Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Story O on the dangers of cruise |

ship



holidays is listed as

UK news source’s ‘most read’ |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

POTENTIAL cruise pas-
sengers from the UK may
have cause to think twice
about a voyage to the
Caribbean, as a popular
British news source yesterday
listed an article on the dan-
gers of cruise ship holidays as
its most-read story.

The story was published on
the online version of one of
the UK's biggest selling news-
papers, The Guardian, which
also happens to be the most
popular online news source in
Britain.

The article — entitled
“Death on the high seas” —
recounts the details of a litany
of criminal encounters and
mysterious disappearances
which have occurred during
cruise holidays in the last three
years.

Christopher Shays, US


















Republican congressman and
chairman. of a subcommittee
charged last year with exam-
ining “the threat posed to cit-
izens by booking a cruise hol-
iday” is quoted in the article as
warning of “a growing mani-
fest of unexplained disap-
pearances, unsolved crimes
and brazen acts of lawlessness
on the high seas”.

Passengers

In all, 24 passengers disap-
peared between 2003 and last
March, and since that time, at
least 10 more passengers and
two crew members have been
reported missing, according to
the committee's findings. .

One of the most recent dis-
appearances was a Scottish
pensioner, somehow lost over-
board in the Atlantic last
November, notes the article.

“Like small cities, said.

Shays, cruise ships experi-



enced crimes. ‘But city
dwellers know the risks of
urban life —- and no one falls
off a city never to be heard of
again.’ Going on a cruise was,
he said, perhaps ‘the perfect
way to commit the perfect

2

crime’.

ing, it was noted that a stew-
ard found "M's" bed unused.

After several days of finding
her room empty, the steward
reported her absence to his
superior, though no action was
taken.

Finally, at the end of the



“The cruise business is
fundamental to our tourism
industry; a large portion of our
visitors come by cruise ship.
That’s why any efforts to
enhance port security, any
effort to enhance security
upon the vessels we support.”



Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe

“It is extremely difficult for
any detective to piece togeth-
er a murder case without a
body, and chances of finding a
passenger dumped into the
ocean are slim indeed.”

The unsolved case of a
young woman, referred to
only as "M", who disappeared
on a cruise to:Alaska in 2004,
is described as “starkly under-
lin(ing) a fact that cruise pas-
sengers, potentially thousands

of miles from home, should .

be well aware of: out at sea,
there are no police.”
On the'second day of cruis-

a 3 IN i) PT Sa

WARE MOU ee
Pest Control .
UC Ma CT ELC
Kara |

trip, the article notes, “her
belongings were packed away.
No one notified the police or
her family. It was only after
her father filed a missing per-
son's report that police dis-
covered that she had disap-
peared from a cruise ship.”

Crime

According to the article,
aside from suspected murders
or accidental falls, crime sta-
tistics supplied to the sub-
committee by 15 of the biggest
cruise lines, evidence that
“there were 178 reports of sex-
ual assault on cruise ships
between 2003 and 2005.”

“Royal Caribbean alone,
which carries around 25 per
cent of cruise passengers,
recorded more than 100 com-
plaints of sexual assault and
sexual anes within that time
span.”

One “former ex-detective

‘and cryise ship security offi-
cer said young women are par--

ticularly susceptible on the
boats — most surprisingly —
from “crew members (who)
hunt in packs.”

Furthermore, even in cases
where criminal liability is
determined, “passengers can
find themselves i in a complex
legal situation.”

“The relevant laws might be
those of Panama, the
Bahamas or Bermuda. Pros-
ecuting, say, a sacked crew
member who has returned to
his own country brings a
whole new dimension of com-
plexity.”

The article, written by
Gwyn Topham, author of the
book, Overboard: The Stories
Cruise Lines Don't Want Told,
does note however that for
now, UK passengers "contin-
ue to flock to the ships.”

“The Passenger Shipping
Association estimates that

there was a 17 per cent rise in
Britons taking cruises last
year,” it said, noting that a fur-
ther rise is predicted.

Cruise companies are also
keen to point out that “In the
context of millions of passen-
gers each year, the number of



missing people and reported
sexual assaults compares well.

with statistics on land.”

However, one hazard men-
tioned in the article does seem
to be more unique to cruise
liners in recent months — the
rise of the norovirus — a high-
ly contagious sickness with
symptoms including diar-
rhoea, stomach cramps and
violent projectile vomiting.

The article mentions how
several older British passen-
gers recently had to be
“stretchered off one ship when
it returned to (the UK city)
Hull” after being afflicted with
the virus.”

Responding to the article,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said that the
Bahamas is “very concerned”
about the public perception
of the safety of travel on cruise
ships.

According to Mr Wilch-
combe, previous outbreaks of
the gastrointestinal virus have
impacted visitor numbers to
the Bahamas for weeks after,
and when discoveries of miss-
ing individuals were made.

He said that “riveting reac-

tions, not only in America
where many of these ships
originate, but certainly in oth-
er parts of the world" were
felt.

“The cruise business is fun-
damental to our tourism
industry; a large portion of our
visitors come by cruise ship,”

the minister said.

“That’s why any efforts to
enhance port security, any
effort to enhance security
upon the vessels we support,”
he said.

Worker is injured at
Ginn construction site

l@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 30-year-old worker was injured on Thurs-
day in an industrial accident at the Ginn construction site in

West End.

According to reports, the accident occurred around 1.45pm
while an employee was operating a heavy-duty machine that top-

pled over into the canal.

Superintendent of Police Basil Rahming reported that equip-
ment operator Damien Smith of Holmes Rock was digging a
canal at the project site when the machine suddenly lost balance
and toppled over into six feet of water.

Despite sustaining injuries to his back, Smith managed to
free himself and escape from the submerged machine.

He reportedly swam to the shore, where he was assisted from

the water.

Smith was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital for medical
attention. No word on his condition was available up to press

time.

West End Police and officials at Ginn are conducting an
investigation into the accident.

Ginn is developing a $4.9 billion resort community at West
End that will contain 4,400 condominium and hotel units centred

around a 20-story tower, 1,800 single family residential home ,

sites, two signature golf courses and clubhouses, two large mari-
nas, a private airport with customs facilities, a casino and other
state of the art amenities.

The Ginn Sur Mer resort development is expected to be the
largest of its kind in the Bahamas.

Ginn has also recently acquired the multi-million dollar Old
Bahama Bay Yacht Resort at West End.




- Cuban Ambassator
- to the Bahamas

- hits out at US

_ foreign policy

mi By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

CUBAN Ambassador to
the Bahamas Felix Wilson has
described US foreign policy
as “arrogant and extreme” fol-
lowing a Norwegian hotel’s
rejection of an official Cuban
delegation because of the
American embargo against
Cuba.

According to international
reports, the Edderkoppen
Hotel in Oslo, Norway is fac-
ing protests, a possible legal
suit and the threat of a boy-
cott, because it refused to per-
mit Cuban Tourism Ministry
officials to stay there as they
usually do for the annual Lille-
stroem Tourism Fair that
began on January 11.

The Edderkoppen is owned
by the Scandic chain, which
was bought by the US chain
Hilton.

The hotel’s management
has admitted to the Norwe-
gian press that because it now
belongs to the US chain, it is
obligated tc follow that
nation’s laws.

However, the Norwegian
Foreign Ministry has declared

CUBAN Ambassador
to the Bahamas
Felix Wilson

that companies operating in
Norway must respect Norwe-
gian law, regardless of where
they are based.
Ambassador

Cuba and a violation against
the sovereignty of Norway.”

“T don’t think that a country
should be able to force their
laws in another country,” he
said. “The decision by the
hotel is an affront to the Nor-
way government and it sets a
very bad precedent in inter-
national law.”

“I wonder what would hap-
pen if every country tried to
apply their laws in another
country,” the ambassador said.

“Tt shows the arrogance and
the extremism of the Bush for-
eign policy to trample on the
sovereignty of other coun-
tries,” he said.

Ambassador ~ Wilson
pledged that Cubans will con-
tinue to travel to tourism con-
ferences in Europe and else-
where in the world, despite
the Norwegian hotel’s deci-
sion.

The stance of the hotel has
also been criticised by the Nor-
wegian labour movement.

The Municipal and General
Employees Union, with
300,000 members, has already
announced a boycott of all
Scandic hotels in the country ~
declaring it unacceptable for
the. United States to give
orders to the world.

Likewise, the Federation of
Commerce Unions, with
830,000 members, demanded
that the government take
immediate measures so that
corporations like Scandic that
support the US blockade of

u b a j
cannot operate in the country.

A Norwegian anti-racism
organisation has filed a suit in
relation to the matter, charg-
ing that it is a violation of the
law prohibiting discrimination
mess on race or ethnic ori-

"The Tribune attempted to
contact the Hilton in the
Bahamas for a comment, but

: “calls were not returned up to

press time.

m@ CORRECTION

A PAGE seven story in
Friday’s Tribune was incor-
rectly headlined “COB gets
$17m grant increase”. The
amount was $2.7 million, as
stated in the article.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this may
have caused.

i Wilson.
i. described the incident as a
“sign of aggression against ©









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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991



Published Daily Monday to Saturday

_ EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-




Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama









HAVANA (AP) — Fidel Castro’s enemies in
exile have long predicted that the end of his
reign in Cuba would bring dancing in the streets,
a mass exodus and a rapid transition to a U.S.-
style democracy and market economy.

But almost six months after Castro stepped
aside due to illness, the transition has occurred
— and with none of those changes. Cubans are
calmly going about their business, and there
has been no northbound rush of migrants, and
no signs of impending policy shifts.

Even if Castro recovers fully and returns to
public life, officials no longer insist that he will
return to power. Why would he? Cuban officials
already have pulled off what their enemies have
long said would be impossible: They have built
a post-Castro communist system.

About the only thing different in Cuba is that

its government, instead of being led by a single
person, is handled by a group. Raul Castro
heads a collective leadership guided by the same
Communist Party his older brother extolled
during a nearly half-century in power.
' “These guys know what they are doing. They
are prepared to lead Cuba without Fidel,” said
Marifeli Perez-Stable of the Inter-American
Dialogue, a Washington think tank. “The coun-
try, in the short run, is not going to collapse.”

Even a senior U.S. intelligence official said
last week that Raul Castro has the support and
respect of military leaders critical to ensuring a
leadership succession within the existing com-
munist system.

Army Lieutenant General Michael D.
Maples, director of the Defence Intelligence
Agency, said the temporary president is firmly
in control and “will likely maintain power and
stability after Fidel Castro dies, at least for the
short-term.”

Cuban officials say no single person can
replace the 80-year-old Maximum Leader, who
_ micromanaged projects, gave marathon speech-
es and entertained visitors at dinners lasting
until dawn.

Raul Castro, the mustachioed longtime
defence minister, now greets visiting dignitaries
and military parades. But he hasn’t kept his
brother’s long hours and reserves his evenings
for family.

“The only substitute for Fidel can be the
Communist Party of Cuba,” the 75-year-old
Raul Castro told university students in Sep-
tember.

The most visible official after Raul is Vice
President Carlos Lage, who favours a white
guayabera dress shirt over fatigues and is said to
drive himself around: in a boxy little Russian
Lada sedan. Lage, 55, exercises wide control
over government administration, much like a
prime minister.

Lage recently represented Cuba at Bolivia’s
constitutional convention and presidential inau-
gurations imColombia and Ecuador. And when
Fidel Castro ceded power in July, he gave Lage




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No changes in post-Castro Cuba

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WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

sole responsibility for his “energy revolution,”
the renovation of the country’s antiquated elec-
trical grid that is close to Castro’s heart.

Castro decreed that five other top officials
would share responsibility for other projects
important to his legacy in Latin America:

e Felipe Perez Roque, 41, the boyish, clean-
shaven foreign minister; :

e Health Minister Jose Ramon Balaguer, 74,
Cuba’s powerful former chief of ideology;

e Jose Ramon Machado Ventura, 76, the
longtime Communist Party leader who repre-
sented Cuba at the inauguration of Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega;

e Esteban Lazo, 62, the country’s most pow-
erful black leader who headed Cuba’s delega-
tion to the U.N. General Assembly in Septem-
ber;

e Francisco Soberon, 62, the central bank
president who was evidently included to facili-
tate project funding.

Fidel Castro did not mention National
Assembly President Ricardo Alarcon among
the group, but the 69-year-old parliament speak-
er and veteran diplomat could be called on
should the United States later accept Raul Cas-
tro’s offer for dialogue.

With Fidel out of view and the state of his
health uncertain, the top priority for these offi-
cials is to work for unity.

“There will be no division among Cuban rev-
olutionaries,” Lage said at a belated 80th birth-
day celebration that Castro was too sick to
attend. “There will be no ambitions, no egos.”

While no major policy changes are expected
while Fidel is alive. analysts believe Raul Castro
and Lage could eventually favour a slight eco-
nomic opening.

Raul Castro in the past expressed interest in
China’s model of a state-dominated market
economy with one-party. political control. Lage
promoted modest reform ling foreign
investment and limited ps prise, that
saved Cuba’s faltering coo ii. i the 1990s
after the Soviet bloc col. used.

Perez-Stable said. collective leadership
should listen to © aus anxious for economic
options in a count: y where government salaries
of around $15 a uionth fail to cover basic needs.

“Any gesture they make toward opening the
economy will be applauded not only by ordinary
Cubans; but will be welcomed by Europe, Cana-
da and countries elsewhere,” she said.

But Cubans recognize that any changes will
be gradual, and “will be orchestrated by those
whom Fidel has long been grooming,” Julia E.
Sweig of the New York-based Council on For-
eign Relations wrote in the current issue of
Foreign Affairs magazine.

“Washington, too, must accept that there is no
alternative to those already running post-Fidel
Cuba,” she wrote.

(This article was written by
_ Anita Snow of the Associated Press).



Bananas Rep Cress




















PRESENTS



his system
is a failure

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS system is a failure.
There is no other possible
conclusion. We can debate
the causes or why it remains
in its present state, whether
it is impotence, present lead-
ers lack the courage to chal-
lenge the archaic system
they inherited, the testicular
fortitude to remove or dis-
cipline individuals who are
not doing their job; or
whether it is vision intoler-
ance, present leaders lack
the creative ability to trans-
form the system into what
is effective; or whether it is
apathy, present leaders just
don’t give a damn. But there
is no debating the conclu-
sion: The system is a failure.

The culprit under the
microscope is the operation
of the public service, gener-
ally, and, specifically, the
administrative procedures in
the Ministry of Education.
How else can one account
for the fact that in the twen-
ty-first century a teacher can
be given a letter of employ-
ment, report for work, offer
exemplary service, and five
months later is still waiting
for a paycheck?

This is inéxcusable. For far

-too long we have cultivated

and encouraged a culture of
inefficiency and mediocrity
in this country. Moreover, in
many cases we have acqui-
esced to and celebrated
these twin viruses, which are
eating away at the organ of
our nation’s integrity.
Recently, a high ranking
official in the Ministry of
Education, when queried
about the length of time it
was taking for payment to
teachers,.he responded: “Oh,

‘you know government takes

”

longto pay.

However, the unacknowl-
edged cries of more than
thirty teachers, on Grand
Bahama alone, who have not
been paid since entering the
profession in August, sends
a loud, thundering crash
through every artery of this
nation, muffling even the
rhythmic thump of the
nation’s heartbeat, drown-
ing out every other note,
every other voice.

So when the Minister of
Education and Technology

or the Director of Education —

says that for the first time in
the history of the education
system every school is fully
staffed and, therefore, we
are well on our way to trans-
forming the national aver-
age, their voices are barely a



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whisper because of the clat-
tering echo: but teachers are
not being paid. When the
Prime Minister or the Gov-
ernor of the Central Bank
pontificates about the eco-
nomic health of the nation,
billion dollar investments, or
the strength of the national
reserves, it is all muted,
because of the wailing
crescendo: but teachers are
not being paid. Every time
any Bahamian sticks out her
chest and brags about the
golden girls and our perfor-
mance on the world stage,
about what a great little
nation we are, it is all stifled
by the agonizing, collective
groans of teachers, vehe-
mently declaring: but we are
not being paid. The plain-
tive cry mocks our every
achievement.

We must discontinue,
immediately, this disre-
spectful dancing on the
graves of our ancestors.
They didn’t sacrifice over
two hundred years of free
labour under a vicious and
merciless system so that
their children can be rein-
troduced to slavery under
the leadership of an indige-
nous government.

Those brave labourers
who marched in protest in
the sweltering heat of Inagua
in 1937 and in New Provi-
dence in 1942 didn’t do so
to allow a Bahamian gov-
ernment to work its citizens
without pay. This is not the
reason for which the great
Sir Randol Fawkes gave his
life in service to the labour
movement.and, therefore,
his country: pips soto

When I was a college stu-
dent in Nashville, Tennessee
in the late 1970s, I would sit
in Sambo’s restaurant for
hours and watch as white

customers, who came in

after me, were served, while
I was ignored.

As I sat there in my rage,
fighting back the tears, I
thought: I am not a.man. I
am not human. I have no
value to them.

On one occasion when I
was walking home from
work on a cold winter
evening, some white men on
the back of a pick-up truck
pelted me with rotten toma-
toes for a full half mile, until
J arrived at the entrance to
the college and dashed
through the gate. As I stood
there desperately trying to
catch my breath, wet, cold,
and stink, I thought: I am
not a man. I am not human.

-J have no value to them.

My oldest son is only sev-
en, and he loves karate. He
is passionate about it. All
over the house he practices
his moves. Sometimes, to his
parents annoyance. He even
has his little brother starting
to love it, and, at times, I
have to remind him not to
be so rough with his little
three-year-old brother.
Recently, this karate-loving
child came into my office at
home. When I looked up
from what I was doing, I saw
yearning and expectation in
his eyes. “Daddy,” he says
“may I have fifty dollars
please for my next karate
belt.” .

Apparently, he was suc-
cessful in the demonstration
of his skills and was moving
on to the next level. There
was to be a ceremony to
mark the occasion. I sat
there looking at him, and I
didn’t have the courage to
tell him: that daddy really
didn’t have it. I couldn't
break his little heart like
that.

Then the moment of
absolute clarity: I am not a
man. I’m not human. I have
no value to them. In all the
times of my life when per-
sons have robbed me of my
manhood, my dignity, my
self-worth, all of the pelting
with tomatoes and all of the
being ignored in restaurants
couldn’t add up to the use-
lessness my country was
causing»me’to feel: sitting

there looking into my son’s
eyes as he waited for a
response. I averted his gaze,
pulled him to me, and as I
hugged him, I said: “Daddy
will take care of it.” I didn’t
want him to see my tears. .

How does a man look into
the eyes of his wife when she
knows that he gets up from
beside her five days every
week and goes to work, and
sometimes she is deprived of
his company because he is
too busy preparing lessons
and grading papers, then at
the end of the month (the
end of five months) he
comes home with nothing?
Nothing to pay the bills, to
help feed the family. How is
he to look at her without
avoiding her eyes? How
does the teacher face the
students every day with the
same enthusiasm, with the
same interest in the overall
agenda? Is the Ministry of
Education unaware that this
too influences the national
average? ¢

The system is a failure.
And, perhaps, by extension
the country is too. It brutal
izes families. It robs individ:
uals of dignity and self-
respect. And in a profession
anemic regarding the pres-
ence of men, it belittles the
manhood of the remnant. I
understand Derek Walcott’s
‘The Schooner Flight’ more
clearly now. And although 1
thought I never would, I
understand the early. .
Naipaul’s invectives against
the region. ee

I know why Brathwaite
left us. Ironically, they have
gone to find solace in the
belly of the beast. ‘

Our solution, regionally
and in the Bahamas, to this
failed system, so far, has
been to keep changing part:
ners, while the band plays
on. It is time to stop the
band from playing, and to
call on the creative among
us to write new songs,
because the ones we havé
been singing and dancing to
have long lost their luster;
their power to produce joy.

DR KEITH A RUSSELL
Freeport, xg
Grand Bahama, %
December, 2006. x

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE is absolutely no
doubt that the Christie Admin“
istration has attracted an incred,
ible value in investment in the
Tourism sector however do wé
all wish to work in the Tourism
sector? Some foresee total
employment for the next 15:
years andon. — i

There was talk about an IT,
project for Freeport, but not too
much more and that there’s not,
one single industrial develop,
ment except the Associated
Grocers warehouse in Freeport.

Does that mean that the Min-
istry of Financial Services and

. Investments has been unable or:

has not tried to market The'
Bahamas to strategic industri-
al, IT and processing investors?
There are some obvious areas;
where it would be so natural for,
us to try to attract substantial
potential alternative employers’
to a hotel — why have we not,
tried to attract an oil refinery?
We read that in the US there’
has not been a single refinery*
built in the past 20 years, one of,
the soft points that affects glob-»
al oil prices — we know when
the price of oil rises how it hits,
the Bahamian driver, at least
the shipping cost would be’
reduced if our wholesalers could,
purchase from within The,
Bahamas rather than Curacao
— any relief will help St.
Thomas has, Curagao also,‘
Jamaica and Trinidad. (
Not all Bahamians support,
and feel comfortable with this’
one-legged economy as we all’
know if the Miami folk have a,
chill we have bronchitis. \
Might it be time for opting to
alternative potential employ-'
ers? ie

MARSHALLFORBES *.
__ Nassau, x
“January 16,2007. ma



THE TRIBUNE





In brief

US Embassy
expands
husiness hours

THE United States
Embassy in Nassau has
announced expanded
‘consular hours for non-
emergency services to
American citizens who
are temporary visitors
‘or permanent residents
in the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos.

. Beginning February 5,
the American Citizen
Services office will be
open on a walk-in basis
from 9am to 1lam and
‘from 1pm to 3pm Mon-
days through Thursdays,
and on Fridays from
9am to llam.

The office will be
closed on a one-time
basis on Friday, Febru-
ary 9.

The Embassy also
pointed out that it is
closed on all US and
Bahamian holidays.

The American Citi-
zens Services office can
notarise documents,
issue passports and reg-
ister American children
born abroad.

It also provides
Americans with infor-
mation on absentee vot-
ing, selective service
registration, receiving
federal benefits, and fil-.
ing US tax forms.

Consular officers
assist Americans who
encounter serious legal,
medical, or financial
difficulties.

+ Although consular
officers cannot act as
legal counsel or repre-
sentatives, they can pro-
vide the names of local
attorneys and doctors,
provide loans to desti-
tute Americans, and
provide information
about dangerous condi-
tions affecting overseas
~ travel or residence.

Tal
SL
rassmaaiata




Darra ae

RR alt

SATURDAY
JANUARY 20TH

12:30 Bullwinke & Friends

1:00 _ King Leonardo

1:30 The Fun Farm

2:30 411

3:00 Matinee: “Sudie & Simpson”

5:00 Cricket World

5:30 Gillette World Sports

6:00 In This Corner

6:30 Sports Lifestyle

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
| 7:30 Native Show

8:00 Spurgeon Smith 2007 ~

New Year’s Day Junkanoo

} Highlights

11:30 Hustle

12:00 The Bahamas Tonight

12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
JANUARY 21ST

6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
* 8:30 The Covenant Hour
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference
Effective Living
10:30 This Is The Life
| 11:00 Zion Baptist Church
1:00 — Gillette World Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
_ 2:00 Gospel Video Countdown
2:30 Agape Full Gospel Baptist
Church
3:00 — St. John’s Jubilee
i Cathedral
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship Ministries
International
- 5:00 Walking In Victory
6:00 |The Human Senses:
r “Taste & Smell’
"7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
- 7:30 Kemp Road Ministries
8:00 Calvary Deliverance Church
8:30 ~~ Turning Point
. 9:00 News In Review 2006
10:30 Spiritual Impact
"11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Bobby Jones Presents
12:30 Community Pg. 1540AM

10:00

NOTE: ZNS-TY 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!



LOCAL NEWS

Haitian-Bahamian citizensh

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5



ip applications



‘could be processed within six months’

m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

ACCORDING to the Direc-
tor of Immigration, Haitian-
Bahamian applications for citi-
zenship could be processed with-
in six months — but only if the
applicants already possess the
required documents.

Late last year, The Tribune
reported several cases of Hait-
ian- Bahamians claiming they
have waited “forever” to receive
any sort of feedback from the
Department of Immigration with
respect to their citizenship appli-
cations.

Sources claimed they had to
wait up to three years to com-
plete the process, and others told
stories of having to wait long

periods and then being told that
they had to obtain further docu-
mentation to complete the
process.

Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson also came under fire last
year for allegedly “fast-tracking”
the residency application of
American celebrity Anna Nicole
Smith.

And despite Mr Gibson’s claim
that Anna-Nicole’s fast-tracking

’ was the result of a new era of

efficiency in the department, The
Tribune continued to receive calls
for the department to deal with
its “disgraceful” backlog of citi-
zenship applications.

In November 2006, human
rights lawyer Fred Smith listed
several cases of “disgraceful,
inhumane and degrading treat-
ment” of people who have been

waiting years to be processed by

the Immigration Department.
Mr Smith, who is based in

Freeport, said he represents

many applicants for work per ,

mits, annual residency permits,
permanent residency certificates
and/or citizenship:

“I challenge the minister to
deal quickly with the many out-
standing applicants from my firm,
Callenders & Co in Freeport, that
are outstanding —- some for
decades,” he said.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Director of Immi-
gration Vernon Burrows claimed
that such cases are only “isolat-
ed” — and that the problem rest-
ed with applicants not having the
required documents.

Mr Burrows explained: “Gen-

- erally speaking, we have a signif-

icant amount of persons born in
the Bahamas of non-Bahamian



@ LAST YEAR, human rights
lawyer Fred Smith (above) listed
several cases of “disgraceful,
inhumane and degrading treat-
ment” of people who have been
waiting years to be processed.



parents who are born out of wed-
lock, and many of them carry
their father’s name all through
their lives, and now they come
to us to apply, but they can only
show that the mother’s name is
on the birth certificate. And so
we then have a last name issue to
confirm that this person is really
who he says he is.”

._ The director said that in these
cases, the applicant is required
to get affidavits or re-register
their birth certificates, so that the
Department of Immigration can
be satisfied that they are who
they say they are.

“Trust me, as soon as all the
documents are in, and we have
interviewed them, the process is
very swift,” said Mr Burrows.

He claimed that properly doc-
umented applications can be
completed in short order — “cer-

_ woman whose spot was also

Knights of the Order of
St John of Jerusalem
honour for Felix Stubbs

PROMINENT Bahamian businessman Felix
Stubbs will be honoured by the Knights of the Order
of St John of Jerusalem in a solemn ceremony of
investiture — the first held by the order in the
Bahamas.

The ceremony will take place at the Parish Church
of St Mary the Virgin at 4pm on Saturday, January
20. Knighthood will be bestowed upon seven promi-
nent men and women from throughout the
Caribbean for their service to faith and humanity.

The order is a branch of the Knights Hospitaller,
which is among the oldest orders of chivalry still in
existence, the third oldest religious organisation in
Christendom, and the direct descendant of the 11th
century crusaders.

The knights are no strangers to the West Indies,
explained the order in a statement.

“The Order of St John purchased St Croix on
May 21, 1651 from King Louis XIV of France who
acted on behalf of the French West Indies Compa-
ny. Documents show that as many as 600 knights
lived on St Croix in the mid-to-late 17th century.”

The Knights also purchased the islands of Tortu-
ga, St Bartholomew and the French parts of St Kitts,
St Christopher, and Saint-Martin.

West Indies commander John Archer explained
the order’s ongoing mission.

“The New Crusades are a 21st century reaffir-
mation of the original hospitaller work of the order,
protection of women‘ and! ohildren, and care of the
sick and poor of the Lord: We are here to work on

a

WHY YOU VEX?

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE 9
“T still vex because the Er
government sold
junkanoo tickets for.$75 a
each and they knew
they wouldn’t have
had enough space for
the customers to sit. I
don’t know why they
put seat numbers on
the tickets because no
one respected it. We
ended up sitting like
three rows up from the
spot where we was sup-
posed to sit. Our original
spots were taken up by a
group of tourists. Another

ahs sis





usurped by a tourist stayed for
about five minutes and then left them

_ to enjoy the seats and left. If the government is going to charge
all that money for junkanoo tickets then the least they can do is
find someone to organise the seating arrangements.”



solutions for poverty, ignorance, and disease. We are
here to restore honour and dignity through service

' to our righteous God.” ,

Grand Prior Emeritus Ian Roger, GCSJ, the Pri-
or of the Pacific, will officiate the service in Nassau.

The Commandery of the West Indies is currently
undertaking several projects that serve the sick and
poor — among them “Jay’s Well” which brings water
to a small remote village in Haiti, close to a school,
where previously children and adults walked hours
in each direction for a drink of water.

The CWI is also a significant supporter of a car-
diac clinic in St Croix which serves a significant por-
tion of the West Indies.

The international headquarters of the Knights
Hospitaller is located in Valetta, Malta — home to
900 Knights and Dames worldwide.

The organisation operates through local non-prot-
it entities created under the laws of their respec-
tive countries.

Each unit carries out humanitarian projects under
its charitable trusts, while promoting good works
undertaken separately by its members.

“For 900 years, the order gained and maintained
its renown through the bravery and determination of

its members. Throughout history, the members have |

been known for their countless acts of mercy; the
protection of women and children, sick and lame; for
their honour and dignity, support of noble causes,
righting wrongs, and by their service to a righteous
God,” the statement said.

-TEW

Nitroce ie ence come
promote high standards

NURSES have been challenged to promote the highest possible
standard of practice and encourage professional development and edu-
cational advancement for their profession.

“Continue to ensure all people irrespective or nationality, race,
colour or social origins have optimal nursing care,” said Airport
Authority human resources manager, Olive Forbes.

"She was speaking during the Nurses Association of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas’ installation of officers on Monday, January 15.

“The world is ever-changing, so be forceful to enunciate the stan-
dards of nursing and promote their implementation,” she said. “You
must stimulate and encourage proficiency among nurses and please,
continue to participate in the national healthcare campaign.”

Ms Forbes called on nurses to examine how important their career
is to them.

“Are nurses living up to the duties and responsibilities of their
vocation?” she asked. “How do nurses care for their patients? Are you
showing love on a daily basis to patients? And are you really truly pre-
pared for the unexpected?

“Nursing should be a calling because if you do not like people, and
some do not, then you would definitely not like sick people. You see,
if nursing is a calling, then you would love what you are doing.”

The new executive team of the union includes president Prescola
Rolle; first vice president Stephanie Poitier; second vice president
Rebecca Johnson; treasurer Rosemarie Josey; assistant treasurer
Dominique Rox.

The standing committee chairpersons for 2006 — 2008 are: for the
standards/practice committee, Karol Mackey; for education and
research, Persephone A Munnings; for socio-economic and welfare
matters, Stacey A Dean; for membership, Leisl Pennerman; and for
public relations, D Enika Johnson

Outgoing president Ampusam Symonette said the new executive
team “is a vibrant one.” ,

The association has been around since 1947 and has about 375
members. The membership is made up of registered and clinical
nurses. aU
















ne



“I vex because I'm about to graduate and I don’t know what
I'm going to do — I want to come home but, it seems as if
employers don’t want to give graduates a chance, as well as, I
want to go to graduate school, but it seems as if ‘who ya know’
is all that matters when trying to get scholarships. So in actual-
ity I'm more lost,than vex.”

-Hopeless

. “T vex because I have been waiting for weeks for my garbage
to be collected and no one has come yet. I live out east and my
trash hasn’t been collected since December. The garbage is
piling up and it is beginning to stink. Its useless trying to call a
government agency, because they only transfer me from one per-
son to the next and still nothing gets done. Whoever is respon-
sible for the collection of garbage needs to address the situation
because this is past ridiculous.”

-L Wilson

“I’m vex at the current national average in the Bahamas. As
a recent graduate of high school and a future college graduate,
I can tell you that school would be not that difficult if students
would only sit down and do their work. The problem is every-
one wants to do their own thing and establish relationships
instead of paying attention to their work. Not only am I vex, I
am embarrassed. Students, we need to wake up.”

WHY YOU HAPPY?

“I’m happy because my daughter went to the Gymnastics Jr
Orange bowl International Competition in Coral Springs, Flori-
da and came home with all of the medals. This was her first time
competing on an international level and she racked up four
medals and one trophy.”

-Lynn Brennen

ntercooled Turbocharged —
Air-Conditioned ==

ES

6 Speakers

MONTROSE.

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE PREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION FULL SET FLOOR MATS
PARTS & SERVICE ASSURED



rane



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007



In Days Gone By: rally fever



WITH General Elections
just months away, political
season is taking off. Every
election year, seas of people
get caught up in the “rally
fever”. On Thursday night, at
a rally in Fox Hill, FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham
announced three of his party’s
candidates for the upcoming
election. In this edition of IN
DAYS GONE BY, we take a
look back at rallies and
demonstrations dating back to
the 1980s. Even then, the
crowds ranged in the thou-
sands. .

@ FEBRUARY 6, 1985 -
FNM supporters carry plac-
ards. Young FNM supporters
are shown blocking Bay
Street. The march stopped in
front of the House of
Assembly.

THE TRIBUNE





. JUNE 15, 1987 -
FORMER Free National
Movement leader Kendal

Issacs is greeted by enthusias-
* tic supporters during Friday
night’s rally at the R M Bailey
Park. Over 6,0000 people
reportedly attended the rally.

(Photo: ODELL
POWELL)
The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21ST,’ 2006















11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Services

Speaker:Pastor Dexter Duvalier





Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm








































Pastor:H. Mills

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
oeeten P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
wummma Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

Waa CHURCH SERVICES
EET] SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 2007

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

METHODIST SCHOOLS SUNDAY

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev.Livingston Parks/Youth Service

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road .
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard

10:00AM Rev. Minerva Knowles

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM Pastor Sidney Pinder/Youth Service
7:00PM — Mr. Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill -
Avenue

8:00AM Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Mr. Hartis Pinder
7:00PM Mr. Jocelyn Demeritte
HRI KAIRIE KIKI II AAAI IKARIA IKI IIIA AAI AAAI AAAI IAA AIA AAA AAA AAI
RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS'1

Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’

on each weekday at 6:55a.m.

Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH- will be holding an HONOURS WORSHIP
SERVICE on Sunday, January 21, 2006- Preacher; Mrs. Kenris L. Carey, Prsident,
The Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Chuch and the Dedication of the
Harold Poiter Resource Center in honour of the late Harold Poiter.

- LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

Geared To The Future



Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am




Prayer time: 6:30pm



Place:



The Madeira Shopping

é Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs



»

Girace and Peace Wesleyan OTe

A t Ch

North America
WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE 1S AFFIRMED
Worship time: Ila.m. & 7p.m.
Adult Sunday School: [0a.m.

HONOURS LUCHEON at 1:00 p.m. at the Wyngham Cable Beach Resort. Members g : a .
being honoured as New Congregational Board Members Emeriti- Mrs. Althea Church School during Worship Service

Lewis &Mr. Maxwell Poitier. Donation: $40.00







Place: Twynam Feights
off Prince Charles Drive

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY JANUARY 21ST, 2007
7:00 a.m. Sis.Kenris Carey/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Youth/Bro. Jamicko Forde
7:00 p.m. Bro. Sidney Pinder/Board of Evangelism :

Minister: Rey. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587




“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7) RSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE















Fr.



B MAY 5, 1987 —- SOME of the more than 10,000 PLP sup-
porters who jammed the Poiniciana Arena, its adjoining rooms
and a makeshift tent outside, wave blue and yellow poms-poms
last night during the closing of the party’s All-New Provi-
dence “All Aboard” convention.






DUR PALHONE TALK
WE BELIEVE HIM
THATS THAT








M@ MONDAY October 24, 1983 — “We want PLP and Bahami-
anisation, not FNM and Americanisation” reads one of the placards
held by participants in the ‘We Day’ parade organised by the PLP
on Saturday. Supporters wore PLP T-shirts and waved a variety of
banners supporting Prime Minister Lynden Pindling and his gov-
ernment and alleging attacks on the country’s second industry,
banking. Members of a contingent of the Boys Brigade Band can
be seen with instruments at right. Other bands playing electric
instruments travelled in open-backed trucks. A junkanoo group was
also present. Sir Lynden told the audience that the gathering was
to commemorate the formation of the PLP. About 15,000 people
attended.




%

a ae

1 *#& eee
‘ & 2 &@ w#@ 4 4



PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 THE TRIBUNE




a oyey-Via 11 ee | :

Boys day retreat at St Paul’s Catholic Centre

@ RIGHT: The boys from .
Woodcock Primary School start
the day by singing the school’s
song during the day retreat at St
Paul's Catholic Centre yester-
day.






@ BELOW: The head boy
and prefect from Woodcock
Primary School look over their
speeches, moments before pre-
senting them to their classmates.

(All photos by:
Ana Bianca Marin

Bu B oo esos

Paul’s Catholic Centre.









“ @ FIFTH and sixth graders from Woodcock Primary School | i The head boy gives a speech during the opening ceremony of the boys retreat.

meet at the St. Paul’s Catholic Centre for a Boys Day Retreat.

Chavez claims Castro
is fighting for his life



Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday, 17 January-200 7



























































Abaco Markets -0.293 0.00% i
10.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.30 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.54% fa RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
6.90 Bank of Bahamas, 8.03 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.24%
0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50% “acl : :
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85 0.00 0.199 0.060 9.3 3.24% _VENEZUELAN Pr esident Hugo Chavez said Friday that
4.10 Fidelity Bank 1.25 0.00 0.170 0.050 7A 4.00% Fidel Castro is "battling for his life" and that he spoke with the
oo Se ieee aoe 1,920 re ore 14.0 2.40% ailing Cuban leader for nearly half an hour several days ago,
: ‘ f : 24.4 2.11% saNatas ake ean
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 12.65 0.00 400 0.943, 0.680 12.7 5.38% according to Associated Press. ,
ce Savecicaies Waite BDRs 4.91 -0.03 0.134 0.045 36.6 0.92% Chavez, a close ally and admirer of Castro, compared the
i octor's Hospita 2.50 i .295 a y % Whe snderias si “ 4 oe ;
aay eocuce Pp : : ee ay Rees neaG a Peo Cuban leader's attempt to recover from an unspecified medical _,
10.70 Finco _ : 12.25 0.00 0.779 0570 15.7 4.65% condition to the 1950s, when Castro was a guerrilla in Cuba's
en tee iene mite pee eee Nae Scan eastern mountains fighting the government he would overthrow.
7 : 4 5 2e * o : gs : a A ° : “5
0.50 Freaport Gonereté oa nee -0.423 0.000 Rin 8.00% "Fidel is in the Sierra Maestra again, battling for his life,"
7.15 ICD Utilities . 7.20 0.00 0.532 0.135 13.5 1.88% Chavez said after attending a summit of South American leaders
J. S. Johnson 0.00 0.588 0.560 14.6 6.51%} in Rio
Premier Real Estate 1.269 0.795 79 7.95% wore : , 8 os :
. “ — eee Castro, 80, has not been seen in public since shortly before July
Symbol Bid $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS$ Div $ P/E Yield 31 when he announced he was temporarily stepping aside while
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.766 1.080 8.8 7.40% he recovered fron aa
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85% rom an operation. . :
ngs cutiiteoe 0.021 0.000 26.2 ———:0.00% He has provisionally ceded power to his brother Raul, the 75-
be oo A Seta ONE) 5 S56 oe : co year-old defense minister.
i : 2. 0.000 19.4 0.00% ee ‘ ws . ;
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 54.66 T5686 foioe Bi Baad Castro's medical condition is a state secret, but Cuban authori- ,
0.35 RND Holdings - ae i 1 ohana et 9.070 0,000. N/M o.oo%f ties deny he suffers from terminal cancer, as U.S. intelligence
: é oe BISX Listed Mutual Funds : . officials have claime ‘ Ffici
(OE ree ace q Mus igen Se : ee c it icials have claimed. Cuban officials have nonetheless stopped
12681 Golna Nieoney Mercer Fund aT aeSTOA insisting Castro will return to power. 4 :
2-6282' Fidelity Guhamas @ & rund 2.9726" In a speech Wednesday night, Chavez called Castro's situation
: ina MSI Preferre' un ‘ oe "dalicate Wie Teal acer, j i
ilies? Coenen cers Ree ae sone delicate" but dismissed as speculation recent Spanish press ‘
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund —11.3075**""* . reports portraying Castro as near death after three failed opera-
EOS CRORE OT OR TOOL ABTS C008 S407 % tions and complications from the intestinal infection diverticulitis.
. MARKE 3 YIELD - last 12 onth dividends divided by closing price EY * ns is . .
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 woeks Bid $ - Binine pied a Bane and mean me ea On Friday, C havez said he could not give more details about
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 wenks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity + 5 January 2007 Castro's condition "because I'm not the doctor who's caring for
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily valume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price ens "
| Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week “44 December 2006 Fidel. ,
| Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths He added: "And if I was, I wouldn't anyway but nevertheless I
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today z NAV - Net Asset Value *** 31 December 2006 y NM, Le : ¥ + ill di ] 1
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful can tell you. I don't know when Fidel wi le, I hope he lives 80
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 +98. Snibeeannibar 2008 more years, I hope he lives 100 more years."
ear eA A ee a ee £ iesen bat eene Chavez is known for making bold statements without elaborat-
I TO FRAIE EATTO GOVT SAS BAS TATA T FTRET TRE SAS SER SEAT PEAR PIAS Fea 4 RTPA TRAPPER APE PRUPAT BBWS RA : nl no,
'





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 9





Alpha Dog ahead



lm By JASON DONALD

ALPHA DOG

Starring: Justin Timberlake, Bruce
Willis, Sharon Stone, Emile Hirsch

THERE is always the danger that an
unpleasant story centred around unap-
pealing people might result in an

unpleasant, unappealing film.

Crime drama Alpha Dog half proves
this point: it’s definitely unpleasant —
but, thanks to some fine performances
from its young cast, it just about man-.
ages to avoid being unappealing.

Inspired by a true story, the film
takes place among a group of wealthy,
middle class teens from Los Angeles,
who do little other than indulging in

drugs and partying.

_ When one of them, drug dealer John-
ny Truelove, gets into a cash row with a
particularly highly-strung member of
the social circle, Jake, it results in the
latter’s younger brother Zack being
“kidnapped” until the dispute can be

resolved.

At first, Zack’s kidnapping involves
nothing more than taking him to parties
and making him part of his would-be
captors’ decadent. lifestyle. But when
the police get involved in the search
for the missing youngster, the situation

begins to spiral out of control.

The fact that Alpha Dog makes for
uncomfortable virtually from start to

finish is testament to some great acting.

Justin Timberlake makes a seamless
transition to the big screen as perhaps
the nearest thing to a sympathetic char-

in "Alpha Dog."

acter in this dodgy bunch, there’s an

intense turn by Shawn Hatosy as Tru-
elove’s put-upon devotee and Emile
Hirsch is suitably ruthless as a young

criminal in over his head.





THE Ministry of Tourism
has announced a number of
master class workshops
designed to help Bahamians
take advantage of the many
opportunities that are open-
ing up in the industry.

The workshops, which will
total 14 in all, are being held
as part of National Tourism
Week later this month.

The ministry noted in a

. statement that government has
announced more than $18 bil-
lion in new developments
throughout the Bahamas.

“These developments have
the potential to create a very
robust economy with oppor-
tunities for jobs and spin-off
businesses,” the statement
said. “The proposed invest-
ments are concentrated on a
number of islands and have
the ability to greatly enhance
the standards of living for
many Family Island residents
if they are prepared to
embrace them. The billion dol-
lar question then remains.
How do Bahamians take
advantage of the pending
opportunities?”

This topic will be addressed

in the My Bahamas Market

master class workshop session

on “Investing in tourism
_ Opportunities.”

The ministry said a very
knowledgeable panel has been
put together to direct this
workshop which promises to
deliver real and usable advice
for becoming a stakeholder in
the tourism industry.

Another unexploited oppor-

tunity for industrious Bahami- -

ans, the statement said, lies in
the $50 billion weddings and
$12 billion honeymoon indus-
try.

“Everybody likes to believe
in the fairy tale of ‘happily
ever-afters.’ And weddings are
wonderful time for immersing
in that feeling,” it said.

According to estimates by
About.com, every year, an
average of 2.4 million wed-
dings are performed in the
United States.

The escalating cost of a US
wedding, which average
upwards from $27,852, how-
ever, has many Americans
choosing the cheaper alterna-
tive of a destination wedding.

“Honeymoon statistics from
About.com estimate that 16



per cent of marriages in the
US are destination weddings.
Many destinations inside and
outside of the United States
are seeing the upswing poten-
tial of this burgeoning market
and are quickly adapting their
product to cater to this grow-
ing demographic,” the Min-
istry of Tourism said.

Currently, of the top five
locations for destination wed-
dings, the Bahamas ranks fifth
with an average of 4,000 wed-
dings per year. The top rank-
ing destination, Las Vegas,
performs over 125,000 desti-
nation weddings annually.

“The potential for this mar-
ket is seen as tremendous and
is being closely watched by the
bridal industry,” the statement
said.

Former Fairchild Bridal

Group marketing director and

certified travel counsellor
Jacqueline Johnson will
explore this topic and outline
opportunities to “Profit from
romance” next week
during this My Bahamas Mar-
ketplace master class work-
shop.

The workshops begin on
January 22. Registration is
available online at
www.ntwbahamas.com.

ee"



But the real standout is Ben Foster —
his kinetic performance as borderline
psychotic Jake is one of most of the
most electrifying I’ve seen in a long

_ Tourism -
workshops

LOCAL NEWS

Fine performances k
of the pack

°
time. Definitely a young actor to watch
out for.
There are downsides to the movie,

however: a clumsy attempt to punctuate __ tighter.

aster class
announced



x

@ PICTURED is a National Tourism Week 2006 master class
workshop at the Wyndham Nassau Resort. This year, NTW will
offer 14 master class sessions covering a wide range of industry top-
iics.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARILYN DORCELEY OF
GENERAL DELIVERY, PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EVANS OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS _ is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen

of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



the proceedings with direct-to-camera
docu-drama moments doesn’t really
work, and the pacing could have been










eep



@ IN THIS photo provided by Universal, Elvis Schmidt (Shawn Hatosy) and Frankie Ballenbacher (Justin Timberlake) discuss what to do with their hostage

(AP Photo/Universal/Darren Michaels)

ing.

But, for the most part, Alpha Dog
is a searing portrayal of out-of-
control youth and is well worth catch-

Spirit Airlines to
begin flying to
Haiti in March

@ PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti

DISCOUNT carrier Spir-
it Airlines will offer service
between Fort Lauderdale
and Haiti's capital beginning
in March, the airline said
Thursday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Fort Lauderdale-based
Spirit will fly to Port-au-
Prince three times a week
starting March 22 and will
offer daily flights starting in
May, the airline said in a
statement.

Onerway fares between
Fort Lauderdale and Port-

au-Prince will start at $93,
according to Spirit's Web
site.

Barry Biffle, Spirit's
chief marketing officer,
said. the new service
would give the 250,000
people of Haitian descent
living in South Florida “a
new low-fare option for trav-
el."

Spirit currently flies to 29
destinations, including 12 in
the Caribbean.

Earlier this week, the air-
line announced a new ser-
vice between Fort Laud-
erdale and Aguadilla, Puer-
to Rico.

General Maintenance Personnel
Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and

some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience

and must provide references.

Excellent salary and benefits package

Commensurate with experience.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, LISA

ILLIAN HEATH

of the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, The |
Bahamas P.O.BOX F-41702, intend to change my name
to JILLIAN BARTLETT. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-792,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY JOHNSTON OF |
MARSH HARBOUR, P.O. Box AB 20282, ABACO, -
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

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MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info
call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

B CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Mon-
day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach
¢ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton
Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482
for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

& CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded persons
to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C
C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343 meets
Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Aipha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Rotary Club of Nassau meets every Tuesday at
Luciano's of Chicago on East Bay Street. Fellowship
starts at 12:30pm with the meeting held from 1pm-
2pm.

WEDNESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to









AROUN D

THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU

a





7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screen-
ing.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS. Can-
cer patients, survivors, their family members and
friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

~ NCIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speaker
and great fellowship. If you would like to attend our
meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery:

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public
to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday
at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is
a worldwide service organisation dedicated to chang-
ing the world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from lOam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Colum-
bus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274
now to make reservations. Open to all ages and
groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at
the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm - Gen-
tlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH
Free public health lectures featuring distinguished



54








JAN 27, 200?

Third National Exhibition (ne3)_

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 cantemparary
Bahanvian artists exploring a vanety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalague,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Whesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. itcontalas the work of eight artists ari offers
samples of the best comtemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are eclay and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imagination,



physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.
REACH - Resources & Education for Autism.and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the'sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the
BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
e TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office com-
plex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fellow-
ship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held from
lpm to 2pm.

FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm.
New Providence Community Centre: Friday 7pm
to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre at







PHOTOS WELCOME

St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents of
the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

Hi CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring. Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on Fri-
day, January 26 at 8pm at St Paul’s Church Hall,
Lyford Cay. -

SATURDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association méets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Train-
ing Representative at 302.4732 for more information
and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10
and 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in

an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents inter- ©

ested in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

if FAMILY REUNION

New - The Valley Family Reunion for former
residents and those reuniting with loved ones and
friends will be holding a

Dinner, Dance Celebration on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 3 - Cocktails at 8pm and dinner at 8:30pm -
at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Gov-
ernor’s Ballroom. The evening will include cock-
tails, dinner and dancing and a three course buffet
dinner. A live band will also be featured. Dress:
Lounge Suit. Renew old acquaintances and meet
friends from school days. For more information
telephone 328.5494. Tickets are available at
McCartney’s Pharmacy, Mount Royal Avenue.
Part proceeds to benefit children’s charities.

lm CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on
Saturday, January 27 at 8pm at St Andrew’s Kirk,
Shirley Street.



SUNDAY

HB PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the
Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to
9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A
spiritual teaching society leading you to greater peace
of mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every Wednes-
day at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Inter-
ested persons are welcome to attend. For more infor-
mation contact by e-mail @ bahmetsol @hotmail.com
or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures if
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the sub-
Ject line.



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SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 11

THE TRIBUNE |

Gun threat’ “Help save the family’ rally set for Spanish Wells |

allegation
FROM page one

ly manage that investigation,”
he said.

Mr Thompson, Permanent
Secretary at the Ministry of
Local Government, was said
to be out of office yesterday,
and Minister Alfred Gray was
also said to be out of office
until Tuesday of next week.

Royal Oasis
FROM page one

it failed to raise the financing nec-
essary for its $40 million purchase.

Some of the original investors
are now part of a new group that
is hoping to close the deal for
Royal Oasis.

“Tf the matter with the World
group does not proceed and they
are unsuccessful, then certainly
we hope for Harcourt. They’re
ideal for Grand Bahama, they
want to be there, they. understand
Grand Bahama. We’re hoping it
all comes together,” Mr Wilch-
combe said.

Tribune Business in December
reported that government had
approached the Dublin-based
Harcourt group to see if it
remained interested in acquiring
the crisis-stricken resort as part
of its wider investment plans on
Grand Bahama.

Minister Wilchcombe said that
he hopes that the purchase of the
Royal Oasis resort, which has
been closed for more two years,
will be concluded before the sum-
mer.

“I’m optimistic, it’s taken a
while, we’ve gone through a num-
ber of people, we've heard a num-
ber of wonderful stories, won-
derful proposals. The truth of the
matter is that they sometimes just
don’t pan out and we don’t want
to be left with egg on our faces,”
he said.

When the Royal Oasis closed
in September 2004, its operator
Driftwood had left liabilities of
at least $22 millions.

The resort also owed the hotel
pension funds $4.1 million.

Other creditors included the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
and its companies, Grand
Bahama Power, the National
Insurance Board (NIB), and oth-
er private companies on Grand
es

















ANTI-same sex union cam-
paigners have announced that
they will continue to expand
the crusade to have marriage
enshrined in the constitution
as a union between a man and
a woman.

Rex Major and Associates
announced yesterday that the
next “Help save the family”
rally is set for Spanish Wells, at
the Food Fair Parking Lot, on
January 24 at 7.30pm.

“In view of the escalating
drive to get same-sex marriages
legalised around the world, our
challenge here as a Christian
nation — publicly acknowledg-
ing God as supreme — is that
we could become the first
nation to state publicly in our
constitution that the true
nature of marriage is a union
between a man and a woman
only,” the group said in a state-
ment yesterday. :

“In light of the tremendous
confusion evidenced all across
the world and in the west in
particular, concerning the true
nature of marriage, it is indeed

Gay rights concerns

FROM page one



uals and they need to be protected as well. Certainly, altercations
can take place between them and they need protection. That
does not say — no one should assume — that that means condoning
same-sex relationships.”

Pastor Moss said that what he opposes is any legal recognition
of same sex unions, such as civil unions. -

Under the new act, domestic violence would
be defined as including “physical, sexual, emotional or psycho-
logical or financial abuse committed by a person against a
spouse, partner, child, any member of the household or depen-
dent.”

This new definition further allows new parties to seek redress
under domestic violence legislation, as The Sexual Offences &
Domestic Violence Act, 1991, relates specifically to married indi-
viduals.

Magistrate’s Courts also would be able to issue protection
orders against abusers, which, if violated, can carry up to 12
months in prison and a $5000 fine, or both.

Further discretion exists in law for magistrates to refer the
matter to the Supreme Court if harsher punishment is deemed nec-
essary.

Children, or, with leave from the court, an agent of a spouse or
partner, would also be able to seek a protection order.

More controversially, the Commissioner of Police, or an officer
of a Department charged with child welfare, can seek a protection
order without charges or a complaint being filed by any member
of the household.

Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson, Director of the Crisis Centre, stat-
ed that the consolation process for the proposed legislation is
still ongoing. She advised Bahamians to review the legislation on
the Bahamas government’s website, and to send any e-mails or
questions to the Ministry of Social Services.

Minister of Social Services Melanie Griffin told The Tribune she
hopes the legislation will be passed before parliament is dissolved
in the run-up to the next general election.



@ HELP Save the Family Committee - from left are Leroy Hanna, Rex Major and Andy Knowles

heartening that the Bahamas
Constitutional Review Com-
mission has made a specific rec-
ommendation to the Bahamas
government regarding this mat-
ter,” it said.

In a March 2006 preliminary
report, the commission
declared that the majority of
Bahamians want the law of
marriage as a union between a
man and a woman to be
enshrined in the constitution.

In August last year, Rex



church ministry, along with
other ministers, conducted a
rally in Rawson Square.

“Hundreds of concerned
Bahamians gathered to say
loud and clear that they stand
behind this recommendation
just mentioned — that the true
nature of marriage as a union
between a woman and a man,
be carried out.

“A petition to this effect is

being signed across the com-
monwealth as we speak,” the
statement said.

The group said that because
of the nature of this matter and
the “serious impact” it could
have on the future of the
nation, it was determined that a
rally should be held in every
population centre of the
Bahamas.

The first Family Island rally
was conducted on November
18 last year in Salt Pond, Long
Island.

On January 28, another rally
will be conducted in Harbour
Island at ’Briland Park, the
group said.

Each person who attends the
rallies and signs a petition will
be calling out to the govern-
ment “to adopt the recom-
mendation without delay,” the
group said.

The rallies are held under
the patronage of couples from
the community married for 50
years or more. A special recog-
nition will be paid to all couples
who have been married for 25
years or more.

“It is hoped that all married
couples will attend and partic-
ipate in the public renewal of
vows ceremony, which will be
conducted as a special feature
of the rally,” the statement

Major and Associates, a para-

said.

FNM Fox Hill candidate

FROM page one

ing tasks they were asked to do. I would have felt
better if they were allowed to do a computer
course free of charge or attend some institution
paid for by the government as a form of com-
pensation,” she said. ;

The educator said approximately one year
into Mr Mitchell's term in office, a tractor bull-
dozed the entire foundation of the community

- centre that George Mackey and the people of the

Fox Hill Constituency had built.

Dr Higgs said that more than $40,000 of mate-
rial and labour were crushed and carted off,
truck load by truck load.

This, she said, shocked George Mackey, who
in turned called civic, religious and political lead-
ers from both the PLP and the FNM in Fox Hill
to attend several meetings where the people
demanded that the foundation be replaced.

“They wanted the MP to abandon his quest to _

build four houses on the property. The meet-
ing was held at St Mark’s Baptist Church in Fox
Hill, where Mr Mitchell was accompanied by
high ranking officers from the Ministry of Hous-
ing. They presented a new plan with four hous-



cy Ae available in
Ne Oe Lae) eas
Ask for them in-store today.

es to be built on the property. The people of Fox
Hill said, ‘No way’,” she said.

Unfortunately, Dr Higgs said, the MP did not
get the message, because instead of inviting all
Fox Hill people to get together and build the cen-
tre so that we could all be proud owners he got
together with a few of his friends and proceeded
to replace the foundation, and construct the
community centre.

Dr Higgs charged that very few sub-contracts
have been offered to the many qualified trades-
men from the Fox Hill constituency.

This notwithstanding that the employment
rate within the Fox Hill community has not
improved.

“One of the experiences I will never forget
was when Fred Mitchell told me and a group of
young volunteers and PLP campaign workers,
that he was not George Mackey. He repeated
this on national TV during the memorial ser-
vice at St. Paul's Baptist Church.

“Of course, he can never be George Mackey,
God rest his soul; Mr. Mackey got both FNMs
and PLPs to work together for the good of the
community. Our present.MP seeks to divide the
leaders and people of the Fox Hill constituency,”
she said.



oe

Brinrsrwern eoietieh

ROR ER
ener } ey

Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause

Heart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases.



.
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fi

PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

-





Ce a ul
NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA oo

anual ean Gala Bal

@ CHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall begins the legal year with
a warm welcome to all guests, including special guests, Cana-
dian Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and her husband
Frank McArdle .

(LEFT to Right) Lady Camille Hall, Sir Burton Hall,
Chief Justice of the Bahamas, Arthur D. Hannah Governor-
General, Chief Justice of Canada Beverly McLachlin, Frank
McArdle, husband of Chief Justice McLachlin, Dame Joan
Sawyer, President of Court-of-Appeal.












mo

PUD GES tite tei oueurers aU CCESSEUL deveuner aud @ ATTORNEY Wayne Munroe, President of the

year of high profile cases. businessman Jerry Capo, owner of es
Magistrate Linda Virgill and _ the Bimini Bay Resort, ‘and with his Bahamas Bar Association, Attorney Hope C V Stra-

Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaac, wife Carmen Capo take time out to chan of Equity House, Mt Royal Avenue, Attorney
attend the ball. Sidney Cambridge, partner in the law firm of Cal-

lender and Company





@ ATTORNEY-GENERAL Alivsbu Maynard-Gibson with
her husband businessman Maxwell Gibson, owner of Colombian:
Emeralds International.



LENE Ree Pee Rese ee ee eae GENE eeu eee eee eee neneeenenesesne seen eeseneeuee see Eeenses ese sbs en eenaneaeeeeeunsnsuenennss seed deeedehite .

Opening of the 2007 legal year



fl ATTORNEY Samuel Campbell, former Commissioner of Police B. K. Bonamy, Director of Legal Affairs Attorney
Deborah Frasier, Attorney Charles McKay, Appeal Justice Hartman Longley.

& BASEL O'Brien,
High Commissioner
to United Kingdom,
Marlene O'Brien, for-
mer Secretary Ella
Thompson, Attorney
Anthony Thompson
of Anthony Thomp-
son and Company. Mr
Thompson is the for-
mer deputy manager
of the Bahamas Mon-
etary Authority —a
fore-runner of the
Central Bank of the
Bahamas.



@ THE parents (Lady Zoe and Sir Clement Maynard, former
deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas) of Acting Justice Dr’
Peter Maynard and Attorney-General Allyson Maynard must |
be celebrating more than just their 60th wedding anniversary. |
For it is the first time in the history of the Bahamas that a
brother and sister hold such high judicial office.





an

a LD - \ a

t Of,
hy 4 ‘ (C7 ‘d







~ SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports

ah RET EE



SPORTS.
NE



@ BASKETBALL
NPWBA ACTION

SUZETTE McKenzie,

- back in action after serv-

ing a three-game suspen-
sion by the New Provi-
dence Women’s Basket-
ball Association, canned
10 points, but it wasn’t
enough Thursday night to
lift the Cleaning Center
Lady Angels over the Sun-
shine Auto Cheetahs.
- Linda Pierre pumped in
-a game high 17 points,
Lucinda Sylvain had 12
and Anastacia Moultrie
chipped in with nine
points and 19 rebounds in
the Lady Cheetahs 56-38
decision over the Lady
Angels at the DW Davis
Gym.

Kecia Smith led the
Lady Angels with 14 and
Tarana Pyfrom had 12.

In the other game
played, Kaivonne New-
bold posted a game high

~.31 points with seven
rebounds to help the Col-
lege of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs record a 64-37 rout
over the Junior All-Stars.
Tiffany Wildgoose had

'.\- eight points in the loss for

-’. the hapless All-Stars.

meen lige te tb

“lg GSSSA ACTION

IT WAS a double dose
of victory for the CI Gib-
son. Rattlers over the Gov-
ernment High Magics on
Thursday as the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools
Sports Association contin-
ued its regular season bas-
ketball action at the DW

. Davis Gym.

Charlise Burns and
Olivia Grant both scored
eight points and Grant
added eight points with
five rebounds as the Rat-
tlers knocked off the Mag-
icwomen 39-15 in a senior
girls game.

Crystal Curry and Kate-
cha Gilcud both had seven
points in the loss.

The Rattlers senior boys
then clobbered the Magic-
men 68-32 as Jermaine
Storr scored a game high
24 points and Drew Rolle
chipped in with eight
rebounds

William Dean led Gov- —

ernment High with 10

points and six rebounds.
In the other game

played, Eugene Bain

scored a game high 31

points with 11 rebounds

- and Gerrad Lubin had 11

‘.’ points and seven steals.as

the CC Sweeting Cobras
pulled off a 79-67 win over
the CV Bethel Stingrays.

Courtney Johnson had
nine pointsand10
rebounds and Sherman
Ferguson had seven
rebounds in the loss.

Over at the CI Gibson
Gym, the HO Nash junior
girls blasted the LW
“Young Golden Eagles 40-
14,

Lakeisha Munroe scored
a game high 18 in the win
and Ladonna Parkinson
got nine in the loss.

In one of the two junior
boys games, the CH
Reeves Raptors nipped
the CC Sweeting Scorpi-
ons 52-50 as Patrico Lead-
on had a game high 27 in
. the win. Gabi Laurent had
. 23 in the loss.

And in the other junior
boys game, the AF Adder-
ley Fighting Tigers pulled
off a 38-29 decision over
the LW Young Golden
Eagles as Alex Rahming
scored 20. Desean

- Williams had 16 in the

loss.

@100jamz.com

OF



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wt wine

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Major ‘going to be a
id champion soon

ASS

International
sports
round-up



Former American Olympian Anthony

m@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter



IT’S only been a couple
days, but Meacher ‘Pain’
Major has settled back in
his training environment in
Hollywood, Florida and he’s
looking forward to bigger
and better things in the
future.

Training under the watch-
ful eyes of former Ameri-
can Olympian Anthony
‘Chills’ Wilson at the War-
riors Boxing Club, Major
went through his first spar-
ring session on Thursday
and he admitted that it was
a good feeling.

“Being in an environment
with the world class fight-

‘ers gives me~mieh-more

inspiration than being at

home,” said Major, who

fought in a series of match-
es with First Class Promo-
tions in the last two years.
“It makes you want to go
out there and push harder.”
Major, the Bahamas light-
weight champion, said with

“this being a new year, he

felt he needed to get in
more sparring than he

received at home in order .

to get to the next level in
the sport.

“If you keep on sparring
with the same guys over and
over, they will eventually
catch onto you,” he admit-
ted. “So I felt I needed
more improvement because
I know it will get harder and
harder in the ring, so I

needed the rough sparring
to get.ready for that.
“There’s always room for
improvement, so I just
wanted to get back over
here, get in tip top shape

and then gear up to fight in »

about two months. It’s a
process and I’m prepared to
go through it.”

Wilson said he’s excited
to have Major back in Flori-

- da.

“He’s going to be a world
champion soon,” Wilson
projected. “We have a great
training camp set up for
him, so look for some great
things for Meacher.”

Motivate

Having fought some of

the best fighters in the
world during his career,
Wilson said.he knows what
it takes to motivate a guy
like Major and he admitted
that he has already brought
his confidence level back
up.
“He’s like a champion is
supposed to look,” Wilson
reflected. “All it was is he
was missing his coach. He’s
comfortable and he looks
real good. And he’s going
to look even better as we
continue to work out.”

Wilson said Major has the

skills of a “pure boxer” and
based on his experience in
the ring, he intends to
“bring out his best and
make him a world champi-
on”.

“He’s a champion in my



eyes, but he’s looking even
better in the gym right now,
Come Monday, he will be
sparring with a Puerto
Rican national champion.
He will be getting some
quality sparring.”

But Wilson said he’s not
going to rush the time table
to get Major back in the
ring. He said he will defi-
nitely be working on putting
in a good month of sparring
and conditioning before he
competes around the end of
March.

“By the end of March or
April, look for him to be
back in the ring,” Wilson
projected. “I will have him
ready to fight at least once
or twice a month and get
him back on the right
track.”

Bhe -geal.according bidder
Wilson, is to have Major
fight some of the best fight-
ers in his class in a bid to
get him a world ranking and
eventually a world title shot.

“He’s got all the tools to
be a champion and we will
slowly work at getting him
there to fight for a title,” he
promised.

@ RIGHT: Meacher
‘Pain’ Major

m@ BELOW: Meacher —
‘Pain’. Majorsimaction.....
against Puerto Rico’s Cel-
stino Rodriquez in their
First Class Promotions’
main event bout last’

_ March.

‘Chills’ Wilson works with Bahamian boxer

- Eon al 3 ae Poke oe









UT aN DD OD ONO toe

The Masters Softball League will be in action this weekend at
the Archdeacon William Thompson Softball Park at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds. The games will get started at 11 a.m.
on Saturday and noon on Sunday.


















@ TRACK
BAAA’S RELAYS




Hot on the heels of the Odd Distance Track and Field Cham-
pionships that were held last weekend, the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Association will host its National High School
Relays today at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, starting at 1 p.m.






@ FOOTBALL
CAFL ACTION

The Commonwealth Ainerican Football League will be back
in action this weekend at the DW Davis playing field. On Sat-
urday at 1 p.m., the John Bull Jets will take on the Nassau
Sunburners. On Sunday at 1 p.m. the Orry J. Sands Pros will
play the Bombers. ~






m@ BASKETBALL
NPWBA DOUBLE HEADER

The New Providence Women’s Basketball Association will be
back in action tonight with a double header on tap at the DW
Davis Gymnasium. The first game is scheduled for 7 p.m. The
feature game will be played at 8:15 p.m.













@ CRICKET
JR LEAGUE




The Bahamas Cricket Association will host a junior league
today at the Columbus Primary School field, starting at 11am.






@ RUGBY
BRU ACTION

The Bahamas Rugby Union will be back in action today at the
Winton Rugby Pitch. The action will get underway at 1 p.m.



Prive ws we tiwa

wr UE MPANT, UAAINUA EE Oy Oe gy ee Ue



SPORTS



Jonathan Massie to miss
out on Tour of the Bahamas





@ CYCLING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHEN the Jeff Auto’s
Repair annual Tour de
Bahamas Cycling Classic is
staged next month around
the western end of the island,
one notable local cyclist will
be missing from the pelaton.

Jonathan Massie will have
to sit this year’s event out in
Atlanta, Georgia.

After getting married to
American Rachel in Novem-
ber, Massie has to remain in
the United States until
around March when his
paperwork will have been
sorted out.

Events

But he assured the public.

that once everything has
been cleared, he will be gear-
ing up to represent the
Bahamas at a couple of
upcoming international
events.

“T thought the paperwork

‘would have been processed

in time, but unfortunately it
won’t, so I won’t be there

this year,” he said. “It’s quite
a shame because I wanted to
be there to represent the
country.

“But it looks like it’s going
to be a great race because
some of my ex-teammates
from Colorado will be com-
ing down for the race. So it’s
a disappointment that I
won’t be there.”

Massie, however, said that
the goal is for him to come
back home to compete in the
Bahamas Cycling Federa-
tion’s, National Cycling
Championships in July.

And in the meantime, he
is preparing himself to rep-
resent the country at the
World B Championships in
South Africa in July, the Pan
American Games in Rio
Brazil in August and the
Caribbean Championships in
October.

Currently unattached,
Massie is looking at the pos-
sibility of linking up ‘with
some of the clubs in Atlanta
with the view of joining one
of them and competing there
in the Georgia Cup Race
Series.

“I’m just going to be racing

regionally in the South East-
ern Conference and go to
Colorado for a little stint as I
prepare for those interna-
tional meets,” he revealed.
“So that is my focus this
year.”

Massie is anxious to get
back on track after having
some mechanical problems
at the Commonwealth
Games in Melbourne, Aus-
tralia last year.

Crash

He also had a crash at the
Central American and
Caribbean Games in Carta-
gena, Colombia.

“I came up to Atlanta and
I started doing some running
so that I could develop a new
focus for this year,” he stat-
ed.

“Hopefully what I do this
year, especially at the World
B Championships, .will help
me to qualify for the
Olympic Games next year.”

If he does qualify for the
Olympics in Shanghai, Chi-

_ ha, Massie will become the

first Bahamian to achieve
that feat in cycling.

B& JONATHAN MASSIE will miss out on the Tour of the Bahamas but expects it to be a great race

Michael Jordan Celebrity
_ Invitational Golf Tournament



@ ACTOR Kurt Russell tees
off from the Ist hole at the Ocean

Club Golf Course for the 6th

Annual Michael Jordan Celebrity

Invitational Golf Tournament.
(Photo: Tim Aylen)













ANGIE EVERHART celebrates

a putt on the 17th green at the Ocean
Club Golf Course for the 6th Annual

Michael Jordan Celebrity Invitational
: Golf Tournament.

(Photo: Tim Aylen)















WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU = Today: NE at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles TPF
Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles TF
FREEPORT Today: N at 7-14 Knots _ _ 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles Tee













“44/6 29/8, c






















Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles FEE

. ; ABACO Today: N at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles TF

Partly sunny. Mainly clear; breezy Partly sunny and Warm with clouds + Warm with periods of Mostly cloudy,a | The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles (IER
late. - - breezy. and sun. sun. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.








High: 80° High: 82° ~~ High: 82° High: 80° saa TPS po
High: 80° Low: 67° Low: oS 4° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 59°

eM erate ac ae











































rN As RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Yaa rag TAA Uae aly AccuWeather RealFeel
80° F a | 78°-70° F [| 83°-73° Fi 87°-73° F 85°-73° F }
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 8:29am. 2.9 2:01am. -0.4

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the aay. 8:47p.m. 25 2:44p.m. -0.4

Sunday 9:14am. 29 2:51am. -0.4
mes pau cs eee 9:34pm. 2.6 3:27 p.m. -0.5
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday ~ 1000am. 28 342am. -04

; : Monday 4 ‘ i 4.
ABACO Temperature 10:24pm. 2.7 4:11pm. -0.5











68/20 46/7 ©
















‘ High ..... 82° F/28° C 5

High: 77° F/25° C : Bee C Tuestay 10:48am. 26° 45am. 03

Low:63°F/17°C | ae im , EA 1116pm. 27 4:57pm. -04 Ss
Normal low 65° F/18° C



Last year’s high . 79° F/26° C




, WEST PALM BEACH











High: 76°F/24°G —— Last year’s low 69° F/20°.C
Low:62°FA7°C Precipitation Sunrise ..... 6:56 a.m. Moonrise. .... 8:13 a.m.
AS Of 1 p.m. yesterday aise 0.03” Sunset, . 5:46 p.m. Moonset... . . 7:33 p.m.
















Year to date ................ fetesrenze soveteteadstey? vee 0.51” .
High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date ......essscsssssssescessesnieseeees 1.08” lb oo ae
Low:61°F/16°C
AccuWeather.com
All forecasts and maps provided by Be [NN] Showers “5 Miami
ELEUTHERA : AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 23/-5 19/-7 sn [<8] T-storms : ge 78/65
Z Z Flan O40 e : [ao R Rain Fronts
Ze NASSAU g ee: ey ner: S [«~* ].Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and on
eS Z High: 80° F/27° 6 vo 70 F/21°C Pee Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm MienMenfis



Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary a



Lower" 21°C



KEY WEST




CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26° C High: 81° F/27°C
Low:6S°F/21°C i. : ic
7 eo 88/31 74/23 pc












AT EXUMA » SAN SALVADOR
= & Sscarrare
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS" LZ Low: 70° F/21°G
highs and tonights's lows. High: 81° F/27°C :
Low: 72° F/22°C









Albuquerque —
Anchorage

Sunday MAYAGUANA
High Low W Ee _ High:85°F/29°C
Fe FIC aii FA c a Fi ee —___ bow:72°F/22°C

— AN/5 22/-5
24/-4 13/-10 sf
‘46/7 40/4 +
35/1 23/-5 pc
84 27/-2 sn
30/-1 20/-6 pc









RAGGEDISLAND — Ttigh:85" Fi2a"e sii
High: 83° F/28° CG Low:72°F/22°G

Low: 68° F/20°C



Atlantic City 19/

Boston

43/6







Little Ro
Los Angeles













GREAT INAGUA
High: 85° F/29° G
Low: 71° F/22°G

57/13 50/10 +
297-4 = 20/-6 sn
oe 2 2h 6 sn



a
48/8 34/1 ¢





68/20 57/13 i ges : = Ges
6 Winnipeg 22/-5 13/-10 sf 17/-8 2/-16 sf

55/12 32/0 po 59/15 32/0 pc
: ; : Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Washington,DC 40/4 24/-4 s 36/2 27/-2 sn storms, r-rain, sf-snow fiurries, sn-snow,.i-ice, Prop-precipitation, Tr-trace











80/26 66/18 pc
EBT AGE Oe

a8 pec
115s!

Tucson





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 3







In brief

Shane Gilson to
be challenged
to public debate

IMMIGRATION Min-
ister Shane Gibson is to
be challenged to a public
debate by the men con-
testing his Golden Gates
seat in the general elec-
tion.

Independent candidate
Clever Duncombe said he
and FNM representative
Don Saunders are ready
to face the minister “any
place, any time” on the
public platform.

“We met on Monday
and we both agreed that
we want an issue-based
campaign,” Mr Dun-
combe told The Tribune
yesterday.

‘We don’t want any
mud-slinging, and we shall
be inviting the minister to
come along. It’s possible
he won’t show up, but you
only need two people to
have a debate.”

The call is in line with
Mr Duncombe’s belief
that all election candi-
dates should be subjected
to public debates before
the people go to the polls.

He said such a process
was essential if the coun-
try is to avoid electing
“makeweight” candidates
on party lines.

Too many current PLP
MPs are sub-standard,
according to Mr Dun-
combe, because they have
not been subjected to
proper scrutiny.

Man arrested:

in connection
with shotgun
lliscovery

“A 39-YEAR-OLD man
was arrested in connection
with the discovery of a 12-
gauge shotgun.

The police reportedly
discovered the gun, which
they believed to be unli-
cenced, while executing a
search warrant.

According to Inspector
Walter Evans, sometime
after lam on Thursday,
Central Detective Unit
officers searched a house in
- Western New Providence.

During the search, a
shotgun and 23 shells were
recovered.

Arrest after
Withesses report
someone ‘attempting
to open vehicles’

AN 18-YEAR-OLD
man was arrested on
Wednesday after witness-
es reported seeing some-
one “attempting to open
Nissan Sentra and Sunny
vehicles” at the Mall at
Marathon around 8pm.

According to police
press liaison officer Wal-
ter Evans, officers
observed a man “acting in
a suspicious manner”.

The officers also confis-
cated a key for a Nissan
vehicle.

_ The government
$100,000 to Fox Hill Clinic

Fred Mitchell: donation is
an investment in the future

THE government donated
$100,000 to the Fox Hill Clin-
ic yesterday in what MP for
the area Fred Mitchell
described as an investment in
the future.

Mr Mitchell noted that pri-
mary health care is a wise
investment, considering the
obvious expense connected
with health care later in life.

“The saying is a gram of pre-
vention is worth a kilogram of
cure,” he said. “This gift will
no doubt help children to
focus on how they can take
care of their health so that they
can be more productive citi-
zens, making healthy choices
for both their physical and
mental health.”

He said such choices might
lead to the next generation
going into adulthood “without
the spectre of breast cancer,
prostate cancer, hypertension
and diabetes looming over
their heads” and affecting their
productivity.

“IT am happy therefore on
behalf of the Fox Hill village,
and this entire community to
thank the benefactors for this
significant and important gift
to our community. I thank the
minister of health and his team
for thinking of Fox Hill as the
recipient of the gift. I know
that it will serve the commu-
nity well,” Mr Mitchell said.

He said that as the repre-
sentative of the area, his “first
area of concentration” has
been the community’s chil-
dren.

Mr Mitchell pointed out that
if he and Minister of Health
Bernard Nottage were to trav-

_el around the historic village
:, together, the minister would

see*“the children call me Fred
Mitchell as if it is one word. -~

“Last Christmas as we were
having our end of term treat
for the children and teachers
of the school, they called me
‘Daddy Mitchell’. I am obvi-
ously thrilled at their approval
but more importantly for me, I

FNM candidate claims
MP has done little to
advance Fox Hill culture |

PLP representative Fred
Mitchell has done little to
advance the culture of Fox
Hill, FNM candidate for the
area Dr Jacinta Higgs told
attendants at a rally Thurs-
day. 7:

“For 4 and a half years, as
the Fox Hill Congos attempt-
ed to provide a.wholesome
environment for young peo-
ple, especially the men of our
community, letters upon let-
ters were written to our MP
for assistance,” she said. “I
know because the letters were
written by me, and signed by
the leader of the group.

“And as I stand here under
these silk cotton trees, I tell
you that while I served as the
public relations cfficer for the

hope it is a signal to me that all
650 children in Sandilands Pri-
mary School know that in this
representative they have
someone who cares for their
every need, and who believes
with all his heart that the
investment in them is an
investment in the future of this
country,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said that his sec-
ond focus is the community’s
economic and social well-
being.

“Great care and attention
have been paid to ensuring

that all who cannot afford it

will have something to eat, will
have adequate shelter and that
their social needs are met
through the Urban Renewal
programme.”

He noted, for example, that

both the Urban Renewal —

office and the clinic are in con-
tact with senior citizens, and
that there will be a formal
organisation formed for them
soon.

“There is a programme of
visitation and social activities
to ensure that no senior feels
isolated within the communi-
ty,” he said. “This clinic is a
part of that effort. I have a
strong affection for this clinic
and its staff. I am not a

. stranger to them and they are

not to me.

“Before I got in this job in
2002, there were those who
threatened to close this
clinic. The people of Fox Hill
were upset up at the sugges-
tion.

“This clinic was one they
had come to depend on in
times of emergency and for

routine medical care. I take ~

great pride in putting a stop
to that decision.

“And I am happy that in the
present dispensation, the clin-
ic is still here to provide the
routine primary health care for
the people of the Fox Hill vil-
lage and that extra care and
comfort for the community
generally,” he said.

However, the tradition was
broken this year when inmates
from Her Majesty's Prison
came and decorated the park
with a tiny Christmas tree.

“I am not against the pris-
oners working because this is
one of the ways in which they
repay their debt to society,
However, I ask you the great
people of Fox Hill, is this what
you expected when you were
promised hope, help, and
community empowerment?”
Dr Higgs asked. .

She said that as Sandilands
Primary School has produced
some of the most productive
citizens in the Bahamas, it is
“high time” that the primary
school be outfitted with the





TM GeO LUM ROC)

@ THE first Honorary Consul of the Bahamas to India, Ashish Saraf, (left) receives his com-
mission and letter of appointment from the Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Public Ser- [â„¢
vice Fred Mitchell. At right is Marilyn Zonicle, head of International Relations Division. _|

FNM hopeful for Fox Hill claims

donates




(BIS photo by Raymond A Bethel)

many PLPs have left Mitchell’s camp

MANY PLPs - including former campaign gen-
eral the Fox Hill branch chairman Larry Wilmott —
have left Fred Mitchell's camp, FNM hopeful for the
area Dr Jacinta Higgs revealed.

Dr Higgs was speaking at an FNM rally in Fox
Hill on Thursday night, where she pointed out that
she also left the PLP — to join the FNM — because
she wanted to serve the area in parliament.

She along with others realised that the grass was
greener on the other side of the fence, the candidate
said.

“Not only is the grass in PLP’s camp burnt and
dried, but also their vision is too blurry,” Dr Higgs
said. ,

She said that Mr Mitchell’s agenda is not about
improving the quality of life and building a solid
future for those in the Fox Hill constituency; rather
it is about him.

“I wish to say to those persons who voted for
the PLP for better — and know that we did not get
what we voted for — to get out as well. Come with
me on the side of better,” Dr Higgs said.

She said that it was time for Fox Hillians to com-
pare what they were promised on the one hand
and what they received on the other.

“I ask you to open up your receiving hand and if
that hand is an empty as mine, its time to make a

change. I can stand here all evening and give exam-
ple after example after example to show why I am
running as the FNM candidate against a man I
worked hard for and with,” the Fox Hill candidate
said.

Dr Higgs said that in four and a half years, Mr
Mitchell has failed to learn the true meaning, and
the true essence of good, wholesome representation
— for the people and by the people.

She asked the constituents not to give Mr Mitchell
another chance in the House of Assembly because
of his unfulfilled promises.

“Fox Hill. You know me. I am your sister. I am
your cousin. I am the one you went to school with.
Iam the one you played with. I am the one who you
helped and who helped you.

“I am the one whe trained your children and

‘ young people in Sunday school, the Girl Guides
and Youth Groups.

“TI am the one who mentored many adult learners
in Fox Hill and in this country.

“T offer you my service as the Free National
Movement candidate in the upcoming elections.
The election is not about me; it is about you. Fox
Hill, I trust you to make the right decision for your-
selves, for your children for your community and for
your country,” she said.



most technologically advanced
resources to prepare the chil-
dren for the challenges of the
21st century.

“I was deeply saddened to
read in the newspaper that
Sandilands Primary School
was one of the lowest ranking
primary schools in New Prov-
idence. It is time, ladies and
gentlemen, for Saridilands pri-
mary school to return to its
former days of glory.

“Please take the politics out
of our schools. If our children
are to improve their perfor-
mance and compete with chil-
dren from all over the world,
we must improve our educa-
tional standards in our
schools,” Dr Higgs said.



| approach}tollifeyevangelistic’ Templejisajolace)
JWwherejpeopleldiscover.Goa)

SUNDAY SERVICES.

Sunday School or alages... 9.45am.
Adult Education sn. A



ola atU bale)
Mol LU SUL




loming Worship Service ....... 8.30 am, ~

group, our MP did not count ‘Womhio Sanice. PS OMe
us worthy to help the Congos OS. ep sence ESA EARS \1.00.an.
find sponsors,” she said. ‘The Mall-at-Marathon Evening Worship Service ws SAN
Now during this election [{& BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY _ Eau oer SUMINEE 200. OA
year, Dr Higgs noted, Mr EFFECTIVE JANUARY 19TH, 2007 oa Winter .. 6.30 p.m.
Mitchell was able to find a [yaonmocoame —____ew| 0 [241 [un Tere [ea | WEDN@SDAY at 7:30 p.m.
sponsor at the last minute. THE HITCHER NEW ois [825 | 1080 | Selective Bible Teaching oe

“Unfortunately, the funds
were not made available early
enough for the young men to
properly organise themselves
and show their creative spirits.

STOMP THE YARD

ARTHUR AND THE INVISIBLES
PRIMEVAL

ALPAH BOG

Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Misslonettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.



Your However, he found it politi- ODE NAME: THE CLEANER t Youth Ministry Meeting
cally prudent to hold cow bells
nevs in his hands and pretend to RADIO MINISTRY

rush with the Congos
junkanoo group during the
Emancipation Day and Box-
ing Day parades for his usual
photo ops,” she said.

Dr Higgs added that for
years, the Fox Hill Festival
Committee held its Tree
Lighting Ceremony and took
pride in decorating the
parade.

She said that this tradition
used to be carried out by
excited, native Fox Hillians.

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME”

a]

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM
THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS
BLOOD DIAMOND

i The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

j making news in their

| neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

i good cause, campaigning

| for improvements in the

/ area or have won an

} award.

W If so, call us on 322-1986

{ and share your story.

Visit Our Premise Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

QURLE:
THE HITCHER
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Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O. Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org












REREATETHIN ERSTE RET EMIT



Meet







SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

° See
page
seven



PRICE — 75¢
‘Major in
Welt

Administrator ‘gun threat’ claim

Council member & peareePreT for prayer at Boys Day Retreat
alleges his life —

was threatened
in front of police

@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter



A DISTRICT council mem-
ber in Bimini has filed a for-
mal complaint against the
island administrator for
allegedly threatening his life
with a handgun in front of
police officers, The Tribune
learned yesterday.

Mr Lloyd Edgecombe said
that when he asked the local
police what they would do
about the matter, he was told
that it was “above their heads”
and that they could not arrest
the administrator, Mr Joseph
Ferguson.

Calls to Mr Ferguson for
comment on the matter were
not answered up to press time
yesterday. However, it is
understood that Mr Ferguson,
in his own right, has also
lodged a complaint against Mr
Edgecombe.

Reportedly, the dispute
escalated from a “casual”
meeting between Mr Fergu-
son and Mr Edgecombe over
an environmental contract for
garbage collection.

Since then, Mr Edgecombe
has issued a formal notice to
the permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Local Government
and Consumer Affairs, Mr
Harrison Thompson, giving
him a full account of the inci-
dent.

The letter reads as follows:
- “Yesterday, during a meet-
ing with Mr Ferguson, we had
a verbal confrontation where
he proceeded to threaten my
life in front of four police offi-
cers. Mr Ferguson went home,
got his gun, and came back to
the government compound
brandishing his gun where
some employees were terri-
fied.

“In a local bar next to the
compound the administrator
went and sat at the bar where
he placed his gun in the open
on the bar. Later in the
evening he pulled up in the
government vehicle to a store
where I was and threatened
my life for the second time,”
the letter read.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday Mr Edgecombe said
that he has reported the mat-
ter to the local police in Bimi-
ni where he was informed that
they were unable to make a
complaint against the admin-
istrator.

‘“T have lodged a formal
complaint with Mr (Elliston)

: said,

Greenslade in Freeport who
informed me that he would be
sending officers to investigate
this matter,” he said.

Speaking with The Tribune,
Mr Greenslade, the assistant
commissioner of police in
Grand Bahama, said that he
has dispatched an officer from
Grand Bahama to look into
the matter. .

“T have afforded both gen-
tlemen due course according
to the law. The police are in.
fact looking into the matter,
and I have instructed one of
my inspectors from the Cen-
tral Detective Unit (CDU)
here in Freeport, to personal-

SEE page 11

New potential buyer _
for Royal Oasis; govt to
meet representatives —

@ By KARIN HERIG i
Tribune Staff Reporter

(OPE) Tamar tril igor

THE purchase process of the stricken Grand Bahama ie

resort Royal Oasis may soon see significant steps towards
completion as government is expected to meet with rep- ;
resentatives of a new potential buyer this week.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Minister of }
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe revealed that although talks :
are ongoing with the Florida-based World Investments ;
Holdings, government hopes that the Harcourt Develop-. ;
ers group will come through with an acceptable proposal ;
to buy the Royal Oasis resort. i

“They’ve expressed an interest before and they would ;
be fantastic for Grand Bahama. i

“We are meeting with the chairman of Harcourt when ;
he comes to the Bahamas this week,” Mr Wilchcombe :

Government chose to resume negotiations with Har- :
court Developers as part of a contingency plan in case }
World Investments Holdings failed to complete its pur-
chase of the property. i

World Investments Holdings had split as a group after :

SEE pagell So



MASTUDENT front
Woodcock Primary School -
prays during the Boys Pay
Retreat at St. Paul's

* SEE PAGE FIGHI

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

FNM Fox Hill candidate
claims Mitchell giving out

govt job application forms.

FNM Fox Hill hopeful Dr Jacinta Higgs said that
over the last few weeks, she has received hundreds of i
i phone calls informing her that Fred Mitchell is driving.
around the area giving out government employment }
i application forms to PLP supporters.
i Dr Higgs made the charge at an FNM rally in Fox |
: Hill on Thursday. : i
“The few of you who may get a job, I beg you, }
: please do not be fooled by these stop gaps, month-to- ;
i month jobs. They are only being offered as bait to }
! secure votes and not to empower the young people. |
i They are nothing but gimmicks, and sheer political i

ploys.

name or the other,” she said.

All of these young persons, mainly young women, Dr }
Higgs said, were mothers and had families to provide }
: and care for. i
“Yet, they did not receive one dime for the demand- ;

SEE page 11

Gay rights concerns over Dontestic Violence Act

: “During the launching of the Urban Renewal project |
: here in Fox Hill many of our young people were filled |
with hope and excitement as they flocked to the centre {
i to become Wardens or Marshals or Deputies or some }



Bacteria fears at
PMH Dialysis Unit

FEARS of the bacteria known as staphylococcus aureus
(staph) has resurfaced in the Dialysis Unit of the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Despite assurances that the bacteria problem at the
hospital was improving, one patient who receives treat-
ment at that unit claimed the problem is in fact becoming

i worse.

The patient, who wished to remain anonymous, fears
the bacteria may enter her system and cause “complica-
tions.”

Several deaths have been unofficially linked to the
bacteria floating around the unit.

However, medical officer Dr Patrick Whitfield, in an
earlier interview, maintained that the loss of life was not
necessarily caused by the bacteria.

Explaining that the patients were already suffering
from other diseases, he said it would not be fair to iden-
tify the bacteria as the cause of death.

According to hospital officials, the staff are working
feverishly to diminish the presence of the bacteria in the
dialysis unit.

The Tribune attempted to reach Dr Whitfield, as well as
the managing director of the Hospital Authority for a
response to the patient’s claim, but calls were not returned:
up to press time.



@ By BRENT DEAN



WHILE applauding the spirit of the
proposed Domestic Violence Act, gay
rights activists say they are concerned
about the lack of protection for same-
sex relationships.

The act would expand protections
within domestic situations beyond mar-
riage. However, it only refers to rela-
tionships between men and a women
in a common law relationships, or those
living together in such a manner.

The controversy around this defini-
tion emerged, as same-sex co-habitants
are not specifically included under the
protections of the act.


















Public spokesperson for the Rainbow
Alliance Bahamas, Ms Erin Greene,
commended the government for creat-
ing a gender neutral document and for
making efforts to protect vulnerable
communities in the Bahamas.

However, Ms Greene stated:
“Although the act may provide recourse
for homosexuals under its other provi-
sions, it is unfair to create protection
for persons involved in heterosexual
relationships and do not provide the
same and equal protections for homo-
sexual couples. Forcing homosexuals to
rely on other statutory instruments for
their protection does not provide
recourse for emotional and psycholog-

ical abuse, nor financial abuse.”

“If the purpose of the act is to protect
people in intimate relationships that are
not defined by law, then to not make
specific and explicit provisions for gay
people is unconstitutional,” she said.

When questioned regarding his views
on the expansion of domestic violence
legislation to non-married individuals,
and not to same-sex cohabitants, senior
pastor of Kingdom Life Church, Cedric
Moss stated: “I think as the law is, the
government obviously is trying to take
into account the realities of the day and
I think it is appropriate to include those
relationships where individuals are liv-
ing together in an intimate fashion. |

suppose the reason that the government
has not included same-sex relationships
is that there is no case for it. I don’t
think that same-sex cohabitation is
widespread. I don’t think that it is —
certainly from my vantage point - and I
would have to assume that because
there was no provision to address it, or
to include it with others, the govern-
ment does not see a need.”

When asked specifically for an opin-
ion on whether the proposed bill should
cover existing same-sex cohabitants,
Pastor Moss stated: “They are individ-

SEE page 11









@ TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

SIXTH-SEEDED Andy,

Roddick outlasted Marat Safin
7-6 (2), 2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (2) Friday to
reach the fourth round of the
Australian Open.

Safin, the 2005 champion and
former world No. 1, was seeded
only 26th as he comes back
from a knee injury that kept
him from defending his title last
year. That meant one of the
highly ranked players would
have to face him early in the
two-week tournament.

Roddick drew the unenviable
task and showed his confidence

is high again after a malaise that _

dropped him out of the top 10
last year before he convinced
Jimmy Connors to coach him.

“The one guy you don’t want
to play in the third round is
probably him,” Roddick said.
“There wasn’t a whole lot
between us, to be honest. I just
tried to tough him out.

“He’s one of the best in the
world, so I definitely had to pick
up my game-in-the third and
fourth sets. Anything less than
that and I would probably
would be going home.”

Serena Williams, also plagued
by a bad knee last year and
unseeded after winning here in
2005, rallied after No. 5 Nadia
Petrova served for the match at
6-1, 5-3, showing that she still
has superb skills and a strong
will to win.

Top-ranked Roger Federer
had an easier time against 25th-
seeded Mikhail Youzhny, beat-
ing last year’s U.S. Open semi-
finalist 6-3, 6-3, 7-6 (5).

Second-seeded Amelie Mau-
resmo, the defending women’s
champion, beat Eva Birnerova
and next plays Lucie Safarova,
who advanced when Anastasiya
Yakimova retired with a back
injury. Other women’s winners
were No. 3 Svetlana Kuznetso-
va, No. 7 Elena Dementieva,
No. 10 Nicole Vaidisova and
No. 16 Shahar Peer.

For more than three hours,
Roddick and Safin exchanged
130 mph-plus serves, stinging
groundstrokes, crisp volleys and
deft drops, leaving the packed
stadium enthralled and
applauding every point.

Both players were dripping
with sweat on a still, muggy
night that had people in the
crowd fanning themselves. The
roof had to be closed due to a



i ANDY RODDICK

Roddick, Serena Wi
—round; Federer and Maurest







Poco cig

Mi RUSSIA'S Marat Safin left, argues with chair umpive Pascal Maria from France durin:

Bae



& SERENA WILLIAMS



tennis tournament in Melbourne, Friday, Jan. 19, 2007. Roddick won in four sets 7-6 2-6 6-4 7-6

light rain, and Satin complained
bitterly that the court hadn’t
been dried up enough when
play resumed, earning a warn-
ing for an audible obscenity.

Safin later said he was unhap-
py wet patches remained out-
side the doubles lines.

“Tt was a joke. It was really,
really pathetic,” Safin said.
“Why I have to put my health in
doubt? If 1 slip and if I get
injured and if something hap-
pens...”

Roddick wasn’t sure the con-
troversy affected Safin’s play.

“With Marat, you know he’s
going to kind of go on the emo-
tional roller coaster a little bit,
but [ don’t know if that hurts
him often,” said Roddick, who



now faces No. 9 Mario Ancic. “I
was just feeling like I should be
even keel éut there tonight.
There was enough emotion in
the air.”

With Connors watching from
courtside after flying in follow-
ing the death of his mother,
Roddick showed his new
aggressiveness, charging the net
after good serves and short balls
from Safin, though he did get a
bit more tentative as the match
wore on and he was passed a
number of times.

Safin left everything he had
on the court, including a bit of
skin. He fell and scraped the
fingers on his right hand, and
had to have treatment for a
bloodied pinkie.

Williams’ 1-6, 7-5, 6-3 victory
over Petrova was impressive for
a woman who dropped out of
the top 100 for the first time
since 1997 before climbing back
to 95th in the year-end rank-
ings.

She was shocked to hear she
had beaten a top-10 player for
the first time since she downed
Mauresmo in the final here two
years ago for her seventh Grand
Slam title.

“Has it been that long? That’s
a terrible stat,” Williams said,
shaking her head in disbelief,

Petrova never has reached
the final of a major, but she
raced through the first set and
was serving for the match at 5-3
in the second. Then Williams

@ ROGER FEDERER

lliams into fourth







found another gear.

“I really had no other option
than for my game to go up,”
Williams said. “I was down 3-5
and on the verge of being out of
the tournament, and I obvious-
ly didn’t want that to happen. |
told myself just to stay in there
and do what I had been prac-
ticing and it'll come together
sooner or later.

“T think the more pressure J
get, the tougher I get.”

Some have questioned
Williams’ fitness. There were
no questions after outlasting
Petrova.

“LT wasn’t tired at all. I’m still
not tired. I feel like going to run
a marathon,” Williams said,
laughing.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ AMELIE MAURESMO





g his third round match against Andy Roddick of the U.S. at the Australian Open

(AP Photo/Andrew Brownbill)

Williams will face No. 11 Jele-
na Jankovic — a 6-3, 6-4 winner
over Victoria Azarenka — on
Sunday.

Federer, bidding for a 10th
major, extended his winning
streak to 32 matches — and 10
straight at Melbourne Park. He
next faces 14th-seeded Novak
Djokovic, who beat Thailand’s
Danai Udomchoke.

Mardy Fish advanced when
veteran Wayne Arthurs retired
while trailing 3-0 in the first,
Also winning were No. 7 Tom-
my Robredo and No. 16 David
Ferrer, No, 18 Richard Gasquet
beat Gael Monfils 6-0, 4-6, 7-5,
6-3 ina match between two for-
mer world No, | juniors from
France.



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PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

Fully fit Liverpool face
champions Chelsea





ee er er

*@ eer’

Yr ey wee

m@SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

A BRIEF look at upcoming
Premier League matches (home
teams listed first; league posi-
tions in parentheses):

@ SATURDAY
Liverpool (3) vs. Chelsea (2)

Liverpool manager Rafael
Benitez has a fully fit squad,
with his only dilemma deciding
which of his three strikers will
start. Midfielder Boudewijn
Zenden (knee) returned to
training from a long-term injury,
while winger Mark Gonzalez
(shin) is still likely to miss out.

Chelsea midfielder Claude
Makelele is suspended, while
defender John Terry continues
to recover from back surgery.
(Midfielder Joe Cole (foot) is a
long-term absentee and defend-
er Khalid Boulahrouz (knee) is
also missing. Goalkeeper Peter
Cech could play for the first
time since fracturing his skull
in October.

Aston Villa (15)
vs. Watford (20)

Aston Villa midfielder Stil-
ian Petrov (hamstring) won't
play, while on-loan defender
Phil Bardsley could make his
debut since joining from Man-
chester United earlier this
month.

Defender Aaron Hughes is
questionable.

Watford striker Ashley |

Young is questionable to play
with a transfer to Villa immi-
nent. Defender Dan Shittu
(ankle) is questionable, while
defenders James Chambers
(ankle) and Clarke Carlisle
(thigh) join striker Marlon King
(knee) on the sidelines.

Fulham (13)
vs. Tottenham (8)

Fulham center backs Zat
Knight (broken jaw) and Ian
Pearce (groin) could feature
after returning to training this
week. United States midfielder
Clint Dempsey is lacking match
fitness, and long-term injuree
Jimmy Bullard (knee) is out.
Senegal midfielder Papa Bou-
ba Diop isn't listed in the squad,
while Wayne Routledge is on
loan from Spurs and cannot
play. Goalkeeper Antti Niemi is
still recovering from a neck
injury. |

Tottenham captain Ledley
King (foot) and midfielder Jer-
maine Jenas (ankle) are miss-
ing. Striker Mido (groin) and
Canada defender Paul Stal-
teri (hip) are questionable.



Middlesbrough (14) °
vs. Bolton (5)

Middlesbrough captain
George Boateng (knee) is a
game-time decision. Defenders
Andrew Taylor and Emanuel
Pogatetz (minor injuries) will
return after missing the 4-3 EFA
Cup third-round win over Hull.

Bolton captain Kevin Nolan
(rib) may play after missing last
week's scoreless draw at home
to Manchester City. Midfielder
Abdoulaye Faye returns from
suspension and striker Kevin
Davies (Achilles) will be avail-
able.

Newcastle (11)
vs. West Ham (18)





Neweastle midfielder Scott
Parker returns from suspension.
Fullback Stephen Carr (foot)
could be available for the first
time in iwo months.

Midficider Emre (calf) is
doubtful, while Damien Dutf,
Michael Owen and Charles
N'Zogbia (all Knee injuries),
Shola Ameobi and Oliver
Bernard (both hip), Celestine
Babayaro and Craig Moore
(both hamstring) and Titus
Brainble (calf) are still out.

West Ham defender Calum
Davenport could make his
debut after joining from Tot-
tenham on Thursday. Center
back Anton Ferdinand could
return, while defenders Danny
Gabidon and James Collins are
both out. Strikers Carlos Tevez



(calf) and Bobby Zamora (sus-
pension) are missing

Portsmouth (6)
vs. Charlton (19)

New signing Lauren —~ who
hasn't played in more than a
year following knee surgery —
could replace midfielder Gary
O'Neil, who is suspended. Mid-
fielder Niko Kranjcar (ankle)
is doubtful and forward
Lomana LuaLua (thigh) is still
a week away from playing
again.

Charlton midfielder Andy
Reid (hamstring) is out, but full-
back Osei'Sankofa (suspension)
will be available. England strik-
er Darren Bent (knee) and cap-
tain Luke Young (knee) are



@ LIVERPOOL striker, Peter Crouch, centre,
BCU Eves eer COU te
Craig Bellamy and Dirl Kuyt, right, during their
English Premier League soccer match against
_ Watford at Vicarage Road, Watford, England.
Saturday,

likely to return for next week's
games.

Reading (9) vs.
Shetfield United (16)

Reading striker Shane Long
(thigh) and defender Graeme
Murty (groin) are game-time

* decisions. Striker Kevin Doyle

and midfielder Brynjar Gun-
narsson (both hamstring) are
out, but striker Dave Kitson and
winger Bobby Convey (both
knee) will rejoin the squad.
Sheffield United is missing
new signings Luton Shelton
(international clearance) and
Matthew Kilgallon (ankle), but
defender Mamadou Seck is
available. Midfielder Mikele
Leigertwood (ankle) is still out



, 2007. Liverpool take on
___ Chelsea this weekend.
'Photo/Simon Dawson)

and skipper Chris Morgan is °
suspended. Goalkeeper Paul |

Gerrard is expected to start



4

ahead of the injured Paddy °

Kennedy.

Manchester City (10)
vs. Blackburn (12)

Manchester City midfielder
Joey Barton is suspended.
Defenders Nedum Onuoha and
Hatem Trabelsi (both ham-
string) are missing, while
defender Sun Jihai (hamstring)
and midfielder Dietmar
Hamann (back) could return
after training with the reserves
this week. ;

Blackburn midfielder David
Bentley returns from suspen-
sion. New signing David Dunn
is unlikely to play due to lack of
match fitness. Forward Paul
Gallagher (groin) is doubtful.

MSUNDAY
Wigan (17) vs. Everton (7)

Wigan is without defender
Arjan de Zeeuw (toe), forward
Henri Camara and midfielder
Paul Scharner (both knee).
Andreas Granqvist (flu) and
Antonio Valencia (hamstring)
could both be available.

Everton midfielder Mikel
Arteta'returns from suspension.
Defenders Nuno Valente
(knee) and Tony Hibbert
(groin) are missing.

Arsenal (4) vs.
Manchester United (1)

Arsenal midfielder Gilberto
Silva is suspended, while for-
ward Robin van Persie (ankle)
is questionable. Midfielder
Mathieu Flamini, striker
Emmanuel Adebayor (thigh),
and fullback Emmanuel Eboue
(ankle) are expected to play.
Fredrik Ljungberg (hamstring)
and William Gallas (thigh)
remain long-term injuries.

Manchester United has no
new injury worries, though
defender Wes Brown is battling
a Virus.

m@ MANCHESTER United's
Wayne Rooney, left, and Aston
Villa's Gary Cahill battle for
the ball during the English Pre-
miership soccer match at Old
Trafford, Manchester, England
Saturday Jan. 13, 2007.

(AP Photo/
PA, Martin Rickett)



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5B



ey ] ) | |

@ PAKISTAN'S Shoaib Akhtar delivers a ball on the first day of a second test match against South
Africa at St. Georges Park, in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, Friday, Jan. 19, 2007.

Pakistan lead by













i PAKISTAN'S Shoaib Akhtar, left, fields his own ball as South Africa's Andr Nel, right, looks on
during a first day of a second test match at St. Georges Park, in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, Friday,
(AP Photo/Obed Zilwa) Jan. 19, 2007.

(AP Photo/Obed Zilwa)

11 on 135-6 after

dismissing South Africa for 124

@ CRICKET
PORT ELIZABETH,
South Africa
Associated Press

MAKHAYA NTINI took
four wickets Friday for Pakistan
to reach 135 for six in reply to
South Africa's 124 at stumps on
day one of the second of three
tests.

Ntini took two wickets before
tea and then dismissed Yasir

‘Hameed straight after the break
to leave Pakistan on 19-3. The
South African quick ended up
with figures of four for 18 off 10
overs.

Earlier, Shoaib Akhtar took
four for 36 and Danish Kaneria.
three for 36. Mark Boucher top-
scored with 35, while South
Africa captain Graeme Smith
had.28 and Jacques Kallis 24.

Smith won the toss and elect-
ed to bat at St George's Park,
but the hosts were in trouble
when A.B de Villiers attempt-
ed to pull a short-pitched deliv-
ery from Shoaib and edged to
wicketkeeper Akmal for 2.

Hashim Amla also played a

_ bad shot, attempting to glance
a short-pitched delivery down
the leg side when on 5. He suc-
ceeded only in getting a glove
to it for Akmal to take another
catch.

Smith started to attack Kane-
ria when he was brought on to
bowl, but, after hitting him down
the ground for four, he misread
a googly and edged the ball.
Akmal palmed it up and Younis
took an easy catch to dismiss
Smith for 28.

Prince got a second chance
‘when Akmal missed a simple
chance from an edge off the
bowling of Sami, but two balls
later edged again, this time
straight to Mohammad Hafeez
at first slip to depart for 2

Gibbs then ‘missed a sweep
against Kaneria's spin to be out

‘ leg-before-wicket for 2.

South Africa went to lunch at
64-5, but 19 runs later Kallis
edged a ball from Akhtar to

4

Akmal.

Boucher fell edging Kaneria
to Younis at slip, while Pollock
on 4 chipped a simple catch to
Mohammad Sami at square leg
off Shoaib.

Pakistan's reply was soon in
trouble when Imran Farhad
prodded at Ntini's second deliv-
ery and edged him to De Vil-
liers at slip to be dismissed for a
duck. Hafeez was then out on
13, hooking a ball from Ntini for
Amla to take a running catch at
short leg.

Hameed was out for 2 and
then Younis Khan and Moham-
mad Yousuf put on a 60-run
stand before Yousuf fell leg-
before-wicket to Shaun Pollock
for 32.

Kamran Akmal came in
ahead of Inzamam-ul-Haq
because the Pakistan captain had
spent too long off the field. You-
nis (45) was caught in the gully
by Herschelle Gibbs for 45 off
Ntini to end a stand of 56.

Akmal played a rash hook
shot at a bouncer by Andre Nel
in the last over of the day and
was. caught by Ashwell Prince
on 33.

Mohammad Sami was not out
without scoring when play end-
ed.

Shoaib and Mohammed Asif
tested positive to the banned
steroid nandrolene last year.
Shoaib was banned for two years
and Asif one, but the Pakistan
Cricket Board overturned the
suspensions. The World Anti-
Doping Agency has appealed to

-CAS, which is expected to rule

within three months.

South Africa won the first test
at Centurion Park by seven
wickets earlier this week.

@ PAKISTAN'S Mohammad
Asif, left, makes an unsuccessful
appeal as AB De Velliers, right,
on the first day of a second test
match against South Africa at
St Goerges Park, in Port Eliza-
beth, South Africa, Friday, Jan.
19, 2007.

(AP Photo/Obed Zilwa)











PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS



COMICS PAGE













JUDGE PARKER













WELL DAD, ITS

00 B OU
SAM IS RIGHT, RANPY..- ERE a !
YOU SHOULD GIVE A NICER TO ME WY FUTURE |
STATEMENT TO THE MILLIONS WITH]

ALL THESE YEARS.

BUT I WON'T
FILE UNTIL
TOMORROW!






THAT'S

FINE,
BUT YOUR
STATEMENT
























Y WILL MAKE
THE MORNING SURE REGGIE
PAPER! BLACK HAG GIVEN HIS!

HOBBES AND I
WENT TO THE
JURASSIC TODAY
AND CAME BAC


























. WITH THESE.
YOURE ¢ GOING. | DRAMATIC
oe pe PHOTOGRAPHS !




"OF COURGE ITS ALIVE! WHY WOULD ANYeopY
BRING A DEAR LIZARP To CHURCH?”







IT MUST BE NICE TO HAVE A WARM
HOUSE TO SIT IN WHILE SOMEONE
ELSE FIGHTS *@ vz
THESE WINTER f..”;




A Horrible Nightmare










TELL YOU ABOUT
My ALLERGIES?










JUST TO





ELEMENTS

















Contract: Seven Diamonds.

— to the tune of 2,440 points.



SATURDAY,

DELIVER 5 North-South vulnerable. Sometimes J discard a spade at
YOUR MAIL © NORTH trick four. When I do, South cashes
= A6532 the K-A of spades and ruffs a spade, JAN UARY 20
Â¥AJ109 establishing two spade tricks in
ee, oK9 dummy. He then plays a heart to | ARIES - March 21/April 20
SP &43 dummy’s ace and cashes the 6-5 of | Cooler weather has put you in a°
aes BSS. KC ( : WEST EAST spades. I discard a heart on the fourth | mood. You might want to spend
ie ERG Se, 2 #QJ109 @87 round of spades, but on the fifth | Some time at home, Aries, until :
V¥KQ8 ¥76543 spade, I’m again hopelessly } you're in better spirits. Post-summer -
76 5432 squeezed. Whether I discard my king | blues are expected. ;
MARVIN #KQ8 #765 of hearts or a club from the K-Q, | TAURUS - April 21/May 21
He - : SOUTH South makes the rest of the tricks. Financial concerns leave you feelin
IVE NOTICED THAT DOGS ALL WEAR aK4 Sometimes I discard the queen of {nervous this week, Taurus, It’s gee
IDENTIFICATION v2 clubs at trick four, hoping declarer ter to pinch some pennies for a
TAGS AROUND HOMELAND #AQJ108 won’t realize I’ve unguarded the | while until you get back on course.
THEIR NECKS SECURITY ? &AJT1092 king. But South is a real smart cookie | Seek help from Virgo. :



NON SEQUITUR

GREAT... NON

CAAN'T STOP
THINKIN’ ABOUT
BON A DUCK'S



\ NOW THAT YA
NEPTION (T,
I'VE NEVA
NOTICED IT
IN ANN oF
NN EXPER-



You WAVE EXPERIENCE
WRERE A DUCK'S
QUACK MIGHT
ECRo ?





(©2007 by North America Syndicate, jae. World rights reserved.

WK QliAck
QUECK Quick
QORCE QubCcK






Dear Mr. Becker: | suffer from
nightmares — bridge nightmares,
that is. I have this recurring dream
where I hold the West hand and find
myself on lead against seven dia-
monds.

I always lead a trump, and South
draws four rounds of trumps. I dis-
card a club on the third trump lead,
and so does dummy, but on the next
trump lead I run into a serious prob-
lem.

Sometimes I discard the eight of
hearts. When J do, South plays a
heart to the ace and miffs a heart,
establishing the J-10 as tricks. He
then plays the K-A of spades and
cashes dummy’s two high hearts,
whereupon I get squeezed and
declarer_makes the rest.of the tricks

and invariably sees through my
scheme. He plays the ace, nails the
king, and J wind up shelling out the
same 2,440 points.

Now, even though the stakes are
nominal and the whole thing’s only a
dream, the fact is that psychologi-
cally, I can’t afford to continually
lose that many points on one deal. I
was therefore wondering whether
you can suggest any way for me to

escape this awful dilemma. I would ~

be most appreciative of any help you
might give me. Cordially yours,
Constant Reader.

Dear C.R.: Happy to oblige. The
next time this terrible dream recurs, I
suggest you ask for a new deal. You
have only 12 cards! Cordially yours,
S.B. Sees ‘



GEMINI- May 22/June 21

A special friend from your past ~

comes back: for a visit, Gemini. It ‘
could lead to interesting things. Keep -

your agenda open for Wednesday
when love is in your stars.

CANCER - June 22/July 22

Keep your patience with a family-, -

member on Tuesday, Cancer.
This person is just feeling a little
Stir crazy and really doesn’t mean

Dh ae:

all the the things he/she says. —

Focus on a home project instead.

LEO — July 23/August 23

A distant family member isn’t visiting -

as much as usual, Leo. Something
could be wrong. Drop this person a

+

line or give him/her a call. It may help ,

ease your concems.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

Stop doing so much for others and |

pamper yourself a little bit this
week, Virgo. Go to a spa, take a

vacation or just stay home from

work for a day.






















Good 20; very good 30; excellent -

39 (or more). Solution tomorrow.










be honest with yourself.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

It may be time to consider a career -

change, Capricom. You are far too edu-
cated and talented to settle for the work

The LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Target You've been feeling very anxious, .'
Nee er ae se mania Libra, and it’s partially because you
~ the main are experiencing low self-esteem. ©
body of 7 You have to exert more confidence
; Chambers or it just will be an endless cycle.
YOU CAN HAVE A How MANY { 21st a SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
PIECE OF CAN Century S58 Sanh ealhy nese yen
E Y GUESSES Vo 4) cy (4! Dictionary Ske ges A close friend really needs your help °
(F YOU CAN Fick L Ger? ; | 2 (1999 2 Ses4o8 on Thursday, Scorpio. Make sure .
WHICH HANY LAN z ed:tion). Zz. @ S Sq 2 Bey your schedule is open so that you can
= S®@ass 8 lend a hand. Put work on hold for
{ HOW many words of four let Ssgaiseg eas :
or more cal you make honk a 3 ae 5 886 BR some quality time with your mate. :
i letters shown here? In making 9 § 324 _g SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21
“8 a word, each letter may be used 9 of eos 35 Have you been spending too much
5 once only. Each must contain z SOs" time at work, Sagittarius? It could be -
i the centre letter and there must 8 oFs9Seda ; a wee
be at least one nine-letter word ui HO eee because you are avoiding a situation
No plurals. ; 5 Bee eso on at home. That’s not like you. Face
TODAY'S TARGET w amecggia up to the situation. It’s far better to
SOSTaGAGE













Poe 2 you've been doing so far. Have some
: confidence_and go for your dreams. |
ACROSS DOWN AQUARIUS - J :
— Jan 21/Feb 18
1 Riches from breaking 1 We may have a sale for ae Pei | \ Your confidence continues to rise,
the law (6) this animal (6) = word Aquarius. It could be because of that
7 Coming by road? (2,3,3) 2 Hang around so as to tile, ae ee good news at work. Consult with Leo
8 — Said to give Phil as much as parhaps (6) 7 - for some good advice on how to
he can eat (4) 3 Keep a hogshead to mature (4) sot ae | marinade improve your financial future. -
"10 Sitting with Edward at the 4 Punished for making the dump 17 19 | PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
seaside (6) untidy? (7) Bea htt ' Be the life of the party on Friday,
eer eas ae ee Ree fs are sey tos
mel (8) what he is (5) = is meat or fis iroie fare romance. Look 3
cane «Tyo Cee Cee rey ea a
shade? (3) wearing thin (5) ; - in ompanionship and sparks will fly. ‘
16. Onyanalopmingsbtyoucen gt] 8 Wheyeupeyiogstor el Fl | a me | a .
Ronn | ee | | | ie i
17 Alok to make you reel cifficulty (3) p eee
= Stee” | a a :
1 19° Giventhe sack 13 Thick part of a wooden seat (5) ay Viorel Bologan v Ratael
= | ° eons, | Sette PU a | | ee eceercince
ee Fuegen. Grandmasters know
21- Located new 18 Adowny bird (5) ;
qe hata 19 Stiffen up a bit (due to healthy x | | that grabbing pawns while :
: (5) exercise?) (3) several pieces remain ‘
Hi WE | 22. The chance to get promoted makes 20 Republican material? (3) undeveloped is a likely route to
le one excited! (3,2) 1 Ae Fah rhenlbecreaentt a zero on the tournament chart. 7
TE = | 23° Abysmal yet Shatce tay be present) (7) ACROSS DOWN It still occurs, and there's usually ,
Q shrewd? (4 22 Marginally, a he-man seems to have 1 Climb (6 1 Native American (6) a special reason. Today’s game
HO | 26 ukclow a (5) aoe 7 None (8) +. -Bemping bse opened with a French Defence 1+
Po Se Racesai Gants 23 Official jobs, or payments made 8 — Record (4) ; aa : : sod (7) 5) e4 e6 where In the earlier moves ,
TEN oe 4 around half time? (6) cat 10 Day nursery (6) 5 — Municipal (5) Vaganian’s knight pair raided
it. good onel (3) 24 She can't help giving some men I 11 Assessing (6) 6 Banners (5) the white camp and eliminated °
Wi E i Quick to give a cue (6) ideas (4) N 14 Devoured (3) : 8 — Expensive bishop, knight and three pawns 2
4 | 30° Fuelit wrong andit's 25 Tha very old Bill (6 N acd Naas (5) 4) before being shot down. :
_ spose) 26 t's fun, | see, getting away from the 2. 19 Afterwards (5) 9__ Pronoun (3) Meanwhile, Bologan's queen,
: c 31 Publicity about a girl being tropics for a change (5) i 21 Disgusting (5) 12 Pitch (3) rook and bishop edged towards
Vy greedy (4) : ; ee wo” 22 Start (5) 13 Lariat (5) the black king and now White Is
Loy y 27 Pieces of worsted — possibly for ; dy to launch a decisiv
R 32 Didn't like to replace nats where deer wear? (5) < 23 Ship's company (4) 15 Proportion (5) reaay to faun ve
Q ight bi ind (8 Lt 26 Broom(5) 18 Black bird (5) attack. What was White's
0 s 4 edie Be (8) 28 The boss being Informal (3) — 28 As wall (3) 19 Limb (3) winning move?
i : me Ae 30 Inabit of adectine, 29 Nevertheless (6) 20° Can (9) LEONARD BARDEN
weaken (4) 30 Distant (6)
S 31 Item (4) 21 Women (7)
s 32 Scowsed (8) 22 Stoop (3) ;
it * TT Isa nn «33 Make certain (6) 23 Comedians (6) _ RSET ET
i Ww | Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 24 Source (4)
W ACROSS: 1, Spoor 6, Coach 9, Willlam 10, Doing 11, Piers ACROSS: 1, Stoat 6, Stock 9, Greaser 10, Money 11, Rivat 25 From where (6) * '
0 12, Li-mi-t 13, Vi-trio-L 15, Tec 17, A-X-is 18, Marina 19, | 12, Strip 13, Bestows 15, Pet 17, Ales 18, Furore 19, 26 Canal boat (5) Chess solution 8283: 1 Rxh7I and Black resigned. If ‘
: Label 20, U-sefu-L 22, Tame 24, End 25, Bayonet 26, Eases 20, Insect 22, Pest 24, Lee 25, Secures 26, Refer 27 Church council (5) Kxh7 2 Rhl+ Kg8 3 Qxg6 Qc7 4 Qh7+ KB 5 Qh8+ K7
R Spiel 27, Solos 28, Maths 29, Succeed 30, Ve-N-om 31, | 27, Tamil 28, Atlas 29, Combine 30, Seven 28 Number (3) 6 Qxg/ mate.
T-odd-y 31, Dried 30 Impolite (4) Mensa quiz: Whale. é
Dp DOWN: 2, Pro-LIX 3, Owners 4, Rig 5, F-L-ail 6, Capital 7, | DOWN: 2, Trowel 3, Agents 4, Try 5, Wants 6, Serious 7, One possible word ladder solution is: SAGE, sale, :
OM-It 8, Car-men 12, Local 13, Val-u-e 14, Tir-e-d 15, Trip 8, Claver 12, Sweat 13, Basil 14, Sense 15, Power 16, hale, halt, hilt, hint, MINT — - a 4

Ti-tan 16, C-adet 18, Me-D-al 19, L-U-MP sum 21, Snoo-
2 22, To-led-o 23, Me-tho-d 25, Beach 26, So-so 28, Met

Tents 18, Fewer 19, Echelon 21, Negate 22, Punter 23,
Sesame 25, Serbs 26, Rice 28, And





TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7B







Man SE = i —
SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 20, 2007 SUNDAY EVENING i JANUARY 21, 2007.
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BBCI respondents. __jrorists (Latenighi). BBCI (Latenight), (Latenight). ane Co- _|(Latenight).
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ma Wirtschaftsbi- Business man) Reporters

porter

| E! E! News |Fashion Police: The 2007 Golden |The 2007 Critics’ Choice Awards Saturday Night Live Peter Sars- E! (ee) El News |Forbes 20 Richest Women in En- |The Girls Next |The Girls Next |Love Ride Mar- |The Soup
" eekend Globes : (N) gaard; the Strokes. 1 (CC) " leekend (N) —_|tertainment Door Door Makeover. jried actors. (N)

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ESPN Bowron ESPN — [fite) Eqalter (live) (Cc) [(Live) (CC)
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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7











¢ Sex toys - good or evil? *« Female sexual health
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Woman Health

The Tribune 7%, tecce. My Newspaper!

Prince Edward to visit Nassau
for the GGYA 20th anniversary

PRINCE Edward, the
Earl of Wessex and
youngest son of Queen
Elizabeth II, will arrive in
Nassau on Friday, Febru-
ary 2 to inaugurate the 20th
anniversary celebration of
the Governor-General's
Youth Award.

The award is the top
accolade that any young
Bahamian can achieve, said.
GGYA co-ordinator
Denise Mortimer.

The Bahamian award
programme is part of an
international network that
is based on the Duke of
Edinburgh's Award, which
was founded in 1956.

Prince Edward is chair-
man of the International
Award Association, which
co-ordinates development
worldwide through a Lon-
don secretariat.

Activities

To date, almost six mil-
lion young people from
*over 100 countries — includ-
ing 8,000 Bahamians — have
participated in the award,



B PRINCE Edward, the Earl of Wessex

since 1991.

undertaking a variety of
voluntary and challenging
activities to build character
and skills.

The prince will arrive via
private, aircraft from the
United States at noon and
pay a courtesy call on Gov-
ernor-General Arthur Han-
na.

While at Government
House he will hand out
recognition and _ gold
awards to about 50 GGYA
participants and volunteers
at a special reception.

That evening he will be
the guest of honour at an

invitation-only, $400-a-
plate, anniversary dinner at
Cafe Martinque on Par-
adise Island.

The following morning he
will meet with more thana
thousand GGYA partici-
pants at a Government
House rally, and afterwards
attend a fundraising lunch
at Lyford Cay before leav-
ing for the Cayman Islands.

The GGYA programme
is divided into bronze, sil-
ver and gold awards so that
participants can choose dif-
ferent levels of participa-
tion in the four categories

of community service, skills
development, physical
recreation and adventurous
journeying.

Currently, there are
about 1,000 registered par-
ticipants on New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros
and Exuma. .

They are led by 35
trained instructors and co-
ordinators, all of which are
volunteers.

Only three staffers are
paid, including Ms Mor-
timer, the programme's
chief co-ordinator

“Anyone aged 14 to 25
can do the award," Ms
Mortimer said. “There are
no limitations — you just
need to be motivated.

“It's the only award that
some Baharhian kids will
ever get in their lifetimes.
It changes lives and it defi-
nitely helps to bridge social
gaps.”

The most anticipated part
of the GGYA programme
is the annual expedition —a
10-day field trip to a Fami-
ly Island for more than 100
youngsters. These excur-





@ THE vendors at Sunset Village at Eight Mile Rock completed the Ministry of Tourism’s two-day Customer Service and Food
Handling Workshop. Jeritzan Outten, Ministry of Tourism official is seen seated far left with workshop participants.
(BIS photo: Vandyke Hepburn)

Plans to transform Sunset Village

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - Plans are underway to
transform Sunset Village into an attrac-
tive hang-out spot for locals and visi-
tors in an effort to boost economic activ-
ity and promote community tourism in
the Eight Mile Rock area.

Jeritzan Outten, senior director at the
Ministry of Tourism with responsibility
for product development, said the min-
istry recognises the importance of com-
munity tourism in all areas of Grand
Bahama.

“The most recent approach to tourism
is community tourism, and we are look-
ing at the whole of Grand Bahama and

not just Freeport,” she said on Wednes-
day as she unveiled improvement plans.

Sunset Village, which is situated in
the bayshore area of Jones Town, is a
popular spot on Thursday nights for res-
idents and visitors.

Temporary booths were built to
accommodate some 30 vendors at Eight
Mile Rock when the hurricane
destroyed the entire village in 2004.

The Ministry of Tourism hosted a
two-day food handler’s workshop for
members of the Sunset Village Associ-
ation. They were taught the importance
of proper food preparation and han-
dling.

Mrs Outten said that improvement
work is expected to begin in the next

two weeks.

According to the tourism official, a
parking lot will be built in the back with
a “hip and gable” Bahamian-style roof.

She said that a 20-foot wooden deck,
an eating area with benches and umbrel-
las and landscaped spaces for patrons
will be added. An area will also be pre-
pared and designated for arts and crafts.

Mrs Outten said that the ministry has
contacted corporate citizens to assist
with the project.

“The original Sunset Village was
destroyed during the hurricanes and
what is here now was a temporary
replacement and we telt that we could
enhance it and make it a lot more attrac-
tive,” she said.



» «o(A P-FILE Photo).

wa

gp 3 ye anh ¥ ’
sions have included camp-

ing on Cat Island and in the
Inagua National Park; hik-
ing on Abaco and
Eleuthera; kayaking in the
Lucayan National Park;
and sailing on the vessel
‘Captain Moxey’ to several
island destinations.
Participants pay a portion
of the cost for the experi-
ence (which is the only part
of the programme they
have to pay for). The bulk
of GGYA expenses are
subsidised by donors, who

have included the Ministry
of Youth, Teekay Shipping,
Cable Bahamas, Lyford
Cay and RBC Royal Bank
of Canada.

In addition to the annual
expedition, GGYA gold
awardees take part in a
yearly trip to different
islands in the Caribbean,
where they join with other
regional participants to
climb mountains.

Reach

According to GGYA
chairman Dr Davidson
Hepburn, co-ordinators are
seeking to extend the pro-
gramme's reach by raising
funds to sponsor additional
children from _ public
schools who cannot afford
the travel costs involved.

There are also plans for
an after-school computer
lab, and the GGYA is seek-
ing a more appropriate
headquarters.

However Dr Hepburn
‘said the main goal is te
raise enough money to set

-up an endowment fund so

that the award can be self-
sustaining.

Other 20th anniversary
activities include a special
church service at Matthew's
Anglican Church on Janu-
ary 21, when participants
and volunteers will worship
with Governor-General
Arthur Hanna, and an elab-
orate exhibition in the main
post office during the sum-
met.

Organisers said an infor-
mational video is also being
produced.

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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Story O on the dangers of cruise |

ship



holidays is listed as

UK news source’s ‘most read’ |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

POTENTIAL cruise pas-
sengers from the UK may
have cause to think twice
about a voyage to the
Caribbean, as a popular
British news source yesterday
listed an article on the dan-
gers of cruise ship holidays as
its most-read story.

The story was published on
the online version of one of
the UK's biggest selling news-
papers, The Guardian, which
also happens to be the most
popular online news source in
Britain.

The article — entitled
“Death on the high seas” —
recounts the details of a litany
of criminal encounters and
mysterious disappearances
which have occurred during
cruise holidays in the last three
years.

Christopher Shays, US


















Republican congressman and
chairman. of a subcommittee
charged last year with exam-
ining “the threat posed to cit-
izens by booking a cruise hol-
iday” is quoted in the article as
warning of “a growing mani-
fest of unexplained disap-
pearances, unsolved crimes
and brazen acts of lawlessness
on the high seas”.

Passengers

In all, 24 passengers disap-
peared between 2003 and last
March, and since that time, at
least 10 more passengers and
two crew members have been
reported missing, according to
the committee's findings. .

One of the most recent dis-
appearances was a Scottish
pensioner, somehow lost over-
board in the Atlantic last
November, notes the article.

“Like small cities, said.

Shays, cruise ships experi-



enced crimes. ‘But city
dwellers know the risks of
urban life —- and no one falls
off a city never to be heard of
again.’ Going on a cruise was,
he said, perhaps ‘the perfect
way to commit the perfect

2

crime’.

ing, it was noted that a stew-
ard found "M's" bed unused.

After several days of finding
her room empty, the steward
reported her absence to his
superior, though no action was
taken.

Finally, at the end of the



“The cruise business is
fundamental to our tourism
industry; a large portion of our
visitors come by cruise ship.
That’s why any efforts to
enhance port security, any
effort to enhance security
upon the vessels we support.”



Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe

“It is extremely difficult for
any detective to piece togeth-
er a murder case without a
body, and chances of finding a
passenger dumped into the
ocean are slim indeed.”

The unsolved case of a
young woman, referred to
only as "M", who disappeared
on a cruise to:Alaska in 2004,
is described as “starkly under-
lin(ing) a fact that cruise pas-
sengers, potentially thousands

of miles from home, should .

be well aware of: out at sea,
there are no police.”
On the'second day of cruis-

a 3 IN i) PT Sa

WARE MOU ee
Pest Control .
UC Ma CT ELC
Kara |

trip, the article notes, “her
belongings were packed away.
No one notified the police or
her family. It was only after
her father filed a missing per-
son's report that police dis-
covered that she had disap-
peared from a cruise ship.”

Crime

According to the article,
aside from suspected murders
or accidental falls, crime sta-
tistics supplied to the sub-
committee by 15 of the biggest
cruise lines, evidence that
“there were 178 reports of sex-
ual assault on cruise ships
between 2003 and 2005.”

“Royal Caribbean alone,
which carries around 25 per
cent of cruise passengers,
recorded more than 100 com-
plaints of sexual assault and
sexual anes within that time
span.”

One “former ex-detective

‘and cryise ship security offi-
cer said young women are par--

ticularly susceptible on the
boats — most surprisingly —
from “crew members (who)
hunt in packs.”

Furthermore, even in cases
where criminal liability is
determined, “passengers can
find themselves i in a complex
legal situation.”

“The relevant laws might be
those of Panama, the
Bahamas or Bermuda. Pros-
ecuting, say, a sacked crew
member who has returned to
his own country brings a
whole new dimension of com-
plexity.”

The article, written by
Gwyn Topham, author of the
book, Overboard: The Stories
Cruise Lines Don't Want Told,
does note however that for
now, UK passengers "contin-
ue to flock to the ships.”

“The Passenger Shipping
Association estimates that

there was a 17 per cent rise in
Britons taking cruises last
year,” it said, noting that a fur-
ther rise is predicted.

Cruise companies are also
keen to point out that “In the
context of millions of passen-
gers each year, the number of



missing people and reported
sexual assaults compares well.

with statistics on land.”

However, one hazard men-
tioned in the article does seem
to be more unique to cruise
liners in recent months — the
rise of the norovirus — a high-
ly contagious sickness with
symptoms including diar-
rhoea, stomach cramps and
violent projectile vomiting.

The article mentions how
several older British passen-
gers recently had to be
“stretchered off one ship when
it returned to (the UK city)
Hull” after being afflicted with
the virus.”

Responding to the article,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said that the
Bahamas is “very concerned”
about the public perception
of the safety of travel on cruise
ships.

According to Mr Wilch-
combe, previous outbreaks of
the gastrointestinal virus have
impacted visitor numbers to
the Bahamas for weeks after,
and when discoveries of miss-
ing individuals were made.

He said that “riveting reac-

tions, not only in America
where many of these ships
originate, but certainly in oth-
er parts of the world" were
felt.

“The cruise business is fun-
damental to our tourism
industry; a large portion of our
visitors come by cruise ship,”

the minister said.

“That’s why any efforts to
enhance port security, any
effort to enhance security
upon the vessels we support,”
he said.

Worker is injured at
Ginn construction site

l@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 30-year-old worker was injured on Thurs-
day in an industrial accident at the Ginn construction site in

West End.

According to reports, the accident occurred around 1.45pm
while an employee was operating a heavy-duty machine that top-

pled over into the canal.

Superintendent of Police Basil Rahming reported that equip-
ment operator Damien Smith of Holmes Rock was digging a
canal at the project site when the machine suddenly lost balance
and toppled over into six feet of water.

Despite sustaining injuries to his back, Smith managed to
free himself and escape from the submerged machine.

He reportedly swam to the shore, where he was assisted from

the water.

Smith was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital for medical
attention. No word on his condition was available up to press

time.

West End Police and officials at Ginn are conducting an
investigation into the accident.

Ginn is developing a $4.9 billion resort community at West
End that will contain 4,400 condominium and hotel units centred

around a 20-story tower, 1,800 single family residential home ,

sites, two signature golf courses and clubhouses, two large mari-
nas, a private airport with customs facilities, a casino and other
state of the art amenities.

The Ginn Sur Mer resort development is expected to be the
largest of its kind in the Bahamas.

Ginn has also recently acquired the multi-million dollar Old
Bahama Bay Yacht Resort at West End.




- Cuban Ambassator
- to the Bahamas

- hits out at US

_ foreign policy

mi By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

CUBAN Ambassador to
the Bahamas Felix Wilson has
described US foreign policy
as “arrogant and extreme” fol-
lowing a Norwegian hotel’s
rejection of an official Cuban
delegation because of the
American embargo against
Cuba.

According to international
reports, the Edderkoppen
Hotel in Oslo, Norway is fac-
ing protests, a possible legal
suit and the threat of a boy-
cott, because it refused to per-
mit Cuban Tourism Ministry
officials to stay there as they
usually do for the annual Lille-
stroem Tourism Fair that
began on January 11.

The Edderkoppen is owned
by the Scandic chain, which
was bought by the US chain
Hilton.

The hotel’s management
has admitted to the Norwe-
gian press that because it now
belongs to the US chain, it is
obligated tc follow that
nation’s laws.

However, the Norwegian
Foreign Ministry has declared

CUBAN Ambassador
to the Bahamas
Felix Wilson

that companies operating in
Norway must respect Norwe-
gian law, regardless of where
they are based.
Ambassador

Cuba and a violation against
the sovereignty of Norway.”

“T don’t think that a country
should be able to force their
laws in another country,” he
said. “The decision by the
hotel is an affront to the Nor-
way government and it sets a
very bad precedent in inter-
national law.”

“I wonder what would hap-
pen if every country tried to
apply their laws in another
country,” the ambassador said.

“Tt shows the arrogance and
the extremism of the Bush for-
eign policy to trample on the
sovereignty of other coun-
tries,” he said.

Ambassador ~ Wilson
pledged that Cubans will con-
tinue to travel to tourism con-
ferences in Europe and else-
where in the world, despite
the Norwegian hotel’s deci-
sion.

The stance of the hotel has
also been criticised by the Nor-
wegian labour movement.

The Municipal and General
Employees Union, with
300,000 members, has already
announced a boycott of all
Scandic hotels in the country ~
declaring it unacceptable for
the. United States to give
orders to the world.

Likewise, the Federation of
Commerce Unions, with
830,000 members, demanded
that the government take
immediate measures so that
corporations like Scandic that
support the US blockade of

u b a j
cannot operate in the country.

A Norwegian anti-racism
organisation has filed a suit in
relation to the matter, charg-
ing that it is a violation of the
law prohibiting discrimination
mess on race or ethnic ori-

"The Tribune attempted to
contact the Hilton in the
Bahamas for a comment, but

: “calls were not returned up to

press time.

m@ CORRECTION

A PAGE seven story in
Friday’s Tribune was incor-
rectly headlined “COB gets
$17m grant increase”. The
amount was $2.7 million, as
stated in the article.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this may
have caused.

i Wilson.
i. described the incident as a
“sign of aggression against ©









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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991



Published Daily Monday to Saturday

_ EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-




Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama









HAVANA (AP) — Fidel Castro’s enemies in
exile have long predicted that the end of his
reign in Cuba would bring dancing in the streets,
a mass exodus and a rapid transition to a U.S.-
style democracy and market economy.

But almost six months after Castro stepped
aside due to illness, the transition has occurred
— and with none of those changes. Cubans are
calmly going about their business, and there
has been no northbound rush of migrants, and
no signs of impending policy shifts.

Even if Castro recovers fully and returns to
public life, officials no longer insist that he will
return to power. Why would he? Cuban officials
already have pulled off what their enemies have
long said would be impossible: They have built
a post-Castro communist system.

About the only thing different in Cuba is that

its government, instead of being led by a single
person, is handled by a group. Raul Castro
heads a collective leadership guided by the same
Communist Party his older brother extolled
during a nearly half-century in power.
' “These guys know what they are doing. They
are prepared to lead Cuba without Fidel,” said
Marifeli Perez-Stable of the Inter-American
Dialogue, a Washington think tank. “The coun-
try, in the short run, is not going to collapse.”

Even a senior U.S. intelligence official said
last week that Raul Castro has the support and
respect of military leaders critical to ensuring a
leadership succession within the existing com-
munist system.

Army Lieutenant General Michael D.
Maples, director of the Defence Intelligence
Agency, said the temporary president is firmly
in control and “will likely maintain power and
stability after Fidel Castro dies, at least for the
short-term.”

Cuban officials say no single person can
replace the 80-year-old Maximum Leader, who
_ micromanaged projects, gave marathon speech-
es and entertained visitors at dinners lasting
until dawn.

Raul Castro, the mustachioed longtime
defence minister, now greets visiting dignitaries
and military parades. But he hasn’t kept his
brother’s long hours and reserves his evenings
for family.

“The only substitute for Fidel can be the
Communist Party of Cuba,” the 75-year-old
Raul Castro told university students in Sep-
tember.

The most visible official after Raul is Vice
President Carlos Lage, who favours a white
guayabera dress shirt over fatigues and is said to
drive himself around: in a boxy little Russian
Lada sedan. Lage, 55, exercises wide control
over government administration, much like a
prime minister.

Lage recently represented Cuba at Bolivia’s
constitutional convention and presidential inau-
gurations imColombia and Ecuador. And when
Fidel Castro ceded power in July, he gave Lage




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TELEPHONE
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No changes in post-Castro Cuba

WANTETL



TED





WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

sole responsibility for his “energy revolution,”
the renovation of the country’s antiquated elec-
trical grid that is close to Castro’s heart.

Castro decreed that five other top officials
would share responsibility for other projects
important to his legacy in Latin America:

e Felipe Perez Roque, 41, the boyish, clean-
shaven foreign minister; :

e Health Minister Jose Ramon Balaguer, 74,
Cuba’s powerful former chief of ideology;

e Jose Ramon Machado Ventura, 76, the
longtime Communist Party leader who repre-
sented Cuba at the inauguration of Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega;

e Esteban Lazo, 62, the country’s most pow-
erful black leader who headed Cuba’s delega-
tion to the U.N. General Assembly in Septem-
ber;

e Francisco Soberon, 62, the central bank
president who was evidently included to facili-
tate project funding.

Fidel Castro did not mention National
Assembly President Ricardo Alarcon among
the group, but the 69-year-old parliament speak-
er and veteran diplomat could be called on
should the United States later accept Raul Cas-
tro’s offer for dialogue.

With Fidel out of view and the state of his
health uncertain, the top priority for these offi-
cials is to work for unity.

“There will be no division among Cuban rev-
olutionaries,” Lage said at a belated 80th birth-
day celebration that Castro was too sick to
attend. “There will be no ambitions, no egos.”

While no major policy changes are expected
while Fidel is alive. analysts believe Raul Castro
and Lage could eventually favour a slight eco-
nomic opening.

Raul Castro in the past expressed interest in
China’s model of a state-dominated market
economy with one-party. political control. Lage
promoted modest reform ling foreign
investment and limited ps prise, that
saved Cuba’s faltering coo ii. i the 1990s
after the Soviet bloc col. used.

Perez-Stable said. collective leadership
should listen to © aus anxious for economic
options in a count: y where government salaries
of around $15 a uionth fail to cover basic needs.

“Any gesture they make toward opening the
economy will be applauded not only by ordinary
Cubans; but will be welcomed by Europe, Cana-
da and countries elsewhere,” she said.

But Cubans recognize that any changes will
be gradual, and “will be orchestrated by those
whom Fidel has long been grooming,” Julia E.
Sweig of the New York-based Council on For-
eign Relations wrote in the current issue of
Foreign Affairs magazine.

“Washington, too, must accept that there is no
alternative to those already running post-Fidel
Cuba,” she wrote.

(This article was written by
_ Anita Snow of the Associated Press).



Bananas Rep Cress




















PRESENTS



his system
is a failure

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS system is a failure.
There is no other possible
conclusion. We can debate
the causes or why it remains
in its present state, whether
it is impotence, present lead-
ers lack the courage to chal-
lenge the archaic system
they inherited, the testicular
fortitude to remove or dis-
cipline individuals who are
not doing their job; or
whether it is vision intoler-
ance, present leaders lack
the creative ability to trans-
form the system into what
is effective; or whether it is
apathy, present leaders just
don’t give a damn. But there
is no debating the conclu-
sion: The system is a failure.

The culprit under the
microscope is the operation
of the public service, gener-
ally, and, specifically, the
administrative procedures in
the Ministry of Education.
How else can one account
for the fact that in the twen-
ty-first century a teacher can
be given a letter of employ-
ment, report for work, offer
exemplary service, and five
months later is still waiting
for a paycheck?

This is inéxcusable. For far

-too long we have cultivated

and encouraged a culture of
inefficiency and mediocrity
in this country. Moreover, in
many cases we have acqui-
esced to and celebrated
these twin viruses, which are
eating away at the organ of
our nation’s integrity.
Recently, a high ranking
official in the Ministry of
Education, when queried
about the length of time it
was taking for payment to
teachers,.he responded: “Oh,

‘you know government takes

”

longto pay.

However, the unacknowl-
edged cries of more than
thirty teachers, on Grand
Bahama alone, who have not
been paid since entering the
profession in August, sends
a loud, thundering crash
through every artery of this
nation, muffling even the
rhythmic thump of the
nation’s heartbeat, drown-
ing out every other note,
every other voice.

So when the Minister of
Education and Technology

or the Director of Education —

says that for the first time in
the history of the education
system every school is fully
staffed and, therefore, we
are well on our way to trans-
forming the national aver-
age, their voices are barely a



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whisper because of the clat-
tering echo: but teachers are
not being paid. When the
Prime Minister or the Gov-
ernor of the Central Bank
pontificates about the eco-
nomic health of the nation,
billion dollar investments, or
the strength of the national
reserves, it is all muted,
because of the wailing
crescendo: but teachers are
not being paid. Every time
any Bahamian sticks out her
chest and brags about the
golden girls and our perfor-
mance on the world stage,
about what a great little
nation we are, it is all stifled
by the agonizing, collective
groans of teachers, vehe-
mently declaring: but we are
not being paid. The plain-
tive cry mocks our every
achievement.

We must discontinue,
immediately, this disre-
spectful dancing on the
graves of our ancestors.
They didn’t sacrifice over
two hundred years of free
labour under a vicious and
merciless system so that
their children can be rein-
troduced to slavery under
the leadership of an indige-
nous government.

Those brave labourers
who marched in protest in
the sweltering heat of Inagua
in 1937 and in New Provi-
dence in 1942 didn’t do so
to allow a Bahamian gov-
ernment to work its citizens
without pay. This is not the
reason for which the great
Sir Randol Fawkes gave his
life in service to the labour
movement.and, therefore,
his country: pips soto

When I was a college stu-
dent in Nashville, Tennessee
in the late 1970s, I would sit
in Sambo’s restaurant for
hours and watch as white

customers, who came in

after me, were served, while
I was ignored.

As I sat there in my rage,
fighting back the tears, I
thought: I am not a.man. I
am not human. I have no
value to them.

On one occasion when I
was walking home from
work on a cold winter
evening, some white men on
the back of a pick-up truck
pelted me with rotten toma-
toes for a full half mile, until
J arrived at the entrance to
the college and dashed
through the gate. As I stood
there desperately trying to
catch my breath, wet, cold,
and stink, I thought: I am
not a man. I am not human.

-J have no value to them.

My oldest son is only sev-
en, and he loves karate. He
is passionate about it. All
over the house he practices
his moves. Sometimes, to his
parents annoyance. He even
has his little brother starting
to love it, and, at times, I
have to remind him not to
be so rough with his little
three-year-old brother.
Recently, this karate-loving
child came into my office at
home. When I looked up
from what I was doing, I saw
yearning and expectation in
his eyes. “Daddy,” he says
“may I have fifty dollars
please for my next karate
belt.” .

Apparently, he was suc-
cessful in the demonstration
of his skills and was moving
on to the next level. There
was to be a ceremony to
mark the occasion. I sat
there looking at him, and I
didn’t have the courage to
tell him: that daddy really
didn’t have it. I couldn't
break his little heart like
that.

Then the moment of
absolute clarity: I am not a
man. I’m not human. I have
no value to them. In all the
times of my life when per-
sons have robbed me of my
manhood, my dignity, my
self-worth, all of the pelting
with tomatoes and all of the
being ignored in restaurants
couldn’t add up to the use-
lessness my country was
causing»me’to feel: sitting

there looking into my son’s
eyes as he waited for a
response. I averted his gaze,
pulled him to me, and as I
hugged him, I said: “Daddy
will take care of it.” I didn’t
want him to see my tears. .

How does a man look into
the eyes of his wife when she
knows that he gets up from
beside her five days every
week and goes to work, and
sometimes she is deprived of
his company because he is
too busy preparing lessons
and grading papers, then at
the end of the month (the
end of five months) he
comes home with nothing?
Nothing to pay the bills, to
help feed the family. How is
he to look at her without
avoiding her eyes? How
does the teacher face the
students every day with the
same enthusiasm, with the
same interest in the overall
agenda? Is the Ministry of
Education unaware that this
too influences the national
average? ¢

The system is a failure.
And, perhaps, by extension
the country is too. It brutal
izes families. It robs individ:
uals of dignity and self-
respect. And in a profession
anemic regarding the pres-
ence of men, it belittles the
manhood of the remnant. I
understand Derek Walcott’s
‘The Schooner Flight’ more
clearly now. And although 1
thought I never would, I
understand the early. .
Naipaul’s invectives against
the region. ee

I know why Brathwaite
left us. Ironically, they have
gone to find solace in the
belly of the beast. ‘

Our solution, regionally
and in the Bahamas, to this
failed system, so far, has
been to keep changing part:
ners, while the band plays
on. It is time to stop the
band from playing, and to
call on the creative among
us to write new songs,
because the ones we havé
been singing and dancing to
have long lost their luster;
their power to produce joy.

DR KEITH A RUSSELL
Freeport, xg
Grand Bahama, %
December, 2006. x

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE is absolutely no
doubt that the Christie Admin“
istration has attracted an incred,
ible value in investment in the
Tourism sector however do wé
all wish to work in the Tourism
sector? Some foresee total
employment for the next 15:
years andon. — i

There was talk about an IT,
project for Freeport, but not too
much more and that there’s not,
one single industrial develop,
ment except the Associated
Grocers warehouse in Freeport.

Does that mean that the Min-
istry of Financial Services and

. Investments has been unable or:

has not tried to market The'
Bahamas to strategic industri-
al, IT and processing investors?
There are some obvious areas;
where it would be so natural for,
us to try to attract substantial
potential alternative employers’
to a hotel — why have we not,
tried to attract an oil refinery?
We read that in the US there’
has not been a single refinery*
built in the past 20 years, one of,
the soft points that affects glob-»
al oil prices — we know when
the price of oil rises how it hits,
the Bahamian driver, at least
the shipping cost would be’
reduced if our wholesalers could,
purchase from within The,
Bahamas rather than Curacao
— any relief will help St.
Thomas has, Curagao also,‘
Jamaica and Trinidad. (
Not all Bahamians support,
and feel comfortable with this’
one-legged economy as we all’
know if the Miami folk have a,
chill we have bronchitis. \
Might it be time for opting to
alternative potential employ-'
ers? ie

MARSHALLFORBES *.
__ Nassau, x
“January 16,2007. ma
THE TRIBUNE





In brief

US Embassy
expands
husiness hours

THE United States
Embassy in Nassau has
announced expanded
‘consular hours for non-
emergency services to
American citizens who
are temporary visitors
‘or permanent residents
in the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos.

. Beginning February 5,
the American Citizen
Services office will be
open on a walk-in basis
from 9am to 1lam and
‘from 1pm to 3pm Mon-
days through Thursdays,
and on Fridays from
9am to llam.

The office will be
closed on a one-time
basis on Friday, Febru-
ary 9.

The Embassy also
pointed out that it is
closed on all US and
Bahamian holidays.

The American Citi-
zens Services office can
notarise documents,
issue passports and reg-
ister American children
born abroad.

It also provides
Americans with infor-
mation on absentee vot-
ing, selective service
registration, receiving
federal benefits, and fil-.
ing US tax forms.

Consular officers
assist Americans who
encounter serious legal,
medical, or financial
difficulties.

+ Although consular
officers cannot act as
legal counsel or repre-
sentatives, they can pro-
vide the names of local
attorneys and doctors,
provide loans to desti-
tute Americans, and
provide information
about dangerous condi-
tions affecting overseas
~ travel or residence.

Tal
SL
rassmaaiata




Darra ae

RR alt

SATURDAY
JANUARY 20TH

12:30 Bullwinke & Friends

1:00 _ King Leonardo

1:30 The Fun Farm

2:30 411

3:00 Matinee: “Sudie & Simpson”

5:00 Cricket World

5:30 Gillette World Sports

6:00 In This Corner

6:30 Sports Lifestyle

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
| 7:30 Native Show

8:00 Spurgeon Smith 2007 ~

New Year’s Day Junkanoo

} Highlights

11:30 Hustle

12:00 The Bahamas Tonight

12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
JANUARY 21ST

6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
* 8:30 The Covenant Hour
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference
Effective Living
10:30 This Is The Life
| 11:00 Zion Baptist Church
1:00 — Gillette World Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
_ 2:00 Gospel Video Countdown
2:30 Agape Full Gospel Baptist
Church
3:00 — St. John’s Jubilee
i Cathedral
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship Ministries
International
- 5:00 Walking In Victory
6:00 |The Human Senses:
r “Taste & Smell’
"7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
- 7:30 Kemp Road Ministries
8:00 Calvary Deliverance Church
8:30 ~~ Turning Point
. 9:00 News In Review 2006
10:30 Spiritual Impact
"11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Bobby Jones Presents
12:30 Community Pg. 1540AM

10:00

NOTE: ZNS-TY 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!



LOCAL NEWS

Haitian-Bahamian citizensh

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5



ip applications



‘could be processed within six months’

m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

ACCORDING to the Direc-
tor of Immigration, Haitian-
Bahamian applications for citi-
zenship could be processed with-
in six months — but only if the
applicants already possess the
required documents.

Late last year, The Tribune
reported several cases of Hait-
ian- Bahamians claiming they
have waited “forever” to receive
any sort of feedback from the
Department of Immigration with
respect to their citizenship appli-
cations.

Sources claimed they had to
wait up to three years to com-
plete the process, and others told
stories of having to wait long

periods and then being told that
they had to obtain further docu-
mentation to complete the
process.

Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson also came under fire last
year for allegedly “fast-tracking”
the residency application of
American celebrity Anna Nicole
Smith.

And despite Mr Gibson’s claim
that Anna-Nicole’s fast-tracking

’ was the result of a new era of

efficiency in the department, The
Tribune continued to receive calls
for the department to deal with
its “disgraceful” backlog of citi-
zenship applications.

In November 2006, human
rights lawyer Fred Smith listed
several cases of “disgraceful,
inhumane and degrading treat-
ment” of people who have been

waiting years to be processed by

the Immigration Department.
Mr Smith, who is based in

Freeport, said he represents

many applicants for work per ,

mits, annual residency permits,
permanent residency certificates
and/or citizenship:

“I challenge the minister to
deal quickly with the many out-
standing applicants from my firm,
Callenders & Co in Freeport, that
are outstanding —- some for
decades,” he said.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Director of Immi-
gration Vernon Burrows claimed
that such cases are only “isolat-
ed” — and that the problem rest-
ed with applicants not having the
required documents.

Mr Burrows explained: “Gen-

- erally speaking, we have a signif-

icant amount of persons born in
the Bahamas of non-Bahamian



@ LAST YEAR, human rights
lawyer Fred Smith (above) listed
several cases of “disgraceful,
inhumane and degrading treat-
ment” of people who have been
waiting years to be processed.



parents who are born out of wed-
lock, and many of them carry
their father’s name all through
their lives, and now they come
to us to apply, but they can only
show that the mother’s name is
on the birth certificate. And so
we then have a last name issue to
confirm that this person is really
who he says he is.”

._ The director said that in these
cases, the applicant is required
to get affidavits or re-register
their birth certificates, so that the
Department of Immigration can
be satisfied that they are who
they say they are.

“Trust me, as soon as all the
documents are in, and we have
interviewed them, the process is
very swift,” said Mr Burrows.

He claimed that properly doc-
umented applications can be
completed in short order — “cer-

_ woman whose spot was also

Knights of the Order of
St John of Jerusalem
honour for Felix Stubbs

PROMINENT Bahamian businessman Felix
Stubbs will be honoured by the Knights of the Order
of St John of Jerusalem in a solemn ceremony of
investiture — the first held by the order in the
Bahamas.

The ceremony will take place at the Parish Church
of St Mary the Virgin at 4pm on Saturday, January
20. Knighthood will be bestowed upon seven promi-
nent men and women from throughout the
Caribbean for their service to faith and humanity.

The order is a branch of the Knights Hospitaller,
which is among the oldest orders of chivalry still in
existence, the third oldest religious organisation in
Christendom, and the direct descendant of the 11th
century crusaders.

The knights are no strangers to the West Indies,
explained the order in a statement.

“The Order of St John purchased St Croix on
May 21, 1651 from King Louis XIV of France who
acted on behalf of the French West Indies Compa-
ny. Documents show that as many as 600 knights
lived on St Croix in the mid-to-late 17th century.”

The Knights also purchased the islands of Tortu-
ga, St Bartholomew and the French parts of St Kitts,
St Christopher, and Saint-Martin.

West Indies commander John Archer explained
the order’s ongoing mission.

“The New Crusades are a 21st century reaffir-
mation of the original hospitaller work of the order,
protection of women‘ and! ohildren, and care of the
sick and poor of the Lord: We are here to work on

a

WHY YOU VEX?

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE 9
“T still vex because the Er
government sold
junkanoo tickets for.$75 a
each and they knew
they wouldn’t have
had enough space for
the customers to sit. I
don’t know why they
put seat numbers on
the tickets because no
one respected it. We
ended up sitting like
three rows up from the
spot where we was sup-
posed to sit. Our original
spots were taken up by a
group of tourists. Another

ahs sis





usurped by a tourist stayed for
about five minutes and then left them

_ to enjoy the seats and left. If the government is going to charge
all that money for junkanoo tickets then the least they can do is
find someone to organise the seating arrangements.”



solutions for poverty, ignorance, and disease. We are
here to restore honour and dignity through service

' to our righteous God.” ,

Grand Prior Emeritus Ian Roger, GCSJ, the Pri-
or of the Pacific, will officiate the service in Nassau.

The Commandery of the West Indies is currently
undertaking several projects that serve the sick and
poor — among them “Jay’s Well” which brings water
to a small remote village in Haiti, close to a school,
where previously children and adults walked hours
in each direction for a drink of water.

The CWI is also a significant supporter of a car-
diac clinic in St Croix which serves a significant por-
tion of the West Indies.

The international headquarters of the Knights
Hospitaller is located in Valetta, Malta — home to
900 Knights and Dames worldwide.

The organisation operates through local non-prot-
it entities created under the laws of their respec-
tive countries.

Each unit carries out humanitarian projects under
its charitable trusts, while promoting good works
undertaken separately by its members.

“For 900 years, the order gained and maintained
its renown through the bravery and determination of

its members. Throughout history, the members have |

been known for their countless acts of mercy; the
protection of women and children, sick and lame; for
their honour and dignity, support of noble causes,
righting wrongs, and by their service to a righteous
God,” the statement said.

-TEW

Nitroce ie ence come
promote high standards

NURSES have been challenged to promote the highest possible
standard of practice and encourage professional development and edu-
cational advancement for their profession.

“Continue to ensure all people irrespective or nationality, race,
colour or social origins have optimal nursing care,” said Airport
Authority human resources manager, Olive Forbes.

"She was speaking during the Nurses Association of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas’ installation of officers on Monday, January 15.

“The world is ever-changing, so be forceful to enunciate the stan-
dards of nursing and promote their implementation,” she said. “You
must stimulate and encourage proficiency among nurses and please,
continue to participate in the national healthcare campaign.”

Ms Forbes called on nurses to examine how important their career
is to them.

“Are nurses living up to the duties and responsibilities of their
vocation?” she asked. “How do nurses care for their patients? Are you
showing love on a daily basis to patients? And are you really truly pre-
pared for the unexpected?

“Nursing should be a calling because if you do not like people, and
some do not, then you would definitely not like sick people. You see,
if nursing is a calling, then you would love what you are doing.”

The new executive team of the union includes president Prescola
Rolle; first vice president Stephanie Poitier; second vice president
Rebecca Johnson; treasurer Rosemarie Josey; assistant treasurer
Dominique Rox.

The standing committee chairpersons for 2006 — 2008 are: for the
standards/practice committee, Karol Mackey; for education and
research, Persephone A Munnings; for socio-economic and welfare
matters, Stacey A Dean; for membership, Leisl Pennerman; and for
public relations, D Enika Johnson

Outgoing president Ampusam Symonette said the new executive
team “is a vibrant one.” ,

The association has been around since 1947 and has about 375
members. The membership is made up of registered and clinical
nurses. aU
















ne



“I vex because I'm about to graduate and I don’t know what
I'm going to do — I want to come home but, it seems as if
employers don’t want to give graduates a chance, as well as, I
want to go to graduate school, but it seems as if ‘who ya know’
is all that matters when trying to get scholarships. So in actual-
ity I'm more lost,than vex.”

-Hopeless

. “T vex because I have been waiting for weeks for my garbage
to be collected and no one has come yet. I live out east and my
trash hasn’t been collected since December. The garbage is
piling up and it is beginning to stink. Its useless trying to call a
government agency, because they only transfer me from one per-
son to the next and still nothing gets done. Whoever is respon-
sible for the collection of garbage needs to address the situation
because this is past ridiculous.”

-L Wilson

“I’m vex at the current national average in the Bahamas. As
a recent graduate of high school and a future college graduate,
I can tell you that school would be not that difficult if students
would only sit down and do their work. The problem is every-
one wants to do their own thing and establish relationships
instead of paying attention to their work. Not only am I vex, I
am embarrassed. Students, we need to wake up.”

WHY YOU HAPPY?

“I’m happy because my daughter went to the Gymnastics Jr
Orange bowl International Competition in Coral Springs, Flori-
da and came home with all of the medals. This was her first time
competing on an international level and she racked up four
medals and one trophy.”

-Lynn Brennen

ntercooled Turbocharged —
Air-Conditioned ==

ES

6 Speakers

MONTROSE.

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE PREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION FULL SET FLOOR MATS
PARTS & SERVICE ASSURED



rane
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007



In Days Gone By: rally fever



WITH General Elections
just months away, political
season is taking off. Every
election year, seas of people
get caught up in the “rally
fever”. On Thursday night, at
a rally in Fox Hill, FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham
announced three of his party’s
candidates for the upcoming
election. In this edition of IN
DAYS GONE BY, we take a
look back at rallies and
demonstrations dating back to
the 1980s. Even then, the
crowds ranged in the thou-
sands. .

@ FEBRUARY 6, 1985 -
FNM supporters carry plac-
ards. Young FNM supporters
are shown blocking Bay
Street. The march stopped in
front of the House of
Assembly.

THE TRIBUNE





. JUNE 15, 1987 -
FORMER Free National
Movement leader Kendal

Issacs is greeted by enthusias-
* tic supporters during Friday
night’s rally at the R M Bailey
Park. Over 6,0000 people
reportedly attended the rally.

(Photo: ODELL
POWELL)
The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21ST,’ 2006















11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Services

Speaker:Pastor Dexter Duvalier





Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm








































Pastor:H. Mills

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
oeeten P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
wummma Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

Waa CHURCH SERVICES
EET] SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 2007

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

METHODIST SCHOOLS SUNDAY

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev.Livingston Parks/Youth Service

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road .
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard

10:00AM Rev. Minerva Knowles

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM Pastor Sidney Pinder/Youth Service
7:00PM — Mr. Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill -
Avenue

8:00AM Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Mr. Hartis Pinder
7:00PM Mr. Jocelyn Demeritte
HRI KAIRIE KIKI II AAAI IKARIA IKI IIIA AAI AAAI AAAI IAA AIA AAA AAA AAI
RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS'1

Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’

on each weekday at 6:55a.m.

Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH- will be holding an HONOURS WORSHIP
SERVICE on Sunday, January 21, 2006- Preacher; Mrs. Kenris L. Carey, Prsident,
The Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Chuch and the Dedication of the
Harold Poiter Resource Center in honour of the late Harold Poiter.

- LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

Geared To The Future



Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am




Prayer time: 6:30pm



Place:



The Madeira Shopping

é Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs



»

Girace and Peace Wesleyan OTe

A t Ch

North America
WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE 1S AFFIRMED
Worship time: Ila.m. & 7p.m.
Adult Sunday School: [0a.m.

HONOURS LUCHEON at 1:00 p.m. at the Wyngham Cable Beach Resort. Members g : a .
being honoured as New Congregational Board Members Emeriti- Mrs. Althea Church School during Worship Service

Lewis &Mr. Maxwell Poitier. Donation: $40.00







Place: Twynam Feights
off Prince Charles Drive

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY JANUARY 21ST, 2007
7:00 a.m. Sis.Kenris Carey/Sis. Alice Woodside
11:00 a.m. Youth/Bro. Jamicko Forde
7:00 p.m. Bro. Sidney Pinder/Board of Evangelism :

Minister: Rey. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587




“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7) RSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE















Fr.



B MAY 5, 1987 —- SOME of the more than 10,000 PLP sup-
porters who jammed the Poiniciana Arena, its adjoining rooms
and a makeshift tent outside, wave blue and yellow poms-poms
last night during the closing of the party’s All-New Provi-
dence “All Aboard” convention.






DUR PALHONE TALK
WE BELIEVE HIM
THATS THAT








M@ MONDAY October 24, 1983 — “We want PLP and Bahami-
anisation, not FNM and Americanisation” reads one of the placards
held by participants in the ‘We Day’ parade organised by the PLP
on Saturday. Supporters wore PLP T-shirts and waved a variety of
banners supporting Prime Minister Lynden Pindling and his gov-
ernment and alleging attacks on the country’s second industry,
banking. Members of a contingent of the Boys Brigade Band can
be seen with instruments at right. Other bands playing electric
instruments travelled in open-backed trucks. A junkanoo group was
also present. Sir Lynden told the audience that the gathering was
to commemorate the formation of the PLP. About 15,000 people
attended.




%

a ae

1 *#& eee
‘ & 2 &@ w#@ 4 4
PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 THE TRIBUNE




a oyey-Via 11 ee | :

Boys day retreat at St Paul’s Catholic Centre

@ RIGHT: The boys from .
Woodcock Primary School start
the day by singing the school’s
song during the day retreat at St
Paul's Catholic Centre yester-
day.






@ BELOW: The head boy
and prefect from Woodcock
Primary School look over their
speeches, moments before pre-
senting them to their classmates.

(All photos by:
Ana Bianca Marin

Bu B oo esos

Paul’s Catholic Centre.









“ @ FIFTH and sixth graders from Woodcock Primary School | i The head boy gives a speech during the opening ceremony of the boys retreat.

meet at the St. Paul’s Catholic Centre for a Boys Day Retreat.

Chavez claims Castro
is fighting for his life



Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday, 17 January-200 7



























































Abaco Markets -0.293 0.00% i
10.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.30 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.54% fa RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
6.90 Bank of Bahamas, 8.03 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.24%
0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50% “acl : :
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85 0.00 0.199 0.060 9.3 3.24% _VENEZUELAN Pr esident Hugo Chavez said Friday that
4.10 Fidelity Bank 1.25 0.00 0.170 0.050 7A 4.00% Fidel Castro is "battling for his life" and that he spoke with the
oo Se ieee aoe 1,920 re ore 14.0 2.40% ailing Cuban leader for nearly half an hour several days ago,
: ‘ f : 24.4 2.11% saNatas ake ean
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 12.65 0.00 400 0.943, 0.680 12.7 5.38% according to Associated Press. ,
ce Savecicaies Waite BDRs 4.91 -0.03 0.134 0.045 36.6 0.92% Chavez, a close ally and admirer of Castro, compared the
i octor's Hospita 2.50 i .295 a y % Whe snderias si “ 4 oe ;
aay eocuce Pp : : ee ay Rees neaG a Peo Cuban leader's attempt to recover from an unspecified medical _,
10.70 Finco _ : 12.25 0.00 0.779 0570 15.7 4.65% condition to the 1950s, when Castro was a guerrilla in Cuba's
en tee iene mite pee eee Nae Scan eastern mountains fighting the government he would overthrow.
7 : 4 5 2e * o : gs : a A ° : “5
0.50 Freaport Gonereté oa nee -0.423 0.000 Rin 8.00% "Fidel is in the Sierra Maestra again, battling for his life,"
7.15 ICD Utilities . 7.20 0.00 0.532 0.135 13.5 1.88% Chavez said after attending a summit of South American leaders
J. S. Johnson 0.00 0.588 0.560 14.6 6.51%} in Rio
Premier Real Estate 1.269 0.795 79 7.95% wore : , 8 os :
. “ — eee Castro, 80, has not been seen in public since shortly before July
Symbol Bid $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS$ Div $ P/E Yield 31 when he announced he was temporarily stepping aside while
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.766 1.080 8.8 7.40% he recovered fron aa
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85% rom an operation. . :
ngs cutiiteoe 0.021 0.000 26.2 ———:0.00% He has provisionally ceded power to his brother Raul, the 75-
be oo A Seta ONE) 5 S56 oe : co year-old defense minister.
i : 2. 0.000 19.4 0.00% ee ‘ ws . ;
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 54.66 T5686 foioe Bi Baad Castro's medical condition is a state secret, but Cuban authori- ,
0.35 RND Holdings - ae i 1 ohana et 9.070 0,000. N/M o.oo%f ties deny he suffers from terminal cancer, as U.S. intelligence
: é oe BISX Listed Mutual Funds : . officials have claime ‘ Ffici
(OE ree ace q Mus igen Se : ee c it icials have claimed. Cuban officials have nonetheless stopped
12681 Golna Nieoney Mercer Fund aT aeSTOA insisting Castro will return to power. 4 :
2-6282' Fidelity Guhamas @ & rund 2.9726" In a speech Wednesday night, Chavez called Castro's situation
: ina MSI Preferre' un ‘ oe "dalicate Wie Teal acer, j i
ilies? Coenen cers Ree ae sone delicate" but dismissed as speculation recent Spanish press ‘
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund —11.3075**""* . reports portraying Castro as near death after three failed opera-
EOS CRORE OT OR TOOL ABTS C008 S407 % tions and complications from the intestinal infection diverticulitis.
. MARKE 3 YIELD - last 12 onth dividends divided by closing price EY * ns is . .
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 woeks Bid $ - Binine pied a Bane and mean me ea On Friday, C havez said he could not give more details about
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 wenks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity + 5 January 2007 Castro's condition "because I'm not the doctor who's caring for
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily valume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price ens "
| Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week “44 December 2006 Fidel. ,
| Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths He added: "And if I was, I wouldn't anyway but nevertheless I
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today z NAV - Net Asset Value *** 31 December 2006 y NM, Le : ¥ + ill di ] 1
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful can tell you. I don't know when Fidel wi le, I hope he lives 80
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 +98. Snibeeannibar 2008 more years, I hope he lives 100 more years."
ear eA A ee a ee £ iesen bat eene Chavez is known for making bold statements without elaborat-
I TO FRAIE EATTO GOVT SAS BAS TATA T FTRET TRE SAS SER SEAT PEAR PIAS Fea 4 RTPA TRAPPER APE PRUPAT BBWS RA : nl no,
'


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 9





Alpha Dog ahead



lm By JASON DONALD

ALPHA DOG

Starring: Justin Timberlake, Bruce
Willis, Sharon Stone, Emile Hirsch

THERE is always the danger that an
unpleasant story centred around unap-
pealing people might result in an

unpleasant, unappealing film.

Crime drama Alpha Dog half proves
this point: it’s definitely unpleasant —
but, thanks to some fine performances
from its young cast, it just about man-.
ages to avoid being unappealing.

Inspired by a true story, the film
takes place among a group of wealthy,
middle class teens from Los Angeles,
who do little other than indulging in

drugs and partying.

_ When one of them, drug dealer John-
ny Truelove, gets into a cash row with a
particularly highly-strung member of
the social circle, Jake, it results in the
latter’s younger brother Zack being
“kidnapped” until the dispute can be

resolved.

At first, Zack’s kidnapping involves
nothing more than taking him to parties
and making him part of his would-be
captors’ decadent. lifestyle. But when
the police get involved in the search
for the missing youngster, the situation

begins to spiral out of control.

The fact that Alpha Dog makes for
uncomfortable virtually from start to

finish is testament to some great acting.

Justin Timberlake makes a seamless
transition to the big screen as perhaps
the nearest thing to a sympathetic char-

in "Alpha Dog."

acter in this dodgy bunch, there’s an

intense turn by Shawn Hatosy as Tru-
elove’s put-upon devotee and Emile
Hirsch is suitably ruthless as a young

criminal in over his head.





THE Ministry of Tourism
has announced a number of
master class workshops
designed to help Bahamians
take advantage of the many
opportunities that are open-
ing up in the industry.

The workshops, which will
total 14 in all, are being held
as part of National Tourism
Week later this month.

The ministry noted in a

. statement that government has
announced more than $18 bil-
lion in new developments
throughout the Bahamas.

“These developments have
the potential to create a very
robust economy with oppor-
tunities for jobs and spin-off
businesses,” the statement
said. “The proposed invest-
ments are concentrated on a
number of islands and have
the ability to greatly enhance
the standards of living for
many Family Island residents
if they are prepared to
embrace them. The billion dol-
lar question then remains.
How do Bahamians take
advantage of the pending
opportunities?”

This topic will be addressed

in the My Bahamas Market

master class workshop session

on “Investing in tourism
_ Opportunities.”

The ministry said a very
knowledgeable panel has been
put together to direct this
workshop which promises to
deliver real and usable advice
for becoming a stakeholder in
the tourism industry.

Another unexploited oppor-

tunity for industrious Bahami- -

ans, the statement said, lies in
the $50 billion weddings and
$12 billion honeymoon indus-
try.

“Everybody likes to believe
in the fairy tale of ‘happily
ever-afters.’ And weddings are
wonderful time for immersing
in that feeling,” it said.

According to estimates by
About.com, every year, an
average of 2.4 million wed-
dings are performed in the
United States.

The escalating cost of a US
wedding, which average
upwards from $27,852, how-
ever, has many Americans
choosing the cheaper alterna-
tive of a destination wedding.

“Honeymoon statistics from
About.com estimate that 16



per cent of marriages in the
US are destination weddings.
Many destinations inside and
outside of the United States
are seeing the upswing poten-
tial of this burgeoning market
and are quickly adapting their
product to cater to this grow-
ing demographic,” the Min-
istry of Tourism said.

Currently, of the top five
locations for destination wed-
dings, the Bahamas ranks fifth
with an average of 4,000 wed-
dings per year. The top rank-
ing destination, Las Vegas,
performs over 125,000 desti-
nation weddings annually.

“The potential for this mar-
ket is seen as tremendous and
is being closely watched by the
bridal industry,” the statement
said.

Former Fairchild Bridal

Group marketing director and

certified travel counsellor
Jacqueline Johnson will
explore this topic and outline
opportunities to “Profit from
romance” next week
during this My Bahamas Mar-
ketplace master class work-
shop.

The workshops begin on
January 22. Registration is
available online at
www.ntwbahamas.com.

ee"



But the real standout is Ben Foster —
his kinetic performance as borderline
psychotic Jake is one of most of the
most electrifying I’ve seen in a long

_ Tourism -
workshops

LOCAL NEWS

Fine performances k
of the pack

°
time. Definitely a young actor to watch
out for.
There are downsides to the movie,

however: a clumsy attempt to punctuate __ tighter.

aster class
announced



x

@ PICTURED is a National Tourism Week 2006 master class
workshop at the Wyndham Nassau Resort. This year, NTW will
offer 14 master class sessions covering a wide range of industry top-
iics.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARILYN DORCELEY OF
GENERAL DELIVERY, PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EVANS OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS _ is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen

of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



the proceedings with direct-to-camera
docu-drama moments doesn’t really
work, and the pacing could have been










eep



@ IN THIS photo provided by Universal, Elvis Schmidt (Shawn Hatosy) and Frankie Ballenbacher (Justin Timberlake) discuss what to do with their hostage

(AP Photo/Universal/Darren Michaels)

ing.

But, for the most part, Alpha Dog
is a searing portrayal of out-of-
control youth and is well worth catch-

Spirit Airlines to
begin flying to
Haiti in March

@ PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti

DISCOUNT carrier Spir-
it Airlines will offer service
between Fort Lauderdale
and Haiti's capital beginning
in March, the airline said
Thursday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Fort Lauderdale-based
Spirit will fly to Port-au-
Prince three times a week
starting March 22 and will
offer daily flights starting in
May, the airline said in a
statement.

Onerway fares between
Fort Lauderdale and Port-

au-Prince will start at $93,
according to Spirit's Web
site.

Barry Biffle, Spirit's
chief marketing officer,
said. the new service
would give the 250,000
people of Haitian descent
living in South Florida “a
new low-fare option for trav-
el."

Spirit currently flies to 29
destinations, including 12 in
the Caribbean.

Earlier this week, the air-
line announced a new ser-
vice between Fort Laud-
erdale and Aguadilla, Puer-
to Rico.

General Maintenance Personnel
Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and

some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience

and must provide references.

Excellent salary and benefits package

Commensurate with experience.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, LISA

ILLIAN HEATH

of the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, The |
Bahamas P.O.BOX F-41702, intend to change my name
to JILLIAN BARTLETT. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-792,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY JOHNSTON OF |
MARSH HARBOUR, P.O. Box AB 20282, ABACO, -
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

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MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info
call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

B CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Mon-
day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach
¢ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton
Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482
for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

& CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded persons
to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C
C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343 meets
Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Aipha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Rotary Club of Nassau meets every Tuesday at
Luciano's of Chicago on East Bay Street. Fellowship
starts at 12:30pm with the meeting held from 1pm-
2pm.

WEDNESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to









AROUN D

THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU

a





7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screen-
ing.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS. Can-
cer patients, survivors, their family members and
friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

~ NCIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speaker
and great fellowship. If you would like to attend our
meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery:

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public
to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday
at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is
a worldwide service organisation dedicated to chang-
ing the world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from lOam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Colum-
bus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274
now to make reservations. Open to all ages and
groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at
the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm - Gen-
tlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH
Free public health lectures featuring distinguished



54








JAN 27, 200?

Third National Exhibition (ne3)_

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 cantemparary
Bahanvian artists exploring a vanety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalague,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Whesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. itcontalas the work of eight artists ari offers
samples of the best comtemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are eclay and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imagination,



physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.
REACH - Resources & Education for Autism.and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the'sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the
BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
e TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office com-
plex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fellow-
ship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held from
lpm to 2pm.

FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm.
New Providence Community Centre: Friday 7pm
to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre at







PHOTOS WELCOME

St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents of
the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

Hi CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring. Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on Fri-
day, January 26 at 8pm at St Paul’s Church Hall,
Lyford Cay. -

SATURDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association méets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Train-
ing Representative at 302.4732 for more information
and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10
and 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in

an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents inter- ©

ested in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

if FAMILY REUNION

New - The Valley Family Reunion for former
residents and those reuniting with loved ones and
friends will be holding a

Dinner, Dance Celebration on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 3 - Cocktails at 8pm and dinner at 8:30pm -
at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Gov-
ernor’s Ballroom. The evening will include cock-
tails, dinner and dancing and a three course buffet
dinner. A live band will also be featured. Dress:
Lounge Suit. Renew old acquaintances and meet
friends from school days. For more information
telephone 328.5494. Tickets are available at
McCartney’s Pharmacy, Mount Royal Avenue.
Part proceeds to benefit children’s charities.

lm CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on
Saturday, January 27 at 8pm at St Andrew’s Kirk,
Shirley Street.



SUNDAY

HB PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the
Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to
9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A
spiritual teaching society leading you to greater peace
of mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every Wednes-
day at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Inter-
ested persons are welcome to attend. For more infor-
mation contact by e-mail @ bahmetsol @hotmail.com
or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures if
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the sub-
Ject line.



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SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 11

THE TRIBUNE |

Gun threat’ “Help save the family’ rally set for Spanish Wells |

allegation
FROM page one

ly manage that investigation,”
he said.

Mr Thompson, Permanent
Secretary at the Ministry of
Local Government, was said
to be out of office yesterday,
and Minister Alfred Gray was
also said to be out of office
until Tuesday of next week.

Royal Oasis
FROM page one

it failed to raise the financing nec-
essary for its $40 million purchase.

Some of the original investors
are now part of a new group that
is hoping to close the deal for
Royal Oasis.

“Tf the matter with the World
group does not proceed and they
are unsuccessful, then certainly
we hope for Harcourt. They’re
ideal for Grand Bahama, they
want to be there, they. understand
Grand Bahama. We’re hoping it
all comes together,” Mr Wilch-
combe said.

Tribune Business in December
reported that government had
approached the Dublin-based
Harcourt group to see if it
remained interested in acquiring
the crisis-stricken resort as part
of its wider investment plans on
Grand Bahama.

Minister Wilchcombe said that
he hopes that the purchase of the
Royal Oasis resort, which has
been closed for more two years,
will be concluded before the sum-
mer.

“I’m optimistic, it’s taken a
while, we’ve gone through a num-
ber of people, we've heard a num-
ber of wonderful stories, won-
derful proposals. The truth of the
matter is that they sometimes just
don’t pan out and we don’t want
to be left with egg on our faces,”
he said.

When the Royal Oasis closed
in September 2004, its operator
Driftwood had left liabilities of
at least $22 millions.

The resort also owed the hotel
pension funds $4.1 million.

Other creditors included the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
and its companies, Grand
Bahama Power, the National
Insurance Board (NIB), and oth-
er private companies on Grand
es

















ANTI-same sex union cam-
paigners have announced that
they will continue to expand
the crusade to have marriage
enshrined in the constitution
as a union between a man and
a woman.

Rex Major and Associates
announced yesterday that the
next “Help save the family”
rally is set for Spanish Wells, at
the Food Fair Parking Lot, on
January 24 at 7.30pm.

“In view of the escalating
drive to get same-sex marriages
legalised around the world, our
challenge here as a Christian
nation — publicly acknowledg-
ing God as supreme — is that
we could become the first
nation to state publicly in our
constitution that the true
nature of marriage is a union
between a man and a woman
only,” the group said in a state-
ment yesterday. :

“In light of the tremendous
confusion evidenced all across
the world and in the west in
particular, concerning the true
nature of marriage, it is indeed

Gay rights concerns

FROM page one



uals and they need to be protected as well. Certainly, altercations
can take place between them and they need protection. That
does not say — no one should assume — that that means condoning
same-sex relationships.”

Pastor Moss said that what he opposes is any legal recognition
of same sex unions, such as civil unions. -

Under the new act, domestic violence would
be defined as including “physical, sexual, emotional or psycho-
logical or financial abuse committed by a person against a
spouse, partner, child, any member of the household or depen-
dent.”

This new definition further allows new parties to seek redress
under domestic violence legislation, as The Sexual Offences &
Domestic Violence Act, 1991, relates specifically to married indi-
viduals.

Magistrate’s Courts also would be able to issue protection
orders against abusers, which, if violated, can carry up to 12
months in prison and a $5000 fine, or both.

Further discretion exists in law for magistrates to refer the
matter to the Supreme Court if harsher punishment is deemed nec-
essary.

Children, or, with leave from the court, an agent of a spouse or
partner, would also be able to seek a protection order.

More controversially, the Commissioner of Police, or an officer
of a Department charged with child welfare, can seek a protection
order without charges or a complaint being filed by any member
of the household.

Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson, Director of the Crisis Centre, stat-
ed that the consolation process for the proposed legislation is
still ongoing. She advised Bahamians to review the legislation on
the Bahamas government’s website, and to send any e-mails or
questions to the Ministry of Social Services.

Minister of Social Services Melanie Griffin told The Tribune she
hopes the legislation will be passed before parliament is dissolved
in the run-up to the next general election.



@ HELP Save the Family Committee - from left are Leroy Hanna, Rex Major and Andy Knowles

heartening that the Bahamas
Constitutional Review Com-
mission has made a specific rec-
ommendation to the Bahamas
government regarding this mat-
ter,” it said.

In a March 2006 preliminary
report, the commission
declared that the majority of
Bahamians want the law of
marriage as a union between a
man and a woman to be
enshrined in the constitution.

In August last year, Rex



church ministry, along with
other ministers, conducted a
rally in Rawson Square.

“Hundreds of concerned
Bahamians gathered to say
loud and clear that they stand
behind this recommendation
just mentioned — that the true
nature of marriage as a union
between a woman and a man,
be carried out.

“A petition to this effect is

being signed across the com-
monwealth as we speak,” the
statement said.

The group said that because
of the nature of this matter and
the “serious impact” it could
have on the future of the
nation, it was determined that a
rally should be held in every
population centre of the
Bahamas.

The first Family Island rally
was conducted on November
18 last year in Salt Pond, Long
Island.

On January 28, another rally
will be conducted in Harbour
Island at ’Briland Park, the
group said.

Each person who attends the
rallies and signs a petition will
be calling out to the govern-
ment “to adopt the recom-
mendation without delay,” the
group said.

The rallies are held under
the patronage of couples from
the community married for 50
years or more. A special recog-
nition will be paid to all couples
who have been married for 25
years or more.

“It is hoped that all married
couples will attend and partic-
ipate in the public renewal of
vows ceremony, which will be
conducted as a special feature
of the rally,” the statement

Major and Associates, a para-

said.

FNM Fox Hill candidate

FROM page one

ing tasks they were asked to do. I would have felt
better if they were allowed to do a computer
course free of charge or attend some institution
paid for by the government as a form of com-
pensation,” she said. ;

The educator said approximately one year
into Mr Mitchell's term in office, a tractor bull-
dozed the entire foundation of the community

- centre that George Mackey and the people of the

Fox Hill Constituency had built.

Dr Higgs said that more than $40,000 of mate-
rial and labour were crushed and carted off,
truck load by truck load.

This, she said, shocked George Mackey, who
in turned called civic, religious and political lead-
ers from both the PLP and the FNM in Fox Hill
to attend several meetings where the people
demanded that the foundation be replaced.

“They wanted the MP to abandon his quest to _

build four houses on the property. The meet-
ing was held at St Mark’s Baptist Church in Fox
Hill, where Mr Mitchell was accompanied by
high ranking officers from the Ministry of Hous-
ing. They presented a new plan with four hous-



cy Ae available in
Ne Oe Lae) eas
Ask for them in-store today.

es to be built on the property. The people of Fox
Hill said, ‘No way’,” she said.

Unfortunately, Dr Higgs said, the MP did not
get the message, because instead of inviting all
Fox Hill people to get together and build the cen-
tre so that we could all be proud owners he got
together with a few of his friends and proceeded
to replace the foundation, and construct the
community centre.

Dr Higgs charged that very few sub-contracts
have been offered to the many qualified trades-
men from the Fox Hill constituency.

This notwithstanding that the employment
rate within the Fox Hill community has not
improved.

“One of the experiences I will never forget
was when Fred Mitchell told me and a group of
young volunteers and PLP campaign workers,
that he was not George Mackey. He repeated
this on national TV during the memorial ser-
vice at St. Paul's Baptist Church.

“Of course, he can never be George Mackey,
God rest his soul; Mr. Mackey got both FNMs
and PLPs to work together for the good of the
community. Our present.MP seeks to divide the
leaders and people of the Fox Hill constituency,”
she said.



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Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause

Heart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases.



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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

-





Ce a ul
NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA oo

anual ean Gala Bal

@ CHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall begins the legal year with
a warm welcome to all guests, including special guests, Cana-
dian Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and her husband
Frank McArdle .

(LEFT to Right) Lady Camille Hall, Sir Burton Hall,
Chief Justice of the Bahamas, Arthur D. Hannah Governor-
General, Chief Justice of Canada Beverly McLachlin, Frank
McArdle, husband of Chief Justice McLachlin, Dame Joan
Sawyer, President of Court-of-Appeal.












mo

PUD GES tite tei oueurers aU CCESSEUL deveuner aud @ ATTORNEY Wayne Munroe, President of the

year of high profile cases. businessman Jerry Capo, owner of es
Magistrate Linda Virgill and _ the Bimini Bay Resort, ‘and with his Bahamas Bar Association, Attorney Hope C V Stra-

Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaac, wife Carmen Capo take time out to chan of Equity House, Mt Royal Avenue, Attorney
attend the ball. Sidney Cambridge, partner in the law firm of Cal-

lender and Company





@ ATTORNEY-GENERAL Alivsbu Maynard-Gibson with
her husband businessman Maxwell Gibson, owner of Colombian:
Emeralds International.



LENE Ree Pee Rese ee ee eae GENE eeu eee eee eee neneeenenesesne seen eeseneeuee see Eeenses ese sbs en eenaneaeeeeeunsnsuenennss seed deeedehite .

Opening of the 2007 legal year



fl ATTORNEY Samuel Campbell, former Commissioner of Police B. K. Bonamy, Director of Legal Affairs Attorney
Deborah Frasier, Attorney Charles McKay, Appeal Justice Hartman Longley.

& BASEL O'Brien,
High Commissioner
to United Kingdom,
Marlene O'Brien, for-
mer Secretary Ella
Thompson, Attorney
Anthony Thompson
of Anthony Thomp-
son and Company. Mr
Thompson is the for-
mer deputy manager
of the Bahamas Mon-
etary Authority —a
fore-runner of the
Central Bank of the
Bahamas.



@ THE parents (Lady Zoe and Sir Clement Maynard, former
deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas) of Acting Justice Dr’
Peter Maynard and Attorney-General Allyson Maynard must |
be celebrating more than just their 60th wedding anniversary. |
For it is the first time in the history of the Bahamas that a
brother and sister hold such high judicial office.





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~ SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports

ah RET EE



SPORTS.
NE



@ BASKETBALL
NPWBA ACTION

SUZETTE McKenzie,

- back in action after serv-

ing a three-game suspen-
sion by the New Provi-
dence Women’s Basket-
ball Association, canned
10 points, but it wasn’t
enough Thursday night to
lift the Cleaning Center
Lady Angels over the Sun-
shine Auto Cheetahs.
- Linda Pierre pumped in
-a game high 17 points,
Lucinda Sylvain had 12
and Anastacia Moultrie
chipped in with nine
points and 19 rebounds in
the Lady Cheetahs 56-38
decision over the Lady
Angels at the DW Davis
Gym.

Kecia Smith led the
Lady Angels with 14 and
Tarana Pyfrom had 12.

In the other game
played, Kaivonne New-
bold posted a game high

~.31 points with seven
rebounds to help the Col-
lege of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs record a 64-37 rout
over the Junior All-Stars.
Tiffany Wildgoose had

'.\- eight points in the loss for

-’. the hapless All-Stars.

meen lige te tb

“lg GSSSA ACTION

IT WAS a double dose
of victory for the CI Gib-
son. Rattlers over the Gov-
ernment High Magics on
Thursday as the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools
Sports Association contin-
ued its regular season bas-
ketball action at the DW

. Davis Gym.

Charlise Burns and
Olivia Grant both scored
eight points and Grant
added eight points with
five rebounds as the Rat-
tlers knocked off the Mag-
icwomen 39-15 in a senior
girls game.

Crystal Curry and Kate-
cha Gilcud both had seven
points in the loss.

The Rattlers senior boys
then clobbered the Magic-
men 68-32 as Jermaine
Storr scored a game high
24 points and Drew Rolle
chipped in with eight
rebounds

William Dean led Gov- —

ernment High with 10

points and six rebounds.
In the other game

played, Eugene Bain

scored a game high 31

points with 11 rebounds

- and Gerrad Lubin had 11

‘.’ points and seven steals.as

the CC Sweeting Cobras
pulled off a 79-67 win over
the CV Bethel Stingrays.

Courtney Johnson had
nine pointsand10
rebounds and Sherman
Ferguson had seven
rebounds in the loss.

Over at the CI Gibson
Gym, the HO Nash junior
girls blasted the LW
“Young Golden Eagles 40-
14,

Lakeisha Munroe scored
a game high 18 in the win
and Ladonna Parkinson
got nine in the loss.

In one of the two junior
boys games, the CH
Reeves Raptors nipped
the CC Sweeting Scorpi-
ons 52-50 as Patrico Lead-
on had a game high 27 in
. the win. Gabi Laurent had
. 23 in the loss.

And in the other junior
boys game, the AF Adder-
ley Fighting Tigers pulled
off a 38-29 decision over
the LW Young Golden
Eagles as Alex Rahming
scored 20. Desean

- Williams had 16 in the

loss.

@100jamz.com

OF



«

AY

wt wine

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Major ‘going to be a
id champion soon

ASS

International
sports
round-up



Former American Olympian Anthony

m@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter



IT’S only been a couple
days, but Meacher ‘Pain’
Major has settled back in
his training environment in
Hollywood, Florida and he’s
looking forward to bigger
and better things in the
future.

Training under the watch-
ful eyes of former Ameri-
can Olympian Anthony
‘Chills’ Wilson at the War-
riors Boxing Club, Major
went through his first spar-
ring session on Thursday
and he admitted that it was
a good feeling.

“Being in an environment
with the world class fight-

‘ers gives me~mieh-more

inspiration than being at

home,” said Major, who

fought in a series of match-
es with First Class Promo-
tions in the last two years.
“It makes you want to go
out there and push harder.”
Major, the Bahamas light-
weight champion, said with

“this being a new year, he

felt he needed to get in
more sparring than he

received at home in order .

to get to the next level in
the sport.

“If you keep on sparring
with the same guys over and
over, they will eventually
catch onto you,” he admit-
ted. “So I felt I needed
more improvement because
I know it will get harder and
harder in the ring, so I

needed the rough sparring
to get.ready for that.
“There’s always room for
improvement, so I just
wanted to get back over
here, get in tip top shape

and then gear up to fight in »

about two months. It’s a
process and I’m prepared to
go through it.”

Wilson said he’s excited
to have Major back in Flori-

- da.

“He’s going to be a world
champion soon,” Wilson
projected. “We have a great
training camp set up for
him, so look for some great
things for Meacher.”

Motivate

Having fought some of

the best fighters in the
world during his career,
Wilson said.he knows what
it takes to motivate a guy
like Major and he admitted
that he has already brought
his confidence level back
up.
“He’s like a champion is
supposed to look,” Wilson
reflected. “All it was is he
was missing his coach. He’s
comfortable and he looks
real good. And he’s going
to look even better as we
continue to work out.”

Wilson said Major has the

skills of a “pure boxer” and
based on his experience in
the ring, he intends to
“bring out his best and
make him a world champi-
on”.

“He’s a champion in my



eyes, but he’s looking even
better in the gym right now,
Come Monday, he will be
sparring with a Puerto
Rican national champion.
He will be getting some
quality sparring.”

But Wilson said he’s not
going to rush the time table
to get Major back in the
ring. He said he will defi-
nitely be working on putting
in a good month of sparring
and conditioning before he
competes around the end of
March.

“By the end of March or
April, look for him to be
back in the ring,” Wilson
projected. “I will have him
ready to fight at least once
or twice a month and get
him back on the right
track.”

Bhe -geal.according bidder
Wilson, is to have Major
fight some of the best fight-
ers in his class in a bid to
get him a world ranking and
eventually a world title shot.

“He’s got all the tools to
be a champion and we will
slowly work at getting him
there to fight for a title,” he
promised.

@ RIGHT: Meacher
‘Pain’ Major

m@ BELOW: Meacher —
‘Pain’. Majorsimaction.....
against Puerto Rico’s Cel-
stino Rodriquez in their
First Class Promotions’
main event bout last’

_ March.

‘Chills’ Wilson works with Bahamian boxer

- Eon al 3 ae Poke oe









UT aN DD OD ONO toe

The Masters Softball League will be in action this weekend at
the Archdeacon William Thompson Softball Park at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds. The games will get started at 11 a.m.
on Saturday and noon on Sunday.


















@ TRACK
BAAA’S RELAYS




Hot on the heels of the Odd Distance Track and Field Cham-
pionships that were held last weekend, the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Association will host its National High School
Relays today at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, starting at 1 p.m.






@ FOOTBALL
CAFL ACTION

The Commonwealth Ainerican Football League will be back
in action this weekend at the DW Davis playing field. On Sat-
urday at 1 p.m., the John Bull Jets will take on the Nassau
Sunburners. On Sunday at 1 p.m. the Orry J. Sands Pros will
play the Bombers. ~






m@ BASKETBALL
NPWBA DOUBLE HEADER

The New Providence Women’s Basketball Association will be
back in action tonight with a double header on tap at the DW
Davis Gymnasium. The first game is scheduled for 7 p.m. The
feature game will be played at 8:15 p.m.













@ CRICKET
JR LEAGUE




The Bahamas Cricket Association will host a junior league
today at the Columbus Primary School field, starting at 11am.






@ RUGBY
BRU ACTION

The Bahamas Rugby Union will be back in action today at the
Winton Rugby Pitch. The action will get underway at 1 p.m.
Prive ws we tiwa

wr UE MPANT, UAAINUA EE Oy Oe gy ee Ue



SPORTS



Jonathan Massie to miss
out on Tour of the Bahamas





@ CYCLING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHEN the Jeff Auto’s
Repair annual Tour de
Bahamas Cycling Classic is
staged next month around
the western end of the island,
one notable local cyclist will
be missing from the pelaton.

Jonathan Massie will have
to sit this year’s event out in
Atlanta, Georgia.

After getting married to
American Rachel in Novem-
ber, Massie has to remain in
the United States until
around March when his
paperwork will have been
sorted out.

Events

But he assured the public.

that once everything has
been cleared, he will be gear-
ing up to represent the
Bahamas at a couple of
upcoming international
events.

“T thought the paperwork

‘would have been processed

in time, but unfortunately it
won’t, so I won’t be there

this year,” he said. “It’s quite
a shame because I wanted to
be there to represent the
country.

“But it looks like it’s going
to be a great race because
some of my ex-teammates
from Colorado will be com-
ing down for the race. So it’s
a disappointment that I
won’t be there.”

Massie, however, said that
the goal is for him to come
back home to compete in the
Bahamas Cycling Federa-
tion’s, National Cycling
Championships in July.

And in the meantime, he
is preparing himself to rep-
resent the country at the
World B Championships in
South Africa in July, the Pan
American Games in Rio
Brazil in August and the
Caribbean Championships in
October.

Currently unattached,
Massie is looking at the pos-
sibility of linking up ‘with
some of the clubs in Atlanta
with the view of joining one
of them and competing there
in the Georgia Cup Race
Series.

“I’m just going to be racing

regionally in the South East-
ern Conference and go to
Colorado for a little stint as I
prepare for those interna-
tional meets,” he revealed.
“So that is my focus this
year.”

Massie is anxious to get
back on track after having
some mechanical problems
at the Commonwealth
Games in Melbourne, Aus-
tralia last year.

Crash

He also had a crash at the
Central American and
Caribbean Games in Carta-
gena, Colombia.

“I came up to Atlanta and
I started doing some running
so that I could develop a new
focus for this year,” he stat-
ed.

“Hopefully what I do this
year, especially at the World
B Championships, .will help
me to qualify for the
Olympic Games next year.”

If he does qualify for the
Olympics in Shanghai, Chi-

_ ha, Massie will become the

first Bahamian to achieve
that feat in cycling.

B& JONATHAN MASSIE will miss out on the Tour of the Bahamas but expects it to be a great race

Michael Jordan Celebrity
_ Invitational Golf Tournament



@ ACTOR Kurt Russell tees
off from the Ist hole at the Ocean

Club Golf Course for the 6th

Annual Michael Jordan Celebrity

Invitational Golf Tournament.
(Photo: Tim Aylen)













ANGIE EVERHART celebrates

a putt on the 17th green at the Ocean
Club Golf Course for the 6th Annual

Michael Jordan Celebrity Invitational
: Golf Tournament.

(Photo: Tim Aylen)












WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU = Today: NE at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles TPF
Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles TF
FREEPORT Today: N at 7-14 Knots _ _ 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles Tee













“44/6 29/8, c






















Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles FEE

. ; ABACO Today: N at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles TF

Partly sunny. Mainly clear; breezy Partly sunny and Warm with clouds + Warm with periods of Mostly cloudy,a | The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the Sunday: E at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles (IER
late. - - breezy. and sun. sun. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.








High: 80° High: 82° ~~ High: 82° High: 80° saa TPS po
High: 80° Low: 67° Low: oS 4° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 59°

eM erate ac ae











































rN As RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Yaa rag TAA Uae aly AccuWeather RealFeel
80° F a | 78°-70° F [| 83°-73° Fi 87°-73° F 85°-73° F }
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 8:29am. 2.9 2:01am. -0.4

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the aay. 8:47p.m. 25 2:44p.m. -0.4

Sunday 9:14am. 29 2:51am. -0.4
mes pau cs eee 9:34pm. 2.6 3:27 p.m. -0.5
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday ~ 1000am. 28 342am. -04

; : Monday 4 ‘ i 4.
ABACO Temperature 10:24pm. 2.7 4:11pm. -0.5











68/20 46/7 ©
















‘ High ..... 82° F/28° C 5

High: 77° F/25° C : Bee C Tuestay 10:48am. 26° 45am. 03

Low:63°F/17°C | ae im , EA 1116pm. 27 4:57pm. -04 Ss
Normal low 65° F/18° C



Last year’s high . 79° F/26° C




, WEST PALM BEACH











High: 76°F/24°G —— Last year’s low 69° F/20°.C
Low:62°FA7°C Precipitation Sunrise ..... 6:56 a.m. Moonrise. .... 8:13 a.m.
AS Of 1 p.m. yesterday aise 0.03” Sunset, . 5:46 p.m. Moonset... . . 7:33 p.m.
















Year to date ................ fetesrenze soveteteadstey? vee 0.51” .
High: 75° F/24° C Normal year to date ......essscsssssssescessesnieseeees 1.08” lb oo ae
Low:61°F/16°C
AccuWeather.com
All forecasts and maps provided by Be [NN] Showers “5 Miami
ELEUTHERA : AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 23/-5 19/-7 sn [<8] T-storms : ge 78/65
Z Z Flan O40 e : [ao R Rain Fronts
Ze NASSAU g ee: ey ner: S [«~* ].Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and on
eS Z High: 80° F/27° 6 vo 70 F/21°C Pee Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm MienMenfis



Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary a



Lower" 21°C



KEY WEST




CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26° C High: 81° F/27°C
Low:6S°F/21°C i. : ic
7 eo 88/31 74/23 pc












AT EXUMA » SAN SALVADOR
= & Sscarrare
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS" LZ Low: 70° F/21°G
highs and tonights's lows. High: 81° F/27°C :
Low: 72° F/22°C









Albuquerque —
Anchorage

Sunday MAYAGUANA
High Low W Ee _ High:85°F/29°C
Fe FIC aii FA c a Fi ee —___ bow:72°F/22°C

— AN/5 22/-5
24/-4 13/-10 sf
‘46/7 40/4 +
35/1 23/-5 pc
84 27/-2 sn
30/-1 20/-6 pc









RAGGEDISLAND — Ttigh:85" Fi2a"e sii
High: 83° F/28° CG Low:72°F/22°G

Low: 68° F/20°C



Atlantic City 19/

Boston

43/6







Little Ro
Los Angeles













GREAT INAGUA
High: 85° F/29° G
Low: 71° F/22°G

57/13 50/10 +
297-4 = 20/-6 sn
oe 2 2h 6 sn



a
48/8 34/1 ¢





68/20 57/13 i ges : = Ges
6 Winnipeg 22/-5 13/-10 sf 17/-8 2/-16 sf

55/12 32/0 po 59/15 32/0 pc
: ; : Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Washington,DC 40/4 24/-4 s 36/2 27/-2 sn storms, r-rain, sf-snow fiurries, sn-snow,.i-ice, Prop-precipitation, Tr-trace











80/26 66/18 pc
EBT AGE Oe

a8 pec
115s!

Tucson


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 3







In brief

Shane Gilson to
be challenged
to public debate

IMMIGRATION Min-
ister Shane Gibson is to
be challenged to a public
debate by the men con-
testing his Golden Gates
seat in the general elec-
tion.

Independent candidate
Clever Duncombe said he
and FNM representative
Don Saunders are ready
to face the minister “any
place, any time” on the
public platform.

“We met on Monday
and we both agreed that
we want an issue-based
campaign,” Mr Dun-
combe told The Tribune
yesterday.

‘We don’t want any
mud-slinging, and we shall
be inviting the minister to
come along. It’s possible
he won’t show up, but you
only need two people to
have a debate.”

The call is in line with
Mr Duncombe’s belief
that all election candi-
dates should be subjected
to public debates before
the people go to the polls.

He said such a process
was essential if the coun-
try is to avoid electing
“makeweight” candidates
on party lines.

Too many current PLP
MPs are sub-standard,
according to Mr Dun-
combe, because they have
not been subjected to
proper scrutiny.

Man arrested:

in connection
with shotgun
lliscovery

“A 39-YEAR-OLD man
was arrested in connection
with the discovery of a 12-
gauge shotgun.

The police reportedly
discovered the gun, which
they believed to be unli-
cenced, while executing a
search warrant.

According to Inspector
Walter Evans, sometime
after lam on Thursday,
Central Detective Unit
officers searched a house in
- Western New Providence.

During the search, a
shotgun and 23 shells were
recovered.

Arrest after
Withesses report
someone ‘attempting
to open vehicles’

AN 18-YEAR-OLD
man was arrested on
Wednesday after witness-
es reported seeing some-
one “attempting to open
Nissan Sentra and Sunny
vehicles” at the Mall at
Marathon around 8pm.

According to police
press liaison officer Wal-
ter Evans, officers
observed a man “acting in
a suspicious manner”.

The officers also confis-
cated a key for a Nissan
vehicle.

_ The government
$100,000 to Fox Hill Clinic

Fred Mitchell: donation is
an investment in the future

THE government donated
$100,000 to the Fox Hill Clin-
ic yesterday in what MP for
the area Fred Mitchell
described as an investment in
the future.

Mr Mitchell noted that pri-
mary health care is a wise
investment, considering the
obvious expense connected
with health care later in life.

“The saying is a gram of pre-
vention is worth a kilogram of
cure,” he said. “This gift will
no doubt help children to
focus on how they can take
care of their health so that they
can be more productive citi-
zens, making healthy choices
for both their physical and
mental health.”

He said such choices might
lead to the next generation
going into adulthood “without
the spectre of breast cancer,
prostate cancer, hypertension
and diabetes looming over
their heads” and affecting their
productivity.

“IT am happy therefore on
behalf of the Fox Hill village,
and this entire community to
thank the benefactors for this
significant and important gift
to our community. I thank the
minister of health and his team
for thinking of Fox Hill as the
recipient of the gift. I know
that it will serve the commu-
nity well,” Mr Mitchell said.

He said that as the repre-
sentative of the area, his “first
area of concentration” has
been the community’s chil-
dren.

Mr Mitchell pointed out that
if he and Minister of Health
Bernard Nottage were to trav-

_el around the historic village
:, together, the minister would

see*“the children call me Fred
Mitchell as if it is one word. -~

“Last Christmas as we were
having our end of term treat
for the children and teachers
of the school, they called me
‘Daddy Mitchell’. I am obvi-
ously thrilled at their approval
but more importantly for me, I

FNM candidate claims
MP has done little to
advance Fox Hill culture |

PLP representative Fred
Mitchell has done little to
advance the culture of Fox
Hill, FNM candidate for the
area Dr Jacinta Higgs told
attendants at a rally Thurs-
day. 7:

“For 4 and a half years, as
the Fox Hill Congos attempt-
ed to provide a.wholesome
environment for young peo-
ple, especially the men of our
community, letters upon let-
ters were written to our MP
for assistance,” she said. “I
know because the letters were
written by me, and signed by
the leader of the group.

“And as I stand here under
these silk cotton trees, I tell
you that while I served as the
public relations cfficer for the

hope it is a signal to me that all
650 children in Sandilands Pri-
mary School know that in this
representative they have
someone who cares for their
every need, and who believes
with all his heart that the
investment in them is an
investment in the future of this
country,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said that his sec-
ond focus is the community’s
economic and social well-
being.

“Great care and attention
have been paid to ensuring

that all who cannot afford it

will have something to eat, will
have adequate shelter and that
their social needs are met
through the Urban Renewal
programme.”

He noted, for example, that

both the Urban Renewal —

office and the clinic are in con-
tact with senior citizens, and
that there will be a formal
organisation formed for them
soon.

“There is a programme of
visitation and social activities
to ensure that no senior feels
isolated within the communi-
ty,” he said. “This clinic is a
part of that effort. I have a
strong affection for this clinic
and its staff. I am not a

. stranger to them and they are

not to me.

“Before I got in this job in
2002, there were those who
threatened to close this
clinic. The people of Fox Hill
were upset up at the sugges-
tion.

“This clinic was one they
had come to depend on in
times of emergency and for

routine medical care. I take ~

great pride in putting a stop
to that decision.

“And I am happy that in the
present dispensation, the clin-
ic is still here to provide the
routine primary health care for
the people of the Fox Hill vil-
lage and that extra care and
comfort for the community
generally,” he said.

However, the tradition was
broken this year when inmates
from Her Majesty's Prison
came and decorated the park
with a tiny Christmas tree.

“I am not against the pris-
oners working because this is
one of the ways in which they
repay their debt to society,
However, I ask you the great
people of Fox Hill, is this what
you expected when you were
promised hope, help, and
community empowerment?”
Dr Higgs asked. .

She said that as Sandilands
Primary School has produced
some of the most productive
citizens in the Bahamas, it is
“high time” that the primary
school be outfitted with the





TM GeO LUM ROC)

@ THE first Honorary Consul of the Bahamas to India, Ashish Saraf, (left) receives his com-
mission and letter of appointment from the Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Public Ser- [â„¢
vice Fred Mitchell. At right is Marilyn Zonicle, head of International Relations Division. _|

FNM hopeful for Fox Hill claims

donates




(BIS photo by Raymond A Bethel)

many PLPs have left Mitchell’s camp

MANY PLPs - including former campaign gen-
eral the Fox Hill branch chairman Larry Wilmott —
have left Fred Mitchell's camp, FNM hopeful for the
area Dr Jacinta Higgs revealed.

Dr Higgs was speaking at an FNM rally in Fox
Hill on Thursday night, where she pointed out that
she also left the PLP — to join the FNM — because
she wanted to serve the area in parliament.

She along with others realised that the grass was
greener on the other side of the fence, the candidate
said.

“Not only is the grass in PLP’s camp burnt and
dried, but also their vision is too blurry,” Dr Higgs
said. ,

She said that Mr Mitchell’s agenda is not about
improving the quality of life and building a solid
future for those in the Fox Hill constituency; rather
it is about him.

“I wish to say to those persons who voted for
the PLP for better — and know that we did not get
what we voted for — to get out as well. Come with
me on the side of better,” Dr Higgs said.

She said that it was time for Fox Hillians to com-
pare what they were promised on the one hand
and what they received on the other.

“I ask you to open up your receiving hand and if
that hand is an empty as mine, its time to make a

change. I can stand here all evening and give exam-
ple after example after example to show why I am
running as the FNM candidate against a man I
worked hard for and with,” the Fox Hill candidate
said.

Dr Higgs said that in four and a half years, Mr
Mitchell has failed to learn the true meaning, and
the true essence of good, wholesome representation
— for the people and by the people.

She asked the constituents not to give Mr Mitchell
another chance in the House of Assembly because
of his unfulfilled promises.

“Fox Hill. You know me. I am your sister. I am
your cousin. I am the one you went to school with.
Iam the one you played with. I am the one who you
helped and who helped you.

“I am the one whe trained your children and

‘ young people in Sunday school, the Girl Guides
and Youth Groups.

“TI am the one who mentored many adult learners
in Fox Hill and in this country.

“T offer you my service as the Free National
Movement candidate in the upcoming elections.
The election is not about me; it is about you. Fox
Hill, I trust you to make the right decision for your-
selves, for your children for your community and for
your country,” she said.



most technologically advanced
resources to prepare the chil-
dren for the challenges of the
21st century.

“I was deeply saddened to
read in the newspaper that
Sandilands Primary School
was one of the lowest ranking
primary schools in New Prov-
idence. It is time, ladies and
gentlemen, for Saridilands pri-
mary school to return to its
former days of glory.

“Please take the politics out
of our schools. If our children
are to improve their perfor-
mance and compete with chil-
dren from all over the world,
we must improve our educa-
tional standards in our
schools,” Dr Higgs said.



| approach}tollifeyevangelistic’ Templejisajolace)
JWwherejpeopleldiscover.Goa)

SUNDAY SERVICES.

Sunday School or alages... 9.45am.
Adult Education sn. A



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loming Worship Service ....... 8.30 am, ~

group, our MP did not count ‘Womhio Sanice. PS OMe
us worthy to help the Congos OS. ep sence ESA EARS \1.00.an.
find sponsors,” she said. ‘The Mall-at-Marathon Evening Worship Service ws SAN
Now during this election [{& BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY _ Eau oer SUMINEE 200. OA
year, Dr Higgs noted, Mr EFFECTIVE JANUARY 19TH, 2007 oa Winter .. 6.30 p.m.
Mitchell was able to find a [yaonmocoame —____ew| 0 [241 [un Tere [ea | WEDN@SDAY at 7:30 p.m.
sponsor at the last minute. THE HITCHER NEW ois [825 | 1080 | Selective Bible Teaching oe

“Unfortunately, the funds
were not made available early
enough for the young men to
properly organise themselves
and show their creative spirits.

STOMP THE YARD

ARTHUR AND THE INVISIBLES
PRIMEVAL

ALPAH BOG

Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Misslonettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.



Your However, he found it politi- ODE NAME: THE CLEANER t Youth Ministry Meeting
cally prudent to hold cow bells
nevs in his hands and pretend to RADIO MINISTRY

rush with the Congos
junkanoo group during the
Emancipation Day and Box-
ing Day parades for his usual
photo ops,” she said.

Dr Higgs added that for
years, the Fox Hill Festival
Committee held its Tree
Lighting Ceremony and took
pride in decorating the
parade.

She said that this tradition
used to be carried out by
excited, native Fox Hillians.

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME”

a]

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM
THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS
BLOOD DIAMOND

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W If so, call us on 322-1986

{ and share your story.

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REREATETHIN ERSTE RET EMIT
Meet







SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

° See
page
seven



PRICE — 75¢
‘Major in
Welt

Administrator ‘gun threat’ claim

Council member & peareePreT for prayer at Boys Day Retreat
alleges his life —

was threatened
in front of police

@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter



A DISTRICT council mem-
ber in Bimini has filed a for-
mal complaint against the
island administrator for
allegedly threatening his life
with a handgun in front of
police officers, The Tribune
learned yesterday.

Mr Lloyd Edgecombe said
that when he asked the local
police what they would do
about the matter, he was told
that it was “above their heads”
and that they could not arrest
the administrator, Mr Joseph
Ferguson.

Calls to Mr Ferguson for
comment on the matter were
not answered up to press time
yesterday. However, it is
understood that Mr Ferguson,
in his own right, has also
lodged a complaint against Mr
Edgecombe.

Reportedly, the dispute
escalated from a “casual”
meeting between Mr Fergu-
son and Mr Edgecombe over
an environmental contract for
garbage collection.

Since then, Mr Edgecombe
has issued a formal notice to
the permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Local Government
and Consumer Affairs, Mr
Harrison Thompson, giving
him a full account of the inci-
dent.

The letter reads as follows:
- “Yesterday, during a meet-
ing with Mr Ferguson, we had
a verbal confrontation where
he proceeded to threaten my
life in front of four police offi-
cers. Mr Ferguson went home,
got his gun, and came back to
the government compound
brandishing his gun where
some employees were terri-
fied.

“In a local bar next to the
compound the administrator
went and sat at the bar where
he placed his gun in the open
on the bar. Later in the
evening he pulled up in the
government vehicle to a store
where I was and threatened
my life for the second time,”
the letter read.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday Mr Edgecombe said
that he has reported the mat-
ter to the local police in Bimi-
ni where he was informed that
they were unable to make a
complaint against the admin-
istrator.

‘“T have lodged a formal
complaint with Mr (Elliston)

: said,

Greenslade in Freeport who
informed me that he would be
sending officers to investigate
this matter,” he said.

Speaking with The Tribune,
Mr Greenslade, the assistant
commissioner of police in
Grand Bahama, said that he
has dispatched an officer from
Grand Bahama to look into
the matter. .

“T have afforded both gen-
tlemen due course according
to the law. The police are in.
fact looking into the matter,
and I have instructed one of
my inspectors from the Cen-
tral Detective Unit (CDU)
here in Freeport, to personal-

SEE page 11

New potential buyer _
for Royal Oasis; govt to
meet representatives —

@ By KARIN HERIG i
Tribune Staff Reporter

(OPE) Tamar tril igor

THE purchase process of the stricken Grand Bahama ie

resort Royal Oasis may soon see significant steps towards
completion as government is expected to meet with rep- ;
resentatives of a new potential buyer this week.

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Minister of }
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe revealed that although talks :
are ongoing with the Florida-based World Investments ;
Holdings, government hopes that the Harcourt Develop-. ;
ers group will come through with an acceptable proposal ;
to buy the Royal Oasis resort. i

“They’ve expressed an interest before and they would ;
be fantastic for Grand Bahama. i

“We are meeting with the chairman of Harcourt when ;
he comes to the Bahamas this week,” Mr Wilchcombe :

Government chose to resume negotiations with Har- :
court Developers as part of a contingency plan in case }
World Investments Holdings failed to complete its pur-
chase of the property. i

World Investments Holdings had split as a group after :

SEE pagell So



MASTUDENT front
Woodcock Primary School -
prays during the Boys Pay
Retreat at St. Paul's

* SEE PAGE FIGHI

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

FNM Fox Hill candidate
claims Mitchell giving out

govt job application forms.

FNM Fox Hill hopeful Dr Jacinta Higgs said that
over the last few weeks, she has received hundreds of i
i phone calls informing her that Fred Mitchell is driving.
around the area giving out government employment }
i application forms to PLP supporters.
i Dr Higgs made the charge at an FNM rally in Fox |
: Hill on Thursday. : i
“The few of you who may get a job, I beg you, }
: please do not be fooled by these stop gaps, month-to- ;
i month jobs. They are only being offered as bait to }
! secure votes and not to empower the young people. |
i They are nothing but gimmicks, and sheer political i

ploys.

name or the other,” she said.

All of these young persons, mainly young women, Dr }
Higgs said, were mothers and had families to provide }
: and care for. i
“Yet, they did not receive one dime for the demand- ;

SEE page 11

Gay rights concerns over Dontestic Violence Act

: “During the launching of the Urban Renewal project |
: here in Fox Hill many of our young people were filled |
with hope and excitement as they flocked to the centre {
i to become Wardens or Marshals or Deputies or some }



Bacteria fears at
PMH Dialysis Unit

FEARS of the bacteria known as staphylococcus aureus
(staph) has resurfaced in the Dialysis Unit of the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Despite assurances that the bacteria problem at the
hospital was improving, one patient who receives treat-
ment at that unit claimed the problem is in fact becoming

i worse.

The patient, who wished to remain anonymous, fears
the bacteria may enter her system and cause “complica-
tions.”

Several deaths have been unofficially linked to the
bacteria floating around the unit.

However, medical officer Dr Patrick Whitfield, in an
earlier interview, maintained that the loss of life was not
necessarily caused by the bacteria.

Explaining that the patients were already suffering
from other diseases, he said it would not be fair to iden-
tify the bacteria as the cause of death.

According to hospital officials, the staff are working
feverishly to diminish the presence of the bacteria in the
dialysis unit.

The Tribune attempted to reach Dr Whitfield, as well as
the managing director of the Hospital Authority for a
response to the patient’s claim, but calls were not returned:
up to press time.



@ By BRENT DEAN



WHILE applauding the spirit of the
proposed Domestic Violence Act, gay
rights activists say they are concerned
about the lack of protection for same-
sex relationships.

The act would expand protections
within domestic situations beyond mar-
riage. However, it only refers to rela-
tionships between men and a women
in a common law relationships, or those
living together in such a manner.

The controversy around this defini-
tion emerged, as same-sex co-habitants
are not specifically included under the
protections of the act.


















Public spokesperson for the Rainbow
Alliance Bahamas, Ms Erin Greene,
commended the government for creat-
ing a gender neutral document and for
making efforts to protect vulnerable
communities in the Bahamas.

However, Ms Greene stated:
“Although the act may provide recourse
for homosexuals under its other provi-
sions, it is unfair to create protection
for persons involved in heterosexual
relationships and do not provide the
same and equal protections for homo-
sexual couples. Forcing homosexuals to
rely on other statutory instruments for
their protection does not provide
recourse for emotional and psycholog-

ical abuse, nor financial abuse.”

“If the purpose of the act is to protect
people in intimate relationships that are
not defined by law, then to not make
specific and explicit provisions for gay
people is unconstitutional,” she said.

When questioned regarding his views
on the expansion of domestic violence
legislation to non-married individuals,
and not to same-sex cohabitants, senior
pastor of Kingdom Life Church, Cedric
Moss stated: “I think as the law is, the
government obviously is trying to take
into account the realities of the day and
I think it is appropriate to include those
relationships where individuals are liv-
ing together in an intimate fashion. |

suppose the reason that the government
has not included same-sex relationships
is that there is no case for it. I don’t
think that same-sex cohabitation is
widespread. I don’t think that it is —
certainly from my vantage point - and I
would have to assume that because
there was no provision to address it, or
to include it with others, the govern-
ment does not see a need.”

When asked specifically for an opin-
ion on whether the proposed bill should
cover existing same-sex cohabitants,
Pastor Moss stated: “They are individ-

SEE page 11






@ TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

SIXTH-SEEDED Andy,

Roddick outlasted Marat Safin
7-6 (2), 2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (2) Friday to
reach the fourth round of the
Australian Open.

Safin, the 2005 champion and
former world No. 1, was seeded
only 26th as he comes back
from a knee injury that kept
him from defending his title last
year. That meant one of the
highly ranked players would
have to face him early in the
two-week tournament.

Roddick drew the unenviable
task and showed his confidence

is high again after a malaise that _

dropped him out of the top 10
last year before he convinced
Jimmy Connors to coach him.

“The one guy you don’t want
to play in the third round is
probably him,” Roddick said.
“There wasn’t a whole lot
between us, to be honest. I just
tried to tough him out.

“He’s one of the best in the
world, so I definitely had to pick
up my game-in-the third and
fourth sets. Anything less than
that and I would probably
would be going home.”

Serena Williams, also plagued
by a bad knee last year and
unseeded after winning here in
2005, rallied after No. 5 Nadia
Petrova served for the match at
6-1, 5-3, showing that she still
has superb skills and a strong
will to win.

Top-ranked Roger Federer
had an easier time against 25th-
seeded Mikhail Youzhny, beat-
ing last year’s U.S. Open semi-
finalist 6-3, 6-3, 7-6 (5).

Second-seeded Amelie Mau-
resmo, the defending women’s
champion, beat Eva Birnerova
and next plays Lucie Safarova,
who advanced when Anastasiya
Yakimova retired with a back
injury. Other women’s winners
were No. 3 Svetlana Kuznetso-
va, No. 7 Elena Dementieva,
No. 10 Nicole Vaidisova and
No. 16 Shahar Peer.

For more than three hours,
Roddick and Safin exchanged
130 mph-plus serves, stinging
groundstrokes, crisp volleys and
deft drops, leaving the packed
stadium enthralled and
applauding every point.

Both players were dripping
with sweat on a still, muggy
night that had people in the
crowd fanning themselves. The
roof had to be closed due to a



i ANDY RODDICK

Roddick, Serena Wi
—round; Federer and Maurest







Poco cig

Mi RUSSIA'S Marat Safin left, argues with chair umpive Pascal Maria from France durin:

Bae



& SERENA WILLIAMS



tennis tournament in Melbourne, Friday, Jan. 19, 2007. Roddick won in four sets 7-6 2-6 6-4 7-6

light rain, and Satin complained
bitterly that the court hadn’t
been dried up enough when
play resumed, earning a warn-
ing for an audible obscenity.

Safin later said he was unhap-
py wet patches remained out-
side the doubles lines.

“Tt was a joke. It was really,
really pathetic,” Safin said.
“Why I have to put my health in
doubt? If 1 slip and if I get
injured and if something hap-
pens...”

Roddick wasn’t sure the con-
troversy affected Safin’s play.

“With Marat, you know he’s
going to kind of go on the emo-
tional roller coaster a little bit,
but [ don’t know if that hurts
him often,” said Roddick, who



now faces No. 9 Mario Ancic. “I
was just feeling like I should be
even keel éut there tonight.
There was enough emotion in
the air.”

With Connors watching from
courtside after flying in follow-
ing the death of his mother,
Roddick showed his new
aggressiveness, charging the net
after good serves and short balls
from Safin, though he did get a
bit more tentative as the match
wore on and he was passed a
number of times.

Safin left everything he had
on the court, including a bit of
skin. He fell and scraped the
fingers on his right hand, and
had to have treatment for a
bloodied pinkie.

Williams’ 1-6, 7-5, 6-3 victory
over Petrova was impressive for
a woman who dropped out of
the top 100 for the first time
since 1997 before climbing back
to 95th in the year-end rank-
ings.

She was shocked to hear she
had beaten a top-10 player for
the first time since she downed
Mauresmo in the final here two
years ago for her seventh Grand
Slam title.

“Has it been that long? That’s
a terrible stat,” Williams said,
shaking her head in disbelief,

Petrova never has reached
the final of a major, but she
raced through the first set and
was serving for the match at 5-3
in the second. Then Williams

@ ROGER FEDERER

lliams into fourth







found another gear.

“I really had no other option
than for my game to go up,”
Williams said. “I was down 3-5
and on the verge of being out of
the tournament, and I obvious-
ly didn’t want that to happen. |
told myself just to stay in there
and do what I had been prac-
ticing and it'll come together
sooner or later.

“T think the more pressure J
get, the tougher I get.”

Some have questioned
Williams’ fitness. There were
no questions after outlasting
Petrova.

“LT wasn’t tired at all. I’m still
not tired. I feel like going to run
a marathon,” Williams said,
laughing.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ AMELIE MAURESMO





g his third round match against Andy Roddick of the U.S. at the Australian Open

(AP Photo/Andrew Brownbill)

Williams will face No. 11 Jele-
na Jankovic — a 6-3, 6-4 winner
over Victoria Azarenka — on
Sunday.

Federer, bidding for a 10th
major, extended his winning
streak to 32 matches — and 10
straight at Melbourne Park. He
next faces 14th-seeded Novak
Djokovic, who beat Thailand’s
Danai Udomchoke.

Mardy Fish advanced when
veteran Wayne Arthurs retired
while trailing 3-0 in the first,
Also winning were No. 7 Tom-
my Robredo and No. 16 David
Ferrer, No, 18 Richard Gasquet
beat Gael Monfils 6-0, 4-6, 7-5,
6-3 ina match between two for-
mer world No, | juniors from
France.



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PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

Fully fit Liverpool face
champions Chelsea





ee er er

*@ eer’

Yr ey wee

m@SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

A BRIEF look at upcoming
Premier League matches (home
teams listed first; league posi-
tions in parentheses):

@ SATURDAY
Liverpool (3) vs. Chelsea (2)

Liverpool manager Rafael
Benitez has a fully fit squad,
with his only dilemma deciding
which of his three strikers will
start. Midfielder Boudewijn
Zenden (knee) returned to
training from a long-term injury,
while winger Mark Gonzalez
(shin) is still likely to miss out.

Chelsea midfielder Claude
Makelele is suspended, while
defender John Terry continues
to recover from back surgery.
(Midfielder Joe Cole (foot) is a
long-term absentee and defend-
er Khalid Boulahrouz (knee) is
also missing. Goalkeeper Peter
Cech could play for the first
time since fracturing his skull
in October.

Aston Villa (15)
vs. Watford (20)

Aston Villa midfielder Stil-
ian Petrov (hamstring) won't
play, while on-loan defender
Phil Bardsley could make his
debut since joining from Man-
chester United earlier this
month.

Defender Aaron Hughes is
questionable.

Watford striker Ashley |

Young is questionable to play
with a transfer to Villa immi-
nent. Defender Dan Shittu
(ankle) is questionable, while
defenders James Chambers
(ankle) and Clarke Carlisle
(thigh) join striker Marlon King
(knee) on the sidelines.

Fulham (13)
vs. Tottenham (8)

Fulham center backs Zat
Knight (broken jaw) and Ian
Pearce (groin) could feature
after returning to training this
week. United States midfielder
Clint Dempsey is lacking match
fitness, and long-term injuree
Jimmy Bullard (knee) is out.
Senegal midfielder Papa Bou-
ba Diop isn't listed in the squad,
while Wayne Routledge is on
loan from Spurs and cannot
play. Goalkeeper Antti Niemi is
still recovering from a neck
injury. |

Tottenham captain Ledley
King (foot) and midfielder Jer-
maine Jenas (ankle) are miss-
ing. Striker Mido (groin) and
Canada defender Paul Stal-
teri (hip) are questionable.



Middlesbrough (14) °
vs. Bolton (5)

Middlesbrough captain
George Boateng (knee) is a
game-time decision. Defenders
Andrew Taylor and Emanuel
Pogatetz (minor injuries) will
return after missing the 4-3 EFA
Cup third-round win over Hull.

Bolton captain Kevin Nolan
(rib) may play after missing last
week's scoreless draw at home
to Manchester City. Midfielder
Abdoulaye Faye returns from
suspension and striker Kevin
Davies (Achilles) will be avail-
able.

Newcastle (11)
vs. West Ham (18)





Neweastle midfielder Scott
Parker returns from suspension.
Fullback Stephen Carr (foot)
could be available for the first
time in iwo months.

Midficider Emre (calf) is
doubtful, while Damien Dutf,
Michael Owen and Charles
N'Zogbia (all Knee injuries),
Shola Ameobi and Oliver
Bernard (both hip), Celestine
Babayaro and Craig Moore
(both hamstring) and Titus
Brainble (calf) are still out.

West Ham defender Calum
Davenport could make his
debut after joining from Tot-
tenham on Thursday. Center
back Anton Ferdinand could
return, while defenders Danny
Gabidon and James Collins are
both out. Strikers Carlos Tevez



(calf) and Bobby Zamora (sus-
pension) are missing

Portsmouth (6)
vs. Charlton (19)

New signing Lauren —~ who
hasn't played in more than a
year following knee surgery —
could replace midfielder Gary
O'Neil, who is suspended. Mid-
fielder Niko Kranjcar (ankle)
is doubtful and forward
Lomana LuaLua (thigh) is still
a week away from playing
again.

Charlton midfielder Andy
Reid (hamstring) is out, but full-
back Osei'Sankofa (suspension)
will be available. England strik-
er Darren Bent (knee) and cap-
tain Luke Young (knee) are



@ LIVERPOOL striker, Peter Crouch, centre,
BCU Eves eer COU te
Craig Bellamy and Dirl Kuyt, right, during their
English Premier League soccer match against
_ Watford at Vicarage Road, Watford, England.
Saturday,

likely to return for next week's
games.

Reading (9) vs.
Shetfield United (16)

Reading striker Shane Long
(thigh) and defender Graeme
Murty (groin) are game-time

* decisions. Striker Kevin Doyle

and midfielder Brynjar Gun-
narsson (both hamstring) are
out, but striker Dave Kitson and
winger Bobby Convey (both
knee) will rejoin the squad.
Sheffield United is missing
new signings Luton Shelton
(international clearance) and
Matthew Kilgallon (ankle), but
defender Mamadou Seck is
available. Midfielder Mikele
Leigertwood (ankle) is still out



, 2007. Liverpool take on
___ Chelsea this weekend.
'Photo/Simon Dawson)

and skipper Chris Morgan is °
suspended. Goalkeeper Paul |

Gerrard is expected to start



4

ahead of the injured Paddy °

Kennedy.

Manchester City (10)
vs. Blackburn (12)

Manchester City midfielder
Joey Barton is suspended.
Defenders Nedum Onuoha and
Hatem Trabelsi (both ham-
string) are missing, while
defender Sun Jihai (hamstring)
and midfielder Dietmar
Hamann (back) could return
after training with the reserves
this week. ;

Blackburn midfielder David
Bentley returns from suspen-
sion. New signing David Dunn
is unlikely to play due to lack of
match fitness. Forward Paul
Gallagher (groin) is doubtful.

MSUNDAY
Wigan (17) vs. Everton (7)

Wigan is without defender
Arjan de Zeeuw (toe), forward
Henri Camara and midfielder
Paul Scharner (both knee).
Andreas Granqvist (flu) and
Antonio Valencia (hamstring)
could both be available.

Everton midfielder Mikel
Arteta'returns from suspension.
Defenders Nuno Valente
(knee) and Tony Hibbert
(groin) are missing.

Arsenal (4) vs.
Manchester United (1)

Arsenal midfielder Gilberto
Silva is suspended, while for-
ward Robin van Persie (ankle)
is questionable. Midfielder
Mathieu Flamini, striker
Emmanuel Adebayor (thigh),
and fullback Emmanuel Eboue
(ankle) are expected to play.
Fredrik Ljungberg (hamstring)
and William Gallas (thigh)
remain long-term injuries.

Manchester United has no
new injury worries, though
defender Wes Brown is battling
a Virus.

m@ MANCHESTER United's
Wayne Rooney, left, and Aston
Villa's Gary Cahill battle for
the ball during the English Pre-
miership soccer match at Old
Trafford, Manchester, England
Saturday Jan. 13, 2007.

(AP Photo/
PA, Martin Rickett)
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5B



ey ] ) | |

@ PAKISTAN'S Shoaib Akhtar delivers a ball on the first day of a second test match against South
Africa at St. Georges Park, in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, Friday, Jan. 19, 2007.

Pakistan lead by













i PAKISTAN'S Shoaib Akhtar, left, fields his own ball as South Africa's Andr Nel, right, looks on
during a first day of a second test match at St. Georges Park, in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, Friday,
(AP Photo/Obed Zilwa) Jan. 19, 2007.

(AP Photo/Obed Zilwa)

11 on 135-6 after

dismissing South Africa for 124

@ CRICKET
PORT ELIZABETH,
South Africa
Associated Press

MAKHAYA NTINI took
four wickets Friday for Pakistan
to reach 135 for six in reply to
South Africa's 124 at stumps on
day one of the second of three
tests.

Ntini took two wickets before
tea and then dismissed Yasir

‘Hameed straight after the break
to leave Pakistan on 19-3. The
South African quick ended up
with figures of four for 18 off 10
overs.

Earlier, Shoaib Akhtar took
four for 36 and Danish Kaneria.
three for 36. Mark Boucher top-
scored with 35, while South
Africa captain Graeme Smith
had.28 and Jacques Kallis 24.

Smith won the toss and elect-
ed to bat at St George's Park,
but the hosts were in trouble
when A.B de Villiers attempt-
ed to pull a short-pitched deliv-
ery from Shoaib and edged to
wicketkeeper Akmal for 2.

Hashim Amla also played a

_ bad shot, attempting to glance
a short-pitched delivery down
the leg side when on 5. He suc-
ceeded only in getting a glove
to it for Akmal to take another
catch.

Smith started to attack Kane-
ria when he was brought on to
bowl, but, after hitting him down
the ground for four, he misread
a googly and edged the ball.
Akmal palmed it up and Younis
took an easy catch to dismiss
Smith for 28.

Prince got a second chance
‘when Akmal missed a simple
chance from an edge off the
bowling of Sami, but two balls
later edged again, this time
straight to Mohammad Hafeez
at first slip to depart for 2

Gibbs then ‘missed a sweep
against Kaneria's spin to be out

‘ leg-before-wicket for 2.

South Africa went to lunch at
64-5, but 19 runs later Kallis
edged a ball from Akhtar to

4

Akmal.

Boucher fell edging Kaneria
to Younis at slip, while Pollock
on 4 chipped a simple catch to
Mohammad Sami at square leg
off Shoaib.

Pakistan's reply was soon in
trouble when Imran Farhad
prodded at Ntini's second deliv-
ery and edged him to De Vil-
liers at slip to be dismissed for a
duck. Hafeez was then out on
13, hooking a ball from Ntini for
Amla to take a running catch at
short leg.

Hameed was out for 2 and
then Younis Khan and Moham-
mad Yousuf put on a 60-run
stand before Yousuf fell leg-
before-wicket to Shaun Pollock
for 32.

Kamran Akmal came in
ahead of Inzamam-ul-Haq
because the Pakistan captain had
spent too long off the field. You-
nis (45) was caught in the gully
by Herschelle Gibbs for 45 off
Ntini to end a stand of 56.

Akmal played a rash hook
shot at a bouncer by Andre Nel
in the last over of the day and
was. caught by Ashwell Prince
on 33.

Mohammad Sami was not out
without scoring when play end-
ed.

Shoaib and Mohammed Asif
tested positive to the banned
steroid nandrolene last year.
Shoaib was banned for two years
and Asif one, but the Pakistan
Cricket Board overturned the
suspensions. The World Anti-
Doping Agency has appealed to

-CAS, which is expected to rule

within three months.

South Africa won the first test
at Centurion Park by seven
wickets earlier this week.

@ PAKISTAN'S Mohammad
Asif, left, makes an unsuccessful
appeal as AB De Velliers, right,
on the first day of a second test
match against South Africa at
St Goerges Park, in Port Eliza-
beth, South Africa, Friday, Jan.
19, 2007.

(AP Photo/Obed Zilwa)








PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS



COMICS PAGE













JUDGE PARKER













WELL DAD, ITS

00 B OU
SAM IS RIGHT, RANPY..- ERE a !
YOU SHOULD GIVE A NICER TO ME WY FUTURE |
STATEMENT TO THE MILLIONS WITH]

ALL THESE YEARS.

BUT I WON'T
FILE UNTIL
TOMORROW!






THAT'S

FINE,
BUT YOUR
STATEMENT
























Y WILL MAKE
THE MORNING SURE REGGIE
PAPER! BLACK HAG GIVEN HIS!

HOBBES AND I
WENT TO THE
JURASSIC TODAY
AND CAME BAC


























. WITH THESE.
YOURE ¢ GOING. | DRAMATIC
oe pe PHOTOGRAPHS !




"OF COURGE ITS ALIVE! WHY WOULD ANYeopY
BRING A DEAR LIZARP To CHURCH?”







IT MUST BE NICE TO HAVE A WARM
HOUSE TO SIT IN WHILE SOMEONE
ELSE FIGHTS *@ vz
THESE WINTER f..”;




A Horrible Nightmare










TELL YOU ABOUT
My ALLERGIES?










JUST TO





ELEMENTS

















Contract: Seven Diamonds.

— to the tune of 2,440 points.



SATURDAY,

DELIVER 5 North-South vulnerable. Sometimes J discard a spade at
YOUR MAIL © NORTH trick four. When I do, South cashes
= A6532 the K-A of spades and ruffs a spade, JAN UARY 20
Â¥AJ109 establishing two spade tricks in
ee, oK9 dummy. He then plays a heart to | ARIES - March 21/April 20
SP &43 dummy’s ace and cashes the 6-5 of | Cooler weather has put you in a°
aes BSS. KC ( : WEST EAST spades. I discard a heart on the fourth | mood. You might want to spend
ie ERG Se, 2 #QJ109 @87 round of spades, but on the fifth | Some time at home, Aries, until :
V¥KQ8 ¥76543 spade, I’m again hopelessly } you're in better spirits. Post-summer -
76 5432 squeezed. Whether I discard my king | blues are expected. ;
MARVIN #KQ8 #765 of hearts or a club from the K-Q, | TAURUS - April 21/May 21
He - : SOUTH South makes the rest of the tricks. Financial concerns leave you feelin
IVE NOTICED THAT DOGS ALL WEAR aK4 Sometimes I discard the queen of {nervous this week, Taurus, It’s gee
IDENTIFICATION v2 clubs at trick four, hoping declarer ter to pinch some pennies for a
TAGS AROUND HOMELAND #AQJ108 won’t realize I’ve unguarded the | while until you get back on course.
THEIR NECKS SECURITY ? &AJT1092 king. But South is a real smart cookie | Seek help from Virgo. :



NON SEQUITUR

GREAT... NON

CAAN'T STOP
THINKIN’ ABOUT
BON A DUCK'S



\ NOW THAT YA
NEPTION (T,
I'VE NEVA
NOTICED IT
IN ANN oF
NN EXPER-



You WAVE EXPERIENCE
WRERE A DUCK'S
QUACK MIGHT
ECRo ?





(©2007 by North America Syndicate, jae. World rights reserved.

WK QliAck
QUECK Quick
QORCE QubCcK






Dear Mr. Becker: | suffer from
nightmares — bridge nightmares,
that is. I have this recurring dream
where I hold the West hand and find
myself on lead against seven dia-
monds.

I always lead a trump, and South
draws four rounds of trumps. I dis-
card a club on the third trump lead,
and so does dummy, but on the next
trump lead I run into a serious prob-
lem.

Sometimes I discard the eight of
hearts. When J do, South plays a
heart to the ace and miffs a heart,
establishing the J-10 as tricks. He
then plays the K-A of spades and
cashes dummy’s two high hearts,
whereupon I get squeezed and
declarer_makes the rest.of the tricks

and invariably sees through my
scheme. He plays the ace, nails the
king, and J wind up shelling out the
same 2,440 points.

Now, even though the stakes are
nominal and the whole thing’s only a
dream, the fact is that psychologi-
cally, I can’t afford to continually
lose that many points on one deal. I
was therefore wondering whether
you can suggest any way for me to

escape this awful dilemma. I would ~

be most appreciative of any help you
might give me. Cordially yours,
Constant Reader.

Dear C.R.: Happy to oblige. The
next time this terrible dream recurs, I
suggest you ask for a new deal. You
have only 12 cards! Cordially yours,
S.B. Sees ‘



GEMINI- May 22/June 21

A special friend from your past ~

comes back: for a visit, Gemini. It ‘
could lead to interesting things. Keep -

your agenda open for Wednesday
when love is in your stars.

CANCER - June 22/July 22

Keep your patience with a family-, -

member on Tuesday, Cancer.
This person is just feeling a little
Stir crazy and really doesn’t mean

Dh ae:

all the the things he/she says. —

Focus on a home project instead.

LEO — July 23/August 23

A distant family member isn’t visiting -

as much as usual, Leo. Something
could be wrong. Drop this person a

+

line or give him/her a call. It may help ,

ease your concems.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

Stop doing so much for others and |

pamper yourself a little bit this
week, Virgo. Go to a spa, take a

vacation or just stay home from

work for a day.






















Good 20; very good 30; excellent -

39 (or more). Solution tomorrow.










be honest with yourself.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

It may be time to consider a career -

change, Capricom. You are far too edu-
cated and talented to settle for the work

The LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Target You've been feeling very anxious, .'
Nee er ae se mania Libra, and it’s partially because you
~ the main are experiencing low self-esteem. ©
body of 7 You have to exert more confidence
; Chambers or it just will be an endless cycle.
YOU CAN HAVE A How MANY { 21st a SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
PIECE OF CAN Century S58 Sanh ealhy nese yen
E Y GUESSES Vo 4) cy (4! Dictionary Ske ges A close friend really needs your help °
(F YOU CAN Fick L Ger? ; | 2 (1999 2 Ses4o8 on Thursday, Scorpio. Make sure .
WHICH HANY LAN z ed:tion). Zz. @ S Sq 2 Bey your schedule is open so that you can
= S®@ass 8 lend a hand. Put work on hold for
{ HOW many words of four let Ssgaiseg eas :
or more cal you make honk a 3 ae 5 886 BR some quality time with your mate. :
i letters shown here? In making 9 § 324 _g SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21
“8 a word, each letter may be used 9 of eos 35 Have you been spending too much
5 once only. Each must contain z SOs" time at work, Sagittarius? It could be -
i the centre letter and there must 8 oFs9Seda ; a wee
be at least one nine-letter word ui HO eee because you are avoiding a situation
No plurals. ; 5 Bee eso on at home. That’s not like you. Face
TODAY'S TARGET w amecggia up to the situation. It’s far better to
SOSTaGAGE













Poe 2 you've been doing so far. Have some
: confidence_and go for your dreams. |
ACROSS DOWN AQUARIUS - J :
— Jan 21/Feb 18
1 Riches from breaking 1 We may have a sale for ae Pei | \ Your confidence continues to rise,
the law (6) this animal (6) = word Aquarius. It could be because of that
7 Coming by road? (2,3,3) 2 Hang around so as to tile, ae ee good news at work. Consult with Leo
8 — Said to give Phil as much as parhaps (6) 7 - for some good advice on how to
he can eat (4) 3 Keep a hogshead to mature (4) sot ae | marinade improve your financial future. -
"10 Sitting with Edward at the 4 Punished for making the dump 17 19 | PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
seaside (6) untidy? (7) Bea htt ' Be the life of the party on Friday,
eer eas ae ee Ree fs are sey tos
mel (8) what he is (5) = is meat or fis iroie fare romance. Look 3
cane «Tyo Cee Cee rey ea a
shade? (3) wearing thin (5) ; - in ompanionship and sparks will fly. ‘
16. Onyanalopmingsbtyoucen gt] 8 Wheyeupeyiogstor el Fl | a me | a .
Ronn | ee | | | ie i
17 Alok to make you reel cifficulty (3) p eee
= Stee” | a a :
1 19° Giventhe sack 13 Thick part of a wooden seat (5) ay Viorel Bologan v Ratael
= | ° eons, | Sette PU a | | ee eceercince
ee Fuegen. Grandmasters know
21- Located new 18 Adowny bird (5) ;
qe hata 19 Stiffen up a bit (due to healthy x | | that grabbing pawns while :
: (5) exercise?) (3) several pieces remain ‘
Hi WE | 22. The chance to get promoted makes 20 Republican material? (3) undeveloped is a likely route to
le one excited! (3,2) 1 Ae Fah rhenlbecreaentt a zero on the tournament chart. 7
TE = | 23° Abysmal yet Shatce tay be present) (7) ACROSS DOWN It still occurs, and there's usually ,
Q shrewd? (4 22 Marginally, a he-man seems to have 1 Climb (6 1 Native American (6) a special reason. Today’s game
HO | 26 ukclow a (5) aoe 7 None (8) +. -Bemping bse opened with a French Defence 1+
Po Se Racesai Gants 23 Official jobs, or payments made 8 — Record (4) ; aa : : sod (7) 5) e4 e6 where In the earlier moves ,
TEN oe 4 around half time? (6) cat 10 Day nursery (6) 5 — Municipal (5) Vaganian’s knight pair raided
it. good onel (3) 24 She can't help giving some men I 11 Assessing (6) 6 Banners (5) the white camp and eliminated °
Wi E i Quick to give a cue (6) ideas (4) N 14 Devoured (3) : 8 — Expensive bishop, knight and three pawns 2
4 | 30° Fuelit wrong andit's 25 Tha very old Bill (6 N acd Naas (5) 4) before being shot down. :
_ spose) 26 t's fun, | see, getting away from the 2. 19 Afterwards (5) 9__ Pronoun (3) Meanwhile, Bologan's queen,
: c 31 Publicity about a girl being tropics for a change (5) i 21 Disgusting (5) 12 Pitch (3) rook and bishop edged towards
Vy greedy (4) : ; ee wo” 22 Start (5) 13 Lariat (5) the black king and now White Is
Loy y 27 Pieces of worsted — possibly for ; dy to launch a decisiv
R 32 Didn't like to replace nats where deer wear? (5) < 23 Ship's company (4) 15 Proportion (5) reaay to faun ve
Q ight bi ind (8 Lt 26 Broom(5) 18 Black bird (5) attack. What was White's
0 s 4 edie Be (8) 28 The boss being Informal (3) — 28 As wall (3) 19 Limb (3) winning move?
i : me Ae 30 Inabit of adectine, 29 Nevertheless (6) 20° Can (9) LEONARD BARDEN
weaken (4) 30 Distant (6)
S 31 Item (4) 21 Women (7)
s 32 Scowsed (8) 22 Stoop (3) ;
it * TT Isa nn «33 Make certain (6) 23 Comedians (6) _ RSET ET
i Ww | Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 24 Source (4)
W ACROSS: 1, Spoor 6, Coach 9, Willlam 10, Doing 11, Piers ACROSS: 1, Stoat 6, Stock 9, Greaser 10, Money 11, Rivat 25 From where (6) * '
0 12, Li-mi-t 13, Vi-trio-L 15, Tec 17, A-X-is 18, Marina 19, | 12, Strip 13, Bestows 15, Pet 17, Ales 18, Furore 19, 26 Canal boat (5) Chess solution 8283: 1 Rxh7I and Black resigned. If ‘
: Label 20, U-sefu-L 22, Tame 24, End 25, Bayonet 26, Eases 20, Insect 22, Pest 24, Lee 25, Secures 26, Refer 27 Church council (5) Kxh7 2 Rhl+ Kg8 3 Qxg6 Qc7 4 Qh7+ KB 5 Qh8+ K7
R Spiel 27, Solos 28, Maths 29, Succeed 30, Ve-N-om 31, | 27, Tamil 28, Atlas 29, Combine 30, Seven 28 Number (3) 6 Qxg/ mate.
T-odd-y 31, Dried 30 Impolite (4) Mensa quiz: Whale. é
Dp DOWN: 2, Pro-LIX 3, Owners 4, Rig 5, F-L-ail 6, Capital 7, | DOWN: 2, Trowel 3, Agents 4, Try 5, Wants 6, Serious 7, One possible word ladder solution is: SAGE, sale, :
OM-It 8, Car-men 12, Local 13, Val-u-e 14, Tir-e-d 15, Trip 8, Claver 12, Sweat 13, Basil 14, Sense 15, Power 16, hale, halt, hilt, hint, MINT — - a 4

Ti-tan 16, C-adet 18, Me-D-al 19, L-U-MP sum 21, Snoo-
2 22, To-led-o 23, Me-tho-d 25, Beach 26, So-so 28, Met

Tents 18, Fewer 19, Echelon 21, Negate 22, Punter 23,
Sesame 25, Serbs 26, Rice 28, And


TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7B







Man SE = i —
SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 20, 2007 SUNDAY EVENING i JANUARY 21, 2007.
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BBCI respondents. __jrorists (Latenighi). BBCI (Latenight), (Latenight). ane Co- _|(Latenight).
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| E! E! News |Fashion Police: The 2007 Golden |The 2007 Critics’ Choice Awards Saturday Night Live Peter Sars- E! (ee) El News |Forbes 20 Richest Women in En- |The Girls Next |The Girls Next |Love Ride Mar- |The Soup
" eekend Globes : (N) gaard; the Strokes. 1 (CC) " leekend (N) —_|tertainment Door Door Makeover. jried actors. (N)

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Buy Me “Em-
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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7











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Prince Edward to visit Nassau
for the GGYA 20th anniversary

PRINCE Edward, the
Earl of Wessex and
youngest son of Queen
Elizabeth II, will arrive in
Nassau on Friday, Febru-
ary 2 to inaugurate the 20th
anniversary celebration of
the Governor-General's
Youth Award.

The award is the top
accolade that any young
Bahamian can achieve, said.
GGYA co-ordinator
Denise Mortimer.

The Bahamian award
programme is part of an
international network that
is based on the Duke of
Edinburgh's Award, which
was founded in 1956.

Prince Edward is chair-
man of the International
Award Association, which
co-ordinates development
worldwide through a Lon-
don secretariat.

Activities

To date, almost six mil-
lion young people from
*over 100 countries — includ-
ing 8,000 Bahamians — have
participated in the award,



B PRINCE Edward, the Earl of Wessex

since 1991.

undertaking a variety of
voluntary and challenging
activities to build character
and skills.

The prince will arrive via
private, aircraft from the
United States at noon and
pay a courtesy call on Gov-
ernor-General Arthur Han-
na.

While at Government
House he will hand out
recognition and _ gold
awards to about 50 GGYA
participants and volunteers
at a special reception.

That evening he will be
the guest of honour at an

invitation-only, $400-a-
plate, anniversary dinner at
Cafe Martinque on Par-
adise Island.

The following morning he
will meet with more thana
thousand GGYA partici-
pants at a Government
House rally, and afterwards
attend a fundraising lunch
at Lyford Cay before leav-
ing for the Cayman Islands.

The GGYA programme
is divided into bronze, sil-
ver and gold awards so that
participants can choose dif-
ferent levels of participa-
tion in the four categories

of community service, skills
development, physical
recreation and adventurous
journeying.

Currently, there are
about 1,000 registered par-
ticipants on New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros
and Exuma. .

They are led by 35
trained instructors and co-
ordinators, all of which are
volunteers.

Only three staffers are
paid, including Ms Mor-
timer, the programme's
chief co-ordinator

“Anyone aged 14 to 25
can do the award," Ms
Mortimer said. “There are
no limitations — you just
need to be motivated.

“It's the only award that
some Baharhian kids will
ever get in their lifetimes.
It changes lives and it defi-
nitely helps to bridge social
gaps.”

The most anticipated part
of the GGYA programme
is the annual expedition —a
10-day field trip to a Fami-
ly Island for more than 100
youngsters. These excur-





@ THE vendors at Sunset Village at Eight Mile Rock completed the Ministry of Tourism’s two-day Customer Service and Food
Handling Workshop. Jeritzan Outten, Ministry of Tourism official is seen seated far left with workshop participants.
(BIS photo: Vandyke Hepburn)

Plans to transform Sunset Village

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - Plans are underway to
transform Sunset Village into an attrac-
tive hang-out spot for locals and visi-
tors in an effort to boost economic activ-
ity and promote community tourism in
the Eight Mile Rock area.

Jeritzan Outten, senior director at the
Ministry of Tourism with responsibility
for product development, said the min-
istry recognises the importance of com-
munity tourism in all areas of Grand
Bahama.

“The most recent approach to tourism
is community tourism, and we are look-
ing at the whole of Grand Bahama and

not just Freeport,” she said on Wednes-
day as she unveiled improvement plans.

Sunset Village, which is situated in
the bayshore area of Jones Town, is a
popular spot on Thursday nights for res-
idents and visitors.

Temporary booths were built to
accommodate some 30 vendors at Eight
Mile Rock when the hurricane
destroyed the entire village in 2004.

The Ministry of Tourism hosted a
two-day food handler’s workshop for
members of the Sunset Village Associ-
ation. They were taught the importance
of proper food preparation and han-
dling.

Mrs Outten said that improvement
work is expected to begin in the next

two weeks.

According to the tourism official, a
parking lot will be built in the back with
a “hip and gable” Bahamian-style roof.

She said that a 20-foot wooden deck,
an eating area with benches and umbrel-
las and landscaped spaces for patrons
will be added. An area will also be pre-
pared and designated for arts and crafts.

Mrs Outten said that the ministry has
contacted corporate citizens to assist
with the project.

“The original Sunset Village was
destroyed during the hurricanes and
what is here now was a temporary
replacement and we telt that we could
enhance it and make it a lot more attrac-
tive,” she said.



» «o(A P-FILE Photo).

wa

gp 3 ye anh ¥ ’
sions have included camp-

ing on Cat Island and in the
Inagua National Park; hik-
ing on Abaco and
Eleuthera; kayaking in the
Lucayan National Park;
and sailing on the vessel
‘Captain Moxey’ to several
island destinations.
Participants pay a portion
of the cost for the experi-
ence (which is the only part
of the programme they
have to pay for). The bulk
of GGYA expenses are
subsidised by donors, who

have included the Ministry
of Youth, Teekay Shipping,
Cable Bahamas, Lyford
Cay and RBC Royal Bank
of Canada.

In addition to the annual
expedition, GGYA gold
awardees take part in a
yearly trip to different
islands in the Caribbean,
where they join with other
regional participants to
climb mountains.

Reach

According to GGYA
chairman Dr Davidson
Hepburn, co-ordinators are
seeking to extend the pro-
gramme's reach by raising
funds to sponsor additional
children from _ public
schools who cannot afford
the travel costs involved.

There are also plans for
an after-school computer
lab, and the GGYA is seek-
ing a more appropriate
headquarters.

However Dr Hepburn
‘said the main goal is te
raise enough money to set

-up an endowment fund so

that the award can be self-
sustaining.

Other 20th anniversary
activities include a special
church service at Matthew's
Anglican Church on Janu-
ary 21, when participants
and volunteers will worship
with Governor-General
Arthur Hanna, and an elab-
orate exhibition in the main
post office during the sum-
met.

Organisers said an infor-
mational video is also being
produced.

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