Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE ©



LOCAL NEWS : " :

PLP ‘unsympathetic and hard-hearted’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

DESPITE assurances that it
would govern with compassion,
the PLP has proven unsympa-
thetic and hardhearted, FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

“You have only to ask the
victims of the 2004 and 2005
hurricane seasons; check with
the victims of the Sea
Hauler/United Star tragedy; ask
the parents of children who
have had their inoculations

against childhood diseases
delayed; ask the elderly about
shortage of medication for
hypertension and diabetes; ask
others who suffer because of a
shortage of vital medicines at
government clinics,” the former
prime minister said.

Mr Ingraham accused Prime
Minister Christie of promising
to lead a government for all
races and political parties and
then failing to do so.

“That must be why one of his
earliest acts as prime minister

was to defend and then apolo-

gise for the hatchet job his
members carried out on FNMs
employed at BAIC. Ask Edi-
son Key how welcomed he was
made to feel in a party led by
Perry Christie. No, his is not a
government for all; it has been a
government of division and
exclusion.

“That is why he has not found
it possible to put a single white
Bahamian in the cabinet — Pin-
dling did; so did I; but not Perry
Gladstone Christie. He now
says that he leads a Black
Nationalist party,” Mr Ingra-

ham said.

He said Perry Christie and
his colleagues have not been
faithful to their promises, and
have “squandered their time in

. office and betrayed the people’s

trust”.

“Instead of good government
we have a government that
appoints committees and
launches investigations; but
they seldom report and hardly
ever take action,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Instead of honest govern-
ment, he said, the Bahamas has

a government that denies
knowledge of all manner of
things — “from shenanigans in
the issuance of visas, work per-
mits and residence permits, to
fisticuffs in the Cabinet Room,
to sting operations that lure
Bahamian citizens to foreign
countries to answer for crimes
allegedly committed in the
Bahamas.

“And, we have a govern-
ment that keeps its actions
secret from the people
whether in relation to votes at
the United Nations, or con-

cessions and incentives includ-
ed in investment agreements, *
or the negotiation of trade
agreements.

“Instead of competent gov-
ernment, we have a government
that squandered the people’s
money on the infamous
junkanoo bleachers; a govern-
ment that refuses to account for
the spending of donated disaster .
relief assistance; and a govern-
ment that in four years has
proven incapable of bringing a
seat-belt law into effect,” Mr r
Ingraham said.

ee
3

* ¢€¢@ se

FNM ‘would institute checks’

FROM page one

Bahamas “which is something
I cannot say of our current gov-
ernment.”

“We will better monitor and
enforce standards of conduct
for Ministers in government and
senior public officers. We will
make public all agreements with
foreign investors in the House
of Assembly.

“We will be accountable to
the people through regularly
scheduled public reports on the
state of our country. We will
answer questions asked by the
Opposition and respond to con-
cerns of citizens,” Mr Ingraham
said.

The former prime minister
said that too many foreigners
are in The Bahamas doing too
many jobs that Bahamians are
willing, able, ready and fit to do.

“Now we have foreigners
building a school! And foreign
maids and foreign workers all
over the place. Promises of jobs
for Bahamians to come will not
pay the bills, you know. While
the grass is growing, the cow is
starving, they say,” the former
prime minister said.

Economic development is
high on the party’s agenda, Mr
Ingraham said, because eco-
nomic growth that excludes
the population from partici-
pation is not the type of devel-



opment we need.

“In fact, that kind of eco-
nomic model is a recipe for
disaster. We will show you
that your government trusts
you. You can trust us to be
faithful to our promises and
faithful to you,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

The next FNM Govern-
ment will resume education
programmes so people can
grow along with the country,
the former prime minister
said.

“We know that you want
better equipment and ade-
quate staff — including spe-
cialist teachers — for your
schools. We know that you
need a better-equipped pub-
lic library to support your
children’s education and
development.

“We hear the calls far
improved recreational and
other self-affirming facilities
in your communities. More
must be done to train young
Bahamians and to retrain old-
er Bahamians to take advan-
tage of the opportunities in
the economy. And, more
must be done to create more
and better paying jobs,” Mr
Ingraham said.



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
PGR LLCa PM (UC
Re a8 Ok) are
PO eC ae
Yd 4b)



Teen Challenge Bahamas









PAULINE Nairn was born
in 1962. She is martied to
Archie Nairn, permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation and has a
daughter and three stepchil-
dren.

Mrs Nairn is employed as a
business analyst with Coli-
nalmperial Insurance.

First elected to local govern-
ment in July 1996, Mrs Nairn
has served as deputy chair-
woman for the Pinder’s Point
Township, chairwoman of the
Housing Commission for Grand
Bahama and chairwoman of the
Licensing Authority for West
Grand Bahama.

She was appointed to the
Senate in April 1997 and served
for five years.

Mrs Nairn has also served as:
captain of the first Grand Bahama
Girls’ Brigade, Junior Achieve-
ment advisor, Children’s Church
Leader, first vice-president of the
Business and Professional Wom-

s Club of Grand Bahama and
member.of the Bahamas Nation-
al Volleyball Team.

jae FNM candidates announced



JACINTA Marie Higgs is
married to Dwight Higgs and
has two children.

In 2006, she earned a Doctor
of Education degree from the
University of St Thomas, Min-
nesota.

She pursued a teaching career
for 15 years in public schools.

She was named Teacher of
the Year at RM Bailey Senior
High School and was the South
East District winner in the
National Teacher of the Year
competition.

Dr Higgs is currently director
of education programmes and
a lecturer at Omega College.

She served as a member of
the Fox Hill Community Devel-
opment Association, Girl Guide
and Ranger Leader of St
Anselm’s Unit and Youth
Adviser at St Anslem’s Church.

She has supported numer-
ous community organisations,
including the Fox Hill Festival
Committee, the Fox Hill Steer-
ing Committee, Miss Fox Hill
Pageant and Fox Hill Guy
Fawkes celebrations.

Ground Breaking Ceremony of
Halfway Home To Be Called

“Marguerite May Sands Transitional Home”
_on Friday January12, 2007 @ 10:00 a.m. at Teen Challenge Grounds,
~ Marshall Road, South Beach

Pastor Rick Dean - Former Director

Jewel Major - Urban Renewal
Pastor Teddy Dorsette - Zion South Beach
Terry Delaney - Virgo Car Rental
Paul Whilly - BFM

Minister Eric Fox - Executive Director Teen Challenge

Vernon Collie - Assistant Director Teen Challenge
The Marguerite May Sands Home will be for graduates of Teen Challenge and 8 beds have been dedicated for guys coming out of prison.

Attending Ground Breaking Ceremony

Ground Breaking Ceremony - Pastor Garry Curry of Evangelistic Temple also founding member of Teen Challenge
Mr. Wayde Sands and Members of The Sands Family





ELMA Elaine “Ellie” Camp-
bell has two adult children and
three grandchildren.

She obtained degrees in mod-
ern languages and linguistics at

the University of Grenoble in .'
France and holds a master of «

science in education degree °
from the University of Miami.
She began her teaching

career at the Government High .. -
School in 1975. She also taught

at C C Sweeting Senior High, .
St Anne’s and the Boys Indus-
trial School.

Ms Campbell has headed her
own law firm since 1985.

She also served as a stipen-
diary and circuit magistrate, and
part-time lecturer in banking
law at COB.

Ms Campbell has been involved °+

in the Bahamas Union of Teach-

ers, St John’s College PTA, the ,
Bahamas Red Cross and the |:

Bahamas Swim Federation.
She was responsible for,
organising “Legal Line”, the >

first weekly radio cail-in ‘pro- et

gramme in the Bahamas dedi-

cated to discussion of the law..,.,; °



+e

£0 6
ee

+




The en mm

ee A A a

ne

ee ee



THE TRIBUNE





Elect ‘true
daughter of
Fox Hill’,
says Bethel



@ CARL Bethel

FNM Senator Carl Bethel
reminded Fox Hillians that
in the next general election,
they will have an opportuni-
ty to elect a “true daughter of
Fox Hill” not a “carpet bag-
ger, looking for an easy seat”.

Senator Bethel, along with
party leader Hubert Ingra-

ham and FNM candidate Dr.

Jacinta Higgs, addressed par-
ty supporters last night in the
Fox Hill community.

“Soon and very soon the
good people of Fox Hill will
be able to elect a new MP
who will actually have the
time of day to come and listen
to your everyday concerns
and to help you individually

with your needs, instead of

+ + — —

an international globetrotter
who can’t find his way around
Foxdale Subdivision and
many areas of Fox Hill.”

He said that very soon,
Fox Hill will have the chance
to make “the globetrotting
Fred Mitchell” pay for his
dereliction of duty, which, he
claimed allowed some PLP
operatives and generals, “and
some PLP family members
to run the visa scam through
the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs for so many years.”

“The Perry Christie gov-
ernment promised an inves-
tigation. Fred Mitchell
promised an investigation,”
he said. “Since then, more
than a year has passed, and
still the Bahamian people
have heard nothing from
Fred Mitchell, or the PLP.”
The senator also noted

N

‘that it was under Mr Mitchel-

l’s watch that there was a
“hundredfold” increase in
legitimate visas issued to
Haitians and Chinese —

’. increasing the number from

200 per year during the
FNM’s tenure to over 2,000
per year for the PLP’s first
three years in office.

Mr Bethel said this adds
up to more than “6,000 new
Haitian nationals” allowed
into the Bahamas.

“This is serious business,
because it is acknowledged that
once someone comes into the
Bahamas, legally, with an entry
visa, there were no checks to
make sure that these persons
ever left the Bahamas.”

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

FNM Senator Carl Bethel
used his speech at the FNM ral-
ly in Fox Hill last night to lam-
baste Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell for his handling
of the arrest of five baggage
handlers in the US on drug
charges.

Senator Bethel said that the
Bahamas is currently faced with
a “crisis in law enforcement”
and no amount of “jive talking”
will eliminate that fact.

“I speak tonight about the
five Nassau Flight Services bag-
gage handlers, who with the
knowledge and complicity of
several government agencies,
were forced, upon threat of los-
ing their jobs, to go to South
Florida under false pretenses,
so that they could be arrested
by the US Drug Enforcement

LOCAL NEWS

Agency and be brought to face
a criminal trial in the USA with-
out having voluntarily surren-
dered to US custody or having
been lawfully extradited under
Bahamian Law,” he said.

“Let me state categorically
that our concerns have nothing
to do with giving any kind of
support to drug trafficking. The
FNM in government was as
committed to the fight against
drug smuggling and the need
for international co-operation
in the fight against drugs as any
government in the history of the

Bahamas,” he said. “Our ster-’

ling record in the fight against
drugs can stand any level of
scrutiny.

“This issue is about the civil
rights of Bahamians, due
process and the rule of law. In
any civilised country it is
acknowledged that there must
be respect for civil rights, due

legal process and the rule of
law.

“No government of the
Bahamas should be even
remotely implicated in any sug-
gestion that it conspired with
foreign agencies to deprive
Bahamian citizens of the pro-
tection offered by Bahamian
law. That is what this issue is
about,” the senator said.

Mr Bethel pointed out that a
deputy secretary for Detainee
Affairs in the US had to pub-
licly apologise to the American
legal profession for suggesting
that lawyers were behaving in
an unpatriotic way when
defending the detainees at
Guantanamo Bay.

“This mere suggestion was
enough to force an apology,”
Mr Bethel said, “That is how
other countries behave.”

“Here in the Bahamas, our
government doesn’t apologise.

Ingraham tells of plans to root
out gimmicks and beaurocracy

FNM leader anounces plans
to ban answering machines

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

POLITICAL “gimmickry”
will be removed from urban
renewal initiatives and a new

FNM government will invest in

programmes, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham told those
gathered at a rally in Fox Hill
last night.

Mr Ingraham said these pro-
grammes will alleviate and bring
permanent relief from poor
housing, poor sanitary services
and inadequate recreational
facilities.

The party leader also
promised to bring order to the
Immigration Department by
observing established and pub-
lished rules and applying clear,
transparent policies.

He said the FNM would
ensure that immigration poli-
cies reflect the priorities and
needs of the Bahamian public
and our economy “and not the
social calendars of cabinet min-
isters and other politically-con-
nected individuals.”

Mr Ingraham said that the
public has had enough of the
highly-publicised operations
that involve chasing only the
poorest illegal immigrants, while
“pay-to-play deals” are made
behind closed doors, “deals that
give work permits for jobs for
which Bahamians are quali-
fied.”

The FNM leader also com-
mitted to “take up where we
left off in public sector reform.”

“We will strengthen local
government in the Family
Islands and extend it to New
Providence. We will modernise
and restructure our postal sys-
tem to deliver more services at
unmatched levels of efficiency.

“We will modernise and inte-



@ HUBERT Ingraham

grate our system of registering
births and deaths and the acqui-
sition of citizenship and perma-
nent residence,” Mr Ingraham
said.

The party leader said that a
new government led by him
would remove the hassle of
obtaining and renewing busi-
ness licenses along with an
introduction of state-of-the-art
methods of motor vehicle reg-
istration and remove personal
data from the windshields of
vehicles.

“We will banish answering
machines from all public sector
entities, including public corpo-
ration customer service tele-
phone and complaints lines —

no more complaining to

machines. We will further
reduce bureaucratic obstacles
that add to the cost of doing
business in the Bahamas; and
we will institute a more effective
system for the settlement of dis-

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from the public sector

putes between employers and
employees,” Mr Ingraham said.

The FNM leader also
promised to restore good order
to our public health system and
to ensure that a workable
national health insurance
scheme is implemented in co-
operation with health care
providers and health insurance
suppliers.

“We promise to give our edu-

cation system the attention it

requires so as to ensure that our
children study in safe ade-
quately staffed and properly
supplied educational facilities
geared to prepare them for pro-
ductive lives in our communi-
ties,” the party leader said.

The opposition leader also
promised to further decentralise
education in the government-
operated school system, plac+
ing greater authority in the
hands of principals, administra-
tors, school boards and parents
for the operation and manage-
ment of our schools.

“The prime minister’s go-
along, get along attitude toward
the management and co-ordi-
nation of the people’s business
does not work. It provides
excuses for incompetence and
deflects attention from mis-
takes. In short, it does not pro-
duce beneficial results for the
people,” Mr Ingraham said.





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FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 3



Instead they deny, deny, deny.
No minister knew anything,
they say. At least three sepa-
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rate ministries had to co-oper-
ate in order to pull off the scam
which entrapped and summari-
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“Now, rather than accept
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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

2 aa lla i a aa aNNSE:

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
_ Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau. Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Adverusuig) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502 2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(

242)-352-0008

Freeport fax: (242) 352 29348

Slaton needed in aaate debate

What will it take? How much evidence is
required before our schools, our region and
our nation can quit arguing over the nature of
global warming? What data will convince the
‘body politic that it’s time to match the con-
sensus already found in the scientific commu-
nity?

I know we remain divided because of the
number of critics who react to every column,
editorial and news story with immediate and
intense reaction that questions the premise
of global warming.

But I keep wondering, what it will take?

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change will issue its next
report February 2, outlining the scientific basis
for global warming. I can hear the dismissals
already: It’s a U.N. body? C’mon, it’s just
those scientists who’ve already drunk the
Kool-Aid. Or, that report dismisses the sci-
entific dissent.

I love dissent — and I bristle at the sugges-
tion that we cannot even consider minority
views. But you have to know: The scientific
data are piling up.

Consider the evolving nature of the lan-
guage in the panei’s report (this will be the
fourth in the series). Two decades ago, cli-
mate scientists wrote that human activity
“could“ be the defining factor. By 1995, the
report said “the balance of evidence” suggests
human influence on the climate. And five
years ago, the report cited “new and stronger
evidence that most of the warming observed
over the last 50 years is attributable to human
activities. “.

What will next week’s report say? More of
the same, building on data that continue to tip
the scales decidedly in one direction.

“People will want to know what’s new in
this report,” said Naomi Oreskes, a science
historian from the University of California,
San Diego. “But I think it’s equally impor-
tant for us to focus on what’s not new.“

Scientists have been gathering evidence
about the relationship between human activ-
ity and climate change since the 1960s, she
said during a conference call sponsored by
the National Environmental Trust. “This is a
problem we’ve been aware of for a very long
time, and action on it is way overdue.”

The words “scientific consensus“ sound like
a chorus of scientists singing from the same
page, overpowering any dissent. Only that’s
not the way the music works.

The process for how the climate panel
reaches consensus is as persuasive as the evi-

se é
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dence itself.

Robert Watson is a scicnust with the World
Bank and former chairman of the latergov-
ernmental Panel on Climate Change. He said
the process has credibility because it involves
2,000 experts trom 100 countries, representing
governments, universities and other stake-
holder groups. Everything included in the
report goes through two rounds of exhaustive
peer review that includes dozens of voices.

He said when there are disagreements about
the scientific data, those questions are “fully
vetted in front of the stakeholders.” The
process is rigorous, exhaustive and transparent
— a model for international cooperation on
science.

But is it proof? Critics often dismiss much of
climate science because it uses computer mod-
eling, a process that docsu t seem to prove
anything. But an increasing body of evidence
called “fingerprinting” directly counters that
notion.

Fingerprinting “involves the comparison of
models and observed patterns in climate
change,” said Benjamin Santer, a research sci-
entist from the Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory and lead author of a chapter tn
the 1995 IPCC report. Fingerprinting gets its
name from what it does: Looking for identi-
fying signatures found in the causes of climate
change, whether natural or man-made.

“The red thread running through all this
fingerprinting work is that natural factors
alone cannot, repeat cannot. simply explain
observed changes that we've seen in the cli-
mate system in the second half of the 20th
century,” Santer said.

Science is reflecting a consistent story — a
fact-based call to action.

But that brings me back to my opening
question, what will it take? When will the
body politic move forward?

President Bush’s State of the Union speech
this week should give us a clue when he
addresses climate change and energy policy
White House Press Secretary Tony Snow last
week said the president will “lay this out” in
his speech. “And T will tell you it’s an inte-
grated energy and environmental policy.”

That would be terrific. It would even be
better if the president would say clearly that
the nation should quit arguing over the nature
of global warming. We’re wasting time, ener-
gy and money ~~ all efforts wed be smarter to
spend in search of solutions.

(This article was written by Mark Trahant
of the Seattle Post Intelligencer-c.2007).





Ther

peopl

really

EDITOR, The Tribune.

i WAS born in the Farm
Road area where I have lived
all my life and have always felt
that no one cared for us in this
community. This morning when
{ bought The Nassau Guardian
| was so elated to see an article
that showed there are people
who really cared.

The school that received the
gifts is considered a dump area
where when it rains the streets
are flooded because there are
no water drains. When I went to
pick up my children in Decem-
ber 2006 a little girl told me that
she was invited along with oth-
er students at their school to a
Christmas party and that they
were going to get some really
nice gifts. | thought to myself
that this little girl did not know
what she was talking about
because my children did not tell
me about the event. Well you
know you could have knocked
me over with a toothpick when
Lread that my children’s school
received 10 computers. My
daughter kept asking me to buy

LETTERS

NCEA ovis clct net








her one but | knew that was jist
wishful thinking because | kicy
L would never be able to buy
one and then send hor ie con

puter classes Poday, wears cain

when | read thar inc
Good Samaritan was @ conus

to any eyes

tor named Mr Audley Hanna
Jr who felt that ne should pive
back to the community some of
his good fortune that would
allow my daughter and her
school mates to have their
dreams come tiue. Realising
that we as parents could not do;
had it not been for this sincere
act of kindness

As | continued to read this
story | found out that not only
did the school receive comput-
ers, but three students were
blessed with their own personal
computers — two of these stu-
dent were trom my childrens
school and the third student was
a little girl from Andros. | hope

The taking of personal
fingerprints in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHAT is the law concerning the taking of personal finger rprints

in the Bahamas?

I am told that only under the provision and powers of the Police
and subject to arrest is a citizen or a person in the Bahamas

‘required at any time to provide fingerprints. Further if that person

is not charged those fingerprints are required to be returned to the
person — no copies having been taken.
If the person is found not euuty also in that case the prints are to

be returned.

- Under the Lotteries and Gaming Act, which provides for the tak-
ing of fingerprints of applicants for croupiers and employees in cer-
tain positions in the Casino there are also provisions which strict-
ly govern how fingerprints will be taken. It is emphatic in that
Act, Article 53 clause (3) that if that applicant is not employed or
is refused employment the fingerprints taken are to be returned to
the applicant. The clauses emphasise that all copies are to be

returned.

The recent announcement from Foreign Affairs indicated that
with the new passport system all citizen will be required to provide

a full set of fingerprints.

Such a provision or requirement is therefore going to require an
amendment to the Penal Cede as well as an atmendiicat to the Lot
teries and Gaming Act and I would suggest possibly the issue

being so fundamental to the core of Constitutional pris

acy Would

require a referendum — certainly all advocated to etidure iat
the rights of the individual must be upheld will challenge any

change to what is in place today

J RAHMING
Nassau, -
January 13, 2007.



Care

are

‘

ihai this kind young man’s con-
wibution to the future genera-
dion would open the hearts of
other business people in the
country who have benefited and
we bencliting from che wealth
41 this nation to do the same
for other schools, not only -at
Christiaas but throughout the
Cal h

It is my prayer that the Lord

stinues to bless this young |
genileman as he continues to
do the Lord s will: because it is
written when we give to the
poor sve are giving to the Lowd
Amen

MURS SMU

A GRATEFUL
PARENT
Nassau,
January 9, 2007

Rules of the
House of.
Assembly _

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANKS for bleu S my
letter concerning the importance
and priority to retain the correct
Rules of the House of Assembly

nwever, | was most surprised
that you put an Editor’s tootnote
iidicauing that to The Tribune’s
understanding the Rt Hon
Hubert Ingraham writes all his
speeches.

I stand to challenge this Edi-
tor. itis well known that a quali-
fied public relations persons who
has offices in Chippingham cer-
tainly has in the past written
many speeches for Mr Ingraham
— comment at the recent dinner
at the time of the visit of the Privy .
Council indicated that there was a
presumption that the speech was
the hand of another, not Mr
Ingraham.

I would have thought the most
important point or issue would -’
be that The Tribune champiens
the correct parliamentary prac:
tice and Rules of the House*of
Assembly and the Senate,—
notes are permitted under the
Kules certainly not written
speeches unless C oimunicatidns
as | suggest lap cops are not
allowed if not what aext? Black-
beiiy’s texting speeches and argu-
aieuis to assist an MP in the fury
ofa Parhamentary debate? ,

iy we cannot uphold the Rudes

| the House of Assembly “*st
Now can Wwe expect the people:
uphold the Rule of Law on the
Streets ¢

J WILLIAMS
Nassau.
January LO, 2007.

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Three face
ammunition
and firearm
‘charges

FREEPORT - Three men
were arraigned in Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on
Wednesday in connection
with illegal firearm and
ammunition charges.

Appearing in court three
before Magistrate Helen
Jones were Succullo Miller,
21, and Marco Forbes, 25, of
Freeport, and Terrell Lock-
hart, 22, of Nassau.

It is alleged that on Janu-

‘ary 13, the men were found
in possession of two hand-
guns and ammunition while
at downtown Freeport.

' The accused men were
represented by K Brian Han-
na. They pleaded not guilty.

Miller and Lockhart were -

remanded into custody at
~ Her Majesty’s Prison.
Forbes was granted $10,000
bail with two sureties.
The matter has been
adjourned to May 29 for trial.

Woman is
charged
following
stabbing

FREEPORT - A 29-year-
old woman was charged in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court

in connection with last
» week’s stabbing incident at
“ Port Lucaya.

Keisha Stubbs, a resident
of No 431 Cove House,
appeared in court two before
Magistrate Subu LaSalle.
‘She was charged with caus-

__ ing grievous harm to Shakera
Gordon, 21, of South Bahamia.
‘ It was alleged that on Jan-
, uary 13, Stubbs stabbed Miss
Gordon in the lower back
_with a knife.
, . The accused pleaded not
guilty to the charge and was
. granted $3,000 bail with one
"surety. The case was
‘adjourned to April 16.



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lm By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter

THERE was a 17 per cent
decrease in the number of peo-
ple admitted to Fox Hill Prison
in 2006 — including a 10 per cent
reduction in recidivism Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming revealed yester-
day.

- This saw the number of pris-
oners entering the compound
drop from 2,899 in 2005 to 2,416
in 2006, to some extent allevi-
ating overcrowding.

The population at any one
time remained fairly stable
between 1,400 and 1,500.

Dr Rahming gave an
overview of the 2006 prison
year yesterday, and proposed
security goals for 2007.

Speaking about the reduced
recidivism rate, Dr Rahming
said prison officials would have
to look at the statistics over the
next few years before making
any definitive statement on
causality.

However, he did note one



LOCAL NEWS _

change in penal policy that may
have been a contributing fac-
tor: all returning prisoners have
immediately entered maximum
security — to serve "hard time" —
rather than being permitted to
work on the compound, or
attend classes, as was previous-
ly the case.

“We have been able to iden-
tify many of the chronic
returnees who have not come
back, and we think. that that
may play a part,” he said.

Describing the composition
of the 2006 admissions to the
prison, Corporal Claudia Fraser
said that three per cent were
murderers, six per cent had
committed armed robbery, and
two per-cent rape. Thirteen per-
cent had breached the Immi-
gration Act, and 21 per cent
were found in possession of
either firearms or drugs.

Overall, 87 per cent were
under the age of 30, and 79 per
cent were serving sentences of a
year or less.

The escape rate stood at 0.25

84

KRIDAY, JANUARY Wy, 2uu/, FAUE Oo






INMATES at Her Majesty’s Prison build a 21-ft high wall

under the supervison of the Tactical Unit.

per cent, taking into considera-
tion the January, August, and
November break-outs. Howev-
er, the recapture rate was 100
per cent, noted Rahming.
Staff revealed 15 security
goals which:they wish to fulfill
in the coming year, including

Pastors appealing to churchmen not to
get involved in politics before election

A GROUP of leading pas-
tors has urged churchmen to
step down if they plan a role in
front-line politics.

The call comes from two past
president#of the Bahamas
Christian Council and three
senior Nassau pastors.

“Pastors with strong social
conscience are to be commend-
ed for their work in the com-
munity,” a group statement said
yesterday.

“But those who feel they can
only make a difference if they
engage in frontline politics
should first step down as pas-
tors of the churches they serve
lest they scatter the flock.”

The statement, which says
pastoral duties and obligations
must always transcend personal
political ambitions, was signed
by Bishop Samuel Greene,
Bishop Simeon Hall, Bishop
Edward Missick, Bishop Del-
ton Fernander and Bishop
Leroy Emmanuel.

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local churchman seeking a
frontline political role is the Rev
CB Moss, whose church is in
Bain Town. ;

Before the last general elec-
tion, there was controversy
over remarks made by Bishop
Neil Ellis from the pulpit of his
Mount Tabor Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church.

In his sermon, Bishop Ellis
advised worshippers to “haul
hip” from his church if they did
not support the PLP.

In yesterday’s statement, the
five bishops said there was noth-
ing “intrinsically wrong” with
entering the political arena.

“But the insularity and trib-












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alism of our two-party system

place the serving pastor/politi-
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tious pastor would wish to be

in

They said: “We advise any
pastor who wishes to offer for

candidacy in the next election to
step down first before offering.”

TROPICAL |
aa as

TeV e
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(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

further fortification of entrances
and exits, and construction of
six new security towers.

However, Rahming and
Deputy Supt Charles Rolle both
noted that these objectives may
depend on budgetary restric-
tions.

Prison admission down 17%

Position to be filled:



Amongst the goals are the
completion of a 21-foot high,
four-foot wide’ perimeter wall
with two-foot deep foundations,
and the start of construction on
a new maximum security com-
pound, according to Dr Rah-
ming.

Construction is currently
underway on the wall, while
plans have now been drawn up
for the much-awaited com-
pound.

Dr Rahming added however,
that he can “only take govern-
ment at its word” with regard to
whether the new compound will
get underway this year.

It was noted that of the 2006
security objectives, 83 per cent
were achieved, including the
installation of security scanners,
the introduction of new uni-
forms, and an increase of maxi-
mum security staff:

By recruiting 75 new officers,
the prison got closer to its ideal
personnel-to-prisoner ratio, said
Rahming, though still falls short
by almost 200 officers.



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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Mt: i
Claim that Wayne Munroe proposed to charge |
Anna Nicole $1,000 an hour for legal services

A BITTER row between two
law firms involved in the Anna
Nicole Smith affair has disclosed
that attorney Wayne Munroe
allegedly proposed to charge the
cover girl $1,000 an hour for his
legal services.

The claim emerges in an angry
exchange of letters between Mr
Munroe and Tracy Ferguson, the
Callenders’ lawyer originally
hired by Ms Smith following the
death of her son Daniel last Sep-
tember.

The legal spat began after Cal-
lenders submitted an invoice for
$77,282.65 in fees.

In Mr Munroe’s reply on
December | last year he accused
Callenders of failing to provide
a detailed statement of account
— a move later described as a



B ANNA NICOLE SMITH
(AP FILE Photo)

“stalling tactic” by Ms Ferguson.

“We are aware from the taxa-
tion of costs involving your firm
that you have the technological
ability to easily provide the detail

requested and for the record we
request details of your final billing
and renew our request for details
of your first invoice. We are
instructed to insist on your com-
pliance with rule X of the
Bahamas Bar (Code of Profes-
sional Conduct) Regulations in
this regard.

“We are of the view that the
position adopted by your firm
that it did not always represent
the interests of Miss Marshall (Ms
Smith) makes the provision of a
detailed invoice imperative.”

Mr Munroe also said Ms Smith
had a claim against Callenders

_tor alleged breach of duty.

“We would advise that our
client claims to be entitled to a
set off of the damage caused by
you against any fee due to you,”

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

MRS. SEVASTI CHARLES
ALEXIOU NEE PATELLLI, 88

of Nassau, The Bahamas will be held at the
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, West Street,
Nassau on Saturday, January 20, 2007 at 11:00 a.m.

Father Theodor Bita, Economos will officiate and
interment will follow in St. Anne's Cemetery. Fox

Hill, Nassau.

Mrs. Alexiou was pre-deceased by her husband, Mr.
Charles Alexiou and is survived by her two sons,
Emmanuel and Michael and their wives, Kersten and
Spring; five grandchildren, Matthew, Nicholas, Lukas,
Sophia and Liam; nieces and nephews. Kaliopy
Tssavousis, Emmanuel M. Alexiou and Katherine Klonaris and many other extended
family members in The Bahamas and abroad.

Instead of flowers, friends may make a donation to The Persis Rogers Home for the
Aged, P. O. Box N-7350, Nassau, Bahamas in memory of Mrs. Sevasti Charles Alexiou.

Friends may pay their respects at the Chapel of Love, le s Funeral Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and Bradley Street, Nassau on Fr gay

p.m. to 7:30 p.m.



anuary 19, 2007 from 6:30

he wrote.

However, Callenders described
his reference to Bar regulations as
impertinent.

“In this connection, our
Michael R Scott recalls:a discus-
sion with you in which he was
shocked to discover that you pro-
posed to charge out ata rate of
$1,000 per hour.

“No doubt our invoices are
modest in comparison with those
of your firm, [tis Mr Scotts view
in all the circumstances that you
might study this rule with profit.

“You should be aware that we
terminated our engagement so as
to avoid any association with
questionable behaviour and a
descent into bad taste. You might
follow our example.”

Callenders also challenged Mr
Munroe’s allegation of “breach
of duty’, saying tt regarded this as
nonsense and would strenuously
resist any such claim.

Regarding Ms Smith’s occupa-
tion of Hortzons, Mr Munroe
sought his clienUs conveyance
within five working days.

But Callenders expressed puz-
zlement, adding: “To reiterate the
position, of which you must be
aware, there is no conveyance to
which your client ts entitled. The
escrowed docuntent in favour of
your client is cancelled for fail-
ure to execute the concomitant
security documents.

“The resultis that your client is
in oceupation of the traceable
proceeds of monies had and
received by your client as
advanced by Mr Ben ‘Thompson
by way of a loan.

“Any suggestion to the con-
trary is plainly absurd. Therefore
there is no conveyance to deliver
up to your chent

“Your client has been asked to
vacate Elorizons by Mr Ben
Thompson and she should do so
without delay.”

The letters were latd before the
court when Callenders sought a
restraining order against Ms
Smith last month

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FROM page one

as the defendant under her oth-
er name, Vicki Lynn Marshall,
is the latest dramatic develop-
ment in the Anna Nicole Smith
saga, which began with her
arrival in the Bahamas last sum-
mer.

And in documents laid before
the court, bilter undercurrents
are revealed between Callen-
ders and Ms Smith’s current
attorney, Wayne Munroe, with
a claim that the latter was plan-
ning to charge her $1,000 per
hour for his services.

Callenders’ action in Decem-
ber resulted in a restraining
order being placed on Ms
Smith’s accounts at Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd and Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Ltd.’This was to
ensure that at least US$125,000

‘staved in her accounts to cover

the law firm’s bill. interest and
costs,

Under the order, dated
December 6, Ms Smith was for-
bidden to inform anyone of the
proceedings within 14 days of
it being handed down. Any
breach of the order could, it
warned, result in imprisonment,
a fine or seizure of assets.

Last night, Callenders said
they were prepared to enforce
any judgment and claim the fees
against the value of Ms Smith’s
new home if necessary.

Ms Smith, who is also in the
midst of litigation over her cur-
rent home, Horizons, on East-
ern Road, is accused in court
papers of failing to pay any of
the fees requested by Callen-
ders since they were hired last
September.

In an affidavit filed with the
court, Ms Ferguson said she was
engaged by Ms mith to pro-
vide consulting and other legal
services relating to a possible
inquest into the death of her
son Daniel. As a result of this
work, total agreed fees were
$113, 217.

However, Ms Ferguson stat-
ed, Ms Smith ignored the inter-
im bill for B$72,645.88 deliv-
ered to her on October 10, 2006,
and had failed to pay the whole
or any part of the fees incurred.

Ms Ferguson said she
believed Ms Smith was able to

.pay “but that she has a total

aversion to paying her bills and
that she will seek to avoid pay-
ing the fees by any means that
occur to her, including by send-
ing her money within this juris-
diction abroad.

“The defendant has, through
her attorneys, requested details
of the plaintiff's s bill. In my view,
the request is not a serious one,
but is a stalling tactic. I am sat-

Claim that
Anna Nicole
‘could end
up in prison’

isfied that the request is merely
being used as an instrument of
delay.”

The affidavit also said Ms
Smith had presented herself to
Ms Ferguson as “a rich and
famous celebrity”, adding that
some US$1.1 million had been
earned by her for the photo-
graphic rights of the love match
“ceremony” she conducted at
sea with lawyer-companion
Howard K Stern last Septem-
ber.

“She has a bank account here
which we reasonably believe
has a balance containing at least
US$1 million,” the affidavit
added.

Ms Ferguson also alleged that
Ms Smith had an established
bank record of avoiding her
financial liabilities by herself
applying for bankruptcy status.
“She has done this before by
filing for bankruptcy in Cali-
fornia, USA, in 2001,” the affi-
davit added.

“It is quite obvious to me that
the defendant has no intention
of paying Callenders’ legal fees
and that she will organise her
‘assets’ in such a way as to frus-
trate our collection of the fees.”

Ms Ferguson’s plea for a
restraining order in the sum of
US$125,000 (to include interest
and costs) over her assets was
granted by Judge Stephen
Isaacs.

Ms Smith’s recent negotia-
tions to buy Mr Rogers’ two-
storey canalside home at Coral
Harbour suggests she will be
leaving Horizons, which ex-
lover Ben Thompson, a South
Carolina realtor, claims is his.

Mr Thompson told The Tri-
bune that he advanced a $1 mil-
lion loan to Ms Smith to buy
the property, and that the deal
was subject to a mortgage
arrangement.

However, he claimed he was
“double-crossed” by Ms Smith,
who subsequently claimed the
house was a gift.

Mr Thompson is now fighting
for possession of the house
through the Nassau courts.

¢ Pathologist Dr Cyril Wecht,
who was hired by Ms Smith to
perform an autopsy on Daniel,
said yesterday that his $80,000
bill had now been paid after he
engaged lawyers to get the
money.

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and consists of eleven acres of tropical forest and
one of the largest collections of palms in the world.
The gardens provide wintering habitat for a number
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Students

sponsored —

to attend

conference :

â„¢ By BRENT DEAN

TWENTY-TWO College of
the Bahamas students will :
receive almost $10, 000 in :
sponsorship in order to attend
the Nassau Conference 2007, i
which brings together top lev- :
el financial services. profes-
sionals from around the coun- :

try.

room of COB.

He advised students to use }
the opportunity to network :
and learn as much as possible i
about the industry in order to }
take advantage of the lucra- }

tive careers it offers.

According to Mr Peet,
salaries in the sector average
from $35,000 per year in
domestic institutions, and
$40,000 per year in off-shore
institutions.

for the sponsorship pro-
gramme on behalf of the stu-
dents.

President Hodder described
the programme as an exam-
ple of one of the pillars of the

* college’s soon to be launched :
strategic plan, which attempts :
to link academics with real life :

experiences.

When asked about the view :
some Bahamians have that top :
level financial service jobs are i
reserved for foreigners, Mr i
. Peet sought to dispel this per-

ception.

He said current trends show :
that an increased number of :
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Bahamians travel and work :
abroad, that increased expo- ;
sure will empower them to }
demand elevation to the high-

est levels in the sector.

In response to the same }
question, President Hodder :
more generally linked the :
expansion of higher education #
to increased opportunities of }

all kinds for Bahamians.

“The more we increase the }
participation of Bahamians in }
higher-education generally — :
and in university education in i
particular — the more we keep i
them here and offer them that :
quality of education, I think :
we'll see a transformation over ;
the next 10 to 15 years. And }
that’s why we say that what :
we are doing is building a }

nation together.”

The conference was estab- :
lished two years ago with the :
Association of International :
Banks and Trust Companies }
in the Bahamas (AIBT) as the }

founding sponsor.

The students attending the
conference will be selected by :
the college and the financial :

services board.

AIBT, the Central Bank of :
the Bahamas, Ansbacher :
Bahamas, Butterfield Bank, :
Cable Bahamas, GAM, Gra- :
ham Thompson, KPMG, :
Lennox Paton and Lombard :
Odier Darier Hentsch Private :
Bank and Trust will be spon- }

soring the students.

Minister of Financial Ser- :
vices and Investments Vincent :
Peet spoke at the launch of }
the conference, which was :
held at the executive board- :

i PRESIDENT of COB Janyne Hodder and Minister of Financial Services and Investments
Vincent Peet-yesterday at the 2007 launch of the Nassau Conference, held at the College of the
Bahamas executive boardroom Michael Eldon Complex

COB gets $17m

COB President Janyne }
Hodder expressed her thanks :

grant increase

@ By BRENT DEAN

PRESIDENT of the College
of the Bahamas Janyne Hod-
der announced yesterday that
the government has agreed toa
$2.7 million increase in funding
for the institution for next year.

Ms Hodder made these
remarks yesterday during a
press conference launching the
Nassau Conference 2007.

The $2.7 million increase in
the government grant is to fund
salary adjustments made last
year by the college, according to
Ms Hodder.

in response to a question
asked about the future of fund-
ing for the college as it pro-

gresses to university status, Ms -

Hodder reasserted her propos-
al for the establishment of a
national endowment that would
rely both on individual and
institutional philanthropy. ~





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Health

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SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

° Dr. Anne Russell: Health and Nutrition

¢ Dr. Timothy Barret: Stress and Grief
Management














(Tim Clarke)

e Mrs Theresa Bastian will be on hand for







dietary information

She said: “We have also
broached the topic with the gov-
ernment of creating the national
endowment for the University
of the Bahamas, which is an
exciting project — we hope it will
excite everybody in the country.”

Ms Hodder said this project
depends on whether COB can
find partners in the private sec-
tor or among the developers of
anchor projects.

The idea, she explained, is to
create a fund that would exist
“in perpetuity and would be
independently managed to sup-
port the University of the
Bahamas for the next 100,150,
200 years”.

The linkage of the proposed
national endowment to foreign °
direct investment would direct a
small percentage of the value
of large foreign investment pro-
jects to an independently man-
aged fund specifically designat-
ed for the university: :

The resources that such an
endowment could generate
would give Bahamians the
opportunity to develop through
world-class education within
this country.

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Performers Audition: 11:00am
Musicians & Small Bands Audition: 2:00pm

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

aera
ite

MONDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood
pressure and cholesterol testing is available. For
more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878







“Ms (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
szMonday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospi-



4 “tal conference room.

taf
i
%

& CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
“nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
4=Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
a “Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

“The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
4 “(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
“the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
ote! Bay St.




















TUESDAY



@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
‘of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.





Ft~The Cancer Society of the Bahamas.meets. at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
-their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.






Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes

required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

f@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
4‘ ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
}, . Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
| Cable Beach e Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
‘)« every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,



Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
r| at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
| « 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

/ ' The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.




WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS
Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

| @ HEALTH -
: Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
: of its meeting times and places: New Providence
: Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
; Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
} 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

i

Y - FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
© . first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New



location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is ©

IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ® Alpha Phi -



_The 2 brewery of The Bahamas"

IDOI RLA ESM AS RAEIN MA RIERLIN IER DERE ESN IE EE MITER

THE TRIBUNE



ybdeleveaux @tri

aS uP UNTHE

Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 cantemparary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to installation.

Exhibitian is

accompanied by a catslages.

Funky Nassau
This exhibition first apeneed in Wiesbaclen, Germany in

March: 2INh.

contains the work of aight artists and offers

samples of the best cantemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
linge and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imagination,

Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening. :
The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS.
Cancer patients, survivors, their family members
and friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the: Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednes-
day at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwa-
nis is a worldwide service organisation dedicated to
changing the world One Child, One Community at
a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and
Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm.
Inquire about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night
at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm -
Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between





5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the sec-
ond Thugsday of each month in the-cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-’
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm..All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-
lowship’ starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from lpm to 2pm.



FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm.
New Providence Community Centre: Friday 7pm to
8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre
at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.










bunemedia.net

PHOTOS WELCOME

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

i CONCERTS
The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on
Friday, January 26 at 8pm at St Paul’s Church

Hall, Lyford Cay.

SATURDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
_ of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,

Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are

offered every third Saturday of the month from-
9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community

Training Representative at 302.4732 for more infor-

mation and.learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to.encourage kids to cycle. Par-
ents interested in registering their children should
contact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

@ FAMILY REUNION

New - The Valley Family Reunion for former
residents and those reuniting with loved ones
and friends will be holding a

Dinner, Dance Celebration on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 3 - Cocktails at 8pm and dinner at 8:30pm
- at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Gov-
ernor’s Ballroom. The evening will include cock-
tails, dinner and dancing and a three course buf-
fet dinner. A live band will also be featured.
Dress: Lounge Suit. Renew old acquaintances
and meet friends from school days. For more
information telephone 328.5494. Tickets are
available at McCartney’s Pharmacy, Mount Roy-
al Avenue. Part proceeds to benefit cere S
charities.

m CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on
Saturday, January 27 at 8pm at St Andrew’s
Kirk, Shirley Street.



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm
to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A
spiritual teaching society leading you to greater
peace of mind, health, prosperity and happiness -
holds Higher Consciousness Services every Sun-
day at 10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures
if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-
mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in
the subject line.





y



THE |} HIBUNE



@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com _
world’s

~
INCE
largest Anglican

provinces - the United States
and Canada - approved the
Episcopal consecration of an

the

openly gay bishop in 2003, the

Anglican communion has been
in a state of turmoil.

A split in the worldwide
church may be inevitable, as
many Anglicans across the
globe maintain that Biblical
scriptures condemn gay rela-
tionships while others are lob-

bying for a more inclusive
church
ihis week, a 10-member

Covenant Design Group,
chaired by Archbishop Drexel
Gomez (Wesi Indies). is meet-
ing in the Bahamas to examine
the fall-out in the Anglican
Communion after the election
and consecration of the first
openly gay bishop - Gene
Robison » as Bishop of New

Hampshire

Are Eben OD Gomez has also
stated that the reason for the
covenant was to propose a way
iu which the churches within
the Anglican Communion
could remain united. He has
also put forth that the meetings
could likely result in the cre-
ation of two sub-groups within
the worldwide communion.

Recently, | spoke to a for-
mer neighbour who has newly
entered the priesthood, and he
stressed that the issue of the
ordination of a gay priest has
been intensely scrutinised in
the church, asserting that
although Anglicans are taught
to believe in the principle of
“unity within diversity”, the
homosexual lifestyle cannot be
accepted and may therefore
tear the fabric of the worldwide
communion.

He said the Episcopal
church in the US/Canada need-

ed to strongly examine itself

since many of the “more liber-
al churches” had almost com-
pletely departed from its scrip-
tural foundations - and the
homosexual upheaval was only
one such example! - .
Since 2008, Archbishop of
Canterbury Rowan Williams,
the spiritual leader of the
Anglican Communion, has
attempted to broker a truce
between liberal and conserva-

tive bishops worldwide - but to



Anglican Chur






YOUNG MAN’S VIEW



ADRIAN
no avail.

Gene Robinson, the bishop
at the centre of this controver-
sy, reportedly divorced his wife,
estranged himself from his chil-
dren and resides as a non-celi-
bate homosexual with his part-
ner of more than a decade. For
many years, traditional Angli-
cans have categorically rejected
the notion of homosexuals lead-
ing the flock.

Since Gene Robinson’s elec-
tion and ordination, the Angli-
can Church has lost many mem-
bers. In December, 2006, eight
churches showed their objec-
iion to the blessing of same-sex
unions and a gay bishop by vot-
ing te
Diocese of Virginia.

Truro church and Falls
church, two of the largest and
most historic churches, were
among those leaving the US
Anglican communion and plac
ing themselves under the lead-~
ership of Archbishop Peter
Akinola of Nigeria. Archbishop
Akinola has called for the
expulsion of the US Episcopal

Church from the worldwide

Anglican Communion, austere-
ly opposing the:ordination of
homosexuals.

The struggle to hold the
world’s third largest Christian
denomination together - 38
autonomous provinces and 70
million members - may prove
futile, as can be seen in Arch-
bishop Gomez’s comments
immediately after Gene Robin-
son’s consecration.

The archbishop asserted that
Anglican congregations were

left in a ‘state of confusion as
opposing views of homosexu-
ality that now confront the
church cannot both be the
truth. ' ;

Archbishop Gomez added:
“This church in American made
a break in the teaching. They
have accepted the homosexual
practice as a legitimate lifestyle
and, in fairness to them, one
must say that their formal posi-
tion is that. homosexual prac-
tice is engaged upon by adults
who are in covenanted rela-
tionships - a relationship they
have committed to remain

break away from the |



GS Wesson

faithful and true to one anoth-
er - they have accepted that as
legitimate.

“Our point of view is that
we consider it illegitimate in
terms of the teaching of the
Bible and the historic teaching
of the church”, he said.

Archbishop Gomez also
declared: “Nowhere in the
Bible is the subject of homo-
sexuality discussed in the
abstract. The Bible deals with
homosexual acts and makes it
clear that homosexual acts are
contrary to God’s pattern for
procreation, clearly enuncrat-
ed in the book of Genesis, reaf-
firmed by Jesus and continual-
ly proclaimed by the Church
from the very beginning”.

Because the Anglican
Church has autonomous
provinces that make their own
decisions, it has been suggested
that the turmoil it now faces
may also be due to the lack of a
clearly defined hierarchical
structure

Unlike the Catholic Church,
where the Pope is the head and
all church policy is handed
down from the Vatican, the
Anglican Church is set up quite
differently.

It has been suggested that
the absence of a centralised
authoritative structure may
possibly be a weakness for the
church.

Indeed, the Anglican church
has arrived at a crossroads and
must decide whether it’s going
to deal with two different sets
of teachings - one of which is
contrary to Biblical beliefs - or
continue to portray a united
front.

MY GRANDFATHER’S
LOST

I would also like to express
my sincere condolences to my
grandfather, Edward Gibson,
on the passing of his sister Ella
Gibson. Having grown up in
Long Island, I got to know
Aunt Ella and grew to appreci-
ate the special bond that she

and my grandfather shared..

May her soul rest in peace!
Also, I would like to express
my family’s gratitude to

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Bank And Insurance

: On Premises :
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Before buying

Bahamas Bus & Truck

_ Call:





Ambrose Smith, the good
Samaritan who stopped and
rendered assistance to Shenell,
taking her to Doctors Hospital
and then to the Walk-In Clinic
and waiting (even after her
family was there).

Last week, a reckless driver
reversed on to my sister,

Accredited ¢ Registere:

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 9



ch at

Shenell’s, foot, as she was walk-
ing to COB.

After the incident, the inat-
tentive driver behaved as if she
was a fugitive, running away
from the scene, returning and -
upon hearing the medical costs
- fleeing!

Luckily, Shenell had only

minor injuries to a toe and an
X-ray showed that she hadn’t
broken any bones.

Mr Smith works on board a
Paradise Fisheries boat - the
Michelle - and is quite possibly
one of the last remaining good
Samaritans during these times.
Again, a sincere thank you!

Sion rai ORIENT

y Re Oe
DMO Make LLG LM OL Yale

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Call-now for registration information



eC te yy Street.



CupisTopHe ERNEST BROWN

October 7th, 1963 - January 14th, 2006

If tears could build a stairway

And memories were a lane

| would walk tight to heaven
To bring you home again
No farewell words were spoken
No time to say goodbye, you

Were gone bel



ore we knew it,

and only God knows why,

Our heart still aches in sadness,
and Secret fears still llow. What
it meant to Loose you, No one
will ever know.

Sadly missed by mom, Juanita; dad, Ernest; sisters, Carla, Dressler,
Christine, Terry, Carmen; brothers, Michael, Andre, and Craig; nieces
and nephews, aunts and uncles and a host of other relatives and fr iends.

SMA AUS PRTG eh IN TS

A ERE



PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007



Se OOBRRARG Q,
Sg

“Reema Rite

RARE



STORY SO FAR: Meli Lleshi, eleven
years old, is telling the story of how and
why her family left Kosovo in 1999 and
came to settle in Vermont. Her uncle has

- just informed the family that the Kosovar
hero Adem Jashari and his family have
been killed by Milosevic’s Serbian army.

CHAPTER TWO
A Costly Caricature

C6 [x Get away from that

door!” I said, but Isuf had

already pulled the door open and both he

and Adil had run into the parlor and

flung themselves at Papa. Vlora was right

behind, headed for Mama’s lap. The

‘ grown-ups were sitting as though
stunned.

“Seventy people!” Mehmet broke the
silence. “The butchers just went in and
slaughtered them.”

Uncle Fadil’s head was down and I
could barely hear him. “It is said that
one child escaped—one of the little
girls.”

“Meli,” Mama said softly, “bring Uncle





Vas” ena

Sh NRT:

Fadil and Aunt Burbuge some tea,
please.”

My hands shook as I poured tea into
the glasses. What would become of us
now? Adem Jashari and his family were

x only, hope againsi-Serbian cruelty
and Milosevic’s oppression. I brought in

the tray-and passed the tea to the four

grown-ups. “Fix a glass for Mehmet,”
Mama said. “And one for yourself, too.
You will have to be grown-ups now.”

“Me too,” Isuf said. “I’m almost nine.”

“You may have a sip of mine,” Papa
said. “And you too, Adil.” He patted
Adil’s head, forestalling a whine.

For a long time we sat in silence. Even
the little ones were still. At last Uncle
Fadil said, “We came because we want
you to come to the country with us. No

place is safe, but the country is safer, |

and if things go wrong, we will have
food.”

Leave home? Leave school and all my
friends? 1 couldn’t bear the thought.
Besides, if no place was safe, why could-
n’t we stay right here? Our Serb neigh-
bors were no longer friendly, but surely
they would never harm us. The police
were annoying, but they’d never actual-
ly hurt any of us. Still, Adem Jashari and
all of his large family were dead. What
did that mean for us? For any Albanian
in Kosovo? But to leave our home?

Everyone was looking at Papa. He
would be the one to decide. Papa took a
long sip of his tea.

“Thank you, brother, but how can I
leave my home and my store?

“My children have never known anoth-
er home, and every Albanian in the
neighborhood depends on me, on our
store, for groceries. What would we do in
the country? You are very generous to
invite us to share your home, but we
would only be a burden.

“Here we are among friends. Here we
are needed.”

THE TRIBUNE

'





“You would be among family with us,”
Aunt Burbuge said.

“Yes,” said Papa. “And family is more
important than anything. But your house
is not'large, and we... ” He laughed

and hugged the boys. “We are blessed
with many children. If there is a ‘crisis,

your own daughter will want to return
from Prestina with her family. The hquse
would burst like an overripe pumpkin.”

Uncle Fadil shook his head. I thought

he would object, but he just said, “We

must get back. Mother is alone.” He
looked around for a place to set down his
glass, so I quickly took him the tray. “If
you change your mind, my brother, we

_ can always make room for you.”

Spring came. School went on much as
usual. I was sure Papa had been right to
stay.

Everything was quiet—too quiet, per-
haps—but I had begun to believe that
the worst was over. After all, what could
be worse than the massacre of the Jashari
family?

Then came the end of May, and that
terrible afternoon when all I wanted was
to be outdoors—not crowded with fifty
other upper-grade children into a room
of the tiny house that we Albanians used
for a school, since all the schools now
belonged to the Serbs. It was so hot that
I couldn’t listen to Mr. Uka drone on
and on. So I began to study his nose. It
was so big. He reminded me of a pelican,
so I drew a picture of a pelican that
looked a lot like Mr. Uka and showed it
to my best friend, Zara, who sat in the
same desk as me. She began to giggle,
which set me off.

“Zara, Meli, come to the front,” Mr.
Uka said.

I tried to slip the picture into my pock-
et, but it was too late; he had seen it.
Mr. Uka held out his hand. “Very
clever,” he said. “But what do pelicans

have to do with the history of Kosovo?” A

“Nothing, sir,” I mumbled. I could feel
Mehmet’s disapproval on the back of my ~ 's
neck. I didn’t dare turn to look. I knew -

how angry he must be.

“Then we will keep it for science

class,” he said. “And I would like the te

two of you to stay after school and catch

up on history.” io

When Mr. Uka finally dismissed us, ‘2
Mehmet was nowhere to be seen. “He ‘
ran home to tattle on me,” I said to Zara.

It wasn’t fair. 1 knew Papa would want
an explanation as to why Mehmet hadn’t
waited—why he was letting us girls walk
home alone when Papa had told him
months ago he was to look out for us.
Papa would be angry at us both.

As always, we had to pass the police
station on the way. A Serb policeman
was loitering outside. “Where are you
girls headed?”

He spoke, of course, in Serbian, and I
had sense enough to answer in Serbian.
“Just home,” I said.

He shrugged. Out of sight of the sta-
tion we began to hurry, and when I left
Zara at her house I began to run. I was
very late.

Yes, there was Papa waiting outside
the store. “Meli, thank God, you’re
home. But where is Mehmet?”

oe»

(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright © 2005

by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright © 2005
by Emily Arnold McCully

c

Reprinted by permission of z “.
Breakfast Serials, Inc. 3

www.breakfastserials.com



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THE TRIBUNE

By
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 11



Chinese workers
‘are here legally’

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE Director of Immigra-
tion said that the Chinese work-
ers employed on the construc-
tion site of TG Glover Primary
School are here legally, because
the Bahamas does not have
enough skilled electrical and
steelworkers to take advantage
of the jobs.

Yesterday, the Workers Par-
ty alerted the local media to
what they described as a “Chi-
nese take-over” on the con-
struction grounds of the prima-
ry school.

Mr Anthony Thompson, a
local steelworker claimed that
his employer (ER Hanna Con-
struction) had dismissed him
and hired Chinese workers in
his place.

Mr E R Hanna and a Chinese
foreman on the site confirmed
that there were about 29 Chi-
nese workers employed on the
site.

Mr E R Hanna told reporters
he was employed by the Min-
istry of Works. '

The Tribune contacted Hous-
ing & Utilities Minister Bradley
Roberts, who claimed he was
not aware of the issue.

Firearms
seized
FROM page one

would wish to credit and thank
the public for their support for :

assisting the police," Inspector
Evans said.

will assist us in our crime fight-
ing efforts, that could bring

police and the public working :
hand-in-hand that can certainly :
bring crime to a level whereby :

all persons can thoroughly enjoy
themselves. The

mitted towards this end," he
continued. "We,are committed,

is eradicated in our community ;

and that all persons can enjoy

free and unhindered."

Minister Roberts told the
reporter: “I am the Minister of
Works, the person you ought
to be relating that matter with is
the Minister of Labour.”

“The Ministry of Works does
not grant work permits, that is
the Ministry of Labour, they
approve any foreign workers
that come in,” explained the
minister.

The Tribune then contacted
the Department of Immigra-
tion. Director Vernon Burrows
confirmed the legal status of the
Chinese workers on the site.

He said: “The bottomline you
want to know is whether or not
they (Chinese workers) have
permission to be there, and the
answer is yes.”

Mr Burrows said the Immi-
gration Board decided to grant
work permits to the Chinese
workers, “after being satisfied
that there weren’t sufficient
unemployed Bahamians in the

market.”

“They made an application
to us and we approved this
application,” said the immigra-
tion director.

When The Tribune asked Mr
Burrows for an explanation, he
claimed: “We don’t have
enough Bahamian steelworkers
in this country.”

Director Burrows said that
Bahamians must not “fool our-
selves” into thinking that “we
have the workers based on the
number of projects that we
have.”

He also claimed that the
Bahamas does not have
enough qualified electrical
workers.

“All you need to do is go
cross to Paradise Island Phase
III and see the number of elec-
tricians over there.”

“Most of our qualified elec-
trical workers are contractors
themselves, and they are not
going to go and work for
nobody else, you have to give
them a contract,” said Director
Burrows.

Mr Burrows claimed that the
Department of Immigration
would be willing to find employ-
ment for skilled electricians and
steelworkers if they knew of
them.

According to him: “If you
could find some of them out
there who are unemployed and
can’t find employment, then, of
course, just let us (Department
of Immigration) and the
Department of Labour know,
and we will ensure that they are
employed. No question about
that.”

Residents claim

‘police harassment’

FROM page one

dents why they believed the police officers had questioned them. All

: of the residents claimed the incident was linked to the coverage of
’ : their complaints published in The Tribune.
"It is this kind of support that :

“In other words, just because we expressed our feelings to the

: paper we are now getting harassed, ” said Mr Christopher Miller of
L : house No. 47.
about great success. With the :

The residents said the group of officers included one female
officer and four male officers who were all dressed in plain clothes.

Ms Leana Carey, the spokesperson for the residents, told The Tri-
: bune that all of the home-owners were tired of writing letters to the
A ' : department of housing. They wanted all of their concerns resolved
oyal :
Bahamas Police force is com- :

immediately.

According to Ms Carey, Housing Minister Wisdom had-dlso

promised the home-owers grass, fencing and fruit trees for their
t : yards, but they had not yet received them.:
to ensure that the fear of crime :

The Tribune contacted Assistant Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson to notify the police of the situation, but our call was not

: returned up to press time.
themselves as they move about :

Nor did The Tribune receive a response from Mr Gordon Major

of the Department of Housing. |

More radio and TV
licences are granted

“We will be able to make sure we are monitoring

FROM page one

A new television licence was given to Wendell
Jones, CEO of Love97 and the Bahama Journal,
he added.

Minister Wilchcombe said his government was
able to grant the licences at this point in time because
the administration is finally moving towards imple-
menting new broadcasting regulations.

“That was the holdup for very long, I wasn’t com-

fortable with the regulations that existed,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that the current government
is now completing the process started by former
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in 1992 when his
administration gave the radio station 100Jamz its
licence, thereby breaking a decades-long monop-
oly on broadcasting.

Cabinet last week, he said, received recommen-
dations from international consultants, including
experts in Canada and the UK, on the question of
the regulation of broadcasting entities and will soon
be able to implement new rules for private radio and
television stations.

and regulating these stations in such a way to ensure
that the high professional level is always main-
tained,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said he is especially pleased with
the licences that were granted for the proposed

radio stations in the Family Islands.

“This. is especially good for the Family Islands
where announcements still have to be made in the
church and put on the street pole because
there are no other means of communication,” he
said.

The minister said that he is also excited about
the licence for COB, as it will serve as a training
ground for potential future broadcasters, generate
more interest in the college and will offer a forum for
discussions on various pertinent issues.

In general, Mr. Wilchcombe said, the new stations
will offer Bahamians a never before seen variety
of media choices.

“T think we are still stuck with the same old stuff,
the talk shows are all the same thing. We don’t have
the diversity that we require,” he said.

@ CHINESE workers at the construction site yesterday.

FROM page one

with the members of the Workers Party, Mr Hen-
ty F Storr, the electrical contractor on the site,
shared his views with the media on the alleged
Chinese take-over.

“There are no Bahamian qualified electricians,”
Mr Storr declared.

“No,” he said, “you can’t find them.”

Mr Storr said this was the problem on all his
projects.

“As soon as you train a fella, he leaves and

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Chinese workers

goes and starts his own business,” Mr Storr
explained.

At the end, Mr Anthony Thompson, the steel-
worker who started the controversy, told The
Tribune the government should be “worried”
about the next general election.

“They better straighten up, because an election
is right around the corner, and it seems like they
only looking for one term,” Mr Thompson said.



A FRIENDLY REMINDER

MASS DISCONNECTION ‘EXERCISES
IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS: a



¢ Blair Estate e Johnson Road ¢ Step St. « Berard Road

e Kool Acres ¢ Fox Hill ¢

Yamacraw Beach Estate « Elizabeth

Estate e Eastwood Sub Colony Village ¢ Nassau East Estate
e Winton Meadows « Mason’s Addition ¢ Leeward East &
Twynam Hwights ¢ East St. « Market St. e Wulff Road
¢ Blue Hill Road ¢ Montell Heights Ridgeland Park and ail
side corners * Pinewood Gardens ¢ Joan’s and Domingo
Heights * Bamboo Town e South Beach e Marshail Road
¢ Seven Hills and Gamble Heights ¢ Pastel and Faith Gardens
¢ Sunshine Park ¢ Silver Gates ¢ Golden Gates
¢ Blue Hill and Bel Air Estate.

PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mali at Marathon
or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations







'
'
!
‘
5
t

we ee He ee we He eee ene



PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUAEYTD, 2007 “THE TRIBUNE

New Year's
ouse
| Sir Lynden Pindling Estates

Off Charles W. Saunders Highway North
(Highway that connects Sea Breeze Estates
to East Street South) /

Saturday, January 20th, eur 10: 00 AM - 4:00 PM
= ON THE SPOT QUALIFYING | se :
ms VIEW TWO FULLY FURNISHED AND LANDSCAPED HOMES



a FREE FOOD AND DRINKS
us FREE DIABET ES, CHOLESTEROL « BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS



SUNSHINE FINANCE LTD.

LENDING & MORTGAGE SERVICTS
AP ARAL RY CF SESERIENE FARE ATE LPP.








agree a marae * ~
WAR
: a wh a\ AA Ae :

As ie = Babess pe ai

+t xh aS. ‘ SS aks




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ea ee aera ~ Til) SEAS

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Sreag iad geceecd f





PAGE 4B, THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




“The Tribune believes strongly in the
people’s right to know, holding both
the public and the private sector to a
high level of accountability and

transparency. At the Tribune, we




y

provide news and information, that...
people need to help make decisions in

their lives. I’m proud to be a part of the
leading print medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

RUPERT MISSICK, JR. ;
“wewene The Tribune
3 pp | /
ty Voice. My Vlewpyee



e news, call our
ips Line at 502-2359.



SER AL





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Notes to Financial Statements

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



1. General information

Freeport Concrete Company Limited ("the Company”) is incorporated under the laws
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and its shares are publicly held. The principal
activities of the Company consist of the production and sale of aggregate and ready-
mixed concrete and the retail sale of hardware, appliances and other consumer
products. The Company operates two retail stores under the trade name, The Home
Centre, in Freeport, Grand Bahama. The principal place of business for the retail
operations is on West Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama and the ready-mixed

concrete operation is on Queen's Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Up to August 31, 2005, the Company owned 90% of the outstanding shares of Robin
Hood Enterprises Limited ("RH"), a company operating in New Providence,
Bahamas. RH is in the business of purchasing and selling new and refurbished
equipment and-appliances. Effective August 31, 2005, the Company sold its entire

investment in RH.

The corresponding figures for the year ended August 31, 2005 in the statement of
operations and the statement of cash flows, include the results of RH up to August
31, 2005. The corresponding figures in the balance sheet do not include the assets

and liabilities of RH, as RH was sold effective August 31, 2005.
2. Significant accounting policies

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) and its interpretations adopted by the
International Accounting Standards Board. The significant accounting policies are as

follows.

(a) Basis of preparation

The financial statements are presented in Bahamian dollars (B$) which is the
functional currency of the Company. The Bahamian dollar is the currency of the
country where the Company is domiciled and is the prime operating currency.
The financial statements are prepared on the historical or amortised cost basis,
except for land which is stated at an appraised value as explained in note 8.

The accounting policies have been consistently applied by the Company and are

consistent with those used in the previous year.

(b) Cash and cash equivalents

The Company considers all cash on hand, demand deposits with financial
institutions and fixed deposits excluding those pledged as security for letters of

credit, less bank overdraft, as cash and cash equivalents.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006 +
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 11B

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



2. Significant accounting policies, continued
(n) Foreign exchange

The Company's functional and reporting currency is the Bahamian dollar.
Transactions in foreign currencies are translated to Bahamian dollars at the
foreign exchange rates prevailing at the dates of the transactions. Monetary
assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the Bahamian dollar
are translated at the market exchange rates at the close of each business day.
Exchange differences arising on translation are included in the statement of
operations.

(0) Segment reporting

A segment is a distinguishable component of the Company that is engaged in
providing products (business segment), which is subject to risks and rewards
that are different from other segments.

(p) Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires
management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the
application of policies and reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure
of contingent assets and liabilities at the balance sheet date and the reported
amounts of income and expenses during the year.

The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience
and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the
circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments
about carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not teadily apparent from
other

sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates. Significant estimates
which could impact the Company’s financial statements include the estimated
useful life of assets which are depreciated, impairment, allowance for doubtful
accounts and provision for slow moving and obsolete inventory. The estimates
and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is
revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and
future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

RN

2. Significant accounting policies, continued

(c)

(d)

Financial instruments
Classification

Financial instruments include financial assets and financial liabilities. Financial
assets that are classified as loans and receivables include accounts receivable,
due from former subsidiary and due from former subsidiary's shareholders.
Financial liabilities that are not at fair value through profit or loss include bank
overdraft, accounts payable and accrued expenses and long-term debt.

Recognition

The Company recognises financial assets and financial liabilities on the date it
becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument.

Measurement

Financial instruments are measured initially at fair value (transaction price) plus,
in the case of a financial asset or financial liability not at fair value through profit
or loss, transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or issue
of the financial asset or financial liability. Transaction costs on financial assets
and financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are expensed
immediately, while on other financial instruments they are amortised.

Subsequent to initial recognition financial assets classified as loans and
receivables are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method,
less impairment losses, if any.

Financial liabilities, other than those at fair value through profit or loss, are
measured at amortized cost using the effective interest rate method.

Derecognition

The Company derecognises a financial asset when the contractual tights for
cash flows from the financial asset expire or it transfers the financial asset and
the transfer qualifies for derecognition in accordance with Intemational
Accounting Standard 39.

'
The Company derecognises a financial liability when the obligation specified in
the contract is discharged, cancelled or expired.

Accounts receivable, net

Accounts receivable are stated at amortised cost less an allowance for doubtful
accounts determined based on the policy for impairment in note 2(g).

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



3. Going concern

During the year ended August 31, 2006, the Company incurred a net loss of
B$1,993,302 and as of August 31, 2006, the Company's current liabilities exceeded
its current assets by B$1,069,869. In addition, as described in note 14 (e), as of
August 31, 2006 and as of the date that these financial statements were approved for
issuance, the Company Was not in compliance with various debt covenants in
connection with the bank overdraft and bank loan facilities, primarily relating to
certain financial ratios. The total amount of the bank overdraft and loan at August 31,
2006 was B$1,963,064. The Company has not received written confirmation from its
bankers that they will agree to tolerate the breaches of debt covenants, and therefore
an uncertainty exists as to what action the Company's bankers will take, if any.

In addition, as explained in note 14 (d), the Company commenced an action in the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas against the Comptroller of
Customs for judicial review of The Bahamas Customs Department demand for
payment of duties of B$738,644 on all goods “on display” in the new Superstore and
to prohibit the clearing of further goods by the Company from the Freeport Harbour
pending payment of the same. An injunction was obtained against the Comptroller of
Customs and leave was obtained to commence an application for judicial review.
The matter is set to be heard on February 12, 2007. The Company has not made an
accrual in its financial statements for the amount of duties claimed. Although the
Company's attorney is of the opinion that the Company has a good arguable case in
obtaining the declarations sought, the ultimate outcome of this matter cannot
presently be determined, and accordingly no provision for any effects on the
Company that may result has been made in the financial statements.

The above situations indicate the existence of material uncertainties which cast
significant doubt on the Company's ability to continue as a going concem, and
therefore it may be unable to realise its assets and discharge its liabilities in the
normal course. of business. The financial statements do not include adjustments, if
any, that may be required to the recorded value: and classification of assets and
liabilities, in the event the Company is not able to continue as a going concem.

Management and the directors have assessed the above matters and have
concluded. that it is appropriate to prepare the financial statements under the going
concern assumption because of.the following reasons: ‘ort ;

Freeport Concrete:Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

a *--———eeee————————

2. Significant accounting policies, continued

(e). Inventories

(i) Retail hardware and consumer products

Retail hardware and consumer products are stated at the lower of cost and
net realisable value. Cost is determined using the weighted average
method. Inventory provisions are made when, in management's opinion,
inventory items will have to be sold at amounts less than cost. Inventory
provisions are calculated as the difference between net realisable value, as
estimated by management, and cost.

(ii) Blocks

Blocks are carried at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost is
determined based on direct production costs andean appropriate share of
overheads based on normal operating capacity. Net realisable value is
determined after considering the net sales price of the finished product.

(iii) Cement and aggregate

Cement and aggregate inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net
realisable value. Cost is determined using the first-in first-out method.

(f) Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation
and impairment losses (refer to accounting policy 2(g)), except for land which is
Stated at appraised value based on directors’ valuation and is not depreciated.

Depreciation is calculated on the straight-line basis over the estimated useful
lives as follows:

Plant 10 years
Heavy equipment 5 years
Automobiles 3-5 years
Trailers and security booth 5-7 years
Store furniture and equipment 7-10 years
Office furniture and equipment 4-7 years
Leasehold improvements the lesser of 10 years or the term of

lease after considering renewal options

Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are recognised in the statement of
operations as incurred. Cost of renewals and improvements are added to
Property, plant and equipment. At the time of disposal or retirement of assets,
the cost and related accumulated depreciation are eliminated, and any resulting
profit or loss is reflected in the statement of operations.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars) : : et

2. Significant accounting policies, continued

(9)

(h)

(i)

w

(k)

()

Impairment '

The carrying amount of the Company’s assets other than inventories (refer to
accounting policy (e)) are reviewed at each balance sheet date to determine
whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, the
asset's recoverable amount is estimated. An impairment loss is recognised
whenever the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. The
recoverable amount is determined based on the higher of the asset's value in
use (present value of estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the
continuing use of an asset and from its disposal at the end of its useful life) or net
selling price (arm's length sales price between willing parties less costs of
disposal). Impairment losses are recognised in the statement of operations.

Accounts payable
Accounts payable and other liabilities are stated at their amortised cost.

Provisions

A provision is recognised in the balance sheet when the Company has a legal or
constructive obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of
economic resources will be required to settle the obligation and the amount can
be reasonably estimated.

Warranties

The provision for warranties is based on estimates made by management from
historical warranty data.

Revenue recognition

Revenue from the sale of retail hardware and consumer products, aggregate,
blocks and ready mix concrete is recognised at the point of sale.

Net gain on sale of subsidiary is recognised when the significant risks and!
rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer.

Operating lease payments

Payments made under operating leases are recognised as an expense in the
statement of operations on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease.

(m) Interest income and expense

Interest income and expense are accounted for on the accrual basis.

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

_ Or

3. Going concern, continued

1.

During the current year, the Company's Home Centre store went through a
business transition period of moving out of a dilapidated facility into a new facility
with new products, expanded inventory and all the increased costs associated
with making this move. Certain related costs are not expected to recur in fiscal
2007. ° : ‘

The Company's financial projections for fiscal 2007 indicate profitable operating
results. The decision to close the Home Centre Seahorse location on December
31, 2006 is expected to save costs and consolidate staff and operations into one
facility.

A new General Manager for the Home Centre has been hired and is focused on
increasing sales, improving gross profit margins, controlling costs and improving
inventory management.

The Company has made all of the loan payments on the scheduled due dates.
Discussions were held with the Company's bankers who have been asked to
tolerate the breaches of covenants and allow the Company to continue to
operate under the existing loan and overdraft facility limits, with the same
scheduled monthly loan repayments.

4. Time deposits

As of August 31, 2006, time deposits earned interest at 3% (2005: 3%) per annum.
Time deposits of B$50,000 (2005: B$50,000) are being held by the Company's
bankers as security for letters of credit as referred to in note 14(b). All time deposits
mature within 3 months of the balance sheet date. All time deposits are held with

banks located in The Bahamas and are denominated in Bahamian dollars.

5. Accounts receivable, net









ate 2006 2005

Trade accounts — third parties B$ 1,333,818 1,086,067
Trade accounts — related parties 411,154 58,759
Trade accounts — employees 106,458 61,889
Other -. 300,000
Other employee receivables and advances 20,119 12,020
1,871,549 1,518,735

Less: allowance for doubtful accounts ($47,832) (209,498)
B$_ 1,323,717 1,309,237

The other receivable in 2005 represents an amount due from one of the Company's
landlords in connection with the settlement related to the leasehold improvements at
the Peel Street location. This amount has been reflected in other income in the 2005

statement of operations.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

_



5. Accounts receivable, net continued

The movement in the allowance for doubtful accounts is as follows:











2006 2005
Balance at the beginning of the year BS 209,498 187,711
Increase in provision for bad debts 335,544 482,921
Write-offs (28,863) (285,601)
Recoveries 31,653 -
Decrease resulting fromsaleof RH = (175,533)
Balance at the end of the year B$ 547,832 209,498
6. Inventories
2006 2005
Hardware and consumer products B$ 2,865,322 1,984,624
Aggregate 3,417 6,671
Cement 13,186 20,384
Blocks a __17,364 8,544
a 7 2,899,289 2,020,223
Less: provision for slow moving and obsolete inventory (410,446) (158,874)
ep oe Zz B$ 2,488,843 1,861,349

The amount shown below as Increase/(decrease) in the provision for slow moving

and obsolete inventory is included in

cost of sales in the statement of operations:



- 2006 2005

Opening provision for slow moving and
obsolete inventory BS = 158,874 559,428
Increase/(decrease) in provision 251,572 (201,495)
Decrease resulting from sale of RH - (199,059)



BS 410,446 158,874

Ott



THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 5B

_ Bahamas hotels nervously Rh,

await US passport impact For the stories behind the



4 2 & $4

4
+ * 44%,





@ By MIKE WILLIAMS
Cox News Service

MIAMI — As the owner of a
small bed and breakfast on
Grand Bahama, Mike Acosta
has battled hurricanes, competi-
tion with luxury resorts and the
vagaries of winter weather in the
northern US, where unexpect-
ed warm spells can put a crimp

cate for identification purposes.

“It is worrying,” said Mr
Acosta, whose Auntie Anne’s B
&B depends on a steady flow of
US tourists. “People might just
as soon go somewhere they
don’t need a passport.”

The change in US policy,
which also applies to Americans
returning by air from Mexico
and Canada, was ordered by the
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity as part of a tightening of
border rules following the 2001
terrorist attacks. Cruise ship pas-
sengers and those entering the
United States by land will also
need passports, but not until

8.

sta in his business. chain with operations in

oe Now Mr Acosta and thou- Jamaica, the Bahamas, Curacao change for some Caribbean

tate sands of other tourist operators and the Dominican Republic, islands such as Barbados, St

**,¢ across the sunny Caribbean are said his bookings for this winter Martin and Martinique, which

eta” facing a new challenge: as of Jan- _are actually ahead of last year. already required arriving Amer-

at uary 23, US citizens must have “But last-minute bookings are _icans to have passports.

w aoe passports to get back into the the cream on the cake,” he said. It could also mean a boon for

ey US. They can no longer jet to “With cold snaps inthe northern _ the US Virgin Islands and Puer- =
ita ¥ the Caribbean with nothing but US, a lot of people say: ‘Let’s to Rico, which are American ter- F ree po rt Co ntai ner Po rt
feta’ a driver’s license or birth certifi- get out of here.’ Now if they __ritories and require only driver’s Grand Bahama, Bahamas

a”

Caribbean tourism officials
say they understand the reasons
for the change, but that doesn’t
quell their worries that the has-
sles and costs of obtaining a
passport might discourage their
most reliable winter market.

“It is a cause of concern,” said
Arley Sobers, director of
research for the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation, a trade
group.

“Tourism accounted for $21.5
billion in the Caribbean in 2005.
It’s far and away our most
important area of economic
activity, and the US is our largest
market, accounting for approxi-
mately half our business.”

One study commissioned by
the World Travel and Tourism

Council rattled the region by
predicting the change in pass-

port rules could jeopardise up
to $2.6 billion in revenues and
threaten 188,000 jobs.

So far, Sobers said, there are
no reports of a downturn in busi-
ness approaching that level.

“But the proof of the pudding
is in the eating,” he said. “We
have to see.”

John Issa, executive chairman
of the SuperClubs resorts, a

don’t have a passport, they may
go somewhere else.”

It normally takes Americans
from four to six weeks to obtain
a passport. The fee is $97 for
adults and $82 for children under
the age of 16, meaning a family
of four might spend nearly $400
for passports. Passports can be
obtained in as little as two
weeks, but each applicant must
pay an additional $60 for expe-
dited service.

The rule change was original-
ly planned for implementation
in 2006, but was delayed a year
after an outcry by tourism oper-
ators.

The one-year reprieve
prompted a bevy of promotion-
al and educational campaigns.

Jamaica’s government ran ads
at US Postal Service outlets in
selected markets, along with
offering free coffee at commuter
stops in New York, Chicago and
Washington, D.C.

SuperClubs met the challenge
head-on by offering to pay for
Americans to obtain their pass-
ports, a promotion that so far
has had more than 1,500 takers.

Other resorts around the
region have offered rebates, dis-
counts, free day-trips, massages
and cocktails.

One bitter pill for Caribbean
hoteliers is the extra year that
cruise-ship passengers get before
the rule applies, a product of
heavy lobbying by that industry.

Many sun-seeking tourists may _.

opt for a cruise instead of a stay
on land to avoid the passport
hurdle, and that gives the cruise
industry an unfair advantage,
they say.

“I can’t understand how the
security concerns are less for
people arriving on cruise ships,”
Mr Issa said. “Less screening for
them means less security for

‘them.”

The new rules will mean no

licenses or birth certificates for
identity checks. Puerto Rico has
run an ad campaign touting itself
as a hassle-free ‘American’
beach destination.

But with less than 30 per cent
of Americans holding passports,
the worry for other Caribbean
destinations with high numbers
of US visitors is significant. In
the Bahamas, 87 per cent of the
tourists come from America,
while the number for Jamaica is
73 per cent.

In past years, only about 20
per cent of Jamaica’s American
tourists had passports.

“We made history last year by
topping 1 million American vis-
itors,” said David Shields,
deputy director of marketing for
the Jamaica Tourism Board.
“We’re encouraged so far by our
bookings for this season, but it’s
too early to tell if our quick get-
away visitors might show a fall-
off.”

While tourism boards and the
big resorts have plowed money
into promotions to try to head
off a drop in business, most small
operators can afford little more
than crossing their fingers and
hoping for the best.

“I’m afraid it could hurt us,”

‘said Barry Benjamin of the 32-

room Club Peace and Plenty on

the Bahamian island of Exuma. ,
“As far as I can tell our bookings °

for January have increased, but
the biggest impact might'be on
the mass market, the people who

SOR
REC



want the best deal and don’t
have a lot to spend.”

* Three (3) years’ experience working on GE, ABB or Siemens Drive Control Systems.

* Diploma or Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical Technology.
* Experience in supporting OMG, HHI or Mobile Cranes preferred.

¢ Computer Literate
* Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

* Must be able to repair and maintain:
o AC/DC Motors

o AC/DC Motor Control Drive Equipment

o Medium/High Voltage Distribution Systems

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful candidates:
o Full-time Employment ,

Major Medical/Life Grou
Retirement Savings Plan
School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
Performance Bonus

O°
Oo
3
Oo

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau on
January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. through 4:00
p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville







news, read /nsight on Mondays



Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
Crane Technician

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:







Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs





PUBLIC NOTICE

THE CENTRAL BANK.
OF THE BAHAMAS



| Freeport Container Port

rand Bahama, Bahamas




ee SER Oe OR

i
x
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at
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&
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“ : Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
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| INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES
on MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: SEMINAR




* Three (3) years’ experience in repairing and maintaining heavy mobile
equipment.



The Central Bank Of

The Bahamas training room,
Market Street and ‘Trinity
Place Entrance

PLACE:



Certification in Heavy Equipment Repair and Maintenance (Diploma or
Associate Degree preferred)




ii Three to Five years working experience and knowledge of Kalmar or
Noell Straddle Carries.




Computer Literate oad ie Rees Des
_January 30, 2007 from.’
10:30 A.M. To 12:00 PRM.



WHEN: |

Must be willing to work as part of a Team.




* Must be able to repair and maintain:
o Hydraulic Systems
o Diesel & Gasoline Engines
o Automotive Electronic Circuits



CONTACT NO. 302-2620, 302-2622,

302-2740 & 302-2734



Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful
candidates:



‘ o Full-time Employment
i o Major Medical/Life Group Insurance
‘ o Retirement Savings Plan
o School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
o Performance Bonus

APPLY BY:



January 26, 2007




j | Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau

on January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. . : 2
through 4:00 p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville The seminar IS open to banks and banking
institutions, government agencies and corporations
and private companies. Applications will be taken

on a first-come/first-served basis, as space is limited.




Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas





email: ADS@fep.com.bs















THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

Foreign firms warned
over ‘buddy system’

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGES JEAN OF

TAYLOR STREET, P.O.BOX N-1 390, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given_ that SMITH FLORVIL OF
CORAL LAKES,TUNA LANE, P.O. BOX NP-4911, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed.statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





General Maintenance Personnel
Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and
some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience
and must provide references.

Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experience.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ULTRACAPE (HOLDINGS) LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the under-
signed at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street,
PO. Box N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or
before the 2nd day of February, 2007. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by
the liquidator.

Dated the 17th day of January 2007.

LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR ~






Legal Notice
NOTICE
U CAP O

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ULTRACAPE (HOLDINGS) LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of ‘the International
Business Companies Act 2000.



(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 17th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General. :




(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
Maycock of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,

East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.

Dated this 17th day of January 2007.



H & J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

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season with 2006 Prices



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Nassau: 323-5701




Freeport: 352-5981







g@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

WARNING foreign compa-
nies against establishing a
“buddy system" in the
Bahamas, the minister of finan-
cial services and investments,
Vincent Peet. said the practice
will not be tolerated by the
Government.

Foreign companies who
enter the Bahamas to proyide
specialist services, once Con-
tracted, ofte “never leave," he
revealed.

“This negative practice has
resulted in the establishment
of a “buddy system’, where
foreign companies refer busi-
nesses to their foreign friends,
that is other foreign companies,
and thus exclude their Bahami-
an counterparts." Mr Peet
explained

He told the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Engineers that this
approach was not conducive to
the Bahamian economy,
because it prevented develop-
ers from trying to make con-
tact with Bahamian engineers,
as they are advised the exper-
tise required is not available in
the Bahamas.

“This is most unacceptable,"

the minister said.

Mr Peet added that the Gov-
ernment was committed to
ensuring that more Bahamians
are able to take advantage of
the opportunities that result

from foreign direct invest-.

ments.

"Of equal importance is the
establishment of the Domestic
Investment Board by Prime
Minister Perry Christie, which
provides additional opportuni-
ties for Bahamians to engage
in entrepreneurial ventures in
our country," he said.

"Lam of the opinion that sig-
nificant in-roads have been
made but we cannot rest on our
laurels. We must continue to
work together and serve as cat-
alysts to move our country for-
ward and leave a lasting legacy
for generations yet unborn."

Despite the existence of the
buddy system in the Bahamas,
according to Minister Peet, the
Bahamas has experienced a
resurgence in its economy.

"Over the past four years, in
excess of 430 foreign invest-
ment projects were submitted
to my Ministry. Of that num-
ber, 53 projects valued at $13.6
billion are currently under var-

ious states of construction.
They include Ginn, Kerzner
International, the I-Group, and
Baha Mar," he said.

These major investors
employed over 100 Bahamians
companies, Mr Peet added.

"A perception exists that not
enough Bahamian engineers,
architects, contractors, survey-
ors and other professional bod-
ies are the true beneficiaries of
the economic bonanza being
experienced in light of foreign
direct investment,” he acknowl-
edged.

Dispel

Attempting to dispel that
misconception, he noted that
Baha Mar had employed the
services of 98 Bahamians com-
panies in their $2.4 billion
Cable Beach development,
while Kerzner International
used the services of 33 Bahami-
an companies on its Phase III
project alone.

The presence of foreign
investors is seen across the
islands of the Bahamas, he
explained. Currently projects
are underway in Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Abaco,

Exuma, Rum Cay, San Sal-
vador and others are in the
pipeline, such as Long Island,
French Wells in Crooked
Island, and Andros.

" Additionally," the minister
said, "I am in dialogue with
representatives of these devel-
opers. As recently as yester-
day, I was assured that focused
attention will be given to the
introduction of an Internship
for young engineers so that
they can gain invaluable expe-
rience and develop technical
skills and expertise in various
areas of specialisation."

“My ministry is also pre-
pared to revisit Heads of
Agreement requirements and
stipulate in the same, that a
lead Bahamian engineer or
engineer-of-record, and related
consultants, become intimately
involved in certain projects
beyond a minimum size and
scope - from its initial stage of
conceptualisation to design and
construction.

“Bahamian engineers and
other professionals have been
submitted to developers and,
more importantly, to all those
who are applying to invest in
the Bahamas.”








Cruise lines may take port stakes

FROM page 1B

would be “much broader in scope than
we had before”, and was adopting a two-
pronged strategy to deal with the increas-
ing tendency of the cruise lines to use their
own private islands as the sole or first port
of call in the Bahamas.

One angle has involved getting “the

major cruise lines to have a direct financial:

interest in the major ports in Nassau and
Grand Bahama”, Mr Johnson said, some-_
thing that has been discussed in negotia?
tions between Carnival and Royal
Caribbean.

And in allowing the cruise lines to use
their private islands, Mr Johnson said the
Ministry of Tourism was negotiating to
have Bahamians take much greater own-
ership, operation and provision of prod-
ucts to passengers visiting these islands
than currently. This is an attempt to ensure
the,economic benefits from the cruise ship
industry trickle down to all Bahamians.

“We are attracting 3.5 million cruise
passengers,” the deputy director-general of

tourism said. “We know our capacity in

Legal Notice
NOTICE
SENECA INC.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SENECA INC. is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) ‘The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 17th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro

Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road ‘Town,

Tortola, B. V1

Dated this 19th day of January, A D. 2007

Verduo Associated Ltd.

Liquidator

: Church Organist

Bex (emo Nae
Pipe Organ and Piano

Successful applicant will need to play piano for
Sunday School, organ for Worship Service.
and accompany a cholt.

Remuncrauion commensurate
with experience and ability.

Send letter of application and resume to:

Church Organist





P.O.Box N-497

Nassau, Bahamas

the near-term is to receive five million
passengers.”

On per capita cruise passengers expen-
diture, Mr Johnson said there was “no
reason” why the Bahamas could not
increase this from the current $50-$60 per
head average to $100. This, he added,
would generate mega bucks, or an extra
$140 million in total cruise passenger
spending in the Bahamas.

To increase cruise visitor spending in
the Bahamas, Mr Johnson said this nation
had to “offer much better experiences to
the customer”.

“Tf we create a great experience, no
cruise line will be prepared to stop a pas-
senger taking advantage of it,” he added.
“We have to make downtown Nassau a
magnet for tourism instead of a turn-off
for tourism, which it is today.”

Speaking earlier to a meeting of the
Rotary Club at Sunrise, Mr Johnson said
the Bahamas had done “a poor job” in
providing visitors with a variety of attrac-
tions, options and quality experiences that
would encourage them to step off resort
campuses.

He made this comment in response to a
question which suggested that the

of the International








2006.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT





In Voluntary Liquidation
“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
OMRO LIMITED. is in Dissolution”

The date of commencement of dissolution is 6th day of September,
Zakharov Andrey Konstantinovich
13 Raziezd Anciferovo

Raiyon Orekhovo-Zyevsky

Bahamas’ major hotels wanted to keep
their guests on-property to maximise vis-
itor spending, denying them the chance
to interact with Bahamian-owned busi-
nesses. ,

It was also pointed out that Kerzner
International's impending takeover of the
Hurricane Hole Shopping Plaza was like-
ly to further squeeze-out Bahamian-owned
businesses.

Meanwhile, Mr Johnson said the Gov-
ernment had lined up the “strategic part-
ners” required for the relocation of Grand

Bahama’s cruise terminal to Williamstown, \

and a commitment and announcement

. were expected in the next 30-45 days.

On the new cruise ship agreements, he
added that the cruise lines were likely to
be able to open their on-board casinos,
shops and bars at night, as major Bahami-
an operators had still seen their business
grow despite this. :

Mr Johnson said the biggest opportuni-
ty for Bahamian-owned businesses in rela-
tion to the cruise ship industry was prob-
ably in the provision of tour optians, espe-
cially adventure and active tours, ag pre-
vious ideas had been “lazy and unpins uc-
tive”. ial




Legal Notice

(No.45 of 2000)

OMRO LIMITED





P/O Kostino
Moscow Region

142642 Russia
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED. is in Dissolution”

December, 2006.

The date of commencement of dissolution is Lith day of

David Ralph Singleton

8 Hill Street,
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands

Liquidator



sol

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THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 7B



Freeport Concrete to assess
demands for extra capital

FROM page 1B

ers the three months to
November 30, 2006.
He added -that the loss

would fall in the range.,

between '$150,000-$200,000, the
two figures being a best and
worst case estimate.
However, Mr Simpson indi-
cated that he felt the worst had
passed for Freeport Concrete,
with overtime payments and
casual labour hired for the
Home Centre transition start-
ing to decline and “get down to
the Budgetary levels we need”
for the store to be profitable.
As for the fiscal 2007 second
quarter, which ends on Febru-
ary 28, Mr Simpson said: “I’m
looking to kind of break even,
and then in the third and
fourth quarters the Home Cen-
tre will be profitable, which
means the company will make
a profit and the losses incurred
in the first quarter will be gone.
We will come in with a small
profit” for full-year fiscal 2007.
Mr Simpson said that in the
absence of any capital injec-
tion, he would continue to
focus on working with
Freeport Concrete’s bankers
and suppliers, and generating
enough sales and cash flow to
meet debt repayments.
He pointed out that the
company’s overdraft had not
increased since September

2006, and that despite owing
almost $3 million in accounts
payables to suppliers, these
firms had been cooperative in
working with the company.

‘ “The suppliers have been

very good with us, seeing what ,

we’re doing at the Superstore
and we’ve made arrangements
with them giving is extension,”
Mr Simpson said.

Credit

Yet because Freeport Con-
crete is likely to be close to its
credit limits with some suppli-
ers, these companies will only
meet - or partially meet - its
orders for new inventory when
payment is received, hamper-
ing the company’s ability to

_raise sales.

Mr Simpson said the move
to the new Home Centre
Superstore had enabled it to
re-establish its paint, plumb-
ing, electrical and housewares
departments, increasing sales.

He added: “We just need the
Freeport economy to kind of
kick-in.”

Another concern of analysts
is the legal battle the Home
Centre is involved in with the
Customs Department, as
Freeport Concrete had made
no provision for having to pay
some $738,644 in duties if it
lost the Supreme Court case.

The company obtained an
injunction against Customs,

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ACTIVISION ENTERPRISE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance

with

‘Section 138 (8)

of the International

Business Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of

ACTIVISION ENTERPRISE

INC. has ‘been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRISTANDALE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of TRISTANDALE LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GAUNLET INVESTMENTS LTD.

SOREEIEIDBLSAI

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GAUNLET INVESTMENTS

| LID. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

which was demanding payment
of $738,644 in duties on all
goods ‘displayed’ at retail in
the new Home Centre super-
store.

' Freeport Concrete was
’ forced to obtain the injunction
“becatise Customs would not

have otherwise allowed it to

open the new Home Centre

Superstore.
If Customs wins the case, the

Home Centre would still be
able to operate, but would
have to warehouse all bonded
goods. This would effectively
defeat- the store’s open-plan

design, based on Home Depot

and Lowe’s in the US, and

undermine a business’ model’

the company feels has helped
to generate current sales levels
and encourage Bahamians to
shop at home.

Legal Notice

. NOTICE

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that on 21 November 2006 by
resolution of its Members, Wander (London) of the
Bahamas Limited went into voluntary liquidation and
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis of Deloitte & Touche, 2nd
Terrace West, Centerville, Nassau, The Bahamas, was

appointed the Liquidator.

Signed
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis
Liquidator
P. O. Box N-7526 ©
Nassau, Bahamas
242-302-4800



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TALCO ALPS INC.

\e

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of TALCO ALPS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TEMPERATURE RISING INC.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

\

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RIBBON FALLS INC.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is’ hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 4th day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

SATIN PREMIER INVESTMENTS LID.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE IS HEREBY given as follows:

(a) THE ABOVE COMPANY is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions Section 137(4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 17th day of
January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

_ (c) The liquidator of the said company is Ms. Alysor I. Yule of BdS
*., Corporate Services Limited, George House,’ George Street, P.O. Box

* N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas. . a a

Dated this 17th day of January, A.D., 2007.

Alyson I. Yule
Liquidator



NOTICE

~ INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

ROSEWOOD PREMIER INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE IS HEREBY given as follows:

(a) THE ABOVE COMPANY is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions Section 137(4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 17th day of
January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Ms. Alyson I. Yule of BdS
Corporate Services Limited, George House, George Street, P.O. Box
N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 17th day of January, A.D., 2007.

Alyson I. Yule
Liquidator

NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF WANDER ae ea) OF .
THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE TO THE CREDITORS

The creditors of the above-named Company are
required, on or before 20 February 2007 to send their
names and addresses and the particular of their
debts of claims, and the names and addresses of their
attorneys (if any) to Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis, the
Liquidator of the said company, at Dehands House, 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, P.O. Box N-7526, Nassau,
The Bahamas, telephone number 242-302-4800. The
creditors may be required by notice in writing from
the said debts or claims at the office of the Liquidator,
at such time as shall be specified in such notice. If in
default thereof they will be excluded from the benfit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Anthony S. Kikivarakis

Liquidator

EMPLOYMENT

hh

wee ye

SPS Ts

FLAN OO SAR & CAFE



Seeks to employ professional

Waiter and Waitress

Must be well-groomed

Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation
Must be able to work flexible
hours

Send Resume to:
‘Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Apply in person
Caves Village, West Bay Street.





PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Ta nes ee a:



WANTED

DATA PROCESSOR
MUST BE ABLE TO ASSIST WITH
INVENTORY

ANTED

SALES PERSONS
WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE



AL












Please forward resume to:
Taylor Industries Ltd.
P.O. Box N-4806
Nassau, Bahamas

GY american

Senior/Junior Programmer (s)

British American Insurance Company the oldest insurance company in the Bahamas and
a leading financial services institution is searching for an experienced, highly organized
Programmer to develop and maintain company-specific applications. The ideal candidate
must be self-motivated to complete initiatives within established timelines and exercise

versatility with respect to project assignments.



@ By MARC LEVY
AP Business Writer






HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP)





Responsibilities:





¢ Support and maintain Oracle database applications
¢ Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

¢ Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

° Maintain existing database integrity and standards

° Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
° Create test transactions, refine and debug programs.

¢ Train end-users and technical support staff







Core Competencies:

* Proven project leadership and project implementation

¢ Experience with formal software development methodologies

° Strong analytical skills and experience in developing applications that meet user
requirements .

¢ Must have strong oral and written communication skills :







Required Qualifications:

°3+ years of recent programming expérience' including use of Oracle PL/SQL as primary
programming language

Bachelor’s degree in CS or equivalent experience and/or education

* Oracle Developer or DBA certifications a plus

Preferred Skills:

° Possess strong Project experience ideally on Oracle Applications implementations,
business systems design, or projects in general

° Proficient in MS Project and/or MS Project Server (required)

° Experience with SQL Server










Technical Skills:

C,C++, .NET, Oracle 8i/9i, Developer 6i (Forms & Reports), PL/SQL, Crystal Reports

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including
Life, Health and Pension.









Submit Resume to Human Resources Manager, British American I nsurance,
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N4815, Nassau, Bahamas or via email to
“dparker@babinsurance.com”




Slop aeuns

BIS:

Pricing Information As Of:







— Rite Aid Corp. shareholders
on Thursday overwhelmingly
approved a deal worth almost
$3 billion to buy more than

1,800 Brooks and Eckerd.
stores and become the largest

drugstore operator on the East
Coast.

Rite Aid, the nation’s third-
largest drugstore chain, has
billed the deal as a way to cat-
apult it within reach of the
rapidly growing drugstore lead-
ers Walgreen Co. and CVS
Corp. As drug retailers expand
into other services, Rite Aid
executives say the acquisition
also will make the company a
more attractive partner for in-
store health care and wellness
clinics and pharmacy benetits
managers.

The Federal Trade Com-
mission is still reviewing the
deal. Rite Aid has said it
expects the transaction to close
shortly after the company’s
fourth quarter, which ends
March 3.

Shareholders voted 404.1
million shares for and 9.1 mil-
lion shares against acquiring
the U.S. Eckerd and Brooks
operations of Canada’s Jean
Coutu Group Ince. for $1.45 bil-
lion in cash and 250 million
shares valued at about $1.5 bil-
lion. Rite Aid is also assuming
$850 million in debt in the deal.

Stronger

“The stronger we get, the
more choices we have in the
future,” Mary Sammons, Rite
Ajd’s president and chief exec-

‘utive, said in an interview after

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning

| for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





a shareholder meeting at a
downtown Harrisburg hotel to
announce the vote tally.

Deal

For Rite Aid, the deal marks
its first major acquisition since
a turnaround team arrived to
bring the company back from
the brink of bankruptcy seven
years ago.

The deal would create a
company of about 5,180 stores
in 31 states and Washington,
D.C., with revenue of nearly
$27 billion, stores on both
coasts and major market shares
in the New York City,
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and
Baltimore areas.

Rite Aid also will acquire six
distribution centers and Jean
Coutu will become the com-
pany’s largest shareholder,
with a 30.2 per cent voting
stake.

The merits of the deal had
divided Wall Street analysts
and proxy advisers. Some said
Rite Aid has the savvy to win
customers back to the deterio-
rating Eckerd stores. Others
said Rite Aid is overpaying for
the stores and hasn’t shown
the ability to make its own
stores productive.

Rite Aid shares gained 6
cents to close at $6.14 on the
New York Stock Exchange.
Since it was announced Aug.
24, Ride Aid’s stock price has
risen about 30 per cent.

“I think if you look at the
stock price today, the market

likes this transaction,” compa-_
ny chairman Bob Miller said °
in response to questions at

Thursday’s meeting.

Shareholder Doug Hoskins,

Rite Aid shareholders
approve $3bn Brooks,
Eckerd stores purchase

a retired insurance brokerage
partner who attended the
meeting, said he reluctantly
voted for the deal after reading
that a major proxy adviser sup-
ported it. Hoskins, who lives
just a few miles from Rite
Aid’s headquarters in Camp
Hill, remembered the compa- -
ny’s deep plunge into debt -
under a prior management
team, six of whom were con-
victed or pleaded guilty in con-
nection with a federal account-
ing-fraud investigation.

“T thought they weren’t
healthy enough to make a big
jump like this,” Hoskins said.

Even with the acquisition,
keeping up with CVS and Wal-
green will not be easy.

Revenue

Walgreen, with 5,584 stores
and $47.4 billion in revenue in
its last full fiscal year, opens a
new store every 18 hours and
has 500 new stores planned for
this fiscal year. CVS, with 6,200
stores and $37 billion in rey-
enue in its last full fiscal year,
purchased about 700 Sav-On
and Osco drugstores in June.

To absorb the new Brooks
and Eckerd stores, Rite Aid
has said it will spend $950 mil-
lion over five years to rebrand

. them, convert them to Rite

Aid’s systems and rebuild cus-
tomer loyalty.

Analysts say the deal will
propel Rite Aid’s long-term
debt to approximately $5.8 bil-
lion — higher than CVS or
Walgreen. However, Rite Aid
said it expects to reduce’ its
debt-to-cash-flow ratio to
below its current level within
two years after the deal closes.



qualifications:

related field.

The American Embassy is presently considering
applications for the following position:

INVESTIGATIVE AIDE

Serves as the Drug Enforcement Administration Liaison
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Her Majesty’s
Customs, Bahamas Immigration and the Royal Bahamas
Defense Force and all other agencies affiliated with the
suppression of illegal drug activity in the Islands of the
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands.

This position is open to candidates with the following

A Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or a
















‘Thursday, 18 January 200 7





Securit y



0.54 Abaco Markets 0.59
10.25 Bahamas Property Fund “11.30
6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85
1.10 Fidelity Bank ti A256
9.05 Cable Bahamas 10.00
1.64 Colina Holdings 1.90
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 12.65
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.88
2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.50
5.54 Famguard 5.95
10.70 Finco 12.25
10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.45
10.00 Focol : 12.55
0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55:
7.15 ICD Utilities 7.20
8.52

J. S. Johnson
10.00 Premi
es ee






S2wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

8.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings





Colina Money Market Fund 1.322791*
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728""*
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**
1.2175 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450****

11.3075*****



Fidelity Prime Income Fund
is z




52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings




Previous Close Today's Close












Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

- Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Five years of Law Enforcement experience is required.
Must have a good working knowledge of Bahamian Law
as well as an understanding of Bahamian Government








Daily Vi



Change


















































0.64 “0.293 0.000 N/M 9.00% agencies and their functions.
11.30 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.54%]

8.03" 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.24%

0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50%

1.85 0.00 700 0.199 0.060 9.3 3.24% PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

1.25 0.00 i 0.170 0.050 74 4.00%
10.00 0.00 0.715 0.240 14.0 2.40%

2.00 0.10 5,000 0.078 0.040 25.6 2.00% st have ahilj icate effect)
soe e106 Roe: ee oes 200% Must have ability to communicate effectively both orally
4.84 -0.04 0.134 0.045 36.4 o.o2%f ‘ff and in writing. Specialized report writing; investigative
2.50 oO. 0.295 0.000 8.5 0.00% . 7 aby } ni ante’ . =
eee een Geebl “eae. Hae a aate and diplomacy skills and computer skills (Microsoft
12.25 0.00 0.779 0570 15.7 4.65% Office Suite) are required.
14.45 0.00 0.921 0.500 15.7 3.46% . fase ne
12.55 0.00 200 1476 0.500 8.5 3.98% Must be able to work with minimum supervision.
0.55 0.00 -0.423 0.000 N/M 0.00%




0.00 0.532

BENEFITS INCLUDE:





The successful candidate will be offered an excellent
compensation package including performance-based
incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance,
pension and opportunities for training and development.









Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens
who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.
























Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m.
Monday through Friday at the security area of the
American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed applications
should be returned to the Embassy: addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than Tuesday, January
30, 2007.









*- 5 January 2007








** - 31 December 2006










*** - 31 December 2006









**** - 31 December 2006







sieee - 31 December 2006

84-2803









+P.

- THE TRIBUNE

Forty per cent higher
building costs damage
first ‘anchor’ hotel

FROM page 1B

: _Costs to construct such prop-

‘erties in Nassau were $500 per

square foot, while in Exuma
the price was $800 per square
foot.

The experiences of the Four
; Seasons Emerald Bay resort
, provide a salutary warning for

., other investors contemplating,

‘ or in the stages of construct-

, ing, similar mega projects on

- other Family Islands.

_ These include the Boston-

, based I-Group, joint 50/50
partners with the Government

. on Mayaguana; Montana

Holdings’ $700 million Rum
Cay project; numerous projects
on Eleuthera; and the Ritz-
Carlton branded Abaco Club
, at Winding Bay and Discov-

ery Land Company’s Baker’s

- Bay development in Abaco.

Simply put, the costs of
putting in infrastructure at
Emerald Bay, such as roads
and all the utilities - paid for at
least in part by the developers
- coupled with the high oper-

, ating cost environment both

inside and outside the resort,

, have made it difficult for the
+, OWners to generate a return on

their investment and profit.
This again raises concerns

., about whether the Govern-
.« Ment’s ‘anchor project’ model

. for developing the Family

,,' Islands will result in sustain-

, able tourism.
; The plan was to spark eco-
nomic activity in thé Family

. Islands, reducing social pres-

sures and overcrowding in Nas-

~ sau by encouraging people to

: return home, but there have

, been unforeseen consequences

with a number of these pro-

, jects.

The Tribune previously
- revealed that the owners had

, been looking to either sell
: Emerald Bay.or attract in new

investor capital. A sale to

‘ ~ Goldman Sachs’ real estate pri-

~£

Se Ra EB I ae a la, Se a ET aa

Fa a

a

=. Oe SCS Pare wie =
“

i AE RSF _ PO _L

Pa ne ee

ee

Pe a ee a

2S € OF

ah

a’

“SS 88 SY eee”

“EEL ee

to PE a a ae ee ee ee ee a *



vate equity arm and another
private equity fund, Rockpoint,
fell through last year.

This newspaper has since

* learnt that the Philadelphia- °

based Adler Group, the finan-
cial backer and supplier of seed
capital for Ginn Clubs &
Resorts’ $4.9 billion Ginn sur
mer project in Grand Bahama,
was approached to see if it was
interested in acquiring Emer-
ald Bay. The offer is under-
stood to have been declined/

Mr Johnson yesterday
underlined the impact the rel-
atively high building costs on
Exuma, compared to Nassau,
were having on Emerald Bay’s
margins. He pointed out that
concrete there cost $200 per
yard, whereas in Nassau it cost
$125 per yard.

“The hotel, with a golf
course and spa, as a 1985-room
resort of Four Seasons’ cali-
bre, can only be profitable if
it has a much larger customer
base outside those rooms,” Mr
Johnson said.

He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitabil-
ity, whereas it was currently
closer to 300-400 units.

The Ministry of Tourism
executive added that there was
“no question” that the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay resort
could not be allowed to fail,
given that acts as the ‘model’
for anchor resort development
in the Family Islands. Its fail-
ure would send a negative mes-
sage to other investors attract-
ed to look at similar develop-
ments in other islands.

“The site is one of the most
special sites for Four Seasons,”
Mr Johnson said. “They’re get-
ting some of the highest aver-
age daily rates of Four Seasons
properties anywhere, but
where they’re suffering is on
the cost. If we can find a way of
getting the costs more into line,
they will have a successful
resort.”

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR
EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

¢ Director of Design

¢ Exterior Relations

e Project Managers

¢ Project Engineers

¢ Genaral Superintendents
¢ Superintendents

¢ Assistant Superintendents

¢ Electrical Construction Managers
° Mechanical Construction Managers

° Office Engineers
¢ Manager of Quality Control

¢ Inspectors

Over 20 postions are to filled. All positions
require successful applicants to reside at North
Eleuthera or vicinity.

Interested persons should submit their resumes

with cover letter to:

The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125

Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



Mr Johnson said Emerald
Bay’s average daily rates
(ADRs) for rooms were in
excess of $300. He acknowl-
edged that Exuma in general
needed to be placed “on a

more sustainable path moving ~

forward with the Emerald bay
project, and make it the model
for projects of that nature in
the future in terms of its inte-
gration with the community,
as well as the provision of win-
win linkages for Bahamians,
investots........ [and tourists]”.

Emerald Bay had also suf-
fered from problems outside
its direct control, with Mr
Johnson saying the resort “did-
n’t anticipate” problems find-
ing housing for its employees.

The demand for housing,
and limited availability of land
on Exuma, has pushed up real
estate prices and rental rates.
Mr Johnson added: “It’s not
unusual to find a two-bed-
room, one-bath apartment in

excess of $2,200 per month,
and they’ve got to rent many of
these to meet staff needs.”
He said: “We must, though,
avoid the temptation to exploit
migrating Bahamians as well
as resort developers, given the
shortage of housing as such
actions can result, if we are not
careful, in our ‘killing the
goose that laid the golden egg’,

‘as we see happening in Exu-

ma.”

On the staff front, Emerald
Bay was having to pay high
wages to entice staff to relo-
cate to Exuma, but suffering
from “high turnover, high
training costs”.

“They’ve not been able to

attract the best staff, so they -

have to invest a lot to get them
up to standard,” Mr Johnson
explained.

“They see the cost of hous-
ing, the cost of groceries, and

then that trained person gets

poached by Atlantis.”

ANG DOD
Store Manager &
Sales Associates

Small Retail Store Specializing in girls accessories is
seeking a dynamic, energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager with prior retail managerial experience
to handle all aspects of store operations.

Only persons 30 years and older need apply.
Vacancy also exists for sales associates.
Please send resumes by e-mail to

- ecooke @coralwave.com

Phone:394-7019









¢ Snorkeling
e Diving



communication skills.



with cover letter to:

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
_ of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

BOAT CAPTAIN

Duties and Responsibilities

e Manage fleet of boats and related equipment.
° Coordinate and manage maintenance of boats
° Coordinate all water sport activities.

° Flats and Deep Sea fishing
¢ Manage Staff of First Mates.
¢ Coordinate Safety of all boat patrons.

* Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience as a boat
captain. Must be familiar with the local waters
and the area around Royal Island. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and boat operations. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal

Interested persons should submit their resumes

The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.







































FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 9B





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential community
with private residences and club, 200 slip marina and
boutique hotel and spa, and a golf course just off North
Eleuthera is seeking to employ a Married Couple with stron
managerial, operational and organizational skills in
managing resort properties to oversee all day to day
operations on the island.








Duties and Responsibilities —




° Greeting potential members/buyers/investors

° Arranging transportation, including airport, transfers, boats
and on -island vehicles

¢ Responsible for setting up guest relations, all staff training,
motivation and recruitment

° Manage local accommodations

¢ Upkeep of boat fleet é

° Manage/coordinate all ocean/beach activities

° Manage guest inquiries and complaints in an efficient and
professional manner










¢ Once the Preview Village is completed this position will:




* Oversee operations
° Maid. Service

¢ Food/beverage

¢ Beach activities.

° Ocean activities —

¢ General maintenance upkeep of premises
e Manage fitness/spa activities

¢ Assist in sales process








* Qualifications: The ideal candidate must have a minimum
of .10 years experience in resort property management with
significant experience in the restaurant and spa industry,
‘including operations and maintenance of pool and spa
equipment. Must have strong managerial and organizational
skills in the areas of personnel and bugeting. Must be computer
literate with strong written and verbal communication skills.







Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to:




The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com






Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

CHEF









Duties and Responsibilities

° Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.

° Coordinate and manage all food preparation
areas.

¢ Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.

¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.










¢ Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience a four (4)
star restaurant cuisine and dining with significant
experience in the food industry. Must have experi-
ence in start up restuarant operation. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and budgeting. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.












Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:





The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas









Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com







Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.






i



PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

Financial Statements of

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Year ended August 31, 2006

Dear Shareholders,
We present our audited financial statements for the year ended August 31,2006.
The figures stated in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the 12 months ended August 31,2005 include the Robin Hood division.

‘The figures stated in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the 12 months ended August 31, 2006 are the consolidated figures for
the Home Centre and concrete plant in Grand Bahama and do not include the Robin Hood division, as this was sold on August 31,2005.

Our gross profit was seriously impacted in the 4th quarter primarily as a result of the costs associated with the transitioning of the stores,
the delayed opening of the Home Centre Superstore, and the reduction in inventory value due to obsolescence, damage and shrinkage.

* Once we had transferred the good, saleable, inventory from the Peel Street facility to the new Superstore, there was a considerable amount
of obsolescent and damaged inventory that had to be written off. We consider this to be an. accumulation of damaged and obsolescent inven-
tory over several years that was finally. dealt with due to the relocation of our business. This, together with the inventory shrinkage, pri-
marily due to theft, resulted in a reduction in the value of our inventory by approx $700k.The new state of the art building, which is now
the Home Centre Superstore, is more conducive in controlling inventory shrinkage. Also, we have added additional security personnel and
are now in the process of installing cameras throughout the store. These things, along with weekly random inventory checks, put in place
by our new General Manager, will help to significantly reduce the inventory shrinkage problem this fiscal year.

* We commenced operations at the new Home Centre Superstore on Atlantic Drive in Freeport on September 6, 2006. All of our planning
‘was geared to opening the Superstore in June, 2006; however, due to éxtended construction time we were not able to commence business
until September 6, 2006. This delay seriously impacted sales, as well as gross profit, and meant that we had approximatcly $1.7 million
worth of inventory with no resulting revenue for several weeks. Additional costs were incurred in the last quarter due to hiring temporary
personnel to help dismantle and put up racking and shelving in the new store, hiring temporary personnel to help in sorting and transfer-
ring inventory from the Peel Street facility to the new Superstore facility and significant overtime costs incurred to get the Superstore open.

+ We incurred increased legal fees associated with several litigation matters, primarily the injunction against Customs to allow us to open
up the new Superstore pending the judicial review of Custom’s decision pertaining to the applicability of customs duties on displayed
goods. ,

© We incurred additional rent expense in the 4th quarter as a result of us not being able to move out of the Peel Street facility in June 2006.

The effect of all of the above seriously impacted the Home Centre's financial performance resulting in significant losses during the last
quarter of the 2005 to 2006 financial year.

The Home Centre for the Ist quarter of the new fiscal year is not yet profitable due to the on-going costs associated with transitioning the
business. However we closed the Seahorse Plaza location on December 31st 2006 and are busy this month moving the inventory and con-
solidating all of the staff into the Superstore. However, the positive financial impact of this decision will not be felt until the 3rd quarter
of this fiscal year. : :

Our primary focus at the Home Centre this year will be in four areas, inventory management, accounts receivable, cost controls and the
implementation of further business procedures,and accountability across the entire organization. Since we opened the Superstore I can state
that the inventory is the best it has ever been and it is constantly turning over. Our customer transaction counts have never been at the high
levels that they are now, which proves that we have the correct business model with the Superstore concepi and barring a catastrophic
downturn in the Grand Bahama economy the Superstore will do well. 7

Iam pleased to report that the concrete plant was profitable over the 12 months to August 31, 2006. This was a considerable turnaround
from the previous year. Our sales at the concrete plant increased 65%. We have still not been able to relocate to the new site at the Bahama
Rock facility, but this will be done in the second quarter of this current financial year. Once we have made the move, this will result in
additional savings in costs, which will translate to increased profit margins.

With the concrete plant forecasting another profit for this fiscal year and the costs of transitioning the Home Centre into it’s new location
being finished in the 2nd quarter and assuming the forecasted sales levels are met, then the Home Centre should also be profitable by the
end of this fiscal year.

Lcan understand our shareholders being disappointed in our share price since we went public in 2001, and trust me there is nothing more
disappointing to have worked as hard as we have to keep this company going after three devastating hurricanes and to see these losses.
However, the company is now positioned to do well as we have the Home Centre Superstore, which is in a perfect location and is the cor-
rect business model and we have the concrete plant that is performing well. Having both these divisions doing well in the same year has
not happened since 2004, which is the year we were profitable and the year prior to the two devastating hurricanes in 2005.

. .

I thank you for your continued support and wish you all a healthy, happy and prosperous 2007.
Ray Simpson

Chief Executive Officer
January 12, 2007




Retophone 249 3299S:
a, Tngommtions! Buddies Sax. ‘QAD SHR VOEE

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Shareholders
Freepart Concrete Company Limited

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Freeport Concrete Company:
Lithited {the Conipany’}. which comorise thé balance shéet as: at August 34; 2006 and
the. statement of operations; statement Gf changes in shareholders’ equity and statement
of cash flows for the year thes éndd. and a sutimaly of significant accounting policies
and other explanatory notes. "

Management's Responsibility for the Financial! Statements

Management 18 FSSponsible fof thé préparation and Jair presentation of these financial:
statements in accordance with intemational Financial Reporting Standards. This
responsiblity inoludés: dauigaing, implementing Sid sigintaining intemal control relevant
io the preparation and fai presentation.of financial Statements that are: free from material
misstatements, whether due fo fauc or enon Selecting and applying appropriate:
accounting policies: and meking accountiig eStimiaes that ate seasonable in the
crqumsiances:








Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility ig. to expiess an opinion.on these financial statements based-on our.
augit, We conducted our audit im accordance with International Standards on Auditing ag.
promulgated by the international Fedération of Accountants. Those standards: require:
that we camply with relevant ethical requinements -and. plan and: pesfonm the audit. to
obtain teasonabis Sssurance whether the financial: statements are free. of material:
misstatement,











ast é fnanciat stat

judgment, including the assessr
slatements, whether due to fraud or error, :
conside® inltmal contol *levant tothe ‘Company's preparation and-tair presentation. of
the financial statements in onder to design. audit procedures tat are-approprate in. the
circumstances, tut rot for thé purdoss of expressirig ai Opition ‘Gi thé effectiveness of
the Company's imal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of
accounting princigies used and the: reasonableniéss of aocounting estimates made by
management as well ds evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements:









We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is. sufficient and appropriate. to
provide a basis for cur opinion,

Opinion

In burepinion, the financial statements present fairy. in all material respects, the financial
position of the Campany as-at August 31. 2006, and of itscinancial performance and. its
‘cash fiows for the year then ended in accordance, with Intemational Financial Reporting
Standards.

Emphasis of matter

Without qualifying our opihion, we draw aiténtion i sete S tothe financial statements
which describes that the Company has incurred a.net Joss -of 831,993,302 for the year
ended August 24, 2006 and, as of that date. the Compa y's current liabilities exceeded its
curtent-assets. by BS1060,66% In addition, as described in nates 3 and 14 (e), as of
August 341, 2008 and as of the date that these financial stateme 2 rove
issuance, the Company was notin compliance with:various debt covenants in connection
with the bank overdrattand bank loan facilitias, primarky relating to:certain financial ratios.
The total aniount of the bank Gvérdraft and loan at August 31,2006 was 891,983,064.









The Company has notreceived written confiemation-fram its -hankerg' that they wal agree
to tolerate the breaches of debt covenants, and therefore.an: unicertamty exits, a8 tc wiat
action the Company's bankers will take, if any. in additio described in:notes:2 and 14

(a). the Company commenced an action in the Supremé Court of the Commonweatttr of
The Bahamas against the Comptraller.of Customs for judicial review of The Bahamas
Customs Department demand for payment of duties of BSTIB644 on all goods. “on
daglay’ in the néw Superstore. and to prohibit. the clearing of further goods: by the
Company from the Freeport Harbour pending payment of the ‘game. An inj Action Was,
obtained against the Comptrolter of Customs and leave was obtained to cam i
application for jucioiat review. The maiter is set to be heard on February 12,2007. The
Company has not made an accrisal ih HS financial statements for the amount of duties
claimed. Although the Company's atiomey is of the opinion that the Company has.a good
arguable case in obtaining the déclarationa sought, the ultimate outtome. of this matter
gannet preséntly ee determined, and accordingly no provision for any. effects on the









indicate the existence of material uncertainties. which cast significant doubt an the
Company's ability to continue as a going concem, and therefore it may be unable to
regise its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business, The
Enancial statements do not include. adjustments, if any, that may be required to the
recorded value and classification of assets and liabilities, in. the event the Company is not
able to continue a6 a-gaing.concem.

, wf
KWE
Chartered Accountants:

Freeport, Bahamas,
danuary 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS ~

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Balance Sheet

August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)







Note 2006 2005
Assets

Current assets:
Cash BS 198,471 107,747
Time deposits 4 63,274 61,626
Accounts receivable, net 5 1,323,717 1,309,237
Due from former subsidiary 12 17,250 578,500
Due from former subsidiary's shareholders 12 - 571,500
Inventories 6 2,488,843 1,861,349
Inventory of spare parts and supplies 121,187 92,143
Deposits and prepaid expenses 132,642 113,376
4,345,384 . 4,695,478
Property, plant and-equipment 8 3,387,232 2,997,002
B$ 7,732,616 7,692,480

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

Current liabilities:



Bank overdraft 9 B$ 1,491,916 320,532
Accounts payable and accrued expenses 10 3,734,627 2,791,916
Warranty provision 5,000 15,809
Current portion of long-term debt . 7811 183,710 177,788
5,415,253 3,306,045
Long-term debt 7&11 440,453 516,223
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital 15 47,083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868
Appraisal excess 8 1,433,867 1,433,867
Accumulated deficit (5,378,908) (3,385,606)
1,876,910 3,870,212
Commitments and contingencies 14

nn EW T.CPTT.Y
BS 7,732,616 7,692,480
See accompanying notes to financial statements.

These financial statements were approved for issue on behalf of the Board of Directors
on January 12, 2007 by the following:

Raymond Simpson : Director Frederick A. Munnings, Jr. » Director



Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Statement of Operations

Year ended August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8

Note 2006 2005







Sales, net of discounts 7 BS$16,061,732 22,625,063
Cost of sales 6&8 12,984,405 17,028,578
Gross profit 3,077,327 5,596,485
Other income:
Other income 5 40,950 349,504
Interest income on time deposits 1,648 » 2,623
Insurance proceeds 13 - 1,476,737
Net gain on sale of subsidiary 12 - 620,179
Finance charges on trade receivables : - 52,160
42,598 2,501,203
3,119,925 8,097,688

Operating expenses:
Payroll related costs, including employee

benefits and commissions 7 2,090,021 3,249,728
Rent 7&14 634,782 506,206
Bad debt expense 5 335,544 482,921
Depreciation and amortisation 8 329,011 284,165
Legal and professional 323,712 170,064
Utilities, postage and delivery 279,096 296,570
Vehicle, maintenance and repairs 228,795 249,479
Other operating costs 7 202,878 300,597
Computertand office supplies 138,531 140,535"
Bank charges and exchange 115,823 294,218
Interest on long-term debt and ,

due to shareholder 7,9&11 77,784 53,603
Interest expense on bank overdraft - 9 76,344 56,207
Business insurance 73,238 74,448
Advertising 66,942: 232,297
Licence fees and permits 54,842 138,577
Security 34,490 33,074
Travel, trade shows and entertainment 33,349 49,291
Donations 18,711 33,091
Inventory damaged by hurricane 13 - 1,263,610
Impairment of property,

plant and equipment 8&13 - 475,595
(Gain)/loss on disposal of property, Sins Aes etek va cote Gif ue A

plant and equipment ‘ “* (666) 4,126







Net loss "BS (1,993,302) 0 (200,714)
Basic loss per share 16 BS (0.423) (0.062)
Diluted loss per share 16 BS (0.423) (0.062)

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity

Year ended August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005



TTT TE ATS.027 8,388,402 ee

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



Number of Contributed Appraisal Accumulated
shares Issued Share capital surplus excess deficit

Balance at August 31, 2005 * 4,708,334 B$ 47,083 5,774,868 1,433,867 (3,094,892)
Net loss - - . - - (290,714)
Balance at August 31, 2006 4,708,334 B$ 47,083 5,774,868 1,433,867 (3,385,606)
Net loss - - - - (1,993,302)
Balance at August 31, 2006 4,708,334 BS 47,083 5,774,868 1,433,867 (5,378,908)

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Statement of Cash Flows

Year ended August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8 nn A



2006 2005
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net loss B$ (1,993,302) (290,714)
Adjustment for:
Depreciation and amortisation 573,353 514,538
Bad debt expense 335,544 482,921
Provision for slow moving inventory 251,572 (201,495)
Net gain on sale of subsidiary - (620,179)
Inventory damaged by hurricane - 1,263,610
Impairment of property, plant and equipment - 475,595
Product warranty (10,809)

(Gain)/loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment (666) 4,126





Operating (loss)/profit before working capital changes (844,308) 1,628,402
Changes in working capital items:
Accounts receivable (350,024) (524,037)
Due from former subsidiary 561,250 (578,500)
Due from former subsidiary's shareholders 571,500 en
Inventories (879,066) (814,344)
Inventory of spare parts and supplies (29,044) (22,476)
Deposits and prepaid expenses (19,266) (35,728)
Accounts payable.and accrued expenses 942,711 1,895,881
Time deposits - 5,000
Cash (used)/provided by operating activities (46,247) 1,554,198
Cash flows from investing activities:
Cash disposed of on sale of subsidiary - (16,158)
Additions to property, plant and equipment » (974,105) (1,076,010)

Proceeds from disposal of property, plant
and equipment 11,188 6,000







Cash used by investing activities (962,917) (1,086,168)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Repayment of shareholder loan - (440,272)
Proceeds from long-term debt 100,000 530,000
Repayment of long-term debt (169,848) (72,211)
Cash (used)/provided by financing activities (69,848) 17,517
Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents (1,079,012) 485,547
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year (201,159) (686,706)
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year B$ (1,280,171) (201,159)
Cash and cash equivalents comprise the following:
Cash BS 198,471 107,747
Time deposits, less those pledged as security 13,274 11,626

Bank overdraft

B$ (1,280,171) (201,159)

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

(1,491,916) _ (320,532) .

Total
4,160,926
(290,714)

3,870,212
(1,993,302)

1,876,910

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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

7. Related party transactions

During 2004, a director and a company related to this director granted two loans to
the Company totalling B$238,675. The loans incur interest at 9% per annum and are
repayable in 5 years with monthly instalments of B$4,955 including Interest and are
included in the balance sheet as long-term debt. Refer to note 11.

Directors of the Company and their immediate relatives control approximately 43%
(2005: 43%) of the voting shares of the Company.

The Company rents administrative office space from a related party as described in
note 14 (a) “Administrative offices”.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



7. Related party transactions, continued

As more fully described in note 14 (a) “New Home Centre Lease’, the Company
entered into a lease agreement in July 2005 with a company related to the founding
shareholder, in respect of the premises to where the Company relocated its retail
operations in August 2006.

The Company used the services of H&F Babak Construction Company Limited to
complete certain leasehold improvements. These leasehold improvements are
included in property, plant and equipment in note 8. This company was owned by the
founding shareholder as of the balance sheet date. reverts for such services
amounted to B$441,976 (2005: B$74,595).

Sates to entities related to the founding shareholder during the year ended August .
31, 2006 amounted to B$976, 122.

Total executive remuneration including employee benefits and commissions

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



12. Sale of investment in RH
On August 16, 2005, the Company entered into an agreement to sell its 90%
shareholding interest in RH. The effective date for the sale was August 31, 2005.

The sales price for the shares was B$571,500, and a total of 70% of the Snares) in
RH were sold to an executive and an employee of RH.

As part of the transaction to sell the RH shares, the Company agreed to forgive
repayment of B$836,221 of the B$1,414,721 debt due by RH to the Company as of
August 31, 2005. Accordingly, the balance due to the Company by RH at August 31,
2005 was B$578,500.

The net effect of these transactions is as follows:





2005

Sales price of RH shares BS 571,500
Carrying value of investment in RH at August 31, 2005

(net shareholders deficit) before forgiveness

of debt of B$836,221 due to the Company by RH 884,900

1,456,400

Receivable due to the Company by RH forgiven at puget 31, 2005 (836,221)

Net gain on sale of RH BS 620,179



The net carrying value of RH’s assets and liabilities at August 31, 2005 (net
shareholders deficit of RH) after forgiveness of debt of B$836,221 due to the
Company by RH was as follows:





amounted to B$248,600 (2005: B$602,194) and is included in the statement of 2005
operations in payroll related costs. "
} An executive officer of RH was paid a commission of 3% of sales made by RH which aay deposit BS aaa
: amounted to B$Nil (2005: B$245,085) and is included in the executive remuneration Accounts receivable, net 4 49.910
Shown above, ; Inventories 1,322,413
; Directors and non-executive officers fees included in other operating costs in the Uli of eal part a supplies oe
i ; 5 ; . eposits and prepayments :
! statement of operations amounted to B$35,000 (2005: B$35,000). Property, plant and equipment 276.136
} A Company owned by the founding shareholder has provided security up to Accounts payable and accrued (1,576,249)
B$250,000 for the Company's bank loan and overdraft. The security includes two Warranty provision (19,458)
Due to the Company (578,500)



parcels of beach front property located in Freeport Lucaya.

As of August 31, 2006, trade receivables due from related parties amounted to
B$411,154 (2005: B$58,759). These amounts are due from H&F Babak
Construction Company Limited.

BS (48,679)

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued
Year ended August 31, 2006
Year ended August 31, 2006 (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)





8. Property, plant and equi “ 13. Insurance proceeds and impairment of assets
In September 2004 certain of the Company's inventory and property, plant and



: Cost/valuation:
| . 2005 Additions Disposals 2006 equipment (“PP&E”) were damaged by hurricanes. As a result, management has
: bute : : kas ; nae estimated the net book value of inventory. damaged to be approximately B$1,263,610
A poe mec vation): (ee Oiler 33,045 * oar aes and the net book value of the portions of the PP&E that were damaged to be
‘ Heavy sculpt : 1,000,367 pa 577 1,030,907 approximately B$471,669. These amounts have been recognised as a loss and are
i Automobiles 326,324 154 54,969 362,509 - : . :
; frailers and security booth 77,301 3.923 . 81.224 shown under inventory damaged by hurricanes and impairment of PP&E,
i Store furniture and equipment 361,720 130,034 - 491,754 respectively in the statement of operations. The Company filed a claim with their
E Office furniture and equipment 159,667 101,870 320 261,217 . . ;

Leasehold improvements 362,783 __ 582.962 i 946'745 insurers which was settled and collected in full by December 2004. The amount

“BS 4,545,041 974,105 55,866 5,463,280 received net of the deductible was B$1,183,610 and B$114,939 for inventory and

oy P,P&E, respectively and is included in the statement of operations as insurance
Accumulated depreciation: : ‘
Depreciation ; proceeds.
2005 charge Disposals 2006

In December 2004, the Company's concrete plant and office was damaged by a fire.
Plant ' : BS SaSek pthc = : ae As a result, management has estimated the net book value of the portions of the
Ace 144,101 62036 45,344 160,793 P,P&E that were damaged to be approximately B$3,926. These amounts have been
Trailers and securitybooth 23,364 12,357 7 35,721 recognised as an impairment loss and are included in impairment of PP&E in the

Store furniture.and equipment... , 212,133... 51,9930. 0 er use 264,126 ‘ < F we A
Office furniture and equipment "96.081 “50,780 = 146,861 statement of operations. The Company filed a claim .with,their,insurers which was
: eTHaNt: QP 19B RS 101498. 64B tl ee Se 245,840 settled and collected in full by December 2004. The amount received was B$178,188








1 BS 14,848,099 5p 873,353- “a5 4 2,076,048 ‘and is included in the’statement of operations as insurance proceeds.
Net book value: (a) Leases | | |
2006 2005
Ready-mixed concrete operations
Land B$ 1,521,000 1,521,000 .
Plant : 228,381 224,099 The Company was party to an agreement to lease approximately 25 acres of
eee pal ies ae land in the Heavy Industrial Area of Freeport for a 7% year period. Certain
Trailers and security boots 45,503 a limestone rock dredged from the Freeport Harbour has been deposited on this
Store furniture and equipment 227,628 149,587 ; ‘
Office furniture and equipment 114'356 63,586 land. The lease agreement expired on December 31, 2001. No new written
Leasehold improvements 700,905 316,591 agreement has been executed between the Company and the landlord, however,
BS 3,387,232 2,997,002 the Company continues to use the premises on a month to month basis.

The Company has received verbal assurance that they can continue to occupy
the land under similar terms of the old lease agreement. The Company intends to
American Society of Professional Real Estate Appraisers, of Freeport, Grand re-locate its operations to premises of Bahama Rock Limited (“BRL”) and has
Bahama, of the market value of the land. The excess of this valuation over the cost of ; signed a lease for this purpose, as described in the “Lease agreement with BRL”
the land is reflected as “appraisal excess’ in the balance sheet. The land comprises section below.

126.75 acres located in the East Airport Zone of Freeport, Grand Bahama, and is :
intended to be used by the Company for future quarrying operations. The carrying
‘value of land had it not been appraised would be B$87,133.

The directors’ valuation of land is based on an appraisal as of March 29, 2005 by Mr.
Bert E. Lightbourne, Member of The Bahamas Real Estate Association and the

This limestone rock was used by-the Company to produce sand and aggregate
which it uses to produce ready-mixed concrete. The rent payable is B$0.25 per
cubic yard of limestone rock utilised by the Company but in no event shall the
quarterly rent be less than B$2,000. Under the agreement referred to in the
preceding paragraphs, the Company is also required to pay B$2.25 per cubic
yard of limestone rock utilised with a minimum of B$18,000 per quarter. During
the prior year the Company ceased producing sand and aggregate and instead
purchased these materials from third parties.

During 2002, the Company acquired a used portable concrete batch plant from the
founding shareholder. The plant was not in use during the year and has a carrying
value at August 31, 2006 of B$17,683 (2005: B$22,019).

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Year ended August 31, 2006
Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8. Property, plant and equipment, continued



Depreciation expense on certain plant assets and equipment amounting to

B$244,342 (2005: B$230,373) has been included in cost of sales. 14. Commitments and contingencies, continued

As described in note 13, certain of the Company's property, plant and equipment with (a) Leases, continued

a net book value of B$475,595 were damaged by hurricanes and fire in the prior year
and have been recognised as an impairment loss in the 2005 statement of
operations.

‘Lease agreement with BRL

On May 9, 2005, the Company signed a 10 year renewable lease agreement
with BRL with an intention of moving its concrete plant operations and to

















9. Bank overdraft . commence a block plant. At August 31, 2006, the Company had commenced its
The bank overdraft bears interest at 7.5% (2005: 7.5%) per annum and is secured as block plant at the said premises and are yet to re-locate their concrete plant.
described in note 11. The overdraft facility limit is B$1,770,000 (2005: B$1,000,000). Under the lease agreement, the Company is committed to purchase all

10. Accounts payable and accrued expenses cia products needed for production of ready mixed cement and blocks

Aue : rom ;
Accounts payable and accrued expenses comprise the following: . } ;
Rent is payable at a base rate of $1 per annum in advance commencing on June
2006 2005 1, 2006. In addition, the Company will pay BRL an annual license fee of
: B$7,500.
Accounts payable B$ 2,999,650 2,170,785 :
, 1 id t
Accrued expenses 734,977 621.131 Hardware and consumer products operations
B$ 3,734,627 2,791,916 In August 2001, the Company entered into a lease agreement whereby it agreed
to lease the premises for its retail merchandising operation on Peel Street in
' 11. Long term debt Freeport, Grand Bahama for a period of 10 years with an option to renew for
another 10 years. The Company was granted the option to purchase the
2006 2005 premises. The option is exercisable on August 15, 2005 and at the end of every
i i i i . Th
Bank loan BS 471,148 497,598 isa month hs koh ued ied continuation of the sae :
Loan from related party 153,015 196,413 purchase price is to be B$ 5 mil ion ess 2% per annum starting from Ju '
624,163 694,011 1998. The Company has assigned this option to a shareholder.
bes current portion (183,710) (177,788) _ The lease called for monthly lease payments with adjustments annually to reflect
B$__ 440,453 516,223 the increase and decrease in the annual average of the United States Consumer



The bank loan bears interest at B$ prime rate plus 2.75% (8.25% at August 31,
2006) and is repayable by June 2012 with monthly instalments of B$14,140 including
interest. The bank loan and overdraft facility are with the same bank. The bank loan
and overdraft are secured by a first floating charge debenture stamped for
B$2,640,000 over the Company's land and all of its business assets. A Company
owned by the founding shareholder has provided security up to B$250,000 for the
Company's bank loan and overdraft. The security includes two parcels of beach
front property located in Freeport, Lucaya.

As described in note 14 (e), as of August 31, 2006, the Company was not in
compliance with various debt covenants relating to its bank loan and overdraft.

The loan from related party as more fully described in note 7, bears interest at 9%
per annum, is unsecured and is repayable in 5 years with monthly instalments of
BS4,955 including interest.

Price Index All Urban Consumers, US City Average for the preceding twelve
months but in no event to be less than B$306,000 per annum.

These premises were severely damaged by the hurricanes in September 2004
and it was agreed with the landlord to terminate the lease effective June 30,
2005. A new lease for the same premises was entered into from July 1, 2005 to
April 30, 2006 for $20,000 per month. Effective from May 1, 2006, it was agreed
with the landlord that the lease would be extended to August 31, 2006 at a rate
of $50,000 per month, and the Company can continue to occupy the premises
with no further liability from September 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006. The
Company agreed to vacate the premises effective December 31, 2006. Rent
expense incurred during the current year on this lease amounted to B$360,000
(2005: B$101,789)





THE TRIBU

Free

NE BUSINESS

port Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

e

eS

14. Commitments and contingencies, continued

(a)

Leases, continued

New Home Centre Lease



In July 2005, the Company entered into a 15 year lease agreement with a
company related to the founding shareholder. The lease commenced on
January 1, 2006, however, the Company did not occupy the building until June,
2006. The Company became liable for rent effective June 1, 2006. During the
first 48 months the lease calls for rent of B$396,000 per annum to be paid in
monthly instalments of B$33,000. Thereafter, the rent is increased in proportion
to the United States consumer price index. The Company received a discount on
the rent for the period from June 1, 2006 to August 31, 2006 of B$8,000 per
month, to B$25,000 per month. Thereafter, the rent increased to the amount in
the lease of B$33,000 per month. Rent expense incurred during the current year -
on this lease amounted to B$75,000 (2005: B$Nil).

Lucaya store lease

In 2005 the Company entered into a 3 year renewable lease for retail store space
comprising approximately 10,000 square feet, in Lucaya. The lease is payable in
monthly instalments of B$11,717 per month. Annual rent will be adjusted to
reflect increases in the consumer price index. Annual rent is not to exceed
B$180,592. Subsequent to year end the Company decided to close this location,
however, the Company continues to be liable under the terms of the lease
agreement until the expiration date in December 2007. Rent expense incurred
during the current year on this lease amounted to B$140,604 (2005: B$93,731).

Administrative offices

The Company leases administrative office space from a related party. The lease
expired on August 31, 2006 and was not renewed. Rent expense incurred
during the current year on this lease amounted to B$34,279 (2005: B$32,016).

The approximate future minimum annual lease payments and license fees under
non-cancellable leases are as follows:

SE

Free

2007 544,095
2008 450,366
2009 - 403,501
2010 139,501
2011 139,501
Thereafter 4,254,004

B$ 5,930,968
port Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



14. Commitments and contingencies, continued

(b)

(c)

(d)

F

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Credit facilities

The Company is contingently liable under stand-by letters of credit amounting to
B$50,000 (2005:$50,000), which are secured by time deposits of an equivalent
amount. The Company is also contingently liable under a corporate visa credit
card of B$20,000 (2005: $20,000). The Company has available a B$1,770,000
(2005: B$1,000,000) overdraft facility of which B$1,491,916 (2005: B$320,532)
has been used at year end.

These credit facilities are collaterised by fixed deposits of B$50,000
(2005:B$50,000) and a fixed and floating charge over the Company's land and
all of its business assets stamped for B$2,640,000.

The Company is also contingently liable under a customs bond guarantee of
B$50,000 (2005: B$50,000).

Capital commitments

The directors have approved B$460,000 in connection with the ereneen ofa
new block plant and a concrete plant at the new BRL premises. As of August 31,
2006 B$190,000 had been incurred. The Company has placed a hold on the
construction of the premises.

Litigation

The Company commenced an action in the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas against the Comptroller of Customs for judicial
review of The Bahamas Customs Department demand for payment of duties of
B$738,644 on all goods “on display” in the new Superstore and to prohibit the
clearing of further goods by the Company from the Freeport Harbour pending
payment of the same. An injunction was obtained against the Comptroller of
Customs and leave was obtained to commence an application for judicial review.
The matter is set to be heard on February 12, 2007. The Company has not
made an accrual in its financial statements for the amount of duties claimed.
Although the Company's attorney is of the opinion that the Company has a good
arguable case in obtaining the declarations sought, the ultimate outcome of this
matter cannot presently be determined, and accordingly no provision for any
effects on the Company that may result has been made in the financial
statements.

The Company is involved in various other legal proceedings and claims related
to products sold by the Company and unfair dismissal matters. Based on
information provided by the Company's legal counsel, in management's opinion,
the ultimate disposition of these matters will not have a material effect on the
Company's financial condition, in excess of the provisions that have already been
recognised.

reeport Concrete Company Limited

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



14.

15.

16.

17.

Commitments and contingencies, continued
(e) Non-compliance with debt covenants

As of August 31, 2006 and as of the date that these financial statements were
approved for issuance, the Company was not in compliance with various debt
covenants in connection with the bank overdraft and bank loan facilities, primarily
relating to certain financial ratios. The total amount of the bank overdraft and
loan at August 31; 2006 was B$1,963,064. The Company has not received
written confirmation from its bankers that they will agree to tolerate the breaches
of debt covenants, and therefore an uncertainty exists as to what action the
Company's bankers will take, if any.

Share capital

The Company has an authorised share capital of 20,000,000 shares with par value
B$0.01 per common shafe. As at August 31, 2006, 4,708,33%°(2065: 4,708,334)
shares were issued and fully paid.

Loss per share

Loss per share is, calculated by dividing net loss for the year by the weighted average
number of shares issued and outstanding. There are no share options, warrants of
other instruments outstanding that have the effect of diluting loss per share.

2006 2005
Net loss applicable to ordinary shares B$ (1,999,302) * (290,714)
Weighted average number
of ordinary shares outstanding 4,708,334 4,708,334
Weighted average number
of ordinary shares outstanding, :
assuming full dilution for options 4,708,334 4,708,334



Segment reporting

Segment reporting is presented in respect of the Company's business segments.
The primary format is based on the Company's management and internal reporting
structure.

Segment results, assets and liabilities include items directly attributable to a segment
as well as those that can be allocated on a reasonable basis.

The Company operates in The Bahamas only, in two business segments comprising
aggregate and ready-mixed concrete, and hardware and consumer products.

SOME EP OMT MRE a NNR Tens etnies IRE OEE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 13B

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



17. Segment reporting, continued
The table below summarises business segment information expressed in B$000’s.

Aggregate and Hardware and
‘ready-mixed concrete consumer products Total Total
2006 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005

Revenue B$ 4,534 2,764 11,528 19,861 16,062 22,625
Direct costs
Materials used/
merchandise sold (2,373) (1,859) (9,183) (14,502) (ee) ee
76)

Payroll related (551) (476) = - (551)
Equipment (318) (104) - - (318) (104)
Depreciation (244) (230) - - (244) (230)

Utilities (63) (59) - - (63) (59)
: (3,549) (2,728) (9,183) (14,502). (12,732) (17,230)
Decrease/(increase) in :
provision for slow moving

inventory. = - (252) 201 (252) 201
Gross profit 985 36 2,093 5,560 3,078 5,596
Other income 1 20 31 2,290 42 2,501
Operating expenses B$ (943) (709) (4,170) (7,679) (5,113) (8,388)
Net income/(loss) 53 (462) | (2,046 171 1,993 (291)

i
Other information:

i
Total assets B$ 3,137 _ 3,048 4,596 4,644 7,733 ___7,692

en rem ow
Total liabilities BS 888 906 4,968. 2,916 5,856 _ 3,822

18. Fair value disclosure of financial instruments

Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time, based on relevant market
information and information about the financial instrument. These estimates do not
reflect any premium or discount that could result from attempting to realise, at one
time, the Company's entire holdings of a particular financial instrument.

These estimates are subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of
significant judgment and, therefore, cannot be determined with precision. Changes
in assumptions could significantly affect the estimates. The carrying amount of the
Company's significant financial assets and liabilities approximate fair value because
of one or more of the following reasons: , "

‘(i)_ Immediate or short-term maturity,
(ii) Carrying value approximates market value,

(iii) Interest rates which approximate market rates.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



19. Financial instrument risk management

The most significant financial risk to which the Company is exposed is credit risk and
interest rate risk. The Company is exposed to credit risk in the form of the carrying
amount of accounts receivable, due from former subsidiary and due from former
subsidiary’s shareholders. The Company is. exposed to interest rate risk in the form
of interest bearing bank loan and loan from related party.

The Company manages the credit risk of accounts receivable by evaluating the
creditworthiness of its customers, establishing credit limits and by implementing
procedures to follow up on a: feguiar basis ‘on ‘the collection. of any balances in
-y. afrears. Management: manages; credit risk on MOTE ‘due from, former subsidiary
and due from former Subsidiany’s‘shareholdets by obtaining adequate security. ia

Management does not anticipate any credit losses arising from credit risk exposures
in excess of the allowance for doubtful accounts disclosed in note 5.

The Company managers interest rate risk by entering into loan agreements at rates
which approximate market rates.

20. Corresponding figures

Certain corresponding figures for 2005 have been reciadsified to carina with the
presentation adopted in 2006.

As explained in note 1, the corresponding figures for thé year ended August 31, 2005
in the statement of operations and statement of cash flows, include the results of RH
up to August 31, 2005. The corresponding figures in the balance sheet do not
include the assets and liabilities of RH, as RH was sold effective August 31, 2005. A
comparison of the statement of operations for the years ended August 31, 2006 and
2005, excluding the results of RH is shown below:

ene a ec A







. 2006 » 2005

Sales, net of discounts B$ 16,061,732 14,413,749
Cost of sales ; 12,984,405 11,096,330
Gross profit 3,077,327 3,317;419
Other income . 40,950 349,504
Interest income on time deposits 1,648 1,270
Gain on sale of subsidiary - 620,179
Insurance proceeds - 1,476,737
: 42,598 2,447,690

3,119,925 5,765,109

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



20. Corresponding figures, continued

SSP FS RT TEL





2006 2005
Operating expenses:
Payroll related costs, including employee
benefits and commissions 2,090,021 1,892,387
Rent 634,782 256,545
Bad debt expense : 335,544 320,753
Depreciation and amortisation 329,011 207,634
Legal and professional 323,712 143,127
Utilities, postage and delivery . 279,096 175,699
Computer and office supplies 138,531 117,245
Vehicle, maintenance and repairs - 228,795 199,247
Other operating costs 202,878 180,835
Bank charges and exchange 115,823 133,637
Interest on long-term debt and
due to shareholder 77,784 53,603
Interest expense on bank overdraft 76,344 14,207
Business insurance 73,238 54,393
Advértising 66,942 65,686
Licence fees and permits 54,842 54,682
Security 34,490 13,132
Travel, trade shows and entertainment 33,349 24,149
Donations 18,711 27,230
Inventory damage by hurricane - 1,263,610
Impairment on property, plant and equipment - 475,595
(Gain)/Loss on disposal of property, plant
and equipment (666) 4,126
5,113,227 §,677,522

Se
Net (loss)/income B$__(1,993,302) 87,587

21. Subsequent events

Subsequent to year end, the Company decided to close the store located in Lucaya,
effective December 31, 2006. The Company will still be liable for rent for this location
as explained in note 14 until December 2007, however the Company is attempting to
sub-lease this property for the remainder of the lease period.





PAGE 14B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 [<& 7 T-storms
- NASSAU _ aera : SEAS [x=] Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
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ZZ Low: 69° F/21°C ZL 58/14 Forecast highfow temperatures are for selected cities.
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highs and tonights's lows.





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Houston 457 393 © 46i7 39/3 Orlando 7423 5140 pe 701° 45/7 pe Washington,DC 46/7 27/-2 pe 37/2 24-4 pe storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

SECTION



= tae

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

SPER TRE, ERS Ee ES




@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

Kentonya keeps Saints

alive with 25-19 victory

BM BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

KENTONYA Miller canned a
game high 15 points as the
Kingsway Academy Saints
marched to a 25-19 victory over
the St. Andrew’s Hurricanes at
home.

In a battle of two of three unde-
feated teams in the Bahamas
Association of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools’ senior girls divi-
sion, the Saints pushed their
record to 6-0, while the Hurri-
canes fell to 5-1.

“The girls came a little over
confident and they didn’t really
come prepared,” said St.
Andrew’s coach Herman May-
cock. “The last two weeks, they
haven’t been coming to practice.

“Tt’s not an excuse, but you
could see in the first quarter and
at the half, they were a little out of
shape, gasping for breath. But as
the game went on, they started to
get their wind. The second half
was a better half.”

Kingsway Academy struggled,
scoring just two points in the first
quarter as they fell behind 4-2.
They trailed 12-5 at the half, man-



Michael

ordan is

back on
course




aging to come up with just three
more in the second quarter.

In both periods, Miller came
up with four points apiece to push
Kingsway Academy out front. She
added five more in the fourth as
the Saints built on their lead.

“1 think we did good. We hada
lot of team work,” Miller reflect-
ed. “They are a team that uses
their hands a lot, so we wanted
to get oui ahead of them and stay
on top.”

Strength

While Miller finished with her
game high 15, center Michaela
Levarity was a tower of strength
on the inside as she scored six with
numerous rebounds. Diandra Fer-
guson and Alicia Bell both added
two. ; :

Saints’ coach Juliet Douglas-
Smith said it was a big victory for
Kingsway Academy at home.

“We actually said that we are

‘going for the championship and

that is what we are doing,” she
stated. “We are going for all wins
- 11-0- straight up to the champi-
onship.”

The Saints, however, are



MICHAEL JORDAN
reacts to his tee shot during the
Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi-
tational on Paradise Island.

The annual golfing event
started yesterday and runs
through Sunday. oe

© SEE PAGE TWO

(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)







expected to face their next biggest
test when they play St. John’s
Giants next week. Going into yes-
terday’s game, the Giants were
the only other undefeated team
in the league.

Douglas-Smith said if they
could play the way they did yes-
terday, they should have no prob-
lems against the Giants. But she’s
not taking any team for granted.

The Hurricanes provided a
challenge for the Saints. Although
they lost, the Hurricanes got a sol-
id game from Kristen Rolle, who
pumped in a side high 11.

Ashley Black contributed seven
and Jackie Carey hit a free throw.

Despite falling behind in the
first half, St. Andrew’s turned
things around in the third quarter
when they crashed the boards and
worked on their defence.

But every time they made a
dent into the lead, Kingsway
Academy managed to get back in
control until the fourth quarter
when they played like they did in
the first half.

Looking back at the game,
coach Maycock said all they had
to do was “protect the ball better
and cut down on the turnovers.
We gave them a lot of points.”





@ VOLLEYBALL
: JANN MORTIMER’S FUNERAL

THE funeral service for former veteran nation-
al team player/coach Jennifer ‘Jann’ Mortimer, 50,
will be held on Saturday at St. Cecilia’s Parish,
Coconut Groove at 2 p.m. ,

Her interment will be in the Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street.

@ TENNIS
MEGAMALT ADULT/
JUNIOR TOURNEY

Nick’s Tennis Academy will hold the Mega-

malt Adult(Junior Tennis Tournament at the







Nassau Beach Hotel from February 2-4.

The event is geared towards males and females
between the ages of 7-18, representing the 14-
and-under and rookie competition as well as the
adult male and female divisions.

i BASKETBALL
NPBA ACTION

The New Providence Basketball Association
will continue its regular season action tonight at
the DW Davis Gym with a double header on tap.
In the 7 p.m. opener, the Coke Explorers will
play the Y-Care Wreckers and the Electrocom
Cybots will take on the Sunshine Auto Ruff
Ryders.







IBUTLERS’ FUNERAL
HOMES AND CREMATORIUM

W@ HALL of Fame basketball
player Julius ‘Dr J’ Erving
swings his club during the
Michael Jordan Celebrity
Tournament yesterday on

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



tars come out
for Michael
Jordan event

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

JULIUS ‘Dr J’ Erving has
had a storied career in the
National Basketball Associ-
ation, although he’s not too
pleased with the way his
Philadelphia 76ers have fall-
en a decade after his retire-
ment.

The former electrifying
swingman is here with a host
of entertainers and sporting
personalities playing in the
Michael Jordan Celebrity
Invitational on Paradise
Island.

The tournament got start-
ed yesterday at the Ocean
Club Golf Course and will
continue through Sunday.

Erving, who helped to
change the way the game
was played with his wizard-

style, has been retired since .

1987. But he said the 76ers
are a franchise currently in
transition,

“They’ve obviously made
a commitment to build. They
freed up the money to go
into the Free Market place
in the off-season, so we will
say what happens there,” he
reflected. “Hopefully the
fans support will be main-
tained during this transi-
tion.”

Still closely associated the
76ers, Erving, who was listed
as one of the 50 greatest
players to play the game,
said he’s not happy with the



B@ HOCKEY great Mario
Lemieux tees off during the
Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi-
tational yesterday at Paradise

island.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)

and Eastern Conference at

but that’s part of the
process,” he noted. “Histor-
ically, it was one of the great
franchises of the league.
Hopefully with a little bit of
luck, we will come back.”

Erving said he was pleased
with the three players who
played in his foursome yes-
terday.

Paul O’Neil, who played
17 years in the Major
Leagues - the last nine with
the New York Yankees -
before hew retired in 2001,
said it’s good to be back in
the sunny Bahamas.

“I’m from the mid-west
where it’s cold and snowing,
so it’s a great opportunity to
come down heie and play
golf,” said O’Neil, who com-
piled a .288 batting average
in 2053 games played during
his career. ,

“T think it becomes better
and better. This is my third
year and the weather has
been the best so far. Hope-
fully that will continue.” |

Having won four Major
League titles with the Yan-
kees, O’Neil said it was a lot
of fun and although he miss-
es “playing in the big games
before the large crowd,” he’s
enjoying himself now.

Vince Coleman, who made
his debut in the Major
League in 1985 for the St.
Louis Cardinals and retired
in 1997 with the Detroit
Tigers after 13 seasons, said
anytime he gets au opportu-

nity to support Jordan he

Paradise Island. . : state they are in, currently 10-29. will do it. Si
: : (Photo: rere Major/ — sitting in last year place in “They are turning into a As for his performance,
Fu neral Announcement Tribune staff) the Atlantic and Division cellar dweller very rapidly, Coleman said he made a few

‘shots and he’s improving his
game because he wants to
defend his title.

When asked how good he
thinks he is right now against
his Jordan, he said, “With-
out a doubt it’s me. He’s
playing good right now, but I
know I can take him.”

Ahmad Green, Green Bay
Packers’ running back, is in
his second appearance in the
tournament and said he’s
“taking in the scenery and
hanging out with the people
because I don’t get to do a
whole lot of this.”

Semi-Military
Funeral
Service for
Retired Land
Sgt. 57 Prince}.
“Ned” Edward

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REIN AA DET SLRS LTE TL A TELAT Eee SR PARTE A ae ae sf











See RRERSHR ATS

Miami Herald |



Che



PRO FOOTBALL
COMMENTARY





ao 1
NICK LAHAM/GETTY IMAGES

Giants’ future:
isn’t looking
all that bright

Newsday
J ust more than one year ago, this



quote.came from New York
Giants running back Tiki Barber:
“T don’t know how long I want to play.
I'd like to rush for 10,000 yards....
Obviously, winning the Super Bowl is
paramount for me. Beyond that, I’m
not gonna play just to
play or just to accu-.
mulate stats. There’s
-too much other that I
want to do in my life.”
And then there is
this quote, from Bar-
NFL ber’s agent, Mark Lep-
REPORT: selter:“Tikiwillbe
8-98 a Giant in 2006. That
Ton Bee much is promised.
Beyond that, I would say the odds. __
of him playing beyond 2006 are no
better than 50-50.” :

A year ago, the Giants were fore-

-warned. They did nothing to dissuade
Barber from his decision and nothing
to prepare for his loss. Now they head
into 2007 disarmed, facing a future
full of Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning
and minus Barber. For this, they have
~ noone to blame but themselves.

RECIPE FOR DISASTER

Giants fans want to be angry at
Barber for getting out when the get-
ting is good? Fine. They really should
be angry at him for running wild for
234 yards against the Washington
Redskins, saving Coughlin’s job.

So now they get to keep Coughlin
and Eli but lose Tiki. Good deal, eh?

But don’t worry, Giants fans. There
still is time to put your 2007 season
tickets up for sale on eBay.

The loss of Barber, the retention of

Coughlin and the continuing presence _

of Manning practically ensure that,
next season, those tickets will be use-
ful only as kindling for tailgate barbe-
cue. Even factoring in the “competi-
tive balance” (read: incompetence) of
the NEC, it’s hard to see how next sea-
son won't wind up even worse than
the debacle that just ended.

The decision to not only retain .
Coughlin but also extend his contract
a year sends a definite message to
Giants fans, the most loyal and patient
fan base New York has: “We haven't
the slightest idea of what to do to fix
this team. So we’re doing nothing.”

By this, the Giants rely upon fans’
patience — and exploit it, too.

‘And patient they have been, with a
team that has won just three playoff
games in the past 16 seasons. Witha _
front office that has drafted all of two
players, outside of Barber, to make it

‘to the Pro Bowl in 10 years: Jeremy
Shockey and Osi Umenyiora. (David
Tyree, special-teams player, doesn’t
really count). With an ownership that
is short on competitive hunger.

SUPER BOWL BUSTS

Aside from 2000, when the Giants
took a magic-carpet ride to Tampa,
only to have the rug yanked out from
under them by Ray Lewis the Balti-
more Ravens, this team hasn’t had a
sniff of the Super Bowl in 16 years.

Can you imagine George Stein-

- brenner running the Giants the way
the Maras and the Tisches have? Can
you imagine Eric Mangini handing the
quarterback job to Manning without a
training-camp competition and send-
ing him out into the regular season
without a serious backup?

Can you imagine Barber wanting to
risk his health and future coming back
to a situation like that?

Jerry Reese has been promoted
from director of player personnel to
succeed Ernie Accorsi as general
manager. Chris Mara, son of the late
Wellington Mara, will probably move
up to take Reese’s old job.

These men, along with Accorsi,

were in the room at the NFL Combine ©

when Manning walked in to be evalu-
ated. They all decided that he, and not
Philip Rivers or Ben Roethlisberger,
would be the quarterback to lead the
Giants out of the funk Jim Fassel had
left them in. These are the men who
will continue to lead the Giants into
their next era of futility.

But they still haven’t seemed to
notice that their best player is gone,
and he isn’t coming back.



BY GEORGE HENRY
Associated Press

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. —
For the third time in nine months,
Atlanta Falcons quarterback
Michael Vick is making headlines
for all the wrong reasons.

On Wednesday, Vick reluc-
tantly surrendered a water bottle
to security at Miami Interna-
tional Airport. The bottle
contained, in a hidden com-
partment, a substance that
reportedly smelled like mari-
juana. Vick was not arrested,
and he was allowed to board an
AirTran flight that landed in
Atlanta before noon.

Miami police said Thursday that
it could be weeks before a decision
is made on whether to file charges
against Vick, a three-time Pro Bowl
player who this season became the



PRO FOOTBALL | ATLANTA FALCONS .

Airport scene puts heat on Vick

first quarterback in NFL history to
rush for 1,000 yards.

Falcons owner Arthur Blank,
general manager Rich McKay and
new head coach Bobby Petrino met
with Vick, who left team headquar-
ters without speaking to reporters.
McKay said Blank was upset with
the quarterback, whose $137 mil-
lion contract was richest in
the NFL when Vick signed it
three years ago.

“We are an organization
that prides itself on not hav-
. ing off-the-field. issues,”
McKay said. “I think we have done
a pretty good job of bringing the
right people in here so we don’t
have to face these types of issues.

“We don’t like it. We don’t
accept it. It is not what we want.”

Under Florida law, possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana



RUSTY KENNEDY/AP
QUESTIONS IN MIAMI: Michael Vick.

is a misdemeanor punishable by up
to a year in prison and a $1,000
fine. First offenders rarely do any
jail time, though.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





“We'll do an analysis and see
what it is. There’s no sense of
urgency to it,” Detective Alvaro
Zabaleta said Thursday in Miami.

The NFL’s substance-abuse pol-
icy states that any team can decide
that a player’s “behavior, including
but not limited to an arrest,” can
warrant a physical exam from its
medical director. NFL spokesman
Greg Aiello said no decision had
been made in Vick’s case.

Last April, Vick settled a lawsuit
filed by a woman who claimed the
player knowingly gave her herpes.

In November, Vick made an
obscene gesture toward Falcons
fans who heckled the team as it
came off the field after a 31-13 loss
to the New Orleans Saints. Vick
apologized profusely, paid a
$10,000 team fine and donated
another $10,000 to charity.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 14 DUKE 62, WAKE FOREST 40

Devils flog







TENNIS | Al

TED RICHARDSON/MCT

RAISING HIS GAME: DeMarcus Nelson of Duke drives and shoots over Wake Forest
defender Kevin Swinton in the first half. Nelson scored nine points in the game.



Deacons

Paulus scores 17 points,
and Duke’s stingy defense
shuts down Wake Forest

BY AARON BEARD
Associated Press .

DURHAM, N.C. — Duke isn’t the high-scoring
machine it has been in recent years. But the way the Blue
Devils are playing defense these days, they can get away
with less offense sometimes.

Greg Paulus scored 17 points, and the 14th-ranked
Blue Devils held Wake Forest to one of its worst scoring
games in a half-century in Thursday night’s 62-40 vic-
tory, the latest stingy effort from one of
the Atlantic Coast Conference’s top
defenses. The Blue Devils (15-3, 2-2 ACC)
shut down the Demon Deacons all night,
hounding freshman point guard Ishmael
Smith on the perimeter and completely
disrupting their transition attack.

By the time it was over, Wake Forest
had matched its second-lowest scoring |
total since the ACC’s inaugural season,
way back in 1963-54. ;

Even Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski, who is about as
demanding as it gets when it comes to defense, could
find little fault. Making it even sweeter was how his
young team ignored its ups and downs on the offensive
end along the way.

“Our defense was excellent,” Krzyzewski said. “It was
rock solid. ... That’s a really good sign for a team, that
you don’t let missed shots let you miss assignments on
the defensive end.”

The Blue Devils came in as the league’s best scoring
defense, holding opponents to 56.1 points per game,
though that number is skewed by Duke’s slower-paced
offense, which ranks last in the ACC.

the Blue Devils held the Demon Deacons (9-8, 1-4) to
33 percent on shots from the field and 3-for-ll from
3-point range, with 21 turnovers and just five assists.
That offset an offense that shot 44 percent and went
nearly six minutes without a point in the second half.

“There’s no plays off,” said Duke’s David McClure,
who finished with seven points, six rebounds and three
steals off the bench. “Especially in a conference like the
ACC, teams are so talented that any little burst can give
them a run and can force a 10-point swing.”

Wake Forest’s previous low was 58 points in a loss to
Air Force in November. Smith — the ACC’s assist leader,
at 6,3 per game — finished with no assists and eight turn-
overs, taunted all night by the “Cameron Crazies.”

e MORE BASKETBALL





.LAN OPEN

Nadal survives tough second-round challenge

BY PAUL ALEXANDER
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia —
Rafael Nadal was hit twice by
stinging backhands at the net
before advancing to the third
round of the Australian Open on
Thursday with a four-set victory
over Philipp Kohlschreiber.
During the second-seeded
Nadal’s 7-5, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 victory,
one shot caught Nadal’s finger, and
another sent him sprawling and
seemed to briefly stun him. —
Nadal said it appeared that
Kohlschreiber was trying to hit
him the second time, and that the
ball could have injured his eye if it
hadn’t caught his racket by chance.
“He has the whole court” to
work with, Nadal said.




Nadal demonstrated his tenac-
ity, fending off chants from a group
of German fans to win the match
and set up a meeting with 3lst-
seeded Stanislas Wawrinka.

Nadal needed 3'2 hours, but
Kim Clijsters and Martina Hingis
raced to see who could finish their
match first, moving a step closer to
a possible quarterfinals showdown.

Neither was as fast as top-
seeded Maria Sharapova. The U.S.
Open champion, who endured

three hours of broiling heat in her ~

first-round match Tuesday, needed
only 58 minutes to beat fellow Rus-
sian Anastassia Rodionova 6-0, 6-3.

“My brain cells were restored
today,” said Sharapova, who
described herself as delusional in
her last match. “It was tice Lo yet a




eR RON TE ROT ETT.
Ce



Alex Kuznetsov 6-4, 6-1, 6-2. Now
he faces another buddy, Robby
Ginepri, who beat German quali-
fier Mischa Zverev 6-4, 7-5, 6-1.
Clijsters extended the winning
start to her farewell tour — she is
retiring at the end of the year to
start a family — by beating Akiko
Morigami 6-3, 6-0 in 59 minutes.
“Pye always enjoyed coming
here, but this year it’s even more
special than in the past,” said Clijs-

RICK STEVENS/AP

THRILL OF VICTORY: Rafael Nadal.

quick one in there today.”
Fifth-seeded James Blake, who
doesn’t shave as long as he Is still
alive in a tournament and hopes to
have 2 big, bushy beard by the end
of next week, beat hitting partner

ters, who is 23 and is seeded fourth
in the tournament. “You appreci-
ate it so much more, I think.”
Hingis, who is seeded sixth,
continued to build momentum in
her comeback after three years
away with a 6-2, 6-2 victory over
Alla Kudryavtseva, needing nine
minutes more than Clijsters did.



4C | FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 _

_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

No. 9 Oregon fights off Stanford upset bid

From Miami Herald Wire Services

EUGENE, Ore. — Aaron
Brooks recorded 19 points and
10 rebounds to lead No. 9 Ore-
gon to a 66-59 victory against
Stanford on Thursday night.

Tajuan Porter added 15
points and Bryce Taylor
scored 14 for the Ducks (17-1,
5-1 Pac-10), who are off to their
best start in 80 years. The vic-
tory ended a seven-game los-
ing streak to the Cardinal (11-5,
3-3), who upset then 23rd-
ranked Washington State 71-68
in overtime in their last game.

Brooks scored nine in a row
for the Ducks late in the sec-
ond half, eventually giving
them a 53-51 advantage with
5:04 to play. Oregon never
trailed again.

The Ducks, who have no
starter taller than 6-foot-9, and
their brand of small ball strug-
gled for much of the game
against Stanford’s 7-foot twin
brothers, Robin and Brook
Lopez.

Maarty Leunen, Oregon’s
only true post player at
6-foot-9, was held scoreless in
the first half and overall, Ore-
gon had 10 shots blocked and
shot just 29 percent from the
field.

But the Ducks stayed
aggressive and continued to
attack the basket and draw
fouls. They got to the free-
throw line 28 times in the sec-
ond half alone, making 23.
They were 30-of-37 from the
line overall. Brooks alone was
10-for-10.

OTHER ACTION
e Xavier 83, Massachu-

BASKETBALL



KEVIN CLARK/AP

NOTHING EASY: Oregon’s Malik Hairston, right, tries to get
past Stanford’s Lawrence Hill during the Ducks’ bruising
66-59 victory over the Cardinal on Thursday in Eugene.

setts 77: Justin Doellman
scored 16 points to lead six
players in double figures as
host Xavier gave Massachu-
setts its first Atlantic 10 loss of
the season.

The Musketeers (13-5, 3-1)
and the Minutemen (13-4, 3-1)



were picked as the Atlantic
10’s top teams before the sea-
son. A dominant front line has
helped UMass get off to its
best start since 1995-96, and
the Minutemen have already
matched last season’s victory
total.

PRO BASKETBALL

Center Rashaun Freeman
led UMass with 22 points and
13 rebounds — 11 offensive —
and forward Stephane Lasme
added 18 points and nine
rebounds, but the Minutemen
turned the ball over 16 times,
made just 5 of their 18 3-point-
ers and put Xavier on the free-
throw line 22 times. Despite
outrebounding Xavier 47-31,
grabbing 25 offensive
rebounds and scoring 56 of its
points in the paint, UMass
took just four free throws,
none by Freeman or Lasme.

With the score tied at 62
with 7:17 to play, Xavier went
on a 10-2 run to take control.
Doellman scored four points
during the run. UMass missed
six of seven shots during the
run.

Trailing 76-68 with 1:20 to
play, the Minutemen used a 7-1
run over the next 50 seconds
to get back in it. Gary Forbes
scored on a tip-in and a layup
and Etienne Brower hit a
3-pointer to make it 77-75 with
30 seconds left. The Muske-
teers made 6-of-6 free throws
in the last 23 seconds.

After a miserable shooting
performance in its last game, a
76-65 loss to Saint Louis, the
Musketeers shot 48 percent
from the field and made
8-of-18 3-pointers.

Gary Forbes had 19 points
for UMass and James Life
added 10. For Xavier, Stanley
Burrell scored 15 points, Drew
Lavender had 14, Josh Duncan
had 13, Justin Cage had 12 and
Derrick Brown added 10. Bran-
don Cole had 10 rebounds.

e Penn 93, La Salle 92:

_MiamiHlerald.com_| THE MIAMI HERALD



Mark Zoller scored 28 points
and grabbed 10 rebounds and
Ibrahim Jaaber had 27 points
and nine assists as Penn
defeated city rival La Salle in
Philadelphia.

Brian Grandieri added 18
points for Penn (10-6), which
defeated the Explorers for the
sixth consecutive time and the
14th in their past 16 meetings.

Darnell Harris had a career-
high 32 points, including eight
3-point shots, for La Salle
(8-10), while Rodney Green
had 22 and Paul Johnson
added 17.

La Salle led 58-47 with 16:14
left to play before Grandieri
started a 16-5 run with a
3-pointer and capped it witha
layup to tie the score 63-63
with 11:26 remaining.

For the next 10:03, neither
team had more than a two-
point lead until Zoller’s two
foul shots with 1:03 to go gave
the Quakers a 90-87 advan-
tage. ,

A jumper by Jaaber with 15
seconds left made it 92-87 and,
after a Green layup and a free
throw by Grandieri, Johnson’s
3-pointer with one second left
accounted for the final score.

Both teams shot well during:
the game, which saw numer-
ous fast breaks. The Quakers
made 37-of-64 shots (58 per-
cent) while La Salle was 34-
for-64 (53 percent).

- @ Illinois State 83, Wich-
ita State 75: Levi Dyer was
perfect from the line and
behind the arc, finishing with
20 points as host Illinois State
beat Wichita State.

Dyer went 4-of-4 from the



free-throw line and from
3-point range, combining with
Osiris Eldridge to sink seven
of Illinois State’s 3-pointers.
Eldridge finished with 16
points for the Redbirds (10-9,
2-6 Missouri Valley).

The Shockers (12-7, 3-5) got
a game-high 27 points from
Kyle Wilson. Wilson was
7-of-12 from the field, includ-
ing 5-of-6 from 3-point range,
and 8-of-10 from the free-
throw line before fouling out
with 3:26 to go in the game.

P.J. Couisnard added 15
points and Ryan Martin scored
14 for Wichita State, which got
a game-high six boards apiece
from each of them and Sean
Ogirri.

e Manhattan 86, Rider
75: Antoine Pearson scored a
career-high 21 points and host
Manhattan extended its win-
ning streak to six games with
the victory over Rider.

Guy Ngarndi had a career-

- high 19 points and Patrick

Bouli added 13 points for the

Jaspers (9-8, 6-1 Metro Atlan-

tic). Harris Mansell scored 21

points for the Broncs (10-8,
4-4).

e New Hampshire 75,
Binghamton 72: Blagoj Janev
scored 18 points to lead visit-
ing New Hampshire to the vic-
tory.

Tyrece Gibbs scored 16
points and Jermaine Anderson
contributed 15 for New Hamp-
shire (7-12, 3-3 America East)

Mike Gordon scored 20
points to lead Binghamton
(9-10, 2-5). Steve Proctor
added 16 and Lazar Trifunovic
had U1 points.

Heat holds off Pacers’ push

From Miami Herald Wire Services

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade
scored 33 points, including a
game-saving layup with 4.3 sec-
onds left, as the Miami Heat
wasted most of a double-digit
lead in the final minutes before
beating the trade-depleted Indi-
ana Pacers 104-101 on Thursday
night.

- Jason Williams added 20
points and eight assists for the
Heat, who led 91-75 with 8:05 left
before the Pacers — who had
only 10 players in uniform — got
within two by going on a 23-9
run.

But Wade hit a pair of free
throws with 24.5 seconds left,
then drove full-court for the cru-
cial layup.

Danny Granger had a career-
high 28 points on 9-of-13 shoot-
ing for Indiana, but came up
short on a potential game-tying
3-point try as the final buzzer
sounded.

The Pacers acquired Troy
Murphy, Mike Dunleavy, Ike
Diogu and Keith McLeod from
the Warriors on Wednesday for
Stephen Jackson, Sarunas Jasi-
kevicius, Josh Powell and Al Har-
rington, but none of the new
players were available Thursday.

‘ Marquis Daniels had a season-
high 21 for the Pacers, who got 17
points and 10 rebounds from Jer-
maine O’Neal.

Alonzo Mourning had 14
points for Miami, and Jason
Kapono had 11 and Michael
Doleac matched a season high
with 10.

THE WAIT FOR SHAQ

MIAMI — The Shaquille
O’Neal comeback watch will
continue for at least a few more
days.

O’Nea], who’s recovering
from surgery to repair torn left
knee cartilage, will miss at least
two more games before return-
ing to the Miami Heat lineup,
interim coach Ron Rothstein
said.

He missed Miami’s home
game Thursday night against
Indiana and will not play when
the Heat visits Philadelphia
tonight. The earliest he could
come back is Sunday, when the
Heat hosts Dallas in a rematch of
last year’s NBA Finals, which
Miami won in six games.

“Shaq is working out, feeling
good, getting better day to day,”
Rothstein said after the Heat’s
shootaround Thursday morning.
“That’s it. Case closed.”

Thursday’s game was the
32nd O’Neal has missed since the

. Nov. 19 surgery. He took part ina
» full-contact, five-on-five work-

out Wednesday for the first time
since the operation and said a
decision on playing against the
Pacers hinged on how his knee
responded from that test.

_ Rothstein said O’Neal did not
have a setback and was able to
take part in the shootaround, but
stressed the team is continuing
to exercise caution. O’Neal will
continue working out ona daily
basis.

“Each individual knows when
they’re ready,” Rothstein said.
“He.wants to play. You think he
wants to do all those court drills?
It’s much easier playing. But he’s
not. ready to play yet, in any
sense. Confidence in the leg,
conditioning, wind. ... You’ve
got to remember, he’s 7-foot-l,
330 pounds. He’s a different indi-
vidual.”

O’Neal was not available for
comment before Thursday’s
game.

When he returns, the Heat
should have their full comple-

‘ ment of regular-rotation players

available for the first time since
winning the NBA championship
on June 20.

O’Neal has played in only four
games, none of those with point
guard Jason Williams, who
missed the season’s first seven
games and five others since
while continuing to recover from
offseason knee surgery. Finals
MVP Dwyane Wade also has
missed six games with injuries.

“We understand as athletes
that certain injuries to certain
players take longer,” Wade said.
“This is a knee injury to some-
one who weighs 300-some
pounds. We know it’s going to
take a little longer. We just want
to make sure he comes back full
strength. No matter how many
games it takes, we know he’s
going to be there with us when
we have to make our run.”

The Heat entered Thursday
with a 17-20 record, 42 games
behind Washington in the South-
east Division standings and 5'2
games back of Cleveland for the
top mark in the Eastern Confer-
ence.

ELSEWHERE

e Mavericks: Starting guard
Devin Harris missed Dallas’
game against the Los Angeles
Lakers on Thursday night
because of an illness.

Devean George, who spent his
first seven NBA seasons with the
Lakers before signing a free-
agent deal with Dallas last off-

season, started in Harris’ spot.

Coach Avery Johnson said
Harris had a “really high” tem-
perature.

“He is a lot under the
weather,” Johnson said. “He just
cannot go tonight whatsoever.”

Harris went through the
morning shootaround, but John-
son said the 6-foot-3, 185-pound
guard didn’t look too good then
either. The coach also plans to
give Harris another day off today
to recover.

“That body can’t afford to
lose much weight,” Johnson said.

Johnson hopes Harris will be
ready to travel with the team Sat-
urday, when it leaves for its
game Sunday at Miami in a
rematch of last year’s NBA
Finals.

e Nets: A British bank hop-
ing to expand its U.S. profile will
spend as much as $400 million
over the next 20 years to put its
name on the New Jersey Nets’
planned Brooklyn arena.

Nets owner Bruce Ratner
announced Thursday the 18,000-
seat stadium designed by archi-
tect Frank Gehry will be called
The Barclays Center when it
opens later this decade.

He declined to say how much
London-based Barclays paid to
attach its name to the complex.
Bank executives and city officials



ALAN DIAZ/AP

THE STROKE OF GENIUS: Heat guard Dwyane Wade poured in
33 points to help Miami outlast Indiana on Thursday night.

described the investment as
“more than $300 million.” A per-
son with knowledge of the deal,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity because he was not
authorized to reveal the price,
said its total value was almost
$400 million.

That total would be among
the steepest ever paid for the
naming rights to an indoor
American sports arena, but com-
parable to the $20 million per
year that Citigroup reportedly
agreed to pay to name the New
York Mets stadium being built in
Queens.

Barclays president Robert
Diamond said he is convinced
the exposure will be well worth
the price.

“Building our brand in the
U.S. is very, very important to
us,” he said.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Lakers 100, Spurs 96:
Kobe Bryant scored 34 points
after a slow start to lead visiting
Los Angeles.

e Trail Blazers 94, Cava-
liers 76: Rookie Brandon Roy
had 19 points and 10 rebounds to
lead host Portland.

e Clippers 115, Warriors
109: Elton Brand had 27 points
and 11 rebounds to lead host Los
Angels.

| NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

| SOUTHEAST WL

| Washington 22 16

_ Orlando 22 17

Miami s:18-20
Atlanta 13 23°84
Charlotte 12. 25

/ ATLANTIC. WW) ok

| Toronto 19 21

i New Jersey 18 20
New York 17° 23
Boston 12 25
Philadelphia 10 29
CENTRAL OW OL
Cleveland 23 15
Chicago 23 17

| Detroit 21 16

| Indiana 20 19

_ Milwaukee 17 21

SOUTHEAST WL Pct, GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
519 - 6-4 W-2 16-3 6-13 14-9
564 % 5-5 L-3 14-6 8-11 12-9.
474 4 5-5 Wel 9-9 9-11 7-10
3361 8 4-6°°W-3 7-10 6-13 8-14
-324 9% 5-5 L-2 7-13 5-12 9-15
Pet. GB 110 Str. Home “Away Conf
475 - 64 W-2 11-6 8-15 13-8
AT4. - 7-3 W-2 12-10 6-10 14-9
425 2 5-5 L-1 10-11 7-12 10-14
324 5% 2-8 L-5 4-13 8-12 8-16
256 8% 2-8 L-3 5-9 5-20 7-16
Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
-605 - 64 L2 15-3 812 15-10
575° 1 5-5 W-3 17-5 6-12 18-7
568 1% 3-7 L2 ° 10-8 11-8 15-8
513 3% 5-5 L3 10-6 10-13 15-11
47 6 3-7 L-l° 9-7 8-14

7-16

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WoL Pe
Dallas 32. «8
San Antonio 27 13
Houston 25 15
New Orleans 15 22
Memphis 10 30
NORTHWEST wie
Utah 25 14
Minnesota 20 17
Denver. 18 17
Portland 16 24
Seattle 15 25
PACIFIC wie
Phoenix 30 8

L.A. Lakers 26 13
| Golden State 19 21
| LA. Clippers 18 21

Pct. GB Li0 Str. Home Away Conf
800 - 9-1 W-5 18-3 14-5 22-6
675 5 5-5 L-2 14-7 13-6 188
625 7 7-3 L-2 13-4 12-11 13-13
405 15% 4-6 W-3- 9-10 6-12 6-16
250 22 4-6 W-1 8-13 2-17 4-17

Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
641 - 46 W-1 14-4 11-10 16-8
541 4 7-3. L-1 12-7 8-10 11-10
+14 5 3-7 W-1 10-10 8-7 6-11
400 9% 3-7 W-1 9-12 7-12 10-12
375 10% 3-7 W-2 11-9 4-16 6-15

eee b Pet, GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
789 - 10-0 W-1l 17-3) 13-5 14-7
667 4% 7-3 W-3 18-4 8-9 16-7
75 12 4-6 L-1 15-7 4-14 13-14
462 12% 5-5 W-1 13-7 5-14 12-16
389 15 2-8 L-7 10-11 4-11 8-15

Sacramento 14 22

Thursday’s results

Tonight’s games

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Miami 104, Ind. 101 Miami at Phil., 7 Tor. 101, Sac. 85

Lak. at Dal., late Utah at Tor., 7 Was. 99, N.Y. 98
Wash. at Orl., 7 NJ. 92, Cha. 85
Char. at Atla., 7:30 Utah 100, Det. 99
Sac. at Bos., 7:30 Chi. 99, Mil. 90
NJ. at N.Y., 7:30 Mem. 118, Phi. 102
Det. at Minn., 8 Atl. 105, Min. 88
N.O. at S.A., 8 Pho. 100, Hou. 91
Port. at Pho., 9 L.A.L. 100, S.A. 96
Mil. at Sea., 10 Por. 94, Cle. 76

Clev. at Den., 10:30

L.A.C. 115, G.S. 109

NBA LEADERS



Through Wednesday
SCORING REBOUNDING

G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 22 265 153 696 31.6 Garnett, Minn. 37 97 370 467 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 38 358 303 1135 29.9 Howard, Orl. 39 139 353 492 12.6
Iverson, Den. 27 267 238 795 29.4 Camby, Den. 30 74 290 364 12.1
Bryant, LAL 36 337 282 1011 28.1 Boozer, Utah 39 128 330 458 11.7
Wade, Mia. 31 283 285 866 27.9 Okafor, Char. 37 144 275 419 11.3
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Chandler, NOk. 35 129 264 393 11.2
James, Clev. 38 366 237 1020 26.8 O'Neal, Ind. 33 76 269 345 10.5
Pierce, Bos. 24 198 181 638 26.6 Lee, N.Y. 40 148 269 417 10.4
Yao, Hou. 27 252 195 699 25.9 Duncan, S.A. 40 113 298 411 10.3
Allen, Sea. 30 262 165 771 25.7 Wallace, Chi. 38 148 237 385 10.1

Carter, NJ. 38 336 205 957 25.2

ASSISTS
FIELD GOALS ati.#.6 tf Ne AST AVG
FG FGA PCT Nash, Phoe. 36 all 114
Biedrins, G.S. 178 288 .618 — Kidd, NJ. 38 349 9.2 =.
Lee, N.Y. 174 284 .613 Paul, NOk. 27 242 «9.0
Stoudemire, Phoe. 250 422 .592 Williams, Utah 39 341 87 |

Dalembert, Phil. 162 277 .585 Miller, Phil. 37 321 87
Curry, N.Y. 286 496 .577 Davis, G.S. 36 309 8.6
Bogut, Mil. 197 348 .566 Billups, Det. 29 235 8.1
Howard, Orl. 240 424 .566 Wade, Mia. 31 247 «8.0

Boozer, Utah 354 635 .557

Brand, LAC 308 556 .554

Duncan, S.A. 312 569 .548
eee

NBA CALENDAR
LAYER OF THE MONTH
JANUARY F
November

Through Wednesday: D-League Showcase

21: Finals Rematch:
(ABC)

FEBRUARY

Mavs @ Heat noon

1: NBA Celebrates Black History Month
12: NBA All-Star Community Caravan

15: Jam Session opens In Vegas
16: T-Mobile Rookie Challenge
17: NBA All-Star Saturday Night

Eastern Conference: Dwight Howard,
Orlando Magic

Western Conference: Yao Ming, Hous-
ton Rockets

December
Eastern Conference: Gilbert Arenas,
Washington Wizards
Western Conference: Kobe Bryant, Los
Angeles Lakers





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _

INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

Winners always keep their cool in the playoffs

BY JASON WHITLOCK
The Kansas City Star

Watching Marty Schottenheimer
lose another playoff game made me
think of Herm Edwards.

The San Diego Chargers’ loss to
the New England Patriots seemed
similar to the Kansas City Chiefs’ loss
to the Indianapolis Colts. Schotten-
heimer’s offense choked. The receiv-
ers dropped routine passes. The
clock was mismanaged. The game
plan failed to make the proper adjust-
ments (LaDainian Tomlinson had
just nine touches in the second half).
There were mental errors caused by
a lack of emotional control.

Before the game, ESPN showed a
graphic of the coaches with the poor-
est playoff winning percentages.
Schottenheimer and Edwards were
both on the list.

There’s a connection. They are
not bad coaches. To the contrary,
they are good coaches. In the regular
season, Schottenheimer is as good as
any coach in football. Edwards isn’t
far behind. So what happens in the
playoffs? What happens when the
stakes are elevated?

Edwards says the playoffs are dif-
ferent. I believe him. I also believe
that he and Schottenheimer don’t
coach nearly as effectively in the
playoffs.

And that’s why, as much as the
Chiefs need to address their person-
nel shortcomings this offseason,

PRO FOOTBALL



MARK TERRILL/AP

POINTING FINGERS: Chargers head coach Marty Schottenheimer, right,
racked up another playoff loss, so of course he’s getting the blame.

Edwards also needs to examine his
coaching method. Fiery, emotional,
defensive-minded head coaches —
Edwards and Schottenheimer —
don’t perform in the playoffs as well
as their more-reserved counterparts.
Yes, Bill Cowher, The.Chin, a fire-

and-brimstone, defensive-minded
coach, won the most recent Super
Bow], but it probably took him longer
to win one than it should have, and
Cowher’s triumph from a sixth-seed
spot was more than a bit lucky.
Before Cowher, the Super Bowl-



INTERNATIONAL EDITION FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 | 5C

winning coaches were Bill Belichick,

Jon Gruden, Brian Billick, Dick Ver-
meil, Mike Shanahan, Mike Holm-

gren, Barry Switzer, George Seifert,
Jimmy Johnson, Joe Gibbs, Bill Par-

~ cells and Bill Walsh. For the most

part, that’s a pretty stoic group. Swit-
zer and Parcells would be the glaring
exceptions. But I’m not sure they are
really exceptions. Parcells has never
won a Super Bow] without Belichick
as his sidekick. And Switzer was
nothing more than a caretaker/com-
edy routine for what Johnson had
built with the Dallas Cowboys.

What do Schottenheimer and
Edwards lack? The ability to get
offensive players to relax and per-
form at their highest level in big
games. Defense is emotional. Offense
is intellectual. It’s a difficult balance
to feed half your team the emotional
energy it needs to hunt and kill, and
feed the other half of your team the
calm and confidence it needs to
counterattack the opposition’s defen-
sive aggression.

You feed the offense too much
emotion, and the players crack. They
drop passes. They miss assignments.
They draw foolish penalties. They
burn timeouts. Maybe, after the
game, they whine about the opposi-
tion celebrating too much.

“They showed no class,” Tomlin-
son said of the Patriots, “and maybe
that comes from the head coach.”

The Chargers showed no compo-

sure. And maybe that comes from the
head coach.

When Bill Snyder had the Kansas
State football program winning 10 or
ll games every year, Snyder
employed crazed defensive coordina-
tors and defensive assistants who
transferred their emotion to the play-
ers. Meanwhile, Snyder worked the
offensive side of the ball and the
team overall with the precision of a
scientist. :

Emotion is best served to a foot-
ball team from the bottom. A head
coach functions best putting a lid on
emotion, rather than providing it.
When the ultimate leader lights the
flame, it’s easy for the fire to burn out
of control. Watching the Chargers
draw costly personal fouls against
the Patriots reminded me of Schot-
tenheimer’s last year in Kansas City,
and the lack of emotional discipline
that engulfed those 1998 Chiefs.

Bottom line: Teams coached by
Schottenheimer and Edwards are
prone to choke, especially on the
offensive side of the ball. That’s not a
product of poor personnel. It’s a
product of head coaches feeding their
teams too much emotion.

Edwards’ preacher routine works
great in the offseason, and it inspires
a team to never give up during the
regular season.

But when you need to win one
game, preaching and talking about it

NFC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

- Bears defense
ready to tackle
Surging Saints

i The Chicago Bears have held up pretty well since Mike
Brown and Tommie Harris went down with injuries, but
now the stakes are high as the New Orleans Saints come
to town with an offense that can strike early and often.
Whoever wins this battle advances to the Super Bowl.

BY DAVID J. NEAL
dneal@MiamiHerald.com
CHICAGO — Two of the
biggest locks in the NFL, fear-
some trademarks of their
team, now and in the past,
units on which you can safely
go from the bank to the
bookie, have been the India-
napolis Colts offense and the
Chicago Bears defense.
Although the Colts offense
hasn’t dazzled anybody in the
playoffs, accomplishing just
enough to win, the Bears
defense has done just enough

to get by while being more.

Teddy Bear than Butkus Bear
over the last month.

And now here come the
New Orleans Saints, marching
into Soldier Field on Sunday
with the No. 1 offense.

Oh, the Bears can pretend
that things haven’t been differ-
ent since All-Pro defensive
tackle Tommie Harris’ ham-
string went kablooey on Dec.
3. But since their second major
defensive injury loss of the
season — safety Mike Brown
went down with a torn foot
ligament during the Bears’
wild comeback victory against
the Arizona Cardinals on Oct.
16 — only the calls have been
the same.

“Our defense has stayed the
same,” Bears linebacker Brian
Urlacher said. “We have had
different guys in there who

have stepped up. You’re not
going to replace either of
those two players. They’re
great players.

“The pass rush hasn’t been

. the same because Tommie did

such a good job on the passing
game,” Urlacher said. “Our
run defense is still about the
same with the guys we have in
there, but you’re not going to
get a guy who can rush a
passer like that anywhere, I
don’t think.”

The raw numbers say the
Bears need to get it together.
Over the four regular-season
games and one playoff game
they have played since Harris’
injury, the Bears.have given up
23.0 offensive points and 359.2
yards per game. The 13 sacks
they have had in those. five
games suggests that the pass
rush hasn’t been kneecapped
by Harris’ loss, but opposing
teams have had time to go
long. ;

Opposing running backs
have run for 471 yards on 117
carries. That 4.02 yards per

carry would be fine in other

places.

By Chicago standards, that
is permissive almost to the
point of unseemly. ,

None of those five oppos-
ing offenses — Detroit, St.
Louis, Seattle and Green Bay

and Tampa Bay — will be con-

fused with, say, the Saints.

SUPER BOWL XXV

GIANTS 20, BILLS 19

e Jan. 27,1991
e Tampa Stadium

e MVP: RB Ottis Anderson, Giants

With the United States less than two weeks
into Operation Desert Storm in the Persian Gulf
War, questions swirled about whether Super

Bowl XXV would be played.

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI

But President George H.W. Bush decided
that the game must go on as scheduled, saying:
“lam not going to be held a captive in the White House by
Saddam Hussein of Iraq. We’re going about our business, and the

world goes on.”

Reminders of the war were seen throughout the telecast.
Whitney Houston's rendition of the national anthem drew
rousing ovations, as fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A!” while images

The wild, weird,
wacky and
wondrous of past |
Super Bowls

r SUPER
renin
reyes





doesn’t get the job done alone.

JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

BRING IT ON: All-Pro linebacker Brian Urlacher and the Bears defense came through in crunch time last weekend
against the Seahawks. How they stand up to Drew Brees and the Saints might determine a trip to the Super Bowl.

Last Sunday, the Seattle
Seahawks had the Bears on the
run for the first three quarters
of the game. When the Sea-
hawks ran between the tack-
les, whether on a draw or a
power run, they exploited the
same vulnerability in the Chi-
cago defense that lesser teams,
such as the Miami Dolphins
and even. the San Francisco
49ers, exposed. The Seahawks
also were able to get the ball
downfield.

“We pressed a little bit,”
Bears defensive coordinator
Ron Rivera said. “I think the
guys were trying to make
plays. We weren’t as disci-

the stadium.



plined as we needed to be.

“A couple of times, they got
us when we were out of posi-
tion. You talk to the guys, and
they say, ‘Well, I saw this.’ In
this defense, you can’t go on ‘I
saw.’ You’ve got to play your
keys, play [your] responsibil-
ity.” «~

But, Rivera said, that’s
probably not what Bears line-
backer Lance Briggs did when
he destroyed the Seahawks’
fourth-and-1 play (with help
from a juggled snap) from the
Chicago 44 with 1:59 left to
play and the game tied at 24.
Briggs shot the gap and upset

- Seahawks running back Shawn

of American troops flashed on large screens in

ABC News received special permission from
the NFL to lengthen the time between quarters
so it could broadcast news updates.

The halftime show was tape-delayed and
replaced with a 15-minute report from ABC
anchor Peter Jennings.

The specter of war was inescapable. Planes
and blimps were forbidden to fly over the
stadium; military helicopters hovered; fans were
subjected to searches and metal detectors; and

the police were in full force, with dogs and

SWAT teams.

The Giants held on for the one-point victory when Bills kicker
Scott Norwood missed a 47-yard field-goal attempt with
8 seconds left. Afterward, Super Bowl MVP Ottis Anderson
acknowledged the war before addressing the media by saying,
“I’m dedicating this one to our troops.”

- SARAH ROTHSCHILD

, 16 DAYS TO GO

Alexander for a 2-yard loss.

“J think Lance was guessing
on that play and using that
[Junior] Seau technique,”
Rivera said loudly over media
shoulders as Briggs walked by.

Briggs, returning Rivera’s
grin, replied with something
along the lines of success
determining how good the
technique was.

Asked what the “Seau tech-
nique” is, Rivera said, “Guess-
ing. Guessing to try to make
the play. We give the guys a
hard time about that.”

That was one of several
important fourth-quarter plays
that got the Bears through a

hard afternoon. Ricky Man-
ning had an interception of an
ill-advised Matt Hasselbeck
pass. The secondary produced
a coverage sack by Tank John-
son as the Seahawks moved
into field-goal range in the
final seconds of regulation,
and the Bears won 27-24 in
overtime.

“We put ourselves in a
tough position, and we had to
respond,” Rivera said, “But
guys did come up with big
plays.”

Just as they have done over
the past month. Or did we not
mention that the Bears are 4-1
in this stretch?

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM ® ON TV: CBS



a
GETTY IMAGES







of | FRIDAY, JANUARY 19,2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _—DIV
Atlanta 26 15 6 2 60151 149 12-6-3-1 14-9-3-1 —12-4-4-1
Carolina 25 19° 2 3 55 148 149 13-8-0-2 12-11-21 —12-4-0-1
Tampa Bay 25 22 1 1 52155 153 12-12-0-0 13-10-1-1 —10-7-0-0 al ‘ 3
Wetman’ onus. By araae ek eto vedios era” 1 > emntlan etal Vins ochuces =
Florida 17 22 4 6 44139 160 12-9-2-1 5-13-2-5 —-3-11-2-0 OTTAWA — Roberto Luongo made 34
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY Vv saves in goal, Rory Fitzpatrick scored his
‘i s me =o a Eee aa Pa hey Ct a eiaaeeciearneenti agree first goal of the season, and the Vancou-
New Jersey 28 14 0 5 61122 108 16-4-0-4 12-10-0-1 11-4-0-1 Cc ike Baacthe OF Sooo os
N.Y. Rangers 23 20 3 1 50139 144 10-9-3-0 13-11-0-1 —8-9-0-0 ver Canucks beat the Ottawa senators 2-
N.Y. Islanders 22 21 2 2 48137 136 11-9-2-1 11-12-0-1 —_9-7-2-0 on Thursday night.
Pittsburgh «20:17, 3 5S 4B 143 1461822 9-9-1-3 13-5-1-1 Taylor Pyatt had a goal and an assist
Philadelphia 11 31 2 2 26111 178 3-14-2-2 8-17-0-0 —-3-12-0-2 for Vaheouver, which won ite third wame
NORTHEAST WL OL SL a GA HOME — AWAY sD in a row and ended Ottawa’s season-high,
“Buffalo 32 W222 «68178 136 1S-7-1-1)17-4-1-1— 9-711 five-game winning streak.
vee. Montreal 26 17 1 4 57 142 137 = 14-7-0-3 12-10-1-1 8-5-0-4 Luongo, who stopped 30 shots Tues-
“= Ottawa 27 20 2 0 56168 138 13-11-1-0 14-9-1-0 - 11-7-0-0 ‘ “0 vi : . :
Toronto oe ao, 2A EDLY 1 IOI. “dole, gg ae | Gay ima 4-0 victory jn Montreal for his
Boston 22 19 1 3 48136 167 14-8-0-2 B-ll-1-1 10-8-0-1 third shutout of the season, had 10 saves

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Thursday’s results

Toronto 3, Florida 2
Montreal 4, Atlanta 1
Washington 5, Carolina 2
Islanders ‘4, Philadelphia 2

* Boston 5, Pittsburgh 4 (SO)
Vancouver 2, Ottawa 1



Nashville 4, Columbus 0
Anaheim at Edmonton, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
St. Louis at L.A., late



Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 2 (SO)






Tonight’s games

Detroit at Columbus, 7
Vancouver at Butfalo, 8
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30
Anaheim at Calgary, 9

NHL LEADERS







Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Buffalo 6, Boston 3
Detroit 5, Nashville 3
Dallas 4, Calgary 2
Colorado 4, Phoenix 3









HOCKEY



THURSDAY’S NHL GAMES





Canucks hold off Senators

in the first period and 11 in the second
before Daniel Alfredsson scored 8:13 into
the third to pull the Senators within one.

Luongo’s shutout streak ended at 154
minutes, 42 seconds. He had not surren-

Coming off two shutouts in a row, the
Canadiens won for just the fifth time in
14 games, taking control in the second
period after two Thashers players were
sent to the pénalty box.

Garnet Exelby was called for holding,
and Shane Hnidy went off for delay of
game after the officials ruled that he
intentionally flipped the puck over the
glass. The Canadiens seized their chance,
scoring twice in 46 seconds for a 3-1 lead.

CAPITALS 5, HURRICANES 2

RALEIGH, N.C. — Alexander Semin
and Chris Clark scored two goals, leading
the Capitals to victory.

The Capitals snapped a six-game road

Erik Cole also scored for Carolina, and
John Grahame stopped 25 shots.

ISLANDERS 4, FLYERS 2

PHILADELPHIA — Mike Sillinger and
Andy Hilbert scored 1:18 apart early in the
third period, and the Islanders snapped a
three-game losing streak and handed the
Flyers their seventh consecutive loss.

Randy Robitaille and Jason Blake also
scored for the Islanders,

Randy Jones and Simon Gagne scored
goals for the Flyers, and Peter Forsberg
had his 600th career assist.

LIGHTNING 3, DEVILS 2 (SO)
EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ. — Brad



CENTRAL =oW L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY dered a goal since Saturday, when Bates
Nashville 33 12 2 1 69167 122 17-3-2-1 16-9-0-0 Battaglia scored 13:31 into the first period
Detroit 30 12 2 3 65147 112 17-3-1-2 13-9-1-1 he Canucks’ 6-1 victory in Toronto.
St. Louis 17 21. 4 4 42119 146 9-11-2-1- 8-10-2-3 of s ks failed io gran
Chicago 17 22.2 5 41116 141 10-11-1-2 © 7-11-1-3 e Canucks falled to get a shot on
Columbus 17°25 2 3 39117 148. 9-10-1-2 8-15-1-1 Ray Emery in the third period and were
NORTHWEST WL OL TS GF GA HOME — AWAY DIV outshot a> 14 overall.
ancouver -8-0- -11-0- -110-0- . 1. c :
Calgary 24 17 2 2 52140 119 18-5-0-0 6-12-2-2 9-5-1-1 previous 12 games (10-1-1), fell to third
Minnesota 24 20 0 3 51132 126 17-5-0-2 -7-15-0-1 ~—7-6-0-2 place in the Northeast Division, one point
Colorado 23 20 2 1 49145 135 12-10-1-1 11-10-10 —9-5-1-0 behind Montreal. TOM HANSON/AP
Edmonton 22 20 2 2 48127 133 13-B-1-1 9-12-1-1 8-9-1-0 PUCK DENIED: Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo deflects a shot by the Senators
PACIFIC w Lo CANADIENS 4, THRASHERS 1 during the second period Thursday. Luongo stopped 34 shots in a 2-1 victory.
Anaheim 30 10 2— 0-1 ATLANTA — Montreal broke out of
San Jose 31 15 0 0. 62 144 107 15-7-0-0 — 10-8-0-0 its scoring slump, finding the net forthe and Alex Ovechkin scored empty-netters and Patrik Elias in the shootout.
ne | “ i ; os = eae ee first time in three games, and All-Star in the final minute to ice the game for the Jay Pandolfo and Paul Martin scored in
tos annelés. -<16.126. 2° 3038 438-178 5-16-0-0 6-13-0-2 Cristobal Huet made 44 saves. Capitals. regulation for the Devils.

PREDATORS 4, BLUE JACKETS O

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Chris Mason
made 33 saves for a career-high and fran-
chise-record fifth shutout this season, and
David Legwand and Paul Kariya each had
a goal and an assist for the Predators.

Steve Sullivan and Martin 'Erat also
scored for Nashville.

MAPLE LEAFS 3, PANTHERS 2

SUNRISE, Fla. — Andrew Raycroft
stopped 39 shots, and Boyd Devereaux,
Chad Kilger and John Pohl scored goals
for the Leafs.

Gregory Campbell and Ville Peltonen
scored for Florida.

SCORING GOALIES losing streak, avoiding their longest such Richards scored both goals in regulation
Through Wednesday Through Wednesday | ° streak since the 1975-76 season. and had the only tally in the shootout, BRUINS 5, PENGUINS 4 (SO)
Player, team GP G A Pts __ Player, team GP MIN GA AVG | Olaf Kolzig had 34 ie for i ope winning it for the Lightning. \ BOSTON — Phil Kessel scored the
__ Crosby, Pit 41 23 45 68 Caron,CH-ANA = 2 88 «= 2:1.36 =| += career victory, tying Gilles Me oche for Johan Holmavist was steady through- game-winner in the shootout, and Marc
st tous, TB 29 4 8” ea " ae ae 200 | 30th place on ae all-time list. “See out for the Lightains making 23 saved in gevaid had agoal’and two assists.
noo ee eae ee caine qe lfe™ Saas After Eric Staal pulled the Hurricanes regulation, and one more in overtime Glén Murray, Brad Stuart and Marco |
Hossa, Atl 48 29 32 61. Toskala, S.l->, 2% 1811 87226 | to 3-2 at 12:07 of the thind period, Glark before denying Zach Parise, Brian Gionta Sturm also scored for Boston. ©



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SPECIAL FOCUS

ALI

at65

His voice is muted, but his mind is ©



still sharp and clear. Boxing great
Muhammad Ali isn’t the man he
once was, but he’s still a fighter

BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

he images are unsettling at
aL best, upsetting at worst. The

world, after all, remembers
what he once was.

Muhammad Ali trembles and has
to be wheeled to a ringside spot ta
watch his daughter fight in New
York. A frail Ali needs to be sup-
ported by basketball player Dwyane
Wade at the Orange Bow] in Miami.

The voice that once bellowed that
he was “The Greatest” is but a whis-
per now, and he communicates’
mostly with facial expressions.

Ali’s body is ravaged by Parkin-
son’s disease and the effects of recent
spinal surgery. He tires easily. His
mind, though, remains sharp and
clear, and his passion for people
hasn’t faded with age.

Ali turned 65 on Wednesday. The
heavyweight champion who shocked
the world is a senior citizen now, eli-
gible to collect Social Security.

Like many other retirees, he has
moved from Michigan to the desert
to be out of the cold.

Visitors to the home in a gated
area of Scottsdale, Ariz., that Ali
shares with his fourth wife, Lonnie,
often find him absorbed in the past,
watching films of his fights and docu-
mentaries about his life — and Elvis
Presley movies.

Even more, he loves to watch him-
self talk.

“Muhammad is a little sentimen-
tal. He likes looking at older things.
He likes watching some of the inter-
views and saying some of the crazy
outrageous things he used to say,”
Lonnie Ali says. “Sometimes I think

- he looks at it and says, ‘Is that me?
Did I really say those things?’ ”

Those were the days when Ali still
floated like a butterfly and stung like
a bee, when he added to his legend by
defying the odds to beat George
Foreman in Zaire and Joe Frazier in
the Philippines.

“Rumble, young man, rumble!”
cornerman Bundini Brown would
yell to him.

That young man’s face is now dis-
torted by Parkinson’s, making him
look far older than he is. Now,
instead of the “Ali Shuffle” that once
dazzled the boxing world, he is
reduced to sometimes using a walker,
the result of surgery to help correct
spinal stenosis, the narrowing of the
spinal canal that causes compression

‘of the nerve roots.

Some days are better than others.
Ali reads fan mail every now and
then, and he painstakingly signs auto-
graphs with his trembling hand.
Sometimes, mostly in the morning
before his medication kicks in, his
family can understand every word he
says.

“We give him enough meds to
make his day go well enough, but not
enough to make him look absolutely
normal,” Lonnie Ali says. “He would
look better if we did, but we don’t
want to. We don’t want him on too
many medications.”

His birthday would pass with calls
from his nine children and other rela-
tives. Ali’s only request to mark the
occasion was a trip to one of his
favorite magic shops so he could pick
up a new trick or two to show visi-
tors.

One of his daughters, Hana, says
no one should feel sorry for him.

“People naturally are going to be
sad to see the effects of his disease,”
she says. “But if they could really see
him in the calm of his everyday life,
they would not be sorry for him. He’s
at complete peace, and he’s here
learning a greater lesson.”

The man who made headlines and
countless television highlights with

ess can’t really talk about himself
anymore. But others can:

THE DAUGHTER

Hana Ali listens often to the tapes,
the ones her father made as an audio
diary in 1979 when she and her sister
Laila were little girls. On them, Ali’s
voice is strong, his opinions certain.

“This is Muhammad Ali making a
tape for future reference, explaining
what’s going on in the world,” it
begins.

Ali talks about his efforts to medi-
ate the Iranian hostage crisis and

' meeting kings from different nations.

He gives his thoughts on war and
peace, and he has a talk with George
Foreman on God and religion.

“Sometimes I have to stop listen-
ing because I get in this time-warp
thing,” Hana says. “It’s all him, in his
own words.”

Of all his children, Hana might be
the closest to her dad. She wants to
take nursing courses so she can help
care for him.

“He needs people like we need the
air to breathe,” she says. “He knows
how great he is, but, at the same time,
he’s very humble. He’s shocked to
see how people still love him and
remember him. You see his eyes light
up, and it takes him back a moment
when they chant ‘Ali! Ali! It’s like
charging a battery up.”

Some days, Hana says, her father
has more energy than others. Some
days, he’s able totalk. .

No one knows why. It just hap-
pens.

“Every now and then you catch
yourself feeling bad,” she says. “But
he’s here, and he has a healthy, strong
spirit and soul and mind, and that’s
what is important.

“He always says he’s lived the life
of 100 men. He got to see the world

‘and do all these things.

“He has no regrets.”

THE INNER CIRCLE —

Gene Kilroy traveled the world at
Ali’s side. His official title was busi-
ness manager, but Kilroy was known
to most as the man who got things
done.

He sheltered Ali from anyone try-
ing to make a quick buck off him, and
he took care of the people around
him. For years, Kilroy was the lone
white man in the champ’s entourage.

“I consider myself one of the luck- -
iest guys in the world, just to call him

my friend,” Kilroy says. “If I was to
die today and go to heaven, it would
be a step down. My heaven was being
with Ali.”

On the walls of Kilroy’s office at
the Luxor hotel-casino in Las Vegas
are pictures of him and Ali taken
around the world. Kilroy tells stories
easily — such as the time he and Ali
landed in the early-morning darkness
in Zaire for Ali’s fight with Foreman,
only to find several thousand people
waiting.

Ali turned to Kilroy and asked him
who the people of Zaire hated most.

“I told him white people. He said,
‘I can’t tell them George Foreman is
white,’ ” Kilroy says. “Then I said,
‘They don’t like the Belgians, who
used to rule Zaire.’ ”

Ali stepped out on the tarmac,
called for quiet and yelled:

“George Foreman’s a Belgian!”

The crowd erupted, chanting “Ali,
boma ye! Ali, boma ye!” Translation:
“ Ali, kill him.”

Kilroy worries about his old
friend. He frets about his health, and
he believes Ali shouldn’t travel so
much. Kilroy cried the last time he
saw Ali, a year ago in Berlin.

“He had a belief, and a goal in his
life. He wanted to see freedom,
equality and justice for the black

BOXING

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 |7C’



BEBETO MATTHEWS/AP.

BATTERED, BUT NOT BEATEN: Muhammad Ali struggles with Parkinson’s disease and the effects of spinal

surgery, and the voice that once bellowed that he was
but he likes to watch films of his fights and documenta

“The artist Leroy Neiman said it
best: ‘Whoever touched Ali’s robe
was a better person for it.’ ”

THE OPPONENT

Larry Holmes was proudest of the
black eye.

He got it as an amateur the first
time he stepped into the ving for a
sparring session with Ali at his train-
ing cainp im Deer Lake, Pa.

“I didn’t want to put ice on it,”
Holmes says. “Having him give me a
black eye meant a lot to me.”

Holmes would later give Ali much
worse. The two met ou Oct. 2, 1980,
at Caesars Palace, with Ali lured out
of retirement to tight a former spar-
ring partner who had become the |
heavyweight champion of the world.

Ali had given Holmes his first
chance in boxing, but Holmes had a
job to do against the aging former
champion, who grew a mustache
before the tight and presented him-
self as “Dark Gable.”

The fight was lopsided from the
opening bell. Holmes was young, fast
and strong: Ali was a shell of himself
and took a beating until he finally
quit on his stool after the 10th round.

“He was like a little baby after the
first round,” Holmes says. “I was
throwing punches and missing just
for the hell of it. I kept saying, ‘Ali,
why are you taking this?’

“He said, ‘Shut up and fight — I’m
going to knock you out.’ ”

When the fight was over, Holmes
and his wife went upstairs to pay
their respects to Ali. In a darkened
room, Holmes told Ali that he loved
him.

“Then why did you whip my ass
like that?” Ali replied.

' Holmes hasn’t seen Ali recently,
but he says he heard thai the tormer
champ was down to 185 pounds.

“I can’t just say Ali was the great-
est, because there were so many
great fighters out there. 1 can’t say he

‘was greater than Marciano, Louis,

Dempsey and everyone else,”
Holmes says. ;

“A lot of it today is that people feel
sorry tor him because he’s got that
Parkinson’s or whatever is wrong
with him. They feel he doesn’t have
too much longer to live, and they
want to be part of the legeud.

THE PROMOTERS

Bob Arum wonders if it was some-
how partly his fault. A lot of the
punches Ali took came on his watch.

Ali had 61 professional fights, win-
ning 56 Arum started with him in

against George Chuvalo in Toronto.
Twelve years later, Arum promoted
his 25th and final Ali fight — his sec-
ond against Leon Spinks, this one at

the Superdome in New Orleans.

“T feel terrible about what hap-
pened because for better or worse I
played a part in it,” Arum says. “Not
that it wouldn’t have happened if
somebody else was involved. But I
feel I played a part in his physical
decline.” x

Arum says the first indication he
had that Ali might have taken too
many punches came after his third
fight with Ken Norton.

“T tried to talk Ali into not fighting,
but there were so uiany people
dependent on the jobs and every-
thing,” Arum says. “That’s one of the
reasons why I made the fight with
Leon Spinks, because it was an easy
tight.”

Arum’s wife, Lovee, and Lonnie
Ali still talk often on the phone. He
sees Ali on occasion, and each time
he feels conflicted.

“Here was a guy who my memo-
ries of him were larger than life. He
was full of life, like nobody I’ve ever
seen in my life,” Arum says. “Now to
see what is essentially a shell of what
was is hard. Every time I see him I’m
glad to see him, but I feel terrible.”

Don King also sees Ali occasion-
ally. Ali was so big that he started the
careers of both of boxing’s biggest
promoters.

“The man had magnetism. He
exuded charm and magnetism,” King
says. “He also stood for something.
He stood up for the rights of black
people and himself in a time when it
wasn’t commonplace.”

In typical King fashion, he even
coined a phrase for Ali that he recites
to this day: :

“Every knee must bend, every
head must bow, and every tongue
must confess thou are the greatest of
all time.”

THE FAN

Musician and actor Kris Kristof-
fersop and his band were touring the
United States when they stopped by
to see Ali training in the Pocono
Mountains, in Pennsylvania, for his
last big fight with Holmes.

It wasn’t long before Kristoffer-
son’s tour bus was headed back down
the highway, Ali at the wheel.

It there was anything Ali loved
better than boxing, it was driving a
bus.

“He drove the bus, and then he did
magic tricks, which he also loved,”

‘The Greatest’ is a whisper now. Ali tires easily,
ries about his life - and Elvis Presley movies.

old daughter on the bus, and she was
entertained quite a bit. He went all
the way to Buffalo with us, and then
he had a limo take him back.”
Kristofferson first saw Ali in
Rome at the 1960 Olympics. He later
became his close friend — and one of
his biggest fans. :
The two even starred ina televi-
sion movie together, with Kristoffer-

‘ son playing a plantation owner and

Ali an emancipated slave in 1979’s
Freedom Road. :

Kristofferson lives in Hawaii and
doesn’t see Ali much these days, but
he thinks a lot about his old friend.

“He'll be remembered more than
any other great athlete because of his
humanitarian work and the courage
he showed in-his life,” Kristofferson
says.

“He’s probably the most remark-
able person I ever met on the planet.
He’s an amazing human being.”

THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Howard Bingham had no idea that
his life would change that day in 1962
when he went to take pictures of a
young fighter at a Los Angeles news
conference.

“My assignment that day was to
cover this big loudmouth coming into
town,” says Bingham, who took pho-
tos for a black weekly newspaper. “I
had never really heard of him.”

Turns out, Bingham was photo-
graphing a young Cassius Clay. For
the next few days, he squired Clay
around town, showing him the sights.

He has been with Ali ever since,
and calls he him his best friend.

“I’ve had the opportunity to meet
and greet kings and queens. And
kings and queens have had the
opportunity to meet me, too,” Bing-
ham says. “It’s been wonderful.”

Bingham doesn’t know how many
pictures he has taken of Ali over the
years; he estimates that it is in the
millions. It’s been a great ride, but he
has some regrets.

“I wish I would have known the
Cassius Clay that I met was going to
become the Muhammad Ali of
today,’ Bingham says. “I would have
archived the pictures better, written
notes, done a lot of things differ-
ently.”

Bingham still travels with Ali and
talks to him regularly on the phone.
They talk about the past, how things.
once were. ,

They both were young men then.
And they remember better times.

“I can’t believe that [he’s 65],”
Bingham says.

his predictions and his boxing prow- man,” Kilroy says. March 1966, promoting his fight Kristofferson says. “I had my 6-year- “Tt just doesn’t seem real.”



THE TRIBUNE

COMICS PAGE







































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HAVE To GET














ARE YOU SURE
YOU'LL BE SAFE
ALL ALONE IN |
THAT BIG, EMPTY. THERE.
BUILDING ?

T/M GLAD YOURE “BUT ALAN'S
EXCITED ABOUT \ STUDIO 13 WAY
YOUR PAINTINGS, ACROSS TOWN.










A CHAUFFEUR,



“IM FEEDIN’ HIM CAT FOOP TO SEE IF
J CAN GET HIM To MEOw."”



(© 1990 Universal Press Syndicate









BLONDIE

OTWIE'S STILL UPSET THAT I
LONG TO PUT UP OUR
> = CHRISTMAS

LIGHTS



Sa

Pop Goes the Weasel

SEE? YOU'RE
BOTH MISSING |
THE WHOLE

YOU'D THINK I'D GET A LITTLE
CREDIT FOR AT LEAST GETTING
ehh i



MARVIN

Dhar by -howty Aipadgs Wsigmin pe Notts pale sated,

NON SEQUITU

\ DON'T KNoW IF A pucks
QUACK ECHOES OR NoT,
BUT \F YOU WANT To
SP THINKING ABOUT IT,
JUST REPLACE IT WITH

“WHAT GOES TOWN
MUST COME UP



ACROSS

following up? (5)

Train, oddly enough (5)

Brown boy in junior fiction (7)
Performing dingo, possibly? (5)
Form of spire seen at seaside
places (5) .
Ituminsted about half a mile,

no more (5)

Figures to include a trio in acid
criticiem (7)

An investigator in state crimes (3)
A cross Is just one line! (4)

She makes an airman

madi (6)

Be all wrong as a tag (5)

Bend 8 blown fuse to the right angle
and t's OKI (6)

Harmless way to

get at me (4)

Horrendous fate? (3)

To be any different, you need to get
something feed (7)

Piles of sales talk? (5)

Possibly backward
performances? (5)

Short drink one shouldn't

take (5)

Be a winner, If you follow (7)

of the way (5)
Obviously there's rum in it (5)

Yesterday's cryptic solutions

Say-80 37, Ge-t-up 38, Ewer-s

Fi-9 27, Napal 28, Erase 30, Venus 32,
Guar 33, Rat





Something significantly beastly worth

Polson that can make you move out -



1, Reo AneseMese ED,



YOU SAIP THAT

DID Xo) KNoW
NEST LIPSTICK
CONTAINS FISK



BACKWARPS



| | CRYPTIC PUZZLE - |

DOWN

2

A bh

on

BBR

ACROSS: 3, Block 8, Co.-MIC 10, RH-one 11, C-an 12,
Pad-ua 13, Buck-led 15, Ski-LL 18, Go-T 19, Stifle 21,
Uberty 22, T-W-in 23, Pond 24, Benefit 26, In-deed 29, Air
31, P-earl 32, S-me-ared 34, Alias (‘AKA) 35, Ton 36,

DOWN: 1, Locum 2, Pink gin.4, L-O-ad 5, C- 6, Khaki
7, Knell 9, Mac 12, Patered 14, Lob 16, Tht eae 19,
Streams 20, Strip 21, Linda 23, Pi-rated 24, Bel-l-ow 25,

The professional figures tobe
verbose (6)

Makers of proprietorial
confessions? (6)

Brighton's oil outfit (3)

Fail to get round the corner with the
threshing equipment (5)

Fine:a great deal of money (7)

Skip it to order (4)

She provides chaps with transport (6)
Whence there's not far to stagger
nome {5)

Not getting this for money, you finish
in depression! (5)

Fed up with the terrible dirt around
central Tottenham (5)

H's up to Nat, perhaps, to be a great
man (5) ;
Being junior, Charlie can

get a date (5)

In a meal, hundreds are for
decoration (5)

. For a posh politician in a terrible
slum, it's a lot of money (4,3)
Sleep soon changed to be a bit of a
daze (6)

Led excessively around town (6)

In a systematic way, It may be hot in
the Mediterranean (6)

Pleasant place to be stranded?’ (5)
Thus, again, It's only fair (2-2)

In some trouble, but satisfied (3)

Yesterday's easy solutions

38, Seeks






ACROSS: 3, Egret 8, Fatal 10, Douse 11, Fir 12, Habit 13,
Reciter 15, Taken 18, Cos 19, Polite 21, Monster 22, Suet
23, Here 24, Matures 26, Origin 29, Sir 31, Titan 32,
Legends 34, Lurid 35, Too 36, Cadet 37, Litre

T BELIEVE
ART SHOULD BE
SPONTANEOUS

POINT HERE!





TARTS NGRY

INTEREETING,

BRENOA...\WWREN
DID You REKR
ABOUT THAT?

WHAT GOES DOWN
MUST COME UP

_ =|
N wo








LIPSTICK





ACROS>

EASY PUZZLE

2888 Neues

DOWN: 1, Wafer 2, Haricot 4, Gear 5, Editor 6, Total 7,
Asset 9, Tic 12, Hessian 14, Ton 16, Kites 17,
Never 19, Perused 20, Ascot 21, Merit 23, Heretic 24,

| Minute 25, Rig 27, Rival 28, Gales 30, Adore 32, Link

1 33, Not

ASD A NPE EMA TR 2 AR POMP

Small mammal (5)
Supply (6)
Mechanic (7)
Cash (5)

Metal

fastener (5)

* Undress (5)

Donates (7)
Favourite (3)
Beers (4)
Uproar (6)
Relaxes (5)

Creepy-

crawly (6)
Nuisance (4)
Shelter (3)
Attaches (7)
Allude (5)
Asian
language (5)
Book of maps (5)
Merge (7)
Number (5)
Desiccated (5)









South dealér.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
Q86
Â¥Q94
5
AQI743
_ WEST -
41072
VI53
@A10743

#82
.. SOUTH
. @AK4
VAK7
QI86
81095
The bidding:
South West North East
INT Pass 3NT All Pass
Opening lead — four of diamonds.
There are plays that are difficult
for a declarer'to make because they
Tun completely contrary to standard
procedure. But bridge being the kind
of game it is, there is room for an
occasional deviation fromthe norm
— espécially. when logic: indicates
that the deviation has everything to
gain-and nothing to lose. .

EAST
@3953
710862
@K92
#K 6

~ = ‘Take this’case where West led the
‘four..of diamonds ‘against three

notrump, and East won with the
king. East returned the diamond
nine, covered by declarer with the

TODAY'S TARGET
Solution Monday.

Type of seed (6)
Eastern

Europeans (5)
Cereal crop (4)
Alo (9)

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

abate abet ablate able abler albeit arable bail
bait bale baler ball ballet bare bate bear beat
bell belt: beta bier BILATERAL bile bill billet
bite biter blare bleat brae braille brat label
labial labile liable libel liberal ratable tabla
table triable tribal -tribe

queen, whereupon West made the

- eminently correct play of the three.

West’s only hope was that East
would later gain the lead and return a
third diamond before declarer could
score nine tricks. East’s return of the
nine indicated he did not have four
diamonds originally, as in that case
he would have returned his original
fourth-best diamond. Declarer’s
most likely diamond holding, there-
fore, was Q-J-x-x.

Lacking a ninth trick, South now
tried a club finesse. East won with
the king and returned a diamond, and

- the contract went down one.

The excellent defense notwith-
standing, declarer did himself in at
trick two when he covered East’s
nine of diamonds with the queen.
Instead, he should have played his
eight. on the nine! This maneuver
would have thoroughly discombobu-
lated the defense. Another diamond
lead by East would have given the
defenders their third trick, and East’s
king of clubs would subsequently
have scored their final trick.

_ From declarer’s viewpoint, the
diamond duck at trick two guaran-
tees three notrump regardless of.
whether West started with four, five
or six diamonds. The hard part is to
think of it before the queen or jack
pops out of declarer’s hand.

Clas

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe
-permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkjet in inkjet printer).



Good. 17; very good 25; excellent 34 (or more).

ECR
omac
IN| TH]

Simon Williams v Florian Jenni,
European Club Cup, Fuegen
2006. Books tell you that bishop
and knight have equal value,
but the pawn formation can
change the verdict. An open
board with few or unbalanced
pawns favours the bishop's
long-range attacks, while

when there are no passed
pawns and locked positions the
knight usually dominates. tt gets
worse If, as here, the bishop is
restricted by its own pawns. So
you would expect a White
advantage, but England
Intemational Williams had
foreseen more. His next three-
move sequence demonstrated
that Black's game is actually
hopeless. What were the moves
(fairly easy) and why did Black
then resign (harder)?





FRIDAY, a
JANUARY 19 >

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
You're feeling very energetic, but
pretty soon you’ll be a romance mag-
net. Expect romantic interests to be+
drawn. to you like they never have*. °
been before. What a rush. *,
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
You’ve been involved in an activity: °
that you’d hoped the public wouldn’t’
discover. Trouble is, the truth always
has a way of leaking out. Deal with
the consequences.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Someone has had their e605 6 yoo
and is ready to reveal wiry. iy you're
attached, graciously avoid fhe issue.,'
If you’re single, enjoy the newe‘
adventure that can ensue.
CANCER - Jun 22/jui 22
You've been flirting »ith someone
but have felt naughty doing so
Unless on of you are attached, .
there’s no reason not to make a bold
move toward creating a relationship.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Now’s your chance to learn about
something you’ve always been inter-
ésted in, Leo. Get a friend to join in
your quest. It will be that much more .
fun if you do it as a couple.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

It’s time for you to destress in a

major way. Wind all things down, «
put a halt to projects and clear up *
your calendar. Summon one last

4} blast of willpower to do so.

LIBRA —-Sept 23/Oct 23

If you’ve been seeing someone casu-
ally, expect that this person will want
more than just a passing thing.
You're irresistible and can’t help it.
Think about what you want to do.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
It’s time to put an end to a relation-*
ship that has been particularly trou-*
blesome, Scorpio. You know what
you have to do, so get with it. It will

be less painful that way.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Opportunities for romance are
everywhere, even in a long-stand- ,
ing relationship, Sagittarius, «
Employ your best romantic tech. *
niques for a week of fun. =
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20,
Security issues are paramount thiss
week, Capricorn. Lock your doors*
and double-check your windows:
You don’t want a stranger lurking:
in your path — it spells trouble.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
You are raring. to go this week, »
Aquarius, but it’s best to keep one -
foot on the brake as well. Loved-,
ones can’t keep up with your energy * ,
level and are surprised as well. “y
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
It’s time to have that talk you've .
been putting off, Pisces. Gather
some energy and put your thoughts
together before you begin -

eS ECCT

LEONARD BARDEN



901 VINE

â„¢
Chess solution 8282: 1 NfS Bd8 2 Rxe8 Rxe8 3 Rel!
Resigns. If Be7 4 Rel wins the bishop.tf Kg8 4 Rc8 Kf8
5 Nxd6 wins. Ifh5 (best) 4 Rc8 Kh7 5 Nxd6 Rg8 6 NIT
Be7 7Rxg8 Kxg8 8 Nh6+ and 9 Nf when White soon

wins a second pawn.

Mensa quiz. a) Sorbet and strobe b) Farmed and

framed c) Curled and curdle.

One possible word ladder solution ts: TOU), boot |

bolt, belt, beet, beef, BEEP.





TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAG








- SPORTS



@ KINGSWAY Academy Saints’
guard Kentonya Miller goes up for
| an uncontested fast-break lay-up
| against the St, Andrew's Hurri
| canes ina BAISS senior girls bas-
| ketball game yesterday at
Kingsway.

e SEE PAGE ONE










(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)







@ STLANDREW’S Asie: Biss
holds onto the ball. as Kingsway

> Sans
t through the

















Whee ee.



THE TRIBUNE





te =




FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Lut



Petite



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Forty per cent highe
building costs damag
first ‘anchor’ hotel

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

igh costs could
\ “kill the goose
that laid the
golden egg” of
the Bahamas’
first Family Island ‘anchor
resort’. project in Exuma, the
Ministry of Tourism’s deputy

High operating costs, worker turnover
and rental rates leave Emerald Bay
suffering, placing ‘anchor property’

model’s sustainability in question

y Freeport Concrete

to assess demands

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s
Board of Directors will meet
shortly to discuss whether - and
how - the company will receive

- new equity capital to carry it
- through its current balance

sheet problems, The Tribune
was told yesterday, with its
chief executive forecasting it
will generate “a small profit”
for fiscal 2007.

Ray Simpson said. the com-
pany was meeting all opera-

’ director-general warned yes-

terday, with the unprofitable
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
property needing to become a
sustainable resort.

David Johnson, deputy
director-general in the Min-
istry of Tourism with respon-
sibility for planning, invest-
ment and business develop-

-ment, said factors such as

building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had



@ DAVID JOHNSON
(FILE photo)

growth and kept it from reach-
ing the development its owners
had previously predicted.

Mr Johnson said of Emer-
ald Bay: “The property was

conceived to be a mixed-use
project, with 185 keys under
the Four Seasons brand. The
vast majority of the property
was to be for mixed-use, con-
dos and hundreds of lots sold

- for significant family homes.

“After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory,

_ There’s been a lot of trading

of the land by the owners, but
the cost of building is prohibi-
tive.

“The buildings costs, the

numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per
square foot to build.”

Mr Johnson explained that
due to Four Seasons’ reputa-
tion and marketing position-
ing at the five-star, luxury end
of the market, properties con-
structed there would be similar
to those built on Kerzner Inter-
national’s Ocean Club Estates
on Paradise Island,

SEE page 9B

tional expenses and funding
repayments of its $1.492 mil-
lion bank overdraft and
$440,453 in long-term debt
from cash flows generated by
sales at the Home Centre
Superstore and its concrete
plant.

He explained, though, that
Freeport Concrete needed
more working capital to fund
inventory purchases, ensuring
that the Home Centre could
meet consumer and Port
Authority licencee demands

retarded Emerald Bay’s

Cruise lines may take port stakes

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor =
THE Government has “successfully con-
cluded negotiations” with the major cruise

lines on a new Cruise Incentive Act, with -

the Bahamas seeking to have the likes of
Carnival and Royal Caribbean Cruise
Lines take “a direct financial interest in the
major ports in Nassau and Grand
Bahama”.

David Johnson, deputy director-gener-
al in the Ministry of Tourism with respon-
sibility for planning, investment and busi-
ness development, said the Government
was “just concluding negotiations with a
major cruise line” on a new incentive

Government in process of ‘concluding’ new incentive agreements

agreement.

The two parties were now in the process
of “formalising the new agreement to give
us something going forward for the next
three years”.

The Bahamas, Mr Johnson said, had

“successfully concluded negotiations” with
the major operators, Carnival and Royal
Caribbean, and was now likely fo engage
the other lines, such as Disney and Nor-
wegian Cruise Lines, in talks on an incen-
tive programme for them during the first
quarter.

The new agreements would replace the
old Cruise Overnight Incentive Act, which
expired in 2003. The cruise lines and the

Bahamas have continued operating as if

that agreement was in force over the.past
three years, and it is understood that this
nation’s failure to agree a new incentive
package has caused some frustrations
among the cruise industry.

Mr Johnson said the new agreements '

SEE page 6B

as individual as you?

Reality Check.
With BahamaHealth you can.
We've got health plans with flexible
options that suit your individual needs.
\l for information on individual
d group coverage,
yn to www.familyguardian.com today!

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FAMILY
IARDIAN

INSURANCE
c 0 AN Y



for its products,

The Home Centre had gen-
erated $4 million in sales in the
first four months since it
opened at its new Atlantic Dri-
ve site on September 6, 2006.
Mr Simpson explained that
with more capital, the country
would be able to purchase
more inventory and increase
sales.

“Our Board has to meet on
it,” Mr Simpson said of the
need for more equity capital.
“T have to sit down with them
and work out the right amount
of capital we need, and make
sure we get it right.

“I would like more capital
because we want more inven-
tory. Our inventory in the store
is right, and bringing in more
of the products that are work-
ing will generate more sales.

Freeport Concrete reported
a $1.993 million loss for the

© for extra capital

Company likely

to make $150,000-
$200,000 Q1 loss,
break even in Q2
and be profitable
for full year, as
Home Centre sees
$4m in sales in.
first four months

year to August 31, 2006, and
saw its auditors provide ‘a
going concern’ warning
because current liabilities
exceeded current assets by just
over $1 million at the balance
sheet date.

This solvency situation has
created the need for Freeport
Concrete to receive more cap-
ital, Among the options open
to it are a rights issue to exist-
ing shareholders, and several
analysts have told The Tribune
that they would like to see its

largest shareholder, chairman

Hannes Babak, step up and
show his long-term commit-
ment to the company through
some form of capital injection.

Mr Simpson said Freeport
Concrete’s 2007 first quarter
results will be published next

ek, adding that the concrete

t was profitable“although

company would still incur

an overall loss due to continu-

ing costs associated with the

Home Centre Superstore tran-
sition. /

The Freeport Concrete chief
executive acknowledged that
“the company will report a loss
in the first quarter”, which cov-

_SEE page 7B

‘Anchor projects
do not have to be
billion-dollar hotels’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ANCHOR properties do not
need to be billion-dollar, mul-
ti-room resorts to achieve their
desired economic impact on

Family Islands, the Ministry of

Tourism’s deputy director-gen-
eral said yesterday, pointing
out that a 13-room property in
South Andros was sustaining
the surrounding community,

David Johnson told The Tri-
bune that the term ‘anchor
project’ was “misunderstood”.
‘He explained: “You can have
different interpretations of

‘anchor’. It has less to do with
size and more to do with func-
tion.”

He added that the Tiamo
Resort in south Andros, near
Mangrove Cay, was a prime
example of how a small, niche
boutique resort could fulfil the
role of an anchor property in
the Family Islands.

The resort, he said, had just
13 rooms but employed a staff
of 35 and had an annual pay-
roll of $2 million that was
largely spent in the local com-
munity.

“Almost everyone in that
community gets some benefit
from it,” Mr Johnson pointed
out, It’s an anchor for South
Andros, It’s not causing a
demand on its infrastructure.”

The Government’s strategy
of trying to secure an ‘anchor
project’ for each Family Island

_ has come under increased

ys

scrutiny, particularly when it
comes to the ability of local
communities in these islands
to sustain them through the
provision of labour and infra-
structure.

Mr Johnson yesterday said
the Bahamas had to be
“extremely careful” in ensuring
that large-scale investment
projects did not completely
alter the character of the island
communities in which they
were set, and undermine the
very attractions that first
brought tourists to these loca-
tions.

He explained that the Min-
istry of Tourism was advocat-
ing a planning strategy that
involved local people, giving
them the opportunity to decide
how their community would
look in 10-20 years, and what
kind of development was suit-
able and would be permitted.

This, Mr Johnson said,
would enable Bahamians to
determine their needs, rather
than leaving them subject to
what investors wanted to see,
and the rates of return on their
investment and profits that
they wanted.

He added that the Bahamas
“didn’t need to be creating”
billion-dollar resorts with hun-
dreds of rooms on every island,
arguing that this nation’s “best
chance for overall success” lay
in segmenting its tourism prod-
uct, developing a brand identi-
ty for each island, and targeting
specific markets for each one.





ase MM)

?’m fovin’ it. | |

| HIGH
LOW

PARTLY SUNY |
5M viobiere



he Tribune





SOF |
GOF |

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 103 No.48



ae Mita
building costs damage
first ‘anchor’ hotel



ae mas again (ct [i]



FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 |

Pa

SEE STORY ON PAGE FIVE



ROW erupts over
— Chinese workers

B By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN ALLEGED Chinese
“take-over” of a government
construction site has led to the
dismissal of a local worker and
claims that there are insufficient
workers in the Bahamian labour
force.

Yesterday, the Workers Par-
ty led by Mr Rodney Moncur
and Mr Allan Strachan, called
the local media to the T G
Glover Primary school.

At the moment, an addition
to the primary school is being

built on a site that is commonly ~

referred to as “The Pitt” on Pitt
Road, which is adjacent to Nas-
sau Street.

According to steelworker
Anthony Thompson, this week
he was dismissed from the con-
struction site because his bosses
claimed they had “no work for
him to do.”

“This morning I was told that
there was nothing for me to
do,” claimed Mr Thompson.

“TI was the only steel man on
the job, but when I reach this
morning it was four or five Chi-
nese steelworkers on the job
doing the same work I was sup-
posed to be doing, but yet they
told me there was nothing for
me to do.” toe

Mr Thompson told reporters
there were more Bahamians on

the job site at the beginning, .

but at the moment, he said: “A
whole lot of Bahamians have
been let go.” |

The reporters'then inter-
viewed Mr Louis Liu, who
described himself ‘as the
“administration manager for the
Chinese team” on the construc-
tion site.

Mr Liu estimated that there
were about 28 to 29 Chinese
workers on the site. He

Enjoy a Whopper Jr.
with medium fries

tenn

end drink

ree
Ay
a

a

struction site yesterday.



BA WORKER at T G Glover Primary school secures the con-

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

explained that they had been
working on the job for a “cou-
ple of days.”
Mr Liu said he is from the
Jiangsu Province in China.
The reporters then confront-

ed Mr E R Hanna, owner of E -

R Hanna Construction, the
head construction firm on the
site.

Mr Hanna denied that he

had refused work to Bahami-

ans.
“Those that come here for
work, I told them that as soon
as we get the buildings off the
ground they will be employed,”
Mr Hanna said. :

“As regards the people from
China,” he continued, “they are
legit, every last one of them.”

The veteran construction boss
said he was hired by the Min-
‘istry of Works.

When Mr Hanna became
involved in a shouting match

SEE page 11





; Evans said the officers con-



‘Massive’ number
of firearms seized
lf By KRYSTEL ROLLE



POLICE seized a “mas-
sive” numberof firearms
last night after a tip:led them
to a.hidden Weapons and
ammunitions cache

According to press liaison
officer Walter Evans,
around 11.30 Wednesday
morning, officers from the
Drug Enforcement Unit
went to a bushy area in the
southwestern area of New
Providence after getting a
"tip." It was there that they
made the discovery.

Describing it as a "major
firearm seizure," Inspector


















fiscated 1,294 live rounds of
ammunition and three
weapons.

According to the report
750 live rounds were found
in a container, and 544.were
found in a bag near the con-
tainer. Also 534 live rounds
of ammunition were found
for a .9mm, 575 for a .380,
135 for a .223, and 50 for a
.22. In addition to the
ammunition, police found a
Tech-9, a 22 German ruger,
and a M-16 assault rifle
along with three magazine
clips.

"Thus far this has been
the largest seizure of
firearms and ammunition
for the*year 2007 and we

SEE page 11























r nVktWs

& By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE frustrated home-own-
ers of Excellence Estates claim

they have suffered “police ’

harassment” as a result of them
telling their stories to The Tri-
bune.

On Monday, The Tribune
reported that residents of the
“low-cost” housing community
in the Carmichael constituency
were complaining about leaky
roofs, cheap house paint, and
many unfinished repairs in their
recently bought homes.

The residents claimed that
they had written many letters
of complaint to the Department
of Housing, but these had gone
unanswered.

The Tribune spoke to Mr

- More radio

and TV licences
are granted

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune. Staff.Reporter



WITH the aim of enhanc-
ing democracy in the
Bahamas, government has
awarded eight more radio
licences and one television
licence to private individuals
‘and companies, Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
said yesterday.

“Jam very pleased with this
(development). You will have
a choice, get the variety of
programmes you want. It will
create a diversity. It will give
us a strong democracy in our
country,” he said.

Continuing with the effort
of breaking the monopoly on
broadcasting in the Bahamas —
an initiative which was started
in 1992 by the FNM — the cur-
rent administration has in
recent months granted
licences for one radio station
in Bimini, one in Inagua, one
in Abaco and two in Grand
Bahama.

Licences have also been
given for one gospel station
and one additional secular sta-
tion in New Providence, as
well as one for a non-com-
mercial station which will be
operated by the College of the
Bahamas, Mr Wilchcombe
said.

SEE page 11





ACO ARS .



Gordon Major, Director of
Technical Services at the
Department of Housing, and he
promised that an investigation
and report would be prepared
as a result of their complaints.

The Tribune again visited the
residents on Tuesday to see if
they had made any progress
with their problems, however
the reporter was met with an
additional complaint from the
angry residents of the subdivi-
sion.

According to Ms Leana
Carey of house No. 60: “A blue
car anda’ white car cantie Over to

‘Ms. Sweeting’s house today.

The officer in the white car had
his police uniform hanging in
the back seat, andthe other
four identified themselves as
police officers when they came
inside Ms Sweeting’s house.”





Ms Carey claimed that one
of the officers asked: “Who is
Leana?”

“So when I came there, I said
I was Leana, and I asked him
what was the problem,” said Ms
Carey.

“According to them, some-
body called the office and said
that illegal actions were going
on in the back here.”

Ms Carey said she told the
officers they were not involved
in any illegal activity, and that
they were “only trying to get
our homes straight.”

Ms Stephanie Sweeeting,
whose home the officers are
alleged to have entered, said

\ that one of the officers even
4vasked to see her passport.

The Tribune asked the resi-

SEE page 11



Claim that Anna Nicole ‘could
end up in Fox Hill Prison’

ANNA Nicole Smith could end
up in Fox Hill Prison if she fails to
pay more than $100,000 in legal
fees allegedly owed to her for-
mer Nassau attorneys, it emerged
yesterday.

A Supreme Court injunction
with penal notice has been grant-
ed to Callenders lawyer Tracy
Ferguson, who says she is ready
to claim the sum against the value
of the reality star’s new home if
she fails to pay up.

Ms Smith, who has just entered
a $700,000 deal to buy the home
of businessman Glen Rogers at
Coral Harbour, was originally the
subject of a restraining order
issued on December 6 last year.

This forbade Ms Smith to reduce
the balance of her Bahamas bank
accounts beyond a certain point.

‘But, according to Ms Fergu-
son, the US$113,217 debt men-
tioned in the order remains out-
standing. Now the law firm is
ready to go all the way in seeking
judgment and enforcement, which
could mean Ms Smith’s committal
to prison if she fails to respond.

Ms Ferguson said last night:
“We are determined to pursue
this. We will be paid. Ms Smith
now needs to respond to this and
stop being evasive.”

The order, which lists Ms Smith

SEE page six

FNM ‘would institute a
checks and balances
regimen for ministers, MPs’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter



TO RESTORE the public’s faith in the country’s political system,
the FNM, if elected, will institute a new regimen of checks and bal-
ances for ministers and MPs, Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham
said yesterday at a rally in Fox Hill while officially announcing three
candidates who will be running for the FNM in the next election.

For Elizabeth — Ellie Campbell; for Yamacraw — Pauline Nairn
and for Fox Hill, Dr Jacinta Higgs.

These candidates, he said, are eminently qualified and dedicat-
ed Bahamian women committed to serving you and the whole of the

SEE page two





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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE |





nowing your posi-
tioning, and by exten-
sion your brand, are

key components to successful

marketing, It is important for

you to understand the two con-
cepts, Great positioning will
first lead to you having a great
brand and, ultimately, to the
holy grail of marketing, brand
loyalty, where the customer is
tied into you lock, stock and
barrel. Positioning is now con-
sidered to be so important that
it is officially incorporated as
the fifth part of the marketing
mix - product, price, promo-
tion, place and positioning.

Positioning is about how you
want your product to be per-
ceived in the marketplace by
your customers, and is the
answer to two questions:

Question 1 — Where does
your product fit in the market
place now?

Question 2 — Wliere do you

Business
Sense



fed By Mark Paliner

want it to be in the future?
According to Al Ries and
Jack Trout, there are two ways
of approaching your position-
ing. Both will require you to
carry out market research;
Physical Positioning — First,
look at how your product mea-
sures up, or will measure up, in
the marketplace through its
features, design, appeal, aoe
tance and packaging. Does it
or will it, imitate what is
already out there, or is it dif-
ferentiated in some way? If
your product is either readily
available elsewhere, or a simi-
lar product is available in the
market at a lower price, you









Days/Hours:

Closed:



ransatlantic slave trade,

Authentic objects associated with the trauma of enslavement including shackles, a slave
\ branding iron, a slave whip, furniture from a slave house and more are here for you to see and
experience.

Admission: Non-Residents: Adults: $3.00
Senlors (60 plus) $2.00

Children (under 14) $1.00

Residents: Adults: . $2.00

Children (under 14) $1,00

The museum is named for the African slave Pompey who led a revolt on the island of
Exuma in 1830 and defied the dehumanizing institution of slavery. The museum is
housed in the former marketplace, Vendue House built around 1769 to allow for the sale

es commodities ee enslaved Africans,

Lest We Forcer

THE TRIUMPH OVER Shee ERY

veling exhibition is unique in that it ‘Focuses less on enslaved Africans as victims
“and niore on the ways in which they reshaped their destinies and place in history through
the creation of distinct cultures...

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
9:30 a.m. » 4:30 p.m.
Sunday and Thursday

need to consider carefully
whether you want to enter that
market, or remain in it.

Perception Positioning —
Second, look at how your
product is perceived in the
mind of the consumer, and
why would someone want to
buy it? Is it for practical rea-
sons, lifestyle, or social accep-
tance? Is someone buying your
car because of its engineering,
price or because they want to
be seen in it?

Advertising is very subtle
and is geared to exploiting
human needs, such as the need
for power, the need for con-
nection and the need for secu-
rity. Once advertisers know
why a product appeals to
someone, they will cynically
hit that hot button. In the way
that some people tend to buy
Volvos because they are posi-
tioned as being safe and meet:

and is fered at the Pompey Museum funingt this dice year to mark] FE

Schomburg Press Release























Mark your calendar
Our Application Deadline

ing their needs of security, oth-
ers will buy Jeep Wranglers
because they are positioned as
promoting an exciting and
healthy lifestyle,
Understanding physical and
perception positioning will
allow you to come up with a
positioning strategy that will
take your product and busi-
ness to where it wants to go,
and hopefully turn it into a
well-known brand,

There are three positioning
strategies you could consider:
1, Low Cost Leadership
strategy — This is where you
choose to undercut the com-
petition, and still offer prod-
ucts of equal or superior value.
. This is an area where large
retailers operate with their
economies of scale, so it is
unlikely this is an area where
you can operate without reduc-
ing the price, or the quality, of
the products that you offer,
Make sure you can supply the
volume required to make a
profit at low margins.

2, Differentiation strategy
-- This is where you choose
to compete on the basis of your
unique selling proposition, or
competitive advantage, be it

F | ot eee
Oo dui rat) ae ee

~ read Insight’
POUL LLU EWE)



the uniqueness of the product,
your company, your customer
service, distribution or deliy-
ery,

Make sure your product
really is different, before you
opt for this strategy,

3, Segmentation strategy —
This is where you choose to

compete on the basis of a

niche, or segment in the mar-
ket, focusing on a narrower
group of people with specific
needs,

Markets are constantly
breaking down into smaller
and smaller niches, Find a
niche where you can have a
competitive advantage.

Whichever strategy you use,
here are some tips to ensure
your strategy is well thought-
out;

First, make sure it is based
on sound research, Is there a
need for the product? Is there
a niche waiting to be exploit-
ed? Are you offering a com-
bination of factors that isn’t
offered currently in the mar-

ket place?

Second, is your strategy sus-
tainable? Just because you

have the right product for the |

right price, will it make enough
money for you to stay in busi-
ness?

Third, will your entry into
the market grow the market,
or will you have to fight for a
smaller part of the pie? Will
you be able to adapt to
changes in the market place
quickly, such as changes in cus-
tomer needs, or increased com-

petition? Will you take the risk °

and create a new market by,
predicting the future and posi,
tioning yourself where you
think the customer might be? ;
Fourth, will upcoming eco-»
nomic cycles affect your ability’
to compete at the current lev-.

el? How will you cope if eco-.

nomic activity declines? Will*
you have to discount and?
reduce your profit margins? »

Make sure your positioning’
strategy makes sense, Take the,
time to think it through. Don’t’
be an antipreneur and make
the following mistakes:

* Be positioning illiterate

* Not understanding the two
approaches to positioning

* Forgetting to spend the
time researching your posi-
tioning

* Having no posioniny
strategy

Marketing your business is
an important area and will
require constant effort to get it
right. So, in order to avoid the

sure you spend time on this
area as it could pay large divi-
dends for your future business
success,

NB: Adapted braid his
4 coming book, Antipreneur-

ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas, He
is chief operating officer of
www.ezpzemail.com, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be
contacted at markalex-
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer..All rights
reserved

FREEPORT CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED (BISX:FCC) hereby
gives that it has applied to the Bahamas International Securities Exchange

The extension was requested as the Company is projecting a loss of
approximately $2 million for the year ended 31st August, 2006 as a result
of which the Company’s auditors, KPMG, have undertaken further audit
procedures, and the Company has had to meet additional financial statement

disclosure requirements,

Preliminary results indicate that the Company’s gross profit was seriously
impacted in the 4th quarter primarily as a result of the delayed opening of the
Home Centre Superstore on Atlantic Drive in Freeport, the significant costs
associated with the transitioning of the Company’s stores and reduction in
inventory value due to obsolescence, damage and shrinkage .

The Company shall publish its audited financial results for the year ended

31st August, 2

is February 2, 2007
Remember to include the following with your application

006 on or before 12th January, 2007,






$40.00 non-refundable processing fee
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of

birth and expiration date of passport

Official high school transcript




* Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!
We look forward to weicoming you to The College,
soon to be the University of The Bahamas.

MO OU Se RRND TE ROR EL DOG TRIED ANOS SRT PRNC ME OR UME RN EEE AREAS ALA ay BSR UoReNATE AGRI

2A SREY ADO AIIM cRNA RA PERRIN CI EH, CRN

‘trap of antipreneurship, make -

4

vay % © ¢

%¢e7-"
4 et?

Ber



PAGE 3B

THE TRIBUNE

E 7

+

Yy









PAGE 16B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007





li By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Government
s “bulldozing”
ahead with
implementation
of the National
Health Insurance (NHI) plan

‘ amid great secrecy and mini-

mal consultation with the
Bahamian people, something

a ZERO DOWN LOT LOANS
een CEM ey Necro Nis

MUTUAL FUNDS

: ca Wee

|
|



THE TRIBUNE

@ THE National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform is
awaiting the response
from Dr Bernard Nottage
(left), minister of health
and national insurance, to
a letter written this month
by the Coalition’s co-
chairs, Dr Robin Roberts
and J Barrie Farrington,
before determining its
next move. >

(FILE photo)

Bulldozing’ described

the Bahamng Employers Con-
federation’s (BECon) presi-
dent described as “a frighten-
ing situation”,

Brian Nutt said BECon and _

the National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, of which
it is a member, feared that the
way NHI was being designed
would create a “two-tier health
system”, something they found
“frightening”.

CDs

Mn BST ISI= & PERSONAL oY

FINANCIAL PLANNING

‘a frightenin

Once NHI was implement-
ed, Mr Nutt told the Rotary
Club of South-East Nassau
that the Government would
be “owning and controlling
much of the healthcare pro-
vided in the Bahamas”, with
the private sector’s market
share squeezed,

He questioned “how
accountable will the Govern-

ment be?’, and drew parallels.

acai Wass sa noe

TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING _

PC Cetar ny

eee
STREET



|

with the Bahamian education
system, The average BGCSE
grade was a D-, but strip out
results from the private
schools and all public schools
would be in the “failing cate-

gory”.
Viewed
Mr Nutt laid out what he

_ viewed as the “worst case sce-

Baie More thana Bank

are (ed i Aarts) arta s one ca for. all his Te lett ie

, HOME Selb? LOANS

PENSION PLANS

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More than a Bank

Nassau; T 356.7764 F 326.3000

ee T 352.6676/7

PARADISE FREEPORT
ae

_ MACKEY
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nario” should NHI be imple-

mented. He pointed out that
the scheme was “going to
overburden and already over-
burdened public health sec-
tor”, given that medical care
under NHI was perceived to
be free, so Bahamians would
gravitate to using those ser-
vices,

The BECon president also
questioned whether there
would still be a role for pri-
vate health insurance carriers
and brokers when NHI was
implemented, given that the
Government scheme is viewed
as being the primary health-
care insurer.

The Government has
argued that NHI’s arrival will
remove a significant risk bur-
den from private health insur-
ers, enabling them to design
supplemental plans to cover
risks and treatments not
insured under NHI.

Yet Mr Nutt warned: “If the
broad base of insurance is tak-
en out of the equation, many
companies may not find it fea-
sible to offer health insurance
of any kind. So you may not

find any private health insur-.

ance is available.”
In addition, Mr Nutt pointed
out that NHI would not cover

‘all the costs of mtttical care

when Bahamians went to pri-
vate healthcare practitioners.
Under NHI, the cost of ser-
vices will be based upon the
fees charged in the public sec-
tor. Since private healthcare
fees will be higher, NHI will
only cover a percentage of
those costs, requiring Bahami-
ans to generate out-of-pocket
funds to fund the remainder,
Mr Nutt said this might cre-
ate a ‘brain drain’ where tal-
ented Bahamian doctors left

the country, especially if

patients are unable to meet
out-of-pocket expenses.

Costs in the private health-
care sector are higher because
practitioners have to meet
expenses such as equipment
costs and depreciation, where-
as under NHI these will be
covered by taxes taken by the
Consolidated Fund. Private
practitioners also have to
make.a profit.

Mr Nutt pointed out that the
5.3 per cent contributions by
salaried workers to the NHI,
split 50/50 between employer
and employee, was “not a true

Situation’

cost of what NHI will be”. It
will cover. the costs of medical
services, but funds for purpos-
es such as building and main-
taining hospitals will continue
to come from public funds.
“The response we got [from
the NHI project team] was the
5.3 per cent is not paying the
full medical costs. It will pay
the salaries, wages' and prac-
titioners, and any direct med-
ication prescribed as part of

- treatment,” Mr Nutt said.

“If anyone wants to contin-
ue to use a private practition-
er, there will be an extra cost.
It will not be the free service
the Government maintains it
will be.”

The NHI steering commit-
tee invited BECon, the Cham-
ber of Commerce, Small Busi-
ness Association of the
Bahamas and Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB) to
meet with it last August to dis-
cuss the proposed scheme.

Yet Mr Nutt disclosed that
the committee told the organ-
isations in advance that it
could not give them a copy of
its full report, on which NHI is
largely based, because Cabi-
net had not authorised its dis-
closure.

As a result, Mr Nutt said it
was impossible for any of the
private sector organisations to
“give any type of input into
NHI when we don’t have any
information on the plan being
proposed.

“There wasn’t really any
consultation at this meeting.
The Steering Committee basi-
cally told us what they were
doing, and any requests we
made were denied.“

Mr Nutt said the Steering
Committee said it was start-
ing to write the NHI legisla-
tion then, and that there would
be no opportunity to review it
prior to it going to the House
of Assembly.

Meanwhile, The Tribune
understands that the Govern-
ment has still to present the
Coalition with any of the stud-
ies it has requested on NHI.

The Coalition is awaiting the
response from Dr Bernard
Nottage, minister of health
and national insurance, to a
letter written this month by
the Coalition’s co-chairs, Dr
Robin Roberts and J Barrie
Farrington, before determin-
ing its next move.



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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE ©



LOCAL NEWS : " :

PLP ‘unsympathetic and hard-hearted’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

DESPITE assurances that it
would govern with compassion,
the PLP has proven unsympa-
thetic and hardhearted, FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

“You have only to ask the
victims of the 2004 and 2005
hurricane seasons; check with
the victims of the Sea
Hauler/United Star tragedy; ask
the parents of children who
have had their inoculations

against childhood diseases
delayed; ask the elderly about
shortage of medication for
hypertension and diabetes; ask
others who suffer because of a
shortage of vital medicines at
government clinics,” the former
prime minister said.

Mr Ingraham accused Prime
Minister Christie of promising
to lead a government for all
races and political parties and
then failing to do so.

“That must be why one of his
earliest acts as prime minister

was to defend and then apolo-

gise for the hatchet job his
members carried out on FNMs
employed at BAIC. Ask Edi-
son Key how welcomed he was
made to feel in a party led by
Perry Christie. No, his is not a
government for all; it has been a
government of division and
exclusion.

“That is why he has not found
it possible to put a single white
Bahamian in the cabinet — Pin-
dling did; so did I; but not Perry
Gladstone Christie. He now
says that he leads a Black
Nationalist party,” Mr Ingra-

ham said.

He said Perry Christie and
his colleagues have not been
faithful to their promises, and
have “squandered their time in

. office and betrayed the people’s

trust”.

“Instead of good government
we have a government that
appoints committees and
launches investigations; but
they seldom report and hardly
ever take action,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Instead of honest govern-
ment, he said, the Bahamas has

a government that denies
knowledge of all manner of
things — “from shenanigans in
the issuance of visas, work per-
mits and residence permits, to
fisticuffs in the Cabinet Room,
to sting operations that lure
Bahamian citizens to foreign
countries to answer for crimes
allegedly committed in the
Bahamas.

“And, we have a govern-
ment that keeps its actions
secret from the people
whether in relation to votes at
the United Nations, or con-

cessions and incentives includ-
ed in investment agreements, *
or the negotiation of trade
agreements.

“Instead of competent gov-
ernment, we have a government
that squandered the people’s
money on the infamous
junkanoo bleachers; a govern-
ment that refuses to account for
the spending of donated disaster .
relief assistance; and a govern-
ment that in four years has
proven incapable of bringing a
seat-belt law into effect,” Mr r
Ingraham said.

ee
3

* ¢€¢@ se

FNM ‘would institute checks’

FROM page one

Bahamas “which is something
I cannot say of our current gov-
ernment.”

“We will better monitor and
enforce standards of conduct
for Ministers in government and
senior public officers. We will
make public all agreements with
foreign investors in the House
of Assembly.

“We will be accountable to
the people through regularly
scheduled public reports on the
state of our country. We will
answer questions asked by the
Opposition and respond to con-
cerns of citizens,” Mr Ingraham
said.

The former prime minister
said that too many foreigners
are in The Bahamas doing too
many jobs that Bahamians are
willing, able, ready and fit to do.

“Now we have foreigners
building a school! And foreign
maids and foreign workers all
over the place. Promises of jobs
for Bahamians to come will not
pay the bills, you know. While
the grass is growing, the cow is
starving, they say,” the former
prime minister said.

Economic development is
high on the party’s agenda, Mr
Ingraham said, because eco-
nomic growth that excludes
the population from partici-
pation is not the type of devel-



opment we need.

“In fact, that kind of eco-
nomic model is a recipe for
disaster. We will show you
that your government trusts
you. You can trust us to be
faithful to our promises and
faithful to you,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

The next FNM Govern-
ment will resume education
programmes so people can
grow along with the country,
the former prime minister
said.

“We know that you want
better equipment and ade-
quate staff — including spe-
cialist teachers — for your
schools. We know that you
need a better-equipped pub-
lic library to support your
children’s education and
development.

“We hear the calls far
improved recreational and
other self-affirming facilities
in your communities. More
must be done to train young
Bahamians and to retrain old-
er Bahamians to take advan-
tage of the opportunities in
the economy. And, more
must be done to create more
and better paying jobs,” Mr
Ingraham said.



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
PGR LLCa PM (UC
Re a8 Ok) are
PO eC ae
Yd 4b)



Teen Challenge Bahamas









PAULINE Nairn was born
in 1962. She is martied to
Archie Nairn, permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation and has a
daughter and three stepchil-
dren.

Mrs Nairn is employed as a
business analyst with Coli-
nalmperial Insurance.

First elected to local govern-
ment in July 1996, Mrs Nairn
has served as deputy chair-
woman for the Pinder’s Point
Township, chairwoman of the
Housing Commission for Grand
Bahama and chairwoman of the
Licensing Authority for West
Grand Bahama.

She was appointed to the
Senate in April 1997 and served
for five years.

Mrs Nairn has also served as:
captain of the first Grand Bahama
Girls’ Brigade, Junior Achieve-
ment advisor, Children’s Church
Leader, first vice-president of the
Business and Professional Wom-

s Club of Grand Bahama and
member.of the Bahamas Nation-
al Volleyball Team.

jae FNM candidates announced



JACINTA Marie Higgs is
married to Dwight Higgs and
has two children.

In 2006, she earned a Doctor
of Education degree from the
University of St Thomas, Min-
nesota.

She pursued a teaching career
for 15 years in public schools.

She was named Teacher of
the Year at RM Bailey Senior
High School and was the South
East District winner in the
National Teacher of the Year
competition.

Dr Higgs is currently director
of education programmes and
a lecturer at Omega College.

She served as a member of
the Fox Hill Community Devel-
opment Association, Girl Guide
and Ranger Leader of St
Anselm’s Unit and Youth
Adviser at St Anslem’s Church.

She has supported numer-
ous community organisations,
including the Fox Hill Festival
Committee, the Fox Hill Steer-
ing Committee, Miss Fox Hill
Pageant and Fox Hill Guy
Fawkes celebrations.

Ground Breaking Ceremony of
Halfway Home To Be Called

“Marguerite May Sands Transitional Home”
_on Friday January12, 2007 @ 10:00 a.m. at Teen Challenge Grounds,
~ Marshall Road, South Beach

Pastor Rick Dean - Former Director

Jewel Major - Urban Renewal
Pastor Teddy Dorsette - Zion South Beach
Terry Delaney - Virgo Car Rental
Paul Whilly - BFM

Minister Eric Fox - Executive Director Teen Challenge

Vernon Collie - Assistant Director Teen Challenge
The Marguerite May Sands Home will be for graduates of Teen Challenge and 8 beds have been dedicated for guys coming out of prison.

Attending Ground Breaking Ceremony

Ground Breaking Ceremony - Pastor Garry Curry of Evangelistic Temple also founding member of Teen Challenge
Mr. Wayde Sands and Members of The Sands Family





ELMA Elaine “Ellie” Camp-
bell has two adult children and
three grandchildren.

She obtained degrees in mod-
ern languages and linguistics at

the University of Grenoble in .'
France and holds a master of «

science in education degree °
from the University of Miami.
She began her teaching

career at the Government High .. -
School in 1975. She also taught

at C C Sweeting Senior High, .
St Anne’s and the Boys Indus-
trial School.

Ms Campbell has headed her
own law firm since 1985.

She also served as a stipen-
diary and circuit magistrate, and
part-time lecturer in banking
law at COB.

Ms Campbell has been involved °+

in the Bahamas Union of Teach-

ers, St John’s College PTA, the ,
Bahamas Red Cross and the |:

Bahamas Swim Federation.
She was responsible for,
organising “Legal Line”, the >

first weekly radio cail-in ‘pro- et

gramme in the Bahamas dedi-

cated to discussion of the law..,.,; °



+e

£0 6
ee

+




The en mm

ee A A a

ne

ee ee
THE TRIBUNE





Elect ‘true
daughter of
Fox Hill’,
says Bethel



@ CARL Bethel

FNM Senator Carl Bethel
reminded Fox Hillians that
in the next general election,
they will have an opportuni-
ty to elect a “true daughter of
Fox Hill” not a “carpet bag-
ger, looking for an easy seat”.

Senator Bethel, along with
party leader Hubert Ingra-

ham and FNM candidate Dr.

Jacinta Higgs, addressed par-
ty supporters last night in the
Fox Hill community.

“Soon and very soon the
good people of Fox Hill will
be able to elect a new MP
who will actually have the
time of day to come and listen
to your everyday concerns
and to help you individually

with your needs, instead of

+ + — —

an international globetrotter
who can’t find his way around
Foxdale Subdivision and
many areas of Fox Hill.”

He said that very soon,
Fox Hill will have the chance
to make “the globetrotting
Fred Mitchell” pay for his
dereliction of duty, which, he
claimed allowed some PLP
operatives and generals, “and
some PLP family members
to run the visa scam through
the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs for so many years.”

“The Perry Christie gov-
ernment promised an inves-
tigation. Fred Mitchell
promised an investigation,”
he said. “Since then, more
than a year has passed, and
still the Bahamian people
have heard nothing from
Fred Mitchell, or the PLP.”
The senator also noted

N

‘that it was under Mr Mitchel-

l’s watch that there was a
“hundredfold” increase in
legitimate visas issued to
Haitians and Chinese —

’. increasing the number from

200 per year during the
FNM’s tenure to over 2,000
per year for the PLP’s first
three years in office.

Mr Bethel said this adds
up to more than “6,000 new
Haitian nationals” allowed
into the Bahamas.

“This is serious business,
because it is acknowledged that
once someone comes into the
Bahamas, legally, with an entry
visa, there were no checks to
make sure that these persons
ever left the Bahamas.”

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

FNM Senator Carl Bethel
used his speech at the FNM ral-
ly in Fox Hill last night to lam-
baste Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell for his handling
of the arrest of five baggage
handlers in the US on drug
charges.

Senator Bethel said that the
Bahamas is currently faced with
a “crisis in law enforcement”
and no amount of “jive talking”
will eliminate that fact.

“I speak tonight about the
five Nassau Flight Services bag-
gage handlers, who with the
knowledge and complicity of
several government agencies,
were forced, upon threat of los-
ing their jobs, to go to South
Florida under false pretenses,
so that they could be arrested
by the US Drug Enforcement

LOCAL NEWS

Agency and be brought to face
a criminal trial in the USA with-
out having voluntarily surren-
dered to US custody or having
been lawfully extradited under
Bahamian Law,” he said.

“Let me state categorically
that our concerns have nothing
to do with giving any kind of
support to drug trafficking. The
FNM in government was as
committed to the fight against
drug smuggling and the need
for international co-operation
in the fight against drugs as any
government in the history of the

Bahamas,” he said. “Our ster-’

ling record in the fight against
drugs can stand any level of
scrutiny.

“This issue is about the civil
rights of Bahamians, due
process and the rule of law. In
any civilised country it is
acknowledged that there must
be respect for civil rights, due

legal process and the rule of
law.

“No government of the
Bahamas should be even
remotely implicated in any sug-
gestion that it conspired with
foreign agencies to deprive
Bahamian citizens of the pro-
tection offered by Bahamian
law. That is what this issue is
about,” the senator said.

Mr Bethel pointed out that a
deputy secretary for Detainee
Affairs in the US had to pub-
licly apologise to the American
legal profession for suggesting
that lawyers were behaving in
an unpatriotic way when
defending the detainees at
Guantanamo Bay.

“This mere suggestion was
enough to force an apology,”
Mr Bethel said, “That is how
other countries behave.”

“Here in the Bahamas, our
government doesn’t apologise.

Ingraham tells of plans to root
out gimmicks and beaurocracy

FNM leader anounces plans
to ban answering machines

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

POLITICAL “gimmickry”
will be removed from urban
renewal initiatives and a new

FNM government will invest in

programmes, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham told those
gathered at a rally in Fox Hill
last night.

Mr Ingraham said these pro-
grammes will alleviate and bring
permanent relief from poor
housing, poor sanitary services
and inadequate recreational
facilities.

The party leader also
promised to bring order to the
Immigration Department by
observing established and pub-
lished rules and applying clear,
transparent policies.

He said the FNM would
ensure that immigration poli-
cies reflect the priorities and
needs of the Bahamian public
and our economy “and not the
social calendars of cabinet min-
isters and other politically-con-
nected individuals.”

Mr Ingraham said that the
public has had enough of the
highly-publicised operations
that involve chasing only the
poorest illegal immigrants, while
“pay-to-play deals” are made
behind closed doors, “deals that
give work permits for jobs for
which Bahamians are quali-
fied.”

The FNM leader also com-
mitted to “take up where we
left off in public sector reform.”

“We will strengthen local
government in the Family
Islands and extend it to New
Providence. We will modernise
and restructure our postal sys-
tem to deliver more services at
unmatched levels of efficiency.

“We will modernise and inte-



@ HUBERT Ingraham

grate our system of registering
births and deaths and the acqui-
sition of citizenship and perma-
nent residence,” Mr Ingraham
said.

The party leader said that a
new government led by him
would remove the hassle of
obtaining and renewing busi-
ness licenses along with an
introduction of state-of-the-art
methods of motor vehicle reg-
istration and remove personal
data from the windshields of
vehicles.

“We will banish answering
machines from all public sector
entities, including public corpo-
ration customer service tele-
phone and complaints lines —

no more complaining to

machines. We will further
reduce bureaucratic obstacles
that add to the cost of doing
business in the Bahamas; and
we will institute a more effective
system for the settlement of dis-

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from the public sector

putes between employers and
employees,” Mr Ingraham said.

The FNM leader also
promised to restore good order
to our public health system and
to ensure that a workable
national health insurance
scheme is implemented in co-
operation with health care
providers and health insurance
suppliers.

“We promise to give our edu-

cation system the attention it

requires so as to ensure that our
children study in safe ade-
quately staffed and properly
supplied educational facilities
geared to prepare them for pro-
ductive lives in our communi-
ties,” the party leader said.

The opposition leader also
promised to further decentralise
education in the government-
operated school system, plac+
ing greater authority in the
hands of principals, administra-
tors, school boards and parents
for the operation and manage-
ment of our schools.

“The prime minister’s go-
along, get along attitude toward
the management and co-ordi-
nation of the people’s business
does not work. It provides
excuses for incompetence and
deflects attention from mis-
takes. In short, it does not pro-
duce beneficial results for the
people,” Mr Ingraham said.





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FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 3



Instead they deny, deny, deny.
No minister knew anything,
they say. At least three sepa-
tate departments in three sepa-
rate ministries had to co-oper-
ate in order to pull off the scam
which entrapped and summari-
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“Now, rather than accept
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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

2 aa lla i a aa aNNSE:

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
_ Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau. Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Adverusuig) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502 2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(

242)-352-0008

Freeport fax: (242) 352 29348

Slaton needed in aaate debate

What will it take? How much evidence is
required before our schools, our region and
our nation can quit arguing over the nature of
global warming? What data will convince the
‘body politic that it’s time to match the con-
sensus already found in the scientific commu-
nity?

I know we remain divided because of the
number of critics who react to every column,
editorial and news story with immediate and
intense reaction that questions the premise
of global warming.

But I keep wondering, what it will take?

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change will issue its next
report February 2, outlining the scientific basis
for global warming. I can hear the dismissals
already: It’s a U.N. body? C’mon, it’s just
those scientists who’ve already drunk the
Kool-Aid. Or, that report dismisses the sci-
entific dissent.

I love dissent — and I bristle at the sugges-
tion that we cannot even consider minority
views. But you have to know: The scientific
data are piling up.

Consider the evolving nature of the lan-
guage in the panei’s report (this will be the
fourth in the series). Two decades ago, cli-
mate scientists wrote that human activity
“could“ be the defining factor. By 1995, the
report said “the balance of evidence” suggests
human influence on the climate. And five
years ago, the report cited “new and stronger
evidence that most of the warming observed
over the last 50 years is attributable to human
activities. “.

What will next week’s report say? More of
the same, building on data that continue to tip
the scales decidedly in one direction.

“People will want to know what’s new in
this report,” said Naomi Oreskes, a science
historian from the University of California,
San Diego. “But I think it’s equally impor-
tant for us to focus on what’s not new.“

Scientists have been gathering evidence
about the relationship between human activ-
ity and climate change since the 1960s, she
said during a conference call sponsored by
the National Environmental Trust. “This is a
problem we’ve been aware of for a very long
time, and action on it is way overdue.”

The words “scientific consensus“ sound like
a chorus of scientists singing from the same
page, overpowering any dissent. Only that’s
not the way the music works.

The process for how the climate panel
reaches consensus is as persuasive as the evi-

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dence itself.

Robert Watson is a scicnust with the World
Bank and former chairman of the latergov-
ernmental Panel on Climate Change. He said
the process has credibility because it involves
2,000 experts trom 100 countries, representing
governments, universities and other stake-
holder groups. Everything included in the
report goes through two rounds of exhaustive
peer review that includes dozens of voices.

He said when there are disagreements about
the scientific data, those questions are “fully
vetted in front of the stakeholders.” The
process is rigorous, exhaustive and transparent
— a model for international cooperation on
science.

But is it proof? Critics often dismiss much of
climate science because it uses computer mod-
eling, a process that docsu t seem to prove
anything. But an increasing body of evidence
called “fingerprinting” directly counters that
notion.

Fingerprinting “involves the comparison of
models and observed patterns in climate
change,” said Benjamin Santer, a research sci-
entist from the Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory and lead author of a chapter tn
the 1995 IPCC report. Fingerprinting gets its
name from what it does: Looking for identi-
fying signatures found in the causes of climate
change, whether natural or man-made.

“The red thread running through all this
fingerprinting work is that natural factors
alone cannot, repeat cannot. simply explain
observed changes that we've seen in the cli-
mate system in the second half of the 20th
century,” Santer said.

Science is reflecting a consistent story — a
fact-based call to action.

But that brings me back to my opening
question, what will it take? When will the
body politic move forward?

President Bush’s State of the Union speech
this week should give us a clue when he
addresses climate change and energy policy
White House Press Secretary Tony Snow last
week said the president will “lay this out” in
his speech. “And T will tell you it’s an inte-
grated energy and environmental policy.”

That would be terrific. It would even be
better if the president would say clearly that
the nation should quit arguing over the nature
of global warming. We’re wasting time, ener-
gy and money ~~ all efforts wed be smarter to
spend in search of solutions.

(This article was written by Mark Trahant
of the Seattle Post Intelligencer-c.2007).





Ther

peopl

really

EDITOR, The Tribune.

i WAS born in the Farm
Road area where I have lived
all my life and have always felt
that no one cared for us in this
community. This morning when
{ bought The Nassau Guardian
| was so elated to see an article
that showed there are people
who really cared.

The school that received the
gifts is considered a dump area
where when it rains the streets
are flooded because there are
no water drains. When I went to
pick up my children in Decem-
ber 2006 a little girl told me that
she was invited along with oth-
er students at their school to a
Christmas party and that they
were going to get some really
nice gifts. | thought to myself
that this little girl did not know
what she was talking about
because my children did not tell
me about the event. Well you
know you could have knocked
me over with a toothpick when
Lread that my children’s school
received 10 computers. My
daughter kept asking me to buy

LETTERS

NCEA ovis clct net








her one but | knew that was jist
wishful thinking because | kicy
L would never be able to buy
one and then send hor ie con

puter classes Poday, wears cain

when | read thar inc
Good Samaritan was @ conus

to any eyes

tor named Mr Audley Hanna
Jr who felt that ne should pive
back to the community some of
his good fortune that would
allow my daughter and her
school mates to have their
dreams come tiue. Realising
that we as parents could not do;
had it not been for this sincere
act of kindness

As | continued to read this
story | found out that not only
did the school receive comput-
ers, but three students were
blessed with their own personal
computers — two of these stu-
dent were trom my childrens
school and the third student was
a little girl from Andros. | hope

The taking of personal
fingerprints in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHAT is the law concerning the taking of personal finger rprints

in the Bahamas?

I am told that only under the provision and powers of the Police
and subject to arrest is a citizen or a person in the Bahamas

‘required at any time to provide fingerprints. Further if that person

is not charged those fingerprints are required to be returned to the
person — no copies having been taken.
If the person is found not euuty also in that case the prints are to

be returned.

- Under the Lotteries and Gaming Act, which provides for the tak-
ing of fingerprints of applicants for croupiers and employees in cer-
tain positions in the Casino there are also provisions which strict-
ly govern how fingerprints will be taken. It is emphatic in that
Act, Article 53 clause (3) that if that applicant is not employed or
is refused employment the fingerprints taken are to be returned to
the applicant. The clauses emphasise that all copies are to be

returned.

The recent announcement from Foreign Affairs indicated that
with the new passport system all citizen will be required to provide

a full set of fingerprints.

Such a provision or requirement is therefore going to require an
amendment to the Penal Cede as well as an atmendiicat to the Lot
teries and Gaming Act and I would suggest possibly the issue

being so fundamental to the core of Constitutional pris

acy Would

require a referendum — certainly all advocated to etidure iat
the rights of the individual must be upheld will challenge any

change to what is in place today

J RAHMING
Nassau, -
January 13, 2007.



Care

are

‘

ihai this kind young man’s con-
wibution to the future genera-
dion would open the hearts of
other business people in the
country who have benefited and
we bencliting from che wealth
41 this nation to do the same
for other schools, not only -at
Christiaas but throughout the
Cal h

It is my prayer that the Lord

stinues to bless this young |
genileman as he continues to
do the Lord s will: because it is
written when we give to the
poor sve are giving to the Lowd
Amen

MURS SMU

A GRATEFUL
PARENT
Nassau,
January 9, 2007

Rules of the
House of.
Assembly _

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANKS for bleu S my
letter concerning the importance
and priority to retain the correct
Rules of the House of Assembly

nwever, | was most surprised
that you put an Editor’s tootnote
iidicauing that to The Tribune’s
understanding the Rt Hon
Hubert Ingraham writes all his
speeches.

I stand to challenge this Edi-
tor. itis well known that a quali-
fied public relations persons who
has offices in Chippingham cer-
tainly has in the past written
many speeches for Mr Ingraham
— comment at the recent dinner
at the time of the visit of the Privy .
Council indicated that there was a
presumption that the speech was
the hand of another, not Mr
Ingraham.

I would have thought the most
important point or issue would -’
be that The Tribune champiens
the correct parliamentary prac:
tice and Rules of the House*of
Assembly and the Senate,—
notes are permitted under the
Kules certainly not written
speeches unless C oimunicatidns
as | suggest lap cops are not
allowed if not what aext? Black-
beiiy’s texting speeches and argu-
aieuis to assist an MP in the fury
ofa Parhamentary debate? ,

iy we cannot uphold the Rudes

| the House of Assembly “*st
Now can Wwe expect the people:
uphold the Rule of Law on the
Streets ¢

J WILLIAMS
Nassau.
January LO, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE





Three face
ammunition
and firearm
‘charges

FREEPORT - Three men
were arraigned in Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on
Wednesday in connection
with illegal firearm and
ammunition charges.

Appearing in court three
before Magistrate Helen
Jones were Succullo Miller,
21, and Marco Forbes, 25, of
Freeport, and Terrell Lock-
hart, 22, of Nassau.

It is alleged that on Janu-

‘ary 13, the men were found
in possession of two hand-
guns and ammunition while
at downtown Freeport.

' The accused men were
represented by K Brian Han-
na. They pleaded not guilty.

Miller and Lockhart were -

remanded into custody at
~ Her Majesty’s Prison.
Forbes was granted $10,000
bail with two sureties.
The matter has been
adjourned to May 29 for trial.

Woman is
charged
following
stabbing

FREEPORT - A 29-year-
old woman was charged in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court

in connection with last
» week’s stabbing incident at
“ Port Lucaya.

Keisha Stubbs, a resident
of No 431 Cove House,
appeared in court two before
Magistrate Subu LaSalle.
‘She was charged with caus-

__ ing grievous harm to Shakera
Gordon, 21, of South Bahamia.
‘ It was alleged that on Jan-
, uary 13, Stubbs stabbed Miss
Gordon in the lower back
_with a knife.
, . The accused pleaded not
guilty to the charge and was
. granted $3,000 bail with one
"surety. The case was
‘adjourned to April 16.



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2006 FORD ESCAPE

lm By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter

THERE was a 17 per cent
decrease in the number of peo-
ple admitted to Fox Hill Prison
in 2006 — including a 10 per cent
reduction in recidivism Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming revealed yester-
day.

- This saw the number of pris-
oners entering the compound
drop from 2,899 in 2005 to 2,416
in 2006, to some extent allevi-
ating overcrowding.

The population at any one
time remained fairly stable
between 1,400 and 1,500.

Dr Rahming gave an
overview of the 2006 prison
year yesterday, and proposed
security goals for 2007.

Speaking about the reduced
recidivism rate, Dr Rahming
said prison officials would have
to look at the statistics over the
next few years before making
any definitive statement on
causality.

However, he did note one



LOCAL NEWS _

change in penal policy that may
have been a contributing fac-
tor: all returning prisoners have
immediately entered maximum
security — to serve "hard time" —
rather than being permitted to
work on the compound, or
attend classes, as was previous-
ly the case.

“We have been able to iden-
tify many of the chronic
returnees who have not come
back, and we think. that that
may play a part,” he said.

Describing the composition
of the 2006 admissions to the
prison, Corporal Claudia Fraser
said that three per cent were
murderers, six per cent had
committed armed robbery, and
two per-cent rape. Thirteen per-
cent had breached the Immi-
gration Act, and 21 per cent
were found in possession of
either firearms or drugs.

Overall, 87 per cent were
under the age of 30, and 79 per
cent were serving sentences of a
year or less.

The escape rate stood at 0.25

84

KRIDAY, JANUARY Wy, 2uu/, FAUE Oo






INMATES at Her Majesty’s Prison build a 21-ft high wall

under the supervison of the Tactical Unit.

per cent, taking into considera-
tion the January, August, and
November break-outs. Howev-
er, the recapture rate was 100
per cent, noted Rahming.
Staff revealed 15 security
goals which:they wish to fulfill
in the coming year, including

Pastors appealing to churchmen not to
get involved in politics before election

A GROUP of leading pas-
tors has urged churchmen to
step down if they plan a role in
front-line politics.

The call comes from two past
president#of the Bahamas
Christian Council and three
senior Nassau pastors.

“Pastors with strong social
conscience are to be commend-
ed for their work in the com-
munity,” a group statement said
yesterday.

“But those who feel they can
only make a difference if they
engage in frontline politics
should first step down as pas-
tors of the churches they serve
lest they scatter the flock.”

The statement, which says
pastoral duties and obligations
must always transcend personal
political ambitions, was signed
by Bishop Samuel Greene,
Bishop Simeon Hall, Bishop
Edward Missick, Bishop Del-
ton Fernander and Bishop
Leroy Emmanuel.

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local churchman seeking a
frontline political role is the Rev
CB Moss, whose church is in
Bain Town. ;

Before the last general elec-
tion, there was controversy
over remarks made by Bishop
Neil Ellis from the pulpit of his
Mount Tabor Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church.

In his sermon, Bishop Ellis
advised worshippers to “haul
hip” from his church if they did
not support the PLP.

In yesterday’s statement, the
five bishops said there was noth-
ing “intrinsically wrong” with
entering the political arena.

“But the insularity and trib-












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alism of our two-party system

place the serving pastor/politi-
cian in a position no conscien-

tious pastor would wish to be

in

They said: “We advise any
pastor who wishes to offer for

candidacy in the next election to
step down first before offering.”

TROPICAL |
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(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

further fortification of entrances
and exits, and construction of
six new security towers.

However, Rahming and
Deputy Supt Charles Rolle both
noted that these objectives may
depend on budgetary restric-
tions.

Prison admission down 17%

Position to be filled:



Amongst the goals are the
completion of a 21-foot high,
four-foot wide’ perimeter wall
with two-foot deep foundations,
and the start of construction on
a new maximum security com-
pound, according to Dr Rah-
ming.

Construction is currently
underway on the wall, while
plans have now been drawn up
for the much-awaited com-
pound.

Dr Rahming added however,
that he can “only take govern-
ment at its word” with regard to
whether the new compound will
get underway this year.

It was noted that of the 2006
security objectives, 83 per cent
were achieved, including the
installation of security scanners,
the introduction of new uni-
forms, and an increase of maxi-
mum security staff:

By recruiting 75 new officers,
the prison got closer to its ideal
personnel-to-prisoner ratio, said
Rahming, though still falls short
by almost 200 officers.



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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Mt: i
Claim that Wayne Munroe proposed to charge |
Anna Nicole $1,000 an hour for legal services

A BITTER row between two
law firms involved in the Anna
Nicole Smith affair has disclosed
that attorney Wayne Munroe
allegedly proposed to charge the
cover girl $1,000 an hour for his
legal services.

The claim emerges in an angry
exchange of letters between Mr
Munroe and Tracy Ferguson, the
Callenders’ lawyer originally
hired by Ms Smith following the
death of her son Daniel last Sep-
tember.

The legal spat began after Cal-
lenders submitted an invoice for
$77,282.65 in fees.

In Mr Munroe’s reply on
December | last year he accused
Callenders of failing to provide
a detailed statement of account
— a move later described as a



B ANNA NICOLE SMITH
(AP FILE Photo)

“stalling tactic” by Ms Ferguson.

“We are aware from the taxa-
tion of costs involving your firm
that you have the technological
ability to easily provide the detail

requested and for the record we
request details of your final billing
and renew our request for details
of your first invoice. We are
instructed to insist on your com-
pliance with rule X of the
Bahamas Bar (Code of Profes-
sional Conduct) Regulations in
this regard.

“We are of the view that the
position adopted by your firm
that it did not always represent
the interests of Miss Marshall (Ms
Smith) makes the provision of a
detailed invoice imperative.”

Mr Munroe also said Ms Smith
had a claim against Callenders

_tor alleged breach of duty.

“We would advise that our
client claims to be entitled to a
set off of the damage caused by
you against any fee due to you,”

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

MRS. SEVASTI CHARLES
ALEXIOU NEE PATELLLI, 88

of Nassau, The Bahamas will be held at the
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, West Street,
Nassau on Saturday, January 20, 2007 at 11:00 a.m.

Father Theodor Bita, Economos will officiate and
interment will follow in St. Anne's Cemetery. Fox

Hill, Nassau.

Mrs. Alexiou was pre-deceased by her husband, Mr.
Charles Alexiou and is survived by her two sons,
Emmanuel and Michael and their wives, Kersten and
Spring; five grandchildren, Matthew, Nicholas, Lukas,
Sophia and Liam; nieces and nephews. Kaliopy
Tssavousis, Emmanuel M. Alexiou and Katherine Klonaris and many other extended
family members in The Bahamas and abroad.

Instead of flowers, friends may make a donation to The Persis Rogers Home for the
Aged, P. O. Box N-7350, Nassau, Bahamas in memory of Mrs. Sevasti Charles Alexiou.

Friends may pay their respects at the Chapel of Love, le s Funeral Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and Bradley Street, Nassau on Fr gay

p.m. to 7:30 p.m.



anuary 19, 2007 from 6:30

he wrote.

However, Callenders described
his reference to Bar regulations as
impertinent.

“In this connection, our
Michael R Scott recalls:a discus-
sion with you in which he was
shocked to discover that you pro-
posed to charge out ata rate of
$1,000 per hour.

“No doubt our invoices are
modest in comparison with those
of your firm, [tis Mr Scotts view
in all the circumstances that you
might study this rule with profit.

“You should be aware that we
terminated our engagement so as
to avoid any association with
questionable behaviour and a
descent into bad taste. You might
follow our example.”

Callenders also challenged Mr
Munroe’s allegation of “breach
of duty’, saying tt regarded this as
nonsense and would strenuously
resist any such claim.

Regarding Ms Smith’s occupa-
tion of Hortzons, Mr Munroe
sought his clienUs conveyance
within five working days.

But Callenders expressed puz-
zlement, adding: “To reiterate the
position, of which you must be
aware, there is no conveyance to
which your client ts entitled. The
escrowed docuntent in favour of
your client is cancelled for fail-
ure to execute the concomitant
security documents.

“The resultis that your client is
in oceupation of the traceable
proceeds of monies had and
received by your client as
advanced by Mr Ben ‘Thompson
by way of a loan.

“Any suggestion to the con-
trary is plainly absurd. Therefore
there is no conveyance to deliver
up to your chent

“Your client has been asked to
vacate Elorizons by Mr Ben
Thompson and she should do so
without delay.”

The letters were latd before the
court when Callenders sought a
restraining order against Ms
Smith last month

Works By
ANTONIOUS ROBERTS
Max Tavior
Post House Stupio &
GALLERY.
PROSPECT RIDGE

Pu:327-7562



FROM page one

as the defendant under her oth-
er name, Vicki Lynn Marshall,
is the latest dramatic develop-
ment in the Anna Nicole Smith
saga, which began with her
arrival in the Bahamas last sum-
mer.

And in documents laid before
the court, bilter undercurrents
are revealed between Callen-
ders and Ms Smith’s current
attorney, Wayne Munroe, with
a claim that the latter was plan-
ning to charge her $1,000 per
hour for his services.

Callenders’ action in Decem-
ber resulted in a restraining
order being placed on Ms
Smith’s accounts at Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Ltd and Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Ltd.’This was to
ensure that at least US$125,000

‘staved in her accounts to cover

the law firm’s bill. interest and
costs,

Under the order, dated
December 6, Ms Smith was for-
bidden to inform anyone of the
proceedings within 14 days of
it being handed down. Any
breach of the order could, it
warned, result in imprisonment,
a fine or seizure of assets.

Last night, Callenders said
they were prepared to enforce
any judgment and claim the fees
against the value of Ms Smith’s
new home if necessary.

Ms Smith, who is also in the
midst of litigation over her cur-
rent home, Horizons, on East-
ern Road, is accused in court
papers of failing to pay any of
the fees requested by Callen-
ders since they were hired last
September.

In an affidavit filed with the
court, Ms Ferguson said she was
engaged by Ms mith to pro-
vide consulting and other legal
services relating to a possible
inquest into the death of her
son Daniel. As a result of this
work, total agreed fees were
$113, 217.

However, Ms Ferguson stat-
ed, Ms Smith ignored the inter-
im bill for B$72,645.88 deliv-
ered to her on October 10, 2006,
and had failed to pay the whole
or any part of the fees incurred.

Ms Ferguson said she
believed Ms Smith was able to

.pay “but that she has a total

aversion to paying her bills and
that she will seek to avoid pay-
ing the fees by any means that
occur to her, including by send-
ing her money within this juris-
diction abroad.

“The defendant has, through
her attorneys, requested details
of the plaintiff's s bill. In my view,
the request is not a serious one,
but is a stalling tactic. I am sat-

Claim that
Anna Nicole
‘could end
up in prison’

isfied that the request is merely
being used as an instrument of
delay.”

The affidavit also said Ms
Smith had presented herself to
Ms Ferguson as “a rich and
famous celebrity”, adding that
some US$1.1 million had been
earned by her for the photo-
graphic rights of the love match
“ceremony” she conducted at
sea with lawyer-companion
Howard K Stern last Septem-
ber.

“She has a bank account here
which we reasonably believe
has a balance containing at least
US$1 million,” the affidavit
added.

Ms Ferguson also alleged that
Ms Smith had an established
bank record of avoiding her
financial liabilities by herself
applying for bankruptcy status.
“She has done this before by
filing for bankruptcy in Cali-
fornia, USA, in 2001,” the affi-
davit added.

“It is quite obvious to me that
the defendant has no intention
of paying Callenders’ legal fees
and that she will organise her
‘assets’ in such a way as to frus-
trate our collection of the fees.”

Ms Ferguson’s plea for a
restraining order in the sum of
US$125,000 (to include interest
and costs) over her assets was
granted by Judge Stephen
Isaacs.

Ms Smith’s recent negotia-
tions to buy Mr Rogers’ two-
storey canalside home at Coral
Harbour suggests she will be
leaving Horizons, which ex-
lover Ben Thompson, a South
Carolina realtor, claims is his.

Mr Thompson told The Tri-
bune that he advanced a $1 mil-
lion loan to Ms Smith to buy
the property, and that the deal
was subject to a mortgage
arrangement.

However, he claimed he was
“double-crossed” by Ms Smith,
who subsequently claimed the
house was a gift.

Mr Thompson is now fighting
for possession of the house
through the Nassau courts.

¢ Pathologist Dr Cyril Wecht,
who was hired by Ms Smith to
perform an autopsy on Daniel,
said yesterday that his $80,000
bill had now been paid after he
engaged lawyers to get the
money.

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The BNT welcomes
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Retreat Gardens on
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This Saturday,
January 20 at 8:30am

The Retreat is a National Park that the Trust
manages on behalf of the Bahamian people
and consists of eleven acres of tropical forest and
one of the largest collections of palms in the world.
The gardens provide wintering habitat for a number
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THE TRIBUNE















Students

sponsored —

to attend

conference :

â„¢ By BRENT DEAN

TWENTY-TWO College of
the Bahamas students will :
receive almost $10, 000 in :
sponsorship in order to attend
the Nassau Conference 2007, i
which brings together top lev- :
el financial services. profes-
sionals from around the coun- :

try.

room of COB.

He advised students to use }
the opportunity to network :
and learn as much as possible i
about the industry in order to }
take advantage of the lucra- }

tive careers it offers.

According to Mr Peet,
salaries in the sector average
from $35,000 per year in
domestic institutions, and
$40,000 per year in off-shore
institutions.

for the sponsorship pro-
gramme on behalf of the stu-
dents.

President Hodder described
the programme as an exam-
ple of one of the pillars of the

* college’s soon to be launched :
strategic plan, which attempts :
to link academics with real life :

experiences.

When asked about the view :
some Bahamians have that top :
level financial service jobs are i
reserved for foreigners, Mr i
. Peet sought to dispel this per-

ception.

He said current trends show :
that an increased number of :
Bahamians are being elevat- :
ed within the sector, and as :
Bahamians travel and work :
abroad, that increased expo- ;
sure will empower them to }
demand elevation to the high-

est levels in the sector.

In response to the same }
question, President Hodder :
more generally linked the :
expansion of higher education #
to increased opportunities of }

all kinds for Bahamians.

“The more we increase the }
participation of Bahamians in }
higher-education generally — :
and in university education in i
particular — the more we keep i
them here and offer them that :
quality of education, I think :
we'll see a transformation over ;
the next 10 to 15 years. And }
that’s why we say that what :
we are doing is building a }

nation together.”

The conference was estab- :
lished two years ago with the :
Association of International :
Banks and Trust Companies }
in the Bahamas (AIBT) as the }

founding sponsor.

The students attending the
conference will be selected by :
the college and the financial :

services board.

AIBT, the Central Bank of :
the Bahamas, Ansbacher :
Bahamas, Butterfield Bank, :
Cable Bahamas, GAM, Gra- :
ham Thompson, KPMG, :
Lennox Paton and Lombard :
Odier Darier Hentsch Private :
Bank and Trust will be spon- }

soring the students.

Minister of Financial Ser- :
vices and Investments Vincent :
Peet spoke at the launch of }
the conference, which was :
held at the executive board- :

i PRESIDENT of COB Janyne Hodder and Minister of Financial Services and Investments
Vincent Peet-yesterday at the 2007 launch of the Nassau Conference, held at the College of the
Bahamas executive boardroom Michael Eldon Complex

COB gets $17m

COB President Janyne }
Hodder expressed her thanks :

grant increase

@ By BRENT DEAN

PRESIDENT of the College
of the Bahamas Janyne Hod-
der announced yesterday that
the government has agreed toa
$2.7 million increase in funding
for the institution for next year.

Ms Hodder made these
remarks yesterday during a
press conference launching the
Nassau Conference 2007.

The $2.7 million increase in
the government grant is to fund
salary adjustments made last
year by the college, according to
Ms Hodder.

in response to a question
asked about the future of fund-
ing for the college as it pro-

gresses to university status, Ms -

Hodder reasserted her propos-
al for the establishment of a
national endowment that would
rely both on individual and
institutional philanthropy. ~





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Health

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SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

° Dr. Anne Russell: Health and Nutrition

¢ Dr. Timothy Barret: Stress and Grief
Management














(Tim Clarke)

e Mrs Theresa Bastian will be on hand for







dietary information

She said: “We have also
broached the topic with the gov-
ernment of creating the national
endowment for the University
of the Bahamas, which is an
exciting project — we hope it will
excite everybody in the country.”

Ms Hodder said this project
depends on whether COB can
find partners in the private sec-
tor or among the developers of
anchor projects.

The idea, she explained, is to
create a fund that would exist
“in perpetuity and would be
independently managed to sup-
port the University of the
Bahamas for the next 100,150,
200 years”.

The linkage of the proposed
national endowment to foreign °
direct investment would direct a
small percentage of the value
of large foreign investment pro-
jects to an independently man-
aged fund specifically designat-
ed for the university: :

The resources that such an
endowment could generate
would give Bahamians the
opportunity to develop through
world-class education within
this country.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

aera
ite

MONDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood
pressure and cholesterol testing is available. For
more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878







“Ms (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
szMonday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospi-



4 “tal conference room.

taf
i
%

& CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
“nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
4=Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
a “Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

“The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
4 “(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
“the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
ote! Bay St.




















TUESDAY



@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
‘of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.





Ft~The Cancer Society of the Bahamas.meets. at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
-their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.






Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes

required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

f@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
4‘ ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
}, . Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
| Cable Beach e Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
‘)« every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,



Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
r| at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
| « 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

/ ' The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.




WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS
Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

| @ HEALTH -
: Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
: of its meeting times and places: New Providence
: Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
; Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
} 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

i

Y - FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
© . first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New



location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is ©

IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ® Alpha Phi -



_The 2 brewery of The Bahamas"

IDOI RLA ESM AS RAEIN MA RIERLIN IER DERE ESN IE EE MITER

THE TRIBUNE



ybdeleveaux @tri

aS uP UNTHE

Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 cantemparary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to installation.

Exhibitian is

accompanied by a catslages.

Funky Nassau
This exhibition first apeneed in Wiesbaclen, Germany in

March: 2INh.

contains the work of aight artists and offers

samples of the best cantemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
linge and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imagination,

Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening. :
The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS.
Cancer patients, survivors, their family members
and friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the: Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednes-
day at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwa-
nis is a worldwide service organisation dedicated to
changing the world One Child, One Community at
a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and
Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm.
Inquire about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night
at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm -
Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between





5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the sec-
ond Thugsday of each month in the-cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-’
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm..All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-
lowship’ starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from lpm to 2pm.



FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm.
New Providence Community Centre: Friday 7pm to
8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre
at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.










bunemedia.net

PHOTOS WELCOME

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

i CONCERTS
The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on
Friday, January 26 at 8pm at St Paul’s Church

Hall, Lyford Cay.

SATURDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
_ of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,

Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are

offered every third Saturday of the month from-
9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community

Training Representative at 302.4732 for more infor-

mation and.learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to.encourage kids to cycle. Par-
ents interested in registering their children should
contact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

@ FAMILY REUNION

New - The Valley Family Reunion for former
residents and those reuniting with loved ones
and friends will be holding a

Dinner, Dance Celebration on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 3 - Cocktails at 8pm and dinner at 8:30pm
- at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Gov-
ernor’s Ballroom. The evening will include cock-
tails, dinner and dancing and a three course buf-
fet dinner. A live band will also be featured.
Dress: Lounge Suit. Renew old acquaintances
and meet friends from school days. For more
information telephone 328.5494. Tickets are
available at McCartney’s Pharmacy, Mount Roy-
al Avenue. Part proceeds to benefit cere S
charities.

m CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its
first concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri
Berlinski, violin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on
Saturday, January 27 at 8pm at St Andrew’s
Kirk, Shirley Street.



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm
to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A
spiritual teaching society leading you to greater
peace of mind, health, prosperity and happiness -
holds Higher Consciousness Services every Sun-
day at 10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures
if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-
mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in
the subject line.





y
THE |} HIBUNE



@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com _
world’s

~
INCE
largest Anglican

provinces - the United States
and Canada - approved the
Episcopal consecration of an

the

openly gay bishop in 2003, the

Anglican communion has been
in a state of turmoil.

A split in the worldwide
church may be inevitable, as
many Anglicans across the
globe maintain that Biblical
scriptures condemn gay rela-
tionships while others are lob-

bying for a more inclusive
church
ihis week, a 10-member

Covenant Design Group,
chaired by Archbishop Drexel
Gomez (Wesi Indies). is meet-
ing in the Bahamas to examine
the fall-out in the Anglican
Communion after the election
and consecration of the first
openly gay bishop - Gene
Robison » as Bishop of New

Hampshire

Are Eben OD Gomez has also
stated that the reason for the
covenant was to propose a way
iu which the churches within
the Anglican Communion
could remain united. He has
also put forth that the meetings
could likely result in the cre-
ation of two sub-groups within
the worldwide communion.

Recently, | spoke to a for-
mer neighbour who has newly
entered the priesthood, and he
stressed that the issue of the
ordination of a gay priest has
been intensely scrutinised in
the church, asserting that
although Anglicans are taught
to believe in the principle of
“unity within diversity”, the
homosexual lifestyle cannot be
accepted and may therefore
tear the fabric of the worldwide
communion.

He said the Episcopal
church in the US/Canada need-

ed to strongly examine itself

since many of the “more liber-
al churches” had almost com-
pletely departed from its scrip-
tural foundations - and the
homosexual upheaval was only
one such example! - .
Since 2008, Archbishop of
Canterbury Rowan Williams,
the spiritual leader of the
Anglican Communion, has
attempted to broker a truce
between liberal and conserva-

tive bishops worldwide - but to



Anglican Chur






YOUNG MAN’S VIEW



ADRIAN
no avail.

Gene Robinson, the bishop
at the centre of this controver-
sy, reportedly divorced his wife,
estranged himself from his chil-
dren and resides as a non-celi-
bate homosexual with his part-
ner of more than a decade. For
many years, traditional Angli-
cans have categorically rejected
the notion of homosexuals lead-
ing the flock.

Since Gene Robinson’s elec-
tion and ordination, the Angli-
can Church has lost many mem-
bers. In December, 2006, eight
churches showed their objec-
iion to the blessing of same-sex
unions and a gay bishop by vot-
ing te
Diocese of Virginia.

Truro church and Falls
church, two of the largest and
most historic churches, were
among those leaving the US
Anglican communion and plac
ing themselves under the lead-~
ership of Archbishop Peter
Akinola of Nigeria. Archbishop
Akinola has called for the
expulsion of the US Episcopal

Church from the worldwide

Anglican Communion, austere-
ly opposing the:ordination of
homosexuals.

The struggle to hold the
world’s third largest Christian
denomination together - 38
autonomous provinces and 70
million members - may prove
futile, as can be seen in Arch-
bishop Gomez’s comments
immediately after Gene Robin-
son’s consecration.

The archbishop asserted that
Anglican congregations were

left in a ‘state of confusion as
opposing views of homosexu-
ality that now confront the
church cannot both be the
truth. ' ;

Archbishop Gomez added:
“This church in American made
a break in the teaching. They
have accepted the homosexual
practice as a legitimate lifestyle
and, in fairness to them, one
must say that their formal posi-
tion is that. homosexual prac-
tice is engaged upon by adults
who are in covenanted rela-
tionships - a relationship they
have committed to remain

break away from the |



GS Wesson

faithful and true to one anoth-
er - they have accepted that as
legitimate.

“Our point of view is that
we consider it illegitimate in
terms of the teaching of the
Bible and the historic teaching
of the church”, he said.

Archbishop Gomez also
declared: “Nowhere in the
Bible is the subject of homo-
sexuality discussed in the
abstract. The Bible deals with
homosexual acts and makes it
clear that homosexual acts are
contrary to God’s pattern for
procreation, clearly enuncrat-
ed in the book of Genesis, reaf-
firmed by Jesus and continual-
ly proclaimed by the Church
from the very beginning”.

Because the Anglican
Church has autonomous
provinces that make their own
decisions, it has been suggested
that the turmoil it now faces
may also be due to the lack of a
clearly defined hierarchical
structure

Unlike the Catholic Church,
where the Pope is the head and
all church policy is handed
down from the Vatican, the
Anglican Church is set up quite
differently.

It has been suggested that
the absence of a centralised
authoritative structure may
possibly be a weakness for the
church.

Indeed, the Anglican church
has arrived at a crossroads and
must decide whether it’s going
to deal with two different sets
of teachings - one of which is
contrary to Biblical beliefs - or
continue to portray a united
front.

MY GRANDFATHER’S
LOST

I would also like to express
my sincere condolences to my
grandfather, Edward Gibson,
on the passing of his sister Ella
Gibson. Having grown up in
Long Island, I got to know
Aunt Ella and grew to appreci-
ate the special bond that she

and my grandfather shared..

May her soul rest in peace!
Also, I would like to express
my family’s gratitude to

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Bank And Insurance

: On Premises :
Check Our Price —
Before buying

Bahamas Bus & Truck

_ Call:





Ambrose Smith, the good
Samaritan who stopped and
rendered assistance to Shenell,
taking her to Doctors Hospital
and then to the Walk-In Clinic
and waiting (even after her
family was there).

Last week, a reckless driver
reversed on to my sister,

Accredited ¢ Registere:

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 9



ch at

Shenell’s, foot, as she was walk-
ing to COB.

After the incident, the inat-
tentive driver behaved as if she
was a fugitive, running away
from the scene, returning and -
upon hearing the medical costs
- fleeing!

Luckily, Shenell had only

minor injuries to a toe and an
X-ray showed that she hadn’t
broken any bones.

Mr Smith works on board a
Paradise Fisheries boat - the
Michelle - and is quite possibly
one of the last remaining good
Samaritans during these times.
Again, a sincere thank you!

Sion rai ORIENT

y Re Oe
DMO Make LLG LM OL Yale

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Experienced,

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Classes begin on gth February, 2006
Call-now for registration information



eC te yy Street.



CupisTopHe ERNEST BROWN

October 7th, 1963 - January 14th, 2006

If tears could build a stairway

And memories were a lane

| would walk tight to heaven
To bring you home again
No farewell words were spoken
No time to say goodbye, you

Were gone bel



ore we knew it,

and only God knows why,

Our heart still aches in sadness,
and Secret fears still llow. What
it meant to Loose you, No one
will ever know.

Sadly missed by mom, Juanita; dad, Ernest; sisters, Carla, Dressler,
Christine, Terry, Carmen; brothers, Michael, Andre, and Craig; nieces
and nephews, aunts and uncles and a host of other relatives and fr iends.

SMA AUS PRTG eh IN TS

A ERE
PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007



Se OOBRRARG Q,
Sg

“Reema Rite

RARE



STORY SO FAR: Meli Lleshi, eleven
years old, is telling the story of how and
why her family left Kosovo in 1999 and
came to settle in Vermont. Her uncle has

- just informed the family that the Kosovar
hero Adem Jashari and his family have
been killed by Milosevic’s Serbian army.

CHAPTER TWO
A Costly Caricature

C6 [x Get away from that

door!” I said, but Isuf had

already pulled the door open and both he

and Adil had run into the parlor and

flung themselves at Papa. Vlora was right

behind, headed for Mama’s lap. The

‘ grown-ups were sitting as though
stunned.

“Seventy people!” Mehmet broke the
silence. “The butchers just went in and
slaughtered them.”

Uncle Fadil’s head was down and I
could barely hear him. “It is said that
one child escaped—one of the little
girls.”

“Meli,” Mama said softly, “bring Uncle





Vas” ena

Sh NRT:

Fadil and Aunt Burbuge some tea,
please.”

My hands shook as I poured tea into
the glasses. What would become of us
now? Adem Jashari and his family were

x only, hope againsi-Serbian cruelty
and Milosevic’s oppression. I brought in

the tray-and passed the tea to the four

grown-ups. “Fix a glass for Mehmet,”
Mama said. “And one for yourself, too.
You will have to be grown-ups now.”

“Me too,” Isuf said. “I’m almost nine.”

“You may have a sip of mine,” Papa
said. “And you too, Adil.” He patted
Adil’s head, forestalling a whine.

For a long time we sat in silence. Even
the little ones were still. At last Uncle
Fadil said, “We came because we want
you to come to the country with us. No

place is safe, but the country is safer, |

and if things go wrong, we will have
food.”

Leave home? Leave school and all my
friends? 1 couldn’t bear the thought.
Besides, if no place was safe, why could-
n’t we stay right here? Our Serb neigh-
bors were no longer friendly, but surely
they would never harm us. The police
were annoying, but they’d never actual-
ly hurt any of us. Still, Adem Jashari and
all of his large family were dead. What
did that mean for us? For any Albanian
in Kosovo? But to leave our home?

Everyone was looking at Papa. He
would be the one to decide. Papa took a
long sip of his tea.

“Thank you, brother, but how can I
leave my home and my store?

“My children have never known anoth-
er home, and every Albanian in the
neighborhood depends on me, on our
store, for groceries. What would we do in
the country? You are very generous to
invite us to share your home, but we
would only be a burden.

“Here we are among friends. Here we
are needed.”

THE TRIBUNE

'





“You would be among family with us,”
Aunt Burbuge said.

“Yes,” said Papa. “And family is more
important than anything. But your house
is not'large, and we... ” He laughed

and hugged the boys. “We are blessed
with many children. If there is a ‘crisis,

your own daughter will want to return
from Prestina with her family. The hquse
would burst like an overripe pumpkin.”

Uncle Fadil shook his head. I thought

he would object, but he just said, “We

must get back. Mother is alone.” He
looked around for a place to set down his
glass, so I quickly took him the tray. “If
you change your mind, my brother, we

_ can always make room for you.”

Spring came. School went on much as
usual. I was sure Papa had been right to
stay.

Everything was quiet—too quiet, per-
haps—but I had begun to believe that
the worst was over. After all, what could
be worse than the massacre of the Jashari
family?

Then came the end of May, and that
terrible afternoon when all I wanted was
to be outdoors—not crowded with fifty
other upper-grade children into a room
of the tiny house that we Albanians used
for a school, since all the schools now
belonged to the Serbs. It was so hot that
I couldn’t listen to Mr. Uka drone on
and on. So I began to study his nose. It
was so big. He reminded me of a pelican,
so I drew a picture of a pelican that
looked a lot like Mr. Uka and showed it
to my best friend, Zara, who sat in the
same desk as me. She began to giggle,
which set me off.

“Zara, Meli, come to the front,” Mr.
Uka said.

I tried to slip the picture into my pock-
et, but it was too late; he had seen it.
Mr. Uka held out his hand. “Very
clever,” he said. “But what do pelicans

have to do with the history of Kosovo?” A

“Nothing, sir,” I mumbled. I could feel
Mehmet’s disapproval on the back of my ~ 's
neck. I didn’t dare turn to look. I knew -

how angry he must be.

“Then we will keep it for science

class,” he said. “And I would like the te

two of you to stay after school and catch

up on history.” io

When Mr. Uka finally dismissed us, ‘2
Mehmet was nowhere to be seen. “He ‘
ran home to tattle on me,” I said to Zara.

It wasn’t fair. 1 knew Papa would want
an explanation as to why Mehmet hadn’t
waited—why he was letting us girls walk
home alone when Papa had told him
months ago he was to look out for us.
Papa would be angry at us both.

As always, we had to pass the police
station on the way. A Serb policeman
was loitering outside. “Where are you
girls headed?”

He spoke, of course, in Serbian, and I
had sense enough to answer in Serbian.
“Just home,” I said.

He shrugged. Out of sight of the sta-
tion we began to hurry, and when I left
Zara at her house I began to run. I was
very late.

Yes, there was Papa waiting outside
the store. “Meli, thank God, you’re
home. But where is Mehmet?”

oe»

(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright © 2005

by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright © 2005
by Emily Arnold McCully

c

Reprinted by permission of z “.
Breakfast Serials, Inc. 3

www.breakfastserials.com



A.

ah
+?

‘zee er
=

Se a


THE TRIBUNE

By
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 11



Chinese workers
‘are here legally’

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE Director of Immigra-
tion said that the Chinese work-
ers employed on the construc-
tion site of TG Glover Primary
School are here legally, because
the Bahamas does not have
enough skilled electrical and
steelworkers to take advantage
of the jobs.

Yesterday, the Workers Par-
ty alerted the local media to
what they described as a “Chi-
nese take-over” on the con-
struction grounds of the prima-
ry school.

Mr Anthony Thompson, a
local steelworker claimed that
his employer (ER Hanna Con-
struction) had dismissed him
and hired Chinese workers in
his place.

Mr E R Hanna and a Chinese
foreman on the site confirmed
that there were about 29 Chi-
nese workers employed on the
site.

Mr E R Hanna told reporters
he was employed by the Min-
istry of Works. '

The Tribune contacted Hous-
ing & Utilities Minister Bradley
Roberts, who claimed he was
not aware of the issue.

Firearms
seized
FROM page one

would wish to credit and thank
the public for their support for :

assisting the police," Inspector
Evans said.

will assist us in our crime fight-
ing efforts, that could bring

police and the public working :
hand-in-hand that can certainly :
bring crime to a level whereby :

all persons can thoroughly enjoy
themselves. The

mitted towards this end," he
continued. "We,are committed,

is eradicated in our community ;

and that all persons can enjoy

free and unhindered."

Minister Roberts told the
reporter: “I am the Minister of
Works, the person you ought
to be relating that matter with is
the Minister of Labour.”

“The Ministry of Works does
not grant work permits, that is
the Ministry of Labour, they
approve any foreign workers
that come in,” explained the
minister.

The Tribune then contacted
the Department of Immigra-
tion. Director Vernon Burrows
confirmed the legal status of the
Chinese workers on the site.

He said: “The bottomline you
want to know is whether or not
they (Chinese workers) have
permission to be there, and the
answer is yes.”

Mr Burrows said the Immi-
gration Board decided to grant
work permits to the Chinese
workers, “after being satisfied
that there weren’t sufficient
unemployed Bahamians in the

market.”

“They made an application
to us and we approved this
application,” said the immigra-
tion director.

When The Tribune asked Mr
Burrows for an explanation, he
claimed: “We don’t have
enough Bahamian steelworkers
in this country.”

Director Burrows said that
Bahamians must not “fool our-
selves” into thinking that “we
have the workers based on the
number of projects that we
have.”

He also claimed that the
Bahamas does not have
enough qualified electrical
workers.

“All you need to do is go
cross to Paradise Island Phase
III and see the number of elec-
tricians over there.”

“Most of our qualified elec-
trical workers are contractors
themselves, and they are not
going to go and work for
nobody else, you have to give
them a contract,” said Director
Burrows.

Mr Burrows claimed that the
Department of Immigration
would be willing to find employ-
ment for skilled electricians and
steelworkers if they knew of
them.

According to him: “If you
could find some of them out
there who are unemployed and
can’t find employment, then, of
course, just let us (Department
of Immigration) and the
Department of Labour know,
and we will ensure that they are
employed. No question about
that.”

Residents claim

‘police harassment’

FROM page one

dents why they believed the police officers had questioned them. All

: of the residents claimed the incident was linked to the coverage of
’ : their complaints published in The Tribune.
"It is this kind of support that :

“In other words, just because we expressed our feelings to the

: paper we are now getting harassed, ” said Mr Christopher Miller of
L : house No. 47.
about great success. With the :

The residents said the group of officers included one female
officer and four male officers who were all dressed in plain clothes.

Ms Leana Carey, the spokesperson for the residents, told The Tri-
: bune that all of the home-owners were tired of writing letters to the
A ' : department of housing. They wanted all of their concerns resolved
oyal :
Bahamas Police force is com- :

immediately.

According to Ms Carey, Housing Minister Wisdom had-dlso

promised the home-owers grass, fencing and fruit trees for their
t : yards, but they had not yet received them.:
to ensure that the fear of crime :

The Tribune contacted Assistant Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson to notify the police of the situation, but our call was not

: returned up to press time.
themselves as they move about :

Nor did The Tribune receive a response from Mr Gordon Major

of the Department of Housing. |

More radio and TV
licences are granted

“We will be able to make sure we are monitoring

FROM page one

A new television licence was given to Wendell
Jones, CEO of Love97 and the Bahama Journal,
he added.

Minister Wilchcombe said his government was
able to grant the licences at this point in time because
the administration is finally moving towards imple-
menting new broadcasting regulations.

“That was the holdup for very long, I wasn’t com-

fortable with the regulations that existed,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that the current government
is now completing the process started by former
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in 1992 when his
administration gave the radio station 100Jamz its
licence, thereby breaking a decades-long monop-
oly on broadcasting.

Cabinet last week, he said, received recommen-
dations from international consultants, including
experts in Canada and the UK, on the question of
the regulation of broadcasting entities and will soon
be able to implement new rules for private radio and
television stations.

and regulating these stations in such a way to ensure
that the high professional level is always main-
tained,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said he is especially pleased with
the licences that were granted for the proposed

radio stations in the Family Islands.

“This. is especially good for the Family Islands
where announcements still have to be made in the
church and put on the street pole because
there are no other means of communication,” he
said.

The minister said that he is also excited about
the licence for COB, as it will serve as a training
ground for potential future broadcasters, generate
more interest in the college and will offer a forum for
discussions on various pertinent issues.

In general, Mr. Wilchcombe said, the new stations
will offer Bahamians a never before seen variety
of media choices.

“T think we are still stuck with the same old stuff,
the talk shows are all the same thing. We don’t have
the diversity that we require,” he said.

@ CHINESE workers at the construction site yesterday.

FROM page one

with the members of the Workers Party, Mr Hen-
ty F Storr, the electrical contractor on the site,
shared his views with the media on the alleged
Chinese take-over.

“There are no Bahamian qualified electricians,”
Mr Storr declared.

“No,” he said, “you can’t find them.”

Mr Storr said this was the problem on all his
projects.

“As soon as you train a fella, he leaves and

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Chinese workers

goes and starts his own business,” Mr Storr
explained.

At the end, Mr Anthony Thompson, the steel-
worker who started the controversy, told The
Tribune the government should be “worried”
about the next general election.

“They better straighten up, because an election
is right around the corner, and it seems like they
only looking for one term,” Mr Thompson said.



A FRIENDLY REMINDER

MASS DISCONNECTION ‘EXERCISES
IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS: a



¢ Blair Estate e Johnson Road ¢ Step St. « Berard Road

e Kool Acres ¢ Fox Hill ¢

Yamacraw Beach Estate « Elizabeth

Estate e Eastwood Sub Colony Village ¢ Nassau East Estate
e Winton Meadows « Mason’s Addition ¢ Leeward East &
Twynam Hwights ¢ East St. « Market St. e Wulff Road
¢ Blue Hill Road ¢ Montell Heights Ridgeland Park and ail
side corners * Pinewood Gardens ¢ Joan’s and Domingo
Heights * Bamboo Town e South Beach e Marshail Road
¢ Seven Hills and Gamble Heights ¢ Pastel and Faith Gardens
¢ Sunshine Park ¢ Silver Gates ¢ Golden Gates
¢ Blue Hill and Bel Air Estate.

PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mali at Marathon
or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations







'
'
!
‘
5
t

we ee He ee we He eee ene
PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUAEYTD, 2007 “THE TRIBUNE

New Year's
ouse
| Sir Lynden Pindling Estates

Off Charles W. Saunders Highway North
(Highway that connects Sea Breeze Estates
to East Street South) /

Saturday, January 20th, eur 10: 00 AM - 4:00 PM
= ON THE SPOT QUALIFYING | se :
ms VIEW TWO FULLY FURNISHED AND LANDSCAPED HOMES



a FREE FOOD AND DRINKS
us FREE DIABET ES, CHOLESTEROL « BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS



SUNSHINE FINANCE LTD.

LENDING & MORTGAGE SERVICTS
AP ARAL RY CF SESERIENE FARE ATE LPP.








agree a marae * ~
WAR
: a wh a\ AA Ae :

As ie = Babess pe ai

+t xh aS. ‘ SS aks




oes Nhe SVC wee Ser
ea ee aera ~ Til) SEAS

,
Y owe

“ews MaMa
nga sonra

Sreag iad geceecd f


PAGE 4B, THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




“The Tribune believes strongly in the
people’s right to know, holding both
the public and the private sector to a
high level of accountability and

transparency. At the Tribune, we




y

provide news and information, that...
people need to help make decisions in

their lives. I’m proud to be a part of the
leading print medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

RUPERT MISSICK, JR. ;
“wewene The Tribune
3 pp | /
ty Voice. My Vlewpyee



e news, call our
ips Line at 502-2359.



SER AL


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Notes to Financial Statements

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



1. General information

Freeport Concrete Company Limited ("the Company”) is incorporated under the laws
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and its shares are publicly held. The principal
activities of the Company consist of the production and sale of aggregate and ready-
mixed concrete and the retail sale of hardware, appliances and other consumer
products. The Company operates two retail stores under the trade name, The Home
Centre, in Freeport, Grand Bahama. The principal place of business for the retail
operations is on West Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama and the ready-mixed

concrete operation is on Queen's Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Up to August 31, 2005, the Company owned 90% of the outstanding shares of Robin
Hood Enterprises Limited ("RH"), a company operating in New Providence,
Bahamas. RH is in the business of purchasing and selling new and refurbished
equipment and-appliances. Effective August 31, 2005, the Company sold its entire

investment in RH.

The corresponding figures for the year ended August 31, 2005 in the statement of
operations and the statement of cash flows, include the results of RH up to August
31, 2005. The corresponding figures in the balance sheet do not include the assets

and liabilities of RH, as RH was sold effective August 31, 2005.
2. Significant accounting policies

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) and its interpretations adopted by the
International Accounting Standards Board. The significant accounting policies are as

follows.

(a) Basis of preparation

The financial statements are presented in Bahamian dollars (B$) which is the
functional currency of the Company. The Bahamian dollar is the currency of the
country where the Company is domiciled and is the prime operating currency.
The financial statements are prepared on the historical or amortised cost basis,
except for land which is stated at an appraised value as explained in note 8.

The accounting policies have been consistently applied by the Company and are

consistent with those used in the previous year.

(b) Cash and cash equivalents

The Company considers all cash on hand, demand deposits with financial
institutions and fixed deposits excluding those pledged as security for letters of

credit, less bank overdraft, as cash and cash equivalents.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006 +
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 11B

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



2. Significant accounting policies, continued
(n) Foreign exchange

The Company's functional and reporting currency is the Bahamian dollar.
Transactions in foreign currencies are translated to Bahamian dollars at the
foreign exchange rates prevailing at the dates of the transactions. Monetary
assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the Bahamian dollar
are translated at the market exchange rates at the close of each business day.
Exchange differences arising on translation are included in the statement of
operations.

(0) Segment reporting

A segment is a distinguishable component of the Company that is engaged in
providing products (business segment), which is subject to risks and rewards
that are different from other segments.

(p) Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires
management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the
application of policies and reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure
of contingent assets and liabilities at the balance sheet date and the reported
amounts of income and expenses during the year.

The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience
and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the
circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments
about carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not teadily apparent from
other

sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates. Significant estimates
which could impact the Company’s financial statements include the estimated
useful life of assets which are depreciated, impairment, allowance for doubtful
accounts and provision for slow moving and obsolete inventory. The estimates
and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is
revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and
future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

RN

2. Significant accounting policies, continued

(c)

(d)

Financial instruments
Classification

Financial instruments include financial assets and financial liabilities. Financial
assets that are classified as loans and receivables include accounts receivable,
due from former subsidiary and due from former subsidiary's shareholders.
Financial liabilities that are not at fair value through profit or loss include bank
overdraft, accounts payable and accrued expenses and long-term debt.

Recognition

The Company recognises financial assets and financial liabilities on the date it
becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument.

Measurement

Financial instruments are measured initially at fair value (transaction price) plus,
in the case of a financial asset or financial liability not at fair value through profit
or loss, transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or issue
of the financial asset or financial liability. Transaction costs on financial assets
and financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are expensed
immediately, while on other financial instruments they are amortised.

Subsequent to initial recognition financial assets classified as loans and
receivables are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method,
less impairment losses, if any.

Financial liabilities, other than those at fair value through profit or loss, are
measured at amortized cost using the effective interest rate method.

Derecognition

The Company derecognises a financial asset when the contractual tights for
cash flows from the financial asset expire or it transfers the financial asset and
the transfer qualifies for derecognition in accordance with Intemational
Accounting Standard 39.

'
The Company derecognises a financial liability when the obligation specified in
the contract is discharged, cancelled or expired.

Accounts receivable, net

Accounts receivable are stated at amortised cost less an allowance for doubtful
accounts determined based on the policy for impairment in note 2(g).

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



3. Going concern

During the year ended August 31, 2006, the Company incurred a net loss of
B$1,993,302 and as of August 31, 2006, the Company's current liabilities exceeded
its current assets by B$1,069,869. In addition, as described in note 14 (e), as of
August 31, 2006 and as of the date that these financial statements were approved for
issuance, the Company Was not in compliance with various debt covenants in
connection with the bank overdraft and bank loan facilities, primarily relating to
certain financial ratios. The total amount of the bank overdraft and loan at August 31,
2006 was B$1,963,064. The Company has not received written confirmation from its
bankers that they will agree to tolerate the breaches of debt covenants, and therefore
an uncertainty exists as to what action the Company's bankers will take, if any.

In addition, as explained in note 14 (d), the Company commenced an action in the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas against the Comptroller of
Customs for judicial review of The Bahamas Customs Department demand for
payment of duties of B$738,644 on all goods “on display” in the new Superstore and
to prohibit the clearing of further goods by the Company from the Freeport Harbour
pending payment of the same. An injunction was obtained against the Comptroller of
Customs and leave was obtained to commence an application for judicial review.
The matter is set to be heard on February 12, 2007. The Company has not made an
accrual in its financial statements for the amount of duties claimed. Although the
Company's attorney is of the opinion that the Company has a good arguable case in
obtaining the declarations sought, the ultimate outcome of this matter cannot
presently be determined, and accordingly no provision for any effects on the
Company that may result has been made in the financial statements.

The above situations indicate the existence of material uncertainties which cast
significant doubt on the Company's ability to continue as a going concem, and
therefore it may be unable to realise its assets and discharge its liabilities in the
normal course. of business. The financial statements do not include adjustments, if
any, that may be required to the recorded value: and classification of assets and
liabilities, in the event the Company is not able to continue as a going concem.

Management and the directors have assessed the above matters and have
concluded. that it is appropriate to prepare the financial statements under the going
concern assumption because of.the following reasons: ‘ort ;

Freeport Concrete:Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

a *--———eeee————————

2. Significant accounting policies, continued

(e). Inventories

(i) Retail hardware and consumer products

Retail hardware and consumer products are stated at the lower of cost and
net realisable value. Cost is determined using the weighted average
method. Inventory provisions are made when, in management's opinion,
inventory items will have to be sold at amounts less than cost. Inventory
provisions are calculated as the difference between net realisable value, as
estimated by management, and cost.

(ii) Blocks

Blocks are carried at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost is
determined based on direct production costs andean appropriate share of
overheads based on normal operating capacity. Net realisable value is
determined after considering the net sales price of the finished product.

(iii) Cement and aggregate

Cement and aggregate inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net
realisable value. Cost is determined using the first-in first-out method.

(f) Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation
and impairment losses (refer to accounting policy 2(g)), except for land which is
Stated at appraised value based on directors’ valuation and is not depreciated.

Depreciation is calculated on the straight-line basis over the estimated useful
lives as follows:

Plant 10 years
Heavy equipment 5 years
Automobiles 3-5 years
Trailers and security booth 5-7 years
Store furniture and equipment 7-10 years
Office furniture and equipment 4-7 years
Leasehold improvements the lesser of 10 years or the term of

lease after considering renewal options

Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are recognised in the statement of
operations as incurred. Cost of renewals and improvements are added to
Property, plant and equipment. At the time of disposal or retirement of assets,
the cost and related accumulated depreciation are eliminated, and any resulting
profit or loss is reflected in the statement of operations.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars) : : et

2. Significant accounting policies, continued

(9)

(h)

(i)

w

(k)

()

Impairment '

The carrying amount of the Company’s assets other than inventories (refer to
accounting policy (e)) are reviewed at each balance sheet date to determine
whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, the
asset's recoverable amount is estimated. An impairment loss is recognised
whenever the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. The
recoverable amount is determined based on the higher of the asset's value in
use (present value of estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the
continuing use of an asset and from its disposal at the end of its useful life) or net
selling price (arm's length sales price between willing parties less costs of
disposal). Impairment losses are recognised in the statement of operations.

Accounts payable
Accounts payable and other liabilities are stated at their amortised cost.

Provisions

A provision is recognised in the balance sheet when the Company has a legal or
constructive obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of
economic resources will be required to settle the obligation and the amount can
be reasonably estimated.

Warranties

The provision for warranties is based on estimates made by management from
historical warranty data.

Revenue recognition

Revenue from the sale of retail hardware and consumer products, aggregate,
blocks and ready mix concrete is recognised at the point of sale.

Net gain on sale of subsidiary is recognised when the significant risks and!
rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer.

Operating lease payments

Payments made under operating leases are recognised as an expense in the
statement of operations on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease.

(m) Interest income and expense

Interest income and expense are accounted for on the accrual basis.

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

_ Or

3. Going concern, continued

1.

During the current year, the Company's Home Centre store went through a
business transition period of moving out of a dilapidated facility into a new facility
with new products, expanded inventory and all the increased costs associated
with making this move. Certain related costs are not expected to recur in fiscal
2007. ° : ‘

The Company's financial projections for fiscal 2007 indicate profitable operating
results. The decision to close the Home Centre Seahorse location on December
31, 2006 is expected to save costs and consolidate staff and operations into one
facility.

A new General Manager for the Home Centre has been hired and is focused on
increasing sales, improving gross profit margins, controlling costs and improving
inventory management.

The Company has made all of the loan payments on the scheduled due dates.
Discussions were held with the Company's bankers who have been asked to
tolerate the breaches of covenants and allow the Company to continue to
operate under the existing loan and overdraft facility limits, with the same
scheduled monthly loan repayments.

4. Time deposits

As of August 31, 2006, time deposits earned interest at 3% (2005: 3%) per annum.
Time deposits of B$50,000 (2005: B$50,000) are being held by the Company's
bankers as security for letters of credit as referred to in note 14(b). All time deposits
mature within 3 months of the balance sheet date. All time deposits are held with

banks located in The Bahamas and are denominated in Bahamian dollars.

5. Accounts receivable, net









ate 2006 2005

Trade accounts — third parties B$ 1,333,818 1,086,067
Trade accounts — related parties 411,154 58,759
Trade accounts — employees 106,458 61,889
Other -. 300,000
Other employee receivables and advances 20,119 12,020
1,871,549 1,518,735

Less: allowance for doubtful accounts ($47,832) (209,498)
B$_ 1,323,717 1,309,237

The other receivable in 2005 represents an amount due from one of the Company's
landlords in connection with the settlement related to the leasehold improvements at
the Peel Street location. This amount has been reflected in other income in the 2005

statement of operations.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

_



5. Accounts receivable, net continued

The movement in the allowance for doubtful accounts is as follows:











2006 2005
Balance at the beginning of the year BS 209,498 187,711
Increase in provision for bad debts 335,544 482,921
Write-offs (28,863) (285,601)
Recoveries 31,653 -
Decrease resulting fromsaleof RH = (175,533)
Balance at the end of the year B$ 547,832 209,498
6. Inventories
2006 2005
Hardware and consumer products B$ 2,865,322 1,984,624
Aggregate 3,417 6,671
Cement 13,186 20,384
Blocks a __17,364 8,544
a 7 2,899,289 2,020,223
Less: provision for slow moving and obsolete inventory (410,446) (158,874)
ep oe Zz B$ 2,488,843 1,861,349

The amount shown below as Increase/(decrease) in the provision for slow moving

and obsolete inventory is included in

cost of sales in the statement of operations:



- 2006 2005

Opening provision for slow moving and
obsolete inventory BS = 158,874 559,428
Increase/(decrease) in provision 251,572 (201,495)
Decrease resulting from sale of RH - (199,059)



BS 410,446 158,874

Ott
THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 5B

_ Bahamas hotels nervously Rh,

await US passport impact For the stories behind the



4 2 & $4

4
+ * 44%,





@ By MIKE WILLIAMS
Cox News Service

MIAMI — As the owner of a
small bed and breakfast on
Grand Bahama, Mike Acosta
has battled hurricanes, competi-
tion with luxury resorts and the
vagaries of winter weather in the
northern US, where unexpect-
ed warm spells can put a crimp

cate for identification purposes.

“It is worrying,” said Mr
Acosta, whose Auntie Anne’s B
&B depends on a steady flow of
US tourists. “People might just
as soon go somewhere they
don’t need a passport.”

The change in US policy,
which also applies to Americans
returning by air from Mexico
and Canada, was ordered by the
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity as part of a tightening of
border rules following the 2001
terrorist attacks. Cruise ship pas-
sengers and those entering the
United States by land will also
need passports, but not until

8.

sta in his business. chain with operations in

oe Now Mr Acosta and thou- Jamaica, the Bahamas, Curacao change for some Caribbean

tate sands of other tourist operators and the Dominican Republic, islands such as Barbados, St

**,¢ across the sunny Caribbean are said his bookings for this winter Martin and Martinique, which

eta” facing a new challenge: as of Jan- _are actually ahead of last year. already required arriving Amer-

at uary 23, US citizens must have “But last-minute bookings are _icans to have passports.

w aoe passports to get back into the the cream on the cake,” he said. It could also mean a boon for

ey US. They can no longer jet to “With cold snaps inthe northern _ the US Virgin Islands and Puer- =
ita ¥ the Caribbean with nothing but US, a lot of people say: ‘Let’s to Rico, which are American ter- F ree po rt Co ntai ner Po rt
feta’ a driver’s license or birth certifi- get out of here.’ Now if they __ritories and require only driver’s Grand Bahama, Bahamas

a”

Caribbean tourism officials
say they understand the reasons
for the change, but that doesn’t
quell their worries that the has-
sles and costs of obtaining a
passport might discourage their
most reliable winter market.

“It is a cause of concern,” said
Arley Sobers, director of
research for the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation, a trade
group.

“Tourism accounted for $21.5
billion in the Caribbean in 2005.
It’s far and away our most
important area of economic
activity, and the US is our largest
market, accounting for approxi-
mately half our business.”

One study commissioned by
the World Travel and Tourism

Council rattled the region by
predicting the change in pass-

port rules could jeopardise up
to $2.6 billion in revenues and
threaten 188,000 jobs.

So far, Sobers said, there are
no reports of a downturn in busi-
ness approaching that level.

“But the proof of the pudding
is in the eating,” he said. “We
have to see.”

John Issa, executive chairman
of the SuperClubs resorts, a

don’t have a passport, they may
go somewhere else.”

It normally takes Americans
from four to six weeks to obtain
a passport. The fee is $97 for
adults and $82 for children under
the age of 16, meaning a family
of four might spend nearly $400
for passports. Passports can be
obtained in as little as two
weeks, but each applicant must
pay an additional $60 for expe-
dited service.

The rule change was original-
ly planned for implementation
in 2006, but was delayed a year
after an outcry by tourism oper-
ators.

The one-year reprieve
prompted a bevy of promotion-
al and educational campaigns.

Jamaica’s government ran ads
at US Postal Service outlets in
selected markets, along with
offering free coffee at commuter
stops in New York, Chicago and
Washington, D.C.

SuperClubs met the challenge
head-on by offering to pay for
Americans to obtain their pass-
ports, a promotion that so far
has had more than 1,500 takers.

Other resorts around the
region have offered rebates, dis-
counts, free day-trips, massages
and cocktails.

One bitter pill for Caribbean
hoteliers is the extra year that
cruise-ship passengers get before
the rule applies, a product of
heavy lobbying by that industry.

Many sun-seeking tourists may _.

opt for a cruise instead of a stay
on land to avoid the passport
hurdle, and that gives the cruise
industry an unfair advantage,
they say.

“I can’t understand how the
security concerns are less for
people arriving on cruise ships,”
Mr Issa said. “Less screening for
them means less security for

‘them.”

The new rules will mean no

licenses or birth certificates for
identity checks. Puerto Rico has
run an ad campaign touting itself
as a hassle-free ‘American’
beach destination.

But with less than 30 per cent
of Americans holding passports,
the worry for other Caribbean
destinations with high numbers
of US visitors is significant. In
the Bahamas, 87 per cent of the
tourists come from America,
while the number for Jamaica is
73 per cent.

In past years, only about 20
per cent of Jamaica’s American
tourists had passports.

“We made history last year by
topping 1 million American vis-
itors,” said David Shields,
deputy director of marketing for
the Jamaica Tourism Board.
“We’re encouraged so far by our
bookings for this season, but it’s
too early to tell if our quick get-
away visitors might show a fall-
off.”

While tourism boards and the
big resorts have plowed money
into promotions to try to head
off a drop in business, most small
operators can afford little more
than crossing their fingers and
hoping for the best.

“I’m afraid it could hurt us,”

‘said Barry Benjamin of the 32-

room Club Peace and Plenty on

the Bahamian island of Exuma. ,
“As far as I can tell our bookings °

for January have increased, but
the biggest impact might'be on
the mass market, the people who

SOR
REC



want the best deal and don’t
have a lot to spend.”

* Three (3) years’ experience working on GE, ABB or Siemens Drive Control Systems.

* Diploma or Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical Technology.
* Experience in supporting OMG, HHI or Mobile Cranes preferred.

¢ Computer Literate
* Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

* Must be able to repair and maintain:
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o Medium/High Voltage Distribution Systems

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful candidates:
o Full-time Employment ,

Major Medical/Life Grou
Retirement Savings Plan
School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
Performance Bonus

O°
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3
Oo

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau on
January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. through 4:00
p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville







news, read /nsight on Mondays



Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
Crane Technician

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:







Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs





PUBLIC NOTICE

THE CENTRAL BANK.
OF THE BAHAMAS



| Freeport Container Port

rand Bahama, Bahamas




ee SER Oe OR

i
x
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“ : Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
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| INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES
on MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: SEMINAR




* Three (3) years’ experience in repairing and maintaining heavy mobile
equipment.



The Central Bank Of

The Bahamas training room,
Market Street and ‘Trinity
Place Entrance

PLACE:



Certification in Heavy Equipment Repair and Maintenance (Diploma or
Associate Degree preferred)




ii Three to Five years working experience and knowledge of Kalmar or
Noell Straddle Carries.




Computer Literate oad ie Rees Des
_January 30, 2007 from.’
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Must be willing to work as part of a Team.




* Must be able to repair and maintain:
o Hydraulic Systems
o Diesel & Gasoline Engines
o Automotive Electronic Circuits



CONTACT NO. 302-2620, 302-2622,

302-2740 & 302-2734



Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful
candidates:



‘ o Full-time Employment
i o Major Medical/Life Group Insurance
‘ o Retirement Savings Plan
o School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
o Performance Bonus

APPLY BY:



January 26, 2007




j | Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau

on January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. . : 2
through 4:00 p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville The seminar IS open to banks and banking
institutions, government agencies and corporations
and private companies. Applications will be taken

on a first-come/first-served basis, as space is limited.




Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:
Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas





email: ADS@fep.com.bs












THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

Foreign firms warned
over ‘buddy system’

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGES JEAN OF

TAYLOR STREET, P.O.BOX N-1 390, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given_ that SMITH FLORVIL OF
CORAL LAKES,TUNA LANE, P.O. BOX NP-4911, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed.statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





General Maintenance Personnel
Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and
some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience
and must provide references.

Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experience.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ULTRACAPE (HOLDINGS) LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the under-
signed at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street,
PO. Box N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or
before the 2nd day of February, 2007. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by
the liquidator.

Dated the 17th day of January 2007.

LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR ~






Legal Notice
NOTICE
U CAP O

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ULTRACAPE (HOLDINGS) LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of ‘the International
Business Companies Act 2000.



(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 17th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General. :




(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
Maycock of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,

East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.

Dated this 17th day of January 2007.



H & J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

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g@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

WARNING foreign compa-
nies against establishing a
“buddy system" in the
Bahamas, the minister of finan-
cial services and investments,
Vincent Peet. said the practice
will not be tolerated by the
Government.

Foreign companies who
enter the Bahamas to proyide
specialist services, once Con-
tracted, ofte “never leave," he
revealed.

“This negative practice has
resulted in the establishment
of a “buddy system’, where
foreign companies refer busi-
nesses to their foreign friends,
that is other foreign companies,
and thus exclude their Bahami-
an counterparts." Mr Peet
explained

He told the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Engineers that this
approach was not conducive to
the Bahamian economy,
because it prevented develop-
ers from trying to make con-
tact with Bahamian engineers,
as they are advised the exper-
tise required is not available in
the Bahamas.

“This is most unacceptable,"

the minister said.

Mr Peet added that the Gov-
ernment was committed to
ensuring that more Bahamians
are able to take advantage of
the opportunities that result

from foreign direct invest-.

ments.

"Of equal importance is the
establishment of the Domestic
Investment Board by Prime
Minister Perry Christie, which
provides additional opportuni-
ties for Bahamians to engage
in entrepreneurial ventures in
our country," he said.

"Lam of the opinion that sig-
nificant in-roads have been
made but we cannot rest on our
laurels. We must continue to
work together and serve as cat-
alysts to move our country for-
ward and leave a lasting legacy
for generations yet unborn."

Despite the existence of the
buddy system in the Bahamas,
according to Minister Peet, the
Bahamas has experienced a
resurgence in its economy.

"Over the past four years, in
excess of 430 foreign invest-
ment projects were submitted
to my Ministry. Of that num-
ber, 53 projects valued at $13.6
billion are currently under var-

ious states of construction.
They include Ginn, Kerzner
International, the I-Group, and
Baha Mar," he said.

These major investors
employed over 100 Bahamians
companies, Mr Peet added.

"A perception exists that not
enough Bahamian engineers,
architects, contractors, survey-
ors and other professional bod-
ies are the true beneficiaries of
the economic bonanza being
experienced in light of foreign
direct investment,” he acknowl-
edged.

Dispel

Attempting to dispel that
misconception, he noted that
Baha Mar had employed the
services of 98 Bahamians com-
panies in their $2.4 billion
Cable Beach development,
while Kerzner International
used the services of 33 Bahami-
an companies on its Phase III
project alone.

The presence of foreign
investors is seen across the
islands of the Bahamas, he
explained. Currently projects
are underway in Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Abaco,

Exuma, Rum Cay, San Sal-
vador and others are in the
pipeline, such as Long Island,
French Wells in Crooked
Island, and Andros.

" Additionally," the minister
said, "I am in dialogue with
representatives of these devel-
opers. As recently as yester-
day, I was assured that focused
attention will be given to the
introduction of an Internship
for young engineers so that
they can gain invaluable expe-
rience and develop technical
skills and expertise in various
areas of specialisation."

“My ministry is also pre-
pared to revisit Heads of
Agreement requirements and
stipulate in the same, that a
lead Bahamian engineer or
engineer-of-record, and related
consultants, become intimately
involved in certain projects
beyond a minimum size and
scope - from its initial stage of
conceptualisation to design and
construction.

“Bahamian engineers and
other professionals have been
submitted to developers and,
more importantly, to all those
who are applying to invest in
the Bahamas.”








Cruise lines may take port stakes

FROM page 1B

would be “much broader in scope than
we had before”, and was adopting a two-
pronged strategy to deal with the increas-
ing tendency of the cruise lines to use their
own private islands as the sole or first port
of call in the Bahamas.

One angle has involved getting “the

major cruise lines to have a direct financial:

interest in the major ports in Nassau and
Grand Bahama”, Mr Johnson said, some-_
thing that has been discussed in negotia?
tions between Carnival and Royal
Caribbean.

And in allowing the cruise lines to use
their private islands, Mr Johnson said the
Ministry of Tourism was negotiating to
have Bahamians take much greater own-
ership, operation and provision of prod-
ucts to passengers visiting these islands
than currently. This is an attempt to ensure
the,economic benefits from the cruise ship
industry trickle down to all Bahamians.

“We are attracting 3.5 million cruise
passengers,” the deputy director-general of

tourism said. “We know our capacity in

Legal Notice
NOTICE
SENECA INC.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SENECA INC. is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) ‘The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 17th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro

Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road ‘Town,

Tortola, B. V1

Dated this 19th day of January, A D. 2007

Verduo Associated Ltd.

Liquidator

: Church Organist

Bex (emo Nae
Pipe Organ and Piano

Successful applicant will need to play piano for
Sunday School, organ for Worship Service.
and accompany a cholt.

Remuncrauion commensurate
with experience and ability.

Send letter of application and resume to:

Church Organist





P.O.Box N-497

Nassau, Bahamas

the near-term is to receive five million
passengers.”

On per capita cruise passengers expen-
diture, Mr Johnson said there was “no
reason” why the Bahamas could not
increase this from the current $50-$60 per
head average to $100. This, he added,
would generate mega bucks, or an extra
$140 million in total cruise passenger
spending in the Bahamas.

To increase cruise visitor spending in
the Bahamas, Mr Johnson said this nation
had to “offer much better experiences to
the customer”.

“Tf we create a great experience, no
cruise line will be prepared to stop a pas-
senger taking advantage of it,” he added.
“We have to make downtown Nassau a
magnet for tourism instead of a turn-off
for tourism, which it is today.”

Speaking earlier to a meeting of the
Rotary Club at Sunrise, Mr Johnson said
the Bahamas had done “a poor job” in
providing visitors with a variety of attrac-
tions, options and quality experiences that
would encourage them to step off resort
campuses.

He made this comment in response to a
question which suggested that the

of the International








2006.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT





In Voluntary Liquidation
“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
OMRO LIMITED. is in Dissolution”

The date of commencement of dissolution is 6th day of September,
Zakharov Andrey Konstantinovich
13 Raziezd Anciferovo

Raiyon Orekhovo-Zyevsky

Bahamas’ major hotels wanted to keep
their guests on-property to maximise vis-
itor spending, denying them the chance
to interact with Bahamian-owned busi-
nesses. ,

It was also pointed out that Kerzner
International's impending takeover of the
Hurricane Hole Shopping Plaza was like-
ly to further squeeze-out Bahamian-owned
businesses.

Meanwhile, Mr Johnson said the Gov-
ernment had lined up the “strategic part-
ners” required for the relocation of Grand

Bahama’s cruise terminal to Williamstown, \

and a commitment and announcement

. were expected in the next 30-45 days.

On the new cruise ship agreements, he
added that the cruise lines were likely to
be able to open their on-board casinos,
shops and bars at night, as major Bahami-
an operators had still seen their business
grow despite this. :

Mr Johnson said the biggest opportuni-
ty for Bahamian-owned businesses in rela-
tion to the cruise ship industry was prob-
ably in the provision of tour optians, espe-
cially adventure and active tours, ag pre-
vious ideas had been “lazy and unpins uc-
tive”. ial




Legal Notice

(No.45 of 2000)

OMRO LIMITED





P/O Kostino
Moscow Region

142642 Russia
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED. is in Dissolution”

December, 2006.

The date of commencement of dissolution is Lith day of

David Ralph Singleton

8 Hill Street,
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands

Liquidator



sol

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THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 7B



Freeport Concrete to assess
demands for extra capital

FROM page 1B

ers the three months to
November 30, 2006.
He added -that the loss

would fall in the range.,

between '$150,000-$200,000, the
two figures being a best and
worst case estimate.
However, Mr Simpson indi-
cated that he felt the worst had
passed for Freeport Concrete,
with overtime payments and
casual labour hired for the
Home Centre transition start-
ing to decline and “get down to
the Budgetary levels we need”
for the store to be profitable.
As for the fiscal 2007 second
quarter, which ends on Febru-
ary 28, Mr Simpson said: “I’m
looking to kind of break even,
and then in the third and
fourth quarters the Home Cen-
tre will be profitable, which
means the company will make
a profit and the losses incurred
in the first quarter will be gone.
We will come in with a small
profit” for full-year fiscal 2007.
Mr Simpson said that in the
absence of any capital injec-
tion, he would continue to
focus on working with
Freeport Concrete’s bankers
and suppliers, and generating
enough sales and cash flow to
meet debt repayments.
He pointed out that the
company’s overdraft had not
increased since September

2006, and that despite owing
almost $3 million in accounts
payables to suppliers, these
firms had been cooperative in
working with the company.

‘ “The suppliers have been

very good with us, seeing what ,

we’re doing at the Superstore
and we’ve made arrangements
with them giving is extension,”
Mr Simpson said.

Credit

Yet because Freeport Con-
crete is likely to be close to its
credit limits with some suppli-
ers, these companies will only
meet - or partially meet - its
orders for new inventory when
payment is received, hamper-
ing the company’s ability to

_raise sales.

Mr Simpson said the move
to the new Home Centre
Superstore had enabled it to
re-establish its paint, plumb-
ing, electrical and housewares
departments, increasing sales.

He added: “We just need the
Freeport economy to kind of
kick-in.”

Another concern of analysts
is the legal battle the Home
Centre is involved in with the
Customs Department, as
Freeport Concrete had made
no provision for having to pay
some $738,644 in duties if it
lost the Supreme Court case.

The company obtained an
injunction against Customs,

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ACTIVISION ENTERPRISE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance

with

‘Section 138 (8)

of the International

Business Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of

ACTIVISION ENTERPRISE

INC. has ‘been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRISTANDALE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of TRISTANDALE LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GAUNLET INVESTMENTS LTD.

SOREEIEIDBLSAI

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GAUNLET INVESTMENTS

| LID. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

which was demanding payment
of $738,644 in duties on all
goods ‘displayed’ at retail in
the new Home Centre super-
store.

' Freeport Concrete was
’ forced to obtain the injunction
“becatise Customs would not

have otherwise allowed it to

open the new Home Centre

Superstore.
If Customs wins the case, the

Home Centre would still be
able to operate, but would
have to warehouse all bonded
goods. This would effectively
defeat- the store’s open-plan

design, based on Home Depot

and Lowe’s in the US, and

undermine a business’ model’

the company feels has helped
to generate current sales levels
and encourage Bahamians to
shop at home.

Legal Notice

. NOTICE

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that on 21 November 2006 by
resolution of its Members, Wander (London) of the
Bahamas Limited went into voluntary liquidation and
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis of Deloitte & Touche, 2nd
Terrace West, Centerville, Nassau, The Bahamas, was

appointed the Liquidator.

Signed
Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis
Liquidator
P. O. Box N-7526 ©
Nassau, Bahamas
242-302-4800



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TALCO ALPS INC.

\e

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of TALCO ALPS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TEMPERATURE RISING INC.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 18th day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

\

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RIBBON FALLS INC.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is’ hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 4th day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

SATIN PREMIER INVESTMENTS LID.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE IS HEREBY given as follows:

(a) THE ABOVE COMPANY is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions Section 137(4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 17th day of
January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

_ (c) The liquidator of the said company is Ms. Alysor I. Yule of BdS
*., Corporate Services Limited, George House,’ George Street, P.O. Box

* N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas. . a a

Dated this 17th day of January, A.D., 2007.

Alyson I. Yule
Liquidator



NOTICE

~ INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

ROSEWOOD PREMIER INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE IS HEREBY given as follows:

(a) THE ABOVE COMPANY is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions Section 137(4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 17th day of
January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Ms. Alyson I. Yule of BdS
Corporate Services Limited, George House, George Street, P.O. Box
N-8159, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 17th day of January, A.D., 2007.

Alyson I. Yule
Liquidator

NOTICE

IN THE MATTER OF WANDER ae ea) OF .
THE BAHAMAS LIMITED

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE TO THE CREDITORS

The creditors of the above-named Company are
required, on or before 20 February 2007 to send their
names and addresses and the particular of their
debts of claims, and the names and addresses of their
attorneys (if any) to Mr. Anthony S. Kikivarakis, the
Liquidator of the said company, at Dehands House, 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville, P.O. Box N-7526, Nassau,
The Bahamas, telephone number 242-302-4800. The
creditors may be required by notice in writing from
the said debts or claims at the office of the Liquidator,
at such time as shall be specified in such notice. If in
default thereof they will be excluded from the benfit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Anthony S. Kikivarakis

Liquidator

EMPLOYMENT

hh

wee ye

SPS Ts

FLAN OO SAR & CAFE



Seeks to employ professional

Waiter and Waitress

Must be well-groomed

Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation
Must be able to work flexible
hours

Send Resume to:
‘Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Apply in person
Caves Village, West Bay Street.


PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Ta nes ee a:



WANTED

DATA PROCESSOR
MUST BE ABLE TO ASSIST WITH
INVENTORY

ANTED

SALES PERSONS
WITH 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE



AL












Please forward resume to:
Taylor Industries Ltd.
P.O. Box N-4806
Nassau, Bahamas

GY american

Senior/Junior Programmer (s)

British American Insurance Company the oldest insurance company in the Bahamas and
a leading financial services institution is searching for an experienced, highly organized
Programmer to develop and maintain company-specific applications. The ideal candidate
must be self-motivated to complete initiatives within established timelines and exercise

versatility with respect to project assignments.



@ By MARC LEVY
AP Business Writer






HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP)





Responsibilities:





¢ Support and maintain Oracle database applications
¢ Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

¢ Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

° Maintain existing database integrity and standards

° Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
° Create test transactions, refine and debug programs.

¢ Train end-users and technical support staff







Core Competencies:

* Proven project leadership and project implementation

¢ Experience with formal software development methodologies

° Strong analytical skills and experience in developing applications that meet user
requirements .

¢ Must have strong oral and written communication skills :







Required Qualifications:

°3+ years of recent programming expérience' including use of Oracle PL/SQL as primary
programming language

Bachelor’s degree in CS or equivalent experience and/or education

* Oracle Developer or DBA certifications a plus

Preferred Skills:

° Possess strong Project experience ideally on Oracle Applications implementations,
business systems design, or projects in general

° Proficient in MS Project and/or MS Project Server (required)

° Experience with SQL Server










Technical Skills:

C,C++, .NET, Oracle 8i/9i, Developer 6i (Forms & Reports), PL/SQL, Crystal Reports

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including
Life, Health and Pension.









Submit Resume to Human Resources Manager, British American I nsurance,
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N4815, Nassau, Bahamas or via email to
“dparker@babinsurance.com”




Slop aeuns

BIS:

Pricing Information As Of:







— Rite Aid Corp. shareholders
on Thursday overwhelmingly
approved a deal worth almost
$3 billion to buy more than

1,800 Brooks and Eckerd.
stores and become the largest

drugstore operator on the East
Coast.

Rite Aid, the nation’s third-
largest drugstore chain, has
billed the deal as a way to cat-
apult it within reach of the
rapidly growing drugstore lead-
ers Walgreen Co. and CVS
Corp. As drug retailers expand
into other services, Rite Aid
executives say the acquisition
also will make the company a
more attractive partner for in-
store health care and wellness
clinics and pharmacy benetits
managers.

The Federal Trade Com-
mission is still reviewing the
deal. Rite Aid has said it
expects the transaction to close
shortly after the company’s
fourth quarter, which ends
March 3.

Shareholders voted 404.1
million shares for and 9.1 mil-
lion shares against acquiring
the U.S. Eckerd and Brooks
operations of Canada’s Jean
Coutu Group Ince. for $1.45 bil-
lion in cash and 250 million
shares valued at about $1.5 bil-
lion. Rite Aid is also assuming
$850 million in debt in the deal.

Stronger

“The stronger we get, the
more choices we have in the
future,” Mary Sammons, Rite
Ajd’s president and chief exec-

‘utive, said in an interview after

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning

| for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





a shareholder meeting at a
downtown Harrisburg hotel to
announce the vote tally.

Deal

For Rite Aid, the deal marks
its first major acquisition since
a turnaround team arrived to
bring the company back from
the brink of bankruptcy seven
years ago.

The deal would create a
company of about 5,180 stores
in 31 states and Washington,
D.C., with revenue of nearly
$27 billion, stores on both
coasts and major market shares
in the New York City,
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and
Baltimore areas.

Rite Aid also will acquire six
distribution centers and Jean
Coutu will become the com-
pany’s largest shareholder,
with a 30.2 per cent voting
stake.

The merits of the deal had
divided Wall Street analysts
and proxy advisers. Some said
Rite Aid has the savvy to win
customers back to the deterio-
rating Eckerd stores. Others
said Rite Aid is overpaying for
the stores and hasn’t shown
the ability to make its own
stores productive.

Rite Aid shares gained 6
cents to close at $6.14 on the
New York Stock Exchange.
Since it was announced Aug.
24, Ride Aid’s stock price has
risen about 30 per cent.

“I think if you look at the
stock price today, the market

likes this transaction,” compa-_
ny chairman Bob Miller said °
in response to questions at

Thursday’s meeting.

Shareholder Doug Hoskins,

Rite Aid shareholders
approve $3bn Brooks,
Eckerd stores purchase

a retired insurance brokerage
partner who attended the
meeting, said he reluctantly
voted for the deal after reading
that a major proxy adviser sup-
ported it. Hoskins, who lives
just a few miles from Rite
Aid’s headquarters in Camp
Hill, remembered the compa- -
ny’s deep plunge into debt -
under a prior management
team, six of whom were con-
victed or pleaded guilty in con-
nection with a federal account-
ing-fraud investigation.

“T thought they weren’t
healthy enough to make a big
jump like this,” Hoskins said.

Even with the acquisition,
keeping up with CVS and Wal-
green will not be easy.

Revenue

Walgreen, with 5,584 stores
and $47.4 billion in revenue in
its last full fiscal year, opens a
new store every 18 hours and
has 500 new stores planned for
this fiscal year. CVS, with 6,200
stores and $37 billion in rey-
enue in its last full fiscal year,
purchased about 700 Sav-On
and Osco drugstores in June.

To absorb the new Brooks
and Eckerd stores, Rite Aid
has said it will spend $950 mil-
lion over five years to rebrand

. them, convert them to Rite

Aid’s systems and rebuild cus-
tomer loyalty.

Analysts say the deal will
propel Rite Aid’s long-term
debt to approximately $5.8 bil-
lion — higher than CVS or
Walgreen. However, Rite Aid
said it expects to reduce’ its
debt-to-cash-flow ratio to
below its current level within
two years after the deal closes.



qualifications:

related field.

The American Embassy is presently considering
applications for the following position:

INVESTIGATIVE AIDE

Serves as the Drug Enforcement Administration Liaison
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force, Her Majesty’s
Customs, Bahamas Immigration and the Royal Bahamas
Defense Force and all other agencies affiliated with the
suppression of illegal drug activity in the Islands of the
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands.

This position is open to candidates with the following

A Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or a
















‘Thursday, 18 January 200 7





Securit y



0.54 Abaco Markets 0.59
10.25 Bahamas Property Fund “11.30
6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85
1.10 Fidelity Bank ti A256
9.05 Cable Bahamas 10.00
1.64 Colina Holdings 1.90
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 12.65
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.88
2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.50
5.54 Famguard 5.95
10.70 Finco 12.25
10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.45
10.00 Focol : 12.55
0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55:
7.15 ICD Utilities 7.20
8.52

J. S. Johnson
10.00 Premi
es ee






S2wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

8.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings





Colina Money Market Fund 1.322791*
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728""*
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**
1.2175 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450****

11.3075*****



Fidelity Prime Income Fund
is z




52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings




Previous Close Today's Close












Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

- Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Five years of Law Enforcement experience is required.
Must have a good working knowledge of Bahamian Law
as well as an understanding of Bahamian Government








Daily Vi



Change


















































0.64 “0.293 0.000 N/M 9.00% agencies and their functions.
11.30 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.54%]

8.03" 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.24%

0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50%

1.85 0.00 700 0.199 0.060 9.3 3.24% PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

1.25 0.00 i 0.170 0.050 74 4.00%
10.00 0.00 0.715 0.240 14.0 2.40%

2.00 0.10 5,000 0.078 0.040 25.6 2.00% st have ahilj icate effect)
soe e106 Roe: ee oes 200% Must have ability to communicate effectively both orally
4.84 -0.04 0.134 0.045 36.4 o.o2%f ‘ff and in writing. Specialized report writing; investigative
2.50 oO. 0.295 0.000 8.5 0.00% . 7 aby } ni ante’ . =
eee een Geebl “eae. Hae a aate and diplomacy skills and computer skills (Microsoft
12.25 0.00 0.779 0570 15.7 4.65% Office Suite) are required.
14.45 0.00 0.921 0.500 15.7 3.46% . fase ne
12.55 0.00 200 1476 0.500 8.5 3.98% Must be able to work with minimum supervision.
0.55 0.00 -0.423 0.000 N/M 0.00%




0.00 0.532

BENEFITS INCLUDE:





The successful candidate will be offered an excellent
compensation package including performance-based
incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance,
pension and opportunities for training and development.









Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens
who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.
























Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m.
Monday through Friday at the security area of the
American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed applications
should be returned to the Embassy: addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than Tuesday, January
30, 2007.









*- 5 January 2007








** - 31 December 2006










*** - 31 December 2006









**** - 31 December 2006







sieee - 31 December 2006

84-2803






+P.

- THE TRIBUNE

Forty per cent higher
building costs damage
first ‘anchor’ hotel

FROM page 1B

: _Costs to construct such prop-

‘erties in Nassau were $500 per

square foot, while in Exuma
the price was $800 per square
foot.

The experiences of the Four
; Seasons Emerald Bay resort
, provide a salutary warning for

., other investors contemplating,

‘ or in the stages of construct-

, ing, similar mega projects on

- other Family Islands.

_ These include the Boston-

, based I-Group, joint 50/50
partners with the Government

. on Mayaguana; Montana

Holdings’ $700 million Rum
Cay project; numerous projects
on Eleuthera; and the Ritz-
Carlton branded Abaco Club
, at Winding Bay and Discov-

ery Land Company’s Baker’s

- Bay development in Abaco.

Simply put, the costs of
putting in infrastructure at
Emerald Bay, such as roads
and all the utilities - paid for at
least in part by the developers
- coupled with the high oper-

, ating cost environment both

inside and outside the resort,

, have made it difficult for the
+, OWners to generate a return on

their investment and profit.
This again raises concerns

., about whether the Govern-
.« Ment’s ‘anchor project’ model

. for developing the Family

,,' Islands will result in sustain-

, able tourism.
; The plan was to spark eco-
nomic activity in thé Family

. Islands, reducing social pres-

sures and overcrowding in Nas-

~ sau by encouraging people to

: return home, but there have

, been unforeseen consequences

with a number of these pro-

, jects.

The Tribune previously
- revealed that the owners had

, been looking to either sell
: Emerald Bay.or attract in new

investor capital. A sale to

‘ ~ Goldman Sachs’ real estate pri-

~£

Se Ra EB I ae a la, Se a ET aa

Fa a

a

=. Oe SCS Pare wie =
“

i AE RSF _ PO _L

Pa ne ee

ee

Pe a ee a

2S € OF

ah

a’

“SS 88 SY eee”

“EEL ee

to PE a a ae ee ee ee ee a *



vate equity arm and another
private equity fund, Rockpoint,
fell through last year.

This newspaper has since

* learnt that the Philadelphia- °

based Adler Group, the finan-
cial backer and supplier of seed
capital for Ginn Clubs &
Resorts’ $4.9 billion Ginn sur
mer project in Grand Bahama,
was approached to see if it was
interested in acquiring Emer-
ald Bay. The offer is under-
stood to have been declined/

Mr Johnson yesterday
underlined the impact the rel-
atively high building costs on
Exuma, compared to Nassau,
were having on Emerald Bay’s
margins. He pointed out that
concrete there cost $200 per
yard, whereas in Nassau it cost
$125 per yard.

“The hotel, with a golf
course and spa, as a 1985-room
resort of Four Seasons’ cali-
bre, can only be profitable if
it has a much larger customer
base outside those rooms,” Mr
Johnson said.

He added that the resort
needed to build out to 700-800
units to get close to profitabil-
ity, whereas it was currently
closer to 300-400 units.

The Ministry of Tourism
executive added that there was
“no question” that the Four
Seasons Emerald Bay resort
could not be allowed to fail,
given that acts as the ‘model’
for anchor resort development
in the Family Islands. Its fail-
ure would send a negative mes-
sage to other investors attract-
ed to look at similar develop-
ments in other islands.

“The site is one of the most
special sites for Four Seasons,”
Mr Johnson said. “They’re get-
ting some of the highest aver-
age daily rates of Four Seasons
properties anywhere, but
where they’re suffering is on
the cost. If we can find a way of
getting the costs more into line,
they will have a successful
resort.”

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR
EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

¢ Director of Design

¢ Exterior Relations

e Project Managers

¢ Project Engineers

¢ Genaral Superintendents
¢ Superintendents

¢ Assistant Superintendents

¢ Electrical Construction Managers
° Mechanical Construction Managers

° Office Engineers
¢ Manager of Quality Control

¢ Inspectors

Over 20 postions are to filled. All positions
require successful applicants to reside at North
Eleuthera or vicinity.

Interested persons should submit their resumes

with cover letter to:

The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125

Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



Mr Johnson said Emerald
Bay’s average daily rates
(ADRs) for rooms were in
excess of $300. He acknowl-
edged that Exuma in general
needed to be placed “on a

more sustainable path moving ~

forward with the Emerald bay
project, and make it the model
for projects of that nature in
the future in terms of its inte-
gration with the community,
as well as the provision of win-
win linkages for Bahamians,
investots........ [and tourists]”.

Emerald Bay had also suf-
fered from problems outside
its direct control, with Mr
Johnson saying the resort “did-
n’t anticipate” problems find-
ing housing for its employees.

The demand for housing,
and limited availability of land
on Exuma, has pushed up real
estate prices and rental rates.
Mr Johnson added: “It’s not
unusual to find a two-bed-
room, one-bath apartment in

excess of $2,200 per month,
and they’ve got to rent many of
these to meet staff needs.”
He said: “We must, though,
avoid the temptation to exploit
migrating Bahamians as well
as resort developers, given the
shortage of housing as such
actions can result, if we are not
careful, in our ‘killing the
goose that laid the golden egg’,

‘as we see happening in Exu-

ma.”

On the staff front, Emerald
Bay was having to pay high
wages to entice staff to relo-
cate to Exuma, but suffering
from “high turnover, high
training costs”.

“They’ve not been able to

attract the best staff, so they -

have to invest a lot to get them
up to standard,” Mr Johnson
explained.

“They see the cost of hous-
ing, the cost of groceries, and

then that trained person gets

poached by Atlantis.”

ANG DOD
Store Manager &
Sales Associates

Small Retail Store Specializing in girls accessories is
seeking a dynamic, energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager with prior retail managerial experience
to handle all aspects of store operations.

Only persons 30 years and older need apply.
Vacancy also exists for sales associates.
Please send resumes by e-mail to

- ecooke @coralwave.com

Phone:394-7019









¢ Snorkeling
e Diving



communication skills.



with cover letter to:

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
_ of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

BOAT CAPTAIN

Duties and Responsibilities

e Manage fleet of boats and related equipment.
° Coordinate and manage maintenance of boats
° Coordinate all water sport activities.

° Flats and Deep Sea fishing
¢ Manage Staff of First Mates.
¢ Coordinate Safety of all boat patrons.

* Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience as a boat
captain. Must be familiar with the local waters
and the area around Royal Island. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and boat operations. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal

Interested persons should submit their resumes

The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.







































FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 9B





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential community
with private residences and club, 200 slip marina and
boutique hotel and spa, and a golf course just off North
Eleuthera is seeking to employ a Married Couple with stron
managerial, operational and organizational skills in
managing resort properties to oversee all day to day
operations on the island.








Duties and Responsibilities —




° Greeting potential members/buyers/investors

° Arranging transportation, including airport, transfers, boats
and on -island vehicles

¢ Responsible for setting up guest relations, all staff training,
motivation and recruitment

° Manage local accommodations

¢ Upkeep of boat fleet é

° Manage/coordinate all ocean/beach activities

° Manage guest inquiries and complaints in an efficient and
professional manner










¢ Once the Preview Village is completed this position will:




* Oversee operations
° Maid. Service

¢ Food/beverage

¢ Beach activities.

° Ocean activities —

¢ General maintenance upkeep of premises
e Manage fitness/spa activities

¢ Assist in sales process








* Qualifications: The ideal candidate must have a minimum
of .10 years experience in resort property management with
significant experience in the restaurant and spa industry,
‘including operations and maintenance of pool and spa
equipment. Must have strong managerial and organizational
skills in the areas of personnel and bugeting. Must be computer
literate with strong written and verbal communication skills.







Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to:




The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com






Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

CHEF









Duties and Responsibilities

° Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.

° Coordinate and manage all food preparation
areas.

¢ Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.

¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.










¢ Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience a four (4)
star restaurant cuisine and dining with significant
experience in the food industry. Must have experi-
ence in start up restuarant operation. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and budgeting. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.












Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:





The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas









Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com







Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.



i



PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

Financial Statements of

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Year ended August 31, 2006

Dear Shareholders,
We present our audited financial statements for the year ended August 31,2006.
The figures stated in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the 12 months ended August 31,2005 include the Robin Hood division.

‘The figures stated in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the 12 months ended August 31, 2006 are the consolidated figures for
the Home Centre and concrete plant in Grand Bahama and do not include the Robin Hood division, as this was sold on August 31,2005.

Our gross profit was seriously impacted in the 4th quarter primarily as a result of the costs associated with the transitioning of the stores,
the delayed opening of the Home Centre Superstore, and the reduction in inventory value due to obsolescence, damage and shrinkage.

* Once we had transferred the good, saleable, inventory from the Peel Street facility to the new Superstore, there was a considerable amount
of obsolescent and damaged inventory that had to be written off. We consider this to be an. accumulation of damaged and obsolescent inven-
tory over several years that was finally. dealt with due to the relocation of our business. This, together with the inventory shrinkage, pri-
marily due to theft, resulted in a reduction in the value of our inventory by approx $700k.The new state of the art building, which is now
the Home Centre Superstore, is more conducive in controlling inventory shrinkage. Also, we have added additional security personnel and
are now in the process of installing cameras throughout the store. These things, along with weekly random inventory checks, put in place
by our new General Manager, will help to significantly reduce the inventory shrinkage problem this fiscal year.

* We commenced operations at the new Home Centre Superstore on Atlantic Drive in Freeport on September 6, 2006. All of our planning
‘was geared to opening the Superstore in June, 2006; however, due to éxtended construction time we were not able to commence business
until September 6, 2006. This delay seriously impacted sales, as well as gross profit, and meant that we had approximatcly $1.7 million
worth of inventory with no resulting revenue for several weeks. Additional costs were incurred in the last quarter due to hiring temporary
personnel to help dismantle and put up racking and shelving in the new store, hiring temporary personnel to help in sorting and transfer-
ring inventory from the Peel Street facility to the new Superstore facility and significant overtime costs incurred to get the Superstore open.

+ We incurred increased legal fees associated with several litigation matters, primarily the injunction against Customs to allow us to open
up the new Superstore pending the judicial review of Custom’s decision pertaining to the applicability of customs duties on displayed
goods. ,

© We incurred additional rent expense in the 4th quarter as a result of us not being able to move out of the Peel Street facility in June 2006.

The effect of all of the above seriously impacted the Home Centre's financial performance resulting in significant losses during the last
quarter of the 2005 to 2006 financial year.

The Home Centre for the Ist quarter of the new fiscal year is not yet profitable due to the on-going costs associated with transitioning the
business. However we closed the Seahorse Plaza location on December 31st 2006 and are busy this month moving the inventory and con-
solidating all of the staff into the Superstore. However, the positive financial impact of this decision will not be felt until the 3rd quarter
of this fiscal year. : :

Our primary focus at the Home Centre this year will be in four areas, inventory management, accounts receivable, cost controls and the
implementation of further business procedures,and accountability across the entire organization. Since we opened the Superstore I can state
that the inventory is the best it has ever been and it is constantly turning over. Our customer transaction counts have never been at the high
levels that they are now, which proves that we have the correct business model with the Superstore concepi and barring a catastrophic
downturn in the Grand Bahama economy the Superstore will do well. 7

Iam pleased to report that the concrete plant was profitable over the 12 months to August 31, 2006. This was a considerable turnaround
from the previous year. Our sales at the concrete plant increased 65%. We have still not been able to relocate to the new site at the Bahama
Rock facility, but this will be done in the second quarter of this current financial year. Once we have made the move, this will result in
additional savings in costs, which will translate to increased profit margins.

With the concrete plant forecasting another profit for this fiscal year and the costs of transitioning the Home Centre into it’s new location
being finished in the 2nd quarter and assuming the forecasted sales levels are met, then the Home Centre should also be profitable by the
end of this fiscal year.

Lcan understand our shareholders being disappointed in our share price since we went public in 2001, and trust me there is nothing more
disappointing to have worked as hard as we have to keep this company going after three devastating hurricanes and to see these losses.
However, the company is now positioned to do well as we have the Home Centre Superstore, which is in a perfect location and is the cor-
rect business model and we have the concrete plant that is performing well. Having both these divisions doing well in the same year has
not happened since 2004, which is the year we were profitable and the year prior to the two devastating hurricanes in 2005.

. .

I thank you for your continued support and wish you all a healthy, happy and prosperous 2007.
Ray Simpson

Chief Executive Officer
January 12, 2007




Retophone 249 3299S:
a, Tngommtions! Buddies Sax. ‘QAD SHR VOEE

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

To the Shareholders
Freepart Concrete Company Limited

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Freeport Concrete Company:
Lithited {the Conipany’}. which comorise thé balance shéet as: at August 34; 2006 and
the. statement of operations; statement Gf changes in shareholders’ equity and statement
of cash flows for the year thes éndd. and a sutimaly of significant accounting policies
and other explanatory notes. "

Management's Responsibility for the Financial! Statements

Management 18 FSSponsible fof thé préparation and Jair presentation of these financial:
statements in accordance with intemational Financial Reporting Standards. This
responsiblity inoludés: dauigaing, implementing Sid sigintaining intemal control relevant
io the preparation and fai presentation.of financial Statements that are: free from material
misstatements, whether due fo fauc or enon Selecting and applying appropriate:
accounting policies: and meking accountiig eStimiaes that ate seasonable in the
crqumsiances:








Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility ig. to expiess an opinion.on these financial statements based-on our.
augit, We conducted our audit im accordance with International Standards on Auditing ag.
promulgated by the international Fedération of Accountants. Those standards: require:
that we camply with relevant ethical requinements -and. plan and: pesfonm the audit. to
obtain teasonabis Sssurance whether the financial: statements are free. of material:
misstatement,











ast é fnanciat stat

judgment, including the assessr
slatements, whether due to fraud or error, :
conside® inltmal contol *levant tothe ‘Company's preparation and-tair presentation. of
the financial statements in onder to design. audit procedures tat are-approprate in. the
circumstances, tut rot for thé purdoss of expressirig ai Opition ‘Gi thé effectiveness of
the Company's imal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of
accounting princigies used and the: reasonableniéss of aocounting estimates made by
management as well ds evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements:









We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is. sufficient and appropriate. to
provide a basis for cur opinion,

Opinion

In burepinion, the financial statements present fairy. in all material respects, the financial
position of the Campany as-at August 31. 2006, and of itscinancial performance and. its
‘cash fiows for the year then ended in accordance, with Intemational Financial Reporting
Standards.

Emphasis of matter

Without qualifying our opihion, we draw aiténtion i sete S tothe financial statements
which describes that the Company has incurred a.net Joss -of 831,993,302 for the year
ended August 24, 2006 and, as of that date. the Compa y's current liabilities exceeded its
curtent-assets. by BS1060,66% In addition, as described in nates 3 and 14 (e), as of
August 341, 2008 and as of the date that these financial stateme 2 rove
issuance, the Company was notin compliance with:various debt covenants in connection
with the bank overdrattand bank loan facilitias, primarky relating to:certain financial ratios.
The total aniount of the bank Gvérdraft and loan at August 31,2006 was 891,983,064.









The Company has notreceived written confiemation-fram its -hankerg' that they wal agree
to tolerate the breaches of debt covenants, and therefore.an: unicertamty exits, a8 tc wiat
action the Company's bankers will take, if any. in additio described in:notes:2 and 14

(a). the Company commenced an action in the Supremé Court of the Commonweatttr of
The Bahamas against the Comptraller.of Customs for judicial review of The Bahamas
Customs Department demand for payment of duties of BSTIB644 on all goods. “on
daglay’ in the néw Superstore. and to prohibit. the clearing of further goods: by the
Company from the Freeport Harbour pending payment of the ‘game. An inj Action Was,
obtained against the Comptrolter of Customs and leave was obtained to cam i
application for jucioiat review. The maiter is set to be heard on February 12,2007. The
Company has not made an accrisal ih HS financial statements for the amount of duties
claimed. Although the Company's atiomey is of the opinion that the Company has.a good
arguable case in obtaining the déclarationa sought, the ultimate outtome. of this matter
gannet preséntly ee determined, and accordingly no provision for any. effects on the









indicate the existence of material uncertainties. which cast significant doubt an the
Company's ability to continue as a going concem, and therefore it may be unable to
regise its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business, The
Enancial statements do not include. adjustments, if any, that may be required to the
recorded value and classification of assets and liabilities, in. the event the Company is not
able to continue a6 a-gaing.concem.

, wf
KWE
Chartered Accountants:

Freeport, Bahamas,
danuary 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS ~

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Balance Sheet

August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)







Note 2006 2005
Assets

Current assets:
Cash BS 198,471 107,747
Time deposits 4 63,274 61,626
Accounts receivable, net 5 1,323,717 1,309,237
Due from former subsidiary 12 17,250 578,500
Due from former subsidiary's shareholders 12 - 571,500
Inventories 6 2,488,843 1,861,349
Inventory of spare parts and supplies 121,187 92,143
Deposits and prepaid expenses 132,642 113,376
4,345,384 . 4,695,478
Property, plant and-equipment 8 3,387,232 2,997,002
B$ 7,732,616 7,692,480

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

Current liabilities:



Bank overdraft 9 B$ 1,491,916 320,532
Accounts payable and accrued expenses 10 3,734,627 2,791,916
Warranty provision 5,000 15,809
Current portion of long-term debt . 7811 183,710 177,788
5,415,253 3,306,045
Long-term debt 7&11 440,453 516,223
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital 15 47,083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868
Appraisal excess 8 1,433,867 1,433,867
Accumulated deficit (5,378,908) (3,385,606)
1,876,910 3,870,212
Commitments and contingencies 14

nn EW T.CPTT.Y
BS 7,732,616 7,692,480
See accompanying notes to financial statements.

These financial statements were approved for issue on behalf of the Board of Directors
on January 12, 2007 by the following:

Raymond Simpson : Director Frederick A. Munnings, Jr. » Director



Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Statement of Operations

Year ended August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8

Note 2006 2005







Sales, net of discounts 7 BS$16,061,732 22,625,063
Cost of sales 6&8 12,984,405 17,028,578
Gross profit 3,077,327 5,596,485
Other income:
Other income 5 40,950 349,504
Interest income on time deposits 1,648 » 2,623
Insurance proceeds 13 - 1,476,737
Net gain on sale of subsidiary 12 - 620,179
Finance charges on trade receivables : - 52,160
42,598 2,501,203
3,119,925 8,097,688

Operating expenses:
Payroll related costs, including employee

benefits and commissions 7 2,090,021 3,249,728
Rent 7&14 634,782 506,206
Bad debt expense 5 335,544 482,921
Depreciation and amortisation 8 329,011 284,165
Legal and professional 323,712 170,064
Utilities, postage and delivery 279,096 296,570
Vehicle, maintenance and repairs 228,795 249,479
Other operating costs 7 202,878 300,597
Computertand office supplies 138,531 140,535"
Bank charges and exchange 115,823 294,218
Interest on long-term debt and ,

due to shareholder 7,9&11 77,784 53,603
Interest expense on bank overdraft - 9 76,344 56,207
Business insurance 73,238 74,448
Advertising 66,942: 232,297
Licence fees and permits 54,842 138,577
Security 34,490 33,074
Travel, trade shows and entertainment 33,349 49,291
Donations 18,711 33,091
Inventory damaged by hurricane 13 - 1,263,610
Impairment of property,

plant and equipment 8&13 - 475,595
(Gain)/loss on disposal of property, Sins Aes etek va cote Gif ue A

plant and equipment ‘ “* (666) 4,126







Net loss "BS (1,993,302) 0 (200,714)
Basic loss per share 16 BS (0.423) (0.062)
Diluted loss per share 16 BS (0.423) (0.062)

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity

Year ended August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005



TTT TE ATS.027 8,388,402 ee

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



Number of Contributed Appraisal Accumulated
shares Issued Share capital surplus excess deficit

Balance at August 31, 2005 * 4,708,334 B$ 47,083 5,774,868 1,433,867 (3,094,892)
Net loss - - . - - (290,714)
Balance at August 31, 2006 4,708,334 B$ 47,083 5,774,868 1,433,867 (3,385,606)
Net loss - - - - (1,993,302)
Balance at August 31, 2006 4,708,334 BS 47,083 5,774,868 1,433,867 (5,378,908)

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Statement of Cash Flows

Year ended August 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8 nn A



2006 2005
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net loss B$ (1,993,302) (290,714)
Adjustment for:
Depreciation and amortisation 573,353 514,538
Bad debt expense 335,544 482,921
Provision for slow moving inventory 251,572 (201,495)
Net gain on sale of subsidiary - (620,179)
Inventory damaged by hurricane - 1,263,610
Impairment of property, plant and equipment - 475,595
Product warranty (10,809)

(Gain)/loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment (666) 4,126





Operating (loss)/profit before working capital changes (844,308) 1,628,402
Changes in working capital items:
Accounts receivable (350,024) (524,037)
Due from former subsidiary 561,250 (578,500)
Due from former subsidiary's shareholders 571,500 en
Inventories (879,066) (814,344)
Inventory of spare parts and supplies (29,044) (22,476)
Deposits and prepaid expenses (19,266) (35,728)
Accounts payable.and accrued expenses 942,711 1,895,881
Time deposits - 5,000
Cash (used)/provided by operating activities (46,247) 1,554,198
Cash flows from investing activities:
Cash disposed of on sale of subsidiary - (16,158)
Additions to property, plant and equipment » (974,105) (1,076,010)

Proceeds from disposal of property, plant
and equipment 11,188 6,000







Cash used by investing activities (962,917) (1,086,168)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Repayment of shareholder loan - (440,272)
Proceeds from long-term debt 100,000 530,000
Repayment of long-term debt (169,848) (72,211)
Cash (used)/provided by financing activities (69,848) 17,517
Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents (1,079,012) 485,547
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year (201,159) (686,706)
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year B$ (1,280,171) (201,159)
Cash and cash equivalents comprise the following:
Cash BS 198,471 107,747
Time deposits, less those pledged as security 13,274 11,626

Bank overdraft

B$ (1,280,171) (201,159)

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

(1,491,916) _ (320,532) .

Total
4,160,926
(290,714)

3,870,212
(1,993,302)

1,876,910

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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

7. Related party transactions

During 2004, a director and a company related to this director granted two loans to
the Company totalling B$238,675. The loans incur interest at 9% per annum and are
repayable in 5 years with monthly instalments of B$4,955 including Interest and are
included in the balance sheet as long-term debt. Refer to note 11.

Directors of the Company and their immediate relatives control approximately 43%
(2005: 43%) of the voting shares of the Company.

The Company rents administrative office space from a related party as described in
note 14 (a) “Administrative offices”.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



7. Related party transactions, continued

As more fully described in note 14 (a) “New Home Centre Lease’, the Company
entered into a lease agreement in July 2005 with a company related to the founding
shareholder, in respect of the premises to where the Company relocated its retail
operations in August 2006.

The Company used the services of H&F Babak Construction Company Limited to
complete certain leasehold improvements. These leasehold improvements are
included in property, plant and equipment in note 8. This company was owned by the
founding shareholder as of the balance sheet date. reverts for such services
amounted to B$441,976 (2005: B$74,595).

Sates to entities related to the founding shareholder during the year ended August .
31, 2006 amounted to B$976, 122.

Total executive remuneration including employee benefits and commissions

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



12. Sale of investment in RH
On August 16, 2005, the Company entered into an agreement to sell its 90%
shareholding interest in RH. The effective date for the sale was August 31, 2005.

The sales price for the shares was B$571,500, and a total of 70% of the Snares) in
RH were sold to an executive and an employee of RH.

As part of the transaction to sell the RH shares, the Company agreed to forgive
repayment of B$836,221 of the B$1,414,721 debt due by RH to the Company as of
August 31, 2005. Accordingly, the balance due to the Company by RH at August 31,
2005 was B$578,500.

The net effect of these transactions is as follows:





2005

Sales price of RH shares BS 571,500
Carrying value of investment in RH at August 31, 2005

(net shareholders deficit) before forgiveness

of debt of B$836,221 due to the Company by RH 884,900

1,456,400

Receivable due to the Company by RH forgiven at puget 31, 2005 (836,221)

Net gain on sale of RH BS 620,179



The net carrying value of RH’s assets and liabilities at August 31, 2005 (net
shareholders deficit of RH) after forgiveness of debt of B$836,221 due to the
Company by RH was as follows:





amounted to B$248,600 (2005: B$602,194) and is included in the statement of 2005
operations in payroll related costs. "
} An executive officer of RH was paid a commission of 3% of sales made by RH which aay deposit BS aaa
: amounted to B$Nil (2005: B$245,085) and is included in the executive remuneration Accounts receivable, net 4 49.910
Shown above, ; Inventories 1,322,413
; Directors and non-executive officers fees included in other operating costs in the Uli of eal part a supplies oe
i ; 5 ; . eposits and prepayments :
! statement of operations amounted to B$35,000 (2005: B$35,000). Property, plant and equipment 276.136
} A Company owned by the founding shareholder has provided security up to Accounts payable and accrued (1,576,249)
B$250,000 for the Company's bank loan and overdraft. The security includes two Warranty provision (19,458)
Due to the Company (578,500)



parcels of beach front property located in Freeport Lucaya.

As of August 31, 2006, trade receivables due from related parties amounted to
B$411,154 (2005: B$58,759). These amounts are due from H&F Babak
Construction Company Limited.

BS (48,679)

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued
Year ended August 31, 2006
Year ended August 31, 2006 (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)





8. Property, plant and equi “ 13. Insurance proceeds and impairment of assets
In September 2004 certain of the Company's inventory and property, plant and



: Cost/valuation:
| . 2005 Additions Disposals 2006 equipment (“PP&E”) were damaged by hurricanes. As a result, management has
: bute : : kas ; nae estimated the net book value of inventory. damaged to be approximately B$1,263,610
A poe mec vation): (ee Oiler 33,045 * oar aes and the net book value of the portions of the PP&E that were damaged to be
‘ Heavy sculpt : 1,000,367 pa 577 1,030,907 approximately B$471,669. These amounts have been recognised as a loss and are
i Automobiles 326,324 154 54,969 362,509 - : . :
; frailers and security booth 77,301 3.923 . 81.224 shown under inventory damaged by hurricanes and impairment of PP&E,
i Store furniture and equipment 361,720 130,034 - 491,754 respectively in the statement of operations. The Company filed a claim with their
E Office furniture and equipment 159,667 101,870 320 261,217 . . ;

Leasehold improvements 362,783 __ 582.962 i 946'745 insurers which was settled and collected in full by December 2004. The amount

“BS 4,545,041 974,105 55,866 5,463,280 received net of the deductible was B$1,183,610 and B$114,939 for inventory and

oy P,P&E, respectively and is included in the statement of operations as insurance
Accumulated depreciation: : ‘
Depreciation ; proceeds.
2005 charge Disposals 2006

In December 2004, the Company's concrete plant and office was damaged by a fire.
Plant ' : BS SaSek pthc = : ae As a result, management has estimated the net book value of the portions of the
Ace 144,101 62036 45,344 160,793 P,P&E that were damaged to be approximately B$3,926. These amounts have been
Trailers and securitybooth 23,364 12,357 7 35,721 recognised as an impairment loss and are included in impairment of PP&E in the

Store furniture.and equipment... , 212,133... 51,9930. 0 er use 264,126 ‘ < F we A
Office furniture and equipment "96.081 “50,780 = 146,861 statement of operations. The Company filed a claim .with,their,insurers which was
: eTHaNt: QP 19B RS 101498. 64B tl ee Se 245,840 settled and collected in full by December 2004. The amount received was B$178,188








1 BS 14,848,099 5p 873,353- “a5 4 2,076,048 ‘and is included in the’statement of operations as insurance proceeds.
Net book value: (a) Leases | | |
2006 2005
Ready-mixed concrete operations
Land B$ 1,521,000 1,521,000 .
Plant : 228,381 224,099 The Company was party to an agreement to lease approximately 25 acres of
eee pal ies ae land in the Heavy Industrial Area of Freeport for a 7% year period. Certain
Trailers and security boots 45,503 a limestone rock dredged from the Freeport Harbour has been deposited on this
Store furniture and equipment 227,628 149,587 ; ‘
Office furniture and equipment 114'356 63,586 land. The lease agreement expired on December 31, 2001. No new written
Leasehold improvements 700,905 316,591 agreement has been executed between the Company and the landlord, however,
BS 3,387,232 2,997,002 the Company continues to use the premises on a month to month basis.

The Company has received verbal assurance that they can continue to occupy
the land under similar terms of the old lease agreement. The Company intends to
American Society of Professional Real Estate Appraisers, of Freeport, Grand re-locate its operations to premises of Bahama Rock Limited (“BRL”) and has
Bahama, of the market value of the land. The excess of this valuation over the cost of ; signed a lease for this purpose, as described in the “Lease agreement with BRL”
the land is reflected as “appraisal excess’ in the balance sheet. The land comprises section below.

126.75 acres located in the East Airport Zone of Freeport, Grand Bahama, and is :
intended to be used by the Company for future quarrying operations. The carrying
‘value of land had it not been appraised would be B$87,133.

The directors’ valuation of land is based on an appraisal as of March 29, 2005 by Mr.
Bert E. Lightbourne, Member of The Bahamas Real Estate Association and the

This limestone rock was used by-the Company to produce sand and aggregate
which it uses to produce ready-mixed concrete. The rent payable is B$0.25 per
cubic yard of limestone rock utilised by the Company but in no event shall the
quarterly rent be less than B$2,000. Under the agreement referred to in the
preceding paragraphs, the Company is also required to pay B$2.25 per cubic
yard of limestone rock utilised with a minimum of B$18,000 per quarter. During
the prior year the Company ceased producing sand and aggregate and instead
purchased these materials from third parties.

During 2002, the Company acquired a used portable concrete batch plant from the
founding shareholder. The plant was not in use during the year and has a carrying
value at August 31, 2006 of B$17,683 (2005: B$22,019).

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Year ended August 31, 2006
Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8. Property, plant and equipment, continued



Depreciation expense on certain plant assets and equipment amounting to

B$244,342 (2005: B$230,373) has been included in cost of sales. 14. Commitments and contingencies, continued

As described in note 13, certain of the Company's property, plant and equipment with (a) Leases, continued

a net book value of B$475,595 were damaged by hurricanes and fire in the prior year
and have been recognised as an impairment loss in the 2005 statement of
operations.

‘Lease agreement with BRL

On May 9, 2005, the Company signed a 10 year renewable lease agreement
with BRL with an intention of moving its concrete plant operations and to

















9. Bank overdraft . commence a block plant. At August 31, 2006, the Company had commenced its
The bank overdraft bears interest at 7.5% (2005: 7.5%) per annum and is secured as block plant at the said premises and are yet to re-locate their concrete plant.
described in note 11. The overdraft facility limit is B$1,770,000 (2005: B$1,000,000). Under the lease agreement, the Company is committed to purchase all

10. Accounts payable and accrued expenses cia products needed for production of ready mixed cement and blocks

Aue : rom ;
Accounts payable and accrued expenses comprise the following: . } ;
Rent is payable at a base rate of $1 per annum in advance commencing on June
2006 2005 1, 2006. In addition, the Company will pay BRL an annual license fee of
: B$7,500.
Accounts payable B$ 2,999,650 2,170,785 :
, 1 id t
Accrued expenses 734,977 621.131 Hardware and consumer products operations
B$ 3,734,627 2,791,916 In August 2001, the Company entered into a lease agreement whereby it agreed
to lease the premises for its retail merchandising operation on Peel Street in
' 11. Long term debt Freeport, Grand Bahama for a period of 10 years with an option to renew for
another 10 years. The Company was granted the option to purchase the
2006 2005 premises. The option is exercisable on August 15, 2005 and at the end of every
i i i i . Th
Bank loan BS 471,148 497,598 isa month hs koh ued ied continuation of the sae :
Loan from related party 153,015 196,413 purchase price is to be B$ 5 mil ion ess 2% per annum starting from Ju '
624,163 694,011 1998. The Company has assigned this option to a shareholder.
bes current portion (183,710) (177,788) _ The lease called for monthly lease payments with adjustments annually to reflect
B$__ 440,453 516,223 the increase and decrease in the annual average of the United States Consumer



The bank loan bears interest at B$ prime rate plus 2.75% (8.25% at August 31,
2006) and is repayable by June 2012 with monthly instalments of B$14,140 including
interest. The bank loan and overdraft facility are with the same bank. The bank loan
and overdraft are secured by a first floating charge debenture stamped for
B$2,640,000 over the Company's land and all of its business assets. A Company
owned by the founding shareholder has provided security up to B$250,000 for the
Company's bank loan and overdraft. The security includes two parcels of beach
front property located in Freeport, Lucaya.

As described in note 14 (e), as of August 31, 2006, the Company was not in
compliance with various debt covenants relating to its bank loan and overdraft.

The loan from related party as more fully described in note 7, bears interest at 9%
per annum, is unsecured and is repayable in 5 years with monthly instalments of
BS4,955 including interest.

Price Index All Urban Consumers, US City Average for the preceding twelve
months but in no event to be less than B$306,000 per annum.

These premises were severely damaged by the hurricanes in September 2004
and it was agreed with the landlord to terminate the lease effective June 30,
2005. A new lease for the same premises was entered into from July 1, 2005 to
April 30, 2006 for $20,000 per month. Effective from May 1, 2006, it was agreed
with the landlord that the lease would be extended to August 31, 2006 at a rate
of $50,000 per month, and the Company can continue to occupy the premises
with no further liability from September 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006. The
Company agreed to vacate the premises effective December 31, 2006. Rent
expense incurred during the current year on this lease amounted to B$360,000
(2005: B$101,789)


THE TRIBU

Free

NE BUSINESS

port Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

e

eS

14. Commitments and contingencies, continued

(a)

Leases, continued

New Home Centre Lease



In July 2005, the Company entered into a 15 year lease agreement with a
company related to the founding shareholder. The lease commenced on
January 1, 2006, however, the Company did not occupy the building until June,
2006. The Company became liable for rent effective June 1, 2006. During the
first 48 months the lease calls for rent of B$396,000 per annum to be paid in
monthly instalments of B$33,000. Thereafter, the rent is increased in proportion
to the United States consumer price index. The Company received a discount on
the rent for the period from June 1, 2006 to August 31, 2006 of B$8,000 per
month, to B$25,000 per month. Thereafter, the rent increased to the amount in
the lease of B$33,000 per month. Rent expense incurred during the current year -
on this lease amounted to B$75,000 (2005: B$Nil).

Lucaya store lease

In 2005 the Company entered into a 3 year renewable lease for retail store space
comprising approximately 10,000 square feet, in Lucaya. The lease is payable in
monthly instalments of B$11,717 per month. Annual rent will be adjusted to
reflect increases in the consumer price index. Annual rent is not to exceed
B$180,592. Subsequent to year end the Company decided to close this location,
however, the Company continues to be liable under the terms of the lease
agreement until the expiration date in December 2007. Rent expense incurred
during the current year on this lease amounted to B$140,604 (2005: B$93,731).

Administrative offices

The Company leases administrative office space from a related party. The lease
expired on August 31, 2006 and was not renewed. Rent expense incurred
during the current year on this lease amounted to B$34,279 (2005: B$32,016).

The approximate future minimum annual lease payments and license fees under
non-cancellable leases are as follows:

SE

Free

2007 544,095
2008 450,366
2009 - 403,501
2010 139,501
2011 139,501
Thereafter 4,254,004

B$ 5,930,968
port Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



14. Commitments and contingencies, continued

(b)

(c)

(d)

F

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Credit facilities

The Company is contingently liable under stand-by letters of credit amounting to
B$50,000 (2005:$50,000), which are secured by time deposits of an equivalent
amount. The Company is also contingently liable under a corporate visa credit
card of B$20,000 (2005: $20,000). The Company has available a B$1,770,000
(2005: B$1,000,000) overdraft facility of which B$1,491,916 (2005: B$320,532)
has been used at year end.

These credit facilities are collaterised by fixed deposits of B$50,000
(2005:B$50,000) and a fixed and floating charge over the Company's land and
all of its business assets stamped for B$2,640,000.

The Company is also contingently liable under a customs bond guarantee of
B$50,000 (2005: B$50,000).

Capital commitments

The directors have approved B$460,000 in connection with the ereneen ofa
new block plant and a concrete plant at the new BRL premises. As of August 31,
2006 B$190,000 had been incurred. The Company has placed a hold on the
construction of the premises.

Litigation

The Company commenced an action in the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas against the Comptroller of Customs for judicial
review of The Bahamas Customs Department demand for payment of duties of
B$738,644 on all goods “on display” in the new Superstore and to prohibit the
clearing of further goods by the Company from the Freeport Harbour pending
payment of the same. An injunction was obtained against the Comptroller of
Customs and leave was obtained to commence an application for judicial review.
The matter is set to be heard on February 12, 2007. The Company has not
made an accrual in its financial statements for the amount of duties claimed.
Although the Company's attorney is of the opinion that the Company has a good
arguable case in obtaining the declarations sought, the ultimate outcome of this
matter cannot presently be determined, and accordingly no provision for any
effects on the Company that may result has been made in the financial
statements.

The Company is involved in various other legal proceedings and claims related
to products sold by the Company and unfair dismissal matters. Based on
information provided by the Company's legal counsel, in management's opinion,
the ultimate disposition of these matters will not have a material effect on the
Company's financial condition, in excess of the provisions that have already been
recognised.

reeport Concrete Company Limited

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



14.

15.

16.

17.

Commitments and contingencies, continued
(e) Non-compliance with debt covenants

As of August 31, 2006 and as of the date that these financial statements were
approved for issuance, the Company was not in compliance with various debt
covenants in connection with the bank overdraft and bank loan facilities, primarily
relating to certain financial ratios. The total amount of the bank overdraft and
loan at August 31; 2006 was B$1,963,064. The Company has not received
written confirmation from its bankers that they will agree to tolerate the breaches
of debt covenants, and therefore an uncertainty exists as to what action the
Company's bankers will take, if any.

Share capital

The Company has an authorised share capital of 20,000,000 shares with par value
B$0.01 per common shafe. As at August 31, 2006, 4,708,33%°(2065: 4,708,334)
shares were issued and fully paid.

Loss per share

Loss per share is, calculated by dividing net loss for the year by the weighted average
number of shares issued and outstanding. There are no share options, warrants of
other instruments outstanding that have the effect of diluting loss per share.

2006 2005
Net loss applicable to ordinary shares B$ (1,999,302) * (290,714)
Weighted average number
of ordinary shares outstanding 4,708,334 4,708,334
Weighted average number
of ordinary shares outstanding, :
assuming full dilution for options 4,708,334 4,708,334



Segment reporting

Segment reporting is presented in respect of the Company's business segments.
The primary format is based on the Company's management and internal reporting
structure.

Segment results, assets and liabilities include items directly attributable to a segment
as well as those that can be allocated on a reasonable basis.

The Company operates in The Bahamas only, in two business segments comprising
aggregate and ready-mixed concrete, and hardware and consumer products.

SOME EP OMT MRE a NNR Tens etnies IRE OEE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAGE 13B

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



17. Segment reporting, continued
The table below summarises business segment information expressed in B$000’s.

Aggregate and Hardware and
‘ready-mixed concrete consumer products Total Total
2006 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005

Revenue B$ 4,534 2,764 11,528 19,861 16,062 22,625
Direct costs
Materials used/
merchandise sold (2,373) (1,859) (9,183) (14,502) (ee) ee
76)

Payroll related (551) (476) = - (551)
Equipment (318) (104) - - (318) (104)
Depreciation (244) (230) - - (244) (230)

Utilities (63) (59) - - (63) (59)
: (3,549) (2,728) (9,183) (14,502). (12,732) (17,230)
Decrease/(increase) in :
provision for slow moving

inventory. = - (252) 201 (252) 201
Gross profit 985 36 2,093 5,560 3,078 5,596
Other income 1 20 31 2,290 42 2,501
Operating expenses B$ (943) (709) (4,170) (7,679) (5,113) (8,388)
Net income/(loss) 53 (462) | (2,046 171 1,993 (291)

i
Other information:

i
Total assets B$ 3,137 _ 3,048 4,596 4,644 7,733 ___7,692

en rem ow
Total liabilities BS 888 906 4,968. 2,916 5,856 _ 3,822

18. Fair value disclosure of financial instruments

Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time, based on relevant market
information and information about the financial instrument. These estimates do not
reflect any premium or discount that could result from attempting to realise, at one
time, the Company's entire holdings of a particular financial instrument.

These estimates are subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of
significant judgment and, therefore, cannot be determined with precision. Changes
in assumptions could significantly affect the estimates. The carrying amount of the
Company's significant financial assets and liabilities approximate fair value because
of one or more of the following reasons: , "

‘(i)_ Immediate or short-term maturity,
(ii) Carrying value approximates market value,

(iii) Interest rates which approximate market rates.

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



19. Financial instrument risk management

The most significant financial risk to which the Company is exposed is credit risk and
interest rate risk. The Company is exposed to credit risk in the form of the carrying
amount of accounts receivable, due from former subsidiary and due from former
subsidiary’s shareholders. The Company is. exposed to interest rate risk in the form
of interest bearing bank loan and loan from related party.

The Company manages the credit risk of accounts receivable by evaluating the
creditworthiness of its customers, establishing credit limits and by implementing
procedures to follow up on a: feguiar basis ‘on ‘the collection. of any balances in
-y. afrears. Management: manages; credit risk on MOTE ‘due from, former subsidiary
and due from former Subsidiany’s‘shareholdets by obtaining adequate security. ia

Management does not anticipate any credit losses arising from credit risk exposures
in excess of the allowance for doubtful accounts disclosed in note 5.

The Company managers interest rate risk by entering into loan agreements at rates
which approximate market rates.

20. Corresponding figures

Certain corresponding figures for 2005 have been reciadsified to carina with the
presentation adopted in 2006.

As explained in note 1, the corresponding figures for thé year ended August 31, 2005
in the statement of operations and statement of cash flows, include the results of RH
up to August 31, 2005. The corresponding figures in the balance sheet do not
include the assets and liabilities of RH, as RH was sold effective August 31, 2005. A
comparison of the statement of operations for the years ended August 31, 2006 and
2005, excluding the results of RH is shown below:

ene a ec A







. 2006 » 2005

Sales, net of discounts B$ 16,061,732 14,413,749
Cost of sales ; 12,984,405 11,096,330
Gross profit 3,077,327 3,317;419
Other income . 40,950 349,504
Interest income on time deposits 1,648 1,270
Gain on sale of subsidiary - 620,179
Insurance proceeds - 1,476,737
: 42,598 2,447,690

3,119,925 5,765,109

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

Notes to Financial Statements, Continued

Year ended August 31, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)



20. Corresponding figures, continued

SSP FS RT TEL





2006 2005
Operating expenses:
Payroll related costs, including employee
benefits and commissions 2,090,021 1,892,387
Rent 634,782 256,545
Bad debt expense : 335,544 320,753
Depreciation and amortisation 329,011 207,634
Legal and professional 323,712 143,127
Utilities, postage and delivery . 279,096 175,699
Computer and office supplies 138,531 117,245
Vehicle, maintenance and repairs - 228,795 199,247
Other operating costs 202,878 180,835
Bank charges and exchange 115,823 133,637
Interest on long-term debt and
due to shareholder 77,784 53,603
Interest expense on bank overdraft 76,344 14,207
Business insurance 73,238 54,393
Advértising 66,942 65,686
Licence fees and permits 54,842 54,682
Security 34,490 13,132
Travel, trade shows and entertainment 33,349 24,149
Donations 18,711 27,230
Inventory damage by hurricane - 1,263,610
Impairment on property, plant and equipment - 475,595
(Gain)/Loss on disposal of property, plant
and equipment (666) 4,126
5,113,227 §,677,522

Se
Net (loss)/income B$__(1,993,302) 87,587

21. Subsequent events

Subsequent to year end, the Company decided to close the store located in Lucaya,
effective December 31, 2006. The Company will still be liable for rent for this location
as explained in note 14 until December 2007, however the Company is attempting to
sub-lease this property for the remainder of the lease period.


PAGE 14B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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Denver 37/2 14/-10 s 39/3 16/-8 New Orleans- 54/12 44/6 , 52/11 5040 c ‘Tallahassee 60/15 40/4 c 37/2 pe : po yak Se sh GR 86
Detroit 30-1 17-8 sf 2563 1947 NewYork -—«s«44H «29/1 f ——-32 2444 pe = Tampa 7124 SAN2 pe 68/20 521 pe Winnipeg 4/-15 pe 20/-6 8/-13 sf Te SP We (2 BH
Honolulu 81/27 67/19 pe 79/26 66/18 Oklahoma City 39/3 23/5 pe 37/2 24-4 sn Tucson 55/12 35/1 pe 58/4 34 pe Weather (W): s-sunny, pé-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- ae
Houston 457 393 © 46i7 39/3 Orlando 7423 5140 pe 701° 45/7 pe Washington,DC 46/7 27/-2 pe 37/2 24-4 pe storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

SECTION



= tae

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

SPER TRE, ERS Ee ES




@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

Kentonya keeps Saints

alive with 25-19 victory

BM BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

KENTONYA Miller canned a
game high 15 points as the
Kingsway Academy Saints
marched to a 25-19 victory over
the St. Andrew’s Hurricanes at
home.

In a battle of two of three unde-
feated teams in the Bahamas
Association of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools’ senior girls divi-
sion, the Saints pushed their
record to 6-0, while the Hurri-
canes fell to 5-1.

“The girls came a little over
confident and they didn’t really
come prepared,” said St.
Andrew’s coach Herman May-
cock. “The last two weeks, they
haven’t been coming to practice.

“Tt’s not an excuse, but you
could see in the first quarter and
at the half, they were a little out of
shape, gasping for breath. But as
the game went on, they started to
get their wind. The second half
was a better half.”

Kingsway Academy struggled,
scoring just two points in the first
quarter as they fell behind 4-2.
They trailed 12-5 at the half, man-



Michael

ordan is

back on
course




aging to come up with just three
more in the second quarter.

In both periods, Miller came
up with four points apiece to push
Kingsway Academy out front. She
added five more in the fourth as
the Saints built on their lead.

“1 think we did good. We hada
lot of team work,” Miller reflect-
ed. “They are a team that uses
their hands a lot, so we wanted
to get oui ahead of them and stay
on top.”

Strength

While Miller finished with her
game high 15, center Michaela
Levarity was a tower of strength
on the inside as she scored six with
numerous rebounds. Diandra Fer-
guson and Alicia Bell both added
two. ; :

Saints’ coach Juliet Douglas-
Smith said it was a big victory for
Kingsway Academy at home.

“We actually said that we are

‘going for the championship and

that is what we are doing,” she
stated. “We are going for all wins
- 11-0- straight up to the champi-
onship.”

The Saints, however, are



MICHAEL JORDAN
reacts to his tee shot during the
Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi-
tational on Paradise Island.

The annual golfing event
started yesterday and runs
through Sunday. oe

© SEE PAGE TWO

(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)







expected to face their next biggest
test when they play St. John’s
Giants next week. Going into yes-
terday’s game, the Giants were
the only other undefeated team
in the league.

Douglas-Smith said if they
could play the way they did yes-
terday, they should have no prob-
lems against the Giants. But she’s
not taking any team for granted.

The Hurricanes provided a
challenge for the Saints. Although
they lost, the Hurricanes got a sol-
id game from Kristen Rolle, who
pumped in a side high 11.

Ashley Black contributed seven
and Jackie Carey hit a free throw.

Despite falling behind in the
first half, St. Andrew’s turned
things around in the third quarter
when they crashed the boards and
worked on their defence.

But every time they made a
dent into the lead, Kingsway
Academy managed to get back in
control until the fourth quarter
when they played like they did in
the first half.

Looking back at the game,
coach Maycock said all they had
to do was “protect the ball better
and cut down on the turnovers.
We gave them a lot of points.”





@ VOLLEYBALL
: JANN MORTIMER’S FUNERAL

THE funeral service for former veteran nation-
al team player/coach Jennifer ‘Jann’ Mortimer, 50,
will be held on Saturday at St. Cecilia’s Parish,
Coconut Groove at 2 p.m. ,

Her interment will be in the Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street.

@ TENNIS
MEGAMALT ADULT/
JUNIOR TOURNEY

Nick’s Tennis Academy will hold the Mega-

malt Adult(Junior Tennis Tournament at the







Nassau Beach Hotel from February 2-4.

The event is geared towards males and females
between the ages of 7-18, representing the 14-
and-under and rookie competition as well as the
adult male and female divisions.

i BASKETBALL
NPBA ACTION

The New Providence Basketball Association
will continue its regular season action tonight at
the DW Davis Gym with a double header on tap.
In the 7 p.m. opener, the Coke Explorers will
play the Y-Care Wreckers and the Electrocom
Cybots will take on the Sunshine Auto Ruff
Ryders.




IBUTLERS’ FUNERAL
HOMES AND CREMATORIUM

W@ HALL of Fame basketball
player Julius ‘Dr J’ Erving
swings his club during the
Michael Jordan Celebrity
Tournament yesterday on

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



tars come out
for Michael
Jordan event

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

JULIUS ‘Dr J’ Erving has
had a storied career in the
National Basketball Associ-
ation, although he’s not too
pleased with the way his
Philadelphia 76ers have fall-
en a decade after his retire-
ment.

The former electrifying
swingman is here with a host
of entertainers and sporting
personalities playing in the
Michael Jordan Celebrity
Invitational on Paradise
Island.

The tournament got start-
ed yesterday at the Ocean
Club Golf Course and will
continue through Sunday.

Erving, who helped to
change the way the game
was played with his wizard-

style, has been retired since .

1987. But he said the 76ers
are a franchise currently in
transition,

“They’ve obviously made
a commitment to build. They
freed up the money to go
into the Free Market place
in the off-season, so we will
say what happens there,” he
reflected. “Hopefully the
fans support will be main-
tained during this transi-
tion.”

Still closely associated the
76ers, Erving, who was listed
as one of the 50 greatest
players to play the game,
said he’s not happy with the



B@ HOCKEY great Mario
Lemieux tees off during the
Michael Jordan Celebrity Invi-
tational yesterday at Paradise

island.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)

and Eastern Conference at

but that’s part of the
process,” he noted. “Histor-
ically, it was one of the great
franchises of the league.
Hopefully with a little bit of
luck, we will come back.”

Erving said he was pleased
with the three players who
played in his foursome yes-
terday.

Paul O’Neil, who played
17 years in the Major
Leagues - the last nine with
the New York Yankees -
before hew retired in 2001,
said it’s good to be back in
the sunny Bahamas.

“I’m from the mid-west
where it’s cold and snowing,
so it’s a great opportunity to
come down heie and play
golf,” said O’Neil, who com-
piled a .288 batting average
in 2053 games played during
his career. ,

“T think it becomes better
and better. This is my third
year and the weather has
been the best so far. Hope-
fully that will continue.” |

Having won four Major
League titles with the Yan-
kees, O’Neil said it was a lot
of fun and although he miss-
es “playing in the big games
before the large crowd,” he’s
enjoying himself now.

Vince Coleman, who made
his debut in the Major
League in 1985 for the St.
Louis Cardinals and retired
in 1997 with the Detroit
Tigers after 13 seasons, said
anytime he gets au opportu-

nity to support Jordan he

Paradise Island. . : state they are in, currently 10-29. will do it. Si
: : (Photo: rere Major/ — sitting in last year place in “They are turning into a As for his performance,
Fu neral Announcement Tribune staff) the Atlantic and Division cellar dweller very rapidly, Coleman said he made a few

‘shots and he’s improving his
game because he wants to
defend his title.

When asked how good he
thinks he is right now against
his Jordan, he said, “With-
out a doubt it’s me. He’s
playing good right now, but I
know I can take him.”

Ahmad Green, Green Bay
Packers’ running back, is in
his second appearance in the
tournament and said he’s
“taking in the scenery and
hanging out with the people
because I don’t get to do a
whole lot of this.”

Semi-Military
Funeral
Service for
Retired Land
Sgt. 57 Prince}.
“Ned” Edward

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REIN AA DET SLRS LTE TL A TELAT Eee SR PARTE A ae ae sf








See RRERSHR ATS

Miami Herald |



Che



PRO FOOTBALL
COMMENTARY





ao 1
NICK LAHAM/GETTY IMAGES

Giants’ future:
isn’t looking
all that bright

Newsday
J ust more than one year ago, this



quote.came from New York
Giants running back Tiki Barber:
“T don’t know how long I want to play.
I'd like to rush for 10,000 yards....
Obviously, winning the Super Bowl is
paramount for me. Beyond that, I’m
not gonna play just to
play or just to accu-.
mulate stats. There’s
-too much other that I
want to do in my life.”
And then there is
this quote, from Bar-
NFL ber’s agent, Mark Lep-
REPORT: selter:“Tikiwillbe
8-98 a Giant in 2006. That
Ton Bee much is promised.
Beyond that, I would say the odds. __
of him playing beyond 2006 are no
better than 50-50.” :

A year ago, the Giants were fore-

-warned. They did nothing to dissuade
Barber from his decision and nothing
to prepare for his loss. Now they head
into 2007 disarmed, facing a future
full of Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning
and minus Barber. For this, they have
~ noone to blame but themselves.

RECIPE FOR DISASTER

Giants fans want to be angry at
Barber for getting out when the get-
ting is good? Fine. They really should
be angry at him for running wild for
234 yards against the Washington
Redskins, saving Coughlin’s job.

So now they get to keep Coughlin
and Eli but lose Tiki. Good deal, eh?

But don’t worry, Giants fans. There
still is time to put your 2007 season
tickets up for sale on eBay.

The loss of Barber, the retention of

Coughlin and the continuing presence _

of Manning practically ensure that,
next season, those tickets will be use-
ful only as kindling for tailgate barbe-
cue. Even factoring in the “competi-
tive balance” (read: incompetence) of
the NEC, it’s hard to see how next sea-
son won't wind up even worse than
the debacle that just ended.

The decision to not only retain .
Coughlin but also extend his contract
a year sends a definite message to
Giants fans, the most loyal and patient
fan base New York has: “We haven't
the slightest idea of what to do to fix
this team. So we’re doing nothing.”

By this, the Giants rely upon fans’
patience — and exploit it, too.

‘And patient they have been, with a
team that has won just three playoff
games in the past 16 seasons. Witha _
front office that has drafted all of two
players, outside of Barber, to make it

‘to the Pro Bowl in 10 years: Jeremy
Shockey and Osi Umenyiora. (David
Tyree, special-teams player, doesn’t
really count). With an ownership that
is short on competitive hunger.

SUPER BOWL BUSTS

Aside from 2000, when the Giants
took a magic-carpet ride to Tampa,
only to have the rug yanked out from
under them by Ray Lewis the Balti-
more Ravens, this team hasn’t had a
sniff of the Super Bowl in 16 years.

Can you imagine George Stein-

- brenner running the Giants the way
the Maras and the Tisches have? Can
you imagine Eric Mangini handing the
quarterback job to Manning without a
training-camp competition and send-
ing him out into the regular season
without a serious backup?

Can you imagine Barber wanting to
risk his health and future coming back
to a situation like that?

Jerry Reese has been promoted
from director of player personnel to
succeed Ernie Accorsi as general
manager. Chris Mara, son of the late
Wellington Mara, will probably move
up to take Reese’s old job.

These men, along with Accorsi,

were in the room at the NFL Combine ©

when Manning walked in to be evalu-
ated. They all decided that he, and not
Philip Rivers or Ben Roethlisberger,
would be the quarterback to lead the
Giants out of the funk Jim Fassel had
left them in. These are the men who
will continue to lead the Giants into
their next era of futility.

But they still haven’t seemed to
notice that their best player is gone,
and he isn’t coming back.



BY GEORGE HENRY
Associated Press

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. —
For the third time in nine months,
Atlanta Falcons quarterback
Michael Vick is making headlines
for all the wrong reasons.

On Wednesday, Vick reluc-
tantly surrendered a water bottle
to security at Miami Interna-
tional Airport. The bottle
contained, in a hidden com-
partment, a substance that
reportedly smelled like mari-
juana. Vick was not arrested,
and he was allowed to board an
AirTran flight that landed in
Atlanta before noon.

Miami police said Thursday that
it could be weeks before a decision
is made on whether to file charges
against Vick, a three-time Pro Bowl
player who this season became the



PRO FOOTBALL | ATLANTA FALCONS .

Airport scene puts heat on Vick

first quarterback in NFL history to
rush for 1,000 yards.

Falcons owner Arthur Blank,
general manager Rich McKay and
new head coach Bobby Petrino met
with Vick, who left team headquar-
ters without speaking to reporters.
McKay said Blank was upset with
the quarterback, whose $137 mil-
lion contract was richest in
the NFL when Vick signed it
three years ago.

“We are an organization
that prides itself on not hav-
. ing off-the-field. issues,”
McKay said. “I think we have done
a pretty good job of bringing the
right people in here so we don’t
have to face these types of issues.

“We don’t like it. We don’t
accept it. It is not what we want.”

Under Florida law, possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana



RUSTY KENNEDY/AP
QUESTIONS IN MIAMI: Michael Vick.

is a misdemeanor punishable by up
to a year in prison and a $1,000
fine. First offenders rarely do any
jail time, though.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





“We'll do an analysis and see
what it is. There’s no sense of
urgency to it,” Detective Alvaro
Zabaleta said Thursday in Miami.

The NFL’s substance-abuse pol-
icy states that any team can decide
that a player’s “behavior, including
but not limited to an arrest,” can
warrant a physical exam from its
medical director. NFL spokesman
Greg Aiello said no decision had
been made in Vick’s case.

Last April, Vick settled a lawsuit
filed by a woman who claimed the
player knowingly gave her herpes.

In November, Vick made an
obscene gesture toward Falcons
fans who heckled the team as it
came off the field after a 31-13 loss
to the New Orleans Saints. Vick
apologized profusely, paid a
$10,000 team fine and donated
another $10,000 to charity.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 14 DUKE 62, WAKE FOREST 40

Devils flog







TENNIS | Al

TED RICHARDSON/MCT

RAISING HIS GAME: DeMarcus Nelson of Duke drives and shoots over Wake Forest
defender Kevin Swinton in the first half. Nelson scored nine points in the game.



Deacons

Paulus scores 17 points,
and Duke’s stingy defense
shuts down Wake Forest

BY AARON BEARD
Associated Press .

DURHAM, N.C. — Duke isn’t the high-scoring
machine it has been in recent years. But the way the Blue
Devils are playing defense these days, they can get away
with less offense sometimes.

Greg Paulus scored 17 points, and the 14th-ranked
Blue Devils held Wake Forest to one of its worst scoring
games in a half-century in Thursday night’s 62-40 vic-
tory, the latest stingy effort from one of
the Atlantic Coast Conference’s top
defenses. The Blue Devils (15-3, 2-2 ACC)
shut down the Demon Deacons all night,
hounding freshman point guard Ishmael
Smith on the perimeter and completely
disrupting their transition attack.

By the time it was over, Wake Forest
had matched its second-lowest scoring |
total since the ACC’s inaugural season,
way back in 1963-54. ;

Even Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski, who is about as
demanding as it gets when it comes to defense, could
find little fault. Making it even sweeter was how his
young team ignored its ups and downs on the offensive
end along the way.

“Our defense was excellent,” Krzyzewski said. “It was
rock solid. ... That’s a really good sign for a team, that
you don’t let missed shots let you miss assignments on
the defensive end.”

The Blue Devils came in as the league’s best scoring
defense, holding opponents to 56.1 points per game,
though that number is skewed by Duke’s slower-paced
offense, which ranks last in the ACC.

the Blue Devils held the Demon Deacons (9-8, 1-4) to
33 percent on shots from the field and 3-for-ll from
3-point range, with 21 turnovers and just five assists.
That offset an offense that shot 44 percent and went
nearly six minutes without a point in the second half.

“There’s no plays off,” said Duke’s David McClure,
who finished with seven points, six rebounds and three
steals off the bench. “Especially in a conference like the
ACC, teams are so talented that any little burst can give
them a run and can force a 10-point swing.”

Wake Forest’s previous low was 58 points in a loss to
Air Force in November. Smith — the ACC’s assist leader,
at 6,3 per game — finished with no assists and eight turn-
overs, taunted all night by the “Cameron Crazies.”

e MORE BASKETBALL





.LAN OPEN

Nadal survives tough second-round challenge

BY PAUL ALEXANDER
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia —
Rafael Nadal was hit twice by
stinging backhands at the net
before advancing to the third
round of the Australian Open on
Thursday with a four-set victory
over Philipp Kohlschreiber.
During the second-seeded
Nadal’s 7-5, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 victory,
one shot caught Nadal’s finger, and
another sent him sprawling and
seemed to briefly stun him. —
Nadal said it appeared that
Kohlschreiber was trying to hit
him the second time, and that the
ball could have injured his eye if it
hadn’t caught his racket by chance.
“He has the whole court” to
work with, Nadal said.




Nadal demonstrated his tenac-
ity, fending off chants from a group
of German fans to win the match
and set up a meeting with 3lst-
seeded Stanislas Wawrinka.

Nadal needed 3'2 hours, but
Kim Clijsters and Martina Hingis
raced to see who could finish their
match first, moving a step closer to
a possible quarterfinals showdown.

Neither was as fast as top-
seeded Maria Sharapova. The U.S.
Open champion, who endured

three hours of broiling heat in her ~

first-round match Tuesday, needed
only 58 minutes to beat fellow Rus-
sian Anastassia Rodionova 6-0, 6-3.

“My brain cells were restored
today,” said Sharapova, who
described herself as delusional in
her last match. “It was tice Lo yet a




eR RON TE ROT ETT.
Ce



Alex Kuznetsov 6-4, 6-1, 6-2. Now
he faces another buddy, Robby
Ginepri, who beat German quali-
fier Mischa Zverev 6-4, 7-5, 6-1.
Clijsters extended the winning
start to her farewell tour — she is
retiring at the end of the year to
start a family — by beating Akiko
Morigami 6-3, 6-0 in 59 minutes.
“Pye always enjoyed coming
here, but this year it’s even more
special than in the past,” said Clijs-

RICK STEVENS/AP

THRILL OF VICTORY: Rafael Nadal.

quick one in there today.”
Fifth-seeded James Blake, who
doesn’t shave as long as he Is still
alive in a tournament and hopes to
have 2 big, bushy beard by the end
of next week, beat hitting partner

ters, who is 23 and is seeded fourth
in the tournament. “You appreci-
ate it so much more, I think.”
Hingis, who is seeded sixth,
continued to build momentum in
her comeback after three years
away with a 6-2, 6-2 victory over
Alla Kudryavtseva, needing nine
minutes more than Clijsters did.
4C | FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 _

_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

No. 9 Oregon fights off Stanford upset bid

From Miami Herald Wire Services

EUGENE, Ore. — Aaron
Brooks recorded 19 points and
10 rebounds to lead No. 9 Ore-
gon to a 66-59 victory against
Stanford on Thursday night.

Tajuan Porter added 15
points and Bryce Taylor
scored 14 for the Ducks (17-1,
5-1 Pac-10), who are off to their
best start in 80 years. The vic-
tory ended a seven-game los-
ing streak to the Cardinal (11-5,
3-3), who upset then 23rd-
ranked Washington State 71-68
in overtime in their last game.

Brooks scored nine in a row
for the Ducks late in the sec-
ond half, eventually giving
them a 53-51 advantage with
5:04 to play. Oregon never
trailed again.

The Ducks, who have no
starter taller than 6-foot-9, and
their brand of small ball strug-
gled for much of the game
against Stanford’s 7-foot twin
brothers, Robin and Brook
Lopez.

Maarty Leunen, Oregon’s
only true post player at
6-foot-9, was held scoreless in
the first half and overall, Ore-
gon had 10 shots blocked and
shot just 29 percent from the
field.

But the Ducks stayed
aggressive and continued to
attack the basket and draw
fouls. They got to the free-
throw line 28 times in the sec-
ond half alone, making 23.
They were 30-of-37 from the
line overall. Brooks alone was
10-for-10.

OTHER ACTION
e Xavier 83, Massachu-

BASKETBALL



KEVIN CLARK/AP

NOTHING EASY: Oregon’s Malik Hairston, right, tries to get
past Stanford’s Lawrence Hill during the Ducks’ bruising
66-59 victory over the Cardinal on Thursday in Eugene.

setts 77: Justin Doellman
scored 16 points to lead six
players in double figures as
host Xavier gave Massachu-
setts its first Atlantic 10 loss of
the season.

The Musketeers (13-5, 3-1)
and the Minutemen (13-4, 3-1)



were picked as the Atlantic
10’s top teams before the sea-
son. A dominant front line has
helped UMass get off to its
best start since 1995-96, and
the Minutemen have already
matched last season’s victory
total.

PRO BASKETBALL

Center Rashaun Freeman
led UMass with 22 points and
13 rebounds — 11 offensive —
and forward Stephane Lasme
added 18 points and nine
rebounds, but the Minutemen
turned the ball over 16 times,
made just 5 of their 18 3-point-
ers and put Xavier on the free-
throw line 22 times. Despite
outrebounding Xavier 47-31,
grabbing 25 offensive
rebounds and scoring 56 of its
points in the paint, UMass
took just four free throws,
none by Freeman or Lasme.

With the score tied at 62
with 7:17 to play, Xavier went
on a 10-2 run to take control.
Doellman scored four points
during the run. UMass missed
six of seven shots during the
run.

Trailing 76-68 with 1:20 to
play, the Minutemen used a 7-1
run over the next 50 seconds
to get back in it. Gary Forbes
scored on a tip-in and a layup
and Etienne Brower hit a
3-pointer to make it 77-75 with
30 seconds left. The Muske-
teers made 6-of-6 free throws
in the last 23 seconds.

After a miserable shooting
performance in its last game, a
76-65 loss to Saint Louis, the
Musketeers shot 48 percent
from the field and made
8-of-18 3-pointers.

Gary Forbes had 19 points
for UMass and James Life
added 10. For Xavier, Stanley
Burrell scored 15 points, Drew
Lavender had 14, Josh Duncan
had 13, Justin Cage had 12 and
Derrick Brown added 10. Bran-
don Cole had 10 rebounds.

e Penn 93, La Salle 92:

_MiamiHlerald.com_| THE MIAMI HERALD



Mark Zoller scored 28 points
and grabbed 10 rebounds and
Ibrahim Jaaber had 27 points
and nine assists as Penn
defeated city rival La Salle in
Philadelphia.

Brian Grandieri added 18
points for Penn (10-6), which
defeated the Explorers for the
sixth consecutive time and the
14th in their past 16 meetings.

Darnell Harris had a career-
high 32 points, including eight
3-point shots, for La Salle
(8-10), while Rodney Green
had 22 and Paul Johnson
added 17.

La Salle led 58-47 with 16:14
left to play before Grandieri
started a 16-5 run with a
3-pointer and capped it witha
layup to tie the score 63-63
with 11:26 remaining.

For the next 10:03, neither
team had more than a two-
point lead until Zoller’s two
foul shots with 1:03 to go gave
the Quakers a 90-87 advan-
tage. ,

A jumper by Jaaber with 15
seconds left made it 92-87 and,
after a Green layup and a free
throw by Grandieri, Johnson’s
3-pointer with one second left
accounted for the final score.

Both teams shot well during:
the game, which saw numer-
ous fast breaks. The Quakers
made 37-of-64 shots (58 per-
cent) while La Salle was 34-
for-64 (53 percent).

- @ Illinois State 83, Wich-
ita State 75: Levi Dyer was
perfect from the line and
behind the arc, finishing with
20 points as host Illinois State
beat Wichita State.

Dyer went 4-of-4 from the



free-throw line and from
3-point range, combining with
Osiris Eldridge to sink seven
of Illinois State’s 3-pointers.
Eldridge finished with 16
points for the Redbirds (10-9,
2-6 Missouri Valley).

The Shockers (12-7, 3-5) got
a game-high 27 points from
Kyle Wilson. Wilson was
7-of-12 from the field, includ-
ing 5-of-6 from 3-point range,
and 8-of-10 from the free-
throw line before fouling out
with 3:26 to go in the game.

P.J. Couisnard added 15
points and Ryan Martin scored
14 for Wichita State, which got
a game-high six boards apiece
from each of them and Sean
Ogirri.

e Manhattan 86, Rider
75: Antoine Pearson scored a
career-high 21 points and host
Manhattan extended its win-
ning streak to six games with
the victory over Rider.

Guy Ngarndi had a career-

- high 19 points and Patrick

Bouli added 13 points for the

Jaspers (9-8, 6-1 Metro Atlan-

tic). Harris Mansell scored 21

points for the Broncs (10-8,
4-4).

e New Hampshire 75,
Binghamton 72: Blagoj Janev
scored 18 points to lead visit-
ing New Hampshire to the vic-
tory.

Tyrece Gibbs scored 16
points and Jermaine Anderson
contributed 15 for New Hamp-
shire (7-12, 3-3 America East)

Mike Gordon scored 20
points to lead Binghamton
(9-10, 2-5). Steve Proctor
added 16 and Lazar Trifunovic
had U1 points.

Heat holds off Pacers’ push

From Miami Herald Wire Services

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade
scored 33 points, including a
game-saving layup with 4.3 sec-
onds left, as the Miami Heat
wasted most of a double-digit
lead in the final minutes before
beating the trade-depleted Indi-
ana Pacers 104-101 on Thursday
night.

- Jason Williams added 20
points and eight assists for the
Heat, who led 91-75 with 8:05 left
before the Pacers — who had
only 10 players in uniform — got
within two by going on a 23-9
run.

But Wade hit a pair of free
throws with 24.5 seconds left,
then drove full-court for the cru-
cial layup.

Danny Granger had a career-
high 28 points on 9-of-13 shoot-
ing for Indiana, but came up
short on a potential game-tying
3-point try as the final buzzer
sounded.

The Pacers acquired Troy
Murphy, Mike Dunleavy, Ike
Diogu and Keith McLeod from
the Warriors on Wednesday for
Stephen Jackson, Sarunas Jasi-
kevicius, Josh Powell and Al Har-
rington, but none of the new
players were available Thursday.

‘ Marquis Daniels had a season-
high 21 for the Pacers, who got 17
points and 10 rebounds from Jer-
maine O’Neal.

Alonzo Mourning had 14
points for Miami, and Jason
Kapono had 11 and Michael
Doleac matched a season high
with 10.

THE WAIT FOR SHAQ

MIAMI — The Shaquille
O’Neal comeback watch will
continue for at least a few more
days.

O’Nea], who’s recovering
from surgery to repair torn left
knee cartilage, will miss at least
two more games before return-
ing to the Miami Heat lineup,
interim coach Ron Rothstein
said.

He missed Miami’s home
game Thursday night against
Indiana and will not play when
the Heat visits Philadelphia
tonight. The earliest he could
come back is Sunday, when the
Heat hosts Dallas in a rematch of
last year’s NBA Finals, which
Miami won in six games.

“Shaq is working out, feeling
good, getting better day to day,”
Rothstein said after the Heat’s
shootaround Thursday morning.
“That’s it. Case closed.”

Thursday’s game was the
32nd O’Neal has missed since the

. Nov. 19 surgery. He took part ina
» full-contact, five-on-five work-

out Wednesday for the first time
since the operation and said a
decision on playing against the
Pacers hinged on how his knee
responded from that test.

_ Rothstein said O’Neal did not
have a setback and was able to
take part in the shootaround, but
stressed the team is continuing
to exercise caution. O’Neal will
continue working out ona daily
basis.

“Each individual knows when
they’re ready,” Rothstein said.
“He.wants to play. You think he
wants to do all those court drills?
It’s much easier playing. But he’s
not. ready to play yet, in any
sense. Confidence in the leg,
conditioning, wind. ... You’ve
got to remember, he’s 7-foot-l,
330 pounds. He’s a different indi-
vidual.”

O’Neal was not available for
comment before Thursday’s
game.

When he returns, the Heat
should have their full comple-

‘ ment of regular-rotation players

available for the first time since
winning the NBA championship
on June 20.

O’Neal has played in only four
games, none of those with point
guard Jason Williams, who
missed the season’s first seven
games and five others since
while continuing to recover from
offseason knee surgery. Finals
MVP Dwyane Wade also has
missed six games with injuries.

“We understand as athletes
that certain injuries to certain
players take longer,” Wade said.
“This is a knee injury to some-
one who weighs 300-some
pounds. We know it’s going to
take a little longer. We just want
to make sure he comes back full
strength. No matter how many
games it takes, we know he’s
going to be there with us when
we have to make our run.”

The Heat entered Thursday
with a 17-20 record, 42 games
behind Washington in the South-
east Division standings and 5'2
games back of Cleveland for the
top mark in the Eastern Confer-
ence.

ELSEWHERE

e Mavericks: Starting guard
Devin Harris missed Dallas’
game against the Los Angeles
Lakers on Thursday night
because of an illness.

Devean George, who spent his
first seven NBA seasons with the
Lakers before signing a free-
agent deal with Dallas last off-

season, started in Harris’ spot.

Coach Avery Johnson said
Harris had a “really high” tem-
perature.

“He is a lot under the
weather,” Johnson said. “He just
cannot go tonight whatsoever.”

Harris went through the
morning shootaround, but John-
son said the 6-foot-3, 185-pound
guard didn’t look too good then
either. The coach also plans to
give Harris another day off today
to recover.

“That body can’t afford to
lose much weight,” Johnson said.

Johnson hopes Harris will be
ready to travel with the team Sat-
urday, when it leaves for its
game Sunday at Miami in a
rematch of last year’s NBA
Finals.

e Nets: A British bank hop-
ing to expand its U.S. profile will
spend as much as $400 million
over the next 20 years to put its
name on the New Jersey Nets’
planned Brooklyn arena.

Nets owner Bruce Ratner
announced Thursday the 18,000-
seat stadium designed by archi-
tect Frank Gehry will be called
The Barclays Center when it
opens later this decade.

He declined to say how much
London-based Barclays paid to
attach its name to the complex.
Bank executives and city officials



ALAN DIAZ/AP

THE STROKE OF GENIUS: Heat guard Dwyane Wade poured in
33 points to help Miami outlast Indiana on Thursday night.

described the investment as
“more than $300 million.” A per-
son with knowledge of the deal,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity because he was not
authorized to reveal the price,
said its total value was almost
$400 million.

That total would be among
the steepest ever paid for the
naming rights to an indoor
American sports arena, but com-
parable to the $20 million per
year that Citigroup reportedly
agreed to pay to name the New
York Mets stadium being built in
Queens.

Barclays president Robert
Diamond said he is convinced
the exposure will be well worth
the price.

“Building our brand in the
U.S. is very, very important to
us,” he said.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Lakers 100, Spurs 96:
Kobe Bryant scored 34 points
after a slow start to lead visiting
Los Angeles.

e Trail Blazers 94, Cava-
liers 76: Rookie Brandon Roy
had 19 points and 10 rebounds to
lead host Portland.

e Clippers 115, Warriors
109: Elton Brand had 27 points
and 11 rebounds to lead host Los
Angels.

| NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

| SOUTHEAST WL

| Washington 22 16

_ Orlando 22 17

Miami s:18-20
Atlanta 13 23°84
Charlotte 12. 25

/ ATLANTIC. WW) ok

| Toronto 19 21

i New Jersey 18 20
New York 17° 23
Boston 12 25
Philadelphia 10 29
CENTRAL OW OL
Cleveland 23 15
Chicago 23 17

| Detroit 21 16

| Indiana 20 19

_ Milwaukee 17 21

SOUTHEAST WL Pct, GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
519 - 6-4 W-2 16-3 6-13 14-9
564 % 5-5 L-3 14-6 8-11 12-9.
474 4 5-5 Wel 9-9 9-11 7-10
3361 8 4-6°°W-3 7-10 6-13 8-14
-324 9% 5-5 L-2 7-13 5-12 9-15
Pet. GB 110 Str. Home “Away Conf
475 - 64 W-2 11-6 8-15 13-8
AT4. - 7-3 W-2 12-10 6-10 14-9
425 2 5-5 L-1 10-11 7-12 10-14
324 5% 2-8 L-5 4-13 8-12 8-16
256 8% 2-8 L-3 5-9 5-20 7-16
Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
-605 - 64 L2 15-3 812 15-10
575° 1 5-5 W-3 17-5 6-12 18-7
568 1% 3-7 L2 ° 10-8 11-8 15-8
513 3% 5-5 L3 10-6 10-13 15-11
47 6 3-7 L-l° 9-7 8-14

7-16

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WoL Pe
Dallas 32. «8
San Antonio 27 13
Houston 25 15
New Orleans 15 22
Memphis 10 30
NORTHWEST wie
Utah 25 14
Minnesota 20 17
Denver. 18 17
Portland 16 24
Seattle 15 25
PACIFIC wie
Phoenix 30 8

L.A. Lakers 26 13
| Golden State 19 21
| LA. Clippers 18 21

Pct. GB Li0 Str. Home Away Conf
800 - 9-1 W-5 18-3 14-5 22-6
675 5 5-5 L-2 14-7 13-6 188
625 7 7-3 L-2 13-4 12-11 13-13
405 15% 4-6 W-3- 9-10 6-12 6-16
250 22 4-6 W-1 8-13 2-17 4-17

Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
641 - 46 W-1 14-4 11-10 16-8
541 4 7-3. L-1 12-7 8-10 11-10
+14 5 3-7 W-1 10-10 8-7 6-11
400 9% 3-7 W-1 9-12 7-12 10-12
375 10% 3-7 W-2 11-9 4-16 6-15

eee b Pet, GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
789 - 10-0 W-1l 17-3) 13-5 14-7
667 4% 7-3 W-3 18-4 8-9 16-7
75 12 4-6 L-1 15-7 4-14 13-14
462 12% 5-5 W-1 13-7 5-14 12-16
389 15 2-8 L-7 10-11 4-11 8-15

Sacramento 14 22

Thursday’s results

Tonight’s games

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Miami 104, Ind. 101 Miami at Phil., 7 Tor. 101, Sac. 85

Lak. at Dal., late Utah at Tor., 7 Was. 99, N.Y. 98
Wash. at Orl., 7 NJ. 92, Cha. 85
Char. at Atla., 7:30 Utah 100, Det. 99
Sac. at Bos., 7:30 Chi. 99, Mil. 90
NJ. at N.Y., 7:30 Mem. 118, Phi. 102
Det. at Minn., 8 Atl. 105, Min. 88
N.O. at S.A., 8 Pho. 100, Hou. 91
Port. at Pho., 9 L.A.L. 100, S.A. 96
Mil. at Sea., 10 Por. 94, Cle. 76

Clev. at Den., 10:30

L.A.C. 115, G.S. 109

NBA LEADERS



Through Wednesday
SCORING REBOUNDING

G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 22 265 153 696 31.6 Garnett, Minn. 37 97 370 467 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 38 358 303 1135 29.9 Howard, Orl. 39 139 353 492 12.6
Iverson, Den. 27 267 238 795 29.4 Camby, Den. 30 74 290 364 12.1
Bryant, LAL 36 337 282 1011 28.1 Boozer, Utah 39 128 330 458 11.7
Wade, Mia. 31 283 285 866 27.9 Okafor, Char. 37 144 275 419 11.3
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Chandler, NOk. 35 129 264 393 11.2
James, Clev. 38 366 237 1020 26.8 O'Neal, Ind. 33 76 269 345 10.5
Pierce, Bos. 24 198 181 638 26.6 Lee, N.Y. 40 148 269 417 10.4
Yao, Hou. 27 252 195 699 25.9 Duncan, S.A. 40 113 298 411 10.3
Allen, Sea. 30 262 165 771 25.7 Wallace, Chi. 38 148 237 385 10.1

Carter, NJ. 38 336 205 957 25.2

ASSISTS
FIELD GOALS ati.#.6 tf Ne AST AVG
FG FGA PCT Nash, Phoe. 36 all 114
Biedrins, G.S. 178 288 .618 — Kidd, NJ. 38 349 9.2 =.
Lee, N.Y. 174 284 .613 Paul, NOk. 27 242 «9.0
Stoudemire, Phoe. 250 422 .592 Williams, Utah 39 341 87 |

Dalembert, Phil. 162 277 .585 Miller, Phil. 37 321 87
Curry, N.Y. 286 496 .577 Davis, G.S. 36 309 8.6
Bogut, Mil. 197 348 .566 Billups, Det. 29 235 8.1
Howard, Orl. 240 424 .566 Wade, Mia. 31 247 «8.0

Boozer, Utah 354 635 .557

Brand, LAC 308 556 .554

Duncan, S.A. 312 569 .548
eee

NBA CALENDAR
LAYER OF THE MONTH
JANUARY F
November

Through Wednesday: D-League Showcase

21: Finals Rematch:
(ABC)

FEBRUARY

Mavs @ Heat noon

1: NBA Celebrates Black History Month
12: NBA All-Star Community Caravan

15: Jam Session opens In Vegas
16: T-Mobile Rookie Challenge
17: NBA All-Star Saturday Night

Eastern Conference: Dwight Howard,
Orlando Magic

Western Conference: Yao Ming, Hous-
ton Rockets

December
Eastern Conference: Gilbert Arenas,
Washington Wizards
Western Conference: Kobe Bryant, Los
Angeles Lakers


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _

INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

Winners always keep their cool in the playoffs

BY JASON WHITLOCK
The Kansas City Star

Watching Marty Schottenheimer
lose another playoff game made me
think of Herm Edwards.

The San Diego Chargers’ loss to
the New England Patriots seemed
similar to the Kansas City Chiefs’ loss
to the Indianapolis Colts. Schotten-
heimer’s offense choked. The receiv-
ers dropped routine passes. The
clock was mismanaged. The game
plan failed to make the proper adjust-
ments (LaDainian Tomlinson had
just nine touches in the second half).
There were mental errors caused by
a lack of emotional control.

Before the game, ESPN showed a
graphic of the coaches with the poor-
est playoff winning percentages.
Schottenheimer and Edwards were
both on the list.

There’s a connection. They are
not bad coaches. To the contrary,
they are good coaches. In the regular
season, Schottenheimer is as good as
any coach in football. Edwards isn’t
far behind. So what happens in the
playoffs? What happens when the
stakes are elevated?

Edwards says the playoffs are dif-
ferent. I believe him. I also believe
that he and Schottenheimer don’t
coach nearly as effectively in the
playoffs.

And that’s why, as much as the
Chiefs need to address their person-
nel shortcomings this offseason,

PRO FOOTBALL



MARK TERRILL/AP

POINTING FINGERS: Chargers head coach Marty Schottenheimer, right,
racked up another playoff loss, so of course he’s getting the blame.

Edwards also needs to examine his
coaching method. Fiery, emotional,
defensive-minded head coaches —
Edwards and Schottenheimer —
don’t perform in the playoffs as well
as their more-reserved counterparts.
Yes, Bill Cowher, The.Chin, a fire-

and-brimstone, defensive-minded
coach, won the most recent Super
Bow], but it probably took him longer
to win one than it should have, and
Cowher’s triumph from a sixth-seed
spot was more than a bit lucky.
Before Cowher, the Super Bowl-



INTERNATIONAL EDITION FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 | 5C

winning coaches were Bill Belichick,

Jon Gruden, Brian Billick, Dick Ver-
meil, Mike Shanahan, Mike Holm-

gren, Barry Switzer, George Seifert,
Jimmy Johnson, Joe Gibbs, Bill Par-

~ cells and Bill Walsh. For the most

part, that’s a pretty stoic group. Swit-
zer and Parcells would be the glaring
exceptions. But I’m not sure they are
really exceptions. Parcells has never
won a Super Bow] without Belichick
as his sidekick. And Switzer was
nothing more than a caretaker/com-
edy routine for what Johnson had
built with the Dallas Cowboys.

What do Schottenheimer and
Edwards lack? The ability to get
offensive players to relax and per-
form at their highest level in big
games. Defense is emotional. Offense
is intellectual. It’s a difficult balance
to feed half your team the emotional
energy it needs to hunt and kill, and
feed the other half of your team the
calm and confidence it needs to
counterattack the opposition’s defen-
sive aggression.

You feed the offense too much
emotion, and the players crack. They
drop passes. They miss assignments.
They draw foolish penalties. They
burn timeouts. Maybe, after the
game, they whine about the opposi-
tion celebrating too much.

“They showed no class,” Tomlin-
son said of the Patriots, “and maybe
that comes from the head coach.”

The Chargers showed no compo-

sure. And maybe that comes from the
head coach.

When Bill Snyder had the Kansas
State football program winning 10 or
ll games every year, Snyder
employed crazed defensive coordina-
tors and defensive assistants who
transferred their emotion to the play-
ers. Meanwhile, Snyder worked the
offensive side of the ball and the
team overall with the precision of a
scientist. :

Emotion is best served to a foot-
ball team from the bottom. A head
coach functions best putting a lid on
emotion, rather than providing it.
When the ultimate leader lights the
flame, it’s easy for the fire to burn out
of control. Watching the Chargers
draw costly personal fouls against
the Patriots reminded me of Schot-
tenheimer’s last year in Kansas City,
and the lack of emotional discipline
that engulfed those 1998 Chiefs.

Bottom line: Teams coached by
Schottenheimer and Edwards are
prone to choke, especially on the
offensive side of the ball. That’s not a
product of poor personnel. It’s a
product of head coaches feeding their
teams too much emotion.

Edwards’ preacher routine works
great in the offseason, and it inspires
a team to never give up during the
regular season.

But when you need to win one
game, preaching and talking about it

NFC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

- Bears defense
ready to tackle
Surging Saints

i The Chicago Bears have held up pretty well since Mike
Brown and Tommie Harris went down with injuries, but
now the stakes are high as the New Orleans Saints come
to town with an offense that can strike early and often.
Whoever wins this battle advances to the Super Bowl.

BY DAVID J. NEAL
dneal@MiamiHerald.com
CHICAGO — Two of the
biggest locks in the NFL, fear-
some trademarks of their
team, now and in the past,
units on which you can safely
go from the bank to the
bookie, have been the India-
napolis Colts offense and the
Chicago Bears defense.
Although the Colts offense
hasn’t dazzled anybody in the
playoffs, accomplishing just
enough to win, the Bears
defense has done just enough

to get by while being more.

Teddy Bear than Butkus Bear
over the last month.

And now here come the
New Orleans Saints, marching
into Soldier Field on Sunday
with the No. 1 offense.

Oh, the Bears can pretend
that things haven’t been differ-
ent since All-Pro defensive
tackle Tommie Harris’ ham-
string went kablooey on Dec.
3. But since their second major
defensive injury loss of the
season — safety Mike Brown
went down with a torn foot
ligament during the Bears’
wild comeback victory against
the Arizona Cardinals on Oct.
16 — only the calls have been
the same.

“Our defense has stayed the
same,” Bears linebacker Brian
Urlacher said. “We have had
different guys in there who

have stepped up. You’re not
going to replace either of
those two players. They’re
great players.

“The pass rush hasn’t been

. the same because Tommie did

such a good job on the passing
game,” Urlacher said. “Our
run defense is still about the
same with the guys we have in
there, but you’re not going to
get a guy who can rush a
passer like that anywhere, I
don’t think.”

The raw numbers say the
Bears need to get it together.
Over the four regular-season
games and one playoff game
they have played since Harris’
injury, the Bears.have given up
23.0 offensive points and 359.2
yards per game. The 13 sacks
they have had in those. five
games suggests that the pass
rush hasn’t been kneecapped
by Harris’ loss, but opposing
teams have had time to go
long. ;

Opposing running backs
have run for 471 yards on 117
carries. That 4.02 yards per

carry would be fine in other

places.

By Chicago standards, that
is permissive almost to the
point of unseemly. ,

None of those five oppos-
ing offenses — Detroit, St.
Louis, Seattle and Green Bay

and Tampa Bay — will be con-

fused with, say, the Saints.

SUPER BOWL XXV

GIANTS 20, BILLS 19

e Jan. 27,1991
e Tampa Stadium

e MVP: RB Ottis Anderson, Giants

With the United States less than two weeks
into Operation Desert Storm in the Persian Gulf
War, questions swirled about whether Super

Bowl XXV would be played.

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI

But President George H.W. Bush decided
that the game must go on as scheduled, saying:
“lam not going to be held a captive in the White House by
Saddam Hussein of Iraq. We’re going about our business, and the

world goes on.”

Reminders of the war were seen throughout the telecast.
Whitney Houston's rendition of the national anthem drew
rousing ovations, as fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A!” while images

The wild, weird,
wacky and
wondrous of past |
Super Bowls

r SUPER
renin
reyes





doesn’t get the job done alone.

JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

BRING IT ON: All-Pro linebacker Brian Urlacher and the Bears defense came through in crunch time last weekend
against the Seahawks. How they stand up to Drew Brees and the Saints might determine a trip to the Super Bowl.

Last Sunday, the Seattle
Seahawks had the Bears on the
run for the first three quarters
of the game. When the Sea-
hawks ran between the tack-
les, whether on a draw or a
power run, they exploited the
same vulnerability in the Chi-
cago defense that lesser teams,
such as the Miami Dolphins
and even. the San Francisco
49ers, exposed. The Seahawks
also were able to get the ball
downfield.

“We pressed a little bit,”
Bears defensive coordinator
Ron Rivera said. “I think the
guys were trying to make
plays. We weren’t as disci-

the stadium.



plined as we needed to be.

“A couple of times, they got
us when we were out of posi-
tion. You talk to the guys, and
they say, ‘Well, I saw this.’ In
this defense, you can’t go on ‘I
saw.’ You’ve got to play your
keys, play [your] responsibil-
ity.” «~

But, Rivera said, that’s
probably not what Bears line-
backer Lance Briggs did when
he destroyed the Seahawks’
fourth-and-1 play (with help
from a juggled snap) from the
Chicago 44 with 1:59 left to
play and the game tied at 24.
Briggs shot the gap and upset

- Seahawks running back Shawn

of American troops flashed on large screens in

ABC News received special permission from
the NFL to lengthen the time between quarters
so it could broadcast news updates.

The halftime show was tape-delayed and
replaced with a 15-minute report from ABC
anchor Peter Jennings.

The specter of war was inescapable. Planes
and blimps were forbidden to fly over the
stadium; military helicopters hovered; fans were
subjected to searches and metal detectors; and

the police were in full force, with dogs and

SWAT teams.

The Giants held on for the one-point victory when Bills kicker
Scott Norwood missed a 47-yard field-goal attempt with
8 seconds left. Afterward, Super Bowl MVP Ottis Anderson
acknowledged the war before addressing the media by saying,
“I’m dedicating this one to our troops.”

- SARAH ROTHSCHILD

, 16 DAYS TO GO

Alexander for a 2-yard loss.

“J think Lance was guessing
on that play and using that
[Junior] Seau technique,”
Rivera said loudly over media
shoulders as Briggs walked by.

Briggs, returning Rivera’s
grin, replied with something
along the lines of success
determining how good the
technique was.

Asked what the “Seau tech-
nique” is, Rivera said, “Guess-
ing. Guessing to try to make
the play. We give the guys a
hard time about that.”

That was one of several
important fourth-quarter plays
that got the Bears through a

hard afternoon. Ricky Man-
ning had an interception of an
ill-advised Matt Hasselbeck
pass. The secondary produced
a coverage sack by Tank John-
son as the Seahawks moved
into field-goal range in the
final seconds of regulation,
and the Bears won 27-24 in
overtime.

“We put ourselves in a
tough position, and we had to
respond,” Rivera said, “But
guys did come up with big
plays.”

Just as they have done over
the past month. Or did we not
mention that the Bears are 4-1
in this stretch?

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM ® ON TV: CBS



a
GETTY IMAGES




of | FRIDAY, JANUARY 19,2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _—DIV
Atlanta 26 15 6 2 60151 149 12-6-3-1 14-9-3-1 —12-4-4-1
Carolina 25 19° 2 3 55 148 149 13-8-0-2 12-11-21 —12-4-0-1
Tampa Bay 25 22 1 1 52155 153 12-12-0-0 13-10-1-1 —10-7-0-0 al ‘ 3
Wetman’ onus. By araae ek eto vedios era” 1 > emntlan etal Vins ochuces =
Florida 17 22 4 6 44139 160 12-9-2-1 5-13-2-5 —-3-11-2-0 OTTAWA — Roberto Luongo made 34
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY Vv saves in goal, Rory Fitzpatrick scored his
‘i s me =o a Eee aa Pa hey Ct a eiaaeeciearneenti agree first goal of the season, and the Vancou-
New Jersey 28 14 0 5 61122 108 16-4-0-4 12-10-0-1 11-4-0-1 Cc ike Baacthe OF Sooo os
N.Y. Rangers 23 20 3 1 50139 144 10-9-3-0 13-11-0-1 —8-9-0-0 ver Canucks beat the Ottawa senators 2-
N.Y. Islanders 22 21 2 2 48137 136 11-9-2-1 11-12-0-1 —_9-7-2-0 on Thursday night.
Pittsburgh «20:17, 3 5S 4B 143 1461822 9-9-1-3 13-5-1-1 Taylor Pyatt had a goal and an assist
Philadelphia 11 31 2 2 26111 178 3-14-2-2 8-17-0-0 —-3-12-0-2 for Vaheouver, which won ite third wame
NORTHEAST WL OL SL a GA HOME — AWAY sD in a row and ended Ottawa’s season-high,
“Buffalo 32 W222 «68178 136 1S-7-1-1)17-4-1-1— 9-711 five-game winning streak.
vee. Montreal 26 17 1 4 57 142 137 = 14-7-0-3 12-10-1-1 8-5-0-4 Luongo, who stopped 30 shots Tues-
“= Ottawa 27 20 2 0 56168 138 13-11-1-0 14-9-1-0 - 11-7-0-0 ‘ “0 vi : . :
Toronto oe ao, 2A EDLY 1 IOI. “dole, gg ae | Gay ima 4-0 victory jn Montreal for his
Boston 22 19 1 3 48136 167 14-8-0-2 B-ll-1-1 10-8-0-1 third shutout of the season, had 10 saves

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Thursday’s results

Toronto 3, Florida 2
Montreal 4, Atlanta 1
Washington 5, Carolina 2
Islanders ‘4, Philadelphia 2

* Boston 5, Pittsburgh 4 (SO)
Vancouver 2, Ottawa 1



Nashville 4, Columbus 0
Anaheim at Edmonton, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
St. Louis at L.A., late



Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 2 (SO)






Tonight’s games

Detroit at Columbus, 7
Vancouver at Butfalo, 8
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30
Anaheim at Calgary, 9

NHL LEADERS







Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Buffalo 6, Boston 3
Detroit 5, Nashville 3
Dallas 4, Calgary 2
Colorado 4, Phoenix 3









HOCKEY



THURSDAY’S NHL GAMES





Canucks hold off Senators

in the first period and 11 in the second
before Daniel Alfredsson scored 8:13 into
the third to pull the Senators within one.

Luongo’s shutout streak ended at 154
minutes, 42 seconds. He had not surren-

Coming off two shutouts in a row, the
Canadiens won for just the fifth time in
14 games, taking control in the second
period after two Thashers players were
sent to the pénalty box.

Garnet Exelby was called for holding,
and Shane Hnidy went off for delay of
game after the officials ruled that he
intentionally flipped the puck over the
glass. The Canadiens seized their chance,
scoring twice in 46 seconds for a 3-1 lead.

CAPITALS 5, HURRICANES 2

RALEIGH, N.C. — Alexander Semin
and Chris Clark scored two goals, leading
the Capitals to victory.

The Capitals snapped a six-game road

Erik Cole also scored for Carolina, and
John Grahame stopped 25 shots.

ISLANDERS 4, FLYERS 2

PHILADELPHIA — Mike Sillinger and
Andy Hilbert scored 1:18 apart early in the
third period, and the Islanders snapped a
three-game losing streak and handed the
Flyers their seventh consecutive loss.

Randy Robitaille and Jason Blake also
scored for the Islanders,

Randy Jones and Simon Gagne scored
goals for the Flyers, and Peter Forsberg
had his 600th career assist.

LIGHTNING 3, DEVILS 2 (SO)
EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ. — Brad



CENTRAL =oW L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY dered a goal since Saturday, when Bates
Nashville 33 12 2 1 69167 122 17-3-2-1 16-9-0-0 Battaglia scored 13:31 into the first period
Detroit 30 12 2 3 65147 112 17-3-1-2 13-9-1-1 he Canucks’ 6-1 victory in Toronto.
St. Louis 17 21. 4 4 42119 146 9-11-2-1- 8-10-2-3 of s ks failed io gran
Chicago 17 22.2 5 41116 141 10-11-1-2 © 7-11-1-3 e Canucks falled to get a shot on
Columbus 17°25 2 3 39117 148. 9-10-1-2 8-15-1-1 Ray Emery in the third period and were
NORTHWEST WL OL TS GF GA HOME — AWAY DIV outshot a> 14 overall.
ancouver -8-0- -11-0- -110-0- . 1. c :
Calgary 24 17 2 2 52140 119 18-5-0-0 6-12-2-2 9-5-1-1 previous 12 games (10-1-1), fell to third
Minnesota 24 20 0 3 51132 126 17-5-0-2 -7-15-0-1 ~—7-6-0-2 place in the Northeast Division, one point
Colorado 23 20 2 1 49145 135 12-10-1-1 11-10-10 —9-5-1-0 behind Montreal. TOM HANSON/AP
Edmonton 22 20 2 2 48127 133 13-B-1-1 9-12-1-1 8-9-1-0 PUCK DENIED: Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo deflects a shot by the Senators
PACIFIC w Lo CANADIENS 4, THRASHERS 1 during the second period Thursday. Luongo stopped 34 shots in a 2-1 victory.
Anaheim 30 10 2— 0-1 ATLANTA — Montreal broke out of
San Jose 31 15 0 0. 62 144 107 15-7-0-0 — 10-8-0-0 its scoring slump, finding the net forthe and Alex Ovechkin scored empty-netters and Patrik Elias in the shootout.
ne | “ i ; os = eae ee first time in three games, and All-Star in the final minute to ice the game for the Jay Pandolfo and Paul Martin scored in
tos annelés. -<16.126. 2° 3038 438-178 5-16-0-0 6-13-0-2 Cristobal Huet made 44 saves. Capitals. regulation for the Devils.

PREDATORS 4, BLUE JACKETS O

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Chris Mason
made 33 saves for a career-high and fran-
chise-record fifth shutout this season, and
David Legwand and Paul Kariya each had
a goal and an assist for the Predators.

Steve Sullivan and Martin 'Erat also
scored for Nashville.

MAPLE LEAFS 3, PANTHERS 2

SUNRISE, Fla. — Andrew Raycroft
stopped 39 shots, and Boyd Devereaux,
Chad Kilger and John Pohl scored goals
for the Leafs.

Gregory Campbell and Ville Peltonen
scored for Florida.

SCORING GOALIES losing streak, avoiding their longest such Richards scored both goals in regulation
Through Wednesday Through Wednesday | ° streak since the 1975-76 season. and had the only tally in the shootout, BRUINS 5, PENGUINS 4 (SO)
Player, team GP G A Pts __ Player, team GP MIN GA AVG | Olaf Kolzig had 34 ie for i ope winning it for the Lightning. \ BOSTON — Phil Kessel scored the
__ Crosby, Pit 41 23 45 68 Caron,CH-ANA = 2 88 «= 2:1.36 =| += career victory, tying Gilles Me oche for Johan Holmavist was steady through- game-winner in the shootout, and Marc
st tous, TB 29 4 8” ea " ae ae 200 | 30th place on ae all-time list. “See out for the Lightains making 23 saved in gevaid had agoal’and two assists.
noo ee eae ee caine qe lfe™ Saas After Eric Staal pulled the Hurricanes regulation, and one more in overtime Glén Murray, Brad Stuart and Marco |
Hossa, Atl 48 29 32 61. Toskala, S.l->, 2% 1811 87226 | to 3-2 at 12:07 of the thind period, Glark before denying Zach Parise, Brian Gionta Sturm also scored for Boston. ©



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SPECIAL FOCUS

ALI

at65

His voice is muted, but his mind is ©



still sharp and clear. Boxing great
Muhammad Ali isn’t the man he
once was, but he’s still a fighter

BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

he images are unsettling at
aL best, upsetting at worst. The

world, after all, remembers
what he once was.

Muhammad Ali trembles and has
to be wheeled to a ringside spot ta
watch his daughter fight in New
York. A frail Ali needs to be sup-
ported by basketball player Dwyane
Wade at the Orange Bow] in Miami.

The voice that once bellowed that
he was “The Greatest” is but a whis-
per now, and he communicates’
mostly with facial expressions.

Ali’s body is ravaged by Parkin-
son’s disease and the effects of recent
spinal surgery. He tires easily. His
mind, though, remains sharp and
clear, and his passion for people
hasn’t faded with age.

Ali turned 65 on Wednesday. The
heavyweight champion who shocked
the world is a senior citizen now, eli-
gible to collect Social Security.

Like many other retirees, he has
moved from Michigan to the desert
to be out of the cold.

Visitors to the home in a gated
area of Scottsdale, Ariz., that Ali
shares with his fourth wife, Lonnie,
often find him absorbed in the past,
watching films of his fights and docu-
mentaries about his life — and Elvis
Presley movies.

Even more, he loves to watch him-
self talk.

“Muhammad is a little sentimen-
tal. He likes looking at older things.
He likes watching some of the inter-
views and saying some of the crazy
outrageous things he used to say,”
Lonnie Ali says. “Sometimes I think

- he looks at it and says, ‘Is that me?
Did I really say those things?’ ”

Those were the days when Ali still
floated like a butterfly and stung like
a bee, when he added to his legend by
defying the odds to beat George
Foreman in Zaire and Joe Frazier in
the Philippines.

“Rumble, young man, rumble!”
cornerman Bundini Brown would
yell to him.

That young man’s face is now dis-
torted by Parkinson’s, making him
look far older than he is. Now,
instead of the “Ali Shuffle” that once
dazzled the boxing world, he is
reduced to sometimes using a walker,
the result of surgery to help correct
spinal stenosis, the narrowing of the
spinal canal that causes compression

‘of the nerve roots.

Some days are better than others.
Ali reads fan mail every now and
then, and he painstakingly signs auto-
graphs with his trembling hand.
Sometimes, mostly in the morning
before his medication kicks in, his
family can understand every word he
says.

“We give him enough meds to
make his day go well enough, but not
enough to make him look absolutely
normal,” Lonnie Ali says. “He would
look better if we did, but we don’t
want to. We don’t want him on too
many medications.”

His birthday would pass with calls
from his nine children and other rela-
tives. Ali’s only request to mark the
occasion was a trip to one of his
favorite magic shops so he could pick
up a new trick or two to show visi-
tors.

One of his daughters, Hana, says
no one should feel sorry for him.

“People naturally are going to be
sad to see the effects of his disease,”
she says. “But if they could really see
him in the calm of his everyday life,
they would not be sorry for him. He’s
at complete peace, and he’s here
learning a greater lesson.”

The man who made headlines and
countless television highlights with

ess can’t really talk about himself
anymore. But others can:

THE DAUGHTER

Hana Ali listens often to the tapes,
the ones her father made as an audio
diary in 1979 when she and her sister
Laila were little girls. On them, Ali’s
voice is strong, his opinions certain.

“This is Muhammad Ali making a
tape for future reference, explaining
what’s going on in the world,” it
begins.

Ali talks about his efforts to medi-
ate the Iranian hostage crisis and

' meeting kings from different nations.

He gives his thoughts on war and
peace, and he has a talk with George
Foreman on God and religion.

“Sometimes I have to stop listen-
ing because I get in this time-warp
thing,” Hana says. “It’s all him, in his
own words.”

Of all his children, Hana might be
the closest to her dad. She wants to
take nursing courses so she can help
care for him.

“He needs people like we need the
air to breathe,” she says. “He knows
how great he is, but, at the same time,
he’s very humble. He’s shocked to
see how people still love him and
remember him. You see his eyes light
up, and it takes him back a moment
when they chant ‘Ali! Ali! It’s like
charging a battery up.”

Some days, Hana says, her father
has more energy than others. Some
days, he’s able totalk. .

No one knows why. It just hap-
pens.

“Every now and then you catch
yourself feeling bad,” she says. “But
he’s here, and he has a healthy, strong
spirit and soul and mind, and that’s
what is important.

“He always says he’s lived the life
of 100 men. He got to see the world

‘and do all these things.

“He has no regrets.”

THE INNER CIRCLE —

Gene Kilroy traveled the world at
Ali’s side. His official title was busi-
ness manager, but Kilroy was known
to most as the man who got things
done.

He sheltered Ali from anyone try-
ing to make a quick buck off him, and
he took care of the people around
him. For years, Kilroy was the lone
white man in the champ’s entourage.

“I consider myself one of the luck- -
iest guys in the world, just to call him

my friend,” Kilroy says. “If I was to
die today and go to heaven, it would
be a step down. My heaven was being
with Ali.”

On the walls of Kilroy’s office at
the Luxor hotel-casino in Las Vegas
are pictures of him and Ali taken
around the world. Kilroy tells stories
easily — such as the time he and Ali
landed in the early-morning darkness
in Zaire for Ali’s fight with Foreman,
only to find several thousand people
waiting.

Ali turned to Kilroy and asked him
who the people of Zaire hated most.

“I told him white people. He said,
‘I can’t tell them George Foreman is
white,’ ” Kilroy says. “Then I said,
‘They don’t like the Belgians, who
used to rule Zaire.’ ”

Ali stepped out on the tarmac,
called for quiet and yelled:

“George Foreman’s a Belgian!”

The crowd erupted, chanting “Ali,
boma ye! Ali, boma ye!” Translation:
“ Ali, kill him.”

Kilroy worries about his old
friend. He frets about his health, and
he believes Ali shouldn’t travel so
much. Kilroy cried the last time he
saw Ali, a year ago in Berlin.

“He had a belief, and a goal in his
life. He wanted to see freedom,
equality and justice for the black

BOXING

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 |7C’



BEBETO MATTHEWS/AP.

BATTERED, BUT NOT BEATEN: Muhammad Ali struggles with Parkinson’s disease and the effects of spinal

surgery, and the voice that once bellowed that he was
but he likes to watch films of his fights and documenta

“The artist Leroy Neiman said it
best: ‘Whoever touched Ali’s robe
was a better person for it.’ ”

THE OPPONENT

Larry Holmes was proudest of the
black eye.

He got it as an amateur the first
time he stepped into the ving for a
sparring session with Ali at his train-
ing cainp im Deer Lake, Pa.

“I didn’t want to put ice on it,”
Holmes says. “Having him give me a
black eye meant a lot to me.”

Holmes would later give Ali much
worse. The two met ou Oct. 2, 1980,
at Caesars Palace, with Ali lured out
of retirement to tight a former spar-
ring partner who had become the |
heavyweight champion of the world.

Ali had given Holmes his first
chance in boxing, but Holmes had a
job to do against the aging former
champion, who grew a mustache
before the tight and presented him-
self as “Dark Gable.”

The fight was lopsided from the
opening bell. Holmes was young, fast
and strong: Ali was a shell of himself
and took a beating until he finally
quit on his stool after the 10th round.

“He was like a little baby after the
first round,” Holmes says. “I was
throwing punches and missing just
for the hell of it. I kept saying, ‘Ali,
why are you taking this?’

“He said, ‘Shut up and fight — I’m
going to knock you out.’ ”

When the fight was over, Holmes
and his wife went upstairs to pay
their respects to Ali. In a darkened
room, Holmes told Ali that he loved
him.

“Then why did you whip my ass
like that?” Ali replied.

' Holmes hasn’t seen Ali recently,
but he says he heard thai the tormer
champ was down to 185 pounds.

“I can’t just say Ali was the great-
est, because there were so many
great fighters out there. 1 can’t say he

‘was greater than Marciano, Louis,

Dempsey and everyone else,”
Holmes says. ;

“A lot of it today is that people feel
sorry tor him because he’s got that
Parkinson’s or whatever is wrong
with him. They feel he doesn’t have
too much longer to live, and they
want to be part of the legeud.

THE PROMOTERS

Bob Arum wonders if it was some-
how partly his fault. A lot of the
punches Ali took came on his watch.

Ali had 61 professional fights, win-
ning 56 Arum started with him in

against George Chuvalo in Toronto.
Twelve years later, Arum promoted
his 25th and final Ali fight — his sec-
ond against Leon Spinks, this one at

the Superdome in New Orleans.

“T feel terrible about what hap-
pened because for better or worse I
played a part in it,” Arum says. “Not
that it wouldn’t have happened if
somebody else was involved. But I
feel I played a part in his physical
decline.” x

Arum says the first indication he
had that Ali might have taken too
many punches came after his third
fight with Ken Norton.

“T tried to talk Ali into not fighting,
but there were so uiany people
dependent on the jobs and every-
thing,” Arum says. “That’s one of the
reasons why I made the fight with
Leon Spinks, because it was an easy
tight.”

Arum’s wife, Lovee, and Lonnie
Ali still talk often on the phone. He
sees Ali on occasion, and each time
he feels conflicted.

“Here was a guy who my memo-
ries of him were larger than life. He
was full of life, like nobody I’ve ever
seen in my life,” Arum says. “Now to
see what is essentially a shell of what
was is hard. Every time I see him I’m
glad to see him, but I feel terrible.”

Don King also sees Ali occasion-
ally. Ali was so big that he started the
careers of both of boxing’s biggest
promoters.

“The man had magnetism. He
exuded charm and magnetism,” King
says. “He also stood for something.
He stood up for the rights of black
people and himself in a time when it
wasn’t commonplace.”

In typical King fashion, he even
coined a phrase for Ali that he recites
to this day: :

“Every knee must bend, every
head must bow, and every tongue
must confess thou are the greatest of
all time.”

THE FAN

Musician and actor Kris Kristof-
fersop and his band were touring the
United States when they stopped by
to see Ali training in the Pocono
Mountains, in Pennsylvania, for his
last big fight with Holmes.

It wasn’t long before Kristoffer-
son’s tour bus was headed back down
the highway, Ali at the wheel.

It there was anything Ali loved
better than boxing, it was driving a
bus.

“He drove the bus, and then he did
magic tricks, which he also loved,”

‘The Greatest’ is a whisper now. Ali tires easily,
ries about his life - and Elvis Presley movies.

old daughter on the bus, and she was
entertained quite a bit. He went all
the way to Buffalo with us, and then
he had a limo take him back.”
Kristofferson first saw Ali in
Rome at the 1960 Olympics. He later
became his close friend — and one of
his biggest fans. :
The two even starred ina televi-
sion movie together, with Kristoffer-

‘ son playing a plantation owner and

Ali an emancipated slave in 1979’s
Freedom Road. :

Kristofferson lives in Hawaii and
doesn’t see Ali much these days, but
he thinks a lot about his old friend.

“He'll be remembered more than
any other great athlete because of his
humanitarian work and the courage
he showed in-his life,” Kristofferson
says.

“He’s probably the most remark-
able person I ever met on the planet.
He’s an amazing human being.”

THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Howard Bingham had no idea that
his life would change that day in 1962
when he went to take pictures of a
young fighter at a Los Angeles news
conference.

“My assignment that day was to
cover this big loudmouth coming into
town,” says Bingham, who took pho-
tos for a black weekly newspaper. “I
had never really heard of him.”

Turns out, Bingham was photo-
graphing a young Cassius Clay. For
the next few days, he squired Clay
around town, showing him the sights.

He has been with Ali ever since,
and calls he him his best friend.

“I’ve had the opportunity to meet
and greet kings and queens. And
kings and queens have had the
opportunity to meet me, too,” Bing-
ham says. “It’s been wonderful.”

Bingham doesn’t know how many
pictures he has taken of Ali over the
years; he estimates that it is in the
millions. It’s been a great ride, but he
has some regrets.

“I wish I would have known the
Cassius Clay that I met was going to
become the Muhammad Ali of
today,’ Bingham says. “I would have
archived the pictures better, written
notes, done a lot of things differ-
ently.”

Bingham still travels with Ali and
talks to him regularly on the phone.
They talk about the past, how things.
once were. ,

They both were young men then.
And they remember better times.

“I can’t believe that [he’s 65],”
Bingham says.

his predictions and his boxing prow- man,” Kilroy says. March 1966, promoting his fight Kristofferson says. “I had my 6-year- “Tt just doesn’t seem real.”
THE TRIBUNE

COMICS PAGE







































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SINCE T
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HAVE To GET














ARE YOU SURE
YOU'LL BE SAFE
ALL ALONE IN |
THAT BIG, EMPTY. THERE.
BUILDING ?

T/M GLAD YOURE “BUT ALAN'S
EXCITED ABOUT \ STUDIO 13 WAY
YOUR PAINTINGS, ACROSS TOWN.










A CHAUFFEUR,



“IM FEEDIN’ HIM CAT FOOP TO SEE IF
J CAN GET HIM To MEOw."”



(© 1990 Universal Press Syndicate









BLONDIE

OTWIE'S STILL UPSET THAT I
LONG TO PUT UP OUR
> = CHRISTMAS

LIGHTS



Sa

Pop Goes the Weasel

SEE? YOU'RE
BOTH MISSING |
THE WHOLE

YOU'D THINK I'D GET A LITTLE
CREDIT FOR AT LEAST GETTING
ehh i



MARVIN

Dhar by -howty Aipadgs Wsigmin pe Notts pale sated,

NON SEQUITU

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QUACK ECHOES OR NoT,
BUT \F YOU WANT To
SP THINKING ABOUT IT,
JUST REPLACE IT WITH

“WHAT GOES TOWN
MUST COME UP



ACROSS

following up? (5)

Train, oddly enough (5)

Brown boy in junior fiction (7)
Performing dingo, possibly? (5)
Form of spire seen at seaside
places (5) .
Ituminsted about half a mile,

no more (5)

Figures to include a trio in acid
criticiem (7)

An investigator in state crimes (3)
A cross Is just one line! (4)

She makes an airman

madi (6)

Be all wrong as a tag (5)

Bend 8 blown fuse to the right angle
and t's OKI (6)

Harmless way to

get at me (4)

Horrendous fate? (3)

To be any different, you need to get
something feed (7)

Piles of sales talk? (5)

Possibly backward
performances? (5)

Short drink one shouldn't

take (5)

Be a winner, If you follow (7)

of the way (5)
Obviously there's rum in it (5)

Yesterday's cryptic solutions

Say-80 37, Ge-t-up 38, Ewer-s

Fi-9 27, Napal 28, Erase 30, Venus 32,
Guar 33, Rat





Something significantly beastly worth

Polson that can make you move out -



1, Reo AneseMese ED,



YOU SAIP THAT

DID Xo) KNoW
NEST LIPSTICK
CONTAINS FISK



BACKWARPS



| | CRYPTIC PUZZLE - |

DOWN

2

A bh

on

BBR

ACROSS: 3, Block 8, Co.-MIC 10, RH-one 11, C-an 12,
Pad-ua 13, Buck-led 15, Ski-LL 18, Go-T 19, Stifle 21,
Uberty 22, T-W-in 23, Pond 24, Benefit 26, In-deed 29, Air
31, P-earl 32, S-me-ared 34, Alias (‘AKA) 35, Ton 36,

DOWN: 1, Locum 2, Pink gin.4, L-O-ad 5, C- 6, Khaki
7, Knell 9, Mac 12, Patered 14, Lob 16, Tht eae 19,
Streams 20, Strip 21, Linda 23, Pi-rated 24, Bel-l-ow 25,

The professional figures tobe
verbose (6)

Makers of proprietorial
confessions? (6)

Brighton's oil outfit (3)

Fail to get round the corner with the
threshing equipment (5)

Fine:a great deal of money (7)

Skip it to order (4)

She provides chaps with transport (6)
Whence there's not far to stagger
nome {5)

Not getting this for money, you finish
in depression! (5)

Fed up with the terrible dirt around
central Tottenham (5)

H's up to Nat, perhaps, to be a great
man (5) ;
Being junior, Charlie can

get a date (5)

In a meal, hundreds are for
decoration (5)

. For a posh politician in a terrible
slum, it's a lot of money (4,3)
Sleep soon changed to be a bit of a
daze (6)

Led excessively around town (6)

In a systematic way, It may be hot in
the Mediterranean (6)

Pleasant place to be stranded?’ (5)
Thus, again, It's only fair (2-2)

In some trouble, but satisfied (3)

Yesterday's easy solutions

38, Seeks






ACROSS: 3, Egret 8, Fatal 10, Douse 11, Fir 12, Habit 13,
Reciter 15, Taken 18, Cos 19, Polite 21, Monster 22, Suet
23, Here 24, Matures 26, Origin 29, Sir 31, Titan 32,
Legends 34, Lurid 35, Too 36, Cadet 37, Litre

T BELIEVE
ART SHOULD BE
SPONTANEOUS

POINT HERE!





TARTS NGRY

INTEREETING,

BRENOA...\WWREN
DID You REKR
ABOUT THAT?

WHAT GOES DOWN
MUST COME UP

_ =|
N wo








LIPSTICK





ACROS>

EASY PUZZLE

2888 Neues

DOWN: 1, Wafer 2, Haricot 4, Gear 5, Editor 6, Total 7,
Asset 9, Tic 12, Hessian 14, Ton 16, Kites 17,
Never 19, Perused 20, Ascot 21, Merit 23, Heretic 24,

| Minute 25, Rig 27, Rival 28, Gales 30, Adore 32, Link

1 33, Not

ASD A NPE EMA TR 2 AR POMP

Small mammal (5)
Supply (6)
Mechanic (7)
Cash (5)

Metal

fastener (5)

* Undress (5)

Donates (7)
Favourite (3)
Beers (4)
Uproar (6)
Relaxes (5)

Creepy-

crawly (6)
Nuisance (4)
Shelter (3)
Attaches (7)
Allude (5)
Asian
language (5)
Book of maps (5)
Merge (7)
Number (5)
Desiccated (5)









South dealér.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
Q86
Â¥Q94
5
AQI743
_ WEST -
41072
VI53
@A10743

#82
.. SOUTH
. @AK4
VAK7
QI86
81095
The bidding:
South West North East
INT Pass 3NT All Pass
Opening lead — four of diamonds.
There are plays that are difficult
for a declarer'to make because they
Tun completely contrary to standard
procedure. But bridge being the kind
of game it is, there is room for an
occasional deviation fromthe norm
— espécially. when logic: indicates
that the deviation has everything to
gain-and nothing to lose. .

EAST
@3953
710862
@K92
#K 6

~ = ‘Take this’case where West led the
‘four..of diamonds ‘against three

notrump, and East won with the
king. East returned the diamond
nine, covered by declarer with the

TODAY'S TARGET
Solution Monday.

Type of seed (6)
Eastern

Europeans (5)
Cereal crop (4)
Alo (9)

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

abate abet ablate able abler albeit arable bail
bait bale baler ball ballet bare bate bear beat
bell belt: beta bier BILATERAL bile bill billet
bite biter blare bleat brae braille brat label
labial labile liable libel liberal ratable tabla
table triable tribal -tribe

queen, whereupon West made the

- eminently correct play of the three.

West’s only hope was that East
would later gain the lead and return a
third diamond before declarer could
score nine tricks. East’s return of the
nine indicated he did not have four
diamonds originally, as in that case
he would have returned his original
fourth-best diamond. Declarer’s
most likely diamond holding, there-
fore, was Q-J-x-x.

Lacking a ninth trick, South now
tried a club finesse. East won with
the king and returned a diamond, and

- the contract went down one.

The excellent defense notwith-
standing, declarer did himself in at
trick two when he covered East’s
nine of diamonds with the queen.
Instead, he should have played his
eight. on the nine! This maneuver
would have thoroughly discombobu-
lated the defense. Another diamond
lead by East would have given the
defenders their third trick, and East’s
king of clubs would subsequently
have scored their final trick.

_ From declarer’s viewpoint, the
diamond duck at trick two guaran-
tees three notrump regardless of.
whether West started with four, five
or six diamonds. The hard part is to
think of it before the queen or jack
pops out of declarer’s hand.

Clas

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe
-permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkjet in inkjet printer).



Good. 17; very good 25; excellent 34 (or more).

ECR
omac
IN| TH]

Simon Williams v Florian Jenni,
European Club Cup, Fuegen
2006. Books tell you that bishop
and knight have equal value,
but the pawn formation can
change the verdict. An open
board with few or unbalanced
pawns favours the bishop's
long-range attacks, while

when there are no passed
pawns and locked positions the
knight usually dominates. tt gets
worse If, as here, the bishop is
restricted by its own pawns. So
you would expect a White
advantage, but England
Intemational Williams had
foreseen more. His next three-
move sequence demonstrated
that Black's game is actually
hopeless. What were the moves
(fairly easy) and why did Black
then resign (harder)?





FRIDAY, a
JANUARY 19 >

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
You're feeling very energetic, but
pretty soon you’ll be a romance mag-
net. Expect romantic interests to be+
drawn. to you like they never have*. °
been before. What a rush. *,
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
You’ve been involved in an activity: °
that you’d hoped the public wouldn’t’
discover. Trouble is, the truth always
has a way of leaking out. Deal with
the consequences.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Someone has had their e605 6 yoo
and is ready to reveal wiry. iy you're
attached, graciously avoid fhe issue.,'
If you’re single, enjoy the newe‘
adventure that can ensue.
CANCER - Jun 22/jui 22
You've been flirting »ith someone
but have felt naughty doing so
Unless on of you are attached, .
there’s no reason not to make a bold
move toward creating a relationship.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Now’s your chance to learn about
something you’ve always been inter-
ésted in, Leo. Get a friend to join in
your quest. It will be that much more .
fun if you do it as a couple.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

It’s time for you to destress in a

major way. Wind all things down, «
put a halt to projects and clear up *
your calendar. Summon one last

4} blast of willpower to do so.

LIBRA —-Sept 23/Oct 23

If you’ve been seeing someone casu-
ally, expect that this person will want
more than just a passing thing.
You're irresistible and can’t help it.
Think about what you want to do.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
It’s time to put an end to a relation-*
ship that has been particularly trou-*
blesome, Scorpio. You know what
you have to do, so get with it. It will

be less painful that way.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Opportunities for romance are
everywhere, even in a long-stand- ,
ing relationship, Sagittarius, «
Employ your best romantic tech. *
niques for a week of fun. =
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20,
Security issues are paramount thiss
week, Capricorn. Lock your doors*
and double-check your windows:
You don’t want a stranger lurking:
in your path — it spells trouble.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
You are raring. to go this week, »
Aquarius, but it’s best to keep one -
foot on the brake as well. Loved-,
ones can’t keep up with your energy * ,
level and are surprised as well. “y
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
It’s time to have that talk you've .
been putting off, Pisces. Gather
some energy and put your thoughts
together before you begin -

eS ECCT

LEONARD BARDEN



901 VINE

â„¢
Chess solution 8282: 1 NfS Bd8 2 Rxe8 Rxe8 3 Rel!
Resigns. If Be7 4 Rel wins the bishop.tf Kg8 4 Rc8 Kf8
5 Nxd6 wins. Ifh5 (best) 4 Rc8 Kh7 5 Nxd6 Rg8 6 NIT
Be7 7Rxg8 Kxg8 8 Nh6+ and 9 Nf when White soon

wins a second pawn.

Mensa quiz. a) Sorbet and strobe b) Farmed and

framed c) Curled and curdle.

One possible word ladder solution ts: TOU), boot |

bolt, belt, beet, beef, BEEP.


TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007, PAG








- SPORTS



@ KINGSWAY Academy Saints’
guard Kentonya Miller goes up for
| an uncontested fast-break lay-up
| against the St, Andrew's Hurri
| canes ina BAISS senior girls bas-
| ketball game yesterday at
Kingsway.

e SEE PAGE ONE










(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)







@ STLANDREW’S Asie: Biss
holds onto the ball. as Kingsway

> Sans
t through the














Whee ee.



THE TRIBUNE


te =




FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Lut



Petite



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Forty per cent highe
building costs damag
first ‘anchor’ hotel

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

igh costs could
\ “kill the goose
that laid the
golden egg” of
the Bahamas’
first Family Island ‘anchor
resort’. project in Exuma, the
Ministry of Tourism’s deputy

High operating costs, worker turnover
and rental rates leave Emerald Bay
suffering, placing ‘anchor property’

model’s sustainability in question

y Freeport Concrete

to assess demands

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s
Board of Directors will meet
shortly to discuss whether - and
how - the company will receive

- new equity capital to carry it
- through its current balance

sheet problems, The Tribune
was told yesterday, with its
chief executive forecasting it
will generate “a small profit”
for fiscal 2007.

Ray Simpson said. the com-
pany was meeting all opera-

’ director-general warned yes-

terday, with the unprofitable
Four Seasons Emerald Bay
property needing to become a
sustainable resort.

David Johnson, deputy
director-general in the Min-
istry of Tourism with respon-
sibility for planning, invest-
ment and business develop-

-ment, said factors such as

building costs being about 40
per cent higher per square foot
than they are in Nassau, had



@ DAVID JOHNSON
(FILE photo)

growth and kept it from reach-
ing the development its owners
had previously predicted.

Mr Johnson said of Emer-
ald Bay: “The property was

conceived to be a mixed-use
project, with 185 keys under
the Four Seasons brand. The
vast majority of the property
was to be for mixed-use, con-
dos and hundreds of lots sold

- for significant family homes.

“After four years of opera-
tion, they have developed very
little of the sold inventory,

_ There’s been a lot of trading

of the land by the owners, but
the cost of building is prohibi-
tive.

“The buildings costs, the

numbers suggest, are in excess
of 40 per cent higher per
square foot to build.”

Mr Johnson explained that
due to Four Seasons’ reputa-
tion and marketing position-
ing at the five-star, luxury end
of the market, properties con-
structed there would be similar
to those built on Kerzner Inter-
national’s Ocean Club Estates
on Paradise Island,

SEE page 9B

tional expenses and funding
repayments of its $1.492 mil-
lion bank overdraft and
$440,453 in long-term debt
from cash flows generated by
sales at the Home Centre
Superstore and its concrete
plant.

He explained, though, that
Freeport Concrete needed
more working capital to fund
inventory purchases, ensuring
that the Home Centre could
meet consumer and Port
Authority licencee demands

retarded Emerald Bay’s

Cruise lines may take port stakes

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor =
THE Government has “successfully con-
cluded negotiations” with the major cruise

lines on a new Cruise Incentive Act, with -

the Bahamas seeking to have the likes of
Carnival and Royal Caribbean Cruise
Lines take “a direct financial interest in the
major ports in Nassau and Grand
Bahama”.

David Johnson, deputy director-gener-
al in the Ministry of Tourism with respon-
sibility for planning, investment and busi-
ness development, said the Government
was “just concluding negotiations with a
major cruise line” on a new incentive

Government in process of ‘concluding’ new incentive agreements

agreement.

The two parties were now in the process
of “formalising the new agreement to give
us something going forward for the next
three years”.

The Bahamas, Mr Johnson said, had

“successfully concluded negotiations” with
the major operators, Carnival and Royal
Caribbean, and was now likely fo engage
the other lines, such as Disney and Nor-
wegian Cruise Lines, in talks on an incen-
tive programme for them during the first
quarter.

The new agreements would replace the
old Cruise Overnight Incentive Act, which
expired in 2003. The cruise lines and the

Bahamas have continued operating as if

that agreement was in force over the.past
three years, and it is understood that this
nation’s failure to agree a new incentive
package has caused some frustrations
among the cruise industry.

Mr Johnson said the new agreements '

SEE page 6B

as individual as you?

Reality Check.
With BahamaHealth you can.
We've got health plans with flexible
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FAMILY
IARDIAN

INSURANCE
c 0 AN Y



for its products,

The Home Centre had gen-
erated $4 million in sales in the
first four months since it
opened at its new Atlantic Dri-
ve site on September 6, 2006.
Mr Simpson explained that
with more capital, the country
would be able to purchase
more inventory and increase
sales.

“Our Board has to meet on
it,” Mr Simpson said of the
need for more equity capital.
“T have to sit down with them
and work out the right amount
of capital we need, and make
sure we get it right.

“I would like more capital
because we want more inven-
tory. Our inventory in the store
is right, and bringing in more
of the products that are work-
ing will generate more sales.

Freeport Concrete reported
a $1.993 million loss for the

© for extra capital

Company likely

to make $150,000-
$200,000 Q1 loss,
break even in Q2
and be profitable
for full year, as
Home Centre sees
$4m in sales in.
first four months

year to August 31, 2006, and
saw its auditors provide ‘a
going concern’ warning
because current liabilities
exceeded current assets by just
over $1 million at the balance
sheet date.

This solvency situation has
created the need for Freeport
Concrete to receive more cap-
ital, Among the options open
to it are a rights issue to exist-
ing shareholders, and several
analysts have told The Tribune
that they would like to see its

largest shareholder, chairman

Hannes Babak, step up and
show his long-term commit-
ment to the company through
some form of capital injection.

Mr Simpson said Freeport
Concrete’s 2007 first quarter
results will be published next

ek, adding that the concrete

t was profitable“although

company would still incur

an overall loss due to continu-

ing costs associated with the

Home Centre Superstore tran-
sition. /

The Freeport Concrete chief
executive acknowledged that
“the company will report a loss
in the first quarter”, which cov-

_SEE page 7B

‘Anchor projects
do not have to be
billion-dollar hotels’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ANCHOR properties do not
need to be billion-dollar, mul-
ti-room resorts to achieve their
desired economic impact on

Family Islands, the Ministry of

Tourism’s deputy director-gen-
eral said yesterday, pointing
out that a 13-room property in
South Andros was sustaining
the surrounding community,

David Johnson told The Tri-
bune that the term ‘anchor
project’ was “misunderstood”.
‘He explained: “You can have
different interpretations of

‘anchor’. It has less to do with
size and more to do with func-
tion.”

He added that the Tiamo
Resort in south Andros, near
Mangrove Cay, was a prime
example of how a small, niche
boutique resort could fulfil the
role of an anchor property in
the Family Islands.

The resort, he said, had just
13 rooms but employed a staff
of 35 and had an annual pay-
roll of $2 million that was
largely spent in the local com-
munity.

“Almost everyone in that
community gets some benefit
from it,” Mr Johnson pointed
out, It’s an anchor for South
Andros, It’s not causing a
demand on its infrastructure.”

The Government’s strategy
of trying to secure an ‘anchor
project’ for each Family Island

_ has come under increased

ys

scrutiny, particularly when it
comes to the ability of local
communities in these islands
to sustain them through the
provision of labour and infra-
structure.

Mr Johnson yesterday said
the Bahamas had to be
“extremely careful” in ensuring
that large-scale investment
projects did not completely
alter the character of the island
communities in which they
were set, and undermine the
very attractions that first
brought tourists to these loca-
tions.

He explained that the Min-
istry of Tourism was advocat-
ing a planning strategy that
involved local people, giving
them the opportunity to decide
how their community would
look in 10-20 years, and what
kind of development was suit-
able and would be permitted.

This, Mr Johnson said,
would enable Bahamians to
determine their needs, rather
than leaving them subject to
what investors wanted to see,
and the rates of return on their
investment and profits that
they wanted.

He added that the Bahamas
“didn’t need to be creating”
billion-dollar resorts with hun-
dreds of rooms on every island,
arguing that this nation’s “best
chance for overall success” lay
in segmenting its tourism prod-
uct, developing a brand identi-
ty for each island, and targeting
specific markets for each one.


ase MM)

?’m fovin’ it. | |

| HIGH
LOW

PARTLY SUNY |
5M viobiere



he Tribune





SOF |
GOF |

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 103 No.48



ae Mita
building costs damage
first ‘anchor’ hotel



ae mas again (ct [i]



FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007 |

Pa

SEE STORY ON PAGE FIVE



ROW erupts over
— Chinese workers

B By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN ALLEGED Chinese
“take-over” of a government
construction site has led to the
dismissal of a local worker and
claims that there are insufficient
workers in the Bahamian labour
force.

Yesterday, the Workers Par-
ty led by Mr Rodney Moncur
and Mr Allan Strachan, called
the local media to the T G
Glover Primary school.

At the moment, an addition
to the primary school is being

built on a site that is commonly ~

referred to as “The Pitt” on Pitt
Road, which is adjacent to Nas-
sau Street.

According to steelworker
Anthony Thompson, this week
he was dismissed from the con-
struction site because his bosses
claimed they had “no work for
him to do.”

“This morning I was told that
there was nothing for me to
do,” claimed Mr Thompson.

“TI was the only steel man on
the job, but when I reach this
morning it was four or five Chi-
nese steelworkers on the job
doing the same work I was sup-
posed to be doing, but yet they
told me there was nothing for
me to do.” toe

Mr Thompson told reporters
there were more Bahamians on

the job site at the beginning, .

but at the moment, he said: “A
whole lot of Bahamians have
been let go.” |

The reporters'then inter-
viewed Mr Louis Liu, who
described himself ‘as the
“administration manager for the
Chinese team” on the construc-
tion site.

Mr Liu estimated that there
were about 28 to 29 Chinese
workers on the site. He

Enjoy a Whopper Jr.
with medium fries

tenn

end drink

ree
Ay
a

a

struction site yesterday.



BA WORKER at T G Glover Primary school secures the con-

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

explained that they had been
working on the job for a “cou-
ple of days.”
Mr Liu said he is from the
Jiangsu Province in China.
The reporters then confront-

ed Mr E R Hanna, owner of E -

R Hanna Construction, the
head construction firm on the
site.

Mr Hanna denied that he

had refused work to Bahami-

ans.
“Those that come here for
work, I told them that as soon
as we get the buildings off the
ground they will be employed,”
Mr Hanna said. :

“As regards the people from
China,” he continued, “they are
legit, every last one of them.”

The veteran construction boss
said he was hired by the Min-
‘istry of Works.

When Mr Hanna became
involved in a shouting match

SEE page 11





; Evans said the officers con-



‘Massive’ number
of firearms seized
lf By KRYSTEL ROLLE



POLICE seized a “mas-
sive” numberof firearms
last night after a tip:led them
to a.hidden Weapons and
ammunitions cache

According to press liaison
officer Walter Evans,
around 11.30 Wednesday
morning, officers from the
Drug Enforcement Unit
went to a bushy area in the
southwestern area of New
Providence after getting a
"tip." It was there that they
made the discovery.

Describing it as a "major
firearm seizure," Inspector


















fiscated 1,294 live rounds of
ammunition and three
weapons.

According to the report
750 live rounds were found
in a container, and 544.were
found in a bag near the con-
tainer. Also 534 live rounds
of ammunition were found
for a .9mm, 575 for a .380,
135 for a .223, and 50 for a
.22. In addition to the
ammunition, police found a
Tech-9, a 22 German ruger,
and a M-16 assault rifle
along with three magazine
clips.

"Thus far this has been
the largest seizure of
firearms and ammunition
for the*year 2007 and we

SEE page 11























r nVktWs

& By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE frustrated home-own-
ers of Excellence Estates claim

they have suffered “police ’

harassment” as a result of them
telling their stories to The Tri-
bune.

On Monday, The Tribune
reported that residents of the
“low-cost” housing community
in the Carmichael constituency
were complaining about leaky
roofs, cheap house paint, and
many unfinished repairs in their
recently bought homes.

The residents claimed that
they had written many letters
of complaint to the Department
of Housing, but these had gone
unanswered.

The Tribune spoke to Mr

- More radio

and TV licences
are granted

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune. Staff.Reporter



WITH the aim of enhanc-
ing democracy in the
Bahamas, government has
awarded eight more radio
licences and one television
licence to private individuals
‘and companies, Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
said yesterday.

“Jam very pleased with this
(development). You will have
a choice, get the variety of
programmes you want. It will
create a diversity. It will give
us a strong democracy in our
country,” he said.

Continuing with the effort
of breaking the monopoly on
broadcasting in the Bahamas —
an initiative which was started
in 1992 by the FNM — the cur-
rent administration has in
recent months granted
licences for one radio station
in Bimini, one in Inagua, one
in Abaco and two in Grand
Bahama.

Licences have also been
given for one gospel station
and one additional secular sta-
tion in New Providence, as
well as one for a non-com-
mercial station which will be
operated by the College of the
Bahamas, Mr Wilchcombe
said.

SEE page 11





ACO ARS .



Gordon Major, Director of
Technical Services at the
Department of Housing, and he
promised that an investigation
and report would be prepared
as a result of their complaints.

The Tribune again visited the
residents on Tuesday to see if
they had made any progress
with their problems, however
the reporter was met with an
additional complaint from the
angry residents of the subdivi-
sion.

According to Ms Leana
Carey of house No. 60: “A blue
car anda’ white car cantie Over to

‘Ms. Sweeting’s house today.

The officer in the white car had
his police uniform hanging in
the back seat, andthe other
four identified themselves as
police officers when they came
inside Ms Sweeting’s house.”





Ms Carey claimed that one
of the officers asked: “Who is
Leana?”

“So when I came there, I said
I was Leana, and I asked him
what was the problem,” said Ms
Carey.

“According to them, some-
body called the office and said
that illegal actions were going
on in the back here.”

Ms Carey said she told the
officers they were not involved
in any illegal activity, and that
they were “only trying to get
our homes straight.”

Ms Stephanie Sweeeting,
whose home the officers are
alleged to have entered, said

\ that one of the officers even
4vasked to see her passport.

The Tribune asked the resi-

SEE page 11



Claim that Anna Nicole ‘could
end up in Fox Hill Prison’

ANNA Nicole Smith could end
up in Fox Hill Prison if she fails to
pay more than $100,000 in legal
fees allegedly owed to her for-
mer Nassau attorneys, it emerged
yesterday.

A Supreme Court injunction
with penal notice has been grant-
ed to Callenders lawyer Tracy
Ferguson, who says she is ready
to claim the sum against the value
of the reality star’s new home if
she fails to pay up.

Ms Smith, who has just entered
a $700,000 deal to buy the home
of businessman Glen Rogers at
Coral Harbour, was originally the
subject of a restraining order
issued on December 6 last year.

This forbade Ms Smith to reduce
the balance of her Bahamas bank
accounts beyond a certain point.

‘But, according to Ms Fergu-
son, the US$113,217 debt men-
tioned in the order remains out-
standing. Now the law firm is
ready to go all the way in seeking
judgment and enforcement, which
could mean Ms Smith’s committal
to prison if she fails to respond.

Ms Ferguson said last night:
“We are determined to pursue
this. We will be paid. Ms Smith
now needs to respond to this and
stop being evasive.”

The order, which lists Ms Smith

SEE page six

FNM ‘would institute a
checks and balances
regimen for ministers, MPs’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter



TO RESTORE the public’s faith in the country’s political system,
the FNM, if elected, will institute a new regimen of checks and bal-
ances for ministers and MPs, Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham
said yesterday at a rally in Fox Hill while officially announcing three
candidates who will be running for the FNM in the next election.

For Elizabeth — Ellie Campbell; for Yamacraw — Pauline Nairn
and for Fox Hill, Dr Jacinta Higgs.

These candidates, he said, are eminently qualified and dedicat-
ed Bahamian women committed to serving you and the whole of the

SEE page two





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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE |





nowing your posi-
tioning, and by exten-
sion your brand, are

key components to successful

marketing, It is important for

you to understand the two con-
cepts, Great positioning will
first lead to you having a great
brand and, ultimately, to the
holy grail of marketing, brand
loyalty, where the customer is
tied into you lock, stock and
barrel. Positioning is now con-
sidered to be so important that
it is officially incorporated as
the fifth part of the marketing
mix - product, price, promo-
tion, place and positioning.

Positioning is about how you
want your product to be per-
ceived in the marketplace by
your customers, and is the
answer to two questions:

Question 1 — Where does
your product fit in the market
place now?

Question 2 — Wliere do you

Business
Sense



fed By Mark Paliner

want it to be in the future?
According to Al Ries and
Jack Trout, there are two ways
of approaching your position-
ing. Both will require you to
carry out market research;
Physical Positioning — First,
look at how your product mea-
sures up, or will measure up, in
the marketplace through its
features, design, appeal, aoe
tance and packaging. Does it
or will it, imitate what is
already out there, or is it dif-
ferentiated in some way? If
your product is either readily
available elsewhere, or a simi-
lar product is available in the
market at a lower price, you









Days/Hours:

Closed:



ransatlantic slave trade,

Authentic objects associated with the trauma of enslavement including shackles, a slave
\ branding iron, a slave whip, furniture from a slave house and more are here for you to see and
experience.

Admission: Non-Residents: Adults: $3.00
Senlors (60 plus) $2.00

Children (under 14) $1.00

Residents: Adults: . $2.00

Children (under 14) $1,00

The museum is named for the African slave Pompey who led a revolt on the island of
Exuma in 1830 and defied the dehumanizing institution of slavery. The museum is
housed in the former marketplace, Vendue House built around 1769 to allow for the sale

es commodities ee enslaved Africans,

Lest We Forcer

THE TRIUMPH OVER Shee ERY

veling exhibition is unique in that it ‘Focuses less on enslaved Africans as victims
“and niore on the ways in which they reshaped their destinies and place in history through
the creation of distinct cultures...

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
9:30 a.m. » 4:30 p.m.
Sunday and Thursday

need to consider carefully
whether you want to enter that
market, or remain in it.

Perception Positioning —
Second, look at how your
product is perceived in the
mind of the consumer, and
why would someone want to
buy it? Is it for practical rea-
sons, lifestyle, or social accep-
tance? Is someone buying your
car because of its engineering,
price or because they want to
be seen in it?

Advertising is very subtle
and is geared to exploiting
human needs, such as the need
for power, the need for con-
nection and the need for secu-
rity. Once advertisers know
why a product appeals to
someone, they will cynically
hit that hot button. In the way
that some people tend to buy
Volvos because they are posi-
tioned as being safe and meet:

and is fered at the Pompey Museum funingt this dice year to mark] FE

Schomburg Press Release























Mark your calendar
Our Application Deadline

ing their needs of security, oth-
ers will buy Jeep Wranglers
because they are positioned as
promoting an exciting and
healthy lifestyle,
Understanding physical and
perception positioning will
allow you to come up with a
positioning strategy that will
take your product and busi-
ness to where it wants to go,
and hopefully turn it into a
well-known brand,

There are three positioning
strategies you could consider:
1, Low Cost Leadership
strategy — This is where you
choose to undercut the com-
petition, and still offer prod-
ucts of equal or superior value.
. This is an area where large
retailers operate with their
economies of scale, so it is
unlikely this is an area where
you can operate without reduc-
ing the price, or the quality, of
the products that you offer,
Make sure you can supply the
volume required to make a
profit at low margins.

2, Differentiation strategy
-- This is where you choose
to compete on the basis of your
unique selling proposition, or
competitive advantage, be it

F | ot eee
Oo dui rat) ae ee

~ read Insight’
POUL LLU EWE)



the uniqueness of the product,
your company, your customer
service, distribution or deliy-
ery,

Make sure your product
really is different, before you
opt for this strategy,

3, Segmentation strategy —
This is where you choose to

compete on the basis of a

niche, or segment in the mar-
ket, focusing on a narrower
group of people with specific
needs,

Markets are constantly
breaking down into smaller
and smaller niches, Find a
niche where you can have a
competitive advantage.

Whichever strategy you use,
here are some tips to ensure
your strategy is well thought-
out;

First, make sure it is based
on sound research, Is there a
need for the product? Is there
a niche waiting to be exploit-
ed? Are you offering a com-
bination of factors that isn’t
offered currently in the mar-

ket place?

Second, is your strategy sus-
tainable? Just because you

have the right product for the |

right price, will it make enough
money for you to stay in busi-
ness?

Third, will your entry into
the market grow the market,
or will you have to fight for a
smaller part of the pie? Will
you be able to adapt to
changes in the market place
quickly, such as changes in cus-
tomer needs, or increased com-

petition? Will you take the risk °

and create a new market by,
predicting the future and posi,
tioning yourself where you
think the customer might be? ;
Fourth, will upcoming eco-»
nomic cycles affect your ability’
to compete at the current lev-.

el? How will you cope if eco-.

nomic activity declines? Will*
you have to discount and?
reduce your profit margins? »

Make sure your positioning’
strategy makes sense, Take the,
time to think it through. Don’t’
be an antipreneur and make
the following mistakes:

* Be positioning illiterate

* Not understanding the two
approaches to positioning

* Forgetting to spend the
time researching your posi-
tioning

* Having no posioniny
strategy

Marketing your business is
an important area and will
require constant effort to get it
right. So, in order to avoid the

sure you spend time on this
area as it could pay large divi-
dends for your future business
success,

NB: Adapted braid his
4 coming book, Antipreneur-

ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas, He
is chief operating officer of
www.ezpzemail.com, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be
contacted at markalex-
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer..All rights
reserved

FREEPORT CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED (BISX:FCC) hereby
gives that it has applied to the Bahamas International Securities Exchange

The extension was requested as the Company is projecting a loss of
approximately $2 million for the year ended 31st August, 2006 as a result
of which the Company’s auditors, KPMG, have undertaken further audit
procedures, and the Company has had to meet additional financial statement

disclosure requirements,

Preliminary results indicate that the Company’s gross profit was seriously
impacted in the 4th quarter primarily as a result of the delayed opening of the
Home Centre Superstore on Atlantic Drive in Freeport, the significant costs
associated with the transitioning of the Company’s stores and reduction in
inventory value due to obsolescence, damage and shrinkage .

The Company shall publish its audited financial results for the year ended

31st August, 2

is February 2, 2007
Remember to include the following with your application

006 on or before 12th January, 2007,






$40.00 non-refundable processing fee
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of

birth and expiration date of passport

Official high school transcript




* Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!
We look forward to weicoming you to The College,
soon to be the University of The Bahamas.

MO OU Se RRND TE ROR EL DOG TRIED ANOS SRT PRNC ME OR UME RN EEE AREAS ALA ay BSR UoReNATE AGRI

2A SREY ADO AIIM cRNA RA PERRIN CI EH, CRN

‘trap of antipreneurship, make -

4

vay % © ¢

%¢e7-"
4 et?

Ber
PAGE 3B

THE TRIBUNE

E 7

+

Yy






PAGE 16B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2007





li By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Government
s “bulldozing”
ahead with
implementation
of the National
Health Insurance (NHI) plan

‘ amid great secrecy and mini-

mal consultation with the
Bahamian people, something

a ZERO DOWN LOT LOANS
een CEM ey Necro Nis

MUTUAL FUNDS

: ca Wee

|
|



THE TRIBUNE

@ THE National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform is
awaiting the response
from Dr Bernard Nottage
(left), minister of health
and national insurance, to
a letter written this month
by the Coalition’s co-
chairs, Dr Robin Roberts
and J Barrie Farrington,
before determining its
next move. >

(FILE photo)

Bulldozing’ described

the Bahamng Employers Con-
federation’s (BECon) presi-
dent described as “a frighten-
ing situation”,

Brian Nutt said BECon and _

the National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, of which
it is a member, feared that the
way NHI was being designed
would create a “two-tier health
system”, something they found
“frightening”.

CDs

Mn BST ISI= & PERSONAL oY

FINANCIAL PLANNING

‘a frightenin

Once NHI was implement-
ed, Mr Nutt told the Rotary
Club of South-East Nassau
that the Government would
be “owning and controlling
much of the healthcare pro-
vided in the Bahamas”, with
the private sector’s market
share squeezed,

He questioned “how
accountable will the Govern-

ment be?’, and drew parallels.

acai Wass sa noe

TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING _

PC Cetar ny

eee
STREET



|

with the Bahamian education
system, The average BGCSE
grade was a D-, but strip out
results from the private
schools and all public schools
would be in the “failing cate-

gory”.
Viewed
Mr Nutt laid out what he

_ viewed as the “worst case sce-

Baie More thana Bank

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nario” should NHI be imple-

mented. He pointed out that
the scheme was “going to
overburden and already over-
burdened public health sec-
tor”, given that medical care
under NHI was perceived to
be free, so Bahamians would
gravitate to using those ser-
vices,

The BECon president also
questioned whether there
would still be a role for pri-
vate health insurance carriers
and brokers when NHI was
implemented, given that the
Government scheme is viewed
as being the primary health-
care insurer.

The Government has
argued that NHI’s arrival will
remove a significant risk bur-
den from private health insur-
ers, enabling them to design
supplemental plans to cover
risks and treatments not
insured under NHI.

Yet Mr Nutt warned: “If the
broad base of insurance is tak-
en out of the equation, many
companies may not find it fea-
sible to offer health insurance
of any kind. So you may not

find any private health insur-.

ance is available.”
In addition, Mr Nutt pointed
out that NHI would not cover

‘all the costs of mtttical care

when Bahamians went to pri-
vate healthcare practitioners.
Under NHI, the cost of ser-
vices will be based upon the
fees charged in the public sec-
tor. Since private healthcare
fees will be higher, NHI will
only cover a percentage of
those costs, requiring Bahami-
ans to generate out-of-pocket
funds to fund the remainder,
Mr Nutt said this might cre-
ate a ‘brain drain’ where tal-
ented Bahamian doctors left

the country, especially if

patients are unable to meet
out-of-pocket expenses.

Costs in the private health-
care sector are higher because
practitioners have to meet
expenses such as equipment
costs and depreciation, where-
as under NHI these will be
covered by taxes taken by the
Consolidated Fund. Private
practitioners also have to
make.a profit.

Mr Nutt pointed out that the
5.3 per cent contributions by
salaried workers to the NHI,
split 50/50 between employer
and employee, was “not a true

Situation’

cost of what NHI will be”. It
will cover. the costs of medical
services, but funds for purpos-
es such as building and main-
taining hospitals will continue
to come from public funds.
“The response we got [from
the NHI project team] was the
5.3 per cent is not paying the
full medical costs. It will pay
the salaries, wages' and prac-
titioners, and any direct med-
ication prescribed as part of

- treatment,” Mr Nutt said.

“If anyone wants to contin-
ue to use a private practition-
er, there will be an extra cost.
It will not be the free service
the Government maintains it
will be.”

The NHI steering commit-
tee invited BECon, the Cham-
ber of Commerce, Small Busi-
ness Association of the
Bahamas and Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB) to
meet with it last August to dis-
cuss the proposed scheme.

Yet Mr Nutt disclosed that
the committee told the organ-
isations in advance that it
could not give them a copy of
its full report, on which NHI is
largely based, because Cabi-
net had not authorised its dis-
closure.

As a result, Mr Nutt said it
was impossible for any of the
private sector organisations to
“give any type of input into
NHI when we don’t have any
information on the plan being
proposed.

“There wasn’t really any
consultation at this meeting.
The Steering Committee basi-
cally told us what they were
doing, and any requests we
made were denied.“

Mr Nutt said the Steering
Committee said it was start-
ing to write the NHI legisla-
tion then, and that there would
be no opportunity to review it
prior to it going to the House
of Assembly.

Meanwhile, The Tribune
understands that the Govern-
ment has still to present the
Coalition with any of the stud-
ies it has requested on NHI.

The Coalition is awaiting the
response from Dr Bernard
Nottage, minister of health
and national insurance, to a
letter written this month by
the Coalition’s co-chairs, Dr
Robin Roberts and J Barrie
Farrington, before determin-
ing its next move.