Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text
PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE.



Pare



its voice concern over alleged

punishment at Simpson Penn Centre

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PARENTS of boys living at the
Simpson Penn Centre are con-
cerned that excessive physical force
is being used to punish their chil-
dren.

Worried parents are claiming
that officers at the rehabilitative
centre for underage offenders and
“wayward” children are using
methods of punishment — beating
the boys and keeping them in iso-
lation — beyond what is necessary.

A mother, who contacted The
Tribune, said that her son has been
living at the Centre for several
months and has witnessed how

other boys were beaten to the
point that “‘mdrks are left on their
bodies.”

She also Cfaimed that often
when parents visited their sons
they were told that the boys were
being held in isolation and could
not receive visitors.

The mother said she believes
that parents are prevented from
seeing their children so they won’t
see how badly they are being pun-
ished.

Barbara Burrows, Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry of Works,
told The Tribune that although cor-
poral punishment is part of the
rehabilitative process at the Simp-
son Penn Centre for Boys, she had

not received any reports of
extreme measures of punishment
being administered.

Mrs Burrows said she will have
to look into the claims by these
concerned parents.

“T have to look into the matter
to see exactly what is going on,”
she said. “Corporal punishment is
administered, but I have looked
into exactly what is happening up

there and I'll be ina

position to say what has to be
done.”

The mother of a Simpson Penn
boy, who wished to remain anony-
mous, claimed that two officers in
particular were responsible for the
harsh punishment.

“J'm very concerned because ~

you put them (the boys) up there
for security and other reasons. I'm

not saying they shouldn't be pun-
ished, they should be’ disciplined,

“just not in the way they are now.
Most of then: are only looking for

someone to love and caré for them,
they need someone to talk to them
and change their lives, beating
doesn't help everything.

“If someone who cares about
doing the right thing, you will have
good children turn out. How do

you expect a child to do better
evhen you just beat him?” she
asked.

The mother said she has spoken
to other parents about the situation
and they are also concerned.

“T just feel something needs to
be done, because they are just
sweeping it under the mat. Some-
one needs to go in there and
straighten it out,” she said.

SEES OT Te

@ MR. GARY HOFFMAN, Group
Chairman Barclays PLC (London)
makes a $100,000 cheque presentation
to Dr. Bernard Nottage, Minister of
Health, on Friday in a ceremony out-
side of the Fox Hill Clinic. The clinic
will be the recipient of the donation.

MP for the area and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell

aoe

described the Barclays donation as an y
investment in the future. : 3
Mr Mitchell noted that primary nm
health care is a wise investment, con- 7
sidering the obvious expense connect- |. 4
ed with health care later in life. ‘
“The saying is a gram of prevention | :
is worth a kilogram of cure,” he said.
“This gift will no doubt help children 5
to focus on how they can take care of
their health so that they can be more










Shema Poiti



ers. Host

productive citizens, making healthy
choices for both their physical and
mental health.”

lm CORRECTION

In Saturday’s edition of The
Tribune, the $100,000 donation was
incorrectly said to be from the
government. The donation is, in fact,
from Barclays PLC. The Tribune
apologises for the error and for any
embarrassment caused.



Covenant Design Group findings ‘won’t be public’

THERE will be no public release
of the findings of the Covenant
Design Group, which is charged
with. determining the future of the

Anglican Communion as the issue
of homosexuality threatened to split
the church.

Representatives of the Anglican

‘Church in the Bahamas told The

Tribune that the interim report for-
mulated by the Covenant Design
Group — chaired by Archbishop
Drexel Gomez of the West Indies —
will not be released before it is pre-
sented to the Primates Meeting and
Joint Standing Committee
when they meet in Tanzania in Feb-
ruary.

Archbishop of Canterbury

Rowan Williams appointed Arch-
bishop Gomez as the chairman of
the 10-member Covenant Design
Group, which is made up of experts
in canon law, the nature and the
mission of the church and ecu-
menical relations.

The group is charged with deter-

mining the full implications of the °

actions of the two of the world’s
largest Anglican Provinces, the
United States and Canada, which
have supported same-sex unions
and approved the Episcopal
Church’s consecration of a

Enter to win this David

necklace & bracelet from

gay bishop.

Archbishop Gomez said that the
Archbishop of Canterbury envi-
sions that there will be two sub-
groups within the world-wide Angli-
can Communion. Those provinces
which sign on to the Covenant will
become constituent members of the
Communion, while those opposed
to it may be called associate mem-
bers.

The Anglican Communion
claims 38 autonomous provinces
and some 70 million members
world-wide.





°
*
>
°
>
>
>
>
»





THE TRIBUNE





Alfred Gray
to open new
Cable Beach
City Market

MINISTER of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer Affairs
Alfred Gray will officially open
a new 24,000 square foot Cable
Beach City Market this evening
at an event designed to give
shareholders, vendors and
guests a sneak preview at what
will become the leading grocer’s
flagship store.

The store located on West
Bay Street opens to the public
Tuesday at 7 am.

At twice the size of the exist-
ing City Market immediately to
its east that it is replacing, the
new store will have parking for
90 vehicles and introduce sev-
eral features other City Market
stores are expected to adopt.

“We are very excited about
this store,” said Ken Burns,
CEO of Bahamas Supermar-
kets Limited, parent company
of 12 stores in New Providence

and Grand Bahama. “In addi- °

tion to an entirely different
décor, very tropical in style, spa-
cious aisles, an array of new
products and greatly expanded
deli and bakery, we will intro-
duce several technology-relat-
ed improvements in this store.
Among them will be point of
sale scanning, a great time-saver
for customers and an important
benefit for inventory purpos-
es.” It will also feature a large
gourmet and organic foods sec-
tion.

Opening the new store cre-
ated four new managerial posi-
tions along with 12 other jobs in
addition to opportunities for
neighbouring students to earn
money as packing assistants.
The existing building which City
Market had leased for more
than 30'years will be renovated
by owners and subdivided for
retail and other appropriate use.

Bahamas Supermarkets Lim-
ited is Bahamian-operated and
employs more than 700 people.
It's charitable arm, Bahamas
Supermarkets Foundation, has
awarded more than $7 million
in scholarships since its incep-
tion in 1968.

Man faces
burglary
and assault
charges

A KEMP Road man was
arraigned in magistrate’s court
Friday on charges of burglary,
stealing and aggravated assault.

Leslie Sweeting, 36, was
arraigned before magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court 11
Nassau Street.

It is alleged that sometime
between the hours of 10 pm on
Friday, December 29 and 2am
on Saturday, December 30
Sweeting broke into the home
of Lisa Bowe at St James Road.

The second charge stated that
between 10 pm on December
29 and December 30, Sweeting
stole a jewellery valued at
$1,550 as well as $35 cash.

Sweeting is also charged with
aggravated assault against Lisa
Bowe.

Sweeting was not required to
plead to the charges and was
remanded until Monday when
he will return to court for a bail
hearing.

Haitian is
charged with

rape of
18-year-old

A HAITIAN man charged
with the rape of a young woman
was arraigned in magistrate’s
court on Friday.

Sherdley Filoussait, 41, of
Sesame Street, Farrington Road
appeared before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court 11
Nassau Street yesterday to
answer to the charge.

It is alleged that on Sunday,
January 14, Filoussait raped an
18-year-old woman. He was not
required to plead to the charge
and was grarited bail in the sum
of $5,000. The case was
adjourned to April 19 for the
start of a preliminary inquiry.

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In brief —

Mitchell retorts










'» LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 3




FNM holds rally in Fox Hill

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN the face of what he
described as “scurrilous and
scandalous” mud-slinging by
the opposition at the FNM’s
rally in Fox Hill last Thursday,
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell yesterday urged his
supporters not to engage in
similar tactics in the months
leading up to the next general
election.

However, “there is only so
far that PLP supporters can be
expected to be pushed up
against the wall before people
will tend to strike back,” Min-
ister Mitchell said at a press
conference held in Fox Hill
yesterday afternoon.

Mr Mitchell said he found it
curious that just one day after
Christian Council President,
Rev William Thompson, urged
all MPs to “stay out of the gut-
ter” and not engage in any



@ FRED Mitchell

mud-slinging in their political
campaigning during last week’s
ecumenical service for parlia-
mentarians, the FNM did just
that.

“The very next day a politi-
cal party came to Fox Hill and
finds the only way that it can
make political capital is not to
deal with the issues and what
they intend to do, but rather
to engage in a personal mud-
slinging campaign at the can-
didate of PLP for Fox Hill,”
he said.

In the course of last week's
church service, Mr Mitchell
said, he discussed the matter
of the then upcoming rally with
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham, he said,
assured him that he would not
be making any derogatory
remarks about the PLP’s rep-
resentative for Fox Hill.

“Unfortunately he was
unable to exercise sufficient
discipline over his supporters
who departed from the script
and chose instead to engage in
vexatious, abusive and scur-
rilous comments,” he said.

He urged his supporters “not



Six-year-old drowns in canal

A SIX-year-old student of
Freeport Primary School was
found drowned in a canal on
Saturday in the Pine Bay sub-
division of Grand Bahama.

According to the police
report from Grand Bahama,
Beshawn Thompson, of num-











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allowed to go to that location
with his aunt, Pauline Whyms,
with whom he lived, and her

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Pyfrom’s yard on Alpine Lane.
Reportedly, after completing the
work, a search was conducted
for Beshawn, only to discover his
body floating in the canal.

At about 5.48pm Emergency
Medical Services personnel
rushed to the scene and sped
Beshawn to the Rand Memori-
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nounced dead on arrival.

This matter is currently being
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syste Ny Street. Tel (242) 329-8537 Fax (242) 326-8135 “ys
Cable Beach Store West Bay Shopping Center. Tel (242) 327-0022

to go down this road.”

Mr Mitchell reiterated that
his campaign “is not about Fred
Mitchell,” but that he is simply
the PLP’s representative who
is seeking to get his party elect-
ed to government for another
term.

He said he is confident that
the PLP will once again win the
Fox Hill seat.

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“No amount of personal
attacks and scurrilous and scan-
dalous behaviour on the part of
the opponents of the PLP in
Fox Hill will change that result.

“The work has been done, it
is there for all people to see.
And | expect, given another
term, my work in this con-
stituency on behalf of the PLP
will continue,” he said.



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

GIBSONBURG, Ohio — Americans don’t
like to argue. We do like to make snide
remarks to someone we know is “on our side”
about what’s bugging us, but we avoid tackling
the problem straight on. We’re not cowards,
mind you, it’s just politeness gone wrong.
We've never been taught the value of civi-
lized disagreement.

When I encourage my college freshmen to
speak up when they disagree with a statement
made by me or a classmate, they refuse until
they become too angry for a discussion and are
ready to resort to classic conflict resolutions
such as: “Ahh, your old lady wears army
shoes.”

This, I warn them, is not rational disagree-
ment — it’s down and dirty verbal combat
and we learn nothing from it. Then I ask how
many fight fairly with their spouses or signif-
icant others. A few hands reach tentatively
skyward.

“T fight fair but she doesn’t,” complains a
young man seated to my right and fiddling
with his pencil. I ask him to explain. He looks
a bit bewildered so IJ try suggesting some pos-
sibilities.

“Do you discuss North Korea, nuclear
weapons and Iran?” My question is answered
by a blank stare.

“Money!” someone tosses in. “Children,
parents and holidays,” suggests another.

Charlie, on my left, puts his 50-cents worth
in with, “My wife hates my family; she partic-
‘ularly can’t stand my Aunt James because her
false teeth clack when she chews.”

As the rest of the class ponders “Aunt”
James, Charlie goes on. “Course, I don’t think
too much of her family either but I keep my
mouth shut.”

I wait, hoping someone else will keep the
discussion going and maybe call Charlie on
his sweeping statement. “You’ve never griped
about your wife’s family?” Linda asks.

“Not to my wife,” he explains. “I complain
to the guys at work but never at home.” Linda
wants to know why not and Charlie says that’s
simple: “Because we’re living with her par-
ents until I graduate.”

“Would it make anyone angry if I made the
statement that I believe Kim Jong II is a nut-
case and should be offed in one of his lavish
palaces.” A few students, it was obvious, had
no idea who Kim Jong II might be but those
who knew said it wouldn’t bother them
because he’s far away in another country.

“What if I said I disagreed with George

‘Bush and his war? Would that anger anyone?”

I looked around for any raised hackles and

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Discussion leads to learning



saw none.

Paul is back in school after two turns in
Iraq. “How about you, Paul? Would you feel
I was attacking you personally with that state-
ment?” He shook his head and grinned. “Heck
no. I’m with you.”

Patti loosens up and accuses her husband of
being a know-it-all. “He can never admit to
being wrong even when he knows he is.” I
ask for an example.

“For weeks I had been telling him the car
was making a funny noise in the rear end. He
told me I didn’t know anything about cars
and there was nothing wrong with it. Day
before yesterday I was halfway back from Port
Clinton when the noise stopped — and so did
the car.

“Chip came home and wanted to know
where my car was and I told him that part of it

-was in a ditch on SR 53; the rest was scat-

tered along the road behind.” We all laughed
except Patti who said Chip blamed the whole
thing on her and said she didn’t know how to
take care of a car.

“Tf I'd been driving that car this would nev-
er have happened because I would have
known something was going wrong,” Chip
bragged.

Patti cut him down to size with: “Like a
funny noise in the rear end?”

Debate, I explained, is a good thing because
when people argue they learn. We discuss the
Socratic method of learning where teaching is
accomplished by “asking” rather than by
“telling” but no one is convinced.

When a student asks a sericus question,
whatever the subject at hand, I’m thrilled.
That’s when the door to learning begins to
open.

When small children ask “Why” five times a
minute, they’re not trying to be a nuisance —
they really want to know. And we really ought
to answer them.

“Can anyone explain the difference between
a debate and a fight?” I ask of the class. “What
are the benefits of discussion over fighting?”

Linda says a debate doesn’t get nasty and
end up with name-calling like fighting can.

Candace adds that no one leaves with hurt
feelings.

“Yeah, but...” Paul interrupts, “the great
thing about fighting is the kissing and making
up. You don’t get that in a discussion.”

Paul, we decide, is obviously a man with
priorities.

(This article was written by Elizabeth
Schuett writes of Cox News Service).






















Hitting back
at criticism of
Fred Mitchell

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to com-
ment on an article appearing
in your newspaper dated
December 23rd entitled: “Yes
Mitchell it is all about you.”
After reading the article it
appears that a vicious-bred
blood hound has been
unleashed in the hunt to
destroy Mr Mitchell. Mrs
Dionne Edgecombe’s criticism
of Mr Mitchell is by far with-
out merit and amounts to
nothing more than a personal
attack on him.

Firstly, let me state that I’m
not blowing the charge horn in
the battle to get Mr Mitchell
re-elected, as a matter of fact
I’m not in his constituency nor
have I decided which party I
will support in the next gen-
eral election. Obviously I have
no axe to grind, however, I
can recognise sheer talent and
a performer when I see one.
To claim that Mr Mitchell’s
performance is dismal is so far
from the truth that it makes
you wonder on what basis
does Mrs Edgecombe evalu-
ate Mr Mitchell’s perfor-
mance.

Has she considered the fol-
lowing?

In the eyes of The Bahami-
an people the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs was of little sig-
nificance. However, since the
appointment of Mr Mitchell
international issues pertinent

to the development of the .

nation have been so. high-
lighted that even the every-
day “Joe Blow” feels com-
pelled to have his say in them.

The option to join CSME
had stimulated wide debate
among the common man and
although not accepted by the
Bahamian public at this time
Mr Mitchell presented a vivid-
ly clear picture of the issues
concerning CSME demon-

Strating his ability and hard

work. All of the issues per-
taining to CSME were
detailed and available for
every Bahamian to scrutinise
if he so desired. Other people
if elected would not even have
a clue as to how to proceed
with such phenomena.

Mr Mitchell carefully navi-
gated through the waters in
voting for Guatemala rather
than Venezuela choosing not
to pander to the wishes of
friends of Venezuela. The
vote for Cuba on the Human
Rights commission wast

OBIS

letters@tribunemedia.net




superbly handled by the Min-
ister, in this instance he did
not pander to the wishes of
the United States and the ter-
rified Bahamians who were
afraid of the economic back-
lash.

The upgrade to Embassy
status in Havana, Cuba was a
tremendous accomplishment,
just ask the almost one thou-
sand students studying there,
despite the criticism and the
personal attacks by so many
ignorant foe who don’t even
realise that almost every coun-
try in the world has represen-
tation in Cuba, including the
US with the largest delega-
tion, the Minister, Mr
Mitchell, continues to per-
form.

Let us not be confused or
assume that the forming of
such diplomatic relationship
is some simple process. It
takes a Minister who under-
stands the international rami-
fications of such decisions, one
who has political savvy, one
like Mr Mitchell. Foreign
Affairs is simply his passion.

Just recently a contract to
supply the Bahamas with
machine-readable passports
encompassing biometrics was
signed, marking a colossal
accomplishment for the
Bahamian people. -All of this
done under the direction of
Mr Mitchell whom some claim
to have a dismal performance
record.

Or course there are many
other accomplishments of Mr
Mitchell that would occupy
substantial space in the news-
paper if they had to be listed,
these are only but a few. I
wonder what Mrs Higgs has
accomplished. What does Mrs
Edgecombe want for repre-
sentation? Does she want the
classic professional married
mother who very often domi-
nates her husband, one who
is So ambitious in her quest to
fulfil her own personal agenda
that she really neglects her
own family in the end? Who
will take care of the family
while ‘mommy’ is out there
making a name for herself? Is
this the role model that Fox
Hill desires? Another Hillary
Clinton is not what Fox Hill

needs.

Does Mrs Edgecombe want
the kind of representative who
spends most of his time parad-
ing up and down Bernard
Road trying to satisfy the cries
of the alcoholics shouting: ©
“Minister buy me a cold one
for a head.” Representation
must certainly be more than
that. Providing hams and
turkeys at Christmas time or
ensuring that the public park
is kept free of weeds should
not be the focus of represen-
tation.

Fox Hill should be proud to
have sent an intellectual to
represent them in Parliament
and even more the Bahamas
in the global arena. Mr
Mitchell is simply made up of
the right stuff, confident,
assertive, knowledgeable and
better looking than many of
his adversaries. Even the
American Ambassador has
stated that. Mr Mitchell is an
intellectual. Why can’t our
Bahamian people give credit
where credit is due?

To single out Mr Mitchell
as being arrogant, Mrs Edge-
combe needs only to look no
further than everybody with
power, especially political
power and she would realise
that it is a common trait. Polit-
ical power and arrogance are
inseparable. However, to be
arrogant and not perform will
only result in one’s political
demise. Politicians are always
put in a precarious situation,
to many or one big strike and
you’re out. Consider the
recent fall of a number of PLP:
representatives. Mr Ingraham
is considered very arrogant
however, performance deter-
mines political longevity.

Finally, Mrs Edgecombe’s
unsubstantiated claim of dis-
mal performance has to be
dismissed. Her efforts to have
Mr Mitchell discredited will
not advance the cause of Mrs
Higgs, in fact my advice to
Mrs Higgs is that she should
distance herself from Mrs
Edgecombe, she is an individ-
ual who seems to advocate
disdain for people whom she
deems to have alternative life -
styles. For heaven sakes, leave
Mr Mitchell alone.

EUGENE
BECKFORD
Nassau,
January 2, 2007.



NOTICE

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as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
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LOCAL NEWS.

*

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5





Fight against |
HIV AIDS is
undermined
by ignorance

@ US VIRGIN ISLANDA
Christiansted

WIDESPREAD ignorance
about HIV/AIDS is under-
mining efforts to fight the
spread of the virus in the
Caribbean, which has the sec-
ond highest rate of infection
after sub-Saharan Africa,
health officials said Sunday,
according to Associated Press.

Discrimination by employ-
ers and others is so pervasive
that infected people often
delay seeking treatment for
the virus, still largely per-
ceived as a “gay disease” by
many in the region, said offi-
cials at the one-day
Caribbean Summit on HIV-
AIDS in St Croix.

“It’s going to be a political
challenge because, unfortu-
nately, we live in a society
that is very homophobic,”
said Douglas Slater, health
minister for St Vincent and
the Grenadines. “It’s some-
thing we are going to have to
overcome.”

The 15-member Caribbean
Community, known as Cari-
com, has not secured enough
international funding for pre-
vention and treatment, said
US Rep Donald Payne, a
Democrat from New Jersey,
and co-chair of the Congres-
sional Caribbean Caucus.

"Caricom needs to step up
to the plate and demand
these federal funds,” Payne
said.

An estimated 500,000 peo-
ple — or 2.4 per cent of the
Caribbean — have the virus.
The figure excludes Cuba,
which has a relatively low rate
due to testing and prevention
programs.

In 2005, an estimated
24,000 people died in the
Caribbean from AIDS-relat-
ed complications, making it
the leading cause of death
among people aged 15 to 44,
said Barry Featherman, pres-
ident of the Inter-American
Economic Council, which
organised the conference.



‘Give-away’ of land criticisec

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Move-
ment criticised the government
yesterday for its indiscriminate
“give-away” of Crown and gov-
ernment land to foreigners —
directly mocking the PLPs
anchor project initiative.

“The record is clear and indis-
putable,” the commentary on
the party’s website begins. “In
its five years in office, the PLP
government sold thousands of
acres of Crown and government
owned land to foreigners, and
they did so at shockingly low
prices.

“Furthermore, most of the

land is for residential develop-
ment for the international mar-
ket — not for traditional
tourism or industrial develop-
ment that would bring continu-
ing benefits to the Bahamian
people.”

“Give-away of the people’s
land” is a recipe for disaster,
said the commentary, quoting
remarks made by party leader
Hubert Ingraham at a rally in
Fox Hill last week.

“With the government’s give-
away and the real estate foreign
developers have managed to
acquire on the market, the land
situation in the Bahamas is
approaching crisis proportions.
The country cannot sustain
another five years of this PLP

‘development model.

The FNM mentioned the crit-
icism it got from the PLP while
in office for its concessions to
hoteliers, and reminded the
public that it was this same PLP
that has now adopted a “colo-
nial mindset” to its own eco-
nomic development policies.

“The PLP’s disastrous land
policy. is directly tied to its
myopic economic model. This
out-dated model bestows wind-
fall profits on some foreign
developers while enriching a
small army of PLP cronies.
Rather than a model of genuine
development, the PLP has given
us a short term re-election strat-
egy of selling off the nation’s
assets in a flurry of speculative
land deals with often dubious
investment numbers.

“They are more interested in

short-term growth rather than -

national development. Surpris-
a8)



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@ HUBERT Ingraham
criticised the government’s
policy at a rally last week

ingly, when she served as the
government’s point person on
economic development, former
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Minister Allyson May-
nard-Gibson actually bragged
about the mixed-use develop-
ment model which dominates
the PLP Government’s eco-
nomic thinking,” the commen-
tary said.

However, the FNM claims
that they have a larger vision,
inclusive of medium and small
scale tourism and other industry
projects which could have a
greater “multiplier effect” in
terms of genuine “Bahamian
ownership of and participation
in the economy.”

“Many of the PLP’s short-
sighted efforts can result in
long-term demographic, eco-
nomic and political imbalance
which can permanently make
Bahamians second class citizens
in their own land. Disturbingly,
the terms of some of these deals
are shrouded in mystery. People
cannot help but wonder who in
the PLP ranks are benefiting
from schemes which will only
have minor benefits for many
Bahamians.

“Before the PLP’s smoke and
mirrors propaganda machine
goes further, a little history is
in order. Prior to the last elec-
tion, the PLP relentlessly and
mindlessly attacked the FNM’s
incentives for the Atlantis
development at a time when the
country’s tourism trade Wvas 1 in

the doldrums.
myie

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“Typically, the PLP conve-
niently never got around to
telling Bahamians that the prop-
erty to develop Atlantis was
acquired from private sources,
not from public land. The same
cannot be said for their fire sale
of hundreds of acres of land in
Cable Beach.”

This, the party said, is not just
the old “run-of-the-mill
hypocrisy”, but hypocrisy of the
“head-spinning, jaw-dropping,
and mind-boggling variety”.

“But the most important thing
for which they (PLP) will never
give the FNM credit is how we
helped to revive, rescue and
resuscitate a collapsed Bahami-
an economy through partner-
ships with ventures such as
Atlantis. Not even the PLP can
deny that Atlantis is the most
dynamic and successful tourism
project in Bahamian history.

“Without it we would have
been in deep trouble. But the
FNM achieved this and other
successes without giving away
huge swathes of Bahamian real
estate to foreign land develop-
ers. In fact, the FNM is proud
that we gave hundreds of

Bahamians the opportunity to°

acquire land for commercial
and residential purposes.
Bahamians now understand
that a PLP that promised a dif-
ferent approach is on the wrong
side of history when it comes
to a truly progressive, balanced
and more sophisticated model
of economic development.
“The Bahamian people no
longer trust the PLP with stew-
ardship of the economy and
their land. A new FNM gov-
ernment is poised to transform
and expand the economy. We
are horrified by the PLP’s
wrong turn. Seasoned by past
success; tempered by insights
acquired when in office, and
inspired by the opportunities a

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a
Cooperating for Caribbean tourism

â„¢@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat).

I: IS welcome news
that the Caribbean’s
two major tourism organisa-
tions — the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation
(CTO) and the Caribbean
Hotels Association (CHA)
— are establishing the
Caribbean Tourism Devel-
opment Corporation
(CTDC) as a commercial



venture to jointly market a
“Caribbean” brand world-
wide.

Tourism now accounts for
more than 60 per cent of the
gross domestic product of
the economies of the 15-
nation Caribbean Communi-
ty (CARICOM) and it is a
significant contributor to the
economies of the US Virgin

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Islands, Puerto Rico, the
French departments of
Guadeloupe and Martinique,
the Dutch Caribbean islands
and the British colonies,
Anguilla and the British Vir-
gin Islands.

While the industry plays
a larger part in the
economies of some
Caribbean countries such as
the Bahamas, Antigua and
Barbuda and the US Virgin
Islands, it is increasingly
making a bigger contribution
to every economy, including
countries such as Guyana
and Dominica where tourism
was not regarded as crucial
to economic growth and
development.

At the same time, the
Caribbean's share of the
global tourist market is
declining. Competition from
other parts of the world is
stiff both in the quality and
cost of service. Even before
the effects of 9/11,
Caribbean’s share of the

world tourist trade was
showing a decline.
In recent years, the

regional tourism industry has
benefited from disasters in
others parts of the world,
such as the Asian Tsunami,
and the declining value of
the US dollar (to which most
Caribbean currencies are
tied) against other major
world currencies such as the
British pound and the euro.

Given the importance of
tourism to regional
economies particularly in
earning foreign exchange
and providing tens of thou-
sands of jobs, tourism has
indeed become vital to
everybody's livelihood in the
Caribbean. No one can
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In the past the CTO and
the CHA were inclined to
rival each other for a domi-
nant role in the promotion
and development of tourism
in the region. The CTO was



they failed to be implement-
ed at national and regional
levels.

CTO particularly suffered
from reliance on government
funding for some of its pro-
jects which, despite the able
capacity of its staff, simply
could not get off the ground.

Recently, the rivalry
between the two organisa-
tions has been set aside, and
they have worked toward a
common purpose — the pro-
motion and advancement of
the Caribbean tourism prod-
uct. Notably, last year they
jointly launched a new logo
— the word “Caribbean” in

.all the vibrant colours with

which the region is associat-
ed. The organisations and
their members include the
logo in all their promotional
and administrative material.

Now, they have

“ Given the importance of
tourism to regional economies
particularly in earning foreign
exchange and providing tens
of thousands of jobs, tourism
has indeed become vital to
everybody’s livelihood in the
Caribbean. No one can afford

to neglect it.”



largely a public sector organ-
isation with its membership
drawn from national tourist
boards, its funding coming
from governments and its
governance from govern-
ment ministers. The CHA is
a private sector body whose
members are primarily hotel
proprietors.

Both organisations suf-
fered not only from their sus-
picion of each other, but
from the fact that while deci-
sions were collectively made,

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announced the creation of
CTDC, a joint venture com-
mercial venture designed to
make profits and to invest in
the joint promotion of the
Caribbean through a num-
ber of new initiatives. The
CTDC should help to
address two problems: the
need for financing, and
machinery to implement the
decisions that are made.
Among the planned ini-
tiatives is the consolidation
of advertising in the regional
and international media;

instead of buying individual-
ly, the CTDC will act as a
purchaser for all its members
giving it bargaining power to
negotiate better prices. The
joint venture company also
plans to create an Internet
web site for merchandising
Caribbean music, arts and
crafts, food, rums and other
liquors in collaboration with
Caribbean firms that pro-
duce these commodities.
From this website, potential
visitors from all over the
world would also be able to
make hotel and other reser-
vations.

Already, a series of
“Caribbean Week” is being
planned for major cities the
world over which will include
not only media focus on the
region but accompanying
events in which industry
players will participate and
the public will be invited.
These are being seen not
only as promotional events,
but also as money earning
ventures.

None of this will be easy.
It will require expert plan-
ning, superb marketing skills,
and experienced manage-
ment. But, it is necessary.

World tourism is highly
competitive and tourists are
now far more discriminating.
The alliance between the
regional private and public
sectors is vital if the
Caribbean is not only to
maintain and increase its
share of global tourism, but
also make tourism in the
region sustainable.

The creation of CTDC
addresses marketing. The
issues of environment, edu-
cation and training, econom-
ic policies to foster opportu-_
nities for greater local own-
ership, and the creation of
firm linkages to regional
agriculture are still crying out
for more vigorous attention.

Responses to: ronald-
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The successful applicant should:

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7



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W HEN officials from
the College of The

Bahamas travelled to the
Republic of South Africa last
month to consummate their lat-
est student exchange agreement

with the University of Johan- —

nesburg, they will have got a
foretaste of an indignity that
will greet family members of
Bahamian students taking part
in the programme: the unrecip-
rocal and totally unjustified visa
requirement for Bahamians
travelling to South Africa as
tourists.

When this columnist travelled
to Cape Town last summer, he
was so confident that the Com-
monwealth status of South
Africa meant (as in the case of
the UK, Canada, Jamaica and
others) that no visa would be
required for a Bahamian, that
he made no pre-departure

effort to inquire into the matter. ©

In the event, only his dual US
citizenship prevented a disas-
ter.

What became more galling
(on returning to Nassau and
enquiring as to whether the
immigration officers in Cape

Town were in fact mistaken)
was learning that the visa
requirement (very real) was not
in fact reciprocated. South
Africans are free to travel to



With so much in
zits favour, it
“cannot have >
escaped the
notice of the _
government of
South Africa that
The Bahamas is
among the most
exciting regional
countries for a
_ prospective

deepening of
bilateral relations
with South
Africa.

RE Se Se]

The Bahamas visa free.

This clearly is an anomaly,
and probably results (as do so
many other aspects of our inter-
national relations) from succes-
sive governments— lack of
interest in such matters and the
resulting lazy lumping of the
Bahamas into a collective
“Caribbean” category by policy-
makers in foreign countries.
This was clearly the case of the
“Schengen” states, which only
now appear to have awoken to
the fact that The Bahamas, Bar-

Re ees

MONDAY,
JANUARY 22ND

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise - Live

11:00 Immediate Response
National Tourism Week

12:00 . ZNS News Update (Live)

12:05 Immediate Response:

National Tourism Week

1:00 Faces of The Island

1:30 Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30. Aqua Kids

3:00 David Pitts

3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis

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4:30 Carmen San Diego

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5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 Gospel Grooves

6:25 Life Line

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7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 You & Your Money

8:30 Be Your Own Boss .

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9:00 Legends: Eunice Deleveaux
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9:30 Island Life Destinations

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

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11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response:
National Tourism Week

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bados, Antigua and St. Kitts are
more likely to attract European
illegal migrants than vice ver-
sa.

|: the case of South Africa,
the consequences of
“slumping” are poignant. As a
small, stable country with no



If every country
were as business-
friendly as the
Chinese, the
requirements
for tourist visas
to common
destinations
would not be
so Onerous.

history of terrorism or related
risks, The Bahamas is surely as
entitled to the usual Common-
wealth privileges that the
Republic of South Africa
undoubtedly extends to large
members, like Britain and Aus-
tralia. Moreover, the per capita
wealth disparity between the
Bahamas and South Africa
makes the prospect of illegal
migration from the former to
the latter laughable.

‘In terms-of bilateral rela-
tions, The Bahamas has, in
addition to its modest part in
hastening the departure of the
monstrous regime that once
disfigured the place, had very
good ones with post-apartheid
South Africa. Bahamians will

recall the Nassau CHOGM of
1984 as the turning point in the
Commonwealth’s posture
toward the apartheid regime,
when Thatcher and her fellow
apologists felt the pressure of
near-global isolation. In recog-
nition, Nelson Mandela made
Nassau one of his first post-
release stops.

More recently, the present
President of South Africa,
Thabo Mbeki, and his Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs have
made fruitful visits to The
Bahamas, where _ they
expressed interest in a tourism



Health |

The Tribune 7%, Gecce. Wy Newspapert
Schengen down, now more to go

PERSPECTIVES

ANDREW ALLEN



model that has attracted,
among others, the massive
investment of a South African-
originated resort developer,
Kerzner International.

With so much in its favour, it
cannot have escaped the notice
of the government of South
Africa that The Bahamas is
among the. most exciting region-
al countries for a prospective
deepening of bilateral relations
with South Africa.

It is time Mr. Mitchell and his
colleagues forcefully made the
case that any such deepening
must begin and end on the basis
of reciprocity for the Bahamian
travelling public.



FOR EASE OF
TRAVEL, CHINA
(STRANGELY) LEADS

n international relations,
as in most things, the Chi-

‘nese are primarily all about

business. How else could an
officially Marxist-Leninist one-
party state have managed to
become both the world’s fastest-
growing economy and the
largest trading partner of the
United States within scarcely a
decade of the “collapse” of
global communism?

So when the Chinese govern-
ment (which requires visas for

tourists from all countries) says
that visas must be obtained in
the applicant’s home country
prior to travel, one can be for-
given for suspecting the exis-
tence of “leeway” at a price.

In fact, the processing of visas
for travel to the mainland has
become such a business in Hong
Kong and Macau that most
large hotels have their own visa
desk. All the applicant has to
do is walk across the street (or,
in this columnist’s case, upstairs
in the adjoining mall) and have
a photo taken. For a reasonable
fee, staff from the “visa desk”
will even go and retrieve the
photos, send off the request to
the mainland and have the visa
ready for travel by 7 o’clock the
next morning.

f every country were as:

business-friendly as the

Chinese, the requirements for
tourist visas to common destina-
tions would not be so onerous.

* But, as the case of the Schengen

states demonstrates, the practice
of obtaining a visa is often bizarre
and even humiliating.

Since the closure of the last
Schengen consulate, the process
has become frankly prohibitive.
The interminable wait (for the
package to go to Jamaica and
back) means saying goodbye to
the prospect of a last minute
cancellation (cheap) ticket, as
are now sold by most online
companies.

Faced with this, this colum-

- nist’s secretary decided on a dif-

ferent route last year. She went
to London hoping to get a visa
to France from there, only to
be told that Schengen visas
must be issued back at home,
like Chinese ones (but of course
without the “leeway”).







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THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007





AN INDEPENDENT CANADIAN CO-EDUCATIONAL eee SCHOOL FOR GRADES 7-12 Or der O f chivalry hol ds
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THE Lieutenant Grand Master’s representative, Grand Prior Tan Roger on Saturday at the
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Knights Hospitaller, the OSJ Priory of the Eastern USA (Malta).

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

Please join us for a presentation
about one of Canada’s most established
independent Boarding Schools,
hosted by Peter Sturrup, Headmaster.



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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

embre Atlantis I in Grand Bahama
~ by gunmen _ A PIECE of history has



wim



In 1979 Atlantis II underwent
a major mid-life refit. The con-






} arrived on the shores ol
: Grand Bahatua. Atlantis 11 version of the vessel’s power
\ A RESIDENT of West Bay =: the same vessel famous for source from steam to diesel
| Street was robbed by three = assisting with artifact reduced the vessel’s operating
| masked gunmen while return- : — reteieval and deep-sea imag- cost, increased its range of trav-
ing home Thursday morning. > ing of the Titanic in 1986, el, and increased its selection
According to reports, when =: arrived in Grand Bahama in of ports. In 1983 a deck hanger
, . the 37-year-old man arrived at: Jate 2006, and ts now under and A-frame were installed
e’» his home around 10 am on : © going restoration enabling her to handle the
Thursday he was accosted by : After being saved froma launch and recovery of the sub-
, three masked men. One was_; - shipyard in Louisiana and mersible oceanographic vehi-
Ny a feportedly armed witha hand- : — surviving Hurricane Katri- cle, Alvin. Atlantis IJ served as
is a The man was robbed of : na, the ship and its new crew Alvin’s tender from 1984 to
\ is watch and cash before the : endured the five-day trip 1996. :
rhe culprits fled the scene on foot. : across the Gulf of Mexico A notable point of interest is
or wo men are being questioned. : to The Bahamas, which will that Atlantis II was one of the

first research vessels to take
women scientists to sea, as well
as the first to employ women
officers and crew. It also set the
Institution’s record for number
of days at sea with one particu-

? become its new home.
: Atlantis [1 was named for
a ‘Police find : the Woods Hole Oceanv-
: graphic Institution's
ne “rassa u it rifle i (WHOM) first research ves

Sas





ne “ i sel, Atlantis, a l42-foot
ioe *« POLICE investigations con- : steel-hulled sailing vessel lar voyage of 575 days and
6 efafinue into the discovery of a : depicted in the Institution s oe 73,907 miles covered. _
es thigh powered assault rifle on : logo which sailed from 1931 High sea breaks eaiinat the port side of the research vessel Atlantis II as a breeches buoy i is rigged Decommissioned in 1996
sae Phursday. i to 1964. NASA named ther —_- up with destroyer Hazelwood for the transfer of sonar equipment to seek the grave of missing after a remarkable 33 year
es According to police reports, : space shuttle Atlantis after submarine Thresher. Hazelwood brought precision depth recording equipment to enable Atlantis career, she sat quietly for a
z “Drug Enforcement officers act- i thissame ship Ihe Atlantis Ul to make close survey of the bottom, 8,000 feet deep, about 270 miles east of Boston. ‘ number of years changing hands
ing on a tip travelled to the : II was built for the WHOI (AP Photo/Str) several times without realising
Lyon Road.area around2 pm : at the Maryland Shipbuild ; : Ae: any significant new purpose.
* wand saw three men who were: ingand Drydock Company beam of 44 feet and a draft of ocean science exploration. No The Atlantis IT visited 112 ports That has changed.
‘Sacting in a suspicious manner. : in Baltimore, MD, under a t7 feet. It cruised at 12 knots, other research vessel has cov- in 78 nations and hosted thou- Just why is the Atlantis IT
i. On seeing the officers the men :; $5 million grant from and could stay at sea for 45 ered as much of the ocean as__ sands of visitors from many here? The reason will unfold in
} reportedly ran. : ~~ National Science Founda days. It could accommodate 25 Atlantis II. It has sailed more _ nations, including-notables such the weeks to come, so stay
ye The police searched the area ? tion, was considered the scientists and had acrew of sim- than 1 million miles (1,006,912) as Vice President Hubert tuned.
“sand found a M-16 hidden under: flagship of their fleet and — tar number. on 458 cruises and spent 8,115 | Humphrey in 1967, Japan’s for- A video tour of the Atlantis
r ops of metal and wrapped in : was their first vessel to get The ship travelled around the — days at sea in every ocean of mer Crown Prince and now _ I will be posted on www.The-
towel. No arrests were made : the RV designation The world many times and was _ the world, a record unequalled | Emperor Akihito in 1987, and = BahamasWeekly.com in late
ind investigations continue. i ship is 210 feet long with a involved with every type of by any other research vessel. the explorer Jacques Cousteau. — January.







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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

FROM page one

by his loose lips.

“Take your evidence and
go to. the police otherwise
shut up and be quiet, because
you have no evidence,” Mr
Mitchell said.

In his speech at the rally,
the FNM’s former attorney
general Mr Bethel claimed
that the number
issued to Haitian and Chinese
nationals had increased hun
dred-fold during Ministe)
Mitchell’s tenure. —

He also alleged that the
number of visas issued

jumped from just over 200

per year in the last year ol
the FNM government, to
more than 2,000 per year ovei
the first three years of the
PLP government.

“Whenever you see any
fresh illegal immigrants, any
fresh, meaning ‘new’, faces
you should remember to
thank Fred Mitchell.

“This is serious business,
because it is acknowledged
that once.someone comes
into the Bahamas, legally,
with an entry visa, there were
no checks to make sure that
these persons ever lett the
Bahamas. So when you see
new faces going to work 14
the morning, you can thaii
Fred Mitchell,” Mr Bethel
said.

Speaking to the press in
Fox Hill yesterday afternoon,
Minister Mitchell said that he
took great exception to those
remarks.

“Mr Bethel has no evi-
dence to show that this min-
ister has ever issued any visa
in his life and I defy anyone
to show that I have person-



sp chan Seger ae

MP eAL & AN aN ‘



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of visas.

| THROW ee

SHOWER C URTAINS
eA Rey ACCESSORIES



i VIINIS' TER of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell

ally issued any visa or
instructed anyone to issue
anv visa to anybody
‘the procedures that are
iy) place with regard to the
issudnice Of visas have been
in place since his government
left office, the same checks
and balances which existed
then, exist now and there has
been no political interference
whatsoever in the issuance of
visas in the Ministry of For-
eu Affairs,” Mr Mitchell



Vie Foreign Affairs Minis-
icy and MP for Fox Hill also
took offence at the comment
by Mr Bethel that the PLP is
a “jive-talking, visa selling,
scandal-plagued, covering-up
and untrustworthy” party.
“{ believe that someone
who is an attorney, who is a
former Attorney General
really ought to be more

responsible than that.”
\ir Mitchell said that these



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THE TRIBUNE





Bi FNM Senator
Carl Bethel

statements by Mr Bethel are
“serious, serious allegations,”
and that the FNM senator
should immediately go to the
police with his proof.

The minister further said
that the statement by Mr
Bethel that the PLP govern-
ment has not followed up on
a promised police investiga:
tion into the visa scam clainis
is completely incorrect. “

Mr Mitchell said he has
repeatedly said that the
police investigation is ongo-

ing, but that it is of such-a

“sensitive and undercover
nature” that it would be
improper for him to speak
about it publicly.

The Fox Hill MP said he
spoke to the police on Satur-
day and that up until that
point Mr Bethel had still not.
contacted the police to be
interviewed and give his evi-
dence on the alleged visa,
scam. :

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“THE TRIBUNE



Threat to

pre-clearance
FROM page one

in an exclusive interview
with The Tribune only a few
weeks ago, Dr Brent Hardt,
deputy chief of mission at the
US Ernbassy, noted that the
same security breeches they
witnessed with the five han-
dlers from NFS were still
uncorrected weeks later.

Dr Hardt emphasized the
importance of airport securi-
ty, echoing the sentiments of
US Ambassador John Rood,
who has outlined similar con-
cerns on numerous occasions
before. '

, A.ccess issues at the airport
have been a problem for the
Embassy for quite some time.
‘Their concern was highlight-
ed by the recent arrests of five
baggage handlers from NFS
who were arrested and
accused of putting narcotics
onboard local and interna-
tional flights.
| The five, along with others,
had been under surveillance
by both local and US author-
hi s for over a year, and are
yow before a Miami court.

US citizen ‘hangs
‘himself’ in cell
2 “FROM page one

Wednesday, January 17, 2007,
and escorted back to Abaco
where he was charged by

police on Thursday, January

18, and taken to court the
next day.

However, on Saturday :

evening, around 6.07pm, Sapp *

was found. hanging from his
cell window in Marsh Har-
bour by an officer who was
about to take him to New
Providence.

“The local clinic’s doctor,
who had been rushed to the
police station, declared Sapp
déad at the scene. His death is
currently being classified as a
Suicide.

“However, officers of the
Central Detective Unit
(CDU) from Grand Bahama
are presently in Abaco to
investigate the matter.

yh

=



Ri.

sepacedsegses.



FROM page one

enne, who was taking special cours-
es at St John’s University, Min-
nesota, was spending a university
vacation with the priest whom he
had met in Nassau as the guest of
Fr Chrysostom Schreiner. Fr
Chrysostom, founder of the
Catholic mission in the Bahamas,
was Sir Etienne’s mentor.

On June 15, 1928, at the end of
the college year at St John’s, they
were married at St Anselm’s parish
church in the Bronx, New York. In
the meantime parliament had been
dissolved in Nassau and Sir Eti-
enne, a member for Inagua, had
to rush to Inagua to fight an elec-
tion. Two days after their wedding
the couple boarded a Dutch ship
sailing for Inagua. The trip was
their honeymoon that ended in an
election campaign at Inagua.

Her life was dedicated to her
family, particularly to her husband,
and his vision for The Tribune and
the people of the Bahamas.

After her children were estab-
lished she did voluntary work for
the Sandilands Hospitals Welfare
Committee, chaired by Lady Freda

LOCAL NEWS

Lady Dupuch dies
at the age of 100

Roberts. Lady Dupuch was the

committee’s secretary/treasurer. .

She is survived by six children
— Mrs Eileen Carron, publisher
of The Tribune, Mr Etienne
Dupuch, Jr, publisher of Dupuch
Publications, Mr Bernard Dupuch
and St Margaret’s MP Pierre
Dupuch, proprietors of Executive
Printers, all of Nassau; Mrs Joan
Munnings of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, and Mrs Bette Hull of
Guelph, Ontario; two sisters, Mrs
Bette Zollner of Sacramento,
Calif., and Mrs Ruth Virzi of
Cincinnati, Ohio, and one brother,
Henry Plouse of Sullivan, Indiana;
two sons-in-law, Mr Roger Car-
ron and Mr Ralph Munnings; and
two daughters-in-law, Mrs Susan
Dupuch and Mrs Maryann
Dupuch; 14 grandchildren, Etienne
and Jeanne Dupuch, Anthony
Dupuch, Robert Carron, Ollie Fer-
guson and Ricardo Munnings, Mrs
Valerie Shipp, Dr James Hull, Mrs
Lisa Todd, Dr Leon Dupuch, Mrs
Michelle Parker, Mrs Brigette
Knudsen, Mrs Danielle Houston,
and Ms Marie Jeanne Dupuch; 19
great grandchildren and many
nieces and nephews, and sister-in-

Gunshots fired at police at
scene of suspected shootout

FROM page one

rid New Providence streets of guns.
“We take reports of shooting very seriously and we expect dan-

ger when we go into those battlefields,”

Mr Evans said.

During this weekend, he said, there were two further incidents of

criminal activity involving illegal firearms.

“At 4am on Saturday a 25-year-old man sustained serious injuries
when he was shot at while driving in the area of Parkgate and

Kemp Road.

According to reports, the man had stopped his Kia vehicle at a
red traffic light when a man ran towards the car firing shots from a

handgun.

The 25-year-old man sustained gun shot wounds to his chest
and his left arm, but was still able to drive himself. to Princess

Margaret Hospital.

Up until press time he was listed in “serious condition.”
Police on the weekend also arrested a man carrying an illegal

firearm.

Acting on a tip, officers searched the Nissan Sentra vehicle of a
Wulff Road man on Saturday shortly after 7pm.

Police stopped the man in the area of Shirley Street and Kemp
Road and found in his vehicle a .45 hand gun and six live rounds of

ammunition.



By Order of the Joint Receivers.

Messrs. D.H. Gilbert & S.J. Micheals of BDO Stoy Hayward
Re. SIS Ltd. Oriental Carpet Intermediaries (in liquidation)

PUBLIC AUCTION

Authentic Handmade High Retail & Connoisseur Calibre

PERSIAN & EASTERN CARPETS

including extra-large oversizes

in all sizes,

Urgent Liquidation of Extremely Valuable Assets of SIS Ltd
Global Intermediaries active in Bahamas since 1972

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ongoing Bahamas footprint established 1972

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% placed in administration 2/06

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Bis So

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All goods ‘Sistonie’ Cleared to be sold piece- by-piece without encumbrance

many without reserve

TOMORROW JANUARY 28TH
AUCTION 5.00 PM - VIEW 4.00 PM

Transferred for convenience of auction from
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DUT mes Csi a Kirk Ss. CE

Bry Ol) Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-4535 Fax: (242) 328-2941



a—

law, Mrs Dorothea Dupuch.

She was predeceased by her
husband, Sir Etienne, her grand-
son, Graham Dupuch, daughter-
in-law, Mrs-Sylvia Dupuch, and
son-in-law, Mr James Hull.

Funeral services will be held at
Sacred Heart Church, Shirley
Street, at [lam Saturday. Mon-
signor Preston Moss will officiate.
Interment will follow in the family

_ plot in St Matthew’s cemetery.

Instead of flowers those who
wish can consider a donation to
the Santa Claus Christmas Com-
mittee at the Royal Bank of Cana-
da. This was a programme started
by Sir Etienne Dupuch to provide
toys for underprivileged children at
Christmas time.

. en eels Ce

es 600) 5
INCLUDESTHREE
WO] EA yay dee
ye Oy.) | ee
‘SHOWROOM |
eo oT

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 13



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curity Assoc!

gion

PROFESSIONAL
SECURITY ASSOCIATI

meecs with M
Of National Security

imester

Bottom Left: Mr Arlington Cox, Vice-President of the Professional Security Association of The
Bahamas (PSAB); Mrs Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prine Minister and Minister of National Security; Mr
Byron C. Rodgers, Founder and Presiden tof the PSAB; Mr Peter D. Isaacs, UnderSecretary of The
Ministr ‘y of National Security.

Standing Left: Directors of the PSAB, Mr Leo P. Thurston, Mr De nzil Rodgers, Mr lan M. Jupp and

N\ Will A)
yy | +h) a) 5
He with the Police

tO We

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«Statutory Protection and is allowed to Self-

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Regulate its own activities, the results of our “partnership” Would reali’
benefits for both con

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i



























THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 15



os : LOCAL AND CARIBBEAN NEWS ! :



lM THE Circus Team (left to right): Marco Pierre, Chucho Ayala, Leo Munnings, Billy I Havik,

Angel St Jacques, Thomas Bates and Dyesun Storr.

Circus ative: inh een

ay

Ag



Kibe
ea

Gea

FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM

Gr and Ba ama : . ae ae TAP RY pe Wito bea |

“LADIES and Gentlemen,
boys and girls, the Havik Cir-
cus has come to The. Bahamas
and it is here to stay!” Flying
trapeze, double trapeze,
comedic acts, live horses and
stunts, and the beautiful aerial
hoop all add up to an exhilarat-
ing world-class show not to: be
missed when visiting Grand
Bahama.

Billy Havik has travelled the
world from Australia to the US
performing and teaching circus,
and is now bringing together
amazing talent from around the
world.

These skilled performers
now include three local stars—
Thomas Bates, Dyesun Storr,

Marco Pierre. They make up
the core of the flying trapeze
team. Chucho Ayala, from
Mexico, is also part of the flying
team specializing in single
trapeze and flying while blind-
folded. Angel St Jacques from
Canada specialises in aerial
hoop and double trapeze as well
as flying.

Billy Havik is trained in
twelve circus disciplines and is
constantly ‘trying to find new
talent while always inventing
new acts.

Another local talent, Leo
Munnings, rides. her trick
ponies, Lightning and Sunshine,
into the show and performs with
them. Before the show rides for

children are available as part of
the entrance fee. ,

Friends of Billy’s will be drop- ... ;
ping in to be guest performers.
while they are on vacation from
their other circus groups, :Li_
Pawson, and Anthony Delany
from Cirque du Soleil, and Cir-. >





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Venezuela’s Chavez tells US
to ‘go to hell’ in broadcast

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
told US officials to “Go to
hell!” on his weekly radio and
TV show Sunday for what he
called unacceptable meddling
after Washington raised con-

cerns about a measure to grant:
Venezuela’s fiery leftist leader

broad. lawmaking powers,
according to Associated Press.

The National Assembly,.

which is controlled by the pres-
ident’s political allies, is expect-
ed tq give final approval this
week to what it calls the
“enabling law,” which would
give Chavez the authority to
pass a series of laws by decree
during an 18-month period.

On Friday, US State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Tom
Casey said Chavez’s plans
under the law “have caused us
some concern.’

Chavez rejected Casey’s state-
ment in his broadcast, saying:
“Go to hell, gringos! Go home!”

Chavez, who was re-elected by
a wide margin last month, has said
he will enact sweeping reforms to
remake Venezuela into a socialist
state. Among his plans are nation-
alising the main telecommunica-
tions company and the electricity
and natural gas sectors.

The president’s opponents
accuse him of using his political
strength to expand his powers.

Relations between Caracas
and Washington have been
tense since Chavez was briefly
ousted in a 2002 coup that he
claimed the US played a role in.



Since then, Chavez has con-
sistently accused the US of con-
spiring to oust him and often
asserts the CIA is working to
destabilise his government. US
officials have denied trying to
overthrow Chavez, but'they
have Jabelled him a threat, to
democracy. 3 ‘

Criticising excessiv
sumption and self-indulgence,
Chavez also announced plans
in his broadcast to raise domes-
tic gasoline prices and approve
a new tax on luxury goods such
as private yachts, second homes
and extravagant automobiles.

He did not give details on the
gas price. ‘hike, which he said
would not affect bus drivers
who provide public transporta-
tion, or the luxury ‘tax.’ He said
revenue from the new measures
would be put toward. govern-
ment social programmes.



Venezuéla‘is one of the.

world’s leading» ‘petroleum
exporters and gasoline now
costs as little as 12 cents a gallon
due to government subsidies. :

In typical style, Chavez spoke
for hours Sunday during his first
appearance on the weekly pro-
gramme in five months. He sent
his best wishes to the ailing
Cuban leader Fidel Castro, his
close ally and friend who has
been sidelined since intestinal
surgery last summer.

Chavez also remarked on the
hanging of former Iraqi Presi-
dent Saddam Hussein: “They
took out Saddam Hussein and
they hanged him, for good or

worse. It’s not up to me tojudge_.
any government, but that gen- |

ine ry mye Top f el ee a

tleman was the president of that

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007 : THE TRIBUNE

- Vatican pursuing diplomatic ties with Beijing,
as pope prepares message for Chinese flock _

@ VATICAN CITY




difficulties," the Vatican said. » allowed to worship only with



THE Vatican has pledged
to pursue dialogue with the
Chinese communist govern-
ment aimed at establishing
diplomatic ties, while Pope
Benedict XVI is preparing a
message for his suffering
flock in China, where
Catholics have sometimes
been jailed or arrested for
their loyalty to the pontiff,
according to Associated Press.
A twofold — strategy

_emerged from two days of
high-level debate on China at
the Vatican: continue to
champion religious freedom
in China while pursuing nor-
malization with Beijing.

Benedict, who called but
did not attend the meeting on
Saturday, received a detailed
briefing on proposals made
during what the Vatican
described as frank debate.

Participants included Sec-
retary of State Cardinal Tar-
cisio Bertone, who is the
pope's top aide, and leading
prelates from China, among
them Hong Kong Cardinal
Joseph Zen, who is an out-
spoken adyocate for freedom
of worship.

Following the talks, Bene-
dict "benevolently has decid-
ed to write a letter to
Catholics in China," the Vat-
ican said in a statement, with-
out indicating when the let-
ter might be issued.

Asia News, a Vatican-affil-
iated news agency, said that it
was likely Benedict would
"directly" take up specific
questions as how to deal with
illicit ordinations in the state-
sanctioned Catholic church,
which does not accept papal
authority.

Emerging from the discus-
sions "was the will to contin-

-uwe on the journey of a

respectful and constructive
dialogue with the governing
authorities, to overcome past






"In addition, the hope was
expressed that a normaliza-
tion of relations on various
levels, with the aim of allow-
ing the peaceful and fruitful
life of the faith of the Church
and of working together for
the good of the Chinese peo-
ple and peace in the world,
would be achieved," it said.

Vatican officials said that
"on various levels" included
diplomatic relations.

The Vatican has long indi-
cated that it wants to establish
diplomatic relations with Bei-
jing, even at the cost of moy-
ing its embassy from Taiwan,
but will not compromise on
the tradition dictating that
only the pope — and not a
local church —-can appoint
bishops.

Denounced

The Vatican has vigorously
denounced Beijing's insis-
tence on ordaining bishops
without papal approval. Last
month, Benedict expressed
"oreat sorrow" over the latest
such ordination, the third
known case in 2006.

Zen has accused Beijing of
reneging on a promise to stap
the practice. China yiews
papal appointments as inter-
ference in its internal affairs.

The last months have also
seen a series of arrests of
priests, according to Asia
News. At least 17 under-
ground bishops have disap-
peared, been arrested or
detained in isolation, and 20
priests have been arrested,
with at least five priests,
arrested on Dec. 27 in Hebei,
still in prison, the news
agency said.

Beijing severed ties with
the Holy See in 1951 after
communists took power and
set up a separate Catholic
church outside the pope's
authority. Local faithful are

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the state-sanctioned church,
the Chinese Patriotic Catholic
Association.

Bishops, clergy and rank-
and-file Catholics in the
underground church in China
loyal to the pope have suf-
fered harassment and perse-
cution, including jailing, and
participants in the Vatican
talks paid tribute to this
"price of great suffering."

"With special joy, it was
noted that today, almost all
the bishops and priests (in
China) are in communion"
with the pope, the Vatican
statement said.

The Vatican said that the
Church community in China
was growing.

Benedict has been champi-
oning religious freedom
around the world. He has also
made improved international
relations with the Holy See a
priority of his papacy, and in

articular with China, leavy-
ing him and his diplomats to
chart a delicate course that
could make progress toward
both goals.

Among the prelates partic-
ipating in the Vatican strate-
gy session on China were
bishops from Taiwan and
Macau, a former Portuguese
enclave.

B POPE Benedict XVI
deliyers his blessing during a
weekly general audience in
the Pope Paul VI hall at the
Vatican, in this Jan. 17,
2007, file photo, Pope Bene-
dict XVI will write a letter
to Catholies in China, and
the Church will work
toward diplomatic ties with
Beijing as it tries to help its
suffering faithful there, the
Holy See said Saturday, Jan.
20, 2007.

(AP Photo/

Plinio Lepri, file)

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THE TRIBUNE




Serbs vote in key
election that will
determine Balkan
republic’s future

li BELGRADE, Serbia

SERBS voted Sunday in
parliamentary elections that
could determine whether the
troubled Balkan nation will
continue with pro-Western
reform or return to its nation-
alist past, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The vote is the first since
Serbia became independent
last year with the end to its
union with Montenegro, its last
partner from the former
Yugoslav federation. Soon
after the vote, a U.N. plan for
the future of Serbia’s break-
away Kosovo province is
expected to be proposed.

More than 6.6 million voters
were choosing among 20 polit-
ical parties, ranging from ultra-
nationalists and conservatives
to pro-Western reformists and
liberals. Parties needed to get
a minimum 5 percent of the
total vote to earn a place in
the 250-member parliament.

About 30 percent of regis-
tered voters had cast ballots
by early afternoon, Serbia’s
Election Commission said,
indicating a strong interest
among the electorate. |

Challenges facing the next
parliament and government
include Western demands for
the arrest of war crimes fugi-
tive Ratko Mladic and the dis-
pute over Kosovo, where a
predominantly ethnic Alban-
ian population seeks indepen-
dence over the strong opposi-
tion of most Serbs.

Another priority will be
improving the economy.
Through reforms since 2000
have helped Serbia recover,
and post 5.9 percent economic
growth in 2005, unemployment
is still around 31 percent and
the average monthly wage is
about $325. .

Opinion polls indicated the
vote would be a close race
between the nationalist Ser-

bian Radical Party, loyal to ©
late ex-leader Slobodan Milo-

sevic, and the Western-backed
Democratic Party of President
Boris Tadic.

But neither of the two
groups was expected to win an
outright majority, forcing them
to partner with smaller parties

to form a governing coalition. }











Health Fair on Saturday, a a 10
the outdoor aerobics program beginnig

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 19



Britain’s Prince Charles —
cancels annual ski holiday
in carbon emissions row

B LONDON

PRINCE Charles has
canceled a traditional 'ski-
ing holiday in a bid to
reduce his carbon foot-
print, his office said Satur-
day - a day after cam-
paigners and a government
minister criticized his deci-
sion to fly to New York to
collect an award for work
on environmental issues,
according to Associated
Press.

Environment Secretary
David Miliband expressed
reservations Friday about
the heir to the British
throne traveling to the
United States for the cere-
mony, while advocacy
groups urged the prince to
use a video link instead.

Flights

Prince Charles' Clarence
House office said the
prince had decided last
year to cancel a regular ski-
ing holiday to Switzerland
as part of an effort to
reduce the number of
flights he takes.

Details of the prince's
carbon footprint — the mea-
sure of green house gases
created by his activities —
are scheduled to be pub-
lished along: with his annu-
al office accounts later this
year. The document will set
out targets for the reduc-
tion of carbon emissions by
his office and household.

Plane Stupid, a climate
change group, and Britain's

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@ PRINCE CHARLES
(AP FILE Photo)

Green Party complained
Friday that Prince Charles
would be accompanied to
the U.S. by an entourage
of around 20 people,
increasing the cost in car-
bon emission terms of the
trip.

During the two-day trip
from Jan. 27, Prince
Charles and wife Camilla
will visit youth develop-
ment, urban regeneration
and environmental conser-
vation projects, the British
Council in New York said
Friday.

In Philadelphia on Jan. |

27, they will learn about
the city's Mural Arts Pro-
gram, the country's largest
public art program and one
that relies a great deal on
youth talent, the consulate
said. They will visit with
students who are studying
or have studied overseas.
The couple will ride a
private train that uses an

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@ TONY BLAIR
(AP FILE Photo)

electric locomotive from
Philadelphia to New York,
where the prince is to col-
lect a Global Environmen-
tal Citizen Award from the
Center for Health and
Global Environment at
Harvard Medical School.

Visit

Following their marriage
in April 2005, the couple
made their first joint visit
to the U.S. in November
2005, when they paid
homage in New York to
the victims of the Sept. 11
attacks and stopped in New
Orleans, which was still
reeling from Hurricane
Katrina.

Earlier this month,
British Prime Minister
Tony Blair mounted a
defense of his own envi-
ronmental credentials after
he claimed lawmakers

Creative Christian Arts



would never ask the pub-
lic to cut down on air trav-
el.

Blair said he planned to
offset carbon emissions
from personal air travel by
donating money to envi-
ronmental projects after
saying in an interview the
onus should be on business











3rd Ch urch

Friday Ja nuary 26th, 2007

Pastor Henry Higgins
& Co Pastor Dr. Ann Higgins

Ministries International

7:30PM

Celebration

iversary Workship Celebration



‘Trevor Williamson
Trinity Full Gospel
Baptist Church

to develop cleaner fuels,
rather than on travelers.
"I personally think these
things are a bit impracti-
cal, actually to expect peo-
ple to do that (take less
flights)," Blair told
Britain's Sky News. "It's
like telling people you
shouldn't drive anywhere."

oo




















Pastor




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SSSR RON ANAL TREAT aR NTO ARNON





THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 22, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

COMICS PAGE |



Dennis











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they seem to be similar to others
encountered previously. This ten-
dency can prove costly at times, as
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this deal.
West led the jack of clubs against
South’s four-spade contract. Declarer
won with the queen, crossed to
dummy with a trump and led a heart

WE NEED To SEE IF ITS
TRUE THAT A DUCKS QUACIC
DOESN'T ECHO



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21st
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once only. Each must. contain the
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No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET i
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26 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

(02007 by King Feetures Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.





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to the jack, losing to the queen.

West made the fine return of a
second trump, which declarer took in
dummy to lead another heart. When
the king lost to the ace, West returned
a third round of trumps. ;

Declarer was now at the end of his
rope. He could not avoid losing a
diamond and another heart, and so
finished down one.

The odd part of the hand is that if
declarer had been dealt three small
hearts instead of the K-J-5, he would
surely have made the contract! In
that case, given the same opening
lead, he would have arranged to muff
one of his heart losers in dummy.

After winning the club, he would
have retumed a heart. Then, regard-
less of what the defenders did next,
he would play another heart, putting
him in position to trump his third
heart in dummy. :

But the presence of the K-J-5 of
hearts induced declarer to cross to
dummy with a trump in order to lead
toward his heart honors. This in turn
opened the gate for repeated tramp
leads by the defense and eventually
brought about South’s downfall,

To avoid this pitfall, declarer
should have led any heart from his
hand at trick two, and 10 tricks
would have been assured.

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JANUARY 22 |
ARIES — March 21/April:20
Conceit can get you into trouble, Aries,
but you seem to ignore all warnings
this week. A co-worker gets defensive

as a result. Money matters seem bleak
— reconcile bank accounts, j
TAURUS - April 21/May'21 |’.
A great opportunity arises on
Tuesday, but you may be too busy -
to see it coming. It’s best if you take
the day off to make the most of this .
one-time deal. Libra is key. '
GEMINI- May 22/June 21

You haven’t been feeling your best,
Gemini, and this week probably will.
be no better. Relax, lay low for.a.
while and try to recuperate. A special
friend drops by for a visit. ‘
CANCER -— June 22/July 22

It seems you’ve gotten youfself ,
into another work bind. You' just:
can’t seem to find a place to work
that interests you, Cancer. Keep .
looking; don’t settle for just any- -—
thing. Aquarius helps out. '

LEO - July 23/August 23:
Have you been feeling lonely, Leo? It
might be time to invite over some
friends to help beat the pre-winter
blues. Thursday seems a good day for

a late dinner. Romance could follow!
VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22; -
Too many road trips have ‘put wear
on your car, Virgo. You just made. -
the investment, so take it easy. for: |
a while. Tuesday is a good day. for
relaxation — something you need...

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 '
You've decided to jump in and—
finally get that.pesky task done
that’s been haunting you. Good for
you! Wednesday is an uneventful
day, so sleep in and enjoy it.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

A better mood keeps you lively this. - |
week, Scorpio. When you’re on a
roll no one can match your work
effort, so make sure the boss sees all

of your hard work. . :
SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21 .

It seems you’ve been pondering -"
starting a new business. Remember,
being self-employed has its benefits
but also several downfalls — con-
sider them carefully. Capricorn: is
the one to watch out for this week. . -
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

A trip to the doctor has you mending some

of your wild ways, Capricom. Now is not
the time for fun and games, but concentra-
tion on setting a course for your future: ¢ -°
Expect Friday to be very exciting. .~

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 ‘

4 Merely a letter to make a No plans for your birthday,

suggestion (6) vegans? (6) Aquarius? Why not think creatively

7 Noemply point in meking an 2 Cover for a dagger? (5) and coordinate a hiking trip with

Ba 3 Short fuses have their friends. The countryside looks beauti-
Test (4,4) - advantages (4) ful snow-covered. Virgo willhelp. * . >

8 Aproperleisure centre — for : anor ene: 7 PISCES — Feb 19/March 20.’

: uatters? (6) a variety of gums ee 7 sc

ee ; 6 — There's plenty | have on, eis eto eT Eda era arene you eaer isbes?
_20 US president writing to a git (5) , PAYS anna ne good luck to come your way, Pisces?
ig cadena soathing (6) A Well, this week it just may arrive in
Legal (4) 9 — Tostart a fire could be quite a bit fried potatoes the form of an overdue check. Spend
14 Such as getting £1 fora disquieting (6) the money wisely, but have fun. '
piace of cake (4) 11 Played up again (3) :
4 : 12 Somet use the Paris:

15. Putyourname down to sing? (4) Reine CHESS by Leonard Barden

26 The soap man, familiarly (3) 13 Woinen with wrong-headed , ; ’

17 Asound from the middie bottom? (4) desires? (7) ‘

19 The one to the fore (In Russia?) (4) 15 Achildish issue? (3) Ivan Cheparinov v lan Rogers,

21 Wise: WaibeiGe a ona tal 16 He or she will come nex! month — Essent, Netherlands 2006,

: shortly, anyway (3) Australia’s number one 8284
could get a weighty education (9) 18 Cont iat for keeping coal in grandmaster Rogers is one of
23 Loco, perhaps, but calm and curiously? (3,3) the most popular players onthe pear 4
collected (4) 20. Ghanaian river with electrical ce oneal ee i a
tential (5) ? neko e affable ex-teacher travels “ ay ;

24 He, self-centred, is a rotter (4) 5 8 Feo ncial DOWN with wife Cathy, who has made

26 No shortage of clothing (3) oot for the big piles (3) 4 — Previously (6) 1 Worries (5) her own speciality of action and =; be | |

ae hoa TN wa 22 _Inllittle England, it's even less (3) 7 Recur (8) 2 Material (5) offboard photos of the top GMs. :

re, in Normandy, cave men 23 = Wolfishly, can it snarl yet coo, ‘0 Cen (6) 3 Church recess (4) Rogers Is rarely outplayed, but it , | ae
heart? (4) possibly? (6) a3 43. Female horse (4) 4 Wide (5) happened in today’s position 3] | yy] a
29 “Doubles”, reasonably enough, 25 That over there in Tokyo, ea | 14 Rational (4) 5 Destiny (4) against the young Bulgarian ; i 2
rhymes with “booze” (4) normally? (3) 'N 15 Assistant (4) 6 Gully (6) champion. Cheparinov’s d7 .
‘32 Possibly eald to be a Welehman' 28 One place you can't walk away from, 5 16 Finish (3) 9 Moron (6) pawn in the heart of the black 1 a a
y sald tobe a 5 asin church (5) a. 17 Agents (4) 11 Uncooked (3) position is potentially a winning boc d'e.f g -
platform (4) 30 Team to succeed with only about half > 19 Sentimental (4) 12 Brimless cap (5) trump, so Rogers has attacked it
33 Acolourful emulsion, say (5) a gate? (5) 2 . on fi 13 Errand (7) with queen, rook and knight. 4 ‘
—_ 15 Mimic (3 : forced a rapi ,

34 Thytiesaniman@) BF Soran Ui | 24 Gamapanees) Pieter an tcl semis wich forced

35 Like all my readers (8) 55: Orion pete bil oT Neto «) 18 Delighted (6) Black to resign. What :

36 Focal pont of recent change (6) this sure is fun (4 29. Snare (4) ee happened? en

32 College head (4) (3)
33. Stop (5) 22 Hill (3)

CEL: ED OT fe Wr ia eae By Z 34 Works dough (6) c Ce (6) ;
Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions ee os Hurry (5) srems) Chess solution 8284: 1 Bc5! (threat 2Bdé winning
ACROSS: 1, W6alth 7, On the way 8, Fill 10, Sea-Ted 11, | ACROSS: 1, Ascend 7, Imperial 8, Disc 10, Creche 11, 36 Position (6) 30 Scape (6) more material) Nxd7 2 Qxf7+1 Kaf7 3 Rxd7+ Qxd7 4
I'm-pede 14, Red 16, Pores 17, Leer 19, Fired 21, Sted Rating 14, Ate 16, Tacos 17, Errs 19, Later 21, Fetid 22, 31 Coin (5) Nxd7 Rd8 5 Rdl and Black conceded. White wins ;

22, Het up 23, Deep 26, Sewer 28, G-‘un 29, Prompt 30, | Begin 23, Crew 26, Besom 28, Too 29, Anyway 30, 32 Daybreak (4) easily a bishop ahead.
Futile 31, A-Vi-d. 32, Re-sent-ed 33, E-aster Remote 31, Unit 32, Glowered 33, Ensure 33° Rope (4) Mensa quiz: Three. In each column the first number







DOWN: 1, We-asel 2, Loiter 3, H-old 4, Thumped 5, Owner
6, Tyres 8, Fare 9, Led 12, P-od 13, Danae 15, Vitus 18,
Eider 19, Fit 20, Rep. 21, Serpent 22, He-m 23,

Du-ti-es 24, Enid 25, Peeler 26, Sport 27, Worse 28, Guv
30, Fade

DOWN: 1, Apache 2, Edicts 3, Dice 4, Debated 5, Civic 6,
Flags 8, Dear 9, She 12, Tar 13, Noose 15, Ratio 18,
Raven 19, Leg 20, Tin 21, Females 22, Bow 23, Comics
24, Root 25, Whence 26, Barge 27, Synod 28, Ten 30,
Rude

plus the second number, minus the third number,
divided by the fourth number, gives the fifth number.
One possible word ladder solution is: VEAL, heal,
hell, hall, call, calm, CALF







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

‘BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE |



BUSINESS FOR SALE

Medium Sized, Established Local Retail Business for Sale:













Profitable, Stable and Fantastic Potential. -
Significal Cash required (-/+1M)
~ Immediate/Constant cash returns
Scriotis enquiries only’ please.’

Email: seriousretail business @hotmail.com

Freeport Container Port

Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
Crane Technician
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
= Three (3) years’ experience working on GE, ABB or Siemens Drive Control Systems.
° Diploma or Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical Technology.
e Experience in supporting OMG, HHI or Mobile Cranes preferred.
¢ Computer Literate
¢ Must be willing to work as part of a Team.
° Must S able to repair and maintain:
AC/DC Motors

: ° S ACIDG Motor Control Drive Equipment
o Medium/High Voltage Distribution Systems

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful candidates:
Full-time Employment

Major Medical/Life Group Insurance

Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents

Performance Bonus :

TE
900000

1g Representatives from tie Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau on
‘| January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. through 4:00
Ei p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
----- - P.O. Box: F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

““eitlail: ADS@fep.com.bs





POSITION AVAILABLE

Ct Cpe
_PR CO-ORDINATOR

_The Corporate Offices of British American Insurance Company is looking for
a Marketing and Public Relations Co-ordinator. The ideal candidate must be
creative, detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent interpersonal and
| communication skills. Ability to work with limited supervision in a fast-paced
| environment is a must.




Responsibilities:



e Executing the daily marketing activities of the Company as planned.

° Co-ordinating the production of marketing collateral and advertising

: materials with attention to detail, brand integrity and deadlines.

H| © Assisting with event planning and various company functions.

4| ° Maintaining and updating files, databases, records and/or other documents
i as needed.

|| @ Communicating with all branches on related matters.

Core Competencies:

e Ability to work with limited supervision and learn new skills quickly
° Excellent oral and written communication skills
4 | ° Ability to resolve problems with a sense of urgency
4 | ° Ability to work under pressure
[| ° Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship
with co-workers
e Ability to maintain confidentiality
° Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

Required Qualifications:

e Bachelors Degree in Marketing or related field.

e 3+ years experience in Marketing and/or PR fieid

e Excellent computer skills required proficiency in Excel is a plus.
e Sales and/or graphic design experience a plus

Benefits:
Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive
benefit package including Life, Health and Pension.
Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator,
British American Insurance, P.O.Box N-4815,
Nassau Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to

dparker @babinsurance.com





FROM page 1B

managed to attract the funds
managed by its two main bro-
ker/dealers, Fidelity and Coli-
na, for listing, apart from that
its mutual fund listings have
otherwise consisted to just one
family of funds, and another
managed by Jamaican-based

.Grace Kennedy. Prior to the

Fidelity Prime Income Fund’s
listing, the previous one had
taken place in 2003.

Any effort to expand BISX’s
investment funds listings had
to involve an attempt to grow
the industry itself, rather than
just be a revenue generator for
the exchange, Mr Davies
added. He pointed out that
international financial centre
rivals such as the Cayman

does not capitalise |
on funds industry

Islands and Bermuda “have a
leg up” on the Bahamas in cer-
tain business areas, due to the
collaboration between private
and public sector, and used
their stock exchanges “as a
jumping off point to bring peo-
ple to their shores.

“I’m trying to do that here,”
the BISX chief executive said.
“Rather than talk about it, you
have to pursue those avenues,
give them reason to be opti-
mistic and kick-start the indus-

try.”
Pointing

Pointing out that some 600-
plus investment funds were
domiciled in the Bahamas, Mr
Davies added: “There is no
reason that I can think of why
we should not be trying to cap-
italise on that and give them
no choice but to deal with our

Inter-American

Development Bank (IDB)

The following will be Sold by Tender
2001 Ford Windstar

Purchaser will be responsible for payment of customs duty
and stamp tax. This vehicle may be inspected during normal
working hours. Monday through Friday upon request through
the office of the Administrative Officer IDB House, East Bay

Street, Nassau, Sealed offers marked “Bid for Automobile:

should be sent to

”

The Administrative Officer
P.O.Box N-3743
Nassau, Bahamas

Offers will be accepted until noon.

on February 9, 2007. This

car will be sold’’as is” The right is reserved to reject any or

all offers.



IBDO Mann Judd

BDO Mann Judd a leading professional services firm and a member firm of BDO
International, an organization with 621 BDO member firm offices in 107 countries around the

globe, is now seeking applications for an office administrator.

Qualifications: The successful candidate will have a Bachelors of. Science or
Arts in accounting and have 3 years work experience in a similiar role. The candidate will

‘No reason’ why BISX

©

exchange. There is no reason .
why we cannot capitalize on:
that number of funds here.”

Mr Davies said he had;
already begun discussions, with :,
the assistance of the Bahamas ':
Financial Services Board’
(BFSB), with the Bahamian ;
investment funds industry,»
including the sector’s working *'
group and the successor to the’
Bahamas Association of Mutu- :
al ‘tas Administrators Cars ‘
fa

He added that he wanted to. iv
hear their concerns, adding: 1%,
think the funds industry i in the; ,
Bahamas is going through a>.
period of change. Now we're’;
being reevaluated, looked at»
to see if it is an area people”
can do business in. Where do:
we go from here? The’,
exchange could play a aaa
cant role.

“There are a lot of areas we,
can focus on to bring them / 4
products that benefit the whole
industry, and mutual fund.:
administrators in particular.’,
I’m part of a larger industry. im
If the industry grows by virtue *
of our initiatives, we will ben- |
efit. It doesn’t help when ney
industry struggles.”

Mr Davies said BISX was’
eyeing two potential avenues. Z
for growing the caventnent!
funds industry, one that would :
result in “marginal” growth, |
the other involving a more sig- .
nificant impact that could see:

‘aggressive expansion of.

between a dozen to 50 funds‘
at a time. io
“It all depends on where the.’
appetite in the industry is,” Mr,
Davies said. He added that:
BISX’s “size and ability”)} i

would enable it to keep pace, -

with the latest market trends“
and developments, and leave *.
it well-placed to capitalize on ;
innovations in listing, trading *
and reporting. -

o. te oe
7 one ee

have a working knowledge of QuickBooks or Peachtree and Microsoft applications, and

should be able to. work in a challenging team driven environment.

The position requires a vivid attention to detail.

Responsibilities: include but are not limited to,

Internal Accounting

Invoice preparation and control
Compliance and HR duties
Corporate services (company formation and administration) 4
This position will support senior management and is administrative and diverse i

Individuals with the above-mentioned qualifications should fax their resumes to the

following:

Recruitment Manager
BDO Mann Judd
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-325-6592

Or e-mail to the following address: info@bdomannjudd.com

Absolutely no phone calls please.

Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The General Public is advised that the Bahamas Electricity Corporation will be
performing disconnection activities in the following areas:

Bozine Town, Yellow

Elder





Gardens, Big Pond, Blue Hill Road, Black |
Village, Bain Town, Boyd Sub, Farrington Road, Chippingham, Oakes Field,
Stapledon Gardens, Millennium Gardens, Engleston and St Alban’s Drive,

at.7 9 & a ae PD

EA ..F FO se se e%

oat O Oe

Highland Park, Tall Pines, Rocky Pine Road, Jubilee Gardens, Carmichael
Road, Sunset Park, Bellot Road, Gladstone Road, Faith Gardens, Tropical °
Meadows, Flamingo Gardens, Miller’s Heights, Avocado Gardens, Bacardi Road, :

Spigot Road, Adelaide, Coral Harbour, South Ocean and Mt. Pleasant Village.

All

consumers

with

overdue accounts

disconnection of your electrical service.

are advised
arrears on their electricity accounts immediately, in order to avoid the

ee

to pay the

The public is also advised that all overdue payments should be made |,

directly to the Corporation. Those payments can be made at Head Office on |}:
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the Main Post Office [';':

on East Hill Street.





be

‘aue ee ernie | -MONDAY, JANUARY 22,





2007, PAGE 23






































JANUARY 22, 2007

——



2 fen eo rzee

SH OCCLa®


















Barkitecture





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| 7:30. | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 //
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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 20, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007



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MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net





The Tribune



USINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

_ EU talks to impact
future investments

Chamber forms Task Force to examine all funds industry

trade arrangements impacting Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Bahamas

Chamber of

Commerce has

appointed a Task

Force to “look at
all aspects” of global trade
agreements that could impact
the Bahamas, with a leading
business executive warning
that this nation’s response to
the rules-based trading systems
could impact the level of future
foreign direct investment (fdi)
in this nation.

Gershan Major, chief execu-
tive of Caleb Enterprises, the
master franchise holder for the
Mail Boxes Etc franchise, iden-
tified the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) talks
with the European Union
(EU) as the most urgent trade
priority for the Government
and private sector. He warned
that this nation had to assess
the impact its ultimate
response would have on future

é investment opportunities in
.*. this nation, as well as existing
' companies.

“It’s not only the existing
companies, but. we have to
look at future opportunities for
investment,” Mr Major said.
He explained that investors



Bahamas from countries that
were members of the World
Trade Organisation (WTO)
and part of other rules-based
trading systems, and this could
have different implications for
the rates of return they were

= would..be coming tothe

able to get on their Bahamas-
based investments.

This again shows how rules-
based trading systems such as
the WTO will impact the
Bahamian economy, this
nation’s business community
and its people, even if the
Bahamas remains outside such
organizations as it is currently,
holding only ‘Observer’ status
at the WTO.

The Bahamas will effective-
ly have to enter trade agree-
ments that are compliant with
WTO rules that stipulate non-
discrimination against foreign
countries, their companies and
products entering the Bahamas
or imported from this country,
and require that this nation
provide market access to such
companies.

Mr Major is chair of the
Chamber’s Globalisation and
Foreign Relations Committee,
and it is from this committee
that the ‘Task Force’ has been
formed, headed by Hank Fer-
guson, a former economist and

senior official:in the Ministry of

Trade and Industry.

“The Task Force will be
looking at all trade arrange-
ments that this countr7y is cur-
rently negotiating, but will
focus on the EPA, given our
view that it’s the most impor-

tant trade negotiation taking
place at the moment,” Mr
Major told:‘The Tribune.
“One of our main priorities
is to work with the Govern-
ment to ensure the private sec-
tor position, as it relates to the
EPA’s impact on industry, is
well-represented going for-
ward. Certainly, we understand
there are challenges relating
to the time for submissions by

_ the Bahamas.”

The deadline for the
Bahamas to submit its formal
feedback to Cariforum, the
body negotiating the EPA on
its and CARICOM”s behalf,
on its ‘wants and needs’ from
the negotiations was last Mon-
day, January 15. As revealed
by The Tribune, that deadline
was missed, and although
unlikely to be fatal to the
Bahamas’ cause, it shows that
both government and private
sector are again off the pace
when it comes to trade talks.

A government briefing
paper on the EPA talks sug-
gested that the EU would like
to see at least 85 per cent of
trade markets opened up,

meaning that the negotiations .

go beyond the $66 million in
goods exported to the EU by
Bacardi, Polymers Interna-
tional and the fishing industry







@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribure Business Editor

Bahamas ‘fifth freest’

Nation rated ‘most prosperous in Caribbean’

THE Bahamas has been ranked as the

economy in Americas

in 2004 to potentially impact
the tourism and financial ser-
vices industry.

Mr Major said the Chamber
had sought a better under-
standing from Cariforum on
the services, investments and
market access chapters of the
proposed EPA talks, as these
were likely to impact the
Bahamian economy the most.

He added that their inclu-
sion “certainly creates some
challenges for the Bahamas, as
we still only have observer sta-
tus at the WTO, and while we
are part of CARICOM, we are
not part of the market side of
the CSME. There are lots of
impacts we have to take into
account on where the Bahamas
stands on this”.

* The Chamber of Commerce
is most concerned about
whether the market access
talks will impact areas of this
economy traditionally reserved
for Bahamian ownership only,
such as retail and wholesale,
as well asthe impact on ser-
vices trade and investments,
and ensuring. exports to the
EU by Bacardi, Polymers and
the fishing industry still retain
their duty free access. ;

SEE page 6B






fifth freest economy in the Western
Hemisphere and “most prosperous in the
Caribbean”, scoring higher than both the
regional and world average, despite the
restrictions imposed on foreign business
ownership and the exchange control
regime.

The Index of Economic Freedom, pub-
lished by the US right-wing think-tank,
the Heritage Foundation, in conjunction
with the Wall Street Journal, rated the
Bahamas as fifth out of 29 economies in
the Americas region when it came to
economic freedom, and 24th in the world.

The only economy rated better in the
Caribbean was Trinidad & Tobago’s,



the Bahamas at 23rd, although both
nations shared the same 71.4 per cent
score. The US, Canada and Chile were
the other Western Hemisphere
economies ranked higher than the
Bahamas.

While the Bahamas’ score fell by 1.2
per cent for the 2007 survey compared to
last year, the Heritage Foundation said
this was partly due to a new base for the
ratings. The Bahamas’ 71.4 per cent rat-
ing was higher than both the 62.3 per
cent average for the Americas region,
and the 60.6 per cent world average.

The survey pointed out that the Gov-

and customs duties for its revenues had
created “a mercantilist barrier to higher
prosperity, as well as closer trade inte-
gration with island neighbours and the
United States”.

However, it added: “The Bahamas



which was ranked one spot higher than |

ernment’s dependence on import tariffs -

enjoys high levels of business freedom,
freedom from government, monetary
freedom, fiscal freedom, property rights
and labour freedom. The Government
imposes no income or corporate tax.
“Regulations can be subject to official
whim, but the environment remains gen-
erally business- friendly. The labour mar-

ket is highly flexible; and severance pack- .

ages are not overly onerous for employ-
ers. A focus on transparency represents
the best traditions of English common
law in protecting private property, which
is nowhere more apparent than in the
advanced financial system.”

The Bahamas scored highest in the cat-
egories on ‘fiscal freedom’ and ‘freedom
from government’, notching up 98 per
cent and 89.9 per cent respectively, large-
ly due to its tax structure.

For the fiscal category, this nation’s
“tax burden is one of the lowest in the
world”, due to the absence of income,
corporate,.capital gains, inheritance and
value-added (VAT) taxes. The Heritage
Foundation/Wall Street Journal survey
said overall tax revenue raised by the
Bahamian government was equivalent
to 16 per cent of gross domestic product
(GDP), while total government spend-
ing was “low” at 19.4 per cent of GDP.

‘ Other areas where the Bahamas scored
well included 80 per cent for ‘Business
freedom’, as “the Bahamian government
generally follows a hands-off approach to
business”.

That statement, and a number of other
comments in the survey, are likely to



































an business community, given the high
level of government involvement and
interference in the economy.

The Heritage Foundation/Wall Street
Journal survey noted that “starting, oper-
ating and closing a business can be hin-
dered by a burdensome regulatory envi-
ronment”, and gave the Bahamas a rela-
tively low 70 per cent on ‘Freedom from
Corruption’.

In that category, the survey noted:
“Piracy of software, music and videos is a
problem. Existing copyright laws are.
ignored. Illegal drug trafficking and mon-
ey laundering are also significant.”

The Bahamas also gained 80 per cent
scores for property rights and labour free-
dom, despite the survey noting that this
nation’s judicial process “tends to be very
slow”, while the labour laws — although
not costly — “can be burdensome, espe-
cially for domestic business”.

On monetary freedom, the Bahamas -
scored 77.3 per cent, largely due to its
average 1.5 per cent rate of inflation
between 2003 and 2005. However, the
Bahamas lost 15 per cent in this category
due to ‘price control’ measures on items
such as drugs and gasoline.

Due to its customs duties regime, and
restrictions on foreign ownership, the
Bahamas fared poorest on “Trade Free-
dom’ and ‘Investment Freedom’, scor-
ing 28.8 per cent and 40 per cent respec-
tively.

The Heritage Foundation/Wall Street
Journal survey reported that the
Bahamas weighted tariff average was
25.6 per cent in 2002.











SABRE ORY Ric cny

cause some surprise among the Bahami-






‘No reason’ why



ere tral ereh
PON |
CUR ERS TTT

PY HH fil [eatin

BISX does not
capitalise on

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange’s
(BISX) chief executive has told
The Tribune that “there is no
reason” why the exchange
should not capitalize on the
600-plus investment funds
domiciled in this nation to
grow its funds listing business,
arguing that his organisation
can be used as a platform to
attract more business to this
jurisdiction.

Speaking to The Tribune in

-the aftermath of the Fidelity

Prime Income Fund’s listing
on BISX, Keith Davies said he
wanted to work with Bahami-
an investment fund adminis-

trators and manager through |

developing a partnership that
would benefit their business-
es, the funds industry and the
exchange.
Acknowledging that fund
listings had “not been a growth
area” for BISX, Mr Davies
said any attempt to grow this
area had to be “an industry-
building exercise”, and.one

‘that could not solely be for just

the exchange’s benefit, as any
such initiative would not be
sustainable.

“We have to speak to the
potential stakeholders and
people in the industry; the peo-

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COMPANIES and executives working to fohh an
for the private security industry are hoping tocon clu
its constitution within the next 70 days, with the ge¢
mated to employ five times’ the members of tk

Police Force (RBPF).

Gamal Newry, a Tribune columnist and Nase!



ple who woule E
this,” Mr Davies said. “The
people in the fund industry
have been working so hard to
generate business and keep the
business they have, it’s diffi-
cult for them to focus on things
that might benefit them.

“T see an area of weakness
[for the exchange], but also. see
an area of opportunity. It’s not
a growth area for the
exchange.”

To date, while BISX has

SEE page 10B









chair of the steering committee seeking to form the association,
said the constitution would “cover everyone wha inolved 4 in the

security and protection indus-
try”, and feature by-laws and
rules consistent with those gov-

SEE page 7B

Mild winter ‘softens’
Bahamas travel demand

l By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

TOURIST arrivals to the
Bahamas in early winter were
“a bit softer than anticipated”
at some major hotel due to the
relatively mild weather expe-
rienced in the US, the Ministry
of Tourism’s deputy director-
general told The Tribune, but
the late arrival of the cold snap
has begun to change that.

David Johnson said: “Some

nerwonking | *



But hoteliers say
no impact seen

of our large hotels have report-
ed in the very early winter that
the market has been a bit soft-
er than anticipated, But that’s

been the case for the: rest of
the Caribbean and Florida,
too, because of the. relatively

SEE page 11B ©

ere CARE EMG SS





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

BISX sees 21.9% value,

volun

he Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities
Exchange (BISX) saw.

its All-Share Index for the year
2006 close up some 24.09 per
cent, despite seeing trading
volumes and the total value of
traded shares both decline by
21.9 per cent last year in com-
parison to 2005.

Releasing its 2006 year- -end
report on trading data, BISX
said some 5.251 million shares
traded on the domestic mar-
ket last year, with a total value
of $28.705 million changing

Nathaniel Beneby, Jr.



hands. iat

However, the traded volume:

was down byl. 473 million
shares compared:to the 2005
total volume of 6.724 million

‘shares. The total worth of

shares traded ‘on BISX
declined by $7.642 million,
having stood at $36. 346 mil-
lion in 2005.

Yet the BISX All-Share
Index, which is'‘a market capi-
talisation-weighted index fea-
turing all the exchange’s 19
domestic tier listings, closed up

325.48 points or 24.09 per cent

Vice President and: Country Head

RBC Royal Bank of Canada, Bahamas



for the year. to: Hederiber 29,

2006, finishing the 12-month
: period at 1,679.19.

Previous.

For the | previous year, ale
BISX All-Share Index ‘saw a
311.33.increase'or rise of 29.95
per cent, closing then at
1,350.71. By December 29,
2006, the market capitalisation
of BISX’s domestic tter had
risen from $2.6 billion the pre-
vious year to $3.2 billion.



Commonwealth’ Bank was,



eee a

Nethaniel. Beneby, Nh «
2006 Civil Socéets ty o
Banker of the y eur

From Ross McDonald & the entire team at
RBC Royal Bank of Canada & RBC FINCO

the leader in terms of value of
shares traded, accounting for
$7,309 million worth of shares

or some 25,4 per cent of total

value that changed hands, This
means that Commonwealth
Bank accounted for more than

a quarter of the value: of traded
. shares,

In second place was. ; Fam-
Guard Corporation, parent of
Family Guardian, with some
$4.282 million worth of stock
traded, accounting for 14.9 per
cent of all market activity. In
third place was Cable

SS ced Bank
RBC) of Canada



Bahamas, generating some
$3.585 million worth of trades
or 12.4 per cent of market

activity. In fourth and fifth:

places were FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
and Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), with stock worth
$2.258 million and $1.48 mil-
lion changing hands respec-
tively, accounting for 7.8 per
cent and 5.15 per cent of mar-
ket activity.

On share volume, Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) led the
way, the 1.48 million shares

THE TRIBUNE

clines in 2006

traded accounting for 28.28 per
cent of market volume. Com-
monwealth Bank was next,
708,590 shares trading and
accounting for 13.49 per cent
of market activity, while Fam-
Guard took care of 13.16 per
cent of market activity with
691,175 shares being traded.
Doctors Hospital Health
Systems saw 449,330 shares
change hands, accounting for
8.56 per cent of market activi-
ty, while in fifth was Cable
Bahamas with 382,759 traded,
accounting for 7.29 per cent.

Gray to open Cable
Beach City Market



@V ALFRED GRAY

MINISTER of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer Affairs
V. Alfred Gray will officially
open a new 24,000 square foot
Cable Beach City Market
Monday evening at an event
designed to give shareholders,
vendors and guests a sneak
preview at what will become
the leading grocer’s flagship
store.

The store located on West
Bay Street opens to the public
Tuesday at 7 am.

At twice the size of the exist-
ing City Market immediately
to its east that it is replacing,
the new store will have parking
for 90 vehicles and introduce
several features other stores in
City Market’s chain are expect-
ed to adopt.

“We are very excited about
this store,” said Ken Burns,
CEO of Bahamas Supermar-
kets Limited, parent company
of 12 stores in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. “In addi-
tion to an entirely different
décor, very tropical in style,
spacious aisles, an array of new



(BIS Photo: Tim'Aylén)

products and greatly expand-
ed deli and bakery, we will
introduce several technology-
related improvements in this
store. Among them will be
point of sale scanning, a great
time-saver for customers and
an important benefit for inven-
tory purposes.” It will also fea-
ture a large gourmet and
organic foods section.
Opening of the new store
created four new managerial
positions along with 12 other
jobs in addition to opportuni-

’ ties for neighbouring students

to earn money as packing assis-
tants. The existing building
which City Market had leased
for more than 30 years will be
renovated by owners and sub-
divided for retail and other
appropriate use.

Bahamas Supermarkets Lim-
ited is Bahamian-operated and
employs more than 700 per-
sons. Its charitable arm,
Bahamas Supermarkets Foun-
dation, has awarded more than
$7 million in scholarships since
its inception in 1968.

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BUSINESS

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The Miami Herald



etoanuroansassenaaencosatie



gE SCENN RUA DEC OECD SSROULLEE UAE DRUULDERODEEUDILEE OLLIE RDRELDIID LEON ELUOLIELL AEE T DA





SB.

To sustain profits, firms look overseas

@ Recently, growth outside of the
United States has outpaced gains
within the country. Firms in
various sectors are looking for
further global expansion.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
associated Press

NEW YORK — Facing a U.S.
economy that’s expected to grow at a
moderating pace in 2007, Wall
Street’s biggest investment houses
are aggressively turning overseas in
hopes of sustaining record profits
reached during the past year.

Economic and business growth

MISS AMERICA

Pageant
tries to
rework
image

marketing campaign that
includes more than nine hours

‘of Miss America-related

programming before the pageant
airs on Jan. 29.

~ BY KATHLEEN HENNESSEY

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — One year after she
left home in search of better fortunes,
Miss America has gone totally Holly-

...wood, ,,.

She’s ‘got her own reality TV
show, a catchy new ringtone and
she’s giving away cash to lucky view-
ers. She’s competing in a “pageant”
again, rather than the politically cor-
rect and, some say, boring “scholar-
ship program” of the past.

After years of struggling for rele-
vance and viewers, the Miss America
Pageant and its cable network host
are attempting to market the beauty
contest back into the American cul-
tural conscience.

“There was a time when everyone
knew Miss America’s name, but the
brand has slipped a little,” said Sam
Haskell, a former executive at the
William Morris Agency and now
chairman of the board of directors of
the Atlantic City, N.J.-based Miss
America Organization.

“We thought it was time to repol-
ish the brand.”

There are few who would argue
the aging beauty queen doesn’t need
the help. After years as a Saturday-
night television event, the pageant
hemorrhaged viewers in the 1990s,
eventually losing its network con-
tract in 2004. Country Music Televi-
sion picked her up and moved her to
Las Vegas last year, hoping the hype
would draw new viewers.

The move, though considered by
some as a blow to Atlantic City and
the die-hard volunteers — pageanis-
tas — who drive the operation, gener-
ally was viewed as a success.

The pageant was aired a combined
20 times on CMT, owned by Via-
com’s MTV Networks, and its sister-
network VHI, the network said.
Although just 3.1 million viewers
watched the show live — less than

*TURN TO PAGEANT
SMALL BUSINESS

surged in Europe and Asia in 2006,
and that trend is projected to con-
tinue this year. Stock markets from
Paris to Hong Kong have outpaced
the gains produced on U.S.
exchanges, and foreign companies
are increasingly using acquisitions to
grow.

This has motivated the major New
York-based investment banks to
expand their. operations in global
financial centers including London,
Frankfurt, Sydney and Hong Kong.
Without plans to increase their busi-
ness outside the United States —
either through organic growth or



Cuba’s daily output o a

Cuba and its foreign partners
are producing roughly 68,000 bar-
rels of oil a day, up from 18,000 a
day in 1992, according to Jorge
Pifion Cervera, an energy expert at
the Institute for Cuban and Cuban-
American Studies at the University
of Miami.

Cuba still imports most of its oil
and refined products — about
100,000 barrels daily — primarily
from Venezuela on favorable
terms. But it’s boosting efforts to
produce more at home.

In recent years, Cuba has been
auctioning blocks off its north
coast to foreign firms such as Span-
ish giant Repsol YPF and Toronto-
based Sherritt International for oil





PRIMING THE WELL OF ANT-EMBARGO SENTIME Tey



and gas exploration in joint ven-

acquisitions — executives said their
companies would fall desperately
behind.

“As a general matter, there are
more opportunities to grow outside
the U.S.,” said Merrill Lynch Chief
Financial Officer Jeff Edwards. “We
will look for places where an acquisi-
tion can accelerate a growth opportu-
nity, but we will remain disciplined.”

Edwards said 37 percent of Mer-
rill’s $34.7 billion in 2006 revenue
came from overseas operations. Last
year showed continued outperform-
ance from outside the United States,
with Europe and Asia setting new

OFFSHORE DRILLING








ly, 68,0

IN SEARCH OF
BLACK GOLD

IF ESTIMATES OF CUBA’S OFFSHORE OIL
RESERVES PROVE ACCURATE, IT COULD
PRESSURE THE U.S. TO LIFT ITS EMBARGO AND
PERMIT EXPLORATION BY U.S. OIL COMPANIES.

BY MARTHA BRANNIGAN
mbrannigan@MiamiHerald.com

Since the demise of the Soviet Union forced Cuba to crack open its
doors to outside investment, oil exploration and nickel mining have
emerged as lucrative ventures for foreign investors.

tures with the government.

Some of those exploration blocs
are just 50 miles from Florida and
closer to the state’s shoreline than
the U.S. government permits for
domestic drilling. But under a 1977
treaty with the United States, the
area is part of Cuba’s exclusive eco-
nomic zone and drilling is allowed.

In 2004, Repsol disclosed its
first oil strike — quality grade light
crude — some 18 miles off Havana,
but said the well wasn’t commer-
cially viable. Repsol teamed up
with Norsk Hydro of Norway and
India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corp.
and is forging ahead on exploring
other sites.

The potential is huge. The U.S.
Geological Survey estimates

Online toolbox renovates contracting

@ A South Florida company is
hoping to build a niche for its
software in a thriving contracting
industry.

BY JIM WYSS
jwyss@MiamiHerald.com

Pompano Beach, Fla.-based Ser-
vusXchange wants to remodel the
contracting industry and it’s hoping
its new website will be just the tool
for the job.

Last month the company launched
MyOnlineToolBox.com, a site that
allows contractors to schedule work,
track clients, generate estimates and
spit out everything from payment
forms to invoices.

Because it exists solely online,
there is no troublesome hardware to
install and users can access the infor-

mation from anywhere there’s an
Internet connection.

With a price tag starting at $89.95
a month (a fee the company is tempo-
rarily waiving as it continues to intro-
duce advanced features), ServusXch-
ange is hoping its OnlineToolBox
will win fans among the 500,000 to 2
million small contractors working
across the nation.

The company already has about
100 clients onboard and hopes to
have 500 by year’s end as it plows
some of the $1.25 million in private
financing it has raised into marketing
and new features, said Brian Javeline,
president and chief executive.

Among those new features is the
ability for contractors registered on
the site to receive check and credit
card payments online.

But breaking into the industry will
be no easy task, said William Cobb,
chairman of the electronic informa-
tion systems committee at the Asso-
ciation of General Contractors of
America.

“There is a ton of software out
there already — certainly in the thou-
sands of products,” said Cobb. Intuit,
the maker of QuickBooks for Con-
tractors, and Oregon’s Timberline
are among the heavy hitters in the
industry.

But there is still room for smart
newcomers, he said.

“There is no such thing as the
Microsoft for the construction indus-
try,” he said. “Nobody has done any-
thing that approaches being a solu-
tion for all the things we have to do.”

In fact, a study by the National

io near. Santa Cruz, del Norte contributes’ 6

full- -year records for both revenue
and earnings. And he expects this
trend to continue.

The story at Merrill Lynch’s four
biggest rivals is the same.

Goldman Sachs Group has long
been considered the most European
of the U.S. investment banks. In 2006,
the company reported a record $37.7
billion of revenue, and 45 percent of
that came from overseas.

A spokesman for the company
said overseas operations have long

been a focus for growth, but that it .

will use internal expansion rather
than acquisitions to grow.

DIEGO GIUDICE/BLOOMBERG FILE _




reserves of 4.6 billion barrels of oil
and 9.8 trillion cubic feet of natural
gas off Cuba’s north shore — a veri-
table bonanza — though the esti-
mate is debatable and the offshore
sites would be difficult and expen-
sive to exploit.

But if major deposits are discov-
ered, it would intensify pressure on
Washington to rethink the
embargo, at least on energy.

Cuba watchers aren’t holding
their breath for change during the
Bush administration — even if |
Fidel Castro dies. And since explo- |
ration is a long-term affair, “Idon’t |
think there will be a sense of |
urgency among U.S. oil companies |
to get into Cuba,” says Pifion.

Last year, Congress talked about
exempting U.S. energy companies
from the’embargo, a proposal
pushed by the American Petroleum
Institute, but the effort fizzled.

Cuba’s biggest foreign player is
Sherritt, which arrived in Cuba in
the mid-1990s. The company says it
is producing about 30,000 barrels
of oil a day with partner Pebercan
of Montreal. Sherritt also has nickel «
and cobalt mining operations and |
electricity generating facilities in

° TURN TO OIL RESERVES











Bear Stearns reported $9.23 billion

of revenue in 2006, and about 14 per-

cent came from overseas. Of all the
Wall Street houses, Bear Stearns had
the lowest portion of its business
coming from outside the United
States. But that’s about to change.

The company has long based its
European business out of a few floors
in a London office building. In
August, Bear Stearns signed a con-
tract to move into a new, 12-story
building based in Canary Wharf.

It’s more than just new digs, said

° TURN TO BANKS

COMCAST

bets big on
With the Golf Channel’s 15-year
PGA Tour contract comes
early-round coverage of every
regular PGA Tour event, but it
may also come with heavy losses

for the channel’s parent company
Comcast in the early years.

BY DEBORAH YAO
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Comcast is
making a big bet on golf, hoping to
transform its little-watched Golf
Channel network into a household
name.

The Golf Channel 3 is exclusively
carrying every round of the first
three PGA Tour events of 2007. So
for the first time in four decades, this
eek’s Bob Hope Chrysler Classic

not be shown on network televi-



‘he Coverage. is ear of the Golf
Channel’s unprecedented 15-year
partnership with the Tour that kicked
off this month. The deal gives the
channel early-round coverage of
every regular PGA Tour event, and
every round at 13. PGA tournaments.
NBC and CBS pick up the weekend
coverage for 31 tournaments.

The contract substantially boosts ©
the channel’s golf programming and
for the first time gives considerable
heft to a network co-founded by
Arnold Palmer 12 years ago. But it’s.
also likely to generate big losses in
the early years for parent company:
Comcast, the nation’s largest cable
operator.

Last year, Walt Disney’s ABC bad
ESPN walked away from negotiations
with the tour, saying they can’t gen-
erate enough advertising revenue to
offset the broadcast rights fees. In
addition, the Golf Channel is shut out
of the five most lucrative events in
golf — the Masters, the U.S. and Brit-
ish opens, the PGA Championship
and the Ryder Cup — that are not
owned or run by the PGA Tour.
Those have separate broadcast deals
for the weekend with the networks
and for early-round coverage with
USA Network, ESPN and TNT.

Comcast — whose Chief Execu-
tive Brian Roberts is an avid golfer —
is taking a longer view. With more
than $22 billion in overall annual rev-
enue, distribution into 24 million
homes and deals with other cable and
satellite TV operators to carry the
Golf Channel, Comcast is gambling
that it can build ratings for the net-
work that will allow it to charge

* TURN TO GOLF CHANNEL



NISSA BENJAMIN/FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

KEEPING IT SIMPLE: Michael Carson, left, and Brian Javeline display
their website, MyOnlineToolBox, which aims to streamline tasks in

the contracting industry.

Institute of Standards and Technol-
ogy in 2004 found the U.S. construc-
tion industry was wasting almost $16
billion a year just trying to make dif-

ferent pieces of software work
together.

* TURN TO TOOLBOX





4B | MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

MISS AMERICA



SS

JAE C. HONG/AP FILE 2006

MARKETING CAMPAIGN: Contestants are introduced
during the preliminary competition for the 2006 Miss
America Pageant. The Miss America Pageant and its
new cable network are attempting to market the
beauty contest back into the American cultural

conscience.

Beauty pageant
reworks image

° PAGEANT

one-third the viewers she
last found on ABC — a total
of 36 million people saw the
show including the replays.
Even the traditionalists
couldn’t argue with that
exposure.

“You can’t stay status quo
in this day and age or you get
left. behind,” said Maris
Schad, a middle school
teacher and the volunteer
executive director of the
Miss Nebraska state pageant.
“You've got to find out what
the public wants and try and
do a little tweaking that
catches their interest.”

This year’s marketing
campaign amounts to more
than a tweak. CMT, reaching
83 million households, will
have run more than nine
hours of Miss America-re-
lated programming before
the 52 contestants take the
stage for the Monday, Jan. 29
crowning at the Aladdin
hotel-casino, itself also in the
middle of a rebranding to the
Planet Hollywood casino.

The TV blitz includes
“Total Access: Miss Amer-
ica,” a behind-the-scenes
look at life under the crown,
and a “Greatest Miss Amer-
ica Moments” special.

NEW LINEUP

The new lineup also fea-
tures a reality TV special,
“Pageant School: Becoming
Miss America,” shot in Los
Angeles and scheduled to air
in the days before the pag-
eant on CMT, VH1, MTV and
Logo. The show follows the
women through a regimen of
training tips imparted by for-
mer winners and pageant
“challenges” that present
unanticipated obstacles, such
as the question posed to Miss
Nebraska: “If you could have
one superpower, what would

OFFSHORE DRILLING

it be and why?”

“I would like to have a
photogenic memory,” she
replied, flashing an unknow-
ing pageant smile.

Interested fans in search
of a ringtone can download a
version of longtime host Bert
Parks’ classic There She Is,
Miss America. Others can log
online to play the “Pick &
Win Game,” which promises
$1 million to the person who
successfully predicts the top
finalists and the winner.

This is not the Miss Amer-
ica Pageant of old, a deft
combination of gams and
goodness that began as a
bathing revue in 1921 on the
Boardwalk and by the mid-
1990s began refering to itself
as a Scholarship program to
emphasize substance over
superficiality.

A ‘DATED’ LOOK

Focus groups. told
researchers they thought
past contestants, many of
them products of years in
state pageant systems,
looked “dated.” Executives
aiming to attract the 18- to
34-year-old demographic
brought in a sexier swimsuit
line and. sent out letters
advising contestants to tone
down the makeup. and
update the style.

Focus groups asked for
other updates, too — most
borrowed from reality TV.

During the pageant, the
camera will cut away to
show reactions from the
judges. Interviews with
judges will be aired to give
viewers a better understand-
ing of how the winners are
chosen.

Viewers will be able to
cast votes, online or in text
messages, for Miss Conge-
niality, an honor previously
awarded by other contes-
tants.

Oil reserves may make
US. end embargo

° OIL RESERVES

Cuba.

“You have to build value
and be seen as a partner that
can move forward, bringing
technology to the table and
training,” says Sherritt
spokesman Michael Minnes.

Nickel was again Cuba’s
top export last year, as keen
global demand for the metal,
used in steel making, has
driven up prices. Sherritt
plans over time to boost its
nickel capacity at Moa to
about 49,000 tons a year from
33,000 tons.

To be sure, doing business

in Cuba is an ordeal for oi
companies. Pebercan, fo
example, announced las
month that Cubapetréleo wa
two months late on some $69
million in oil payments — $3
million owed to Pebercan and
the rest to Sherritt.

Patrice Bedu, vice presi
dent of exploration for Peber
can, which finances opera
tions from cash flow because
bank loans are hard to find
says “We are negotiating with
the Cuban government to fix
the problem.” But he adds:
“We maintain good relation
with the government. It’s 2
temporary issue, we’re sure.”

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

WALL STREET

°BANKS

Bear Stearns European Chair-
man Michael Peretie in a
statement: “This building rep-
resents a new milestone in the
development of Bear Stearns’

_ franchise in Europe and con-

firms our commitment to the
region.”

Lehman Brothers reported
that 37 percent of its $17.6 bil-
lion of revenue was from
overseas operations. Just this
past week, the company made
a big move to boost its Asia-
Pacific expansion strategy by
acquiring closely held Grange
Securities in Australia.

Morgan Stanley won’t pro-
vide a breakout of its 2006
revenue until it files its annual
report with the Securities and
Exchange Commission,

COMCAST

Golf Channel bets.o

*GOLF CHANNEL

advertisers ever-higher rates.
“If we don’t generate
enough ad revenue but it

. helps us grow our brand and

grow our distribution . . . (we
hope the result will be similar
to) what football did for Fox,”
said Dave Manougian, presi-
dent of the Golf Channel.
News Corp.’s Fox televi-
sion network’s successful $1.6
billion bid in 1993 to broad-
cast the National Football
Conference pitched the net-
work for the first time into the

- same echelon as the three

major networks. What helped
was the financial backing of
Rupert Murdoch’s empire.

Comcast first invested in
the Golf Channel in 1994,
along with five other cable
operators. It began increasing
its stake and in 2003, acquired
the final 8.6 percent stake for
$100: million.

REVENUE

With the PGA Tour deal,
ad revenues are “up, well in

-double digits,” Manougian

said. He added that the chan-
nel should generate enough’
ad revenue to offset rights
fees midway through the con-
tract.

Gil Kerr, PGA Tour’s
senior vice president of
broadcasting, programming
and productions, said the tour
has had a relationship with
the Golf Channel since its
inception. THe channel is the
exclusive carrier of the Cham-
pions Tour and Nationwide
Tour. : ‘

“They weren’t in enough

homes at the time to do a deal .

with them on their own,” Kerr
said. But “their distribution
has grown a lot in the last six
years. We knew going into the
TV negotiations that they
wanted to be aggressive in
acquiring the PGA Tour.”
The Golf Channel is avail-
able in 75 million homes com-
pared with 92 million homes
for ESPN. Manougian said the
channel currently is in at least
85 percent of basic video tiers.
The Golf Channel is part of

SMALL BUSINESS

expected in February. How-
ever, in 2005, the company
derived about 29 percent of
revenue from overseas.

Beyond its Asian and Euro-
pean operations, Morgan
Stanley has taken a keen
interest in expanding in the
Middle East as well. The com-
pany on Wednesday said it
would form a joint venture
with Capital Group, a securi-
ties firm based in Riyadh,
Saudi Arabia.

“The markets in the U.S.
aren’t growing like they used
to, and we’ve seen the poten-
tial of equity markets pretty
much tapped out,” said David
Easthope, an analyst with
business consulting firm
Celent. “These banks are sim-
ply going where there’s
growth.”

the digital package of Cox
Communications and Cablev-
ision. In 2012, when the
Tour’s contracts with NBC
and CBS lapse, Manougian
believes the Golf Channel will
be able to pick up more week-
end coverage.

Kerr won’t say what the
Golf Channel deal is worth,
only noting that the total
value of all current contracts
has increased. He also won’t
comment on whether there’s
any revenue sharing. Comcast
and Golf Channel executives
also declined to discuss con-
tract terms.

EXIT CLAUSE

Asked whether the con-
tract has an exit clause, Man-
ougian would only say that
“any contract has disaster
clauses, whether it’s a one-
year deal or a 20-year deal.
There’s nothing out of ordi-
nary about this contract.” .

It helps that Comcast isn’t
only counting on ad revenue
to offset the Tour’s rights
fees. It charges cable and sat-
ellite providers 21 cents per
subscriber per month, a frac-
tion of ESPN’s average
monthly fee of $2.60. And
Golf Channel officials say
they aren’t planning an imme-



~ “Even. d

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

In Europe, that growth is
being spurred in a number of
areas. The conversion to the
euro has certainly made
cross-border merger and
acquisition deals easier. Trad-
ing in equities and derivatives
has also picked up as stock
exchanges become more pan-
European.

Developing economies in
Asia, such as China or India,
have also been a source of
income for U.S. banks. These
countries have previously
been difficult to crack
because of regulatory laws
that restrict investments by
foreign ‘companies. Those
laws are changing, and the
Asia-Pacific region has the
fastest growth rate in the
world.

Expanding internationally

diate increase to offset the
costs of the PGA Tour con-
tract — another bet that in
doing so, they will be able to
get picked up on more cable
systems. d

In 2005, 63 percent of the
Golf Channel’s $267.5 million
in revenue came from license
fees, according to Kagan
Research in Monterey, Calif.
Cash flow was $116.7 million.
For 2006, Kagan is projecting
a 13 percent increase in reve-
nues to $302.5 million and
cash flow of $139 million.

For now, viewership of the
final rounds for the first two
PGA championships on the
Golf Channel has come in far
lower than last year, when
they were on ESPN.

Still, boosting viewership
takes time, said Neal Pilson,
former president of CBS
Sports and now a TV consul-

tant in.Chappaqua, N.Y..
nthe road; I.don’t’

know if'¥iewing levels‘on the
Golf Channel will equal the
levels that golf was achieving
on ESPN.”

“But what they will have is
a strong golf audience that is
saleable (to advertisers) and it
will be a permanent home for
‘PGA Tour, which they have
not had in the past,” he said.

‘Investment banks lean on Asian,
European growth to boost earnings

isn’t only for the big banks,
either. Discount brokerages
like E-Trade also plan global
growth to access new markets

’— and even offer U.S. cus-

tomers the ability to trade for-
eign stocks.

“International is a key
component of our strategy,”
said Jarrett Lilien, E-Trade’s
president and chief operating
officer, who added that the
company would like do so
through spot acquisitions.

“The growth overseas on
the retail side is far outpacing
the U.S., and this year we
want to expand our geogra-
phic footprint and develop
new products,” he said. “We
want to use this infrastructure
to give our U.S. customers a
shot at trading internation-
ally.”

n PGA Tour



FORE! Phil Mickelson,

above, tees off during the |

Bob Hope Classic golf
‘tournament in Thousand, .
Palms, Calif., Friday. Golfer
Charley Hoffman, below,
tees off during the first
day of the Bob Hope
Classic golf tournament in
Berrmuda Dunes, Calif.,
Wednesday.

Web tool renovates contracting

* TOOLBOX

The niche ServusXchange
is aiming for is the small firm
thin on computer savvy, tech
support and budget. While
most industry software
requires contractors to make
hefty upfront payments and
live with their choice, MyOn-
lineToolBox has a modest
monthly fee with no further
obligation, said Javeline.

“There’s no contract to
sign. Just try it, and if you like
it, keep it,” he said. “Not even
the phone company will do
that for you.”

If Javeline sounds confi-
dent about the product, it’s
because ServusXchange has
invested heavily in under-
standing its market. The com-
pany worked with dozens of
real-world contractors who
helped shape the software’s
development. One thing the
collaboration highlighted
early on is that a contractor’s

life is one of constant inter-
ruptions, said Javeline.

On a typical morning, an
office manager might be field-
ing phone calls from four dif-
ferent projects and need to
jump between creating esti-
mates, checking client contact
information and issuing
invoices.

ServusXchange facilitates
that through its WorkFlow
Queue, a patent-pending pro-
cess that allows users to eas-
ily hop back and forth
between tasks without losing
their place or their data.

ORGANIZED SYSTEM

It’s a system that Oliver
Fugmann, office manager at
T.C. Crum Roofing and Gen-
eral Contractors of Welling-
ton, said he wished was in
place during last year’s hurri-
cane season. When the storms
hit, his office was slammed
with calls, he said. Panicked
homeowners often called

three or four times a day, talk-
ing to different employees,
and generating a slew of
duplicate orders.
MyOnlineToolBox would
have caught those duplica-
tions and made it easier to
coordinate the company’s
seven work crews and follow
up with clients, said Fugmann.
“This has helped us
streamline procedures in the
office and make sure every-
one is on the same page,” said
Fugmann. “And it has really
cut out so much paperwork.”
Whether Fugmann and
others will still be pleased
with the product once they
have to pay for it remains to
be seen. Meanwhile, Ser-
vusXchange is pursuing alter-
native streams of income —
from equipment rental to job
listings to transaction fees on
online payments — that may
allow it to offer the software
free for some time and still
make its break-even date of

2009, said Vice President
Michael Carson.

He said it’s working as a
marketing strategy. “We want
to start with this free seed, let
it spread and then figure out
how to ignite it,” said Carson.

While MyOnlineToolBox
is primarily. being used in
offices, the company is posi-
tioned for the day when cheap
hand-held computers are just
another tool in a worker’s
belt. ‘

HESITANT

But that day could still be a
ways off in an industry still
suspicious of technology, said
Cobb of the Association of
General Contractors.

“There is still this percep-
tion [among many construc-
tion workers] that the guy
with the hammer is the one
doing the work,” he said.
“And the guy sitting behind a
computer is just wasting
time.”

Es

a



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9



yy,
ie Ly jj

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PAGE 20, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

ES
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Lawmakers urge Britain and US to ©

THE TRIBUNE

work on alternative to Guantanamo

ml LONDON

A PANEL of British law-
makers urged the govern-
ment Sunday to work with
the United States to devel-
op an alternative to holding
terror suspects at Guan-
tanamo — aiming to speed
up the closure of the much-

Report also calls for overhaul of Geneva Conventions

criticized U.S. military
prison, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The Commons Foreign
Affairs Select Committee

released a report that also
called for an overhaul of the
Geneva Conventions and
suggesting Prime Minister
Tony Blair lead efforts to

update the international
standards to reflect the chal-
lenge of terrorism.

“The international com-
munity as a whole needs to

Teenage suspect detained in Turkey in
killing of ethnic Armenian journalist

ISTANBUL, Turkey —



POLICE on Saturday detained a teenag-
er suspected of slaying an ethnic Armenian
journalist, acting on a tip from the boy’s
father after his picture was broadcast on
Turkish television, senior officials said,
according to Associated Press.

The boy later confessed to the killing, a
prosecutor said.

Ogun Samast, who is either 16 or 17 years
old, was caught on a bus in the Black Sea
“city of Samsun, Prime Minister Recep

Tayyip Erdogan said. He was apparently
traveling from Istanbul back to his home-
town of Trabzon, Istanbul Gov. Muammer
‘Guler said.

Samast was wanted in connection with
the killing of Hrant Dink, a 52-year-old edi-
. tor of the Turkish-Armenian newspaper
-'Agos who was gunned down outside his
newspaper’s office in Istanbul on Friday.

On Sunday, Chief prosecutor Ahmet
_ Cokcinar told the state-run Anatolia news
-. agency that the teenager confessed to killing
Dink during initial questioning.

The private Dogan news agency quoted
the teenager told Cokcinar he had carried
out the attack because he did not like
‘ Dink’s opinions.

Erdogan said Samast was arrested with
the gun believed to have been used in the
killing. Video footage showed paramilitary
_ police at the Samsun bus station inspecting

a pistol and then placing it into an evidence,«««
tary said she saw him waiting in front of a

bag.

ne



For all life’s roads

Guler said Samast’s father had turned
him in.

Most Turks assume Dink ‘was targeted
for his columns saying the killing of ethnic
Armenians by Turks in the early 20th cen-
tury was genocide. Nationalists consider
such statements an insult to Turkey’s hon-
or and a threat to its unity, and Dink had
been showered with insults and threats.

Turkey’s relationship with its Armenian
minority has long been haunted by a bloody
past. Much of its once-influential Armenian
population was killed or driven out begin-
ning around 1915 in what an increasing
number of nations are calling the first geno-
cide of the 20th century.

Turkey acknowledges that large numbers
of Armenians died but vehemently denies it
was genocide, saying the overall figure is
inflated and the deaths occurred in the ciy-
il unrest during the collapse of the Ottoman
Empire.

Samast was caught after ieReigOn sta-
tions across ‘Turkey broadcast on Saturday
a purported photograph of hii caught by a
security camera about two blocks from the
scene of the crime in Istanbul.

Guler said earlier that Dink’s secretary
had identified the young man in the photo-
graph as the same person who had request-
ed a meeting with Dink the day he was
killed, the Anatolia news agency reported.
The man said he was a student at Ankara
University, Guler said.

The request was.refused, and the secre-

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bank about an hour before Dink was killed,
Anatolia reported.

Guler said Samast was born in 1990, but
did not release his exact age. He said the
teen was being brought back to Istanbul
for questioning along with six other sus-
pects from Trabzon.

Police were investigating whether the
teen acted alone or had ties to a group.

The suspect’s uncle Faik Samast told pri-
vate NTV television that he didn’t think
his nephew was capable of acting alone.

“He didn’t even know his way around
Istanbul,” Samast said. “This kid was used.”

Threats and violence against Turkish edi-
tors and reporters is not uncommon. Well-
known journalists commonly receive police
protection and travel around Istanbul with
bodyguards. Dink was alone when he was
killed.

Guler rejected accusations the govern-
ment did not do enough to protect Dink.

“Because he didn’t request protection,
he didn’t get close protection,” he said Sat-
urday. “Only general security precautions
were taken.”

Mourners held a vigil at the spot where
Dink was gunned down. Many in the crowd,
which included Turks and members of
Istanbul’s small Armenian community, had
pictures of the slain journalist pinned to
their chests.

“We’re here to pay our respects,” said
Sabri Nas, 47, an Armenian-Turk. “We are
against this violence,.whatever the motiva-
tion.”





onl,





shoulder its responsibility in
finding a longer-term solu-
tion” to the indefinite deten-
tion of terrorist suspects at
Guantanamo.

“We recommend that the
government engage actively
with the U.S. administration
and with the international
community to assist the
process of closing Guan-
tanamo as soon as may be
consistent with the overrid-
ing need to protect the pub-
lic from terrorist threats,”
the report said.

Detainees

About 395 foreign men
currently held at Guan-
tanamo are allegedly linked
to al-Qaida or the Taliban.
Human rights groups have
condemned the U.S. for
operating the prison, where
most detainees have been
held for years without being
charged.

The U.S. government has
blocked their access to U.S.
courts, claiming it has the
authority to detain them
indefinitely to keep America
safe. The military says many
of those imprisoned provide
interrogators with informa-
tion about terror networks.
The U.S. has operated the
prison for five years.

Nine British nationals held
at the facility had been
released by January 2005,
but the committee said it
believed another nine former
British residents remained at
Guantanamo. Human rights
lawyers have said they were
aware of eight ex-British res-

~ idents being detained.




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Seven panel members vis-
ited Guantanamo in Sep-
tember. Though the image
of inmates “kneeling in the
dirt, shackled and hooded”
was no longer accurate, the
report said Guantanamo
failed to achieve minimum
British standards “on access

‘to exercise and recreation,

to lawyers, and to the out-
side world through educa-
tional facilities and the
media.”

In October, Foreign Sec-
retary Margaret Beckett said
Guantanamo was “unaccept-
able in terms of human
rights” and “ineffective in
terms of counterterrorism.”

Blair has gone no further
than calling the camp an
“anomaly” that sooner or
later must end.

Treatment

The committee called on
Blair and his successor to
help change the Geneva
Convention that governs
treatment of prisoners of war
to “deal more satisfactorily
with asymmetric warfare,
with international combat-
ants and with the status of
irregular combatants.”

President Bush has said
the Geneva Conventions do
not apply to Guantanamo
detainees, who were classi-
fied as “enemy combatants”
—a status that accords them
fewer rights than prisoners
of war.

Britain’s Foreign Office
said it would not comment
on the report until a formal
response had been sent to
the committee.











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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 21



ee (Wa We Na |S



Rebels say government resumed
in Darfur

large-scale bombing

m@ SUDAN
Khartoum

GOVERNMENT aircraft
bombed wide areas of northern
Darfur in breach of a cease-fire,

. ‘rebel commanders said Sunday
as the African Union and the
U.S. called on Khartoum to let
insurgent factions hold a unity
meeting aimed at ending the
deadly infighting, according to

. Associated Press.

The reports on the bombings,
which could not be indepen-
dently confirmed, came days
after Sudanese President Omar
al-Bashir vowed to adhere toa
truce brokered by U.S. gover-
nor Bill Richardson and others
earlier this month.

Sudan’s military spokesman
denied the bombings, which
would violate the new cease-
fire as well as May peace agree-
ment between the government
and one rebel group and sever-
al U.N. Security Council reso-
lutions.

“We never bombard civilians
anywhere,” the army
spokesman said, speaking under
customary condition of
anonymity.

But rebel field commander
Abdallah Banda said the
Sudanese air force bombed

_large stretches of North Darfur
from Friday to Sunday near the
localities of Hashaba and Ein
Sirro.

Three villages were
destroyed, he said. Banda, a
rebel chief for the Justice and
Equality Movement, could not
confirm reports of more than a
dozen casualties.

“It’s too early to count the
dead, but there are probably
many,” he said by satellite tele-

. phone from North Darfur. JEM
is among several factions who
rejected the May peace accord.

The African Union peace-
keeping mission in Darfur,
already investigating two other
bombings reported earlier this
week, said it was aware of new

. Incidents in northern Darfur.

-. The AU’s cease-fire commis-

sion “has received such a report
and will send a team there,
hopefully tomorrow,” said
spokesman Noureddine Mezni.

Sudan has been repeatedly
accused of bombing civilians in
rebel-controlled zones with
crews on Antonov cargo planes
dropping crude explosives onto
villages, destroying houses and
killing cattle.

Many incidents are difficult
for the AU to investigate
because they occur in the rebel
strongholds of lawless northern
Darfur, which are “no-go
zones” for the 7,000 African
peacekeepers.

Denial

Sudan’s military spokesman
also denied allegations made by
the government of neighboring
Chad that Sudanese planes had
recently violated Chadian air-
space.

“We call on Chadians to
refrain from providing assis-
tance to Sudanese rebel groups
and honor the bilateral agree-
ments we have signed,” the
army spokesman said.

More than 200,000 people
have died in nearly four years of
fighting in Darfur, and the con-
flict is spilling over the borders
into the Central African Repub-
lic and Chad, where hundreds
of thousands of Darfur’s 2.5 mil-
lion refugees have fled.

Sudan and Chad trade accu-
sations of supporting each oth-
er’s rebel groups, and the Unit-
ed Nations —-which Khartoum
bars from deploying some
22,000 peacekeepers in Darfur—
is making plans to send them
to neighboring countries
instead.

Khartoum’s new accusations
came after the U.S. special

envoy for Sudan, Andrew Nat- |

sios, met with Darfur rebel lead-
ers in Chad on Friday to urge
them to work together for peace
in the region.

Several rebel commanders

said they were returning from

their talks with Natsios when
they were bombed Chad.

Banda, of JEM, said his
movement was planning a meet-
ing later this month, but com-
manders now had to join their
units because of the bombings.
Jar al-Naby, of the rival Sudan
Liberation Army rebel group,
also said his faction was plan-
ning to gather but would post-
pone this because of the bomb-
ings.

A truce for the rebel confer-
ence was initiated by the AU’s
chief commander in late
December. However, the
Sudanese government bombed
the meeting place just after the
African general left. He later
issued a statement calling on
the Sudanese government “to
desist from further bombard-
ment (so) as not to scuttle the
fragile cease-fire.”

Richardson, the visiting gov-
ernor of New Mexico who has
said he plans to announce his
candidacy for U.S. president
soon, obtained a public com-
mitment from Khartoum earlier
this month that-it would stick
to the new truce.

On Sunday, the U.S. embassy
in Khartoum said in a statement
that the United States support-
ed efforts by the AU and the
United Nations to facilitate a
rebel meeting.

“The United States calls on
the Government of Sudan to
respond positively to the
request from the African Union
for assurances that such a meet-
ing ... can take place under
secure conditions,” the state-
ment said.

AU officials say there are
now more than a dozen com-
peting Darfur rebel factions, up
from two when negotiations for
last May’s peace agreement
began.

In Khartoum, one splinter
group known as the “Free Will”
faction reunited on Sunday with
the Sudan Liberation Move-

the government.

Embattled Guinea president urges
unity amid paralysing strike

@ GUINEA
_ Conakry

THE embattled president of
Guinea on Sunday urged his
. countrymen and the army to
- support him in the face of a par-
’ alyzing nationwide strike aimed
at bringing down the govern-
ment of this west African
nation, according to Associated
Press.

The call marked President
Lansana Conte’s first public
address since the strike began
Jan. 10. With schools and busi-

‘nesses closed and Conakry’s
main seaport shut, the growing
strike represents one of the
gravest threats yet to the rule




of Conte, who seized power ina
1984 military coup.

“Guineans, and above all
our soldiers, must stay united,”
Conte said in an address
broadcast on state radio and
television. “We must,be proud
to wear the uniform, symbol
of our faith, and defend
Guinea.”

Surrounded by soldiers, Con-
te said “it is God who gives
power.”

The ailing leader spoke in the
local dialect of his Soussou eth-
nic group, which accounts for
about 20 percent of the tiny
nation’s 10 million people. Oth-
er main ethnic groups include
the Peuhl, who make up 40 per-

cent of the population and the
Malinke, who make up 30 per-
cent. Because of the country’s
ethnic diversity and myriad
dialects, the national language is
French.

Public support for Conte's
regime has faltered amid a
declining economy that has seen
the Guinea franc depreciate and
prices for food and fuel rise
markedly. The impoverished
country is home to nearly half
the world’s reserves of bauxite,
a material used to produce alu-
minum.

The strike began after Conte
halted the trial of two men
accused of stealing millions of
dollars from the state.

dahe

signed the May peace deal with









@ DARFUR rebellion delegates from the Sudan Liberation Movement (right: Abu Obeida
al-Khalifa) and the SLM “Free Will” faction (left: Ali Majouhk) clasp hands after they signed a
unity deal at the SLM’s headquarters in Omdurman, Sudan on Sunday. While the mainstream
SLM signed the Darfur Peace Agreement with the Sudanese government last May, more than a
dozen other factions reject it and violence in Darfur has only worsened since the accord was
reached.

(AP Photo/Alfred de Montesquiou)

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5B





Bahamas to host
top hotel summit

New tourism development company to
market Caribbean under single brand

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL :
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE Bahamas will receive
a tremendous economic boost
next January when it hosts del-
egates from around the world
». at Caribbean Marketplace
2008, to be held at the Atlantis
Resort and Casino on Paradise
"Island.

Celebrating its 27th anniver-
sary, Caribbean Marketplace
is the region's single most
. important tourism marketing
event, matching Caribbean
suppliers with international
buyers. Nearly 400 supplier
companies and destinations
showcase their products to
close to 900 buyers from 200
. International organisations.

The event attracts about
1,600 attendees and members
of the press from 35 countries.
Over 12,000 business appoint-
ments are scheduled to solidify

_ _ relationships with tour opera-

tors from the US, UK, Canada,
- Europe and Latin America
that sell the Caribbean.

It is used as a networking
tool for persons in the travel
industry, and allows for a num-
ber of submeetings to be held
during the conference.

Held

At this year's Caribbean
Marketplace, held in Oranjes-
tad, Aruba, January 14-16,
CHA officials announced that
they and the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation have
launched the Caribbean
Tourism Development Com-
pany (CTDC) to market the
region under a single brand.



world.

At a press conference to
launch the project, CHA pres-
ident Peter Odle said it was
vital that Caribbean countries
speak with one voice when
promoting the region as a pre-
mier tourism destination.

Similarly

Similarly, Allan Chastenet,
St Lucia’s minister of Tourism,
said that over the past 15 years,
the region has lost 3.7 per cent
of its market share, and that
the islands have to band
together to ensure that they
remain competitive.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, the CTO’s secetary-gen-
eral, said marketing the region
as a single destination would
not hamper the success of any
individual countries.

“ When the brand grows,
everyone’s business grows,” he
said..

He added that the Carribean
brand offered diversity, as
people realise each island has a
uniqueness to it that seperates
them from any other island.

CDTC will be a private, for -
rofit entity registered in the
Cayman Islands,
designed to generate market-
ing to further support the pro-
motion of the region.

CTDC evolved out of the
Memorandum of Understand-
ing and Cooperation signed by
CTO and CHA in October
2005. The new entity is jointly
owned and operated by CTO
and CHA, and each organisa-

THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS | |
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is to implement strategies that build.alliances and

and is’

partnerships with universities around the

tion will have a 50 per cent
share in the company.

The goals of the new com-
pany include:

* Promotion and protection
of the Caribbean brand

* Promotion and protection
of the interests of the owners.

* Creation of synergies
which might not otherwise go
to the partners.

* To generate revenues for
the benefit of the Caribbean
people.

The CTDC Board of Direc-
tors will include: co-chairmen,
consisting of the president of
CHA and the chairman of
CTO, the first vice-president
and first vice-chairman of the
respective organisations, and
the marketing directors of
these organisations, as well as
the secretary-general and chief
executive of CTO and the
director-general and chief
executive of CHA and the
chairman of the CHA Mar-
keting Committee.

Responsible

CTDC will be responsible
for a variety of projects, which
are marketing-focused and as
well as event-oriented. :

A press release on the new
company stated that other
examples of results from the
creation of CTDC will be the
launching of a series of news-
paper advertorial sections
across North America to pro-
mote the region.

Merchandising of the






Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

International Liaison Officer (ILO)

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators. .

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-tg-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°" January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas





tHAMAS

G & TRADING Ramamrans











Caribbean brand and logos will
be reviewed by the Board, as
the new Caribbean logo was
created as a collaborative
effort by CHA and CTO affil-
iates on both sides of the
Atlantic.

A new Caribbean Website
will -be launched in 2007, and a
series of media bulk purchas-
ing agreements will help mem-
bers of both organisations
reach greater economies of
scale, helping both the private
and public sector entities to
launch expanded advertising
and marketing campaigns. |

Oversee

The CTDC will also oversee
the cooperative efforts at con-
sumer travel shows, such as the
upcoming New York Times
Travel Show in February, in
which the Caribbean will bring
together the largest single
pavilion for any region under
the new Caribbean banner and
the popular Caribbean Week
in New York.

Other events such as music
festivals, a Caribbean beauty
pageant and a Caribbean fash-
ion show are among the long
range plans. In addition, the
CTDC will be looking at a co-
branded affinity credit card
under the Caribbean banner
the release added.

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P.O.Box N-497
Nassau, Bahamas

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Pictured above are (left): Eugene Higgs, Financial Controller & AVP. Financial
Services & Investments and (right) Gilbert Williams, Vice President Home Services
& Operations who made the cheque presentation on behalf of British American to
Lionel Haven, General Secretary for the BFA.

British American is actively involved in the community through its support of
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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED is in Dissolution”

The date of commencement of dissolution is 30th day of
August, 2006. ,

FIDES LIQUIDATORS INC.
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East 54th Street, Panama

Republic of Panama
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FROM page 1B

Daily Vol.

In a statement, the Cham-
ber of Commerce said it had
started an independent analy-
sis of the Bahamian services
and manufacturing sectors to
assess the “full implications”
for the Bahamian economy of
these international trade agree-
ments.

EPS $

Mr Major agreed that any
trade agreements entered into
by the Bahamas would impact
the “average businessman”,
adding that the Chamber want-
ed to educate the private sector
on what these agreements
meant for them.

“The second step is to go
beyond that — get from the
business community what their
concerns are, and where they
see some of the opportunities
relating to possible joint ven-

Div $

ture partners, not only in the
local economy and the same
industry, but regional and
multinational,” Mr Major said.
“In and of itself, our tax
structure is an area that will
have to be revisited, and that
will have an impact on all the
business community.”

Sensitive

He added that the most sen-
sitive areas for the Bahamas,












The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
‘making news inthe
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story

EU talks to impact
future investments

such as the industries reserved
for domestic ownership, its tax
structure, and services indus-
tries, required “skilled, delib-
erate negotiation” by this
nation to ensure that it was
able to obtain a full reserva-
tion or ‘opt out’ for them from
the EPA’s provisions, or that
at worst, any changes were
phased-in over time.

‘These areas we expect to be
negotiated in a phased
process,” Mr Major said,
adding that he did not want to
preempt whatever position the
Bahamas took on the EPA.

“This is a tremendous
opportunity for-us as a private
sector to really engage the pub-
lic and the community in these
arrangements, even as we find
ourselves at a point of delay,
and I use that term very loose-
ly,” Mr Major said. “These are
still negotiations, and we have
an opportunity to make sure
the Bahamas’ position is very
clear and the private sector’s
position is represented as best
we can.

“We have a lot of work to
do and are certainly engaged.
Everyone is certainly on board —
and recognizes not only the
urgency but the tremendous
importance it represents for
the country.”

Mr Major said Bacardi, Poly-
mers International and the
fisheries industry were all rep-
resented on the Task Force, as
the EPA outcome would
impact their businesses, lives
and jobs.

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Inco.

52wk-Low
1.2691
2.6262
2.3220
1.1495

10.0000

1.322791"
2.9728***
2.500211**

5 1.217450**"*
11.3075



SW IRA SRR

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
a N/M.>-Not Meaningful t

* LE INDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF WANDER (LONDON) OF
THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

ts! AND
\jsIN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
} Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
gov $ - Dividends per share paid in the lash 12¢moptt SY wrens
2g P/E - Closing price divided by the last 42 month‘eathings ¢

* - 5 January 2007
** - 31 December 2006
*** ~ 31 December 2006

nye
**** . 31 December 2006





VA - 31 December

eh
EGG
CRA NRE



NOTICE TO THE CREDITORS



The creditors of the above-named Company are-
required, on or before 20 February 2007 to send their
names and addresses and the particular of their
debts of claims, and the names and addresses of their
attorneys (if any) to Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis, the
Liquidator of the said company, at Dehands House, 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, P.O. Box N-7526, Nassau,
The Bahamas, telephone number 242-302-4800. The
creditors may be required by notice in writing from
the said debts or claims at the office of the Liquidator,
at such time as shall be specified in such notice. "fin
default thereof they will be excluded from the benfit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.







Queen’s College

Centre for Further Education

P.O. Box N-7127, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 393-1666, 393-2646, Fax: (242) 393-3248

Email: cfe@qchenceforth.com

Professional Development Clas




Anthony S. Kikivarakis

Liquidator





Re

Ge ened cs

Banamas Rep Cross

PRESENTS



Bananas Rem Caoss

Microsoft Word Level 1 | $255 | Jan. 29, 2007 to | Mon. & Wed.

(Pitman Levell ) March 28, 2007 | 6:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Microsoft:Word Level 2 Jan. 27, 2007 to Saturdays
March 24, 2007 }12:00 - 2:00 p.m.



FREE
COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS

















Jan. 29, 2007 to PeeW ane Wkes. 8 ae a
March 15, 2007
6 weeks

Mon. & Thurs
6:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Adult Conversational
French Level.1













Raising public
PEs Mal
Meta Cm Me uit
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Bahamian community.



Learn how to operate
the camera, develop
a simple story-board

script and make your

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(Pitman Level 2)













Mon. & Thurs
315-415pm.

Jan. 29, 2007 to
March 15, 2007
6 weeks

Kids Conversational
Spanish
(Ages 7-1 lyrs.)



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Jan 27,2007 to | Saturdays Guest Speaker:
















Microsoft PowerPoint March 24, 2007 | 10:00 - 12:00 p.m. Stel y ive :
Level 1 ; OR OR Sie mel Ce Le
Jan, 30, 2007 fo Tuesdays ener
March 29, 2007 | 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.



WEDNESDAY, JAN 24th
7PM

TUESDAY, JAN 23rd
ia







Classes are 8 weeks long ne
Spring Semester Break February 19.— 23, 2007 (na classes) Bears ed
, March 28, 2007

Call for schedule

Pitrnan Level 1—
Book-Keeping















Call for schedule



New Provipenct
(Olanrns ry CENTER,

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COMMUNITY
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29, 2007 to

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ch 28, 2007





Feb 03, 2007 to RveE CG HOR)
April 28, 2007
10 weeks

SATI Saturday
Classes
(All high School students)





Saturdays
9-00 - 12 noon










Saturdays
11:30 - 1:30 pm.




| March 28, 2007




Refreshments will be served.

For more information, please contact Diane Turnquest
at 327-1660 of 323-7370.





rth.com

For inquiries please contact Mrs. D. McKinney: - Administrator at 393-1666 or email: cfe@qchencefo







» erning similar associations in -

THE TRIBUNE



Pa Seas ee

Private security

five times as big as’

law enforcement

FROM page 1B

other countries and interna-
tional bodies.

On the security industry’s
economic importance to the
Bahamas, Mr Newry said there
were no readily available sta-
tistics on this, but an estimate

. that it employed three times

as many people as the Gov-
ernment’s law enforcement
agencies might well be an
underestimate.

He added that at a recent
meeting with the Ministry of
National Security, it was sug-

3 gested that the number of per-

sons employed in private secu-
rity was “five times that of the
police”.

Given that the police force

numbers between 2,000-2,500

officers, this estimate indicated
that the private security indus-

» try employed at least 10,000
- people, Mr Newry said, spread

between private companies, in-

, house officers and teams

- employed by specific compa-

nies for their own security, and
suppliers of electronic security
and surveillance devices.

He pointed out that because

- the security industry was

oe ait ae + eek a

ck ee Sw LTT

involved in the protection of
assets, both human, physical
buildings and financial, its indi-
rect economic impact went far
beyond that of its direct one.
Mr Newry said the private
security guards played a key

* role in making the Bahamas a

safe destination for tourists,
and personnel from the sector
were more likely to be seen by
visitors than police officers.
Therefore, the industry was
key to making the Bahamas
seem a Safe destination, ensur-

. ing the tourists kept coming.

Mr Newry said the steering
committee was considering



whether the Association
should embrace as wide a
membership as possible, mak-
ing it open to anyone involved
in asset protection, such as
accountants.

“We are considering that this
organisation should not be lim-
ited to guards or frontline
accountants,” Mr Newry said,
“and whether it should include
accountants, auditors and
fraud examiners — anyone
who’s involved in protecting
the assets of the company. The
accountants controls what goes
in, what comes out, and looks
out for fraud and loss.”

He added that executives
involved in crisis management,
disaster management and
emergency response techni-
cians might also be admitted
to the Association when it is
formed.

“Our organisation is endeav-
ouring to bring all these people
into one body, and participat-
ing in making a better, safer
Bahamas,” Mr Newry said.
“We want to be able to work
with the Ministry of National
Security in the not too distant
future to improve the standard
for security guards entering the
industry, and ensuring we have
a high quality of persons in the
industry.

NOTICE

“We have a deadline, just
over 70 days away or so, and
will have something to present
to the general public as to
where we are with the consti-
tution.”

The Steering Committee was
continuing to meet in Nassau
and Grand Bahama, Mr
Newry said, and on its adviso-
ry board were ‘persons such as
Paul Thompson, former assis-
tant commissioner of police,
Henry Whyms of WEMCO,
and Christopher Lowe, presi-
dent of the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce.

Mr Newry said different con-
cerns were being raised
depending on which parts of
the industry the companies and
individuals involved worked.

For the private security com-
panies, their greatest concern
was to secure enough talented
labour, while for personnel
employed in the tourism, hotel
and restaurant sectors, their
concerns related to the type of
guest attracted to those estab-
lishments.

And for electronic security
companies, their concerns
related primarily to the cost
and availability of technology,
and being able to provide good
service to the customer, Mr
Newry said.

NOTICE is hereby given that GARTH STEWART OF
CROSSING ROCK, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that on 21 November 2006 by
resolution of its Members, Wander (London) of the
Bahamas Limited went into voluntary liquidation and
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis of Deloitte & Touche, 2nd
Terrace West, Centerville, Nassau, The Bahamas, was .

appointed the Liquidator.

Signed
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis
Liquidator
P. O. Box N-7526
Nassau, Bahamas
242-302-4800






yl
yp

SYZ & CO ]] Bank & Trust

Private Banking
OYSTER Funds

Alternative Investments

www.syzbank.com

Mark your calendar
Our Application Deadline
is February 2, 2007

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7B

yas,

Senior/Junior Programmer (Ss)

British American Insurance Company the oldest insurance company in the Bahamas and
a leading financial services institution is searching for an experienced, highly organized
Programmer to develop and maintain company-specific applications. The ideal candidate
must be self-motivated to complete initiatives within established timelines and exercise
versatility with respect to project assignments.

Responsibilities:

¢ Support and maintain Oracle database applications

¢ Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

° Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

e Maintain existing database integrity and standards

¢ Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
¢ Create test transactions, refine and debug programs. —

¢ Train‘end-users and technical support staff

Core Competencies:

e Proven project leadership and project implementation

e Experience with formal software development methodologies

e Strong analytical skills and experience in developing applications that meet user
requirements

° Must have strong oral and written communication skills

Required Qualifications:

¢ 3+ years of recent programming experience including use of Oracle PL/SQL as primary
programming language

* Bachelor’s degree in CS or equivalent experience and/or education

¢ Oracle Developer or DBA certifications a plus

Preferred Skills:

¢ Possess strong Project experience ideally on Oracle Applications implementations,
business systems design, or projects in general

¢ Proficient in MS Project and/or MS Project Server (required)

¢ Experience with SQL Server

Technical Skills:

C,C++, .NET, Oracle 8i/9i, Developer 6i (Forms & Reports), PL/SQL, Crystal Reports

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including
Life, Health and Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Manager, British American Insurance,
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N4815, Nassau, Bahamas or via email to
“dparker@babinsurance.com”



Innovative Private Banking Group is presently looking for a:

Compliance Officer

The successful applicant must:
m Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.
m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.

m Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge.and experience with:
Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.
Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.
Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.

Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

Motivated team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

We offer:
m= A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.

Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

Please send your resume and two (2) letters of reference to:
SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. a Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park a RO. Box N-1089 @ Nassau, Bahamas



Remember to include the following with your application

$40.00 non-refundable processing fee :
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of

birth and expiration date of passport

Official high school transcript

e Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!



e look forward to welcoming you to The College,

soon to be the University of The Bahamas.








PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DWAIPAYAN CHOUDHURY OF
HUDSON STREET, P.O. BOX SS-6256 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUERDA TOUSSAINT OF
MIAMI STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED

DATA PROCESSOR
MUST BE ABLETO ASSIST WITH
INVENTORY

A
SALES PERSONS
WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE








AL










Please forward resume to:
Taylor Industries Ltd.

P.O. Box N-4806 .

Nassau, Bahamas

America awaits

THE TRIBUNE ~

action on ee

@ By H JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —A
year after warning America of
its addiction to oil, President
Bush is expected to renew con-
cerns about energy security in
his State of the Union address.
But will the rhetoric be fol-
lowed by action? Up to now,
the record has been mixed.

Aides hint of a major pro-
nouncement on energy in the
speech before Congress and
the nation Tuesday night. Yet
the president is expected to
take a predictable path, urg-
ing expanded use of ethanol in
gasoline, more research into
cleaner burning coal and on
gas-electric “hybrid” cars, and
greater nuclear energy.

He may tweak his voluntary
program on climate change.
Aides, however, say the presi-
dent remains opposed to
mandatory cuts in carbon diox-
ide and other heat-trapping
“greenhouse” gases as has
been proposed in Congress.

A year ago, Bush declared
“America is addicted to oil”
and he set a goal of replacing
three-fourths of today’s oil
imports from the Middle East
by 2025. He pledged to press
for alternatives to oil and for
more efficient use of energy.

He has had some success in
getting more domestic pro-
duction.

The Bush administration has
opened new federal lands for
oil and gas drilling. Last

MINISTRY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVORONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
BAHAMAS GOVERNMENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Department of Environmental Health Services (DEHS) and The Ministry of Energy and The
Environment, now invites local firms and joint ventures to participate in this bidding process by
presenting sealed bids for the processing and exporting of derelict vehicles and other ferrous
materials for New Providence and the Family Islands. The procedures for the contracting for the
provision of service, financed by this program, will be subject to the provisions of the Ministry

of Finance.

Interested parties may obtain further information, including eligibility to participate, and may

| | collect'a copy the bidding document from the office of the:

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
MINISTRY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Farrington Road
P.O. Box SS-19048
Nassau, The Bahamas

Interested Tenderers may purchase a complete set of tender documents by submitting a written
application to the Department of Environmental Health Services and upon payment of a non-
refundable fee of one hundred ($100.00) dollars. The method of payment will be certified
cheque or cash. The documents would be ready for review as of Friday, January 26", 2007,

Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope(s) marked “Tenders for Processing and
Exporting of Derelict Vehicles and Other Ferrous Materials for New Providence and The

Family Islands”, and sent to:

The Tenders Board
c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

All tenders must reach the Tender’s Board no later than 4:00 p.m. on Monday, February 26",
2007. All tenders must be submitted in triplicate. Tenders will be opened at 10: 00 am., on
Tuesday, February 27", 2007, at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance. The
Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders,



month, Congress approved
opening a large new area in
the Gulf of Mexico to drilling.
This month, Bush lifted a long-
time ban on oil and gas drilling
in Alaska’s Bristol Bay.

But when it comes to wean-
ing the country away from oil,
the president’s critics say his
rhetoric has not been matched
by action.

“President Bush actually cut
funding for the key energy-sav-
ing technologies,” says Joseph
Romm, a former head of the
renewable fuels and efficien-
cy programs at the Energy
Department during the Clin-
ton administration.

The department’s requests
for renewable fuel and conser-
vation programs have stayed
flat at about $1.18 billion annu-
ally over the past six years —
really a decline if inflation is
considered, energy efficiency
advocates say.

“Since 2002, the energy effi-
ciency programs at the Energy
Department have dropped by
a third in real dollars,” says
Kateri Callahan, president of
the Alliance to Safe Energy, a
private advocacy group.

When one program is
increased, others have suf-
fered, these critics maintain.

They acknowledge spending
increases for research into
solar and wind energy, but con-
tend that came at the expense
of two other renewable energy
programs that were eliminated:
research into geothermal ener-
gy deep within the earth and
efforts to make hydroelectric
dams more fish friendly.

Congress has not been all
that helpful, either.

The energy law passed in
2005 authorized $3.8 billion
worth of renewable energy and
conservation programs. But a
vast majority of those pro-
grams are without minds, nel-

ther requested by the adminis-
tration nor approved by Con-
gress.

Callahan points to a $450
million consumer education
and outreach campaign on

energy efficiency in that law,,

but says “not one penny has
been appropriated” nor has the
money been sought by the
administration.

Energy Secretary Samuel
Bodman says the administra-
tion over the years has spent
nearly $12 billion in developing
new energy technologies. He
cited the president’s $2.1 bil-

lion “advanced energy initia- ~

tive”. in the State of the Union
a year ago.

Nuclear

But most of that program
goes for nuclear research and
clean coal technology that gen-
erally has little impact on the
country’s dependence on oil,
70 percent of which is used in
transportation.

For that, Bush told a renew-
able fuels conference last year
in St. Louis, “we need to
change how we power our
automobiles. ... I like the idea
of promoting a fuel that relies
upon our farmers.”

Bush has.supported law-
makers’ push to use more
corn-based ethanol as a gaso-
line blend and he is expected
to call for a sharp escalation
of ethanol use in his speech.

It is a political sure bet as
ethanol has widespread bipar-
tisan support.

Among the first bills intro-
duced in the new Democratic-
run Senate calls for using 60
billion gallons of ethanol, 10
times current production
capacity, by 2030.

Two 2008 presidential hope- .

fuls, Democratic Sens. Barack
Obama of Illinois and Joe

Biden of Delaware, are its.~.-

leading co-sponsors.

Ethanol is “riding a big.
wave” this year, says Mark
McMinimy, a policy analyst at
the Stanford Group. “The
renewable fuels-ethanol jug-,,
gernaut enjoys one of the most:
prized commodities in Wash- *
ington — broad-based support, .

we

bipartisan political momen- | ~

tum.”

. But even there, the adminis- =.”

tration has been ‘criticized for,
not living up to the rhetoric. _

In last year’s State of the) ~
Bush.’ -

Union speech,

a

a

announced a goal to make a °.

“new kind of ethanol ee
and competitive within six.

years.” His administration fol- |.

lowed within days with a bud-,

get calling for only a modest: os

increase — about $29 million.”

— for research into cellulosic , a

ethanol development.

Last week, the House passed’ ,
legislation that would funnel .
$14 billion in money collected ;
from oil companies into a:
renewable fuel fund. Ethanol |:
lobbyist Bob Dinneen of the.”

of

A

Renewable Fuels Association a:

welcomed the action and urged, ,
that the fund finance loan °
guarantees — approved by.

c

not

Congress in 2005, but not fund- ©.

ed — for cellulosic ethanol |
plants.
Yet the White House strong-

ly opposed the House-passed , : iB

bill in part because it said addi-,

tional taxes on the oil compa- ,. °

nies should not be used to pay...
for such new programs.
A report last week by the >

General Accountability Office, *

the investigative arm of Con- '
gress, concluded “it is unlikely” . ,
that the government’s current °-
research and development pro-

grams will provide the alter- .. ; a

native energy sources needed ~
to “reverse our growing depen-,
dence on imported oil.”

IN DIAN A SOCIATI ON OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

BOARDING SCHOOL FAIR

An Exposition of the Finest Boarding Schools in Canada offeri ‘ing University Preparation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007

6:00 - 9:00PM

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secondary grade levels offered
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* scholarships and financial assistance available

MEET REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS:

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5: ,

THE TRIBUNE




@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas could be left
with rundown tourism proper-
ties that generate a net loss for
their owner if it fails to attract
new investment and resorts to
all its islands, a Ministry of
Tourism deputy director-gen-
eral has warned.

Addressing the Sunrise
Rotary Club, David Johnson
said that while there was a feel-

ing the Bahamas - and espe-

cially the Family Islands -
could be “overwhelmed” by
large-scale tourism develop-
ments, a failure to upgrade

could lead to the decline of ©

many hotels.
“The risk here, though, is

that if we withdraw we could’

find ourselves in those areas
or islands where we adopt this
strategy with an old, tired plant
attracting low-end customers
where the cost.to attract and
host these customers might be
matching or even greater than
the net return associated with
hosting them,” Mr Johnson
said, “and in Cable Beach and
downtown Nassau, we are on
the verge of returning to that
situation if we refuse to rede-
velop and reinvent these
areas.” He added that the tra-
ditional resort hotel, financed
by a sufficient number of short-
staying guests who generated
enough revenues to meet costs
and generate a profit for the
owners, was becoming redun-
dant due to poor performance
and a failure to deliver finan-
cial returns.

Instead, the tourism indus-
try had switched to mixed-use
resorts, minimising exposure
and risk for owners and their

partiets by relying on the vis-
itor to finance it through pre--

sales of condos, single family
homes and lots as second or
third homes, timeshares, frac-
tional’ ownership. and docko-
miniums..

Mr Johnson said the key for
Bahamian tourism and the
wider economy was to suc-
cessfully integrate such devel-
opments with local communi-
ties hosting them, with the



















Closed:

BUSINESS

No turning back on
tourism investments







Government and developer
financing the infrastructure,
and opportunities provided for
potential Bahamian entrepre-
neurs. °

The Bahamas, he added,
could still shape the tourism
industry into the one it wanted,
taking a more proactive
approach to planning at the
local level and segmenting this
nation’s islands into different
brands, each with their own
identities and stand-out attrac-
tions.

Yet too few Bahamians were
taking advantage of potential
‘business opportunities in sec-
tors reserved specifically for
100 per cent Bahamian own
ership..Mr J ey hile
‘those who hac
ownership ha
institutions
Bahamas Developmen! Bani
with mounting debt

Bahamian companies were
supplying an “ins cant”
amount of food 1
products’ to an estimated fine
million total visitors, who speni
a combined $2 billion in this
nation. with these sectors fail





failed, leaving

such as







The museum is named for the African slave Pompey who led a revolt on the island of
Exuma in 1830 and defied the dehumanizing institution of slavery. The museum is

® DAVID JOHNSON

ing to meet domestic demand
for their goods.

And Mr Johnson said the
Bahamas was still a nation
where “the majority of our
people are driven towards a
preference for ‘white collar’
jobs and working indoors in
air conditioned premises.

“The Government is by far
the largest employer, and we
have far too few of our citizens
being inclined to own busi-
nesses or interested in pursuing
careers outside of the tradi-
tional administrative areas.

Che reality is that many
more profitable business
opportunities exist that
Bahamians are bypassing as
non-Bahamians or those wha, ..,
have recently acquired status

capitalise on such opportuni-

ies ‘
Arguing that the Bahamas
should look at whether to tar-
get Andros for developing an
agriculture industry supplying
products to the tourism sector,
reducing the leakage of $0.80
of every tourism dollar that is
spent outside the Bahamas, Mr
johnson suggested that such

housed in the former marketplace, Vendue House built around 1769 to allow for the sale

This riveting exhibition was created by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
tthe} \ Museum during this bicentennial year to mark



and UNESCO and is featured a |
the abolition of the transatisiitie . ik

OVER

of commodities including enslaved Africans.

mae ORGET _

SLAVERY

Se



This traveling exhibition is unique in that it focuses less on enslaved Africans as victims
and more on the ways in which they reshaped their destinies and place in history through

the creation of distinct cu!tures

Authentic objects associated with the at

Schomburg Press Release

ima of enslavement including shackles, a slave

branding iron, a slave whip, /urniture (rons a slave house and more are here for you to see and

experience.

Days/Hours:

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Admission: Non-Resicen‘s

Adults:
Seniors (60 plus)

Sunday and Thursday

$3.00
$2.00

Children (under 14) $1.00

Resideniis:

Bay Street opp. George S
eee 4] Pe Ky

ee ue va
Pa LY



Adults:
Children (iinder 14) $1.00

$2.00



- have to provide themselves,



MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9B

MEETING FOR PEOPLE WHO STUTTER



Qualified Applicants s should possess the following:

e Solid training in all areas of Hotei Accounting from A/P, AUR.
General Ledger, Credit, Collections, Audit, Inventory control,
payroll, Budgeting, Costing, P&L preparation and analysis, etc.

} ° Clear, concise written and verbal communication skulls

e Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects

¢ Demonstrate team building experience

e Track record promoting an atmosphere of teamwork

¢ Solid career progression up through the ranks

) » Abilities to inspire, train, and develop people for promotion

Qualified Applicants should possess the following:
° Creativity in selling, managing and menu design
¢ Knowledge of banquets. catering, and room service
¢ Understanding forecasting budgeting, food and labor costs
¢ Ability to read and manage a P&L
° Positive attitude who appreciates being part of a team
® Organized with good computer skills
¢ Desire to mentor and train others
¢ Ability to focus, stay on task and produce
e Must be a strong manager and proven leader

(FILE photo)

possibilities could be unlocked
through joint ventures and
partnerships with foreigners.
Among the services and
products developers would

and “not part of their core
business”, if Bahamians did not
step up to the plate were indus-
trial laundry facilities to sup-
port investments within a 25-
mile radius.

Other services required were
furniture repair facilities; fine
dining and out-of-resort restau-
rants with Bahamian themes;
machine shops; tour operators;
authentic Bahamian arts and
handicrafts; fresh seafood;
medical and healthcare facili-
ties; small-scale bonefishing -
and eco-lodges; residential
housing; and landscaping work.

Personal. Energetic Executive Chef who is a leader. innovator,
dynamic, creative, flexible, people oriented with strong
management skills and eager to display a genuine desire to lead
the team in producing a high quality product and to maximize the
performance of kitchen personnel.

Business and profit oriented, able to estimate food consumption
and purchase food, create menus, strong people management
and development skills with strong ability to manage ina diverse
environment with focus on client and customer services is
essential to success in this role

All applications are appreciated but only qualified ee will .
be considered. Our email address is kw t@marle ce
H Fax: (242). 2 RAFr4393. 08 you can mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440,

Nassau, Bas mas



a
MK

QE GG"
QBS

—

Freeport ¢ Container Port

rand Bahama, Bahamas

Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of

Straddie Technician

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

° Three (3) years’ experience in repairing and maintaining heavy mobile
equipment.

Certification in Heavy Equipment Repair and Maintenance (Diploma or *
Associate Degree preferred)

Three to Five years working experience and knowledge of Kalmar or
Noell Straddle Carries.

Computer Literate
Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

¢ Must be able to repair and maintain:
o Hydraulic Systems
o Diesel & Gasoline Engines
o Automotive Electronic Circuits

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful
candidates:

Fuli-time Employment

Major Medical/Life Group Insurance

Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents

Performance Bonus

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau
on January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m.
through 4:00 p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11B |









Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

~ Mild winter ‘softens’
Bahamas travel demand

FROM page 1B




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably

near their home cities.
However according to two

Bahamian hoteliers, the trend

has not impacted Nassau.
Baha Mar's booking pace for

end of last week, the arrival of
cold weather in the US had
meant that the telephone and
Internet booking lines at major
Bahamian hotels were ringing

once again. .

Yet Bahamian hoteliers spo-
ken to by The Tribune said the
unseasonably warm winter in
the northeastern US had not

mild winter.”
He added that towards the

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR
EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,

. an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
‘ community with private residences and club, 200
_ slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
» course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably

! ; qualified individuals to apply for the following
~ position with the company:

'e Director of Design -

e Exterior Relations

° Project Managers

e Project Engineers

e Genaral Superintendents ~

¢ Superintendents

e Assistant Superintendents

e Electrical Construction Managers
¢ Mechanical Construction Managers
¢ Office Engineers

e Manager of Quality Control

e Inspectors .

- Over 20 postions are to filled: All positions
. Tequire successful applicants to reside at North

| Eleuthera or vicinity.

* Interested persons should submit their resumes
t xwith cover letter to:

fycsepes feeacpee cs k Te
3837

To eee CeO LE!

a
a
Bh
a
4
Hie
6
|
ao
ao
a
‘

The H.R. Director
' GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com
Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all

applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



Wish to increase your
pay for 2007???

Looking for Sales Manager,
Assistant Managers and

ta , : motivation and recruitment e
Sales Associates for High End * Coordinate and manage multiple food venues. * Manage local accommodations
° Coordinate and manage all food preparation * Upkeep of boat fleet

Jewellery and Fashion.
it teins é Q ing re

2-5 years experience. —
21 years of age or older.
Have a pleasant smile
Be a people’s person
Energetic

Team Player |

Love for luxury retail.

If you meet the requirements of all the
above, come and be a part of our team with
rewarding incentives and great financial
opportunities

Submit Resume with a passport size photo
to:

Versace Boutique
Crystal Court
Atlantis, Paradise Island
Hillside@batelnet.bs



this month was the same as this
time last year, said Robert
Sands, senior vice-president for
administration and public
affairs.

He said the mild weather in
US cities was something that

affected their January book-
ings, something that has
impacted other hotels in the
region.

With temperatures being
unseasonably warm, coupled
with a lack of snow over the
first week of the year, some
hoteliers attending Caribbean
Marketplace 2007 in Aruba
said they had recorded a
decrease in visitor arrivals as
Americans either stayed at
home or vacationed in towns

no impact has been felt.

Similarly Opal Gibson,
spokeswoman for the British
Colonial Hilton, said January
bookings were looking solid
well at over 80 per cent.

POSITION
AVAILABLE

Registered Nurse

Responsibilities

¢ Provide primary and minor emergency
medical care
Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined |
in the Clinical Protocol Manual
Provide accurate and comprehensive medical
reports as required

Requirements:
Holder of current Bahamian Licence
Must have at least three years experience post
graduation
Have current BLS & ALS Certification
Must be responsible, have good
communication skills and independent.

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
mary.epcotmedical? }
@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.

THE
MEDICLINIC

ix

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the ee
position with the company:

CHEF

Duties and Responsibilities

areas.
¢ Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.
_¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.

© Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience a four (4)
star restaurant cuisine and dining with significant
experience in the food industry. Must have experi-
ence in start up restuarant operation. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and budgeting. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:

The H.R. Director
GCM ti
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



will be monitored, but as yet -

qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

BOAT CAPTAIN



















































Duties and Responsibilities




¢ Manage fleet of boats and related equipment.
¢ Coordinate and manage maintenance of boats
¢ Coordinate all water sport activities.

¢ Snorkeling

e Diving

e Flats and Deep Sea fishing ’
e Manage Staff of First Mates.
¢ Coordinate Safety of all boat patrons.

¢ Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding areaand
have a minimum of 10 years experience as a boat
captain. Must be familiar with the local waters
and the area around Royal Island. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and boat operations. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.



Interested persons should submit their resumes
_ with cover letter to:

The H.R. Director
GCM
" P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
+» Or. Enaall fe! toe ee com




Royal Island aan) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential community

with private residences and club, 200 slip marina and
boutique hotel and spa, and a golf course just off North
Eleuthera is seeking to employ a Married Couple with strong
managerial, operational and organizational skills in
managing resort properties to oversee all day to day
operations on the island.

Duties and Responsibilities



e Greeting potential members/buyers/investors

¢ Arranging transportation, including airport, transfers, boats
and on -island vehicles

¢ Responsible for setting up guest relations, all staff training,

¢ Manage/coordinate all ocean/beach activities
¢ Manage guest inquiries and complaints in an efficient and
professional manner

* Once the Preview Village is completed this position will:
e Oversee operations
¢ Maid Service

¢ Kood/ beverage

¢ Beach activities

e Ocean activities

° General maintenance upkeep of premises
e Manage fitness/spa activities

e Assist in sales process




* Qualifications: The ideal candidate must have a minimum
of 10 years experience in resort property management with
significant experience in the restaurant and spa industry,
including® operations and maintenance of pool and spa
equipment. Must have strong managerial and organizational
skills in the areas of personnel and bugeting. Must be computer
literate with strong written and verbal communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes “ cover
letter to:

The H.R. Direc

GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125

Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.



PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

i os a a
Joint venture

lines up Bahamas
resort projects



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ATAIN TAKITOTA OF
BAHAMA AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.













Legal Notice

NOTICE

LUKANDRES INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LUKANDRES INVESTMENTS
LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



OSes te key melee AE ea cele

mae in Barbados, Bahamas or Cayman Islands)
RESPONSIBILITIES:

the function in the management of compliance risk

particularly those associated with the products and
services provided by the Bank
| ° To be responsible at a senior level for implementing

Bank
e To assist with developing policies, procedures and
controls to guide the business



QUALIFICATION & EXPERIENCE:

e Legal and or regulatory background and experience
| © Minimum of five years of relevant experience in the
| financial services or legal industry

& © Bachelor's Degree in Finance/Business or Legal “

| ~=Qualifications





') ° To be a key member of the Compliance Team, assisting

(| associated with the legal and regulatory requirements,

the Compliance Strategy and ensuring an acceptable -
level of compliance and internal control practice in the

A US holding company that
owns 54 mining claims in Utah,
the US, has entered into a joint
venture agreement with a Nas-
sau-based company to halp it
acquire interests in resort and
condominium projects in the
Bahamas.

Russell Industries said it had
signed the agreement with
Andros Isle Development Ltd,
a wholly-owned subsidiary of



FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of market-leading financial services in
Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital Markets and Treasury.
We are the largest regionally-listed bank in the English-speaking Caribbean with over 3,500 staff,

100 branches and banking centres, andipffices in 17 regional markets, serving 800,000 active accounts.



Andros Isle Development Cor-
_ poration.

The Tribune had previous-
ly reported that Andros Isle
had submitted proposals to the
Government fora tourism-
related development centred
on the Lighthouse Club at
Fresh Creek, Andros, the last
remaining resort property
owned by the Hotel Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas.

This newspaper had been
told at the time that the Gov-
ernment had received several
proposals for the Lighthouse
Club, but none were close to
receiving formal approval at
that time.

“The purpose of the joint
venture is to facilitate the
acquisition and development
of condo hotels, luxury resorts,
marinas and high end and

e Ability to research and apply relevant international
standards in local environment
e Strong knowledge of relevant financial/banking

legislation and regulations

e Strong knowledge of Compliance and risk

management

e Good interpersonal skills to work effectively with

customers and staff

e Excellent written and oral communication skills

© Good PC skills and proficiency in Microsoft Office and
other appropriate applications

e Ability to work on own initiative

e Strong multi-tasking and time management skills with
an ability to work in a deadline-oriented environment

e Exposure to general banking and particularly risk
management support functions —

e Self-motivation and the ability to manage the situation

¢ Team player orientation

, Applications with detailed résumés with the names of three business references should be submitted no later than «

4 Monday 29th January, 2007 to:

Anna McLean

Head of Compliance

First Caribbean International Bank (Cayman) Limited
George Town, Cayman Islands

Email: anna.mclean@firstcaribbeanbank.com



f) RESPONSIBILITIES:

F © To deliver planned targets by aggressively growing the

book of profitable business and increase the relative
contribution of the Corporate Banking to overall
| business profitability
Hl ° To enhance and strengthen the reputation of
| FirstCaribbean International Bank and the Corporate



be
fi

external network of key stakeholders, prospects,

business community at large

© To effectively lead and mentor the team of business
development and relationship managers who
originate and provide business:solutions to clients in

OPCO



i Monday 29th January, 2007 to:

[| Deangelia Deleveaux
Business Associate
First Caribbean International Bank
Human Resources Department
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: Deangelia.Deleveaux@firstcaribbeanbank.com

ély structured compensation and reward package

ell'as performance bonuses.



Division in markets by developing and maintaining an

community involvement, and playing a key role in the

the corporate and commercial markets in the Bahamas

“DIRECTOR, CORPORATE BANKING - BAHAMAS OPCO (Based in Bahamas),



QUALIFICATION & EXPERIENCE:

e In-depth understanding of Corporations business, —
financing solutions, issues and challenges

e Superior ability to interpret complex corporate client
needs and to assemble innovative value-adding
solutions that achieve client objectives

¢ High level of understanding of the markets,
geographic, macro economic and global factors

impacting our client base

© Highly effective communication skills to deal
productively with demanding and sophisticated clients

¢ Must have a clear vision for the direction and goals of
this business and be able to lead people through
change to share and operationalise that vision

¢ Ability to work effectively within and across complex

matrix structures

e Graduate status with minimum of 7 years' experience
in the business/financial world

L Applications with detailed résumés with the names of three business references should be submitted no later than

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

resort communities in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas,” said Rick Berman,
president and chief executive
of Russell Industries.

The partners said they
hoped to announce their first
joint project “in the coming
weeks”, and were focusing on
hotels that are currently oper-
ational and can be redeveloped
as condo hotels, as well as,
small, ultra luxury develop-
ment projects in the Family
Islands.





Sas,
tas

e THE Central Bank of
the Bahamas has named, '
two financial institutions: |
alleged to be operating in”
breach ofthelaw. =

The financial services reg-_
ulator warned that:
Caribbean International’
Bank, purportedly based at —
the Solomon’s Building in
Nassau, and Deltec Finan-
cial & Trust Services, claim-
ing to be based at Deltec
House, Lyford Cay, were
not licensed under the
Banks and Trust Compa- |
nies Regulation Act 2000. ©

e THE Government and
financial services regulators
are developing legislative
amendments to provide a
supervisory regime for
money transmission busi:
nesses. o

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DJERMA HOLDINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DJIERMA HOLDINGS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. ’

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLACK CHERRY CORPORATION

af

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BLACK CHERRY CORPORATION has

| been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORB. INC.
(Liquidator)



lf your answers are aWES, then
we want youNOW!

Please respond to Fax: 363-6822
hrarecruitment@starwoodvo.com, |
Harborside Resort Or Deliver the resume to:.

Human Resources Department
Marine One Building

Marina One Drive, Paradise Island

The Recruiter,

at Atlantis on or
before Jan 24th,
07, by:

©

VACHVSOR GMRKR EO”



The Atlantis Vacation Club is Recruiting
Explorer Sales Representatives!

Can youListen as well as you hear?
Are Peopledrawn to you?

Are you Goal oriented?

Are youPositively Focuse@

Do you have exceller®uest Relation?

Can you build instarnfrust andRapport? |

Are you aTeam Playeryet Self Motivated?

Do you have tremendot&nergy to SELL?

Sheraion
Santino tianne











W
WESTIN

AAD BONEN

SrRecis





aR:





HIGH
LOW

Volume: 103 No.50





#m lovin it. |

82F
71F

SUNSHINE
=~ AND CLOUDS

EU talks to impact
future investments

Naga eg (by Eanes abut

TSA agents discover

‘serious weaknesses’

during inspections of
Customs Warehouse

at the airport

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
_ Tribune Staff, Reporter.



CUSTOMS pre- -clearance at
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport could be with-
drawn in the near future, if the
“serious weaknesses” discov-
ered by TSA agents during their
inspections of the Customs
Warehouse at the airport are
not addressed, The Tribune has
learned.

Agents from the Transporta-
tion and Security Administra-
tion (TSA), a wing of the US
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity, have revealed that the secu-
rity lapses — allegedly exploit-
ed by the arrested baggage han-
dlers from Nassau Flight: Ser-
vices (NFS) — are not only still
in play at the airport, but have
yet to be addressed by the Air-
port Authority or the Ministry
of Transport and Aviation.

The Customs Warehouse,
which has direct access to the
airport, stores cargo for inter-
national and local airlines. It is
this access, which if left

unchecked, could have serious
international repercussions, not
only for the Bahamas, but US
security generally. .

It is understood that the
“worst case scenario” would be
that a 90-day notice would be














ts!

12noeon - 5pm ° Janue ery. 27th 2007
Entry Fees Adults $5 Chi

| i Bic Po) yee st

issued by the US Embassy, -

alerting travellers to the securi-
ty'risks associated with flying
to the Bahamas, until the weak-
nesses are corrected. :

However, it is understood
that every effort is being made
“through back channels”
have these issues addressed
without any embarrassment to
the government — although
these lapses in security have
been highlighted before.

Foreign Affairs and Public
Service Minister Fred Mitchell
has denied these reports, stating
that there were no severe secu-
rity breeches at the building,
and that reports of the pre-
clearance being in jeopardy
were unfounded.

But, according to sources at
the airport, TSA agents docu-
mented enough breeches at the
warehouse that they would be
within their rights to shut down
the facility.

Reportedly guards were not
posted at designated areas, vehi-
cles were allowed too close to
the building, and personnel

‘were being allowed onto the air-

port ramp without proper clear-
ance. These are a few among
other infractions observed, it
was claimed.

SEE page 13







ildren $1







seus (V\. The Trib

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

WA FIREFIGHTER turns
from the smoke after a blaze

which destroyed an abandoned

PRO ke

house in Cable Beach. It fook the

firefishters about two hours to

bring the fire under control.
CMG



‘Mitchell hits

back at claims

by Carl Bethel

lm By KARIN HERIG

Tribune. Staff Reporter

_ FNM Senator Carl Bethel :»
should “shut up and be quiet” ;
with his claims about an alleged :
visa scam at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs if he does not have :
sufficient evidence to present }
to the police, Fox Hill MP Fred }
Mitchell said yesterday at a }

press conference.

. Mr Mitchell said that despite }
all of Mr Bethel’s claims made
at last Thursday’s FNM Fox Hill :
rally he knows of no members
of the PLP government who are }
selling visas or illegally facili- :
tating the issuance of visas, the :
FNM senator has yet to go to }
the police with his evidence, he }

said.

“I believe he has no evidence,
What he is doing is coming ona :
political platform and engaging :
in slack, loose talk. Loose lips }
sink ships and he ought to be }
careful that his party is not sunk: }

SEE page 12

Cre

Ana Bianca Marin)

| Lady Dupuch dies
at the age of 100 /

LADY Dupuch, widow of Sir Etienne
Dupuch, died in her sleep at the
Camperdown hame of her eldest daugh-
ter and son-in-law Friday night. She
would have bzen 101 on February 18.

.Marie Annie Plouse, born in Love-

une





t: (242) 325-8737
info@ae.com.bs

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‘US citizen ‘hangs

himself’ in cell

| â„¢ By PAUL TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

A 48-YEAR-OLD US citi-
zen was reported to have
hanged himself from his cell

‘Plouse’s 10 children. They made. their

joy, Indiana on February 18, 1906, was
the third of Henry and Frances Hoover

home in Spangler, Pennsylvania, where
as a young grade school teacher she met



window while in police custody
in Marsh Harbour over the
weekend.

Mark Sapp, who resided at

her future husband who was visiting the
family’s next door neighbour, a Catholic

SEE page 13



Gunshots fired at police at
scene of ee shootout |

m@ By KARIN HERIG

‘POLICE were the target of
gunshots this weekend as they
rushed to the scene of a sus-
pected shootout.

Press liaison officer Inspec-
tor Walter Evans said that two
police vehicles were called into
a residential area on Saturday at
11pm after receiving reports of
a shooting.

e6pc)Drumsticks &Thighs
22 Regular Friese 2) 2022 Drinks wd UY)

“Several gunshots were
directed at the police. There
were two police vehicles, one
marked, one unmarked. The
unmarked one was hit on the
right side,” he said.

As investigations into this
matter continue, Inspector
Evans said, this incident again
highlights the need for police
to continue with their fight to

SEE page 13

the Royal Palms condominiums
in Treasure Cay, Abaco, had
been remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison in Fox Hill on
charges of arson until March 23,
2007 by Magistrate Crawford
i McGee on January 19, 2007.
Sapp was charged with arson
following a devastating fire that
: completely destroyed the six-
i plex Royal Palms Condomini-
ums in Treasure Cay around
3.45am on Friday, January 12,
2007. The loss had been esti-
mated at more than $3 million.
Following his arrest after the
fire, Sapp was flown to New
Providence where he under-
went a psychiatric evaluation at
the Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre. He was released on

SEE page 13






PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007 : THE TRIBUNE)»
eevee eee



€
@ PUBLISHED poet Mr. Tyrone Sawyer shares one of his pieces during the latest session of Express +
Yourself’, on January 17, 2007. The event, held at ‘Da Island Club’ in the Nassau Beach Hotel, is an ty
open mic forum for poets, musicians and performance artists to share their work. The next session will oe
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(Bahamas) Limited || -

is presently considering applications for a

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P.O. Box N-4928
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or via fax 356-8148

9

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DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
JANUARY 26th 2007 fe



—_—



_ | PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007 | | sg ale’







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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 17

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

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FILES


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE.



Pare



its voice concern over alleged

punishment at Simpson Penn Centre

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PARENTS of boys living at the
Simpson Penn Centre are con-
cerned that excessive physical force
is being used to punish their chil-
dren.

Worried parents are claiming
that officers at the rehabilitative
centre for underage offenders and
“wayward” children are using
methods of punishment — beating
the boys and keeping them in iso-
lation — beyond what is necessary.

A mother, who contacted The
Tribune, said that her son has been
living at the Centre for several
months and has witnessed how

other boys were beaten to the
point that “‘mdrks are left on their
bodies.”

She also Cfaimed that often
when parents visited their sons
they were told that the boys were
being held in isolation and could
not receive visitors.

The mother said she believes
that parents are prevented from
seeing their children so they won’t
see how badly they are being pun-
ished.

Barbara Burrows, Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry of Works,
told The Tribune that although cor-
poral punishment is part of the
rehabilitative process at the Simp-
son Penn Centre for Boys, she had

not received any reports of
extreme measures of punishment
being administered.

Mrs Burrows said she will have
to look into the claims by these
concerned parents.

“T have to look into the matter
to see exactly what is going on,”
she said. “Corporal punishment is
administered, but I have looked
into exactly what is happening up

there and I'll be ina

position to say what has to be
done.”

The mother of a Simpson Penn
boy, who wished to remain anony-
mous, claimed that two officers in
particular were responsible for the
harsh punishment.

“J'm very concerned because ~

you put them (the boys) up there
for security and other reasons. I'm

not saying they shouldn't be pun-
ished, they should be’ disciplined,

“just not in the way they are now.
Most of then: are only looking for

someone to love and caré for them,
they need someone to talk to them
and change their lives, beating
doesn't help everything.

“If someone who cares about
doing the right thing, you will have
good children turn out. How do

you expect a child to do better
evhen you just beat him?” she
asked.

The mother said she has spoken
to other parents about the situation
and they are also concerned.

“T just feel something needs to
be done, because they are just
sweeping it under the mat. Some-
one needs to go in there and
straighten it out,” she said.

SEES OT Te

@ MR. GARY HOFFMAN, Group
Chairman Barclays PLC (London)
makes a $100,000 cheque presentation
to Dr. Bernard Nottage, Minister of
Health, on Friday in a ceremony out-
side of the Fox Hill Clinic. The clinic
will be the recipient of the donation.

MP for the area and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell

aoe

described the Barclays donation as an y
investment in the future. : 3
Mr Mitchell noted that primary nm
health care is a wise investment, con- 7
sidering the obvious expense connect- |. 4
ed with health care later in life. ‘
“The saying is a gram of prevention | :
is worth a kilogram of cure,” he said.
“This gift will no doubt help children 5
to focus on how they can take care of
their health so that they can be more










Shema Poiti



ers. Host

productive citizens, making healthy
choices for both their physical and
mental health.”

lm CORRECTION

In Saturday’s edition of The
Tribune, the $100,000 donation was
incorrectly said to be from the
government. The donation is, in fact,
from Barclays PLC. The Tribune
apologises for the error and for any
embarrassment caused.



Covenant Design Group findings ‘won’t be public’

THERE will be no public release
of the findings of the Covenant
Design Group, which is charged
with. determining the future of the

Anglican Communion as the issue
of homosexuality threatened to split
the church.

Representatives of the Anglican

‘Church in the Bahamas told The

Tribune that the interim report for-
mulated by the Covenant Design
Group — chaired by Archbishop
Drexel Gomez of the West Indies —
will not be released before it is pre-
sented to the Primates Meeting and
Joint Standing Committee
when they meet in Tanzania in Feb-
ruary.

Archbishop of Canterbury

Rowan Williams appointed Arch-
bishop Gomez as the chairman of
the 10-member Covenant Design
Group, which is made up of experts
in canon law, the nature and the
mission of the church and ecu-
menical relations.

The group is charged with deter-

mining the full implications of the °

actions of the two of the world’s
largest Anglican Provinces, the
United States and Canada, which
have supported same-sex unions
and approved the Episcopal
Church’s consecration of a

Enter to win this David

necklace & bracelet from

gay bishop.

Archbishop Gomez said that the
Archbishop of Canterbury envi-
sions that there will be two sub-
groups within the world-wide Angli-
can Communion. Those provinces
which sign on to the Covenant will
become constituent members of the
Communion, while those opposed
to it may be called associate mem-
bers.

The Anglican Communion
claims 38 autonomous provinces
and some 70 million members
world-wide.





°
*
>
°
>
>
>
>
»


THE TRIBUNE





Alfred Gray
to open new
Cable Beach
City Market

MINISTER of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer Affairs
Alfred Gray will officially open
a new 24,000 square foot Cable
Beach City Market this evening
at an event designed to give
shareholders, vendors and
guests a sneak preview at what
will become the leading grocer’s
flagship store.

The store located on West
Bay Street opens to the public
Tuesday at 7 am.

At twice the size of the exist-
ing City Market immediately to
its east that it is replacing, the
new store will have parking for
90 vehicles and introduce sev-
eral features other City Market
stores are expected to adopt.

“We are very excited about
this store,” said Ken Burns,
CEO of Bahamas Supermar-
kets Limited, parent company
of 12 stores in New Providence

and Grand Bahama. “In addi- °

tion to an entirely different
décor, very tropical in style, spa-
cious aisles, an array of new
products and greatly expanded
deli and bakery, we will intro-
duce several technology-relat-
ed improvements in this store.
Among them will be point of
sale scanning, a great time-saver
for customers and an important
benefit for inventory purpos-
es.” It will also feature a large
gourmet and organic foods sec-
tion.

Opening the new store cre-
ated four new managerial posi-
tions along with 12 other jobs in
addition to opportunities for
neighbouring students to earn
money as packing assistants.
The existing building which City
Market had leased for more
than 30'years will be renovated
by owners and subdivided for
retail and other appropriate use.

Bahamas Supermarkets Lim-
ited is Bahamian-operated and
employs more than 700 people.
It's charitable arm, Bahamas
Supermarkets Foundation, has
awarded more than $7 million
in scholarships since its incep-
tion in 1968.

Man faces
burglary
and assault
charges

A KEMP Road man was
arraigned in magistrate’s court
Friday on charges of burglary,
stealing and aggravated assault.

Leslie Sweeting, 36, was
arraigned before magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court 11
Nassau Street.

It is alleged that sometime
between the hours of 10 pm on
Friday, December 29 and 2am
on Saturday, December 30
Sweeting broke into the home
of Lisa Bowe at St James Road.

The second charge stated that
between 10 pm on December
29 and December 30, Sweeting
stole a jewellery valued at
$1,550 as well as $35 cash.

Sweeting is also charged with
aggravated assault against Lisa
Bowe.

Sweeting was not required to
plead to the charges and was
remanded until Monday when
he will return to court for a bail
hearing.

Haitian is
charged with

rape of
18-year-old

A HAITIAN man charged
with the rape of a young woman
was arraigned in magistrate’s
court on Friday.

Sherdley Filoussait, 41, of
Sesame Street, Farrington Road
appeared before Magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court 11
Nassau Street yesterday to
answer to the charge.

It is alleged that on Sunday,
January 14, Filoussait raped an
18-year-old woman. He was not
required to plead to the charge
and was grarited bail in the sum
of $5,000. The case was
adjourned to April 19 for the
start of a preliminary inquiry.

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In brief —

Mitchell retorts










'» LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 3




FNM holds rally in Fox Hill

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN the face of what he
described as “scurrilous and
scandalous” mud-slinging by
the opposition at the FNM’s
rally in Fox Hill last Thursday,
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell yesterday urged his
supporters not to engage in
similar tactics in the months
leading up to the next general
election.

However, “there is only so
far that PLP supporters can be
expected to be pushed up
against the wall before people
will tend to strike back,” Min-
ister Mitchell said at a press
conference held in Fox Hill
yesterday afternoon.

Mr Mitchell said he found it
curious that just one day after
Christian Council President,
Rev William Thompson, urged
all MPs to “stay out of the gut-
ter” and not engage in any



@ FRED Mitchell

mud-slinging in their political
campaigning during last week’s
ecumenical service for parlia-
mentarians, the FNM did just
that.

“The very next day a politi-
cal party came to Fox Hill and
finds the only way that it can
make political capital is not to
deal with the issues and what
they intend to do, but rather
to engage in a personal mud-
slinging campaign at the can-
didate of PLP for Fox Hill,”
he said.

In the course of last week's
church service, Mr Mitchell
said, he discussed the matter
of the then upcoming rally with
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham, he said,
assured him that he would not
be making any derogatory
remarks about the PLP’s rep-
resentative for Fox Hill.

“Unfortunately he was
unable to exercise sufficient
discipline over his supporters
who departed from the script
and chose instead to engage in
vexatious, abusive and scur-
rilous comments,” he said.

He urged his supporters “not



Six-year-old drowns in canal

A SIX-year-old student of
Freeport Primary School was
found drowned in a canal on
Saturday in the Pine Bay sub-
division of Grand Bahama.

According to the police
report from Grand Bahama,
Beshawn Thompson, of num-











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ber 114 Columbus Drive, was
allowed to go to that location
with his aunt, Pauline Whyms,
with whom he lived, and her

boyfriend, 32-year-old Trevor

Bain.
Bain and several other men
were landscaping Mrs Charlotte

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Pyfrom’s yard on Alpine Lane.
Reportedly, after completing the
work, a search was conducted
for Beshawn, only to discover his
body floating in the canal.

At about 5.48pm Emergency
Medical Services personnel
rushed to the scene and sped
Beshawn to the Rand Memori-
al Hospital, where he was pro-..
nounced dead on arrival.

This matter is currently being
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syste Ny Street. Tel (242) 329-8537 Fax (242) 326-8135 “ys
Cable Beach Store West Bay Shopping Center. Tel (242) 327-0022

to go down this road.”

Mr Mitchell reiterated that
his campaign “is not about Fred
Mitchell,” but that he is simply
the PLP’s representative who
is seeking to get his party elect-
ed to government for another
term.

He said he is confident that
the PLP will once again win the
Fox Hill seat.

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“No amount of personal
attacks and scurrilous and scan-
dalous behaviour on the part of
the opponents of the PLP in
Fox Hill will change that result.

“The work has been done, it
is there for all people to see.
And | expect, given another
term, my work in this con-
stituency on behalf of the PLP
will continue,” he said.



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

GIBSONBURG, Ohio — Americans don’t
like to argue. We do like to make snide
remarks to someone we know is “on our side”
about what’s bugging us, but we avoid tackling
the problem straight on. We’re not cowards,
mind you, it’s just politeness gone wrong.
We've never been taught the value of civi-
lized disagreement.

When I encourage my college freshmen to
speak up when they disagree with a statement
made by me or a classmate, they refuse until
they become too angry for a discussion and are
ready to resort to classic conflict resolutions
such as: “Ahh, your old lady wears army
shoes.”

This, I warn them, is not rational disagree-
ment — it’s down and dirty verbal combat
and we learn nothing from it. Then I ask how
many fight fairly with their spouses or signif-
icant others. A few hands reach tentatively
skyward.

“T fight fair but she doesn’t,” complains a
young man seated to my right and fiddling
with his pencil. I ask him to explain. He looks
a bit bewildered so IJ try suggesting some pos-
sibilities.

“Do you discuss North Korea, nuclear
weapons and Iran?” My question is answered
by a blank stare.

“Money!” someone tosses in. “Children,
parents and holidays,” suggests another.

Charlie, on my left, puts his 50-cents worth
in with, “My wife hates my family; she partic-
‘ularly can’t stand my Aunt James because her
false teeth clack when she chews.”

As the rest of the class ponders “Aunt”
James, Charlie goes on. “Course, I don’t think
too much of her family either but I keep my
mouth shut.”

I wait, hoping someone else will keep the
discussion going and maybe call Charlie on
his sweeping statement. “You’ve never griped
about your wife’s family?” Linda asks.

“Not to my wife,” he explains. “I complain
to the guys at work but never at home.” Linda
wants to know why not and Charlie says that’s
simple: “Because we’re living with her par-
ents until I graduate.”

“Would it make anyone angry if I made the
statement that I believe Kim Jong II is a nut-
case and should be offed in one of his lavish
palaces.” A few students, it was obvious, had
no idea who Kim Jong II might be but those
who knew said it wouldn’t bother them
because he’s far away in another country.

“What if I said I disagreed with George

‘Bush and his war? Would that anger anyone?”

I looked around for any raised hackles and

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Discussion leads to learning



saw none.

Paul is back in school after two turns in
Iraq. “How about you, Paul? Would you feel
I was attacking you personally with that state-
ment?” He shook his head and grinned. “Heck
no. I’m with you.”

Patti loosens up and accuses her husband of
being a know-it-all. “He can never admit to
being wrong even when he knows he is.” I
ask for an example.

“For weeks I had been telling him the car
was making a funny noise in the rear end. He
told me I didn’t know anything about cars
and there was nothing wrong with it. Day
before yesterday I was halfway back from Port
Clinton when the noise stopped — and so did
the car.

“Chip came home and wanted to know
where my car was and I told him that part of it

-was in a ditch on SR 53; the rest was scat-

tered along the road behind.” We all laughed
except Patti who said Chip blamed the whole
thing on her and said she didn’t know how to
take care of a car.

“Tf I'd been driving that car this would nev-
er have happened because I would have
known something was going wrong,” Chip
bragged.

Patti cut him down to size with: “Like a
funny noise in the rear end?”

Debate, I explained, is a good thing because
when people argue they learn. We discuss the
Socratic method of learning where teaching is
accomplished by “asking” rather than by
“telling” but no one is convinced.

When a student asks a sericus question,
whatever the subject at hand, I’m thrilled.
That’s when the door to learning begins to
open.

When small children ask “Why” five times a
minute, they’re not trying to be a nuisance —
they really want to know. And we really ought
to answer them.

“Can anyone explain the difference between
a debate and a fight?” I ask of the class. “What
are the benefits of discussion over fighting?”

Linda says a debate doesn’t get nasty and
end up with name-calling like fighting can.

Candace adds that no one leaves with hurt
feelings.

“Yeah, but...” Paul interrupts, “the great
thing about fighting is the kissing and making
up. You don’t get that in a discussion.”

Paul, we decide, is obviously a man with
priorities.

(This article was written by Elizabeth
Schuett writes of Cox News Service).






















Hitting back
at criticism of
Fred Mitchell

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to com-
ment on an article appearing
in your newspaper dated
December 23rd entitled: “Yes
Mitchell it is all about you.”
After reading the article it
appears that a vicious-bred
blood hound has been
unleashed in the hunt to
destroy Mr Mitchell. Mrs
Dionne Edgecombe’s criticism
of Mr Mitchell is by far with-
out merit and amounts to
nothing more than a personal
attack on him.

Firstly, let me state that I’m
not blowing the charge horn in
the battle to get Mr Mitchell
re-elected, as a matter of fact
I’m not in his constituency nor
have I decided which party I
will support in the next gen-
eral election. Obviously I have
no axe to grind, however, I
can recognise sheer talent and
a performer when I see one.
To claim that Mr Mitchell’s
performance is dismal is so far
from the truth that it makes
you wonder on what basis
does Mrs Edgecombe evalu-
ate Mr Mitchell’s perfor-
mance.

Has she considered the fol-
lowing?

In the eyes of The Bahami-
an people the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs was of little sig-
nificance. However, since the
appointment of Mr Mitchell
international issues pertinent

to the development of the .

nation have been so. high-
lighted that even the every-
day “Joe Blow” feels com-
pelled to have his say in them.

The option to join CSME
had stimulated wide debate
among the common man and
although not accepted by the
Bahamian public at this time
Mr Mitchell presented a vivid-
ly clear picture of the issues
concerning CSME demon-

Strating his ability and hard

work. All of the issues per-
taining to CSME were
detailed and available for
every Bahamian to scrutinise
if he so desired. Other people
if elected would not even have
a clue as to how to proceed
with such phenomena.

Mr Mitchell carefully navi-
gated through the waters in
voting for Guatemala rather
than Venezuela choosing not
to pander to the wishes of
friends of Venezuela. The
vote for Cuba on the Human
Rights commission wast

OBIS

letters@tribunemedia.net




superbly handled by the Min-
ister, in this instance he did
not pander to the wishes of
the United States and the ter-
rified Bahamians who were
afraid of the economic back-
lash.

The upgrade to Embassy
status in Havana, Cuba was a
tremendous accomplishment,
just ask the almost one thou-
sand students studying there,
despite the criticism and the
personal attacks by so many
ignorant foe who don’t even
realise that almost every coun-
try in the world has represen-
tation in Cuba, including the
US with the largest delega-
tion, the Minister, Mr
Mitchell, continues to per-
form.

Let us not be confused or
assume that the forming of
such diplomatic relationship
is some simple process. It
takes a Minister who under-
stands the international rami-
fications of such decisions, one
who has political savvy, one
like Mr Mitchell. Foreign
Affairs is simply his passion.

Just recently a contract to
supply the Bahamas with
machine-readable passports
encompassing biometrics was
signed, marking a colossal
accomplishment for the
Bahamian people. -All of this
done under the direction of
Mr Mitchell whom some claim
to have a dismal performance
record.

Or course there are many
other accomplishments of Mr
Mitchell that would occupy
substantial space in the news-
paper if they had to be listed,
these are only but a few. I
wonder what Mrs Higgs has
accomplished. What does Mrs
Edgecombe want for repre-
sentation? Does she want the
classic professional married
mother who very often domi-
nates her husband, one who
is So ambitious in her quest to
fulfil her own personal agenda
that she really neglects her
own family in the end? Who
will take care of the family
while ‘mommy’ is out there
making a name for herself? Is
this the role model that Fox
Hill desires? Another Hillary
Clinton is not what Fox Hill

needs.

Does Mrs Edgecombe want
the kind of representative who
spends most of his time parad-
ing up and down Bernard
Road trying to satisfy the cries
of the alcoholics shouting: ©
“Minister buy me a cold one
for a head.” Representation
must certainly be more than
that. Providing hams and
turkeys at Christmas time or
ensuring that the public park
is kept free of weeds should
not be the focus of represen-
tation.

Fox Hill should be proud to
have sent an intellectual to
represent them in Parliament
and even more the Bahamas
in the global arena. Mr
Mitchell is simply made up of
the right stuff, confident,
assertive, knowledgeable and
better looking than many of
his adversaries. Even the
American Ambassador has
stated that. Mr Mitchell is an
intellectual. Why can’t our
Bahamian people give credit
where credit is due?

To single out Mr Mitchell
as being arrogant, Mrs Edge-
combe needs only to look no
further than everybody with
power, especially political
power and she would realise
that it is a common trait. Polit-
ical power and arrogance are
inseparable. However, to be
arrogant and not perform will
only result in one’s political
demise. Politicians are always
put in a precarious situation,
to many or one big strike and
you’re out. Consider the
recent fall of a number of PLP:
representatives. Mr Ingraham
is considered very arrogant
however, performance deter-
mines political longevity.

Finally, Mrs Edgecombe’s
unsubstantiated claim of dis-
mal performance has to be
dismissed. Her efforts to have
Mr Mitchell discredited will
not advance the cause of Mrs
Higgs, in fact my advice to
Mrs Higgs is that she should
distance herself from Mrs
Edgecombe, she is an individ-
ual who seems to advocate
disdain for people whom she
deems to have alternative life -
styles. For heaven sakes, leave
Mr Mitchell alone.

EUGENE
BECKFORD
Nassau,
January 2, 2007.



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knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS.

*

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5





Fight against |
HIV AIDS is
undermined
by ignorance

@ US VIRGIN ISLANDA
Christiansted

WIDESPREAD ignorance
about HIV/AIDS is under-
mining efforts to fight the
spread of the virus in the
Caribbean, which has the sec-
ond highest rate of infection
after sub-Saharan Africa,
health officials said Sunday,
according to Associated Press.

Discrimination by employ-
ers and others is so pervasive
that infected people often
delay seeking treatment for
the virus, still largely per-
ceived as a “gay disease” by
many in the region, said offi-
cials at the one-day
Caribbean Summit on HIV-
AIDS in St Croix.

“It’s going to be a political
challenge because, unfortu-
nately, we live in a society
that is very homophobic,”
said Douglas Slater, health
minister for St Vincent and
the Grenadines. “It’s some-
thing we are going to have to
overcome.”

The 15-member Caribbean
Community, known as Cari-
com, has not secured enough
international funding for pre-
vention and treatment, said
US Rep Donald Payne, a
Democrat from New Jersey,
and co-chair of the Congres-
sional Caribbean Caucus.

"Caricom needs to step up
to the plate and demand
these federal funds,” Payne
said.

An estimated 500,000 peo-
ple — or 2.4 per cent of the
Caribbean — have the virus.
The figure excludes Cuba,
which has a relatively low rate
due to testing and prevention
programs.

In 2005, an estimated
24,000 people died in the
Caribbean from AIDS-relat-
ed complications, making it
the leading cause of death
among people aged 15 to 44,
said Barry Featherman, pres-
ident of the Inter-American
Economic Council, which
organised the conference.



‘Give-away’ of land criticisec

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Move-
ment criticised the government
yesterday for its indiscriminate
“give-away” of Crown and gov-
ernment land to foreigners —
directly mocking the PLPs
anchor project initiative.

“The record is clear and indis-
putable,” the commentary on
the party’s website begins. “In
its five years in office, the PLP
government sold thousands of
acres of Crown and government
owned land to foreigners, and
they did so at shockingly low
prices.

“Furthermore, most of the

land is for residential develop-
ment for the international mar-
ket — not for traditional
tourism or industrial develop-
ment that would bring continu-
ing benefits to the Bahamian
people.”

“Give-away of the people’s
land” is a recipe for disaster,
said the commentary, quoting
remarks made by party leader
Hubert Ingraham at a rally in
Fox Hill last week.

“With the government’s give-
away and the real estate foreign
developers have managed to
acquire on the market, the land
situation in the Bahamas is
approaching crisis proportions.
The country cannot sustain
another five years of this PLP

‘development model.

The FNM mentioned the crit-
icism it got from the PLP while
in office for its concessions to
hoteliers, and reminded the
public that it was this same PLP
that has now adopted a “colo-
nial mindset” to its own eco-
nomic development policies.

“The PLP’s disastrous land
policy. is directly tied to its
myopic economic model. This
out-dated model bestows wind-
fall profits on some foreign
developers while enriching a
small army of PLP cronies.
Rather than a model of genuine
development, the PLP has given
us a short term re-election strat-
egy of selling off the nation’s
assets in a flurry of speculative
land deals with often dubious
investment numbers.

“They are more interested in

short-term growth rather than -

national development. Surpris-
a8)



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@ HUBERT Ingraham
criticised the government’s
policy at a rally last week

ingly, when she served as the
government’s point person on
economic development, former
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Minister Allyson May-
nard-Gibson actually bragged
about the mixed-use develop-
ment model which dominates
the PLP Government’s eco-
nomic thinking,” the commen-
tary said.

However, the FNM claims
that they have a larger vision,
inclusive of medium and small
scale tourism and other industry
projects which could have a
greater “multiplier effect” in
terms of genuine “Bahamian
ownership of and participation
in the economy.”

“Many of the PLP’s short-
sighted efforts can result in
long-term demographic, eco-
nomic and political imbalance
which can permanently make
Bahamians second class citizens
in their own land. Disturbingly,
the terms of some of these deals
are shrouded in mystery. People
cannot help but wonder who in
the PLP ranks are benefiting
from schemes which will only
have minor benefits for many
Bahamians.

“Before the PLP’s smoke and
mirrors propaganda machine
goes further, a little history is
in order. Prior to the last elec-
tion, the PLP relentlessly and
mindlessly attacked the FNM’s
incentives for the Atlantis
development at a time when the
country’s tourism trade Wvas 1 in

the doldrums.
myie

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“Typically, the PLP conve-
niently never got around to
telling Bahamians that the prop-
erty to develop Atlantis was
acquired from private sources,
not from public land. The same
cannot be said for their fire sale
of hundreds of acres of land in
Cable Beach.”

This, the party said, is not just
the old “run-of-the-mill
hypocrisy”, but hypocrisy of the
“head-spinning, jaw-dropping,
and mind-boggling variety”.

“But the most important thing
for which they (PLP) will never
give the FNM credit is how we
helped to revive, rescue and
resuscitate a collapsed Bahami-
an economy through partner-
ships with ventures such as
Atlantis. Not even the PLP can
deny that Atlantis is the most
dynamic and successful tourism
project in Bahamian history.

“Without it we would have
been in deep trouble. But the
FNM achieved this and other
successes without giving away
huge swathes of Bahamian real
estate to foreign land develop-
ers. In fact, the FNM is proud
that we gave hundreds of

Bahamians the opportunity to°

acquire land for commercial
and residential purposes.
Bahamians now understand
that a PLP that promised a dif-
ferent approach is on the wrong
side of history when it comes
to a truly progressive, balanced
and more sophisticated model
of economic development.
“The Bahamian people no
longer trust the PLP with stew-
ardship of the economy and
their land. A new FNM gov-
ernment is poised to transform
and expand the economy. We
are horrified by the PLP’s
wrong turn. Seasoned by past
success; tempered by insights
acquired when in office, and
inspired by the opportunities a

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a
Cooperating for Caribbean tourism

â„¢@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat).

I: IS welcome news
that the Caribbean’s
two major tourism organisa-
tions — the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation
(CTO) and the Caribbean
Hotels Association (CHA)
— are establishing the
Caribbean Tourism Devel-
opment Corporation
(CTDC) as a commercial



venture to jointly market a
“Caribbean” brand world-
wide.

Tourism now accounts for
more than 60 per cent of the
gross domestic product of
the economies of the 15-
nation Caribbean Communi-
ty (CARICOM) and it is a
significant contributor to the
economies of the US Virgin

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Islands, Puerto Rico, the
French departments of
Guadeloupe and Martinique,
the Dutch Caribbean islands
and the British colonies,
Anguilla and the British Vir-
gin Islands.

While the industry plays
a larger part in the
economies of some
Caribbean countries such as
the Bahamas, Antigua and
Barbuda and the US Virgin
Islands, it is increasingly
making a bigger contribution
to every economy, including
countries such as Guyana
and Dominica where tourism
was not regarded as crucial
to economic growth and
development.

At the same time, the
Caribbean's share of the
global tourist market is
declining. Competition from
other parts of the world is
stiff both in the quality and
cost of service. Even before
the effects of 9/11,
Caribbean’s share of the

world tourist trade was
showing a decline.
In recent years, the

regional tourism industry has
benefited from disasters in
others parts of the world,
such as the Asian Tsunami,
and the declining value of
the US dollar (to which most
Caribbean currencies are
tied) against other major
world currencies such as the
British pound and the euro.

Given the importance of
tourism to regional
economies particularly in
earning foreign exchange
and providing tens of thou-
sands of jobs, tourism has
indeed become vital to
everybody's livelihood in the
Caribbean. No one can
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In the past the CTO and
the CHA were inclined to
rival each other for a domi-
nant role in the promotion
and development of tourism
in the region. The CTO was



they failed to be implement-
ed at national and regional
levels.

CTO particularly suffered
from reliance on government
funding for some of its pro-
jects which, despite the able
capacity of its staff, simply
could not get off the ground.

Recently, the rivalry
between the two organisa-
tions has been set aside, and
they have worked toward a
common purpose — the pro-
motion and advancement of
the Caribbean tourism prod-
uct. Notably, last year they
jointly launched a new logo
— the word “Caribbean” in

.all the vibrant colours with

which the region is associat-
ed. The organisations and
their members include the
logo in all their promotional
and administrative material.

Now, they have

“ Given the importance of
tourism to regional economies
particularly in earning foreign
exchange and providing tens
of thousands of jobs, tourism
has indeed become vital to
everybody’s livelihood in the
Caribbean. No one can afford

to neglect it.”



largely a public sector organ-
isation with its membership
drawn from national tourist
boards, its funding coming
from governments and its
governance from govern-
ment ministers. The CHA is
a private sector body whose
members are primarily hotel
proprietors.

Both organisations suf-
fered not only from their sus-
picion of each other, but
from the fact that while deci-
sions were collectively made,

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announced the creation of
CTDC, a joint venture com-
mercial venture designed to
make profits and to invest in
the joint promotion of the
Caribbean through a num-
ber of new initiatives. The
CTDC should help to
address two problems: the
need for financing, and
machinery to implement the
decisions that are made.
Among the planned ini-
tiatives is the consolidation
of advertising in the regional
and international media;

instead of buying individual-
ly, the CTDC will act as a
purchaser for all its members
giving it bargaining power to
negotiate better prices. The
joint venture company also
plans to create an Internet
web site for merchandising
Caribbean music, arts and
crafts, food, rums and other
liquors in collaboration with
Caribbean firms that pro-
duce these commodities.
From this website, potential
visitors from all over the
world would also be able to
make hotel and other reser-
vations.

Already, a series of
“Caribbean Week” is being
planned for major cities the
world over which will include
not only media focus on the
region but accompanying
events in which industry
players will participate and
the public will be invited.
These are being seen not
only as promotional events,
but also as money earning
ventures.

None of this will be easy.
It will require expert plan-
ning, superb marketing skills,
and experienced manage-
ment. But, it is necessary.

World tourism is highly
competitive and tourists are
now far more discriminating.
The alliance between the
regional private and public
sectors is vital if the
Caribbean is not only to
maintain and increase its
share of global tourism, but
also make tourism in the
region sustainable.

The creation of CTDC
addresses marketing. The
issues of environment, edu-
cation and training, econom-
ic policies to foster opportu-_
nities for greater local own-
ership, and the creation of
firm linkages to regional
agriculture are still crying out
for more vigorous attention.

Responses to: ronald-
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The successful applicant should:

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7



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W HEN officials from
the College of The

Bahamas travelled to the
Republic of South Africa last
month to consummate their lat-
est student exchange agreement

with the University of Johan- —

nesburg, they will have got a
foretaste of an indignity that
will greet family members of
Bahamian students taking part
in the programme: the unrecip-
rocal and totally unjustified visa
requirement for Bahamians
travelling to South Africa as
tourists.

When this columnist travelled
to Cape Town last summer, he
was so confident that the Com-
monwealth status of South
Africa meant (as in the case of
the UK, Canada, Jamaica and
others) that no visa would be
required for a Bahamian, that
he made no pre-departure

effort to inquire into the matter. ©

In the event, only his dual US
citizenship prevented a disas-
ter.

What became more galling
(on returning to Nassau and
enquiring as to whether the
immigration officers in Cape

Town were in fact mistaken)
was learning that the visa
requirement (very real) was not
in fact reciprocated. South
Africans are free to travel to



With so much in
zits favour, it
“cannot have >
escaped the
notice of the _
government of
South Africa that
The Bahamas is
among the most
exciting regional
countries for a
_ prospective

deepening of
bilateral relations
with South
Africa.

RE Se Se]

The Bahamas visa free.

This clearly is an anomaly,
and probably results (as do so
many other aspects of our inter-
national relations) from succes-
sive governments— lack of
interest in such matters and the
resulting lazy lumping of the
Bahamas into a collective
“Caribbean” category by policy-
makers in foreign countries.
This was clearly the case of the
“Schengen” states, which only
now appear to have awoken to
the fact that The Bahamas, Bar-

Re ees

MONDAY,
JANUARY 22ND

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise - Live

11:00 Immediate Response
National Tourism Week

12:00 . ZNS News Update (Live)

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National Tourism Week

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bados, Antigua and St. Kitts are
more likely to attract European
illegal migrants than vice ver-
sa.

|: the case of South Africa,
the consequences of
“slumping” are poignant. As a
small, stable country with no



If every country
were as business-
friendly as the
Chinese, the
requirements
for tourist visas
to common
destinations
would not be
so Onerous.

history of terrorism or related
risks, The Bahamas is surely as
entitled to the usual Common-
wealth privileges that the
Republic of South Africa
undoubtedly extends to large
members, like Britain and Aus-
tralia. Moreover, the per capita
wealth disparity between the
Bahamas and South Africa
makes the prospect of illegal
migration from the former to
the latter laughable.

‘In terms-of bilateral rela-
tions, The Bahamas has, in
addition to its modest part in
hastening the departure of the
monstrous regime that once
disfigured the place, had very
good ones with post-apartheid
South Africa. Bahamians will

recall the Nassau CHOGM of
1984 as the turning point in the
Commonwealth’s posture
toward the apartheid regime,
when Thatcher and her fellow
apologists felt the pressure of
near-global isolation. In recog-
nition, Nelson Mandela made
Nassau one of his first post-
release stops.

More recently, the present
President of South Africa,
Thabo Mbeki, and his Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs have
made fruitful visits to The
Bahamas, where _ they
expressed interest in a tourism



Health |

The Tribune 7%, Gecce. Wy Newspapert
Schengen down, now more to go

PERSPECTIVES

ANDREW ALLEN



model that has attracted,
among others, the massive
investment of a South African-
originated resort developer,
Kerzner International.

With so much in its favour, it
cannot have escaped the notice
of the government of South
Africa that The Bahamas is
among the. most exciting region-
al countries for a prospective
deepening of bilateral relations
with South Africa.

It is time Mr. Mitchell and his
colleagues forcefully made the
case that any such deepening
must begin and end on the basis
of reciprocity for the Bahamian
travelling public.



FOR EASE OF
TRAVEL, CHINA
(STRANGELY) LEADS

n international relations,
as in most things, the Chi-

‘nese are primarily all about

business. How else could an
officially Marxist-Leninist one-
party state have managed to
become both the world’s fastest-
growing economy and the
largest trading partner of the
United States within scarcely a
decade of the “collapse” of
global communism?

So when the Chinese govern-
ment (which requires visas for

tourists from all countries) says
that visas must be obtained in
the applicant’s home country
prior to travel, one can be for-
given for suspecting the exis-
tence of “leeway” at a price.

In fact, the processing of visas
for travel to the mainland has
become such a business in Hong
Kong and Macau that most
large hotels have their own visa
desk. All the applicant has to
do is walk across the street (or,
in this columnist’s case, upstairs
in the adjoining mall) and have
a photo taken. For a reasonable
fee, staff from the “visa desk”
will even go and retrieve the
photos, send off the request to
the mainland and have the visa
ready for travel by 7 o’clock the
next morning.

f every country were as:

business-friendly as the

Chinese, the requirements for
tourist visas to common destina-
tions would not be so onerous.

* But, as the case of the Schengen

states demonstrates, the practice
of obtaining a visa is often bizarre
and even humiliating.

Since the closure of the last
Schengen consulate, the process
has become frankly prohibitive.
The interminable wait (for the
package to go to Jamaica and
back) means saying goodbye to
the prospect of a last minute
cancellation (cheap) ticket, as
are now sold by most online
companies.

Faced with this, this colum-

- nist’s secretary decided on a dif-

ferent route last year. She went
to London hoping to get a visa
to France from there, only to
be told that Schengen visas
must be issued back at home,
like Chinese ones (but of course
without the “leeway”).







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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007





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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

embre Atlantis I in Grand Bahama
~ by gunmen _ A PIECE of history has



wim



In 1979 Atlantis II underwent
a major mid-life refit. The con-






} arrived on the shores ol
: Grand Bahatua. Atlantis 11 version of the vessel’s power
\ A RESIDENT of West Bay =: the same vessel famous for source from steam to diesel
| Street was robbed by three = assisting with artifact reduced the vessel’s operating
| masked gunmen while return- : — reteieval and deep-sea imag- cost, increased its range of trav-
ing home Thursday morning. > ing of the Titanic in 1986, el, and increased its selection
According to reports, when =: arrived in Grand Bahama in of ports. In 1983 a deck hanger
, . the 37-year-old man arrived at: Jate 2006, and ts now under and A-frame were installed
e’» his home around 10 am on : © going restoration enabling her to handle the
Thursday he was accosted by : After being saved froma launch and recovery of the sub-
, three masked men. One was_; - shipyard in Louisiana and mersible oceanographic vehi-
Ny a feportedly armed witha hand- : — surviving Hurricane Katri- cle, Alvin. Atlantis IJ served as
is a The man was robbed of : na, the ship and its new crew Alvin’s tender from 1984 to
\ is watch and cash before the : endured the five-day trip 1996. :
rhe culprits fled the scene on foot. : across the Gulf of Mexico A notable point of interest is
or wo men are being questioned. : to The Bahamas, which will that Atlantis II was one of the

first research vessels to take
women scientists to sea, as well
as the first to employ women
officers and crew. It also set the
Institution’s record for number
of days at sea with one particu-

? become its new home.
: Atlantis [1 was named for
a ‘Police find : the Woods Hole Oceanv-
: graphic Institution's
ne “rassa u it rifle i (WHOM) first research ves

Sas





ne “ i sel, Atlantis, a l42-foot
ioe *« POLICE investigations con- : steel-hulled sailing vessel lar voyage of 575 days and
6 efafinue into the discovery of a : depicted in the Institution s oe 73,907 miles covered. _
es thigh powered assault rifle on : logo which sailed from 1931 High sea breaks eaiinat the port side of the research vessel Atlantis II as a breeches buoy i is rigged Decommissioned in 1996
sae Phursday. i to 1964. NASA named ther —_- up with destroyer Hazelwood for the transfer of sonar equipment to seek the grave of missing after a remarkable 33 year
es According to police reports, : space shuttle Atlantis after submarine Thresher. Hazelwood brought precision depth recording equipment to enable Atlantis career, she sat quietly for a
z “Drug Enforcement officers act- i thissame ship Ihe Atlantis Ul to make close survey of the bottom, 8,000 feet deep, about 270 miles east of Boston. ‘ number of years changing hands
ing on a tip travelled to the : II was built for the WHOI (AP Photo/Str) several times without realising
Lyon Road.area around2 pm : at the Maryland Shipbuild ; : Ae: any significant new purpose.
* wand saw three men who were: ingand Drydock Company beam of 44 feet and a draft of ocean science exploration. No The Atlantis IT visited 112 ports That has changed.
‘Sacting in a suspicious manner. : in Baltimore, MD, under a t7 feet. It cruised at 12 knots, other research vessel has cov- in 78 nations and hosted thou- Just why is the Atlantis IT
i. On seeing the officers the men :; $5 million grant from and could stay at sea for 45 ered as much of the ocean as__ sands of visitors from many here? The reason will unfold in
} reportedly ran. : ~~ National Science Founda days. It could accommodate 25 Atlantis II. It has sailed more _ nations, including-notables such the weeks to come, so stay
ye The police searched the area ? tion, was considered the scientists and had acrew of sim- than 1 million miles (1,006,912) as Vice President Hubert tuned.
“sand found a M-16 hidden under: flagship of their fleet and — tar number. on 458 cruises and spent 8,115 | Humphrey in 1967, Japan’s for- A video tour of the Atlantis
r ops of metal and wrapped in : was their first vessel to get The ship travelled around the — days at sea in every ocean of mer Crown Prince and now _ I will be posted on www.The-
towel. No arrests were made : the RV designation The world many times and was _ the world, a record unequalled | Emperor Akihito in 1987, and = BahamasWeekly.com in late
ind investigations continue. i ship is 210 feet long with a involved with every type of by any other research vessel. the explorer Jacques Cousteau. — January.







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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

FROM page one

by his loose lips.

“Take your evidence and
go to. the police otherwise
shut up and be quiet, because
you have no evidence,” Mr
Mitchell said.

In his speech at the rally,
the FNM’s former attorney
general Mr Bethel claimed
that the number
issued to Haitian and Chinese
nationals had increased hun
dred-fold during Ministe)
Mitchell’s tenure. —

He also alleged that the
number of visas issued

jumped from just over 200

per year in the last year ol
the FNM government, to
more than 2,000 per year ovei
the first three years of the
PLP government.

“Whenever you see any
fresh illegal immigrants, any
fresh, meaning ‘new’, faces
you should remember to
thank Fred Mitchell.

“This is serious business,
because it is acknowledged
that once.someone comes
into the Bahamas, legally,
with an entry visa, there were
no checks to make sure that
these persons ever lett the
Bahamas. So when you see
new faces going to work 14
the morning, you can thaii
Fred Mitchell,” Mr Bethel
said.

Speaking to the press in
Fox Hill yesterday afternoon,
Minister Mitchell said that he
took great exception to those
remarks.

“Mr Bethel has no evi-
dence to show that this min-
ister has ever issued any visa
in his life and I defy anyone
to show that I have person-



sp chan Seger ae

MP eAL & AN aN ‘



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of visas.

| THROW ee

SHOWER C URTAINS
eA Rey ACCESSORIES



i VIINIS' TER of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell

ally issued any visa or
instructed anyone to issue
anv visa to anybody
‘the procedures that are
iy) place with regard to the
issudnice Of visas have been
in place since his government
left office, the same checks
and balances which existed
then, exist now and there has
been no political interference
whatsoever in the issuance of
visas in the Ministry of For-
eu Affairs,” Mr Mitchell



Vie Foreign Affairs Minis-
icy and MP for Fox Hill also
took offence at the comment
by Mr Bethel that the PLP is
a “jive-talking, visa selling,
scandal-plagued, covering-up
and untrustworthy” party.
“{ believe that someone
who is an attorney, who is a
former Attorney General
really ought to be more

responsible than that.”
\ir Mitchell said that these



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THE TRIBUNE





Bi FNM Senator
Carl Bethel

statements by Mr Bethel are
“serious, serious allegations,”
and that the FNM senator
should immediately go to the
police with his proof.

The minister further said
that the statement by Mr
Bethel that the PLP govern-
ment has not followed up on
a promised police investiga:
tion into the visa scam clainis
is completely incorrect. “

Mr Mitchell said he has
repeatedly said that the
police investigation is ongo-

ing, but that it is of such-a

“sensitive and undercover
nature” that it would be
improper for him to speak
about it publicly.

The Fox Hill MP said he
spoke to the police on Satur-
day and that up until that
point Mr Bethel had still not.
contacted the police to be
interviewed and give his evi-
dence on the alleged visa,
scam. :

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“THE TRIBUNE



Threat to

pre-clearance
FROM page one

in an exclusive interview
with The Tribune only a few
weeks ago, Dr Brent Hardt,
deputy chief of mission at the
US Ernbassy, noted that the
same security breeches they
witnessed with the five han-
dlers from NFS were still
uncorrected weeks later.

Dr Hardt emphasized the
importance of airport securi-
ty, echoing the sentiments of
US Ambassador John Rood,
who has outlined similar con-
cerns on numerous occasions
before. '

, A.ccess issues at the airport
have been a problem for the
Embassy for quite some time.
‘Their concern was highlight-
ed by the recent arrests of five
baggage handlers from NFS
who were arrested and
accused of putting narcotics
onboard local and interna-
tional flights.
| The five, along with others,
had been under surveillance
by both local and US author-
hi s for over a year, and are
yow before a Miami court.

US citizen ‘hangs
‘himself’ in cell
2 “FROM page one

Wednesday, January 17, 2007,
and escorted back to Abaco
where he was charged by

police on Thursday, January

18, and taken to court the
next day.

However, on Saturday :

evening, around 6.07pm, Sapp *

was found. hanging from his
cell window in Marsh Har-
bour by an officer who was
about to take him to New
Providence.

“The local clinic’s doctor,
who had been rushed to the
police station, declared Sapp
déad at the scene. His death is
currently being classified as a
Suicide.

“However, officers of the
Central Detective Unit
(CDU) from Grand Bahama
are presently in Abaco to
investigate the matter.

yh

=



Ri.

sepacedsegses.



FROM page one

enne, who was taking special cours-
es at St John’s University, Min-
nesota, was spending a university
vacation with the priest whom he
had met in Nassau as the guest of
Fr Chrysostom Schreiner. Fr
Chrysostom, founder of the
Catholic mission in the Bahamas,
was Sir Etienne’s mentor.

On June 15, 1928, at the end of
the college year at St John’s, they
were married at St Anselm’s parish
church in the Bronx, New York. In
the meantime parliament had been
dissolved in Nassau and Sir Eti-
enne, a member for Inagua, had
to rush to Inagua to fight an elec-
tion. Two days after their wedding
the couple boarded a Dutch ship
sailing for Inagua. The trip was
their honeymoon that ended in an
election campaign at Inagua.

Her life was dedicated to her
family, particularly to her husband,
and his vision for The Tribune and
the people of the Bahamas.

After her children were estab-
lished she did voluntary work for
the Sandilands Hospitals Welfare
Committee, chaired by Lady Freda

LOCAL NEWS

Lady Dupuch dies
at the age of 100

Roberts. Lady Dupuch was the

committee’s secretary/treasurer. .

She is survived by six children
— Mrs Eileen Carron, publisher
of The Tribune, Mr Etienne
Dupuch, Jr, publisher of Dupuch
Publications, Mr Bernard Dupuch
and St Margaret’s MP Pierre
Dupuch, proprietors of Executive
Printers, all of Nassau; Mrs Joan
Munnings of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, and Mrs Bette Hull of
Guelph, Ontario; two sisters, Mrs
Bette Zollner of Sacramento,
Calif., and Mrs Ruth Virzi of
Cincinnati, Ohio, and one brother,
Henry Plouse of Sullivan, Indiana;
two sons-in-law, Mr Roger Car-
ron and Mr Ralph Munnings; and
two daughters-in-law, Mrs Susan
Dupuch and Mrs Maryann
Dupuch; 14 grandchildren, Etienne
and Jeanne Dupuch, Anthony
Dupuch, Robert Carron, Ollie Fer-
guson and Ricardo Munnings, Mrs
Valerie Shipp, Dr James Hull, Mrs
Lisa Todd, Dr Leon Dupuch, Mrs
Michelle Parker, Mrs Brigette
Knudsen, Mrs Danielle Houston,
and Ms Marie Jeanne Dupuch; 19
great grandchildren and many
nieces and nephews, and sister-in-

Gunshots fired at police at
scene of suspected shootout

FROM page one

rid New Providence streets of guns.
“We take reports of shooting very seriously and we expect dan-

ger when we go into those battlefields,”

Mr Evans said.

During this weekend, he said, there were two further incidents of

criminal activity involving illegal firearms.

“At 4am on Saturday a 25-year-old man sustained serious injuries
when he was shot at while driving in the area of Parkgate and

Kemp Road.

According to reports, the man had stopped his Kia vehicle at a
red traffic light when a man ran towards the car firing shots from a

handgun.

The 25-year-old man sustained gun shot wounds to his chest
and his left arm, but was still able to drive himself. to Princess

Margaret Hospital.

Up until press time he was listed in “serious condition.”
Police on the weekend also arrested a man carrying an illegal

firearm.

Acting on a tip, officers searched the Nissan Sentra vehicle of a
Wulff Road man on Saturday shortly after 7pm.

Police stopped the man in the area of Shirley Street and Kemp
Road and found in his vehicle a .45 hand gun and six live rounds of

ammunition.



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a—

law, Mrs Dorothea Dupuch.

She was predeceased by her
husband, Sir Etienne, her grand-
son, Graham Dupuch, daughter-
in-law, Mrs-Sylvia Dupuch, and
son-in-law, Mr James Hull.

Funeral services will be held at
Sacred Heart Church, Shirley
Street, at [lam Saturday. Mon-
signor Preston Moss will officiate.
Interment will follow in the family

_ plot in St Matthew’s cemetery.

Instead of flowers those who
wish can consider a donation to
the Santa Claus Christmas Com-
mittee at the Royal Bank of Cana-
da. This was a programme started
by Sir Etienne Dupuch to provide
toys for underprivileged children at
Christmas time.

. en eels Ce

es 600) 5
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MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 13



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Bottom Left: Mr Arlington Cox, Vice-President of the Professional Security Association of The
Bahamas (PSAB); Mrs Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prine Minister and Minister of National Security; Mr
Byron C. Rodgers, Founder and Presiden tof the PSAB; Mr Peter D. Isaacs, UnderSecretary of The
Ministr ‘y of National Security.

Standing Left: Directors of the PSAB, Mr Leo P. Thurston, Mr De nzil Rodgers, Mr lan M. Jupp and

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 15



os : LOCAL AND CARIBBEAN NEWS ! :



lM THE Circus Team (left to right): Marco Pierre, Chucho Ayala, Leo Munnings, Billy I Havik,

Angel St Jacques, Thomas Bates and Dyesun Storr.

Circus ative: inh een

ay

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Kibe
ea

Gea

FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM

Gr and Ba ama : . ae ae TAP RY pe Wito bea |

“LADIES and Gentlemen,
boys and girls, the Havik Cir-
cus has come to The. Bahamas
and it is here to stay!” Flying
trapeze, double trapeze,
comedic acts, live horses and
stunts, and the beautiful aerial
hoop all add up to an exhilarat-
ing world-class show not to: be
missed when visiting Grand
Bahama.

Billy Havik has travelled the
world from Australia to the US
performing and teaching circus,
and is now bringing together
amazing talent from around the
world.

These skilled performers
now include three local stars—
Thomas Bates, Dyesun Storr,

Marco Pierre. They make up
the core of the flying trapeze
team. Chucho Ayala, from
Mexico, is also part of the flying
team specializing in single
trapeze and flying while blind-
folded. Angel St Jacques from
Canada specialises in aerial
hoop and double trapeze as well
as flying.

Billy Havik is trained in
twelve circus disciplines and is
constantly ‘trying to find new
talent while always inventing
new acts.

Another local talent, Leo
Munnings, rides. her trick
ponies, Lightning and Sunshine,
into the show and performs with
them. Before the show rides for

children are available as part of
the entrance fee. ,

Friends of Billy’s will be drop- ... ;
ping in to be guest performers.
while they are on vacation from
their other circus groups, :Li_
Pawson, and Anthony Delany
from Cirque du Soleil, and Cir-. >





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Venezuela’s Chavez tells US
to ‘go to hell’ in broadcast

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
told US officials to “Go to
hell!” on his weekly radio and
TV show Sunday for what he
called unacceptable meddling
after Washington raised con-

cerns about a measure to grant:
Venezuela’s fiery leftist leader

broad. lawmaking powers,
according to Associated Press.

The National Assembly,.

which is controlled by the pres-
ident’s political allies, is expect-
ed tq give final approval this
week to what it calls the
“enabling law,” which would
give Chavez the authority to
pass a series of laws by decree
during an 18-month period.

On Friday, US State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Tom
Casey said Chavez’s plans
under the law “have caused us
some concern.’

Chavez rejected Casey’s state-
ment in his broadcast, saying:
“Go to hell, gringos! Go home!”

Chavez, who was re-elected by
a wide margin last month, has said
he will enact sweeping reforms to
remake Venezuela into a socialist
state. Among his plans are nation-
alising the main telecommunica-
tions company and the electricity
and natural gas sectors.

The president’s opponents
accuse him of using his political
strength to expand his powers.

Relations between Caracas
and Washington have been
tense since Chavez was briefly
ousted in a 2002 coup that he
claimed the US played a role in.



Since then, Chavez has con-
sistently accused the US of con-
spiring to oust him and often
asserts the CIA is working to
destabilise his government. US
officials have denied trying to
overthrow Chavez, but'they
have Jabelled him a threat, to
democracy. 3 ‘

Criticising excessiv
sumption and self-indulgence,
Chavez also announced plans
in his broadcast to raise domes-
tic gasoline prices and approve
a new tax on luxury goods such
as private yachts, second homes
and extravagant automobiles.

He did not give details on the
gas price. ‘hike, which he said
would not affect bus drivers
who provide public transporta-
tion, or the luxury ‘tax.’ He said
revenue from the new measures
would be put toward. govern-
ment social programmes.



Venezuéla‘is one of the.

world’s leading» ‘petroleum
exporters and gasoline now
costs as little as 12 cents a gallon
due to government subsidies. :

In typical style, Chavez spoke
for hours Sunday during his first
appearance on the weekly pro-
gramme in five months. He sent
his best wishes to the ailing
Cuban leader Fidel Castro, his
close ally and friend who has
been sidelined since intestinal
surgery last summer.

Chavez also remarked on the
hanging of former Iraqi Presi-
dent Saddam Hussein: “They
took out Saddam Hussein and
they hanged him, for good or

worse. It’s not up to me tojudge_.
any government, but that gen- |

ine ry mye Top f el ee a

tleman was the president of that

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PARADISE IISLANDs..



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“all for a quote toaay: “a
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freeport t 242.352.5705 £242, any ets



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PAGE 18, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007 : THE TRIBUNE

- Vatican pursuing diplomatic ties with Beijing,
as pope prepares message for Chinese flock _

@ VATICAN CITY




difficulties," the Vatican said. » allowed to worship only with



THE Vatican has pledged
to pursue dialogue with the
Chinese communist govern-
ment aimed at establishing
diplomatic ties, while Pope
Benedict XVI is preparing a
message for his suffering
flock in China, where
Catholics have sometimes
been jailed or arrested for
their loyalty to the pontiff,
according to Associated Press.
A twofold — strategy

_emerged from two days of
high-level debate on China at
the Vatican: continue to
champion religious freedom
in China while pursuing nor-
malization with Beijing.

Benedict, who called but
did not attend the meeting on
Saturday, received a detailed
briefing on proposals made
during what the Vatican
described as frank debate.

Participants included Sec-
retary of State Cardinal Tar-
cisio Bertone, who is the
pope's top aide, and leading
prelates from China, among
them Hong Kong Cardinal
Joseph Zen, who is an out-
spoken adyocate for freedom
of worship.

Following the talks, Bene-
dict "benevolently has decid-
ed to write a letter to
Catholics in China," the Vat-
ican said in a statement, with-
out indicating when the let-
ter might be issued.

Asia News, a Vatican-affil-
iated news agency, said that it
was likely Benedict would
"directly" take up specific
questions as how to deal with
illicit ordinations in the state-
sanctioned Catholic church,
which does not accept papal
authority.

Emerging from the discus-
sions "was the will to contin-

-uwe on the journey of a

respectful and constructive
dialogue with the governing
authorities, to overcome past






"In addition, the hope was
expressed that a normaliza-
tion of relations on various
levels, with the aim of allow-
ing the peaceful and fruitful
life of the faith of the Church
and of working together for
the good of the Chinese peo-
ple and peace in the world,
would be achieved," it said.

Vatican officials said that
"on various levels" included
diplomatic relations.

The Vatican has long indi-
cated that it wants to establish
diplomatic relations with Bei-
jing, even at the cost of moy-
ing its embassy from Taiwan,
but will not compromise on
the tradition dictating that
only the pope — and not a
local church —-can appoint
bishops.

Denounced

The Vatican has vigorously
denounced Beijing's insis-
tence on ordaining bishops
without papal approval. Last
month, Benedict expressed
"oreat sorrow" over the latest
such ordination, the third
known case in 2006.

Zen has accused Beijing of
reneging on a promise to stap
the practice. China yiews
papal appointments as inter-
ference in its internal affairs.

The last months have also
seen a series of arrests of
priests, according to Asia
News. At least 17 under-
ground bishops have disap-
peared, been arrested or
detained in isolation, and 20
priests have been arrested,
with at least five priests,
arrested on Dec. 27 in Hebei,
still in prison, the news
agency said.

Beijing severed ties with
the Holy See in 1951 after
communists took power and
set up a separate Catholic
church outside the pope's
authority. Local faithful are

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the state-sanctioned church,
the Chinese Patriotic Catholic
Association.

Bishops, clergy and rank-
and-file Catholics in the
underground church in China
loyal to the pope have suf-
fered harassment and perse-
cution, including jailing, and
participants in the Vatican
talks paid tribute to this
"price of great suffering."

"With special joy, it was
noted that today, almost all
the bishops and priests (in
China) are in communion"
with the pope, the Vatican
statement said.

The Vatican said that the
Church community in China
was growing.

Benedict has been champi-
oning religious freedom
around the world. He has also
made improved international
relations with the Holy See a
priority of his papacy, and in

articular with China, leavy-
ing him and his diplomats to
chart a delicate course that
could make progress toward
both goals.

Among the prelates partic-
ipating in the Vatican strate-
gy session on China were
bishops from Taiwan and
Macau, a former Portuguese
enclave.

B POPE Benedict XVI
deliyers his blessing during a
weekly general audience in
the Pope Paul VI hall at the
Vatican, in this Jan. 17,
2007, file photo, Pope Bene-
dict XVI will write a letter
to Catholies in China, and
the Church will work
toward diplomatic ties with
Beijing as it tries to help its
suffering faithful there, the
Holy See said Saturday, Jan.
20, 2007.

(AP Photo/

Plinio Lepri, file)

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THE TRIBUNE




Serbs vote in key
election that will
determine Balkan
republic’s future

li BELGRADE, Serbia

SERBS voted Sunday in
parliamentary elections that
could determine whether the
troubled Balkan nation will
continue with pro-Western
reform or return to its nation-
alist past, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The vote is the first since
Serbia became independent
last year with the end to its
union with Montenegro, its last
partner from the former
Yugoslav federation. Soon
after the vote, a U.N. plan for
the future of Serbia’s break-
away Kosovo province is
expected to be proposed.

More than 6.6 million voters
were choosing among 20 polit-
ical parties, ranging from ultra-
nationalists and conservatives
to pro-Western reformists and
liberals. Parties needed to get
a minimum 5 percent of the
total vote to earn a place in
the 250-member parliament.

About 30 percent of regis-
tered voters had cast ballots
by early afternoon, Serbia’s
Election Commission said,
indicating a strong interest
among the electorate. |

Challenges facing the next
parliament and government
include Western demands for
the arrest of war crimes fugi-
tive Ratko Mladic and the dis-
pute over Kosovo, where a
predominantly ethnic Alban-
ian population seeks indepen-
dence over the strong opposi-
tion of most Serbs.

Another priority will be
improving the economy.
Through reforms since 2000
have helped Serbia recover,
and post 5.9 percent economic
growth in 2005, unemployment
is still around 31 percent and
the average monthly wage is
about $325. .

Opinion polls indicated the
vote would be a close race
between the nationalist Ser-

bian Radical Party, loyal to ©
late ex-leader Slobodan Milo-

sevic, and the Western-backed
Democratic Party of President
Boris Tadic.

But neither of the two
groups was expected to win an
outright majority, forcing them
to partner with smaller parties

to form a governing coalition. }











Health Fair on Saturday, a a 10
the outdoor aerobics program beginnig

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 19



Britain’s Prince Charles —
cancels annual ski holiday
in carbon emissions row

B LONDON

PRINCE Charles has
canceled a traditional 'ski-
ing holiday in a bid to
reduce his carbon foot-
print, his office said Satur-
day - a day after cam-
paigners and a government
minister criticized his deci-
sion to fly to New York to
collect an award for work
on environmental issues,
according to Associated
Press.

Environment Secretary
David Miliband expressed
reservations Friday about
the heir to the British
throne traveling to the
United States for the cere-
mony, while advocacy
groups urged the prince to
use a video link instead.

Flights

Prince Charles' Clarence
House office said the
prince had decided last
year to cancel a regular ski-
ing holiday to Switzerland
as part of an effort to
reduce the number of
flights he takes.

Details of the prince's
carbon footprint — the mea-
sure of green house gases
created by his activities —
are scheduled to be pub-
lished along: with his annu-
al office accounts later this
year. The document will set
out targets for the reduc-
tion of carbon emissions by
his office and household.

Plane Stupid, a climate
change group, and Britain's

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@ PRINCE CHARLES
(AP FILE Photo)

Green Party complained
Friday that Prince Charles
would be accompanied to
the U.S. by an entourage
of around 20 people,
increasing the cost in car-
bon emission terms of the
trip.

During the two-day trip
from Jan. 27, Prince
Charles and wife Camilla
will visit youth develop-
ment, urban regeneration
and environmental conser-
vation projects, the British
Council in New York said
Friday.

In Philadelphia on Jan. |

27, they will learn about
the city's Mural Arts Pro-
gram, the country's largest
public art program and one
that relies a great deal on
youth talent, the consulate
said. They will visit with
students who are studying
or have studied overseas.
The couple will ride a
private train that uses an

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@ TONY BLAIR
(AP FILE Photo)

electric locomotive from
Philadelphia to New York,
where the prince is to col-
lect a Global Environmen-
tal Citizen Award from the
Center for Health and
Global Environment at
Harvard Medical School.

Visit

Following their marriage
in April 2005, the couple
made their first joint visit
to the U.S. in November
2005, when they paid
homage in New York to
the victims of the Sept. 11
attacks and stopped in New
Orleans, which was still
reeling from Hurricane
Katrina.

Earlier this month,
British Prime Minister
Tony Blair mounted a
defense of his own envi-
ronmental credentials after
he claimed lawmakers

Creative Christian Arts



would never ask the pub-
lic to cut down on air trav-
el.

Blair said he planned to
offset carbon emissions
from personal air travel by
donating money to envi-
ronmental projects after
saying in an interview the
onus should be on business











3rd Ch urch

Friday Ja nuary 26th, 2007

Pastor Henry Higgins
& Co Pastor Dr. Ann Higgins

Ministries International

7:30PM

Celebration

iversary Workship Celebration



‘Trevor Williamson
Trinity Full Gospel
Baptist Church

to develop cleaner fuels,
rather than on travelers.
"I personally think these
things are a bit impracti-
cal, actually to expect peo-
ple to do that (take less
flights)," Blair told
Britain's Sky News. "It's
like telling people you
shouldn't drive anywhere."

oo




















Pastor




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Sundays 10:00 am----Creative Workshop

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SSSR RON ANAL TREAT aR NTO ARNON


THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 22, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

COMICS PAGE |



Dennis











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gs
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winesr( P One tends to become a victim of
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they seem to be similar to others
encountered previously. This ten-
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West led the jack of clubs against
South’s four-spade contract. Declarer
won with the queen, crossed to
dummy with a trump and led a heart

WE NEED To SEE IF ITS
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W O'O% WILD INK, IRC u-2
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letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must. contain the
centre letter and there must be at
least one nine-letter word.

No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET i
Good 13; very good 20; excellent
26 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

(02007 by King Feetures Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.





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to the jack, losing to the queen.

West made the fine return of a
second trump, which declarer took in
dummy to lead another heart. When
the king lost to the ace, West returned
a third round of trumps. ;

Declarer was now at the end of his
rope. He could not avoid losing a
diamond and another heart, and so
finished down one.

The odd part of the hand is that if
declarer had been dealt three small
hearts instead of the K-J-5, he would
surely have made the contract! In
that case, given the same opening
lead, he would have arranged to muff
one of his heart losers in dummy.

After winning the club, he would
have retumed a heart. Then, regard-
less of what the defenders did next,
he would play another heart, putting
him in position to trump his third
heart in dummy. :

But the presence of the K-J-5 of
hearts induced declarer to cross to
dummy with a trump in order to lead
toward his heart honors. This in turn
opened the gate for repeated tramp
leads by the defense and eventually
brought about South’s downfall,

To avoid this pitfall, declarer
should have led any heart from his
hand at trick two, and 10 tricks
would have been assured.

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JANUARY 22 |
ARIES — March 21/April:20
Conceit can get you into trouble, Aries,
but you seem to ignore all warnings
this week. A co-worker gets defensive

as a result. Money matters seem bleak
— reconcile bank accounts, j
TAURUS - April 21/May'21 |’.
A great opportunity arises on
Tuesday, but you may be too busy -
to see it coming. It’s best if you take
the day off to make the most of this .
one-time deal. Libra is key. '
GEMINI- May 22/June 21

You haven’t been feeling your best,
Gemini, and this week probably will.
be no better. Relax, lay low for.a.
while and try to recuperate. A special
friend drops by for a visit. ‘
CANCER -— June 22/July 22

It seems you’ve gotten youfself ,
into another work bind. You' just:
can’t seem to find a place to work
that interests you, Cancer. Keep .
looking; don’t settle for just any- -—
thing. Aquarius helps out. '

LEO - July 23/August 23:
Have you been feeling lonely, Leo? It
might be time to invite over some
friends to help beat the pre-winter
blues. Thursday seems a good day for

a late dinner. Romance could follow!
VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22; -
Too many road trips have ‘put wear
on your car, Virgo. You just made. -
the investment, so take it easy. for: |
a while. Tuesday is a good day. for
relaxation — something you need...

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 '
You've decided to jump in and—
finally get that.pesky task done
that’s been haunting you. Good for
you! Wednesday is an uneventful
day, so sleep in and enjoy it.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

A better mood keeps you lively this. - |
week, Scorpio. When you’re on a
roll no one can match your work
effort, so make sure the boss sees all

of your hard work. . :
SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21 .

It seems you’ve been pondering -"
starting a new business. Remember,
being self-employed has its benefits
but also several downfalls — con-
sider them carefully. Capricorn: is
the one to watch out for this week. . -
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

A trip to the doctor has you mending some

of your wild ways, Capricom. Now is not
the time for fun and games, but concentra-
tion on setting a course for your future: ¢ -°
Expect Friday to be very exciting. .~

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 ‘

4 Merely a letter to make a No plans for your birthday,

suggestion (6) vegans? (6) Aquarius? Why not think creatively

7 Noemply point in meking an 2 Cover for a dagger? (5) and coordinate a hiking trip with

Ba 3 Short fuses have their friends. The countryside looks beauti-
Test (4,4) - advantages (4) ful snow-covered. Virgo willhelp. * . >

8 Aproperleisure centre — for : anor ene: 7 PISCES — Feb 19/March 20.’

: uatters? (6) a variety of gums ee 7 sc

ee ; 6 — There's plenty | have on, eis eto eT Eda era arene you eaer isbes?
_20 US president writing to a git (5) , PAYS anna ne good luck to come your way, Pisces?
ig cadena soathing (6) A Well, this week it just may arrive in
Legal (4) 9 — Tostart a fire could be quite a bit fried potatoes the form of an overdue check. Spend
14 Such as getting £1 fora disquieting (6) the money wisely, but have fun. '
piace of cake (4) 11 Played up again (3) :
4 : 12 Somet use the Paris:

15. Putyourname down to sing? (4) Reine CHESS by Leonard Barden

26 The soap man, familiarly (3) 13 Woinen with wrong-headed , ; ’

17 Asound from the middie bottom? (4) desires? (7) ‘

19 The one to the fore (In Russia?) (4) 15 Achildish issue? (3) Ivan Cheparinov v lan Rogers,

21 Wise: WaibeiGe a ona tal 16 He or she will come nex! month — Essent, Netherlands 2006,

: shortly, anyway (3) Australia’s number one 8284
could get a weighty education (9) 18 Cont iat for keeping coal in grandmaster Rogers is one of
23 Loco, perhaps, but calm and curiously? (3,3) the most popular players onthe pear 4
collected (4) 20. Ghanaian river with electrical ce oneal ee i a
tential (5) ? neko e affable ex-teacher travels “ ay ;

24 He, self-centred, is a rotter (4) 5 8 Feo ncial DOWN with wife Cathy, who has made

26 No shortage of clothing (3) oot for the big piles (3) 4 — Previously (6) 1 Worries (5) her own speciality of action and =; be | |

ae hoa TN wa 22 _Inllittle England, it's even less (3) 7 Recur (8) 2 Material (5) offboard photos of the top GMs. :

re, in Normandy, cave men 23 = Wolfishly, can it snarl yet coo, ‘0 Cen (6) 3 Church recess (4) Rogers Is rarely outplayed, but it , | ae
heart? (4) possibly? (6) a3 43. Female horse (4) 4 Wide (5) happened in today’s position 3] | yy] a
29 “Doubles”, reasonably enough, 25 That over there in Tokyo, ea | 14 Rational (4) 5 Destiny (4) against the young Bulgarian ; i 2
rhymes with “booze” (4) normally? (3) 'N 15 Assistant (4) 6 Gully (6) champion. Cheparinov’s d7 .
‘32 Possibly eald to be a Welehman' 28 One place you can't walk away from, 5 16 Finish (3) 9 Moron (6) pawn in the heart of the black 1 a a
y sald tobe a 5 asin church (5) a. 17 Agents (4) 11 Uncooked (3) position is potentially a winning boc d'e.f g -
platform (4) 30 Team to succeed with only about half > 19 Sentimental (4) 12 Brimless cap (5) trump, so Rogers has attacked it
33 Acolourful emulsion, say (5) a gate? (5) 2 . on fi 13 Errand (7) with queen, rook and knight. 4 ‘
—_ 15 Mimic (3 : forced a rapi ,

34 Thytiesaniman@) BF Soran Ui | 24 Gamapanees) Pieter an tcl semis wich forced

35 Like all my readers (8) 55: Orion pete bil oT Neto «) 18 Delighted (6) Black to resign. What :

36 Focal pont of recent change (6) this sure is fun (4 29. Snare (4) ee happened? en

32 College head (4) (3)
33. Stop (5) 22 Hill (3)

CEL: ED OT fe Wr ia eae By Z 34 Works dough (6) c Ce (6) ;
Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions ee os Hurry (5) srems) Chess solution 8284: 1 Bc5! (threat 2Bdé winning
ACROSS: 1, W6alth 7, On the way 8, Fill 10, Sea-Ted 11, | ACROSS: 1, Ascend 7, Imperial 8, Disc 10, Creche 11, 36 Position (6) 30 Scape (6) more material) Nxd7 2 Qxf7+1 Kaf7 3 Rxd7+ Qxd7 4
I'm-pede 14, Red 16, Pores 17, Leer 19, Fired 21, Sted Rating 14, Ate 16, Tacos 17, Errs 19, Later 21, Fetid 22, 31 Coin (5) Nxd7 Rd8 5 Rdl and Black conceded. White wins ;

22, Het up 23, Deep 26, Sewer 28, G-‘un 29, Prompt 30, | Begin 23, Crew 26, Besom 28, Too 29, Anyway 30, 32 Daybreak (4) easily a bishop ahead.
Futile 31, A-Vi-d. 32, Re-sent-ed 33, E-aster Remote 31, Unit 32, Glowered 33, Ensure 33° Rope (4) Mensa quiz: Three. In each column the first number







DOWN: 1, We-asel 2, Loiter 3, H-old 4, Thumped 5, Owner
6, Tyres 8, Fare 9, Led 12, P-od 13, Danae 15, Vitus 18,
Eider 19, Fit 20, Rep. 21, Serpent 22, He-m 23,

Du-ti-es 24, Enid 25, Peeler 26, Sport 27, Worse 28, Guv
30, Fade

DOWN: 1, Apache 2, Edicts 3, Dice 4, Debated 5, Civic 6,
Flags 8, Dear 9, She 12, Tar 13, Noose 15, Ratio 18,
Raven 19, Leg 20, Tin 21, Females 22, Bow 23, Comics
24, Root 25, Whence 26, Barge 27, Synod 28, Ten 30,
Rude

plus the second number, minus the third number,
divided by the fourth number, gives the fifth number.
One possible word ladder solution is: VEAL, heal,
hell, hall, call, calm, CALF




PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

‘BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE |



BUSINESS FOR SALE

Medium Sized, Established Local Retail Business for Sale:













Profitable, Stable and Fantastic Potential. -
Significal Cash required (-/+1M)
~ Immediate/Constant cash returns
Scriotis enquiries only’ please.’

Email: seriousretail business @hotmail.com

Freeport Container Port

Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
Crane Technician
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
= Three (3) years’ experience working on GE, ABB or Siemens Drive Control Systems.
° Diploma or Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical Technology.
e Experience in supporting OMG, HHI or Mobile Cranes preferred.
¢ Computer Literate
¢ Must be willing to work as part of a Team.
° Must S able to repair and maintain:
AC/DC Motors

: ° S ACIDG Motor Control Drive Equipment
o Medium/High Voltage Distribution Systems

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful candidates:
Full-time Employment

Major Medical/Life Group Insurance

Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents

Performance Bonus :

TE
900000

1g Representatives from tie Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau on
‘| January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. through 4:00
Ei p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
----- - P.O. Box: F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

““eitlail: ADS@fep.com.bs





POSITION AVAILABLE

Ct Cpe
_PR CO-ORDINATOR

_The Corporate Offices of British American Insurance Company is looking for
a Marketing and Public Relations Co-ordinator. The ideal candidate must be
creative, detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent interpersonal and
| communication skills. Ability to work with limited supervision in a fast-paced
| environment is a must.




Responsibilities:



e Executing the daily marketing activities of the Company as planned.

° Co-ordinating the production of marketing collateral and advertising

: materials with attention to detail, brand integrity and deadlines.

H| © Assisting with event planning and various company functions.

4| ° Maintaining and updating files, databases, records and/or other documents
i as needed.

|| @ Communicating with all branches on related matters.

Core Competencies:

e Ability to work with limited supervision and learn new skills quickly
° Excellent oral and written communication skills
4 | ° Ability to resolve problems with a sense of urgency
4 | ° Ability to work under pressure
[| ° Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship
with co-workers
e Ability to maintain confidentiality
° Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

Required Qualifications:

e Bachelors Degree in Marketing or related field.

e 3+ years experience in Marketing and/or PR fieid

e Excellent computer skills required proficiency in Excel is a plus.
e Sales and/or graphic design experience a plus

Benefits:
Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive
benefit package including Life, Health and Pension.
Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator,
British American Insurance, P.O.Box N-4815,
Nassau Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to

dparker @babinsurance.com





FROM page 1B

managed to attract the funds
managed by its two main bro-
ker/dealers, Fidelity and Coli-
na, for listing, apart from that
its mutual fund listings have
otherwise consisted to just one
family of funds, and another
managed by Jamaican-based

.Grace Kennedy. Prior to the

Fidelity Prime Income Fund’s
listing, the previous one had
taken place in 2003.

Any effort to expand BISX’s
investment funds listings had
to involve an attempt to grow
the industry itself, rather than
just be a revenue generator for
the exchange, Mr Davies
added. He pointed out that
international financial centre
rivals such as the Cayman

does not capitalise |
on funds industry

Islands and Bermuda “have a
leg up” on the Bahamas in cer-
tain business areas, due to the
collaboration between private
and public sector, and used
their stock exchanges “as a
jumping off point to bring peo-
ple to their shores.

“I’m trying to do that here,”
the BISX chief executive said.
“Rather than talk about it, you
have to pursue those avenues,
give them reason to be opti-
mistic and kick-start the indus-

try.”
Pointing

Pointing out that some 600-
plus investment funds were
domiciled in the Bahamas, Mr
Davies added: “There is no
reason that I can think of why
we should not be trying to cap-
italise on that and give them
no choice but to deal with our

Inter-American

Development Bank (IDB)

The following will be Sold by Tender
2001 Ford Windstar

Purchaser will be responsible for payment of customs duty
and stamp tax. This vehicle may be inspected during normal
working hours. Monday through Friday upon request through
the office of the Administrative Officer IDB House, East Bay

Street, Nassau, Sealed offers marked “Bid for Automobile:

should be sent to

”

The Administrative Officer
P.O.Box N-3743
Nassau, Bahamas

Offers will be accepted until noon.

on February 9, 2007. This

car will be sold’’as is” The right is reserved to reject any or

all offers.



IBDO Mann Judd

BDO Mann Judd a leading professional services firm and a member firm of BDO
International, an organization with 621 BDO member firm offices in 107 countries around the

globe, is now seeking applications for an office administrator.

Qualifications: The successful candidate will have a Bachelors of. Science or
Arts in accounting and have 3 years work experience in a similiar role. The candidate will

‘No reason’ why BISX

©

exchange. There is no reason .
why we cannot capitalize on:
that number of funds here.”

Mr Davies said he had;
already begun discussions, with :,
the assistance of the Bahamas ':
Financial Services Board’
(BFSB), with the Bahamian ;
investment funds industry,»
including the sector’s working *'
group and the successor to the’
Bahamas Association of Mutu- :
al ‘tas Administrators Cars ‘
fa

He added that he wanted to. iv
hear their concerns, adding: 1%,
think the funds industry i in the; ,
Bahamas is going through a>.
period of change. Now we're’;
being reevaluated, looked at»
to see if it is an area people”
can do business in. Where do:
we go from here? The’,
exchange could play a aaa
cant role.

“There are a lot of areas we,
can focus on to bring them / 4
products that benefit the whole
industry, and mutual fund.:
administrators in particular.’,
I’m part of a larger industry. im
If the industry grows by virtue *
of our initiatives, we will ben- |
efit. It doesn’t help when ney
industry struggles.”

Mr Davies said BISX was’
eyeing two potential avenues. Z
for growing the caventnent!
funds industry, one that would :
result in “marginal” growth, |
the other involving a more sig- .
nificant impact that could see:

‘aggressive expansion of.

between a dozen to 50 funds‘
at a time. io
“It all depends on where the.’
appetite in the industry is,” Mr,
Davies said. He added that:
BISX’s “size and ability”)} i

would enable it to keep pace, -

with the latest market trends“
and developments, and leave *.
it well-placed to capitalize on ;
innovations in listing, trading *
and reporting. -

o. te oe
7 one ee

have a working knowledge of QuickBooks or Peachtree and Microsoft applications, and

should be able to. work in a challenging team driven environment.

The position requires a vivid attention to detail.

Responsibilities: include but are not limited to,

Internal Accounting

Invoice preparation and control
Compliance and HR duties
Corporate services (company formation and administration) 4
This position will support senior management and is administrative and diverse i

Individuals with the above-mentioned qualifications should fax their resumes to the

following:

Recruitment Manager
BDO Mann Judd
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-325-6592

Or e-mail to the following address: info@bdomannjudd.com

Absolutely no phone calls please.

Only the applicants with the above mentioned qualifications will be contacted.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The General Public is advised that the Bahamas Electricity Corporation will be
performing disconnection activities in the following areas:

Bozine Town, Yellow

Elder





Gardens, Big Pond, Blue Hill Road, Black |
Village, Bain Town, Boyd Sub, Farrington Road, Chippingham, Oakes Field,
Stapledon Gardens, Millennium Gardens, Engleston and St Alban’s Drive,

at.7 9 & a ae PD

EA ..F FO se se e%

oat O Oe

Highland Park, Tall Pines, Rocky Pine Road, Jubilee Gardens, Carmichael
Road, Sunset Park, Bellot Road, Gladstone Road, Faith Gardens, Tropical °
Meadows, Flamingo Gardens, Miller’s Heights, Avocado Gardens, Bacardi Road, :

Spigot Road, Adelaide, Coral Harbour, South Ocean and Mt. Pleasant Village.

All

consumers

with

overdue accounts

disconnection of your electrical service.

are advised
arrears on their electricity accounts immediately, in order to avoid the

ee

to pay the

The public is also advised that all overdue payments should be made |,

directly to the Corporation. Those payments can be made at Head Office on |}:
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the Main Post Office [';':

on East Hill Street.


be

‘aue ee ernie | -MONDAY, JANUARY 22,





2007, PAGE 23






































JANUARY 22, 2007

——



2 fen eo rzee

SH OCCLa®


















Barkitecture





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| 7:30. | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 //
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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 20, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007



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MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net





The Tribune



USINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

_ EU talks to impact
future investments

Chamber forms Task Force to examine all funds industry

trade arrangements impacting Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Bahamas

Chamber of

Commerce has

appointed a Task

Force to “look at
all aspects” of global trade
agreements that could impact
the Bahamas, with a leading
business executive warning
that this nation’s response to
the rules-based trading systems
could impact the level of future
foreign direct investment (fdi)
in this nation.

Gershan Major, chief execu-
tive of Caleb Enterprises, the
master franchise holder for the
Mail Boxes Etc franchise, iden-
tified the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) talks
with the European Union
(EU) as the most urgent trade
priority for the Government
and private sector. He warned
that this nation had to assess
the impact its ultimate
response would have on future

é investment opportunities in
.*. this nation, as well as existing
' companies.

“It’s not only the existing
companies, but. we have to
look at future opportunities for
investment,” Mr Major said.
He explained that investors



Bahamas from countries that
were members of the World
Trade Organisation (WTO)
and part of other rules-based
trading systems, and this could
have different implications for
the rates of return they were

= would..be coming tothe

able to get on their Bahamas-
based investments.

This again shows how rules-
based trading systems such as
the WTO will impact the
Bahamian economy, this
nation’s business community
and its people, even if the
Bahamas remains outside such
organizations as it is currently,
holding only ‘Observer’ status
at the WTO.

The Bahamas will effective-
ly have to enter trade agree-
ments that are compliant with
WTO rules that stipulate non-
discrimination against foreign
countries, their companies and
products entering the Bahamas
or imported from this country,
and require that this nation
provide market access to such
companies.

Mr Major is chair of the
Chamber’s Globalisation and
Foreign Relations Committee,
and it is from this committee
that the ‘Task Force’ has been
formed, headed by Hank Fer-
guson, a former economist and

senior official:in the Ministry of

Trade and Industry.

“The Task Force will be
looking at all trade arrange-
ments that this countr7y is cur-
rently negotiating, but will
focus on the EPA, given our
view that it’s the most impor-

tant trade negotiation taking
place at the moment,” Mr
Major told:‘The Tribune.
“One of our main priorities
is to work with the Govern-
ment to ensure the private sec-
tor position, as it relates to the
EPA’s impact on industry, is
well-represented going for-
ward. Certainly, we understand
there are challenges relating
to the time for submissions by

_ the Bahamas.”

The deadline for the
Bahamas to submit its formal
feedback to Cariforum, the
body negotiating the EPA on
its and CARICOM”s behalf,
on its ‘wants and needs’ from
the negotiations was last Mon-
day, January 15. As revealed
by The Tribune, that deadline
was missed, and although
unlikely to be fatal to the
Bahamas’ cause, it shows that
both government and private
sector are again off the pace
when it comes to trade talks.

A government briefing
paper on the EPA talks sug-
gested that the EU would like
to see at least 85 per cent of
trade markets opened up,

meaning that the negotiations .

go beyond the $66 million in
goods exported to the EU by
Bacardi, Polymers Interna-
tional and the fishing industry







@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribure Business Editor

Bahamas ‘fifth freest’

Nation rated ‘most prosperous in Caribbean’

THE Bahamas has been ranked as the

economy in Americas

in 2004 to potentially impact
the tourism and financial ser-
vices industry.

Mr Major said the Chamber
had sought a better under-
standing from Cariforum on
the services, investments and
market access chapters of the
proposed EPA talks, as these
were likely to impact the
Bahamian economy the most.

He added that their inclu-
sion “certainly creates some
challenges for the Bahamas, as
we still only have observer sta-
tus at the WTO, and while we
are part of CARICOM, we are
not part of the market side of
the CSME. There are lots of
impacts we have to take into
account on where the Bahamas
stands on this”.

* The Chamber of Commerce
is most concerned about
whether the market access
talks will impact areas of this
economy traditionally reserved
for Bahamian ownership only,
such as retail and wholesale,
as well asthe impact on ser-
vices trade and investments,
and ensuring. exports to the
EU by Bacardi, Polymers and
the fishing industry still retain
their duty free access. ;

SEE page 6B






fifth freest economy in the Western
Hemisphere and “most prosperous in the
Caribbean”, scoring higher than both the
regional and world average, despite the
restrictions imposed on foreign business
ownership and the exchange control
regime.

The Index of Economic Freedom, pub-
lished by the US right-wing think-tank,
the Heritage Foundation, in conjunction
with the Wall Street Journal, rated the
Bahamas as fifth out of 29 economies in
the Americas region when it came to
economic freedom, and 24th in the world.

The only economy rated better in the
Caribbean was Trinidad & Tobago’s,



the Bahamas at 23rd, although both
nations shared the same 71.4 per cent
score. The US, Canada and Chile were
the other Western Hemisphere
economies ranked higher than the
Bahamas.

While the Bahamas’ score fell by 1.2
per cent for the 2007 survey compared to
last year, the Heritage Foundation said
this was partly due to a new base for the
ratings. The Bahamas’ 71.4 per cent rat-
ing was higher than both the 62.3 per
cent average for the Americas region,
and the 60.6 per cent world average.

The survey pointed out that the Gov-

and customs duties for its revenues had
created “a mercantilist barrier to higher
prosperity, as well as closer trade inte-
gration with island neighbours and the
United States”.

However, it added: “The Bahamas



which was ranked one spot higher than |

ernment’s dependence on import tariffs -

enjoys high levels of business freedom,
freedom from government, monetary
freedom, fiscal freedom, property rights
and labour freedom. The Government
imposes no income or corporate tax.
“Regulations can be subject to official
whim, but the environment remains gen-
erally business- friendly. The labour mar-

ket is highly flexible; and severance pack- .

ages are not overly onerous for employ-
ers. A focus on transparency represents
the best traditions of English common
law in protecting private property, which
is nowhere more apparent than in the
advanced financial system.”

The Bahamas scored highest in the cat-
egories on ‘fiscal freedom’ and ‘freedom
from government’, notching up 98 per
cent and 89.9 per cent respectively, large-
ly due to its tax structure.

For the fiscal category, this nation’s
“tax burden is one of the lowest in the
world”, due to the absence of income,
corporate,.capital gains, inheritance and
value-added (VAT) taxes. The Heritage
Foundation/Wall Street Journal survey
said overall tax revenue raised by the
Bahamian government was equivalent
to 16 per cent of gross domestic product
(GDP), while total government spend-
ing was “low” at 19.4 per cent of GDP.

‘ Other areas where the Bahamas scored
well included 80 per cent for ‘Business
freedom’, as “the Bahamian government
generally follows a hands-off approach to
business”.

That statement, and a number of other
comments in the survey, are likely to



































an business community, given the high
level of government involvement and
interference in the economy.

The Heritage Foundation/Wall Street
Journal survey noted that “starting, oper-
ating and closing a business can be hin-
dered by a burdensome regulatory envi-
ronment”, and gave the Bahamas a rela-
tively low 70 per cent on ‘Freedom from
Corruption’.

In that category, the survey noted:
“Piracy of software, music and videos is a
problem. Existing copyright laws are.
ignored. Illegal drug trafficking and mon-
ey laundering are also significant.”

The Bahamas also gained 80 per cent
scores for property rights and labour free-
dom, despite the survey noting that this
nation’s judicial process “tends to be very
slow”, while the labour laws — although
not costly — “can be burdensome, espe-
cially for domestic business”.

On monetary freedom, the Bahamas -
scored 77.3 per cent, largely due to its
average 1.5 per cent rate of inflation
between 2003 and 2005. However, the
Bahamas lost 15 per cent in this category
due to ‘price control’ measures on items
such as drugs and gasoline.

Due to its customs duties regime, and
restrictions on foreign ownership, the
Bahamas fared poorest on “Trade Free-
dom’ and ‘Investment Freedom’, scor-
ing 28.8 per cent and 40 per cent respec-
tively.

The Heritage Foundation/Wall Street
Journal survey reported that the
Bahamas weighted tariff average was
25.6 per cent in 2002.











SABRE ORY Ric cny

cause some surprise among the Bahami-






‘No reason’ why



ere tral ereh
PON |
CUR ERS TTT

PY HH fil [eatin

BISX does not
capitalise on

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange’s
(BISX) chief executive has told
The Tribune that “there is no
reason” why the exchange
should not capitalize on the
600-plus investment funds
domiciled in this nation to
grow its funds listing business,
arguing that his organisation
can be used as a platform to
attract more business to this
jurisdiction.

Speaking to The Tribune in

-the aftermath of the Fidelity

Prime Income Fund’s listing
on BISX, Keith Davies said he
wanted to work with Bahami-
an investment fund adminis-

trators and manager through |

developing a partnership that
would benefit their business-
es, the funds industry and the
exchange.
Acknowledging that fund
listings had “not been a growth
area” for BISX, Mr Davies
said any attempt to grow this
area had to be “an industry-
building exercise”, and.one

‘that could not solely be for just

the exchange’s benefit, as any
such initiative would not be
sustainable.

“We have to speak to the
potential stakeholders and
people in the industry; the peo-

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

COMPANIES and executives working to fohh an
for the private security industry are hoping tocon clu
its constitution within the next 70 days, with the ge¢
mated to employ five times’ the members of tk

Police Force (RBPF).

Gamal Newry, a Tribune columnist and Nase!



ple who woule E
this,” Mr Davies said. “The
people in the fund industry
have been working so hard to
generate business and keep the
business they have, it’s diffi-
cult for them to focus on things
that might benefit them.

“T see an area of weakness
[for the exchange], but also. see
an area of opportunity. It’s not
a growth area for the
exchange.”

To date, while BISX has

SEE page 10B









chair of the steering committee seeking to form the association,
said the constitution would “cover everyone wha inolved 4 in the

security and protection indus-
try”, and feature by-laws and
rules consistent with those gov-

SEE page 7B

Mild winter ‘softens’
Bahamas travel demand

l By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

TOURIST arrivals to the
Bahamas in early winter were
“a bit softer than anticipated”
at some major hotel due to the
relatively mild weather expe-
rienced in the US, the Ministry
of Tourism’s deputy director-
general told The Tribune, but
the late arrival of the cold snap
has begun to change that.

David Johnson said: “Some

nerwonking | *



But hoteliers say
no impact seen

of our large hotels have report-
ed in the very early winter that
the market has been a bit soft-
er than anticipated, But that’s

been the case for the: rest of
the Caribbean and Florida,
too, because of the. relatively

SEE page 11B ©

ere CARE EMG SS


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

BISX sees 21.9% value,

volun

he Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities
Exchange (BISX) saw.

its All-Share Index for the year
2006 close up some 24.09 per
cent, despite seeing trading
volumes and the total value of
traded shares both decline by
21.9 per cent last year in com-
parison to 2005.

Releasing its 2006 year- -end
report on trading data, BISX
said some 5.251 million shares
traded on the domestic mar-
ket last year, with a total value
of $28.705 million changing

Nathaniel Beneby, Jr.



hands. iat

However, the traded volume:

was down byl. 473 million
shares compared:to the 2005
total volume of 6.724 million

‘shares. The total worth of

shares traded ‘on BISX
declined by $7.642 million,
having stood at $36. 346 mil-
lion in 2005.

Yet the BISX All-Share
Index, which is'‘a market capi-
talisation-weighted index fea-
turing all the exchange’s 19
domestic tier listings, closed up

325.48 points or 24.09 per cent

Vice President and: Country Head

RBC Royal Bank of Canada, Bahamas



for the year. to: Hederiber 29,

2006, finishing the 12-month
: period at 1,679.19.

Previous.

For the | previous year, ale
BISX All-Share Index ‘saw a
311.33.increase'or rise of 29.95
per cent, closing then at
1,350.71. By December 29,
2006, the market capitalisation
of BISX’s domestic tter had
risen from $2.6 billion the pre-
vious year to $3.2 billion.



Commonwealth’ Bank was,



eee a

Nethaniel. Beneby, Nh «
2006 Civil Socéets ty o
Banker of the y eur

From Ross McDonald & the entire team at
RBC Royal Bank of Canada & RBC FINCO

the leader in terms of value of
shares traded, accounting for
$7,309 million worth of shares

or some 25,4 per cent of total

value that changed hands, This
means that Commonwealth
Bank accounted for more than

a quarter of the value: of traded
. shares,

In second place was. ; Fam-
Guard Corporation, parent of
Family Guardian, with some
$4.282 million worth of stock
traded, accounting for 14.9 per
cent of all market activity. In
third place was Cable

SS ced Bank
RBC) of Canada



Bahamas, generating some
$3.585 million worth of trades
or 12.4 per cent of market

activity. In fourth and fifth:

places were FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
and Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), with stock worth
$2.258 million and $1.48 mil-
lion changing hands respec-
tively, accounting for 7.8 per
cent and 5.15 per cent of mar-
ket activity.

On share volume, Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) led the
way, the 1.48 million shares

THE TRIBUNE

clines in 2006

traded accounting for 28.28 per
cent of market volume. Com-
monwealth Bank was next,
708,590 shares trading and
accounting for 13.49 per cent
of market activity, while Fam-
Guard took care of 13.16 per
cent of market activity with
691,175 shares being traded.
Doctors Hospital Health
Systems saw 449,330 shares
change hands, accounting for
8.56 per cent of market activi-
ty, while in fifth was Cable
Bahamas with 382,759 traded,
accounting for 7.29 per cent.

Gray to open Cable
Beach City Market



@V ALFRED GRAY

MINISTER of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer Affairs
V. Alfred Gray will officially
open a new 24,000 square foot
Cable Beach City Market
Monday evening at an event
designed to give shareholders,
vendors and guests a sneak
preview at what will become
the leading grocer’s flagship
store.

The store located on West
Bay Street opens to the public
Tuesday at 7 am.

At twice the size of the exist-
ing City Market immediately
to its east that it is replacing,
the new store will have parking
for 90 vehicles and introduce
several features other stores in
City Market’s chain are expect-
ed to adopt.

“We are very excited about
this store,” said Ken Burns,
CEO of Bahamas Supermar-
kets Limited, parent company
of 12 stores in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. “In addi-
tion to an entirely different
décor, very tropical in style,
spacious aisles, an array of new



(BIS Photo: Tim'Aylén)

products and greatly expand-
ed deli and bakery, we will
introduce several technology-
related improvements in this
store. Among them will be
point of sale scanning, a great
time-saver for customers and
an important benefit for inven-
tory purposes.” It will also fea-
ture a large gourmet and
organic foods section.
Opening of the new store
created four new managerial
positions along with 12 other
jobs in addition to opportuni-

’ ties for neighbouring students

to earn money as packing assis-
tants. The existing building
which City Market had leased
for more than 30 years will be
renovated by owners and sub-
divided for retail and other
appropriate use.

Bahamas Supermarkets Lim-
ited is Bahamian-operated and
employs more than 700 per-
sons. Its charitable arm,
Bahamas Supermarkets Foun-
dation, has awarded more than
$7 million in scholarships since
its inception in 1968.

POSITION
AVAILABLE

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Responsibilities

_¢ Air medical transport of patients
¢ Administration of medication, oxygen and
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined
in the Clinical Protocol Manual.
Provide accurate and comprehensive verbal
and written medical reports.

Requirements:

¢ Holder of current Bahamian Licence.
* Must have at least three years experience
post graduation in emergency or critical care

Medicine

Have current BLS & ALS Certification
Must be independent, responsible with good
communication skills

Attractive Compensation Package

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
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@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.

AAS



Air Ambulance Services Ltd


ee as me

BUSINESS

WALL STREET

The Miami Herald



etoanuroansassenaaencosatie



gE SCENN RUA DEC OECD SSROULLEE UAE DRUULDERODEEUDILEE OLLIE RDRELDIID LEON ELUOLIELL AEE T DA





SB.

To sustain profits, firms look overseas

@ Recently, growth outside of the
United States has outpaced gains
within the country. Firms in
various sectors are looking for
further global expansion.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
associated Press

NEW YORK — Facing a U.S.
economy that’s expected to grow at a
moderating pace in 2007, Wall
Street’s biggest investment houses
are aggressively turning overseas in
hopes of sustaining record profits
reached during the past year.

Economic and business growth

MISS AMERICA

Pageant
tries to
rework
image

marketing campaign that
includes more than nine hours

‘of Miss America-related

programming before the pageant
airs on Jan. 29.

~ BY KATHLEEN HENNESSEY

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — One year after she
left home in search of better fortunes,
Miss America has gone totally Holly-

...wood, ,,.

She’s ‘got her own reality TV
show, a catchy new ringtone and
she’s giving away cash to lucky view-
ers. She’s competing in a “pageant”
again, rather than the politically cor-
rect and, some say, boring “scholar-
ship program” of the past.

After years of struggling for rele-
vance and viewers, the Miss America
Pageant and its cable network host
are attempting to market the beauty
contest back into the American cul-
tural conscience.

“There was a time when everyone
knew Miss America’s name, but the
brand has slipped a little,” said Sam
Haskell, a former executive at the
William Morris Agency and now
chairman of the board of directors of
the Atlantic City, N.J.-based Miss
America Organization.

“We thought it was time to repol-
ish the brand.”

There are few who would argue
the aging beauty queen doesn’t need
the help. After years as a Saturday-
night television event, the pageant
hemorrhaged viewers in the 1990s,
eventually losing its network con-
tract in 2004. Country Music Televi-
sion picked her up and moved her to
Las Vegas last year, hoping the hype
would draw new viewers.

The move, though considered by
some as a blow to Atlantic City and
the die-hard volunteers — pageanis-
tas — who drive the operation, gener-
ally was viewed as a success.

The pageant was aired a combined
20 times on CMT, owned by Via-
com’s MTV Networks, and its sister-
network VHI, the network said.
Although just 3.1 million viewers
watched the show live — less than

*TURN TO PAGEANT
SMALL BUSINESS

surged in Europe and Asia in 2006,
and that trend is projected to con-
tinue this year. Stock markets from
Paris to Hong Kong have outpaced
the gains produced on U.S.
exchanges, and foreign companies
are increasingly using acquisitions to
grow.

This has motivated the major New
York-based investment banks to
expand their. operations in global
financial centers including London,
Frankfurt, Sydney and Hong Kong.
Without plans to increase their busi-
ness outside the United States —
either through organic growth or



Cuba’s daily output o a

Cuba and its foreign partners
are producing roughly 68,000 bar-
rels of oil a day, up from 18,000 a
day in 1992, according to Jorge
Pifion Cervera, an energy expert at
the Institute for Cuban and Cuban-
American Studies at the University
of Miami.

Cuba still imports most of its oil
and refined products — about
100,000 barrels daily — primarily
from Venezuela on favorable
terms. But it’s boosting efforts to
produce more at home.

In recent years, Cuba has been
auctioning blocks off its north
coast to foreign firms such as Span-
ish giant Repsol YPF and Toronto-
based Sherritt International for oil





PRIMING THE WELL OF ANT-EMBARGO SENTIME Tey



and gas exploration in joint ven-

acquisitions — executives said their
companies would fall desperately
behind.

“As a general matter, there are
more opportunities to grow outside
the U.S.,” said Merrill Lynch Chief
Financial Officer Jeff Edwards. “We
will look for places where an acquisi-
tion can accelerate a growth opportu-
nity, but we will remain disciplined.”

Edwards said 37 percent of Mer-
rill’s $34.7 billion in 2006 revenue
came from overseas operations. Last
year showed continued outperform-
ance from outside the United States,
with Europe and Asia setting new

OFFSHORE DRILLING








ly, 68,0

IN SEARCH OF
BLACK GOLD

IF ESTIMATES OF CUBA’S OFFSHORE OIL
RESERVES PROVE ACCURATE, IT COULD
PRESSURE THE U.S. TO LIFT ITS EMBARGO AND
PERMIT EXPLORATION BY U.S. OIL COMPANIES.

BY MARTHA BRANNIGAN
mbrannigan@MiamiHerald.com

Since the demise of the Soviet Union forced Cuba to crack open its
doors to outside investment, oil exploration and nickel mining have
emerged as lucrative ventures for foreign investors.

tures with the government.

Some of those exploration blocs
are just 50 miles from Florida and
closer to the state’s shoreline than
the U.S. government permits for
domestic drilling. But under a 1977
treaty with the United States, the
area is part of Cuba’s exclusive eco-
nomic zone and drilling is allowed.

In 2004, Repsol disclosed its
first oil strike — quality grade light
crude — some 18 miles off Havana,
but said the well wasn’t commer-
cially viable. Repsol teamed up
with Norsk Hydro of Norway and
India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corp.
and is forging ahead on exploring
other sites.

The potential is huge. The U.S.
Geological Survey estimates

Online toolbox renovates contracting

@ A South Florida company is
hoping to build a niche for its
software in a thriving contracting
industry.

BY JIM WYSS
jwyss@MiamiHerald.com

Pompano Beach, Fla.-based Ser-
vusXchange wants to remodel the
contracting industry and it’s hoping
its new website will be just the tool
for the job.

Last month the company launched
MyOnlineToolBox.com, a site that
allows contractors to schedule work,
track clients, generate estimates and
spit out everything from payment
forms to invoices.

Because it exists solely online,
there is no troublesome hardware to
install and users can access the infor-

mation from anywhere there’s an
Internet connection.

With a price tag starting at $89.95
a month (a fee the company is tempo-
rarily waiving as it continues to intro-
duce advanced features), ServusXch-
ange is hoping its OnlineToolBox
will win fans among the 500,000 to 2
million small contractors working
across the nation.

The company already has about
100 clients onboard and hopes to
have 500 by year’s end as it plows
some of the $1.25 million in private
financing it has raised into marketing
and new features, said Brian Javeline,
president and chief executive.

Among those new features is the
ability for contractors registered on
the site to receive check and credit
card payments online.

But breaking into the industry will
be no easy task, said William Cobb,
chairman of the electronic informa-
tion systems committee at the Asso-
ciation of General Contractors of
America.

“There is a ton of software out
there already — certainly in the thou-
sands of products,” said Cobb. Intuit,
the maker of QuickBooks for Con-
tractors, and Oregon’s Timberline
are among the heavy hitters in the
industry.

But there is still room for smart
newcomers, he said.

“There is no such thing as the
Microsoft for the construction indus-
try,” he said. “Nobody has done any-
thing that approaches being a solu-
tion for all the things we have to do.”

In fact, a study by the National

io near. Santa Cruz, del Norte contributes’ 6

full- -year records for both revenue
and earnings. And he expects this
trend to continue.

The story at Merrill Lynch’s four
biggest rivals is the same.

Goldman Sachs Group has long
been considered the most European
of the U.S. investment banks. In 2006,
the company reported a record $37.7
billion of revenue, and 45 percent of
that came from overseas.

A spokesman for the company
said overseas operations have long

been a focus for growth, but that it .

will use internal expansion rather
than acquisitions to grow.

DIEGO GIUDICE/BLOOMBERG FILE _




reserves of 4.6 billion barrels of oil
and 9.8 trillion cubic feet of natural
gas off Cuba’s north shore — a veri-
table bonanza — though the esti-
mate is debatable and the offshore
sites would be difficult and expen-
sive to exploit.

But if major deposits are discov-
ered, it would intensify pressure on
Washington to rethink the
embargo, at least on energy.

Cuba watchers aren’t holding
their breath for change during the
Bush administration — even if |
Fidel Castro dies. And since explo- |
ration is a long-term affair, “Idon’t |
think there will be a sense of |
urgency among U.S. oil companies |
to get into Cuba,” says Pifion.

Last year, Congress talked about
exempting U.S. energy companies
from the’embargo, a proposal
pushed by the American Petroleum
Institute, but the effort fizzled.

Cuba’s biggest foreign player is
Sherritt, which arrived in Cuba in
the mid-1990s. The company says it
is producing about 30,000 barrels
of oil a day with partner Pebercan
of Montreal. Sherritt also has nickel «
and cobalt mining operations and |
electricity generating facilities in

° TURN TO OIL RESERVES











Bear Stearns reported $9.23 billion

of revenue in 2006, and about 14 per-

cent came from overseas. Of all the
Wall Street houses, Bear Stearns had
the lowest portion of its business
coming from outside the United
States. But that’s about to change.

The company has long based its
European business out of a few floors
in a London office building. In
August, Bear Stearns signed a con-
tract to move into a new, 12-story
building based in Canary Wharf.

It’s more than just new digs, said

° TURN TO BANKS

COMCAST

bets big on
With the Golf Channel’s 15-year
PGA Tour contract comes
early-round coverage of every
regular PGA Tour event, but it
may also come with heavy losses

for the channel’s parent company
Comcast in the early years.

BY DEBORAH YAO
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Comcast is
making a big bet on golf, hoping to
transform its little-watched Golf
Channel network into a household
name.

The Golf Channel 3 is exclusively
carrying every round of the first
three PGA Tour events of 2007. So
for the first time in four decades, this
eek’s Bob Hope Chrysler Classic

not be shown on network televi-



‘he Coverage. is ear of the Golf
Channel’s unprecedented 15-year
partnership with the Tour that kicked
off this month. The deal gives the
channel early-round coverage of
every regular PGA Tour event, and
every round at 13. PGA tournaments.
NBC and CBS pick up the weekend
coverage for 31 tournaments.

The contract substantially boosts ©
the channel’s golf programming and
for the first time gives considerable
heft to a network co-founded by
Arnold Palmer 12 years ago. But it’s.
also likely to generate big losses in
the early years for parent company:
Comcast, the nation’s largest cable
operator.

Last year, Walt Disney’s ABC bad
ESPN walked away from negotiations
with the tour, saying they can’t gen-
erate enough advertising revenue to
offset the broadcast rights fees. In
addition, the Golf Channel is shut out
of the five most lucrative events in
golf — the Masters, the U.S. and Brit-
ish opens, the PGA Championship
and the Ryder Cup — that are not
owned or run by the PGA Tour.
Those have separate broadcast deals
for the weekend with the networks
and for early-round coverage with
USA Network, ESPN and TNT.

Comcast — whose Chief Execu-
tive Brian Roberts is an avid golfer —
is taking a longer view. With more
than $22 billion in overall annual rev-
enue, distribution into 24 million
homes and deals with other cable and
satellite TV operators to carry the
Golf Channel, Comcast is gambling
that it can build ratings for the net-
work that will allow it to charge

* TURN TO GOLF CHANNEL



NISSA BENJAMIN/FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

KEEPING IT SIMPLE: Michael Carson, left, and Brian Javeline display
their website, MyOnlineToolBox, which aims to streamline tasks in

the contracting industry.

Institute of Standards and Technol-
ogy in 2004 found the U.S. construc-
tion industry was wasting almost $16
billion a year just trying to make dif-

ferent pieces of software work
together.

* TURN TO TOOLBOX


4B | MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

MISS AMERICA



SS

JAE C. HONG/AP FILE 2006

MARKETING CAMPAIGN: Contestants are introduced
during the preliminary competition for the 2006 Miss
America Pageant. The Miss America Pageant and its
new cable network are attempting to market the
beauty contest back into the American cultural

conscience.

Beauty pageant
reworks image

° PAGEANT

one-third the viewers she
last found on ABC — a total
of 36 million people saw the
show including the replays.
Even the traditionalists
couldn’t argue with that
exposure.

“You can’t stay status quo
in this day and age or you get
left. behind,” said Maris
Schad, a middle school
teacher and the volunteer
executive director of the
Miss Nebraska state pageant.
“You've got to find out what
the public wants and try and
do a little tweaking that
catches their interest.”

This year’s marketing
campaign amounts to more
than a tweak. CMT, reaching
83 million households, will
have run more than nine
hours of Miss America-re-
lated programming before
the 52 contestants take the
stage for the Monday, Jan. 29
crowning at the Aladdin
hotel-casino, itself also in the
middle of a rebranding to the
Planet Hollywood casino.

The TV blitz includes
“Total Access: Miss Amer-
ica,” a behind-the-scenes
look at life under the crown,
and a “Greatest Miss Amer-
ica Moments” special.

NEW LINEUP

The new lineup also fea-
tures a reality TV special,
“Pageant School: Becoming
Miss America,” shot in Los
Angeles and scheduled to air
in the days before the pag-
eant on CMT, VH1, MTV and
Logo. The show follows the
women through a regimen of
training tips imparted by for-
mer winners and pageant
“challenges” that present
unanticipated obstacles, such
as the question posed to Miss
Nebraska: “If you could have
one superpower, what would

OFFSHORE DRILLING

it be and why?”

“I would like to have a
photogenic memory,” she
replied, flashing an unknow-
ing pageant smile.

Interested fans in search
of a ringtone can download a
version of longtime host Bert
Parks’ classic There She Is,
Miss America. Others can log
online to play the “Pick &
Win Game,” which promises
$1 million to the person who
successfully predicts the top
finalists and the winner.

This is not the Miss Amer-
ica Pageant of old, a deft
combination of gams and
goodness that began as a
bathing revue in 1921 on the
Boardwalk and by the mid-
1990s began refering to itself
as a Scholarship program to
emphasize substance over
superficiality.

A ‘DATED’ LOOK

Focus groups. told
researchers they thought
past contestants, many of
them products of years in
state pageant systems,
looked “dated.” Executives
aiming to attract the 18- to
34-year-old demographic
brought in a sexier swimsuit
line and. sent out letters
advising contestants to tone
down the makeup. and
update the style.

Focus groups asked for
other updates, too — most
borrowed from reality TV.

During the pageant, the
camera will cut away to
show reactions from the
judges. Interviews with
judges will be aired to give
viewers a better understand-
ing of how the winners are
chosen.

Viewers will be able to
cast votes, online or in text
messages, for Miss Conge-
niality, an honor previously
awarded by other contes-
tants.

Oil reserves may make
US. end embargo

° OIL RESERVES

Cuba.

“You have to build value
and be seen as a partner that
can move forward, bringing
technology to the table and
training,” says Sherritt
spokesman Michael Minnes.

Nickel was again Cuba’s
top export last year, as keen
global demand for the metal,
used in steel making, has
driven up prices. Sherritt
plans over time to boost its
nickel capacity at Moa to
about 49,000 tons a year from
33,000 tons.

To be sure, doing business

in Cuba is an ordeal for oi
companies. Pebercan, fo
example, announced las
month that Cubapetréleo wa
two months late on some $69
million in oil payments — $3
million owed to Pebercan and
the rest to Sherritt.

Patrice Bedu, vice presi
dent of exploration for Peber
can, which finances opera
tions from cash flow because
bank loans are hard to find
says “We are negotiating with
the Cuban government to fix
the problem.” But he adds:
“We maintain good relation
with the government. It’s 2
temporary issue, we’re sure.”

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

WALL STREET

°BANKS

Bear Stearns European Chair-
man Michael Peretie in a
statement: “This building rep-
resents a new milestone in the
development of Bear Stearns’

_ franchise in Europe and con-

firms our commitment to the
region.”

Lehman Brothers reported
that 37 percent of its $17.6 bil-
lion of revenue was from
overseas operations. Just this
past week, the company made
a big move to boost its Asia-
Pacific expansion strategy by
acquiring closely held Grange
Securities in Australia.

Morgan Stanley won’t pro-
vide a breakout of its 2006
revenue until it files its annual
report with the Securities and
Exchange Commission,

COMCAST

Golf Channel bets.o

*GOLF CHANNEL

advertisers ever-higher rates.
“If we don’t generate
enough ad revenue but it

. helps us grow our brand and

grow our distribution . . . (we
hope the result will be similar
to) what football did for Fox,”
said Dave Manougian, presi-
dent of the Golf Channel.
News Corp.’s Fox televi-
sion network’s successful $1.6
billion bid in 1993 to broad-
cast the National Football
Conference pitched the net-
work for the first time into the

- same echelon as the three

major networks. What helped
was the financial backing of
Rupert Murdoch’s empire.

Comcast first invested in
the Golf Channel in 1994,
along with five other cable
operators. It began increasing
its stake and in 2003, acquired
the final 8.6 percent stake for
$100: million.

REVENUE

With the PGA Tour deal,
ad revenues are “up, well in

-double digits,” Manougian

said. He added that the chan-
nel should generate enough’
ad revenue to offset rights
fees midway through the con-
tract.

Gil Kerr, PGA Tour’s
senior vice president of
broadcasting, programming
and productions, said the tour
has had a relationship with
the Golf Channel since its
inception. THe channel is the
exclusive carrier of the Cham-
pions Tour and Nationwide
Tour. : ‘

“They weren’t in enough

homes at the time to do a deal .

with them on their own,” Kerr
said. But “their distribution
has grown a lot in the last six
years. We knew going into the
TV negotiations that they
wanted to be aggressive in
acquiring the PGA Tour.”
The Golf Channel is avail-
able in 75 million homes com-
pared with 92 million homes
for ESPN. Manougian said the
channel currently is in at least
85 percent of basic video tiers.
The Golf Channel is part of

SMALL BUSINESS

expected in February. How-
ever, in 2005, the company
derived about 29 percent of
revenue from overseas.

Beyond its Asian and Euro-
pean operations, Morgan
Stanley has taken a keen
interest in expanding in the
Middle East as well. The com-
pany on Wednesday said it
would form a joint venture
with Capital Group, a securi-
ties firm based in Riyadh,
Saudi Arabia.

“The markets in the U.S.
aren’t growing like they used
to, and we’ve seen the poten-
tial of equity markets pretty
much tapped out,” said David
Easthope, an analyst with
business consulting firm
Celent. “These banks are sim-
ply going where there’s
growth.”

the digital package of Cox
Communications and Cablev-
ision. In 2012, when the
Tour’s contracts with NBC
and CBS lapse, Manougian
believes the Golf Channel will
be able to pick up more week-
end coverage.

Kerr won’t say what the
Golf Channel deal is worth,
only noting that the total
value of all current contracts
has increased. He also won’t
comment on whether there’s
any revenue sharing. Comcast
and Golf Channel executives
also declined to discuss con-
tract terms.

EXIT CLAUSE

Asked whether the con-
tract has an exit clause, Man-
ougian would only say that
“any contract has disaster
clauses, whether it’s a one-
year deal or a 20-year deal.
There’s nothing out of ordi-
nary about this contract.” .

It helps that Comcast isn’t
only counting on ad revenue
to offset the Tour’s rights
fees. It charges cable and sat-
ellite providers 21 cents per
subscriber per month, a frac-
tion of ESPN’s average
monthly fee of $2.60. And
Golf Channel officials say
they aren’t planning an imme-



~ “Even. d

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

In Europe, that growth is
being spurred in a number of
areas. The conversion to the
euro has certainly made
cross-border merger and
acquisition deals easier. Trad-
ing in equities and derivatives
has also picked up as stock
exchanges become more pan-
European.

Developing economies in
Asia, such as China or India,
have also been a source of
income for U.S. banks. These
countries have previously
been difficult to crack
because of regulatory laws
that restrict investments by
foreign ‘companies. Those
laws are changing, and the
Asia-Pacific region has the
fastest growth rate in the
world.

Expanding internationally

diate increase to offset the
costs of the PGA Tour con-
tract — another bet that in
doing so, they will be able to
get picked up on more cable
systems. d

In 2005, 63 percent of the
Golf Channel’s $267.5 million
in revenue came from license
fees, according to Kagan
Research in Monterey, Calif.
Cash flow was $116.7 million.
For 2006, Kagan is projecting
a 13 percent increase in reve-
nues to $302.5 million and
cash flow of $139 million.

For now, viewership of the
final rounds for the first two
PGA championships on the
Golf Channel has come in far
lower than last year, when
they were on ESPN.

Still, boosting viewership
takes time, said Neal Pilson,
former president of CBS
Sports and now a TV consul-

tant in.Chappaqua, N.Y..
nthe road; I.don’t’

know if'¥iewing levels‘on the
Golf Channel will equal the
levels that golf was achieving
on ESPN.”

“But what they will have is
a strong golf audience that is
saleable (to advertisers) and it
will be a permanent home for
‘PGA Tour, which they have
not had in the past,” he said.

‘Investment banks lean on Asian,
European growth to boost earnings

isn’t only for the big banks,
either. Discount brokerages
like E-Trade also plan global
growth to access new markets

’— and even offer U.S. cus-

tomers the ability to trade for-
eign stocks.

“International is a key
component of our strategy,”
said Jarrett Lilien, E-Trade’s
president and chief operating
officer, who added that the
company would like do so
through spot acquisitions.

“The growth overseas on
the retail side is far outpacing
the U.S., and this year we
want to expand our geogra-
phic footprint and develop
new products,” he said. “We
want to use this infrastructure
to give our U.S. customers a
shot at trading internation-
ally.”

n PGA Tour



FORE! Phil Mickelson,

above, tees off during the |

Bob Hope Classic golf
‘tournament in Thousand, .
Palms, Calif., Friday. Golfer
Charley Hoffman, below,
tees off during the first
day of the Bob Hope
Classic golf tournament in
Berrmuda Dunes, Calif.,
Wednesday.

Web tool renovates contracting

* TOOLBOX

The niche ServusXchange
is aiming for is the small firm
thin on computer savvy, tech
support and budget. While
most industry software
requires contractors to make
hefty upfront payments and
live with their choice, MyOn-
lineToolBox has a modest
monthly fee with no further
obligation, said Javeline.

“There’s no contract to
sign. Just try it, and if you like
it, keep it,” he said. “Not even
the phone company will do
that for you.”

If Javeline sounds confi-
dent about the product, it’s
because ServusXchange has
invested heavily in under-
standing its market. The com-
pany worked with dozens of
real-world contractors who
helped shape the software’s
development. One thing the
collaboration highlighted
early on is that a contractor’s

life is one of constant inter-
ruptions, said Javeline.

On a typical morning, an
office manager might be field-
ing phone calls from four dif-
ferent projects and need to
jump between creating esti-
mates, checking client contact
information and issuing
invoices.

ServusXchange facilitates
that through its WorkFlow
Queue, a patent-pending pro-
cess that allows users to eas-
ily hop back and forth
between tasks without losing
their place or their data.

ORGANIZED SYSTEM

It’s a system that Oliver
Fugmann, office manager at
T.C. Crum Roofing and Gen-
eral Contractors of Welling-
ton, said he wished was in
place during last year’s hurri-
cane season. When the storms
hit, his office was slammed
with calls, he said. Panicked
homeowners often called

three or four times a day, talk-
ing to different employees,
and generating a slew of
duplicate orders.
MyOnlineToolBox would
have caught those duplica-
tions and made it easier to
coordinate the company’s
seven work crews and follow
up with clients, said Fugmann.
“This has helped us
streamline procedures in the
office and make sure every-
one is on the same page,” said
Fugmann. “And it has really
cut out so much paperwork.”
Whether Fugmann and
others will still be pleased
with the product once they
have to pay for it remains to
be seen. Meanwhile, Ser-
vusXchange is pursuing alter-
native streams of income —
from equipment rental to job
listings to transaction fees on
online payments — that may
allow it to offer the software
free for some time and still
make its break-even date of

2009, said Vice President
Michael Carson.

He said it’s working as a
marketing strategy. “We want
to start with this free seed, let
it spread and then figure out
how to ignite it,” said Carson.

While MyOnlineToolBox
is primarily. being used in
offices, the company is posi-
tioned for the day when cheap
hand-held computers are just
another tool in a worker’s
belt. ‘

HESITANT

But that day could still be a
ways off in an industry still
suspicious of technology, said
Cobb of the Association of
General Contractors.

“There is still this percep-
tion [among many construc-
tion workers] that the guy
with the hammer is the one
doing the work,” he said.
“And the guy sitting behind a
computer is just wasting
time.”

Es

a
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9



yy,
ie Ly jj

THE C-CLASS SALOONS

et oe





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PAGE 20, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

ES
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Lawmakers urge Britain and US to ©

THE TRIBUNE

work on alternative to Guantanamo

ml LONDON

A PANEL of British law-
makers urged the govern-
ment Sunday to work with
the United States to devel-
op an alternative to holding
terror suspects at Guan-
tanamo — aiming to speed
up the closure of the much-

Report also calls for overhaul of Geneva Conventions

criticized U.S. military
prison, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The Commons Foreign
Affairs Select Committee

released a report that also
called for an overhaul of the
Geneva Conventions and
suggesting Prime Minister
Tony Blair lead efforts to

update the international
standards to reflect the chal-
lenge of terrorism.

“The international com-
munity as a whole needs to

Teenage suspect detained in Turkey in
killing of ethnic Armenian journalist

ISTANBUL, Turkey —



POLICE on Saturday detained a teenag-
er suspected of slaying an ethnic Armenian
journalist, acting on a tip from the boy’s
father after his picture was broadcast on
Turkish television, senior officials said,
according to Associated Press.

The boy later confessed to the killing, a
prosecutor said.

Ogun Samast, who is either 16 or 17 years
old, was caught on a bus in the Black Sea
“city of Samsun, Prime Minister Recep

Tayyip Erdogan said. He was apparently
traveling from Istanbul back to his home-
town of Trabzon, Istanbul Gov. Muammer
‘Guler said.

Samast was wanted in connection with
the killing of Hrant Dink, a 52-year-old edi-
. tor of the Turkish-Armenian newspaper
-'Agos who was gunned down outside his
newspaper’s office in Istanbul on Friday.

On Sunday, Chief prosecutor Ahmet
_ Cokcinar told the state-run Anatolia news
-. agency that the teenager confessed to killing
Dink during initial questioning.

The private Dogan news agency quoted
the teenager told Cokcinar he had carried
out the attack because he did not like
‘ Dink’s opinions.

Erdogan said Samast was arrested with
the gun believed to have been used in the
killing. Video footage showed paramilitary
_ police at the Samsun bus station inspecting

a pistol and then placing it into an evidence,«««
tary said she saw him waiting in front of a

bag.

ne



For all life’s roads

Guler said Samast’s father had turned
him in.

Most Turks assume Dink ‘was targeted
for his columns saying the killing of ethnic
Armenians by Turks in the early 20th cen-
tury was genocide. Nationalists consider
such statements an insult to Turkey’s hon-
or and a threat to its unity, and Dink had
been showered with insults and threats.

Turkey’s relationship with its Armenian
minority has long been haunted by a bloody
past. Much of its once-influential Armenian
population was killed or driven out begin-
ning around 1915 in what an increasing
number of nations are calling the first geno-
cide of the 20th century.

Turkey acknowledges that large numbers
of Armenians died but vehemently denies it
was genocide, saying the overall figure is
inflated and the deaths occurred in the ciy-
il unrest during the collapse of the Ottoman
Empire.

Samast was caught after ieReigOn sta-
tions across ‘Turkey broadcast on Saturday
a purported photograph of hii caught by a
security camera about two blocks from the
scene of the crime in Istanbul.

Guler said earlier that Dink’s secretary
had identified the young man in the photo-
graph as the same person who had request-
ed a meeting with Dink the day he was
killed, the Anatolia news agency reported.
The man said he was a student at Ankara
University, Guler said.

The request was.refused, and the secre-

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bank about an hour before Dink was killed,
Anatolia reported.

Guler said Samast was born in 1990, but
did not release his exact age. He said the
teen was being brought back to Istanbul
for questioning along with six other sus-
pects from Trabzon.

Police were investigating whether the
teen acted alone or had ties to a group.

The suspect’s uncle Faik Samast told pri-
vate NTV television that he didn’t think
his nephew was capable of acting alone.

“He didn’t even know his way around
Istanbul,” Samast said. “This kid was used.”

Threats and violence against Turkish edi-
tors and reporters is not uncommon. Well-
known journalists commonly receive police
protection and travel around Istanbul with
bodyguards. Dink was alone when he was
killed.

Guler rejected accusations the govern-
ment did not do enough to protect Dink.

“Because he didn’t request protection,
he didn’t get close protection,” he said Sat-
urday. “Only general security precautions
were taken.”

Mourners held a vigil at the spot where
Dink was gunned down. Many in the crowd,
which included Turks and members of
Istanbul’s small Armenian community, had
pictures of the slain journalist pinned to
their chests.

“We’re here to pay our respects,” said
Sabri Nas, 47, an Armenian-Turk. “We are
against this violence,.whatever the motiva-
tion.”





onl,





shoulder its responsibility in
finding a longer-term solu-
tion” to the indefinite deten-
tion of terrorist suspects at
Guantanamo.

“We recommend that the
government engage actively
with the U.S. administration
and with the international
community to assist the
process of closing Guan-
tanamo as soon as may be
consistent with the overrid-
ing need to protect the pub-
lic from terrorist threats,”
the report said.

Detainees

About 395 foreign men
currently held at Guan-
tanamo are allegedly linked
to al-Qaida or the Taliban.
Human rights groups have
condemned the U.S. for
operating the prison, where
most detainees have been
held for years without being
charged.

The U.S. government has
blocked their access to U.S.
courts, claiming it has the
authority to detain them
indefinitely to keep America
safe. The military says many
of those imprisoned provide
interrogators with informa-
tion about terror networks.
The U.S. has operated the
prison for five years.

Nine British nationals held
at the facility had been
released by January 2005,
but the committee said it
believed another nine former
British residents remained at
Guantanamo. Human rights
lawyers have said they were
aware of eight ex-British res-

~ idents being detained.




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Seven panel members vis-
ited Guantanamo in Sep-
tember. Though the image
of inmates “kneeling in the
dirt, shackled and hooded”
was no longer accurate, the
report said Guantanamo
failed to achieve minimum
British standards “on access

‘to exercise and recreation,

to lawyers, and to the out-
side world through educa-
tional facilities and the
media.”

In October, Foreign Sec-
retary Margaret Beckett said
Guantanamo was “unaccept-
able in terms of human
rights” and “ineffective in
terms of counterterrorism.”

Blair has gone no further
than calling the camp an
“anomaly” that sooner or
later must end.

Treatment

The committee called on
Blair and his successor to
help change the Geneva
Convention that governs
treatment of prisoners of war
to “deal more satisfactorily
with asymmetric warfare,
with international combat-
ants and with the status of
irregular combatants.”

President Bush has said
the Geneva Conventions do
not apply to Guantanamo
detainees, who were classi-
fied as “enemy combatants”
—a status that accords them
fewer rights than prisoners
of war.

Britain’s Foreign Office
said it would not comment
on the report until a formal
response had been sent to
the committee.











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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 21



ee (Wa We Na |S



Rebels say government resumed
in Darfur

large-scale bombing

m@ SUDAN
Khartoum

GOVERNMENT aircraft
bombed wide areas of northern
Darfur in breach of a cease-fire,

. ‘rebel commanders said Sunday
as the African Union and the
U.S. called on Khartoum to let
insurgent factions hold a unity
meeting aimed at ending the
deadly infighting, according to

. Associated Press.

The reports on the bombings,
which could not be indepen-
dently confirmed, came days
after Sudanese President Omar
al-Bashir vowed to adhere toa
truce brokered by U.S. gover-
nor Bill Richardson and others
earlier this month.

Sudan’s military spokesman
denied the bombings, which
would violate the new cease-
fire as well as May peace agree-
ment between the government
and one rebel group and sever-
al U.N. Security Council reso-
lutions.

“We never bombard civilians
anywhere,” the army
spokesman said, speaking under
customary condition of
anonymity.

But rebel field commander
Abdallah Banda said the
Sudanese air force bombed

_large stretches of North Darfur
from Friday to Sunday near the
localities of Hashaba and Ein
Sirro.

Three villages were
destroyed, he said. Banda, a
rebel chief for the Justice and
Equality Movement, could not
confirm reports of more than a
dozen casualties.

“It’s too early to count the
dead, but there are probably
many,” he said by satellite tele-

. phone from North Darfur. JEM
is among several factions who
rejected the May peace accord.

The African Union peace-
keeping mission in Darfur,
already investigating two other
bombings reported earlier this
week, said it was aware of new

. Incidents in northern Darfur.

-. The AU’s cease-fire commis-

sion “has received such a report
and will send a team there,
hopefully tomorrow,” said
spokesman Noureddine Mezni.

Sudan has been repeatedly
accused of bombing civilians in
rebel-controlled zones with
crews on Antonov cargo planes
dropping crude explosives onto
villages, destroying houses and
killing cattle.

Many incidents are difficult
for the AU to investigate
because they occur in the rebel
strongholds of lawless northern
Darfur, which are “no-go
zones” for the 7,000 African
peacekeepers.

Denial

Sudan’s military spokesman
also denied allegations made by
the government of neighboring
Chad that Sudanese planes had
recently violated Chadian air-
space.

“We call on Chadians to
refrain from providing assis-
tance to Sudanese rebel groups
and honor the bilateral agree-
ments we have signed,” the
army spokesman said.

More than 200,000 people
have died in nearly four years of
fighting in Darfur, and the con-
flict is spilling over the borders
into the Central African Repub-
lic and Chad, where hundreds
of thousands of Darfur’s 2.5 mil-
lion refugees have fled.

Sudan and Chad trade accu-
sations of supporting each oth-
er’s rebel groups, and the Unit-
ed Nations —-which Khartoum
bars from deploying some
22,000 peacekeepers in Darfur—
is making plans to send them
to neighboring countries
instead.

Khartoum’s new accusations
came after the U.S. special

envoy for Sudan, Andrew Nat- |

sios, met with Darfur rebel lead-
ers in Chad on Friday to urge
them to work together for peace
in the region.

Several rebel commanders

said they were returning from

their talks with Natsios when
they were bombed Chad.

Banda, of JEM, said his
movement was planning a meet-
ing later this month, but com-
manders now had to join their
units because of the bombings.
Jar al-Naby, of the rival Sudan
Liberation Army rebel group,
also said his faction was plan-
ning to gather but would post-
pone this because of the bomb-
ings.

A truce for the rebel confer-
ence was initiated by the AU’s
chief commander in late
December. However, the
Sudanese government bombed
the meeting place just after the
African general left. He later
issued a statement calling on
the Sudanese government “to
desist from further bombard-
ment (so) as not to scuttle the
fragile cease-fire.”

Richardson, the visiting gov-
ernor of New Mexico who has
said he plans to announce his
candidacy for U.S. president
soon, obtained a public com-
mitment from Khartoum earlier
this month that-it would stick
to the new truce.

On Sunday, the U.S. embassy
in Khartoum said in a statement
that the United States support-
ed efforts by the AU and the
United Nations to facilitate a
rebel meeting.

“The United States calls on
the Government of Sudan to
respond positively to the
request from the African Union
for assurances that such a meet-
ing ... can take place under
secure conditions,” the state-
ment said.

AU officials say there are
now more than a dozen com-
peting Darfur rebel factions, up
from two when negotiations for
last May’s peace agreement
began.

In Khartoum, one splinter
group known as the “Free Will”
faction reunited on Sunday with
the Sudan Liberation Move-

the government.

Embattled Guinea president urges
unity amid paralysing strike

@ GUINEA
_ Conakry

THE embattled president of
Guinea on Sunday urged his
. countrymen and the army to
- support him in the face of a par-
’ alyzing nationwide strike aimed
at bringing down the govern-
ment of this west African
nation, according to Associated
Press.

The call marked President
Lansana Conte’s first public
address since the strike began
Jan. 10. With schools and busi-

‘nesses closed and Conakry’s
main seaport shut, the growing
strike represents one of the
gravest threats yet to the rule




of Conte, who seized power ina
1984 military coup.

“Guineans, and above all
our soldiers, must stay united,”
Conte said in an address
broadcast on state radio and
television. “We must,be proud
to wear the uniform, symbol
of our faith, and defend
Guinea.”

Surrounded by soldiers, Con-
te said “it is God who gives
power.”

The ailing leader spoke in the
local dialect of his Soussou eth-
nic group, which accounts for
about 20 percent of the tiny
nation’s 10 million people. Oth-
er main ethnic groups include
the Peuhl, who make up 40 per-

cent of the population and the
Malinke, who make up 30 per-
cent. Because of the country’s
ethnic diversity and myriad
dialects, the national language is
French.

Public support for Conte's
regime has faltered amid a
declining economy that has seen
the Guinea franc depreciate and
prices for food and fuel rise
markedly. The impoverished
country is home to nearly half
the world’s reserves of bauxite,
a material used to produce alu-
minum.

The strike began after Conte
halted the trial of two men
accused of stealing millions of
dollars from the state.

dahe

signed the May peace deal with









@ DARFUR rebellion delegates from the Sudan Liberation Movement (right: Abu Obeida
al-Khalifa) and the SLM “Free Will” faction (left: Ali Majouhk) clasp hands after they signed a
unity deal at the SLM’s headquarters in Omdurman, Sudan on Sunday. While the mainstream
SLM signed the Darfur Peace Agreement with the Sudanese government last May, more than a
dozen other factions reject it and violence in Darfur has only worsened since the accord was
reached.

(AP Photo/Alfred de Montesquiou)

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5B





Bahamas to host
top hotel summit

New tourism development company to
market Caribbean under single brand

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL :
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE Bahamas will receive
a tremendous economic boost
next January when it hosts del-
egates from around the world
». at Caribbean Marketplace
2008, to be held at the Atlantis
Resort and Casino on Paradise
"Island.

Celebrating its 27th anniver-
sary, Caribbean Marketplace
is the region's single most
. important tourism marketing
event, matching Caribbean
suppliers with international
buyers. Nearly 400 supplier
companies and destinations
showcase their products to
close to 900 buyers from 200
. International organisations.

The event attracts about
1,600 attendees and members
of the press from 35 countries.
Over 12,000 business appoint-
ments are scheduled to solidify

_ _ relationships with tour opera-

tors from the US, UK, Canada,
- Europe and Latin America
that sell the Caribbean.

It is used as a networking
tool for persons in the travel
industry, and allows for a num-
ber of submeetings to be held
during the conference.

Held

At this year's Caribbean
Marketplace, held in Oranjes-
tad, Aruba, January 14-16,
CHA officials announced that
they and the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation have
launched the Caribbean
Tourism Development Com-
pany (CTDC) to market the
region under a single brand.



world.

At a press conference to
launch the project, CHA pres-
ident Peter Odle said it was
vital that Caribbean countries
speak with one voice when
promoting the region as a pre-
mier tourism destination.

Similarly

Similarly, Allan Chastenet,
St Lucia’s minister of Tourism,
said that over the past 15 years,
the region has lost 3.7 per cent
of its market share, and that
the islands have to band
together to ensure that they
remain competitive.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, the CTO’s secetary-gen-
eral, said marketing the region
as a single destination would
not hamper the success of any
individual countries.

“ When the brand grows,
everyone’s business grows,” he
said..

He added that the Carribean
brand offered diversity, as
people realise each island has a
uniqueness to it that seperates
them from any other island.

CDTC will be a private, for -
rofit entity registered in the
Cayman Islands,
designed to generate market-
ing to further support the pro-
motion of the region.

CTDC evolved out of the
Memorandum of Understand-
ing and Cooperation signed by
CTO and CHA in October
2005. The new entity is jointly
owned and operated by CTO
and CHA, and each organisa-

THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS | |
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is to implement strategies that build.alliances and

and is’

partnerships with universities around the

tion will have a 50 per cent
share in the company.

The goals of the new com-
pany include:

* Promotion and protection
of the Caribbean brand

* Promotion and protection
of the interests of the owners.

* Creation of synergies
which might not otherwise go
to the partners.

* To generate revenues for
the benefit of the Caribbean
people.

The CTDC Board of Direc-
tors will include: co-chairmen,
consisting of the president of
CHA and the chairman of
CTO, the first vice-president
and first vice-chairman of the
respective organisations, and
the marketing directors of
these organisations, as well as
the secretary-general and chief
executive of CTO and the
director-general and chief
executive of CHA and the
chairman of the CHA Mar-
keting Committee.

Responsible

CTDC will be responsible
for a variety of projects, which
are marketing-focused and as
well as event-oriented. :

A press release on the new
company stated that other
examples of results from the
creation of CTDC will be the
launching of a series of news-
paper advertorial sections
across North America to pro-
mote the region.

Merchandising of the






Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

International Liaison Officer (ILO)

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators. .

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-tg-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°" January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas





tHAMAS

G & TRADING Ramamrans











Caribbean brand and logos will
be reviewed by the Board, as
the new Caribbean logo was
created as a collaborative
effort by CHA and CTO affil-
iates on both sides of the
Atlantic.

A new Caribbean Website
will -be launched in 2007, and a
series of media bulk purchas-
ing agreements will help mem-
bers of both organisations
reach greater economies of
scale, helping both the private
and public sector entities to
launch expanded advertising
and marketing campaigns. |

Oversee

The CTDC will also oversee
the cooperative efforts at con-
sumer travel shows, such as the
upcoming New York Times
Travel Show in February, in
which the Caribbean will bring
together the largest single
pavilion for any region under
the new Caribbean banner and
the popular Caribbean Week
in New York.

Other events such as music
festivals, a Caribbean beauty
pageant and a Caribbean fash-
ion show are among the long
range plans. In addition, the
CTDC will be looking at a co-
branded affinity credit card
under the Caribbean banner
the release added.

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
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LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED is in Dissolution”

The date of commencement of dissolution is 30th day of
August, 2006. ,

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Liquidator



Pricing Information As Of:

RO SES ‘
RS
: us Close Today's Close
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
3 J. S. Johnson
10.00. eu 10.00 aus Premier Real Estate | am
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol
42.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
“eee 0: 20,RND Holdings
28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.05
1.64
9.05
4.15
2.40
5.54

10.70

10.90

10.00
0.50
7.15
8.52

Change

FROM page 1B

Daily Vol.

In a statement, the Cham-
ber of Commerce said it had
started an independent analy-
sis of the Bahamian services
and manufacturing sectors to
assess the “full implications”
for the Bahamian economy of
these international trade agree-
ments.

EPS $

Mr Major agreed that any
trade agreements entered into
by the Bahamas would impact
the “average businessman”,
adding that the Chamber want-
ed to educate the private sector
on what these agreements
meant for them.

“The second step is to go
beyond that — get from the
business community what their
concerns are, and where they
see some of the opportunities
relating to possible joint ven-

Div $

ture partners, not only in the
local economy and the same
industry, but regional and
multinational,” Mr Major said.
“In and of itself, our tax
structure is an area that will
have to be revisited, and that
will have an impact on all the
business community.”

Sensitive

He added that the most sen-
sitive areas for the Bahamas,












The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
‘making news inthe
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story

EU talks to impact
future investments

such as the industries reserved
for domestic ownership, its tax
structure, and services indus-
tries, required “skilled, delib-
erate negotiation” by this
nation to ensure that it was
able to obtain a full reserva-
tion or ‘opt out’ for them from
the EPA’s provisions, or that
at worst, any changes were
phased-in over time.

‘These areas we expect to be
negotiated in a phased
process,” Mr Major said,
adding that he did not want to
preempt whatever position the
Bahamas took on the EPA.

“This is a tremendous
opportunity for-us as a private
sector to really engage the pub-
lic and the community in these
arrangements, even as we find
ourselves at a point of delay,
and I use that term very loose-
ly,” Mr Major said. “These are
still negotiations, and we have
an opportunity to make sure
the Bahamas’ position is very
clear and the private sector’s
position is represented as best
we can.

“We have a lot of work to
do and are certainly engaged.
Everyone is certainly on board —
and recognizes not only the
urgency but the tremendous
importance it represents for
the country.”

Mr Major said Bacardi, Poly-
mers International and the
fisheries industry were all rep-
resented on the Task Force, as
the EPA outcome would
impact their businesses, lives
and jobs.

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Inco.

52wk-Low
1.2691
2.6262
2.3220
1.1495

10.0000

1.322791"
2.9728***
2.500211**

5 1.217450**"*
11.3075



SW IRA SRR

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
a N/M.>-Not Meaningful t

* LE INDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF WANDER (LONDON) OF
THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

ts! AND
\jsIN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
} Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
gov $ - Dividends per share paid in the lash 12¢moptt SY wrens
2g P/E - Closing price divided by the last 42 month‘eathings ¢

* - 5 January 2007
** - 31 December 2006
*** ~ 31 December 2006

nye
**** . 31 December 2006





VA - 31 December

eh
EGG
CRA NRE



NOTICE TO THE CREDITORS



The creditors of the above-named Company are-
required, on or before 20 February 2007 to send their
names and addresses and the particular of their
debts of claims, and the names and addresses of their
attorneys (if any) to Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis, the
Liquidator of the said company, at Dehands House, 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, P.O. Box N-7526, Nassau,
The Bahamas, telephone number 242-302-4800. The
creditors may be required by notice in writing from
the said debts or claims at the office of the Liquidator,
at such time as shall be specified in such notice. "fin
default thereof they will be excluded from the benfit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.







Queen’s College

Centre for Further Education

P.O. Box N-7127, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 393-1666, 393-2646, Fax: (242) 393-3248

Email: cfe@qchenceforth.com

Professional Development Clas




Anthony S. Kikivarakis

Liquidator





Re

Ge ened cs

Banamas Rep Cross

PRESENTS



Bananas Rem Caoss

Microsoft Word Level 1 | $255 | Jan. 29, 2007 to | Mon. & Wed.

(Pitman Levell ) March 28, 2007 | 6:00 - 7:00 p.m.

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March 24, 2007 }12:00 - 2:00 p.m.



FREE
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Jan. 29, 2007 to
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Jan, 30, 2007 fo Tuesdays ener
March 29, 2007 | 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.



WEDNESDAY, JAN 24th
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Spring Semester Break February 19.— 23, 2007 (na classes) Bears ed
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| March 28, 2007




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For inquiries please contact Mrs. D. McKinney: - Administrator at 393-1666 or email: cfe@qchencefo




» erning similar associations in -

THE TRIBUNE



Pa Seas ee

Private security

five times as big as’

law enforcement

FROM page 1B

other countries and interna-
tional bodies.

On the security industry’s
economic importance to the
Bahamas, Mr Newry said there
were no readily available sta-
tistics on this, but an estimate

. that it employed three times

as many people as the Gov-
ernment’s law enforcement
agencies might well be an
underestimate.

He added that at a recent
meeting with the Ministry of
National Security, it was sug-

3 gested that the number of per-

sons employed in private secu-
rity was “five times that of the
police”.

Given that the police force

numbers between 2,000-2,500

officers, this estimate indicated
that the private security indus-

» try employed at least 10,000
- people, Mr Newry said, spread

between private companies, in-

, house officers and teams

- employed by specific compa-

nies for their own security, and
suppliers of electronic security
and surveillance devices.

He pointed out that because

- the security industry was

oe ait ae + eek a

ck ee Sw LTT

involved in the protection of
assets, both human, physical
buildings and financial, its indi-
rect economic impact went far
beyond that of its direct one.
Mr Newry said the private
security guards played a key

* role in making the Bahamas a

safe destination for tourists,
and personnel from the sector
were more likely to be seen by
visitors than police officers.
Therefore, the industry was
key to making the Bahamas
seem a Safe destination, ensur-

. ing the tourists kept coming.

Mr Newry said the steering
committee was considering



whether the Association
should embrace as wide a
membership as possible, mak-
ing it open to anyone involved
in asset protection, such as
accountants.

“We are considering that this
organisation should not be lim-
ited to guards or frontline
accountants,” Mr Newry said,
“and whether it should include
accountants, auditors and
fraud examiners — anyone
who’s involved in protecting
the assets of the company. The
accountants controls what goes
in, what comes out, and looks
out for fraud and loss.”

He added that executives
involved in crisis management,
disaster management and
emergency response techni-
cians might also be admitted
to the Association when it is
formed.

“Our organisation is endeav-
ouring to bring all these people
into one body, and participat-
ing in making a better, safer
Bahamas,” Mr Newry said.
“We want to be able to work
with the Ministry of National
Security in the not too distant
future to improve the standard
for security guards entering the
industry, and ensuring we have
a high quality of persons in the
industry.

NOTICE

“We have a deadline, just
over 70 days away or so, and
will have something to present
to the general public as to
where we are with the consti-
tution.”

The Steering Committee was
continuing to meet in Nassau
and Grand Bahama, Mr
Newry said, and on its adviso-
ry board were ‘persons such as
Paul Thompson, former assis-
tant commissioner of police,
Henry Whyms of WEMCO,
and Christopher Lowe, presi-
dent of the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce.

Mr Newry said different con-
cerns were being raised
depending on which parts of
the industry the companies and
individuals involved worked.

For the private security com-
panies, their greatest concern
was to secure enough talented
labour, while for personnel
employed in the tourism, hotel
and restaurant sectors, their
concerns related to the type of
guest attracted to those estab-
lishments.

And for electronic security
companies, their concerns
related primarily to the cost
and availability of technology,
and being able to provide good
service to the customer, Mr
Newry said.

NOTICE is hereby given that GARTH STEWART OF
CROSSING ROCK, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that on 21 November 2006 by
resolution of its Members, Wander (London) of the
Bahamas Limited went into voluntary liquidation and
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis of Deloitte & Touche, 2nd
Terrace West, Centerville, Nassau, The Bahamas, was .

appointed the Liquidator.

Signed
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis
Liquidator
P. O. Box N-7526
Nassau, Bahamas
242-302-4800






yl
yp

SYZ & CO ]] Bank & Trust

Private Banking
OYSTER Funds

Alternative Investments

www.syzbank.com

Mark your calendar
Our Application Deadline
is February 2, 2007

MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7B

yas,

Senior/Junior Programmer (Ss)

British American Insurance Company the oldest insurance company in the Bahamas and
a leading financial services institution is searching for an experienced, highly organized
Programmer to develop and maintain company-specific applications. The ideal candidate
must be self-motivated to complete initiatives within established timelines and exercise
versatility with respect to project assignments.

Responsibilities:

¢ Support and maintain Oracle database applications

¢ Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

° Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

e Maintain existing database integrity and standards

¢ Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
¢ Create test transactions, refine and debug programs. —

¢ Train‘end-users and technical support staff

Core Competencies:

e Proven project leadership and project implementation

e Experience with formal software development methodologies

e Strong analytical skills and experience in developing applications that meet user
requirements

° Must have strong oral and written communication skills

Required Qualifications:

¢ 3+ years of recent programming experience including use of Oracle PL/SQL as primary
programming language

* Bachelor’s degree in CS or equivalent experience and/or education

¢ Oracle Developer or DBA certifications a plus

Preferred Skills:

¢ Possess strong Project experience ideally on Oracle Applications implementations,
business systems design, or projects in general

¢ Proficient in MS Project and/or MS Project Server (required)

¢ Experience with SQL Server

Technical Skills:

C,C++, .NET, Oracle 8i/9i, Developer 6i (Forms & Reports), PL/SQL, Crystal Reports

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including
Life, Health and Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Manager, British American Insurance,
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N4815, Nassau, Bahamas or via email to
“dparker@babinsurance.com”



Innovative Private Banking Group is presently looking for a:

Compliance Officer

The successful applicant must:
m Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.
m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.

m Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge.and experience with:
Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.
Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.
Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.

Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

Motivated team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

We offer:
m= A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.

Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

Please send your resume and two (2) letters of reference to:
SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. a Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park a RO. Box N-1089 @ Nassau, Bahamas



Remember to include the following with your application

$40.00 non-refundable processing fee :
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of

birth and expiration date of passport

Official high school transcript

e Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!



e look forward to welcoming you to The College,

soon to be the University of The Bahamas.





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DWAIPAYAN CHOUDHURY OF
HUDSON STREET, P.O. BOX SS-6256 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUERDA TOUSSAINT OF
MIAMI STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 18th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

WANTED

DATA PROCESSOR
MUST BE ABLETO ASSIST WITH
INVENTORY

A
SALES PERSONS
WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE








AL










Please forward resume to:
Taylor Industries Ltd.

P.O. Box N-4806 .

Nassau, Bahamas

America awaits

THE TRIBUNE ~

action on ee

@ By H JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —A
year after warning America of
its addiction to oil, President
Bush is expected to renew con-
cerns about energy security in
his State of the Union address.
But will the rhetoric be fol-
lowed by action? Up to now,
the record has been mixed.

Aides hint of a major pro-
nouncement on energy in the
speech before Congress and
the nation Tuesday night. Yet
the president is expected to
take a predictable path, urg-
ing expanded use of ethanol in
gasoline, more research into
cleaner burning coal and on
gas-electric “hybrid” cars, and
greater nuclear energy.

He may tweak his voluntary
program on climate change.
Aides, however, say the presi-
dent remains opposed to
mandatory cuts in carbon diox-
ide and other heat-trapping
“greenhouse” gases as has
been proposed in Congress.

A year ago, Bush declared
“America is addicted to oil”
and he set a goal of replacing
three-fourths of today’s oil
imports from the Middle East
by 2025. He pledged to press
for alternatives to oil and for
more efficient use of energy.

He has had some success in
getting more domestic pro-
duction.

The Bush administration has
opened new federal lands for
oil and gas drilling. Last

MINISTRY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVORONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
BAHAMAS GOVERNMENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Department of Environmental Health Services (DEHS) and The Ministry of Energy and The
Environment, now invites local firms and joint ventures to participate in this bidding process by
presenting sealed bids for the processing and exporting of derelict vehicles and other ferrous
materials for New Providence and the Family Islands. The procedures for the contracting for the
provision of service, financed by this program, will be subject to the provisions of the Ministry

of Finance.

Interested parties may obtain further information, including eligibility to participate, and may

| | collect'a copy the bidding document from the office of the:

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
MINISTRY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Farrington Road
P.O. Box SS-19048
Nassau, The Bahamas

Interested Tenderers may purchase a complete set of tender documents by submitting a written
application to the Department of Environmental Health Services and upon payment of a non-
refundable fee of one hundred ($100.00) dollars. The method of payment will be certified
cheque or cash. The documents would be ready for review as of Friday, January 26", 2007,

Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope(s) marked “Tenders for Processing and
Exporting of Derelict Vehicles and Other Ferrous Materials for New Providence and The

Family Islands”, and sent to:

The Tenders Board
c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

All tenders must reach the Tender’s Board no later than 4:00 p.m. on Monday, February 26",
2007. All tenders must be submitted in triplicate. Tenders will be opened at 10: 00 am., on
Tuesday, February 27", 2007, at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance. The
Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders,



month, Congress approved
opening a large new area in
the Gulf of Mexico to drilling.
This month, Bush lifted a long-
time ban on oil and gas drilling
in Alaska’s Bristol Bay.

But when it comes to wean-
ing the country away from oil,
the president’s critics say his
rhetoric has not been matched
by action.

“President Bush actually cut
funding for the key energy-sav-
ing technologies,” says Joseph
Romm, a former head of the
renewable fuels and efficien-
cy programs at the Energy
Department during the Clin-
ton administration.

The department’s requests
for renewable fuel and conser-
vation programs have stayed
flat at about $1.18 billion annu-
ally over the past six years —
really a decline if inflation is
considered, energy efficiency
advocates say.

“Since 2002, the energy effi-
ciency programs at the Energy
Department have dropped by
a third in real dollars,” says
Kateri Callahan, president of
the Alliance to Safe Energy, a
private advocacy group.

When one program is
increased, others have suf-
fered, these critics maintain.

They acknowledge spending
increases for research into
solar and wind energy, but con-
tend that came at the expense
of two other renewable energy
programs that were eliminated:
research into geothermal ener-
gy deep within the earth and
efforts to make hydroelectric
dams more fish friendly.

Congress has not been all
that helpful, either.

The energy law passed in
2005 authorized $3.8 billion
worth of renewable energy and
conservation programs. But a
vast majority of those pro-
grams are without minds, nel-

ther requested by the adminis-
tration nor approved by Con-
gress.

Callahan points to a $450
million consumer education
and outreach campaign on

energy efficiency in that law,,

but says “not one penny has
been appropriated” nor has the
money been sought by the
administration.

Energy Secretary Samuel
Bodman says the administra-
tion over the years has spent
nearly $12 billion in developing
new energy technologies. He
cited the president’s $2.1 bil-

lion “advanced energy initia- ~

tive”. in the State of the Union
a year ago.

Nuclear

But most of that program
goes for nuclear research and
clean coal technology that gen-
erally has little impact on the
country’s dependence on oil,
70 percent of which is used in
transportation.

For that, Bush told a renew-
able fuels conference last year
in St. Louis, “we need to
change how we power our
automobiles. ... I like the idea
of promoting a fuel that relies
upon our farmers.”

Bush has.supported law-
makers’ push to use more
corn-based ethanol as a gaso-
line blend and he is expected
to call for a sharp escalation
of ethanol use in his speech.

It is a political sure bet as
ethanol has widespread bipar-
tisan support.

Among the first bills intro-
duced in the new Democratic-
run Senate calls for using 60
billion gallons of ethanol, 10
times current production
capacity, by 2030.

Two 2008 presidential hope- .

fuls, Democratic Sens. Barack
Obama of Illinois and Joe

Biden of Delaware, are its.~.-

leading co-sponsors.

Ethanol is “riding a big.
wave” this year, says Mark
McMinimy, a policy analyst at
the Stanford Group. “The
renewable fuels-ethanol jug-,,
gernaut enjoys one of the most:
prized commodities in Wash- *
ington — broad-based support, .

we

bipartisan political momen- | ~

tum.”

. But even there, the adminis- =.”

tration has been ‘criticized for,
not living up to the rhetoric. _

In last year’s State of the) ~
Bush.’ -

Union speech,

a

a

announced a goal to make a °.

“new kind of ethanol ee
and competitive within six.

years.” His administration fol- |.

lowed within days with a bud-,

get calling for only a modest: os

increase — about $29 million.”

— for research into cellulosic , a

ethanol development.

Last week, the House passed’ ,
legislation that would funnel .
$14 billion in money collected ;
from oil companies into a:
renewable fuel fund. Ethanol |:
lobbyist Bob Dinneen of the.”

of

A

Renewable Fuels Association a:

welcomed the action and urged, ,
that the fund finance loan °
guarantees — approved by.

c

not

Congress in 2005, but not fund- ©.

ed — for cellulosic ethanol |
plants.
Yet the White House strong-

ly opposed the House-passed , : iB

bill in part because it said addi-,

tional taxes on the oil compa- ,. °

nies should not be used to pay...
for such new programs.
A report last week by the >

General Accountability Office, *

the investigative arm of Con- '
gress, concluded “it is unlikely” . ,
that the government’s current °-
research and development pro-

grams will provide the alter- .. ; a

native energy sources needed ~
to “reverse our growing depen-,
dence on imported oil.”

IN DIAN A SOCIATI ON OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

BOARDING SCHOOL FAIR

An Exposition of the Finest Boarding Schools in Canada offeri ‘ing University Preparation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007

6:00 - 9:00PM

BRITISH COLONIAL HOTEL, ONE BAY STREET, NASSAU

* boys/girls/co-ed boarding in attendance;
secondary grade levels offered
* challenging academic and athletic programs

* distinguished placement record at Canadian,
American and international universities
* scholarships and financial assistance available

MEET REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS:

Albert College

The Bishop Strachan School

Branksome Hall
Havergal College

Lakefield College
Pickering College
Ridley College

Rothesay Netherwood School

CRIS...

Stanstead College

St. Andrew's College
Trafalgar Castle School
Trinity College School

Canadian Association of Independent Schools

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT DOLLY MOF ATI
1S eY Pa eee MAC see 08 ATER Cel ARNON CLL NGG

_ Telepho

VNC

“2s yee ae >
¢ FRR OC eS + &
ke F AD Y&F,9_¢ 9 =

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4 Owe 6 OTS EB Gg;
Gees ss 2 ¥%

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5: ,

THE TRIBUNE




@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas could be left
with rundown tourism proper-
ties that generate a net loss for
their owner if it fails to attract
new investment and resorts to
all its islands, a Ministry of
Tourism deputy director-gen-
eral has warned.

Addressing the Sunrise
Rotary Club, David Johnson
said that while there was a feel-

ing the Bahamas - and espe-

cially the Family Islands -
could be “overwhelmed” by
large-scale tourism develop-
ments, a failure to upgrade

could lead to the decline of ©

many hotels.
“The risk here, though, is

that if we withdraw we could’

find ourselves in those areas
or islands where we adopt this
strategy with an old, tired plant
attracting low-end customers
where the cost.to attract and
host these customers might be
matching or even greater than
the net return associated with
hosting them,” Mr Johnson
said, “and in Cable Beach and
downtown Nassau, we are on
the verge of returning to that
situation if we refuse to rede-
velop and reinvent these
areas.” He added that the tra-
ditional resort hotel, financed
by a sufficient number of short-
staying guests who generated
enough revenues to meet costs
and generate a profit for the
owners, was becoming redun-
dant due to poor performance
and a failure to deliver finan-
cial returns.

Instead, the tourism indus-
try had switched to mixed-use
resorts, minimising exposure
and risk for owners and their

partiets by relying on the vis-
itor to finance it through pre--

sales of condos, single family
homes and lots as second or
third homes, timeshares, frac-
tional’ ownership. and docko-
miniums..

Mr Johnson said the key for
Bahamian tourism and the
wider economy was to suc-
cessfully integrate such devel-
opments with local communi-
ties hosting them, with the



















Closed:

BUSINESS

No turning back on
tourism investments







Government and developer
financing the infrastructure,
and opportunities provided for
potential Bahamian entrepre-
neurs. °

The Bahamas, he added,
could still shape the tourism
industry into the one it wanted,
taking a more proactive
approach to planning at the
local level and segmenting this
nation’s islands into different
brands, each with their own
identities and stand-out attrac-
tions.

Yet too few Bahamians were
taking advantage of potential
‘business opportunities in sec-
tors reserved specifically for
100 per cent Bahamian own
ership..Mr J ey hile
‘those who hac
ownership ha
institutions
Bahamas Developmen! Bani
with mounting debt

Bahamian companies were
supplying an “ins cant”
amount of food 1
products’ to an estimated fine
million total visitors, who speni
a combined $2 billion in this
nation. with these sectors fail





failed, leaving

such as







The museum is named for the African slave Pompey who led a revolt on the island of
Exuma in 1830 and defied the dehumanizing institution of slavery. The museum is

® DAVID JOHNSON

ing to meet domestic demand
for their goods.

And Mr Johnson said the
Bahamas was still a nation
where “the majority of our
people are driven towards a
preference for ‘white collar’
jobs and working indoors in
air conditioned premises.

“The Government is by far
the largest employer, and we
have far too few of our citizens
being inclined to own busi-
nesses or interested in pursuing
careers outside of the tradi-
tional administrative areas.

Che reality is that many
more profitable business
opportunities exist that
Bahamians are bypassing as
non-Bahamians or those wha, ..,
have recently acquired status

capitalise on such opportuni-

ies ‘
Arguing that the Bahamas
should look at whether to tar-
get Andros for developing an
agriculture industry supplying
products to the tourism sector,
reducing the leakage of $0.80
of every tourism dollar that is
spent outside the Bahamas, Mr
johnson suggested that such

housed in the former marketplace, Vendue House built around 1769 to allow for the sale

This riveting exhibition was created by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
tthe} \ Museum during this bicentennial year to mark



and UNESCO and is featured a |
the abolition of the transatisiitie . ik

OVER

of commodities including enslaved Africans.

mae ORGET _

SLAVERY

Se



This traveling exhibition is unique in that it focuses less on enslaved Africans as victims
and more on the ways in which they reshaped their destinies and place in history through

the creation of distinct cu!tures

Authentic objects associated with the at

Schomburg Press Release

ima of enslavement including shackles, a slave

branding iron, a slave whip, /urniture (rons a slave house and more are here for you to see and

experience.

Days/Hours:

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday

9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Admission: Non-Resicen‘s

Adults:
Seniors (60 plus)

Sunday and Thursday

$3.00
$2.00

Children (under 14) $1.00

Resideniis:

Bay Street opp. George S
eee 4] Pe Ky

ee ue va
Pa LY



Adults:
Children (iinder 14) $1.00

$2.00



- have to provide themselves,



MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9B

MEETING FOR PEOPLE WHO STUTTER



Qualified Applicants s should possess the following:

e Solid training in all areas of Hotei Accounting from A/P, AUR.
General Ledger, Credit, Collections, Audit, Inventory control,
payroll, Budgeting, Costing, P&L preparation and analysis, etc.

} ° Clear, concise written and verbal communication skulls

e Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects

¢ Demonstrate team building experience

e Track record promoting an atmosphere of teamwork

¢ Solid career progression up through the ranks

) » Abilities to inspire, train, and develop people for promotion

Qualified Applicants should possess the following:
° Creativity in selling, managing and menu design
¢ Knowledge of banquets. catering, and room service
¢ Understanding forecasting budgeting, food and labor costs
¢ Ability to read and manage a P&L
° Positive attitude who appreciates being part of a team
® Organized with good computer skills
¢ Desire to mentor and train others
¢ Ability to focus, stay on task and produce
e Must be a strong manager and proven leader

(FILE photo)

possibilities could be unlocked
through joint ventures and
partnerships with foreigners.
Among the services and
products developers would

and “not part of their core
business”, if Bahamians did not
step up to the plate were indus-
trial laundry facilities to sup-
port investments within a 25-
mile radius.

Other services required were
furniture repair facilities; fine
dining and out-of-resort restau-
rants with Bahamian themes;
machine shops; tour operators;
authentic Bahamian arts and
handicrafts; fresh seafood;
medical and healthcare facili-
ties; small-scale bonefishing -
and eco-lodges; residential
housing; and landscaping work.

Personal. Energetic Executive Chef who is a leader. innovator,
dynamic, creative, flexible, people oriented with strong
management skills and eager to display a genuine desire to lead
the team in producing a high quality product and to maximize the
performance of kitchen personnel.

Business and profit oriented, able to estimate food consumption
and purchase food, create menus, strong people management
and development skills with strong ability to manage ina diverse
environment with focus on client and customer services is
essential to success in this role

All applications are appreciated but only qualified ee will .
be considered. Our email address is kw t@marle ce
H Fax: (242). 2 RAFr4393. 08 you can mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440,

Nassau, Bas mas



a
MK

QE GG"
QBS

—

Freeport ¢ Container Port

rand Bahama, Bahamas

Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of

Straddie Technician

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

° Three (3) years’ experience in repairing and maintaining heavy mobile
equipment.

Certification in Heavy Equipment Repair and Maintenance (Diploma or *
Associate Degree preferred)

Three to Five years working experience and knowledge of Kalmar or
Noell Straddle Carries.

Computer Literate
Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

¢ Must be able to repair and maintain:
o Hydraulic Systems
o Diesel & Gasoline Engines
o Automotive Electronic Circuits

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful
candidates:

Fuli-time Employment

Major Medical/Life Group Insurance

Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents

Performance Bonus

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau
on January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m.
through 4:00 p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11B |









Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

~ Mild winter ‘softens’
Bahamas travel demand

FROM page 1B




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably

near their home cities.
However according to two

Bahamian hoteliers, the trend

has not impacted Nassau.
Baha Mar's booking pace for

end of last week, the arrival of
cold weather in the US had
meant that the telephone and
Internet booking lines at major
Bahamian hotels were ringing

once again. .

Yet Bahamian hoteliers spo-
ken to by The Tribune said the
unseasonably warm winter in
the northeastern US had not

mild winter.”
He added that towards the

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR
EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,

. an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
‘ community with private residences and club, 200
_ slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
» course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably

! ; qualified individuals to apply for the following
~ position with the company:

'e Director of Design -

e Exterior Relations

° Project Managers

e Project Engineers

e Genaral Superintendents ~

¢ Superintendents

e Assistant Superintendents

e Electrical Construction Managers
¢ Mechanical Construction Managers
¢ Office Engineers

e Manager of Quality Control

e Inspectors .

- Over 20 postions are to filled: All positions
. Tequire successful applicants to reside at North

| Eleuthera or vicinity.

* Interested persons should submit their resumes
t xwith cover letter to:

fycsepes feeacpee cs k Te
3837

To eee CeO LE!

a
a
Bh
a
4
Hie
6
|
ao
ao
a
‘

The H.R. Director
' GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com
Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all

applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



Wish to increase your
pay for 2007???

Looking for Sales Manager,
Assistant Managers and

ta , : motivation and recruitment e
Sales Associates for High End * Coordinate and manage multiple food venues. * Manage local accommodations
° Coordinate and manage all food preparation * Upkeep of boat fleet

Jewellery and Fashion.
it teins é Q ing re

2-5 years experience. —
21 years of age or older.
Have a pleasant smile
Be a people’s person
Energetic

Team Player |

Love for luxury retail.

If you meet the requirements of all the
above, come and be a part of our team with
rewarding incentives and great financial
opportunities

Submit Resume with a passport size photo
to:

Versace Boutique
Crystal Court
Atlantis, Paradise Island
Hillside@batelnet.bs



this month was the same as this
time last year, said Robert
Sands, senior vice-president for
administration and public
affairs.

He said the mild weather in
US cities was something that

affected their January book-
ings, something that has
impacted other hotels in the
region.

With temperatures being
unseasonably warm, coupled
with a lack of snow over the
first week of the year, some
hoteliers attending Caribbean
Marketplace 2007 in Aruba
said they had recorded a
decrease in visitor arrivals as
Americans either stayed at
home or vacationed in towns

no impact has been felt.

Similarly Opal Gibson,
spokeswoman for the British
Colonial Hilton, said January
bookings were looking solid
well at over 80 per cent.

POSITION
AVAILABLE

Registered Nurse

Responsibilities

¢ Provide primary and minor emergency
medical care
Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined |
in the Clinical Protocol Manual
Provide accurate and comprehensive medical
reports as required

Requirements:
Holder of current Bahamian Licence
Must have at least three years experience post
graduation
Have current BLS & ALS Certification
Must be responsible, have good
communication skills and independent.

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
mary.epcotmedical? }
@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.

THE
MEDICLINIC

ix

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the ee
position with the company:

CHEF

Duties and Responsibilities

areas.
¢ Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.
_¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.

© Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience a four (4)
star restaurant cuisine and dining with significant
experience in the food industry. Must have experi-
ence in start up restuarant operation. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and budgeting. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:

The H.R. Director
GCM ti
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



will be monitored, but as yet -

qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

BOAT CAPTAIN



















































Duties and Responsibilities




¢ Manage fleet of boats and related equipment.
¢ Coordinate and manage maintenance of boats
¢ Coordinate all water sport activities.

¢ Snorkeling

e Diving

e Flats and Deep Sea fishing ’
e Manage Staff of First Mates.
¢ Coordinate Safety of all boat patrons.

¢ Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding areaand
have a minimum of 10 years experience as a boat
captain. Must be familiar with the local waters
and the area around Royal Island. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and boat operations. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.



Interested persons should submit their resumes
_ with cover letter to:

The H.R. Director
GCM
" P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
+» Or. Enaall fe! toe ee com




Royal Island aan) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential community

with private residences and club, 200 slip marina and
boutique hotel and spa, and a golf course just off North
Eleuthera is seeking to employ a Married Couple with strong
managerial, operational and organizational skills in
managing resort properties to oversee all day to day
operations on the island.

Duties and Responsibilities



e Greeting potential members/buyers/investors

¢ Arranging transportation, including airport, transfers, boats
and on -island vehicles

¢ Responsible for setting up guest relations, all staff training,

¢ Manage/coordinate all ocean/beach activities
¢ Manage guest inquiries and complaints in an efficient and
professional manner

* Once the Preview Village is completed this position will:
e Oversee operations
¢ Maid Service

¢ Kood/ beverage

¢ Beach activities

e Ocean activities

° General maintenance upkeep of premises
e Manage fitness/spa activities

e Assist in sales process




* Qualifications: The ideal candidate must have a minimum
of 10 years experience in resort property management with
significant experience in the restaurant and spa industry,
including® operations and maintenance of pool and spa
equipment. Must have strong managerial and organizational
skills in the areas of personnel and bugeting. Must be computer
literate with strong written and verbal communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes “ cover
letter to:

The H.R. Direc

GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125

Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

i os a a
Joint venture

lines up Bahamas
resort projects



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ATAIN TAKITOTA OF
BAHAMA AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.













Legal Notice

NOTICE

LUKANDRES INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LUKANDRES INVESTMENTS
LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



OSes te key melee AE ea cele

mae in Barbados, Bahamas or Cayman Islands)
RESPONSIBILITIES:

the function in the management of compliance risk

particularly those associated with the products and
services provided by the Bank
| ° To be responsible at a senior level for implementing

Bank
e To assist with developing policies, procedures and
controls to guide the business



QUALIFICATION & EXPERIENCE:

e Legal and or regulatory background and experience
| © Minimum of five years of relevant experience in the
| financial services or legal industry

& © Bachelor's Degree in Finance/Business or Legal “

| ~=Qualifications





') ° To be a key member of the Compliance Team, assisting

(| associated with the legal and regulatory requirements,

the Compliance Strategy and ensuring an acceptable -
level of compliance and internal control practice in the

A US holding company that
owns 54 mining claims in Utah,
the US, has entered into a joint
venture agreement with a Nas-
sau-based company to halp it
acquire interests in resort and
condominium projects in the
Bahamas.

Russell Industries said it had
signed the agreement with
Andros Isle Development Ltd,
a wholly-owned subsidiary of



FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of market-leading financial services in
Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital Markets and Treasury.
We are the largest regionally-listed bank in the English-speaking Caribbean with over 3,500 staff,

100 branches and banking centres, andipffices in 17 regional markets, serving 800,000 active accounts.



Andros Isle Development Cor-
_ poration.

The Tribune had previous-
ly reported that Andros Isle
had submitted proposals to the
Government fora tourism-
related development centred
on the Lighthouse Club at
Fresh Creek, Andros, the last
remaining resort property
owned by the Hotel Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas.

This newspaper had been
told at the time that the Gov-
ernment had received several
proposals for the Lighthouse
Club, but none were close to
receiving formal approval at
that time.

“The purpose of the joint
venture is to facilitate the
acquisition and development
of condo hotels, luxury resorts,
marinas and high end and

e Ability to research and apply relevant international
standards in local environment
e Strong knowledge of relevant financial/banking

legislation and regulations

e Strong knowledge of Compliance and risk

management

e Good interpersonal skills to work effectively with

customers and staff

e Excellent written and oral communication skills

© Good PC skills and proficiency in Microsoft Office and
other appropriate applications

e Ability to work on own initiative

e Strong multi-tasking and time management skills with
an ability to work in a deadline-oriented environment

e Exposure to general banking and particularly risk
management support functions —

e Self-motivation and the ability to manage the situation

¢ Team player orientation

, Applications with detailed résumés with the names of three business references should be submitted no later than «

4 Monday 29th January, 2007 to:

Anna McLean

Head of Compliance

First Caribbean International Bank (Cayman) Limited
George Town, Cayman Islands

Email: anna.mclean@firstcaribbeanbank.com



f) RESPONSIBILITIES:

F © To deliver planned targets by aggressively growing the

book of profitable business and increase the relative
contribution of the Corporate Banking to overall
| business profitability
Hl ° To enhance and strengthen the reputation of
| FirstCaribbean International Bank and the Corporate



be
fi

external network of key stakeholders, prospects,

business community at large

© To effectively lead and mentor the team of business
development and relationship managers who
originate and provide business:solutions to clients in

OPCO



i Monday 29th January, 2007 to:

[| Deangelia Deleveaux
Business Associate
First Caribbean International Bank
Human Resources Department
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: Deangelia.Deleveaux@firstcaribbeanbank.com

ély structured compensation and reward package

ell'as performance bonuses.



Division in markets by developing and maintaining an

community involvement, and playing a key role in the

the corporate and commercial markets in the Bahamas

“DIRECTOR, CORPORATE BANKING - BAHAMAS OPCO (Based in Bahamas),



QUALIFICATION & EXPERIENCE:

e In-depth understanding of Corporations business, —
financing solutions, issues and challenges

e Superior ability to interpret complex corporate client
needs and to assemble innovative value-adding
solutions that achieve client objectives

¢ High level of understanding of the markets,
geographic, macro economic and global factors

impacting our client base

© Highly effective communication skills to deal
productively with demanding and sophisticated clients

¢ Must have a clear vision for the direction and goals of
this business and be able to lead people through
change to share and operationalise that vision

¢ Ability to work effectively within and across complex

matrix structures

e Graduate status with minimum of 7 years' experience
in the business/financial world

L Applications with detailed résumés with the names of three business references should be submitted no later than

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

resort communities in the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas,” said Rick Berman,
president and chief executive
of Russell Industries.

The partners said they
hoped to announce their first
joint project “in the coming
weeks”, and were focusing on
hotels that are currently oper-
ational and can be redeveloped
as condo hotels, as well as,
small, ultra luxury develop-
ment projects in the Family
Islands.





Sas,
tas

e THE Central Bank of
the Bahamas has named, '
two financial institutions: |
alleged to be operating in”
breach ofthelaw. =

The financial services reg-_
ulator warned that:
Caribbean International’
Bank, purportedly based at —
the Solomon’s Building in
Nassau, and Deltec Finan-
cial & Trust Services, claim-
ing to be based at Deltec
House, Lyford Cay, were
not licensed under the
Banks and Trust Compa- |
nies Regulation Act 2000. ©

e THE Government and
financial services regulators
are developing legislative
amendments to provide a
supervisory regime for
money transmission busi:
nesses. o

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DJERMA HOLDINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DJIERMA HOLDINGS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. ’

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLACK CHERRY CORPORATION

af

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BLACK CHERRY CORPORATION has

| been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORB. INC.
(Liquidator)



lf your answers are aWES, then
we want youNOW!

Please respond to Fax: 363-6822
hrarecruitment@starwoodvo.com, |
Harborside Resort Or Deliver the resume to:.

Human Resources Department
Marine One Building

Marina One Drive, Paradise Island

The Recruiter,

at Atlantis on or
before Jan 24th,
07, by:

©

VACHVSOR GMRKR EO”



The Atlantis Vacation Club is Recruiting
Explorer Sales Representatives!

Can youListen as well as you hear?
Are Peopledrawn to you?

Are you Goal oriented?

Are youPositively Focuse@

Do you have exceller®uest Relation?

Can you build instarnfrust andRapport? |

Are you aTeam Playeryet Self Motivated?

Do you have tremendot&nergy to SELL?

Sheraion
Santino tianne











W
WESTIN

AAD BONEN

SrRecis


aR:





HIGH
LOW

Volume: 103 No.50





#m lovin it. |

82F
71F

SUNSHINE
=~ AND CLOUDS

EU talks to impact
future investments

Naga eg (by Eanes abut

TSA agents discover

‘serious weaknesses’

during inspections of
Customs Warehouse

at the airport

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
_ Tribune Staff, Reporter.



CUSTOMS pre- -clearance at
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport could be with-
drawn in the near future, if the
“serious weaknesses” discov-
ered by TSA agents during their
inspections of the Customs
Warehouse at the airport are
not addressed, The Tribune has
learned.

Agents from the Transporta-
tion and Security Administra-
tion (TSA), a wing of the US
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity, have revealed that the secu-
rity lapses — allegedly exploit-
ed by the arrested baggage han-
dlers from Nassau Flight: Ser-
vices (NFS) — are not only still
in play at the airport, but have
yet to be addressed by the Air-
port Authority or the Ministry
of Transport and Aviation.

The Customs Warehouse,
which has direct access to the
airport, stores cargo for inter-
national and local airlines. It is
this access, which if left

unchecked, could have serious
international repercussions, not
only for the Bahamas, but US
security generally. .

It is understood that the
“worst case scenario” would be
that a 90-day notice would be














ts!

12noeon - 5pm ° Janue ery. 27th 2007
Entry Fees Adults $5 Chi

| i Bic Po) yee st

issued by the US Embassy, -

alerting travellers to the securi-
ty'risks associated with flying
to the Bahamas, until the weak-
nesses are corrected. :

However, it is understood
that every effort is being made
“through back channels”
have these issues addressed
without any embarrassment to
the government — although
these lapses in security have
been highlighted before.

Foreign Affairs and Public
Service Minister Fred Mitchell
has denied these reports, stating
that there were no severe secu-
rity breeches at the building,
and that reports of the pre-
clearance being in jeopardy
were unfounded.

But, according to sources at
the airport, TSA agents docu-
mented enough breeches at the
warehouse that they would be
within their rights to shut down
the facility.

Reportedly guards were not
posted at designated areas, vehi-
cles were allowed too close to
the building, and personnel

‘were being allowed onto the air-

port ramp without proper clear-
ance. These are a few among
other infractions observed, it
was claimed.

SEE page 13







ildren $1







seus (V\. The Trib

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007

WA FIREFIGHTER turns
from the smoke after a blaze

which destroyed an abandoned

PRO ke

house in Cable Beach. It fook the

firefishters about two hours to

bring the fire under control.
CMG



‘Mitchell hits

back at claims

by Carl Bethel

lm By KARIN HERIG

Tribune. Staff Reporter

_ FNM Senator Carl Bethel :»
should “shut up and be quiet” ;
with his claims about an alleged :
visa scam at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs if he does not have :
sufficient evidence to present }
to the police, Fox Hill MP Fred }
Mitchell said yesterday at a }

press conference.

. Mr Mitchell said that despite }
all of Mr Bethel’s claims made
at last Thursday’s FNM Fox Hill :
rally he knows of no members
of the PLP government who are }
selling visas or illegally facili- :
tating the issuance of visas, the :
FNM senator has yet to go to }
the police with his evidence, he }

said.

“I believe he has no evidence,
What he is doing is coming ona :
political platform and engaging :
in slack, loose talk. Loose lips }
sink ships and he ought to be }
careful that his party is not sunk: }

SEE page 12

Cre

Ana Bianca Marin)

| Lady Dupuch dies
at the age of 100 /

LADY Dupuch, widow of Sir Etienne
Dupuch, died in her sleep at the
Camperdown hame of her eldest daugh-
ter and son-in-law Friday night. She
would have bzen 101 on February 18.

.Marie Annie Plouse, born in Love-

une





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‘US citizen ‘hangs

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| â„¢ By PAUL TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

A 48-YEAR-OLD US citi-
zen was reported to have
hanged himself from his cell

‘Plouse’s 10 children. They made. their

joy, Indiana on February 18, 1906, was
the third of Henry and Frances Hoover

home in Spangler, Pennsylvania, where
as a young grade school teacher she met



window while in police custody
in Marsh Harbour over the
weekend.

Mark Sapp, who resided at

her future husband who was visiting the
family’s next door neighbour, a Catholic

SEE page 13



Gunshots fired at police at
scene of ee shootout |

m@ By KARIN HERIG

‘POLICE were the target of
gunshots this weekend as they
rushed to the scene of a sus-
pected shootout.

Press liaison officer Inspec-
tor Walter Evans said that two
police vehicles were called into
a residential area on Saturday at
11pm after receiving reports of
a shooting.

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“Several gunshots were
directed at the police. There
were two police vehicles, one
marked, one unmarked. The
unmarked one was hit on the
right side,” he said.

As investigations into this
matter continue, Inspector
Evans said, this incident again
highlights the need for police
to continue with their fight to

SEE page 13

the Royal Palms condominiums
in Treasure Cay, Abaco, had
been remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison in Fox Hill on
charges of arson until March 23,
2007 by Magistrate Crawford
i McGee on January 19, 2007.
Sapp was charged with arson
following a devastating fire that
: completely destroyed the six-
i plex Royal Palms Condomini-
ums in Treasure Cay around
3.45am on Friday, January 12,
2007. The loss had been esti-
mated at more than $3 million.
Following his arrest after the
fire, Sapp was flown to New
Providence where he under-
went a psychiatric evaluation at
the Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre. He was released on

SEE page 13



PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007 : THE TRIBUNE)»
eevee eee



€
@ PUBLISHED poet Mr. Tyrone Sawyer shares one of his pieces during the latest session of Express +
Yourself’, on January 17, 2007. The event, held at ‘Da Island Club’ in the Nassau Beach Hotel, is an ty
open mic forum for poets, musicians and performance artists to share their work. The next session will oe
take place Wednesday, January 24, 2007, at 8pm. wf,







mu R

eed
(Photo: Eric Rose): Pate

Pe peat
Led

Features

Large Open Living Room with French Doors
Spacious outdoor patio for entertainment

270 Degree Wraparound balcony on second floor
Open Kitchen Plan

Additional Living space from converted garage
Detached Garage

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Bars and ‘Security Alarm, Automatic Gate

Paved Driveway into property

Underground utilities at the lot

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Location: Greenwood Road — off Village Road
Lot Size: 200 x 144 average

House Size: 3200 Square Feet

Bedrooms: 3 (Optional 4th)

Bathrooms: 3.5

'

Credit Suisse A es
(Bahamas) Limited || -

is presently considering applications for a

CLIENT SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR ||”

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
‘Qualifications:

_A minimum of four (4) years experience in a Client Services Area of fists
an offshore bank
PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel and Power Point)
_ Experience with custodial, maintenance and filing duties of client related
records fh
. Experience of Archiving systems and providing research and retrieval
of client information
Knowledge in banking due diligence practices and procedures
Knowledge of securities valuations and other related functions We
Knowledge of the calculation and posting of Portfolio Management and 2S
Custodial Fees -

sonal Qualities:

Excellent administrative, organizational, leadership and communication
skills \
A commitment to service excellence cate
Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
Ability to work in a team environment

Benefits provided include: a’
- Competitive salary and performance bonus is

- Pension Plan aes
- Health and Life Insurance

Â¥,

Only applicants with Client Services experience need apply.

Re eee

ONLY APPLICANTS MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS food
WILL BE CONTACTED. NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ©
ACCEPTED.

a>




*

Applications should be submitted:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

9

> 96
2 2

2 eR

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
JANUARY 26th 2007 fe



—_—
_ | PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007 | | sg ale’







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Crew Team Member Thompson Boulevard,
__ Ayears of outstanding service





oo . ee a a a Crew Team Member Freeport, 11 years of
a oo ee outstanding service
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 17

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

"3 ig teegs see ey

TH aot Met biagnt







Gain, Joy
Pampers, Pantene,
- Gillette, Clair



of Flying
in the
Great Hall’

VISITOR Fred Seitz pho-
tographs a high flying model
plane as the art of hand





crafted airplanes is celebrat- — . ae ee : Ce es at " fe ay of Flying in ne ce
reat Hall" at the Nationa a Enj Wh J
Building Museum in NH 4 a oy ch opper Ie
ashington aturday, oo
FOOT Tn addition to Ae ig | a ae with medium fries

activities such as paper air-
plane making and flying for
kids, members of the DC
Maxecuters, a model aircraft
club, held demonstration
flights with their own model

planes.
(AP Photo/
be The Washington Times,
ths Allison Shelley)

seeeeergenees



January 26, 2007






Rainforest Theatre ss
Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal P

Tickets $50.00 @ Wlinisixy ci









YO

Call 356-693: one BAEC RAAOQAL ‘| OF BAGB-6C

end be

Sri

JO,