Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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== Se

PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

Bole ee

THE TRIBUNE



Mother appeals for help with sons

Pain is constant, spirits are
low and tension is high in the
Strachan household where a
mother looks after three chil-
dren suffering daily from a
severely debilitating blood con-
dition, haemophilia.

Janice Strachan is hoping that
articles in the press will alert the
public to her difficulties. Her
three sons, Michael, Nathaniel
and Raphael, all need financial
aid to help them access Factor,
the medicine that stops the
internal bleeding they all suffer
from on a regular basis as a
result of their rare condition.

Now Raphael has run out of
the medicine, which is sent over
on an unpredictable basis from
the States, depending on

whether stocks are available for.

donation.

With each day that passes,
they fear his condition will
worsen, with the effect that his
joints will be further deformed.

“The longer you don't treat a
joint, that's when the damage

sets in. It's a crippling disease - ©

the blood stays in that area, it

deteriorates the bone, it eats

the bone, and the joint becomes
deformed,” she explained.

On top of it all, the boys
have all been out of school since
October, because their mother
cannot afford the private school
fees anymore - another source
of anxiety.

She explained that the public
school environment, where
overcrowding creates a constant
threat for the boys, who can suf-
fer internal bleeding from the
slightest impact, is not safe for
them.

“They're very angry - angry
and frustrated. They ask me
“Why can’t we be in school?""
she said.

"They're asking me to get
someone to home school them.
I told them, no matter which
way, people are going to expect
to get paid and I don't know
how I'm going to do that."

Ms Strachan, has set up an
account (number 707712) at the
Royal Bank of Canada on
Mackey Street for anyone who
wishes to make donations.

eC



a (LEFT to > right) Michael, 16, Raphael, 10 nd Nathaniel, 14 spent t their Sunday playing video
games and watching TV in their room, after Raphael and Nathaniel woke up with internal bleed-
ing. The boys try to lead a normal life, but sometimes Bie to be more careful, since minor blem-

ishes will cause them to bleed incessantly.

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

Man blames law firm for loss of savings:

®@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN irate client is accusing a
law firm of not “protecting his
interest” in a transaction to buy



a home and, as a result, he
claims to have lost his family’s
entire savings.

Shawn Johnson told The Tri-
bune his side of the story yes-
terday, claiming the loss had

been a devastating blow.

According to him, he went to
Wells and Wells, a family law
firm in Nassau, to seek repre-
sentation to buy a home costing
around $400,000.

Marina Village, Paradise Island



-1480

- Onen 10am - 11pm daily
Major Credit Cartis Accepted
DISCOUNTED PARKING

Rvalianio af the Paradise island parking garage.

Mtr Johnson said he ave the
firm a manager’s cheque,
which he received ifrom a
bank, for $47,000 plus, so that
they could represent him in
the transaction.

He said he asked the law
firm to place the money in an
“escrow account” as a down
payment for the home that he
and his wife were bree to
purchase.

Mr Johnson aeplaihee: “J
specifically told the firm that we
were seeking financing | for the
balance of the monies to pur-
chase the home, and {that I
would like for the firm to pro-
tect my deposit if we did not get
the financing from the bank.”

He claimed the firm verbal-
ly assured him that they would
write “specific instructions”
into the agreement, so that the
deposit could be protected.

However, Mr Johnson said
he was unable to,obtain financ-
ing from the bank.

“] relayed this message to -

the law firm and Ms Wells
assured me that I would get
all of my monies back. Three
days later I was told I would
receive some of the monies
back as they would need to
deduct legal fees.

“But, after an additional two
days had passed, the law firm
told me that J would receive
no monies and that I had for-
feited my monies because of
the agreement,” addey Mr
Johnson.

He said the firm informed
him that the buyers were not
prepared to give him back the
$47,000 because the agreement
was not subject to whether he
was successful in getting finan-
cial backing from a bank,

Mr Johnson said: “I am a
hard working Bahamian,
working in a government job,
and money is very tight. Ihave
a wife and two small children,
and I wonder if this law} firm

}

eee day

PUSS ACT
NON Rem LTCC AAU TRS PRLU Lem RTCA RST” OSI
fae Ca pail tt

©2006 CreativeRelations.net

knows how hard and long a
family like mine has to work,
how much we have to sacri-
fice to save, and how my wife
and I have deprived our chil-
dren and ourselves just to save
this money to try and get a bet-
ter life.”

Stephanie Wells, head part-
ner of Wells and Wells,
claimed that Mr Johnson nev-
er asked for the agreement to
be made subject to financing.

Ms Wells said: “Mr Johnson
said that, besides the desposit,
he had an extra $200,000 to
purchase the house.” She said
Mr Johnson never told the
firm he was seeking financial
backing from a bank.

“The deeds were already

prepared, the buyers had
already flown in from Thai-
land to complete the transac-
tion, and at the last minute Mr
Johnson told us he did not get
the money from the bank.”

Further, Ms Wells said the
initial contract for the pur-
chase of the home was not pre-
pared by Wells and Wells, but
another law firm.

She said she tried to get
some of the money back for
her client, but that she could-
n’t, because the buyers felt he
had forfeited his right to the
deposit.

“I feel sorry for him, but this
is the business world and the
truth is, if it was my money, I
would have lost my deposit,
too,” said Ms Wells.

The Tribune spoke to
another attorney who
explained that normally these
transactions would be subject
to financing.

However, he said he could
not comment on who was pos-
sibly liable in Mr Johnson’s
case, because “attorneys can
only follow the instructions of
their client and if that was the
case, there is no negligence on
their part.”

©

COMMONWEALTH BANK





In brief

- Carl Bethel:
government

knew about
NFS sting

FNM SENATOR Carl
Bethel is accusing the govern-
ment of being aware of the sting
operation that led to the arrest
of five Bahamian baggage han-
dlers in South Florida.

The former MP for Holy
Cross was the guest on a radio
talk show yesterday.

According to Senator Bethel,
the Minister of National Secu-
rity (Cynthia “Mother” Pratt)
must have known about the
operation because local police
were aware of it.

The senator accepted that
ministers can’t know about every
police investigation, but he said:
“Tt was a joint operation so the
minister must have known.”

Since the December 18 arrest
of five Nassau Flight Services
employees on US soil for
allegedly smuggling drugs on
local and international airlines
at.the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport, the Free
National Movement and other
political groups have alleged
that the government may have
circumvented the extradition
treaty by allowing the US to
lure the five men to its shores
under the guise of a training
programme, and then have
them arrested for allegedly
committing a crime in the
Bahamas.

Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson told the press
that the government was not
aware of the sting operation,
and last week Prime Minister
Perry Christie promised that he
would personally launch an
investigation into the matter.

The Tribune learned from a
source that Bernard Turner, the
director of public prosecutions,
was not allowed to attend a
meeting last year in Washing-
ton where plans for the opera-
tion were discussed.

Senator Bethel said the issue
was not whether an officer from
the Attorney General’s Office
was allowed into a preparatory
meeting for the sting operation.

“There is political responsi-
bility and collective responsi-
bilty, and the government is
responsible for the actions of
the police, and there had to
have been an element of co-
operation for it to go across
police lines, it was not purely a
police matter,” he said.

The five men appeared in a
Florida court last week and
were charged with conspiracy
to import drugs into the US.

All pleaded not guilty and
they are expected to reappear in

- court later in the month.

Robber
makes off
with food
store cash

AN armed robber fled with
$1,500 from the John Chea
number four foodstore on
Carmichael Road on Friday.

Police said a man wearing a
blue-hooded jacket entered the
store at around 7pm on Friday
wielding a silver handgun and
demanded cash.

Police are investigating.

Man escapes
serious
injury in
accident.

FREEPORT - A young man
is lucky to be alive following a
serious traffic accident early
Sunday morning at Eight Mile
Rock.

According to police, the acci-
dent occurred around 3.25am
in Jones Town involving a 1995
Honda Accord (licence 38147)
driven by 24-year-old Quincy
Bain of Frobisher Drive,
Freeport.

Police say Bain lost control
of the vehicle near Mount Zion
Baptist Church.

The car skidded off the road
and crashed into a utility pole,
cutting it down and causing a
power outage in the area.

Mr Rahming said the vehicle
also went through a concrete
wall and chainlink fence before
crashing into another vehicle
parked in the area.

Bain’s yehicle was extensive-
ly damaged. He was treated at
Rand Memorial Hospital for
lacerations to the forehead and
discharged.

Police afe investigating.

»

44 4 5 ¢°

v,vvr Vv ¢
oe ss

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«

+

4



PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. #

Parallels in:



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon) LL.D; D.Litt;

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Govt. not sharing NHI information

THE National Coalition for Health Reform is.

yet to receive from government the much-
promised documentation on the National Health
Insurance plan. We are not surprised.

We shall resist the temptation of saying “we
told you so.” However, we must say that this
group has shown a great deal of naiveté to
believe that if its members, especially the doc-
tors, remained silent while government rushed
the flawed legislation through parliament, the
much-awaited documentation would be forth-
coming.

We first learned of the Coalition’s deal with
government in an article written by Rick Lowe,
a member of the Coalition, and published in
The Tribune on December 11.

“I for one,” wrote Mr Lowe, “am proud of
what the Coalition has accomplished to date.
At least now the government has promised to
share the information they have, but only if
they, Coalition, takes the debate out of the court
of public opinion. While I am personally uncom-
fortable with this approach because of past expe-
rience with this government and its predecessor,
I sincerely hope that Dr Nottage will live up to
the new promise.”

So far he has not. Members of the Coalition,
who should by now be well versed in the ways of
politicians, fell for the bait and, like so many
little flies, got entrapped in the spider’s web.

We wager that the reason the mule train with
the actuarial documents is so slow in arriving at
the Coalition’s offices is that the figures con-
tained in it don’t add up. It will probably be
like the slow-in-coming ILO report, which when
it eventually did arrive, revealed that, contrary to
the statements of both Prime Minister Christie
and Health Minister Nottage, did not give the
Bahamas’ health insurance plan an unqualified
“thumbs up.” As a matter of fact.it contained
many caveats.

The ILO warned of the tendency of politi-
cians to over sell the scheme, thereby giving
Bahamians the impression that they would be
receiving more than the plan intended, or could
deliver. It also warned that the scheme could
cost far more than government’s projected $235
million figure.

It wasn’t until the legislation was safely
through parliament, and before the ILO report
was made public, that in a radio talk show, Dr
Nottage admitted that the plan could be more
than government projected. He acknowledged
that rising drug costs and salaries, among other
things, could force up the NHI bill. He was obvi-
ously preparing Bahamians for the warnings in
the ILO report, the details of which govern-
ment failed to share with them during the par-

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liamentary debate.

Government seems so reluctant to share its -

working papers with the doctors, union leaders
and business persons — those who represent
Bahamians who will be most affected — that
its reason for secrecy is daily becoming more
suspect.

"For us to do a true analysis of the plan we
need to have that information available to us,"
said Mr Winston Rolle, past president of the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce . "This infor-
mation is critical for the public to understand the
true sustainability of the plan."

Mr Rolle said the Coalition was promised
the information by December 1. It is now Janu-
ary 15.

It is unfortunate that Mr Christie included
both Canada and England as examples of coun-
tries that had a system similar to what is about to
be introduced in the Bahamas. Canada’s sys-
tem is far from satisfactory and England’s
National Health Service (NHS) is downright
shambolic.

Not only have operations been cancelled in
England because the NHS has run out of cash,
but a leaked copy of the British government’s
pay and workforce strategy reveals that by 2011
there will be 3,200 consultants too many in the
medical profession, which suggests that they will
be employed in more junior positions at reduced
salaries. Needless to say the British Medical
Association is up 1n arms.

By that date the leaked document predicted
that there will be a shortage of 14,000 nurses
and 1,200 general practitioners.

Already Princess Margaret Hospital staff
want to know where government is going to
find the personnel to staff the clinics promised
for the Family-Islands.

Princess Margaret Hospital nurses also want
to know how the PMH will be able to cope with
the increased number of patients expected under
the NHI plan. Already the hospital has a serious
bed shortage, and cannot satisfactorily care for
the patients it now has.

The nurses urged government to rethink the
implementation of the plan, because in their
opinion it will “wreak havoc” if extensive infra-
structural upgrades are not done before the plan
is launched.

And it will wreak even greater havoc if those
who are supposed to make it work — the doctors
and nurses — are not satisfied that the plan
makes sense.

So, please, Dr Nottage, share your informa-

tion with the Coalition — after all, its members _

are supposed to be your partners in its imple-
mentation.



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arrogance |

THE TRIBUNE

*.

4

*

of power —

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHEN one experienced
the arrogance of power
demonstrated by our most
powerful neighbour, those of
us who are students of history,
usually reflect on past events
and persons who wrote on
such events.

One person that comes to
mind is Edward Gibbon, the
18th century English histori-
an and author of “Decline and
fall of the Roman Empire.”

When one reads Gibbon
and reflects on our neigh-
bour’s arrogance of power, the
parallel is frightening, because
no one wants his or her neigh-
bour and friends to fall.

When Cleopatra fled the
battle in 31 BC, Anthony
deserted his men and followed
her to Egypt. The following
year, when Octavian landed
in Egypt, both Anthony and
Cleopatra committed suicide
after failing to rally support
against him. Soon thereafter,
the ancient land of Egypt
became a Roman province.

In 31 BC Octavian, who lat-
er became known as Augus-
tus, became ruler of Rome;
his reign marked the begin-
ning of the Roman Empire.
When he died in 14 AD the
senate voted the title of imper-
ator to his stepson, Tiberius. It
was during his reign, which
lasted until 37 AD that Jesus
Christ was crucified in Pales-
tine.

From the time of Tiberius,
to the end of the empire in
476 AD, Rome was ruled by a
variety of emperors, some
good and some bad.

Nero was judged the most
wicked and worthless ruler
ever to mount the throne, he
murdered his wife, and his
mother, and was accused of
setting fire to Rome in 64 AD,
a great nine-day catastrophe
that destroyed half the city.

Military conquests made
Rome a world state; the
boundaries of the empire
expanded as the Roman
legions scored victory, after
victory; yet force alone was
not enough to maintain a uni-
fied state.

Skilful diplomacy, and effec-
tive government, a flexible
system of law and a wice-
spread network, which
brought about the Pax

Romana, or “Roman Peace”

throughout their far- flung
domain.

















SOSA MBE

fete sOumelliatcimtice| enact

The period in the history of
the world when the human
race was most happy and pros-
perous was the 2nd century
AD.

It was during this century
that the Roman Empire
reached its greatest extent and
was, according to Gibbon,
governed by absolute power,
under the “guidance of virtue
and wisdom.”

A Roman subject of the 2nd

aside; mankind turns to enjoy

happiness. Strife has been qui-

eted, leaving only the compe-
tition of cities, each eager to

Fad Sa! ker XK

be the most beautiful and the ©

most fair.

The whole earth is decked ©

with beauty like a garden, yet -
of the twenty-nine emperors ~

who ruled between 180 and

284 AD, only four died a nat- '

ural death.

The others were murdered ,

by army officers or by rival
claimants to the throne.
Emperor Septimus Severus

advised his sons, “Make the -

soldiers rich and don’t trou-
ble about the rest.”

century Aelius Aristides, had

this to say about the era in PRINCE G SMITH
which he lived: The whole Freeport,

world keeps holiday; the age- Grand Bahama,
long curse of war has been put December, 2006.

, Hysterical paranoia

of the first order

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IS THE US Government, Homeland Security/TSA, going too far
with their proposal that without exception, in the not too distant
future, all visitors to the US will have their 10-finger fingerprints tak-
en and stored in a data bank? I find this abusive and intrusive as I
have already paid $100 to apply for a Visa to enter the US and the
US Government has approved me — I presume checking my back-
ground... police record, etc.

If this is the new style “friendlier” US then God be to the glory,
but I suggest this has gone too far and is yet again the “Ugly
American” policy coming to the fore.

Mr Ambassador, Mr Rood - please advise the White House
that if we could we would collectively cancel our US visas and
say to the US go and screw yourself unfortunately we don’t have
that luxury so the unfriendly US Government to its immediate
friendly neighbour to the south-east will continue to pour billions
of hard earned US dollars into their economy, We, citizens of The
Bahamas, are treated like criminals.

This security issue has gone too far, Mr Aenbassador — get real.
If The Bahamas instituted this for all Americans visiting The
Bahamas you know full well your State Department would be
screaming and without any doubt a Travel Advisory would have
been issued — Avoid The Bahamas!

Foreign Minister, Mitchell — before this new step in the US

“ugly” American attitude is installed send a Diplomatic Note to the
US Secretary of State and advise Madam Secretary that The
Bahamas takes considerable offence as to this proposal and will
institute similar requirements for all visiting US citizens to The
Bahamas forthwith on the installation of the system in the US.

What next? This is hysterical paranoia of the first order.

H HUMES
Nassau,
January 7, 2007.

Open letter to Minister

EDITOR, The Tribune.
Please publish this open letter to Minister Glenys Hanna-Martin
at the Ministry of Transport.

Dear Madam,

Re: Dockage Space

Thereby write on behalf of many concerned residents of Farmers Cay
who are now faced with a dilemma and experiencing hardship that
needs to be addressed urgently. Due to the fact that the government
dock is not up to standard, the mail boat cannot dock at the same due
to the poor docking facilities. The owner of the private dock where the
government was renting space now refuses the mail boat dockage
space for whatever reasons. Passengers, groceries and other necessities
that come on the mail boat to the island have to now be ferried into the
island by a small boat, sometimes the weather is bad and it is no picnic
to be ferried to a place from out to sea. We need our dock now, just like
every other island.

Farmers Cay might be few in numbers, but we are all Bahamians and
should be treated equally. Stop forsaking us!

We trust that you will promptly and adequately address our concerns.

CONCERNED RESIDENTS OF FARMERS CAY
Farmers Cay,
January 4, 2007.



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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 5



Oln brief

Election
date chosen
for Turks and
Caicos

PREMIER of Turks and
Caicos, Dr Michael Misick,
‘has dissolved parliament and
announced a February 9 date
for a general election in the
islands.

This means Turks and
Caicos will have held two
general elections since elec-
tions were last held in the
Bahamas in 2002.

After announcing the
election date on Friday, Dr
Misick encouraged all citi-
zens to exercise their right to
vote, and stressed that his
government had fulfilled
"every major manifesto
promise" since coming to
power.

He said that for this rea-
son he is confident that the
people of Turks and Caicos
will support his party again.

Dr Misick said: “My gov-
ernment stands proudly on
our record of achievement,
one. of unprecedented
accomplishments.”

He claimed that, since
being elected, his party had
brought increased develop-
ment, empowerment and a
better quality of life to
islanders.

Top issues in the forth-
coming elections include the
need to curb rising crime lev-
els and advancing the
tourism-based economy of
the islands.

Nomination day has been
set for January 22.

Youths are
arrested
after shotgun
discovered

FREEPORT - Two male
juveniles were arrested over
the weekend after a shotgun
was discovered hidden in
bushes in Hanna Hill, Eight
Mile Rock.

Supt Basil Rahming
reported that police, acting
on information received,
apprehended two youths
aged 14 and 15 years around
1.30pm on Saturday.

Mr Rahming said the
minors led officers to a bushy
area off a track road near the
Church of God in Hanna
Hill, where police retrieved a
12-gauye Pardner—FBI shot-
gun.

_ The teens, of Hawksbill,

were iaken into custody.
They are expected to face
charges this week.

Mother and
son recover
after blaze
at home

A MOTHER and her five-
year-old son.are being treat-
ed in hospital for minor
burns and smoke inhalation
after their Yellow Elder Gar-
dens home was found ablaze
at 2am yesterday.

The fire was concentrated
in a bedroom in the two-bed-
room, single-storey home
when police attended the
scene on Sunday morning,
according to police press liai-
son officer, Walter Evans.

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2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 David Pitts
7 3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Little Robots
1 4:30 - Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News.Update
5:05 The Fun Farm
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 The Envy Life
9:00 Legends
9:30 Island Life Destinations
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!









Security fears after series of
- boat thefts strikes harbour



@ PAUL Thompson



AN alarming spate of boat
thefts from Nassau Harbour has
sparked new security fears. for
visiting cruise ships.

So many have gone missing
during the dark hours that a
new call is being made for
improved patrols.

There is even a suggestion

that the police and Defence —

Force should set up a 24-hour
watch, not just to halt thieves,
but also potential terrorists.

Security expert Paul Thomp-
son said his investigations
showed that many marinas do
not provide security.

“I know that some form of
action has been taken to
improve security at the dock, in
particular when cruise ships are
in port.

“However, it is my candid
opinion that more ought to be
done during the night hours.”

He felt a patrol boat should
be provided together with a sta-
tic post with night vision and
proper communication to be set
by the Defence Force near the
lighthouse.

“Both recommendations, if
implemented, would enhance
security and safety in our har-
bour,” he said.

During 2006, he said, several
boats were stolen from marinas
in Nassau harbour.

“TI am aware of nine such ves-

Deterioration of British
National Health Service
casts doubt over NHI

THE government’s contro-
versial plans for a National
Health Insurance scheme are
likely to come in for even clos-
er scrutiny following the latest
alarming disclosures from Lon-
don.

The British National Health
Service, which has been pro-
viding health care since the
1940s, is teetering on the brink
of extinction, according to high-
ranking medical sources.

The leader of Britain’s doc-
tors has revealed there is only
one year left to save the Nation-
al Health Service before the

governmernt starts to question.

its future.

James Johnson, chairman of

the British Medical Association,
said if the health service failed
to break even this year, minis-
ters would “look very carefully”
at what happened next.

The London Daily Telegraph
reported him as saying that
unprecedented sums had been
poured into the NHS in the past
five years, yet there was still a
financial crisis.

But he told a briefing in Lon-
don that next year the current
high levels of funding would
cease.

“Don’t assume there’s any-
thing automatic about the sys-
tem we have at the moment

jections are

continuing in perpetuity,” said
Mr Johnson.

“| know that ministers will
want to look very carefully at
what they do next. If you, get
nine per cent of GDP spent on
health and you still can’t make
it work, people will be saying:
‘Do you want to carry on doing
the same thing or should we be
trying something fundamental-
ly different?’”

Mr Johnson said other coun-
tries had shown that other
options existed, including co-
funding by the state and
employers.

A reduced health service that
did not try to provide every-
thing was another alternative,
he added.

His comments add fuel to
critics of the NHI, who say that
the government’s financial pro-
inadequate.

They have warned that peo-
ple’s contributions would have
to rise dramatically to fund an
acceptable level of service.

However, a British Depart-
ment of Health spokesman dis-
missed Mr Johnson’s remarks
as “unnecessary doom-monger-
ing”, adding that the govern-
ment was fully committed to a
publicly-funded NHS which
delivered according to clinical
need, not the ability to pay.

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Rosetta St. “

sels as my firm has been con-
ducting: inquiries for an insur-
ance company in an effort to
locate and recover the vessels.

“T have been informed that
there are scores of other ves-
sels missing. It appears from our
investigation that many of the
marinas in our harbour do not
provide security on their
premises, making it easy for the
intrusion of criminals.” /

The thefts have occurred on
Paradise Island, Potter’s Cay,
Hurricane Hole and elsewhere
on Nassau waterfront.

Mr Thompson said: “Nightly
activities on our docks and in
our harbour dictate the need
for patrols and marina security
personnel.”

Concern has also been

expressed at the presence of
Haitian sloops in the harbour.
Security experts believe the

-sloops, which frequently sail

quite near visiting cruise ships,
could be commandeered by ter-
rorists.

“An explosion among several
cruise ships would cause untold
damage and pose a threat to lots
of lives,” a source said.

“It seems to me that the
sloops, which are allowed right
into the harbour, could easily
be used as a ‘front’ for terrorist
activity.”

Since the attack on the World
Trade Centre in New York in
2001, security has been tight-
ened round Nassau docks.

But it is thought that too
many loopholes still exist.



GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

(Ory Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Xo” Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448,

Lait

Geers



Ph: 325-3336



PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE ;





To visa or not to visa: challenge

of tourism and terrorism

m@ By SIR RONALD a mg.

SANDERS
(The writer is a business

consultant and former ~
Caribbean diplomat).

A were who has
marketed or pro-

moted tourism to the



The ostensible purpose of
this special visa was to cre-

rk Design & Construction

Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
Installation & Maintenance

Homes ¢ Offices ¢ Subdivisions
Call Us Today!

‘Tel: 393-7733

E-mail: info@lemcoenetworks.com

BAHAMAS WHOLESALE AGENCIES

BWA {Bahamas Wholesale Agencies) Ltd., a
local distributor, is seeking an experienced
professional to join their team as

Territory Sales Consultant

We are looking for highly-motivated,
outgoing, energetic, and driven candidates to
sell and execute special marketing initiatives
and provide category consulting services to
our retail partners.

In order to meet our requirements alll
applicants must possess:

e Bachelors Degree or higher

¢ Strong planning and
organizational skills

Polished written and oral
communication skills

Developed mathematical and
analytical skills

Computer skills including use

of Microsoft Office

Knowledge of retail environment
and prior sales or merchandising,
experience is preferred

Applications will not be accepted in person.
Cover letters and resumes must be sent to
the following e-mail address no later than
Friday, Jan. 19: jobs_bwa@hotmail.com



VORLD VIE





countries to see the games.

Further, nationals of non-
cricket playing countries,
who have not needed visas
in the past to come to the
Caribbean on holiday,
should continue not to
require visas.

Curiously, the idea of one
visa for all ten countries in
order to facilitate the tens
of thousands expected to
attend the CWC games got
turned onits head. —



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

instrument to combat ter-
rorism.
In this connection, peo-



“The s

pecial visa is no

longer a document to facilitate
the travel of people coming

to more than one country

for cricket; it has been
transformed into an instrument
to combat terrorism.”



The special visa is no
longer a document to facili-
tate the travel of people
coming to more than one
country for cricket; it has
been transformed into an

ple from countries that nev-
er required a visa now have
to have the special visa.
Thus, Australians and New
Zealanders (two cricket

POSITION
AVAILABLE

Registered Nurse

Responsibilities

¢ Provide primary and minor emergency

medical care

Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined
in the Clinical Protocol Manual

Provide accurate and comprehensive medical

reports as required

Requirements:

Holder of current Bahamian Licence
Must have at least three years experience post

graduation

Have current BLS & ALS Certification
Must be responsible, have good
communication skills and independent.

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
mary.epcotmedical
@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.





‘THE
MEDICLINIC

playing countries) have
joined Indians and Pakista-
nis in the requirement to
have a special visa. But,
nationals of South Africa
and the United Kingdom
(two other cricket playing
nations) don’t need visas
even though both Britain
and South Africa require
nationals of some Caribbean
countries to have visas to
enter their countries.
Others requiring visas are
nationals of Sweden, Den-
mark and Austria who are
among those tourists who
come to the Caribbean dur-
ing this time of year. But,
Japanese are exempt even
though they constitute a
smaller number of tourists
to the Caribbean than the

Scandinavian countries and

Austria.

he criteria used for
deciding which

countries should require
visas and which are exempt
is, of course, unknown to us.
However, all the official
statements point to a neces-
sity to ensure the security of
the host countries from ter-
rorism.

Logically, if one were to
strictly apply this criteria,
nationals of Britain and
Canada should require a
visa. For the British police
have confirmed that there
are approximately 200 ter-
rorist cells in the United
Kingdom that are under sur-
veillance, and there have
been two terrorist incidents
there since 9/11. Similarly,
Canada has had warnings of
terrorism from militant
groups.

‘There have been no
reports of terrorist cells in
Denmark and Sweden and,
indeed, none in New
Zealand.

abroad. For example, it:
requires no evidence of a
return ticket or a list of the
hotels (or other places)
where the visitor intends to:
stay, or proof that the’
accommodation has been
paid for. .

It does ask if the appli-
cant has been convicted of a.
criminal offence — a box
which any terrorist would be,
most unlikely to tick in the
affirmative.

At the bottom line of all
this, those officials charged
with the security of the 10
countries that are hosting.
the World Cup Cricket tour-
nament have a tough job.

If something happens,
they will be criticised heavi-,
ly for not doing enough and
for not adequately vetting
visitors during this impor-
tant period when tens of
thousands of persons are,
expected to pour into the
area. Their extreme caution
is, therefore, understands
able. !

But, instead of requiring
visas from countries that did
not previously require one;
and which will revert to not
requiring one when World
Cup Cricket is over, would it
not have been a better way
to vet potential terrorists by
getting the cooperation of
the authorities in' the US;
UK and other countries to
provide a list of people on
their watch list and to com-
pare passengers entering the
country against such a list?,

Such lists do exist. After
9/11, US authorities sent
governments all over the
world a long list of people
suspected of financing ter-
rorism with a request that
their assets be seized. What
is more airlines are required
to send passenger lists with
detailed information prior
to landing at US airports so



“The criteria used for
deciding which countries
should require visas and which
are exempt is, of course,
unknown to us.

'

1
{
{
‘
1
1
'
'

However, all the official | wd
statements point to a necessity |
to ensure the security of the

host countries from terrorism.”



The further curious thing
about this Special Visa is
that the application form
requires no information that
could reasonably help to
identify a terrorist. In fact, it
is less investigative than visa
application forms used by
some CARICOM consulates

7iVIN
ack

Montague Motors Ltd.
again extends it thanks
and appreciation to the
Bahamian public by
donating to the local
charities. This year we
have donated a total of

$6,000.00 to
The Salvation Army

$2,000.00 to
Bilney Lane Childrens Home

$2,000.00 to
The Children’s Emergency Hostel

Photo from top:

Lisa Armbrister-Salvation Army

Janet Brown - Bilney Lane

Nakita Darling - Children's Emergency
Left in each photo - Mrs. Jill Fox

Right in each photo - Mr. Brent Fox

~ MOTORS LIMITED

Village Road Near Shirley Street
Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377



that immigration and secut
rity officials are prepared
for doubtful persons.
As it is, after World Cup
Cricket, hotels and tourist
officials will have an enor-
mous task wooing back
those visitors who have been
turned off, and explaining
to them that a visa will no
longer be required. And,
then, of course, the
Caribbean still has to find
an effective way of dealing
with any potential terrorist
threat long after the games
are over. :
Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.c
om
sanders29@hotmail.com>





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












THE TRIBUNE

G: Let’s sort out justice system.

@ By Bahamas
Information Services

ATTORNEY General and
Minister of Legal Affairs
Allyson Maynard-Gibson
pledged to do “whatever is nec-
essary” to stamp out lawless-
ness in The Bahamas, saying
that Bahamians demand noth-
ing less from those charged with
administration of justice.

The Attorney General said
one way of attaining that goal is
through the facilitation of the
Swift Justice Programme, which
“can and must work” through
an integrated justice system that
is already in the works.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
progress “is already being
made” in the area of Swift Jus-
tice by “those already dedicated
to making it work.” She encour-
aged critics of the programme,
particularly those who are
charged with the administration
of justice, to “get behind it and

mâ„¢ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
; Tribune Staff Reporter

- THE STYLISTICS are expect-
ed to be the top act at this year’s
Red Cross Ball, according to the
évent’s planning committee.
The committee announced on
Friday that the 35th Annual
Red Cross Ball will be held on
Saturday, January 27, in the
Crystal Ballroom at Wyndham
Nassau Resorts and Crystal
Palace Casino.
, The black-tie affair will begin

with cocktails at 7pm and be —

followed by dinner at 8pm.

. This year the ball will be held
under the patronage of Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna and
Mrs Hanna, and Prime Minister
Perry Christie and his wife,
Bernadette.

’ The committee said enter-
tainment will be provided by
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band, the Lou Adams
Orchestra and special perfor-
mances by Visage, and popular
soul band The Stylistics.

The internationally acclaimed
rhythm and blues group pro-
duced 12 consecutive top-ten
hits in the early 1970s, culmi-
nating with their Grammy-nom-



make it work.”

“We all depend on it and
everyone needs to support the
concept,” Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said. “We note that there are
systemic problems that have
existed for decades. These can-
not be solved overnight. This is
why I invite defence lawyers,
investigators, officials of the
Office of the Attorney General
charged with the presentation of
cases, to all reflect on our duty to
the Bahamian public and to ask
ourselves whether we are work-
ing together to do all we can to
serve the Bahamian public.

“Together we must address
the backlog of cases and enable
efficiency and the swift hearing
of matters before our courts,”
the Attorney General added.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
her office is implementing an
integrated justice system to fur-
ther positively impact the swift
administration of justice in The
Bahamas. ;

THE Stylistics

inated hit, “You Make Me Feel
Brand New.”

Other hits by the group
include “Break Up to Make
Up”, “Betcha by Golly Wow”,
and “You are Everything.”

The planning committee said
those interested in attending
should collect tickets as soon as
possible, because many had
already been sold.

The money derived from the
ball is used to finance the Red
Cross’s ongoing programmes,

Stylistics to headline at Red Cross Ball

She said the Royal Bahamas
Police Force’s system is working
as a stand-alone and is con-
nected to the prison. She said
the system at the Supreme
Court is also working and is
ready to be connected to the
Office of the Attorney General
and the police.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
Office of the Attorney General

. is completing the infrastructural

improvements that will enable
safe and reliable intranet and
internet communications.

“Our communications
experts, BTC, and our systems
experts, IBM, advise that as
soon as the Office of the Attor-
ney General’s improvements
are completed, they can pro-
ceed to connect the Supreme
Court, the police, the prison and
the Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral to each other.

“In anticipation of the com-
pletion of the infrastructural
integration, we are working

including meals on wheels, dis-
aster and emergency relief,
assisting senior citizens, Family
Islands, refugees, and the after-
school mentoring programme.

There will be a raffle and
door prizes at the event, with
first-place winners of the raffle
being awarded American Atr-
line round-trip tickets to any-
where in the world.

Interested persons are asked
to contact the Red Cross head-
quarters for ticket information,



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Strachan for the improvement
and efficiency of the registry
and to guide and complete the
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the Turks and Caicos Islands s
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Reporting directly to th
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Excellent organizational and analytical skills

Strong computer literacy in Microsoft Word, Excel &
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An attractive compensation package that incl
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MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 7

system to function as designed,”
the Attorney General said.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
“strong focus” is being brought
to the successful completion of
the project which, if it functions
as designed, will result in a more
efficient use of court time.

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS COUNTRY MANAGER—
INSURANCE OPERATIONS

The deadline for applications is January 31st 2007.

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Tel (345) 946 7837

Fax (345) 946 7836
Email jobs@steppingstonescayman.com

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ance services, domestic

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e VP & Regional Marketing Manager, the

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Business related Bachelor’s Degree Qualification
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Proven track record in new business development

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“The system is designed to
prevent time conflicts in terms
of double bookings of matters
and lawyers and other such inef-
ficiencies that continue to
plague the administration of jus-
tice and cause grave inconve-
nience to litigants,” she added.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., ac
AY CEO we CCT
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

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“———~





PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

Ci °° (ae Ae

2006 ended with a lynching

Pre the start, it was

predestined to end the
way it did. The murdered
lawyers, the convenient switch-
ing of judges, the helpful testi-
mony of anonymous witnesses
and the emotional tirades of a
puppet Prime Minister all pro-
vided the backdrop.

The dictator’s swift trial,
speedy conviction and sum-
mary execution were all
required ingredients in the
salving tonic for a broken,
traumatised land.

As kangaroo show trials/exe-
cutions go, this one was pulled
off so expertly that it could
almost have disguised itself as
an act of justice - save for a few
stubborn historical details and
an eager spectator with a cell-
phone camera.

The offending historical
details fall into two categories:
those concerned with the con-
text in which this whole farci-
cal exercise has taken place,
and those that provide a con-

_ trast between the unabridged
facts of Iraqi history and the
skewed, selective western ver-
sion still being pushed by
some.

A keen sense of irony is
required to spot the former
kind. Here is one group of
countries invading another ille-
gally and without a hint of
provocation, then proceeding
to hand over its captured leader







The Bahamas National
Trust has appointed Hank
O. Ferguson as Conser-
vation Finance Specialist.

The Bahamas Na-
tional Trust, The Bahamas
government (represented
by the BEST Commis-
sion) and The Nature

“Conservancy signed a
National Implementation
Support Partnership
Agreement to implement
a programme of work on
protected areas.

This programme was
adopted at the Seventh
Meeting of the Confer-
ence of Parties to the



Now it comes ata:

Convention on Biological Diversity.

A trained and experienced econo-
mist, Mr. Ferguson will develop and
make recommendations for the imple-
mentation of a sustainable finance plan
for protected areas in The Bahamas in-
cluding the 25 national parks sthat en-
compassing some 700,000 acres, as well
as five marine reserves declared by the

to another faction in an as yet
unresolved civil war.

While thus flouting the
Geneva Conventions (which
emphatically require combat-
ants to guarantee the security
of prisoners of war), the occu-
piers then react with breath-
taking, Pilatian self-absolu-
tion as the inevitable next

step in the blood feud tran-_

spires.

Stripped ab initio of legiti-
macy, this whole sordid affair is
now stripped of a little more
sanity every time its orchestra-
tors open their mouths in self-
justification.

| he second kind of
troublins historical

detail is even less easy for bal-
anced minds to ignore. They
involve putting into context
the litany of crimes attributed
to a doubtlessly evil man
against the dubiously selec-
tive process that has now
ensured that he will never face
a fair trial for the most serious
of these.

To much of the world, the
big question remains: “Why
Dujail?” Why did the slaying
of 180 people (modest by Sad-
dam’s standards) following an
assassination attempt take such
precedence over the many, far
graver crimes of which he has
been accused?

Had the end-game gone dif-

Hank Ferguson Appointed
Conservation Finance
Specialist at BNT



Hank O. Ferguson

nce

financial plan and outline is paramount

in realizing the success of these ventures.

He has a graduate degree in econom-

ics and has practiced both nationally and

internationally as an economist, trade

‘ negotiator and foreign service officer

managing projects funded by the Euro-
pean Union in The Bahamas.

PERSPECTIVES



ferently, there would perhaps
have been an easy answer to
that question. It could, for

:



That most of
this horrid man’s
crimes were
committed with
either the tacit
approval or
the active
connivance of
the powers that
now occupy his
country is a most
inconvenient fact
both for the
occupiers and
their stooges.



instance, have been a longer
and more complex process col-
lating the evidence for such

Department of Fisheries
in 2000.

Mr. Ferguson will also
support initiatives to
draft and develop fund-
ing proposals for the
BNT and Bahamian
protected areas.
partners to this agree-
ment are committed to
work towards the estab-
lishment of a compre-
hensive, effectively
managed and ecologi-
cally representative sys-
tem of Bahamian pro-
tected land areas by 2010,
and sea areas by 2012.
Mr. Ferguson’s 10-year

















KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

Performance has always come at a price
sonable one.

ANDREW ALLEN






large, complex massacres as at
the Kurdish city of Halabja in
1988.

But the staged reaction of
ascendant Shi’ite politicians,
who insisted on carrying out
the Dujail verdict before other
trials could begin, has now
deprived even their Kurdish
allies of the satisfaction they
too crave.

And in several respects,
Dujail was far from the most
compelling example of the sav-
agery of Mr Hussein’s regime.

Fis: whatever the
overkill of the regime’s
response, it must be conceded
that it was prompted by an
attempted assassination of Mr
Hussein and his senior col-
leagues.



Gassing the
Kurds (not to
mention the
Iranians) wasn’t
quite an
unforgivable act

. in western eyes

when presented
as guarding his
rearguard against
the hated
Ayatollahs.



And while massacring 180
“rebels” was hardly a legiti-
mate response, it is a matter
of historical record that far
more stable personalities than
Saddam Hussein have similar-
ly over-reacted to attempts to
kill them.

The words “national emer-
gency” are both handy and
chronically over-used by politi-
cians of all stripes, not just
Baathist tyrants.

Secondly, for sheer sav-
agery and unwarrantedness,
Dujail pales in comparison
both to the gassing of 5,000
Kurds at Halabja by the
Baathist regime, and to the
notorious “anfal” campaign,
in which the lives and liveli-
hoods of recalcitrant Kurdish
communities were declared
legitimate booty of war by Mr
Hussein. Now, thanks to
“swift justice”, occupation
style, he will never be tried
for these crimes.

Of course, both Halabja and
Anfal occurred against the
backdrop of Mr Hussein’s bit-
ter, wasteful (and western-
backed) war of attrition
against Iran, while his bloody
suppression of the Shi’ite
uprising of 1991 involved an
embarrassing failure of west-
ern powers to support an



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insurgency which they had
stoked and encouraged.

And there, one suspects, lies
the rub. That most of this hor-
rid man’s crimes were com-
mitted with either the tacit
approval or the active con-
nivance of the powers that
now occupy his country is a
most inconvenient fact both
for the occupiers and their
stooges.

y ou see, gassing the
Kurds (not to men-

tion the Iranians) wasn’t quite
an unforgivable act in western
eyes when presented as guard-

‘ing his rearguard against the

hated Ayatollahs.

That the poison gas used was
courtesy of NATO could, on
the other hand, be a little diffi-
cult to,explain both for occu-
piers supposedly driven to Iraq
out of concern for human rights

and for the local stooges that

they sponsor.

That may explain the perfect
synchronisation of events in late
December between occupier
and stooge in a country where
almost nothing else goes to
plan. The captive was quickly
handed over in some undis-
closed location and within
hours he was dead.

Soon after, the stooges were
quick to release their official
footage of the event. Soundless
and sanitised, it was enough to
sate the bloodlust of their con-
stituents, but not enough to give
a real characterisation of the
whole sordid affair. That would

Paint Professionals Trust

THE TRIBUNE

come later, in the “unofficial”
version caught on cell-phone
camera.

W hat we saw in that
version was the true

face of last week’s events and,
by extension, the true face of
today’s Iraq. The masked thugs
to whom the occupiers handed
their captive not only traded
sectarian insults with their vic-
tim, but could be heard chanti-
ng the name of Moqtada al-
Sadr, one of the new Iraq’s
most prominent and bloody-
handed militia leaders. It was
to all who have seen it a sec-
tarian lynching by any other
name.

The British, who incidentally
are responsible for most of the
mess in the Middle East (if not
the modern world), were nev-
ertheless in their heyday far
more adept at carrying out a
colonial proxy-lynching.

Supporters of Kenya’s Mau
Mau movement found them-
selves raped, tortured, hanged
and mutilated, while still being
presented as the “bad guys” in
polite circles.

It had something to do with
knowing when you are on a
colonial mission, accepting it
and not bothereing to clothe it
in the kind of troubling lan-
guage (Operation Iraqi Free-
dom) that requires too much
explanation when things go
awry. .

Or maybe they just lacked
pesky spectators with cell-
phone cameras.

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THE TRIBUNE



‘ LOCAL NEWS |

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 9



' HI MIKE Love and Bruce Johnston on stage Saturday night

Beach Boys still
have their magic

THE Beach Boys brought
their ‘good vibrations’ to Nas-
sau over the weekend to remind
their fans that - no matter what
else has happened since - the
1960s remain the defining
decade of pop music.

The rhythms and melodies of

that incredible time gave a
‘. packed house at the Rainforest
Theatre on Cable Beach the
night of their lives.

Roly-poly women and grey-
topped men with beerbellies
danced in the aisles as their
youth came back to them via
one of the truly great rock
bands of their time.

Only two of the original five
‘Boys’ are still around, but care-
fully selected young musicians
now fill the vocal and instru-
mental gaps left behind by the
absentees.

And - as they proved on Sat-
* urday night - it’s the music that
really counts, belted out by men
whose passion for the Sixties
pop phenomenon remains undi-
minished, >

Tracking back four decades,
~ there are probably four num-
» bers that for me exemplify the
+ Sixties spirit. They are Twist
and Shout by The Beatles, A
Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol
Harum, San Francisco by Scott
MacKenzie and, of course, Cal-
* ifornia Girls by The Beach
Boys.

But only The Beatles and
The Beach Boys truly repre-
sented, in everything they did,
. the freshness and energy of
youth at a time when youth was
everything.

ae

ee
eZ

ae a a a eM

eS

Â¥

eee

- dark, rainy northern city in Eng-
land, were a symbol of musical
rebellion whose melodies ener-
» gised a whole nation, The
- Beach Boys were all about sun-

shine, fin-tailed limos and gor-
, geous girls. And California, not
| Liverpool, was their turf, a
coastal playground fringed by

ia FM Ly ae ae eee 4g

from people who are
| making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning

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;. | for improvements in the
*, | area or have won an

* | award.

| | Ifso, call us on 322- 1986
* | and share your story.

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i P.O. Box SS-5166

4 Nassau, Bahamas

While The Beatles, from a_

you are raising funds for a

Review

Pacific surf. ;

Together, these groups gave
musical definition to those, like
me, whose late teens and early
twenties coincided with THE
great decade of the last century.

On Saturday night, old
troupers Mike Love and Bruce
Johnston looked like a couple
of granpops who had just wan-
dered in from a baseball game.

But, with their young assis-
tants on guitars, keyboards and
drums, they managed to pro-
duce a wall of sound that was,
quite frankly, astounding.

All the best Beach Boys num-
bers came tumbling out in a 90-
minute torrent which had every-
one on their feet rocking and
rolling and, in some instances,
openly weeping from the sheer
joy of it.

‘Do You Wanna Dance?’ was
met with a resounding ‘yes’
while ‘Barbara Ann’ had the
audience high of memories.
They were up on their feet for
‘Good Vibrations’ and deliri-
ous with delight when ‘Califor-
nia Girls’ set the seal on the
evening.

But it was for that great old
Bahamian folk song ‘Sloop
John B’ - a major hit for the
band in 1966 - that the crowd
reserved its most ardent
applause.

One amazing aspect of The
Beach Boys’ concert was that,
among the middle-aged fans of
old, were so many in their twen-
ties, thirties and forties who -
having missed the band first
time round - were determined
to catch them while they could.
Even more astonishing was that
they knew the words to every

‘| Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

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Like most bands of the time,
The Beach Boys have known
their troubles. The mental
decline and ultimate withdraw-
al of their main force, Brian
Wilson, was a blow. And they
have known their share of
internecine strife over the years,
with legal battles still rumbling
on in the background.

But in Nassau over the week-
end, despite it all, pop fans of all
ages were reminded just how
good the best really are - and
how very special the Sixties
were as a seedbed of memo-
rable melodies.

With 36 Top 40 hits behind
them, including four number
one singles, The Beach Boys
are Hall of Famers whose stage
careers date back to 1961.
Forty-six years on, their music is
as fresh and invigorating as
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





The Royal Bank of Canada welcomes

@ CELEBRITY Cruise liner
Century docking at the Price
George Wharf last Friday carrying
1500 outstanding RBC Royal
Bank of Canada employees from
around the world.









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@ HUNDREDS of RBC Royal Bank of Canada employees from around the world converge.
at the parking lot of RBC’s historic Main Branch at Prince George ™ Wharf for a Bahamian style.

welcome reception.

RBC Royal Bank of Cana-
da welcomed 1,500 outstand-
ing RBC employees and their
guests to The Bahamas on Fri-
day, January 12, 2007.

The group traveled to Nas-
sau aboard the luxurious
Celebrity Cruise Line ship
Century. The Century was
exclusively rented by RBC to
take its top performing
employees from around the
world on a seven-day cruise
of the Caribbean with Nassau
as a scheduled stop. A
“Bahamas Experience” par-
ty, co-sponsored by RBC and



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the Ministry of Tourism was
held in their honour at RBC
Main Branch parking lot,
Prince George Wharf, where
the group experienced
Junkanoo, down home
Bahamian food, drinks and
live entertainment by the
Soulful Groovers.

“Royal Bank’s reward and
recognition program plays a
key role in our business cul-
ture,” said Nathaniel Beneby,
RBC’s Vice President and
Country Head for The
Bahamas. “Our employees
are rewarded on a consistent






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basis for outstanding job per- -'
formance, and we are pleased
that we can support this recog- :

“nition.”

Over 70,000 employees
from around the world partic- '
ipate in RBC’s Reward and |
Recognition program called ‘
RBC Performance. Each year !
about 600 employees become :









winners of this deluxe all *
expense paid cruise which is ,
the top award in the program. i
Eleven employees from the
Bahamas were recognized and
traveled on the cruise that left
Miami on January 6, 2007.



@ ABOVE: Getting Down!
A Roots Junkanoo Group
Dancer gives this Royal Bank
of Canada guest a warm wel-
come to The Bahamas.

A large contingent of
Junkanoo performers was on
hand to welcome 1500 out-
standing Royal Bank of Cana-
da employees from around
the world.

@ MIDDLE PICTURE: Jan
Knowles, Regional Manager
Public Relations for RBC Roy-
al Bank (left) welcomes home
Donnetta Brown, Royal Per-
formance Cruise winner for
The Bahamas (right).

Mee ie Se ee es





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 11



Pi oe aes
Royal Bankers from around the world









YOUR CONN



B TOP LEFT: Ross
McDonald, Senior Vice Pres-
ident, RBC Caribbean Bank-
ing (third from left) welcomes
guests along with Quincey
Fisher, Manager Personal
Financial Services Bahamas

Applications



(4th from left). . yo
TOP RIGHT: Larry Wil- : The ~-Bahamas Tel “0 —
_ son, Chief Financial Officer available Limited (BTC) wishes«to caution ued —
for RBC Royal Bank of Cana- customers and the general public that a number of |

da introduces a guest to the
colours of Junkanoo. RBC

soncncaneuevccatve | Lutord Cay Foundation

guests from around the world.

cavove-rumanm | _ sehOlarships

left to right are Patrice Ellis,
Royal Performance Cruise
winner for The Bahamas and

her husband Daron welcom- | The Lyford Cay Foundation is pleased to announce that applications are

ing cruise winners from Cana- , ‘ ,

da. now being accepted for academic scholarships at the graduate and
undergraduate levels, Apply for:

ice Gaiae phote card dtcaad Ro are Se .

@ The following RBC
employees from The
Bahamas were recognised
as RBC Top Performers in
2006:

# The US $7.500/yr Lyford Cay Foundation Awards
# Cdn$7.500/yr The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation Awards
# Estelle Siebens Excellence Awards in specialized disciplines

@ RBC Royal

Bank of Canada ~

Donuetra Brown. Mans Applications available from all secondary school guidance counsellors,
ager, Bahamas and Financial Aid Office at C.0.B, ot through the I:yford Cay Foundation at
Caribbean Service Cen- P.O. Box N-777



vassal, Bahamas
ters gat
Dave Dyck, Vice Presi-
dent, Operations and Ser-
vice Delivery

Patrice Ellis, Adminis-
tration and Procurement
Officer, Nassau, Process-
ing Center

Eleanor Forbes, Person-
al Financial Services Rep-
resentative, RBC Main
Branch

Or online at war

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MARCH 31, 2007





Anastacia Knowles,
Account Manager, RBC
Main Branch

Joyce Mackey, Manag-
er, RBC George Town,
Exuma Branch

Robert Pantry, Network
Support Officer, Bahamas
Credit Card Center

Jerome Pinder, Execu-
tive Account Manager,
Commercial Banking
Center

@ RBC FINCO

Coretta Rolle, Manager,
Mortgages, RBC FINCO
Robinson Road Branch

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Loans Collection Center



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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Human rights group joining call

for closure of Guantanamo Bay

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

A LOCAL human rights
group Is supporting an interna-
tional campaign demanding the
immediate closure of the Guan-
tanamo Bay detainment camp.

The camp serves as a joint
military prison and interroga-
tion centre under the leader-
ship of Joint Task Force Guan-
tanamo and has occupied a por-
tion of the United States Navy's
base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
since 2002.

More than 770 captives have
been held at Guantanamo, of
whom only 10 have been
charged with crimes. About 395
prisoners remain there, sus-
pected of al-Qaeda and Taliban

links, imprisoned in modern ~

maximum-security cells.

The concentration camp has
drawn strong criticism, both in
the US and worldwide, for its
detainment of prisoners with-
out trial, and allegations of tor-
ture.

Amnesty International UK
describes Guantanamo Bay
detainment camp as a “symbol
of injustice and abuse”.

The UK-based human rights
group exclaimed that “enough
is enough” and its calling for
the immediate closure of the
detainment camp.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Tamico Gilbert,
vice-president of Amnesty
International Bahamas, spoke
about the group’s position on
the camp.

Mr Gilbert said: “Amnesty
International Bahamas joins
with our UK group in denounc-
ing Guantanamo Bay as a sym-
bol of oppression and injustice in
the world, and it shows exactly
how the so-called war on terror
has gone contrary to interna-
tional human rights standards.”

In January 2005, the US mil-
itary revealed that twenty-three
prisoners tried to hang or stran-
gle themselves during a mass
protest at Guantanamo Bay in
August 2003.

At the time, a US military
spokesman said the incidents
were "gestures" aimed at get-
ting attention, and only two of
the prisoners were considered
suicidal.

The Bush-administration clas-
sified the prisoners as "enemy

combatants", and claimed that
the detainees were not entitled
to the protections of the Gene-
va Conventions, but in June
2006 the US Supreme Court
ruled against this interpretation.

Last week, UN Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon urged
that the prison be closed.

During this week, an interna-
tional delegation of former pris-
oners, families of current pris-
oners, US lawyers and human
rights activists travelled to
Guantanamo, Cuba to hold a
conference on prison abuses
and march to the Cuban-side
security gate of the US Naval
Base to call for the closure of
the prison.

The international campaign
is part of the January 11 Inter-
national Day to Shut Down
Guantanamo, the day that
marks the five-year anniversary
of the first prisoners being sent
to Guantanamo.

“In a system of international
human rights persons are inno-
cent before proven guilty, so as
far as we are concerned, the sit-
uation is that innocent people
have been unlawfully detaineed
for five years,” said Mr. Gilbert.



BA US flag is seen flying at the North East Gate in Guantanamo Bay in Cuba

Mr Gilbert said Amnesty
International Bahamas is also
calling for the immediate clo-

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The international campaign
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Man loses
$1,500 to
armed
robbers

A 38-YEAR-OLD man fell
victim to armed robbers on Sat-
urday morning, losing $1,500 in
cash and being forced into his
assailants’ car before escaping
unharmed.

The man was about to enter
his car on Market Street when
he was approached by the two
men, one bearing a handgun, at
around 2am, police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans said.

After stealing his money, the
two men drove the victim to
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Police are investigating the
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His ordeal came during a
weekend when police issued
seven arrest warrants and
searched 125 vehicles and peo-
ple as part of Operation Quiet
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THE TRIBUNE



Anger
FROM page one

and a leaky roof in her front
room.

Ms Culmer claimed she
told the building inspector
about her leaky roof prob-
lem, and he said she would
have to buy the rooting
cement to repair the leak.

“I don’t see why I should
have to purchase roof cement
for a brand new house,
because when they asked me
for the down payment I had
to have all the money with
no excuses,” stated Ms Cul-
mer.

She also said that her out-
side cessp'‘s remain uncov-
ered.

House 47

Mr Christopher Miller lives
in a three-bedroom home in
the sub-division.

He complained about flaky
wall paint, an unfinished
bathroom toilet, exposed
plumbing pipes in his yard,
and claimed the electricty
keeps cutting off.

Mr Miller said he wanted
to ask the government a
question in respect to the
“low-cost” homes.

“The 885s are the homes
that cost $94,000, which are
the ones without the utility
room, and the 805s are the
houses with the utility room.

“If the only differnce is the
utility room, why do the 805s
cost $9,000 more to pur-
chase?” asked Mr Miller.

He claimed he paid
$103,000 for his home and
that, after interest, he expects
to pay over $250,000 back for
the loan.

All residents interviewed
said they attempted to con-
tact Housing Minister Neville
Wisdom on many occasions,
but without any success.

“They look like they for-
get about us,” said Ms Carey.

The Tribune was also
unsuccessful in contacting the
minister for comment.

All home-owners inter-
viewed said their homes
were valued in the range of
$94,000-$103,000 and their
average mortgage payment
is about $900 per month.









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National Coalition for H

ealthcare Reforn



MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 13

‘still waiting’ on NHI plan documentation

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

president of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and
consultant to the coalition
which represents a cross-section
of business organisations,
labour unions and professional
medical groups.

The coalition in principle
supports a national healthcare
plan for all Bahamians, but
believes that insufficient infor-
mation has been provided about
the NHI plan as proposed by
the Blue Ribbon Commission
and its steering committee, and

_has been seeking to obtain
information from the Ministry
of Heaith for months.

The government previously

THE National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform is yet to
receive any of the promised
documentation on the National
Health Insurance plan which
government said last year the
group would be given an oppor-
tunity to review.

"We're still waiting to hear
from them with regards to an
overview that they were sup-
posed to give us as well as the
documentation, as well as any
plans to move ahead with
putting the regulations into
place," said Winston Rolle, past

Announcement on Daniel Smith

_ death inquest decision today
FROM page one

anticipated it would arrive in the afternoon. — :

He said he would study the document thoroughly over the
weekend and on Monday, ready to announce his decision on Tues-
day.

The announcement will bring to an end months of speculation
by commentators in the Bahamian and international press over how
the matter of the 20-year-old's mysterious death will be concluded.

In October, a leading jurist said that an inquest would normal-
ly be a "matter of policy and procedure" in all cases of "sudden
death," such as Daniel's, in which no-one is criminally charged.

"If you are not going to charge anyone with homicide, you
must hold an inquest, there's no ifs and buts about that," said the
source, who questioned why it had taken so long for an inquest date
to be set.

The jurist said at that time that'a key question to be answered
was how the 20-year-old got possession of the methadone, which
was later found in his system.

Daniel died in Doctors Hospital on September 10 while visiting
his mother, Anna Nicole Smith, and his baby sister, Dannie Lynn
Hope, born three days earlier. .

An American pathologist hired by Miss Smith, Dr Cyril Wecht,
subsequently determined that Daniel died "accidentally" as a
result of the effects of a "cocktail" of drugs in his system.

The combination of drugs ~~ two anti-depressants and
methadone — would have reportedly affected the brain, lungs,
and ultimately Daniel's heart, with devastating results, he said.

In October, Daniel's grandmother, Virgie Arthur, told CNN's
Nancy Grace that she believed her grandson was murdered.

"Daniel did not take drugs. No-one could convince me of that,"
she told the show's host.

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tions for the 10,15 and 20-year
period after implementation, a
study on the economic impact
NHI could have and "a com-
plete report on the components,
cost and financing of NHI," Mr
Rolle told The Tribune in
November.

"For us to do a true analysis
of the plan we need to have that
information available to us," he
said.

"This information is critical
for the public to understand the
true sustainability of the plan."

Mr Rolle has previously said
that the NHI plan could have a
"devastating" effect on the
Bahamian economy if imple-
mented incorrectly.

"For the sake of the Bahami-
an economy and this nation's

promised that they would give
the details to the coalition by
December 1. But on Friday Mr
Rolle said that there had been
"no communication whatsoeév-
er" from the government to the
coalition on the matter in recent
weeks.

"All we know is what I guess
we read in the papers the other
day about them rolling out a
strategic plan," he said.

He said that the coalition
hoped the delay was only the
effect of the holidays, and that
the ministry would get "back in
the swing of things" and engage
with them again now the holi-
day season is over.

Specifically, the group is
awaiting actuarial studies on
NHI, income and cost projec-

Bahamasair boss
FROM page one

could not say at this point whether police were following any “sig-
nificant leads” into the matter as this might compromise their
investigation.

“TI would rather leave that alone until we get to a point where we -

can give you some positive information because otherwise it inter-
feres with our investigation,” he explained.

“We don’t have any problem giving the information but first of
all we want to know where we are in terms of our investigation.”

In response to the alleged theft, The Tribune received an official
press statement from Bahamasair yesterday.

The document read: “The Managing Director (Henry Woods)
has outrightly called for the retraction of this article as it is false and
misleading.

“He emphatically states that no monies have been stolen at
Bahamasair in the amount of $73,000 during his tenure as manag-
ing director and the airline has not reported any such matter to the
police.” .

The investigation is the latest of several problems affecting the
national flag-carrier.

In mid-December, hundreds of Bahamians were delayed in their
pre-Christmas travels when Bahamasair pilots staged a major sick-
out as the ongoing dispute over an industrial agreement with the air-
line’s management came to a new standstill.

Dismayed passengers contacted The Tribune reporting that their
flights had been delayed. Hundreds of customers were stranded in
US and domestic airports.

In respect to the alleged theft, police said that as soon as a con-
clusion was reached in the matter they would be willing to discuss
their findings. :

“Right now we really don’t want to give any information out to
the press beause the matter is under active investigation,” said

future well-being, employment
and prosperity this nation could

not afford to get NHI and it
implementation wrong," h:
said.

The latest figures of peopl:

who have signed the petitio:
launched by the coalition i

November - which requests tha‘
government "release all fact:
and allow for meaningful con-

sultation before making a fine
determination" - will b:

revealed this week, Mr Roll

said.

A total of 3,500 signature:
were obtained within 10 day:

ta +-

of its launch.



| Woman in
hospital
FROM page one

discovering firearms and
ammunition in a vehicle in the
downtown area on Saturday.
While on duty around
5.50pm conducting surveil-
lance at the Junior Junkanoo
Parade, a team of detectives
observed two men acting in a
suspicious manner next to a
Suburban mini-van near
Esquire Clothing store at
Churchill Square. s

As the officers approached, |,

the two men quickly went
inside the vehicle, where the
driver was seated. The offi-
cers told the men of their sus-
picion and ordered them to
get out of the vehicle.

Police discovered a .45
semi-automatic pistol, con-
taining nine .45 ammunition,
and a .{mm semi-automatic
pistol with eight..9mm ammu-
nition inside the vehicle.

A 21-year-old resident of
Spinney Road, a 25-year-old
resident of Gordon Avenue,
and a 22-year-old resident of
Nassau were taken into police
custody. They are expected to
be charged in Freeport Mag-
istrate’s Court today.







ASP Cartwright.

THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF.THE BAHAMAS |
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & Internationai Relations
is to implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

international Liaison Officer (IO)

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
_ departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.























































Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-tg-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°'' January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas

P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas

\ THE COLLEGE OF

Visit our website at www.coh.edu.bs





MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 15



NASSAU LIFE



Winners are
announced for

PCCC

PRESENTATIONS have
been made to raffle winners in
aid of the Physically Challenged
Children’s Committee (PCCC),
formerly the Crippled Chil-
dren’s Committee.

The winning tickets were
drawn by raffle patron
Bernadette Christie, wife of
Prime Minister Perry Christie,
on December 18 at Kelly’s in
the Mall at Marathon.

The photograph shows win-
ners receiving their prizes from
chairman of the PCCC Bismar-
ck Coakley (left) along with the
executive director, Dorothy
‘Philips, far right.

«The prizes are as follows:

“© 2007 Chevrolet Optra, won
by Vivian Knowles - ticket
09323.



Researchers
help Cuban
Americans
find roots

& FORT LAUDERDALE,
Florida



CUBAN-AMERICANS
who lost their family histories
when they fled the island nation
are joining forces to rediscover

‘ their roots, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Jorge Pinon, a senior research
associate at the University of
Miami's Institute for Cuban and
Cuban-American Studies,
helped launch the Cuban Fam-
ily History and Genealogy Pro-
ject. It helps Cuban-Americans
trace their family histories and
helps preserve the history of
groups ranging from indigenous
tribes to the various cultures
who settled on the island after
the Spanish colonization began
in the 15th century

"What happens with every
migration is you bring with you
your music, your food and you
pass it on to future genera-
tions," Pinon said. "But we lose
our family history."

Civil records in communist
Cuban can be even harder to
obtain, Pinon said, though he
has traced his own bloodlines
to the 1600s and documented
1,200 ancestors.

Cuban-American genealo-
gists also are transcribing docu-
ments and putting them on a
Web site to help others in their
search. The records include bur-
ial lists, ship passengers and
church records such as baptism,
marriage and death certificates.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













raffle

¢ Caribbean cruise for two -
donated by Arawak Homes and
Sunshine Companies, return air-
fare donated by Continental
Connections, won by Danielle
Farmer - ticket 10353.

¢ Opal and diamond ring -
donated by Coin of the Realm,
won by Snuggles Russell - tick-
et 12671.

e 16-inch Omega 14k gold
necklace -donated by
Solomon’s Mines, won by
Gwendolyn Johnson - ticket
15543.

5) $250 gift certificate - donat-

. ed by Kelly’s Home Centre,

won by O Nesbeth - ticket 0167.
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PAGE 22, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007





Pope says migt

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

ants should heed values

THE TRIBUNE








of host nation to help integration





Si FAITHFUL hold a banner reading, World Day of the Migrants, prior to the start of Pope Benedict XVI's Angelus prayer in St. Peter's
14, 2007. Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday urged migrants

square at the Vatican, Sunday, Jan.
sures are needed to favor legal migration and to keep emigrant families united.

tries to favor integration, and said mea
{

1

‘

i VATICAN CITY

POPE Benedict XVI, insist-
ing:immigration should be
viewed as a resource and not
just a problem, on Sunday
urged immigrants to respect
the ‘social values of their new
countries and said laws are
neetled to protect their dignity,
according to Associated Press.

"Let us recognize in partic-
ular the difficulties of migrant
families as they’ are: the dis-
comfort, the humiliation," the
pontiff said, addressing pil-
griths and tourists from many °
nations in St. Peter's Square.

Without naming any coun-



en RRR TET TTT



try or nationality, he lamented
the "painful" conditions
refugees, exiles, the homeless
and the persecuted often
endure.

"It is thus important to pro-
tect migrants and their fami-
lies through the help of leg-
islative" assistance, services
and counseling centers, Bene-
dict said. ‘

"I hope that soon there will
be a balanced management of
migratory flows and of human
mobility in general, so bene-
fits can reach the entire human
family, beginning with-eoncrete
measures which-favor legal
emigkation, and the reuniting
of families,” the pontiff added.



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"Only respect for human
dignity for all migrants, on one
hand, and the recognition by
the migrants themselves of the
values of the societies which
host them, will make possible
the proper integration of fam-
ilies in the social, economic
and political systems" where
they are now living, Benedict
said.

"The reality of migration
shouldn't ever be seen only as
a problem but also and above
all as a great resource on the
path of humanity," Benedict
said.

. Archbishop Agostino: Mar-
chetto, a top official of the
Vatican's office on migrants,

& 8

At The Carnival
Monday, January 15 - Friday, January !



SS

to heed the social values of their host coun-

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)

said the pope was particularly
concerned about the families
of refugees.

"There is a tendency today
to protect order and well-being
from the threat that many see
in the continuous arrival of for-
eigners, a mix of migrants and
refugees," Marchetto said in
an interview on Vatican Radio.

The prelate lamented the
lack of adequate funding for
humanitarian assistance for
refugees, “especially for
women and children" leaving
them easy prey for abuse.

The«Gatholic Church on
Sunday was marking the annu-
al World;Day for Migrants and

Refugees.

‘Ride all the rides



~ Communist regime.





@ POPE Benedict XVI blesses the faithful gathered in St.Peter's
square for the Angelus prayer at the Vatican, Sunday, Jan. 14,
2007. The Pontiff told Polish pilgrims on Sunday that he hoped God
would encourage those in difficulty and searching for truth, but he
made no mention of the scandal besetting the Polish Church after
accusations that a Warsaw prelate collaborated with the former

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)





4B | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

HEALTHCARE

INTERNATIONAL EDITION |

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Reversing U.S. healthcare’s ‘death spiral’

* INSURANCE

A: Yes, America spends a
lot, for various reasons. One is
the demands of the American
consumer, but also we have a
highly fragmented, highly
inefficient system. And we’re
the only one of those [indus-
trial] countries without a
national, single-payer system.

Q@: Where is one area
where we cut back on costs
and not hurt healthcare?

A: I think the administra-

AUTOMOBILES

tive overhead and the lack of
any integrated medical record
system is a huge opportunity.
We have so much duplication
because we have these little
silos of information in each
doctor’s office and every hos-
pital. And no one talks to each
other, and so consequently
when the physicians order
things they have no idea what
other doctors ordered.

If we could come up with a
single electronic medical
record system that everybody

shared, in my estimation we
could save trillions of dollars
because everybody is access-
ing the same information. ...
Everybody has to share.

Q: America has 45 million
uninsured. Give me a short
take on how to get people cov-
ered.

A: You can take the Demo-
cratic approach — universal
health [insurance], govern-
ment control. Or you can take
the Republican approach —
the free enterprise system.

I’m for the free enterprise sys-
tem.

The system will not self-
correct right now. The market
forces aren’t aligned to make
it self-correct.

I love what Massachusetts
is doing with the mandate
[requiring employers to pro-
vide insurance]. They have
less of a problem. Their unin-
sured is 6 to 8 percent.

Q: Hospital gross charges
are often three or four times
what private insurers or Medi-





DESIGN: On many concepts and production cars,

3
b



CARLOS OSORIO/AP
designers have raised the top of the doors, reducing the window
size. It’s clearly a trend that will be more pronounced in the future, and you can see it in concept vehicles such as
Volvo’s XC-60 crossover, Chrysler's Nassau sedan and the sleek but retro Holden Efiygabove.

New trends seen at auto show

*HOT CARS

across the globe. GM didn’t
put any time frame on the
Volt other than to say anew
battery could be ready by
2010 or 2012.

“T do think that it’s a very
solid interim solution until we
get a (hydrogen powered)
fuel cell,” said Michael Robi-
net, vice president of global
forecast services for North-
ville, Mich.-based CSM
Worldwide, an auto industry
consulting company.

Between now and then,
buyers will be treated to
many more models that look,
feel and perform better than
their predecessors. In the
popular mid-sized segment,
Honda rolled out the 2008
Accord Coupe, which will
look like its sister sedan, both
due in showrooms this fall.

They'll fight it out against
Chevrolet’s new Malibu, a car
that many analysts say will
finally give GM a model to

CATTLE RANCHING

take on Toyota’s Camry, the
best-selling car in the U.S.

In both the Accord and
Malibu, designers have raised
the top of the doors, or the
“beltline,” in automotive jar-
gon, reducing the window
size. They did the same thing
on the redesigned Ford Focus
small car.

“It gives the vehicle, I
think, a very substantial
look,” said Ed Welburn, GM’s
vice president of global
design. “It allows you to doa
long, uninterrupted line”
along the side, he said.

It’s clearly a trend that will
be more pronounced in the
future. You can see it in con-
cept vehicles such as Volvo’s
XC6O0 crossover, Chrysler’s
Nassau sedan that may be the
next generation 300, the Lin-
coln MKR and even the
sculpted but retro Holden
Efijy from GM.

In many cases, the high
doors are coupled with a roof
made mostly of glass, which

Welburn said makes a car feel
more open even with smaller
side windows.

Glass technology has
evolved so it’s as strong as
steel roofs, Welburn said.

Designers also are lower-
ing the slope of the wind-
shield to give cars a lower
feel. Even Jeep, which nor-
mally has a more boxy look,
had the angular windshield
and high door line in its Trail-
hawk concept.

Robinet said the higher
doors give people a feeling of
safety, too, but conversely,
the smaller windows and
lower windshield angle can
cut into a driver’s vision.

Chrysler’s new minivans
are among the few new mod-
els that don’t look more mod-
ern. But Robinet sees the
minivans as a big seller
mainly for their interiors,
which have more head and
shoulder room than previous
models because they are box-
ier on the outside.

“I think the exterior’s not
going to win them any design
awards,” Robinet said.

Key to the interior of
DaimlerChrysler’s Chrysler
Town & Country and Dodge
Caravan minivans is the
“Swivel n’ Go” seating in
which the second-row seats
swivel backward to face the
third row. A table can be
snapped between the rows so
families can play games, do
homework or whatever.

The vans also have two
rows of soft, white light tubes
on the ceiling to make the
passenger area feel like a
home. Other vehicles, such as
Ford’s Focus and several of
Toyota’s Scidn models also
have more homelike lighting
with colored LEDs in the floor
and cupholders.

Robinet sees the lighting as
a trend that will stick around
until the concepts. become
reality. “The days of just hav-
ing a dome lamp are probably

finished,” he said.

Brazil’s ranches keep expanding

* BRAZIL

The cheaper cost of Brazil~
ian beef attracts orders from
Russia, its No. 1 customer, and
Middle Eastern countries.

Last December, Russia and
55 other countries stopped
imports from Brazilian states
affected by foot-and-mouth
disease but 10 months later
removed the ban on major
producing states like Mato
Grosso deemed clear of the
infection. Despite the embar-
goes, Brazil’s exports from
January through September
2006 rose 17.6 percent in cash
value and 3.8 percent in vol-
ume compared with a year
earlier, according to the Bra-
zilian Beef Industry and
Exporters Association, or
ABIEC.

SUPPLIERS

. Internal and external fac-
tors explain how Brazil now
supplies a quarter of the
globe’s beef exports.

European outbreaks of two
cattle diseases — mad-cow
and foot-and-mouth — dra-
matically upset production
and consumption in the 1990s.
Then European Union subsi-

dies on beef quality replaced
those promoting volume.
These factors combined to
open big consumer markets
like Russia to lower-priced
Brazilian beef, according to

ABIEC.

Aside from being hor-
mone-free, more than 90 per-
cent of Brazilian cattle are
grass-fed and therefore
unlikely to contract mad-cow
disease from tainted feed.

This pleases consumers in,

Europe, where most cases of
the fatal disease, bovine spon-
giform encephalopathy, have
occurred,

Right now, few American
ranchers appear concerned
about Brazilian competition.
Moreover, more expensive
grain-fed beef from the
United States has ended up in
foreign markets, except for
some by-products like tongue,
U.S. producers say.

The sanguine American
reaction to Brazil’s runaway
export growth might well be
justified — if Brazilians don’t
expand their relatively tiny
base of feedlots and compete
head to head with higher-
quality beef.

Less than 10 percent of cat-

tle here go through feedlots,
where a diet of grain adds
pounds quickly.

But low corn and soybean
prices, compounded by an
abundance of supply often in
the same regions, are making
feedlots much more attractive
to Brazilian cattlemen.

FEEDLOT

Carlos Kind operates the
country’s lith-biggest feedlot,
Boitel (an acronym for
“Bovine Hotel’) near Rio
Verde in Goias state. The

, feedlot can handle 12,500 cat-

tle; about 75 percent are
owned by him and his part-
ner. He says Brazilian ranch-
ers are increasingly using
feedlots to produce higher-
grade beef cattle.

“We may now represent
less than a tenth of cattle pro-
duction, but feedlots are
growing at 20 percent a year,”
Kind said through an inter-
preter.

“The big feedlots are get-
ting bigger, and there are
more small ones. As for me, I
am going to invest in better
feed — cornmeal and soy —
to get the steers finished
faster. We’ve got the land and



FLFR AON eS IS CE TCT OMe) Me Ler NER I RR CoE eh

é

the grain. The problem is that
banks generally don’t lend to
feedlots.”

TEXAS CONCERNS

Texas rancher Gary McGe-
hee has seen the Brazilian
potential, and he is worried.

Although the American
industry has derided grass-fed
beef as inferior to the U.S.
corn-fed variety, McGehee
said he was uncomfortably
impressed by the grass-fed
meat he ate during a visit to
Brazil.

“The steaks were great,
prepared well. That kind of
stuff scares me,” he said dur-
ing acall from the West Texas
town of Mertzon.

Brazil should no longer be
dismissed as just another
Third World country, McGe-
hee cautioned.

“They are competitive
with us,” he said. “Although
we might export less than 7
percent of our beef, if the
price of cattle drops 3 or 4
percent because of Brazilian
competition, that is going to
have an effect on me. Eventu-
ally, they are coming to our
own market and we're going
to have to deal with it.”

care pays. Why not just do
away with gross charges?

A: The complex gross
charge structure is incongru-
ent, incoherent, indefensible.
I will not defend the way hos-

pitals charge, but we don’t

control that because we have
all these impositions that are
brought down on us by the
federal government, which by
the way pays us two different
ways for Medicare and Med-
icaid. And then every man-
aged care company decides at

THE BIG THREE

its own discretion that they’re
going to pay us differently.

If we had a uniform, single
methodology for reimbursing
hospitals and physicians, we
could save a huge amount of
money, but it’s beyond our
capability to force that upon
these payers out there,
because they’re the ones who
set the rules. And we need to
make this consumer-friendly,
especially as we have this
major shift to consumer-
driven healthcare. )

Automakers
hope to learn

° TURNAROUND

spiked and people wanted
something more efficient.

Now they’re all losing bil-
lions and scrambling to catch
up with customers who are
increasingly being drawn to
cars made by foreign-based
automakers, particularly Toy-
ota and Honda.

Auto executives know they
can learn a lot from how Jobs
used a new product and
clever marketing to raise his
company from the grave.

“We're really trying to be
more like companies like
Apple, where we can innovate
and move faster,” said Mark
LaNeve, vice president of
sales, service and marketing
for General Motors.

Before October 2001, when
the first iPod was launched,
digital music players were
clunky and had limited stor-
age capacity., They, were
fueled by tunes torn from CDs
or pirated via Napster. Sync-
ing with a PC was difficult,
and even navigating through
songs was a chore.

Apple saw an opportunity

and jumped on it, introducing’

a sleek player with a hard
drive large enough for thou-
sands of songs, a click wheel
for quick navigation and,
within months, an online
store that offered a legal
means for filling up the iPod.

SAME APPROACH

Jobs, who is fond of car
analogies, had tried the same
approach with the original
1998 iMac: Introducing a sleek
machine that made other
computers look like a gray
1983 Oldsmobile Cutlass
Ciera.

There are differences, of
course, between a 3,600-
pound car and an egg-shaped
iMac or a featherweight iPod
Shuffle, chief among them the
time it takes to design and
build them.

The new iPhone, for exam-
ple, took about two and a half
years to bring to market —
and even that’s a long time in
the consumer electronics
niche, where many products
live in six- or 12-month devel-
opment cycles. The average
car takes four or five years.

WALL STREET

Double-digit gains
still a possibility

* EARNINGS GROWTH

beat expectations, 23 said
ithey’d be in line, and 101 said
they’d miss.

Although these are
extremely early indicators, it
suggests the fourth quarter
remains on par with the previ-
ous quarter. Although many
on Wall Street don’t expect
profit growth to hit the 22
percent level seen in the S&P
500 during the third quarter,
it is still expected to blow past
the historical average of 7.6
percent.

Portfolio managers say
what has come out so far
hasn’t been significantly neg-
ative or positive, and that
double-digit growth is still
achievable.

“T’'d be more concerned if
you saw multiple warnings
from the same industry,” said
Matt Kelmon, portfolio man-

from Apple |

Also, Apple contracts out
virtually all its manufacturing,
where the Big Three have bil-
lions invested in plants and
machinery and must bear the
healthcare, pension and salary
costs of a huge — though
quickly shrinking — and
expensive unionized labor
force. Still, Apple’s core focus
on consumer appeal can serve
as a model. ;

“I think a fresh, Geative
mind is something that you
can appreciate and focus sim-
ply on some complicated
things,” said Eric Ridenqur,
chief operating officer, of
DaimlerChrysler BGs Chrys-
ler Group.

IMPACT
Ridenour sees Chrysler’s

300 sedan and the 1980s

invention of the minivan as
products with similar impact
to the iPod. The 300’s’ striking
silhouette brought the com-
pany ‘big profits when it came
out in 2004, quickly becoming
the large car sales leader. The
minivan created a whole yew
segment of the market. ,

GM expects the Chevrelet
Volt to bea breakthrotigh
product. The electric. ‘car
plugs into a home outlet and
has a small gas engine that
together give the small car a
range of more than 600 miles
on a tank of gas.

It’s just a prototype, bat
LaNeve said it’s within reach
in the short term, and
products like the Volt cquld
help reduce or eliminate
America’s dependence on and
fossil fuels.

“We think this has a
chance to be a game-changing
technology for our company
and our industry,” he said.

But gone are the days
where one product can carry
a company.

“Product is the be- all, end-
all of any recovery,” said
Efraim Levy, an auto industty
analyst for Standard & Poors.
“One home run won’t be
enough to bail out these cour
panies.”

“The key is not just peli.
odic hits, but a steady succ@s-
sion of appealing products,”
Levy said. “That’s what ydu
see in the Toyotas or the Hop-
das.”

Fae O88 we ate Se

ager of the Kelmoore Strateby
Funds. “Every quarter for the
past 18 quarters we’ve been
waiting for this earnings
slowdown, and it’s just never
come. It might be a headline if
it’s not double digit, but we're
still seeing really strong prof
its anyway.’

Russ Koesterich, senior
portfolio manager at Barclays
Global Investments, ae
investors aren’t shaken by
recent warnings. He still cas
resilient corporate earnings
on the way.

“The expectations for
profit growth already wére
ratcheted down, but wevre
now seeing some leeway}\in
that,” he said. “Even if you
have a few of these disap-
pointments like with AMD,
that’s still not enough :to
change expectations that
profit will decelerate below
expectations.” »





THE TRIBUNE ~ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 23

THE TRIBUNE. PRESENTS











Presents

a breakfast sarials sto

"ean ‘Bieta










atherine Paterson ~ illus





TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS :
JANUARY 16 - MARCH 23

%

READ THIS COMPELLING NINETEEN PART STORY ABOUT
MELI AND HER FAMILY'S QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.

| he Tribune
believes that
reading helps people to
focus on constructive
choices through expo-

When Meli, an Albanian 11-year-old
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not





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Breakfast Serials pro-
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securely—living in their ancestral
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Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic
Albanians from their homes. Family
closeness is not enough. The
intervention of U.S. forces is not

enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,

the ‘family must flee, embarking on a

dangerous journey in search of safety.
Though family ties and tradition are
severely tested, they eventually reach
the U.S. and the tranquility of a
Vermont town. It is there that Meli

experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11 distrust of



Muslims. Her response is an inspiration for all.

Based on a true story, Long Road Home presents a warm and compassionate family’s

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Read "Long Road Home" with us... every Tuesday and Friday from
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For more information about The Tribune's - e
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-Eco-Discovery

THE TRIBUNE







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lo rida Keys

Centre opens

i KEY WEST, Fla.

FLORIDA Keys visitors now
have a way to experience the
area's underwater ecosystem
without getting wet. That's after
a $6 million, free-admission
education facility opened there
Saturday, according to Associ-
ated Press.

‘Located on the Key West
waterfront, the 6,400-square-
foot Florida Keys Eco-Discov-
ery Center showcases the
underwater and upland habi-
tats that characterize the Keys,
emphasizing the coral reef that
parallels the island chain.



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Through interactive and
touch-screen exhibits and audio
and video components, visitors
can explore the Keys' hard-
wood hammock, mangrove,
patch reef, seagrass, deep shelf
and Dry Tortugas environ-
ments. Exhibition highlights
include a walkthrough version
of the Aquarius Undersea Lab,
a manned underwater research
laboratory located off Key
Largo. Visitors can hear record-
ings from the lab, take video
tours of the Keys' undersea
world and view indigenous fish
and sea creatures through video
screens shaped like portholes.

"By educating the public
before they access the (marine)
resource, they can appreciate
the resource and ensure its con-
tinued conservation," said
James L. Connaughton, chair-
man of the White House Coun-
cil on Environmental Quality
and a keynote speaker at the
opening.

The Eco-Discovery Center is
operated by the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration's Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary,
the National Park Service and
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice.



ay

@ UN THIS photo released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, visitors at the new Florida Keys Eco-
Discovery Center examine the inside of a model of the Aquarius underwater marine habitat labora-
tory, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007, in Key West, Fla.

: (AP Photo/Florida Keys News Bureau, Andy Newman)

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@ IN THIS photo released
by the Florida Keys News
Bureau, Andy Olday, left,
hoists his daughter Emilia,
so she can view a video
screen on an underwater
camera at the new Florida
Keys Eco-Discovery Center:
Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007, in
Key West, Fla. Through a
series of interactive exhibits, -
the $6 million Eco-Discovery
Center, that formally opened
Saturday, showcases the
Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary's environ-
ment.

(AP Photo/
Florida Keys
News Bureau,
Andy Newman)





). ibahames
marketplace



Dundas Centre for the
_ Performing Arts,
— Mackey Street









- Show Times: |
January 20, at 7pm | |
January 21, at 4pm ee
January 22, at 7pm ,





A very moving self
examination of
Bahamian culture and
_Tthe customer service
attitudes that have
emerged over the last
few decades.



Log on to www W amas
oremail












SECTION

;

business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

BUSINESS




Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street






First anchor
A Me |
Ce en OGTR TE

See Page Ze

i
i



BIC flouts regulatory.

rocess over the ViBe

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Bahamas
Telecommunica-
_tions Company
(BTC) “seems to
think it can do
whatever it wants to do”, the
Public Utilities Commission’s
‘ (PUC) executive director told
The Tribune, after it launched
its ViBe Voice over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) product with-
- out obtaining the required
- licence amendments and regu-
latory approvals.

Barrett Russell said the tele-
coms industry regulator was
not going to|take any action
against BTC, though, as ViBe’s





PUC chief:

arrival would benefit
Bahamas-based consumers and
the economy’s competitiveness
due to its prices being lower
than traditional fixed-line ser-
vices.

The PUC’s consultation doc-
ument on price regulation for
ViBe said: “BTC introduced
ViBe for international long dis-

tance calls in September 2006, |

and inter-island long distance
calls in December 2006 despite
the fact that formal approval of
ViBe has not yet been issued.
It is indeed regrettable that

BTC has been so recalcitrant
in this matter........

“The Commission indeed
regrets that the ViBe service
was introduced before formal
approval of pricing was
obtained, and emphasizes that
this should not be regarded as
a precedent for the future.

“However, the Commission
will not deny consumers the
benefits of this cheaper ser-
vice.”

Mr Russell said the PUC
believed it was “in the best

interests of consumers not to

take any action” against BTC,
due to the lower prices and
enhanced economic benefits
that ViBe promised. :

He told The Tribune:
“We’re not contemplating any
further action. We want to
make sure these prices are
locked in under law. We need
to do a public consultation. If
these prices are not locked in,
BTC can change them.

“BTC seems to think it can
do whatever it wants to do, and
at some point in time they’re

going to have to stop that. But

$ 100m in Bahamian goods at stake

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Busines Editor



THERE is likely to be “minimal”
‘impact on the Government's tax revenues
if an Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) between Europe and the
Caribbean results in European exports
being admitted to the Bahamas duty-free,
the minister of state for finance told The
Tribune, but some $100 million in Bahami-:
an exports remain at stake.

James Smith said this was because many
European imports to the Bahamas already
entered with low or zero customs duty
rates attached, but he pointed out that the
EPA situation showed that this nation
needed to keep tax reform “on the front
burner” and that international trade agree-
ments “are not going away”.

The urgency of the EPA situation has
been highlighted by the fact that sources
have told The Tribune that the date for the
Bahamas to submit its “wants and needs”
on the EPA talks to Cariforum, the body
negotiating on this nation and CARI-
COM’s behalf, is “past due”.

Mr Smith told The Tribune that he
thought the submission date was “proba-
bly in a couple of weeks”, and added that
the. Ministry of Foreign Affairs — which
took over responsibility for international

trade relations at the last Cabinet reshuf-

fle — was “working on it”.
The Bahamas submission to Cariforum
would indicate what this nation wanted
to get from the EPA, chiefly securing duty-
free access to EU markets for exports by
its fisheries industry, Bacardi’s spirits and
_ rum, and Polymers International in
Freeport.

It would also indicate what this country
was prepared to offer European exporters
in return, in terms of duty-free access to
the Bahamian market. And any submis-
sion would also indicate economic sectors
that the Bahamas was not prepared to
open up or offer tariff-free access to, plus
any other carve-outs, opt-outs, deroga-



B JAMES SMITH

tions, extensions and timeframes this ~

nation would like.

Mr Smith said the Cariforum talks
would involve the Bahamas and
Caribbean putting forward the major
exports they would like to secure duty-

free access to Europe for. As the EPA:

was reciprocal, the Europeans were seek-
ing the same treatment for their exports.

Mr Smith said the Bahamas exported
about $100 million of goods to the EU

_per year, the bulk of its crawfish and oth-

er fisheries products. Anthony McKinney,
head of the Fisheries Advisory Board,
previously told The Tribune that failure to
secure duty-free access to the EU would
raise the costs of Bahamian fisheries prod-
ucts by $6 million, and make them uncom-
petitive.

On the tax front, Mr Smith said most
imports to the Bahamas from the EU
already had zero import duty rates
attached. The bulk of these goods were
perfumes, watches and jewellery.

“Over the years, we’ve eliminated or
educed considerably the duty on imports
from Europe to encourage tourist expen-
diture,” Mr Smith said. “In terms of the
direct tax loss, it’s likely to be minimal.

EPA talks show need
to keep tax reform
‘on front burner’

“The overall net impact of the EPA is
likely to be in the Bahamas favour, the
retention of net jobs and income.”

A Leonard Archer, the Bahamas
Ambassador to CARICOM, previously
said the Bahamas earned about $10 mil-
lion per year in tax revenues from EU
imports.

Apart from the EPA, the Bahamas will
also have to deal with Caribbean Basin
Initiative (CBI), the system of one-way
preferences that allows some $100 million
of Bahamian goods per annum into the
US duty-free. ;

This has expired, and although still in
operation, has yet to be renewed. The US
must seek a waiver from the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) to continue the CBI,
but this has not been forthcoming due to
the objections of Paraguay, whic h is. com-
plaining that the CBI provides benefits to
the Caribbean nations that it does not
receive, making it discriminatory. ;

The US has indicated that any replace-
ment for the CBI will also involve recip-
rocal treatment from Caribbean nations.
On CBI, Mr Smith said the Bahamas had
to decide whether it was going to be part
of a CARICOM negotiating bloc, or if it
would go the bilateral route and talk to
Washington next week.

“We've got a couple of fundamental
decisions to make,” Mr Smith said of the
Bahamas’ approach to international trade.

“It kind of points the way to keep it
[tax reform] on the front burner to inves-
tigate alternatives. International trade
agreements are not going away, despite
what some may think. The need for reci-
procal access and duty free access will
always be on the table.”

Financing for new port still concerns

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

HOW to raise the necessary funds to
finance the relocation of downtown ship-
ping companies to new port facilities in
the south - and to sustain the project - will
be one of the biggest challenges Dutch
consultants Ecorys-Liviense face as they

At the contract signing for the business
plan last week, Marten van den Bossche,
chairman of Ecorys-Liviense, outlined the

three phases of the business plan, the first

step being the design of the port facility.
The second step in the business plan will
look at the cost of the project.
“The port will cost a lot of money. It’s a
huge investment., and it is something that
has to be done jointly between govern-

ment and the private sector and financing
institutions,” Mr van den Bossche said.

“So, basically we have to do some finan-
cial engineering here, and that is part of the
business plan. We will look into opportu-
nities, whether this plan can be financed
and how it can be financed.”

SEE page 7B

































































the Commission decided at this
particular stage, we want to
lock in the prices.”

Mr Russell said the PUC
was not opposed to ViBe’s
introduction, but added: “We
would like to see BTC follow
the process as outlined in the
Telecommunications Act, but
on the other hand don’t want
to stop it. The consumer gains
far better products and prices
from these services.”

Yet given that BTC
launched ViBe before receiv-
ing the required licence

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

SYSTEMS Resource
Group (SRG) has filed a dis-
pute over the permanent tar-
iff the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) is
charging it to terminate its
customers’ calls in Family
Islands where it has no net-
work, arguing that this is dis-
criminatory and anti-compet-
itive.

Sources told The Tribune
that SRG, parent company of
IndiGo Networks, BTC’s
only legal competitor for
fixed-line services, had filed
the dispute with the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC),
the telecoms sector regulator,
on November 14, 2006.

IndiGo only has networks,
and a licence to operate, on
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Abaco. It has
been unable to start opera-
tions on Abaco due to a sep-
arate ongoing dispute with
BTC over the point of inter-
connection between the two
companies’ networks, which
is again with the PUC.

The latest dispute revolves
around the fact that IndiGo
has no network on Family
Islands such as Exuma and
Eleuthera.

If its customers call BTC
subscribers in those islands,
they have to pay a permanent
tariff of $0.13 per minute to
terminate those calls on
BTC’s network.

BTC therefore still has a
monopoly in those islands,
but unlike IndiGo sub-
scribers, customers of BT'C’s
new Voice over Internet Pro-
tocol (VoIP) service, ViBe,
are not being charged for calls
terminating there.

Subscribers to ViBe’s
Bahamian Pack can pay
$34.99 per month for unlimit-
ed calls to anywhere in the
| Bahamas, and SRG is under-
stood to be complaining that
BTC is charging its ViBe divi-
sion a different wholesale
price for call termination than
IndiGo.

And because BTC has the



Dispute over BTC call-
end tariff charges

. Savings.

_ company allowed to provide

‘BIC seems to think it can do whatever it wants’

amendments, pricing and oth-
er regulatory approvals will
likely lead impartial observers
to conclude that there is one

law for BTC, and another for |

its private sector competitors,
chiefly IndiGo Networks and
Cable Bahamas.
ViBe is not the first time that
BTC has done something with-
out receiving prior regulatory
approval. In 2004, it cut its
international and inter-island

SEE page 12B

monopoly network on those

island, SRG is arguing that
the different prices are anti-
competitive, discriminatory
and a form of predatory pric-
ing designed to drive SRG
out of the market.

In its public consultation
on BTC’s ViBe pricing, the
PUC acknowledged that the
dispute also involved SRG’s
concerns about the bundling
of BTC’s high-speed Internet
service with lower-priced
long-distance calls.

_ The PUC said it was inves-
tigating the competition
aspects of this, noting that it
was common for telecoms
operators across the globe to
bundle services, as a means
of selling more services to
consumers, for greater cus-
tomer convenience, and cost

Barrett Russell, the PUC’s
executive director, said the
regulator would be looking
at bundling in the Bahamian
market once it had addressed
issues relating to long-dis-
tance services, but added that
it would be “difficult to do
much” because its use was
widespread across the tele-
coms world.

Mr Russell said the PUC
hoped that once BTC’s ViBe
pricing was approved, it
would encourage Bahamian
consumers and businesses
using unlicensed VoIP ser-
vices to switch to legal ones.
Currently, BTC is the only

VoIP services, although com-
panies can use it exclusively
for communications within
their own premises.

Mr Russell said the PUC
had yet to resolve the dispute
between BTC and SRG over
interconnection between their
two networks in Abaco,
which was first filed in March
2005. The PUC is supposed
to resolve all disputes within
six months of their being
filed.

Mr Russell added: “We’ve
been attempting to resolve
that, but have had some larg-
er issues to deal with, like the
ViBe thing. We’ll get back to
that in due course.”















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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

Messe

THE TRIBUNE



First anchor
needs trade protection

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/PROGRAM COORDINATOR

The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Program Coordinator.
The Program Coordinator coordinates the administrative and operational aspects of a program
or project. S/he contributes to the processes for annual planning and budgeting, submission of
periodic and annual financial and technical reports and monitoring progress over the life of the
program/project. The Coordinator may be responsible for developing ‘operational guidelines to
ensure efficient management of the program and compliance with regulations. S/he coordinates
program/project-related workshops and meetings and documents activities, strategies and lessons
learned as appropriate. The Coordinator assists with the preparation of financial analyses and reports
for Program/Project management and other team members. S/he also assists in the preparation of
proposals for program/project support and serves as an information resource about the Prograrn/
Project in general — helping to develop communications materials, and responding to public inquiries.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS

Bachelor's degree and 3-5 years related experience or equivalent combination.

Excellent verbal and written skiils.

Proven organizational skills and attention to detail.

Demonstrated experience in MS Office, Word, Excel, Power Point and Data Base Management. Ability
to manipulate, analyze and interpret data.

Understanding of how organizations work and experience with project implementation and design.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/SENIOR POLICY ADVISOR

The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Senior Policy Advisor.
The Senior Policy advisor develops, coordinates and implements the program strategy to further the
work of the Conservancy and its conservation partners through direct interaction with the Governments
in the Northern Caribbean Program and multi- and bi-lateral agencies that provide conservation
opportunities and/or impact the nations’ conservation programs. S/he identifies conservation policy
and funding opportunities, evaluates the potential for TNC and NGO partner involvement, and develops
and implements strategies to influence policy and public funding for conservation al the national and/or
global levels. The Senior Policy Advisor tiaises with counterparts in the Conservancy's Mesoamerica
and Caribbean Conservation Region and Internationa! Government Relations department to provide
and extract useful lessons and to coordinate on joint policy approaches. S/he also serves as contact
with the external professional community in the policy arena to keep abreast of new developmenis
and opportunities that may be useful to the Conservancy and its partners and to report on and share
the Conservancy's experiences with others. The Senior Policy Advisor provides expert policy analysis
and contributes directly to the Conservancy's public funding strategies by providing input for proposal
writing, negotiating with bilateral and multilateral agencies and donor cultivation as needed.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS
Bachelor's degree in relevant field and 6 or more years of senior relevant experience. Master's
degree may be preferred or required. May require federal agency or congressional staff experience or
equivalent experience for positions with a global focus.
Expert knowledge of current trends in relevant policy discipline.
Demonstrated experience conceiving and implementing strategic initiatives.
Demonstrated excellent project management skills.
Excellent verbal and written communications skills. ;
é
Interested persons should apply in writing with full details, including resume and cover letter, to

HYPERLINK “mailto:bahamas@tnc.org” bahatnas@inc.org by January 31, 2007.



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas must protect
the “first anchor project” in its
history during negotiations on
any trade agreements, the
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
warned, as other countries
might object to Freeport’s
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

Christopher Lowe said that
the World Trade Organisa-
tion’s (WTO) rules-based trad-
ing system called for a “level
playing field” in areas ranging
from goods and services to
market access, government
transparency and procurement
and market access. It meant
that each country had to offer

the same terms to foreign and |

domestic companies, and could
not discriminate between
countries.
-“The problem with the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
is that while it is an internal,
national situation, written into
our constitution, some of the
other signatories [to a trade
agreement] could take issue
with it,” Mr Lowe explained. |
“Given the importance of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment to the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas as the original
anchor project, it must be tak-
en into consideration when
determining our entire trade
policy.”

Toavertise in The

Mr Lowe pointed out that
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment had been designed as the
first anchor project in the
Bahamas’ history, creating a
city of 50-60,000 people from
what had previously been a
desolate pine forest. Yet
Freeport had not worked, he
added, pointing to the warn-
ing signals it sent for Prime
Minister Perry Christie’s so-
called ‘anchor project’ strategy.

In its 2001 application to the
WTO for full membership, the
Bahamas, which currently has
observer status, described the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
and entire Freeport areas as
an ‘economic development
zone’, rather than a ‘free trade
zone’,

However, Mr Lowe said:
“The existence of the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement could
cause them to block our acces-
sion if they took issue with it.”
The Bahamas, he added, was
at “the last end of the stick”
when it came to negotiating its
entry to trade agreements and
bodies, as it was one of the few
nations outside them.

Freeport’s existence, coupled
with its comprehensive net-
work of investment incentives,
could cause other WTO mem-
bers to demand that either
they be allowed to establish a
similar zone in the interests of
reciprocal treatment, or that
the Bahamas abolish the

Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

The future of the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement,.and its con-
tinuation, are understood to
have caused some concern
among Freeport-based manu-
facturers and exporters, espe-
cially given the multitude of
trade agreements the Bahamas
has to deal with. |

Its end would undermine the
very rationale for them to con-
tinue operating in Freeport in
many cases. \

The Bahamas’ failure to
appreciate the importance of
developing a position and
strategy on international trade
was a collective failure of both
the Government and the pri-
vate sector, Mr Lowe said.

He added: “You also have a
general blame to be laid at the
Government’s feet, because
they’ve not shared information

with us. They continue to hide °

information from us.

“How can the Government
expect our help if they’re not
being forthcoming with us?
They need to consider if they
wish our help, it cannot be
entirely on their terms. Maybe
the business community has
more to offer if their terms are
considered, not their content.’

James Smith, minister of
state for finance, said it was
too early to tell what impact
free trade talks would have on
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.

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WALL STREET

Analysts: Firms may show doubl

Even though some companies
have warned that they will miss
financial expectations, investors
remain upbeat, but analysts
believe the days of double-digit
growth are over.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Advanced Micro
Devices and several other major
companies issued warnings this past

_ week that fourth-quarter results will
miss expectations. Wall Street barely
noticed.

For weeks, analysts have said the

HEALTHCARE
Stopping
uninsured

‘death

spiral’

& Brian Keeley, head of South
Florida’s largest healthcare
company, discusses what to do
about the nation’s health
problems and his own firm’s role.

BY JOHN DORSCHNER
jdorschner@MiamiHerald.com

Brian Keeley is a mix of big-time

business executive, philosopher and

social innovator.

As chief executive of Baptist
Health South Florida, he has created
over the past 20 years a strong non-
profit system of five hospitals at a
time when many stand-alone facili-
ties were going under or being sold to
for-profit chains.

The system has become South
Florida’s largest nongovernment
employer, with more than 11,200
workers, and the region’s biggest
healthcare firm, with $1.5 billion in
annual revenue and a net surplus of
$136 million.

Even with all this success, Keeley
is concerned about America’s con-
flicting views of healthcare. He suc-
cinctly portrays the tensions this
way: “We all want the absolutely best
care, and we want someone else to
pay for it.”

Like many industry leaders, he is
convinced the country’s healthcare
system is in a “death spiral,” because
the number of uninsured keeps ris-
ing. These people tend to skip pri-
mary care and end up in emergency
rooms, where they run up big bills
that they frequently can’t pay, mean-
ing hospitals must charge private
insurers more to make up for these
losses. That tends to make private
health insurance less affordable,
causing more companies to drop cov-
erage, increasing the number of unin-
sured, and so on.

At times a bubbly cheerleader for
new ideas, Keeley has announced
recently two major initiatives: Baptist
Health South Florida will favor using
vendors who provide health insur-
ance for their employees and it plans
to provide affordable. housing to
attract workers.

- | Q: America spends twice as much
* on healthcare as other industrial coun-
tries, but we have the same or shorter
life expectancy. Do we spend too
much? .

* TURN TO INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILES



can etaaeag ats AMARANTE RN

Ghe Fiami Herald \ p | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007



long period of stellar earnings growth
might be over for U.S. companies,
that the 18 straight quarters of dou-
ble-digit profit growth for Standard
& Poor’s 500 companies will be
replaced by more modest results.

But investors remain upbeat as
hundreds of companies are set to
report results in the next few weeks.
Shareholders did not go screaming
for the exits Friday after AMD, busi-
ness software maker SAP and Mur-
phy’s Oil warned results will miss
expectations.

In fact, the Dow Jones industrials
hit a record close. And analysts say







there are signs that companies might
have been able to eke out double-
digit gains during the last three
months of 2006.

“There is an indication that the
overall quarter might turn out to be
better than expected,” said David
Dropsey, a research analyst with
Thomson Financial that tracks equi-
ties. “Earnings are still strong coming
out of a lot of sectors.”

For instance, there’s an old adage
on Wall Street that “as goes Alcoa,
goes the market.” The world’s big-
gest aluminum maker, which
reported its results Wednesday said





MORE THAN A HOBBY: James King Carr De Muzio, who is both a doctor and rancher, surveys his herd
near Vera, Brazil. He started with two cows in 1994 and now has 500.

BRAZIL BANKS
ON BEEF

IN 2004 BRAZIL BECAME THE WORLD’S LARGEST
BEEF EXPORTER BY VOLUME, AND RANCHES
KEEP EXPANDING

BY BARRY SHLACHTER
McClatchy Newspapers

VERA, Brazil — James King Carr De Muzio started cattle ranching
later in life. But the easy-mannered 53-year-old Brazilian doctor and

scrubs.

De Muzio -—- who says his mixed
ancestry, unusual even in Brazil,
includes Alabamans who joined a
colony of Confederates after the
Civil War on one side and a “tossed
salad” Spanish-Italian-African heri-
tage on the other — counts himself

‘among producers enlarging their
cattle holdings as the country’s
beef industry continues a seem-
ingly insatiable growth..

Starting with two cows as pay-
ment for delivering a baby during
Brazil’s 1994'currency crisis, De
Muzio built his herd to more than
1,000 head, then scaled back to 500



after a dry summer. He says he’s

rancher feels as comfortable in the saddle as he does wearing surgical

reshaping his operation, gearing it
toward yearling stocker steers. He
remains bullish on his country’s
cattle industry, which has been
hobbled by a lack of paved roads,
by quality issues, and by periodic
outbreaks of disease.

“It’s still something new for
me,” he said of ranching. “I like
medicine, but this is more than a
hobby. I can afford to lose some
money ... but I can’t throw money
away.”

Brazil’s herd, conservatively
estimated at 170 million head (the
nation’s beef export association fig-
ures 204 million), is the world’s

Detroit auto show takes peek at
what's new in transportation

@ More glass in the roof and
higher door lines are featured on
cars this year at the North
American International Auto
Show, but Chevrolet’s Volt is
taking center stage.

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press
DETROIT — Higher door lines
and more glass in the roof. Sleek, low
hood lines with big chrome grilles.
Functional interiors, including house-
like lighting and a van with seats on
two sides of a table.
That’s what the cars and trucks

you'll be driving soon will look like,
as seen at the North American Inter-
national Auto Show in Detroit.

But it’s the future that may be the
most intriguing, with General
Motors’ plug-in, rechargeable elec-
tric-powered Chevrolet Volt hogging
a lot of attention during the show’s
media preview days this week.

Mike Jackson, chief executive of
AutoNation, the country’s largest
auto dealership group, was amazed at
the Volt, saying that current hybrid
gasoline-electric vehicles are merely
a fuel-efficiency bridge between now
and a practical electric car embraced



by everyone.

The Volt overcomes range, noise
and power issues that plagued previ-
ous electric cars, Jackson said. It has a
40-mile range on batteries and a
small gasoline engine that generates
electricity to power the car and
recharge the batteries when they’re
depleted.

If GM or another auto maker is
successful in overcoming battery
technology hurdles, something like
the low-slung four or five-passenger
Volt could show up in driveways

° TURN TO HOT CARS



cooked beef products and is Bra-



profits soared 60 percent from a year
earlier, and it had a 20 percent jump
in revenue that pushed past analysts’
expectations.

As of Thursday, 31 S&P 500 com-
ponents reported earnings. There
were 17 companies that beat expecta-
tions, six that met them and eight that
reported results below projections.
That matches the historical averages,
Dropsey said.

Of the 31 companies, those that
have beaten expectations have done
so by an average of 8 percent. This is
still well above the norm of a 3 per-
cent rise, according to Thomson



BARRY SHLACHTER/MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

largest -—— there are about 97 mil-
lion U.S. beef cattle — and there is
every indication that Brazilians like
De Muzio will make it an even big-
ger ranching country.

In 2004 Brazil became the
world’s largest beef exporter by
volume, according to the U.S. Agri-
culture Department. Disease, sani-
tary issues at slaughter plants, and
the sale of lower-priced cuts
account for why it still trails Aus-
tralia in export value.

Incidences of highly contagious
foot-and-mouth disease in some
parts of Brazil prevent exports of
fresh, chilled and frozen beef to
some key markets, including the
United States, Canada, Mexico,
Japan, Taiwan, South Korea and
Japan, -

But with exports to 150 other
countries, “losing a few hasn’t had
a discernible impact on the num-
bers,” says Steve Kay of Cattle Buy-
ers Weekly, based in Petaluma,
Calif. The U.S. market does buy

zil’s customer for such exports.

° TURN TO BRAZIL



LARD ALAC OURCE CLEC OOM NBR LODO OESLOEIRLEGD YOO IOOLRSULELE ORMELRIARLEONEDLA SRE EE

3B







e-digit gains

Financial.

Measuring the pace of profit warn-
ings has also been a good way to
judge how the quarter will turn out.

As of Thursday, 156 companies
pre-announced results — 37 said
they’d be above projections, 26 said
they were in line with estimates, and
93 announced they would miss.

Even adding AMD and other
recent warnings, Wall Street is still
faring slightly better than it did in the
third quarter. During that period, 177
pre-announced — 53 said they would

° TURN TO EARNINGS GROWTH ©

THE BIG THREE

Automakers
say they
can learn
from Apple

@& Apple’s Steve Jobs helped turn
the company around by creating
something people want to buy.
The auto industry is looking to
Apple as an example of how to
succeed.

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press

DETROIT — It’s a long way from
Henry Ford’s gritty factory complex
on the banks of the Rouge to the

light-filled atrium of Apple’s corpo--

rate headquarters in sunny Silicon
Valley.

But recent events have leaders of
Detroit’s Big Three automakers
thinking less about differences and
more about similarities. between
themselves and the once-troubled
company that brought the world
iPods, Macintosh computers and —
starting in June — iPhones.

Apple’s problems, circa 1997, are
familiar: red ink, falling market share,
tumbling stock price and persistent
doubts about its future. Analysts
questioned whether it could find
someone to permanently replace

-ousted CEO Gil Amelio, who had

been hired to turn the company
around.

The key to the turnaround — engi-
neered by returning co-founder Steve
Jobs — was in ideas as old as capital-
ism itself; Make something new,
something people want to buy.

Detroit is watching.

“I admire their pure understand-
ing of the brand and the type of cus-
tomer they’re going after, and mar-
ried to that, a product and a design
strategy that they do not veer off of,”
said Mark Fields, Ford’s president of
the Americas.

This week, Jobs introduced the
iPhone, a cross between the cellular
telephone, a computer and the com-
pany’s wildly successful personal
music players. In Detroit, automakers
unveiled multiple new models, each
carrying the hope that people will
buy enough of them to change red ink
to black.

For the Big Three, the problem —
for the past few years, anyway — has
been product. They made boatloads
of cash on trucks and sport utility
vehicles when gas was cheap and the
economy was booming, but were late
in changing when petroleum costs

* TURN TO TURNAROUND





CARLOS OSORIO/AP

NEW CONCEPT: GM’s-plug-in, rechargeable electric-powered Chevrolet
Volt is on display at the North American International Auto Show in

Detroit.



¢

Ne



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 5B
| | BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION |

© . e
Financial | DAV oy MWe wx (OS 001
planning key, [S=sascce
5
li
says Colina

executive

e All consumers with overdue accounts are advised to pay the arrears on
foe ] nit 1S oS co eer eos ° oo. . . . ° ° 7%
Ea aaa their electricity accounts immediately, in order to avoid the disconnection

essential Sat eae
lies to achie® their gos an . sea:
avoid finanal hardshi, said of your electrical service
Dashwell Fiwers, vic-Presi-
dent of salefor ColinImper-
ial Insuranc Compar:

In an adcess to tk Rotary

Club of New Provience, Mr
Flowers said te many
‘Bahamianfamilis had lost
‘their digniy and fund them-
selves indespeite straits
because they w¢ not pre-
pared for ‘he fin:cial realities
of life.

“You must hz a plan anda

, good financiePlan should
_-.include a com2ation of sav-
--ings, investmts and insur-
ance,” Mr Flers said.

He added tt life insurance
~,-was no long about just one
_«,traditional te of policy.

. “Insurar tocay offers

“Many optic and plans that

‘you can lefage to not only
“protect yofamily but tohelp _

you saveid achieve your

‘ dreams, th for yourself and

“" your loveenes during this life-

~ time,” MFlowers said.
He emhasised that a life
_' insuran@olicy was key to a
‘ financialan because it pro-
~ "vided picyholders with the
quickesnd safest way to build will only get $1,000 when you
an estaand provide financial die. On the other hand, if
._proteon for loved ones. you’ve taken out a life insur-
’ }. “Jf -wre saving with an ance policy for $500,000 or $1
_annuj and you die today, million, although you may have Max ‘PAYtor
. your mily will only get the only paid $1,000 or a few Post Housn SrTupio &
. valuef that annuity at the ee
_ | timeou died. If you have er ere
-» $1,0Gn the bank, your family SEE page 9B PH:327-7562

2G Y



||Blair Estate, Johnson Road, Step St, Bernard Road, Kool Acres, Fox Hill,
Yamacraw Beach Estate, Elizabeth Estate, Eastwood Sub, Colony Village, Nassau
East Estate, Winton Meadows, Mason’s Add, Leeward East & Twynam Heights, East
St, Market St, Wulff Road, Blue Hill Road, Montell Heights, Ridgeland Park and
all side corners, Pinewood Gardens, Joan’s and Domingo Heights, Bamboo Town,
South Beach, Marshall Road, Seven Hills and Gamble Heights. Pastel and Faith
Gardens, Sunshine Pars, Silver Gates, Golden Gates, Blue Hill and Bel Air Estate.

The public is also advised that all overdue payments should be made —
directly to the Corporation. Those payments can be made at Head Office on
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the Main Post Office
on East Hill Street.

Royal Holiday

is now seeking Sales representaives to join their
multi-million dollar Sales Team.

Are you goal oriented, energetic, well groomed,
self-motivated, ambitious,
between 21-35 years of age, love making money
and meeting people?



& DASHWELL FLOWERS

(Photo courtesy) If this sounds like you, your opportunity is here!
Interested persons should visit
Royal Holiday at the Wyndham Nassau Resort
ground floor opposite Crystal Sweets Restaurant or

Call 242-327-5595/8

Works By

ANTONIOUS ROBERTS





USPS ae
myo aiiiitay



Restaurant Managers

Betty K. Agencies (Nassau) Ltd.

Are you an energetic, hardworking “people person’ who seeks
a career-oriented position with an established company? .

| To our valued customers, please be
| advised that, until further notice, The
1; Betty K. Agencies (Nassau) Limited,
‘office and warehouse will be closed

Then this might be the position for you!

WV Cnr MAL for leading fast food franchise.

Requirements:

* Management experience and/or degree

to the general public on Saturdays. Our

warehouse will be closed from Friday 19th
thru Monday 22nd January 2007 for

renovations.

- We apologise for any inconvenience caused

and look forward to serving you in the
future. |

We take this opportunity to wish you and
your’s a very happy and prosperous new
year. |



¢ Strong leadership skills

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

e Exceptional customer service skills

¢ Team oriented attitude

SP Noy Venn COm vet E:T am

¢ Goal oriented manner

e Ability to work in a fast paced environment

¢ Results-driven approach

e Professional demeanor :

* Ability to work flexible hours, including late nights,
weekends and holidays

Great benefits include competitive salary commensurate with

experience, free Training and Development, Paid Vacation,
Health Insurance, Life Insurance and more!

Interested persons should submit Résumé to:
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-746
Nassau, Bahamas









GE | MONDAY, JANUARY 15,2007 INTERNATIONALEDITION

FLORIDA GATORS







FOND FAREWELL: Chris Leak says goodbye to his father, Curtis, on Saturday as the Gators celebrate their championship. ‘I wanted to bring Florida back to the top,’ he said.

EAK LEAVES
HIS LEGACY

Chris Leak took the national championship game MVP trophy from Danny
Wuerffel in Saturday’s celebration and solidified his place in Gators lore.

BY MIKE PHILLIPS
mphillips@MiamiHerald.com

GAINESVILLE — They
were singing and chanting and

cheering Saturday — more .

than 50,000 celebrating Flori-
da’s BCS national football
championship at the Swamp.
But amid the chants and
cheers, there was that one fro-
zen moment when the crowd
held its breath.

Danny Wuerffel had just
handed the title game’s MVP
trophy to Chris Leak, and as
the two quarterbacks stood
together, Leak finally had
reached a point in his career
where few thought he would
get.

He was standing toe-to-toe
with Wuerffel.

Wuerffel is the legend, the
Heisman winner who led UF
to its first national title, in
1996, the most beloved Gator
this side of Steve Spurrier.

Leak was the kid with so
much promise who always fell
short, an easy target for Gators
fans’ most cynical critics.
They questioned everything
from his arm strength to his
leadership, from his slow feet
to his willingness to slide at
the end of a run.

ROCKY START

Leak should have been
stronger, faster and played
with more courage, they said.
Even his coach, Urban Meyer,
said Leak needed to prove his
worth. In August, Meyer chal-
lenged Leak, saying the way
you measure quarterbacks at
Florida is by the number of
rings they have won, and Leak
hadn’t won any.

Leak leaves Florida with a
record 11,213 passing yards,,88





RATING THE QUARTERBACKS

Name (Years)

Chris Leak (2002-’06)

Rex Grossman (2000-02)
Danny Wuerffel (1993-’96)
Shane Matthews (1989-’92)
Steve Spurrier (1964-66)

touchdowns, and a couple of
invaluable rings, a survivor of
two coaches, three offensive
coordinators and a dramatic
change in the offense that
Meyer brought to UF last sea-
son.

“Did it start off rocky? No,
not at all,” Meyer said. “It
started off bizarre. There
wasn’t a lot of communication
there, but once you get to
know Chris, there’s not a
whole lot being said. But
there’s not a deeper person, or
better person.

“When good things happen
to good people it just makes it
that much more worth while.”

No one had more pressure
than Leak in UF’s 38-28 vic-
tory in the SEC championship
game. Maybe that’s why Leak
jumped so high on his 9-yard
touchdown run that gave UF a
10-0 lead. Leak scored, and
then ran to the corner of the
end zone alone, then bowed
and said a quick prayer.

Validation is a personal
thing.

He more than validated
himself in Glendale, Ariz.,
where he was the MVP in
Florida’s 41-14 romp against

Number of yards Gators freshman standout Percy Harvin gained in the BCS title game (60 receiving, 22 rushing).

How does Gators QB Chris Leak stack up against UF’s best?

Comp.-Att. Eff. Yds. TDs
895-1,458 140.4 11,213 88
667-1,110 146.7 9,164 ra
708-1,170 163.6 10,875 114
722-1,202 137.6 9,287 14

392-692 123.7 4,848 36

Ohio State, outplaying Heis-
man winner Troy Smith, who
completed just four passes for
35 yards and was intercepted
once. Leak completed his first
nine passes and threw for 213
yards and a touchdown, and
afterward, when he clutched
the national title trophy, he
was all but in tears.

“My legacy is, I wanted to
bring Florida back to the top,”
said Leak, who vowed as a
freshman to win a national
title at UF. He won more than
that against Ohio State — he
won acceptance from UF fans.

UF receiver Dallas Baker,
one of Leak’s closest friends,
said: “You could see the love
he got today. But I think the
love has always been there.”

Not always. Leak heard the
boos this season in the game
against Kentucky on Sept. 23,
and he heard the crowd chant
Tim Tebow’s name the minute
the freshman took the field in
the season opener Sept. 2. But
Leak never complained and
shared the spotlight with
Tebow, giving Meyer a lethal
hybrid to throw at opponents.

Leak’s unselfishness made
the two-quarterback system





work, and he admirably made
sure there was never any con-
troversy. But in the end, it was
Leak’s team, and Leak’s cham-
pionship, and you could see it
in his eyes Saturday as he
finally soaked in everything he
had dreamed.

LEAK ‘EMOTIONAL’

“It was a very emotional
deal,” he said of the ceremony.
“J still have to catch my
breath.”

But if you ask Wuerffel,
Leak should have no problem
getting over it.

“The real reason I’m here,”
Wuerffel said, “is that I have
an incredible amount of
respect and admiration for
Chris Leak. He’s gone through
a lot of highs and lows, and a
lot of adversity. And he’s han-
dled himself with so much
pride and so much poise.”

The ceremony got to Leak.

“It [winning the national
championship] really didn’t
hit me until I was out there
with my teammates,” he said.
“Tl never forget the Swamp.
ll miss it a lot. And I’ll be call-
ing these guys the rest of my
life.”



___MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

WE Osis) ] mcg

Number of total yards by Ohio State’s potent offense, the fewest amassed in BCS title-game history.

Name

Lutrell Alford
Markihe Anderson
Brandon Antwine
Dallas Baker
Derek Baldry

Jim Barrie
Roderick Blackett
Andrew Blaylock
Nyan Boateng
Cam Brewer
Nick Brooks
Andre Caldwell
Miguel Carodine
Curtis Carr

Tate Casey
Simon Codrington
Joe Cohen

Telly Concepcion
Riley Cooper
Jemalle Cornelius
Brian Crum
Jermaine Cunningham
John Curtis

Jon Demps
Jamaal Deveaux
Dustin Doe
Javier Estopinan
Earl Everett

John Fairbanks
Jarred Fayson
Andrew Fritze
Marcus Gilbert
Darryl Gresham Jr.
Mark Guandolo
Michael Guilford
Steven Harris
Derrick Harvey
Percy Harvin
Eddie Haupt
Chris Hetland
Brad Hiers

Tim Higgins
Corey Hobbs
Cade Holliday
Jamar Hornsby
Bo Howard
Maurice Hurt
Joey Ijjas
Cornelius Ingram
Kyle Jackson
Brandon James
Carl Johnson
Andrew Johnson
Tony Joiner

AJ. Jones

Bobby Kane

Billy Latsko
' Chris Leak

Reggie Lewis
Markus Manson
Lawrence Marsh
Tremaine McCollum
Jermaine McCollum
Ray McDonald
Clint McMillan
Carlton Medder
Drew Miller
Kestahn Moore
Jarvis Moss
Dorian Munroe
Louis Murphy
Eric Nappy
Reggie Nelson
David Nelson
Kyle Newell
Moise Paul
Jonathan Phillips
Wondy Pierre-Louis
Chris Pintado
Trent Pupello
Jacques Rickerson
Steve Rissler
baryon Robinson
Butch Rowley
Eric Rutledge
Terron Sanders
Vernon Shelton
Lamont Sheppard
Brandon Siler
Eric Sledge

Ryan Smith
James Smith
Joey Sorrentino
Brandon Spikes
Ryan Stamper
Jim Tartt

Tim Tebow
Bryan Thomas
Kenneth Tookes
Phil Trautwein
Chevon Walker
Jason Watkins
Eric Wilbur

Mon Williams
Justin Williams
Mike Williamson
Ronnie Wilson
Cody Worton
DeShawn Wynn





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~

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Hometown

Gainesville

Fort Myers
Garland, Texas
New Smyrna Beach
Gainesville

Tampa

Pompano Beach
Durham, N.C.
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Gainesville
Warner Robins, Ga.
Tampa

Gainesville
Gainesville
Longview, Texas
Miami

Melbourne

Tampa

Clearwater

Fort Meade
Woodbine, Ga.
Stone Mountain, Ga.
Rockledge
Pensacola

Port St. Lucie
Jasper

Miami

Webster
Celebration
Tampa

Ponce Inlet

Fort Lauderdale
Roanoke, Va.
Hollywood

Quincy

Miami

Greenbelt, Md.
Virginia Beach, Va.
Merritt Island
Leesburg, Ga.

Bartow
Northville, Mich.
Oviedo
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Ponte Vedra Beach
Milledgeville, Ga.
Clearwater
Hawthorne
Neptune Beach
St. Augustine
Durham, N.C.
Parkland
Haines City
Tampa

Coconut Creek
Gainesville
Charlotte, N.C.
Jacksonville
Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Augusta, Ga.
Miami

Miami

Belle Glade
Oviedo
Clermont
Sarasota
Arlington, Texas
Denton, Texas
Miami

St. Petersburg
Gainesville
Melbourne
Wichita Falls, Texas
Tampa
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Wellington
Naples

Miami

Tampa

St. Augustine
Sarasota
Gainesville
Orlando
Gainesville
Bradenton
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Orlando

Apopka
Diamond Bar, Calif.
Gainesville
Ocala

Shelby, N.C.
Jacksonville
Sopchoney
Jacksonville
Zephyrhills
Jacksonville
Voorhees, NJ.
Fort Myers
Lakeland
Winter Park
Mesquite, Texas
Folkston, Ga.
Winter Park
Pompano Beach
Homestead
Cincinnati, Ohio






THE TRIBUNE



Still no
response
from
Immigration

B By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THERE has been no
response to The Tribune's
November 7 request for
Department of Immigration
records on permanent residency
approvals.

And attempts to follow up
on the request have revealed
another pressing deficiency -
that it is virtually impossible for
the public to contact the
Department of Immigration.

In November, The Tribune
delivered a letter to Director of
Immigration Mr Vernon Bur-
rows and Minister of Immigra-
tion Mr Shane Gibson asking
for a list of all people granted
permanent residency since
August 11 - the date when US
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith's
application was approved.

Through acquiring this list
an assessment could be made
of the claim by Mr Gibson that
the speed with which Ms Smith
received her status was an
example of generally improved
rates of efficiency at the depart-
ment or, as critics have claimed,
due to preferential treatment.

On Friday, attempting to fol-
low up on the request, The Tri-
bune found that none of the
numbers listed at the depart-
ment were answered, despite
calls being made to all exten-
sions over a period of hours
throughout the day.

The numbers included the
general head of department, the
director of immigration, the
deputy director and. the assis-
tant director.

This was a repeat of the
experience of at least a month
and a half of attempts to reach
the department.

When a call was made to the
Ministry of Immigration, a
member of staff, when queried
as to why this might be the case,

. or whether she could advise the
~'use of an alternative number,
‘said that a lot of people had
been calling in with the same
complaint. ,

"I don't know what to tell
you. You're going to go up
there (to the Department of
Immigration), because we've
had a lot of people calling in
saying the same thing," she said.

"IT don't know what's hap-
pening. Man, we can't even
transfer you that way - their
lines are different from ours."

_ Questioned as to how min-
istry staff contact the depart-
‘ment, she said it was "difficult"
and mainly done through their
messenger.

"We call, yeah, but we have
to wait the same amount of time
as you guys wait - waiting, hop-
ing they answer," she added.

Meanwhile, another key
public institution is also prov-
ing difficult to contact. On Fri-
day, a member of the public
contacted The Tribune to say
that all extensions listed for the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion, including the "Water
emergencies" line, also rang
"endlessly."



of things we
think, say or do

“11s it the TRUTH?
2.|s it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?












4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to







@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government has been
accused of "massaging" unem-
ployment figures - and taking
more people on to the govern-
ment's payroll - to disguise the
reality of the levels of unem-
ployment.

Speaking on Island FM's
Parliament Street, FNM sena-

tor Carl Bethel said, Ahe gov-,
‘the sta- -

ernment had "fixed"
tistics to create the appearance
that the problem is not as large
as it is, by creating a category
of people called "discouraged
workers."

These statistics are disguis-
ing the fact that youth unem-
ployment in particular is



LOCAL NEWS.

"almost chronic," he said.

He further suggested that
in recent years the government
had "spent a lot of money it
doesn't have" attempting to
alleviate the figures by hiring
more people.

"[ think that when the hard
numbers are in you will see a
quite significant increase for
this country in the number of
persons who are on the gov-
ernment's payroll over the last
two years."

According to Bethel, while
unemployment figures are
recorded as having dropped -
from 10.1 per cent to 7.6 per
cent - at the same time the
number of "discouraged work-
ers" has risen.

These people are those who





fi CARL Bethel

have told the department of
statistics that they have "giv-

Water leak repaired downtown

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

CONSUMER complaints
about low water pressure
resulted in the discovery of a
leak on the main water line to
the downtown area, according
to Glenn Laville, acting deputy
manager of the Water and
Sewerage Corporation.

Mr Laville said: “This morn-
ing We started getting some
calls in about some low pres-
sure complaints tin the down-
town area. We found that there
was a possible leak on the main
water line that is feeding the
downtown area,” continued Mr
Laville.

He explained that a crew of
workers had pinpointed the
leak between Nassau Street
and the British Colonial Hotel.

“It’s an underground leak
but what we are doing right
now is re-routing some of the
flows to see if we can improve

; Umbrellas
Loungs ;





Decorative Rod Seis

Roller Shades

§ sixes, Natural & Fruftwood from

the pressure,” said Mr Lav-
ille.

The Water and Sewerage
executive said that a night crew
would be sent to locate the
leak, and he said that repairs
were expected to be completed
by Saturday morning.

Last month, the government
announced that the Water and
Sewerage Corporation had
embarked on a campaign to
win back disenchanted cus-
tomers through improved
water quality and quantity.

Last year the corporation's
net loss was $3.1 million com-
pared to the $7.8 million which
was the net income tor 2004,
according to the audited finan-
cial statements for the period
which ended December 31,
2005.

The government subsidy for
2005 was $15.5 million, several
million more than.the $12 mil-
lion the government gave the
corporation in 2004.

Last year, the corporation's
operating revenue was $37.4
million, in excess of two mil-
lion dollars more than what it
operated with in the previous
year. For New Providence
there was a modest growth of
$1.2 million. Mr Roberts said
the largest single factor in the
latter was the newly-acquired
Treasure Cay operations in
Abaco.

Operating expenses for 2005
totalled $46.6 million compared
with $37.1 million for 2004. The
increases in cost were mostly
to improve customer service
delivery like the reverse osmo-
sis water purchases that
increased by $2.5 million and
water importation costs, Mr
Roberts said.

The importation carried
with it a $2.7 million increased
expense, the costs of hiring
additional vessels during the
winter months and increased
fuel costs.

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blue, green-or terracotta

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3 sizes, White & Alabaster from










MONDAY, JANUARY 1

en up hope" of finding a job.
This figure is not included in
the "unemployed" category,

‘ said Bethel.

Claim

"They ask - are you working,
and he says no I'm not...then
they ask another question - are
you actively looking for a job,
and he says no I've lost
hope..:I've looked everywhere."

“And they say ‘ah, he's a dis-
couraged worker" and they
don't count him," said Mr
Bethel.

According to Mr Bethel
unemployment, particularly
among young people, had
remained high under the cur-
rent administration, contrary to
their claims.

"The fact of the matter is
that everywhere I go when I'm

5, 2007, PAGE 3

eee)






campaigning ['m running into
young people who are unem-
ployed and whether they are
counted as discouraged work-
ers or counted as unemployed,
the fact is, they are not work-
ing," he said.

He said young men are more
regularly unemployed, and
something needed to be done
to address this.

"You have to cr Y
jobs than people co gon
stream to look for them in or sede
to in real terms reduce unem-
ployment."

The term "discouraged work-
er" needed to be redefined - if







the person had voluntarily cho-
sen not to be tn the labour mar-
ket, they should not be taken
into account in unemployment
figures, he si aid.

If, however, they would take

a job if it were offered to them,
then they should, he claimed.





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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
i
NAY NU a

Perth eae §=Finnish ambassador designate









DAME Marguerite Pindling, wife of former prime minister the late Sir Lynden Pindling,
appeared on ZNS Radio’s Drive Time talk show on Wednesday, January 10, on the 40th
anniversary of Majority Rule in the Bahamas. Dame Marguerite (left), who was made a Dame
Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (DCMG) as part of the Queen’s New
Year’s Honours List, discussed her role in Bahamian politics. The talk show is hosted by Phillip-
pa Russell.

@ PASI Patokallio, Ambassador Designate of Finland (right) presented his Letters of Credence,
to Arthur Hanna, Governor General of The Bahamas, last Thursday at Government House. In
background from left are Protocol Officers Terry Archer and Carol Young.

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)

Features
Large Open Living Room with French Doors
Spacious outdoor patio for entertainment
270 Degree Wraparound balcony on second floor
Open Kitchen Plan
Additional Living space from converted garage
Detached Garage
Fully enclosed lot with lush native foliage
Bars and Security Alarm, Automatic Gate
Paved Driveway into property
= Underground utilities at the lot

ASKING PRICE $550,000 @ HIS Excellency Pasi Patokallio, Ambassador Designate of Finland, presented a copy of his

Location: Greenwood Road - off Village Road
Lot Size: 200 x 144 average

House Size: 3200 Square Feet

Bedrooms: 3 (Optional 4th)

Bathrooms: 3.5



Seu Letters of Credence to Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred Mitchell last
| a | Wednesday atthe Ministry of Foreign Affairs on East Hill Street.

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

PARR SEN eee wr

. o¢ ANDREW, :
SCHOOL ©

The International School of The Babanias
FOUNDED 1938

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS







A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew’s School is offered
annually to students attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.

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These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10,
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e Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including
grades 8 and 9

4dr Crew ° Be of the highest academic standing, maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above

eee e Be at least 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31 st August
full power. 2008

Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor
of the student’s school. The students awarded these scholarships will be
expected to follow a full programme of BGCSE and advanced courses leading
to graduation at the end of year 12.

The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates
will sit the scholarship examinations at 9am on Saturday, 10 March 2007 at
St Andrew’s School. Successful examination candidates will be short-listed
and interviewed.

$29,550.00
3.0L V6 Automatic






Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary mes
schools in New Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be
obtained from the administration office of St Andrew’s School.




The worlds
best selling
mid size truck Further details are available from St Andrew's School, telephone: 1-242-324-

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Application forms should be returned to: -

Robert F. Wade

Principal

St Andrew’s School

The International School of The Bahamas 2
PO Box EE 17340 ~
Nassau, Bahamas ':

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PART OF YOUR LIFE







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007









































2005
No. 00453

Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
In The Supreme Court
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel or let of land
having an area of 54,890.88 square fee situate in the
Island of Crooked Island one of The Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

9

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act 1959.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
FLORENCE ANDERSON.

NOTICE OF PETITION

Notice is hereby given that Florence Anderson of the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence
(hereinafter called “the Petitioner”) claims to be the owner
of the unencumbered fee simple estate in possession of
the land hereinafter described, that is to say:

ALL THAT piece parcel or let of land having an area
of 54,890.88 square fee situate in the Island of Crooked
Island one of The Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and being a lot of land situate on the southern
side of The Queens Highway bounded on the NORTH
by the said Queens Highway and running thereon One
Hundred and Fifty one and Eighty Hundredths (151.80)
feet on the EAST by land said to be the property of Lucy
Winter and running thereon Three Hundred and Sixty one
and Sixty Hundredths (361.60) feet on the SOUTH by
land now or formerly the property of The Anderson Family
and running thereon One Hundred and Fifty one and
Eighty Hundredths (151.80) feet and on the WEST by
land said to be the property of Virginia Deleveaux and
running thereon Three Hundred Sixty one and Sixty
Hundredths (361.60) feet.

A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:-

a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
_b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes situate
at Mareva House, 4 George Street, Nassau Bahamas
-c) On the notice board at the office of the Administrator
on Crooked Island

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
- recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 15th day
of March A.D., 2007 file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner and the undersigned a statement of their
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to
bg filed therewith together with.a plan ef the area ¢laimed
and an abstract of their title to the said area claimed by
them. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of claim on or before the 15th day of March,
A.D. 2007 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 10th day of January 2007.

McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
Mareva House ~—
4 George Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Attorneys for the Petitioner

“Teach Me. Q Lord, Thy Way". Psalm G35

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites application from qualified Christian teachers for the
following positions for the 2007-2008 school year.

Math (Gr.7-12)
Geography/History(Gr.10-12)

Applicants must:

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing to .-
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian School

Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of Specialization

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

Have at least two years teaching experience in the relevant
subject area with excellent communication skills

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students for all
examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.

Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra curricular
programmes.

pplication must be picked up at the High School Office on +
“Girley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae, recent
coloured photograpgh and three references to: -

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application in January 23rd, 2007



BUSINESS

Cheney defends bank

THE TRIBUNE



records investigations

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Vice President Dick Cheney
said Sunday the Pentagon and
CIA are not violating people’s
rights by examining the bank-
ing and credit records of hun-
dreds of Americans and others
suspected of terrorism or espi-

. onage in the United States.

Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-
Texas, the new chairman of the
House Intelligence Committee,
said his panel will be the judge
of that.

National security letters per-
mit the executive branch to seek
records about people in terror-
ism and spy investigations with-
out a judge’s approval or grand
jury subpoena.

“The Defense Department




mas.

explanation that may

NOTICE

COMAS RESEARCH LTD.

Notice is hereby given that at an Extra Ordinary General
Meeting of the above-named Company held on the 1ith
day of April, 2006, the following resolutions were passed.

RESOLVED that the Company be voluntarily wound up.

FURTHER RESOLVED that the Liquidator is Chancellors
Corporate Services Limited, P.O.Box N-4589, Nassau, The Baha-

All persons having Claims against the above-named Com-
pany are requested to submit particulars of such claims and
proof thereof in writing to the liquidator, Chancellors Corporate
Services Limited, PO. Box N-4589, Nassau, The Bahamas no
later than the 14th day of February, 2007 after which the books
will be closed and the assets of the Company will be distributed.

Notice is also given in accordance with the Companies Act,
that a General Meeting of the Members of the above-named
Company will be held at the offices of Chancellors Chambers,
Samana Hill, No. 14 Village Road (North), on the 14th day
of February, 2007 at 10 0’ clock in the afternoon for the pur-
pose of having an account laid before them showing the man-
ner in which the winding up has been conducted and that the
property of the Company disposed of and. hearing

liquidator, and so also of determining by Resolution
manner in which the books, accounts and documents of
the Company and the liquidator, shall’~be
Dated this 15th day of January, 2007.

CHANCELLORS CORPORATE SERVICES LIMITED -

gets involved because we’ve got
hundreds of bases inside the
United States that are potential
terrorist targets,” Cheney said.

“The Department of Defense

has legitimate authority in this’

area. This is an authority that

goes back three or four decades.

It was reaffirmed in the Patriot
Act,” he said. “It’s perfectly
legitimate activity. There’s noth-
ing wrong with it or illegal. It
doesn’t violate people’s civil
rights.”

In a statement Sunday, Reyes
promised. that his panel would
take a careful look at those
claims.

“Any expansion by the
department into intelligence col-
lection, particularly on U.S. soil,
























any
the
the

be given by

disposed of.





is something our committee will
thorough review,” Reyes said.

“We want our intelligence
professionals to have strong
tools that will enable them to
interrupt the planning process
of our enemies and to stop
attacks against our country,” he
said. “But in doing so, we also
want those tools to comply fully
with the law and the Constitu-
tion.”

The Pentagon and the CIA,
to a lesser extent, have used this
little-known power, officials
said. The FBI, the lead agency
on domestic counterterrorism
and espionage, has issued thou-
sands of such letters since the
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

The letters have generated
criticism and court challenges
from civil liberties advocates
who claim they invade the pri-
vacy of Americans’ lives, even
though banks and other finan-
cial institutions typically turn
over the financial records vol-
untarily.

The vast majority of national
security letters are issued by the
FBI, but in rare circumstances
they have been used by the CIA
before and after Sept. 11,
according to a U.S. intelligence
official. The CIA has used these
noncompulsory letters in espi-
onage investigations and other
circumstances, the official said.

The New York Times, which
reported Sunday on the expand-
ed use of the technique by the
Pentagon and CIA, said mili-
tary intelligence officers have
sent the letters in up to 500
investigations.

“This is a dramatic story, but
I think it’s important for peo-
ple to understand here this is a
legitimate security effort that’s
been under way for a long time,
and it does not represent a new
departure from the standpoint
of our efforts to protect our-
selves against terrorist attacks,”
the vice president said.

Cheney was interviewed on
“Fox News Sunday.”

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The Entrance Examination for St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport and
St. Andrew’s School, Exuma will take place on Saturday,

February 3rd, 2007 at 9:00a.m.

Applications ¢an be collected from the Schools between the
hours of 8:00am. and 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

Applications Forms and $25.00 Applications Fee must be
returned to the School no later than Friday, January 26th, 2007

Vaca ncies

St. John’s College is now accepting ‘Applications for the
students from Kindergarten through Grade Six. Kindergarten
screening will begin during the second week ‘in February



SENIOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR





Information Technology

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas. Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to lacal and
international cents.























An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Information Technology
team, The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Information
Technology.

ea alent cc cS
Core Responsibilities

® Develop, maintain, support and optimize the organization's network
infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communications, and
telecommunications systems.

® Ensure hardware and software is maintained and data is secured through
proper back-ups and staff training,

® Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentation to
secure procedures and prevent system failure. This includes IT Disaster
Recovery / Business Continuity planning. ;

® Provide-management and direction for end-user support function in support of
business operations, inclusive of management of the Help-Desk function.

® Manage and direct software, hardware, network, telecommunications and web
providers to enhance operational efficiencies and ROL based on the bank’s
business objectives.

Desired Qualifications

® Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well recognized
university.

® A minimum of five years progressive professional IT experience preferably in
the Financial Services Industry,

® IT based training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from
accredited institutions will be advantageous,

® Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs:
ielecommunications, Web-based applications, client-server applications, and
PC-based software applications,

2 Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows-Servers, Microsoft Windows XP,
Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Office and Microsoft Exchange Server
systems.

® Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills,

Closing Date: January 26, 2007

Be AS pace etch Se cata Me Np neta eT te
Contact

Hunan Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau. Bahamas

Fan: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment butterfieldbank. bs

www. buttertieldbank.bs

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MANAGER, BANKING & CUSTODY

BANKING DEPARTMENT

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join our dynamic Banking Services team.
‘The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

ensansnmnnnanannnnnnnanannanannnnnnasnnsssspasasanssnssssssnsssusssnnssassssssesasusnssssssssssssssnssssssssnnssstassansssssnssnsssssessnssecscsssssssnssssssnssssssconsmsstasaassssscsitst

Core Responsibilities

® ‘To manage and control the banking-and custody departments of the Bank ina
cohesive, well organized and risk oriented manner.

To effectively manage the Relationship Management Team of both banking
and custody so as a first class service is offered to all clients ina proactive
manner,

‘To assist with the development and implementation of new products and

systems as may be required in order to further enhance productivity and
efficiency.

To work closely with the Assistant Manager of Operational Risk
Management to ensure procedures and processes remain fully in fine with the
group’s strategy relating to Enterprise & Operational Risk.

To ensure, at all times, the banking and custody operations are effectively
managed to ensure processing of all deposit and payments, foreign exchange
and security transactions are carried out technically correct, without error and
within procedures,

‘To ensure full aware of all applicable laws, regulations, bank policies and
procedures and that they are implemented effectively on a day to day basis
within the department.

‘To assist in the preparation of the banking and custody budgets and for the
effective management of revenues and costs,

Desired Qualifications

Relevant Degree or related discipline from a well recognized university.

A minimum of ten years progressive Banking/Custody experience in the
Financial Services Industry.

A good proven background in professional and experience client facing role
High degree of awareness and compliance orientation

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpessonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills.

Closing DatesJanuary 26, 2007

Contact

Haman Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fas: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recrnitment@ butterfieldbank.bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs

nae

Butterfield Bank



7 @

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7

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 | THE TRIjNE BUSINESS










Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs —

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAH/MAS

CENTRE FOR-CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSIONERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semeste 2007













Centre for Continuing Education and
Extension Services (CEES)



Personal Development Schedule
Spring Semester 2007

'
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBKS
This course is for the beginner who knows PRESENTATIONS This coUrrains new and eting small
very ite about computers and does nat This workshop is designed to provide business Cepreneurs (fewehan 20
understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the employees) organizing anchanaging thelr
covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsaft PowerPoint, It accounting yg QuickBooksro software.
extensive hands-on practice using various focuses on developing effective and dynamic Students will rn how lo set their

CORRECTION



, a 2 software, including: PowarPoint presentations. company fileShart of accous, budget and
SEW 804 Bedroom Decorating will meet | (ieee jes” aan fac mia
/ {ii} Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite; None i
; (iii) Microsoft Access ~ Database Date: Thursday, Bth March 2007 Pre-requisite: Ne ti
Management. Time: 9:30am ~ 4:30pm Begins: Tetay,
Saturdays for 10 weeks from 10am to 1pm Dain: te ae
Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: = 6 Ws \
2 1" Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007 Fees: $160.00 Venue: CEEomputer fab
beginning February 24, 2007 and not 1 - 10pm sa , a
y Section 01 (CEES) INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | A
This course covers basic concepts of WEBPAGE DESIGN: Mxsuop
. ; , 7 Re Saturday, 3rd February, 2007 Information Technology. The course provides Targeting persons whCyq jike to create
as p rev | O U S V a V e rt | S e = 10:00am - 1:00pm training in these areas: Basic Hardware their personal web Pagyic course
: Section 02 (CEES) Proficiency. Application Features Proficiency, will cover Web page City Web site
Duration: 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML ecitic topics will
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. include Formatting, Gap. mutimedia,
. Tuition: $450.00 Forms and Tables and io, of web pages.
‘ , Pre-requisite: None. :
f 5 1 1 ; COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Begins: Wednesday, 7th February Pre-requisite: Participanlss pe
O f U rt e f | Nn O it Y ) at | O Nn O Nn T | S O l a Nn y ot eC t This course covers the advanced concepts 2007 computer Itp and have
with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm a basic knoe of
. 1 various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word proces
a S ect of t h eC C E E S offe rl Nn S | eC as eC G O nt act (} Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dates: Ast & 2nd Me 2007
’ 5 (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00 \
‘ J i (iil) Microsoft Access - Database Time: 9:30am - 4:30
t h 1 t Management. PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration: 2 days
i O O i | Nn a O I. This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Compute,
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications | technology systems for use in information Fees: $550.00
‘ Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007 — environments. The course will cover the ‘
Time: 6:00pm - 9:06pm following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Duration: 12 weeks ‘ Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

3 2 5 5 { 1 4 Fees: $550.00 Pre-requisite: None
= Bagins: Monday 12th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm ~ 7:30pm :



Monday & Wednesday
3 2 8 ze 0 0 9 3 Duration; 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting applic,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, 's,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course.

328-1936
302-4300 ext. 5202

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu:

325-5714 320-000)

FS

CEES regrets.any inconvenience caused.

Sh

as



~ 328-1936 + 302-4300 ext. 5204

Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007



Have you done an

s oy COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE |
NO. 0. DESCRIPTION |
special for yourself today? ' | | |
, ACCOUNTING
Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’s —accagoo. —-01._—s ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm MoryWed 12-Feb 10wks $250
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Il 6:00-8:00pm — Tke/Thurs 13-Feb 1Owks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ilt 6:00-8:00om Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10. wks $300

With one of our courses, you can gain
new job skills, increase your chances ior
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success

in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up
for a course today.






























BUSINESS ;

BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225
CUST9OO 01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs 22-Feb {day $170
BUSI904 01 — INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs {-Mar 1Owks $225

COMPUTERS

COMPS01 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-00pra Mon 5-Feb 12wks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 16:00am-1:00pm Sat 3-Feb . 12 wks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II §:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb i2wks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 7-Feb 12wks $450
COMP 941 01 ° QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 6wks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR ~ -§:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 12-Feb 12 wks $500
COMP960 01 EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 930am-4:30om Thurs §-Mar {day $160
COMP930 01 WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs/Fri 1-Mar 2 days $550

COSMETOLOGY

COSM802. Of MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb Bwks $225
cOsMe04 —-0t.-—S ss MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Fep 8wks $225
COSM807 = 01—sNAVL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs 26-Feb 6 wks $500

DECOsOO 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I §:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 8wks $225
DECOBO1 01 — INTERIOR DECORATING fl 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 8wks $250
FLOR8O0 O1 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 10 wks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN Il 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10wks $250

ENQUIRIES FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN Hl 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 1-Mar 10wks $300
_ Email: perdev@cob.edu.bs
7 ENGLISH
All fees are included with the exception of ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WAITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225

the application fee of $40.00 {ane time).

ESL 900 O1 ENGLISH AS ASECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:30pm MonvFri 26-Feb 10 wks $250





OEES reserves the right lo change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedue .
and Course Materials.

HEALTH & FITNESS :

MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 92-Feb 10 wks $465
MASGSO1 Ot MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm = Mon 26-Feb 10. wks, $620
LTHOOO —-«dOT.-~—=sGROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed —«-28-Fed 10 wks $400



| Contact the Coordinator ANAGEMENT

MGMT9—00. ~=«01.~Ss HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | 6:00-9:30pm Thurs 8-Feb 12wks $250
MGMT901 - O1 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Ii 6:00-9:30pm Man 5-Feb 12wks $300

MEDICAL
MEDT9GO 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $225

SEWING :
SEW 800 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 1Owks $225
SEW 802 O1 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING IE — 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $250

SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING! 6:00-9:09pm Tues 27-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING Il 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb iO wks $250
SEW811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10wks $225

SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING | 4:00-10:00pm — Sat 24-Feb 1Qwks $225





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IE COLLEGE (

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

EDUCATING & TRAINING Barameans

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an-overview of the fundamentals of superior

customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee

motivation.
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: To be announced

Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $160.00

WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.

Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $550.00

| All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 fone time). When submitting

application, kinclly provide copies of the first four pages of your passpart. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Contact the Coordinator - p erdev(@cob.edu.bs

THE COLLEGE OF THE. BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massag therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving

Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
_ Time: §:00-8:00pm

Duration: 10Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
tapics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy- —
Fundamentals or Essential Oils»Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.
Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major

topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
componenis of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.
Starting: Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
_ Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs



Or THE BAHAMAS

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 7B



Financing for new
port still concerns

FROM page 1B

Mr van den Bossche said his
firm will look into the ques-
tion of whether such a port can
be financed and how.

The third phase is a man-
agement issue to determine the
history of the old port and
institutional framework of the
new one.

‘Prime

Minister Perry

’ Christie said that while the

Government was convinced of
the soundness of the project,
it recognisied the reality that it
will not compromise on good
business judgment.

The Prime Minister added
that a public/private partner-
ship will work to ensure the
new port is run efficiently and
profitably.

“Opportunities will also
become available to ensure
that the Bahamians participate

in its ownership and manage-
ment. Whatever we do, signif-

icant Bahamian ownership is ,

the order of the day, at any
new facility of this order and
kind in the Bahamas,” the
Prime Minister added.

“J want to be very careful,”
Mr Christie said when asked
if physical work will start
before the end of the year.
“The reason we have a pub-
lic/private partnership was for
our partners to make those
decisions, but I wanted them
to start this month.”

Michael Maura, of Tropical
Shipping, said the industry was
heavily involved in discussions
on the ramifications of relo-
cating the shipping companies
from the downtown Nassau
area, and said that while the
industry was supportive of the
relocation, the cost and financ-
ing was a concern.

Mr Matra said the new con-
tainer port will have to be self-
sustaining.

“It should not depend to any
great degree on subsidies from
the Bahamian people,” he
explained. “It needs to be as
efficient as we can afford in
order to keep the cost of living
at a reasonable level. All of
the shipping companies and
stevedoring companies and
land owners are in total sup-
port of doing what we all need
to do to play our part.”

Mr Maura said the shipping
companies did have concerns
on the timing of the port relo-
cation.

He added: “Part of the chal-
lenge will be to introduce some
kind of phased approach on
how we can move, because you
can’t just cut the ribbon one
day at the port and tell every-
body just show up. There is
going to be a lot of thought
that goes into how you are
going to relocate. And that is
why we are looking at compa-
nies like Ecorys that have that
expertise to guide us.”

AMENDED DIVIDEND NOTICE

Premier Commercial Real Estate

Investment Corporation Limited

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors of PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL
ESTATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED has resolved to declare a
dividend of 60 cents {90- 60) per share for all shareholders of record as of the lose
of business on the 22"â„¢ day of January, 2007, the same to be payable on the 26 day
of January, 2007.

This dividend declaration is in substitution for the dividend which was previously
declared in error and unpaid for 6 cent its ($0.06) per share for all shareholders of record
as of the close of business i in the 21§ day of December, 2006, and was stated to be
payable on the 27” day of December, 2006. That former dividend declaration has
been formally rescinded by the Board of Directors of the company and is now null
and void.

All payments shall be made through Experta Trust Company (Bahamas). Limited, qth
Floor, Trade Winds Building, Nassau, Bahamas, the Administrator for the Company,
pursuant t £9 the instructions of the relevant shareholders on the files of company as
at the 22° day of January, 2007.

Melanie Rouse
Assistant Secretary

Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of

GLOBAL FEE
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST:

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated
recovery management. The successful candidate will also be
responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
management, maintenance of all fee agreements, as well as
document management including filing and imaging of
correspondence.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting,
Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three
(3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution.

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution,
communication, organization and pc skills. The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR

Email: betty.roberts@citigroup.com

Deadline for application is Friday, January 19, 2007.





| -Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
\ ow - Lowest closing pri in last 52 week

‘PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007











Legal Notice

NOTICE

DMK VALLEY LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DMK VALLEY LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Sar aS a Ta EAS REA

Ja Poe
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)








=)

Home

USINESS




Depot chiefs

THE TRIBUNE




get nice ‘goodbyes’

@ By PATTI BOND and
MARIA SAPORTA
Cox News Service

ATLANTA — Bob Nardelli’s
controversial exit from Home Depot
this month was scripted before he
ever walked in the door of the
Atlanta-based retail giant.

The $210 million payout Nardelli
got for leaving its helm may have
been the final chapter of this cor-
ner-office tale, but it certainly wasn’t
a surprise ending. The beginning of
the story, woven by interlocking
board and business ties, a “super

Well established Wholesaler requires
warehouse workers. Persons must be well
groomed, well mannered, and willing to

work. Starting salary is $10,000, increasing
to 15,600 after a three month probationary

period.

PNSor
merchandisers

EViS
will

required
dates

experienced
be team

leaders. Persons must be well groomed,
well mannered, and willing to work.
BSyevaehoneg salary is $13,000 and after nate
three month probationary period the salary
will be increased to $15,000 along with an
: tatere nea Ker Company offers sood enters

No phone. oily mee Apply in person at
ne ghtbourn Trading Co., Mackey Street,
next door to Nassau. Hotels and Resturants.

\Pricing Information As Of:
iThursday, 11 January 200 7





: Securit y
Abaco Markets




1.85 0.54

12.05 10.25 Bahamas Property Fund

8.03 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.76
41.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.75
1:49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.25
10.00 9.05 Cable Bahamas 10.00
2.20 1.64 Colina Holdings 1.90
12.54 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 12.54
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.76
2.88 2.26 Doctor's Hospital 2.50
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.79
12.20 10.70 Finco 12.02
14.45 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.15 |
12.55 10.00 Focol 12.55
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55
410.20 7.15 ICD Utilities 7.20
49.10 : J! S. Johnson 8.60

Premier Real Estat








14.60
8.00

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)



14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings







S2wk-Hi ‘Fund Name









NA V
W7.3216 1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund 1.321587"
B3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728***
2.5002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**
1 2175 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450****



o



FUNG. cant lB 0 nin inainit
{HEX CLOSE 742.

oh “YIELD -





AARKET TERMS




{ARE







6 - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume



e - Current day's weighted price for daily volume






Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
}
= . Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings





: 0.00
5 0.00
8.03 0,00
0.80 0.04 1,500
41.75 0.00 .
41.25 0.00 4,000
10.00 0.00 600
1.90 0.00 500
12.54 0.00 850
4.83 0.07
2.50 0.00
5.79 0.00
12.20 0.18 3,000
14.45 0.30 2,000 ©
12.55 0.00
0.55 0.00
7.20 0.00 4,250
8.60 0.00

000

Last Price Weekly







Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX ~ The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Pec AntON GAEL

wanna

e

lawyer” and directors who just
couldn’t say no, held all the clues to
the outcome six years later.

It all started with a single turn of
events at General Electric in late
2000.

It was then that legendary GE
chief Jack Welch was stepping down
after 20 years as chief of the Amer-
ican icon. The three-way contest for
the top of GE, considered a prime
breeding ground for some of capi-
talism’s best leaders, had captured
corporate America at the time. The
“losers,” as the going notion went,
would be immediately snapped up.

Home Depot directors, already
in the midst of a search for a top
executive, were enamored with the
horse race.

Home Depot co-founder and
then-CEO Arthur Blank had over-
seen an incredible growth streak,
but he had not identified a No. 2 to
succeed him, and directors were get-
ting antsy. as

Although director Ken Langone,
who helped found Home Depot in
1978, said at the time that it wasn’t a
“panic situation,” the search turned
into a sprint the minute Welch chose
Jeffrey Immelt as his successor.

Langone made it clear he wanted

‘either of the runners-up, Jim McN-

erney or Nardelli.

But McNerney was quickly
knocked off Home Depot’s radar
when 3M Co. snagged him. So Lan-
gone and fellow directors pounced
on Nardelli.

Almost overnight, the first out-
sider to take the helm of the home
improvement retailer was hired and
began setting up.shop at his new
Atlanta office, swooping in with the
fanfare of a major league draft pick.

Langone told The Atlanta Jour-
nal-Constitution at the time, “We
found a home run - he is Mickey
Mantle, Joe DiMaggio, Hank Aaron
- rolled into one.”

In fact, Nardelli kicked off his first
day, Dec. 4, 2000, with an employ-
ment contract that a sports star could
appreciate: a guaranteed annual
bonus of at least $3 million, stock,
retirement benefits and a $10 mil-
lion loan to be written off in five
years.

From the start, Nardelli’s pay was
bound for the clouds.

Nardelli was known as a “golden
boy” at.GE, where he ultimately
landed at the top of GE Power Sys-
tems, oné of the most profitable
businesses within the.GE empire.

Home Depot, or any future
employer for that matter, would
have to compensate him for all the
pay and perks he had racked up dur-
ing his 26 years at GE, compensation
experts say.

Nardelli got that and much more
when he hired Chicago attorney
Robert Stucker, a so-called “super
lawyer” who helped secure some of
the biggest pay packages and golden

, parachutes around - including for

former Delta Air Lines chief Leo
Mullin.

Stucker, who declined to com-
ment for this story, belongs to a
small roster of deal-makers who
have been likened to sports agents
for their skill in getting top-dollar
for clients.

Stucker was a busy man the week
he negotiated Nardelli’s deal - he
also was representing McNerney on
his 3M contract. ,

In fact, the imprint of Stucker and
his colleagues is so powerful that it
was the subject of a recent study by
the University of Washington, Stan-
ford University and Duke Universi-
ty.
Stucker and two other lawyers
have a virtual lock on the pay nego-
tiations for Wall Street’s biggest
names, and it’s no wonder: The
study found that first-year compen-
sation for their CEO clients was $7.3




























AV KEY
* - 29 December 2006
** 31 December 2006
*** . 31 December 2006
**** _ 31 December 2006

Aiaes - 31 December 2006
242) 394-2503 <

million higher on average than for
CEOs who hadn’t used one of the
three attorneys.

The so-called super-lawyer con-
tracts also typically contain several
signature elements, including guar-
anteed bonuses, accelerated pension
benefits and, notably, a full range
of severance payments.

All but about $18 million of
Nardelli’s $210 million exit package
was provided for in 2000, according
to the contract.

The recent uproar over Nardel-
li’s package came after the fact,
notes professor Shiva Rajgopal, who
co-authored the “super lawyer”
report at the University of Wash-
ington.'“If people want to make
noise, they should make noise when
these CEOs are hired,” he said.

In Nardelli’s case, there wasn’t
much time for pushback. Any com-
pany that ended up hiring Nardelli
would’ve faced a steep tab.

“It was pretty clear what the com-
pensation would have to be ...
1/Sbecause of 3/8 the cost of unwind-
ing him out of the GE contract,”
said Pat Pittard, retired CEO of Hei-
drick & Struggles, the firm behind
Home Depot’s search for a successor
in 2000. .

Home Depot was coming off an
period of phenomenal expansion,
reaching $46 billion in sales, but
some internal operations needed a
tune-up. The fast-growing retailer,
Pittard recalled, needed someone
with a firm hand who could instill
some operational discipline and take
the company into new businesses as
it sought to double revenue.

“Home Depot needed a Fortune
100 infrastructure, and that was
Nardelli’s strength,” Pittard said.
“There is less than 100th of 1 percent
of executives who can be an effective
CEO 1/8of Fortune 100 companies
3/8. They are worth tens of millions
of dollars.

” 1/8Nardelli 3/8 was paid a ton at
GE,“ Pittard said. ”It was either pay
him the compensation ... or go to
another candidate.“ i

Home Depot’s board said they
felt pressured to move quickly, and
that placed the ball in Nardelli’s
court.

»It’s all about supply and demand
in these situations,“ said Monterey,
Calif:, consultant Ed Brodow, author
of.”Negotiation Boot Camp.“

If 20 people were available, I
doubt Nardelli would’ve gotten that
kind of deal, but he was the one guy
1/SHome Depot 3/8 apparently felt
they had to get,“ Brodow said.
Nardelli was in position to ask for
the moon.“

It’s unclear to what extent the
attorneys for Home Depot’s board
negotiated Nardelli’s asking price.
People in the executive suite at the
time talked about a choke offer“
submitted by Nardelli’s attorney,
presumably to shoot for the highest
numbers possible.

It’s also unclear to what extent
Langone, Home Depot’s lead direc-
tor, directly influenced Nardelli’s
pay package. He declined to com-
ment for this story.

Langone, a longtime investment

banker with deep ties to Wall Street, :

also had direct links to GE. He was
on the compensation committee of
GE’s board in 2000, when Welch
passed over Nardelli to choose
TImmelt as his successor.

Today’s stricter corporate gover-
nance requirement would likely
prompt a director with overlapping
interests to recuse himself from an
executive search, Pittard noted.

*

Langone is no stranger to pay
controversies. Since 2003 he has
been a main target for his role as
head of the compensation commit-
tee at the New York Stock
Exchange, which awarded former
CEO Richard Grasso a pay pack-
age worth more than $140 million.

Grasso also served on Home
Depot’s board from 2002 to 2004,
including a stint on its compensa-
tion committee. ‘

Langone has defended the pay
for Grasso and Nardelli, although
his vocal support of Nardelli waned
late last year, reportedly because of
a dispute over a proposed pay cut.
The fallout is believed to be the rea-
son Nardelli suddenly resigned 12
days ago.

Nardelli was unlikely to get much
pushback at the beginning of his
Home Depot reign, as the compa-
ny’s ties to GE only got tighter.

GE directors - and also members
of GE’s compensation committee -
Claudio Gonzalez and Roger Penske
joined Home Depot’s board and the
retailer’s compensation committee
after Nardelli arrived.

Penske left the board in 2005.

* Current Home Depot director
Larry Johnston ran GE’s appliance
business before becoming Albert-
son’s CEO in 2001. He also was a
client of super-lawyer Stucker.

Home Depot’s search firm, Hei-
drick & Struggles, also had its share

of overlapping allegiances. Not only

was it doing the matchmaking for
Home Depot, but it also was han-
dling 3M’s CEO search - all while
doing due diligence for Jack Welch’s
succession.plan at GE. *

The tightly woven alliances that
often surface in the top tier of busi-
ness, particularly in Home Depot’s
case, have caused concern among
corporate governance watchdogs.

»Tt’s not a question of whether .
Nardelli was a valuable candidate
or not,‘ said Pat McGurn, executive
vice president of proxy advisory firm
Institutional Shareholder Services.
»T’ve just seen no evidence that there
was anyone who was involved in this
who wasn’t in the business of pro-
tecting Nardelli’s interests.“

Disgruntled shareholder groups
only grew more disenchanted with
Nardelli’s "golden boy“ billing when:
Home Depot’s stock price slid, but
his paycheck didn’t. Py:

Criticism hit fever pitch last
spring, when activists protested in
yellow-feathered chicken costumes
outside Home Depot’s annual share-
holder meeting, chanting that direc-
tors were afraid to take action
against Nardelli. (The chorus only
grew louder when Nardelli was the
only director to show up for the
meeting.) ae

The renewed uproar over Nardel-
li’s exit package comes just as Home
Depot hammers out the pay details
for new chief Frank Blake, another
GE recruit. Blake, a former lawyer, _
came to Home Depot four years ago ©
and is said to be the architect of sev-
eral key. strategies, including the
company’s move into the wholesale
supply business.

Shareholders and critics will like-
ly go over Blake’s upcoming com-
pensation agreement with a fine-
toothed comb.

“Efome Depot has clearly listened
to investors - Nardelli would still be
there if they hadn’t,“ McGurn said.
”T just hope Blake has listened to
the debate over the past few months
and realizes that a new set of rules
will have to apply to Home Depot
going forward.”

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THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Business Briefs _

e THE Apollo Group has
signed a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) with
the American International
Medical University (AIMU)
to develop $200 million in
medical tourism projects in

the Bahamas and St Lucia.

¢ Some 36 per cent of cruis-
ers who book through Trave-
locity want to cruise to the
Bahamas, a survey has found.

Mexico and the Caribbean
were the most popular desti-
nations, the survey found.

° Ron Perelman, the bil-
lionaire Revlon tycoon, has

bought land on Harbour
Island, US media reports have
claimed. It was also alleged

‘that the island’s Coral Beach

Club property was likely to
“absorb” the Pink Sands
resort.





Financial planning key, says Colina executive

FROM page 5B

months of premiums, your
family will receive the full val-
ue of that policy, so a life insur-
ance policy creates an almost
immediate estate,” Mr Flow-
ers said.

Defining a good life insur-
ance policy, Mr Flowers said
it was a policy that will replace
and provide the income the
insured individual would have
contributed to his or her
household over a specified
period of time.

He explained that today
there are many other types of
plans customers can leverage
to benefit themselves and their
families while they are still
alive. Term life policies were
often used to help secure mort-

gages, for which life insurance
is a requirement today.
“These policies can enable
you to secure coverage for var-
ious lengths of time, as needed,
and some can be renewed or
converted to participating poli-
cies, if desired. Some policies
also provide a living benefit
loan in the event of terminal
illness where you can borrow
up to one-third of the death
benefit value if you should suf-
fer such an illness,’ Mr Flow-

- ers said. He added that other

types of plans include endow-
ment plans that allow persons
to save for a specific period of
time towards a particular aim,
such as a child’s education or
towards retirement so that the
funds are there when they are
needed: :

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

FRANCO LEASE TWO LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance. with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of FRANCO LEASE TWO LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was

the 29th day of December, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR
EMPLOYMENT














Royal island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf

- course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:








e Director of Design

e Exterior Relations

e Project Managers

e Project Engineers

¢ Genaral Superintendents

¢ Superintendents

e Assistant Superintendents :

¢ Electrical Construction Managers
° Mechanical Construction Managers
e Office Engineers

¢ Manager of Quality Control

° Inspectors .










Over 20 postions are to filled. All positions
require successful applicants to reside at North
Eleuthera or vicinity.







Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:




The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 199]
Nassau Bahamas






Fax to: (242) 356-4125




Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com






Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.




Customer Service .
Engineer

Micronet Ltd., a leading business technology supplier
requires a Customer Service Engineer.

A minimum of 2 years experience in the implementation
of LAN and WAN networks using Microsoft and CISCO
technologies, working knowledge of Voice technology,
implementation of PBX Systems:

The key areas of experience are as follows;

* Experience in implementing and troubleshooting
LAN and WAN solutions .

* Microsoft Server certifications and experience

* Strong TCP/IP knowledge and routing concepts

~° Experience in the repair of computers, printers and
related peripherals a plus

* Working knowledge of Nortel Meridian, Nortel
Succession or Nortel BCM Systems

Desired Certifications

¢ CISCO- CCNA Minimum

° MCP, MCSE

* Nortel Installation and maintenance certifications

No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
or fax (subject line: CSE) to:

The Manager
Micronet Ltd.
Email: jobs@muicronet.bs
Fax: (242) 328-3043

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

COPY. « FAX # PRINT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential community
with private residences and club, 200 slip marina and
boutique hotel and spa, and a golf course just off North
Eleuthera is seeking to employ a Married Couple with strong
managerial, operational and organizational skills in
managing resort properties to oversee all day .to day
operations on the island.

Duties and Responsibilities

° Greeting potential members/buyers/investors

° Arranging transportation, including airport, transfers, boats
and on -island vehicles

° Responsible for setting up guest relations, all staff training,
motivation and recruitment

¢ Manage local accommodations

° Upkeep of boat fleet

¢ Manage/ coordinate all ocean/beach activities

e Manage guest inquiries and complaints in an efficient and
protessional manner

° Once the Preview Village is completed this position will:

¢ Oversee operations

¢ Maid Service

¢ Food/beverage

¢ Beach activities

° Ocean activities

° General maintenance upkeep of premises
° Manage fitness/spa activities

¢ Assist in sales process

° Qualifications: The ideal candidate must have a minimum
of 10 years experience in resort property management with
significant experience in the restaurant and spa industry,
including operations and maintenance of pool and spa
equipment. Must have strong managerial and organizational
skills in the areas of personnel and bugeting. Must be computer
literate with strong written and verbal communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to:

The ELR. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.
























~- MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 9B

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

' ¢
Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

BOAT CAPTAIN

Duties and Responsibilities.

¢ Manage fleet of boats and related equipment.
¢ Coordinate and manage maintenance of boats
¢ Coordinate all water sport activities.
¢ Snorkeling
e Diving
* Flats and Deep Sea fishing
e Manage Staff of First Mates.
° Coordinate Safety. of all boat patrons.




* Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
_have a minimum of 10 years experience as a boat
captain. Must be familiar with the local waters
and the area around Royal Island. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and boat operations. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:



The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all :
applicants for their interest, however only. those
under consideration will be contacted.



Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
a .

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers

of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential













community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

CHEF





Duties and Responsibilities ©








¢ Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.
* Coordinate and manage all food preparation

_ areas. , ’

° Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.

¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.










° Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience a four (4)
star restaurant cuisine and dining with significant
experience in the food industry. Must have experi-
ence in start up restuarant operation. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and budgeting. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.












Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:





The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas















Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.

Sean a ee ew

.
\
\











THE TRIBUNE



§ By LIBBY QUAID
AP Food and Farm
Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Lawmakers begin work on a
new multibillion-dollar farm
bill at odds with President Bush
over whether big changes real-
ly are needed.

The two sides are far apart.
Just how far, farmers saw for
themselves during the Ameri-
can Farm Bureau Federation’s
recent meeting in Salt Lake
City.

“TI think the bill could look‘a
lot like what we have now.
What I think we’re going to
end up doing, you could say, is
extending the farm bill,” Rep.
Collin Peterson, D-Minn.,
chairman of the House Agri-
culture Committee, told farm-
ers.

Contrast that with Bush’s
agriculture secretary, Mike
Johanns, who said at the meet-
ing that farm programs need
an overhaul.

“I will be the first to argue
‘that the 2002 farm bill was
good policy for its time,”
Johanns said, “But the agricul-
tural and economic realities
that influenced the develop-
ment of the ’02 farm bill —
they simply don’t exist.”

The farm bill — really a
series of federal programs —
gives farmers payments and



VR ati:

other help to supplement their
incomes, support crop prices
and manage supplies.

Near $18 billion in public
money was spent on these pro-
grams last year. The current
farm bill, written in 2002,
expires at the end of this year.

Congress and the adminis-
tration disagree mightily on
what the new farm bill should
look like.

Which side is closer to the
wishes of Farm Bureau, the
biggest general-interest agri-
culture group? -

Right

Right now, probably the
House Agriculture Committee
chairman, said Bob Stallman,
the organization’s president.
Johanns advocated massive
changes, Stallman said.

“That, frankly, is not what
our delegates are saying,” he
said.

Not that farmers are in lock
step. ;

den wants changes in farm pro-
grams and liked what Johanns
said. With the Illinois River just
a few miles from Hadden’s
corn and soybean fields, he
ships most of his crop to the
Gulf Coast to be exported.

“If we’re going to be.a player

in international trade markets;

we need to be sure we. don’t



Py

Illinois delegate Dale Had-

run into a lot of problems,”
Hadden said.

Among the disagreements

are:
e TRADE: The U.S. and
other rich countries are under
pressure from around the world
to reduce their farm subsidies.
Conflict over the issue led to
the collapse last summer of
World Trade Organization
talks.

Without an agreement,
American farmers face high
tariffs and other barriers when
they sell crops abroad — and
they export a big chunk of their
products.

Against this backdrop,
Johanns has pushed for change
as U.S. farm programs them-
selves come under fire. The
WTO, in a case brought by
Brazil, has ruled that some cot-
ton subsidies are illegal. Cana-
da is pursing a complaint about
USS. corn subsidies.

“Now of course the tempta-
tion may be to say to the WTO,
"You know what, folks? Take a
hike,”’ Johanns told farmers.

“Now, surely there are peo-
ple in this room who grow
rice,” he said. “Fifty percent of
the rice that you grow goes into
the international market. Do
you want us to ignore the WTO
and jeopardize that market?”

Some farmers do want to
ignore the trade issue. Johanns
drew a smattering of unexpect-
ed applause at the idea of
telling the WTO to take a hike.

‘Peterson, too, is disinclined
to worry too much about the
WTO.

“I want to write a farm bill
that’s good for agriculture,” he

said. “If somebody wants to sue
us, we’ve got a lot of lawyers in
Washington.”

¢ COST: There probably will
be fewer dollars for farm pro-
grams when Congress writes
the latest bill. The Democratic-
run Congress is insisting on
budget cuts to pay for new
spending, and Bush has
pledged to balance the budget
in five years.

Johanns seems to be prepar-
ing lawmakers to do more with
less. High subsidies, he told
Farm Bureau members, do not
necessarily equal a strong farm

‘economy.

At the same time, Peterson
argues against reducing farm
spending. That is a tough sell
because the farm bill has cost
billions of dollars less than law-
makers thought it would.

Peterson says. agriculture
somehow should be credited
for wise spending. “We feel like
we’ve done our part,” Peter-
son said. “I’m not going to say
this is going to be easy, but we
feel like we’re going to be able
to get the resources.”

Peterson also wants to
include a permanent disaster
aid program in the farm bill;
Congress has considered
drought and hurricane aid sep-
arately. But Farm Bureau del-
egates voted against such a pro-
gram because they worried it
could take money away from
other farm spending.

¢ PAYMENT LIMITS:
Johanns favors ending practices
that allow some growers to col-
lect millions of dollars annual-
ly above the $350,000 limit on
payments.



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Legal Notice

"NOTICE |]

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) ev

_ ‘KEYCREST LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), |
KEYCREST LIMITED is in Dissolution” |

The date of commencement of dissolution is 5th day of
September, 2006.

STANEY LIMITED
80 Broad Street
Monrovia,
Liberia
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CARGO AIRCRAFT SERVICES LTD

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of CARGO AIRCRAFT SERVIES LTD |
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

| Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 29th day of December, 2006



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DWAIPAYAN CHOUDHURY OF
HUDSON STREET, P.O. BOX SS-6256 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should.send_a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

|. | NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
3 (No.45 of 2000)

LURIG S.A.

In Voluntary Liquidation

| “Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
‘LURIG S.A. is in Dissolution”

The date of commencement of dissolution is 17th day of
Novemeber, 2006.

MARK JAMES SHORTLAND
Vannin, Fairy Cottage,
Laxey, Isle of Man, _.
IM4 7JB
Liquidator

Sale Sta rts fan 8th
Sale Cnds fan 3ist

Bay St., 2 Doors West of Victoria Ave.
© Tel: 242-356-7302
© email: ariana@batalnet.bs



Farm bill divides US government

He has broad support in
Congress — except from
Southerners, who would feel
limits more keenly because
their cotton and rice crops, cost
more to grow and get higher
subsidies.

Peterson said a farm bill can-
not pass without support from
Southern lawmakers.

“I’m not interested in putting
our agriculture friends in the
South in trouble. They’ve got
enough problems,” he said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
igsy-(e WM se(e/ ss
‘on Mondays

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

RiSTORAN TS

Villaggio

PLANO BAR & CAFE

Seeks to employ professional
Waiter and Waitress

Must be well-groomed

Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation
Must be able to work flexible
hours

Send Resume to:
Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Apply in person

Caves Village, West Bay Street. “e

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/bnk/00015
Commercial Division ‘

IN THE MATTER OF MOSAIC COMPOSITE
LIMITED now MOSAIC COMPOSITE
LIMITED (U.S.) INC.

(a Minnesota Corporation) (“Mosaic”)
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE INTERNATIONAL BUSI-
NESS COMPANIES ACT, Chapter 309
Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition (“the Act’)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition for
the winding-up of the above-named Company was on the
17th day of March.2006 presented to the said Court by
Olympus Univest Ltd. (in liquidation) c/o BDO Mann Judd.
Third Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street North, Nassau,
Bahamas

AND that the said Petition which was directed to be
heard before the Honourable Madame Justice Cheryl Albury
in Court at the Law Courts, the Harrison Building,
Marlborough Street, Nassau on Thursday, 14th day* of
December, 2006 at 11:00 o’clock in the forenoon is now
directed to be heard on Tuesday, the 23rd day of January,
2007 at 10:30 o’clock in the forenoon before the said Judge
and any Creditor or contributory of the said Company
desirous to support or oppose the making of an Order on
the said Petition may appear at the time of the hearing in
person or by his. Counsel for that purpose; and a copy of the
Petition ‘will be furnished by the undersigned to any
Creditor or Contributory of the said Company requiring such
copy on payment of the prescribed charges for the same.

DATED the 12th day of January, A.D. 2007

Callenders &CO.
Chambers,
One Millars Court,
Nassau, Bahamas
_ Attorneys for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing of
the said Petition must serve on or send by post to the
above-named, notice in writing of his intention to do so.
The Notice must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and must
be signed by the person or firm or his or their attorney if
any, and must be served or if posted, must be sent by post
in sufficient time to reach the above-named not later than
4:00 o’clock in the afternoon of 22nd day of January, 2007





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PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







BUSINESS









i MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell

(FILE Photo)



BTC flouts regulatory

process over the ViBe

FROM page 1B

long-distance rates under the
guise of a promotion, a move
that many viewed as a
response to the arrival of legal
competition in fixed-line, voice

_telephony for the first time in

the shape of IndiGo Networks.

The fact that BTC has done
this a second time, and appears
to have gotten away with it,
indicates the company feels it

is protected due to the fact it is:

100 per cent-owned by the
Government.

Actions

Yet its actions undermine
the integrity of the Bahamian
telecommunications industry’s
governing laws, regulations
and policies. Several observers
have suggested that the Gov-
ernment, aided by the PUC, is
attempting to stifle legal com-
petition to BTC because it is
pursuing two separate but con-
flicting policies at the same
time. On one hand, the Gov-
ernment wants to liberalise the
Bahanuan telecoms market to
create competition, giving con-
sumer more choice, and bet-
ter services and prices.

Yet on the other it is
attempting to protect BTC’s
market position because of the
ongoing eight-year attempt to
privatize BTC. James Smith,
minister of state for finance,
previously told The Tribune
that the Government’s nego-
tiating team had completed its
work, and it was now down to
the Cabinet to decide whether
to accept the offer from Blue-
water Communications Hold-
ings over BTC’s privatization.

But the efforts to protect
BTC, and allow minimal com-
petition, end up hurting the

“consumer and Bahamian busi-

nesses and the wider econo-
my. through less choice, poor-
er services and more expen-
sive prices.

‘The PUC’s independence in
matters involving BTC has also
been questioned by observers,

\

given that the state-owned car-
rier is its largest source of
licence revenue and, more
importantly, it received an
annual government subsidy.

The public consultation on
ViBe is likely to be perceived
as an attempt by the PUC to
legitimise BTC’s behaviour
after the fact.

ViBe enables BTC’s Inter-
net customers to make phone
calls via the Internet, and the
PUC said in its consultation
document that it had been in
talks with the company over
the product since early 2006.

BTC had argued that VoIP
was not a telecommunications
service as defined under the
Telecommunications Act 1999,
but “a value-added feature”
for its DSL broadband Internet
customers. As a result, the
company alleged that the ser-
vice should not be price-regu-
lated.

These arguments cut little
ice with the PUC, but it
acknowledged that ViBE
would benefit Bahamas resi-
dents and the national econo-
my through enhancing effi-
ciency and competitiveness;
promoting the development of
information. and telecommu-
nications technology; making
telecoms more affordable and
allowing consumers to pur-
chase more calls for less.

After benchmarking BTC’s
ViBe prices with the compa-
ny’s inter-island and interna-
tional long-distance fixed-line
prices, and those of other
Caribbean VoIP providers, the
PUC said ViBe “represents
considerable savings over its
current prices for convention-
al switched inter-island and
international long distance
calls”.

Prices

The ViBe prices, the PUC
added, were lower than the

current prices for calls to the-

Bahamas’major trading part-
ners, and compared well with
those charged by other







Caribbean VoIP operators.

Compared to BTC’s fixed-
line calls, ViBe prices are:

© $0.15 and $0.20 per minute
for out of plan calls to the US,
compared to $0.47 per minute
for fixed-line calls

° $0.20 for calls to Canada,
compared to $0.50 for fixed-
line

° $0.20 to the UK, compared
to $0.85 for fixed-line

© $0.20 to Switzerland, com-
pared to $0.85 for fixed-line

© $0.7-$1 to Cuba, compared
to $0.85

e $0.2 and $0.3 to the
Caribbean, compared to $0.66

e $0.2-$2 for other countries,
compared to $0.85

When it came to compar-
isons against other VoIP oper-
ators in the Caribbean, ViBe’s
out of plan calls were more
expensive than Jamaica-based
InfoChannel, but broadly in
line with those offered by
Cable & Wireless (C&W).

Service
C&W’s VoIP ‘service in

Jamaica is slightly less expen-
sive than BTC’s, but is more

expensive in Anguilla and the |

Cayman Islands.

The PUC concluded: “ViBe
is beneficial to customers and
the national economy, and the
deployment of this cheaper
service is in the public inter-
est. Despite BTC’s failure to
make proper application pri-
or to the launch of the new
ViBe service, the Commission
is minded to approve the pric-
ing plans and out of plan prices
for ViBe...”

The PUC added that it
would not insist that ViBe
users be able to use the ser-
vice to call the emergency ser-
vices, due to the high level of
cellular and fixed-line pene-
tration in the Bahamas.

At the end of 2005, there
were some 43.9 fixed lines per
100 inhabitants in the
Bahamas, with 58.35 cell
phones per 100 people.

>

Minister’s concern
on Bacardi exports

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

_ FRED Mitchell, minister of
foreign affairs, is “primarily
concerned with securing access
for Bacardi’s rum to Europe”
during talks between the
Caribbean and European
Union (EU) over the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA).

The disclosure was made by
Odell Cunningham, a member
of the Caribbean Regional
Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM), who disclosed that
Cariforum — the body negoti-
ating on the Bahamas and
CARICOM’s behalf - was
now in phase four of the talks
with the EU.

Bacardi told The Tribune
that it was too early for it to
comment on the EPA and its
implications for the company,
particularly the Bahamian
manufacturing facility.

The EPA aims to secure
duty-free market access to the
EU for Bahamian exporters

like Bacardi, ensuring their
products remain competitive.
After talks on the framework

governing the talks were com-_

pleted, negotiations on recip-
rocal market access for all
industries — agriculture, goods
and services and other areas —
had begun.

Mr Cunningham said the
market access talks had not
reached the stage where they
could be “translated into a
legally binding text”.

Private

He urged the Bahamian pri-
vate sector to partner with the
Government and let it know
what it wanted from these
trade agreements, pointing to
the example set by Trinidad
& Tobago, where commerce
bodies had pushed the gov-
ernment there to negotiate a
trade agreement with Cost
Rica that had recently been
ratified.

Mr Cunningham said that
with the World Trade Organi-

sation’s (WTO) Doha round
of global trade talks currently
in limbo, and the Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA)
“pretty much dead”, the EPA
“now represents the best
opportunity for the private
sector” to get on board in
trade negotiations and tell
their governments what they
wanted.

“The Bahamas is not ina
position to use these trade
agreements as the level of pri-
vate sector participation is not
there,” he added.

Mr. Cunningham urged
Bahamian companies to
broaden their outlook, and
look beyond this nation to .
diversify into export markets,
developing a “global plat-
form”.

He added that the private
sector had been “slow to take
advantage of trade opportuni-
ties”, and encouraged Bahami-
an companies to joint venture
with foreign counterparts as a
way of accessing overseas mar-
kets and bidding on contracts.

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MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Knowles
and Nestor

beaten in
the final

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

MARK KNOWLES
and Daniel Nestor fell
one match short of win-
ning their first doubles
title of the year.

Competing in the final
of the Medibank Inter-

‘.*. national Tournament on
’ Saturday in Sydney,

Australia, Knowles and
Nestor were taken to the
wire before they were
beaten by the team of
Paul Hanley from Aus-
tralia and Kevin Ullyett
from Zimbabwe.

Knowles and Nestor,
the number two seeded
team in the tournanient,
were hoping to bounce
back and win the title
that got away from them
the way before in Doha
where they were ousted
in the semifinal by the
team of Martin Damm
from the Czech Republic
and Leander Paes from
India.

But the No.3 team of
Hanley and Ullyett had
other plans. The duo,
who came together at
the beginning of last
year and compiled an
impressive 58-18 record,
avenged their loss to
Knowles and Nestor in
the semis of the Tennis
Master Cup in Novem-
ber in China by clinching
their sixth title.

Hanley, in a quote
from the tourney's web-
site, said: "To win a tour-
nament in my home
country - there are only
three a year in Australia
- is nice, particularly in
front of such a big
crowd."

Knowles and Nestor
couldn’t be reached for
comments. But on their
way to the final, they got
revenge on Damm and
Paes by beating them in
the semis. Knowles and
Nestor were chasing
their 38th career title.

’ They will now have to

‘wait for the Australian
Open to accomplish that
feat. The Australian
Open kicked off today in
Melbourne. Knowles
and Nestor won the
Grand Slam title back in
2002.

This year's draw for
the doubles is not
expected to be released
until Wednesday. But
Knowles and Nestor are
hoping that their
improvement from the
semis to the final in the
previous two tourna-
ments for the year will
lead to the title at the
first Grand Slam title
this year.

- Last year, Knowles
and Nestor were ousted
in the first round by
Dick Norman of Bel-
gium and Vincent
Spadea of the United
States in two straight
sets.

Knowles and Nestor
went on to compile a 48-
20 record last year with
five titles under their
belt at Delray Beach in
February, Indian Wells
in March, Barcelona in
April, Rome in May and
Basel in October.

They ended the year as
the runners-up at the
Tennis Masters Cup in
Shanghai in November
where they lost in the
final to the team of
Jonas Bjornman of Swe-
den and Max Mirnyi of
Bulgaria.

Knowles and Nestor
finished as the number
four ranked team in the
world.



MIAM! HERALD SPORTS






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@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE













Carnesha shines

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter

THE BAAA opened up
the season on Saturday with
their annual Odd Distance
Meet, with more than 380
athletes competing. The
meet, which hosted athletes
from various clubs and
schools including LN Coak-
ley and Freeport, was divided:
into five categories and saw
athletes compete from ages
9-20.

Carnesha Nixon of Road
Runners would shine in the
girls under nine division, fin-
ishing in the top three of the
five events she competed in.

In the 60 meters Nixon
clocked 10.00 seconds for the
win, she was followed by
Charisma Taylor of Club
Monica in 10.01 seconds and
Daijonique Lightbourne’s
10.04 seconds.

Lightbourne would get the
better of the two in the 150m
with a time of 24.50 seconds,
Taylor was second in 24.70
seconds and Nixon third in
25.00 seconds.

The long jump event
belonged to Taylor with a
leap of 2.39m. Angel Butler
was second in 1.70m and
Nixon third in 1.42m.

Asia Butler ran away with
the girls 150m in the under
11 girls division, but had to
settle for second place in the
60m.

Butler clocked 21.08 sec-

onds in the 150m for the win

and 9.00 seconds for second
in the 60m. Winning the 60m
was Martiqua Richardson of
Club Monica in 8.09 seconds.
Richardson was second in the
long jump with a leap of
3.05m, winning with 3.12m
was teammate Savannah Har-
riott.

It was a heated 60m dash
in the boy’s under nine divi-
sion between Brason Rolle,
Jameson Miller and Miguel
Bethel.

Rolle took top prize in the
both the 60m and the 150m
with Miller coming in second
place. Bethel would run with
the third spot in the 60m, but
had to settle for fourth in the
150m. Rolle’s time in the 60m
was recorded at 9.05 second,
Miller’s was 10.00 seconds
with Bethel clocking 10.01
seconds. All three athletes
represented the Road Run-
ners Club.

This year might see a
change of the guard in the
open women’s division. New-
comer Krystal Bodie is set-
ting the tone for the other
athletes capturing the 60m
and the 300m.

Bodie, who has recently
signed a letter of intent to
attend Auburn University,
got the best of Tia Rolle and
Shenique Armbrister in the
60m clocking 7.3 seconds for
the win. Rolle was second in
7.6 seconds and Armbrister
third with 8.0 seconds.

It was tougher field in the
300m with the return of
Tamara Rigby.

But Rigby would have to
settle for second behind Bod-
ie who ran away with the
event in 41.10 seconds, Rigby
was second in 42.70 and Kar-
lica Robinson third in 45.10
seconds. ,

Patrick Bodie would have a
field day in' the high jump
event being the only athlete
to clear the bar with 1.52m.
Also competing in the event
were Phillip Brown and Mav-
erick Bowleg.



@ CARNESHA Nixon of

Road Runners wins the 60m

dash.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

The 500m would also
belong to Bodie as he ran
away from the field in 1:17.50
seconds, coming in second
was Marvin Minns in 1:22.80
seconds and Stephen Taylor
third in 1:27.48 seconds.

In the open men's 60m,
Scotty Ward clocked 6.7 sec-
onds for the win over Ravan-
no Ferguson who also
clocked 6.7 seconds and Denu
Campbell in 6.8 seconds.

Jerone Mitchel took the
350m in 42.9 seconds, Aaron
Seymour was second in 44.2
seconds and Leslie Hanna
third in 44.3 seconds.

@ WINNING the high jump
from CI Gibson was Vincent
McKinney.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

ene neN eT

in season opener


















@ ROAD RACE
BSC FAMILY FUN/WALK

The Baptist Sports Council is gear-

ing up for the hosting of their sev-_

enth annual Family Fun Run/Walk
Road Race.

This year's event, scheduled for
Saturday, January 28, will be held in
honour of Evangelist, Rev. Clinton
Minnis.

It will start promptly at 7 a.m. from
the Charles W. Saunders High
School, Jean Street. Pre-registration
will take place from 6 a.m.

The run will cover a four-mile
course, while the walk will only be
two miles. They will start at the same
point, but travel in different direc-
tions.

The run will travel south on Jean
Street to Prince Charles Drive, east to
the intersection at Robinson Road
and Fox Hill Road, north to Bernard
Road, west to Hillside Estate, oppo-
site Kingsway Academy and south
back to Jean Street.

The walk will leave Jean Street and
head north to Hillside Estate, west
on Bernard Road to Village Road,
south to Robinson Road and east
back to Jean Street.

The entry fee is $5.00 per athlete,
but'as an added incentive, there is a
group rate of $100.00 for 20 or more
participants. So Church, civic and
community minded groups are invit-
ed to come out and participate.

Individual awards will be given out
to the first three finishers in each cat-
egory and there will be an award for
the Church or company that brings
out the most participants, who must
complete the race.

The age group categories include
15-and-under, 20-and-under, 30-and-
under, 40-and-under, 50-and-under
and 50-and-over for men and women
in both the walk and the run.

Interested persons can call 502-
2363 for further details.

Immediately following the race,
there will be a Health Fair where
medical personnel and fitness experts
will be on hand to provide informa-
tion for those persons who wish to
live a more healthy lifestyle.

Following the Health Fair, the
Baptist Sports Council will hold its
final registration for its 2007 Rev.
Tyrone Knowles Basketball Classic.

The classic is scheduled to start’ on“

Saturday, February 3 at the Charles
W. Saunders high School.

@ BASKETBALL
BSC BASKETBALL
REGISTRATION

The Baptist Sports Council will
hold its final registration for all teams
wishing to participate in the 2007
Rev. Tyrone Knowles Basketball
Classic on Saturday, January 27 at
10 a.m. at the Bahamas Baptist Col-
lege, Jean Street. The league will
comprise of the men, ladies, 19-and-
under and 15-and-under divisions.
The entry fee will be $100.00 per.
team. The league is scheduled to start
on Saturday, February 3. For further
information, persons can call 502-
2363.

& GSSSA ACTION

The Government Secondary.

Schools Sports Association will con-
tinue its basketball action today at 4
p.m. with the following games on tap:

DW Davis Gym - RM Bailey vs
CC Sweeting (SG); Dame Doris
Johnson vs CV Bethel (SG) and
Dame Doris Johnson vs CV Bethel
(SB).

CI Gibson Gym - AF Adderley vs
CH Reeves (JG); SC McPherson vs
HO Nash (JG); LW Young vs CC
Sweeting (SB).

The Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools Sports

will be back in action today at 4 p.m.

with the senior boys and junior girls
playing at various sites.

@ SQUASH
NEW YEAR'S LEAGUE

The New Year's Squash League
will host its second week of action
on Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the Village
Squash Club. Some of the top squash
players will be in action.

@ FOOTBALL
MEGAMALT NATIONAL
“YOUTH COMBINE

Plans are underway for the first
Megamalt National Youth Combine.
It is scheduled for Saturday, starting
at 10 a.m. at Goodman’s Bay. It's
being organised by Frank Ruther-
ford through his Elite Athletic Devel-
opment (FREAD) programme that is
based in Houston, Texas.

The camp is expected to be direct-
ed by visiting coaches Bob Stoops of
the University of Oklahoma; Tony
Fritzpatrick from the University of
Houston; Les Miles from Louisiana
State University and Mario Cristo-
bal from the University of Miami.

m@ NPBA OPEN SEASON

After taking a break for the Christ-
mas holiday, the New Providence
Basketball Association will com-
‘mence its regular season action
tonight at the DW Davis Gymnasi-
um. In the opener, Cable Bahamas
Entertainers will face the Y-Care
Wreckers and in the feature contest,
its the Police Crimestoppers against
the Millennium Jammers.

4










PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007




@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

JASON Williams made it look so
easy as he made his debut as a stu-
dent of the College of the Bahamas.

Competing in the COB's 14th
annual Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt
Road Race on Saturday, Williams,
26, ran away from the competition,
that was dominated in attendance
by both the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and the Defence Force, to
win the run segment of the event in
39 minutes and 14 seconds.

His nearest rival came in two
minutes later.

"It was easy. It was a good open-
er for the year," Williams reflected.
"T hope that the competition would

‘have been better with the young

men taking it serious and coming
out to run because it's not an easy
sport,

"The older runners are getting
off the scene and we need the fresh
young blood to come out and take
it over.”

Williams, who has enrolled at
COB full-time studying finance and
economics, didn't waste any time
in. taking control of the race.

In fact. Chris Cartwright, who
came in second overall in 41.04,
said when he saw Williams make
his move at the mid-way point in
the race, there wasn’t anything he
could do, but watch.

"I just need more leg speed," said
Cartwright, 18, about chasing
Williams for the top spot.

This is the fifth year that
Cartwright has been running and
the CC Sweeting High School stu-
dent admits that he hopes to get
better as time progresses.

Valentino Thomas trailed
Cartwright with third place in 41.06.

Celeste Williams-Bethel, a mem-
ber of the Pro Active Fitness Club,
was the first female finisher. She

~ did the course-in 62.18 — running
-her first race.
~-{ What J wanted to do was use to

as a preparation for the half-
marathon in Jacksonville at the end
of this month," said Williams-
Bethel, who will be making her
debut at a marathon as well. "So I
just thought I would to do this one
and the Ministry of Tourism's race
next week. That should get me set
for the half marathon."

Two Defence Force Officers, M
Taylor (62.28) and L. Smith (65.00),
followed Bethel-Williams in order
of finish.

As for the walk race, there was
no competition for Philip Moss,
who once again cruised to another
victory, clocking 53.58.

"This morning was rough because
I worked out in the gym on Tues-
day and my muscles were still sore.
I couldn't pull out," Moss reflected.
"But I didn't have any competition,
so I'm okay."

Moss said he was pleased to see
the amount of participants, but he
just wanted to complete the race
as he continues his preparation for
the Jacksonville Marathon on Jan-
uary 28 and the Miami marathon
on February 10.

Former distance runner-turned

SPORTS

coach Keno Demeritte came in sec-
ond in the walk in 53.58, while E.
Seymour was third in 54.16. :

"The race was pretty good,"
Demeritte stated. "The route was
hard, considering this was my first
race. But I knew Philip and some of
the other guys in the race were
walkers, so I just had to go out
there and do what I had to do to
finish."

Lorraine Simms was the first
female walker. She the course in
60.28. Defence force Officer
Natasha Miller was second and S.
Miller was third.

Simms, who has been competing
for the past two years, said it was
"no competition."

Patron Cynthia Pratt, the Deputy
Prime Minister and former Assis-
tant Athletic Director at COB, said
she's excited about the vast number
of young people who showed up to
participate.

"It's so good to see the cama-
raderie between the Police Force
and the Defence Force. It's always
exciting when they come together,
so I want to thank them and the
College of the Bahamas and its Stu-
dent Activities Department for con-
tinuing my legacy and to give me
the incentive to go on. I thank God
for everything."

The Defence Force had around
100 competitors in the race, includ-
ing Commodore Clifford 'Butch'
Scavalla.

"I'm excited because we just
started our annual fitness pro-
gramme and the support has been
tremendous with young women and
men finding themselves and re-res-
urrecting the force," Scavalla said.

"We are refocusing and recondi-
tioning this force into something
that the Bahamian people can be
tremendously proud about. So we
are well on our way. We only got
this group together yesterday.
Imagine if we had some More time.
The people are on fire, reinvigo-



Wedd

rated." ay

1489 Cyntherette Miller, who had
about 50-plus members of the
Police Cadets in attendance, said
she was pleased with their efforts.

COB's Athletic Director Greg
Charshaw said every year the sup-
port has been growing in every area
and hopefully they will be able to
establish a vibrant athletic pro-
gramme as they branch into the
inter-collegiate arena.

"Jason and I have been taking
and it is my hope that we can estab-
lish some athletic scholarships that
will enable the Bahamian athletes
to stay on the island," he said.

"I know it breaks my heart that
everybody wants to go to the
States.

"But I came-here to encourage
them to stay on the islands and I
think it will enjoy the federations
and the national teams.

“That's what a college is sup-
posed to do and we hope to estab-
lish that programme here so we can
all work together."

Race co-ordinator Bradley Coop-
er said the event was a success and
they only expect it to get better in
the future.



@ JASON WILLIAMS receives his trophy from COB

Greg Harshaw on Saturday. ‘



@ CELESTE



Se SS 3

COB's Athletic Director Greg Harshaw.

BETHEL, the first female runner, receives her tro

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Athletic Director





if PHILIP MOSS collects his trophy from COB's Athletic Director Greg Har-

shaw for being the first walker to complete the race.



ombers defused by

rampant Stingrays

@ AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE youthful Stingrays
welcomed the. veteran
Bombers back into the Com-
monwealth American Foot-
ball League yesterday with a
22-0 beating at the DW
Davis High School playing
field.

As they improved to 2-1 to
remain in second place
behind the Orry J. Sands
Pros, the Stingrays rebound-
ed from a defensive battle in
the first quarter, scoring in
the remaining three.

“We practiced all week.
Last week we lost to the
Pros. We felt we gave them a
gift,” said Stingrays’ coach
Tyrone Rolle. “So the guys
stepped up their intensity,
they practised hard all week

and they came out here and
made a statement.”

Gardiner said as long as_

the players come out to prac-
tise and do what they're sup-
posed to do, they should
have no problem duplicating
what they did against the
Bombers.

“We feel we could take the
whole thing,” Rolle reflected.

He said they have the

desire, so it’s just a matter of

them putting it all together
when they had to.

Difficult

Rolle anticipated that it
would have been difficult to
score in the first quarter and
he was right. It wasn’t until
the second quarter that
Quincy Smith scored the first
two points of the game ona
safety.

Before the quarter was
over, Perez Adderley got a
15-yard pass from quarter-
back Nesley Lucien for the
first touchdown to extend the
Stingrays lead to 8-0 at the
half.

In the third, Lucien ran in
their second TD from the 10-
yard line to extend their lead
to 14-0.

The Stingrays then closed
out the fourth quarter when
Melwin Smith scored on a
seven-yard pass from Lucien.
Raymond Finley then scored
on the extra two point con-
version.

Lucien said they just came
out with a game plan and
they worked on what they
did in practice.

“After the loss (to the
Pros), we said there’s no way
that we would lose again,”
he stated. “We gotja good

¢

challenge, but we came out
with the win.”

Bombers’ coach Dwayne
Ellis said they only decided
to join the league to add
some competition. But he
admitted that they didn’t
anticipate playing the way
they did.

Undecided

“Not making excuses, we
were undecided as to
whether or not we will come
out.” he lamented. “So we
decided to come out and see
what we can do.”

Ellis said they have a team
meeting this week and, based
on how they were shut-out,
they will have a real check
about their future in the
league.

“The Bombers are late

starters, so I’m sure that mid-
season, we will be right
there,” he projected. “We,
need to construct our offen-
sive line. We are okay defen-
sively. But we have to work
on our offensive line.”

Despite getting shutout,
Ellis sent a message to the
rest of the league, ensuring
them the Bombers will be
back bigger and better as the
season progresses.

“We came to foster the
growth of the league, but tie
fellows came together a little
too late,” he stated. “It’s a
lack of practice and a little
lack of discipline. But we
hope to get it together.”

Quarter-back Cleveland.

Sutherland had the ball near
the goal at least three times,
but the Bombers just didn’t
have the offense to punch it
in on either trip.



phy frou:







SPO



AAAS A

"

GOLF | SONY OPEN

ERIC RISBERG/AP
SONY WINNER: Paul Goydos reacts
after making birdie on the 16th
green during the final round of

‘- the Sony Open in Honolulu on

Sunday. He won the event after
shooting a 3-under-par 67 to
finish at total 14-under-par.

Goydos ends
drought with
a late rally

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

HONOLULU — Paul Goydos
staged an unlikely rally 11 weeks ago
just to keep his PGA Tour card. Sun-
day was even sweeter, with three
birdies in the final four holes at the
Sony Open for his first victory in ll
years.

Goydos closed with a 3-under 67
and made birdie on the last hole when
his 25-foot chip banged into the pin
and settled within tap-in range.
Charles Howell III and Luke Donald
tied for second, a stroke back.

“IT never felt like I was going to
win,” said Goydos, who earned
$936,000, more than he made all last
year.

The tournament belonged to How-
ell for most of a sunny afternoon at
Waialae until a sudden shift on the
back nine, when Howell made back-
to-back bogeys and Goydos made

~ consecutive birdies.

“This one hurts,” Howell said.

He had a chance to force a playoff
when his 8-iron from the rough didn’t
come out as hot as he expected, and
the shot came up 50 feet short of the
green. His chip ran 15 feet past the pin,
and the birdie putt never had a
chance. He shot 70 for his seventh
runner-up since his only victory in
2002.

“The chip just wasn’t good
enough,” Howell said.

Donald had an eagle chip on the
par-5 18th that would have forced a
playoff, but it hit the pin and spun
away, leaving him with a 69.

Tadd Fujikawa, the 16-year-old
who became the youngest player in 50
years to make a cut on the PGA Tour,
finished his dream week with a birdie

‘on the final hole for a 72, putting him

in a tie for 20th.

_ “I never imagined myself doing
this, especially at this age,” Fujikawa
said, who returns to the 10th grade on
Tuesday.

Goydos might not have been in
Oahu this week except for the final
full tournament of 2006. He was
headed for Q-school when he put
together his best four rounds of the
year and tied for second in the Chrys-

._ ler Championship, earning enough
money to finish 97th on the money list

and keep his card.

He didn’t waste any time with the
new year.

Goydos’ last victory came at the

'. 1996 Bay Hill Invitational — so long
‘ago that Tiger Woods was still an

amateur.

“I set some goals, and one of them
was to win every decade,” Goydos
deadpanned. “I’m stunned.”

This one looked in doubt until he
rolled in a 25-foot birdie on the 15th
hole to catch Howell, and a 15-footer
on the next hole to take the lead. Goy-
dos made bogey from the bunker on
the 17th, and the man they call “Sun-
shine” — a sarcastic reference to his
dour demeanor — finally found rea-
son to smile on the closing hole.

From 25 feet off the green, his chip
banged into the pin and stopped a foot
away; otherwise, it likely would have
rolled some 10 feet by.

“That chip could have gone where
Charles’ did,” Goydos said. ‘‘Fortu-
nately for me, it stopped close enough
where I could make it.”

Goydos finished at 14-under 266.

“I try to win every tournament I
play, so I accomplished that goal,”
Goydos said dryly. “My last two

*TURN TO PGA











7

pt PSP ONESNALSDS ACERS ESSER SEINE ENE

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007







sce G OCDE ESIC ALES OSES ESE SROREELE BOESE ESN OE NE EEA SONNE LEE ENE LENNIE

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

3E







_AFC PLAYOFFS | NEW ENGLAND 24, SAN DIEGO 21 |

Chargers give Pats one chance too many

BY BERNIE WILSON ;
Associated Press .

SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Chargers
gave Tom Brady one chance too many, and
that’s exactly what the three-time Super Bowl-
winning quarterback needed.

Brady and the New England Patriots shocked
league MVP LaDainian Tomlinson and the
Chargers on Sunday, winning 24-21 to move
within one win of their fourth Super Bow] trip
in six seasons.

Brady overcame three interceptions, his
career playoff high, to lead the Patriots to ll
points in 3:26 late in the game. He and coach Bill
Belichick now have a 12-1 postseason record
and are heading to Indianapolis for the AFC
championship game next Sunday.

“That was as tough of a game as I can ever
remember playing,” Brady said.

While the Chargers respected the mystique
Brady and the Patriots had built with Super
Bowl] wins following the 2001, 2002 and 2004
seasons, they hoped to be the ones raising the
Lombardi Trophy in Miami on Feb. 4.

San Diego had nine players voted to the Pro
Bowl team and five to the All-Pro team. And it



had been supercharged by Tomlinson, who
became the most prolific scorer in one season
in NFL history with 31 touchdowns and 186
points while winning the rushing title with 1,885
yards.

But Brady is the one who’s been there before
in January. And nearly always has won — it was
Brady’s 24th career game-winning drive.

He left behind some frustrated Chargers,
including Tomlinson, who went after an
unidentified Patriots player when the game

ended. Tomlinson ran for 123 yards and two

scores, and caught two passes for 64 yards.

Tomlinson said he was upset that some
Patriots were dancing on the Chargers logo at
midfield after they had silenced the record
crowd of 68;810 at Qualcomm Stadium and
wrecked the Chargers’ season, which included
an NEL-best 14-2 record and 8-0 home mark in
the regular season.

“I would never react in that way. I was very
upset,” Tomlinson said. “When you go to the
middle of our field and start doing the dance
Shawne Merriman is known for, that is disre-
spectful. They showed no class and maybe that
comes from the head coach.”



rHARRY HOW/GETTY IMAGES

IMPORTANT CATCH: Patriots receiver Reche
Caldwell, left, catches a 49-yard pass
over the shoulder of Chargers defender
Quentin Jammer to put the Patriots in
field goal position in the fourth quarter.

Merriman, nicknamed “Lights Out,” did a
spasmodic dance to celebrate each of his NFL-
high 17 sacks. ;

*TURN TO AFC

NEC PLAYOFFS | CHICAGO 27, SEATTLE 24 (OT)

Long time coming



aS
JIM PRISCHING/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT

OVERDUE CELEBRATION: Bears holder Brad Maynard hugs Robbie Gould after Gould hit
the game-winning field goal in overtime against the Seahawks in Chicago on Sunday.
It was the Bears’ first playoff victory since 1995.

Bears claim
their first
playoff victory
since 1995

BY RICK GANO
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Two swings of the foot by
Robbie Gould were all the Chicago Bears
needed to offset any shortcomings in Rex Gross-
man’s arm.

And the Chicago Bears got their first playoff
win since 1995, moving them one step from the
Super Bowl.

Gould, working construction 16 months ago,
cleared a path for the Bears with his strong leg
Sunday, kicking a 49-yard field goal in overtime
for a 27-24 victory over the Seattle Seahawks.
The game-winner came shortly after Grossman
got them in position with a clutch pass to Rash-
ied Davis.

“A year ago I’m pounding nails. Now I'm hit-
ting game-winning kicks and going to the NFC
championship game,” Gould said. “T.didn’t even
watch the end of it. I hit it right where I wanted
it to go.”

Where the Bears want to go is their first
Super Bowl in 21 years. Chicago will host the
Saints next Sunday in the NFC championship
game; New Orleans never has been this far.

“We win one game and we're in the Super
Bowl,” Grossman said, “two wins away from
having a ring on my finger for the rest of my
life.”

Grossman, one of the most scrutinized fig-
ures in the football-crazed city for his inconsis-
tent performances, set up the kick with his pass
to Davis.

“In every game you're not going to play per-
fect. There were several situations where I wish
I would’ve had a few plays back, but for the
most part I’m pleased,” Grossman said.

Grossman completed 21-of-38 for 282 yards
with an interception and a fumble. It was quite

* TURN TO NFC

FITNESS | GRANNY BASKETBALL

Senior women compete to stay fit

BY NAFEESA SYEED
Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa — Playing
basketball isn’t ladylike.

That’s what Jewell Chapman’s
high school principal told her in
1961 when he banned the girls bas-
ketball program.

“We were very frustrated,” said
Chapman, a forward for her high
school team in Des Moines.

Nearly 50 years later, Chapman
is back on the court. She’s 62 and
plays for the Hot Pink Grannies,
joining about 10 other women on a
team whose uniforms are black
bloomers and hot pink socks. They
play in the Iowa Granny Basketball
League.

It’s one of dozens of basketball
leagues for women over 50 that
have sprung up across the country.
For some, it’s an opportunity to
exercise and socialize; for others,
it’s a once-denied chance to com-
pete.

“You see more and more senior
women’s teams participating in
state and national competitions
and more recreational leagues,”
said Michael Rogers, an associate
professor in sports studies at
Wichita State University. “In the
future it,will be commonplace to
have leagues like this.”

Annual surveys by the National
Sporting Goods Association indi-
cate the number of women 55 and

older who play basketball at least
50 times a year has grown from
16,000 in 1995 to nearly 131,000 a
decade later.

The women on the Hot Pink
Grannies are good-natured but
competitive come game time.

“J think I’m tough,” says Hot
Pink Granny Colleen Pulliam, 69,
flexing her biceps at opponents in
a game against the Strutters,
known for their brilliant yellow
socks.

Seconds later, she dives for the
ball as it slips from a player’s hand
and tosses it over her head to the
forward waiting under the basket.

* TURN TO FITNESS



KEVIN SANDERS/AP
WITH AGE COMES ...: Judy
Harms, of Waukee, lowa,
prepares to shoot during
practice in Des Moines, lowa.





4E | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION ___ Miamitferald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

NBAEXTRA | BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ



LAKERS AT MAVERICKS, 9:30 P.M. THURSDAY, TNT

Kobe Bryant, left, has had his way throughout his career
against Dallas, but the Mavericks are among the best in the
league at taking away a team’s No. 1 option. Sasha Vujacic
hada big game when Los Angeles ended Dallas’ winning
streak last week. If the Lakers are going to defeat the
Mavericks for the second time in two weeks, it will take
another similar feat. But such surprise performances will be
tougher to do on the road.

SUNS AT ROCKETS, 7:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY

The Rockets are the most stubborn defensive team this
season, keeping 11 teams belaw 80 points and three
below 70. But when they played Phoenix, the Suns
scored 102 points and won by 11. That was in Phoenix,
however, and it might help the Rockets to be without
Yao Ming because the pace of a Suns game is too quick
for him. If the Suns are hitting three-pointers, it will
make life tough for the Rockets.

WHAT 10

WATCH
THIS WEEK

‘ALL ACCESS



A weekly look inside the NBA champio





n Heat:



EASTERN
CONFERENCE



The New Jersey Nets

WHAT’S YOUR might not be too far from

LEAST FAVOR- trading one or more of their
ITE NBA CITY TO Big Three, with Richard Jef-
VISIT? ferson likely being the most

e Wayne Simien:
I’m nota fan of Jer-
sey. If we stay in
New York City, that’s
cool. But Jersey,
there’s really nothing



there. And the arena is not all that nice, either.
© Dorell Wright: [Salt Lake City] Utah. First,
[Michael] Doleac is from there. Second, it’s

just boring. There ain’t nothing to do.

e Michael Doleac: It’s actually Philadelphia. |
just don't like it. I've never really done any-
thing there. | don’t know why, | just don’t like

‘the city. I’m sure there’s plenty to doin Phila- .

delphia, just like anywhere else. | just

don't like

it. Ever since my rookie year, it’s been one of
those places where | just sit in my hotel and

chill.

FANTASY VS. REALITY





DREW GOODEN, CAVALIERS - .

e Fantasy: The career averages of 12.3
points and 7.8 rebounds, including:2.6 offen-



JULIE JACOBSON/AP

PUMPED UP: Knicks center Eddy Curry, 24, has been ona tear since late November.

Unsung heroes abound

hey never were really bad
| enough to earn Most

Improved Player, but
they’re easily having their best
seasons to date. One or two might
squeeze into the All-Star Game,
although the often cruel numbers
crunch could keep them out.

That doesn’t mean these guys .

don’t deserve some recognition.



ward, not only is finding ways to
play with Arenas, he’s becoming
just as important to Washington.
Butler is putting up career highs
in points, rebounds, assists,
steals, shooting percentage and
free-throw. percentage. hos
The reason might be-as simple
as continuity, This is the first»
time Butlerhas spent a full sec-

forced Smith to grow up or
George Karl is enamored with his
shooting stroke and athleticism.
Regardless, Smith is getting
every chance to excel in Denver.
Entering Friday, Smith was aver-

_aging 16.5 points and shooting -.

45.3 percent in 29.4 minutes —— he

‘had not reached 40 percent

shooting in either of his first two



i
j
|
|



“again.”

untouchable of the group.
Jason Kidd’s suddenly public
divorce isn’t as much of a
problem as the questionable
chemistry on the team. The
Nets would prefer to trade
any of their stars to a Western
Conference team if they make
any major moves... . The
Knicks’ chemistry, on the
other hand, is as Good as it
has been all season. That has
coach Isiah Thomas believing
his team is a serious con-
tender for the Atlantic Divi-
sion title and a top-four play-
off seed. “New Jersey is still
the class of the division as far
as I’m concerned,” Thomas
said. “I’m surprised that we’re
this close to them at this point
in time in the season. Let’s see
where we are in April.” ... Fur-
ther proof that Rasheed Wal-
lace is not playing with a full

, deck: The Pistons recently

endured a distressing 90-min-
ute flight from Oklahoma City
to Chicago that included vio-
lent dips in altitude for most
of the trip. Pistons coach Flip
Saunders called it “the worst
flight of my life.” Wallace’s
reaction? He kept throwing
his hands in the air as if he
were ona roller coaster and
yelled, “Do it again, do it







sive rebounds and 48 percent shooting, will Callthemthe ond season with a team. In his seasons. It helps that there is far
tell you Drew Gooden is a safe bet as a steady All-Break- second and final season in Miami, less structure to Karl’soffense | 0 0-= —~
forward in any fantasy lineup. The problem is, through First Butler was bothered by a knee than Scott’s, but these are the WESTERN
Gooden is one of those rare streaky big men / Team. injury and didn’t round into form kinds of numbers many expected
because his offensive numbers depend | CENTER: until the late stages. Then he from Smith when he was drafted CONFERENCE
largely on whether he’s receiving passes, and | & EDDY CURRY spent one season with the Lakers _ out of high school in 2004. He’s
his rebounding coincides with his enthusiasm This fi and was traded to Washington shooting 38.8 percent fromthreee —s,
fora game. IN Boren oe a before last season. This could point range and can get hot ina

@ Reality: The streakiness remains Good- ISRAEL Chicseo bulls miean a brighter future if Butler hurry, as the Heat saw last month Rockets center Dikembe
en's problem here, also, with Gooden occa BUTIERREZ Payee actually plays with the Wizards when he drained seven threes in Mutombo is not playing like a
sionally disappearing when he doesn’t touch aiteae §«Came out of fi re y the first half 40-year-old. He had double-
the ball as much as he would like. What i , high school as yioss oe oa i figures in rebounds for eight
Gooden does best for his team is bring energy pm Wr, the closest thing © POWER FORWARD: POINT GUARD: consecutive games, averag-
that often is lacking. If he ever could keep his : to Shaquille O’Neal, always has CHRIS WILCOX LEANDRO BARBOSA ing 13 in that span, and is
head in the game long enough, he’d be one of been considered a disappoint- erat The Sonics got a SA TJ. Ford also is blocking shots aggressively.

LeBron James’ most important teammates.



ment. It was either because he



glance at the

having a break-



It’s impressing even him. “It’s

e Winner: Fantasy. couldn’t defend well enough to potential of Wilcox through season at amazing, just the way I’m
stay on the court or wouldn’t when they point guard, but | playing,” Mutombo said.
play aggressively enough on acquired him last that might be more “Even to myself, I'm sitting
offense, or a frustrating combina- season; he aver- of a product of down like, ‘Whoa, is Mutombo
= aac rem tion of both. aged 14.1 points in playing on a bad i really playing like that?’’”...

DWIGHT
HOWARD

SHARIF



GROUNDED

ABDUR-RAHIM

reached the play-

It was more of the same when
he started his second season with
the Knicks. In late November,
though, the light switched on,
and he has been rolling. From
Nov. 24 to jan. 10, Curry aver-
aged 22 points and 7.8 rebounds,

block a few more shots (he aver-

29 games. But in his first four sea-
sons out of Maryland, Wilcox
never averaged better than 8.6
points in one season.

Now that he’s a starter, Wil-
cox is putting that athleticism
and sculpted 6-10 frame to good

up 13 points a game, including a

team. Barbosa is becoming one of
Phoenix’s most consistent threats
and is a major reason why the
Suns have, at times, looked like
the best team in the league.

As recently as last season, his
third in the league, it was thought

season, Barbosa has better than a

Florida alumnus Matt Bonner
tried to brag to his teammates
about the Gators winning the
football national title. But with
so many foreign-born players
onthe Spurs’ roster, he was
largely unsuccessful. “I asked
Manu [Ginobili], ‘Hey, did you

oa Last sea: and shot 60.6 percent. Curry, 24, use. The Sonics areaperimeter- _ that Barbosa was more suitedasa watch the game last night? ”
ae oe who is 6-11, could stand to heavy team that rarely looks shooting guard because of his | Bonner said. “He was like
isn’t Abdur- : 3 BAS ‘> aes . 7 : | : ,
exactly Bahien. rebound a bit more and possibly inside, but Wilcox still is putting shoot-first mentality. But this ‘What game?’ He was dead-

serious. He had no clue.”...

void of a big man, :

with Andris Bied- offs for the first ages less than a block a game), season-best 28 against the Heat, 2-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio for The Clippers could break out

rins being one of time in his career, | but he obviously still is on the and is among the league’s top 20 _ the first time in his career, and he of their perplexing season-

the best young which began 10 ' rise. ‘ in offensive rebounds. still is managing to score almost | long slump now that Sam

post players in the seasons ago. But SMALL FORWARD: SHOOTING GUARD: 17 points a game as a reserve. Cassell has a healthier heel

league. But How- now, Abdur-Rahim | CARON BUTLER J.R. SMITH. He’s still arguably the fastest and the leather ball is back.

ard still had a mon- is amediocre Gilbert Arenas Smith’s biggest player in the league, but now he’s Cassell missed 10 games

ster game, with 30 player ona bad isn’t the only rea- problem with the finding more efficient ways to pee aie bad a Se

points and 25 team. In the Kings’ | os : take advantage of his speed, and Was <0 rom Deyond tne
| son the Washing Hornets was his 8 P are with the old ball. “I’m not

rebounds against
Biedrins this week.
That performance
might be proof
Howard is ready to
handle major
responsibilities.

Abdur-Ra
totaled 17



three losses enter-
ing the weekend,

him
points

and 14 rebounds,
and made
shots.

8 of 22

ton Wizards are
one of the hottest
teams in the East-
ern Conference. In
his second season with the Wiz-
ards, Butler, a former Heat for-





immaturity, which
rubbed Byron
Scott the wrong
way and led to him
being traded twice before he
turned 21. Either getting traded

might be the closet competition
the Bulls’ Ben Gordon has for
Sixth Man of the Year. Oh, and
Barbosa’s development is making
the 2003 draft class look even
better.

where | need to be at right
now, but | can’t wait much
longer,” Cassell said. “I’ve got
to get out there for my ball-
club.”

WHO HAS THE EDGE?



WHO IS MORE LIKELY TO SNEAK INTO THE ALL-STAR GAME:
JOSH HOWARD OR BEN GORDON?
In the Eastern Conference, the starting All-Star guards appear to be Dwyane Wade and Vince Carter,

leaving Gilbert Arenas, Michael Redd, Jason Kidd, Joe Johnson, Richard Hamilton and Gordon vying for
_the rest of the guard spots. Arenas and Redd would seem to be locks, given that they’re in the top six in

#5 Cu scoring, and Hamilton would seem to be the next logical choice as the first-place Pistons’ only represen-
Cy) tative. Usually, the assumed number of guards on the team would be five, which would leave no more 7) tt]
Forward/ spots. But with Paul Pierce sitting with a lengthy injury, and LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Jermaine O'Neal rT Guard

and Caron Butler as the only likely forward candidates, that could open a spot for a sixth guard.

Out West, one of the deepest positions in recent history is at forward. Kevin Garnett and Tim Duncan
look like they'll get the starting votes from the fans, with Dirk Nowitzki and Shawn Marion also appearing
as locks to make the team. Then there are players having big statistical seasons, such as Carlos Boozer
and Zach Randolph. And there is the case of Carmelo Anthony, who leads the league in scoring but will
have missed 15 games because of a suspension for fighting. That’s seven forwards who might have a

The edge: It would be a long shot for either, but the numbers look like they're more in Gordon’s favor. ( () RR ) () \

Guard

6-7/201

HOWARD

MPG © FG% 39% FI% OFF DEF RPG APG SPG BPG 10 PFE s~PPG

6-3/191






stronger case than Howard.

Team G GS MPG )«=FG% «= 3p% «= FI% «= OFF. = s«EF)=— RPG APG

Team G 6S spec. = BPGSsé*TO PFO PPG



DALLAS 30 290 347 A 83 20 5.0 10 18 ij VN 16 25 W2 CHICAGO 3] 6 04 Abt 3 886 24 28 32 08 02 3.0 32 0



“Go online to view our Extras, including Heat beat writer Israel Gutierrez’s weblog and our interactive free-throw game. Also wa
festivities before the defending NBA champions’ opening game, view photo galleries from last season’s run to the title and download wallpaper.








beta tara fof 0)





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

NWS | TER

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL
Orlando 22 16
Washington 20 16
Miami 17 19
Charlotte 12 23
Atlanta 11 23
ATLANTIC = OW OL
Toronto I7 .21
New Jersey 16 20
New York 16 22
Boston 12 24
Philadelphia 10 27

CENTRAL WL

Cleveland 23 13

Detroit 21 14
Chicago 21 (17
Indiana 20 17
Milwaukee 16 20

Str.

Home

14-6
14-3
8-9
7-11
6-10

a HOM

10-6
11-10
9-11
4-13
5-8

Away

8-10
6-13
9-10
5-12
5-13

ANY

7-15
5-10
7-11
8-11
5-19

Cont
12-9
13-9

Pct. GB L10
579-555
556 1 64
42204 55
343 8% 5-5
324 «98
Pet, GB L10
AAT - 5-5
M44 - 55
42101 55
333 4° «(28
270 6% 3-7
Pct. GB L10
639 - 82
600 1% 4-6
553355
541 3% 6-4
444-7 4G

WESTERN CONFERENCE





ONE at ee ee dee Oe AWAY Peat
Dallas 31 8 795 - 91 W-4 17-3 145 21-6
San Antonio 27 11 711 3% «6-4 W-4 146 13-5 18-7
Houston 25 13 658 5% 9-1 W-4 13-3 12-10 13-11
New Orleans 14 22 .38915% 3-7 W-2 8-10 6-12 6-16
Memphis 9 29 .23721% 37 L2 712 217 416
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 2413 649 - 55 L3 144 10-9 168
Minnesota 19 16543, 47-3 ~W-2 126 7-10 11-10
Denver 17 17 500 5% 37 L2 10-10 7-7 5-11
Portland 15 23 395 9% 3-7 Wl 811 7-12 10-11
Seattle 14 25 359 11 2-8 W-l 10-9 416 6-15
ER cee ee aca om ace ties Mame Away Sait
Phoenix 288 778 - 91 W-9 17-3 11-5 12-7
LA.Lakers 24 13 .649 4% 6-4 W-l 17-4 7-9 15-7
Golden State 18 20 474 11 46 L3 14-7 443 12-13
LA. Clippers 17 20 .45911% 5-5 Ll 12-7 5-13 11-15
Sacramento 14 20 412 13 46 LS 10-11 49 8-15

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games

Miami at Lakrs, 10
Utah at Wash., 1
Sac. at N.Y., 1
Mil. at Char., 1
Boston at Atl., 2
S.A. at Chi, 2

Tor. at Phil., 2
Ind. at NJ., 3:30

Sunday’s results

Dallas 97, Toronto 96
Denver at Portland, late

Minn. at Det., 3:30
Clippers at G.S., 4
Pho. at Mem., 7:30



Saturday’s results

Miami 119, Utah 110
Cha. 89, Phi. 83

N.O. at Mil., ppd.

Det. 81, Bos. 73

S.A. 93, Wash. 80
Minn. 109, N.J. 98

Chi. 111, Mem. 66

Pho. 107, Orl. 101

Hou. 115, Sac. 111 (OT)
Cle. 104, L.A.C. 92

e
BY

GUS RUELAS/AP



HEADING TO THE HOOP: Cleveland’s LeBron
James, with ball, drives to the basket past the
Clippers’ Corey Maggette in the fourth
quarter Saturday night in Los Angeles. The

Cavaliers won 104-92.



NHL STANDINGS |

EASTERN CONFERENCE



SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Atlanta 25 14 6 2 58144 143 11-5-3-1 14-9-3-1
Carolina 24°18 2 3 53 143 142 13-7-0-2 11-11-2-1
Tampa Bay 23 21 1 1 48146 144 12-11-0-0 11-10-1-1
Washington 19 19 2 5 45 141 157 11-10-1-2 8-9-1-3
Florida 7 21 3 6 43.135 154 = 12-8-1-1 —_5-13-2-5
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
New Jersey 27 14 O 4 58119 105 15-4-0-3 12-10-0-1
N.Y. Rangers 23 19 3 1 50 139 143 10-9-3-0 13-10-0-1
N.Y. Islanders 21 19 2 2 46128 125 11-8-2-1 10-11-0-1
Pittsburgh 19 17 3 4 45-134 139 10-8-2-2 9-9-1-2
Philadelphia 11 30 2 2 26109 174 3-13-2-2 8-17-0-0
NORTHEAST
Buffalo
Montreal
Ottawa
Toronto
Boston

WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL == Wt OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME AWAY _
Nashville 31 11 2 1 65155 114 = 15-3-2-1 16-8-0-
Detroit 28 12 2 3 61140 109 15-3-1-2 13-9-1
Chicago 17 22) «1. 5 40 112 136 10-11-0-2 7-11-1
St. Louis 16 21 4 3 39109 139 9-11-2-1 7-10-2
Columbus 16 24 2 3 37112 140 9-10-1-2 7-14-1
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME — AWAY
Calgary 24 15 2 2 52135 110 18-5-0-0 6-10-2-2
Vancouver 25 19 O 1 51115 117. 15-8-0-0 10-11-0-1
Minnesota 24 19 0 3 51131 124 17-4-0-2 7-15-0-1
Colorado 22 19 2 1 47 140 129 11-10-1-1 11-9-1-0
Edmonton 21 20 2 2 46125 132 13-8-1-1 8-12-1-1
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Anaheim 30 9 2 6 68162 117 16-3-1-4 14-6-1-
San Jose 30 15 0 O 60141 106 15-8-0-0 15-7-0-
Dallas 26 18 O 1 53120 112 13-8-0-0 13-10-0-
Phoenix 20 22 1 1 42120 149 11-10-i-0 9-12-0-
Los Angeles 16 24 3 3 38132 167 11-10-3-3 5-14-0-







Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Sunday’s results
Minn. 4, Chicago 3, SO-

Today’s games

T.B. at Islanders, 12
Buffalo at Boston, 1

St. Louis at Phoenix, 4

L.A. at Dallas, 4
Calgary at N’ville, 6
Montreal at Detroit, 7
Colorado at S.J., 10

Saturday’s results

Florida 7, Washington 3
Ottawa 8, Montreal 3

St. Louis 6, Los Angeles 5
N.Y. Rangers 3, Boston 1

Pittsburgh 5, Phil. 3

Tampa Bay 3, Buffalo 2

Detroit 6, Chicago 3

Atlanta 4, Carolina 3 (SO)
Vancouver 6, Toronto 1
Nashville 4, Columbus 1

New Jersey 2, Islanders 1 (OT)
San Jose 4, Phoenix 1

Calgary 3, Edmonton 1
Colorado 3, Anaheim 2 (SO)

PRO BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

NBA GAMES

INTERNATIONAL EDITION __MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 | 5



Nowitski, Howard lead Dallas rally

Associated Press
TORONTO — (AP) — The

Dallas Mavericks felt fortunate .

to get the victory.

Dirk Nowitzki had 38 points
and Josh Howard made the go-
ahead layup with 0.9 seconds left
to give the Dallas Mavericks a
97-96 victory over the Toronto
Raptors on Sunday.

Toronto’s Morris Peterson
was told not to switch off How-
ard and cover Nowitzki during a
timeout before the decisive play.
But Peterson did, allowing How-
ard to make a wide-open layup to
give Dallas the lead. Toronto’s
Anthony Parker missed a
3-pointer at the buzzer.

“We really didn’t show up
until the second quarter and then
we were in a dog fight,” Now-
itzki said. “Obviously, we got a
little lucky. They both went with
me and Josh was open and made
a hell of a finish.”

Nowitzki had 11 rebounds, five
assists, three blocks and two
-steals for the Mavericks, winners
of 17 of their last 18 games.

Chris Bosh had 24 points and
15 rebounds, but his turnover
after winning a jump ball set up
the Mavericks’ last play with 6.5
seconds left. After the Mavericks
inbounded the ball, Peterson
converged on Nowitzki, allowing
Howard to stand under the bas-
ket uncovered to receive Jason
Terry’s pass. :

“I found Josh wide open. He
made like a receiver and it was a
great play,” Terry said. “Toronto
could have easily won that
game.” :

Toronto led nearly the entire
game, with Dallas briefly taking
the lead with just over two min-
utes left and for good on How-
ard’s layup.

Peterson called it a tough loss.

“We wanted this game bad.
To come up short is definitely
disappointing,” Peterson said.
“The lesson we can take out of
this game is that we can play
with anybody. We took a team
like Dallas down to the wire.”

The Raptors led by as many as
16, but Nowitzki scored eight
straight points to start the fourth
to cut the lead to three.

Bosh attempted just one shot
in the fourth compared to five for
backup point guard Jose Calde-
ron. Bosh played only 5:48 min-
utes in the final quarter.

Toronto led by 11 at halftime
and lost despite shooting 48.6
percent from the field.

T.J. Ford had 16 points and
eight assists.

NHL GAMES

Associated Press



DIV |
10-401 Blackhawks 4-3 on Sunday
8-8-0-0 | night.
ee | A possible shootout goal by
3-11-0-2 | Denis Arkhipov, Chicago’s
|

line.
Pierre-Marc

CHICAGO — Pavol Demi-
tra scored the only shootout
goal, and the Minnesota Wild
rallied to beat the Chicago

third shooter, was disallowed
after a video review. Minne-
sota goalie Manny Fernandez
stopped the shot, then it
nearly trickled over the goal

Bouchard,
Marian Gaborik and Wes
Walz scored in regulation for
Minnesota, which won its
third straight overall and on
the road. The Wild hadn’t
posted three consecutive road
wins since last February.
Tuomo Ruutu, Martin Hav-
lat, Cam Barker scored in reg-





ADRIAN WYLD/CP/AP

DRIVE-BY IN TORONTO: Dallas Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki, right,
drives past Toronto Raptors’ Jorge Garbajosa during their
game in Toronto on Sunday. The Mavericks defeated the
Raptors 97-96 as Nowitzki scored 38 points.

. Andrea Bargnani, the No. 1
pick in the draft, had 12 points,
including two 3-pointers. The
7-foot Italian has often been
compared to Nowitzki because
of his size and outside shot.

“He’s a better player than

when I was 19 or 20,” Nowitzki '

said of the 21-year-old Bargnani.
“He’s going to be a heck of a
player. He’s a little more athletic
than I even was back then. He
can drive a little better than me.”

LATE SATURDAY

e Heat 119, Jazz 110: In Salt
Lake City, Dwyane Wade had 32
points and 10 assists, and Miami
extended its longest winning
streak of the season to four.

Wade made 21 of 23 free
throws and Miami improved to

4-1 on a six-game road trip,
which concludes Monday against
the Los Angeles Lakers. The
Heat are also 4-2 since Ron
Rothstein took over as interim
coach for Pat Riley.

The game took nearly three
hours, as the teams shot a com-
bined 99 free throws. The Heat
were far better at the line, going
42-for-45 while giving the Jazz
their first three-game losing
streak of the season.

Carlos Boozer led the Jazz
with 29 points and 14 rebounds.
Matt Harpring scored 18 points
for Utah.

® Suns 107, Magic 101: In
Phoenix, Boris Diaw fell a
rebound shy of a triple-double
and Phoenix held off a late
Orlando rally for its ninth victory





oN ulation for Chicago, which lost
oigoi | its sixth straight.
7-5-0-2 Trailing 3-1, Gaborik scored
9-5-1-0 short-handed late in the sec-
7-9-1-0 ond period and Walz con-
DIV nected midway through the

third to tie the score.

three games.

LATE SATURDAY

career hat trick.



Gaborik, playing for the
fifth time after missing 34
games due to a strained groin,
got his fifth goal in the last

Barker, recalled earlier in
the day from Norfolk of the
AHL, scored on a 5-on-3 power
play for his first NHL goal.

@ Panthers 7, Capitals 3:
In Sunrise, Fla., Stephen Weiss
scored three goals for his first

Jay Bouwmeester, selected
to the Eastern Conference All-
Star team earlier in the day,

had 14 saves.

saves on 12 shots.

had two goals and two assists
for Florida. Chris Gratton and
Rostislav Olesz also scored for
the Panthers, and Ed Belfour

Alexander Semin, Matt Pet-
tinger and Chris Clark scored
for Washington, which lost its
fifth straight on the road. Olaf
Kolzig gave up five goals on 41
shots before being replaced by
Brent Johnson at the start of
the third. Johnson made 10

The 53 shots were a season

TERRENCE ANTONIO JAMES/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT

THE CHASE IS ON: The Wild’s Brent Burns, left, chases the
Blackhawks’ Jeff Hamilton in the first period in Chicago.

high for Florida, which has
won four straight at home.

e Sharks 4, Coyotes 1: In
Glendale, Ariz., Ryane Clowe
had two goals and an assist,
Vesa Toskala made 29 saves
and San Jose beat Phoenix.

Jonathan Cheechoo and
Matt Carle also scored, and
Joe Thornton added three
assists for the Sharks, who
won for the fifth time in six
games.

Shane Doan scored for the
Coyotes, losers of two straight

in a row.

Diaw had 19 points and 11
assists to help the Suns improve
to 17-1 against Eastern Confer-
ence foes this season. Steve Nash
scored 17 of his 23 points in the
first half for Phoenix and had
eight assists.

Jameer Nelson scored 26
points, 16 in the third quarter,
and Hedo Turkoglu added 18 for
the Magic, who had six players in
double figures.

Phoenix also put six in double
digits. Shawn Marion scored 16
and had a season-high five steals.
Raja Bell scored 15 and Amare
Stoudemire and Leandro Barbosa
added 12 apiece. :

e Rockets 115, Kings 111
(OT): In Sacramento, Calif.,
Tracy McGrady had 37 points
and nine assists as Houston
handed Sacramento its fifth
straight loss.

Rafer Alston had 22 points
and eight assists for Houston,
which has won four straight and
nine of 10. Juwan Howard made
his first five shots and scored 17
points, Luther Head scored 14
points, and Dikembe Mutombo
added 11 points and 18 rebounds.

A difficult season continues
for the Kings, who fell to a very
uncharacteristic 10-11 at home.
They have lost four straight at
Arco Arena and may welcome
the upcoming stretch that has
them playing eight of 10 games
on the road, starting today in
New York.

Ron Artest scored 34 points
and reserve Corliss Williamson
had season highs of 30 points and
12 rebounds for the Kings. Shar-
eef Abdur-Rahim scored 15,
Kevin Martin had 14, and Mike
Bibby missed 11 of 14 shots and
finished with 12 points. |

e Cavaliers 104, Clippers
92: In Los Angeles, LeBron
James scored 28 points and Zyd-
runas Ilgauskas had 20 for Cleve-
land.

The Cavaliers, making the
third stop on their seven-game
road trip and coming off their
most lopsided loss of the season
in Phoenix, won for the ninth
time in their last 11 games. Eric
Snow finished with 18 points for
Cleveland, which leads the East-
ern Conference with a 23-13
record.

The Clippers, coming off a
six-game road trip, got 22 points
from reserve forward Corey
Maggette. Chris Kaman had 20
points and nine rebounds, and
Elton Brand added 16 points and
10 boards.

after a seven-game winning
streak.

Clowe broke a 1-1 tie at
14:28 of the second period
when he one-timed Doug
Murray’s pass from the left
boards over Curtis Joseph’s
left shoulder for his eighth
goal in five games.

Clowe has ll goals and
three assists in 21 games.

e Avalanche 3, Ducks 2
(SO): In Anaheim, Calif. —
(AP) — Milan Hedjuk scored
the deciding goal in the shoot-
out to lift Colorado past Ana-
heim.

Hedjuk beat goalie Ilya Bry-
zaglov with a backhand shot in
the fourth round of the shoot-
out, after Wojtek Woksi had
previously scored for the Ava-
lanche and Chris Kunitz for
the Ducks in the opening
round.

Anaheim’s Ryan Getzlaf
sent the game to overtime
with a goal from the slot off a
feed from Corey Perry with
11:03 to play. Rookie Curtis
Glencross also scored for the
Ducks in his in his first NHL
game.

Andrew Brunette and Wol-
ski scored for Colorado, and
Peter Budaj had 38 saves.

e Flames 3, Oilers 1: In
Calgary, Alberta, Dion Pha-
neuf scored the tiebreaking
power-play goal at 11:29 of the
third period and Calgary ral-
lied past Edmonton.

Phaneuf one-timed a nifty
pass from Kristian Huselius
past goalie Dwayne Roloson to
give the Flames their first lead
of the game. Jeff Friesen and
Matthew Lombardi also
scored for the Flames, winners
of five straight.

Demitra’s shootout goal lifts Wild





7E. | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Bears advance
in overtime

- *NFC

an upgrade from his final per-
formance of the regular sea-
son, when he had a quarter-

back rating of 0.0 in a loss to.

Green Bay.

Seattle got the ball first in
overtime, but Chicago’s Israel
Idonije forced an 18-yard punt
by Ryan Plackemeier with a
strong rush. Grossman hit
. Davis for a third-down pass of
-_ 30 yards to the Seattle 36.

“Pye learned that he knows
how to bounce back from
tough situations,” coach Lovie
Smith said of Grossman. “He’s
been roasted the past couple
-’ weeks over all different kinds

\* of things. He is our quarter-

“ pressure on him and our
entire football team and I
thought they handled it well.”

The unheralded Davis is a

_ former Arena League player.

“after I got up, I screamed.
It was probably the biggest
catch I made in my life,”
Davis said.

Gould, who entered the
NFL as an undrafted free
agent and is now headed to
the Pro Bowl, made his first
24 field goals this season, and
32 of 36 overall. His 41-yarder
with 4:24 left Sunday just
cleared the crossbar and tied
the game at 24.

The Bears had won a divi-
sion title and earned a first-
round bye in their previous
two playoff appearances, only
to lose their first game at
home, so their elation was
tinged with relief.

The Seahawks (10-8), rav-
aged by injuries throughout
the season, got a strong per-

formance from Shaun Alexan=

der. Alexander, who missed
the first meeting between the
teams, a 37-6 Chicago win in
October, gained 108 yards and
gave the Bears’ defense a

tough time. He had a pair of

touchdowns runs.

“Jt’s hard to say ‘If we had
this or that,” Alexander said.
“Tt was, ‘Nah we came up
short.”

Late in the fourth quarter,
the Bears stacked up Alexan-
der on third-and-1 for no gain
at the Chicago 44, and the
Seahawks decided to go for it.
But Matt Hasselbeck bobbled
the snap and Lance Briggs
threw Alexander for a 2-yard
loss, turning the ball over to
the Bears with just under two
minutes to go.

“If the snap was smooth, I
could have run for a TD,”
Alexander said. “It was defi-
nitely the best I felt all season
running the ball.”

After a short completion
and two of Grossman’s passes
were deflected — one nearly
intercepted — the Bears
punted.

The Seahawks got the ball
at the 20 with 1:38 to go and
moved to the Bears 45 before
Tank Johnson, whose legal
problems have been a head-
ache for his team this season,
sacked Hasselbeck.

Davis made his catch when
Jordan Babineaux let him get
past the line. Babineaux, who
also missed an early intercep-
tion Saturday, hauled down
Tony Romo after he bobbled
the snap on a field goal
attempt in Seattle’s 21-20 vic-
tory over Dallas last weekend.

“We had this game,” Babi-
neaux said of Sunday’s dis-
heartening loss. “My job was
to reroute the receiver

(Davis) and he got behind me

real quick. I was supposed to
knock him off his route.”
Last year’s NFC champs
took their first lead in the
third quarter and momen-
tarily silenced the bundled up
crown at Soldier Field — tem-
peratures were in the 30s —

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Patriots eliminate Chargers 24-21

* AFC

“We lost:to a better team
today,” Tomlinson said.
_ “Hopefully the next opportu-
nity we have we'll learn some-
thing from this.”

The winning points came.

on a 31-yard field goal by Ste-
phen Gostkowski with 1:10
left. That capped a 72-yard
drive highlighted by a 49-yard

pass to Reche Caldwell, who

left the Chargers as a free
agent after last season.

’ Coincidentally, the man
the rookie Gostkowski
replaced, Adam Vinatieri,
kicked five field goals for all
of Indianapolis’ points in a
15-6 win at Baltimore on Sat-
urday.

With the Patriots trailing
21-13, Brady threw a 4-yard
touchdown pass to the wide-
open Caldwell with 4:36 to

_play. The Patriots tied it ona

‘. tricky 2-point conversion,

‘ snapping the ball directly to
running back Kevin Faulk,
who was standing next to
Brady and ran through the
middle of the line.

San Diego’s Pro Bowl

. kicker Nate Kaeding was

short on a 54-yard field goal

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI

SUPER BOWL XxXI

NEW YORK 39, DENVER 20

e Jan. 25,1987
oe Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

e@ MVP: QB Phil Simms, New York

After guiding the New York Giants to their
first Super Bowl victory, quarterback Phil
Simms was asked, “What are you going to do
next?” To which he responded: “I’m going to

Disney World!”



DENIS POROY/AP

LOOKING TO PASS: Patriots
quarterback Tom Brady
looks for an opening
against the Chargers.

try with 3 seconds left.

It was a crushing end to
San Diego’s season, and could
lead to coach Marty Schotten-
heimer’s ouster.

Schottenheimer fell to 5-13
in the postseason in his
career, with Cleveland, Kan-
sas City and San Diego.
Although he has a year left on
his contract, at more than $3
million, he and general man-
ager A.J. Smith have had an
icy relationship for months,

As aresult, Disney launched a “What’s next?”
advertising campaign, starting with Simms.

Over the years, Super Bowl MVPs Joe Montana, Troy Aikman,
Ernmitt Smith, Jerry Rice, Steve Young, John Elway and Tom
Brady ‘have been featured in the spots. Other sports stars who
have appeared in the ads include Mark McGwire, Michael Jordan,



Olympic figure skating silver-medalist Nancy Kerrigan, the 1999

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



The wild, weird,
wackyand:
wondrous of past
Super Bowls”

lls
ete) ea
ees



when Alexander ran up the
middle for a 13-yard TD ona
third-and-10 to make it 24-21.

Earlier, as Gould made a
field goal that would have tied
the game, Seattle’s Leroy Hill
was called for jumping up and
trying to induce a false start.
Instead of the three points,
the Bears got 5 extra yards on
the penalty and a first down at
the Seattle 13.

’ But Grossman’s pass went
off Muhsin Muhammad’s
shoulder pad and Pete
Hunter, who had been work-
ing in a mortgage office
before being signed before
the playoffs, intercepted early
in the fourth quarter.

Hasselbeck gave it right
back on first down when his
pass was intercepted by Ricky
Manning Jr. at the 32. The
Béars couldn’t canvert and
punted.

Seattle moved swiftly to
the Bears 21 on the opening

series of the second half, but,

Briggs knocked Alexander

PRO FOOTBALL

___ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

sno emnennettvnitniatynst ratemmrerttan tennant ett A





JIM PRISCHING/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT
SCORING LEAP: The Bears’ Thomas Jones leaps over the
goal line to score his first-quarter touchdown against
the Seahawks in Chicago on Sunday.

off a 13-yard: run, and on
fourth-and-1 fromthe Bears 4,
he bulled his way into the end
zone to make it 14-14 with 2:29
left in the first half. The score
was set up by Grossman’s
fumble.

But the Bears didn’t run
out the clock. Grossman
rebounded from the turnover,
finding Muhammad for 21
yards and Davis with an 18-
yarder to the 16.

Muhammad_ grabbed
another pass to the 7, and
Thomas Jones ran in for the
score on fourth down for a
21-14 lead.

Jones opened the scoring
with a for a 9-yard TD to capa
12-play, 80-yard drive that
opened the game.

Seattle got even early in
the second quarter. Hassel-
beck hit passes of 24 and 14
yards to Darrell Jackson, the
Seahawks’ leading receiver
who’s been bothered by a sore

,|toe. Nate Burleson powered
‘his way into the end zone to

back for a l-yard loss on third- _ complete a 16-yard scoring

and-l. Josh Brown connectedâ„¢ pass play.

on a 40-yard field goal that
got the Seahawks within 21-17.

Alexander showed at times
why he was the 2005 MVP. In
the second quarter, he broke

and the front-office felt this
team was built for a deep
playoff run.

Schottenhbeimer will no
doubt be criticized for going
for it on fourth-and-ll from
the New England 30-yard line
in the fourth quarter rather
than having Kaeding try a
field goal.

Philip Rivers, the Chargers’
first-year starting quarter-
back, was sacked by Mike
Vrabel and fumbled, giving
the Patriots the ball at their 35.

The Chargers had four
turnovers and made other
critical mistakes.

Punt returner Eric Parker
had a double muff to give the
Patriots the ball on their 31
late in the third quarter. Fol-
lowing a third-and-13 on
which Brady fumbled and
Matt Light recovered, Char-
gers cornerback Drayton
Florence head-butted tight
end Daniel Graham and drew
a 15-yard unsportsmanlike
conduct penalty. That led to
Gostkowski’s. 24-yard field
that pulled the Patriots to
14-13.

Tomlinson scored on a
3-yard run with 8:35 left in the
game for a 21-13 lead.

Red Sox.

Houston.

The tie laste
Grossman hit




rookie corner Kelly Jennings

for a 68-yard TD pass.

On the next Patriots drive,
Brady was intercepted by
safety Marlon McCree, who,
rather than going down, tried
for a return and was hit by
Troy Brown and fumbled,
with Caldwell recovering.

The Chargers challenged,
but the play was upheld, and
the Patriots had the ball at the
Chargers 32. Five plays later,
Brady hit Caldwell and Faulk
added the conversion.

Tomlinson scored on a
2-yard run in the second quar-
ter for a 7-3 lead. Later, he
turned a screen pass into a
brilliant 58-yard gain, leaving
two defenders grasping at air
while he scooted to the New
England 6} His backup,
Michael Turner, scored on
the next play for a 14-3 lead.

Brady kept the Patriots in it
by running the two-minute
offense to perfection, pulling
New England to 14-10 just
before halftime. At the end of
the 10-play, 72-yard drive,
Brady had all day to throw a
6-yard pass to Jabar Gaffney
in the back of the end zone.

San Diego lost its fourth
straight postseason game dat-
ing to the Super Bowl follow-
ing the 1994 season.

U.S. women’s World Cup championship team
and the 2004 World Series champion Boston

The Disney ads were noticeably absent
during 2005, breaking a 19-year streak. Several
industry analysts reasoned image-conscious
Disney stopped the campaign in response to

Jackson's wardrobe malfunction during the
halftime show of Super Bowl XXXVIIIin

Disney officials disputed claims that the

Super Bowl had become too.“mature” for its
target audience, saying the “What's next?”
campaign did not mesh with its marketing efforts that year.
The ads resumed in 2006 with Super Bowl MVP Hines Ward,
who announced, “I’m going to Disney World and I'm taking The

Bus [teammate Jerome Bettis].”

- SARAH ROTHSCHILD

|
|





NFL NOTES



Cardinals hire
Steelers assistant
Whisenhunt as
team’s new coach

Associated Press
The Arizona Cardinals

hired Pittsburgh Steelers

offensive coordinator Ken
Whisenhunt as coach after a
5-11 season that culminated
with Dennis Green’s firing.

The 44-year-old Whisen-
hunt signed a four-year con-
tract with a team option for a
fifth, the Cardinals
announced Sunday.

Green was fired after
three seasons and a 16-32
record. Whisenhunt
becomes the Cardinals’
eighth coach since the fran-
chise moved to Arizona in
1988.

Whisenhunt was one of
eight candidates interviewed
for the job, but one of only
two who got a second inter-
view. The other was former
Green Bay Packers coach
Mike Sherman.

The Steelers assistant also
interviewed for coaching
jobs in Pittsburgh, Miami and
Atlanta. He and fellow Pitts-
burgh assistant Russ Grimm
had been considered leading
candidates to replace Bill
Cowher with the Steelers.

“Tt’s clear to us that he has
all the attributes we were
seeking,” Cardinals vice
president of football opera-
tions Rod Graves said in a
news release, “in terms of
coaching ability, enthusiasm,
organizational and. leader-
ship skills and the overall
ability to lead this team to
success immediately and for
years to come.”

The new coach inherits
plenty of young talent,
including quarterback Matt
Leinart and a pair of the top
receivers in the NFL,
Anquan Boldin and Larry
Fitzgerald. However, he
also joins a franchise with a
legacy of losing unprece-
dented in this era of NFL par-
ity.
The Cardinals have had
one winning season, and one
playoff appearance, since
1984. They have one playoff
victory since winning the
NFL championship in 1947.

Owner Bill Bidwill and
son Michael, the Cardinals’
vice president and general
counsel, joined Graves in
conducting the interviews.
The Cardinals insist they are
intent at putting a winning
team in their new stadium,
pointing to the free agent
acquisition of running back
Edgerrin James and con-
tract extensions to Boldin,
Pro Bow] safety Adrian Wil-
son and several other of
their best young players.

At Pittsburgh, Whisen-
hunt helped develop. Ben
Roethlisberger into an
immediate success. He has
another talented pupil now
in Leinart.

“Young quarterbacks that
have a bright future like he
does are hard to find,” Whis-
enhunt said after his initial
interview with the Cardinals
on Jan. 5. “They don’t grow
on trees. That’s an exciting
part of this organization.”

Whisenhunt, who will be
introduced at a news confer-
ence on Tuesday, spent six





years on Cowher’s staff,
three’as tight ends coach and
three as offensive coordina-
tor. He also had assistant
coaching stints with the New
York Jets, @leveland and Bal-
timore. Whisenhunt played .
in the NFL for nine seasons
with Atlanta, Washington
and the Jets.

In his second season as
ceordinator, the Steelers
won the Super Bowl, averag-
ing 26.8 points per game in
the playoffs. This season,
Pittsburgh’s offense ranked
seventh in the NFL, ninth in
passing and 10th in rushing.

The other candidates
interviewed by the Cardinals
were Grimm, Tennessee
Titans offensive coordinator
Norm Chow, Chicago Bears
defensive coordinator Ron
Rivera, San Diego Chargers
offensive coordinator Cam
Cameron, Indianapolis
Colts assistant head coach-
quarterbacks coach Jim
Caldwell and Cardinals
defensive coordinator
Clancy Pendergast.

DOLPHINS

Former Atlanta Falcons
coach Jim Mora Jr. has been
invited to a second interview
with the Miami Dolphins,
who also plan to meet again
with Georgia Tech coach
Chan Gailey and New York

‘Jets offensive coordinator

Brian Schottenheimer, a
person familiar with the
team’s search said Sunday.

The person requested
anonymity because the Dol-
phins have declined to iden-
tify candidates.

The Dolphins reached an
agreement with their defen-
sive coordinator, Dom
Capers, on a new three-year
contract. He may remain in
contention for the head
coaching job vacated when
Nick Saban left for Alabama
on Jan. 3.

Dolphins officials pared
down their list of candidates
over the weekend. The team
met with 12 coaches during
the first round of interviews,
which ended Wednesday.

Last week, the Dolphins
said they planned to narrow
the list to five candidates,
then to two before making an
offer.

49ERS

The San Francisco 49ers
hired veteran assistant coach
Al Everest to be their spe-
cial teams coordinator on
Sunday.

Everest spent last season
as a consultant at Southern
California after serving as
the New Orleans Saints’ spe-
cial teams coordinator from
2000-05. He had the same job
with the Arizona Cardinals
the previous four years.

Everest replaces Larry
Mac Duff, who resigned Jan.
7 to become assistant head
coach and co-defensive coor-
dinator at Texas. San Fran-
cisco still must hire a
replacement for defensive
coordinator Billy Davis, who
was fired after the 49ers’ 7-9
season. He also coached in
the CFL and Arena League.

6 P.M, EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @ ON TV: CBS

fo) PHIL SIMMS





GETTY IMAGES FILE PHOTO










Volume: 103 No.45

| gem PLENTY OF |
|e SUNSHINE

{
{

UAC a TEL
Meir Ue UL

aa eg Cag aesy | Sige) UT

Residents complain over
the condition of houses at
government sub-division

@ By ALEXANDRIO cially my house, because as far
MORLEY as am concerned my house is in
Tribune Staff Reporter a mess and the contractor needs

=e] to come back and do what he
ANGRY home-owners are _ has to do.”
complaining about leaky roofs, House 44

cheap house paint and many,

unfinishéd repairs in a recently-
built goverment sub-division.
Excellence Gardens Number
Two is located in the
Carmichael Road constituency.
_ Last year, residents contacted
The Tribune about alleged
“shoddy” work done during
ction of their homes.
Liana Carey, one of the
epersons for the residents,
contacted The Tribune yester-
day and some home-owners
took the opportunity to express
their complaints.
House 42
According to Ms Carey, she
moved into her home at the end
of September, and from the
beginning she realised the house
was not completely finished.
She’ explained: “The ceiling
light is cracked, my doors can’t
shut unless you slam them, and



The owner, who said she
wanted,to be known only as Ms
Kelly, said she moved into her
new home last October, and
claimed the contractor was
working on her house right up
to her move-in date. ?

“Steel nails are still in the
concrete floor, I have cracked
tiles, and my doors are coming
off the hinges because I have
to slam them just to get them
closed.”

Ms Kelly claimed that her
house was in such a “mess” that
she ended up in the hospital due
to stress.

“I expected this to be my
dream home, but my house was
below standard from the day
that I stepped in the door,”
exclaimed Ms Kelly.

When The Tribune reporter
asked if she had any further
complaints, the single mother













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MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

migrants on Sunday morning.
Flamingo Cay in the Ragged

Woman in

The Miami Herald

; BAHAMAS EDITION



ahamias Defence Force apprehended 111 Haitian

The 96 males and 15 females were found on

[sland chain in the Southern Bahamas _
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)






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Announcement on Daniel Smith Man in hospital

as a result all of the doors are said “no” because her list of 1 jess | i : ene ys

falling off their hinges.” complaints could go on “forev- Os pital : death inquest decision to day after being
House 46 er”. as i :

, sor leu as sale , Ly 85 eae ea f é 11 e : Mi By ALISON LOWE final decision on the matter - f d 6 th

into her three-bedroom home s Minarva Culmer said she W : Tribune Staff Reporter on Friday. i

with her two young daughters was the very first person to O O ing i 2 The Tribune reported on } oun Wi

over 4 month ago.

“There are patches in my

house, the tub is mouldly and
bent up, and I don’t even have
hot water,” said Ms Sargent.
_ Ms Sargent said she com-
plained to the building contrac-
tor and he promised to inspect
the home, but he never did.

She added: “Mr Neville Wis-
dom (Housing Minister) needs
to inspect these houses, espe-

move into the area, when there
was no access to water or elec-
tricty.

“T was here in September
using a generator with a two-
month-old baby,” she
explained. a

Ms Culmer is complaining
about an unfinished bathroom

- floor, thin walls, flaky wall paint

SEE page 13

2007

! 12noon - 5pm « January 27th 2007
Entry Fee: Adults $5 Children $7



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
| }

FREEPORT - A 21-year-old }
woman is detained in serious con- :
dition at Rand Memorial Hospital :
following a stabbing incident at :
Port Lucaya Marketplace over :

the weekend.

Shakera Gordon, of Braemer }
Drive, South Bahamia, was at :
Port Lucaya around 11.30pm }
when she was stabbed by another ;

woman.

According to reports, the :
attacker sneaked behind Ms Gor- }
don and stabbed her in the lower :
right back with a knife. The vic- j
tim ran to her car and drove to i
Municipal Plaza on East Sunrise :
Highway, where she was assisted i

to hospital.

Police are searching for the

assailant.
* rf

FIREARM ARREST

GRAND Bahama Police
arrested three young men after ;

stabbing

BY 2PM tomorrow an
announcement will be made on
whether an inquest will be held
into the death of 20-year-old
Daniel Smith, son of contro-
versial US reality TV star Anna
Nicole Smith.

This revelation was made by
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
- the man charged with the
responsibility of making the

Thursday that Bernard Turner,
director of public prosecutions,
had told the Associated Press
that the police file - which has

Mr Gomez by Friday.

SEE page 13

Bahamasair boss denies
¢73 000 stolen from airline

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter



police.

on Saturday it was reported th

that the money had been stolen, but would say little more about the : 1 ;
: came to receive his

incident.

They would not say if they had any suspects, or if they felt they ;
were close to making an arrest. i

The Tribune spoke with ASP Drexel Cartwright, who said that he

SEE page 13

head injuries

: , : m@ By ALISON LOWE
been in the office of the Attor- $=
ney General - would be with :

AN UNCONSCIOUS 22-

year-old man was found

On Friday lunchtime, he said | \ith lacerations to the head

he was still awaiting the file, but | at the side of a road in Long
: Island at around lam on
: Saturday, police said yester-

, day.

Press liaison officer Wal-

: ter Evans said the man was
: lying in an "unresponsive"
: state in the Roses area of

: Deadman's Cay.

He is now "very ill" in

: the intensive care unit of

THE boss of Bahamasair is denying claims that $73,000 has ce Me eter RDN D
been stolen from the airline and that the matter was reported to ; WHEL UE WAS SIME
: shortly after being discov-

The Tribune learned of the theft from an anonymous source, and ; ered.

at senior officers had confirmed : ,
: ing how the man

Police are still investigat-

injuries.
"Whether it was.a traffic

: accident, or an assault, we
: can't say as yet," said Mr
: Evans.

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eA Op ot ee pm pr iggtiast

PAGE 20, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

@ ASEAN leaders pose for

a group photo prior to their
meeting with their counter-
parts from China, Japan and
South Korea in the 12th
ASEAN Summit and their
Dialogue Partners Sunday,
Jan. 14, 2007 in Cebu, central
Philippines. The leaders are,
from left: Prime Minister Hun
Sen of Cambodia, Boediono
(in place of Indonesian Presi-
dent Susilo Bambang Yudhoy-
ono), Prime Minister Boua-
sone Bouphavanh of Laos,
Prime Minister Abdullah
Ahmad Badawi of Malaysia,
President Roh Moo-hyun of
South Korea, Chinese Premier
Wen Jiabao, President Gloria
Macapagal Arroyo of the
Philippines, Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe of Japan, Prime
Minister Lee Hsien Loong of

Singapore, Prime Minister Soe |

Win of Myanmar, Prime Min-
ister Surayud Chulanont of
Thailand, Vietnamese Prime
Minister Nguyen Than Dung
and Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah
of Brunei Darussalam.

(AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Telecommunications Market Information and Data Collection



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



The Public Utilities Commission hereby invites comments from
licensees and other interested parties on its consultation document
on Telecommunications Market Information and Data Collection.

The goals of this consultation are to:
a) inform licensees and other stakeholders of the PUC’s

intention to regularly collect information from the
telecommunications sector;
b) indicate how the PUC intends to use and analyze the
information and data collected; and |
c) invite comments from licensees and other stakeholders.

Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 requires the PUC
to act in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory
manner and consistent with the objectives of the Act. While section
6(5) of the Act requires the Commission to publish its proposals on
any general instruction intended to be issued under any part of the
Act.

Copies of this document can be obtained from the PUC’s office
located in the Agape House at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue or
downloaded from the PUC’s website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs.
Written comments should be submitted by February 2, 2007 via
post, hand delivery, facsimile or e-mail to:

Mr. Barrett Russell
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P. 0. Box N4960, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
_ Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: (242)323-7288
Email: info@puchahamas.gov.bs

The College of The Bahamas

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 012007

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THE TRIBUNE

Southeast Asian

leade

rs hold

summits with
China, other
Asian partners

‘i CEBU, Philippines

ASIAN powerhouses Japan,
China, and South Korea held
their first joint summit in two
years Sunday, urging North
Korea to drop its nuclear pro-
gram and trying to deepen trade
ties with Southeast Asia, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

A series of talks were held on
the eve of this year's last big
Asian regional meeting, which
was set for Monday and meant
to tackle energy security as the
fast-developing area — spanning
from Australia to India — seeks
ways to lessen dependency on
Mideast oil and forge trade deals.

The talks, hosted in the central
Philippine city of Cebu, came a
day after the 10-country Associa-
tion of Southeast Asian Nations
or ASEAN completed its own
annual meeting, vowing to
strengthen political solidarity,
fight terrorism and create a free
trade zone by 2015.

South Korea's President Roh
Moo-hyun, Chinese Premier Wen
Jiabao and Japanese Prime Min-
ister Shinzo Abe expressed con-
cern over North Korea's nuclear
test, and restated the need to ful-
ly carry out U.N. sanctions against
Pyongyang.

The countries are looking for a
way to persuade North Korea to
return to international talks
aimed at getting it to abandon its
nuclear weapons program. The
most recent round of interna-
tional talks on the issue broke

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down without progress last month
in Beijing.

According to a statement deliv-
ered after Sunday's ASEAN-
South Korea summit, Philippine
President Gloria Macapagal
Arroyo expressed "solidarity"
with efforts to solve the standoff
through talks.

"The nuclear test of North
Korea casts a blight on our dream
of one caring and sharing com-
munity," she said in the state-
ment.

She said the region hopes

_ North Korea's Oct. 9 nuclear test

will not inspire an arms race, par-
ticularly with Tokyo.

"It may be tempting for Japan
to consider becoming a nuclear
weapons state," the statement
said. "But the possession of
nuclear weapons by more coun-
tries in our region will only lead
to greater risks, not less."

The Japan-China-South Korea
meeting provided a chance for
the three neighbors to mend ties
damaged by disputes over sever-

-al small islands, oil drilling rights

and Japanese leaders' visits to a
Tokyo war shrine seen by many
as a symbol of Japanese mili-
tarism.

"I would like to make an effort
to keep holding summits with
China and South Korea, and also
to build up better communication
and trust with both nations," Abe
said afterward.

In other meetings, the ASEAN
leaders and India agreed to
increase economic and cultural
exchanges, and suggested south-
east Asia play a "balancing role"
between the emerging economic
powerhouses of India and China.

They also expressed support















@ SOUTH Korean
President Roh Moo-
Hyun, left, shakes hand
with China's Prime
Minister Wen Jiabao
before their meeting
during the 12th Associa-
tion of Southeast Asian
Nations (ASEAN) sum-
mit in Cebu, central
Philippines, Sunday,
Jan. 14, 2007 in Cebu
City in central Philip-
pines.





(AP Photo/
Beawiharta, POOL)

for a free trade agreement
between India and ASEAN
member states.

On Monday, the ASEAN lead-
ers will hold their final summit in
Cebu with Australia, New
Zealand, India, Japan, China and
South Korea.

They will sign The Cebu Goals
on East Asian Energy Security,
which aims to help countries
reduce their dependence on con-
ventional fuels and seek new
energy sources, particularly bio-
fuels.

Minimizing greenhouse gas
emissions and investing in infra-
structure — such as a regional elec-
tricity grid and a natural gas
pipeline spanning Southeast Asia
— to ensure stable energy supplies
will also be discussed, according
to a draft agreement.

ASEAN's members are the
Philippines, Thailand, Myanmar,
Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore,
Brunei, Cambodia, Laos and
Vietnam.

Also arriving here on Sunday
were Australia and New Zealand,
ASEAN's two other "dialogue
partners" for a broader summit
to be held on Monday.







PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





lice
into
heir

| we
ome
se it
‘he

the
now
on.”
Tri-
rent

sing
illed
alse

nies Though in a new role, Munroe will continue to provide her trademark of dedicated, quality service. With over three

decades of distinguished service to the general insurance industry, Mary Munroe is foved by many and known for

her ability to build and strengthen client relations. “I would follow her wherever she goes,” said Martha Wallace, a
long-time client. “She really cares, not just-about her clients but about the community and the less fortunate.”

the
qan-
iort-

eral
rier.
umi-
rav-
ajor
dus-
age-

Mary Munroe Joins Colina General Insurance Agency
COMMITMENT TO PROVIDING QUALITY SERVICE

Quality Service: Meet Mary Munroe, the newest member of
the Colina General family... (Photo ay: Colina General insurance Agency)

(Nassau, Bahamas) — Wednesday December 13, 2006, Colina General Insurance Agency officially announced the

appointment of fong time industry veteran Mary CG. Munroe to the Colina General Insurance family as Senior

“We're very pleased to welcome Mary Munroe to the Colina General Family,” said Howard Knowles, General
Manager of Colina General Insurance Agency. “Colina General Insurance Agency Is committed to giving our
valued customers access to products that help them meet their general insurance and financial services needs.
Mary’s 36 years in the industry will help solidify our commitment and philosophy of servicing clients and treating

Colina General Insurance Agency (CGIA) was established to provide a comprehensive range of non-life insurance
products to the Bahamian Market. CGIA offers:

Tri- -

een
and-

said
din
cuss
give

the
said



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them as family.”

¢ Home
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Colina General _
Insurance Agency

For more photos or further informatian regarding this event, please contact

Michelle Reckley at Carter Marketing - T: 242.322.8826 or E: michelle@cartermktg.com

Additional Customer Comments that you may choose to incorporate Into article: =

Larina Evans-Pennerman, Bank Manager (UBS)

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dates in doing so she makes you feel safe that your affairs are always properly protected.”

Raphael Whymms, Superintendent of Bahamas Customs Department
“She makes you feel comfortable, like family and you can call on her day or night for assistance with your insur-
ance needs. | will never contemplate going anywhere else but with her. She goes the extra mile and even works
when she is feeling ill and is not a clock watcher. Her personality draws customers so she is a definite assts

wherever she is employed. She is a very quietly a leader in the insurance industry.”

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info@colinageneral.com

nassau 394.2213 marsh harbour abaco 242.3672271 —



SS



MACKEY STREET







ERE SERABS STERILE ee RAE ST EAD RSET av ea RT ae

aa ei
Rood hopes potential
security problems at .
airport will be resolved —

before end of his tenure

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - US Ambas-
sador John Rood hopes that
potential security problems and
breaches at Lynden Pindling
International Airport can be
resolved before he ends his
tenure here in the Bahamas.

Mr Rood said the recent arrests
of five Bahamian baggage han-
dlers had shown that there are
some security issues which need
to be addressed.

The ambassador said there had
been similar concerns at Grand
Bahama International Airport
about six to eight months ago,
which had led them to re-evaluate
whether the pre-clearance facility
should continue in Freeport.

“In the case of Freeport, the
security issues were addressed
early on and dramatic changes
were made an we don’t feel that
there are issues there right now,”
he said.

“That was one of the things
we felt was important in order to
agree to a long-term commitment
to a pre-clearance facility - that
potential security problems were
addressed at the airport (in GB),
and they have been.”

The arrest of five Nassau Flight |

Services workers, who are
accused of smuggling drugs into
the US, has been the subject of
much public and political debate
over the past several weeks.

While on Grand Bahama last
week, Ambassador Rood said US
officials were very concerned
when suitcases that got around
pre-clearance in the Bahamas
were found with drugs after re-
inspection in Fort Lauderdale.

“That was one of the things
that led us to re-evaluate whether
or not pre-clearance should be
kept at the airport in Freeport.
And, this is what happened in
Nassau when planes get re-
inspected and we find drugs on
those planes we know we have a
breach and these breaches are
what led us to these investiga-
tions,” he said.

He stressed that it is very
important that the US work along
with the Aviation Minister to
address the issue that were
exposed at the airport as a result
of police investigation.

“The threats we are facing
from terrorists and drug dealers
are real threats we want to
address, and we want to get to
the bottom of the potential prob-
lems at the airport and deal with
those while I am still here.

“Tt is an area where we can
work together and provide our
expertise and opinion on, and I
am sure that transportation is
going to take it seriously and take
the necessary steps to make what-
ever changes they feel are appro-
priate so that this does not hap-
pen again,” he said.

Ambassador Rood said offi-
cials at the Transportation Secu-
rity Administration (TSA) are
working with the airport author-
ity in Nassau to help determine
where the breaches in security



might have been.

While the government has stat-
ed that cabinet ministers were not
aware of the operation involving
the arrest of the baggage han-
dlers, the US Embassy has stated -
that the relevant local agencies °
were informed, namely the Attor-
ney General’s office, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force. |

The men were arrested.on
December 18 in Fort Lauderdale
after leaving the country as part
of group of about 20 Bahamian
baggage handlers to participate

_in TSA training in the US.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and his cabinet have been accused
by political observers of compro-
mising the sovereignty of the
Bahamas. —

He said that the accusations
are just political “pot shots” by
those in opposition. aes

“It is important for the people
of Commonwealth of the
Bahamas to understand that I
believe, of someone who was a
criminal defense attorney, that
no government of the Bahamas
need compromise itself in granti-
ng favor to any agency of the
United States America, said:Mr
Christie. ¢

“No police force in our country
could rightly do so. And I have
indicated to the country that I
will make an informed presenta-
tion to the country on the nature
of all that is being discussed now,”
he said. ‘

“As you listen to the political
debate in this country, and it is a
right to have such a debate, nev-
er lose sight of the fact that your
government of the day, and who-
ever may be that government, or .
comprise it, has a sacred respon-
sibility to protect the internatignal
integrity of this country,” he said.

Mr Christie said that country
must do all it can to minimizing
threat of terrorism, drug and alien
smuggling, which significantly
impacts the country. “8

By ALISONLOWE -->
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN THE week of the 40th
anniversary of Majority Rule
Day, the FNM has hit out at |
the PLP's handling of the -
operation to arrest the five -}.
Nassau Flight Services bag~ }-
gage handlers in the US—"}
claiming that recent events
prove that the PLP “do not
trust our laws and institutions."

Mr Ingraham noted in the
House of Assembly on
Wednesday that "the Bahami- |
an people and their freedom
fighters" stayed "within the.
rule of law" when making the
move towards Majority Rule-,;
on January 10, 1967. -

"Heroic leaders ushered in |
peaceful and dramatic changes
They did so by successfully.:
confronting and transcending
the injustices through which
the rule of law and our nation-
al institutions were hijacked
by a small elite.

"As heirs and guardians of,
this struggle we have the.
opportunity - and obligation -
to uphold the power of the
rule of law by renewing and
reforming the institutions and
statutes that safeguard this
sacred principle," said a state-
ment released by the party
yesterday.

The party said the need to
uphold and safeguard the rule.
of law are “as alive as ever"
40 years on from Majority ..
Rule, and are at stake in the
recent arrest of five Nassau
Flight Services baggage han-
dlers in the US for alleged
drug trafficking. i

"The FNM joins in the cel-
ebration of January 10 by’
assuring the Bahamian people
that even as we protect them
against the scourge of drugs
we will protect their right to-
due process and the security },
of the rule of law. We will do-
this for all citizens, including '
those accused of criminal con- .
duct," said the party. \

"The FNM supports the
continued transformation of,
our law enforcement agencies.
and criminal justice system in
order to make them more,
modern and efficient but also. }.
more transparent, expeditious -
and fair.”

The statement added that
this "must be achieved with-
out compromising our sover-
eignty and independence."

"Our national task is to
strengthen the rule of law and
the institutions which uphold
our laws. We cannot abandon
these responsibilities to oth-
ers," said the party.



—



sie

iran,










THE TRIBUNE



@ CARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELA’S Hugo
Chavez and Iran’s Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad — fiery anti-
American leaders whose moves
to extend their influence have
alarmed Washington — said
Saturday they would help
finance investment projects in
other countries seeking to
thwart U.S. domination, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The two countries had previ-
ously revealed plans for a joint
$2 billion fund to finance invest-
ments in Venezuela and Iran,
but the leaders said Saturday
the money would also be used
for projects in friendly coun-
tries throughout the develop-
ing world.”

“Tt will permit us to under-
pin investments ... above all in
those countries whose govern-
ments are making efforts to lib-
erate themselves from the
(U.S.) imperialist yoke,”
Chavez said.

“This fund, my brother,” the

Venezuelan president said, .

referring affectionately to
Ahmadinejad, “will become a
mechanism for liberation.”

“Death to U.S. imperialism!”
Chavez said.

Ahmadinejad, who is starting
a tour of left-leaning countries
in the region, called it a “very
important” decision that would
help promote “joint coopera-
tion in third countries,” espe-
cially in Latin America and
Africa.

It was not clear if the leaders
were referring to investment in
infrastructure, social and energy
projects — areas that the two
countries have focused on until
now — or other types of financ-
ing.
Iran and Venezuela are mem-
bers of the Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries,
and Chavez said Saturday that
they had agreed to back a fur-
ther oil production cut in.the
cartel to stem a recent fall in
crude prices. uP:

“We know today there is too

- much-crude-in-the market,”



Lt

PRESENT THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% DIS

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



HIN THIS image released by Miraflores Press Office, Iran's

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, left, and his Venezuelan coun-
terpart Hugo Chavez stand at attention outside Miraflores presi-
dential palace in Caracas, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007.

(AP Photo/Miraflores Press Office, Marcelo Garcia,HO)

Chavez said. “We have agreed
to join our forces within OPEC
... t6 support a production cut
and save the price of oil.”

OPEC reduced output by 1.2
million barrels a day in Novem-
ber, then announced an addi-
tional cut of 500,000 barrels a
day, due to begin on Feb. 1.
Dow Jones Newswires reported
Friday that OPEC is discussing
holding an emergency meeting
later this month to reduce out-
put! by another 500,000 barrels a
day. Venezuela and Iran have
been leading price hawks with-
in OPEC.

Ahmadinejad’s visit Saturday
— his second to Venezuela in

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less than four months — comes
as he seeks to break interna-

tional isolation over his coun-

try’s nuclear program and pos-
sibly line up new allies in Latin
America. He is also expected
to visit Nicaragua and Ecuador,
which both recently elected left-
ist governments.

’ Chavez and Ahmadinejad
have been increasingly united
by their deep-seated antago-
nism toward the Bush adminis-
tration. Chavez has become a
leading defender of Iran’s
nuclear ambitions, accusing the
Washington of using the issue as
a pretext to attack Tehran.

Ahmadinejad, meanwhile, *





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pig pe

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has called Chavez “the cham-
pion of the struggle against
imperialism.”

USS. officials have accused
Chavez — a close ally of Cuban
leader Fidel Castro — of
authoritarian tendencies, and
National Intelligence Director
John Negroponte said recently
in an annual review of global
threats that Venezuela’s democ-
racy was at risk.

The U.S. also believes Iran is
seeking to use its nuclear pro-
gram to develop an atomic
bomb. Tehran says its program
is peaceful and geared toward
the production of energy.

The increasingly close rela-
tionship between Chavez and
Ahmadinejad has alarmed some
Chavez critics, who accuse him
of pursuing an alliance that does
not serve Venezuela’s interests
and jeopardizes its ties with the
United States, the country’s top
oil buyer. Venezuela is among
the top five suppliers of crude to
the U.S. market.

In a speech earlier Saturday,
Chavez called for the U.S. gov-
ernment to accept “the new
realities of Latin America,” as
he brushed aside restrictions
that limit presidents to two con-
secutive terms. He vowed to
stay in office beyond 2013, when
his term expires, saying he
would revise the constitution to
get rid of presidential term lim-
its.

But Chavez also said in his
state of the nation address to

government officials and legis- —

lators that he had personally
expressed hope to a high-rank-
ing U.S. official for better rela-
tions between their two’ coun-
tries.

Chavez said he spoke with
Thomas Shannon, head of the
U.S. State Department’s West-
ern Hemisphere affairs bureau,
on the sidelines of Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega’s inau-
guration earlier this week.

“We shook hands and I told
him: "I hope that everything
improves,” Chavez said. “I’m
not anyone’s enemy.”

Chavez prompted a crash in

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 17

Venezuelan share prices this
past week when he announced
he would seek special powers
from the legislature to push
through “revolutionary”
reforms, including a string of
nationalizations and unspeci-
fied changes to business laws
and the commerce code.

He also announced plans for
the state to take control of the
country’s largest telecommuni-
cations company, its electricity
and natural gas sectors and four
heavy crude upgrading projects
now controlled by some of the
world’s top oil companies.

Venezuela offer to finance efforts by
~ other countriés to overcome US dominance |

He said Saturday, however,
that private companies would
be allowed to own
minority stakes in the lucrative
Orinoco River basin oil pro-

jects.

The government has already
taken majority ownership of all
other oil-producing operations
in the country through joint
ventures controlled by the state
oil company.

Most companies have shown
a willingness to continue invest-
ing despite the tightening terms,
which have also included tax
and royalty increases.

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



France’s ruling conservatives

Ominate



Sarkozy as presidential candidate

@ PARIS

FRANCE’S interior minister,
Nicolas Sarkozy, formally
clinched the ruling conserva-
tives’ presidential nomination
Sunday, pushing a pivotal race
for a discouraged nation into
high gear, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The ruling UMP party
announced that Sarkozy, the
sole person listed on the party
ballot, had won a vote by regis-
tered members. He now faces a
tight race against the top con-
tender on the left, Socialist

Segolene Royal, for the elec-
tions in April and May.

“I do not have the right to
fail,” Sarkozy told tens of thou-
sands of supporters packed in
a conference hall on Paris’
southern edge.

The anointment at a big-bud-
get, American-style bash lands
the dogged, divisive son of a
Hungarian immigrant one step
away from a job he has coveted
for much of his life. The next
three months may prove bruis-
ing for him and Royal: Both
must work hard to keep their
parties united, and win over

Make it a Combo:
OR Pacmdiie



both moderates and extremes
to come out on top.

Whoever wins, France’s next
president will herald a new era
after 12 years under Jacques
Chirac, who is unlikely to run
for a third term. Many voters
are hoping their next leader will
find new direction for a nation
worried about its future in
Europe and the world, the eco-
nomic challenge from China,
and how to reach out to its
unemployment-stricken blacks,
Arabs and Muslims.

Sunday’s $4.5 million con-
vention for the conservative

UMP party is aimed at giving
Sarkozy momentum before the
two-round election.

His challenge will be to hold
together conservatives, includ-
ing Prime Minister Dominique
de Villepin and party founder
Chirac, who have not
announced their backing for
Sarkozy’s candidacy.

“ll need — and France will
need — everybody here,”
Sarkozy told cheering party
members in brief early remarks.

Villepin, a Sarkozy rival who

has refused to endorse a candi-

date because Chirac has not
announced his future plans,
made a brief, closely scripted
appearance at the convention
and shook Sarkozy’s hand.
Other potential challengers
to Sarkozy’s candidacy have

been tarnished by corruption’

scandals or government crises,
or fell to Sarkozy’s takeover of
the party.

Some 69 percent of UMP

members, or a total of 233,779 _

people, took part in the vote,
and 229,303 voted for Sarkozy:
The others left their ballot
blank in protest — a sign that
his bald ambition may have
alienated many.

Sarkozy has earned both
kudos and vitriol for promising
to cut cherished workplace pro-
tections, championing tough
police tactics in hardscrabble
housing projects and‘ dispatch-
ing illegal immigrants back to
Africa and elsewhere.

He says he is trying to snap
France out of its slump: He says
the French are overtaxed, over-
burdened by government fees
that crimp innovation, too resis-
tant to speaking English and ill-
prepared for globalization.

After a career of ups and
downs and a falling out with
one-time mentor . Chirac,
Sarkozy has in recent years won
over or worn down most Chirac
loyalists and ministers.

Many French voters hover
around ‘the-center and-decide
their vote at the last minute, but
Royal is not Sarkozy’s only

challenge in the months to’

come. Jean-Marie Le Pen —
the far-right leader who came
in a shock second place in 2002
presidential elections behind
Chirac — is a real threat to
Sarkozy’s right flank.



Pa ae er a
MELE Gee

@ FRENCH tiiefiok Minister and head of the ruling conserva-

‘tive Union for a Popular Movement party Nicolas Sarkozy, gestures

as he delivers his speech, during the party's congress for the anoint-
ment of its presidential candidate for the upcoming presidential
election, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2007 in Paris. Sarkozy formally clinched
the ruling conservatives' presidential nomination Sunday, pushing
this pivotal election race for a discouraged nation into high gear.

(AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

@ NICOLAS SAKOZY presidential candidate for the upcoming presidential elections in
April, waves as he stands all members of the government at the conservative party's congress

in Paris, Sunday Jan. 14, 2007.

(AP Photo/Michel Euler)





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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 19

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 21

nae
NTERNATIONAL NEWS

@ GREENVILLE Fire-Rescue firefighters. work to extinguish a-fire at The Memorial Baptist

Memorial Baptist and another church last night are "suspicious."
(AP Photo/The Daily Reflector, Jenni Farrow)

‘Church, Saturday, January 13, 2007, in Greenville, N.C. Authorities say the fires that damaged

-~Authorities are
considering

arson as cause
for church fires

@ GREENVILLE, N.C.

AUTHORITIES investigat-
ing two fires and a break-in at
three Baptist churches, all
reported within an hour of each
other, said Sunday they are
looking into the possibility of
arson, according to Associated
Press.

The size of the fire alone at
The Memorial Baptist Church,

a fast-moving blaze described °

as the largest in Greenville in
the past 10 years, led investi-

‘ gators to treat the fires as a

crime scene, said Greenville
Fire Chief Mike Burton.

“Tt suggested we need to con-
sider things other than an acci-

_ dental cause,” Burton said.

“Most of the accidental causes
would not have that rapid of a
buildup.”

Burton said local investiga-
tors, along with the state
Bureau of Investigation and the
federal Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explo-
sives, were working Sunday to
determined the cause and ori-
gin of the fire at The Memorial
and a much smaller blaze at
Unity Free Will Baptist
Church, about a mile away.

Investigators there discov-
ered broken windows after fire-
fighters were able to contain
the fire, limiting most of the
damage to a single room.
Authorities also found a bro-
ken window while investigat-
ing an alarm call at Oakmont
Baptist Church, also about a
mile from The Memorial.

Police said witnesses report-
ed seeing a person fleeing from
The Memorial in a white vehi-
cle shortly after the fire broke
out. The tires of three church
vehicles were also slashed.

The fires and the break-in
were reported between 10:37

1

Investigators treat
fires as crime scene



p.m. and 11:31 p.m. on Satur-
day night, leading police and
sheriff's deputies to check on
churches throughout the city
and surrounding Pitt County,
about 75 miles east of Raleigh.

No other fires were discov-
ered, but Greenville Police
Chief William Anderson said
Sunday his department planned
to continue increased patrols.

“We’re going to be highly
visible at our. churches,” he said
Sunday.

Burton said damage at The
Memorial was conservatively
estimated at $1 million. Upon
arriving, firefighters found

smoke billowing from the |

church’s educational wing, and
the blaze quickly spread to the
church’s original structure.
Officials said about half of
the church appeared to be
destroyed, though the main
sanctuary appeared undam-
aged. The church’s steeple was
standing, but firefighters were

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

worried about its stability.

“That’s bricks and concrete,
and that stuff can be replaced,”
said Dr. Rick Bailey, the asso-
ciate minister at The Memorial.
“You just need to move on.”

A few hundred members of
the church gathered Sunday
morning in-a picnic area behind
the church. Bailey said he was-
n’t yet sure where they would
gather next Sunday, although
several churches in Greenville
have offered to host the con-
gregation.

The fire damage at Unity
Free Will was estimated at
between $30,000 and $40,000.

“Right now, I’m numb,” Jeff
Manning, minister at Unity
Free Will, told The Daily
Reflector of Greenville. “My
head is spinning. We will have
to figure out what to do, and at
the same time, our heart goes
out to the good folks at Memo-
rial Baptist because there’s is
a whole lot worse than ours.”














¢ Tel: 356-2070
¢ P.O.BOX N7508
-e Nassau, Bahamas

:
CHEOUES NEW PROVIDENCE LOCAL OFFICE

173 Short-Term Benefit Cheques Await Collection By Eligible
Claimants. All Claims Were Processed In New Providence.

The names of persons with outstanding cheques are listed below.
These persons are requested to collect their cheque(s) from the
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photo identification.

and to produce photo identification.

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NAME N. I. Number
ABDUL-HADI, Khalid 14913542

ALLEN, Jerem 10423664

ANDERSON, Dominique 10103864

ARCHER, Charles 12394858

BAILLOU, Darren 30504775

BAIN, Cynthia 12967637
BAIN, Jasmine 11728701

BETHEL, Annamae 14068540:
BETHEL, Christina 16215648

BETHEL, Jestina 13795783

BETHEL, Monique 13708716

BETHELL, Dellareese 14458705

BETHELL, Michael 10732810

BULLARD, Audre 14985586
BURROWS, Charles 12503665

BURROWS, Deborah 11437553

CAMPBELL, Patrenda 58015671

CAPRON, Judith 11475641

CARTER, Harcourt 12443735
CLARIDGE, Dushinka 13827812
CLARKE, James 12134619
CLARKE, Linda 12695521

CLARKE, Natika 12937746
CLARKE, Nekoda 10488820
COAKLEY, Maria 13846655
CONYERS, Douglas 14644681

COOPER, Sharie 13595768
CURTIN, Linda 15718549
DAMES, Anastasia 11426810

DARLING, Tiffany 30077745
DAVIS, Sherica 10365850
DEAN, Gertlene 11175532

DEAN, Nakia 12126810
DEAN, Pats 11785446
DELANCY, Melanie 15938662

DEMERITTE, Van 13591762
DORSETT, Desmond 12732753

DORSETT, Franklyn 14283867
EGUEZANTIL, Jistilien 22764615

FARRINGTON, Nelson 11673656

FARRINGTON, Shanador 13937774
FERGUSON, Althemese 10485570
FERNANDER, Michael 17294649
FERNANDER,, Nellie 12556505
FOX, Tania 10496645
GAITOR, Javan 12433845
GAITOR, Jennifer 13388657
GARDINER, Philippa 13858777
GEORGE, Michelot 14873796
GIBSON, Flora 12847798
GIBSON, Kenneth 62073605
GIBSON, Sean 12774715
GLASS, Kathryn 12577782
GRAY, Tyrone 15254704
HAMILTON, Nicola 15558649
HAMILTON, Norma 11958499
HANNA, Barbara 13566660
HANNA, Carolyn 52006735
HANNA, Susan 14868717
HANNA, Tamika 13768840
HANNA, Una 11407778
HARRIS-SMITH, Laverne 12247650
HEPBURN, Laverne 20926677
HINSEY, Evelyn | 13067532
INGRAHAM, Calvin 10493786
JOHNSON, Alfred 10501533
JOHNSON, Althea 19228619
JOHNSON, Chandel 12006726
JOHNSON, Daniel 10841482
JOHNSON, Danielle 12868876.
JOHNSON, Shawanda 14017849
JOHNSON, Suzanne 10995552
JONES, Angelique 10796738
JOSEPH, Dieudonne 17403596
KEMP, Cherylene 14978776
KNOWLES, Dianna 10126430
KNOWLES, Donell 12658618
KNOWLES, Melanie 21587639
LEADON, Janet 11235683
LEWIS, Kenya 14207834
LUBAIN, Analie 16447735
MACKEY, Jeffrey 30953634
MACKEY, Monique 12565814
MARSHALL, Chester 16241606
MAYCOCK, Anita 14527731

McDONALD, Sherrell 14347849
McKENZIE, Donovan. 14633884
McKINNEY, Wellington 15181669
MINNIS, Mario 30544769
MORLEY, Elizabeth 11967587
MORLEY, Zeria 84096772
MOSS, Alvin 14462621

MOSS, Leah 16087607
MOSS, Raymond 26024632
MUNNINGS, Alfred 10044639
MUSGROVE, Monique 14495813
NEELY, Bradley 12232564
NUTT, Niven 11431563
PHILLIPS, Esther 15128806
PIERRE, Rochelle 14285738
PINDER, Lastaica 60067837
POITIER, Charisma 13627813
PORTER, Claire _ 12096725
RAHMING, Kendrick 78001811

ROLLE, Alicia 12368830
ROLLE, Andrew 13961780
ROLLE, Elliott 13382829
ROLLE, Fenrick 60044772
ROLLE, Juliette 10695788
ROLLE, Paulette 10578552
SANDS, Lionel 11811544
SANDS, Owen 62043838
SAUNDERS, Lamar 18914675
SIMMONS, Tony 14993643
SMITH, Anita 21058628
SMITH, Jamie 12108847
SMITH, Leonardo 12104736
SMITH, Marguerite 13955705
SMITH, Rhonda 12107794
“SMITH, wen. 24497630
STRACHAN, Bradley 11822600

STUBBS, Anthony 10043586
STUBBS, June 10296654
STUBBS, Vanessa 11986689

STYLES, Jacqueline 14537648
TAYLOR, Jamine 70103828
TAYLOR, Robin 14007681

THOMPSON, Marsha 10427600
THURSTON, Geraldine 11268468

THURSTON, Malawi 12875767
TUCKER, Aubrey. 11804610

TURNQUEST, Shanika 13495771

WALLACE, Theba 15027759
WELLS, Desiree 11026782
WEMYSS, Denise 14978660
WEMYSS, Safiya 12787817
WESTON, Donald 10104380
WILLIAMS, Enid 52038815
WILLIAMS, Frederick 13453777
WILLIAMS, Hope 13337645
WILLIAMS, Sean 14141698
WOODS, Clifford 12283541

PLEASE NOTE: Claimants are asked to collect their cheque(s) in person} |



PAGE 8E, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 | TRIBUNE SPORTS

AAA Odd Distance Meet





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(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune staff)







@ KRYSTAL BODIE of Club Monica @ JENNI PIERRE throws
crosses the line to win the open women’s 60 the javelin
metre dash. (Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



7 p ee i eae i i Hi : ft a :

® DIJONNAISE BROWN of Doris Johnson tries to clear 5 ft 6 in the open mens high jump.

(Photo: Felipé Major/ Trisune staff)



Full Text


== Se

PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

Bole ee

THE TRIBUNE



Mother appeals for help with sons

Pain is constant, spirits are
low and tension is high in the
Strachan household where a
mother looks after three chil-
dren suffering daily from a
severely debilitating blood con-
dition, haemophilia.

Janice Strachan is hoping that
articles in the press will alert the
public to her difficulties. Her
three sons, Michael, Nathaniel
and Raphael, all need financial
aid to help them access Factor,
the medicine that stops the
internal bleeding they all suffer
from on a regular basis as a
result of their rare condition.

Now Raphael has run out of
the medicine, which is sent over
on an unpredictable basis from
the States, depending on

whether stocks are available for.

donation.

With each day that passes,
they fear his condition will
worsen, with the effect that his
joints will be further deformed.

“The longer you don't treat a
joint, that's when the damage

sets in. It's a crippling disease - ©

the blood stays in that area, it

deteriorates the bone, it eats

the bone, and the joint becomes
deformed,” she explained.

On top of it all, the boys
have all been out of school since
October, because their mother
cannot afford the private school
fees anymore - another source
of anxiety.

She explained that the public
school environment, where
overcrowding creates a constant
threat for the boys, who can suf-
fer internal bleeding from the
slightest impact, is not safe for
them.

“They're very angry - angry
and frustrated. They ask me
“Why can’t we be in school?""
she said.

"They're asking me to get
someone to home school them.
I told them, no matter which
way, people are going to expect
to get paid and I don't know
how I'm going to do that."

Ms Strachan, has set up an
account (number 707712) at the
Royal Bank of Canada on
Mackey Street for anyone who
wishes to make donations.

eC



a (LEFT to > right) Michael, 16, Raphael, 10 nd Nathaniel, 14 spent t their Sunday playing video
games and watching TV in their room, after Raphael and Nathaniel woke up with internal bleed-
ing. The boys try to lead a normal life, but sometimes Bie to be more careful, since minor blem-

ishes will cause them to bleed incessantly.

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

Man blames law firm for loss of savings:

®@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN irate client is accusing a
law firm of not “protecting his
interest” in a transaction to buy



a home and, as a result, he
claims to have lost his family’s
entire savings.

Shawn Johnson told The Tri-
bune his side of the story yes-
terday, claiming the loss had

been a devastating blow.

According to him, he went to
Wells and Wells, a family law
firm in Nassau, to seek repre-
sentation to buy a home costing
around $400,000.

Marina Village, Paradise Island



-1480

- Onen 10am - 11pm daily
Major Credit Cartis Accepted
DISCOUNTED PARKING

Rvalianio af the Paradise island parking garage.

Mtr Johnson said he ave the
firm a manager’s cheque,
which he received ifrom a
bank, for $47,000 plus, so that
they could represent him in
the transaction.

He said he asked the law
firm to place the money in an
“escrow account” as a down
payment for the home that he
and his wife were bree to
purchase.

Mr Johnson aeplaihee: “J
specifically told the firm that we
were seeking financing | for the
balance of the monies to pur-
chase the home, and {that I
would like for the firm to pro-
tect my deposit if we did not get
the financing from the bank.”

He claimed the firm verbal-
ly assured him that they would
write “specific instructions”
into the agreement, so that the
deposit could be protected.

However, Mr Johnson said
he was unable to,obtain financ-
ing from the bank.

“] relayed this message to -

the law firm and Ms Wells
assured me that I would get
all of my monies back. Three
days later I was told I would
receive some of the monies
back as they would need to
deduct legal fees.

“But, after an additional two
days had passed, the law firm
told me that J would receive
no monies and that I had for-
feited my monies because of
the agreement,” addey Mr
Johnson.

He said the firm informed
him that the buyers were not
prepared to give him back the
$47,000 because the agreement
was not subject to whether he
was successful in getting finan-
cial backing from a bank,

Mr Johnson said: “I am a
hard working Bahamian,
working in a government job,
and money is very tight. Ihave
a wife and two small children,
and I wonder if this law} firm

}

eee day

PUSS ACT
NON Rem LTCC AAU TRS PRLU Lem RTCA RST” OSI
fae Ca pail tt

©2006 CreativeRelations.net

knows how hard and long a
family like mine has to work,
how much we have to sacri-
fice to save, and how my wife
and I have deprived our chil-
dren and ourselves just to save
this money to try and get a bet-
ter life.”

Stephanie Wells, head part-
ner of Wells and Wells,
claimed that Mr Johnson nev-
er asked for the agreement to
be made subject to financing.

Ms Wells said: “Mr Johnson
said that, besides the desposit,
he had an extra $200,000 to
purchase the house.” She said
Mr Johnson never told the
firm he was seeking financial
backing from a bank.

“The deeds were already

prepared, the buyers had
already flown in from Thai-
land to complete the transac-
tion, and at the last minute Mr
Johnson told us he did not get
the money from the bank.”

Further, Ms Wells said the
initial contract for the pur-
chase of the home was not pre-
pared by Wells and Wells, but
another law firm.

She said she tried to get
some of the money back for
her client, but that she could-
n’t, because the buyers felt he
had forfeited his right to the
deposit.

“I feel sorry for him, but this
is the business world and the
truth is, if it was my money, I
would have lost my deposit,
too,” said Ms Wells.

The Tribune spoke to
another attorney who
explained that normally these
transactions would be subject
to financing.

However, he said he could
not comment on who was pos-
sibly liable in Mr Johnson’s
case, because “attorneys can
only follow the instructions of
their client and if that was the
case, there is no negligence on
their part.”

©

COMMONWEALTH BANK





In brief

- Carl Bethel:
government

knew about
NFS sting

FNM SENATOR Carl
Bethel is accusing the govern-
ment of being aware of the sting
operation that led to the arrest
of five Bahamian baggage han-
dlers in South Florida.

The former MP for Holy
Cross was the guest on a radio
talk show yesterday.

According to Senator Bethel,
the Minister of National Secu-
rity (Cynthia “Mother” Pratt)
must have known about the
operation because local police
were aware of it.

The senator accepted that
ministers can’t know about every
police investigation, but he said:
“Tt was a joint operation so the
minister must have known.”

Since the December 18 arrest
of five Nassau Flight Services
employees on US soil for
allegedly smuggling drugs on
local and international airlines
at.the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport, the Free
National Movement and other
political groups have alleged
that the government may have
circumvented the extradition
treaty by allowing the US to
lure the five men to its shores
under the guise of a training
programme, and then have
them arrested for allegedly
committing a crime in the
Bahamas.

Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson told the press
that the government was not
aware of the sting operation,
and last week Prime Minister
Perry Christie promised that he
would personally launch an
investigation into the matter.

The Tribune learned from a
source that Bernard Turner, the
director of public prosecutions,
was not allowed to attend a
meeting last year in Washing-
ton where plans for the opera-
tion were discussed.

Senator Bethel said the issue
was not whether an officer from
the Attorney General’s Office
was allowed into a preparatory
meeting for the sting operation.

“There is political responsi-
bility and collective responsi-
bilty, and the government is
responsible for the actions of
the police, and there had to
have been an element of co-
operation for it to go across
police lines, it was not purely a
police matter,” he said.

The five men appeared in a
Florida court last week and
were charged with conspiracy
to import drugs into the US.

All pleaded not guilty and
they are expected to reappear in

- court later in the month.

Robber
makes off
with food
store cash

AN armed robber fled with
$1,500 from the John Chea
number four foodstore on
Carmichael Road on Friday.

Police said a man wearing a
blue-hooded jacket entered the
store at around 7pm on Friday
wielding a silver handgun and
demanded cash.

Police are investigating.

Man escapes
serious
injury in
accident.

FREEPORT - A young man
is lucky to be alive following a
serious traffic accident early
Sunday morning at Eight Mile
Rock.

According to police, the acci-
dent occurred around 3.25am
in Jones Town involving a 1995
Honda Accord (licence 38147)
driven by 24-year-old Quincy
Bain of Frobisher Drive,
Freeport.

Police say Bain lost control
of the vehicle near Mount Zion
Baptist Church.

The car skidded off the road
and crashed into a utility pole,
cutting it down and causing a
power outage in the area.

Mr Rahming said the vehicle
also went through a concrete
wall and chainlink fence before
crashing into another vehicle
parked in the area.

Bain’s yehicle was extensive-
ly damaged. He was treated at
Rand Memorial Hospital for
lacerations to the forehead and
discharged.

Police afe investigating.

»

44 4 5 ¢°

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«

+

4
PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. #

Parallels in:



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon) LL.D; D.Litt;

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Govt. not sharing NHI information

THE National Coalition for Health Reform is.

yet to receive from government the much-
promised documentation on the National Health
Insurance plan. We are not surprised.

We shall resist the temptation of saying “we
told you so.” However, we must say that this
group has shown a great deal of naiveté to
believe that if its members, especially the doc-
tors, remained silent while government rushed
the flawed legislation through parliament, the
much-awaited documentation would be forth-
coming.

We first learned of the Coalition’s deal with
government in an article written by Rick Lowe,
a member of the Coalition, and published in
The Tribune on December 11.

“I for one,” wrote Mr Lowe, “am proud of
what the Coalition has accomplished to date.
At least now the government has promised to
share the information they have, but only if
they, Coalition, takes the debate out of the court
of public opinion. While I am personally uncom-
fortable with this approach because of past expe-
rience with this government and its predecessor,
I sincerely hope that Dr Nottage will live up to
the new promise.”

So far he has not. Members of the Coalition,
who should by now be well versed in the ways of
politicians, fell for the bait and, like so many
little flies, got entrapped in the spider’s web.

We wager that the reason the mule train with
the actuarial documents is so slow in arriving at
the Coalition’s offices is that the figures con-
tained in it don’t add up. It will probably be
like the slow-in-coming ILO report, which when
it eventually did arrive, revealed that, contrary to
the statements of both Prime Minister Christie
and Health Minister Nottage, did not give the
Bahamas’ health insurance plan an unqualified
“thumbs up.” As a matter of fact.it contained
many caveats.

The ILO warned of the tendency of politi-
cians to over sell the scheme, thereby giving
Bahamians the impression that they would be
receiving more than the plan intended, or could
deliver. It also warned that the scheme could
cost far more than government’s projected $235
million figure.

It wasn’t until the legislation was safely
through parliament, and before the ILO report
was made public, that in a radio talk show, Dr
Nottage admitted that the plan could be more
than government projected. He acknowledged
that rising drug costs and salaries, among other
things, could force up the NHI bill. He was obvi-
ously preparing Bahamians for the warnings in
the ILO report, the details of which govern-
ment failed to share with them during the par-

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liamentary debate.

Government seems so reluctant to share its -

working papers with the doctors, union leaders
and business persons — those who represent
Bahamians who will be most affected — that
its reason for secrecy is daily becoming more
suspect.

"For us to do a true analysis of the plan we
need to have that information available to us,"
said Mr Winston Rolle, past president of the
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce . "This infor-
mation is critical for the public to understand the
true sustainability of the plan."

Mr Rolle said the Coalition was promised
the information by December 1. It is now Janu-
ary 15.

It is unfortunate that Mr Christie included
both Canada and England as examples of coun-
tries that had a system similar to what is about to
be introduced in the Bahamas. Canada’s sys-
tem is far from satisfactory and England’s
National Health Service (NHS) is downright
shambolic.

Not only have operations been cancelled in
England because the NHS has run out of cash,
but a leaked copy of the British government’s
pay and workforce strategy reveals that by 2011
there will be 3,200 consultants too many in the
medical profession, which suggests that they will
be employed in more junior positions at reduced
salaries. Needless to say the British Medical
Association is up 1n arms.

By that date the leaked document predicted
that there will be a shortage of 14,000 nurses
and 1,200 general practitioners.

Already Princess Margaret Hospital staff
want to know where government is going to
find the personnel to staff the clinics promised
for the Family-Islands.

Princess Margaret Hospital nurses also want
to know how the PMH will be able to cope with
the increased number of patients expected under
the NHI plan. Already the hospital has a serious
bed shortage, and cannot satisfactorily care for
the patients it now has.

The nurses urged government to rethink the
implementation of the plan, because in their
opinion it will “wreak havoc” if extensive infra-
structural upgrades are not done before the plan
is launched.

And it will wreak even greater havoc if those
who are supposed to make it work — the doctors
and nurses — are not satisfied that the plan
makes sense.

So, please, Dr Nottage, share your informa-

tion with the Coalition — after all, its members _

are supposed to be your partners in its imple-
mentation.



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arrogance |

THE TRIBUNE

*.

4

*

of power —

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHEN one experienced
the arrogance of power
demonstrated by our most
powerful neighbour, those of
us who are students of history,
usually reflect on past events
and persons who wrote on
such events.

One person that comes to
mind is Edward Gibbon, the
18th century English histori-
an and author of “Decline and
fall of the Roman Empire.”

When one reads Gibbon
and reflects on our neigh-
bour’s arrogance of power, the
parallel is frightening, because
no one wants his or her neigh-
bour and friends to fall.

When Cleopatra fled the
battle in 31 BC, Anthony
deserted his men and followed
her to Egypt. The following
year, when Octavian landed
in Egypt, both Anthony and
Cleopatra committed suicide
after failing to rally support
against him. Soon thereafter,
the ancient land of Egypt
became a Roman province.

In 31 BC Octavian, who lat-
er became known as Augus-
tus, became ruler of Rome;
his reign marked the begin-
ning of the Roman Empire.
When he died in 14 AD the
senate voted the title of imper-
ator to his stepson, Tiberius. It
was during his reign, which
lasted until 37 AD that Jesus
Christ was crucified in Pales-
tine.

From the time of Tiberius,
to the end of the empire in
476 AD, Rome was ruled by a
variety of emperors, some
good and some bad.

Nero was judged the most
wicked and worthless ruler
ever to mount the throne, he
murdered his wife, and his
mother, and was accused of
setting fire to Rome in 64 AD,
a great nine-day catastrophe
that destroyed half the city.

Military conquests made
Rome a world state; the
boundaries of the empire
expanded as the Roman
legions scored victory, after
victory; yet force alone was
not enough to maintain a uni-
fied state.

Skilful diplomacy, and effec-
tive government, a flexible
system of law and a wice-
spread network, which
brought about the Pax

Romana, or “Roman Peace”

throughout their far- flung
domain.

















SOSA MBE

fete sOumelliatcimtice| enact

The period in the history of
the world when the human
race was most happy and pros-
perous was the 2nd century
AD.

It was during this century
that the Roman Empire
reached its greatest extent and
was, according to Gibbon,
governed by absolute power,
under the “guidance of virtue
and wisdom.”

A Roman subject of the 2nd

aside; mankind turns to enjoy

happiness. Strife has been qui-

eted, leaving only the compe-
tition of cities, each eager to

Fad Sa! ker XK

be the most beautiful and the ©

most fair.

The whole earth is decked ©

with beauty like a garden, yet -
of the twenty-nine emperors ~

who ruled between 180 and

284 AD, only four died a nat- '

ural death.

The others were murdered ,

by army officers or by rival
claimants to the throne.
Emperor Septimus Severus

advised his sons, “Make the -

soldiers rich and don’t trou-
ble about the rest.”

century Aelius Aristides, had

this to say about the era in PRINCE G SMITH
which he lived: The whole Freeport,

world keeps holiday; the age- Grand Bahama,
long curse of war has been put December, 2006.

, Hysterical paranoia

of the first order

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IS THE US Government, Homeland Security/TSA, going too far
with their proposal that without exception, in the not too distant
future, all visitors to the US will have their 10-finger fingerprints tak-
en and stored in a data bank? I find this abusive and intrusive as I
have already paid $100 to apply for a Visa to enter the US and the
US Government has approved me — I presume checking my back-
ground... police record, etc.

If this is the new style “friendlier” US then God be to the glory,
but I suggest this has gone too far and is yet again the “Ugly
American” policy coming to the fore.

Mr Ambassador, Mr Rood - please advise the White House
that if we could we would collectively cancel our US visas and
say to the US go and screw yourself unfortunately we don’t have
that luxury so the unfriendly US Government to its immediate
friendly neighbour to the south-east will continue to pour billions
of hard earned US dollars into their economy, We, citizens of The
Bahamas, are treated like criminals.

This security issue has gone too far, Mr Aenbassador — get real.
If The Bahamas instituted this for all Americans visiting The
Bahamas you know full well your State Department would be
screaming and without any doubt a Travel Advisory would have
been issued — Avoid The Bahamas!

Foreign Minister, Mitchell — before this new step in the US

“ugly” American attitude is installed send a Diplomatic Note to the
US Secretary of State and advise Madam Secretary that The
Bahamas takes considerable offence as to this proposal and will
institute similar requirements for all visiting US citizens to The
Bahamas forthwith on the installation of the system in the US.

What next? This is hysterical paranoia of the first order.

H HUMES
Nassau,
January 7, 2007.

Open letter to Minister

EDITOR, The Tribune.
Please publish this open letter to Minister Glenys Hanna-Martin
at the Ministry of Transport.

Dear Madam,

Re: Dockage Space

Thereby write on behalf of many concerned residents of Farmers Cay
who are now faced with a dilemma and experiencing hardship that
needs to be addressed urgently. Due to the fact that the government
dock is not up to standard, the mail boat cannot dock at the same due
to the poor docking facilities. The owner of the private dock where the
government was renting space now refuses the mail boat dockage
space for whatever reasons. Passengers, groceries and other necessities
that come on the mail boat to the island have to now be ferried into the
island by a small boat, sometimes the weather is bad and it is no picnic
to be ferried to a place from out to sea. We need our dock now, just like
every other island.

Farmers Cay might be few in numbers, but we are all Bahamians and
should be treated equally. Stop forsaking us!

We trust that you will promptly and adequately address our concerns.

CONCERNED RESIDENTS OF FARMERS CAY
Farmers Cay,
January 4, 2007.



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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 5



Oln brief

Election
date chosen
for Turks and
Caicos

PREMIER of Turks and
Caicos, Dr Michael Misick,
‘has dissolved parliament and
announced a February 9 date
for a general election in the
islands.

This means Turks and
Caicos will have held two
general elections since elec-
tions were last held in the
Bahamas in 2002.

After announcing the
election date on Friday, Dr
Misick encouraged all citi-
zens to exercise their right to
vote, and stressed that his
government had fulfilled
"every major manifesto
promise" since coming to
power.

He said that for this rea-
son he is confident that the
people of Turks and Caicos
will support his party again.

Dr Misick said: “My gov-
ernment stands proudly on
our record of achievement,
one. of unprecedented
accomplishments.”

He claimed that, since
being elected, his party had
brought increased develop-
ment, empowerment and a
better quality of life to
islanders.

Top issues in the forth-
coming elections include the
need to curb rising crime lev-
els and advancing the
tourism-based economy of
the islands.

Nomination day has been
set for January 22.

Youths are
arrested
after shotgun
discovered

FREEPORT - Two male
juveniles were arrested over
the weekend after a shotgun
was discovered hidden in
bushes in Hanna Hill, Eight
Mile Rock.

Supt Basil Rahming
reported that police, acting
on information received,
apprehended two youths
aged 14 and 15 years around
1.30pm on Saturday.

Mr Rahming said the
minors led officers to a bushy
area off a track road near the
Church of God in Hanna
Hill, where police retrieved a
12-gauye Pardner—FBI shot-
gun.

_ The teens, of Hawksbill,

were iaken into custody.
They are expected to face
charges this week.

Mother and
son recover
after blaze
at home

A MOTHER and her five-
year-old son.are being treat-
ed in hospital for minor
burns and smoke inhalation
after their Yellow Elder Gar-
dens home was found ablaze
at 2am yesterday.

The fire was concentrated
in a bedroom in the two-bed-
room, single-storey home
when police attended the
scene on Sunday morning,
according to police press liai-
son officer, Walter Evans.

RRR Rate

MONDAY
JANUARY 15TH

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Security fears after series of
- boat thefts strikes harbour



@ PAUL Thompson



AN alarming spate of boat
thefts from Nassau Harbour has
sparked new security fears. for
visiting cruise ships.

So many have gone missing
during the dark hours that a
new call is being made for
improved patrols.

There is even a suggestion

that the police and Defence —

Force should set up a 24-hour
watch, not just to halt thieves,
but also potential terrorists.

Security expert Paul Thomp-
son said his investigations
showed that many marinas do
not provide security.

“I know that some form of
action has been taken to
improve security at the dock, in
particular when cruise ships are
in port.

“However, it is my candid
opinion that more ought to be
done during the night hours.”

He felt a patrol boat should
be provided together with a sta-
tic post with night vision and
proper communication to be set
by the Defence Force near the
lighthouse.

“Both recommendations, if
implemented, would enhance
security and safety in our har-
bour,” he said.

During 2006, he said, several
boats were stolen from marinas
in Nassau harbour.

“TI am aware of nine such ves-

Deterioration of British
National Health Service
casts doubt over NHI

THE government’s contro-
versial plans for a National
Health Insurance scheme are
likely to come in for even clos-
er scrutiny following the latest
alarming disclosures from Lon-
don.

The British National Health
Service, which has been pro-
viding health care since the
1940s, is teetering on the brink
of extinction, according to high-
ranking medical sources.

The leader of Britain’s doc-
tors has revealed there is only
one year left to save the Nation-
al Health Service before the

governmernt starts to question.

its future.

James Johnson, chairman of

the British Medical Association,
said if the health service failed
to break even this year, minis-
ters would “look very carefully”
at what happened next.

The London Daily Telegraph
reported him as saying that
unprecedented sums had been
poured into the NHS in the past
five years, yet there was still a
financial crisis.

But he told a briefing in Lon-
don that next year the current
high levels of funding would
cease.

“Don’t assume there’s any-
thing automatic about the sys-
tem we have at the moment

jections are

continuing in perpetuity,” said
Mr Johnson.

“| know that ministers will
want to look very carefully at
what they do next. If you, get
nine per cent of GDP spent on
health and you still can’t make
it work, people will be saying:
‘Do you want to carry on doing
the same thing or should we be
trying something fundamental-
ly different?’”

Mr Johnson said other coun-
tries had shown that other
options existed, including co-
funding by the state and
employers.

A reduced health service that
did not try to provide every-
thing was another alternative,
he added.

His comments add fuel to
critics of the NHI, who say that
the government’s financial pro-
inadequate.

They have warned that peo-
ple’s contributions would have
to rise dramatically to fund an
acceptable level of service.

However, a British Depart-
ment of Health spokesman dis-
missed Mr Johnson’s remarks
as “unnecessary doom-monger-
ing”, adding that the govern-
ment was fully committed to a
publicly-funded NHS which
delivered according to clinical
need, not the ability to pay.

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Rosetta St. “

sels as my firm has been con-
ducting: inquiries for an insur-
ance company in an effort to
locate and recover the vessels.

“T have been informed that
there are scores of other ves-
sels missing. It appears from our
investigation that many of the
marinas in our harbour do not
provide security on their
premises, making it easy for the
intrusion of criminals.” /

The thefts have occurred on
Paradise Island, Potter’s Cay,
Hurricane Hole and elsewhere
on Nassau waterfront.

Mr Thompson said: “Nightly
activities on our docks and in
our harbour dictate the need
for patrols and marina security
personnel.”

Concern has also been

expressed at the presence of
Haitian sloops in the harbour.
Security experts believe the

-sloops, which frequently sail

quite near visiting cruise ships,
could be commandeered by ter-
rorists.

“An explosion among several
cruise ships would cause untold
damage and pose a threat to lots
of lives,” a source said.

“It seems to me that the
sloops, which are allowed right
into the harbour, could easily
be used as a ‘front’ for terrorist
activity.”

Since the attack on the World
Trade Centre in New York in
2001, security has been tight-
ened round Nassau docks.

But it is thought that too
many loopholes still exist.



GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

(Ory Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Xo” Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448,

Lait

Geers



Ph: 325-3336
PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE ;





To visa or not to visa: challenge

of tourism and terrorism

m@ By SIR RONALD a mg.

SANDERS
(The writer is a business

consultant and former ~
Caribbean diplomat).

A were who has
marketed or pro-

moted tourism to the



The ostensible purpose of
this special visa was to cre-

rk Design & Construction

Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
Installation & Maintenance

Homes ¢ Offices ¢ Subdivisions
Call Us Today!

‘Tel: 393-7733

E-mail: info@lemcoenetworks.com

BAHAMAS WHOLESALE AGENCIES

BWA {Bahamas Wholesale Agencies) Ltd., a
local distributor, is seeking an experienced
professional to join their team as

Territory Sales Consultant

We are looking for highly-motivated,
outgoing, energetic, and driven candidates to
sell and execute special marketing initiatives
and provide category consulting services to
our retail partners.

In order to meet our requirements alll
applicants must possess:

e Bachelors Degree or higher

¢ Strong planning and
organizational skills

Polished written and oral
communication skills

Developed mathematical and
analytical skills

Computer skills including use

of Microsoft Office

Knowledge of retail environment
and prior sales or merchandising,
experience is preferred

Applications will not be accepted in person.
Cover letters and resumes must be sent to
the following e-mail address no later than
Friday, Jan. 19: jobs_bwa@hotmail.com



VORLD VIE





countries to see the games.

Further, nationals of non-
cricket playing countries,
who have not needed visas
in the past to come to the
Caribbean on holiday,
should continue not to
require visas.

Curiously, the idea of one
visa for all ten countries in
order to facilitate the tens
of thousands expected to
attend the CWC games got
turned onits head. —



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

instrument to combat ter-
rorism.
In this connection, peo-



“The s

pecial visa is no

longer a document to facilitate
the travel of people coming

to more than one country

for cricket; it has been
transformed into an instrument
to combat terrorism.”



The special visa is no
longer a document to facili-
tate the travel of people
coming to more than one
country for cricket; it has
been transformed into an

ple from countries that nev-
er required a visa now have
to have the special visa.
Thus, Australians and New
Zealanders (two cricket

POSITION
AVAILABLE

Registered Nurse

Responsibilities

¢ Provide primary and minor emergency

medical care

Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined
in the Clinical Protocol Manual

Provide accurate and comprehensive medical

reports as required

Requirements:

Holder of current Bahamian Licence
Must have at least three years experience post

graduation

Have current BLS & ALS Certification
Must be responsible, have good
communication skills and independent.

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
mary.epcotmedical
@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.





‘THE
MEDICLINIC

playing countries) have
joined Indians and Pakista-
nis in the requirement to
have a special visa. But,
nationals of South Africa
and the United Kingdom
(two other cricket playing
nations) don’t need visas
even though both Britain
and South Africa require
nationals of some Caribbean
countries to have visas to
enter their countries.
Others requiring visas are
nationals of Sweden, Den-
mark and Austria who are
among those tourists who
come to the Caribbean dur-
ing this time of year. But,
Japanese are exempt even
though they constitute a
smaller number of tourists
to the Caribbean than the

Scandinavian countries and

Austria.

he criteria used for
deciding which

countries should require
visas and which are exempt
is, of course, unknown to us.
However, all the official
statements point to a neces-
sity to ensure the security of
the host countries from ter-
rorism.

Logically, if one were to
strictly apply this criteria,
nationals of Britain and
Canada should require a
visa. For the British police
have confirmed that there
are approximately 200 ter-
rorist cells in the United
Kingdom that are under sur-
veillance, and there have
been two terrorist incidents
there since 9/11. Similarly,
Canada has had warnings of
terrorism from militant
groups.

‘There have been no
reports of terrorist cells in
Denmark and Sweden and,
indeed, none in New
Zealand.

abroad. For example, it:
requires no evidence of a
return ticket or a list of the
hotels (or other places)
where the visitor intends to:
stay, or proof that the’
accommodation has been
paid for. .

It does ask if the appli-
cant has been convicted of a.
criminal offence — a box
which any terrorist would be,
most unlikely to tick in the
affirmative.

At the bottom line of all
this, those officials charged
with the security of the 10
countries that are hosting.
the World Cup Cricket tour-
nament have a tough job.

If something happens,
they will be criticised heavi-,
ly for not doing enough and
for not adequately vetting
visitors during this impor-
tant period when tens of
thousands of persons are,
expected to pour into the
area. Their extreme caution
is, therefore, understands
able. !

But, instead of requiring
visas from countries that did
not previously require one;
and which will revert to not
requiring one when World
Cup Cricket is over, would it
not have been a better way
to vet potential terrorists by
getting the cooperation of
the authorities in' the US;
UK and other countries to
provide a list of people on
their watch list and to com-
pare passengers entering the
country against such a list?,

Such lists do exist. After
9/11, US authorities sent
governments all over the
world a long list of people
suspected of financing ter-
rorism with a request that
their assets be seized. What
is more airlines are required
to send passenger lists with
detailed information prior
to landing at US airports so



“The criteria used for
deciding which countries
should require visas and which
are exempt is, of course,
unknown to us.

'

1
{
{
‘
1
1
'
'

However, all the official | wd
statements point to a necessity |
to ensure the security of the

host countries from terrorism.”



The further curious thing
about this Special Visa is
that the application form
requires no information that
could reasonably help to
identify a terrorist. In fact, it
is less investigative than visa
application forms used by
some CARICOM consulates

7iVIN
ack

Montague Motors Ltd.
again extends it thanks
and appreciation to the
Bahamian public by
donating to the local
charities. This year we
have donated a total of

$6,000.00 to
The Salvation Army

$2,000.00 to
Bilney Lane Childrens Home

$2,000.00 to
The Children’s Emergency Hostel

Photo from top:

Lisa Armbrister-Salvation Army

Janet Brown - Bilney Lane

Nakita Darling - Children's Emergency
Left in each photo - Mrs. Jill Fox

Right in each photo - Mr. Brent Fox

~ MOTORS LIMITED

Village Road Near Shirley Street
Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377



that immigration and secut
rity officials are prepared
for doubtful persons.
As it is, after World Cup
Cricket, hotels and tourist
officials will have an enor-
mous task wooing back
those visitors who have been
turned off, and explaining
to them that a visa will no
longer be required. And,
then, of course, the
Caribbean still has to find
an effective way of dealing
with any potential terrorist
threat long after the games
are over. :
Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.c
om
sanders29@hotmail.com>





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.









THE TRIBUNE

G: Let’s sort out justice system.

@ By Bahamas
Information Services

ATTORNEY General and
Minister of Legal Affairs
Allyson Maynard-Gibson
pledged to do “whatever is nec-
essary” to stamp out lawless-
ness in The Bahamas, saying
that Bahamians demand noth-
ing less from those charged with
administration of justice.

The Attorney General said
one way of attaining that goal is
through the facilitation of the
Swift Justice Programme, which
“can and must work” through
an integrated justice system that
is already in the works.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
progress “is already being
made” in the area of Swift Jus-
tice by “those already dedicated
to making it work.” She encour-
aged critics of the programme,
particularly those who are
charged with the administration
of justice, to “get behind it and

mâ„¢ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
; Tribune Staff Reporter

- THE STYLISTICS are expect-
ed to be the top act at this year’s
Red Cross Ball, according to the
évent’s planning committee.
The committee announced on
Friday that the 35th Annual
Red Cross Ball will be held on
Saturday, January 27, in the
Crystal Ballroom at Wyndham
Nassau Resorts and Crystal
Palace Casino.
, The black-tie affair will begin

with cocktails at 7pm and be —

followed by dinner at 8pm.

. This year the ball will be held
under the patronage of Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna and
Mrs Hanna, and Prime Minister
Perry Christie and his wife,
Bernadette.

’ The committee said enter-
tainment will be provided by
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band, the Lou Adams
Orchestra and special perfor-
mances by Visage, and popular
soul band The Stylistics.

The internationally acclaimed
rhythm and blues group pro-
duced 12 consecutive top-ten
hits in the early 1970s, culmi-
nating with their Grammy-nom-



make it work.”

“We all depend on it and
everyone needs to support the
concept,” Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said. “We note that there are
systemic problems that have
existed for decades. These can-
not be solved overnight. This is
why I invite defence lawyers,
investigators, officials of the
Office of the Attorney General
charged with the presentation of
cases, to all reflect on our duty to
the Bahamian public and to ask
ourselves whether we are work-
ing together to do all we can to
serve the Bahamian public.

“Together we must address
the backlog of cases and enable
efficiency and the swift hearing
of matters before our courts,”
the Attorney General added.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
her office is implementing an
integrated justice system to fur-
ther positively impact the swift
administration of justice in The
Bahamas. ;

THE Stylistics

inated hit, “You Make Me Feel
Brand New.”

Other hits by the group
include “Break Up to Make
Up”, “Betcha by Golly Wow”,
and “You are Everything.”

The planning committee said
those interested in attending
should collect tickets as soon as
possible, because many had
already been sold.

The money derived from the
ball is used to finance the Red
Cross’s ongoing programmes,

Stylistics to headline at Red Cross Ball

She said the Royal Bahamas
Police Force’s system is working
as a stand-alone and is con-
nected to the prison. She said
the system at the Supreme
Court is also working and is
ready to be connected to the
Office of the Attorney General
and the police.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
Office of the Attorney General

. is completing the infrastructural

improvements that will enable
safe and reliable intranet and
internet communications.

“Our communications
experts, BTC, and our systems
experts, IBM, advise that as
soon as the Office of the Attor-
ney General’s improvements
are completed, they can pro-
ceed to connect the Supreme
Court, the police, the prison and
the Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral to each other.

“In anticipation of the com-
pletion of the infrastructural
integration, we are working

including meals on wheels, dis-
aster and emergency relief,
assisting senior citizens, Family
Islands, refugees, and the after-
school mentoring programme.

There will be a raffle and
door prizes at the event, with
first-place winners of the raffle
being awarded American Atr-
line round-trip tickets to any-
where in the world.

Interested persons are asked
to contact the Red Cross head-
quarters for ticket information,



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Excellent organizational and analytical skills

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MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 7

system to function as designed,”
the Attorney General said.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
“strong focus” is being brought
to the successful completion of
the project which, if it functions
as designed, will result in a more
efficient use of court time.

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS COUNTRY MANAGER—
INSURANCE OPERATIONS

The deadline for applications is January 31st 2007.

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Fax (345) 946 7836
Email jobs@steppingstonescayman.com

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e VP & Regional Marketing Manager, the

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“The system is designed to
prevent time conflicts in terms
of double bookings of matters
and lawyers and other such inef-
ficiencies that continue to
plague the administration of jus-
tice and cause grave inconve-
nience to litigants,” she added.

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“———~


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

Ci °° (ae Ae

2006 ended with a lynching

Pre the start, it was

predestined to end the
way it did. The murdered
lawyers, the convenient switch-
ing of judges, the helpful testi-
mony of anonymous witnesses
and the emotional tirades of a
puppet Prime Minister all pro-
vided the backdrop.

The dictator’s swift trial,
speedy conviction and sum-
mary execution were all
required ingredients in the
salving tonic for a broken,
traumatised land.

As kangaroo show trials/exe-
cutions go, this one was pulled
off so expertly that it could
almost have disguised itself as
an act of justice - save for a few
stubborn historical details and
an eager spectator with a cell-
phone camera.

The offending historical
details fall into two categories:
those concerned with the con-
text in which this whole farci-
cal exercise has taken place,
and those that provide a con-

_ trast between the unabridged
facts of Iraqi history and the
skewed, selective western ver-
sion still being pushed by
some.

A keen sense of irony is
required to spot the former
kind. Here is one group of
countries invading another ille-
gally and without a hint of
provocation, then proceeding
to hand over its captured leader







The Bahamas National
Trust has appointed Hank
O. Ferguson as Conser-
vation Finance Specialist.

The Bahamas Na-
tional Trust, The Bahamas
government (represented
by the BEST Commis-
sion) and The Nature

“Conservancy signed a
National Implementation
Support Partnership
Agreement to implement
a programme of work on
protected areas.

This programme was
adopted at the Seventh
Meeting of the Confer-
ence of Parties to the



Now it comes ata:

Convention on Biological Diversity.

A trained and experienced econo-
mist, Mr. Ferguson will develop and
make recommendations for the imple-
mentation of a sustainable finance plan
for protected areas in The Bahamas in-
cluding the 25 national parks sthat en-
compassing some 700,000 acres, as well
as five marine reserves declared by the

to another faction in an as yet
unresolved civil war.

While thus flouting the
Geneva Conventions (which
emphatically require combat-
ants to guarantee the security
of prisoners of war), the occu-
piers then react with breath-
taking, Pilatian self-absolu-
tion as the inevitable next

step in the blood feud tran-_

spires.

Stripped ab initio of legiti-
macy, this whole sordid affair is
now stripped of a little more
sanity every time its orchestra-
tors open their mouths in self-
justification.

| he second kind of
troublins historical

detail is even less easy for bal-
anced minds to ignore. They
involve putting into context
the litany of crimes attributed
to a doubtlessly evil man
against the dubiously selec-
tive process that has now
ensured that he will never face
a fair trial for the most serious
of these.

To much of the world, the
big question remains: “Why
Dujail?” Why did the slaying
of 180 people (modest by Sad-
dam’s standards) following an
assassination attempt take such
precedence over the many, far
graver crimes of which he has
been accused?

Had the end-game gone dif-

Hank Ferguson Appointed
Conservation Finance
Specialist at BNT



Hank O. Ferguson

nce

financial plan and outline is paramount

in realizing the success of these ventures.

He has a graduate degree in econom-

ics and has practiced both nationally and

internationally as an economist, trade

‘ negotiator and foreign service officer

managing projects funded by the Euro-
pean Union in The Bahamas.

PERSPECTIVES



ferently, there would perhaps
have been an easy answer to
that question. It could, for

:



That most of
this horrid man’s
crimes were
committed with
either the tacit
approval or
the active
connivance of
the powers that
now occupy his
country is a most
inconvenient fact
both for the
occupiers and
their stooges.



instance, have been a longer
and more complex process col-
lating the evidence for such

Department of Fisheries
in 2000.

Mr. Ferguson will also
support initiatives to
draft and develop fund-
ing proposals for the
BNT and Bahamian
protected areas.
partners to this agree-
ment are committed to
work towards the estab-
lishment of a compre-
hensive, effectively
managed and ecologi-
cally representative sys-
tem of Bahamian pro-
tected land areas by 2010,
and sea areas by 2012.
Mr. Ferguson’s 10-year

















KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise”

Performance has always come at a price
sonable one.

ANDREW ALLEN






large, complex massacres as at
the Kurdish city of Halabja in
1988.

But the staged reaction of
ascendant Shi’ite politicians,
who insisted on carrying out
the Dujail verdict before other
trials could begin, has now
deprived even their Kurdish
allies of the satisfaction they
too crave.

And in several respects,
Dujail was far from the most
compelling example of the sav-
agery of Mr Hussein’s regime.

Fis: whatever the
overkill of the regime’s
response, it must be conceded
that it was prompted by an
attempted assassination of Mr
Hussein and his senior col-
leagues.



Gassing the
Kurds (not to
mention the
Iranians) wasn’t
quite an
unforgivable act

. in western eyes

when presented
as guarding his
rearguard against
the hated
Ayatollahs.



And while massacring 180
“rebels” was hardly a legiti-
mate response, it is a matter
of historical record that far
more stable personalities than
Saddam Hussein have similar-
ly over-reacted to attempts to
kill them.

The words “national emer-
gency” are both handy and
chronically over-used by politi-
cians of all stripes, not just
Baathist tyrants.

Secondly, for sheer sav-
agery and unwarrantedness,
Dujail pales in comparison
both to the gassing of 5,000
Kurds at Halabja by the
Baathist regime, and to the
notorious “anfal” campaign,
in which the lives and liveli-
hoods of recalcitrant Kurdish
communities were declared
legitimate booty of war by Mr
Hussein. Now, thanks to
“swift justice”, occupation
style, he will never be tried
for these crimes.

Of course, both Halabja and
Anfal occurred against the
backdrop of Mr Hussein’s bit-
ter, wasteful (and western-
backed) war of attrition
against Iran, while his bloody
suppression of the Shi’ite
uprising of 1991 involved an
embarrassing failure of west-
ern powers to support an



There's practical and then there's
Good - looking and practical.

_ Thompson Blvd. « Oaks Field
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insurgency which they had
stoked and encouraged.

And there, one suspects, lies
the rub. That most of this hor-
rid man’s crimes were com-
mitted with either the tacit
approval or the active con-
nivance of the powers that
now occupy his country is a
most inconvenient fact both
for the occupiers and their
stooges.

y ou see, gassing the
Kurds (not to men-

tion the Iranians) wasn’t quite
an unforgivable act in western
eyes when presented as guard-

‘ing his rearguard against the

hated Ayatollahs.

That the poison gas used was
courtesy of NATO could, on
the other hand, be a little diffi-
cult to,explain both for occu-
piers supposedly driven to Iraq
out of concern for human rights

and for the local stooges that

they sponsor.

That may explain the perfect
synchronisation of events in late
December between occupier
and stooge in a country where
almost nothing else goes to
plan. The captive was quickly
handed over in some undis-
closed location and within
hours he was dead.

Soon after, the stooges were
quick to release their official
footage of the event. Soundless
and sanitised, it was enough to
sate the bloodlust of their con-
stituents, but not enough to give
a real characterisation of the
whole sordid affair. That would

Paint Professionals Trust

THE TRIBUNE

come later, in the “unofficial”
version caught on cell-phone
camera.

W hat we saw in that
version was the true

face of last week’s events and,
by extension, the true face of
today’s Iraq. The masked thugs
to whom the occupiers handed
their captive not only traded
sectarian insults with their vic-
tim, but could be heard chanti-
ng the name of Moqtada al-
Sadr, one of the new Iraq’s
most prominent and bloody-
handed militia leaders. It was
to all who have seen it a sec-
tarian lynching by any other
name.

The British, who incidentally
are responsible for most of the
mess in the Middle East (if not
the modern world), were nev-
ertheless in their heyday far
more adept at carrying out a
colonial proxy-lynching.

Supporters of Kenya’s Mau
Mau movement found them-
selves raped, tortured, hanged
and mutilated, while still being
presented as the “bad guys” in
polite circles.

It had something to do with
knowing when you are on a
colonial mission, accepting it
and not bothereing to clothe it
in the kind of troubling lan-
guage (Operation Iraqi Free-
dom) that requires too much
explanation when things go
awry. .

Or maybe they just lacked
pesky spectators with cell-
phone cameras.

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THE TRIBUNE



‘ LOCAL NEWS |

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 9



' HI MIKE Love and Bruce Johnston on stage Saturday night

Beach Boys still
have their magic

THE Beach Boys brought
their ‘good vibrations’ to Nas-
sau over the weekend to remind
their fans that - no matter what
else has happened since - the
1960s remain the defining
decade of pop music.

The rhythms and melodies of

that incredible time gave a
‘. packed house at the Rainforest
Theatre on Cable Beach the
night of their lives.

Roly-poly women and grey-
topped men with beerbellies
danced in the aisles as their
youth came back to them via
one of the truly great rock
bands of their time.

Only two of the original five
‘Boys’ are still around, but care-
fully selected young musicians
now fill the vocal and instru-
mental gaps left behind by the
absentees.

And - as they proved on Sat-
* urday night - it’s the music that
really counts, belted out by men
whose passion for the Sixties
pop phenomenon remains undi-
minished, >

Tracking back four decades,
~ there are probably four num-
» bers that for me exemplify the
+ Sixties spirit. They are Twist
and Shout by The Beatles, A
Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol
Harum, San Francisco by Scott
MacKenzie and, of course, Cal-
* ifornia Girls by The Beach
Boys.

But only The Beatles and
The Beach Boys truly repre-
sented, in everything they did,
. the freshness and energy of
youth at a time when youth was
everything.

ae

ee
eZ

ae a a a eM

eS

Â¥

eee

- dark, rainy northern city in Eng-
land, were a symbol of musical
rebellion whose melodies ener-
» gised a whole nation, The
- Beach Boys were all about sun-

shine, fin-tailed limos and gor-
, geous girls. And California, not
| Liverpool, was their turf, a
coastal playground fringed by

ia FM Ly ae ae eee 4g

from people who are
| making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning

Ree ev

‘
k

;. | for improvements in the
*, | area or have won an

* | award.

| | Ifso, call us on 322- 1986
* | and share your story.

.

h

4

+

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4

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w

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‘ Maderia Shopping Plaza

i P.O. Box SS-5166

4 Nassau, Bahamas

While The Beatles, from a_

you are raising funds for a

Review

Pacific surf. ;

Together, these groups gave
musical definition to those, like
me, whose late teens and early
twenties coincided with THE
great decade of the last century.

On Saturday night, old
troupers Mike Love and Bruce
Johnston looked like a couple
of granpops who had just wan-
dered in from a baseball game.

But, with their young assis-
tants on guitars, keyboards and
drums, they managed to pro-
duce a wall of sound that was,
quite frankly, astounding.

All the best Beach Boys num-
bers came tumbling out in a 90-
minute torrent which had every-
one on their feet rocking and
rolling and, in some instances,
openly weeping from the sheer
joy of it.

‘Do You Wanna Dance?’ was
met with a resounding ‘yes’
while ‘Barbara Ann’ had the
audience high of memories.
They were up on their feet for
‘Good Vibrations’ and deliri-
ous with delight when ‘Califor-
nia Girls’ set the seal on the
evening.

But it was for that great old
Bahamian folk song ‘Sloop
John B’ - a major hit for the
band in 1966 - that the crowd
reserved its most ardent
applause.

One amazing aspect of The
Beach Boys’ concert was that,
among the middle-aged fans of
old, were so many in their twen-
ties, thirties and forties who -
having missed the band first
time round - were determined
to catch them while they could.
Even more astonishing was that
they knew the words to every

‘| Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

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Like most bands of the time,
The Beach Boys have known
their troubles. The mental
decline and ultimate withdraw-
al of their main force, Brian
Wilson, was a blow. And they
have known their share of
internecine strife over the years,
with legal battles still rumbling
on in the background.

But in Nassau over the week-
end, despite it all, pop fans of all
ages were reminded just how
good the best really are - and
how very special the Sixties
were as a seedbed of memo-
rable melodies.

With 36 Top 40 hits behind
them, including four number
one singles, The Beach Boys
are Hall of Famers whose stage
careers date back to 1961.
Forty-six years on, their music is
as fresh and invigorating as
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





The Royal Bank of Canada welcomes

@ CELEBRITY Cruise liner
Century docking at the Price
George Wharf last Friday carrying
1500 outstanding RBC Royal
Bank of Canada employees from
around the world.









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@ HUNDREDS of RBC Royal Bank of Canada employees from around the world converge.
at the parking lot of RBC’s historic Main Branch at Prince George ™ Wharf for a Bahamian style.

welcome reception.

RBC Royal Bank of Cana-
da welcomed 1,500 outstand-
ing RBC employees and their
guests to The Bahamas on Fri-
day, January 12, 2007.

The group traveled to Nas-
sau aboard the luxurious
Celebrity Cruise Line ship
Century. The Century was
exclusively rented by RBC to
take its top performing
employees from around the
world on a seven-day cruise
of the Caribbean with Nassau
as a scheduled stop. A
“Bahamas Experience” par-
ty, co-sponsored by RBC and



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the Ministry of Tourism was
held in their honour at RBC
Main Branch parking lot,
Prince George Wharf, where
the group experienced
Junkanoo, down home
Bahamian food, drinks and
live entertainment by the
Soulful Groovers.

“Royal Bank’s reward and
recognition program plays a
key role in our business cul-
ture,” said Nathaniel Beneby,
RBC’s Vice President and
Country Head for The
Bahamas. “Our employees
are rewarded on a consistent






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basis for outstanding job per- -'
formance, and we are pleased
that we can support this recog- :

“nition.”

Over 70,000 employees
from around the world partic- '
ipate in RBC’s Reward and |
Recognition program called ‘
RBC Performance. Each year !
about 600 employees become :









winners of this deluxe all *
expense paid cruise which is ,
the top award in the program. i
Eleven employees from the
Bahamas were recognized and
traveled on the cruise that left
Miami on January 6, 2007.



@ ABOVE: Getting Down!
A Roots Junkanoo Group
Dancer gives this Royal Bank
of Canada guest a warm wel-
come to The Bahamas.

A large contingent of
Junkanoo performers was on
hand to welcome 1500 out-
standing Royal Bank of Cana-
da employees from around
the world.

@ MIDDLE PICTURE: Jan
Knowles, Regional Manager
Public Relations for RBC Roy-
al Bank (left) welcomes home
Donnetta Brown, Royal Per-
formance Cruise winner for
The Bahamas (right).

Mee ie Se ee es


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 11



Pi oe aes
Royal Bankers from around the world









YOUR CONN



B TOP LEFT: Ross
McDonald, Senior Vice Pres-
ident, RBC Caribbean Bank-
ing (third from left) welcomes
guests along with Quincey
Fisher, Manager Personal
Financial Services Bahamas

Applications



(4th from left). . yo
TOP RIGHT: Larry Wil- : The ~-Bahamas Tel “0 —
_ son, Chief Financial Officer available Limited (BTC) wishes«to caution ued —
for RBC Royal Bank of Cana- customers and the general public that a number of |

da introduces a guest to the
colours of Junkanoo. RBC

soncncaneuevccatve | Lutord Cay Foundation

guests from around the world.

cavove-rumanm | _ sehOlarships

left to right are Patrice Ellis,
Royal Performance Cruise
winner for The Bahamas and

her husband Daron welcom- | The Lyford Cay Foundation is pleased to announce that applications are

ing cruise winners from Cana- , ‘ ,

da. now being accepted for academic scholarships at the graduate and
undergraduate levels, Apply for:

ice Gaiae phote card dtcaad Ro are Se .

@ The following RBC
employees from The
Bahamas were recognised
as RBC Top Performers in
2006:

# The US $7.500/yr Lyford Cay Foundation Awards
# Cdn$7.500/yr The Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation Awards
# Estelle Siebens Excellence Awards in specialized disciplines

@ RBC Royal

Bank of Canada ~

Donuetra Brown. Mans Applications available from all secondary school guidance counsellors,
ager, Bahamas and Financial Aid Office at C.0.B, ot through the I:yford Cay Foundation at
Caribbean Service Cen- P.O. Box N-777



vassal, Bahamas
ters gat
Dave Dyck, Vice Presi-
dent, Operations and Ser-
vice Delivery

Patrice Ellis, Adminis-
tration and Procurement
Officer, Nassau, Process-
ing Center

Eleanor Forbes, Person-
al Financial Services Rep-
resentative, RBC Main
Branch

Or online at war

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MARCH 31, 2007





Anastacia Knowles,
Account Manager, RBC
Main Branch

Joyce Mackey, Manag-
er, RBC George Town,
Exuma Branch

Robert Pantry, Network
Support Officer, Bahamas
Credit Card Center

Jerome Pinder, Execu-
tive Account Manager,
Commercial Banking
Center

@ RBC FINCO

Coretta Rolle, Manager,
Mortgages, RBC FINCO
Robinson Road Branch

Ingrid Simon, Manager,
Loans Collection Center



Custom

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Human rights group joining call

for closure of Guantanamo Bay

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

A LOCAL human rights
group Is supporting an interna-
tional campaign demanding the
immediate closure of the Guan-
tanamo Bay detainment camp.

The camp serves as a joint
military prison and interroga-
tion centre under the leader-
ship of Joint Task Force Guan-
tanamo and has occupied a por-
tion of the United States Navy's
base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
since 2002.

More than 770 captives have
been held at Guantanamo, of
whom only 10 have been
charged with crimes. About 395
prisoners remain there, sus-
pected of al-Qaeda and Taliban

links, imprisoned in modern ~

maximum-security cells.

The concentration camp has
drawn strong criticism, both in
the US and worldwide, for its
detainment of prisoners with-
out trial, and allegations of tor-
ture.

Amnesty International UK
describes Guantanamo Bay
detainment camp as a “symbol
of injustice and abuse”.

The UK-based human rights
group exclaimed that “enough
is enough” and its calling for
the immediate closure of the
detainment camp.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Tamico Gilbert,
vice-president of Amnesty
International Bahamas, spoke
about the group’s position on
the camp.

Mr Gilbert said: “Amnesty
International Bahamas joins
with our UK group in denounc-
ing Guantanamo Bay as a sym-
bol of oppression and injustice in
the world, and it shows exactly
how the so-called war on terror
has gone contrary to interna-
tional human rights standards.”

In January 2005, the US mil-
itary revealed that twenty-three
prisoners tried to hang or stran-
gle themselves during a mass
protest at Guantanamo Bay in
August 2003.

At the time, a US military
spokesman said the incidents
were "gestures" aimed at get-
ting attention, and only two of
the prisoners were considered
suicidal.

The Bush-administration clas-
sified the prisoners as "enemy

combatants", and claimed that
the detainees were not entitled
to the protections of the Gene-
va Conventions, but in June
2006 the US Supreme Court
ruled against this interpretation.

Last week, UN Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon urged
that the prison be closed.

During this week, an interna-
tional delegation of former pris-
oners, families of current pris-
oners, US lawyers and human
rights activists travelled to
Guantanamo, Cuba to hold a
conference on prison abuses
and march to the Cuban-side
security gate of the US Naval
Base to call for the closure of
the prison.

The international campaign
is part of the January 11 Inter-
national Day to Shut Down
Guantanamo, the day that
marks the five-year anniversary
of the first prisoners being sent
to Guantanamo.

“In a system of international
human rights persons are inno-
cent before proven guilty, so as
far as we are concerned, the sit-
uation is that innocent people
have been unlawfully detaineed
for five years,” said Mr. Gilbert.



BA US flag is seen flying at the North East Gate in Guantanamo Bay in Cuba

Mr Gilbert said Amnesty
International Bahamas is also
calling for the immediate clo-

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The international campaign
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Man loses
$1,500 to
armed
robbers

A 38-YEAR-OLD man fell
victim to armed robbers on Sat-
urday morning, losing $1,500 in
cash and being forced into his
assailants’ car before escaping
unharmed.

The man was about to enter
his car on Market Street when
he was approached by the two
men, one bearing a handgun, at
around 2am, police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans said.

After stealing his money, the
two men drove the victim to
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and share your story.

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Police are investigating the
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His ordeal came during a
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THE TRIBUNE



Anger
FROM page one

and a leaky roof in her front
room.

Ms Culmer claimed she
told the building inspector
about her leaky roof prob-
lem, and he said she would
have to buy the rooting
cement to repair the leak.

“I don’t see why I should
have to purchase roof cement
for a brand new house,
because when they asked me
for the down payment I had
to have all the money with
no excuses,” stated Ms Cul-
mer.

She also said that her out-
side cessp'‘s remain uncov-
ered.

House 47

Mr Christopher Miller lives
in a three-bedroom home in
the sub-division.

He complained about flaky
wall paint, an unfinished
bathroom toilet, exposed
plumbing pipes in his yard,
and claimed the electricty
keeps cutting off.

Mr Miller said he wanted
to ask the government a
question in respect to the
“low-cost” homes.

“The 885s are the homes
that cost $94,000, which are
the ones without the utility
room, and the 805s are the
houses with the utility room.

“If the only differnce is the
utility room, why do the 805s
cost $9,000 more to pur-
chase?” asked Mr Miller.

He claimed he paid
$103,000 for his home and
that, after interest, he expects
to pay over $250,000 back for
the loan.

All residents interviewed
said they attempted to con-
tact Housing Minister Neville
Wisdom on many occasions,
but without any success.

“They look like they for-
get about us,” said Ms Carey.

The Tribune was also
unsuccessful in contacting the
minister for comment.

All home-owners inter-
viewed said their homes
were valued in the range of
$94,000-$103,000 and their
average mortgage payment
is about $900 per month.









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National Coalition for H

ealthcare Reforn



MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 13

‘still waiting’ on NHI plan documentation

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

president of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and
consultant to the coalition
which represents a cross-section
of business organisations,
labour unions and professional
medical groups.

The coalition in principle
supports a national healthcare
plan for all Bahamians, but
believes that insufficient infor-
mation has been provided about
the NHI plan as proposed by
the Blue Ribbon Commission
and its steering committee, and

_has been seeking to obtain
information from the Ministry
of Heaith for months.

The government previously

THE National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform is yet to
receive any of the promised
documentation on the National
Health Insurance plan which
government said last year the
group would be given an oppor-
tunity to review.

"We're still waiting to hear
from them with regards to an
overview that they were sup-
posed to give us as well as the
documentation, as well as any
plans to move ahead with
putting the regulations into
place," said Winston Rolle, past

Announcement on Daniel Smith

_ death inquest decision today
FROM page one

anticipated it would arrive in the afternoon. — :

He said he would study the document thoroughly over the
weekend and on Monday, ready to announce his decision on Tues-
day.

The announcement will bring to an end months of speculation
by commentators in the Bahamian and international press over how
the matter of the 20-year-old's mysterious death will be concluded.

In October, a leading jurist said that an inquest would normal-
ly be a "matter of policy and procedure" in all cases of "sudden
death," such as Daniel's, in which no-one is criminally charged.

"If you are not going to charge anyone with homicide, you
must hold an inquest, there's no ifs and buts about that," said the
source, who questioned why it had taken so long for an inquest date
to be set.

The jurist said at that time that'a key question to be answered
was how the 20-year-old got possession of the methadone, which
was later found in his system.

Daniel died in Doctors Hospital on September 10 while visiting
his mother, Anna Nicole Smith, and his baby sister, Dannie Lynn
Hope, born three days earlier. .

An American pathologist hired by Miss Smith, Dr Cyril Wecht,
subsequently determined that Daniel died "accidentally" as a
result of the effects of a "cocktail" of drugs in his system.

The combination of drugs ~~ two anti-depressants and
methadone — would have reportedly affected the brain, lungs,
and ultimately Daniel's heart, with devastating results, he said.

In October, Daniel's grandmother, Virgie Arthur, told CNN's
Nancy Grace that she believed her grandson was murdered.

"Daniel did not take drugs. No-one could convince me of that,"
she told the show's host.

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tions for the 10,15 and 20-year
period after implementation, a
study on the economic impact
NHI could have and "a com-
plete report on the components,
cost and financing of NHI," Mr
Rolle told The Tribune in
November.

"For us to do a true analysis
of the plan we need to have that
information available to us," he
said.

"This information is critical
for the public to understand the
true sustainability of the plan."

Mr Rolle has previously said
that the NHI plan could have a
"devastating" effect on the
Bahamian economy if imple-
mented incorrectly.

"For the sake of the Bahami-
an economy and this nation's

promised that they would give
the details to the coalition by
December 1. But on Friday Mr
Rolle said that there had been
"no communication whatsoeév-
er" from the government to the
coalition on the matter in recent
weeks.

"All we know is what I guess
we read in the papers the other
day about them rolling out a
strategic plan," he said.

He said that the coalition
hoped the delay was only the
effect of the holidays, and that
the ministry would get "back in
the swing of things" and engage
with them again now the holi-
day season is over.

Specifically, the group is
awaiting actuarial studies on
NHI, income and cost projec-

Bahamasair boss
FROM page one

could not say at this point whether police were following any “sig-
nificant leads” into the matter as this might compromise their
investigation.

“TI would rather leave that alone until we get to a point where we -

can give you some positive information because otherwise it inter-
feres with our investigation,” he explained.

“We don’t have any problem giving the information but first of
all we want to know where we are in terms of our investigation.”

In response to the alleged theft, The Tribune received an official
press statement from Bahamasair yesterday.

The document read: “The Managing Director (Henry Woods)
has outrightly called for the retraction of this article as it is false and
misleading.

“He emphatically states that no monies have been stolen at
Bahamasair in the amount of $73,000 during his tenure as manag-
ing director and the airline has not reported any such matter to the
police.” .

The investigation is the latest of several problems affecting the
national flag-carrier.

In mid-December, hundreds of Bahamians were delayed in their
pre-Christmas travels when Bahamasair pilots staged a major sick-
out as the ongoing dispute over an industrial agreement with the air-
line’s management came to a new standstill.

Dismayed passengers contacted The Tribune reporting that their
flights had been delayed. Hundreds of customers were stranded in
US and domestic airports.

In respect to the alleged theft, police said that as soon as a con-
clusion was reached in the matter they would be willing to discuss
their findings. :

“Right now we really don’t want to give any information out to
the press beause the matter is under active investigation,” said

future well-being, employment
and prosperity this nation could

not afford to get NHI and it
implementation wrong," h:
said.

The latest figures of peopl:

who have signed the petitio:
launched by the coalition i

November - which requests tha‘
government "release all fact:
and allow for meaningful con-

sultation before making a fine
determination" - will b:

revealed this week, Mr Roll

said.

A total of 3,500 signature:
were obtained within 10 day:

ta +-

of its launch.



| Woman in
hospital
FROM page one

discovering firearms and
ammunition in a vehicle in the
downtown area on Saturday.
While on duty around
5.50pm conducting surveil-
lance at the Junior Junkanoo
Parade, a team of detectives
observed two men acting in a
suspicious manner next to a
Suburban mini-van near
Esquire Clothing store at
Churchill Square. s

As the officers approached, |,

the two men quickly went
inside the vehicle, where the
driver was seated. The offi-
cers told the men of their sus-
picion and ordered them to
get out of the vehicle.

Police discovered a .45
semi-automatic pistol, con-
taining nine .45 ammunition,
and a .{mm semi-automatic
pistol with eight..9mm ammu-
nition inside the vehicle.

A 21-year-old resident of
Spinney Road, a 25-year-old
resident of Gordon Avenue,
and a 22-year-old resident of
Nassau were taken into police
custody. They are expected to
be charged in Freeport Mag-
istrate’s Court today.







ASP Cartwright.

THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF.THE BAHAMAS |
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & Internationai Relations
is to implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

international Liaison Officer (IO)

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
_ departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.























































Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-tg-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°'' January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas

P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas

\ THE COLLEGE OF

Visit our website at www.coh.edu.bs


MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 15



NASSAU LIFE



Winners are
announced for

PCCC

PRESENTATIONS have
been made to raffle winners in
aid of the Physically Challenged
Children’s Committee (PCCC),
formerly the Crippled Chil-
dren’s Committee.

The winning tickets were
drawn by raffle patron
Bernadette Christie, wife of
Prime Minister Perry Christie,
on December 18 at Kelly’s in
the Mall at Marathon.

The photograph shows win-
ners receiving their prizes from
chairman of the PCCC Bismar-
ck Coakley (left) along with the
executive director, Dorothy
‘Philips, far right.

«The prizes are as follows:

“© 2007 Chevrolet Optra, won
by Vivian Knowles - ticket
09323.



Researchers
help Cuban
Americans
find roots

& FORT LAUDERDALE,
Florida



CUBAN-AMERICANS
who lost their family histories
when they fled the island nation
are joining forces to rediscover

‘ their roots, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Jorge Pinon, a senior research
associate at the University of
Miami's Institute for Cuban and
Cuban-American Studies,
helped launch the Cuban Fam-
ily History and Genealogy Pro-
ject. It helps Cuban-Americans
trace their family histories and
helps preserve the history of
groups ranging from indigenous
tribes to the various cultures
who settled on the island after
the Spanish colonization began
in the 15th century

"What happens with every
migration is you bring with you
your music, your food and you
pass it on to future genera-
tions," Pinon said. "But we lose
our family history."

Civil records in communist
Cuban can be even harder to
obtain, Pinon said, though he
has traced his own bloodlines
to the 1600s and documented
1,200 ancestors.

Cuban-American genealo-
gists also are transcribing docu-
ments and putting them on a
Web site to help others in their
search. The records include bur-
ial lists, ship passengers and
church records such as baptism,
marriage and death certificates.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













raffle

¢ Caribbean cruise for two -
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Sunshine Companies, return air-
fare donated by Continental
Connections, won by Danielle
Farmer - ticket 10353.

¢ Opal and diamond ring -
donated by Coin of the Realm,
won by Snuggles Russell - tick-
et 12671.

e 16-inch Omega 14k gold
necklace -donated by
Solomon’s Mines, won by
Gwendolyn Johnson - ticket
15543.

5) $250 gift certificate - donat-

. ed by Kelly’s Home Centre,

won by O Nesbeth - ticket 0167.
6) $100 gift certificate - donat-
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PAGE 22, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007





Pope says migt

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

ants should heed values

THE TRIBUNE








of host nation to help integration





Si FAITHFUL hold a banner reading, World Day of the Migrants, prior to the start of Pope Benedict XVI's Angelus prayer in St. Peter's
14, 2007. Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday urged migrants

square at the Vatican, Sunday, Jan.
sures are needed to favor legal migration and to keep emigrant families united.

tries to favor integration, and said mea
{

1

‘

i VATICAN CITY

POPE Benedict XVI, insist-
ing:immigration should be
viewed as a resource and not
just a problem, on Sunday
urged immigrants to respect
the ‘social values of their new
countries and said laws are
neetled to protect their dignity,
according to Associated Press.

"Let us recognize in partic-
ular the difficulties of migrant
families as they’ are: the dis-
comfort, the humiliation," the
pontiff said, addressing pil-
griths and tourists from many °
nations in St. Peter's Square.

Without naming any coun-



en RRR TET TTT



try or nationality, he lamented
the "painful" conditions
refugees, exiles, the homeless
and the persecuted often
endure.

"It is thus important to pro-
tect migrants and their fami-
lies through the help of leg-
islative" assistance, services
and counseling centers, Bene-
dict said. ‘

"I hope that soon there will
be a balanced management of
migratory flows and of human
mobility in general, so bene-
fits can reach the entire human
family, beginning with-eoncrete
measures which-favor legal
emigkation, and the reuniting
of families,” the pontiff added.



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"Only respect for human
dignity for all migrants, on one
hand, and the recognition by
the migrants themselves of the
values of the societies which
host them, will make possible
the proper integration of fam-
ilies in the social, economic
and political systems" where
they are now living, Benedict
said.

"The reality of migration
shouldn't ever be seen only as
a problem but also and above
all as a great resource on the
path of humanity," Benedict
said.

. Archbishop Agostino: Mar-
chetto, a top official of the
Vatican's office on migrants,

& 8

At The Carnival
Monday, January 15 - Friday, January !



SS

to heed the social values of their host coun-

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)

said the pope was particularly
concerned about the families
of refugees.

"There is a tendency today
to protect order and well-being
from the threat that many see
in the continuous arrival of for-
eigners, a mix of migrants and
refugees," Marchetto said in
an interview on Vatican Radio.

The prelate lamented the
lack of adequate funding for
humanitarian assistance for
refugees, “especially for
women and children" leaving
them easy prey for abuse.

The«Gatholic Church on
Sunday was marking the annu-
al World;Day for Migrants and

Refugees.

‘Ride all the rides



~ Communist regime.





@ POPE Benedict XVI blesses the faithful gathered in St.Peter's
square for the Angelus prayer at the Vatican, Sunday, Jan. 14,
2007. The Pontiff told Polish pilgrims on Sunday that he hoped God
would encourage those in difficulty and searching for truth, but he
made no mention of the scandal besetting the Polish Church after
accusations that a Warsaw prelate collaborated with the former

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)


4B | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

HEALTHCARE

INTERNATIONAL EDITION |

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Reversing U.S. healthcare’s ‘death spiral’

* INSURANCE

A: Yes, America spends a
lot, for various reasons. One is
the demands of the American
consumer, but also we have a
highly fragmented, highly
inefficient system. And we’re
the only one of those [indus-
trial] countries without a
national, single-payer system.

Q@: Where is one area
where we cut back on costs
and not hurt healthcare?

A: I think the administra-

AUTOMOBILES

tive overhead and the lack of
any integrated medical record
system is a huge opportunity.
We have so much duplication
because we have these little
silos of information in each
doctor’s office and every hos-
pital. And no one talks to each
other, and so consequently
when the physicians order
things they have no idea what
other doctors ordered.

If we could come up with a
single electronic medical
record system that everybody

shared, in my estimation we
could save trillions of dollars
because everybody is access-
ing the same information. ...
Everybody has to share.

Q: America has 45 million
uninsured. Give me a short
take on how to get people cov-
ered.

A: You can take the Demo-
cratic approach — universal
health [insurance], govern-
ment control. Or you can take
the Republican approach —
the free enterprise system.

I’m for the free enterprise sys-
tem.

The system will not self-
correct right now. The market
forces aren’t aligned to make
it self-correct.

I love what Massachusetts
is doing with the mandate
[requiring employers to pro-
vide insurance]. They have
less of a problem. Their unin-
sured is 6 to 8 percent.

Q: Hospital gross charges
are often three or four times
what private insurers or Medi-





DESIGN: On many concepts and production cars,

3
b



CARLOS OSORIO/AP
designers have raised the top of the doors, reducing the window
size. It’s clearly a trend that will be more pronounced in the future, and you can see it in concept vehicles such as
Volvo’s XC-60 crossover, Chrysler's Nassau sedan and the sleek but retro Holden Efiygabove.

New trends seen at auto show

*HOT CARS

across the globe. GM didn’t
put any time frame on the
Volt other than to say anew
battery could be ready by
2010 or 2012.

“T do think that it’s a very
solid interim solution until we
get a (hydrogen powered)
fuel cell,” said Michael Robi-
net, vice president of global
forecast services for North-
ville, Mich.-based CSM
Worldwide, an auto industry
consulting company.

Between now and then,
buyers will be treated to
many more models that look,
feel and perform better than
their predecessors. In the
popular mid-sized segment,
Honda rolled out the 2008
Accord Coupe, which will
look like its sister sedan, both
due in showrooms this fall.

They'll fight it out against
Chevrolet’s new Malibu, a car
that many analysts say will
finally give GM a model to

CATTLE RANCHING

take on Toyota’s Camry, the
best-selling car in the U.S.

In both the Accord and
Malibu, designers have raised
the top of the doors, or the
“beltline,” in automotive jar-
gon, reducing the window
size. They did the same thing
on the redesigned Ford Focus
small car.

“It gives the vehicle, I
think, a very substantial
look,” said Ed Welburn, GM’s
vice president of global
design. “It allows you to doa
long, uninterrupted line”
along the side, he said.

It’s clearly a trend that will
be more pronounced in the
future. You can see it in con-
cept vehicles such as Volvo’s
XC6O0 crossover, Chrysler’s
Nassau sedan that may be the
next generation 300, the Lin-
coln MKR and even the
sculpted but retro Holden
Efijy from GM.

In many cases, the high
doors are coupled with a roof
made mostly of glass, which

Welburn said makes a car feel
more open even with smaller
side windows.

Glass technology has
evolved so it’s as strong as
steel roofs, Welburn said.

Designers also are lower-
ing the slope of the wind-
shield to give cars a lower
feel. Even Jeep, which nor-
mally has a more boxy look,
had the angular windshield
and high door line in its Trail-
hawk concept.

Robinet said the higher
doors give people a feeling of
safety, too, but conversely,
the smaller windows and
lower windshield angle can
cut into a driver’s vision.

Chrysler’s new minivans
are among the few new mod-
els that don’t look more mod-
ern. But Robinet sees the
minivans as a big seller
mainly for their interiors,
which have more head and
shoulder room than previous
models because they are box-
ier on the outside.

“I think the exterior’s not
going to win them any design
awards,” Robinet said.

Key to the interior of
DaimlerChrysler’s Chrysler
Town & Country and Dodge
Caravan minivans is the
“Swivel n’ Go” seating in
which the second-row seats
swivel backward to face the
third row. A table can be
snapped between the rows so
families can play games, do
homework or whatever.

The vans also have two
rows of soft, white light tubes
on the ceiling to make the
passenger area feel like a
home. Other vehicles, such as
Ford’s Focus and several of
Toyota’s Scidn models also
have more homelike lighting
with colored LEDs in the floor
and cupholders.

Robinet sees the lighting as
a trend that will stick around
until the concepts. become
reality. “The days of just hav-
ing a dome lamp are probably

finished,” he said.

Brazil’s ranches keep expanding

* BRAZIL

The cheaper cost of Brazil~
ian beef attracts orders from
Russia, its No. 1 customer, and
Middle Eastern countries.

Last December, Russia and
55 other countries stopped
imports from Brazilian states
affected by foot-and-mouth
disease but 10 months later
removed the ban on major
producing states like Mato
Grosso deemed clear of the
infection. Despite the embar-
goes, Brazil’s exports from
January through September
2006 rose 17.6 percent in cash
value and 3.8 percent in vol-
ume compared with a year
earlier, according to the Bra-
zilian Beef Industry and
Exporters Association, or
ABIEC.

SUPPLIERS

. Internal and external fac-
tors explain how Brazil now
supplies a quarter of the
globe’s beef exports.

European outbreaks of two
cattle diseases — mad-cow
and foot-and-mouth — dra-
matically upset production
and consumption in the 1990s.
Then European Union subsi-

dies on beef quality replaced
those promoting volume.
These factors combined to
open big consumer markets
like Russia to lower-priced
Brazilian beef, according to

ABIEC.

Aside from being hor-
mone-free, more than 90 per-
cent of Brazilian cattle are
grass-fed and therefore
unlikely to contract mad-cow
disease from tainted feed.

This pleases consumers in,

Europe, where most cases of
the fatal disease, bovine spon-
giform encephalopathy, have
occurred,

Right now, few American
ranchers appear concerned
about Brazilian competition.
Moreover, more expensive
grain-fed beef from the
United States has ended up in
foreign markets, except for
some by-products like tongue,
U.S. producers say.

The sanguine American
reaction to Brazil’s runaway
export growth might well be
justified — if Brazilians don’t
expand their relatively tiny
base of feedlots and compete
head to head with higher-
quality beef.

Less than 10 percent of cat-

tle here go through feedlots,
where a diet of grain adds
pounds quickly.

But low corn and soybean
prices, compounded by an
abundance of supply often in
the same regions, are making
feedlots much more attractive
to Brazilian cattlemen.

FEEDLOT

Carlos Kind operates the
country’s lith-biggest feedlot,
Boitel (an acronym for
“Bovine Hotel’) near Rio
Verde in Goias state. The

, feedlot can handle 12,500 cat-

tle; about 75 percent are
owned by him and his part-
ner. He says Brazilian ranch-
ers are increasingly using
feedlots to produce higher-
grade beef cattle.

“We may now represent
less than a tenth of cattle pro-
duction, but feedlots are
growing at 20 percent a year,”
Kind said through an inter-
preter.

“The big feedlots are get-
ting bigger, and there are
more small ones. As for me, I
am going to invest in better
feed — cornmeal and soy —
to get the steers finished
faster. We’ve got the land and



FLFR AON eS IS CE TCT OMe) Me Ler NER I RR CoE eh

é

the grain. The problem is that
banks generally don’t lend to
feedlots.”

TEXAS CONCERNS

Texas rancher Gary McGe-
hee has seen the Brazilian
potential, and he is worried.

Although the American
industry has derided grass-fed
beef as inferior to the U.S.
corn-fed variety, McGehee
said he was uncomfortably
impressed by the grass-fed
meat he ate during a visit to
Brazil.

“The steaks were great,
prepared well. That kind of
stuff scares me,” he said dur-
ing acall from the West Texas
town of Mertzon.

Brazil should no longer be
dismissed as just another
Third World country, McGe-
hee cautioned.

“They are competitive
with us,” he said. “Although
we might export less than 7
percent of our beef, if the
price of cattle drops 3 or 4
percent because of Brazilian
competition, that is going to
have an effect on me. Eventu-
ally, they are coming to our
own market and we're going
to have to deal with it.”

care pays. Why not just do
away with gross charges?

A: The complex gross
charge structure is incongru-
ent, incoherent, indefensible.
I will not defend the way hos-

pitals charge, but we don’t

control that because we have
all these impositions that are
brought down on us by the
federal government, which by
the way pays us two different
ways for Medicare and Med-
icaid. And then every man-
aged care company decides at

THE BIG THREE

its own discretion that they’re
going to pay us differently.

If we had a uniform, single
methodology for reimbursing
hospitals and physicians, we
could save a huge amount of
money, but it’s beyond our
capability to force that upon
these payers out there,
because they’re the ones who
set the rules. And we need to
make this consumer-friendly,
especially as we have this
major shift to consumer-
driven healthcare. )

Automakers
hope to learn

° TURNAROUND

spiked and people wanted
something more efficient.

Now they’re all losing bil-
lions and scrambling to catch
up with customers who are
increasingly being drawn to
cars made by foreign-based
automakers, particularly Toy-
ota and Honda.

Auto executives know they
can learn a lot from how Jobs
used a new product and
clever marketing to raise his
company from the grave.

“We're really trying to be
more like companies like
Apple, where we can innovate
and move faster,” said Mark
LaNeve, vice president of
sales, service and marketing
for General Motors.

Before October 2001, when
the first iPod was launched,
digital music players were
clunky and had limited stor-
age capacity., They, were
fueled by tunes torn from CDs
or pirated via Napster. Sync-
ing with a PC was difficult,
and even navigating through
songs was a chore.

Apple saw an opportunity

and jumped on it, introducing’

a sleek player with a hard
drive large enough for thou-
sands of songs, a click wheel
for quick navigation and,
within months, an online
store that offered a legal
means for filling up the iPod.

SAME APPROACH

Jobs, who is fond of car
analogies, had tried the same
approach with the original
1998 iMac: Introducing a sleek
machine that made other
computers look like a gray
1983 Oldsmobile Cutlass
Ciera.

There are differences, of
course, between a 3,600-
pound car and an egg-shaped
iMac or a featherweight iPod
Shuffle, chief among them the
time it takes to design and
build them.

The new iPhone, for exam-
ple, took about two and a half
years to bring to market —
and even that’s a long time in
the consumer electronics
niche, where many products
live in six- or 12-month devel-
opment cycles. The average
car takes four or five years.

WALL STREET

Double-digit gains
still a possibility

* EARNINGS GROWTH

beat expectations, 23 said
ithey’d be in line, and 101 said
they’d miss.

Although these are
extremely early indicators, it
suggests the fourth quarter
remains on par with the previ-
ous quarter. Although many
on Wall Street don’t expect
profit growth to hit the 22
percent level seen in the S&P
500 during the third quarter,
it is still expected to blow past
the historical average of 7.6
percent.

Portfolio managers say
what has come out so far
hasn’t been significantly neg-
ative or positive, and that
double-digit growth is still
achievable.

“T’'d be more concerned if
you saw multiple warnings
from the same industry,” said
Matt Kelmon, portfolio man-

from Apple |

Also, Apple contracts out
virtually all its manufacturing,
where the Big Three have bil-
lions invested in plants and
machinery and must bear the
healthcare, pension and salary
costs of a huge — though
quickly shrinking — and
expensive unionized labor
force. Still, Apple’s core focus
on consumer appeal can serve
as a model. ;

“I think a fresh, Geative
mind is something that you
can appreciate and focus sim-
ply on some complicated
things,” said Eric Ridenqur,
chief operating officer, of
DaimlerChrysler BGs Chrys-
ler Group.

IMPACT
Ridenour sees Chrysler’s

300 sedan and the 1980s

invention of the minivan as
products with similar impact
to the iPod. The 300’s’ striking
silhouette brought the com-
pany ‘big profits when it came
out in 2004, quickly becoming
the large car sales leader. The
minivan created a whole yew
segment of the market. ,

GM expects the Chevrelet
Volt to bea breakthrotigh
product. The electric. ‘car
plugs into a home outlet and
has a small gas engine that
together give the small car a
range of more than 600 miles
on a tank of gas.

It’s just a prototype, bat
LaNeve said it’s within reach
in the short term, and
products like the Volt cquld
help reduce or eliminate
America’s dependence on and
fossil fuels.

“We think this has a
chance to be a game-changing
technology for our company
and our industry,” he said.

But gone are the days
where one product can carry
a company.

“Product is the be- all, end-
all of any recovery,” said
Efraim Levy, an auto industty
analyst for Standard & Poors.
“One home run won’t be
enough to bail out these cour
panies.”

“The key is not just peli.
odic hits, but a steady succ@s-
sion of appealing products,”
Levy said. “That’s what ydu
see in the Toyotas or the Hop-
das.”

Fae O88 we ate Se

ager of the Kelmoore Strateby
Funds. “Every quarter for the
past 18 quarters we’ve been
waiting for this earnings
slowdown, and it’s just never
come. It might be a headline if
it’s not double digit, but we're
still seeing really strong prof
its anyway.’

Russ Koesterich, senior
portfolio manager at Barclays
Global Investments, ae
investors aren’t shaken by
recent warnings. He still cas
resilient corporate earnings
on the way.

“The expectations for
profit growth already wére
ratcheted down, but wevre
now seeing some leeway}\in
that,” he said. “Even if you
have a few of these disap-
pointments like with AMD,
that’s still not enough :to
change expectations that
profit will decelerate below
expectations.” »


THE TRIBUNE ~ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 23

THE TRIBUNE. PRESENTS











Presents

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TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS :
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FLORIDA Keys visitors now
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‘Located on the Key West
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tours of the Keys' undersea
world and view indigenous fish
and sea creatures through video
screens shaped like portholes.

"By educating the public
before they access the (marine)
resource, they can appreciate
the resource and ensure its con-
tinued conservation," said
James L. Connaughton, chair-
man of the White House Coun-
cil on Environmental Quality
and a keynote speaker at the
opening.

The Eco-Discovery Center is
operated by the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration's Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary,
the National Park Service and
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@ UN THIS photo released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, visitors at the new Florida Keys Eco-
Discovery Center examine the inside of a model of the Aquarius underwater marine habitat labora-
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: (AP Photo/Florida Keys News Bureau, Andy Newman)

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Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007, in
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(AP Photo/
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). ibahames
marketplace



Dundas Centre for the
_ Performing Arts,
— Mackey Street









- Show Times: |
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January 22, at 7pm ,





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_Tthe customer service
attitudes that have
emerged over the last
few decades.



Log on to www W amas
oremail









SECTION

;

business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

BUSINESS




Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street






First anchor
A Me |
Ce en OGTR TE

See Page Ze

i
i



BIC flouts regulatory.

rocess over the ViBe

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Bahamas
Telecommunica-
_tions Company
(BTC) “seems to
think it can do
whatever it wants to do”, the
Public Utilities Commission’s
‘ (PUC) executive director told
The Tribune, after it launched
its ViBe Voice over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) product with-
- out obtaining the required
- licence amendments and regu-
latory approvals.

Barrett Russell said the tele-
coms industry regulator was
not going to|take any action
against BTC, though, as ViBe’s





PUC chief:

arrival would benefit
Bahamas-based consumers and
the economy’s competitiveness
due to its prices being lower
than traditional fixed-line ser-
vices.

The PUC’s consultation doc-
ument on price regulation for
ViBe said: “BTC introduced
ViBe for international long dis-

tance calls in September 2006, |

and inter-island long distance
calls in December 2006 despite
the fact that formal approval of
ViBe has not yet been issued.
It is indeed regrettable that

BTC has been so recalcitrant
in this matter........

“The Commission indeed
regrets that the ViBe service
was introduced before formal
approval of pricing was
obtained, and emphasizes that
this should not be regarded as
a precedent for the future.

“However, the Commission
will not deny consumers the
benefits of this cheaper ser-
vice.”

Mr Russell said the PUC
believed it was “in the best

interests of consumers not to

take any action” against BTC,
due to the lower prices and
enhanced economic benefits
that ViBe promised. :

He told The Tribune:
“We’re not contemplating any
further action. We want to
make sure these prices are
locked in under law. We need
to do a public consultation. If
these prices are not locked in,
BTC can change them.

“BTC seems to think it can
do whatever it wants to do, and
at some point in time they’re

going to have to stop that. But

$ 100m in Bahamian goods at stake

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Busines Editor



THERE is likely to be “minimal”
‘impact on the Government's tax revenues
if an Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) between Europe and the
Caribbean results in European exports
being admitted to the Bahamas duty-free,
the minister of state for finance told The
Tribune, but some $100 million in Bahami-:
an exports remain at stake.

James Smith said this was because many
European imports to the Bahamas already
entered with low or zero customs duty
rates attached, but he pointed out that the
EPA situation showed that this nation
needed to keep tax reform “on the front
burner” and that international trade agree-
ments “are not going away”.

The urgency of the EPA situation has
been highlighted by the fact that sources
have told The Tribune that the date for the
Bahamas to submit its “wants and needs”
on the EPA talks to Cariforum, the body
negotiating on this nation and CARI-
COM’s behalf, is “past due”.

Mr Smith told The Tribune that he
thought the submission date was “proba-
bly in a couple of weeks”, and added that
the. Ministry of Foreign Affairs — which
took over responsibility for international

trade relations at the last Cabinet reshuf-

fle — was “working on it”.
The Bahamas submission to Cariforum
would indicate what this nation wanted
to get from the EPA, chiefly securing duty-
free access to EU markets for exports by
its fisheries industry, Bacardi’s spirits and
_ rum, and Polymers International in
Freeport.

It would also indicate what this country
was prepared to offer European exporters
in return, in terms of duty-free access to
the Bahamian market. And any submis-
sion would also indicate economic sectors
that the Bahamas was not prepared to
open up or offer tariff-free access to, plus
any other carve-outs, opt-outs, deroga-



B JAMES SMITH

tions, extensions and timeframes this ~

nation would like.

Mr Smith said the Cariforum talks
would involve the Bahamas and
Caribbean putting forward the major
exports they would like to secure duty-

free access to Europe for. As the EPA:

was reciprocal, the Europeans were seek-
ing the same treatment for their exports.

Mr Smith said the Bahamas exported
about $100 million of goods to the EU

_per year, the bulk of its crawfish and oth-

er fisheries products. Anthony McKinney,
head of the Fisheries Advisory Board,
previously told The Tribune that failure to
secure duty-free access to the EU would
raise the costs of Bahamian fisheries prod-
ucts by $6 million, and make them uncom-
petitive.

On the tax front, Mr Smith said most
imports to the Bahamas from the EU
already had zero import duty rates
attached. The bulk of these goods were
perfumes, watches and jewellery.

“Over the years, we’ve eliminated or
educed considerably the duty on imports
from Europe to encourage tourist expen-
diture,” Mr Smith said. “In terms of the
direct tax loss, it’s likely to be minimal.

EPA talks show need
to keep tax reform
‘on front burner’

“The overall net impact of the EPA is
likely to be in the Bahamas favour, the
retention of net jobs and income.”

A Leonard Archer, the Bahamas
Ambassador to CARICOM, previously
said the Bahamas earned about $10 mil-
lion per year in tax revenues from EU
imports.

Apart from the EPA, the Bahamas will
also have to deal with Caribbean Basin
Initiative (CBI), the system of one-way
preferences that allows some $100 million
of Bahamian goods per annum into the
US duty-free. ;

This has expired, and although still in
operation, has yet to be renewed. The US
must seek a waiver from the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) to continue the CBI,
but this has not been forthcoming due to
the objections of Paraguay, whic h is. com-
plaining that the CBI provides benefits to
the Caribbean nations that it does not
receive, making it discriminatory. ;

The US has indicated that any replace-
ment for the CBI will also involve recip-
rocal treatment from Caribbean nations.
On CBI, Mr Smith said the Bahamas had
to decide whether it was going to be part
of a CARICOM negotiating bloc, or if it
would go the bilateral route and talk to
Washington next week.

“We've got a couple of fundamental
decisions to make,” Mr Smith said of the
Bahamas’ approach to international trade.

“It kind of points the way to keep it
[tax reform] on the front burner to inves-
tigate alternatives. International trade
agreements are not going away, despite
what some may think. The need for reci-
procal access and duty free access will
always be on the table.”

Financing for new port still concerns

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

HOW to raise the necessary funds to
finance the relocation of downtown ship-
ping companies to new port facilities in
the south - and to sustain the project - will
be one of the biggest challenges Dutch
consultants Ecorys-Liviense face as they

At the contract signing for the business
plan last week, Marten van den Bossche,
chairman of Ecorys-Liviense, outlined the

three phases of the business plan, the first

step being the design of the port facility.
The second step in the business plan will
look at the cost of the project.
“The port will cost a lot of money. It’s a
huge investment., and it is something that
has to be done jointly between govern-

ment and the private sector and financing
institutions,” Mr van den Bossche said.

“So, basically we have to do some finan-
cial engineering here, and that is part of the
business plan. We will look into opportu-
nities, whether this plan can be financed
and how it can be financed.”

SEE page 7B

































































the Commission decided at this
particular stage, we want to
lock in the prices.”

Mr Russell said the PUC
was not opposed to ViBe’s
introduction, but added: “We
would like to see BTC follow
the process as outlined in the
Telecommunications Act, but
on the other hand don’t want
to stop it. The consumer gains
far better products and prices
from these services.”

Yet given that BTC
launched ViBe before receiv-
ing the required licence

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

SYSTEMS Resource
Group (SRG) has filed a dis-
pute over the permanent tar-
iff the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) is
charging it to terminate its
customers’ calls in Family
Islands where it has no net-
work, arguing that this is dis-
criminatory and anti-compet-
itive.

Sources told The Tribune
that SRG, parent company of
IndiGo Networks, BTC’s
only legal competitor for
fixed-line services, had filed
the dispute with the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC),
the telecoms sector regulator,
on November 14, 2006.

IndiGo only has networks,
and a licence to operate, on
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Abaco. It has
been unable to start opera-
tions on Abaco due to a sep-
arate ongoing dispute with
BTC over the point of inter-
connection between the two
companies’ networks, which
is again with the PUC.

The latest dispute revolves
around the fact that IndiGo
has no network on Family
Islands such as Exuma and
Eleuthera.

If its customers call BTC
subscribers in those islands,
they have to pay a permanent
tariff of $0.13 per minute to
terminate those calls on
BTC’s network.

BTC therefore still has a
monopoly in those islands,
but unlike IndiGo sub-
scribers, customers of BT'C’s
new Voice over Internet Pro-
tocol (VoIP) service, ViBe,
are not being charged for calls
terminating there.

Subscribers to ViBe’s
Bahamian Pack can pay
$34.99 per month for unlimit-
ed calls to anywhere in the
| Bahamas, and SRG is under-
stood to be complaining that
BTC is charging its ViBe divi-
sion a different wholesale
price for call termination than
IndiGo.

And because BTC has the



Dispute over BTC call-
end tariff charges

. Savings.

_ company allowed to provide

‘BIC seems to think it can do whatever it wants’

amendments, pricing and oth-
er regulatory approvals will
likely lead impartial observers
to conclude that there is one

law for BTC, and another for |

its private sector competitors,
chiefly IndiGo Networks and
Cable Bahamas.
ViBe is not the first time that
BTC has done something with-
out receiving prior regulatory
approval. In 2004, it cut its
international and inter-island

SEE page 12B

monopoly network on those

island, SRG is arguing that
the different prices are anti-
competitive, discriminatory
and a form of predatory pric-
ing designed to drive SRG
out of the market.

In its public consultation
on BTC’s ViBe pricing, the
PUC acknowledged that the
dispute also involved SRG’s
concerns about the bundling
of BTC’s high-speed Internet
service with lower-priced
long-distance calls.

_ The PUC said it was inves-
tigating the competition
aspects of this, noting that it
was common for telecoms
operators across the globe to
bundle services, as a means
of selling more services to
consumers, for greater cus-
tomer convenience, and cost

Barrett Russell, the PUC’s
executive director, said the
regulator would be looking
at bundling in the Bahamian
market once it had addressed
issues relating to long-dis-
tance services, but added that
it would be “difficult to do
much” because its use was
widespread across the tele-
coms world.

Mr Russell said the PUC
hoped that once BTC’s ViBe
pricing was approved, it
would encourage Bahamian
consumers and businesses
using unlicensed VoIP ser-
vices to switch to legal ones.
Currently, BTC is the only

VoIP services, although com-
panies can use it exclusively
for communications within
their own premises.

Mr Russell said the PUC
had yet to resolve the dispute
between BTC and SRG over
interconnection between their
two networks in Abaco,
which was first filed in March
2005. The PUC is supposed
to resolve all disputes within
six months of their being
filed.

Mr Russell added: “We’ve
been attempting to resolve
that, but have had some larg-
er issues to deal with, like the
ViBe thing. We’ll get back to
that in due course.”















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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

Messe

THE TRIBUNE



First anchor
needs trade protection

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/PROGRAM COORDINATOR

The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Program Coordinator.
The Program Coordinator coordinates the administrative and operational aspects of a program
or project. S/he contributes to the processes for annual planning and budgeting, submission of
periodic and annual financial and technical reports and monitoring progress over the life of the
program/project. The Coordinator may be responsible for developing ‘operational guidelines to
ensure efficient management of the program and compliance with regulations. S/he coordinates
program/project-related workshops and meetings and documents activities, strategies and lessons
learned as appropriate. The Coordinator assists with the preparation of financial analyses and reports
for Program/Project management and other team members. S/he also assists in the preparation of
proposals for program/project support and serves as an information resource about the Prograrn/
Project in general — helping to develop communications materials, and responding to public inquiries.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS

Bachelor's degree and 3-5 years related experience or equivalent combination.

Excellent verbal and written skiils.

Proven organizational skills and attention to detail.

Demonstrated experience in MS Office, Word, Excel, Power Point and Data Base Management. Ability
to manipulate, analyze and interpret data.

Understanding of how organizations work and experience with project implementation and design.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/SENIOR POLICY ADVISOR

The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Senior Policy Advisor.
The Senior Policy advisor develops, coordinates and implements the program strategy to further the
work of the Conservancy and its conservation partners through direct interaction with the Governments
in the Northern Caribbean Program and multi- and bi-lateral agencies that provide conservation
opportunities and/or impact the nations’ conservation programs. S/he identifies conservation policy
and funding opportunities, evaluates the potential for TNC and NGO partner involvement, and develops
and implements strategies to influence policy and public funding for conservation al the national and/or
global levels. The Senior Policy Advisor tiaises with counterparts in the Conservancy's Mesoamerica
and Caribbean Conservation Region and Internationa! Government Relations department to provide
and extract useful lessons and to coordinate on joint policy approaches. S/he also serves as contact
with the external professional community in the policy arena to keep abreast of new developmenis
and opportunities that may be useful to the Conservancy and its partners and to report on and share
the Conservancy's experiences with others. The Senior Policy Advisor provides expert policy analysis
and contributes directly to the Conservancy's public funding strategies by providing input for proposal
writing, negotiating with bilateral and multilateral agencies and donor cultivation as needed.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS
Bachelor's degree in relevant field and 6 or more years of senior relevant experience. Master's
degree may be preferred or required. May require federal agency or congressional staff experience or
equivalent experience for positions with a global focus.
Expert knowledge of current trends in relevant policy discipline.
Demonstrated experience conceiving and implementing strategic initiatives.
Demonstrated excellent project management skills.
Excellent verbal and written communications skills. ;
é
Interested persons should apply in writing with full details, including resume and cover letter, to

HYPERLINK “mailto:bahamas@tnc.org” bahatnas@inc.org by January 31, 2007.



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas must protect
the “first anchor project” in its
history during negotiations on
any trade agreements, the
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
warned, as other countries
might object to Freeport’s
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

Christopher Lowe said that
the World Trade Organisa-
tion’s (WTO) rules-based trad-
ing system called for a “level
playing field” in areas ranging
from goods and services to
market access, government
transparency and procurement
and market access. It meant
that each country had to offer

the same terms to foreign and |

domestic companies, and could
not discriminate between
countries.
-“The problem with the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
is that while it is an internal,
national situation, written into
our constitution, some of the
other signatories [to a trade
agreement] could take issue
with it,” Mr Lowe explained. |
“Given the importance of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment to the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas as the original
anchor project, it must be tak-
en into consideration when
determining our entire trade
policy.”

Toavertise in The

Mr Lowe pointed out that
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment had been designed as the
first anchor project in the
Bahamas’ history, creating a
city of 50-60,000 people from
what had previously been a
desolate pine forest. Yet
Freeport had not worked, he
added, pointing to the warn-
ing signals it sent for Prime
Minister Perry Christie’s so-
called ‘anchor project’ strategy.

In its 2001 application to the
WTO for full membership, the
Bahamas, which currently has
observer status, described the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
and entire Freeport areas as
an ‘economic development
zone’, rather than a ‘free trade
zone’,

However, Mr Lowe said:
“The existence of the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement could
cause them to block our acces-
sion if they took issue with it.”
The Bahamas, he added, was
at “the last end of the stick”
when it came to negotiating its
entry to trade agreements and
bodies, as it was one of the few
nations outside them.

Freeport’s existence, coupled
with its comprehensive net-
work of investment incentives,
could cause other WTO mem-
bers to demand that either
they be allowed to establish a
similar zone in the interests of
reciprocal treatment, or that
the Bahamas abolish the

Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

The future of the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement,.and its con-
tinuation, are understood to
have caused some concern
among Freeport-based manu-
facturers and exporters, espe-
cially given the multitude of
trade agreements the Bahamas
has to deal with. |

Its end would undermine the
very rationale for them to con-
tinue operating in Freeport in
many cases. \

The Bahamas’ failure to
appreciate the importance of
developing a position and
strategy on international trade
was a collective failure of both
the Government and the pri-
vate sector, Mr Lowe said.

He added: “You also have a
general blame to be laid at the
Government’s feet, because
they’ve not shared information

with us. They continue to hide °

information from us.

“How can the Government
expect our help if they’re not
being forthcoming with us?
They need to consider if they
wish our help, it cannot be
entirely on their terms. Maybe
the business community has
more to offer if their terms are
considered, not their content.’

James Smith, minister of
state for finance, said it was
too early to tell what impact
free trade talks would have on
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.

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WALL STREET

Analysts: Firms may show doubl

Even though some companies
have warned that they will miss
financial expectations, investors
remain upbeat, but analysts
believe the days of double-digit
growth are over.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Advanced Micro
Devices and several other major
companies issued warnings this past

_ week that fourth-quarter results will
miss expectations. Wall Street barely
noticed.

For weeks, analysts have said the

HEALTHCARE
Stopping
uninsured

‘death

spiral’

& Brian Keeley, head of South
Florida’s largest healthcare
company, discusses what to do
about the nation’s health
problems and his own firm’s role.

BY JOHN DORSCHNER
jdorschner@MiamiHerald.com

Brian Keeley is a mix of big-time

business executive, philosopher and

social innovator.

As chief executive of Baptist
Health South Florida, he has created
over the past 20 years a strong non-
profit system of five hospitals at a
time when many stand-alone facili-
ties were going under or being sold to
for-profit chains.

The system has become South
Florida’s largest nongovernment
employer, with more than 11,200
workers, and the region’s biggest
healthcare firm, with $1.5 billion in
annual revenue and a net surplus of
$136 million.

Even with all this success, Keeley
is concerned about America’s con-
flicting views of healthcare. He suc-
cinctly portrays the tensions this
way: “We all want the absolutely best
care, and we want someone else to
pay for it.”

Like many industry leaders, he is
convinced the country’s healthcare
system is in a “death spiral,” because
the number of uninsured keeps ris-
ing. These people tend to skip pri-
mary care and end up in emergency
rooms, where they run up big bills
that they frequently can’t pay, mean-
ing hospitals must charge private
insurers more to make up for these
losses. That tends to make private
health insurance less affordable,
causing more companies to drop cov-
erage, increasing the number of unin-
sured, and so on.

At times a bubbly cheerleader for
new ideas, Keeley has announced
recently two major initiatives: Baptist
Health South Florida will favor using
vendors who provide health insur-
ance for their employees and it plans
to provide affordable. housing to
attract workers.

- | Q: America spends twice as much
* on healthcare as other industrial coun-
tries, but we have the same or shorter
life expectancy. Do we spend too
much? .

* TURN TO INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILES



can etaaeag ats AMARANTE RN

Ghe Fiami Herald \ p | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007



long period of stellar earnings growth
might be over for U.S. companies,
that the 18 straight quarters of dou-
ble-digit profit growth for Standard
& Poor’s 500 companies will be
replaced by more modest results.

But investors remain upbeat as
hundreds of companies are set to
report results in the next few weeks.
Shareholders did not go screaming
for the exits Friday after AMD, busi-
ness software maker SAP and Mur-
phy’s Oil warned results will miss
expectations.

In fact, the Dow Jones industrials
hit a record close. And analysts say







there are signs that companies might
have been able to eke out double-
digit gains during the last three
months of 2006.

“There is an indication that the
overall quarter might turn out to be
better than expected,” said David
Dropsey, a research analyst with
Thomson Financial that tracks equi-
ties. “Earnings are still strong coming
out of a lot of sectors.”

For instance, there’s an old adage
on Wall Street that “as goes Alcoa,
goes the market.” The world’s big-
gest aluminum maker, which
reported its results Wednesday said





MORE THAN A HOBBY: James King Carr De Muzio, who is both a doctor and rancher, surveys his herd
near Vera, Brazil. He started with two cows in 1994 and now has 500.

BRAZIL BANKS
ON BEEF

IN 2004 BRAZIL BECAME THE WORLD’S LARGEST
BEEF EXPORTER BY VOLUME, AND RANCHES
KEEP EXPANDING

BY BARRY SHLACHTER
McClatchy Newspapers

VERA, Brazil — James King Carr De Muzio started cattle ranching
later in life. But the easy-mannered 53-year-old Brazilian doctor and

scrubs.

De Muzio -—- who says his mixed
ancestry, unusual even in Brazil,
includes Alabamans who joined a
colony of Confederates after the
Civil War on one side and a “tossed
salad” Spanish-Italian-African heri-
tage on the other — counts himself

‘among producers enlarging their
cattle holdings as the country’s
beef industry continues a seem-
ingly insatiable growth..

Starting with two cows as pay-
ment for delivering a baby during
Brazil’s 1994'currency crisis, De
Muzio built his herd to more than
1,000 head, then scaled back to 500



after a dry summer. He says he’s

rancher feels as comfortable in the saddle as he does wearing surgical

reshaping his operation, gearing it
toward yearling stocker steers. He
remains bullish on his country’s
cattle industry, which has been
hobbled by a lack of paved roads,
by quality issues, and by periodic
outbreaks of disease.

“It’s still something new for
me,” he said of ranching. “I like
medicine, but this is more than a
hobby. I can afford to lose some
money ... but I can’t throw money
away.”

Brazil’s herd, conservatively
estimated at 170 million head (the
nation’s beef export association fig-
ures 204 million), is the world’s

Detroit auto show takes peek at
what's new in transportation

@ More glass in the roof and
higher door lines are featured on
cars this year at the North
American International Auto
Show, but Chevrolet’s Volt is
taking center stage.

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press
DETROIT — Higher door lines
and more glass in the roof. Sleek, low
hood lines with big chrome grilles.
Functional interiors, including house-
like lighting and a van with seats on
two sides of a table.
That’s what the cars and trucks

you'll be driving soon will look like,
as seen at the North American Inter-
national Auto Show in Detroit.

But it’s the future that may be the
most intriguing, with General
Motors’ plug-in, rechargeable elec-
tric-powered Chevrolet Volt hogging
a lot of attention during the show’s
media preview days this week.

Mike Jackson, chief executive of
AutoNation, the country’s largest
auto dealership group, was amazed at
the Volt, saying that current hybrid
gasoline-electric vehicles are merely
a fuel-efficiency bridge between now
and a practical electric car embraced



by everyone.

The Volt overcomes range, noise
and power issues that plagued previ-
ous electric cars, Jackson said. It has a
40-mile range on batteries and a
small gasoline engine that generates
electricity to power the car and
recharge the batteries when they’re
depleted.

If GM or another auto maker is
successful in overcoming battery
technology hurdles, something like
the low-slung four or five-passenger
Volt could show up in driveways

° TURN TO HOT CARS



cooked beef products and is Bra-



profits soared 60 percent from a year
earlier, and it had a 20 percent jump
in revenue that pushed past analysts’
expectations.

As of Thursday, 31 S&P 500 com-
ponents reported earnings. There
were 17 companies that beat expecta-
tions, six that met them and eight that
reported results below projections.
That matches the historical averages,
Dropsey said.

Of the 31 companies, those that
have beaten expectations have done
so by an average of 8 percent. This is
still well above the norm of a 3 per-
cent rise, according to Thomson



BARRY SHLACHTER/MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

largest -—— there are about 97 mil-
lion U.S. beef cattle — and there is
every indication that Brazilians like
De Muzio will make it an even big-
ger ranching country.

In 2004 Brazil became the
world’s largest beef exporter by
volume, according to the U.S. Agri-
culture Department. Disease, sani-
tary issues at slaughter plants, and
the sale of lower-priced cuts
account for why it still trails Aus-
tralia in export value.

Incidences of highly contagious
foot-and-mouth disease in some
parts of Brazil prevent exports of
fresh, chilled and frozen beef to
some key markets, including the
United States, Canada, Mexico,
Japan, Taiwan, South Korea and
Japan, -

But with exports to 150 other
countries, “losing a few hasn’t had
a discernible impact on the num-
bers,” says Steve Kay of Cattle Buy-
ers Weekly, based in Petaluma,
Calif. The U.S. market does buy

zil’s customer for such exports.

° TURN TO BRAZIL



LARD ALAC OURCE CLEC OOM NBR LODO OESLOEIRLEGD YOO IOOLRSULELE ORMELRIARLEONEDLA SRE EE

3B







e-digit gains

Financial.

Measuring the pace of profit warn-
ings has also been a good way to
judge how the quarter will turn out.

As of Thursday, 156 companies
pre-announced results — 37 said
they’d be above projections, 26 said
they were in line with estimates, and
93 announced they would miss.

Even adding AMD and other
recent warnings, Wall Street is still
faring slightly better than it did in the
third quarter. During that period, 177
pre-announced — 53 said they would

° TURN TO EARNINGS GROWTH ©

THE BIG THREE

Automakers
say they
can learn
from Apple

@& Apple’s Steve Jobs helped turn
the company around by creating
something people want to buy.
The auto industry is looking to
Apple as an example of how to
succeed.

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press

DETROIT — It’s a long way from
Henry Ford’s gritty factory complex
on the banks of the Rouge to the

light-filled atrium of Apple’s corpo--

rate headquarters in sunny Silicon
Valley.

But recent events have leaders of
Detroit’s Big Three automakers
thinking less about differences and
more about similarities. between
themselves and the once-troubled
company that brought the world
iPods, Macintosh computers and —
starting in June — iPhones.

Apple’s problems, circa 1997, are
familiar: red ink, falling market share,
tumbling stock price and persistent
doubts about its future. Analysts
questioned whether it could find
someone to permanently replace

-ousted CEO Gil Amelio, who had

been hired to turn the company
around.

The key to the turnaround — engi-
neered by returning co-founder Steve
Jobs — was in ideas as old as capital-
ism itself; Make something new,
something people want to buy.

Detroit is watching.

“I admire their pure understand-
ing of the brand and the type of cus-
tomer they’re going after, and mar-
ried to that, a product and a design
strategy that they do not veer off of,”
said Mark Fields, Ford’s president of
the Americas.

This week, Jobs introduced the
iPhone, a cross between the cellular
telephone, a computer and the com-
pany’s wildly successful personal
music players. In Detroit, automakers
unveiled multiple new models, each
carrying the hope that people will
buy enough of them to change red ink
to black.

For the Big Three, the problem —
for the past few years, anyway — has
been product. They made boatloads
of cash on trucks and sport utility
vehicles when gas was cheap and the
economy was booming, but were late
in changing when petroleum costs

* TURN TO TURNAROUND





CARLOS OSORIO/AP

NEW CONCEPT: GM’s-plug-in, rechargeable electric-powered Chevrolet
Volt is on display at the North American International Auto Show in

Detroit.



¢

Ne
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 5B
| | BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION |

© . e
Financial | DAV oy MWe wx (OS 001
planning key, [S=sascce
5
li
says Colina

executive

e All consumers with overdue accounts are advised to pay the arrears on
foe ] nit 1S oS co eer eos ° oo. . . . ° ° 7%
Ea aaa their electricity accounts immediately, in order to avoid the disconnection

essential Sat eae
lies to achie® their gos an . sea:
avoid finanal hardshi, said of your electrical service
Dashwell Fiwers, vic-Presi-
dent of salefor ColinImper-
ial Insuranc Compar:

In an adcess to tk Rotary

Club of New Provience, Mr
Flowers said te many
‘Bahamianfamilis had lost
‘their digniy and fund them-
selves indespeite straits
because they w¢ not pre-
pared for ‘he fin:cial realities
of life.

“You must hz a plan anda

, good financiePlan should
_-.include a com2ation of sav-
--ings, investmts and insur-
ance,” Mr Flers said.

He added tt life insurance
~,-was no long about just one
_«,traditional te of policy.

. “Insurar tocay offers

“Many optic and plans that

‘you can lefage to not only
“protect yofamily but tohelp _

you saveid achieve your

‘ dreams, th for yourself and

“" your loveenes during this life-

~ time,” MFlowers said.
He emhasised that a life
_' insuran@olicy was key to a
‘ financialan because it pro-
~ "vided picyholders with the
quickesnd safest way to build will only get $1,000 when you
an estaand provide financial die. On the other hand, if
._proteon for loved ones. you’ve taken out a life insur-
’ }. “Jf -wre saving with an ance policy for $500,000 or $1
_annuj and you die today, million, although you may have Max ‘PAYtor
. your mily will only get the only paid $1,000 or a few Post Housn SrTupio &
. valuef that annuity at the ee
_ | timeou died. If you have er ere
-» $1,0Gn the bank, your family SEE page 9B PH:327-7562

2G Y



||Blair Estate, Johnson Road, Step St, Bernard Road, Kool Acres, Fox Hill,
Yamacraw Beach Estate, Elizabeth Estate, Eastwood Sub, Colony Village, Nassau
East Estate, Winton Meadows, Mason’s Add, Leeward East & Twynam Heights, East
St, Market St, Wulff Road, Blue Hill Road, Montell Heights, Ridgeland Park and
all side corners, Pinewood Gardens, Joan’s and Domingo Heights, Bamboo Town,
South Beach, Marshall Road, Seven Hills and Gamble Heights. Pastel and Faith
Gardens, Sunshine Pars, Silver Gates, Golden Gates, Blue Hill and Bel Air Estate.

The public is also advised that all overdue payments should be made —
directly to the Corporation. Those payments can be made at Head Office on
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the Main Post Office
on East Hill Street.

Royal Holiday

is now seeking Sales representaives to join their
multi-million dollar Sales Team.

Are you goal oriented, energetic, well groomed,
self-motivated, ambitious,
between 21-35 years of age, love making money
and meeting people?



& DASHWELL FLOWERS

(Photo courtesy) If this sounds like you, your opportunity is here!
Interested persons should visit
Royal Holiday at the Wyndham Nassau Resort
ground floor opposite Crystal Sweets Restaurant or

Call 242-327-5595/8

Works By

ANTONIOUS ROBERTS





USPS ae
myo aiiiitay



Restaurant Managers

Betty K. Agencies (Nassau) Ltd.

Are you an energetic, hardworking “people person’ who seeks
a career-oriented position with an established company? .

| To our valued customers, please be
| advised that, until further notice, The
1; Betty K. Agencies (Nassau) Limited,
‘office and warehouse will be closed

Then this might be the position for you!

WV Cnr MAL for leading fast food franchise.

Requirements:

* Management experience and/or degree

to the general public on Saturdays. Our

warehouse will be closed from Friday 19th
thru Monday 22nd January 2007 for

renovations.

- We apologise for any inconvenience caused

and look forward to serving you in the
future. |

We take this opportunity to wish you and
your’s a very happy and prosperous new
year. |



¢ Strong leadership skills

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

e Exceptional customer service skills

¢ Team oriented attitude

SP Noy Venn COm vet E:T am

¢ Goal oriented manner

e Ability to work in a fast paced environment

¢ Results-driven approach

e Professional demeanor :

* Ability to work flexible hours, including late nights,
weekends and holidays

Great benefits include competitive salary commensurate with

experience, free Training and Development, Paid Vacation,
Health Insurance, Life Insurance and more!

Interested persons should submit Résumé to:
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-746
Nassau, Bahamas






GE | MONDAY, JANUARY 15,2007 INTERNATIONALEDITION

FLORIDA GATORS







FOND FAREWELL: Chris Leak says goodbye to his father, Curtis, on Saturday as the Gators celebrate their championship. ‘I wanted to bring Florida back to the top,’ he said.

EAK LEAVES
HIS LEGACY

Chris Leak took the national championship game MVP trophy from Danny
Wuerffel in Saturday’s celebration and solidified his place in Gators lore.

BY MIKE PHILLIPS
mphillips@MiamiHerald.com

GAINESVILLE — They
were singing and chanting and

cheering Saturday — more .

than 50,000 celebrating Flori-
da’s BCS national football
championship at the Swamp.
But amid the chants and
cheers, there was that one fro-
zen moment when the crowd
held its breath.

Danny Wuerffel had just
handed the title game’s MVP
trophy to Chris Leak, and as
the two quarterbacks stood
together, Leak finally had
reached a point in his career
where few thought he would
get.

He was standing toe-to-toe
with Wuerffel.

Wuerffel is the legend, the
Heisman winner who led UF
to its first national title, in
1996, the most beloved Gator
this side of Steve Spurrier.

Leak was the kid with so
much promise who always fell
short, an easy target for Gators
fans’ most cynical critics.
They questioned everything
from his arm strength to his
leadership, from his slow feet
to his willingness to slide at
the end of a run.

ROCKY START

Leak should have been
stronger, faster and played
with more courage, they said.
Even his coach, Urban Meyer,
said Leak needed to prove his
worth. In August, Meyer chal-
lenged Leak, saying the way
you measure quarterbacks at
Florida is by the number of
rings they have won, and Leak
hadn’t won any.

Leak leaves Florida with a
record 11,213 passing yards,,88





RATING THE QUARTERBACKS

Name (Years)

Chris Leak (2002-’06)

Rex Grossman (2000-02)
Danny Wuerffel (1993-’96)
Shane Matthews (1989-’92)
Steve Spurrier (1964-66)

touchdowns, and a couple of
invaluable rings, a survivor of
two coaches, three offensive
coordinators and a dramatic
change in the offense that
Meyer brought to UF last sea-
son.

“Did it start off rocky? No,
not at all,” Meyer said. “It
started off bizarre. There
wasn’t a lot of communication
there, but once you get to
know Chris, there’s not a
whole lot being said. But
there’s not a deeper person, or
better person.

“When good things happen
to good people it just makes it
that much more worth while.”

No one had more pressure
than Leak in UF’s 38-28 vic-
tory in the SEC championship
game. Maybe that’s why Leak
jumped so high on his 9-yard
touchdown run that gave UF a
10-0 lead. Leak scored, and
then ran to the corner of the
end zone alone, then bowed
and said a quick prayer.

Validation is a personal
thing.

He more than validated
himself in Glendale, Ariz.,
where he was the MVP in
Florida’s 41-14 romp against

Number of yards Gators freshman standout Percy Harvin gained in the BCS title game (60 receiving, 22 rushing).

How does Gators QB Chris Leak stack up against UF’s best?

Comp.-Att. Eff. Yds. TDs
895-1,458 140.4 11,213 88
667-1,110 146.7 9,164 ra
708-1,170 163.6 10,875 114
722-1,202 137.6 9,287 14

392-692 123.7 4,848 36

Ohio State, outplaying Heis-
man winner Troy Smith, who
completed just four passes for
35 yards and was intercepted
once. Leak completed his first
nine passes and threw for 213
yards and a touchdown, and
afterward, when he clutched
the national title trophy, he
was all but in tears.

“My legacy is, I wanted to
bring Florida back to the top,”
said Leak, who vowed as a
freshman to win a national
title at UF. He won more than
that against Ohio State — he
won acceptance from UF fans.

UF receiver Dallas Baker,
one of Leak’s closest friends,
said: “You could see the love
he got today. But I think the
love has always been there.”

Not always. Leak heard the
boos this season in the game
against Kentucky on Sept. 23,
and he heard the crowd chant
Tim Tebow’s name the minute
the freshman took the field in
the season opener Sept. 2. But
Leak never complained and
shared the spotlight with
Tebow, giving Meyer a lethal
hybrid to throw at opponents.

Leak’s unselfishness made
the two-quarterback system





work, and he admirably made
sure there was never any con-
troversy. But in the end, it was
Leak’s team, and Leak’s cham-
pionship, and you could see it
in his eyes Saturday as he
finally soaked in everything he
had dreamed.

LEAK ‘EMOTIONAL’

“It was a very emotional
deal,” he said of the ceremony.
“J still have to catch my
breath.”

But if you ask Wuerffel,
Leak should have no problem
getting over it.

“The real reason I’m here,”
Wuerffel said, “is that I have
an incredible amount of
respect and admiration for
Chris Leak. He’s gone through
a lot of highs and lows, and a
lot of adversity. And he’s han-
dled himself with so much
pride and so much poise.”

The ceremony got to Leak.

“It [winning the national
championship] really didn’t
hit me until I was out there
with my teammates,” he said.
“Tl never forget the Swamp.
ll miss it a lot. And I’ll be call-
ing these guys the rest of my
life.”



___MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

WE Osis) ] mcg

Number of total yards by Ohio State’s potent offense, the fewest amassed in BCS title-game history.

Name

Lutrell Alford
Markihe Anderson
Brandon Antwine
Dallas Baker
Derek Baldry

Jim Barrie
Roderick Blackett
Andrew Blaylock
Nyan Boateng
Cam Brewer
Nick Brooks
Andre Caldwell
Miguel Carodine
Curtis Carr

Tate Casey
Simon Codrington
Joe Cohen

Telly Concepcion
Riley Cooper
Jemalle Cornelius
Brian Crum
Jermaine Cunningham
John Curtis

Jon Demps
Jamaal Deveaux
Dustin Doe
Javier Estopinan
Earl Everett

John Fairbanks
Jarred Fayson
Andrew Fritze
Marcus Gilbert
Darryl Gresham Jr.
Mark Guandolo
Michael Guilford
Steven Harris
Derrick Harvey
Percy Harvin
Eddie Haupt
Chris Hetland
Brad Hiers

Tim Higgins
Corey Hobbs
Cade Holliday
Jamar Hornsby
Bo Howard
Maurice Hurt
Joey Ijjas
Cornelius Ingram
Kyle Jackson
Brandon James
Carl Johnson
Andrew Johnson
Tony Joiner

AJ. Jones

Bobby Kane

Billy Latsko
' Chris Leak

Reggie Lewis
Markus Manson
Lawrence Marsh
Tremaine McCollum
Jermaine McCollum
Ray McDonald
Clint McMillan
Carlton Medder
Drew Miller
Kestahn Moore
Jarvis Moss
Dorian Munroe
Louis Murphy
Eric Nappy
Reggie Nelson
David Nelson
Kyle Newell
Moise Paul
Jonathan Phillips
Wondy Pierre-Louis
Chris Pintado
Trent Pupello
Jacques Rickerson
Steve Rissler
baryon Robinson
Butch Rowley
Eric Rutledge
Terron Sanders
Vernon Shelton
Lamont Sheppard
Brandon Siler
Eric Sledge

Ryan Smith
James Smith
Joey Sorrentino
Brandon Spikes
Ryan Stamper
Jim Tartt

Tim Tebow
Bryan Thomas
Kenneth Tookes
Phil Trautwein
Chevon Walker
Jason Watkins
Eric Wilbur

Mon Williams
Justin Williams
Mike Williamson
Ronnie Wilson
Cody Worton
DeShawn Wynn





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Hometown

Gainesville

Fort Myers
Garland, Texas
New Smyrna Beach
Gainesville

Tampa

Pompano Beach
Durham, N.C.
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Gainesville
Warner Robins, Ga.
Tampa

Gainesville
Gainesville
Longview, Texas
Miami

Melbourne

Tampa

Clearwater

Fort Meade
Woodbine, Ga.
Stone Mountain, Ga.
Rockledge
Pensacola

Port St. Lucie
Jasper

Miami

Webster
Celebration
Tampa

Ponce Inlet

Fort Lauderdale
Roanoke, Va.
Hollywood

Quincy

Miami

Greenbelt, Md.
Virginia Beach, Va.
Merritt Island
Leesburg, Ga.

Bartow
Northville, Mich.
Oviedo
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Ponte Vedra Beach
Milledgeville, Ga.
Clearwater
Hawthorne
Neptune Beach
St. Augustine
Durham, N.C.
Parkland
Haines City
Tampa

Coconut Creek
Gainesville
Charlotte, N.C.
Jacksonville
Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Augusta, Ga.
Miami

Miami

Belle Glade
Oviedo
Clermont
Sarasota
Arlington, Texas
Denton, Texas
Miami

St. Petersburg
Gainesville
Melbourne
Wichita Falls, Texas
Tampa
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Wellington
Naples

Miami

Tampa

St. Augustine
Sarasota
Gainesville
Orlando
Gainesville
Bradenton
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Orlando

Apopka
Diamond Bar, Calif.
Gainesville
Ocala

Shelby, N.C.
Jacksonville
Sopchoney
Jacksonville
Zephyrhills
Jacksonville
Voorhees, NJ.
Fort Myers
Lakeland
Winter Park
Mesquite, Texas
Folkston, Ga.
Winter Park
Pompano Beach
Homestead
Cincinnati, Ohio



THE TRIBUNE



Still no
response
from
Immigration

B By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THERE has been no
response to The Tribune's
November 7 request for
Department of Immigration
records on permanent residency
approvals.

And attempts to follow up
on the request have revealed
another pressing deficiency -
that it is virtually impossible for
the public to contact the
Department of Immigration.

In November, The Tribune
delivered a letter to Director of
Immigration Mr Vernon Bur-
rows and Minister of Immigra-
tion Mr Shane Gibson asking
for a list of all people granted
permanent residency since
August 11 - the date when US
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith's
application was approved.

Through acquiring this list
an assessment could be made
of the claim by Mr Gibson that
the speed with which Ms Smith
received her status was an
example of generally improved
rates of efficiency at the depart-
ment or, as critics have claimed,
due to preferential treatment.

On Friday, attempting to fol-
low up on the request, The Tri-
bune found that none of the
numbers listed at the depart-
ment were answered, despite
calls being made to all exten-
sions over a period of hours
throughout the day.

The numbers included the
general head of department, the
director of immigration, the
deputy director and. the assis-
tant director.

This was a repeat of the
experience of at least a month
and a half of attempts to reach
the department.

When a call was made to the
Ministry of Immigration, a
member of staff, when queried
as to why this might be the case,

. or whether she could advise the
~'use of an alternative number,
‘said that a lot of people had
been calling in with the same
complaint. ,

"I don't know what to tell
you. You're going to go up
there (to the Department of
Immigration), because we've
had a lot of people calling in
saying the same thing," she said.

"IT don't know what's hap-
pening. Man, we can't even
transfer you that way - their
lines are different from ours."

_ Questioned as to how min-
istry staff contact the depart-
‘ment, she said it was "difficult"
and mainly done through their
messenger.

"We call, yeah, but we have
to wait the same amount of time
as you guys wait - waiting, hop-
ing they answer," she added.

Meanwhile, another key
public institution is also prov-
ing difficult to contact. On Fri-
day, a member of the public
contacted The Tribune to say
that all extensions listed for the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion, including the "Water
emergencies" line, also rang
"endlessly."



of things we
think, say or do

“11s it the TRUTH?
2.|s it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?












4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to







@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government has been
accused of "massaging" unem-
ployment figures - and taking
more people on to the govern-
ment's payroll - to disguise the
reality of the levels of unem-
ployment.

Speaking on Island FM's
Parliament Street, FNM sena-

tor Carl Bethel said, Ahe gov-,
‘the sta- -

ernment had "fixed"
tistics to create the appearance
that the problem is not as large
as it is, by creating a category
of people called "discouraged
workers."

These statistics are disguis-
ing the fact that youth unem-
ployment in particular is



LOCAL NEWS.

"almost chronic," he said.

He further suggested that
in recent years the government
had "spent a lot of money it
doesn't have" attempting to
alleviate the figures by hiring
more people.

"[ think that when the hard
numbers are in you will see a
quite significant increase for
this country in the number of
persons who are on the gov-
ernment's payroll over the last
two years."

According to Bethel, while
unemployment figures are
recorded as having dropped -
from 10.1 per cent to 7.6 per
cent - at the same time the
number of "discouraged work-
ers" has risen.

These people are those who





fi CARL Bethel

have told the department of
statistics that they have "giv-

Water leak repaired downtown

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

CONSUMER complaints
about low water pressure
resulted in the discovery of a
leak on the main water line to
the downtown area, according
to Glenn Laville, acting deputy
manager of the Water and
Sewerage Corporation.

Mr Laville said: “This morn-
ing We started getting some
calls in about some low pres-
sure complaints tin the down-
town area. We found that there
was a possible leak on the main
water line that is feeding the
downtown area,” continued Mr
Laville.

He explained that a crew of
workers had pinpointed the
leak between Nassau Street
and the British Colonial Hotel.

“It’s an underground leak
but what we are doing right
now is re-routing some of the
flows to see if we can improve

; Umbrellas
Loungs ;





Decorative Rod Seis

Roller Shades

§ sixes, Natural & Fruftwood from

the pressure,” said Mr Lav-
ille.

The Water and Sewerage
executive said that a night crew
would be sent to locate the
leak, and he said that repairs
were expected to be completed
by Saturday morning.

Last month, the government
announced that the Water and
Sewerage Corporation had
embarked on a campaign to
win back disenchanted cus-
tomers through improved
water quality and quantity.

Last year the corporation's
net loss was $3.1 million com-
pared to the $7.8 million which
was the net income tor 2004,
according to the audited finan-
cial statements for the period
which ended December 31,
2005.

The government subsidy for
2005 was $15.5 million, several
million more than.the $12 mil-
lion the government gave the
corporation in 2004.

Last year, the corporation's
operating revenue was $37.4
million, in excess of two mil-
lion dollars more than what it
operated with in the previous
year. For New Providence
there was a modest growth of
$1.2 million. Mr Roberts said
the largest single factor in the
latter was the newly-acquired
Treasure Cay operations in
Abaco.

Operating expenses for 2005
totalled $46.6 million compared
with $37.1 million for 2004. The
increases in cost were mostly
to improve customer service
delivery like the reverse osmo-
sis water purchases that
increased by $2.5 million and
water importation costs, Mr
Roberts said.

The importation carried
with it a $2.7 million increased
expense, the costs of hiring
additional vessels during the
winter months and increased
fuel costs.

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blue, green-or terracotta

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3 sizes, White & Alabaster from










MONDAY, JANUARY 1

en up hope" of finding a job.
This figure is not included in
the "unemployed" category,

‘ said Bethel.

Claim

"They ask - are you working,
and he says no I'm not...then
they ask another question - are
you actively looking for a job,
and he says no I've lost
hope..:I've looked everywhere."

“And they say ‘ah, he's a dis-
couraged worker" and they
don't count him," said Mr
Bethel.

According to Mr Bethel
unemployment, particularly
among young people, had
remained high under the cur-
rent administration, contrary to
their claims.

"The fact of the matter is
that everywhere I go when I'm

5, 2007, PAGE 3

eee)






campaigning ['m running into
young people who are unem-
ployed and whether they are
counted as discouraged work-
ers or counted as unemployed,
the fact is, they are not work-
ing," he said.

He said young men are more
regularly unemployed, and
something needed to be done
to address this.

"You have to cr Y
jobs than people co gon
stream to look for them in or sede
to in real terms reduce unem-
ployment."

The term "discouraged work-
er" needed to be redefined - if







the person had voluntarily cho-
sen not to be tn the labour mar-
ket, they should not be taken
into account in unemployment
figures, he si aid.

If, however, they would take

a job if it were offered to them,
then they should, he claimed.





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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
i
NAY NU a

Perth eae §=Finnish ambassador designate









DAME Marguerite Pindling, wife of former prime minister the late Sir Lynden Pindling,
appeared on ZNS Radio’s Drive Time talk show on Wednesday, January 10, on the 40th
anniversary of Majority Rule in the Bahamas. Dame Marguerite (left), who was made a Dame
Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (DCMG) as part of the Queen’s New
Year’s Honours List, discussed her role in Bahamian politics. The talk show is hosted by Phillip-
pa Russell.

@ PASI Patokallio, Ambassador Designate of Finland (right) presented his Letters of Credence,
to Arthur Hanna, Governor General of The Bahamas, last Thursday at Government House. In
background from left are Protocol Officers Terry Archer and Carol Young.

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)

Features
Large Open Living Room with French Doors
Spacious outdoor patio for entertainment
270 Degree Wraparound balcony on second floor
Open Kitchen Plan
Additional Living space from converted garage
Detached Garage
Fully enclosed lot with lush native foliage
Bars and Security Alarm, Automatic Gate
Paved Driveway into property
= Underground utilities at the lot

ASKING PRICE $550,000 @ HIS Excellency Pasi Patokallio, Ambassador Designate of Finland, presented a copy of his

Location: Greenwood Road - off Village Road
Lot Size: 200 x 144 average

House Size: 3200 Square Feet

Bedrooms: 3 (Optional 4th)

Bathrooms: 3.5



Seu Letters of Credence to Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred Mitchell last
| a | Wednesday atthe Ministry of Foreign Affairs on East Hill Street.

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

PARR SEN eee wr

. o¢ ANDREW, :
SCHOOL ©

The International School of The Babanias
FOUNDED 1938

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS







A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew’s School is offered
annually to students attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.

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These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10,
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e Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including
grades 8 and 9

4dr Crew ° Be of the highest academic standing, maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above

eee e Be at least 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31 st August
full power. 2008

Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor
of the student’s school. The students awarded these scholarships will be
expected to follow a full programme of BGCSE and advanced courses leading
to graduation at the end of year 12.

The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates
will sit the scholarship examinations at 9am on Saturday, 10 March 2007 at
St Andrew’s School. Successful examination candidates will be short-listed
and interviewed.

$29,550.00
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Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary mes
schools in New Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be
obtained from the administration office of St Andrew’s School.




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best selling
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Application forms should be returned to: -

Robert F. Wade

Principal

St Andrew’s School

The International School of The Bahamas 2
PO Box EE 17340 ~
Nassau, Bahamas ':

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PART OF YOUR LIFE




PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007









































2005
No. 00453

Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
In The Supreme Court
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel or let of land
having an area of 54,890.88 square fee situate in the
Island of Crooked Island one of The Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

9

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act 1959.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
FLORENCE ANDERSON.

NOTICE OF PETITION

Notice is hereby given that Florence Anderson of the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence
(hereinafter called “the Petitioner”) claims to be the owner
of the unencumbered fee simple estate in possession of
the land hereinafter described, that is to say:

ALL THAT piece parcel or let of land having an area
of 54,890.88 square fee situate in the Island of Crooked
Island one of The Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and being a lot of land situate on the southern
side of The Queens Highway bounded on the NORTH
by the said Queens Highway and running thereon One
Hundred and Fifty one and Eighty Hundredths (151.80)
feet on the EAST by land said to be the property of Lucy
Winter and running thereon Three Hundred and Sixty one
and Sixty Hundredths (361.60) feet on the SOUTH by
land now or formerly the property of The Anderson Family
and running thereon One Hundred and Fifty one and
Eighty Hundredths (151.80) feet and on the WEST by
land said to be the property of Virginia Deleveaux and
running thereon Three Hundred Sixty one and Sixty
Hundredths (361.60) feet.

A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:-

a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
_b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes situate
at Mareva House, 4 George Street, Nassau Bahamas
-c) On the notice board at the office of the Administrator
on Crooked Island

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
- recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 15th day
of March A.D., 2007 file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner and the undersigned a statement of their
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to
bg filed therewith together with.a plan ef the area ¢laimed
and an abstract of their title to the said area claimed by
them. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of claim on or before the 15th day of March,
A.D. 2007 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 10th day of January 2007.

McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
Mareva House ~—
4 George Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Attorneys for the Petitioner

“Teach Me. Q Lord, Thy Way". Psalm G35

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites application from qualified Christian teachers for the
following positions for the 2007-2008 school year.

Math (Gr.7-12)
Geography/History(Gr.10-12)

Applicants must:

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing to .-
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian School

Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of Specialization

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

Have at least two years teaching experience in the relevant
subject area with excellent communication skills

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students for all
examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.

Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra curricular
programmes.

pplication must be picked up at the High School Office on +
“Girley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae, recent
coloured photograpgh and three references to: -

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application in January 23rd, 2007



BUSINESS

Cheney defends bank

THE TRIBUNE



records investigations

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Vice President Dick Cheney
said Sunday the Pentagon and
CIA are not violating people’s
rights by examining the bank-
ing and credit records of hun-
dreds of Americans and others
suspected of terrorism or espi-

. onage in the United States.

Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-
Texas, the new chairman of the
House Intelligence Committee,
said his panel will be the judge
of that.

National security letters per-
mit the executive branch to seek
records about people in terror-
ism and spy investigations with-
out a judge’s approval or grand
jury subpoena.

“The Defense Department




mas.

explanation that may

NOTICE

COMAS RESEARCH LTD.

Notice is hereby given that at an Extra Ordinary General
Meeting of the above-named Company held on the 1ith
day of April, 2006, the following resolutions were passed.

RESOLVED that the Company be voluntarily wound up.

FURTHER RESOLVED that the Liquidator is Chancellors
Corporate Services Limited, P.O.Box N-4589, Nassau, The Baha-

All persons having Claims against the above-named Com-
pany are requested to submit particulars of such claims and
proof thereof in writing to the liquidator, Chancellors Corporate
Services Limited, PO. Box N-4589, Nassau, The Bahamas no
later than the 14th day of February, 2007 after which the books
will be closed and the assets of the Company will be distributed.

Notice is also given in accordance with the Companies Act,
that a General Meeting of the Members of the above-named
Company will be held at the offices of Chancellors Chambers,
Samana Hill, No. 14 Village Road (North), on the 14th day
of February, 2007 at 10 0’ clock in the afternoon for the pur-
pose of having an account laid before them showing the man-
ner in which the winding up has been conducted and that the
property of the Company disposed of and. hearing

liquidator, and so also of determining by Resolution
manner in which the books, accounts and documents of
the Company and the liquidator, shall’~be
Dated this 15th day of January, 2007.

CHANCELLORS CORPORATE SERVICES LIMITED -

gets involved because we’ve got
hundreds of bases inside the
United States that are potential
terrorist targets,” Cheney said.

“The Department of Defense

has legitimate authority in this’

area. This is an authority that

goes back three or four decades.

It was reaffirmed in the Patriot
Act,” he said. “It’s perfectly
legitimate activity. There’s noth-
ing wrong with it or illegal. It
doesn’t violate people’s civil
rights.”

In a statement Sunday, Reyes
promised. that his panel would
take a careful look at those
claims.

“Any expansion by the
department into intelligence col-
lection, particularly on U.S. soil,
























any
the
the

be given by

disposed of.





is something our committee will
thorough review,” Reyes said.

“We want our intelligence
professionals to have strong
tools that will enable them to
interrupt the planning process
of our enemies and to stop
attacks against our country,” he
said. “But in doing so, we also
want those tools to comply fully
with the law and the Constitu-
tion.”

The Pentagon and the CIA,
to a lesser extent, have used this
little-known power, officials
said. The FBI, the lead agency
on domestic counterterrorism
and espionage, has issued thou-
sands of such letters since the
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

The letters have generated
criticism and court challenges
from civil liberties advocates
who claim they invade the pri-
vacy of Americans’ lives, even
though banks and other finan-
cial institutions typically turn
over the financial records vol-
untarily.

The vast majority of national
security letters are issued by the
FBI, but in rare circumstances
they have been used by the CIA
before and after Sept. 11,
according to a U.S. intelligence
official. The CIA has used these
noncompulsory letters in espi-
onage investigations and other
circumstances, the official said.

The New York Times, which
reported Sunday on the expand-
ed use of the technique by the
Pentagon and CIA, said mili-
tary intelligence officers have
sent the letters in up to 500
investigations.

“This is a dramatic story, but
I think it’s important for peo-
ple to understand here this is a
legitimate security effort that’s
been under way for a long time,
and it does not represent a new
departure from the standpoint
of our efforts to protect our-
selves against terrorist attacks,”
the vice president said.

Cheney was interviewed on
“Fox News Sunday.”

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The Entrance Examination for St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport and
St. Andrew’s School, Exuma will take place on Saturday,

February 3rd, 2007 at 9:00a.m.

Applications ¢an be collected from the Schools between the
hours of 8:00am. and 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

Applications Forms and $25.00 Applications Fee must be
returned to the School no later than Friday, January 26th, 2007

Vaca ncies

St. John’s College is now accepting ‘Applications for the
students from Kindergarten through Grade Six. Kindergarten
screening will begin during the second week ‘in February



SENIOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR





Information Technology

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas. Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to lacal and
international cents.























An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Information Technology
team, The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Information
Technology.

ea alent cc cS
Core Responsibilities

® Develop, maintain, support and optimize the organization's network
infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communications, and
telecommunications systems.

® Ensure hardware and software is maintained and data is secured through
proper back-ups and staff training,

® Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentation to
secure procedures and prevent system failure. This includes IT Disaster
Recovery / Business Continuity planning. ;

® Provide-management and direction for end-user support function in support of
business operations, inclusive of management of the Help-Desk function.

® Manage and direct software, hardware, network, telecommunications and web
providers to enhance operational efficiencies and ROL based on the bank’s
business objectives.

Desired Qualifications

® Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well recognized
university.

® A minimum of five years progressive professional IT experience preferably in
the Financial Services Industry,

® IT based training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from
accredited institutions will be advantageous,

® Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs:
ielecommunications, Web-based applications, client-server applications, and
PC-based software applications,

2 Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows-Servers, Microsoft Windows XP,
Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Office and Microsoft Exchange Server
systems.

® Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills,

Closing Date: January 26, 2007

Be AS pace etch Se cata Me Np neta eT te
Contact

Hunan Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau. Bahamas

Fan: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment butterfieldbank. bs

www. buttertieldbank.bs

ad

Butterfield Bank



MANAGER, BANKING & CUSTODY

BANKING DEPARTMENT

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join our dynamic Banking Services team.
‘The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

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Core Responsibilities

® ‘To manage and control the banking-and custody departments of the Bank ina
cohesive, well organized and risk oriented manner.

To effectively manage the Relationship Management Team of both banking
and custody so as a first class service is offered to all clients ina proactive
manner,

‘To assist with the development and implementation of new products and

systems as may be required in order to further enhance productivity and
efficiency.

To work closely with the Assistant Manager of Operational Risk
Management to ensure procedures and processes remain fully in fine with the
group’s strategy relating to Enterprise & Operational Risk.

To ensure, at all times, the banking and custody operations are effectively
managed to ensure processing of all deposit and payments, foreign exchange
and security transactions are carried out technically correct, without error and
within procedures,

‘To ensure full aware of all applicable laws, regulations, bank policies and
procedures and that they are implemented effectively on a day to day basis
within the department.

‘To assist in the preparation of the banking and custody budgets and for the
effective management of revenues and costs,

Desired Qualifications

Relevant Degree or related discipline from a well recognized university.

A minimum of ten years progressive Banking/Custody experience in the
Financial Services Industry.

A good proven background in professional and experience client facing role
High degree of awareness and compliance orientation

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpessonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills.

Closing DatesJanuary 26, 2007

Contact

Haman Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fas: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recrnitment@ butterfieldbank.bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs

nae

Butterfield Bank



7 @

tb ¢'a @ v.*

7

weontwees er ee > -seeeenes a a oe a a a a strom
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 | THE TRIjNE BUSINESS










Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs —

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAH/MAS

CENTRE FOR-CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSIONERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semeste 2007













Centre for Continuing Education and
Extension Services (CEES)



Personal Development Schedule
Spring Semester 2007

'
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBKS
This course is for the beginner who knows PRESENTATIONS This coUrrains new and eting small
very ite about computers and does nat This workshop is designed to provide business Cepreneurs (fewehan 20
understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the employees) organizing anchanaging thelr
covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsaft PowerPoint, It accounting yg QuickBooksro software.
extensive hands-on practice using various focuses on developing effective and dynamic Students will rn how lo set their

CORRECTION



, a 2 software, including: PowarPoint presentations. company fileShart of accous, budget and
SEW 804 Bedroom Decorating will meet | (ieee jes” aan fac mia
/ {ii} Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite; None i
; (iii) Microsoft Access ~ Database Date: Thursday, Bth March 2007 Pre-requisite: Ne ti
Management. Time: 9:30am ~ 4:30pm Begins: Tetay,
Saturdays for 10 weeks from 10am to 1pm Dain: te ae
Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: = 6 Ws \
2 1" Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007 Fees: $160.00 Venue: CEEomputer fab
beginning February 24, 2007 and not 1 - 10pm sa , a
y Section 01 (CEES) INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | A
This course covers basic concepts of WEBPAGE DESIGN: Mxsuop
. ; , 7 Re Saturday, 3rd February, 2007 Information Technology. The course provides Targeting persons whCyq jike to create
as p rev | O U S V a V e rt | S e = 10:00am - 1:00pm training in these areas: Basic Hardware their personal web Pagyic course
: Section 02 (CEES) Proficiency. Application Features Proficiency, will cover Web page City Web site
Duration: 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML ecitic topics will
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. include Formatting, Gap. mutimedia,
. Tuition: $450.00 Forms and Tables and io, of web pages.
‘ , Pre-requisite: None. :
f 5 1 1 ; COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Begins: Wednesday, 7th February Pre-requisite: Participanlss pe
O f U rt e f | Nn O it Y ) at | O Nn O Nn T | S O l a Nn y ot eC t This course covers the advanced concepts 2007 computer Itp and have
with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm a basic knoe of
. 1 various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word proces
a S ect of t h eC C E E S offe rl Nn S | eC as eC G O nt act (} Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dates: Ast & 2nd Me 2007
’ 5 (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00 \
‘ J i (iil) Microsoft Access - Database Time: 9:30am - 4:30
t h 1 t Management. PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration: 2 days
i O O i | Nn a O I. This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Compute,
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications | technology systems for use in information Fees: $550.00
‘ Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007 — environments. The course will cover the ‘
Time: 6:00pm - 9:06pm following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Duration: 12 weeks ‘ Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

3 2 5 5 { 1 4 Fees: $550.00 Pre-requisite: None
= Bagins: Monday 12th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm ~ 7:30pm :



Monday & Wednesday
3 2 8 ze 0 0 9 3 Duration; 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting applic,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, 's,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course.

328-1936
302-4300 ext. 5202

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu:

325-5714 320-000)

FS

CEES regrets.any inconvenience caused.

Sh

as



~ 328-1936 + 302-4300 ext. 5204

Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007



Have you done an

s oy COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE |
NO. 0. DESCRIPTION |
special for yourself today? ' | | |
, ACCOUNTING
Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’s —accagoo. —-01._—s ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm MoryWed 12-Feb 10wks $250
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Il 6:00-8:00pm — Tke/Thurs 13-Feb 1Owks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ilt 6:00-8:00om Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10. wks $300

With one of our courses, you can gain
new job skills, increase your chances ior
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success

in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up
for a course today.






























BUSINESS ;

BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225
CUST9OO 01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs 22-Feb {day $170
BUSI904 01 — INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs {-Mar 1Owks $225

COMPUTERS

COMPS01 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-00pra Mon 5-Feb 12wks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 16:00am-1:00pm Sat 3-Feb . 12 wks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II §:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb i2wks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 7-Feb 12wks $450
COMP 941 01 ° QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 6wks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR ~ -§:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 12-Feb 12 wks $500
COMP960 01 EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 930am-4:30om Thurs §-Mar {day $160
COMP930 01 WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs/Fri 1-Mar 2 days $550

COSMETOLOGY

COSM802. Of MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb Bwks $225
cOsMe04 —-0t.-—S ss MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Fep 8wks $225
COSM807 = 01—sNAVL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs 26-Feb 6 wks $500

DECOsOO 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I §:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 8wks $225
DECOBO1 01 — INTERIOR DECORATING fl 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 8wks $250
FLOR8O0 O1 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 10 wks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN Il 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10wks $250

ENQUIRIES FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN Hl 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 1-Mar 10wks $300
_ Email: perdev@cob.edu.bs
7 ENGLISH
All fees are included with the exception of ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WAITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225

the application fee of $40.00 {ane time).

ESL 900 O1 ENGLISH AS ASECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:30pm MonvFri 26-Feb 10 wks $250





OEES reserves the right lo change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedue .
and Course Materials.

HEALTH & FITNESS :

MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 92-Feb 10 wks $465
MASGSO1 Ot MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm = Mon 26-Feb 10. wks, $620
LTHOOO —-«dOT.-~—=sGROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed —«-28-Fed 10 wks $400



| Contact the Coordinator ANAGEMENT

MGMT9—00. ~=«01.~Ss HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | 6:00-9:30pm Thurs 8-Feb 12wks $250
MGMT901 - O1 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Ii 6:00-9:30pm Man 5-Feb 12wks $300

MEDICAL
MEDT9GO 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $225

SEWING :
SEW 800 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 1Owks $225
SEW 802 O1 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING IE — 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $250

SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING! 6:00-9:09pm Tues 27-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING Il 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb iO wks $250
SEW811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10wks $225

SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING | 4:00-10:00pm — Sat 24-Feb 1Qwks $225


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IE COLLEGE (

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

EDUCATING & TRAINING Barameans

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an-overview of the fundamentals of superior

customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee

motivation.
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: To be announced

Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $160.00

WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.

Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $550.00

| All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 fone time). When submitting

application, kinclly provide copies of the first four pages of your passpart. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Contact the Coordinator - p erdev(@cob.edu.bs

THE COLLEGE OF THE. BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massag therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving

Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
_ Time: §:00-8:00pm

Duration: 10Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
tapics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy- —
Fundamentals or Essential Oils»Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.
Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major

topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
componenis of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.
Starting: Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
_ Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs



Or THE BAHAMAS

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 7B



Financing for new
port still concerns

FROM page 1B

Mr van den Bossche said his
firm will look into the ques-
tion of whether such a port can
be financed and how.

The third phase is a man-
agement issue to determine the
history of the old port and
institutional framework of the
new one.

‘Prime

Minister Perry

’ Christie said that while the

Government was convinced of
the soundness of the project,
it recognisied the reality that it
will not compromise on good
business judgment.

The Prime Minister added
that a public/private partner-
ship will work to ensure the
new port is run efficiently and
profitably.

“Opportunities will also
become available to ensure
that the Bahamians participate

in its ownership and manage-
ment. Whatever we do, signif-

icant Bahamian ownership is ,

the order of the day, at any
new facility of this order and
kind in the Bahamas,” the
Prime Minister added.

“J want to be very careful,”
Mr Christie said when asked
if physical work will start
before the end of the year.
“The reason we have a pub-
lic/private partnership was for
our partners to make those
decisions, but I wanted them
to start this month.”

Michael Maura, of Tropical
Shipping, said the industry was
heavily involved in discussions
on the ramifications of relo-
cating the shipping companies
from the downtown Nassau
area, and said that while the
industry was supportive of the
relocation, the cost and financ-
ing was a concern.

Mr Matra said the new con-
tainer port will have to be self-
sustaining.

“It should not depend to any
great degree on subsidies from
the Bahamian people,” he
explained. “It needs to be as
efficient as we can afford in
order to keep the cost of living
at a reasonable level. All of
the shipping companies and
stevedoring companies and
land owners are in total sup-
port of doing what we all need
to do to play our part.”

Mr Maura said the shipping
companies did have concerns
on the timing of the port relo-
cation.

He added: “Part of the chal-
lenge will be to introduce some
kind of phased approach on
how we can move, because you
can’t just cut the ribbon one
day at the port and tell every-
body just show up. There is
going to be a lot of thought
that goes into how you are
going to relocate. And that is
why we are looking at compa-
nies like Ecorys that have that
expertise to guide us.”

AMENDED DIVIDEND NOTICE

Premier Commercial Real Estate

Investment Corporation Limited

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors of PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL
ESTATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED has resolved to declare a
dividend of 60 cents {90- 60) per share for all shareholders of record as of the lose
of business on the 22"â„¢ day of January, 2007, the same to be payable on the 26 day
of January, 2007.

This dividend declaration is in substitution for the dividend which was previously
declared in error and unpaid for 6 cent its ($0.06) per share for all shareholders of record
as of the close of business i in the 21§ day of December, 2006, and was stated to be
payable on the 27” day of December, 2006. That former dividend declaration has
been formally rescinded by the Board of Directors of the company and is now null
and void.

All payments shall be made through Experta Trust Company (Bahamas). Limited, qth
Floor, Trade Winds Building, Nassau, Bahamas, the Administrator for the Company,
pursuant t £9 the instructions of the relevant shareholders on the files of company as
at the 22° day of January, 2007.

Melanie Rouse
Assistant Secretary

Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of

GLOBAL FEE
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST:

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated
recovery management. The successful candidate will also be
responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
management, maintenance of all fee agreements, as well as
document management including filing and imaging of
correspondence.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting,
Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three
(3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution.

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution,
communication, organization and pc skills. The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR

Email: betty.roberts@citigroup.com

Deadline for application is Friday, January 19, 2007.


| -Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
\ ow - Lowest closing pri in last 52 week

‘PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007











Legal Notice

NOTICE

DMK VALLEY LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DMK VALLEY LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Sar aS a Ta EAS REA

Ja Poe
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)








=)

Home

USINESS




Depot chiefs

THE TRIBUNE




get nice ‘goodbyes’

@ By PATTI BOND and
MARIA SAPORTA
Cox News Service

ATLANTA — Bob Nardelli’s
controversial exit from Home Depot
this month was scripted before he
ever walked in the door of the
Atlanta-based retail giant.

The $210 million payout Nardelli
got for leaving its helm may have
been the final chapter of this cor-
ner-office tale, but it certainly wasn’t
a surprise ending. The beginning of
the story, woven by interlocking
board and business ties, a “super

Well established Wholesaler requires
warehouse workers. Persons must be well
groomed, well mannered, and willing to

work. Starting salary is $10,000, increasing
to 15,600 after a three month probationary

period.

PNSor
merchandisers

EViS
will

required
dates

experienced
be team

leaders. Persons must be well groomed,
well mannered, and willing to work.
BSyevaehoneg salary is $13,000 and after nate
three month probationary period the salary
will be increased to $15,000 along with an
: tatere nea Ker Company offers sood enters

No phone. oily mee Apply in person at
ne ghtbourn Trading Co., Mackey Street,
next door to Nassau. Hotels and Resturants.

\Pricing Information As Of:
iThursday, 11 January 200 7





: Securit y
Abaco Markets




1.85 0.54

12.05 10.25 Bahamas Property Fund

8.03 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.76
41.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.75
1:49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.25
10.00 9.05 Cable Bahamas 10.00
2.20 1.64 Colina Holdings 1.90
12.54 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 12.54
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.76
2.88 2.26 Doctor's Hospital 2.50
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.79
12.20 10.70 Finco 12.02
14.45 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.15 |
12.55 10.00 Focol 12.55
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55
410.20 7.15 ICD Utilities 7.20
49.10 : J! S. Johnson 8.60

Premier Real Estat








14.60
8.00

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)



14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings







S2wk-Hi ‘Fund Name









NA V
W7.3216 1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund 1.321587"
B3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728***
2.5002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**
1 2175 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450****



o



FUNG. cant lB 0 nin inainit
{HEX CLOSE 742.

oh “YIELD -





AARKET TERMS




{ARE







6 - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume



e - Current day's weighted price for daily volume






Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
}
= . Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings





: 0.00
5 0.00
8.03 0,00
0.80 0.04 1,500
41.75 0.00 .
41.25 0.00 4,000
10.00 0.00 600
1.90 0.00 500
12.54 0.00 850
4.83 0.07
2.50 0.00
5.79 0.00
12.20 0.18 3,000
14.45 0.30 2,000 ©
12.55 0.00
0.55 0.00
7.20 0.00 4,250
8.60 0.00

000

Last Price Weekly







Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX ~ The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Pec AntON GAEL

wanna

e

lawyer” and directors who just
couldn’t say no, held all the clues to
the outcome six years later.

It all started with a single turn of
events at General Electric in late
2000.

It was then that legendary GE
chief Jack Welch was stepping down
after 20 years as chief of the Amer-
ican icon. The three-way contest for
the top of GE, considered a prime
breeding ground for some of capi-
talism’s best leaders, had captured
corporate America at the time. The
“losers,” as the going notion went,
would be immediately snapped up.

Home Depot directors, already
in the midst of a search for a top
executive, were enamored with the
horse race.

Home Depot co-founder and
then-CEO Arthur Blank had over-
seen an incredible growth streak,
but he had not identified a No. 2 to
succeed him, and directors were get-
ting antsy. as

Although director Ken Langone,
who helped found Home Depot in
1978, said at the time that it wasn’t a
“panic situation,” the search turned
into a sprint the minute Welch chose
Jeffrey Immelt as his successor.

Langone made it clear he wanted

‘either of the runners-up, Jim McN-

erney or Nardelli.

But McNerney was quickly
knocked off Home Depot’s radar
when 3M Co. snagged him. So Lan-
gone and fellow directors pounced
on Nardelli.

Almost overnight, the first out-
sider to take the helm of the home
improvement retailer was hired and
began setting up.shop at his new
Atlanta office, swooping in with the
fanfare of a major league draft pick.

Langone told The Atlanta Jour-
nal-Constitution at the time, “We
found a home run - he is Mickey
Mantle, Joe DiMaggio, Hank Aaron
- rolled into one.”

In fact, Nardelli kicked off his first
day, Dec. 4, 2000, with an employ-
ment contract that a sports star could
appreciate: a guaranteed annual
bonus of at least $3 million, stock,
retirement benefits and a $10 mil-
lion loan to be written off in five
years.

From the start, Nardelli’s pay was
bound for the clouds.

Nardelli was known as a “golden
boy” at.GE, where he ultimately
landed at the top of GE Power Sys-
tems, oné of the most profitable
businesses within the.GE empire.

Home Depot, or any future
employer for that matter, would
have to compensate him for all the
pay and perks he had racked up dur-
ing his 26 years at GE, compensation
experts say.

Nardelli got that and much more
when he hired Chicago attorney
Robert Stucker, a so-called “super
lawyer” who helped secure some of
the biggest pay packages and golden

, parachutes around - including for

former Delta Air Lines chief Leo
Mullin.

Stucker, who declined to com-
ment for this story, belongs to a
small roster of deal-makers who
have been likened to sports agents
for their skill in getting top-dollar
for clients.

Stucker was a busy man the week
he negotiated Nardelli’s deal - he
also was representing McNerney on
his 3M contract. ,

In fact, the imprint of Stucker and
his colleagues is so powerful that it
was the subject of a recent study by
the University of Washington, Stan-
ford University and Duke Universi-
ty.
Stucker and two other lawyers
have a virtual lock on the pay nego-
tiations for Wall Street’s biggest
names, and it’s no wonder: The
study found that first-year compen-
sation for their CEO clients was $7.3




























AV KEY
* - 29 December 2006
** 31 December 2006
*** . 31 December 2006
**** _ 31 December 2006

Aiaes - 31 December 2006
242) 394-2503 <

million higher on average than for
CEOs who hadn’t used one of the
three attorneys.

The so-called super-lawyer con-
tracts also typically contain several
signature elements, including guar-
anteed bonuses, accelerated pension
benefits and, notably, a full range
of severance payments.

All but about $18 million of
Nardelli’s $210 million exit package
was provided for in 2000, according
to the contract.

The recent uproar over Nardel-
li’s package came after the fact,
notes professor Shiva Rajgopal, who
co-authored the “super lawyer”
report at the University of Wash-
ington.'“If people want to make
noise, they should make noise when
these CEOs are hired,” he said.

In Nardelli’s case, there wasn’t
much time for pushback. Any com-
pany that ended up hiring Nardelli
would’ve faced a steep tab.

“It was pretty clear what the com-
pensation would have to be ...
1/Sbecause of 3/8 the cost of unwind-
ing him out of the GE contract,”
said Pat Pittard, retired CEO of Hei-
drick & Struggles, the firm behind
Home Depot’s search for a successor
in 2000. .

Home Depot was coming off an
period of phenomenal expansion,
reaching $46 billion in sales, but
some internal operations needed a
tune-up. The fast-growing retailer,
Pittard recalled, needed someone
with a firm hand who could instill
some operational discipline and take
the company into new businesses as
it sought to double revenue.

“Home Depot needed a Fortune
100 infrastructure, and that was
Nardelli’s strength,” Pittard said.
“There is less than 100th of 1 percent
of executives who can be an effective
CEO 1/8of Fortune 100 companies
3/8. They are worth tens of millions
of dollars.

” 1/8Nardelli 3/8 was paid a ton at
GE,“ Pittard said. ”It was either pay
him the compensation ... or go to
another candidate.“ i

Home Depot’s board said they
felt pressured to move quickly, and
that placed the ball in Nardelli’s
court.

»It’s all about supply and demand
in these situations,“ said Monterey,
Calif:, consultant Ed Brodow, author
of.”Negotiation Boot Camp.“

If 20 people were available, I
doubt Nardelli would’ve gotten that
kind of deal, but he was the one guy
1/SHome Depot 3/8 apparently felt
they had to get,“ Brodow said.
Nardelli was in position to ask for
the moon.“

It’s unclear to what extent the
attorneys for Home Depot’s board
negotiated Nardelli’s asking price.
People in the executive suite at the
time talked about a choke offer“
submitted by Nardelli’s attorney,
presumably to shoot for the highest
numbers possible.

It’s also unclear to what extent
Langone, Home Depot’s lead direc-
tor, directly influenced Nardelli’s
pay package. He declined to com-
ment for this story.

Langone, a longtime investment

banker with deep ties to Wall Street, :

also had direct links to GE. He was
on the compensation committee of
GE’s board in 2000, when Welch
passed over Nardelli to choose
TImmelt as his successor.

Today’s stricter corporate gover-
nance requirement would likely
prompt a director with overlapping
interests to recuse himself from an
executive search, Pittard noted.

*

Langone is no stranger to pay
controversies. Since 2003 he has
been a main target for his role as
head of the compensation commit-
tee at the New York Stock
Exchange, which awarded former
CEO Richard Grasso a pay pack-
age worth more than $140 million.

Grasso also served on Home
Depot’s board from 2002 to 2004,
including a stint on its compensa-
tion committee. ‘

Langone has defended the pay
for Grasso and Nardelli, although
his vocal support of Nardelli waned
late last year, reportedly because of
a dispute over a proposed pay cut.
The fallout is believed to be the rea-
son Nardelli suddenly resigned 12
days ago.

Nardelli was unlikely to get much
pushback at the beginning of his
Home Depot reign, as the compa-
ny’s ties to GE only got tighter.

GE directors - and also members
of GE’s compensation committee -
Claudio Gonzalez and Roger Penske
joined Home Depot’s board and the
retailer’s compensation committee
after Nardelli arrived.

Penske left the board in 2005.

* Current Home Depot director
Larry Johnston ran GE’s appliance
business before becoming Albert-
son’s CEO in 2001. He also was a
client of super-lawyer Stucker.

Home Depot’s search firm, Hei-
drick & Struggles, also had its share

of overlapping allegiances. Not only

was it doing the matchmaking for
Home Depot, but it also was han-
dling 3M’s CEO search - all while
doing due diligence for Jack Welch’s
succession.plan at GE. *

The tightly woven alliances that
often surface in the top tier of busi-
ness, particularly in Home Depot’s
case, have caused concern among
corporate governance watchdogs.

»Tt’s not a question of whether .
Nardelli was a valuable candidate
or not,‘ said Pat McGurn, executive
vice president of proxy advisory firm
Institutional Shareholder Services.
»T’ve just seen no evidence that there
was anyone who was involved in this
who wasn’t in the business of pro-
tecting Nardelli’s interests.“

Disgruntled shareholder groups
only grew more disenchanted with
Nardelli’s "golden boy“ billing when:
Home Depot’s stock price slid, but
his paycheck didn’t. Py:

Criticism hit fever pitch last
spring, when activists protested in
yellow-feathered chicken costumes
outside Home Depot’s annual share-
holder meeting, chanting that direc-
tors were afraid to take action
against Nardelli. (The chorus only
grew louder when Nardelli was the
only director to show up for the
meeting.) ae

The renewed uproar over Nardel-
li’s exit package comes just as Home
Depot hammers out the pay details
for new chief Frank Blake, another
GE recruit. Blake, a former lawyer, _
came to Home Depot four years ago ©
and is said to be the architect of sev-
eral key. strategies, including the
company’s move into the wholesale
supply business.

Shareholders and critics will like-
ly go over Blake’s upcoming com-
pensation agreement with a fine-
toothed comb.

“Efome Depot has clearly listened
to investors - Nardelli would still be
there if they hadn’t,“ McGurn said.
”T just hope Blake has listened to
the debate over the past few months
and realizes that a new set of rules
will have to apply to Home Depot
going forward.”

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*


THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Business Briefs _

e THE Apollo Group has
signed a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) with
the American International
Medical University (AIMU)
to develop $200 million in
medical tourism projects in

the Bahamas and St Lucia.

¢ Some 36 per cent of cruis-
ers who book through Trave-
locity want to cruise to the
Bahamas, a survey has found.

Mexico and the Caribbean
were the most popular desti-
nations, the survey found.

° Ron Perelman, the bil-
lionaire Revlon tycoon, has

bought land on Harbour
Island, US media reports have
claimed. It was also alleged

‘that the island’s Coral Beach

Club property was likely to
“absorb” the Pink Sands
resort.





Financial planning key, says Colina executive

FROM page 5B

months of premiums, your
family will receive the full val-
ue of that policy, so a life insur-
ance policy creates an almost
immediate estate,” Mr Flow-
ers said.

Defining a good life insur-
ance policy, Mr Flowers said
it was a policy that will replace
and provide the income the
insured individual would have
contributed to his or her
household over a specified
period of time.

He explained that today
there are many other types of
plans customers can leverage
to benefit themselves and their
families while they are still
alive. Term life policies were
often used to help secure mort-

gages, for which life insurance
is a requirement today.
“These policies can enable
you to secure coverage for var-
ious lengths of time, as needed,
and some can be renewed or
converted to participating poli-
cies, if desired. Some policies
also provide a living benefit
loan in the event of terminal
illness where you can borrow
up to one-third of the death
benefit value if you should suf-
fer such an illness,’ Mr Flow-

- ers said. He added that other

types of plans include endow-
ment plans that allow persons
to save for a specific period of
time towards a particular aim,
such as a child’s education or
towards retirement so that the
funds are there when they are
needed: :

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

FRANCO LEASE TWO LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance. with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of FRANCO LEASE TWO LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was

the 29th day of December, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR





Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR
EMPLOYMENT














Royal island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf

- course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:








e Director of Design

e Exterior Relations

e Project Managers

e Project Engineers

¢ Genaral Superintendents

¢ Superintendents

e Assistant Superintendents :

¢ Electrical Construction Managers
° Mechanical Construction Managers
e Office Engineers

¢ Manager of Quality Control

° Inspectors .










Over 20 postions are to filled. All positions
require successful applicants to reside at North
Eleuthera or vicinity.







Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:




The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 199]
Nassau Bahamas






Fax to: (242) 356-4125




Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com






Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.




Customer Service .
Engineer

Micronet Ltd., a leading business technology supplier
requires a Customer Service Engineer.

A minimum of 2 years experience in the implementation
of LAN and WAN networks using Microsoft and CISCO
technologies, working knowledge of Voice technology,
implementation of PBX Systems:

The key areas of experience are as follows;

* Experience in implementing and troubleshooting
LAN and WAN solutions .

* Microsoft Server certifications and experience

* Strong TCP/IP knowledge and routing concepts

~° Experience in the repair of computers, printers and
related peripherals a plus

* Working knowledge of Nortel Meridian, Nortel
Succession or Nortel BCM Systems

Desired Certifications

¢ CISCO- CCNA Minimum

° MCP, MCSE

* Nortel Installation and maintenance certifications

No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
or fax (subject line: CSE) to:

The Manager
Micronet Ltd.
Email: jobs@muicronet.bs
Fax: (242) 328-3043

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

COPY. « FAX # PRINT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential community
with private residences and club, 200 slip marina and
boutique hotel and spa, and a golf course just off North
Eleuthera is seeking to employ a Married Couple with strong
managerial, operational and organizational skills in
managing resort properties to oversee all day .to day
operations on the island.

Duties and Responsibilities

° Greeting potential members/buyers/investors

° Arranging transportation, including airport, transfers, boats
and on -island vehicles

° Responsible for setting up guest relations, all staff training,
motivation and recruitment

¢ Manage local accommodations

° Upkeep of boat fleet

¢ Manage/ coordinate all ocean/beach activities

e Manage guest inquiries and complaints in an efficient and
protessional manner

° Once the Preview Village is completed this position will:

¢ Oversee operations

¢ Maid Service

¢ Food/beverage

¢ Beach activities

° Ocean activities

° General maintenance upkeep of premises
° Manage fitness/spa activities

¢ Assist in sales process

° Qualifications: The ideal candidate must have a minimum
of 10 years experience in resort property management with
significant experience in the restaurant and spa industry,
including operations and maintenance of pool and spa
equipment. Must have strong managerial and organizational
skills in the areas of personnel and bugeting. Must be computer
literate with strong written and verbal communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to:

The ELR. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.
























~- MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 9B

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

' ¢
Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

BOAT CAPTAIN

Duties and Responsibilities.

¢ Manage fleet of boats and related equipment.
¢ Coordinate and manage maintenance of boats
¢ Coordinate all water sport activities.
¢ Snorkeling
e Diving
* Flats and Deep Sea fishing
e Manage Staff of First Mates.
° Coordinate Safety. of all boat patrons.




* Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
_have a minimum of 10 years experience as a boat
captain. Must be familiar with the local waters
and the area around Royal Island. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and boat operations. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.

Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:



The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all :
applicants for their interest, however only. those
under consideration will be contacted.



Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
a .

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers

of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential













community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

CHEF





Duties and Responsibilities ©








¢ Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.
* Coordinate and manage all food preparation

_ areas. , ’

° Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.

¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.










° Qualifications: The ideal candidate will have to
reside on Eleuthera or its surrounding area and
have a minimum of 10 years experience a four (4)
star restaurant cuisine and dining with significant
experience in the food industry. Must have experi-
ence in start up restuarant operation. Must have
strong managerial and organizational skills in the
areas of personnel and budgeting. Must be
computer literate with strong written and verbal
communication skills.












Interested persons should submit their resumes
with cover letter to:





The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas















Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.

Sean a ee ew

.
\
\








THE TRIBUNE



§ By LIBBY QUAID
AP Food and Farm
Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Lawmakers begin work on a
new multibillion-dollar farm
bill at odds with President Bush
over whether big changes real-
ly are needed.

The two sides are far apart.
Just how far, farmers saw for
themselves during the Ameri-
can Farm Bureau Federation’s
recent meeting in Salt Lake
City.

“TI think the bill could look‘a
lot like what we have now.
What I think we’re going to
end up doing, you could say, is
extending the farm bill,” Rep.
Collin Peterson, D-Minn.,
chairman of the House Agri-
culture Committee, told farm-
ers.

Contrast that with Bush’s
agriculture secretary, Mike
Johanns, who said at the meet-
ing that farm programs need
an overhaul.

“I will be the first to argue
‘that the 2002 farm bill was
good policy for its time,”
Johanns said, “But the agricul-
tural and economic realities
that influenced the develop-
ment of the ’02 farm bill —
they simply don’t exist.”

The farm bill — really a
series of federal programs —
gives farmers payments and



VR ati:

other help to supplement their
incomes, support crop prices
and manage supplies.

Near $18 billion in public
money was spent on these pro-
grams last year. The current
farm bill, written in 2002,
expires at the end of this year.

Congress and the adminis-
tration disagree mightily on
what the new farm bill should
look like.

Which side is closer to the
wishes of Farm Bureau, the
biggest general-interest agri-
culture group? -

Right

Right now, probably the
House Agriculture Committee
chairman, said Bob Stallman,
the organization’s president.
Johanns advocated massive
changes, Stallman said.

“That, frankly, is not what
our delegates are saying,” he
said.

Not that farmers are in lock
step. ;

den wants changes in farm pro-
grams and liked what Johanns
said. With the Illinois River just
a few miles from Hadden’s
corn and soybean fields, he
ships most of his crop to the
Gulf Coast to be exported.

“If we’re going to be.a player

in international trade markets;

we need to be sure we. don’t



Py

Illinois delegate Dale Had-

run into a lot of problems,”
Hadden said.

Among the disagreements

are:
e TRADE: The U.S. and
other rich countries are under
pressure from around the world
to reduce their farm subsidies.
Conflict over the issue led to
the collapse last summer of
World Trade Organization
talks.

Without an agreement,
American farmers face high
tariffs and other barriers when
they sell crops abroad — and
they export a big chunk of their
products.

Against this backdrop,
Johanns has pushed for change
as U.S. farm programs them-
selves come under fire. The
WTO, in a case brought by
Brazil, has ruled that some cot-
ton subsidies are illegal. Cana-
da is pursing a complaint about
USS. corn subsidies.

“Now of course the tempta-
tion may be to say to the WTO,
"You know what, folks? Take a
hike,”’ Johanns told farmers.

“Now, surely there are peo-
ple in this room who grow
rice,” he said. “Fifty percent of
the rice that you grow goes into
the international market. Do
you want us to ignore the WTO
and jeopardize that market?”

Some farmers do want to
ignore the trade issue. Johanns
drew a smattering of unexpect-
ed applause at the idea of
telling the WTO to take a hike.

‘Peterson, too, is disinclined
to worry too much about the
WTO.

“I want to write a farm bill
that’s good for agriculture,” he

said. “If somebody wants to sue
us, we’ve got a lot of lawyers in
Washington.”

¢ COST: There probably will
be fewer dollars for farm pro-
grams when Congress writes
the latest bill. The Democratic-
run Congress is insisting on
budget cuts to pay for new
spending, and Bush has
pledged to balance the budget
in five years.

Johanns seems to be prepar-
ing lawmakers to do more with
less. High subsidies, he told
Farm Bureau members, do not
necessarily equal a strong farm

‘economy.

At the same time, Peterson
argues against reducing farm
spending. That is a tough sell
because the farm bill has cost
billions of dollars less than law-
makers thought it would.

Peterson says. agriculture
somehow should be credited
for wise spending. “We feel like
we’ve done our part,” Peter-
son said. “I’m not going to say
this is going to be easy, but we
feel like we’re going to be able
to get the resources.”

Peterson also wants to
include a permanent disaster
aid program in the farm bill;
Congress has considered
drought and hurricane aid sep-
arately. But Farm Bureau del-
egates voted against such a pro-
gram because they worried it
could take money away from
other farm spending.

¢ PAYMENT LIMITS:
Johanns favors ending practices
that allow some growers to col-
lect millions of dollars annual-
ly above the $350,000 limit on
payments.



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Legal Notice

"NOTICE |]

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) ev

_ ‘KEYCREST LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), |
KEYCREST LIMITED is in Dissolution” |

The date of commencement of dissolution is 5th day of
September, 2006.

STANEY LIMITED
80 Broad Street
Monrovia,
Liberia
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CARGO AIRCRAFT SERVICES LTD

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of CARGO AIRCRAFT SERVIES LTD |
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

| Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 29th day of December, 2006



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DWAIPAYAN CHOUDHURY OF
HUDSON STREET, P.O. BOX SS-6256 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should.send_a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

|. | NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
3 (No.45 of 2000)

LURIG S.A.

In Voluntary Liquidation

| “Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
‘LURIG S.A. is in Dissolution”

The date of commencement of dissolution is 17th day of
Novemeber, 2006.

MARK JAMES SHORTLAND
Vannin, Fairy Cottage,
Laxey, Isle of Man, _.
IM4 7JB
Liquidator

Sale Sta rts fan 8th
Sale Cnds fan 3ist

Bay St., 2 Doors West of Victoria Ave.
© Tel: 242-356-7302
© email: ariana@batalnet.bs



Farm bill divides US government

He has broad support in
Congress — except from
Southerners, who would feel
limits more keenly because
their cotton and rice crops, cost
more to grow and get higher
subsidies.

Peterson said a farm bill can-
not pass without support from
Southern lawmakers.

“I’m not interested in putting
our agriculture friends in the
South in trouble. They’ve got
enough problems,” he said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
igsy-(e WM se(e/ ss
‘on Mondays

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

RiSTORAN TS

Villaggio

PLANO BAR & CAFE

Seeks to employ professional
Waiter and Waitress

Must be well-groomed

Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation
Must be able to work flexible
hours

Send Resume to:
Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Apply in person

Caves Village, West Bay Street. “e

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/bnk/00015
Commercial Division ‘

IN THE MATTER OF MOSAIC COMPOSITE
LIMITED now MOSAIC COMPOSITE
LIMITED (U.S.) INC.

(a Minnesota Corporation) (“Mosaic”)
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE INTERNATIONAL BUSI-
NESS COMPANIES ACT, Chapter 309
Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition (“the Act’)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition for
the winding-up of the above-named Company was on the
17th day of March.2006 presented to the said Court by
Olympus Univest Ltd. (in liquidation) c/o BDO Mann Judd.
Third Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street North, Nassau,
Bahamas

AND that the said Petition which was directed to be
heard before the Honourable Madame Justice Cheryl Albury
in Court at the Law Courts, the Harrison Building,
Marlborough Street, Nassau on Thursday, 14th day* of
December, 2006 at 11:00 o’clock in the forenoon is now
directed to be heard on Tuesday, the 23rd day of January,
2007 at 10:30 o’clock in the forenoon before the said Judge
and any Creditor or contributory of the said Company
desirous to support or oppose the making of an Order on
the said Petition may appear at the time of the hearing in
person or by his. Counsel for that purpose; and a copy of the
Petition ‘will be furnished by the undersigned to any
Creditor or Contributory of the said Company requiring such
copy on payment of the prescribed charges for the same.

DATED the 12th day of January, A.D. 2007

Callenders &CO.
Chambers,
One Millars Court,
Nassau, Bahamas
_ Attorneys for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing of
the said Petition must serve on or send by post to the
above-named, notice in writing of his intention to do so.
The Notice must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and must
be signed by the person or firm or his or their attorney if
any, and must be served or if posted, must be sent by post
in sufficient time to reach the above-named not later than
4:00 o’clock in the afternoon of 22nd day of January, 2007





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DEWWEEPRASE LESS
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







BUSINESS









i MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell

(FILE Photo)



BTC flouts regulatory

process over the ViBe

FROM page 1B

long-distance rates under the
guise of a promotion, a move
that many viewed as a
response to the arrival of legal
competition in fixed-line, voice

_telephony for the first time in

the shape of IndiGo Networks.

The fact that BTC has done
this a second time, and appears
to have gotten away with it,
indicates the company feels it

is protected due to the fact it is:

100 per cent-owned by the
Government.

Actions

Yet its actions undermine
the integrity of the Bahamian
telecommunications industry’s
governing laws, regulations
and policies. Several observers
have suggested that the Gov-
ernment, aided by the PUC, is
attempting to stifle legal com-
petition to BTC because it is
pursuing two separate but con-
flicting policies at the same
time. On one hand, the Gov-
ernment wants to liberalise the
Bahanuan telecoms market to
create competition, giving con-
sumer more choice, and bet-
ter services and prices.

Yet on the other it is
attempting to protect BTC’s
market position because of the
ongoing eight-year attempt to
privatize BTC. James Smith,
minister of state for finance,
previously told The Tribune
that the Government’s nego-
tiating team had completed its
work, and it was now down to
the Cabinet to decide whether
to accept the offer from Blue-
water Communications Hold-
ings over BTC’s privatization.

But the efforts to protect
BTC, and allow minimal com-
petition, end up hurting the

“consumer and Bahamian busi-

nesses and the wider econo-
my. through less choice, poor-
er services and more expen-
sive prices.

‘The PUC’s independence in
matters involving BTC has also
been questioned by observers,

\

given that the state-owned car-
rier is its largest source of
licence revenue and, more
importantly, it received an
annual government subsidy.

The public consultation on
ViBe is likely to be perceived
as an attempt by the PUC to
legitimise BTC’s behaviour
after the fact.

ViBe enables BTC’s Inter-
net customers to make phone
calls via the Internet, and the
PUC said in its consultation
document that it had been in
talks with the company over
the product since early 2006.

BTC had argued that VoIP
was not a telecommunications
service as defined under the
Telecommunications Act 1999,
but “a value-added feature”
for its DSL broadband Internet
customers. As a result, the
company alleged that the ser-
vice should not be price-regu-
lated.

These arguments cut little
ice with the PUC, but it
acknowledged that ViBE
would benefit Bahamas resi-
dents and the national econo-
my through enhancing effi-
ciency and competitiveness;
promoting the development of
information. and telecommu-
nications technology; making
telecoms more affordable and
allowing consumers to pur-
chase more calls for less.

After benchmarking BTC’s
ViBe prices with the compa-
ny’s inter-island and interna-
tional long-distance fixed-line
prices, and those of other
Caribbean VoIP providers, the
PUC said ViBe “represents
considerable savings over its
current prices for convention-
al switched inter-island and
international long distance
calls”.

Prices

The ViBe prices, the PUC
added, were lower than the

current prices for calls to the-

Bahamas’major trading part-
ners, and compared well with
those charged by other







Caribbean VoIP operators.

Compared to BTC’s fixed-
line calls, ViBe prices are:

© $0.15 and $0.20 per minute
for out of plan calls to the US,
compared to $0.47 per minute
for fixed-line calls

° $0.20 for calls to Canada,
compared to $0.50 for fixed-
line

° $0.20 to the UK, compared
to $0.85 for fixed-line

© $0.20 to Switzerland, com-
pared to $0.85 for fixed-line

© $0.7-$1 to Cuba, compared
to $0.85

e $0.2 and $0.3 to the
Caribbean, compared to $0.66

e $0.2-$2 for other countries,
compared to $0.85

When it came to compar-
isons against other VoIP oper-
ators in the Caribbean, ViBe’s
out of plan calls were more
expensive than Jamaica-based
InfoChannel, but broadly in
line with those offered by
Cable & Wireless (C&W).

Service
C&W’s VoIP ‘service in

Jamaica is slightly less expen-
sive than BTC’s, but is more

expensive in Anguilla and the |

Cayman Islands.

The PUC concluded: “ViBe
is beneficial to customers and
the national economy, and the
deployment of this cheaper
service is in the public inter-
est. Despite BTC’s failure to
make proper application pri-
or to the launch of the new
ViBe service, the Commission
is minded to approve the pric-
ing plans and out of plan prices
for ViBe...”

The PUC added that it
would not insist that ViBe
users be able to use the ser-
vice to call the emergency ser-
vices, due to the high level of
cellular and fixed-line pene-
tration in the Bahamas.

At the end of 2005, there
were some 43.9 fixed lines per
100 inhabitants in the
Bahamas, with 58.35 cell
phones per 100 people.

>

Minister’s concern
on Bacardi exports

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

_ FRED Mitchell, minister of
foreign affairs, is “primarily
concerned with securing access
for Bacardi’s rum to Europe”
during talks between the
Caribbean and European
Union (EU) over the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA).

The disclosure was made by
Odell Cunningham, a member
of the Caribbean Regional
Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM), who disclosed that
Cariforum — the body negoti-
ating on the Bahamas and
CARICOM’s behalf - was
now in phase four of the talks
with the EU.

Bacardi told The Tribune
that it was too early for it to
comment on the EPA and its
implications for the company,
particularly the Bahamian
manufacturing facility.

The EPA aims to secure
duty-free market access to the
EU for Bahamian exporters

like Bacardi, ensuring their
products remain competitive.
After talks on the framework

governing the talks were com-_

pleted, negotiations on recip-
rocal market access for all
industries — agriculture, goods
and services and other areas —
had begun.

Mr Cunningham said the
market access talks had not
reached the stage where they
could be “translated into a
legally binding text”.

Private

He urged the Bahamian pri-
vate sector to partner with the
Government and let it know
what it wanted from these
trade agreements, pointing to
the example set by Trinidad
& Tobago, where commerce
bodies had pushed the gov-
ernment there to negotiate a
trade agreement with Cost
Rica that had recently been
ratified.

Mr Cunningham said that
with the World Trade Organi-

sation’s (WTO) Doha round
of global trade talks currently
in limbo, and the Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA)
“pretty much dead”, the EPA
“now represents the best
opportunity for the private
sector” to get on board in
trade negotiations and tell
their governments what they
wanted.

“The Bahamas is not ina
position to use these trade
agreements as the level of pri-
vate sector participation is not
there,” he added.

Mr. Cunningham urged
Bahamian companies to
broaden their outlook, and
look beyond this nation to .
diversify into export markets,
developing a “global plat-
form”.

He added that the private
sector had been “slow to take
advantage of trade opportuni-
ties”, and encouraged Bahami-
an companies to joint venture
with foreign counterparts as a
way of accessing overseas mar-
kets and bidding on contracts.

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MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Knowles
and Nestor

beaten in
the final

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

MARK KNOWLES
and Daniel Nestor fell
one match short of win-
ning their first doubles
title of the year.

Competing in the final
of the Medibank Inter-

‘.*. national Tournament on
’ Saturday in Sydney,

Australia, Knowles and
Nestor were taken to the
wire before they were
beaten by the team of
Paul Hanley from Aus-
tralia and Kevin Ullyett
from Zimbabwe.

Knowles and Nestor,
the number two seeded
team in the tournanient,
were hoping to bounce
back and win the title
that got away from them
the way before in Doha
where they were ousted
in the semifinal by the
team of Martin Damm
from the Czech Republic
and Leander Paes from
India.

But the No.3 team of
Hanley and Ullyett had
other plans. The duo,
who came together at
the beginning of last
year and compiled an
impressive 58-18 record,
avenged their loss to
Knowles and Nestor in
the semis of the Tennis
Master Cup in Novem-
ber in China by clinching
their sixth title.

Hanley, in a quote
from the tourney's web-
site, said: "To win a tour-
nament in my home
country - there are only
three a year in Australia
- is nice, particularly in
front of such a big
crowd."

Knowles and Nestor
couldn’t be reached for
comments. But on their
way to the final, they got
revenge on Damm and
Paes by beating them in
the semis. Knowles and
Nestor were chasing
their 38th career title.

’ They will now have to

‘wait for the Australian
Open to accomplish that
feat. The Australian
Open kicked off today in
Melbourne. Knowles
and Nestor won the
Grand Slam title back in
2002.

This year's draw for
the doubles is not
expected to be released
until Wednesday. But
Knowles and Nestor are
hoping that their
improvement from the
semis to the final in the
previous two tourna-
ments for the year will
lead to the title at the
first Grand Slam title
this year.

- Last year, Knowles
and Nestor were ousted
in the first round by
Dick Norman of Bel-
gium and Vincent
Spadea of the United
States in two straight
sets.

Knowles and Nestor
went on to compile a 48-
20 record last year with
five titles under their
belt at Delray Beach in
February, Indian Wells
in March, Barcelona in
April, Rome in May and
Basel in October.

They ended the year as
the runners-up at the
Tennis Masters Cup in
Shanghai in November
where they lost in the
final to the team of
Jonas Bjornman of Swe-
den and Max Mirnyi of
Bulgaria.

Knowles and Nestor
finished as the number
four ranked team in the
world.



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@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE













Carnesha shines

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter

THE BAAA opened up
the season on Saturday with
their annual Odd Distance
Meet, with more than 380
athletes competing. The
meet, which hosted athletes
from various clubs and
schools including LN Coak-
ley and Freeport, was divided:
into five categories and saw
athletes compete from ages
9-20.

Carnesha Nixon of Road
Runners would shine in the
girls under nine division, fin-
ishing in the top three of the
five events she competed in.

In the 60 meters Nixon
clocked 10.00 seconds for the
win, she was followed by
Charisma Taylor of Club
Monica in 10.01 seconds and
Daijonique Lightbourne’s
10.04 seconds.

Lightbourne would get the
better of the two in the 150m
with a time of 24.50 seconds,
Taylor was second in 24.70
seconds and Nixon third in
25.00 seconds.

The long jump event
belonged to Taylor with a
leap of 2.39m. Angel Butler
was second in 1.70m and
Nixon third in 1.42m.

Asia Butler ran away with
the girls 150m in the under
11 girls division, but had to
settle for second place in the
60m.

Butler clocked 21.08 sec-

onds in the 150m for the win

and 9.00 seconds for second
in the 60m. Winning the 60m
was Martiqua Richardson of
Club Monica in 8.09 seconds.
Richardson was second in the
long jump with a leap of
3.05m, winning with 3.12m
was teammate Savannah Har-
riott.

It was a heated 60m dash
in the boy’s under nine divi-
sion between Brason Rolle,
Jameson Miller and Miguel
Bethel.

Rolle took top prize in the
both the 60m and the 150m
with Miller coming in second
place. Bethel would run with
the third spot in the 60m, but
had to settle for fourth in the
150m. Rolle’s time in the 60m
was recorded at 9.05 second,
Miller’s was 10.00 seconds
with Bethel clocking 10.01
seconds. All three athletes
represented the Road Run-
ners Club.

This year might see a
change of the guard in the
open women’s division. New-
comer Krystal Bodie is set-
ting the tone for the other
athletes capturing the 60m
and the 300m.

Bodie, who has recently
signed a letter of intent to
attend Auburn University,
got the best of Tia Rolle and
Shenique Armbrister in the
60m clocking 7.3 seconds for
the win. Rolle was second in
7.6 seconds and Armbrister
third with 8.0 seconds.

It was tougher field in the
300m with the return of
Tamara Rigby.

But Rigby would have to
settle for second behind Bod-
ie who ran away with the
event in 41.10 seconds, Rigby
was second in 42.70 and Kar-
lica Robinson third in 45.10
seconds. ,

Patrick Bodie would have a
field day in' the high jump
event being the only athlete
to clear the bar with 1.52m.
Also competing in the event
were Phillip Brown and Mav-
erick Bowleg.



@ CARNESHA Nixon of

Road Runners wins the 60m

dash.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

The 500m would also
belong to Bodie as he ran
away from the field in 1:17.50
seconds, coming in second
was Marvin Minns in 1:22.80
seconds and Stephen Taylor
third in 1:27.48 seconds.

In the open men's 60m,
Scotty Ward clocked 6.7 sec-
onds for the win over Ravan-
no Ferguson who also
clocked 6.7 seconds and Denu
Campbell in 6.8 seconds.

Jerone Mitchel took the
350m in 42.9 seconds, Aaron
Seymour was second in 44.2
seconds and Leslie Hanna
third in 44.3 seconds.

@ WINNING the high jump
from CI Gibson was Vincent
McKinney.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

ene neN eT

in season opener















@ ROAD RACE
BSC FAMILY FUN/WALK

The Baptist Sports Council is gear-

ing up for the hosting of their sev-_

enth annual Family Fun Run/Walk
Road Race.

This year's event, scheduled for
Saturday, January 28, will be held in
honour of Evangelist, Rev. Clinton
Minnis.

It will start promptly at 7 a.m. from
the Charles W. Saunders High
School, Jean Street. Pre-registration
will take place from 6 a.m.

The run will cover a four-mile
course, while the walk will only be
two miles. They will start at the same
point, but travel in different direc-
tions.

The run will travel south on Jean
Street to Prince Charles Drive, east to
the intersection at Robinson Road
and Fox Hill Road, north to Bernard
Road, west to Hillside Estate, oppo-
site Kingsway Academy and south
back to Jean Street.

The walk will leave Jean Street and
head north to Hillside Estate, west
on Bernard Road to Village Road,
south to Robinson Road and east
back to Jean Street.

The entry fee is $5.00 per athlete,
but'as an added incentive, there is a
group rate of $100.00 for 20 or more
participants. So Church, civic and
community minded groups are invit-
ed to come out and participate.

Individual awards will be given out
to the first three finishers in each cat-
egory and there will be an award for
the Church or company that brings
out the most participants, who must
complete the race.

The age group categories include
15-and-under, 20-and-under, 30-and-
under, 40-and-under, 50-and-under
and 50-and-over for men and women
in both the walk and the run.

Interested persons can call 502-
2363 for further details.

Immediately following the race,
there will be a Health Fair where
medical personnel and fitness experts
will be on hand to provide informa-
tion for those persons who wish to
live a more healthy lifestyle.

Following the Health Fair, the
Baptist Sports Council will hold its
final registration for its 2007 Rev.
Tyrone Knowles Basketball Classic.

The classic is scheduled to start’ on“

Saturday, February 3 at the Charles
W. Saunders high School.

@ BASKETBALL
BSC BASKETBALL
REGISTRATION

The Baptist Sports Council will
hold its final registration for all teams
wishing to participate in the 2007
Rev. Tyrone Knowles Basketball
Classic on Saturday, January 27 at
10 a.m. at the Bahamas Baptist Col-
lege, Jean Street. The league will
comprise of the men, ladies, 19-and-
under and 15-and-under divisions.
The entry fee will be $100.00 per.
team. The league is scheduled to start
on Saturday, February 3. For further
information, persons can call 502-
2363.

& GSSSA ACTION

The Government Secondary.

Schools Sports Association will con-
tinue its basketball action today at 4
p.m. with the following games on tap:

DW Davis Gym - RM Bailey vs
CC Sweeting (SG); Dame Doris
Johnson vs CV Bethel (SG) and
Dame Doris Johnson vs CV Bethel
(SB).

CI Gibson Gym - AF Adderley vs
CH Reeves (JG); SC McPherson vs
HO Nash (JG); LW Young vs CC
Sweeting (SB).

The Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools Sports

will be back in action today at 4 p.m.

with the senior boys and junior girls
playing at various sites.

@ SQUASH
NEW YEAR'S LEAGUE

The New Year's Squash League
will host its second week of action
on Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the Village
Squash Club. Some of the top squash
players will be in action.

@ FOOTBALL
MEGAMALT NATIONAL
“YOUTH COMBINE

Plans are underway for the first
Megamalt National Youth Combine.
It is scheduled for Saturday, starting
at 10 a.m. at Goodman’s Bay. It's
being organised by Frank Ruther-
ford through his Elite Athletic Devel-
opment (FREAD) programme that is
based in Houston, Texas.

The camp is expected to be direct-
ed by visiting coaches Bob Stoops of
the University of Oklahoma; Tony
Fritzpatrick from the University of
Houston; Les Miles from Louisiana
State University and Mario Cristo-
bal from the University of Miami.

m@ NPBA OPEN SEASON

After taking a break for the Christ-
mas holiday, the New Providence
Basketball Association will com-
‘mence its regular season action
tonight at the DW Davis Gymnasi-
um. In the opener, Cable Bahamas
Entertainers will face the Y-Care
Wreckers and in the feature contest,
its the Police Crimestoppers against
the Millennium Jammers.

4










PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007




@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

JASON Williams made it look so
easy as he made his debut as a stu-
dent of the College of the Bahamas.

Competing in the COB's 14th
annual Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt
Road Race on Saturday, Williams,
26, ran away from the competition,
that was dominated in attendance
by both the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and the Defence Force, to
win the run segment of the event in
39 minutes and 14 seconds.

His nearest rival came in two
minutes later.

"It was easy. It was a good open-
er for the year," Williams reflected.
"T hope that the competition would

‘have been better with the young

men taking it serious and coming
out to run because it's not an easy
sport,

"The older runners are getting
off the scene and we need the fresh
young blood to come out and take
it over.”

Williams, who has enrolled at
COB full-time studying finance and
economics, didn't waste any time
in. taking control of the race.

In fact. Chris Cartwright, who
came in second overall in 41.04,
said when he saw Williams make
his move at the mid-way point in
the race, there wasn’t anything he
could do, but watch.

"I just need more leg speed," said
Cartwright, 18, about chasing
Williams for the top spot.

This is the fifth year that
Cartwright has been running and
the CC Sweeting High School stu-
dent admits that he hopes to get
better as time progresses.

Valentino Thomas trailed
Cartwright with third place in 41.06.

Celeste Williams-Bethel, a mem-
ber of the Pro Active Fitness Club,
was the first female finisher. She

~ did the course-in 62.18 — running
-her first race.
~-{ What J wanted to do was use to

as a preparation for the half-
marathon in Jacksonville at the end
of this month," said Williams-
Bethel, who will be making her
debut at a marathon as well. "So I
just thought I would to do this one
and the Ministry of Tourism's race
next week. That should get me set
for the half marathon."

Two Defence Force Officers, M
Taylor (62.28) and L. Smith (65.00),
followed Bethel-Williams in order
of finish.

As for the walk race, there was
no competition for Philip Moss,
who once again cruised to another
victory, clocking 53.58.

"This morning was rough because
I worked out in the gym on Tues-
day and my muscles were still sore.
I couldn't pull out," Moss reflected.
"But I didn't have any competition,
so I'm okay."

Moss said he was pleased to see
the amount of participants, but he
just wanted to complete the race
as he continues his preparation for
the Jacksonville Marathon on Jan-
uary 28 and the Miami marathon
on February 10.

Former distance runner-turned

SPORTS

coach Keno Demeritte came in sec-
ond in the walk in 53.58, while E.
Seymour was third in 54.16. :

"The race was pretty good,"
Demeritte stated. "The route was
hard, considering this was my first
race. But I knew Philip and some of
the other guys in the race were
walkers, so I just had to go out
there and do what I had to do to
finish."

Lorraine Simms was the first
female walker. She the course in
60.28. Defence force Officer
Natasha Miller was second and S.
Miller was third.

Simms, who has been competing
for the past two years, said it was
"no competition."

Patron Cynthia Pratt, the Deputy
Prime Minister and former Assis-
tant Athletic Director at COB, said
she's excited about the vast number
of young people who showed up to
participate.

"It's so good to see the cama-
raderie between the Police Force
and the Defence Force. It's always
exciting when they come together,
so I want to thank them and the
College of the Bahamas and its Stu-
dent Activities Department for con-
tinuing my legacy and to give me
the incentive to go on. I thank God
for everything."

The Defence Force had around
100 competitors in the race, includ-
ing Commodore Clifford 'Butch'
Scavalla.

"I'm excited because we just
started our annual fitness pro-
gramme and the support has been
tremendous with young women and
men finding themselves and re-res-
urrecting the force," Scavalla said.

"We are refocusing and recondi-
tioning this force into something
that the Bahamian people can be
tremendously proud about. So we
are well on our way. We only got
this group together yesterday.
Imagine if we had some More time.
The people are on fire, reinvigo-



Wedd

rated." ay

1489 Cyntherette Miller, who had
about 50-plus members of the
Police Cadets in attendance, said
she was pleased with their efforts.

COB's Athletic Director Greg
Charshaw said every year the sup-
port has been growing in every area
and hopefully they will be able to
establish a vibrant athletic pro-
gramme as they branch into the
inter-collegiate arena.

"Jason and I have been taking
and it is my hope that we can estab-
lish some athletic scholarships that
will enable the Bahamian athletes
to stay on the island," he said.

"I know it breaks my heart that
everybody wants to go to the
States.

"But I came-here to encourage
them to stay on the islands and I
think it will enjoy the federations
and the national teams.

“That's what a college is sup-
posed to do and we hope to estab-
lish that programme here so we can
all work together."

Race co-ordinator Bradley Coop-
er said the event was a success and
they only expect it to get better in
the future.



@ JASON WILLIAMS receives his trophy from COB

Greg Harshaw on Saturday. ‘



@ CELESTE



Se SS 3

COB's Athletic Director Greg Harshaw.

BETHEL, the first female runner, receives her tro

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Athletic Director





if PHILIP MOSS collects his trophy from COB's Athletic Director Greg Har-

shaw for being the first walker to complete the race.



ombers defused by

rampant Stingrays

@ AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE youthful Stingrays
welcomed the. veteran
Bombers back into the Com-
monwealth American Foot-
ball League yesterday with a
22-0 beating at the DW
Davis High School playing
field.

As they improved to 2-1 to
remain in second place
behind the Orry J. Sands
Pros, the Stingrays rebound-
ed from a defensive battle in
the first quarter, scoring in
the remaining three.

“We practiced all week.
Last week we lost to the
Pros. We felt we gave them a
gift,” said Stingrays’ coach
Tyrone Rolle. “So the guys
stepped up their intensity,
they practised hard all week

and they came out here and
made a statement.”

Gardiner said as long as_

the players come out to prac-
tise and do what they're sup-
posed to do, they should
have no problem duplicating
what they did against the
Bombers.

“We feel we could take the
whole thing,” Rolle reflected.

He said they have the

desire, so it’s just a matter of

them putting it all together
when they had to.

Difficult

Rolle anticipated that it
would have been difficult to
score in the first quarter and
he was right. It wasn’t until
the second quarter that
Quincy Smith scored the first
two points of the game ona
safety.

Before the quarter was
over, Perez Adderley got a
15-yard pass from quarter-
back Nesley Lucien for the
first touchdown to extend the
Stingrays lead to 8-0 at the
half.

In the third, Lucien ran in
their second TD from the 10-
yard line to extend their lead
to 14-0.

The Stingrays then closed
out the fourth quarter when
Melwin Smith scored on a
seven-yard pass from Lucien.
Raymond Finley then scored
on the extra two point con-
version.

Lucien said they just came
out with a game plan and
they worked on what they
did in practice.

“After the loss (to the
Pros), we said there’s no way
that we would lose again,”
he stated. “We gotja good

¢

challenge, but we came out
with the win.”

Bombers’ coach Dwayne
Ellis said they only decided
to join the league to add
some competition. But he
admitted that they didn’t
anticipate playing the way
they did.

Undecided

“Not making excuses, we
were undecided as to
whether or not we will come
out.” he lamented. “So we
decided to come out and see
what we can do.”

Ellis said they have a team
meeting this week and, based
on how they were shut-out,
they will have a real check
about their future in the
league.

“The Bombers are late

starters, so I’m sure that mid-
season, we will be right
there,” he projected. “We,
need to construct our offen-
sive line. We are okay defen-
sively. But we have to work
on our offensive line.”

Despite getting shutout,
Ellis sent a message to the
rest of the league, ensuring
them the Bombers will be
back bigger and better as the
season progresses.

“We came to foster the
growth of the league, but tie
fellows came together a little
too late,” he stated. “It’s a
lack of practice and a little
lack of discipline. But we
hope to get it together.”

Quarter-back Cleveland.

Sutherland had the ball near
the goal at least three times,
but the Bombers just didn’t
have the offense to punch it
in on either trip.



phy frou:




SPO



AAAS A

"

GOLF | SONY OPEN

ERIC RISBERG/AP
SONY WINNER: Paul Goydos reacts
after making birdie on the 16th
green during the final round of

‘- the Sony Open in Honolulu on

Sunday. He won the event after
shooting a 3-under-par 67 to
finish at total 14-under-par.

Goydos ends
drought with
a late rally

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

HONOLULU — Paul Goydos
staged an unlikely rally 11 weeks ago
just to keep his PGA Tour card. Sun-
day was even sweeter, with three
birdies in the final four holes at the
Sony Open for his first victory in ll
years.

Goydos closed with a 3-under 67
and made birdie on the last hole when
his 25-foot chip banged into the pin
and settled within tap-in range.
Charles Howell III and Luke Donald
tied for second, a stroke back.

“IT never felt like I was going to
win,” said Goydos, who earned
$936,000, more than he made all last
year.

The tournament belonged to How-
ell for most of a sunny afternoon at
Waialae until a sudden shift on the
back nine, when Howell made back-
to-back bogeys and Goydos made

~ consecutive birdies.

“This one hurts,” Howell said.

He had a chance to force a playoff
when his 8-iron from the rough didn’t
come out as hot as he expected, and
the shot came up 50 feet short of the
green. His chip ran 15 feet past the pin,
and the birdie putt never had a
chance. He shot 70 for his seventh
runner-up since his only victory in
2002.

“The chip just wasn’t good
enough,” Howell said.

Donald had an eagle chip on the
par-5 18th that would have forced a
playoff, but it hit the pin and spun
away, leaving him with a 69.

Tadd Fujikawa, the 16-year-old
who became the youngest player in 50
years to make a cut on the PGA Tour,
finished his dream week with a birdie

‘on the final hole for a 72, putting him

in a tie for 20th.

_ “I never imagined myself doing
this, especially at this age,” Fujikawa
said, who returns to the 10th grade on
Tuesday.

Goydos might not have been in
Oahu this week except for the final
full tournament of 2006. He was
headed for Q-school when he put
together his best four rounds of the
year and tied for second in the Chrys-

._ ler Championship, earning enough
money to finish 97th on the money list

and keep his card.

He didn’t waste any time with the
new year.

Goydos’ last victory came at the

'. 1996 Bay Hill Invitational — so long
‘ago that Tiger Woods was still an

amateur.

“I set some goals, and one of them
was to win every decade,” Goydos
deadpanned. “I’m stunned.”

This one looked in doubt until he
rolled in a 25-foot birdie on the 15th
hole to catch Howell, and a 15-footer
on the next hole to take the lead. Goy-
dos made bogey from the bunker on
the 17th, and the man they call “Sun-
shine” — a sarcastic reference to his
dour demeanor — finally found rea-
son to smile on the closing hole.

From 25 feet off the green, his chip
banged into the pin and stopped a foot
away; otherwise, it likely would have
rolled some 10 feet by.

“That chip could have gone where
Charles’ did,” Goydos said. ‘‘Fortu-
nately for me, it stopped close enough
where I could make it.”

Goydos finished at 14-under 266.

“I try to win every tournament I
play, so I accomplished that goal,”
Goydos said dryly. “My last two

*TURN TO PGA











7

pt PSP ONESNALSDS ACERS ESSER SEINE ENE

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007







sce G OCDE ESIC ALES OSES ESE SROREELE BOESE ESN OE NE EEA SONNE LEE ENE LENNIE

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

3E







_AFC PLAYOFFS | NEW ENGLAND 24, SAN DIEGO 21 |

Chargers give Pats one chance too many

BY BERNIE WILSON ;
Associated Press .

SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Chargers
gave Tom Brady one chance too many, and
that’s exactly what the three-time Super Bowl-
winning quarterback needed.

Brady and the New England Patriots shocked
league MVP LaDainian Tomlinson and the
Chargers on Sunday, winning 24-21 to move
within one win of their fourth Super Bow] trip
in six seasons.

Brady overcame three interceptions, his
career playoff high, to lead the Patriots to ll
points in 3:26 late in the game. He and coach Bill
Belichick now have a 12-1 postseason record
and are heading to Indianapolis for the AFC
championship game next Sunday.

“That was as tough of a game as I can ever
remember playing,” Brady said.

While the Chargers respected the mystique
Brady and the Patriots had built with Super
Bowl] wins following the 2001, 2002 and 2004
seasons, they hoped to be the ones raising the
Lombardi Trophy in Miami on Feb. 4.

San Diego had nine players voted to the Pro
Bowl team and five to the All-Pro team. And it



had been supercharged by Tomlinson, who
became the most prolific scorer in one season
in NFL history with 31 touchdowns and 186
points while winning the rushing title with 1,885
yards.

But Brady is the one who’s been there before
in January. And nearly always has won — it was
Brady’s 24th career game-winning drive.

He left behind some frustrated Chargers,
including Tomlinson, who went after an
unidentified Patriots player when the game

ended. Tomlinson ran for 123 yards and two

scores, and caught two passes for 64 yards.

Tomlinson said he was upset that some
Patriots were dancing on the Chargers logo at
midfield after they had silenced the record
crowd of 68;810 at Qualcomm Stadium and
wrecked the Chargers’ season, which included
an NEL-best 14-2 record and 8-0 home mark in
the regular season.

“I would never react in that way. I was very
upset,” Tomlinson said. “When you go to the
middle of our field and start doing the dance
Shawne Merriman is known for, that is disre-
spectful. They showed no class and maybe that
comes from the head coach.”



rHARRY HOW/GETTY IMAGES

IMPORTANT CATCH: Patriots receiver Reche
Caldwell, left, catches a 49-yard pass
over the shoulder of Chargers defender
Quentin Jammer to put the Patriots in
field goal position in the fourth quarter.

Merriman, nicknamed “Lights Out,” did a
spasmodic dance to celebrate each of his NFL-
high 17 sacks. ;

*TURN TO AFC

NEC PLAYOFFS | CHICAGO 27, SEATTLE 24 (OT)

Long time coming



aS
JIM PRISCHING/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT

OVERDUE CELEBRATION: Bears holder Brad Maynard hugs Robbie Gould after Gould hit
the game-winning field goal in overtime against the Seahawks in Chicago on Sunday.
It was the Bears’ first playoff victory since 1995.

Bears claim
their first
playoff victory
since 1995

BY RICK GANO
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Two swings of the foot by
Robbie Gould were all the Chicago Bears
needed to offset any shortcomings in Rex Gross-
man’s arm.

And the Chicago Bears got their first playoff
win since 1995, moving them one step from the
Super Bowl.

Gould, working construction 16 months ago,
cleared a path for the Bears with his strong leg
Sunday, kicking a 49-yard field goal in overtime
for a 27-24 victory over the Seattle Seahawks.
The game-winner came shortly after Grossman
got them in position with a clutch pass to Rash-
ied Davis.

“A year ago I’m pounding nails. Now I'm hit-
ting game-winning kicks and going to the NFC
championship game,” Gould said. “T.didn’t even
watch the end of it. I hit it right where I wanted
it to go.”

Where the Bears want to go is their first
Super Bowl in 21 years. Chicago will host the
Saints next Sunday in the NFC championship
game; New Orleans never has been this far.

“We win one game and we're in the Super
Bowl,” Grossman said, “two wins away from
having a ring on my finger for the rest of my
life.”

Grossman, one of the most scrutinized fig-
ures in the football-crazed city for his inconsis-
tent performances, set up the kick with his pass
to Davis.

“In every game you're not going to play per-
fect. There were several situations where I wish
I would’ve had a few plays back, but for the
most part I’m pleased,” Grossman said.

Grossman completed 21-of-38 for 282 yards
with an interception and a fumble. It was quite

* TURN TO NFC

FITNESS | GRANNY BASKETBALL

Senior women compete to stay fit

BY NAFEESA SYEED
Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa — Playing
basketball isn’t ladylike.

That’s what Jewell Chapman’s
high school principal told her in
1961 when he banned the girls bas-
ketball program.

“We were very frustrated,” said
Chapman, a forward for her high
school team in Des Moines.

Nearly 50 years later, Chapman
is back on the court. She’s 62 and
plays for the Hot Pink Grannies,
joining about 10 other women on a
team whose uniforms are black
bloomers and hot pink socks. They
play in the Iowa Granny Basketball
League.

It’s one of dozens of basketball
leagues for women over 50 that
have sprung up across the country.
For some, it’s an opportunity to
exercise and socialize; for others,
it’s a once-denied chance to com-
pete.

“You see more and more senior
women’s teams participating in
state and national competitions
and more recreational leagues,”
said Michael Rogers, an associate
professor in sports studies at
Wichita State University. “In the
future it,will be commonplace to
have leagues like this.”

Annual surveys by the National
Sporting Goods Association indi-
cate the number of women 55 and

older who play basketball at least
50 times a year has grown from
16,000 in 1995 to nearly 131,000 a
decade later.

The women on the Hot Pink
Grannies are good-natured but
competitive come game time.

“J think I’m tough,” says Hot
Pink Granny Colleen Pulliam, 69,
flexing her biceps at opponents in
a game against the Strutters,
known for their brilliant yellow
socks.

Seconds later, she dives for the
ball as it slips from a player’s hand
and tosses it over her head to the
forward waiting under the basket.

* TURN TO FITNESS



KEVIN SANDERS/AP
WITH AGE COMES ...: Judy
Harms, of Waukee, lowa,
prepares to shoot during
practice in Des Moines, lowa.


4E | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION ___ Miamitferald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

NBAEXTRA | BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ



LAKERS AT MAVERICKS, 9:30 P.M. THURSDAY, TNT

Kobe Bryant, left, has had his way throughout his career
against Dallas, but the Mavericks are among the best in the
league at taking away a team’s No. 1 option. Sasha Vujacic
hada big game when Los Angeles ended Dallas’ winning
streak last week. If the Lakers are going to defeat the
Mavericks for the second time in two weeks, it will take
another similar feat. But such surprise performances will be
tougher to do on the road.

SUNS AT ROCKETS, 7:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY

The Rockets are the most stubborn defensive team this
season, keeping 11 teams belaw 80 points and three
below 70. But when they played Phoenix, the Suns
scored 102 points and won by 11. That was in Phoenix,
however, and it might help the Rockets to be without
Yao Ming because the pace of a Suns game is too quick
for him. If the Suns are hitting three-pointers, it will
make life tough for the Rockets.

WHAT 10

WATCH
THIS WEEK

‘ALL ACCESS



A weekly look inside the NBA champio





n Heat:



EASTERN
CONFERENCE



The New Jersey Nets

WHAT’S YOUR might not be too far from

LEAST FAVOR- trading one or more of their
ITE NBA CITY TO Big Three, with Richard Jef-
VISIT? ferson likely being the most

e Wayne Simien:
I’m nota fan of Jer-
sey. If we stay in
New York City, that’s
cool. But Jersey,
there’s really nothing



there. And the arena is not all that nice, either.
© Dorell Wright: [Salt Lake City] Utah. First,
[Michael] Doleac is from there. Second, it’s

just boring. There ain’t nothing to do.

e Michael Doleac: It’s actually Philadelphia. |
just don't like it. I've never really done any-
thing there. | don’t know why, | just don’t like

‘the city. I’m sure there’s plenty to doin Phila- .

delphia, just like anywhere else. | just

don't like

it. Ever since my rookie year, it’s been one of
those places where | just sit in my hotel and

chill.

FANTASY VS. REALITY





DREW GOODEN, CAVALIERS - .

e Fantasy: The career averages of 12.3
points and 7.8 rebounds, including:2.6 offen-



JULIE JACOBSON/AP

PUMPED UP: Knicks center Eddy Curry, 24, has been ona tear since late November.

Unsung heroes abound

hey never were really bad
| enough to earn Most

Improved Player, but
they’re easily having their best
seasons to date. One or two might
squeeze into the All-Star Game,
although the often cruel numbers
crunch could keep them out.

That doesn’t mean these guys .

don’t deserve some recognition.



ward, not only is finding ways to
play with Arenas, he’s becoming
just as important to Washington.
Butler is putting up career highs
in points, rebounds, assists,
steals, shooting percentage and
free-throw. percentage. hos
The reason might be-as simple
as continuity, This is the first»
time Butlerhas spent a full sec-

forced Smith to grow up or
George Karl is enamored with his
shooting stroke and athleticism.
Regardless, Smith is getting
every chance to excel in Denver.
Entering Friday, Smith was aver-

_aging 16.5 points and shooting -.

45.3 percent in 29.4 minutes —— he

‘had not reached 40 percent

shooting in either of his first two



i
j
|
|



“again.”

untouchable of the group.
Jason Kidd’s suddenly public
divorce isn’t as much of a
problem as the questionable
chemistry on the team. The
Nets would prefer to trade
any of their stars to a Western
Conference team if they make
any major moves... . The
Knicks’ chemistry, on the
other hand, is as Good as it
has been all season. That has
coach Isiah Thomas believing
his team is a serious con-
tender for the Atlantic Divi-
sion title and a top-four play-
off seed. “New Jersey is still
the class of the division as far
as I’m concerned,” Thomas
said. “I’m surprised that we’re
this close to them at this point
in time in the season. Let’s see
where we are in April.” ... Fur-
ther proof that Rasheed Wal-
lace is not playing with a full

, deck: The Pistons recently

endured a distressing 90-min-
ute flight from Oklahoma City
to Chicago that included vio-
lent dips in altitude for most
of the trip. Pistons coach Flip
Saunders called it “the worst
flight of my life.” Wallace’s
reaction? He kept throwing
his hands in the air as if he
were ona roller coaster and
yelled, “Do it again, do it







sive rebounds and 48 percent shooting, will Callthemthe ond season with a team. In his seasons. It helps that there is far
tell you Drew Gooden is a safe bet as a steady All-Break- second and final season in Miami, less structure to Karl’soffense | 0 0-= —~
forward in any fantasy lineup. The problem is, through First Butler was bothered by a knee than Scott’s, but these are the WESTERN
Gooden is one of those rare streaky big men / Team. injury and didn’t round into form kinds of numbers many expected
because his offensive numbers depend | CENTER: until the late stages. Then he from Smith when he was drafted CONFERENCE
largely on whether he’s receiving passes, and | & EDDY CURRY spent one season with the Lakers _ out of high school in 2004. He’s
his rebounding coincides with his enthusiasm This fi and was traded to Washington shooting 38.8 percent fromthreee —s,
fora game. IN Boren oe a before last season. This could point range and can get hot ina

@ Reality: The streakiness remains Good- ISRAEL Chicseo bulls miean a brighter future if Butler hurry, as the Heat saw last month Rockets center Dikembe
en's problem here, also, with Gooden occa BUTIERREZ Payee actually plays with the Wizards when he drained seven threes in Mutombo is not playing like a
sionally disappearing when he doesn’t touch aiteae §«Came out of fi re y the first half 40-year-old. He had double-
the ball as much as he would like. What i , high school as yioss oe oa i figures in rebounds for eight
Gooden does best for his team is bring energy pm Wr, the closest thing © POWER FORWARD: POINT GUARD: consecutive games, averag-
that often is lacking. If he ever could keep his : to Shaquille O’Neal, always has CHRIS WILCOX LEANDRO BARBOSA ing 13 in that span, and is
head in the game long enough, he’d be one of been considered a disappoint- erat The Sonics got a SA TJ. Ford also is blocking shots aggressively.

LeBron James’ most important teammates.



ment. It was either because he



glance at the

having a break-



It’s impressing even him. “It’s

e Winner: Fantasy. couldn’t defend well enough to potential of Wilcox through season at amazing, just the way I’m
stay on the court or wouldn’t when they point guard, but | playing,” Mutombo said.
play aggressively enough on acquired him last that might be more “Even to myself, I'm sitting
offense, or a frustrating combina- season; he aver- of a product of down like, ‘Whoa, is Mutombo
= aac rem tion of both. aged 14.1 points in playing on a bad i really playing like that?’’”...

DWIGHT
HOWARD

SHARIF



GROUNDED

ABDUR-RAHIM

reached the play-

It was more of the same when
he started his second season with
the Knicks. In late November,
though, the light switched on,
and he has been rolling. From
Nov. 24 to jan. 10, Curry aver-
aged 22 points and 7.8 rebounds,

block a few more shots (he aver-

29 games. But in his first four sea-
sons out of Maryland, Wilcox
never averaged better than 8.6
points in one season.

Now that he’s a starter, Wil-
cox is putting that athleticism
and sculpted 6-10 frame to good

up 13 points a game, including a

team. Barbosa is becoming one of
Phoenix’s most consistent threats
and is a major reason why the
Suns have, at times, looked like
the best team in the league.

As recently as last season, his
third in the league, it was thought

season, Barbosa has better than a

Florida alumnus Matt Bonner
tried to brag to his teammates
about the Gators winning the
football national title. But with
so many foreign-born players
onthe Spurs’ roster, he was
largely unsuccessful. “I asked
Manu [Ginobili], ‘Hey, did you

oa Last sea: and shot 60.6 percent. Curry, 24, use. The Sonics areaperimeter- _ that Barbosa was more suitedasa watch the game last night? ”
ae oe who is 6-11, could stand to heavy team that rarely looks shooting guard because of his | Bonner said. “He was like
isn’t Abdur- : 3 BAS ‘> aes . 7 : | : ,
exactly Bahien. rebound a bit more and possibly inside, but Wilcox still is putting shoot-first mentality. But this ‘What game?’ He was dead-

serious. He had no clue.”...

void of a big man, :

with Andris Bied- offs for the first ages less than a block a game), season-best 28 against the Heat, 2-to-1 assist-to-turnover ratio for The Clippers could break out

rins being one of time in his career, | but he obviously still is on the and is among the league’s top 20 _ the first time in his career, and he of their perplexing season-

the best young which began 10 ' rise. ‘ in offensive rebounds. still is managing to score almost | long slump now that Sam

post players in the seasons ago. But SMALL FORWARD: SHOOTING GUARD: 17 points a game as a reserve. Cassell has a healthier heel

league. But How- now, Abdur-Rahim | CARON BUTLER J.R. SMITH. He’s still arguably the fastest and the leather ball is back.

ard still had a mon- is amediocre Gilbert Arenas Smith’s biggest player in the league, but now he’s Cassell missed 10 games

ster game, with 30 player ona bad isn’t the only rea- problem with the finding more efficient ways to pee aie bad a Se

points and 25 team. In the Kings’ | os : take advantage of his speed, and Was <0 rom Deyond tne
| son the Washing Hornets was his 8 P are with the old ball. “I’m not

rebounds against
Biedrins this week.
That performance
might be proof
Howard is ready to
handle major
responsibilities.

Abdur-Ra
totaled 17



three losses enter-
ing the weekend,

him
points

and 14 rebounds,
and made
shots.

8 of 22

ton Wizards are
one of the hottest
teams in the East-
ern Conference. In
his second season with the Wiz-
ards, Butler, a former Heat for-





immaturity, which
rubbed Byron
Scott the wrong
way and led to him
being traded twice before he
turned 21. Either getting traded

might be the closet competition
the Bulls’ Ben Gordon has for
Sixth Man of the Year. Oh, and
Barbosa’s development is making
the 2003 draft class look even
better.

where | need to be at right
now, but | can’t wait much
longer,” Cassell said. “I’ve got
to get out there for my ball-
club.”

WHO HAS THE EDGE?



WHO IS MORE LIKELY TO SNEAK INTO THE ALL-STAR GAME:
JOSH HOWARD OR BEN GORDON?
In the Eastern Conference, the starting All-Star guards appear to be Dwyane Wade and Vince Carter,

leaving Gilbert Arenas, Michael Redd, Jason Kidd, Joe Johnson, Richard Hamilton and Gordon vying for
_the rest of the guard spots. Arenas and Redd would seem to be locks, given that they’re in the top six in

#5 Cu scoring, and Hamilton would seem to be the next logical choice as the first-place Pistons’ only represen-
Cy) tative. Usually, the assumed number of guards on the team would be five, which would leave no more 7) tt]
Forward/ spots. But with Paul Pierce sitting with a lengthy injury, and LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Jermaine O'Neal rT Guard

and Caron Butler as the only likely forward candidates, that could open a spot for a sixth guard.

Out West, one of the deepest positions in recent history is at forward. Kevin Garnett and Tim Duncan
look like they'll get the starting votes from the fans, with Dirk Nowitzki and Shawn Marion also appearing
as locks to make the team. Then there are players having big statistical seasons, such as Carlos Boozer
and Zach Randolph. And there is the case of Carmelo Anthony, who leads the league in scoring but will
have missed 15 games because of a suspension for fighting. That’s seven forwards who might have a

The edge: It would be a long shot for either, but the numbers look like they're more in Gordon’s favor. ( () RR ) () \

Guard

6-7/201

HOWARD

MPG © FG% 39% FI% OFF DEF RPG APG SPG BPG 10 PFE s~PPG

6-3/191






stronger case than Howard.

Team G GS MPG )«=FG% «= 3p% «= FI% «= OFF. = s«EF)=— RPG APG

Team G 6S spec. = BPGSsé*TO PFO PPG



DALLAS 30 290 347 A 83 20 5.0 10 18 ij VN 16 25 W2 CHICAGO 3] 6 04 Abt 3 886 24 28 32 08 02 3.0 32 0



“Go online to view our Extras, including Heat beat writer Israel Gutierrez’s weblog and our interactive free-throw game. Also wa
festivities before the defending NBA champions’ opening game, view photo galleries from last season’s run to the title and download wallpaper.








beta tara fof 0)


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

NWS | TER

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL
Orlando 22 16
Washington 20 16
Miami 17 19
Charlotte 12 23
Atlanta 11 23
ATLANTIC = OW OL
Toronto I7 .21
New Jersey 16 20
New York 16 22
Boston 12 24
Philadelphia 10 27

CENTRAL WL

Cleveland 23 13

Detroit 21 14
Chicago 21 (17
Indiana 20 17
Milwaukee 16 20

Str.

Home

14-6
14-3
8-9
7-11
6-10

a HOM

10-6
11-10
9-11
4-13
5-8

Away

8-10
6-13
9-10
5-12
5-13

ANY

7-15
5-10
7-11
8-11
5-19

Cont
12-9
13-9

Pct. GB L10
579-555
556 1 64
42204 55
343 8% 5-5
324 «98
Pet, GB L10
AAT - 5-5
M44 - 55
42101 55
333 4° «(28
270 6% 3-7
Pct. GB L10
639 - 82
600 1% 4-6
553355
541 3% 6-4
444-7 4G

WESTERN CONFERENCE





ONE at ee ee dee Oe AWAY Peat
Dallas 31 8 795 - 91 W-4 17-3 145 21-6
San Antonio 27 11 711 3% «6-4 W-4 146 13-5 18-7
Houston 25 13 658 5% 9-1 W-4 13-3 12-10 13-11
New Orleans 14 22 .38915% 3-7 W-2 8-10 6-12 6-16
Memphis 9 29 .23721% 37 L2 712 217 416
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 2413 649 - 55 L3 144 10-9 168
Minnesota 19 16543, 47-3 ~W-2 126 7-10 11-10
Denver 17 17 500 5% 37 L2 10-10 7-7 5-11
Portland 15 23 395 9% 3-7 Wl 811 7-12 10-11
Seattle 14 25 359 11 2-8 W-l 10-9 416 6-15
ER cee ee aca om ace ties Mame Away Sait
Phoenix 288 778 - 91 W-9 17-3 11-5 12-7
LA.Lakers 24 13 .649 4% 6-4 W-l 17-4 7-9 15-7
Golden State 18 20 474 11 46 L3 14-7 443 12-13
LA. Clippers 17 20 .45911% 5-5 Ll 12-7 5-13 11-15
Sacramento 14 20 412 13 46 LS 10-11 49 8-15

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games

Miami at Lakrs, 10
Utah at Wash., 1
Sac. at N.Y., 1
Mil. at Char., 1
Boston at Atl., 2
S.A. at Chi, 2

Tor. at Phil., 2
Ind. at NJ., 3:30

Sunday’s results

Dallas 97, Toronto 96
Denver at Portland, late

Minn. at Det., 3:30
Clippers at G.S., 4
Pho. at Mem., 7:30



Saturday’s results

Miami 119, Utah 110
Cha. 89, Phi. 83

N.O. at Mil., ppd.

Det. 81, Bos. 73

S.A. 93, Wash. 80
Minn. 109, N.J. 98

Chi. 111, Mem. 66

Pho. 107, Orl. 101

Hou. 115, Sac. 111 (OT)
Cle. 104, L.A.C. 92

e
BY

GUS RUELAS/AP



HEADING TO THE HOOP: Cleveland’s LeBron
James, with ball, drives to the basket past the
Clippers’ Corey Maggette in the fourth
quarter Saturday night in Los Angeles. The

Cavaliers won 104-92.



NHL STANDINGS |

EASTERN CONFERENCE



SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Atlanta 25 14 6 2 58144 143 11-5-3-1 14-9-3-1
Carolina 24°18 2 3 53 143 142 13-7-0-2 11-11-2-1
Tampa Bay 23 21 1 1 48146 144 12-11-0-0 11-10-1-1
Washington 19 19 2 5 45 141 157 11-10-1-2 8-9-1-3
Florida 7 21 3 6 43.135 154 = 12-8-1-1 —_5-13-2-5
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
New Jersey 27 14 O 4 58119 105 15-4-0-3 12-10-0-1
N.Y. Rangers 23 19 3 1 50 139 143 10-9-3-0 13-10-0-1
N.Y. Islanders 21 19 2 2 46128 125 11-8-2-1 10-11-0-1
Pittsburgh 19 17 3 4 45-134 139 10-8-2-2 9-9-1-2
Philadelphia 11 30 2 2 26109 174 3-13-2-2 8-17-0-0
NORTHEAST
Buffalo
Montreal
Ottawa
Toronto
Boston

WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL == Wt OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME AWAY _
Nashville 31 11 2 1 65155 114 = 15-3-2-1 16-8-0-
Detroit 28 12 2 3 61140 109 15-3-1-2 13-9-1
Chicago 17 22) «1. 5 40 112 136 10-11-0-2 7-11-1
St. Louis 16 21 4 3 39109 139 9-11-2-1 7-10-2
Columbus 16 24 2 3 37112 140 9-10-1-2 7-14-1
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME — AWAY
Calgary 24 15 2 2 52135 110 18-5-0-0 6-10-2-2
Vancouver 25 19 O 1 51115 117. 15-8-0-0 10-11-0-1
Minnesota 24 19 0 3 51131 124 17-4-0-2 7-15-0-1
Colorado 22 19 2 1 47 140 129 11-10-1-1 11-9-1-0
Edmonton 21 20 2 2 46125 132 13-8-1-1 8-12-1-1
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Anaheim 30 9 2 6 68162 117 16-3-1-4 14-6-1-
San Jose 30 15 0 O 60141 106 15-8-0-0 15-7-0-
Dallas 26 18 O 1 53120 112 13-8-0-0 13-10-0-
Phoenix 20 22 1 1 42120 149 11-10-i-0 9-12-0-
Los Angeles 16 24 3 3 38132 167 11-10-3-3 5-14-0-







Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Sunday’s results
Minn. 4, Chicago 3, SO-

Today’s games

T.B. at Islanders, 12
Buffalo at Boston, 1

St. Louis at Phoenix, 4

L.A. at Dallas, 4
Calgary at N’ville, 6
Montreal at Detroit, 7
Colorado at S.J., 10

Saturday’s results

Florida 7, Washington 3
Ottawa 8, Montreal 3

St. Louis 6, Los Angeles 5
N.Y. Rangers 3, Boston 1

Pittsburgh 5, Phil. 3

Tampa Bay 3, Buffalo 2

Detroit 6, Chicago 3

Atlanta 4, Carolina 3 (SO)
Vancouver 6, Toronto 1
Nashville 4, Columbus 1

New Jersey 2, Islanders 1 (OT)
San Jose 4, Phoenix 1

Calgary 3, Edmonton 1
Colorado 3, Anaheim 2 (SO)

PRO BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

NBA GAMES

INTERNATIONAL EDITION __MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 | 5



Nowitski, Howard lead Dallas rally

Associated Press
TORONTO — (AP) — The

Dallas Mavericks felt fortunate .

to get the victory.

Dirk Nowitzki had 38 points
and Josh Howard made the go-
ahead layup with 0.9 seconds left
to give the Dallas Mavericks a
97-96 victory over the Toronto
Raptors on Sunday.

Toronto’s Morris Peterson
was told not to switch off How-
ard and cover Nowitzki during a
timeout before the decisive play.
But Peterson did, allowing How-
ard to make a wide-open layup to
give Dallas the lead. Toronto’s
Anthony Parker missed a
3-pointer at the buzzer.

“We really didn’t show up
until the second quarter and then
we were in a dog fight,” Now-
itzki said. “Obviously, we got a
little lucky. They both went with
me and Josh was open and made
a hell of a finish.”

Nowitzki had 11 rebounds, five
assists, three blocks and two
-steals for the Mavericks, winners
of 17 of their last 18 games.

Chris Bosh had 24 points and
15 rebounds, but his turnover
after winning a jump ball set up
the Mavericks’ last play with 6.5
seconds left. After the Mavericks
inbounded the ball, Peterson
converged on Nowitzki, allowing
Howard to stand under the bas-
ket uncovered to receive Jason
Terry’s pass. :

“I found Josh wide open. He
made like a receiver and it was a
great play,” Terry said. “Toronto
could have easily won that
game.” :

Toronto led nearly the entire
game, with Dallas briefly taking
the lead with just over two min-
utes left and for good on How-
ard’s layup.

Peterson called it a tough loss.

“We wanted this game bad.
To come up short is definitely
disappointing,” Peterson said.
“The lesson we can take out of
this game is that we can play
with anybody. We took a team
like Dallas down to the wire.”

The Raptors led by as many as
16, but Nowitzki scored eight
straight points to start the fourth
to cut the lead to three.

Bosh attempted just one shot
in the fourth compared to five for
backup point guard Jose Calde-
ron. Bosh played only 5:48 min-
utes in the final quarter.

Toronto led by 11 at halftime
and lost despite shooting 48.6
percent from the field.

T.J. Ford had 16 points and
eight assists.

NHL GAMES

Associated Press



DIV |
10-401 Blackhawks 4-3 on Sunday
8-8-0-0 | night.
ee | A possible shootout goal by
3-11-0-2 | Denis Arkhipov, Chicago’s
|

line.
Pierre-Marc

CHICAGO — Pavol Demi-
tra scored the only shootout
goal, and the Minnesota Wild
rallied to beat the Chicago

third shooter, was disallowed
after a video review. Minne-
sota goalie Manny Fernandez
stopped the shot, then it
nearly trickled over the goal

Bouchard,
Marian Gaborik and Wes
Walz scored in regulation for
Minnesota, which won its
third straight overall and on
the road. The Wild hadn’t
posted three consecutive road
wins since last February.
Tuomo Ruutu, Martin Hav-
lat, Cam Barker scored in reg-





ADRIAN WYLD/CP/AP

DRIVE-BY IN TORONTO: Dallas Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki, right,
drives past Toronto Raptors’ Jorge Garbajosa during their
game in Toronto on Sunday. The Mavericks defeated the
Raptors 97-96 as Nowitzki scored 38 points.

. Andrea Bargnani, the No. 1
pick in the draft, had 12 points,
including two 3-pointers. The
7-foot Italian has often been
compared to Nowitzki because
of his size and outside shot.

“He’s a better player than

when I was 19 or 20,” Nowitzki '

said of the 21-year-old Bargnani.
“He’s going to be a heck of a
player. He’s a little more athletic
than I even was back then. He
can drive a little better than me.”

LATE SATURDAY

e Heat 119, Jazz 110: In Salt
Lake City, Dwyane Wade had 32
points and 10 assists, and Miami
extended its longest winning
streak of the season to four.

Wade made 21 of 23 free
throws and Miami improved to

4-1 on a six-game road trip,
which concludes Monday against
the Los Angeles Lakers. The
Heat are also 4-2 since Ron
Rothstein took over as interim
coach for Pat Riley.

The game took nearly three
hours, as the teams shot a com-
bined 99 free throws. The Heat
were far better at the line, going
42-for-45 while giving the Jazz
their first three-game losing
streak of the season.

Carlos Boozer led the Jazz
with 29 points and 14 rebounds.
Matt Harpring scored 18 points
for Utah.

® Suns 107, Magic 101: In
Phoenix, Boris Diaw fell a
rebound shy of a triple-double
and Phoenix held off a late
Orlando rally for its ninth victory





oN ulation for Chicago, which lost
oigoi | its sixth straight.
7-5-0-2 Trailing 3-1, Gaborik scored
9-5-1-0 short-handed late in the sec-
7-9-1-0 ond period and Walz con-
DIV nected midway through the

third to tie the score.

three games.

LATE SATURDAY

career hat trick.



Gaborik, playing for the
fifth time after missing 34
games due to a strained groin,
got his fifth goal in the last

Barker, recalled earlier in
the day from Norfolk of the
AHL, scored on a 5-on-3 power
play for his first NHL goal.

@ Panthers 7, Capitals 3:
In Sunrise, Fla., Stephen Weiss
scored three goals for his first

Jay Bouwmeester, selected
to the Eastern Conference All-
Star team earlier in the day,

had 14 saves.

saves on 12 shots.

had two goals and two assists
for Florida. Chris Gratton and
Rostislav Olesz also scored for
the Panthers, and Ed Belfour

Alexander Semin, Matt Pet-
tinger and Chris Clark scored
for Washington, which lost its
fifth straight on the road. Olaf
Kolzig gave up five goals on 41
shots before being replaced by
Brent Johnson at the start of
the third. Johnson made 10

The 53 shots were a season

TERRENCE ANTONIO JAMES/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT

THE CHASE IS ON: The Wild’s Brent Burns, left, chases the
Blackhawks’ Jeff Hamilton in the first period in Chicago.

high for Florida, which has
won four straight at home.

e Sharks 4, Coyotes 1: In
Glendale, Ariz., Ryane Clowe
had two goals and an assist,
Vesa Toskala made 29 saves
and San Jose beat Phoenix.

Jonathan Cheechoo and
Matt Carle also scored, and
Joe Thornton added three
assists for the Sharks, who
won for the fifth time in six
games.

Shane Doan scored for the
Coyotes, losers of two straight

in a row.

Diaw had 19 points and 11
assists to help the Suns improve
to 17-1 against Eastern Confer-
ence foes this season. Steve Nash
scored 17 of his 23 points in the
first half for Phoenix and had
eight assists.

Jameer Nelson scored 26
points, 16 in the third quarter,
and Hedo Turkoglu added 18 for
the Magic, who had six players in
double figures.

Phoenix also put six in double
digits. Shawn Marion scored 16
and had a season-high five steals.
Raja Bell scored 15 and Amare
Stoudemire and Leandro Barbosa
added 12 apiece. :

e Rockets 115, Kings 111
(OT): In Sacramento, Calif.,
Tracy McGrady had 37 points
and nine assists as Houston
handed Sacramento its fifth
straight loss.

Rafer Alston had 22 points
and eight assists for Houston,
which has won four straight and
nine of 10. Juwan Howard made
his first five shots and scored 17
points, Luther Head scored 14
points, and Dikembe Mutombo
added 11 points and 18 rebounds.

A difficult season continues
for the Kings, who fell to a very
uncharacteristic 10-11 at home.
They have lost four straight at
Arco Arena and may welcome
the upcoming stretch that has
them playing eight of 10 games
on the road, starting today in
New York.

Ron Artest scored 34 points
and reserve Corliss Williamson
had season highs of 30 points and
12 rebounds for the Kings. Shar-
eef Abdur-Rahim scored 15,
Kevin Martin had 14, and Mike
Bibby missed 11 of 14 shots and
finished with 12 points. |

e Cavaliers 104, Clippers
92: In Los Angeles, LeBron
James scored 28 points and Zyd-
runas Ilgauskas had 20 for Cleve-
land.

The Cavaliers, making the
third stop on their seven-game
road trip and coming off their
most lopsided loss of the season
in Phoenix, won for the ninth
time in their last 11 games. Eric
Snow finished with 18 points for
Cleveland, which leads the East-
ern Conference with a 23-13
record.

The Clippers, coming off a
six-game road trip, got 22 points
from reserve forward Corey
Maggette. Chris Kaman had 20
points and nine rebounds, and
Elton Brand added 16 points and
10 boards.

after a seven-game winning
streak.

Clowe broke a 1-1 tie at
14:28 of the second period
when he one-timed Doug
Murray’s pass from the left
boards over Curtis Joseph’s
left shoulder for his eighth
goal in five games.

Clowe has ll goals and
three assists in 21 games.

e Avalanche 3, Ducks 2
(SO): In Anaheim, Calif. —
(AP) — Milan Hedjuk scored
the deciding goal in the shoot-
out to lift Colorado past Ana-
heim.

Hedjuk beat goalie Ilya Bry-
zaglov with a backhand shot in
the fourth round of the shoot-
out, after Wojtek Woksi had
previously scored for the Ava-
lanche and Chris Kunitz for
the Ducks in the opening
round.

Anaheim’s Ryan Getzlaf
sent the game to overtime
with a goal from the slot off a
feed from Corey Perry with
11:03 to play. Rookie Curtis
Glencross also scored for the
Ducks in his in his first NHL
game.

Andrew Brunette and Wol-
ski scored for Colorado, and
Peter Budaj had 38 saves.

e Flames 3, Oilers 1: In
Calgary, Alberta, Dion Pha-
neuf scored the tiebreaking
power-play goal at 11:29 of the
third period and Calgary ral-
lied past Edmonton.

Phaneuf one-timed a nifty
pass from Kristian Huselius
past goalie Dwayne Roloson to
give the Flames their first lead
of the game. Jeff Friesen and
Matthew Lombardi also
scored for the Flames, winners
of five straight.

Demitra’s shootout goal lifts Wild


7E. | MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Bears advance
in overtime

- *NFC

an upgrade from his final per-
formance of the regular sea-
son, when he had a quarter-

back rating of 0.0 in a loss to.

Green Bay.

Seattle got the ball first in
overtime, but Chicago’s Israel
Idonije forced an 18-yard punt
by Ryan Plackemeier with a
strong rush. Grossman hit
. Davis for a third-down pass of
-_ 30 yards to the Seattle 36.

“Pye learned that he knows
how to bounce back from
tough situations,” coach Lovie
Smith said of Grossman. “He’s
been roasted the past couple
-’ weeks over all different kinds

\* of things. He is our quarter-

“ pressure on him and our
entire football team and I
thought they handled it well.”

The unheralded Davis is a

_ former Arena League player.

“after I got up, I screamed.
It was probably the biggest
catch I made in my life,”
Davis said.

Gould, who entered the
NFL as an undrafted free
agent and is now headed to
the Pro Bowl, made his first
24 field goals this season, and
32 of 36 overall. His 41-yarder
with 4:24 left Sunday just
cleared the crossbar and tied
the game at 24.

The Bears had won a divi-
sion title and earned a first-
round bye in their previous
two playoff appearances, only
to lose their first game at
home, so their elation was
tinged with relief.

The Seahawks (10-8), rav-
aged by injuries throughout
the season, got a strong per-

formance from Shaun Alexan=

der. Alexander, who missed
the first meeting between the
teams, a 37-6 Chicago win in
October, gained 108 yards and
gave the Bears’ defense a

tough time. He had a pair of

touchdowns runs.

“Jt’s hard to say ‘If we had
this or that,” Alexander said.
“Tt was, ‘Nah we came up
short.”

Late in the fourth quarter,
the Bears stacked up Alexan-
der on third-and-1 for no gain
at the Chicago 44, and the
Seahawks decided to go for it.
But Matt Hasselbeck bobbled
the snap and Lance Briggs
threw Alexander for a 2-yard
loss, turning the ball over to
the Bears with just under two
minutes to go.

“If the snap was smooth, I
could have run for a TD,”
Alexander said. “It was defi-
nitely the best I felt all season
running the ball.”

After a short completion
and two of Grossman’s passes
were deflected — one nearly
intercepted — the Bears
punted.

The Seahawks got the ball
at the 20 with 1:38 to go and
moved to the Bears 45 before
Tank Johnson, whose legal
problems have been a head-
ache for his team this season,
sacked Hasselbeck.

Davis made his catch when
Jordan Babineaux let him get
past the line. Babineaux, who
also missed an early intercep-
tion Saturday, hauled down
Tony Romo after he bobbled
the snap on a field goal
attempt in Seattle’s 21-20 vic-
tory over Dallas last weekend.

“We had this game,” Babi-
neaux said of Sunday’s dis-
heartening loss. “My job was
to reroute the receiver

(Davis) and he got behind me

real quick. I was supposed to
knock him off his route.”
Last year’s NFC champs
took their first lead in the
third quarter and momen-
tarily silenced the bundled up
crown at Soldier Field — tem-
peratures were in the 30s —

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Patriots eliminate Chargers 24-21

* AFC

“We lost:to a better team
today,” Tomlinson said.
_ “Hopefully the next opportu-
nity we have we'll learn some-
thing from this.”

The winning points came.

on a 31-yard field goal by Ste-
phen Gostkowski with 1:10
left. That capped a 72-yard
drive highlighted by a 49-yard

pass to Reche Caldwell, who

left the Chargers as a free
agent after last season.

’ Coincidentally, the man
the rookie Gostkowski
replaced, Adam Vinatieri,
kicked five field goals for all
of Indianapolis’ points in a
15-6 win at Baltimore on Sat-
urday.

With the Patriots trailing
21-13, Brady threw a 4-yard
touchdown pass to the wide-
open Caldwell with 4:36 to

_play. The Patriots tied it ona

‘. tricky 2-point conversion,

‘ snapping the ball directly to
running back Kevin Faulk,
who was standing next to
Brady and ran through the
middle of the line.

San Diego’s Pro Bowl

. kicker Nate Kaeding was

short on a 54-yard field goal

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI

SUPER BOWL XxXI

NEW YORK 39, DENVER 20

e Jan. 25,1987
oe Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

e@ MVP: QB Phil Simms, New York

After guiding the New York Giants to their
first Super Bowl victory, quarterback Phil
Simms was asked, “What are you going to do
next?” To which he responded: “I’m going to

Disney World!”



DENIS POROY/AP

LOOKING TO PASS: Patriots
quarterback Tom Brady
looks for an opening
against the Chargers.

try with 3 seconds left.

It was a crushing end to
San Diego’s season, and could
lead to coach Marty Schotten-
heimer’s ouster.

Schottenheimer fell to 5-13
in the postseason in his
career, with Cleveland, Kan-
sas City and San Diego.
Although he has a year left on
his contract, at more than $3
million, he and general man-
ager A.J. Smith have had an
icy relationship for months,

As aresult, Disney launched a “What’s next?”
advertising campaign, starting with Simms.

Over the years, Super Bowl MVPs Joe Montana, Troy Aikman,
Ernmitt Smith, Jerry Rice, Steve Young, John Elway and Tom
Brady ‘have been featured in the spots. Other sports stars who
have appeared in the ads include Mark McGwire, Michael Jordan,



Olympic figure skating silver-medalist Nancy Kerrigan, the 1999

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



The wild, weird,
wackyand:
wondrous of past
Super Bowls”

lls
ete) ea
ees



when Alexander ran up the
middle for a 13-yard TD ona
third-and-10 to make it 24-21.

Earlier, as Gould made a
field goal that would have tied
the game, Seattle’s Leroy Hill
was called for jumping up and
trying to induce a false start.
Instead of the three points,
the Bears got 5 extra yards on
the penalty and a first down at
the Seattle 13.

’ But Grossman’s pass went
off Muhsin Muhammad’s
shoulder pad and Pete
Hunter, who had been work-
ing in a mortgage office
before being signed before
the playoffs, intercepted early
in the fourth quarter.

Hasselbeck gave it right
back on first down when his
pass was intercepted by Ricky
Manning Jr. at the 32. The
Béars couldn’t canvert and
punted.

Seattle moved swiftly to
the Bears 21 on the opening

series of the second half, but,

Briggs knocked Alexander

PRO FOOTBALL

___ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

sno emnennettvnitniatynst ratemmrerttan tennant ett A





JIM PRISCHING/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT
SCORING LEAP: The Bears’ Thomas Jones leaps over the
goal line to score his first-quarter touchdown against
the Seahawks in Chicago on Sunday.

off a 13-yard: run, and on
fourth-and-1 fromthe Bears 4,
he bulled his way into the end
zone to make it 14-14 with 2:29
left in the first half. The score
was set up by Grossman’s
fumble.

But the Bears didn’t run
out the clock. Grossman
rebounded from the turnover,
finding Muhammad for 21
yards and Davis with an 18-
yarder to the 16.

Muhammad_ grabbed
another pass to the 7, and
Thomas Jones ran in for the
score on fourth down for a
21-14 lead.

Jones opened the scoring
with a for a 9-yard TD to capa
12-play, 80-yard drive that
opened the game.

Seattle got even early in
the second quarter. Hassel-
beck hit passes of 24 and 14
yards to Darrell Jackson, the
Seahawks’ leading receiver
who’s been bothered by a sore

,|toe. Nate Burleson powered
‘his way into the end zone to

back for a l-yard loss on third- _ complete a 16-yard scoring

and-l. Josh Brown connectedâ„¢ pass play.

on a 40-yard field goal that
got the Seahawks within 21-17.

Alexander showed at times
why he was the 2005 MVP. In
the second quarter, he broke

and the front-office felt this
team was built for a deep
playoff run.

Schottenhbeimer will no
doubt be criticized for going
for it on fourth-and-ll from
the New England 30-yard line
in the fourth quarter rather
than having Kaeding try a
field goal.

Philip Rivers, the Chargers’
first-year starting quarter-
back, was sacked by Mike
Vrabel and fumbled, giving
the Patriots the ball at their 35.

The Chargers had four
turnovers and made other
critical mistakes.

Punt returner Eric Parker
had a double muff to give the
Patriots the ball on their 31
late in the third quarter. Fol-
lowing a third-and-13 on
which Brady fumbled and
Matt Light recovered, Char-
gers cornerback Drayton
Florence head-butted tight
end Daniel Graham and drew
a 15-yard unsportsmanlike
conduct penalty. That led to
Gostkowski’s. 24-yard field
that pulled the Patriots to
14-13.

Tomlinson scored on a
3-yard run with 8:35 left in the
game for a 21-13 lead.

Red Sox.

Houston.

The tie laste
Grossman hit




rookie corner Kelly Jennings

for a 68-yard TD pass.

On the next Patriots drive,
Brady was intercepted by
safety Marlon McCree, who,
rather than going down, tried
for a return and was hit by
Troy Brown and fumbled,
with Caldwell recovering.

The Chargers challenged,
but the play was upheld, and
the Patriots had the ball at the
Chargers 32. Five plays later,
Brady hit Caldwell and Faulk
added the conversion.

Tomlinson scored on a
2-yard run in the second quar-
ter for a 7-3 lead. Later, he
turned a screen pass into a
brilliant 58-yard gain, leaving
two defenders grasping at air
while he scooted to the New
England 6} His backup,
Michael Turner, scored on
the next play for a 14-3 lead.

Brady kept the Patriots in it
by running the two-minute
offense to perfection, pulling
New England to 14-10 just
before halftime. At the end of
the 10-play, 72-yard drive,
Brady had all day to throw a
6-yard pass to Jabar Gaffney
in the back of the end zone.

San Diego lost its fourth
straight postseason game dat-
ing to the Super Bowl follow-
ing the 1994 season.

U.S. women’s World Cup championship team
and the 2004 World Series champion Boston

The Disney ads were noticeably absent
during 2005, breaking a 19-year streak. Several
industry analysts reasoned image-conscious
Disney stopped the campaign in response to

Jackson's wardrobe malfunction during the
halftime show of Super Bowl XXXVIIIin

Disney officials disputed claims that the

Super Bowl had become too.“mature” for its
target audience, saying the “What's next?”
campaign did not mesh with its marketing efforts that year.
The ads resumed in 2006 with Super Bowl MVP Hines Ward,
who announced, “I’m going to Disney World and I'm taking The

Bus [teammate Jerome Bettis].”

- SARAH ROTHSCHILD

|
|





NFL NOTES



Cardinals hire
Steelers assistant
Whisenhunt as
team’s new coach

Associated Press
The Arizona Cardinals

hired Pittsburgh Steelers

offensive coordinator Ken
Whisenhunt as coach after a
5-11 season that culminated
with Dennis Green’s firing.

The 44-year-old Whisen-
hunt signed a four-year con-
tract with a team option for a
fifth, the Cardinals
announced Sunday.

Green was fired after
three seasons and a 16-32
record. Whisenhunt
becomes the Cardinals’
eighth coach since the fran-
chise moved to Arizona in
1988.

Whisenhunt was one of
eight candidates interviewed
for the job, but one of only
two who got a second inter-
view. The other was former
Green Bay Packers coach
Mike Sherman.

The Steelers assistant also
interviewed for coaching
jobs in Pittsburgh, Miami and
Atlanta. He and fellow Pitts-
burgh assistant Russ Grimm
had been considered leading
candidates to replace Bill
Cowher with the Steelers.

“Tt’s clear to us that he has
all the attributes we were
seeking,” Cardinals vice
president of football opera-
tions Rod Graves said in a
news release, “in terms of
coaching ability, enthusiasm,
organizational and. leader-
ship skills and the overall
ability to lead this team to
success immediately and for
years to come.”

The new coach inherits
plenty of young talent,
including quarterback Matt
Leinart and a pair of the top
receivers in the NFL,
Anquan Boldin and Larry
Fitzgerald. However, he
also joins a franchise with a
legacy of losing unprece-
dented in this era of NFL par-
ity.
The Cardinals have had
one winning season, and one
playoff appearance, since
1984. They have one playoff
victory since winning the
NFL championship in 1947.

Owner Bill Bidwill and
son Michael, the Cardinals’
vice president and general
counsel, joined Graves in
conducting the interviews.
The Cardinals insist they are
intent at putting a winning
team in their new stadium,
pointing to the free agent
acquisition of running back
Edgerrin James and con-
tract extensions to Boldin,
Pro Bow] safety Adrian Wil-
son and several other of
their best young players.

At Pittsburgh, Whisen-
hunt helped develop. Ben
Roethlisberger into an
immediate success. He has
another talented pupil now
in Leinart.

“Young quarterbacks that
have a bright future like he
does are hard to find,” Whis-
enhunt said after his initial
interview with the Cardinals
on Jan. 5. “They don’t grow
on trees. That’s an exciting
part of this organization.”

Whisenhunt, who will be
introduced at a news confer-
ence on Tuesday, spent six





years on Cowher’s staff,
three’as tight ends coach and
three as offensive coordina-
tor. He also had assistant
coaching stints with the New
York Jets, @leveland and Bal-
timore. Whisenhunt played .
in the NFL for nine seasons
with Atlanta, Washington
and the Jets.

In his second season as
ceordinator, the Steelers
won the Super Bowl, averag-
ing 26.8 points per game in
the playoffs. This season,
Pittsburgh’s offense ranked
seventh in the NFL, ninth in
passing and 10th in rushing.

The other candidates
interviewed by the Cardinals
were Grimm, Tennessee
Titans offensive coordinator
Norm Chow, Chicago Bears
defensive coordinator Ron
Rivera, San Diego Chargers
offensive coordinator Cam
Cameron, Indianapolis
Colts assistant head coach-
quarterbacks coach Jim
Caldwell and Cardinals
defensive coordinator
Clancy Pendergast.

DOLPHINS

Former Atlanta Falcons
coach Jim Mora Jr. has been
invited to a second interview
with the Miami Dolphins,
who also plan to meet again
with Georgia Tech coach
Chan Gailey and New York

‘Jets offensive coordinator

Brian Schottenheimer, a
person familiar with the
team’s search said Sunday.

The person requested
anonymity because the Dol-
phins have declined to iden-
tify candidates.

The Dolphins reached an
agreement with their defen-
sive coordinator, Dom
Capers, on a new three-year
contract. He may remain in
contention for the head
coaching job vacated when
Nick Saban left for Alabama
on Jan. 3.

Dolphins officials pared
down their list of candidates
over the weekend. The team
met with 12 coaches during
the first round of interviews,
which ended Wednesday.

Last week, the Dolphins
said they planned to narrow
the list to five candidates,
then to two before making an
offer.

49ERS

The San Francisco 49ers
hired veteran assistant coach
Al Everest to be their spe-
cial teams coordinator on
Sunday.

Everest spent last season
as a consultant at Southern
California after serving as
the New Orleans Saints’ spe-
cial teams coordinator from
2000-05. He had the same job
with the Arizona Cardinals
the previous four years.

Everest replaces Larry
Mac Duff, who resigned Jan.
7 to become assistant head
coach and co-defensive coor-
dinator at Texas. San Fran-
cisco still must hire a
replacement for defensive
coordinator Billy Davis, who
was fired after the 49ers’ 7-9
season. He also coached in
the CFL and Arena League.

6 P.M, EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @ ON TV: CBS

fo) PHIL SIMMS





GETTY IMAGES FILE PHOTO







Volume: 103 No.45

| gem PLENTY OF |
|e SUNSHINE

{
{

UAC a TEL
Meir Ue UL

aa eg Cag aesy | Sige) UT

Residents complain over
the condition of houses at
government sub-division

@ By ALEXANDRIO cially my house, because as far
MORLEY as am concerned my house is in
Tribune Staff Reporter a mess and the contractor needs

=e] to come back and do what he
ANGRY home-owners are _ has to do.”
complaining about leaky roofs, House 44

cheap house paint and many,

unfinishéd repairs in a recently-
built goverment sub-division.
Excellence Gardens Number
Two is located in the
Carmichael Road constituency.
_ Last year, residents contacted
The Tribune about alleged
“shoddy” work done during
ction of their homes.
Liana Carey, one of the
epersons for the residents,
contacted The Tribune yester-
day and some home-owners
took the opportunity to express
their complaints.
House 42
According to Ms Carey, she
moved into her home at the end
of September, and from the
beginning she realised the house
was not completely finished.
She’ explained: “The ceiling
light is cracked, my doors can’t
shut unless you slam them, and



The owner, who said she
wanted,to be known only as Ms
Kelly, said she moved into her
new home last October, and
claimed the contractor was
working on her house right up
to her move-in date. ?

“Steel nails are still in the
concrete floor, I have cracked
tiles, and my doors are coming
off the hinges because I have
to slam them just to get them
closed.”

Ms Kelly claimed that her
house was in such a “mess” that
she ended up in the hospital due
to stress.

“I expected this to be my
dream home, but my house was
below standard from the day
that I stepped in the door,”
exclaimed Ms Kelly.

When The Tribune reporter
asked if she had any further
complaints, the single mother













THE Royal B




|

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

migrants on Sunday morning.
Flamingo Cay in the Ragged

Woman in

The Miami Herald

; BAHAMAS EDITION



ahamias Defence Force apprehended 111 Haitian

The 96 males and 15 females were found on

[sland chain in the Southern Bahamas _
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)






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info@ae.com.bs

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Announcement on Daniel Smith Man in hospital

as a result all of the doors are said “no” because her list of 1 jess | i : ene ys

falling off their hinges.” complaints could go on “forev- Os pital : death inquest decision to day after being
House 46 er”. as i :

, sor leu as sale , Ly 85 eae ea f é 11 e : Mi By ALISON LOWE final decision on the matter - f d 6 th

into her three-bedroom home s Minarva Culmer said she W : Tribune Staff Reporter on Friday. i

with her two young daughters was the very first person to O O ing i 2 The Tribune reported on } oun Wi

over 4 month ago.

“There are patches in my

house, the tub is mouldly and
bent up, and I don’t even have
hot water,” said Ms Sargent.
_ Ms Sargent said she com-
plained to the building contrac-
tor and he promised to inspect
the home, but he never did.

She added: “Mr Neville Wis-
dom (Housing Minister) needs
to inspect these houses, espe-

move into the area, when there
was no access to water or elec-
tricty.

“T was here in September
using a generator with a two-
month-old baby,” she
explained. a

Ms Culmer is complaining
about an unfinished bathroom

- floor, thin walls, flaky wall paint

SEE page 13

2007

! 12noon - 5pm « January 27th 2007
Entry Fee: Adults $5 Children $7



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
| }

FREEPORT - A 21-year-old }
woman is detained in serious con- :
dition at Rand Memorial Hospital :
following a stabbing incident at :
Port Lucaya Marketplace over :

the weekend.

Shakera Gordon, of Braemer }
Drive, South Bahamia, was at :
Port Lucaya around 11.30pm }
when she was stabbed by another ;

woman.

According to reports, the :
attacker sneaked behind Ms Gor- }
don and stabbed her in the lower :
right back with a knife. The vic- j
tim ran to her car and drove to i
Municipal Plaza on East Sunrise :
Highway, where she was assisted i

to hospital.

Police are searching for the

assailant.
* rf

FIREARM ARREST

GRAND Bahama Police
arrested three young men after ;

stabbing

BY 2PM tomorrow an
announcement will be made on
whether an inquest will be held
into the death of 20-year-old
Daniel Smith, son of contro-
versial US reality TV star Anna
Nicole Smith.

This revelation was made by
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
- the man charged with the
responsibility of making the

Thursday that Bernard Turner,
director of public prosecutions,
had told the Associated Press
that the police file - which has

Mr Gomez by Friday.

SEE page 13

Bahamasair boss denies
¢73 000 stolen from airline

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter



police.

on Saturday it was reported th

that the money had been stolen, but would say little more about the : 1 ;
: came to receive his

incident.

They would not say if they had any suspects, or if they felt they ;
were close to making an arrest. i

The Tribune spoke with ASP Drexel Cartwright, who said that he

SEE page 13

head injuries

: , : m@ By ALISON LOWE
been in the office of the Attor- $=
ney General - would be with :

AN UNCONSCIOUS 22-

year-old man was found

On Friday lunchtime, he said | \ith lacerations to the head

he was still awaiting the file, but | at the side of a road in Long
: Island at around lam on
: Saturday, police said yester-

, day.

Press liaison officer Wal-

: ter Evans said the man was
: lying in an "unresponsive"
: state in the Roses area of

: Deadman's Cay.

He is now "very ill" in

: the intensive care unit of

THE boss of Bahamasair is denying claims that $73,000 has ce Me eter RDN D
been stolen from the airline and that the matter was reported to ; WHEL UE WAS SIME
: shortly after being discov-

The Tribune learned of the theft from an anonymous source, and ; ered.

at senior officers had confirmed : ,
: ing how the man

Police are still investigat-

injuries.
"Whether it was.a traffic

: accident, or an assault, we
: can't say as yet," said Mr
: Evans.

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eA Op ot ee pm pr iggtiast

PAGE 20, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

@ ASEAN leaders pose for

a group photo prior to their
meeting with their counter-
parts from China, Japan and
South Korea in the 12th
ASEAN Summit and their
Dialogue Partners Sunday,
Jan. 14, 2007 in Cebu, central
Philippines. The leaders are,
from left: Prime Minister Hun
Sen of Cambodia, Boediono
(in place of Indonesian Presi-
dent Susilo Bambang Yudhoy-
ono), Prime Minister Boua-
sone Bouphavanh of Laos,
Prime Minister Abdullah
Ahmad Badawi of Malaysia,
President Roh Moo-hyun of
South Korea, Chinese Premier
Wen Jiabao, President Gloria
Macapagal Arroyo of the
Philippines, Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe of Japan, Prime
Minister Lee Hsien Loong of

Singapore, Prime Minister Soe |

Win of Myanmar, Prime Min-
ister Surayud Chulanont of
Thailand, Vietnamese Prime
Minister Nguyen Than Dung
and Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah
of Brunei Darussalam.

(AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Telecommunications Market Information and Data Collection



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



The Public Utilities Commission hereby invites comments from
licensees and other interested parties on its consultation document
on Telecommunications Market Information and Data Collection.

The goals of this consultation are to:
a) inform licensees and other stakeholders of the PUC’s

intention to regularly collect information from the
telecommunications sector;
b) indicate how the PUC intends to use and analyze the
information and data collected; and |
c) invite comments from licensees and other stakeholders.

Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 requires the PUC
to act in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory
manner and consistent with the objectives of the Act. While section
6(5) of the Act requires the Commission to publish its proposals on
any general instruction intended to be issued under any part of the
Act.

Copies of this document can be obtained from the PUC’s office
located in the Agape House at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue or
downloaded from the PUC’s website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs.
Written comments should be submitted by February 2, 2007 via
post, hand delivery, facsimile or e-mail to:

Mr. Barrett Russell
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P. 0. Box N4960, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
_ Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: (242)323-7288
Email: info@puchahamas.gov.bs

The College of The Bahamas

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 012007

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THE TRIBUNE

Southeast Asian

leade

rs hold

summits with
China, other
Asian partners

‘i CEBU, Philippines

ASIAN powerhouses Japan,
China, and South Korea held
their first joint summit in two
years Sunday, urging North
Korea to drop its nuclear pro-
gram and trying to deepen trade
ties with Southeast Asia, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

A series of talks were held on
the eve of this year's last big
Asian regional meeting, which
was set for Monday and meant
to tackle energy security as the
fast-developing area — spanning
from Australia to India — seeks
ways to lessen dependency on
Mideast oil and forge trade deals.

The talks, hosted in the central
Philippine city of Cebu, came a
day after the 10-country Associa-
tion of Southeast Asian Nations
or ASEAN completed its own
annual meeting, vowing to
strengthen political solidarity,
fight terrorism and create a free
trade zone by 2015.

South Korea's President Roh
Moo-hyun, Chinese Premier Wen
Jiabao and Japanese Prime Min-
ister Shinzo Abe expressed con-
cern over North Korea's nuclear
test, and restated the need to ful-
ly carry out U.N. sanctions against
Pyongyang.

The countries are looking for a
way to persuade North Korea to
return to international talks
aimed at getting it to abandon its
nuclear weapons program. The
most recent round of interna-
tional talks on the issue broke

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down without progress last month
in Beijing.

According to a statement deliv-
ered after Sunday's ASEAN-
South Korea summit, Philippine
President Gloria Macapagal
Arroyo expressed "solidarity"
with efforts to solve the standoff
through talks.

"The nuclear test of North
Korea casts a blight on our dream
of one caring and sharing com-
munity," she said in the state-
ment.

She said the region hopes

_ North Korea's Oct. 9 nuclear test

will not inspire an arms race, par-
ticularly with Tokyo.

"It may be tempting for Japan
to consider becoming a nuclear
weapons state," the statement
said. "But the possession of
nuclear weapons by more coun-
tries in our region will only lead
to greater risks, not less."

The Japan-China-South Korea
meeting provided a chance for
the three neighbors to mend ties
damaged by disputes over sever-

-al small islands, oil drilling rights

and Japanese leaders' visits to a
Tokyo war shrine seen by many
as a symbol of Japanese mili-
tarism.

"I would like to make an effort
to keep holding summits with
China and South Korea, and also
to build up better communication
and trust with both nations," Abe
said afterward.

In other meetings, the ASEAN
leaders and India agreed to
increase economic and cultural
exchanges, and suggested south-
east Asia play a "balancing role"
between the emerging economic
powerhouses of India and China.

They also expressed support















@ SOUTH Korean
President Roh Moo-
Hyun, left, shakes hand
with China's Prime
Minister Wen Jiabao
before their meeting
during the 12th Associa-
tion of Southeast Asian
Nations (ASEAN) sum-
mit in Cebu, central
Philippines, Sunday,
Jan. 14, 2007 in Cebu
City in central Philip-
pines.





(AP Photo/
Beawiharta, POOL)

for a free trade agreement
between India and ASEAN
member states.

On Monday, the ASEAN lead-
ers will hold their final summit in
Cebu with Australia, New
Zealand, India, Japan, China and
South Korea.

They will sign The Cebu Goals
on East Asian Energy Security,
which aims to help countries
reduce their dependence on con-
ventional fuels and seek new
energy sources, particularly bio-
fuels.

Minimizing greenhouse gas
emissions and investing in infra-
structure — such as a regional elec-
tricity grid and a natural gas
pipeline spanning Southeast Asia
— to ensure stable energy supplies
will also be discussed, according
to a draft agreement.

ASEAN's members are the
Philippines, Thailand, Myanmar,
Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore,
Brunei, Cambodia, Laos and
Vietnam.

Also arriving here on Sunday
were Australia and New Zealand,
ASEAN's two other "dialogue
partners" for a broader summit
to be held on Monday.




PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





lice
into
heir

| we
ome
se it
‘he

the
now
on.”
Tri-
rent

sing
illed
alse

nies Though in a new role, Munroe will continue to provide her trademark of dedicated, quality service. With over three

decades of distinguished service to the general insurance industry, Mary Munroe is foved by many and known for

her ability to build and strengthen client relations. “I would follow her wherever she goes,” said Martha Wallace, a
long-time client. “She really cares, not just-about her clients but about the community and the less fortunate.”

the
qan-
iort-

eral
rier.
umi-
rav-
ajor
dus-
age-

Mary Munroe Joins Colina General Insurance Agency
COMMITMENT TO PROVIDING QUALITY SERVICE

Quality Service: Meet Mary Munroe, the newest member of
the Colina General family... (Photo ay: Colina General insurance Agency)

(Nassau, Bahamas) — Wednesday December 13, 2006, Colina General Insurance Agency officially announced the

appointment of fong time industry veteran Mary CG. Munroe to the Colina General Insurance family as Senior

“We're very pleased to welcome Mary Munroe to the Colina General Family,” said Howard Knowles, General
Manager of Colina General Insurance Agency. “Colina General Insurance Agency Is committed to giving our
valued customers access to products that help them meet their general insurance and financial services needs.
Mary’s 36 years in the industry will help solidify our commitment and philosophy of servicing clients and treating

Colina General Insurance Agency (CGIA) was established to provide a comprehensive range of non-life insurance
products to the Bahamian Market. CGIA offers:

Tri- -

een
and-

said
din
cuss
give

the
said



Account Executive.

them as family.”

¢ Home
« Motor
» Casualty
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pages benign at cindeava aa Lf

Colina General _
Insurance Agency

For more photos or further informatian regarding this event, please contact

Michelle Reckley at Carter Marketing - T: 242.322.8826 or E: michelle@cartermktg.com

Additional Customer Comments that you may choose to incorporate Into article: =

Larina Evans-Pennerman, Bank Manager (UBS)

“Her service is friendly and beyond reproach. She takes obvious pride in her job and gives personal care and atten-
tion to her clients needs. She keeps you focused on your insurance needs by her friendly reminders of coverage
dates in doing so she makes you feel safe that your affairs are always properly protected.”

Raphael Whymms, Superintendent of Bahamas Customs Department
“She makes you feel comfortable, like family and you can call on her day or night for assistance with your insur-
ance needs. | will never contemplate going anywhere else but with her. She goes the extra mile and even works
when she is feeling ill and is not a clock watcher. Her personality draws customers so she is a definite assts

wherever she is employed. She is a very quietly a leader in the insurance industry.”

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Insurance Agency

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paintpicecoralwave.com

325-3809

Rosetta Street

info@colinageneral.com

nassau 394.2213 marsh harbour abaco 242.3672271 —



SS



MACKEY STREET







ERE SERABS STERILE ee RAE ST EAD RSET av ea RT ae

aa ei
Rood hopes potential
security problems at .
airport will be resolved —

before end of his tenure

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - US Ambas-
sador John Rood hopes that
potential security problems and
breaches at Lynden Pindling
International Airport can be
resolved before he ends his
tenure here in the Bahamas.

Mr Rood said the recent arrests
of five Bahamian baggage han-
dlers had shown that there are
some security issues which need
to be addressed.

The ambassador said there had
been similar concerns at Grand
Bahama International Airport
about six to eight months ago,
which had led them to re-evaluate
whether the pre-clearance facility
should continue in Freeport.

“In the case of Freeport, the
security issues were addressed
early on and dramatic changes
were made an we don’t feel that
there are issues there right now,”
he said.

“That was one of the things
we felt was important in order to
agree to a long-term commitment
to a pre-clearance facility - that
potential security problems were
addressed at the airport (in GB),
and they have been.”

The arrest of five Nassau Flight |

Services workers, who are
accused of smuggling drugs into
the US, has been the subject of
much public and political debate
over the past several weeks.

While on Grand Bahama last
week, Ambassador Rood said US
officials were very concerned
when suitcases that got around
pre-clearance in the Bahamas
were found with drugs after re-
inspection in Fort Lauderdale.

“That was one of the things
that led us to re-evaluate whether
or not pre-clearance should be
kept at the airport in Freeport.
And, this is what happened in
Nassau when planes get re-
inspected and we find drugs on
those planes we know we have a
breach and these breaches are
what led us to these investiga-
tions,” he said.

He stressed that it is very
important that the US work along
with the Aviation Minister to
address the issue that were
exposed at the airport as a result
of police investigation.

“The threats we are facing
from terrorists and drug dealers
are real threats we want to
address, and we want to get to
the bottom of the potential prob-
lems at the airport and deal with
those while I am still here.

“Tt is an area where we can
work together and provide our
expertise and opinion on, and I
am sure that transportation is
going to take it seriously and take
the necessary steps to make what-
ever changes they feel are appro-
priate so that this does not hap-
pen again,” he said.

Ambassador Rood said offi-
cials at the Transportation Secu-
rity Administration (TSA) are
working with the airport author-
ity in Nassau to help determine
where the breaches in security



might have been.

While the government has stat-
ed that cabinet ministers were not
aware of the operation involving
the arrest of the baggage han-
dlers, the US Embassy has stated -
that the relevant local agencies °
were informed, namely the Attor-
ney General’s office, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force. |

The men were arrested.on
December 18 in Fort Lauderdale
after leaving the country as part
of group of about 20 Bahamian
baggage handlers to participate

_in TSA training in the US.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and his cabinet have been accused
by political observers of compro-
mising the sovereignty of the
Bahamas. —

He said that the accusations
are just political “pot shots” by
those in opposition. aes

“It is important for the people
of Commonwealth of the
Bahamas to understand that I
believe, of someone who was a
criminal defense attorney, that
no government of the Bahamas
need compromise itself in granti-
ng favor to any agency of the
United States America, said:Mr
Christie. ¢

“No police force in our country
could rightly do so. And I have
indicated to the country that I
will make an informed presenta-
tion to the country on the nature
of all that is being discussed now,”
he said. ‘

“As you listen to the political
debate in this country, and it is a
right to have such a debate, nev-
er lose sight of the fact that your
government of the day, and who-
ever may be that government, or .
comprise it, has a sacred respon-
sibility to protect the internatignal
integrity of this country,” he said.

Mr Christie said that country
must do all it can to minimizing
threat of terrorism, drug and alien
smuggling, which significantly
impacts the country. “8

By ALISONLOWE -->
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN THE week of the 40th
anniversary of Majority Rule
Day, the FNM has hit out at |
the PLP's handling of the -
operation to arrest the five -}.
Nassau Flight Services bag~ }-
gage handlers in the US—"}
claiming that recent events
prove that the PLP “do not
trust our laws and institutions."

Mr Ingraham noted in the
House of Assembly on
Wednesday that "the Bahami- |
an people and their freedom
fighters" stayed "within the.
rule of law" when making the
move towards Majority Rule-,;
on January 10, 1967. -

"Heroic leaders ushered in |
peaceful and dramatic changes
They did so by successfully.:
confronting and transcending
the injustices through which
the rule of law and our nation-
al institutions were hijacked
by a small elite.

"As heirs and guardians of,
this struggle we have the.
opportunity - and obligation -
to uphold the power of the
rule of law by renewing and
reforming the institutions and
statutes that safeguard this
sacred principle," said a state-
ment released by the party
yesterday.

The party said the need to
uphold and safeguard the rule.
of law are “as alive as ever"
40 years on from Majority ..
Rule, and are at stake in the
recent arrest of five Nassau
Flight Services baggage han-
dlers in the US for alleged
drug trafficking. i

"The FNM joins in the cel-
ebration of January 10 by’
assuring the Bahamian people
that even as we protect them
against the scourge of drugs
we will protect their right to-
due process and the security },
of the rule of law. We will do-
this for all citizens, including '
those accused of criminal con- .
duct," said the party. \

"The FNM supports the
continued transformation of,
our law enforcement agencies.
and criminal justice system in
order to make them more,
modern and efficient but also. }.
more transparent, expeditious -
and fair.”

The statement added that
this "must be achieved with-
out compromising our sover-
eignty and independence."

"Our national task is to
strengthen the rule of law and
the institutions which uphold
our laws. We cannot abandon
these responsibilities to oth-
ers," said the party.



—
sie

iran,










THE TRIBUNE



@ CARACAS, Venezuela

VENEZUELA’S Hugo
Chavez and Iran’s Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad — fiery anti-
American leaders whose moves
to extend their influence have
alarmed Washington — said
Saturday they would help
finance investment projects in
other countries seeking to
thwart U.S. domination, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The two countries had previ-
ously revealed plans for a joint
$2 billion fund to finance invest-
ments in Venezuela and Iran,
but the leaders said Saturday
the money would also be used
for projects in friendly coun-
tries throughout the develop-
ing world.”

“Tt will permit us to under-
pin investments ... above all in
those countries whose govern-
ments are making efforts to lib-
erate themselves from the
(U.S.) imperialist yoke,”
Chavez said.

“This fund, my brother,” the

Venezuelan president said, .

referring affectionately to
Ahmadinejad, “will become a
mechanism for liberation.”

“Death to U.S. imperialism!”
Chavez said.

Ahmadinejad, who is starting
a tour of left-leaning countries
in the region, called it a “very
important” decision that would
help promote “joint coopera-
tion in third countries,” espe-
cially in Latin America and
Africa.

It was not clear if the leaders
were referring to investment in
infrastructure, social and energy
projects — areas that the two
countries have focused on until
now — or other types of financ-
ing.
Iran and Venezuela are mem-
bers of the Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries,
and Chavez said Saturday that
they had agreed to back a fur-
ther oil production cut in.the
cartel to stem a recent fall in
crude prices. uP:

“We know today there is too

- much-crude-in-the market,”



Lt

PRESENT THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% DIS

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



HIN THIS image released by Miraflores Press Office, Iran's

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, left, and his Venezuelan coun-
terpart Hugo Chavez stand at attention outside Miraflores presi-
dential palace in Caracas, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007.

(AP Photo/Miraflores Press Office, Marcelo Garcia,HO)

Chavez said. “We have agreed
to join our forces within OPEC
... t6 support a production cut
and save the price of oil.”

OPEC reduced output by 1.2
million barrels a day in Novem-
ber, then announced an addi-
tional cut of 500,000 barrels a
day, due to begin on Feb. 1.
Dow Jones Newswires reported
Friday that OPEC is discussing
holding an emergency meeting
later this month to reduce out-
put! by another 500,000 barrels a
day. Venezuela and Iran have
been leading price hawks with-
in OPEC.

Ahmadinejad’s visit Saturday
— his second to Venezuela in

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less than four months — comes
as he seeks to break interna-

tional isolation over his coun-

try’s nuclear program and pos-
sibly line up new allies in Latin
America. He is also expected
to visit Nicaragua and Ecuador,
which both recently elected left-
ist governments.

’ Chavez and Ahmadinejad
have been increasingly united
by their deep-seated antago-
nism toward the Bush adminis-
tration. Chavez has become a
leading defender of Iran’s
nuclear ambitions, accusing the
Washington of using the issue as
a pretext to attack Tehran.

Ahmadinejad, meanwhile, *





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D-NIGHT








pig pe

ye Sgt.



has called Chavez “the cham-
pion of the struggle against
imperialism.”

USS. officials have accused
Chavez — a close ally of Cuban
leader Fidel Castro — of
authoritarian tendencies, and
National Intelligence Director
John Negroponte said recently
in an annual review of global
threats that Venezuela’s democ-
racy was at risk.

The U.S. also believes Iran is
seeking to use its nuclear pro-
gram to develop an atomic
bomb. Tehran says its program
is peaceful and geared toward
the production of energy.

The increasingly close rela-
tionship between Chavez and
Ahmadinejad has alarmed some
Chavez critics, who accuse him
of pursuing an alliance that does
not serve Venezuela’s interests
and jeopardizes its ties with the
United States, the country’s top
oil buyer. Venezuela is among
the top five suppliers of crude to
the U.S. market.

In a speech earlier Saturday,
Chavez called for the U.S. gov-
ernment to accept “the new
realities of Latin America,” as
he brushed aside restrictions
that limit presidents to two con-
secutive terms. He vowed to
stay in office beyond 2013, when
his term expires, saying he
would revise the constitution to
get rid of presidential term lim-
its.

But Chavez also said in his
state of the nation address to

government officials and legis- —

lators that he had personally
expressed hope to a high-rank-
ing U.S. official for better rela-
tions between their two’ coun-
tries.

Chavez said he spoke with
Thomas Shannon, head of the
U.S. State Department’s West-
ern Hemisphere affairs bureau,
on the sidelines of Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega’s inau-
guration earlier this week.

“We shook hands and I told
him: "I hope that everything
improves,” Chavez said. “I’m
not anyone’s enemy.”

Chavez prompted a crash in

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 17

Venezuelan share prices this
past week when he announced
he would seek special powers
from the legislature to push
through “revolutionary”
reforms, including a string of
nationalizations and unspeci-
fied changes to business laws
and the commerce code.

He also announced plans for
the state to take control of the
country’s largest telecommuni-
cations company, its electricity
and natural gas sectors and four
heavy crude upgrading projects
now controlled by some of the
world’s top oil companies.

Venezuela offer to finance efforts by
~ other countriés to overcome US dominance |

He said Saturday, however,
that private companies would
be allowed to own
minority stakes in the lucrative
Orinoco River basin oil pro-

jects.

The government has already
taken majority ownership of all
other oil-producing operations
in the country through joint
ventures controlled by the state
oil company.

Most companies have shown
a willingness to continue invest-
ing despite the tightening terms,
which have also included tax
and royalty increases.

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



France’s ruling conservatives

Ominate



Sarkozy as presidential candidate

@ PARIS

FRANCE’S interior minister,
Nicolas Sarkozy, formally
clinched the ruling conserva-
tives’ presidential nomination
Sunday, pushing a pivotal race
for a discouraged nation into
high gear, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The ruling UMP party
announced that Sarkozy, the
sole person listed on the party
ballot, had won a vote by regis-
tered members. He now faces a
tight race against the top con-
tender on the left, Socialist

Segolene Royal, for the elec-
tions in April and May.

“I do not have the right to
fail,” Sarkozy told tens of thou-
sands of supporters packed in
a conference hall on Paris’
southern edge.

The anointment at a big-bud-
get, American-style bash lands
the dogged, divisive son of a
Hungarian immigrant one step
away from a job he has coveted
for much of his life. The next
three months may prove bruis-
ing for him and Royal: Both
must work hard to keep their
parties united, and win over

Make it a Combo:
OR Pacmdiie



both moderates and extremes
to come out on top.

Whoever wins, France’s next
president will herald a new era
after 12 years under Jacques
Chirac, who is unlikely to run
for a third term. Many voters
are hoping their next leader will
find new direction for a nation
worried about its future in
Europe and the world, the eco-
nomic challenge from China,
and how to reach out to its
unemployment-stricken blacks,
Arabs and Muslims.

Sunday’s $4.5 million con-
vention for the conservative

UMP party is aimed at giving
Sarkozy momentum before the
two-round election.

His challenge will be to hold
together conservatives, includ-
ing Prime Minister Dominique
de Villepin and party founder
Chirac, who have not
announced their backing for
Sarkozy’s candidacy.

“ll need — and France will
need — everybody here,”
Sarkozy told cheering party
members in brief early remarks.

Villepin, a Sarkozy rival who

has refused to endorse a candi-

date because Chirac has not
announced his future plans,
made a brief, closely scripted
appearance at the convention
and shook Sarkozy’s hand.
Other potential challengers
to Sarkozy’s candidacy have

been tarnished by corruption’

scandals or government crises,
or fell to Sarkozy’s takeover of
the party.

Some 69 percent of UMP

members, or a total of 233,779 _

people, took part in the vote,
and 229,303 voted for Sarkozy:
The others left their ballot
blank in protest — a sign that
his bald ambition may have
alienated many.

Sarkozy has earned both
kudos and vitriol for promising
to cut cherished workplace pro-
tections, championing tough
police tactics in hardscrabble
housing projects and‘ dispatch-
ing illegal immigrants back to
Africa and elsewhere.

He says he is trying to snap
France out of its slump: He says
the French are overtaxed, over-
burdened by government fees
that crimp innovation, too resis-
tant to speaking English and ill-
prepared for globalization.

After a career of ups and
downs and a falling out with
one-time mentor . Chirac,
Sarkozy has in recent years won
over or worn down most Chirac
loyalists and ministers.

Many French voters hover
around ‘the-center and-decide
their vote at the last minute, but
Royal is not Sarkozy’s only

challenge in the months to’

come. Jean-Marie Le Pen —
the far-right leader who came
in a shock second place in 2002
presidential elections behind
Chirac — is a real threat to
Sarkozy’s right flank.



Pa ae er a
MELE Gee

@ FRENCH tiiefiok Minister and head of the ruling conserva-

‘tive Union for a Popular Movement party Nicolas Sarkozy, gestures

as he delivers his speech, during the party's congress for the anoint-
ment of its presidential candidate for the upcoming presidential
election, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2007 in Paris. Sarkozy formally clinched
the ruling conservatives' presidential nomination Sunday, pushing
this pivotal election race for a discouraged nation into high gear.

(AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

@ NICOLAS SAKOZY presidential candidate for the upcoming presidential elections in
April, waves as he stands all members of the government at the conservative party's congress

in Paris, Sunday Jan. 14, 2007.

(AP Photo/Michel Euler)





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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 19

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007, PAGE 21

nae
NTERNATIONAL NEWS

@ GREENVILLE Fire-Rescue firefighters. work to extinguish a-fire at The Memorial Baptist

Memorial Baptist and another church last night are "suspicious."
(AP Photo/The Daily Reflector, Jenni Farrow)

‘Church, Saturday, January 13, 2007, in Greenville, N.C. Authorities say the fires that damaged

-~Authorities are
considering

arson as cause
for church fires

@ GREENVILLE, N.C.

AUTHORITIES investigat-
ing two fires and a break-in at
three Baptist churches, all
reported within an hour of each
other, said Sunday they are
looking into the possibility of
arson, according to Associated
Press.

The size of the fire alone at
The Memorial Baptist Church,

a fast-moving blaze described °

as the largest in Greenville in
the past 10 years, led investi-

‘ gators to treat the fires as a

crime scene, said Greenville
Fire Chief Mike Burton.

“Tt suggested we need to con-
sider things other than an acci-

_ dental cause,” Burton said.

“Most of the accidental causes
would not have that rapid of a
buildup.”

Burton said local investiga-
tors, along with the state
Bureau of Investigation and the
federal Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explo-
sives, were working Sunday to
determined the cause and ori-
gin of the fire at The Memorial
and a much smaller blaze at
Unity Free Will Baptist
Church, about a mile away.

Investigators there discov-
ered broken windows after fire-
fighters were able to contain
the fire, limiting most of the
damage to a single room.
Authorities also found a bro-
ken window while investigat-
ing an alarm call at Oakmont
Baptist Church, also about a
mile from The Memorial.

Police said witnesses report-
ed seeing a person fleeing from
The Memorial in a white vehi-
cle shortly after the fire broke
out. The tires of three church
vehicles were also slashed.

The fires and the break-in
were reported between 10:37

1

Investigators treat
fires as crime scene



p.m. and 11:31 p.m. on Satur-
day night, leading police and
sheriff's deputies to check on
churches throughout the city
and surrounding Pitt County,
about 75 miles east of Raleigh.

No other fires were discov-
ered, but Greenville Police
Chief William Anderson said
Sunday his department planned
to continue increased patrols.

“We’re going to be highly
visible at our. churches,” he said
Sunday.

Burton said damage at The
Memorial was conservatively
estimated at $1 million. Upon
arriving, firefighters found

smoke billowing from the |

church’s educational wing, and
the blaze quickly spread to the
church’s original structure.
Officials said about half of
the church appeared to be
destroyed, though the main
sanctuary appeared undam-
aged. The church’s steeple was
standing, but firefighters were

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

worried about its stability.

“That’s bricks and concrete,
and that stuff can be replaced,”
said Dr. Rick Bailey, the asso-
ciate minister at The Memorial.
“You just need to move on.”

A few hundred members of
the church gathered Sunday
morning in-a picnic area behind
the church. Bailey said he was-
n’t yet sure where they would
gather next Sunday, although
several churches in Greenville
have offered to host the con-
gregation.

The fire damage at Unity
Free Will was estimated at
between $30,000 and $40,000.

“Right now, I’m numb,” Jeff
Manning, minister at Unity
Free Will, told The Daily
Reflector of Greenville. “My
head is spinning. We will have
to figure out what to do, and at
the same time, our heart goes
out to the good folks at Memo-
rial Baptist because there’s is
a whole lot worse than ours.”














¢ Tel: 356-2070
¢ P.O.BOX N7508
-e Nassau, Bahamas

:
CHEOUES NEW PROVIDENCE LOCAL OFFICE

173 Short-Term Benefit Cheques Await Collection By Eligible
Claimants. All Claims Were Processed In New Providence.

The names of persons with outstanding cheques are listed below.
These persons are requested to collect their cheque(s) from the
Cashier’s Department, located on the Ground Floor of the National
Insurance Board’s Clifford Darling Complex, Baillou Hill Road,

between 9:15a.m. - 4:45 p.m. on weekdays.
Claimants are asked to collect heir cheque(s) in person and to produce
photo identification.

and to produce photo identification.

Lennox eames

Director

NAME N. I. Number
ABDUL-HADI, Khalid 14913542

ALLEN, Jerem 10423664

ANDERSON, Dominique 10103864

ARCHER, Charles 12394858

BAILLOU, Darren 30504775

BAIN, Cynthia 12967637
BAIN, Jasmine 11728701

BETHEL, Annamae 14068540:
BETHEL, Christina 16215648

BETHEL, Jestina 13795783

BETHEL, Monique 13708716

BETHELL, Dellareese 14458705

BETHELL, Michael 10732810

BULLARD, Audre 14985586
BURROWS, Charles 12503665

BURROWS, Deborah 11437553

CAMPBELL, Patrenda 58015671

CAPRON, Judith 11475641

CARTER, Harcourt 12443735
CLARIDGE, Dushinka 13827812
CLARKE, James 12134619
CLARKE, Linda 12695521

CLARKE, Natika 12937746
CLARKE, Nekoda 10488820
COAKLEY, Maria 13846655
CONYERS, Douglas 14644681

COOPER, Sharie 13595768
CURTIN, Linda 15718549
DAMES, Anastasia 11426810

DARLING, Tiffany 30077745
DAVIS, Sherica 10365850
DEAN, Gertlene 11175532

DEAN, Nakia 12126810
DEAN, Pats 11785446
DELANCY, Melanie 15938662

DEMERITTE, Van 13591762
DORSETT, Desmond 12732753

DORSETT, Franklyn 14283867
EGUEZANTIL, Jistilien 22764615

FARRINGTON, Nelson 11673656

FARRINGTON, Shanador 13937774
FERGUSON, Althemese 10485570
FERNANDER, Michael 17294649
FERNANDER,, Nellie 12556505
FOX, Tania 10496645
GAITOR, Javan 12433845
GAITOR, Jennifer 13388657
GARDINER, Philippa 13858777
GEORGE, Michelot 14873796
GIBSON, Flora 12847798
GIBSON, Kenneth 62073605
GIBSON, Sean 12774715
GLASS, Kathryn 12577782
GRAY, Tyrone 15254704
HAMILTON, Nicola 15558649
HAMILTON, Norma 11958499
HANNA, Barbara 13566660
HANNA, Carolyn 52006735
HANNA, Susan 14868717
HANNA, Tamika 13768840
HANNA, Una 11407778
HARRIS-SMITH, Laverne 12247650
HEPBURN, Laverne 20926677
HINSEY, Evelyn | 13067532
INGRAHAM, Calvin 10493786
JOHNSON, Alfred 10501533
JOHNSON, Althea 19228619
JOHNSON, Chandel 12006726
JOHNSON, Daniel 10841482
JOHNSON, Danielle 12868876.
JOHNSON, Shawanda 14017849
JOHNSON, Suzanne 10995552
JONES, Angelique 10796738
JOSEPH, Dieudonne 17403596
KEMP, Cherylene 14978776
KNOWLES, Dianna 10126430
KNOWLES, Donell 12658618
KNOWLES, Melanie 21587639
LEADON, Janet 11235683
LEWIS, Kenya 14207834
LUBAIN, Analie 16447735
MACKEY, Jeffrey 30953634
MACKEY, Monique 12565814
MARSHALL, Chester 16241606
MAYCOCK, Anita 14527731

McDONALD, Sherrell 14347849
McKENZIE, Donovan. 14633884
McKINNEY, Wellington 15181669
MINNIS, Mario 30544769
MORLEY, Elizabeth 11967587
MORLEY, Zeria 84096772
MOSS, Alvin 14462621

MOSS, Leah 16087607
MOSS, Raymond 26024632
MUNNINGS, Alfred 10044639
MUSGROVE, Monique 14495813
NEELY, Bradley 12232564
NUTT, Niven 11431563
PHILLIPS, Esther 15128806
PIERRE, Rochelle 14285738
PINDER, Lastaica 60067837
POITIER, Charisma 13627813
PORTER, Claire _ 12096725
RAHMING, Kendrick 78001811

ROLLE, Alicia 12368830
ROLLE, Andrew 13961780
ROLLE, Elliott 13382829
ROLLE, Fenrick 60044772
ROLLE, Juliette 10695788
ROLLE, Paulette 10578552
SANDS, Lionel 11811544
SANDS, Owen 62043838
SAUNDERS, Lamar 18914675
SIMMONS, Tony 14993643
SMITH, Anita 21058628
SMITH, Jamie 12108847
SMITH, Leonardo 12104736
SMITH, Marguerite 13955705
SMITH, Rhonda 12107794
“SMITH, wen. 24497630
STRACHAN, Bradley 11822600

STUBBS, Anthony 10043586
STUBBS, June 10296654
STUBBS, Vanessa 11986689

STYLES, Jacqueline 14537648
TAYLOR, Jamine 70103828
TAYLOR, Robin 14007681

THOMPSON, Marsha 10427600
THURSTON, Geraldine 11268468

THURSTON, Malawi 12875767
TUCKER, Aubrey. 11804610

TURNQUEST, Shanika 13495771

WALLACE, Theba 15027759
WELLS, Desiree 11026782
WEMYSS, Denise 14978660
WEMYSS, Safiya 12787817
WESTON, Donald 10104380
WILLIAMS, Enid 52038815
WILLIAMS, Frederick 13453777
WILLIAMS, Hope 13337645
WILLIAMS, Sean 14141698
WOODS, Clifford 12283541

PLEASE NOTE: Claimants are asked to collect their cheque(s) in person} |
PAGE 8E, MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2007 | TRIBUNE SPORTS

AAA Odd Distance Meet





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AN N

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(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune staff)







@ KRYSTAL BODIE of Club Monica @ JENNI PIERRE throws
crosses the line to win the open women’s 60 the javelin
metre dash. (Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



7 p ee i eae i i Hi : ft a :

® DIJONNAISE BROWN of Doris Johnson tries to clear 5 ft 6 in the open mens high jump.

(Photo: Felipé Major/ Trisune staff)



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