Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





efence Force is ‘inequipped to -
fulfil duties’, claims opposition -

m@ By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter

The Defence Force is “inad-
equately equipped to discharge
its duties” according to opposi-
tion leader Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham said on Thurs-
day that the government has
allowed the nation’s military
branch to become run-down.

Speaking at an FNM rally in
Long Island — where he said

yesterday that he was “very
pleased” to see a large crowd
in attendance — Mr Ingraham
pledged that the FNM would

upgrade and enhance the

Defence Force.

Mr Ingraham said an FNM
government would better
enable “properly trained and
provisioned officers . . . to

enforce our laws, not only
against poaching but also
against illegal migration,

migrant smuggling, and drug
trafficking.”

The Defence Force has few
operational sea craft and no
suitable aircraft for air surveil-
lance at the moment, he said.

Mr Ingraham claimed that if
the FNM is elected to office, it
will make a number of new craft

acquisitions and established new’

outposts for the force, creating
greater surveillance capabilities.
He added that a Defence

Force base would be established
in the southern Bahamas, an
outpost in Farmer's Cay, Exu-
ma, and a satellite presence in
the Ragged Island chain. In
addition, currently out-of-ser-
vice Defence Force boats will
be brought back online.

Mr Ingraham also used the
platform to appeal specifically
to the needs of Long Islanders.
He said that,the infrastructure
plans that the FNM had for that

island have been "interrupted
for too long."

"Another five years will not
pass without Long Island having
the state-of-the-art education-
al facilities you need and
deserve. The children of Long
Island need and deserve a new
high school," he said. sd

In addition, he claimed that
an FNM government would
attend to Long Island's trans-
port needs, by resuming the

Bahamasair service to the Stel-
la Mares airport, upgrading the
airport at Deadman's Cay, and
creating “adequate and appro-
priate docking facilities to
replace the rundown one at Salt
Pond.”

“Long Island, I have come to
say, we in the FNM have got your
back. We’re going to talk a lot
less and we’re going to deliver a
lot more. We will restore your
faith in government,” he said.




*



Haitian 7
m sloopis .
= discoverd .
Ff carrying ©
migrants



- oe
»



A TOTALSS suspected ille-
gal immigrants are being held _,
at the Carmichael Road Deten-

_ tion Centre after being appre- -.-
hended off the Eastern Endof .',
New Providence by the Har- ,
bour Unit of the Royal ,
Bahamas Defence Force late; ,
Thursday night. ve

While on routine patrol, —-,

5



@ A GROUP of cold and weary female migrants at the
Defence Force Base huddling for warmth

HMBS P-41, under the com- ,
- mand of Leading Seaman

Bertram Wallace, spotted a 35-
foot Haitian sail sloop around fi
two miles off Port New Provi- , .
dence.

A routine search of the vessel
uncovered the large numberof +;
immigrants onboard the vessel. +,

HMBS P-110 was calledinto. _.:
assist, and the Haitian vessel.
was escorted into the Coral -,,
Harbour Base early Friday =
morning. :

The Defence Force reported, ,
that the immigrants (47 men +.
and eight women) all appeared...»
to be in good health, and were
turned over to immigration

-authorities for-further. process-.- «=
ing.

This is the second group of
Haitian immigrants apprehend-
ed in Bahamian waters this year
by the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.

Last year, over 1,500 suspect-
ed illegal immigrants were tak-
en into custody.

m@ A DEFENCE Force Marine assisting the migrants off their sail sloop at the Coral Harbour Base



ee

ar



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARILYN DORCELEY OF
‘(GENERAL DELIVERY, PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.












Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

A DEFENCE Force Marine assisting a female migrant as she ascends from below the deck of













the Haitian sloop
















EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/PROGRAM COORDINATOR
The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Program Coordinator.
The Program Coordinator coordinates the administrative and operational aspects of a program
or project. S/he contributes to the processes for annual planning and budgeting, submission of
periodic and annual financial and technical reports and monitoring progress over the life of the
program/project. The Coordinator may be responsible for developing operational guidelines to

LEER Cw ae RS OA PET aR ES PE









NOTICE

a. toy te

































































NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EVANS OF ensure efficient management of the program and compliance with regulations. S/he coordinates ou are raising funds for a "
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is program/project-related workshops and meetings and documents activities, strategies and lessons y d 8 mate ‘
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and learned as appropriate. The Coordinator assists with the preparation of financial analyses and reports } S00 cause, campaigning .
Citizenship, for registration /naturalization as a citizen for Program/Project management and other team members. S/he also assists in the preparation of | for improvements in the «
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any oe for program/project support and serves as an information resource about the Program! area or have won an :
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be roject in general — helping to develop communications materials, and responding to public inquiries. aware ry
granted, should send a written and signed statement of : . §
fhe facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS If so, call us on 322-1986 !
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality Bachelor's degree and 3-5 years related experience or equivalent combination. and share your story. %
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. Excellent verbal and written skills. ; 4
: Proven organizational skills and attention to detail. i

Demonstrated experience in MS Office, Word, Excel, Power Point and Data Base Management. Ability 4

to manipulate, analyze and interpret data. ‘4

\ Understanding of how organizations work and experience with project implementation and design. :

A tant Wanted |
ee an Me ant c zi EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/SENIOR POLICY ADVISOR x
Lipa eee Ne The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Senior Policy Advisor. ,

The Senior Policy advisor develops, coordinates and implements the program strategy to further the a

: work of the Conservancy and its conservation partners through direct interaction with the Governments The .
International Investment Group in the Northern Caribbean Program and multi- and bilateral agencies that provide conservation -Way 3

; opportunities and/or impact the nations’ conservation programs. S/he identifies conservation policy a

based in Nassau seeks Accountant for and funding opportunities, evaluates the potential for TNC and NGO partner involvement, and develops Test e

- : 5 and implements strategies to influence policy and public funding for conservation at the national and/or i .

general accounting duties; prepar ation global levels. The Senior Policy Advisor liaises with counterparts in the Conservancy's Mesoamerica oe ue. a ‘

< and Caribbean Conservation Region and International Government Relations department to provide Ink, Say Or GO 5

of financial statements, cash flow, and extract useful lessons and to coordinate on joint policy approaches. S/he also serves as contact 1. Is it the TRUTH? .

b d cili . d with the external professional community in the policy arena to keep abreast of new developments ae A ; ,

uU gets, account recon. ations an and opportunities that may be useful to the Conservancy and its partners and to report on and share 2.Is it F Te all |

: : the Conservancy's experiences with others. The Senior Policy Advisor provides expert policy analysis concernedq: 4
financial analysis. Knowledge of GAAP, and contributes directly to the Conservancy's public funding strategies by revels ica io Sapeeal 3. Will it build "
consolidation eliminations necessary. writing, negotiating with bilateral and multilateral agencies and donor cultivation as needed. GOODWILL and i
BS Degree in Accounting and CPA or KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS SE Beane :

, , : ; Bachelor's degree in relevant field and 6 or more years of senior relevant experience. Master's pies ; <
equivalent licensin = requ re d. degree may be preferred or required. May require federal agency or congressional staff experience or 4. Will it be ,
equivalent experience for positions with a global focus. BENEFICIAL to i)

Expert knowledge of current trends in relevant policy discipline. i

Demonstrated experience conceiving and implementing strategic initiatives. all concerned? :

Demonstrated excellent project management skills. WANWiTORAFY.O78 ij

| Excellent verbal and written communications skills. :

- 5 We ‘a @ «)

Send resume & salary WlStory i fi Interested persons should apply in writing with full details, including resume and cover letter, to ad 3 LR Pal SERVICE \;

° ‘ HYPERLINK “mailto:bahamas@tnc.org” bahamas@tnc.org by January 31, 2007. Fertilizer, F ungicide, %

via email to: Aeon D '

A Pee ACLU LC ;

starcapitalcorp@starcapital.net

FA AA ESSAI STE ESET EE LE EES ENT

RAL



~
rat

arp SS



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS .

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 3





US Embassy
closed for
Martin Luther
King holiday

THe US Embassy will be
closed on Monday, January :

15, 2007 in observance of the

Martin Luther King, Jr holi-

day.

8am.

Haitian is

charged with

sex with
six-year-old

A JUDGE yesterday :
ordered that a Haitian man :
accused of having sex witha :
six-year-old girl be remand- :
’. ed to prison because he could :

pose a flight risk.

Jasmyr Ettienne, 29, was ;
officially arraigned before :
Chief Magistrate Roger :
Gomez at court one on Bank :
Lane yesterday on the charge :

of unlawful intercourse.

Ettienne, who was aided by :
a translator, was told that he :
‘would not be required to }

enter a plea to the charge.

It was alleged that Ettienne
committed the offence some- :

time during December 2006:

The prosecutor, Sergeant :
Alexander Bannister, object- :
ed to Ettienne being granted :
bail on the grounds that :
immigration officials had con- :
firmed that the accused has _ :

no status in the country.

Bannister suggested that if
he was granted bail, Ettienne :

would be a flight risk.

Chief Magistrate Gomez
said the court was of the opin- |
ion that due to the serious :
nature of the charge, andthe :
fact that Ettienne had no sta- :
tus, he would be a flight risk if :

granted bail.

Ettienne was remanded to }
Her Majesty’s Prison and his :
case was adjourned to Janu- :
ary 16, when it will be heard :

in court five, Bank Lane.

The embassy will resume
normal business operations
on Tuesday, January 16, at :

Ingraham accused PLP MPs of
being ‘lukewarm democrats’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE members of the current
PLP government have proven
to be “very lukewarm democ-
rats” according to opposition
leader Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham said the PLP
has “governed in secret” and
rather than putting the people
first, government members
“have busied themselves with
the trappings of office”.

Laying out the reasoning
behind his claims, he said that
the government has “conspired

i * to keep votes taken at the Unit-

ed Nations hush-hush; conclud-
ed foreign investment agree-
ments with undisclosed claus-
es; attacked the media when
questions are raised about their
dealings (and) answered criti-
cisms by arranging the launch
of investigations that are sel-
dom, if ever concluded.”
Speaking at a rally in Long
Island on Thursday, Mr Ingra-
ham said the PLP has broken
trust with the pubic by permit-
ting “political allies, associates



@ HUBERT Ingraham

and cronies to influence the
award of government contracts
and access to government ser-
vices”.

He said the government has
gone “to great lengths to keep
the people in the dark with
regard to the misbehaviour and
misadventures of their mem-
bers."

“They said they would wipe
every tear from the eyes of
Bahamians," Mr Ingraham not-
ed. Instead, they have misman-

aged disaster relief for the vic-
tims of the 2004/2005 hurricanes
and neglected to repair dam-
ages caused during the same
natural disasters, he said.

Mr Ingraham alleged that
government members “callous-
ly mishandled” the sale of the
Royal Oasis resort in Freeport,
prolonging mass unemploy-
ment.

Furthermore, he said that
they have delayed their
acknowledgment of the gov-
ernment's liability to the vic-
tims of the collision between
the Sea Hauler and United Star

’ vessels in 2005.

He said schools are “full to
overflow”, teachers are
“engaged but not paid” and
government-operated medical
facilities are “in jeopardy” due
to medicine stock shortages.

“Instead of addressing these
tangible concerns the govern-
ing party has rushed to pass into
law, a National Health Insur-
ance Scheme that is long on
promise and woefully short on
deliverables,” Mr Ingraham
said.

File on Inagua beating scandal
to be on AG’s desk ‘by Monday’

THE police file on the
alleged beating of a 27-year-old
Inagua man by Defence Force
officers will be on the attorney
general's desk by Monday,
ready for her to review, the
director of public prosecutions
said yesterday.

Bernard Turner said he
would not comment on whether
it is likely that charges will be
brought against any of the offi-
cers involved in the November
26 incident, “until a decision has
been made.”

Several people are said to ©

have witnessed Dexter Wilson
“beaten almost to death” that
night in Matthew Town by up to

THE BAHAMAS,

15 Defence Force officers, in an
attack that was said to have left
Inaguans outraged.

He was airlifted to Nassau to
receive treatment for his injuries
— which reports indicate includ-
ed a massive head wound, the
result of an officer “pounding”
his head with a rock — after a

‘dispute allegedly broke out over

a female officer.

Yesterday, The Tribune
reported that police are upset
that failure to make arrests in
connection with the matter is
rebounding on them.

Officers claimed they are
being blamed by the public for
the attorney general’s delay in

‘ TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS,

CONFERENCE

The Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas

195TH ANNUAL SESSION

Meeting, Friday, January 12-Monday, January 22, 2007
at Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church

108 Montrose Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas

Friday, January 12-and Monday, January 15-Ministerial

Session

Lord’s Day, January 14 in the congregations of the
circuit-Trial Services for Probationer Presbyters,
Candidate for the Ministry and Candidate for the

Ministry of Lay Evangelist

ordering charges to be laid.

According to former assistant
police commissioner Paul
Thompson, many case files are
being sent to the AG’s office
before anyone is charged by
police.

“The incident in Inagua is
case in point,” he said. “From
what I have read in the various

.nhewspapers and heard on the

radio, it appears there is evi-
dence to charge these persons
with causing dangerous harm,
wounding, assault and battery,
discharging firearms to the dan-
ger of annoyance of the public,
assault with a deadly weapon
and disorderly conduct.”

| IE



‘ ° o es
Galleria Cinem
4 Mall-at-Marathon
BOX Orrick OPENS AT 10: 00.4 AM DAILY :

epee BeBe: Pryra = = i











EFFECTIVE JANUARY
f | STOMP THE vaRD new | 1:00 CALEE
[ [ARTHUR AND THE INVISIBLES wEW Ws









Do you have a piece of Artwork that needs to
be restored or is damaged and needs repair?





Call Sharon Aitken @ 364-8040. I have 15
years of experience in both restoring and
repairing damaged artwork. I use products of
“MUSEUM GRADE” quality and the same
restoration techniques used in Art Museums.
My pricing is very affordable despite Art
Restoration being so highly specialized. Call
today fora FREE CONSULTATION....








Your Artwork Will Thank You! J

oak aL Recs

warehouse workers. Persons ny i

re

Renee qn rerulesalereel
BitovedentelNors that will be team
Persons must be well groomed
Po vaueriveto cre amelie Manat TT reamea Cova oy)
Severe rae is $13,000 and after the
three month probationary period the salary
will be increased to $15,000 along with an
nee een TenNy offers good aS

Tuesday, January 16, 9a.m. Flag Raising Ceremony and
Opening of Representative Session

Tuesday, January 16, 7:30p.m.- Welcome/
Communion Service

Thursday, January 18, 7:30p.m. Service of Ordination to
the Presbytery for Rev. Mark S. Christmas
Friday, January19, 7:30p.m.-Open Session:

‘““The Church’s Response to Social Issues”

Saturday, January 20, 7a.m.-Prayer Breakfast
Saturday, January 20, 7p.m.-” Joyful, Joyful” Concert at
Wesley Methodist Church, Malcolm Road East

No. Pio er as Apply HY oe

Lord’s Day, January 21, 10.am.-Official Conference
Service with the Conferral of the Title Bishop on the
President of the Conferernce





PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation ard Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
- Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Bush’s Iraq speech is a welcome start

ADMITTEDLY, I’ve been the one who
has been saying in this space that a change in
strategy and direction — almost any change
— would be better than clinging to a failed
policy for a war that was ill-advised in the first
place.

I’m not ready to renounce those words yet.
But readers who have taken issue should
know I'll be fully prepared to eat them if this
“surge,” as President Bush and his inner cir-
cle politely call it, turns into a deadly escala-
tion of a quagmire with no end in sight.

With.a Democratic Congress in place, ask-
ing questions and vowing to hold the admin-
istration accountable, that, we hope, won’t be
the case.

Even for administration critics and those
who aren’t convinced that sending in more
troops is the answer, Bush’s address to the
nation ought to be gratifying for some of its
significant themes.

For the first time, the commander in chief
who is the architect of the awful war strategy

seemed to be saying that an exit strategy is ,

something to be desired, not disdained. For
the first time, the president who has been
_ called stubborn and arrogant seemed to
acknowledge that the conduct of the war has
been flawed and riddled with mistakes.

For the first time, he acknowledged that the.
responsibility for those mistakes lies in the
Oval Office.

Of course, contrition won’t undo all the
blunders or end the deadly chaos. But if the

president-and-his cronies start seeing the |

lation and that most news stories the past
few weeks that used the administration’s term

“surge” has bracketed that word in quota-
tion marks.

The media are even less influential than
congressional critics in the actual conduct of
foreign policy. But the language of war does
matter.

Even former Defence Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld admitted as much recently in an
unusually reflective interview with columnist
Cal Thomas. Rumsfeld said the phrase “war
on terror,” unquestionably an administration
invention, raised false expectations.

“Tt creates a level of expectation of victory
and an ending within 30 or 60 minutes of a
soap opera,” Rumsfeld said, admitting he
was among those who helped sell the phrase
to the American public and the rest of the
world. ;

- Before the series of war failures and its
pattern of secrecy and deceit erased what
was left of its credibility, this administration
had been masters of spin in framing the
national discourse. I’m not among those who
think the media have been fawning lapdogs
of the administration’s linguistic machina-
tions. But, clearly, we’ve at times been vic-
tims of it.

_. When news reports were first published in

~ October suggesting the administration was

considering a new policy that involved timeta-
bles for the Iraqi government to disarm mili-
tias, achieve certain political and economic

_ benchmarks and assume a larger role in that

Majority —

meaning

EDITOR, The Tribune

JANUARY 10, 1967 ushered
in the advent of the first major-
ity government in the history of
the Bahama Islands, as they
were then known. Hitherto, the
government of the day com-
prised elements of the so-called
white Bahamian oligarchy and
the white British Governor and
expatriates.

The eligibility to vote, prior to
1964-5, was highly dependent
on property qualifications and
severely restricted to adult aged
men. These draconian measures
often resulted in the perpetua-
tion of the political rule of what
one could loosely term “The
Bay Street Boys’, led by the late
Sir Roland T Symonette and Sir
Stafford L Sands.

As early as the 1960’s the
embryonic ‘black’ Progressive
Liberal Party (PLP) was able
to capture a majority of elec-
toral votes but due to suspected
gerrymandering and other polit-
ical devices, the minority white
oligarch was able to perpetuate
its benign rule over the majori-
ty of blacks and conchyjoes.

Not only were those two sub-
classes disadvantaged from a
political point of view but they
were, generally speaking,
excluded from the economic
benefits which were rapidly
becoming available to Bahami-
ans during the 1950’s and
1960’s. This, of course, was the
fuel that ignited the massive
political realignment in 1967.

If it were not for the decisive
votes and support of the late Sir
Randol Francis Fawkes and the
late Sir Alvin Braynen, howev-
er, the PLP would not have
come to high office in 1967.
Truly, it was a combination of
the so-called black Bahamians
and the so-called conchyjoe or
off-white Bahamian which
formed the majority of those




DAMPERS

letters@tribunemecia.net



cians, like Bradley Roberts et
al, were not, initially, supporters
of the concept of majority rule
as espoused by nation builders
like the late Sir Lynden Oscar
Pindling; Sir Milo B Butler; the
Hon A D Hanna; the Hon
Dame Doris Johnson; the Hon
A Loftus Roker and, of course,

the indomitable Sir Cecil Wal- .

lace Whitfield.

These men and women, at
great personal and professional
sacrifice, took it upon them-
selves to call for political rule
by the majority of Bahamians.
Others, inclusive of a large
number of black-skinned
Bahamians would have died in
defence of the old guard.

Today, now that it is fashion-
able to align oneself with the
black majority, some of them
are able to wax eloquently
about “the struggle”. Rank
hypocrisy or revisionism?

I sat in on the recent debate

in the House of Assembly. ©

Bradley Roberts, a self-styled
“moderately successful busi-
nessman”, was his usual self
while he waxed on, haltingly,
with his “contribution” on
majority rule.

As a fairly young man in the
1960's I attended countless pub-
lic meetings of the PLP at places
like Windsor Park and the

Southern Recreation Grounds. ©

Bradley Roberts, to the best of
my recollection, was nowhere
in sight. I never heard him
address such meetings, much
less saw him campaigning with

pioneers and freedom fighters .

like Messrs Pindling, Ortland
H Bodie Sr, and Randol
Fawkes. . :

There were some who sus-

op

THE TRIBUNE :*:

»

-?

Rule and its:

©

ans

was he, my father, who took it.” :

upon himself to introduce Pin-

dling to the people south of the. '
arch. My dad also made avail-__ .
able the use of the former Bod-' ’.
ie Bank Building, still on Wulff.*
Road, to the infant PLP and the, ,
labour movement to hold busi- ”
ness meetings. He also con-* |
tributed financially to both _
groups. “4
The most unfortunate thing, _ _.
however, about the so-called *-° .’
“majority rule” is that it was ..
hijacked, in my: view, by rabid ‘ *
so-called black nationailists.., -.,
Instead of recognising that day “

for what it was, too many mem-
bers of the “old” PLP sought, °

successfully, to portray January °°”

10, 1967 as a “PLP” event.

iv,

This bogus perception has” ’
existed to this very day. Few of
our politicians, on either side *

of the aisle, have had the vision ’

or wisdom to embrace that day

as a truly “majority rule” day.~"™

As a result, I counted a maxi- ‘~"’

mum of 20 white Bahamians at

the Southern Recreation’ ”’

Grounds the other evening.

No effort, that I could dis-
cern, was made by the “new”. -

PLP and Christie’s government:

to embrace or welcome or white". 4
Bahamian brothers and sisters. ~
How sad. One day, however, '

when the real history of The *
Bahamas is written, it will’.







reflect that a vast majority of..s
Bahamians, of all colours and’: '
backgrounds, voted PLP in 1967. ,, :

and not just blacks, as some
would have us to believe.

While some have called for ~

January 10th to be declared a
national holiday, I do not agree
with that proposal, at this time

ae)

>

as it is still too emotive for many“
of us. To God then, whom one'~”
misguided or farcical PLP -

Councillor unabashedly claims:
is “black”, in all things, be the
glory.

~

same reality the rest of the world sees, it country’s own security, the administration. who voted for a change. pected my late father, the Rev- ORTLAND H BODIE JR
can’t be a bad thing for the big picture. distanced itself from those reports. ; Too many of our socialcom- _ erend Doctor Ortland H Bodie Nassau 3
Bush’s long-awaited speech did not gar- White House spokesmen’s statements in mentators and current politi- _ Sr of being a closet UBP but it January 12 2007

ner much immediate cheerleading. The
response from military experts and congres-
sional critics of both parties ranged from
lukewarm to outright hostile. Bush himself
acknowledged that even with his plan to send
21,500 more troops into battle, there will be
more sectarian violence, more fighting and
“more Iraqi and American casualties.”

Still, it was gratifying to hear the president
say to the Iraqi government and the rest of
the world, “America’s commitment is not
open-ended.” Contrasted to his past pro-
nouncements that we are in this bitter battle

response ranged from outright denial to inde-
cipherable qualifiers.

Now that Bush’s speech makes clear that

such things are central to his new policy, you
should expect some pundits and commenta-
tors to sprinkle a few smug “I-told-you-so’s”
into their columns and sound bites.

Pll resist that temptation. But as I see the
administration “cut and run” from its stub-
born “stay-thegcourse” pronouncements of
pre-election aps, I'll be cautiously optimistic
that the change in tone and rhetoric means
something, even if the change in direction

Tourism business is creating:

ugliness at Cable Beach

EDITOR, The Tribune

WHEN even the people in
the tourism business create
‘ugliness’ then we known we are

containers seemingly as a
result of the refurbishment
works on the Radisson and
Cable Beach.

We would have hoped that

green trap.

By the way Bah Mar, when |.
will you be starting the road-44

+

Pe,

4

we



Â¥

I.

n

2

ae

"i








‘iS.

oe a we ies

Bae



works? The public is anxious to,~ *
4

see the dirt being moved and * '

ee ae indefinite lone ee any his aoe isn't what I'd like it to be. at the end of the rope. someone would at least realise _ things really happening.
that tings were going well in the war effort, 2 ke Location: Cable Beach, the just how ugly these containers : i
it’s a welcomed shift in tone at least. (This column was written by Kenneth F. strip of land before you reach are F GIBSON i
_ [I'm glad that the P-I’s morning-after head- Bunting of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer - the ‘Cable Beach fire. station My Salitiond Breet achanic Nausea ‘
line called Bush’s troop commitment an esca- c.2007). has become a parking areafor link fence and cover that with January 8 2007 ‘



NOTICE

General Maintenance Personnel

Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel

with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and

some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience
and must provide references.



"NOTICE 1

is hereby given that JILIO JOSEPH OF



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE MARTHE MICHEL OF
McKinney Drive, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and




SOLDIER ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and



that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement-of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.
LY STOREWIDE

CLEARANCE SALE




Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experience.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107











erice
shoe & Bag Boutique



| |
| Hi ekvs |

BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES

\

’
cai
ee






Â¥




Pa A A @

The Entrance Examination for St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport and

St. Andrew’s School, Exuma will take place on Saturday, -
February 3rd, 2007 at 9:00a.m.

2 rw we oe ee £8

Applications can be collected from the Schools between the
hours of 8:00a.m. and 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

hess are.

Applications Forms and $25.00 Applications Fee must be
returned to the School no later than Friday, January 26th, 2007

St. John’s College is now accepting Applications for the ‘se
students from Kindergarten through Grade Six. Kindergarten ¥
screening will begin during the second week in February



setta St. Palmdale
Wels 328-8391





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE
















This week, In Days Gone By looks
back at Black Tuesday and the
celebrations following Majority Rule.
In Bahamian history, the term Black
Tuesday refers to April 27, 1965, when
then-opposition leader and later prime
minister of the Bahamas Sir Lynden
Pindling, threw the Speaker's Mace out
of the House of Assembly window

in protest against the unfair
gerrymandering of constituency
boundaries by the then ruling United
Bahamian Party CUBP).



















CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS » Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14TH, 2006

11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Services

Speaker: Elder Brentford Isaacs

f Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.

ning Service: 7:00 p.m.
inesdays) :

Thursday of each month)




Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |}.
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour: :
Sunday 6pm:- ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 e Box N-3622 }}



Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church

A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
P North America
(WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED













Worship time: 11am & 7pm
Prayer time: 10:15 - 10:43a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Candlelight Service - Dec. 17@ 7p.m.
> Christmas Eve Service - Dec. 24 @ 11:00 p.m
Watchnight Service - Dec. 31 @ 11:00 p.m. \



Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE






LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
/ Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
_ P.O.Box EE-16807 ;
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk @batelnet.bs









THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
‘oseamiind P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
ymemmm Phone: 393-37 26/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

tome CHURCH SERVICES
Pee SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 2007
COVENANT SUNDAY

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. George Knowles ~

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard

10:00AM Rev. Livingston Parks

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Mr. Earl Oinder

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue
8:00AM
9:30AM

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs/HC

7:00PM Mr. Livingston Parks
GORI IGG IG III IG III GI IGIGI I I IIIG R R IR IIR R FFE
RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

Your Host: Rev. James D. Neilly

‘METHODIST MOMENTS’

on each weekday at 6:55a.m.

Your Host: Rev. James D. Neilly

ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH- will be celebrating their 43rd Church

Anniversary Service on Sunday, January 14th, 2007 at 9:30 a.m. in their Sanctuary
on Boyd Subdivision.







































Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs-43rd Anniversary Service




RENEWAL SERVICES-Meaningful Worsip, Practical Preaching-Times of Meditation.
Monday, January 15, 2007 - 7:30 p.m. - Speaker: Dr. Rex Major

Tuesday, January 16. 2007 - 6:30 p.m. - Speaker: Rev. Philip Stubbs

Wednesday, January 17. 2007 - 7:30 p..m.- Speaker: Major Lester Ferguson
Thursday, January 18, 2007 - 6:30 p.m. - Speaker: Rev. Philip Stubbs

Friday, January 19,2007- 7:30 p.m. - Speaker: Apostle Clifford Smith




~ Grant’s Town We
(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Stre 13046.
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY JANUARY 14TH, 2007
7:00 a.m.Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis.Marilyn Tinker
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Comm. of Training Institute
10:00 p.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Visitation, Outreach & Social Witness

“Casting our cares upon Him, for. He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)






APRIL 28, 1965 (above) — The 165-year-old ceremonial mace,
symbol of the Speaker’s authority in the House of Assembly,
was hurled out the window of the House by Progressive Liberal
Party leader Lynden Pindling. The PLP was protesting the terms
of an order calling for the revision of electoral boundaries in the
Bahamas.

B JANUARY 10, 1967 (left) — Mr and Mrs Arnold, parents of
then premier Lynden Pindling, at their home on East Street
where Lynden spent part of his triumphant day following the
opening of the House of Assembly.

@ ABOVE top and left: Crowds gather to protest the unfair
electoral boundaries :

of THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE

OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE 0
E






CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS |
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIB

pak ET LES AMERIQUES

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES

108 Montrose Avenue

P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist
| witness for Christ in The Bahamas”
THE THIRD LORD’S DAY AFTER THE NATIVITY,
BAPTISM OF THE LORD, JANUARY 14, 2007
} COLLECT: ;
Almighty God, in Christ you make all things new: transform
the poverty of our nature by the riches of your grace, and in
the renewal of our lives make known your heavenly glory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Kenneth P. Lewis (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Cecilia Gardiner

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)

7:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan
10:00 a.m. Prayer Band
11:00 a.m. Rev. Hilgrove Hamilton
6:30 p.m. Sis. Claire Robinson
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox
Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rey. Dr. Kenneth A. Huggins

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

7:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter
10:00 a.m. Rev. Julia E. Williams (Holy Communion)
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH (20 Cedar
Terrace, Tall Pines)
10:00 a.m. At Rhodes Memorial Church
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Fridays — Children’s Club
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
FASTING FOR JUSTICE — All Methodists of the Conference
are urged to fast for Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases.
The fast begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday
and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly:
“My God and My Right.”
RADIO PROGRAMS
“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS | at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.

PRAYERS

For Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases. Our brothers and
sisters in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes and other
natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.

The 195th Annual Session of Conference will meet from Friday,
January 12th to Monday, January 22nd, 2007 at Rhodes Memorial
Methodist Church.

ORES NTT



Were?

Bo

2 EDV OMB Fi Ey

Te he



THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 7 }
of ANDRE), }

scHool’’s |
NHI contributions |

‘smaller than
private insurers’

THE overall contribution of
each person in the National
Health Insurance Plan “will be
small” compared to the premi-
um charged by private insurers
for lesser benefits, Minister of
Health Dr Bernard Nottage said.

All employees will pay 2.65
per cent of their monthly earn-
ings up to a maximum of $5,000
he told the 16th annual
Bahamas Business Outlook at
the Radisson Cable Beach on
January 9.

“For example, an employee
earning about $1,000 per month

Se :
><] i

The International School of The Babamas
POUNDED 1948

(word school

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International |
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian |
candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2007. Full
information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com

Se

Dec TL

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications
for the position(s) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's |
degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful school-based |
experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual posts, are
that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or international school and
an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or advise
school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (.e. middle and upper)
school teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered
at this time, although permanent residents with the right to’‘work are invited to submit their
papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the recruiting
process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it will advertise internationally





will only be required to con- in January.
tribute $26.50 per month. For
someone earning $3,000, the | THE Minister of Health and National Insurance Senator Dr ALL SCHOOL

contribution will be $79.50.
Someone earning at the ceiling
of $5,000 and above will con-
tribute $133 per month.
Employers will match the con-
tribution of their employees,”

Bernard Nottage addressed the National Health Insurance Plan
at the 16th annual Bahamas Business Outlook seminar on
Tuesday at Radisson Cable Beach Resort.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)

Physical education: Years pre-school to 13 responsibilities. Candidates must have successful
experience in coaching years 7 to 13 in at least three of the following sports: baseball/softball; §
basketball; soccer; track and field; volleyball. Swimming/WSI certification would be welcomed. |}

PRIMARY SCHOOL

aT en soe

Bm aE

Dr Nottage explained.

Those who work for them-
selves will pay 5.3 per cent of
their earnings. Dr Nottage said
indigent pensioners will be cov-
ered by a contribution from the
government.

The minister said NHI will

be monitored and administered
by the National Health Insur-
ance Commission, a corporate
body. But it is proposed that
the commission purchases ser-
vices from National Insurance
Board to collect contributions
and process claims.

“The NHI Commission will
be obligated to provide services
to its members on a timely basis
and with dignity,” said Dr Not-
tage. “This will require improve-
ments in the health system, par-
ticularly the public sector.”

Efforts have already begun
to bring about the necessary
enhancements, he added.

Department of Public Health
clinics, by the end of February,
will provide services until 11pm,

he said.

The upgrading of existing
facilities is ongoing and plans
are progressing for the con-
struction of new facilities on
several islands, he added.

Dr Nottage said a National
Blood Bank will be operational
by the end of June to bring
about much needed improve-
ments in the availability of
blood and blood products. And
an aggressive customer service
initiative will be initiated
throughout the health system
by February 1.

“Admittedly, there are defi-
ciencies throughout the health
system,” he said. “As we seek to
address those which exist in the
public sector, plans have been
developed and investments will
be made to provide modern
information systems to support
regular audits and reviews and
mandated by NHI legislation.”

Another constraint of the
public sector is the unavailabil-
ity of essential sources, he said.

“Despite the almost $300 mil-
lion expended by the govern-
ment from the consolidated
fund,” said Dr Nottage, “the
capacity of the sector to meet
the growing demand for service
is adversely affected by short-
ages of prescription drugs, diag-
nostic equipment, and health
professional in specialised areas
of medicine nursing and the
allied health professional.”

NHI, he said, will provide
financial stability and sustain-
ability for the health system and
offer the benefits of cost-con-
tainment and ideal allocation of
resources, when compared with
a more market-based approach.

And, added Dr Nottage,
health outcomes have improved
at a quicker rate in countries
with NHI than those without.

“In the United States, life

“expectancy increased by 3.8

years for the period 1980 to
2004, compared to 5.7 years for
Germany and six: years for
Japan and France.”

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International
Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school should be
committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP. Applications are warmly
welcomed from teachers who are committed to an inquiry-based pedagogy but who have
not yet had the opportunity to teach in a PYP school.

Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.

Primary school music

Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful teaching experience at all years from
pre-reception to six. They must also have successful experience in organizing primary
school music and drama performances.

SECONDARY SCHOOL

The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the
BGCSE in years 10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma [|
Programme (DP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades -f

11 and 12).

Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able to
work as a contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach
to pre-university level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate

diploma programme.

Science

ose

6-2 am:

7 a a Ge.

_ 2 2 8 @ ewe wx

eee

cE ee

Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified:to teach biology to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either chemistry or physics at BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
_ Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Chemistry: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or physics to BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Mathematics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Successful experience in teaching calculus to AP and/or IB level is preferred for this post.
Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT II experience is also desirable.

Economics and accounts: Candidates must be familiar with current computer applications
theory and practice and should also be qualified to teach business studies and economics
to pre-university level. They should also be familiar with the demands of the International
Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful BGCSE or IGCSE experience is desirable.

Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications,
experience working with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle
schools are required from applicants for these posts. Applicants may also be required to
teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.

At least two of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in
teaching English in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following -
PSE; IT & ICA; art; drama - possibly to BGCSE level.

Another successful applicant will have documented successful experience in teaching general
science in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer any combination of biology, chemistry and
physics at BGCSE level. If he/she could also teach mathematics that would be useful.

Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful
experience in teaching in both areas. .
NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching
of the Theory of Knowledge course at IB diploma level. Another will be able to offer
the teaching of psychology at IB diploma level

Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mr Robert Wade, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications MUST include the following:

letter of application

a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy

a full curriculum vitae,

either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three
people who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name
and address of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers
may be obtained.

yo On Premises _
Check Our Price
Before buying —

Bahamas Bus & Truc

_ Call:

Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools
by email or fax only.

Frank Coyle, Head of the secondary school:

Email: FCoyle@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Allison Collie, Head of the primary school:
Email ACollie@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Robert F. Wade

Principal

St Andrew's School

P O Box EE 17340
Nassau

Email: -

Fax: (1 242) 364 1654

The closing date for applications is 31 January 2007. Applications from unqualified candidates,
applications arriving without the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this date will not be considered.







_ confirmed

THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

The task force is co-chaired
by Paul Major for the govern-
ment and Michael Maura of
Tropical Shipping for the pri-
vate sector, with the Dutch firm
Ecorys consulting.

The prime minister said that
this public/private sector part-
nership will ensure that the port
will run “not only efficiently but
also profitably.”

He emphasised that oppor-
tunities will be made available
for Bahamians to participate
significantly in the new port’s
ownership and management.

While government is expect-
ed to have some share in the
project, Mr Christie said that
the new port is expected to

- essentially be a privately owned

and operated facility.
So far preliminary environ-
mental impact reports have

theft of

Container

been conducted and arrange-
ments have made with the
landowners of the designated
area in the south-west of the
island.

Minister of Energy and Envi-
ronment Dr Marcus Bethel —
who his heading this project for
the government — commended
the New Providence Develop-
ment Company, Sun Oil Com-
pany, and the Oakes Estate for
their full co-operation in this
effort to move the container port.

Prime Minister Christie
explained that the port will be
placed in the area behind the
Commonwealth Breweries and
BEC’s generating facilities.

New separate roads, which
lead to the new port and the
nearby Clifton Heritage and

Police silent on

FROM page one

“Right now we really don’t
want to give any information
out to the press because the
matter is under active investi-
gation,” he said.

Once police had reached a
conclusion in the matter they

be. fooled by PLP

would be willing to discuss their
findings, he added.

The investigation is the lat-
est of several problems affecting
the national flag-carrier.

In mid-December, hundreds
of Bahamians were delayed in
their pre-Christmas travels
when Bahamasair pilots staged

Ingraham: Don’t

FROM page one
At arally in Grand Bahama

last month, Mr Ingraham

revealed the FNM candidates
for that island.

At a mass rally in Long Island
on Friday night, he officially
that Larry
Cartwright is the ratified oppo-

FROM page one

Nelson was among several
members of Congress and the

Bush administration who raised -
objections to a proposal last

year by then-Secretary of

Defence Donald Rumsfeld to.

redeploy the seven Bahamas
Blackhawks because of war
needs. Attorney General Alber-
to Gonzales, who oversees the
DEA, was among those ques-
tioning the move.

The DEA considers the heli-
copters a vital part of its Opera-
tion Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
—or OPBAT for short — which

- is credited with seizing thou-

sands of tons of cocaine and
marijuana since 1982 and with

sition candidate for the Long
Island/Ragged Island con-
stituency. :
During his speech to the rally,
Mr Ingraham told the crowd:
“We have completed our selec-
tion of candidates; we are mak-
ing ready for whenever elec-
tions are called. Do not forget
or neglect to register to vote;

helping drive drug smugglers
away from the vast island chain.

Without the army helicopters,
the DEA would have only one
helicopter in the Bahamas along
with three Coast Guard Jay-
hawks.

Under the agreement, which
must be approved by the White
House, the Pentagon will give
the DEA three Sikorsky heli-
copters in 2008 and provide oth-
er assets to temporarily fill the
gap created when the Black-
hawks are withdrawn by Octo-
ber 1 of this year, according to
Nelson’s office.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas







eed

Nassau.



of Treasure Cove,
Nassau, The
Bahamas will be
held at Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic
Church, Shirley
Street, Nassau, on
Tuesday, 16th
January, 2007 at
1:00p.m. Father Mel
Taylor will officiate
and interment will be
in .Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery,
East Shirley Street,

Mr. Pinder is survived by his wife, Lorraine
Moyra Pinder; his mother, Emily Pinder; sons,
Craig and Brett Pinder; a daughter, Tracy
Bonczek; granddaughters, Hannah and Hailey

Bonczek; brother, Godfrey Pinder; sister, Janet
Pinder; aunt, Agnes Knowles; son-in-law,

Zachary Bonczek and many other relatives and
friends including, Joey, Jude and Doreen, Billy
and Edna Kemp, Agnes and Kenny Roberts,
Gwen, Terry and Ruth, Billy and Lulabelle,
Kermit and Janet Cates, Nita and George Baker,
Harry, Laurette and Eleanor Albury, Ethelyn
and Hansford Darville, Elliott and Cynthia Sands,
Michael and Janice Knowles, Jackie Kemp,
Tommy and Candy Kemp, Karen and Glen
Pritchard, Martha Pinder, Jenny Viviano,
Michael and Cherie Pinder, Tyrone and Barbara
Albury, Joe and Barbara Bonczek, Robert Sands,
Mark and Aleece Campbell, lan and Tanya
Bayles, Randy and Stephanie Sands, Reg
Bonimy, Jimmy and Camaille Roberts and

Chuck Cartwright.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.



SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 9

ee

connect directly to Gladstone
Road Park have been proposed,
Mr Christie said.

From a planning point of
view, the prime minister said,
the new port is intended to
impact Andros, the Berry
Islands and South Abaco.

It will be a “major and mag-
nificent way” to provide link-
ages from New Providence to
these Family Islands, he said.

Mr Christie said he envisions
fast ferry and other quick trans-
portation connections between
the islands which will help
Andros, the Berry Islands and
South Abaco to develop expo-
nentially with what is happening
in New Providence.

Ecorys representative Mr van
den Bossche outlined the three
phases of the business plan, the
first step being the question of
the design of the port facility.

The second step in the busi-

a major sick-out as the ongoing
dispute over an industrial agree-
ment with the airline’s manage-
ment came to a new standstill.
Dismayed passengers con-
tacted The Tribune reporting
that their flights had been either
cancelled or severely delayed.
Hundreds of Bahamasair cus-

we need your vote to vote them
out.”
The PLP insiders quoted in
Friday’s story said the govern-
ment is hoping that the momen-
tum gained from the Majority
Rule celebrations and the 200th
anniversary of the end of the
transatlantic slave trade will
“seal the deal” and win the elec-



Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets



ness plan, he said, will look at
the cost of the project.

“The port will cost a lot of
money. It’s a huge investment,”
and it is something that has to
be done jointly between gov-
ernment and the private sector,
he said.

Mr van den Bossche said that
his firm will look into the ques-
tion of how such a move and
the new port can be financed.

“(The port) should not
depend to any great degree on
subsidies from the Bahamian
people, it needs to be self sus-
taining,” Mr Maura of Tropical
Shipping emphasised.

The third step in the business
plan, Mr van den Bossche said,
is looking at the issue of port
management.

The method of managing the
downtown port, he said, may
not be an optimal one for the
new facility.



1941-2006

tomers who were travelling to
do some last-minute Christmas
shopping, or just to travel home
for the holidays, were report-
edly stranded in US and domes-
tic airports.

Police officials said yesterday
that the theft is currently under
“active investigation”.



tion for the PLP.

However, during his speech
in Long Island, Mr Ingraham
said he understands not many
people turned up to the gov-
ernment’s Majority Rule event
held on Wednesday night.

An independent eyewitness
said that only around 200 to 300
persons were in attendance.

S
Change

“Daily Vol.

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

1.321587"

2.9728"**

2.500211**

1.217450°*"*

11.3075*****

no SANS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided b
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Bhd Clans Cll

aN SN
NAV KEY

*- 29 Decamber 2006

“* - 31 December 2006
***~ 31 Decamber 2006
see" ~ 31 Dacember 2006

nbar 2006
SORRY





Ne

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007 THE TRIBUNE






rea thfast SB: vials

he Site

Se :
i st









TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
JANUARY 16 - MARCH 23





READ THIS COMPELLING NINETEEN PART STORY ABOUT
MELI AND HER FAMILY'S QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.






he Tribune

believes that
reading helps people to
focus on constructive
choices through expo-
sure to worlds beyond aN securely—living in their. ancestral
their immediate envi- noe e-. community in Kosovo. But in 1999
ronment. ‘ A ~ Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic

Breakfast Serials pro- : Albanians from their homes. Family

vides the great gift of closeness is not enough. The
fine literature, read in intervention of U.S. forces is not

convenient installments

- so that the reader : |

| : dangerous journey in search of safety.
keeps coming back for as Though family ties and tradition are
More. | — severely tested, they eventually reach
_ : the U.S. and the tranquility of a
Vermont town. It is there that Meli



When Meli, an Albanian 11-year-old
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not








enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,
the family must flee, embarking on a






Read. Learn. Enjoy.



experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11 distrust of



sds sacedseceade sbepocsadcdcietseedesesecdeoacscdssneucase4dsesavecabasacaosdsesssodosoesesees Muslims. Her response is an inspiration for all.



Based on a true story, Long Road Home presents a warm and compassionate family’s



response to conflict and emigration to America.








Read "Long Road Home" with us... every Tuesday and Friday from
3 qxivune January 16 to March 23, 2007."






For more information about The Tribune's >? ic : ie
| | Ted A fast Serials

NIE Literacy Programme, contact | Good Books Unbound
“* nie@tribunemedia.net or call 502-2394.






THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Religious tourism is focus of Tourism Week

RELIGIOUS tourism will be
the topic of discussion during a
special segment of this year’s
National Tourism Week to be
held in Grand Bahama.

Carmeta Miller, the recently
appointed manager of faith-
based tourism and senior man-
ager of the religious market will
speak about her new position
and her charge to attract more
religious tourism to Grand
Bahama.

This is just one of many new
events planned under the
expanded schedule for this
year’s Tourism Week.

Grand Bahama will host a full
week of activities organised by
the Ministry of Tourism from
January 20 to 26.

The week will be highlighted
by a mini-conference in the Our
Lucaya Ballroom on Thursday,
January 25 where a line-up of
industry professionals headed
by Touris™’s director General,
Vernice Walkine will host gen-
eral sessions aimed at sparking
extensive discussions on the
future of the country’s most
vital sector.

Betty Bethel, who works with
the Ministry of Tourism in
Grand Bahama, noted during a

press conference, that prepara-
tions for the second annual
National Tourism Week are
now well underway.

“The national theme: ‘My
Bahamas Marketplace’, encour-
ages everyone to view the
industry’s relevance to all sec-
tors of the economy, and the
focus during the week will cen-
ter on increasing tourism relat-
ed linkages and lowering the
percentage of tourism earnings
currently being leaked outside
of the Bahamas,” she said.

“In Grand Bahama National
Tourism Week commences on
Sunday, January 21 at 1lam
with a church service at Mt
Zion Baptist Church, Jones
Town, Eight Mile Rock.

“On Monday at 9am a
careers fair kicks off in the Ball-
room of the Westin and Shera-
ton at Our Lucaya specifically
geared toward high school
seniors, grades 10 to 12.
Tourism in the primary schools
will take place on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday when
representatives of the tourism
office will visit primary schools
on Grand Bahama taking the
tourism message,” Ms Bethel
explained.

The primary school children
have been challenged to create a
poster under theme “Tourism is
everybody’s business”,
dents in Grades 7 to 9 will par-
ticipate in an essay competition.

Ms Walkine has described the
upcoming National Tourism
Week as a forum for frank,
open and honest discussion of
the tourism business. “It is very
important to meet regularly to
discuss issues relative to tourism
and to make adjustments and
improvements when necessary
in order to sustain and enhance
what we have,” she said.

“This year’s theme focuses
on the linkages between
tourism and other sectors of the
economy which we hope will
serve as a vital reminder that
tourism is indeed everyone’s
business.”

According to the Ministry of
Tourism, the new events have
been added this year to give
everyone an opportunity to par-
ticipate in “this most important
celebration”.

The ministry explained in a
statement that events are also
planned for other locations in
addition to New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

while stu-~

@ NATIONAL Tourism Week plans for! Grand Bahama being qumsuaced by touion officials.
From left to right, Carmeta Miller, senior manager for the religious market and faith-based
tourism; Betty Bethel, general manager for groups and special events, and Mikala Moss, assistant
naa for PR and communications for the film and television commission.

(BIS photo by Greg Christie)

EEE PETE eeTeEeeTTTTreeereerereerereereeereresereeeerereeererrrerrerrrreireererererrrrrereerereerrreeerrerereererrrrerrererrrrerreeereerer reeer rarer reer reer rrereerererrrr errr reer ere ere reer ereererrrrerrererrrrerrererrreerre rere treet rerer terre terre rere eee eee eee rer ee rer er errr ree rer ere eer rere rere eer Teer eeeeeeerererreerrerereeereeer rere rere ree er rere rrr rie oe

National agency to
help Bahamians train
for job opportunities

THE government has
announced the establishment of
a national training agency to
enable Bahamians to take
advantage of job opportunities.

Addressing the 16th Annual
Bahamas Business Outlook on
Tuesday Prime Minister Perry
Christie said another aim of this
initiative is to forge a compre-
hensive approach to training in
close collaboration with the pri-
vate sector.

“Through training, citizens will

be able to take the most advan- .

tage of the thousands of job
opportunities being made avail-
able to them,” Mr Christie said,

He said the government is
also committed to instituting
comprehensive training pro-
grammes at all levels of the pub-
lic service to keep pace with the
rapid development underway
in the country, and to ensure
necessary improvement in the
delivery of public service.

ft the helm of this initiative

is the College of the Bahamas,
he said.

*“T am personally committed
to the idea that the College of
the Bahamas must play a much
stronger role in the process of
development in our country,”
he said. “There should be no
need for the extensive engage-
ment by the government or the
private sector of foreign con-
sultancies if the College of the

Bahamas can bring its colleé”

tive expertise | to bear.”

Ace eeneceeueceenapeeseceeuscenaccaacnecacaeaseeecccnuscnencsesenunayecuaasnhpeccensceneceyacesuseeassasuesaensaceceeeeasneenweanauennensesaenescubeneensdnemaaceeenesuQeetbagerseeeeueseageaeneeneeee

Parent of three haemophiliac sons
speaks of her anger and frustration

FROM page one

“God gave me these boys for
a reason. They are brilliant,
good-looking and very intelli-
gent boys. One of these days I
will look back at the hard times.
I want my boys to have a place
in this world," she said, on the
verge of tears.

Haemophilia is an incurable
disorder which stems from defi-
ciencies in the blood clotting
factors. Persons with the con-
dition bleed in the same way
that those without it do, but for
longer periods. Cuts and bruis-
es are not a concern. The
biggest problem is the possi-
bility of internal bleeding.

"Unfortunately, it's some-
thing they will have to live with
for the rest of their lives," she
noted.

"Sometimes they are very
depressed because they can't
play sports like other children.
Sometimes they have to be
bedridden for long periods.
They have to rest the part of
- body that's injured.

“Elevate, ice-pack, take pain
killers," she said, “And they are
unable to use that limb until
recovery. When the bleeding
has stopped they have to do
therapy to get that limb mov-
ing."

So the boys constantly have
to learn how to walk again, she
explained. They have also
learned to treat themselves.

The treatment, a mixture of
blood plasma, which comes in a
powder form, and bacterial ster-
ile water, is intravenously inject-
ed.

"Their instinct has driven the
boys. They know that it is some-
thing that they have to have. I
did not have to get a few people
to hold them down to give them
the needle."

The biggest challenge with
their treatment, she explained,
is to find funds to pay for it.

"One week's worth of treat-
ment for Michael could cost
$32,000,” she said. “In a month
about $160,000 to $180,000
worth of treatment is required.
Sometimes it could be less,
sometimes it could be more."

Mrs Strachan has to depend

on her American friends, who
donate the factor for her chil-
dren. "I can't pay for it, I can't
get insurance, the government
can't assist so I call for help
from Americans -we depend on
them for donations. They have

‘been helping me for the past 16

years," she said.

Mrs Strachan has also devel-
oped relationships with other
parents whose children are
affected and assists them in get-
ting the factor.

“The medical system here is
not set so I can readily get the
factor,” she explained.

"If any of my kids gets into a
life-threatening situation and I
don't have the factor at home,
it's a chance that they won't sur-
vive. If you want the medica-
tion you have to request it
through the government."

The bills are piling up and
Mrs Strachan desperately needs
help. Originally, she explained,
her children were in public
school, but their father removed
them for fear of something hap-
pening to them.

"The risk is too great," she
said, referring to increasing vio-
lence in government schools.
"It’s a high risk. And because
they are teenagers, it presents
an even greater risk. High
schools are violent and I don't
want to take any chances.

“My kids are very sensitive
and they said ‘mommy, if you
put us back in the high school
system, we are going to be bom-
barded. People are going to see
us in the papers and they are
going to tease us.’"

They haven't been to school
since October. "I don't know
what to do because I don't have
the funds. I want my boys back
in school but I can't afford to
send them.

“It hurts me because here I
am trying to reach out to get
help for us and they don't want
me to do it. They feel like ‘why
do we have to be like this?’ -
and that hurts me. That makes
me feel bad.

“T am having second thoughts
about putting them back in the
high school system. They are
not going to want to learn and
that’s not fair on them. So I

need help," she said.

Mrs Strachan has created a
foundation in a atteiupt to raise
funds for children in the
Bahamas with the condition.
The Bahamas Haemophilia

Noting that the government
spends millions or. dollars on

‘consultation, the prime minis-

ter challenged COB to take an
increasingly expanded role in
such areas, especially those that
are researéh-driven.

He said that already, the gov-
ernment is taking advantage of
collaboration with Bahamian
academics in a number of ways:

¢ The $60 million spent on

“installing a fibre optic cable to

allow for modern communica-

Foundation has not yet been
launched, but she has estab-
lished a bank account with Sco-
tia Bank in the British Colonial
Hilton and is accepting any
donations. -

@ MINISTRY of Tourism director general Vernice Walkine

speaking at the event

tions throughout the country

e The installation of potable
water in the Family Islands

e The use of solar energy to
power airports at Congo Town
and Mangrove Cay in Andros;
New Bight and Arthur’s Town

FROM page one

Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said: “Following the initial
investigation at the scene, offi-
cers determined that arson was
the cause of the fire and arrest-
ed the 47-year-old male. resi-
dent of unit 2401.”

On the direction of a local
doctor, the man was flown to
Nassau for examination as part
of the police investigation.

No-one was hurt in the inci-
dent. Grand Bahama police are
continuing inquiries at the scene.

new location.

in Cat Island; Acklins; Crooked
Island; and Moore’s Island in
Abaco. -

Plans are also underway for
solar infrastructure at Sandy
Point, the Berry Islands, Bimini,
the Exumas and Long Island.

TPT so iccst RR esha saste ls ore aah Eee a oeeaoeeecad jevseseeceeeeeeseneceeeeeetanennueeeensesusenaceesssensseeaceeucnecessaseeuseneuenbasseseseesseacsaneas apesees

Chief Supt Rahming said the
American man and native Trea-
sure Cay woman, had been
engaged in a heated argument
when officers were called earlier.

Some time after officers left
the scene, the report came in
saying their apartment was
engulfed in flames and that the
fire was spreading.

When police and volunteer
firefighters arrived, the entire
six-plex structure was ablaze.

our continuing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

Aen are El a OF ahr NA a



| Visit or call your Agent
—at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

Premium payment functions will be
transferred from Collins Avenue to our
| Harbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

FAMILY
| GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY









LY



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2006 THE TRIBUNE



By Franklyn G Ferguson



aN

ON

‘

NASSAU

‘Dame Marguerite and Sir Garet
saluted at New Year’s Eve gala

EVENTS GAP TURE D CAMERA



FOR 26 years, a collection of
friends known as the New
Year’s Group has held an event
that has become known simply
as “The Gathering”.

This year’s Gathering paid
appropriate respects to the loss

1. Both honourees hail from
Long Bay Cays, South
Andros. It is certainly without
precedent in The Bahamas
that a Dame and a Knight
would have come from such a
small settlement.

2. Sir Arlington Butler, the
Bahamas first black Speaker
of the House of Assembly and
Sir Garet Finlayson first met
56 years ago, as apprentices in
a tailor shop situated at
Market and Lewis Streets.
Now they share tales with
Lady Sheila Butler and Lady
Rowena Finlayson.

3. Heart Specialist Dr Conville
Brown and his wife

Dr Corrine SinQuee-Brown,
pediatrics oncologist,
Professor Howard, and
Beverley Spencer research
co-ordinator UWI Medical
School The Bahamas campus.

4. The McGill connection.
Gary Mullings, author, shares
with his wife Janyne Hodder,
president of The College of
The Bahamas and a former
acting principal of McGill
University and Dr Arthur
Potter, managing director of
the Cancer Centre (Bahamas)
and president of McGill’s
Medical System and a recent
appointee to the Board of :
Directors of Air Canada.

5, Warmer than in Denmark.
Soren Barholt, chief executive
officer of one of the largest
engineering firms in Europe,
and his wife Sidel agree on the
warmth. The Barholts were
the guest of Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts and his wife.

h

6. Mark Finlayson, managing
director of Solomons Mines,
president of Clear Channel
with his wife Najah, vice
president of apparell, sun-
glasses and accessories at
Solomon’s Mines, celebrate
the New Year and their 15th
wedding anniversary with
family members and friends at
the Gathering.

7. Lawrence Bascom and his
wife Arlene, both professional
accountants, flew in from New
York to be a part of the
gathering- Mr Bascom is one
of the first Bahamians to have
been admitted to partnership
in a Big Four accounting firm
in America. His partnership |
in the USA was with Deloitte.

8. Former Banker and
businessman Alex Reckley
danced the hully-gully with
his daughter Solomonia
Reckley-Rigby.

9, Samuel “Bookie” Johnson,
Proprietor of Zanzibar
Courier Services pose with
his daughter Nikera, and his
wife Inez Johnson.





of a group member, Dr Richard
Crawford, in whose memory the
group has sponsored an award
at the College of the Bahamas.

Then special tribute was paid
in poetry to Dame Margaurite
Pindling by Dr Valron Grimes-

sth

10. Attorney Donna Smith, partner in the
firm of Sharon Wilson & Co. and
businessman Ed Fitzgerald, proprietor of
Global United enjoyed the evening.




Tinubu and in song to Sir Garet
and Lady Rowena Finlayson
by the Falcons band.

In response, Dame Marguerite
humbly made reference to her
first conversation with Queen
Elizabeth II, which helped her

lis

Bahamas!” :

to begin working on behalf of
the Bahamas Red Cross.

Sir Garet was commended
not only for his unparalleled
and consistent services in busi-
ness under three different gov-
ernments but also his philan-

11. Danny Houston, Leadership Consultant from Columbus, Ohio, son
of the late Vestra Hanna of Spring Point Acklins and Heather Atkinson,
Attorney for MGM Studios Los Angeles agree that “It is Better in The

t
}

thropy, which includes having
personally endowed with mil-
lions of dollars the trust fund
which provides scholarships to
dozens of Bahamians in the
memory of Archdeacon
William Thompson and former

Clayton.

12. Dr Tony Davis, Ella Davis, former
banker and jewelry entrepreneur enjoying
the evening with their daughter and

son-in-law Darel Davis-Clayton and Scott

prime minister Sir Lynden Pin-
dling.

Sir Garet also joined Robert
(Bobby) H Symonette in spon-
soring all of the Family Island
regattas in George Town, Exu-
ma for many years. ~





6. Hergqgusuon

P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas









oe

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Australia Friday Jan. 12, 2007.

@ A SEQUENCE showing England’s Kevin Pietersen reacting after being hit in the ribs



Australia wins by
eight wickets;
Pietersen ruled out
with broken ribs

B CRICKET
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

> RICKY Ponting guided Aus-

st

- "+" tralia to an eight-wicket win in

| the opening tri-series limited-

overs international against Eng-
dJand on’Friday, extending his
side’s unbeaten stretch against
the tourists in all versions of
cricket this summer.

Ponting scored 82 from 96
balls as Australia reached 246

- for two, surpassing England’s

,

242 for eight with more than six
overs to spare. .

He shared a 133-run partner-
ship with Michael Clarke, who
was unbeaten on 57 when Aus-
tralia passed the target.

Kevin Pietersen top scored
for England with 82 from 91
balls but was ruled out for the
remainder of the series after
being struck in the ribs advanc-
ing down the pitch at a Glenn
McGrath short ball. It was a
major blow, for England’s
series and World Cup ambi-
tions.

The Australian chase started
quickly, with Adam Gilchrist
and Matthew Hayden putting
on 101 for the first wicket
before Gilchrist was out for 60
from 61 balls, including five
boundaries and a six.

Hayden played the anchor
role and was out for 28 with the
total at 118.

“We played well again

“+ tonight. I thought our bowlers

‘did a good restricting job. We
took wickets along the way —
240, on this wicket, was proba-
bly 30 runs shy,” Ponting said.



in their one day international
day, Jan. 12, 2007.

Australia.is honing a squad
to win a third a consecutive
World Cup.

“We're not far away. This
group of players will form the
nucleus of our World Cup
squad. We’ve got some good
young blokes in among some
older blokes,” he said.

Pietersen clubbed three six-
es and four boundaries in his
91-ball knock, holding the Eng-
land innings together in the

middle overs before Andrew

Flintoff took over, hitting an
unbeaten 47 from 38 balls at the
end.

Treatment

Pietersen was hit in the ribs
by a rising short ball after a big
swing-and-a-miss on 73 and
needed treatment on the field.
He was later taken to hospital
for tests.

England management
revealed he would be sent home
after breaking a rib on his right
side. A replacement has not
been named.

Skipper Michael Vaughan,
who missed the 5-0 Ashes loss
to Australia, won the toss and
elected to bat, the move back-
firing early when Andrew
Strauss (12) was caught at slip
by Hayden and Vaughan (26)
was out in the same mode with
the total at 47.

Ian Bell (15) was. out with the
total at 73 before Pietersen and
Paul Collingwood combined in
a 95-run fourth wicket stand.

Collingwood (43) hada
reprieve when Cameron White



misjudged an attempted catch
in the outfield before veteran
paceman McGrath broke up the
partnership.

He deceived Collingwood
with a slower ball and had him
caught by Mitchell Johnson.

Pietersen, who smacked
White for sixes on consecutive
balls in the 36th over, was more
subdued after being hit by
McGrath and eventually was
out when he hit Stuart Clark to
Andrew Symonds:on the long-
on boundary.

England lost three wickets for
five runs in an 18-ball slump fol-
lowing Pietersen’s dismissal
before test captain Flintoff took
control, hitting five boundaries
to lift the run rate.

“We batted well at times, got |
ourselves a good platform,”
Vaughan said. “Again, Aus-
tralia chased us down with great
effect.”

Vaughan said Pietersen was
returning to England for treat-
ment.

“Tt looks like Kevin is going
home, a crack in his right rib ...
and trying to get him ready for
the World Cup,” he said. The
bad luck came in doses, he said:
“When it rains, it pours.”

England has lost every match
against Australia on this tour,
being swept in the Ashes test
series for the first time in 86
years and then being thrashed
by 77 runs in the Twenty20
international in Sydney on
Tuesday night.

Australia plays New Zealand
on Sunday. England’s next
match is against New Zealand
at Hobart on Tuesday.







@ AUSTRALIAN teammates Ricky Ponting, right, and Mitchell Johnson, second right, celebrate
after the dismissal of England’s batsman Ian Bell, second left, for 15 runs off the bowling of Braken

cricket match at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Fri-

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)





SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2U0U/, PAGE 3b





by a ball from Australia’s Glenn McGrath during the One Day International cricket at the MCG in Melbourne,

(AP Photo/PA, Gareth Copley)







LS Se oe) S ‘

HB ENGLAND’S wicketkeeper Paul Nixon, left, watches as Australia’s Michael Clarke hooks a
shot during their one day international cricket: match at:the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Mel-.. ,...... os
bourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007.:Australia won by 8 wickets. while. Pietersen suffered a:rib _ >. .-
injury from a McGrath delivery that has ended Pietersen’s tour.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft). .











@ ENGLAND'S Jamie Dalrymple, left, scurries on the ground while fielding as Australia’s Rick .

Ponting moves back to his crease during their one day international cricket match at the Mel-

bourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007. Australia won by 8 wickets.
(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

7
ll AUSTRALIA’S Cameron White falls over as he attempts to catch out England’s batsman Paul
Collingwood in their one day international cricket match at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in





Melbourne, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007. ;
(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft) cafe



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 7B



SATURDAY EVENING ~

JANUARY 14, 2007



JANUARY 13, 2007 |
| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 |
One Season

9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS ;
WPBT |Wonders

Keeping Up Ap- |As Time Goes | x * 4 INHERIT THE WIND (1960, Drama) Spencer Tracy, Frediic
peorani: New |By Steven and |March, Gene Kelly. Bible orator and liberal lawyer debate Darwinism.
miture. (CC) —_ jhis wife visit.

WPBT

7:30

fe The
awrence Welk
Show





NFL Football: INCIS Gibbs uncovers a twisted love [CSI: NY “Trapped” Danny activates |48 Hours Mystery “Murder on His
WEOR [AFC Playoff _|triangle as he hunts for the killer of Ja panic room and becomes trapped |Mind” A golden boy becomes a
Colts at Ravens {a murdered model. (CC) inside. 1 (CC) Killer. (N) A (CC)
Access a Dateline NBGA woman assumes [Psych Searching for a missing teen |Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
WTV4 {wood (N) (CC) [the identity of her missing twin. fata comic-book and scifi conven- |An accident leads detectives to
(CC) tion. (CC) questionable practices. (CC)

Fox NFL NFL Football NFC Divisional Playoff ~ Philadelphia Eagles at New Orleans Saints. Jeff Garcia and the Eagles
@ WSVN mae (Live) |take on Drew Brees and the Saints. From the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. (Live) (CC)
0



@ WFOR
WTVWJ

WSVN





















































:00) The Coral. {In Touch (CC) Hour of Power (CC) Billy Graham Classic Crusades
TBN tae Hour (CC)
*% 10 THINGS || x & x SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE ae Romance-Comedy) Jack Nicholson, Diane | &4 THE
TBS var ABOUT: |Keaton, Keanu Reeves. A music exec falls for the mother of his young girlfriend. (CC) (aon SHOW
: 19
:00) Flip That [Moving Up ‘Wedding Bells and Flip That House |Flip That House | Trading Spaces “Shrewsbury: Oak
TLC louse Las Ve- |Breakup Hel A caine divorce. (N) |“David” (N) (CC) |"Montse” Pasade- Street” Worcester Mass. (N)
gas home. (CC) na, Calif. (CC) oie eat
xx FOOLS — |x MISS CONGENIALITY (2000, Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Michael | * MISS CONGENIALITY (2000,
TNT RUSH IN (1997) |Caine, Benjamin Bratt. A clumsy FBI agent goes under cover at a beauty cone Sandra Bullock, Michael
Matthew Perry. pageant. (CC) Caine, Benjamin Bratt. (CC)
: Yu-Gi-Oh! G/X [Teen Titans Naruto (N) Zatch Bell The Prince of —|Mar (N)
TOON _ | ae eae Tennis
Les Années bonheur 45) Histoires | L’Envers du dé- |Village en vue
TV5 2 Ke chateaux — |cor |
Twc co Earth |Weather: PM Edition (CC) Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
(00 Casos de |Sabado Gigante Batalla de los Gemelos; boxeadores gemelos Carlos y Juan Velasquez. :
amilia: Edicion

| UNIV



Especial







cial Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

; od Psych Law & Order: Spe
‘USA ‘Who Ya Gonna |Stabler tries to pin another murder |A notorious judge's stepdaughter is |Cabot crosses the line to close a
Call?” (CC) on a serial killer. O (CC) raped and murdered. child molestation case.



1 VH4 *%% BMILE [The White Rapper Show Rappers | * *% AWESOME; | F...IN’ SHOT THAT! (2006) Audi-
(2002) Eminem. |compete. 1 ence members film the Beastie Boys.
VS.

Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic. From Worcester, Mass. (Live)
WGN

Shooting Size-
more 1

NLL Lacrosse Buffalo Bandits at
Colorado Mammoth.

rom the United Center in Chicago.













Bulls E

Funniest Pets & e |
a (och

People 1 (CC)



Live) [NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Chicago Bulls. F
(Live) 1 (CC)







Everybody American Idol Rewind “Hollywood |Billy Graham Special CW11 News at Ten -- Weekend
WPIX _|Loves Raymond |Week” © (CC) A Edition With Peter Thorne and
N (CC) Mary Murphy (CC)







CSI: Miami ‘Witness to Murder” A
mentally disabled man is the only
witness to a murder. (CC)

Jeopardy! (CC) | x» LOOK WHO'S TALKING (1989, Comedy) John Travolta, Kirstie Al-
ley, Olympia Dukakis, An unwed mother's baby offers a running commen-

tary on life.

WSBK

rope aaa eumere EU Italy aes McC ieee
oa x THE | x %% FIREWALL (2006, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Paul Bettany, ean Louis C.K.: Shameless The comic

HBO-E _|WEDDING DATE|Madsen. Premiere. A bank security expert battles a criminal. ( ‘PG-13' |performs at the Henry Fonda The-
(2005) A (CC) ; ater in Los Angeles.

(:15) & & CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 2 (2005, Com- [Deadwood “Tell Your God to Ready /Downtown Girls: The Hookers of

edy) Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. The Bakers’ vacation |for Blood” Deadwood's first true Honolulu © (CC)

tums competitive. ‘PG’ (CC) elections approach. (CC)

(:45) & &% THE FAMILY STONE (2005, Romance-Comedy) Dermot Mul-| x * THE WEDDING DATE (2005) Debra Messing,

HBO-W _ |roney, Sarah Jessica Parker, Diane Keaton. A man introduces his uptight |Dermot Mulroney. A woman brings a male escort to her
girlfriend to his family. O ‘PG-13' (CC) sister's wedding. O ‘PG-13' (CC)

6:45) * & & INHER SHOES a Comedy-Drama) | « % * WEDDING CRASHERS (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince

ameron Diaz. A sexy partyer clashes with her seri Vaughn, Christopher Walken. Partygoers spend a wild weekend with a

ous-minded sister. © ‘PG-13' (CC) politician's family. © ‘R’ (CC)

MISS CONGE- | x x FORCES OF NATURE (1999, Romance-Comedy) Sandra Bullock, | x x * 16 BLOCKS (2006) Bruce

NIALITY 2 Ben Affleck, Maura Tiemey. A groom hurries to his wedding, with a fellow |Willis. A world-weary cop protects a

traveler. ‘PG-13' (CC) witness from assassins.

(5) % *% ROLL BOUNCE (2005, Comedy-Drama): | #% DATE MOVIE (2006, Romance-Comedy) Alyson |Hotel Erotica
}ow Wow, Chi McBride. A roller-skater prepares for a_|Hannigan. A hopeless romantic faces many obstacles |Models work to-
big showdown. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) in her courtship, ‘PG-13' (CC) gether. (CC)

Sa * x % TOMORROW NEVER DIES (1997) % & FOUR BROTHERS (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese
ierce Brosnan. iTV, James Bond tries to short-circuit Gibson, André Benjamin. iTV Premiere. Siblings seek revenge for their
a communications tycoon. © ‘PG-13' (CC adoptive mother’s murder. © 'R’ (CC)

6:00) % 4 BE- | & % x TOMBSTONE (1993, ween Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Michael |(:15) % & PAYBACK (1999, Ac-





HBO-P

HBO-S





MAX-E
MOMAX
SHOW
TMC













OND THE SEA |Biehn. Doc Holliday joins Wyatt Earp for OK Corral showdown. ‘R’ tion) Mel Gibson, Gregg Henry,
[eo (co) fcc Jana, (CE





TBS
TLC
TNT

=

TV5

UNIV

VH1




WPIX
WSBK

HBO-P
HBO-W
HBO-S




NFL Football:
AFC Playoff






i Deal or No
eal (iTV) (N) 0
(CC)
The Simpsons
Homer lands in
basic training,

























8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS |

Nature “The Best of Nature: 25 Years” Memorable mo- |Dolphin Rescue Masterpiece Theatre ‘The Virgin
Queen” Anne-Marie Duff portrays
Elizabeth |. (CC) (DVS)

ments from the “Nature” series include clips from “The

Urban Elephant.” (N) © (CC) (DVS)

60 Minutes The forensic scientist in [Cold Case “Blackout” Lilly and | Without a Trace The team search-
the Duke lacrosse rape case made Spee reopen the 1998 case ofa jes for a competitive eater who dis-
a “big error’. (N) © (CC) wealthy family matriarch’s death. appears after a contest.

Grease: You're the One That! —_|The Apprentice: Los Angeles The {Crossing Jordan Jordan tries to
Want The casting search continues; |candidates design swimsuits for a _|figure out what happened the night
Olivia Newton-John. (N) (CC) beach fashion show, (N) Pollack was Killed. hi (CC)

24 ei 6: 6:00AM - 7:00AM/7:00AM - 8:00AM” (Season Premiere) A se- |News (CC)
rigs of terrorist attacks leads President Wayne Palmer into an unthinkable
day. (N) © (PA) (CC)





































































Wheel of For- | % % THE TERMINAL (2004, Canady Brame} Tom Hanks, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci. Premiere. A ia America’s [Extreme Makeover: Home Edition [Desperate Housewives Gabrielle Sa Brothers & Sisters Kevin falls
@ WPLG Itune (cc) European living in an airport befriends a stewardess. © (CC) @) WPLG [Funniest Home |A community leader and his family learns the hu of her secret ad- for a soap-opera actor who is un-
Videos (N) (CC) |get a new home. (N) (CC) mirer. (N) (CC) sure of his sexuality. (N)
rey. Vs}M=mey 7.1 1 roe si ‘CABLE CHANNELS ;
Sell This House! |Flip This House “Intern Affairs’ An |Flip This House (CC) Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History The Iceman and the Psychiatrist {Iceman Confesses: Secrets of a |Intervention ‘Cristy’ Alcohol and
A&E (CC) intem is recruited. (CC) (CC) A&E A (CC) Mafia Hitman 1 (CC) crystal-meth addict. (CC)
This Week Cor- |(:10) Al Qaeda: Time to Talk? ——_—|(:10) The World Uncovered “Sad- |BBC News The Reporters Extra Time BBC News Dateline London|BBC News Earth Report {BBC News Have Your Say
BBCI respondents. dam's Road to Hell” Dangerous mis-|(Latenight). BBCI (Latenight). (Latenight). |*Drawingthe —_|(Latenight).
sion through Iraq. Line”
BET The Wayans |The Wayans |The Wayans —|The Wire ‘The Tapet Chronicling a wide-ranging po- |The Wire “The BET :00) American {American Gangster “Smith Bros.” |American Gangster A crack enter- Soul Food “Don't Think This Hasn't
Bros. (CC) Bros. (CC) Bros. 1 (CC) lice investigation. /\ (CC) Detail” (CC) angster (CC) (CC) prise in Detroit. (CC) Been Fabulous’ © (CC)
CBC (00) NHL HOG AY Meee: Canucks at Toronto Maple Leafs. From Air Canada Centre in |NHL Hockey Edmonton Oilers at CBC co Planet [CRACKER (2006, Mystery) Robbie Coltrane, Barbara Flynn. A criminal CBC News: Sunday Night (CC)
oronto. (Live) (CC) Calgary Flames. (Live) (CC) . arth (N} (CC) {psychologist investigates a suspected murderer. (CC)
:00) Tim Deal or No Deal Contestants get a [The Suze Orman Show (N) (CC) Tim Russert Wall Street Jour-|High Net Worth [Chris Matthews |Big Brother, Big Business
CNBC chance to win money. 1 (cc} CNBC nal Report
(:00) This Week {Saving Your Life (N) Larry King Live CNN Saturday Night 00) CNN Live /Saving Your Life CNN Sunday Night
| CNN ‘tz CNN Sad (CC}
Scrubs JD. tres |x & & NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries, | * NATIONAL LAMPOON'S VAN % + NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries, |Demetri Martin The comic per-
-COM to spend time Aaron Ruell. Premiere. A gawky teen helps a friend run for class presi- | WILDER (2002, Comedy) Ryan COM Aaron Ruell. A gawky teen helps a friend run for class president. (CC) forms. (N) (CC)
with Turk. dent. (CC) Reynolds, Tara Reid. (CC)
Forensic Files Forensic Files |Forensic Files [Body ofEvi- [Body ofEvi- Body of Evi- Body of Evi- Cops “Coastto [Cops “Arizona” [Cops “Arizona” [Cops ‘Arizona’ [Cops “Arizona” |Beach Patrol Beach Patrol
COURT dence dence dence COURT [csr nica lave [avec) |atcc) {A (co)
The Suite Life of JUMP IN! (2007, Drama) Corbin Bleu, Keke Palmer, (i) Hannah ee The Suite Life of Zack & The Suite Life of JUMP IN! (2007, Drama) Corbin Bleu, Keke Palmer, (:45) The Re- —_|(:15) The Replacements “The Ma-
DISN Zack & ony David Reivers. A promising young boxer competes in |Montana 1 ‘ody “Commercial Breaks” Staff au- DISN Zack & Cody 1 |David Reivers, A promising young boxer competes in |placements |jestic Horse; Carnie Dearest” Horse;
Motivation. (CC) |double Dutch jump-rope. ( ‘NR’ (CC) (CC) ditions. O (CC) (CC) double Dutch jump-rope. £4 ‘NR’ (CC) foc) odd runs away. (CC)
This Old House |DIY to the Res- [DIY to the Res- Wood Works [Wood Works [DIY Freeform Furni- This Old House |DIY to the Res- 10 Things You |Tricked Out
DIY DIY
(CC) . cue cue Oak nightstand. ture A (CC) Must Know
DW In Focus (Ger- jJournal: Popxport Journal: with The Journal {lm Focus DW In Focus (Ger- Journal: with The Journal —_jlm Focus
man). Wirtschaftsbi- Business man). Reporters
E! -00) E!News — |Jack Nicholson: The E! True Hollywood Story Jack Nicholson. sateen aN Live Jason Lee; E! : cine Lohan: The E! True Holly-|The Girls Next |The Girls Next |Love Ride High Mainte-
_ eekend (CC) , the Foo Fighters. © (CC) " wood Story © (CC) Door Door Cameron Diaz. |nance 90210
‘ World's College GameDay (Live) (CC) College Basketball Georgetown at Pittsburgh. (Live) (CC) 00) SportsCen-|NFL Primetime [College Football Hula Bowl. From Honolulu. (Live) (CC)
ESPN Strongest Man ESPN tm ke (Live) (CC) : eke
Spanish Soccer Barcelona vs. Espanyol. (Same-day Tape) Karate: U.S. [SportsCenter -- International Edi- Tennis Australian Open -- Early Round -- Day 1. From Melbourne, Australia. (Live) (CC
ESPNI : es Open tion (Live) ESPNI : : ! ne
Daily Mass: Our |Door to Hope Bookmark The Holy Rosary|To Be Announced Father Father Corapi and the Catechism |G.K. Chesterton |The Holy Rosary A World At Hound of Heav-
EWTN Lady Pett cee | | EWTN {éroesche of the Catholic Church Prayer en
FIT TV “|Blaine’s Low |All Star Workouts Fat buming | Total Body Sculpt With Gilad Caribbean Work-/Namaste i FIT TV Health Cops: [Art of the Athlete “Steve Young” Insider Trainin “Basketball” Bas- |Ship Out, Shape Up Nine travelers
Carb Kitchen dance party. (CC) Strength training. O (CC) out O (CC) _| Firebird” (CC) New Orleans {Steve Young. © (CC) ketball players. tcc) try to trim their waistiines.
(:00) Fox Report [Heartland With John Kasich In |The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Primetime (Live) 00) Fox Report [War Stories With Oliver North — |Hannity’s America Big Story Primetime (Live
FOX-NC |" Columbus, Ohio. (Live) ae FOX-NC |) FoxRep y ene me)
NHL Hockey Washington Capitals at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Destination Wild|The FSN Final [ College Basket: [College Basketball Oregon at Arizona. (Live The FSN Final -
FSNFL |Sunise Fea (Subject to Blacout) (Live) | Score (Live) FSNFL |pai’ q : me Score (Live)
(:00) PGA Golf Sony Open in Hawaii -- Third Round. From Waialae Country Club in Honolulu. (Live) Post Game -00) PGA Golf Sony Open in Hawaii -- Final Round. From Waialae Country Club in Honolu- |Post Game Show (Live
GOLF |” ne pus posta «| | |GOLF ithe ee : (Ue)
(:00) Greed (CC) |Gameshow Moments Gone Ba- |Gameshow Moments Gone Ba- |Gameshow Moments Gone Ba- 00) Twen Greatest Game Show Moments [Lingo (CC) - JLingo (CC Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC
GSN nanas 1 (CC) nanas 1 (CC) nanas 1 (CC GSN MI nN icy (N) ae go (C0 , oe
: -00) Star Trek [Star Trek: The Next Generation “A |Cops “Virginia |Cops “Indianapo- Cops “Indianapo-|Cops “Indianapo- Cops “Indianapo- [Cops “Indianapo- [Cops “Indianapo- |G4 Presents The Adult Entertainment Expo 2007 The latest movies
GATech [yreteave’ |Fistu of baas" A (CC) Beach” (V(CC) lls" (CC) ls" (CC) ls” 4 (CC) GATech [ish (Cc) fist A (Co) lls" (CC) land periormers ofthe adit entertainment industry.
MYSTERY WOMAN: OH BABY (2006) Kelie Martin, MYSTERY WOMAN: IN THE SHADOWS (2007, Mystery) Kelle Mart, % ki MATLOCK: NOWHERE TO TURN (1990) Andy | * PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE MURDERED MADAM (1987,
HALL Clarence Williams Il. A sleuth investigates murder after|Clarence Williams Ill, Nina Siemaszko. Premiere. A sleuth finds espi- HALL Griffith, Nancy Stafford. Attorney Ben Matlock is ac- Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, Ann villian. A young prostitute
someone abandons a baby. (CC) onage linked to a KGB double agent. (CC) cused of murdering an L.A. judge. (CC) holds the key to a former madam’s death. (CC)
Design Rivals [Makeover Wish [Takeover My [Home to Stay [My First Place |How Not to Decorate ‘Fife Slated :00) Million Dol-]The Big Flip [Buy Me “Mavis &/House Hunters [Junk Brothers |Holmes on Homes /’ (CC)
HGTV “Family Flow” |Setbacks. — |Makeover Home aot Coun” |Honeymoon re- |coffee table. HGTV ar am “Holly-/Floors arent lev- Water A Alexandria, Va. |An old wooden
: Kitchen. (CC) —_|(CC) theater. A (CC) treat. © (CC) wood’ (CC) el. O (CC) Nn — trunk. 0 (CC)
tf ~~ |(:00) Old Time | Gaither Homecoming Hour Specials Christian Artist ||-Gospel i's aNew Day In Touch (CC “TTheRiig Is ~~ |Calvary Revival Jack Van Impe jManna-Fest (CC
INSP [gata [trenton fesse dea _| INSP ee elds lene" Pees [ere
~ 1 |e NOTHING TO-LOSE (1997, Comedy-Drama) /My Wife and According p Everybody _|NBA Basketball: % JUST VISIT: |All of Us Robert [Girlfriends = |The-Game Kelly! |Everybody'. - [Reba Reba | Reba Barbra
KTLA [Martin Lawrence, Tim Robbins. An ad executive be- Kids “Jay the Jim ‘Wedding _jLoves Raymond |Cavaliers at Clip- KTLA _ [ING (2001) Jean Jaids a stranger. "Everybody Hates|approaches Ja- |Hates Chris catches Kyra Jean suspects
comes a carjacker's unlikely buddy. 0 Artis’ © (CC) |Bell Blues” (CC) | (CC) pers Reno. n (CC Monica’ (CC) — |son for money. {Chris is robbed. drinking. (CC) the new inter.
~ {MOM AT SIXTEEN (2005, rae Mercedes Ruehl, | % x SHALL WE DANCE? (2004, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, | TO BE FAT LIKE ME (2007, Docudrama) Kaley Cuo- | %: SHALL WE DANCE? (2004, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere,
LIFE Jane Krakowski, Danielle Panabaker. A teen must hide | Jennifer Lopez, Susan Sarandon. Premiere. A husband takes dancing les- LIFE co, Caroline Rhea. A slim teen faces ridicule while pos-|Jennifer Lopez, Susan Sarandon. A husband takes dancing lessons from
the fact that she has a child. (CC) sons from a beautiful instructor. (CC) ing as a 250-pound student. (CC) a beautiful instructor. (CC) ;
:00) Circle of [Crime & Punishment ‘People v. |MSNBC Investigates: Lockup: In- |Warrior Nation “Malice at the Lockun: Inside )MSNBC Special: Quest for Atlantis Meet the Press (CC
MSNBC rents Contreras’ 1 (CC) side Alaska ? : Palace” ° ; MSNBC San Quentin ; ; ns
SpongeBob _ |The Fairly OddParents ‘Fairy Idol” SpongeBob SpongeBob —_|Full House 1 |Full House Just Jordan (N) [Zoey 101 |Unfabulous ‘The|Full House |Full House ‘The {Roseanne ‘D-|- |Roseanne
NICK A (CC) SquarePants [SquarePants (|(CC) (CC) NICK farm Ice} Drama’ ‘(CC Test'(CC) _|W-O-R-C-E"A_|(CC)
NFL Football: [NFL Football NFC Divisional Playoff -- Philadelphia Eagles at New Orleans Saints. Jeff Garcia and the Eagles -00) Brothers & [Extreme Makeover: Home Edition [The Apprentice: Los Angeles (N) |News (CC) |News
NTV AFC Playoff take on Drew Brees and the Sains, From the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. (CC) NTV le (N) (CC) |'Noyola Family" (N) © (CC) a ice) . geles(N) (
Late Model Dirt |Two Roads to Baja (N) THE WILD ANGELS (1966, Drama) Peter Fonda, Nancy Sinatra. A 00) SPEED Re-|Payback Jim {Street Tuner —/Pinks NOPI Tunervi- {Redline TV
‘SPEED a eee ne tena > 42 rough band of motarcyclists roams through California. SPEED Ot (N) Catiezd Challenge sion
(

* &% SOME-
THING’S GOTTA
GIVE

Jack Hayford Joel Osteen. __| Taking Authority |Believer’s Voice |Changing Your |Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) i (CC) (CC) of Victory (CC) |Worl (C2)
( (PA)
)

eu American
hopper

(:00) Law & Or-
der “Ghosts”. 1
(CC) (DVS)













































4 FORREST GUMP (1994, pe PA) Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise. A slow-witted South-
emer experiences 30 years of history. (C

American vue “OCC Produc- [American Chopper ‘Billy Joel Bike” Billy Joe'’s Indian bobber motorcy-
tion Bike’ OCC decides tomass- cle.
produce a bike.

% * x AIR FORCE ONE (1997, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Ga
Glenn Close. Premiere, Terrorists hijack the president's plane. (CC)






Oldman, |x * * AIR FORCE ONE (1 al
Harrison Ford. Terrorists hijack the
president's plane. (CC)










My Gym Part- ass of 3000
TOON nef a Monkey

Questions pour

un champion
Storm Stories |Weather: PM Edition (CC)
TWO

mo La Hora
ico

00) Monk “Mr. |Monk “Mr. Monk and Little Monk” A
USA tr Gets Jury |childhood crush asks for Monk's

Duty’ (CC)



00) 2006 Dakar
allly

VS. lI Tape)
Funniest Pets & |American Idol Rewind “Audition 5°
WGN ___ People n (Cc) | (CC)

Reba Barbra
Jean suspects
the new intern.

That '70s Show
Eric decides to
go on the road.





TLove New York "Do You Have Love for New York?” |Surreal Life Fame Game Scan- {Hogan Knows Shooting Size-
New York makes the first cut dalous video. Best more Ny n
Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic. From Worcester, Mass. (Same-day 2006 Dakar Rally The most gruel-









i Edd n Eddy cin Adven- — Squirrel Boy

Futurama 1 ‘| Aqua Teen
ures CC

Hungerforce







Vivement dimanche Musiques rebelles Americas



It Could Happen |It Could Happen |Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
Tomorrow Tomorrow

Bailando por la Boda de Mis Sueftos Concursantes compiten para ganar una boda,



Monk Monk travels to Mexico to
probe the mid-air drowning of a sky
diver. (CC)

Monk ‘Mr. Monk Gets Cabin Fever”
Monk uncovers a murder while lying
low in a remote cabin.





help. (CC)



















ing off-road race on Earth.

WGN News at |(:40) Instant Re-
Nine © (CC) |play 4 (CC)






Maximum Exposure A man eats
live snakes; mud-bogging. (CC)











CW1i News at Ten -- Weekend
Edition With Peter Thorne and
Mary Murphy (CC)

Red Sox This |Red Sox Stories
Week

7th Heaven The Camdens help
make a difference in the world. (N)
0 (CC)

Patriots 5th Quarter

Beauty and the Geek The geeks
must sketch a portrait of a nude
woman; another elimination. (CC)

Stone Undercover ‘The Grand Al-
liance” (N) (CC)












PREMIUM CHANNELS.

Rome ‘Kalends of February’ Pullo. |Rome “Passover” (Season Pre- ~ {Extras (Season | % % %% MU-



G45 4) MR
MRS. SMITH
(2008)



olin Firth.

Pearl Tracking the

00) % * BOYS ON THE SIDE (1995, Comedy-
rama) Whoopi Goldberg. A cross-country trip draws
three women together.

oe 4 NANNY MCPHEE
2005, oo GC owe husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. (\ ‘PG-13}

The Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniell TSUNAMI, THE AFTERMATH (2006, Docudrama)
terrorist Omar Sheikh.











and Vorenus are rewarded. (CC)|miere) Mark Antony makes plans to |Premiere) (N) NICH (2005) Eric
leave the city. (N) © (CC) (CC) Bana. 'R’ (CC)

% % THE FAMILY STONE (2005, Romance-Comedy) Dermot Mulroney,
Sarah Jessica Parker, Diane Keaton. A man introduces his uptight girl
{friend to his family. © ‘PG-13' (CC)

(:45) % & MR, & MRS. SMITH (2005, Action) Brad Pitt, An





'R’ (CC)







elina Jolie, Vince Vaughn. A
(CC)





| * & ONE FINE
lives of journalist Daniel Pearl and |(Part 2 of 2) Tim Roth, Chiwetel Fo Acataclysmic |DAY (1996) ‘PG’
(ec) event devastates Thailand in 2004. 1 (CC) (CC)






MAX-E
MOMAX



TMC

Pe * LIVE
WIRE (1992)
Pierce Brosnan.






(as) 4
AD HOT BALL-
ROOM

6:20) SWIM-
ING UP-
|STREAM (2001)



a * kx 16 BLOCKS Lee Action) Bruce Willis,
ios Def. Premiere. A worl
ness from assassins. (1 ‘PG-13' (






% % & ASSAULT ON PRECINCT: 13 (2005, Action) Ethan Hawke, Lau- | * BACHELOR PARTY (1984)
rence Fishburne, John Lequizamo. Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta-|Tom Hanks, Hookers, mule and
tion to kill a gangster. 1 'R' (CC) more show up for guy's bash. 'R’
% & % SERENITY (2005, Science Fiction) Nathan Fillion, Gina Torres,
ec. A spaceship crew gets caught in a deadly conflict. ‘PG-
* & PRETTY WOMAN (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia |The L Word “Livin’ La Vida Loca”
Roberts, Ralph ae Cc) A corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a (iTV) (N) © (CC)



-weary cop protects a wit-
CC)





business escort. 1 'R

& DUANE HOPWOOD (2005, Comedy-Drama)
David Schwimmer. Premiere. A divorced alcoholic
siugles reunite fami.

* % THE BIG WHITE a Comedy) Robin
Williams, Holly Hunter. Premiere, An indebted travel
agent resto commit insurance fraud. (1 'R' (CC)












Partly cloudy and

Windy with times of Partly sunny and
clouds and sun. breezy. breezy.
High: 81°
High: 79° Low: 69° Low: 69°









AccuWeath

eet eye)

[| 88°-70° Fd

asiceilacl




Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



ESP its





Sunday

Today Today Sunday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low
Fe OF FL FC ; ; Fe OFC FC FC Fe FL
Albuquerque 51N0 29/-1 + 41 21/-6 pe Indianapolis 425 36/2 + Nh 341 4 Philadelphia 5412 36/2 —
Anchorage 24/-4 13/-10 sn 20/-6 13/-10 sf Jacksonville 75/23 53/11 pe 78/25 55/12 pe Phoenix . 5412 37/2
Atlanta 66/18 51/10 pe 72/22 52/11 Kansas City ~24/-4 22/-5 i ~——-28/-2 14/-10 sn Pittsburgh 44/6 33/0
Atlantic City 58/14 31/0 © 4577 39/3 © Las Vegas 43/6 26/-3 $s 43/6 26/-3 pc Portland, OR 38/3 26/-3
Baltimore §5/12 40/4 r 46/77 «39/3 Little Rock 5412 47/8 + 6216 41/5 +t Raleigh-Durham 68/20 50/10
Boston 48/8 27/-2 ¢c 38/3 36/2 pc Los Angeles 59/15 38/3 s 63/17 41/5 pe St. Louis 37/2 33/0
Buffalo 34/1 23/-5 ¢ 33/0 28/-2 ¢ Louisville 47/8 39/8 48/8 45/7 + Salt Lake City -24/-4 13/-10
Charleston, SC 73/22 53/11 pc 76/24 54/12 pc Memphis 5713 52/11 t 64/17 45/7 ¢t San Antonio 70/21 59/15
Chicago 32/0 25/-3 ¢ 30/-1 21/-6 sn Miami 80/26 68/20 pc 80/26 70/21 pc San Diego 58/14 40/4
Cleveland 35/1 27/-2 1 35/1 30/-1 Fr Minneapolis 19/-7 7/-13 pc 20/-6 7/-13 sf San Francisco 53/11 37/2
Dallas 39/3 38/3 F&F 39/3 33/0 +r Nashville 5713 510 Fr 6116 48/8. t Seaitle 37/2 28/-2
Denver 15/-9 10/-12 sn 18/-7 5/-15 sf New Orleans 74/23 62/16 c 76/24 5713 ¢ Tallahassee 77/25 49/9
Detroit 34/1 28/-2 ¢ 34/1 24/-4 ¢ New York 52/1 35 rr 43/6 37/2 Fr Tampa 80/26. 61/16
Honolulu 81/27 68/20 s 80/26 69/20 s Oklahoma City 30/-1 27/-2 i 27/-2 24/-4 ij Tucson 53/11 31/0
Houston 74/23 64/17 t 70/21 43/6 t Orlando 78/25 57413 pe 80/26 59/15 pe Washington, DC 57/13

36/2

Warm with several
hours of sunshine.

Ww
r

pe
t

r

High: 83°
Low: 71°

RealFeel



High Low
Fe FIC
43/6 39/3
5713 36/2
44/6 37/2
36/2 29/-1
70/21 50/10
35/1 28/-2
22/-5 10/-12
69/20 42/5
60/15 43/6
55/12 39/3
39/3 31/0
75/23 54/12
80/26 62/16
5512 27/-2
48/8 40/4








M







ODERATE



Partly sunny and

Warm with several
_ hours of sun. remaining warm.
High: 83° High: 83°

Low: 71°

Veather F

Low: 68°

er RealFeel :





Feel

85°-74° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.



TT Te

. 17° F/25° C





. 70° F/21° C

. 17° F/25° C

NOrmal OW ......cesescssecsesseesesseceteseeeee OO” F/18° C

Last year’s HIGH 02... .eeessesessesseeeeeeee O17 F/27° ©

Last year’s low ...... snbietcaitintennn Ol TL.
Precipitation :

AS Of 1 p.m. yeSterday 0... cssecsesseeeseeeeeee 0.00"

Year to date .............. . 0.26”

Normal year to date . 0.69”
AccuWeather.com

_All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.



Sunset. .
Rew



Jan. 18

High: 62° F/28°C
Low: 66° F/19°C
GREAT INAGUA
High: 85° F/29°C
Low: 68°



High: 81° F/27° C
Low: 68° F/20° C

F/20°C

Sunrise... ... 6:57 am.
. 5:40 p.m.





ea 4 *

Jan.25 Feb. 2









Feb. 10





‘Acapul

Helsinki
‘Hong Kong
Islamaba
Istanbul ©.
Jerusalem
Johannesburg =~
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi

New Delhi.
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro.

Riyadh

Rome a

St. Thomas

San Salvador
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo’

Seoul

Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna.
‘Warsaw
Winnipeg

Weather (W): s-sunny,

















Today Sunday
High Low W High Low W
FC F/C FC F/C -
88/31 73/22 s- 87/30 71/21 s
50/110 47/8 c 48/8 38/3 s
37/2 23/5 sn =—s«39/8—Ss 25/-3 pc
61416 51/10 s
T7125 66/18 pe
93/33 76/24 pc
85/29 75/23
6417 48/8 pc
AB 26s 39/3 23/-5 pe
6116 54/12 ¢
53/1 37/2 pc 37/2 pe











30/-1



GIANG s -
Bc





70/21 ¢





49/9 41/5 ¢
5412 37/2 po”





40/4 22/-5 pce 30/-1 17/-8 pe
8127 61N6 ss 81/27 B58 s
36/2 23/-5 sn 28/-2 25/-3 sn
68/20 58/14s = 69/20. 61/16 pe:
67/19 40/4 s 66/18 40/4 s
47/8 41/5 pe 49/9 45/7 pe
54/12 42/5 pc 56/13 44/6 s
$227 S915 pe —— 76/24: 58/14 pe
86/30 76/24 pc 88/31 76/24 pc
978/85 70/21 c= 82/27 70/21
55/12 45/7 sh 46/77 414 pe
~-§5A2 34/1 s- §5/12 - 34/1 s
86/30 73/22 pc 86/30 73/22 pe
77125 416 s 78/25 «42 s-
79/26 59/15 pc 87/30 51/10 pc
2° 24/-4 10/-12 pe = —-26/-3-13/-10 pe
35/1 34/1 sf 35/1 26/-3 sn
52/11 35/1 -¢ 50/10 38/3 c™
80/26 52/11 pc 78/25 50/10 c
70/21 40/4 s 6618 416 s-
34/1 21/-6 pc 28/-2 27/-2
49/9 «43/6 po | 47/78 36/2 pc
5140 8639/3 c _ 47/78 28/-2 pe
83/28 72/22 t 81/27 74/23
66/18 48/8 pc 59/15 46/7 pc
6626) 44 Ss 63/17 45/7 pe
83/28 73/22 pc 84/28 74/23 t
102/88 «71/21 's 90/32 70/21 pc
89/31 70/21 s 89/31 70/21 pc
90/32 57/13 s 88/31 57/13 s~
83/28 69/20 c 83/28 68/20 pc
74723 6417 + STT25 BEB
30/-1 11/-11 s 36/2: 20/-6 s
39/3 32/0 sn = =——s 3471 3:10 sn
73/22 67/19 pe 74/23 65/18 pc
67/19 62/16 pc 74/23 65/18 pc
43/6 32/0 pc 46/7 34/1 s
31/0 22/-5 po. 32/0 - 25/-3 ¢
88/31 74/23 t 86/30 69/20 t
36/2. 28/-2 pe 36/2 30/-1 pe
= 52/11 41/5 c. 50/10 33/0 c
“48/8 39/3 46/7 31/0 r
‘10/-12 -6/-21 ¢ -2/-18 -12/-24 pc

pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



-2}-
84/28 69/20 pc 69/20 pe
85/29





SES eee
VISIBILITY
5-7 Miles
6-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles
4-7 Miles



WAVES
3-5 Feet
3-5 Feet
3-5 Feet
2-4 Feet
4-7 Feet

WINDS
ENE at 12-25 Knots
ENE at 10-20 Knots
E at 10-20 Knots
E at 8-16 Knots
ENE at 12-25 Knots
E at 10-20 Knots



NASSAU = Today:

Sunday:













EN] Showers
EX] T-storms
“0_4 Rain
Flurries
pe) Snow
[v_Â¥] Ice

Fronts
Cold ==="

Warm ienM@ientie
Stationary Moxa

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

ur

o Insurance,

AGENMIC

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

j Elvthers =] Exon |
We |









THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 5





Man admits
to drunk
charge and
is fined

A MAN has been sen-
tenced to serve two years in
prison and ordered to pay a
$5,000 fine after pleading

guilty to a substantial drug




Church
| 1:00 — Gillette World Sports
fs.1530 Sports Desk

=} 2:00

charge earlier this week.
Christopher Sharsky
Williams was charged. with
taking preparatory steps to
export cocaine as well as
possession of the drugs with
the intent to supply on
Thursday March 3, 2005.
Williams was arraigned on
the charges on March 4, 2005.
At that time, he pleaded
not guilty and was granted
bail.
On Wednesday however,
Williams pleaded guilty to
the charges.

Former
officer faces
underage
sex charge

A FORMER police con-
stable accused of having’ sex
with a 13-year-old girl was
charged before a local admin-
istrator on Andros earlier this
week.

Oswald Poitier Jr, 31, was

, hot required to enter a pleato }
the charge of unlawful inter- :

course.

It is alleged that Poitier

committed the offence some-
time on Friday, December 22,
2006 while at New Provi-
dence.

Poitier was remanded into

police custody until January

13 which is when the case
continues.

Man denies
involvement
in marijuana
conspiracy

A MAN was granted
$100,000 bail yesterday in
connection with drug con-
spiracy charges involving 714
pounds of marijuana.

Michael Swaby ,49, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel on Tuesday
and pleaded not guilty.

He returned to court yes-
terday for a bail hearing.

The case has been
adjourned to March 27, 2007.

REE Haut:

SATURDAY
JANUARY 13TH

12:30 Bullwinke & Friends
1:00 King Leonardo
Â¥1:30 The Fun Farm



















2:30 411 ;
3:00 Matinee: “Polly”
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 — Gillette World Sports
6:00 In This Corner
6:30 — Sports Lifestyle
j 7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Native Show
1 8:00 Spurgeon Smith 2007
New Year’s Day Junkanoo
Highlights
10:00 Tropical Beat
) 11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Hustle
12:00 The Bahamas Tonight



12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
JANUARY 14TH

6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:30 Spiritual Impact

9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.

9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference

Effective Living

This Is The Life

St. Barnabas Anglican













10:00
10:30
11:00






This Week In The Bahamas
Agape Full Gospel Baptist




2:30








Church

3:00 St. John’s Jubilee
Cathedral

3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries

4:30 Temple Fellowship Ministries
International





5:00
6:00

Walking In Victory
Five Porches of Deliverance
Centre

The Bahamas Tonight
Kemp Road Ministries
Calvary Deliverance Church
Immediate Response: Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Meet The Press
Bahamas Tonight

New Dimension
Community Pg. 1540AM






7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30







} 11:00
} 11:30



NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!






@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

I VEX because the College
of the Bahamas is so back-
wards. First of all, their regis-
tration is off. The process is
absolutely ludicrous. They
need to update many of the
facilities and they supposedly
implementing a new system
but nothing looks like its
changing. It’s 2007, we sup-
posed to be moving forward,
but it seems as if we are going
backward.

- Miss Educated

I vex because when the bus
drivers let off people they feel
as though it is okay to stop right
in the road and hold up traffic
with no concern of drivers
behind them.

-Road Runner

I vex because now it time for
elections and everyone is try-
ing to get something for noth-
ing, instead of trying to get
things for themselves they
expect the government to give
them everything, and they try
to hold them hostage because
they feel as though they would
need their vote. I say stop using
this time to take advantage of
the government and be grate-
ful that they are trying to better
this country.

-Patriot

I vex at the girl who’s calling |

another woman man and telling
him that she is nothing without
him. Please go get your own
man before I really get Vex!

-One Woman Man

I vex cuz the FNM didn't

Why you vex?

support the Majority Rule day
celebrations, making it same
as though it was a political
plot — and if it wasn’t for that
day many of us wouldn’t be
able to enjoy the lifestyles we
have now. Shame on Hubert
and his party, and he says he
is the future for this country,
and he can’t even support the
past.

-RK

I am extremely vex because
Immigration isn't coming in the
Bain Town area to round up
the illegal immigrants. There
are new ones everyday, so they
need to be more visible.

-N Hall

I vex because it’s always dif-
ficult for me to get online with

this BaTelCo DSL service. I
really need to switch to cable.
Just last month, my cousin, who
was also experiencing problems
with her DSL connection,
switched, and she said it’s much



" better now. BaTelCo needs to

do something with the connec-
tion before they lose anymore
customers to the competition

-DISconnected

Cargo scanner is officially
commissioned in Freeport

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A $3 million
mobile cargo scanner was offi-
cially commissioned on Thurs-
day at the Freeport Container
Port, which is now among more
than 40 ports operating under
the US Container Security Ini-
tiative programme.

US Ambassador to the
Bahamas John Rood and Prime
Minister Perry Christie attend-
ed the unveiling of the new car-
go scanning system, which is
capable of detecting weapons
of mass destruction and illegal
contraband that could be hid-
den in containers bound for the
United States.

Mr Rood said the CSI bene-
fits both countries and reported
that since its inception last
December, 245 containers were
scanned using x-rays and five
were physically inspected fol-
lowing inconclusive scans at the
container port:

In addition to the security
regime, Ambassador Rood
explained that pre-screened
containers at FCP allow con-
tainers shipped to immediately
enter into the commerce in the
United States without any
delays.

“Together with the Mega-
ports Initiative, a US Depart-
ment of Energy programme
that today screens more than
90 per cent of the cargo con-

tainers at Freeport Container

Port, CSI makes this container
port one of the most secure and
efficient ports in the world for
transshipment of containers to
the United States,” he said.
US Customs Border Protec-

tion officers, who will operate
the scanner, conducted a
demonstration for Ambassador
Rood and Prime Minister
Christie, showing the efficien-

cy of the scanner which is ablé «
‘to examine three containers in :

less than five minutes. ¢

Mr Rood said that Bahamian
Customs officials have been ful-
ly trained in the CSI pro-
gramme and will be responsi-
ble for all aspects of the pro-
gramme, except driving the
scanner.

“Hutchison Port Holding,
operator of the FCP, provided
the facility to house the scanner
and the US and Bahamian per-
sonnel who will operate it, and
oversee the programme. This is
truly a partnership that makes
both of our countries safer and
more prosperous,” he said.

Prime Minister Christie said
the CSI programme, which is a
joint operation between the US
and the Bahamas, will ensure

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN LUE FAUSTIN OF
COLLINS AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX SB-50766
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY JOHNSTON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, P.O. Box AB 20282, ABACO,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

OPEN HOUSE
LUXURY OCEAN
FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina

1 to 6 bedroom from $349,000-+
The Porches @ Coral Harbor
Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm
Free Food and Drinks

For More Information Call: 424-8366









maximum protection for both
countries.

“Whether we like it, or not,
every Bahamian must know
that the world changed after

9/11. And in the world chang-
ing, every country has been
required to spend more of its
national budget to ensure that
we protect ourselves and our
trading interests against terror-
ism, drug smuggling, and alien
smuggling, which all impact our
country,” he said.

Mr Christie revealed that
government is in the process of
acquiring two major scanning
devices — one each for Freeport,
and New Providence. He also
noted that the Bahamas Cus-
toms Department has sent offi-
cials off for orientation of the
scanners.

“TI travelled to China for the
demonstration of the machine
and it will be very good for the
country to have the same excel-
lent capacity to detect in the
goods brought into the country
for the smugglers who are trying

to evadé customs, including



Come to the

radioactive materials.

“We are making great
progress in protecting our coun-
try, revenue base, and most cer-
tainly ensuring that we minimise
smuggling to the extent we
can,” he said.

The prime minister stressed
that amidst political debate, the
government of the day, whoev-
er it maybe, has a sacred
responsibility to protect the
international integrity of the
country.

“Just as the American gov-
ernment sees it as a priority, so
does the Bahamas government,
and it must.”

ia ee

EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157








Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing
Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and

Evangelistic Crusade

Sunday, January 14th to Friday, January 19th, 2007

At 7:30p.m. Nightly at

The East Street Tabernacle
Kast Street and Sunlight Village —

Under the Theme:

“IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

Dynamic Speakers are:

Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudol ph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.0.G)



Tabernacle Conce





Team and by the Churc

changed!







SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

"Angels make a cleat getaway Wi



The Tribune CRICKET,
SOCCER |
| AND TENNIS

SCTION

ae Aree



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



‘Match victory against Truckers —

@ BASKETBALL
‘By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE New Center Cleaning
Angels might have cruised to
an easy victory on Tuesday
night but the team had to pull
out their big guns last night to
clinch the win.

Having to play against the
Johnson Lady Truckers is never
an easy task for the Angels, the
New Providence Women’s Bas-
ketball Association (NPWBA)
former champions. It was the
Truckers who stopped the
Angels in their tracks for two
consecutive NPWBA titles, but
the team couldn’t find the mag-
ic used in the championship
round in the regular season
game last night, falling 66-63.

Angels’ Sharelle Cash, who
opted not to play in Tuesday
night’s game, returned with the
hot hands for her team, going 9
of 25 from the field, for the
team’s high 23 points. But she
wasn’t finished yet — the athlet-
ic Cash powered her way
through seven rebounds, five
assists and steals.

Also putting a dent on the
Angels’ score board was Keisha
Richardson with 21 points, two
assists and four steals.

Thanks to Cash and Richard-

"son, the Angels dominated the

first half of play guisearng: the

Truckers in both the first and
second quarters. But the return
to the court after the half-time
break saw a new Truckers team.
The team which was once being
out hustled on both ends of the
court tightened up on defence,
running away with four of the
Angels’ opening minute pos-
sessions.

It was revenge for the Truck-
ers and unlike the Angels, who
placed their game back into
cruise control, the team was
looking for the third quarter
kill.

The Truckers got the. help
they needed from Shantell
Rolle, but more importantly
Glenda Gilcud. A quiet Gilcud
exploded in the third quarter,
sealing two big three pointers.
Between her and Rolle, the duo
scored 47 points, raising the
team’s second half shooting
average. Rolle would finish the
game with the top score of 31
points, six rebounds, three
assists and six steals. The Truck-
ers would outscore the Angels
20-12 in this quarter.

The fire was lit in both team’s
sharp shooters, but the last ten
minutes belonged to the Angels,
who held off the attack from
the Truckers.

Action in the NPWBA will
continue tonight at the D W
Davis gym with two games on
schedule.

Cobras show some bite
against the Magics

@ BASKETBALL

The Government Secondary
School Sports Association

‘(GSSSA) hosted three games

on Thursday as they continued
with their regular season action.

In the senior girls division the
CC Sweeting Cobras blew past
the GHS Magics.35-18. Top
scorer in the game was
Ruthanne Simms from the
Cobras with 17 points, eight
rebounds, teammate Shenecca
Smith contributed with 13
rebounds. For the Magics Crys-

tal Curry led with 14 points.

It was a close match between
CR Walker Knights and Doris
Johnson Marlins with the
Knights getting the edge over
the Marlins 28-25. In the senior
boys the Knights’ men defeated
the Marlins 49-43.

St Augustine’s senior boys
got the win they were looking
for on Thursday defeating the
St Anne’s Bluewaves 42-32. St
John’s College continued on
with their perfect season, over-
powering the Westminister Col-
lege 53-24.






























































































@ JOHNSON Lady
Truckers’ Chantell Rolle
scoops under the defencce
of Cleaning Center
Angels’ Suzette McKenzie
in the NPWBA’s season
opener on Saturday night
at the DW Davis Gym last
year. The Angels won 87-
77

What’s going on in the
sports world this weekend

wet things started today at t the Apckdeaeon
William Thompson’s Park.








Rugby - Thiers oil be two eucung atuhes
this weekend at the Winton Rugby Fields.

The first game will get on the way at 2pm.
Road Race - The annual Mother Pratt road

Football - Now that the wheels are turning, __race is set to start at 7am, all interested persons
the Commonwealth American Football are asked to line up at the COB southern
League extends invitations to all football fans entrance at 6:30am.
in the capital. Games are played on the DW
Davis Field on Saturdays and Sundays, start-
ing at 3pm.















@ ANOTHER day in
action — Cyndi White

of the Angels makes a
clean shot at the










Basketball - The New Providence Wom-
en’s Basketball Association (NPWBA) will
continue with the regular season’s play tonight

NPWBA Feat :

Game sold at Lovots Soccer - The Bahamas Football Associa- at the DW Davis gym, two games are on set.
Hall on Gladstone tion continues on with its Football Academy, The Annual Keva Bethel Basketball tour-
Road in 2004. The a developmental programme held at St John’s nament will be held at the Sir Kendal Isaacs

gym and all interested teams are asked to

College every Saturday morning at 9am.
attend.

Angels defeated the
Stingrays 80-57.



Swimming - The Bahamas Swimming Fed-
eration will open their season today at the
national swimming complex. The meet is set to
start at 9am and all are invited.

Track - The Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations will open their season with
their annual Odd Distance meet today at the
Thomas A Robinson stadium, the first race
will get on the way at 2pm.



Softball - The Old Timers Association will













WINDY,



Volume: 103 No.44

a

m tovin' It.

79F
69F



CLOUDS, SUN

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

Check out The Tribune’s

Classifieds Trader

TU US ser a UL On UMC Se Teen Tat



Parent of three

haemophiliac sons
speaks of her anger
and frustration

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A SINGLE mother admitted
last night that she is at breaking
point trying to raise three young
sons who are suffering from a
life-threatening blood disease.

Overwhelmed by medical
bills, Janice Strachan admits
that 16 years of struggle against
her family’s incurable problem
are taking their toll.

She spoke to The Tribune
after taking a conscious deci-
sion to make her ordeal public,
claiming she was tired of carry-
ing the burden alone.

Mrs Strachan, who lives off
Eastern Road, ‘admitted that
she has been an emotional
wreck for several months.

Suffering silently with her
three children as they battle
against the bleeding condition,
haemophilia, she admits she is
living on hope.

"Hope," she explained, "that .

something will happen, and that
something bad doesn't happen
to my kids."

Only one per cent of the
world's population are severely
affected by the bleeding disor-
der, according to. one health
website.

In mild cases of haemophilia,

a person would have to be
‘involved in an accident or
become injured for internal
bleeding to occur. But in severe
cases, no injury is necessary.
Infected persons can bleed at
any time. All of her children
have severe haemophilia.

Michael, 16, Nathaniel, 14,

and Rafael, 10, are severe
haemophilia “bleeders".

"They can bleed at any time,
on any part of their bodies," she
explained.

Haemophilia, a condition that
disproportionately affects
males, is carried in females and
miales already affected.

That worrying fact has caused
tremendous stress for Mrs Stra-
chan, whose ex-husband was
not affected.

With her sons shouting
"Mom, why do I have to be like
this?" and members of the pub-
lic telling her she never should
have had children, Mrs Stra-
chan's emotional balance i is tip-
ping.

"I'm angry and frustrated
because IJ didn't put a gun to
anyone's head and ask them to
give me these boys. I was in
love, I was married and I want-
ed a family just like anyone else.

“And it makes me angry and
it hurts me that I'm in this all
alone and people make me feel
like I committed a crime.”

Mrs Strachan said she had
been told: “You had the boys
and you knew it was in your
family." Another question
posed to her was: "If you knew
that was in your family why did
you have three?"

She told The Tribune: "I took
the same chance any other
mother would have. My sisters
are carriers and they took the
same chance. I am no different
from any other woman on earth.

SEE page 11

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

imap

rrrmennneesessnaamaenen

Ria OPER

motes —

J



HN aT Te TA EL
See Sports Section





PRICE — 75¢

Vex?

Bahamians who don’t hold back



lM THE container port is soon to be relocated to make room for the development of the new downtown

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the fundamental
realignment of the city of Nas-
sau, in mind, government yes-
terday signed a contract for a
business plan to move the
downtown container port to the
southwest of the island.

The Dutch firm Ecorys — with
extensive expertise in port plan-
ning — was awarded the
$350,000 contract: to consult on
the business plan for the pro-
ject, Prime Minister Perry

Christie announced yesterday
at the contract signing in the
Cabinet Office.

This business plan is consid-
ered the first step in creating a
new state-of-the-art container
port for New Providence and a
major step towards transform-
ing and revitalising downtown
Nassau.

Marten van den Bossche,
vice-chairman of Ecorys’ board
of directors, told the Bahami-
an press that he expects the.
business plan to be completed
within the next four to five

months.

“Moving the port from down-
town will free up more than 50
acres of prime waterfront devel-
opment for conversion into
commercial and residential uses
and restore Nassau to its right-
ful place among the leading
waterfront cities not only in the
Caribbean but in the world,”
Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said that
the new port is not being
planned in isolation, but is part
of a comprehensive plan for the

development of the south-west- -

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

ern part of the island, which will
soon see the establishment of
the Clifton Heritage Park and a
luxury real estate project known
as the Albany development.

Following years of research
on the project by the Nassau
Economic Development Board
and Nassau Tourism Board, a
joint task force of public and
private stakeholders was select-
ed last year to come up with a
business plan for the container
port move.

SEE page nine



Police silent on theft of $73,000_ - OPBAT could retain US Army support

& By NATARIO McKENZIE

POLICE yesterday remained
tight-lipped about their investi-
gation into the theft of $73,000
from Bahamasair.

Senior officers confirmed that
the money had been stolen, but
would say little more about the
incident.

They would not say if they
have any suspects or if they feel
they are close to making an arrest.

The Tribune learned of the
theft from an anonymous
source but was unable to con-
tact Bahamasair representatives
for details up to press time.

The Tribune spoke with ASP
Drexel Cartwright of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit who said
that he could not say at this
point whether police were fol-
lowing any “significant leads”
into the matter as this might
compromise their investigation.

“TI would rather leave that
alone until we get to a point
where we can give you some
positive information because
otherwise it interferes with our
investigation,” he explained.

“We don’t have any problem
giving the information but first
of all we want to know where
we are at in terms of our inves-
tigation.

SEE page nine

A US Senator has confirmed
that Operation Bahamas Turks
and Caicos could retain US
Army support even after the
Pentagon withdraws the Black-
hawk helicopters that have
been the crux of the anti-drug
interdiction initiative.

According to an Associated
Press report filed in Miami yes-
terday, US Senator Bill Nelson,
the democratic representaive
for Florida, said the army has

offered to give the DEA three
Sikorsky S-76 helicopters by
2008.

He said the army is also will-
ing to spend $3.4 miilion a year
for the next five years to main-
tain the helicopter base known
as the “Hawk’s Nest” in the
Bahamas.

“This will keep cocaine and
marijuana smugglers from
operating off Florida’s coast,”
said Nelson, a member of the

Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee. “With the Army’s con-
tinued support, the US-
Bahamas anti-drug effort will
remain fully operational.”

‘’he announcement came as
Senator Nelson departed Fri-
day on a two-day trip that
includes stops in Haiti and a
flight with the DEA over the
Bahamas.

SEE page nine

Ingraham: Don’t be fooled by PLP

OPPOSITION leader
Hubert Ingraham urged the
public not to be fooled into
complacency by “PLP propa-
ganda” about the date of the
upcoming general elections.

Yesterday, The Tribune
quoted sources inside the gov-
erning party as saying that par-
liament is to be dissolved on
April 10 and that the date of
the elections would be
announced soon after.

However, according to Mr
Ingraham, the elections will be
called much earlier than this.

Saying the April 10 date was
an effort to induce FNM sup-
porters to “relax”, he urged all
members of the public to
remain prepared.

“I can’t over stress the
absolute need to register to
vote,” Mr Ingraham said.

He went on to refute claims
that the FNM is waiting for the

government to call elections
before announcing the full slate
of opposition candidates.

“The FNM is not waiting. As !
said before, we have settled and
ratified candidates for all con-
stituencies,” Mr Ingraham said.

He said the party will contin-
ue to reveal these candidates
to the pubic in a steady stream
of announcements.

SEE page nine

Man arrested after condominium blaze

A MIDDLE-AGED man
was arrested yesterday after a
blaze swept through a condo-
minium block causing $3 mil-
lion worth of damage.

The man, 47, had earlier
been questioned by police fol-
lowing a domestic dispute.

Police say the fire, at Royal
Palm Condominiums at Trea-
sure Cay, Abaco, was the result
of arson.

The man, who was initially

taken into custody at Marsh
Harbour, was later flown to
Sandilands Rehabitation Unit
in Nassau for psychiatric exam-
ination.

Firemen were called to the
scene at 3.45am yesterday, just
six hours after a couple at the
condo were involved in an
argument.

Police summoned to their
home at 9.25pm on Thursday
had left after restoring calm.

But when the fire call came

. through later, it was their wait

that was ablaze. And flames
then spread throughout the
building.

Although Marsh Har:
bour’s volunteer brigade was
able to get the fire under
control, they could nat save
the building, which was
destroyed.

SEE page 11







PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Asif takes three wickets on
his return to test cricket |

& CRICKET
CENTURION,
South Africa
Associated Press



PAKISTAN quick Moham-
mad Asif, who had a one-year
doping ban overturned last
month, took all three wickets
as South Africa reached 130-3
at tea Friday on day two of the
first test.

Hashim Amla (62): and Ash-
well Prince (30) had an unbro-
ken 77-run stand as South
Africa recovered from 8-2 at
Centurion Park. Pakistan had
earlier lost it last five wickets
for 71 to be dismissed for 313.

South Africa captain Graeme
Smith edged a delivery from
Asif to wicketkeeper Kamran
Akmal for a duck, and A.B. de
Villiers nicked a ball from the
same bowler to Younis Khan
for 4.

Amla and Jacques Kallis had
steered the Proteas to 53 before
Kallis drove at a wide ball from
Asif and was caught by Younis
for 18 after lunch.

Asif had 3-34 off nine overs.

The Pakistan Cricket Board
appeals panel overturned Asif's
one-year ban and Shoaib
Akhtar's two-year ban on Dec.
5 after the Pakistan pacemen
tested positive for the banned
steroid Nandrolone.

The World Anti-Doping
Agency has lodged an appeal
for the restoration of the origi-
nal bans to world sport's highest
tribunal - the Court of Arbitra-
tion for Sport — but both players
are currently free to play.

Pakistan had earlier resumed
on its overnight 242-5 before
captain Inzamam-ul-Haq was
caught hooking by Amla at
square leg off Makhaya Ntini
for 42.

Akmal mistimed a pull off
Ntini and was caught by Shaun
Pollock for 29.

The tail-enders pushed the
total past 300, with Rana

- Naved-ul-Hasan scoring 30 off



29 balls before he was caught-

and-bowled by Andre Nel.
Ntini also took the wickets of

Shahid Nazir, who was caught

pulling by: Herschelle-Gibbs:

after scoring 15 off 17 balls, and

Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause
eart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases. |

Danish Kaneria, who edged
a delivery to Kallis for a
duck.

Ntini was the best of South

Africa's bowlers with 5-83, his

16th five-wicket test haul.

WO aaucimesce today.

@ PAKISTAN'S bowler Mohammad Asif, center, celebrates with teammates after dismissing



South Africa's batsman Jacques Kallis, unseen, for 18 runs on the second day of the Ist Test and
the series against South Africa at Centurion Park in Pretoria, South Africa, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007.

tid be oye

ADE

ACE RU eet) oe
PE eed ee



Longa neccanmconttacontt tae mantic ALOHEALPatHRRY OA

(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)



we me





PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

| | | | SPORT ;

Clarke looks for escape during Royal Trophy







@ DARREN Clarke of North Ireland hits from a sandtrap during the foursomes golf match at the 2nd Royal Trophy men’s team tournament, Asia against Europe, at the Amata Spring Country Club







course in Chonburi province, southeastern Thailand Friday Jan. 12, 2007.

\

Peru and Paraguay meet for u20s match

(AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)








sas



@ PERU’S Christian Laura , left, fights for the ball with Paraguay’s Pablo Aguilar during a South ‘fi CHILE’S Nicolas Larrondo, celebrates after scoring against Bolivia during a South American
American under-20 soccer championship game in Pedro Juan Caballero, Paraguay, Thursday, Jan. —_ under-20 soccer championship game in Pedro Juan Caballero, Paraguay, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007.
11, 2007. ,

(AP Phote/Lucas Nunez) |
(AP Photo/Lucas Nunez) ws



‘ AAT





@ PERU’S Damian Ismodes ,center, fights for the ball with Paraguay’s Nery Bareiro, left, and Angel Enciso, right, during a South American under-20 soccer championship game in Pedro Juan
Caballero, Paraguay, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Paraguay won 1-0.



(AP Photo/Lucas Nunez)





'
'
'
b
b

oh
we

eves
ve

“99 @ @ @ «
2 eeees

TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 5°







S S S ESS

a



@ KIM Clijsters of Belgium plays a shot during her finals match against Serbia’s Jelena Jankovic
at the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007.

Jannkovic won the first set 6-4.

Clijsters

&

(AP Photo/Paul Miller)

SPORTS







gium at the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2
Clijsters won the match 4-6, 7-6, 6-4

wins women’s

final;

(AP Photo/Rob Grijiih

Blake

=



gets walkover into men’s final

B TENNIS
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

KIM Clijsters began her
retirement year with a victory,
beating Serbia’s Jelena Jankovic
4-6, 7-6 (1), 6-4 in the Sydney
International final Friday.

Third-seeded Clijsters, who
is expected to retire at the end
of 2007, broke a nine-match
winning streak by Jankovic,
who won the Auckland WTA
title last week.

Clijsters, who had to save a
match point in the second set
Friday against Jankovic, beat

‘Australian Open No. 1 seed

Maria Sharapova in a Hong
Kong exhibition tournament
last week.

Earlier Friday, defending
men’s champion James Blake

cruised into the Sydney final in .

a walkover when Austria’s Jur-
gen Melzer could not start his
semifinal due to illness.

In a scheduling quirk, the
third-seeded Blake will go for
the title against Spain’s Carlos
Moya _ his first-round oppo-
nent at the Australian Open
next week. Moya, who survived
a three-setter against Marcos
Baghdatis on Thursday night,

had to go the distance again to
beat Frenchman Richard Gas-
quet 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 as tempera-
tures hit 38 C (100 F) Friday
afternoon.

Melzer, blaming a batch of
bad sushi, said he was so sick
to his stomach that he needed
an intravenous drip. He had
doubts about his fitness‘for the
Open.

“At the moment, there’s no
way I could play,” Melzer said.
“IT hope that somebody from
upstairs looks down on me and
gets me ready.”

Melzer is the seventh player
this week to either withdraw

More tennis action.
rom around the world



â„¢~ i



or retire from a match in Syd-
ney, and Lleyton Hewitt was a
late withdrawal with a calf mus-
cle injury. Women’s No. 1 Jus-
tine Henin-Hardenne withdrew
due to personal reasons that
also will keep her out of the
Open.

No. 3-ranked Nikolay Davy-
denko was fined $10,000 Thurs-
day by the ATP for “unsport-

mansmanlike conduct” after

saying nobody cares about the
tournament, a traditional
warmup for the Open, the sea-
son-opening Grand Slam event.
Davydenko retired with a foot
injury after losing the first set of



his opening match, saying he
was not overly concerned about
the smaller tournaments.
Rafael Nadal, Paradorn
Srichaphan, Dmitry Tursunov,
Svetlana Kuznetsova and Nadia
Petrova also pulled out of the
tournament citing either injury

or illness.

While Blake criticized Davy-
denko’s comments, he suggest-
ed the sport needs an injection
of entertainment to improve its
image after 383 withdrawals
from tournaments last year _a
trend that ATP chairman Eti-
enne De Villiers has described
as “unacceptable madness.”

“You go to other sporiing
events and there’s an entertain
ment value inherent besides just
the athletes out there ... wh
it be music during change:
whether it be cheerleade
basketball games, anything ike
that,” Blake said.

“It’s tough with such a traci-
tional sport (like tennis) to |:
that there’s no timeouts w!
you bring in cheerleader
have rap music blasting. ©
think there may be ways that
we can find a happy medium
and make it entertaining for the
casual fan as well as those
diehards."











H SPAIN’S Tommy Robredo in action during his match against Agustin Calleri of Argentina in
the first semifinal at the Heineken Open Mens tennis tournament in Auckland, New Zealand, Vri
day, Jan. 12, 2007. Robredo won in straight sets 6-4, 6-0.



@ SPAIN’S Carlos Moya plays a shot in his semi-finals match against France’s Richard Gasquet at
the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007. Moya

won the match 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.

(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

(AP Photo/NZPA, Wayne Drough:)



@ RUSSIA’S Anna Chakvetadze in action against Vasilisa Bardina also of



SS SS S NS

Russia during the final,

of the Hobart International tennis tournament, Friday Jan. 12, 2007, in Hobart, Australia. Chakve-

tadze won the mach 6-3, 7-6 (3).

(AP Photo/Peter Mathew)





PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007








JUDGE PARKER

HEY, NEDDY...SOPHIE...

Faw

a WHO'S YOUR FRIENDS

AD
RY.

a

L08TIN THOUGHT, LUANN | SHE TURNS A

WS Sy
LT eA

Ue



THIS 1S RAVU
MISHRA, OUR
HOUSEGUEST

WANLPERS THROUGH TH

SEE YOU!

=

Be

FROM INDIA’ (“SX Tere

HE NEEDS SOME
NEW CLOTHES’ CAN



e



YOU HELP HIMS



ALAN MUST‘E}?

SLEPT HERE

WHILE HE WAS

A COT AND
BLANKETS?



MY ASSISTANT LJ
TOLD YOU THAT?!

OH, FOR PETE'S SAKE! WHY )
\ DO YOU ALWAYS TRY TO



you Bet’ tes Syl
GET UNDRESSED,
RAJQU/



OH, SUDDENLY
IM SO TIRED...

COMICS PAGE













Dennis ©

t
z
S
&
q
x
e
>



‘ONE MORE THING... WOULD YOU PLEASE FIND
MARGARET A NEW NEIGHBORHCOP 2"

PEOPLE DONT
UNDERSTAND ME .
THEN DONT REALIZE
I'M A CARD-
CARRNING GENIUS,

WELL, NOT
REALLY, BUT
No ONE EVER



The Striptease Coup

wHo TOLD 4F PIN ME DOWN?! IT WAS
yOU THAT?! i ONE DAY LAST WEEK!
i South dealer. :
By North-South vulnerable.
zi NORTH
le @AK 8543
3 ¥93
£ 4104
: #982
Sh WEST EAST
#310972 6
VÂ¥KQ107 86542
85 09732
. PAB &K 64
T HEARD JUDGING BY THE WAN SOUTH
IT ON: TV Moe FREAKED OUT, IT ve
AY BE MY LAST WORD @AKQIO
#&QI1075
The bidding:
South West North East
1¢ 14 Dble Pass
3 Pass 3% Pass
4h Pass Sh



Opening lead — king of hearts.

Today’s deal illustrates a rare play

sometimes called the “striptease
coup.”

West leads the king of hearts, and

declarer sees he might lose a heart
and two trumps and go down one in
\ five clubs. To try to avoid this out-
come, South wins the heart lead with
the ace, cashes the queen of spades,
crosses to the ten of diamonds and



N SPECIAL
PLACE...



plays the ace of spades.

East ruffs with the four to stop
declarer from discarding his heart
loser, and South overruffs with the
five. Declarer cashes the ace of dia-
monds and continues with the king,
planning to discard dummy’s heart
loser if West follows suit.

But West trumps the third dia-
mond with the three, and dummy
overruffs with the eight as East fol-
lows suit. Continuing his campaign,
declarer plays the king of spades
from dummy, forcing East to mff
with the six as South overruffs with
the seven.

The striptease has now been ac-

complished. Both East and West

have been denuded of their low
trumps, leaving the king and ace as
the only trumps they have left.

Declarer next leads the queen of
diamonds, and West can do no better
than ruff with the ace as dummy’s
nine of hearts is discarded. Sooner or
later South ruffs the jack of hearts in
dummy, and his only losers turn out
to be the A-K of trumps.

The sequence of plays described
here is, of course, an unusual way of
extracting trumps, but that is hardly a
bar to its use.

Any port in a storm!



TRIBUNE SPORTS

CERTIFIED
GENIUS ”’

EMBOSS THIS
CARO? WITH
A SCREWDRIVER?

a



SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Feeling fizzled out, Aries? It could
be because you pushed yourself too
hard partying in the last few weeks. |
Take the early part of this year to sit, -
back and relax.

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21
Something that seems insurmount-
able is actually much easier to
scale than you think, Taurus...
Think positively and you’ll reach
great heights. '

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 | '
Think before you speak when you're |
called to intervene in a situation,
Gemini. Though you can offer
words of wisdom, let the other par-
ties do the compromising. -
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

There is success coming your way, you":
just need to keep your eyes peeled in’ -
anticipation, Cancer. However, there
are two sides to every coin, and this

| good news also brings some bad. '

LEO -— Jul 23/Aug 23 '
You sometimes have to lose before. ‘
you can. win, Leo, and this will

become apparent in the next few’. .



WHY ARE You
LOOKING so
SULLEN,

www.kingleatures.com

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS

Caught by Captain

Edward? (6,
Employ to maximum,

handity (6)
Roduce the final esdmate, just in
cuse (4)

Quick with a diaper for

one’s little son (6)

Might the layman liken It

to moss? (6)

14 At the turning point it provides an

su &

a1
22
23
26
2
2
30

w
b=

opening (3)
Boy's name for a cigar maker (5)
intuitive Interviewer? (4)

In my case, an

Individual lolly (5)

He's immersed In his work (5)
What the heimsman did, giving a girl
a hearty kies (5)

No love for Thea, unfortunately (4)
The devil gives Natasha a bit of a
tum! (5)

The putse of a changed

lad (3)

Worn down in time (6)

An eventer's garment? (6)
They caneasilyget

out of hand (4)

32 Wooded part of London,

perhaps? (8)

33 Ina way, anaesthetic can make you

tower (6)

Yesterday's cryptic solutions



UM PRACTICING FoR

WHEN I GET Ta GE
A TEENAGER

DOWN

1
2

B NRBRRBRK

8

Is shot badly, so pulls up (6)

With clean sheets, he retains .

his job (6)

A caller for payment? (4)

Person responsible for the bad
cooking of rice? (7)

A greeting at Honolulu (5)

Being prone to malinger (5)

Water the kate, perhaps (4)

One going round specifically looking
for information (3)

Weep since crime is sald to be
endiess (3)

Too young really to be a fat lady (5)
Long to have a great day In bed (5)
Regal composer (5)

Figures to be sociable (3)

In having noted ways, he differs from
Ted (3)

Finished composing a rondo around
just two notes (4,3)

Not the nicest of academicians? (3)
Princely little place in the country (6)
Pals touring high places (4)

One having a job paying his bills? (6)
Pass over the net? (5)

Put a hand on the central heating
with a cry of pain (5)

On account of a duke taking a
weekend out (3)

She makes a change from

Jane (4)

Yesterday's easy solutions



(©2006 by King Featurve Syndicate, ina. World rights reserved.

EASY PUZZLE

come out OK.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

If you have all the answers, Virgo,
why aren’t people constantly asking
your advice? Realize that you can, .
learn a thing or two from someone
else, especially this week.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 :

If you’re in the mood for romance, ..



ne

GOCOMES, COM / POP SEQAIMNTIR

nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 17; very good 25;
excellent 33 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.

a sticky situation, Sagittarius. All, ‘
you ¢an do is be patient and trust that,
things will work out. '

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

A financial folly leaves you coming up
short, Capricorn. It’s time to buckle
down and stretch those dollars as far as
they can go. Otherwise, you could end

up in a pickle by mid ‘year.’
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Why wrestle with a concern alone
when you have loved ones you can:
trust to assist you, Aquarius? Put’.
some of your worries in another per-,
son’s hands.





metabolism

process of the

body breaking .

down food for
Tae]



You will find hidden meanings in} -”
the most mundane things, Pisces.”
The trouble will be figuring out”:
what the big message is. :



Sergey Volkov v Pavel
Tregubov, Russia Cup 2006.
You have to be careful when
queens and rooks are
roaming on an open board. If
White makes an obvious
start by 1 Rh8+ Kg7 2 Rb8
with the threat 3 Rxb7+
then Black's reply 2...Qb1+ 3
Kh2 Qh7+ 3 Kg3 secures at
least a perpetual check draw
by Qg6+. So, Volkov cast
around for a different idea,
and noticed that the black
queen was also tactically
vulnerable. How did he force
a quick win?

Grandmaster chess comes
to London this afternoon.
The £10,000 Staunton
Memorial at Simpson‘s-in-
the-Strand includes England

ACROSS
Flower (6)
Strangle (8)
Prima
donna (4) Cringed (7)
Dealer (6) Thong (5)
Discussion (6) Yielded
Confronted (3) (5)
Quick (5) Moist (4)
Agents (4) Animal doctor (3)
Mature (5)
Furious (5) Prohibit (3)
Subtract ° Jewelled
(5) headdress (5)
Practise boxing (4) Polite (5)
Spiral (5) Keen (5)
Devoured (3) pedis vy e)
lu
Sarcastic (6) need

Dictionary (7)
Looked angrily (6) Noise (3)
Hire (4)

; Position (6)
Native American (8) Saucy (4)



No 1 Michael Adams and Dutch
legend Jan Timman. Play
continues until Saturday and
spectators are welcome, with free
entry and running commentary.

LEONARD BARDEN oat

DS bet bet et ot ee
SBESUSRES

RE EA NT

days. Stay the course and you will’ -" -”

f
te
‘
'
'
’

Libra, then you'll be justly rewarded."

The ‘
Target
uses
S|E|K words in
body at Ss Now js the i d quali
ly 0 & ow is the time to spend quality. time '
RI i Chambers ae Ba, with that special person in your life '
21st aasos because soon you’ ll be busier than ever. |
Century z dau ous y Py -8
Dictionary ss ya an SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 '
(1899 5 ‘Ma ES Quiet comtemplation is the key this!
edition) g ae week, Scorpio. Mull over all of: !
Peer arareeaneonaniake é Ba 2s your problems and you’ll soon find
a o = i
from the letters shown here? = o ae aa ae a a ees
In making a word, each letter a 4 a BR y Berups: ; o&
may be used once only. Each = A4so E SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
must contain the centre letter ous “S Silence can be deafening, especially «
and there must be at least one : i ages tA when you’re awaiting an outcome to + —

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar20 Be

CHESS byLeonardBarden gj es

SRESIS BE

ACROSS: 1, Least 6, Stock 9, Arbiter 10, Tally 11, Tense 12,
Haste 13, Bestial 15, Lea 17, Idle 18, Renown 19, Tiber
20, Ocelot 22, Peal 24, Nap 25, Reverse 26, Miser 27,
Relic 28, Muted 29, Manages 30, Creel

31, Teeth

DOWN: 2, Elated 3, Salute 4, Try 5, Vital 6, Settler 7, Tree
8, Cashew 12, Habit 13, Bison 14, Sleep 15, Lower 16,
Angle 18, Refer 19, Topical 21, Career 22, Peruse 23, ;
Ascent 25, Regal 26, Mime 28, Met

ACROSS: 1, |-Deal 6, Left-s 9, Get over 10, Smart 11,
Tamps.12, Balts 13, Liberal 15, Cod 17, EN-I'd 18, Scrape
19, Route 20, Gol-de-n 22, Beta 24, Hay 25, Cruiser 26,
Mu-ehy 27, Fives 28, At war 29, Se-aside 30, Chess 31,
O-rate

DOWN: 2, Doma-I-n 3, A-greed 4, Let 5, Tot-Al 6, Lett-ice
7, Eras 8, Tip-top 12, BA-Ron 13, Leigh 14, B-lll-y 15,
Cases 16, Debar 18, S-tory 19, Re-fuses 21, O-a-fish 22,
B-Ht-ter 23, Ten-ant 25, Chas.-E 26, Mess 28, Ado

Twist (6)

GC ROZHHODO





Salad plant (8)
Problem (5)
Romeo (5)
Beer (3)
Incraased (4)

Chess solution: 1 Qb8+ KI7 2Qc7+ when Ke8 or ;
K{8 fails to 3 Rh8+ while if Kg8 3 Rg3 (simplest) wins ‘|
the queen. (
Mensa quiz: 95. A black circle is worth 12, a grey
circle is worth 25 and a white circle is worth 29.

One possible word ladder solution is: CREW, craw,
claw, clam, slam, seam, TEAM

pny





PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

MONDAY



@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm -

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-
_ tors Hospital conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
{(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

S HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pmie® cowerage ces

The Cancer Society of the Bahanias méets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday ofeach month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
‘7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach e Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

‘The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
‘every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
'the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.

#



WEDNESDAY

4 PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

«& RESTAURANTS

s#Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free
‘appetizers and numerous drink specials.

‘i HEALTH
:Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the










ain event



NATION








BOTS SHOWS UP
Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediurns ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. it contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imaqinathon,

<< ~ coc
WS \ ‘ .







S




UNTIL JAN 29, 2c












public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are
held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
ter Blake Road. For more information call
327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,
Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support

Group meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm

.to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors

south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

B CIVIC CLUBS
The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets
every Wednesday from lpm — 2pm at East
Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of

each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference °

Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the
world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programnies.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on





Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at

large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital’€yvery third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room.Free screenings between 5pm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.



Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm. |

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

B CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend ¢ TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.



THE TRIBUNE



PHOTOS WELCOME



FRIDAY

i HEALTH .

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the.
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to
attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre. .

SATURDAY



HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. wad

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid-class-..,

es are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.



SUNDAY

B@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS |

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

H@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW $- The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness
Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-
ed persons are welcome to attend. For more
information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.













MeN
oe a
Sis. ot



Full Text


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





efence Force is ‘inequipped to -
fulfil duties’, claims opposition -

m@ By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter

The Defence Force is “inad-
equately equipped to discharge
its duties” according to opposi-
tion leader Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham said on Thurs-
day that the government has
allowed the nation’s military
branch to become run-down.

Speaking at an FNM rally in
Long Island — where he said

yesterday that he was “very
pleased” to see a large crowd
in attendance — Mr Ingraham
pledged that the FNM would

upgrade and enhance the

Defence Force.

Mr Ingraham said an FNM
government would better
enable “properly trained and
provisioned officers . . . to

enforce our laws, not only
against poaching but also
against illegal migration,

migrant smuggling, and drug
trafficking.”

The Defence Force has few
operational sea craft and no
suitable aircraft for air surveil-
lance at the moment, he said.

Mr Ingraham claimed that if
the FNM is elected to office, it
will make a number of new craft

acquisitions and established new’

outposts for the force, creating
greater surveillance capabilities.
He added that a Defence

Force base would be established
in the southern Bahamas, an
outpost in Farmer's Cay, Exu-
ma, and a satellite presence in
the Ragged Island chain. In
addition, currently out-of-ser-
vice Defence Force boats will
be brought back online.

Mr Ingraham also used the
platform to appeal specifically
to the needs of Long Islanders.
He said that,the infrastructure
plans that the FNM had for that

island have been "interrupted
for too long."

"Another five years will not
pass without Long Island having
the state-of-the-art education-
al facilities you need and
deserve. The children of Long
Island need and deserve a new
high school," he said. sd

In addition, he claimed that
an FNM government would
attend to Long Island's trans-
port needs, by resuming the

Bahamasair service to the Stel-
la Mares airport, upgrading the
airport at Deadman's Cay, and
creating “adequate and appro-
priate docking facilities to
replace the rundown one at Salt
Pond.”

“Long Island, I have come to
say, we in the FNM have got your
back. We’re going to talk a lot
less and we’re going to deliver a
lot more. We will restore your
faith in government,” he said.




*



Haitian 7
m sloopis .
= discoverd .
Ff carrying ©
migrants



- oe
»



A TOTALSS suspected ille-
gal immigrants are being held _,
at the Carmichael Road Deten-

_ tion Centre after being appre- -.-
hended off the Eastern Endof .',
New Providence by the Har- ,
bour Unit of the Royal ,
Bahamas Defence Force late; ,
Thursday night. ve

While on routine patrol, —-,

5



@ A GROUP of cold and weary female migrants at the
Defence Force Base huddling for warmth

HMBS P-41, under the com- ,
- mand of Leading Seaman

Bertram Wallace, spotted a 35-
foot Haitian sail sloop around fi
two miles off Port New Provi- , .
dence.

A routine search of the vessel
uncovered the large numberof +;
immigrants onboard the vessel. +,

HMBS P-110 was calledinto. _.:
assist, and the Haitian vessel.
was escorted into the Coral -,,
Harbour Base early Friday =
morning. :

The Defence Force reported, ,
that the immigrants (47 men +.
and eight women) all appeared...»
to be in good health, and were
turned over to immigration

-authorities for-further. process-.- «=
ing.

This is the second group of
Haitian immigrants apprehend-
ed in Bahamian waters this year
by the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.

Last year, over 1,500 suspect-
ed illegal immigrants were tak-
en into custody.

m@ A DEFENCE Force Marine assisting the migrants off their sail sloop at the Coral Harbour Base



ee

ar



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARILYN DORCELEY OF
‘(GENERAL DELIVERY, PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.












Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

A DEFENCE Force Marine assisting a female migrant as she ascends from below the deck of













the Haitian sloop
















EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/PROGRAM COORDINATOR
The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Program Coordinator.
The Program Coordinator coordinates the administrative and operational aspects of a program
or project. S/he contributes to the processes for annual planning and budgeting, submission of
periodic and annual financial and technical reports and monitoring progress over the life of the
program/project. The Coordinator may be responsible for developing operational guidelines to

LEER Cw ae RS OA PET aR ES PE









NOTICE

a. toy te

































































NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EVANS OF ensure efficient management of the program and compliance with regulations. S/he coordinates ou are raising funds for a "
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is program/project-related workshops and meetings and documents activities, strategies and lessons y d 8 mate ‘
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and learned as appropriate. The Coordinator assists with the preparation of financial analyses and reports } S00 cause, campaigning .
Citizenship, for registration /naturalization as a citizen for Program/Project management and other team members. S/he also assists in the preparation of | for improvements in the «
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any oe for program/project support and serves as an information resource about the Program! area or have won an :
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be roject in general — helping to develop communications materials, and responding to public inquiries. aware ry
granted, should send a written and signed statement of : . §
fhe facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS If so, call us on 322-1986 !
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality Bachelor's degree and 3-5 years related experience or equivalent combination. and share your story. %
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. Excellent verbal and written skills. ; 4
: Proven organizational skills and attention to detail. i

Demonstrated experience in MS Office, Word, Excel, Power Point and Data Base Management. Ability 4

to manipulate, analyze and interpret data. ‘4

\ Understanding of how organizations work and experience with project implementation and design. :

A tant Wanted |
ee an Me ant c zi EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/SENIOR POLICY ADVISOR x
Lipa eee Ne The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position of Senior Policy Advisor. ,

The Senior Policy advisor develops, coordinates and implements the program strategy to further the a

: work of the Conservancy and its conservation partners through direct interaction with the Governments The .
International Investment Group in the Northern Caribbean Program and multi- and bilateral agencies that provide conservation -Way 3

; opportunities and/or impact the nations’ conservation programs. S/he identifies conservation policy a

based in Nassau seeks Accountant for and funding opportunities, evaluates the potential for TNC and NGO partner involvement, and develops Test e

- : 5 and implements strategies to influence policy and public funding for conservation at the national and/or i .

general accounting duties; prepar ation global levels. The Senior Policy Advisor liaises with counterparts in the Conservancy's Mesoamerica oe ue. a ‘

< and Caribbean Conservation Region and International Government Relations department to provide Ink, Say Or GO 5

of financial statements, cash flow, and extract useful lessons and to coordinate on joint policy approaches. S/he also serves as contact 1. Is it the TRUTH? .

b d cili . d with the external professional community in the policy arena to keep abreast of new developments ae A ; ,

uU gets, account recon. ations an and opportunities that may be useful to the Conservancy and its partners and to report on and share 2.Is it F Te all |

: : the Conservancy's experiences with others. The Senior Policy Advisor provides expert policy analysis concernedq: 4
financial analysis. Knowledge of GAAP, and contributes directly to the Conservancy's public funding strategies by revels ica io Sapeeal 3. Will it build "
consolidation eliminations necessary. writing, negotiating with bilateral and multilateral agencies and donor cultivation as needed. GOODWILL and i
BS Degree in Accounting and CPA or KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS SE Beane :

, , : ; Bachelor's degree in relevant field and 6 or more years of senior relevant experience. Master's pies ; <
equivalent licensin = requ re d. degree may be preferred or required. May require federal agency or congressional staff experience or 4. Will it be ,
equivalent experience for positions with a global focus. BENEFICIAL to i)

Expert knowledge of current trends in relevant policy discipline. i

Demonstrated experience conceiving and implementing strategic initiatives. all concerned? :

Demonstrated excellent project management skills. WANWiTORAFY.O78 ij

| Excellent verbal and written communications skills. :

- 5 We ‘a @ «)

Send resume & salary WlStory i fi Interested persons should apply in writing with full details, including resume and cover letter, to ad 3 LR Pal SERVICE \;

° ‘ HYPERLINK “mailto:bahamas@tnc.org” bahamas@tnc.org by January 31, 2007. Fertilizer, F ungicide, %

via email to: Aeon D '

A Pee ACLU LC ;

starcapitalcorp@starcapital.net

FA AA ESSAI STE ESET EE LE EES ENT

RAL



~
rat

arp SS
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS .

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 3





US Embassy
closed for
Martin Luther
King holiday

THe US Embassy will be
closed on Monday, January :

15, 2007 in observance of the

Martin Luther King, Jr holi-

day.

8am.

Haitian is

charged with

sex with
six-year-old

A JUDGE yesterday :
ordered that a Haitian man :
accused of having sex witha :
six-year-old girl be remand- :
’. ed to prison because he could :

pose a flight risk.

Jasmyr Ettienne, 29, was ;
officially arraigned before :
Chief Magistrate Roger :
Gomez at court one on Bank :
Lane yesterday on the charge :

of unlawful intercourse.

Ettienne, who was aided by :
a translator, was told that he :
‘would not be required to }

enter a plea to the charge.

It was alleged that Ettienne
committed the offence some- :

time during December 2006:

The prosecutor, Sergeant :
Alexander Bannister, object- :
ed to Ettienne being granted :
bail on the grounds that :
immigration officials had con- :
firmed that the accused has _ :

no status in the country.

Bannister suggested that if
he was granted bail, Ettienne :

would be a flight risk.

Chief Magistrate Gomez
said the court was of the opin- |
ion that due to the serious :
nature of the charge, andthe :
fact that Ettienne had no sta- :
tus, he would be a flight risk if :

granted bail.

Ettienne was remanded to }
Her Majesty’s Prison and his :
case was adjourned to Janu- :
ary 16, when it will be heard :

in court five, Bank Lane.

The embassy will resume
normal business operations
on Tuesday, January 16, at :

Ingraham accused PLP MPs of
being ‘lukewarm democrats’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE members of the current
PLP government have proven
to be “very lukewarm democ-
rats” according to opposition
leader Hubert Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham said the PLP
has “governed in secret” and
rather than putting the people
first, government members
“have busied themselves with
the trappings of office”.

Laying out the reasoning
behind his claims, he said that
the government has “conspired

i * to keep votes taken at the Unit-

ed Nations hush-hush; conclud-
ed foreign investment agree-
ments with undisclosed claus-
es; attacked the media when
questions are raised about their
dealings (and) answered criti-
cisms by arranging the launch
of investigations that are sel-
dom, if ever concluded.”
Speaking at a rally in Long
Island on Thursday, Mr Ingra-
ham said the PLP has broken
trust with the pubic by permit-
ting “political allies, associates



@ HUBERT Ingraham

and cronies to influence the
award of government contracts
and access to government ser-
vices”.

He said the government has
gone “to great lengths to keep
the people in the dark with
regard to the misbehaviour and
misadventures of their mem-
bers."

“They said they would wipe
every tear from the eyes of
Bahamians," Mr Ingraham not-
ed. Instead, they have misman-

aged disaster relief for the vic-
tims of the 2004/2005 hurricanes
and neglected to repair dam-
ages caused during the same
natural disasters, he said.

Mr Ingraham alleged that
government members “callous-
ly mishandled” the sale of the
Royal Oasis resort in Freeport,
prolonging mass unemploy-
ment.

Furthermore, he said that
they have delayed their
acknowledgment of the gov-
ernment's liability to the vic-
tims of the collision between
the Sea Hauler and United Star

’ vessels in 2005.

He said schools are “full to
overflow”, teachers are
“engaged but not paid” and
government-operated medical
facilities are “in jeopardy” due
to medicine stock shortages.

“Instead of addressing these
tangible concerns the govern-
ing party has rushed to pass into
law, a National Health Insur-
ance Scheme that is long on
promise and woefully short on
deliverables,” Mr Ingraham
said.

File on Inagua beating scandal
to be on AG’s desk ‘by Monday’

THE police file on the
alleged beating of a 27-year-old
Inagua man by Defence Force
officers will be on the attorney
general's desk by Monday,
ready for her to review, the
director of public prosecutions
said yesterday.

Bernard Turner said he
would not comment on whether
it is likely that charges will be
brought against any of the offi-
cers involved in the November
26 incident, “until a decision has
been made.”

Several people are said to ©

have witnessed Dexter Wilson
“beaten almost to death” that
night in Matthew Town by up to

THE BAHAMAS,

15 Defence Force officers, in an
attack that was said to have left
Inaguans outraged.

He was airlifted to Nassau to
receive treatment for his injuries
— which reports indicate includ-
ed a massive head wound, the
result of an officer “pounding”
his head with a rock — after a

‘dispute allegedly broke out over

a female officer.

Yesterday, The Tribune
reported that police are upset
that failure to make arrests in
connection with the matter is
rebounding on them.

Officers claimed they are
being blamed by the public for
the attorney general’s delay in

‘ TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS,

CONFERENCE

The Methodist Church in the Caribbean and the Americas

195TH ANNUAL SESSION

Meeting, Friday, January 12-Monday, January 22, 2007
at Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church

108 Montrose Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas

Friday, January 12-and Monday, January 15-Ministerial

Session

Lord’s Day, January 14 in the congregations of the
circuit-Trial Services for Probationer Presbyters,
Candidate for the Ministry and Candidate for the

Ministry of Lay Evangelist

ordering charges to be laid.

According to former assistant
police commissioner Paul
Thompson, many case files are
being sent to the AG’s office
before anyone is charged by
police.

“The incident in Inagua is
case in point,” he said. “From
what I have read in the various

.nhewspapers and heard on the

radio, it appears there is evi-
dence to charge these persons
with causing dangerous harm,
wounding, assault and battery,
discharging firearms to the dan-
ger of annoyance of the public,
assault with a deadly weapon
and disorderly conduct.”

| IE



‘ ° o es
Galleria Cinem
4 Mall-at-Marathon
BOX Orrick OPENS AT 10: 00.4 AM DAILY :

epee BeBe: Pryra = = i











EFFECTIVE JANUARY
f | STOMP THE vaRD new | 1:00 CALEE
[ [ARTHUR AND THE INVISIBLES wEW Ws









Do you have a piece of Artwork that needs to
be restored or is damaged and needs repair?





Call Sharon Aitken @ 364-8040. I have 15
years of experience in both restoring and
repairing damaged artwork. I use products of
“MUSEUM GRADE” quality and the same
restoration techniques used in Art Museums.
My pricing is very affordable despite Art
Restoration being so highly specialized. Call
today fora FREE CONSULTATION....








Your Artwork Will Thank You! J

oak aL Recs

warehouse workers. Persons ny i

re

Renee qn rerulesalereel
BitovedentelNors that will be team
Persons must be well groomed
Po vaueriveto cre amelie Manat TT reamea Cova oy)
Severe rae is $13,000 and after the
three month probationary period the salary
will be increased to $15,000 along with an
nee een TenNy offers good aS

Tuesday, January 16, 9a.m. Flag Raising Ceremony and
Opening of Representative Session

Tuesday, January 16, 7:30p.m.- Welcome/
Communion Service

Thursday, January 18, 7:30p.m. Service of Ordination to
the Presbytery for Rev. Mark S. Christmas
Friday, January19, 7:30p.m.-Open Session:

‘““The Church’s Response to Social Issues”

Saturday, January 20, 7a.m.-Prayer Breakfast
Saturday, January 20, 7p.m.-” Joyful, Joyful” Concert at
Wesley Methodist Church, Malcolm Road East

No. Pio er as Apply HY oe

Lord’s Day, January 21, 10.am.-Official Conference
Service with the Conferral of the Title Bishop on the
President of the Conferernce


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation ard Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
- Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Bush’s Iraq speech is a welcome start

ADMITTEDLY, I’ve been the one who
has been saying in this space that a change in
strategy and direction — almost any change
— would be better than clinging to a failed
policy for a war that was ill-advised in the first
place.

I’m not ready to renounce those words yet.
But readers who have taken issue should
know I'll be fully prepared to eat them if this
“surge,” as President Bush and his inner cir-
cle politely call it, turns into a deadly escala-
tion of a quagmire with no end in sight.

With.a Democratic Congress in place, ask-
ing questions and vowing to hold the admin-
istration accountable, that, we hope, won’t be
the case.

Even for administration critics and those
who aren’t convinced that sending in more
troops is the answer, Bush’s address to the
nation ought to be gratifying for some of its
significant themes.

For the first time, the commander in chief
who is the architect of the awful war strategy

seemed to be saying that an exit strategy is ,

something to be desired, not disdained. For
the first time, the president who has been
_ called stubborn and arrogant seemed to
acknowledge that the conduct of the war has
been flawed and riddled with mistakes.

For the first time, he acknowledged that the.
responsibility for those mistakes lies in the
Oval Office.

Of course, contrition won’t undo all the
blunders or end the deadly chaos. But if the

president-and-his cronies start seeing the |

lation and that most news stories the past
few weeks that used the administration’s term

“surge” has bracketed that word in quota-
tion marks.

The media are even less influential than
congressional critics in the actual conduct of
foreign policy. But the language of war does
matter.

Even former Defence Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld admitted as much recently in an
unusually reflective interview with columnist
Cal Thomas. Rumsfeld said the phrase “war
on terror,” unquestionably an administration
invention, raised false expectations.

“Tt creates a level of expectation of victory
and an ending within 30 or 60 minutes of a
soap opera,” Rumsfeld said, admitting he
was among those who helped sell the phrase
to the American public and the rest of the
world. ;

- Before the series of war failures and its
pattern of secrecy and deceit erased what
was left of its credibility, this administration
had been masters of spin in framing the
national discourse. I’m not among those who
think the media have been fawning lapdogs
of the administration’s linguistic machina-
tions. But, clearly, we’ve at times been vic-
tims of it.

_. When news reports were first published in

~ October suggesting the administration was

considering a new policy that involved timeta-
bles for the Iraqi government to disarm mili-
tias, achieve certain political and economic

_ benchmarks and assume a larger role in that

Majority —

meaning

EDITOR, The Tribune

JANUARY 10, 1967 ushered
in the advent of the first major-
ity government in the history of
the Bahama Islands, as they
were then known. Hitherto, the
government of the day com-
prised elements of the so-called
white Bahamian oligarchy and
the white British Governor and
expatriates.

The eligibility to vote, prior to
1964-5, was highly dependent
on property qualifications and
severely restricted to adult aged
men. These draconian measures
often resulted in the perpetua-
tion of the political rule of what
one could loosely term “The
Bay Street Boys’, led by the late
Sir Roland T Symonette and Sir
Stafford L Sands.

As early as the 1960’s the
embryonic ‘black’ Progressive
Liberal Party (PLP) was able
to capture a majority of elec-
toral votes but due to suspected
gerrymandering and other polit-
ical devices, the minority white
oligarch was able to perpetuate
its benign rule over the majori-
ty of blacks and conchyjoes.

Not only were those two sub-
classes disadvantaged from a
political point of view but they
were, generally speaking,
excluded from the economic
benefits which were rapidly
becoming available to Bahami-
ans during the 1950’s and
1960’s. This, of course, was the
fuel that ignited the massive
political realignment in 1967.

If it were not for the decisive
votes and support of the late Sir
Randol Francis Fawkes and the
late Sir Alvin Braynen, howev-
er, the PLP would not have
come to high office in 1967.
Truly, it was a combination of
the so-called black Bahamians
and the so-called conchyjoe or
off-white Bahamian which
formed the majority of those




DAMPERS

letters@tribunemecia.net



cians, like Bradley Roberts et
al, were not, initially, supporters
of the concept of majority rule
as espoused by nation builders
like the late Sir Lynden Oscar
Pindling; Sir Milo B Butler; the
Hon A D Hanna; the Hon
Dame Doris Johnson; the Hon
A Loftus Roker and, of course,

the indomitable Sir Cecil Wal- .

lace Whitfield.

These men and women, at
great personal and professional
sacrifice, took it upon them-
selves to call for political rule
by the majority of Bahamians.
Others, inclusive of a large
number of black-skinned
Bahamians would have died in
defence of the old guard.

Today, now that it is fashion-
able to align oneself with the
black majority, some of them
are able to wax eloquently
about “the struggle”. Rank
hypocrisy or revisionism?

I sat in on the recent debate

in the House of Assembly. ©

Bradley Roberts, a self-styled
“moderately successful busi-
nessman”, was his usual self
while he waxed on, haltingly,
with his “contribution” on
majority rule.

As a fairly young man in the
1960's I attended countless pub-
lic meetings of the PLP at places
like Windsor Park and the

Southern Recreation Grounds. ©

Bradley Roberts, to the best of
my recollection, was nowhere
in sight. I never heard him
address such meetings, much
less saw him campaigning with

pioneers and freedom fighters .

like Messrs Pindling, Ortland
H Bodie Sr, and Randol
Fawkes. . :

There were some who sus-

op

THE TRIBUNE :*:

»

-?

Rule and its:

©

ans

was he, my father, who took it.” :

upon himself to introduce Pin-

dling to the people south of the. '
arch. My dad also made avail-__ .
able the use of the former Bod-' ’.
ie Bank Building, still on Wulff.*
Road, to the infant PLP and the, ,
labour movement to hold busi- ”
ness meetings. He also con-* |
tributed financially to both _
groups. “4
The most unfortunate thing, _ _.
however, about the so-called *-° .’
“majority rule” is that it was ..
hijacked, in my: view, by rabid ‘ *
so-called black nationailists.., -.,
Instead of recognising that day “

for what it was, too many mem-
bers of the “old” PLP sought, °

successfully, to portray January °°”

10, 1967 as a “PLP” event.

iv,

This bogus perception has” ’
existed to this very day. Few of
our politicians, on either side *

of the aisle, have had the vision ’

or wisdom to embrace that day

as a truly “majority rule” day.~"™

As a result, I counted a maxi- ‘~"’

mum of 20 white Bahamians at

the Southern Recreation’ ”’

Grounds the other evening.

No effort, that I could dis-
cern, was made by the “new”. -

PLP and Christie’s government:

to embrace or welcome or white". 4
Bahamian brothers and sisters. ~
How sad. One day, however, '

when the real history of The *
Bahamas is written, it will’.







reflect that a vast majority of..s
Bahamians, of all colours and’: '
backgrounds, voted PLP in 1967. ,, :

and not just blacks, as some
would have us to believe.

While some have called for ~

January 10th to be declared a
national holiday, I do not agree
with that proposal, at this time

ae)

>

as it is still too emotive for many“
of us. To God then, whom one'~”
misguided or farcical PLP -

Councillor unabashedly claims:
is “black”, in all things, be the
glory.

~

same reality the rest of the world sees, it country’s own security, the administration. who voted for a change. pected my late father, the Rev- ORTLAND H BODIE JR
can’t be a bad thing for the big picture. distanced itself from those reports. ; Too many of our socialcom- _ erend Doctor Ortland H Bodie Nassau 3
Bush’s long-awaited speech did not gar- White House spokesmen’s statements in mentators and current politi- _ Sr of being a closet UBP but it January 12 2007

ner much immediate cheerleading. The
response from military experts and congres-
sional critics of both parties ranged from
lukewarm to outright hostile. Bush himself
acknowledged that even with his plan to send
21,500 more troops into battle, there will be
more sectarian violence, more fighting and
“more Iraqi and American casualties.”

Still, it was gratifying to hear the president
say to the Iraqi government and the rest of
the world, “America’s commitment is not
open-ended.” Contrasted to his past pro-
nouncements that we are in this bitter battle

response ranged from outright denial to inde-
cipherable qualifiers.

Now that Bush’s speech makes clear that

such things are central to his new policy, you
should expect some pundits and commenta-
tors to sprinkle a few smug “I-told-you-so’s”
into their columns and sound bites.

Pll resist that temptation. But as I see the
administration “cut and run” from its stub-
born “stay-thegcourse” pronouncements of
pre-election aps, I'll be cautiously optimistic
that the change in tone and rhetoric means
something, even if the change in direction

Tourism business is creating:

ugliness at Cable Beach

EDITOR, The Tribune

WHEN even the people in
the tourism business create
‘ugliness’ then we known we are

containers seemingly as a
result of the refurbishment
works on the Radisson and
Cable Beach.

We would have hoped that

green trap.

By the way Bah Mar, when |.
will you be starting the road-44

+

Pe,

4

we



Â¥

I.

n

2

ae

"i








‘iS.

oe a we ies

Bae



works? The public is anxious to,~ *
4

see the dirt being moved and * '

ee ae indefinite lone ee any his aoe isn't what I'd like it to be. at the end of the rope. someone would at least realise _ things really happening.
that tings were going well in the war effort, 2 ke Location: Cable Beach, the just how ugly these containers : i
it’s a welcomed shift in tone at least. (This column was written by Kenneth F. strip of land before you reach are F GIBSON i
_ [I'm glad that the P-I’s morning-after head- Bunting of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer - the ‘Cable Beach fire. station My Salitiond Breet achanic Nausea ‘
line called Bush’s troop commitment an esca- c.2007). has become a parking areafor link fence and cover that with January 8 2007 ‘



NOTICE

General Maintenance Personnel

Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel

with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and

some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience
and must provide references.



"NOTICE 1

is hereby given that JILIO JOSEPH OF



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE MARTHE MICHEL OF
McKinney Drive, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and




SOLDIER ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and



that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement-of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.
LY STOREWIDE

CLEARANCE SALE




Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experience.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107











erice
shoe & Bag Boutique



| |
| Hi ekvs |

BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES

\

’
cai
ee






Â¥




Pa A A @

The Entrance Examination for St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport and

St. Andrew’s School, Exuma will take place on Saturday, -
February 3rd, 2007 at 9:00a.m.

2 rw we oe ee £8

Applications can be collected from the Schools between the
hours of 8:00a.m. and 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

hess are.

Applications Forms and $25.00 Applications Fee must be
returned to the School no later than Friday, January 26th, 2007

St. John’s College is now accepting Applications for the ‘se
students from Kindergarten through Grade Six. Kindergarten ¥
screening will begin during the second week in February



setta St. Palmdale
Wels 328-8391


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE
















This week, In Days Gone By looks
back at Black Tuesday and the
celebrations following Majority Rule.
In Bahamian history, the term Black
Tuesday refers to April 27, 1965, when
then-opposition leader and later prime
minister of the Bahamas Sir Lynden
Pindling, threw the Speaker's Mace out
of the House of Assembly window

in protest against the unfair
gerrymandering of constituency
boundaries by the then ruling United
Bahamian Party CUBP).



















CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS » Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14TH, 2006

11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Services

Speaker: Elder Brentford Isaacs

f Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.

ning Service: 7:00 p.m.
inesdays) :

Thursday of each month)




Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |}.
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour: :
Sunday 6pm:- ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 e Box N-3622 }}



Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church

A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
P North America
(WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED













Worship time: 11am & 7pm
Prayer time: 10:15 - 10:43a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Candlelight Service - Dec. 17@ 7p.m.
> Christmas Eve Service - Dec. 24 @ 11:00 p.m
Watchnight Service - Dec. 31 @ 11:00 p.m. \



Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE






LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
/ Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
_ P.O.Box EE-16807 ;
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk @batelnet.bs









THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
‘oseamiind P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
ymemmm Phone: 393-37 26/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

tome CHURCH SERVICES
Pee SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 2007
COVENANT SUNDAY

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. George Knowles ~

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard

10:00AM Rev. Livingston Parks

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Mr. Earl Oinder

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue
8:00AM
9:30AM

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs/HC

7:00PM Mr. Livingston Parks
GORI IGG IG III IG III GI IGIGI I I IIIG R R IR IIR R FFE
RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

Your Host: Rev. James D. Neilly

‘METHODIST MOMENTS’

on each weekday at 6:55a.m.

Your Host: Rev. James D. Neilly

ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH- will be celebrating their 43rd Church

Anniversary Service on Sunday, January 14th, 2007 at 9:30 a.m. in their Sanctuary
on Boyd Subdivision.







































Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs-43rd Anniversary Service




RENEWAL SERVICES-Meaningful Worsip, Practical Preaching-Times of Meditation.
Monday, January 15, 2007 - 7:30 p.m. - Speaker: Dr. Rex Major

Tuesday, January 16. 2007 - 6:30 p.m. - Speaker: Rev. Philip Stubbs

Wednesday, January 17. 2007 - 7:30 p..m.- Speaker: Major Lester Ferguson
Thursday, January 18, 2007 - 6:30 p.m. - Speaker: Rev. Philip Stubbs

Friday, January 19,2007- 7:30 p.m. - Speaker: Apostle Clifford Smith




~ Grant’s Town We
(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Stre 13046.
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY JANUARY 14TH, 2007
7:00 a.m.Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis.Marilyn Tinker
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Comm. of Training Institute
10:00 p.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Visitation, Outreach & Social Witness

“Casting our cares upon Him, for. He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)






APRIL 28, 1965 (above) — The 165-year-old ceremonial mace,
symbol of the Speaker’s authority in the House of Assembly,
was hurled out the window of the House by Progressive Liberal
Party leader Lynden Pindling. The PLP was protesting the terms
of an order calling for the revision of electoral boundaries in the
Bahamas.

B JANUARY 10, 1967 (left) — Mr and Mrs Arnold, parents of
then premier Lynden Pindling, at their home on East Street
where Lynden spent part of his triumphant day following the
opening of the House of Assembly.

@ ABOVE top and left: Crowds gather to protest the unfair
electoral boundaries :

of THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE

OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE 0
E






CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS |
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIB

pak ET LES AMERIQUES

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES

108 Montrose Avenue

P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist
| witness for Christ in The Bahamas”
THE THIRD LORD’S DAY AFTER THE NATIVITY,
BAPTISM OF THE LORD, JANUARY 14, 2007
} COLLECT: ;
Almighty God, in Christ you make all things new: transform
the poverty of our nature by the riches of your grace, and in
the renewal of our lives make known your heavenly glory;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Kenneth P. Lewis (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Cecilia Gardiner

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)

7:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan
10:00 a.m. Prayer Band
11:00 a.m. Rev. Hilgrove Hamilton
6:30 p.m. Sis. Claire Robinson
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox
Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rey. Dr. Kenneth A. Huggins

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

7:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter
10:00 a.m. Rev. Julia E. Williams (Holy Communion)
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH (20 Cedar
Terrace, Tall Pines)
10:00 a.m. At Rhodes Memorial Church
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Fridays — Children’s Club
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
FASTING FOR JUSTICE — All Methodists of the Conference
are urged to fast for Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases.
The fast begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday
and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly:
“My God and My Right.”
RADIO PROGRAMS
“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS | at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.

PRAYERS

For Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases. Our brothers and
sisters in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes and other
natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.

The 195th Annual Session of Conference will meet from Friday,
January 12th to Monday, January 22nd, 2007 at Rhodes Memorial
Methodist Church.

ORES NTT
Were?

Bo

2 EDV OMB Fi Ey

Te he



THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 7 }
of ANDRE), }

scHool’’s |
NHI contributions |

‘smaller than
private insurers’

THE overall contribution of
each person in the National
Health Insurance Plan “will be
small” compared to the premi-
um charged by private insurers
for lesser benefits, Minister of
Health Dr Bernard Nottage said.

All employees will pay 2.65
per cent of their monthly earn-
ings up to a maximum of $5,000
he told the 16th annual
Bahamas Business Outlook at
the Radisson Cable Beach on
January 9.

“For example, an employee
earning about $1,000 per month

Se :
><] i

The International School of The Babamas
POUNDED 1948

(word school

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International |
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian |
candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2007. Full
information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com

Se

Dec TL

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications
for the position(s) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's |
degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful school-based |
experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual posts, are
that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or international school and
an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or advise
school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (.e. middle and upper)
school teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered
at this time, although permanent residents with the right to’‘work are invited to submit their
papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the recruiting
process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it will advertise internationally





will only be required to con- in January.
tribute $26.50 per month. For
someone earning $3,000, the | THE Minister of Health and National Insurance Senator Dr ALL SCHOOL

contribution will be $79.50.
Someone earning at the ceiling
of $5,000 and above will con-
tribute $133 per month.
Employers will match the con-
tribution of their employees,”

Bernard Nottage addressed the National Health Insurance Plan
at the 16th annual Bahamas Business Outlook seminar on
Tuesday at Radisson Cable Beach Resort.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)

Physical education: Years pre-school to 13 responsibilities. Candidates must have successful
experience in coaching years 7 to 13 in at least three of the following sports: baseball/softball; §
basketball; soccer; track and field; volleyball. Swimming/WSI certification would be welcomed. |}

PRIMARY SCHOOL

aT en soe

Bm aE

Dr Nottage explained.

Those who work for them-
selves will pay 5.3 per cent of
their earnings. Dr Nottage said
indigent pensioners will be cov-
ered by a contribution from the
government.

The minister said NHI will

be monitored and administered
by the National Health Insur-
ance Commission, a corporate
body. But it is proposed that
the commission purchases ser-
vices from National Insurance
Board to collect contributions
and process claims.

“The NHI Commission will
be obligated to provide services
to its members on a timely basis
and with dignity,” said Dr Not-
tage. “This will require improve-
ments in the health system, par-
ticularly the public sector.”

Efforts have already begun
to bring about the necessary
enhancements, he added.

Department of Public Health
clinics, by the end of February,
will provide services until 11pm,

he said.

The upgrading of existing
facilities is ongoing and plans
are progressing for the con-
struction of new facilities on
several islands, he added.

Dr Nottage said a National
Blood Bank will be operational
by the end of June to bring
about much needed improve-
ments in the availability of
blood and blood products. And
an aggressive customer service
initiative will be initiated
throughout the health system
by February 1.

“Admittedly, there are defi-
ciencies throughout the health
system,” he said. “As we seek to
address those which exist in the
public sector, plans have been
developed and investments will
be made to provide modern
information systems to support
regular audits and reviews and
mandated by NHI legislation.”

Another constraint of the
public sector is the unavailabil-
ity of essential sources, he said.

“Despite the almost $300 mil-
lion expended by the govern-
ment from the consolidated
fund,” said Dr Nottage, “the
capacity of the sector to meet
the growing demand for service
is adversely affected by short-
ages of prescription drugs, diag-
nostic equipment, and health
professional in specialised areas
of medicine nursing and the
allied health professional.”

NHI, he said, will provide
financial stability and sustain-
ability for the health system and
offer the benefits of cost-con-
tainment and ideal allocation of
resources, when compared with
a more market-based approach.

And, added Dr Nottage,
health outcomes have improved
at a quicker rate in countries
with NHI than those without.

“In the United States, life

“expectancy increased by 3.8

years for the period 1980 to
2004, compared to 5.7 years for
Germany and six: years for
Japan and France.”

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International
Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school should be
committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP. Applications are warmly
welcomed from teachers who are committed to an inquiry-based pedagogy but who have
not yet had the opportunity to teach in a PYP school.

Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.

Primary school music

Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful teaching experience at all years from
pre-reception to six. They must also have successful experience in organizing primary
school music and drama performances.

SECONDARY SCHOOL

The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the
BGCSE in years 10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma [|
Programme (DP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades -f

11 and 12).

Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able to
work as a contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach
to pre-university level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate

diploma programme.

Science

ose

6-2 am:

7 a a Ge.

_ 2 2 8 @ ewe wx

eee

cE ee

Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified:to teach biology to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either chemistry or physics at BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
_ Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Chemistry: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or physics to BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Mathematics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Successful experience in teaching calculus to AP and/or IB level is preferred for this post.
Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT II experience is also desirable.

Economics and accounts: Candidates must be familiar with current computer applications
theory and practice and should also be qualified to teach business studies and economics
to pre-university level. They should also be familiar with the demands of the International
Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful BGCSE or IGCSE experience is desirable.

Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications,
experience working with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle
schools are required from applicants for these posts. Applicants may also be required to
teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.

At least two of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in
teaching English in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following -
PSE; IT & ICA; art; drama - possibly to BGCSE level.

Another successful applicant will have documented successful experience in teaching general
science in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer any combination of biology, chemistry and
physics at BGCSE level. If he/she could also teach mathematics that would be useful.

Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful
experience in teaching in both areas. .
NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching
of the Theory of Knowledge course at IB diploma level. Another will be able to offer
the teaching of psychology at IB diploma level

Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mr Robert Wade, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications MUST include the following:

letter of application

a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy

a full curriculum vitae,

either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three
people who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name
and address of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers
may be obtained.

yo On Premises _
Check Our Price
Before buying —

Bahamas Bus & Truc

_ Call:

Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools
by email or fax only.

Frank Coyle, Head of the secondary school:

Email: FCoyle@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Allison Collie, Head of the primary school:
Email ACollie@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Robert F. Wade

Principal

St Andrew's School

P O Box EE 17340
Nassau

Email: -

Fax: (1 242) 364 1654

The closing date for applications is 31 January 2007. Applications from unqualified candidates,
applications arriving without the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this date will not be considered.




_ confirmed

THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

The task force is co-chaired
by Paul Major for the govern-
ment and Michael Maura of
Tropical Shipping for the pri-
vate sector, with the Dutch firm
Ecorys consulting.

The prime minister said that
this public/private sector part-
nership will ensure that the port
will run “not only efficiently but
also profitably.”

He emphasised that oppor-
tunities will be made available
for Bahamians to participate
significantly in the new port’s
ownership and management.

While government is expect-
ed to have some share in the
project, Mr Christie said that
the new port is expected to

- essentially be a privately owned

and operated facility.
So far preliminary environ-
mental impact reports have

theft of

Container

been conducted and arrange-
ments have made with the
landowners of the designated
area in the south-west of the
island.

Minister of Energy and Envi-
ronment Dr Marcus Bethel —
who his heading this project for
the government — commended
the New Providence Develop-
ment Company, Sun Oil Com-
pany, and the Oakes Estate for
their full co-operation in this
effort to move the container port.

Prime Minister Christie
explained that the port will be
placed in the area behind the
Commonwealth Breweries and
BEC’s generating facilities.

New separate roads, which
lead to the new port and the
nearby Clifton Heritage and

Police silent on

FROM page one

“Right now we really don’t
want to give any information
out to the press because the
matter is under active investi-
gation,” he said.

Once police had reached a
conclusion in the matter they

be. fooled by PLP

would be willing to discuss their
findings, he added.

The investigation is the lat-
est of several problems affecting
the national flag-carrier.

In mid-December, hundreds
of Bahamians were delayed in
their pre-Christmas travels
when Bahamasair pilots staged

Ingraham: Don’t

FROM page one
At arally in Grand Bahama

last month, Mr Ingraham

revealed the FNM candidates
for that island.

At a mass rally in Long Island
on Friday night, he officially
that Larry
Cartwright is the ratified oppo-

FROM page one

Nelson was among several
members of Congress and the

Bush administration who raised -
objections to a proposal last

year by then-Secretary of

Defence Donald Rumsfeld to.

redeploy the seven Bahamas
Blackhawks because of war
needs. Attorney General Alber-
to Gonzales, who oversees the
DEA, was among those ques-
tioning the move.

The DEA considers the heli-
copters a vital part of its Opera-
tion Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
—or OPBAT for short — which

- is credited with seizing thou-

sands of tons of cocaine and
marijuana since 1982 and with

sition candidate for the Long
Island/Ragged Island con-
stituency. :
During his speech to the rally,
Mr Ingraham told the crowd:
“We have completed our selec-
tion of candidates; we are mak-
ing ready for whenever elec-
tions are called. Do not forget
or neglect to register to vote;

helping drive drug smugglers
away from the vast island chain.

Without the army helicopters,
the DEA would have only one
helicopter in the Bahamas along
with three Coast Guard Jay-
hawks.

Under the agreement, which
must be approved by the White
House, the Pentagon will give
the DEA three Sikorsky heli-
copters in 2008 and provide oth-
er assets to temporarily fill the
gap created when the Black-
hawks are withdrawn by Octo-
ber 1 of this year, according to
Nelson’s office.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas







eed

Nassau.



of Treasure Cove,
Nassau, The
Bahamas will be
held at Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic
Church, Shirley
Street, Nassau, on
Tuesday, 16th
January, 2007 at
1:00p.m. Father Mel
Taylor will officiate
and interment will be
in .Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery,
East Shirley Street,

Mr. Pinder is survived by his wife, Lorraine
Moyra Pinder; his mother, Emily Pinder; sons,
Craig and Brett Pinder; a daughter, Tracy
Bonczek; granddaughters, Hannah and Hailey

Bonczek; brother, Godfrey Pinder; sister, Janet
Pinder; aunt, Agnes Knowles; son-in-law,

Zachary Bonczek and many other relatives and
friends including, Joey, Jude and Doreen, Billy
and Edna Kemp, Agnes and Kenny Roberts,
Gwen, Terry and Ruth, Billy and Lulabelle,
Kermit and Janet Cates, Nita and George Baker,
Harry, Laurette and Eleanor Albury, Ethelyn
and Hansford Darville, Elliott and Cynthia Sands,
Michael and Janice Knowles, Jackie Kemp,
Tommy and Candy Kemp, Karen and Glen
Pritchard, Martha Pinder, Jenny Viviano,
Michael and Cherie Pinder, Tyrone and Barbara
Albury, Joe and Barbara Bonczek, Robert Sands,
Mark and Aleece Campbell, lan and Tanya
Bayles, Randy and Stephanie Sands, Reg
Bonimy, Jimmy and Camaille Roberts and

Chuck Cartwright.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.



SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 9

ee

connect directly to Gladstone
Road Park have been proposed,
Mr Christie said.

From a planning point of
view, the prime minister said,
the new port is intended to
impact Andros, the Berry
Islands and South Abaco.

It will be a “major and mag-
nificent way” to provide link-
ages from New Providence to
these Family Islands, he said.

Mr Christie said he envisions
fast ferry and other quick trans-
portation connections between
the islands which will help
Andros, the Berry Islands and
South Abaco to develop expo-
nentially with what is happening
in New Providence.

Ecorys representative Mr van
den Bossche outlined the three
phases of the business plan, the
first step being the question of
the design of the port facility.

The second step in the busi-

a major sick-out as the ongoing
dispute over an industrial agree-
ment with the airline’s manage-
ment came to a new standstill.
Dismayed passengers con-
tacted The Tribune reporting
that their flights had been either
cancelled or severely delayed.
Hundreds of Bahamasair cus-

we need your vote to vote them
out.”
The PLP insiders quoted in
Friday’s story said the govern-
ment is hoping that the momen-
tum gained from the Majority
Rule celebrations and the 200th
anniversary of the end of the
transatlantic slave trade will
“seal the deal” and win the elec-



Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets



ness plan, he said, will look at
the cost of the project.

“The port will cost a lot of
money. It’s a huge investment,”
and it is something that has to
be done jointly between gov-
ernment and the private sector,
he said.

Mr van den Bossche said that
his firm will look into the ques-
tion of how such a move and
the new port can be financed.

“(The port) should not
depend to any great degree on
subsidies from the Bahamian
people, it needs to be self sus-
taining,” Mr Maura of Tropical
Shipping emphasised.

The third step in the business
plan, Mr van den Bossche said,
is looking at the issue of port
management.

The method of managing the
downtown port, he said, may
not be an optimal one for the
new facility.



1941-2006

tomers who were travelling to
do some last-minute Christmas
shopping, or just to travel home
for the holidays, were report-
edly stranded in US and domes-
tic airports.

Police officials said yesterday
that the theft is currently under
“active investigation”.



tion for the PLP.

However, during his speech
in Long Island, Mr Ingraham
said he understands not many
people turned up to the gov-
ernment’s Majority Rule event
held on Wednesday night.

An independent eyewitness
said that only around 200 to 300
persons were in attendance.

S
Change

“Daily Vol.

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

1.321587"

2.9728"**

2.500211**

1.217450°*"*

11.3075*****

no SANS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided b
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Bhd Clans Cll

aN SN
NAV KEY

*- 29 Decamber 2006

“* - 31 December 2006
***~ 31 Decamber 2006
see" ~ 31 Dacember 2006

nbar 2006
SORRY


Ne

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007 THE TRIBUNE






rea thfast SB: vials

he Site

Se :
i st









TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
JANUARY 16 - MARCH 23





READ THIS COMPELLING NINETEEN PART STORY ABOUT
MELI AND HER FAMILY'S QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.






he Tribune

believes that
reading helps people to
focus on constructive
choices through expo-
sure to worlds beyond aN securely—living in their. ancestral
their immediate envi- noe e-. community in Kosovo. But in 1999
ronment. ‘ A ~ Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic

Breakfast Serials pro- : Albanians from their homes. Family

vides the great gift of closeness is not enough. The
fine literature, read in intervention of U.S. forces is not

convenient installments

- so that the reader : |

| : dangerous journey in search of safety.
keeps coming back for as Though family ties and tradition are
More. | — severely tested, they eventually reach
_ : the U.S. and the tranquility of a
Vermont town. It is there that Meli



When Meli, an Albanian 11-year-old
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not








enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,
the family must flee, embarking on a






Read. Learn. Enjoy.



experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11 distrust of



sds sacedseceade sbepocsadcdcietseedesesecdeoacscdssneucase4dsesavecabasacaosdsesssodosoesesees Muslims. Her response is an inspiration for all.



Based on a true story, Long Road Home presents a warm and compassionate family’s



response to conflict and emigration to America.








Read "Long Road Home" with us... every Tuesday and Friday from
3 qxivune January 16 to March 23, 2007."






For more information about The Tribune's >? ic : ie
| | Ted A fast Serials

NIE Literacy Programme, contact | Good Books Unbound
“* nie@tribunemedia.net or call 502-2394.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Religious tourism is focus of Tourism Week

RELIGIOUS tourism will be
the topic of discussion during a
special segment of this year’s
National Tourism Week to be
held in Grand Bahama.

Carmeta Miller, the recently
appointed manager of faith-
based tourism and senior man-
ager of the religious market will
speak about her new position
and her charge to attract more
religious tourism to Grand
Bahama.

This is just one of many new
events planned under the
expanded schedule for this
year’s Tourism Week.

Grand Bahama will host a full
week of activities organised by
the Ministry of Tourism from
January 20 to 26.

The week will be highlighted
by a mini-conference in the Our
Lucaya Ballroom on Thursday,
January 25 where a line-up of
industry professionals headed
by Touris™’s director General,
Vernice Walkine will host gen-
eral sessions aimed at sparking
extensive discussions on the
future of the country’s most
vital sector.

Betty Bethel, who works with
the Ministry of Tourism in
Grand Bahama, noted during a

press conference, that prepara-
tions for the second annual
National Tourism Week are
now well underway.

“The national theme: ‘My
Bahamas Marketplace’, encour-
ages everyone to view the
industry’s relevance to all sec-
tors of the economy, and the
focus during the week will cen-
ter on increasing tourism relat-
ed linkages and lowering the
percentage of tourism earnings
currently being leaked outside
of the Bahamas,” she said.

“In Grand Bahama National
Tourism Week commences on
Sunday, January 21 at 1lam
with a church service at Mt
Zion Baptist Church, Jones
Town, Eight Mile Rock.

“On Monday at 9am a
careers fair kicks off in the Ball-
room of the Westin and Shera-
ton at Our Lucaya specifically
geared toward high school
seniors, grades 10 to 12.
Tourism in the primary schools
will take place on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday when
representatives of the tourism
office will visit primary schools
on Grand Bahama taking the
tourism message,” Ms Bethel
explained.

The primary school children
have been challenged to create a
poster under theme “Tourism is
everybody’s business”,
dents in Grades 7 to 9 will par-
ticipate in an essay competition.

Ms Walkine has described the
upcoming National Tourism
Week as a forum for frank,
open and honest discussion of
the tourism business. “It is very
important to meet regularly to
discuss issues relative to tourism
and to make adjustments and
improvements when necessary
in order to sustain and enhance
what we have,” she said.

“This year’s theme focuses
on the linkages between
tourism and other sectors of the
economy which we hope will
serve as a vital reminder that
tourism is indeed everyone’s
business.”

According to the Ministry of
Tourism, the new events have
been added this year to give
everyone an opportunity to par-
ticipate in “this most important
celebration”.

The ministry explained in a
statement that events are also
planned for other locations in
addition to New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

while stu-~

@ NATIONAL Tourism Week plans for! Grand Bahama being qumsuaced by touion officials.
From left to right, Carmeta Miller, senior manager for the religious market and faith-based
tourism; Betty Bethel, general manager for groups and special events, and Mikala Moss, assistant
naa for PR and communications for the film and television commission.

(BIS photo by Greg Christie)

EEE PETE eeTeEeeTTTTreeereerereerereereeereresereeeerereeererrrerrerrrreireererererrrrrereerereerrreeerrerereererrrrerrererrrrerreeereerer reeer rarer reer reer rrereerererrrr errr reer ere ere reer ereererrrrerrererrrrerrererrreerre rere treet rerer terre terre rere eee eee eee rer ee rer er errr ree rer ere eer rere rere eer Teer eeeeeeerererreerrerereeereeer rere rere ree er rere rrr rie oe

National agency to
help Bahamians train
for job opportunities

THE government has
announced the establishment of
a national training agency to
enable Bahamians to take
advantage of job opportunities.

Addressing the 16th Annual
Bahamas Business Outlook on
Tuesday Prime Minister Perry
Christie said another aim of this
initiative is to forge a compre-
hensive approach to training in
close collaboration with the pri-
vate sector.

“Through training, citizens will

be able to take the most advan- .

tage of the thousands of job
opportunities being made avail-
able to them,” Mr Christie said,

He said the government is
also committed to instituting
comprehensive training pro-
grammes at all levels of the pub-
lic service to keep pace with the
rapid development underway
in the country, and to ensure
necessary improvement in the
delivery of public service.

ft the helm of this initiative

is the College of the Bahamas,
he said.

*“T am personally committed
to the idea that the College of
the Bahamas must play a much
stronger role in the process of
development in our country,”
he said. “There should be no
need for the extensive engage-
ment by the government or the
private sector of foreign con-
sultancies if the College of the

Bahamas can bring its colleé”

tive expertise | to bear.”

Ace eeneceeueceenapeeseceeuscenaccaacnecacaeaseeecccnuscnencsesenunayecuaasnhpeccensceneceyacesuseeassasuesaensaceceeeeasneenweanauennensesaenescubeneensdnemaaceeenesuQeetbagerseeeeueseageaeneeneeee

Parent of three haemophiliac sons
speaks of her anger and frustration

FROM page one

“God gave me these boys for
a reason. They are brilliant,
good-looking and very intelli-
gent boys. One of these days I
will look back at the hard times.
I want my boys to have a place
in this world," she said, on the
verge of tears.

Haemophilia is an incurable
disorder which stems from defi-
ciencies in the blood clotting
factors. Persons with the con-
dition bleed in the same way
that those without it do, but for
longer periods. Cuts and bruis-
es are not a concern. The
biggest problem is the possi-
bility of internal bleeding.

"Unfortunately, it's some-
thing they will have to live with
for the rest of their lives," she
noted.

"Sometimes they are very
depressed because they can't
play sports like other children.
Sometimes they have to be
bedridden for long periods.
They have to rest the part of
- body that's injured.

“Elevate, ice-pack, take pain
killers," she said, “And they are
unable to use that limb until
recovery. When the bleeding
has stopped they have to do
therapy to get that limb mov-
ing."

So the boys constantly have
to learn how to walk again, she
explained. They have also
learned to treat themselves.

The treatment, a mixture of
blood plasma, which comes in a
powder form, and bacterial ster-
ile water, is intravenously inject-
ed.

"Their instinct has driven the
boys. They know that it is some-
thing that they have to have. I
did not have to get a few people
to hold them down to give them
the needle."

The biggest challenge with
their treatment, she explained,
is to find funds to pay for it.

"One week's worth of treat-
ment for Michael could cost
$32,000,” she said. “In a month
about $160,000 to $180,000
worth of treatment is required.
Sometimes it could be less,
sometimes it could be more."

Mrs Strachan has to depend

on her American friends, who
donate the factor for her chil-
dren. "I can't pay for it, I can't
get insurance, the government
can't assist so I call for help
from Americans -we depend on
them for donations. They have

‘been helping me for the past 16

years," she said.

Mrs Strachan has also devel-
oped relationships with other
parents whose children are
affected and assists them in get-
ting the factor.

“The medical system here is
not set so I can readily get the
factor,” she explained.

"If any of my kids gets into a
life-threatening situation and I
don't have the factor at home,
it's a chance that they won't sur-
vive. If you want the medica-
tion you have to request it
through the government."

The bills are piling up and
Mrs Strachan desperately needs
help. Originally, she explained,
her children were in public
school, but their father removed
them for fear of something hap-
pening to them.

"The risk is too great," she
said, referring to increasing vio-
lence in government schools.
"It’s a high risk. And because
they are teenagers, it presents
an even greater risk. High
schools are violent and I don't
want to take any chances.

“My kids are very sensitive
and they said ‘mommy, if you
put us back in the high school
system, we are going to be bom-
barded. People are going to see
us in the papers and they are
going to tease us.’"

They haven't been to school
since October. "I don't know
what to do because I don't have
the funds. I want my boys back
in school but I can't afford to
send them.

“It hurts me because here I
am trying to reach out to get
help for us and they don't want
me to do it. They feel like ‘why
do we have to be like this?’ -
and that hurts me. That makes
me feel bad.

“T am having second thoughts
about putting them back in the
high school system. They are
not going to want to learn and
that’s not fair on them. So I

need help," she said.

Mrs Strachan has created a
foundation in a atteiupt to raise
funds for children in the
Bahamas with the condition.
The Bahamas Haemophilia

Noting that the government
spends millions or. dollars on

‘consultation, the prime minis-

ter challenged COB to take an
increasingly expanded role in
such areas, especially those that
are researéh-driven.

He said that already, the gov-
ernment is taking advantage of
collaboration with Bahamian
academics in a number of ways:

¢ The $60 million spent on

“installing a fibre optic cable to

allow for modern communica-

Foundation has not yet been
launched, but she has estab-
lished a bank account with Sco-
tia Bank in the British Colonial
Hilton and is accepting any
donations. -

@ MINISTRY of Tourism director general Vernice Walkine

speaking at the event

tions throughout the country

e The installation of potable
water in the Family Islands

e The use of solar energy to
power airports at Congo Town
and Mangrove Cay in Andros;
New Bight and Arthur’s Town

FROM page one

Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said: “Following the initial
investigation at the scene, offi-
cers determined that arson was
the cause of the fire and arrest-
ed the 47-year-old male. resi-
dent of unit 2401.”

On the direction of a local
doctor, the man was flown to
Nassau for examination as part
of the police investigation.

No-one was hurt in the inci-
dent. Grand Bahama police are
continuing inquiries at the scene.

new location.

in Cat Island; Acklins; Crooked
Island; and Moore’s Island in
Abaco. -

Plans are also underway for
solar infrastructure at Sandy
Point, the Berry Islands, Bimini,
the Exumas and Long Island.

TPT so iccst RR esha saste ls ore aah Eee a oeeaoeeecad jevseseeceeeeeeseneceeeeeetanennueeeensesusenaceesssensseeaceeucnecessaseeuseneuenbasseseseesseacsaneas apesees

Chief Supt Rahming said the
American man and native Trea-
sure Cay woman, had been
engaged in a heated argument
when officers were called earlier.

Some time after officers left
the scene, the report came in
saying their apartment was
engulfed in flames and that the
fire was spreading.

When police and volunteer
firefighters arrived, the entire
six-plex structure was ablaze.

our continuing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

Aen are El a OF ahr NA a



| Visit or call your Agent
—at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

Premium payment functions will be
transferred from Collins Avenue to our
| Harbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

FAMILY
| GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY









LY
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2006 THE TRIBUNE



By Franklyn G Ferguson



aN

ON

‘

NASSAU

‘Dame Marguerite and Sir Garet
saluted at New Year’s Eve gala

EVENTS GAP TURE D CAMERA



FOR 26 years, a collection of
friends known as the New
Year’s Group has held an event
that has become known simply
as “The Gathering”.

This year’s Gathering paid
appropriate respects to the loss

1. Both honourees hail from
Long Bay Cays, South
Andros. It is certainly without
precedent in The Bahamas
that a Dame and a Knight
would have come from such a
small settlement.

2. Sir Arlington Butler, the
Bahamas first black Speaker
of the House of Assembly and
Sir Garet Finlayson first met
56 years ago, as apprentices in
a tailor shop situated at
Market and Lewis Streets.
Now they share tales with
Lady Sheila Butler and Lady
Rowena Finlayson.

3. Heart Specialist Dr Conville
Brown and his wife

Dr Corrine SinQuee-Brown,
pediatrics oncologist,
Professor Howard, and
Beverley Spencer research
co-ordinator UWI Medical
School The Bahamas campus.

4. The McGill connection.
Gary Mullings, author, shares
with his wife Janyne Hodder,
president of The College of
The Bahamas and a former
acting principal of McGill
University and Dr Arthur
Potter, managing director of
the Cancer Centre (Bahamas)
and president of McGill’s
Medical System and a recent
appointee to the Board of :
Directors of Air Canada.

5, Warmer than in Denmark.
Soren Barholt, chief executive
officer of one of the largest
engineering firms in Europe,
and his wife Sidel agree on the
warmth. The Barholts were
the guest of Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts and his wife.

h

6. Mark Finlayson, managing
director of Solomons Mines,
president of Clear Channel
with his wife Najah, vice
president of apparell, sun-
glasses and accessories at
Solomon’s Mines, celebrate
the New Year and their 15th
wedding anniversary with
family members and friends at
the Gathering.

7. Lawrence Bascom and his
wife Arlene, both professional
accountants, flew in from New
York to be a part of the
gathering- Mr Bascom is one
of the first Bahamians to have
been admitted to partnership
in a Big Four accounting firm
in America. His partnership |
in the USA was with Deloitte.

8. Former Banker and
businessman Alex Reckley
danced the hully-gully with
his daughter Solomonia
Reckley-Rigby.

9, Samuel “Bookie” Johnson,
Proprietor of Zanzibar
Courier Services pose with
his daughter Nikera, and his
wife Inez Johnson.





of a group member, Dr Richard
Crawford, in whose memory the
group has sponsored an award
at the College of the Bahamas.

Then special tribute was paid
in poetry to Dame Margaurite
Pindling by Dr Valron Grimes-

sth

10. Attorney Donna Smith, partner in the
firm of Sharon Wilson & Co. and
businessman Ed Fitzgerald, proprietor of
Global United enjoyed the evening.




Tinubu and in song to Sir Garet
and Lady Rowena Finlayson
by the Falcons band.

In response, Dame Marguerite
humbly made reference to her
first conversation with Queen
Elizabeth II, which helped her

lis

Bahamas!” :

to begin working on behalf of
the Bahamas Red Cross.

Sir Garet was commended
not only for his unparalleled
and consistent services in busi-
ness under three different gov-
ernments but also his philan-

11. Danny Houston, Leadership Consultant from Columbus, Ohio, son
of the late Vestra Hanna of Spring Point Acklins and Heather Atkinson,
Attorney for MGM Studios Los Angeles agree that “It is Better in The

t
}

thropy, which includes having
personally endowed with mil-
lions of dollars the trust fund
which provides scholarships to
dozens of Bahamians in the
memory of Archdeacon
William Thompson and former

Clayton.

12. Dr Tony Davis, Ella Davis, former
banker and jewelry entrepreneur enjoying
the evening with their daughter and

son-in-law Darel Davis-Clayton and Scott

prime minister Sir Lynden Pin-
dling.

Sir Garet also joined Robert
(Bobby) H Symonette in spon-
soring all of the Family Island
regattas in George Town, Exu-
ma for many years. ~





6. Hergqgusuon

P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas






oe

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Australia Friday Jan. 12, 2007.

@ A SEQUENCE showing England’s Kevin Pietersen reacting after being hit in the ribs



Australia wins by
eight wickets;
Pietersen ruled out
with broken ribs

B CRICKET
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

> RICKY Ponting guided Aus-

st

- "+" tralia to an eight-wicket win in

| the opening tri-series limited-

overs international against Eng-
dJand on’Friday, extending his
side’s unbeaten stretch against
the tourists in all versions of
cricket this summer.

Ponting scored 82 from 96
balls as Australia reached 246

- for two, surpassing England’s

,

242 for eight with more than six
overs to spare. .

He shared a 133-run partner-
ship with Michael Clarke, who
was unbeaten on 57 when Aus-
tralia passed the target.

Kevin Pietersen top scored
for England with 82 from 91
balls but was ruled out for the
remainder of the series after
being struck in the ribs advanc-
ing down the pitch at a Glenn
McGrath short ball. It was a
major blow, for England’s
series and World Cup ambi-
tions.

The Australian chase started
quickly, with Adam Gilchrist
and Matthew Hayden putting
on 101 for the first wicket
before Gilchrist was out for 60
from 61 balls, including five
boundaries and a six.

Hayden played the anchor
role and was out for 28 with the
total at 118.

“We played well again

“+ tonight. I thought our bowlers

‘did a good restricting job. We
took wickets along the way —
240, on this wicket, was proba-
bly 30 runs shy,” Ponting said.



in their one day international
day, Jan. 12, 2007.

Australia.is honing a squad
to win a third a consecutive
World Cup.

“We're not far away. This
group of players will form the
nucleus of our World Cup
squad. We’ve got some good
young blokes in among some
older blokes,” he said.

Pietersen clubbed three six-
es and four boundaries in his
91-ball knock, holding the Eng-
land innings together in the

middle overs before Andrew

Flintoff took over, hitting an
unbeaten 47 from 38 balls at the
end.

Treatment

Pietersen was hit in the ribs
by a rising short ball after a big
swing-and-a-miss on 73 and
needed treatment on the field.
He was later taken to hospital
for tests.

England management
revealed he would be sent home
after breaking a rib on his right
side. A replacement has not
been named.

Skipper Michael Vaughan,
who missed the 5-0 Ashes loss
to Australia, won the toss and
elected to bat, the move back-
firing early when Andrew
Strauss (12) was caught at slip
by Hayden and Vaughan (26)
was out in the same mode with
the total at 47.

Ian Bell (15) was. out with the
total at 73 before Pietersen and
Paul Collingwood combined in
a 95-run fourth wicket stand.

Collingwood (43) hada
reprieve when Cameron White



misjudged an attempted catch
in the outfield before veteran
paceman McGrath broke up the
partnership.

He deceived Collingwood
with a slower ball and had him
caught by Mitchell Johnson.

Pietersen, who smacked
White for sixes on consecutive
balls in the 36th over, was more
subdued after being hit by
McGrath and eventually was
out when he hit Stuart Clark to
Andrew Symonds:on the long-
on boundary.

England lost three wickets for
five runs in an 18-ball slump fol-
lowing Pietersen’s dismissal
before test captain Flintoff took
control, hitting five boundaries
to lift the run rate.

“We batted well at times, got |
ourselves a good platform,”
Vaughan said. “Again, Aus-
tralia chased us down with great
effect.”

Vaughan said Pietersen was
returning to England for treat-
ment.

“Tt looks like Kevin is going
home, a crack in his right rib ...
and trying to get him ready for
the World Cup,” he said. The
bad luck came in doses, he said:
“When it rains, it pours.”

England has lost every match
against Australia on this tour,
being swept in the Ashes test
series for the first time in 86
years and then being thrashed
by 77 runs in the Twenty20
international in Sydney on
Tuesday night.

Australia plays New Zealand
on Sunday. England’s next
match is against New Zealand
at Hobart on Tuesday.







@ AUSTRALIAN teammates Ricky Ponting, right, and Mitchell Johnson, second right, celebrate
after the dismissal of England’s batsman Ian Bell, second left, for 15 runs off the bowling of Braken

cricket match at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Fri-

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)





SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2U0U/, PAGE 3b





by a ball from Australia’s Glenn McGrath during the One Day International cricket at the MCG in Melbourne,

(AP Photo/PA, Gareth Copley)







LS Se oe) S ‘

HB ENGLAND’S wicketkeeper Paul Nixon, left, watches as Australia’s Michael Clarke hooks a
shot during their one day international cricket: match at:the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Mel-.. ,...... os
bourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007.:Australia won by 8 wickets. while. Pietersen suffered a:rib _ >. .-
injury from a McGrath delivery that has ended Pietersen’s tour.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft). .











@ ENGLAND'S Jamie Dalrymple, left, scurries on the ground while fielding as Australia’s Rick .

Ponting moves back to his crease during their one day international cricket match at the Mel-

bourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007. Australia won by 8 wickets.
(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

7
ll AUSTRALIA’S Cameron White falls over as he attempts to catch out England’s batsman Paul
Collingwood in their one day international cricket match at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in





Melbourne, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007. ;
(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft) cafe
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 7B



SATURDAY EVENING ~

JANUARY 14, 2007



JANUARY 13, 2007 |
| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 |
One Season

9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS ;
WPBT |Wonders

Keeping Up Ap- |As Time Goes | x * 4 INHERIT THE WIND (1960, Drama) Spencer Tracy, Frediic
peorani: New |By Steven and |March, Gene Kelly. Bible orator and liberal lawyer debate Darwinism.
miture. (CC) —_ jhis wife visit.

WPBT

7:30

fe The
awrence Welk
Show





NFL Football: INCIS Gibbs uncovers a twisted love [CSI: NY “Trapped” Danny activates |48 Hours Mystery “Murder on His
WEOR [AFC Playoff _|triangle as he hunts for the killer of Ja panic room and becomes trapped |Mind” A golden boy becomes a
Colts at Ravens {a murdered model. (CC) inside. 1 (CC) Killer. (N) A (CC)
Access a Dateline NBGA woman assumes [Psych Searching for a missing teen |Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
WTV4 {wood (N) (CC) [the identity of her missing twin. fata comic-book and scifi conven- |An accident leads detectives to
(CC) tion. (CC) questionable practices. (CC)

Fox NFL NFL Football NFC Divisional Playoff ~ Philadelphia Eagles at New Orleans Saints. Jeff Garcia and the Eagles
@ WSVN mae (Live) |take on Drew Brees and the Saints. From the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. (Live) (CC)
0



@ WFOR
WTVWJ

WSVN





















































:00) The Coral. {In Touch (CC) Hour of Power (CC) Billy Graham Classic Crusades
TBN tae Hour (CC)
*% 10 THINGS || x & x SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE ae Romance-Comedy) Jack Nicholson, Diane | &4 THE
TBS var ABOUT: |Keaton, Keanu Reeves. A music exec falls for the mother of his young girlfriend. (CC) (aon SHOW
: 19
:00) Flip That [Moving Up ‘Wedding Bells and Flip That House |Flip That House | Trading Spaces “Shrewsbury: Oak
TLC louse Las Ve- |Breakup Hel A caine divorce. (N) |“David” (N) (CC) |"Montse” Pasade- Street” Worcester Mass. (N)
gas home. (CC) na, Calif. (CC) oie eat
xx FOOLS — |x MISS CONGENIALITY (2000, Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Michael | * MISS CONGENIALITY (2000,
TNT RUSH IN (1997) |Caine, Benjamin Bratt. A clumsy FBI agent goes under cover at a beauty cone Sandra Bullock, Michael
Matthew Perry. pageant. (CC) Caine, Benjamin Bratt. (CC)
: Yu-Gi-Oh! G/X [Teen Titans Naruto (N) Zatch Bell The Prince of —|Mar (N)
TOON _ | ae eae Tennis
Les Années bonheur 45) Histoires | L’Envers du dé- |Village en vue
TV5 2 Ke chateaux — |cor |
Twc co Earth |Weather: PM Edition (CC) Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
(00 Casos de |Sabado Gigante Batalla de los Gemelos; boxeadores gemelos Carlos y Juan Velasquez. :
amilia: Edicion

| UNIV



Especial







cial Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

; od Psych Law & Order: Spe
‘USA ‘Who Ya Gonna |Stabler tries to pin another murder |A notorious judge's stepdaughter is |Cabot crosses the line to close a
Call?” (CC) on a serial killer. O (CC) raped and murdered. child molestation case.



1 VH4 *%% BMILE [The White Rapper Show Rappers | * *% AWESOME; | F...IN’ SHOT THAT! (2006) Audi-
(2002) Eminem. |compete. 1 ence members film the Beastie Boys.
VS.

Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic. From Worcester, Mass. (Live)
WGN

Shooting Size-
more 1

NLL Lacrosse Buffalo Bandits at
Colorado Mammoth.

rom the United Center in Chicago.













Bulls E

Funniest Pets & e |
a (och

People 1 (CC)



Live) [NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Chicago Bulls. F
(Live) 1 (CC)







Everybody American Idol Rewind “Hollywood |Billy Graham Special CW11 News at Ten -- Weekend
WPIX _|Loves Raymond |Week” © (CC) A Edition With Peter Thorne and
N (CC) Mary Murphy (CC)







CSI: Miami ‘Witness to Murder” A
mentally disabled man is the only
witness to a murder. (CC)

Jeopardy! (CC) | x» LOOK WHO'S TALKING (1989, Comedy) John Travolta, Kirstie Al-
ley, Olympia Dukakis, An unwed mother's baby offers a running commen-

tary on life.

WSBK

rope aaa eumere EU Italy aes McC ieee
oa x THE | x %% FIREWALL (2006, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Paul Bettany, ean Louis C.K.: Shameless The comic

HBO-E _|WEDDING DATE|Madsen. Premiere. A bank security expert battles a criminal. ( ‘PG-13' |performs at the Henry Fonda The-
(2005) A (CC) ; ater in Los Angeles.

(:15) & & CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 2 (2005, Com- [Deadwood “Tell Your God to Ready /Downtown Girls: The Hookers of

edy) Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. The Bakers’ vacation |for Blood” Deadwood's first true Honolulu © (CC)

tums competitive. ‘PG’ (CC) elections approach. (CC)

(:45) & &% THE FAMILY STONE (2005, Romance-Comedy) Dermot Mul-| x * THE WEDDING DATE (2005) Debra Messing,

HBO-W _ |roney, Sarah Jessica Parker, Diane Keaton. A man introduces his uptight |Dermot Mulroney. A woman brings a male escort to her
girlfriend to his family. O ‘PG-13' (CC) sister's wedding. O ‘PG-13' (CC)

6:45) * & & INHER SHOES a Comedy-Drama) | « % * WEDDING CRASHERS (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince

ameron Diaz. A sexy partyer clashes with her seri Vaughn, Christopher Walken. Partygoers spend a wild weekend with a

ous-minded sister. © ‘PG-13' (CC) politician's family. © ‘R’ (CC)

MISS CONGE- | x x FORCES OF NATURE (1999, Romance-Comedy) Sandra Bullock, | x x * 16 BLOCKS (2006) Bruce

NIALITY 2 Ben Affleck, Maura Tiemey. A groom hurries to his wedding, with a fellow |Willis. A world-weary cop protects a

traveler. ‘PG-13' (CC) witness from assassins.

(5) % *% ROLL BOUNCE (2005, Comedy-Drama): | #% DATE MOVIE (2006, Romance-Comedy) Alyson |Hotel Erotica
}ow Wow, Chi McBride. A roller-skater prepares for a_|Hannigan. A hopeless romantic faces many obstacles |Models work to-
big showdown. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) in her courtship, ‘PG-13' (CC) gether. (CC)

Sa * x % TOMORROW NEVER DIES (1997) % & FOUR BROTHERS (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese
ierce Brosnan. iTV, James Bond tries to short-circuit Gibson, André Benjamin. iTV Premiere. Siblings seek revenge for their
a communications tycoon. © ‘PG-13' (CC adoptive mother’s murder. © 'R’ (CC)

6:00) % 4 BE- | & % x TOMBSTONE (1993, ween Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Michael |(:15) % & PAYBACK (1999, Ac-





HBO-P

HBO-S





MAX-E
MOMAX
SHOW
TMC













OND THE SEA |Biehn. Doc Holliday joins Wyatt Earp for OK Corral showdown. ‘R’ tion) Mel Gibson, Gregg Henry,
[eo (co) fcc Jana, (CE





TBS
TLC
TNT

=

TV5

UNIV

VH1




WPIX
WSBK

HBO-P
HBO-W
HBO-S




NFL Football:
AFC Playoff






i Deal or No
eal (iTV) (N) 0
(CC)
The Simpsons
Homer lands in
basic training,

























8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS |

Nature “The Best of Nature: 25 Years” Memorable mo- |Dolphin Rescue Masterpiece Theatre ‘The Virgin
Queen” Anne-Marie Duff portrays
Elizabeth |. (CC) (DVS)

ments from the “Nature” series include clips from “The

Urban Elephant.” (N) © (CC) (DVS)

60 Minutes The forensic scientist in [Cold Case “Blackout” Lilly and | Without a Trace The team search-
the Duke lacrosse rape case made Spee reopen the 1998 case ofa jes for a competitive eater who dis-
a “big error’. (N) © (CC) wealthy family matriarch’s death. appears after a contest.

Grease: You're the One That! —_|The Apprentice: Los Angeles The {Crossing Jordan Jordan tries to
Want The casting search continues; |candidates design swimsuits for a _|figure out what happened the night
Olivia Newton-John. (N) (CC) beach fashion show, (N) Pollack was Killed. hi (CC)

24 ei 6: 6:00AM - 7:00AM/7:00AM - 8:00AM” (Season Premiere) A se- |News (CC)
rigs of terrorist attacks leads President Wayne Palmer into an unthinkable
day. (N) © (PA) (CC)





































































Wheel of For- | % % THE TERMINAL (2004, Canady Brame} Tom Hanks, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci. Premiere. A ia America’s [Extreme Makeover: Home Edition [Desperate Housewives Gabrielle Sa Brothers & Sisters Kevin falls
@ WPLG Itune (cc) European living in an airport befriends a stewardess. © (CC) @) WPLG [Funniest Home |A community leader and his family learns the hu of her secret ad- for a soap-opera actor who is un-
Videos (N) (CC) |get a new home. (N) (CC) mirer. (N) (CC) sure of his sexuality. (N)
rey. Vs}M=mey 7.1 1 roe si ‘CABLE CHANNELS ;
Sell This House! |Flip This House “Intern Affairs’ An |Flip This House (CC) Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History The Iceman and the Psychiatrist {Iceman Confesses: Secrets of a |Intervention ‘Cristy’ Alcohol and
A&E (CC) intem is recruited. (CC) (CC) A&E A (CC) Mafia Hitman 1 (CC) crystal-meth addict. (CC)
This Week Cor- |(:10) Al Qaeda: Time to Talk? ——_—|(:10) The World Uncovered “Sad- |BBC News The Reporters Extra Time BBC News Dateline London|BBC News Earth Report {BBC News Have Your Say
BBCI respondents. dam's Road to Hell” Dangerous mis-|(Latenight). BBCI (Latenight). (Latenight). |*Drawingthe —_|(Latenight).
sion through Iraq. Line”
BET The Wayans |The Wayans |The Wayans —|The Wire ‘The Tapet Chronicling a wide-ranging po- |The Wire “The BET :00) American {American Gangster “Smith Bros.” |American Gangster A crack enter- Soul Food “Don't Think This Hasn't
Bros. (CC) Bros. (CC) Bros. 1 (CC) lice investigation. /\ (CC) Detail” (CC) angster (CC) (CC) prise in Detroit. (CC) Been Fabulous’ © (CC)
CBC (00) NHL HOG AY Meee: Canucks at Toronto Maple Leafs. From Air Canada Centre in |NHL Hockey Edmonton Oilers at CBC co Planet [CRACKER (2006, Mystery) Robbie Coltrane, Barbara Flynn. A criminal CBC News: Sunday Night (CC)
oronto. (Live) (CC) Calgary Flames. (Live) (CC) . arth (N} (CC) {psychologist investigates a suspected murderer. (CC)
:00) Tim Deal or No Deal Contestants get a [The Suze Orman Show (N) (CC) Tim Russert Wall Street Jour-|High Net Worth [Chris Matthews |Big Brother, Big Business
CNBC chance to win money. 1 (cc} CNBC nal Report
(:00) This Week {Saving Your Life (N) Larry King Live CNN Saturday Night 00) CNN Live /Saving Your Life CNN Sunday Night
| CNN ‘tz CNN Sad (CC}
Scrubs JD. tres |x & & NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries, | * NATIONAL LAMPOON'S VAN % + NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries, |Demetri Martin The comic per-
-COM to spend time Aaron Ruell. Premiere. A gawky teen helps a friend run for class presi- | WILDER (2002, Comedy) Ryan COM Aaron Ruell. A gawky teen helps a friend run for class president. (CC) forms. (N) (CC)
with Turk. dent. (CC) Reynolds, Tara Reid. (CC)
Forensic Files Forensic Files |Forensic Files [Body ofEvi- [Body ofEvi- Body of Evi- Body of Evi- Cops “Coastto [Cops “Arizona” [Cops “Arizona” [Cops ‘Arizona’ [Cops “Arizona” |Beach Patrol Beach Patrol
COURT dence dence dence COURT [csr nica lave [avec) |atcc) {A (co)
The Suite Life of JUMP IN! (2007, Drama) Corbin Bleu, Keke Palmer, (i) Hannah ee The Suite Life of Zack & The Suite Life of JUMP IN! (2007, Drama) Corbin Bleu, Keke Palmer, (:45) The Re- —_|(:15) The Replacements “The Ma-
DISN Zack & ony David Reivers. A promising young boxer competes in |Montana 1 ‘ody “Commercial Breaks” Staff au- DISN Zack & Cody 1 |David Reivers, A promising young boxer competes in |placements |jestic Horse; Carnie Dearest” Horse;
Motivation. (CC) |double Dutch jump-rope. ( ‘NR’ (CC) (CC) ditions. O (CC) (CC) double Dutch jump-rope. £4 ‘NR’ (CC) foc) odd runs away. (CC)
This Old House |DIY to the Res- [DIY to the Res- Wood Works [Wood Works [DIY Freeform Furni- This Old House |DIY to the Res- 10 Things You |Tricked Out
DIY DIY
(CC) . cue cue Oak nightstand. ture A (CC) Must Know
DW In Focus (Ger- jJournal: Popxport Journal: with The Journal {lm Focus DW In Focus (Ger- Journal: with The Journal —_jlm Focus
man). Wirtschaftsbi- Business man). Reporters
E! -00) E!News — |Jack Nicholson: The E! True Hollywood Story Jack Nicholson. sateen aN Live Jason Lee; E! : cine Lohan: The E! True Holly-|The Girls Next |The Girls Next |Love Ride High Mainte-
_ eekend (CC) , the Foo Fighters. © (CC) " wood Story © (CC) Door Door Cameron Diaz. |nance 90210
‘ World's College GameDay (Live) (CC) College Basketball Georgetown at Pittsburgh. (Live) (CC) 00) SportsCen-|NFL Primetime [College Football Hula Bowl. From Honolulu. (Live) (CC)
ESPN Strongest Man ESPN tm ke (Live) (CC) : eke
Spanish Soccer Barcelona vs. Espanyol. (Same-day Tape) Karate: U.S. [SportsCenter -- International Edi- Tennis Australian Open -- Early Round -- Day 1. From Melbourne, Australia. (Live) (CC
ESPNI : es Open tion (Live) ESPNI : : ! ne
Daily Mass: Our |Door to Hope Bookmark The Holy Rosary|To Be Announced Father Father Corapi and the Catechism |G.K. Chesterton |The Holy Rosary A World At Hound of Heav-
EWTN Lady Pett cee | | EWTN {éroesche of the Catholic Church Prayer en
FIT TV “|Blaine’s Low |All Star Workouts Fat buming | Total Body Sculpt With Gilad Caribbean Work-/Namaste i FIT TV Health Cops: [Art of the Athlete “Steve Young” Insider Trainin “Basketball” Bas- |Ship Out, Shape Up Nine travelers
Carb Kitchen dance party. (CC) Strength training. O (CC) out O (CC) _| Firebird” (CC) New Orleans {Steve Young. © (CC) ketball players. tcc) try to trim their waistiines.
(:00) Fox Report [Heartland With John Kasich In |The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Primetime (Live) 00) Fox Report [War Stories With Oliver North — |Hannity’s America Big Story Primetime (Live
FOX-NC |" Columbus, Ohio. (Live) ae FOX-NC |) FoxRep y ene me)
NHL Hockey Washington Capitals at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Destination Wild|The FSN Final [ College Basket: [College Basketball Oregon at Arizona. (Live The FSN Final -
FSNFL |Sunise Fea (Subject to Blacout) (Live) | Score (Live) FSNFL |pai’ q : me Score (Live)
(:00) PGA Golf Sony Open in Hawaii -- Third Round. From Waialae Country Club in Honolulu. (Live) Post Game -00) PGA Golf Sony Open in Hawaii -- Final Round. From Waialae Country Club in Honolu- |Post Game Show (Live
GOLF |” ne pus posta «| | |GOLF ithe ee : (Ue)
(:00) Greed (CC) |Gameshow Moments Gone Ba- |Gameshow Moments Gone Ba- |Gameshow Moments Gone Ba- 00) Twen Greatest Game Show Moments [Lingo (CC) - JLingo (CC Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC
GSN nanas 1 (CC) nanas 1 (CC) nanas 1 (CC GSN MI nN icy (N) ae go (C0 , oe
: -00) Star Trek [Star Trek: The Next Generation “A |Cops “Virginia |Cops “Indianapo- Cops “Indianapo-|Cops “Indianapo- Cops “Indianapo- [Cops “Indianapo- [Cops “Indianapo- |G4 Presents The Adult Entertainment Expo 2007 The latest movies
GATech [yreteave’ |Fistu of baas" A (CC) Beach” (V(CC) lls" (CC) ls" (CC) ls” 4 (CC) GATech [ish (Cc) fist A (Co) lls" (CC) land periormers ofthe adit entertainment industry.
MYSTERY WOMAN: OH BABY (2006) Kelie Martin, MYSTERY WOMAN: IN THE SHADOWS (2007, Mystery) Kelle Mart, % ki MATLOCK: NOWHERE TO TURN (1990) Andy | * PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE MURDERED MADAM (1987,
HALL Clarence Williams Il. A sleuth investigates murder after|Clarence Williams Ill, Nina Siemaszko. Premiere. A sleuth finds espi- HALL Griffith, Nancy Stafford. Attorney Ben Matlock is ac- Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, Ann villian. A young prostitute
someone abandons a baby. (CC) onage linked to a KGB double agent. (CC) cused of murdering an L.A. judge. (CC) holds the key to a former madam’s death. (CC)
Design Rivals [Makeover Wish [Takeover My [Home to Stay [My First Place |How Not to Decorate ‘Fife Slated :00) Million Dol-]The Big Flip [Buy Me “Mavis &/House Hunters [Junk Brothers |Holmes on Homes /’ (CC)
HGTV “Family Flow” |Setbacks. — |Makeover Home aot Coun” |Honeymoon re- |coffee table. HGTV ar am “Holly-/Floors arent lev- Water A Alexandria, Va. |An old wooden
: Kitchen. (CC) —_|(CC) theater. A (CC) treat. © (CC) wood’ (CC) el. O (CC) Nn — trunk. 0 (CC)
tf ~~ |(:00) Old Time | Gaither Homecoming Hour Specials Christian Artist ||-Gospel i's aNew Day In Touch (CC “TTheRiig Is ~~ |Calvary Revival Jack Van Impe jManna-Fest (CC
INSP [gata [trenton fesse dea _| INSP ee elds lene" Pees [ere
~ 1 |e NOTHING TO-LOSE (1997, Comedy-Drama) /My Wife and According p Everybody _|NBA Basketball: % JUST VISIT: |All of Us Robert [Girlfriends = |The-Game Kelly! |Everybody'. - [Reba Reba | Reba Barbra
KTLA [Martin Lawrence, Tim Robbins. An ad executive be- Kids “Jay the Jim ‘Wedding _jLoves Raymond |Cavaliers at Clip- KTLA _ [ING (2001) Jean Jaids a stranger. "Everybody Hates|approaches Ja- |Hates Chris catches Kyra Jean suspects
comes a carjacker's unlikely buddy. 0 Artis’ © (CC) |Bell Blues” (CC) | (CC) pers Reno. n (CC Monica’ (CC) — |son for money. {Chris is robbed. drinking. (CC) the new inter.
~ {MOM AT SIXTEEN (2005, rae Mercedes Ruehl, | % x SHALL WE DANCE? (2004, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, | TO BE FAT LIKE ME (2007, Docudrama) Kaley Cuo- | %: SHALL WE DANCE? (2004, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere,
LIFE Jane Krakowski, Danielle Panabaker. A teen must hide | Jennifer Lopez, Susan Sarandon. Premiere. A husband takes dancing les- LIFE co, Caroline Rhea. A slim teen faces ridicule while pos-|Jennifer Lopez, Susan Sarandon. A husband takes dancing lessons from
the fact that she has a child. (CC) sons from a beautiful instructor. (CC) ing as a 250-pound student. (CC) a beautiful instructor. (CC) ;
:00) Circle of [Crime & Punishment ‘People v. |MSNBC Investigates: Lockup: In- |Warrior Nation “Malice at the Lockun: Inside )MSNBC Special: Quest for Atlantis Meet the Press (CC
MSNBC rents Contreras’ 1 (CC) side Alaska ? : Palace” ° ; MSNBC San Quentin ; ; ns
SpongeBob _ |The Fairly OddParents ‘Fairy Idol” SpongeBob SpongeBob —_|Full House 1 |Full House Just Jordan (N) [Zoey 101 |Unfabulous ‘The|Full House |Full House ‘The {Roseanne ‘D-|- |Roseanne
NICK A (CC) SquarePants [SquarePants (|(CC) (CC) NICK farm Ice} Drama’ ‘(CC Test'(CC) _|W-O-R-C-E"A_|(CC)
NFL Football: [NFL Football NFC Divisional Playoff -- Philadelphia Eagles at New Orleans Saints. Jeff Garcia and the Eagles -00) Brothers & [Extreme Makeover: Home Edition [The Apprentice: Los Angeles (N) |News (CC) |News
NTV AFC Playoff take on Drew Brees and the Sains, From the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. (CC) NTV le (N) (CC) |'Noyola Family" (N) © (CC) a ice) . geles(N) (
Late Model Dirt |Two Roads to Baja (N) THE WILD ANGELS (1966, Drama) Peter Fonda, Nancy Sinatra. A 00) SPEED Re-|Payback Jim {Street Tuner —/Pinks NOPI Tunervi- {Redline TV
‘SPEED a eee ne tena > 42 rough band of motarcyclists roams through California. SPEED Ot (N) Catiezd Challenge sion
(

* &% SOME-
THING’S GOTTA
GIVE

Jack Hayford Joel Osteen. __| Taking Authority |Believer’s Voice |Changing Your |Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) i (CC) (CC) of Victory (CC) |Worl (C2)
( (PA)
)

eu American
hopper

(:00) Law & Or-
der “Ghosts”. 1
(CC) (DVS)













































4 FORREST GUMP (1994, pe PA) Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise. A slow-witted South-
emer experiences 30 years of history. (C

American vue “OCC Produc- [American Chopper ‘Billy Joel Bike” Billy Joe'’s Indian bobber motorcy-
tion Bike’ OCC decides tomass- cle.
produce a bike.

% * x AIR FORCE ONE (1997, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Ga
Glenn Close. Premiere, Terrorists hijack the president's plane. (CC)






Oldman, |x * * AIR FORCE ONE (1 al
Harrison Ford. Terrorists hijack the
president's plane. (CC)










My Gym Part- ass of 3000
TOON nef a Monkey

Questions pour

un champion
Storm Stories |Weather: PM Edition (CC)
TWO

mo La Hora
ico

00) Monk “Mr. |Monk “Mr. Monk and Little Monk” A
USA tr Gets Jury |childhood crush asks for Monk's

Duty’ (CC)



00) 2006 Dakar
allly

VS. lI Tape)
Funniest Pets & |American Idol Rewind “Audition 5°
WGN ___ People n (Cc) | (CC)

Reba Barbra
Jean suspects
the new intern.

That '70s Show
Eric decides to
go on the road.





TLove New York "Do You Have Love for New York?” |Surreal Life Fame Game Scan- {Hogan Knows Shooting Size-
New York makes the first cut dalous video. Best more Ny n
Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic. From Worcester, Mass. (Same-day 2006 Dakar Rally The most gruel-









i Edd n Eddy cin Adven- — Squirrel Boy

Futurama 1 ‘| Aqua Teen
ures CC

Hungerforce







Vivement dimanche Musiques rebelles Americas



It Could Happen |It Could Happen |Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
Tomorrow Tomorrow

Bailando por la Boda de Mis Sueftos Concursantes compiten para ganar una boda,



Monk Monk travels to Mexico to
probe the mid-air drowning of a sky
diver. (CC)

Monk ‘Mr. Monk Gets Cabin Fever”
Monk uncovers a murder while lying
low in a remote cabin.





help. (CC)



















ing off-road race on Earth.

WGN News at |(:40) Instant Re-
Nine © (CC) |play 4 (CC)






Maximum Exposure A man eats
live snakes; mud-bogging. (CC)











CW1i News at Ten -- Weekend
Edition With Peter Thorne and
Mary Murphy (CC)

Red Sox This |Red Sox Stories
Week

7th Heaven The Camdens help
make a difference in the world. (N)
0 (CC)

Patriots 5th Quarter

Beauty and the Geek The geeks
must sketch a portrait of a nude
woman; another elimination. (CC)

Stone Undercover ‘The Grand Al-
liance” (N) (CC)












PREMIUM CHANNELS.

Rome ‘Kalends of February’ Pullo. |Rome “Passover” (Season Pre- ~ {Extras (Season | % % %% MU-



G45 4) MR
MRS. SMITH
(2008)



olin Firth.

Pearl Tracking the

00) % * BOYS ON THE SIDE (1995, Comedy-
rama) Whoopi Goldberg. A cross-country trip draws
three women together.

oe 4 NANNY MCPHEE
2005, oo GC owe husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. (\ ‘PG-13}

The Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniell TSUNAMI, THE AFTERMATH (2006, Docudrama)
terrorist Omar Sheikh.











and Vorenus are rewarded. (CC)|miere) Mark Antony makes plans to |Premiere) (N) NICH (2005) Eric
leave the city. (N) © (CC) (CC) Bana. 'R’ (CC)

% % THE FAMILY STONE (2005, Romance-Comedy) Dermot Mulroney,
Sarah Jessica Parker, Diane Keaton. A man introduces his uptight girl
{friend to his family. © ‘PG-13' (CC)

(:45) % & MR, & MRS. SMITH (2005, Action) Brad Pitt, An





'R’ (CC)







elina Jolie, Vince Vaughn. A
(CC)





| * & ONE FINE
lives of journalist Daniel Pearl and |(Part 2 of 2) Tim Roth, Chiwetel Fo Acataclysmic |DAY (1996) ‘PG’
(ec) event devastates Thailand in 2004. 1 (CC) (CC)






MAX-E
MOMAX



TMC

Pe * LIVE
WIRE (1992)
Pierce Brosnan.






(as) 4
AD HOT BALL-
ROOM

6:20) SWIM-
ING UP-
|STREAM (2001)



a * kx 16 BLOCKS Lee Action) Bruce Willis,
ios Def. Premiere. A worl
ness from assassins. (1 ‘PG-13' (






% % & ASSAULT ON PRECINCT: 13 (2005, Action) Ethan Hawke, Lau- | * BACHELOR PARTY (1984)
rence Fishburne, John Lequizamo. Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta-|Tom Hanks, Hookers, mule and
tion to kill a gangster. 1 'R' (CC) more show up for guy's bash. 'R’
% & % SERENITY (2005, Science Fiction) Nathan Fillion, Gina Torres,
ec. A spaceship crew gets caught in a deadly conflict. ‘PG-
* & PRETTY WOMAN (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia |The L Word “Livin’ La Vida Loca”
Roberts, Ralph ae Cc) A corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a (iTV) (N) © (CC)



-weary cop protects a wit-
CC)





business escort. 1 'R

& DUANE HOPWOOD (2005, Comedy-Drama)
David Schwimmer. Premiere. A divorced alcoholic
siugles reunite fami.

* % THE BIG WHITE a Comedy) Robin
Williams, Holly Hunter. Premiere, An indebted travel
agent resto commit insurance fraud. (1 'R' (CC)









Partly cloudy and

Windy with times of Partly sunny and
clouds and sun. breezy. breezy.
High: 81°
High: 79° Low: 69° Low: 69°









AccuWeath

eet eye)

[| 88°-70° Fd

asiceilacl




Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



ESP its





Sunday

Today Today Sunday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low
Fe OF FL FC ; ; Fe OFC FC FC Fe FL
Albuquerque 51N0 29/-1 + 41 21/-6 pe Indianapolis 425 36/2 + Nh 341 4 Philadelphia 5412 36/2 —
Anchorage 24/-4 13/-10 sn 20/-6 13/-10 sf Jacksonville 75/23 53/11 pe 78/25 55/12 pe Phoenix . 5412 37/2
Atlanta 66/18 51/10 pe 72/22 52/11 Kansas City ~24/-4 22/-5 i ~——-28/-2 14/-10 sn Pittsburgh 44/6 33/0
Atlantic City 58/14 31/0 © 4577 39/3 © Las Vegas 43/6 26/-3 $s 43/6 26/-3 pc Portland, OR 38/3 26/-3
Baltimore §5/12 40/4 r 46/77 «39/3 Little Rock 5412 47/8 + 6216 41/5 +t Raleigh-Durham 68/20 50/10
Boston 48/8 27/-2 ¢c 38/3 36/2 pc Los Angeles 59/15 38/3 s 63/17 41/5 pe St. Louis 37/2 33/0
Buffalo 34/1 23/-5 ¢ 33/0 28/-2 ¢ Louisville 47/8 39/8 48/8 45/7 + Salt Lake City -24/-4 13/-10
Charleston, SC 73/22 53/11 pc 76/24 54/12 pc Memphis 5713 52/11 t 64/17 45/7 ¢t San Antonio 70/21 59/15
Chicago 32/0 25/-3 ¢ 30/-1 21/-6 sn Miami 80/26 68/20 pc 80/26 70/21 pc San Diego 58/14 40/4
Cleveland 35/1 27/-2 1 35/1 30/-1 Fr Minneapolis 19/-7 7/-13 pc 20/-6 7/-13 sf San Francisco 53/11 37/2
Dallas 39/3 38/3 F&F 39/3 33/0 +r Nashville 5713 510 Fr 6116 48/8. t Seaitle 37/2 28/-2
Denver 15/-9 10/-12 sn 18/-7 5/-15 sf New Orleans 74/23 62/16 c 76/24 5713 ¢ Tallahassee 77/25 49/9
Detroit 34/1 28/-2 ¢ 34/1 24/-4 ¢ New York 52/1 35 rr 43/6 37/2 Fr Tampa 80/26. 61/16
Honolulu 81/27 68/20 s 80/26 69/20 s Oklahoma City 30/-1 27/-2 i 27/-2 24/-4 ij Tucson 53/11 31/0
Houston 74/23 64/17 t 70/21 43/6 t Orlando 78/25 57413 pe 80/26 59/15 pe Washington, DC 57/13

36/2

Warm with several
hours of sunshine.

Ww
r

pe
t

r

High: 83°
Low: 71°

RealFeel



High Low
Fe FIC
43/6 39/3
5713 36/2
44/6 37/2
36/2 29/-1
70/21 50/10
35/1 28/-2
22/-5 10/-12
69/20 42/5
60/15 43/6
55/12 39/3
39/3 31/0
75/23 54/12
80/26 62/16
5512 27/-2
48/8 40/4








M







ODERATE



Partly sunny and

Warm with several
_ hours of sun. remaining warm.
High: 83° High: 83°

Low: 71°

Veather F

Low: 68°

er RealFeel :





Feel

85°-74° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.



TT Te

. 17° F/25° C





. 70° F/21° C

. 17° F/25° C

NOrmal OW ......cesescssecsesseesesseceteseeeee OO” F/18° C

Last year’s HIGH 02... .eeessesessesseeeeeeee O17 F/27° ©

Last year’s low ...... snbietcaitintennn Ol TL.
Precipitation :

AS Of 1 p.m. yeSterday 0... cssecsesseeeseeeeeee 0.00"

Year to date .............. . 0.26”

Normal year to date . 0.69”
AccuWeather.com

_All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.



Sunset. .
Rew



Jan. 18

High: 62° F/28°C
Low: 66° F/19°C
GREAT INAGUA
High: 85° F/29°C
Low: 68°



High: 81° F/27° C
Low: 68° F/20° C

F/20°C

Sunrise... ... 6:57 am.
. 5:40 p.m.





ea 4 *

Jan.25 Feb. 2









Feb. 10





‘Acapul

Helsinki
‘Hong Kong
Islamaba
Istanbul ©.
Jerusalem
Johannesburg =~
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi

New Delhi.
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro.

Riyadh

Rome a

St. Thomas

San Salvador
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo’

Seoul

Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna.
‘Warsaw
Winnipeg

Weather (W): s-sunny,

















Today Sunday
High Low W High Low W
FC F/C FC F/C -
88/31 73/22 s- 87/30 71/21 s
50/110 47/8 c 48/8 38/3 s
37/2 23/5 sn =—s«39/8—Ss 25/-3 pc
61416 51/10 s
T7125 66/18 pe
93/33 76/24 pc
85/29 75/23
6417 48/8 pc
AB 26s 39/3 23/-5 pe
6116 54/12 ¢
53/1 37/2 pc 37/2 pe











30/-1



GIANG s -
Bc





70/21 ¢





49/9 41/5 ¢
5412 37/2 po”





40/4 22/-5 pce 30/-1 17/-8 pe
8127 61N6 ss 81/27 B58 s
36/2 23/-5 sn 28/-2 25/-3 sn
68/20 58/14s = 69/20. 61/16 pe:
67/19 40/4 s 66/18 40/4 s
47/8 41/5 pe 49/9 45/7 pe
54/12 42/5 pc 56/13 44/6 s
$227 S915 pe —— 76/24: 58/14 pe
86/30 76/24 pc 88/31 76/24 pc
978/85 70/21 c= 82/27 70/21
55/12 45/7 sh 46/77 414 pe
~-§5A2 34/1 s- §5/12 - 34/1 s
86/30 73/22 pc 86/30 73/22 pe
77125 416 s 78/25 «42 s-
79/26 59/15 pc 87/30 51/10 pc
2° 24/-4 10/-12 pe = —-26/-3-13/-10 pe
35/1 34/1 sf 35/1 26/-3 sn
52/11 35/1 -¢ 50/10 38/3 c™
80/26 52/11 pc 78/25 50/10 c
70/21 40/4 s 6618 416 s-
34/1 21/-6 pc 28/-2 27/-2
49/9 «43/6 po | 47/78 36/2 pc
5140 8639/3 c _ 47/78 28/-2 pe
83/28 72/22 t 81/27 74/23
66/18 48/8 pc 59/15 46/7 pc
6626) 44 Ss 63/17 45/7 pe
83/28 73/22 pc 84/28 74/23 t
102/88 «71/21 's 90/32 70/21 pc
89/31 70/21 s 89/31 70/21 pc
90/32 57/13 s 88/31 57/13 s~
83/28 69/20 c 83/28 68/20 pc
74723 6417 + STT25 BEB
30/-1 11/-11 s 36/2: 20/-6 s
39/3 32/0 sn = =——s 3471 3:10 sn
73/22 67/19 pe 74/23 65/18 pc
67/19 62/16 pc 74/23 65/18 pc
43/6 32/0 pc 46/7 34/1 s
31/0 22/-5 po. 32/0 - 25/-3 ¢
88/31 74/23 t 86/30 69/20 t
36/2. 28/-2 pe 36/2 30/-1 pe
= 52/11 41/5 c. 50/10 33/0 c
“48/8 39/3 46/7 31/0 r
‘10/-12 -6/-21 ¢ -2/-18 -12/-24 pc

pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



-2}-
84/28 69/20 pc 69/20 pe
85/29





SES eee
VISIBILITY
5-7 Miles
6-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles
4-7 Miles



WAVES
3-5 Feet
3-5 Feet
3-5 Feet
2-4 Feet
4-7 Feet

WINDS
ENE at 12-25 Knots
ENE at 10-20 Knots
E at 10-20 Knots
E at 8-16 Knots
ENE at 12-25 Knots
E at 10-20 Knots



NASSAU = Today:

Sunday:













EN] Showers
EX] T-storms
“0_4 Rain
Flurries
pe) Snow
[v_Â¥] Ice

Fronts
Cold ==="

Warm ienM@ientie
Stationary Moxa

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

ur

o Insurance,

AGENMIC

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

j Elvthers =] Exon |
We |






THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 5





Man admits
to drunk
charge and
is fined

A MAN has been sen-
tenced to serve two years in
prison and ordered to pay a
$5,000 fine after pleading

guilty to a substantial drug




Church
| 1:00 — Gillette World Sports
fs.1530 Sports Desk

=} 2:00

charge earlier this week.
Christopher Sharsky
Williams was charged. with
taking preparatory steps to
export cocaine as well as
possession of the drugs with
the intent to supply on
Thursday March 3, 2005.
Williams was arraigned on
the charges on March 4, 2005.
At that time, he pleaded
not guilty and was granted
bail.
On Wednesday however,
Williams pleaded guilty to
the charges.

Former
officer faces
underage
sex charge

A FORMER police con-
stable accused of having’ sex
with a 13-year-old girl was
charged before a local admin-
istrator on Andros earlier this
week.

Oswald Poitier Jr, 31, was

, hot required to enter a pleato }
the charge of unlawful inter- :

course.

It is alleged that Poitier

committed the offence some-
time on Friday, December 22,
2006 while at New Provi-
dence.

Poitier was remanded into

police custody until January

13 which is when the case
continues.

Man denies
involvement
in marijuana
conspiracy

A MAN was granted
$100,000 bail yesterday in
connection with drug con-
spiracy charges involving 714
pounds of marijuana.

Michael Swaby ,49, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel on Tuesday
and pleaded not guilty.

He returned to court yes-
terday for a bail hearing.

The case has been
adjourned to March 27, 2007.

REE Haut:

SATURDAY
JANUARY 13TH

12:30 Bullwinke & Friends
1:00 King Leonardo
Â¥1:30 The Fun Farm



















2:30 411 ;
3:00 Matinee: “Polly”
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 — Gillette World Sports
6:00 In This Corner
6:30 — Sports Lifestyle
j 7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Native Show
1 8:00 Spurgeon Smith 2007
New Year’s Day Junkanoo
Highlights
10:00 Tropical Beat
) 11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Hustle
12:00 The Bahamas Tonight



12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
JANUARY 14TH

6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:30 Spiritual Impact

9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.

9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference

Effective Living

This Is The Life

St. Barnabas Anglican













10:00
10:30
11:00






This Week In The Bahamas
Agape Full Gospel Baptist




2:30








Church

3:00 St. John’s Jubilee
Cathedral

3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries

4:30 Temple Fellowship Ministries
International





5:00
6:00

Walking In Victory
Five Porches of Deliverance
Centre

The Bahamas Tonight
Kemp Road Ministries
Calvary Deliverance Church
Immediate Response: Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Meet The Press
Bahamas Tonight

New Dimension
Community Pg. 1540AM






7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30







} 11:00
} 11:30



NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!






@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

I VEX because the College
of the Bahamas is so back-
wards. First of all, their regis-
tration is off. The process is
absolutely ludicrous. They
need to update many of the
facilities and they supposedly
implementing a new system
but nothing looks like its
changing. It’s 2007, we sup-
posed to be moving forward,
but it seems as if we are going
backward.

- Miss Educated

I vex because when the bus
drivers let off people they feel
as though it is okay to stop right
in the road and hold up traffic
with no concern of drivers
behind them.

-Road Runner

I vex because now it time for
elections and everyone is try-
ing to get something for noth-
ing, instead of trying to get
things for themselves they
expect the government to give
them everything, and they try
to hold them hostage because
they feel as though they would
need their vote. I say stop using
this time to take advantage of
the government and be grate-
ful that they are trying to better
this country.

-Patriot

I vex at the girl who’s calling |

another woman man and telling
him that she is nothing without
him. Please go get your own
man before I really get Vex!

-One Woman Man

I vex cuz the FNM didn't

Why you vex?

support the Majority Rule day
celebrations, making it same
as though it was a political
plot — and if it wasn’t for that
day many of us wouldn’t be
able to enjoy the lifestyles we
have now. Shame on Hubert
and his party, and he says he
is the future for this country,
and he can’t even support the
past.

-RK

I am extremely vex because
Immigration isn't coming in the
Bain Town area to round up
the illegal immigrants. There
are new ones everyday, so they
need to be more visible.

-N Hall

I vex because it’s always dif-
ficult for me to get online with

this BaTelCo DSL service. I
really need to switch to cable.
Just last month, my cousin, who
was also experiencing problems
with her DSL connection,
switched, and she said it’s much



" better now. BaTelCo needs to

do something with the connec-
tion before they lose anymore
customers to the competition

-DISconnected

Cargo scanner is officially
commissioned in Freeport

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A $3 million
mobile cargo scanner was offi-
cially commissioned on Thurs-
day at the Freeport Container
Port, which is now among more
than 40 ports operating under
the US Container Security Ini-
tiative programme.

US Ambassador to the
Bahamas John Rood and Prime
Minister Perry Christie attend-
ed the unveiling of the new car-
go scanning system, which is
capable of detecting weapons
of mass destruction and illegal
contraband that could be hid-
den in containers bound for the
United States.

Mr Rood said the CSI bene-
fits both countries and reported
that since its inception last
December, 245 containers were
scanned using x-rays and five
were physically inspected fol-
lowing inconclusive scans at the
container port:

In addition to the security
regime, Ambassador Rood
explained that pre-screened
containers at FCP allow con-
tainers shipped to immediately
enter into the commerce in the
United States without any
delays.

“Together with the Mega-
ports Initiative, a US Depart-
ment of Energy programme
that today screens more than
90 per cent of the cargo con-

tainers at Freeport Container

Port, CSI makes this container
port one of the most secure and
efficient ports in the world for
transshipment of containers to
the United States,” he said.
US Customs Border Protec-

tion officers, who will operate
the scanner, conducted a
demonstration for Ambassador
Rood and Prime Minister
Christie, showing the efficien-

cy of the scanner which is ablé «
‘to examine three containers in :

less than five minutes. ¢

Mr Rood said that Bahamian
Customs officials have been ful-
ly trained in the CSI pro-
gramme and will be responsi-
ble for all aspects of the pro-
gramme, except driving the
scanner.

“Hutchison Port Holding,
operator of the FCP, provided
the facility to house the scanner
and the US and Bahamian per-
sonnel who will operate it, and
oversee the programme. This is
truly a partnership that makes
both of our countries safer and
more prosperous,” he said.

Prime Minister Christie said
the CSI programme, which is a
joint operation between the US
and the Bahamas, will ensure

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN LUE FAUSTIN OF
COLLINS AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX SB-50766
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY JOHNSTON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, P.O. Box AB 20282, ABACO,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

OPEN HOUSE
LUXURY OCEAN
FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina

1 to 6 bedroom from $349,000-+
The Porches @ Coral Harbor
Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm
Free Food and Drinks

For More Information Call: 424-8366









maximum protection for both
countries.

“Whether we like it, or not,
every Bahamian must know
that the world changed after

9/11. And in the world chang-
ing, every country has been
required to spend more of its
national budget to ensure that
we protect ourselves and our
trading interests against terror-
ism, drug smuggling, and alien
smuggling, which all impact our
country,” he said.

Mr Christie revealed that
government is in the process of
acquiring two major scanning
devices — one each for Freeport,
and New Providence. He also
noted that the Bahamas Cus-
toms Department has sent offi-
cials off for orientation of the
scanners.

“TI travelled to China for the
demonstration of the machine
and it will be very good for the
country to have the same excel-
lent capacity to detect in the
goods brought into the country
for the smugglers who are trying

to evadé customs, including



Come to the

radioactive materials.

“We are making great
progress in protecting our coun-
try, revenue base, and most cer-
tainly ensuring that we minimise
smuggling to the extent we
can,” he said.

The prime minister stressed
that amidst political debate, the
government of the day, whoev-
er it maybe, has a sacred
responsibility to protect the
international integrity of the
country.

“Just as the American gov-
ernment sees it as a priority, so
does the Bahamas government,
and it must.”

ia ee

EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157








Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing
Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and

Evangelistic Crusade

Sunday, January 14th to Friday, January 19th, 2007

At 7:30p.m. Nightly at

The East Street Tabernacle
Kast Street and Sunlight Village —

Under the Theme:

“IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

Dynamic Speakers are:

Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudol ph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.0.G)



Tabernacle Conce





Team and by the Churc

changed!




SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

"Angels make a cleat getaway Wi



The Tribune CRICKET,
SOCCER |
| AND TENNIS

SCTION

ae Aree



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



‘Match victory against Truckers —

@ BASKETBALL
‘By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE New Center Cleaning
Angels might have cruised to
an easy victory on Tuesday
night but the team had to pull
out their big guns last night to
clinch the win.

Having to play against the
Johnson Lady Truckers is never
an easy task for the Angels, the
New Providence Women’s Bas-
ketball Association (NPWBA)
former champions. It was the
Truckers who stopped the
Angels in their tracks for two
consecutive NPWBA titles, but
the team couldn’t find the mag-
ic used in the championship
round in the regular season
game last night, falling 66-63.

Angels’ Sharelle Cash, who
opted not to play in Tuesday
night’s game, returned with the
hot hands for her team, going 9
of 25 from the field, for the
team’s high 23 points. But she
wasn’t finished yet — the athlet-
ic Cash powered her way
through seven rebounds, five
assists and steals.

Also putting a dent on the
Angels’ score board was Keisha
Richardson with 21 points, two
assists and four steals.

Thanks to Cash and Richard-

"son, the Angels dominated the

first half of play guisearng: the

Truckers in both the first and
second quarters. But the return
to the court after the half-time
break saw a new Truckers team.
The team which was once being
out hustled on both ends of the
court tightened up on defence,
running away with four of the
Angels’ opening minute pos-
sessions.

It was revenge for the Truck-
ers and unlike the Angels, who
placed their game back into
cruise control, the team was
looking for the third quarter
kill.

The Truckers got the. help
they needed from Shantell
Rolle, but more importantly
Glenda Gilcud. A quiet Gilcud
exploded in the third quarter,
sealing two big three pointers.
Between her and Rolle, the duo
scored 47 points, raising the
team’s second half shooting
average. Rolle would finish the
game with the top score of 31
points, six rebounds, three
assists and six steals. The Truck-
ers would outscore the Angels
20-12 in this quarter.

The fire was lit in both team’s
sharp shooters, but the last ten
minutes belonged to the Angels,
who held off the attack from
the Truckers.

Action in the NPWBA will
continue tonight at the D W
Davis gym with two games on
schedule.

Cobras show some bite
against the Magics

@ BASKETBALL

The Government Secondary
School Sports Association

‘(GSSSA) hosted three games

on Thursday as they continued
with their regular season action.

In the senior girls division the
CC Sweeting Cobras blew past
the GHS Magics.35-18. Top
scorer in the game was
Ruthanne Simms from the
Cobras with 17 points, eight
rebounds, teammate Shenecca
Smith contributed with 13
rebounds. For the Magics Crys-

tal Curry led with 14 points.

It was a close match between
CR Walker Knights and Doris
Johnson Marlins with the
Knights getting the edge over
the Marlins 28-25. In the senior
boys the Knights’ men defeated
the Marlins 49-43.

St Augustine’s senior boys
got the win they were looking
for on Thursday defeating the
St Anne’s Bluewaves 42-32. St
John’s College continued on
with their perfect season, over-
powering the Westminister Col-
lege 53-24.






























































































@ JOHNSON Lady
Truckers’ Chantell Rolle
scoops under the defencce
of Cleaning Center
Angels’ Suzette McKenzie
in the NPWBA’s season
opener on Saturday night
at the DW Davis Gym last
year. The Angels won 87-
77

What’s going on in the
sports world this weekend

wet things started today at t the Apckdeaeon
William Thompson’s Park.








Rugby - Thiers oil be two eucung atuhes
this weekend at the Winton Rugby Fields.

The first game will get on the way at 2pm.
Road Race - The annual Mother Pratt road

Football - Now that the wheels are turning, __race is set to start at 7am, all interested persons
the Commonwealth American Football are asked to line up at the COB southern
League extends invitations to all football fans entrance at 6:30am.
in the capital. Games are played on the DW
Davis Field on Saturdays and Sundays, start-
ing at 3pm.















@ ANOTHER day in
action — Cyndi White

of the Angels makes a
clean shot at the










Basketball - The New Providence Wom-
en’s Basketball Association (NPWBA) will
continue with the regular season’s play tonight

NPWBA Feat :

Game sold at Lovots Soccer - The Bahamas Football Associa- at the DW Davis gym, two games are on set.
Hall on Gladstone tion continues on with its Football Academy, The Annual Keva Bethel Basketball tour-
Road in 2004. The a developmental programme held at St John’s nament will be held at the Sir Kendal Isaacs

gym and all interested teams are asked to

College every Saturday morning at 9am.
attend.

Angels defeated the
Stingrays 80-57.



Swimming - The Bahamas Swimming Fed-
eration will open their season today at the
national swimming complex. The meet is set to
start at 9am and all are invited.

Track - The Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations will open their season with
their annual Odd Distance meet today at the
Thomas A Robinson stadium, the first race
will get on the way at 2pm.



Softball - The Old Timers Association will










WINDY,



Volume: 103 No.44

a

m tovin' It.

79F
69F



CLOUDS, SUN

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

Check out The Tribune’s

Classifieds Trader

TU US ser a UL On UMC Se Teen Tat



Parent of three

haemophiliac sons
speaks of her anger
and frustration

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A SINGLE mother admitted
last night that she is at breaking
point trying to raise three young
sons who are suffering from a
life-threatening blood disease.

Overwhelmed by medical
bills, Janice Strachan admits
that 16 years of struggle against
her family’s incurable problem
are taking their toll.

She spoke to The Tribune
after taking a conscious deci-
sion to make her ordeal public,
claiming she was tired of carry-
ing the burden alone.

Mrs Strachan, who lives off
Eastern Road, ‘admitted that
she has been an emotional
wreck for several months.

Suffering silently with her
three children as they battle
against the bleeding condition,
haemophilia, she admits she is
living on hope.

"Hope," she explained, "that .

something will happen, and that
something bad doesn't happen
to my kids."

Only one per cent of the
world's population are severely
affected by the bleeding disor-
der, according to. one health
website.

In mild cases of haemophilia,

a person would have to be
‘involved in an accident or
become injured for internal
bleeding to occur. But in severe
cases, no injury is necessary.
Infected persons can bleed at
any time. All of her children
have severe haemophilia.

Michael, 16, Nathaniel, 14,

and Rafael, 10, are severe
haemophilia “bleeders".

"They can bleed at any time,
on any part of their bodies," she
explained.

Haemophilia, a condition that
disproportionately affects
males, is carried in females and
miales already affected.

That worrying fact has caused
tremendous stress for Mrs Stra-
chan, whose ex-husband was
not affected.

With her sons shouting
"Mom, why do I have to be like
this?" and members of the pub-
lic telling her she never should
have had children, Mrs Stra-
chan's emotional balance i is tip-
ping.

"I'm angry and frustrated
because IJ didn't put a gun to
anyone's head and ask them to
give me these boys. I was in
love, I was married and I want-
ed a family just like anyone else.

“And it makes me angry and
it hurts me that I'm in this all
alone and people make me feel
like I committed a crime.”

Mrs Strachan said she had
been told: “You had the boys
and you knew it was in your
family." Another question
posed to her was: "If you knew
that was in your family why did
you have three?"

She told The Tribune: "I took
the same chance any other
mother would have. My sisters
are carriers and they took the
same chance. I am no different
from any other woman on earth.

SEE page 11

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

imap

rrrmennneesessnaamaenen

Ria OPER

motes —

J



HN aT Te TA EL
See Sports Section





PRICE — 75¢

Vex?

Bahamians who don’t hold back



lM THE container port is soon to be relocated to make room for the development of the new downtown

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the fundamental
realignment of the city of Nas-
sau, in mind, government yes-
terday signed a contract for a
business plan to move the
downtown container port to the
southwest of the island.

The Dutch firm Ecorys — with
extensive expertise in port plan-
ning — was awarded the
$350,000 contract: to consult on
the business plan for the pro-
ject, Prime Minister Perry

Christie announced yesterday
at the contract signing in the
Cabinet Office.

This business plan is consid-
ered the first step in creating a
new state-of-the-art container
port for New Providence and a
major step towards transform-
ing and revitalising downtown
Nassau.

Marten van den Bossche,
vice-chairman of Ecorys’ board
of directors, told the Bahami-
an press that he expects the.
business plan to be completed
within the next four to five

months.

“Moving the port from down-
town will free up more than 50
acres of prime waterfront devel-
opment for conversion into
commercial and residential uses
and restore Nassau to its right-
ful place among the leading
waterfront cities not only in the
Caribbean but in the world,”
Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said that
the new port is not being
planned in isolation, but is part
of a comprehensive plan for the

development of the south-west- -

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

ern part of the island, which will
soon see the establishment of
the Clifton Heritage Park and a
luxury real estate project known
as the Albany development.

Following years of research
on the project by the Nassau
Economic Development Board
and Nassau Tourism Board, a
joint task force of public and
private stakeholders was select-
ed last year to come up with a
business plan for the container
port move.

SEE page nine



Police silent on theft of $73,000_ - OPBAT could retain US Army support

& By NATARIO McKENZIE

POLICE yesterday remained
tight-lipped about their investi-
gation into the theft of $73,000
from Bahamasair.

Senior officers confirmed that
the money had been stolen, but
would say little more about the
incident.

They would not say if they
have any suspects or if they feel
they are close to making an arrest.

The Tribune learned of the
theft from an anonymous
source but was unable to con-
tact Bahamasair representatives
for details up to press time.

The Tribune spoke with ASP
Drexel Cartwright of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit who said
that he could not say at this
point whether police were fol-
lowing any “significant leads”
into the matter as this might
compromise their investigation.

“TI would rather leave that
alone until we get to a point
where we can give you some
positive information because
otherwise it interferes with our
investigation,” he explained.

“We don’t have any problem
giving the information but first
of all we want to know where
we are at in terms of our inves-
tigation.

SEE page nine

A US Senator has confirmed
that Operation Bahamas Turks
and Caicos could retain US
Army support even after the
Pentagon withdraws the Black-
hawk helicopters that have
been the crux of the anti-drug
interdiction initiative.

According to an Associated
Press report filed in Miami yes-
terday, US Senator Bill Nelson,
the democratic representaive
for Florida, said the army has

offered to give the DEA three
Sikorsky S-76 helicopters by
2008.

He said the army is also will-
ing to spend $3.4 miilion a year
for the next five years to main-
tain the helicopter base known
as the “Hawk’s Nest” in the
Bahamas.

“This will keep cocaine and
marijuana smugglers from
operating off Florida’s coast,”
said Nelson, a member of the

Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee. “With the Army’s con-
tinued support, the US-
Bahamas anti-drug effort will
remain fully operational.”

‘’he announcement came as
Senator Nelson departed Fri-
day on a two-day trip that
includes stops in Haiti and a
flight with the DEA over the
Bahamas.

SEE page nine

Ingraham: Don’t be fooled by PLP

OPPOSITION leader
Hubert Ingraham urged the
public not to be fooled into
complacency by “PLP propa-
ganda” about the date of the
upcoming general elections.

Yesterday, The Tribune
quoted sources inside the gov-
erning party as saying that par-
liament is to be dissolved on
April 10 and that the date of
the elections would be
announced soon after.

However, according to Mr
Ingraham, the elections will be
called much earlier than this.

Saying the April 10 date was
an effort to induce FNM sup-
porters to “relax”, he urged all
members of the public to
remain prepared.

“I can’t over stress the
absolute need to register to
vote,” Mr Ingraham said.

He went on to refute claims
that the FNM is waiting for the

government to call elections
before announcing the full slate
of opposition candidates.

“The FNM is not waiting. As !
said before, we have settled and
ratified candidates for all con-
stituencies,” Mr Ingraham said.

He said the party will contin-
ue to reveal these candidates
to the pubic in a steady stream
of announcements.

SEE page nine

Man arrested after condominium blaze

A MIDDLE-AGED man
was arrested yesterday after a
blaze swept through a condo-
minium block causing $3 mil-
lion worth of damage.

The man, 47, had earlier
been questioned by police fol-
lowing a domestic dispute.

Police say the fire, at Royal
Palm Condominiums at Trea-
sure Cay, Abaco, was the result
of arson.

The man, who was initially

taken into custody at Marsh
Harbour, was later flown to
Sandilands Rehabitation Unit
in Nassau for psychiatric exam-
ination.

Firemen were called to the
scene at 3.45am yesterday, just
six hours after a couple at the
condo were involved in an
argument.

Police summoned to their
home at 9.25pm on Thursday
had left after restoring calm.

But when the fire call came

. through later, it was their wait

that was ablaze. And flames
then spread throughout the
building.

Although Marsh Har:
bour’s volunteer brigade was
able to get the fire under
control, they could nat save
the building, which was
destroyed.

SEE page 11




PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Asif takes three wickets on
his return to test cricket |

& CRICKET
CENTURION,
South Africa
Associated Press



PAKISTAN quick Moham-
mad Asif, who had a one-year
doping ban overturned last
month, took all three wickets
as South Africa reached 130-3
at tea Friday on day two of the
first test.

Hashim Amla (62): and Ash-
well Prince (30) had an unbro-
ken 77-run stand as South
Africa recovered from 8-2 at
Centurion Park. Pakistan had
earlier lost it last five wickets
for 71 to be dismissed for 313.

South Africa captain Graeme
Smith edged a delivery from
Asif to wicketkeeper Kamran
Akmal for a duck, and A.B. de
Villiers nicked a ball from the
same bowler to Younis Khan
for 4.

Amla and Jacques Kallis had
steered the Proteas to 53 before
Kallis drove at a wide ball from
Asif and was caught by Younis
for 18 after lunch.

Asif had 3-34 off nine overs.

The Pakistan Cricket Board
appeals panel overturned Asif's
one-year ban and Shoaib
Akhtar's two-year ban on Dec.
5 after the Pakistan pacemen
tested positive for the banned
steroid Nandrolone.

The World Anti-Doping
Agency has lodged an appeal
for the restoration of the origi-
nal bans to world sport's highest
tribunal - the Court of Arbitra-
tion for Sport — but both players
are currently free to play.

Pakistan had earlier resumed
on its overnight 242-5 before
captain Inzamam-ul-Haq was
caught hooking by Amla at
square leg off Makhaya Ntini
for 42.

Akmal mistimed a pull off
Ntini and was caught by Shaun
Pollock for 29.

The tail-enders pushed the
total past 300, with Rana

- Naved-ul-Hasan scoring 30 off



29 balls before he was caught-

and-bowled by Andre Nel.
Ntini also took the wickets of

Shahid Nazir, who was caught

pulling by: Herschelle-Gibbs:

after scoring 15 off 17 balls, and

Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause
eart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases. |

Danish Kaneria, who edged
a delivery to Kallis for a
duck.

Ntini was the best of South

Africa's bowlers with 5-83, his

16th five-wicket test haul.

WO aaucimesce today.

@ PAKISTAN'S bowler Mohammad Asif, center, celebrates with teammates after dismissing



South Africa's batsman Jacques Kallis, unseen, for 18 runs on the second day of the Ist Test and
the series against South Africa at Centurion Park in Pretoria, South Africa, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007.

tid be oye

ADE

ACE RU eet) oe
PE eed ee



Longa neccanmconttacontt tae mantic ALOHEALPatHRRY OA

(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)



we me


PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

| | | | SPORT ;

Clarke looks for escape during Royal Trophy







@ DARREN Clarke of North Ireland hits from a sandtrap during the foursomes golf match at the 2nd Royal Trophy men’s team tournament, Asia against Europe, at the Amata Spring Country Club







course in Chonburi province, southeastern Thailand Friday Jan. 12, 2007.

\

Peru and Paraguay meet for u20s match

(AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)








sas



@ PERU’S Christian Laura , left, fights for the ball with Paraguay’s Pablo Aguilar during a South ‘fi CHILE’S Nicolas Larrondo, celebrates after scoring against Bolivia during a South American
American under-20 soccer championship game in Pedro Juan Caballero, Paraguay, Thursday, Jan. —_ under-20 soccer championship game in Pedro Juan Caballero, Paraguay, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007.
11, 2007. ,

(AP Phote/Lucas Nunez) |
(AP Photo/Lucas Nunez) ws



‘ AAT





@ PERU’S Damian Ismodes ,center, fights for the ball with Paraguay’s Nery Bareiro, left, and Angel Enciso, right, during a South American under-20 soccer championship game in Pedro Juan
Caballero, Paraguay, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Paraguay won 1-0.



(AP Photo/Lucas Nunez)


'
'
'
b
b

oh
we

eves
ve

“99 @ @ @ «
2 eeees

TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007, PAGE 5°







S S S ESS

a



@ KIM Clijsters of Belgium plays a shot during her finals match against Serbia’s Jelena Jankovic
at the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007.

Jannkovic won the first set 6-4.

Clijsters

&

(AP Photo/Paul Miller)

SPORTS







gium at the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2
Clijsters won the match 4-6, 7-6, 6-4

wins women’s

final;

(AP Photo/Rob Grijiih

Blake

=



gets walkover into men’s final

B TENNIS
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

KIM Clijsters began her
retirement year with a victory,
beating Serbia’s Jelena Jankovic
4-6, 7-6 (1), 6-4 in the Sydney
International final Friday.

Third-seeded Clijsters, who
is expected to retire at the end
of 2007, broke a nine-match
winning streak by Jankovic,
who won the Auckland WTA
title last week.

Clijsters, who had to save a
match point in the second set
Friday against Jankovic, beat

‘Australian Open No. 1 seed

Maria Sharapova in a Hong
Kong exhibition tournament
last week.

Earlier Friday, defending
men’s champion James Blake

cruised into the Sydney final in .

a walkover when Austria’s Jur-
gen Melzer could not start his
semifinal due to illness.

In a scheduling quirk, the
third-seeded Blake will go for
the title against Spain’s Carlos
Moya _ his first-round oppo-
nent at the Australian Open
next week. Moya, who survived
a three-setter against Marcos
Baghdatis on Thursday night,

had to go the distance again to
beat Frenchman Richard Gas-
quet 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 as tempera-
tures hit 38 C (100 F) Friday
afternoon.

Melzer, blaming a batch of
bad sushi, said he was so sick
to his stomach that he needed
an intravenous drip. He had
doubts about his fitness‘for the
Open.

“At the moment, there’s no
way I could play,” Melzer said.
“IT hope that somebody from
upstairs looks down on me and
gets me ready.”

Melzer is the seventh player
this week to either withdraw

More tennis action.
rom around the world



â„¢~ i



or retire from a match in Syd-
ney, and Lleyton Hewitt was a
late withdrawal with a calf mus-
cle injury. Women’s No. 1 Jus-
tine Henin-Hardenne withdrew
due to personal reasons that
also will keep her out of the
Open.

No. 3-ranked Nikolay Davy-
denko was fined $10,000 Thurs-
day by the ATP for “unsport-

mansmanlike conduct” after

saying nobody cares about the
tournament, a traditional
warmup for the Open, the sea-
son-opening Grand Slam event.
Davydenko retired with a foot
injury after losing the first set of



his opening match, saying he
was not overly concerned about
the smaller tournaments.
Rafael Nadal, Paradorn
Srichaphan, Dmitry Tursunov,
Svetlana Kuznetsova and Nadia
Petrova also pulled out of the
tournament citing either injury

or illness.

While Blake criticized Davy-
denko’s comments, he suggest-
ed the sport needs an injection
of entertainment to improve its
image after 383 withdrawals
from tournaments last year _a
trend that ATP chairman Eti-
enne De Villiers has described
as “unacceptable madness.”

“You go to other sporiing
events and there’s an entertain
ment value inherent besides just
the athletes out there ... wh
it be music during change:
whether it be cheerleade
basketball games, anything ike
that,” Blake said.

“It’s tough with such a traci-
tional sport (like tennis) to |:
that there’s no timeouts w!
you bring in cheerleader
have rap music blasting. ©
think there may be ways that
we can find a happy medium
and make it entertaining for the
casual fan as well as those
diehards."











H SPAIN’S Tommy Robredo in action during his match against Agustin Calleri of Argentina in
the first semifinal at the Heineken Open Mens tennis tournament in Auckland, New Zealand, Vri
day, Jan. 12, 2007. Robredo won in straight sets 6-4, 6-0.



@ SPAIN’S Carlos Moya plays a shot in his semi-finals match against France’s Richard Gasquet at
the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Jan. 12, 2007. Moya

won the match 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.

(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

(AP Photo/NZPA, Wayne Drough:)



@ RUSSIA’S Anna Chakvetadze in action against Vasilisa Bardina also of



SS SS S NS

Russia during the final,

of the Hobart International tennis tournament, Friday Jan. 12, 2007, in Hobart, Australia. Chakve-

tadze won the mach 6-3, 7-6 (3).

(AP Photo/Peter Mathew)


PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007








JUDGE PARKER

HEY, NEDDY...SOPHIE...

Faw

a WHO'S YOUR FRIENDS

AD
RY.

a

L08TIN THOUGHT, LUANN | SHE TURNS A

WS Sy
LT eA

Ue



THIS 1S RAVU
MISHRA, OUR
HOUSEGUEST

WANLPERS THROUGH TH

SEE YOU!

=

Be

FROM INDIA’ (“SX Tere

HE NEEDS SOME
NEW CLOTHES’ CAN



e



YOU HELP HIMS



ALAN MUST‘E}?

SLEPT HERE

WHILE HE WAS

A COT AND
BLANKETS?



MY ASSISTANT LJ
TOLD YOU THAT?!

OH, FOR PETE'S SAKE! WHY )
\ DO YOU ALWAYS TRY TO



you Bet’ tes Syl
GET UNDRESSED,
RAJQU/



OH, SUDDENLY
IM SO TIRED...

COMICS PAGE













Dennis ©

t
z
S
&
q
x
e
>



‘ONE MORE THING... WOULD YOU PLEASE FIND
MARGARET A NEW NEIGHBORHCOP 2"

PEOPLE DONT
UNDERSTAND ME .
THEN DONT REALIZE
I'M A CARD-
CARRNING GENIUS,

WELL, NOT
REALLY, BUT
No ONE EVER



The Striptease Coup

wHo TOLD 4F PIN ME DOWN?! IT WAS
yOU THAT?! i ONE DAY LAST WEEK!
i South dealer. :
By North-South vulnerable.
zi NORTH
le @AK 8543
3 ¥93
£ 4104
: #982
Sh WEST EAST
#310972 6
VÂ¥KQ107 86542
85 09732
. PAB &K 64
T HEARD JUDGING BY THE WAN SOUTH
IT ON: TV Moe FREAKED OUT, IT ve
AY BE MY LAST WORD @AKQIO
#&QI1075
The bidding:
South West North East
1¢ 14 Dble Pass
3 Pass 3% Pass
4h Pass Sh



Opening lead — king of hearts.

Today’s deal illustrates a rare play

sometimes called the “striptease
coup.”

West leads the king of hearts, and

declarer sees he might lose a heart
and two trumps and go down one in
\ five clubs. To try to avoid this out-
come, South wins the heart lead with
the ace, cashes the queen of spades,
crosses to the ten of diamonds and



N SPECIAL
PLACE...



plays the ace of spades.

East ruffs with the four to stop
declarer from discarding his heart
loser, and South overruffs with the
five. Declarer cashes the ace of dia-
monds and continues with the king,
planning to discard dummy’s heart
loser if West follows suit.

But West trumps the third dia-
mond with the three, and dummy
overruffs with the eight as East fol-
lows suit. Continuing his campaign,
declarer plays the king of spades
from dummy, forcing East to mff
with the six as South overruffs with
the seven.

The striptease has now been ac-

complished. Both East and West

have been denuded of their low
trumps, leaving the king and ace as
the only trumps they have left.

Declarer next leads the queen of
diamonds, and West can do no better
than ruff with the ace as dummy’s
nine of hearts is discarded. Sooner or
later South ruffs the jack of hearts in
dummy, and his only losers turn out
to be the A-K of trumps.

The sequence of plays described
here is, of course, an unusual way of
extracting trumps, but that is hardly a
bar to its use.

Any port in a storm!



TRIBUNE SPORTS

CERTIFIED
GENIUS ”’

EMBOSS THIS
CARO? WITH
A SCREWDRIVER?

a



SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Feeling fizzled out, Aries? It could
be because you pushed yourself too
hard partying in the last few weeks. |
Take the early part of this year to sit, -
back and relax.

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21
Something that seems insurmount-
able is actually much easier to
scale than you think, Taurus...
Think positively and you’ll reach
great heights. '

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 | '
Think before you speak when you're |
called to intervene in a situation,
Gemini. Though you can offer
words of wisdom, let the other par-
ties do the compromising. -
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

There is success coming your way, you":
just need to keep your eyes peeled in’ -
anticipation, Cancer. However, there
are two sides to every coin, and this

| good news also brings some bad. '

LEO -— Jul 23/Aug 23 '
You sometimes have to lose before. ‘
you can. win, Leo, and this will

become apparent in the next few’. .



WHY ARE You
LOOKING so
SULLEN,

www.kingleatures.com

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS

Caught by Captain

Edward? (6,
Employ to maximum,

handity (6)
Roduce the final esdmate, just in
cuse (4)

Quick with a diaper for

one’s little son (6)

Might the layman liken It

to moss? (6)

14 At the turning point it provides an

su &

a1
22
23
26
2
2
30

w
b=

opening (3)
Boy's name for a cigar maker (5)
intuitive Interviewer? (4)

In my case, an

Individual lolly (5)

He's immersed In his work (5)
What the heimsman did, giving a girl
a hearty kies (5)

No love for Thea, unfortunately (4)
The devil gives Natasha a bit of a
tum! (5)

The putse of a changed

lad (3)

Worn down in time (6)

An eventer's garment? (6)
They caneasilyget

out of hand (4)

32 Wooded part of London,

perhaps? (8)

33 Ina way, anaesthetic can make you

tower (6)

Yesterday's cryptic solutions



UM PRACTICING FoR

WHEN I GET Ta GE
A TEENAGER

DOWN

1
2

B NRBRRBRK

8

Is shot badly, so pulls up (6)

With clean sheets, he retains .

his job (6)

A caller for payment? (4)

Person responsible for the bad
cooking of rice? (7)

A greeting at Honolulu (5)

Being prone to malinger (5)

Water the kate, perhaps (4)

One going round specifically looking
for information (3)

Weep since crime is sald to be
endiess (3)

Too young really to be a fat lady (5)
Long to have a great day In bed (5)
Regal composer (5)

Figures to be sociable (3)

In having noted ways, he differs from
Ted (3)

Finished composing a rondo around
just two notes (4,3)

Not the nicest of academicians? (3)
Princely little place in the country (6)
Pals touring high places (4)

One having a job paying his bills? (6)
Pass over the net? (5)

Put a hand on the central heating
with a cry of pain (5)

On account of a duke taking a
weekend out (3)

She makes a change from

Jane (4)

Yesterday's easy solutions



(©2006 by King Featurve Syndicate, ina. World rights reserved.

EASY PUZZLE

come out OK.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

If you have all the answers, Virgo,
why aren’t people constantly asking
your advice? Realize that you can, .
learn a thing or two from someone
else, especially this week.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 :

If you’re in the mood for romance, ..



ne

GOCOMES, COM / POP SEQAIMNTIR

nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 17; very good 25;
excellent 33 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.

a sticky situation, Sagittarius. All, ‘
you ¢an do is be patient and trust that,
things will work out. '

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

A financial folly leaves you coming up
short, Capricorn. It’s time to buckle
down and stretch those dollars as far as
they can go. Otherwise, you could end

up in a pickle by mid ‘year.’
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Why wrestle with a concern alone
when you have loved ones you can:
trust to assist you, Aquarius? Put’.
some of your worries in another per-,
son’s hands.





metabolism

process of the

body breaking .

down food for
Tae]



You will find hidden meanings in} -”
the most mundane things, Pisces.”
The trouble will be figuring out”:
what the big message is. :



Sergey Volkov v Pavel
Tregubov, Russia Cup 2006.
You have to be careful when
queens and rooks are
roaming on an open board. If
White makes an obvious
start by 1 Rh8+ Kg7 2 Rb8
with the threat 3 Rxb7+
then Black's reply 2...Qb1+ 3
Kh2 Qh7+ 3 Kg3 secures at
least a perpetual check draw
by Qg6+. So, Volkov cast
around for a different idea,
and noticed that the black
queen was also tactically
vulnerable. How did he force
a quick win?

Grandmaster chess comes
to London this afternoon.
The £10,000 Staunton
Memorial at Simpson‘s-in-
the-Strand includes England

ACROSS
Flower (6)
Strangle (8)
Prima
donna (4) Cringed (7)
Dealer (6) Thong (5)
Discussion (6) Yielded
Confronted (3) (5)
Quick (5) Moist (4)
Agents (4) Animal doctor (3)
Mature (5)
Furious (5) Prohibit (3)
Subtract ° Jewelled
(5) headdress (5)
Practise boxing (4) Polite (5)
Spiral (5) Keen (5)
Devoured (3) pedis vy e)
lu
Sarcastic (6) need

Dictionary (7)
Looked angrily (6) Noise (3)
Hire (4)

; Position (6)
Native American (8) Saucy (4)



No 1 Michael Adams and Dutch
legend Jan Timman. Play
continues until Saturday and
spectators are welcome, with free
entry and running commentary.

LEONARD BARDEN oat

DS bet bet et ot ee
SBESUSRES

RE EA NT

days. Stay the course and you will’ -" -”

f
te
‘
'
'
’

Libra, then you'll be justly rewarded."

The ‘
Target
uses
S|E|K words in
body at Ss Now js the i d quali
ly 0 & ow is the time to spend quality. time '
RI i Chambers ae Ba, with that special person in your life '
21st aasos because soon you’ ll be busier than ever. |
Century z dau ous y Py -8
Dictionary ss ya an SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 '
(1899 5 ‘Ma ES Quiet comtemplation is the key this!
edition) g ae week, Scorpio. Mull over all of: !
Peer arareeaneonaniake é Ba 2s your problems and you’ll soon find
a o = i
from the letters shown here? = o ae aa ae a a ees
In making a word, each letter a 4 a BR y Berups: ; o&
may be used once only. Each = A4so E SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
must contain the centre letter ous “S Silence can be deafening, especially «
and there must be at least one : i ages tA when you’re awaiting an outcome to + —

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar20 Be

CHESS byLeonardBarden gj es

SRESIS BE

ACROSS: 1, Least 6, Stock 9, Arbiter 10, Tally 11, Tense 12,
Haste 13, Bestial 15, Lea 17, Idle 18, Renown 19, Tiber
20, Ocelot 22, Peal 24, Nap 25, Reverse 26, Miser 27,
Relic 28, Muted 29, Manages 30, Creel

31, Teeth

DOWN: 2, Elated 3, Salute 4, Try 5, Vital 6, Settler 7, Tree
8, Cashew 12, Habit 13, Bison 14, Sleep 15, Lower 16,
Angle 18, Refer 19, Topical 21, Career 22, Peruse 23, ;
Ascent 25, Regal 26, Mime 28, Met

ACROSS: 1, |-Deal 6, Left-s 9, Get over 10, Smart 11,
Tamps.12, Balts 13, Liberal 15, Cod 17, EN-I'd 18, Scrape
19, Route 20, Gol-de-n 22, Beta 24, Hay 25, Cruiser 26,
Mu-ehy 27, Fives 28, At war 29, Se-aside 30, Chess 31,
O-rate

DOWN: 2, Doma-I-n 3, A-greed 4, Let 5, Tot-Al 6, Lett-ice
7, Eras 8, Tip-top 12, BA-Ron 13, Leigh 14, B-lll-y 15,
Cases 16, Debar 18, S-tory 19, Re-fuses 21, O-a-fish 22,
B-Ht-ter 23, Ten-ant 25, Chas.-E 26, Mess 28, Ado

Twist (6)

GC ROZHHODO





Salad plant (8)
Problem (5)
Romeo (5)
Beer (3)
Incraased (4)

Chess solution: 1 Qb8+ KI7 2Qc7+ when Ke8 or ;
K{8 fails to 3 Rh8+ while if Kg8 3 Rg3 (simplest) wins ‘|
the queen. (
Mensa quiz: 95. A black circle is worth 12, a grey
circle is worth 25 and a white circle is worth 29.

One possible word ladder solution is: CREW, craw,
claw, clam, slam, seam, TEAM

pny


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2007

MONDAY



@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm -

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-
_ tors Hospital conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
{(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

S HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pmie® cowerage ces

The Cancer Society of the Bahanias méets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday ofeach month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
‘7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach e Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

‘The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
‘every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
'the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.

#



WEDNESDAY

4 PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

«& RESTAURANTS

s#Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free
‘appetizers and numerous drink specials.

‘i HEALTH
:Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the










ain event



NATION








BOTS SHOWS UP
Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediurns ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. it contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imaqinathon,

<< ~ coc
WS \ ‘ .







S




UNTIL JAN 29, 2c












public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are
held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
ter Blake Road. For more information call
327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,
Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support

Group meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm

.to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors

south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

B CIVIC CLUBS
The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets
every Wednesday from lpm — 2pm at East
Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of

each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference °

Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the
world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programnies.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on





Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at

large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital’€yvery third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room.Free screenings between 5pm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.



Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm. |

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

B CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend ¢ TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.



THE TRIBUNE



PHOTOS WELCOME



FRIDAY

i HEALTH .

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the.
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to
attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre. .

SATURDAY



HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. wad

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid-class-..,

es are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.



SUNDAY

B@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS |

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

H@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW $- The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness
Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-
ed persons are welcome to attend. For more
information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.













MeN
oe a
Sis. ot



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EBCULD26W_USGGLI INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T15:12:41Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02792
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES