Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







i ANNA Nicole Smith, right, leaves the US Supreme Court in .

Washington with her son Daniel Smith in this February 28,

2006 photo

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Shipyard CEO defends safety standards

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Grand

Bahama Shipyard adheres to’

very strong, internationally-
recognised safety and environ-
mental standards, according to
Shipyard CEO Dave Dalleish.

He made this comment in
response to the “damaging”
allegations made by union offi-

cials earlier this week.
Mr Dalleish said he took
strong exception to comments

‘regarding safety and environ-

mental conditions at the ship
repair facility, where 250
Bahamian workers are
employed.

“What is of great concern. to
me, are people saying that the
management of this company
has a ‘lackadaisical and care-

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Decision ‘soon’ on Daniel Smith inquest

®@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DECISION is expected to —

be made soon on whether an
inquest is to be held into the
death of Anna Nicole Smith's
son.

On Wednesday, The Tribune
was told by Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson that
the police file on Daniel Smith's
death would soon be with Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez, and
that it was he — not she — who
would make the final decision
as to whether an inquest would

be carried out.

Now, Bernard Turner, direc-
tor of public prosecutions, has
told the Associated Press that
the file will be with Mr Gomez
“by the end of the week”.

Attempts to contact Mr
Gomez for comment on the
issue were unsuccessful as his
cellular phone was turned off,
AP said.

In the wake of the 20-year-
old's mysterious death, some
commentators claimed there
was an unnecessarily protracted
period of deliberation over the
matter of an inquest.

A leading jurist said in Octo-
ber that an inquest should be a
matter of course in all cases of
sudden death where no one is
criminally charged.

However, Mr Turner said
that the investigation had not
taken "unusually long."

“Every matter has to be
investigated based on the pecu-
liarities ‘of that case. You have
to keep in mind that although
he died in the Bahamas, he had
only arrived here a few hours
earlier, so this ended up not
being an entirely local matter,”
Mr Turner said.

In what some see as another
bizarre turn in the saga of Anna
Nicole Smith, it was reported |
yesterday that she had tattoos of
her dead son and new daugh-
ter, Dannielynn, inked on her
shoulders during her recent
return to the US.

On her left shoulder, she is
reported to bear a large tattoo
portraying an image of herself
and Daniel, with the dates of
his birth and death, alongside
the words "My Pumpkinhead."

On her right shoulder is said
to be a portrait of four month-
old Dannielynn.

Dalleish hits back at criticism by union officials



free’ approach to safety. The
exact opposite is true,” he said
on Wednesday.

“We are an internationally
known and recognised company
and this kind of rhetoric .. . is
actually quite damaging and
could be harmful to the very,
Bahamians that the union pur-
ports to support,” he said.

Harold Grey, president of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Workers Union, claimed that
there are serious safety and
environmental concerns at the
facility.

During a press conference on
Tuesday, Mr Grey announced
that the union intends to take a
strike vote next week.

However, Mr . Dalleish
assured that the safety of work-
ers and the protection of the
environment are given top pri-
ority at the shipyard.

“We have strong environ-
mental and safety programme
internationally recognised (in
place) and we are audited ona
regular basis by an internation-
al body — Lloyds,” he noted.

According to the CEO, the
shipyard has a larger safety
department than many ship-
yards around the world.

Mr Dalleish said the safety
department, which includes six
officers, is headed by a quali-
fied and capable Bahamian.



Mr Grey believes that the
safety department is under-
staffed, and complained that
sometimes one safety officer is
left alone to patrol and inspect
the entire shipyard.

Assurance

Mr Dalleish responded: “I was
the operation director of Halifax
Shipyard in Canada, where I can
assure you safety standards are
extremely stringent. The whole
company of 1,000 employees had
one safety manager and his job
was to patrol because it is not
the safety officers who are
responsible for safety in the ship-
yard: It is the responsibility of
the individual employee to work
in a safe ‘and proper environ-
ment monitored by his supervi-
sors,” he said.

Mr Dalleish stated that in
addition to patrolling the ship-
yard, it is the duty of the safety
officer to correct any situation
that may become potentially
dangerous to workers or the
environment.

The safety officers are
responsible for checking com-
partments on ships to make sure
they are suitable for employees
to enter.

The officer also ensures that
first aid; safety and environ-

mental materials are constantly
available in case of an accident,
he said.

Mr Dalleish explained that
the shipyard was recently
engaged in two disciplinary mat-
ters, regarding the suspension
of a safety officer and the sus-
pension of a shop steward who
was given a verbal warning for
poor time keeping.

He said the union has taken
both matters to Labour Depart-
ment.

“There have been two sepa-
rate meetings on those issues, and
in the end, the company stood
firm on its ground and the union
was upset because we refuse to
overturn the two matters... and
they are now going to the press to
agitate and make noise because
they are not getting what they
want,” said Mr Dalleish.

He stressed that the five-day
suspension of a safety officer,
who left his assigned post where
an X-ray procedure was being
performed, was warranted.

The safety officer, he said,
was stationed in a place where
he was told to stay and prevent
access of any other employees
to that area.

“He violated a situation and
an instruction from his imme-
diate superior and could have
placed people at severe risk. If
he felt it was important to leave

his station he could have con-
tacted someone by radio and
had someone else take over his
duties there before he left to go
patrolling,” he said.

Mr Dalleish said that the safe-
ty officer who was suspended is
back to work. Although the
matter is resolved, he feels that
the union is using it as lever-
age. ,

Addressing the environmen-
tal concerns regarding a sunken
barge, Mr Dalleish said the ves-
sel is empty and does not con-
tain any contaminants, as the
union claims.

“It has been underwater for
three years and there is no
requirement, or need for that
to be removed because it is in
60 feet of water and does not
harm or hinder any activity that
goes on the shipyard,” he said.

As part of its environmental
management system, the ship-
yard conducts regular water
sampling at the facility. There
has been no indication of any
kind of environment situation,
Mr Dalleish said.

FOR 3 IN.1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Aig) for enti
AL ee





A FRIENDLY REMINDER
MASS DISCONNECTION EXERCISES

IN THE FOLLOWING. AREAS:

* Rosetta « Kemp Road and all side corners
« Village Road ¢ Soldier Road « Prince Charles Dr. to
Village Road « Dannottage Estate « Village Estate,
« Nassau Village « Blair Estate ¢ Fox Hill
¢ Yamacraw Beach « Monastery Park « College Gardens
« East Park Estate *» Seabreeze Estate & Imperial Park
* Hillside Park ¢ Bay St. & Victoria Ave. « Centreville
¢ Palmdale including Madeira St. « Mt. Royal Ave. and
Mt. Rose Ave. and all side corners.

PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY! .

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon

or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations

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ra

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 3



O1n brief

Man killed
in Harbour
Island is
identified

THE man stabbed to death
on Wednesday in Harbour
Island has been identified as
Clarington Moss.

According to reports, Mr

. Moss was stabbed after an
argument that may have
stemmed from a domestic
dispute.

The victim was in his mid-
40s and is said to be from
Eleuthera. Another man was
stabbed during the incident
and was airlifted to Nassau for
treatment. The second man is
also a resident of Eleuthera.

According to Inspector
Walter Evans, the two men
were walking when they were
approached by several men.

An argument followed,
resulting in both men being
stabbed several times.

The condition of the sec-
ond victim is unknown.

Film set at
end of
Cold War
scheduled

THE International Lan-
guages and Cultures institute
of the College of the
Bahamas has announced that
it will be screening a film
about East German society
near the end of the Cold War.
. The German-language

“movie Good Bye Lenin! offers

a Satirical view of East Ger-
man society, rushing madly to
embrace the joys of unbridled
consumerism after the fall of
the Berlin Wall in 1989.
Stephen B Aranha. history
lecutrer at the School of
Social Sciences at COB, will
make a presentation on the
film’s historical background.
The screening will take
| ' place on January 17 at 7pm in
; room three of the Munnings
«Jf
|

Campus of the college.

YOUR CONNECTIO

“Building at the Oakes Field Ai
- t - bune to possibly suggest politi-

Police feel the heat
for delay in Inagua
beating inquiry

POLICE are upset that fail-
ure to make arrests in the
Inagua beating scandal is
rebounding on them.

They claim they are being
blamed by the public for the
Attorney General’s delay in
ordering charges to be laid.

Dexter Wilson, a 27-year-old
marine worker for Morton Salt,
was beaten up in Mathew
Town, Inagua, by a large group
of Defence Force officers in late
November.

He was “left for dead” by
marines who took exception to
a conversation he had in a local
bar with a woman Defence
Force marine.

Since then, police have con-
ducted a full investigation into —
and sent documents to the
Attorney General’s Office.

However, no action has been
taken against the culprits - even
though there were several wit-
nesses to the incident.

Now police are growing rest-
less over mounting disquiet in
Inagua, where locals are sus-



& PAUL Thompson

pecting a cover-up.

Yesterday, former assistant
police commissioner Paul Thomp-
son said many case files are being
sent to the AG’s office before
anyone is charged by police.

“The incident in Inagua is a
case in point,” he said, “From
what I have read in the various

newspapers and heard on radio,

it appears there is evidence to.

charge these persons with caus-
ing dangerous harm, wounding,
assault and battery, discharging
firearms to the danger and
annoyance of the public, assault
with a deadly weapon and dis-
orderly conduct.”

He said evidence also sug-
gested aiding and abetting
offences.

“These would most likely be
the criminal charges that the old
inspectors and sergeants would
have brought against the vari-
ous offenders,” he said.

“The police then would have
obtained warrants of arrest for
those concerned. As a matter
of respect, the officer in charge
(in this case, the Commodore)
would have been informed and
requested to produce his per-
sonnel to a particular police sta-
tion for processing and any
interrogation necessary.

“TJ submit that the police could
have dealt with this matter effi-
ciently and expeditiously.”

AG: Inagua file still to reach my desk

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ATTORNEY _ General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has
told The Tribune that the file
on the alleged Inagua beating
remains in her office — but has
not reached her desk.

And Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said she could not respond to
claims made by a senior police
source that her office is request-
ing police files “to an extent ney-
er known before” — unless The
Tribune identified the source and
specified the files in question.

She added: “I would simply
say that it is the political sea-
son so I would expect The Tri-

cal mischief.”

In November, eyewitnesses
said Mr Wilson, a 27-year-old
Morton Salt worker was “beat-
en almost death” by about 15
Defence Force officers.

Immediately after the inci-
dent, an investigative team from
both the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and the Defence Force
travelled to the island to inves-
tigate the claims and returned to
Nassau to complete their report.

The file was forwarded to the
Attorney General's office in
mid-December.

Several sources have ques-
tioned why no one has been
charged with the offence yet.

On January 3, Shane Wilson,
the victim's brother claimed

‘TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

WIRELESS SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company

Limited, (BTC) is pleased to inform our valued

customers and the general public that wireless services

such as new applications, ESN changes and adding

features can now be done at the following locations;
BTC Mall at Marathon, BTC Fox Hill Multi Service
Centre and BTC JFK.

BTC encourages the public to use any of the

convenient locations for their wireless needs.

BTC

is working hard to keep our customers connected to

the world.



that he felt “the government is
trying to protect someone”.
“Had this been Dexter or me

’ who had attacked a marine we

would have been before the
court and would now be in Fox
Hill Prison,” he said.

A senior police source told
The Tribune that "there is no
reason for this matter to be
referred to the AG's office.

“The police have been to
Inagua and taken statements.
These men should have been
before the courts by now. There
is no excuse for this delay,” the
source said.

However, the Attorney Gen-
eral said on Wednesday that the
file being referred to her office
was a matter of procedure.

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>"sCHOOL *



The International School of The Babamas
FOUNDED 1948

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS

A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew’s School is offered
annually to students attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.



These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10,
11 and 12. Eligible students should meet the following criteria:

e Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including

grades 8 and 9

e Be of the highest academic standing, maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above
e Be at least. 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31st August

2007

Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor
of the student’s school. The students awarded these scholarships will be
expected to follow a full programme of BGCSE and advanced courses leading
to graduation at the end of year 12.

The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates
will sit the scholarship examinations at 9am on Saturday, 10.March 2007 at

St Andrew’s School.
and interviewed.

Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary
schools in New Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be

Successful examination candidates will be short-listed

obtained from the administration office of St Andrew’s School.

Further details are available from St Andrew’s School, telephone: 1

2621.

Application forms should be returned to: -

Robert F. Wade

Principal

St Andrew’s School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau, Bahamas

The closing date for applications is Wednesday, 28 February 2007.

Ss Authorized by:



* ORGANIZATION

'§ INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE




sn aN Accredited by:

-242-324-

vege" COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS

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& COLLEGES

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

Our story must
be told for us

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETLENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 ,

Saddam Hussein’s echoing voice

EARLIER THIS week, the Iraqi High Tri-
bunal heard damning evidence of Saddam
Hussein’s responsibility for genocidal crimes
against the Kurds of Iraq in the late 1980s
evidence given in the despot’s own voice.
The old audiotape that was played in the
courtroom provided a stunning self-incrimi-
nation from beyond the grave. But it also
underlined how much was lost when the Iraqi
government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Mali-
ki put Saddam to death before trials for his
worst crimes against humanity could be com-
pleted.

The rushed hanging of Saddam deprived
families and friends of his victims of true jus-
tice. It also kept him from speaking in court
about past US and European tolerance for his
repression and use of chemical weapons. And
because he killed Sunni Arabs, Christians,
and Turkmen as well as Kurds and Shiites,
the current government’s cheating of justice
means that a chance to foster the sort of
national reconciliation Iraq desperately needs
today has been deliberately sacrificed in
favour of sectarian vengeance.

Allowing Saddam to live through trials that
proved definitively his guilt for horrific crimes
against his people and Iraq’s neighbours
could have taught crucial lessons for the
future. Instead, a chance was. lost to teach
both an Iraqi and a regional atidience about
the difference between the law of the rufer
and the rule of law. If Saddam had been in
the courtroom Tuesday, forced to listen to his



Good news for

THE RULING Thursday in Gulfport, Mis-
sissippi, was good news for hundreds of
homeowners challenging insurers for refusing
to cover billions of dollars in storm damage.

A federal judge in Gulfport took part of a
case out of the hands of the jury before they
were allowed to award punitive damages to a
couple that had insurance with State Farm
Fire & Casualty Co.

State Farm held that the.couple’s insur-
ance policy did not cover the storm surge
from Hurricane Katrina. The couple said
that a tornado during the hurricane destroyed
their home. State Farm blamed all the dam-
age on Katrina’s storm surge. State Farm
and other insurers say their homeowner poli-
cies cover damage from wind, but not from

Expressions Boutique

oy ue UTE oF ee Ae aCe the. DL

own taped voice speaking not in the flowery
oratorical manner of his public persona but in
the brutal terms of the cold killer he was,

* many of the political myths spun around him

in the Arab world would have been dissolved.
Saddam’s remorseless cruelty as he
instructs his inner circle on the uses of mus-
tard gas and nerve gas to kill Kurdish vil-
lagers leaves no doubt that they were acting
on his orders and he intended to murder as
many Kurds as he could. Indeed, Human
Rights Watch has estimated that Saddam had
100,000 Kurds killed in the Anfal campaign of
the late 1980s; Kurdish authorities and the tri-
bunal’s prosecution put the number of victims
as high as 180,000. At one moment, Saddam
is heard on the tape telling one of his top
henchmen that "chemical weapons are not

used unless I personally give the orders.”
Since a videotape has been disseminated
around the world in which Saddam’s execu-
tion appears as one among many killings in a
vicious sectarian war, as merely an act of
revenge by Shiite authorities against a Sun-
ni Arab ruler, the old myths about Saddam as
a heroic knight of the Arab world have been
given a second life. At the same time, the
few useful truths he might have told about
American and European complicity in his
crimes against humanity will not be aired in a
court of law. There are reasons why human-

ity never seems to learn from history.

(This article was written by The Boston
Globe - c.2006).

policyholders

water, and that the policies exclude damage

~ that could have been caused by a combina-

tion of both, even if hurricane-force winds
preceded a storm’s rising water.
However, the judge ruled that State Farm

couldn’t prove that Katrina’s storm surge -

was responsible for all of the damage to the
couple’s home.

The judge also said the testimony failed
to establish how much damage was caused by
wind and how much resulted from storm
surge. The judge ordered State Farm to pay
$223,292 in damage caused by Hurricane
Katrina to the home.

The jury then awarded the couple $2.5 mil-
lion in punitive damages.

State Farm says it will appeal.

to advance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

CHAPTER one was writ-
ten in 1953 when three
Bahamians of vision, Mr H
M Taylor, William
Cartwright and Cyril Steven-
son got together and estab-
lished the country’s first
political organisation, the
Progressive Liberal Party,
unaware of the fact that soon
they would be pushed on the
wing of history, while others
took centre stage.

History is often referred to
as a biased recording of
events by a people towards
themselves and their people,
which deprive future genera-
tions of their true history.

Our story must be told for
us to advance as a people,
our people seem to have a
good understanding of what
is, but they have no knowl-
edge of what was. Those who
are fifty years old today were
under twelve when the new
chapter was written in Janu-
ary, 1967.

They must know who were
L O Pindling, Cecil Wallace
Whitfield, Milo Butler, Carl-
ton Francis, Randol Fawkes,
Cyril Stevenson, H M Tay-
lor, Clarence A Bain and A
R Braynen. We must let
them know also who is
Arthur D Hanna, Arthur
Foulkes, Clifford Darling,
Warren Levarity and Elwood
Donaldson.

P Anthony White was right
when he wrote that the
Bahamian nation needs to
stand up and cheer the life

- of Mr Cyril Stevenson, who

was part of that tiny circle of
heroes, who began the
process of bringing the mass-
es out of ignorant darkness,
and into the marvelous light
of political freedom.

Mr Stevenson wrote anoth-
er political chapter in 1967,
but South Androsians
declined his script.

In that election the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party won
eighteen seats, and the Unit-
ed Bahamian Party won eigh-
teen, the other two were won
by Randol Fawkes (Labour)
and A R Braynen (Indepen-
dent).

With the PLP and UBP
locked in a tie, Mr Fawkes
and Mr Braynen represent-
ed the balance of power;
expectation was high, that Mr
Fawkes would support the
PLP but what about Mr

ACRE ARS
e Nassau,

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Learn From Yesturday, Live For
Today, Hope For Tomorrow!

, and stepped out. .

Bag MeS



letters@tribunemedia. net

Braynen? No doubt there
was a lot of wheeling and
dealing on both sides, in the
end as we know now, both
men merged with the PLP
giving them the mandate to
form the Government, which
gave birth to majority rule.

Mr Braynen’s merger with
the Progressive Liberal Party
reminds those of us who have
a little knowledge of Ameri-
can history, how John Brown,
a man of Anglo Saxon her-
itage, went to the aid of
African American slaves, in
1859 at Harpers Ferry, for
which he paid the ultimate
price.

John Brown was charged
and convicted of treason and
insurrection for his attempt
to free slaves.

When he rose to address
the court in his defence he
had this to say:

I have, may it please the
court, a few words to say. In
the first place, I deny every-
thing but what I have already
admitted, of a design on my
part to free slaves. Now if it is
deemed necessary that I
should forfeit my life for the
furtherance of the end of jus-
tice, and mingle my blood
further with the blood of my
children, with the blood of
millions in this slave country,
whose rights are disregarded
by wicked, cruel, and unjust
enactment — I say let it be
done.

African American will for-
ever remember John Brown,
shouldn’t Bahamians of
African descent remember A
R Braynen.

PRINCE G SMITH
Nassau,
January 2007.

Since when |
has this been
an issue?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHILE on McDonald’s drive-through line in Palmdale,
around 7.45am today a police officer, driving a mobile patrol car
pulled.in the front of a party supplies store, parked his vehicle

Then: he proceeded to tell everyone (approximately 6-12
cars) on the drive-through line to move as it is a $100 fine to be

stationary in the road.

No one was in the middle of the road as cars were able to pass

by without hindrance.

When I called to find out his number, he was very haughty,

biggity and rude.

I asked him about the other fast-food restaurants. He says he
did a favour and everyone was supposed to get a ticket and as
far as he was concerned, any other officer who questioned it
“doesn’t know their job”. ;

My question is when since has this been an issue? I- thought
police officers are to use their discretion. I have been a patron
of McDonald’s and other fast-food restaurants for many years
and this is the first time an officer has had to do this. In fact, oth-
er police officers do the same thing as I did all the time (on or
off duty). Is this a double standard?

On another note, it may not have been much, but
McDonald’s, Palmdale lost a few breakfast patrons this morn-
ing.

NO NAME
Nassau,
January 4, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 5



MMi aa
Animal shelter boss becomes

In brief

PM quizzed
to table
answer on
NFS workers

THE Workers Party has
demanded that Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie table in the
House of Assembly a record
communication
between himself and the com-
missioner of police on the
Nassau Flight Services

of the

arrests.

The party asked in particu-
lar for the portion of the com-
munication in which Com-

missioner Paul Farquharson
advised Mr Christie that the

police did not circumvent ;
Bahamian law in terms of :

their involvement in the
arrest of the five baggage
handlers.

At a police luncheon earli-
er this week, Mr Christie said

the police had, “in writing”,
assured him that they had no
knowledge of the arrests
before they occurred.

In response to this, the
Workers Party said it feels

that the prime minister

should tell the public on what
grounds the commissioner
had to write a communica-
tion advising that he and his
force did not break the laws
of the Bahamas.

“Is the prime minister
investigating the commis-
sioner of police and his force

to determine to what extent if
any, they may have been

involved in infractions against
the laws of the Bahamas?”
the party leader asked.

Mr Moncur questioned
whether this matter should
now be referred to a Com-
mission of Inquiry in order

that the public may be :

assured that there is no lack
of confidence between the
office of prime minister and
the police. 5

The Workers Party, he said,

hopes that Prime Minister :
Christie will recognise the *:

‘< dangerous “curve ball” that
he has thrown at the Royal
‘ ‘Bahamas Police Force by cit-
ing portions of a correspon-

dence between himself and

- the commissioner.

eae
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PHONE: 322-2157



























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DOG lover Kevin Degen-
hard probably loves them just a
little less after being savaged in
a pack attack near his home.

The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety boss suffered deep bites to
his legs when four dogs being
walked off the leash by their
owner pounced.

With blood running down the
back of his leg, Mr Degenhard
was astounded that the irritated
owner, having pulled his dogs
off, didn’t even say sorry.

Now police are investigating
the incident, which happened
early yesterday morning near

Mr Degenhard’s Sandyport

home.

Mr Degenhard, executive
director of the humane society,
was walking his own dog when
the attack occurred.

Two people approached
walking four dogs off their
leashes which attacked his dog.

His leashed dog was kept
under control but it took some

see eececcecanceeeerenanaesscceceenecessacaeasossaseasaeeseneee seen

Union claims its

time before the man and
woman walking the other dogs
pulled their animals away.

About 15 minutes later, on
the return route of the early
morning walk, the encounter
was_ repeated, but this time
with a violent outcome.

The leashed dog obeyed the
command to sit to allow the
loose dogs to pass but all four

‘attacked again, totally unpro-

voked.

Then one of the dogs bit Mr
Degenhard’s right leg, causing
instant bleeding. Deep punc-
ture wounds were left in his calf
muscle.

Mr Degenhard told The Tri-
bune: “Despite having over 35
years experience working with
dogs professionally, it is fright-
ening enduring such an unpro-
voked attack, especially when
it was transparently obvious the
two owners had no control over
their animals at all.

“I was astounded that the

man had watched:the first
attack 15 minutes earlier and
was still allowing his dogs to
walk off a leash. He even had a
leash in his hand.
“When I asked him why it
was not on the dog, he told me
his dog walks too slowly on a
leash...so I guess that makes it
okay to abdicate personal
responsibility.”

Laws

Mr Degenhard said: “The

real irony here is that, as exec-
utive director of The Bahamas
Humane Society, and a mem-
ber of the ad hoc committee for
the promotion of responsible
animal ownership, we have tried
to improve the out-of-date,
inadequate animal care and
control laws since the early
1990s.

“After a year of hard, focused
work, the committee submit-

ted a draft Animal Care and
Control Act around November,
2005, and here we are in 2007
and it is still not on the statute
books as law.

“If the act had been passed
it would have been illegal to
have these dangerous dogs off
their leashes and this would not
have happened.”

Mr Degenhard added:
“When the owner saw the blood
flowing down the back of my
leg he just made one four-letter

expletive and dragged his dogs

away. I didn’t get as much as
an apology.”

The proposed act, which ani-
mal welfare workers want to see
as law without further delay,
emphasises responsible animal
ownership.

“The BHS supports this
approach. These owners are
clearly not acting responsibly.
If my dog had been smaller they
would probably have killed it
as their dogs were in a hysterical

role in Majority

Rule has been passed over

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE Public Service Drivers
Union is claiming that its con-
tribution to the establishment
of Majority Rule has been over-
looked.

The union’s president said
yesterday that his organisation
was instrumental in bringing

about the monumental social -

changes that took place 40 years
ago.

During a press conference
yesterday, Richard Johnson Sr
said he wanted to draw atten-
tion to the “painful truth” that
after the first black govern-
ment came to power in the
Bahamas, “some of the prima-
ry producers —- Bahamians who
did the hard work to bring
about Majority Rule — have yet
to be recognised and reward-
ed.”

This, he said, includes taxi
drivers.

For the past 10 years, Mr
Johnson said, the PSDU —-
which consists of the Bahamas
Taxi Union, the Grand Bahama
Taxi Union and public service
drivers — have been in negotia-
tions for a heads of agreement
on transportation with the gov-
ernment.

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They are seeking to gain
ownership of the taxi franchise,
the endorsement of a mini-
mum of $100,000 on each fran-
chise and to gain responsibility
for transportation services
from the docks, airports and
hotels.

“In 1958 we led this country
in a general strike and as a
result of that strike women got
to vote for the first time.” Mr
Johnson said taxi drivers also
helped to bring an end to the
“Jand vote” law — under which
only persons owning land were
allowed to vote.

“Also,” he continued, “legis-
lation was enacted to allow for
the formation of trade unions.
Taxi drivers were econGfiiically
independent back thei. In fact
we were thé only pébple who
did not have to depetid'on Bay
Street for income and that is
why we were able to lead the
country in a general strike,” he
explained.

“T would like the government,
specifically the prime minister,
whose father was a taxi driver
and was also a participant in the
general strike, to give us this
heads of agreement because we
believe that taxi drivers are
positioned to complete the rev-

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olution that was dubbed the
quiet revolution back in 1967 -
it’s fitting since we played a part
in Majority Rule.”

In the 1960s, Mr Johnson
said, taxi drivers worked for the
“sreater good” in an effort to
sensitise the Bahamian public
about their social situation.

With that accomplished, it is
now time for the union to be
rewarded, he said.

@ RICHARD Johnson
says that the contribution
of taxi drivers to the social
changes 40 year ago, and

: that the government
should recognise this with

y a heads of agreement



victim to dogs out of control

frenzy,” he said.

“If it had been a child walking
the dog, I hate to think what
the outcome would have been.”

Cable Beach police and
Sandyport security are investi-
gating the matter.

Meanwhile, Mr Degenhard
has received medical treatment
and his dog is licking his bruises.

BER Ea

FRIDAY,
‘JANUARY 12TH

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise

11:00 Immediate Response

Noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response
Cont'd

1:00 _ A Special Report

1:30 Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 International Fellowship -
of Christians & Jews

3:30 Ed Young

4:00 Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The’Fun Farm

6:00 Caribbean Passport

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 — Island Wide Crusade:

“Youth Explosion”

Caribbean Newsline ©

News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30 Community Page 1540 am

SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise




































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10:30



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10:30 Dennis The Menace
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11:30 Little Robots

noon Underdog

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007



LOCAL NEWS

ew judicial complex




to cost estimated $70m

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A STATE-OF-THE-ART
judicial complex that will con-
tain the Supreme Court, the
Court of Appeal and the Indus-
trial Tribunal is to be built at
an estimated cost of $70 mil-
lion, the attorney general said
on Wednesday.

The complex will be built on
land extending from the existing
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
building to the old site of St
John's College, Allyson May-
nard-Gibson said.

Addressing the judiciary at
the opening of the legal year,
she said that this complex, com-
bined with a forthcoming “sys-
tem of integrated justice” which
will see the police, the prison,
the Supreme Court, and the
office of the attorney general
linked by infranet, will increase
elliciency in the administration

of justice.
She said that the office of the

attorney general will be con-

nected with the other institu-
tions as soon as the necessary
“infrastructural improvements”
are completed at her office.

Currently, the police system is
connected to the system at the
prison, and the Supreme Court
system is “ready to be connect-
ed to the office of the attorney
general and the police,” she
said.

Mrs Maynard Gibson said
that her office is committed to
the use of technology for
improved efficiency, and
"aim(s) to provide the capacity
for persons with matters before
us to go online and track the
progress of their matters
through our chambers."

However. Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall, speaking after the
Attorney General, said that

‘although he “welcomed the

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advances” that she had spoken:

about, he “felt obliged to point
out” that “despite the commit-
ment by the executive in previ-
ous years to provide to the
office of the judiciary person-
nel a dedicated information
technology department, this has
not yet happened.”

Tracking

He said that for this reason,
the Bahamas Integrated Justice
Information System has not
been delivering on promises up
to this point “for the tracking
of cases and the consistent
record keeping essential to the
production of statistics that
make sense” — despite the
“enormous” sums of money that
have already been spent on it.

Sir Burton added that he had
expected to be in a position to
reveal which of the recommen-

dations made by Justice Stra-
chan in a December 2005 report
to government had been imple-
mented.

The report was on how best
the registry can be structured
to serve "today's Bahamas".

However, Sir Burton
revealed that currently, he could
only state that the recommen-
dations were “still being con-
sidered.”

Mrs Maynard Gibson said
that a consultant will be
employed to implement Justice
Strachan's recommendations
once the aforementioned infra-
structural integration is com-
pleted. ;

She said that once this sys-
tem is in order, and Justice Stra-
chan's recommendations for the
registry are in place, “ineffi-
ciencies that continue to plague
the administration of justice and
cause grave inconvenience to
litigants” will be mitigated.



Warning for motorcyclists



without there helmets





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road traffic department advising motorcyclists not to ride

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



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Chief Justice complains

THE TRIBUNE

about the state of
Eight Mile Rock court

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Nothing has been done to
improve ‘the situation at’ the
Eight Mile Rock magistrate’s
court in Grand Bahama since
it was "virtually destroyed" by a
hurricane in 2005.

Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall
said he was "distressed" to
make this report to the legal
community at the opening of
the 2007 legal year on Wednes-
day.

“Not only have no improve-
ments in that situation occurred
but the department of local gov-
ernment has given the magis-
trate notice to vacate the
premises,” said Sir Burton.

Earlier, Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson indi-
cated in her address that gov-
ernment's intention is to relo-
cate that court in the first quar-
ter of 2007.

Sir Burton said that while it is
"plain and obvious" to those
within the legal system, it
appears "not readily appreciat-
ed by the public generally or
the bureaucratic machinery on
which the legal system must rely
... that a court — at whatever
level — is not merely the presid-
ing judicial officer, whether
judge, registrar or magistrate.

“The judge must, have ade-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

quate physical facilities in which
to sit and from which to work
when not presiding and must
be supported by the necessary
staff,” he said.

Sir Burton said that ensur-
ing that this support is main-
tained is a major administra-
tive challenge, especially for
“the magistracy which, even in
New Providence, is not cen-
trally located and which is
spread further across the arch-
ipelago.”

According to Sir Burton, it
has been the problem of ensur-
ing these administrative
arrangements are in place and
functioning “that has stymied
any advance on the Community
Courts project that I trumpeted
two years ago.”

Sir Burton added that
because of the “uneven pace of
development” across the
Bahamas’ island chain, “the
problem of carrying the system
of justice to the Family Islands
is... the most intractable of
problems” that faces those

charged with administering the

legal system.

Earlier, the attorney general
stated that government intends
to expand the magistrates courts

' in Abaco and Exuma, in view of

the “existing and anticipated
expansion of population in
those areas.”













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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Writer claims that the
Bahamas is the most stable

predominantly black country

THE Bahamas is the most
stable of any predominantly
black country in the world, a
US scholar has declared.

But it is bucking a_ global
trend, for blacks elsewhere
are in terminal decline,
according to controversial
black author Clinton L Black.

In a staggeringly provoca-
tive assessment of the blacks’
status in the modern world,
Mr Black said: “The only way
we as a black people can pos-
sibly reverse the negativity we
generate is to totally and
unconditionally reinvent the
black man.”

Mr Black’s theories, which
are expected to cause a spirit-
ed debate among black Amer-
icans in particular, are laid out
in a new book called Why All
Black People Are Coming to
an End.

In the 289-page book, sub-
titled A Suigenocide in

Progress, Mr Black says

blacks are in clear danger of
extinction.

“If we as a black people
continue our ferociously self-
destructive behaviour, then
we all will suffer a more ill-
fated future.”

He wrote the book, he said,
“to help us finally escape from
our vicious cycles of self-
destruction.” He hoped it
would educate blacks into
becoming “more constructive
citizens in our global society.”

Yesterday, in an interview
with The Tribune, Mr Black
said he felt the Bahamas was
“unique” in that it had man-
aged to avoid most of the pit-
falls suffered by other black
societies. —

He said the Bahamas was
the most stable predominant-
ly black country in the world,
with the highest per capita
income (over $20,000), and a
record for avoiding “epi-
demics” of the problems
affecting most black societies,
including coups, sectarian
strife, AIDS, divorce, black
male incarceration and abor-
tions. :

He said the Bahamas com-
pared well with the US and
Caribbean nations like
Trinidad and Jamaica in this
respect, adding: “The
Bahamas is unique, and
frankly much better off, com-
pared to otaer predominantly
black countries.”

Accepting that attitudes of
US and Bahamian blacks dif-
fered considerably, he said:
“Black Bahamians started
their freedom from the white
man’s draconian bondage
beginning in 1834 via the
British Emancipation Act.

“Black Americans were not
freed until 1863 via the Eman-
cipation Declaration. Howev-
er, unlike most Bahamian
slave descendants, American
slave descendants’ transition



Mi MARTIN LUTHER KING JR
(AP FILE Photo)

from slavery was only wel-
comed by systematic lynching,
which was actually sanctioned
by the US government.”

He said American blacks
were also subjected to Jim
Crow laws, institutional
racism and discrimination and
the eventual assassination of
civil rights leader Martin
Luther King Jr.

Unlike Bahamians, he said,
American blacks were under-



represented in government,
business and higher education
and formed only 13 per cent
of the population.

But blacks in the US were
severely over-represented in
murder, abortion, poverty,
AIDS, incarceration and
divorce.

“Seventy per cent of black
children in America are born
out of wedlock and 40 per
cemt of black children in
America are right here and
right now suffering in abject
poverty in the most wealthy
and powerful country in the
world,” he said.

“In so many visible ways,
America is clearly the most
hypocritical country in the
world. This explains the
extreme level of anti-white
resentment and racial vio-
lence.”

In his book, Mr Black
points out that blacks are
numerically the strongest race
on earth, and were once the
most powerful and respected.
But now they are the least
respected, he adds.

He also lists ten disturbing
facts which, he claims, indi-
cate the scale of their decline.

Black people, he claims,
have the highest AIDS death
rate in the US and the world,
the highest crime rate, the
highest divorce rate, the short-
est life expectancy, the highest
poverty rate, the highest
school drop-out rate, the high-
est abortion rate, the highest
murder rate and are in the
worst shape of any other peo-

le.

“Realistically, all black peo-
ple are now in clear and pre-
sent danger of extinction,” he
said, “Something has got to
give.”

Mr Black’s book is available
on the Amazon and Barnes
and Noble websites.

e SEE Monday’s INSIGHT
for a fuller interview with
Clinton L Black, a biology
graduate who has written four
previous books.

Public Utilities Commission

Ao EDS

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Price Regulation of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
Provided by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

Branded as ViBe

The Public Utilities Commission (Commission) is pleased to invite
comments from the public and licensees on its consultation
document on Price Regulation of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
provided by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
(BTC) branded as ViBe.

The main objectives of this consultation are to:

a) inform the public and licensees that BTC’s VoIP service is func-
tionally and commercially substitutable for conventional
switched voice services and falls within the definition of Voice
Telephony and is price regulated as set out in BTC’s Licence;

b) indicate the Commission’s proposal for the price regulation of

ViBe; and

_¢) invite comments from the public and licensees.

Section 6(5) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, requires the
Commission to publish its proposals on any general instruction

intended to be issued under any part of the Act.

Copies of this document can be obtained from the PUC’s office
located Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded from the
PUC’s website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs. Written comments
should be submitted by February 2, 2007, via post, hand delivery,

facsimile or e-mail to:

Mr. Barrett Russell

i

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P. 0. Box N4860, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: (242)323-7288

Email: info@puchahamas.gov.bs



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« ANDRE}p,

3 SCHOOL rs

The Internatianal School of The Babamas
FOUNDED 1948

world school



St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian
candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2007. Full
information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications
for the position(s) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's
degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful school-based
experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual posts, are
that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or international school and
an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or advise
school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (/.e. middle and upper)
school teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered
at this time, although permanent residents with the right to work are invited to submit their
papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the recruiting
process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it will advertise internationally
in January.

ALL SCHOOL

Physical education: Years pre-school to 13 responsibilities. Candidates must have successful
experience in coaching years 7 to 13 in at least three of the following sports: baseball/softball;

_ basketball; soccer; track and field; volleyball. Swimming/WS| certification would be welcomed.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International
Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school should be
committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP. Applications are warmly
welcomed from teachers who are committed to an inquiry-based pedagogy but who have
not yet had the opportunity to teach in a PYP school.

Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.
Primary school music
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful teaching experience at all years from

pre-reception to six. They must also have successful exponetice in organizing primary
school music and drama performances.

SECONDARY SCHOOL

The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the
BGCSE in years 10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma
Programme (DP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades
11 and 12).

Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able to
work as a contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach
to pre-university level and be fens with the demands of the International Baccalaureate



Science (lof) ain
Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach biology to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either chemistry or physics at BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Chemistry: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or physics to BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Mathematics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Successful experience in teaching calculus to AP and/or IB level is preferred for this post.
Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT Il experience is also desirable.

Economics and accounts: Candidates must be familiar with current computer applications
theory and practice and should also be qualified to teach business studies and economics
to pre-university level. They should also be familiar with the demands of the International
Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful BGCSE or IGCSE experience is desirable.

‘ @
Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications,
experience working with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle
schools are required from applicants for these posts. Applicants may also be required to
teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.

At least two of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in

‘teaching English in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following -

PSE; IT & ICA; art; drama — possibly to BGCSE level.

Another successful applicant will have documented successful experience in teaching general
science in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer any combination of biology, chemistry and
physics at BGCSE level. If he/she could also teach mathematics that would be useful.

Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful
experience in teaching in both areas.

NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching
of the Theory of Knowledge course at IB diploma level. Another will be able to offer
the teaching of psychology at IB diploma level

Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mr Robert Wade, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications ‘MUST include the following:

letter of application

a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy

a full curriculum vitae,

either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, tex and email numbers of three
people who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name ~
and address of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers
may be obtained.

Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools
by email or fax only.

_ Frank Coyle, Head of the secondary school:

Email: FCoyle@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Allison Collie, Head of the primary school:

Email ACollie@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Robert F. Wade
Principal

St Andrew's School
P O Box EE 17340
Nassau
Email: -
Fax: (1 242) 364 1654

The closing date for applications is 31 January 2007. Applications from unqualified candidates,
applications arriving without the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this date will not be considered.



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Ingraham claims
govt’s Majority Rule
celebration was
politically motivated -

_ FROM page one

me.”

He said the government
billed the celebration “and
wrapped it up under the ban-
ner of the Christian Council and
they invited all and sundry to
what they said was a national
event.

“They went into the highways
and the byways and invited all
and sundry. They even had
some senior public officers
attend what they were naively
made to believe was a national
service. They had music and
tents and big lights — all the
trappings.”

According to Mr Ingraham,
their efforts proved fruitless, as
not many persons turned up.

“The truth is that our country
can’t afford to keep these
proven failures in control of the
government,” he said. “The his-
tory of their single term in office
is a litany of their inadequacy
and incompetence.”

He said the PLP came to





@ FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham

office making many promises.

“They promised to be honest
and truthful in office, to be
responsive to the people and to
conduct themselves in a man-
ner that would be worthy of the
people’s trust.”

Mr Ingraham said the PLP
have not been faithful to these
commitments.

The party leader was speak-
ing at an FNM rally in Long
Island last night.

“I’ve come to report that
things are going well, very well
indeed for your party, the FNM,
all over the Bahamas,” Mr
Ingraham told the crowd. “We

have completed our selection

of candidates; we are making
ready for whenever pleceons
are called.”

He urged all Long
Islanders not to forget to
register to vote. “We need your

. vote to vote them out,” he

said.

Noting the selection and rat-
ification of Larry Cartwright as
the FNM’s candidate for the
Long Island/Ragged Island con-
stituency, Mr Ingraham said the
party is happy to have him on
board.

“He has my full confidence,
that of the party, and I am
assured, the full confidence of
Long Island from Seymour’s in
the north to Gordon’s in the
south; and he has the confi-
dence of Ragged Island.”

FNM leader: govt could not care less about fishermen

FROM page one

"We knew we couldn’t police all 100,000
square miles of our territorial waters at the same
time. We also knew that Nassau Grouper didn’t
school in south Long Island and in Bimini and in
many other places at the same time," he said.

He said that if the FNM comes to power, they
will "ensure that an appropriate balance is struck
between the need for our southern fishermen to
earn a living; the need to protect and conserve our
marine resources for all Bahamians and the
enforcement of restrictive orders for specific geo-

Is

graphical areas during certain times of the year."
"Look at what this new Government has done.

Put Bahamian grouper fishermen out of business
all over the country while Dominicans and others
have a field day in the southern Bahamas catch-
ing grouper without hindrance or fear of appre-
hension," he said.

"Then we import grouper from Santo Domin-
go to sell to our restaurants and hotels during
the closed fishing season," he added.

If voted in, the FNM will "take full account of
the views of the people who know about fishing - -
the fishermen!" he told his audience. _

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 9





tbat
Mi

The PLP politics




with the honours system

HE recent Queen’s

Honours list has high-
lighted the PLP’s zeal to can-
onize party stalwarts in a most
brazen way. Over the past year,
the PLP has idolised their
heroes unabatedly, putting their
names on public buildings in a
push to exploit their contribu-
tions in the run-up to the 2007
general elections.

After having a glance at the
New Year’s Honours list, it
seems that the Bahamas may
have more heroes than the car-

., toon network, and, in my opin-
_ ion, there are others who may

ore

be more deserving.

This year, opponents of the
British honours system were
given more ammunition when
Lady Marguerite Pindling, Gar-
rett “Tiger” Finlayson and Bal-

. tron Bethel all turned up on the

honours lists for knighthoods,
and what’s more, none of the
three seemed to be as deserving
of ennoblement as others who
have been persistently ignored.

The PLP needs to decide
what it stands for, as they were

_ previously seen as the party that

rejected the Queen’s honours,
particularly as party figure-

_ heads, such as AD Hanna and
: Paul Adderley both rejected

knighthoods. Now, the party
that portrayed the image of
nationalism and a disbelief in
the British honours system, has
apparently used these honours
to a political end. It is really
duplicitous that the PLP would
now use British honours as an

~ election ploy!

Se

he past five years under

the PLP administration
has been bland and rather emp-
ty of achievements. Just looking
at the list of those honoured
would reveal the “new” PLP’s
election scheme of relying on
the rather tarnished legacy of
the former administration in
their bid to catch grassroots
votes and desperately clinging
onto power.

Any reasonable person who
reviews the “new” PLP’s track
record over the last five years
would note that they have zilch
to run on. It has become abun-
dantly clear that the PLP is
doing all it can to get people on
their side by capitalising on the
achievements of another admin-
istration, whether that means
bestowing upon Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s widow a Damehood,
renaming the NIB complex
after Sir Clifford Darling, nam-
ing the airport after Sir Lynden,
etc.

Yes, I would concede that
Lady Pindling stood by Sir Lyn-
den in the fight for majority rule
and nationhood, however, it
would be fair to question what
she, Baltron Bethel and Gar-
rett “Tiger” Finlayson individ-
ually contributed to the devel-
opment of the Bahamas as a
whole.

Recently, Sir Randol Fawkes’
family publicly expressed their

displeasure because they felt he



YOU

ADR



SS

AN

NG MAN’S

VIEW

She

BSON



oa



had not been duly recognised
for the role he played in the
movement towards Majority
Rule. Indeed, Sir Randol was a

nationalist and a hero, and his ,

contributions to the Bahamas

Day renamed in his honour, as
he is possibly more worthy of
honour than many on the New
Year’s list.

People are raising their eye-
brows over the elevation of



Now, the party that portrayed the image
of nationalism and a disbelief in the
British honours system, has apparently
used these honours to a political end.



during those times far outweigh
that of any of those recently
honoured. In recognition of his
contributions to the country’s
labour movement, Sir Randol
is deserving of having Labour

Marguerite Pindling to Dame-
hood, and many are asking why
she should be there. Lady Pin-
dling had already been hon-
oured through her husband’s
recognition, earning the title of

‘lady’ by virtue of her husband’s
knighthood. Since there is a lim-
ited number of knighthoods and
damehoods that can be given,
the honour of ‘dame’ could
have been bestowed on some-
one else, for example, Dr. Keva
Bethel. ,

It is odd to see that Garrett
Finlayson, the booze baron of
the Bahamas, was also knight-
ed. Among other things, Mr
Finlayson has, in my opinion,
made a sterling contribution to
the country’s alcoholism rate!

Many intelligent Bahamians
are also curious as to why Bal-
tron Bethel was knighted. Mr
Bethel was not exactly found to
be a saint at a recent Commis-
sion of Inquiry.

As Bahamians have not been
knighted in a few years prior to
the recent honours, it 1s obvi-
ous that the PLP was just play-
ing to the gallery—honouring
the super friends of the party!

These days, the bar for hon-
ours is not as high as it used to
be.

ajbahama@hotmail.com

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Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 * CELL: 357-3617 |

RANNIE PINDER President _
a Se a Cae

NORA
KNOWLES, 91

of St. Vincent Road and
formerly of Delectable Bay,
Acklins will be held on
Saturday 11:00am at
Amazing Grace Missionary
Baptist Church, Wilson
Tract. Officiating will be
Pastor Elva Johnson.
Interment will follow in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail
Road.

She is survived by son, Victor Knowles Jr.; daughter,
Hortense Rosario; eight grandchildren, Victonio,
Vincent, Victor Jr., Adrian, Victoria and Victorian
Knowles, Natasha and Sharlene Rosario; one brother,
Atwell Williams of Boston; one daughter-in-law,
Nancy Knowles; sister-in-law, Arimetha Williams;
eight nieces, Elthamese Joseph, Theresa Ferguson,
Luma Rolle, Margeratte Butler, Rose Pernard of
Boston, Minister Beverly Clark, Lily Knowles and
Terry Dorsette; twelve nephews, Eckright, Mike,
Jameslee and Felix Ferguson, Ralph, Andrew, Atwell
Jr., Thomas, Jack and Ogelus Joseph, Michael and
Edbert; grandnieces and nephews, Sandra and Glen
Poitier, Lanez and Livingston Burt of Orlando Fla.,
Kenneth and Sherelle Joseph, Denice Hanna, Shada,
Dorcas, Levetha Bulter, Phillipa, Peter, Joshua, Denzo,
Petrica, Nickolette, Synovia and Barron, Geraldo,
Evelyn and Lonara Williams, other relatives and
friends including, Bishop Carroll E. Rolle, Ruthlyn,
Althea Rolle and family, Mable Hanna and family,
Iva Dames, Merlene Williams of Miami Fla., Ivy
Pearson and family, Carrie and family, Stevens family,
Pastor Elva Johnson and Amazing Grace Missionary
Baptist Church family and a host of other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention but to important
to forget.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Pinder's
Funeral Home, Friday from 1:00pm to 6:00pm and
at the church from 10:00am until service time.







PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



KEITH BARON PINDER, 61



of Treasure Cove,
Nassau, The
Bahamas will be
held at Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic
Church, Shirley
Street, Nassau, on
Tuesday, 16th
January, 2007 at.
1:00p.m. Father Mel
Taylor will officiate
and interment will be
in. ‘Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery,
East Shirley Street,













Nassau.



Mr. Pinder is survived by his wife, Lorraine
Moyra Pinder; his mother, Emily Pinder; sons,
Craig and Brett Pinder; a daughter, Tracy
Bonczek; granddaughters, Hannah and Hailey
Bonczek; brother, Godfrey Pinder; sister, Janet
Pinder; aunt, Agnes Knowles; son-in-law,
Zachary Bonczek and many other relatives and
friends including, Joey, Jude and Doreen, Billy
| and Edna Kemp, Agnes and Kenny Roberts,
_ Gwen, Terry and Ruth, Billy and Lulabelle,
Kermit and Janet Cates, Nita and George Baker,
Harry, Laurette and Eleanor Albury, Ethelyn
and Hansford Darville, Elliott and Cynthia Sands,
Michael and Janice Knowles, Jackie Kemp,
Tommy and Candy Kemp, Karen and Glen
Pritchard, Martha Pinder, Jenny Viviano,
Michael and Cherie Pinder, Tyrone and Barbara
Albury, Joe and Barbara Bonczek, Robert Sands,
Mark and Aleece Campbell, Ian and Tanya
Bayles, Randy and Stephanie Sands, Reg
Bonimy, Jimmy and Camaille Roberts and
Chuck Cartwright.

























Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited,

YOUR

PUBLIC NOTICE
[>LOSURE NOTICE

-ONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

LOCAL NEWS

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale,
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ° Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
EDDLENE SMITH 74




aresident of 151 Water Street, Big Pond
and formerly of Church Grove Crooked
Island, will be held at St. Barnabs
Anglican Church, Baillou Hill and Wulff
Road on Saturday: January 13th, 2007
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Basil
Canon Tynes assisted by Fr. William
Thompson. Interemnt follows in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens J.F.K. and
Gladstone Road.


















Left to mourn her, three sons, David Smith Jr., His Excellency
Keod Smith, M.P., Kean Smith; one daughter, Nurse Orelia
Morally-Jacques; 19 grand children, Romaine and Alvian Dayis,
Hugh, Faron and Tashann Morally, Jamira and James Jr. Deus-
Day, Oswald, Gareth, Dion, Kemmie, Awu, Beris, Claudette, Ellie,
Makeda and Zadok Smith and Kevin Farrington; two great grand
children, Logan and Ian Davis; one. brother, Kenneth Bonaby of
New York; two sisters, Violet Bonaby and Muriel Moss of Miami,
Florida; one son-in-law, Prosperson Jacques; one daughter-in-law,
Monique Smith; one aunt, Josephine Bonaby; sixteen nephews,
Dr. Doswell Coakley of Grand Bahama, Andrew Bonaby, Ledley
Jr., and Anthony Moss of Miami Florida, Bruce, Barry, Brian and
Braxton Smith of Freeport Grand Bahama, Hudden Simmons of
New York, Charles, Dennis and David of West Palm Beach,
Florida USA, Neville Simmons, Oswald and Wellington Dean;
nieces, Faith Johnson, Veronica Bonaby, Vanessa Moss, Sanica
Moss-Chatfleld, Janice Moss, Beorah and Bloneva Smith, Anita
Miller and Veronica Dean; brother-in-laws, Ledley Moss of Miami,
Florida and Thomas and,Smith of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Kenneth
Bonaby of New York, and the Venerable Archdeacon Dr. Murillo
Bonaby (Deceased); sisters-in-law, Sylvia Hall and Aleda Dean
and Norma Smith; cousins, George Jones and family, Jane Beneby
and family, Winston Bonaby and family, Admiral Ferguson and
_ family, Mabon, Fred and Tony Bonaby and family, Gloria Coakley
and family, Mabel Wilson and family, Willard and Elvie
Cunningham and family, Natalie Barns and family, Robert and
Barbara Gibson and family, Brian and Georgiemae Miller and
family, Thelma Walkes and family, Agnes Allen and family,
Carmen Cox and family, Doreen Ferguson and family, Olive
Deleveaux and family, Olga Sands and family, Leroy and Shirley
Ferguson of Cabbage Hill, Crooked Island, Rodney and Cecil
Farquharson and family, Ron and Edward Cunningham and family,
Gweneth Gibson and family, Doris Moss and family, Viola
Cunningham and family, Luellyn Farquharson and family, Nellie
Bain and family, Horatio, Elaun and Obie Ferguson and family,
Mabon Johnson and family, Moss family Reunion (Baracoa Race),
a host of relatives and friends including, Bishop Gilbert Thompson
and family, Oslie Bullard and family, Lucy and Dennis Penn and
family, Arthur and Walter Penn of Inagua and family, Valencia







































Swaby and family, Miriam Brown and family, Jane Ramsey and
Family, Loreen and Elaine Bastian and Family, The Crooked
Island Benovelent Association, St. Barnabas ACW, Mt. Moriah
Branch of the Progressive Liberal Party.





Friend may pay their last respects at the Rock Of Ages Funeral
Chapel Wulff Road and Pinedale in the Petra Suite on Friday from
10 am to 6 pm and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 am until
funeral time.







Lynes and family, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Rolle and family, Miss —

FROM page one

said, the police officers drew
their service weapons and
opened fire. This was in the
area of Culberts Hill.

The chase was renewed. “The
vehicle slowed down again in
the area of the Eastern Road
and Fox Hill Road,” Mr Evans
reported. The passenger in the
back seat once again pointed a
black object in the direction of
the police, provoking more gun-
fire from the police.

“The officers withdrew their
service weapons and discharged,
as a result there was a further
chase,” Mr Evans reported.

It wasn’t until the men neared
Johnson Road that police
caught up with their car.

Again the back seat passen-

ger leaned out of the window .

and pointed an object at the
police. “It was discovered that
the rear seat passenger had gun
shot wounds to the back. He
was taken to the hospital where
he was treated and discharged.”

An Eastern Road resident,
who passed shortly after police
had the young men in custody,
said the incident took place just
opposite the Hermitage on the
Eastern Road.

“There were seven police
cars,” he said, “and I would esti-
mated more than a dozen
armed police officers. There
was a man sitting behind his car
in the middle of the road and
another lying in the road. The
police had trained their guns on



Man shot

THE TRIBUNE













the sitting man. The shooting
must have taken place just
before I passed, because,
although I saw the man lying in
the road, I didn’t realise there
had been gun fire and that a
man had been shot.”

Another woman called The
Tribune to say that she lived
nearby, but could get no nearer
than Johnson Road to find out
what had happened. She said
the police had the area cor-
doned off as a crime scene. Sev-
eral ambulances had arrived
and two had left, she said.

According to Mr Evans the
three occupants of the vehicle,
all in their late twenties, are
now in police custody.

While searching the vehicle
the police found a stocking
mask. The matter is under
police investigation.

Election
FROM page one

Ingraham to make his move and
the PLP believes that Mr Ingra-

ham is waiting for Mr Christie | |

to make his announcement.
However, with the FNM’s ral-
ly in Long Island yesterday it is
expected that as the days creep
toward April, the parties will
be increasing their activities.

Lawyer speaks on Bahamas

FROM page one

our neighbours to the north. We become failed states when gov-
ernments cease to govern and oppositions cease to be loyal.”
’ “When I say failed state J.am thinking in terms of not a state
where you can’t find for the next 10 or 20 years flour on the shelves
of the food stores, but simply where there is no government which
can represent you on the international plane. No government
which is prepared to ensure your protection as a matter of domes-
tic law, when you have a government which is not sensitive to the
obligations its parliament created,” Mr Glinton said.

In addition to this, the lawyer said, a “very strange” situation has
developed in the country where politicians have been accusing
the Bahamian public of being too critical or attacking them per-

sonally.

“How could that ever be? You are only a politician or a minister
because you were afforded the opportunity of representing this very
same people. When you have the government continually having to
defend itself against its own people. Even as it appears that they are
seeking to explain the excessiveness of another government over
reaching into this jurisdiction and overcoming the laws of this

country,” Mr Glinton said.

‘Come to the

Church of God of Prophec

. | Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing

‘| Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and
Soul Restoring

eae
Par oe



Evangelistic Crusade

Sunday, January 14th to Friday, January 19th, 2007
At 7:30p.m. Nightly at .
The East Street Tabernacle
East Street and Sunlight Village
Under the Theme:
‘IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited (BTC) wishes to inform
our valued customers and the general public
that our office located in Town Center Mall
will be closed to the public on Thursday
January 1 1th and Friday January jath 2007.

Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudolph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.O.G)

1! Customers needing assistance may visit
BTC’s offices at either JFK or the Mall at
Marathon.

; | f Go raise
The office is scheduled to reopen to the e Nee 3 +
‘| public on Monday January 15th, 2007.
BTC wishes to thank the public for their

consideration during this time.

othy Johnson, J arenda R:
~ Seott Wilson :
Come and be blessed, inspired, challenged and
changed!



Se ne

A e



THE TRIBUNE

_ FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 11



Planning begins -

to improve
Potter’s Cay dock

THE Port Department has’

begun developing a plan for
improved access to and regula-
tion of the Potter’s Cay dock
and its surrounding area.

Port Controller Captain
Anthony Allens said the plan
will take into consideration
improved lighting, security and
traffic flows for the area, which
serves as the hub of the inter-
island mail service and sea
travel throughout — the
Bahamas.

“What we are trying to do is
to make the Pottet’s Cay dock
and its surrounding area more
user friendly, but safe for those
persons who use its transship-
ment facilities and for those per-
sons who use it for social and
other commercial purposes,”
Captain Allens said.

“That has been our challenge
recently, particularly now that
we have increases in the num-
ber of containers and cargo ves-
sels wanting to use the facility as
a transshipment point to the
Family Islands.

“It’s good to know that ship-
ping into the Family Islands has
become more modernised with
regards to the use of container-
ised services, but that takes up

i ACCESS to the Potter’s Cay dock will be improved

that improvements be made to
Potter’s Cay in terms of securi-
ty, accessibility and aesthetics.

He said the fact that numer-
ous Bahamians visit the fish-fry
stalls puts port officials in a posi-
tion where security must be bal-
anced with the need for free
access,

“Let me say that this is not
intended to deny those persons
who visit the fish fry and those
who purchase their seafood
from the stalls in the area access



tinue to put in, a number of
security and safety measures in
place to ensure that we have no
incidences.

Captain Allens said that while
he does not forsee the mail boat
services being removed from

i

in line for upgrades

the Potter’s Cay, the “con-
tainerisation aspect ’’of the
operation will eventually be
moved.

“T foresee the fish fry atmos-
phere remaining, albeit in an
improved manner, because I
think that side of it is something
that both the locals and tourists
look forward to,” Captain
Allens added, “but I think we
will have to concentrate on
improving the flow of traffic in
and around the Potter’s Cay
area and improving the general
aesthetics.






Ht

@ CONSIDERED the hub of inter-island commerce and transportation, the Potter’s Cay Dock is

(Photos: BIS/Patrick Hanna)



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

















to continue to do both,” Cap-
tain Allens said, “but because of
the increase in traffic, both
pedestrian and vehicular, we
have had to put in, and will con-

quite a bit of space and so
accommodations have to be
made for that,” he added.
Captain Allens said growth
in the Family Islands demands

x - eh og

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary
| Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761






s

ha














RY

Captain Ted Alexander Johnson
aka “Tron” aged 59

























































of Sea Breeze Lane and
formerly of Black Point,
Exuma will be held on Sunday
at 3pm at Mt Calvary Baptist
Cathedral, Blue Hill Road and
Laird Street. Officiating will
be Rev. Dr. Phillip McPhee
assisted by other Ministers.
Interment in The Fox Hill
Cemetery, Fox Hill Road.

He is survived by his
Stepfather: Walter Robinson;
3 Sons: Keith, Kirk and Steve;
3 Daughter: Kurrice Smith, Renay and Elouise Johnson;
Confident and Friend: Ethel Moss; 3 Stepchildren:
Kayleaser Moss, Karen Moss and Timothy and Karen
Neymour; 3 Brothers: Bertram Brown, Cylde Rolle and
Lundy Robinson; 2 Sisters: Althea Adderley and Ruthmae
Smith; 14 grandchildren; Jazriea Shanna, Ricky, Willisha,
Devonya, Ricardo, Richante, Troy, Shanae, Joshua,
Kalen, Abagial and Lathera; neices, Lilliamae, Maxine,
Violet, Jackie, Jazmon, Suzette, Siviann, Karen Bridgette,
Maria, Lynette, Theresa, Ernestine, Raquel Danielle,
Raquel Sunae, Tanya and Lathera; nephews: Larry,
Franklyn, Alvin Gregory, Tyrone, Warren Kino, Marvin,
fan, Claron, Aaron, Theoda, Lynden, Gerad, Theron,
Obre and Jamal; son-in-law: Wilton Smith; daughter-
in-law: Sylvia Johnson: 2 brothers-in-law: Horatio Smith
and Lawerence Adderely; 3 sister-in-law: Vernice Brown,
Shanricka Rolle and Sharon Robinson; godchildren:
Leothea Kemp, Presscilla McIntosh; host of other
relatives and friends including the entire body of the
Sailing Association and the Commonwealth Sailing
association especially The Tida Wave; Eunice Wright
Mille Robinson, Christine, Dorothy, Cynthia Netter;
Pearline, Margaret, Mr. and Mrs. Sudlin Black, Effort,
‘Genease,, Ralph, Roosevet, Cislyn, Esther, Ann Florence,
Heastine, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Bethel, Lorina Rahming,
William Pratt, Lyle Rolle, Frank, Sam, H.1. Rolle, Joseph
| Swendal, George Brown, Jude Dudley Rudolph, Carlan
- Cartwright, Joel, Vincent, Burke, Freddie and Tony Gray,
Rubin Captain Ed, Ken Butler, Warren Davis, Dorsey
Rolle, Rev. Joseph Saunders, Sharon Rolle, Roberta,
Pervical Cox, Cookie and Alex, Alice, Connie, Larice,
Maude, Cathy Laura, Valarie, Carla, Maranda, Max,
Valie Sandra, Joan, Marsha, Grace, Millie Taylor, Dakota
Jewel, Michelle Heneritta, Linda, The Musgrove Family,
| The Strachan family, The Roberts Family, The Duncombe
Family, The Harbour Island Community Sea Breeze
Community, St. Luke Baptist Church Family,
Gethsemaine Baptist Church Family, Bahamas Holy
Bible Ministries Family, Hillside Restoration Centre
and the Community of Black Point Staniel Cat and
Farmer's Cay Exuma.

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The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Saturday from
10:00am until 5:00pm Sunday from 10:00am until
1:00pm and at the church from 2:00pm service time.



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 THE TRIBUNE













More images aa
of the
ceremony to
open the
legal year,
which was
held on
Wednesday





















Bomeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
e MARKET STREET
¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782







PaaS a
Ezekiel "Anthony" Greene, Jr., 37

a.resident of Isabella
Blvd, Marathon Estates
and formerly of Father
Calan Road, will be held
at Solid Rock Church of
God, Soldier Road, on
Saturday January 13th,
2007: at 1:00 p.m.
Officiating will be
Bishop Samuel
Mortimer, assisted by
Rev. Abraham Mackey.
Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

On Janwary 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
wil move to sew offices on East Bay
Stree! (the former IBM Building).



Left to cherish his memory are his mother, Dorcas
Greene; father, Ezekiel Greene; wife, Linda
Thompson-Greene; brothers, Wayne Greene; James
Greene and Fourson Greene; sister, Kareem Greene;
3 stepsons, Lavar, Lamount and Jermaine Adderley;
3 sisters-in-law, Sharon, Monique and Stephanie
Greene; 9 aunts, Joan Colebrooke, Dorothy Jones,

‘Miriam Greene, Glendena Greene, Mildred Rahming,
Annie Colebrooke, Bloneva Flowers, Lealyn Ferguson
and Laura Greene; 5 uncles, Luther Jones, Jerome
Colebrooke, Rev. Euthal Greene, Felton Greene and
Othnell Colebrooke; 1 grand aunt Catherine Romer;
nieces, Kendisha Taylor and Victoria Greene; nephew,
Kimeko Greene; cousins including, Pauline Jones,
Mario Jones, Bradley Thurston, Jevon Colebrooke,
Jauanita Colebrooke-Rolle, Shawn Thurston, Johnesha
Rolle, Eleazor John Rolle, Ramon Thurston, Rudella
Thurston, Regina, Rudina, Romeko and, Racquel
Thurston, Hubert and Christine Ferguson, Hubert Jr.,
Candice, Chakelle and Dwayne Ferguson and a host
of other relatives and friends including, Benjamin
Fife, Lou Fife, June Fife, Yvette McCartney, Edris,
Sherry and Theresa Bethel, Lorenzo, Michael and
Ramone.



| Wisi or call your Agent
at our convenient new location,
| telephone number 3276-1040.

remium payment functions will be
transferred from Collins Avenue to our ets!
Harbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

Â¥
4

>

+.

oo

%

>
aa os 2,9

i FAMILY ,
GUARDIAN ‘:‘ a 1

FINSURANCE:.
COMPANY *

TRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

= %

Friends may pay their last repsects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00
p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.-11:00
a.m. and at the church from 12:00 p.m. until service
time.


















~ SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

BUSINE

acl hr ee ne ee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

‘The Tribune _











Bahamas ‘caught with pants down’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Bahamas has

been “caught with

our pants down”

as a result of its

collective failure
to develop a strategy for dealing
with international trade agree-
ments and working out where
this nation fits into the global
economy, the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce’s presi-
dent said yesterday.

Chris Lowe told The Tribune
that with negotiations between
the Caribbean and the Euro-
pean Union (EV) over the Eco-
nomic Partnership (EPA) hav-
ing reached a critical point, the

Bahamas had yet to communi-
‘cate to the CARICOM repre-
sentatives negotiating on its

Chamber chief warns nation bereft of strategy for EU, US trade talks
that have major implications for Bahamian exporters, tax system

behalf what it wanted from the
agreement.

The EPA is supposed to be
concluded before year-end
2007, and Mr Lowe said: “We
should have had a long-term
vision of this over the last 20
years, and unfortunately we’ve
been caught, as a country, with
our pants down.

“I’m not blaming any partic-
ular government or minister of
foreign affairs or trade minis-
ter, but the bottom line is that
no significant work has been

done to educate our people on
what’s happening globally, and
whether we’re either going to
fit in or be blocked out of [these
trade agreements].

“As-a result, we are now at
the short end of the trading
stick. We’re between a rock and
a hard place, and technically
don’t have a position yet.”

The private sector collective-
ly, Mr Lowe added, also had to
shoulder its share of the blame
for not keeping up to date with
international developments and

pending trade agreements.

Between them, successive
governments and the private
sector had “failed to come up
with a long-term vision for our
global standing”.

The outcome of the EPA
talks is critical for the Bahami-
an economy and its major
exporters, as failure to secure
duty free access to the EU mar-
kets could result in the loss of
millions in revenue for these
companies.

Through their exports to





@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

' Tribune Business Reporter

- IF the Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) talks between the European Union
(EU) and the Caribbean do not secure duty-free
access to Europe for Bahamian fisheries prod-
ucts, they will increase the cost of this nation’s
exported fish products by about $6 million and
erode their competitiveness, The Tribune was
‘told yesterday.

-. The EPA is being negotiated through Cari-
forum, a body representing the Bahamas, oth-
er CARICOM members and the Dominican
Republic, and is designed to replace the Coto-
nou Agreement - a trade programme of pref-
- erences that allows certain Caribbean-based
exporters to export their goods into the EU
market duty-free.

Although Cotonou is supposed to last until
2020, in reality the agreement will expire at the
end of 2007. This is because the agreement is
regarded as ‘discriminatory’ under World Trade
Organisation (WTO) rules, as it offers
Caribbean nations preferences and benefits not
available to others.

Anthony McKinney, chairman of the Fish-
eries Advisory Board, said yesterday that if
duty-free access to the EU markets could not be
secured for Bahamian fisheries products, it
would have a detrimental impact on the indus-
try and many fishermen.

“It would put the cost of our product up by $6
million, so we would certainly lose our com-
petitive edge,” Mr McKinney said. “Basically,
what it is, is that our product is going into that







Loss of EU benefits to raise fish costs by $6m

Failure to secure tariff-free access would erode
Bahamas fisheries competitiveness in Europe

market and the importers do not have to pay
taxes on it.

“But if we lose that agreement, we probably

will fall within that 12 per cent tax bracket, and
the importers would have to pay to bring in our
product, so the cost of the product would go
up.”
Mr McKinney said this was because import
taxes levied by EU countries would make it far
less attractive to buy from the Bahamian mar-
ket.

“There is no question that this is something
that we need to stay a part of,” he added.
“There is no question other than that it takes
away our competitive edge, and that would
affect every fisherman in the Bahamas. You
are talking about a sector that really we survive
on.

“Over the past 10 years, we are probably
one of the biggest exporters into the European
market on the spiny lobster tail, primarily
because we have that competitive edge and
also because we can enjoy better prices.”

Mr Mckinney said he was optimistic from
the meetings the industry has had with the Gov-
ernment that it will do its best to facilitate con-
tinued duty free exemptions. However he said
they are still awaiting a final decision.

In addition to the fishing industry, Bacardi -

which The Tribune understands exports about
98 per cent of its product to the European mar-
ket, will also be impacted by the outcome of the
EPA talks.

But Mr Mckinney said the EPA outcome
could have an even greater impact than the
loss of revenue for both the Government and
exporters.

“You have to take into consideration the
future because, let’s say we don’t sign on,” he

--explained. “That means that we would not be

able to market ourselves as a place where you
can enjoy duty free tariffs with Europe. That
could also attract investors.

“So you just can’t look at only the sea food
industry, only Bacardi. These agreements, once
you come off, it’s not as simple as getting right
back on. We need to think in terms of future
business in the sector.

“With globalisation, the whole world is even-
tually going to become one, so you have to
accept that you will have to be partners with
these countries and their agreements.”

Mr McKinney said that eventually, the
Bahamas would have to sign on to these types
of trade agreements.

“We are a small nation; we only have sun,
sand and sea, so if we knock out the little things
we are doing now, forget it,” he said.

is all play? |

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INSURANCE
COMPANY

GUARDIAN
|

“ORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

Europe, they are also major
earners of foreign exchange for
the Bahamas, so if this source
dried up there would be some
effect on the external reserves
and monetary side of the econ-
omy.

A Leonard Archer, ambas-
sador to CARICOM at the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
said more than $20 million in
revenue received annually by
the Government could also be
impacted by the EPA, depend-
ing on the outcome.

Container Port set for

The Government earns about
$13 million or $5 per gallon in
export taxes annually from
Bacardi through its exports of
rum to Europe, and a further
$600,000 from fisheries
exports.

But it is not just export taxes
that could be impacted. The
EPA is being negotiated to
replace the Cotonou Agree-
ment, the document currently

SEE page 7B



$250m expansion

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Freeport
Container Port is likely to soon
undergo a $250 million expansion,
which is expected to create 300
extra jobs, Prime Minister Perry
Christie announced yesterday.

Mr Christie made the announce-
ment at the official commission-
ing of the Container Port’s $3 mil-
lion mobile cargo scanner, which
joins more than 40 ports world-
wide that are operating under the
US: Container Security Initiative
(CSI) programme.

The Freeport Container Port,
which is operated by Hutchison
Port Holdings, is one of the largest
transshipment terminals in the
Western Hemisphere.

Mr Christie said Freeport Con-
tainer Port employs 782 Bahami-
ans, and pays out some $25 mil-
lion annually in salaries, which
range from $20,000- $70,000 to line
staff.

“T was also told that that the
year 2006 represented a record
year for the number of containers
passing through this port facility.
So much so that the 1.5 million

Move to create
300 jobs



@ PM PERRY CHRISTIE

containers which passed through
amounted to more than what
passed through the Port of Mia-
mi,” Mr Christie said.

SEE page 6B

Bahamas credit cards and
accounts used in fraud plot

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A US stockbroker has pleaded
guilty to using Bahamian bank
accounts and credit cards to receive
and conceal kickbacks receives from a
$16.8 million stork market manipu-
lation and fraud scheme.

Robert Montani pleaded guilty in
the US District Court for New Jer-
sey to moving “illegal gains” from the
scheme to the Bahamas, then provid-
ing false documents to the US Inter-










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paying taxes on the commission
income accumulated in the Bahamas.

The indictment against Montani
detailed how his superior at Pennsyl-
vania brokerage house Bryn Mawr
Investment Group, also known as
Valley Forge Securities, one Tonino
Labella, introduced credit cards
administered by Bahamas-based
Axxess International into the scheme

SEE page 6B

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BUSIN

ssauaatoseganneanngaat teem OAANEN EARNER NNN RAT AANA

THE MARKETS
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS 5-6B

12,514.98 +72.82 4X

DOW 30
S&P 500 1,423.82 +8.97 4h
NASDAQ 2,484.85 +25.52 Ad

10-YR NOTE 474 +05 &
CRUDE OIL 51.88

2M Vv
Stocks
advance

declines

‘BYTIMPARADIS ts
Associated Press SS

NEW YORK — Investors _

regained some of their swagger
Thursday, sending stocks
. higher and the Dow Jones

industrials to another record _
close after oil prices plunged _
and a drop in jobless claims _

indicated the economy wasn’t
Slowing too quickly, =
Thursday’s trading stood in —

sharp contrast to recent ses- _

sions in which investors made
small bets as they wrestled with
whether stocks would eventu-
ally push higher with the same
vigor as in 2006. Economic data,
such as Thursday’s unemploy-
ment figures, and oil prices,
which have fallen for four
straight days, have drawn the

-- market’s attention as investors
try to piece together where
Wall Street is headed.

Strength in employment
indicates the economy is hold-=:
ing up well as it slows. A:‘num- _
ber of strong profit forecasts
lent support to that notion
Thursday. However, investors
want the economy to give off
some signs of gradual slow-
down in order to wring a cut in
interest rates from the Federal
Reserve.

“The markets had a very
strong run in the fourth quarter

- and we have spent the first
week and a half consolidating
those gains,” said Steven Gold-
man, chief market strategist at
Weeden & Co. He contends
stocks remain “in a pretty good
period,” as with 2006. :

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 72.82, or 0.59 per-
cent, to 12,514.98, topping the
previous record close, which
came Dec. 27, by 4.41 points. It
marked the Dow’s 23rd record
close since the beginning of
October. ©

Broader stock indicators also
rose. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index came within range of its
six-year closing high, rising
8.97, or 0.63 percent, to 1,423.82.
The Nasdaq composite index
advanced 25.52, or 1.04 percent,
to 2,484.85.

Bonds fell sharply as the
drop in jobless claims pointed
to a healthy economy and
stirred some concerns that the
Fed might not lower rates. The
yield on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note rose to 4.74 per-
cent from 4.69 percent late
Wednesday. —

Light, sweet crude, which has
already declined 15 percent in:
2007, fell to its lowest level
since May 2005, settling down
$2.14 to $51.88 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.

' In economic news, the Labor
Department said the number of
newly laid off workers seeking
unemployment benefits fell to a
six-month low last week, drop-
ping by 26,000 to 299,000 ona
seasonally adjusted basis. It was’
the first time jobless claims
have moved below 300,000
since the week of July 22.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 9.58, or
1.23 percent, to 788.45.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered décliners by more than 2
to 1 on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to 2.92 billion
shares, compared with 2.82 bil-
lion traded Wednesday.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.62
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed up 1.13 percent. Germa-
ny’s DAX index closed up 1.84
percent, and France’s CAC-40
was up 1.96 percent.



Wel WEI






INTEREST RATES

i The Bank of England lifted the
key interest rate from 5 percent
to 5.25 percent, its highest point
since May 2001, despite
expectations for no move. The
ECB left its rate unchanged.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany — Wor-
ries about creeping inflation spurred
the Bank of England to make a sur-
prise increase in its main interest rate
Thursday, while the European Cen-
tral Bank held steady but hinted at an

[povrereees enmeernnrnyernnennneeennnernnennasnenenerinennsaann rth

.

Consumer Electronics Show.

Analysts and,executives thought
that by this year’s show, there
would be a clear winner, especially
after Sony in November released its
Playstation 3 video game console,
which comes standard with a Blu-
ray disc drive.

Instead, both sides have hun-
kered down for what could be a
long fight and some are even con-
ceding that both formats may be
here to stay.

“In an optimal world you would
have one format,” Kevin Tsujihara,



AIRLINES

ncaa An RA RASA AARON RAN GARRARD

SScSPO

sSNA AR ARR RR RRB UIE Ecce see ce NU Roeececee ato

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

Bank of Englan

increase of its own to come.

British interest rates are now level
with those in United States. The
increase makes mortgage and loan
repayments more expensive, and was
criticized by some consumer groups,
retailers and employers’ groups. Poli-
cy-makers in Britain are concerned
about rising inflation rates, which
reached 2.7 percent in November —
above the bank’s target of 2 percent
for the seventh month in a row.

The ECB, meanwhile, left its
benchmark rate unchanged at 3.5 per-
cent, but President Jean-Claude Tri-

ELECTRONICS



rii~DEF DVD

OPPOSING SIDES IN HIGH-DEFINITION DVD BATTLE
HUNKER DOWN FOR LONG FIGHT

BY GARY GENTILE
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Ina city built on wagering, the smart money is staying
on the sidelines when it comes to the battle between two high-definition
DVD formats. The first shots between Blu-ray, backed by a Sony-led
consortium, and HD DVD, whose group is led by Toshiba, were fired last
year when the formats made their splashy debuts at the International

‘

president of the Warner Bros. home
entertainment group said this week.
“But there are many industries
where multiple formats have
existed and flourished.”

Tsujihara noted that in video
gaming, three incompatible formats
— Playstation, the Microsoft XBox
and consoles from Nintendo,
including the recently released Wii
— have existed for years.

At this year’s CES, Warner Bros.
showed off a double-sided disc that
holds movies in both formats. Tsu-











crenencnmanneeninnnnatnernneieresnsaen th



raises key rate

chet’s comment that it would engage
in “very close monitoring” of infla-
tion risks was taken by most analysts
as a signal that a quarter-point hike
could be in the cards for March.

Annual inflation in the euro zone
was at 1.9 percent in December, just
below the ECB’s target of about or
below than 2 percent.

“Frankfurt clearly is a less hectic
place than London,” said Holger
Schmieding, Bank of America’s chief
economist for Europe, on Thursday.
“Whereas the Bank of England
shocked observers like us with a sur-

JAEC.HONG/AP |

HIGH-DEFINITION DVD: Show attendees watch movie clips inside Panasonic’s Blu-ray Jazz Club at the
Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on Thursday. Competing formats are Blu-ray, backed by
a Sony-led consortium, and HD DVD, led by Toshiba, whose booth is shown below.

WAR





ILLER/GETTY IMAGES

jihara said the “Total Hi Def” disc |

should spur the purchase of more

high-definition DVD players.
“THD inspires consumer confi-

° TURN TO HIGH-DEFINITION DVD. 4B





prise rate increase today, the ECB
calmly confirmed expectations that it
will raise its rates again by [a quarter
of a percentage point] in March.”

By waiting, the bank — which sets
policy for 13 nations with more than
316 million people and a combined.
gross domestic product that accounts
for more than 15 percent of the
world’s economy — allowed itself to
get a better picture of the effect of a
value-added tax increase in Germany
and see more fourth-quarter gross

° TURN TO INTEREST RATES, 4B

PHARMACEUTICALS

Pfizer may
announce
more,
deener
cutbacks

@ Pfizer is among at least four
drugmakers cutting staff and
expenses because of mergers
and the onset of generic
competition.

BY SHANNON PETTYPIECE
Bloomberg News

Pfizer, the world’s largest drug-
maker, may tell investors this month
it will trim annual spending by as
much as‘$2 billion by firing 10 per-
cent of its workforce and cutting its
research budget.

Pfizer may announce the cuts to
its $7 billion research budget and a
workforce of about 100,000 people at
a Jan. 22 analyst meeting, said
Deutsche Bank analyst Barbara Ryan.
Pfizer Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey
Kindler said in October he would
seek cuts that go beyond an earlier
plan to trim $4 billion in yearly
spending by 2008.

Pfizer needs to reduce costs as it
braces to lose sales by 2012 from
medicines, losing patent protection,
that account for nearly half its 2005
revenue. New York-based Pfizer was
counting on replacing sales of its top
selling cholesterol drug Lipitor,
which goes off patent as early as 2010,
with a new therapy called torcetra-

' pib. The company halted develop-

ment on that product in December
because of safety concerns.

“We believe they will target a spe-
cific amount of savings from R&D,”
said Ryan, rated four out of five stars
by analyst rating firm StarMine, in a
telephone interview. “R&D is the
area most focused on efficiencies and
process improvements rather than
head count reduction. Head count
reductions, in addition to sales force,
will be company wide.”

Pfizer spokesman Andy McCor-
mick said the company will share the

° TURN TO PFIZER, 4B

AirTran raises bid for Midwest, woos investors

@ AirTran, a low-cost U.S. carrier,
raised its hostile takeover bid for
Midwest Air by almost 20 percent
to $345 million and said it’s
seeking commitments from
Midwest investors to sell their
shares.

BY GRETCHEN EHLKE
Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — AirTran Hold-
ings appealed directly to sharehold-
ers Thursday with a sweetened offer
of about $345 million in cash and
stock for rival Midwest Air after the
regional carrier rebuffed its earlier
unsolicited takeover bid.

AirTran Holdings, which owns the
discount carrier AirTran Airways,
raised its offer for Midwest Air by
almost 18 percent. Midwest said its
board will evaluate the latest offer
and make a recommendation to
sharehoiders with 10 days.

“We certainly believe the consoli-
dation has started in this industry and
will continue and that Midwest is
vulnerable,” AirTran Chairman and
Chief Executive Joe Leonard said



during a visit to Milwaukee.

Airtran’s renewed effort to buy
Midwest Air comes only a day after
US Airways raised its bid for Delta to
by about 20 percent to $10.3 billion.
Delta had rejected the previous offer
and opposed to the takeover bid.

After years of losses following the
Sept. ll attacks in 2001, the industry
has begun regaining its balance. Crit-
ics of consolidation say fewer carri-
ers could mean higher prices for air
travelers.

The new offer for Midwest was
equivalent to $13.25 per Midwest
share, based on the closing price of
AirTran common stock on Monday
and represented a premium of almost
3 percent over the airline’s closing
share price on Wednesday.

AirTran earlier bid $11.25 per share
for Midwest, but the Midwest board
turned down that offer on Dec. 6,
prompting the Orlando, Fla., discount
carrier to bypass the board in its lat-
est takeover attempt.

“We thought we would get no

*TURN TO AIRLINES, 4B



MORRY GASH/AP

HOSTILE BID: AirTran Holdings appealed directly to shareholders
Thursday with its sweetened offer of about $345 million for rival

Midwest Air. Above, a Midwest jet lands in Milwaukee.



CMM



8



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 bat Seen : veya ie A 28 ne TE TRIBUNE



THE TRIBUNE PRESENTS



-Tursbays AND F RIDAYS-
-_ JANUARY 16 - Marcu 23.



FAD THIS: CO RT/STORY ABOUT
Mert’ = ND HER FAMILY’ S QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.



he Tribune: «4.
. believes that : eas by Katherine Lene ~ illustrated by Emily Arnold MeCilly
reading helps people to :
focus on constructive
choices through
“exposure to worlds.



When Meli, an Albanian Ai jeerald
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not
securely—living _ in their ancestral

beyond their imm ediate

environment.
Breakfast Sérials

community in Kosovo. | But in 1999

Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic

Albanians from their homies. Family :

provides the great gift : 5 ao closeness is not enough. The
of fine literature, Lee Pao intervention of US. forces is not
read in convenient 7 enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,

the family. must flee, embarking on a
installments - so. that Ss SANE ANE, aay
dangerous journey in search: of safety.



the reader keeps. om Though family tiés and tradition are
coming, back for more. a ee severely tested, they eventually reach:
Bae eS as NS ‘the U.S. and ‘the tranquility of a
* hea eee ei. pe Nae 3 , : Vermont town. It is thére that Meli
experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11. distrust of
meee aeulauucanssants a et ae eT er we eedtted i o se Muslims. Her response is ee inspiration for all. ‘ i
: . Based on a true story, Long Road oie presents a warm and ‘compassionate family’s
: _Fesponse to > conflict and emigration to America. |
Sales" “Read "Long Road Home" with us... every e ucsday and Friday from



For more information about The Tribune's - | ke : S i
NIE Literacy Programme, contact Téa Afaast ane es iat

nie@tribunemedia.net or call 502-2394.





PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



- FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 12, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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to a family with three girls. families. (N) (CC)

| Jeopardy! (N) —}Grey’s Anatomy “Six Days” 01) Brothers and Sisters The 20/20 (CC)

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



CC Sweeting Cobras

strike in season opener:

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

FRESH from their Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s senior
girls volleyball championship
victory, the CC Sweeting
Cobras served notice that
they intend to.be a challenger
for the basketball title too.

On day two of the delayed
basketball season, the Cobras
stung the Government High
Magicwomen 37-18 as they
pulled off the season opener
between the two teams yes-

terday at the DW Davis Gym- |

nasium. |

Garcia Redwood got the
ball rolling and Ruthann
Simms finished the job as the
Cobras ran circles around the
.Magicwomen. But coach Dar-
nell Bastian said this was just
an indication of what to
expect the rest of the season.

“This was just a practice.
We started off very late
because we just came from
playing volleyball,” Bastian
stressed. “This was our first
game out, but it was just our
second practice. We will take
it one game at a time.”

The way the Cobras played,
you would think that they had
more than one practice. But
Bastian said it was just the
way the Cobras are accus-
tomed to playing.

“We'll always look good
because we are Cobras,
Cobras never come in with
their head down. We always
hold our head up,” she point-
ed out. “But we will walk into
it one day at a time.”

Simms had a game high 17
_ points, Redwood ‘seven,
Chrishandra Kelly six and
Crystal Dean chipped in with
three in the win. Crystal Cur-
ry had a side high 14 and Jes-
sica Thomas added four in the
loss.
“ Redwood, the talented
guard, reeled off CC Sweet-
ing’s first three baskets in the
first half as they jumped out
to a 7-0 lead before the Mag-
icwomen got on the score-
board with a jumper from
Crystal Curry.

Redwood then got the rest
of her Cobras’ team-mates
involved as she wheeled and
dealed through the Magic-
women’s defence.

At the receiving end was
Simms, who powered inside
for five and Chrishandra Kel-
ly, who added another four.

At the other end, Curry
scored another seven points
to keep Government High in
the game. But their only oth-
er player to score in the half
was Jessica Thomas, whose
jumper cut the deficit to 18-11
as the clock ran out to signal
the half.

Unlike the first half when

@ GOVERNMENT High
Magicwomen’s Jessica
Thomas dribbles the ball .
around the defence of CC
Sweeting Cobras’ Garcia
Redwood during their GSS-
SA senior girls game yester-'
day at the DW Davis Gym.
The Cobras won the game
37-18. | Lee
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Bastian only used her start-
ing five, she brought in the
bench throughout the second
half and they managed to stay
in control of the game.
Simms stepped it up in.the
half as she controlled the
paint, pulling down rebounds
and going back up for the lay-
up as they posted 12 in th
period.

Coach Leroy Thompson.

tried to keep his Magicwomen
in the game, substituting play-
ers at will. But each time they

tried to make a run, they

either turned the ball over or

got boxed out on the rebound.
Thompson admitted that

his team was out of shape.

“We played good in spurts, ,

but they were not consistent,”
he charged.
Asked what he think the
need to work on, Thompson
pointed out: “Conditioning.
But they understand the
game. They just need to get in
shape.
“Plus, we missed a lot of
free throws. We have to
improve on that too.”









yclists pre me for

CYCLING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

‘+ Junior Sports Reporter

IN THE next three weeks the island of
New Providence will be transformed to
accommodate some of the world’s top
amateur cyclists.

The roads of New Providence will be
invaded by cyclists all vying for the top
prize in the annual Tour of the Bahamas.

The tour, which has grown from what
local cyclists are calling a ‘mustard seed
into a full bloom tree’ is set for February
3rd-4th, and will host top amateur cyclists
from the United States, Portugal, Italy and
the Bahamas.

On February Sth-9th, a training camp
for members of the USA Cycling Nation-
al Development Team, in conjunction with

VMG Racing will be conducted. The’

VMG headquarters is located in the
Bahamas.

According to Bryon Musgrove, this
year’s Tour of the Bahamas can be com-
pared to the ‘Superbowl,’ but should be
referred to as the Cyclistbowl of the
Bahamas.

Musgrove said the increase in partici-
pants this year has turned the invitational
event into one of the biggest races hosted



by the Bahamas Cycling Association
(BCA). :
Musgrove said: “The Tour of the
Bahamas is a race that seems to have burst
into a big event. It isn’t an international
race but it takes the course of interna-
tional races. But it is an invitational race
attended by top names in the United States

and other parts of the world.

“This race has truly grown from the
number of cyclist that competes. It will be
our intention in the association to expand
the race seeking the assistance of the gov-
ernment. It is already on the VGM calen-
dar so we are hoping to get it on the Inter-
national Union of Cyclist, they are also
responsible for cycling in the world.

“We are trying hard to get it on that
calendar, this is also the calendar that is

responsible for the Tour de France. If we -

can get it, that will be a mammoth accom-
plishment for the Bahamas and big task for
the association.

“So we are in the process to see how
feasible that will be to turn the tour into an
international event, not an invitational.”

Despite the efforts being put forth by the
BCA to turn the event into an interna-
tional tour, Musgrove believes that the
Tour of the Bahamas is a great opportunity
for local cyclists to ‘cash in’ on some real

competition, since there are limited oppor-
tunities to do so.

For Musgrove, the Tour of the Bahamas,
which is set in a three stage race format,
can evolve but the level of success will be
determined by the partnership between
the BCA and the government.

“The public will get to see some of the
top cyclists in America and Europe, but if
we want to expand we will really need the
help of the government,” said Musgrove.

“We need their help even at this stage.
We need the help of the Ministry of
Tourism, all the cyclists like to bring their
family members down, that is a form of
sports tourism. The Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and Sports will definitely need to
be on board.”

Although much attention will be given
to some of the top cyclists, Musgrove
boasted about the fact that Bahamas have
their own professional cyclists who will be
taking part. He also highlighted the junior
team that will take on the American under
20 squad.

Musgrove strongly believes that the local
participants will make a strong showing
at the event.

The route for the race has not been
determined yet, but Musgrove is promising
a picturesque route.



the Bahamas ©



SPORTSWVt

aeaangnaannannetanaanangnonnngeneesmnngysyqwen«soaqgpyeoneeseahswegwengoaé eA NE AR RAE AD

PRO BASKETBALL
COMMENTARY







Kobe Bryant, 2
like his jersey,
has a new look

BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
he public rehabilitation of Kobe
LT Bryant is now complete, at
least in the eyes of NBA fans.
That bécame official this week with
the news that Bryant’s Los Angeles
Lakers jersey has regained its spot as
the No. 1 seller in league stores.

No real surprise there. Look no fur-
ther than Baltimore Ravens line-
backer Ray Lewis as a prime example
of how quick sports fans are to forgive
and forget.

The only surprise
with Bryant is how
quickly they have for-
given and forgotten.

Tt wasn’t allthat _

: long ago that Bryant .
was scorned as an admitted philan-
derer at best, a suspected rapist at
worst. Bryant had used his celebrity
to take advantage of a teenage girl,
and he faced the real possibility of
spending years in a Colorado prison.

Women’s groups protested against
Bryant, and, to keep his wife happy

amid all the turmoil, he had'to buy her
a $4 million ring.

THE IMAGE NEEDED WORK

On the court, things weren’t much
better. Bryant sent one very large
teammate packing, and his desire to
always have the ball created such fric-
tion on the Lakers that Phil Jackson
called him uncoachable. :

~* To:top it off, companies that once
embraced the young superstar sud-
denly wanted nothing to do with him.
Among them was McDonald’s, which
quickly figured out that a player
charged with sexual assault wasn’t the
best endorser for a family-friendly,
fast-food chain. :

Bryant still isn’t pushing hamburg-
ers. And he might never get the main-
stream endorsements that once were
his for the taking. But a lot has hap-
pened in 28 short months — by design
or not — to turn Bryant into a far
more sympathetic and marketable fig-
ure than anyone who ever watched
him enter an Eagle, Colo., courtroom
could ever imagine.

Bryant has stayed out of trouble
since the charges against him were
dropped at the last minute, and he
agreed to pay his accuser an undis-
closed amount to settle a civil suit.

While other NBA players have
engaged in brawls, have gotten shot
and have been arrested by the handful
since then, Bryant has stayed above
the fray. NBA Commissioner David
Stern didn’t have him in mind when
he issued a league dress edict, and, if
not for the charges in Colorado, per-
haps he could have been promoted as
the NBA’s model employee.

RESHAPING HIS GAME

Bryant has changed his game, too.
He did score 81 points one night last
season, but he has seemingly dedi-
cated himself lately to becoming
something other than a selfish player
who wants the ball all the time and
-will take a shot from anywhere.

In a game last week against the
Denver Nuggets, Bryant actually had
more assists (10) than points (eight).
It was the first time since April 2004
that he scored less than 10 points in
a game, and Bryant spoke afterward
about how he simply wanted to make
those playing with him better.

“It’s about being a big brother,
giving them encouragement but also
getting on top of them at times,”
Bryant said.

Shaquille O’Neal probably gagged
when he heard those words, but the
truth is that Bryant is comfortable
now in his role as team leader..

He also is comfortable in his new
jersey. Bryant changed from his No. 8
to No. 24 this season, and the switch
surely had a lot to do with his moving
up from fourth to first in jersey sales
at the NBA Store in New York City
and in the league’s online market.

Image rehabilitation can be a tricky
thing, but so far Bryant has done
everything right.

He seems to have changed the way
a lot of people look at him almost as
easily as he changed his jersey.





asenannnnpssanhn

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

“pe
|
|
| |
|
|



BY BERNIE WILSON
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Philip Rivers
would love to be just like Tom
Brady.

Who wouldn’t want to win a
Super Bowl in his first season as a
starting quarterback, then add ona
couple more? That’s what Brady
did in compiling his
impressive, l-1 postsea-
son record.

For Rivers to follow
that path, he and his
San Diego Chargers
will have to beat Brady and the
playoff-seasoned New England
Patriots on Sunday in a divisional-
round game at Qualcomm Stadium.

“Obviously, I understand it, as
all quarterbacks do, that you have a
won-loss record attached to your
name,” Rivers said this week. “I
don’t want to do it for me. I want to
do it for us.” -



uanaetsesaaeseesbeaa



PRO FOOTBALL | NEW ENGLAND AT SAN DIEGO

Rivers ready for playoff debut

This has been a season of firsts
for Rivers, and he gets another on
Sunday — the first playoff start in
his three-year career.

It’s something Rivers has been
aiming for since the Chargers
pulled off a draft-day coup in 2004
and acquired him and a handful of
draft picks from the New York
Giants for Eli Manning.

“This is why you
play,” said Rivers, who
was elevated to starter
in March after Drew
Brees signed with the
New Orleans Saints as a free agent.

Rivers was the inactive, third-
string quarterback two years ago
when the Chargers lost at home, in
overtime, to the New York Jets ina
wild-card game. But he remembers
how wired the Chargers were.

“We were so fired-up, it maybe
worked against us,” he said. “We
need to just come out poised and

SOCCER | DAVID BECKHAM

Becks jumps



DONALDMIRALLE/GETTY IMAGES
NICE START: Philip Rivers led the
Chargers to a 14-2 record in
his first season as quarterback.

under control, kinda see what’s
happening to us, obviously expect-
ing a wrinkle or two and then play-
ing from there.”

That might be easier said than
done, but Rivers has done a good
job of keeping everything in per-
spective this season. He faced



DENIS DOYLE/GETTY IMAGES

GALAXY GAINS A STAR: David Beckham isn’t happy sitting on the bench for Real Madrid,

and a deal worth a reported $250 million brings him to Major League Soccer in August.

Donald drills a 63,

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

HONOLULU — Luke Donald
didn’t have much of a following
Thursday, so he barely heard any
applause — even as he made bird-
ies on half his holes for a 7-under
round of 63 and a one-shot lead in
the Sony Open.

The crowds were with Michelle
Wie. And there wasn’t much
cheering there, either. Wie, who is
17 and is playing in the tournament
for the fourth consecutive year,
struggled home with a 78.

She finished the day in next-to-
last place, five shots clear of
Hawaii club pro Abe Mariano.

The best score by a Hawaii teen



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

pretty much every scenario possi-
ble in leading the Chargers to an
NFL-best, 14-2 record. He passed
for 3,388 yards and 22 touchdowns,
against nine interceptions. He led
wild rallies and helped secure
comfortable leads. He struggled
and shined. And he took a couple
of tough losses on the road.

In the season finale, against the
Arizona Cardinals, Rivers sprained
his right foot, then came back and
threw two touchdown passes on
the way to a 27-20 victory.

“T’ll be the first to admit I wasn’t
as efficient late in the year in some
games,” Rivers said, “I think some
of those bumps in the road late in
the year were good for many rea-
sons — one, I’m continuing to get
better, and two, we didn’t lose.

“I think I can gain\ a lot from
some of those somewhat struggles
and carry them with me now.”

e NFL REPORT



to MLS

British midfielder
commits to Galaxy
in a landmark deal

BY CHRIS LEHOURITES
Associated Press

LONDON — David Beckham, the former
England soccer captain known as much for his
style as for his play, has agreed to leave Real
Madrid and join the Los Angeles Galaxy in a
deal that Major League Soccer hopes will boost
the sport in‘ the United
States in a manner similar to
Pele’s arrival with the New
York Cosmos in 1975.

Beckham will
Madrid at the end of the sea-
son. The
announced Thursday after
the end of discussions on
extending the 3l-year-old
English midfielder’s contract
with the Spanish club. a

“This week, Real Madrid asked me to make a
decision regarding my future and the offer to
extend my contract by a further two seasons,”
Beckham said in a statement.

“After discussing several options with my
family and advisers to either stay here at Madrid
or join other major British and European clubs, I
have decided to join the Los Angeles Galaxy and
play in the MLS from August this year.”

The Galaxy, citing industry experts, said
Beckham’s deal is worth more than $250 million
in salary and commercial endorsements and is
“thought to be the biggest in sporting history.”

An entertainment personality who draws
paparazzi like a movie star, Beckham and his
wife, Victoria, the former Posh Spice of the
Spice Girls, regularly find their way onto tabloid
and magazine covers. With snazzy clothes,
rotating hair colors and styles and a pop-star
wife, Beckham is the epitome of the modern mix
of celebrity and athlete. He even had a movie
named after him: Bend it like Beckham.

His soccer skills are only part of the equation.
He is David Beckham Inc., a multinational cor-
poration with links to Pepsi, Gillette, Motorola
and Adidas.

leave

move was



MORE
SOCCER: 8B

* TURN TO DAVID BECKHAM

GOLF | SONY OPEN

belonged to 16-
year-old Tadd Fuji-
kawa, one year
younger and a foot
shorter than Wie.
Fujikawa, who
qualified for the
U.S. Open last year,
opened with a
l-over 71 at Waia-
lae, the same as
Kapalua winner
Vijay Singh.

KJ. Choi played
in stiffer wind in
the afternoon,
made the turn in 30 and settled for
a 64. Will MacKenzie continued
riding his wave and, despite being



JEFF GROSS/GETTY IMAGES

OUT FRONT: Luke Donald.

frustrated after a
three-putt par on
the 18th, shot a 65
and was tied for
third place with
Jim Furyk.

Donald is No. 10
in the world rank-
ing, and his game
has looked as
though he belongs
there. Donald has
only two PGA
Tour victories,
including the
Honda Classic last
year, but his confidence is building,
and his game looks tidier than ever.

“I’m getting better every yeax,”

leads by one after first round

Donald said. “It has not quite yet
resulted in lots of wins, winning
majors, that kind of stuff, but I feel
like I’m getting a lot closer than
I was a year or two ago. I’ve gotten
to the stage where I’m expecting to
be up there and contending, and
winning each week I play.”

For Wie, expectations are
headed the other direction.

Her swing no longer is long and
fluid. It is more mechanical than
when she first played the Sony
Open and shot a 68 in the second
round to miss the cut by one shot.
Her weakness then was her short
game, which is now her strength.

It kept a bad round from being
embarrassing on Thursday.



4E | FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 __

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER

Real Madrid ties Real Betis |

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Real Madrid drew Real
Betis 0-0 in the Copa del Rey
on Thursday, hours after
David Beckham announced
he will leave the club at the
end of the season.

Beckham, who will join the

Los Angeles Galaxy on a five-
year deal in Major League Soc-
cer, was left off Madrid’s
squad for the first-leg, fifth-
round match at Betis’ Manuel
Ruiz de Lopera Stadium and
remained in the Spanish capi-
tal.

The draw gave Madrid a
slight advantage when the
teams bid for a quarterfinal
place in the return leg at Santi-
ago Bernabeu Stadium next
week.

Madrid coach Fabio
Capello, who also omitted
Ronaldo, handed a debut to
‘teenage striker Gonzalo Hig-
uain, a recent signing from
River Plate.

Another newcomer, former
Boca Juniors midfielder Fer-
nando Gago, was retained for
his second game.

The visitors were hit by the
loss of left back Roberto Car-
los in the 10th minute with
what appeared to be a thigh
rouscle injury, leading to the
introduction of Raul Bravo.

Betis, struggling in the
league and playing its second
game under new coach Luis
Fernandez, spurned the only
clear chance of a ragged first
half when Jorge Wagner
headed Xisco Munoz2’s cross

SPORTS ROUNDUP





JAVIER BARBANCHO/AP

A TURF WAR: Real Madrid’s
Robinho, front, battles for
the ball with Real Betis’
Francisco Collantes.

over the bar in the 35th min-
ute.

The untidy play continued
into the second half, although
Madrid striker Ruud van Nis-
telrooy nearly scored in the
6lst with a gentle, angled shot
which Betis goalkeeper Pedro
Contreras managed to deflect
with his left leg.

Gago fired over the bar in
the 74th, and substitute Raul
Gonzalez headed narrowly

~wide five minutes later as

Madrid’s attacking play
improved in the final stages.
In other first-leg games this

Yankees have



From Miami Herald Wire Services

Now that they have Andy
Pettitte, the New York Yan-
kees want Roger Clemens,
too.

“He’s kind of like your per-
fect employee,” general man-
ager Brian Cashman said
Thursday after welcoming
Pettitte back.to Yankee Sta-
dium.

Clemens pitched for the
Yankees alongside Pettitte
from 1999-2003, helping them
capture two World Series
titles and four American
League pennants.

The pair spent the past
three seasons with their home-
town Houston Astros.

“If Roger is interested in
coming to New York, I'd love
to talk to him,” Cashman said.
“He came in here and not only
delivered a huge performance
on the field but had a major
impact within the clubhouse.”

New York hasn’t reached
the World Series since Clem-
ens left. The Yankees traded
Randy Johnson back to the
Arizona Diamondbacks earlier
this week, and Cashman
admitted the move put the
rotation at risk.

Clemens, a seven-time Cy
Young Award winner, is
choosing among returning to
the Astros, retiring or rejoin-
ing the Yankees or Boston Red
Sox, his first major league
team. Clemens’ agent, Randy
Hendricks, says that if the
Rocket pitches, he probably
wouldn’t start his season until
May or June.

Pettitte has played golf with
Clemens in recent weeks. He
wouldn’t say exactly what his
buddy told him, but he
dropped a few hints.

“After speaking with him, it
sounds like that he probably
wants to try to pitch. It’s amaz-
ing to me that he still wants to
pitch, but he does,” said Pet-
titte, laughing.

e Elsewhere: Barry
Bonds said he did not get
amphetamines from teammate
Mark Sweeney, but did not
deny a report Thursday saying
he tested positive for the
drugs last season. According
to a story in the New York
Daily News, the San Francisco

slugger failed an amphet-
amines test in 2006. The news-
paper reported that when first
informed of the positive result,
Bonds attributed it to a sub-
stance he had taken from
Sweeney’s locker. Bonds’
reported positive test could be
another snag in contract nego-
tiations with the Giants. The
sides reached a preliminary
agreement on a one-year, $16
million contract on Dec. 7, but
the seven-time National
League MVP still hasn’t signed
the deal or taken the manda-
tory physical that is part of the
process. ... Catcher Hum-
berto Cota, who is not
expected to make the Pitts-
burgh Pirates’ opening-day
roster, has agreed to terms on
a one-year, $537,000 contract.

. The Kansas City Royals
avoided arbitration with
pitcher Jimmy ‘Gobble,
agreeing to a one-year con-
tract worth $712,500.

ETC.

e College
Anthony Gonzalez, the sec-
ond-leading receiver for Ohio
State, said he will not return
for his senior season and will
enter the NFL Draft. Two
other Buckeyes are contem-
plating jumping to the NFL a
year early. Tailback Antonio
Pittman will announce his
decision Monday at his Akron
high school. Wide receiver
Ted Ginn Jr. has not yet made
up his mind, his father said
Thursday. ... Notre Dame tail-
back Darius Walker, on pace
to become the school’s career
rushing leader, will skip his
senior season and enter the
NFL Draft. Coach Charlie
Weis also announced that
nine players with another year
of eligibility have asked per-
mission from the school to
return, including safety Tom
Zbikowski, linebacker Travis
Thomas, tight end John Carl-
son, center John Sullivan
and defensive end Trevor
Laws. ... Oklahoma running
back Adrian Peterson was
still undecided on whether to
return for his senior season or
declare himself eligible for the
NFL Draft. ... Linebacker
Keith Rivers, the leading

football:

SOCCER | BASEBALL | ETC.

week, FC Barcelona won 2-0 at
second-division Alaves, while
Sevilla drew third-division
Rayo Vallecano 0-0.

Other results were: Getafe
J, Valencia 1; Atletico Madrid 1,
Osasuna ]; Valladolid 2, Villar-
real 1; Mallorca 1, Deportivo La
Coruna 2; and Malae# 0, Zara-
goza 3.

ELSEWHERE

e Germany: Wolfsburg
coach Klaus Augenthaler
signed a two-year contract
extension to the end of the
2009 season, the club said.

Augenthaler took over the
team at the start of last year.
Wolfsburg is 12th this season
in the Bundesliga with 19
points from 17 games.

Augenthaler, a former Bay-
ern Munich defender who
won the 1990 World Cup with
Germany, has also coached
Bayer Leverkusen, Nuremberg
and Austrian club Grazer AK.

Fraud charges were
dropped against Reiner Cal-
mund, the former general
manager of Bayer Leverkusen.
The district attorney’s office
asked for the case to be closed.
It revolved around $724,000
that Leverkusen paid an agent
in 2003 to secure options on
several East European players.

The deals were never com-
pleted but the district attor-
ney’s office found no evidence
Calmund profited from them.
Calmund had turned Leverku-
sen into a top team that
repeatedly just missed win-

ning titles, including a 2002
Champions League final loss
to Real Madrid.

@ Britain: Sheffield United
signed Jon Stead from Sun-
derland in a $1.46 million deal.
The 23-year-old striker scored
only. two goals in 39 games at
the Stadium of Light following
his transfer from Blackburn in
June 2005.

Stead had been on-loan at
Derby for the past three
months, scoring three goals in
17 games.

Stead scored six goals in
Blackburn’s last 13 games of
the 2003-04 season.

League Championship side
Sunderland will receive an
extra $973,600 if Sheffield
United remains in England’s
top-flight league at the end of
the season.

Sheffield is 16th in the
standings with 22 points. .
Portsmouth acquired Charlton
defender Djimi Traore in a
$1.94 million transfer deal. ...
Birmingham signed Luton
striker Rowan Vine in a $4.86
million transfer. Vine agreed
to a 32-year deal with the
Blues. ... Charlton agreed to a
$971,982 transfer fee with
Manchester City for fullback
Ben Thatcher. ... Liverpool
signed Boca Juniors defender
Emiliano Insua on an 18-
month loan... . Cardiff signed
Peter Whittingham from
Aston Villa in a $680,470
transfer.... Struggling League
Two side Wrexham fired man-
ager Denis Smith.



PAUL BATTAGLIA/AP

BRONX RETURN? Roger Clemens, pitching for the Yankees
in the 2003 playoffs, won two World Series and four AL
pennants while playing for New York from 1999-2003.

tackler for Southern California
this season, has decided to
stay in school and play his
senior year for the Trojans. ...
Offensive guard Shannon
Tevaga, who has started 31
consecutive games at UCLA,
has decided to stay in school
and play his senior season for
the Bruins. ... Arizona corner-
back Antoine Cason
announced that he will return

for his senior season instead of

entering the NFL Draft. ...
Wake Forest coach . Jim
Grobe, who led the Demon
Deacons to a school-record 11
victories and an Orange Bowl
berth, has been named Coach
of the Year by the American
Football Coaches Association.

e Tennis: Defending
champion James Blake
defeated Russian qualifier
Evgeny Korolev 6-1, 6-4 to
reach the semifinals of the
Sydney International. On the
women’s side, Kim Clijsters
advanced to the final with a

‘6-1, 1-6, 7-5 victory over Li Na

of China. Clijsters will play
Jelena Jankovic, who upset
Nicole Vaidisova 6-4, 4-6,
6-4.... Russians Anna Chak-
vetadze and Vasilisa Bar-

dina will meet in the final of

the Hobart (Australia) Inter-
national women’s tournament
after winning their semifinals
in straight sets. ... Top-seeded
Tommy Robredo won two

matches en route to the semi-
finals of the Heineken Tennis
Open in Auckland, New Zea-
land.... Roger Federer beat
Marat Safin 6-3, 7-6 (7-2) to
reach the final of the Kooyong
exhibition tournament in Mel-
bourne, Australia. ... Federer
and Maria Sharapova topped
the lists of seeded players at
next week’s Australian Open,
with organizers sticking to the
world rankings.

e Golf: South Africa’s
Andrew McLardy shot a
course-record, 9-under 63 on
the Royal Johannesburg and
Kensington Golf Club’s West
Course to take the first-round
lead in the Joburg Open in
Johannesburg, South Africa.
McLardy eagled two of the last
four holes for a back-nine 29 in
the event sanctioned by the
European and Southern Africa
tours. Italy’s Edoardo Moli-
nari, the 2005 U.S. Amateur
champion, had the best score
on the tougher East Course, a
7-under 64. South Africans
Warren Abery and Mark
Murless opened with 64s on
the West Course. The final
two rounds will be played on
the East Course.

e Horse racing: Barbaro
showed a promising first step
after suffering a big setback
from laminitis when X-rays
showed no additional compli-
cations in either hind leg.







‘Feb. 4. Two of the fights will be televised by Showtime. “

Id.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





PEOPLE IN SPORTS



RAMON ESPINOSA/AP

EXPERT ADVICE:

New York Mets player and 22-year major leaguer Julio
Franco, right, gives hitting tips to aspiring baseball
players during Thursday’s visit to’ the team’s training
complex in Boca de Nigua, Dominican Republic.



i ust Saisie setback

‘The news conference was expected to announce the
return of professional sports to Miami Arena. Instead, it
delivered further notice on the venue’s current status of
neglect.

Promoter Don King, who planned to present a fight card
at the downtown Miami facility Feb. 3, said Thursday he
would consider other local sites after a deal fell through with
Arena officials.

“I made Miami Arena a partner in the event, we put it
together in time, but their check bounced,” King said. “We
don’t have time to lose, because I want to save this show and
keep it in South Florida.”

King said the Arena failed to comply with a $500,000 fee as
the card’s co-promoter. King, whose company is handling all
boxing matters related to the show, had all of the card’s fea-
tured fighters, including junior-middleweight champion Cory
Spinks and lightweight titleholder Jesus Chavez, at Thurs-
day’s news conference.

“The investor we were counting on fell through,” said Al
Howell, who represents the Arena. “We are still trying to
make this happen.”

King is not completely ruling out the Arena, but is not giv-
ing much time before targeting other locations and partners.
“Within 48 hours, if they can’t come up with a solid deal, we
will go elsewhere,” King said.

The card’s theme is to link it with other South Florida . fis
events leading to Super Bowl XLI'at Dolphin Stadium. qn

In an effort to keep the event in South Florida, King is will-
ing to welcome a new partner for a lesser co-promotion fee.
He would not disclose the fee.

“You are talking about an event that will generate a lot of
publicity because it will take place here just before the Super
Bowl,” King said.

Once home to the Miami Heat, Florida Panthers and Uni-
versity of Miami men’s basketball, Miami Arena has not
played host to a sporting event since the Miami Morays shut
down after one season of indoor football in 2005.

A Marc Anthony concert in May 2006 was the last event
presented at the Arena, Howell said.

— SANTOS A. PEREZ

Anew addition A new venture?

|
Julie Foudy andhus- =~ Cal Ripken Jr. would be
band lan Sawyers wel- | interested in buying the Bal-
comed a baby girl on New | timore Orioles if Peter
Year’s Day. | Angelos decides to sell the
The former captain of | team.
the U.S. women’s soccer | Ripken Professional
team gave birth by Caesar- |__ Baseball has owned the
ean section in Mission | Class-A Aberdeen Ironbirds
Viejo, Calif,tolsabel Ann | of the New York-Penn
Sawyers, who weighed 7 League since 2002 and the
pounds, 2 ounces. | Class-A Augusta GreenJack-
“She came out with a ets of the South Atlantic
bruise on her eye,” Foudy | League since 2005.
said. | There has been specula-
“J thought, ‘Atta girl — _ tion that Ripken would want
she’s a scrapper.’ to own the Orioles, and he
“She sleeps all the time _ was asked Wednesday

about a possible purchase at
the Hall of Fame news con-
ference.

“T haven't been
approached,” he said. “I’ve
| thought about that, yes, and

and hasn’t said a peep,”
Foudy added. “I said, |
‘That’s not a Foudy.’ ”
Foudy was a World Cup
commentator for ESPN last
summer, ran the Julie

Foudy Sports Leadership if an opportunity were to
Academy and worked out | arise, if Mr. Angelos would
during her pregnancy. | want to sell the club, it

Foudy, nicknamed would be an interesting



“Loudy Foudy,” helped the thought process to go

U.S. team capture two through.”

World Cups (1991, 1999) and | Ripken and Tony Gwynn
two Olympic gold medals were elected to the Hall of
(1996, 2004) before oe Fame on Tuesday and will
in 2004. be inducted in July.

‘He’s not going to lose any money
by staying in school, because the
prices keep going up.’

- GIL BRANDT, draft expert for NFL.com and
longtime personnel director for the Dallas
Cowboys, on the draft prospects for
Oklahoma running back Adrian Peterson,
right. Peterson is undecided on whether to
turn pro or not.



“FLASHBACK



On this day in history:
1960 — Syracuse’s Dolph Schayes becomes the first
player in NBA history to score 15,000 points.



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

Time marches on,

BY GARY SHELTON
St. Petersburg Times

Mackey and Matte and Johnny U.
And the grownup in me says it
shouldn’t matter.

So much time has passed since a
franchise sneaked out of town. It has
been 22 seasons since the Colts left
Baltimore, and they were there for
only 32. Increasingly, the adult inside
whispers that I should just get over it.

Raymond and Lenny and the Iron
Horse. And the cynic inside says they
are yesterday’s news.

Other towns have lost franchises,
and you don’t hear their teeth gnash.
Houston and Cleveland and Los
Angeles and St. Louis all have moved
forward. A part of me thinks that
maybe I should deal with it.

Bubba a nd Fatso and the Mad
Dog. More and more, I don’t sound
nostalgic. Just old.

There is a new team in Baltimore,
with new colors and new stars. To
those on the bragging side of age 50,
Baltimore now belongs to the
Ravens. The Colts used to play there?
Yeah, and the Dodgers used to play
in Brooklyn, and the Bears used to
play in Decatur. Maybe I should turn
it loose.

Still, it stings. There is an NFL
playoff game in Baltimore on Satur-
day, and the wrong team is wearing
the horseshoe.

First love sinks in deep, and that’s
as true with football teams as it is
with anything else. For me, that team
was the Baltimore Colts, the team of
Johnny Unitas and his high-top shoes
and Tom Matte and his wristband.

Remember the running gag in the
movie Diner, when a prospective

AROUND THE NFL



groom forced his fiancée to pass a
Colts trivia contest before he would
marry her? A lot of us knew the
answers. This was the team that won
perhaps the greatest game ever
played (the 1958 NFL Championship
Game) and that lost perhaps the most
important (Super Bowl III, the game
that validated the AFL).

Even for a kid growing up a thou-
sand miles away, it was a team of
wonder. There was John Mackey and
Raymond Berry and Lenny Moore.
There was the Mad Dog (Mike Cur-
tis) and the Iron Horse (Alan
Ameche) and Fatso (Artie Donovan).

Alas, there also was Bob Irsay, the
boogeyman of Baltimore, and the
dark ee of March 28, 1984. When

Three-man attack

gives the

Patriots

lots of room to run

BY HOWARD ULMAN
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. —
LaDainian Tomlinson of the Char-
gers isn’t the only dangerous running
back in Sunday’s playoff game in San
Diego. The New England Patriots
have three of them, and their success
could help limit how many yards the
NFL’s MVP piles up.

The more Corey Dillon, Lau-
rence Maroney and Kevin Faulk
can use up time by gaining yards on
the ground, the less time the Char-
gers star might have to do what he
did better than any other player —
run through defenses and into the
end zone.

“With that stable of backs, all
three of them can do great things
back there,” Patriots wide receiver
Jabar Gaffney said Thursday.

Their performance last Sunday in
a 37-16 playoff victory over the New
York Jets kept that Jets team from
focusing on stopping the passing
game. That helped Gaffney catch
eight passes for 104 yards, his best
performance since joining the
Patriots early in the season.

Maroney rushed for 69 yards, Dil-
lon had 53 and a touchdown, and
Faulk had consecutive runs of 7, 8
and 9 yards on a 15-play touchdown
drive that gave the Patriots a 17-10
lead with 11 seconds left to play in the
first half.

Tomlinson, deservedly so, gets
plenty of attention because of his
NFL-high 1,815 yards rushing and his
record 31 touchdowns, and the
Patriots’ runners get much less of the

COUNTDOWN TO § SUPER | BOWL > XL 1g

SUPER BOWL XVIII

L.A. RAIDERS 38, WASHINGTON 9

e@ Jan. 22, 1984
e Tampa Stadium, Tampa
e MVP: RB Marcus Allen, Los Angeles

spotlight. Of course, Dillon rarely
speaks to reporters, Maroney is
restricted from doing that by head
coach Bill Belichick because he’s a
rookie, and Faulk declined to be
interviewed Thursday, although he
generally is accessible.

Still, the Patriots use the trio’s lack
of publicity in a week dominated by
Tomlinson as fitting into their psy-
chological game plan of not getting
enough respect — despite winning
three of the past five Super Bowls.

“That’s nothing new to us,”
Patriots cornerback Ellis Hobbs
said. “That’s kind of like our M.O.
The thing about our running game is
we can hit you through so many dif-
ferent ways.”

Dillon is a power runner, with 13
touchdowns and 812 yards on the
ground this season. Maroney is elu-
sive and strong, with 745 yards rush-
ing. Faulk is a receiving threat, with
43 regular-season catches and a
touchdown reception Sunday against
the Jets.

“They all bring another dimension
to the game and another difficulty for
the defense to stop,” Hobbs said.
“We know what we have over here.
We don’t need anybody to hype us.”

But Chargers linebacker Shawne
Merriman did just that with Dillon
and Maroney.

“It’s a one-two punch with them,”
said Merriman, who led the NFL with
17 sacks this season. “They are a dif-
ferent style of running back, a little
shiftier in the rookie. Dillon is
a real vet, and he knows how to
run the ball, and that’s why he’s

wacky and
wondrous of past |
| Super Bowls

TS

PRO FOOTBALL

LLOYD PEARSON/BALTIMORE SUN

PULLING UP STAKES: It was a snowy night on March 28, 1984, when
Colts owner Robert Irsay shipped his franchise from Baltimore to
Indianapolis aboard Mayflower trucks. The wounds have not healed
in Baltimore, and now the Colts return Saturday to play the Ravens.

Irsay loaded up the Mayflower trucks
and left in the middle of the night, it
was as if he had kidnapped a team
and a city’s innocence.

In Baltimore, the town that lies
between New York and Washington
without quite being either, the
wounds have not healed for the 50-
and-older set. All of which adds extra
meaning when the Indianapolis Colts
come to town Saturday for an NFL
playoff game.

“There are still people here who
have the Colts horseshoe tattooed on
their butts,” said Donovan, the old
defensive tackle. “People here are a
little wacky.”

At 81, Donovan is a T-shirt model
again. He gave his approval this week



ELSA/GETTY IMAGES







for a shirt to be manufactured with
his face in the name of beating India-
napolis. There is another shirt with
Unitas on it. In other words, some
fans cling so firmly to the past that
you would think they were doing it
with Berry’s hands.

“There would be a great deal See
satisfaction for a lot of people if the
Ravens would stick it to the Colts,”
Matte said. “This adds a little fuel to
the fire.”

Bruce Laird, an old Colts defen:
sive back, put it this way: “We were
cheated out of our heritage, out of
our franchise, out of our history.”

For whatever reason, losing a team
seemed to affect Baltimore more
deeply than it did other towns. Los
Angeles lost the Raiders and the
Rams, but L.A. is too cool to care.
Houston lost the Oilers, and St. Louis
lost the Cardinals, and Cleveland lost
the old Browns.

“T think it bothered Baltimore
because it’s a blue-collar town,”
Matte said. “We lived here, our chil-
dren were born here, and we died
here. We didn’t live in million-dollar
houses. We lived in the neighbor-
hoods.”

“People still talk about ’58,” Dono-
van said. “[For them,] Irsay ruined
Sunday afternoons.”

It would have helped if the Colts
had changed their nickname upon
leaving, the way the Browns (now the
Ravens) and the Oilers (now the
Titans) did. That way, Baltimore
could have reclaimed the Colts name
when the Ravens came to town.

“We never played for Indianapo-
lis,” Laird said. “Johnny Unitas didn’t.
Raymond Berry didn’t. I didn’t.

ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

“That’s not right. We never played
there.”

Remember Matte’s wristband? In
1965, Matte had to play quarterback
because of injuries, and the plays
were written on his wristband. That
wristband is in the Hall of Fame —
representing the Indianapolis Colts.

“T love Indianapolis,” Matte said.
“Great city, great people. But what
does Indianapolis have to do with us?

- We played in Baltimore,”

So what does Matte think when he
sees the horseshoe?

“I get confused. When I did the
Ravens broadcast, I would call them
the Baltimore Colts because it was
ingrained in me.”

And when he hears Irsay’s name?

“Jerk. I don’t know how he got into
the NFL to start wii

And when he sees a Mayflower
moving truck: “I think, ‘At least it
took Irsay away.’ ”

“I want to suit up for this one,”
Laird said. “I don’t want to hit any-
one. I just want to put on a uniform
and stand there.

“Maybe I could play one play, and
then they could carry me off.”

As of Saturday, the Colts will have
played more playoff games repre-
senting Indianapolis than they did
representing Baltimore. The Ravens
have won as many Super Bowls in
Baltimore as the Colts did. -

Eventually, the wounds will close.
Eventually, even the youngest of the
scorned fans will grow old. Eventu-
ally, the Baltimore Colts will sound
as aged as the Brooklyn Dodgers.

But not yet.

Not until this weekend is over.

And maybe a few more after that.

al
NICK LAHAM/GETTY IMAGES



FULL-HOUSE BACKFIELD: When the Patriots aren't running the ball with Corey Dillon (left), maybe they’re
handing it to Laurence Maroney (center). Or Kevin Faulk (right). They all know how to get the job done.

playing the way he’s playing.”

Chargers defensive end Luis Cas-
tillo also knows that Tomlinson isn’t
the only running threat Sunday.

“As good as Tom Brady is, we
have to worry about that running
game because they have some great
running backs,” Castillo said.

Against the Jets, the Patriots had a
balanced attack, with 158 yards rush-
ing and 200 passing. They ran for
more than 100 yards in each of their
past four games and were held under
that total just six times this season.

Excluding the two games Maroney
was sidelined, he led the Patriots in
rushing eight times, and Dillon led
six times. The blocking has been
solid, especially with the same five
linemen starting each of the past
eight games.

“There’s continuity there,” Brady
said. “When these O-lines are
together over the course of the sea-
son, [they] can just be very produc-
tive, because [they] learn to play
together. There is a chemistry that
develops.”

The chemistry among the running
backs also seems sound, even though





UBER Bowls

f
i

During the first half, the Raiders scored

on offense, defense and special teams,
becoming the first team to score two

non-offensive touchdowns in a Super Bowl.
The lasting image of Super Bowl XVIII
came in the third quarter, on a dazzling run

by Raiders running back Marcus Allen.

With the Raiders ahead 28-9, Allen, from

23 DAYS TO GO

the emergence of Maroney has taken
carries away from Dillon, a 10-year
NFL veteran who rushed for a career-
high 1,635 yards just two seasons ago,
his first with the Patriots.

“Tremendous backs,” Gaffney
said. “They get the job done, week in
and week out.”

ELSEWHERE

e Broncos: The team hired Jim
Bates as assistant head coach/
defense and promoted defensive-
backs coach Bob Slowik to defen-
sive coordinator.

Bates, 60, was defensive coordina-
tor for the Packers in 2005 and for the
Dolphins from 2000-04, including
seven games as interim head coach in
2004. He has coached in the NFL for
15 years.

Slowik, 52, was defensive coordi-
nator for the Packers in 2004, the
Browns in 1999 and the Bears in
1993-98. He coached the Broncos’
defensive backs for two seasons.

e Giants: Tim Lewis, who inter-
viewed for the vacant head coaching
job in Miami on Wednesday, was
fired as defensive coordinator.

e Steelers: Georgia Tech coach
Chan Gailey will be interviewed for
Pittsburgh’s head coaching job, the
fifth coach to meet with the team.
since Bill Cowher resigned.

e Raiders: Former Giants coach
Jim Fassel, Oakland’s quarterbacks
coach in 1995, interviewed for the
head coaching vacancy. Oakland
fired Art Shell as coach last week
after a 2-14 season.

e Eagles: Thomas Tapeh, the
only fullback on Philadelphia’s ros-
ter, is questionable for Saturday
night’s playoff game at New Orleans
because of a knee injury.

e Patriots: Two women are
suing linebacker Junior Seau, claim-
ing that he threw drinks at them in a
San Diego bar last May.

e Bengals: Defensive end Rob-
ert Geathers’ breakout season —
10'4 sacks, the most by a Bengal since
1983 — earned him one of the biggest
contract extensions in team history.
Geathers, who had a $425,009 salary
last season, signed a six-year exten-
sion that will pay him $14 million
next season in salary and bonuses.

— ASSOCIATED PRESS

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @ ON TV: CBS





his 26, took a pitch from quarterback Jim
Plunkett, and it looked as if he would run
straight into a wall of Redskins defenders
on the outside. But Allen cut inside and
went 74 yards for a touchdown that ended
: the third quarter.

Allen ran for 191 yards on the day and was named MVP in

“The Voice of God” gave its final sermon
in Super Bowl XVIII.

Announcer John Facenda, whose deep,
authoritative, resounding voice narrated
NFL Films, called his final Super Bowl in the
Los Angeles Raiders’ 38-9 rout of the
Washington Redskins. It was the first Super Bowl played in



Tampa. the Raiders’ romp.
Facenda died a little more than eight months after the This Raiders victery would mark the last time an AFC team
game. would win a Super Bowl until the Denver Broncos defeated



the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII 14 seasons later,
- PETE PELEGRIN

The Raiders, in their second season in Los Angeles after
moving from Oakland, delivered a heavenly performance.

PHOTO/AP ARCHIVES



GE _| FRIDAY, JANUARY 12,2007 |

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BASKETBALL : HOCKEY |



Nets roar back behind Kidd

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CHICAGO — Jason Kidd
recorded his 82nd career triple-
double, and the New Jersey Nets
erased an 18-point deficit against
Chicago for the second time in a
week, beating the Bulls 86-83 on
Thursday night.

Kidd had 23 points, 14
rebounds and 1] assists for his
seventh triple-double of the sea-
son. Vince Carter added 18
points for the Nets.

Kirk Hinrich made a runner in
the lane for Chicago to make it
74-67, then the Nets came back
and scored 14 consecutive
points. Richard Jefferson had a
reverse dunk, Carter made two
free throws and then Kidd fol-
lowed with a 3-pointer to give
the Nets a 76-74 lead with 5:41
left in the game.

Kidd extended the Nets’ lead
with a basket with 2:20 left, mak-
ing it 81-74. Chicago got within
81-78 with 51 seconds left, but Jef-
ferson followed with two free
throws.

Andres Nocioni’s 3 cut the
Nets’ lead. to 83-81 with 16 sec-
onds remaining. Kidd followed
by hitting 1-of-2 free throws on
the other end, making it 84-81.
After Hinrich made two free
throws, Kidd came back and
made both free throws to make it
86-83. After losing control of the
ball, Hinrich’s 3-point attempt
was blocked by Bostjan Nachbar
as time expired.

Nocioni finished with 28
points for Chicago and Ben Gor-
don had 23 — but only three
after halftime.

The Nets won for the fifth
time in six games. The Bulls have
dropped five of six.

ELSEWHERE

e Heat: Shaquille O’Neal
practiced for the first time since
tearing cartilage in his left knee
on Nov. 12, and forwards
Antoine Walker and James
Posey also rejoined the team.

Walker and Posey were
placed on the inactive list on Jan.

3 for failing to meet conditioning.

guidelines.

The Heat are midway through
a six-game road trip. Walker and
Posey will be available for
tonight’s game at Golden State,

PRO BASKETBALL

but O’Neal will not play, the
team said.

O’Neal has missed the past 28
games and played in only four
games this season. He earlier
said he would likely need about
four or five practices before he
would play.

O’Neal had surgery on Nov. 19
and was then projected to be
sidelined until at least late
December.

Walker and Posey have,

missed the past four games.
They were deactivated by coach
Pat Riley the day he began an
indefinite leave of absence to
undergo knee and hip surgery.

The injury-plagued defending
NBA champions are 15-19 and
third in the Southeast Division,
but they’re 2-1 on their trip under
interim coach Ron Rothstein.

e 76ers: The club waived
forward Chris Webber, making
the five-time All-Star eligible to
sign with another team after
clearing waivers.

The Sixers completed the
paperwork to buy out the
remaining l'4 seasons on Web-
ber’s contract Wednesday, end-
ing two disappointing years in
Philadelphia. Once he clears
waivers after 48 business hours,
teams will be eligible to sign him.

Webber missed ll of the past
14 games, officially with foot and
ankle injuries. He was due nearly
$21 million this season and $22
million next season.

e Celtics: Guard Tony Allen
will miss the rest of the season
with two torn ligaments in his
left knee.

Coach Doc Rivers said that
Allen will be out at least six
months. Allen hurt the knee
when he landed awkwardly after
an uncontested dunk in the final
minutes of a 97-84 loss to, Indi-
ana on Wednesday night.

Rivers said Allen “was not in
good spirits” when he spoke
with him earlier Thursday.

The Celtics have already lost
“Teading scorer Paul Pierce, out
since Dec. 20 with:a stress frac-
ture in his left: foot. Forward
Wally Szczerbiak is out at least a
week because of ankle injuries
and guard Delonte West is out
with a sore back.

Center Theo Ratliff is out for

THAT KIDD CAN PLAY: Nets point guard Jason Kidd goes to the
basket against Bulls guard Chris Duhon. Kidd had 23 points,
14 rebounds and 11 assists for his seventh triple-double of 4 f°
the season, as New Jersey rallied past Chicago on Thursday.

the season with a back injury.

e Nuggets-Bucks trade:
The Denver Nuggets traded fan
favorite Earl Boykins, along with
swingman Julius Hodge and
cash, to the Milwaukee Bucks for
Steve Blake. ~

Blake averaged.3.6 points and
2.5 assists in 33 games for the
Bucks this season.

“We're getting a classic point

guard,” Nuggets vice president

of basketball. operations Mark
Warkentien said. ‘“‘He’s an out-
standing shooter and solid floor
leader.”

The point eased Boykins
played a little over three years

for Denver and was averaging

15.2 points this season.

He picked up his play with
Carmelo Anthony and J.R. Smith
serving suspensions for their
roles in a brawl against the New
York Knicks, but .his future
became unclear when Denver
obtained high-scoring guard



h

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



NBA STANDINGS

Orlando
Washington
Miami
Atlanta
Charlotte

New Jersey
Toronto
New York
Boston
Philadelphia

CENTRAL

Cleveland
Detroit
Indiana
Chicago
Milwaukee

BRIAN KERSEY/AP

ATLANTIC yet

Thursday’s results

86, Chi. 83
Clev. at Pho., late

Allen Iverson in a trade.

“Earl’s performance during
our ‘suspension season’ has been
sensational,’ Warkentien said.
“He’s done a heck of a job.”

Hodge recently returned to
the lineup after being shot five
times last April when a gunman
pulled up alongside him, spray-
ing his vehicle with bullets. He’s
played in four games this season.



victory.









Detroit at Phoenix, late
Calgary at Col., late
Minnesota at Vanc., late
San Jose at L.A., late

LEADERS



NHL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Atlanta 24 13 6 2 56139 138 = 11-5-3-1 13-8-3-1 11-4-4-1
Carolina 24 18 2 2 52140 138. 13-7-0-1 11-11-2-1 — 11-3-0-0
Tampa Bay 22 21° 1 #241 46 143 142) 12-11-0-0 10-10-1-1 10-7-0-0
Washington 19 18 2 5 -45 138 150 11-10-1-2 8-8-1-3. |. 6-7-1-1
Florida _ 16 21 3 6 41128 151 11-8-1-1 5-13-2-5 = 2-11-1-0
ATLANTIC W =L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
New Jersey 25 14 O 4 54115 103 14-4-0-3 11-10-0-1 9-4-0-1
N.Y. Rangers 22 19 3 1. 48 136 142 9-9-3-0 13-10-0-1 8-8-0-0
N.Y. Islanders 21 19 1 2 45127 123 = 11-8-1-1 10-11-0-1 8-6-1-0
Pittsburgh 18 17 3 4 43129 136 10-8-2-2 8-9-1-2, 11-5-1-1
Philadelphia 11 29 2 2 26106 169 3-12-2-2 8-17-0-0 3-10-0-2
Buffalo ‘31 10 2 «1 65168 127 14-6-1-1 — 17-4-1-0 8-7-1-0
Montreal 25°14 1 4 #55135 122 14-6-0-3 11-8-1-1 8-4-0-4
Ottawa 25 19 2 O 52 154 131. 11-10-1-0 14-9-1-0 = 10-7-0-0
Toronto 20 19 2 4 -46 149 150 10-11-1-2 10-8-1-2 8-8-2-2
Boston 20 17 2 2 44124 152 = 12-8-1-1 8-9-1-1 $-7-0-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL _W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Nashville 29 11 2 #1 61 149 113 15-8-0-0 11-3-1-0
Detroit 26.12 2 3. 57129 105 12-9-1-1 9-2-0-1
Chicago 17 21 #1 #4 #39 106 126 T-10-1-3 9-9-0-0
Columbus 1622 2 3 37 111 134 7-13-1-1 5-8-0-2
St. Louis 15 21 4 3 37 103° 134 7-10-2-2. 6-10-2-2
Vancouver 24 18 #O 1. rr) 107 111 9-11-0-1 9-9-0-1
Calgary 22 15 2 2 48125 106 5-10-2-2 7-5-1-1
Edmonton 21.18 2 2 46122 125 8-11-1-1 T-T-1-0
Colorado ~21 18 2 #1 45 134 120 10-9-1-0 9-4-1-0
Minnesota 21.19 0 3 45 118 117 4-15-0-1 5-5-0-2
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Anaheim 30 9 2 5S 67 160 114 - 14-6-1-2 — 10-3-0-1
San Jose 28 15 0 O 56 132 103 15-8-0-0 13-7-0-0 8-8-0-0
Dallas 26 18 O 1 53120 112 13-8-0-0 13-10-0-1 12-5-0-0
Phoenix 20 20 1 1 42118 140 11-8-1-0 9-12-0-1 —6-10-1-1
Los Angeles 16°22 3 «3 38125 156 11-9-3-3 5-13-0-0 6-11-0-2
Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Thursday’s results Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
Carolina 6, Florida 4 Atlanta at New Jersey, 7:30 Florida 5, Pittsburgh 2
Toronto 4, Buffalo 2 Columbus at Nashville, 8 St. Louis 3, New Jersey 2
N.Y. Islanders 5, Boston 4,SO — Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 Buffalo 2, Chicago 1
Ottawa 6, N.Y. Rangers 4 Edmonton 3, San Jose 2
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 2
Tampa Bay 5, Washington 4
Anaheim 5, Dallas 1

SCORING GOALIES
Through Wednesday Through Wednesday
Player,team GP GOA Pts_~—~Pllayer, team GP MIN GAAVG
Crosby, Pit 39 21 44 65 Hasek, Det 33 1945 67 2.07
Ovechkin, Was 43 28 31. 59 Brodeur, NJ 41 2464 86 2.09
Hossa, Atl 45 26 32 58 Gigu, Ana 34 = 1905 69 2.17
St. Louis, TB 44 27 30 57 Backstrom, Minn 13 655 24 2.20
Jagr, NYR 44 17 40 57 Turco, Dal 38 2092 79 2.27
Lecavalier, TB 44 24 32 56 Kiprusoff, Cal 37 2218 85 2.30
Heatley, Ott 45 26 29 55 Toskala, S.J. 24 1391 54 2.33
Selanne, Ana 45 25 29 54 Mason, Nash 27° «1578 62 2.36
Straka, NYR 44 23 31 54 Smith, Dal 11 559 22 2.36
Iginla, Cal 39 23 30 53 Nabokov, S.J. 22) «1177 47 2.40



HOCKEY

Canes rally to beat

From Miami Herald Wire Services

RALEIGH, N.C. — Cory Stillman
scored the go-ahead goal midway through
the third period, and the Carolina Hurri-
canes rallied from a three-goal deficit to
beat the Florida Panthers 6-4 on Thursday
night.

Chad LaRose, Erik Cole, Scott Walker,
Craig Adams and Ray Whitney also
scored for the Hurricanes, who trailed 3-0
after two periods before scoring each of
their goals in a span of about 10 minutes
in the third — their first five-goal third
period since Oct. 28, 2005, against Phila-
delphia.

Olli Jokinen scored two goals and Juraj
Kolnik and Stephen Weiss added one goal
apiece for the Panthers in what seemed
like an easy victory but melted down into
just another empty trip to Raleigh —
where they haven’t won since Dec. 6,
2002.

Cam Ward stopped 28 shots in two
periods, and was benched after giving up
three goals in the second.

John Grahame finished the game and
stopped six shots.

The Hurricanes won after trailing by
three goals for the first time since Nov. 5,
1998, when the New York Islanders blew
a 3-0 lead and lost to Carolina 6-3.

Alex Auld stopped 21 shots but gave up
five goals for Florida.

SENATORS 6, RANGERS 4

NEW YORK — Daniel Alfredsson gave
Ottawa a five-goal lead early in the third
period and the Senators then held off
New York’s furious rally.

Just two nights after a lackluster 5-3
home loss to the New York Islanders that
snapped a four-game winning streak and
caused a rare postgame rant from coach
Tom Renney, the Rangers fell behind 5-0
early in the third period.

CANADIENS 4, FLYERS 2

PHILADELPHIA — Chris Higgins
scored the go-ahead goal midway through
the second period and added an assist to
help the Canadiens hand the Flyers their
fifth consecutive loss.

Mike Johnson, Alex Kovalev, and
Michael Ryder also scored for the Cana-
diens, who won their second in a row.
Tomas Plekanec and Andrei Markov each
had two assists for Montreal.



CHRIS SEWARD/MCT

WALKING ON AIR: Scott Walker of the
Hurricanes celebrates after his goal
during Carolina’s third-period rally.

ISLANDERS 5, BRUINS 4 (SO)

BOSTON — Jason Blake and Miroslav
Satan each scored goals in the shootout to
lift the Islanders.

Satan scored on the Islanders’ first
shootout attempt and Boston extended it
to sudden death when Marc Savard
scored on the Bruins’ third shot.

Brad Boyes then failed to convert and
Blake put a shot over the shoulder of Bru-
ins goalie Hannu Toivonen for the game-
winner.

LIGHTNING 5, CAPITALS 4

TAMPA, Fla. — Vincent Lecavalier
had two goals and an assist and Martin St.
Louis snapped a third-period tie with his
28th goal of the season, giving the sud-
denly streaking Lightning the victory over
the Capitals.

Vinny Prospal had a goal and two
assists and Ryan Craig also scored for the
Lightning, who got 18 saves from goal-
tender Johan Holmqvist to match a sea-
son high with their third consecutive vic-
tory.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

eos

weet Pet, GB 110 Str. Home me Away — Conf
22 14 ‘611 - 6-4 4 W-5_ “14 6 8-8 12-9
20 14 588 1 82 W-1 14-3 6-11 13-9
15 19 441 6 46 W-2 8-9 7-10 6-10
10 23 .30310% 1-9 L2 5-10 5-13 6-14
10 23. .30310% 4-6 W-1 6-11 4-12 7-13
Ww eL Pct. GB £10 Str. Home Away Conf
16 19 457 - 5-5 W-2 11-10 5-9 12-9
16 20 444 % 55 W-1 10-5 6-15 11-8
16 21 432 1 6-4 W-3 9-10 7-11 10-12
12 22 .353 3% 2-8 L2 412 8-10 8-13
9 26 257 7 37 L4 48 518 6-14
22 12 #.647 - 82 W-5 15-3 7-9 15-10
20 13 606 1% 55 L-l 9-6 11-7 14-7
20 16 556 3 7-3 W-3 10-5 10-11 15-9
20 17 541 3% 46 L-3 15-5 5-12 17-7
16 19 457 6% 5-5 L-4 9-6 7-13 6-14

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WoL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 29 8 .784 - 9-1 W-2 17-3 12-5 21-6
San Antonio 26 11 .703 3 6-4 W-3) 13-6 13-5 18-7
Houston 23 13. 689 5% 7-3 W-2 13-3 10-10 11-11
New Orleans 13 22) 371 15 2-8 W-1 7-10 6-12 6-16
Memphis 9 27 .25019% 3-7 W-l 7-11 2-16 4-15
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 24 11 686 - 6-4 \L-l 143 10-8 16-7
Denver 17 16 «#46515 6 3-7 L-l 10-9 7-7 5-10
Minnesota 17 16) «4.515 «6 «67-3, SLL 11-6 = 6-10 -10-10
Portland 14 23) 378 11 2-8 L-3 7-11 7-12) 9-11
Seattle 13 25 .34212% 2-8 L6 9-9 4-16 5-15
PACIFIC | WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 26 8 .765 - 82 W-7 15-3 11-5 12-7
L.A. Lakers 23.13 «639 «4 «66-4 «CLe2s 16-4 7-9 15-7
Golden State 18 19 .486 9% 5-5 L-2 14-6 4-13 12-13
LA. Clippers 17 19 .472 10 6-4 W-2 12-6 5-13 11-15
Sacramento 14 18 .438 11 44-6 L-3 10-10 4-8 8-13

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
Miami at G.S., 10:30 Miami 107, Sea. 103

Dal. at Ind., 7 Was. 113, Chi. 103

Mil. at Phil., 7 N.O. 96, Atl. 77

Det. at Atl., 7:30 Ind. 97, Bos. 84

Tor. at Bos., 7:30 N.Y. 106, Phi, 99

Char. at N.Y. 7:30
Minn. at Memp., 8
: Wash. vs. N.O. @0.C., 8

Cha. 103, Det. 96
Tor. 90, Milwaukee 77
LA.C. 92, Min. 91

Sac. at Port., 10 Hou. 102, L.A.L. 77
Utah at Sea., 10:30 Dal. 99, Por. 74
Hou. at Den., 10:30 S.A. 92, Den. 83
Orl. at Lakrs, 10:30 Orl. 91, G.S. 76

LEY eV) oe)

Through Wednesday

LATE WEDNESDAY SCORING REBOUNDING
e Spurs 92, Nuggets 83: G FG FT PTSAVG ~——————C“(ié«WG OFF DEF TOOT’ AVG
: Anthony, Den. 22 265 153 696 31.6 Howard, Orl. 36 129 333 462 128
Tony Parker scored 26 points — 4renas, Wash. 34 329 264 1028 30.2 Garnett, Minn. 33-82 333415 12.6
and Tim Duncan had 19 to lead _Werson, Den. 25 246 222 735 29.4 Camby, Den. 28 64 262 326 11.6
Sere z Bryant, LAL 33 305 259 924 28.0 Boozer, Utah 35 110 296 406 11.6
visiting San Antonio. wale, es 28 - a" TI 27.8 phates Boke 8 123 250 373 113
i Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 124 244 368 11.2
e Heat 107, SuperSonics James, Clev. 34 325 209 905 266 Lee, N.Y. 37 142 248 390 10.5
103: Dwyane Wade scored 14 of _ Pierce, Bos. 24 198 181 638 26.6 O'Neal, Ind. 31 71 255 326 10.5

evhis 29 points in the final eight °*."" 21282 195 699 23° ASSISTS
minutes to rally visiting Miami. . FIELD. GOALS es : G’,_AST AVG
e Magic 91 Warriors 76: . FG FGA PCT iach, phos 32, 353 110
. : Biedrins, GS. 167 267 .625 Kidd, NJ. 34°° ° 3129.2
Dwight Howard had a career- Lee, NN. : 161 263 .612 Paul NOK. 27 242 30
; ; -hi Stoudemire, Phoe. 216 361 .598 Miller, Phil. 33 291 8
high 30 points and a season-high Dalembert, Phil. 140 241 581 Williams, Utah 35 304.87
25 rebounds to lead visiting Cory B68 Gl ats, 0 Davis Gs at, eae Bt
: : oward, Orl. a: illups, De’
Orlando to its fifth consecutive _ patterson, Mil. 196 350 1560 Wade, Mia. 2 86.220 -« 7:9
Bogut, Mil. 174 313 .556

Panthers

DUCKS 5, STARS 1

DALLAS — Teemu Selanne scored
three goals and Andy McDonald added
four assists to help the Ducks beat the
Stars.

Selanne registered his 19th career hat
trick — his first since March 29, 2001.
That one came against the Ducks when he
played for the San Jose Sharks.

Ilya Bryzgalov stopped 17 shots for the
Ducks, who had only one victory in their
previous six games (1-4-1) after getting off
to a franchise-best 28-5-6 start.

Scott Niedermayer and Joe DiPenta
added goals for the Ducks, whose 67
points lead the Western Conference
despite their recent slump.

Niklas Hagman scored for the injury-
depleted Stars, who are 1-4-1 in their past
six games.

MAPLE LEAFS 4, SABRES 2

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Jeff O’Neill scored
twice and Mats Sundin added two assists,
lifting the banged-up Maple Leafs over
the Sabres.

Alex Steen had a goal and an assist, and
Pavel Kubina also scored in a game in
which the Maple Leafs never trailed.

Sundin’s two assists gave him 495 with
Toronto, moving him into third on the
team’s career list, two ahead of former
captain Dave Keon.

Toronto snapped a two-game losing
skid and won on the road for only the
third time in nine games (3-5-1).

ELSEWHERE

e Blue Jackets: The club placed left
wing Rick Nash on injured reserve —
because of a back injury, and said
defenseman Duvie Westcott will be side-
lined indefinitely because of a concus-
sion. -

The Blue Jackets also recalled left wing
Alexandre Picard and defenseman Der-
rick Walser from Syracuse of the AHL.

Picard has appeared in seven games
with the Blue Jackets this season.

Walser was acquired from Carolina in
November.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Oilers 3, Sharks 2: Marc-Andre
Bergeron and Jarret Stoll each had a pow-
er-play goal and an assist in the first
period to lead visiting Edmonton.







. 8 HEALTH





THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-

tors Hospital conference room.

| m@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm e Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach © Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm _

to 7pm / 8: fale to 9:30pm.

The Cancer - Society of i
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

B@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh

, ‘Creek, Central Andros © Club 7178 meets

each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach e Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic. House, IBM Office, 4th
floor, meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.

~ WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free

4. appetizers and numerous drink specials.

f@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the





hg Babamas, mets. at;







public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

-FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are

held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
ter Blake Road. For more information call
327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,
Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

Gratip meets every Wednesday trom 5:2

to"7$m at Canver “Headquatters, two d6ors
south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets
every Wednesday from Ipm — 2pm at East
Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street, Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the Ist and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the
world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on

<<)

BOTH SHOWS UP UNTIL JAN 27, 2007
Third National Exhibition (ne3):

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to insti Hlation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalague.

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
Marth 2006. it contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imaqinathon,

















Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at

large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See-u there.

@ HEALTH
Free public health lectures featuring distin-

ager guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
ag ice Society of the Bahamas Support ;

pital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources &.Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend e TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from lpm to 2pm.

AROUN D

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 9B S

NASSAU




PHOTOS Welle ne





FRIDAY (227



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

m@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak

. Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to

attend meetings on the-third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.



SATURDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. ;

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid class-

es are offered every third Saturday of-the
month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-

tive at 302.4732 for more information and.

learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the

public of its meeting times and places: The.

Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

m@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness
Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-
ed persons are welcome to attend. For more
information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.







THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

Jayhawks deliver a message

BY RICK PLUMLEE
McClatchy Newspapers

LAWRENCE, Kan. — As far as
Kansas coach Bill Self is concerned,
you don’t make major statements by
winning big at home. Real statements
come with road victories.

OK, fair enough.

But you would have to think that
No. 6 KU’s first step into the Big 12
season with Wednesday night’s 87-57
blowout of No. 9 Oklahoma State was
at least as noteworthy. .

At least Brandon Rush thinks it’s
that — and much more.

“This was a big-time statement for
us,” KU’s sophomore guard said after
scoring a game-high 18 points. “This
is a statement to the rest of the Big 12.
We won big at home against a top-10
team. We have to defend our title.”

On that much, Self will agree. But
he also recalls tying Texas for the
regular-season title last season
despite losing by 25 points in Austin.

“One game, one win,” he said. “We
got hammered at Texas, so I guess
you’d have to stay that was a state-
ment. But it was only one game. It’s a
16-game [conference] season.”

What is certain is that Kansas
went hard after Oklahoma State’s

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Williams,



JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES

RUSH JOB: Brandon Rush and the
No. 6 Jayhawks shot down the
No. 9 Cowboys on Wednesday.

depleted ranks, pushing the Cowboys
up and down the court from the
opening tip. The Jayhawks led 33-11
with nearly 9 minutes left to play in
the first half, and they kept the ham-
mer down, with the exception of a
brief stretch in the second half.

Arizona

beat Oregon State;

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Marcus Williams scored a career-
high 27 points, leading No. 10 Arizona
to an 83-72 victory over Oregon State
on Thursday night in Tucson.

It was the fourth 20-point game in
the past five starts for Williams, who
also had eight rebounds.

Chase Budinger added 16 points

“and 10 rebounds as the Wildcats ~

‘ (13-2, 4-1 Pac-10) bounced back from
an overtime defeat at Washington
State on Saturday. Arizona is 9-0 at
McKale Center.

Marcel Jones scored 26 points and
Sasa Cuic added 16 to lead the Bea-
vers (8-9, 0-4 Pac-10), who lost their
season-high fourth game in a row.

Oregon State, coached by former
Arizona assistant Jay John, has
dropped 25 consecutive games in

. Tucson.

'. The Beavers’ last victory at

McKale Center came in 1983, the year
before Lute Olson arrived at Arizona.

Arizona, whose 41.2 percent
3-point shooting leads the Pac-10,
shot only 16.7 percent (3-for-18) from
beyond the arc, its percentage lowest
of the season.

The Wildcats scored the game’s
first 10 points, with Williams and
Budinger each scoring five, and went
on another 10-0 run late in the first
half to take a 42-27 halftime lead.

Williams and Budinger combined
to outscore the Beavers 30-27 in the
first half as Arizona limited Oregon
State to 34.5 percent shooting from
the floor, 21.4 percent from beyond
the 3-point arc.

Sparked by Williams’ seven
points, the Wildcats opened the sec-
ond half with a 13-6 run to take a 55-33
lead with 15:16 to go.

The Wildcats spent the rest of the
game protecting the’ lead and tuning
up for their matchup with No. 15 Ore-
gon on Sunday night, also at McKale
Center.

Oregon State wraps up its desert
trip at Arizona State on Saturday.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

also Wins

e No. 20 Memphis 79, Hous-
ton 69: Chris Douglas-Roberts
scored 16 points, Joey Dorsey
grabbed 10 rebounds and blocked
three shots, and the Tigers won on
the road.

Jeremy Hunt added 14 and Robert
Dozier had 12 points and three blocks

for the Tigers (12-3, 2-0 Conference’

USA), who have won four in a row
and six of their past seven.
Memphis is Conference USA’s

‘top-scoring team, but the Tigers beat

the Cougars with their defense as
much as with their offense, holding
Houston to 43 percent shooting (26-
of-60).

Memphis also dominated inside,
outrebounding the Cougars 35-26 and
scoring 40 points in the paint.

Robert McKiver scored 22, but
only five in the second half, to lead
the Cougars (5-8, 0-1), who ha ve lost
five ganes in a row and six of their
past seven.

Memphis built an early nine-point
lead with a 9-0 spurt, fueled by Hous-
ton miscues. Dozier finished a fast
break with a layup, and Hunt sank a
3-pointer, both off Cougars’ turn-
overs, to put Memphis up 14-5.

The Tigers led 20-13 when Jahmar
Thorpe rebounded a 3-point miss by
McKiver with one hand and dunked
the ball, triggering an 8-2 spurt.
McKiver swished a pair of 3-pointers
to cut the Tigers’ lead to 22-21.

Houston trailed by three when
Memphis mounted a 13-3 burst to
push the lead into double digits.
Douglas-Roberts converted a three-
point play after another Houston
turnover, and Antonio Anderson hit a
3-pointer to give the Tigers a 39-26
lead.

Memphis led 47-33 at the break
after hitting 18 of 28 shots (64 per-
cent).

The Tigers dominated inside at
both ends in the half, outrebounding
Houston 19-14, blocking four shots
and scoring 24 points in the paint.



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | SOCCER

“Run, run, run,” Jayhawks center
Sasha Kaun said after scoring a sea-
son-high 16 points.

With only eight scholarship play-
ers available, the Cowboys had no
chance of keeping the pace. And, oh,
what KU’s defense did to OSU. The
Jayhawks held a team averaging
nearly 85 points per game to a season
scoring low.

“This was an old-fashioned butt-
kicking,” OSU coach Sean Sutton
said. “Our guys just didn’t compete.”

Hard to do when you can’t even
get an offense working. KU’s 17
steals, including six by Mario Chal-
mers, doomed the Cowboys.

No one took the brunt of KU’s
defense harder than forward Mario
Boggan and guard JamesOn Curry.
They came in averaging a combined
4] points per game but put up only 20
on a collective 7-of-24 shooting.

“The statement we made was with
our defense,” Kansas freshman guard
Sherron Collins said. “We’re not
going to let anybody run over us.”

This was a type of game you could
see coming from KU in recent weeks
after playing mediocre against lesser
competition.

But although it was the Jayhawks’

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 | 7E

13th consecutive victory over OSU at
Allen Fieldhouse and the seventh out
of the past nine games overall, this
night was somewhat out of character
for the series. It was KU’s biggest
margin of victory over the Cowboys
since winning by 32 points a decade
ago at Allen Fieldhouse.

“We just had some guys flying
around,” Self said.

Particularly Rush. Then again, he
finally paid attention to his mom.

“Before every game, she calls me
and tells me to be more aggressive,”
Rush said. “I listen, but sometimes it
hasn’t worked out.”

It did Wednesday night.

Rush was forever slashing into the
lane, drawing foul after foul on the
way to making a career-high hine
free throws out of 10 attempts, also a
career high.

Collins also provided KU with
plenty of interesting moments.

The slimmer and ‘trimmer guard
triggered numerous fast breaks, fin-
ishing them with some of his six
assists and others with layups.

But twice he fouled Curry on
3-point attempts. The first resulted in
three free throws from the OSU

junior guard in the opening half, but



In Big 12 opener

the second brought a four-point play
that cut KU’s lead to 13 points, 53-40,
with 15 minutes remaining.

Not a problem. Collins soon fol-
lowed with a 3-pointer of his own as
the Jayhawks went on a 16-5 burst
that virtually finished the Cowboys.

The Jayhawks left the Cowboys
offense in a jumbled wreck on the
way to leading 47-30 at halftime.

OSU had trouble getting any
offense sets going while committing
13 turnovers before the break, includ-
ing ll off Jayhawk steals. Point guard
Byron Eaton had five turnovers alone
in the game’s first 2 minutes.

The Jayhawks used a particularly-
rough ball-handling stretch by OSU
to fuel a 19-3 run that left KU with a
33-11 lead with 8:10 remaining in the
half. Rush, who had 10 points in the
first seven minutes, made a soaring,
one-handed dunk during that stretch.

“We're not going to play that well,
making shots and having things fall
right for us every game,” Self said,
“but there was certainly great inten-
sity. Guys were ready to play, and
we've been getting better. Now we’ve
got to take our show on the road.”

That would be Saturday after-
noon, in a game at Iowa State.



JOHN MILLER/AP

A MAD SCRAMBLE: Marcus Williams (3) and Mustafa Shakur (15) of Arizona battle Oregon State’s Angelo
Tsagarakis (4) for a loose ball in the second half Thursday night. Williams led all scorers with 27 points.

OTHER GAMES

e Seton Hall 79, St. John’s 63:
Brian Laing scored 18 points, Jamar
Nutter added 17, and the two led a
26-6 second-half run that carried the
Pirates at home.

Larry Davis added 17 points and
Eugene Harvey 16 points and eight
assists for Seton Hall (10-5, 2-1 Big
East), which shot 52 percent from the
field in the second half and limited S
t. John’s (10-6, 1-2) to 32 percent.

Anthony Mason Jr. matched his
career high with 22 points, leading
thé Red Storm, and Lamont Hamilton
added 13. However, the two com-
bined for only 10 points in the second
half.

Laing had 10 points and Nutter
nine in the big spurt that turned a
44-43 deficit with 18:07 to play into a
69-50 lead with 3:08 to go.

e Xavier 71, Fordham 56: Justin
Doellman scored 20 points, and
Xavier hit a school-record 15 3-point-
ers in its victory in New York City.

The Musketeers (12-4, 2-0 Atlantic
10) were 10-for-14 on 3-pointers in
taking a 44-15 halftime lead, and the
6-foot-9 Doellman was 3-for-5 from

‘beyond the arc.

The Rams (8-7, 1-2) were 4-for-16

from the field in the first half and
committed 14 turnovers in falling
behind by 29 points.

Stanley Burrell added 18 points for
the Musketeers in their fourth con-
secutive victory. They have won 14 of
their past 15 against Fordham and
lead the all-time series 15-3.

Marcus Stout had 15 points for the
Rams, who closed within 12 points
only twice in the second half.

e George Mason 73, Towson
44: Folarin Campbell had 18 points
and nine assists, and the Patriots won
big on the road, posting their 10th
consecutive victory over the Tigers.

Will Thomas added 16 points for
the Patriots (8-7, 2-3 Colonial Ath-
letic Association). George Mason
improved to 22-8 all-time against
Towson (7-8, 2-3).

Gary Neal led the Tigers, scoring
18 points. :

Towson sustained its most lop-
sided setback of the season. The
Tigers have dropped three of four.

George Mason, the worst 3-point
shooting team in the CAA, converted
nine of 19 attempts from beyond the
arc. Campbell matched a career-high
with four 3-pointers.

Campbell had 10 points in the

opening 20 minutes as George Mason
built a 33-19 halftime lead.

e Hofstra 55, Drexel 53 (OT):
Carlos Rivera hit a jump shot with
36 seconds remaining in overtime,
and Hofstra won in Philadelphia,
snapping the Dragons’ 10-game win-
ning streak.

The Pride (12-4, 5-0 Colonial Ath-
letic Association) scored the last
seven points in the game and won
their sixth game in a row. Hofstra has
won 12 of 13.

Antoine Agudio scored three
points in overtime and finished with
26 for Hofstra, and Loren Stokes
added 13 points.

Dominick Mejia hit four 3-pointers
and scored 21 points for Drexel (12-3,
4-1), which shot a season-low 29.4
percent and lost for the first time in
six home games. Bashir Mason added
13 points.

Frank Elegar, who scored all 10 of
Drexel’s points in overtime, hit a free
throw with 2:56 remaining in over-
time to give the Dragons a 53-48 lead
before Hofstra rallied.

Mejia sent the game to overtime
when he hit three free throws with
13 seconds left to play in regulation,
knotting the score at 48.

Beckham’s commitment to Galaxy should bolster MLS

*DAVID BECKHAM

“David Beckham isa global sports
icon who will transcend the sport of
soccer in America,” MLS Commis-
sioner Don Garber said. “His deci-
sion to continue his storied career in
Major League Soccer is testament to
the fact that America is rapidly
becoming a true ‘Soccer Nation,’
with Major League Soccer at the
core.”

Beckham will become the biggest
star to play soccer in the United
States since Pele and Franz Becken-
bauer played in the now-defunct
North American Soccer League in
the 1970s.

“He’s a cultural icon,” former
U.S. soccer star Alexi Lalas, the pres-




ident and general manager of the Los
Angeles Galaxy, told The Associated
Press in July. “I think that the people
that don’t know a tremendous
amount about soccer know who
Beckham is, whether it’s the way he
looks or who he’s married to or what
he’s done in international soccer.
“The fact is, he’s transcended the
sport.”
The Galaxy opens play on April 8
in Houston against the Dynamo.
“It’s great for the Galaxy. It’s
great for the league,” Real Salt Lake
coach John Ellinger said. “One of his
attractions is he’s still playing well.
It’s a shame it can’t be at the begin-
ning of the season, so you can’t avoid
him. Most coaches are probably say-
ing, “Give me my L.A. games early.”

Beckham’s four-year contract
with Real Madrid expires at the end
of this season. He joined the team
from Manchester United in 2003,
where he had had won six league
titles, two FA Cups and the Champi-
ons League title.

But Beckham, the world’s most
recognized player, hasn’t won a
major trophy since joining Madrid.

“I have enjoyed my time in Spain
enormously, and I am extremely
grateful to the club for giving me the
opportunity to play for such a great
team and their amazing fans,”* Beck-
ham said.

Beckham has been unhappy this .

season at Madrid under coach Fabio
Capello. fie has started only seven of
25 matches, and he was left off the

squad for Thursday’s Copa del Rey
match against Real Betis.

“For the rest of this season, I will
continue to give 100 percent to my
coach, teammates and fans, as I
believe Fabio Capello will bring this
club and its supporters the success
they truly deserve,” Beckham said.

Before the season began, Beck-
ham led England to the quarterfinals
of the World Cup, scoring from a
free kick in the second round to beat
Ecuador 1-0. But he was taken off the
field early in the second half against
Portugal with ankle. and Achilles
tendon injuries, and his team was
eliminated in a penalty shootout.

A day after the game, Beckham
stepped down as captain of the team
— a post he had held for 58 of his

94 international appearances. Then,
on Aug. ll, England coach Steve
McClaren dropped Beckham from
the team altogether, signaling the
end of his international career.

Then came more heartache in
Madrid: Beckham was injured in
November when he was allowed to
travel to Rome to visit movie stars
Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, but
Beckham was forced to skip the
wedding and return to Madrid to sit
on the bench — another sign that his
days in Madrid under Capello were |
numbered.

Beckham and his wife are worth
$169 million, according to Britain’s
Rich List. Beckham alone reportedly
makes about $32 million per year in
salary and endorsements.



PAGE 8E, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 _



WHEN SHE'S DONE
WITH YOU... YOU'LL
BE THE COOLEST
OUY IN, TOWN’














WE'LL. START
IN MEN'S
SPORTSWEAR...
MY. FRIEND
ALISON:
WORKS THERE’







LUANN OPENS THE LETTER
AND READS... ay

“LUAWN, IM
GLAD YOU DECIDEP

70 USE THE
STUDIOS



“70. SAY

“WHILE YOURE THERE, T LOVE You,
r LOVE 7

THINK OF ME SOME-
TIMES. ILL BE
THINKING OF YOU,















©2006 by North America Syndicate, ine. World rights reserved.

BLONDIE

HONEY, HAVE YOU SEEN MY OLD
BOWLING BALL?

GEEZ LOUISE, WHAT: KIND OF
TWISTED LOGIC IS THAT?! 1:






ARE you
FINALLY GOING







AREN'T GOING TO. ,)\
THROW IT AWAY, (683

WEST



#Q 1082
VA63
#Q1052
436



















“NOPE. WUSTA BIT OF
PEANUT BUTTER LEFT
| OVER FROM LUNCH
tO











NO, | DON'T

TAINK | MANE

VERN HIGH -
CTATIONS



GOCOMICS, Cor /POVEEQ ITIL

POT. BY ULVEREAL Boe UOTE

WIL pr @ CASTILE. HET

iy 4
BRN © VALET WE, WO =

TIGER











THERE'S A MAN AT
THE POOR SELLING
STUFF



THE BYE AND
SIN’ NO
THANKS’





Siice 37, Try-St.38, Trade. . ‘
DOWN: 1, Ma-Rio 2, So-meho-w 4, Rain 5, Small-s.6,
M-Ala.-y 7, Beg-un 9, Car 12, Fore-man 14, Ded 16,
PO-red 17, Perth 19, Stunner 20, A-Ct.-or 21, Rated
(trade) 23, Lettars 24, Hooter 25, Tea(-m) 27, Bowls 28,
MaaOut 0" “ene 20 Mu 6199, Hay



Anger 38, Ethos
DOWN: 1, Moral 2, Capital 4, Lout 5, Palace 6, Entry 7,
Flash 9, Cab 12, Bengali 14, Nor 16, Otter 17, Eerie 19,
Steamer 20, Stabs 21, Maine 23, Per cent 24,

Ballet 25, Tar 27, Other 28, Sauce 30, Beret 32, Peso 33,
Hag :



1 Bestlinetotown (5). : 2 Realm in which a nomad may be out Pa
6 Departed, some of us ofine (6)
coming to blows (5) 3 Not a quality, that’s understood (6) hee Pee
© Cross? You'l feel better about h (2,4) | 4 Leased to a bit ofa simpleton (3) Pe ge
10 Quick to put trams into reverse (6) § Alito give a child a name (5) Re eae
11. Pada dom ity wihasatot | @ Gfenane fra Lavin Pee
shuffling stamp (6) CN cg
12 Their attractions may be seen as 7 To get the water out of cameras Red lee
ronda, | wrest a
13 Free use of Braile in poltics (7) | 8 Very best advice atthe summit).
15 Footie) | 22Batlrboy in a t aa
17 Points |had to make to a gir (4) | 23 . The fown Vivien went to (5) ea bi
18 Capers can get you into one (8) 14 Sick at heart, he gets by (6) eal
19 The way to marcti? (5). -—-=-—«|_ 28 Hospital ones due to boxing? (6)
20 Lhe the rose-tnted past, maybe] 16 Exctudebadbroad (6) = | | i
long about half dead (6). "18 That of a Spartan leader at Troy,
22 Leber covering abet? (4) | Pathaps?)
24 As ina London street market? (3) | 28 Won't accept some more saiety NSS :
2 epoca) | : oe
26 Piece of music, quiet, soft and 21° Loutich love for a swimmer (6) Ww 9 — Judge (7)
sentimental (6) 22 Bert's upset about it being sour (6) | ad e aes
2 Figures in a bali game (5) 23 Figure a social worker to be the: N 7 bury
28 Not all great warriors - gcoupant (8): a. 15 Moadow (3)
are fighting (2,3) 28 Run after Charlie East (5): | > 7 Lary (4)
(6
29 Not quite set aside for 26 Something to clear up at the 2 Bae )
oe . 28 seavk iin ai aiabeoice ac 20 Fao
30 A 6) 22° Chime (4
31 aunenaie play (8) 24 Short sleep (3)
‘ 25 hey ia
26 Skinflint
Yesterdiay’s cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 2 an
ACROSS: 3, Prim 8, Bacon (no cab) 10, Melee 11, Ram | ACROSS: 3, Slope 8, Local 10, Angle 11, Rap 12, Built 13, . Cee
12, Final 13, Fired on 18, Lap up 18, Har 19, Sy on-E 21, | Cabinet 15, Arose 18, Ton 19, Scythe 21, Margate 22, Teal Sp Eek
Ro-Bert’s 22, C-law 23, Le-NT 24, H-a-unted 28, Oberon | 23, Peri 24, Bloater 26, Bonsal 29, Mar 31, Steal 32, basket (6)
J - 29, Net31, Rode-0 32, Hea-the-r 94, A-TT-ar 35, Ear 36, | Perched 34, Ulcer 35, Ear 96, Fence 37, a. Molars (5)

COMICS PAGE



‘T COULDNT.GO To SCHOOL TODAY, “CAUSE MY |
MoM WAS AFRAID I'D GINE SOMEBODY MY COLP.

South dealer.
’ Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
#7543
Â¥Q92
A964
#K 10
EAST
@J6

38
$Q872

SOUTH

*AK9

WK7

@K73-

$A9543

The bidding:

West

Opening lead — two of spades.

Assume you’re in three notrump
and West leads a spade. You win
East’s jack with the ace, and the
problem is what to do next.

Actually, there’s only one correct .
way to proceed, and, if you find it,
you get home safe and sound. You
lead a low club at trick two and, after
West follows low, play the ten from
dummy. As the cards lie, this some-

‘Upping the Percentages

Â¥J10854

North — East
Pass -2NT Pass








what irregular finesse makes the con-
tract. You eventually score four club
tricks, two spades, two diamonds and
a heart.

But if you lead a ciub to the king
at trick two, instead of playing the
ten, you are almost sure to finish
down one.

The advantage of playing the ten
from dummy is that you make four
club tricks not only when the suit is
divided 3-3, but also when the suit is
divided 4-2 and West started with the
Q-x, J-x or Q-J-x-x.

These possibilities cannot be
lightly brushed aside. Thus, if you
played only for the clubs to be
divided 3-3 — by cashing the K-A
and continuing with a third club —
you would have only a 36 percent
chance of finding the suit evenly
divided. ‘

But if you play the ten from
dummy at trick two, your chances
improve to about 58 percent because
of the possibility of finding West
with either a doubleton honor or both
honors.

In essence, the outcome of the
hand rests on whether or not you
make four club tricks, and leading to
the ten at trick two offers by far the

best chance of achieving that goal.

ANC =al

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
- one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb forms

ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in

inkjet printer).
TODAY’S TARGET



‘Good 13; very good 19; excellent 25 (or more).

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION

WE APOLOGISE TO OUR READERS

TARGET Answer to Thursday’s

Target not received







Large snrup (4)
Type of nut (6)
12 Custom (5)
13 Buffato (5)

14 Slumber (5)
15 Decrease (5)
16 Fish (5)

18 Allude (5)

19 Current (7)
21. Profession (6)
22 = Scan (6)

23 = Climb (6)

28 Majestic (5)
26 Act silently (4)
28 Encountered (3)

~
og



MY TIGER, IT SEEMS, IS RUNNING ‘ROUND NUDE.
THIS FUR COAT MUST HAVE MADE HIM PERSPIRE. fe
IT LIES ON THE FLOOR- SHOULD THIS BE CONSTRUED
AS A PERMANENT CHANGE OF ATTIRE?

PERHAPS HE CONSIDERS ITS COLORS PASSE,

OR MANBE IT FIT HIM Too SNUG
© WILL HE WANT IT BACK? SHOULD.T PUT IT AWAY ? =
OR USE IT RIGHT HERE AS A RUG?





TRIBUNE SPORTS




© 1990 Universal Press Syndicate



FRIDAY,
JANUARY 12

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20

Someone you care about is -acting
strangely and you need to get to the?
bottom of what is bugging this per-
son. It may take a while, but you’ll
find a resolution. :

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

‘In order'to achieve great things you

need to take risks, Taurus. This is
definitely the week for risk-taking.

You may not be immediately happy-. ate

with the results, but hang in there.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
There’s a side of you that loves
order but the other side thrives on
chaos. Feed your need t» have
things unruly and exciting this
week, Gemini.

CANCER ~ Jun 22/Jul 22

Be true to yourself, Cancer, and stick
to your. guns when someone chal-
lenges what you know to be right.
Pretty soon most will come around
to your way of thinking anyway.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

When you’re faced with a particu-
larly vexing situation this week,

jLeo, you'll find that the answer
f.isn’t nearly as complicated as you
.f-originally thought.

‘F VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

Take note of the little things around
you, Virgo. They will help you
spawn new ideas. Channel your cre-
ative energy into a special project
this week. 3

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23

Take inventory of the relationships
you have that need a little work, Libra.
You may find that you’re spending
time with some people more than oth-”
ers and this is adding to the problem.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Noy 22
This week you need to adjust your
focus to give equal time to both work
and family, Scorpio. It’s easier said
than done, however, when a large
project arises.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
To the surprise of those around you,
Sagittarius, you are able to see and
relate to someone else’s point of.
view. Embrace these feelings and-
make a plan to have more of them.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Are you pining over someone or:

something that seems out of your . >. -

grasp, Capricorn? Find a new. object
of your devotion and you'll feel.
much better. ,

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
There are times when you have to .
put your people-pleasing skills aside
and speak the honest truth, Aquarius.
This week is one of them. Don’t sug- -
arcoat anything.

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20

If you’ve been a bag of emotions
it’s time to reign in those feelings,
Pisces. You can no longer coast
out of control.



CHESS by Leonard Barden

Magnus Carlsen v Luis Galego,
Reykjavik Open 2006. Carlsen,
15, broke the legendary Bobby
Fischer's age record last year as
the youngest ever world title
candidate. He was again
impressive at Reykjavik, missing _
first prize only because of a
final-round blunder and beating
the world number two Vishy
Anand in the blitz tournament.
Here as White (to move) Carlsen
has an extra pawn but Black's
. pieces are quite active and a

long struggle seems in prospect.
However, it took just two turns
for the teenager to persuade his
opponent to resign. What
happened?





LEONARD BARDEN

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

“Aygiau at 0} Buypu0ode +1)Y 40 +LXN b Aq

pamorto} +9UN € 96°"Z J] BYU LON € BN" I +BY

RH) +GUD P SUN +IXO € SHEAR ayy poubisar
yortg Pur jZPYZ Z4X0 i9PYT ‘Twopmos ssaug





ss



















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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 22 8:05am. 04
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. i : 1.8 8:02p.m.. 0.2
Saturday 241am. 22 9:05am. 04
: a 2:52p.m. 1.8 8:56pm. 0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterda Sunday 238am. 23 70:03 a.m. 0.3
= ABACO Temperature 3:50pm. 18 9:50pm. 0.1
3 a Hight isisacdsis scene oesteere ree 77° F/25° C : ; 02
High: 75° F/24° C ‘aw 70° FI21° C Monday 4:33 2.m. 24 10:58am. 0.
a seesseceeessnraseersereeeserseseeenens . -46 p.m. | 10: ‘m. 0.0
Low:58°F/14°C Normal high. "77° F/25° C SEP Ve
ZA LA Normal low . .. 65° F/18° C
WEST PALM BEACH Last year’s high etsions 82° F/28° C
LZ High:78°F/26°G Last year’s IOW ....eesseeseesseesees snnssdocsnees 70° F/21° C
ZL : Low:69°F/21°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:57 a.m. Moonrise... . 12:57 a.m.
Za As of 1 p.m. yeSterday accesses 0.00" Sunset....... 5:40 p.m. Moonset . . . . 12:16 p.m.
Vearto:date? c.sccc esse: Peeise ssietiissiteneO:20"
High: 75° F/24°C Normal year to date ............... Sebesticeansbs sveee 0:63" id in
Low:57° F/14°C AA ;
AccuWeather.com (77
All forecasts and maps provided by _ - :
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Jan. 18 Jan. 25 Feb. 2 Feb. 10
NASSAU = =—=—_—CséHigh: 80° F/27°C
Low: 67° F/19°C
KEY WEST 22 CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26°C High: 78° F/26°C
Low: 63° F/21 € 262° F/7°C
- GREATEXUMA = = SAN SALVADOR
Hight 80° F/27° C Hight #1°F/27°C
. igh: 81° F/27
. Low: 69° F/21°C 2 cEHae
‘ . ' Zs Z Low: 66° F/19° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's s Ze
highs and tonights's lows. High: 79° F/26° G Fe
~ Low:67° F/19°G _
see
Today . “Saturday 4 Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low wW High Low W ___ High: 84°F/29°C
FO FC FO F/G ___cLow:67°F/i9°C
Albuquerque 53/11 33/0 c 48/8 24/-4- 712 54/ ACKLINS — Be
Anchorage 21/-6 13/-10_ sf 24/-4 13/-10 Jacksonville 74/23 51/10 75/23 53/11 542 33/0 High = ee E EE
Atlanta 6246 48/8 pe 66/18 51N0 pe KansasCify 35/1 21/6 33/0. 22/-5 50/10 | LAN OL
Atlantic City 5412 45/7 pc 55/12 43/6 c LasVegas = 48/8. 27/-2 41/5 23/-5 38/3 28/-2 te Low: 68° F/20°C
Baltimore © “53M1 44/5 pe 5542 44/6 c LittleRock = 6a/18 55/12 66/18 54/12 68/20 50/10. Leb2°F/I7°C
Boston 50/10 38/3 pe 48/8 33/0 c Los Angeles 55/12 38/3 57/13 38/3 38/3 35/1 4 fs
Buffalo 42/5 32/0 + = 3A 27/2 Louisville «60/15. 49/9 B4A2 49/9 © 23/-5 9/12 20/6 8-13 Cc! GREAT INAGUA
Charleston,SC 69/20 48/8 pe 73/22 51/10 pc Memphis 67/19 58/14 66/18 57/13 71/2 70/21 59/15 c¢ High: 83° F/28°C
Chicago =——i“‘<“‘w GG AA OBS Miami 77/25 67AQ 78/25 66/18 BTAS 58/14 40/4 s_ "Fi 67° F/19°C
Cleveland 48/8 38/2 1 41/5 32/0 + Minneapolis 19/-7 6/-14 19/-7 9/-12 ¢ San Francisco 51/10 51/10 37/2 s - eS
Dallas 679 53/11 t = 626 SIMO ~t ~—Nashville. 6216 Sait c | «GANT Sa2 1 Seattle = 82/0 87/2 28/-2 “pe
Denver 20/-6 6/-14 sn 21/-6 7/-13° sn New Orleans 73/22 62/16 c¢ 74/23 60/15 c Tallahassee 73/22 74/23 53/11 pe
Detroit — 44/6 29/-1 + 34/1 27/-2 ¢ New York «53/114 43/6 pe = 49/9 40/4 c= Tampa 8026 80/26 61/16 = s.
Honolulu 81/27 69/20 pce 81/27 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 50/10 32/0 t - 39/3 344 F Tucson 59/15 51/10 25/-3 pe Re
Houston 74/23 66/18 c¢ 74/22 6216 ¢ Orlando 79/26 58/14 pe 78/25 57/13 $s Washington, DC 59/15 5713 45/7

Partly cloudy and j Breezy with times of Partly sunny and
clouds and sun. breezy. 3 clouds and sun. ; nice. ~
| High: 79°
High: 79° Low: 67° 4 Low: 69°
Neuter lh PY eg atl ig i aie















5
es.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the



Mostly sunny and Warm with sun and






warm. ; some clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 83° i High: 82°
Low: 71°
Mela





































Today



Low W High tow W
F/C FC F/C
743s 88/31 71121 pe.
TI 46/7 6 53/11 49/9 c
ADA 21-2 &. 86/2 26/-3 sn

S21 pe ——«B/18 55/12 s



48/8 s
EES:



8881 7222 s
65/18 55/12 pe
141 -4/-20
84/28 69/20 pe
85/29 70/21 sh
‘7322 563s
49/9 35/1 c





-68/20 r
Copenhagen
Dublin

























Frankfurt 49/9 40/4 c

Geneva — - SIAQ 35/1

Halifax 35/1 21/-6 pe

Havana GIA

Helsinki 21/-6 sn

Hong Kong 59/1

Islamabad

Istanbul

Jerusalem

Johannesburg -

Kingston

London 55/12 50/10 5412 48/8 c

Madrid 467 «34H po 8 — S00 4A pe

Manila 84/28 74/23 pc 86/30 73/22 ¢

Mexico City 5/23, ADA s 725 41s
77/25 59/15 pe 81/27 58/14 pc

3 ='36 217-6 sn «DAFA 10/-12 pe









19/-7
43/6

66/18 53/11 pc 48/8 pc
60/5 44/6 pe ——sBTANG 425 pe
83/28 73/22t _ 83/28. 73/22 pe
9886 76/24 pe A]
90/32 70/21 pc
86/80 «59/15 s
83/28 67/19 c















ee Ber 65/4 Cc x : Fl
29/-1 9/-12 s 30/-1 12/-11 s
a8 330 si 39/3 32/0 sn
84/28 75/23 pe 75/23 61M6 pc
-- 7APY 82A6 pe 71/21 «G26 pe




Tokyo 36/2 pc 44/6 30/-1 pc
Toronte = y-1 sn 31/0 271-2 pe
Trinidad 90/32 73/22 sh 86/30 73/22 t

Vancouver 86/2 27-2 pe 38/3. 29/-1 pe
Vienna 45/7 41/5 pe 52/11 41/5 pe
Warsaw 41/5 34/1 sn 49/9 38/3 c

Winnipeg -3/-19 -17/-27 pc 14/-10 -8/-22 pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

-ABACO





Sota

WAVES VISIBILITY







NASSAU Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles ~
Saturday: _ ENE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles

FREEPORT Today:
Saturday:
Today:

Saturda'











[ANN Showers
f = & 4 T-storms

ENE at 10-20 Knots
ENE at 8-16 Knots

ENE at 10-20 Knots
ENE at 10-20 Knots








3-5 Feet
2-4 Feet
4-7 Feet
3-6 Feet

4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles




Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Tai aia ile iin icin con ne

AUTO INSURANCE |

us!

t





PAGE 10E, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007





JAMES Blake of the United States plays a backhand shot in his quarter-final match against Rus-
sia's Eygeny Korolev at the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Thursday,
Jan. 11, 2007. Blake won the match 6-1, 6-4.

TRIBUNE SPORTS








Pa

@ BELGIUM'S Kim Clijsters plays a shot in her semi finals match against China's LiNa at the Syd-
ney International Tennis in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Clijsters won the match 6-1,
1-6, 7-5. :

(AP Photo/Rob Griffith) (AP Photo/Rob Griffith).

Blake into semifinals and

Clijsters adva

SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

. DEFENDING champion James
‘Blake defeated Russian qualifier
Evgeny Korolev 6-1, 6-4 Thursday
to reach the semifinal of the Syd-
ney International tournament.

Kim Clijsters advanced to the
final with a 6-1, 1-6, 7-5 win over
Li Na of China. Clijsters, ranked
No. 5, will play Jelena Jankovic,
who upset Nicole Vaidisova 6-4, 4-
6, 6-4. ‘

Blake will meet Jurgen Melzer
in the semifinals after the Austri-
an defeated Tomas Berdych 6-2, 6-
4,

Unseeded Carlos Moya defeated
Marcos Baghdatis 6-1, 3-6, 7-6 (3)
to advance to the semis.

Battling to save his opening ser-
vice game in the third set, Bagh-
datis went down awkwardly on his
left ankle during the sixth deuce
after reaching for a wide ball to
the forehand court.

He was helped back to his chair
by a trainer re-taped the strained
calf muscle. :

The 21-year-old Cypriot had a
chance to serve for the match in
the 10th game but Moya rallied,
forced a tiebreaker and then set
up three match points with a pow-
erful crosscourt forehand winner.
One was all he needed after Bagh-
datis netted a forehand.

Baghdatis said he was confident
the injury would not hamper his
Australian Open preparations.

"No, no, I don't think so, unless
tomorrow I cannot walk," he said,

Nikolay Davydenko was fined
$10,000 Thursday by the ATP for
comments he made about the Syd-
ney International after retiring
Wednesday from his first-round
match with a foot problem.

Davydenko said "nobody cares"
about the tournament, a tradition-
al warmup for the Australian
Open starting Monday.

Blake called Davydenko's
remarks were "silly" and that they
did not represent the view of most
players.

"T play tournaments to go in
‘hinking that I can win them, and
that's the reason I'm playing
here," Blake said. "I hope I get a
chance to hold up that trophy
again. I'm extremely proud that I
won it last year, so I don't think
anyone looks at it as a secondary
title."



ces to final

SOAS NNR





Ny s ‘ y ES

M@ AUSTRIA'S Jurgen Melzer serves during his quarter finals match against the Czech Republic's Tomas Berdych at the Sydney International Tennis in Syd-
ney, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Melzer won the match 6-2, 6-4, ,
(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)



‘) ee

@ CARLOS MOYA of Spain returns a shot during his quater final match against Marcos Baghdatis of Cyprus at the Sydney International tennis tournament,
in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Moya won the match 6-1, 3-6, 7-6.
(AP Photo/Paul Miller)

/ ) | J







HIGH
LOW




Volume: 103 No.43





eek |
79F |
67F |

ey WINDY WIT
am CLOUDS 8 SUN







|
|



|
1



Chamber chief warns
nation bereft of strategy

for EU, US trade talks
Saat e a tals RI sss Ay tL





She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

Pear atari na agai





FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007







PRICE — 75¢










THA

IN THEIR SEASON OPENER



Election date al

House ‘will be dissolved,

THE House of Assembly will
be dissolved by April 10 and
the date of the next general
election announced soon after,
political insiders revealed to The
Tribune.

The law requires prime min-
ister to give two months notice
before the old election registry
is brought to a close and a 30-
day notice to give the parlia-
mentary registration depart-
ment an opportunity to call up
the new register and get voters
cards out: z “ee

As a result it is expected that
elections will be called in May
or early June.

Elections are not usually held
during Lent and Easter, which
falls on April 7 to 9.

While the prime minister
could call the election earlier
and use the old register, a PLP
insider told The Tribune that
this will not be the case.

The old register, according to
political experts, would be too
“messy” a situation as it is full of
dead persons, people who have
left their constituencies since
2001 and persons who have
moved into new homes.

The PLP used the old register
in 1987, however, which many
political observers said was
done deliberately because the
late Sir Lynden Pindling
thought he was about to lose
the election. :

Meanwhile, according to PLP
insiders, the government is
expected to win the next elec-
tion and Mr Christie’s advisers
are hoping that the momentum
the party will get from the
Majority Rule celebrations and
the commemoration of the
200th year of the end of the
transatlantic slave trade will
“seal the deal” for the PLP.



° 6pc Drumsticks /& Thighs)

announcement soon after’





TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

However, observers from the
side opposite said that the poor
showing of 200 to 300 people at
the Majority Rule ecumenical
service on the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds has shown the
government that the old “tricks
of the past won’t work in a
modern Bahamas”.

“The thing is no one believes
that Majority Rule or even
black nationalism is solely a
PLP thing anymore. You can
be an FNM and celebrate
Majority Rule and emancipa-
tion just as well as.a PLP,” one
FNM insider told The Tribune
yesterday.

This has been part and parcel
of the FNM strategy heading
into the next election, he said.

The insider pointed out that
the PLP has lost steam with the
National Health Insurance issue
because it is supported by the
FNM as well as the celebration
of majority rule.

“Even the prime minister
wasn’t sure this was going to
work. He asked whether the
people would come out last
night. Seeing what he did yes-
terday, no matter what you say
about him he must be a realist,
he must realise that he has lost
support and it is continuing to
dwindle,” the observer said.

Meanwhile, things seem luke-
warm on the political front with
no political party officially
announcing their slate of can-
didates.

The FNM is convinced that
Mr Christie is waiting for Mr

SEE page 10

«

o/2|RegulanFries



0/2) '2022/Drinks)



Ou

Ingraham claims govt's
Majority Rule celebration
was politically motivated

NOT many people turned-up to the govern-
ment’s Majority Rule celebration on Wednes-
day because the Bahamian people realised the
event was politically motivated, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham said. i

Carlton Smith, ZNS general manager and
host of the event, said “hundreds” of Bahami-
ans had turned up. However, according to one
eyewitness, as few as 200 to 300 were present.

“The majority of the people.saw through
their staged political shenanigans,” Mr Ingra-
ham said. “Nassau is fed up with them. Trust

SEE page eight |








Haitian boat a

reretetey

_ FNM leader: govt could not —

care less about fishermen

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE current administration "could not care
less about fishermen" - and the fishermen know
it, claimed opposition leader Hubert Ingraham
at an FNM rally in Long Island last night.

Foreign fishermen poaching in Bahamian
waters have "gone unapprehended," he said,
while criticising the approach government has
taken in addressing the need to allow the stock
of Nassau grouper to be replenished.

He said the FNM was the first governing par-
ty to address the issue of overfishing, and that
they did it "sensibly."

SEE page eight

» . y

WILSONART

INT AA TI a RRIING WILSONART ADHESIVES
LAMINATE FOR COUNTERTOPS & CABINETS

PLUS CABINET KNOBS, HINGES & PULLS!

ar Yi t | .
} 1 ath q ¢ ye
Nk 4 fi , 4

br April 10)

Man shot
after high |
speed chase
with police

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A HIGH speed chase, involv--
ing police and three young men,
ended in disaster on the Eastern
Road when one man was shot
and injured.

According to Police Press
Liaison Inspector Walter Evans,
around 9 pm Wednesday, while
patrolling on Prince Charles
Drive near Sea Grapes Shop-
ping Plaza, officers in a marked
police vehicle noticed the occu-
pants in a black coloured Nissan
Sentra acting in a suspicious
manner. : :

“As the officers approached,
the vehicle sped off and the
police gave chase. During the
chase the vehicle slowed.down
and the rear seat passenger
leaned out of the window and
pointed an object at the police.”

As a result, Inspector Evans

SEE page 10

Lawyer says
Bahamas on
way to being
a failing state

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamas is limping
toward a failing state, lawyer
Maurice Glinton said yesterday
on More FM’s talk show Real
Talk Live, hosted by Jeff Lloyd.

Mr Lloyd questioned the
lawyer as to how the Bahamas
could be described as a coun-
try on its way to be coming a
failed state when, among other
things the economy is good and
there are no massive street
protests over any particular
issue.

However, Mr Glinton said
that this was not what he meant.

“We are not a failed state
because we protest. That is our
duty. We are not a failed state
because we cry out for an expla-
nation from our government.
We are not a failed state
because we appear overly sen-
sitive to the aggressiveness of

SEE page 10







PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



aaa eee
Ensure your business reflects correct image

IN the same way that image
is important to you, the image
your business portrays will have
a definite bearing on your suc-
cess. Whether you are self-
employed or a business owner,
be clear about your image, as it
will have implications regard-
ing pricing, distribution and
promotion.

There are three market areas
you will be competing in, name-
ly high, medium and low-end.
Make sure you know which one
you are competing in.

The characteristics of high-
end are exclusive, up market
and prestigious. The type of
product will tend to be expen-
sive, high quality and selective,

H dyou a
ae woul yee the Bahamian

economy

Essay Contest Rules:

® Explain how you would improve the Bahamian economy

with a smaller number of up-
market customers that can
afford to pay for it. Your prod-
ucts will tend to be distributed
in exclusive locations, with lav-
ish promotions.

The characteristics of mid-
end are value for money, where
your product will tend to be of
good quality and appealing to a



© Competition open to all High School sophomores, juniors and seniors
@ Essays should be 500-1000 wards .
® Essays should be double-spaced

@ Submissions will be accepted via email at kwood07@elmira.edu

Deadline: Monday, January 15, 2007

Please tnelude you name, home address, telephone mumber and personal email address with your essay subniission,

Win 8 33,0 G8Q) cowards an Elmira College education

‘Top ten finalists will be notified by January 19 via email.
Finalists will present their essays before a panel of judges Senaday, February 24, 2007, at the
Sunshine Insurance headqaarcers on Shirley Sereee.

Elmira Cofloge will hold an Open House at the Sunshine Insurance headquarters during the
competition for all interested in studying at che College.

For more information, please contact:

Fanon Wilson, Ditecror of Sunshine Insurance, 242-394-0013
Mike Rogers, Assiseane ro the President, Elimite College, 607-735-1891

Bbnita College Students In Froe Enterprise (EC SIFE) create sustainable positive change by Improving businesses
and organisations through teaching and practicing the principles af free encerprise,



University of the West Indies

Cem ce ccTUU Liam tLe Titec



Cee VA ctedterY mater TCH met LUD)

in association with

Dermatology Association of the Bahamas
Cosmetology Association of the Bahamas

“Causes, Remedies, Prev

~ Symposium/Workshop:

‘A

ention”

British Colonial Hilton
Monday 22nd January, 2007

7:00am - 4:00pm
Pre-registration: $55.00

Onsite registration: $60.00
(Complimentary parking, , workshop materials, lunch and coffee breaks included)

Guest Speaker:

Dr.Neil Persadsingh-Dermatologist
Author of “The Hair in Black Women”

Presenters include:

Dermatology

large group of customers. You
will have a lot of competition.
Your products will tend to be
distributed in various ways,
with branded promotions
emphasising quality and
lifestyle.

The characteristics of low-
end are in the cheap, possibly
discount, mass market, where
your product will tend to be
generic, and probably quite
basic, appealing to a large
group of customers with limited
spending power. Your products

_ will tend to be distributed

through warehouse-type out-
lets, with straight forward pro-
motions emphasising value and
savings.

Only. an antipreneur in the
high-end market would sell
their product at a low price and
distribute through retailers.

Think of what you are trying
to achieve and make your
image reflect it. If your busi-
ness delivers on exclusivity,
design, cheapness, quality, val-
ue, professionalism, reliability,
speed, customer service or con-
venience, make your image
reflect it. Just like UPS created
a unique image for itself, you
too can get the image you
deserve through addressing the
following tangible factors:

Factor 1: Your Business
Name - You must get this right,
as it will be in the forefront of
your customer’s mind. Avoid
names that are difficult to pro-
nounce, that don’t match your
image, or don’t explain what
you do.

Avoid names that clash with
trademarked names, that could
confuse you with a competitor,
or clash with an existing com-
pany or website. Test your
name out on your friends to get
their reaction. If you are
stumped, look at the franchise
section in business magazines
for examples of good names.

Factor 2: Your Strapline, or
slogan is a great way of building
your image. Try and come up
with a catchy slogan that
describes what you do. Mac-
donald’s ‘I'm lovin' it’ and
Nike’s ‘Just Do It’ are two that
spring to mind.





| Business
| Sense

Factor 3: Your Logo is a
good way to project a positive
image that your customers will
remember. A logo is a symbol
that will allow customers to
recognise you easily, as well as

convey something positive’

about you.

Coca-Cola has one of the
most recognisable logos in the
business. That logo and its
branding was recently estimat-
ed to be worth $50 billion. Your
name may never be worth that
much, but it shows you the
financial impact a good choice
of logo and brand name can do
for you.

Get a graphic designer to
help you create your logo. Be
clear about what you want to
achieve. When you have your
logo, put it on your brochures,
letter heads, web sites and
invoices, as well as your staff
clothing, vehicles and signage.

Factor 4: Your Signage is also
an effective way of building
your image. Signs at your loca-
tion, signs directing customers
to your location, and signage
inside your facility all con-
tribute to building your brand.

Make sure your signs are
clear, clean and incorporate
your logos. If you are self-
employed, consider creating a
mobile sign you can take with
you.

Factor 5: Your Location, its
exterior and interior design, will
also be part of your image, so
ensure your premises match
your price point.

Factor 6: Your Packaging will
be an important part of your
image if you are a manufactur-
er, or providing an item that
will be sold at retail.

Take advice from experts in
this area, as packaging is quite a
tricky thing to get right. Your
packaging needs to display the

productzattractively.with nice,

copy, incorporate your logos
and reinforce your business
image. It also needs to be
robust when being handled, and
to protect the product while in
storage and transit.

Your image is a combina-
tion of all the above tangible .
factors, as well as intangible fac-
tors, such as how your staff deal
with customers, and whether
they provide good customer
service. Think these areas
through carefully, and make
sure your overall image sup-
ports your USP and you will be
way ahead of your competition.
If you are an existing business,
scrutinise every aspect of your
image to make sure there are
no conflicting image problems.
If you are setting up a new busi-
ness, then you can work your
image up from scratch.

Don’t be an antipreneur and
make the following mistakes:

* Choosing the wrong price
point for your image

* Choosing the wrong distri-
bution for your image

* Choosing the wrong loca-
tion or premises for your image

* Choosing the wrong busi-
ness name

* Choosing a poor logo,
strapline, signage, design and
packaging

Marketing your business is
an important area, and will
require constant effort to get it
right. So, in order to avoid the
trap of antipreneurship, make
sure you spend time on this
area, as it could pay large divi-
dends for your future business
success.

NB: Adapted from his .
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He

is chief operating officer of |
www.ezpzemail.com, currently

lives in Nassau, and can be con-
tacted at
markalexpalmer@mac.com

~- ©-Mark Palmer.-All rights | _-_.
. reserved sites HeEF OPE ihe

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager

Qualifications:

Bahamas

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).
Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.
Sound experience in global capital markets
Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development

processes.

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment

“Dr. Herbert Orlande!
*Dr. Cleland Gooding
} *Dr. Juliette Hepburn
*Dr. Rosetta Ingraham
*Dr. Valya Grimes

management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual
stock picks

General Requirements/Responsibilities: ;

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Psychiatr
“Dr. Nelson Clarke |

Plastic Surgery
“Dr. Srikanth Garikaparthi |

International Association o Cosmetogly
*Dr Vienna Clarke

*

ane Association of the Bahamas

r. Zelrona Mackey
*Dr. Ida L. Symonette
*Dr. Clifford Humes

Meet chi cuss
UWI Clinical Programme, Shirley Street
Tel/Fax: (242) 356-5289

eases ecco Aecukal skal hou

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux @ FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.







4B | FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007,

GAS

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

____MiamiHerald,com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Tension surrounds NY natural gas plan

BY FRANK ELTMAN
Associated Press

SMITHTOWN, N.Y. — It
would be about as long as the
Queen Mary 2 ocean liner and
would supply enough natural
gas to heat 4 million homes a
year.

And it would be right in the
middle of Long Island Sound,
halfway between densely pop-
ulated areas of New York and
Connecticut.

CONTROVERSIAL

Although years from gener-
ating power, a proposed float-
ing liquefied natural gas termi-
nal is churning up controversy
and uniting politicians, envi-
ronmentalists and activists in
both states.

The proposed $700 million
terminal is part of a growing
national debate over the pres-
ence of liquefied natural gas
facilities in coastal cities. The
issue has affected communi-
ties from Massachusetts to
Texas, as cities grapple over
environmental and security
concerns while also trying to
create more energy infrastruc-
ture to deal with rising

ELECTRONICS

Battle over
two DVD
formats
continues

* HIGH-DEFINITION DVD, FROM 1B

dence by eliminating confu-
sion and fear of choosing the
wrong format,” he said.

Warner Bros., a division of
Time Warner, releases. its
films in both formats, as does
Paramount Pictures, a unit of
Viacom.

Warner said it would start
releasing content in Total HD
format only sometime in the
second half of the year. It also
said the dual-format discs will
cost slightly more.

Warner Bros. hopes other
studios will adopt the solu-
tion. But most remain stub-
bornly in one camp or the
other and show no signs of
budging.

In fact, the three studios
that release only in Blu-ray —
The Walt Disney Co., News
Corp.’s 20th Century Fox and
Sony Pictures — this week
boldly predicted total victory
for their format.

‘FINAL PHASE?’

“The format war’s in its
final phase,” Mike Dunn,
president of 20th Century Fox
home entertainment said at a
Blu-ray press conference.

Universal Studios, a divi-
sion of General Electric, is the

INTEREST RATES

demands.

Natural gas is used to heat
more than 60 million homes in
the U.S. and it is increasingly
important as a source of fuel
for power producers.

Energy demand is espe-
cially robust in the area that
would be served by the Long
Island terminal. About half of
the gas would go to New York
City, the nation’s largest city.
Between 25 and 30 percent is
targeted for Long Island, and
the rest would go to Connecti-
cut — both densely populated
areas.

The proposal also carries
political implications: Former
New York Mayor Rudy Giulia-
ni’s company served as a con-
sultant for the project, and the
likely 2008 presidential candi-
date has visited communities
this week where public hear-
ings were being held on the
proposal.

Meanwhile, Sen. Hillary
Rodham Clinton — Giuliani’s
potential 2008 rival. — has
spoken out against the project.

The debate received
renewed attention this week
as the Federal Energy Regula-



ED BETZ/AP

STRONG PROPOSAL: Former New York City Mayor Rudolph
Giuliani speaks about the proposed Broadwater project,
an offshore liquefied natural gas facility, Wednesday.

tory Commission began hear-
ings on whether to allow
Broadwater Energy — a con-
sortium of Shell Oil, a Hous-
ton-based subsidiary of Royal
Dutch Shell, and TransCanada
Pipelines — to build the termi-
nal about nine miles off Wad-
ing River, N.Y., and 10 miles

south of New Haven, Conn.
Broadwater officials say the
terminal is needed to meet the
growing demand for natural
gas. They site the New York
State Energy Plan, which pro-
jects a 37 percent growth in
statewide natural gas use by
2021; Connecticut forecasts





JAE C. HONG/AP

CLEAR PICTURE, UNCLEAR FUTURE: Show attendees admire Sony’s Blu-ray movie display at
the Consumer Electronics Show. Blu-ray competes fiercely with Toshiba’s HD DVD.

only studio to support HD
DVD exclusively.

Sony revealed at CES that
it met its goal of shipping 1
million Playstation 3 consoles
to North America in 2006.
The company said a survey
showed that 80 percent of
buyers said they will purchase
Blu-ray DVDs to play on their
machines.

Still, there were other signs
of compromise at CES 2007.

LG Electronics, a member
of the Blu-ray camp,
announced a new player that
will accommodate both for-
mats.

The model BH100, dubbed
“Super Multi Blue,” will sell
for $1,199 when it becomes
available next month.

But some observers say
announcements like those
from LG and Warner Bros.,

European Central
Bank: No rate change

* INTEREST RATES, FROM 1B

domestic product data.

The German government
announced earlier Thursday
that the nation’s economy —
Europe’s largest — expanded
by 2.5 percent in 2006, its fast-
est rate since 2000. The
Eurostat statistical agency,
meanwhile, said economic
growth in the euro zone
slowed in the third quarter of
2006, but full-year figures
were not yet available.

The ECB’s forecasts for
euro-zone growth this year
are between 1.7 percent and
2.7 percent, up from 1.6 per-
cent and 2.6 percent issued
last year. For next year, GDP
growth is expected to be
between 1.8 percent and 2.8
percent.

“In an apparent effort to
drive home the point that the
ECB does not intend to raise
rates in February, Trichet
pointedly noted in the press
conference that the ’mood’ of
the ECB Governing Council
had ‘not changed much’ since
December, with the economy
developing in line with the
ECB’s baseline scenario,”
Schmieding said.

While Trichet said euro-
zone inflation is expected to
hover at around 2 percent this
year and in 2008, analysts
expect inflation to rise above
the ECB’s target early this
year and lead to a rate
increase in March.

INFLATION UP MORE?

In Britain, inflation has
been running above the
bank’s 2 percent target for
seven successive months and
is now at 2.7 percent, with
economists predicting a rise
to 3 percent when the Decem-
ber figure is published.

“It is likely that inflation
will rise further above the tar-
get in the near term,” the
Bank of England noted in a
statement saying the rate
increase was needed to con-
trol inflation.

The Bank of England sent
the pound up to $1.9483
against the dollar, compared
with $1.9324 late Wednesday.
The euro fell to $1.2948, an
eight-week low against the
dollar. Higher interest rates
support a currency by making
some assets denominated in
that currency more attractive
to investors.

aren’t necessarily helpful.
“Consumers are aware
there are two formats and
they think ‘VHS versus Beta-
max,’”’ said Phillip Swann,

president of the technology--

oriented website TVpredic-
tions.com.

“Consequently one of the
formats has to go away, either
via the marketplace or a nego-
tiated truce,” Swann added.

PRICE DROP

Swann also believes the
price of players has to come
down to $299 or below before
consumers embrace one
format.

Toshiba makes an HD
DVD model for $499, while
most Blu-ray players sell in
the $1,000 range.

One huge incentive for stu-
dios to resolve their differ-





TORSTEN SILZ/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

MAY RISE: European Central
Bank president
Jean-Claude Trichet
warned that interest rates
may still climb higher.

Many analysts saw the
Bank of England’s move as an
early step to control the
effects of agreements that
could spur higher inflation.

“The surprise value of a
move today may be seen as an
opportunity to derive more
bang per buck. from the
move,” JP Morgan Chase

economist Malcolm Barr said.

For Britons, the bank’s
decision will mean higher
rates on their mortgages, auto
loans and credit cards and
comes after a holiday season
that saw record sales, leading
to fears of defaults on loans.

“We are already seeing a
rapidly growing number of
people falling behind with
mortgage payments and in
some cases threatened with
repossession,” said Peter Tut-
ton of Citizens Advice.

ences may be a slowdown in
the growth of the overall

DVD market. Sales for 2006 °

are expected to be flat,
despite huge numbers for
some titles such as Disney’s
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead
Man’s Chest.

Expect electronics compa-
nies to follow LG’s lead and
introduce dual-format players
this year, says James
McQuivey, a former Forrester
Research analyst who is now
a Boston University professor
specializing in technology
and communications.

“It’s a logjam breaker,” he
said. “It could influence the
studios to release their films
in both formats.

“If that happens, it will
allow some momentum to be
generated. Right now, there
isn’t any,” he said.

AIRLINES

AirTran raises Midwest Air

* AIRLINES, FROM 1B

more consideration than
we’ve gotten so far. We
thought we’d let the owners
decide,” Leonard said.

Carol Skornicka, Midwest’s
senior vice president of cor-
porate affairs, said the airline
had been expecting another
offer from AirTran, but
expected the company to
come back to the board. She
said it was somewhat surpris-
ing that AirTran made the
improved offer “directly to
shareholders at this stage.”

Midwest Air climbed to a
new 52-week high of $13.48
before closing at $13.40, up 50
cents, or 3.9 percent, on the
American Stock Exchange.
Airtran shares rose 48 cents,
or 4.03 percent, to finish at
$12.40 on the New York Stock
Exchange.

The offer consists of $6.625
in cash and 0.5884 shares of
AirTran common stock for
each Midwest share.

‘BEST CARE IN THE AIR’

Midwest Air, which oper-
ates Midwest Airline and
Midwest Connect, promotes
itself as “the best care in the
air,” with its wide leather
seats and chocolate chip
cookies baked on board.

the use of natural gas for elec-
tric generation will hit 47 per-
cent by 2008.

COULD REDUCE PRICES

Broadwater estimates it
will reduce natural gas and
electricity prices by an aver-
age $680 million a year in the
region. The median savings
for customers, according to
Broadwater, will be $300 per
year, a figure critics dispute.

Hundreds of residents
showed up at the hearings,
held in both Connecticut and
Long Island, to let their views
be known on everything from
the environment, security, the
need for alternative energy,
and the potential threat to the
fishing industry in Long Island
Sound.

Giuliani said the proposed
terminal would be “as safe a
facility in design as you could
possibly have.”

He said employees would
have thorough background

‘checks, and the company was

committed to using the latest
security technology available.
He also said the proposed ter-
minal would be far enough

PHARMACEUTICALS

from the New York and Con-
necticut coasts to avoid major
problems in the event of an
emergency.

“Just in case the worst thing
happens, there could be no
impact on the Long Island
shore or Connecticut shore,”
he said Wednesday before a
meeting on the proposal at
Smithtown High School in
Smithtown, N.Y.

But Clinton reacted with
skepticism about the project’s
safety. “The safety and secu-
rity risks involved with this
project have not been
addressed. I am very con-
cerned about ... who will bear
the burden of first response
should an accident occur.”

Natural gas is shipped in
massive refrigerated tankers
after being cooled and con-
densed into a liquid referred
to as liquefied natural gas.
Under the Broadwater pro-
posal, LNG tankers would
dock at the terminal, and the
fuel would be warmed up to a
gas. It would then be pumped
through an existing underwa-
ter pipeline system that serves
Long Island and Connecticut.

Pfizer might make
deeper cutbacks

°* PFIZER, FROM 1B

specifics of its plan at the Jan-
uary meeting, and declined to
comment on speculation
about what the cuts may
include.

Kindler cut 20 percent of
Pfizer’s sales force, or 2,200
jobs, in December. The com-
pany has fired more than 5,325
employees mainly in manu-
facturifig, sales and.research
as of @ét. 1, the company said
in a regulatory filing. ~~

Among the cuts Pfizer may
be announcing is a 30 percent
decrease in the company’s
sales force outside the U.S, or
more than 6,000 jobs, saving
$800 million in annual costs,
said Bank of America analyst
Chris Schott in a report .

While it cuts its staff,
Pfizer has also been increas-
ing efforts to license products
from other companies with
some of the $30 billion it has
on hand. Pfizer has entered
into at least six agreements
with biotechnology compa-
nies since December, includ-
ing three this week, as it hunts
for the next medicine capable
of reaching $1 billion in
annual sales.

Pfizer may see generic
competition as early as 2010
for its Lipitor cholesterol pill,
the world’s top selling drug.

Pfizer was counting on
replacing sales of Lipitor with
torcetrapib.. Without that
product, Pfizer doesn’t have
enough drugs in development

Some passengers. and
shareholders fear those
touches might end if AirTran
is successful in its takeover.

But Leonard said a merger
would create a more competi-
tive company in the changing
airline industry and provide
better service to underserved
cities such as Milwaukee and
Kansas City.

NO GAS GUZZLERS

He told investors in a con-
ference call that the combined
company would have more
modern equipment, coast-to-
coast service with multiple
hubs and no “gas guzzling”
aircraft like those he said
Midwest currently operates.

Helane Becker, a transpor-
tation analyst with Bench-
mark of New York, said Air-
Tran and Midwest seem to be
a good fit.

LATE TRADING

to replace the estimated $14
billion in sales it will lose
from generic competition to
Lipitor, analysts have said.

“We project that the cur-
rent late-stage pipeline will
generate more than $7 billion
in sale from 2011-2012,” said
J.P. Morgan analyst Chris Shi-
butani, who carries Star-
mine’s top rating, in a Jan. 3
research report. Analysts also
expect Pfizer to lose pate
protection through 201] on
five other drugs with $8.69
billion in 2005 sales.

“Pfizer’s plans to cut its
U.S. sales force by at least 20
percent offers an opportunity
for companies with large pri-
mary care sales force to fur-
ther reduce headcount,”
Susanna Matter, an analyst
with Leerink Swann & Co. in
Boston, said in a Jan. 3 note to
clients.

GlaxoSmithKline and San-
ofi-Aventis would benefit the
most from sales job cuts, Mat-
ters said.

Bayer said in November it
would cut more than 800 U.S.
jobs, many in research, after
completing its purchase of
Schering. The move will save
Bayer $210 million a year by
the end of 2008.

Lilly announced in late
2005 that it aimed to trim $250
million in costs this year and
cut staff by 6 percent. Last
year Merck began eliminating
7,000 jobs and closing plants
to reduce $5 billion in costs
by 2010.

bid

“There’s a lot of synergies
that AirTran can get in this
transaction.... You don’t
need two CEOs, two CFOs,”
she said.

Representatives from the
Air Line Pilots Association
met this week with AirTran
executives, according to
Jerome G. Schnedorf, chair-
man of the Midwest Airlines

unit, which includes about
380 pilots. It planned to meet

Dat





a a

me

Gooey

r

EO we eee 0 0 ee ete ae ea a Ew

i



he

ee

with Midwest Air next week. - |

Schnedorf said the union
has taken a neutral stand on
the AirTran bid at this point.
A closer look at AirTran’s
detailed economic plan is
needed before it can be seri-
ously evaluated, he said.

“You have to really look at
things at that level and not
have an emotional reaction to
what might appear to be a
good thing,” he said.



4 6:35 p.m. Late 4 6:35 pm. Late

Stock Tk. cose close Chg. volume | Stock Th. doe dose Chg. vee
Oracle ORCL = 17.39 1733-06 = 146565 VeritDGC = VTS. 83.33 8331 = -.02 $900
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 45.08 45.10 +02 47355 | DUIADiam DIA 12499 12499 * S747
Timewarn TWX — 22.62 22.57 -.05 ATLA LSI Log LSI 9.84 9.84 . 4990
Hertzn = HTZ-— 16.69. 16,70 = +01 26639 SunMicro. =SUNW 6.14 613 OL 4728
SPDR spy 142.16 142.19 +03 17663 | yahoo YHOO 2920 2919 -01 4501
Microsoft MSFT 30.70 30.70 * 16284 | ishaknya WM 7823 «7816-07 AT
Level3 LT 6.48 6.48 . 13235 SanDisk SNDK 43.80 B55 6 4005
AMR AMR (37.94 37.95 +01 12171 ch :

rmSh CHRS = 13.99 = 13.99 3961
Aspent pfA AHLpA 25.68 25.72 +04 = 12000 XLC x
Metlifeun MEU = 31.54 (31.54 * 7718 apun XLpQ 23.00 23.04 +04 STR
QwestCm 8.38 8.40 +.02 7625 GnMotr GM 30.86 38 = * 3R
ConAgra CAG = 27.44 27-40-04 6161 Cytyc CYTC 29.19 2920 +01 «| (3889
Consco pfB CNOpB 25.12 2519 +07 ~~ 6000-*| Blockbstr —BBI 6.16 658 +4 383



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



‘
t



THE TRIBUNE



’

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 5B

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,

Colinalmperial gains
A-(Excellent) rating

COLINAImperial Insurance
Company yesterday sww its A-
(Excellent) financial strength
rating reaffirmed by the lead-
ing international insurance rat-
ing agency, largely as a result
of having the largest share of
the Bahamian life and health
insurance market.

A. M. Best also reaffirmed
Colinalmperial’s ‘a-’ issuer
credit rating, with the outlook
for both ratings pegged at ‘sta-
ble’. ©

Agency

The rating agency said its
actions “reflect Colinalmperi-
al’Sic.c. ese adequate risk-
adjusted capitalisation, con-
servative reserving practices
and its leading life/health mar-
ket share in the Bahamas.

“As the life/health market
leader and having operated in
the Bahamas for.over 40 years,
ColinaImperial has established
strong brand name recognition.

A.M. Best said the company
was looking for “opportunities
to develop new geographic

markets, while identifying
prospective acquisitions to
expand its distributive capaci-
ty and improve economies of
scale. Colinalmperial's current
financial position, operating
performance and scale reflect
the successful integration of
several acquisitions in recent
years”.

However, it added that off-
setting these strengths were
Colinalmperial’s reliance on
the Bahamian market, this
market’s relatively mature
standing, integration chal-
lenges over its acquisitions and
“the level of financial lever-
age” at.its parent company,
A.F. Holdings, the successor
to the Colina Financial Group
(CFG).

Montgomery Braithwaite,
Colinalmperial’s president,«
said in a statement yesterday:
“Along with last year’s finan-
cial results and the recent div-
idend payment made by our
parent company to sharehold-
ers, today’s A- (Excellent) rat-
ing encourages the entire Col-
inalmperial family.

WANTED

“It also confirms that our
financial strengths and com-
mitment to serving our policy-
holders form a sound founda-
tion which translates to the
benefit of our shareholders and
policy owners alike.”

Underpinning its ratings
were, A. M. Best said, Coli-
nalmperial’s positive earnings
in recent years, despite having
to incur acquisition and ihte-
gration costs involving the
Global Bahamas, Life of Bar-
bados and Capital Life, Cana-
da Life and Imperial Life pur-

chases.
Added

The rating agency added
that if felt Colinalmperial
would achieve greater prof-
itability going forward as it

achieved synergies from its ,

operations, while risk-adjust-
ed capitalisation “remains
more than adequate relative
to its investment and insurance

risks despite its conservative
reserving practices”.

Following an almost two-
year integration process after
the Imperial Life purchase,
Colinalmperial’s net income
for the three months to Sep-
tember 30, 2006, more than
tripled from $551,421 the year-
before to $1.189 million. For
the first nine months of its cur-
rent fiscal year, net income has
more than doubled to $4.011
million, compared to $1.834
million the year before.

Colinalmperial Insurance
Company saw its net settled
first year premium income
increase by 35 per cent for the
year to November 2006.

Colinalmperial is a wholly-
owned subsidiary of BISX-list-
ed Colina Holdings.

Colina Holdings is 63 per
cent majority-owned by A. F.
Holdings, the holding firm for
the group’s two principals,
Emanuel Alexiou and Antho-
ny Ferguson.

Legal Notite

NOTICE

AHVAZ INC

read Insight od Mondays

4 Qtrs. Restdueant &
Sporting rae

Come and pets 2 aoyesanas
Experience the SA we wd
Newest Sporting Fi

Lounge in the South

Located:

Off East Street
South
Sapodilla Blvd. &
Joan’s Hgt’s.

Ph: 242- 392-3687 ;
“Featuring Oral Hudson”

Karaoke Night

Starting
Monday Jan. 15 from 8: pmn—12: am

RocLand D.J.

Friday & Saturday Nights
Old School Music

Hours of Operation:
OPEN EVERYDAY
12: Noon Until

CY



ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The Entrance Examination for St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport and
St. Andrew’s School, Exuma will take place on Saturday,
February 3rd, 2007 at 9:00a.m. ,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AHVAZ INC has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Store Manager &
Sales Associates

Applications can be collected from the Schools between the
hours of 8:00a.m. and 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

Small Retail Store Specializing in girls accessories 1s
seeking a dynamic, energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager with prior retail managerial experience
to handle all aspects of store operations.

Applications Forms and $25.00 Applications Fee must be
returned to the School no later than Friday, January 26th, 2007

Vacancies

St. John’s College is. now accepting Applications for the
students from Kindergarten through Grade Six. Kindergarten
screening will begin during the second week in February

Only persons 30 years and older need apply.
Vacancy also exists for sales associates,
Please send resumes by e-mail to
ecooke@coralwave.com

Phone:394-7019

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

SENIOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Information Technology

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands. Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Information Technology
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Information
Technology.

Core Responsibilities

® Develop. maintain, support and optimize the organization's network
infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communsications, and
telecommunications systems.
Ensure hardware and software is maintained and data is secured through
proper back-ups and staff training.
Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentation to

secure procedures and prevent system failure. This includes FT Disaster
Recovery / Business Continuity plasning,

Provide management and direction for end-user support function in support of
business operations, inclusive of management of the Help-Desk function,



Manage and direct software, hardware, network, telecommunications and web
providers to enhance operational efficiencies and ROT based on the bank's
business objectives.

Date and Starting Time: Saturday; January 13, 2007 at 6.30a.m.

pe tiins Registration Fee: $5.00 Adults
Desired Qualifications

Entry Deadline: January 12, 2007
For additional information, please contact Tel. 302-4525 or 302-4592

* Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well recognized
university. ‘

A minimum of five years progressive professional IT experience preferably in
the Financial Services Indastry.

IT based training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from
accredited institutions will be advantageous.

Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs:
telecommunications, Web-based applications, client-server applications, and



“Fenvals fe

Walker]

PC-based software applications. Runner [ ] Male [ ]

Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows XP, Under-i4[ ] Under-20[.] Under30[ ] Under4do[ ] Under50[ ] Under60{ ] 60Plus[ ]
Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Office and Microsoft Exchange Server

se RUNNERS

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills.

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to U.E. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge, Prospect Ridge to J.F. Kennedy Drive
to Gladstone Road junction, Gladstone Road junction back to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road,

Closing Date: January 26, 2007 Tucker Road to the back entrance of The College of The Bahamas

WALKERS

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge,
Prospéct Ridge to J.F Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road, Tucker Road to the back entrance of The
College of The Bahamas ~

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@ butterfieldbank. bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs





Race Committee will not be held responsible for injuries incurred.

Signature of Waiver:

x

Butterfield Bank










= PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 .

CONTAINER PORT, from 1B

“The context of that is particu-
larly important when you think of
the 783 persons employed here,

and I am told that Chris Grey is .

the only non-Bahamian employed
on this site. That deserves a round
of applause.”

US Ambassador John Rood
said the new CSI programme,
which allows for containers to be
pre-screened at Freeport Contain-
er Portefor entry to the US for
security purposes, will also allow
quicker turnaround of containers
for shippers.

“The Bahamas benefits, as CSI
provides a competitive advantage
to the Freeport Container Port by
allowing containers shipped to
quickly enter into commerce in the
United States,” Mr Rood said.

He explained that containers not
screened before reaching the US

FRAUD, from 1B

to allow those involved “to conceal
and transfer the illegal proceeds from
their stock manipulation scheme”.
Labella than directed that “certain
amounts of money” be deposited into
their Bahamas-based bank accounts
that were likely held at Leadenhall
Bank & Trust, Axxess’ former bank-
ing partner that is now in liquidation.
The US Attorney’s Office in New

must wait days - and sometimes
weeks - before they can be
released.

Freeport Container Port expe-
rienced a 26 per cent growth in the
number of TEUs (20-foot equiva-
lent units) that it handled during
the first six months in 2006, indi-
cating its potential as a
logistics/transportation/distribution
centre for the Americas.

Hutchison Whampoa, which
holds a 60 per cent stake in the
Container Port via its Hutchison
Port Holdings subsidiary, said in
its results for the six months to
June 30, 2006, that the Freeport
facility was among the “major con-
tributors” to growth in TEU
throughput.

Hutchison Whampoa’s 2005
annual report showed how
Freeport Container Port had

Jersey alleged that the funds deposit-
ed in Montani’s Bahamian bank
accounts “included the excessive com-
missions he earned from brokering
sales of Eagletech and Select Media
Communications to the selected
investors, and from the liquidation of
stock he held in the Bahamas”.

The indictment also alleged that
the credit/ATM cards issued by Lead-
enhall, and administered by Axxess
International, were used to conceal
the proceeds of the scheme and other

MANAGER, BANKING & CUSTODY

BANKING DEPARTMENT

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

picked up in 2006 where it left off
last year.

The Container Port processes
1.115 million TEUs during the
2005 full year, an increase of 6 per
cent upon the previous year.

Derek Newbold, Hutchison Port
Holdings (Bahamas) sales and mar-
keting manager, said in early 2006
that the Container Port expected
“to exceed” in 2006 the 1.115 mil-
lion throughput TEU volume that
it processed in 2005, with its parent
company looking at investing $572
million in the port’s long-term
expansion.

Mr Newbold added then that
the Freeport Container Port had
“a lot of room for growth and
opportunity”, having developed “a
very comprehensive expansion
plan”.

The potential Phase V North
Berth expansion would see an
additional 450 metres of capacity

income from the IRS.

It claimed that Labella failed to
report and disclose the income
received through the Axxess cards on
his personal tax return for the years
1999-2001, something Montani also
did.

After the IRS detected Montani’s
use of his Axxess card, he and, Label-
la “prepared and back-dated a bogus
retention loan agreement for presen-
tation to the IRS to cover up their
past efforts to conceal income from
the IRS”.

and nine blocks stacking area,

while Phase VI could lead to a fur-
ther 340 metre expansion of the
North Berth.

And Phase VII might see a 335
metre Berth expansion and three
blocks stacking area. Another 600
metre area was also available for
expansion.

When completed, all this expan-
sion would give Freeport Contain-
er nine berths - with total docking
length of 2,749 metres - 30 quay
cranes, a 4.5 million TEU capacity,
and create employment for 650
workers. 2

Mr Newbold said this did not
include a possible eighth Phase. of
expansion, which would require
dredging and land reclamation at
Billy Cay.

Ata cost of more than $200 mil-
lion, this could provide 1,219
metres in berth space and 12 quay
cranes on a 42-hectare site.

The case against Montani again
shows that the credit card portfolio
administered by Axxess/Leadenhall
had become something of a reputa-
tional risk for the Bahamas’ financial
services reputation by the time the
latter’s issuing licence was pulled by
MasterCard in summer 2004.

Numerous US court cases involving
tax evasion, fraud and money laun-
dering have detailed how the credit
cards were used at some point in these
schemes.

The manipulation scheme also

e aintenance Personne
Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and
some electrical.
Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience

and must provide references.

Only 1 per cent of the containers
handled by the Freeport Contain-
er Port were destined for the
Bahamian markets, with the
largest share - some 44 per cent -
going to South America, and
another 32 per cent going to Mex-
ico and the US Gulf Coast.

Freeport Container Port,.which
was Officially opened in July 1997,
comprises a total land area of 3,400
acres (1,036 metres of berths) with
15.5 metre depth alongside, 10
Super Post Panamax Quayside
Gantry Cranes, 2 Gottwald Mobile
Harbour Cranes, 50 Straddle Car-
riers, Navis Operating System, 49
Hectares/118 acres of Stacking
Area, 16 metre/52 feet in Channel
& Turning Basin. ;

Freeport:Container Port is
strategically located to serve as a
major world'container transship-
ment hub between the Eastern

Gulf Coasts of. the United States, .

involved a Bahamas-registered com-
pany, Lloyds Bahamas Securities. The
plot began in April 1999, when the
founder of Eagletech, a publicly-trad-
ed US company, sought Bryn Mawr’s
assistance in issuing 10 million shares
in the firm for a price of $1.2 million.

The capital was raised by Montani

and others purportedly selling the

shares to a small group of selected
investors, but the stock was never
issued to these people despite their
money being taken. 5
In fact, these shares were issued to
Montani’s co-conspirators, who then
managed to obtain control of 90 per
cent of Eagletech through causing the
company to carry out reverse stock
"splits undisclosed to other investors.
Letters from the Bahamian entity,
Lloyds Bahamas Securities, were used
to reassure the outside investors that
they owned the Eagletech shares,
when they did not.
Montani received undisclosed com-
misisons of 25 per cent for selling the

THE TRIBUNE

the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean,
South America, and trade lanes to
European, the Mediterranean, Far
Eastern and Australasian destina-
tions.

Prime Minister Christie, who
was pleased about the prospects
of expansion at Freeport Contain-
er Port, said the future holds great
prospects for the country, and even
more benefits for Bahamians.

He added that according to the
projections of the International
Monetary Fund (IMF), the
Bahamas economy is projecting a
6.5 per cent growth, and at the end
of the budget year going forward, a
6.7 per cent growth.

“That is also is here in Grand ,
Bahama. This country of ours, with
$8 billion of capital inflows, is
enjoying unparallelled success, and
the word unparalleled means cap-
ital you cannot find and equal in
the world,” said Mr Christie.

Eagletech shares to the investors.

This stock was transferred by
Labella to brokerage accounts with
Lloyds Bahamas Securities, and then
sold back into the market via a ‘pump
and dump’ scheme with the selling.
brokers earning commissions of ©
between 30-50 per cent.

The US Attorney alleged that
Montani and his colleagues “obtained
millions of dollars from the manipu-
lation of Eagletech stock”, which was
sold to unsuspecting investors via the
Lloyds Bahamas Securities accounts
for between $0.70 per share to $14
per share. Exactly the same scheme
was employed in relation to the Select
Media Communications stock, with
4.5 million shares obtained by Mon-
tani’s colleagues, giving them control
of 90 per cent of the stock.

The Select Mediz: Communications
stock was then sold back to the invest-
ing public via the brokerage accounts
at Lloyds Bahamas Securities, which
was beneficially owned by Labella.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a°
record of professional achievements to join our dynamic Banking Services team.
The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experince.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107

EMPLOYMENT
0) yt) ae a



Core Responsibilities

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SMITH FLORVIL OF
CORAL LAKES, TUNA LANE, P.O. BOX NP-4911, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











© To manage and contro! the banking and custody departments of the Bank ina
cohesive, well organized and risk oriented manner.

VILLAGO
RESTAURANT

To effectively manage the Relationship Management Team of both banking
and custody so as a first class service is offered to all clients ina proactive
manner.

To assist with the development and implementation of new products and
systems.as may be required in order to furiher enhance productivity and
efficiency.

To work closely with the Assistant Manager of Operational Risk

Management to ensure procedures and processes remain fully in line with the
group's strategy relating to Enterprise & Operational Risk.

Seeks to employ professional

Waiter and Waitress

To ensure, at all times, the banking and custody operations are effectively
managed to ensure processing of all deposit and payments, foreign exchange
and security transactions are earried out technically correct, without error and
within procedures. ‘ ayviayd

PORTE Ee tinge

‘Must be well-groomed.
Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation —
Must be able to work flexible

hours

To ensure full aware of all applicable laws, regulatidns, bank policies'and:
procedures and that they are implemented effectively on a day to day basis
within the department.

To assist in the preparation of the banking and custody budgets and for the
effective management of revenues and costs.

Desired Qualifications
Relevant Degree or related discipline from a well recognized university.

A minimum of ten years progressive Banking/Custody experience in the
Financial Services Industry.

Send Resume to:
Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax to: 327-0966

A good proven background in professional and experience client facing role
High degree of awareness and compliance orientation ©
Proficient in Microsoft Office snite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving. project management
and customer service skills.

Closing Date:January 26, 2007

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242 .
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment @ butterfieldbank. bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs



SS SSE GCCGGECKG
HRIST orn HEART |

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LANA


















Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

For the 2007/2008 School Year will be
held on January 13, 2007 at 8:00 am
at Kingsway Academy High School,
located on Bernard Road.

’



Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
11 Janua
AG fl
BESTS WII WN AC SEK \\\
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank 12.6
Consolidated Water BDRs 35.5
Doctor's Hospital R 7 : : 8.5
Famguard 10.5
Finco 15.7
FirstCaribbean. « 15.7
Focol 7 : < z 8.5
Freeport Concrete N/M
ICD Utilities 13.5
8.52 J. S. Johnson 14.6
oe ee a ee caiicid 00 00... mswsseaies ren . i ie ecu
Ee daly Over ine Counter Seciities : ee
mbo! i P/E Id

e

10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.05
1.64
9.00
4.12
2.26
5.54

10.70

10.90

10.00
0.50
7.15

14.0
24.4

The examination is for those
students wishing to enter grades 7-10.



Application forms are available
at the High School Office. The
application fee is thirty dollars
($30.00), to be made payable at
Kingsway Business Office on or before

Friday, January 12, 2007



12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
2 isiaiiaias 0.20 RND oldi
LLL
: 28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings



Yield %
1.321587*
2.9728*°""
2.500211**
1.217450****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

2.6262

2.3220

1.1495
10.0000



For Further
information Call

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask.$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINIDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

* - 29 December 2006
** 34 December 2006
*** - 31 December 2006
“*** _ 34 December 2006

324-8811 or 324-3409

2006





t. tg '4 £9.77 %
+ OH BP eg

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== be ee. see kee wwe rir

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 7B



eee eee eee eee

FROM page 1B

governing trade between the
EU and the Caribbean, which
in theory lasts until 2020 but, in
reality, will finish at the end of
this year. ;

Cotonou is being replaced
because it is non-compliant
with World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO) rules, as the pref-
erences and benefits it grants
are all one-way for the advan-
tage of Caribbean nations.

EU states receive no bene-
fits, and other WTO members
have complained that Cotonou
grants Caribbean nations not
made available to them, mak-
ing it discriminatory and non-
WTO compliant.

The EPA, instead of a one-
way flow of benefits, will
involve reciprocal treatment
for EU members, meaning that

--in return for granting Bahami-

an exports tariff-free access to
their markets, they will want
their producers to be able to
export to the Bahamas tariff-
free. ;

Mr Archer told The Tribune
on Wednesday that the Gov-

Bahamas ‘caugh

ernment currently earns $10
million per year from import
duties on European goods
coming into the Bahamas, so
the EPA talks outcome has
important implications for the
Bahamian tax system.

Mr Lowe told The Tribune
that securing duty-free market
access for Bahamian exporters
via the EPA talks was “100 per
cent critical”.

He added that “50 per cent
of our seafood catch” went to
the EU market. If duties were
imposed, “it will no longer be
competitive in the market
there is it is subject to tariffs.
We would have to shift that
output to another market, and
will get less money from it”.

Reciprocity

Mr Lowe said the reciproci-
ty required by the EPA would
also potentially require a “100
per cent revision of our cur-
rent tax structure”.

He added that the Bahamas
would have to decide whether
it remained outside agree-
ments such as the EPA entire-
ly, allowing it to continue bas-

. ing its tax system on import

and customs duties, or if it was
going to participate and switch

to a more “sustainable and bal-
anced” structure.

“It’s reciprocity in all
regards,” Mr Lowe said of the
EPA. “Whether it’s goods and
services, bank secrecy, gov-
ernment procurement, trans-
parency in government, it’s all
about reciprocity.

“These are not simple trade
agreements. These are multi-
level agreements.”

And it was not just the EPA
where reciprocal preferences
and benefits were required.
The Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI), which allows products
from the Bahamas to enter the
US duty-free, is also under
pressure at the WTO from
Paraguay, which is blocking
the renewal of its waiver on
the grounds that the Caribbean
is getting benefits its exporters
do not.

Mr Lowe said any replace-
ment of the CBI would be
based on the trade agreement
signed between the Central
American Free Trade Area
(CAFTA) and the Dominican
Republic on one hand, and the
US on the other.

This would also involve the
Bahamas, if it signed on to any
such deal, providing recipro-
cal benefits and preferences to

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of

US exporters sending goods to
this nation.

This could have huge impli-
cations for the Bahamian tax
system, as this nation imports

most of its goods from the US.
If many of these are required
to enter duty free, this would
force this nation to reform its

tax structure.



t with pants down’

“The US has basically said
that any further agreement will
be modelled on CAFTA-DR,”
Mr Lowe said. “It’s reciprocity
once again.”

With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands and
the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial services
group offering a comprehensive range of insurance services, domestic
and international banking, estate planning, pension services and corporate
finance as well as other financial products and services. Fidelity is now
inviting applications for a:

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS COUNTRY MANAGER—

INSURANCE OPERATIONS

Reporting directly to the VP & Regional Marketing Mana ger, the

Powerpoint

successful candidate will have the following minimum requirements:-

Business related Bachelor’s Degree Qualification
Professional Insurance Qualification, i.e. FCIL, ACHE or CPCU
Ten years relevant insurance experience

Proven track record in new business development

Self motivated in addition to being an excellent team leader
Excellent organizational and analytical skills

Strong computer literacy in Microsoft Word, Excel &

Ability to relocate and reside in the Turks & Caicos Islands
Ability to prepare & deliver high level presentations

e Knowledge of the local insurance market would be an advantage

The successful applicant will manage Fidelity’s Turks & Caicos

Insurance operations and will focus on new business development as well
as maintaining & developing existing client & carrier relationships across
a broad range of products & services.

An attractive compensation package that includes a large performance
related component, plus a comprehensive range of employee benefits and
relocation allowance is being offered.

Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
others area of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high
performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance

and provident fund benefits.

TCI COUNTRY MANAGER -INSURANCE OPERATIONS



The deadline for applications is January 31st 2007.

TCI Country Manager—Insurance Operations

SteppingStones Recruitment

P.O. Box 10091

Grand Cayman KY1-1001

Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836

Email jobs@steppingstonesca viman. com

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of

GLOBAL FEE
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated

recovery management. The successful candidate will also be

responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
management, maintenance of all fee agreements, as well as
document management including filing and imaging of
correspondence.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting,
Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three
(3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution.

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution, |
communication, organization and pc skills. The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR

Email: betty.roberts@citigroup.com

Deadline for application is Friday, January 19, 2007.



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65866
65874
66480
66085
65133
65962
65144
66160
65328

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PAGE 2E, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

Leevan



#@ DAVID BECKHAM
(AP FILE Photo)

Beckham

looks like
a perfect

fit for Los
Angeles

â„¢ SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

ROLL out the red carpet,
Hollywood. The David Beck-
ham show is coming to town.

It’s not “Bend it Like
Beckham” this time, though.
It’s more like “Spend it Like
Beckham.”

The most recognized play-
er on the planet — fashion
icon, tabloid fixture, market-
ing giant and husband of a
former Spice Girl — is taking
his game and fame to Tinsel-
town, and he’s going to be
earning an estimated $250
million for the five years of
his contract.

The 31-year-old former
England captain agreed to a
deal Thursday to play for the
Los Angeles Galaxy of
Major League Soccer, turn-
ing down a two-year contract
extension from Real Madrid
for a chance to lift soccer’s
profile in the United States.

“There are so many great
sports in America,” the for-
mer Manchester United star
said. “There are so many kids
that play baseball, American
football, basketball. But soc-
cer is huge all around the
world apart from America;
so that’s where I want-to
make a difference with the
kids.”

Beckham, who has failed
to win any major titles in 3
1/2 seasons in Madrid, said
the time was right for a
change.

“I’ve played now for two
‘of the biggest clubs in the
world and played at the high-
est level for 15 years, and
now I: think that I need
another challenge,” Beck-
ham said.

Beckham will become the
biggest star to play soccer in
the United States since Pele
and Franz Beckenbauer
played in the now-defunct
North American Soccer
League in the 1970s.

The Galaxy, citing indus-
try experts, said the LA deal
is worth more than $250 mil-
lion in salary and commer-
cial endorsements — about
$1 million a week — and is
“thought to be the biggest in
sporting history.”

“David Beckham is a glob-
al sports icon who will tran-
scend the sport of soccer in
America,” MLS commis-
sioner Don Garber said.

Beckham and his pop star
wife, Victoria, should fit in
just fine in LA. Beckham
opened a soccer academy in
Carson, California, last year,
and Victoria was pho-
tographed house-hunting in
the area.

A celebrity who draws
paparazzi like a movie star,
Beckham and his wife regu-
larly find their way onto
tabloid and magazine covers,

With trendy clothes, rotating :

hair colors and styles and a
glamorous wife, he’s the epit-
ome of the modern mix of
celebrity and athlete. He’s
even had a movie named
after him: “Bend it like Beck-.
ham.”

His soccer skills are only
part of the equation, He’s
David Beckham Inc., a multi-
national corporation with
links to Pepsi, Gillette,
Motorola and Adidas.

MLS even changed its
rules on salary caps, clearing
the way for Beckham to sign
the lucrative deal and
become the first player to be
signed under the new rule,

“I’m going out there to
hopefully build a club and
team that’s got a lot of poten-
tial,” Beckham said. “I think
that’s what excites me.”

Los Angeles opens its sea-
son April 8 in Houston, but
Beckham is not expected to
join the team until August.
His four-year contract with
Madrid expires at the end of
this season.
















i
t
i

-beensuspended. vive: 4

back ir

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

LEEVAN ‘Superman’ Sands
is getting ready to soar again.

Sands is hoping to bounce
back this year after he was hit
with a three-month suspension
from the International Amateur
Athletic Federation that kept
him grounded for the entire
outdoor season.

After spending some quiet
time home with his family and
friends during the Christmas
holiday, Sands is back at
Auburn University in Alabama
training under the watchful eyes
of his coach, Henry Rolle.

“Training has been going
good. I think coach thinks ’m
more ready than I was last year
and the year before,” Sands
reflected. “So, I think this year,
I’m a little more hungrier.

“T have something to prove, I
haven’t gotten a (shoe) contract
yet, so I have to go out there
jumping to get a contract
again.”

The 26-year-old Sands said
the three-month ordeal that
banned him from competing at
the IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships in Moscow, Russia
and the Commonwealth Games
in Manchester, England, as well
as the Central American and
Caribbean Games, was devas-
tating.

“It was really rough for me,”
said Sands, who basically has to
start from scratch. “It’s like
when I came from high school
and went to college and earned
my contract.

“So now IJ have to do that all
over again. It’s like starting over
again.”

Despite what he experienced,
Sands said he spent some qual-
ity time reflecting on what could
have happened, had he not

insisted.‘] have to be focussed
and rebuild myself to back to
where I was before.”

Based on his training, Sands
said he feels like he’s ready to
fly ahead. But he won’t know
just how far he can soar until
he gets back on the track.

opening win |

! #Ejust devoted all of my.time.
toxtraining.on the track,” he

He will be heading to Birm-
ingham, England for his first
meet back on January, 27. After
that, he will go to Germany and
Sweden for a five to six meet
tour before he returns to the
United States in February.

“T think it will take a couple
meets to get the feeling, get the
legs back,” he noted. “But I
hope to be back out there jum
ing far after I get in a couple of
months.”

Having done just four meets
in what would have been his
first full season on the tour since
graduating from Auburn, Sands
said he intends to make the best
of this year’s campaign.

“J just need to get amongst
the rest of the world class
jumpers, not the little small
meets that I did before the
World Championship,” he
insisted, “I just need.to get out
there with them.”

Sands intends to take it meet
by meet, but he would like to
jump at least 56 feet high or
even 57 indoors. Outdoors, he
said the ultimate goal is jump
57-high or 58 and eventually
qualify for the IAAF World
Outdoor Championships in
August in Osaka, Japan.

By the way, Sands holds both
of the BAAA’s National indoor
long and triple jump records
and the outdoor triple jump
record. The only one that eludes
him is the outdoor long jump
record that is held by Craig
Hepburn.

While the triple jump is
Sands’ bread and butter, he siat-
ed that he intend to pursue the
long jump and eventually sur-
pass the record that he came
close to erasing while he was
at Auburn when he did the
deuce to secure points for the
school.

“I'm still going to long jump
in a couple meets because I still
want that record,” he stressed.
“T want all of the records. But
the long jump is the only one I
haven’t gotten yet. I just have to
work on it.”

In the meantime, Sands said
he’s looking forward to getting
back on the circuit, especially
to renew his showdown with
Sweden’s world champion
Christian Olsson.



TRIBUNE SPORTS





Alanna
_ joins the ~
Tigers’ fight
for title

& SWIMMING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ALANNA DILLETTE
will join the fight with the
Auburn Tigers women’s swim
team who are hoping to clinch
the NCAA division I title.

Both the Tigers’ teams will
compete in a dual men and
women’s meet against nation-
ally ranked Texas today.

The Tigers’, who are
ranked number three.in both
the women and men, will host
the meet at the James E Mar-
tin Aquatics Center in
Auburn. Texas are ranked
number one in men and 12th
in women.

The two day meet will be a
handful for Dillette who com-
petes in the 50m, 100m, and
the 200m free. So far this sea-
son she has a best times of
24.79 seconds, 52.97 seconds

-and 1:55.64 seconds in each
of the respective events. Dil-
lette also competes in the
100m back.

This weekend will also be a
busy one for Olympian Nikia
Deveaux who is still seeking
qualification for the national
championships.

Deveaux a student and
member of the University of
Kentucky women’s swimming
team will use their weekend
meet as a tune up for the SEC
conference championships
and an opportunity to qualify
for the NCAA national cham-
pionships.

The two day meet is set to
begin today at the University
of Kentucky will be against
nationally ranked Alabama
(18th ranked) — it will be the
second dual meet for the uni-
versity.

The results from the meets
will be posted in Monday’s
edition of the Tribune.

ee hse



Full Text
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







i ANNA Nicole Smith, right, leaves the US Supreme Court in .

Washington with her son Daniel Smith in this February 28,

2006 photo

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Shipyard CEO defends safety standards

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Grand

Bahama Shipyard adheres to’

very strong, internationally-
recognised safety and environ-
mental standards, according to
Shipyard CEO Dave Dalleish.

He made this comment in
response to the “damaging”
allegations made by union offi-

cials earlier this week.
Mr Dalleish said he took
strong exception to comments

‘regarding safety and environ-

mental conditions at the ship
repair facility, where 250
Bahamian workers are
employed.

“What is of great concern. to
me, are people saying that the
management of this company
has a ‘lackadaisical and care-

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Decision ‘soon’ on Daniel Smith inquest

®@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DECISION is expected to —

be made soon on whether an
inquest is to be held into the
death of Anna Nicole Smith's
son.

On Wednesday, The Tribune
was told by Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson that
the police file on Daniel Smith's
death would soon be with Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez, and
that it was he — not she — who
would make the final decision
as to whether an inquest would

be carried out.

Now, Bernard Turner, direc-
tor of public prosecutions, has
told the Associated Press that
the file will be with Mr Gomez
“by the end of the week”.

Attempts to contact Mr
Gomez for comment on the
issue were unsuccessful as his
cellular phone was turned off,
AP said.

In the wake of the 20-year-
old's mysterious death, some
commentators claimed there
was an unnecessarily protracted
period of deliberation over the
matter of an inquest.

A leading jurist said in Octo-
ber that an inquest should be a
matter of course in all cases of
sudden death where no one is
criminally charged.

However, Mr Turner said
that the investigation had not
taken "unusually long."

“Every matter has to be
investigated based on the pecu-
liarities ‘of that case. You have
to keep in mind that although
he died in the Bahamas, he had
only arrived here a few hours
earlier, so this ended up not
being an entirely local matter,”
Mr Turner said.

In what some see as another
bizarre turn in the saga of Anna
Nicole Smith, it was reported |
yesterday that she had tattoos of
her dead son and new daugh-
ter, Dannielynn, inked on her
shoulders during her recent
return to the US.

On her left shoulder, she is
reported to bear a large tattoo
portraying an image of herself
and Daniel, with the dates of
his birth and death, alongside
the words "My Pumpkinhead."

On her right shoulder is said
to be a portrait of four month-
old Dannielynn.

Dalleish hits back at criticism by union officials



free’ approach to safety. The
exact opposite is true,” he said
on Wednesday.

“We are an internationally
known and recognised company
and this kind of rhetoric .. . is
actually quite damaging and
could be harmful to the very,
Bahamians that the union pur-
ports to support,” he said.

Harold Grey, president of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Workers Union, claimed that
there are serious safety and
environmental concerns at the
facility.

During a press conference on
Tuesday, Mr Grey announced
that the union intends to take a
strike vote next week.

However, Mr . Dalleish
assured that the safety of work-
ers and the protection of the
environment are given top pri-
ority at the shipyard.

“We have strong environ-
mental and safety programme
internationally recognised (in
place) and we are audited ona
regular basis by an internation-
al body — Lloyds,” he noted.

According to the CEO, the
shipyard has a larger safety
department than many ship-
yards around the world.

Mr Dalleish said the safety
department, which includes six
officers, is headed by a quali-
fied and capable Bahamian.



Mr Grey believes that the
safety department is under-
staffed, and complained that
sometimes one safety officer is
left alone to patrol and inspect
the entire shipyard.

Assurance

Mr Dalleish responded: “I was
the operation director of Halifax
Shipyard in Canada, where I can
assure you safety standards are
extremely stringent. The whole
company of 1,000 employees had
one safety manager and his job
was to patrol because it is not
the safety officers who are
responsible for safety in the ship-
yard: It is the responsibility of
the individual employee to work
in a safe ‘and proper environ-
ment monitored by his supervi-
sors,” he said.

Mr Dalleish stated that in
addition to patrolling the ship-
yard, it is the duty of the safety
officer to correct any situation
that may become potentially
dangerous to workers or the
environment.

The safety officers are
responsible for checking com-
partments on ships to make sure
they are suitable for employees
to enter.

The officer also ensures that
first aid; safety and environ-

mental materials are constantly
available in case of an accident,
he said.

Mr Dalleish explained that
the shipyard was recently
engaged in two disciplinary mat-
ters, regarding the suspension
of a safety officer and the sus-
pension of a shop steward who
was given a verbal warning for
poor time keeping.

He said the union has taken
both matters to Labour Depart-
ment.

“There have been two sepa-
rate meetings on those issues, and
in the end, the company stood
firm on its ground and the union
was upset because we refuse to
overturn the two matters... and
they are now going to the press to
agitate and make noise because
they are not getting what they
want,” said Mr Dalleish.

He stressed that the five-day
suspension of a safety officer,
who left his assigned post where
an X-ray procedure was being
performed, was warranted.

The safety officer, he said,
was stationed in a place where
he was told to stay and prevent
access of any other employees
to that area.

“He violated a situation and
an instruction from his imme-
diate superior and could have
placed people at severe risk. If
he felt it was important to leave

his station he could have con-
tacted someone by radio and
had someone else take over his
duties there before he left to go
patrolling,” he said.

Mr Dalleish said that the safe-
ty officer who was suspended is
back to work. Although the
matter is resolved, he feels that
the union is using it as lever-
age. ,

Addressing the environmen-
tal concerns regarding a sunken
barge, Mr Dalleish said the ves-
sel is empty and does not con-
tain any contaminants, as the
union claims.

“It has been underwater for
three years and there is no
requirement, or need for that
to be removed because it is in
60 feet of water and does not
harm or hinder any activity that
goes on the shipyard,” he said.

As part of its environmental
management system, the ship-
yard conducts regular water
sampling at the facility. There
has been no indication of any
kind of environment situation,
Mr Dalleish said.

FOR 3 IN.1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Aig) for enti
AL ee





A FRIENDLY REMINDER
MASS DISCONNECTION EXERCISES

IN THE FOLLOWING. AREAS:

* Rosetta « Kemp Road and all side corners
« Village Road ¢ Soldier Road « Prince Charles Dr. to
Village Road « Dannottage Estate « Village Estate,
« Nassau Village « Blair Estate ¢ Fox Hill
¢ Yamacraw Beach « Monastery Park « College Gardens
« East Park Estate *» Seabreeze Estate & Imperial Park
* Hillside Park ¢ Bay St. & Victoria Ave. « Centreville
¢ Palmdale including Madeira St. « Mt. Royal Ave. and
Mt. Rose Ave. and all side corners.

PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY! .

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon

or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations

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a A ee

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it. oh 2 er
ra

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 3



O1n brief

Man killed
in Harbour
Island is
identified

THE man stabbed to death
on Wednesday in Harbour
Island has been identified as
Clarington Moss.

According to reports, Mr

. Moss was stabbed after an
argument that may have
stemmed from a domestic
dispute.

The victim was in his mid-
40s and is said to be from
Eleuthera. Another man was
stabbed during the incident
and was airlifted to Nassau for
treatment. The second man is
also a resident of Eleuthera.

According to Inspector
Walter Evans, the two men
were walking when they were
approached by several men.

An argument followed,
resulting in both men being
stabbed several times.

The condition of the sec-
ond victim is unknown.

Film set at
end of
Cold War
scheduled

THE International Lan-
guages and Cultures institute
of the College of the
Bahamas has announced that
it will be screening a film
about East German society
near the end of the Cold War.
. The German-language

“movie Good Bye Lenin! offers

a Satirical view of East Ger-
man society, rushing madly to
embrace the joys of unbridled
consumerism after the fall of
the Berlin Wall in 1989.
Stephen B Aranha. history
lecutrer at the School of
Social Sciences at COB, will
make a presentation on the
film’s historical background.
The screening will take
| ' place on January 17 at 7pm in
; room three of the Munnings
«Jf
|

Campus of the college.

YOUR CONNECTIO

“Building at the Oakes Field Ai
- t - bune to possibly suggest politi-

Police feel the heat
for delay in Inagua
beating inquiry

POLICE are upset that fail-
ure to make arrests in the
Inagua beating scandal is
rebounding on them.

They claim they are being
blamed by the public for the
Attorney General’s delay in
ordering charges to be laid.

Dexter Wilson, a 27-year-old
marine worker for Morton Salt,
was beaten up in Mathew
Town, Inagua, by a large group
of Defence Force officers in late
November.

He was “left for dead” by
marines who took exception to
a conversation he had in a local
bar with a woman Defence
Force marine.

Since then, police have con-
ducted a full investigation into —
and sent documents to the
Attorney General’s Office.

However, no action has been
taken against the culprits - even
though there were several wit-
nesses to the incident.

Now police are growing rest-
less over mounting disquiet in
Inagua, where locals are sus-



& PAUL Thompson

pecting a cover-up.

Yesterday, former assistant
police commissioner Paul Thomp-
son said many case files are being
sent to the AG’s office before
anyone is charged by police.

“The incident in Inagua is a
case in point,” he said, “From
what I have read in the various

newspapers and heard on radio,

it appears there is evidence to.

charge these persons with caus-
ing dangerous harm, wounding,
assault and battery, discharging
firearms to the danger and
annoyance of the public, assault
with a deadly weapon and dis-
orderly conduct.”

He said evidence also sug-
gested aiding and abetting
offences.

“These would most likely be
the criminal charges that the old
inspectors and sergeants would
have brought against the vari-
ous offenders,” he said.

“The police then would have
obtained warrants of arrest for
those concerned. As a matter
of respect, the officer in charge
(in this case, the Commodore)
would have been informed and
requested to produce his per-
sonnel to a particular police sta-
tion for processing and any
interrogation necessary.

“TJ submit that the police could
have dealt with this matter effi-
ciently and expeditiously.”

AG: Inagua file still to reach my desk

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ATTORNEY _ General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has
told The Tribune that the file
on the alleged Inagua beating
remains in her office — but has
not reached her desk.

And Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said she could not respond to
claims made by a senior police
source that her office is request-
ing police files “to an extent ney-
er known before” — unless The
Tribune identified the source and
specified the files in question.

She added: “I would simply
say that it is the political sea-
son so I would expect The Tri-

cal mischief.”

In November, eyewitnesses
said Mr Wilson, a 27-year-old
Morton Salt worker was “beat-
en almost death” by about 15
Defence Force officers.

Immediately after the inci-
dent, an investigative team from
both the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and the Defence Force
travelled to the island to inves-
tigate the claims and returned to
Nassau to complete their report.

The file was forwarded to the
Attorney General's office in
mid-December.

Several sources have ques-
tioned why no one has been
charged with the offence yet.

On January 3, Shane Wilson,
the victim's brother claimed

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such as new applications, ESN changes and adding

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that he felt “the government is
trying to protect someone”.
“Had this been Dexter or me

’ who had attacked a marine we

would have been before the
court and would now be in Fox
Hill Prison,” he said.

A senior police source told
The Tribune that "there is no
reason for this matter to be
referred to the AG's office.

“The police have been to
Inagua and taken statements.
These men should have been
before the courts by now. There
is no excuse for this delay,” the
source said.

However, the Attorney Gen-
eral said on Wednesday that the
file being referred to her office
was a matter of procedure.

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>"sCHOOL *



The International School of The Babamas
FOUNDED 1948

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS

A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew’s School is offered
annually to students attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.



These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10,
11 and 12. Eligible students should meet the following criteria:

e Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including

grades 8 and 9

e Be of the highest academic standing, maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above
e Be at least. 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31st August

2007

Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor
of the student’s school. The students awarded these scholarships will be
expected to follow a full programme of BGCSE and advanced courses leading
to graduation at the end of year 12.

The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates
will sit the scholarship examinations at 9am on Saturday, 10.March 2007 at

St Andrew’s School.
and interviewed.

Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary
schools in New Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be

Successful examination candidates will be short-listed

obtained from the administration office of St Andrew’s School.

Further details are available from St Andrew’s School, telephone: 1

2621.

Application forms should be returned to: -

Robert F. Wade

Principal

St Andrew’s School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau, Bahamas

The closing date for applications is Wednesday, 28 February 2007.

Ss Authorized by:



* ORGANIZATION

'§ INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE




sn aN Accredited by:

-242-324-

vege" COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS

\ NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIA’
& COLLEGES

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*
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ASR RAIN
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

Our story must
be told for us

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETLENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 ,

Saddam Hussein’s echoing voice

EARLIER THIS week, the Iraqi High Tri-
bunal heard damning evidence of Saddam
Hussein’s responsibility for genocidal crimes
against the Kurds of Iraq in the late 1980s
evidence given in the despot’s own voice.
The old audiotape that was played in the
courtroom provided a stunning self-incrimi-
nation from beyond the grave. But it also
underlined how much was lost when the Iraqi
government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Mali-
ki put Saddam to death before trials for his
worst crimes against humanity could be com-
pleted.

The rushed hanging of Saddam deprived
families and friends of his victims of true jus-
tice. It also kept him from speaking in court
about past US and European tolerance for his
repression and use of chemical weapons. And
because he killed Sunni Arabs, Christians,
and Turkmen as well as Kurds and Shiites,
the current government’s cheating of justice
means that a chance to foster the sort of
national reconciliation Iraq desperately needs
today has been deliberately sacrificed in
favour of sectarian vengeance.

Allowing Saddam to live through trials that
proved definitively his guilt for horrific crimes
against his people and Iraq’s neighbours
could have taught crucial lessons for the
future. Instead, a chance was. lost to teach
both an Iraqi and a regional atidience about
the difference between the law of the rufer
and the rule of law. If Saddam had been in
the courtroom Tuesday, forced to listen to his



Good news for

THE RULING Thursday in Gulfport, Mis-
sissippi, was good news for hundreds of
homeowners challenging insurers for refusing
to cover billions of dollars in storm damage.

A federal judge in Gulfport took part of a
case out of the hands of the jury before they
were allowed to award punitive damages to a
couple that had insurance with State Farm
Fire & Casualty Co.

State Farm held that the.couple’s insur-
ance policy did not cover the storm surge
from Hurricane Katrina. The couple said
that a tornado during the hurricane destroyed
their home. State Farm blamed all the dam-
age on Katrina’s storm surge. State Farm
and other insurers say their homeowner poli-
cies cover damage from wind, but not from

Expressions Boutique

oy ue UTE oF ee Ae aCe the. DL

own taped voice speaking not in the flowery
oratorical manner of his public persona but in
the brutal terms of the cold killer he was,

* many of the political myths spun around him

in the Arab world would have been dissolved.
Saddam’s remorseless cruelty as he
instructs his inner circle on the uses of mus-
tard gas and nerve gas to kill Kurdish vil-
lagers leaves no doubt that they were acting
on his orders and he intended to murder as
many Kurds as he could. Indeed, Human
Rights Watch has estimated that Saddam had
100,000 Kurds killed in the Anfal campaign of
the late 1980s; Kurdish authorities and the tri-
bunal’s prosecution put the number of victims
as high as 180,000. At one moment, Saddam
is heard on the tape telling one of his top
henchmen that "chemical weapons are not

used unless I personally give the orders.”
Since a videotape has been disseminated
around the world in which Saddam’s execu-
tion appears as one among many killings in a
vicious sectarian war, as merely an act of
revenge by Shiite authorities against a Sun-
ni Arab ruler, the old myths about Saddam as
a heroic knight of the Arab world have been
given a second life. At the same time, the
few useful truths he might have told about
American and European complicity in his
crimes against humanity will not be aired in a
court of law. There are reasons why human-

ity never seems to learn from history.

(This article was written by The Boston
Globe - c.2006).

policyholders

water, and that the policies exclude damage

~ that could have been caused by a combina-

tion of both, even if hurricane-force winds
preceded a storm’s rising water.
However, the judge ruled that State Farm

couldn’t prove that Katrina’s storm surge -

was responsible for all of the damage to the
couple’s home.

The judge also said the testimony failed
to establish how much damage was caused by
wind and how much resulted from storm
surge. The judge ordered State Farm to pay
$223,292 in damage caused by Hurricane
Katrina to the home.

The jury then awarded the couple $2.5 mil-
lion in punitive damages.

State Farm says it will appeal.

to advance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

CHAPTER one was writ-
ten in 1953 when three
Bahamians of vision, Mr H
M Taylor, William
Cartwright and Cyril Steven-
son got together and estab-
lished the country’s first
political organisation, the
Progressive Liberal Party,
unaware of the fact that soon
they would be pushed on the
wing of history, while others
took centre stage.

History is often referred to
as a biased recording of
events by a people towards
themselves and their people,
which deprive future genera-
tions of their true history.

Our story must be told for
us to advance as a people,
our people seem to have a
good understanding of what
is, but they have no knowl-
edge of what was. Those who
are fifty years old today were
under twelve when the new
chapter was written in Janu-
ary, 1967.

They must know who were
L O Pindling, Cecil Wallace
Whitfield, Milo Butler, Carl-
ton Francis, Randol Fawkes,
Cyril Stevenson, H M Tay-
lor, Clarence A Bain and A
R Braynen. We must let
them know also who is
Arthur D Hanna, Arthur
Foulkes, Clifford Darling,
Warren Levarity and Elwood
Donaldson.

P Anthony White was right
when he wrote that the
Bahamian nation needs to
stand up and cheer the life

- of Mr Cyril Stevenson, who

was part of that tiny circle of
heroes, who began the
process of bringing the mass-
es out of ignorant darkness,
and into the marvelous light
of political freedom.

Mr Stevenson wrote anoth-
er political chapter in 1967,
but South Androsians
declined his script.

In that election the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party won
eighteen seats, and the Unit-
ed Bahamian Party won eigh-
teen, the other two were won
by Randol Fawkes (Labour)
and A R Braynen (Indepen-
dent).

With the PLP and UBP
locked in a tie, Mr Fawkes
and Mr Braynen represent-
ed the balance of power;
expectation was high, that Mr
Fawkes would support the
PLP but what about Mr

ACRE ARS
e Nassau,

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Learn From Yesturday, Live For
Today, Hope For Tomorrow!

, and stepped out. .

Bag MeS



letters@tribunemedia. net

Braynen? No doubt there
was a lot of wheeling and
dealing on both sides, in the
end as we know now, both
men merged with the PLP
giving them the mandate to
form the Government, which
gave birth to majority rule.

Mr Braynen’s merger with
the Progressive Liberal Party
reminds those of us who have
a little knowledge of Ameri-
can history, how John Brown,
a man of Anglo Saxon her-
itage, went to the aid of
African American slaves, in
1859 at Harpers Ferry, for
which he paid the ultimate
price.

John Brown was charged
and convicted of treason and
insurrection for his attempt
to free slaves.

When he rose to address
the court in his defence he
had this to say:

I have, may it please the
court, a few words to say. In
the first place, I deny every-
thing but what I have already
admitted, of a design on my
part to free slaves. Now if it is
deemed necessary that I
should forfeit my life for the
furtherance of the end of jus-
tice, and mingle my blood
further with the blood of my
children, with the blood of
millions in this slave country,
whose rights are disregarded
by wicked, cruel, and unjust
enactment — I say let it be
done.

African American will for-
ever remember John Brown,
shouldn’t Bahamians of
African descent remember A
R Braynen.

PRINCE G SMITH
Nassau,
January 2007.

Since when |
has this been
an issue?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHILE on McDonald’s drive-through line in Palmdale,
around 7.45am today a police officer, driving a mobile patrol car
pulled.in the front of a party supplies store, parked his vehicle

Then: he proceeded to tell everyone (approximately 6-12
cars) on the drive-through line to move as it is a $100 fine to be

stationary in the road.

No one was in the middle of the road as cars were able to pass

by without hindrance.

When I called to find out his number, he was very haughty,

biggity and rude.

I asked him about the other fast-food restaurants. He says he
did a favour and everyone was supposed to get a ticket and as
far as he was concerned, any other officer who questioned it
“doesn’t know their job”. ;

My question is when since has this been an issue? I- thought
police officers are to use their discretion. I have been a patron
of McDonald’s and other fast-food restaurants for many years
and this is the first time an officer has had to do this. In fact, oth-
er police officers do the same thing as I did all the time (on or
off duty). Is this a double standard?

On another note, it may not have been much, but
McDonald’s, Palmdale lost a few breakfast patrons this morn-
ing.

NO NAME
Nassau,
January 4, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 5



MMi aa
Animal shelter boss becomes

In brief

PM quizzed
to table
answer on
NFS workers

THE Workers Party has
demanded that Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie table in the
House of Assembly a record
communication
between himself and the com-
missioner of police on the
Nassau Flight Services

of the

arrests.

The party asked in particu-
lar for the portion of the com-
munication in which Com-

missioner Paul Farquharson
advised Mr Christie that the

police did not circumvent ;
Bahamian law in terms of :

their involvement in the
arrest of the five baggage
handlers.

At a police luncheon earli-
er this week, Mr Christie said

the police had, “in writing”,
assured him that they had no
knowledge of the arrests
before they occurred.

In response to this, the
Workers Party said it feels

that the prime minister

should tell the public on what
grounds the commissioner
had to write a communica-
tion advising that he and his
force did not break the laws
of the Bahamas.

“Is the prime minister
investigating the commis-
sioner of police and his force

to determine to what extent if
any, they may have been

involved in infractions against
the laws of the Bahamas?”
the party leader asked.

Mr Moncur questioned
whether this matter should
now be referred to a Com-
mission of Inquiry in order

that the public may be :

assured that there is no lack
of confidence between the
office of prime minister and
the police. 5

The Workers Party, he said,

hopes that Prime Minister :
Christie will recognise the *:

‘< dangerous “curve ball” that
he has thrown at the Royal
‘ ‘Bahamas Police Force by cit-
ing portions of a correspon-

dence between himself and

- the commissioner.

eae
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PHONE: 322-2157



























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DOG lover Kevin Degen-
hard probably loves them just a
little less after being savaged in
a pack attack near his home.

The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety boss suffered deep bites to
his legs when four dogs being
walked off the leash by their
owner pounced.

With blood running down the
back of his leg, Mr Degenhard
was astounded that the irritated
owner, having pulled his dogs
off, didn’t even say sorry.

Now police are investigating
the incident, which happened
early yesterday morning near

Mr Degenhard’s Sandyport

home.

Mr Degenhard, executive
director of the humane society,
was walking his own dog when
the attack occurred.

Two people approached
walking four dogs off their
leashes which attacked his dog.

His leashed dog was kept
under control but it took some

see eececcecanceeeerenanaesscceceenecessacaeasossaseasaeeseneee seen

Union claims its

time before the man and
woman walking the other dogs
pulled their animals away.

About 15 minutes later, on
the return route of the early
morning walk, the encounter
was_ repeated, but this time
with a violent outcome.

The leashed dog obeyed the
command to sit to allow the
loose dogs to pass but all four

‘attacked again, totally unpro-

voked.

Then one of the dogs bit Mr
Degenhard’s right leg, causing
instant bleeding. Deep punc-
ture wounds were left in his calf
muscle.

Mr Degenhard told The Tri-
bune: “Despite having over 35
years experience working with
dogs professionally, it is fright-
ening enduring such an unpro-
voked attack, especially when
it was transparently obvious the
two owners had no control over
their animals at all.

“I was astounded that the

man had watched:the first
attack 15 minutes earlier and
was still allowing his dogs to
walk off a leash. He even had a
leash in his hand.
“When I asked him why it
was not on the dog, he told me
his dog walks too slowly on a
leash...so I guess that makes it
okay to abdicate personal
responsibility.”

Laws

Mr Degenhard said: “The

real irony here is that, as exec-
utive director of The Bahamas
Humane Society, and a mem-
ber of the ad hoc committee for
the promotion of responsible
animal ownership, we have tried
to improve the out-of-date,
inadequate animal care and
control laws since the early
1990s.

“After a year of hard, focused
work, the committee submit-

ted a draft Animal Care and
Control Act around November,
2005, and here we are in 2007
and it is still not on the statute
books as law.

“If the act had been passed
it would have been illegal to
have these dangerous dogs off
their leashes and this would not
have happened.”

Mr Degenhard added:
“When the owner saw the blood
flowing down the back of my
leg he just made one four-letter

expletive and dragged his dogs

away. I didn’t get as much as
an apology.”

The proposed act, which ani-
mal welfare workers want to see
as law without further delay,
emphasises responsible animal
ownership.

“The BHS supports this
approach. These owners are
clearly not acting responsibly.
If my dog had been smaller they
would probably have killed it
as their dogs were in a hysterical

role in Majority

Rule has been passed over

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE Public Service Drivers
Union is claiming that its con-
tribution to the establishment
of Majority Rule has been over-
looked.

The union’s president said
yesterday that his organisation
was instrumental in bringing

about the monumental social -

changes that took place 40 years
ago.

During a press conference
yesterday, Richard Johnson Sr
said he wanted to draw atten-
tion to the “painful truth” that
after the first black govern-
ment came to power in the
Bahamas, “some of the prima-
ry producers —- Bahamians who
did the hard work to bring
about Majority Rule — have yet
to be recognised and reward-
ed.”

This, he said, includes taxi
drivers.

For the past 10 years, Mr
Johnson said, the PSDU —-
which consists of the Bahamas
Taxi Union, the Grand Bahama
Taxi Union and public service
drivers — have been in negotia-
tions for a heads of agreement
on transportation with the gov-
ernment.

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They are seeking to gain
ownership of the taxi franchise,
the endorsement of a mini-
mum of $100,000 on each fran-
chise and to gain responsibility
for transportation services
from the docks, airports and
hotels.

“In 1958 we led this country
in a general strike and as a
result of that strike women got
to vote for the first time.” Mr
Johnson said taxi drivers also
helped to bring an end to the
“Jand vote” law — under which
only persons owning land were
allowed to vote.

“Also,” he continued, “legis-
lation was enacted to allow for
the formation of trade unions.
Taxi drivers were econGfiiically
independent back thei. In fact
we were thé only pébple who
did not have to depetid'on Bay
Street for income and that is
why we were able to lead the
country in a general strike,” he
explained.

“T would like the government,
specifically the prime minister,
whose father was a taxi driver
and was also a participant in the
general strike, to give us this
heads of agreement because we
believe that taxi drivers are
positioned to complete the rev-

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olution that was dubbed the
quiet revolution back in 1967 -
it’s fitting since we played a part
in Majority Rule.”

In the 1960s, Mr Johnson
said, taxi drivers worked for the
“sreater good” in an effort to
sensitise the Bahamian public
about their social situation.

With that accomplished, it is
now time for the union to be
rewarded, he said.

@ RICHARD Johnson
says that the contribution
of taxi drivers to the social
changes 40 year ago, and

: that the government
should recognise this with

y a heads of agreement



victim to dogs out of control

frenzy,” he said.

“If it had been a child walking
the dog, I hate to think what
the outcome would have been.”

Cable Beach police and
Sandyport security are investi-
gating the matter.

Meanwhile, Mr Degenhard
has received medical treatment
and his dog is licking his bruises.

BER Ea

FRIDAY,
‘JANUARY 12TH

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise

11:00 Immediate Response

Noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response
Cont'd

1:00 _ A Special Report

1:30 Ethnic Health America

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5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The’Fun Farm

6:00 Caribbean Passport

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 — Island Wide Crusade:

“Youth Explosion”

Caribbean Newsline ©

News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30 Community Page 1540 am

SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise




































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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007



LOCAL NEWS

ew judicial complex




to cost estimated $70m

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A STATE-OF-THE-ART
judicial complex that will con-
tain the Supreme Court, the
Court of Appeal and the Indus-
trial Tribunal is to be built at
an estimated cost of $70 mil-
lion, the attorney general said
on Wednesday.

The complex will be built on
land extending from the existing
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
building to the old site of St
John's College, Allyson May-
nard-Gibson said.

Addressing the judiciary at
the opening of the legal year,
she said that this complex, com-
bined with a forthcoming “sys-
tem of integrated justice” which
will see the police, the prison,
the Supreme Court, and the
office of the attorney general
linked by infranet, will increase
elliciency in the administration

of justice.
She said that the office of the

attorney general will be con-

nected with the other institu-
tions as soon as the necessary
“infrastructural improvements”
are completed at her office.

Currently, the police system is
connected to the system at the
prison, and the Supreme Court
system is “ready to be connect-
ed to the office of the attorney
general and the police,” she
said.

Mrs Maynard Gibson said
that her office is committed to
the use of technology for
improved efficiency, and
"aim(s) to provide the capacity
for persons with matters before
us to go online and track the
progress of their matters
through our chambers."

However. Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall, speaking after the
Attorney General, said that

‘although he “welcomed the

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a

advances” that she had spoken:

about, he “felt obliged to point
out” that “despite the commit-
ment by the executive in previ-
ous years to provide to the
office of the judiciary person-
nel a dedicated information
technology department, this has
not yet happened.”

Tracking

He said that for this reason,
the Bahamas Integrated Justice
Information System has not
been delivering on promises up
to this point “for the tracking
of cases and the consistent
record keeping essential to the
production of statistics that
make sense” — despite the
“enormous” sums of money that
have already been spent on it.

Sir Burton added that he had
expected to be in a position to
reveal which of the recommen-

dations made by Justice Stra-
chan in a December 2005 report
to government had been imple-
mented.

The report was on how best
the registry can be structured
to serve "today's Bahamas".

However, Sir Burton
revealed that currently, he could
only state that the recommen-
dations were “still being con-
sidered.”

Mrs Maynard Gibson said
that a consultant will be
employed to implement Justice
Strachan's recommendations
once the aforementioned infra-
structural integration is com-
pleted. ;

She said that once this sys-
tem is in order, and Justice Stra-
chan's recommendations for the
registry are in place, “ineffi-
ciencies that continue to plague
the administration of justice and
cause grave inconvenience to
litigants” will be mitigated.



Warning for motorcyclists



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road traffic department advising motorcyclists not to ride

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



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Chief Justice complains

THE TRIBUNE

about the state of
Eight Mile Rock court

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Nothing has been done to
improve ‘the situation at’ the
Eight Mile Rock magistrate’s
court in Grand Bahama since
it was "virtually destroyed" by a
hurricane in 2005.

Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall
said he was "distressed" to
make this report to the legal
community at the opening of
the 2007 legal year on Wednes-
day.

“Not only have no improve-
ments in that situation occurred
but the department of local gov-
ernment has given the magis-
trate notice to vacate the
premises,” said Sir Burton.

Earlier, Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson indi-
cated in her address that gov-
ernment's intention is to relo-
cate that court in the first quar-
ter of 2007.

Sir Burton said that while it is
"plain and obvious" to those
within the legal system, it
appears "not readily appreciat-
ed by the public generally or
the bureaucratic machinery on
which the legal system must rely
... that a court — at whatever
level — is not merely the presid-
ing judicial officer, whether
judge, registrar or magistrate.

“The judge must, have ade-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

quate physical facilities in which
to sit and from which to work
when not presiding and must
be supported by the necessary
staff,” he said.

Sir Burton said that ensur-
ing that this support is main-
tained is a major administra-
tive challenge, especially for
“the magistracy which, even in
New Providence, is not cen-
trally located and which is
spread further across the arch-
ipelago.”

According to Sir Burton, it
has been the problem of ensur-
ing these administrative
arrangements are in place and
functioning “that has stymied
any advance on the Community
Courts project that I trumpeted
two years ago.”

Sir Burton added that
because of the “uneven pace of
development” across the
Bahamas’ island chain, “the
problem of carrying the system
of justice to the Family Islands
is... the most intractable of
problems” that faces those

charged with administering the

legal system.

Earlier, the attorney general
stated that government intends
to expand the magistrates courts

' in Abaco and Exuma, in view of

the “existing and anticipated
expansion of population in
those areas.”













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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Writer claims that the
Bahamas is the most stable

predominantly black country

THE Bahamas is the most
stable of any predominantly
black country in the world, a
US scholar has declared.

But it is bucking a_ global
trend, for blacks elsewhere
are in terminal decline,
according to controversial
black author Clinton L Black.

In a staggeringly provoca-
tive assessment of the blacks’
status in the modern world,
Mr Black said: “The only way
we as a black people can pos-
sibly reverse the negativity we
generate is to totally and
unconditionally reinvent the
black man.”

Mr Black’s theories, which
are expected to cause a spirit-
ed debate among black Amer-
icans in particular, are laid out
in a new book called Why All
Black People Are Coming to
an End.

In the 289-page book, sub-
titled A Suigenocide in

Progress, Mr Black says

blacks are in clear danger of
extinction.

“If we as a black people
continue our ferociously self-
destructive behaviour, then
we all will suffer a more ill-
fated future.”

He wrote the book, he said,
“to help us finally escape from
our vicious cycles of self-
destruction.” He hoped it
would educate blacks into
becoming “more constructive
citizens in our global society.”

Yesterday, in an interview
with The Tribune, Mr Black
said he felt the Bahamas was
“unique” in that it had man-
aged to avoid most of the pit-
falls suffered by other black
societies. —

He said the Bahamas was
the most stable predominant-
ly black country in the world,
with the highest per capita
income (over $20,000), and a
record for avoiding “epi-
demics” of the problems
affecting most black societies,
including coups, sectarian
strife, AIDS, divorce, black
male incarceration and abor-
tions. :

He said the Bahamas com-
pared well with the US and
Caribbean nations like
Trinidad and Jamaica in this
respect, adding: “The
Bahamas is unique, and
frankly much better off, com-
pared to otaer predominantly
black countries.”

Accepting that attitudes of
US and Bahamian blacks dif-
fered considerably, he said:
“Black Bahamians started
their freedom from the white
man’s draconian bondage
beginning in 1834 via the
British Emancipation Act.

“Black Americans were not
freed until 1863 via the Eman-
cipation Declaration. Howev-
er, unlike most Bahamian
slave descendants, American
slave descendants’ transition



Mi MARTIN LUTHER KING JR
(AP FILE Photo)

from slavery was only wel-
comed by systematic lynching,
which was actually sanctioned
by the US government.”

He said American blacks
were also subjected to Jim
Crow laws, institutional
racism and discrimination and
the eventual assassination of
civil rights leader Martin
Luther King Jr.

Unlike Bahamians, he said,
American blacks were under-



represented in government,
business and higher education
and formed only 13 per cent
of the population.

But blacks in the US were
severely over-represented in
murder, abortion, poverty,
AIDS, incarceration and
divorce.

“Seventy per cent of black
children in America are born
out of wedlock and 40 per
cemt of black children in
America are right here and
right now suffering in abject
poverty in the most wealthy
and powerful country in the
world,” he said.

“In so many visible ways,
America is clearly the most
hypocritical country in the
world. This explains the
extreme level of anti-white
resentment and racial vio-
lence.”

In his book, Mr Black
points out that blacks are
numerically the strongest race
on earth, and were once the
most powerful and respected.
But now they are the least
respected, he adds.

He also lists ten disturbing
facts which, he claims, indi-
cate the scale of their decline.

Black people, he claims,
have the highest AIDS death
rate in the US and the world,
the highest crime rate, the
highest divorce rate, the short-
est life expectancy, the highest
poverty rate, the highest
school drop-out rate, the high-
est abortion rate, the highest
murder rate and are in the
worst shape of any other peo-

le.

“Realistically, all black peo-
ple are now in clear and pre-
sent danger of extinction,” he
said, “Something has got to
give.”

Mr Black’s book is available
on the Amazon and Barnes
and Noble websites.

e SEE Monday’s INSIGHT
for a fuller interview with
Clinton L Black, a biology
graduate who has written four
previous books.

Public Utilities Commission

Ao EDS

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Price Regulation of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
Provided by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

Branded as ViBe

The Public Utilities Commission (Commission) is pleased to invite
comments from the public and licensees on its consultation
document on Price Regulation of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
provided by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
(BTC) branded as ViBe.

The main objectives of this consultation are to:

a) inform the public and licensees that BTC’s VoIP service is func-
tionally and commercially substitutable for conventional
switched voice services and falls within the definition of Voice
Telephony and is price regulated as set out in BTC’s Licence;

b) indicate the Commission’s proposal for the price regulation of

ViBe; and

_¢) invite comments from the public and licensees.

Section 6(5) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, requires the
Commission to publish its proposals on any general instruction

intended to be issued under any part of the Act.

Copies of this document can be obtained from the PUC’s office
located Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded from the
PUC’s website at www.pucbahamas.gov.bs. Written comments
should be submitted by February 2, 2007, via post, hand delivery,

facsimile or e-mail to:

Mr. Barrett Russell

i

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P. 0. Box N4860, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: (242)323-7288

Email: info@puchahamas.gov.bs



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« ANDRE}p,

3 SCHOOL rs

The Internatianal School of The Babamas
FOUNDED 1948

world school



St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian
candidates for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2007. Full
information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications
for the position(s) for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's
degree, and normally need to have a minimum of two years successful school-based
experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual posts, are
that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or international school and
an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or advise
school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (/.e. middle and upper)
school teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered
at this time, although permanent residents with the right to work are invited to submit their
papers for future consideration. Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the recruiting
process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it will advertise internationally
in January.

ALL SCHOOL

Physical education: Years pre-school to 13 responsibilities. Candidates must have successful
experience in coaching years 7 to 13 in at least three of the following sports: baseball/softball;

_ basketball; soccer; track and field; volleyball. Swimming/WS| certification would be welcomed.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International
Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in the primary school should be
committed to the principles of, and preferably trained in, the PYP. Applications are warmly
welcomed from teachers who are committed to an inquiry-based pedagogy but who have
not yet had the opportunity to teach in a PYP school.

Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.
Primary school music
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful teaching experience at all years from

pre-reception to six. They must also have successful exponetice in organizing primary
school music and drama performances.

SECONDARY SCHOOL

The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the
BGCSE in years 10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma
Programme (DP) of the International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades
11 and 12).

Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able to
work as a contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach
to pre-university level and be fens with the demands of the International Baccalaureate



Science (lof) ain
Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach biology to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either chemistry or physics at BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Chemistry: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university
level and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Candidates should also be able to offer either biology or physics to BGCSE/IGCSE level.

Mathematics: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level
and be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Successful experience in teaching calculus to AP and/or IB level is preferred for this post.
Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT Il experience is also desirable.

Economics and accounts: Candidates must be familiar with current computer applications
theory and practice and should also be qualified to teach business studies and economics
to pre-university level. They should also be familiar with the demands of the International
Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful BGCSE or IGCSE experience is desirable.

‘ @
Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications,
experience working with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle
schools are required from applicants for these posts. Applicants may also be required to
teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.

At least two of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in

‘teaching English in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following -

PSE; IT & ICA; art; drama — possibly to BGCSE level.

Another successful applicant will have documented successful experience in teaching general
science in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer any combination of biology, chemistry and
physics at BGCSE level. If he/she could also teach mathematics that would be useful.

Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful
experience in teaching in both areas.

NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching
of the Theory of Knowledge course at IB diploma level. Another will be able to offer
the teaching of psychology at IB diploma level

Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mr Robert Wade, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications ‘MUST include the following:

letter of application

a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy

a full curriculum vitae,

either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, tex and email numbers of three
people who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name ~
and address of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers
may be obtained.

Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools
by email or fax only.

_ Frank Coyle, Head of the secondary school:

Email: FCoyle@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Allison Collie, Head of the primary school:

Email ACollie@st-andrews.com
Fax (1 242) 324 0816

Robert F. Wade
Principal

St Andrew's School
P O Box EE 17340
Nassau
Email: -
Fax: (1 242) 364 1654

The closing date for applications is 31 January 2007. Applications from unqualified candidates,
applications arriving without the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this date will not be considered.



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Ingraham claims
govt’s Majority Rule
celebration was
politically motivated -

_ FROM page one

me.”

He said the government
billed the celebration “and
wrapped it up under the ban-
ner of the Christian Council and
they invited all and sundry to
what they said was a national
event.

“They went into the highways
and the byways and invited all
and sundry. They even had
some senior public officers
attend what they were naively
made to believe was a national
service. They had music and
tents and big lights — all the
trappings.”

According to Mr Ingraham,
their efforts proved fruitless, as
not many persons turned up.

“The truth is that our country
can’t afford to keep these
proven failures in control of the
government,” he said. “The his-
tory of their single term in office
is a litany of their inadequacy
and incompetence.”

He said the PLP came to





@ FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham

office making many promises.

“They promised to be honest
and truthful in office, to be
responsive to the people and to
conduct themselves in a man-
ner that would be worthy of the
people’s trust.”

Mr Ingraham said the PLP
have not been faithful to these
commitments.

The party leader was speak-
ing at an FNM rally in Long
Island last night.

“I’ve come to report that
things are going well, very well
indeed for your party, the FNM,
all over the Bahamas,” Mr
Ingraham told the crowd. “We

have completed our selection

of candidates; we are making
ready for whenever pleceons
are called.”

He urged all Long
Islanders not to forget to
register to vote. “We need your

. vote to vote them out,” he

said.

Noting the selection and rat-
ification of Larry Cartwright as
the FNM’s candidate for the
Long Island/Ragged Island con-
stituency, Mr Ingraham said the
party is happy to have him on
board.

“He has my full confidence,
that of the party, and I am
assured, the full confidence of
Long Island from Seymour’s in
the north to Gordon’s in the
south; and he has the confi-
dence of Ragged Island.”

FNM leader: govt could not care less about fishermen

FROM page one

"We knew we couldn’t police all 100,000
square miles of our territorial waters at the same
time. We also knew that Nassau Grouper didn’t
school in south Long Island and in Bimini and in
many other places at the same time," he said.

He said that if the FNM comes to power, they
will "ensure that an appropriate balance is struck
between the need for our southern fishermen to
earn a living; the need to protect and conserve our
marine resources for all Bahamians and the
enforcement of restrictive orders for specific geo-

Is

graphical areas during certain times of the year."
"Look at what this new Government has done.

Put Bahamian grouper fishermen out of business
all over the country while Dominicans and others
have a field day in the southern Bahamas catch-
ing grouper without hindrance or fear of appre-
hension," he said.

"Then we import grouper from Santo Domin-
go to sell to our restaurants and hotels during
the closed fishing season," he added.

If voted in, the FNM will "take full account of
the views of the people who know about fishing - -
the fishermen!" he told his audience. _

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 9





tbat
Mi

The PLP politics




with the honours system

HE recent Queen’s

Honours list has high-
lighted the PLP’s zeal to can-
onize party stalwarts in a most
brazen way. Over the past year,
the PLP has idolised their
heroes unabatedly, putting their
names on public buildings in a
push to exploit their contribu-
tions in the run-up to the 2007
general elections.

After having a glance at the
New Year’s Honours list, it
seems that the Bahamas may
have more heroes than the car-

., toon network, and, in my opin-
_ ion, there are others who may

ore

be more deserving.

This year, opponents of the
British honours system were
given more ammunition when
Lady Marguerite Pindling, Gar-
rett “Tiger” Finlayson and Bal-

. tron Bethel all turned up on the

honours lists for knighthoods,
and what’s more, none of the
three seemed to be as deserving
of ennoblement as others who
have been persistently ignored.

The PLP needs to decide
what it stands for, as they were

_ previously seen as the party that

rejected the Queen’s honours,
particularly as party figure-

_ heads, such as AD Hanna and
: Paul Adderley both rejected

knighthoods. Now, the party
that portrayed the image of
nationalism and a disbelief in
the British honours system, has
apparently used these honours
to a political end. It is really
duplicitous that the PLP would
now use British honours as an

~ election ploy!

Se

he past five years under

the PLP administration
has been bland and rather emp-
ty of achievements. Just looking
at the list of those honoured
would reveal the “new” PLP’s
election scheme of relying on
the rather tarnished legacy of
the former administration in
their bid to catch grassroots
votes and desperately clinging
onto power.

Any reasonable person who
reviews the “new” PLP’s track
record over the last five years
would note that they have zilch
to run on. It has become abun-
dantly clear that the PLP is
doing all it can to get people on
their side by capitalising on the
achievements of another admin-
istration, whether that means
bestowing upon Sir Lynden Pin-
dling’s widow a Damehood,
renaming the NIB complex
after Sir Clifford Darling, nam-
ing the airport after Sir Lynden,
etc.

Yes, I would concede that
Lady Pindling stood by Sir Lyn-
den in the fight for majority rule
and nationhood, however, it
would be fair to question what
she, Baltron Bethel and Gar-
rett “Tiger” Finlayson individ-
ually contributed to the devel-
opment of the Bahamas as a
whole.

Recently, Sir Randol Fawkes’
family publicly expressed their

displeasure because they felt he



YOU

ADR



SS

AN

NG MAN’S

VIEW

She

BSON



oa



had not been duly recognised
for the role he played in the
movement towards Majority
Rule. Indeed, Sir Randol was a

nationalist and a hero, and his ,

contributions to the Bahamas

Day renamed in his honour, as
he is possibly more worthy of
honour than many on the New
Year’s list.

People are raising their eye-
brows over the elevation of



Now, the party that portrayed the image
of nationalism and a disbelief in the
British honours system, has apparently
used these honours to a political end.



during those times far outweigh
that of any of those recently
honoured. In recognition of his
contributions to the country’s
labour movement, Sir Randol
is deserving of having Labour

Marguerite Pindling to Dame-
hood, and many are asking why
she should be there. Lady Pin-
dling had already been hon-
oured through her husband’s
recognition, earning the title of

‘lady’ by virtue of her husband’s
knighthood. Since there is a lim-
ited number of knighthoods and
damehoods that can be given,
the honour of ‘dame’ could
have been bestowed on some-
one else, for example, Dr. Keva
Bethel. ,

It is odd to see that Garrett
Finlayson, the booze baron of
the Bahamas, was also knight-
ed. Among other things, Mr
Finlayson has, in my opinion,
made a sterling contribution to
the country’s alcoholism rate!

Many intelligent Bahamians
are also curious as to why Bal-
tron Bethel was knighted. Mr
Bethel was not exactly found to
be a saint at a recent Commis-
sion of Inquiry.

As Bahamians have not been
knighted in a few years prior to
the recent honours, it 1s obvi-
ous that the PLP was just play-
ing to the gallery—honouring
the super friends of the party!

These days, the bar for hon-
ours is not as high as it used to
be.

ajbahama@hotmail.com

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Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 * CELL: 357-3617 |

RANNIE PINDER President _
a Se a Cae

NORA
KNOWLES, 91

of St. Vincent Road and
formerly of Delectable Bay,
Acklins will be held on
Saturday 11:00am at
Amazing Grace Missionary
Baptist Church, Wilson
Tract. Officiating will be
Pastor Elva Johnson.
Interment will follow in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail
Road.

She is survived by son, Victor Knowles Jr.; daughter,
Hortense Rosario; eight grandchildren, Victonio,
Vincent, Victor Jr., Adrian, Victoria and Victorian
Knowles, Natasha and Sharlene Rosario; one brother,
Atwell Williams of Boston; one daughter-in-law,
Nancy Knowles; sister-in-law, Arimetha Williams;
eight nieces, Elthamese Joseph, Theresa Ferguson,
Luma Rolle, Margeratte Butler, Rose Pernard of
Boston, Minister Beverly Clark, Lily Knowles and
Terry Dorsette; twelve nephews, Eckright, Mike,
Jameslee and Felix Ferguson, Ralph, Andrew, Atwell
Jr., Thomas, Jack and Ogelus Joseph, Michael and
Edbert; grandnieces and nephews, Sandra and Glen
Poitier, Lanez and Livingston Burt of Orlando Fla.,
Kenneth and Sherelle Joseph, Denice Hanna, Shada,
Dorcas, Levetha Bulter, Phillipa, Peter, Joshua, Denzo,
Petrica, Nickolette, Synovia and Barron, Geraldo,
Evelyn and Lonara Williams, other relatives and
friends including, Bishop Carroll E. Rolle, Ruthlyn,
Althea Rolle and family, Mable Hanna and family,
Iva Dames, Merlene Williams of Miami Fla., Ivy
Pearson and family, Carrie and family, Stevens family,
Pastor Elva Johnson and Amazing Grace Missionary
Baptist Church family and a host of other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention but to important
to forget.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Pinder's
Funeral Home, Friday from 1:00pm to 6:00pm and
at the church from 10:00am until service time.




PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



KEITH BARON PINDER, 61



of Treasure Cove,
Nassau, The
Bahamas will be
held at Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic
Church, Shirley
Street, Nassau, on
Tuesday, 16th
January, 2007 at.
1:00p.m. Father Mel
Taylor will officiate
and interment will be
in. ‘Ebenezer
Methodist Cemetery,
East Shirley Street,













Nassau.



Mr. Pinder is survived by his wife, Lorraine
Moyra Pinder; his mother, Emily Pinder; sons,
Craig and Brett Pinder; a daughter, Tracy
Bonczek; granddaughters, Hannah and Hailey
Bonczek; brother, Godfrey Pinder; sister, Janet
Pinder; aunt, Agnes Knowles; son-in-law,
Zachary Bonczek and many other relatives and
friends including, Joey, Jude and Doreen, Billy
| and Edna Kemp, Agnes and Kenny Roberts,
_ Gwen, Terry and Ruth, Billy and Lulabelle,
Kermit and Janet Cates, Nita and George Baker,
Harry, Laurette and Eleanor Albury, Ethelyn
and Hansford Darville, Elliott and Cynthia Sands,
Michael and Janice Knowles, Jackie Kemp,
Tommy and Candy Kemp, Karen and Glen
Pritchard, Martha Pinder, Jenny Viviano,
Michael and Cherie Pinder, Tyrone and Barbara
Albury, Joe and Barbara Bonczek, Robert Sands,
Mark and Aleece Campbell, Ian and Tanya
Bayles, Randy and Stephanie Sands, Reg
Bonimy, Jimmy and Camaille Roberts and
Chuck Cartwright.

























Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited,

YOUR

PUBLIC NOTICE
[>LOSURE NOTICE

-ONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

LOCAL NEWS

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale,
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ° Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR
EDDLENE SMITH 74




aresident of 151 Water Street, Big Pond
and formerly of Church Grove Crooked
Island, will be held at St. Barnabs
Anglican Church, Baillou Hill and Wulff
Road on Saturday: January 13th, 2007
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Basil
Canon Tynes assisted by Fr. William
Thompson. Interemnt follows in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens J.F.K. and
Gladstone Road.


















Left to mourn her, three sons, David Smith Jr., His Excellency
Keod Smith, M.P., Kean Smith; one daughter, Nurse Orelia
Morally-Jacques; 19 grand children, Romaine and Alvian Dayis,
Hugh, Faron and Tashann Morally, Jamira and James Jr. Deus-
Day, Oswald, Gareth, Dion, Kemmie, Awu, Beris, Claudette, Ellie,
Makeda and Zadok Smith and Kevin Farrington; two great grand
children, Logan and Ian Davis; one. brother, Kenneth Bonaby of
New York; two sisters, Violet Bonaby and Muriel Moss of Miami,
Florida; one son-in-law, Prosperson Jacques; one daughter-in-law,
Monique Smith; one aunt, Josephine Bonaby; sixteen nephews,
Dr. Doswell Coakley of Grand Bahama, Andrew Bonaby, Ledley
Jr., and Anthony Moss of Miami Florida, Bruce, Barry, Brian and
Braxton Smith of Freeport Grand Bahama, Hudden Simmons of
New York, Charles, Dennis and David of West Palm Beach,
Florida USA, Neville Simmons, Oswald and Wellington Dean;
nieces, Faith Johnson, Veronica Bonaby, Vanessa Moss, Sanica
Moss-Chatfleld, Janice Moss, Beorah and Bloneva Smith, Anita
Miller and Veronica Dean; brother-in-laws, Ledley Moss of Miami,
Florida and Thomas and,Smith of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Kenneth
Bonaby of New York, and the Venerable Archdeacon Dr. Murillo
Bonaby (Deceased); sisters-in-law, Sylvia Hall and Aleda Dean
and Norma Smith; cousins, George Jones and family, Jane Beneby
and family, Winston Bonaby and family, Admiral Ferguson and
_ family, Mabon, Fred and Tony Bonaby and family, Gloria Coakley
and family, Mabel Wilson and family, Willard and Elvie
Cunningham and family, Natalie Barns and family, Robert and
Barbara Gibson and family, Brian and Georgiemae Miller and
family, Thelma Walkes and family, Agnes Allen and family,
Carmen Cox and family, Doreen Ferguson and family, Olive
Deleveaux and family, Olga Sands and family, Leroy and Shirley
Ferguson of Cabbage Hill, Crooked Island, Rodney and Cecil
Farquharson and family, Ron and Edward Cunningham and family,
Gweneth Gibson and family, Doris Moss and family, Viola
Cunningham and family, Luellyn Farquharson and family, Nellie
Bain and family, Horatio, Elaun and Obie Ferguson and family,
Mabon Johnson and family, Moss family Reunion (Baracoa Race),
a host of relatives and friends including, Bishop Gilbert Thompson
and family, Oslie Bullard and family, Lucy and Dennis Penn and
family, Arthur and Walter Penn of Inagua and family, Valencia







































Swaby and family, Miriam Brown and family, Jane Ramsey and
Family, Loreen and Elaine Bastian and Family, The Crooked
Island Benovelent Association, St. Barnabas ACW, Mt. Moriah
Branch of the Progressive Liberal Party.





Friend may pay their last respects at the Rock Of Ages Funeral
Chapel Wulff Road and Pinedale in the Petra Suite on Friday from
10 am to 6 pm and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 am until
funeral time.







Lynes and family, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Rolle and family, Miss —

FROM page one

said, the police officers drew
their service weapons and
opened fire. This was in the
area of Culberts Hill.

The chase was renewed. “The
vehicle slowed down again in
the area of the Eastern Road
and Fox Hill Road,” Mr Evans
reported. The passenger in the
back seat once again pointed a
black object in the direction of
the police, provoking more gun-
fire from the police.

“The officers withdrew their
service weapons and discharged,
as a result there was a further
chase,” Mr Evans reported.

It wasn’t until the men neared
Johnson Road that police
caught up with their car.

Again the back seat passen-

ger leaned out of the window .

and pointed an object at the
police. “It was discovered that
the rear seat passenger had gun
shot wounds to the back. He
was taken to the hospital where
he was treated and discharged.”

An Eastern Road resident,
who passed shortly after police
had the young men in custody,
said the incident took place just
opposite the Hermitage on the
Eastern Road.

“There were seven police
cars,” he said, “and I would esti-
mated more than a dozen
armed police officers. There
was a man sitting behind his car
in the middle of the road and
another lying in the road. The
police had trained their guns on



Man shot

THE TRIBUNE













the sitting man. The shooting
must have taken place just
before I passed, because,
although I saw the man lying in
the road, I didn’t realise there
had been gun fire and that a
man had been shot.”

Another woman called The
Tribune to say that she lived
nearby, but could get no nearer
than Johnson Road to find out
what had happened. She said
the police had the area cor-
doned off as a crime scene. Sev-
eral ambulances had arrived
and two had left, she said.

According to Mr Evans the
three occupants of the vehicle,
all in their late twenties, are
now in police custody.

While searching the vehicle
the police found a stocking
mask. The matter is under
police investigation.

Election
FROM page one

Ingraham to make his move and
the PLP believes that Mr Ingra-

ham is waiting for Mr Christie | |

to make his announcement.
However, with the FNM’s ral-
ly in Long Island yesterday it is
expected that as the days creep
toward April, the parties will
be increasing their activities.

Lawyer speaks on Bahamas

FROM page one

our neighbours to the north. We become failed states when gov-
ernments cease to govern and oppositions cease to be loyal.”
’ “When I say failed state J.am thinking in terms of not a state
where you can’t find for the next 10 or 20 years flour on the shelves
of the food stores, but simply where there is no government which
can represent you on the international plane. No government
which is prepared to ensure your protection as a matter of domes-
tic law, when you have a government which is not sensitive to the
obligations its parliament created,” Mr Glinton said.

In addition to this, the lawyer said, a “very strange” situation has
developed in the country where politicians have been accusing
the Bahamian public of being too critical or attacking them per-

sonally.

“How could that ever be? You are only a politician or a minister
because you were afforded the opportunity of representing this very
same people. When you have the government continually having to
defend itself against its own people. Even as it appears that they are
seeking to explain the excessiveness of another government over
reaching into this jurisdiction and overcoming the laws of this

country,” Mr Glinton said.

‘Come to the

Church of God of Prophec

. | Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing

‘| Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and
Soul Restoring

eae
Par oe



Evangelistic Crusade

Sunday, January 14th to Friday, January 19th, 2007
At 7:30p.m. Nightly at .
The East Street Tabernacle
East Street and Sunlight Village
Under the Theme:
‘IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited (BTC) wishes to inform
our valued customers and the general public
that our office located in Town Center Mall
will be closed to the public on Thursday
January 1 1th and Friday January jath 2007.

Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudolph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.O.G)

1! Customers needing assistance may visit
BTC’s offices at either JFK or the Mall at
Marathon.

; | f Go raise
The office is scheduled to reopen to the e Nee 3 +
‘| public on Monday January 15th, 2007.
BTC wishes to thank the public for their

consideration during this time.

othy Johnson, J arenda R:
~ Seott Wilson :
Come and be blessed, inspired, challenged and
changed!



Se ne

A e
THE TRIBUNE

_ FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 11



Planning begins -

to improve
Potter’s Cay dock

THE Port Department has’

begun developing a plan for
improved access to and regula-
tion of the Potter’s Cay dock
and its surrounding area.

Port Controller Captain
Anthony Allens said the plan
will take into consideration
improved lighting, security and
traffic flows for the area, which
serves as the hub of the inter-
island mail service and sea
travel throughout — the
Bahamas.

“What we are trying to do is
to make the Pottet’s Cay dock
and its surrounding area more
user friendly, but safe for those
persons who use its transship-
ment facilities and for those per-
sons who use it for social and
other commercial purposes,”
Captain Allens said.

“That has been our challenge
recently, particularly now that
we have increases in the num-
ber of containers and cargo ves-
sels wanting to use the facility as
a transshipment point to the
Family Islands.

“It’s good to know that ship-
ping into the Family Islands has
become more modernised with
regards to the use of container-
ised services, but that takes up

i ACCESS to the Potter’s Cay dock will be improved

that improvements be made to
Potter’s Cay in terms of securi-
ty, accessibility and aesthetics.

He said the fact that numer-
ous Bahamians visit the fish-fry
stalls puts port officials in a posi-
tion where security must be bal-
anced with the need for free
access,

“Let me say that this is not
intended to deny those persons
who visit the fish fry and those
who purchase their seafood
from the stalls in the area access



tinue to put in, a number of
security and safety measures in
place to ensure that we have no
incidences.

Captain Allens said that while
he does not forsee the mail boat
services being removed from

i

in line for upgrades

the Potter’s Cay, the “con-
tainerisation aspect ’’of the
operation will eventually be
moved.

“T foresee the fish fry atmos-
phere remaining, albeit in an
improved manner, because I
think that side of it is something
that both the locals and tourists
look forward to,” Captain
Allens added, “but I think we
will have to concentrate on
improving the flow of traffic in
and around the Potter’s Cay
area and improving the general
aesthetics.






Ht

@ CONSIDERED the hub of inter-island commerce and transportation, the Potter’s Cay Dock is

(Photos: BIS/Patrick Hanna)



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

















to continue to do both,” Cap-
tain Allens said, “but because of
the increase in traffic, both
pedestrian and vehicular, we
have had to put in, and will con-

quite a bit of space and so
accommodations have to be
made for that,” he added.
Captain Allens said growth
in the Family Islands demands

x - eh og

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary
| Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020° Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761






s

ha














RY

Captain Ted Alexander Johnson
aka “Tron” aged 59

























































of Sea Breeze Lane and
formerly of Black Point,
Exuma will be held on Sunday
at 3pm at Mt Calvary Baptist
Cathedral, Blue Hill Road and
Laird Street. Officiating will
be Rev. Dr. Phillip McPhee
assisted by other Ministers.
Interment in The Fox Hill
Cemetery, Fox Hill Road.

He is survived by his
Stepfather: Walter Robinson;
3 Sons: Keith, Kirk and Steve;
3 Daughter: Kurrice Smith, Renay and Elouise Johnson;
Confident and Friend: Ethel Moss; 3 Stepchildren:
Kayleaser Moss, Karen Moss and Timothy and Karen
Neymour; 3 Brothers: Bertram Brown, Cylde Rolle and
Lundy Robinson; 2 Sisters: Althea Adderley and Ruthmae
Smith; 14 grandchildren; Jazriea Shanna, Ricky, Willisha,
Devonya, Ricardo, Richante, Troy, Shanae, Joshua,
Kalen, Abagial and Lathera; neices, Lilliamae, Maxine,
Violet, Jackie, Jazmon, Suzette, Siviann, Karen Bridgette,
Maria, Lynette, Theresa, Ernestine, Raquel Danielle,
Raquel Sunae, Tanya and Lathera; nephews: Larry,
Franklyn, Alvin Gregory, Tyrone, Warren Kino, Marvin,
fan, Claron, Aaron, Theoda, Lynden, Gerad, Theron,
Obre and Jamal; son-in-law: Wilton Smith; daughter-
in-law: Sylvia Johnson: 2 brothers-in-law: Horatio Smith
and Lawerence Adderely; 3 sister-in-law: Vernice Brown,
Shanricka Rolle and Sharon Robinson; godchildren:
Leothea Kemp, Presscilla McIntosh; host of other
relatives and friends including the entire body of the
Sailing Association and the Commonwealth Sailing
association especially The Tida Wave; Eunice Wright
Mille Robinson, Christine, Dorothy, Cynthia Netter;
Pearline, Margaret, Mr. and Mrs. Sudlin Black, Effort,
‘Genease,, Ralph, Roosevet, Cislyn, Esther, Ann Florence,
Heastine, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Bethel, Lorina Rahming,
William Pratt, Lyle Rolle, Frank, Sam, H.1. Rolle, Joseph
| Swendal, George Brown, Jude Dudley Rudolph, Carlan
- Cartwright, Joel, Vincent, Burke, Freddie and Tony Gray,
Rubin Captain Ed, Ken Butler, Warren Davis, Dorsey
Rolle, Rev. Joseph Saunders, Sharon Rolle, Roberta,
Pervical Cox, Cookie and Alex, Alice, Connie, Larice,
Maude, Cathy Laura, Valarie, Carla, Maranda, Max,
Valie Sandra, Joan, Marsha, Grace, Millie Taylor, Dakota
Jewel, Michelle Heneritta, Linda, The Musgrove Family,
| The Strachan family, The Roberts Family, The Duncombe
Family, The Harbour Island Community Sea Breeze
Community, St. Luke Baptist Church Family,
Gethsemaine Baptist Church Family, Bahamas Holy
Bible Ministries Family, Hillside Restoration Centre
and the Community of Black Point Staniel Cat and
Farmer's Cay Exuma.

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The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Saturday from
10:00am until 5:00pm Sunday from 10:00am until
1:00pm and at the church from 2:00pm service time.
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 THE TRIBUNE













More images aa
of the
ceremony to
open the
legal year,
which was
held on
Wednesday





















Bomeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
e MARKET STREET
¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782







PaaS a
Ezekiel "Anthony" Greene, Jr., 37

a.resident of Isabella
Blvd, Marathon Estates
and formerly of Father
Calan Road, will be held
at Solid Rock Church of
God, Soldier Road, on
Saturday January 13th,
2007: at 1:00 p.m.
Officiating will be
Bishop Samuel
Mortimer, assisted by
Rev. Abraham Mackey.
Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

On Janwary 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
wil move to sew offices on East Bay
Stree! (the former IBM Building).



Left to cherish his memory are his mother, Dorcas
Greene; father, Ezekiel Greene; wife, Linda
Thompson-Greene; brothers, Wayne Greene; James
Greene and Fourson Greene; sister, Kareem Greene;
3 stepsons, Lavar, Lamount and Jermaine Adderley;
3 sisters-in-law, Sharon, Monique and Stephanie
Greene; 9 aunts, Joan Colebrooke, Dorothy Jones,

‘Miriam Greene, Glendena Greene, Mildred Rahming,
Annie Colebrooke, Bloneva Flowers, Lealyn Ferguson
and Laura Greene; 5 uncles, Luther Jones, Jerome
Colebrooke, Rev. Euthal Greene, Felton Greene and
Othnell Colebrooke; 1 grand aunt Catherine Romer;
nieces, Kendisha Taylor and Victoria Greene; nephew,
Kimeko Greene; cousins including, Pauline Jones,
Mario Jones, Bradley Thurston, Jevon Colebrooke,
Jauanita Colebrooke-Rolle, Shawn Thurston, Johnesha
Rolle, Eleazor John Rolle, Ramon Thurston, Rudella
Thurston, Regina, Rudina, Romeko and, Racquel
Thurston, Hubert and Christine Ferguson, Hubert Jr.,
Candice, Chakelle and Dwayne Ferguson and a host
of other relatives and friends including, Benjamin
Fife, Lou Fife, June Fife, Yvette McCartney, Edris,
Sherry and Theresa Bethel, Lorenzo, Michael and
Ramone.



| Wisi or call your Agent
at our convenient new location,
| telephone number 3276-1040.

remium payment functions will be
transferred from Collins Avenue to our ets!
Harbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

Â¥
4

>

+.

oo

%

>
aa os 2,9

i FAMILY ,
GUARDIAN ‘:‘ a 1

FINSURANCE:.
COMPANY *

TRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

= %

Friends may pay their last repsects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00
p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.-11:00
a.m. and at the church from 12:00 p.m. until service
time.















~ SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

BUSINE

acl hr ee ne ee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

‘The Tribune _











Bahamas ‘caught with pants down’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



he Bahamas has

been “caught with

our pants down”

as a result of its

collective failure
to develop a strategy for dealing
with international trade agree-
ments and working out where
this nation fits into the global
economy, the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce’s presi-
dent said yesterday.

Chris Lowe told The Tribune
that with negotiations between
the Caribbean and the Euro-
pean Union (EV) over the Eco-
nomic Partnership (EPA) hav-
ing reached a critical point, the

Bahamas had yet to communi-
‘cate to the CARICOM repre-
sentatives negotiating on its

Chamber chief warns nation bereft of strategy for EU, US trade talks
that have major implications for Bahamian exporters, tax system

behalf what it wanted from the
agreement.

The EPA is supposed to be
concluded before year-end
2007, and Mr Lowe said: “We
should have had a long-term
vision of this over the last 20
years, and unfortunately we’ve
been caught, as a country, with
our pants down.

“I’m not blaming any partic-
ular government or minister of
foreign affairs or trade minis-
ter, but the bottom line is that
no significant work has been

done to educate our people on
what’s happening globally, and
whether we’re either going to
fit in or be blocked out of [these
trade agreements].

“As-a result, we are now at
the short end of the trading
stick. We’re between a rock and
a hard place, and technically
don’t have a position yet.”

The private sector collective-
ly, Mr Lowe added, also had to
shoulder its share of the blame
for not keeping up to date with
international developments and

pending trade agreements.

Between them, successive
governments and the private
sector had “failed to come up
with a long-term vision for our
global standing”.

The outcome of the EPA
talks is critical for the Bahami-
an economy and its major
exporters, as failure to secure
duty free access to the EU mar-
kets could result in the loss of
millions in revenue for these
companies.

Through their exports to





@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

' Tribune Business Reporter

- IF the Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) talks between the European Union
(EU) and the Caribbean do not secure duty-free
access to Europe for Bahamian fisheries prod-
ucts, they will increase the cost of this nation’s
exported fish products by about $6 million and
erode their competitiveness, The Tribune was
‘told yesterday.

-. The EPA is being negotiated through Cari-
forum, a body representing the Bahamas, oth-
er CARICOM members and the Dominican
Republic, and is designed to replace the Coto-
nou Agreement - a trade programme of pref-
- erences that allows certain Caribbean-based
exporters to export their goods into the EU
market duty-free.

Although Cotonou is supposed to last until
2020, in reality the agreement will expire at the
end of 2007. This is because the agreement is
regarded as ‘discriminatory’ under World Trade
Organisation (WTO) rules, as it offers
Caribbean nations preferences and benefits not
available to others.

Anthony McKinney, chairman of the Fish-
eries Advisory Board, said yesterday that if
duty-free access to the EU markets could not be
secured for Bahamian fisheries products, it
would have a detrimental impact on the indus-
try and many fishermen.

“It would put the cost of our product up by $6
million, so we would certainly lose our com-
petitive edge,” Mr McKinney said. “Basically,
what it is, is that our product is going into that







Loss of EU benefits to raise fish costs by $6m

Failure to secure tariff-free access would erode
Bahamas fisheries competitiveness in Europe

market and the importers do not have to pay
taxes on it.

“But if we lose that agreement, we probably

will fall within that 12 per cent tax bracket, and
the importers would have to pay to bring in our
product, so the cost of the product would go
up.”
Mr McKinney said this was because import
taxes levied by EU countries would make it far
less attractive to buy from the Bahamian mar-
ket.

“There is no question that this is something
that we need to stay a part of,” he added.
“There is no question other than that it takes
away our competitive edge, and that would
affect every fisherman in the Bahamas. You
are talking about a sector that really we survive
on.

“Over the past 10 years, we are probably
one of the biggest exporters into the European
market on the spiny lobster tail, primarily
because we have that competitive edge and
also because we can enjoy better prices.”

Mr Mckinney said he was optimistic from
the meetings the industry has had with the Gov-
ernment that it will do its best to facilitate con-
tinued duty free exemptions. However he said
they are still awaiting a final decision.

In addition to the fishing industry, Bacardi -

which The Tribune understands exports about
98 per cent of its product to the European mar-
ket, will also be impacted by the outcome of the
EPA talks.

But Mr Mckinney said the EPA outcome
could have an even greater impact than the
loss of revenue for both the Government and
exporters.

“You have to take into consideration the
future because, let’s say we don’t sign on,” he

--explained. “That means that we would not be

able to market ourselves as a place where you
can enjoy duty free tariffs with Europe. That
could also attract investors.

“So you just can’t look at only the sea food
industry, only Bacardi. These agreements, once
you come off, it’s not as simple as getting right
back on. We need to think in terms of future
business in the sector.

“With globalisation, the whole world is even-
tually going to become one, so you have to
accept that you will have to be partners with
these countries and their agreements.”

Mr McKinney said that eventually, the
Bahamas would have to sign on to these types
of trade agreements.

“We are a small nation; we only have sun,
sand and sea, so if we knock out the little things
we are doing now, forget it,” he said.

is all play? |

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INSURANCE
COMPANY

GUARDIAN
|

“ORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

Europe, they are also major
earners of foreign exchange for
the Bahamas, so if this source
dried up there would be some
effect on the external reserves
and monetary side of the econ-
omy.

A Leonard Archer, ambas-
sador to CARICOM at the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
said more than $20 million in
revenue received annually by
the Government could also be
impacted by the EPA, depend-
ing on the outcome.

Container Port set for

The Government earns about
$13 million or $5 per gallon in
export taxes annually from
Bacardi through its exports of
rum to Europe, and a further
$600,000 from fisheries
exports.

But it is not just export taxes
that could be impacted. The
EPA is being negotiated to
replace the Cotonou Agree-
ment, the document currently

SEE page 7B



$250m expansion

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Freeport
Container Port is likely to soon
undergo a $250 million expansion,
which is expected to create 300
extra jobs, Prime Minister Perry
Christie announced yesterday.

Mr Christie made the announce-
ment at the official commission-
ing of the Container Port’s $3 mil-
lion mobile cargo scanner, which
joins more than 40 ports world-
wide that are operating under the
US: Container Security Initiative
(CSI) programme.

The Freeport Container Port,
which is operated by Hutchison
Port Holdings, is one of the largest
transshipment terminals in the
Western Hemisphere.

Mr Christie said Freeport Con-
tainer Port employs 782 Bahami-
ans, and pays out some $25 mil-
lion annually in salaries, which
range from $20,000- $70,000 to line
staff.

“T was also told that that the
year 2006 represented a record
year for the number of containers
passing through this port facility.
So much so that the 1.5 million

Move to create
300 jobs



@ PM PERRY CHRISTIE

containers which passed through
amounted to more than what
passed through the Port of Mia-
mi,” Mr Christie said.

SEE page 6B

Bahamas credit cards and
accounts used in fraud plot

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A US stockbroker has pleaded
guilty to using Bahamian bank
accounts and credit cards to receive
and conceal kickbacks receives from a
$16.8 million stork market manipu-
lation and fraud scheme.

Robert Montani pleaded guilty in
the US District Court for New Jer-
sey to moving “illegal gains” from the
scheme to the Bahamas, then provid-
ing false documents to the US Inter-










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nal Revenue Service (IRS) to avoid
paying taxes on the commission
income accumulated in the Bahamas.

The indictment against Montani
detailed how his superior at Pennsyl-
vania brokerage house Bryn Mawr
Investment Group, also known as
Valley Forge Securities, one Tonino
Labella, introduced credit cards
administered by Bahamas-based
Axxess International into the scheme

SEE page 6B

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Ss
BUSIN

ssauaatoseganneanngaat teem OAANEN EARNER NNN RAT AANA

THE MARKETS
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS 5-6B

12,514.98 +72.82 4X

DOW 30
S&P 500 1,423.82 +8.97 4h
NASDAQ 2,484.85 +25.52 Ad

10-YR NOTE 474 +05 &
CRUDE OIL 51.88

2M Vv
Stocks
advance

declines

‘BYTIMPARADIS ts
Associated Press SS

NEW YORK — Investors _

regained some of their swagger
Thursday, sending stocks
. higher and the Dow Jones

industrials to another record _
close after oil prices plunged _
and a drop in jobless claims _

indicated the economy wasn’t
Slowing too quickly, =
Thursday’s trading stood in —

sharp contrast to recent ses- _

sions in which investors made
small bets as they wrestled with
whether stocks would eventu-
ally push higher with the same
vigor as in 2006. Economic data,
such as Thursday’s unemploy-
ment figures, and oil prices,
which have fallen for four
straight days, have drawn the

-- market’s attention as investors
try to piece together where
Wall Street is headed.

Strength in employment
indicates the economy is hold-=:
ing up well as it slows. A:‘num- _
ber of strong profit forecasts
lent support to that notion
Thursday. However, investors
want the economy to give off
some signs of gradual slow-
down in order to wring a cut in
interest rates from the Federal
Reserve.

“The markets had a very
strong run in the fourth quarter

- and we have spent the first
week and a half consolidating
those gains,” said Steven Gold-
man, chief market strategist at
Weeden & Co. He contends
stocks remain “in a pretty good
period,” as with 2006. :

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 72.82, or 0.59 per-
cent, to 12,514.98, topping the
previous record close, which
came Dec. 27, by 4.41 points. It
marked the Dow’s 23rd record
close since the beginning of
October. ©

Broader stock indicators also
rose. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index came within range of its
six-year closing high, rising
8.97, or 0.63 percent, to 1,423.82.
The Nasdaq composite index
advanced 25.52, or 1.04 percent,
to 2,484.85.

Bonds fell sharply as the
drop in jobless claims pointed
to a healthy economy and
stirred some concerns that the
Fed might not lower rates. The
yield on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note rose to 4.74 per-
cent from 4.69 percent late
Wednesday. —

Light, sweet crude, which has
already declined 15 percent in:
2007, fell to its lowest level
since May 2005, settling down
$2.14 to $51.88 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.

' In economic news, the Labor
Department said the number of
newly laid off workers seeking
unemployment benefits fell to a
six-month low last week, drop-
ping by 26,000 to 299,000 ona
seasonally adjusted basis. It was’
the first time jobless claims
have moved below 300,000
since the week of July 22.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 9.58, or
1.23 percent, to 788.45.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered décliners by more than 2
to 1 on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to 2.92 billion
shares, compared with 2.82 bil-
lion traded Wednesday.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.62
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed up 1.13 percent. Germa-
ny’s DAX index closed up 1.84
percent, and France’s CAC-40
was up 1.96 percent.



Wel WEI






INTEREST RATES

i The Bank of England lifted the
key interest rate from 5 percent
to 5.25 percent, its highest point
since May 2001, despite
expectations for no move. The
ECB left its rate unchanged.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany — Wor-
ries about creeping inflation spurred
the Bank of England to make a sur-
prise increase in its main interest rate
Thursday, while the European Cen-
tral Bank held steady but hinted at an

[povrereees enmeernnrnyernnennneeennnernnennasnenenerinennsaann rth

.

Consumer Electronics Show.

Analysts and,executives thought
that by this year’s show, there
would be a clear winner, especially
after Sony in November released its
Playstation 3 video game console,
which comes standard with a Blu-
ray disc drive.

Instead, both sides have hun-
kered down for what could be a
long fight and some are even con-
ceding that both formats may be
here to stay.

“In an optimal world you would
have one format,” Kevin Tsujihara,



AIRLINES

ncaa An RA RASA AARON RAN GARRARD

SScSPO

sSNA AR ARR RR RRB UIE Ecce see ce NU Roeececee ato

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

Bank of Englan

increase of its own to come.

British interest rates are now level
with those in United States. The
increase makes mortgage and loan
repayments more expensive, and was
criticized by some consumer groups,
retailers and employers’ groups. Poli-
cy-makers in Britain are concerned
about rising inflation rates, which
reached 2.7 percent in November —
above the bank’s target of 2 percent
for the seventh month in a row.

The ECB, meanwhile, left its
benchmark rate unchanged at 3.5 per-
cent, but President Jean-Claude Tri-

ELECTRONICS



rii~DEF DVD

OPPOSING SIDES IN HIGH-DEFINITION DVD BATTLE
HUNKER DOWN FOR LONG FIGHT

BY GARY GENTILE
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Ina city built on wagering, the smart money is staying
on the sidelines when it comes to the battle between two high-definition
DVD formats. The first shots between Blu-ray, backed by a Sony-led
consortium, and HD DVD, whose group is led by Toshiba, were fired last
year when the formats made their splashy debuts at the International

‘

president of the Warner Bros. home
entertainment group said this week.
“But there are many industries
where multiple formats have
existed and flourished.”

Tsujihara noted that in video
gaming, three incompatible formats
— Playstation, the Microsoft XBox
and consoles from Nintendo,
including the recently released Wii
— have existed for years.

At this year’s CES, Warner Bros.
showed off a double-sided disc that
holds movies in both formats. Tsu-











crenencnmanneeninnnnatnernneieresnsaen th



raises key rate

chet’s comment that it would engage
in “very close monitoring” of infla-
tion risks was taken by most analysts
as a signal that a quarter-point hike
could be in the cards for March.

Annual inflation in the euro zone
was at 1.9 percent in December, just
below the ECB’s target of about or
below than 2 percent.

“Frankfurt clearly is a less hectic
place than London,” said Holger
Schmieding, Bank of America’s chief
economist for Europe, on Thursday.
“Whereas the Bank of England
shocked observers like us with a sur-

JAEC.HONG/AP |

HIGH-DEFINITION DVD: Show attendees watch movie clips inside Panasonic’s Blu-ray Jazz Club at the
Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on Thursday. Competing formats are Blu-ray, backed by
a Sony-led consortium, and HD DVD, led by Toshiba, whose booth is shown below.

WAR





ILLER/GETTY IMAGES

jihara said the “Total Hi Def” disc |

should spur the purchase of more

high-definition DVD players.
“THD inspires consumer confi-

° TURN TO HIGH-DEFINITION DVD. 4B





prise rate increase today, the ECB
calmly confirmed expectations that it
will raise its rates again by [a quarter
of a percentage point] in March.”

By waiting, the bank — which sets
policy for 13 nations with more than
316 million people and a combined.
gross domestic product that accounts
for more than 15 percent of the
world’s economy — allowed itself to
get a better picture of the effect of a
value-added tax increase in Germany
and see more fourth-quarter gross

° TURN TO INTEREST RATES, 4B

PHARMACEUTICALS

Pfizer may
announce
more,
deener
cutbacks

@ Pfizer is among at least four
drugmakers cutting staff and
expenses because of mergers
and the onset of generic
competition.

BY SHANNON PETTYPIECE
Bloomberg News

Pfizer, the world’s largest drug-
maker, may tell investors this month
it will trim annual spending by as
much as‘$2 billion by firing 10 per-
cent of its workforce and cutting its
research budget.

Pfizer may announce the cuts to
its $7 billion research budget and a
workforce of about 100,000 people at
a Jan. 22 analyst meeting, said
Deutsche Bank analyst Barbara Ryan.
Pfizer Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey
Kindler said in October he would
seek cuts that go beyond an earlier
plan to trim $4 billion in yearly
spending by 2008.

Pfizer needs to reduce costs as it
braces to lose sales by 2012 from
medicines, losing patent protection,
that account for nearly half its 2005
revenue. New York-based Pfizer was
counting on replacing sales of its top
selling cholesterol drug Lipitor,
which goes off patent as early as 2010,
with a new therapy called torcetra-

' pib. The company halted develop-

ment on that product in December
because of safety concerns.

“We believe they will target a spe-
cific amount of savings from R&D,”
said Ryan, rated four out of five stars
by analyst rating firm StarMine, in a
telephone interview. “R&D is the
area most focused on efficiencies and
process improvements rather than
head count reduction. Head count
reductions, in addition to sales force,
will be company wide.”

Pfizer spokesman Andy McCor-
mick said the company will share the

° TURN TO PFIZER, 4B

AirTran raises bid for Midwest, woos investors

@ AirTran, a low-cost U.S. carrier,
raised its hostile takeover bid for
Midwest Air by almost 20 percent
to $345 million and said it’s
seeking commitments from
Midwest investors to sell their
shares.

BY GRETCHEN EHLKE
Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — AirTran Hold-
ings appealed directly to sharehold-
ers Thursday with a sweetened offer
of about $345 million in cash and
stock for rival Midwest Air after the
regional carrier rebuffed its earlier
unsolicited takeover bid.

AirTran Holdings, which owns the
discount carrier AirTran Airways,
raised its offer for Midwest Air by
almost 18 percent. Midwest said its
board will evaluate the latest offer
and make a recommendation to
sharehoiders with 10 days.

“We certainly believe the consoli-
dation has started in this industry and
will continue and that Midwest is
vulnerable,” AirTran Chairman and
Chief Executive Joe Leonard said



during a visit to Milwaukee.

Airtran’s renewed effort to buy
Midwest Air comes only a day after
US Airways raised its bid for Delta to
by about 20 percent to $10.3 billion.
Delta had rejected the previous offer
and opposed to the takeover bid.

After years of losses following the
Sept. ll attacks in 2001, the industry
has begun regaining its balance. Crit-
ics of consolidation say fewer carri-
ers could mean higher prices for air
travelers.

The new offer for Midwest was
equivalent to $13.25 per Midwest
share, based on the closing price of
AirTran common stock on Monday
and represented a premium of almost
3 percent over the airline’s closing
share price on Wednesday.

AirTran earlier bid $11.25 per share
for Midwest, but the Midwest board
turned down that offer on Dec. 6,
prompting the Orlando, Fla., discount
carrier to bypass the board in its lat-
est takeover attempt.

“We thought we would get no

*TURN TO AIRLINES, 4B



MORRY GASH/AP

HOSTILE BID: AirTran Holdings appealed directly to shareholders
Thursday with its sweetened offer of about $345 million for rival

Midwest Air. Above, a Midwest jet lands in Milwaukee.



CMM



8
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 bat Seen : veya ie A 28 ne TE TRIBUNE



THE TRIBUNE PRESENTS



-Tursbays AND F RIDAYS-
-_ JANUARY 16 - Marcu 23.



FAD THIS: CO RT/STORY ABOUT
Mert’ = ND HER FAMILY’ S QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.



he Tribune: «4.
. believes that : eas by Katherine Lene ~ illustrated by Emily Arnold MeCilly
reading helps people to :
focus on constructive
choices through
“exposure to worlds.



When Meli, an Albanian Ai jeerald
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not
securely—living _ in their ancestral

beyond their imm ediate

environment.
Breakfast Sérials

community in Kosovo. | But in 1999

Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic

Albanians from their homies. Family :

provides the great gift : 5 ao closeness is not enough. The
of fine literature, Lee Pao intervention of US. forces is not
read in convenient 7 enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,

the family. must flee, embarking on a
installments - so. that Ss SANE ANE, aay
dangerous journey in search: of safety.



the reader keeps. om Though family tiés and tradition are
coming, back for more. a ee severely tested, they eventually reach:
Bae eS as NS ‘the U.S. and ‘the tranquility of a
* hea eee ei. pe Nae 3 , : Vermont town. It is thére that Meli
experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11. distrust of
meee aeulauucanssants a et ae eT er we eedtted i o se Muslims. Her response is ee inspiration for all. ‘ i
: . Based on a true story, Long Road oie presents a warm and ‘compassionate family’s
: _Fesponse to > conflict and emigration to America. |
Sales" “Read "Long Road Home" with us... every e ucsday and Friday from



For more information about The Tribune's - | ke : S i
NIE Literacy Programme, contact Téa Afaast ane es iat

nie@tribunemedia.net or call 502-2394.


PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



- FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 12, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



CC Sweeting Cobras

strike in season opener:

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

FRESH from their Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s senior
girls volleyball championship
victory, the CC Sweeting
Cobras served notice that
they intend to.be a challenger
for the basketball title too.

On day two of the delayed
basketball season, the Cobras
stung the Government High
Magicwomen 37-18 as they
pulled off the season opener
between the two teams yes-

terday at the DW Davis Gym- |

nasium. |

Garcia Redwood got the
ball rolling and Ruthann
Simms finished the job as the
Cobras ran circles around the
.Magicwomen. But coach Dar-
nell Bastian said this was just
an indication of what to
expect the rest of the season.

“This was just a practice.
We started off very late
because we just came from
playing volleyball,” Bastian
stressed. “This was our first
game out, but it was just our
second practice. We will take
it one game at a time.”

The way the Cobras played,
you would think that they had
more than one practice. But
Bastian said it was just the
way the Cobras are accus-
tomed to playing.

“We'll always look good
because we are Cobras,
Cobras never come in with
their head down. We always
hold our head up,” she point-
ed out. “But we will walk into
it one day at a time.”

Simms had a game high 17
_ points, Redwood ‘seven,
Chrishandra Kelly six and
Crystal Dean chipped in with
three in the win. Crystal Cur-
ry had a side high 14 and Jes-
sica Thomas added four in the
loss.
“ Redwood, the talented
guard, reeled off CC Sweet-
ing’s first three baskets in the
first half as they jumped out
to a 7-0 lead before the Mag-
icwomen got on the score-
board with a jumper from
Crystal Curry.

Redwood then got the rest
of her Cobras’ team-mates
involved as she wheeled and
dealed through the Magic-
women’s defence.

At the receiving end was
Simms, who powered inside
for five and Chrishandra Kel-
ly, who added another four.

At the other end, Curry
scored another seven points
to keep Government High in
the game. But their only oth-
er player to score in the half
was Jessica Thomas, whose
jumper cut the deficit to 18-11
as the clock ran out to signal
the half.

Unlike the first half when

@ GOVERNMENT High
Magicwomen’s Jessica
Thomas dribbles the ball .
around the defence of CC
Sweeting Cobras’ Garcia
Redwood during their GSS-
SA senior girls game yester-'
day at the DW Davis Gym.
The Cobras won the game
37-18. | Lee
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Bastian only used her start-
ing five, she brought in the
bench throughout the second
half and they managed to stay
in control of the game.
Simms stepped it up in.the
half as she controlled the
paint, pulling down rebounds
and going back up for the lay-
up as they posted 12 in th
period.

Coach Leroy Thompson.

tried to keep his Magicwomen
in the game, substituting play-
ers at will. But each time they

tried to make a run, they

either turned the ball over or

got boxed out on the rebound.
Thompson admitted that

his team was out of shape.

“We played good in spurts, ,

but they were not consistent,”
he charged.
Asked what he think the
need to work on, Thompson
pointed out: “Conditioning.
But they understand the
game. They just need to get in
shape.
“Plus, we missed a lot of
free throws. We have to
improve on that too.”









yclists pre me for

CYCLING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

‘+ Junior Sports Reporter

IN THE next three weeks the island of
New Providence will be transformed to
accommodate some of the world’s top
amateur cyclists.

The roads of New Providence will be
invaded by cyclists all vying for the top
prize in the annual Tour of the Bahamas.

The tour, which has grown from what
local cyclists are calling a ‘mustard seed
into a full bloom tree’ is set for February
3rd-4th, and will host top amateur cyclists
from the United States, Portugal, Italy and
the Bahamas.

On February Sth-9th, a training camp
for members of the USA Cycling Nation-
al Development Team, in conjunction with

VMG Racing will be conducted. The’

VMG headquarters is located in the
Bahamas.

According to Bryon Musgrove, this
year’s Tour of the Bahamas can be com-
pared to the ‘Superbowl,’ but should be
referred to as the Cyclistbowl of the
Bahamas.

Musgrove said the increase in partici-
pants this year has turned the invitational
event into one of the biggest races hosted



by the Bahamas Cycling Association
(BCA). :
Musgrove said: “The Tour of the
Bahamas is a race that seems to have burst
into a big event. It isn’t an international
race but it takes the course of interna-
tional races. But it is an invitational race
attended by top names in the United States

and other parts of the world.

“This race has truly grown from the
number of cyclist that competes. It will be
our intention in the association to expand
the race seeking the assistance of the gov-
ernment. It is already on the VGM calen-
dar so we are hoping to get it on the Inter-
national Union of Cyclist, they are also
responsible for cycling in the world.

“We are trying hard to get it on that
calendar, this is also the calendar that is

responsible for the Tour de France. If we -

can get it, that will be a mammoth accom-
plishment for the Bahamas and big task for
the association.

“So we are in the process to see how
feasible that will be to turn the tour into an
international event, not an invitational.”

Despite the efforts being put forth by the
BCA to turn the event into an interna-
tional tour, Musgrove believes that the
Tour of the Bahamas is a great opportunity
for local cyclists to ‘cash in’ on some real

competition, since there are limited oppor-
tunities to do so.

For Musgrove, the Tour of the Bahamas,
which is set in a three stage race format,
can evolve but the level of success will be
determined by the partnership between
the BCA and the government.

“The public will get to see some of the
top cyclists in America and Europe, but if
we want to expand we will really need the
help of the government,” said Musgrove.

“We need their help even at this stage.
We need the help of the Ministry of
Tourism, all the cyclists like to bring their
family members down, that is a form of
sports tourism. The Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and Sports will definitely need to
be on board.”

Although much attention will be given
to some of the top cyclists, Musgrove
boasted about the fact that Bahamas have
their own professional cyclists who will be
taking part. He also highlighted the junior
team that will take on the American under
20 squad.

Musgrove strongly believes that the local
participants will make a strong showing
at the event.

The route for the race has not been
determined yet, but Musgrove is promising
a picturesque route.



the Bahamas ©
SPORTSWVt

aeaangnaannannetanaanangnonnngeneesmnngysyqwen«soaqgpyeoneeseahswegwengoaé eA NE AR RAE AD

PRO BASKETBALL
COMMENTARY







Kobe Bryant, 2
like his jersey,
has a new look

BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
he public rehabilitation of Kobe
LT Bryant is now complete, at
least in the eyes of NBA fans.
That bécame official this week with
the news that Bryant’s Los Angeles
Lakers jersey has regained its spot as
the No. 1 seller in league stores.

No real surprise there. Look no fur-
ther than Baltimore Ravens line-
backer Ray Lewis as a prime example
of how quick sports fans are to forgive
and forget.

The only surprise
with Bryant is how
quickly they have for-
given and forgotten.

Tt wasn’t allthat _

: long ago that Bryant .
was scorned as an admitted philan-
derer at best, a suspected rapist at
worst. Bryant had used his celebrity
to take advantage of a teenage girl,
and he faced the real possibility of
spending years in a Colorado prison.

Women’s groups protested against
Bryant, and, to keep his wife happy

amid all the turmoil, he had'to buy her
a $4 million ring.

THE IMAGE NEEDED WORK

On the court, things weren’t much
better. Bryant sent one very large
teammate packing, and his desire to
always have the ball created such fric-
tion on the Lakers that Phil Jackson
called him uncoachable. :

~* To:top it off, companies that once
embraced the young superstar sud-
denly wanted nothing to do with him.
Among them was McDonald’s, which
quickly figured out that a player
charged with sexual assault wasn’t the
best endorser for a family-friendly,
fast-food chain. :

Bryant still isn’t pushing hamburg-
ers. And he might never get the main-
stream endorsements that once were
his for the taking. But a lot has hap-
pened in 28 short months — by design
or not — to turn Bryant into a far
more sympathetic and marketable fig-
ure than anyone who ever watched
him enter an Eagle, Colo., courtroom
could ever imagine.

Bryant has stayed out of trouble
since the charges against him were
dropped at the last minute, and he
agreed to pay his accuser an undis-
closed amount to settle a civil suit.

While other NBA players have
engaged in brawls, have gotten shot
and have been arrested by the handful
since then, Bryant has stayed above
the fray. NBA Commissioner David
Stern didn’t have him in mind when
he issued a league dress edict, and, if
not for the charges in Colorado, per-
haps he could have been promoted as
the NBA’s model employee.

RESHAPING HIS GAME

Bryant has changed his game, too.
He did score 81 points one night last
season, but he has seemingly dedi-
cated himself lately to becoming
something other than a selfish player
who wants the ball all the time and
-will take a shot from anywhere.

In a game last week against the
Denver Nuggets, Bryant actually had
more assists (10) than points (eight).
It was the first time since April 2004
that he scored less than 10 points in
a game, and Bryant spoke afterward
about how he simply wanted to make
those playing with him better.

“It’s about being a big brother,
giving them encouragement but also
getting on top of them at times,”
Bryant said.

Shaquille O’Neal probably gagged
when he heard those words, but the
truth is that Bryant is comfortable
now in his role as team leader..

He also is comfortable in his new
jersey. Bryant changed from his No. 8
to No. 24 this season, and the switch
surely had a lot to do with his moving
up from fourth to first in jersey sales
at the NBA Store in New York City
and in the league’s online market.

Image rehabilitation can be a tricky
thing, but so far Bryant has done
everything right.

He seems to have changed the way
a lot of people look at him almost as
easily as he changed his jersey.





asenannnnpssanhn

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

“pe
|
|
| |
|
|



BY BERNIE WILSON
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Philip Rivers
would love to be just like Tom
Brady.

Who wouldn’t want to win a
Super Bowl in his first season as a
starting quarterback, then add ona
couple more? That’s what Brady
did in compiling his
impressive, l-1 postsea-
son record.

For Rivers to follow
that path, he and his
San Diego Chargers
will have to beat Brady and the
playoff-seasoned New England
Patriots on Sunday in a divisional-
round game at Qualcomm Stadium.

“Obviously, I understand it, as
all quarterbacks do, that you have a
won-loss record attached to your
name,” Rivers said this week. “I
don’t want to do it for me. I want to
do it for us.” -



uanaetsesaaeseesbeaa



PRO FOOTBALL | NEW ENGLAND AT SAN DIEGO

Rivers ready for playoff debut

This has been a season of firsts
for Rivers, and he gets another on
Sunday — the first playoff start in
his three-year career.

It’s something Rivers has been
aiming for since the Chargers
pulled off a draft-day coup in 2004
and acquired him and a handful of
draft picks from the New York
Giants for Eli Manning.

“This is why you
play,” said Rivers, who
was elevated to starter
in March after Drew
Brees signed with the
New Orleans Saints as a free agent.

Rivers was the inactive, third-
string quarterback two years ago
when the Chargers lost at home, in
overtime, to the New York Jets ina
wild-card game. But he remembers
how wired the Chargers were.

“We were so fired-up, it maybe
worked against us,” he said. “We
need to just come out poised and

SOCCER | DAVID BECKHAM

Becks jumps



DONALDMIRALLE/GETTY IMAGES
NICE START: Philip Rivers led the
Chargers to a 14-2 record in
his first season as quarterback.

under control, kinda see what’s
happening to us, obviously expect-
ing a wrinkle or two and then play-
ing from there.”

That might be easier said than
done, but Rivers has done a good
job of keeping everything in per-
spective this season. He faced



DENIS DOYLE/GETTY IMAGES

GALAXY GAINS A STAR: David Beckham isn’t happy sitting on the bench for Real Madrid,

and a deal worth a reported $250 million brings him to Major League Soccer in August.

Donald drills a 63,

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

HONOLULU — Luke Donald
didn’t have much of a following
Thursday, so he barely heard any
applause — even as he made bird-
ies on half his holes for a 7-under
round of 63 and a one-shot lead in
the Sony Open.

The crowds were with Michelle
Wie. And there wasn’t much
cheering there, either. Wie, who is
17 and is playing in the tournament
for the fourth consecutive year,
struggled home with a 78.

She finished the day in next-to-
last place, five shots clear of
Hawaii club pro Abe Mariano.

The best score by a Hawaii teen



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

pretty much every scenario possi-
ble in leading the Chargers to an
NFL-best, 14-2 record. He passed
for 3,388 yards and 22 touchdowns,
against nine interceptions. He led
wild rallies and helped secure
comfortable leads. He struggled
and shined. And he took a couple
of tough losses on the road.

In the season finale, against the
Arizona Cardinals, Rivers sprained
his right foot, then came back and
threw two touchdown passes on
the way to a 27-20 victory.

“T’ll be the first to admit I wasn’t
as efficient late in the year in some
games,” Rivers said, “I think some
of those bumps in the road late in
the year were good for many rea-
sons — one, I’m continuing to get
better, and two, we didn’t lose.

“I think I can gain\ a lot from
some of those somewhat struggles
and carry them with me now.”

e NFL REPORT



to MLS

British midfielder
commits to Galaxy
in a landmark deal

BY CHRIS LEHOURITES
Associated Press

LONDON — David Beckham, the former
England soccer captain known as much for his
style as for his play, has agreed to leave Real
Madrid and join the Los Angeles Galaxy in a
deal that Major League Soccer hopes will boost
the sport in‘ the United
States in a manner similar to
Pele’s arrival with the New
York Cosmos in 1975.

Beckham will
Madrid at the end of the sea-
son. The
announced Thursday after
the end of discussions on
extending the 3l-year-old
English midfielder’s contract
with the Spanish club. a

“This week, Real Madrid asked me to make a
decision regarding my future and the offer to
extend my contract by a further two seasons,”
Beckham said in a statement.

“After discussing several options with my
family and advisers to either stay here at Madrid
or join other major British and European clubs, I
have decided to join the Los Angeles Galaxy and
play in the MLS from August this year.”

The Galaxy, citing industry experts, said
Beckham’s deal is worth more than $250 million
in salary and commercial endorsements and is
“thought to be the biggest in sporting history.”

An entertainment personality who draws
paparazzi like a movie star, Beckham and his
wife, Victoria, the former Posh Spice of the
Spice Girls, regularly find their way onto tabloid
and magazine covers. With snazzy clothes,
rotating hair colors and styles and a pop-star
wife, Beckham is the epitome of the modern mix
of celebrity and athlete. He even had a movie
named after him: Bend it like Beckham.

His soccer skills are only part of the equation.
He is David Beckham Inc., a multinational cor-
poration with links to Pepsi, Gillette, Motorola
and Adidas.

leave

move was



MORE
SOCCER: 8B

* TURN TO DAVID BECKHAM

GOLF | SONY OPEN

belonged to 16-
year-old Tadd Fuji-
kawa, one year
younger and a foot
shorter than Wie.
Fujikawa, who
qualified for the
U.S. Open last year,
opened with a
l-over 71 at Waia-
lae, the same as
Kapalua winner
Vijay Singh.

KJ. Choi played
in stiffer wind in
the afternoon,
made the turn in 30 and settled for
a 64. Will MacKenzie continued
riding his wave and, despite being



JEFF GROSS/GETTY IMAGES

OUT FRONT: Luke Donald.

frustrated after a
three-putt par on
the 18th, shot a 65
and was tied for
third place with
Jim Furyk.

Donald is No. 10
in the world rank-
ing, and his game
has looked as
though he belongs
there. Donald has
only two PGA
Tour victories,
including the
Honda Classic last
year, but his confidence is building,
and his game looks tidier than ever.

“I’m getting better every yeax,”

leads by one after first round

Donald said. “It has not quite yet
resulted in lots of wins, winning
majors, that kind of stuff, but I feel
like I’m getting a lot closer than
I was a year or two ago. I’ve gotten
to the stage where I’m expecting to
be up there and contending, and
winning each week I play.”

For Wie, expectations are
headed the other direction.

Her swing no longer is long and
fluid. It is more mechanical than
when she first played the Sony
Open and shot a 68 in the second
round to miss the cut by one shot.
Her weakness then was her short
game, which is now her strength.

It kept a bad round from being
embarrassing on Thursday.
4E | FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 __

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER

Real Madrid ties Real Betis |

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Real Madrid drew Real
Betis 0-0 in the Copa del Rey
on Thursday, hours after
David Beckham announced
he will leave the club at the
end of the season.

Beckham, who will join the

Los Angeles Galaxy on a five-
year deal in Major League Soc-
cer, was left off Madrid’s
squad for the first-leg, fifth-
round match at Betis’ Manuel
Ruiz de Lopera Stadium and
remained in the Spanish capi-
tal.

The draw gave Madrid a
slight advantage when the
teams bid for a quarterfinal
place in the return leg at Santi-
ago Bernabeu Stadium next
week.

Madrid coach Fabio
Capello, who also omitted
Ronaldo, handed a debut to
‘teenage striker Gonzalo Hig-
uain, a recent signing from
River Plate.

Another newcomer, former
Boca Juniors midfielder Fer-
nando Gago, was retained for
his second game.

The visitors were hit by the
loss of left back Roberto Car-
los in the 10th minute with
what appeared to be a thigh
rouscle injury, leading to the
introduction of Raul Bravo.

Betis, struggling in the
league and playing its second
game under new coach Luis
Fernandez, spurned the only
clear chance of a ragged first
half when Jorge Wagner
headed Xisco Munoz2’s cross

SPORTS ROUNDUP





JAVIER BARBANCHO/AP

A TURF WAR: Real Madrid’s
Robinho, front, battles for
the ball with Real Betis’
Francisco Collantes.

over the bar in the 35th min-
ute.

The untidy play continued
into the second half, although
Madrid striker Ruud van Nis-
telrooy nearly scored in the
6lst with a gentle, angled shot
which Betis goalkeeper Pedro
Contreras managed to deflect
with his left leg.

Gago fired over the bar in
the 74th, and substitute Raul
Gonzalez headed narrowly

~wide five minutes later as

Madrid’s attacking play
improved in the final stages.
In other first-leg games this

Yankees have



From Miami Herald Wire Services

Now that they have Andy
Pettitte, the New York Yan-
kees want Roger Clemens,
too.

“He’s kind of like your per-
fect employee,” general man-
ager Brian Cashman said
Thursday after welcoming
Pettitte back.to Yankee Sta-
dium.

Clemens pitched for the
Yankees alongside Pettitte
from 1999-2003, helping them
capture two World Series
titles and four American
League pennants.

The pair spent the past
three seasons with their home-
town Houston Astros.

“If Roger is interested in
coming to New York, I'd love
to talk to him,” Cashman said.
“He came in here and not only
delivered a huge performance
on the field but had a major
impact within the clubhouse.”

New York hasn’t reached
the World Series since Clem-
ens left. The Yankees traded
Randy Johnson back to the
Arizona Diamondbacks earlier
this week, and Cashman
admitted the move put the
rotation at risk.

Clemens, a seven-time Cy
Young Award winner, is
choosing among returning to
the Astros, retiring or rejoin-
ing the Yankees or Boston Red
Sox, his first major league
team. Clemens’ agent, Randy
Hendricks, says that if the
Rocket pitches, he probably
wouldn’t start his season until
May or June.

Pettitte has played golf with
Clemens in recent weeks. He
wouldn’t say exactly what his
buddy told him, but he
dropped a few hints.

“After speaking with him, it
sounds like that he probably
wants to try to pitch. It’s amaz-
ing to me that he still wants to
pitch, but he does,” said Pet-
titte, laughing.

e Elsewhere: Barry
Bonds said he did not get
amphetamines from teammate
Mark Sweeney, but did not
deny a report Thursday saying
he tested positive for the
drugs last season. According
to a story in the New York
Daily News, the San Francisco

slugger failed an amphet-
amines test in 2006. The news-
paper reported that when first
informed of the positive result,
Bonds attributed it to a sub-
stance he had taken from
Sweeney’s locker. Bonds’
reported positive test could be
another snag in contract nego-
tiations with the Giants. The
sides reached a preliminary
agreement on a one-year, $16
million contract on Dec. 7, but
the seven-time National
League MVP still hasn’t signed
the deal or taken the manda-
tory physical that is part of the
process. ... Catcher Hum-
berto Cota, who is not
expected to make the Pitts-
burgh Pirates’ opening-day
roster, has agreed to terms on
a one-year, $537,000 contract.

. The Kansas City Royals
avoided arbitration with
pitcher Jimmy ‘Gobble,
agreeing to a one-year con-
tract worth $712,500.

ETC.

e College
Anthony Gonzalez, the sec-
ond-leading receiver for Ohio
State, said he will not return
for his senior season and will
enter the NFL Draft. Two
other Buckeyes are contem-
plating jumping to the NFL a
year early. Tailback Antonio
Pittman will announce his
decision Monday at his Akron
high school. Wide receiver
Ted Ginn Jr. has not yet made
up his mind, his father said
Thursday. ... Notre Dame tail-
back Darius Walker, on pace
to become the school’s career
rushing leader, will skip his
senior season and enter the
NFL Draft. Coach Charlie
Weis also announced that
nine players with another year
of eligibility have asked per-
mission from the school to
return, including safety Tom
Zbikowski, linebacker Travis
Thomas, tight end John Carl-
son, center John Sullivan
and defensive end Trevor
Laws. ... Oklahoma running
back Adrian Peterson was
still undecided on whether to
return for his senior season or
declare himself eligible for the
NFL Draft. ... Linebacker
Keith Rivers, the leading

football:

SOCCER | BASEBALL | ETC.

week, FC Barcelona won 2-0 at
second-division Alaves, while
Sevilla drew third-division
Rayo Vallecano 0-0.

Other results were: Getafe
J, Valencia 1; Atletico Madrid 1,
Osasuna ]; Valladolid 2, Villar-
real 1; Mallorca 1, Deportivo La
Coruna 2; and Malae# 0, Zara-
goza 3.

ELSEWHERE

e Germany: Wolfsburg
coach Klaus Augenthaler
signed a two-year contract
extension to the end of the
2009 season, the club said.

Augenthaler took over the
team at the start of last year.
Wolfsburg is 12th this season
in the Bundesliga with 19
points from 17 games.

Augenthaler, a former Bay-
ern Munich defender who
won the 1990 World Cup with
Germany, has also coached
Bayer Leverkusen, Nuremberg
and Austrian club Grazer AK.

Fraud charges were
dropped against Reiner Cal-
mund, the former general
manager of Bayer Leverkusen.
The district attorney’s office
asked for the case to be closed.
It revolved around $724,000
that Leverkusen paid an agent
in 2003 to secure options on
several East European players.

The deals were never com-
pleted but the district attor-
ney’s office found no evidence
Calmund profited from them.
Calmund had turned Leverku-
sen into a top team that
repeatedly just missed win-

ning titles, including a 2002
Champions League final loss
to Real Madrid.

@ Britain: Sheffield United
signed Jon Stead from Sun-
derland in a $1.46 million deal.
The 23-year-old striker scored
only. two goals in 39 games at
the Stadium of Light following
his transfer from Blackburn in
June 2005.

Stead had been on-loan at
Derby for the past three
months, scoring three goals in
17 games.

Stead scored six goals in
Blackburn’s last 13 games of
the 2003-04 season.

League Championship side
Sunderland will receive an
extra $973,600 if Sheffield
United remains in England’s
top-flight league at the end of
the season.

Sheffield is 16th in the
standings with 22 points. .
Portsmouth acquired Charlton
defender Djimi Traore in a
$1.94 million transfer deal. ...
Birmingham signed Luton
striker Rowan Vine in a $4.86
million transfer. Vine agreed
to a 32-year deal with the
Blues. ... Charlton agreed to a
$971,982 transfer fee with
Manchester City for fullback
Ben Thatcher. ... Liverpool
signed Boca Juniors defender
Emiliano Insua on an 18-
month loan... . Cardiff signed
Peter Whittingham from
Aston Villa in a $680,470
transfer.... Struggling League
Two side Wrexham fired man-
ager Denis Smith.



PAUL BATTAGLIA/AP

BRONX RETURN? Roger Clemens, pitching for the Yankees
in the 2003 playoffs, won two World Series and four AL
pennants while playing for New York from 1999-2003.

tackler for Southern California
this season, has decided to
stay in school and play his
senior year for the Trojans. ...
Offensive guard Shannon
Tevaga, who has started 31
consecutive games at UCLA,
has decided to stay in school
and play his senior season for
the Bruins. ... Arizona corner-
back Antoine Cason
announced that he will return

for his senior season instead of

entering the NFL Draft. ...
Wake Forest coach . Jim
Grobe, who led the Demon
Deacons to a school-record 11
victories and an Orange Bowl
berth, has been named Coach
of the Year by the American
Football Coaches Association.

e Tennis: Defending
champion James Blake
defeated Russian qualifier
Evgeny Korolev 6-1, 6-4 to
reach the semifinals of the
Sydney International. On the
women’s side, Kim Clijsters
advanced to the final with a

‘6-1, 1-6, 7-5 victory over Li Na

of China. Clijsters will play
Jelena Jankovic, who upset
Nicole Vaidisova 6-4, 4-6,
6-4.... Russians Anna Chak-
vetadze and Vasilisa Bar-

dina will meet in the final of

the Hobart (Australia) Inter-
national women’s tournament
after winning their semifinals
in straight sets. ... Top-seeded
Tommy Robredo won two

matches en route to the semi-
finals of the Heineken Tennis
Open in Auckland, New Zea-
land.... Roger Federer beat
Marat Safin 6-3, 7-6 (7-2) to
reach the final of the Kooyong
exhibition tournament in Mel-
bourne, Australia. ... Federer
and Maria Sharapova topped
the lists of seeded players at
next week’s Australian Open,
with organizers sticking to the
world rankings.

e Golf: South Africa’s
Andrew McLardy shot a
course-record, 9-under 63 on
the Royal Johannesburg and
Kensington Golf Club’s West
Course to take the first-round
lead in the Joburg Open in
Johannesburg, South Africa.
McLardy eagled two of the last
four holes for a back-nine 29 in
the event sanctioned by the
European and Southern Africa
tours. Italy’s Edoardo Moli-
nari, the 2005 U.S. Amateur
champion, had the best score
on the tougher East Course, a
7-under 64. South Africans
Warren Abery and Mark
Murless opened with 64s on
the West Course. The final
two rounds will be played on
the East Course.

e Horse racing: Barbaro
showed a promising first step
after suffering a big setback
from laminitis when X-rays
showed no additional compli-
cations in either hind leg.







‘Feb. 4. Two of the fights will be televised by Showtime. “

Id.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





PEOPLE IN SPORTS



RAMON ESPINOSA/AP

EXPERT ADVICE:

New York Mets player and 22-year major leaguer Julio
Franco, right, gives hitting tips to aspiring baseball
players during Thursday’s visit to’ the team’s training
complex in Boca de Nigua, Dominican Republic.



i ust Saisie setback

‘The news conference was expected to announce the
return of professional sports to Miami Arena. Instead, it
delivered further notice on the venue’s current status of
neglect.

Promoter Don King, who planned to present a fight card
at the downtown Miami facility Feb. 3, said Thursday he
would consider other local sites after a deal fell through with
Arena officials.

“I made Miami Arena a partner in the event, we put it
together in time, but their check bounced,” King said. “We
don’t have time to lose, because I want to save this show and
keep it in South Florida.”

King said the Arena failed to comply with a $500,000 fee as
the card’s co-promoter. King, whose company is handling all
boxing matters related to the show, had all of the card’s fea-
tured fighters, including junior-middleweight champion Cory
Spinks and lightweight titleholder Jesus Chavez, at Thurs-
day’s news conference.

“The investor we were counting on fell through,” said Al
Howell, who represents the Arena. “We are still trying to
make this happen.”

King is not completely ruling out the Arena, but is not giv-
ing much time before targeting other locations and partners.
“Within 48 hours, if they can’t come up with a solid deal, we
will go elsewhere,” King said.

The card’s theme is to link it with other South Florida . fis
events leading to Super Bowl XLI'at Dolphin Stadium. qn

In an effort to keep the event in South Florida, King is will-
ing to welcome a new partner for a lesser co-promotion fee.
He would not disclose the fee.

“You are talking about an event that will generate a lot of
publicity because it will take place here just before the Super
Bowl,” King said.

Once home to the Miami Heat, Florida Panthers and Uni-
versity of Miami men’s basketball, Miami Arena has not
played host to a sporting event since the Miami Morays shut
down after one season of indoor football in 2005.

A Marc Anthony concert in May 2006 was the last event
presented at the Arena, Howell said.

— SANTOS A. PEREZ

Anew addition A new venture?

|
Julie Foudy andhus- =~ Cal Ripken Jr. would be
band lan Sawyers wel- | interested in buying the Bal-
comed a baby girl on New | timore Orioles if Peter
Year’s Day. | Angelos decides to sell the
The former captain of | team.
the U.S. women’s soccer | Ripken Professional
team gave birth by Caesar- |__ Baseball has owned the
ean section in Mission | Class-A Aberdeen Ironbirds
Viejo, Calif,tolsabel Ann | of the New York-Penn
Sawyers, who weighed 7 League since 2002 and the
pounds, 2 ounces. | Class-A Augusta GreenJack-
“She came out with a ets of the South Atlantic
bruise on her eye,” Foudy | League since 2005.
said. | There has been specula-
“J thought, ‘Atta girl — _ tion that Ripken would want
she’s a scrapper.’ to own the Orioles, and he
“She sleeps all the time _ was asked Wednesday

about a possible purchase at
the Hall of Fame news con-
ference.

“T haven't been
approached,” he said. “I’ve
| thought about that, yes, and

and hasn’t said a peep,”
Foudy added. “I said, |
‘That’s not a Foudy.’ ”
Foudy was a World Cup
commentator for ESPN last
summer, ran the Julie

Foudy Sports Leadership if an opportunity were to
Academy and worked out | arise, if Mr. Angelos would
during her pregnancy. | want to sell the club, it

Foudy, nicknamed would be an interesting



“Loudy Foudy,” helped the thought process to go

U.S. team capture two through.”

World Cups (1991, 1999) and | Ripken and Tony Gwynn
two Olympic gold medals were elected to the Hall of
(1996, 2004) before oe Fame on Tuesday and will
in 2004. be inducted in July.

‘He’s not going to lose any money
by staying in school, because the
prices keep going up.’

- GIL BRANDT, draft expert for NFL.com and
longtime personnel director for the Dallas
Cowboys, on the draft prospects for
Oklahoma running back Adrian Peterson,
right. Peterson is undecided on whether to
turn pro or not.



“FLASHBACK



On this day in history:
1960 — Syracuse’s Dolph Schayes becomes the first
player in NBA history to score 15,000 points.
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

Time marches on,

BY GARY SHELTON
St. Petersburg Times

Mackey and Matte and Johnny U.
And the grownup in me says it
shouldn’t matter.

So much time has passed since a
franchise sneaked out of town. It has
been 22 seasons since the Colts left
Baltimore, and they were there for
only 32. Increasingly, the adult inside
whispers that I should just get over it.

Raymond and Lenny and the Iron
Horse. And the cynic inside says they
are yesterday’s news.

Other towns have lost franchises,
and you don’t hear their teeth gnash.
Houston and Cleveland and Los
Angeles and St. Louis all have moved
forward. A part of me thinks that
maybe I should deal with it.

Bubba a nd Fatso and the Mad
Dog. More and more, I don’t sound
nostalgic. Just old.

There is a new team in Baltimore,
with new colors and new stars. To
those on the bragging side of age 50,
Baltimore now belongs to the
Ravens. The Colts used to play there?
Yeah, and the Dodgers used to play
in Brooklyn, and the Bears used to
play in Decatur. Maybe I should turn
it loose.

Still, it stings. There is an NFL
playoff game in Baltimore on Satur-
day, and the wrong team is wearing
the horseshoe.

First love sinks in deep, and that’s
as true with football teams as it is
with anything else. For me, that team
was the Baltimore Colts, the team of
Johnny Unitas and his high-top shoes
and Tom Matte and his wristband.

Remember the running gag in the
movie Diner, when a prospective

AROUND THE NFL



groom forced his fiancée to pass a
Colts trivia contest before he would
marry her? A lot of us knew the
answers. This was the team that won
perhaps the greatest game ever
played (the 1958 NFL Championship
Game) and that lost perhaps the most
important (Super Bowl III, the game
that validated the AFL).

Even for a kid growing up a thou-
sand miles away, it was a team of
wonder. There was John Mackey and
Raymond Berry and Lenny Moore.
There was the Mad Dog (Mike Cur-
tis) and the Iron Horse (Alan
Ameche) and Fatso (Artie Donovan).

Alas, there also was Bob Irsay, the
boogeyman of Baltimore, and the
dark ee of March 28, 1984. When

Three-man attack

gives the

Patriots

lots of room to run

BY HOWARD ULMAN
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. —
LaDainian Tomlinson of the Char-
gers isn’t the only dangerous running
back in Sunday’s playoff game in San
Diego. The New England Patriots
have three of them, and their success
could help limit how many yards the
NFL’s MVP piles up.

The more Corey Dillon, Lau-
rence Maroney and Kevin Faulk
can use up time by gaining yards on
the ground, the less time the Char-
gers star might have to do what he
did better than any other player —
run through defenses and into the
end zone.

“With that stable of backs, all
three of them can do great things
back there,” Patriots wide receiver
Jabar Gaffney said Thursday.

Their performance last Sunday in
a 37-16 playoff victory over the New
York Jets kept that Jets team from
focusing on stopping the passing
game. That helped Gaffney catch
eight passes for 104 yards, his best
performance since joining the
Patriots early in the season.

Maroney rushed for 69 yards, Dil-
lon had 53 and a touchdown, and
Faulk had consecutive runs of 7, 8
and 9 yards on a 15-play touchdown
drive that gave the Patriots a 17-10
lead with 11 seconds left to play in the
first half.

Tomlinson, deservedly so, gets
plenty of attention because of his
NFL-high 1,815 yards rushing and his
record 31 touchdowns, and the
Patriots’ runners get much less of the

COUNTDOWN TO § SUPER | BOWL > XL 1g

SUPER BOWL XVIII

L.A. RAIDERS 38, WASHINGTON 9

e@ Jan. 22, 1984
e Tampa Stadium, Tampa
e MVP: RB Marcus Allen, Los Angeles

spotlight. Of course, Dillon rarely
speaks to reporters, Maroney is
restricted from doing that by head
coach Bill Belichick because he’s a
rookie, and Faulk declined to be
interviewed Thursday, although he
generally is accessible.

Still, the Patriots use the trio’s lack
of publicity in a week dominated by
Tomlinson as fitting into their psy-
chological game plan of not getting
enough respect — despite winning
three of the past five Super Bowls.

“That’s nothing new to us,”
Patriots cornerback Ellis Hobbs
said. “That’s kind of like our M.O.
The thing about our running game is
we can hit you through so many dif-
ferent ways.”

Dillon is a power runner, with 13
touchdowns and 812 yards on the
ground this season. Maroney is elu-
sive and strong, with 745 yards rush-
ing. Faulk is a receiving threat, with
43 regular-season catches and a
touchdown reception Sunday against
the Jets.

“They all bring another dimension
to the game and another difficulty for
the defense to stop,” Hobbs said.
“We know what we have over here.
We don’t need anybody to hype us.”

But Chargers linebacker Shawne
Merriman did just that with Dillon
and Maroney.

“It’s a one-two punch with them,”
said Merriman, who led the NFL with
17 sacks this season. “They are a dif-
ferent style of running back, a little
shiftier in the rookie. Dillon is
a real vet, and he knows how to
run the ball, and that’s why he’s

wacky and
wondrous of past |
| Super Bowls

TS

PRO FOOTBALL

LLOYD PEARSON/BALTIMORE SUN

PULLING UP STAKES: It was a snowy night on March 28, 1984, when
Colts owner Robert Irsay shipped his franchise from Baltimore to
Indianapolis aboard Mayflower trucks. The wounds have not healed
in Baltimore, and now the Colts return Saturday to play the Ravens.

Irsay loaded up the Mayflower trucks
and left in the middle of the night, it
was as if he had kidnapped a team
and a city’s innocence.

In Baltimore, the town that lies
between New York and Washington
without quite being either, the
wounds have not healed for the 50-
and-older set. All of which adds extra
meaning when the Indianapolis Colts
come to town Saturday for an NFL
playoff game.

“There are still people here who
have the Colts horseshoe tattooed on
their butts,” said Donovan, the old
defensive tackle. “People here are a
little wacky.”

At 81, Donovan is a T-shirt model
again. He gave his approval this week



ELSA/GETTY IMAGES







for a shirt to be manufactured with
his face in the name of beating India-
napolis. There is another shirt with
Unitas on it. In other words, some
fans cling so firmly to the past that
you would think they were doing it
with Berry’s hands.

“There would be a great deal See
satisfaction for a lot of people if the
Ravens would stick it to the Colts,”
Matte said. “This adds a little fuel to
the fire.”

Bruce Laird, an old Colts defen:
sive back, put it this way: “We were
cheated out of our heritage, out of
our franchise, out of our history.”

For whatever reason, losing a team
seemed to affect Baltimore more
deeply than it did other towns. Los
Angeles lost the Raiders and the
Rams, but L.A. is too cool to care.
Houston lost the Oilers, and St. Louis
lost the Cardinals, and Cleveland lost
the old Browns.

“T think it bothered Baltimore
because it’s a blue-collar town,”
Matte said. “We lived here, our chil-
dren were born here, and we died
here. We didn’t live in million-dollar
houses. We lived in the neighbor-
hoods.”

“People still talk about ’58,” Dono-
van said. “[For them,] Irsay ruined
Sunday afternoons.”

It would have helped if the Colts
had changed their nickname upon
leaving, the way the Browns (now the
Ravens) and the Oilers (now the
Titans) did. That way, Baltimore
could have reclaimed the Colts name
when the Ravens came to town.

“We never played for Indianapo-
lis,” Laird said. “Johnny Unitas didn’t.
Raymond Berry didn’t. I didn’t.

ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

“That’s not right. We never played
there.”

Remember Matte’s wristband? In
1965, Matte had to play quarterback
because of injuries, and the plays
were written on his wristband. That
wristband is in the Hall of Fame —
representing the Indianapolis Colts.

“T love Indianapolis,” Matte said.
“Great city, great people. But what
does Indianapolis have to do with us?

- We played in Baltimore,”

So what does Matte think when he
sees the horseshoe?

“I get confused. When I did the
Ravens broadcast, I would call them
the Baltimore Colts because it was
ingrained in me.”

And when he hears Irsay’s name?

“Jerk. I don’t know how he got into
the NFL to start wii

And when he sees a Mayflower
moving truck: “I think, ‘At least it
took Irsay away.’ ”

“I want to suit up for this one,”
Laird said. “I don’t want to hit any-
one. I just want to put on a uniform
and stand there.

“Maybe I could play one play, and
then they could carry me off.”

As of Saturday, the Colts will have
played more playoff games repre-
senting Indianapolis than they did
representing Baltimore. The Ravens
have won as many Super Bowls in
Baltimore as the Colts did. -

Eventually, the wounds will close.
Eventually, even the youngest of the
scorned fans will grow old. Eventu-
ally, the Baltimore Colts will sound
as aged as the Brooklyn Dodgers.

But not yet.

Not until this weekend is over.

And maybe a few more after that.

al
NICK LAHAM/GETTY IMAGES



FULL-HOUSE BACKFIELD: When the Patriots aren't running the ball with Corey Dillon (left), maybe they’re
handing it to Laurence Maroney (center). Or Kevin Faulk (right). They all know how to get the job done.

playing the way he’s playing.”

Chargers defensive end Luis Cas-
tillo also knows that Tomlinson isn’t
the only running threat Sunday.

“As good as Tom Brady is, we
have to worry about that running
game because they have some great
running backs,” Castillo said.

Against the Jets, the Patriots had a
balanced attack, with 158 yards rush-
ing and 200 passing. They ran for
more than 100 yards in each of their
past four games and were held under
that total just six times this season.

Excluding the two games Maroney
was sidelined, he led the Patriots in
rushing eight times, and Dillon led
six times. The blocking has been
solid, especially with the same five
linemen starting each of the past
eight games.

“There’s continuity there,” Brady
said. “When these O-lines are
together over the course of the sea-
son, [they] can just be very produc-
tive, because [they] learn to play
together. There is a chemistry that
develops.”

The chemistry among the running
backs also seems sound, even though





UBER Bowls

f
i

During the first half, the Raiders scored

on offense, defense and special teams,
becoming the first team to score two

non-offensive touchdowns in a Super Bowl.
The lasting image of Super Bowl XVIII
came in the third quarter, on a dazzling run

by Raiders running back Marcus Allen.

With the Raiders ahead 28-9, Allen, from

23 DAYS TO GO

the emergence of Maroney has taken
carries away from Dillon, a 10-year
NFL veteran who rushed for a career-
high 1,635 yards just two seasons ago,
his first with the Patriots.

“Tremendous backs,” Gaffney
said. “They get the job done, week in
and week out.”

ELSEWHERE

e Broncos: The team hired Jim
Bates as assistant head coach/
defense and promoted defensive-
backs coach Bob Slowik to defen-
sive coordinator.

Bates, 60, was defensive coordina-
tor for the Packers in 2005 and for the
Dolphins from 2000-04, including
seven games as interim head coach in
2004. He has coached in the NFL for
15 years.

Slowik, 52, was defensive coordi-
nator for the Packers in 2004, the
Browns in 1999 and the Bears in
1993-98. He coached the Broncos’
defensive backs for two seasons.

e Giants: Tim Lewis, who inter-
viewed for the vacant head coaching
job in Miami on Wednesday, was
fired as defensive coordinator.

e Steelers: Georgia Tech coach
Chan Gailey will be interviewed for
Pittsburgh’s head coaching job, the
fifth coach to meet with the team.
since Bill Cowher resigned.

e Raiders: Former Giants coach
Jim Fassel, Oakland’s quarterbacks
coach in 1995, interviewed for the
head coaching vacancy. Oakland
fired Art Shell as coach last week
after a 2-14 season.

e Eagles: Thomas Tapeh, the
only fullback on Philadelphia’s ros-
ter, is questionable for Saturday
night’s playoff game at New Orleans
because of a knee injury.

e Patriots: Two women are
suing linebacker Junior Seau, claim-
ing that he threw drinks at them in a
San Diego bar last May.

e Bengals: Defensive end Rob-
ert Geathers’ breakout season —
10'4 sacks, the most by a Bengal since
1983 — earned him one of the biggest
contract extensions in team history.
Geathers, who had a $425,009 salary
last season, signed a six-year exten-
sion that will pay him $14 million
next season in salary and bonuses.

— ASSOCIATED PRESS

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @ ON TV: CBS





his 26, took a pitch from quarterback Jim
Plunkett, and it looked as if he would run
straight into a wall of Redskins defenders
on the outside. But Allen cut inside and
went 74 yards for a touchdown that ended
: the third quarter.

Allen ran for 191 yards on the day and was named MVP in

“The Voice of God” gave its final sermon
in Super Bowl XVIII.

Announcer John Facenda, whose deep,
authoritative, resounding voice narrated
NFL Films, called his final Super Bowl in the
Los Angeles Raiders’ 38-9 rout of the
Washington Redskins. It was the first Super Bowl played in



Tampa. the Raiders’ romp.
Facenda died a little more than eight months after the This Raiders victery would mark the last time an AFC team
game. would win a Super Bowl until the Denver Broncos defeated



the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII 14 seasons later,
- PETE PELEGRIN

The Raiders, in their second season in Los Angeles after
moving from Oakland, delivered a heavenly performance.

PHOTO/AP ARCHIVES
GE _| FRIDAY, JANUARY 12,2007 |

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BASKETBALL : HOCKEY |



Nets roar back behind Kidd

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CHICAGO — Jason Kidd
recorded his 82nd career triple-
double, and the New Jersey Nets
erased an 18-point deficit against
Chicago for the second time in a
week, beating the Bulls 86-83 on
Thursday night.

Kidd had 23 points, 14
rebounds and 1] assists for his
seventh triple-double of the sea-
son. Vince Carter added 18
points for the Nets.

Kirk Hinrich made a runner in
the lane for Chicago to make it
74-67, then the Nets came back
and scored 14 consecutive
points. Richard Jefferson had a
reverse dunk, Carter made two
free throws and then Kidd fol-
lowed with a 3-pointer to give
the Nets a 76-74 lead with 5:41
left in the game.

Kidd extended the Nets’ lead
with a basket with 2:20 left, mak-
ing it 81-74. Chicago got within
81-78 with 51 seconds left, but Jef-
ferson followed with two free
throws.

Andres Nocioni’s 3 cut the
Nets’ lead. to 83-81 with 16 sec-
onds remaining. Kidd followed
by hitting 1-of-2 free throws on
the other end, making it 84-81.
After Hinrich made two free
throws, Kidd came back and
made both free throws to make it
86-83. After losing control of the
ball, Hinrich’s 3-point attempt
was blocked by Bostjan Nachbar
as time expired.

Nocioni finished with 28
points for Chicago and Ben Gor-
don had 23 — but only three
after halftime.

The Nets won for the fifth
time in six games. The Bulls have
dropped five of six.

ELSEWHERE

e Heat: Shaquille O’Neal
practiced for the first time since
tearing cartilage in his left knee
on Nov. 12, and forwards
Antoine Walker and James
Posey also rejoined the team.

Walker and Posey were
placed on the inactive list on Jan.

3 for failing to meet conditioning.

guidelines.

The Heat are midway through
a six-game road trip. Walker and
Posey will be available for
tonight’s game at Golden State,

PRO BASKETBALL

but O’Neal will not play, the
team said.

O’Neal has missed the past 28
games and played in only four
games this season. He earlier
said he would likely need about
four or five practices before he
would play.

O’Neal had surgery on Nov. 19
and was then projected to be
sidelined until at least late
December.

Walker and Posey have,

missed the past four games.
They were deactivated by coach
Pat Riley the day he began an
indefinite leave of absence to
undergo knee and hip surgery.

The injury-plagued defending
NBA champions are 15-19 and
third in the Southeast Division,
but they’re 2-1 on their trip under
interim coach Ron Rothstein.

e 76ers: The club waived
forward Chris Webber, making
the five-time All-Star eligible to
sign with another team after
clearing waivers.

The Sixers completed the
paperwork to buy out the
remaining l'4 seasons on Web-
ber’s contract Wednesday, end-
ing two disappointing years in
Philadelphia. Once he clears
waivers after 48 business hours,
teams will be eligible to sign him.

Webber missed ll of the past
14 games, officially with foot and
ankle injuries. He was due nearly
$21 million this season and $22
million next season.

e Celtics: Guard Tony Allen
will miss the rest of the season
with two torn ligaments in his
left knee.

Coach Doc Rivers said that
Allen will be out at least six
months. Allen hurt the knee
when he landed awkwardly after
an uncontested dunk in the final
minutes of a 97-84 loss to, Indi-
ana on Wednesday night.

Rivers said Allen “was not in
good spirits” when he spoke
with him earlier Thursday.

The Celtics have already lost
“Teading scorer Paul Pierce, out
since Dec. 20 with:a stress frac-
ture in his left: foot. Forward
Wally Szczerbiak is out at least a
week because of ankle injuries
and guard Delonte West is out
with a sore back.

Center Theo Ratliff is out for

THAT KIDD CAN PLAY: Nets point guard Jason Kidd goes to the
basket against Bulls guard Chris Duhon. Kidd had 23 points,
14 rebounds and 11 assists for his seventh triple-double of 4 f°
the season, as New Jersey rallied past Chicago on Thursday.

the season with a back injury.

e Nuggets-Bucks trade:
The Denver Nuggets traded fan
favorite Earl Boykins, along with
swingman Julius Hodge and
cash, to the Milwaukee Bucks for
Steve Blake. ~

Blake averaged.3.6 points and
2.5 assists in 33 games for the
Bucks this season.

“We're getting a classic point

guard,” Nuggets vice president

of basketball. operations Mark
Warkentien said. ‘“‘He’s an out-
standing shooter and solid floor
leader.”

The point eased Boykins
played a little over three years

for Denver and was averaging

15.2 points this season.

He picked up his play with
Carmelo Anthony and J.R. Smith
serving suspensions for their
roles in a brawl against the New
York Knicks, but .his future
became unclear when Denver
obtained high-scoring guard



h

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



NBA STANDINGS

Orlando
Washington
Miami
Atlanta
Charlotte

New Jersey
Toronto
New York
Boston
Philadelphia

CENTRAL

Cleveland
Detroit
Indiana
Chicago
Milwaukee

BRIAN KERSEY/AP

ATLANTIC yet

Thursday’s results

86, Chi. 83
Clev. at Pho., late

Allen Iverson in a trade.

“Earl’s performance during
our ‘suspension season’ has been
sensational,’ Warkentien said.
“He’s done a heck of a job.”

Hodge recently returned to
the lineup after being shot five
times last April when a gunman
pulled up alongside him, spray-
ing his vehicle with bullets. He’s
played in four games this season.



victory.









Detroit at Phoenix, late
Calgary at Col., late
Minnesota at Vanc., late
San Jose at L.A., late

LEADERS



NHL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Atlanta 24 13 6 2 56139 138 = 11-5-3-1 13-8-3-1 11-4-4-1
Carolina 24 18 2 2 52140 138. 13-7-0-1 11-11-2-1 — 11-3-0-0
Tampa Bay 22 21° 1 #241 46 143 142) 12-11-0-0 10-10-1-1 10-7-0-0
Washington 19 18 2 5 -45 138 150 11-10-1-2 8-8-1-3. |. 6-7-1-1
Florida _ 16 21 3 6 41128 151 11-8-1-1 5-13-2-5 = 2-11-1-0
ATLANTIC W =L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
New Jersey 25 14 O 4 54115 103 14-4-0-3 11-10-0-1 9-4-0-1
N.Y. Rangers 22 19 3 1. 48 136 142 9-9-3-0 13-10-0-1 8-8-0-0
N.Y. Islanders 21 19 1 2 45127 123 = 11-8-1-1 10-11-0-1 8-6-1-0
Pittsburgh 18 17 3 4 43129 136 10-8-2-2 8-9-1-2, 11-5-1-1
Philadelphia 11 29 2 2 26106 169 3-12-2-2 8-17-0-0 3-10-0-2
Buffalo ‘31 10 2 «1 65168 127 14-6-1-1 — 17-4-1-0 8-7-1-0
Montreal 25°14 1 4 #55135 122 14-6-0-3 11-8-1-1 8-4-0-4
Ottawa 25 19 2 O 52 154 131. 11-10-1-0 14-9-1-0 = 10-7-0-0
Toronto 20 19 2 4 -46 149 150 10-11-1-2 10-8-1-2 8-8-2-2
Boston 20 17 2 2 44124 152 = 12-8-1-1 8-9-1-1 $-7-0-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL _W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Nashville 29 11 2 #1 61 149 113 15-8-0-0 11-3-1-0
Detroit 26.12 2 3. 57129 105 12-9-1-1 9-2-0-1
Chicago 17 21 #1 #4 #39 106 126 T-10-1-3 9-9-0-0
Columbus 1622 2 3 37 111 134 7-13-1-1 5-8-0-2
St. Louis 15 21 4 3 37 103° 134 7-10-2-2. 6-10-2-2
Vancouver 24 18 #O 1. rr) 107 111 9-11-0-1 9-9-0-1
Calgary 22 15 2 2 48125 106 5-10-2-2 7-5-1-1
Edmonton 21.18 2 2 46122 125 8-11-1-1 T-T-1-0
Colorado ~21 18 2 #1 45 134 120 10-9-1-0 9-4-1-0
Minnesota 21.19 0 3 45 118 117 4-15-0-1 5-5-0-2
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Anaheim 30 9 2 5S 67 160 114 - 14-6-1-2 — 10-3-0-1
San Jose 28 15 0 O 56 132 103 15-8-0-0 13-7-0-0 8-8-0-0
Dallas 26 18 O 1 53120 112 13-8-0-0 13-10-0-1 12-5-0-0
Phoenix 20 20 1 1 42118 140 11-8-1-0 9-12-0-1 —6-10-1-1
Los Angeles 16°22 3 «3 38125 156 11-9-3-3 5-13-0-0 6-11-0-2
Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Thursday’s results Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
Carolina 6, Florida 4 Atlanta at New Jersey, 7:30 Florida 5, Pittsburgh 2
Toronto 4, Buffalo 2 Columbus at Nashville, 8 St. Louis 3, New Jersey 2
N.Y. Islanders 5, Boston 4,SO — Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 Buffalo 2, Chicago 1
Ottawa 6, N.Y. Rangers 4 Edmonton 3, San Jose 2
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 2
Tampa Bay 5, Washington 4
Anaheim 5, Dallas 1

SCORING GOALIES
Through Wednesday Through Wednesday
Player,team GP GOA Pts_~—~Pllayer, team GP MIN GAAVG
Crosby, Pit 39 21 44 65 Hasek, Det 33 1945 67 2.07
Ovechkin, Was 43 28 31. 59 Brodeur, NJ 41 2464 86 2.09
Hossa, Atl 45 26 32 58 Gigu, Ana 34 = 1905 69 2.17
St. Louis, TB 44 27 30 57 Backstrom, Minn 13 655 24 2.20
Jagr, NYR 44 17 40 57 Turco, Dal 38 2092 79 2.27
Lecavalier, TB 44 24 32 56 Kiprusoff, Cal 37 2218 85 2.30
Heatley, Ott 45 26 29 55 Toskala, S.J. 24 1391 54 2.33
Selanne, Ana 45 25 29 54 Mason, Nash 27° «1578 62 2.36
Straka, NYR 44 23 31 54 Smith, Dal 11 559 22 2.36
Iginla, Cal 39 23 30 53 Nabokov, S.J. 22) «1177 47 2.40



HOCKEY

Canes rally to beat

From Miami Herald Wire Services

RALEIGH, N.C. — Cory Stillman
scored the go-ahead goal midway through
the third period, and the Carolina Hurri-
canes rallied from a three-goal deficit to
beat the Florida Panthers 6-4 on Thursday
night.

Chad LaRose, Erik Cole, Scott Walker,
Craig Adams and Ray Whitney also
scored for the Hurricanes, who trailed 3-0
after two periods before scoring each of
their goals in a span of about 10 minutes
in the third — their first five-goal third
period since Oct. 28, 2005, against Phila-
delphia.

Olli Jokinen scored two goals and Juraj
Kolnik and Stephen Weiss added one goal
apiece for the Panthers in what seemed
like an easy victory but melted down into
just another empty trip to Raleigh —
where they haven’t won since Dec. 6,
2002.

Cam Ward stopped 28 shots in two
periods, and was benched after giving up
three goals in the second.

John Grahame finished the game and
stopped six shots.

The Hurricanes won after trailing by
three goals for the first time since Nov. 5,
1998, when the New York Islanders blew
a 3-0 lead and lost to Carolina 6-3.

Alex Auld stopped 21 shots but gave up
five goals for Florida.

SENATORS 6, RANGERS 4

NEW YORK — Daniel Alfredsson gave
Ottawa a five-goal lead early in the third
period and the Senators then held off
New York’s furious rally.

Just two nights after a lackluster 5-3
home loss to the New York Islanders that
snapped a four-game winning streak and
caused a rare postgame rant from coach
Tom Renney, the Rangers fell behind 5-0
early in the third period.

CANADIENS 4, FLYERS 2

PHILADELPHIA — Chris Higgins
scored the go-ahead goal midway through
the second period and added an assist to
help the Canadiens hand the Flyers their
fifth consecutive loss.

Mike Johnson, Alex Kovalev, and
Michael Ryder also scored for the Cana-
diens, who won their second in a row.
Tomas Plekanec and Andrei Markov each
had two assists for Montreal.



CHRIS SEWARD/MCT

WALKING ON AIR: Scott Walker of the
Hurricanes celebrates after his goal
during Carolina’s third-period rally.

ISLANDERS 5, BRUINS 4 (SO)

BOSTON — Jason Blake and Miroslav
Satan each scored goals in the shootout to
lift the Islanders.

Satan scored on the Islanders’ first
shootout attempt and Boston extended it
to sudden death when Marc Savard
scored on the Bruins’ third shot.

Brad Boyes then failed to convert and
Blake put a shot over the shoulder of Bru-
ins goalie Hannu Toivonen for the game-
winner.

LIGHTNING 5, CAPITALS 4

TAMPA, Fla. — Vincent Lecavalier
had two goals and an assist and Martin St.
Louis snapped a third-period tie with his
28th goal of the season, giving the sud-
denly streaking Lightning the victory over
the Capitals.

Vinny Prospal had a goal and two
assists and Ryan Craig also scored for the
Lightning, who got 18 saves from goal-
tender Johan Holmqvist to match a sea-
son high with their third consecutive vic-
tory.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

eos

weet Pet, GB 110 Str. Home me Away — Conf
22 14 ‘611 - 6-4 4 W-5_ “14 6 8-8 12-9
20 14 588 1 82 W-1 14-3 6-11 13-9
15 19 441 6 46 W-2 8-9 7-10 6-10
10 23 .30310% 1-9 L2 5-10 5-13 6-14
10 23. .30310% 4-6 W-1 6-11 4-12 7-13
Ww eL Pct. GB £10 Str. Home Away Conf
16 19 457 - 5-5 W-2 11-10 5-9 12-9
16 20 444 % 55 W-1 10-5 6-15 11-8
16 21 432 1 6-4 W-3 9-10 7-11 10-12
12 22 .353 3% 2-8 L2 412 8-10 8-13
9 26 257 7 37 L4 48 518 6-14
22 12 #.647 - 82 W-5 15-3 7-9 15-10
20 13 606 1% 55 L-l 9-6 11-7 14-7
20 16 556 3 7-3 W-3 10-5 10-11 15-9
20 17 541 3% 46 L-3 15-5 5-12 17-7
16 19 457 6% 5-5 L-4 9-6 7-13 6-14

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WoL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 29 8 .784 - 9-1 W-2 17-3 12-5 21-6
San Antonio 26 11 .703 3 6-4 W-3) 13-6 13-5 18-7
Houston 23 13. 689 5% 7-3 W-2 13-3 10-10 11-11
New Orleans 13 22) 371 15 2-8 W-1 7-10 6-12 6-16
Memphis 9 27 .25019% 3-7 W-l 7-11 2-16 4-15
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 24 11 686 - 6-4 \L-l 143 10-8 16-7
Denver 17 16 «#46515 6 3-7 L-l 10-9 7-7 5-10
Minnesota 17 16) «4.515 «6 «67-3, SLL 11-6 = 6-10 -10-10
Portland 14 23) 378 11 2-8 L-3 7-11 7-12) 9-11
Seattle 13 25 .34212% 2-8 L6 9-9 4-16 5-15
PACIFIC | WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 26 8 .765 - 82 W-7 15-3 11-5 12-7
L.A. Lakers 23.13 «639 «4 «66-4 «CLe2s 16-4 7-9 15-7
Golden State 18 19 .486 9% 5-5 L-2 14-6 4-13 12-13
LA. Clippers 17 19 .472 10 6-4 W-2 12-6 5-13 11-15
Sacramento 14 18 .438 11 44-6 L-3 10-10 4-8 8-13

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
Miami at G.S., 10:30 Miami 107, Sea. 103

Dal. at Ind., 7 Was. 113, Chi. 103

Mil. at Phil., 7 N.O. 96, Atl. 77

Det. at Atl., 7:30 Ind. 97, Bos. 84

Tor. at Bos., 7:30 N.Y. 106, Phi, 99

Char. at N.Y. 7:30
Minn. at Memp., 8
: Wash. vs. N.O. @0.C., 8

Cha. 103, Det. 96
Tor. 90, Milwaukee 77
LA.C. 92, Min. 91

Sac. at Port., 10 Hou. 102, L.A.L. 77
Utah at Sea., 10:30 Dal. 99, Por. 74
Hou. at Den., 10:30 S.A. 92, Den. 83
Orl. at Lakrs, 10:30 Orl. 91, G.S. 76

LEY eV) oe)

Through Wednesday

LATE WEDNESDAY SCORING REBOUNDING
e Spurs 92, Nuggets 83: G FG FT PTSAVG ~——————C“(ié«WG OFF DEF TOOT’ AVG
: Anthony, Den. 22 265 153 696 31.6 Howard, Orl. 36 129 333 462 128
Tony Parker scored 26 points — 4renas, Wash. 34 329 264 1028 30.2 Garnett, Minn. 33-82 333415 12.6
and Tim Duncan had 19 to lead _Werson, Den. 25 246 222 735 29.4 Camby, Den. 28 64 262 326 11.6
Sere z Bryant, LAL 33 305 259 924 28.0 Boozer, Utah 35 110 296 406 11.6
visiting San Antonio. wale, es 28 - a" TI 27.8 phates Boke 8 123 250 373 113
i Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 124 244 368 11.2
e Heat 107, SuperSonics James, Clev. 34 325 209 905 266 Lee, N.Y. 37 142 248 390 10.5
103: Dwyane Wade scored 14 of _ Pierce, Bos. 24 198 181 638 26.6 O'Neal, Ind. 31 71 255 326 10.5

evhis 29 points in the final eight °*."" 21282 195 699 23° ASSISTS
minutes to rally visiting Miami. . FIELD. GOALS es : G’,_AST AVG
e Magic 91 Warriors 76: . FG FGA PCT iach, phos 32, 353 110
. : Biedrins, GS. 167 267 .625 Kidd, NJ. 34°° ° 3129.2
Dwight Howard had a career- Lee, NN. : 161 263 .612 Paul NOK. 27 242 30
; ; -hi Stoudemire, Phoe. 216 361 .598 Miller, Phil. 33 291 8
high 30 points and a season-high Dalembert, Phil. 140 241 581 Williams, Utah 35 304.87
25 rebounds to lead visiting Cory B68 Gl ats, 0 Davis Gs at, eae Bt
: : oward, Orl. a: illups, De’
Orlando to its fifth consecutive _ patterson, Mil. 196 350 1560 Wade, Mia. 2 86.220 -« 7:9
Bogut, Mil. 174 313 .556

Panthers

DUCKS 5, STARS 1

DALLAS — Teemu Selanne scored
three goals and Andy McDonald added
four assists to help the Ducks beat the
Stars.

Selanne registered his 19th career hat
trick — his first since March 29, 2001.
That one came against the Ducks when he
played for the San Jose Sharks.

Ilya Bryzgalov stopped 17 shots for the
Ducks, who had only one victory in their
previous six games (1-4-1) after getting off
to a franchise-best 28-5-6 start.

Scott Niedermayer and Joe DiPenta
added goals for the Ducks, whose 67
points lead the Western Conference
despite their recent slump.

Niklas Hagman scored for the injury-
depleted Stars, who are 1-4-1 in their past
six games.

MAPLE LEAFS 4, SABRES 2

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Jeff O’Neill scored
twice and Mats Sundin added two assists,
lifting the banged-up Maple Leafs over
the Sabres.

Alex Steen had a goal and an assist, and
Pavel Kubina also scored in a game in
which the Maple Leafs never trailed.

Sundin’s two assists gave him 495 with
Toronto, moving him into third on the
team’s career list, two ahead of former
captain Dave Keon.

Toronto snapped a two-game losing
skid and won on the road for only the
third time in nine games (3-5-1).

ELSEWHERE

e Blue Jackets: The club placed left
wing Rick Nash on injured reserve —
because of a back injury, and said
defenseman Duvie Westcott will be side-
lined indefinitely because of a concus-
sion. -

The Blue Jackets also recalled left wing
Alexandre Picard and defenseman Der-
rick Walser from Syracuse of the AHL.

Picard has appeared in seven games
with the Blue Jackets this season.

Walser was acquired from Carolina in
November.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Oilers 3, Sharks 2: Marc-Andre
Bergeron and Jarret Stoll each had a pow-
er-play goal and an assist in the first
period to lead visiting Edmonton.




. 8 HEALTH





THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-

tors Hospital conference room.

| m@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm e Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach © Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm _

to 7pm / 8: fale to 9:30pm.

The Cancer - Society of i
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

B@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh

, ‘Creek, Central Andros © Club 7178 meets

each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach e Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic. House, IBM Office, 4th
floor, meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.

~ WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free

4. appetizers and numerous drink specials.

f@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the





hg Babamas, mets. at;







public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

-FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are

held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
ter Blake Road. For more information call
327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,
Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

Gratip meets every Wednesday trom 5:2

to"7$m at Canver “Headquatters, two d6ors
south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets
every Wednesday from Ipm — 2pm at East
Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street, Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the Ist and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the
world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on

<<)

BOTH SHOWS UP UNTIL JAN 27, 2007
Third National Exhibition (ne3):

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to insti Hlation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalague.

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
Marth 2006. it contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imaqinathon,

















Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at

large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See-u there.

@ HEALTH
Free public health lectures featuring distin-

ager guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
ag ice Society of the Bahamas Support ;

pital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources &.Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend e TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from lpm to 2pm.

AROUN D

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 9B S

NASSAU




PHOTOS Welle ne





FRIDAY (227



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

m@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak

. Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to

attend meetings on the-third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.



SATURDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. ;

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid class-

es are offered every third Saturday of-the
month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-

tive at 302.4732 for more information and.

learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the

public of its meeting times and places: The.

Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

m@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness
Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-
ed persons are welcome to attend. For more
information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.




THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

Jayhawks deliver a message

BY RICK PLUMLEE
McClatchy Newspapers

LAWRENCE, Kan. — As far as
Kansas coach Bill Self is concerned,
you don’t make major statements by
winning big at home. Real statements
come with road victories.

OK, fair enough.

But you would have to think that
No. 6 KU’s first step into the Big 12
season with Wednesday night’s 87-57
blowout of No. 9 Oklahoma State was
at least as noteworthy. .

At least Brandon Rush thinks it’s
that — and much more.

“This was a big-time statement for
us,” KU’s sophomore guard said after
scoring a game-high 18 points. “This
is a statement to the rest of the Big 12.
We won big at home against a top-10
team. We have to defend our title.”

On that much, Self will agree. But
he also recalls tying Texas for the
regular-season title last season
despite losing by 25 points in Austin.

“One game, one win,” he said. “We
got hammered at Texas, so I guess
you’d have to stay that was a state-
ment. But it was only one game. It’s a
16-game [conference] season.”

What is certain is that Kansas
went hard after Oklahoma State’s

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Williams,



JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES

RUSH JOB: Brandon Rush and the
No. 6 Jayhawks shot down the
No. 9 Cowboys on Wednesday.

depleted ranks, pushing the Cowboys
up and down the court from the
opening tip. The Jayhawks led 33-11
with nearly 9 minutes left to play in
the first half, and they kept the ham-
mer down, with the exception of a
brief stretch in the second half.

Arizona

beat Oregon State;

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Marcus Williams scored a career-
high 27 points, leading No. 10 Arizona
to an 83-72 victory over Oregon State
on Thursday night in Tucson.

It was the fourth 20-point game in
the past five starts for Williams, who
also had eight rebounds.

Chase Budinger added 16 points

“and 10 rebounds as the Wildcats ~

‘ (13-2, 4-1 Pac-10) bounced back from
an overtime defeat at Washington
State on Saturday. Arizona is 9-0 at
McKale Center.

Marcel Jones scored 26 points and
Sasa Cuic added 16 to lead the Bea-
vers (8-9, 0-4 Pac-10), who lost their
season-high fourth game in a row.

Oregon State, coached by former
Arizona assistant Jay John, has
dropped 25 consecutive games in

. Tucson.

'. The Beavers’ last victory at

McKale Center came in 1983, the year
before Lute Olson arrived at Arizona.

Arizona, whose 41.2 percent
3-point shooting leads the Pac-10,
shot only 16.7 percent (3-for-18) from
beyond the arc, its percentage lowest
of the season.

The Wildcats scored the game’s
first 10 points, with Williams and
Budinger each scoring five, and went
on another 10-0 run late in the first
half to take a 42-27 halftime lead.

Williams and Budinger combined
to outscore the Beavers 30-27 in the
first half as Arizona limited Oregon
State to 34.5 percent shooting from
the floor, 21.4 percent from beyond
the 3-point arc.

Sparked by Williams’ seven
points, the Wildcats opened the sec-
ond half with a 13-6 run to take a 55-33
lead with 15:16 to go.

The Wildcats spent the rest of the
game protecting the’ lead and tuning
up for their matchup with No. 15 Ore-
gon on Sunday night, also at McKale
Center.

Oregon State wraps up its desert
trip at Arizona State on Saturday.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

also Wins

e No. 20 Memphis 79, Hous-
ton 69: Chris Douglas-Roberts
scored 16 points, Joey Dorsey
grabbed 10 rebounds and blocked
three shots, and the Tigers won on
the road.

Jeremy Hunt added 14 and Robert
Dozier had 12 points and three blocks

for the Tigers (12-3, 2-0 Conference’

USA), who have won four in a row
and six of their past seven.
Memphis is Conference USA’s

‘top-scoring team, but the Tigers beat

the Cougars with their defense as
much as with their offense, holding
Houston to 43 percent shooting (26-
of-60).

Memphis also dominated inside,
outrebounding the Cougars 35-26 and
scoring 40 points in the paint.

Robert McKiver scored 22, but
only five in the second half, to lead
the Cougars (5-8, 0-1), who ha ve lost
five ganes in a row and six of their
past seven.

Memphis built an early nine-point
lead with a 9-0 spurt, fueled by Hous-
ton miscues. Dozier finished a fast
break with a layup, and Hunt sank a
3-pointer, both off Cougars’ turn-
overs, to put Memphis up 14-5.

The Tigers led 20-13 when Jahmar
Thorpe rebounded a 3-point miss by
McKiver with one hand and dunked
the ball, triggering an 8-2 spurt.
McKiver swished a pair of 3-pointers
to cut the Tigers’ lead to 22-21.

Houston trailed by three when
Memphis mounted a 13-3 burst to
push the lead into double digits.
Douglas-Roberts converted a three-
point play after another Houston
turnover, and Antonio Anderson hit a
3-pointer to give the Tigers a 39-26
lead.

Memphis led 47-33 at the break
after hitting 18 of 28 shots (64 per-
cent).

The Tigers dominated inside at
both ends in the half, outrebounding
Houston 19-14, blocking four shots
and scoring 24 points in the paint.



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | SOCCER

“Run, run, run,” Jayhawks center
Sasha Kaun said after scoring a sea-
son-high 16 points.

With only eight scholarship play-
ers available, the Cowboys had no
chance of keeping the pace. And, oh,
what KU’s defense did to OSU. The
Jayhawks held a team averaging
nearly 85 points per game to a season
scoring low.

“This was an old-fashioned butt-
kicking,” OSU coach Sean Sutton
said. “Our guys just didn’t compete.”

Hard to do when you can’t even
get an offense working. KU’s 17
steals, including six by Mario Chal-
mers, doomed the Cowboys.

No one took the brunt of KU’s
defense harder than forward Mario
Boggan and guard JamesOn Curry.
They came in averaging a combined
4] points per game but put up only 20
on a collective 7-of-24 shooting.

“The statement we made was with
our defense,” Kansas freshman guard
Sherron Collins said. “We’re not
going to let anybody run over us.”

This was a type of game you could
see coming from KU in recent weeks
after playing mediocre against lesser
competition.

But although it was the Jayhawks’

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 | 7E

13th consecutive victory over OSU at
Allen Fieldhouse and the seventh out
of the past nine games overall, this
night was somewhat out of character
for the series. It was KU’s biggest
margin of victory over the Cowboys
since winning by 32 points a decade
ago at Allen Fieldhouse.

“We just had some guys flying
around,” Self said.

Particularly Rush. Then again, he
finally paid attention to his mom.

“Before every game, she calls me
and tells me to be more aggressive,”
Rush said. “I listen, but sometimes it
hasn’t worked out.”

It did Wednesday night.

Rush was forever slashing into the
lane, drawing foul after foul on the
way to making a career-high hine
free throws out of 10 attempts, also a
career high.

Collins also provided KU with
plenty of interesting moments.

The slimmer and ‘trimmer guard
triggered numerous fast breaks, fin-
ishing them with some of his six
assists and others with layups.

But twice he fouled Curry on
3-point attempts. The first resulted in
three free throws from the OSU

junior guard in the opening half, but



In Big 12 opener

the second brought a four-point play
that cut KU’s lead to 13 points, 53-40,
with 15 minutes remaining.

Not a problem. Collins soon fol-
lowed with a 3-pointer of his own as
the Jayhawks went on a 16-5 burst
that virtually finished the Cowboys.

The Jayhawks left the Cowboys
offense in a jumbled wreck on the
way to leading 47-30 at halftime.

OSU had trouble getting any
offense sets going while committing
13 turnovers before the break, includ-
ing ll off Jayhawk steals. Point guard
Byron Eaton had five turnovers alone
in the game’s first 2 minutes.

The Jayhawks used a particularly-
rough ball-handling stretch by OSU
to fuel a 19-3 run that left KU with a
33-11 lead with 8:10 remaining in the
half. Rush, who had 10 points in the
first seven minutes, made a soaring,
one-handed dunk during that stretch.

“We're not going to play that well,
making shots and having things fall
right for us every game,” Self said,
“but there was certainly great inten-
sity. Guys were ready to play, and
we've been getting better. Now we’ve
got to take our show on the road.”

That would be Saturday after-
noon, in a game at Iowa State.



JOHN MILLER/AP

A MAD SCRAMBLE: Marcus Williams (3) and Mustafa Shakur (15) of Arizona battle Oregon State’s Angelo
Tsagarakis (4) for a loose ball in the second half Thursday night. Williams led all scorers with 27 points.

OTHER GAMES

e Seton Hall 79, St. John’s 63:
Brian Laing scored 18 points, Jamar
Nutter added 17, and the two led a
26-6 second-half run that carried the
Pirates at home.

Larry Davis added 17 points and
Eugene Harvey 16 points and eight
assists for Seton Hall (10-5, 2-1 Big
East), which shot 52 percent from the
field in the second half and limited S
t. John’s (10-6, 1-2) to 32 percent.

Anthony Mason Jr. matched his
career high with 22 points, leading
thé Red Storm, and Lamont Hamilton
added 13. However, the two com-
bined for only 10 points in the second
half.

Laing had 10 points and Nutter
nine in the big spurt that turned a
44-43 deficit with 18:07 to play into a
69-50 lead with 3:08 to go.

e Xavier 71, Fordham 56: Justin
Doellman scored 20 points, and
Xavier hit a school-record 15 3-point-
ers in its victory in New York City.

The Musketeers (12-4, 2-0 Atlantic
10) were 10-for-14 on 3-pointers in
taking a 44-15 halftime lead, and the
6-foot-9 Doellman was 3-for-5 from

‘beyond the arc.

The Rams (8-7, 1-2) were 4-for-16

from the field in the first half and
committed 14 turnovers in falling
behind by 29 points.

Stanley Burrell added 18 points for
the Musketeers in their fourth con-
secutive victory. They have won 14 of
their past 15 against Fordham and
lead the all-time series 15-3.

Marcus Stout had 15 points for the
Rams, who closed within 12 points
only twice in the second half.

e George Mason 73, Towson
44: Folarin Campbell had 18 points
and nine assists, and the Patriots won
big on the road, posting their 10th
consecutive victory over the Tigers.

Will Thomas added 16 points for
the Patriots (8-7, 2-3 Colonial Ath-
letic Association). George Mason
improved to 22-8 all-time against
Towson (7-8, 2-3).

Gary Neal led the Tigers, scoring
18 points. :

Towson sustained its most lop-
sided setback of the season. The
Tigers have dropped three of four.

George Mason, the worst 3-point
shooting team in the CAA, converted
nine of 19 attempts from beyond the
arc. Campbell matched a career-high
with four 3-pointers.

Campbell had 10 points in the

opening 20 minutes as George Mason
built a 33-19 halftime lead.

e Hofstra 55, Drexel 53 (OT):
Carlos Rivera hit a jump shot with
36 seconds remaining in overtime,
and Hofstra won in Philadelphia,
snapping the Dragons’ 10-game win-
ning streak.

The Pride (12-4, 5-0 Colonial Ath-
letic Association) scored the last
seven points in the game and won
their sixth game in a row. Hofstra has
won 12 of 13.

Antoine Agudio scored three
points in overtime and finished with
26 for Hofstra, and Loren Stokes
added 13 points.

Dominick Mejia hit four 3-pointers
and scored 21 points for Drexel (12-3,
4-1), which shot a season-low 29.4
percent and lost for the first time in
six home games. Bashir Mason added
13 points.

Frank Elegar, who scored all 10 of
Drexel’s points in overtime, hit a free
throw with 2:56 remaining in over-
time to give the Dragons a 53-48 lead
before Hofstra rallied.

Mejia sent the game to overtime
when he hit three free throws with
13 seconds left to play in regulation,
knotting the score at 48.

Beckham’s commitment to Galaxy should bolster MLS

*DAVID BECKHAM

“David Beckham isa global sports
icon who will transcend the sport of
soccer in America,” MLS Commis-
sioner Don Garber said. “His deci-
sion to continue his storied career in
Major League Soccer is testament to
the fact that America is rapidly
becoming a true ‘Soccer Nation,’
with Major League Soccer at the
core.”

Beckham will become the biggest
star to play soccer in the United
States since Pele and Franz Becken-
bauer played in the now-defunct
North American Soccer League in
the 1970s.

“He’s a cultural icon,” former
U.S. soccer star Alexi Lalas, the pres-




ident and general manager of the Los
Angeles Galaxy, told The Associated
Press in July. “I think that the people
that don’t know a tremendous
amount about soccer know who
Beckham is, whether it’s the way he
looks or who he’s married to or what
he’s done in international soccer.
“The fact is, he’s transcended the
sport.”
The Galaxy opens play on April 8
in Houston against the Dynamo.
“It’s great for the Galaxy. It’s
great for the league,” Real Salt Lake
coach John Ellinger said. “One of his
attractions is he’s still playing well.
It’s a shame it can’t be at the begin-
ning of the season, so you can’t avoid
him. Most coaches are probably say-
ing, “Give me my L.A. games early.”

Beckham’s four-year contract
with Real Madrid expires at the end
of this season. He joined the team
from Manchester United in 2003,
where he had had won six league
titles, two FA Cups and the Champi-
ons League title.

But Beckham, the world’s most
recognized player, hasn’t won a
major trophy since joining Madrid.

“I have enjoyed my time in Spain
enormously, and I am extremely
grateful to the club for giving me the
opportunity to play for such a great
team and their amazing fans,”* Beck-
ham said.

Beckham has been unhappy this .

season at Madrid under coach Fabio
Capello. fie has started only seven of
25 matches, and he was left off the

squad for Thursday’s Copa del Rey
match against Real Betis.

“For the rest of this season, I will
continue to give 100 percent to my
coach, teammates and fans, as I
believe Fabio Capello will bring this
club and its supporters the success
they truly deserve,” Beckham said.

Before the season began, Beck-
ham led England to the quarterfinals
of the World Cup, scoring from a
free kick in the second round to beat
Ecuador 1-0. But he was taken off the
field early in the second half against
Portugal with ankle. and Achilles
tendon injuries, and his team was
eliminated in a penalty shootout.

A day after the game, Beckham
stepped down as captain of the team
— a post he had held for 58 of his

94 international appearances. Then,
on Aug. ll, England coach Steve
McClaren dropped Beckham from
the team altogether, signaling the
end of his international career.

Then came more heartache in
Madrid: Beckham was injured in
November when he was allowed to
travel to Rome to visit movie stars
Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, but
Beckham was forced to skip the
wedding and return to Madrid to sit
on the bench — another sign that his
days in Madrid under Capello were |
numbered.

Beckham and his wife are worth
$169 million, according to Britain’s
Rich List. Beckham alone reportedly
makes about $32 million per year in
salary and endorsements.
PAGE 8E, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 _



WHEN SHE'S DONE
WITH YOU... YOU'LL
BE THE COOLEST
OUY IN, TOWN’














WE'LL. START
IN MEN'S
SPORTSWEAR...
MY. FRIEND
ALISON:
WORKS THERE’







LUANN OPENS THE LETTER
AND READS... ay

“LUAWN, IM
GLAD YOU DECIDEP

70 USE THE
STUDIOS



“70. SAY

“WHILE YOURE THERE, T LOVE You,
r LOVE 7

THINK OF ME SOME-
TIMES. ILL BE
THINKING OF YOU,















©2006 by North America Syndicate, ine. World rights reserved.

BLONDIE

HONEY, HAVE YOU SEEN MY OLD
BOWLING BALL?

GEEZ LOUISE, WHAT: KIND OF
TWISTED LOGIC IS THAT?! 1:






ARE you
FINALLY GOING







AREN'T GOING TO. ,)\
THROW IT AWAY, (683

WEST



#Q 1082
VA63
#Q1052
436



















“NOPE. WUSTA BIT OF
PEANUT BUTTER LEFT
| OVER FROM LUNCH
tO











NO, | DON'T

TAINK | MANE

VERN HIGH -
CTATIONS



GOCOMICS, Cor /POVEEQ ITIL

POT. BY ULVEREAL Boe UOTE

WIL pr @ CASTILE. HET

iy 4
BRN © VALET WE, WO =

TIGER











THERE'S A MAN AT
THE POOR SELLING
STUFF



THE BYE AND
SIN’ NO
THANKS’





Siice 37, Try-St.38, Trade. . ‘
DOWN: 1, Ma-Rio 2, So-meho-w 4, Rain 5, Small-s.6,
M-Ala.-y 7, Beg-un 9, Car 12, Fore-man 14, Ded 16,
PO-red 17, Perth 19, Stunner 20, A-Ct.-or 21, Rated
(trade) 23, Lettars 24, Hooter 25, Tea(-m) 27, Bowls 28,
MaaOut 0" “ene 20 Mu 6199, Hay



Anger 38, Ethos
DOWN: 1, Moral 2, Capital 4, Lout 5, Palace 6, Entry 7,
Flash 9, Cab 12, Bengali 14, Nor 16, Otter 17, Eerie 19,
Steamer 20, Stabs 21, Maine 23, Per cent 24,

Ballet 25, Tar 27, Other 28, Sauce 30, Beret 32, Peso 33,
Hag :



1 Bestlinetotown (5). : 2 Realm in which a nomad may be out Pa
6 Departed, some of us ofine (6)
coming to blows (5) 3 Not a quality, that’s understood (6) hee Pee
© Cross? You'l feel better about h (2,4) | 4 Leased to a bit ofa simpleton (3) Pe ge
10 Quick to put trams into reverse (6) § Alito give a child a name (5) Re eae
11. Pada dom ity wihasatot | @ Gfenane fra Lavin Pee
shuffling stamp (6) CN cg
12 Their attractions may be seen as 7 To get the water out of cameras Red lee
ronda, | wrest a
13 Free use of Braile in poltics (7) | 8 Very best advice atthe summit).
15 Footie) | 22Batlrboy in a t aa
17 Points |had to make to a gir (4) | 23 . The fown Vivien went to (5) ea bi
18 Capers can get you into one (8) 14 Sick at heart, he gets by (6) eal
19 The way to marcti? (5). -—-=-—«|_ 28 Hospital ones due to boxing? (6)
20 Lhe the rose-tnted past, maybe] 16 Exctudebadbroad (6) = | | i
long about half dead (6). "18 That of a Spartan leader at Troy,
22 Leber covering abet? (4) | Pathaps?)
24 As ina London street market? (3) | 28 Won't accept some more saiety NSS :
2 epoca) | : oe
26 Piece of music, quiet, soft and 21° Loutich love for a swimmer (6) Ww 9 — Judge (7)
sentimental (6) 22 Bert's upset about it being sour (6) | ad e aes
2 Figures in a bali game (5) 23 Figure a social worker to be the: N 7 bury
28 Not all great warriors - gcoupant (8): a. 15 Moadow (3)
are fighting (2,3) 28 Run after Charlie East (5): | > 7 Lary (4)
(6
29 Not quite set aside for 26 Something to clear up at the 2 Bae )
oe . 28 seavk iin ai aiabeoice ac 20 Fao
30 A 6) 22° Chime (4
31 aunenaie play (8) 24 Short sleep (3)
‘ 25 hey ia
26 Skinflint
Yesterdiay’s cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 2 an
ACROSS: 3, Prim 8, Bacon (no cab) 10, Melee 11, Ram | ACROSS: 3, Slope 8, Local 10, Angle 11, Rap 12, Built 13, . Cee
12, Final 13, Fired on 18, Lap up 18, Har 19, Sy on-E 21, | Cabinet 15, Arose 18, Ton 19, Scythe 21, Margate 22, Teal Sp Eek
Ro-Bert’s 22, C-law 23, Le-NT 24, H-a-unted 28, Oberon | 23, Peri 24, Bloater 26, Bonsal 29, Mar 31, Steal 32, basket (6)
J - 29, Net31, Rode-0 32, Hea-the-r 94, A-TT-ar 35, Ear 36, | Perched 34, Ulcer 35, Ear 96, Fence 37, a. Molars (5)

COMICS PAGE



‘T COULDNT.GO To SCHOOL TODAY, “CAUSE MY |
MoM WAS AFRAID I'D GINE SOMEBODY MY COLP.

South dealer.
’ Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
#7543
Â¥Q92
A964
#K 10
EAST
@J6

38
$Q872

SOUTH

*AK9

WK7

@K73-

$A9543

The bidding:

West

Opening lead — two of spades.

Assume you’re in three notrump
and West leads a spade. You win
East’s jack with the ace, and the
problem is what to do next.

Actually, there’s only one correct .
way to proceed, and, if you find it,
you get home safe and sound. You
lead a low club at trick two and, after
West follows low, play the ten from
dummy. As the cards lie, this some-

‘Upping the Percentages

Â¥J10854

North — East
Pass -2NT Pass








what irregular finesse makes the con-
tract. You eventually score four club
tricks, two spades, two diamonds and
a heart.

But if you lead a ciub to the king
at trick two, instead of playing the
ten, you are almost sure to finish
down one.

The advantage of playing the ten
from dummy is that you make four
club tricks not only when the suit is
divided 3-3, but also when the suit is
divided 4-2 and West started with the
Q-x, J-x or Q-J-x-x.

These possibilities cannot be
lightly brushed aside. Thus, if you
played only for the clubs to be
divided 3-3 — by cashing the K-A
and continuing with a third club —
you would have only a 36 percent
chance of finding the suit evenly
divided. ‘

But if you play the ten from
dummy at trick two, your chances
improve to about 58 percent because
of the possibility of finding West
with either a doubleton honor or both
honors.

In essence, the outcome of the
hand rests on whether or not you
make four club tricks, and leading to
the ten at trick two offers by far the

best chance of achieving that goal.

ANC =al

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
- one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb forms

ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in

inkjet printer).
TODAY’S TARGET



‘Good 13; very good 19; excellent 25 (or more).

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION

WE APOLOGISE TO OUR READERS

TARGET Answer to Thursday’s

Target not received







Large snrup (4)
Type of nut (6)
12 Custom (5)
13 Buffato (5)

14 Slumber (5)
15 Decrease (5)
16 Fish (5)

18 Allude (5)

19 Current (7)
21. Profession (6)
22 = Scan (6)

23 = Climb (6)

28 Majestic (5)
26 Act silently (4)
28 Encountered (3)

~
og



MY TIGER, IT SEEMS, IS RUNNING ‘ROUND NUDE.
THIS FUR COAT MUST HAVE MADE HIM PERSPIRE. fe
IT LIES ON THE FLOOR- SHOULD THIS BE CONSTRUED
AS A PERMANENT CHANGE OF ATTIRE?

PERHAPS HE CONSIDERS ITS COLORS PASSE,

OR MANBE IT FIT HIM Too SNUG
© WILL HE WANT IT BACK? SHOULD.T PUT IT AWAY ? =
OR USE IT RIGHT HERE AS A RUG?





TRIBUNE SPORTS




© 1990 Universal Press Syndicate



FRIDAY,
JANUARY 12

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20

Someone you care about is -acting
strangely and you need to get to the?
bottom of what is bugging this per-
son. It may take a while, but you’ll
find a resolution. :

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

‘In order'to achieve great things you

need to take risks, Taurus. This is
definitely the week for risk-taking.

You may not be immediately happy-. ate

with the results, but hang in there.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
There’s a side of you that loves
order but the other side thrives on
chaos. Feed your need t» have
things unruly and exciting this
week, Gemini.

CANCER ~ Jun 22/Jul 22

Be true to yourself, Cancer, and stick
to your. guns when someone chal-
lenges what you know to be right.
Pretty soon most will come around
to your way of thinking anyway.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

When you’re faced with a particu-
larly vexing situation this week,

jLeo, you'll find that the answer
f.isn’t nearly as complicated as you
.f-originally thought.

‘F VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

Take note of the little things around
you, Virgo. They will help you
spawn new ideas. Channel your cre-
ative energy into a special project
this week. 3

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23

Take inventory of the relationships
you have that need a little work, Libra.
You may find that you’re spending
time with some people more than oth-”
ers and this is adding to the problem.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Noy 22
This week you need to adjust your
focus to give equal time to both work
and family, Scorpio. It’s easier said
than done, however, when a large
project arises.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
To the surprise of those around you,
Sagittarius, you are able to see and
relate to someone else’s point of.
view. Embrace these feelings and-
make a plan to have more of them.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Are you pining over someone or:

something that seems out of your . >. -

grasp, Capricorn? Find a new. object
of your devotion and you'll feel.
much better. ,

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
There are times when you have to .
put your people-pleasing skills aside
and speak the honest truth, Aquarius.
This week is one of them. Don’t sug- -
arcoat anything.

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20

If you’ve been a bag of emotions
it’s time to reign in those feelings,
Pisces. You can no longer coast
out of control.



CHESS by Leonard Barden

Magnus Carlsen v Luis Galego,
Reykjavik Open 2006. Carlsen,
15, broke the legendary Bobby
Fischer's age record last year as
the youngest ever world title
candidate. He was again
impressive at Reykjavik, missing _
first prize only because of a
final-round blunder and beating
the world number two Vishy
Anand in the blitz tournament.
Here as White (to move) Carlsen
has an extra pawn but Black's
. pieces are quite active and a

long struggle seems in prospect.
However, it took just two turns
for the teenager to persuade his
opponent to resign. What
happened?





LEONARD BARDEN

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

“Aygiau at 0} Buypu0ode +1)Y 40 +LXN b Aq

pamorto} +9UN € 96°"Z J] BYU LON € BN" I +BY

RH) +GUD P SUN +IXO € SHEAR ayy poubisar
yortg Pur jZPYZ Z4X0 i9PYT ‘Twopmos ssaug


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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 22 8:05am. 04
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. i : 1.8 8:02p.m.. 0.2
Saturday 241am. 22 9:05am. 04
: a 2:52p.m. 1.8 8:56pm. 0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterda Sunday 238am. 23 70:03 a.m. 0.3
= ABACO Temperature 3:50pm. 18 9:50pm. 0.1
3 a Hight isisacdsis scene oesteere ree 77° F/25° C : ; 02
High: 75° F/24° C ‘aw 70° FI21° C Monday 4:33 2.m. 24 10:58am. 0.
a seesseceeessnraseersereeeserseseeenens . -46 p.m. | 10: ‘m. 0.0
Low:58°F/14°C Normal high. "77° F/25° C SEP Ve
ZA LA Normal low . .. 65° F/18° C
WEST PALM BEACH Last year’s high etsions 82° F/28° C
LZ High:78°F/26°G Last year’s IOW ....eesseeseesseesees snnssdocsnees 70° F/21° C
ZL : Low:69°F/21°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:57 a.m. Moonrise... . 12:57 a.m.
Za As of 1 p.m. yeSterday accesses 0.00" Sunset....... 5:40 p.m. Moonset . . . . 12:16 p.m.
Vearto:date? c.sccc esse: Peeise ssietiissiteneO:20"
High: 75° F/24°C Normal year to date ............... Sebesticeansbs sveee 0:63" id in
Low:57° F/14°C AA ;
AccuWeather.com (77
All forecasts and maps provided by _ - :
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Jan. 18 Jan. 25 Feb. 2 Feb. 10
NASSAU = =—=—_—CséHigh: 80° F/27°C
Low: 67° F/19°C
KEY WEST 22 CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26°C High: 78° F/26°C
Low: 63° F/21 € 262° F/7°C
- GREATEXUMA = = SAN SALVADOR
Hight 80° F/27° C Hight #1°F/27°C
. igh: 81° F/27
. Low: 69° F/21°C 2 cEHae
‘ . ' Zs Z Low: 66° F/19° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's s Ze
highs and tonights's lows. High: 79° F/26° G Fe
~ Low:67° F/19°G _
see
Today . “Saturday 4 Saturday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low wW High Low W ___ High: 84°F/29°C
FO FC FO F/G ___cLow:67°F/i9°C
Albuquerque 53/11 33/0 c 48/8 24/-4- 712 54/ ACKLINS — Be
Anchorage 21/-6 13/-10_ sf 24/-4 13/-10 Jacksonville 74/23 51/10 75/23 53/11 542 33/0 High = ee E EE
Atlanta 6246 48/8 pe 66/18 51N0 pe KansasCify 35/1 21/6 33/0. 22/-5 50/10 | LAN OL
Atlantic City 5412 45/7 pc 55/12 43/6 c LasVegas = 48/8. 27/-2 41/5 23/-5 38/3 28/-2 te Low: 68° F/20°C
Baltimore © “53M1 44/5 pe 5542 44/6 c LittleRock = 6a/18 55/12 66/18 54/12 68/20 50/10. Leb2°F/I7°C
Boston 50/10 38/3 pe 48/8 33/0 c Los Angeles 55/12 38/3 57/13 38/3 38/3 35/1 4 fs
Buffalo 42/5 32/0 + = 3A 27/2 Louisville «60/15. 49/9 B4A2 49/9 © 23/-5 9/12 20/6 8-13 Cc! GREAT INAGUA
Charleston,SC 69/20 48/8 pe 73/22 51/10 pc Memphis 67/19 58/14 66/18 57/13 71/2 70/21 59/15 c¢ High: 83° F/28°C
Chicago =——i“‘<“‘w GG AA OBS Miami 77/25 67AQ 78/25 66/18 BTAS 58/14 40/4 s_ "Fi 67° F/19°C
Cleveland 48/8 38/2 1 41/5 32/0 + Minneapolis 19/-7 6/-14 19/-7 9/-12 ¢ San Francisco 51/10 51/10 37/2 s - eS
Dallas 679 53/11 t = 626 SIMO ~t ~—Nashville. 6216 Sait c | «GANT Sa2 1 Seattle = 82/0 87/2 28/-2 “pe
Denver 20/-6 6/-14 sn 21/-6 7/-13° sn New Orleans 73/22 62/16 c¢ 74/23 60/15 c Tallahassee 73/22 74/23 53/11 pe
Detroit — 44/6 29/-1 + 34/1 27/-2 ¢ New York «53/114 43/6 pe = 49/9 40/4 c= Tampa 8026 80/26 61/16 = s.
Honolulu 81/27 69/20 pce 81/27 68/20 pc Oklahoma City 50/10 32/0 t - 39/3 344 F Tucson 59/15 51/10 25/-3 pe Re
Houston 74/23 66/18 c¢ 74/22 6216 ¢ Orlando 79/26 58/14 pe 78/25 57/13 $s Washington, DC 59/15 5713 45/7

Partly cloudy and j Breezy with times of Partly sunny and
clouds and sun. breezy. 3 clouds and sun. ; nice. ~
| High: 79°
High: 79° Low: 67° 4 Low: 69°
Neuter lh PY eg atl ig i aie















5
es.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the



Mostly sunny and Warm with sun and






warm. ; some clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 83° i High: 82°
Low: 71°
Mela





































Today



Low W High tow W
F/C FC F/C
743s 88/31 71121 pe.
TI 46/7 6 53/11 49/9 c
ADA 21-2 &. 86/2 26/-3 sn

S21 pe ——«B/18 55/12 s



48/8 s
EES:



8881 7222 s
65/18 55/12 pe
141 -4/-20
84/28 69/20 pe
85/29 70/21 sh
‘7322 563s
49/9 35/1 c





-68/20 r
Copenhagen
Dublin

























Frankfurt 49/9 40/4 c

Geneva — - SIAQ 35/1

Halifax 35/1 21/-6 pe

Havana GIA

Helsinki 21/-6 sn

Hong Kong 59/1

Islamabad

Istanbul

Jerusalem

Johannesburg -

Kingston

London 55/12 50/10 5412 48/8 c

Madrid 467 «34H po 8 — S00 4A pe

Manila 84/28 74/23 pc 86/30 73/22 ¢

Mexico City 5/23, ADA s 725 41s
77/25 59/15 pe 81/27 58/14 pc

3 ='36 217-6 sn «DAFA 10/-12 pe









19/-7
43/6

66/18 53/11 pc 48/8 pc
60/5 44/6 pe ——sBTANG 425 pe
83/28 73/22t _ 83/28. 73/22 pe
9886 76/24 pe A]
90/32 70/21 pc
86/80 «59/15 s
83/28 67/19 c















ee Ber 65/4 Cc x : Fl
29/-1 9/-12 s 30/-1 12/-11 s
a8 330 si 39/3 32/0 sn
84/28 75/23 pe 75/23 61M6 pc
-- 7APY 82A6 pe 71/21 «G26 pe




Tokyo 36/2 pc 44/6 30/-1 pc
Toronte = y-1 sn 31/0 271-2 pe
Trinidad 90/32 73/22 sh 86/30 73/22 t

Vancouver 86/2 27-2 pe 38/3. 29/-1 pe
Vienna 45/7 41/5 pe 52/11 41/5 pe
Warsaw 41/5 34/1 sn 49/9 38/3 c

Winnipeg -3/-19 -17/-27 pc 14/-10 -8/-22 pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

-ABACO





Sota

WAVES VISIBILITY







NASSAU Today: ENE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles ~
Saturday: _ ENE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles

FREEPORT Today:
Saturday:
Today:

Saturda'











[ANN Showers
f = & 4 T-storms

ENE at 10-20 Knots
ENE at 8-16 Knots

ENE at 10-20 Knots
ENE at 10-20 Knots








3-5 Feet
2-4 Feet
4-7 Feet
3-6 Feet

4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles




Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Tai aia ile iin icin con ne

AUTO INSURANCE |

us!

t


PAGE 10E, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007





JAMES Blake of the United States plays a backhand shot in his quarter-final match against Rus-
sia's Eygeny Korolev at the Sydney International tennis tournament in Sydney, Australia, Thursday,
Jan. 11, 2007. Blake won the match 6-1, 6-4.

TRIBUNE SPORTS








Pa

@ BELGIUM'S Kim Clijsters plays a shot in her semi finals match against China's LiNa at the Syd-
ney International Tennis in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Clijsters won the match 6-1,
1-6, 7-5. :

(AP Photo/Rob Griffith) (AP Photo/Rob Griffith).

Blake into semifinals and

Clijsters adva

SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

. DEFENDING champion James
‘Blake defeated Russian qualifier
Evgeny Korolev 6-1, 6-4 Thursday
to reach the semifinal of the Syd-
ney International tournament.

Kim Clijsters advanced to the
final with a 6-1, 1-6, 7-5 win over
Li Na of China. Clijsters, ranked
No. 5, will play Jelena Jankovic,
who upset Nicole Vaidisova 6-4, 4-
6, 6-4. ‘

Blake will meet Jurgen Melzer
in the semifinals after the Austri-
an defeated Tomas Berdych 6-2, 6-
4,

Unseeded Carlos Moya defeated
Marcos Baghdatis 6-1, 3-6, 7-6 (3)
to advance to the semis.

Battling to save his opening ser-
vice game in the third set, Bagh-
datis went down awkwardly on his
left ankle during the sixth deuce
after reaching for a wide ball to
the forehand court.

He was helped back to his chair
by a trainer re-taped the strained
calf muscle. :

The 21-year-old Cypriot had a
chance to serve for the match in
the 10th game but Moya rallied,
forced a tiebreaker and then set
up three match points with a pow-
erful crosscourt forehand winner.
One was all he needed after Bagh-
datis netted a forehand.

Baghdatis said he was confident
the injury would not hamper his
Australian Open preparations.

"No, no, I don't think so, unless
tomorrow I cannot walk," he said,

Nikolay Davydenko was fined
$10,000 Thursday by the ATP for
comments he made about the Syd-
ney International after retiring
Wednesday from his first-round
match with a foot problem.

Davydenko said "nobody cares"
about the tournament, a tradition-
al warmup for the Australian
Open starting Monday.

Blake called Davydenko's
remarks were "silly" and that they
did not represent the view of most
players.

"T play tournaments to go in
‘hinking that I can win them, and
that's the reason I'm playing
here," Blake said. "I hope I get a
chance to hold up that trophy
again. I'm extremely proud that I
won it last year, so I don't think
anyone looks at it as a secondary
title."



ces to final

SOAS NNR





Ny s ‘ y ES

M@ AUSTRIA'S Jurgen Melzer serves during his quarter finals match against the Czech Republic's Tomas Berdych at the Sydney International Tennis in Syd-
ney, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Melzer won the match 6-2, 6-4, ,
(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)



‘) ee

@ CARLOS MOYA of Spain returns a shot during his quater final match against Marcos Baghdatis of Cyprus at the Sydney International tennis tournament,
in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. Moya won the match 6-1, 3-6, 7-6.
(AP Photo/Paul Miller)

/ ) | J




HIGH
LOW




Volume: 103 No.43





eek |
79F |
67F |

ey WINDY WIT
am CLOUDS 8 SUN







|
|



|
1



Chamber chief warns
nation bereft of strategy

for EU, US trade talks
Saat e a tals RI sss Ay tL





She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

Pear atari na agai





FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007







PRICE — 75¢










THA

IN THEIR SEASON OPENER



Election date al

House ‘will be dissolved,

THE House of Assembly will
be dissolved by April 10 and
the date of the next general
election announced soon after,
political insiders revealed to The
Tribune.

The law requires prime min-
ister to give two months notice
before the old election registry
is brought to a close and a 30-
day notice to give the parlia-
mentary registration depart-
ment an opportunity to call up
the new register and get voters
cards out: z “ee

As a result it is expected that
elections will be called in May
or early June.

Elections are not usually held
during Lent and Easter, which
falls on April 7 to 9.

While the prime minister
could call the election earlier
and use the old register, a PLP
insider told The Tribune that
this will not be the case.

The old register, according to
political experts, would be too
“messy” a situation as it is full of
dead persons, people who have
left their constituencies since
2001 and persons who have
moved into new homes.

The PLP used the old register
in 1987, however, which many
political observers said was
done deliberately because the
late Sir Lynden Pindling
thought he was about to lose
the election. :

Meanwhile, according to PLP
insiders, the government is
expected to win the next elec-
tion and Mr Christie’s advisers
are hoping that the momentum
the party will get from the
Majority Rule celebrations and
the commemoration of the
200th year of the end of the
transatlantic slave trade will
“seal the deal” for the PLP.



° 6pc Drumsticks /& Thighs)

announcement soon after’





TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

However, observers from the
side opposite said that the poor
showing of 200 to 300 people at
the Majority Rule ecumenical
service on the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds has shown the
government that the old “tricks
of the past won’t work in a
modern Bahamas”.

“The thing is no one believes
that Majority Rule or even
black nationalism is solely a
PLP thing anymore. You can
be an FNM and celebrate
Majority Rule and emancipa-
tion just as well as.a PLP,” one
FNM insider told The Tribune
yesterday.

This has been part and parcel
of the FNM strategy heading
into the next election, he said.

The insider pointed out that
the PLP has lost steam with the
National Health Insurance issue
because it is supported by the
FNM as well as the celebration
of majority rule.

“Even the prime minister
wasn’t sure this was going to
work. He asked whether the
people would come out last
night. Seeing what he did yes-
terday, no matter what you say
about him he must be a realist,
he must realise that he has lost
support and it is continuing to
dwindle,” the observer said.

Meanwhile, things seem luke-
warm on the political front with
no political party officially
announcing their slate of can-
didates.

The FNM is convinced that
Mr Christie is waiting for Mr

SEE page 10

«

o/2|RegulanFries



0/2) '2022/Drinks)



Ou

Ingraham claims govt's
Majority Rule celebration
was politically motivated

NOT many people turned-up to the govern-
ment’s Majority Rule celebration on Wednes-
day because the Bahamian people realised the
event was politically motivated, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham said. i

Carlton Smith, ZNS general manager and
host of the event, said “hundreds” of Bahami-
ans had turned up. However, according to one
eyewitness, as few as 200 to 300 were present.

“The majority of the people.saw through
their staged political shenanigans,” Mr Ingra-
ham said. “Nassau is fed up with them. Trust

SEE page eight |








Haitian boat a

reretetey

_ FNM leader: govt could not —

care less about fishermen

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE current administration "could not care
less about fishermen" - and the fishermen know
it, claimed opposition leader Hubert Ingraham
at an FNM rally in Long Island last night.

Foreign fishermen poaching in Bahamian
waters have "gone unapprehended," he said,
while criticising the approach government has
taken in addressing the need to allow the stock
of Nassau grouper to be replenished.

He said the FNM was the first governing par-
ty to address the issue of overfishing, and that
they did it "sensibly."

SEE page eight

» . y

WILSONART

INT AA TI a RRIING WILSONART ADHESIVES
LAMINATE FOR COUNTERTOPS & CABINETS

PLUS CABINET KNOBS, HINGES & PULLS!

ar Yi t | .
} 1 ath q ¢ ye
Nk 4 fi , 4

br April 10)

Man shot
after high |
speed chase
with police

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A HIGH speed chase, involv--
ing police and three young men,
ended in disaster on the Eastern
Road when one man was shot
and injured.

According to Police Press
Liaison Inspector Walter Evans,
around 9 pm Wednesday, while
patrolling on Prince Charles
Drive near Sea Grapes Shop-
ping Plaza, officers in a marked
police vehicle noticed the occu-
pants in a black coloured Nissan
Sentra acting in a suspicious
manner. : :

“As the officers approached,
the vehicle sped off and the
police gave chase. During the
chase the vehicle slowed.down
and the rear seat passenger
leaned out of the window and
pointed an object at the police.”

As a result, Inspector Evans

SEE page 10

Lawyer says
Bahamas on
way to being
a failing state

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamas is limping
toward a failing state, lawyer
Maurice Glinton said yesterday
on More FM’s talk show Real
Talk Live, hosted by Jeff Lloyd.

Mr Lloyd questioned the
lawyer as to how the Bahamas
could be described as a coun-
try on its way to be coming a
failed state when, among other
things the economy is good and
there are no massive street
protests over any particular
issue.

However, Mr Glinton said
that this was not what he meant.

“We are not a failed state
because we protest. That is our
duty. We are not a failed state
because we cry out for an expla-
nation from our government.
We are not a failed state
because we appear overly sen-
sitive to the aggressiveness of

SEE page 10




PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



aaa eee
Ensure your business reflects correct image

IN the same way that image
is important to you, the image
your business portrays will have
a definite bearing on your suc-
cess. Whether you are self-
employed or a business owner,
be clear about your image, as it
will have implications regard-
ing pricing, distribution and
promotion.

There are three market areas
you will be competing in, name-
ly high, medium and low-end.
Make sure you know which one
you are competing in.

The characteristics of high-
end are exclusive, up market
and prestigious. The type of
product will tend to be expen-
sive, high quality and selective,

H dyou a
ae woul yee the Bahamian

economy

Essay Contest Rules:

® Explain how you would improve the Bahamian economy

with a smaller number of up-
market customers that can
afford to pay for it. Your prod-
ucts will tend to be distributed
in exclusive locations, with lav-
ish promotions.

The characteristics of mid-
end are value for money, where
your product will tend to be of
good quality and appealing to a



© Competition open to all High School sophomores, juniors and seniors
@ Essays should be 500-1000 wards .
® Essays should be double-spaced

@ Submissions will be accepted via email at kwood07@elmira.edu

Deadline: Monday, January 15, 2007

Please tnelude you name, home address, telephone mumber and personal email address with your essay subniission,

Win 8 33,0 G8Q) cowards an Elmira College education

‘Top ten finalists will be notified by January 19 via email.
Finalists will present their essays before a panel of judges Senaday, February 24, 2007, at the
Sunshine Insurance headqaarcers on Shirley Sereee.

Elmira Cofloge will hold an Open House at the Sunshine Insurance headquarters during the
competition for all interested in studying at che College.

For more information, please contact:

Fanon Wilson, Ditecror of Sunshine Insurance, 242-394-0013
Mike Rogers, Assiseane ro the President, Elimite College, 607-735-1891

Bbnita College Students In Froe Enterprise (EC SIFE) create sustainable positive change by Improving businesses
and organisations through teaching and practicing the principles af free encerprise,



University of the West Indies

Cem ce ccTUU Liam tLe Titec



Cee VA ctedterY mater TCH met LUD)

in association with

Dermatology Association of the Bahamas
Cosmetology Association of the Bahamas

“Causes, Remedies, Prev

~ Symposium/Workshop:

‘A

ention”

British Colonial Hilton
Monday 22nd January, 2007

7:00am - 4:00pm
Pre-registration: $55.00

Onsite registration: $60.00
(Complimentary parking, , workshop materials, lunch and coffee breaks included)

Guest Speaker:

Dr.Neil Persadsingh-Dermatologist
Author of “The Hair in Black Women”

Presenters include:

Dermatology

large group of customers. You
will have a lot of competition.
Your products will tend to be
distributed in various ways,
with branded promotions
emphasising quality and
lifestyle.

The characteristics of low-
end are in the cheap, possibly
discount, mass market, where
your product will tend to be
generic, and probably quite
basic, appealing to a large
group of customers with limited
spending power. Your products

_ will tend to be distributed

through warehouse-type out-
lets, with straight forward pro-
motions emphasising value and
savings.

Only. an antipreneur in the
high-end market would sell
their product at a low price and
distribute through retailers.

Think of what you are trying
to achieve and make your
image reflect it. If your busi-
ness delivers on exclusivity,
design, cheapness, quality, val-
ue, professionalism, reliability,
speed, customer service or con-
venience, make your image
reflect it. Just like UPS created
a unique image for itself, you
too can get the image you
deserve through addressing the
following tangible factors:

Factor 1: Your Business
Name - You must get this right,
as it will be in the forefront of
your customer’s mind. Avoid
names that are difficult to pro-
nounce, that don’t match your
image, or don’t explain what
you do.

Avoid names that clash with
trademarked names, that could
confuse you with a competitor,
or clash with an existing com-
pany or website. Test your
name out on your friends to get
their reaction. If you are
stumped, look at the franchise
section in business magazines
for examples of good names.

Factor 2: Your Strapline, or
slogan is a great way of building
your image. Try and come up
with a catchy slogan that
describes what you do. Mac-
donald’s ‘I'm lovin' it’ and
Nike’s ‘Just Do It’ are two that
spring to mind.





| Business
| Sense

Factor 3: Your Logo is a
good way to project a positive
image that your customers will
remember. A logo is a symbol
that will allow customers to
recognise you easily, as well as

convey something positive’

about you.

Coca-Cola has one of the
most recognisable logos in the
business. That logo and its
branding was recently estimat-
ed to be worth $50 billion. Your
name may never be worth that
much, but it shows you the
financial impact a good choice
of logo and brand name can do
for you.

Get a graphic designer to
help you create your logo. Be
clear about what you want to
achieve. When you have your
logo, put it on your brochures,
letter heads, web sites and
invoices, as well as your staff
clothing, vehicles and signage.

Factor 4: Your Signage is also
an effective way of building
your image. Signs at your loca-
tion, signs directing customers
to your location, and signage
inside your facility all con-
tribute to building your brand.

Make sure your signs are
clear, clean and incorporate
your logos. If you are self-
employed, consider creating a
mobile sign you can take with
you.

Factor 5: Your Location, its
exterior and interior design, will
also be part of your image, so
ensure your premises match
your price point.

Factor 6: Your Packaging will
be an important part of your
image if you are a manufactur-
er, or providing an item that
will be sold at retail.

Take advice from experts in
this area, as packaging is quite a
tricky thing to get right. Your
packaging needs to display the

productzattractively.with nice,

copy, incorporate your logos
and reinforce your business
image. It also needs to be
robust when being handled, and
to protect the product while in
storage and transit.

Your image is a combina-
tion of all the above tangible .
factors, as well as intangible fac-
tors, such as how your staff deal
with customers, and whether
they provide good customer
service. Think these areas
through carefully, and make
sure your overall image sup-
ports your USP and you will be
way ahead of your competition.
If you are an existing business,
scrutinise every aspect of your
image to make sure there are
no conflicting image problems.
If you are setting up a new busi-
ness, then you can work your
image up from scratch.

Don’t be an antipreneur and
make the following mistakes:

* Choosing the wrong price
point for your image

* Choosing the wrong distri-
bution for your image

* Choosing the wrong loca-
tion or premises for your image

* Choosing the wrong busi-
ness name

* Choosing a poor logo,
strapline, signage, design and
packaging

Marketing your business is
an important area, and will
require constant effort to get it
right. So, in order to avoid the
trap of antipreneurship, make
sure you spend time on this
area, as it could pay large divi-
dends for your future business
success.

NB: Adapted from his .
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He

is chief operating officer of |
www.ezpzemail.com, currently

lives in Nassau, and can be con-
tacted at
markalexpalmer@mac.com

~- ©-Mark Palmer.-All rights | _-_.
. reserved sites HeEF OPE ihe

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager

Qualifications:

Bahamas

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).
Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.
Sound experience in global capital markets
Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development

processes.

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment

“Dr. Herbert Orlande!
*Dr. Cleland Gooding
} *Dr. Juliette Hepburn
*Dr. Rosetta Ingraham
*Dr. Valya Grimes

management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual
stock picks

General Requirements/Responsibilities: ;

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Psychiatr
“Dr. Nelson Clarke |

Plastic Surgery
“Dr. Srikanth Garikaparthi |

International Association o Cosmetogly
*Dr Vienna Clarke

*

ane Association of the Bahamas

r. Zelrona Mackey
*Dr. Ida L. Symonette
*Dr. Clifford Humes

Meet chi cuss
UWI Clinical Programme, Shirley Street
Tel/Fax: (242) 356-5289

eases ecco Aecukal skal hou

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux @ FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.




4B | FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007,

GAS

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

____MiamiHerald,com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Tension surrounds NY natural gas plan

BY FRANK ELTMAN
Associated Press

SMITHTOWN, N.Y. — It
would be about as long as the
Queen Mary 2 ocean liner and
would supply enough natural
gas to heat 4 million homes a
year.

And it would be right in the
middle of Long Island Sound,
halfway between densely pop-
ulated areas of New York and
Connecticut.

CONTROVERSIAL

Although years from gener-
ating power, a proposed float-
ing liquefied natural gas termi-
nal is churning up controversy
and uniting politicians, envi-
ronmentalists and activists in
both states.

The proposed $700 million
terminal is part of a growing
national debate over the pres-
ence of liquefied natural gas
facilities in coastal cities. The
issue has affected communi-
ties from Massachusetts to
Texas, as cities grapple over
environmental and security
concerns while also trying to
create more energy infrastruc-
ture to deal with rising

ELECTRONICS

Battle over
two DVD
formats
continues

* HIGH-DEFINITION DVD, FROM 1B

dence by eliminating confu-
sion and fear of choosing the
wrong format,” he said.

Warner Bros., a division of
Time Warner, releases. its
films in both formats, as does
Paramount Pictures, a unit of
Viacom.

Warner said it would start
releasing content in Total HD
format only sometime in the
second half of the year. It also
said the dual-format discs will
cost slightly more.

Warner Bros. hopes other
studios will adopt the solu-
tion. But most remain stub-
bornly in one camp or the
other and show no signs of
budging.

In fact, the three studios
that release only in Blu-ray —
The Walt Disney Co., News
Corp.’s 20th Century Fox and
Sony Pictures — this week
boldly predicted total victory
for their format.

‘FINAL PHASE?’

“The format war’s in its
final phase,” Mike Dunn,
president of 20th Century Fox
home entertainment said at a
Blu-ray press conference.

Universal Studios, a divi-
sion of General Electric, is the

INTEREST RATES

demands.

Natural gas is used to heat
more than 60 million homes in
the U.S. and it is increasingly
important as a source of fuel
for power producers.

Energy demand is espe-
cially robust in the area that
would be served by the Long
Island terminal. About half of
the gas would go to New York
City, the nation’s largest city.
Between 25 and 30 percent is
targeted for Long Island, and
the rest would go to Connecti-
cut — both densely populated
areas.

The proposal also carries
political implications: Former
New York Mayor Rudy Giulia-
ni’s company served as a con-
sultant for the project, and the
likely 2008 presidential candi-
date has visited communities
this week where public hear-
ings were being held on the
proposal.

Meanwhile, Sen. Hillary
Rodham Clinton — Giuliani’s
potential 2008 rival. — has
spoken out against the project.

The debate received
renewed attention this week
as the Federal Energy Regula-



ED BETZ/AP

STRONG PROPOSAL: Former New York City Mayor Rudolph
Giuliani speaks about the proposed Broadwater project,
an offshore liquefied natural gas facility, Wednesday.

tory Commission began hear-
ings on whether to allow
Broadwater Energy — a con-
sortium of Shell Oil, a Hous-
ton-based subsidiary of Royal
Dutch Shell, and TransCanada
Pipelines — to build the termi-
nal about nine miles off Wad-
ing River, N.Y., and 10 miles

south of New Haven, Conn.
Broadwater officials say the
terminal is needed to meet the
growing demand for natural
gas. They site the New York
State Energy Plan, which pro-
jects a 37 percent growth in
statewide natural gas use by
2021; Connecticut forecasts





JAE C. HONG/AP

CLEAR PICTURE, UNCLEAR FUTURE: Show attendees admire Sony’s Blu-ray movie display at
the Consumer Electronics Show. Blu-ray competes fiercely with Toshiba’s HD DVD.

only studio to support HD
DVD exclusively.

Sony revealed at CES that
it met its goal of shipping 1
million Playstation 3 consoles
to North America in 2006.
The company said a survey
showed that 80 percent of
buyers said they will purchase
Blu-ray DVDs to play on their
machines.

Still, there were other signs
of compromise at CES 2007.

LG Electronics, a member
of the Blu-ray camp,
announced a new player that
will accommodate both for-
mats.

The model BH100, dubbed
“Super Multi Blue,” will sell
for $1,199 when it becomes
available next month.

But some observers say
announcements like those
from LG and Warner Bros.,

European Central
Bank: No rate change

* INTEREST RATES, FROM 1B

domestic product data.

The German government
announced earlier Thursday
that the nation’s economy —
Europe’s largest — expanded
by 2.5 percent in 2006, its fast-
est rate since 2000. The
Eurostat statistical agency,
meanwhile, said economic
growth in the euro zone
slowed in the third quarter of
2006, but full-year figures
were not yet available.

The ECB’s forecasts for
euro-zone growth this year
are between 1.7 percent and
2.7 percent, up from 1.6 per-
cent and 2.6 percent issued
last year. For next year, GDP
growth is expected to be
between 1.8 percent and 2.8
percent.

“In an apparent effort to
drive home the point that the
ECB does not intend to raise
rates in February, Trichet
pointedly noted in the press
conference that the ’mood’ of
the ECB Governing Council
had ‘not changed much’ since
December, with the economy
developing in line with the
ECB’s baseline scenario,”
Schmieding said.

While Trichet said euro-
zone inflation is expected to
hover at around 2 percent this
year and in 2008, analysts
expect inflation to rise above
the ECB’s target early this
year and lead to a rate
increase in March.

INFLATION UP MORE?

In Britain, inflation has
been running above the
bank’s 2 percent target for
seven successive months and
is now at 2.7 percent, with
economists predicting a rise
to 3 percent when the Decem-
ber figure is published.

“It is likely that inflation
will rise further above the tar-
get in the near term,” the
Bank of England noted in a
statement saying the rate
increase was needed to con-
trol inflation.

The Bank of England sent
the pound up to $1.9483
against the dollar, compared
with $1.9324 late Wednesday.
The euro fell to $1.2948, an
eight-week low against the
dollar. Higher interest rates
support a currency by making
some assets denominated in
that currency more attractive
to investors.

aren’t necessarily helpful.
“Consumers are aware
there are two formats and
they think ‘VHS versus Beta-
max,’”’ said Phillip Swann,

president of the technology--

oriented website TVpredic-
tions.com.

“Consequently one of the
formats has to go away, either
via the marketplace or a nego-
tiated truce,” Swann added.

PRICE DROP

Swann also believes the
price of players has to come
down to $299 or below before
consumers embrace one
format.

Toshiba makes an HD
DVD model for $499, while
most Blu-ray players sell in
the $1,000 range.

One huge incentive for stu-
dios to resolve their differ-





TORSTEN SILZ/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

MAY RISE: European Central
Bank president
Jean-Claude Trichet
warned that interest rates
may still climb higher.

Many analysts saw the
Bank of England’s move as an
early step to control the
effects of agreements that
could spur higher inflation.

“The surprise value of a
move today may be seen as an
opportunity to derive more
bang per buck. from the
move,” JP Morgan Chase

economist Malcolm Barr said.

For Britons, the bank’s
decision will mean higher
rates on their mortgages, auto
loans and credit cards and
comes after a holiday season
that saw record sales, leading
to fears of defaults on loans.

“We are already seeing a
rapidly growing number of
people falling behind with
mortgage payments and in
some cases threatened with
repossession,” said Peter Tut-
ton of Citizens Advice.

ences may be a slowdown in
the growth of the overall

DVD market. Sales for 2006 °

are expected to be flat,
despite huge numbers for
some titles such as Disney’s
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead
Man’s Chest.

Expect electronics compa-
nies to follow LG’s lead and
introduce dual-format players
this year, says James
McQuivey, a former Forrester
Research analyst who is now
a Boston University professor
specializing in technology
and communications.

“It’s a logjam breaker,” he
said. “It could influence the
studios to release their films
in both formats.

“If that happens, it will
allow some momentum to be
generated. Right now, there
isn’t any,” he said.

AIRLINES

AirTran raises Midwest Air

* AIRLINES, FROM 1B

more consideration than
we’ve gotten so far. We
thought we’d let the owners
decide,” Leonard said.

Carol Skornicka, Midwest’s
senior vice president of cor-
porate affairs, said the airline
had been expecting another
offer from AirTran, but
expected the company to
come back to the board. She
said it was somewhat surpris-
ing that AirTran made the
improved offer “directly to
shareholders at this stage.”

Midwest Air climbed to a
new 52-week high of $13.48
before closing at $13.40, up 50
cents, or 3.9 percent, on the
American Stock Exchange.
Airtran shares rose 48 cents,
or 4.03 percent, to finish at
$12.40 on the New York Stock
Exchange.

The offer consists of $6.625
in cash and 0.5884 shares of
AirTran common stock for
each Midwest share.

‘BEST CARE IN THE AIR’

Midwest Air, which oper-
ates Midwest Airline and
Midwest Connect, promotes
itself as “the best care in the
air,” with its wide leather
seats and chocolate chip
cookies baked on board.

the use of natural gas for elec-
tric generation will hit 47 per-
cent by 2008.

COULD REDUCE PRICES

Broadwater estimates it
will reduce natural gas and
electricity prices by an aver-
age $680 million a year in the
region. The median savings
for customers, according to
Broadwater, will be $300 per
year, a figure critics dispute.

Hundreds of residents
showed up at the hearings,
held in both Connecticut and
Long Island, to let their views
be known on everything from
the environment, security, the
need for alternative energy,
and the potential threat to the
fishing industry in Long Island
Sound.

Giuliani said the proposed
terminal would be “as safe a
facility in design as you could
possibly have.”

He said employees would
have thorough background

‘checks, and the company was

committed to using the latest
security technology available.
He also said the proposed ter-
minal would be far enough

PHARMACEUTICALS

from the New York and Con-
necticut coasts to avoid major
problems in the event of an
emergency.

“Just in case the worst thing
happens, there could be no
impact on the Long Island
shore or Connecticut shore,”
he said Wednesday before a
meeting on the proposal at
Smithtown High School in
Smithtown, N.Y.

But Clinton reacted with
skepticism about the project’s
safety. “The safety and secu-
rity risks involved with this
project have not been
addressed. I am very con-
cerned about ... who will bear
the burden of first response
should an accident occur.”

Natural gas is shipped in
massive refrigerated tankers
after being cooled and con-
densed into a liquid referred
to as liquefied natural gas.
Under the Broadwater pro-
posal, LNG tankers would
dock at the terminal, and the
fuel would be warmed up to a
gas. It would then be pumped
through an existing underwa-
ter pipeline system that serves
Long Island and Connecticut.

Pfizer might make
deeper cutbacks

°* PFIZER, FROM 1B

specifics of its plan at the Jan-
uary meeting, and declined to
comment on speculation
about what the cuts may
include.

Kindler cut 20 percent of
Pfizer’s sales force, or 2,200
jobs, in December. The com-
pany has fired more than 5,325
employees mainly in manu-
facturifig, sales and.research
as of @ét. 1, the company said
in a regulatory filing. ~~

Among the cuts Pfizer may
be announcing is a 30 percent
decrease in the company’s
sales force outside the U.S, or
more than 6,000 jobs, saving
$800 million in annual costs,
said Bank of America analyst
Chris Schott in a report .

While it cuts its staff,
Pfizer has also been increas-
ing efforts to license products
from other companies with
some of the $30 billion it has
on hand. Pfizer has entered
into at least six agreements
with biotechnology compa-
nies since December, includ-
ing three this week, as it hunts
for the next medicine capable
of reaching $1 billion in
annual sales.

Pfizer may see generic
competition as early as 2010
for its Lipitor cholesterol pill,
the world’s top selling drug.

Pfizer was counting on
replacing sales of Lipitor with
torcetrapib.. Without that
product, Pfizer doesn’t have
enough drugs in development

Some passengers. and
shareholders fear those
touches might end if AirTran
is successful in its takeover.

But Leonard said a merger
would create a more competi-
tive company in the changing
airline industry and provide
better service to underserved
cities such as Milwaukee and
Kansas City.

NO GAS GUZZLERS

He told investors in a con-
ference call that the combined
company would have more
modern equipment, coast-to-
coast service with multiple
hubs and no “gas guzzling”
aircraft like those he said
Midwest currently operates.

Helane Becker, a transpor-
tation analyst with Bench-
mark of New York, said Air-
Tran and Midwest seem to be
a good fit.

LATE TRADING

to replace the estimated $14
billion in sales it will lose
from generic competition to
Lipitor, analysts have said.

“We project that the cur-
rent late-stage pipeline will
generate more than $7 billion
in sale from 2011-2012,” said
J.P. Morgan analyst Chris Shi-
butani, who carries Star-
mine’s top rating, in a Jan. 3
research report. Analysts also
expect Pfizer to lose pate
protection through 201] on
five other drugs with $8.69
billion in 2005 sales.

“Pfizer’s plans to cut its
U.S. sales force by at least 20
percent offers an opportunity
for companies with large pri-
mary care sales force to fur-
ther reduce headcount,”
Susanna Matter, an analyst
with Leerink Swann & Co. in
Boston, said in a Jan. 3 note to
clients.

GlaxoSmithKline and San-
ofi-Aventis would benefit the
most from sales job cuts, Mat-
ters said.

Bayer said in November it
would cut more than 800 U.S.
jobs, many in research, after
completing its purchase of
Schering. The move will save
Bayer $210 million a year by
the end of 2008.

Lilly announced in late
2005 that it aimed to trim $250
million in costs this year and
cut staff by 6 percent. Last
year Merck began eliminating
7,000 jobs and closing plants
to reduce $5 billion in costs
by 2010.

bid

“There’s a lot of synergies
that AirTran can get in this
transaction.... You don’t
need two CEOs, two CFOs,”
she said.

Representatives from the
Air Line Pilots Association
met this week with AirTran
executives, according to
Jerome G. Schnedorf, chair-
man of the Midwest Airlines

unit, which includes about
380 pilots. It planned to meet

Dat





a a

me

Gooey

r

EO we eee 0 0 ee ete ae ea a Ew

i



he

ee

with Midwest Air next week. - |

Schnedorf said the union
has taken a neutral stand on
the AirTran bid at this point.
A closer look at AirTran’s
detailed economic plan is
needed before it can be seri-
ously evaluated, he said.

“You have to really look at
things at that level and not
have an emotional reaction to
what might appear to be a
good thing,” he said.



4 6:35 p.m. Late 4 6:35 pm. Late

Stock Tk. cose close Chg. volume | Stock Th. doe dose Chg. vee
Oracle ORCL = 17.39 1733-06 = 146565 VeritDGC = VTS. 83.33 8331 = -.02 $900
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 45.08 45.10 +02 47355 | DUIADiam DIA 12499 12499 * S747
Timewarn TWX — 22.62 22.57 -.05 ATLA LSI Log LSI 9.84 9.84 . 4990
Hertzn = HTZ-— 16.69. 16,70 = +01 26639 SunMicro. =SUNW 6.14 613 OL 4728
SPDR spy 142.16 142.19 +03 17663 | yahoo YHOO 2920 2919 -01 4501
Microsoft MSFT 30.70 30.70 * 16284 | ishaknya WM 7823 «7816-07 AT
Level3 LT 6.48 6.48 . 13235 SanDisk SNDK 43.80 B55 6 4005
AMR AMR (37.94 37.95 +01 12171 ch :

rmSh CHRS = 13.99 = 13.99 3961
Aspent pfA AHLpA 25.68 25.72 +04 = 12000 XLC x
Metlifeun MEU = 31.54 (31.54 * 7718 apun XLpQ 23.00 23.04 +04 STR
QwestCm 8.38 8.40 +.02 7625 GnMotr GM 30.86 38 = * 3R
ConAgra CAG = 27.44 27-40-04 6161 Cytyc CYTC 29.19 2920 +01 «| (3889
Consco pfB CNOpB 25.12 2519 +07 ~~ 6000-*| Blockbstr —BBI 6.16 658 +4 383



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



‘
t
THE TRIBUNE



’

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 5B

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,

Colinalmperial gains
A-(Excellent) rating

COLINAImperial Insurance
Company yesterday sww its A-
(Excellent) financial strength
rating reaffirmed by the lead-
ing international insurance rat-
ing agency, largely as a result
of having the largest share of
the Bahamian life and health
insurance market.

A. M. Best also reaffirmed
Colinalmperial’s ‘a-’ issuer
credit rating, with the outlook
for both ratings pegged at ‘sta-
ble’. ©

Agency

The rating agency said its
actions “reflect Colinalmperi-
al’Sic.c. ese adequate risk-
adjusted capitalisation, con-
servative reserving practices
and its leading life/health mar-
ket share in the Bahamas.

“As the life/health market
leader and having operated in
the Bahamas for.over 40 years,
ColinaImperial has established
strong brand name recognition.

A.M. Best said the company
was looking for “opportunities
to develop new geographic

markets, while identifying
prospective acquisitions to
expand its distributive capaci-
ty and improve economies of
scale. Colinalmperial's current
financial position, operating
performance and scale reflect
the successful integration of
several acquisitions in recent
years”.

However, it added that off-
setting these strengths were
Colinalmperial’s reliance on
the Bahamian market, this
market’s relatively mature
standing, integration chal-
lenges over its acquisitions and
“the level of financial lever-
age” at.its parent company,
A.F. Holdings, the successor
to the Colina Financial Group
(CFG).

Montgomery Braithwaite,
Colinalmperial’s president,«
said in a statement yesterday:
“Along with last year’s finan-
cial results and the recent div-
idend payment made by our
parent company to sharehold-
ers, today’s A- (Excellent) rat-
ing encourages the entire Col-
inalmperial family.

WANTED

“It also confirms that our
financial strengths and com-
mitment to serving our policy-
holders form a sound founda-
tion which translates to the
benefit of our shareholders and
policy owners alike.”

Underpinning its ratings
were, A. M. Best said, Coli-
nalmperial’s positive earnings
in recent years, despite having
to incur acquisition and ihte-
gration costs involving the
Global Bahamas, Life of Bar-
bados and Capital Life, Cana-
da Life and Imperial Life pur-

chases.
Added

The rating agency added
that if felt Colinalmperial
would achieve greater prof-
itability going forward as it

achieved synergies from its ,

operations, while risk-adjust-
ed capitalisation “remains
more than adequate relative
to its investment and insurance

risks despite its conservative
reserving practices”.

Following an almost two-
year integration process after
the Imperial Life purchase,
Colinalmperial’s net income
for the three months to Sep-
tember 30, 2006, more than
tripled from $551,421 the year-
before to $1.189 million. For
the first nine months of its cur-
rent fiscal year, net income has
more than doubled to $4.011
million, compared to $1.834
million the year before.

Colinalmperial Insurance
Company saw its net settled
first year premium income
increase by 35 per cent for the
year to November 2006.

Colinalmperial is a wholly-
owned subsidiary of BISX-list-
ed Colina Holdings.

Colina Holdings is 63 per
cent majority-owned by A. F.
Holdings, the holding firm for
the group’s two principals,
Emanuel Alexiou and Antho-
ny Ferguson.

Legal Notite

NOTICE

AHVAZ INC

read Insight od Mondays

4 Qtrs. Restdueant &
Sporting rae

Come and pets 2 aoyesanas
Experience the SA we wd
Newest Sporting Fi

Lounge in the South

Located:

Off East Street
South
Sapodilla Blvd. &
Joan’s Hgt’s.

Ph: 242- 392-3687 ;
“Featuring Oral Hudson”

Karaoke Night

Starting
Monday Jan. 15 from 8: pmn—12: am

RocLand D.J.

Friday & Saturday Nights
Old School Music

Hours of Operation:
OPEN EVERYDAY
12: Noon Until

CY



ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The Entrance Examination for St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport and
St. Andrew’s School, Exuma will take place on Saturday,
February 3rd, 2007 at 9:00a.m. ,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AHVAZ INC has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Store Manager &
Sales Associates

Applications can be collected from the Schools between the
hours of 8:00a.m. and 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

Small Retail Store Specializing in girls accessories 1s
seeking a dynamic, energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager with prior retail managerial experience
to handle all aspects of store operations.

Applications Forms and $25.00 Applications Fee must be
returned to the School no later than Friday, January 26th, 2007

Vacancies

St. John’s College is. now accepting Applications for the
students from Kindergarten through Grade Six. Kindergarten
screening will begin during the second week in February

Only persons 30 years and older need apply.
Vacancy also exists for sales associates,
Please send resumes by e-mail to
ecooke@coralwave.com

Phone:394-7019

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

SENIOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Information Technology

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands. Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Information Technology
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Information
Technology.

Core Responsibilities

® Develop. maintain, support and optimize the organization's network
infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communsications, and
telecommunications systems.
Ensure hardware and software is maintained and data is secured through
proper back-ups and staff training.
Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentation to

secure procedures and prevent system failure. This includes FT Disaster
Recovery / Business Continuity plasning,

Provide management and direction for end-user support function in support of
business operations, inclusive of management of the Help-Desk function,



Manage and direct software, hardware, network, telecommunications and web
providers to enhance operational efficiencies and ROT based on the bank's
business objectives.

Date and Starting Time: Saturday; January 13, 2007 at 6.30a.m.

pe tiins Registration Fee: $5.00 Adults
Desired Qualifications

Entry Deadline: January 12, 2007
For additional information, please contact Tel. 302-4525 or 302-4592

* Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well recognized
university. ‘

A minimum of five years progressive professional IT experience preferably in
the Financial Services Indastry.

IT based training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from
accredited institutions will be advantageous.

Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs:
telecommunications, Web-based applications, client-server applications, and



“Fenvals fe

Walker]

PC-based software applications. Runner [ ] Male [ ]

Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows XP, Under-i4[ ] Under-20[.] Under30[ ] Under4do[ ] Under50[ ] Under60{ ] 60Plus[ ]
Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Office and Microsoft Exchange Server

se RUNNERS

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills.

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to U.E. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge, Prospect Ridge to J.F. Kennedy Drive
to Gladstone Road junction, Gladstone Road junction back to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road,

Closing Date: January 26, 2007 Tucker Road to the back entrance of The College of The Bahamas

WALKERS

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge,
Prospéct Ridge to J.F Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road, Tucker Road to the back entrance of The
College of The Bahamas ~

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@ butterfieldbank. bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs





Race Committee will not be held responsible for injuries incurred.

Signature of Waiver:

x

Butterfield Bank







= PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007 .

CONTAINER PORT, from 1B

“The context of that is particu-
larly important when you think of
the 783 persons employed here,

and I am told that Chris Grey is .

the only non-Bahamian employed
on this site. That deserves a round
of applause.”

US Ambassador John Rood
said the new CSI programme,
which allows for containers to be
pre-screened at Freeport Contain-
er Portefor entry to the US for
security purposes, will also allow
quicker turnaround of containers
for shippers.

“The Bahamas benefits, as CSI
provides a competitive advantage
to the Freeport Container Port by
allowing containers shipped to
quickly enter into commerce in the
United States,” Mr Rood said.

He explained that containers not
screened before reaching the US

FRAUD, from 1B

to allow those involved “to conceal
and transfer the illegal proceeds from
their stock manipulation scheme”.
Labella than directed that “certain
amounts of money” be deposited into
their Bahamas-based bank accounts
that were likely held at Leadenhall
Bank & Trust, Axxess’ former bank-
ing partner that is now in liquidation.
The US Attorney’s Office in New

must wait days - and sometimes
weeks - before they can be
released.

Freeport Container Port expe-
rienced a 26 per cent growth in the
number of TEUs (20-foot equiva-
lent units) that it handled during
the first six months in 2006, indi-
cating its potential as a
logistics/transportation/distribution
centre for the Americas.

Hutchison Whampoa, which
holds a 60 per cent stake in the
Container Port via its Hutchison
Port Holdings subsidiary, said in
its results for the six months to
June 30, 2006, that the Freeport
facility was among the “major con-
tributors” to growth in TEU
throughput.

Hutchison Whampoa’s 2005
annual report showed how
Freeport Container Port had

Jersey alleged that the funds deposit-
ed in Montani’s Bahamian bank
accounts “included the excessive com-
missions he earned from brokering
sales of Eagletech and Select Media
Communications to the selected
investors, and from the liquidation of
stock he held in the Bahamas”.

The indictment also alleged that
the credit/ATM cards issued by Lead-
enhall, and administered by Axxess
International, were used to conceal
the proceeds of the scheme and other

MANAGER, BANKING & CUSTODY

BANKING DEPARTMENT

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

picked up in 2006 where it left off
last year.

The Container Port processes
1.115 million TEUs during the
2005 full year, an increase of 6 per
cent upon the previous year.

Derek Newbold, Hutchison Port
Holdings (Bahamas) sales and mar-
keting manager, said in early 2006
that the Container Port expected
“to exceed” in 2006 the 1.115 mil-
lion throughput TEU volume that
it processed in 2005, with its parent
company looking at investing $572
million in the port’s long-term
expansion.

Mr Newbold added then that
the Freeport Container Port had
“a lot of room for growth and
opportunity”, having developed “a
very comprehensive expansion
plan”.

The potential Phase V North
Berth expansion would see an
additional 450 metres of capacity

income from the IRS.

It claimed that Labella failed to
report and disclose the income
received through the Axxess cards on
his personal tax return for the years
1999-2001, something Montani also
did.

After the IRS detected Montani’s
use of his Axxess card, he and, Label-
la “prepared and back-dated a bogus
retention loan agreement for presen-
tation to the IRS to cover up their
past efforts to conceal income from
the IRS”.

and nine blocks stacking area,

while Phase VI could lead to a fur-
ther 340 metre expansion of the
North Berth.

And Phase VII might see a 335
metre Berth expansion and three
blocks stacking area. Another 600
metre area was also available for
expansion.

When completed, all this expan-
sion would give Freeport Contain-
er nine berths - with total docking
length of 2,749 metres - 30 quay
cranes, a 4.5 million TEU capacity,
and create employment for 650
workers. 2

Mr Newbold said this did not
include a possible eighth Phase. of
expansion, which would require
dredging and land reclamation at
Billy Cay.

Ata cost of more than $200 mil-
lion, this could provide 1,219
metres in berth space and 12 quay
cranes on a 42-hectare site.

The case against Montani again
shows that the credit card portfolio
administered by Axxess/Leadenhall
had become something of a reputa-
tional risk for the Bahamas’ financial
services reputation by the time the
latter’s issuing licence was pulled by
MasterCard in summer 2004.

Numerous US court cases involving
tax evasion, fraud and money laun-
dering have detailed how the credit
cards were used at some point in these
schemes.

The manipulation scheme also

e aintenance Personne
Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and
some electrical.
Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience

and must provide references.

Only 1 per cent of the containers
handled by the Freeport Contain-
er Port were destined for the
Bahamian markets, with the
largest share - some 44 per cent -
going to South America, and
another 32 per cent going to Mex-
ico and the US Gulf Coast.

Freeport Container Port,.which
was Officially opened in July 1997,
comprises a total land area of 3,400
acres (1,036 metres of berths) with
15.5 metre depth alongside, 10
Super Post Panamax Quayside
Gantry Cranes, 2 Gottwald Mobile
Harbour Cranes, 50 Straddle Car-
riers, Navis Operating System, 49
Hectares/118 acres of Stacking
Area, 16 metre/52 feet in Channel
& Turning Basin. ;

Freeport:Container Port is
strategically located to serve as a
major world'container transship-
ment hub between the Eastern

Gulf Coasts of. the United States, .

involved a Bahamas-registered com-
pany, Lloyds Bahamas Securities. The
plot began in April 1999, when the
founder of Eagletech, a publicly-trad-
ed US company, sought Bryn Mawr’s
assistance in issuing 10 million shares
in the firm for a price of $1.2 million.

The capital was raised by Montani

and others purportedly selling the

shares to a small group of selected
investors, but the stock was never
issued to these people despite their
money being taken. 5
In fact, these shares were issued to
Montani’s co-conspirators, who then
managed to obtain control of 90 per
cent of Eagletech through causing the
company to carry out reverse stock
"splits undisclosed to other investors.
Letters from the Bahamian entity,
Lloyds Bahamas Securities, were used
to reassure the outside investors that
they owned the Eagletech shares,
when they did not.
Montani received undisclosed com-
misisons of 25 per cent for selling the

THE TRIBUNE

the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean,
South America, and trade lanes to
European, the Mediterranean, Far
Eastern and Australasian destina-
tions.

Prime Minister Christie, who
was pleased about the prospects
of expansion at Freeport Contain-
er Port, said the future holds great
prospects for the country, and even
more benefits for Bahamians.

He added that according to the
projections of the International
Monetary Fund (IMF), the
Bahamas economy is projecting a
6.5 per cent growth, and at the end
of the budget year going forward, a
6.7 per cent growth.

“That is also is here in Grand ,
Bahama. This country of ours, with
$8 billion of capital inflows, is
enjoying unparallelled success, and
the word unparalleled means cap-
ital you cannot find and equal in
the world,” said Mr Christie.

Eagletech shares to the investors.

This stock was transferred by
Labella to brokerage accounts with
Lloyds Bahamas Securities, and then
sold back into the market via a ‘pump
and dump’ scheme with the selling.
brokers earning commissions of ©
between 30-50 per cent.

The US Attorney alleged that
Montani and his colleagues “obtained
millions of dollars from the manipu-
lation of Eagletech stock”, which was
sold to unsuspecting investors via the
Lloyds Bahamas Securities accounts
for between $0.70 per share to $14
per share. Exactly the same scheme
was employed in relation to the Select
Media Communications stock, with
4.5 million shares obtained by Mon-
tani’s colleagues, giving them control
of 90 per cent of the stock.

The Select Mediz: Communications
stock was then sold back to the invest-
ing public via the brokerage accounts
at Lloyds Bahamas Securities, which
was beneficially owned by Labella.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a°
record of professional achievements to join our dynamic Banking Services team.
The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experince.

Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107

EMPLOYMENT
0) yt) ae a



Core Responsibilities

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SMITH FLORVIL OF
CORAL LAKES, TUNA LANE, P.O. BOX NP-4911, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











© To manage and contro! the banking and custody departments of the Bank ina
cohesive, well organized and risk oriented manner.

VILLAGO
RESTAURANT

To effectively manage the Relationship Management Team of both banking
and custody so as a first class service is offered to all clients ina proactive
manner.

To assist with the development and implementation of new products and
systems.as may be required in order to furiher enhance productivity and
efficiency.

To work closely with the Assistant Manager of Operational Risk

Management to ensure procedures and processes remain fully in line with the
group's strategy relating to Enterprise & Operational Risk.

Seeks to employ professional

Waiter and Waitress

To ensure, at all times, the banking and custody operations are effectively
managed to ensure processing of all deposit and payments, foreign exchange
and security transactions are earried out technically correct, without error and
within procedures. ‘ ayviayd

PORTE Ee tinge

‘Must be well-groomed.
Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation —
Must be able to work flexible

hours

To ensure full aware of all applicable laws, regulatidns, bank policies'and:
procedures and that they are implemented effectively on a day to day basis
within the department.

To assist in the preparation of the banking and custody budgets and for the
effective management of revenues and costs.

Desired Qualifications
Relevant Degree or related discipline from a well recognized university.

A minimum of ten years progressive Banking/Custody experience in the
Financial Services Industry.

Send Resume to:
Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax to: 327-0966

A good proven background in professional and experience client facing role
High degree of awareness and compliance orientation ©
Proficient in Microsoft Office snite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving. project management
and customer service skills.

Closing Date:January 26, 2007

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242 .
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment @ butterfieldbank. bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs



SS SSE GCCGGECKG
HRIST orn HEART |

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Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

For the 2007/2008 School Year will be
held on January 13, 2007 at 8:00 am
at Kingsway Academy High School,
located on Bernard Road.

’



Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
11 Janua
AG fl
BESTS WII WN AC SEK \\\
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank 12.6
Consolidated Water BDRs 35.5
Doctor's Hospital R 7 : : 8.5
Famguard 10.5
Finco 15.7
FirstCaribbean. « 15.7
Focol 7 : < z 8.5
Freeport Concrete N/M
ICD Utilities 13.5
8.52 J. S. Johnson 14.6
oe ee a ee caiicid 00 00... mswsseaies ren . i ie ecu
Ee daly Over ine Counter Seciities : ee
mbo! i P/E Id

e

10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.05
1.64
9.00
4.12
2.26
5.54

10.70

10.90

10.00
0.50
7.15

14.0
24.4

The examination is for those
students wishing to enter grades 7-10.



Application forms are available
at the High School Office. The
application fee is thirty dollars
($30.00), to be made payable at
Kingsway Business Office on or before

Friday, January 12, 2007



12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
2 isiaiiaias 0.20 RND oldi
LLL
: 28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings



Yield %
1.321587*
2.9728*°""
2.500211**
1.217450****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

2.6262

2.3220

1.1495
10.0000



For Further
information Call

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask.$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINIDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

* - 29 December 2006
** 34 December 2006
*** - 31 December 2006
“*** _ 34 December 2006

324-8811 or 324-3409

2006


t. tg '4 £9.77 %
+ OH BP eg

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007, PAGE 7B



eee eee eee eee

FROM page 1B

governing trade between the
EU and the Caribbean, which
in theory lasts until 2020 but, in
reality, will finish at the end of
this year. ;

Cotonou is being replaced
because it is non-compliant
with World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO) rules, as the pref-
erences and benefits it grants
are all one-way for the advan-
tage of Caribbean nations.

EU states receive no bene-
fits, and other WTO members
have complained that Cotonou
grants Caribbean nations not
made available to them, mak-
ing it discriminatory and non-
WTO compliant.

The EPA, instead of a one-
way flow of benefits, will
involve reciprocal treatment
for EU members, meaning that

--in return for granting Bahami-

an exports tariff-free access to
their markets, they will want
their producers to be able to
export to the Bahamas tariff-
free. ;

Mr Archer told The Tribune
on Wednesday that the Gov-

Bahamas ‘caugh

ernment currently earns $10
million per year from import
duties on European goods
coming into the Bahamas, so
the EPA talks outcome has
important implications for the
Bahamian tax system.

Mr Lowe told The Tribune
that securing duty-free market
access for Bahamian exporters
via the EPA talks was “100 per
cent critical”.

He added that “50 per cent
of our seafood catch” went to
the EU market. If duties were
imposed, “it will no longer be
competitive in the market
there is it is subject to tariffs.
We would have to shift that
output to another market, and
will get less money from it”.

Reciprocity

Mr Lowe said the reciproci-
ty required by the EPA would
also potentially require a “100
per cent revision of our cur-
rent tax structure”.

He added that the Bahamas
would have to decide whether
it remained outside agree-
ments such as the EPA entire-
ly, allowing it to continue bas-

. ing its tax system on import

and customs duties, or if it was
going to participate and switch

to a more “sustainable and bal-
anced” structure.

“It’s reciprocity in all
regards,” Mr Lowe said of the
EPA. “Whether it’s goods and
services, bank secrecy, gov-
ernment procurement, trans-
parency in government, it’s all
about reciprocity.

“These are not simple trade
agreements. These are multi-
level agreements.”

And it was not just the EPA
where reciprocal preferences
and benefits were required.
The Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI), which allows products
from the Bahamas to enter the
US duty-free, is also under
pressure at the WTO from
Paraguay, which is blocking
the renewal of its waiver on
the grounds that the Caribbean
is getting benefits its exporters
do not.

Mr Lowe said any replace-
ment of the CBI would be
based on the trade agreement
signed between the Central
American Free Trade Area
(CAFTA) and the Dominican
Republic on one hand, and the
US on the other.

This would also involve the
Bahamas, if it signed on to any
such deal, providing recipro-
cal benefits and preferences to

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of

US exporters sending goods to
this nation.

This could have huge impli-
cations for the Bahamian tax
system, as this nation imports

most of its goods from the US.
If many of these are required
to enter duty free, this would
force this nation to reform its

tax structure.



t with pants down’

“The US has basically said
that any further agreement will
be modelled on CAFTA-DR,”
Mr Lowe said. “It’s reciprocity
once again.”

With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands and
the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial services
group offering a comprehensive range of insurance services, domestic
and international banking, estate planning, pension services and corporate
finance as well as other financial products and services. Fidelity is now
inviting applications for a:

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS COUNTRY MANAGER—

INSURANCE OPERATIONS

Reporting directly to the VP & Regional Marketing Mana ger, the

Powerpoint

successful candidate will have the following minimum requirements:-

Business related Bachelor’s Degree Qualification
Professional Insurance Qualification, i.e. FCIL, ACHE or CPCU
Ten years relevant insurance experience

Proven track record in new business development

Self motivated in addition to being an excellent team leader
Excellent organizational and analytical skills

Strong computer literacy in Microsoft Word, Excel &

Ability to relocate and reside in the Turks & Caicos Islands
Ability to prepare & deliver high level presentations

e Knowledge of the local insurance market would be an advantage

The successful applicant will manage Fidelity’s Turks & Caicos

Insurance operations and will focus on new business development as well
as maintaining & developing existing client & carrier relationships across
a broad range of products & services.

An attractive compensation package that includes a large performance
related component, plus a comprehensive range of employee benefits and
relocation allowance is being offered.

Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
others area of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high
performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance

and provident fund benefits.

TCI COUNTRY MANAGER -INSURANCE OPERATIONS



The deadline for applications is January 31st 2007.

TCI Country Manager—Insurance Operations

SteppingStones Recruitment

P.O. Box 10091

Grand Cayman KY1-1001

Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836

Email jobs@steppingstonesca viman. com

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of

GLOBAL FEE
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated

recovery management. The successful candidate will also be

responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
management, maintenance of all fee agreements, as well as
document management including filing and imaging of
correspondence.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting,
Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three
(3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution.

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution, |
communication, organization and pc skills. The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR

Email: betty.roberts@citigroup.com

Deadline for application is Friday, January 19, 2007.



\

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66157
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66938
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65979
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66692
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65807
65856
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65785
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66005
65415
65866
65874
66480
66085
65133
65962
65144
66160
65328

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PAGE 2E, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 2007

Leevan



#@ DAVID BECKHAM
(AP FILE Photo)

Beckham

looks like
a perfect

fit for Los
Angeles

â„¢ SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

ROLL out the red carpet,
Hollywood. The David Beck-
ham show is coming to town.

It’s not “Bend it Like
Beckham” this time, though.
It’s more like “Spend it Like
Beckham.”

The most recognized play-
er on the planet — fashion
icon, tabloid fixture, market-
ing giant and husband of a
former Spice Girl — is taking
his game and fame to Tinsel-
town, and he’s going to be
earning an estimated $250
million for the five years of
his contract.

The 31-year-old former
England captain agreed to a
deal Thursday to play for the
Los Angeles Galaxy of
Major League Soccer, turn-
ing down a two-year contract
extension from Real Madrid
for a chance to lift soccer’s
profile in the United States.

“There are so many great
sports in America,” the for-
mer Manchester United star
said. “There are so many kids
that play baseball, American
football, basketball. But soc-
cer is huge all around the
world apart from America;
so that’s where I want-to
make a difference with the
kids.”

Beckham, who has failed
to win any major titles in 3
1/2 seasons in Madrid, said
the time was right for a
change.

“I’ve played now for two
‘of the biggest clubs in the
world and played at the high-
est level for 15 years, and
now I: think that I need
another challenge,” Beck-
ham said.

Beckham will become the
biggest star to play soccer in
the United States since Pele
and Franz Beckenbauer
played in the now-defunct
North American Soccer
League in the 1970s.

The Galaxy, citing indus-
try experts, said the LA deal
is worth more than $250 mil-
lion in salary and commer-
cial endorsements — about
$1 million a week — and is
“thought to be the biggest in
sporting history.”

“David Beckham is a glob-
al sports icon who will tran-
scend the sport of soccer in
America,” MLS commis-
sioner Don Garber said.

Beckham and his pop star
wife, Victoria, should fit in
just fine in LA. Beckham
opened a soccer academy in
Carson, California, last year,
and Victoria was pho-
tographed house-hunting in
the area.

A celebrity who draws
paparazzi like a movie star,
Beckham and his wife regu-
larly find their way onto
tabloid and magazine covers,

With trendy clothes, rotating :

hair colors and styles and a
glamorous wife, he’s the epit-
ome of the modern mix of
celebrity and athlete. He’s
even had a movie named
after him: “Bend it like Beck-.
ham.”

His soccer skills are only
part of the equation, He’s
David Beckham Inc., a multi-
national corporation with
links to Pepsi, Gillette,
Motorola and Adidas.

MLS even changed its
rules on salary caps, clearing
the way for Beckham to sign
the lucrative deal and
become the first player to be
signed under the new rule,

“I’m going out there to
hopefully build a club and
team that’s got a lot of poten-
tial,” Beckham said. “I think
that’s what excites me.”

Los Angeles opens its sea-
son April 8 in Houston, but
Beckham is not expected to
join the team until August.
His four-year contract with
Madrid expires at the end of
this season.
















i
t
i

-beensuspended. vive: 4

back ir

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

LEEVAN ‘Superman’ Sands
is getting ready to soar again.

Sands is hoping to bounce
back this year after he was hit
with a three-month suspension
from the International Amateur
Athletic Federation that kept
him grounded for the entire
outdoor season.

After spending some quiet
time home with his family and
friends during the Christmas
holiday, Sands is back at
Auburn University in Alabama
training under the watchful eyes
of his coach, Henry Rolle.

“Training has been going
good. I think coach thinks ’m
more ready than I was last year
and the year before,” Sands
reflected. “So, I think this year,
I’m a little more hungrier.

“T have something to prove, I
haven’t gotten a (shoe) contract
yet, so I have to go out there
jumping to get a contract
again.”

The 26-year-old Sands said
the three-month ordeal that
banned him from competing at
the IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships in Moscow, Russia
and the Commonwealth Games
in Manchester, England, as well
as the Central American and
Caribbean Games, was devas-
tating.

“It was really rough for me,”
said Sands, who basically has to
start from scratch. “It’s like
when I came from high school
and went to college and earned
my contract.

“So now IJ have to do that all
over again. It’s like starting over
again.”

Despite what he experienced,
Sands said he spent some qual-
ity time reflecting on what could
have happened, had he not

insisted.‘] have to be focussed
and rebuild myself to back to
where I was before.”

Based on his training, Sands
said he feels like he’s ready to
fly ahead. But he won’t know
just how far he can soar until
he gets back on the track.

opening win |

! #Ejust devoted all of my.time.
toxtraining.on the track,” he

He will be heading to Birm-
ingham, England for his first
meet back on January, 27. After
that, he will go to Germany and
Sweden for a five to six meet
tour before he returns to the
United States in February.

“T think it will take a couple
meets to get the feeling, get the
legs back,” he noted. “But I
hope to be back out there jum
ing far after I get in a couple of
months.”

Having done just four meets
in what would have been his
first full season on the tour since
graduating from Auburn, Sands
said he intends to make the best
of this year’s campaign.

“J just need to get amongst
the rest of the world class
jumpers, not the little small
meets that I did before the
World Championship,” he
insisted, “I just need.to get out
there with them.”

Sands intends to take it meet
by meet, but he would like to
jump at least 56 feet high or
even 57 indoors. Outdoors, he
said the ultimate goal is jump
57-high or 58 and eventually
qualify for the IAAF World
Outdoor Championships in
August in Osaka, Japan.

By the way, Sands holds both
of the BAAA’s National indoor
long and triple jump records
and the outdoor triple jump
record. The only one that eludes
him is the outdoor long jump
record that is held by Craig
Hepburn.

While the triple jump is
Sands’ bread and butter, he siat-
ed that he intend to pursue the
long jump and eventually sur-
pass the record that he came
close to erasing while he was
at Auburn when he did the
deuce to secure points for the
school.

“I'm still going to long jump
in a couple meets because I still
want that record,” he stressed.
“T want all of the records. But
the long jump is the only one I
haven’t gotten yet. I just have to
work on it.”

In the meantime, Sands said
he’s looking forward to getting
back on the circuit, especially
to renew his showdown with
Sweden’s world champion
Christian Olsson.



TRIBUNE SPORTS





Alanna
_ joins the ~
Tigers’ fight
for title

& SWIMMING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ALANNA DILLETTE
will join the fight with the
Auburn Tigers women’s swim
team who are hoping to clinch
the NCAA division I title.

Both the Tigers’ teams will
compete in a dual men and
women’s meet against nation-
ally ranked Texas today.

The Tigers’, who are
ranked number three.in both
the women and men, will host
the meet at the James E Mar-
tin Aquatics Center in
Auburn. Texas are ranked
number one in men and 12th
in women.

The two day meet will be a
handful for Dillette who com-
petes in the 50m, 100m, and
the 200m free. So far this sea-
son she has a best times of
24.79 seconds, 52.97 seconds

-and 1:55.64 seconds in each
of the respective events. Dil-
lette also competes in the
100m back.

This weekend will also be a
busy one for Olympian Nikia
Deveaux who is still seeking
qualification for the national
championships.

Deveaux a student and
member of the University of
Kentucky women’s swimming
team will use their weekend
meet as a tune up for the SEC
conference championships
and an opportunity to qualify
for the NCAA national cham-
pionships.

The two day meet is set to
begin today at the University
of Kentucky will be against
nationally ranked Alabama
(18th ranked) — it will be the
second dual meet for the uni-
versity.

The results from the meets
will be posted in Monday’s
edition of the Tribune.

ee hse





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