Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
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9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

inister responds to FNM leader's



promise on windshield information

TRANSPORT Minister
Glenys Hanna-Martin has
responded to the Opposi-
tion leader’s promise to
remove personal informa-
tion from the windshields
of cars.

At arally in Fox Hill last
week, FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham said that if his
party were to win the com-
ing general elections, he
would see to it that “per-
sonal data”. was removed
from vehicle registration
disks.

Mr Ingraham comment-
ed that under the FNM, no
longer would people be
able to approach a car and
“see where you're living”.

In response, Mrs Hanna-
Martin said yesterday: “I

wish to advise that the
Road Traffic Department
discontinued the practice
of placing the owner’s
address on motor vehicles
since 1998.”

The information current-
ly printed on license disk
includes:

° owner’s name

e license plate number

e expiry date of vehicle
registration;

e vehicle information/
vehicle type ie Ford Mus-
tang

° fee paid;

e vehicl® serial/chassis_.
number ©.

e inspection/decal num-
ber

® insurance expiry date

e validation number





“I wish to advise that the
Road Traffic Department
discontinued the practice of
placing the owner’s address on
motor vehicles since 1998.”

us EEE

e registering clerk’s sig-

nature
a) date.

“P reiterate, therefore
that the addresses of vehi-
.cle owners are not printed
on the license disk and

have not done so for more

than eight years.”

-The information as print-
ed by the clerk is vital for
several reasons, Mrs Han-
na-Martin said.

She noted that in the
event of an accident, vital
information can be
obtained from the disks,
which also aid police in
determining is a vehicle has

the correct licence plates.

“T am pleased to advise
that the Road Traffic
Department, in an effort to
enhance its services and to
make those services more
accessible to the Bahamian
people, is engaged ina
number of initiatives to
modernise its motor vehi-

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Transport Minister
Glenys Hanna-Martin

cle registration and driver’s

license systems,” she
added.

“The Road Traffic
Department recently

upgraded and in some,
instances introduced for the
first time photo driver’s
licenses and learner’s per-
mits in Family Island dis-
tricts. These services are
available in New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Long Island and
Eleuthera.

“Plans are underway to
introduce within the next
few weeks these services to
Exuma and Andros. This
will complete the first
phase of this exercise.”

Additionally, she said,
the Road Traffic Depart-
ment proposes to expand
its services in the Eight
Mile Rock and West End
districts of Grand Bahama,
as well as Inagua, Cat
Island and Bimini.



FNM claims that

' Delaporte residents
# are angry over the

state of local parks

DELAPORTE residents
are angered over the “dan-
gerous and neglected state”
of their local parks, according
to the FNM.

The current state of the
parks, said opposition candi-
date of the area Dr Hubert
Minnis, is the result of work
started several years ago and
then simply abandoned.

Dr-Minnis said he did a
thorough walkabout and was
shocked at what residents
pointed out to him at the
parks — “up to eight feet deep
uncovered holes in the
ground, rotting wood with
exposed rusty nails, chest-high
weeds and bushes, accumulat-

ing garbage, waste water

breeding mosquitoes, aban-
doned construction sites, and
other serious health hazards.
A children’s party had just
been held on one of the sites
last weekend,” Dr Minnis said
in a statement.

He noted that several years
ago, the Ministry of Works
and Neville Wisdom, the PLP
incumbent for the constituen-
cy, began to construct a bath-
room at the public seaside
playground across from the
popular restaurant and bar
“Nesbitt’s” on West Bay
Street. “However, soon after,
construction was completely
abandoned and never fin-
ished.”

Dr Minnis said the busy
park, which is regularly used —
especially on weekends by
school children and residents
in the area — now has an
incomplete bathroom that
cannot be used.

“Of most'concern to the res-
idents is a huge gaping open
hole that had been dug to
accommodate a cesspit for the
bathrooms.

“The septic tank now sits on
top of the ground uninstalled,
and the pit remains exposed,
filling with water, garbage, and
mosquitoes.



“Of most concern to the
residents is a huge gaping open —
hole that had been dug to |
accommodate a cesspit for the
bathrooms. The septic tank
now sits on top of the ground
uninstalled, and the pit remains
exposed, filling with water,
garbage, and mosquitoes.”
ane

Opposition candidate for Delaporte

“The building itself has no
roof, windows, doors, toilets
or infrastructure whatsoever,”
said Dr Minnis.

“The rickety and rusting
scaffolding used to construct
the building was never
removed and acts as an entice-
ment for neighbourhood chil-
dren to climb and seriously
hurt themselves.”

He said that during his
walkabout, residents
expressed their fear that the

abandoned building, con-:

struction rubble, and gaping
pit in the ground are a dan-
ger to the neighbourhood chil-
dren and an eyesore, “but
even after several years, no
one has bothered to complete
the bathroom.”

Dr Minnis said residents are
anxious that the abandoned
building will encourage crimi-
nal activity and predators in
the area and may be used for
illicit drugs.

“The abandoned structure
sits right in open view on West
Bay Street and is viewed not
only by tourists visiting the
area, but by all visitors on
their way driving into Nassau
from the airport along the
seashore road. Not only is the

Dr Hubert Minnis

incomplete structure a blot on
the landscape, it blocks the
already limited view of the sea
from the road.

“One resident complained
that Mr Wisdom must pass the
site every single day but has
never returned to complete
the bathrooms. ‘How could he
just forget about it?’ he
asked.”

Dr Minnis said that resi-

-dents in Tropical Gardens

were also outraged over work
started at their local park sev-
eral years ago, but also never
completed.

A few playground items had
been brought to the park, he
said, “but the equipment
could never be used as the
ground is uneven and rocky
with weeds waist-high hiding
dangerous holes in the
ground.”

“There is litter and discard-
ed wooden packing crates that
can trip children, causing them
to fall. Despite several years
passing, the swings have not
been installed and piles of fill
and rubble remain. The pro-
posed basketball court is
unfinished and is collecting
rainwater breeding mosqui-
toes,” he said.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 3





In brief

Man sustains
serious
injuries in
shooting

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT- Grand
Bahama Police are investigat-
ing a shooting that occurred
early Tuesday morning in the
Fishing Hole Road area, in
which one man sustained seri-
ous gunshot injuries to the
body.

The victim, Cedric Wright,
28, of Jones Town, Eight Mile
Rock, is detained in serious
condition at the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital.

According to police reports,
Wright had just arrived at
work around 6.40am at the
construction site of Interna-
tional Wholesale Grocers on
Fishing Hole Road when the
incident occurred.

He told police that he was
in the process of getting some
tools from his car trunk when
aman he recognised pulled
up in a gold-coloured car and
fired two shots at him and
fled.

Wright was struck by bullet
in the left side. However, he
was able to drive to Central
Police Station, where detec-
tives assisted him in getting to
the hospital.

Superintendent Basil Rab-.
ming said the motive for the
shooting is unclear. He said
police are still searching the
shooter.

Four appear on
housebreaking,
stealing and
drug charges

B By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -— A number of
persons*were arraigned together
in Freeport’s magistrate’s court
on housebreaking, stealing’and
drug possession charges.

Grace Ann Miller, 50, and her
son Matthew Miller, 18, of Coral
Reef Estates, along with Allison
McKenzie, 19, and Jamal Cleare,
30, were charged with 10 counts
of housebreaking, stealing, receiv-
ing, and unlawful possession.

It is alleged that the group
broke into several homes and
stole a number of items during a
series of break-ins that began on
October 14 last year.

The items included jewellery,
wrist watches, TV sets, VCRs,
DVDs, Gameboys Playstations,
cellular phones, computer equip-
ment a shotgun and cartridges.

Additionally, the Miller family,
including the father, Washington
Miller, 58, was charged with pos-
session of a small quantity of mar-
ijuana.

The defendants pleaded not
guilty to the charges and were
granted bail in the sum of $17,000
with sureties.

The matter was adjourned to
May 29 for trial.

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Bahamian boat captain, US man, charged in

@ By ALISON LOWE

connection with human smuggling operation

iioune satreponer Pair COUld face life imprisonment if convicted



A BAHAMIAN boat
captain and an American
have been charged in the
US in connection with a
human smuggling operation

that left one immigrant
drowned.

According to several news
reports in the US, it is

‘alleged that the men were
attempting to transport the
group from Freeport to
Florida in December



Pair charged with second-degree

murder over deaths of three women.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men were charged with second-
degree murder yesterday in a Miami federal
court — after one of them was arrested while
travelling on a speedboat from the Bahamas.

The men were charged in connection with
the deaths of three Caribbean women dur-
ing a crossing from Nassau to South Florida in
2005, according to a US news report.

Two of the women — Diane Mecca Thomp-.

son, a Jamaica native and mother of two in her
20s who had been working as a bartender in
Nassau, and Angeline Thelusma of Jean-
Rabel, Haiti, were found November 5 on the
sand on Pompano Beach. A third woman's
body was found, but she was never identi-
fied.

The report, printed in The Miami Herald,
said it is alleged that the women formed part
of a group of eight passengers who were
forced overboard by the men — Zhivargo
McBride and Devon Russell, who had alleged-
ly been paid to transport them — in the middle
of the night as the 19-foot sailboat approached
Broward County.

Yesterday McBride entered his plea in Fort
Lauderdale. Russell still faces charges of prof-
iting from the smuggling job and causing the
deaths of the three women.







work was causing huge traffic jams



lH ROADWORKS on East Bay Street set the nerves
of motorists on edge yesterday. Drivers said that the




(Photo by: Ana Bianca Marin)

The indictment against McBride and Russell
refers to a fourth passenger, named only as "Y
F" who suffered serious injury as a result of
allegedly being forced into the ocean by the
men.

The prosecution is claiming that it was
shortly after 4.30am, with the Florida coastline
far off, that the men ordered everyone off
the boat.

The indictment alleges that McBride killed -

Ms Thompson “by ordering her off a boat
and into deep water.”

Ms Thompson's parents reportedly told The
Miami Herald that their daughter had always
dreamed of coming to the United States. They
currently live in Los Gatos, California.

Her father reportedly said he had no idea
she had been planning to illegally enter the
country.

Thompson and Thelusmas' bodies were dis-
covered separately along the Florida coast,

‘the report said.

McBride remained a fugitive until July
when he was identified — after detection by a
US Customs and Border Protection surveil-
lance plane — as one of the passengers
onboard a speedboat travelling during the
night from the Bahamas.

The report said that after two high-pow-
ered US patrol vessels gave chase, he was
taken into custody.





A
eke
aU ee

See tg
May
Eye

of last year.

Boat captain Rickey
Thompson, 40, and Leon
Brice Johnson, 38, could
face life imprisonment if
convicted on conspiracy and
related charges.

The vessel in question
first came into the hands of
US authorities after it ran
aground on the Florida
coast at Blowing Rocks Pre-
serve at around 11pm on
December 28, 2006.

Inspecting the 35-foot
boat, authorities .allegedly
discovered 83 pounds of
marijuana, one kilo of
cocaine, a handgun and
nearby, nine illegal immi-
grants swimming in rough
waters, according to US
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement.

A Jamaican man - said to
be the tenth illegal immi-
grant — was found drowned.

US authorities are claim-
ing that the group — made
up of one Haitian, seven

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Jamaicans and a Romanian
- had waited days or
even weeks in Freeport
before beginning their
journey.

According to the Califor-
nia-based news website:
newsblaze.com, the indict-
ment alleges that each
immigrant had paid Thomp-
son between $2,000 and
$4,000 for transportation
from the Bahamas.

It said the indictment also
claims that as the vessel
approached the shore near
Jupiter Island in Martin
County, “Thompson
ordered the migrants off the
boat in deep, rough waters,
although one of the aliens
had previously told Thomp-
son that he could not
swim.

“When this individual was
ordered off the boat, he
again told Thompson and
Johnson that he could not
swim, but was still ordered
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Speak to
electorate on
important and

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon) LED. D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Vote for sale mocks democracy

IN THIS column yesterday we com-
mented on Fred Mitchell’s suggestion for
both political parties to come together to
cap election spending.

The opinion of a gentleman who has
“worked” several elections, first as a can-
vasser for the PLP, but more recently for
the FNM, is that the politician is to blame
for encouraging voters to think that elec-
tion time is for their financial benefit rather
than considering what benefits the candi-
date, if elected, could offer the country.
“The voter wants personal care,” he says,
“not national care.”

Before elections can be cleaned up, he .

said, politicians have to start campaigning
on issues, not on how much they give their
“generals” — the leading persons in a com-
munity — to hand out to a voter in terms of
contracts, money, payment of debts and
refurbishing of homes.

Voters, he said, have to be weaned away
from the idea that every five years is a one-
day bonanza for them as they figure out

what they can get out of a candidate for —

themselves — in exchange for their vote.

He talked mainly of the years when he
was a part of the team that campaigned
for the PLP.

He said that in house-to-house cam-
paigning they would concentrate on the
homes that could deliver up several votes
— seven, nine, 12. These were the homes
on which politicians focused their spending
in return for a bloc vote from each home.

“Of course,” he said, “the politician pre- ~

ferred to give jobs, for example cleaning
parks, removing rubbish from the con-
stituency, ‘painting houses, or repairing
roofs.

“This way they kill two birds with one
stone.

“They not only give out money, but cre-
ate jobs for the unemployed youth in the
constituency.”

Very often, he said, a “general” will col-
lect all the voters cards from a home in
which his candidate has bought the vote
and will hold them until election day. He
then picks up the voters whose cards he
holds and personally takes them to the
polls.

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He only gives them their cards when he
is shepherding them to the polling booth.
“Whoever gives you money first,” said
the gentleman, “is the candidate that you

- are going to support. However, today some

of these voters will take the money and
vote for the opposing candidate.” ;

For example, he said, there are occa-
sions when a voter will ask for $2,000 to pay
his mortgage.

If his vote is important, and he can influ-
ence many other voters in the area, the
candidate will probably give him $1,000
with a promise that he can collect the
remaining $1,000 if he votes the right way

_and influences as many friends as possible

to do the same.
And how can the politician be certain

that his investments have paid off? Appar-

ently, there are several ways, but according
to our informant, the “Oops, I made a mis-
take!” method is the favourite.

When the voter has marked his X in the
secrecy of the polling booth, he is supposed
to fold his voter’s card inwards, hold it up
for polling officials to see, and then drop it
into the ballot box.

Each candidate has his scrutineers in the
room.

However, the “bought” voter who must
verify his vote often folds the card out-
wards, quickly holds it up showing the scru-
tineers that he has marked his X for their
candidate, then just as quickly exclaims:
“Oops, I made a mistake!” folds it inwards,
and drops it into the box.

This, said our informant, was a favourite
trick during the Pindling era. However, it is
a trick that both sidés should watch for
and challenge.

But, Mr Mitchell will never get election
spending capped until all politicians agree
that there will be no more vote buying

and the Bahamian electorate can be edu- -

cated to understand that they are actually
being insulted when another man or
woman offers to pay for their vote.

A vote for sale also makes a mockery of
the many sacrifices made over the years
by enlightened Bahamians who fought hard
to win the one-man one-vote for Bahami-
an men and women.





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EDITOR, The Tribune.

ANSWERING
machines....answering
machine...you have got to be
kidding me. Please allow me a
few brief lines to speak to the
recent comments made by the
former Prime Minister at the
opposition’s mini rallies held

_ in Long Island and Fox Hill.

Unfortunately I was unable
to attend the rallies but I am
certain that I am not alone in
this state...and as such I, like
thousands of others, had to
rely on the excerpts provided
by the print and broadcast
media.

I could not believe that of
all the issues plaguing the
Bahamas today the opposition
found it important to talk to
the public about personal
information on vehicle license
discs (which by the way have
been modified for over five
years now where only the
name of the driver and the
insurance company is listed),
removing automated answer-
ing systems in government
corporations (just for infor-
mation purposes most systems
are designed to direct the
caller to a live person by sim-
ply pressing “0” at anytime
during the process), and then
there was the comment about
staggering the closing of the
grouper season to different
locations in the Bahamas
(how is that supposed to work,
are we going to tag the fish
from Ragged Island to differ-
entiate from the fish in Long
Island?)

Please, please this election
period speak to the electorate
on important, pertinent and
real issues. Just in case the
opposition find themselves
void of ideas can I suggest a
few:

Tell the public how:

e An FNM administration
will curb the crime issue that is
presently threatening all of
our lifestyles?

© How will an FNM admin-
istration prepare our country
for the severe shortage of
skilled and unskilled workers
that will be required for all
the proposed anchor develop-
ments. that will be a reality
before we know it?

© How will an FNM admin-
istration move to really diver-
















auto @
sales =
LIMITED

Dea beltts

letters@triounemedia.net






sify our economy to create
more of a balance?

e How will an FNM admin-
istration reverse the obvious
“brain drain” of young
Bahamian professionals?

© How will an FNM admin-
istration solve our ever vex-
ing immigration problem?

the

pertinent issues

advisers, PR specialists and
others are for. If the opposi-
tion continues to conduct ral-
lies without substance then
they will only serve to confirm
to me and many others that
they really have no plan for
the Bahamas (long or short
term) and are only doing what
I and others now know them
to do best...razzle and dazzle
with pretty colours and good
music.

Criticism without offering
an alternate view is a waste of

e What is the FNM’s solu-
tion to providing affordable
Health Care for the Bahamian
public?

I could really go on and on
but that’s what the highly paid

my and the public’s time. See
ya at the polls! :

SEAN A. FARRINGTON
Nassau,
January 22, 2007.

Real men applaud and

encourage women

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS letter is in response to a letter written in the Tribune on 22
January by a Mr Eugene Beckford. It did not speak kindly about
women and it appeared to promote an alternative lifestyle. I do not
believe Mr Beckford exists, but is a coward hiding this name. The
letter mentioned my name so I must respond.

eeee

MALE chauvinists often try to dismiss or downplay the contribution
and the ability of women. They have no respect for women and they
have no feelings for them either. Many males cannot come to grips with
the fact that women are their equal. While on the other hand wise
women acknowledge that the man is the head of the family.

There are a species of males who cannot in their wildest dreams
accept women in any part of their lives; therefore they treat them as an
object. The fact of'the matter is that men who behave in a superior man-

ner to women id most:cases have no wives or children therefore they

have no feelings for the opposite sex.

These ‘imale chauvinist pigs” cannot fathom how any woman could
expéct to be on equal footing with men in the workplace, in the church
and in politics. Some male members of Parliament believe that the halls
of Parliament should be an “all boys club”. There is great suspicion with
this kind of thinking and/or behaviour. One could easily conclude
that maybe a “third gender” is being promoted.

The upcoming general elections will see many ladies, especially on
the FNM ticket. Should they be taken less seriously because of their
gender, I think not. Should we expect less ability, sincerity enthusiasm
or performance from females in parliament, certainly not? Shotld
they just pack up their bags and go home to their families to cook, clean

and caretake their children, just because some colourful characters are,

afraid to have them around, most definitely not.

All female politicians, both PLP and FNM have every right to serve °

their country in whatever capacity, even politics. So, Mr Eugene Beck-
ford, if there is such a person, even though you are advocating for an
alternative lifestyle, must accept that women have always been in
charge whether behind the scenes in the home, out front supporting her
husband and in many cases genuinely making a name for herself, by
herself.

The family must be supported. It must be strengthened and no plan
to create an alternative lifestyle should be encouraged. The only way
for the world to continue is for a husband and wife to build a family,
nothing else. A woman balances everything. One thing for sure is
that a mother would always protect her children. She would die before
she gives away her children’s birthright. We need women in the mix.
Real men applaud and encourage their women, but all males are not
men.

DIONNE EDGECOMBE
Nassau, :
January 23, 2007.

People who handle
food must wear gloves

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD like you to know that here in the Bahamas that the
persons who handle or serve food need to be trained that they must
use gloves and not serve food with their bare hands. I witnessed at
a popular, downtown restaurant a young lady who served me with
her bare hands and as she did so she placed her fingerprints into the
serving bowls into which she was placing my food. Then a few
minutes later I watched in disbelief as she proceeded to go to the
cash register and handle cash with the same bare hands with which
she served my food. I was astounded since this is not the first time
that I had to deal with this type of behaviour.

In the past I have protested by walking out of the establish-
ment or asking the food handlers to wash their hands and put on
gloves. I was in a hurry today and I prayed that I would not get sick
from such a nasty practice by this person.

I am amazed that these food handlers do not realise that all
kinds of viruses are on money that pass from one person to the next
and to handle money and to then handle food will cause persons to
get sick and pay a lot of money in doctors’ bills. I guess these restau-
rants and their food handlers are waiting to have a legal suit issued
against them that could perhaps cause their food establishment a lot

_ of bad press and money. I guess that is what will have to happen

before these food handlers learn to practice proper sanitary food
service and wear gloves every time they serve food. I guess these
restaurants will have to wait until they are forced to close down
because of poor food handling practices that is detrimental to
public health. Perhaps that is what needs to happen to all these
restaurants that are so concerned about making money at the
expense of the health of their patrons. The Ministry of Public
Health needs to go under cover and shut down any such food
establishment in this country where the persons do not wear gloves
while serving food, etc.

WEAR GLOVES

While serving food or face being
shut down for poor food handling
Nassau,

January 19, 2007.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 5







In brief

New passport
rules for air
travellers go
into effect

@ ATLANTA

AMERICANS flying to
Mexico, Canada and the
Caribbean made sure to bring
their passports because of a
new tule going into effect
Tuesday that requires them
to show one to get back into
the country, according to
Associated Press.

Only about a quarter of
US. citizens hold valid pass-
ports, and most Americans
are accustomed to traveling
to neighboring countries with
just a driver's license or birth
certificate, which have long
been sufficient to get through
airport customs on the trip
home.

The new regulations requir-
ing passports were adopted
by Congress in 2004 to secure
the borders against terrorists.

Travelers at Hartsfield-
Jackson Atlanta Internation-
al Airport and other airports
on Monday said they had no
complaints about the require-
ment.

"I'd rather be going
through a security check, than
possibly being blown out of
the air because of lack of
security measures," John
Golden of Columbus, Geor-
gia, who was headed to Can-
cun, Mexico.

Starting Tuesday, Canadi-
an, Mexican and Bermudan
air travelers, as well as U.S.
citizens flying home from
those countries or the
Caribbean, must display their
passports to enter the Unit-
ed States.

The only valid substitutes
for a passport will be a
NEXUS Air card, used by
some American and Canadi-
an frequent fliers; identifica-
tion as a U.S. Coast Guard
merchant mariner; and the
green card carried by legal
permanent residents. Active
members of the U.S. ay
are exempt). > |

only air travelers. Land and
séa. travelers will not have to
show passports until at least
January 2008. Air travelers
who cannot produce a pass-
port will be interviewed by
customs agents, who will
decide whether to let them
into the country.

"We're not seeing a panic
from travelers because we've
been pretty diligent in telling
them for over a year that they
need a passport.

“It's written on any piece
of paper we have going out,"
said AAA spokeswoman
Teresa Hildebrand.

Internet travel sites such as

‘Expedia.com have posted
warnings "in bold with excla-
mation point," said company
spokeswoman Erin Krause,
adding that agents followed-
up with e-mails to customers
traveling to the affected des-
tinations.

Canadian consulate officials
in the U.S. reported fielding
hundreds of calls a day, most
from the approximately
100,000 Canadian "snow-
birds" who spend the winter
in Florida or Arizona and
feared they might not be able
to fly back without passports,
said Lawrence Barker, presi-
dent of the Canadian Snow-
bird Association. (They can,
Barker said.)

WVBR Et

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 24TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM

8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

9:00 | Opening Ceremony National

Tourism Conference

National Tourism Week








10:30




Proclamation
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update





12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 __ Island Lifestyles

1:30 — Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee






















2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 » Bahamas Tonight

8:00 1|Can See

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 10th Annual Cacique
Awards 2006

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response




1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!





Anger over heavy-load
truck missing wheel

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MEMBER of the public

was left outraged yesterday
after seeing a heavy-load
truck missing one of its back
wheels being driven on the
streets of Nassau — only to
later be informed by police
that they “can't do anything
about it”.
- The angry source said the
issue is indicative of an
already huge and growing
problem of obviously unsafe
vehicles being allowed to con-
tinue travelling on Bahami-
an streets.

The Nassau) woman
explained how she was trav-
elling on Abundant Life
Road when the dodgy truck
pulled out in front of her.

It soon became obvious
that the vehicle was missing
one of its back wheels on the
right side — the axle was sim-
ply dangling.

Though the truck was still
technically driveable, as it had
more than two sets of wheels
in total, the missing back
wheel on the right side meant

that the wheel on the left side -

leaned precariously outwards
due to the lopsided weight of
the truck — looking about

_ ready to fly off at any minute.

The woman took several

- photos before setting off with

the intention of reporting the
vehicle to the authorities.
However, seeing a police offi-
cer at the bank shortly after,
she took the opportunity to
show her the photos, and
explain her concerns.

It was then that she was
informed that if it’s a “regis-
tered, licensed vehicle, we
can't do anything about it.”

- This despite the fact that
the vehicle also clearly had a
US licence plate,— something

‘Bor now; “the: lees affect wb ..that Jerome ‘Bethel, assistant

: controller at the Department’

of Road Traffic, said would
indicate that it had never
been licensed in _ the
Bahamas.

When it was brought to the
attention of the officer that
the truck did not bear a
Bahamian licence plate, the



@ THE truck — with a US licence plate — was missing a back wheel on its right side.

officer then responded that
nothing can be done unless it
has a Bahamian plate.
Meanwhile, the source said
the officer agreed that there
are a large number of vehi-
cles in New Providence that
are not roadworthy, but that
as long as people are being
cleared by those who are
inspecting the vehicles,
“there's nothing (the police)
can do about it.”
Responding to this e
ment, Mr Bethel Laid ave
Road Traffic deparjent
does not tolerate such dan-
gerous vehicles. He said it is
indeed the police's responsi-
bility to ensure they are
brought in to be inspected.
"They are supposed to
make us aware of that," he

Demolitions still
part of plans for

Cable Beach
transformation

@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter



THE demolition of the Nassau Beach Hotel and two
towers of the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace
Casino is still part of the plan for the transformation of

Cable Beach.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of
administration and public affairs, confirmed for The Tri-
bune yesterday that the demolition is scheduled to take
place in the second half of this year.

Mr Sands said that Baha Mar also hopes to.

get underway with work on the roads and certain ‘build-
ings on the Cable Beach strip within the next three

months.

Announcements

Although Baha Mar has not yet demolished the police
and fire stations on West Bay Street — which was initial-
ly scheduled to happen in the last quarter of 2006 — Mr
Sands said that the developers will soon be able to make
some announcements regarding their construction sched-

ule.

“We’re hoping that in due course we’ll be able to make
some very positive statements about some definite tim-
ings, especially in light of the road and the commercial
buildings which are the two major projects we hope to
jump-start sometime during in the first quarter of this

year,” he said.

Mr Sands said that Baha Mar is currently working to
finalise arrangements with Harrah’s Entertainment, which
will give the world-renowned casino operator a 43 per
cent equity stake in the project.

Some of those arrangements, Mr Sands said, are

still

subject to approval by the government.

Baha Mar expects its $2.4 billion transformation of the
Cable Beach strip to be finished by 2011.

The first phase of the hotel construction will entail the
$80 million renovation of the Radisson into a Sheraton-

brand hotel.

Upgrades to 300 rooms and all the resort’s public areas
are expected to be completed by May, 2007.

said.
street and has a defective part
the police have the authority
to stop it and bring it to us to
be inspected.”

"Everything that comes
here we make sure that it is in
good working order. After
something has left here and it
deteriorates after a period of
time, it is the police’s job, if
they see it and it is not up to
par, to bring it back to us and
we will put it off the street or
give them time to get it fixed,

"If a vehicle is on the.

whatever the situation is," he
explained.

"They are the persons who
look for this stuff, we don't
have officers that go out there
and look for this stuff — our
officers would have no juris-
diction over a private vehicle
when it gets out there, only
when it comes here."

The concerned citizen said
that in Canada — where she

-lived for a number of years —

there have been numerous

cases of trucks with insecure .



wheels causing fatal accidents
on highways.

She agreed that the issue
of the number of unsafe vehi-
cles on Bahamian streets
could be a political one — with
politicians unwilling to make
the potentially unpopular
movement towards stamping
out unsafe vehicles from the
streets because doing so
would be very costly to a
large percentage of the public
who currently drive poorly
maintained cars or trucks.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

On Premises
Check Our Price

Before buying
Bahamas Bus & Truck |

Call:

322-1722





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





@ CARMICHAEL MP
John Carey

Q: What are your
views on the death
penalty? Can it serve
as a deterrent?

CAREY: I strongly sup-
port the death penalty
because it is a punishment.

I am not looking at a
deterrent in that sense.

I think if you kill someone
you should be executed, that
has nothing to do with deter-
ring the fellow down the
street, but certainly you will
not do it again.

BANNISTER: I think sta-
tistics show that the death
penalty is not a deterrent but
it is the law of the Bahamas.
Under the FNM it was car-
ried out notwithstanding the
personal views of anyone in
the administration.

It was carried out to loud
boisterous protest from a
number of persons now in
the cabinet.

Minister Fred Mitchell,
Minister Alfred Sears, Min-
ister Glenys Hanna Martin,
a number of them protested
the carrying out of the death
penalty.

The death penalty may not
be a deterrent, however, the
people of the Bahamas have
seen fit to keep it as a law of
the land.

In justice there is not only
the aspect of deterrent, there
is the aspect of seeing that
justice is done.







ELECTION

FACE OFF

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr — Chief Reporter





Yesterday, the PLP incumbent for Carmichael John Carey and his FNM challenger Desmond Bannister
faced off on foreign investment, crime and immigration. Today, they go head to head on the death

penalty, education and their ideas about improving Conditions in the constituency.

Q: How do you think
the country's
education system can
be reformed?

CAREY: I think you have
to put an incentive and
award system in place for
teachers.

As a former teacher if you
gave an incentive to produce
a 50 per cent pass at the
BGCSE I would probably
work harder to do that.

You have to look at
streamlining students. Per-
sons who need to be stream-
lined into vocational areas
are streamlining into acade-
mic areas even though
everyone cannot be acade-
mically gifted.

What we have is thousands
of people with such a low
passing grade coming out
and in some instances they

‘can be defined by that term

‘functionally illiterate’
because they cannot hold
certain positions in society
because they are not capa-
ble.

A lot of that has to do
with what happens in the
social promotion programme
of the education system,

which I think we eradicated

when we came into office.

BANNISTER: Carmichael
is blessed with great primary
schools. Those schools are
very much a shining beacon
for the community. Howev-

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ©

I If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Ta ios

Satellite Offices in Nassau

WILL BE CLOSED

to the public on
Friday, January 26, 2007.

Our main office at Bolam House,
George Street as well as our desks at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport
and Festival Place will remain open.

Please direct all inquiries to our main
line at 242-302-2000

We sincerely apologize for any
inconvenience caused.





Webahidiias
“10

er, there are two things that
need to be addressed in the
area of education.

The first is the fact that
there is no junior high in the
area and so we have young
people in the community
who have to get up in the
morning and they have to go
between anyone of three
junior high schools which are
not a part of the community.

The second aspect is that
schools have to meet the
needs of a growing commu-
nity.

We have to look at. the
careers that young Bahami-
ans are going to be faced
with in the next 10 to 20
years and we have to shift
our policy to help our young
people in preparing for that.

Q: How would you
be different from your
opponent in terms of
the representation you
provide/will provide?

CAREY: First I would
like to say that I am willing
to debate all of the candi-
dates who will run in the
Carmichael constituency
whenever the time comes
before the next election. I
have more experience with
almost five years in parlia-
ment and at 35, the best
years of my life are ahead in

Which I can contribute sub-

stantially to a stronger
Carmichael.

There are a number of ini-
tiatives that we are embark-
ing on in an effort to
enhance community devel-
opment. These include but
are not limited to the fol-
lowing:

Aesthetics

1) Infrastructure improve-
ments, which include road
paving, speed bumps, new
road construction

2) Removal of derelict
vehicles, clearing overgrown
bush, and demolition of
abandoned buildings

3) A parks cleaning cam-
paign for all the community
parks

4) An anti- graffitti cam-
paign

Lifestyle Development

1) A sexual abstinence
seminar in conjunction with
Full Time Kingdom on Feb-
ruary 8

2) Community Prayer Day
in March

3) Job readiness seminar
in March

4) Parenting skills seminar
in April

5) Domestic violence sem-

_inar in April

Town Meetings

1) Crime town meeting on
January :22 at the Gerald
Cash Primary School

2) Monthly meeting of the
PLP at Gerald Cash Primary
School on the fourth Mon-
day of every month

New Beginnings

1) Construction of a Com-
munity Centre

2) The Carmichael Com-
munity Marching Band

3) Carmichael community
website that allows for inter-
active communication
between MP. and con-
stituents

4) Working toward a more
secure community with the
police through the formation
of more crime watch com-
mittees in the area

5) Expansion of offerings
of the current after-school
programme at the Flamingo
Gardens Family Life Centre
to include computer training

6) The launch of my sec-
ond book, to be disseminat-
ed to all constituents
through private funding

7) House-to-house visits
by the member of parlia-
ment over the course of the
new term

8) Annual “clean-up my
area” day for the Carmichael
community

BANNISTER: My oppo-
nent was elected on a five
year.plan and over 30 things
he was going to do. He has
not accomplished a single
one of those in the commu-
nity.

So if you mark him by
what he promised he would
do he is an abysmal failure,
if you compare what I have
done in the past four and a
half years as an un-elected
person in the community.

I have stayed in the com-
munity I have worked in the
community, we have organ-
ised our resources, we have
provided scholarships in the
primary schools in our com-
munity, we have continually
ensured that what work we
have done in Carmichael
would affect the lives of
young people in Carmichael
because I believe they are
the future of the community.

So I am a direct and stark
contrast to my opponent in
terms of the activity we have
generated in Carmichael.

Whatever we have
promised we have delivered
on.

Q: Should
candidates receive
money directly from
contributors to run
their campaign?

CAREY: Unless we have
campaign finance reform it
doesn’t make sense to talk
about what we would like to
happen or should happen.

There is no initiative on
any political side to have
campaign finance reform.
Until that happens, you can
collect money from anyone
who comes up and gives you
money.

For me to take a hard
position of not doing that
when someone does it would
put me in a political disad-
vantage and put the people
who support me at a disad-
vantage.

BANNISTER: There is
nothing wrong with receiv-
ing money directly from con-
tributors.

The difficulty we have in
our country is that we are
not required to report cam-
paign contributions.

In the last election there
was much talk about who
may have received money
from drug smugglers.

Legislation can be used to
ensure that candidates for
election who receive money
from sources which may
unsavory are exposed and
are known and secondly that
the whole system is regulat-
ed.

If you are a good fundrais-
er you should not be pun-
ished in your effort to raise
money.

On the other hand, the fel-
low who has difficulty raising
funds should not be pun-
ished because the fellow he
is running against is going to
get money from drug smug-
glers or from other illegal
sources.

Q: What are the
biggest concerns of
constituents in your
area?

CAREY: The perception
of crime, secondly the future
for their children and third-
ly the overall development
of the Bahamas in terms of
what the Bahamas will be in
the short term.

BANNISTER: People in

Gotta Sing?

Gotta Act?

Gotta Dance?
®@



@ FNM CHALLENGER
Desmond Bannister

Carmichael have to get up
really early in the morning
to run water, and to run a
washing machine they have
to get up late at night to run
the water because of the
poor service from Water and
Sewerage.

Flamingo Gardens is an
area that has one central
sewer system.

We have to go around in
guiding Water and Sewerage
people in getting those gut-
ters clean because the rep-
resentative has not ensured
that service is provided so
the sewer system is backed
up frequently which causes
difficulty.

Another issue is the poor
garbage collection in the
area, electricity cuts in the
area, and overwhelmingly it
has been crime.

We have a lot of persons
who have been shot, many
merchants who have been
robbed.

Q: What do you feel
will be / is your great-
est accomplishment
for the people _
of your constituency?

CAREY: Being able to be
accessible and available for
the constituents.

We came out of 10 years
of absentee representation
where we had an MP who
was in New York.

Coming out of that era, its
a refreshing difference
where I just came out of my
constituency office where
people can see me on a daily
basis and they are able to
interact with me and address
problems that are important
to them.

BANNISTER: Truly rep-
resentative government in
the area — they don’t get it
now.

There is no consultative
government at all.

If you are elected to
government you have to
ensure that the polices put
in place come from the peo-
ple.

The polices should not be
what I want to see in place
but what the people in
Carmichael area want to
see,

To ensure that the educa-
tion system meets the needs
of the community. -

We have too many young
people in the area but can-
not meet the requirements
of employers.

Looking for Singers, Dancers, Jugglers, Magicians, Comedians, Musicians, Emcees & Show

Stopping personalities for Entertainment Coordinators.

Full Time/Part Time positions available.

Wednesday January 24, 2007 — Balmoral Ballroom

Vocal Audition: 10:00am
Performers Audition: 11:00am

Musicians & Small Bands Audition:

2:00pm

Email your resume to: cmajor@srb.sandals.com.
Resume can also be dropped off at Human Resources office at Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

Nouw’ve got talent and personality....you Gotta Audition!!





Experts help
govt plans to
commemorate
the end of the
slave trade

INTERNATIONAL
experts are helping the
government with its
plans to commemorate
the end of the slave
trade.

A group of officials
from the United Nations
Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organisa-
tion (UNESCO) visited
the Bahamas this month
and were hosted by the
Bahamas National Com-
mission for UNESCO
and the Antiquities,
Monuments and Muse- .
ums Corporation.

The team included Mr
Kwame Boafo, director
of the Caribbean Cluster
Office in Kingston,
Jamaica, and Mr
Edmond Moukala
N’Gouemo, programme
specialist in the Division
of History and Culture,
based at UNESCO
Headquarters in Paris.

The purpose of the vis-
it was to assist in map-
ping out activities to
commemorate the 200th
anniversary of the aboli-
tion of the slave trade in
British governed territo-
ries, and to advise the
Antiquities, Monuments
and Museums Corpora-
tion on a plan of action
leading to the establish-
ment of the Pompey
Museum of Slavery and
Emancipation as a
regional centre for
research into the
transatlantic slave trade.

Initiative

A highlight of the mis-
sion was a presentation
by programme specialist
Moukala N’Gouemo on
UNESCO’s Slave Route

‘Project,,a flagship initia-
tive of the organisation,
launched more than 10
years ago, and aimed at
breaking the silence
around the tragedy of
the transatlantic slave
trade and its continuing
legacy.

Held at the British
Colonial Hilton hotel,
the lecture was attended
by representatives from
a cross-section of major
educational and cultural
institutions, such as the
Ministry of Education,
the Department of
Archives, the College of
the Bahamas, the Min-
istry of Culture, the
Bahamas Historical
Society, the National
Art Gallery and the
Ministry of Tourism.

While in Nassau, the
UNESCO officials met
at the Cabinet Office
with government minis-
ters Bradley Roberts,
Fred Mitchell and
Alfred Sears, members
of the ministerial sub-
committee formed to
organise activities to
commemorate the
abolition of the slave
trade and majority
rule.

They also held discus-
sions with senior offi-
cials of the College of
the Bahamas, including
president Janyne Hod-
der, and with members
of the executive board of
the Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museums
Corporation.

Owen Bethel, chair-
man of the AAMC,
hailed the mission as
critical to the preserva-
tion of the Bahamian
cultural heritage.

Before leaving the
capital, both Mr Boafo
and Mr Moukala
expressed their admira-
tion for the rich cultural
legacy of the Bahamas,
emphasising its value as
a prime source for seri-
ous scholarly investiga-
tion, and its potential as
a superior tourist attrac-
tion.

The Bahamas joined
UNESCO in 1981 and
since that time, has
received financial and
technical assistance for a
number of important
projects.

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama’s long spell of eco-
nomic hardship could have
ended months ago accord-
ing to former FNM cabinet
minister Zhivargo Laing.

He blamed the govern-
ment for allowing a bid by
the Harcourt Group to
interrupt negotiations with
a Florida-based investment
group for the purchase of
the Royal Oasis Resort.

Mr Laing said he believes
that the government con-
tinues to misrepresent the
facts about many matters
on Grand Bahama, includ-



“The government is now desperate
to find something positive to say to
Freeport because there is nothing
happening for Freeport in the way of
investments, and the government
has continued to promise a sale of
RO over and over again, and now
Grand Bahamians do not trust them.”



Former FNM cabinet minister Zhivargo Laing

ing the vacant hotel.

He called on the govern-
ment to be honest, trans-
parent, and truthful with
Grand Bahamians.

World Investment Hold-

ings (WHI) of Florida
entered an agreement some
time last year to purchase
the Royal Oasis for $40
million. The group, howev-
er, has not been able to

Laing claims unemployment

up 70 per cent under PLP

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

rising, there is limited job availability to contend
with and their wages are stagnant — and on top



FREEPORT - Unemployment in Grand
Bahama has increased by 70 per cent under the
PLP, according to Zhivargo Laing.

The FNM candidate for Marco City claimed
that when Prime Minister Perry Christie came to
office in 2002, there were 1,610 persons unem-
ployed in Grand Bahama. He said the latest
figures compiled by the Department of Statistics
show that this number has risen to 2,300.

He said the PLP government has done noth-
ing to reverse the depressed economic situa-
tion in Grand Bahama over the past four years.

Mr Laing criticised the government for failing
to generate any tangible economic activity in
Freeport since the Royal Oasis Resort closed in

2004.

“Jn West End there is Ginn, but in Freeport
there is nothing, and that is one of the reasons
why we have the sorry employment situation
that we have in Freeport today,” he said.

“The fact of the matter is that Grand Bahama
is experiencing severe economic hardship. The
price of food is’ Sutrageously high and rising
every day, utility rates are high, interest rates are

she

ing.”

‘Once in a lifetime’
outreach event to

be held in Bahamas -

A FREE, “once in a life-
time” outreach event is to
be held in the Bahamas,
organisers announced yes-
terday. .

The Nassau Beach Hotel
was host to an “historic”
meeting, between PraiseFest
Ministries, the Ministry of
Tourism, the Christian
Council, and various other
Christian leaders, held to
make plans and preparation
for BahamaFest ’07.

“This will be a once in a
lifetime outreach event that
will be held at Clifford Park
on June 5 and will be free to
the public,” said the organ-
isers.

The event will be spon-

sored by PraiseFest Min-

istries and an outreach
group known as Cruise with
a Cause.

“On that day more than
2,000 people aboard a Roy-
al Caribbean cruise ship
that has been fully char-
tered by the ministry will
disembark in Nassau. Dur-
ing the day they will minis-
ter in the schools, the
prison, and the streets of
Nassau, the statement said.

The passengers will
reportedly bring with them
“some of the biggest mames
in the ministry” including
wrestlers STING and Lex
Luger, Josh McDowell,
Fred Hammond, the Crabb
Family, Dr Mark Chironna,
KJ-52, David Phelps, Dr
Patricia Bailey, Nicole C
Mullen, comedian Mark
Lawrence, and many others.
The event will also show-
case a few local Bahamian
artists.

According to the organis-
ers, in attendance at the
Nassau Beach meeting were
the following:

e Virginia Kelly — Min-

istry of Tourism

e Matthew Dunaway -
president, PraiseFest Min-
istries,

° Steve Dunaway — direc-
tor of counselling, Praise-
Fest Ministries

e Rev Dr William Thomp-
son — president, Bahamas
Christian Council

e Bishop John N Humes
— Church of God, Bahamas,
Turks and Caicos

e Kenris L Carey, presi-
dent — the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist
Church

e Rev Pat Paul — Supt of
the Assemblies of God

e Bishop V G Clarke -
Calvary Deliverance Church
and regional leader for
World Harvest Church with
Rod Parsley

e Irvine Armstrong —
Bahamas Faith Ministries

e Bishop Albert Hepburn
— United Christian Church

e Derek Stubbs — Gospel
Music Fellowship

The event will
include a free conference on
Saturday March 3, tobe
held at a location yet to be
determined.

“This conference is sched-
uled to have wrestler Lex
Luger, Josh McDowell, and
Dr Mark Chironna. .

“This conference is specif-
ically being held for
pastors, church staff, teach-
ers, key church leaders, and
their spouses along with
business owners that wish
to attend,” the statement
said.

“This type of conference
has never been offered
before and the goal is to
have every church on the
island represented.”

The organisers said more
information on the event
will be released soon.

also .

of all that, they can’t put their hands on any
tangible project coming forward that could
reverse their situation,” Mr Laing said.

He also stated that Grand Bahamians must
contend with the “constant state of flux” that
exists at the Grand Bahama Port Authority,
and this continues to be a hindrance to the
development of optimism and hope.

Mr Laing said it is important that leaders be
truthful and stop pretending as if all is well.

“Tn an environment such as Grand Bahama,
they need to be people of integrity and stop
pretending that people are unintelligent and
can’t see through the nonsense they are shar-

Mr Laing said he believes that better
prospects will come to Grand Bahama with a
change in policy — and a change in policy-mak-

S.

“I believe that Grand Bahama has hope, no
question about that. I also believe Grand
Bahama has great potential and prospects,
despite the interference, incompetence, poor
management, and handling of Grand Bahama
by the government,” he said.

bv











Qualifications:
an offshore bank

records

Custodial Fees

Personal Qualities:








skills

- Pension Plan






ACCEPTED.








ONLY APPLICANTS MEETING
WILL BE CONTACTED. NO T

Applications should be submitted:

THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7

Zhivargo Laing claims economic hardship in
Grand Bahama could have ended months ago



complete the deal.

According to a recent
article in The Tribune, the
government decided to
resume negotiations with
Harcourt Developers as a
part of a contingency plan
in case WIH failed to com-
plete its purchase of the
property.

Mr Laing said that the
government should have
concluded a deal long ago
with Harcourt. Unfortu-
nately, he said, its failure
to do so has caused severe
economic hardship for
Grand Bahama.

“This could have been a
situation finalised some-
time ago... . prior to World
Investment Holding com-
ing into the picture. In fact,
that deal was interrupted
by the interjection of WIH
into the whole picture and
so it seems to me rather
surprising now where the

government was talking.

about having done its due
diligence, and waiting on
due diligence to be done,
that they are now going
back to a group that has
been in Grand Bahama for
some time that had made a
substantial investment in
Grand Bahama, had
expressed interest in Royal

Oasis and was prepared to
go ahead with the purchase
of Royal Oasis.”

Mr Laing said that the
deal with Harcourt would
have spared thousands of
laid-off workers a great
deal of hardship.

“It really is only a reflec-
tion of the fact that this
government has continued
to play games with the
Bahamian people and has
continued to be disorgan-
ised and unfocused,” he
said.

Mr Laing said Grand
Bahamians have grown,
tired of. listening to the
government’s promises
regarding the Royal Oasis.

“The government is now
desperate to find some-
thing positive to say to
Freeport’ because there is
nothing happening for
Freeport in the way of
investments, and the gov-
ernment has continued to
promise a sale of RO over
and over again, and now
Grand Bahamians do not
trust them,” he said.

Lucaya MP Neko Grant
said Minister of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe has
failed Grand Bahama mis-
erably.

He said tourism arrivals
have dropped significantly
in the last year and hotel
wotkers are now only
working one or two days a
week.

“It is wrong for the gov-
ernment to deceive people
for the sake of votes,” he
said. :
Mr Grant said the Royal
Oasis “represented a true
oasis in the desert for the
thousands of workers on
Grand Bahama... and
they really need to come
clean and tell the people
what is happening because
their announcements after

announcements are not at
all clear, and the people
are frustrated.”



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(Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

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- A minimum of four (4) years experience in a Client Services Area of

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





The arrest of the five
airport baggage handlers

"This is a different era. It's a
different mindset. Today, we
cloak our children in wrong-
doing." -- National Security
Minister Cynthia Pratt.

[i arrest of five Nas-
Sau airport baggage
handlers in Florida last month
unleashed a storm of self right-
eous protest. An an
election in the offing — oppo-
sition politicos are having a
field day.



They accuse the govern-
ment of "colluding" in an
"extra-judicial rendition" of
unsuspecting Bahamians to
imprisonment in another coun-
try. Some go so far as to say

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they were officially kidnapped.

By this account, the baggage
handlers were "tricked" into
travelling to the US as part of
an elaborate scheme to cir-
cumvent their right of due
process under Bahamian law.

The word "treason" has been

bandied about in some quar-
ters.

All of the cabinet ministers
who would logically be in a
position to know what hap-
pened have been put on the
defensive and have denied any
foreknowledge.

They include Cynthia Pratt
(who oversees the police), Fred
Mitchell (who handles foreign
relations), and Allyson Gibson
(who is responsible for prose-
cutions). Mitchell also said that
Glenys Hanna-Martin (who is
in charge of the airport) had
no prior information, and nei-
ther did the managers of Nas-
sau Flight Services, who
employed the unfortunate bag
men.

But the opposition insists
otherwise. They say that
Bahamian suspects should not
be enticed to travel abroad to
facilitate their arrest and pros-
ecution by foreigners: "Some-
body is lying. There is more to
this than meets the eye," one
political source told Tough
Call.

"At least three separate
departments in three separate
ministries had to co-operate to
pull off the scam which
entrapped and summarily
deported five Bahamians," said
former attorney-general Carl
Bethel. "But now everybody
is ducking for cover." ~

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The FNM has called for a
full accounting of the govern-

ment's knowledge of, and -

involvement in, the so-called
"sting" operation. And the
prime minister — bemused as
always — says he will look into
the matter.

The issue has generated
over 30 pages of comments on
the Bahamas Issues discussion
forum alone since the bag men
were arrested on December 18

(
http://www.bahamasissues.com
/archive/index.php/t-5259-p-

30.html). Here are just a few
examples:

"What right does the gov-
ernment have to become com-
plicit in a scheme to kidnap
free people by another nation?
This one is going all the way to
the Privy Council and the Unit-
ed Nations."

"Not quite entrapment, but
unethical nonetheless...our
‘democratic’ government is
becoming more and more
undemocratic at a frightening
speed."

"Where was all this grand
talk of sovereignty when Hubie
and the boyz gave up our off-
shore banking system to the
OECD bullies?"

“How can we explain set-
ting up our own people to
please the US when we have a
system already in place to deal
with extradition?"

"Tam speechless...black
people get shaft by their black
leaders again. When will it
end?"

"The bag handlers were
hoodwinked out of having
their day in a Bahamian court
by the very entity that was sup-
posed to protect them."

‘This amounts to the gov-
ernment conspiring with for-
eign agents against citizens of
the Bahamas. The same acts
perpetrated by individuals
could be considered treaso-
nous."

According to the wife of one
of the arrested men: "I believe
my husband was kidnapped
rather than arrested and I will
fight the authorities until he is
discharged from prison and
returned to the Bahamas."

A Nassau Guardian editor-
ial was outraged: "The man-
agers of Nassau Flight Services
were patently wrong to agree
with the (US) Transportation
Security Administration to
send 20 of its employees to
Florida on a bogus training
course, recognizing that a num-
ber of those employees would
be arrested and would not be
returning to the Bahamas."

No evidence was adduced
to support these claims.

Guardian columnist and
potential PLP election candi-
date, Craig Butler, had this to
say: "If you are a handler of
baggage at the airport and you
are involved in a conspiracy to
export drugs to the United
States, don't go — especially
when you realize that the oth-
ers with whom you have
allegedly conspired are also
going."

And Tribune columnist Sir
Arthur Foulkes also weighed
in: "Citizens have a right and a
duty to ask questions when it
appears that Bahamian author-
ities may have colluded with
agents of another country to
bypass the sovereignty and due
processes of the laws of the
Bahamas in order to render
Bahamian suspects to another
jurisdiction."

So what are we to make of
all this?

Well, in law enforcement
terms a “sting” is an operation
designed to catch a person
committing a crime — by
means of deception.

And “rendition” means the
handing over of criminal sus-
pects from one jurisdiction to
another. Extradition is the
process by which this usually
happens, regulated by interna-
tional treaty.

"Extra-judicial rendition"
means handing over suspects
who are denied due process
because they are arrested with-
out charges and deprived of

legal counsel. The NFS bag
men have been charged in a
Florida court with conspiracy
to import illegal drugs into the
United States — a violation of
American law. They have been
assigned lawyers and the
Bahamian consulate i in Miami
is fully involved.

One of the principles of sov-
ereignty is that every state has
legal authority. over its own
people. And most countries
have signed bilateral extradi-
tion treaties with most other
countries. Samuel ‘90’ Knowles
was extradited to the US
recently on drug charges after
years of costly legal appeals in

crime, like money fraud and
money laundering. All of these
things can physically be done in
other jurisdictions, but if peo-
ple are defrauded in the US,
or the drugs end up in the US
as a result of your action, you
have broken US law and are
liable to US prosecution."
And according to the Amer- '

ican Ambassador, John Rood:
"It was merely the fact that
there were indictments on the
individuals in the United States
and when it was found out that
these individuals were travel-
ling to the United States they
were arrested. If they are not
guilty they will be set free.”



“According to both American
and Bahamian officials, there
are concerns about ‘potential
security shortcomings’ at
Nassau's airport that could lead
to illegal drugs and weapons
being imported into the US.
And perhaps to more
dramatic consequences
for the Bahamas.”



the Bahamas failed.

According to both Ameri-
can and Bahamian officials,
there are concerns about
“potential security shortcom-
ings” at Nassau's airport that
could lead to illegal drugs and
weapons being imported into
the US. And perhaps to more
dramatic consequences for the
Bahamas.

These officials say the
arrests were the result of a long
investigation into the “high
incidence of drugs found on
pre-cleared aircraft during sec-
ondary searches in the US".
So the first point is that the
accused bag men were alleged-
ly able and willing to put unin-
spected packages onto aircraft
flying to the US.

"These finds prompted the
DEA to begin an investiga-
tion," US Deputy Chief of Mis-
sion Dr Brent Hardt told
Tough Call, “which they coor-
dinated closely with the
Bahamian Drug Enforcement
Unit. These cases were devel-
oped by US and Bahamian law
enforcement authorities in the
same way that we routinely
coordinate our many successful
counter-drug investigations.

“Cases were developed by
both sides and those arrested in
the US had a clear US nexus.
Anybody who violates US law
and travels to the US is sub-
ject to arrest, just as an Amer-
ican who violates Bahamian
law would be in the Bahamas.”

Official sources say the
training was “neither mandat-
ed nor sponsored” by the TSA.
It was apparently requested by
Spirit Airlines for NFS staff
loading baggage onto their
planes, in order to meet US
requirements. But the airline's
communications manager
would not respond to inquiries
despite repeated calls.

However, the fact is that
another group of bag handlers
went for the same training in
mid-December and returned
without incident. -

And other NFS staff mem-
bers who travelled with the five
arrested men also received
training and returned. So the
suggestion that the training was
"bogus" does not hold water.

It has also been suggested
that the pre-clearance space at
NIA is considered US territo-
ry.B

ut the bilateral agreement
(which is published on the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
web site) states clearly that this
is not so. Bahamian law applies
and Bahamian sovereignty per-
tains in the pre-clearance area.
And although many aircraft
using the airport may be US-
owned and flagged, when they
are on the ground here they
are under Bahamian jurisdic-
tion.

"That is not to say that one
cannot do something in the
Bahamas that brings you on
the wrong side of the law in
the US," Dr Hardt said. " Drug
trafficking is a cross-border

Meanwhile, Assistant Com-
missioner of Police Reginald

' Ferguson insists that —

although two other baggage
handlers were arrested here as
part of the same investigation
— there was not enough evi-
dence to charge the other five
bag men in Nassau.

_ But according to lawyers we
spoke to, Bahamian police
would have had the same evi-
dence as the DEA had, since it
was a joint investigation: "Our
guys declined to prosecute —
when they should have and
could have — having both the
jurisdiction and the evidence."

So question remains — why
did this happen?

Was it out of deference to.
American security concerns?
Is it because our jails are too.
full?

Or that it would take too
long to bring the accused to
trial?

And because witnesses and
evidence might disappear in
the meantime?

‘Is it because of a fear that.
politicians would compromise:
the prosecution?

In other words, was the fail-
ure to prosecute locally am
indictment of the Bahamian:
criminal justice system by our’
own government and law.
enforcement agencies? :

Are we moving down the,
road towards a failed state,
where the rule of law has bro-:
ken down?

As a matter of fact, the
Bahamas is not the only for-
mer British territory whose
judges have attacked the gov-:
ernment for compromising:
their independence. Accord-'
ing to a senior judge in Zim-.
babwe, that country's judicial:
system has collapsed after’
being starved of funds by Pres-'
ident Robert Mugabe's gov-,
ernment: ‘

"It is wrong to make the’
judiciary beg for its sustenance
from central government," said
Judge Rita Makarau recently.

And in the midst of all this
self-righteous rhetoric about
the bag men, we should not
lose sight of stark reality.

The 9/11 terror attacks have
changed the way we live. By
most accounts, the airport is a
huge security risk — and we
all know how important the
airport is to the industry that .
makes our entire economy '
function.

It costs up to $30 million a
year to support the 45 Ameri-
can pre-clearance officers and
facilities in the Bahamas. And |
the fees that are collected.from |
ticket taxes to support that are |
fractional.

So the real question is, how.
do we weigh these interests?

4

What do you think? Send:

comments to larry@tribune- '
media.net bunemedia.net>

Or visit www.bahamapun-'

dit.com pundit.com/>



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 9























m@ BAHA MAR shows stu-
dents the different areas of
the hotel industry they could
venture into yesterday at the
Tourism Career fair held at
the Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym.
The event was taking place
as part of the 2nd Annual
National Tourism Week.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

M@ STUDENTS answer _
tourism related questions in
order to win a prize yester-
day at the Tourism Career
Fair held at the Sir Kendal
Isaacs Gym,



(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)





ren









Ss i SSS

@ COSMETOLOGY students of BI VI show students different ways to style hair yesterday at the
Tourism Career Fair held at the Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym.



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(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



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@ STUDENTS listen as Ministry of Tourism personnel explain the tourism market to them yesterday
at the Tourism Career Fair at the Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)





es THE TRIBUNE

JANUARY 24, 2007

10:30














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TMC







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 11



FNM denies government

~ claim over radar system

FROM page one

The source claimed that dur-
‘ing the FNM’s term in office
.new radar equipment was
‘bought for the airport, but it
‘had not been used as yet.
“Six to nine million dollars of
.radar equipment is sitting in air-
‘traffic not being used because a
‘ major part of the equipment is
not there,” explained the
_ source.
“So we have to:use the same
‘ equipment that we have always
‘been using and that’s the same
‘equipment that always gives us
‘‘ problems.
'" “And when the generator
breaks down we have no radar,
‘so basically the air traffic con-
‘trollers are working on faith
‘right now,” he said.
The source also claimed that
the faulty radar system is
putting Family Island travellers
at risk.
According to the source, the
radar system-is down at least
, three to four times a month, and
-major accidents were only
avoided because “everybody is
‘already used to the system not
- working.”
; “Tf you never had it, you can’t
ever miss it,” the source said.
The Tribune contacted Mrs
- ‘Hanna-Martin for comment,
. .and she decided to call a press
conference that Monday
“evening to speak on the mat-
ter. : :
Minister Martin said: “It has
come to my attention and the
attention of this ministry that a
rumour is circulating in at least
- one media house (The Tribune)
relative to the acquisition and
operation of the ASR9 radar.
“The ASR9 radar was pur-
chased by the previous admin-
istration at a cost of just under
$8 million. It was intended to
replace the currently utilised
ASRS8 radar as an air traffic
management system.”

She said the acquisition of the _

FROM page one

4
names were entered into the Customs and Border
Protection’s computer system, and they will be

radar system was made without
thorough consultation with
technical personnel at the Civil
Aviation Department. She
claimed that the purchase was
made with “great haste” by the
FNM

The Minister said the radar
system bought by the FNM
required a software component
that was not user-friendly, so
her ministry has been “forced”
to explore the acquisition of

alternative software.

“We are advised,” she said,
“that despite having expended
almost $8 million on the said
radar that an additional almost
$3 million must be expended so
that the radar might be effec-
tively and safely utilised by the
Department of Civil Aviation.”

Minister Martin claimed that
a more considered and careful
approach to the acquisition
from the very beginning would

have avoided this situation. She
pledged that her ministry was
attempting to resolve the issue.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune former FNM Avi-
ation Minister C A Smith said
that the “exact opposite”

occurred during the process of ~

the radar system.

“Before we bought the radar
system we had proper consul-
tation from both the FAA and
the consultants at the time, and

I find it unthinkable that they
(Tthe PLP) have not yet put it
into use,” said Mr Smith.

The former Aviation Minister
admitted that the radar system
was bought during his tenure at
the ministry. He claimed that
the device was “state-of-the-art”
at the time of purchase.

“What I don’t understand is
they have had the system since
we left office, and since that
time they seem to have done

nothing to get the system up,
and running.” !

“It appears to me that PLP:
ministers do not take responsi-'
bility for any item under their:
charge.” : !

Asked how he felt the Free:
National Movement would per- ;
form in the upcoming election ,
this year, Mr. Smith said: “The!
FNM will win the next election ;
and form the government of the:
Bahamas.” ;

Customs warehouse at
airport ‘received extremely poor
review’ from US officials

FROM page one

John Rolle said that until he is in
receipt of the Transportation Security
Administration’s (TSA) report, he
could not comment on what The Tri-
bune has revealed was an “extremely
poor rating” of the warehouse’s secu-
rity.

According to sources at the airport,
there were reportedly enough breach-
es that TSA agents were within their
rights to shut the facility down. During
their inspection, another source stat-
ed, these agents were overheard com-
menting that the building was the
most “poorly secured” cargo ware-
house they had ever inspected.

This warehouse, has direct access
to the airport, and stores cargo for
both local and international airlines.

Among the list of infractions not-
ed were the fact that guards were not
posted at designated areas, vehicles
were allowed to park too close to the
building, and personnel without prop-

New passport rule
comes into effect

scrutinised if it happens again, The Associated |

Press reported.

At some airports in the US, security officers and
travellers were unclear about the fact that they
needed only a passport and not a visa to travel to
Caribbean countries like the Bahamas.

The new passport requirement is part of the
Department of Homeland Security’s Western
Hemisphere Travel Initiative which is aimed at
enhancing security at US borders.

For now, the rules affect only air travellers. Land
and sea travellers — which includes the cruise ship
passengers — will not have to show passports until at

least January 2008.

Pd
F

| @PHILSAPP, «|
father of Mark
Sapp - the man

who was found
dead in his prison

| cell in Abaco last

| Saturday - with his

| lawyer Godfrey
Pinder.

(Photo: Ana |
Bianca Marin)



FROM page one

but someone who is objective.
We believe the police are cov-
ering this thing up.”

While struggling to hold back
his emotions, Phil Sapp spoke of
seeing his son on Saturday after-
noon, just hours before he was
found dead in his cell.

“I spent quite a bit of time
with him on Saturday. He was-
n’t suicidal. :

“Efe had on thongs (slippers),
jeans, a tee-shirt, no belt, no
shoelaces, no pillowcase, no
blanket. There was nothing in
there. But what he had was his
pants, and his shirt, and
thongs.”

Phil Sapp is concerned about
what happened to his son dur-
ing the hours after he visited
him.

According to Mr Sapp, his
son called a friend around 5pm
on Saturday and asked the

Observers in the tourism industry have expressed
fears that the new passport requirement will dis-
suade Americans from travelling abroad, thereby
costing the Caribbean hundreds of millions of dol-
lars in revenue intake and thousands of tourism-

related jobs.

the new requirement.

Father seeks independent investigation

The only valid substitutes for a passport will be
a NEXUS Air card, which used by some American
and Canadian frequent fliers; identification as a
US Coast Guard merchant mariner; and the green
card carried by legal permanent residents. Active
members of the US military are also exempt from

ér authorization were being allowed
onto the airport ramp.

Following The Tribune’s exclusive
headline story revealing these inade-
quacies while intentionally with-hold-
ing many more for obvious security
reasons, Minister of Transport and
Aviation, Mrs Glenys Hanna-Martin
announced that she would appoint a
“multi-agency” task force to review
the security climate and procedures
at the facility.

In 2004, TSA announced its Air
Cargo Strategic Plan in the Federal
Register of the Notice of Proposed
Rule Making (NPRM). As explained
on the agency’s Website, this docu-
ment stated that the proposed rule-
making would require the adoption
of security measures throughout the
air cargo supply. chain, as it seeks to
impose “significant barriers to terror-
ists seeking to use the air cargo trans-
portation system for malicious pur-
poses.”

Although the inspection last week
revealed a number of weaknesses that

require urgent, if not immediate atten,
tion, sources have told The Tribune
that conditions there now have in fact
improved dramatically from what they
once were.

Noting only what he had read in

The Tribune of the inspection, Mr:
Rolle said that Customs will be a part:
of the multi-agency force. ;

“So once we get the facts, I’m pre-.
pared to say something. But you know,
we still have to look into it,” he said. :

ey:

have access to records

FROM page one

to show that this minister has ever issued any visa in his life and J defy anyone:
to show that I have personally issued any visa or instructed anyone to issue any;
visa to anybody,” the minister told the press.

Mr Mitchell also pointed out that, according to his information, Mr Bethel has‘
yet to contact the police to be interviewed and give his evidence on the alleged:
visa scam. :




4

t
1

i
ae)
3

Atlantis Invites you to join :

our Dynamic



friend to urgently get in contact
with his attorney Godfrey Pin-
der. However, this individual
was unable to reach Mr Pinder.

Mark Sapp was found dead
at 6.07pm, about an hour later,
by police.

Both Mr Sapp and Mr Pin-
der are demanding that police
explain how Mr Sapp received
an item to potentially hang him-
self when there were no such
items present when Phil Sapp
left his son.

Mr Sapp and Mr Pinder also
refute police reports that Mark
Sapp was taken to Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre for
assessment when he was
brought to Nassau.

Mr Pinder claims that his for-
mer client was brought to Nas-
sau where he was looked at by
medical professionals at the
Princess Margaret Hospital.
However, both Mr Pinder and
Mr Sapp were adamant that

Mark Sapp never went to _

Sandilands for assessment, as
claimed by police.

The Tribune attempted to
reach authorities at Sandilands.
However, no authorities from

the institution were willing to’

comment on the matter.
At the time of his death,

Mark Sapp was being held in

police custody in Abaco pend-
ing his transfer to Her Majesty’s
Prison. He was to be remanded
to Fox Hill Prison until March
23, 2007, by Magistrate Craw-
ford McGee.

Mark Sapp was charged with
arson in relation to a fire that
swept through the Royal Palm
Condominiums at Treasure
Cay, Abaco, causing an esti-
mated $3 million worth of dam-
age.

Attempts were made to reach
Assistant Commissioner of
Police for the Northern
Bahamas, Mr_ Elliston
Greenslade. Yet, up to press

time, he did not respond.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



The Tribune

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Jini



HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

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Alternative urged to

EPA’s ‘total devastation’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Government
was yesterday
urged to take the
Bahamas into the
European Union’s
(EU) General System of Pref-
erences (GSP) scheme to secure
duty-free access to European
markets, rather than sign on to
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) talks, which
could cause “total devastation”

for the economy, jobs and the

tax system.

Paul Moss, head of Domin-
ion Management, a financial
services provider, and a lead-
ing member of Bahamian Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF), warned
that signing on. to the EPA as
part-of the Cariforum regional
negotiating bloc would be “dis-

astrous” for the Bahamian



Trade campaigner calls for Bahamas to sign on to European
Union’s GSP to protect economy, jobs and tax system

economy due to the agreemen-
t’s emphasis on reciprocal treat-
ment.

The EPA, which is being
negotiated on the Bahamas’ and
Caribbean’s behalf by Carifo-
rum, is due to be completed by
the end of 2007, but Mr Moss
said a better alternative was for
this nation to sign on to the
EU’s General System of Pref-
erences (GSP).

This, he explained, was a sys-
tem of trade benefits and pref-
erences developed in 197] by
the EU for 178. developing
countries. The GSP, Mr Moss
said, was last updated in Feb-
ruary 2005, and this version runs

Financial services

fears on EU trade

® By NEIL RARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN financial
services executive yesterday
said he was “very concerned”
about the impact the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)

could have on the industry,

warning that it could open the
doors to further pressure on tax
information exchange and the
European Union’s (EU) Sav-
ings Tax Directive.

Paul Moss, head of Domin-
ion Management, a financial
services provider, and a lead-
ing member of Bahamian Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF), said the











eventual EPA agreed with the
EU would have an impact way

until December 2008, provid-

_ing-tariff cuts for around 7,200

products.

He added that the GSP Plus
scheme provided special duty
free access to EU markets for
countries that had special devel-
opment needs and small
economies, which were vulner-
able and poorly diversified.

Mr Moss said the Bahamas
clearly fell into these categories,
and could easily meet another
EU criteria, which was that its
exports represent less than 1
per cent of the European trad-

_ ing bloc’s imports.

“Clearly, the Bahamas falls
in this threshold, as it is a devel-

beyond Bahamian companies _|. |

that exported to Europe.

The EPA is likely to cover 85
per cent of trade between the
EU and the Bahamas and
Caribbean, and go beyond
physical goods to encompass
services, investments and mar-
ket access.

Mr Moss warned that the
EPA could be used to place the
Bahamas “at a further disad-
vantage, while allowing coun-
tries in Europe to benefit” in
the financial services arena.

SEE page 2B

oping country, poorly diversi-
fied due to its heavy reliance
on tourism, and exports less

than 1 per cent of the EU’s |

imports,” Mr Moss said.

The Bahamas, he added, also
had to ratify 27 international
conventions on sustainable
development and good gover-
nance to qualify, and it would
be eligible for GSP plus if it
chose not to sign on to the
EPA.

“This is the alternative for the

Bahamas, to establish itself
under this regime to preserve
for Bacardi, Paradise Fisheries
and Polymers the same regime
as they have now, without hav-



@ JASPER Knaab, chief executive officer of Pegasus Wireless

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)

14.94%

ing to allow other goods from
the EU in as duty free,” Mr

"Moss said.

“The Bahamas has yet to
look at any alternative to its cur-
rent tax system. You cannot
throw away your main revenue

generator. You cannot allow .

pressure from the outside to
force the change.”

Mr Moss’s position is at odds
with the Government’s pre-
ferred option, which according
to a leaked Ministry of Foreign
Affairs briefing document is
likely to involve signing on to
the EPA talks as part of Cari-
forum, a move that would lead
to close integration with CARI-

Investor eyes wireless

COM. That is something close
to the heart of Fred Mitchell,

‘minister of foreign affairs.

The Ministry of Foreign
Affairs felt the Bahamas would
be unable to negotiate its own
separate agreement with the
EU, due to the minimal level
of trade with this nation, and
the fact that the Bahamas would
not get the same concessions
made available to Cariforum.

Mr Moss said the EPA was
designed to provide European
companies with access to
numerous markets in the

SEE page 10B



expansion with BTC

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
THE investor behind a multi-million manufacturing plant in

Freeport yesterday told The Tribune he plans to install wireless Wi-
FI broadband services on all the Family Islands once his project

becomes operational.

Jasper Knaab, chief executive of Pegasus Wireless, said expand-
ing wireless service was his next goal when he moves his company 4

operations to the Bahamas.

“After we get the plant open and we start manufacturing, my next
project is putting wireless throughout the islands - on all the

islands,” he said.

“Because the Government owns the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC), they have that data infrastructure in place,
so all I have to do is piggyback off that, put up a tiny piece of hard-

ware and we can offer wireless

Wi-FI broadband service.”

Mr Knabb said Pegasus Wire-

SEE page 2B

$12m boost from Atlantis giving
up $1.3m room revenue

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DESPITE giving up $1.3 mil-
lion in room revenues by pro-
viding free accommodation dur-
ing the filming of Beyond the
Sunset, the film starring Pierce
Brosnan and Selma Hayek, the

$12 million into the Bahamian
economy.

The findings, contained in a
report on CARICOM’s cultur-
al industries for the Caribbean
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THE MARKETS
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,533.80 +56.64 Ad
S&P 500 1,427.99 +5.04 Ad
NASDAQ 2,431.41 40.34 AY
10-YR NOTE 481 +05 A
CRUDE OIL. 55.04 +2.48 Ad

Knergy
sparks
rise In
stocks

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Wall Street
rebounded Tuesday, rising
moderately as crude oil surged
more than $2 a barrel and trig-
gered a rally among energy pro-
ducers. Investors regained their
optimism about corporate prof-
its after a series of positive

. earnings reports.

Energy prices spiked after
the Energy Secretary Samuel
Bodman said the U.S. will dou-_

_ ble the size of the nation’s Stra-
tegic Petroleum Reserve. Prices
were already rising as a cold

snap in the northeast United
States was seen increasing

- demand for heating fuel in the
region. — :

Exxon Mobil led blue chips
and was among the Dow Jones

industrials’ biggest gainers,
while fellow refiners Conoco-
Phillips and Chevron also
surged during the session. The
advance in oil stocks helped the
Dow recover from an 88-point
decline Monday, its biggest
drop in two months and a reac-
tion to investor uneasiness
about earnings.
ae “Earnings are not coming in -
~ all that bad,” said Brian Gen-
dreau, an investment strategist
with ING Investment Manage-
ment. ‘There is an absence of
any real bad news, leading indi-
cators are up, and companies

_ are not falling off the table.

- That’s consistent with the mod-

est rise in the Dow.”

The Dow rose 56.64, or 0.45
percent, to 12,533.80.

Broader stock indicators also
advanced. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index was up 5.04, or -
0.35 percent, at 1,427.99, and the
Nasdaq composite index added

_ 0.34, or 0.01 percent, to 2,431.41,

Bond prices fell, with the
yield on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note rising to 4.81 per-
cent from 4.76 percent late
Monday.

The dollar was mixed against
other major currencies, while
gold prices spiked. A barrel of
light, sweet crude rose $2.47 to
settle at $55.04 on the New York
Mercantile Exchange.

As has been typical in previ-
ous sessions, oil companies got
a boost on the rebound in crude
prices. The refiners stand to
benefit if the government
expands its reserves. Exxon
Mobil rose $1.59, or 2.2 percent,

‘to $74.49; ConocoPhillips was
up $1.59, or 2.9 percent, at
$64.97; and Chevron increased
$1.34 to $72.88. *

Technology stocks were up
overall after chip maker Texas
Instruments reported a robust
quarterly profit and was
upgraded by several Wall Street
firms. Shares rose $1.01, or 3.5
percent, to $29.60.

United Technologies, which
makes everything from air con-
ditioners to aircraft engines,
reported fourth-quarter profit
rose 38 percent, which sent
shares up $2.05, or 3.2 percent,
to $66.14.

Advancing issues led decli-
ners by a 3 to 2 margin on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated volume
came to 3.02 billion shares, up
from 2.89 billion shares in the
previous session.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller gained 7.42, or 0.95 per-
cent, to 785.38.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.08
percent. At the close, Britain’s
FTSE 100 was up 0.15 percent,
Germany’s DAX index dropped
0.13 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 shed 0.08 percent.

poses snnnaen



B | weone sean

BANKING

3B

sunserassoseoiboceonestepesteeondetetttle



RARDIN ESRB SSOORNSECSOS CC BEMI EE DS LUDO AE CECE OOENEEON

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007



Acquisitions boost banks’ profits

Il Despite battling a squeeze on
interest rates, Bank of America
and Wachovia pumped up their
fourth-quarter earnings with
recent acquisitions.

BY IEVA M. AUGSTUMS
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Fourth-
quarter earnings rose strongly at
Bank of America and Wachovia,
driven by acquisitions last year that
helped the banks avoid the interest-
rate squeeze that has hampered some
of the nation’s other ee banks.







_ Digital textbooks
can save college
students hundreds
of dollars every
semester, but the
market is off to
an unimpressive
start.



INTERNET

Bank of America, the nation’s No.
2 bank, said Tuesday that fourth-
quarter net income jumped 47 per-
cent, aided by its takeover of credit
card issuer MBNA Corp. It’s local
rival, No.4 Wachovia, said its 35 per-
cent gain in fourth-quarter earnings
was driven by its purchase of Golden
West Financial, which was com-
pleted in October.

Gary Townsend, an analyst with
Friedman, Billings, Ramsey & Co.,
said he liked what he saw from the
banks and reiterated his “outper-
form” rating for Bank of America.

PUBLISHING



HARDBACK OR DIGITAL? Alberto Robles, 21, shops at the campus bookstore of Florida International
University in Miami. Some students save money by buying digital books.

ILL THEY BITE?

BY BRIDGET CAREY

“Both banks seemed very pleased
with their acquisitions and outlooks,
although to some degree, Wachovia
did acknowledge that the overall con-
dition of the housing market is cur-
rently more muted than they
expected it to be,” Townsend said.

Bank of America profits climbed
to $5.26 billion, or $1.16 per share,
from $3.57 billion, or 88 cents per
share, a year ago. Results for the
fourth quarter of 2005 did not include
MBNA, which vi was acquired on Jan. 1,
2006.

Excluding merger and restructur-



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

bcarey@MiamiHerald.com

Tell college students they can save
50 percent on a textbook, and you’ve
got their full attention..

For that matter, you have their
parents’ full attention, too.

It’s been a year since most U.S.
campus bookstores began offering
downloadable versions of some text-
books, ranging between 40 percent
and 50 percent less than the cost of
the tangible version.

But as the spring semester kicks
off on college campuses, these

cyber shelves. Industry insiders point
to several reasons: lack of knowledge,
poor marketing and few choices.

In an age in which students are
more tech savvy than ever before,
publishers say they are preparing for
an e-textbook craze and are investing
in creating electronic versions. Yet it
seems publishers are not sure what
will trigger demand for these e-text-
books, and they continue to test the
waters.

“Publishers are having a hard time
figuring out what they need to do,”

* TURN TO E-BOOKS

cheaper e-books are not flying off the





Yahoo’s fourth-quarter profit
exceeds analysts’ forecasts

i Yahoo’s profit in the fourth
quarter, excluding some items,
was 16 cents a share, beating the
average analyst estimate by

3 cents per share.

BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo’s
fourth-quarter profit topped analyst
expectations to end a recent streak of
financial letdowmns at the Internet
bellwether.

The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based com-
pany said Tuesday that it earned
$268.7 million, or 19 cents per share,
during the final three months of 2006,
traditionally the peak season for Web
sites like Yahoo that depend on
advertising for most of their revenue.

The profit declined 61 percent
from net income of $683.2 million, or
46 cents per share, at the same time
in 2005, but the two quarters didn’t
provide an apples-to-apples compari-
son. That’s because a one-time gain
of $310 million boosted the 2005
results while the 2006 figures
included stock option expenses that
weren’t recorded on Yahoo’s books
in the previous year.

If not for certain tax benefits,
Yahoo said it would have earned 16
cents per share, exceeding the aver-
age analyst estimate by 3 cents per





PAUL SAKUMA/AP

INTERNET BELLWETHER: While Yahoo’s profit fell 61 percent, the
company said the two quarters did not provide an apples-to-apples
comparison and analyst expectations were exceeded. Above,
people pass Yahoo headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif., on Monday.

share, according to Thomson Finan-
cial.

Yahoo’s revenue for the period
totaled $1.7 billion, a 13 percent rise
from $1.5 billion in the prior year.

In a measure far more important
to investors, Yahoo’s revenue fell to
$1.23 billion after subtracting adver-
tising commission that the company

paid to its partners. That figure rep-
resented a 15 percent increase from
the prior year and a 10 percent rise
from 2006’s third quarter.

Yahoo shares fell 46 cents to close
at $26.96 on the Nasdaq Stock Market
before the fourth-quarter earnings
were announced, then recovered 23
cents in extended trading.

ing charges, the company earned
$5.01 billion, or $1.19 per share, in the
latest quarter.

The bank’s revenue grew 34 per-
cent to $18.46 billion from $13.81 bil-
lion last year.

That exceed the profits of $1.18 per
share on revenue of $18.01 billion
expected by analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial.

Michael L. Mayo, an analyst with
Prudential Equity Group, said in a
research note that he was concerned

* TURN TO BANKS

ECONOMIC SUMMIT

Global
forum to
focus on
energy,
warming

& The lack of thick snow in
Davos, Switzerland, where the
World Economic Forum
convenes this week, is a firm
reminder to delegates that
climate change is a hot topic.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press”

DAVOS, Switzerland — Concerns
about global warming and resolving
the seemingly endless tensions in the
Middle East are set to dominate the
agenda of the World Economic
Forum’s annual meeting this week,
with a lack of snow in the tiny moun-
tain community a stark reminder of ©
the warm weather.

About 2,500 business and political
leaders — including musicians and
social activists Bono and Peter
Gabriel — are set to meet for the
annual meeting of the minds to talk
politics, economics and social issues
in an atmosphere aimed at finding
long-term solutions instead of quick
fixes.

Global warming and security are
the two dominant issues, according
to the Forum’s organizers, and the
lack of thick snow was a firm
reminder that climate change is a hot
topic.

' “We are getting huge demand
from our members to place climate
change and issues of environmental
security at the very heart of the pro-
gram of the World Economic
Forum,” said Dominic Waughray,
head of environmental initiatives for
the WEF. “The Forum has already
been instrumental in getting busi-
ness voices heard at the very center
of global decision-making on climate
change, but the program at this
year’s annual meeting shows just
how crucial business leaders believe
these issues are and just how serious
they are in finding real solutions in
partnership with governments and
leading NGOs.”

There will be 17 sessions focusing
on climate change, featuring topics
to help companies and governments
navigate the legalities of implement-
ing policy changes aimed at curbing
emissions and pollution and how to
make going green profitable. Among
the people scheduled to talk include
U.S. Sen. John McCain, a likely can-
didate for the Republican presiden-
tial nomination; Zhang Xiaoqiang,
vice chairman of China’s National
Development and Reform Commis-
sion; and Montek Ahluwalia, deputy
chairman of India’s planning com-
mission.

A survey of participants by poll-
ster Gallup International found that
twice the number of attendees from
last year thought that environmental
protection should be a priority for
world leaders.

German Chancellor Angela Mer-
kel, whose country is president of
the European Union and the Group
of Eight, has said she would focus on
climate change in her address. Brit-
ish Prime Minister Tony Blair told
the Forum on its website that “talks
between leaders could help outline
elements of a future post-Kyoto cli-
mate framework that could then be

* TURN TO ECONOMIC SUMMIT





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



< INSIGHT

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read Insight Mondays












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PARADISE ISLAND



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor -



ahamian busi-

nesses and con-

sumers are likely

to face “sharp

increases in tax-
es” in future to pay for a
National Health Insurance
(NHI) scheme that is finan-
cially unsustainable, a
Bahamas-based economist has
warned.

Ralph Massey, a director of
the Nassau Institute economic
think-tank, said the Govern-
ment’s proposed NHI plan was
attempting to impose on the
Bahamas a “50 year-old” mod-
el for healthcare financing that
had run into deep trouble in
the UK and Canada.

“The National Health Insur-
ance programme in its present
form is financially unsustain-
able, and one can conclude
that the Government must be
reckless and irresponsible in
its haste to implement it,” Mr
Massey wrote in an article for
the Institute.

“The healthcare entitlement
of NHI will require sharp
increases in taxes in the medi-
um and long term, and is high-
ly likely to be financially unsus-
tainable...... The Government
refuses to provide any data
relating to programme costs
beyond the very first years of
operation, despite the vast
body of evidence showing that
the cost of such a programme
will increase significantly.”

Mr Massey pointed out that
in the UK, its National Health
Service (NHS) - the model
upon which the Governmen-
t’s NHI is largely based, will
generate a financial deficit of
$182 million for the year end-
ing on March 31, 2007, prompt-
ing discussions about whether
to cut back medical services
made available by the plan.

As for Canada, another
model for NHI, Mr Massey
said 10 separate provincial
health systems were in “finan-
cial crisis”. There, due to an
ageing population, healthcare
costs were projected to more
than double over a 75-year
period.

The Nassau Institute direc-
tor said the Government, and
its NHI implementation team,
had avoided the impact such
shifts in demographics and an
ageing population would have
on the Bahamian scheme.

Mr Massey said declining











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4

‘Sharp tax increases’
to pay for NHI likely

Economist warns scheme’s
reliance on troubled 50
year-old model is ‘financially
unsustainable’, as short-term

gain at nation s expense
‘baked’ into politics
by two main parties

“The National Health
Insurance programme
in its present form is
financially unsustainable,
and one can conclude
that the Government
must be reckless
and irresponsible
in its haste to
implement it.”

— Ralph Massey

birth rates impacted the ability
of countries to fund public sec-
tor welfare schemes such as
NHI, as such plans required
“an ever increasing number of
taxpaying workers to fund the
healthcare needs of older
workers andretirees”.

Europe, the US, Canada and
other developed nations had
all experienced declining fer-
tility rates, and Mr Massey said
the same thing was happening
in the Bahamas.

This nation’s total fertility
rate in the early 1970s was 3.44
children per woman, and has
dropped to its current 2.3 chil-
dren per woman.

Barbados now has the lowest
fertility rate in the Caribbean
of 1.5, with Cuba and Trinidad
& Tobago both at 1.61.

Mr Massey added: “In its
forecasts the UN Population
Division assumes that the
Bahamian total fertility rate
will decline to a rate of 1.85 in
the year 2030, and not to the
present rates of these three
countries or lower.

“In the UN’s 2004 report,
the picture one sees is a



Bahamian population of 79,000
in 1950 growing at an increas-
ing annual rate to 170,000 in
1970, and then increasing at a
steadily declining rate to the
peak in 2040 of 394,000.”
Criticising both the Govern-
ment and FNM opposition, Mr
Massey said: “A national
healthcare programme has
such an appeal to the elec-
torate that potential short-term
political gains swamp longer-
term medical, financial and
political considerations.
“This applies to both the

- party in power and its loyal

opposition. The latter neither
voted ‘No’, nor did it make a
strong case for an alternative.
As a result, unless something
changes, costly long-term struc-
tural errors will be ‘baked’ into
the Bahamian political land-
scape.”

The Government’s failure to
release NHI actuarial studies
and the full 2005 report on the
scheme’s costs, components

_ and financing to the National

Coalition for Healthcare
Reform was described by Mr
Massey as “a totally inade-
quate response”.

Describing the whole situa-
tion as ‘a wall of silence’, Mr
Massey recalled the “dismis-
sive” response. by the NHI

implementation team to the © ~

report compiled on the scheme
by Nadeem Esmail, of the
Fraser Institute, which detailed
alternative policy options for
the Government to consider.

He added: “For instance, the
Fraser report described the
effect of ageing on total pro-
gramme costs. The NHI
response stated that this fac-
tor was less important than
other medical cost factors, such
as the economies of scale, pub-
lic sector inefficiencies and
high private care health
charges.”

Alternative urged to
EPA's ‘total devastation’

FROM page 1B

Bahamas and other Caribbean
countries that they had yet to
enter, with the agreement over-
riding parliamentary sovereign-
ty and the ability of nations to
design their own laws and poli-
cies.

Describing the EPA as “noth-
ing more than the WTO by the
back door”, Mr Moss said that
providing reciprocal access for
EU imports to the Bahamas
meant providing them with
duty-free access to this nation,
impacting customs revenues.

The Government has esti-
mated that it could lose $10-$14
million in revenues from EU
imports as a result of the EPA
in a worst-case scenario, but Mr
Moss said: “This country, this
government cannot afford to
lose a couple of hundred thou-
sand dollars, much less $10-$14
million.”

Currently, exports of rum,
seafood and polymers to the
EU by Bahamian companies
are allowed to enter that market
duty free under the Cotonou
Agreement, signed in 2000.
However, goods exported to the
Bahamas and rest of the
Caribbean from the EU do not
enter these markets duty-free.

This type of one-way prefer-
ence regime is contrary to
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) rules, and that organi-
sation’s refusal to renew the
waiver for Coronou beyond
2007 has forced the 79 nations

that make up the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group to negotiate the EPA.

t Moss described concerns
that Bacardi and Polymers
International would close their
Bahamian operations if they
lost their EU duty-free market
access, costing hundreds of jobs,
as “hype that does not make
economic sense”.

He urged those companies to
lobby the Government to sign
on to the GSP, as signing the
EPA will “cost thousands of
jobs everywhere in the country
as goods will flood to this coun-
try duty free”. ,

Mr Moss added: “If we join,
we will have to forget about cus-
toms duties, our main tax
regime. We have not yet sought
to change this, and it would be
disastrous to allow this country
to be subjected to duty free
imports from Europe.”

He pointed out that the
Bahamas would have to offer
the same duty-free access to EU
goods as the rest of Cariforum,
as the EPA deal would apply
to all members of the bloc.

Even though the Govern-
ment would seek to phase-in
tariff cuts and duty free access
for EU goods, Mr Moss said the
Bahamas’ hands would be tied,
as it was bound to whatever
phase-ins, reservations and
timetables that Cariforum
agreed.

He pointed out that this
might not be in the Bahamas’
best interests, and said: “The
Bahamas has special circum-_
stances. It ought to take itself
out [of Cariforum] and say it
cannot do this, we have to do it
on our own.”



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



The Suns turn up the
heat for next season

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

THE Temple Christian
Suns won’t be able to
defend their Bahamas
Association of Indepen-
dent Secondary Schools’
senior girls basketball title
this year.

But coach Sharel Cash
warned the rest of the
league that they will be
back to regain their crown
next year. .

The Suns, the two-time
defending champions, out-
shone the St. Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
26-16 yesterday at Temple
Christian.

Like the Big Red
Machines, who dropped to
2-5, the Suns won’t be eli-
gible for the playoffs as
they are out of the top four
spots at 5-4. cei

“We're rebuilding, which
is good for me,” said Cash,
who also coaches some of
the players on the Junior

All-Star team in the New .

Providence Women’s Bas-
ketball Association.

“Like I made a statement
at the beginning of the
year, who doesn’t beat me
in 2006/2007, they won’t
beat Temple Christian in
2007/2008. ,

“They will need to come
with all of their weapons
because right now we’re in
a rebuilding stage. I have
a young team and I know
this team will be around
for the next 3-4 years.”

Directed

Despite being young, the
Suns got a solid leadership
from Tiffany Wildgoose,
who emerged as the start-
ing point guard. The 1]-
grader directed the show
with seven points. .

She was joined by Alexis
Bell with seven. Destine
Bootle contributed four
and Stenell Babbs, Hillary
Rolle, Latoya Rahming
and Gariece Butler all
chipped in with two.

For the Big Red
Machines, Syneisha Bootle
had a game high eight.
Royandra Nairn had four
and Lavaughn Dames and
Ivanna Seymour helped out
with a basket each.

Cash, however, said she
expected SAC to put up a
much better showing than
they did. The Suns didn’t
allow the Big Red
Machines to get rolling as
they took the ball out of
the hands of Nairn by run-
ning a box and one defence
— the point guard.

Up 5-4 at the end of the
first quarter, Temple Chris-
tian got a 1-2 punch from
Wildgoose and Bell as they
worked the ball on the out-
side and inside respective-
ly with three and four
points to push their lead to
13-6 at the half.

The Suns continued to
control the tempo of the
game as they crashed the
boards and ran the fast
break in the third quarter,
extending their lead to 22-
8 as Destine Bootle came
up with four to go along
with Bell’s three.

But the Big Red
Machines, who started to

@ TEMPLE Christian
Suns’ Tiffany Wildgoose
squares up to shoot the
uncontested jumper against
the St. Augustine’s College
Big Red Machines yesterday
as the Suns won this BAISS
senior girls basketball game
26-16 at home.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

play a lot better in the
third quarter, posted their
best quarter in the fourth
as they got three big bas-
kets from Syneisha Bootle
to trim the lead.

Comfortable

“It was a good win and
so far the girls look com-
fortable,” Cash said. “I’m
trying to get them to play a
little of everything because
they are young.”

SAC’s coach Marco
Munnings said he wasn’t at
all disappointed in the
loss.

“We were just a little too
late in trying to come back
in the game,” he stated.
“Our problem is we need
to have better court aware-
ness.

“They were isolating our
guard and they left the
middle open and we didn’t
capitalise on that.

“We just didn’t make the
most of the opportunities.
They were there. It wasn’t
that the team was that
much better and they dom-
inated us. It’s a good pro-
gression from one game to
the next.”

Like Cash, Munnings
said he’s looking forward
to next year with his entire
team coming back.



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



clash with

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



IF THERE’S one team in the way of
Mark Knowles and Daniel Nestor winning
another Australian Open Grand Slam dou-
bles title, it’s American twin brothers Bob
and Mike Bryan.

Knowles and Nestor will clash with the
Bryans in the semifinals of the first Grand
Slam tournament for the year today in Mel-
bourne, Australia.

It’s a match that Knowles said he and
Nestor are looking forward to playing.

“It’s a big match. Obviously, we’re been
playing really well so far in this tournament
and they’re the top seed, but we’ve had a
rivalry for a long time,” Knowles reflected.

The Bryans hold a 10-8 advantage over
Knowles and Nestor. They also won the
last big match they played together in a
Grand Slam — the semis of Wimbledon
which the Bryans won.

But Knowles said there’s no reason why
they can’t get a big win over the world’s
best team in 2006 and the number one seeds
in the tournament.

“It would be a good chance for us to win
this one to get right back at them,” Knowles
projected.

In the quarter-finals, Knowl2s and Nestor
knocked off Fabrice Santoro and Nenad
Zimonjic in identical scores of 6-3, 6-3, while
the Bryans prevailed with a 7-5, 7-5 decision
over Jeff Coetzee and Rogier Wassen.

Knowles and Nestor, who are going for
their first tournament victory of the year
after losing the first two they played in, are
confident that they can succeed.

“We’ve been playing great and I’ve been
hitting the ball really well,” Knowles noted.
“Tt’s always good when you start of the year
well. It’s a sign that you have put in some
work during the off-season.





“We had a really good start to the year,
we've been playing really well and we're
fresh and healthy and pretty excited about
being this far in the tournament.”

But Knowles insisted that the Bryans are
not going to be any pushover.

“They are tough. Obviously, they finish
number one in the world a couple years
when we haven't,” he pointed out. “So they
bring a lot to the table.

“They bring a lot of energy and they play
some big games.

“But we've beaten them before and we
know what it takes to beat them.



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

W TENNIS ACE
Mark Knowles.



“It will just comes down to execution on
the day.”

Having played against and practised with
each other for so long, Knowles said there’s
no mystery about the way either team play.
But he said they are the team they have to
beat if they want to win another Australian
Open title.

“We can do it. We can definitely do it,”
Knowles said.

- They did it in 2002 when they won the
first of their two Grand Slam titles. The
other came in 2005 at the US Open in
Flushing Meadows, New York.

fo



owles looking forward to
Bryan brothers



PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





@ BASKETBALL
BAISS ACTION

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools will con-
tinue its basketball regular
season action today with
games being played from
4 p.m. Junior girls - CW
Saunders at St. Anne’s
and Queen’s College at
Nassau Christian Acade-
my. Senior boys - St.
Anne’s at St. John’s; St.
Augustine’s at Kingsway
Academy; Temple Christ-
ian at Prince William;
Faith Temple at Westmin-
ister and Nassau Christian
Academy at St. Andrew’s.

H@ GSSSA ACTION

THE Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association will bé back
in action today at 4 p.m.
with its basketball regular
season after taking a
break the past two days.
The junior girls and boys
will play at the CI Gibson
Gym and the senior girls
and boys will play at the
DW Davis Gym.

NPBA ACTION

THE New Providence
Basketball Association
will continue its regular
season action tonight at
the CI Gibson Gymnasi-
um with a double header
on tap. In the opener at
7:30 p.m., the Y-Care
Wreckers will play Cable
Bahamas Entertainers and
in the feature contest, the
Millennium Jammers will
meet the Sunshine Auto
Ruff Ryders.

Roddick —
prepares.
for Federer
in semifinals

B TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

ANDY RODDICK was
ruthless, treating his close
friend like little more than
warmup fodder for his semi-

final showdown with Roger

Federer.

The 2003 U.S. Open cham-
pion flattened Mardy Fish
without blinking Tuesday,
making only four unforced
errors in a 6-2, 6-2, 6-2 quar-
terfinal win at the Australian
Open.

“T played pretty flawless, I
thought,” Roddick said. “I
feel good going into the
semis.”

Roddick said he could
remember making more
errors in one game than he
had in the entire match
against Fish, who lived with
him in Boca Raton, Fla., for a
while and went to his high
school.

“TI tried my best to kind of
put our friendship to the back
of my head,” Roddick said.
“You know, it’s always diffi-
cult. It’s a weird, weird situa-
tion.”

Next up is how to beat Fed-
erer, something he has not
managed since Montreal in
2003.

That was the year he ended
at No. 1 and collected his only
major title.

Federer also won his first
major at Wimbledon that
year, and is now bidding for
his 10th Grand Slam title.

The defending champion
encountered tricky wind con-
ditions on Rod Laver Arena
and a difficult opponent,
looking nervous at times dur-
ing a 6-3, 7-6 (2), 7-5 win over
No. 7 Tommy Robredo with
his parents in the crowd.

Federer, who lost to Rod-
dick in the final of an exhibi-
tion tournament 10 days ago,
dropped his serve four times.
He was shaking his head after
shanking some shots.

“The break of serves,
they’re due to the wind I
assume,” Federer said. “I had
to kind of change my game
around a little bit midway
through the second set.”











Minister: govt hoping to
take —— to next level

B SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

REGATTA fans are in for
a treat, with this season being
dubbed the biggest and best
to hit the Bahamas by Minis-
ter V Alfred Gray. :

Mr Gray, the minister
responsible for regattas in the
country, believes that the
union between the associa-
tions will only strengthen the
sport.

Reflecting on the times
when regatta was known by
every Bahamian as the num-
ber one sport in the country,
the minister praised the
sailors, the different associa-
tion presidents and the mem-
bers for their insight and their
vision for the sport.

He said: “Regatta 2007 will
officially be launched on Sat-
urday by the Honourable
Prime Minister Perry Christie.
This is a very special regatta
because for the first time in
the history of all regattas all
three associations will come
under thé same umbrella, the
same for the other upcoming
regattas.

“The government is hoping

to take regatta to the next lev-
el. We realise that the sport is ~

a significant puller in the
socio-economic development
of our country as a cultural

“event. It brings together peo-

ales

ple from all walks of life and
boosts the economy in which
the regatta was held.

. “It is also an opportunity
for people from one island to
visit another island. We call it
inter-island trading, boosting
inter-island tourism as well. It
also gives social interaction of
people getting to know other
traditions from other islands.”
. This year’s regatta season

will: kick ‘off'on Friday with

the New Year Day regatta, set
to take place at the Montagu
Shores. The regatta is expect-
ed to set the tune for the oth-



BTHE SOUTHERN CROSS in Acton the coming fematta

eason has been dubbed ‘the — and best’.

er regattas.

According to Mr Gray, who
released the jam packed
scheduled yesterday, regatta
fans can make preparations
for the sailing events now that
the sport will be hosted on
every major island.

He said: “It is expected that
I will review the possibility, at
the cabinet level, in making
regatta not only the number
one sporting event but cultur-
al'as well in our country
because from all indications it
seems to be heading there.
Outside of Junkanoo, I think
regattas are the largest event
held on an annual basis in the
Bahamas.

“I do think that regattas will

be more significant than
Junkanoo because every
island in the Bahamas now has
regattas, but every island has-
n't been attracted to Junkanoo
as yet. So in that regard regat-
tas are more popular because
regattas touch every island.”

Depending on the success
of the various regattas this
year, there may be some
changes, but the sport is
unlikely to be expanded trom
its current form in the near
future.

“MiarvGray added: “T don’t
think that we will expand or
extend regattas because the
government doesn’t deter-
mine which island will host
regattas, that is up to the local



communities -and is support-
ed by the government. While
we can’t quote how many
regattas we can have, we cer-
tainly do not ask people to
have them, we just support the
associations in making the
sport number one.

“The government will sup-
port them financially and cer-
tainly the government has a
policy to interact with the peo-
ple. We also try to encourage
and facilitate the marketing
of regattas so that people are
aware of What ic going on in
the island.”

a



W MINISTER of Local
Government and Consumer
Affairs V Alfred Gray

New Zealand make 210 against England

B® NEW ZEALAND'S Daniel Vittori,
center, jumps after taking the wicket of Eng-
land's Andrew Flintoff, right, caught by
wicketkeeper Brendon McCullum, left, for
9 runs in their one day international cricket
match in Adelaide, Australia, Tuesday, Jan.
23, 2007. New Zealand made 210 in their
innings.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)





SRARAONANNANHY

¢ Hiami Herald y



IN MY OPINION

GREG COTE

gcote@MiamiHerald.com

Want that ring?
Winners usually
ride a little luck

E verything about a Super Bowl

is excess and exaggeration

because somewhere along the
long, gladiators’ march to Roman
numeral XLI the game stopped being
a game — the NFL championship no
longer was enough on its own, appar-
ently — and became a metastasizing
spectacle ever out to top itself.

They have official news confer-
ences about the pregame coin flip
now. The bloated halftime extrava-
ganza deigns to let some football be
played around
it. The TV
commercials,
once things to
be avoided, are
obscenely-
priced works of
sad fascination.

Nothing,
though, epitomizes XXXL-sized Super
Bowl hype as steadfastly as “the ring.”

The mighty, mystical Ring.

It is the patron saint of the Super
Bowl, its deity, and it will be referred
to as such over the coming days as the
Chicago Bears and the Indianapolis
Colts speak reverently, fervently (and
constantly) of the ring and all it
means. Get used to it. It is their Holy
Grail, awaiting only the chosen, fated
ones Feb. 4 at Dolphin Stadium.

THE RING IS THE THING |

Nothing in this game’s buildup, as
hundreds of writers flood in to file
millions of words of claptrap, will be
more prevalent than one single
theme: Will Peyton Manning finall
win a ring!? “

All that will come close is the
theme about Tony Dungy and Lovie
Smith being the first black head
coaches in Super Bowl history —
meaning the first with a chance to
earn the ring!
~ It is time to hit this mystique witha
hard reality check:

The championship ring in general,
and specifically the Lord of the Ring
Super Bowl, has become the most
overrated symbol in sports largely
because so many of them sparkle
from the hands of men who had so lit-
tle to do with winning them.

Dan Marino has no Super Bowl
ring, but obscure Charlie Leigh won
two because he lucked out to be a sel-
dom-used Dolphins reserve running
back in the early 1970s.

Ted Williams owns no World
Series ring, but Mike Mordecai (a
2003 Marlins scrub) does.

Charles Barkley has no NBA cham-
pionship ring, but Earl Barron does.
Because Earl played in eight games
(none in the playoffs) with the Miami
Heat last season. |

Fathom the preceding few exam-
ples, among way too many others, and
ask yourself what it really means to
present your fist with That Ring on it.

Athletes who hold up their bejew-
eled hand as some sort of imperial,

- irrefutable statement about them-
selves need to stop that, please.

WHAT IT REALLY MEANS

The ring says only that you were ©
along on a magic ride once, giving no
indication whatsoever whether you
were steering, riding shotgun, dozing
in the back seat, stowed in the trunk
or left at a rest stop.

That is why we look to Halls of
Fame as our best measurements of
individual greatness.

The gaudy ring doesn’t get you
through those doors, and even your
teammates’ help is limited.

Think of all of those llth guys.off
the bench during the Chicago Bulls’
heydays, the barnacles riding Michael
Jordan’s whale.

Think of this Bears team’s backup
long-snapper, or the Colts’ fifth guard,
or either team’s seldom-used, oft-in-
jured rookie: Guys you’ve never heard
of, and whose contribution is utterly
incidental. Someone among these pas-
sengers is about to get to call himself
“a champion.” For all-time.

But Marino isn’t? Is there a God?

The Bears or Colts will have richly
earned their champions’ status a week
from Sunday. But enough, please, —
with waving that jewelry as the ulti-
mate personal validation of who you
are. Because, in that sense, the ring is
usually wrong.

The ring might well represent your
own contribution and true greatness,
in which case it is superfluous.

Far more likely, the ring will repre-
sent your dumb luck, for which true
gratefulness should follow.



MORE INSIDE: 11B

SPORTS |

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

BY JOHN PYE
Associated Press /

MELBOURNE, Australia —
Maria Sharapova advanced to the
Australian Open semifinals with a
7-6 (7-5), 7-5 victory today over
Anna Chakvetadze, another Rus-
sian star who is 19 years old.

Sharapova, seeded first and
assured of gaining the No. 1 world
ranking next month, had trouble on
her serve, getting broken twice in
each set and having to fend off five
break points.

She was broken when serving
for the match at 5-3, giving up the
break with a double fault, and
wasted a match point with a back-
hand error in the next game.

Sharapova got two more match
points in the 12th game of the sec-
ond set and finished it off in
2 hours, 14 minutes when Chakve-
tadze netted a forehand.

3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



TENNIS | AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Sharapova advances to semifinals

“It was very difficult. I didn’t
feel like we had a lot of easy ral-
lies,” Sharapova said. “I felt I had
to work on every point.”

“T was a little up and down, a bit
scratchy,” Sharapova said. “I am
glad I got through, but next time
will even be tougher.”

Sharapova is into the semifinals
at Melbourne Park for the third
consecutive year, and she is among

‘the last four at a major for the

eighth time. She is the defending
U.S. Open champion and also won
Wimbledon in 2004.

Chakvetadze, who had won 20
of her previous 21 matches, had
never been beyond the fourth
round of a major.

‘No. 4 Kim Clijsters and three-
time champion Martina Hingis
were to meet in a quarterfinal here
for the second consecutive year.

On the other side of the draw,



EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES
HARD TO BEAT: Maria Sharapova.

Andy Roddick was ruthless, treat-
ing his close friend like little more
than warmup fodder for his semifi-
nal showdown with Roger Federer.

The 2003 U.S. Open champion
flattened Mardy Fish without
blinking on Tuesday, making only
four unforced errors in a 6-2, 6-2,
6-2 quarterfinal victory. —

Federer, who lost to Roddick in
the final of an exhibition tourna-
ment 10 days ago but has a 12-1
record in official ATP matches,
dropped his serve four times in a
6-3, 7-6 (7-2), 7-5 victory over
No. 7 Tommy Robredo.

Serena Williams continued her
improbable run for an eighth
Grand Slam title, fending off 10
break points and coming within
two points of defeat before beating
Shahar Peer 3-6, 6-2, 8-6.

“I am the ultimate competitor,”
said Williams, who missed most of
last season with recurring knee
trouble. “I don’t think anyone
thought I would get this far, except
for me and my mom.”



PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XLI

Long time coming



@ After a decades-long struggle for
minority coaches in the NEL, the Colts’
Tony Dungy embraces the significance of
two black head coaches in the Super Bowl.

BY MICHAEL WALLACE
mwallace@MiamiHerald.com od

INDIANAPOLIS — Tony Dungy could only
shake his head in disbelief as he reflected on the
numbers back then.

Way back when black head coaches in the
NFL didn’t exist. Back when any thought of
establishing a pipeline of minority head coaches
essentially was a pipe dream.

That was the reality that a.
Dungy, the coach of the Indianap-

olis Colts, stepped into in 1981
when he accepted his first NFL
coaching job, as an assistant with
the Pittsburgh Steelers. Dungy
quickly did the math. And then he



ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

BREAKING NEW GROUND: Colts head coach Tony Dungy, above, and Bears coach Lovie

Smith are in the Super Bowl, and that should open doors for other minority coaches.

BY GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press

ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Oak-
land Raiders hired 31-year-old Lane
Kiffin as their head coach Tuesday
to rebuild a three-time Super Bow]
champion that fell to the NFL’s
worst record this season.

Kiffin, who was the offensive
coordinator at the University
of Southern California,
became the youngest head
coach in Raiders history, and
the NFL’s youngest in sev-
eral decades. Though Kiffin
has just one season of experience
as an NFL assistant coach, Raiders
owner Al Davis didn’t hesitate to
put him in charge of his franchise.

“T’m extremely excited about
this opportunity and where I see
this place going,” Kiffin said. “It’s a



PRO FOOTBALL | OAKLAND RAIDERS

Raiders make Lane Kiffin a head coach at 31

historic franchise that has had
greatness and has fallen on tough
times, but we will bring it back to
where it was before. We will do
that through hard work.”

The Raiders also will retain
defensive coordinator Rob Ryan,
who built an above-average
defense last season despite the
troubles on offense.

Davis has fired three
coaches in the past four
years while attempting to get
his club back to respectabili-
ty. The Raiders have
endured four consecutive losing
seasons, culminating in its NFL-
worst 2-14 campaign in 2006.

As Davis reflected on what he
called the “year of infamy,” he real-
ized that the Raiders needed a pro-
found ‘change.



JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES

JUST WIN, BABY ... Lane Kiffin
inherits a team that went 2-14.

“As time went on, I realized that
we had to go in a different direc-
tion,” Davis said. “We have to
move the clock back. We have to
get youth in the organization, and
we have to go ahead and attack,
and with someone who really
means that he will attack.”

set out to alter the equation.

“When I came into the league,
there were 14 African-American
assistant coaches and 28 teams,” Dungy, 51, said
Monday, a day after he and the Bears’ Lovie
Smith became the first black head coaches to
reach the Super Bowl.

“People who had an opportunity to change
that were going to have to do it. It was about
bringing good coaches and people into the
league. In my heart of hearts, it was also to bring
good African-American coaches.”

On Feb. 4, Dungy faces one of the protégés he
groomed when the Colts play Smith’s Chicago
Bears in Super Bow] XLI at Dolphin Stadium. It
will be the first meeting between black head
coaches in the Super Bowl, which guarantees a
black coach will lead his team to the title for the
first time in NFL history.

For that reason, Dungy said, next week’s his-
torical Super Bow] matchup represents “a win-
win” situation. It’s also the high-water mark in a
decades-long struggle for minority coaches who
have had to overcome discriminatory hiring
practices to land jobs at the top level.’

“I realize the position we’re in,” Smith, 49,
told reporters in Chicago after the Bears beat
the New Orleans Saints to get to the Super
Bowl. “It’s hard to put into words, but I know a
lot of great coaches who came before me that
didn’t get this opportunity.”

* TURN TO TONY DUNGY

The Raiders have the No. 1 pick

_in the upcoming NFL Draft, and

now they also have Kiffin, a former
Fresno State quarterback, in charge
of a new philosophy on offense.
The Raiders managed just 168
points this season — fifth-fewest in
a 16-game schedule in NFL history.

Davis fired head Art Shell after
the season and apparently became
determined to hire a young offen-
sive mind to succeed him. This
strategy has worked for Davis
before: John Madden was just 14
months older than Kiffin when he
took over the Raiders in 1969.

“I think, ‘31 years old — wow,
that’s young,’ ” said Davis, who is
78. “But you don’t have to be old to
be great. You have to be good. You
have to want it. You have to have a
desire, a passion for football.”

RS Be a SN



4E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

ALL-STAR
NOTEBOOK

Schedule

format
won't be

changed

BY GEORGE RICHARDS
grichards@MiamiHerald.com

DALLAS — National
Hockey League Commis-
sioner Gary Bettman’s
preference of a division-
heavy schedule was upheld
Tuesday in
a vote
by the
league’s
Board of
Governors.

Bettman
has long
champi-
oned the
current
schedule format, although
there was thought that it
would change Tuesday so
each team would play each
other at least once a season.
The measure to change the
schedule fell a vote short of
the needed two-thirds
majority.

Next season will be the
third of a cycle in which
each team plays eight
games against each divi-
sional rival, four against
each conference team and
one each against two of the
three divisions in the
opposing conference.

The prelockout schedule
included only six divisional
games for each franchise,
and at least one game
against each team from the
other conference.

Bettman added that
there was little to no sup-
port to realign the divi-
sions.

e The Pittsburgh Pen-



BETTMAN

guins’ status has beenahot _

topic for months now, but *
Bettman has repeatedly
said that he hoped a deal
could be worked out to
keep the team in Pittsburgh.
Bettman added that a
deal needs to be struck
quickly somewhere, and
that Pittsburgh shouldn’t
feel rushed because Pen-
guins owner Mario Lem-
ieux “has been looking for
a building for seven years.”
Bettman addressed the
issue of the Penguins possi-
bly moving and if the
league was going to expand.
“We're focused on hav-
ing 30 healthy teams right
. now — where they are,”
Bettman said. “We haven’t
looked at a lot of people
_ and said, ‘Well, what if
Pittsburgh doesn’t get the
building?’ The answer is,
we'll deal with the what-if if
it happens.

“We're really focused on
all the teams, including
Pittsburgh, where they are.”

e NHL games televised
on the Versus channel seem
lost, with a number of
Americans without access
to the Comcast-owned net-
work. Bettman said the
cable provider is expanding
its reach.

“It’s growing,” he said.
“They’ve been giving us
priority treatment. And
they’ve grown almost 8 mil-
lion households since we’ve
been with them....

“As we sit here today, I
still maintain that for this
game, long-term, this was
the right decision.”

e Bettman hopes to
expand the league’s Inter-
net capabilities with live
streaming games in the
near future. Major League
Baseball has found a large
revenue stream from its
online business, and the
NHL would love to do simi-
lar business.

GOING TO MONTREAL

Bettman announced
Montreal will play host to
the 2009 Ail-Star Game.
The game, which was last
held in Montreal at the
Forum in 1993, will be part
of the Canadiens’ 100th
anniversary celebration.

The All-Star Game will
be played in Atlanta next
season.

“We're delighted to be
part of that event,” Bettman
said of the Canadiens’ cen-
tennial.

i



|
i
i
|
|
|
1
|

2B

Get ready for

BY JAIME ARON
Associated Press

DALLAS — Sitting side by
side at a table, facing question
after question about being the
faces of the new NHL, Sidney
Crosby and Alex Ovechkin
flashed their grace and charm.
** Asked about trying to bring
the game to a wider audience,
Ovechkin smiled, turned to

Crosby and said, “Can you >

answer?”

And the 19-year-old deliv-
ered smoothly, giving a
thoughtful response that
included this line: ‘“We’re
going to do our best to make
that possible.”

-Then came the subject of
the league’s MVP thus far this
season. Ovechkin leaned right
into the microphone and said,
“Crosby!” Crosby laughed,
started giving a politically cor-
rect answer about there being
“too many guys right now,”
then broke into a smile and
said, “I mean, the best answer
would be Ovechkin right now,
right?”

Pretty good, eh?

' They should be even more
dazzling on the ice tonight.

“Those guys could do a lot

‘of damage,” 10-time All-Star

Teemu Selanne said.

The Gretzky and Lemieux
of their generation (at least
that’s what the NHL is banking
on), Crosby and Ovechkin will
be teammates for the first time
when they lead the East’s best
against the West’s best in the
league’s first midseason gath-
ering since 2004 — since the
lockout that left hockey even
less of a factor for sports fans

BY STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press

DALLAS — About the only
part of the game in which Sid-
ney Crosby has struggled this
season is shootouts — until
the 19-year-old superstar was
on the same ice with the rest
of the NHL’s best players.

Crosby scored on two of his
three shots in the final individ-
ual shootout Tuesday night,
delivering a victory for the
Eastern Conference in the
NHL All-Star skills competi-
tion.

The NHL’s leading scorer,
whose 72 points are five more
than anybody else, is 0-for-5 in
shootouts during the regular
season.

“Tt was fun to be in that sit-
uation. I didn’t ask for it, but I
liked it,” Crosby said.

“Especially with all the
ones that I missed this season,
it was nice.”

_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

HOCKEY | NHL ALL-STAR GAME



INSIDE THE GAME



TONY GUTIERREZ/AP

LEAGUE LEADERS: Crosby, on the right, and Ovechkin were
chosen to represent the NHL in a media session Monday.

in the United States.
Although the league spouts
attendance figures showing

- that popularity is zooming, the

entire NHL is counting on this
exciting young duo to get tele-
vision ratings up and to gener-
ate more buzz.

’That’s why Crosby and
Ovechkin were the only two
players selected to meet the
media Monday.

And it explains how Ovech-
kin, a 21-year-old Moscow
native, got stuck trying to
compare himself and Crosby
to NBA Hall of Famers Larry
Bird and Magic Johnson.

“JT feel. comfortable,”
Ovechkin said. “And I think
Sidney feels comfortable, too.
We concentrate on the game
and don’t think about our
faces, the NHL or Magic John-
son or Larry Bird.

“We concentrate on our

game and our team.”

Crosby plays for the Pitts-
burgh Penguins and leads the
league with 72 points, five
more than anyone else.

In his bid to become the
youngest MVP since Gretzky,
Crosby already has become
the youngest top-vote-getter
for the All-Star Game.

And he lives with Mario
Lemieux, who, as the owner of
the Penguins, also is his boss.

“It’s been very exciting for
my family. My four kids really
love him,” Lemieux said.
“They play hockey with him
all the time in the basement.
They have a great time. He’s a
great kid, a great person, a
great ambassador for our
league.

“I feel very fortunate to
have a chance to watch him
play.”

Ovechkin, of the Washing-

_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



: JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
DYNAMIC DUO: Young stars Alex Ovechkin, left, and Sidney Crosby are shaping up as the Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux of their generation.

CATCH THE RISING STARS

the Crosby & Ovechkin Show



NHL ALL-STARS

SEASON STATISTICS

Game time: 8 p.m. EST today, in Dallas. On TV: Versus
(x-starter; c-captain; i-injured, will not play; z-injury replacement)

EASTERN CONFERENCE





WESTERN CONFERENCE
Player, team GP G A Pts Player, team GP G A Pts
x-Sidney Crosby, Pit 39 21 44 65 x-Joe Thornton, SJ 44 11 42 53
x-Alex Ovechkin, Was 44 28 33 61 xc-Joe Sakic, Col 43 18 29 47
x-Daniel Briere, Buf 44 16 35 51 x-Jonathan Cheechoo, SJ 38 14 «15 «29
Jason Blake, NYI 43 23 18 41 Bill Guerin, StL 42 18 13° 31
Simon Gagne, Phi. 44 20 13 33 Martin Havlat, Chi 21 #13 «#13 «26
Dany Heatley, Ott 40 27 31 58 Pairick Marleau, SJ 44 20 26 46
Marian Hossa, Atl 46 26 32 58 z-Andy McDonald, Ana 49 12 33 45
Vincent Lecavalier, TB 45 26 -33 59 Rick Nash, Clm 39.13 17 30
Martin St. Louis, TB 45 28 31 59 Yanic Perreault, Pho 31 14 «11 25
c-Brendan Shanahan, NYR 45 24 22 46 Brian Rolston, Min 45 23 18 41
Eric Staal, Car 46 19 18 37 Teemu Selanne, Ana 46 28 29 57
Justin Williams, Car 46 21 20 41. Ryan Smyth, Edm 34 21 12 = 33
x-Brian Campbell, Buf 44 5 21 26 i-Henrik Zetterberg, Det 44 17 16 33
x-Sheldon Souray, Mon 43 14 23 37 xi-Scott Niedermayer, Ana 46 8 34 42
Jay Bouwmeester, Fla 46 6 16 22 x-Nicklas Lidstrom, Det 44 9 26 35
Zdeno Chara, Bos 39 8 18 26 Philippe Boucher, Dal 44 13 20 33
Tomas Kaberle, Tor 45 8 29 37 z-Ed Jovanovski, Pho 42 11 16 27
Brian Rafalski, NJ - 44 2 27 29 Dion Phaneuf, Cal 41 9 16 25
. Kimmo Timonen, Nas 44 8 23 31
Lubomir Visnovsky, LA 43 13. 23 36
GOALIES GOALIES

Player, team GP WL T AVG Player, team GP W L_ T AVG
x-Ryan Miller, Buf 32 22 7 2 2.62 x-Roberto Luongo, Van 42 24 6 1 2.50
Martin Brodeur, NJ 42 26 13 3 2.07 — Miikka Kiprusoff, Cal 38 21 14 3 2.32
Cristobal Huet, Mon 31 17 8 3.2.46 — Marty Turco, Dal °39 21 «15 1 2.34

ton Capitals, has 65 points and
29 goals, one off the league
lead. He also beat out Crosby
last season for Rookie of the
Year honors.

Yet as great as Crosby and
Ovechkin are separately, it’s
hard to talk about one without
mentioning the other.

“It’s fun to watch the high-
lights every night because you
know there will be a lot from
both of them,” said Dany Hea-
tley of the Ottawa Senators.

Happy to be their teammate
this week, Heatley added, “It

gives us a good chance.”

During a light practice
Monday night, Crosby and
Ovechkin shared a few passes

TUESDAY’S ALL-STAR COMPETITIONS

Crosby delivers for Eastern squad in skills contest

_ Crosby also scored on his
only shootout attempt in the
team competition, midway
through the nine-event com-
petition, to tie the score 7-7.

The competition was tied
10-10 after Vancouver goalie
Roberto Luongo stopped all
four shots in the final team
shootout. Meanwhile, Colora-
do’s Joe Sakic and Edmonton’s
Ryan Smyth scored against
Ryan Miller of Buffalo to get
even going into the final event.

But Luongo couldn’t stop
Crosby, the top All-Star vote-
getter. Crosby made his first
two shots, and that gave the
East squad a 15-l1 victory over
the West.

“Going against Luongo,
you’re going against the best,
so if you don’t score you’ve
got an excuse,” Crosby said.
“l’m competitive. I want to
win with the game on the line
like that.”

Anaheim’s ‘Teemu Selanne
scored on his first attempt for
the West, but he missed his
next two — the last a glove
save by Miller to end the
event.

Selanne, who will play in
his 10th All-Star Game when
he takes the ice tonight, was
impressed by Crosby’s perfor-
mance.

“T’ve only seen him on high-
lights. It’s great to watch a kid
like that,” Selanne said. “He’s
got the full package.”

After Crosby's tying point
in the team shootout, the East
squad took the lead in the next
event.

Carolina’s Eric Staal and
Atlanta’s Marian Hossa both
hit four targets in five shots to
share the individual honors in
shooting accuracy.

Brendan Shanahan of the
New York Rangers, on his 38th
birthday, hit four of six shots

for the East squad.

The tallest player in NHL
history also can claim the
hardest shot on the ice.

Boston’s Zdeno Chara, the
6-foot-9 defenseman trom
Czechoslovakia, fired a shot of
100.4 mph to win the hardest-
shot competition.

Chara’s first shot read 99.5
mph on the radar gun, and he
increased that on the second
shot from 30 feet.

The only other player to hit
100 mph —- and he did it on the
nose — was Montreal’s Shel-
don Souray, who hit 102.2 mph
in the last event, thiee years
ago,- along with Adrian
Aucoin.

Staal was part of the three-
man East group — along with
Buffalo’s Daniel Briere and
Brian Campbell — that scored
two goals in the team zone
contest. They put two of their
three shots past hometown



without showing off too much.
On Tuesday afternoon, they
worked with other All-Stars to
build a Habitat for Humanity
house, then logged more ice
time together during the All-
Star skills competition. They
both took part in shootout
events.

“We've seen each other
casually at events like this, but
we haven’t spent a lot of time
together,” Crosby said. “We’re
on the same team, we’re sitting
next to each other in the
[dressing] room, so I’m sure
V’ll talk to him a bit.”

The better Crosby and
Ovechkin are, the better for
the NHL's long-term health.

goalie Marty Turco of the Dal-
las Stars.

Columbus forward Rick
Nash won the individual puck-
control relay for the second
consecutive time, beating
Florida’s Jay Bouwmeester
after the East squad won the
three-player team relay. The
only other individual multiple
winner was Paul Kariya, who
won four in a row from
1999-2002.

When Nash won at the pre-
vious All-Star Game, in 2004,
he was 19 years old and the
first teen-age AlJ-Star since
1992. Now there’s a new teen-
age All-Star in Crosby.

The West went ahead 3-1 by
sweeping the fastest skater,
Anaheim’s Andy McDonald
winning the individual at 14.03
seconds — only the fourth
time in 13 the event has been
held that the top time was
slower than 14 seconds.



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.

com

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Indiana, Notre Dame, Alabama all go down

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Rich McBride scored 15
points to lead Illinois to a 51-43
victory over No. 23 Indiana on
Tuesday night in Champaign,
IIL, the Illini’s first triumph
against a ranked opponent in
five tries this season.

D.J. White scored 12 points
for Indiana (14-5, 4-2 Big Ten),
which had a five-game win-
ning streak snapped.

The Illini (15-7, 3-4) held the
Hoosiers without a field goal
for more than 17 minutes —
from the 12:21 mark in the first
half until the 14:56 mark of the
second. Indiana led 18-11 at the
beginning of that stretch, but
trailed 31-25 when it was over. .

The game was Indiana
coach Kelvin Sampson’s first
trip to Champaign since a fall
recruiting controversy over
Indianapolis high schooler
Eric Gordon. Gordon orally
committed to Illinois in late
2005, then reconsidered and
eventually committed to Indi-
ana.

The Big Ten has said Samp-
son broke no rules by recruit-
ing a player who had already
orally committed to another
school. But Illini fans show-
ered Sampson with boos as he
entered and exited the court.

AROUND THE TOP 25

e St. John’s 71, No. 22
Notre Dame 68: Larry
Wright hit a 3-pointer with 9.9
seconds to play to give host St.
John’s the victory over Notre
Dame, the Red Storm’s second
consecutive last-minute tri-
umph at Madison Square Gar-
den.

Lamont Hamilton scored all
of his 23 points in the first half
for St. John’s (12-8, 3-4 Big
East), which beat Syracuse
64-60 on Sunday on two late
3-pointers by Avery Patterson.

Notre Dame (16-4, 4-3) tied

Suns extend win streak to 14

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON Steve
Nash and the Phoenix Suns made
Gilbert Arenas and the Washing-
ton Wizards look more like pre-
tenders than contenders, putting
the so-called “Phoenix Suns of
the East” in their place with a
127-105 thumping on Tuesday
night.

Nash scored 27 points on ll-
for-13 shooting and added 14
assists in the Suns’ 14th consecu-
tive victory. Phoenix led by 21
after the first quarter and won
for the 30th time in 32 games ina
matchup between the NBA’s two
highest-scoring teams.

Arenas, who has compared
his team’s high-octane offense to
the Suns’, scored 31 points, but he
started 1-for-6 and the game was
essentially over before he got
going. When he finally made his
second field goal, it only served
to cut the Suns’ lead to 24. The
Wizards cut the lead to 13 mid-
way through the fourth quarter,
but the Suns responded with a
6-0 run to put the game firmly
out of reach.

Arenas scored 54 against the
Suns in an overtime victory at
Phoenix last month, but the Suns
arrived only two hours before
tipoff that day because they had
been stranded in Denver by a
blizzard. Arenas considered that
game as payback for getting cut
last summer from the U.S.
national team, on which Phoenix
coach Mike D’Antoni serves as
an assistant.

The Suns shot a season-high
60.8 percent, had assists on 35 of
their 48 field goals and had five
players in double figures before
halftime. Nash was 7-for-7 from
the field and had eight assists in
the first half, and his best move
was a baseline hesitation step
that got him past Brendan Hay-
wood for a three-point play.

Wizards coach Eddie Jordan
said before the game he was so
excited he didn’t sleep well the
night before. His players looked
just as edgy, starting 3-for-15
from the field. Nash had back-to-
back alley-oop assists to Shawn
Marion in the second quarter,
helping the Suns to a 76-51 half-
time lead.

MAVERICKS 111, MAGIC 95
ORLANDO, Fla. — Dirk Now-

INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 | 5

BASKETBALL



ROBIN SCHOLZ/AP

A ROUGH ROAD: Indiana’s Joey Shaw tries to power his
way past Illinois’ Rich McBride, who had 15 points to
lead the host Illini to the victory on Tuesday night.

the game at 68 with 40 sec-
onds to go on the second of

two free throws by Colin Falls. -

The Red Storm called a time-
out with 36 seconds left, and
they ran the shot clock down
under 10 seconds before pass-
ing the ball to Wright in the
right corner. The 6-foot-2
freshman reserve buried his
third 3 of the game in four
attempts.

Notre Dame rushed the ball
down court and Russell Cart-
er’s 3-point attempt from
about 28 feet bounced off the
rim and the Fighting Irish
dropped to 0-3 on the road in
the conference.

Carter finished with a

career-high 32 points for
Notre Dame. He scored all the
points in the Irish’s 11-0 run to
open the second half that got
them a 52-49 lead.

Eugene Lawrence had 13
points and seven assists for St.
John’s, which shot 59.3 percent
from the field in taking a 49-41]
halftime lead. The Red Storm
missed their first 10 shots of
the second half before Wright,
who finished with ll points, hit
a 3-pointer 6:18 in.

Falls had 16 points for
Notre Dame but he was 1-for-6
from 3-point range.in the sec-
ond half after going 4-for-6 in
the opening 20 minutes.

e Auburn 81, No. 12 Ala-

PRO BASKETBALL

bama 57: Korvotney Barber

scored 18 points and Frank
Tolbert added 17 to lead host
Auburn to the upset of Ala-

bama, ending a seven-game .

losing streak to the Crimson
Tide.

The Tigers (13-8, 3-3 South-
eastern Conference) scored
the first eight points of the
second half to overcome a
36-35 deficit and shot 58 per-
cent.

They hadn’t beaten Ala-
bama (15-4, 2-3) since 2003 and
have now won two games
against ranked teams in a six-
day stretch after ending an
O-for-15 stretch against
then-No. 22 Tennessee.

Josh Dollard added 16
points and Quan Prowell had
14 points and 10 rebounds for
Auburn, which held Alabama
to just 21 points after halftime.
Tolbert made 6-of-7 shots, the
only miss an errant 3-pointer
in the final two minutes.

The Tide’s road struggles
continued. Alabama has lost
its first three SEC road games
by an average of 24 points to
unranked teams. Western
Division teams are now 0-15 in
SEC road games.

' Alabama shot just 32 per-
cent in the second half.

Ronald Steele led Alabama
with 19 points, but he also had
five turnovers. Jermareo
Davidson added 18 points and
ll rebounds. He only scored
two points after halftime.

Alonzo Gee had 11 points.
Richard Hendrix played much
of the game in foul trouble and
finished with just four points
— 10 below his season average
— in 19 minutes.

e No. 16 Air Force 72,
TCU 39: Dan Nwaelele scored
13 points and host Air Force
used sharp shooting and a sti-
fling defense to roll past TCU
for its 27th consecutive home

victory.

Matt McCraw and Tim
Anderson each added 11 points
for the Falcons (19-2, 6-1
Mountain West), who turned
the tables on TCU, which
brought the league’s best field-
goal-percentage defense (41
percent) into Clune Arena but
was quickly’ overwhelmed at
both ends of the court.

The Falcons shot 62 per-
cent from the floor and 50 per-
cent from beyond the arc.

It was the Horned Frogs
(10-8, 2-4) who couldn’t find
an offensive rhythm, shooting
32 percent.

e No. 24 Virginia Tech
92, Miami 85: Zabian Dow-
dell scored a career-high 30
points to help visiting Virginia
Tech beat Miami.

Deron Washington added
23 points and scored on two
separate three-point plays in
the final 1:16 to secure the vic-
tory for the Hokies (15-5, 5-1
ACC), who have won six of :
their past seven.

After trailing most of the
first half by double digits,
Miami (9-12, 2-5) finally got to
within 46-38 on Brian Asbury’s
three-point play 3:27 into the
second half.

Dowdell scored four points
and A.D. Vassallo added a
3-pointer, which increased
Virginia Tech’s lead to 66-53
with 9:19 remaining.

But the Hurricanes count-
ered with a 9-2 spurt in the
next 2:09. Jack McClinton
capped the run with a
3-pointer which reduced the
Hokies’ advantage to 68-62
with 7:10 remaining.

Miami got no closer than
78-74 with 2:48 left on McClin-
ton’s basket.

Dennis Clemente scored 24
points to lead Miami, which
has lost four in a row. McClin-
ton added 18 and Raymond

itzki had 33 points, 10 rebounds
and eight assists, and Josh How-
ard added 25 points to help the
Mavericks beat the Magic for
their eighth consecutive victory.

For the second consecutive
game, the Mavericks led from
beginning to end. They pushed
the margin to 25 points in the
second quarter with a 15-5 run
capped by Nowitzki’s three-
point play, and kept it around 20
for most of the second and third
periods. ;

The Magic pulled closer in
the third with a 13-4 run, but it
happened with the defending

Western Conference champions

resting Nowitzki.

It was the closest the Magic
had been since 8 minutes into
the first quarter, and aside froma

’ quick basket to begin the fourth,

it was the closest they would
come.

Dallas rattled off six unan-
swered points, including a fast-
break dunk from Nowitzki, to
push the lead back to 14 and out
of Orlando’s reach.

76ERS 102, HORNETS 96

PHILADELPHIA Kyle
Korver scored 25 points, Andre
Iguodala added 20 and the 76ers
held on for the victory.

The Sixers got double-figure
scoring from five players and
opened their second half with a
victory after going 11-30 over
their first 41 games.

Andre Miller had 17 points
and 1] assists, Rodney Carney,
who got the start after Willie
Green was a late scratch for Phil-
adelphia, chipped in with 13
points, and Samuel Dalembert
added 10 points and seven
rebounds for Philadelphia.

Devin Brown led the way for
the Hornets with 24 points and
David West added 23 in his third
game back after missing 30 fol-
lowing shoulder surgery. Des-
mond Mason scored 17 for the
Hornets, who had won four of
five coming in.

BULLS 94, HAWKS 86

CHICAGO — Luol Deng
scored 18 points and Kirk Hin-
rich added 12 points and 12
assists to lead the Bulls.

P.J. Brown scored a season-
high 15 points and had nine
rebounds for Chicago, which has



SUN THROWS DOWN: Suns forward Shawn Marion gets two
of his 21 points in Phoenix’s 127-105 rout of Washington.

won nine in a row over the
Hawks.

T’WOLVES FIRE CASEY

MINNEAPOLIS — The Min-
nesota Timberwolves fired
coach Dwane Casey, one day
after the Wolves lost their fourth
game in a row.

Casey lasted less than 1'4 sea-
sons in Minnesota in his first
head coaching job, unable to
solve the Timberwolves’ incon-
sistencies and put them back into
the thick of the competitive
Western Conference.

The Timberwolves looked to
be turning the corner at the start
of the new year, when they
opened 2007 with seven victo-
ries in their first eight games. But
they lost their next four games.

Assistant coach Randy Witt-
man will take over as interim
coach.

ELSEWHERE

e Knicks: The Knicks could
be without starting point guard
Stephon Marbury tonight when
they host the Phoenix Suns. Mar-
bury was unable to finish either
of the past two games because of

San Antonio
| Houston 25 16
\ New Orleans 16 24
/ Memphis 1032
| Utah 28 14
_ Denver 21 17
| Minnesota 20 20
' Portland 17 25
Seattle 16 25
Phoenix 33 8
NICK WASS/AP |. Lakers 27 15
| LA. Clippers 19 21
_ Golden State 19 23
| Sacramento 16 23

soreness in his left knee. He did
little more than shoot at practice
Tuesday and said he would wait
another day before making a
decision.

e Kings: The Kings waived
veteran forward Maurice Taylor
after 12 games with the club.

LATE MONDAY

e Lakers 108, Warriors
103: Kobe Bryant celebrated the
one-year anniversary of his 81-
point performance by scoring 42,
and host Los Angeles snapped a
two-game losing streak despite a
season-high 24 turnovers.

e Kings 88, Nets 87: Mike
Bibby scored the Kings’ last 15
points, including the go-ahead
jumper with 10.3 seconds to play,

_ and host Sacramento erased a

20-point deficit.

e Nuggets 115, Grizzlies
98: Carmelo Anthony scored 28
points in his return from a 15-
game suspension for fighting and
Allen Iverson added 23 to lead
host Denver.

' @ Jazz 106, Timberwolves
91: Mehmet Okur scored 28
points and host Utah won its
fourth in a row.





NBA STANDINGS

SOUTHEAST W
Washington —
Orlando
Miami
Charlotte
| Atlanta
| ATLANTIC woe
| NewJersey 20 21
' Toronto 20 22
_ New York 18 25
_ Boston 12 28
| Philadelphia 12 30
i
CENTRAL wi
Detroit 23 16
| Cleveland 24 17
_ Chicago 24 19
| Indiana 21 20
Milwaukee 17 23



Hicks had.16 points.

Dowdell, whose previous
career high was a 25-point per-
formance against North Caro-
lina A&T on Dec. 7, 2005, fin-
ished 15-of-18 from the
free-throw line.

Dowdell, Washington and
Jamon Gordon each hit
3-pointers to help the Hokies
open a 9-2 lead in the first 3:53
of the game.

OTHER GAMES

e Villanova 82, Provi-
dence 73: Mike Nardi had a
game-high 19 points and Scot-
tie Reynolds added 18 to lead
visiting Villanova.

It was the third consecutive
victory for the Wildcats (14-5,
3-3 Big East).

Sharaud Curry and Dwain
Williams had 18 each for the
Friars (13-6, 3-3), who had their
12-game home winning streak
snapped.

e Boston College 85,
Florida State 82: Sean Mar-
shall hit the game-winning
3-pointer over two defenders
at the buzzer, finishing with 22
points and 10 rebounds to lead
host Boston College (14-5, 6-1
Atlantic Coast Conference) to
the victory over Florida State
(14-6, 2-4).

ELSEWHERE

e Notre Dame: Point
guard Kyle McAlarney was
suspended from school for his
arrest last month on a mari-
juana possession charge, his
mother said.

e Baylor: Coach Scott
Drew underwent an appen-
dectomy Tuesday but expects
to be on the bench when the
Bears play No. 8 Kansas, the
university said. Drew, 36, in
his third season with Baylor,
was recovering at home Tues-
day night. The Bears face Kan-
sas tonight in Waco.





Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
488 - 7-3) L-l 13-10 7-11 16-9
476 Ye 7-3 Wel 127 B15 14-8
AI9 3° 5-5 Ll 10-12 8-13 11-16
300 7% 19 L8 415 813 817
.286 8% 3-7 W-1 7-10 5-20 816
CENTRAL == OW OL Pct. GB 110 Str, Home Away Conf
590 - 55 W2 118 128 15-8
585 - 55 Ll 15-4 9-13 15-11
558 1 5-5 Wl 186 6413 19-8
512. 3 46 W-1 11-7 10-13 16-12
425 6% 28 L3 9-7 816 7-16




12-8
10-12 7-13 10-13
12-9 4-16 6-15
_Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
805 - 10-0 W-14 19-3 145 16-7
643 6% 6-4 W-1 19-4 811 17-9
A75 13% 5-5 W-2 14-7 5-14 13-16
452 14% 3-7 13 15-8 4-15 13-15
410 16 2-8 Wel 11-11 5-12 8-15

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
Dallas 111, Orlando 95 Mia. at Ind., 7 Miami 101, N.Y. 83
Phoenix 127, Wash. 105 N.O. at Tor., 7 Indiana 98, Chicago 91
| Phil. 102, N.O. 96 Det. at Cha., 7 Toronto 105, Char. 84
Chicago 94, Atlanta 86 Phi. at Cle., 7 Orlando 90, Clev. 79

Den. at Sea.,
Mil. at L.A.C.

late
, late

Atl. at Bos., 7:30
Pho. at N.Y., 7:30
Mem. at Utah, 9

S.A. 93, Boston 89
Utah 106, Minn. 91
Denver 115, Mem. 98

Hou. at S.A., 9 Sacramento 88, N.J. 87
Mil. at Sac., 10 Lakers 108, G.S. 103
Min. at Por., 10

NJ. at G.S., 10:30

' NBA LEADERS

Through Monday

REBOUNDING .





SCORING
G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 23 275 161 724 31.5 Garnett, Minn. 39 101 396 497 12.7
Arenas, Wash. 40 378 308 1187 29.7 Camby, Den. 33 87 333 420 12.7
Iverson, Den. 30 296 260 879 29.3 Howard, Orl. 42 146 378 524 12.5
Bryant, LAL 39 363 314 1102 28.3 Boozer, Utah 42 135 361 496 11.8
Wade, Mia. 34 318 305 958 28.2 Chandler, NOk. 37 140 276 416 11.2
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 40 154 290 444 11.1
James, Clev. 41 395 257 1100 26.8 Lee, N.Y. 43 159 298 457 10.6
Allen, Sea. 31 270 166 792 26.5 Duncan, S.A. 43 123 328 451 10.5
Nowitzki, Dall. 41 347 287 1020 24.9 O'Neal, Ind. 36 86 289 375 10.4
Johnson, Atl. 34 321 124 840 24.7 Randolph, Port. 41 120 299 419 10.2
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 186 301 .618 Nash, Phoe. 38 437 115
, Lee, N.Y. 185 307 .603 Kidd, NJ. 41 375 91
Stoudemire, Phoe. 269 450 598 Paul, NOk. 27 242 9.0
Curry, N.Y. 311 533 .583 Williams, Utah 42 371-88
Bogut, Mil. 211 371 .569 Miller, Phil. 39 336 8.6
Howard, Orl. 255 449 568 Davis, G.S. 37 316 8.5
Dalembert, Phil. 172 303 .568 _ Billups, Det. 31 247 8.0
Boozer, Utah 381 678 .562 Wade, Mia. 34 270) «7.9
Brand, LAC 321 579 .554
Patterson, Mil. 221 407 .543



6E_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _



ROMERO BRITTO

internationally acclaimed visual artist —





_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



STEPHEN DUNN/AP
SHUT UP AND PLAY: Bill Parcells couldn’t run a team the way he wanted with the Cowboys.

To Bill Parcells, NFL has
too many disgusting players

BY WALLACE MATTHEWS
Newsday

It happens to all of us. You
wake up one morning to dis-
cover that the world you are
living in no longer is your
world. So you die.

It happened to Dallas Cow-
boys head coach Bill Parcells
on Monday. He finally came to
realize that the NFL no longer
is his league. So his coaching
career died, this time probably
for good.

The easy — read: lazy —
analysis of Parcells’ latest
retirement from coaching will
be that Terrell Owens drove
him out, that the constant soap
opera starring his tempera-
mental wide receiver got to be
too much for the old coach to
bear. =,
There is a smidgen of truth
in this, but it is only that
—asmidgen.

The whole story is that,
these days, there is a Terrell
Owens on just about every
roster in the NFL, or at least a
T.O. in training. That’s what
free agency spawns — an inde-
pendence of thought and
action that you can live with in
baseball but is death to a foot-
ball team. Loss of control over
the players by management
translates to a loss of control
by the coach. To totalitarian
coaches such as Parcells, T.O.
was merely the symptom of a
league-wide disease.

With the exception of a
couple of rare cases, the days
when an NEL football coach
could control the thoughts and
actions of every last man on
his roster are as dead as the
drop kick. For now, Bill Beli-
chick has enough power to do
it with the New England
Patriots, and enough backing
from the team’s ownership to



DALLAS COWBOYS

ship out anyone not on board
with his program. In his first
season as New York Jets
coach, Eric Mangini has gotten
away with it, with the help ofa
(mostly) prima-donna-free
roster that soon might be rid
of Laveranues Coles.

Parcells had neither the
roster in Dallas nor the back-
ing from the team’s owner —
Jerry Jones, a star-struck
megalomaniac — to conduct
business the way he wanted
to, the way he was able to with
the New York Giants, the Jets«
and the Patriots.

Back in November, about
the time the Cowboys were
mired at 4-4 and barely a
month after the T.O.
“attempted suicide” melo-
drama, Parcells confided toa
mutual friend that he would
not return to the Cowboys in
2007. Then Tony Romo came
along, the Cowboys made the
playoffs, and the bad feeling in
Parcells’ gut might have
receded. But the Cowboys’
heart-stopping playoff loss to
the Seattle Seahawks no doubt
brought it rushing back.

Jones intended to bring
Owens back next season,
whether Parcells wanted him
or not. It is not too much of a
stretch to surmise that Par-
cells did not.

_ It also is not too much of a
stretch to postulate that, after
a year of sunning himself on
the Jersey shore, Parcells will
be tempted to unretire again
so he can rescue the Giants,
who by then will have realized
that extending Tom Cough-
lin’s contract was as big a mis-
take as trading four draft picks

‘for quarterback Eli Manning.

But when Parcells looks
over the Giants roster, what
will he see? T.O. Lite, also

known as Plaxico Burress. Jer-
emy Shockey, who once
referred to Parcells as “a
homo.” Michael Strahan, lead
singer of the Defensive Divas.
And Manning, who makes
Romo look like Joe Montana.

And when Parcells looks
around for another re-entry
point, he will find nothing but
other examples.

In New Orleans, Reggie
Bush, who turns a touchdown
into a “look at me” moment,
somersaulting into the end
zone. In Chicago, Parcells .
would have to deal with “gun
enthusiast” Tank Johnson and
serial bully Ricky Manning Jr.

And all around the league,
it gets no better. Chad Johnson
to the left, Randy Moss to the
right and Keyshawn Johnson
in his rear-view mirror.

Parcells is a lot of things,
but idiot is not one of them. He
didn’t like the view in Dallas,
and he won’t like it any better
just about anywhere else.

Gone are the days when
you worried about Lawrence
Taylor six days a week but
knew he would show up to
play, not show up his team-
mates and coaches, on Sunday.
Gone are the coaches who win
by striking fear into the hearts
of their players. The meek
have inherited the Earth — the
Tony Dungys, the guys who
willingly embrace the once-
fatal label of “players’ coach”
because, frankly, no other
style will be tolerated by the
men who really run NFL
teams these days: the players. _

It has been headed this way
for a while, and, for Bill Par-
cells, Monday was the day it
finally arrived — the sickening
realization that, after nearly 40
years of coaching, he suddenly
was out of his league.

Time for a change, Owens says

BY CLARENCE E. HILL JR.
Fort-Worth Star-Telegram

IRVING, Texas — After
sometimes going a week or
two without talking to Bill Par-
cells during the season, Dallas
Cowboys receiver Terrell
Owens said the coach’s retire-
ment was best for him and the
Cowboys.

“J am just hoping his retire-
ment brings promise to what
the team has to offer,” said
Owens, who was in Miami
recovering from surgery on
his right index finger. “This
past year was a big letdown.

“Hopefully, the owner will
hire a coach to take the team
to the next level.”

Owens described the
team’s locker-room environ-
ment, fostered by Parcells’ old
school ways, as difficult.

“Sometimes
good,” Owens said. “I think it
was needed.”

Owens said he understands
that there will be speculation
that “he ran Parcells out of
here” — especially after a sea-
son that included injuries, an
accidental overdose and com-
plaints about his role.

Owens said that, after
everything he had been
through in San Francisco and
Philadelphia, he initially
thought Parcells might be
good for him.



change is.

CHRIS McGRATH/GETTY IMAGES

HEARD THIS BEFORE? Terrell
Owens wants it run his way.

The receiver’s impression
changed when Parcells didn’t
offer any encouragement after
Owens’ accidental overdose.

-I still think he is a great
guy,” Owens said. “But he is
like my grandmother. You
love the person, but they are
stuck in their old-school
ways.”

He said Parcells’ coaching
style “hurt us.”

“You don’t know who is
doing what,’ Owens said.
“You don’t know who is call-
ing plays. That is why our
offense was up and down. You

saw that at the end of the year.
It filtered off.

“We, as a team, felt the
frustration. I felt the frustra-
tion. But Bill is Bill.”

Owens caught 85 passes, for
1,180 yards, and had a league-
best 13 touchdowns. But he
was undone by a league-high
18 dropped passes. He said
hand injuries were to blame
for some of the drops, but he
also said that not being made
the focal point of the offense
was the biggest problem.

“T was underutilized in the
offense,” Owens said. “A new
coach can be good for the
Cowboys. It’s not just me. But
my teammates know I could
have done more. I wasn’t used
as a No. 1 receiver.”

Regarding his surgically-re-

paired finger, Owens said he is
well ahead of schedule. A sec-
ond phase of the surgery is
coming sometime in the next
six weeks.
, Owens, who hasn’t been
back to Dallas since the end of
the season, said he will be
ready to play next season.

The Cowboys must decide
if they want him back. Fran-
chise owner Jerry Jones said
he wants Owens to return, but
the Cowboys’ new coach
might make that decision.

Owens is due a $3 million
roster bonus in June.





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ci. eae

New



FROM left: Michael Rodgers, Takai Bethel, Ambassador

Rood, Sir Clifford Darling, Kristina Deveaux and Lori-Amn

Edwards.

Birthday of the late
Dr Martin Luther
King Jr celebrated —

with essay competition |

ON JANUARY 15, Amer-
icans observed the birthday
holiday of the late Reverend
Dr Martin Luther King Jr.

In the Bahamas,-the US
Embassy celebrated the life
and legacy of Dr King at a
reception hosted by US
Ambassador John Rood.
The highlight of the event
was the public announcement
of the winners of an embassy-
sponsored “I Have A
Dream” essay competition.

Family and friends of the
essay contestants were pre-
sent for the occasion.

The competition, open to
students in grades 9 to 12 in
public and private schools in
New Providence and the
Family Islands, attracted 35
participants from 14 schools
in New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Eleuthera.

Teachings

Students were asked to
write a 21st century Bahami-
an “I have a dream” essay
reflecting Dr King’s life, prin-
ciples and teachings, and
demonstrating a clear under-
standing of Dr King’s beliefs
in racial equality, non-vio-
lence and social justice — and
their relevance to modern
Bahamian society.

In his remarks, Ambas-
sador Rood noted that the
competition was “a wonderful
opportunity for the young
people of the Bahamas to use
Dr King's most powerful
instrument of change — the
written and spoken word — to
assess his legacy and to offer
their modern day vision for
how the Bahamas and the
world can still strive to fulfill
the vision he dreamed and
meet the challenges he left us
as his legacy.”

The ambassador added that

_ he was deeply impressed by

the participants’ c-pth of
understanding about the com-
plex issues facing modern
society: “They took a hard
look at problems ranging
from discrimination against
the Haitian community, to
disability rights and the
increasing violence in society.
Their essays spoke of the
hope for equality in the coun-
try, an end to violence and
the belief that the values
cherished by Dr King could
help bring the Bahamas to a
better place.”

Michael Rodgers, a 10th
grade student at St Andrew’s
High School, walked away
with first place and a new
computer donated by the
United States Coast Guard.

Takai ‘Antoinette Bethel of
St Augustine’s College fin-
ished in second place fol-
lowed by third place winner,
Kristina Deveaux of Grand
Bahama Catholic High
School.

Lori-Ann Marie Edwards,
a student at CV Bethel High
School, placed fourth.

Second, third and fourth
place winners received a vari-
ety of materials on Dr King
including book sets, cassettes
and DVDs.

Honorable mention went
to the following: Mia
Andrews of Queen’s Jollege,
Denae Tekia Bullard of Sun-
land Baptist Academy in
Freeport, Raeshan Davis of
St Augustine’s College,
Tashon Lewis of Grand
Bahama Catholic High
School, Sherzel Smith of St
Andrew’s and Brittany
Natasha Sweeting. As a spe-
cial keepsake, all of the par-
ticipants were given a book
by Dr King inscribed by
Ambassador Rood.





City Markets store opens

nassaulite : ee

ERRUNAANUNNNNNIHANNNY AUR



@ THE brand new City Markets store opened

on Cable Beach on Monday night. The store will

_. serve the growing community in the area, includ-
, ving residents of Bayroc. i



5 iy (Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)





Colina General.
Insurance Agency







On Wednesday December 13, 2006, Colina General Insurance Agency officially announced the
appointment of long time industry veteran Mary C. Munroe to the Colina General Insurance family as .
Senior Account Executive.

“We're very pleased to welcome Mary Munroe to the Colina General Family,” said Howard Knowles,
General Manager of Colina General Insurance Agency. “Colina General Insurance Agency is committed
to giving our valued customers access to products that help them meet their general insurance and
financial services needs. Mary’s 36 years in the industry will help solidify our commitment and

| philosophy of sérvicing clients and treating them as family.”

| Long time clients continue to recognize her value in the industry and the intimate role she plays in their

lives. “Her service is friendly and beyond reproach. She takes obvious pride in her job and gives }
personal care and attention to her client’s needs,” says Larina Evans-Pennerman, Bank Manager (UBS).
“She keeps you focused on your insurance needs by her friendly reminders, and in doing so, she makes

| you feel secure in knowing that your affairs are always properly protected.”

| When it comes to Munroe’s approach, one thing is clear, “She makes you feel comfortable; just like”

family,” says Raphael Whymms, Superintendent of Bahamas Customs Department. “Call on her day or
night, and she’s always there, always going the extra mile.” :

| Though in a new role, Munroe will continue to provide her trademark of dedicated, quality service. With

over three decades of distinguished service to the general insurance industry, Mary Munroe is loved by -

| many and known for her ability to build and strengthen client relations. “I would follow her wherever

she goes,” said Martha Wallace, a long-time client. “She really cares, not just about her clients but about :

| the community and the less fortunate.”

Colina General Insurance Agency (CGIA) was established to provide a comprehensive range of non-life
| insurance products to the Bahamian Market. CGIA offers: !

e Home eMotor ° Liability °¢ Casualty
° Contract Works °¢ Commercial Property = ° Marine

Tel: 325-3809







THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



INSIDE THE GAME

Colts and Bears
are separated by
more than miles

nly four hours sepa-
@) rate the Chicago
Bears and the India-

napolis Colts. Yet if clashing .

contrasts create spice, Super
Bowl XLI could have that
hair-tingling AFL-NFL flavor.

The Colts and the Bears
go to the Super Bowl] as
hemispheric opposites on the
franchise map.

The story of the
“Chicago Bears” is
the story of the
National Football
League: charter
members in 1920, as
the Decatur Staleys;
moved to Chicago’s
Wrigley Field in 1921
when end George
Halas bought the
team from ALE. Staley;
renamed the Bears as a nod
to Chicago Cubs owner Wil-
liam Wrigley.

The story of the “India-
napolis Colts” is the story of
modern professional sports:
the All-America Football
Conference’s bankrupt
Miami team moved to Balti-
more and was renamed; the
team joined the NFL, then
was sold back to the league,
with the name mothballed
until the first Dallas Texans
(not Lamar Hunt’s AFL ver-
sion) moved to Baltimore in
1953; moved once again when
Baltimore refused to build a
new stadium.

The Bears have a fight
song from 1941 — Bear Down,
Chicago Bears — with dated
lyrics still sung after every

~ score at Soldier Field. The
Colts left behind a band in
Baltimore and get accused of
pumping fake crowd noise
into the RCA Dome.

The Bears are the’No. 1
sports team from a football
area, “Da Region,” the Chica-
go-influenced area that dips
deeply into Northwest Indi-
ana. That’s where you such
tough towns as Hobart and
Gary.

In fact, for the next two
weeks, for the only time in its
191-year existence, Indiana
will lead the world in smack
talked per square mile.

The Colts are tne No. 2

“team in town, playing what

_ Still is the state’s No. 2 sport,
class-divided high school
basketball tournaments be
damned. Suggest to many a
longtime Indy resident that a
Colts victory would bring
Indianapolis its first major
sports league title, and be
prepared for a lecture-on
how the three-time Ameri-
can Basketball Association
champion Indiana Pacers
could have taken their NBA
counterparts in a best-of-
seven series,

It isn’t that Indianapolis
isn’t Colts-crazy. These Colts
are theirs. The morning of
last year’s playoff game
against the Pittsburgh Steel-
ers, an entire Bob Evans res-
taurant — staff and most cus-
tomers festooned in blue and
white — booed when Steel-
ers-clad fans entered for
breakfast. Being Indianapo-
lis, it was a friendly booing
and done with a smile.

But fandom, like disci-
pline and morals, usually
forms when you're young,
and it often can be an align-
ment with or rebellion

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER

SUPER BOWL XXX

DALLAS 27, PITTSBURGH 17



against the parental example.
It is passed down through
generations. |

Indy’s late-30s-to-mid-40s
set grew up without a local

' NFL team, so fans threw

their rah-rahs out to the
1970s winners — Dallas, Min-
nesota, the Dolphins, Pitts-
burgh, Oakland. NBC, which
televised the AFC,
put Indianapolis in
the Cincinnati Ben-
gals’ region. As far as
CBS and then the
NFC network were
concerned, Indianap-
olis was Chicago.
Despite an admira-
tion for Walter Pay-
ton’s work for a
lousy team and the
Bengals being above average
for all but 1978-80, neither
team garnered broad love
from Indy’s metro area.

Then there is the thirty-
something group, which
came of NFL fan age as the
Bears rose to power in the
mid-1980s. With the Colts
being new in town and comi-
cally bad, the Bears were an
accessible alternative. What
were Mike Pagel and Albert
Bentley when compared with
the 46 Defense, Walter Pay-
ton, Mike Ditka and Jim
McMahon?

The Colts have a dome
team, designed to scorch.
They drafted a great receiver
in 1996 (Marvin Harrison),
made the right quarterback
choice in the 1998 draft (Pey-
ton Manning), then put an —
offensive line in front of him
and a running back behind
him. They ask Manning to
put up pecks of points and
ask the defense to stop some-
body once in a while until the
offense builds a 10- to 14-
point lead. Then, take the
ball away. wo coe

The Bears always have
been built for the hawkish.
lake winds that scrape skin.
As they have numerous
times, they drafted the
wrong quarterback in 1999
(Cade McNown) but the
right linebacker in 2000
(Brian Urlacher) and hit on
several other defensive draft
picks. They ask quarterback
Rex Grossman to make a
couple of good decisions and
let the defense take the ball
away all game.

Though the Bears have
been where they are so much
longer than the Colts have
been where they are, it’s the
Colts who now represent
established order.

In the past 12 seasons, the
Horseshoe Boys have missed
the playoffs just three times,
have seven 10-victory sea-
sons and a working streak of
five. During the same period,
the Bears have made the

_ playoffs only three times and

have had six 10-loss seasons.

The Bears just wanta .
place at the table with the
memory of the 1985 Super
Bowl Shuffle crew. The Colts
want to finish establishing
that a version of the India-
napolis Colts deserves men-
tion alongside the beloved
versions of the Baltimore
Colts.

Somewhere, Super Bow]
cofounder Lamar Hunt is
smiling over this game. So is
Papa Bear George Halas.









BOWL XLI +;

Steelers’



IT'S ABOUT TIME: Bears Coach Lovie Smith, above, on he and Tony Dungy of the Colts
becoming the first black coaches in the Super Bowl: ‘It’s hard to put into words, but
| know a lot of great coaches who came before me that didn’t get this opportunity.’

A long time coming
for Dungy and Smith

*TONY DUNGY

smu ty Was A cube ge
tant watii i290 when Dungy,
then the head coach of the
Jampa Bay Buccaneers, nired

assis









hum to covaeb linebackers

(ar pne a5 questions Uungy
was asked at Mouday s news
conference, 20 sere te
to his rule tn fighting through
obstacles ie vreate opporiuni
ties for himseif and other
black coaches.

Dungy is the only active
coach te iead A ay the
playatis ior Seven Consecu-

tive seasons. He is at the top
of a coaching tree that saw a

Tourer 4 Get as ne and 2





top joboan Monk whe
Mike Tomlit fecame the
first black head
coach. Herm Edwards (Kan.
sas City) and Rod Marinelli
(Detroit), who is white, also
have worked for Dungy.

“An opportunity like this,
to get to the big game, has







been a long time coming fu
him,” said Colts lineman
Anthony Melarlana, whe also





played fey Gungy in Tampa.
“TL wish it would have hap-
pened for him years ago in
Tampa. But he's got i now,
and it couldn't be am



agpesann

themed toa

His iafant son




INTERNATIONAL EDITION — W

> FRONT

The attention on Dungy
and Smith leading to the
Super Bow! should raise con-
cerns about the overall low
number of minority head
coaches, said Floyd Keith,
executive director of the Indi-
ariapolis-based Black Coaches
Association,

There were seven black
head coaches among the
NFL’s 32 teams this season,
and two — Dennis Green
(Arizona) and Art Shell (Oak-
and) —- since have been fired,
in college, there were only
five among 119 Division I-A
schools. The University of
Miami made Randy Shannon
the sixtheafter the season.

‘I don’t know if we’ll ever
saatch a day in the NFL of this
magnitude,” Keith said Mon-
day. “I don’t know if you can
adequately describe it, but
you just appreciate it. It
should send a message that
color should never be a bar-
iier. The issue is the quality.
But some of the. break-
throughs in the NET. we vs
not seeing in college.”

shannon’s hiring was a sig-
niheant step, but more need
to be taken, said Florida State
associate athletic director Bob
Miunix, a member of the



11 DAYS

ovnoys touchdown.
Growl’s monumental performance came 2%
months ofter a pe sonal tragedy - the death of

_ Started to circulate a report

‘ that once didn’t exist. He said



4

NAM HUH/AP





BCA’s board of directors.
Minnix said the BCA has |

card that evaluates hiring |
practices of college athletic
departments, It serves a pur- |
pose similar to that of the
NFL's’ so-called “Rooney
Rule,” which mandates that
owners must interview
minority candidates in coach-
ing searches. |

“On the collegiate level,
we're woefully behind the
times.” Minnix said. “We’re
just trying to help colleges |
make up ground. I applaud
the University of Miami. But
with Randy’s hire, it’s slow
progress.”

Dungy sees that progress
with programs now in place |

being one of two black |
coaches in the Super Bowl
should continue. to raise
awareness. |

“Some of the impediments
are out of the way,” he said. “I
think about soy generation of
Kics who «atched Super
Bowls and never saw African-
Atiericant coaches and didn’t
think that you could coach.
Now ‘hey can look at us and
say. Hcy, might be the coach
ane day.’ That’s special.”



TO

par itt
ha Me



AY, JANUARY 24, 2007 | 7E



NFL NOTEBOOK

Judge gives
Tank Johnson
permission to

make the trip

From Miami Herald Wire Services

*Chicago Bears defensive
tackle Tank Johnson will -
play in the Super Bowl —
with court approval and a
warning from a judge to
stay out of trouble.

Cook County Judge
John Moran. granted a
defense request Tuesday to
allow
Johnson to
travel out-
side IIli-
nois as he
awaits trial
on = gun-
possession
charges.
The Bears

will face ,
the Indianapolis Colts in
the Super Bowl, to be
played in Miami on Feb. 4.

Johnson was arrested
Dec. 14 after police raided
his home in Gurnee, about
40 miles northwest of Chi-
cago. Prosecutors say offi-
cers found three rifles,
three handguns and ammu-
nition in Johnson’s home.
He faces 10 counts of pos-
session of firearms without
a state gun-owner identifi-
cation card.

Arrested three times in
18 months, Johnson has
pleaded not guilty to the
most recent charges. The
previous arrests involved a
scuffle with a police officer,
in which the charges were
dropped, and a misde-
meanor weapons charge.

Defense attorney Lorna
Propes said Johnson has
been “100 percent” compli-
ant with the requirements
of his home confinement.

' “Hfe’s been there every
single time they’ve checked
on him,” Propes said.

A court hearing to con-
sider dropping Johnson’s
home continement is Feb. 8.

ELSEWHERE

e Cardinals: Russ
Grimm was hired as an
assistant head coach and
offensive-line coach, two
weeks after he interviewed
for the head coaching posi-
tion. Grimm’s hiring came
two days after erroneous
reports that the Steelers
had chosen him to replace
retired coach Bill Cowher.
Grimm wanted the Steelers
job, but he said he was
happy to reunite with Car-
dinals coach Ken Whisen-
hunt, who were both on the
Steelers’ staff.

e Vikings: Former
Minnesota receiver Koren
Robinson reached a deal
with prosecutors to be sen-
tenced on a single felony
charge of fleeing police
after leading officers on a
high-speed chase in August.
In exchange for Robinson’s
plea, prosecutors dismissed
seven lesser charges related
to drunken driving, reckless
driving and driving without
a license. Robinson was
rushing to get back to train-
ing camp before curfew.

e Eagles: The team
reshuffled its coaching
staff, naming special-teams
coordinator John War-
baugh secondary coach
and Sean McDermott line-
backers coach.

e Chargers: Quarier.
back Philip Rivers won't
play in the Pro Bowl
because of a foot injury.



~

JOHNSON

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @® ON TV: CBS





Jan. 28, 1996 = 7 rsto : 2 who was born about 14 weeks
e Sun Devil Stadium, Tempe, Ariz. ee eee
e MVP: CB Larry Brown, Dallas “We can oy imagine what it’s like to losea

With Pittsburgh trailing by a field goal late in chiid like he diel,” | owboys quarterback Troy
the fourth quarter, the Cowboys baited Steelers Asmar tole repo: ‘ers.
quarterback Neil O’Donnell with a zone blitz, We're happy ie had the night he had on the
resulting in an interception. stage he had it oj ‘

Dallas cornerback Larry Brown beat Aiter fhe yame .Brown said: “I just thank
Pittsburgh wide receiver Andre Hastings to the God, cme the strength to get through
ball with 4:01 remaining in the game, guiding the Cowboys to this year. It was tougn. Wil v tearm and the players and the
their third Super Bowl victory in four seasons. : way they suppo ted me thi ough ali or the hard times, I’ve just got

Brown returned the interception for 33 yards, setting the to give therm credit.
stage for running back Emmitt Smith’s game-sealing, 4-yard “LT couldn't have done # without them. They enabled me to ge!






touchdown run. through this season.”

It was Brown's second interception of the game, and each of SUSAN RAGAN/AP FILE

- SARAH ROTHSCHILD





PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 . TRIBUNE SPORTS

uns shine against Machines

im iL. Lue
















, @ TEMPLE Christian Suns’ point
; guard Tiffany Wildgoose goes up for
a lay-up over the defence of St.
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines’ Ivanna Seymour in their
BAISS senior girls basketball game
yesterday at Temple Christian. The

Suns won 26-16. ‘
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

‘al







hi
it

a

HARn

RSG
Ph
ACN

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HIGH
LOW

fm lovin’ fhe

SIF |
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WITH SUN

Volume: 103 No.52—








Maen a GUL
PU Ram CURIA EY CLUE

FUL a Sed

Carl Bethel claims to have
access to records; says

Fred Mitchell needs to.
explain entries in documents

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE political back and
forth about an alleged visa
scandal at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs heated up yester-
day as FNM senator Carl
. Bethel claimed to have access

to some records that need
explaining.“ "-"" "=

Revealing what he said was
one page of a ledger prepared
by the visa section of the min-
istry, Mr Bethel said that Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell has still failed to
account for the large increase
of visas issued during his
tenure in office.

“Nothing said by Minister
Mitchell has gone any further
in explaining how and why the
number of visas issued to
Haitian and Chinese nation-
als skyrocketed from 200 a
year to more than 2,000 a year
under his superintendence.
The Bahamian people have a
right to be concerned about
this. Bahamians have a right
to demand answers,” Mr
Bethel said in a press release
yesterday.

The FNM senator did not
answer Mr Mitchell’s question
as to why he had not yet gone
to the police with the evidence
he claims to have on some

. PLP government members
allegedly involved in a visa
scandal, but instead raised
concerns about the issuance

of five particular visas to Chi-
nese nationals. .

In his press statement, Mr
Bethel said the document
shows that the visa section on
November 13, 2004, issued
five visas to five Chinese
nationals allegedly on behalf
of a PLP official.

In the ledger’s column

“approved by”, the document.

lists “minister” as the person
giving the approval in-four of
the five cases.
_ Mr Bethel said Mr Mitchell
“plainly has direct access to
all the files in his ministry. He
needs to fully explain these
entries in the ministry’s own
documents,” said Mr Bethel.
Mr Bethel suggested that
instead of trying to investigate
him, Mr Mitchell should
‘explain the entries in question.
_ Mr Mitchell, during a press
conference held in his Fox Hill
constituency on Sunday, urged
Mr Bethel to go to police if
he has any evidence on meim-
bers of the PLP government
who are selling visas or ille-
gally facilitating the issuance
of visas.
Otherwise, he said, he
advised the FNM senator to
“shut up and:be quiet.”
Mr Mitchell said that he
believes Mr Bethel has no evi-
dence, and is merely speaking
ona political platform.

“Mr Bethel has no evidence.

SEE page 11

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

i | Hetero =| Evo
AHA Ye (42) 380-2862 J To (242) 336-2804







The Tribune



f

She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

@ PHIL SAPP, father of Mark:
Sapp - the man who was found
dead in his prison cell in Abaco
last Saturday - with his lawyer
Godfrey Pinder. a
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)



@ By BRENT DEAN

THE family of American Mark
Sapp, who was found dead in his
police cell in Abaco last Saturday,
is seeking an independent investi-
gation into his alleged suicide.

Mr Phil Sapp, father of the
deceased, accompanied by attor-
ney Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder, rejected
the police assertion that Mr Sapp
committed suicide.

Mr Pinder stated: “What I am
asking for is an investigation, not
by any local group, but either by
Interpol, or the FBI, or Scotland
Yard or by someone who can
determine what happened to this
young man, because they are cov-
ering this up now. And, they are
putting suicide out there.

“There is no reason for them to
suggest it’s suicide until the autop-
sy report. We want a pathologist of
our own to make that determina-
tion. Either a pathologist sent over
by the people from Interpol, from
England, or our own personal
pathologist who will be as objective
as possible.

“It’s probably better to get
someone who is objective — not
the government side, not our side,

SEE page 11










WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

M denies —



sovt claim over
radar system

wi By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Movement has refuted
government’s claim that it bought a radar sys-
tem for Lynden Pindling International Airport
without proper consultation and accused PLP
ministers of not accepting responsibility for
their ministries.

On Monday, Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin blamed the FNM
for the “hasty” purchase of an $8 million radar
system which, she claims, will cost an addi-
tional $3 million from public funds before it
can be used.

Mrs Hanna-Martin made the announce-
ment after The Tribune questioned her about
the low morale of air traffic controllers at the
airport because of problems with the obsolete
radar system in use, and a “new radar sys-
tem,” allegedly bought during the FNM’s
administration.

The Tribune learned of the new radar sys-
tem from a source who spoke on the condition
of anonymity.

SEE page 11






Customs warehouse
at airport ‘received
extremely poor review

from US authorities

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter _

THE Comptroller of Customs has
declined to comment on reports that, the
Customs warehouse at Lynden Pindling
International Airport was given an extreme-
ly poor review by US authorities following a
routine inspection last week.

SEE page 11



New passport
rule has smooth
introduction

THE new passport rule which requires all

US citizens travelling by air to obtain a pass- *

: port when visiting the Caribbean came into
: -effect yesterday with few glitches.
US media reported yesterday that most

travellers who were unaware of the new”

requirement were allowed to enter after
receiving a warning and a passport application.
No travellers were turned away, but their

SEE page 11

Te ne eee ay

o

M&LIBBY Bern



oe
Jumping-Jacks N nN \

_Easy Spirit.



|
(Etienne Aigner |

Shoes For All Walks Of Life!


































se



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Investor eyes wireless expansion with BTC

FROM page 1B

less has received the necessary
government approvals, and is
now poised to take possession
of its new multi-million dollar
facility on Grand Bahama on
the target date of February 1,
2007.

He added that everything was
on target for the manufactur-
ing plant, where Pegasus Wire-
less hopes to build a variety of
high-technology products for
distribution to the US and
Western Hemisphere markets.

The products will include
wireless access points, wireless
bridging technology, and wire-
less cards for computers and
outdoor units that can be used
at home via computer tie-ins.
The company also does contract
manufacturing for Motorolla.

The Grand Bahama facility
will eventually employ 280-300





: No form will be accepted without:

workers.

“We are already employing.
We're at 25 so far. We’re hand
picking the management first,
and we have hired a plant man-
ager, sO we are continuing the
job site. We finally take posses-
sion of the building on February
1,” Mr Knabb said.

“That has been the single
biggest wait. We would have
already started if it hadn’t been
for that.

“T believe everything’s done.
Miss Bridgewater (Pleasant
Bridgewater, the PLP MP and
Mr Knabb’s attorney) handles
it. [ called her last week and
said we had containers coming
in, and she said it was all set up.
I have people who handle the
licensing and things like that,
so I am here today speaking, so
I assume that it is all on track.”

Mr Knaab said countries
must choose to become techno-
logically advanced, and even
though the Bahamas is primar-

ALL prospective graduates for SPRING 2007 MUST

1 submit COMPLETED Graduation Evaluation Forms to
the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY 2, 2007.

ily tourism-based, “you have
Freeport and you have a group
of people who want more, the
youth, the island that want to
be technology based.

“Here I get a say. We get to
build this business from here
and I get to hire people from
here,” he added.

“We are pleased that people
here do have the training, and I
am going to recruit every junior
and senior in high school that
wants to be in technology. If
you can capture the youth and
they want to be a part of this
and they want to innovate, can
you imagine what they can do.”

The Grand Bahama plant is
to be some 20,000 square feet,
marking an investment of more
than $20 million.

Mr Knaab was the keynote
speaker at an IBM luncheon to
discuss tourism and technolo-
gy, one of the events scheduled
for National Tourism Week yes-
terday.











Financial services
fears on EU trade

FROM page 1B

He added that he was “very
concerned about it”, especial-
ly as the EPA would be. based
on the World Trade Organi-
sation’s (WTO) rules-based
trading system. This relies
heavily on principles of non-
discrimination through clauses
such as ‘reciprocity’, ‘Most
Favoured Nation’, and
‘National Treatment’.

What this essentially means
is that countries have to treat
all companies and all countries
equally, giving them a uniform
regime of trade preferences
and benefits, and they are
unable to discriminate in
favour of domestic producers
and firms.

European nations such as
France and Germany were
among the main drivers of the
OECD’s ‘harmful tax prac-
tices’ initiative, and it is likely
they could use the EPA talks
to try and pressurise the
Bahamas into signing up to tax
information exchange agree-
ments.

In addition, there is also the
EU Savings Directive. The
Bahamas could be more
exposed by this, given that a

‘| number of Caribbean nations

that are still dependencies of
the UK - Cayman, Bermuda
and the British Virgin Islands -
have signed up to this.

The Bahamas has currently
not signed on to the EU Sav-
ings Tax Directive, which
requires countries to either
impose a withholding tax on
the offshore holdings of EU
residents, or exchange infor-
mation with their home coun-
tries.

Given that the Bahamas, if it
decides to sign up to the EPA
and negotiate through Carifo-
rum, would be tied to whatev-
er the region negotiated, it
could face additional pres-
sures on the Savings Tax
Directive.

Nation

Arguing that this nation
should negotiate with the EU
on its own, rather than as part
of Cariforum, Mr Moss said
the EPA would also impact
investors from the EU exam-
ining potential development
projects in the Bahamas.

“Today, the Cabinet of the
Bahamas is able to negotiate
directly with investors,” Mr
Moss said. “But these trade
agreements set out the rules
and parameters of what these
investments will be, and how
negotiations are conducted.
That puts us at a disadvan-
tage.”

Mr Moss warned that the
EPA could effectively impose
a ‘one-size-fits all’ template on

how Caribbean nations nego-
tiated with investors from the.
EU, governing the types and
amount of incentives offered,
and meaning that all countries
had to effectively offer the
same - eroding any competi-
tive advantage for the
Bahamas.

He added that the Bahamas
had two major decisions to
make - examining and reform-.
ing its tax structure, and reduc-
ing its trade deficit by devel-
oping an agricultural industry
and other sectors in the
Bahamas to reduce the vol-
ume of imports.

Mr Moss said tax reform
was “critical” and would take
10 years to implement. He
explained that the current sys-
tem was not raising sufficient
funds now for the Government
to effectively provide services
and infrastructure, such as
roads to alleviate the traffic
congestion that was resulting
in much lost productivity.

An income tax, based on
equity and people’s ability to
pay, was what was required,
he added.

Mr Moss said that in the
EPA and other trade arrange-
ments, the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement and the prefer-
ences it provided Freeport
with would be “the first thing
that will be attacked, will fall,
and will be obliterated”.

v ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and
Chairperson’s) and







V PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business
Office.



Ber COL ere .




the #1 newspaper in circulation,
Oa



| N.B. ANY form submitted after this date will be considered |
LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester
2007.







LLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS.
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is to implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world.

’ Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

International Liaison Officer (ILO

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

~ THE €0

oi





| THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Libraries.and Instructional Media Services Department
af The Law Library Branch :

| Lunch & Litigation

Inaugural Luncheon

Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006
“=




















Wednesday, 31st January, 2007
Choices Restaurant
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
The College of The Bahamas
_ Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.








Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

‘The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.




















Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon








Donation: $35.00 :: Student: $25.00
Part proceeds in aid of the new library fund









Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30" January 2007 to:




Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas

THE COLLEGE O1

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs








Tue Coiece OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs ——_ Flyyr yng





4B | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 __

ECONOMIC SUMMIT

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Forum to focus on energy, environment

* ECONOMIC SUMMIT

agreed at the German G-8”
meeting in June.

Blair, who raised the issue
at Davos in 2005, is expected
to focus on it again.

The meeting is also to
focus on securing global
energy supplies, including the
development of more alterna-
tive fuels, particularly in light
of oil prices that surged in
2006 before settling in recent
weeks, supply disruptions
from Russia and attacks on oil
pipelines in Iraq and Nigeria.

PUBLISHING

Another key issue is the
ongoing conflict between
Israel and the Palestinians
and securing the future of
Iraq. Israeli Foreign Minister
Tzipi Livni and Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas
are among those attending the
event, while Jordanian King -
Abdullah II will speak about
the future of the Middle East.

Lebanese Prime Minister
Fuad Saniora will talk about
how his country is emerging

‘from last summer’s fighting

between Israel and Hezbollah.
Iraqi Vice President Adil

Abdul-Mahdi, Sunni Vice
President Tariq al Hashimi
and Iraqi Deputy Prime Min-
ister Barham Saleh are sched-
uled to talk about the chal-
lenges facing their country
and whether the divide
between Sunnis and Shiites
can be bridged in a bid to
avoid further bloodshed.
Security was tight around
the city, with Swiss police, the
military and private contrac-
tors cordoning off ‘access to
the Congress Center, the
meeting’s main venue.
Protests, by people critical

of globalization and who
claim that corporate and big
business favors profits over
people, are expected to be
minimal.

Critics have planned an
action day for Saturday in
Davos and a national demon-
stration in the city of Basel
the same day.

Over the weekend, hun-
dreds gathered in different
Swiss cities to demonstrate
against the World Economic
Forum, with 300 rallying in St.
Gallen, 200 in Zurich and
around 100 in Delsberg.

Students don’ t buy many cheaper e-books

° E-BOOKS

said Bill McKenna, director of
digital products at Follett, a
company that operates more
than 700 college bookstores.
Follett offers about 1,000
titles in digital form, but sales
have been meager.

“We haven’t seen the revo-
lutionary kinds of successes
that other markets involved in
digital delivery have seen,”
McKenna said.

But it doesn’t mean that
e-books are not desired.

As 21-year-old senior
Xochiot Guadarrama hunted
for textbooks at the Florida
International University
Bookstore, she hoped to come
across a few cheaper used
books to ease the pain come
checkout time.

The health science major
expects to spend close to
$600 on six hefty textbooks
this semester. She usually
spends anywhere from $400
to $600 a semester just for
books.

The thought of being able
to download a textbook at half
the price sounded unbeliev-
able to her.

“Are you serious?” she
asked. “I would buy it in a
heartbeat!”

College textbook sales are
a $6.3 billion-a-year business,
-according to the National
Association of College Stores.
The cost of books and sup-
plies for the 2005-06 aca-
demic year ranged from $801




oye Nyy Tt) =

For advertising information please e-mai





AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

AN ARMFUL: Brandy Raulerson, 18, shops for textbooks at
Florida International University. Some students lighten

the load by buying e-books.

to $904 per student.

Barnes & Noble College
Booksellers offers download-
able titles from MBS Direct.
MBS started its Universal
Digital Textbook program in
August 2005 with only 136
digital textbook titles and four
publishers.

The program has grown to
include about 1,300 titles from
10 publishers, but that’s only a

crussell@herald.com





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sliver of the estimated 125,000
textbook titles available.

TOO EARLY TO TELL

Jade Roth, vice president of
books at Barnes & Noble Col-
lege Booksellers, said digital
textbook sales make up less
than 2 percent of their total
text sales, but it’s too early to
analyze the market, she said.

“We want to get another

BANKING

term under our belt,” she said.
“We'll get much better infor-
mation this time around.”

At a majority of book-
stores, students need to go
online to purchase e-text-
books, so some textbook pro-
viders are coming up with
ideas to boost in-store sales.
MBS is working with book-
stores to allow students to
purchase the digital version in
the store and receive a code
to download it online to their
computer later, said Kevin
McKiernan, director of busi-
ness development at MBS
Direct.

The idea is that in-store
purchases are more attractive
for students who use financial
aid to buy books.

Even if sales are not imme-
diately taking off, publishers
will keep producing digital
versions.

“TJ think publishers are
begining to feel that they need
to have all of their titles in
some sort of electronic form,
so when an opportunity
comes up, they can act on it
quickly,” McKiernan said.
“Everyone is kind of holding
their breath for an evolution-
ary reader.”

Publishers use different
software programs, called
readers, to view the digital
pages; some are using .pdf
files for Adobe Reader, others
are using .xml to view online.
This adds to the complica-
tions of selling the concept to
students.

Deals boost Bank of
America, Wachovia
4th-quarter profits

* BANKS

that Bank of America’s fourth-
quarter performance was
below that of other money
center banks, such as JPMor-
gan Chase.

He said that spread reve-
nues — the different between
what the bank pays for funds
and what it can lend them out
at — were up only modestly.

Meanwhile, “its institu-
tional securities business
lagged peers” and capital
markets revenue was not as
strong as at other major
banks, Mayo said.

SOME MIXED RESULTS

Bank of America shares fell
33 cents, or 0.62 percent,
Tuesday to $53.32 on the New
York Stock Exchange.

Earnings at Wachovia rose
to $2.3 billion, or $1.20 per
share, in the fourth quarter
from $1.71 billion, or $1.09 per
share, during the same period

last year.
Excluding merger and
restructuring expenses,

adjusted net income totaled
$2.33 billion, or $1.21 per share,
versus $1.74 billion, or $1.11
cents per share, last year.

Total revenue gained 31
percent to $8.59 billion versus
$6.56 billion last year.

That topped the $1.18 per
share on revenue of $7.81 bil-
lion expected by analysts sur-
veyed by Thomson Financial.

WACHOVIA REPORT

Wachovia shares climbed
38 cents, or 0.68 percent, to
close at $56.65 on the NYSE.

Goldman Sachs analyst
Lori B. Appelbaum wrote in a
research note to investors
Tuesday that Wachovia’s
fourth quarter earnings were
among the best reported by

any bank for the period.

“Wachovia generated one
of the strongest fourth quar-
ters of the banks reporting so
far given sizable strength in
market-sensitive businesses,
net interest margin improve-
ment, and stable-to-improved
credit trends across the port-
folio,” the note said.

“Credit quality was among
the best of those reporting
this quarter.”

BATTLING THE CURVE

Like all U.S. banks, Bank of
America and Wachovia con-
tinued to battle an inverted
yield curve, which means
short-term rates are higher
than long-term rates. |

That means banks must
pay more for deposits while
they’re earning less on loans,
which squeezes profits.

In other reports Tuesday,
Pittsburgh-based PNC Finan-
cial Services Group said
fourth-quarter profit rose 6
percent.

But the results came in
below estimates on a narrow-
ing interest-rate spread and
the need to set aside more
reserves against problem
loans.

PNC posted fourth-quarter
net income of $376 million, or
$1.27 per share, compared
with a profit of $355 million,
or $1.20 per share, a year ear-
lier.

Excluding an $8 million
charge for a sale of part of its
stake in BlackRock, PNC
earned $1.20 per share in the
quarter.

Analysts polled by Thom-
son Financial forecast earn-
ings of $1.30 per share for the
fourth quarter.

PNC’s shares fell 78 cents,
or 1.06 percent, to close at
$73.14 on the NYSE.

__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

BUSINESS BRIEFS



HEALTHCARE



MIKE DERER/AP
STRONG QUARTER: Johnson & Johnson said revenue was
$13.68 billion, up 8.5 percent from 2005. Above, Irvin
Belin works with vials of Anti Sera in Raritan, N.J.

Johnson & Johnson
posts 3.5% profit hike

From Herald Wire Services

Healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) on Tuesday
’ posted a 3.5 percent increase in fourth-quarter profit as higher
sales, especially for consumer products overseas, were
mostly offset by the first charge for a major acquisition.
Despite the solid performance, shares fell more than 1 per-
cent.

The New Brunswick, N,J. -based maker of contraceptives,
contact lenses, prescription drugs and baby products
reported net income of $2.17 billion, or 74 cents per share, up
from $2.10 billion, or 70 cents per share, in 2005’s final quar-
ter.

Excluding an after-tax charge of $217 million for the acqui-
sition of Pfizer Consumer Healthcare late in the fourth quar-
ter, income would have been $2.4 billion, or 81 cents per
share, the company said.

Revenue totaled $13.68 billion, up 8.5 percent from $12.61
billion in the last quarter of 2005.

e TELECOM

ALCATEL-LUCENT’S
PROFIT, SHARES DIP

Growing pains and
tougher competition hit
Alcatel-Lucent’s (ALU)
revenue and wiped out

e RAILROADS

BURLINGTON SANTA FE
SAYS 4Q PROFIT UP 21%

Burlington Northern
Santa Fe (BNI) said its.
fourth-quarter profit rose 21
percent because of strong



demand for shipping coal fourth-quarter profit, the
and agricultural and con- telecom equipment maker
sumer goods. warned, sending its shares
The company’s chief plummeting less than two
executive said the sluggish months after the company’s
housing market has creation in a $11.6 billion

depressed shipments of
building products, but he
predicted record volume in
2007 for other parts of the
business.

merger.
Alcatel-Lucent said pro-
forma revenue — calculated
as if the tie-up had taken
effect previously — fell 16
percent to $5.72 billion in
October-December. Operat-
ing income was “approxi-
mately at break-even” after
a 570 million euros profit in

e HOMEBUILDERS

D.R: HORTON SAYS
EARNINGS FALL 64%



ings fell 64 percent in the:
|

D.R. Horton (DHI), the
nation’s largest homebuilder
by deliveries, said that earn-

the fourth quarter of 2005.

Shares of Alcatel-Lucent
fell as much as $1.75, or 12.3
percent, to $12.42 in Paris.
last three months of 2006 as
it wrote down the value of
assets and forfeited land
deposits and took fewer
sales orders.

But the results still beat
Wall Street’s expectations,
and Horton shares jumped
$1.25, or 4.6 percent, to

e U.S. ECONOMY

FUTURE ACTIVITY
INDICATOR GOES UP

A gauge of future eco-
nomic activity rose slightly
in December as two of the
economy’s soft spots — the

$28.38 in afternoon trading housing and job markets —
on the New York Stock showed signs of improve-
Exchange. ment, according to an indus-

try-backed research group.
e CHEMICALS The New York-based

Conference Board said its
Index of Leading Economic
Indicators edged up 0.3 per-
cent last month, suggesting
the economy may grow ata
modest clip in the next sev-
eral months.

DUPONT SEES ITS
4Q PROFIT SOAR

Specialty chemicals
maker DuPont said its
fourth-quarter profit more
than quadrupled, due mainly
to a hefty tax benefit, as well
as higher sales and flat fixed
costs.

Net income totaled $871
million, or 94 cents per
share, up sharply from last
year’s profit of $154 million,
or 16 cents per share. The
latest quarter included a net
gain of $449 million, or 49
| cents per share, mainly due
to tax benefits and insurance
recoveries from hurricanes
Katrina and Rita, partly off-
set by charges for restruc-
turing, an asset impairment
and accounting adjustments.
Fourth-quarter 2005 results
included a gain of $28 mil-
lion, or 3 cents per share.

e COMPUTERS

DELL OPENS GLOBAL
CENTER IN MALAYSIA

Computer maker Dell
(DELL) opened its first
global business center out-
side the United States to
provide 24-hour engineering
and technology support to
its branches worldwide.

Chief Executive Officer
Kevin Rollins opened the
200,000-square-foot center
in Malaysia’s high-tech city
of Cyberjaya. Dell says the
center will employ 600 peo-
ple by year-end and 1,000
within five years.



LATE TRADING





4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late 4pm. 6:35 Late
Stock Tkr. dose close Chg. volume | Stock Tk. dose aa volume
yahoo YHOO 26.96 28.50 +1.54 160783 | SeagateT STX 2618 27.20 +1.02 11538
SunMicro SUNW 5.66 6.11 +45 133926 | Disney DIS 35.58 35.56 02 =——«11527
ApldMatl AMAT = 17.46 17.52, +.06 119005 Hallibtns = HAL 29.73 29.84 = +.11 10609
iShR2Knya WM 77.92 7.19 7366158 | Firstbatas FOC 2614 2615 +01 10382
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 4358 43.71 «+13 46413:«|Aordrc | ARC~O«1098~=S«10098Sts* 9942
BarrickG ABX 29.34 29.2905 30132 : : ; 506

UtdMicro UMC 367 380 +13 7!

AMD AMD 17.51 16.67.84 27368 |G 2604 2612 +08 «7436
GoldS pfD GSpD 2650 26.48 ~=— 02. -—2to4g | Cisco CSCO 26. :
RFMicD RFMD «G88)7.35~= 4.471745 | MedProp §=MPW = 16.00 15.93 07,7432
Verizoncm = VZ 37493749 * 14933 | SPFncl = XLF = 36.91 37.00 #096775
SPDR SPY 142.80 142.93. +#.13 14312. | Erthlink = ELNK 7.16 7.16 6479
Citrixsy —« CTXS «29.87 «32.87 -+3.00 14067 | EqOffPT EOP 5244 52.44 * 6116
TimeWam TWX 2246 2246 * 12444 | NCRCp NCR 4446 9 44.25 -.21— 6012



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

CELE EE a a TT SLT TY OS



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 5B





City Markets

opens up

its.

‘crown jewel’

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

BAHAMAS Supermarkets
said it had created four new
management posts with the
opening of its “crown jewel”
$1.3 million flagship store at
‘Cable Beach, marking the first
time a branch of the store had
opened under Bahamian own-
ership for 40 years.

“The store on Cable Beach
will be the crown jewel in. the
City Markets necklace of 12
grocery stores serving New
Providence, Grand Bahama
and shipping to all the Family
Islands,” said Bahamas Super-
markets chairman Basil L
Sands.

The store will include state-
of-the-art technology, with
point-of-sale scanners through-
out the store. These can
instantly tally a customer’s
charges while tracking inven-
tory, while there will also be
an expanded deli and bakery.

Mr Sands added that four

new management positions
alone were created with the
store opening.

“But what makes us most
proud as we prepare to offi-
cially open this stunning Cable

he said.

For what we are celebrating
tonight is the grand opening
of the first store in 40 years of
Bahamas Supermarkets histo-
ry - that is, Bahamian -owned
and operated.”

He was referring to the fact
that BSL Holdimgs bought the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamasw Supermarekts from
Winn Dixie last August.

“For, many years, the rela-
tionship between Winn Dixie
and Bahamas Supermarkets
provided quality products and
essential systems. That rela-
tionship is now over, and we
at Bahamas Supermarkets
Limited entered a new era
drawing on the expertise of a
new board of directors,” Mr
Sands said.

Performing the official open-

INSIGHT |

eau Al eee sli Tiire|
Mat melo ate lil §

i

®

on Mondays

C

CHEVENING

ing was the Minister of Local
Government and Consumer
Affairs, V Alfred Gray, who
said the Government’s goal

‘ was to work towards diversifi-

cation of the economy away

_ from tourism.

“My government~ has

~ extended duty exemptions for

other industries to make shop-
ping in the Bahamas more
competitive, and to make man-
ufacturing more efficient. We
have looked for, and I believe
successfully identified, con-
struction-related projects,” he
added.

At 24,000 square feet, the
new store has 90 parking
spaces and is the fourth largest
in the chain behind Harbour
Bay and two Grand Bahama
stores. However, due to its

advanced features, it will be .

the flagship store.

Become a PC Technician
Build your skills for anew

U] Work for yourself building

and repairing computers
[] Troubleshoot PC problems

[] Install and configure PC
hardware

BIZJET
BUSINESS CENTER

. Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

PHONE: (242) 356-5760



BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2007-2008

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-2008 Chevening Scholarships,
available to Bahamian applicants wishing to pursue post-graduated studies in the
UK in the following subjects:

Justice & Human rights

Media/journalism studies

International relations/diplomacy Public Administration
Sustainable development

Law

Environmental Studies

Management

Further information and application forms can be found on the British Council

(Jamaica) website at: www.britishcouncil.org/jamaica

Closing date 5th February 2007

BRITISH HIGH COMMISSION



Oke mO ee:

Needed to play
Pipe Organ and Piano

Successful applicant will need to play piano for
Sunday School, organ for Worship Service.
* and accompany a choir.

Remuneration commensurate
with experience and ability.

Send letter of application and resume to:
.Church Organist
P.O.Box N-497
Nassau, Bahamas



OPEN HOUSE |
LUXURY OCEAN
FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina



= SHOPPERS at the new City
Markets, Cable Beach

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)
1 to 6 bedroom from $349,000 +
The Porches @ Coral Harbor
Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm >
Free Food.and Drinks

For More Information Call: 424-8366
By Appointment Only

| BDO Mann Judd

BDO Mann Judd a leading professional services firm and a member firm of BDO
International, an organization with 621 BDO member firm offices in 107 countries around the
globe, is now seeking applications for an office administrator.

Qualifications: The successful candidate will have a Bachelors of Science or
Arts in accounting and have 3 years work experience in a similiar role. The candidate will
have a working knowledge of QuickBooks or Peachtree and Microsoft applications,. and
should be able to work in a challenging team driven environment.

The position requires a vivid attention to detail:

Responsibilities: include but are not limited to;
Intemal Accounting
Invoice preparation and control
Compliance and HR duties
Corporate services (company formation and administration)
This position will support senior management and is administrative and diverse
Individuals with the above-mentioned qualifications should fax their resumes to the
following: :
Recruitment Manager
BDO Mann Judd
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-325-6592

Or e-mail to the following address: info@bdomannjudd.com

Absolutely no phone calls please:
Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted.



IMPORTANT

NOTICE
SERVICE INTERRUPTION



From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. on
Sunday 28th January 2007.

Our Electronic Banking System will be temporarily unavailable
during the times listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance in order to improve our service to you. |

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:
¢ Point-Of-Sale (POS) transactions
e VISA transactions via ABM

ABM machines will be available from 7 a.m.
for cash withdrawals. Internet and Telephone banking
will be available from 10 a.m.

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



MN




Legal Notice

NOTICE
KARDIA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) KARDIA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 23rd
January, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 24th day of January, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



>
ye

S41 = ae









$12m boost from

Atlantis giving up
$1.3m room revenue

FROM page 1B

Bahamas, and generate
immense exposure and pub-
licity that benefited its resorts
and tourism industry.

The report said: “The film
Beyond the Sunset, starring
Pierce Brosnan and Selma
Hayek, featured the Atlantis
resort and logo prominently
in many scenes, in return for
the hotel providing the
accommodation free. The val-
ue of the hotel rooms was $1.3
million, but in return the pro-
duction spent $12 million in
the Bahamas.”

That return can also be

used as an argument by the

Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) against the Govern-
ment’s plans to levy room tax-
es, at 6 per cent, on compli-
mentary rooms that are
offered free by resorts for
marketing and promotional
purposes.

The Ministry of Finance
has been driving the compli-
mentary room tax initiative
in an effort to close alleged



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

underreporting by some
hotels of their room taxes, but
the hotel industry has been
arguing that the Government
should instead focus on
“enforcement efforts direct-
ed at those properties abus-
ing the system”.

The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation, in its 2006 annual
report, pointed out that no
competing destinations in the
Caribbean levied taxes on
complimentary rooms made
available for marketing and
goodwill purposes.

The report for the CRNM
urged that a Collective Man-
agement Organisation
(CMO) be established in the
Bahamas to look after
authors’ copyrights, describ-
ing “stimulating interest” in
creating such an organisation
as “a difficult task”.

Another difficulty, it added,
would be to encourage the
foreign Performing Rights
Society (PRS) “to hand over
its lucrative cruise ship and
hotel-derived royalty base to
the national entity” in the
Bahamas.





The Public is hereby advised that |, BARBARA LOUISE SCOTT-RIGBY

of Nassau, Bahamas, mother of JOHNATHAN WESLEY ALEXANDER j



SCOTT, of the same place who is a minor and a citizen of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas by birth, do hereby intend to have



ALEXANDER SCOTT name change to JOHNAT. Ww E DER
BOSTWICK. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,

you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.

NOTICE

‘



NOTICE is hereby given that MARIETTA DANY OF

SPANISH WELLS,

ELEUTHERA,

BAHAMAS _ is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written an “signed statement of

the facts within twenty-eight days.from the 17th ‘day of ©

January, 2007 to the Minister respensible for Nationality

Innovative Private Banking Group is presently looking for a:

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Compliance Officer

The successful applicant must:

m Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.

m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance. requirements.

m Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge and experience with:

m Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.

m Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.

m Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.

m Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

Motivated team player with pleasant personality.

Private Banking

OYSTER Funds
We offer:
Alternative Investments

Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

Please send your resume and two (2) letters of reference to:

SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. a Human Resources Manager

www.syzbank.com

: [Pricing Information As Of:
23

Bayside Executive Park a PO. Box N —-1089 m Nassau, Bahamas

m A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.



SF A LS

—
SSS
SENN SH

ES ... ASS







THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007



Bahamas
can be ‘fish
capital of
the world’

i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Should cease fisheries
exports and focus on
feeding locals, five
million tourists

THE Bahamas should
become “the fishing capital of
the world” by ceasing exports
of its seafood products and
instead focusing on feeding its
own population and the
tourism industry, a Bahamian __ to its advantage.
trade campaigner said yester- He added: “What we have
day. to do is develop the Bahamas

Paul Moss, head of Domin- as a fish capital of the world.
ion Management, a financial We must stop the casual
services provider, andaleading _ tourists coming in and taking
member of Bahamian Agitat- away 1,000 pounds of fish, and
ing fora Referendum on Free _ insist those resorts here and
Trade (BARF), said: “When coming on stream buy from
it comes to fishing, the Paradise Fisheries and others.
Bahamas has to take a differ- “It seems to me to make lit-
ent focus. If I were responsible, tle sense for Bahamas Food
I would look for the Bahamas Services and other to be
to cease, desist from all types importing fish to satisfy the
of fisheries exports.” demands of locals and tourists.

Mr Moss said fish stocks in It makes more sense to feed
the Dominican Republic, — the five million who come to
Europe and the US were our shores with our own
severely depleted, but the resources.”

Bahamas was not in such a
position and could exploit this











NOTICE is hereby given that LARRY JACQUES OF .
5139 Marion Place, West Palm Beach, FI. 33407, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows. any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




‘

.PUBLIC NOTICE
-INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

the. Public is hereby advised that |, LIONEL STAFFORD
RECKLY STIRRUP of Winton Meadows, Carrot Road,
P.O.Box EE-17535 of Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my
name to LIONEL STAFFORD RECKLEY. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write |
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the date of
publication of this notice.
















WHO STUTTER

SSSR

See Shoe.
HARLLY, OO KEES
REMEMBER YOU ARE NOT ALONER!!

Daily Vol. EPS $ Yield
Abaco Markets Es zi 550 -0.293
Bahamas Property Fund : 3 1.689
Bank of Bahamas ‘ 3 0.796
Benchmark : : 0.265
Bahamas Waste ; : 0.199
Fidelity Bank os i 0.170
Cable Bahamas . 5 0.715
Colina Holdings 7 u 0.078
Commonwealth Bank . s 0.998
Consolidated Water BDRs 2 i 0.134
Doctor's Hospital ‘ : 0.295
Famguard : 0.552
Finco é s . 0.779
FirstCaribbean - i 0.921
Focol : 3 1.476
Freeport Concrete i 2 -0.423
ICD Utilities a ; 0.532
J. S. Johnson 2 is 0.588
Premier Real Estate . is 1
” i

Private club is seeking two (2) experienced
‘full-time sous chefs with a minimum of eight
(8) years experience in the culinary field. All
standard diplomas from the Nassau Hotel Training
College are demanded. The applicants must have
extensive knowledge in management skills and
excellent levels of cooking skills. The positions
to be filled are banquet sous chef and production
sous chef.

42.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
eee 20 RND Holdings
sspeumnmnmas
: Is

8.00 ABDA

Interested persons should fax resumes to
362-6245 to the attention of:

Last 12 Months Div $
1.325275”
2.9728""*
2.500211**
1.217450****
11.3075***"*

4.2700 Colina Money Market Fund
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund

THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE

LYFORD CAY CLUB
LYFORD CAY DRIVE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

SE SOR
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidellty
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

soe
MARKET TERMS

52wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

*- 19 January 2007

> ** - 31 December 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

° 9 Div $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

*** - 31 December 2006

**** - 31 December 2006





»

THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7B



Don’t get lost in mutual
fund strategy rivalry

@ By TIM PARADIS
AP Business News

NEW YORK (AP) — To
some it is a rivalry for the ages,
akin to the one shared by the
Yankees and the Red Sox or
those who debate whether
their beer’s most important
attribute is that it tastes great
or is less filling.

As with any storied contest,
the claims of the stalwarts on
either side often draw the most
attention. So the long-running
debate over whether mutual
funds managed by profession-
als ‘are any better than those
that simply mirror major mar-
ket indexes can obscure a larg-
er point for many investors:

Neither side has to be right all .

the time to be a right fit.

Last year, both strategies,
often referred to as active and
passive investing, had their
moments. But the contest —
still a ways away from becom-
ing a Hatfield-McCoy-style
feud as portfolio managers
have yet to take up arms —
mostly came down in favor of
index funds in 2006.

Mutual funds that mirror
large and small-capitalization
indexes outperformed a major-
ity of managed funds last year,
figures from Standard & Poor’s
Corp. show. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index — a widely
used benchmark for funds —
beat 69.1 percent,of managed
large-cap funds, while the S&P

SmallCap 600 index showed a.

greater return than 63.6 per-
cent of managed smallcap
funds, according to S&P.
Among midcap funds, howev-
er, managers beat their bench-
mark, with 53.3 percent of
managed funds outperforming
the S&P MidCap 400 index.

“Stock picking skills can eas-
ily-be:swamped by a strong
market movement,” Clark
said. “It becomes difficult to
beat your benchmark because
everything is going up.”

The S&P 500 did better than
large-cap funds by more than 3
percent and the S&P Small-
Cap 600 beat smallcap funds
by nearly 2 percent. Actively
managed midcap funds topped
the S&P MidCap 400 by 0.34
percent.

For the past five years, the
S&P 500 has beaten 71.4 per-
cent of large-cap funds, while
the S&P MidCap 400 has out-
performed 79.7 percent of mid-
cap funds. The S&P SmallCap
600 has done better than 77.5
percent of small cap funds.

Clark notes that in the first
half of 2006, before the stock
market began its months-long
run-up and the Dow Jones
industrial average climbed to
néw highs, some managed
funds held the upper hand
because portfolio managers
made some defensive moves
as the market meandered.

“Indexing is a long-term






strategy and it may on occa-
sion test the patience of
investors,” said Sonya Morris,
an analyst with investment
research provider Morningstar
Inc.

Clark said long-term
investors need to remain disci-
plined and not react to every
jump or pullback in the market
when investing in index funds.
“You’re getting a greater
return but you’re also going to
pick up a little more volatility if
you stay entirely on the pas-
sive side.”

Index

Miller noted that index funds
and most actively managed
funds were burned by declines
at the start of the decade when
stocks spiraled amid an eco-
nomic recession.

“Index investors weren’t
immune from the selloff,”
Morris noted. “But those that
stuck it out have enjoyed
above average long term
returns.”

One of the main arguments

in favor of index funds such as
the well-known Spartan 500
Index Fund is their low
expense.

Morris noted that many of
these funds are essentially
commodities with little differ-
ence among them because they
are tracing indexes. “There’s

very little reason under those
conditions not to choose the
cheapest one.”

Of course, index funds are

designed to match the market,

not beat it. That’s where the
judicious use of managed funds
can help add to investors’
returns.

“T think it’s a mistake to
blindly adhere to one strategy
or the other. There is a small
minority of very talented
investors who have shown an
ability to beat the indexes over
the long haul,” Morris said.

She also noted that actively

‘managed funds often prove

their worth in certain invest-
ment categories, such as
emerging markets, where man-
agers might drawn on local
knowledge when making
investment decisions.

Ultimately, however, she
contends index funds can offer
long-term investors who are
unwilling or unable to do
research on funds a wise, low-
cost way to invest. The best
index funds offer not only low
expense ratios but also diver-
sity in their holdings, low
turnover and tax efficiency, she
said.

“T think it can be a very
potent strategy over the long
haul for disciplined long-term
investors.”

In recommending how
investors weigh active versus

7

he

CB

Vin Orne Bay
ABACU, BAKRAMAS

Bee etl mel ar ey
1-Director of Development

Objectives: Responsible for selection, supervision, and development of staff
in accordance with company policies and procedures.

Job Summary:

- Development Management in Architechite and Construction understands

business goals.

- Twenty (20) years experience as Construction Industry and Resort

Design.

- Must be educated to'at least degree level (MBA preferred) in either
Project Management of Quantity Surveying.

~ Strong Leadership, management, and communication skills providing
the ability to work in a dynamic mult-functional matrix management

environment, as a “Team Player”.

- Experience in qualifying, contract negotiation, recommendation, and
administration of Professional and Contractor Agreements.

- Computer literacy on Microsoft office products.

- Successful candidate will be reporting directly to the board of directors
and therefore must have excellent written and oral communications skills.
In-depth monthly reporting will be required

1-Quantity Surveyor

- A full time management position for a qualified and experienced Quantity

Surveyor.

- Must have experience in high end residential developments.
- Commercial/hotel experience preferred.

- Computer literacy on Microsoft office products

- Five (5) years experience as Quantity Surveyor

Please send resumes to

Attn: Human Resources Department
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB20571
Marsh Harbour Abaco
Fax: 242-367-2930







passively managed funds in »

their portfolios, Clark said he’d
favor actively managed funds if
he expected the S&P 500 to
either lose 5 percent or gain 5

' percent in the next year or so.

But he would move a bulk of
his holdings into passively
manaped funds if he expected

the S&P 500 would show
strong double-digit gains as it
did in 2006. Last year, the S&P
500’s total return was 15.79
percent. “i think sometimes
the active-passive debate gets a
little overblown and we lose
sight of investors overall
goals,” Morris said.

The Tribune wants to hear *
from people who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora °
good cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and
y share your story.



i

A CANADIAN, EDUCATION:

ANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF INDEPEN

BOARDING SCHOOL FAIR:

KES

An Exposition of the Finest Boarding Schools in Canada offering University Preparation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007

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* scholarships and tinancial assistance available

* boys/girls/co-ed boarding in attendance;
secondary grade levels otfered
* challenging academic and athletic programs

MEET REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS:

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%

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Canadian Asseciatian of Independent Schools

FOR’ aOanals INFORMATION, ‘CONTACT. DOLLY MOFFAT-LYNCH
LoS ool 10) Sea eed LILLE LO) LD MES Mireici te on.ca

Mark your calendar

Our Application Deadline

is February 2, 2007

Remember to include the following with your application : 4

ce — ar

m




e $40.00 non-refundable processing fee
¢ Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of
birth and expiration date of passport
e Official high school transcript
¢« Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!
We look forward to welcoming you to The College,
soon to be the University of The Bahamas.



at

<





BUSINESS
PAGE 88, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 ee

The Bank assésses whether objective evidence of impairment exists individually for
financial assets that are individually significant, and individually or collectively for

@MMG Bank & Trust Ltd.





Batance Sheet financial asséts that are not individually significant. If the Bank determines that no
September 30, 2006 objective evidence of impairment exists for an individually assessed financial ma
{Expressed in United States Dollars) whether significant or not, it includes the asset in a group of financial assets wit
similar credit risk characteristics and collectively assesses them for impairment.
2006 2005 Assets that are individually assessed for impairment and for which an impairment loss
Unaudited is or Continues to be recognized are not included in a collective assessment of
impairment.
he When a loan is uncollectible, it is written-off against the related provision for loan
Due trom banks (Notes 3 and 8) , impairment. Such loans are written off when all the necessary procedures have been
Non-interest earning deposits $ 15,114,915 § 8,341,641 completed and the amount of the loss has been determined. Subsequent recoveries of
apietrhenmne dees ee ao ee ‘amounts previously written-off decrease the amount of the provision for loan
r ES la impairment in the income statement, If, in a subsequent period, the amount of the
poveb dine Sromn banks TA 926373 90,922:085 impairment loss decrease and the decrease can be related objectively to an event
Available- for-sale securities (Note 4) 52,977,713 6,064.49] occurring after the impairment loss is reversed by adjusting the allowance account.
Held-to-maturity securities (Note 5) 2856 805 3.64 1 “447 _ The amount of the reversal is recognized in the income. statement.
eat ieee) Re ee Assets carried at fair value . ‘
ecrued inte! ecei 16,891 Assets Carried at fair value Beer ws .
eee oe ee 1) Pee 139,756 The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that
Other assets he 8 and 9) 307.728 53.773 a financial asset or a group of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity
gee : * investments classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged decline in the
ai i i i i i ining whether the
‘Total as ; 6 4 92,547,077 fair value of the security below its cost is considered in determining Ww I
see 2 _D9.612.738 SES. assets are itnpaired: If any such evidence exists for available-for-sale financial
2 i assets,.the cumulative loss measured as. the difference between the acquisition cost
aes sng ahd the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously
; gnized i i i ized in the statement
“us nan : : 7 5 2 recognized in profit or loss is removed from equity and recognizer 2
crtomers cer Afearp ei ea . : 8 ; a. ' of income. Impairment losses recognized in the statement of income on equity
Othe bi: iN es er 4231. 427 . 35.675 instruments are not reversed through the income statement, If, in a subsequent
Teg -—o—o—o—oor— oem period, the fair value of a debt instrument classified as available for sale increases
r iabilit , and the increase can be objectively related to an event occurring after the impairment
Total liabilities — 150,644,683 83,814,327, loss. was recégnized in profit or loss, the impairment logs is reversed through the
Contingencies (Notes 8, 10 and 14) ame of income, ; :
Equity (e) Furniture and equipment
iquity ; :
Common stock, par value $1 per share; : All furniture and equipment are stated at historical cost less depreciation. Historical
pborized, oa = outstanding: 5,000,000 oe 5,000,000 cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items.
‘Net changes in available-for-sale securities : 25,19 - :
Retained earnings: —___3,942,865. ——___3.732,750 Subsequent costs’ are included in the asset’s carrying amount or are recognised as a
T nee separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits
2 ite !
eae $268,085 _8.732,750 associated with the item will flow to the Bank and the cost of the item can be
Total liabilities aid ely $ 159,612,738 92,547,077 measured reliably.
edb Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method based on the estimated
Approved by:

useful lives of the assets as follows:

Office equipment : » 10 years
Software : 5 years



(f) Translation of Foreign Currencies

December 1, 2006

Items included in the financial statements are measured using the currency of the
ptimary economic environment in which ‘the Bank Operates (“the functional
currency”). The financial statements are presented in United States dollars, which is
the Bank’s functional and presentation currency, - Monetary assets and liabilities in
currencies other than the United States dollar are translated at rates of exchange
“prevailing at the year-end. Income and expenses in currencies other than the United
States. dollar are translated at rates of exchange existing at the dates of the
“transactions.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Notes to the Balance Sheet
7 General Information

MMG Bank & Trust Ltd. (“the Bank”) isa limited liability company established in
Nassau, Bahamas, on December 18, 1996. Its objective is to promote and participate in all
Kinds of banking, financing, and investing activities from the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. The Bank’s license was granted on January 20, 1997.

a : Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are detailed as follows:

2006 2005
bate : aha dited
The registered office of the Bank is located at First Floor, Shirley House, 50 Shirley Street, enaualte
Nassau, The Bahamas. Non-interest earning deposits $ 15,114,915 $ 8,341,641
oes ints eps Nae < Interest earning deposits, with original ;
ance s 1as been approved for issue Ly Management ecember 1, 2006. : =
Vhe balance sheet has been approved {ov issu: vy Management on December 1, 2006 maturities up to 90 days 23.285 663 33.368.154

“0 Summary of Jconifie: Alcs. 4 vulieies

The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of the balance sheet are set out
below. “These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless
otherwise stated.

4. Available-for-Sale Securities

‘ Available-for-sale securities are described as follows:

2006 2005
(a) Basis of Presentation Phas : Unaudited
; At fair-value (listed); rete
The balance sheet is ptepared in accordance with Internativnal Financial Reporting Debt securities and investment funds $ 51,202,328 $ 3,443,404
Standards (IFRS). The balance sheet is prepared under the historical cost convention U:S.A Treasury notes ; edi 1,503,042 2,338,093
as modified by the revaluation of avVailable-for-sale investment securities, Equity securities ; . a 272,343 ___- 282.904

$52,977,713 $6,064,491

The Central Bank of The Bahamas approved the change of MMG Bank & Trust
The movement in available-for-sale securities is summarized as follows:

Ltd.’s fiscal year end from December 31 to September 30.

The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with IFRS requires the use of

certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its 2006 2005
Judgment in the process of applying the Bank’s accounting policies. The areas ; Unaudited
involving a higher degree of judgment or complexity, or areas where assumptions ; :
_ and estimates are significant to the balance sheet are disclosed in Note 15. Balance at beginning of year $ 6,064,491 $ 4,900,810
Purchases 51,396,813 2,824,301
(b) Cash and Cash Equivalents Sales and redemptions : (4,508,781) (1,660,620)
' Change in fair value : ie 25190 2

The Bank considers as cash ahd cash equivalents, all deposits with original maturity
of ninety days or less.

Balance at end of year £.52.977.713 $6,064.49]

(c) Financial Assets 5.e. Held-To-Maturity Securities
The financial assets are classified in the following three categories: loans, held-to-

Held-to-maturity securities are summarized as follows:
maturity securities and available-for-sale securities. Management determines the ae

ea : : i 2006 - 2005 |
classification of its financial assets as follows: Unaudited

° Loans , Debt secu iti i .
Loans are non derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are Ee a est : 82,856,805 $3,641,447
not quoted in an active market. They arise when the Bank provides money, goods or 7

services directly to a debtor with no intention of trading the receivable. The movement in held-to-maturity securities is summarized as follows:

e Held-to-maturity

2006 2005
Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed -or Unaudited -
determinable payments and fixed maturities that the Bank’s management has the ee se 7 ; :
positive intention and ability to hold to maturity. Balance at beginning ofyear - $ 3,641,447 § 4.186 774

¢ — Available-for-sale ees i 955,052 1,710,154
Taree . le

_ Available-for-sale investments are those intended to be held for an indefinite period of ake (1,739,694) (2,243,668),

; c 1 io bet eli . Provision ‘
time, which may be sold in response to needs for liquidity or changes in interest rates, 3
exchange rates or equity prices.

(11,813)
Balance at end of year $2,856,805 £.3.641,447

Purchases and sales of financial: assets held to maturity and available for sale are 6. Loans
: 1d ae

recognized on trade date, the date on which the Bank commits to purchase or sell the

asset. Loans are recognized when cash is advanced to the borrowers. Financial assets

are initially recognized at fair value plus transaction costs for all financial assets not

’ Loans are summarized as tollows:

i . bi carried at fair value trough profit or loss. Financial assets are derecognized when the ape pee
tights to receive cash flows from the financial assets have expired or where the Bank
has transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership.
. Commercial $ 27,757,577 $25,031,504
Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Loans and Mortgage 950,000 1,096,682

held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortized cost using the effective interest
method. Gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of the available-for-
sale securities, are recognized directly in equity until the financial asset is
derecognized or impaired at which time the cumulative gain or lose previously
recognized in equity should be recognized in the profit or loss. However, interest
calculated using the effective interest method is recognized in the income statement.
Dividends on available-for-sale equity instruments are recognized in the income
statement when the entity’s right to receive payment is established.

Overdraft 25,086 4.783

: 28,732,663 26,132,969
Less: Allowance for loan losses - (24,335)

£..28.732,663 226,108,634



Movement of the allowance for loans losses:

The fair values of quoted investments in active markets are based on current bid

2006 2005
prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the Unaudited
Bank establishes fair value by using valuation techniques. These include the use of

recent arm’s length transactions, discounted cash flow analysis and other valuation ‘Balance at beginning of year $ 24,335 = § 24,335
techniques commonly used by market participants. Equity securities for which fair Reversal of allowance for loan losses (24,335) =

values cannot be measured reliably are recognized at cost less impairment.

(d) Impairment of Financial Assets

a Balance at end of year $ - . bh 24.335

Assets carried at amortized cost 7. Furainire and Equipment
The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that
a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset or a group
of financial assets is impaired and impairment losses are incurred if, and only if, there
is objective evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that occurred
after the initial recognition of the asset (a “loss event”) and that loss event (or events)
has an impact on the estimated future cash flows of the financial asset or group of

financial assets that can be reliably estimated. Objective evidence that a financial

Furniture and equipment are comprised as follows:

Office
Furniture & = Computer

Equipment Equipment Total

At September 30, 2006



: is impai i i < 9 139,756
asset or group of assets is impaired includes observable data that comes to the ee BetOook- Amount : ee : 199 784
attention of the Bank about the following loss events: Depreciation charge (660) (54.027) (54,687)

e — Significant financial difficulty of the issuer or obligor;
e a breach of contract, such as a default or delinquency in interest or
principal payments;
e the Bank granting to the borrower, for economic or legal reasons
relating to the borrower’s financial difficulty, a concession that the
lender would not otherwise consider; :
© it becoming probable that the borrower will enter bankruptcy or other financial
reorganization; ;
° the disappearance of an active market for that financial asset because of financial
difficulties; or ‘

Closing. net book amount _ 2 $546 8 283,307 = 82 84.853

At September 30, 2006 -
Cost § 8,164 $ 573,358 $ 581,522

Accumulated depreciation _ (6,618) _ (290,051) (296,669)
Net book amount $ 1546 $283,307 $ 284.853
At September 30, 2005 (Unaudited)





© — Observable data indicating that there is a measurable decrease in the estimated future a ‘ati ; Gee, Fel : 24198
cash flows from a group of financial assets since the initial recognition of those assets, Accumulated depreciation (5,958) (236,024) (241,982)
although the decrease cannot yet be identified with the individual financial assets |
the Bank. 7 oe eR en Net book amount $ L36) $138,395 § 139,756
: : ‘ ' Ssasalalnt aeraie tes mami Witenes tyenk et wes NR OT tren ht ees saree ean ne mente ney eben
eee RR A etc 8 tat necmsceliin nih he meant tniealiattittrnshteansataatamhantel tijereeh namin cate 2 ee ona He en ae ares

RPE ARTIS ah OR MOEA LEICA HORI IBL tat darlin SAN mnt me hs mem ree) se em urea? arse erruse rp rearmenn wearer oe

| i



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 9B

'

8. Balances with Related Parties The matching and controlled mismatching of the maturities and interest rates of assets and

liabilities is fundamental to the administration of the Bank. It is unusual for the Banks ever

The balance sheet includes balances with related parties, as follows: to be completely matched since business transacted is often of uncertain term and of

2006 2005 different types. An unmatched position potentially enhances profitability, but also increases
Unaudited the risk of losses.
Assets 1 a Soa aenels R or
Due from banks “ $17,576,908 S. 142mwert The maturities of assets and liabilities and the ability to replace, at an acceptable cost,
interest-bearing liabilities as they mature, are important factors in assessing the liquidity of
Loans $12,011,197 $13,981,936 the Bank and its exposure to changes in interest rates and exchange rates.
Other assets $268 «=D The maturity of assets and liabilities, based on the remaining period at balance sheet to the
contractual maturity date, are the following:
006
Without 0-3 3-6 6-12 Over 1
—Maturity. _ Months _ Months Months Year Total
> 2006 2005 Assets . :
Unaudited Due from banks $ 15,197,290 $ 23,203,288 $ 30,266,111 $ 5,032,640 $ 727,044 $ 74,426,373
ene Investments 23,607,967 17,611,981 6,771,871 2,268,777 5,573,922 55,834,518
Liabilities Loans _ | 9,283 1,004,976 10,123,947 «9,764,571 7,829,886 28,732,663
Other assets 418,142 ~_ 5,152 1.191 13,943 180,756 ___.619,184
Customers’ deposits $21,323,731 £_29,636.218 Total assets $20.232.682 $41,825,307 $.47.163.120 $17,079.93) S.14111.608 . $19,612,738
Paes Liabilities se
Other liabilities Customers’ deposits $ 34,161,352 $ 38,005,598 $ 46,010,843 $ 21,221,465 $ .6,513,998 $145,913,256
Other liabilities 4 4,731,427 ? : :
Contingencies and commitments $__ 494.894 $502,000 ‘Total liabilities ° $.38,202.779 $38,005
* Contingencies and commitments ~ Sue =~ £23,000 § 82 188 $1644 g88 s £1.755.076
9. | Other Assets :
Net liquidity gap $2220) £4.106.709 $1,065,089 $15,786,422) $_2.792.610 $_2.212,979
Other assets include account receivable of $450,000 which has been fully provided for in
this fiscal period. PUSS Tere AN ae EE Soe Ungiitines ee OR ee
Without 0-3 3-6 6-12 Over-I
10. Off-Balance Sheet Credit Risk Financial Instruments _Maturity _ lonth: Months Months Year Total
Assets ‘ ;
wee’ oye ‘ eo ws Due from bank: 8,341,641 1368,
The bank maintains financial instruments with off-balance sheet credit risk, that arise in the lnvestments , 2436994 ; *Taasa7 ; tet sea ; 538.198 : 3.644.090 ; 9.705938
normal course of business and which involve elements of credit and liquidity risk. The ae Se 992,340 7,178,323 3,067,252 14,870,719 26,108,634 °
Bank does not anticipate losses as a result of these transactions. Such financial instruments Sr 152.395 ____32.380 m+. ___18.820 ___6.825
include commitment payments for $1,755,076 (2005 - $1,502,457). Total assets $10,930,430 $35,418,646 $15,978,580 $10,879,285 $19340136 $92,547,077
: : 7 : Liabilities "
The commitment payments are exposed to credit losses in the event that the client does not Customers’ deposits $ 31,290,743 $ 16,161,304 $10,870,357 $ 19,067,865 $ 6,388,383. § 83,778,652
fulfill the payable obligation. The policies and procedures of the Bank in the approval of Other liabilities 3 Ly BSGIB cla on LRP RON SS 2 H
credit commitments are the same as those used in granting loans registered in the balance : : :
Total liabilities
sheet, ile RALI26418 £.16161.304 §_10,870.357 $19,067,865 5 6,388,383 § 83,8)4.327
Contingencies and commitments & 580:457 i 312.000 § . £ 4 £605,000 ‘ 1,502,457
Commitment payments are agreements that the Bank accepts to lend to a customer when .
. oa _ : Net liquidity gap * $£:(20,976.445) $18,940,342 § 5,108,223 $_(8,188,5R0
certain conditions are satisfied, which have an average maturity of twelve months and are ) S12d46183 $2230.29
mainly used for disbursements of credit line. The Bank does not anticipate losses as a
result of these transactions. =
: 13. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

11. Income Taxes |
The Bank is not subject to income tax in The Bahamas.
12. Financial Risk Management
Strategy in Using Financial Instruments
By its nature, the Bank activities are principally related tothe use of firancial instruments,

through accepting deposits from customers and financing received at both fixed and
floating rates and seeks to earn above average interest margins by investing these funds in

Financial instruments utilized by the Barik include recorded assets and liabilities shown in
the balance sheet, as well as items disclosed in the accompanying notes that principally
involve off-balance sheet risk. The majority of the Bank’s financial instruments are either
short-term in nature or have interest rates that automatically reset to market on a periodic
basis. Accordingly, their estimated fair values are not significantly different from their
carrying values for each major category of the Bank’s recorded assets and liabilities.

high quality assets. In addition, the Bank seeks to increase these margins by consolidating 14. Fiduciary Activities

short-term terms and lending for longer periods at higher rates while maintaining sufficient ae : .

liquidity to meet all claims that might fall due. MMG Bank & Trust Ltd. maintains off-balance sheet accounts related to trusts under
: administration. The trusts under administration amounted to $96,566,467 (2005 -

Fiduciary Risk ? $21,657,160). The Bank does not anticipate any losses as_a-result of the administration of

The Bank is susceptible to fiduciary risk, which is the risk that the Bank may fail in these trusts.

carrying out certain mandates in accordance with the wishes of its clients. To circumvent

this risk, the Bank takes a very conservative approach in its undertakings. High risk

instruments are not considered attractive instrument vehicles and are not invested in unless 15. Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments in Applying Accounting Policies

the Bank is specifically advised to do so by its clients and covered by an indemnity
agreement. :

Credit Risk

The Bank has an exposure to credit risk, which is the risk that a counterparty will be unable
to pay amounts in full when due. The Bank structures the levels of credit risk it undertakes
by placing limits on the amount of risk accepted in relation to one borrower, group of
borrowers, and to geographical segments. Such risks are monitored on a revolving basis
and subject to a frequent review. The financial assets that are potentially exposed to credit
risk are interest earning deposits and loans. The interest eaming deposits are mainly placed
with prestigious financial institutions and with the head bank.

Exposure to credit risk is managed through regular analysis of the ability of borrowers and









The Bank makes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and
liabilities within the next financial year. Estimates and judgments are continually evaluated
and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future
events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

(a) Impairment losses on loans and advances
The Bank reviews its loan portfolios to assess impairment at least on a quarterly basis.
‘In determining whether an impairment loss should be recorded in the statement of
income, the Bank makes judgments as to whether there is any observable data
indicating that there is a measurable decrease in the estimated future cash flows from





potential borrowers to meet interest and capital repayment obligations and by changing R a portfolio of loans before the decrease can be identified with an individual loan in
these lending limits where appropriate. Exposure to credit risk is also managed in part by & that portfolio. This evidence may include observable data indicating that there has
obtaining collaterals. « been an adverse change in ‘the’ payment status of borrowers in a group, or national or
local economic conditions that correlate with defaults on assets in the Bank.
The geographical distribution of assets and liabilities are as follows: . Management uses estimates based on historical loss experience for assets with credit ‘
risk characteristics and objective evidence of impairment similar to those in the i
2006 portfolio when scheduling its future cash flows. The methodology and assumptions ;
‘Accet Liabilities Contingencies used for estimating both the amount and timing of future cash flows are reviewed
. regularly to reduce any differences between loss estimates and actual loss experience. :
Panama $ 43,000,218 $ 53,323,813 $$ 1,755,076 : : !
Europe : 53,618,862 13,936,046 - (b) Impairment of available-for-sale equity investments i
Bahamas 5,888,765 74,202,483 : The Bank determines that available-for-sale equity investments are impaired when ‘
North America 57,104,893 __9,182,341 = there has been a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value below its cost. This i
$1,755,076 determination of what is significant or prolonged requires judgment. In making this ;
S182.6)2,738 — £150,044,083 judgment, the Bank evaluates among other factors, the normal volatility in share i
prices. In addition, impairment may be appropriate when there is evidence of a \
2005 Unaudited deterioration in the financial health of the invested, industry and sector performance, '
changes in technology, and operational and financing cash flows. ‘
Asset Liabilities Contingencies ‘
c) Held-to-maturity investments
Panama $ 45,614,775 $37,911,317 $ 402,000 e The Bank folloves the guidance of IAS 39 on classifying non-derivative financial
Eurnpe ‘ 19,584,361 10,941,204 i assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity as held-to-maturity. ‘
Bahamas 13,866,591 34,719,910 ey : Aes : ae: . . aoa 5
North America 13.481.350 241 896 This classification requires significant judgment. In making this judgment, the Bank :
evaluates its intention and ability to hold such investments to maturity. If the Bank ;
$92,547,077 $_83.814.327 $1,502,457 fails to keep these investments to maturity other than for the specific circumstances - 8
for example, selling an insignificant amount close to maturity — it will be required tc ;
Interest Rate Risk reclassify the entire class as available-for-sale. The investments would therefore be ;
The Bank is exposed to various risks associated with the effects of market fluctuations on measured at fair value not amortized cost. 4
interest rates, Following is a summary of the Bank’s exposure to interest rates risks that a
includes assets and liabilities classified by the earlier of contractual repricing of maturity t
dates.
pa OG :
a, i
0-3 3-6 6-12 Over I Hh | ) RICEVVATERHOUSE( COPERS :
use font! Months — Months Year Bearing Total ’ :
7 ; ® ‘ 2 ‘
pease sana Swuaeul + sages mies tla Seen |
Loans, net 1,004,976 10,123,947 9,764,571 7,829 886 9,283 . 28,732,663 East Hill Street ,
Other assets 5,152 L19L 17.943 __180,756 ___418.142 __619.184 P.O. Box N-3910 5
Total assets $41,825,397 $4716.20 £12072] SI4911608 $39,232,682 $159,612.738 Wane et eece i
‘ : : E-mail: pwcbs@bs.pwe.com a
Liabilities an ; HA Telephone (242) 302-5300 i
Customers’ deposits $ 38,005,598 $46,010,843 $ 21,221,465 $ 6,513,998 $ 34,161,352 ° $145,913,256 Facsimile (242) 302-5350 {
Other liabilities ; - 2 is 7 4,731,427 4,731,427 4
”
Total liabilities” $38,005,508 $46,010,843 $21,221,465 $6,513,008 $38,892,772 £150,644,683
Contingencies and commitments 4 23,000 § 87.188 $1,644,888 § sa fi = 4£...1.255,076 x
x
2005 Unaudited 4
7 ’ ’
0-3 3-6 6-12 Over 1 Ri INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT ‘
ene —Months _ _Months _ Months. ___Year. _Bearing — __Total__ i
as “ 2 . q
ee eg ee To the Shareholder of MMG Bank & Trust Li
Loans, net 992,340 7,178,323 3,067,252 14,870,719 . 26,108,634 :
Oey mses 2280 ________ ___18.820 ____6,825 152.393 210.420 We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of MMG Bank & Trust Ltd., (the Bank) as of i
Total assets $3541R.646 $_15,978.580 $10,879,285 $19,340,136 $10,930,430 $92,547,077 September 30, 2006. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our ‘
Eabuiies ; responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit. 5
: ’ 1 2 2
Othe Habits ea eet aioe eee Ponsa ale We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those ;
siaviahiliies ra : Standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about i
Rol SASL AAI ST 8 IB. OS7. RNS SGARBIR3 S3LI2641E § 83.814327 whether the balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a a
Contingencies and commitments’ $317,000 fs Gt, 8 005,000 $580,457 $1,502,457 test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also a
, includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our
audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
The tollowing are the effective rates collected and paid by the Bank for different assets and In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
liabilities: MMG Bank & Trust Ltd., as of September 2006 in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards.
2006 2005
Unaudited Due to the change. in the Bank’s fiscal period for the year 2006, the balance sheet as of
Assets September 30, 2005 was compiled by us and is presented solely for comparative purposes. The
Due from banks 5.89% 3.74% accompanying balance sheet as of September 30, 2005 was not audited by us, and accordingly, ;
Investment securities 3.45% \ 2.12% we do not express an opinion on it. The balance sheet as of December 31, 2005, was audited by
Loans 7.05% 7.07% us, and in our report dated March 13, 2006, we expressed an unqualified opinion on them. ’
Liabilities :
Customers’ deposits 5.66% 5.17%
J
Liquidity Risk face datel hinwete ‘i
The liquidity risk is the risk that the Bank will be unable to fulfill all of its obligations. The Chartered
Bank mitigates this risk setting limits on the minimum proportion of funds available in high D . etec: Mecountants
liquidity instruments and limits of interbank and others borrowing facilities. : Seonue rage une



Full Text
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FILES






PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

inister responds to FNM leader's



promise on windshield information

TRANSPORT Minister
Glenys Hanna-Martin has
responded to the Opposi-
tion leader’s promise to
remove personal informa-
tion from the windshields
of cars.

At arally in Fox Hill last
week, FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham said that if his
party were to win the com-
ing general elections, he
would see to it that “per-
sonal data”. was removed
from vehicle registration
disks.

Mr Ingraham comment-
ed that under the FNM, no
longer would people be
able to approach a car and
“see where you're living”.

In response, Mrs Hanna-
Martin said yesterday: “I

wish to advise that the
Road Traffic Department
discontinued the practice
of placing the owner’s
address on motor vehicles
since 1998.”

The information current-
ly printed on license disk
includes:

° owner’s name

e license plate number

e expiry date of vehicle
registration;

e vehicle information/
vehicle type ie Ford Mus-
tang

° fee paid;

e vehicl® serial/chassis_.
number ©.

e inspection/decal num-
ber

® insurance expiry date

e validation number





“I wish to advise that the
Road Traffic Department
discontinued the practice of
placing the owner’s address on
motor vehicles since 1998.”

us EEE

e registering clerk’s sig-

nature
a) date.

“P reiterate, therefore
that the addresses of vehi-
.cle owners are not printed
on the license disk and

have not done so for more

than eight years.”

-The information as print-
ed by the clerk is vital for
several reasons, Mrs Han-
na-Martin said.

She noted that in the
event of an accident, vital
information can be
obtained from the disks,
which also aid police in
determining is a vehicle has

the correct licence plates.

“T am pleased to advise
that the Road Traffic
Department, in an effort to
enhance its services and to
make those services more
accessible to the Bahamian
people, is engaged ina
number of initiatives to
modernise its motor vehi-

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Transport Minister
Glenys Hanna-Martin

cle registration and driver’s

license systems,” she
added.

“The Road Traffic
Department recently

upgraded and in some,
instances introduced for the
first time photo driver’s
licenses and learner’s per-
mits in Family Island dis-
tricts. These services are
available in New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Long Island and
Eleuthera.

“Plans are underway to
introduce within the next
few weeks these services to
Exuma and Andros. This
will complete the first
phase of this exercise.”

Additionally, she said,
the Road Traffic Depart-
ment proposes to expand
its services in the Eight
Mile Rock and West End
districts of Grand Bahama,
as well as Inagua, Cat
Island and Bimini.



FNM claims that

' Delaporte residents
# are angry over the

state of local parks

DELAPORTE residents
are angered over the “dan-
gerous and neglected state”
of their local parks, according
to the FNM.

The current state of the
parks, said opposition candi-
date of the area Dr Hubert
Minnis, is the result of work
started several years ago and
then simply abandoned.

Dr-Minnis said he did a
thorough walkabout and was
shocked at what residents
pointed out to him at the
parks — “up to eight feet deep
uncovered holes in the
ground, rotting wood with
exposed rusty nails, chest-high
weeds and bushes, accumulat-

ing garbage, waste water

breeding mosquitoes, aban-
doned construction sites, and
other serious health hazards.
A children’s party had just
been held on one of the sites
last weekend,” Dr Minnis said
in a statement.

He noted that several years
ago, the Ministry of Works
and Neville Wisdom, the PLP
incumbent for the constituen-
cy, began to construct a bath-
room at the public seaside
playground across from the
popular restaurant and bar
“Nesbitt’s” on West Bay
Street. “However, soon after,
construction was completely
abandoned and never fin-
ished.”

Dr Minnis said the busy
park, which is regularly used —
especially on weekends by
school children and residents
in the area — now has an
incomplete bathroom that
cannot be used.

“Of most'concern to the res-
idents is a huge gaping open
hole that had been dug to
accommodate a cesspit for the
bathrooms.

“The septic tank now sits on
top of the ground uninstalled,
and the pit remains exposed,
filling with water, garbage, and
mosquitoes.



“Of most concern to the
residents is a huge gaping open —
hole that had been dug to |
accommodate a cesspit for the
bathrooms. The septic tank
now sits on top of the ground
uninstalled, and the pit remains
exposed, filling with water,
garbage, and mosquitoes.”
ane

Opposition candidate for Delaporte

“The building itself has no
roof, windows, doors, toilets
or infrastructure whatsoever,”
said Dr Minnis.

“The rickety and rusting
scaffolding used to construct
the building was never
removed and acts as an entice-
ment for neighbourhood chil-
dren to climb and seriously
hurt themselves.”

He said that during his
walkabout, residents
expressed their fear that the

abandoned building, con-:

struction rubble, and gaping
pit in the ground are a dan-
ger to the neighbourhood chil-
dren and an eyesore, “but
even after several years, no
one has bothered to complete
the bathroom.”

Dr Minnis said residents are
anxious that the abandoned
building will encourage crimi-
nal activity and predators in
the area and may be used for
illicit drugs.

“The abandoned structure
sits right in open view on West
Bay Street and is viewed not
only by tourists visiting the
area, but by all visitors on
their way driving into Nassau
from the airport along the
seashore road. Not only is the

Dr Hubert Minnis

incomplete structure a blot on
the landscape, it blocks the
already limited view of the sea
from the road.

“One resident complained
that Mr Wisdom must pass the
site every single day but has
never returned to complete
the bathrooms. ‘How could he
just forget about it?’ he
asked.”

Dr Minnis said that resi-

-dents in Tropical Gardens

were also outraged over work
started at their local park sev-
eral years ago, but also never
completed.

A few playground items had
been brought to the park, he
said, “but the equipment
could never be used as the
ground is uneven and rocky
with weeds waist-high hiding
dangerous holes in the
ground.”

“There is litter and discard-
ed wooden packing crates that
can trip children, causing them
to fall. Despite several years
passing, the swings have not
been installed and piles of fill
and rubble remain. The pro-
posed basketball court is
unfinished and is collecting
rainwater breeding mosqui-
toes,” he said.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 3





In brief

Man sustains
serious
injuries in
shooting

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT- Grand
Bahama Police are investigat-
ing a shooting that occurred
early Tuesday morning in the
Fishing Hole Road area, in
which one man sustained seri-
ous gunshot injuries to the
body.

The victim, Cedric Wright,
28, of Jones Town, Eight Mile
Rock, is detained in serious
condition at the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital.

According to police reports,
Wright had just arrived at
work around 6.40am at the
construction site of Interna-
tional Wholesale Grocers on
Fishing Hole Road when the
incident occurred.

He told police that he was
in the process of getting some
tools from his car trunk when
aman he recognised pulled
up in a gold-coloured car and
fired two shots at him and
fled.

Wright was struck by bullet
in the left side. However, he
was able to drive to Central
Police Station, where detec-
tives assisted him in getting to
the hospital.

Superintendent Basil Rab-.
ming said the motive for the
shooting is unclear. He said
police are still searching the
shooter.

Four appear on
housebreaking,
stealing and
drug charges

B By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -— A number of
persons*were arraigned together
in Freeport’s magistrate’s court
on housebreaking, stealing’and
drug possession charges.

Grace Ann Miller, 50, and her
son Matthew Miller, 18, of Coral
Reef Estates, along with Allison
McKenzie, 19, and Jamal Cleare,
30, were charged with 10 counts
of housebreaking, stealing, receiv-
ing, and unlawful possession.

It is alleged that the group
broke into several homes and
stole a number of items during a
series of break-ins that began on
October 14 last year.

The items included jewellery,
wrist watches, TV sets, VCRs,
DVDs, Gameboys Playstations,
cellular phones, computer equip-
ment a shotgun and cartridges.

Additionally, the Miller family,
including the father, Washington
Miller, 58, was charged with pos-
session of a small quantity of mar-
ijuana.

The defendants pleaded not
guilty to the charges and were
granted bail in the sum of $17,000
with sureties.

The matter was adjourned to
May 29 for trial.

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Bahamian boat captain, US man, charged in

@ By ALISON LOWE

connection with human smuggling operation

iioune satreponer Pair COUld face life imprisonment if convicted



A BAHAMIAN boat
captain and an American
have been charged in the
US in connection with a
human smuggling operation

that left one immigrant
drowned.

According to several news
reports in the US, it is

‘alleged that the men were
attempting to transport the
group from Freeport to
Florida in December



Pair charged with second-degree

murder over deaths of three women.

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men were charged with second-
degree murder yesterday in a Miami federal
court — after one of them was arrested while
travelling on a speedboat from the Bahamas.

The men were charged in connection with
the deaths of three Caribbean women dur-
ing a crossing from Nassau to South Florida in
2005, according to a US news report.

Two of the women — Diane Mecca Thomp-.

son, a Jamaica native and mother of two in her
20s who had been working as a bartender in
Nassau, and Angeline Thelusma of Jean-
Rabel, Haiti, were found November 5 on the
sand on Pompano Beach. A third woman's
body was found, but she was never identi-
fied.

The report, printed in The Miami Herald,
said it is alleged that the women formed part
of a group of eight passengers who were
forced overboard by the men — Zhivargo
McBride and Devon Russell, who had alleged-
ly been paid to transport them — in the middle
of the night as the 19-foot sailboat approached
Broward County.

Yesterday McBride entered his plea in Fort
Lauderdale. Russell still faces charges of prof-
iting from the smuggling job and causing the
deaths of the three women.







work was causing huge traffic jams



lH ROADWORKS on East Bay Street set the nerves
of motorists on edge yesterday. Drivers said that the




(Photo by: Ana Bianca Marin)

The indictment against McBride and Russell
refers to a fourth passenger, named only as "Y
F" who suffered serious injury as a result of
allegedly being forced into the ocean by the
men.

The prosecution is claiming that it was
shortly after 4.30am, with the Florida coastline
far off, that the men ordered everyone off
the boat.

The indictment alleges that McBride killed -

Ms Thompson “by ordering her off a boat
and into deep water.”

Ms Thompson's parents reportedly told The
Miami Herald that their daughter had always
dreamed of coming to the United States. They
currently live in Los Gatos, California.

Her father reportedly said he had no idea
she had been planning to illegally enter the
country.

Thompson and Thelusmas' bodies were dis-
covered separately along the Florida coast,

‘the report said.

McBride remained a fugitive until July
when he was identified — after detection by a
US Customs and Border Protection surveil-
lance plane — as one of the passengers
onboard a speedboat travelling during the
night from the Bahamas.

The report said that after two high-pow-
ered US patrol vessels gave chase, he was
taken into custody.





A
eke
aU ee

See tg
May
Eye

of last year.

Boat captain Rickey
Thompson, 40, and Leon
Brice Johnson, 38, could
face life imprisonment if
convicted on conspiracy and
related charges.

The vessel in question
first came into the hands of
US authorities after it ran
aground on the Florida
coast at Blowing Rocks Pre-
serve at around 11pm on
December 28, 2006.

Inspecting the 35-foot
boat, authorities .allegedly
discovered 83 pounds of
marijuana, one kilo of
cocaine, a handgun and
nearby, nine illegal immi-
grants swimming in rough
waters, according to US
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement.

A Jamaican man - said to
be the tenth illegal immi-
grant — was found drowned.

US authorities are claim-
ing that the group — made
up of one Haitian, seven

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Jamaicans and a Romanian
- had waited days or
even weeks in Freeport
before beginning their
journey.

According to the Califor-
nia-based news website:
newsblaze.com, the indict-
ment alleges that each
immigrant had paid Thomp-
son between $2,000 and
$4,000 for transportation
from the Bahamas.

It said the indictment also
claims that as the vessel
approached the shore near
Jupiter Island in Martin
County, “Thompson
ordered the migrants off the
boat in deep, rough waters,
although one of the aliens
had previously told Thomp-
son that he could not
swim.

“When this individual was
ordered off the boat, he
again told Thompson and
Johnson that he could not
swim, but was still ordered
to jump off the boat.”



























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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Speak to
electorate on
important and

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon) LED. D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Vote for sale mocks democracy

IN THIS column yesterday we com-
mented on Fred Mitchell’s suggestion for
both political parties to come together to
cap election spending.

The opinion of a gentleman who has
“worked” several elections, first as a can-
vasser for the PLP, but more recently for
the FNM, is that the politician is to blame
for encouraging voters to think that elec-
tion time is for their financial benefit rather
than considering what benefits the candi-
date, if elected, could offer the country.
“The voter wants personal care,” he says,
“not national care.”

Before elections can be cleaned up, he .

said, politicians have to start campaigning
on issues, not on how much they give their
“generals” — the leading persons in a com-
munity — to hand out to a voter in terms of
contracts, money, payment of debts and
refurbishing of homes.

Voters, he said, have to be weaned away
from the idea that every five years is a one-
day bonanza for them as they figure out

what they can get out of a candidate for —

themselves — in exchange for their vote.

He talked mainly of the years when he
was a part of the team that campaigned
for the PLP.

He said that in house-to-house cam-
paigning they would concentrate on the
homes that could deliver up several votes
— seven, nine, 12. These were the homes
on which politicians focused their spending
in return for a bloc vote from each home.

“Of course,” he said, “the politician pre- ~

ferred to give jobs, for example cleaning
parks, removing rubbish from the con-
stituency, ‘painting houses, or repairing
roofs.

“This way they kill two birds with one
stone.

“They not only give out money, but cre-
ate jobs for the unemployed youth in the
constituency.”

Very often, he said, a “general” will col-
lect all the voters cards from a home in
which his candidate has bought the vote
and will hold them until election day. He
then picks up the voters whose cards he
holds and personally takes them to the
polls.

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He only gives them their cards when he
is shepherding them to the polling booth.
“Whoever gives you money first,” said
the gentleman, “is the candidate that you

- are going to support. However, today some

of these voters will take the money and
vote for the opposing candidate.” ;

For example, he said, there are occa-
sions when a voter will ask for $2,000 to pay
his mortgage.

If his vote is important, and he can influ-
ence many other voters in the area, the
candidate will probably give him $1,000
with a promise that he can collect the
remaining $1,000 if he votes the right way

_and influences as many friends as possible

to do the same.
And how can the politician be certain

that his investments have paid off? Appar-

ently, there are several ways, but according
to our informant, the “Oops, I made a mis-
take!” method is the favourite.

When the voter has marked his X in the
secrecy of the polling booth, he is supposed
to fold his voter’s card inwards, hold it up
for polling officials to see, and then drop it
into the ballot box.

Each candidate has his scrutineers in the
room.

However, the “bought” voter who must
verify his vote often folds the card out-
wards, quickly holds it up showing the scru-
tineers that he has marked his X for their
candidate, then just as quickly exclaims:
“Oops, I made a mistake!” folds it inwards,
and drops it into the box.

This, said our informant, was a favourite
trick during the Pindling era. However, it is
a trick that both sidés should watch for
and challenge.

But, Mr Mitchell will never get election
spending capped until all politicians agree
that there will be no more vote buying

and the Bahamian electorate can be edu- -

cated to understand that they are actually
being insulted when another man or
woman offers to pay for their vote.

A vote for sale also makes a mockery of
the many sacrifices made over the years
by enlightened Bahamians who fought hard
to win the one-man one-vote for Bahami-
an men and women.





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EDITOR, The Tribune.

ANSWERING
machines....answering
machine...you have got to be
kidding me. Please allow me a
few brief lines to speak to the
recent comments made by the
former Prime Minister at the
opposition’s mini rallies held

_ in Long Island and Fox Hill.

Unfortunately I was unable
to attend the rallies but I am
certain that I am not alone in
this state...and as such I, like
thousands of others, had to
rely on the excerpts provided
by the print and broadcast
media.

I could not believe that of
all the issues plaguing the
Bahamas today the opposition
found it important to talk to
the public about personal
information on vehicle license
discs (which by the way have
been modified for over five
years now where only the
name of the driver and the
insurance company is listed),
removing automated answer-
ing systems in government
corporations (just for infor-
mation purposes most systems
are designed to direct the
caller to a live person by sim-
ply pressing “0” at anytime
during the process), and then
there was the comment about
staggering the closing of the
grouper season to different
locations in the Bahamas
(how is that supposed to work,
are we going to tag the fish
from Ragged Island to differ-
entiate from the fish in Long
Island?)

Please, please this election
period speak to the electorate
on important, pertinent and
real issues. Just in case the
opposition find themselves
void of ideas can I suggest a
few:

Tell the public how:

e An FNM administration
will curb the crime issue that is
presently threatening all of
our lifestyles?

© How will an FNM admin-
istration prepare our country
for the severe shortage of
skilled and unskilled workers
that will be required for all
the proposed anchor develop-
ments. that will be a reality
before we know it?

© How will an FNM admin-
istration move to really diver-
















auto @
sales =
LIMITED

Dea beltts

letters@triounemedia.net






sify our economy to create
more of a balance?

e How will an FNM admin-
istration reverse the obvious
“brain drain” of young
Bahamian professionals?

© How will an FNM admin-
istration solve our ever vex-
ing immigration problem?

the

pertinent issues

advisers, PR specialists and
others are for. If the opposi-
tion continues to conduct ral-
lies without substance then
they will only serve to confirm
to me and many others that
they really have no plan for
the Bahamas (long or short
term) and are only doing what
I and others now know them
to do best...razzle and dazzle
with pretty colours and good
music.

Criticism without offering
an alternate view is a waste of

e What is the FNM’s solu-
tion to providing affordable
Health Care for the Bahamian
public?

I could really go on and on
but that’s what the highly paid

my and the public’s time. See
ya at the polls! :

SEAN A. FARRINGTON
Nassau,
January 22, 2007.

Real men applaud and

encourage women

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS letter is in response to a letter written in the Tribune on 22
January by a Mr Eugene Beckford. It did not speak kindly about
women and it appeared to promote an alternative lifestyle. I do not
believe Mr Beckford exists, but is a coward hiding this name. The
letter mentioned my name so I must respond.

eeee

MALE chauvinists often try to dismiss or downplay the contribution
and the ability of women. They have no respect for women and they
have no feelings for them either. Many males cannot come to grips with
the fact that women are their equal. While on the other hand wise
women acknowledge that the man is the head of the family.

There are a species of males who cannot in their wildest dreams
accept women in any part of their lives; therefore they treat them as an
object. The fact of'the matter is that men who behave in a superior man-

ner to women id most:cases have no wives or children therefore they

have no feelings for the opposite sex.

These ‘imale chauvinist pigs” cannot fathom how any woman could
expéct to be on equal footing with men in the workplace, in the church
and in politics. Some male members of Parliament believe that the halls
of Parliament should be an “all boys club”. There is great suspicion with
this kind of thinking and/or behaviour. One could easily conclude
that maybe a “third gender” is being promoted.

The upcoming general elections will see many ladies, especially on
the FNM ticket. Should they be taken less seriously because of their
gender, I think not. Should we expect less ability, sincerity enthusiasm
or performance from females in parliament, certainly not? Shotld
they just pack up their bags and go home to their families to cook, clean

and caretake their children, just because some colourful characters are,

afraid to have them around, most definitely not.

All female politicians, both PLP and FNM have every right to serve °

their country in whatever capacity, even politics. So, Mr Eugene Beck-
ford, if there is such a person, even though you are advocating for an
alternative lifestyle, must accept that women have always been in
charge whether behind the scenes in the home, out front supporting her
husband and in many cases genuinely making a name for herself, by
herself.

The family must be supported. It must be strengthened and no plan
to create an alternative lifestyle should be encouraged. The only way
for the world to continue is for a husband and wife to build a family,
nothing else. A woman balances everything. One thing for sure is
that a mother would always protect her children. She would die before
she gives away her children’s birthright. We need women in the mix.
Real men applaud and encourage their women, but all males are not
men.

DIONNE EDGECOMBE
Nassau, :
January 23, 2007.

People who handle
food must wear gloves

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD like you to know that here in the Bahamas that the
persons who handle or serve food need to be trained that they must
use gloves and not serve food with their bare hands. I witnessed at
a popular, downtown restaurant a young lady who served me with
her bare hands and as she did so she placed her fingerprints into the
serving bowls into which she was placing my food. Then a few
minutes later I watched in disbelief as she proceeded to go to the
cash register and handle cash with the same bare hands with which
she served my food. I was astounded since this is not the first time
that I had to deal with this type of behaviour.

In the past I have protested by walking out of the establish-
ment or asking the food handlers to wash their hands and put on
gloves. I was in a hurry today and I prayed that I would not get sick
from such a nasty practice by this person.

I am amazed that these food handlers do not realise that all
kinds of viruses are on money that pass from one person to the next
and to handle money and to then handle food will cause persons to
get sick and pay a lot of money in doctors’ bills. I guess these restau-
rants and their food handlers are waiting to have a legal suit issued
against them that could perhaps cause their food establishment a lot

_ of bad press and money. I guess that is what will have to happen

before these food handlers learn to practice proper sanitary food
service and wear gloves every time they serve food. I guess these
restaurants will have to wait until they are forced to close down
because of poor food handling practices that is detrimental to
public health. Perhaps that is what needs to happen to all these
restaurants that are so concerned about making money at the
expense of the health of their patrons. The Ministry of Public
Health needs to go under cover and shut down any such food
establishment in this country where the persons do not wear gloves
while serving food, etc.

WEAR GLOVES

While serving food or face being
shut down for poor food handling
Nassau,

January 19, 2007.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 5







In brief

New passport
rules for air
travellers go
into effect

@ ATLANTA

AMERICANS flying to
Mexico, Canada and the
Caribbean made sure to bring
their passports because of a
new tule going into effect
Tuesday that requires them
to show one to get back into
the country, according to
Associated Press.

Only about a quarter of
US. citizens hold valid pass-
ports, and most Americans
are accustomed to traveling
to neighboring countries with
just a driver's license or birth
certificate, which have long
been sufficient to get through
airport customs on the trip
home.

The new regulations requir-
ing passports were adopted
by Congress in 2004 to secure
the borders against terrorists.

Travelers at Hartsfield-
Jackson Atlanta Internation-
al Airport and other airports
on Monday said they had no
complaints about the require-
ment.

"I'd rather be going
through a security check, than
possibly being blown out of
the air because of lack of
security measures," John
Golden of Columbus, Geor-
gia, who was headed to Can-
cun, Mexico.

Starting Tuesday, Canadi-
an, Mexican and Bermudan
air travelers, as well as U.S.
citizens flying home from
those countries or the
Caribbean, must display their
passports to enter the Unit-
ed States.

The only valid substitutes
for a passport will be a
NEXUS Air card, used by
some American and Canadi-
an frequent fliers; identifica-
tion as a U.S. Coast Guard
merchant mariner; and the
green card carried by legal
permanent residents. Active
members of the U.S. ay
are exempt). > |

only air travelers. Land and
séa. travelers will not have to
show passports until at least
January 2008. Air travelers
who cannot produce a pass-
port will be interviewed by
customs agents, who will
decide whether to let them
into the country.

"We're not seeing a panic
from travelers because we've
been pretty diligent in telling
them for over a year that they
need a passport.

“It's written on any piece
of paper we have going out,"
said AAA spokeswoman
Teresa Hildebrand.

Internet travel sites such as

‘Expedia.com have posted
warnings "in bold with excla-
mation point," said company
spokeswoman Erin Krause,
adding that agents followed-
up with e-mails to customers
traveling to the affected des-
tinations.

Canadian consulate officials
in the U.S. reported fielding
hundreds of calls a day, most
from the approximately
100,000 Canadian "snow-
birds" who spend the winter
in Florida or Arizona and
feared they might not be able
to fly back without passports,
said Lawrence Barker, presi-
dent of the Canadian Snow-
bird Association. (They can,
Barker said.)

WVBR Et

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 24TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM

8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

9:00 | Opening Ceremony National

Tourism Conference

National Tourism Week








10:30




Proclamation
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update





12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 __ Island Lifestyles

1:30 — Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee






















2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 » Bahamas Tonight

8:00 1|Can See

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 10th Annual Cacique
Awards 2006

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response




1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!





Anger over heavy-load
truck missing wheel

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MEMBER of the public

was left outraged yesterday
after seeing a heavy-load
truck missing one of its back
wheels being driven on the
streets of Nassau — only to
later be informed by police
that they “can't do anything
about it”.
- The angry source said the
issue is indicative of an
already huge and growing
problem of obviously unsafe
vehicles being allowed to con-
tinue travelling on Bahami-
an streets.

The Nassau) woman
explained how she was trav-
elling on Abundant Life
Road when the dodgy truck
pulled out in front of her.

It soon became obvious
that the vehicle was missing
one of its back wheels on the
right side — the axle was sim-
ply dangling.

Though the truck was still
technically driveable, as it had
more than two sets of wheels
in total, the missing back
wheel on the right side meant

that the wheel on the left side -

leaned precariously outwards
due to the lopsided weight of
the truck — looking about

_ ready to fly off at any minute.

The woman took several

- photos before setting off with

the intention of reporting the
vehicle to the authorities.
However, seeing a police offi-
cer at the bank shortly after,
she took the opportunity to
show her the photos, and
explain her concerns.

It was then that she was
informed that if it’s a “regis-
tered, licensed vehicle, we
can't do anything about it.”

- This despite the fact that
the vehicle also clearly had a
US licence plate,— something

‘Bor now; “the: lees affect wb ..that Jerome ‘Bethel, assistant

: controller at the Department’

of Road Traffic, said would
indicate that it had never
been licensed in _ the
Bahamas.

When it was brought to the
attention of the officer that
the truck did not bear a
Bahamian licence plate, the



@ THE truck — with a US licence plate — was missing a back wheel on its right side.

officer then responded that
nothing can be done unless it
has a Bahamian plate.
Meanwhile, the source said
the officer agreed that there
are a large number of vehi-
cles in New Providence that
are not roadworthy, but that
as long as people are being
cleared by those who are
inspecting the vehicles,
“there's nothing (the police)
can do about it.”
Responding to this e
ment, Mr Bethel Laid ave
Road Traffic deparjent
does not tolerate such dan-
gerous vehicles. He said it is
indeed the police's responsi-
bility to ensure they are
brought in to be inspected.
"They are supposed to
make us aware of that," he

Demolitions still
part of plans for

Cable Beach
transformation

@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter



THE demolition of the Nassau Beach Hotel and two
towers of the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace
Casino is still part of the plan for the transformation of

Cable Beach.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of
administration and public affairs, confirmed for The Tri-
bune yesterday that the demolition is scheduled to take
place in the second half of this year.

Mr Sands said that Baha Mar also hopes to.

get underway with work on the roads and certain ‘build-
ings on the Cable Beach strip within the next three

months.

Announcements

Although Baha Mar has not yet demolished the police
and fire stations on West Bay Street — which was initial-
ly scheduled to happen in the last quarter of 2006 — Mr
Sands said that the developers will soon be able to make
some announcements regarding their construction sched-

ule.

“We’re hoping that in due course we’ll be able to make
some very positive statements about some definite tim-
ings, especially in light of the road and the commercial
buildings which are the two major projects we hope to
jump-start sometime during in the first quarter of this

year,” he said.

Mr Sands said that Baha Mar is currently working to
finalise arrangements with Harrah’s Entertainment, which
will give the world-renowned casino operator a 43 per
cent equity stake in the project.

Some of those arrangements, Mr Sands said, are

still

subject to approval by the government.

Baha Mar expects its $2.4 billion transformation of the
Cable Beach strip to be finished by 2011.

The first phase of the hotel construction will entail the
$80 million renovation of the Radisson into a Sheraton-

brand hotel.

Upgrades to 300 rooms and all the resort’s public areas
are expected to be completed by May, 2007.

said.
street and has a defective part
the police have the authority
to stop it and bring it to us to
be inspected.”

"Everything that comes
here we make sure that it is in
good working order. After
something has left here and it
deteriorates after a period of
time, it is the police’s job, if
they see it and it is not up to
par, to bring it back to us and
we will put it off the street or
give them time to get it fixed,

"If a vehicle is on the.

whatever the situation is," he
explained.

"They are the persons who
look for this stuff, we don't
have officers that go out there
and look for this stuff — our
officers would have no juris-
diction over a private vehicle
when it gets out there, only
when it comes here."

The concerned citizen said
that in Canada — where she

-lived for a number of years —

there have been numerous

cases of trucks with insecure .



wheels causing fatal accidents
on highways.

She agreed that the issue
of the number of unsafe vehi-
cles on Bahamian streets
could be a political one — with
politicians unwilling to make
the potentially unpopular
movement towards stamping
out unsafe vehicles from the
streets because doing so
would be very costly to a
large percentage of the public
who currently drive poorly
maintained cars or trucks.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

On Premises
Check Our Price

Before buying
Bahamas Bus & Truck |

Call:

322-1722


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





@ CARMICHAEL MP
John Carey

Q: What are your
views on the death
penalty? Can it serve
as a deterrent?

CAREY: I strongly sup-
port the death penalty
because it is a punishment.

I am not looking at a
deterrent in that sense.

I think if you kill someone
you should be executed, that
has nothing to do with deter-
ring the fellow down the
street, but certainly you will
not do it again.

BANNISTER: I think sta-
tistics show that the death
penalty is not a deterrent but
it is the law of the Bahamas.
Under the FNM it was car-
ried out notwithstanding the
personal views of anyone in
the administration.

It was carried out to loud
boisterous protest from a
number of persons now in
the cabinet.

Minister Fred Mitchell,
Minister Alfred Sears, Min-
ister Glenys Hanna Martin,
a number of them protested
the carrying out of the death
penalty.

The death penalty may not
be a deterrent, however, the
people of the Bahamas have
seen fit to keep it as a law of
the land.

In justice there is not only
the aspect of deterrent, there
is the aspect of seeing that
justice is done.







ELECTION

FACE OFF

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr — Chief Reporter





Yesterday, the PLP incumbent for Carmichael John Carey and his FNM challenger Desmond Bannister
faced off on foreign investment, crime and immigration. Today, they go head to head on the death

penalty, education and their ideas about improving Conditions in the constituency.

Q: How do you think
the country's
education system can
be reformed?

CAREY: I think you have
to put an incentive and
award system in place for
teachers.

As a former teacher if you
gave an incentive to produce
a 50 per cent pass at the
BGCSE I would probably
work harder to do that.

You have to look at
streamlining students. Per-
sons who need to be stream-
lined into vocational areas
are streamlining into acade-
mic areas even though
everyone cannot be acade-
mically gifted.

What we have is thousands
of people with such a low
passing grade coming out
and in some instances they

‘can be defined by that term

‘functionally illiterate’
because they cannot hold
certain positions in society
because they are not capa-
ble.

A lot of that has to do
with what happens in the
social promotion programme
of the education system,

which I think we eradicated

when we came into office.

BANNISTER: Carmichael
is blessed with great primary
schools. Those schools are
very much a shining beacon
for the community. Howev-

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ©

I If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Ta ios

Satellite Offices in Nassau

WILL BE CLOSED

to the public on
Friday, January 26, 2007.

Our main office at Bolam House,
George Street as well as our desks at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport
and Festival Place will remain open.

Please direct all inquiries to our main
line at 242-302-2000

We sincerely apologize for any
inconvenience caused.





Webahidiias
“10

er, there are two things that
need to be addressed in the
area of education.

The first is the fact that
there is no junior high in the
area and so we have young
people in the community
who have to get up in the
morning and they have to go
between anyone of three
junior high schools which are
not a part of the community.

The second aspect is that
schools have to meet the
needs of a growing commu-
nity.

We have to look at. the
careers that young Bahami-
ans are going to be faced
with in the next 10 to 20
years and we have to shift
our policy to help our young
people in preparing for that.

Q: How would you
be different from your
opponent in terms of
the representation you
provide/will provide?

CAREY: First I would
like to say that I am willing
to debate all of the candi-
dates who will run in the
Carmichael constituency
whenever the time comes
before the next election. I
have more experience with
almost five years in parlia-
ment and at 35, the best
years of my life are ahead in

Which I can contribute sub-

stantially to a stronger
Carmichael.

There are a number of ini-
tiatives that we are embark-
ing on in an effort to
enhance community devel-
opment. These include but
are not limited to the fol-
lowing:

Aesthetics

1) Infrastructure improve-
ments, which include road
paving, speed bumps, new
road construction

2) Removal of derelict
vehicles, clearing overgrown
bush, and demolition of
abandoned buildings

3) A parks cleaning cam-
paign for all the community
parks

4) An anti- graffitti cam-
paign

Lifestyle Development

1) A sexual abstinence
seminar in conjunction with
Full Time Kingdom on Feb-
ruary 8

2) Community Prayer Day
in March

3) Job readiness seminar
in March

4) Parenting skills seminar
in April

5) Domestic violence sem-

_inar in April

Town Meetings

1) Crime town meeting on
January :22 at the Gerald
Cash Primary School

2) Monthly meeting of the
PLP at Gerald Cash Primary
School on the fourth Mon-
day of every month

New Beginnings

1) Construction of a Com-
munity Centre

2) The Carmichael Com-
munity Marching Band

3) Carmichael community
website that allows for inter-
active communication
between MP. and con-
stituents

4) Working toward a more
secure community with the
police through the formation
of more crime watch com-
mittees in the area

5) Expansion of offerings
of the current after-school
programme at the Flamingo
Gardens Family Life Centre
to include computer training

6) The launch of my sec-
ond book, to be disseminat-
ed to all constituents
through private funding

7) House-to-house visits
by the member of parlia-
ment over the course of the
new term

8) Annual “clean-up my
area” day for the Carmichael
community

BANNISTER: My oppo-
nent was elected on a five
year.plan and over 30 things
he was going to do. He has
not accomplished a single
one of those in the commu-
nity.

So if you mark him by
what he promised he would
do he is an abysmal failure,
if you compare what I have
done in the past four and a
half years as an un-elected
person in the community.

I have stayed in the com-
munity I have worked in the
community, we have organ-
ised our resources, we have
provided scholarships in the
primary schools in our com-
munity, we have continually
ensured that what work we
have done in Carmichael
would affect the lives of
young people in Carmichael
because I believe they are
the future of the community.

So I am a direct and stark
contrast to my opponent in
terms of the activity we have
generated in Carmichael.

Whatever we have
promised we have delivered
on.

Q: Should
candidates receive
money directly from
contributors to run
their campaign?

CAREY: Unless we have
campaign finance reform it
doesn’t make sense to talk
about what we would like to
happen or should happen.

There is no initiative on
any political side to have
campaign finance reform.
Until that happens, you can
collect money from anyone
who comes up and gives you
money.

For me to take a hard
position of not doing that
when someone does it would
put me in a political disad-
vantage and put the people
who support me at a disad-
vantage.

BANNISTER: There is
nothing wrong with receiv-
ing money directly from con-
tributors.

The difficulty we have in
our country is that we are
not required to report cam-
paign contributions.

In the last election there
was much talk about who
may have received money
from drug smugglers.

Legislation can be used to
ensure that candidates for
election who receive money
from sources which may
unsavory are exposed and
are known and secondly that
the whole system is regulat-
ed.

If you are a good fundrais-
er you should not be pun-
ished in your effort to raise
money.

On the other hand, the fel-
low who has difficulty raising
funds should not be pun-
ished because the fellow he
is running against is going to
get money from drug smug-
glers or from other illegal
sources.

Q: What are the
biggest concerns of
constituents in your
area?

CAREY: The perception
of crime, secondly the future
for their children and third-
ly the overall development
of the Bahamas in terms of
what the Bahamas will be in
the short term.

BANNISTER: People in

Gotta Sing?

Gotta Act?

Gotta Dance?
®@



@ FNM CHALLENGER
Desmond Bannister

Carmichael have to get up
really early in the morning
to run water, and to run a
washing machine they have
to get up late at night to run
the water because of the
poor service from Water and
Sewerage.

Flamingo Gardens is an
area that has one central
sewer system.

We have to go around in
guiding Water and Sewerage
people in getting those gut-
ters clean because the rep-
resentative has not ensured
that service is provided so
the sewer system is backed
up frequently which causes
difficulty.

Another issue is the poor
garbage collection in the
area, electricity cuts in the
area, and overwhelmingly it
has been crime.

We have a lot of persons
who have been shot, many
merchants who have been
robbed.

Q: What do you feel
will be / is your great-
est accomplishment
for the people _
of your constituency?

CAREY: Being able to be
accessible and available for
the constituents.

We came out of 10 years
of absentee representation
where we had an MP who
was in New York.

Coming out of that era, its
a refreshing difference
where I just came out of my
constituency office where
people can see me on a daily
basis and they are able to
interact with me and address
problems that are important
to them.

BANNISTER: Truly rep-
resentative government in
the area — they don’t get it
now.

There is no consultative
government at all.

If you are elected to
government you have to
ensure that the polices put
in place come from the peo-
ple.

The polices should not be
what I want to see in place
but what the people in
Carmichael area want to
see,

To ensure that the educa-
tion system meets the needs
of the community. -

We have too many young
people in the area but can-
not meet the requirements
of employers.

Looking for Singers, Dancers, Jugglers, Magicians, Comedians, Musicians, Emcees & Show

Stopping personalities for Entertainment Coordinators.

Full Time/Part Time positions available.

Wednesday January 24, 2007 — Balmoral Ballroom

Vocal Audition: 10:00am
Performers Audition: 11:00am

Musicians & Small Bands Audition:

2:00pm

Email your resume to: cmajor@srb.sandals.com.
Resume can also be dropped off at Human Resources office at Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

Nouw’ve got talent and personality....you Gotta Audition!!


Experts help
govt plans to
commemorate
the end of the
slave trade

INTERNATIONAL
experts are helping the
government with its
plans to commemorate
the end of the slave
trade.

A group of officials
from the United Nations
Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organisa-
tion (UNESCO) visited
the Bahamas this month
and were hosted by the
Bahamas National Com-
mission for UNESCO
and the Antiquities,
Monuments and Muse- .
ums Corporation.

The team included Mr
Kwame Boafo, director
of the Caribbean Cluster
Office in Kingston,
Jamaica, and Mr
Edmond Moukala
N’Gouemo, programme
specialist in the Division
of History and Culture,
based at UNESCO
Headquarters in Paris.

The purpose of the vis-
it was to assist in map-
ping out activities to
commemorate the 200th
anniversary of the aboli-
tion of the slave trade in
British governed territo-
ries, and to advise the
Antiquities, Monuments
and Museums Corpora-
tion on a plan of action
leading to the establish-
ment of the Pompey
Museum of Slavery and
Emancipation as a
regional centre for
research into the
transatlantic slave trade.

Initiative

A highlight of the mis-
sion was a presentation
by programme specialist
Moukala N’Gouemo on
UNESCO’s Slave Route

‘Project,,a flagship initia-
tive of the organisation,
launched more than 10
years ago, and aimed at
breaking the silence
around the tragedy of
the transatlantic slave
trade and its continuing
legacy.

Held at the British
Colonial Hilton hotel,
the lecture was attended
by representatives from
a cross-section of major
educational and cultural
institutions, such as the
Ministry of Education,
the Department of
Archives, the College of
the Bahamas, the Min-
istry of Culture, the
Bahamas Historical
Society, the National
Art Gallery and the
Ministry of Tourism.

While in Nassau, the
UNESCO officials met
at the Cabinet Office
with government minis-
ters Bradley Roberts,
Fred Mitchell and
Alfred Sears, members
of the ministerial sub-
committee formed to
organise activities to
commemorate the
abolition of the slave
trade and majority
rule.

They also held discus-
sions with senior offi-
cials of the College of
the Bahamas, including
president Janyne Hod-
der, and with members
of the executive board of
the Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museums
Corporation.

Owen Bethel, chair-
man of the AAMC,
hailed the mission as
critical to the preserva-
tion of the Bahamian
cultural heritage.

Before leaving the
capital, both Mr Boafo
and Mr Moukala
expressed their admira-
tion for the rich cultural
legacy of the Bahamas,
emphasising its value as
a prime source for seri-
ous scholarly investiga-
tion, and its potential as
a superior tourist attrac-
tion.

The Bahamas joined
UNESCO in 1981 and
since that time, has
received financial and
technical assistance for a
number of important
projects.

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama’s long spell of eco-
nomic hardship could have
ended months ago accord-
ing to former FNM cabinet
minister Zhivargo Laing.

He blamed the govern-
ment for allowing a bid by
the Harcourt Group to
interrupt negotiations with
a Florida-based investment
group for the purchase of
the Royal Oasis Resort.

Mr Laing said he believes
that the government con-
tinues to misrepresent the
facts about many matters
on Grand Bahama, includ-



“The government is now desperate
to find something positive to say to
Freeport because there is nothing
happening for Freeport in the way of
investments, and the government
has continued to promise a sale of
RO over and over again, and now
Grand Bahamians do not trust them.”



Former FNM cabinet minister Zhivargo Laing

ing the vacant hotel.

He called on the govern-
ment to be honest, trans-
parent, and truthful with
Grand Bahamians.

World Investment Hold-

ings (WHI) of Florida
entered an agreement some
time last year to purchase
the Royal Oasis for $40
million. The group, howev-
er, has not been able to

Laing claims unemployment

up 70 per cent under PLP

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

rising, there is limited job availability to contend
with and their wages are stagnant — and on top



FREEPORT - Unemployment in Grand
Bahama has increased by 70 per cent under the
PLP, according to Zhivargo Laing.

The FNM candidate for Marco City claimed
that when Prime Minister Perry Christie came to
office in 2002, there were 1,610 persons unem-
ployed in Grand Bahama. He said the latest
figures compiled by the Department of Statistics
show that this number has risen to 2,300.

He said the PLP government has done noth-
ing to reverse the depressed economic situa-
tion in Grand Bahama over the past four years.

Mr Laing criticised the government for failing
to generate any tangible economic activity in
Freeport since the Royal Oasis Resort closed in

2004.

“Jn West End there is Ginn, but in Freeport
there is nothing, and that is one of the reasons
why we have the sorry employment situation
that we have in Freeport today,” he said.

“The fact of the matter is that Grand Bahama
is experiencing severe economic hardship. The
price of food is’ Sutrageously high and rising
every day, utility rates are high, interest rates are

she

ing.”

‘Once in a lifetime’
outreach event to

be held in Bahamas -

A FREE, “once in a life-
time” outreach event is to
be held in the Bahamas,
organisers announced yes-
terday. .

The Nassau Beach Hotel
was host to an “historic”
meeting, between PraiseFest
Ministries, the Ministry of
Tourism, the Christian
Council, and various other
Christian leaders, held to
make plans and preparation
for BahamaFest ’07.

“This will be a once in a
lifetime outreach event that
will be held at Clifford Park
on June 5 and will be free to
the public,” said the organ-
isers.

The event will be spon-

sored by PraiseFest Min-

istries and an outreach
group known as Cruise with
a Cause.

“On that day more than
2,000 people aboard a Roy-
al Caribbean cruise ship
that has been fully char-
tered by the ministry will
disembark in Nassau. Dur-
ing the day they will minis-
ter in the schools, the
prison, and the streets of
Nassau, the statement said.

The passengers will
reportedly bring with them
“some of the biggest mames
in the ministry” including
wrestlers STING and Lex
Luger, Josh McDowell,
Fred Hammond, the Crabb
Family, Dr Mark Chironna,
KJ-52, David Phelps, Dr
Patricia Bailey, Nicole C
Mullen, comedian Mark
Lawrence, and many others.
The event will also show-
case a few local Bahamian
artists.

According to the organis-
ers, in attendance at the
Nassau Beach meeting were
the following:

e Virginia Kelly — Min-

istry of Tourism

e Matthew Dunaway -
president, PraiseFest Min-
istries,

° Steve Dunaway — direc-
tor of counselling, Praise-
Fest Ministries

e Rev Dr William Thomp-
son — president, Bahamas
Christian Council

e Bishop John N Humes
— Church of God, Bahamas,
Turks and Caicos

e Kenris L Carey, presi-
dent — the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist
Church

e Rev Pat Paul — Supt of
the Assemblies of God

e Bishop V G Clarke -
Calvary Deliverance Church
and regional leader for
World Harvest Church with
Rod Parsley

e Irvine Armstrong —
Bahamas Faith Ministries

e Bishop Albert Hepburn
— United Christian Church

e Derek Stubbs — Gospel
Music Fellowship

The event will
include a free conference on
Saturday March 3, tobe
held at a location yet to be
determined.

“This conference is sched-
uled to have wrestler Lex
Luger, Josh McDowell, and
Dr Mark Chironna. .

“This conference is specif-
ically being held for
pastors, church staff, teach-
ers, key church leaders, and
their spouses along with
business owners that wish
to attend,” the statement
said.

“This type of conference
has never been offered
before and the goal is to
have every church on the
island represented.”

The organisers said more
information on the event
will be released soon.

also .

of all that, they can’t put their hands on any
tangible project coming forward that could
reverse their situation,” Mr Laing said.

He also stated that Grand Bahamians must
contend with the “constant state of flux” that
exists at the Grand Bahama Port Authority,
and this continues to be a hindrance to the
development of optimism and hope.

Mr Laing said it is important that leaders be
truthful and stop pretending as if all is well.

“Tn an environment such as Grand Bahama,
they need to be people of integrity and stop
pretending that people are unintelligent and
can’t see through the nonsense they are shar-

Mr Laing said he believes that better
prospects will come to Grand Bahama with a
change in policy — and a change in policy-mak-

S.

“I believe that Grand Bahama has hope, no
question about that. I also believe Grand
Bahama has great potential and prospects,
despite the interference, incompetence, poor
management, and handling of Grand Bahama
by the government,” he said.

bv











Qualifications:
an offshore bank

records

Custodial Fees

Personal Qualities:








skills

- Pension Plan






ACCEPTED.








ONLY APPLICANTS MEETING
WILL BE CONTACTED. NO T

Applications should be submitted:

THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7

Zhivargo Laing claims economic hardship in
Grand Bahama could have ended months ago



complete the deal.

According to a recent
article in The Tribune, the
government decided to
resume negotiations with
Harcourt Developers as a
part of a contingency plan
in case WIH failed to com-
plete its purchase of the
property.

Mr Laing said that the
government should have
concluded a deal long ago
with Harcourt. Unfortu-
nately, he said, its failure
to do so has caused severe
economic hardship for
Grand Bahama.

“This could have been a
situation finalised some-
time ago... . prior to World
Investment Holding com-
ing into the picture. In fact,
that deal was interrupted
by the interjection of WIH
into the whole picture and
so it seems to me rather
surprising now where the

government was talking.

about having done its due
diligence, and waiting on
due diligence to be done,
that they are now going
back to a group that has
been in Grand Bahama for
some time that had made a
substantial investment in
Grand Bahama, had
expressed interest in Royal

Oasis and was prepared to
go ahead with the purchase
of Royal Oasis.”

Mr Laing said that the
deal with Harcourt would
have spared thousands of
laid-off workers a great
deal of hardship.

“It really is only a reflec-
tion of the fact that this
government has continued
to play games with the
Bahamian people and has
continued to be disorgan-
ised and unfocused,” he
said.

Mr Laing said Grand
Bahamians have grown,
tired of. listening to the
government’s promises
regarding the Royal Oasis.

“The government is now
desperate to find some-
thing positive to say to
Freeport’ because there is
nothing happening for
Freeport in the way of
investments, and the gov-
ernment has continued to
promise a sale of RO over
and over again, and now
Grand Bahamians do not
trust them,” he said.

Lucaya MP Neko Grant
said Minister of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe has
failed Grand Bahama mis-
erably.

He said tourism arrivals
have dropped significantly
in the last year and hotel
wotkers are now only
working one or two days a
week.

“It is wrong for the gov-
ernment to deceive people
for the sake of votes,” he
said. :
Mr Grant said the Royal
Oasis “represented a true
oasis in the desert for the
thousands of workers on
Grand Bahama... and
they really need to come
clean and tell the people
what is happening because
their announcements after

announcements are not at
all clear, and the people
are frustrated.”



Credit Suisse
(Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

CLIENT SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

- A minimum of four (4) years experience in a Client Services Area of

- PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel and Power Point)
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- Experience of Archiving systems and providing research and retrieval
of client information
- Knowledge in banking due diligence practices and procedures

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Only. applicants with Client Services experience need apply.

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P.O. Box N-4928
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or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

JANUARY 26th 2007

THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS
ELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





The arrest of the five
airport baggage handlers

"This is a different era. It's a
different mindset. Today, we
cloak our children in wrong-
doing." -- National Security
Minister Cynthia Pratt.

[i arrest of five Nas-
Sau airport baggage
handlers in Florida last month
unleashed a storm of self right-
eous protest. An an
election in the offing — oppo-
sition politicos are having a
field day.



They accuse the govern-
ment of "colluding" in an
"extra-judicial rendition" of
unsuspecting Bahamians to
imprisonment in another coun-
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they were officially kidnapped.

By this account, the baggage
handlers were "tricked" into
travelling to the US as part of
an elaborate scheme to cir-
cumvent their right of due
process under Bahamian law.

The word "treason" has been

bandied about in some quar-
ters.

All of the cabinet ministers
who would logically be in a
position to know what hap-
pened have been put on the
defensive and have denied any
foreknowledge.

They include Cynthia Pratt
(who oversees the police), Fred
Mitchell (who handles foreign
relations), and Allyson Gibson
(who is responsible for prose-
cutions). Mitchell also said that
Glenys Hanna-Martin (who is
in charge of the airport) had
no prior information, and nei-
ther did the managers of Nas-
sau Flight Services, who
employed the unfortunate bag
men.

But the opposition insists
otherwise. They say that
Bahamian suspects should not
be enticed to travel abroad to
facilitate their arrest and pros-
ecution by foreigners: "Some-
body is lying. There is more to
this than meets the eye," one
political source told Tough
Call.

"At least three separate
departments in three separate
ministries had to co-operate to
pull off the scam which
entrapped and summarily
deported five Bahamians," said
former attorney-general Carl
Bethel. "But now everybody
is ducking for cover." ~

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The FNM has called for a
full accounting of the govern-

ment's knowledge of, and -

involvement in, the so-called
"sting" operation. And the
prime minister — bemused as
always — says he will look into
the matter.

The issue has generated
over 30 pages of comments on
the Bahamas Issues discussion
forum alone since the bag men
were arrested on December 18

(
http://www.bahamasissues.com
/archive/index.php/t-5259-p-

30.html). Here are just a few
examples:

"What right does the gov-
ernment have to become com-
plicit in a scheme to kidnap
free people by another nation?
This one is going all the way to
the Privy Council and the Unit-
ed Nations."

"Not quite entrapment, but
unethical nonetheless...our
‘democratic’ government is
becoming more and more
undemocratic at a frightening
speed."

"Where was all this grand
talk of sovereignty when Hubie
and the boyz gave up our off-
shore banking system to the
OECD bullies?"

“How can we explain set-
ting up our own people to
please the US when we have a
system already in place to deal
with extradition?"

"Tam speechless...black
people get shaft by their black
leaders again. When will it
end?"

"The bag handlers were
hoodwinked out of having
their day in a Bahamian court
by the very entity that was sup-
posed to protect them."

‘This amounts to the gov-
ernment conspiring with for-
eign agents against citizens of
the Bahamas. The same acts
perpetrated by individuals
could be considered treaso-
nous."

According to the wife of one
of the arrested men: "I believe
my husband was kidnapped
rather than arrested and I will
fight the authorities until he is
discharged from prison and
returned to the Bahamas."

A Nassau Guardian editor-
ial was outraged: "The man-
agers of Nassau Flight Services
were patently wrong to agree
with the (US) Transportation
Security Administration to
send 20 of its employees to
Florida on a bogus training
course, recognizing that a num-
ber of those employees would
be arrested and would not be
returning to the Bahamas."

No evidence was adduced
to support these claims.

Guardian columnist and
potential PLP election candi-
date, Craig Butler, had this to
say: "If you are a handler of
baggage at the airport and you
are involved in a conspiracy to
export drugs to the United
States, don't go — especially
when you realize that the oth-
ers with whom you have
allegedly conspired are also
going."

And Tribune columnist Sir
Arthur Foulkes also weighed
in: "Citizens have a right and a
duty to ask questions when it
appears that Bahamian author-
ities may have colluded with
agents of another country to
bypass the sovereignty and due
processes of the laws of the
Bahamas in order to render
Bahamian suspects to another
jurisdiction."

So what are we to make of
all this?

Well, in law enforcement
terms a “sting” is an operation
designed to catch a person
committing a crime — by
means of deception.

And “rendition” means the
handing over of criminal sus-
pects from one jurisdiction to
another. Extradition is the
process by which this usually
happens, regulated by interna-
tional treaty.

"Extra-judicial rendition"
means handing over suspects
who are denied due process
because they are arrested with-
out charges and deprived of

legal counsel. The NFS bag
men have been charged in a
Florida court with conspiracy
to import illegal drugs into the
United States — a violation of
American law. They have been
assigned lawyers and the
Bahamian consulate i in Miami
is fully involved.

One of the principles of sov-
ereignty is that every state has
legal authority. over its own
people. And most countries
have signed bilateral extradi-
tion treaties with most other
countries. Samuel ‘90’ Knowles
was extradited to the US
recently on drug charges after
years of costly legal appeals in

crime, like money fraud and
money laundering. All of these
things can physically be done in
other jurisdictions, but if peo-
ple are defrauded in the US,
or the drugs end up in the US
as a result of your action, you
have broken US law and are
liable to US prosecution."
And according to the Amer- '

ican Ambassador, John Rood:
"It was merely the fact that
there were indictments on the
individuals in the United States
and when it was found out that
these individuals were travel-
ling to the United States they
were arrested. If they are not
guilty they will be set free.”



“According to both American
and Bahamian officials, there
are concerns about ‘potential
security shortcomings’ at
Nassau's airport that could lead
to illegal drugs and weapons
being imported into the US.
And perhaps to more
dramatic consequences
for the Bahamas.”



the Bahamas failed.

According to both Ameri-
can and Bahamian officials,
there are concerns about
“potential security shortcom-
ings” at Nassau's airport that
could lead to illegal drugs and
weapons being imported into
the US. And perhaps to more
dramatic consequences for the
Bahamas.

These officials say the
arrests were the result of a long
investigation into the “high
incidence of drugs found on
pre-cleared aircraft during sec-
ondary searches in the US".
So the first point is that the
accused bag men were alleged-
ly able and willing to put unin-
spected packages onto aircraft
flying to the US.

"These finds prompted the
DEA to begin an investiga-
tion," US Deputy Chief of Mis-
sion Dr Brent Hardt told
Tough Call, “which they coor-
dinated closely with the
Bahamian Drug Enforcement
Unit. These cases were devel-
oped by US and Bahamian law
enforcement authorities in the
same way that we routinely
coordinate our many successful
counter-drug investigations.

“Cases were developed by
both sides and those arrested in
the US had a clear US nexus.
Anybody who violates US law
and travels to the US is sub-
ject to arrest, just as an Amer-
ican who violates Bahamian
law would be in the Bahamas.”

Official sources say the
training was “neither mandat-
ed nor sponsored” by the TSA.
It was apparently requested by
Spirit Airlines for NFS staff
loading baggage onto their
planes, in order to meet US
requirements. But the airline's
communications manager
would not respond to inquiries
despite repeated calls.

However, the fact is that
another group of bag handlers
went for the same training in
mid-December and returned
without incident. -

And other NFS staff mem-
bers who travelled with the five
arrested men also received
training and returned. So the
suggestion that the training was
"bogus" does not hold water.

It has also been suggested
that the pre-clearance space at
NIA is considered US territo-
ry.B

ut the bilateral agreement
(which is published on the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
web site) states clearly that this
is not so. Bahamian law applies
and Bahamian sovereignty per-
tains in the pre-clearance area.
And although many aircraft
using the airport may be US-
owned and flagged, when they
are on the ground here they
are under Bahamian jurisdic-
tion.

"That is not to say that one
cannot do something in the
Bahamas that brings you on
the wrong side of the law in
the US," Dr Hardt said. " Drug
trafficking is a cross-border

Meanwhile, Assistant Com-
missioner of Police Reginald

' Ferguson insists that —

although two other baggage
handlers were arrested here as
part of the same investigation
— there was not enough evi-
dence to charge the other five
bag men in Nassau.

_ But according to lawyers we
spoke to, Bahamian police
would have had the same evi-
dence as the DEA had, since it
was a joint investigation: "Our
guys declined to prosecute —
when they should have and
could have — having both the
jurisdiction and the evidence."

So question remains — why
did this happen?

Was it out of deference to.
American security concerns?
Is it because our jails are too.
full?

Or that it would take too
long to bring the accused to
trial?

And because witnesses and
evidence might disappear in
the meantime?

‘Is it because of a fear that.
politicians would compromise:
the prosecution?

In other words, was the fail-
ure to prosecute locally am
indictment of the Bahamian:
criminal justice system by our’
own government and law.
enforcement agencies? :

Are we moving down the,
road towards a failed state,
where the rule of law has bro-:
ken down?

As a matter of fact, the
Bahamas is not the only for-
mer British territory whose
judges have attacked the gov-:
ernment for compromising:
their independence. Accord-'
ing to a senior judge in Zim-.
babwe, that country's judicial:
system has collapsed after’
being starved of funds by Pres-'
ident Robert Mugabe's gov-,
ernment: ‘

"It is wrong to make the’
judiciary beg for its sustenance
from central government," said
Judge Rita Makarau recently.

And in the midst of all this
self-righteous rhetoric about
the bag men, we should not
lose sight of stark reality.

The 9/11 terror attacks have
changed the way we live. By
most accounts, the airport is a
huge security risk — and we
all know how important the
airport is to the industry that .
makes our entire economy '
function.

It costs up to $30 million a
year to support the 45 Ameri-
can pre-clearance officers and
facilities in the Bahamas. And |
the fees that are collected.from |
ticket taxes to support that are |
fractional.

So the real question is, how.
do we weigh these interests?

4

What do you think? Send:

comments to larry@tribune- '
media.net bunemedia.net>

Or visit www.bahamapun-'

dit.com pundit.com/>
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 9























m@ BAHA MAR shows stu-
dents the different areas of
the hotel industry they could
venture into yesterday at the
Tourism Career fair held at
the Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym.
The event was taking place
as part of the 2nd Annual
National Tourism Week.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

M@ STUDENTS answer _
tourism related questions in
order to win a prize yester-
day at the Tourism Career
Fair held at the Sir Kendal
Isaacs Gym,



(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)





ren









Ss i SSS

@ COSMETOLOGY students of BI VI show students different ways to style hair yesterday at the
Tourism Career Fair held at the Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym.



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(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



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@ STUDENTS listen as Ministry of Tourism personnel explain the tourism market to them yesterday
at the Tourism Career Fair at the Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)


es THE TRIBUNE

JANUARY 24, 2007

10:30














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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 11



FNM denies government

~ claim over radar system

FROM page one

The source claimed that dur-
‘ing the FNM’s term in office
.new radar equipment was
‘bought for the airport, but it
‘had not been used as yet.
“Six to nine million dollars of
.radar equipment is sitting in air-
‘traffic not being used because a
‘ major part of the equipment is
not there,” explained the
_ source.
“So we have to:use the same
‘ equipment that we have always
‘been using and that’s the same
‘equipment that always gives us
‘‘ problems.
'" “And when the generator
breaks down we have no radar,
‘so basically the air traffic con-
‘trollers are working on faith
‘right now,” he said.
The source also claimed that
the faulty radar system is
putting Family Island travellers
at risk.
According to the source, the
radar system-is down at least
, three to four times a month, and
-major accidents were only
avoided because “everybody is
‘already used to the system not
- working.”
; “Tf you never had it, you can’t
ever miss it,” the source said.
The Tribune contacted Mrs
- ‘Hanna-Martin for comment,
. .and she decided to call a press
conference that Monday
“evening to speak on the mat-
ter. : :
Minister Martin said: “It has
come to my attention and the
attention of this ministry that a
rumour is circulating in at least
- one media house (The Tribune)
relative to the acquisition and
operation of the ASR9 radar.
“The ASR9 radar was pur-
chased by the previous admin-
istration at a cost of just under
$8 million. It was intended to
replace the currently utilised
ASRS8 radar as an air traffic
management system.”

She said the acquisition of the _

FROM page one

4
names were entered into the Customs and Border
Protection’s computer system, and they will be

radar system was made without
thorough consultation with
technical personnel at the Civil
Aviation Department. She
claimed that the purchase was
made with “great haste” by the
FNM

The Minister said the radar
system bought by the FNM
required a software component
that was not user-friendly, so
her ministry has been “forced”
to explore the acquisition of

alternative software.

“We are advised,” she said,
“that despite having expended
almost $8 million on the said
radar that an additional almost
$3 million must be expended so
that the radar might be effec-
tively and safely utilised by the
Department of Civil Aviation.”

Minister Martin claimed that
a more considered and careful
approach to the acquisition
from the very beginning would

have avoided this situation. She
pledged that her ministry was
attempting to resolve the issue.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune former FNM Avi-
ation Minister C A Smith said
that the “exact opposite”

occurred during the process of ~

the radar system.

“Before we bought the radar
system we had proper consul-
tation from both the FAA and
the consultants at the time, and

I find it unthinkable that they
(Tthe PLP) have not yet put it
into use,” said Mr Smith.

The former Aviation Minister
admitted that the radar system
was bought during his tenure at
the ministry. He claimed that
the device was “state-of-the-art”
at the time of purchase.

“What I don’t understand is
they have had the system since
we left office, and since that
time they seem to have done

nothing to get the system up,
and running.” !

“It appears to me that PLP:
ministers do not take responsi-'
bility for any item under their:
charge.” : !

Asked how he felt the Free:
National Movement would per- ;
form in the upcoming election ,
this year, Mr. Smith said: “The!
FNM will win the next election ;
and form the government of the:
Bahamas.” ;

Customs warehouse at
airport ‘received extremely poor
review’ from US officials

FROM page one

John Rolle said that until he is in
receipt of the Transportation Security
Administration’s (TSA) report, he
could not comment on what The Tri-
bune has revealed was an “extremely
poor rating” of the warehouse’s secu-
rity.

According to sources at the airport,
there were reportedly enough breach-
es that TSA agents were within their
rights to shut the facility down. During
their inspection, another source stat-
ed, these agents were overheard com-
menting that the building was the
most “poorly secured” cargo ware-
house they had ever inspected.

This warehouse, has direct access
to the airport, and stores cargo for
both local and international airlines.

Among the list of infractions not-
ed were the fact that guards were not
posted at designated areas, vehicles
were allowed to park too close to the
building, and personnel without prop-

New passport rule
comes into effect

scrutinised if it happens again, The Associated |

Press reported.

At some airports in the US, security officers and
travellers were unclear about the fact that they
needed only a passport and not a visa to travel to
Caribbean countries like the Bahamas.

The new passport requirement is part of the
Department of Homeland Security’s Western
Hemisphere Travel Initiative which is aimed at
enhancing security at US borders.

For now, the rules affect only air travellers. Land
and sea travellers — which includes the cruise ship
passengers — will not have to show passports until at

least January 2008.

Pd
F

| @PHILSAPP, «|
father of Mark
Sapp - the man

who was found
dead in his prison

| cell in Abaco last

| Saturday - with his

| lawyer Godfrey
Pinder.

(Photo: Ana |
Bianca Marin)



FROM page one

but someone who is objective.
We believe the police are cov-
ering this thing up.”

While struggling to hold back
his emotions, Phil Sapp spoke of
seeing his son on Saturday after-
noon, just hours before he was
found dead in his cell.

“I spent quite a bit of time
with him on Saturday. He was-
n’t suicidal. :

“Efe had on thongs (slippers),
jeans, a tee-shirt, no belt, no
shoelaces, no pillowcase, no
blanket. There was nothing in
there. But what he had was his
pants, and his shirt, and
thongs.”

Phil Sapp is concerned about
what happened to his son dur-
ing the hours after he visited
him.

According to Mr Sapp, his
son called a friend around 5pm
on Saturday and asked the

Observers in the tourism industry have expressed
fears that the new passport requirement will dis-
suade Americans from travelling abroad, thereby
costing the Caribbean hundreds of millions of dol-
lars in revenue intake and thousands of tourism-

related jobs.

the new requirement.

Father seeks independent investigation

The only valid substitutes for a passport will be
a NEXUS Air card, which used by some American
and Canadian frequent fliers; identification as a
US Coast Guard merchant mariner; and the green
card carried by legal permanent residents. Active
members of the US military are also exempt from

ér authorization were being allowed
onto the airport ramp.

Following The Tribune’s exclusive
headline story revealing these inade-
quacies while intentionally with-hold-
ing many more for obvious security
reasons, Minister of Transport and
Aviation, Mrs Glenys Hanna-Martin
announced that she would appoint a
“multi-agency” task force to review
the security climate and procedures
at the facility.

In 2004, TSA announced its Air
Cargo Strategic Plan in the Federal
Register of the Notice of Proposed
Rule Making (NPRM). As explained
on the agency’s Website, this docu-
ment stated that the proposed rule-
making would require the adoption
of security measures throughout the
air cargo supply. chain, as it seeks to
impose “significant barriers to terror-
ists seeking to use the air cargo trans-
portation system for malicious pur-
poses.”

Although the inspection last week
revealed a number of weaknesses that

require urgent, if not immediate atten,
tion, sources have told The Tribune
that conditions there now have in fact
improved dramatically from what they
once were.

Noting only what he had read in

The Tribune of the inspection, Mr:
Rolle said that Customs will be a part:
of the multi-agency force. ;

“So once we get the facts, I’m pre-.
pared to say something. But you know,
we still have to look into it,” he said. :

ey:

have access to records

FROM page one

to show that this minister has ever issued any visa in his life and J defy anyone:
to show that I have personally issued any visa or instructed anyone to issue any;
visa to anybody,” the minister told the press.

Mr Mitchell also pointed out that, according to his information, Mr Bethel has‘
yet to contact the police to be interviewed and give his evidence on the alleged:
visa scam. :




4

t
1

i
ae)
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Atlantis Invites you to join :

our Dynamic



friend to urgently get in contact
with his attorney Godfrey Pin-
der. However, this individual
was unable to reach Mr Pinder.

Mark Sapp was found dead
at 6.07pm, about an hour later,
by police.

Both Mr Sapp and Mr Pin-
der are demanding that police
explain how Mr Sapp received
an item to potentially hang him-
self when there were no such
items present when Phil Sapp
left his son.

Mr Sapp and Mr Pinder also
refute police reports that Mark
Sapp was taken to Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre for
assessment when he was
brought to Nassau.

Mr Pinder claims that his for-
mer client was brought to Nas-
sau where he was looked at by
medical professionals at the
Princess Margaret Hospital.
However, both Mr Pinder and
Mr Sapp were adamant that

Mark Sapp never went to _

Sandilands for assessment, as
claimed by police.

The Tribune attempted to
reach authorities at Sandilands.
However, no authorities from

the institution were willing to’

comment on the matter.
At the time of his death,

Mark Sapp was being held in

police custody in Abaco pend-
ing his transfer to Her Majesty’s
Prison. He was to be remanded
to Fox Hill Prison until March
23, 2007, by Magistrate Craw-
ford McGee.

Mark Sapp was charged with
arson in relation to a fire that
swept through the Royal Palm
Condominiums at Treasure
Cay, Abaco, causing an esti-
mated $3 million worth of dam-
age.

Attempts were made to reach
Assistant Commissioner of
Police for the Northern
Bahamas, Mr_ Elliston
Greenslade. Yet, up to press

time, he did not respond.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



The Tribune

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Jini



HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



Alternative urged to

EPA’s ‘total devastation’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Government
was yesterday
urged to take the
Bahamas into the
European Union’s
(EU) General System of Pref-
erences (GSP) scheme to secure
duty-free access to European
markets, rather than sign on to
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) talks, which
could cause “total devastation”

for the economy, jobs and the

tax system.

Paul Moss, head of Domin-
ion Management, a financial
services provider, and a lead-
ing member of Bahamian Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF), warned
that signing on. to the EPA as
part-of the Cariforum regional
negotiating bloc would be “dis-

astrous” for the Bahamian



Trade campaigner calls for Bahamas to sign on to European
Union’s GSP to protect economy, jobs and tax system

economy due to the agreemen-
t’s emphasis on reciprocal treat-
ment.

The EPA, which is being
negotiated on the Bahamas’ and
Caribbean’s behalf by Carifo-
rum, is due to be completed by
the end of 2007, but Mr Moss
said a better alternative was for
this nation to sign on to the
EU’s General System of Pref-
erences (GSP).

This, he explained, was a sys-
tem of trade benefits and pref-
erences developed in 197] by
the EU for 178. developing
countries. The GSP, Mr Moss
said, was last updated in Feb-
ruary 2005, and this version runs

Financial services

fears on EU trade

® By NEIL RARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN financial
services executive yesterday
said he was “very concerned”
about the impact the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)

could have on the industry,

warning that it could open the
doors to further pressure on tax
information exchange and the
European Union’s (EU) Sav-
ings Tax Directive.

Paul Moss, head of Domin-
ion Management, a financial
services provider, and a lead-
ing member of Bahamian Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF), said the











eventual EPA agreed with the
EU would have an impact way

until December 2008, provid-

_ing-tariff cuts for around 7,200

products.

He added that the GSP Plus
scheme provided special duty
free access to EU markets for
countries that had special devel-
opment needs and small
economies, which were vulner-
able and poorly diversified.

Mr Moss said the Bahamas
clearly fell into these categories,
and could easily meet another
EU criteria, which was that its
exports represent less than 1
per cent of the European trad-

_ ing bloc’s imports.

“Clearly, the Bahamas falls
in this threshold, as it is a devel-

beyond Bahamian companies _|. |

that exported to Europe.

The EPA is likely to cover 85
per cent of trade between the
EU and the Bahamas and
Caribbean, and go beyond
physical goods to encompass
services, investments and mar-
ket access.

Mr Moss warned that the
EPA could be used to place the
Bahamas “at a further disad-
vantage, while allowing coun-
tries in Europe to benefit” in
the financial services arena.

SEE page 2B

oping country, poorly diversi-
fied due to its heavy reliance
on tourism, and exports less

than 1 per cent of the EU’s |

imports,” Mr Moss said.

The Bahamas, he added, also
had to ratify 27 international
conventions on sustainable
development and good gover-
nance to qualify, and it would
be eligible for GSP plus if it
chose not to sign on to the
EPA.

“This is the alternative for the

Bahamas, to establish itself
under this regime to preserve
for Bacardi, Paradise Fisheries
and Polymers the same regime
as they have now, without hav-



@ JASPER Knaab, chief executive officer of Pegasus Wireless

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)

14.94%

ing to allow other goods from
the EU in as duty free,” Mr

"Moss said.

“The Bahamas has yet to
look at any alternative to its cur-
rent tax system. You cannot
throw away your main revenue

generator. You cannot allow .

pressure from the outside to
force the change.”

Mr Moss’s position is at odds
with the Government’s pre-
ferred option, which according
to a leaked Ministry of Foreign
Affairs briefing document is
likely to involve signing on to
the EPA talks as part of Cari-
forum, a move that would lead
to close integration with CARI-

Investor eyes wireless

COM. That is something close
to the heart of Fred Mitchell,

‘minister of foreign affairs.

The Ministry of Foreign
Affairs felt the Bahamas would
be unable to negotiate its own
separate agreement with the
EU, due to the minimal level
of trade with this nation, and
the fact that the Bahamas would
not get the same concessions
made available to Cariforum.

Mr Moss said the EPA was
designed to provide European
companies with access to
numerous markets in the

SEE page 10B



expansion with BTC

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
THE investor behind a multi-million manufacturing plant in

Freeport yesterday told The Tribune he plans to install wireless Wi-
FI broadband services on all the Family Islands once his project

becomes operational.

Jasper Knaab, chief executive of Pegasus Wireless, said expand-
ing wireless service was his next goal when he moves his company 4

operations to the Bahamas.

“After we get the plant open and we start manufacturing, my next
project is putting wireless throughout the islands - on all the

islands,” he said.

“Because the Government owns the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC), they have that data infrastructure in place,
so all I have to do is piggyback off that, put up a tiny piece of hard-

ware and we can offer wireless

Wi-FI broadband service.”

Mr Knabb said Pegasus Wire-

SEE page 2B

$12m boost from Atlantis giving
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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DESPITE giving up $1.3 mil-
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ing the filming of Beyond the
Sunset, the film starring Pierce
Brosnan and Selma Hayek, the

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economy.

The findings, contained in a
report on CARICOM’s cultur-
al industries for the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machin-
ery (CRNM), detailed how the
film industry could provide big
economic spin-offs for the



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THE MARKETS
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,533.80 +56.64 Ad
S&P 500 1,427.99 +5.04 Ad
NASDAQ 2,431.41 40.34 AY
10-YR NOTE 481 +05 A
CRUDE OIL. 55.04 +2.48 Ad

Knergy
sparks
rise In
stocks

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Wall Street
rebounded Tuesday, rising
moderately as crude oil surged
more than $2 a barrel and trig-
gered a rally among energy pro-
ducers. Investors regained their
optimism about corporate prof-
its after a series of positive

. earnings reports.

Energy prices spiked after
the Energy Secretary Samuel
Bodman said the U.S. will dou-_

_ ble the size of the nation’s Stra-
tegic Petroleum Reserve. Prices
were already rising as a cold

snap in the northeast United
States was seen increasing

- demand for heating fuel in the
region. — :

Exxon Mobil led blue chips
and was among the Dow Jones

industrials’ biggest gainers,
while fellow refiners Conoco-
Phillips and Chevron also
surged during the session. The
advance in oil stocks helped the
Dow recover from an 88-point
decline Monday, its biggest
drop in two months and a reac-
tion to investor uneasiness
about earnings.
ae “Earnings are not coming in -
~ all that bad,” said Brian Gen-
dreau, an investment strategist
with ING Investment Manage-
ment. ‘There is an absence of
any real bad news, leading indi-
cators are up, and companies

_ are not falling off the table.

- That’s consistent with the mod-

est rise in the Dow.”

The Dow rose 56.64, or 0.45
percent, to 12,533.80.

Broader stock indicators also
advanced. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index was up 5.04, or -
0.35 percent, at 1,427.99, and the
Nasdaq composite index added

_ 0.34, or 0.01 percent, to 2,431.41,

Bond prices fell, with the
yield on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note rising to 4.81 per-
cent from 4.76 percent late
Monday.

The dollar was mixed against
other major currencies, while
gold prices spiked. A barrel of
light, sweet crude rose $2.47 to
settle at $55.04 on the New York
Mercantile Exchange.

As has been typical in previ-
ous sessions, oil companies got
a boost on the rebound in crude
prices. The refiners stand to
benefit if the government
expands its reserves. Exxon
Mobil rose $1.59, or 2.2 percent,

‘to $74.49; ConocoPhillips was
up $1.59, or 2.9 percent, at
$64.97; and Chevron increased
$1.34 to $72.88. *

Technology stocks were up
overall after chip maker Texas
Instruments reported a robust
quarterly profit and was
upgraded by several Wall Street
firms. Shares rose $1.01, or 3.5
percent, to $29.60.

United Technologies, which
makes everything from air con-
ditioners to aircraft engines,
reported fourth-quarter profit
rose 38 percent, which sent
shares up $2.05, or 3.2 percent,
to $66.14.

Advancing issues led decli-
ners by a 3 to 2 margin on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated volume
came to 3.02 billion shares, up
from 2.89 billion shares in the
previous session.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller gained 7.42, or 0.95 per-
cent, to 785.38.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.08
percent. At the close, Britain’s
FTSE 100 was up 0.15 percent,
Germany’s DAX index dropped
0.13 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 shed 0.08 percent.

poses snnnaen



B | weone sean

BANKING

3B

sunserassoseoiboceonestepesteeondetetttle



RARDIN ESRB SSOORNSECSOS CC BEMI EE DS LUDO AE CECE OOENEEON

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007



Acquisitions boost banks’ profits

Il Despite battling a squeeze on
interest rates, Bank of America
and Wachovia pumped up their
fourth-quarter earnings with
recent acquisitions.

BY IEVA M. AUGSTUMS
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Fourth-
quarter earnings rose strongly at
Bank of America and Wachovia,
driven by acquisitions last year that
helped the banks avoid the interest-
rate squeeze that has hampered some
of the nation’s other ee banks.







_ Digital textbooks
can save college
students hundreds
of dollars every
semester, but the
market is off to
an unimpressive
start.



INTERNET

Bank of America, the nation’s No.
2 bank, said Tuesday that fourth-
quarter net income jumped 47 per-
cent, aided by its takeover of credit
card issuer MBNA Corp. It’s local
rival, No.4 Wachovia, said its 35 per-
cent gain in fourth-quarter earnings
was driven by its purchase of Golden
West Financial, which was com-
pleted in October.

Gary Townsend, an analyst with
Friedman, Billings, Ramsey & Co.,
said he liked what he saw from the
banks and reiterated his “outper-
form” rating for Bank of America.

PUBLISHING



HARDBACK OR DIGITAL? Alberto Robles, 21, shops at the campus bookstore of Florida International
University in Miami. Some students save money by buying digital books.

ILL THEY BITE?

BY BRIDGET CAREY

“Both banks seemed very pleased
with their acquisitions and outlooks,
although to some degree, Wachovia
did acknowledge that the overall con-
dition of the housing market is cur-
rently more muted than they
expected it to be,” Townsend said.

Bank of America profits climbed
to $5.26 billion, or $1.16 per share,
from $3.57 billion, or 88 cents per
share, a year ago. Results for the
fourth quarter of 2005 did not include
MBNA, which vi was acquired on Jan. 1,
2006.

Excluding merger and restructur-



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

bcarey@MiamiHerald.com

Tell college students they can save
50 percent on a textbook, and you’ve
got their full attention..

For that matter, you have their
parents’ full attention, too.

It’s been a year since most U.S.
campus bookstores began offering
downloadable versions of some text-
books, ranging between 40 percent
and 50 percent less than the cost of
the tangible version.

But as the spring semester kicks
off on college campuses, these

cyber shelves. Industry insiders point
to several reasons: lack of knowledge,
poor marketing and few choices.

In an age in which students are
more tech savvy than ever before,
publishers say they are preparing for
an e-textbook craze and are investing
in creating electronic versions. Yet it
seems publishers are not sure what
will trigger demand for these e-text-
books, and they continue to test the
waters.

“Publishers are having a hard time
figuring out what they need to do,”

* TURN TO E-BOOKS

cheaper e-books are not flying off the





Yahoo’s fourth-quarter profit
exceeds analysts’ forecasts

i Yahoo’s profit in the fourth
quarter, excluding some items,
was 16 cents a share, beating the
average analyst estimate by

3 cents per share.

BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo’s
fourth-quarter profit topped analyst
expectations to end a recent streak of
financial letdowmns at the Internet
bellwether.

The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based com-
pany said Tuesday that it earned
$268.7 million, or 19 cents per share,
during the final three months of 2006,
traditionally the peak season for Web
sites like Yahoo that depend on
advertising for most of their revenue.

The profit declined 61 percent
from net income of $683.2 million, or
46 cents per share, at the same time
in 2005, but the two quarters didn’t
provide an apples-to-apples compari-
son. That’s because a one-time gain
of $310 million boosted the 2005
results while the 2006 figures
included stock option expenses that
weren’t recorded on Yahoo’s books
in the previous year.

If not for certain tax benefits,
Yahoo said it would have earned 16
cents per share, exceeding the aver-
age analyst estimate by 3 cents per





PAUL SAKUMA/AP

INTERNET BELLWETHER: While Yahoo’s profit fell 61 percent, the
company said the two quarters did not provide an apples-to-apples
comparison and analyst expectations were exceeded. Above,
people pass Yahoo headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif., on Monday.

share, according to Thomson Finan-
cial.

Yahoo’s revenue for the period
totaled $1.7 billion, a 13 percent rise
from $1.5 billion in the prior year.

In a measure far more important
to investors, Yahoo’s revenue fell to
$1.23 billion after subtracting adver-
tising commission that the company

paid to its partners. That figure rep-
resented a 15 percent increase from
the prior year and a 10 percent rise
from 2006’s third quarter.

Yahoo shares fell 46 cents to close
at $26.96 on the Nasdaq Stock Market
before the fourth-quarter earnings
were announced, then recovered 23
cents in extended trading.

ing charges, the company earned
$5.01 billion, or $1.19 per share, in the
latest quarter.

The bank’s revenue grew 34 per-
cent to $18.46 billion from $13.81 bil-
lion last year.

That exceed the profits of $1.18 per
share on revenue of $18.01 billion
expected by analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial.

Michael L. Mayo, an analyst with
Prudential Equity Group, said in a
research note that he was concerned

* TURN TO BANKS

ECONOMIC SUMMIT

Global
forum to
focus on
energy,
warming

& The lack of thick snow in
Davos, Switzerland, where the
World Economic Forum
convenes this week, is a firm
reminder to delegates that
climate change is a hot topic.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press”

DAVOS, Switzerland — Concerns
about global warming and resolving
the seemingly endless tensions in the
Middle East are set to dominate the
agenda of the World Economic
Forum’s annual meeting this week,
with a lack of snow in the tiny moun-
tain community a stark reminder of ©
the warm weather.

About 2,500 business and political
leaders — including musicians and
social activists Bono and Peter
Gabriel — are set to meet for the
annual meeting of the minds to talk
politics, economics and social issues
in an atmosphere aimed at finding
long-term solutions instead of quick
fixes.

Global warming and security are
the two dominant issues, according
to the Forum’s organizers, and the
lack of thick snow was a firm
reminder that climate change is a hot
topic.

' “We are getting huge demand
from our members to place climate
change and issues of environmental
security at the very heart of the pro-
gram of the World Economic
Forum,” said Dominic Waughray,
head of environmental initiatives for
the WEF. “The Forum has already
been instrumental in getting busi-
ness voices heard at the very center
of global decision-making on climate
change, but the program at this
year’s annual meeting shows just
how crucial business leaders believe
these issues are and just how serious
they are in finding real solutions in
partnership with governments and
leading NGOs.”

There will be 17 sessions focusing
on climate change, featuring topics
to help companies and governments
navigate the legalities of implement-
ing policy changes aimed at curbing
emissions and pollution and how to
make going green profitable. Among
the people scheduled to talk include
U.S. Sen. John McCain, a likely can-
didate for the Republican presiden-
tial nomination; Zhang Xiaoqiang,
vice chairman of China’s National
Development and Reform Commis-
sion; and Montek Ahluwalia, deputy
chairman of India’s planning com-
mission.

A survey of participants by poll-
ster Gallup International found that
twice the number of attendees from
last year thought that environmental
protection should be a priority for
world leaders.

German Chancellor Angela Mer-
kel, whose country is president of
the European Union and the Group
of Eight, has said she would focus on
climate change in her address. Brit-
ish Prime Minister Tony Blair told
the Forum on its website that “talks
between leaders could help outline
elements of a future post-Kyoto cli-
mate framework that could then be

* TURN TO ECONOMIC SUMMIT


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



< INSIGHT

For the stories —
behind the news,
read Insight Mondays












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PARADISE ISLAND



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor -



ahamian busi-

nesses and con-

sumers are likely

to face “sharp

increases in tax-
es” in future to pay for a
National Health Insurance
(NHI) scheme that is finan-
cially unsustainable, a
Bahamas-based economist has
warned.

Ralph Massey, a director of
the Nassau Institute economic
think-tank, said the Govern-
ment’s proposed NHI plan was
attempting to impose on the
Bahamas a “50 year-old” mod-
el for healthcare financing that
had run into deep trouble in
the UK and Canada.

“The National Health Insur-
ance programme in its present
form is financially unsustain-
able, and one can conclude
that the Government must be
reckless and irresponsible in
its haste to implement it,” Mr
Massey wrote in an article for
the Institute.

“The healthcare entitlement
of NHI will require sharp
increases in taxes in the medi-
um and long term, and is high-
ly likely to be financially unsus-
tainable...... The Government
refuses to provide any data
relating to programme costs
beyond the very first years of
operation, despite the vast
body of evidence showing that
the cost of such a programme
will increase significantly.”

Mr Massey pointed out that
in the UK, its National Health
Service (NHS) - the model
upon which the Governmen-
t’s NHI is largely based, will
generate a financial deficit of
$182 million for the year end-
ing on March 31, 2007, prompt-
ing discussions about whether
to cut back medical services
made available by the plan.

As for Canada, another
model for NHI, Mr Massey
said 10 separate provincial
health systems were in “finan-
cial crisis”. There, due to an
ageing population, healthcare
costs were projected to more
than double over a 75-year
period.

The Nassau Institute direc-
tor said the Government, and
its NHI implementation team,
had avoided the impact such
shifts in demographics and an
ageing population would have
on the Bahamian scheme.

Mr Massey said declining











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4

‘Sharp tax increases’
to pay for NHI likely

Economist warns scheme’s
reliance on troubled 50
year-old model is ‘financially
unsustainable’, as short-term

gain at nation s expense
‘baked’ into politics
by two main parties

“The National Health
Insurance programme
in its present form is
financially unsustainable,
and one can conclude
that the Government
must be reckless
and irresponsible
in its haste to
implement it.”

— Ralph Massey

birth rates impacted the ability
of countries to fund public sec-
tor welfare schemes such as
NHI, as such plans required
“an ever increasing number of
taxpaying workers to fund the
healthcare needs of older
workers andretirees”.

Europe, the US, Canada and
other developed nations had
all experienced declining fer-
tility rates, and Mr Massey said
the same thing was happening
in the Bahamas.

This nation’s total fertility
rate in the early 1970s was 3.44
children per woman, and has
dropped to its current 2.3 chil-
dren per woman.

Barbados now has the lowest
fertility rate in the Caribbean
of 1.5, with Cuba and Trinidad
& Tobago both at 1.61.

Mr Massey added: “In its
forecasts the UN Population
Division assumes that the
Bahamian total fertility rate
will decline to a rate of 1.85 in
the year 2030, and not to the
present rates of these three
countries or lower.

“In the UN’s 2004 report,
the picture one sees is a



Bahamian population of 79,000
in 1950 growing at an increas-
ing annual rate to 170,000 in
1970, and then increasing at a
steadily declining rate to the
peak in 2040 of 394,000.”
Criticising both the Govern-
ment and FNM opposition, Mr
Massey said: “A national
healthcare programme has
such an appeal to the elec-
torate that potential short-term
political gains swamp longer-
term medical, financial and
political considerations.
“This applies to both the

- party in power and its loyal

opposition. The latter neither
voted ‘No’, nor did it make a
strong case for an alternative.
As a result, unless something
changes, costly long-term struc-
tural errors will be ‘baked’ into
the Bahamian political land-
scape.”

The Government’s failure to
release NHI actuarial studies
and the full 2005 report on the
scheme’s costs, components

_ and financing to the National

Coalition for Healthcare
Reform was described by Mr
Massey as “a totally inade-
quate response”.

Describing the whole situa-
tion as ‘a wall of silence’, Mr
Massey recalled the “dismis-
sive” response. by the NHI

implementation team to the © ~

report compiled on the scheme
by Nadeem Esmail, of the
Fraser Institute, which detailed
alternative policy options for
the Government to consider.

He added: “For instance, the
Fraser report described the
effect of ageing on total pro-
gramme costs. The NHI
response stated that this fac-
tor was less important than
other medical cost factors, such
as the economies of scale, pub-
lic sector inefficiencies and
high private care health
charges.”

Alternative urged to
EPA's ‘total devastation’

FROM page 1B

Bahamas and other Caribbean
countries that they had yet to
enter, with the agreement over-
riding parliamentary sovereign-
ty and the ability of nations to
design their own laws and poli-
cies.

Describing the EPA as “noth-
ing more than the WTO by the
back door”, Mr Moss said that
providing reciprocal access for
EU imports to the Bahamas
meant providing them with
duty-free access to this nation,
impacting customs revenues.

The Government has esti-
mated that it could lose $10-$14
million in revenues from EU
imports as a result of the EPA
in a worst-case scenario, but Mr
Moss said: “This country, this
government cannot afford to
lose a couple of hundred thou-
sand dollars, much less $10-$14
million.”

Currently, exports of rum,
seafood and polymers to the
EU by Bahamian companies
are allowed to enter that market
duty free under the Cotonou
Agreement, signed in 2000.
However, goods exported to the
Bahamas and rest of the
Caribbean from the EU do not
enter these markets duty-free.

This type of one-way prefer-
ence regime is contrary to
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) rules, and that organi-
sation’s refusal to renew the
waiver for Coronou beyond
2007 has forced the 79 nations

that make up the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group to negotiate the EPA.

t Moss described concerns
that Bacardi and Polymers
International would close their
Bahamian operations if they
lost their EU duty-free market
access, costing hundreds of jobs,
as “hype that does not make
economic sense”.

He urged those companies to
lobby the Government to sign
on to the GSP, as signing the
EPA will “cost thousands of
jobs everywhere in the country
as goods will flood to this coun-
try duty free”. ,

Mr Moss added: “If we join,
we will have to forget about cus-
toms duties, our main tax
regime. We have not yet sought
to change this, and it would be
disastrous to allow this country
to be subjected to duty free
imports from Europe.”

He pointed out that the
Bahamas would have to offer
the same duty-free access to EU
goods as the rest of Cariforum,
as the EPA deal would apply
to all members of the bloc.

Even though the Govern-
ment would seek to phase-in
tariff cuts and duty free access
for EU goods, Mr Moss said the
Bahamas’ hands would be tied,
as it was bound to whatever
phase-ins, reservations and
timetables that Cariforum
agreed.

He pointed out that this
might not be in the Bahamas’
best interests, and said: “The
Bahamas has special circum-_
stances. It ought to take itself
out [of Cariforum] and say it
cannot do this, we have to do it
on our own.”
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



The Suns turn up the
heat for next season

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

THE Temple Christian
Suns won’t be able to
defend their Bahamas
Association of Indepen-
dent Secondary Schools’
senior girls basketball title
this year.

But coach Sharel Cash
warned the rest of the
league that they will be
back to regain their crown
next year. .

The Suns, the two-time
defending champions, out-
shone the St. Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
26-16 yesterday at Temple
Christian.

Like the Big Red
Machines, who dropped to
2-5, the Suns won’t be eli-
gible for the playoffs as
they are out of the top four
spots at 5-4. cei

“We're rebuilding, which
is good for me,” said Cash,
who also coaches some of
the players on the Junior

All-Star team in the New .

Providence Women’s Bas-
ketball Association.

“Like I made a statement
at the beginning of the
year, who doesn’t beat me
in 2006/2007, they won’t
beat Temple Christian in
2007/2008. ,

“They will need to come
with all of their weapons
because right now we’re in
a rebuilding stage. I have
a young team and I know
this team will be around
for the next 3-4 years.”

Directed

Despite being young, the
Suns got a solid leadership
from Tiffany Wildgoose,
who emerged as the start-
ing point guard. The 1]-
grader directed the show
with seven points. .

She was joined by Alexis
Bell with seven. Destine
Bootle contributed four
and Stenell Babbs, Hillary
Rolle, Latoya Rahming
and Gariece Butler all
chipped in with two.

For the Big Red
Machines, Syneisha Bootle
had a game high eight.
Royandra Nairn had four
and Lavaughn Dames and
Ivanna Seymour helped out
with a basket each.

Cash, however, said she
expected SAC to put up a
much better showing than
they did. The Suns didn’t
allow the Big Red
Machines to get rolling as
they took the ball out of
the hands of Nairn by run-
ning a box and one defence
— the point guard.

Up 5-4 at the end of the
first quarter, Temple Chris-
tian got a 1-2 punch from
Wildgoose and Bell as they
worked the ball on the out-
side and inside respective-
ly with three and four
points to push their lead to
13-6 at the half.

The Suns continued to
control the tempo of the
game as they crashed the
boards and ran the fast
break in the third quarter,
extending their lead to 22-
8 as Destine Bootle came
up with four to go along
with Bell’s three.

But the Big Red
Machines, who started to

@ TEMPLE Christian
Suns’ Tiffany Wildgoose
squares up to shoot the
uncontested jumper against
the St. Augustine’s College
Big Red Machines yesterday
as the Suns won this BAISS
senior girls basketball game
26-16 at home.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

play a lot better in the
third quarter, posted their
best quarter in the fourth
as they got three big bas-
kets from Syneisha Bootle
to trim the lead.

Comfortable

“It was a good win and
so far the girls look com-
fortable,” Cash said. “I’m
trying to get them to play a
little of everything because
they are young.”

SAC’s coach Marco
Munnings said he wasn’t at
all disappointed in the
loss.

“We were just a little too
late in trying to come back
in the game,” he stated.
“Our problem is we need
to have better court aware-
ness.

“They were isolating our
guard and they left the
middle open and we didn’t
capitalise on that.

“We just didn’t make the
most of the opportunities.
They were there. It wasn’t
that the team was that
much better and they dom-
inated us. It’s a good pro-
gression from one game to
the next.”

Like Cash, Munnings
said he’s looking forward
to next year with his entire
team coming back.



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



clash with

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



IF THERE’S one team in the way of
Mark Knowles and Daniel Nestor winning
another Australian Open Grand Slam dou-
bles title, it’s American twin brothers Bob
and Mike Bryan.

Knowles and Nestor will clash with the
Bryans in the semifinals of the first Grand
Slam tournament for the year today in Mel-
bourne, Australia.

It’s a match that Knowles said he and
Nestor are looking forward to playing.

“It’s a big match. Obviously, we’re been
playing really well so far in this tournament
and they’re the top seed, but we’ve had a
rivalry for a long time,” Knowles reflected.

The Bryans hold a 10-8 advantage over
Knowles and Nestor. They also won the
last big match they played together in a
Grand Slam — the semis of Wimbledon
which the Bryans won.

But Knowles said there’s no reason why
they can’t get a big win over the world’s
best team in 2006 and the number one seeds
in the tournament.

“It would be a good chance for us to win
this one to get right back at them,” Knowles
projected.

In the quarter-finals, Knowl2s and Nestor
knocked off Fabrice Santoro and Nenad
Zimonjic in identical scores of 6-3, 6-3, while
the Bryans prevailed with a 7-5, 7-5 decision
over Jeff Coetzee and Rogier Wassen.

Knowles and Nestor, who are going for
their first tournament victory of the year
after losing the first two they played in, are
confident that they can succeed.

“We’ve been playing great and I’ve been
hitting the ball really well,” Knowles noted.
“Tt’s always good when you start of the year
well. It’s a sign that you have put in some
work during the off-season.





“We had a really good start to the year,
we've been playing really well and we're
fresh and healthy and pretty excited about
being this far in the tournament.”

But Knowles insisted that the Bryans are
not going to be any pushover.

“They are tough. Obviously, they finish
number one in the world a couple years
when we haven't,” he pointed out. “So they
bring a lot to the table.

“They bring a lot of energy and they play
some big games.

“But we've beaten them before and we
know what it takes to beat them.



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

W TENNIS ACE
Mark Knowles.



“It will just comes down to execution on
the day.”

Having played against and practised with
each other for so long, Knowles said there’s
no mystery about the way either team play.
But he said they are the team they have to
beat if they want to win another Australian
Open title.

“We can do it. We can definitely do it,”
Knowles said.

- They did it in 2002 when they won the
first of their two Grand Slam titles. The
other came in 2005 at the US Open in
Flushing Meadows, New York.

fo



owles looking forward to
Bryan brothers
PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





@ BASKETBALL
BAISS ACTION

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools will con-
tinue its basketball regular
season action today with
games being played from
4 p.m. Junior girls - CW
Saunders at St. Anne’s
and Queen’s College at
Nassau Christian Acade-
my. Senior boys - St.
Anne’s at St. John’s; St.
Augustine’s at Kingsway
Academy; Temple Christ-
ian at Prince William;
Faith Temple at Westmin-
ister and Nassau Christian
Academy at St. Andrew’s.

H@ GSSSA ACTION

THE Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association will bé back
in action today at 4 p.m.
with its basketball regular
season after taking a
break the past two days.
The junior girls and boys
will play at the CI Gibson
Gym and the senior girls
and boys will play at the
DW Davis Gym.

NPBA ACTION

THE New Providence
Basketball Association
will continue its regular
season action tonight at
the CI Gibson Gymnasi-
um with a double header
on tap. In the opener at
7:30 p.m., the Y-Care
Wreckers will play Cable
Bahamas Entertainers and
in the feature contest, the
Millennium Jammers will
meet the Sunshine Auto
Ruff Ryders.

Roddick —
prepares.
for Federer
in semifinals

B TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

ANDY RODDICK was
ruthless, treating his close
friend like little more than
warmup fodder for his semi-

final showdown with Roger

Federer.

The 2003 U.S. Open cham-
pion flattened Mardy Fish
without blinking Tuesday,
making only four unforced
errors in a 6-2, 6-2, 6-2 quar-
terfinal win at the Australian
Open.

“T played pretty flawless, I
thought,” Roddick said. “I
feel good going into the
semis.”

Roddick said he could
remember making more
errors in one game than he
had in the entire match
against Fish, who lived with
him in Boca Raton, Fla., for a
while and went to his high
school.

“TI tried my best to kind of
put our friendship to the back
of my head,” Roddick said.
“You know, it’s always diffi-
cult. It’s a weird, weird situa-
tion.”

Next up is how to beat Fed-
erer, something he has not
managed since Montreal in
2003.

That was the year he ended
at No. 1 and collected his only
major title.

Federer also won his first
major at Wimbledon that
year, and is now bidding for
his 10th Grand Slam title.

The defending champion
encountered tricky wind con-
ditions on Rod Laver Arena
and a difficult opponent,
looking nervous at times dur-
ing a 6-3, 7-6 (2), 7-5 win over
No. 7 Tommy Robredo with
his parents in the crowd.

Federer, who lost to Rod-
dick in the final of an exhibi-
tion tournament 10 days ago,
dropped his serve four times.
He was shaking his head after
shanking some shots.

“The break of serves,
they’re due to the wind I
assume,” Federer said. “I had
to kind of change my game
around a little bit midway
through the second set.”











Minister: govt hoping to
take —— to next level

B SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

REGATTA fans are in for
a treat, with this season being
dubbed the biggest and best
to hit the Bahamas by Minis-
ter V Alfred Gray. :

Mr Gray, the minister
responsible for regattas in the
country, believes that the
union between the associa-
tions will only strengthen the
sport.

Reflecting on the times
when regatta was known by
every Bahamian as the num-
ber one sport in the country,
the minister praised the
sailors, the different associa-
tion presidents and the mem-
bers for their insight and their
vision for the sport.

He said: “Regatta 2007 will
officially be launched on Sat-
urday by the Honourable
Prime Minister Perry Christie.
This is a very special regatta
because for the first time in
the history of all regattas all
three associations will come
under thé same umbrella, the
same for the other upcoming
regattas.

“The government is hoping

to take regatta to the next lev-
el. We realise that the sport is ~

a significant puller in the
socio-economic development
of our country as a cultural

“event. It brings together peo-

ales

ple from all walks of life and
boosts the economy in which
the regatta was held.

. “It is also an opportunity
for people from one island to
visit another island. We call it
inter-island trading, boosting
inter-island tourism as well. It
also gives social interaction of
people getting to know other
traditions from other islands.”
. This year’s regatta season

will: kick ‘off'on Friday with

the New Year Day regatta, set
to take place at the Montagu
Shores. The regatta is expect-
ed to set the tune for the oth-



BTHE SOUTHERN CROSS in Acton the coming fematta

eason has been dubbed ‘the — and best’.

er regattas.

According to Mr Gray, who
released the jam packed
scheduled yesterday, regatta
fans can make preparations
for the sailing events now that
the sport will be hosted on
every major island.

He said: “It is expected that
I will review the possibility, at
the cabinet level, in making
regatta not only the number
one sporting event but cultur-
al'as well in our country
because from all indications it
seems to be heading there.
Outside of Junkanoo, I think
regattas are the largest event
held on an annual basis in the
Bahamas.

“I do think that regattas will

be more significant than
Junkanoo because every
island in the Bahamas now has
regattas, but every island has-
n't been attracted to Junkanoo
as yet. So in that regard regat-
tas are more popular because
regattas touch every island.”

Depending on the success
of the various regattas this
year, there may be some
changes, but the sport is
unlikely to be expanded trom
its current form in the near
future.

“MiarvGray added: “T don’t
think that we will expand or
extend regattas because the
government doesn’t deter-
mine which island will host
regattas, that is up to the local



communities -and is support-
ed by the government. While
we can’t quote how many
regattas we can have, we cer-
tainly do not ask people to
have them, we just support the
associations in making the
sport number one.

“The government will sup-
port them financially and cer-
tainly the government has a
policy to interact with the peo-
ple. We also try to encourage
and facilitate the marketing
of regattas so that people are
aware of What ic going on in
the island.”

a



W MINISTER of Local
Government and Consumer
Affairs V Alfred Gray

New Zealand make 210 against England

B® NEW ZEALAND'S Daniel Vittori,
center, jumps after taking the wicket of Eng-
land's Andrew Flintoff, right, caught by
wicketkeeper Brendon McCullum, left, for
9 runs in their one day international cricket
match in Adelaide, Australia, Tuesday, Jan.
23, 2007. New Zealand made 210 in their
innings.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)


SRARAONANNANHY

¢ Hiami Herald y



IN MY OPINION

GREG COTE

gcote@MiamiHerald.com

Want that ring?
Winners usually
ride a little luck

E verything about a Super Bowl

is excess and exaggeration

because somewhere along the
long, gladiators’ march to Roman
numeral XLI the game stopped being
a game — the NFL championship no
longer was enough on its own, appar-
ently — and became a metastasizing
spectacle ever out to top itself.

They have official news confer-
ences about the pregame coin flip
now. The bloated halftime extrava-
ganza deigns to let some football be
played around
it. The TV
commercials,
once things to
be avoided, are
obscenely-
priced works of
sad fascination.

Nothing,
though, epitomizes XXXL-sized Super
Bowl hype as steadfastly as “the ring.”

The mighty, mystical Ring.

It is the patron saint of the Super
Bowl, its deity, and it will be referred
to as such over the coming days as the
Chicago Bears and the Indianapolis
Colts speak reverently, fervently (and
constantly) of the ring and all it
means. Get used to it. It is their Holy
Grail, awaiting only the chosen, fated
ones Feb. 4 at Dolphin Stadium.

THE RING IS THE THING |

Nothing in this game’s buildup, as
hundreds of writers flood in to file
millions of words of claptrap, will be
more prevalent than one single
theme: Will Peyton Manning finall
win a ring!? “

All that will come close is the
theme about Tony Dungy and Lovie
Smith being the first black head
coaches in Super Bowl history —
meaning the first with a chance to
earn the ring!
~ It is time to hit this mystique witha
hard reality check:

The championship ring in general,
and specifically the Lord of the Ring
Super Bowl, has become the most
overrated symbol in sports largely
because so many of them sparkle
from the hands of men who had so lit-
tle to do with winning them.

Dan Marino has no Super Bowl
ring, but obscure Charlie Leigh won
two because he lucked out to be a sel-
dom-used Dolphins reserve running
back in the early 1970s.

Ted Williams owns no World
Series ring, but Mike Mordecai (a
2003 Marlins scrub) does.

Charles Barkley has no NBA cham-
pionship ring, but Earl Barron does.
Because Earl played in eight games
(none in the playoffs) with the Miami
Heat last season. |

Fathom the preceding few exam-
ples, among way too many others, and
ask yourself what it really means to
present your fist with That Ring on it.

Athletes who hold up their bejew-
eled hand as some sort of imperial,

- irrefutable statement about them-
selves need to stop that, please.

WHAT IT REALLY MEANS

The ring says only that you were ©
along on a magic ride once, giving no
indication whatsoever whether you
were steering, riding shotgun, dozing
in the back seat, stowed in the trunk
or left at a rest stop.

That is why we look to Halls of
Fame as our best measurements of
individual greatness.

The gaudy ring doesn’t get you
through those doors, and even your
teammates’ help is limited.

Think of all of those llth guys.off
the bench during the Chicago Bulls’
heydays, the barnacles riding Michael
Jordan’s whale.

Think of this Bears team’s backup
long-snapper, or the Colts’ fifth guard,
or either team’s seldom-used, oft-in-
jured rookie: Guys you’ve never heard
of, and whose contribution is utterly
incidental. Someone among these pas-
sengers is about to get to call himself
“a champion.” For all-time.

But Marino isn’t? Is there a God?

The Bears or Colts will have richly
earned their champions’ status a week
from Sunday. But enough, please, —
with waving that jewelry as the ulti-
mate personal validation of who you
are. Because, in that sense, the ring is
usually wrong.

The ring might well represent your
own contribution and true greatness,
in which case it is superfluous.

Far more likely, the ring will repre-
sent your dumb luck, for which true
gratefulness should follow.



MORE INSIDE: 11B

SPORTS |

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

BY JOHN PYE
Associated Press /

MELBOURNE, Australia —
Maria Sharapova advanced to the
Australian Open semifinals with a
7-6 (7-5), 7-5 victory today over
Anna Chakvetadze, another Rus-
sian star who is 19 years old.

Sharapova, seeded first and
assured of gaining the No. 1 world
ranking next month, had trouble on
her serve, getting broken twice in
each set and having to fend off five
break points.

She was broken when serving
for the match at 5-3, giving up the
break with a double fault, and
wasted a match point with a back-
hand error in the next game.

Sharapova got two more match
points in the 12th game of the sec-
ond set and finished it off in
2 hours, 14 minutes when Chakve-
tadze netted a forehand.

3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



TENNIS | AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Sharapova advances to semifinals

“It was very difficult. I didn’t
feel like we had a lot of easy ral-
lies,” Sharapova said. “I felt I had
to work on every point.”

“T was a little up and down, a bit
scratchy,” Sharapova said. “I am
glad I got through, but next time
will even be tougher.”

Sharapova is into the semifinals
at Melbourne Park for the third
consecutive year, and she is among

‘the last four at a major for the

eighth time. She is the defending
U.S. Open champion and also won
Wimbledon in 2004.

Chakvetadze, who had won 20
of her previous 21 matches, had
never been beyond the fourth
round of a major.

‘No. 4 Kim Clijsters and three-
time champion Martina Hingis
were to meet in a quarterfinal here
for the second consecutive year.

On the other side of the draw,



EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES
HARD TO BEAT: Maria Sharapova.

Andy Roddick was ruthless, treat-
ing his close friend like little more
than warmup fodder for his semifi-
nal showdown with Roger Federer.

The 2003 U.S. Open champion
flattened Mardy Fish without
blinking on Tuesday, making only
four unforced errors in a 6-2, 6-2,
6-2 quarterfinal victory. —

Federer, who lost to Roddick in
the final of an exhibition tourna-
ment 10 days ago but has a 12-1
record in official ATP matches,
dropped his serve four times in a
6-3, 7-6 (7-2), 7-5 victory over
No. 7 Tommy Robredo.

Serena Williams continued her
improbable run for an eighth
Grand Slam title, fending off 10
break points and coming within
two points of defeat before beating
Shahar Peer 3-6, 6-2, 8-6.

“I am the ultimate competitor,”
said Williams, who missed most of
last season with recurring knee
trouble. “I don’t think anyone
thought I would get this far, except
for me and my mom.”



PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XLI

Long time coming



@ After a decades-long struggle for
minority coaches in the NEL, the Colts’
Tony Dungy embraces the significance of
two black head coaches in the Super Bowl.

BY MICHAEL WALLACE
mwallace@MiamiHerald.com od

INDIANAPOLIS — Tony Dungy could only
shake his head in disbelief as he reflected on the
numbers back then.

Way back when black head coaches in the
NFL didn’t exist. Back when any thought of
establishing a pipeline of minority head coaches
essentially was a pipe dream.

That was the reality that a.
Dungy, the coach of the Indianap-

olis Colts, stepped into in 1981
when he accepted his first NFL
coaching job, as an assistant with
the Pittsburgh Steelers. Dungy
quickly did the math. And then he



ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

BREAKING NEW GROUND: Colts head coach Tony Dungy, above, and Bears coach Lovie

Smith are in the Super Bowl, and that should open doors for other minority coaches.

BY GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press

ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Oak-
land Raiders hired 31-year-old Lane
Kiffin as their head coach Tuesday
to rebuild a three-time Super Bow]
champion that fell to the NFL’s
worst record this season.

Kiffin, who was the offensive
coordinator at the University
of Southern California,
became the youngest head
coach in Raiders history, and
the NFL’s youngest in sev-
eral decades. Though Kiffin
has just one season of experience
as an NFL assistant coach, Raiders
owner Al Davis didn’t hesitate to
put him in charge of his franchise.

“T’m extremely excited about
this opportunity and where I see
this place going,” Kiffin said. “It’s a



PRO FOOTBALL | OAKLAND RAIDERS

Raiders make Lane Kiffin a head coach at 31

historic franchise that has had
greatness and has fallen on tough
times, but we will bring it back to
where it was before. We will do
that through hard work.”

The Raiders also will retain
defensive coordinator Rob Ryan,
who built an above-average
defense last season despite the
troubles on offense.

Davis has fired three
coaches in the past four
years while attempting to get
his club back to respectabili-
ty. The Raiders have
endured four consecutive losing
seasons, culminating in its NFL-
worst 2-14 campaign in 2006.

As Davis reflected on what he
called the “year of infamy,” he real-
ized that the Raiders needed a pro-
found ‘change.



JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES

JUST WIN, BABY ... Lane Kiffin
inherits a team that went 2-14.

“As time went on, I realized that
we had to go in a different direc-
tion,” Davis said. “We have to
move the clock back. We have to
get youth in the organization, and
we have to go ahead and attack,
and with someone who really
means that he will attack.”

set out to alter the equation.

“When I came into the league,
there were 14 African-American
assistant coaches and 28 teams,” Dungy, 51, said
Monday, a day after he and the Bears’ Lovie
Smith became the first black head coaches to
reach the Super Bowl.

“People who had an opportunity to change
that were going to have to do it. It was about
bringing good coaches and people into the
league. In my heart of hearts, it was also to bring
good African-American coaches.”

On Feb. 4, Dungy faces one of the protégés he
groomed when the Colts play Smith’s Chicago
Bears in Super Bow] XLI at Dolphin Stadium. It
will be the first meeting between black head
coaches in the Super Bowl, which guarantees a
black coach will lead his team to the title for the
first time in NFL history.

For that reason, Dungy said, next week’s his-
torical Super Bow] matchup represents “a win-
win” situation. It’s also the high-water mark in a
decades-long struggle for minority coaches who
have had to overcome discriminatory hiring
practices to land jobs at the top level.’

“I realize the position we’re in,” Smith, 49,
told reporters in Chicago after the Bears beat
the New Orleans Saints to get to the Super
Bowl. “It’s hard to put into words, but I know a
lot of great coaches who came before me that
didn’t get this opportunity.”

* TURN TO TONY DUNGY

The Raiders have the No. 1 pick

_in the upcoming NFL Draft, and

now they also have Kiffin, a former
Fresno State quarterback, in charge
of a new philosophy on offense.
The Raiders managed just 168
points this season — fifth-fewest in
a 16-game schedule in NFL history.

Davis fired head Art Shell after
the season and apparently became
determined to hire a young offen-
sive mind to succeed him. This
strategy has worked for Davis
before: John Madden was just 14
months older than Kiffin when he
took over the Raiders in 1969.

“I think, ‘31 years old — wow,
that’s young,’ ” said Davis, who is
78. “But you don’t have to be old to
be great. You have to be good. You
have to want it. You have to have a
desire, a passion for football.”

RS Be a SN
4E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

ALL-STAR
NOTEBOOK

Schedule

format
won't be

changed

BY GEORGE RICHARDS
grichards@MiamiHerald.com

DALLAS — National
Hockey League Commis-
sioner Gary Bettman’s
preference of a division-
heavy schedule was upheld
Tuesday in
a vote
by the
league’s
Board of
Governors.

Bettman
has long
champi-
oned the
current
schedule format, although
there was thought that it
would change Tuesday so
each team would play each
other at least once a season.
The measure to change the
schedule fell a vote short of
the needed two-thirds
majority.

Next season will be the
third of a cycle in which
each team plays eight
games against each divi-
sional rival, four against
each conference team and
one each against two of the
three divisions in the
opposing conference.

The prelockout schedule
included only six divisional
games for each franchise,
and at least one game
against each team from the
other conference.

Bettman added that
there was little to no sup-
port to realign the divi-
sions.

e The Pittsburgh Pen-



BETTMAN

guins’ status has beenahot _

topic for months now, but *
Bettman has repeatedly
said that he hoped a deal
could be worked out to
keep the team in Pittsburgh.
Bettman added that a
deal needs to be struck
quickly somewhere, and
that Pittsburgh shouldn’t
feel rushed because Pen-
guins owner Mario Lem-
ieux “has been looking for
a building for seven years.”
Bettman addressed the
issue of the Penguins possi-
bly moving and if the
league was going to expand.
“We're focused on hav-
ing 30 healthy teams right
. now — where they are,”
Bettman said. “We haven’t
looked at a lot of people
_ and said, ‘Well, what if
Pittsburgh doesn’t get the
building?’ The answer is,
we'll deal with the what-if if
it happens.

“We're really focused on
all the teams, including
Pittsburgh, where they are.”

e NHL games televised
on the Versus channel seem
lost, with a number of
Americans without access
to the Comcast-owned net-
work. Bettman said the
cable provider is expanding
its reach.

“It’s growing,” he said.
“They’ve been giving us
priority treatment. And
they’ve grown almost 8 mil-
lion households since we’ve
been with them....

“As we sit here today, I
still maintain that for this
game, long-term, this was
the right decision.”

e Bettman hopes to
expand the league’s Inter-
net capabilities with live
streaming games in the
near future. Major League
Baseball has found a large
revenue stream from its
online business, and the
NHL would love to do simi-
lar business.

GOING TO MONTREAL

Bettman announced
Montreal will play host to
the 2009 Ail-Star Game.
The game, which was last
held in Montreal at the
Forum in 1993, will be part
of the Canadiens’ 100th
anniversary celebration.

The All-Star Game will
be played in Atlanta next
season.

“We're delighted to be
part of that event,” Bettman
said of the Canadiens’ cen-
tennial.

i



|
i
i
|
|
|
1
|

2B

Get ready for

BY JAIME ARON
Associated Press

DALLAS — Sitting side by
side at a table, facing question
after question about being the
faces of the new NHL, Sidney
Crosby and Alex Ovechkin
flashed their grace and charm.
** Asked about trying to bring
the game to a wider audience,
Ovechkin smiled, turned to

Crosby and said, “Can you >

answer?”

And the 19-year-old deliv-
ered smoothly, giving a
thoughtful response that
included this line: ‘“We’re
going to do our best to make
that possible.”

-Then came the subject of
the league’s MVP thus far this
season. Ovechkin leaned right
into the microphone and said,
“Crosby!” Crosby laughed,
started giving a politically cor-
rect answer about there being
“too many guys right now,”
then broke into a smile and
said, “I mean, the best answer
would be Ovechkin right now,
right?”

Pretty good, eh?

' They should be even more
dazzling on the ice tonight.

“Those guys could do a lot

‘of damage,” 10-time All-Star

Teemu Selanne said.

The Gretzky and Lemieux
of their generation (at least
that’s what the NHL is banking
on), Crosby and Ovechkin will
be teammates for the first time
when they lead the East’s best
against the West’s best in the
league’s first midseason gath-
ering since 2004 — since the
lockout that left hockey even
less of a factor for sports fans

BY STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press

DALLAS — About the only
part of the game in which Sid-
ney Crosby has struggled this
season is shootouts — until
the 19-year-old superstar was
on the same ice with the rest
of the NHL’s best players.

Crosby scored on two of his
three shots in the final individ-
ual shootout Tuesday night,
delivering a victory for the
Eastern Conference in the
NHL All-Star skills competi-
tion.

The NHL’s leading scorer,
whose 72 points are five more
than anybody else, is 0-for-5 in
shootouts during the regular
season.

“Tt was fun to be in that sit-
uation. I didn’t ask for it, but I
liked it,” Crosby said.

“Especially with all the
ones that I missed this season,
it was nice.”

_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

HOCKEY | NHL ALL-STAR GAME



INSIDE THE GAME



TONY GUTIERREZ/AP

LEAGUE LEADERS: Crosby, on the right, and Ovechkin were
chosen to represent the NHL in a media session Monday.

in the United States.
Although the league spouts
attendance figures showing

- that popularity is zooming, the

entire NHL is counting on this
exciting young duo to get tele-
vision ratings up and to gener-
ate more buzz.

’That’s why Crosby and
Ovechkin were the only two
players selected to meet the
media Monday.

And it explains how Ovech-
kin, a 21-year-old Moscow
native, got stuck trying to
compare himself and Crosby
to NBA Hall of Famers Larry
Bird and Magic Johnson.

“JT feel. comfortable,”
Ovechkin said. “And I think
Sidney feels comfortable, too.
We concentrate on the game
and don’t think about our
faces, the NHL or Magic John-
son or Larry Bird.

“We concentrate on our

game and our team.”

Crosby plays for the Pitts-
burgh Penguins and leads the
league with 72 points, five
more than anyone else.

In his bid to become the
youngest MVP since Gretzky,
Crosby already has become
the youngest top-vote-getter
for the All-Star Game.

And he lives with Mario
Lemieux, who, as the owner of
the Penguins, also is his boss.

“It’s been very exciting for
my family. My four kids really
love him,” Lemieux said.
“They play hockey with him
all the time in the basement.
They have a great time. He’s a
great kid, a great person, a
great ambassador for our
league.

“I feel very fortunate to
have a chance to watch him
play.”

Ovechkin, of the Washing-

_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



: JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
DYNAMIC DUO: Young stars Alex Ovechkin, left, and Sidney Crosby are shaping up as the Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux of their generation.

CATCH THE RISING STARS

the Crosby & Ovechkin Show



NHL ALL-STARS

SEASON STATISTICS

Game time: 8 p.m. EST today, in Dallas. On TV: Versus
(x-starter; c-captain; i-injured, will not play; z-injury replacement)

EASTERN CONFERENCE





WESTERN CONFERENCE
Player, team GP G A Pts Player, team GP G A Pts
x-Sidney Crosby, Pit 39 21 44 65 x-Joe Thornton, SJ 44 11 42 53
x-Alex Ovechkin, Was 44 28 33 61 xc-Joe Sakic, Col 43 18 29 47
x-Daniel Briere, Buf 44 16 35 51 x-Jonathan Cheechoo, SJ 38 14 «15 «29
Jason Blake, NYI 43 23 18 41 Bill Guerin, StL 42 18 13° 31
Simon Gagne, Phi. 44 20 13 33 Martin Havlat, Chi 21 #13 «#13 «26
Dany Heatley, Ott 40 27 31 58 Pairick Marleau, SJ 44 20 26 46
Marian Hossa, Atl 46 26 32 58 z-Andy McDonald, Ana 49 12 33 45
Vincent Lecavalier, TB 45 26 -33 59 Rick Nash, Clm 39.13 17 30
Martin St. Louis, TB 45 28 31 59 Yanic Perreault, Pho 31 14 «11 25
c-Brendan Shanahan, NYR 45 24 22 46 Brian Rolston, Min 45 23 18 41
Eric Staal, Car 46 19 18 37 Teemu Selanne, Ana 46 28 29 57
Justin Williams, Car 46 21 20 41. Ryan Smyth, Edm 34 21 12 = 33
x-Brian Campbell, Buf 44 5 21 26 i-Henrik Zetterberg, Det 44 17 16 33
x-Sheldon Souray, Mon 43 14 23 37 xi-Scott Niedermayer, Ana 46 8 34 42
Jay Bouwmeester, Fla 46 6 16 22 x-Nicklas Lidstrom, Det 44 9 26 35
Zdeno Chara, Bos 39 8 18 26 Philippe Boucher, Dal 44 13 20 33
Tomas Kaberle, Tor 45 8 29 37 z-Ed Jovanovski, Pho 42 11 16 27
Brian Rafalski, NJ - 44 2 27 29 Dion Phaneuf, Cal 41 9 16 25
. Kimmo Timonen, Nas 44 8 23 31
Lubomir Visnovsky, LA 43 13. 23 36
GOALIES GOALIES

Player, team GP WL T AVG Player, team GP W L_ T AVG
x-Ryan Miller, Buf 32 22 7 2 2.62 x-Roberto Luongo, Van 42 24 6 1 2.50
Martin Brodeur, NJ 42 26 13 3 2.07 — Miikka Kiprusoff, Cal 38 21 14 3 2.32
Cristobal Huet, Mon 31 17 8 3.2.46 — Marty Turco, Dal °39 21 «15 1 2.34

ton Capitals, has 65 points and
29 goals, one off the league
lead. He also beat out Crosby
last season for Rookie of the
Year honors.

Yet as great as Crosby and
Ovechkin are separately, it’s
hard to talk about one without
mentioning the other.

“It’s fun to watch the high-
lights every night because you
know there will be a lot from
both of them,” said Dany Hea-
tley of the Ottawa Senators.

Happy to be their teammate
this week, Heatley added, “It

gives us a good chance.”

During a light practice
Monday night, Crosby and
Ovechkin shared a few passes

TUESDAY’S ALL-STAR COMPETITIONS

Crosby delivers for Eastern squad in skills contest

_ Crosby also scored on his
only shootout attempt in the
team competition, midway
through the nine-event com-
petition, to tie the score 7-7.

The competition was tied
10-10 after Vancouver goalie
Roberto Luongo stopped all
four shots in the final team
shootout. Meanwhile, Colora-
do’s Joe Sakic and Edmonton’s
Ryan Smyth scored against
Ryan Miller of Buffalo to get
even going into the final event.

But Luongo couldn’t stop
Crosby, the top All-Star vote-
getter. Crosby made his first
two shots, and that gave the
East squad a 15-l1 victory over
the West.

“Going against Luongo,
you’re going against the best,
so if you don’t score you’ve
got an excuse,” Crosby said.
“l’m competitive. I want to
win with the game on the line
like that.”

Anaheim’s ‘Teemu Selanne
scored on his first attempt for
the West, but he missed his
next two — the last a glove
save by Miller to end the
event.

Selanne, who will play in
his 10th All-Star Game when
he takes the ice tonight, was
impressed by Crosby’s perfor-
mance.

“T’ve only seen him on high-
lights. It’s great to watch a kid
like that,” Selanne said. “He’s
got the full package.”

After Crosby's tying point
in the team shootout, the East
squad took the lead in the next
event.

Carolina’s Eric Staal and
Atlanta’s Marian Hossa both
hit four targets in five shots to
share the individual honors in
shooting accuracy.

Brendan Shanahan of the
New York Rangers, on his 38th
birthday, hit four of six shots

for the East squad.

The tallest player in NHL
history also can claim the
hardest shot on the ice.

Boston’s Zdeno Chara, the
6-foot-9 defenseman trom
Czechoslovakia, fired a shot of
100.4 mph to win the hardest-
shot competition.

Chara’s first shot read 99.5
mph on the radar gun, and he
increased that on the second
shot from 30 feet.

The only other player to hit
100 mph —- and he did it on the
nose — was Montreal’s Shel-
don Souray, who hit 102.2 mph
in the last event, thiee years
ago,- along with Adrian
Aucoin.

Staal was part of the three-
man East group — along with
Buffalo’s Daniel Briere and
Brian Campbell — that scored
two goals in the team zone
contest. They put two of their
three shots past hometown



without showing off too much.
On Tuesday afternoon, they
worked with other All-Stars to
build a Habitat for Humanity
house, then logged more ice
time together during the All-
Star skills competition. They
both took part in shootout
events.

“We've seen each other
casually at events like this, but
we haven’t spent a lot of time
together,” Crosby said. “We’re
on the same team, we’re sitting
next to each other in the
[dressing] room, so I’m sure
V’ll talk to him a bit.”

The better Crosby and
Ovechkin are, the better for
the NHL's long-term health.

goalie Marty Turco of the Dal-
las Stars.

Columbus forward Rick
Nash won the individual puck-
control relay for the second
consecutive time, beating
Florida’s Jay Bouwmeester
after the East squad won the
three-player team relay. The
only other individual multiple
winner was Paul Kariya, who
won four in a row from
1999-2002.

When Nash won at the pre-
vious All-Star Game, in 2004,
he was 19 years old and the
first teen-age AlJ-Star since
1992. Now there’s a new teen-
age All-Star in Crosby.

The West went ahead 3-1 by
sweeping the fastest skater,
Anaheim’s Andy McDonald
winning the individual at 14.03
seconds — only the fourth
time in 13 the event has been
held that the top time was
slower than 14 seconds.
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.

com

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Indiana, Notre Dame, Alabama all go down

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Rich McBride scored 15
points to lead Illinois to a 51-43
victory over No. 23 Indiana on
Tuesday night in Champaign,
IIL, the Illini’s first triumph
against a ranked opponent in
five tries this season.

D.J. White scored 12 points
for Indiana (14-5, 4-2 Big Ten),
which had a five-game win-
ning streak snapped.

The Illini (15-7, 3-4) held the
Hoosiers without a field goal
for more than 17 minutes —
from the 12:21 mark in the first
half until the 14:56 mark of the
second. Indiana led 18-11 at the
beginning of that stretch, but
trailed 31-25 when it was over. .

The game was Indiana
coach Kelvin Sampson’s first
trip to Champaign since a fall
recruiting controversy over
Indianapolis high schooler
Eric Gordon. Gordon orally
committed to Illinois in late
2005, then reconsidered and
eventually committed to Indi-
ana.

The Big Ten has said Samp-
son broke no rules by recruit-
ing a player who had already
orally committed to another
school. But Illini fans show-
ered Sampson with boos as he
entered and exited the court.

AROUND THE TOP 25

e St. John’s 71, No. 22
Notre Dame 68: Larry
Wright hit a 3-pointer with 9.9
seconds to play to give host St.
John’s the victory over Notre
Dame, the Red Storm’s second
consecutive last-minute tri-
umph at Madison Square Gar-
den.

Lamont Hamilton scored all
of his 23 points in the first half
for St. John’s (12-8, 3-4 Big
East), which beat Syracuse
64-60 on Sunday on two late
3-pointers by Avery Patterson.

Notre Dame (16-4, 4-3) tied

Suns extend win streak to 14

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON Steve
Nash and the Phoenix Suns made
Gilbert Arenas and the Washing-
ton Wizards look more like pre-
tenders than contenders, putting
the so-called “Phoenix Suns of
the East” in their place with a
127-105 thumping on Tuesday
night.

Nash scored 27 points on ll-
for-13 shooting and added 14
assists in the Suns’ 14th consecu-
tive victory. Phoenix led by 21
after the first quarter and won
for the 30th time in 32 games ina
matchup between the NBA’s two
highest-scoring teams.

Arenas, who has compared
his team’s high-octane offense to
the Suns’, scored 31 points, but he
started 1-for-6 and the game was
essentially over before he got
going. When he finally made his
second field goal, it only served
to cut the Suns’ lead to 24. The
Wizards cut the lead to 13 mid-
way through the fourth quarter,
but the Suns responded with a
6-0 run to put the game firmly
out of reach.

Arenas scored 54 against the
Suns in an overtime victory at
Phoenix last month, but the Suns
arrived only two hours before
tipoff that day because they had
been stranded in Denver by a
blizzard. Arenas considered that
game as payback for getting cut
last summer from the U.S.
national team, on which Phoenix
coach Mike D’Antoni serves as
an assistant.

The Suns shot a season-high
60.8 percent, had assists on 35 of
their 48 field goals and had five
players in double figures before
halftime. Nash was 7-for-7 from
the field and had eight assists in
the first half, and his best move
was a baseline hesitation step
that got him past Brendan Hay-
wood for a three-point play.

Wizards coach Eddie Jordan
said before the game he was so
excited he didn’t sleep well the
night before. His players looked
just as edgy, starting 3-for-15
from the field. Nash had back-to-
back alley-oop assists to Shawn
Marion in the second quarter,
helping the Suns to a 76-51 half-
time lead.

MAVERICKS 111, MAGIC 95
ORLANDO, Fla. — Dirk Now-

INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 | 5

BASKETBALL



ROBIN SCHOLZ/AP

A ROUGH ROAD: Indiana’s Joey Shaw tries to power his
way past Illinois’ Rich McBride, who had 15 points to
lead the host Illini to the victory on Tuesday night.

the game at 68 with 40 sec-
onds to go on the second of

two free throws by Colin Falls. -

The Red Storm called a time-
out with 36 seconds left, and
they ran the shot clock down
under 10 seconds before pass-
ing the ball to Wright in the
right corner. The 6-foot-2
freshman reserve buried his
third 3 of the game in four
attempts.

Notre Dame rushed the ball
down court and Russell Cart-
er’s 3-point attempt from
about 28 feet bounced off the
rim and the Fighting Irish
dropped to 0-3 on the road in
the conference.

Carter finished with a

career-high 32 points for
Notre Dame. He scored all the
points in the Irish’s 11-0 run to
open the second half that got
them a 52-49 lead.

Eugene Lawrence had 13
points and seven assists for St.
John’s, which shot 59.3 percent
from the field in taking a 49-41]
halftime lead. The Red Storm
missed their first 10 shots of
the second half before Wright,
who finished with ll points, hit
a 3-pointer 6:18 in.

Falls had 16 points for
Notre Dame but he was 1-for-6
from 3-point range.in the sec-
ond half after going 4-for-6 in
the opening 20 minutes.

e Auburn 81, No. 12 Ala-

PRO BASKETBALL

bama 57: Korvotney Barber

scored 18 points and Frank
Tolbert added 17 to lead host
Auburn to the upset of Ala-

bama, ending a seven-game .

losing streak to the Crimson
Tide.

The Tigers (13-8, 3-3 South-
eastern Conference) scored
the first eight points of the
second half to overcome a
36-35 deficit and shot 58 per-
cent.

They hadn’t beaten Ala-
bama (15-4, 2-3) since 2003 and
have now won two games
against ranked teams in a six-
day stretch after ending an
O-for-15 stretch against
then-No. 22 Tennessee.

Josh Dollard added 16
points and Quan Prowell had
14 points and 10 rebounds for
Auburn, which held Alabama
to just 21 points after halftime.
Tolbert made 6-of-7 shots, the
only miss an errant 3-pointer
in the final two minutes.

The Tide’s road struggles
continued. Alabama has lost
its first three SEC road games
by an average of 24 points to
unranked teams. Western
Division teams are now 0-15 in
SEC road games.

' Alabama shot just 32 per-
cent in the second half.

Ronald Steele led Alabama
with 19 points, but he also had
five turnovers. Jermareo
Davidson added 18 points and
ll rebounds. He only scored
two points after halftime.

Alonzo Gee had 11 points.
Richard Hendrix played much
of the game in foul trouble and
finished with just four points
— 10 below his season average
— in 19 minutes.

e No. 16 Air Force 72,
TCU 39: Dan Nwaelele scored
13 points and host Air Force
used sharp shooting and a sti-
fling defense to roll past TCU
for its 27th consecutive home

victory.

Matt McCraw and Tim
Anderson each added 11 points
for the Falcons (19-2, 6-1
Mountain West), who turned
the tables on TCU, which
brought the league’s best field-
goal-percentage defense (41
percent) into Clune Arena but
was quickly’ overwhelmed at
both ends of the court.

The Falcons shot 62 per-
cent from the floor and 50 per-
cent from beyond the arc.

It was the Horned Frogs
(10-8, 2-4) who couldn’t find
an offensive rhythm, shooting
32 percent.

e No. 24 Virginia Tech
92, Miami 85: Zabian Dow-
dell scored a career-high 30
points to help visiting Virginia
Tech beat Miami.

Deron Washington added
23 points and scored on two
separate three-point plays in
the final 1:16 to secure the vic-
tory for the Hokies (15-5, 5-1
ACC), who have won six of :
their past seven.

After trailing most of the
first half by double digits,
Miami (9-12, 2-5) finally got to
within 46-38 on Brian Asbury’s
three-point play 3:27 into the
second half.

Dowdell scored four points
and A.D. Vassallo added a
3-pointer, which increased
Virginia Tech’s lead to 66-53
with 9:19 remaining.

But the Hurricanes count-
ered with a 9-2 spurt in the
next 2:09. Jack McClinton
capped the run with a
3-pointer which reduced the
Hokies’ advantage to 68-62
with 7:10 remaining.

Miami got no closer than
78-74 with 2:48 left on McClin-
ton’s basket.

Dennis Clemente scored 24
points to lead Miami, which
has lost four in a row. McClin-
ton added 18 and Raymond

itzki had 33 points, 10 rebounds
and eight assists, and Josh How-
ard added 25 points to help the
Mavericks beat the Magic for
their eighth consecutive victory.

For the second consecutive
game, the Mavericks led from
beginning to end. They pushed
the margin to 25 points in the
second quarter with a 15-5 run
capped by Nowitzki’s three-
point play, and kept it around 20
for most of the second and third
periods. ;

The Magic pulled closer in
the third with a 13-4 run, but it
happened with the defending

Western Conference champions

resting Nowitzki.

It was the closest the Magic
had been since 8 minutes into
the first quarter, and aside froma

’ quick basket to begin the fourth,

it was the closest they would
come.

Dallas rattled off six unan-
swered points, including a fast-
break dunk from Nowitzki, to
push the lead back to 14 and out
of Orlando’s reach.

76ERS 102, HORNETS 96

PHILADELPHIA Kyle
Korver scored 25 points, Andre
Iguodala added 20 and the 76ers
held on for the victory.

The Sixers got double-figure
scoring from five players and
opened their second half with a
victory after going 11-30 over
their first 41 games.

Andre Miller had 17 points
and 1] assists, Rodney Carney,
who got the start after Willie
Green was a late scratch for Phil-
adelphia, chipped in with 13
points, and Samuel Dalembert
added 10 points and seven
rebounds for Philadelphia.

Devin Brown led the way for
the Hornets with 24 points and
David West added 23 in his third
game back after missing 30 fol-
lowing shoulder surgery. Des-
mond Mason scored 17 for the
Hornets, who had won four of
five coming in.

BULLS 94, HAWKS 86

CHICAGO — Luol Deng
scored 18 points and Kirk Hin-
rich added 12 points and 12
assists to lead the Bulls.

P.J. Brown scored a season-
high 15 points and had nine
rebounds for Chicago, which has



SUN THROWS DOWN: Suns forward Shawn Marion gets two
of his 21 points in Phoenix’s 127-105 rout of Washington.

won nine in a row over the
Hawks.

T’WOLVES FIRE CASEY

MINNEAPOLIS — The Min-
nesota Timberwolves fired
coach Dwane Casey, one day
after the Wolves lost their fourth
game in a row.

Casey lasted less than 1'4 sea-
sons in Minnesota in his first
head coaching job, unable to
solve the Timberwolves’ incon-
sistencies and put them back into
the thick of the competitive
Western Conference.

The Timberwolves looked to
be turning the corner at the start
of the new year, when they
opened 2007 with seven victo-
ries in their first eight games. But
they lost their next four games.

Assistant coach Randy Witt-
man will take over as interim
coach.

ELSEWHERE

e Knicks: The Knicks could
be without starting point guard
Stephon Marbury tonight when
they host the Phoenix Suns. Mar-
bury was unable to finish either
of the past two games because of

San Antonio
| Houston 25 16
\ New Orleans 16 24
/ Memphis 1032
| Utah 28 14
_ Denver 21 17
| Minnesota 20 20
' Portland 17 25
Seattle 16 25
Phoenix 33 8
NICK WASS/AP |. Lakers 27 15
| LA. Clippers 19 21
_ Golden State 19 23
| Sacramento 16 23

soreness in his left knee. He did
little more than shoot at practice
Tuesday and said he would wait
another day before making a
decision.

e Kings: The Kings waived
veteran forward Maurice Taylor
after 12 games with the club.

LATE MONDAY

e Lakers 108, Warriors
103: Kobe Bryant celebrated the
one-year anniversary of his 81-
point performance by scoring 42,
and host Los Angeles snapped a
two-game losing streak despite a
season-high 24 turnovers.

e Kings 88, Nets 87: Mike
Bibby scored the Kings’ last 15
points, including the go-ahead
jumper with 10.3 seconds to play,

_ and host Sacramento erased a

20-point deficit.

e Nuggets 115, Grizzlies
98: Carmelo Anthony scored 28
points in his return from a 15-
game suspension for fighting and
Allen Iverson added 23 to lead
host Denver.

' @ Jazz 106, Timberwolves
91: Mehmet Okur scored 28
points and host Utah won its
fourth in a row.





NBA STANDINGS

SOUTHEAST W
Washington —
Orlando
Miami
Charlotte
| Atlanta
| ATLANTIC woe
| NewJersey 20 21
' Toronto 20 22
_ New York 18 25
_ Boston 12 28
| Philadelphia 12 30
i
CENTRAL wi
Detroit 23 16
| Cleveland 24 17
_ Chicago 24 19
| Indiana 21 20
Milwaukee 17 23



Hicks had.16 points.

Dowdell, whose previous
career high was a 25-point per-
formance against North Caro-
lina A&T on Dec. 7, 2005, fin-
ished 15-of-18 from the
free-throw line.

Dowdell, Washington and
Jamon Gordon each hit
3-pointers to help the Hokies
open a 9-2 lead in the first 3:53
of the game.

OTHER GAMES

e Villanova 82, Provi-
dence 73: Mike Nardi had a
game-high 19 points and Scot-
tie Reynolds added 18 to lead
visiting Villanova.

It was the third consecutive
victory for the Wildcats (14-5,
3-3 Big East).

Sharaud Curry and Dwain
Williams had 18 each for the
Friars (13-6, 3-3), who had their
12-game home winning streak
snapped.

e Boston College 85,
Florida State 82: Sean Mar-
shall hit the game-winning
3-pointer over two defenders
at the buzzer, finishing with 22
points and 10 rebounds to lead
host Boston College (14-5, 6-1
Atlantic Coast Conference) to
the victory over Florida State
(14-6, 2-4).

ELSEWHERE

e Notre Dame: Point
guard Kyle McAlarney was
suspended from school for his
arrest last month on a mari-
juana possession charge, his
mother said.

e Baylor: Coach Scott
Drew underwent an appen-
dectomy Tuesday but expects
to be on the bench when the
Bears play No. 8 Kansas, the
university said. Drew, 36, in
his third season with Baylor,
was recovering at home Tues-
day night. The Bears face Kan-
sas tonight in Waco.





Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
488 - 7-3) L-l 13-10 7-11 16-9
476 Ye 7-3 Wel 127 B15 14-8
AI9 3° 5-5 Ll 10-12 8-13 11-16
300 7% 19 L8 415 813 817
.286 8% 3-7 W-1 7-10 5-20 816
CENTRAL == OW OL Pct. GB 110 Str, Home Away Conf
590 - 55 W2 118 128 15-8
585 - 55 Ll 15-4 9-13 15-11
558 1 5-5 Wl 186 6413 19-8
512. 3 46 W-1 11-7 10-13 16-12
425 6% 28 L3 9-7 816 7-16




12-8
10-12 7-13 10-13
12-9 4-16 6-15
_Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
805 - 10-0 W-14 19-3 145 16-7
643 6% 6-4 W-1 19-4 811 17-9
A75 13% 5-5 W-2 14-7 5-14 13-16
452 14% 3-7 13 15-8 4-15 13-15
410 16 2-8 Wel 11-11 5-12 8-15

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
Dallas 111, Orlando 95 Mia. at Ind., 7 Miami 101, N.Y. 83
Phoenix 127, Wash. 105 N.O. at Tor., 7 Indiana 98, Chicago 91
| Phil. 102, N.O. 96 Det. at Cha., 7 Toronto 105, Char. 84
Chicago 94, Atlanta 86 Phi. at Cle., 7 Orlando 90, Clev. 79

Den. at Sea.,
Mil. at L.A.C.

late
, late

Atl. at Bos., 7:30
Pho. at N.Y., 7:30
Mem. at Utah, 9

S.A. 93, Boston 89
Utah 106, Minn. 91
Denver 115, Mem. 98

Hou. at S.A., 9 Sacramento 88, N.J. 87
Mil. at Sac., 10 Lakers 108, G.S. 103
Min. at Por., 10

NJ. at G.S., 10:30

' NBA LEADERS

Through Monday

REBOUNDING .





SCORING
G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 23 275 161 724 31.5 Garnett, Minn. 39 101 396 497 12.7
Arenas, Wash. 40 378 308 1187 29.7 Camby, Den. 33 87 333 420 12.7
Iverson, Den. 30 296 260 879 29.3 Howard, Orl. 42 146 378 524 12.5
Bryant, LAL 39 363 314 1102 28.3 Boozer, Utah 42 135 361 496 11.8
Wade, Mia. 34 318 305 958 28.2 Chandler, NOk. 37 140 276 416 11.2
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 40 154 290 444 11.1
James, Clev. 41 395 257 1100 26.8 Lee, N.Y. 43 159 298 457 10.6
Allen, Sea. 31 270 166 792 26.5 Duncan, S.A. 43 123 328 451 10.5
Nowitzki, Dall. 41 347 287 1020 24.9 O'Neal, Ind. 36 86 289 375 10.4
Johnson, Atl. 34 321 124 840 24.7 Randolph, Port. 41 120 299 419 10.2
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 186 301 .618 Nash, Phoe. 38 437 115
, Lee, N.Y. 185 307 .603 Kidd, NJ. 41 375 91
Stoudemire, Phoe. 269 450 598 Paul, NOk. 27 242 9.0
Curry, N.Y. 311 533 .583 Williams, Utah 42 371-88
Bogut, Mil. 211 371 .569 Miller, Phil. 39 336 8.6
Howard, Orl. 255 449 568 Davis, G.S. 37 316 8.5
Dalembert, Phil. 172 303 .568 _ Billups, Det. 31 247 8.0
Boozer, Utah 381 678 .562 Wade, Mia. 34 270) «7.9
Brand, LAC 321 579 .554
Patterson, Mil. 221 407 .543
6E_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _



ROMERO BRITTO

internationally acclaimed visual artist —





_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



STEPHEN DUNN/AP
SHUT UP AND PLAY: Bill Parcells couldn’t run a team the way he wanted with the Cowboys.

To Bill Parcells, NFL has
too many disgusting players

BY WALLACE MATTHEWS
Newsday

It happens to all of us. You
wake up one morning to dis-
cover that the world you are
living in no longer is your
world. So you die.

It happened to Dallas Cow-
boys head coach Bill Parcells
on Monday. He finally came to
realize that the NFL no longer
is his league. So his coaching
career died, this time probably
for good.

The easy — read: lazy —
analysis of Parcells’ latest
retirement from coaching will
be that Terrell Owens drove
him out, that the constant soap
opera starring his tempera-
mental wide receiver got to be
too much for the old coach to
bear. =,
There is a smidgen of truth
in this, but it is only that
—asmidgen.

The whole story is that,
these days, there is a Terrell
Owens on just about every
roster in the NFL, or at least a
T.O. in training. That’s what
free agency spawns — an inde-
pendence of thought and
action that you can live with in
baseball but is death to a foot-
ball team. Loss of control over
the players by management
translates to a loss of control
by the coach. To totalitarian
coaches such as Parcells, T.O.
was merely the symptom of a
league-wide disease.

With the exception of a
couple of rare cases, the days
when an NEL football coach
could control the thoughts and
actions of every last man on
his roster are as dead as the
drop kick. For now, Bill Beli-
chick has enough power to do
it with the New England
Patriots, and enough backing
from the team’s ownership to



DALLAS COWBOYS

ship out anyone not on board
with his program. In his first
season as New York Jets
coach, Eric Mangini has gotten
away with it, with the help ofa
(mostly) prima-donna-free
roster that soon might be rid
of Laveranues Coles.

Parcells had neither the
roster in Dallas nor the back-
ing from the team’s owner —
Jerry Jones, a star-struck
megalomaniac — to conduct
business the way he wanted
to, the way he was able to with
the New York Giants, the Jets«
and the Patriots.

Back in November, about
the time the Cowboys were
mired at 4-4 and barely a
month after the T.O.
“attempted suicide” melo-
drama, Parcells confided toa
mutual friend that he would
not return to the Cowboys in
2007. Then Tony Romo came
along, the Cowboys made the
playoffs, and the bad feeling in
Parcells’ gut might have
receded. But the Cowboys’
heart-stopping playoff loss to
the Seattle Seahawks no doubt
brought it rushing back.

Jones intended to bring
Owens back next season,
whether Parcells wanted him
or not. It is not too much of a
stretch to surmise that Par-
cells did not.

_ It also is not too much of a
stretch to postulate that, after
a year of sunning himself on
the Jersey shore, Parcells will
be tempted to unretire again
so he can rescue the Giants,
who by then will have realized
that extending Tom Cough-
lin’s contract was as big a mis-
take as trading four draft picks

‘for quarterback Eli Manning.

But when Parcells looks
over the Giants roster, what
will he see? T.O. Lite, also

known as Plaxico Burress. Jer-
emy Shockey, who once
referred to Parcells as “a
homo.” Michael Strahan, lead
singer of the Defensive Divas.
And Manning, who makes
Romo look like Joe Montana.

And when Parcells looks
around for another re-entry
point, he will find nothing but
other examples.

In New Orleans, Reggie
Bush, who turns a touchdown
into a “look at me” moment,
somersaulting into the end
zone. In Chicago, Parcells .
would have to deal with “gun
enthusiast” Tank Johnson and
serial bully Ricky Manning Jr.

And all around the league,
it gets no better. Chad Johnson
to the left, Randy Moss to the
right and Keyshawn Johnson
in his rear-view mirror.

Parcells is a lot of things,
but idiot is not one of them. He
didn’t like the view in Dallas,
and he won’t like it any better
just about anywhere else.

Gone are the days when
you worried about Lawrence
Taylor six days a week but
knew he would show up to
play, not show up his team-
mates and coaches, on Sunday.
Gone are the coaches who win
by striking fear into the hearts
of their players. The meek
have inherited the Earth — the
Tony Dungys, the guys who
willingly embrace the once-
fatal label of “players’ coach”
because, frankly, no other
style will be tolerated by the
men who really run NFL
teams these days: the players. _

It has been headed this way
for a while, and, for Bill Par-
cells, Monday was the day it
finally arrived — the sickening
realization that, after nearly 40
years of coaching, he suddenly
was out of his league.

Time for a change, Owens says

BY CLARENCE E. HILL JR.
Fort-Worth Star-Telegram

IRVING, Texas — After
sometimes going a week or
two without talking to Bill Par-
cells during the season, Dallas
Cowboys receiver Terrell
Owens said the coach’s retire-
ment was best for him and the
Cowboys.

“J am just hoping his retire-
ment brings promise to what
the team has to offer,” said
Owens, who was in Miami
recovering from surgery on
his right index finger. “This
past year was a big letdown.

“Hopefully, the owner will
hire a coach to take the team
to the next level.”

Owens described the
team’s locker-room environ-
ment, fostered by Parcells’ old
school ways, as difficult.

“Sometimes
good,” Owens said. “I think it
was needed.”

Owens said he understands
that there will be speculation
that “he ran Parcells out of
here” — especially after a sea-
son that included injuries, an
accidental overdose and com-
plaints about his role.

Owens said that, after
everything he had been
through in San Francisco and
Philadelphia, he initially
thought Parcells might be
good for him.



change is.

CHRIS McGRATH/GETTY IMAGES

HEARD THIS BEFORE? Terrell
Owens wants it run his way.

The receiver’s impression
changed when Parcells didn’t
offer any encouragement after
Owens’ accidental overdose.

-I still think he is a great
guy,” Owens said. “But he is
like my grandmother. You
love the person, but they are
stuck in their old-school
ways.”

He said Parcells’ coaching
style “hurt us.”

“You don’t know who is
doing what,’ Owens said.
“You don’t know who is call-
ing plays. That is why our
offense was up and down. You

saw that at the end of the year.
It filtered off.

“We, as a team, felt the
frustration. I felt the frustra-
tion. But Bill is Bill.”

Owens caught 85 passes, for
1,180 yards, and had a league-
best 13 touchdowns. But he
was undone by a league-high
18 dropped passes. He said
hand injuries were to blame
for some of the drops, but he
also said that not being made
the focal point of the offense
was the biggest problem.

“T was underutilized in the
offense,” Owens said. “A new
coach can be good for the
Cowboys. It’s not just me. But
my teammates know I could
have done more. I wasn’t used
as a No. 1 receiver.”

Regarding his surgically-re-

paired finger, Owens said he is
well ahead of schedule. A sec-
ond phase of the surgery is
coming sometime in the next
six weeks.
, Owens, who hasn’t been
back to Dallas since the end of
the season, said he will be
ready to play next season.

The Cowboys must decide
if they want him back. Fran-
chise owner Jerry Jones said
he wants Owens to return, but
the Cowboys’ new coach
might make that decision.

Owens is due a $3 million
roster bonus in June.


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ci. eae

New



FROM left: Michael Rodgers, Takai Bethel, Ambassador

Rood, Sir Clifford Darling, Kristina Deveaux and Lori-Amn

Edwards.

Birthday of the late
Dr Martin Luther
King Jr celebrated —

with essay competition |

ON JANUARY 15, Amer-
icans observed the birthday
holiday of the late Reverend
Dr Martin Luther King Jr.

In the Bahamas,-the US
Embassy celebrated the life
and legacy of Dr King at a
reception hosted by US
Ambassador John Rood.
The highlight of the event
was the public announcement
of the winners of an embassy-
sponsored “I Have A
Dream” essay competition.

Family and friends of the
essay contestants were pre-
sent for the occasion.

The competition, open to
students in grades 9 to 12 in
public and private schools in
New Providence and the
Family Islands, attracted 35
participants from 14 schools
in New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Eleuthera.

Teachings

Students were asked to
write a 21st century Bahami-
an “I have a dream” essay
reflecting Dr King’s life, prin-
ciples and teachings, and
demonstrating a clear under-
standing of Dr King’s beliefs
in racial equality, non-vio-
lence and social justice — and
their relevance to modern
Bahamian society.

In his remarks, Ambas-
sador Rood noted that the
competition was “a wonderful
opportunity for the young
people of the Bahamas to use
Dr King's most powerful
instrument of change — the
written and spoken word — to
assess his legacy and to offer
their modern day vision for
how the Bahamas and the
world can still strive to fulfill
the vision he dreamed and
meet the challenges he left us
as his legacy.”

The ambassador added that

_ he was deeply impressed by

the participants’ c-pth of
understanding about the com-
plex issues facing modern
society: “They took a hard
look at problems ranging
from discrimination against
the Haitian community, to
disability rights and the
increasing violence in society.
Their essays spoke of the
hope for equality in the coun-
try, an end to violence and
the belief that the values
cherished by Dr King could
help bring the Bahamas to a
better place.”

Michael Rodgers, a 10th
grade student at St Andrew’s
High School, walked away
with first place and a new
computer donated by the
United States Coast Guard.

Takai ‘Antoinette Bethel of
St Augustine’s College fin-
ished in second place fol-
lowed by third place winner,
Kristina Deveaux of Grand
Bahama Catholic High
School.

Lori-Ann Marie Edwards,
a student at CV Bethel High
School, placed fourth.

Second, third and fourth
place winners received a vari-
ety of materials on Dr King
including book sets, cassettes
and DVDs.

Honorable mention went
to the following: Mia
Andrews of Queen’s Jollege,
Denae Tekia Bullard of Sun-
land Baptist Academy in
Freeport, Raeshan Davis of
St Augustine’s College,
Tashon Lewis of Grand
Bahama Catholic High
School, Sherzel Smith of St
Andrew’s and Brittany
Natasha Sweeting. As a spe-
cial keepsake, all of the par-
ticipants were given a book
by Dr King inscribed by
Ambassador Rood.





City Markets store opens

nassaulite : ee

ERRUNAANUNNNNNIHANNNY AUR



@ THE brand new City Markets store opened

on Cable Beach on Monday night. The store will

_. serve the growing community in the area, includ-
, ving residents of Bayroc. i



5 iy (Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)





Colina General.
Insurance Agency







On Wednesday December 13, 2006, Colina General Insurance Agency officially announced the
appointment of long time industry veteran Mary C. Munroe to the Colina General Insurance family as .
Senior Account Executive.

“We're very pleased to welcome Mary Munroe to the Colina General Family,” said Howard Knowles,
General Manager of Colina General Insurance Agency. “Colina General Insurance Agency is committed
to giving our valued customers access to products that help them meet their general insurance and
financial services needs. Mary’s 36 years in the industry will help solidify our commitment and

| philosophy of sérvicing clients and treating them as family.”

| Long time clients continue to recognize her value in the industry and the intimate role she plays in their

lives. “Her service is friendly and beyond reproach. She takes obvious pride in her job and gives }
personal care and attention to her client’s needs,” says Larina Evans-Pennerman, Bank Manager (UBS).
“She keeps you focused on your insurance needs by her friendly reminders, and in doing so, she makes

| you feel secure in knowing that your affairs are always properly protected.”

| When it comes to Munroe’s approach, one thing is clear, “She makes you feel comfortable; just like”

family,” says Raphael Whymms, Superintendent of Bahamas Customs Department. “Call on her day or
night, and she’s always there, always going the extra mile.” :

| Though in a new role, Munroe will continue to provide her trademark of dedicated, quality service. With

over three decades of distinguished service to the general insurance industry, Mary Munroe is loved by -

| many and known for her ability to build and strengthen client relations. “I would follow her wherever

she goes,” said Martha Wallace, a long-time client. “She really cares, not just about her clients but about :

| the community and the less fortunate.”

Colina General Insurance Agency (CGIA) was established to provide a comprehensive range of non-life
| insurance products to the Bahamian Market. CGIA offers: !

e Home eMotor ° Liability °¢ Casualty
° Contract Works °¢ Commercial Property = ° Marine

Tel: 325-3809




THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



INSIDE THE GAME

Colts and Bears
are separated by
more than miles

nly four hours sepa-
@) rate the Chicago
Bears and the India-

napolis Colts. Yet if clashing .

contrasts create spice, Super
Bowl XLI could have that
hair-tingling AFL-NFL flavor.

The Colts and the Bears
go to the Super Bowl] as
hemispheric opposites on the
franchise map.

The story of the
“Chicago Bears” is
the story of the
National Football
League: charter
members in 1920, as
the Decatur Staleys;
moved to Chicago’s
Wrigley Field in 1921
when end George
Halas bought the
team from ALE. Staley;
renamed the Bears as a nod
to Chicago Cubs owner Wil-
liam Wrigley.

The story of the “India-
napolis Colts” is the story of
modern professional sports:
the All-America Football
Conference’s bankrupt
Miami team moved to Balti-
more and was renamed; the
team joined the NFL, then
was sold back to the league,
with the name mothballed
until the first Dallas Texans
(not Lamar Hunt’s AFL ver-
sion) moved to Baltimore in
1953; moved once again when
Baltimore refused to build a
new stadium.

The Bears have a fight
song from 1941 — Bear Down,
Chicago Bears — with dated
lyrics still sung after every

~ score at Soldier Field. The
Colts left behind a band in
Baltimore and get accused of
pumping fake crowd noise
into the RCA Dome.

The Bears are the’No. 1
sports team from a football
area, “Da Region,” the Chica-
go-influenced area that dips
deeply into Northwest Indi-
ana. That’s where you such
tough towns as Hobart and
Gary.

In fact, for the next two
weeks, for the only time in its
191-year existence, Indiana
will lead the world in smack
talked per square mile.

The Colts are tne No. 2

“team in town, playing what

_ Still is the state’s No. 2 sport,
class-divided high school
basketball tournaments be
damned. Suggest to many a
longtime Indy resident that a
Colts victory would bring
Indianapolis its first major
sports league title, and be
prepared for a lecture-on
how the three-time Ameri-
can Basketball Association
champion Indiana Pacers
could have taken their NBA
counterparts in a best-of-
seven series,

It isn’t that Indianapolis
isn’t Colts-crazy. These Colts
are theirs. The morning of
last year’s playoff game
against the Pittsburgh Steel-
ers, an entire Bob Evans res-
taurant — staff and most cus-
tomers festooned in blue and
white — booed when Steel-
ers-clad fans entered for
breakfast. Being Indianapo-
lis, it was a friendly booing
and done with a smile.

But fandom, like disci-
pline and morals, usually
forms when you're young,
and it often can be an align-
ment with or rebellion

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER

SUPER BOWL XXX

DALLAS 27, PITTSBURGH 17



against the parental example.
It is passed down through
generations. |

Indy’s late-30s-to-mid-40s
set grew up without a local

' NFL team, so fans threw

their rah-rahs out to the
1970s winners — Dallas, Min-
nesota, the Dolphins, Pitts-
burgh, Oakland. NBC, which
televised the AFC,
put Indianapolis in
the Cincinnati Ben-
gals’ region. As far as
CBS and then the
NFC network were
concerned, Indianap-
olis was Chicago.
Despite an admira-
tion for Walter Pay-
ton’s work for a
lousy team and the
Bengals being above average
for all but 1978-80, neither
team garnered broad love
from Indy’s metro area.

Then there is the thirty-
something group, which
came of NFL fan age as the
Bears rose to power in the
mid-1980s. With the Colts
being new in town and comi-
cally bad, the Bears were an
accessible alternative. What
were Mike Pagel and Albert
Bentley when compared with
the 46 Defense, Walter Pay-
ton, Mike Ditka and Jim
McMahon?

The Colts have a dome
team, designed to scorch.
They drafted a great receiver
in 1996 (Marvin Harrison),
made the right quarterback
choice in the 1998 draft (Pey-
ton Manning), then put an —
offensive line in front of him
and a running back behind
him. They ask Manning to
put up pecks of points and
ask the defense to stop some-
body once in a while until the
offense builds a 10- to 14-
point lead. Then, take the
ball away. wo coe

The Bears always have
been built for the hawkish.
lake winds that scrape skin.
As they have numerous
times, they drafted the
wrong quarterback in 1999
(Cade McNown) but the
right linebacker in 2000
(Brian Urlacher) and hit on
several other defensive draft
picks. They ask quarterback
Rex Grossman to make a
couple of good decisions and
let the defense take the ball
away all game.

Though the Bears have
been where they are so much
longer than the Colts have
been where they are, it’s the
Colts who now represent
established order.

In the past 12 seasons, the
Horseshoe Boys have missed
the playoffs just three times,
have seven 10-victory sea-
sons and a working streak of
five. During the same period,
the Bears have made the

_ playoffs only three times and

have had six 10-loss seasons.

The Bears just wanta .
place at the table with the
memory of the 1985 Super
Bowl Shuffle crew. The Colts
want to finish establishing
that a version of the India-
napolis Colts deserves men-
tion alongside the beloved
versions of the Baltimore
Colts.

Somewhere, Super Bow]
cofounder Lamar Hunt is
smiling over this game. So is
Papa Bear George Halas.









BOWL XLI +;

Steelers’



IT'S ABOUT TIME: Bears Coach Lovie Smith, above, on he and Tony Dungy of the Colts
becoming the first black coaches in the Super Bowl: ‘It’s hard to put into words, but
| know a lot of great coaches who came before me that didn’t get this opportunity.’

A long time coming
for Dungy and Smith

*TONY DUNGY

smu ty Was A cube ge
tant watii i290 when Dungy,
then the head coach of the
Jampa Bay Buccaneers, nired

assis









hum to covaeb linebackers

(ar pne a5 questions Uungy
was asked at Mouday s news
conference, 20 sere te
to his rule tn fighting through
obstacles ie vreate opporiuni
ties for himseif and other
black coaches.

Dungy is the only active
coach te iead A ay the
playatis ior Seven Consecu-

tive seasons. He is at the top
of a coaching tree that saw a

Tourer 4 Get as ne and 2





top joboan Monk whe
Mike Tomlit fecame the
first black head
coach. Herm Edwards (Kan.
sas City) and Rod Marinelli
(Detroit), who is white, also
have worked for Dungy.

“An opportunity like this,
to get to the big game, has







been a long time coming fu
him,” said Colts lineman
Anthony Melarlana, whe also





played fey Gungy in Tampa.
“TL wish it would have hap-
pened for him years ago in
Tampa. But he's got i now,
and it couldn't be am



agpesann

themed toa

His iafant son




INTERNATIONAL EDITION — W

> FRONT

The attention on Dungy
and Smith leading to the
Super Bow! should raise con-
cerns about the overall low
number of minority head
coaches, said Floyd Keith,
executive director of the Indi-
ariapolis-based Black Coaches
Association,

There were seven black
head coaches among the
NFL’s 32 teams this season,
and two — Dennis Green
(Arizona) and Art Shell (Oak-
and) —- since have been fired,
in college, there were only
five among 119 Division I-A
schools. The University of
Miami made Randy Shannon
the sixtheafter the season.

‘I don’t know if we’ll ever
saatch a day in the NFL of this
magnitude,” Keith said Mon-
day. “I don’t know if you can
adequately describe it, but
you just appreciate it. It
should send a message that
color should never be a bar-
iier. The issue is the quality.
But some of the. break-
throughs in the NET. we vs
not seeing in college.”

shannon’s hiring was a sig-
niheant step, but more need
to be taken, said Florida State
associate athletic director Bob
Miunix, a member of the



11 DAYS

ovnoys touchdown.
Growl’s monumental performance came 2%
months ofter a pe sonal tragedy - the death of

_ Started to circulate a report

‘ that once didn’t exist. He said



4

NAM HUH/AP





BCA’s board of directors.
Minnix said the BCA has |

card that evaluates hiring |
practices of college athletic
departments, It serves a pur- |
pose similar to that of the
NFL's’ so-called “Rooney
Rule,” which mandates that
owners must interview
minority candidates in coach-
ing searches. |

“On the collegiate level,
we're woefully behind the
times.” Minnix said. “We’re
just trying to help colleges |
make up ground. I applaud
the University of Miami. But
with Randy’s hire, it’s slow
progress.”

Dungy sees that progress
with programs now in place |

being one of two black |
coaches in the Super Bowl
should continue. to raise
awareness. |

“Some of the impediments
are out of the way,” he said. “I
think about soy generation of
Kics who «atched Super
Bowls and never saw African-
Atiericant coaches and didn’t
think that you could coach.
Now ‘hey can look at us and
say. Hcy, might be the coach
ane day.’ That’s special.”



TO

par itt
ha Me



AY, JANUARY 24, 2007 | 7E



NFL NOTEBOOK

Judge gives
Tank Johnson
permission to

make the trip

From Miami Herald Wire Services

*Chicago Bears defensive
tackle Tank Johnson will -
play in the Super Bowl —
with court approval and a
warning from a judge to
stay out of trouble.

Cook County Judge
John Moran. granted a
defense request Tuesday to
allow
Johnson to
travel out-
side IIli-
nois as he
awaits trial
on = gun-
possession
charges.
The Bears

will face ,
the Indianapolis Colts in
the Super Bowl, to be
played in Miami on Feb. 4.

Johnson was arrested
Dec. 14 after police raided
his home in Gurnee, about
40 miles northwest of Chi-
cago. Prosecutors say offi-
cers found three rifles,
three handguns and ammu-
nition in Johnson’s home.
He faces 10 counts of pos-
session of firearms without
a state gun-owner identifi-
cation card.

Arrested three times in
18 months, Johnson has
pleaded not guilty to the
most recent charges. The
previous arrests involved a
scuffle with a police officer,
in which the charges were
dropped, and a misde-
meanor weapons charge.

Defense attorney Lorna
Propes said Johnson has
been “100 percent” compli-
ant with the requirements
of his home confinement.

' “Hfe’s been there every
single time they’ve checked
on him,” Propes said.

A court hearing to con-
sider dropping Johnson’s
home continement is Feb. 8.

ELSEWHERE

e Cardinals: Russ
Grimm was hired as an
assistant head coach and
offensive-line coach, two
weeks after he interviewed
for the head coaching posi-
tion. Grimm’s hiring came
two days after erroneous
reports that the Steelers
had chosen him to replace
retired coach Bill Cowher.
Grimm wanted the Steelers
job, but he said he was
happy to reunite with Car-
dinals coach Ken Whisen-
hunt, who were both on the
Steelers’ staff.

e Vikings: Former
Minnesota receiver Koren
Robinson reached a deal
with prosecutors to be sen-
tenced on a single felony
charge of fleeing police
after leading officers on a
high-speed chase in August.
In exchange for Robinson’s
plea, prosecutors dismissed
seven lesser charges related
to drunken driving, reckless
driving and driving without
a license. Robinson was
rushing to get back to train-
ing camp before curfew.

e Eagles: The team
reshuffled its coaching
staff, naming special-teams
coordinator John War-
baugh secondary coach
and Sean McDermott line-
backers coach.

e Chargers: Quarier.
back Philip Rivers won't
play in the Pro Bowl
because of a foot injury.



~

JOHNSON

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @® ON TV: CBS





Jan. 28, 1996 = 7 rsto : 2 who was born about 14 weeks
e Sun Devil Stadium, Tempe, Ariz. ee eee
e MVP: CB Larry Brown, Dallas “We can oy imagine what it’s like to losea

With Pittsburgh trailing by a field goal late in chiid like he diel,” | owboys quarterback Troy
the fourth quarter, the Cowboys baited Steelers Asmar tole repo: ‘ers.
quarterback Neil O’Donnell with a zone blitz, We're happy ie had the night he had on the
resulting in an interception. stage he had it oj ‘

Dallas cornerback Larry Brown beat Aiter fhe yame .Brown said: “I just thank
Pittsburgh wide receiver Andre Hastings to the God, cme the strength to get through
ball with 4:01 remaining in the game, guiding the Cowboys to this year. It was tougn. Wil v tearm and the players and the
their third Super Bowl victory in four seasons. : way they suppo ted me thi ough ali or the hard times, I’ve just got

Brown returned the interception for 33 yards, setting the to give therm credit.
stage for running back Emmitt Smith’s game-sealing, 4-yard “LT couldn't have done # without them. They enabled me to ge!






touchdown run. through this season.”

It was Brown's second interception of the game, and each of SUSAN RAGAN/AP FILE

- SARAH ROTHSCHILD


PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 . TRIBUNE SPORTS

uns shine against Machines

im iL. Lue
















, @ TEMPLE Christian Suns’ point
; guard Tiffany Wildgoose goes up for
a lay-up over the defence of St.
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines’ Ivanna Seymour in their
BAISS senior girls basketball game
yesterday at Temple Christian. The

Suns won 26-16. ‘
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

‘al







hi
it

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HARn

RSG
Ph
ACN

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foray,


HIGH
LOW

fm lovin’ fhe

SIF |
70F

WITH SUN

Volume: 103 No.52—








Maen a GUL
PU Ram CURIA EY CLUE

FUL a Sed

Carl Bethel claims to have
access to records; says

Fred Mitchell needs to.
explain entries in documents

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE political back and
forth about an alleged visa
scandal at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs heated up yester-
day as FNM senator Carl
. Bethel claimed to have access

to some records that need
explaining.“ "-"" "=

Revealing what he said was
one page of a ledger prepared
by the visa section of the min-
istry, Mr Bethel said that Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell has still failed to
account for the large increase
of visas issued during his
tenure in office.

“Nothing said by Minister
Mitchell has gone any further
in explaining how and why the
number of visas issued to
Haitian and Chinese nation-
als skyrocketed from 200 a
year to more than 2,000 a year
under his superintendence.
The Bahamian people have a
right to be concerned about
this. Bahamians have a right
to demand answers,” Mr
Bethel said in a press release
yesterday.

The FNM senator did not
answer Mr Mitchell’s question
as to why he had not yet gone
to the police with the evidence
he claims to have on some

. PLP government members
allegedly involved in a visa
scandal, but instead raised
concerns about the issuance

of five particular visas to Chi-
nese nationals. .

In his press statement, Mr
Bethel said the document
shows that the visa section on
November 13, 2004, issued
five visas to five Chinese
nationals allegedly on behalf
of a PLP official.

In the ledger’s column

“approved by”, the document.

lists “minister” as the person
giving the approval in-four of
the five cases.
_ Mr Bethel said Mr Mitchell
“plainly has direct access to
all the files in his ministry. He
needs to fully explain these
entries in the ministry’s own
documents,” said Mr Bethel.
Mr Bethel suggested that
instead of trying to investigate
him, Mr Mitchell should
‘explain the entries in question.
_ Mr Mitchell, during a press
conference held in his Fox Hill
constituency on Sunday, urged
Mr Bethel to go to police if
he has any evidence on meim-
bers of the PLP government
who are selling visas or ille-
gally facilitating the issuance
of visas.
Otherwise, he said, he
advised the FNM senator to
“shut up and:be quiet.”
Mr Mitchell said that he
believes Mr Bethel has no evi-
dence, and is merely speaking
ona political platform.

“Mr Bethel has no evidence.

SEE page 11

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

i | Hetero =| Evo
AHA Ye (42) 380-2862 J To (242) 336-2804







The Tribune



f

She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

@ PHIL SAPP, father of Mark:
Sapp - the man who was found
dead in his prison cell in Abaco
last Saturday - with his lawyer
Godfrey Pinder. a
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)



@ By BRENT DEAN

THE family of American Mark
Sapp, who was found dead in his
police cell in Abaco last Saturday,
is seeking an independent investi-
gation into his alleged suicide.

Mr Phil Sapp, father of the
deceased, accompanied by attor-
ney Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder, rejected
the police assertion that Mr Sapp
committed suicide.

Mr Pinder stated: “What I am
asking for is an investigation, not
by any local group, but either by
Interpol, or the FBI, or Scotland
Yard or by someone who can
determine what happened to this
young man, because they are cov-
ering this up now. And, they are
putting suicide out there.

“There is no reason for them to
suggest it’s suicide until the autop-
sy report. We want a pathologist of
our own to make that determina-
tion. Either a pathologist sent over
by the people from Interpol, from
England, or our own personal
pathologist who will be as objective
as possible.

“It’s probably better to get
someone who is objective — not
the government side, not our side,

SEE page 11










WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

M denies —



sovt claim over
radar system

wi By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Movement has refuted
government’s claim that it bought a radar sys-
tem for Lynden Pindling International Airport
without proper consultation and accused PLP
ministers of not accepting responsibility for
their ministries.

On Monday, Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin blamed the FNM
for the “hasty” purchase of an $8 million radar
system which, she claims, will cost an addi-
tional $3 million from public funds before it
can be used.

Mrs Hanna-Martin made the announce-
ment after The Tribune questioned her about
the low morale of air traffic controllers at the
airport because of problems with the obsolete
radar system in use, and a “new radar sys-
tem,” allegedly bought during the FNM’s
administration.

The Tribune learned of the new radar sys-
tem from a source who spoke on the condition
of anonymity.

SEE page 11






Customs warehouse
at airport ‘received
extremely poor review

from US authorities

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter _

THE Comptroller of Customs has
declined to comment on reports that, the
Customs warehouse at Lynden Pindling
International Airport was given an extreme-
ly poor review by US authorities following a
routine inspection last week.

SEE page 11



New passport
rule has smooth
introduction

THE new passport rule which requires all

US citizens travelling by air to obtain a pass- *

: port when visiting the Caribbean came into
: -effect yesterday with few glitches.
US media reported yesterday that most

travellers who were unaware of the new”

requirement were allowed to enter after
receiving a warning and a passport application.
No travellers were turned away, but their

SEE page 11

Te ne eee ay

o

M&LIBBY Bern



oe
Jumping-Jacks N nN \

_Easy Spirit.



|
(Etienne Aigner |

Shoes For All Walks Of Life!


































se
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Investor eyes wireless expansion with BTC

FROM page 1B

less has received the necessary
government approvals, and is
now poised to take possession
of its new multi-million dollar
facility on Grand Bahama on
the target date of February 1,
2007.

He added that everything was
on target for the manufactur-
ing plant, where Pegasus Wire-
less hopes to build a variety of
high-technology products for
distribution to the US and
Western Hemisphere markets.

The products will include
wireless access points, wireless
bridging technology, and wire-
less cards for computers and
outdoor units that can be used
at home via computer tie-ins.
The company also does contract
manufacturing for Motorolla.

The Grand Bahama facility
will eventually employ 280-300





: No form will be accepted without:

workers.

“We are already employing.
We're at 25 so far. We’re hand
picking the management first,
and we have hired a plant man-
ager, sO we are continuing the
job site. We finally take posses-
sion of the building on February
1,” Mr Knabb said.

“That has been the single
biggest wait. We would have
already started if it hadn’t been
for that.

“T believe everything’s done.
Miss Bridgewater (Pleasant
Bridgewater, the PLP MP and
Mr Knabb’s attorney) handles
it. [ called her last week and
said we had containers coming
in, and she said it was all set up.
I have people who handle the
licensing and things like that,
so I am here today speaking, so
I assume that it is all on track.”

Mr Knaab said countries
must choose to become techno-
logically advanced, and even
though the Bahamas is primar-

ALL prospective graduates for SPRING 2007 MUST

1 submit COMPLETED Graduation Evaluation Forms to
the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY 2, 2007.

ily tourism-based, “you have
Freeport and you have a group
of people who want more, the
youth, the island that want to
be technology based.

“Here I get a say. We get to
build this business from here
and I get to hire people from
here,” he added.

“We are pleased that people
here do have the training, and I
am going to recruit every junior
and senior in high school that
wants to be in technology. If
you can capture the youth and
they want to be a part of this
and they want to innovate, can
you imagine what they can do.”

The Grand Bahama plant is
to be some 20,000 square feet,
marking an investment of more
than $20 million.

Mr Knaab was the keynote
speaker at an IBM luncheon to
discuss tourism and technolo-
gy, one of the events scheduled
for National Tourism Week yes-
terday.











Financial services
fears on EU trade

FROM page 1B

He added that he was “very
concerned about it”, especial-
ly as the EPA would be. based
on the World Trade Organi-
sation’s (WTO) rules-based
trading system. This relies
heavily on principles of non-
discrimination through clauses
such as ‘reciprocity’, ‘Most
Favoured Nation’, and
‘National Treatment’.

What this essentially means
is that countries have to treat
all companies and all countries
equally, giving them a uniform
regime of trade preferences
and benefits, and they are
unable to discriminate in
favour of domestic producers
and firms.

European nations such as
France and Germany were
among the main drivers of the
OECD’s ‘harmful tax prac-
tices’ initiative, and it is likely
they could use the EPA talks
to try and pressurise the
Bahamas into signing up to tax
information exchange agree-
ments.

In addition, there is also the
EU Savings Directive. The
Bahamas could be more
exposed by this, given that a

‘| number of Caribbean nations

that are still dependencies of
the UK - Cayman, Bermuda
and the British Virgin Islands -
have signed up to this.

The Bahamas has currently
not signed on to the EU Sav-
ings Tax Directive, which
requires countries to either
impose a withholding tax on
the offshore holdings of EU
residents, or exchange infor-
mation with their home coun-
tries.

Given that the Bahamas, if it
decides to sign up to the EPA
and negotiate through Carifo-
rum, would be tied to whatev-
er the region negotiated, it
could face additional pres-
sures on the Savings Tax
Directive.

Nation

Arguing that this nation
should negotiate with the EU
on its own, rather than as part
of Cariforum, Mr Moss said
the EPA would also impact
investors from the EU exam-
ining potential development
projects in the Bahamas.

“Today, the Cabinet of the
Bahamas is able to negotiate
directly with investors,” Mr
Moss said. “But these trade
agreements set out the rules
and parameters of what these
investments will be, and how
negotiations are conducted.
That puts us at a disadvan-
tage.”

Mr Moss warned that the
EPA could effectively impose
a ‘one-size-fits all’ template on

how Caribbean nations nego-
tiated with investors from the.
EU, governing the types and
amount of incentives offered,
and meaning that all countries
had to effectively offer the
same - eroding any competi-
tive advantage for the
Bahamas.

He added that the Bahamas
had two major decisions to
make - examining and reform-.
ing its tax structure, and reduc-
ing its trade deficit by devel-
oping an agricultural industry
and other sectors in the
Bahamas to reduce the vol-
ume of imports.

Mr Moss said tax reform
was “critical” and would take
10 years to implement. He
explained that the current sys-
tem was not raising sufficient
funds now for the Government
to effectively provide services
and infrastructure, such as
roads to alleviate the traffic
congestion that was resulting
in much lost productivity.

An income tax, based on
equity and people’s ability to
pay, was what was required,
he added.

Mr Moss said that in the
EPA and other trade arrange-
ments, the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement and the prefer-
ences it provided Freeport
with would be “the first thing
that will be attacked, will fall,
and will be obliterated”.

v ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and
Chairperson’s) and







V PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business
Office.



Ber COL ere .




the #1 newspaper in circulation,
Oa



| N.B. ANY form submitted after this date will be considered |
LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester
2007.







LLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS.
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is to implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world.

’ Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

International Liaison Officer (ILO

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

~ THE €0

oi





| THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Libraries.and Instructional Media Services Department
af The Law Library Branch :

| Lunch & Litigation

Inaugural Luncheon

Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006
“=




















Wednesday, 31st January, 2007
Choices Restaurant
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
The College of The Bahamas
_ Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.








Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

‘The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.




















Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon








Donation: $35.00 :: Student: $25.00
Part proceeds in aid of the new library fund









Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30" January 2007 to:




Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas

THE COLLEGE O1

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs








Tue Coiece OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs ——_ Flyyr yng


4B | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 __

ECONOMIC SUMMIT

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Forum to focus on energy, environment

* ECONOMIC SUMMIT

agreed at the German G-8”
meeting in June.

Blair, who raised the issue
at Davos in 2005, is expected
to focus on it again.

The meeting is also to
focus on securing global
energy supplies, including the
development of more alterna-
tive fuels, particularly in light
of oil prices that surged in
2006 before settling in recent
weeks, supply disruptions
from Russia and attacks on oil
pipelines in Iraq and Nigeria.

PUBLISHING

Another key issue is the
ongoing conflict between
Israel and the Palestinians
and securing the future of
Iraq. Israeli Foreign Minister
Tzipi Livni and Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas
are among those attending the
event, while Jordanian King -
Abdullah II will speak about
the future of the Middle East.

Lebanese Prime Minister
Fuad Saniora will talk about
how his country is emerging

‘from last summer’s fighting

between Israel and Hezbollah.
Iraqi Vice President Adil

Abdul-Mahdi, Sunni Vice
President Tariq al Hashimi
and Iraqi Deputy Prime Min-
ister Barham Saleh are sched-
uled to talk about the chal-
lenges facing their country
and whether the divide
between Sunnis and Shiites
can be bridged in a bid to
avoid further bloodshed.
Security was tight around
the city, with Swiss police, the
military and private contrac-
tors cordoning off ‘access to
the Congress Center, the
meeting’s main venue.
Protests, by people critical

of globalization and who
claim that corporate and big
business favors profits over
people, are expected to be
minimal.

Critics have planned an
action day for Saturday in
Davos and a national demon-
stration in the city of Basel
the same day.

Over the weekend, hun-
dreds gathered in different
Swiss cities to demonstrate
against the World Economic
Forum, with 300 rallying in St.
Gallen, 200 in Zurich and
around 100 in Delsberg.

Students don’ t buy many cheaper e-books

° E-BOOKS

said Bill McKenna, director of
digital products at Follett, a
company that operates more
than 700 college bookstores.
Follett offers about 1,000
titles in digital form, but sales
have been meager.

“We haven’t seen the revo-
lutionary kinds of successes
that other markets involved in
digital delivery have seen,”
McKenna said.

But it doesn’t mean that
e-books are not desired.

As 21-year-old senior
Xochiot Guadarrama hunted
for textbooks at the Florida
International University
Bookstore, she hoped to come
across a few cheaper used
books to ease the pain come
checkout time.

The health science major
expects to spend close to
$600 on six hefty textbooks
this semester. She usually
spends anywhere from $400
to $600 a semester just for
books.

The thought of being able
to download a textbook at half
the price sounded unbeliev-
able to her.

“Are you serious?” she
asked. “I would buy it in a
heartbeat!”

College textbook sales are
a $6.3 billion-a-year business,
-according to the National
Association of College Stores.
The cost of books and sup-
plies for the 2005-06 aca-
demic year ranged from $801




oye Nyy Tt) =

For advertising information please e-mai





AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

AN ARMFUL: Brandy Raulerson, 18, shops for textbooks at
Florida International University. Some students lighten

the load by buying e-books.

to $904 per student.

Barnes & Noble College
Booksellers offers download-
able titles from MBS Direct.
MBS started its Universal
Digital Textbook program in
August 2005 with only 136
digital textbook titles and four
publishers.

The program has grown to
include about 1,300 titles from
10 publishers, but that’s only a

crussell@herald.com





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sliver of the estimated 125,000
textbook titles available.

TOO EARLY TO TELL

Jade Roth, vice president of
books at Barnes & Noble Col-
lege Booksellers, said digital
textbook sales make up less
than 2 percent of their total
text sales, but it’s too early to
analyze the market, she said.

“We want to get another

BANKING

term under our belt,” she said.
“We'll get much better infor-
mation this time around.”

At a majority of book-
stores, students need to go
online to purchase e-text-
books, so some textbook pro-
viders are coming up with
ideas to boost in-store sales.
MBS is working with book-
stores to allow students to
purchase the digital version in
the store and receive a code
to download it online to their
computer later, said Kevin
McKiernan, director of busi-
ness development at MBS
Direct.

The idea is that in-store
purchases are more attractive
for students who use financial
aid to buy books.

Even if sales are not imme-
diately taking off, publishers
will keep producing digital
versions.

“TJ think publishers are
begining to feel that they need
to have all of their titles in
some sort of electronic form,
so when an opportunity
comes up, they can act on it
quickly,” McKiernan said.
“Everyone is kind of holding
their breath for an evolution-
ary reader.”

Publishers use different
software programs, called
readers, to view the digital
pages; some are using .pdf
files for Adobe Reader, others
are using .xml to view online.
This adds to the complica-
tions of selling the concept to
students.

Deals boost Bank of
America, Wachovia
4th-quarter profits

* BANKS

that Bank of America’s fourth-
quarter performance was
below that of other money
center banks, such as JPMor-
gan Chase.

He said that spread reve-
nues — the different between
what the bank pays for funds
and what it can lend them out
at — were up only modestly.

Meanwhile, “its institu-
tional securities business
lagged peers” and capital
markets revenue was not as
strong as at other major
banks, Mayo said.

SOME MIXED RESULTS

Bank of America shares fell
33 cents, or 0.62 percent,
Tuesday to $53.32 on the New
York Stock Exchange.

Earnings at Wachovia rose
to $2.3 billion, or $1.20 per
share, in the fourth quarter
from $1.71 billion, or $1.09 per
share, during the same period

last year.
Excluding merger and
restructuring expenses,

adjusted net income totaled
$2.33 billion, or $1.21 per share,
versus $1.74 billion, or $1.11
cents per share, last year.

Total revenue gained 31
percent to $8.59 billion versus
$6.56 billion last year.

That topped the $1.18 per
share on revenue of $7.81 bil-
lion expected by analysts sur-
veyed by Thomson Financial.

WACHOVIA REPORT

Wachovia shares climbed
38 cents, or 0.68 percent, to
close at $56.65 on the NYSE.

Goldman Sachs analyst
Lori B. Appelbaum wrote in a
research note to investors
Tuesday that Wachovia’s
fourth quarter earnings were
among the best reported by

any bank for the period.

“Wachovia generated one
of the strongest fourth quar-
ters of the banks reporting so
far given sizable strength in
market-sensitive businesses,
net interest margin improve-
ment, and stable-to-improved
credit trends across the port-
folio,” the note said.

“Credit quality was among
the best of those reporting
this quarter.”

BATTLING THE CURVE

Like all U.S. banks, Bank of
America and Wachovia con-
tinued to battle an inverted
yield curve, which means
short-term rates are higher
than long-term rates. |

That means banks must
pay more for deposits while
they’re earning less on loans,
which squeezes profits.

In other reports Tuesday,
Pittsburgh-based PNC Finan-
cial Services Group said
fourth-quarter profit rose 6
percent.

But the results came in
below estimates on a narrow-
ing interest-rate spread and
the need to set aside more
reserves against problem
loans.

PNC posted fourth-quarter
net income of $376 million, or
$1.27 per share, compared
with a profit of $355 million,
or $1.20 per share, a year ear-
lier.

Excluding an $8 million
charge for a sale of part of its
stake in BlackRock, PNC
earned $1.20 per share in the
quarter.

Analysts polled by Thom-
son Financial forecast earn-
ings of $1.30 per share for the
fourth quarter.

PNC’s shares fell 78 cents,
or 1.06 percent, to close at
$73.14 on the NYSE.

__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

BUSINESS BRIEFS



HEALTHCARE



MIKE DERER/AP
STRONG QUARTER: Johnson & Johnson said revenue was
$13.68 billion, up 8.5 percent from 2005. Above, Irvin
Belin works with vials of Anti Sera in Raritan, N.J.

Johnson & Johnson
posts 3.5% profit hike

From Herald Wire Services

Healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) on Tuesday
’ posted a 3.5 percent increase in fourth-quarter profit as higher
sales, especially for consumer products overseas, were
mostly offset by the first charge for a major acquisition.
Despite the solid performance, shares fell more than 1 per-
cent.

The New Brunswick, N,J. -based maker of contraceptives,
contact lenses, prescription drugs and baby products
reported net income of $2.17 billion, or 74 cents per share, up
from $2.10 billion, or 70 cents per share, in 2005’s final quar-
ter.

Excluding an after-tax charge of $217 million for the acqui-
sition of Pfizer Consumer Healthcare late in the fourth quar-
ter, income would have been $2.4 billion, or 81 cents per
share, the company said.

Revenue totaled $13.68 billion, up 8.5 percent from $12.61
billion in the last quarter of 2005.

e TELECOM

ALCATEL-LUCENT’S
PROFIT, SHARES DIP

Growing pains and
tougher competition hit
Alcatel-Lucent’s (ALU)
revenue and wiped out

e RAILROADS

BURLINGTON SANTA FE
SAYS 4Q PROFIT UP 21%

Burlington Northern
Santa Fe (BNI) said its.
fourth-quarter profit rose 21
percent because of strong



demand for shipping coal fourth-quarter profit, the
and agricultural and con- telecom equipment maker
sumer goods. warned, sending its shares
The company’s chief plummeting less than two
executive said the sluggish months after the company’s
housing market has creation in a $11.6 billion

depressed shipments of
building products, but he
predicted record volume in
2007 for other parts of the
business.

merger.
Alcatel-Lucent said pro-
forma revenue — calculated
as if the tie-up had taken
effect previously — fell 16
percent to $5.72 billion in
October-December. Operat-
ing income was “approxi-
mately at break-even” after
a 570 million euros profit in

e HOMEBUILDERS

D.R: HORTON SAYS
EARNINGS FALL 64%



ings fell 64 percent in the:
|

D.R. Horton (DHI), the
nation’s largest homebuilder
by deliveries, said that earn-

the fourth quarter of 2005.

Shares of Alcatel-Lucent
fell as much as $1.75, or 12.3
percent, to $12.42 in Paris.
last three months of 2006 as
it wrote down the value of
assets and forfeited land
deposits and took fewer
sales orders.

But the results still beat
Wall Street’s expectations,
and Horton shares jumped
$1.25, or 4.6 percent, to

e U.S. ECONOMY

FUTURE ACTIVITY
INDICATOR GOES UP

A gauge of future eco-
nomic activity rose slightly
in December as two of the
economy’s soft spots — the

$28.38 in afternoon trading housing and job markets —
on the New York Stock showed signs of improve-
Exchange. ment, according to an indus-

try-backed research group.
e CHEMICALS The New York-based

Conference Board said its
Index of Leading Economic
Indicators edged up 0.3 per-
cent last month, suggesting
the economy may grow ata
modest clip in the next sev-
eral months.

DUPONT SEES ITS
4Q PROFIT SOAR

Specialty chemicals
maker DuPont said its
fourth-quarter profit more
than quadrupled, due mainly
to a hefty tax benefit, as well
as higher sales and flat fixed
costs.

Net income totaled $871
million, or 94 cents per
share, up sharply from last
year’s profit of $154 million,
or 16 cents per share. The
latest quarter included a net
gain of $449 million, or 49
| cents per share, mainly due
to tax benefits and insurance
recoveries from hurricanes
Katrina and Rita, partly off-
set by charges for restruc-
turing, an asset impairment
and accounting adjustments.
Fourth-quarter 2005 results
included a gain of $28 mil-
lion, or 3 cents per share.

e COMPUTERS

DELL OPENS GLOBAL
CENTER IN MALAYSIA

Computer maker Dell
(DELL) opened its first
global business center out-
side the United States to
provide 24-hour engineering
and technology support to
its branches worldwide.

Chief Executive Officer
Kevin Rollins opened the
200,000-square-foot center
in Malaysia’s high-tech city
of Cyberjaya. Dell says the
center will employ 600 peo-
ple by year-end and 1,000
within five years.



LATE TRADING





4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late 4pm. 6:35 Late
Stock Tkr. dose close Chg. volume | Stock Tk. dose aa volume
yahoo YHOO 26.96 28.50 +1.54 160783 | SeagateT STX 2618 27.20 +1.02 11538
SunMicro SUNW 5.66 6.11 +45 133926 | Disney DIS 35.58 35.56 02 =——«11527
ApldMatl AMAT = 17.46 17.52, +.06 119005 Hallibtns = HAL 29.73 29.84 = +.11 10609
iShR2Knya WM 77.92 7.19 7366158 | Firstbatas FOC 2614 2615 +01 10382
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 4358 43.71 «+13 46413:«|Aordrc | ARC~O«1098~=S«10098Sts* 9942
BarrickG ABX 29.34 29.2905 30132 : : ; 506

UtdMicro UMC 367 380 +13 7!

AMD AMD 17.51 16.67.84 27368 |G 2604 2612 +08 «7436
GoldS pfD GSpD 2650 26.48 ~=— 02. -—2to4g | Cisco CSCO 26. :
RFMicD RFMD «G88)7.35~= 4.471745 | MedProp §=MPW = 16.00 15.93 07,7432
Verizoncm = VZ 37493749 * 14933 | SPFncl = XLF = 36.91 37.00 #096775
SPDR SPY 142.80 142.93. +#.13 14312. | Erthlink = ELNK 7.16 7.16 6479
Citrixsy —« CTXS «29.87 «32.87 -+3.00 14067 | EqOffPT EOP 5244 52.44 * 6116
TimeWam TWX 2246 2246 * 12444 | NCRCp NCR 4446 9 44.25 -.21— 6012



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

CELE EE a a TT SLT TY OS
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 5B





City Markets

opens up

its.

‘crown jewel’

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

BAHAMAS Supermarkets
said it had created four new
management posts with the
opening of its “crown jewel”
$1.3 million flagship store at
‘Cable Beach, marking the first
time a branch of the store had
opened under Bahamian own-
ership for 40 years.

“The store on Cable Beach
will be the crown jewel in. the
City Markets necklace of 12
grocery stores serving New
Providence, Grand Bahama
and shipping to all the Family
Islands,” said Bahamas Super-
markets chairman Basil L
Sands.

The store will include state-
of-the-art technology, with
point-of-sale scanners through-
out the store. These can
instantly tally a customer’s
charges while tracking inven-
tory, while there will also be
an expanded deli and bakery.

Mr Sands added that four

new management positions
alone were created with the
store opening.

“But what makes us most
proud as we prepare to offi-
cially open this stunning Cable

he said.

For what we are celebrating
tonight is the grand opening
of the first store in 40 years of
Bahamas Supermarkets histo-
ry - that is, Bahamian -owned
and operated.”

He was referring to the fact
that BSL Holdimgs bought the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamasw Supermarekts from
Winn Dixie last August.

“For, many years, the rela-
tionship between Winn Dixie
and Bahamas Supermarkets
provided quality products and
essential systems. That rela-
tionship is now over, and we
at Bahamas Supermarkets
Limited entered a new era
drawing on the expertise of a
new board of directors,” Mr
Sands said.

Performing the official open-

INSIGHT |

eau Al eee sli Tiire|
Mat melo ate lil §

i

®

on Mondays

C

CHEVENING

ing was the Minister of Local
Government and Consumer
Affairs, V Alfred Gray, who
said the Government’s goal

‘ was to work towards diversifi-

cation of the economy away

_ from tourism.

“My government~ has

~ extended duty exemptions for

other industries to make shop-
ping in the Bahamas more
competitive, and to make man-
ufacturing more efficient. We
have looked for, and I believe
successfully identified, con-
struction-related projects,” he
added.

At 24,000 square feet, the
new store has 90 parking
spaces and is the fourth largest
in the chain behind Harbour
Bay and two Grand Bahama
stores. However, due to its

advanced features, it will be .

the flagship store.

Become a PC Technician
Build your skills for anew

U] Work for yourself building

and repairing computers
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BIZJET
BUSINESS CENTER

. Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

PHONE: (242) 356-5760



BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2007-2008

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-2008 Chevening Scholarships,
available to Bahamian applicants wishing to pursue post-graduated studies in the
UK in the following subjects:

Justice & Human rights

Media/journalism studies

International relations/diplomacy Public Administration
Sustainable development

Law

Environmental Studies

Management

Further information and application forms can be found on the British Council

(Jamaica) website at: www.britishcouncil.org/jamaica

Closing date 5th February 2007

BRITISH HIGH COMMISSION



Oke mO ee:

Needed to play
Pipe Organ and Piano

Successful applicant will need to play piano for
Sunday School, organ for Worship Service.
* and accompany a choir.

Remuneration commensurate
with experience and ability.

Send letter of application and resume to:
.Church Organist
P.O.Box N-497
Nassau, Bahamas



OPEN HOUSE |
LUXURY OCEAN
FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina



= SHOPPERS at the new City
Markets, Cable Beach

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)
1 to 6 bedroom from $349,000 +
The Porches @ Coral Harbor
Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm >
Free Food.and Drinks

For More Information Call: 424-8366
By Appointment Only

| BDO Mann Judd

BDO Mann Judd a leading professional services firm and a member firm of BDO
International, an organization with 621 BDO member firm offices in 107 countries around the
globe, is now seeking applications for an office administrator.

Qualifications: The successful candidate will have a Bachelors of Science or
Arts in accounting and have 3 years work experience in a similiar role. The candidate will
have a working knowledge of QuickBooks or Peachtree and Microsoft applications,. and
should be able to work in a challenging team driven environment.

The position requires a vivid attention to detail:

Responsibilities: include but are not limited to;
Intemal Accounting
Invoice preparation and control
Compliance and HR duties
Corporate services (company formation and administration)
This position will support senior management and is administrative and diverse
Individuals with the above-mentioned qualifications should fax their resumes to the
following: :
Recruitment Manager
BDO Mann Judd
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-325-6592

Or e-mail to the following address: info@bdomannjudd.com

Absolutely no phone calls please:
Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted.



IMPORTANT

NOTICE
SERVICE INTERRUPTION



From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. on
Sunday 28th January 2007.

Our Electronic Banking System will be temporarily unavailable
during the times listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance in order to improve our service to you. |

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:
¢ Point-Of-Sale (POS) transactions
e VISA transactions via ABM

ABM machines will be available from 7 a.m.
for cash withdrawals. Internet and Telephone banking
will be available from 10 a.m.

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.
MN




Legal Notice

NOTICE
KARDIA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) KARDIA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 23rd
January, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 24th day of January, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



>
ye

S41 = ae









$12m boost from

Atlantis giving up
$1.3m room revenue

FROM page 1B

Bahamas, and generate
immense exposure and pub-
licity that benefited its resorts
and tourism industry.

The report said: “The film
Beyond the Sunset, starring
Pierce Brosnan and Selma
Hayek, featured the Atlantis
resort and logo prominently
in many scenes, in return for
the hotel providing the
accommodation free. The val-
ue of the hotel rooms was $1.3
million, but in return the pro-
duction spent $12 million in
the Bahamas.”

That return can also be

used as an argument by the

Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) against the Govern-
ment’s plans to levy room tax-
es, at 6 per cent, on compli-
mentary rooms that are
offered free by resorts for
marketing and promotional
purposes.

The Ministry of Finance
has been driving the compli-
mentary room tax initiative
in an effort to close alleged



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

underreporting by some
hotels of their room taxes, but
the hotel industry has been
arguing that the Government
should instead focus on
“enforcement efforts direct-
ed at those properties abus-
ing the system”.

The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation, in its 2006 annual
report, pointed out that no
competing destinations in the
Caribbean levied taxes on
complimentary rooms made
available for marketing and
goodwill purposes.

The report for the CRNM
urged that a Collective Man-
agement Organisation
(CMO) be established in the
Bahamas to look after
authors’ copyrights, describ-
ing “stimulating interest” in
creating such an organisation
as “a difficult task”.

Another difficulty, it added,
would be to encourage the
foreign Performing Rights
Society (PRS) “to hand over
its lucrative cruise ship and
hotel-derived royalty base to
the national entity” in the
Bahamas.





The Public is hereby advised that |, BARBARA LOUISE SCOTT-RIGBY

of Nassau, Bahamas, mother of JOHNATHAN WESLEY ALEXANDER j



SCOTT, of the same place who is a minor and a citizen of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas by birth, do hereby intend to have



ALEXANDER SCOTT name change to JOHNAT. Ww E DER
BOSTWICK. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,

you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.

NOTICE

‘



NOTICE is hereby given that MARIETTA DANY OF

SPANISH WELLS,

ELEUTHERA,

BAHAMAS _ is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written an “signed statement of

the facts within twenty-eight days.from the 17th ‘day of ©

January, 2007 to the Minister respensible for Nationality

Innovative Private Banking Group is presently looking for a:

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Compliance Officer

The successful applicant must:

m Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.

m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance. requirements.

m Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge and experience with:

m Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.

m Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.

m Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.

m Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

Motivated team player with pleasant personality.

Private Banking

OYSTER Funds
We offer:
Alternative Investments

Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

Please send your resume and two (2) letters of reference to:

SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. a Human Resources Manager

www.syzbank.com

: [Pricing Information As Of:
23

Bayside Executive Park a PO. Box N —-1089 m Nassau, Bahamas

m A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.



SF A LS

—
SSS
SENN SH

ES ... ASS







THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007



Bahamas
can be ‘fish
capital of
the world’

i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Should cease fisheries
exports and focus on
feeding locals, five
million tourists

THE Bahamas should
become “the fishing capital of
the world” by ceasing exports
of its seafood products and
instead focusing on feeding its
own population and the
tourism industry, a Bahamian __ to its advantage.
trade campaigner said yester- He added: “What we have
day. to do is develop the Bahamas

Paul Moss, head of Domin- as a fish capital of the world.
ion Management, a financial We must stop the casual
services provider, andaleading _ tourists coming in and taking
member of Bahamian Agitat- away 1,000 pounds of fish, and
ing fora Referendum on Free _ insist those resorts here and
Trade (BARF), said: “When coming on stream buy from
it comes to fishing, the Paradise Fisheries and others.
Bahamas has to take a differ- “It seems to me to make lit-
ent focus. If I were responsible, tle sense for Bahamas Food
I would look for the Bahamas Services and other to be
to cease, desist from all types importing fish to satisfy the
of fisheries exports.” demands of locals and tourists.

Mr Moss said fish stocks in It makes more sense to feed
the Dominican Republic, — the five million who come to
Europe and the US were our shores with our own
severely depleted, but the resources.”

Bahamas was not in such a
position and could exploit this











NOTICE is hereby given that LARRY JACQUES OF .
5139 Marion Place, West Palm Beach, FI. 33407, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows. any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




‘

.PUBLIC NOTICE
-INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

the. Public is hereby advised that |, LIONEL STAFFORD
RECKLY STIRRUP of Winton Meadows, Carrot Road,
P.O.Box EE-17535 of Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my
name to LIONEL STAFFORD RECKLEY. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write |
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the date of
publication of this notice.
















WHO STUTTER

SSSR

See Shoe.
HARLLY, OO KEES
REMEMBER YOU ARE NOT ALONER!!

Daily Vol. EPS $ Yield
Abaco Markets Es zi 550 -0.293
Bahamas Property Fund : 3 1.689
Bank of Bahamas ‘ 3 0.796
Benchmark : : 0.265
Bahamas Waste ; : 0.199
Fidelity Bank os i 0.170
Cable Bahamas . 5 0.715
Colina Holdings 7 u 0.078
Commonwealth Bank . s 0.998
Consolidated Water BDRs 2 i 0.134
Doctor's Hospital ‘ : 0.295
Famguard : 0.552
Finco é s . 0.779
FirstCaribbean - i 0.921
Focol : 3 1.476
Freeport Concrete i 2 -0.423
ICD Utilities a ; 0.532
J. S. Johnson 2 is 0.588
Premier Real Estate . is 1
” i

Private club is seeking two (2) experienced
‘full-time sous chefs with a minimum of eight
(8) years experience in the culinary field. All
standard diplomas from the Nassau Hotel Training
College are demanded. The applicants must have
extensive knowledge in management skills and
excellent levels of cooking skills. The positions
to be filled are banquet sous chef and production
sous chef.

42.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
eee 20 RND Holdings
sspeumnmnmas
: Is

8.00 ABDA

Interested persons should fax resumes to
362-6245 to the attention of:

Last 12 Months Div $
1.325275”
2.9728""*
2.500211**
1.217450****
11.3075***"*

4.2700 Colina Money Market Fund
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund

THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE

LYFORD CAY CLUB
LYFORD CAY DRIVE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

SE SOR
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidellty
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

soe
MARKET TERMS

52wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

*- 19 January 2007

> ** - 31 December 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

° 9 Div $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

*** - 31 December 2006

**** - 31 December 2006


»

THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7B



Don’t get lost in mutual
fund strategy rivalry

@ By TIM PARADIS
AP Business News

NEW YORK (AP) — To
some it is a rivalry for the ages,
akin to the one shared by the
Yankees and the Red Sox or
those who debate whether
their beer’s most important
attribute is that it tastes great
or is less filling.

As with any storied contest,
the claims of the stalwarts on
either side often draw the most
attention. So the long-running
debate over whether mutual
funds managed by profession-
als ‘are any better than those
that simply mirror major mar-
ket indexes can obscure a larg-
er point for many investors:

Neither side has to be right all .

the time to be a right fit.

Last year, both strategies,
often referred to as active and
passive investing, had their
moments. But the contest —
still a ways away from becom-
ing a Hatfield-McCoy-style
feud as portfolio managers
have yet to take up arms —
mostly came down in favor of
index funds in 2006.

Mutual funds that mirror
large and small-capitalization
indexes outperformed a major-
ity of managed funds last year,
figures from Standard & Poor’s
Corp. show. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index — a widely
used benchmark for funds —
beat 69.1 percent,of managed
large-cap funds, while the S&P

SmallCap 600 index showed a.

greater return than 63.6 per-
cent of managed smallcap
funds, according to S&P.
Among midcap funds, howev-
er, managers beat their bench-
mark, with 53.3 percent of
managed funds outperforming
the S&P MidCap 400 index.

“Stock picking skills can eas-
ily-be:swamped by a strong
market movement,” Clark
said. “It becomes difficult to
beat your benchmark because
everything is going up.”

The S&P 500 did better than
large-cap funds by more than 3
percent and the S&P Small-
Cap 600 beat smallcap funds
by nearly 2 percent. Actively
managed midcap funds topped
the S&P MidCap 400 by 0.34
percent.

For the past five years, the
S&P 500 has beaten 71.4 per-
cent of large-cap funds, while
the S&P MidCap 400 has out-
performed 79.7 percent of mid-
cap funds. The S&P SmallCap
600 has done better than 77.5
percent of small cap funds.

Clark notes that in the first
half of 2006, before the stock
market began its months-long
run-up and the Dow Jones
industrial average climbed to
néw highs, some managed
funds held the upper hand
because portfolio managers
made some defensive moves
as the market meandered.

“Indexing is a long-term






strategy and it may on occa-
sion test the patience of
investors,” said Sonya Morris,
an analyst with investment
research provider Morningstar
Inc.

Clark said long-term
investors need to remain disci-
plined and not react to every
jump or pullback in the market
when investing in index funds.
“You’re getting a greater
return but you’re also going to
pick up a little more volatility if
you stay entirely on the pas-
sive side.”

Index

Miller noted that index funds
and most actively managed
funds were burned by declines
at the start of the decade when
stocks spiraled amid an eco-
nomic recession.

“Index investors weren’t
immune from the selloff,”
Morris noted. “But those that
stuck it out have enjoyed
above average long term
returns.”

One of the main arguments

in favor of index funds such as
the well-known Spartan 500
Index Fund is their low
expense.

Morris noted that many of
these funds are essentially
commodities with little differ-
ence among them because they
are tracing indexes. “There’s

very little reason under those
conditions not to choose the
cheapest one.”

Of course, index funds are

designed to match the market,

not beat it. That’s where the
judicious use of managed funds
can help add to investors’
returns.

“T think it’s a mistake to
blindly adhere to one strategy
or the other. There is a small
minority of very talented
investors who have shown an
ability to beat the indexes over
the long haul,” Morris said.

She also noted that actively

‘managed funds often prove

their worth in certain invest-
ment categories, such as
emerging markets, where man-
agers might drawn on local
knowledge when making
investment decisions.

Ultimately, however, she
contends index funds can offer
long-term investors who are
unwilling or unable to do
research on funds a wise, low-
cost way to invest. The best
index funds offer not only low
expense ratios but also diver-
sity in their holdings, low
turnover and tax efficiency, she
said.

“T think it can be a very
potent strategy over the long
haul for disciplined long-term
investors.”

In recommending how
investors weigh active versus

7

he

CB

Vin Orne Bay
ABACU, BAKRAMAS

Bee etl mel ar ey
1-Director of Development

Objectives: Responsible for selection, supervision, and development of staff
in accordance with company policies and procedures.

Job Summary:

- Development Management in Architechite and Construction understands

business goals.

- Twenty (20) years experience as Construction Industry and Resort

Design.

- Must be educated to'at least degree level (MBA preferred) in either
Project Management of Quantity Surveying.

~ Strong Leadership, management, and communication skills providing
the ability to work in a dynamic mult-functional matrix management

environment, as a “Team Player”.

- Experience in qualifying, contract negotiation, recommendation, and
administration of Professional and Contractor Agreements.

- Computer literacy on Microsoft office products.

- Successful candidate will be reporting directly to the board of directors
and therefore must have excellent written and oral communications skills.
In-depth monthly reporting will be required

1-Quantity Surveyor

- A full time management position for a qualified and experienced Quantity

Surveyor.

- Must have experience in high end residential developments.
- Commercial/hotel experience preferred.

- Computer literacy on Microsoft office products

- Five (5) years experience as Quantity Surveyor

Please send resumes to

Attn: Human Resources Department
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB20571
Marsh Harbour Abaco
Fax: 242-367-2930







passively managed funds in »

their portfolios, Clark said he’d
favor actively managed funds if
he expected the S&P 500 to
either lose 5 percent or gain 5

' percent in the next year or so.

But he would move a bulk of
his holdings into passively
manaped funds if he expected

the S&P 500 would show
strong double-digit gains as it
did in 2006. Last year, the S&P
500’s total return was 15.79
percent. “i think sometimes
the active-passive debate gets a
little overblown and we lose
sight of investors overall
goals,” Morris said.

The Tribune wants to hear *
from people who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora °
good cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and
y share your story.



i

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BOARDING SCHOOL FAIR:

KES

An Exposition of the Finest Boarding Schools in Canada offering University Preparation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007

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* scholarships and tinancial assistance available

* boys/girls/co-ed boarding in attendance;
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MEET REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS:

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FOR’ aOanals INFORMATION, ‘CONTACT. DOLLY MOFFAT-LYNCH
LoS ool 10) Sea eed LILLE LO) LD MES Mireici te on.ca

Mark your calendar

Our Application Deadline

is February 2, 2007

Remember to include the following with your application : 4

ce — ar

m




e $40.00 non-refundable processing fee
¢ Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of
birth and expiration date of passport
e Official high school transcript
¢« Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!
We look forward to welcoming you to The College,
soon to be the University of The Bahamas.



at

<


BUSINESS
PAGE 88, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007 ee

The Bank assésses whether objective evidence of impairment exists individually for
financial assets that are individually significant, and individually or collectively for

@MMG Bank & Trust Ltd.





Batance Sheet financial asséts that are not individually significant. If the Bank determines that no
September 30, 2006 objective evidence of impairment exists for an individually assessed financial ma
{Expressed in United States Dollars) whether significant or not, it includes the asset in a group of financial assets wit
similar credit risk characteristics and collectively assesses them for impairment.
2006 2005 Assets that are individually assessed for impairment and for which an impairment loss
Unaudited is or Continues to be recognized are not included in a collective assessment of
impairment.
he When a loan is uncollectible, it is written-off against the related provision for loan
Due trom banks (Notes 3 and 8) , impairment. Such loans are written off when all the necessary procedures have been
Non-interest earning deposits $ 15,114,915 § 8,341,641 completed and the amount of the loss has been determined. Subsequent recoveries of
apietrhenmne dees ee ao ee ‘amounts previously written-off decrease the amount of the provision for loan
r ES la impairment in the income statement, If, in a subsequent period, the amount of the
poveb dine Sromn banks TA 926373 90,922:085 impairment loss decrease and the decrease can be related objectively to an event
Available- for-sale securities (Note 4) 52,977,713 6,064.49] occurring after the impairment loss is reversed by adjusting the allowance account.
Held-to-maturity securities (Note 5) 2856 805 3.64 1 “447 _ The amount of the reversal is recognized in the income. statement.
eat ieee) Re ee Assets carried at fair value . ‘
ecrued inte! ecei 16,891 Assets Carried at fair value Beer ws .
eee oe ee 1) Pee 139,756 The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that
Other assets he 8 and 9) 307.728 53.773 a financial asset or a group of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity
gee : * investments classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged decline in the
ai i i i i i ining whether the
‘Total as ; 6 4 92,547,077 fair value of the security below its cost is considered in determining Ww I
see 2 _D9.612.738 SES. assets are itnpaired: If any such evidence exists for available-for-sale financial
2 i assets,.the cumulative loss measured as. the difference between the acquisition cost
aes sng ahd the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously
; gnized i i i ized in the statement
“us nan : : 7 5 2 recognized in profit or loss is removed from equity and recognizer 2
crtomers cer Afearp ei ea . : 8 ; a. ' of income. Impairment losses recognized in the statement of income on equity
Othe bi: iN es er 4231. 427 . 35.675 instruments are not reversed through the income statement, If, in a subsequent
Teg -—o—o—o—oor— oem period, the fair value of a debt instrument classified as available for sale increases
r iabilit , and the increase can be objectively related to an event occurring after the impairment
Total liabilities — 150,644,683 83,814,327, loss. was recégnized in profit or loss, the impairment logs is reversed through the
Contingencies (Notes 8, 10 and 14) ame of income, ; :
Equity (e) Furniture and equipment
iquity ; :
Common stock, par value $1 per share; : All furniture and equipment are stated at historical cost less depreciation. Historical
pborized, oa = outstanding: 5,000,000 oe 5,000,000 cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items.
‘Net changes in available-for-sale securities : 25,19 - :
Retained earnings: —___3,942,865. ——___3.732,750 Subsequent costs’ are included in the asset’s carrying amount or are recognised as a
T nee separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits
2 ite !
eae $268,085 _8.732,750 associated with the item will flow to the Bank and the cost of the item can be
Total liabilities aid ely $ 159,612,738 92,547,077 measured reliably.
edb Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method based on the estimated
Approved by:

useful lives of the assets as follows:

Office equipment : » 10 years
Software : 5 years



(f) Translation of Foreign Currencies

December 1, 2006

Items included in the financial statements are measured using the currency of the
ptimary economic environment in which ‘the Bank Operates (“the functional
currency”). The financial statements are presented in United States dollars, which is
the Bank’s functional and presentation currency, - Monetary assets and liabilities in
currencies other than the United States dollar are translated at rates of exchange
“prevailing at the year-end. Income and expenses in currencies other than the United
States. dollar are translated at rates of exchange existing at the dates of the
“transactions.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Notes to the Balance Sheet
7 General Information

MMG Bank & Trust Ltd. (“the Bank”) isa limited liability company established in
Nassau, Bahamas, on December 18, 1996. Its objective is to promote and participate in all
Kinds of banking, financing, and investing activities from the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. The Bank’s license was granted on January 20, 1997.

a : Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are detailed as follows:

2006 2005
bate : aha dited
The registered office of the Bank is located at First Floor, Shirley House, 50 Shirley Street, enaualte
Nassau, The Bahamas. Non-interest earning deposits $ 15,114,915 $ 8,341,641
oes ints eps Nae < Interest earning deposits, with original ;
ance s 1as been approved for issue Ly Management ecember 1, 2006. : =
Vhe balance sheet has been approved {ov issu: vy Management on December 1, 2006 maturities up to 90 days 23.285 663 33.368.154

“0 Summary of Jconifie: Alcs. 4 vulieies

The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of the balance sheet are set out
below. “These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless
otherwise stated.

4. Available-for-Sale Securities

‘ Available-for-sale securities are described as follows:

2006 2005
(a) Basis of Presentation Phas : Unaudited
; At fair-value (listed); rete
The balance sheet is ptepared in accordance with Internativnal Financial Reporting Debt securities and investment funds $ 51,202,328 $ 3,443,404
Standards (IFRS). The balance sheet is prepared under the historical cost convention U:S.A Treasury notes ; edi 1,503,042 2,338,093
as modified by the revaluation of avVailable-for-sale investment securities, Equity securities ; . a 272,343 ___- 282.904

$52,977,713 $6,064,491

The Central Bank of The Bahamas approved the change of MMG Bank & Trust
The movement in available-for-sale securities is summarized as follows:

Ltd.’s fiscal year end from December 31 to September 30.

The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with IFRS requires the use of

certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its 2006 2005
Judgment in the process of applying the Bank’s accounting policies. The areas ; Unaudited
involving a higher degree of judgment or complexity, or areas where assumptions ; :
_ and estimates are significant to the balance sheet are disclosed in Note 15. Balance at beginning of year $ 6,064,491 $ 4,900,810
Purchases 51,396,813 2,824,301
(b) Cash and Cash Equivalents Sales and redemptions : (4,508,781) (1,660,620)
' Change in fair value : ie 25190 2

The Bank considers as cash ahd cash equivalents, all deposits with original maturity
of ninety days or less.

Balance at end of year £.52.977.713 $6,064.49]

(c) Financial Assets 5.e. Held-To-Maturity Securities
The financial assets are classified in the following three categories: loans, held-to-

Held-to-maturity securities are summarized as follows:
maturity securities and available-for-sale securities. Management determines the ae

ea : : i 2006 - 2005 |
classification of its financial assets as follows: Unaudited

° Loans , Debt secu iti i .
Loans are non derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are Ee a est : 82,856,805 $3,641,447
not quoted in an active market. They arise when the Bank provides money, goods or 7

services directly to a debtor with no intention of trading the receivable. The movement in held-to-maturity securities is summarized as follows:

e Held-to-maturity

2006 2005
Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed -or Unaudited -
determinable payments and fixed maturities that the Bank’s management has the ee se 7 ; :
positive intention and ability to hold to maturity. Balance at beginning ofyear - $ 3,641,447 § 4.186 774

¢ — Available-for-sale ees i 955,052 1,710,154
Taree . le

_ Available-for-sale investments are those intended to be held for an indefinite period of ake (1,739,694) (2,243,668),

; c 1 io bet eli . Provision ‘
time, which may be sold in response to needs for liquidity or changes in interest rates, 3
exchange rates or equity prices.

(11,813)
Balance at end of year $2,856,805 £.3.641,447

Purchases and sales of financial: assets held to maturity and available for sale are 6. Loans
: 1d ae

recognized on trade date, the date on which the Bank commits to purchase or sell the

asset. Loans are recognized when cash is advanced to the borrowers. Financial assets

are initially recognized at fair value plus transaction costs for all financial assets not

’ Loans are summarized as tollows:

i . bi carried at fair value trough profit or loss. Financial assets are derecognized when the ape pee
tights to receive cash flows from the financial assets have expired or where the Bank
has transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership.
. Commercial $ 27,757,577 $25,031,504
Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Loans and Mortgage 950,000 1,096,682

held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortized cost using the effective interest
method. Gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of the available-for-
sale securities, are recognized directly in equity until the financial asset is
derecognized or impaired at which time the cumulative gain or lose previously
recognized in equity should be recognized in the profit or loss. However, interest
calculated using the effective interest method is recognized in the income statement.
Dividends on available-for-sale equity instruments are recognized in the income
statement when the entity’s right to receive payment is established.

Overdraft 25,086 4.783

: 28,732,663 26,132,969
Less: Allowance for loan losses - (24,335)

£..28.732,663 226,108,634



Movement of the allowance for loans losses:

The fair values of quoted investments in active markets are based on current bid

2006 2005
prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the Unaudited
Bank establishes fair value by using valuation techniques. These include the use of

recent arm’s length transactions, discounted cash flow analysis and other valuation ‘Balance at beginning of year $ 24,335 = § 24,335
techniques commonly used by market participants. Equity securities for which fair Reversal of allowance for loan losses (24,335) =

values cannot be measured reliably are recognized at cost less impairment.

(d) Impairment of Financial Assets

a Balance at end of year $ - . bh 24.335

Assets carried at amortized cost 7. Furainire and Equipment
The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that
a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset or a group
of financial assets is impaired and impairment losses are incurred if, and only if, there
is objective evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that occurred
after the initial recognition of the asset (a “loss event”) and that loss event (or events)
has an impact on the estimated future cash flows of the financial asset or group of

financial assets that can be reliably estimated. Objective evidence that a financial

Furniture and equipment are comprised as follows:

Office
Furniture & = Computer

Equipment Equipment Total

At September 30, 2006



: is impai i i < 9 139,756
asset or group of assets is impaired includes observable data that comes to the ee BetOook- Amount : ee : 199 784
attention of the Bank about the following loss events: Depreciation charge (660) (54.027) (54,687)

e — Significant financial difficulty of the issuer or obligor;
e a breach of contract, such as a default or delinquency in interest or
principal payments;
e the Bank granting to the borrower, for economic or legal reasons
relating to the borrower’s financial difficulty, a concession that the
lender would not otherwise consider; :
© it becoming probable that the borrower will enter bankruptcy or other financial
reorganization; ;
° the disappearance of an active market for that financial asset because of financial
difficulties; or ‘

Closing. net book amount _ 2 $546 8 283,307 = 82 84.853

At September 30, 2006 -
Cost § 8,164 $ 573,358 $ 581,522

Accumulated depreciation _ (6,618) _ (290,051) (296,669)
Net book amount $ 1546 $283,307 $ 284.853
At September 30, 2005 (Unaudited)





© — Observable data indicating that there is a measurable decrease in the estimated future a ‘ati ; Gee, Fel : 24198
cash flows from a group of financial assets since the initial recognition of those assets, Accumulated depreciation (5,958) (236,024) (241,982)
although the decrease cannot yet be identified with the individual financial assets |
the Bank. 7 oe eR en Net book amount $ L36) $138,395 § 139,756
: : ‘ ' Ssasalalnt aeraie tes mami Witenes tyenk et wes NR OT tren ht ees saree ean ne mente ney eben
eee RR A etc 8 tat necmsceliin nih he meant tniealiattittrnshteansataatamhantel tijereeh namin cate 2 ee ona He en ae ares

RPE ARTIS ah OR MOEA LEICA HORI IBL tat darlin SAN mnt me hs mem ree) se em urea? arse erruse rp rearmenn wearer oe

| i
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 9B

'

8. Balances with Related Parties The matching and controlled mismatching of the maturities and interest rates of assets and

liabilities is fundamental to the administration of the Bank. It is unusual for the Banks ever

The balance sheet includes balances with related parties, as follows: to be completely matched since business transacted is often of uncertain term and of

2006 2005 different types. An unmatched position potentially enhances profitability, but also increases
Unaudited the risk of losses.
Assets 1 a Soa aenels R or
Due from banks “ $17,576,908 S. 142mwert The maturities of assets and liabilities and the ability to replace, at an acceptable cost,
interest-bearing liabilities as they mature, are important factors in assessing the liquidity of
Loans $12,011,197 $13,981,936 the Bank and its exposure to changes in interest rates and exchange rates.
Other assets $268 «=D The maturity of assets and liabilities, based on the remaining period at balance sheet to the
contractual maturity date, are the following:
006
Without 0-3 3-6 6-12 Over 1
—Maturity. _ Months _ Months Months Year Total
> 2006 2005 Assets . :
Unaudited Due from banks $ 15,197,290 $ 23,203,288 $ 30,266,111 $ 5,032,640 $ 727,044 $ 74,426,373
ene Investments 23,607,967 17,611,981 6,771,871 2,268,777 5,573,922 55,834,518
Liabilities Loans _ | 9,283 1,004,976 10,123,947 «9,764,571 7,829,886 28,732,663
Other assets 418,142 ~_ 5,152 1.191 13,943 180,756 ___.619,184
Customers’ deposits $21,323,731 £_29,636.218 Total assets $20.232.682 $41,825,307 $.47.163.120 $17,079.93) S.14111.608 . $19,612,738
Paes Liabilities se
Other liabilities Customers’ deposits $ 34,161,352 $ 38,005,598 $ 46,010,843 $ 21,221,465 $ .6,513,998 $145,913,256
Other liabilities 4 4,731,427 ? : :
Contingencies and commitments $__ 494.894 $502,000 ‘Total liabilities ° $.38,202.779 $38,005
* Contingencies and commitments ~ Sue =~ £23,000 § 82 188 $1644 g88 s £1.755.076
9. | Other Assets :
Net liquidity gap $2220) £4.106.709 $1,065,089 $15,786,422) $_2.792.610 $_2.212,979
Other assets include account receivable of $450,000 which has been fully provided for in
this fiscal period. PUSS Tere AN ae EE Soe Ungiitines ee OR ee
Without 0-3 3-6 6-12 Over-I
10. Off-Balance Sheet Credit Risk Financial Instruments _Maturity _ lonth: Months Months Year Total
Assets ‘ ;
wee’ oye ‘ eo ws Due from bank: 8,341,641 1368,
The bank maintains financial instruments with off-balance sheet credit risk, that arise in the lnvestments , 2436994 ; *Taasa7 ; tet sea ; 538.198 : 3.644.090 ; 9.705938
normal course of business and which involve elements of credit and liquidity risk. The ae Se 992,340 7,178,323 3,067,252 14,870,719 26,108,634 °
Bank does not anticipate losses as a result of these transactions. Such financial instruments Sr 152.395 ____32.380 m+. ___18.820 ___6.825
include commitment payments for $1,755,076 (2005 - $1,502,457). Total assets $10,930,430 $35,418,646 $15,978,580 $10,879,285 $19340136 $92,547,077
: : 7 : Liabilities "
The commitment payments are exposed to credit losses in the event that the client does not Customers’ deposits $ 31,290,743 $ 16,161,304 $10,870,357 $ 19,067,865 $ 6,388,383. § 83,778,652
fulfill the payable obligation. The policies and procedures of the Bank in the approval of Other liabilities 3 Ly BSGIB cla on LRP RON SS 2 H
credit commitments are the same as those used in granting loans registered in the balance : : :
Total liabilities
sheet, ile RALI26418 £.16161.304 §_10,870.357 $19,067,865 5 6,388,383 § 83,8)4.327
Contingencies and commitments & 580:457 i 312.000 § . £ 4 £605,000 ‘ 1,502,457
Commitment payments are agreements that the Bank accepts to lend to a customer when .
. oa _ : Net liquidity gap * $£:(20,976.445) $18,940,342 § 5,108,223 $_(8,188,5R0
certain conditions are satisfied, which have an average maturity of twelve months and are ) S12d46183 $2230.29
mainly used for disbursements of credit line. The Bank does not anticipate losses as a
result of these transactions. =
: 13. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

11. Income Taxes |
The Bank is not subject to income tax in The Bahamas.
12. Financial Risk Management
Strategy in Using Financial Instruments
By its nature, the Bank activities are principally related tothe use of firancial instruments,

through accepting deposits from customers and financing received at both fixed and
floating rates and seeks to earn above average interest margins by investing these funds in

Financial instruments utilized by the Barik include recorded assets and liabilities shown in
the balance sheet, as well as items disclosed in the accompanying notes that principally
involve off-balance sheet risk. The majority of the Bank’s financial instruments are either
short-term in nature or have interest rates that automatically reset to market on a periodic
basis. Accordingly, their estimated fair values are not significantly different from their
carrying values for each major category of the Bank’s recorded assets and liabilities.

high quality assets. In addition, the Bank seeks to increase these margins by consolidating 14. Fiduciary Activities

short-term terms and lending for longer periods at higher rates while maintaining sufficient ae : .

liquidity to meet all claims that might fall due. MMG Bank & Trust Ltd. maintains off-balance sheet accounts related to trusts under
: administration. The trusts under administration amounted to $96,566,467 (2005 -

Fiduciary Risk ? $21,657,160). The Bank does not anticipate any losses as_a-result of the administration of

The Bank is susceptible to fiduciary risk, which is the risk that the Bank may fail in these trusts.

carrying out certain mandates in accordance with the wishes of its clients. To circumvent

this risk, the Bank takes a very conservative approach in its undertakings. High risk

instruments are not considered attractive instrument vehicles and are not invested in unless 15. Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments in Applying Accounting Policies

the Bank is specifically advised to do so by its clients and covered by an indemnity
agreement. :

Credit Risk

The Bank has an exposure to credit risk, which is the risk that a counterparty will be unable
to pay amounts in full when due. The Bank structures the levels of credit risk it undertakes
by placing limits on the amount of risk accepted in relation to one borrower, group of
borrowers, and to geographical segments. Such risks are monitored on a revolving basis
and subject to a frequent review. The financial assets that are potentially exposed to credit
risk are interest earning deposits and loans. The interest eaming deposits are mainly placed
with prestigious financial institutions and with the head bank.

Exposure to credit risk is managed through regular analysis of the ability of borrowers and









The Bank makes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and
liabilities within the next financial year. Estimates and judgments are continually evaluated
and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future
events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

(a) Impairment losses on loans and advances
The Bank reviews its loan portfolios to assess impairment at least on a quarterly basis.
‘In determining whether an impairment loss should be recorded in the statement of
income, the Bank makes judgments as to whether there is any observable data
indicating that there is a measurable decrease in the estimated future cash flows from





potential borrowers to meet interest and capital repayment obligations and by changing R a portfolio of loans before the decrease can be identified with an individual loan in
these lending limits where appropriate. Exposure to credit risk is also managed in part by & that portfolio. This evidence may include observable data indicating that there has
obtaining collaterals. « been an adverse change in ‘the’ payment status of borrowers in a group, or national or
local economic conditions that correlate with defaults on assets in the Bank.
The geographical distribution of assets and liabilities are as follows: . Management uses estimates based on historical loss experience for assets with credit ‘
risk characteristics and objective evidence of impairment similar to those in the i
2006 portfolio when scheduling its future cash flows. The methodology and assumptions ;
‘Accet Liabilities Contingencies used for estimating both the amount and timing of future cash flows are reviewed
. regularly to reduce any differences between loss estimates and actual loss experience. :
Panama $ 43,000,218 $ 53,323,813 $$ 1,755,076 : : !
Europe : 53,618,862 13,936,046 - (b) Impairment of available-for-sale equity investments i
Bahamas 5,888,765 74,202,483 : The Bank determines that available-for-sale equity investments are impaired when ‘
North America 57,104,893 __9,182,341 = there has been a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value below its cost. This i
$1,755,076 determination of what is significant or prolonged requires judgment. In making this ;
S182.6)2,738 — £150,044,083 judgment, the Bank evaluates among other factors, the normal volatility in share i
prices. In addition, impairment may be appropriate when there is evidence of a \
2005 Unaudited deterioration in the financial health of the invested, industry and sector performance, '
changes in technology, and operational and financing cash flows. ‘
Asset Liabilities Contingencies ‘
c) Held-to-maturity investments
Panama $ 45,614,775 $37,911,317 $ 402,000 e The Bank folloves the guidance of IAS 39 on classifying non-derivative financial
Eurnpe ‘ 19,584,361 10,941,204 i assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity as held-to-maturity. ‘
Bahamas 13,866,591 34,719,910 ey : Aes : ae: . . aoa 5
North America 13.481.350 241 896 This classification requires significant judgment. In making this judgment, the Bank :
evaluates its intention and ability to hold such investments to maturity. If the Bank ;
$92,547,077 $_83.814.327 $1,502,457 fails to keep these investments to maturity other than for the specific circumstances - 8
for example, selling an insignificant amount close to maturity — it will be required tc ;
Interest Rate Risk reclassify the entire class as available-for-sale. The investments would therefore be ;
The Bank is exposed to various risks associated with the effects of market fluctuations on measured at fair value not amortized cost. 4
interest rates, Following is a summary of the Bank’s exposure to interest rates risks that a
includes assets and liabilities classified by the earlier of contractual repricing of maturity t
dates.
pa OG :
a, i
0-3 3-6 6-12 Over I Hh | ) RICEVVATERHOUSE( COPERS :
use font! Months — Months Year Bearing Total ’ :
7 ; ® ‘ 2 ‘
pease sana Swuaeul + sages mies tla Seen |
Loans, net 1,004,976 10,123,947 9,764,571 7,829 886 9,283 . 28,732,663 East Hill Street ,
Other assets 5,152 L19L 17.943 __180,756 ___418.142 __619.184 P.O. Box N-3910 5
Total assets $41,825,397 $4716.20 £12072] SI4911608 $39,232,682 $159,612.738 Wane et eece i
‘ : : E-mail: pwcbs@bs.pwe.com a
Liabilities an ; HA Telephone (242) 302-5300 i
Customers’ deposits $ 38,005,598 $46,010,843 $ 21,221,465 $ 6,513,998 $ 34,161,352 ° $145,913,256 Facsimile (242) 302-5350 {
Other liabilities ; - 2 is 7 4,731,427 4,731,427 4
”
Total liabilities” $38,005,508 $46,010,843 $21,221,465 $6,513,008 $38,892,772 £150,644,683
Contingencies and commitments 4 23,000 § 87.188 $1,644,888 § sa fi = 4£...1.255,076 x
x
2005 Unaudited 4
7 ’ ’
0-3 3-6 6-12 Over 1 Ri INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT ‘
ene —Months _ _Months _ Months. ___Year. _Bearing — __Total__ i
as “ 2 . q
ee eg ee To the Shareholder of MMG Bank & Trust Li
Loans, net 992,340 7,178,323 3,067,252 14,870,719 . 26,108,634 :
Oey mses 2280 ________ ___18.820 ____6,825 152.393 210.420 We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of MMG Bank & Trust Ltd., (the Bank) as of i
Total assets $3541R.646 $_15,978.580 $10,879,285 $19,340,136 $10,930,430 $92,547,077 September 30, 2006. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our ‘
Eabuiies ; responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit. 5
: ’ 1 2 2
Othe Habits ea eet aioe eee Ponsa ale We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those ;
siaviahiliies ra : Standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about i
Rol SASL AAI ST 8 IB. OS7. RNS SGARBIR3 S3LI2641E § 83.814327 whether the balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a a
Contingencies and commitments’ $317,000 fs Gt, 8 005,000 $580,457 $1,502,457 test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also a
, includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our
audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
The tollowing are the effective rates collected and paid by the Bank for different assets and In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
liabilities: MMG Bank & Trust Ltd., as of September 2006 in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards.
2006 2005
Unaudited Due to the change. in the Bank’s fiscal period for the year 2006, the balance sheet as of
Assets September 30, 2005 was compiled by us and is presented solely for comparative purposes. The
Due from banks 5.89% 3.74% accompanying balance sheet as of September 30, 2005 was not audited by us, and accordingly, ;
Investment securities 3.45% \ 2.12% we do not express an opinion on it. The balance sheet as of December 31, 2005, was audited by
Loans 7.05% 7.07% us, and in our report dated March 13, 2006, we expressed an unqualified opinion on them. ’
Liabilities :
Customers’ deposits 5.66% 5.17%
J
Liquidity Risk face datel hinwete ‘i
The liquidity risk is the risk that the Bank will be unable to fulfill all of its obligations. The Chartered
Bank mitigates this risk setting limits on the minimum proportion of funds available in high D . etec: Mecountants
liquidity instruments and limits of interbank and others borrowing facilities. : Seonue rage une