Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE






Bahamas on collision course
with destruction, claims BDM |

FORTY years after the advent
of Majority Rule, the Bahamas is
“on a collision course with
destruction,” Bahamas Democ-
ratic Movement leader Cassius
Stuart warned.

Mr‘Stuart said the country
must realise that education is
the only solution to economic
instability.

“It is evidently clear that edu-
cation in the Bahamas has been
sacrificed on the altar of the
almighty dollar,” he said. “With
over 60 per cent of our popula-
tion under the age of 30, edu-
cation should and must become
our primary industry for the
development of the Bahamas.”

In a statement issued yester-
day, the party leader said that
only through education can
Bahamians offset “the poten-
tial quagmires of a fickle
tourism sector that is beholden
to external and extemporane-
ous forces”.

He said future governments
must not only address the lack
of emphasis on education but
must also restructure invest-
ment policy so that Bahamians
can have the opportunity to
become significant investors,
partners and shareholders in
future hotel and resort devel-
opments. .

According to Mr Stuart, the

country has been led to the
edge of crisis because the histo-
ry of the Bahamas keeps repeat-
ing itself.

He noted that after the stag-
nation of the first PLP era, a
charismatic individual emerged
in Bahamian politics “with jobs,
jobs, jobs as his battle cry.”

Under Hubert Ingraham and
the FNM, he said, the tourism
sector underwent a “much-
needed resurgence”.

Unfortunately, Mr Stuart
said, the new government recy-
cled the ‘tourism first’ policy of
its predecessor, once again rel-

egating education to second

place.

“The new FNM government
failed miserably to realise the
original vision of educating the
masses and all but ignored the
plan of the further educational
development of the Bahamas.
Under the leadership of the new
administration, the education-
al standards of the country
descended to an all time low,”
he said.

Mr Stuart said that again in
2002, history repeated itself.

“Once again, market forces cou-_

pled with the September 11
attacks and a second Gulf War,
initiated a downturn in the
Bahamian economy and as a
result, many Bahamians became

MAJORITY RULE DAY

jobless once again.

“The unemployment list again
grew to unprecedented levels
exhibiting a familiar client: une-
ducated young Bahamians.
Again the masses began a des-
perate plea for help just as they

had done in the past. Once again.

the private sector could not con-
sume the larger numbers of the
unemployed.”

Mr Stuart said that once
again a charismatic figure
appeared on the political scene
— this time the battle cry was
“help and hope is on the way”.

“Just as they had done a
decade earlier, the masses, still
uneducated and still desperate
for economic relief, took that
message and responded in the
ballot box.

“Just like his predecessors,
this new leader echoed the same
message preached throughout
the years: ‘We will build more
hotels so that the uneducated
mass can have a job’. Hence the
birth of the Anchor Projects
which will bring more hotel and
resort developments to the
Bahamas then both former
administrations combined.

“A number of billion-dollar
developments were announced

~ over the last four-plus years

with education again suffering
the consequences.”

@ BDM leader Cassius Stuart

He said that in addition,
Bahamians will once again suf-
fer the indignity of being rele-
gated to the position of “wait-
ers, bartenders and the like.”

“The BDM offers a fresh
new, comprehensive and sub-
stantive plan of action for the
next 40 years to repair the bro-



ken system of education,
restructure our economic and
investment policy and to nur-
ture a new way of thinking for
every Bahamian who truly
believes that the Bahamas has
yet to scratch the surface of its
unlimited potential,” the party
leader said.

Pindling era blamed for current social disintegration

THE social disintegration evi-
dent in today’s Bahamas has its
roots in the Pindling govern-
ment’s decision to turn a blind
eye to the scourge of drugs, it
has been claimed.

In a statement on majority
rule issued yesterday, Cassius
Stuart, the leader of the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment said that the first PLP gov-
ernment began its tenure with
noble aims, which included edu-
cating the masses out of igno-

Start saving
today and
have a merrier
Christmas in
2007!

rance.

“This ambitious policy com-
menced with the primary objec-
tive of providing the Bahami-
an masses, to whom govern-
mental power and authority was
historically’denied, with oppor-
tunities to elevate their educa-
tional, political, social and socio-
economic status,” he said.

However; Mr Stuart said, this
“idealistic-and egalitarian agen-
da” did not endure.

“Less than a generation

removed from the historic
achievement of Majority Rule,
the vision of a developing, first
world Bahamas became severe-
ly compromised,” he said. “The
emergence of the illegal drug
trade in the 1980's inflicted a
severe blow to the social life
and reputation of the country.

Mr Stuart noted that many
promising young Bahamians
who under normal circum-
stances would have sought to
secure a college education or a

Playing Santa can be easier in
2007 with the Royal Bank

$aving$ Club.

Save now through November”

so you can:

> Accumulate a down
payment for a home or lot

> Paint your house

> Buy new furniture

> Shop for family and friends

Caltl con witsilt aumy: REC Reonycall Baume, cof Cavmeandtin
evaenecttn (owe dhathaillss, “Who wailltvdlnanwalls allkononerdl
wimtil December 1, 2OO7..



vocational trade, opted instead
to become drug dealers.

“The era of quick money,
instant gratification and instant
success brought on by engaging
in a profitable yet illegal enter-
prise tore at the very fabric of
our social life. There was a mass
exodus from our schools to by
young men chasing the dream
of instant wealth. Violent crime
and criminal activity inextrica-
bly linked to the drug trade
became an everyday occurrence
on the streets of the Bahamas.

“Moreover, many men and

women, young and old, found. .

them selves on the other side
of the drug trade addicted to
these illegal drugs. Cocaine
addiction in particular spread
like cancer throughout our soci-
ety in the 1980’s and many
young children were abandoned
or left to be raised by grand-
parents, themselves or other
older relatives.”

Mr Stuart said that as a result,
a generation of Bahamian chil-
dren was raised without adult
supervision and without a prop-
er education.

“To make matters worse, not
only did the PLP government





@ BDM leader Cassius Stuart
has blamed social decay in the
Bahamas on the moral
collapse of the administration
under Sir Lynden Pindling

- (above)

turn a blind eye to the scourge
of the illegal drug-trade inflict-
ing social disintegration on our
society, but there were allega-
tions that some of our govern-
ment leaders and high ranking
government officials were com-
plicit in its success,” Mr Stuart
added.

Leader of slave revolt
‘should be recognised’

l@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE leader of the Exuma
slave revolt should be recog-
nised as a national hero accord-
ing to Dion Hanna, the director
of the Eugene Dupuch Legal
Aid Centre.

Yesterday The Tribune spoke
to the long-time Rastafarian,
law lecturer, pan-Africanist and
human rights activist about his
views on Majority Rule — and
also who he believes should be
recognised as a national hero.

According to Mr Hanna:
“Our power is an illusion
because all the power that we
think we have is in the hands
of these people; the Royal
Banks of Canadas, the
Solomons Mines, the insurance
companies and all these other
powerful institutions.”

Mr Hanna claimed that it
would be a “farce” for Bahami-
ans to celebrate Majority Rule,
because “common Bahamians
still don’t control anything.”

“Asa mater of fact, I believe
we have gone backwards,
because back in the day we had
the Penny Savings Bank, which
was for the common man, but
we don’t even have that any-
more,” explained Mr Hanna.

When asked by The Tribune
who he believes should receive
national recognition for their
contribution to history, the vet-
eran attorney replied “Pom-
pey”.

In 1829, a young slave named
Pompey led a small rebellion
on Exuma.

Rolleville was the largest
slave settlement on the island

during Lord John Rolle’s time
and the site of several slave

uprisings in the 1820s and 1830s,

when Pompey journeyed along
the beach from Steventon to
Rolleville to inform the
Rolleville slaves about the
revolt.

Today, descendants of Rolle
are still claiming land from Lord
Rolle's Estate.

As historians Michael Craton
and Gail Saunders have noted,
the Pompey slave revolt was so
significant that it “firmly estab-
lished the principle that
Bahamian slaves could not be
moved with impunity against
their will.”

And for all of his troubles
Pompey received a public flog-
ging of 39 lashes.

“Heroes are people who actu-

ally go in the trenches and make .

fundamental changes,” said Mr
Hanna.

With respect to majority rule,
Mr Hanna claimed that the
Pompey revolt was probably the
most “effective act” that has
occurred in the history of the
Bahamas.

“1967 was a change of politi-
cal power but it was not a
change of the dynamics that we
face, and we:still have the same
economic disempowerment of
the majority of Bahamians.”

Mr Hanna also accused the
government of. practising
“apartheid”.

He said: “There are Rasta
children who are still refused
entry into schools in this coun-
try, and until we change that,
please don’t talk to me about
Majority Rule.”

Tourism
dollar lure
‘destroyed
our hopes

for an
educated
populace’

THE old PLP’s vision of
an educated, enterprising
and self-determining
Bahamas was drowned by
the lure of the tourist dol-
lar, according to Cassius Stu-
art.

Mr Stuart said that along
with the problem of illegal
drugs in the 1980s, tourism
was the defining force of the
post-majority rule Bahamas.

“The tourist dollar
became our major legal
source of income as a nation
and tourism was touted as
our primary industry,” he
said. “Hotel developments
became a common fixture
of the Bahamian landscape
and job opportunities in the
tourism sector were preva-
lent. Once again young
Bahamians left school for
the lure of the thriving
tourism sector and hefty tips
from tourists.”

He said the government
of the day increased the
problem by not enforcing
educational requirements.

“The tourism Industry
absorbed a plethora of job
seekers from. gardeners to
pool attendants to bell man
to bar tenders. Many
promising young Bahamians
left school to occupy the low
level entry jobs, while mid-
dle and senior level man-
agement job opportunities
were reserved for the for-
eign expatriates, Mr Stuart
said.

He said that as a result,
the goal of many young
Bahamian became, “Get a
job in a hotel and you are
set for life”.

However, the party leader
said, this goal was soon
exposed as shortsighted by
“the sobering forces of real-
ity”.

He noted that the
unprecedented prosperity
seen in the Bahamas in the
1980s came as a result of the
illegal drug trade — tourism,
however, became the scape-
goat for this success. “The
deception prevailed with
impunity, so much so that
the new catch-phrase
became ‘Tourism is Our
Nation’s Bread and But- |
ter.”

This continued until real-
ity came crashing down
around the Bahamas as a
result of “unpredictable and
unforeseeable global mar-
ket forces.”

“In the early 1990s the
American economy began
to experience an economic
recession. Thus, the would-
be American tourist had lit-
tle or no discretionary or dis-
posable income and as a
result the airline and travel |
industry experienced signif-
icant downturns. As a con-
sequence, the Bahamas
experienced a critical blow
to its tourism industry with
hotel occupancy drastically
declining and dipping to
records low,” Mr Stuart said.

“Maintenance on many
hotel properties was neglect-
ed and the overall standards
of quality and excellence in
many of our hotel became
substandard,” he said.
“Adding further to the
downturn in the market was
the first Gulf War in the ear-
ly 1990’s which injected
additional problems to the
once healthy tourism mar-
ket.”

Mr Stuart said Bahamians
began losing jobs and many
found their job positions
made redundant. It was
clear, he said, that the econ-
omy was headed into crisis.

He continued: “Many
Bahamians found them-
selves in an obvious quag-
mire, with little or no edu-
cation and no employment.
The ‘blessing’ of the
Bahamas now became its
‘curse’. Unemployment rose
to unprecedented levels and
became a nightmare for the
government. The private
sector could not consume
the large numbers of unem-
ployed and uneducated indi-
viduals seeking jobs. Facing
an impending crisis and with
the 1992 elections approach-
ing, the government played
politics as usual. As a result,
hundreds of Bahamians
were absorbed into the pub-
lic sector prior to the elec-
tions.”





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.




Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Faxx (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Saddam is history; his crimes live on

SADDAM Hussein is history, his chok-
ing grip on Iraqi society broken by a noose.
His merciless crimes, however, live on in
photographs, grainy videos and, not least,
in the memories of those who suffered his
rule. ,

If the former dictator had lived and met his
end in one of the great civilizations of
Mesopotamia he tried to emulate — Sad-
dam fancied himself the successor to Ham-
murabi and Nebuchadnezzar — his adver-
saries might also have extirpated him from
history.

The ancients didn’t only destroy the phys-
ical presence of reviled leaders, scattering
their bodies to the four winds. They also
erased all records of the lives and deeds of
the vanquished. They renamed cities, They
chiseled names off monuments. They put
blood relatives to the sword.

Plenty of people around the world today
would be happy to emulate antiquity, to wipe
the history books clean of Saddam. In life, he
was variously regarded as a champion of
pan-Arabism, a defender of Islam, a proxy
USS. ally in a troubled region and a lone
antagonist against American hegemony.

In death, his three decades of absolute
rule in Iraq and the atrocities he committed
are, now, embarrassments. Without the
Baathist propaganda machine churning out
encomiums and Saddam enforcing the glo-
rification of his own greatness, the truth
about the modern-day Hammurabi is harder

‘ to ignore.

Those who celebrated Saddam as the stan-
dard bearer of Arab pride and unity would
like to conceal the fact that his most inti-
mate victims were fellow Arabs — hundreds
of thousands of Iraqi citizens, then tens of
thousands of Kuwaitis.

A man regarded as an Arab hero for
championing the extremist cause against
Israel was responsible in 24 years for Arab
death on a scale that dwarfs the casualties of
all the Arab-Israeli conflicts combined.

Those who bizarrely came to view Sad-

dam as a defender of Islam would like to
obscure his homicidal secularism and the
detail that his victims — well more than a
‘million in all — were overwhelmingly Mus-
lim. Islamists who condemn the U.S.-led war
on terror as a purported war on Islam have a
hard time explaining Saddam’s very real wars
against Iraqi and Iranian Shiites and Sunni
Kurds.

Foreign policy realists in the United States
did more than merely accept Saddam as the
enemy of our Iranian enemy. A succession of
American leaders, beginning with the Carter
administration, aligned U.S. interests with
Baathist interests, supplying money,
weapons, intelligence and training ‘despite
full knowledge of Saddam’s psychopathic

repression, mass murder and use of chemical ,

weapons. 5
An international cadre of politicians, busi-
nessmen and United Nations employees

_ enriched themselves by skimming money off

a U.N. programme that was supposed to pro-
vide food and medicine to the Iraqi people.
So many people would like to see history
buried along with Saddam. Dr. ;
Najmaldin Karim is not one of them.
In 1972, Karim abandoned his medical
career in northern Iraq to join the Kurdish

‘resistance. Today he is an American neuro-

surgeon and the president of the Washington
Kurdish Institute. While he escaped Sad-
dam’s murderous reign, members of his fam-
ily didnot.

Writing recently in the New York Times,

he called Saddam’s execution an act of jus- -

tice. But, he wrote, the execution came both
too late and too early:

“Too late, because had Saddam Hussein
been removed from the scene many years
ago, many lives would have been saved.

*Killing Saddam now, however, for order-
ing the massacre at Dujail in 1982, means
that he will not face justice for his greatest
crimes: the so-called Anfal campaign. against
the Kurds in the late 1980s, the genocidal
assault on the Marsh Arabs in the 1990s,
and the slaughtering of the Shiite Arabs and
Kurds who rose up against him, with Amer-
ican encouragement, in 1991.”

Three thousand years ago, the death of a
megalomaniac like Saddam would have per-
mitted his successors to wipe clean the his-
torical slate. Perhaps that’s why history is
filled with so many megalomaniacs.

Remembering Saddam’s atrocities and
holding to account the accomplices and apol-
ogists who helped him gain and retain pow-
er is the best way to prevent history from
repeating. Which is why his regime’s trial
should go on, even though Saddam is dead.

(This article is written by
Jonathan Gurwitz of the
San Antonio Express-News ¢.2007).












DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT



Donald Newman Archer,
70 yrs.

Died peacefully ,at his home

after a long illness on Saturday,

6th January. He is survived by

his wife Vivien; three daughters:

Lisa Archer, Jennifer Archer of

England, and, Melody Levarity

of Freeport; two sons: Patrick and

a ® Nicholas of England; two daughters-
in-law: Irene Archer and Julia Archer; one son-in-law: Marcian
Levarity of Freeport; one sistet: Sylvia (Billie) Phillips of
England; one brother-in-law: Allan Garland of En land; seven
grandchildren: Aaron, Andre, Benjamin, Carol¥M, ‘Yasmin,
Shenique and Sherice; three aunts: Ulrica Bethel, Patricia Lady
Isaacs, and Ella Garland of Scotland; one uncle: Basil North;
five nephews and neices: Brian, John and David Phillips,
Jacqueline Qwen and Lindsay Garland, all of England. Many
other relatives and special friends including: the Archer and
Isaacs families, Greschan Sands, Jan and Frusan Bethell, Dr.
Anthony Bethell, Dr. Henri Podlewski and Sandra, Adrian
Burrows, John and Sandra Rolle, Margaret Hall, Peter Pateman,
Claire Cash, Noreen Major, Billy Styles, Johnny Pratt, Michael
and Joan Knowles, Dr. Ian Kelly, "Auntie Clee" Dean, Lynden

Curry and the "Andros family."

A Memorial service will be held at
St. Matthews Church, Shirley Street,
Monday, 15th January 2007 at 2.00 p.m.

—"”



In leiu of flowers donations may be made to The Cancer Society.

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer

‘99 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
“03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low mileage

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

QUALITY sates

Paying tribute to

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I FIRST met Mr Everette
L. Cartwright, better known
as ELC, on my first day at
NGM Major High School on

September 2, 1981. My first -

impression was “Oh my God,
this ride is going to be rough;
he must’ve been a drill
sergeant in the British
Navy.”

Well suffice to say, I sur-
vived the six years with ELC
at the helm of an education-
al masterpiece. He was seri-
ous, but yet humorous; he
was an intellect, but yet
down to earth, and, most of
all, he was truly a mentor to
hundreds. He inspired a lot

‘of us (students) to reach for

higher grounds, to aim for
the stars and for God’s sake
don’t fall below the tree tops.
He was an enemy to igno-
rance, a champion for edu-
cation and a true example of
a Christian. He defined the
essence of one of God’s mes-
sengers. He lived by the
Divine God’s code, he
walked the walk and trust me
he talked the talk. He
ensured that all of his stu-
dents were taught the word
of God. Why? Because he
was the teacher. Religious
Knowledge was my best sub-
ject and best grade through-
out high school. I guess it
was my way of showing him
respect. Whenever I did
wrong in school, he would
preach to fe everytime and
everytime the words would
be the same.

. SBarryl, when,.are you ,

going to change, your Dad is
working hard and all you’re
doing is skylarking, assume
the position.” Then the
tamarind switch would do
the talking. Then the note to
my Dad would follow and I
would look forward to
another whooping at home.
Discipline was one of his
strong attributes; he made
sure that respect and order
was in place. No monkey
business, no skylarking, no
fooling around and the list
can go on and on. He
enforced educational and
moral values; they were the
benchmarks of his entire
legacy. I am forever grateful
that I met and was a small

_ part in Mr ELC’s life. He

was a God-given gift to me
and I am indeed blessed to
have known him. He was a

=r

A ane CUE er
Ae

5h
me

|



LIMITED

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 © 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ud for similar deais * Queen's Highway + 352-4122

Mr Everette L.
Cartwright (ELC)

detail. Most of all I know he
is praying for all of us. May
he rest in peace, in the loving
arms of his loving God.

My heartfelt condolences
to Mrs Cartwright, and all of
your children and grandchil-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

Long Island hero, a great

father, a great teacher, a dren.

great leader and most of alla

great person. I know he will ©

be greatly missed, however, I DARRYL DARVILLE
know ELC is with God in Nassau,

heaven giving a report about Bahamas.

his time on earth, detail by

We did not vote for some
unknown speech-writer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

’ HERE we go again copying America and reducing the historic
practice of the Westminster style of parliamentary debating to
scripts written by some speech writer who the people did not elect.

Mr Speaker, Hon Oswald Ingraham, MP — as we come into 2007
I request that you will enforce the rules of the House of Assembly
that unless an MP is making a ‘communication’ they may not use,
read-off pre-written speeches, scripts, etc..

Over the past months we see more and more MPs with their lap-
tops which are again questionable under the rules as with the use
of messenger an MP can have the unfair advantage in a debate with
the input by persons not elected to the House with the use of
direct IT connection.

The recent Health Insurance debate showed the lack of parlia-
mentary debating skills to the extreme — possibly only four MPs

- could actually stand on their feet and talk without a script for 15

minutes! Even the leader of the Loyal Opposition, Rt Hon Hubert
Ingraham read his 30 minutes speech word-for-word off obvious-
ly a prepared speech by one of his speech writers.

This is a total breach of the Rules of our Honourable House of
Assembly and in total violation of the Westminster Rules of Par-
liament — it is no different in the Senate so here, Madam President,
Ms Sharon Wilson, lay the rules down and get back to the rules.

It is so laughable when one hears the objection to the foreign
influence in Bahamian matters as it seems today we copy everything
foreign, even our practice in the House of Assembly and the Sen-
atejust likethe US.Congress and Senate.

Mr Speaker, Président of The Senate, read the rules and enforce
them please. We did not vote for some unknown speech-writer and
if the MPs-and potential candidates seemingly can’t'speak with basic
notes then surely they do not qualify to represent the people or be
offered as a candidate. Incredibly the majority of the MPs are
attorneys who use the skill of oratory to defend a defendant — sure-
ly the skills of oratory have been lowered this tar below any accept-
able level of standard?

J WILLIAMS
Nassau,
December 21, 2006.

(As far as we know Mr Ingraham writes his own speecsoo, —

Pex
ateey

A whole new meaning
to Bahamian time

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS following brings a
whole new meaning to
Bahamian time. I was driving
from Cable Beach to the
Marathon Mall yesterday,
when I reached Harrold Road
I got myself prepared (as I
always do) to ride the rollar-
coaster you know the stretch
of road I mean 400 yards from



LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

JFK Drive when to my utter
surprise no more roller-coast-
er the road had been levelled
out, not bad after 25 years —
keep up the good work ha!
ha! have a happy and safe new
year.

PAUL HANNA
Nassau
January 4, 2007

CA










We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department.
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.

Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter
‘ 4
no later than 31st January 2007 to:

HR Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas








THE TRIBUNE





0 In brief

BHA ‘continues
to voice its
concerns

over NHI plan’

THE Bahamas Hotel
Association, as a member
of the National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform,
continues encourage gov-
ernment to slow down the
implementation of the
National Health Insurance
plan, the association’s new
president Russell Miller
said yesterday.

Despite the bill to create
the NHI scheme having
been passed in parliament
in December, the BHA
continues to voice their
concerns and provide input
for the ongoing discussion,
Mr Miller told Rotarians of
the Nassau Yacht Club yes-
terday.

Mr Miller said that while
the BHA, with its 220 mem-
bers, is supportive of the
concept of universal insur-
ance coverage, it has seri-
ous concerns about the
scheme’s sustainability and
the restrictions it places on
Bahamians.

“We are moving very
quickly on this, too quickly
when there is in fact a lot
more to review and not all
concerns have been heard
yet,” he said.

The National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform last
week told The Tribune that
it was concerned about sev-
eral findings in the Interna-
tional Labour Organisa-
tion’s (ILO) report on the
NHI scheme.

The Coalition was espe-
cially concerned that the
ILO projected that contri-
bution rates would have to
become “significantly high-
er” than the initial pro-
posed 5.3 per cent.

Dominica
approves
special visa
for cricket
World Cup fans

B ROSEAU, Dominica

DOMINICA'S Parlia-
ment has approved use of -
a special tourist visa for
visitors traveling to the
region for the cricket
World Cup, according to
Associated Press.

. Jamaica, Barbados and

St. Kitts and Nevis also

have approved the visa,
established by the
Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) to facilitate
travel at border check
points in the nine coun-
tries hosting play and
Dominica. They can be
used starting Feb. 1 and
are good until May 15.

Dominica's Parliament
passed the legislation
Monday night.

Dominica is not hosting
matches during the March
13-April 28 tournament,
but hopes its proximity to
countries that are will
help lure cricket fans to
the island. Tourism Minis-
ter Yvor Nassief worried
that those without a visa
may be dissuaded from
coming to Dominica dur-
ing the tournament.

Parliament also passed a
law designed to share
information with authori-
ties throughout the region
during the World Cup as
part of stepped up securi-
ty measures.

More than 100,000 visi-
tors are expected to
attend the tournament,
which is being held for the
first time in the
Caribbean. ,

@ By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE tourism director-general
said yesterday that the Bahamas
had yet to fully exploit the indus-
try’s potential to fuel economic
growth and development, even
though in 2005 visitors spent
$6,600 for every Bahamian man,
woman and child - one of the
highest figures in the world.

Vernice Walkine said the
Bahamas had to find a way to
increase the visitor spend per
capita if the country was to fully
exploit the tourism product.

Despite projections that sug-
gest tourism will drive forecasted
real economic growth of 3-4 per
cent in 2007, Ms Walkine said
that for the most part Bahamians
have simply taken what the
industry has given them.

Visitors

Of the $6,600 spent by visitors
for every Bahamian man, woman
and child, she added: “That is
the number we need to keep our
eyes focused on when we focus
on the interest of the Bahamian
people. That is where the jobs
come from, that is where the
wages, tips and salaries come
from.”

Ms Walkine said that while the
tourism product had been large-
ly resort-based, with the bulk of
tourism dollars concentrated
there, the unrealised potential of
the industry was vast.

* “The more small Bahamian
businesses participating in sup-
plying and servicing the needs of

LOCAL NEWS














the industry, the greater the eco-
nomic benefits derived by the
Bahamas,” she added.

Ms Walkine said Bahamians
needed to take advantage of the
opportunities available for areas
that are reserved for Bahamians
only.

Linkages between these sec-
tors and the so-called anchor
projects were one avenue to do
this, as was the potential to sup-
ply the varied needs of owners of
mixed-use resorts and the visiting
homeowner.

“Tn fact, in most instances, the
spin-off businesses linked to such

. ii VERNICE
WALKINE, Director
‘ourism, speaks at
he opening of the
ahamas Business
utlook Conference.
hoto Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



projects enjoy less capitalisation
and better margins or higher

‘return on investment than those

anchor projects,” the director-
general said.

These businesses included pro-
viding housing for workers at
these projects, supplying items
consumed by owners and guests
at these projects, such as food,
drink, dining and excursions, art-
work and handicrafts.

Ms Walkine added that the
impact of the major resort pro-
jects also influences air access
that benefits an entire destina-



Strike vote to be taken
against GB Shipyard

B By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Union officials announced yes-
terday that a strike vote will be taken next week
against the Grand Bahama Shipyard to ensure the
protection of workers.

Harold Grey, president of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority Workers Union (GBPAWU),
claimed there are still serious safety and envi-
ronmental concerns at the facility and that the
safety of employees is threatened.

Mr Grey accused the management of taking a
“lackadaisical and carefree” approach to safety
and environmental concerns at the shipyard,
where he says there have been three deaths and
numerous injuries in the last six years.

The first fatal accident, which took place in
January 2004, claimed the life of Bahamian Wen-
dell “Sarge” Maxxam, after an explosion on a
barge.

Safety

Following Maxxam’s death, safety protocols
at the shipyard were reviewed by an internation-
al safety expert and steps were immediately tak-
en, including the appointment of safety officers.

However, Mr Grey claims that there continue
to be safety and environmental concerns at the
shipyard.

He said the facility is not being closely moni-
tored by Environmental Health officials, and
called on the relevant authorities to conduct thor-

ough investigations.

Although six safety officers are employed at the
facility, Mr Grey believes that the safety depart-
ment is understaffed.

He claims that management refuses to hire
additional safety officers and that sometimes,
one officer is left alone to patrol and inspect the
entire shipyard.

According to. the union president, the lack of
sufficient manpower led to the wrongful suspen-
sion of a safety officer on November 25.

He explained that the officer was on duty with
four ships in the yard, and while patrolling the
compound came across an injured employee who
had suffered a burn.

The officer escorted the injured worker to the
First Aid station and did what he could to help.

However, at the same time, an X-ray procedure
was being performed on one of the ships which
required the area to be curtained off.

Mr Grey claims that when a management rep-
resentative visited the area and realised that the
safety officer was not present, he instructed that
the officer be suspended pending an investigation.

The Tribune attempted to reach the manage-
ment representative for comment, but calls were
not returned up to press time on Tuesday.

Mr Grey said that the safety officer was doing
what he was required to do. He said that one
officer cannot sufficiently man the entire ship-
yard.

He stated that the suspension of the officer
was a Violation of the union’s labour agreement.

He pointed out that the agreement requires
that a worker is given a warning before being
suspended.

Mr Grey said the union had filed a dispute
against management with the Labour Depart-
ment, but that discussions have reached an
impasse and remain unresolved.

In addition to the inadequate staffing in the
safety department, Mr Grey said the
union is deeply troubled over environmerital con-
cerns.

He claims that two sunken barges at the ship-
yard which contain fuel, oil and human waste,
could have serious environmental implications.

Mr Grey said that the union has reported the
matter to the Bahamas Environmental Science
and Technology (BEST) Commission, but noth-
ing has been done.

“According to the heads of agreement, the
government is supposed to have a full-time envi-
ronmentalist at the shipyard and they don’t have
anyone.

“There are serious environmental and safety
concerns, and no authority visits the shipyard,” he
said.

“We feel the only way these matters can be
settled is to take a strike vote to force the com-
pany to address our concerns. We will have a
general meeting next week with workers to get
them ready for the strike vote in order to do
what is necessary to protect the workers at the
shipyard,” Mr Grey said.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 5

‘The Bahamas ‘yet to fully
et urine

tion, and improves the financial
performance of all tourism-relat-
ed businesses in the impacted
communities.

A prime example of this would
be the commencement of two
direct flights by American and
Continental between Exuma and
the United States as a result of
the Four Seasons at Emerald
Bay.

The Ministry of Tourism, she
said, was working to establish
similar linkages with the cruise
lines. ;

“We are now engaging the
major cruise lines with a view to
entering into agreements where-
by many more entrepreneurial
options are available to Bahami-
ans as suppliers to their ships and
private ports,” Ms Walkine said.

She added that these ranged
from providing all water sports
options, providing stronger
Bahamian entertainment, and
developing more adventure / fun
driven tour options.

Attractions

Further, she said that an
increased number of attractions
in the country can broaden visi-
tor spend and employ Bahami-
ans beyond hotels.

Ms Walkine said arrivals and
visitor spending numbers for
2006 were in line with projec-
tions, after visitor spending
exceeded $2 billion for the first
time in 2005. That same year,
real GDP growth was estimated
to have been 2.73 per cent, the
strongest level for five years.

Some 32 per cent of visitor
spending went towards paying
for accommodations; 25 per cent
went on prepaid packages; some
16 per cent on meals and drinks;
11 per cent in the casinos; 7 per
cent on shopping; 5 per cent on
sporting activities; 3 per cent on
transportation; and less than 1
per cent on inter-island trans-
portation.

Ms Walkine said there were
numerous “unrealised” oppor-
tunities to exploit tourism and
achieve a broader distribution of
its revenues among Bahamians.

She added that a key way to
achieve this was to increase the
number of small Bahamian,busi-

Hite





nesses servicing the industry, as
this. generated increased eco-
nomic benefits, while more |
Bahamian ownership would
enhance its sustainability.

To maintain the Bahamian
tourism industry’s competitive-
ness, Ms Walkine said people
had to stop viewing its resiliency,
viability and sustainability with
suspicion.

She added that the “most
destructive” practice in the
Caribbean was to view tourism
as “the employer of last resort”,
rather than attempt to attract —
their best citizens to work in the
sector.

TROPICAL .
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
ba 74a fa





eee

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 10TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM

8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
9:00 Bullwinkle & Friends

9:30 King Leonardo

10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Real Moms, Real Stories,









Real Savvy
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update



12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd |
1:00 Island Lifestyles

1:30 — Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 Little Robots

4:30 | Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 One Cubed














6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30

10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30

1:30am Community Page 1540AM

Neyiswa\ Sen aRiiesa sls
right to make last minute —
programme changes!




News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Faces Of The Islands
Keith Glinton - 2006 Junior |
Junkanoo Highlights
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response















at




Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452





On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of Majority Rule we
challenge the PLP Government to bring the five kidnapped boys

back home to stand trial in The Bahamas and uphold the
Sovereignty of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

(paid for by the political action committee of the Workers Party)

Se STRAT MORE EY AAR PP EE PT TT YS AS LR NE TR OE aT



RU TET PT MUI LAT AY ISELIN LT LOPLI TORY BTID IT PL IIT aM EEN SE AN IATL RT TN TRIN ETE RN NE UA MMT MMT



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007










THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic
Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.






ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 — Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901— Human Resource Management II



Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional development
in both private and public sectors with the added recognition that these courses have



EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBOOKS :

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I



been equated to courses taken toward a degree programme.







SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Education majors are asked to note the following meetings:










Dr. Beulah Gardiner-Farquhars

on will be holding an Orientation

Meeting on Friday, January 12, 2007 @ 6:00 p.m. in the E-Block,
Room 12 for all students taking the following web courses:















EDU 301 Section: WB-02

EDU 325 Section: WB
EDU 329 Section: WB
EDU 429 Section: WB

Ms. Wendy Riley will be holding a meeting for all students registered
for Web Based EDU 301—Information Technology, Section WB-
01 on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 in the E-Block Room 12 at















on 0] Om enaar

All students concerned must attend.



i

R Ny
wee

LE















for a course today.




























ENQUIRIES
Email :: perdev@cob.edu.bs







and Course Materials.






















Have you done anything
special for yourself today?" *

With one of our courses, you can gain

new job skills, increase your chances for
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success

in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up














All fees are included with the exception of
the application tee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule

ACCOUNTING

Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB's ACCAQOD Ot
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901_— 0

ACCAQ]02 a1

BUSINESS

BUSI9O0" 01
CUST9O0 Ot
BUSIQO4 Ot

COMPUTERS
COMPSO1 ot
COMPSO4 2

~ COMP902 = 01
COMP903 1
COMP 941 oF
COMPS53) OF
COMPS60 01
COMPS30 OT

COSMBD2 OI
COSM804 Of
COSM807 4

DECORATING
pecosoa =
pecose! 01
FioRs0o =
FLoReOT =O
FLoR802 Ot

ENGLISH
ENG 900 v4
ESL 900 01








MASG900 01
MASG901 01
HLTH9O0 Ot

MGMT900 01
MGMT9O1 01

MEDICAL
MEDT900 v

SEWING

SEW 800 01
SEW 802 01
SEW 805 Ot
SEW 806 01
SEW811 01
SEW 804 01



MANAGEMENT

This course is for the beginner who knows

very little about computers and does not

understand how It works. This course

covers ihe major computer concepts with

extensive hands-on practice using various

software, including:

(l) Microsoft Office - Word Processing

(ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet

(iil) Microsoft Access - Database
Management.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007
6:00pm - 9:00pm
Section 01 (CEES)

Saturday, 3rd February, 2007
10:00am - 1:00pm
Section 02 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fuition; $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 11

This course covers the advanced concepts

with extensive hands-on practice using

various software, including:

(l) Microsoft Office - Word Processing

(ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet

(ili) Microsoft Access - Database
Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications |
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007

Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00

Pre-requisite: None -
Begins: Monday 12th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Monday & Wednesday
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTG Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designed to provide
participants wilh an overview of the
fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It
focuses on developing effective and dynamic
PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisile: None

Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007
Time: 9:30am ~ 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day ;
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: _ 160,00

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 1

This course covers basic concapts of
Information Technology. The course pravides
training in these areas: Basic Hardware
Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency,
Operating System Proficiency, Internet and
Email Proficiency.

Pre-reguisite: None

Begins: Wednesday, 7th February
2007
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Duration: 12 weeks

Venue: © CEES Consputer Lab
Fees: $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

This course is a hands-on intraductian to
technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the
following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs,

This course trains new and existing small
business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
amployees} in organizing and managing their
accounting using QuickBooks Pro software.
Students will learn how to set up their
company files, chart of accounts, budget and
customer, vendor and employee files.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 3:00pm

Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

‘Targeting persons who would like to create
their personal web pages, this course

will cover Web page creation, Web site
management and HTML. Specific topics will
include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Pre-requisife: Participants must be
computer Jiterate and have
abasic knowledge of

word processing
Bates: ist & 2nd March, 2007
cd
Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: GEES Computer Lab
Fees: $650.00



All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (ane time). When submitting application,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course. ‘

COURSE SECT COURSE

DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS |
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ill

CREDIT & COLLECTIONS |

Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

TIME DAY

6:00-8:00pm MonWed 12-Feb 10 wks $250
§:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $275
6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $300

6:00-9:00pm Tue

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS |

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 5
QUICKBOOKS

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S

~ WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

COSMETOLOGY

MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAIL ART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING |
INTERIOR DECORATING Il
FLORAL DESIGN |
FLORAL DESIGN
FLORAL DESIGN tll

EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:30pn

HEALTH & FITNESS

, 6:00-9:00pm Thurs

6:00-9-00pm = Mon
10:00am-1:00pm Sat
6:00-9:00pm = Thurs
§:00-9:00pm Wed
6:00-9:00pm Tue

§:00-7:30pm MorWed 12-Feb 12 wks $500

§.30am-4:30pm Thurs

6:00-9:00pm Man
6:00-2:00pm Tue

6:00-9:00pm MovThurs 26-Feb 6 wks $500

§:00-9:00pm Wed
§:00-9:00pm Tue
6:00-9:00pm Tue
6:00-9:00pm Mon
6:00-9:00pm Thurs

6:00-9:00pn Tue

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pn Thurs
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il 6:00-9:00pm Mon

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

§:00-9:00prr Wed

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT! 6:00-9:30prr Thurs

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT If 6:00-9:30pir Mon





6:00-9:00pn Thurs



BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pn Mon
BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thurs

DRAPERY MAKING |
DRAPERY MAKING II
UPHOLSTERY MAKING |
BEDROOM DECORATING |

6:00-9:00pm Tues
6:00-9:00pm Wed

6:00-9:00pm Wed '

1:00-10:00pm — Sat

9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs/Fri 1-Mar 2 days $950

Mover 26-Feb TO wks $250



START DUR FEE

27-Feb Bwks $225
22-Feb day $170
{-Mar 10 wks $225










5-Feb 12 wks $450
3-Feb 12wks $480
8-Feb 12 wks $550
7-Feb 12 wks $450
27-Feb Gwks $330




8-Mar day $160

26-Feb Bwks $225
27-Feb Swks $225

28-Feb Swks $225
27-Feb Swks $250
27-Feb 1Owks $225
26-Feb 10 wks $250
i-Mar 10 wks $300




27-Feb Bwks $225





29.Feb 1d wks $465
o6-Feb 1d wks $820
98-Feb 1dwks $400




8-Feb 12 wks $250
5-feb 12 wks $300






22-Feb 10 wks $225





26-Feb 10 wks $225
20-Feb 1Owks $250
27-Feb 10 wks $225
28-Feb 10 wks $250
28-Feb 10 wks $225
24-Feb 10 wks $225





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



i aos oe rr

Governor General’s Youth |
Award’s 20th anniversary |

y OU may not know
this, but Tough

Call grew up with Prince
Charles.

He and I are about the
same age, we went to
the Clifford Park Indepen-
dence celebrations togeth-
er, and we still haven't fig-
ured out what we are sup-
posed to do in life.

I clearly recall Charles’
troubled childhood. But
while he may have had dis-
tant and pre-occupied par-

ents, he certainly enjoyed a:

much finer education than
I did.

During the 1960s, while
I was lectured by a Scot
named Roger Kelty in un-
air conditioned classrooms
at Queen's College, Charles
was at Gordonstoun — an
elite school set in a 17th
century Scottish estate that
could have been the model
for Harry Potter's Hogwarts
Academy.

Students at Gordonstoun
and its associated schools
are committed to "academ-
ic excellence, personal
development and responsi-
bility ...achieved by partici-
pating in community ser-

vice, work projects,
exchange programmes and
adventuring." .

Wow! Other than picking
‘up rocks on the playing field
_and writing lines about “tri-

fling in de corridor” (set by
prefect Winston Jones), all I
can remember from my
school days are Mr Kelty's
literary jokes (as in "There's
a divinity that shapes our
ends...") — which he con-
tinues to e-mail me from his
Lifeless Cay office.
Whereas in a recent
interview Charles described
his own experience thusly:
"The thing about Gordon-
stoun was that it encour-

aged people to take the ini-
tiative and not sit around
expecting others to do
everything. The main prin-
ciple underlying the school
was that in order to help the
transition from childhood to
adulthood you needed to
give young adolescents
responsibilities."



burgh, had attended way
back in the day.

While Prince Philip was
at Gordonstoun, he partici-
pated in the school's award
programme. And in a fit of
nostalgia in 1956 he set up a
national youth programme
along the same lines, called
the Duke of Edinburgh's

ee
“ The GGYA is part of an
international network that has
processed almost six million
young people in over 100
countries since 1956. It is
divided into bronze, silver
and gold awards so that
participants can choose
different levels of participation
in areas like community

service, skills development,

physical recreation and
adventurous journeying.”

a

Gordonstoun was set
up in 1934 by a Jewish
refugee from Nazi Germany
named Kurt Hahn. It was
an international boarding
school committed to a
"sound mind and a sound
body." And it was the same
school that Charles’ dad,

the iron Duke of Edin-

WAS





on

Stueeting’s Colonial
) Mortuary And Crematorium

84 Blue Hill Road ¢ P.O. Box N-8161 ¢ Tel: 325-7867

° Fax: 325-7867

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

MARGARET

PALACIOUS,

a resident of Dominica Way and
formerly of Matthew Town, Inagua
will be held on Wednesday 10th
January 2007 at St. Gregory’s Anglican
Church, Carmichael Road at 4:00 p,m.
Officiating will be Father Atma Budhu
assisted by other Ministers.

___2002 BMW XS

















MRS.

VILNA

75




eo

Award, to promote the
development of British 14-

‘to 25-year-olds, regardless

of gender, background or
ability.

"It's a do-it yourself
growing-up kit," the Duke
explained in a recent inter-
view. "The idea was to pro-
vide young people with a
broad range of choices of
what they could do. Ina
sense they decide how they
are going to educate them-
selves. The principle was
that they decide what they
are going to do, and when
and how much."

More than three million
young people in Britain
have gone through the pro-
gramme since then. And
surely it would be a fine
thing to have such a scheme
in the Bahamas, where old-



er folks like us wring our
hands in despair at the
spaced out lifestyles of the
younger generation.

There should be a chal-
lenging outlet for young
Bahamians. Something
that's not punitive but
inspiring.

Something that's available
to all, that bridges social
divides and builds positive
life experiences.

Well, turns out there is
just such a programme. It
was originally named after
the Duke of Edinburgh in
the 1970s, but later re-
branded as the Governor-
General's Youth Award,
and more than 8000 young
Bahamians have received a
better start in life because
of it.

he GGYA teaches

skills outside of the
classroom such as leader-
ship, self-confidence and
teamwork. And in addition
to about a thousand young-
sters from regular public
and private high schools, it
includes dozens of kids from
the National Youth Service
as well as 15 juvenile
offenders at the Simpson-
Penn School.

It was re-started in Nas-
sau in 1987, with the help
of Robert Nihon — the son
of a Belgian butcher named
Alexis Nihon who became
a real estate magnate in

Canada and made the.

Bahamas his third home.
Currently, the GGYA is
chaired by Dr Davidson
Hepburn, a former ambas-
sador to the United Nations,

who says the annual cost

runs to some $200,000. But,
he adds, the returns are
immeasurable.

As Esso dealer Hender-
son Burrows told Tough
Call: "The Award strength-
ens character, sharpens
skills, increases stamina,
gives back to the commu-
nity and let's you venture
on expeditions to see and
do things that you will
remember all your life."

Burrows joined the
GGYA through the Cathe-
dral scout troop, and to
complete his gold award he
spent three days hiking the
length of Rose Island with a
dozen other youngsters liv-

Cynthia Louise Henfield, age 73 years of

Strachan Subdivision off So
Of Turks and Caicos Islands, W.
[died at Doctor’s Hospital on Wedn«
27th, 2006, and not at Princess

formerly

December

dier Road, and

esday,

Margaret Hospital as previously reported.

She is survived by Four Sons, Norman,

Milton, Lealon and Vernon
Gloria and Judith, Henfield

Daughters

enfield; Five

Shirleen Clarke, Maxine Robinson an

Black w/ Two Tone Beige Leather
Premium Package
Xenon Headlamps
Excellent Condition
Premium 20 inch Alloy Wheels
Rear Shades
Fully Loaded PWR Everything

$42,500.00
Call 424-0352
_omar@piranajoe.com

ANE ECFA NLA CN LENE

Thelma Vanalstine; Four Sisters, Enith and
Annis Henfield, Hessie Arthur, and Lilleth
Harvey; One Brother, Alphas Smith,
Fourteen Nieces, Twenty-Four Nephews,
and a host of other Relatives and Friends.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced later.

ing off the land. One of his
companions was Victor
Chandler of J. S. Johnson.
Other gold awardees (and

‘there are more than 180 in

all) have included Patricia
Hermanns of Family
Guardian, and Jackie Light-
bourn at the Kirk.

The GGYA is part of an
international network that
has processed almost six
million young people in
over 100 countries since
1956. ;

It is divided into bronze,
silver and gold awards so
that participants can choose
different levels of participa-
tion in areas like communi-
ty service, skills develop-
ment, physical recreation
and adventurous journey-
ing. Currently, there are
about a thousand partici-
pants on New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera, Andros and Exu-
ma.

They are led by 35
trained instructors who
include personalities like
Nurse Donna Saunders
from St Augustine's Col-
lege, Constance Miller of
the Girl Guides, Henry Cur-
ry of the Boy's Brigade,
Roger Thompson of the
College of The Bahamas
and Alan Pinto of GHS. All
the instructors — as well as
their helpers — are volun-
teers. Only three staffers
are paid, including the pro-
gramme's chief coordinator
since 1991 — Denise Mor-
timer.

"Anyone can do the
Award," Mortimer told
Tough Call. "There are no
limitations — you just need
to be motivated. It's the top
accolade that any Bahamian
youth can achieve, and it's
the only award that some
will ever get in their life-
times. It changes lives and it
definitely helps to bridge
social gaps."

That was the view of a
recent Bahamian participant
from St Andrew's named
Aliya: "One of my best
memories was a camping
trip where we walked all
day with maps and huge
bags to Adelaide village,
cooked for ourselves,
bathed in the sea and fought
off stray goats and dogs. We
were able to meet and inter-
act with GGYA members
from other schools and I
still have friends that I met
on that trip years ago."



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

Perhaps the most unusu-
al part of the GGYA pro-
gramme is the annual expe-
dition — a 10-day field trip
to a Family Island for more
than a hundred youngsters.
These excursions have
included camping on Cat
Island and the Inagua
National Park; hiking on
Abaco and Eleuthera;
kayaking in the Lucayan
National Park; and sailing
on the Captain Moxey to
several islands.

Kids pay a small portion
of the cost for this once-in-
a-lifetime experience (and
it's the only part of the pro-
gramme they have to pay
for). .
The bulk of GGYA
expenses are subsidised by)
donors. These sponsors
have included the Ministry
of Youth, Teekay Shipping,
Cable Bahamas and Lyford
Cay.

On top of this, GGYA
gold awardees take part ina
yearly trip to different
islands in the Caribbean,
where they join with other
regional participants to
climb mountains.

he GGYA cele-
brates its 20th

anniversary this year
and coordinators are seek-
ing to extend the program-
me's reach by subsidising
more inner city school chil-
dren from Nassau. But the
main goal is to raise enough
money to set up an endow-
ment fund so that the
Award can be self-sustain-
ing.

And guess who's coming
to dinner? None other than
Charles' younger brother —
Edward Antony Richard
Louis Mountbatten-Wind-
sor (otherwise known as the
Earl of Wessex - seventh in
line to the British throne).

Edward was just a baby
when Charles and I were —
growing up, but he is now
chairman of the interna-
tional division of the Duke
of Edinburgh's Award. He
arrives in Nassau February
2 to hand out awards, meet
participants and star at
fund-raising events to sup-
port "a programme without
boundaries." .

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tri-
bunemedia.net
Or visit

-www.bahamapundit.com














NOTICE

Arthur Vince of Devon, England,
husband of Barbara, father of
Joan Bethel and Patriach of the

Barber, Jackson, Lester, Redgrave
and Bethel Families, died on 21st

December, 2006,

years.

at the age of 99

He had visits to The Bahamas over
about 40 years and many will

remember him.

PERE PETE SAN EN





_ THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 9





SIR Jack Hayward, the
Freeport-based multi-mil-
lionaire, is reportedly ready
to sell the English soccer club
he has owned for many years.

Former Scottish interna-
tional footballer Graeme
Souness has offered £20 mil-
lion for Wolverhampton
Wanderers, the Midlands
club which has been close to
Sir Jack’s heart since boy-
hood.

“Last week I made an
offer, subject to an examina-
tion of the club’s books and
accounts, of £20 million,
which is the figure Sir Jack
had publicly declared he was
looking for,” Souness told the
Daily Telegraph of London.

“T was told ‘no’ by Jez
Moxey (chief executive) but
the offer still stands. It is Sir
Jack’s football club and if he
chooses mot to sell at this
time, that’s his prerogative.

“He can do what he wants.
I have a partner and I see the
club having vast potential
and I will put money into it if
| got the opportunity.” .

LOCAL NEWS





Tourism Ministry heads |

to south Florida for
Superbowl promotion

As American Football Con-
ference and National Football
Conference teams battle for the
title of NFL champions, the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
will be in South Florida enhanc-
ing the Super Bowl experience
for thousands of international
guests.

The ministry is an official
sponsor of the Super Bow! XLI
Host Committee, a group of

influential business and commu-
nity leaders from Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach coun-
ties responsible for co-ordinating
South Florida’s Super Bowl
efforts leading up to and during
the February 4, 2007 game at
Miami’s Dolphin Stadium.
Among the entertainment
attractions, sports clinics and
autograph sessions will be a cul-
tural welcoming committee of

Come to the

Junkanoo, delicious Bahamian
cuisine, and contest giveaways
in 230 Publix supermarkets
through South Florida, touting a
chance to win a relaxing vaca-
tion on Grand Bahama Island.

The Bahamas will also
receive exposure at a VIP gala
of 2,000 attendees and a media
party, where roughly 3,500 jour-
nalists will get a preview of
island life.

Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing
Body Healing, Spiritual imparting

Life Transforming and

Soul Restoring

Evangelistic Crusade

Sunday, January 14th to Friday, January 19th, 2007

At 7:30p.m. Nightly at

The East Street Tabernacle

East Street and Sunlight Village

Under the Theme:

‘IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudolph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.O.G)

ir, the.
ahs

Scott Wilson

he

Come and be blessed, inspired, challenged and

changed!

“This is a highly strategic
partnership for The Bahamas,”
said Vernice Walkine, director-
general of tourism for the Min-
istry of Tourism. “The Super
Bowl is perhaps the largest,
most visible sporting event in
the US, and we now have a
medium to bring the beauty and
culture of the Bahamas to an
international audience in only
a matter of days.”

OC
\ \ \ X
CX \ N



Sir Jack Hayward ‘to sell Wolverhampton Wanderers’

@ MANCHESTER United’s Wayne Rooney, left, holds off
Wolverhampton Wanderers’ Seol during the FA Cup fourth
round soccer match at Molineux, Wolverhampton, England,
Sunday Jan. 29, 2006.

(AP Photo/ Nick Potts, PA)

Share your news |

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













The Art of Istand Living

Le a |

Sale Starts fan Sth |
Soe he CUS Thy:

“Bay St., 2 Doors West of Victoria Ave.
© Tel: 242-356-7302
Mar AM ToL TAG) eae elt ody



2006 FORD F150 |
$34,300.00 |

4.6L V6 Automatic
Reg Cab STX

“Ss The worlds

best selling
full size
truck

_ (other
modeis

2007 FORD SPORT T

$39,700.00

4.0L V6 Automatic

Limited
Edition,
loaded
with
leather
interior

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 ¢ FAX: 328-6094

S

SmartChoice

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com PART OF YOUR LIFE





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



THE TRIBUNE PRESENTS



rr i (fast 58: jriale J stor Z ~











“ TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
JANUARY 16 - MARCH 23

ay
vo

“READ THIS COMPELLING NINETEEN PART.
«STORY ABOUT MELI AND HER FAMILY'S
QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.

: Long Road Home





by Katherine Paterson ~ illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully

When Meli, an Albanian 11-year-old
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not
securely—living in their ancestral
community in Kosovo. But in 1999
Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic
Albanians from their homes. Family
enough. The

closeness is not

‘intervention of U.S. forces is not
enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,
the family must flee, embarking on a
_ dangerous journey ‘im search of safety."
Though, family ties and tradition are



severely tested, they eventually reach
the U.S. and the tranquility of a
Vermont town. It is there that Meli



experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11 distrust of
Muslims. Her response is an inspiration for all.

Based on a true story, Long Road Home presents a warm and compassionate family’s

response to conflict and emigration to America.



he Tribune believes that reading helps

| people to focus on constructive

choices through exposure to worlds beyond

their immediate environment. Breakfast Serials

provides the great gift of fine literature, read in

convenient installments - so that the reader keeps
coming back for more.









Read. Learn. Enjoy.

Read "Long Road Home" with us...
every Tuesday and Friday from
January 16 to March 23, 2007.

pune |

=. |







Breakfast Se

ood Books Unbound

For more information about The Tribune's
NIE Literacy Programme, contact
nie@tribunemedia.net or call 502-2394.

tases eee





: LOCAL NEWS ia

LLL

@ THE Bahamas National Geographic Information Systems Centre (BNGISC) continued its
ongoing training schedule with an introductory course to ArcGIS at the centre’s headquarters on
East Bay Street. Pictured (back row from left) are: Troy McIntosh (Road Traffic Department),
Mark Allen (Ministry of Works), Shanty Richards (Department of Environmental Health
Services), Randolph Burrows (Bahamas National Trust), Wendell Rigby (National Emergency
Management Agency) and Duane Miller, BNGIS Céntre technician. Pictured (from left in front
row) are: Tia Hinsey (Department of Statistics), Antonique Sweeting (analyst, BNGIS Centre),
Delores Stubbs (Department of Environmental Health Services), Elaine Bullard (Registrar
General’s Department), Carolann Albury (Director, BNGIS Centre), Valerie Grant-Harry
(authorised instructor), Shakira Simms (Ministry of Works), Danielle Hanek (analyst, BNGIS
Centre) and Karen Mortimer (Road Traffic Department).

(BIS photo: Kristaan Ingraham)

Training week on
new geographic
system technology

@ By Bahamas
Information Services

GEOGRAPHIC Informa-
tion Systems experts at the
Bahamas National Geographic
Information Systems Centre

-have launched a week-long

series of training exercises in
the fundamentals of ArcGIS
Technology for public service
employees and representatives
of the Bahamas National Trust.

The course is designed to
teach participants the funda-
mental concepts of Graphic
Information Systems (GIS)
while allowing them to become
more familiar with the range of
functions in ArcGIS — an inte-
grated collection of GIS soft-
ware and products used to build
a complete GIS wherever it is
needed; be it on desktops,
servers, custom applications,
over the Internet or in the field.

Representatives from 25
agencies throughout the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas,
including Local Government
officials, will participate in the
training sessions.

At the end of the course, par-

ticipants will be able to use the

technology to compliment their
daily job functions, which is
expected to help create larger
databases within the public ser-
vice, while improving informa-
tion collection, sharing, acces-
sibility and management.

Future

Carolann Albury, director of
the BNGIS Centre, part of the
Office of the Prime Minister,
said the training is essential to
addressing the country’s infor-
mation management needs,
particularly when dealing with
land information or spatially
inherent data and providing
local technicians and decision-
makers with modern tools to
discover new ways of display-
ing and analysing data. This,
she said is “the wave of the
future.”

“The training will help offi-
cers to locate new businesses,
track building applications and
environmental degradation,
plan housing developments and
major investment projects and
even help to provide and
improve emergency services

and so much more,” Ms Albury
said.

“GIS technology, along with
reliable data and the necessary
skills such as urban planning,
geography, engineering and
many. other disciplines is the
solution that is being employed
by thousands of persons all over
the world and it is the intent of
the Office of the Prime Minis-
ter, that we do everything in our
power to catch up,” Ms Albury
said.

The ArcGIS course is the
third in a series of training pro-
grammes in GIS use being
delivered by the Centre under
the Land Use Policy and
Administration Project
(LUPAP). Component two and
will be facilitated through the
use of lectures, demonstrations
and hands-on exercises in which
participants will work with
ArcGIS desktop viewing and
manipulating data which will
allow them to be able to cap-
ture, store, analyse, query and
display data.

Another function will be to
allow them to output various
map products in the form of
reports, graphs and documents.

Seat eeeeeeneeceneeeenenceeeeseneeseneeseneeseneenenens ences en eneeneeseneeeenees esses eens eens eee aa seen eae se ene ee eae ee ees eeE eee ee ee SSeS eee eens EeeSs Reena eeeee tees eacesenseneebensensantetensenenstececees

Plans to mark the
abolition of slavery
for Majority Rule Day

FROM pag e one

“There was a great surge of
people saying we want to goy-
ern ourselves and we can,” he
said.

“J don't think it was hatred; it
was doubt,” added Sir Clement.

Many people indeed recog-
nised the key role some whites
had played as "intermediaries"
in helping the black majority
achieve a more representative
democracy.

In addition, Mr Darling com-
mented that he felt "something
tangible" should be done in

honour of Sir Randol Fawkes, :

the trade unionist who went
over to the PLP in 1967, break-

‘ing the 18-18 seat tie between

the two parties.

Sir Clement, however, said of
Fawkes: “We can't do anything
greater for him than has already
been done, he is the number
one trade unionist — he brought
about the revolution — the

‘ change.”

“No one can erase that, noth-
ing can be done to take away
from that,” he said.

Some commentators spoke
of how partisanship has so far
held back the chance of
appreciating the “purity of







Mi SIR Arthur Foulkes

the achievement.”

According to Tribune colum-
nist and FNM candidate Zhivar-
go Laing, as the party who led
the country towards majority
rule, the PLP have traditionally

cited the day as their achieve-
ment and one which indicates
that they should be "forever
regarded as the appropriate par-
ty to govern in the future.”

Yesterday, he questioned
why the PLP had failed to
declare the day a national holi-
day during their five year
tenure. “Iam baftled,” he said,
adding that he thinks it “speaks
something to their genuine
belief about that day.” _

It has also been suggested
that some have manipulated
popular awareness of the event
in an effort to incite racial ten-
sions.

For this reason, the gravity
of the day is sometimes tar-
nished, it has been suggested.

Sir Arthur is among those
who believe that the day should
be commemorated — though not
necessarily as a public holiday —
but in a way which truly fur-
thers people's understanding of
its significance.

“Forty years later we have
achieved much but there is still
a host of challenges which we
still need to overcome in order
to make the Bahamas the free,
progressive, peaceful and devel-
oped country for which we all
strive,” added Sir Orville.

\



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 11



Visitors
FROM page one

he bélieves that it will have lit-
tle impact on tourists travel-
ling to the Bahamas.

“It is a concern, but I don’t
think it will have too much of
an impact on us with our prox-
imity to the US,” he said.

Mr Miller said he considers
the potential increase in the
price of air travel due to this
proposed tax “the cost of
doing business.”

The European parliament
last year called for airlines to
pay taxes on aviation fuel, and
to make it part of the EU’s
carbon emissions trading
scheme (ETS).

According to reports in the
international media, British
Airways is pushing for a deal
in which only intra-EU flights
are included in the scheme,
while American Airlines have
threatened to take the EU to
court if it includes
cross-Atlantic flights in the
ETS.

The EU made the ETS pro-
posal after it was determined
that airplane travel is the
fastest growing source of car-
bon emissions, and that that
sector is not covered by the
Kyoto Protocol.

The EU’s report recom-
mends that the airline industry
should no longer get an
exemption from paying Value
Added Tax (VAT) on avia-
tion fuel, and that an addi-
tional fuel tax should be
brought in.

Opponents to the scheme
have described the ETS as just
another tax on passengers.

Speaking at the luncheon
yesterday, Mr Miller said he
thinks that neither the avia-
tion fuel tax nor the US’ new
passport rules will significant-
ly affect the Bahamas’ tourism
industry.

He said he does believe that
the soon to be launched West-
erm Hemisphere Travel Initia-
tive — which requires US trav-
ellers to obtain a passport for
all international air travel as
of January 23 — will prove to
be quite the financial blow to
the industry as observers have
previously predicted.

“T see. it as an issue, unlike a
lot of people I am not overly
concerned. I think there is a
concern, but I think we will
continue to have people come
here. I think our tourism prod-
uct.sells itself and will continue
to do so,” he said.



















4 ite



FROM page one

until Sunday, January 7, accord-
ing to a BahaMar representative.

This said membership would
no longer be accepted as of Sat-
urday, the day before the sign was
displayed.

In addition, those wishing to
renew their membership could
not do so after Saturday, leaving
members angry because “not
enough warning was given.”

One member claimed this was
an attempt to keep Bahamians
out of the gym.

The member said that if they
had been told in sufficient time
they would have renewed their
membership earlier, but they
were never given that opportuni-
ty.

” This member felt particularly

hurt because for years, he
claimed, he had been going to
that gym.

Even members who renewed

their membership in time are -

angry because some of their
favourite training partners will
not be allowed to train there any-
more.

“If they are going to take
smalls steps like this it’s an indi-
cation of where the hotel is

Cable Beach hotel gym users

going,” the member said.

However, Baha Mar’s Robert
Sands said the Uecision to bar
prospective members, and renew-
al of membership, had nothing to
do with the hotel not wanting
Bahamian members.

He said: “Bahamians are a big
supporter of our facility, but this
facility is of limited size, so it is in
dire need of upgrading and at
some point these facilities must
undergo revamping and redevel-
opment.”

He added: “We are not taking
new membership — the difficulty
remains at the level of the prod-
uct that we are offering.

“We are in the process where
we are about to upgrade and we
cannot allow people to invest
money in membership and we are
not delivering a product and a
service to them that we are satis-
fied with.

“The equipment is about to be
replaced. It’s been a cry of theirs
as well having the amount of

available operating equipment. |

A number of those things are on
order. And we had to suspend

some of our operations while we
make some meaningful improve-
ments to our facility.”

Because the Radisson and Nas-
sau Beach Hotels were also being
renovated, their gym now had an
extra responsibility to accommo-

"date their guests.

“Which is putting tremendous
pressure on this particular gym
facility,” he said.

Responding specifically to
claims that it was Baha Mar’s
intention to stop locals using the
facilities, he said: “Let me answer
you like this: any Bahamian can

check in at any time and have’

complete access to any facility
within the hotel. And so why
would we, on one end, say
Bahamians and locals are not
allowed to use the facilities when

we have a policy where Bahami- ‘

ans contribute tremendously to
our business?

“When they are guests of the
hotel they have complimentary
use of the facility — so that
(claim) does not hold water to
me.

“First of all it’s a hotel facility

Deen ee senna eeeeseeeeneeeeeeeeeeaeeees eens eeeDaRPeSeeONE DOES eRHEGED EERE ESS ES EU SEESEGSSGEDAGEODESH EGE GESGEOEGEEOEGGOEENHRH EEE DEEAESEDAOREOE ESE OH EL EEAEGECH ERO SHNO OHIO EAH RO EERO R SURO R ANGE EROS DERE SS EES



Monday, January 22, TO

HOUSEKEEPING IN THE 21ST CENTURY
New methods and best practices for
housekeeping.

uct. SECURITY PROTOCOLS IN 2007

importance
protocols and filtering information to front
line agents in a timely fashion.

mgt HR BEST PRACTICES
6 Develipaneat and training for the changing - 2:00pm- —

Wescay, Janucry 23, 2007

IBM LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Wyndham Nassau Resort

FROM page one

on December 25, 2006 intentionally caused the death
of Cecil Coakley.

As for Sawyer, the police alleged that she aided
and abetted Miller in the murder. Attorney Langton
Hilton represented Sawyer.

On January 2, Mr Hilton presented the court with
submissions about why his client should be granted
bail.

He told the court there were certain offences in
the Bail-Act for which bail would not be granted,
inclusive of treason, armed robbery and conspiracy.

However, Mr. Hilton stated that his client had
been in court since 5.10 pm on December 26 and he
suspected that it was illegal to keep someone for so
long without granting bail.

Further, Mr Hilton had argued that the continued
detention of his client could give rise to depriva-
tion of liberty which could be viewed as a breach of
his client’s constitutional rights.

Mr Hilton said that his client was charged with a

bailable offence and that bail could be granted on-.

the discretion of the court.

The prosecutor had argued that bail could not
be granted to the defendant as the punishment for
abetment to murder was the same as murder. The
prosecution submitted that Sawyer was not entitled
to bail and should be remanded.

Chief Magistrate Gomez made no ruling on the
application of bail.and remanded the pair to prison.

Yesterday, the prosecution presented the Chief
Magistrate with the same argument that Sawyer

‘was not entitled to bail and he told the judge he

had case law that backed up the submission.

The Chief Justice told the lawyers to come back at
3 pm so that he could hear further submissions from
both sides on the bail issue.

J a Se
MUbahamas

marketplace



Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach

INVESTING IN TOURISM OPPORTUNITIES
Making the most out of the billions of dollars
in tourism related developments.

DELIVERING BRAND PROMISE
Case Study: The islands OF The Bzhamas 9:00am — 11:00¢

=e ae 11:00am - 1:

mc* ARE YOU LISTENING TO WHAT THE VISITORS.

5 ARE SAYING ABOUT YOU?
How best to make the information we are

gathering work for us in a competitive
environment.

12:30pm

Register online at

» WwWw.ntwbahamas.com ‘W) s

or email
events@bahamas.com

for downloadable
registration forms

and fax 0 302-2098 |















9:00am — 11:00am

9:00am — 11:00a

11:00am — 1:00

session

Woman granted bail

At 3 pm the prosecutor presented the court with

the case of Edward Cunnigham vs The Commis-
sioner of Police, a criminal matter on which Justice
Anita Allen gave a ruling on May 22, 1998.

The case involved an application for bail in respect
of a defendant who had been charged with abet-
ment to commit armed robbery.

In the Edward’s case, the attorney for the defen-
dant argued that the offence of abetment to commit
armed robbery was not included under Section 4
and Part B or C of the schedule to the Bail Act and
therefore it fell within the discretionary powers of
the court to grant bail.

Counsel for the respondent submitted that the
offence of abetment to commit armed robbery fell
within Part C of the Bail Act because section 85(2)
of the Penal Code deems a person guilty of the
offence if the crime which is abetted is actually com-
pleted.

Justice Allen rejected the submission of the attor-

‘ney for the respondent.

In her ruling, Justice Allen said that abetment to” acer how (he meanaice xpect-

commit armed robbery was not included in Part B or
C of the schedule to the Bail Act 1994.

After presenting the Edwards’ case, the prose-
cutor acceded that the magistrate’s court did in fact
have the authority to grant bail in respect of Sawyer.

The prosecution also conceded to the court that
any amendments to the Bail Act, such as including
abetment for serious criminal matters, had to be
made by Parliament.

Magistrate Gomez granted Sawyer bail in the
amount of $20,000 with one surety. The conditions
of the bail are that she has to report to the police sta-

tion every Wednesday and Saturday and surrender.

her travel documents to the police.







13

13



per

Making the most of new technologies in
advancing your business.
ARE WE BUILDING HOTELS AND ee G

ways to integrate more Bahamian
entertainment in restaurants and hotels.




Find out how to break into the multi-billion
dollar weddings and honeymoon industry.

wary 20-26, 2007

and we’ve opened it up to a lim-
ited number of outside member-
ships. We can’t just have it
open wide. It’s a limited-size facil-
ity.
ad at some point in time we
have to step back and do what is
absolutely necessary if we are
going to provide a product that
people expect,” he said.
In a few weeks the hotel will
close its ballroom, but not
because they don’t want locals to

come in,” he said, “but because
the need is there to upgrade,
improve and change so that we
have a product that locals and
non-locals can be proud of.”

Mr Sands could not say

‘whether the hotel would offer

membership to prospective mem-
bers after renovations are com-
plete.

“We will revisit the whole issue
at that time. Our notice simply
said we have suspended and dis-
continued at this point until fur-
ther notice, but when the time
comes we will revisit the issue,"»
he said.

Search for suspect

FROM page one
the nightclub.

Ferguson told police that he was at Native Hut around lam
dancing with a woman friend when a man, whose face he knows,
began touching the woman from behind in an indecent manner.

He said when he confronted the man about his behaviour, the
man pulled out a sharp object and stabbed him in his neck, feft *
shoulder and upper back. His attacker then fled the scene on foot.’

A police search is underway.

FROM page one

and Rolle families have also had
an opportunity to speak with
the Jawyers — many of them
privately. Only one of the

~accused has a US government

appointed lawyer.

All three men are expected
to appear again before Magis-
trate Judge Ted E Bandstra.

This will be the second time
that they will appear for
arraignment as the first sitting
was postponed to this morning.

Of the three men, only Bain
is represented by Mr Michael
David Spivak of the Federal
Public Defender’s Office. Rolle

is represented by Mr Roderick .

Darrell Vereen, and Rigby has
since changed lawyers from his
appointed attorney Michael
Gary Smith. He is now repre-
sented by a private attorney, Mr
Abe Anselheart Bailey.

Mrs Adams said she had ho

ed to plead.
The men are being held at

the Federal Detention Centre |

in downtown Miami.

It is still unknown when the
two other men, Roney Tony,
and John Peters will have their
cases heard.

The three men being
arraigned, Bain, Rigby, and
Rolle, have all been denied bail
and issued an “order of “deten-

tion” as-they have been regis-



Get tips on how to break into the industry
from those who know.

PROFILING THE NEW WORKER IN THE WC
invovanve methods weed new best peace

empower employees and increase

12 PROFITING FROM YOUR ARTISTIC TALENT
Find out what's hot and what's not in the sf
handicraft industry. nn OM — AD

Mcé PROFITING FROM RELIGIOUS TOURISM
Leam the secrets of this rapidly growing niche 2:00pm oD)

wc? GET PROMOTED AND INCREASE
14 your EARNING POWER

Learn the secrets to success from top Human
Resources Executives.

Register online at
rm

or email
events@

for downloadable
registration forms

and fax 10302-2098

2:30pm

11:00am - 1:

11:00am — 1:

com

com

Baggage handlers

tered as flight risks.

The governing Progressive
Liberal Party has been severely
criticised for allegedly aiding in
what has been described as a
conscious effort to circumvent
Bahamian laws by having the
men arrested in the US, instead
of the Bahamas. Government
has denied all knowledge.

Since the arrests on Decem-
ber 18, government has been
criticised in the newspapers as
well as on various radio stations
for their “silence” on the mat-
ter.

Since then, Prime Minister

Perry Christie has announced
that he will “personally” inves-
tigate the matter. He said it was
unacceptable that no one in his
cabinet knew anything of the
joint US/Bahamas law enforce-
ment operation that resulted in
the men’s arrest.
According to information
released by the US Embassy,
the baggage handlers had been
under surveillance for over a
year. It said that besides the
federal charges, additional crim-
inal charges were expected to
be filed against them.

The five NFS employees were
arrested and charged with
smuggling illicit drugs into the
United States on local and inter-

_ national flights at the Lynden

Pindling International Airport.












11:00am — 1x



































PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Starbucks and customers’ help

Sra

life

Your look at what’s going on in your community

HE stockings were not hung
by the chimney, but the toy and
book drive baskets at Starbucks
stores were filled with gifts for
children of the Bilney Lane
Home and Nazareth Centre.

Tremendous support for the
drive was given by partners,
customers and the public at
large.

On December 18, Starbucks
partners sprang into action and
treated -the Bilney Lane Chil-

dren’s Home to an afternoon

of excitement.

The children enjoyed face
painting, arts and crafts, music
and dancing, eats and treats and
finally a surprise visit from San-
ta.



Royal Bahamas Defence
Force officer Lt Michael Hanna
has been selected to attend a
three month training course at
the US Coast Guard Center in
Yorktown, Virginia. |

The course, sponsored by the
US Embassy's Naval Liaison
Office at an estimated cost of
$18,000, will run from January 4
to April 7.

- Prior to leaving for Virginia,
Lt Hanna paid a courtesy call
on US Charge d’Affaires Dr
Brent Hardt, who commended
him on his selection and encour-
aged him to take full advantage
of the training and information
he will receive over the three-
month period.

During the training, Lt Han-
na will participate in three
courses. The first, a crisis com-
mand and control course, is
designed to provide the skills
necessary for decision-makers
to manage emergency incidents.

The course consists of train-
ing on risk communications,
risk-based decision making, best
response to a disaster, contin-
gency planning, the Incident
Command System, exercise
design and development, and a
day of challenging hands-on:
media relations training.

Lt Hanna will also take part
in a two-day crisis management



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

i SOME of those attending Nove
Thief starring Jamaica’s Oliver did more than
member Myrna Dawkins (centre) won a pair of round
producer and CEO of Capital City Marketing Kathy
Cancer Society of the Bahamas Terry Fountain (righ

ohare your news

The Tribune wants to hear

| you are raising funds for a



The partners of Starbucks
were off again on December 28,
giving of their time as they
shared holiday cheer with chil-
dren of the Nazareth Centre.

Administrator of the home
sister Joan gave the partners a
tour of the facility and gifts were
given to children to celebrate
the season.

“Starbucks Bahamas’ com-
mitment to community was evi-
dent over the holiday” said
Colleen Ferguson, the store

manager of Starbucks Harbour .

Bay, “It was a rewarding expe-
rience for all those involved; all
of us at Starbucks feel great
about what we’ve done. Star-
bucks Bahamas cares about



i JANET Brown, administrator of the Bilney Lane Home,
shown receiving gifts from Starbucks partner James Walkine.

people and giving certainly
helps to keep things in perspec-
tive” .

“We had overwhelming sup-
port from our customers and
partners for this year's toy and
book drive,” said Peter Rounce,



mber’s one night only performance of the play The Assistant
“Jaugh ‘til dem belly bust”. Lucky audience

-trip tickets to Kingston, Jamaica. Show
Ingraham (left) assisted president of the
t) draw Ms Dawkins’ name. Part of the
proceeds of the sold-out show went to the Cancer Society.

exercise using computer simu-
lation software in which partic-
ipants will work in groups to’
resolve a series simulated crises.

The second course, interna-
tional leadership and manage-
ment, is designed specifically
for international mid-grade and
senior Officers.

The objective is to enhance
supervisory skills in communi-
cation to promote better under-
standing.

The curriculum uses the
instructional systems design
(ISD) process in which each
concept is introduced, discussed,
and applied in a measurable
fashion.

In addition, each student is
given individual feedback on
strengths and weaknesses in
applying the skills learned.

The training relies on role-
playing, case studies and group
activities to facilitate the stu-
dents’ learning.

The third and final course is
scheduled for January 28 to
April 7 and will focus on the
roles and responsibilities of the
international maritime officer.

The training was made possi-
ble as an ongoing joint effort
between US and Bahamian law
enforcement agencies, promot-
ing partnership and protecting
both borders.

















operations manager for Star-
bucks Bahamas. “Our efforts
paid off to make the drive a suc-
cess. We were excited to bring
love to the underprivileged and
reach out to assist the needy in
our community.



Pa AE

ing hand for children’s homes



@ (LEFT to right) Inga Bowleg, director of business develop-
ment for the John Bull Group of Companies; Peter Rounce,
operations manager for Starbucks Bahamas; Sister Joan, admin-
istrator of the Nazareth Centre, Timothy Pinder, IT/partner
asset protection manager for Starbucks Bahamas; Noel Sturrup,
partner resources manager for Starbucks Bahamas and Leonard
Sands, construction manager for Starbucks Bahamas.

“The partners at Starbucks
are a wonderful group of dedi-
cated people,” he said. “They

all make’a great team, both in
work and out of work. I am very
proud of our partners.”



@ SPONSORS and producers congratulate Oliver Samuels, star of the sold out success The Assis-

tant Thief after a stellar performance.
ing; Kathy Ingraham, producer. and CEO, Capital City Marketing;
Samuels; show sponsors Mrs and Mr Jacque Cadet of Village Har

Pictured left to right: Gloria Darville, Capital City Market-
Jamaican king of comedy Oliver
dware and Building Supplies. ©

(Photo by Arthia Nixon-Stack, Capital City Marketing)









our continuing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

Visit or call your Agent
at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

Premium payment functions will be
) transferred from Collins Avenue to our
Harbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.



FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY






SECTION

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

BUSINESS

ninew@tituneneaianee Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Siw



HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



$2.7bn in damages from
catastrophic hurricane

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

catastrophic

hurricane that

struck all the

major Bahami-

an islands would
cause a minimum $2,7 billion in
total damages, Bahamas First’s
president and chief executive
warned yesterday, with about 30
_ per cent of those assets likely to
be either uninsured or underin-
sured.

Patrick Ward gave the
Bahamas Business Outlook a
graphic illustration of the impact
on this-nation and its economy
from a ‘once in 100 years’ event,
such as Hurricane [van’s impact
on the Cayman Islands in 2004,

The $2.7 billion figure, he said,
was based upon the assessments
of damage experts, who had cal-
culated that a catastrophic cate-
gory five hurricane hitting the



a | PRIME Minister = Peiry Christie speaks with BEC general
manager Kevin Basden (left) during the Bahamas Business
Outlook Conference yesterday.

(Photo; Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

PM: ‘Unemployment |
close to a ‘minimum’ |

a By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

grihune Business Reporter

KERZNER International’s ‘eens -launched job recruit-
ment drive for more than 1500 persons will further decrease the
Bahamas’ unemployment rate, which is now approaching an_ |

“irreducible minimum”, the Prime Minister said yesterday,

‘Perry Christie told the Bahamas Business Outlook Conference |
that the hiring of persons to sustain the third phase at Atlantis _|
was just one example of the fact that “jobs are everywhere in evi- |
dence and in all sectors of the economy”,

“Tam advised that the preliminary unemployment figure for
2006 is 6.9 per cent, which is a decline of 3.3 points below that of
2005 (10.2 per cent), and the

lowest for the last four years.

Bahamas First chief says 30 per cent of assets uninsured or
underinsured, raising serious concern about rebuilding ability

Bahamas would result in a “min-
imum” loss of 10 per cent of all
property, auto and marine
assets,

There were an estimated $27
billion worth of such assets in
the Bahamas, Mr Ward said,

excluding major resort develop- |

ments, meaning that the $2.7 bil-
lion damage figure was likely to
occur if a catastrophic category
five hurricane hit the major
islands of New Pravidence, Aba-
co and Grand Bahama,

Mr Ward said the minimum
loss estimates for personal and
commercial property assets in
this situation was 10 per cent,
the same ratio also being applied



SEE page 5B

Bahamas urged to export
‘unique’ tourism services

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas should exploit
its “unique” tourism products
and knowledge by selling these
services to the rest of the world,
the Caribbean Tourism Organi-
sation’s (CTO) secretary-gener-
al said yesterday.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
the former Bahamas tourism
director-general, told the annu-
al Bahamas Business Outlook
conference that this nation “has
the potential to be recognised”,
not just as a leading Caribbean
destination for visitors, but as

“the regional hub for tourism _

thinking”.

He added that there “is no
reason on God’s earth why the
Bahamas should not have” one
of the world’s leading hospitali-
ty and tourism management
schools, capitalising on the
decades of experience and

' knowledge it had built-up in the

tourism sector.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the Ministry of Tourism’s immi-
gration card, a venture in col-
laboration with the Indusa tech-

SEE page 7B



to buildings in the course of con-
struction. He added that major
tourism properties were again
excluded from this calculation.

On vehicles, | per cent would
be lost, the ratio for marine vehi-
cles being 2 per cent.

In such a scenario, Mr Ward
estimated that on New Provi-
dence alone, a catastrophic hur-
ricane would inflict some $1.9
billion worth of damage, given
that this island housed about
$19.4 billion in exposed assets.

This consisted of $16.6 billion
in personal and commercial
properties that were exposed;
$2.345 billion in buildings under
construction; $370 million in

vehicles; and $160 million worth
of marine vehicles and boats,

Mr Ward had previously esti-
mated that just 48 per cent, or
just below $13.5 billion, of the
$27 billion in Bahamas-based
assets eligible for insurance were
covered by Bahamian general
insurers and their reinsurance
partners.

A further $6 billion or 21.7

per cent of assets were covered
by overseas insurers, such as the
Lloyds of London market, while
more than $8 billion in assets
was either underinsured or not
insured at all,

The final figure, Mr Ward
said, suggested that some 30 per

cent of property, motor and
marine assets in the Bahamas
were not properly covered by
general insurance, raising ques-
tions about how many Bahami-
ans will be unable to rebuild
their lives in the event disaster
strikes.

Based on the New Providence
total damage estimate of $1.9
billion, Mr Ward said about $925
million of this would be covered
by Bahamian general insurance
carriers and their reinsurers. A
further $400 million would be
covered by offshore insurance,
but some $563 million in dam-
ages in New Providence would
either be uninsured or underin-

sured.

Mr Ward said among the
uninsured properties were likely
to be a number of government
buildings, and he questioned
whether - in the aftermath of a
disaster - foreign insurers cov-
ering 21 per cent of the exposed
assets in New Providence and
the wider Bahamas would still
have the appetite to “reinvest”
and reinsure clients for the fol-
lowing year.

With almost one- sthied of all
assets underinsured or unin-
sured, Mr Ward questioned

SEE page 6B

Freeport Concrete to incur $2m loss

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete, the company
chaired by embattled Grand Bahama Port
Authority-(GBPA)-head-Hannes Bababk,



231510 re TROL mes
CHECKING & SNe eee LE

Cone FUNDS

an

Seeks Bahamas International Securities Exchange filing extension

yesterday announced it was likely to incur a
$2 million loss for the fiscal year ended
August-31,-2006,:-having- requested an exten-

Fidelity - More than a Bank

sion from BISX for the filing of its accounts.
SEE. page.7B.





Fidelity is Gary’s one stop for all NEMEL CTE eat tete ee

CDs

MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS

FINANCIAL PLANNING

~ FREE INTERNET BANKING.

TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING

Cree Wie

FREDERICK
RHI el

We]
ROAD

y one of the oldest technology ;
fi ms in the alba i



= ) FIDELITY.

HOME EQUITY LOANS

ie el Eder tS)

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT



More than.a Bank

Nassau: T 356.7764 F 326.3000

Freeport:

PARADISE
ISLAND





T 352.6676/7

an ue aoeP

ha FREEPORT

POBox § een
242,328.30 AO
fax: 242,328. 3043 |

VA VAPIAY mioranet.



SUSIN

anne Neate ASAE TONE AE ARE AREA TE AT TT

_wammeaeaneeeetaceretaNNG NHN LARNER AAN NETH HAN mH NNT TT

The Miami Herald





THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B
pow30 —1z,416.60~—«-6.89 W
S&P 500 iain -0.73 W
NASDAQ 2,443.83 +5.63 AL
10-YR NOTE 474 NIC
CRUDE OIL 55.64

a3

Stocks —







after

_ BY JOE BEL BRUNO © -
AssociatedPress
_ NEW YORK — Wall Street _
was mixed in an erratic session _
Tuesday as investors, uneasy _
- about approaching earnings
reports, debated whether the _
drop in oil prices would eventu- _
ally bring stocks down as well.

’ Investors had already lost —

some of their recent ebullience |
going into the earnings season, _
worried that 18 straight quarters _
of double-digit growth in Stan- _
dard & Poor’s 500 companies _
_ might be ending. The market _
_ was skittish after Sprint Nextel —
warned that its 2007 results will _
miss analyst projections, and _
- after another half-dozen compa- _
nies warned Monday that —
fourth-quarter results will come —
up short. | So

But investors also wrestled _
with the positive and negative —
effects of a continuing slide in _
oil prices: Warm weather in the
Northeast has weakened
demand for energy, and at one —
point drove a barrel of oil to.
below $54abarrel

Not only did this drag shares _
of major oil and gasoline com- _
panies to two-month lows, but
‘caused institutional investors _
like hedge funds to rethink their
positions, analysts said. Some
big investors might be taking
cash off the table on concern
demand for crude might not re-
emerge in the near term, ana-
lysts said. 1

The Dow fell 6.89, or 0.06
percent, to 12,416.60. Mean-
while, the broader S&P 500
index dropped 0.73, or 0.05 per- _
cent, to 1,412.11.

Technology stocks went —
against the overall market, with
the Nasdaq composite index ris- _
ing 5.63, or 0.23 percent, to
2,443.83. Leading the composite
was Apple Computer, which
unveiled its long-anticipated
iPhone.

While there were plenty of
fluctuations in stocks, fixed-in-
come trading remained range
bound with little economic
news for traders to act on.

Bond prices edged lower,
with the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury up to
4.66 percent from 4.65 percent
Monday.

The dollar was higher
against other major currencies,
and gold prices moved up along
with it. Lower oil prices have
made currencies and gold more
attractive to investors looking
for a safer place to stow cash.

The drop in oil prices was
originally one of the market’s
biggest motivators, sending
shares of transports and retail-
ers higher. 5

' Investors bet lower prices at
the pump would cause consum-
ers to spend more in stores, and
trucking companies would
spend less to fuel their fleets.

But that decline in turn sent
shares of major oil and gasoline
companies sliding as lower
prices could cut into profits.

Advancers outnumbered
decliners by about 3 to 2 on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 1.70 bil-
lion shares.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies fell 1.34, or
0.17 percent, to 778.33.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed up 0.86
percent after being closed Mon-
day due to a public holiday.

At the‘close, Britain’s FTSE
100 was up 0.03 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index rose 0.10
percent, and France’s CAC-40

added 0.26 percent.














. The iPhone, which will start at
$499 when it launches in June, is
controlled by touch, plays music,
surfs the Internet and runs the





AIRLINES

ELECTRONICS

READY FOR THE WORLD: Apple CEO Steve Jobs shows off the new iPhone during his keynote address
at the Macworld Conference and Expo on Tuesday in San Francisco.

APPLE SHINES WITH |
NEW NAME, iPHONE.

CHAIRMAN STEVE JOBS UNVEILS LONG-AWAITED
WIRELESS PHONE AND FIRM’S NEW FOCUS

BY RACHEL KONRAD
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs on Tuesday
announced the iPod maker’s long-awaited leap into the mobile phone
business and renamed the company just “Apple Inc.,” reflecting its
increased focus on consumer electronics.

Macintosh computer operating sys-
tem. Jobs said it will “reinvent”
wireless communications and
“leapfrog” past the current genera-

United may get first
nonstop Washington
to China daily flight

@ A final approval by the
Department of Transportation is
all that stands between United
getting the route from
Washington to Beijing, which
could be worth $200 million.

BY DAN CATERINICCHIA —
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — United Air-
lines won tentative approval on
Tuesday to operate the first nonstop
daily flight between Washington and
Beijing, a 14-hour trip that links the
countries’ capitals as their economies
become more intertwined.

The Department of Transporta-
tion’s final OK would give UAL’s
United a route coveted by executives
and government officials and poten-
tially worth $200 million a year.

Washington-based fliers who
make regular trips to Beijing
applauded the news.

“Jt means that I probably save two
to three hours in my flight,” said
Richard Bush, a senior fellow at the
Brookings Institution. “Anything that
gets you into the hotel ahead of the
evening rush hour [in Beijing] is
great.”

United did not immediately say
how much it would charge for the
flight. Existing fares for travel
between Washington and Beijing
start at under $1,000 for economy

class and can top $15,000 for first
class.

If it wins final approval from the
government, the Elk Grove Village,

Ill.-based airline can begin nonstop -

service between Washington Dulles
International Airport and Beijing’s
China Peking Capital Airport on

“March 25.

“It’s overdue,” said James Mill-
ward, an associate professor of Chi-
nese history at Georgetown Univer-
sity. “It shortens the time and
shortens the fatigue that is part of
international travel.”

United beat out AMR’s American
Airlines, which sought to fly between
Dallas/Fort Worth and Beijing; Con-
tinental Airlines, which applied for
service between Newark, N.J., and
Shanghai; and Northwest Airlines,
which applied for Detroit-Shanghai
service.

The Transportation Department
said United’s rivals have 14 days to
file objections.

The new route would strengthen
United’s already-extensive Pacific
network and provide an injection of
cash when the carrier is still trying to
regain its former financial strength
after a three-year bankruptcy
restructuring that ended in February.

Airline analyst Roger King esti-

° TURN TO UNITED



ESSSSPORTS

tT NAE SEER R EEE TOELEM A NRL TEENA LL TI SSO OS MOEN OULU EUS ESOT ESTADO NN ENON E LEVEN EOIN AEN M VALE ATA

¢



PAUL SAKUMA/AP

tion of smart phones.

“Every once in a while a revolu-
tionary product comes along that
changes everything,” he said during
his keynote address at the annual
Macworld Conference and Expo.
“It’s very fortunate if you can work
on just one of these in your career.
... Apple’s been very fortunate in
that it’s introduced a few of these.”

He said the company’s name ©
change is meant to reflect Apple’s
transformation from a computer
manufacturer to a full-fledged con-
sumer electronics company.

°* TURN TO APPLE



3B

SALARIES

Executive
pay to be
heavily
scrutinized

@ When the salaries and benefits
of top executives at public
companies are disclosed later
this month, investors angered
over previous numbers will have a
scorecard from which to proceed.

BY MARCY GORDON
Associated Press

Investors will soon have a new
scorecard designed to lay out in plain
English just how much pay and perks
are being lavished on top executives
at public companies. If the goals of

_ federal regulators are met, you won’t

need an MBA to decipher the num-
bers.

The new disclosures, in annual
reports and proxy statements that
will begin arriving later this month,
will come closer than ever to a full
accounting of total compensation for
companies’ top two executives and
the next three highest-paid execu-
tives.

“The SEC, in a very short amount
of time for a regulator, has pushed
through very sweeping pay disclo-
sures that, for the first time, will give
investors a very clear picture of CEO
pay,” said Amy Borrus, deputy direc-
tor of the Council of Institutional
Investors. “The big picture is a very
big win for investors.”

Investor anger over executive pay
has spread from union activists to
buttoned-down mutual fund trustees.
The AFL-CIO singled out Home
Depot’s CEO Bob Nardelli for loud
criticism of his pay package, but
almost all mutual funds in the
$308.1 billion T. Rowe Price more
quietly withheld their votes for the
majority of Home Depot's ll directors
at the company’s May annual meet-
ing. On Jan. 3, Nardelli resigned
abruptly — with a severance package
worth roughly $210 million.

Investors wondering whether
executives at their companies are
getting similarly stratospheric pay
have always been able to look for evi-
dence in companies’ annual reports
and proxies. But key parts of the
information often were buried in
footnotes. :

What will be new in the reports
for public companies whose fiscal
year ends after Dec. 15 are total fig-
ures that add up executives’ annual

° TURN TO EXECUTIVES

DONNA MCWILLIAM/AP

ROUGH TIMES: Chairman Donald Horton said his company continues
to experience ‘higher than normal cancellation rates and an
increased use of sales incentives in many of our markets.’ Above, a
sign shows a newly built Horton house for sale in Fort Worth, Texas.

Horton’s first-quarter
orders fall 23 percent

§& Horton’s net sales orders
dropped from 11,453 last year to
8,771, and order cancellations
were at 33 percent from

40 percent in the fourth quarter.

BY PETER WOODIFIELD
Bloomberg News

D.R. Horton, the largest U.S. hom-
ebuilder, said orders dropped 23 per-
cent in its fiscal first quarter as
declining prices sapped the confi-
dence of buyers.

Net sales orders slid to 8,771
homes from 11,453 a year earlier and

_ the average price of an ordered home

dropped 6.1 percent to $262,000, the
Fort Worth, Texas-based company
said in a statement Tuesday. Order
cancellations fell to 33 percent from
40 percent in the fourth quarter.
Tumbling home prices are causing
some potential buyers to wait, wor-
ried that the value of their purchases
will erode, and keeping inventories of
unsold properties near record highs.
The U.S. median price of a new home
this quarter is $231,700, down 5.5 per-
cent from a year ago, according to
David Berson, chief economist at

* TURN TO HORTON








IN MY OPINION

ISRAEL GUTIERRE

igutlerrez@Miamitieraia cK



Urban Meyer's.
top 10 reasons —
to stay a Gator ©

t was less than 24 hours after |

l Urban Meyer was crowned king

_ of college football, and already
there were conversations about the
Florida coach possibly going pro.

There are at least 10 reasons
Meyer shouldn’t even consider that:

1. Because sometimes a great
college coach is just that. Nick
Saban’s two-year tragedy with the —
Miami Dolphins is the only the most
recent reminder that college coaches
who are good at their college jobs

should remain at their
college jobs. And Meyer
is the prototypical col-
lege football coach.He
creates family atmo- -
spheres, he preaches —
strong character, and he
develops people as well
as players.

_ 2. Because the
money’s there. NFL —
coaches make scywhere

< in the neighborhood of

$2 million to $4 million. But Saban.
just took a $4-million-a-year job with

Alabama. And that sets a standard -

_ that could more than double Meyer's"

contract next year. Meyer reportedly _
has a provision in his contract stating
that the athletics department “will
review the adequacy” of his contract
upon his request after the 2007 sea-
son. This season he made less than
$2 million. Think there’s any chance
he won’t make that request?

3. Because he’s just getting

. started. Sure, that Florida defense,

which made Troy Smith look like he _

should return the Heisman Trophy
and apologize for accepting it under
false pretenses, could lose as many as

10 players. And, yes, Meyer is losing .

Chris Leak, his MVP senior quarter-

back. But Meyer is just beginning to

run the spread-option offense he per-
fected with Alex Smith at Utah. With
sophomores-to-be Percy Harvin and

Tim Tebow as the staples of Meyer’s

offense next season, it will be the true

test of whether his system can work
in the Southeastern Conference.

And Meyer’s second set of recruits,
the ones who aren’t supposed to be in
school until next year, already are get-
ting a head start. Nine of them are
enrolled in school this semester.

“T can’t think of anybody in the
country that has nine [freshman] guys
that showed up for class on Monday,”
Meyer said.

4. Because Tebow is his cre-
ation. Even though Meyer said after
Monday’s game that he and Chris
Leak will be connected for the next
30 years, it’s Tebow who is supposed
to be Meyer’s signature quarterback.
And why would he leave before see-
ing what Tebow can really do? How
could Meyer leave Tebow’s future in
- another coach’s hands?

_ 5. Because the Atlanta Falcons

job already is filled. Unless Meyer

goes to Oakland and drafts LSU quar-
terback JaMarcus Russell first overall,
he won’t have a running quarterback
to play anything resembling his style
of offense at the pro level.

6. Because his style of offense
shouldn’t be played in the NFL. Of
course, that’s the same thing people
said when he got to the SEC, but let’s
just assume it’s true and move on.



MORE
INSIDE —

BY RONALD BLUM
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Cal Ripken Jr.

- and Tony Gwynn easily made the

Hall of Fame, but Mark McGwire

~ fell far short in his first try for the

baseball’s highest honor, picked by
just 23.5 percent of the voters.
Tarnished by accusations of ste-
roid use, McGwire appeared on 128
of a record 545 ballots
in voting released
Tuesday by the Base-
ball Writers’ Associa-
tion of America.
Ripken was picked
by 537 voters and appeared on
98.53 percent of ballots, finishing
with the third-highest percentage
ever, behind Tom Seaver (98.84
percent) and Nolan Ryan (98.29).
The former Baltimore Orioles
shortstop said he was both relieved
and euphoric. If he had been
picked by two of the eight voters





BASEBALL | HALL OF FAME VOTING

Ripken, Gwynn score; McGwire whiffs

EZRA SHAW/ALLSPORT

IRON MAN: Cal Ripken Jr. once
played in 2,632 games in a row.

who didn’t select him: at all, he
would have set the percentage
record — but he didn’t mind.

“All I wanted to hear was,
‘You're in,’” Ripken said during a
conference call. “I really didn’t get





TODD WARSHAW/ALLSPORT

WHAT A HITTER: Tony Gwynn had
a .338 career batting average.

caught up with wanting to be unan-
imous or wanting to be the most.”

Gwynn received 532 votes, for
97.61 percent, the seventh-highest
ever, also trailing Ty Cobb, George
Brett and Hank Aaron.

3E

eee

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

’ “It’s an unbelievable feeling to
know that people think that what
you did was worthy,” Gwynn said.
“For me, it’s kind of validation. The
type of player that I was doesn’t
get a whole lot of credit in today’s
game.”

Goose Gossage finished third,
with 388 votes, falling 21 shy of the
necessary 409. His percentage
increased from 64.6 to 712, putting
him in good position to reach the
necessary 75 percent next year.

‘Jim Rice was fourth, with 346
votes, his percentage dropping to
63.5 from 64.8 last year. He was fol-
lowed by Andre Dawson (309),
Bert Blyleven (260), Lee Smith
(217) and Jack Morris (202).
McGwire was ninth, and Tommy
John (125) finished 10th.

Jose Canseco, on the ballot for
the first time, received six votes,
well below the 5 percent threshold
needed to stay on future ballots.



PRO BASKETBALL | DALLAS 108, UTAH 105

- Mavs claw past Jazz



Nowitzki gets 38,
and late comeback
wins it for Dallas

Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — Dirk Nowitzki scored a
season-high 38 points, including two free throws
_.With 10.2 remaining in the game, to help the Dal-
las Mavericks beat the Utah Jazz 108-105 on
Tuesday night.

_ Nowitzki, who: has averaged more than
30‘points per game in his past six games, scored
25 points in the second half as the
Mavs avenged a 101-79 loss to
Utah on Dec. 11, when Dallas shot
a season-low 37.7 percent. ,

The Mavs had no trouble this
time, as they made 53 percent of
their field goals and handed the
Jazz their just their third home
loss of the season.

Mavs swingman Jerry Stack-



house was kicked out of the game after getting
called for his second flagrant foul. He also was
hit with a technical in the first half for an argu-

ment with Utah coach Jerry Sloan.

Josh Howard scored 21 points for the Mavs,
and Jason Terry shook off a recent slump to
score ll of his 18 points in the fourth quarter.
The Mavs, who have the NBA’s best record, at
28-8, bounced back after falling 101-98 to the Los
Angeles Lakers on Sunday, breaking their 13-
game victory streak.

The Jazz, who were led by Carlos Boozer’s 29
points, shot just 8-of-21 in the final period after
hitting 57 percent to that point.

The Jazz led 94-91 on Derek Fisher’s
3-pointer to beat the shot clock. But Terry’s free
throws capped an 11-3 run as the Mavs held the
Jazz without a field goal for more than 4 minutes
to take a 102-97 lead with 2:38 to play.

Utah had three chances to draw even in the
last minute after Josh Howard missed a layup
and two tip attempts, Devin Harris threw a bad
pass, and Nowitzki inexplicably drove for a
layup and missed before the final buzzer.

But the Jazz could not convert any of their
last-minute 3-point attempts, including Mehmet

DOUGLAS PIZAC/AP

7. Because he can dominate the Okur’s desperation turnaround shot when Utah

South in recruiting now that Miami
and Florida State are rebuilding
jobs in progress. It actually might
help Meyer in recruiting that he could
lose as many as 17 starters off this
championship team.

“I know where I would want to
go,” Meyer said. “Am I allowed to say
that for recruiting? Print that. I know
where I would want to go.

“What’s the future look like? I
think it looks really good.”

8. Because the pressure is off.
After winning the 1996 title,Steve
Spurrier won just one SEC title in the |
next five years, but he never heard the
first word about a disappointed fan
base or a lack of job security. For at
least another half-decade, Meyer can
do no wrong — because he is at least
as beloved as Spurrier now that he
brought home a title in two seasons.

9. Because his wife is a bundle
of energy and support. Shelley
Meyer is the first lady of college foot-
ball. Could you imagine a title like
that for any pro coach’s wife?

10, Because if he leaves now,
everyone will say he won with Ron
Zook’s players. And any man who
has his thunder stolen by Ron Zook
will never be a happy man.

RIM SHOT: Mavericks forward Josh Howard beats Jazz defender Andrei Kirilenko for a

dunk in the first half Tuesday night in Salt Lake City. Howard had 21 points in the game.

inbounded with just 0.3 seconds to play.

e NBA REPORT



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 3 WISCONSIN 72, NO. 5 OHIO STATE 69

Badgers escape after late rally by Buckeyes

BY CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. — Kammron
Taylor scored 25 points Tuesday
night, and No. 3 Wisconsin sur-
vived a late charge by freshman
Greg Oden and No. 5 Ohio State to
hold on for a tight, 72-69 victory.
The Badgers (16-1, 2-0
Big Ten) used a 14-0 run
midway through the
second half to appar-
ently take control
in an early-season
matchup of conference favorites.
But the Buckeyes (13-3, 2-1) ral-
lied to close within 69-64 on a
dunk by Oden with 37 seconds left.
Taylor then made one of two
free throws on the other end, and



the Buckeyes’ Ron Lewis hit a
3-pointer to cut the lead to three
with 25 seconds left.

Joe Krabbenhoft hit one of two
free throws for Wisconsin, and
Oden again scored on a dunk with
8.9 seconds left to cut the lead to

71-69. After Taylor again hit one of

two free throws, Jamar
Butler missed a poten-
tial game-tying
3-pointer at the buzzer.

Alando Tucker
added 17 points for the
Badgers. Ivan Harris led Ohio State
with 17 points.

It was a breakout performance
for Wisconsin sophomore forward
Marcus Landty, who had 10 points
and four blocked shots.



ANDY MANIS/AP

ON THE LOOSE: Alando Tucker of
Wisconsin drives to the basket
past Ron Lewis of Ohio State.

The Badgers led 43-41 after a
3-pointer by Butler, but Krabben-
hoft scored inside to start Wiscon-
sin’s 14-0 run, which featured sev-
eral key plays by Landry, who sat
out part of last season after being

ruled academically ineligible.

A block by Landry led to an end-
to-end layup by Michael Flowers
that put Wisconsin ahead 47-41.
Landry rebounded his own miss
and scored on a putback to put the
Badgers up 55-41

Oden blocked Landry on the
Badgers’ next possession, but he
got the ball back and then got it to
Flowers, who drove the lane and
scored to put Wisconsin ahead
57-41 with 9:20 remaining.

Landry hit a 3-pointer with 8:04
left to play that made it 60-47.

But Ohio State went on a 17-9
run as Wisconsin’s shaky free-
throw shooting kept the Buckeyes
in the game until the end.

e@ MORE GAMES





4E || WeNESDAY, JANUARY 10,2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP RECAP





FLORIDA 41, OHIO STATE 14

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

NO. 1: Florida wide receiver Andre Caldwell celebrates after his 1-yard touchdown reception late in the second quarter of the Gators’ 41-14 victory.



Gators laugh last with a blowout victory

BY MIKE PHILLIPS
mphillips@MiamiHerald.com ;

GLENDALE, Ariz. — For-
get the style points.

Forget the voters, the com-
puters and the politics. Forget
coach Lloyd Carr and all the
crying at Michigan. Forget all
that and more.

Remember this: The Flor-
ida Gators, the team that

believed it could win it all.

when no one believed in them,
celebrated .100 years of foot-
ball Monday night by playing a

game for the ages, blowing out.

top-ranked Ohio State 41-14 to
win the Bowl Championship
Series title.

“We are a team of destiny,”
defensive end Jarvis Moss said
Nov. 11, when no one in the
nation gave the Gators a
chance to reach the title game.

Carr said his Wolverines,
who lost to OSU 42-39,
deserved a rematch, while
most of the BCS voters
expected Southern Cal to meet
the Buckeyes, who were
everyone’s No. 1 team in
August.

But somehow, these Gators
just kept believing. Now
everyone believes.

“It’s just a matter of compe-
tition, and the competition is a
lot better in our conference,”
said Moss, who had two sacks.
“We played against better
teams than Ohio State during
the season. I can name four or
five teams in the SEC that
could play with or beat Ohio
State.”

The Gators embarrassed
Buckeyes quarterback and
Heisman Trophy winner Troy
Smith, who completed just 4
of 14 passes for 35 yards with
one interception.

“We play against great
quarterbacks in the SEC,”
Moss said. “The competition
is just so much better. That’s
the difference.”

DEFENSE SLAMS DOOR

In the end, UF’s defense,
which carried it all season,
stopped one of the best
offenses in the nation, and
Chris Leak, the quarterback
who never received a Heisman




FIRST QUARTER

e Highlights: The rest of the
quarter belonged to the Gators,
but the first play of the game cer-
tainly sent a sobering jolt through
the Florida fans. On Ohio State’s
first play in seven weeks, kick
returner Ted Ginn Jr. dazzled the
crowd by racing 93 yards fora
Buckeyes touchdown.

vote, outplayed the Heisman
winner. And Urban Meyer,
who grew up in Astabula,
Ohio, dreaming of coaching
the Buckeyes, beat his friend
Jim Tressel to become seventh
coach to win it all in his sec-
ond season at a school.

“Well, what this means is
that we are going to hang out
together for the next 30 years,
because we won the national
title together,” said Meyer, in
his sixth season overall as a
head coach.

“How do I feel?’ Meyer
said. “This is a once-in-a-life-
time deal.”

Florida is the first school to
hold men’s basketball and
football national titles simulta-
neously. It has never felt this
great to be a Florida Gator,
which is what many fans
started chanting with 14 min-

UARTER | BY JEFF DARLINGTON, MIAMI HERALD STAF

SECOND QUARTER

e Highlights: After hitting on just
4 of 13 field-goal attempts this
season, Florida kicker Chris Het-
land made both tries. Hetland hit
a 42-yard attempt and followed it
with a 40-yard kick on the next
drive. Pretty impressive, consid-
ering that he hadn’t made one
longer than 33 yards all season.

utes left in the game.
It was that big of a blowout.
Leak, who vowed to win a
national title four years ago
when he was freshman, was

the MVP, completing 25 of 36 |

passes for 213 yards, with a
touchdown and no intercep-
tions. ,

“My legacy was to get Flor-
ida back (on top), and along
with my coaches and team-
mates, we did it,” Leak said.
“This is the greatest feeling in
the world. All the hard work
and sacrifice we went through
to get here makes it unbeliev-
able. This was special.”

Leak completed his first
nine passes for 99 yards, and
by the time he completed his
ninth, the Gators were driving
for their third touchdown and
a 21-7 lead. He went 5 for 5 and
found Dallas Baker for a 14-

THIRD QUARTER

e Highlights: Not every quarter
was filled with highlights. But
even though Florida's offense
wasn't as effective as it was the
rest of the game, the defense
played brilliantly. On Ohio State’s
first drive, the Buckeyes lost 4
yards on the first carry, gaining
just 3 more on the next two.

yard touchdown to complete
the first drive, and completed
his only pass —.a 20-yarder to
Cornelius Ingram to the Buck-
eyes’ 7 — on the second drive,
capped by a a 4-yard run by
Percy Harvin.

PILING ON

Reggie Lewis intercepted a
Smith pass, and UF went 71
yards in 10 plays, capped by
DeShawn Wynn’s spinning
2-yard run into the end zone
on the first play of the second
quarter for a 21-7 lead.

“No one respected us. No
one thought we deserved to be
here, and we played with a
chip on our shoulder most of
the year,” said Harvin, who
caught nine passes for 60
yards and rushed for 22 more.

He nearly had as many
receiving yards as Ohio State’s



’ AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF
ROUGH PLAY: Donald Washington of Ohio State grabs Brandon James’ facemask during the first quarter Monday.

wo
71

FOURTH QUARTER

© Highlights: Though this night
belonged to Chris Leak, the
Gators also managed to show
that the future still is bright at
quarterback. Freshman Tim
Tebow scrambled for a touch-
down Monday. Indeed, everyone
was getting a piece of this cham-
pionship pie.

total on offense (82).

The Buckeyes (12-1) had
won 19 ina row. They missed
Ted Ginn Jr., who lett because
of an ankle injury shortly after
returning the opening kickoff
93 yards for a touchdown. It
was OSU’s only lead.

The Gators couldn’t have
dreamed of a better first half,
taking a 34-14 lead on two
touchdown runs, two touch-
down passes and two Chris
Hetland field goals. That’s
right, Hetland, who missed 9
of 13 attempts this season, hit
from 42 and 40 yards. He
hadn’t kicked a field goal lon-
ger than 33 yards this season
and hadn’t had two field goals
in a game since last year
against Florida State.

“We were a team of des-
tiny,” Moss said. “We always
knew it.”

|



t
t
i
i
i



{
|





Solo

HOW THEY SCORED
Florida 144200 7 - 41:
Ohio State 770 0 -'4 -
FIRST QUARTER

Ohio St.: Ginn 93 kickoff return (Pettrey
kick). Time: 14:44 left. Key play: Ginn brings
finds a crease to his right on opening kickoff,
jets past UF’s Nelson and sprints down the
sideline untouched. Ohio St. 7, Florida 0.

Florida: Baker 14 pass from Leak (Hetland
kick). Drive: 46 yards, 7 plays. Time: 10:31
left. Key plays: Leak goes 5-for-5 on drive for
35 yards, also finding Baker to convert 3rd-
and-3 down to OSU 36. Florida 7, Ohio St. 7.

Florida: Harvin 5 run (Hetland kick).
Drive: 34 yards, 5 plays. Time: 5:51 left. Key
play: Ingram takes short 3rd-down pass from
Leak for 20 yards down to OSU 7. Florida 14,
Ohio St. 7. :
SECOND QUARTER

Florida: Wynn 2 run (Hetland kick). Drive:
71 yards, 10 plays. Time: 14:56 left. Key
plays: Leak hits his first three passes on
drive, finding Ingram and Cornelius on con-
secutive 19-yarders down to OSU 28. Florida
21, Ohio St. 7.

Ohio St.: Pittman 18 run (Pettrey kick).
Drive: 64 yards, 4 plays. Time: 13:32 left. Key
play: T.Smith gets untracked with 13-yard
pass to Hartline on firstsnap, with 15 tacked
on for roughing flag against UF's Siler. Flori-
da 21, Ohio St. 14, :

Florida: FG Hetland. 43. Drive: 32 yards, 9
plays. Time: 6:00 left. Key plays: Leak again
hits first three passes, amassing 29 yards
down to OSU 21 before drive stalls. Florida
24, Ohio St. 14.

Florida: FG Hetland 40. Drive: 6 yards, 4
plays. Time: 1:53 left. Key play: Everett stuffs
OSU's C.Wells short on 4th-and-1 gamble,
giving Gators possession at OSU 29. Florida
27, Ohio St. 14.

Florida: Caldwell 1 pass from Tebow (Het-
land kick). Drive: 5 yards, 3 plays. Time: :23
left. Key play: Moss strips OSU’s. T.Smith
from behind, with Harvey returning fumble 4
yards to Buckeyes 5. Florida 34, Ohio St. 14.
FOURTH QUARTER

Florida: Tebow 1 run (Hetland kick).
Drive: 39 yards, 8 plays. Time: 10:20 left. Key
plays: Leak accounts for 35 yards on drive,
with two passes for 21 yards and a 14-yard
sels early in the series. Florida 41, Ohio
St. 14. :

Paid attendance: 74,628. eT.

TEAM STATISTICS
UF OSU
First downs - total 21 14
First downs rushing 6 5
First downs passing 14 1
First downs by penalty 1 2
Third-down efficiency 10-19 1-9
Fourth-down efficiency 2-3 0-1
Total net yards 7 82
Total offensive plays 37 37
Avg. gain per play 10.0 2.2
Net yards rushing 156 47
Rushing plays 43 23
Avg. gain per rush 3.6 2.0
Net yards passing 214 35
Sacks by 5-51 1-7
Passes attempted 37 14
Passescompleted . 26 4
Interceptions suffered 0 1
Punts/average 2 6-37.8
Had blocked 0
Total return yardage 70 206
Punt returns-yards 4-28 1-13
Kickoff returns-yards 1-33 6-193
Int. returns-yards 1-0 0-0
Penalties-yards 6-50 5-50
Fumbles-lost 0-0 1-1
FG made-attempts 2-2 0-0
Time of possession 40:48 19:12
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
FLORIDA GATORS
PASSING — Att.Com. Pct.- Yds. TD INT
i Leak 36 «625 69.4 213 1 0
. < Tebow Polpw0o0 P11 0
RUSHING No. Yds Avg. Lg
Wynn 19 69 36 17
Tebow 10 39 39 10
Harvin 5 22 44 6
Caldwell 3 23 43
RECEIVING No. Yds Avg. Lg
Harvin 9 6 67 7
Cornelius 5 50 10.0 19
Ingram: 4 58 145 20
Baker 4 23 58 14
PUNTING No. Avg. Lg TB [20
Wilbur 4442 59 2 #O
PUNT RETURNS No. Avg. Lg
James 470!
KICK RETURNS * No. Avg. lg.
James 1 33.0 33
INTERCEPTIONS No.. Avg. lg
Lewis 1 0.0 0
TACKLES Solo Ass. Tot.
Everett 5 2 7
Siler 4 0 4
Harvey 4 0 4
McDonald 0 3 3
* Munroe 2 0 2
McColum 2 0 2
Moss 2 0 2
Smith 2 0 2
Cooper 1 0 1
Murphy 1 0 1
Crum 1 0 1
Joiner 0 1 1
Brooks 0 1 1
Smith 0 1 1
Harris 0 1 1
Nelson 0 1 1

Sacks: McDonald 3-31, Moss 2-20.
Kicking: Hetland 2-2 (42, 40).

OHIO STATE BUCKEYES

PASSING Att.Com. Pct. Yds TD INT
Smith 14 4 288 «#35 2 (0) 1
RUSHING No. Yds Avg. _ Lg
Pittman 10 62 6.2 18
Wells 2 9 45 7
Whitner 1 5 5.0 5
Smith 10-29-29 0
RECEIVING No. Yds _ Avg. _ tg
Gonzalez 2. “Al <55 8
Whitner 1 13. 13.0 13
Pittman ods MO
PUNTING No. Avg. Lg TB [20
Trapassa 6 37.8 44 0 2
PUNTRETURNS NO. Avg. _ihg
Gonzalez 1 13.0 13
KICK RETURNS NO. Avg. _ig
Ginn 1 93.0 93
Wells 1 22.0 22
Gonzalez 2 215 31
Hall
TACKLES Solo Ass. Tot.
Laurinaitis 10 5 15
Freeman 9 6 15
Mitchell 6 3 9
Ashton 6 1 ie
O'Neal 3 3 6
Gholston 2 3 5
Smith 2 3 5
Haw 3 1 4
Patterson 3, 1 4
Penton 2 1 3
Pitcock 1 2 3
Sacks: Gholston 1-7. 5
UF SCHEDULE AND RESULTS ~ ~

DATE OPPONENT TIME/RESULT
Sept. 2S. Mississippi W, 34-7
Sept.9 UCF W, 42-0
Sept. 16 @Tennessee W, 21-20
Sept. 24 Kentucky W, 26-7
Sept. 31 Alabama W, 28-13
Oct.7 LSU W, 23-10
Oct. 14 @Auburn L, 27-17
Oct. 28 vs Georgia W, 21-14
Nov.4 @ Vanderbilt W, 25-19
Nov. 11S. Carolina W, 17-16
Nov. 18 W. Carolina W, 62-0
Nov. 25 @FSU W, 21-14
Dec.2 Arkansas W, 38-21
Jan.8 — Ohio State W, 41-14

BCS CHAMPIONS

2007: Florida 41, Ohio State 14

2006: Texas 41, Southern California 38
2005: Southern California 55, Oklahoma 19
2004: Louisiana State 21, Oklahoma 14
2003: Ohio State 31, Miami 24 (20T)

2062: Miami 37, Nebraska 14

2001: Oklahoma 13, Florida State 2

2000: Florida State. 46, Virginia Tech 29
1999: Tennessee 23, Florida State 16



6E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 _

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP RECAP

INTERNATIONALEDITION





INSIDE THE GATORS | QUARTERBACK CHRIS LEAK

Leak’s concentrated effort

UF quarterback Chris
Leak brought his focused
state onto the field and led
the Gators to the title he
envisioned as a freshman.

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Ina
dimly-lit tunnel just a few
yards away from the field
where he would solidify his
legacy, Florida quarterback
Chris Leak still had work to
do.

He was throwing passes.
Hard ones. The kind that
snapped every time they left
his hand and popped every
time teammate Tim Tebow
caught them.

Maybe this was a strange
place to be warming up, espe-
cially since only a few minutes

separated him from the BCS |

national championship game.
Then again, maybe it wasn’t.
Maybe this was perfect.

“Are you ready?” Tebow
said, breaking the silence in an
otherwise quiet, dark area
beneath University of Phoenix
Stadium.

Leak didn’t answer him. He
just turned his body toward
the field and walked silently
away, exhibiting the same
focus that has led him through
four roller-coaster years. |

Indeed, this was tunnel
vision. On Monday, Leak had
it from start to finish.

“We're national champs,”
Leak said. “That’s what you
dream about. My legacy was
to get University of Florida
_ football back here. What bet-
ter way then to play against a
great team like Ohio State?”

Less than an hour after his
last-minute warm-up, as the
first quarter came to an end,
Leak was nearly perfect. And
he had his team rolling toward
a second national champion-
ship in a dominating fashion
few expected.

LEAK completed 9 of 10
attempts for 99 yards and one
touchdown in one of his finest
quarters as a college quarter-
back in undoubtedly the most
important game of his life.

At the season’s start, there
were plenty of questions about
whether Leak would be able to
handle pressure like this.
Whether he would be able to
limit himself from making
those costly mistakes that
caused “Tebow” chants to fill
Ben Hill Griffin Stadium.

On Monday? No questions
at all. Leak was sacked only
once and didn’t throw an
interception.

And as a result, in a game

GATORS | DEFENSE

CHRIS LEAK:
BY THE NUMBERS

s Collegiate starts /
4 472 forteak,who
guaranteed mul

- tiple SEC and national.
s autles when he eto UF.











ams: won three North: oe



: ~ national
and state.
~ passing —
ue ore

that would forever define him
in the storied history of Flor-
ida football, the Gators left
Arizona with their second
national championship.

This was what he had envi-
sioned for so long, the way he
saw himself ending his career.
He wanted championships.

No, he didn’t win them
every year, like he had hoped
he would as a freshman phe-
nom. No, he wasn’t always the
campus’ favorite quarterback,
instead enduring moments
when many wanted someone
more fitting for Urban Mey-
er’s system to take over.

When Meyer first arrived,
he even tried to get Leak to
relax. But that’s not Leak’s
nature. He remained a student
of the game, preparing for
weeks to face Ohio State.

On Monday, he proved why
focus matters so much.

“There’s been only two
quarterbacks to win a national
championship in 100 years of
Florida football,” Meyer said.
“And Chris Leak is one of
them.”

x12 When Leak first committed

to, Florida, his focus was as
blatant as it was before and
during Monday’s game. Some-

times, it was even alarming. |

This was a man who said he
wouldn’t date women until he
won a national title, a man
who spoke with short clichés.

“He spent hours in film ses-
sions, sometimes so late into
the night, he would be given a
key to lock up the building
because everyone else had
gone home. But after all those
years of devotion, committing

himself so devoutly to football, '

it all started to make sense.

‘You can call him crazy. But
now, you must also call him a
champion.

2 47: LeakasaQBin
S high school. His -





_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

A VICTORY TO CHERISH: Florida quarterback Chris Leak holds aloft the BCS national
championship trophy after leading the Gators to a huge triumph against Ohio State.

Fast and furious unit stifles Buckeyes

EA The Gators’ defense
limited Ohio State’s
offense to 82 total yards
during Florida’s 41-14
victory over the Buckeyes.

BY LOUIS ANASTASIS
Miami Herald Writer

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Over- -

rated Florida speed, where?

The Gators shocked a
Buckeyes team Monday night.
But though the final score was
certainly surprising on some
fronts, the way Florida won
wasn't.

Defense. Defense. Defense.

It has been the Gators’ ral-
lying cry all season.

“Take that Ohio State!”
linebacker Brian Crum said.
“They were supposedly one of
the most storied programs in
the nation, and that’s all I had
been hearing about all week.
We just came out and just hit
them in the mouth on every
play.”

The Gators limited Ohio
State to 82 yards of total
offense.

Florida’s defense also set up .

an easy score before halftime
when defensive end Jarvis
Moss stripped the ball from
quarterback Troy Smith.

Fellow defensive end Der-
rick Harvey scooped up the
ball and returned it to the
Buckeyes’ 5-yard line.

The Gators scored three
plays later when backup quar-
terback Tim Tebow faked a



run to the right, moved to the
left, then looked up to find
receiver Andre Caldwell for a
l1-yard touchdown.

“We were just playing our

game, using our speed and our





athleticism,” Moss said. “We
just had to get after him. It was
just something we had been
doing all season. To play the
way we did tonight may have
come as a surprise to some

DOWNED:
Florida
defensive
end Derrick
Harvey
sacks Troy
Smith
during the
first quarter
Monday
night. Smith
completed
just 2 of 8
passes for
24 yards
and was
sacked
three times
in the first
half alone.

a

AL DIAZ/
MIAMI HERALD STAFF

people, but not to us.”

Said Florida co-defensive
coordinator Greg Mattison:
“We had a meeting before the
game where I pulled aside the

guys and told them, eeeee”

PR TE CR TINE TN ANTE TEN ET NTT TE



prepares harder than you
guys. >”

During a Sunday interview
with ESPN, Florida coach
Urban Meyer was asked how
to stop Ohio State’s Heisman
Trophy-winning quarterback
Troy Smith.

“You don’t stop him, but
you try to contain him,” Meyer
responded.

Go figure. Smith completed
4 of 14 passes for 35 yards, no
touchdowns and one intercep-
tion.

- “He hadn’t seen any pres-
sure like this all year,” Crum
said. “We just thought if we
got some pressure on them
with Moss and Harvey and
Steve [Harris], he can’t really
get into his reads and find any-

body open.”

Florida’s suffocating front
four stymied Smith all game.
Any time one of the linemen
came free, a foot race would
ensue. And once that: hap-
pened, the play usually
resulted in an incomplete pass.

The intriguing part about it
were the sacks. The Gators
had just four in their previous
four games. But the disarray
Florida caused accounted for
Smith being sacked three
times in the first half.

Part of the equation was the
secondary.

The Gators tightly covered
Ohio State’s receivers — who
played without a hobbled Ted
Ginn Jr. for most of the game.

SRT







NOTEBOOK

STILL HURTING

GLENDALE, Ariz. —
The most difficult moment
Monday came before the
kickoff, a silent tug at the
heart for UF safety Reggie

_ Nelson, whose mother,

Mary Lakes, died Dec. 21
after a three-year battle
with cancer.

The Gators don’t permit
cellphones in the locker
room, but no one said any-
thing to Nelson, who
always spoke to his mother
just before taking the field.

“That call won’t be made ~
this tirne, and that’s going
to be tough on Reggie,” said
UF co-defensive coordina-
tor Charlie Strong earlier
this week. “She was a spe-
cial lady.”

The Gators did every-
thing they could to protect
Nelson from the national
media horde in Arizona.
The BCS contract states all
players must be made avail-
able to the media during
media day. But UF reached
an agreement with the BCS,
and that clause in the con-
tract was waived for Nel-
son.

“Reggie Nelson is the
heart of this defense,” UF
linebacker Brandon Siler
said. “He’s the best player
I’ve ever played wi

Nelson, an All-American
who is called “Eraser” by
his teammates, did talk
about facing Ohio State
before leaving Gainesville.

“We're just going to let
them talk and we’re going
to continue like we’ve been
doing,” Nelson said.

“That’s motivation. We’re
the underdogs, but like I
said, we’ve just got to go
out and keep playing foot-

- ball and not worry about

the media or anybody else.”

SPLIT LOYALTIES

There has been much
written about Urban Mey-
er’s Ohio roots, but this has
been a difficult time for his
wife, Shelley, who also is a
native of Ohio.

“We go back to the
Buckeyes from birth,” said
Shelley, who still carries a
lucky Buckeye nut with her.
“T’ve been carrying two
Florida coins and a Buck-
eye all season long, and
we're playing Ohio State
for the national title. I have
been saying how ironic it is,
but it’s not just ironic. It’s
eerie.

“All season long Ohio
State was doing so well,
and all season long ’m
rooting for them all season.
I never thought this would
happen. I was in denial.

“It’s been crazy. Our
friends are [in Ohio]. Our
families are there. We have
a lot of people confused
about this game,” Shelley
said. “Our families are say-
ing, ‘We will be happy
either way.’ How often do
you hear that? Most of
them knowit’s really
important for us to win. But
it’s hard for them. I don’t
blame them. It runs deep.

“T’ve told them, ‘You
can’t come to the game ona
ticket from me if you’re not
wearing orange and blue.’
We had over 200 ask for
tickets, and I told everyone

-who got a ticket they better

wear orange and blue.”

Shelly even had some
advice for former Ohio
State coach Earle Bruce,
who is close to Urban .
Meyer and Ohio State
coach Jim Tressel, who
both worked for Bruce.
Shelly told Bruce he could
wear Ohio State red, but he
should at least wear some
Gator underwear.

ULTIMATE UNDERDOGS

The media didn’t have
much faith in the Gators.

The Jacksonville Times-
Union polled members of
the media from across the
United States, and only ll of
the 25 polled picked the
Gators to win Monday
night.

USA Today polled its
writers, and 1 of 12 writers
picked Ohio State.

— MIKE PHILLIPS

TET EL LTTE TT TT



PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Australia are just too |
good again for Englan

@ CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

AUSTRALIA thrashed
England by 77 runs Tuesday
after setting a record target
for a Twenty20 internation-
al in the shortest version of
cricket, just four days after
completing a 5-0 Ashes
series sweep in the tradi-
tional game.

Adam Gilchrist clubbed
five sixes in his 48 and
shared a 69-run second-
wicket stand with skipper
Ricky Ponting that pro-
pelled Australia to a record
221 in a Twenty20 interna-
tional. .

Michael Vaughan, return-
ing as England skipper after
missing the Ashes series
with a knee injury, held the
top of the innings together
before he was out for 27 and
the tourists slumped to 54

- for four.

Combined

Paul Nixon (not out 31)
and Jamie Dalrymple (32)
combined in a 49-run sev-
enth-wicket stand to help
England recover to 144 for
nine.

"It's good to be back. I'd
have liked a win, but...
they're a powerful team,"
Vaughan said. "We didn't
get off to.a good start, but it
was always going to be a tall
order with that target."

Jon Lewis' was the most
costly of the four missed
catches, dropping Ponting at
mid-on for 16. Ponting went
on to make 47 from 26 balls
before Lewis caught him
behind square leg off Paul
Collingwood's bowling.

Opener Matthew Hayden _

set the Australians in

@ ENGLAND'S Jamie Dalrymple, right, plays a reverse sweep shot in front of Australia’

ney Cricket Ground in Sydney, Australia, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2007. Australia won by 77 runs.

motion, hitting 20 from eight
balls at the top of the order
while Gilchrist, who initially
struggled against Andrew
Flintoff, plundered 48 from
28 balls.
Gilchrist's innings con-
tained two boundaries and
five massive sixes, including
three off consecutive balls

from one James Anderson
over that netted Australia
21 runs.

Cameron White finished
unbeaten on 40 with four
sixes and a four and shared
a 66-run sixth-wicket stand
in 5.4 overs with Andrew
Symonds, who was not out
39.

England lost wickets in
the first and second overs in
reply.

Nathan Bracken dismissed
Ed Joyce for one in the first
over and Shane Harwood
had Flintoff out for a duck
in the second over.

‘Harwood ran out Kevin
Pietersen for 11 with a direct

hit from out near the bound-
ary after Pietersen turned a
Nathan Bracken ball behind
square and attempted a sec-
ond run, making the tourists
32 for three after 4.1 overs
and virtually ending the run
chase.

It was only the second
Twenty20 international

COE IE
Pe ee rate ed ea
Ask for them in-store ULL



Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause
Heart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases.





s wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist in their 20/20 cricket match at the Syd:

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

played in Australia, follow-
ing the 95-run win by the
Australians over South
Africa in Brisbane last
year. :
England and Australia
meet again Friday in the
opening match of the limit-
ed-overs tri-series that also
involves New Zealand.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 3





Uproar
in PLP
about

George
Smith
remarks

FROM page one

voice of advancement for the
Bahamian people.”

The party said Mr Smith’s
views suggested new PLP
incumbents were unworthy
of nomination.

“He went so far as to say
that most aspiring MPs want
this office simply for the
glamour and power of it or
just to rottenly enrich them-
selves.”

Describing his remarks as
a “sad indictment” of the
PLP’s parliamentary team,
the party blamed Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie for
encouraging them to. be
“slackers” in their con-
stituencies.

“The Workers Party is
aware from intelligence
reports coming out of the
PLP that Prime Minister
Christie is leaning towards
firing many of his sitting MPs
and presenting a new face to
the Bahamian people.”

Such a move, it said, would
meet with “strong and over-
whelming public approval”
and greatly enhance the
PLP’s chances at the polls.

The party said it hoped
both Mr Christie and FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham
would use Mr Smith’s com-
ments to “clean house” and
present the best candidates
possible.



Preval says
US not doing
enough on
narcotics

B HAITI
Port-au-Prince

_ PRESIDENT Rene Preval
said Haiti remained a “vic-
tin of drug-consuming coun-
tries” in a speech Monday,
accusing the United States in

| particular of not doing
enough to help his impover-
ished nation fight the nar-
cotics trade, according to
Associated Press. .

Renewing a criticism he
made in his first presidential
term, Preval accused rich,
drug-consuming countries of
blaming Haiti for failing to
stop the flow of illegal drugs
while doing little to boost the
Caribbean country’s weak
defences.

“Since I made that speech,
thas the situation changed? I
don’t think so,” Preval said.

‘FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157



oem eeoe e@ 8 @ @

~ Cushions



MAJORITY RULE DAY

Plans to mark the abolition of



slavery for Majority Rule Day

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TODAY, the 40th anniver-
sary of Majority Rule in the
Bahamas, has been declared a
“national day of reflection” by
the government.

The
announced plans to commemo-
rate another historical milestone
— the 200th anniversary of the
abolition of the trans-Atlantic
slave trade — with an ecumenical
service at the Southern Recre-

ation Grounds, an area which

has been central “to black
Bahamian political life through-
out the 20th century,” it was
revealed yesterday.

“Through its celebration of
these important historic mile-
stones, the government will
ensure that the legacies of past
Bahamians live on from gener-
ation to generation," said Min-
ister of Works and Utilities, Mr

: _ Bradley Roberts.





He said Majority Rule Day
is to be reflected upon as ush-
ering in “the opportunity for all
Bahamians to have constitu-
tional, political, social, cultural
and economic rights” in the
wake of the traditional disen-

franchisement of the majority ©

government also”

ll THE new Cabinet in 1967

under the rule of what has been
commonly described as a “priv-
ileged elite”.

Whereas before 1958 only
male Bahamians with property
over the age of 21 could vote —

‘while those owning property,

or companies, had multiple
votes — recommendations made
by Secretary of State for
Colonies Allen Lennox Boyd
that year saw this constitutional
inequality dismantled, with the
result that the 1962 election was
the first in which universal suf-
frage was exercised.



However, Majority Rule was
yet again delayed, after the PLP
were denied power despite win-
ning a majority of votes.

They finished with fewer
seats than the primarily white
United Bahamian Party, politi-
cal home of the ruling "Bay
street Boys"-
— due to what many commen-
tators have described as "ger-
rymandering" — the manipula-
tion of constituency boundaries
for political ends.

The UBP’s political domi-
nance continued until 1967

Black minority controls Bahamas,
claims social activist Duncombe

MAJORITY Rule was dis-
missed as a myth yesterday by a
social activist who claims a
wealthy black minority now
controls the Bahamas.

Fathers rights leader Clever
Duncombe said the PLP and
FNM had both taken on the
faults of the former white oli-
garchy.

“They have all aspired to
become filthy rich at the
expense of the ordinary man,”
he said. ;

As a result, poor blacks wh
were promised a “Square Deal”
during the general election cam-
paign of 1967 are still as poorly
off as they always were. -

While maybe 15 or 20 per cent
of blacks had prospered from
so-called Majority Rule, most
were still struggling from pay
cheque to pay cheque, he said.

His hard-hitting comments
came 40 years to the day since
the PLP won power from the
former UBP with the help of
two “outsiders” - Labour leader
Randol Fawkes and Eleuthera
representative Alvin Braynen.

Mr Duncombe said succes-
sive governments had betrayed
the parents and grandparents
who had sacrificed so much in
the past.

Black politicians had repeat-
ed all the faults of the former
white rulers, getting rich off the
backs of the people and helping
their cronies.

“Meanwhile, the masses are
still suffering,” he told The Tri-
bune. ;

Mr Duncombe said many of
the old divisive laws left on the
statute books since colonial
times were still there.

Affiliation laws designed to
split families and make individ-
uals less able to function suc-
cessfully in society had been
retained.

“I don’t want to make it a
racial issue because it is not
white on black anymore, it is a
black on black situation.

“We need to get rid of these
discriminatory laws as they.
relate to our socio-economic
structure,” he said. &

On the growing disparity in
wealth, Mr Duncombe said some
people are “still living from pay
cheque to pay cheque and many
have no pay cheques at all.”

Mr Duncombe drewia com-
parison between the fortunes
of the late prime minister Sir
Lynden Pindling - who ended
up in a mansion on a hill - and
those who were supposed to
benefit from his “Square Deal”.

And he decried the decline
in educational standards which
- 40 years after the PLP
takeover - left children lan-
guishing with D-plus grades.

It was only now, four decades
on, that a national health scheme
was being mentioned, he added.

“It is a sad indictment on suc-
cessive governments when you
consider where we are today,”
he said. .

The country’s social fibre had
deteriorated badly, with 60 mur-
ders last year, 52 the year before
and a record 70 in the year 2000.

“Crime has increased by unac-
ceptable numbers,” said Mr Dun-
combe, “We have 520 reported
cases of abuse on children.”

Referring to political intimi-
dation and victimisation, he
said: “They can’t take us under
the fig tree and whip us any-
more, but what they can do is
intimidate us for speaking out.

“The politicians have not
been motivated by ideals and I
would challenge any politician
who has served over the last 40
years to refute that.”

He said today’s rulers did not
even abide by the provisions of





the Public Disclosure Act,
which required them to reveal
details of their wealth.

“They have refused to accept

high standards, and this is a

challenge we have to meet over °

the next 40 years,” he added.

“In 1967, our parents and
grandparents had a legitimate
claim as they were experienc-
ing unjustified oppression and
felt that the PLP were the sav-
iours from above. It was easy
for them to buy into the ideolo-
gy of the PLP.”

But the party was irrelevant
now. “I don’t see any reason to
support the PLP in terms of
their philosophy,” he said.

“After all, while ordinary peo-

le wili be receiving pensions of

200 per month, the black politi-
cians will be retiring on pensions
running into hundreds of thou-
sands. We have replaced one
hierarchy with another.

He added: “Vote buying is
still big business in the Bahamas
today. They know an issue-
based campaign will open the
eyes of the people, so they
resort to rallies, where politi-
cians crack jokes and soon. |"

“They are using the same

. machinery our’ parents and

grandparents fought so hard to
eliminate.”

Mr Duncombe, who is con-
testing Golden Gates as an inde-
pendent in the election, pointed
out that it was an independent
candidate who made the differ-
ence on January 10, 1967.

“We are paying the price of
social neglect by successive gov-
ernments. Where do we go now
from here?”



Decorations
Poinsettias
Garlands
Wreaths
Trees
Picks
Lights



ee SoS

The management and Rea aL) Pars.

Christmas candles
Christmas ribbon

despite having won fewer votes,
but, as Carlton Francis put it,
"they stood on the beach of his-
tory but they could not hold
back the tide."

Reform |

Yesterday, commentators
spoke of the significance of this
day in 1967, on which the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party was at
last victorious in the general
election, having finally been in a
position to benefit from the new
political rights of the majority of
Bahamians, as well as the stren-
uously called-for electoral
reform.

The happily non-violent
transformation of power came
after years of claims on all sides
that the black majority were
"not ready" be governed by a
party made up of “their own”
said Sir Clifford Darling and Sir
Clement Maynard, two of the
PLP members voted into par-
liament in 1967, on the Real
Talk Live show on ZNS yester-
day.

Sir Arthur Foulkes, anothe
of the successful PLP candi-
dates that day, said that it was
“perhaps the most significant

day in our history...even the

most important since emanci-
pation.”

He and his political allies
were "euphoric" on the day that
they, and their PLP party, were
ushered into the country's cor-
ridors of power, and he looks
back on it as the greatest in his
political career, he said.

Former governor general Sir
Orville Turnquest, another PLP
parliamentarian of the era, said
January 10 “signalled the begin-
ning of an era in our centuries’
old history when the opportu-
nity for leadership and involve-
ment in all areas of our country
was now open to all our citizens
without discrimination on
account of race, colour or
creed.”

Sir Clifford and Sir Clement
agreed that the move towards
Majority Rule was facilitated
by collective action such as
woman's suffrage in 1961 and
the general strike of 1957.

Mr Darling said that the lead-
ing elite were not pushed out
because they were white, but
because “it was felt that they
were not trying to go all the way
with the majority rule.”

SEE page 10

ESAS SSSA

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com .

Sa








Rd i) rr
Christmas












a

\\\

customers sincere thanks for continued support over the past year.
We wish you a New Year of Peace, Lael) and Success.

Where Fabrics, Cralts & Inspiration Meet

Home Fabrics

PON a WRyee PeS OCU e224 ye





+p eaedae es

ana ere

=F 9% a,

$4.47

ae

2 a & & 6.8.8 D4 .F.9_*_*

tte #7

2 tas te

ogee ee ea & 9 PLE! See a a eS LL

~7 ee eo

BS nn we ®

7 VT TT
a a Ay

2 Re

st we @.0.0.9.F Ir ors

eee Be 6 SP FPF

ek

oe Raa se 2.

ws Et

RPT eG eee FSS

ee ey

7?

€€ @ PLR UBS S 4 Bf 6s! tA SE

2
es



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs







THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007

av We

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE ;
‘This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee

motivation.
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007
Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm Be:






Venue: To be announced
Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $160.00




















WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.
Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tultion:

Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007
9:30am - 4:30pm, é
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00












All fees are inciuded with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

perdev cob.edu.bs
Brae vic,
328-0093

Contact the Coordinator -





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007












MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS i
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS U

This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments, Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.














Starting: | Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: ‘6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

C ontact the Coordinator - f erdev (@cob.edu.bs



THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 7

SSS SSS







@ HIGH sea breaks against the port side
breeches buoy is rigged up with destroyer

the grave of missing submarine Thresher.

Historic vessel 1

of the research vessel Atlantis II, April 14, 1963, as a
Hazelwood for the transfer of sonar equipment to seek





(AP Photo/Sir)



Grand Bahama

A piece of history has arrived
on the shores of Grand
Bahama.

Atlantis I, the vessel famous
for the discovery and first film-
ing of the Titanic, arrived in
Grand Bahama in late 2006, and
is now undergoing restoration.

After being saved from a
shipyard in Louisiana and sur-
viving Hurricane Katrina, the
ship and its new crew endured
the five-day trip across the Gulf
of Mexico to the Bahamas,
which will become its new
home.

Atlantis II was the first
research vessel ever built in the
US and the first to get the RV
designation.

She was built for the Woods
Hole Oceanographic Institution
(WHOI) and was considered
the flagship of their fleet..The
ship travelled around the world
and was involved with every
type of ocean science explo-
ration.

In 1979 Atlantis II underwent
a major mid-life refit. The con-
version’ of the power source
from steam to diesel reduced
the vessel’s operating cost,
increased its range of travel, and
increased its selection of ports.

In 1983 a deck hanger and A-
frame were installed enabling
her to handle the launch and
recovery of the submersible
oceanographic vehicle, Alvin.

- for restoration

Atlantis II served as Alvin’s te:

_ der from 1984 to 1996.

Atlantis II concluded 34 yez
of service, over one milliv:
miles sailed for science, a)
more than 8,000 days at sea, «
record unequalled by ai.
research vessel.

Decommissioned in 1996, s!:
sat quiet for a number of ye:

~ changing hands several tin

without realising any signific::
new purpose. That has chang:

Just why is the Atlantis ||
here? The reason will unfold
the weeks to come, So Stu\
tuned.

e Photo and history excerpts
from www.whoi.edu

Activist: Fewer political
prisoners, but Cuban
dissidents still harassed

m@ HAVANA

THE number of political pris-
oners held in Cuba dropped in
the second half of last year, but
harassment of dissidents con-
tinues, a veteran human rights
activist said Tuesday.

Elizardo Sanchez of the
Cuban Commission on Human

Rights and National Reconcili-_,

ation said in his twice-yearly
update that his group counted
283 prisoners of conscience,
down from 316 in early July.

The commission counted 333
political prisoners in Cuba a
year ago.

Sanchez attributed the drop
to “selective” releases of pris-
oners, such as Hector Palacios,
an opposition leader who was
recently set free on medical
parole.

Palacios was one of 75 dissi-
dents arrested in a broad crack-
down in 2003. Besides Palacios,
fifteen of those arrested have
since been freed for health rea-
sons.

But Sanchez said that even
as some prisoners have been
released, Cuba’s communist-
run government continues to
harass dissidents with short
detentions, interrogations and
monitoring.

The rights activist also said
he had no hope for,a major
change under Raul Castro, the
defense minister named acting
president when his older broth-
er Fidel Castro stepped aside
in late July after intestinal
surgery.

“There is nothing pressuring
Raul to make changes,” said
Sanchez. “My vision is pes-
simistic.”

Cuba’s communist govern-



IS <

@ CUBAN dissident Elizardo Sanchez is seen on the porch of








his home in the Cuban capital of Havana in this September 1994

photo.

ment denies holding prisoners

of conscience, characterising

them as common criminals.
Because there are no public

(CP Photo/Jose Goitia)

records available about the pris-
oners, rights activists count on
family members and others to
bring cases to their attention.



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com __





NOTEBOOK

cotinine

THE COST OF WINNING

GLENDALE, Ariz. — As
college football’s hierarchy
tries to digest (probably
with antacids) the details of
Nick Saban’s contract at
the University of Alabama,
Ohio State officials were
bracing for immediate ram-
ifications.

A clause in coach Jim
Tressel’s contract, signed
last May, voids the deal if
the Buckeyes win the
national title.

The language was
inserted after OSU won the
2002 crown, and it was kept
in his most recent deal.

“T didn’t even know I
’ had it,” Tressel said after

’ OSU’s first practice in the
desert last week.

If Saban, who won a
national title at LSU in .
2003, is worth a reported $4
million a year, what would
Tressel be worth with two
crowns?

“T don’t know. A lot,”
receiver Anthony Gonza-
lez said. “To me, Coach
Tressel is the best coach in
the country, so he ought to
be compensated that way.”

Tressel is completing
the first of a seven-year
deal that pays him at least
$2.38 million this season
and rises incrementally
each year. He’s not even
the highest-paid coach in
the Big Ten; that honor
belongs to Iowa’s Kirk Fer-
entz ($2.84 million).

Until Saban took Ala-
bama’s offer last week,
Oklahoma’s Bob Stoops
($3.4 million) and Notre

‘Dame’s Charlie Weis (esti-
mated $3.3 million) were at
the top of the national
charts.

OSU athletic director
Gene Smith told reporters
he wants to see details of
Saban’s contract to learn
how much is money, com-
pared to perks such as cars,
housing aid and the like.

‘My philosophy,” Smith
said, “is to look at our
coaches and see where they
are competitively in the
marketplace with their
peers... . We'll look first at
the [Big Ten], then we'll
look at peers.”

BOOKS TO HIT
The Ohio State players

-"+ had to return to Columbus

” facing a challenge not
encountered by any previ-
ous Buckeyes squad:

Five days of classes to

*. make up.

Ohio State operates on a
quarter system, and classes
for the winter quarter
began last Wednesday. It’s
a byproduct of the new
BCS model that plays the
final game later than any
previous season’s end.

To ease the transition,
OSU sent six tutors to Ari-
zona to set up a computer
lab and help the players
with class outlines and
assignments. Some players

have been subject toaman- -

-datory study table.

“The culture is in place
to allow them to reach
championship perfor-
mances, both on the field
and in the classroom,” said

. John P. Bruno, Ohio
State’s faculty athletics rep- _
resentative.

The Buckeyes had to
obtain NCAA waivers for
its nine graduated players
to compete without regis-
tering.

Florida’s new semester,
by the way, began Monday.

UNFAMILIAR ZONE

The Gators’ first-half
scoring output left Ohio
- State in some uncomfort-
* able territory. The Buck-
eyes had trailed in just
three games during the reg-
ular season. Cincinnati,
Penn State and Indiana all
managed to score first in
their meetings.

All told, Ohio State
’ trailed for just a total of
23:17 in the regular season.
The Gators exceeded that
by intermission, holding
the lead for the final 24:09
of the opening half.

— JEFF SHAIN

















INSIDE THE GAME | OHIO STATE

Buckeyes fell into a ‘lls hole

@ Ohio State was left
confused by Florida’s
multiple-formation and
high-octane offense- and
Ted Ginn Jr. was injured.

BY JEFF SHAIN
jshain@MiamiHerald.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Ohio
State got only 10 minutes out
of Ted Ginn Jr. That alone was
ominous enough.

Ginn’s presence, though,
would have done little to mask
the defensive deficiencies
Florida exploited in Monday
night’s 41-14 romp, which left
the Buckeyes short of college

_ football’s summit.

The Gators’ wide array of
offensive looks and superior
speed combined to roll up 220
yards and 34 points by half-
time, putting the Buckeyes in a
hole even their offensive
weapons couldn’t blast their
way out of.

“When you look at what
transpired in the game, it’s not
surprising that it turned out
the way it did,” OSU coach Jim
Tressel said. “We gave them
every opportunity to make it a
40-whatever game. Did that
hurt? No question.”

Nor did it help that the

Buckeyes were without their |

fastest offensive weapon.
After taking the opening kick-
off 93 yards for a touchdown,
Ginn was on the field for just
three snaps and two more
kickoffs before leaving the
game with a suspected ankle
injury.

“That was very noticeable,”
said Troy Smith, OSU’s Heis-
man Trophy quarterback.
“Not having him definitely
took a little bit away from the
team. But, at the same time,
you can’t harp on it.”

Ohio State (12-1) was seek+
ing to become the first team
since Florida State in 1999 to
go wire-to-wire as the nation’s
No. 1 team. Instead they could
only shake their heads at their
most lopsided loss in 2 1/2 sea-
sons.

The Buckeyes had held
nine of their 12 regular-season‘
opponents to less than 10
points this season, holding the

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



__ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 | 7



‘



JOE RIMKUS JR./MIAMI HERALD STAFF

STEAMROLLED: Florida back DeShawn Wynn barrels tHrodah the Ohio State defense on his way into the end zone.

line even after games were
decided and benches emptied.

But no one on OSU’s sched-
ule could have prepared the
Buckeyes for all the different
variations Florida’s offense
threw at them.

Six different Gators caught
passes, all on short out pat-
terns or crossing routes. No
completion all night went for
more than 20 yards. UF also
utilized six rushers, including
two listed as wideouts.

The Gators even used three
quarterbacks — not only
bringing in Tim Tebow for his

usual job running in short-
yardage situations but giving
fellow freshman Percy Harvin
more direct snaps than any
previous outing.

On at least three occasions,
Chris Leak either lined up
wide or went in motion as
Tebow or Harvin stood in
shotgun formation.

All of it left the Buckeyes
on their heels. Though Ohio
State frequently dropped eight
men into coverage, Leak had
time to find receivers in the
seams or the flat.

“We didn’t cause any turn-

overs; lost the turnover mar-
gin,” defensive tackle David
Patterson said. “We just didn’t
do the things it takes to win.”

By the time it was finished,
Ohio State had given up 371
yards — eight shy of what
Michigan rolled up as the sea-
son high for a Buckeyes oppo-
nent.

Ginn, meanwhile, could do
nothing more than watch.

It took only 16 seconds for
the speedster to put the Buck-

eyes in front, breaking through -

a crease to outrace the Gators
to the end zone with the open-

ing kickoff.

But things quickly went
downhill after that. OSU went
three-and-out on its first
offensive series, and Ginn took
himself out of the deep return
spot after UF took a 14-7 lead.

He limped off the field as
the rest of the offense trotted
on, never to return.

“When you lose a guy that’s
a big part of what you do and

_constantly gives you big

sparks, I think it affects you,“
Tressel said.

the board.”



Urban legend 1 is thriving ahead of schedule

t’s only fitting that the
l Gators played Monday in
a stadium that resembles a
grounded UFO.
Because this championship
was ahead of its time.
What took Steve Spurrier
seven years to earn was sup-
posed to take
-at least a:cou-
ple more
years for
Urban Meyer
to duplicate.
Urban.
wasn’t sup-
posed to
- igutlerrez _ become a leg-
_ MiamiHerald.c end quite this
- quickly.

‘ And yet, he is. And these
Gators are champs — legiti-
mate champs that only Boise
State can make the mildest of
cases against. Champs that
brought home a crystal foot-
ball way before Gainesville
could have expected sucha
lovely gift.

Even in his most disillu-
sioned of moments, clouded
by that occasionally arrogant
orange-and-blue pride, Meyer
couldn’t have imagined a
national championship would
come this soon. Not when he
was playing with a quarter-
back who’s far from ideal for
his system. Not when he was
playing a second quarterback
just to make his game plan
work. Not when his best pure
running back couldn’t average
60 yards a game this season.

Granted, one of the themes
of the early season was that
Meyer’s offense tends,to take
flight in his second season at a
school. But this?

Chris Leak calmly carving
his way down the field at will,
sometimes from a comfortable
pocket, and other times toss-
ing pinpoint passes on a
designed rollouts? Percy Har-
vin taking snaps from the cen-
ter, bullets from the quarter-
back and an option pitch for a
touchdown? DeShawn Wynn
muscling in a touchdown from

2 yards out? Tim Tebow actu-
ally throwing a touchdown
pass? And doing it all against
the top scoring defense i in the
nation?

Nothing about this Gators
season warned that this was
coming. Based on the body of
work, nothing about the
Gators season said the team
could absolutely dominate. At
best, it said Meyer was making
due with his less-than-ideal
roster and piecing together a
better-than-expected season.
But it wasn’t supposed to
translate into a clean whoop-
ing of the No. 1 team in the
nation — the team that was
supposed to have the better
game-day technician on its
sideline with the best quarter-
back and the best wide
receiver also wearing scarlet.

There were clues all sea-
son, some subtle, some smack-
ing you in the face, that
showed the Gators weren’t
ready to run over good teams.

Consider that Meyer called
four fake punts this season

ELITE COMPANY



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

WAY TO GO: Urban Meyer, who won the BCS title in his second season coaching the
Gators, celebrates the final moments of Monday’s 41-14 victory against Ohio State.

By winning the BCS title in his second season as coach of AQ
Florida, Urban Meyer joined some elite company. Inthe nine —
seasons the BCS has been in place, six teams have won the _
title within the first four yeoke ofa Roach taking over.

Year Champion ¢
2000 Oklahoma Bc
2001 Miami

2002 Ohio State






2006 “Florida

because he felt his team
needed an immediate change
of momentum. All four
worked. Teams that are good
enough to control a national .
title game aren’t supposed to
need those kinds of desperate
acts that often in a season.
Consider that Meyer had to
find gimmicky ways to run the
football, including using a
freshman quarterback and a
pair of receivers as his most

Coach eA

Larry Coker wi wins title | in n his first year
im Tressel win title i in his second year

itle j in| his fourth vyear |

Hh wins title | in his. fourth year

Urban Meyer. wins title in his second year

consistent threats. In fact, six
of the team’s top nine rushers
weren't even running backs.
That wasn’t supposed to work
for 12 regular-season games, a
conference title game and a
national championship game
against an Ohio State team
that trailed for 23 minutes all
season.

Consider that the Gators
needed two blocked field-goal
attempts by Jarvis Moss,

including the game-winning
attempt, to beat an OK South
Carolina team in its Swamp.
Runaway national champion-
ships are not supposed to
require that much fortune to

. win games like that against

opponents like those.

And when Ohio State’s
Tedd Ginn Jr. ran back the
opening kickoff Monday to put
the Gators behind 7-0 in 16
seconds, evoking memories of
the historical 62-24 drubbing
at the hands of Nebraska in the
1995 title game, it appeared the
Buckeyes were ready to prove
all these signals as accurate
indicators of a national title
mismatch.

Instead, it was Florida not
only recovering from the early
Ohio State fireworks, but
squeezing all the venom out of
that poisonous nut and spit-
ting it right back at the Buck-
eyes.

The only possible predictor
that something like this could
occur was a Gators defense
that played the part of bully in
the already-physical South-
eastern Conference. And it
certainly helped that Harvin,
who had been’bothered by
nagging injuries all season,
was healthy enough to show
his full potential. He was
Joakim Noah with a helmet
and pads, affecting nearly
every offensive play (he didn’t
finish with jump-off-the-page
stats, but Noah rarely does,
either) and ensuring he will
enter next season with Reggie
Bush-like acclaim.

In a way, these Gators are
quite similar to the reigning
hoops champs. They both
entered their championship
rounds as relative after-
thoughts. And they both ended
their seasons hoisting tro-
phies, waving index fingers
and making the Gator chomp
the official celebratory act in
college sports today.

Turns out these Gators are
hot, too.

Who knew?

ELEN EE TE OTL TSN SLL GEL ET TOL OA

“But we just ~
didn’t get the job done across. .:





cme tasty’ {






HIGH
LOW



Te



lovin’

TIF
__65F

PARTLY




'

It.

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION













in da








i



ee

ee



Pe

ayes from |

_ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007









PLP uproar over Smith remarks

Former MP’s
comments stun
many senior
party members

ON. A day when it
thought it might capitalise
on the events of 40 years
ago, the PLP today finds
itself in uproar over the
remarks of an MP from the
Majority Rule era.

George Smith’s com-
ments about many current
PLP MPs being unfit to run
in the general election have
stunned many senior party
members.

And, according to
sources close to the PLP
‘hierarchy, it has been
‘branded as an “act of
‘betrayal” in the run-up to
the election.

Mr Smith’s controversial
remarks came during a
Love 97 interview when he
said there was a “serious
disconnect” between some
PLP MPs and their con-
stituencies.

And he compounded the
problem by claiming many
of them sought elected
‘office only for the glamour
and power.

Mr Smith, senior mem-
ber of the PLP’s candidates
committee, was appearing
on the Jones and Compa-
ny radio show at the week-
end.

A source told The Tri-
























,

bune: “This has caused an
uproar in the PLP. Some
members are yelling
‘betrayal’, but others feel
he is telling the truth.”

There is undoubtedly dis-
quiet within the party over
the quality of some PLP
MPs. Some -were
“makeweight” candidates
at the 2002 election who
found themselves in parlia-
ment only because of the
party’s unexpected land-
slide victory. :

Now the PLP is taking a
close look at the “failures”
within its parliamentary
ranks in a bid to improve
the quality of its candidates
for the upcoming poll.

Mr Smith was one of the

new MPs swept to power.

when the PLP won the Jan-
uary 10, 1967, election.

And last night he was
praised by the Workers
Party for “sanitised and
clear thinking”.

“We feel that Mr Smith
has paid his dues and has
emerged from the long
night of his personal holo-
caust during the Commis-
sion of Inquiry in 1984 as a
refreshing and vigorous

SEE page two





Street obstruction angers motorists

il
—

& MOTORISTS on Shirley Street were frus-
trated by this obstruction, which blocked an entire
lane and brought traffic to a standstill. Many dri-
vers, who could be seen turning off the road to
search for another route, said what angered them
most was that although the signs advised that
maintenance work was underway, the site seemed

abandoned for hours.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Woman suspected

of involvement in
murder granted bail

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE woman suspected of
being involved in the Christmas
Day murder of Cecil Coakley was
granted bail yesterday — but only
after the prosecution was made
to concede that the offence
charged was in fact a bailable
offence.

James Miller of Malcolm
Allotment, and his girlfriend,
Kacie Sawyer of Blair Estates,
were charged in connection with
Coakley’s murder and appeared
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez to answer to the charges.

The police alleged that Miller

SEE page 11



Possible aviation
fuel tax is ‘not |

expected to affect
visitor numbers’

! Ml By KARIN HERIG
i Tribune Staff Reporter i

i DESPITE the introduction of a :
i possible new aviation fuel tax —
: which could lead to higher prices
: for airline tickets — visitor num- :
: bers to the Bahamas are not :
i expected to decrease, the Bahamas;
Hotel Association’s new president {3
: Russell Miller said yesterday. ;
: Speaking yesterday at the week- i
: ly meeting of the Nassau Rotary i
: Club, Mr Miller said that while the ;
: Hotel Association is aware of the
: concerns regarding the European :
: Union’s proposed aviation fuel tax, i

SEE page 11

ASL SA OR
hour imeonite
eR LOLATA LUNA





Cable Beach
hotel gym
users claim
discrimination

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

GYM users at a Cable Beach
hotel claim they are victims of
discrimination after being told
their membership is not being
renewed.

They claim Baha Mar’s deci-
sion to close the gym at Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort was an
attempt to keep out Bahamians.

A sign, which was put up at the
entrance to the gym, was the first
indication that changes would be
made.

But the sign did not materialise

SEE page 11

. Shitley
www.ssibahamas

Three
baggage
handlers
expected
in court

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ LESTER Bain, Delvino Rig-

by and Marcus Rolle are
expected to appear before a
Miami Federal court magistrate
at 10 o’clock this morning on
charges of possession with
intent to distribute cocaine to
the United States.

The three men, part of a
group of five Nassau Flight Ser-
vices (NFS) baggage handlers
arrested in the US, are the first
to be arraigned before a US
Federal court.

According to Mrs Alma
Adams, Bahamas Consul Gen-
eral for Miami, Florida, the
three have had an opportunity
to speak with their lawyers.

Mrs Adams told The Tribune
yesterday that the Bain, Rigby,

SEE page 11

e

Search for
suspect after
man stabbed

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter



FREEPORT - Police are
investigating an incident at the
New Native Hut Nightclub and
Restaurant, where a 20-year-
old Freeport man was stabbed
several times.

Supt Basil Rahming said
police are searching for the sus-
pect in connection with the stab-
bing.

Police received a report from
the duty nurse at Rand Memo-
rial Hospital around 1.30am on
Monday about a patient who
had been brought into the hos-
pital suffering from multiple
stab wounds.

An officer went to the Acci-
dent and Emergency section at
the hospital and spoke with the
victim, Gem Godfrey Ferguson,
20, of Caravel Beach, who told
police what had happened at

SEE page 11

Si





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Legal Notice

NOTICE

BABI VALLEY ENTERPRISES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BABI VALLEY ENTERPRISES INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Making your business |
a harder crime target .

IS the workplace safe?
Before we say ‘yes’, the follow-
ing should be considered. It
depends on where you work,
what you do and what time of
the day you do it. It, of course,
means work, and the individ-
ual who decides to commit a
crime has to consider these
options.

They, too, must consider the
risk involved with where, when
and what type of crime to com-



THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is e implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world,

aoeucations are invited from suitably quale individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

ti |

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in Speen the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College's efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter. ;

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
eed basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
ang ueae is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°"' January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P.O, Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas



The College of The Bahamas

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
CULINARY COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 012007

DUR, IME: THITION 8
3 FRE

. : f (ADDITIONAT

’ } SAPP PRE
tas : FOR NEW |
; | , STUDENTS)
1, Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 J January 18 SOE YI ce | 6:00-9:00pmi | $2.25,00

2, Gourmet Cooking | - COOK 823 Mon. H 6:00-9:00pm

3, Gourmet Cooking Il COOK 824 Mon.

$200,00

$225.00

4, Cake & Pastry Making! | COOK 813 | January 16 Tues/Thurs
5, Cake & Pastry Making HT COOK 814 Tues/Thurs
i, Bread Making COOK 810 Thurs,

6:00-9:00pm_ J $225.00

Mon/Wed — # 6:00-9:00pm_ | $225.00

1
1
1
,

8, Cake Decoration IT COOK 818 | January 15
% Jntro. to Bartending ITPB 9038 \ Tanuary i)
Skills :

| Mon/Wed )6:00-0-00pin | $402.98

eorrveneregen
6 weeks

7. Cake Decorating I COOK 817 Mon/Wed

mit. So, if we were to asses

RESOURCE
MATERIALS

$10 - $12 per week

\ heer
$20 per week

$20 per week

$250.00 $10 - $15 per week | CHMI Pastry | 15
Kitchen
6:00-9:00pm 7 $200.00 $5 - S10 per week
S1O- $15 perweek J CHMI Larder
Kitchen

$10- $15 per week

$225.00 $10-$15 per week | CHMI Larder
Kitchen

1 ornnemrearasal

these factors from a criminal’s
viewpoint, what would we come
up with. I believe a better
understanding, with effective
countermeasures developed
and implemented, meaning
many robbery situations can be
prevented, and those which do
occur, properly managed. |

Let us consider the business
owner of a cell phone retail
store, as opposed to a cell
phone wholesaler, What would
make either enterprise more
attractive to criminal minds?
Initially, let’s look at revenue.
We all would agree that the
wholesaler should have more
money than the retailer,-but in
what form is this money in?

This is the problem the crim-
inal must consider, as he is
quite aware that the whole-
saler’s revenues might be in the
form of credit card payments
and money transfers. So, upon
consideration, even though
more funds are available at the
wholesaler’s location, the crim-
inal may think it more worth-
while to make his/her robbery
attempt at the retailer’s loca-
tion, because more ‘cash’ is per-
ceived to be available, Also,
access to the offices where the
wholesaler handles funds may
be difficult, whereas the retail-
er’s cash register, in some
instances, can be seen from the
street.

On the flip side of this exam-
ple is the action of a criminal
who prefers using fraudulent
documents, The attraction or
perceived opportunity is that
there are so many forms and
documents being handled by
the wholesale operation, he/she
may be able to obtain cell
phones with the presentation
of fraudulent checks or pur-
chase orders.

Both examples raise ques-
tions on what actions are nec-
essary on behalf of the perpe-
trator t6 bésuccessful. We must
remember that the robbers, too,
generally tall into three cate-
gories: ©

* 1. The Amateur
* 2, The intermediate
* 3. The professional

The method of attack will
vary, but it will usually corre-
spond with the degree of expe-
rience, discipline and available
resources the robber has. These
methods can include:

* The lone gunman who
passes a note,

* The gang, who takes the
lobby over for a period of time

* The coordinated attackers

* The fraudster

* The identity thief

Considering that actions at
the retail level will be more
direct, and person-to-person,
how does the criminal convince
the business owner to handover
the cash. A gun, a note or even
taking some other person like a
wife or child hostage are all
ways that can be used to per-
suade the business owner to
hand over the cash. Yet the
thief who goes about his/her
activity using fraud does not
necessarily have to resort to
such hostile behaviour.

Does this mean retail stores
are more at risk than large
wholesale outlets and suppli-

Max, Enrol,

CHMI Main

Kitchen
5
. 1
5

1 CLM Main ol
Kitehen
CHMI Main eos
Kitehen

CHMI Pastry 2]

Kitchen

1s

15

13
CHMI Larder | 15
Kitchen

5

5

§

CHMI
Dinning
Room

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute |

j at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 328-8175

“pe DE thy



Visit our website at www.cob,edu.bs



sggenngg eo: ry On ee \ ge AR a Ne

EDUCATING & TRAINING






ers? The numbers suggest that
retail stores are more suscepti-
ble to violent crimes, not nec-
essarily less crime, We must not
forget location, as any market-
ing guru will tell you the cus-
tomer has to be able to ‘easily’
access your product and ser-
vices. So questions about tar-
get hardening should come to
mind. How do J, then, make
my business less attractive to

would-be robbers, yet not turn °
- it into a fortress that likewise

scares off my customers?

‘Time, too, plays a role in this
equation, as we have only thus
far considered the type of busi-
ness and location. What about
operational hours? We are find-
ing that most retailers ‘must’
operate into the evening, as
every one works a basic 9am to
Spm day. So, to be more acces-
sible, retailers must now stay
open maybe until 7pm or 8pm.
The wholesaler or supplier,
because of the business type,
has more control over opera-
tional hours.

From an individual stand-
point, what exactly is your role
in the organisation. Do. you
hold all the keys and combina-
tions, or are you the filing

clerk? Your function will deter-

mine if: you are a target the

criminal should be going after,

How accessible are you? You
may be the filing clerk,-with lit-
tle or no access to valuables,
but vou are easy to reach. You
may be used as an indirect
avenue to persons or individu-
als who have direct access to
valuables.

Key to determining vulnera-
bility is access to the target and
access to assets required, At
this point, access must be seen
as not entry and exit, but also
movement in and around the
business. For example, access
to a bank is easy, but move-
ment in and around that office
may be restricted and limited,
But how does access relate to
safety in the workplace? When

|By Gamal Newry

Safe &
Secure





we consider these five elements
of crime from the perspective of
access, then the relationship
hopefully becomes a bit clearer

1. Motivation — This can be
seen as lack of access to certain
living conditions the perpetra-
tors may not have available to
him /her, such as food and shel-
ter

2. Opportunity — This relates
back to perceived easy access to
varying assets, in order to satis-
fy the motivating factors
addressed above.

3. Ability on the part of the
perpetrator — access to resources,
be they tools or knowledge, and
a plan of action. /

4. A reasonable expectation
of escape. How will my
access/exiting of the scene be
denied? ;

5. A low probability for detec-
tion and apprehension — how
accessible am I, after the event.

Some will argue that there
are numerous other relation-
ships that can be drawn, and
there are many more elements
to crime. Certainly there are,
but it is my opinion that these
five listed above make crime a
bit more real to prevention
efforts: Additionally, access - a
way in and out - is key, and [
am using it to blanket several
conditions, but again I think it
best describes the.concept of

“‘easé to accomplish the crimi-

nal act. :

_ NB; Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss prevention and
asset protection training and
consulting company, specialis-
ing in policy and procedure
development, business securi-
ty reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis manage-
ment. Comments can be sent,
to PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas, or e-mail
gnewry@coralwave.com

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GREENSTONE TRADING LIMITED

Notice is hereby
Section 138 (8) of

given that in
the International

accordance with
Business

Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of GREENSTONE
TRADING LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

Small Offshore Company
‘urgently requires
office space to rent/lease-
in downtown area. approx

a

| 000 square feet

Telephone: 323-7460/2





4B_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

HOMEBUILDERS



__INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Horton’s 1Q orders tumble 23%

*HORTON

Fannie Mae, the largest mort-
gage buyer.

“Cancellations have sub-
sided a little bit, but it appears
the deterioration in terms of
gross orders is accelerating,”
Rick Murray, a homebuilding
analyst at Raymond James,
who does not own shares of
D.R. Horton, said in an inter-
view. “It’s going to be a chal-

_lenging environment for hom-
ebuilders for the foreseeable
future.”

Another homebuilder,
Meritage Homes, the 13th
largest, said its fourth-quarter
net sales plunged 51 percent,
and analysts say they expect a
dismal season for homebuild-
ers across the country.

AIRLINES

Some consumers are hav-
ing difficulty selling their
existing home and are unable
to buy a new home they have
agreed to purchase. “They
don’t want to carry two mort-
gages,” Robert Curran, a man-
aging director at Fitch Rat-
ings, said in an interview.

MORE CANCELLATIONS

Chairman Donald Horton
said in the statement that the
company continues to experi-
ence “higher than normal can-
cellation rates and an
increased use of sales incen-
tives in many of our markets.”

D.R. Horton, which sells
houses priced from $90,000
to more than $900,000, sold

‘some of its land holdings in"

the second half of its last fis-

cal year as home sales
declined. The company said
in November it didn’t expect
the market to improve soon.
Homebuilders are seeing
their profits fall as they offer
incentives, such as making
mortgage payments for cus-
tomers, in a bid to move

unsold homes. In an adver- .

tisement in the Dec. 29 Chi-
cago Sun-Times, D.R. Horton

advertised free 42-inch

plasma televisions “plus thou-
sands in additional savings”
for customers who buy in
December and move in before
March 30.

SHARES RISE

Shares of D.R. Horton rose
8 cents to $25.47 in New York
Stock Exchange composite

trading. D.R. Horton’s stock
has fallen 35 percent in the
past year, compared with a 32
percent decline in the Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500 Home-
building Index.

Meritage, based in Scotts-
dale, Ariz., said profit will be
reduced by $1.25 to $1.50 a
share in the quarter. In a
statement Tuesday, it blamed
the decline on $55 million to

- $65 million of pretax expenses

to cancel options contracts
and to write down the value
of its inventory. Meritage will
report earnings for the period
on Jan. 24.

Shares of Meritage fell 8
cents to $43.34. The shares are
down 35 percent over the past
year.

United may get Washington to China route

* UNITED

mated that the route could
bring United roughly
$200 million a year in addi-
tional revenue, based on daily
16,000-mile, round-trip
flights.

The flights, he said, are
certain to draw executives
and politicians willing to pay
business-class fares, which
can cost as much as $10,000.

“It further cements their

ELECTRONICS

dominant position among the
American carriers in Asia,”
said King, airline sector ana-
lyst at CreditSights.

The cachet of capital-to-
capital flights was probably
the deciding factor in United
winning the route, King said,
though he and other analysts
said alternate regions of the
U.S. and China would be bet-
ter served by more nonstop
service.

Terry Trippler, an airline

travel analyst based in Minne-
sota, said a flight to Shanghai
— the industrial and financial
center of China — would have
offered more economic bene-
fits and he predicted it is
likely to get stronger consid-
eration for the next U.S. route
in 2008.

The government said Unit-
ed’s proposal had the poten-
tial td benefit the greatest
number of passengers, since
more people travel to China

from the Washington metro
area than any other city that
does not have nonstop U.S.-
China service.

United’s service will offer
more than 253,000 seats annu-
ally, the government said.

Shares of UAL added 4
cents to end at $46.84 on the
Nasdaq Stock Market, while
AMR rose 63 cents to close at
$34, and Continental added

$1.10, or 2.5 percent, to $45.72, ©

both on the NYSE.

Apple unveils new name, phone |

° APPLE

During his speech, Jobs
also unveiled a TV set-top
box that allows people to send
video from their computers
and announced the number of
songs sold on its iTunes
Music Store has topped 2 bil-
lion.

SHARES JUMP

Apple shares jumped more
than 8 percent on the
announcements, while the
stock of rival smart-phone
makers plunged. The run on
Apple stock created about $6
billion in shareholder wealth.

While Jobs noted the
explosive growth of the cell
phone market, it’s not clear
that a device as alluring as the
iPhone poses a threat to main-
stream handset makers due to
the price, said Avi Greengart,
mobile device analyst for the
research firm Current Analy-
sis.

“My initial reaction is that
this product actually lives up
to the extensive hype, and I’m
not easily impressed,” he said.
“But the vast majority of
phones sold cost way less

than $500.” Instead, the rivals .

most likely to face new com-
petition from Apple’s handset
are makers of higher-end
smart phones such as Palm
Inc.

Tim Bajarin, principal ana-
lyst with Creative Strategies,
said the iPhone could revolu-
tionize the way cell phones
are designed and sold.

“This goes beyond smart
phones and should be given
its own category called ‘bril-

SALARIES

Exec pay numbers

° EXECUTIVES

salary, bonus, stock awards,
stock option awards, other
“incentive” compensation,
changes in the value of the
pension and all. other com-

pensation.
The tallies were mandated
by the Securities and

Exchange Commission last
July, as part of the agency’s
biggest overhaul of executive
pay disclosure since 1992.

“In our view, this is a step
in the right direction; how-
ever, in some respects, it still
doesn’t go far enough,” said
David Zion, an accounting
analyst at Credit Suisse.

Shareholder advocates say
the tallies, likely to be the
most scrutinized parts of the
reports, are missing some
important components of pay,
such as the amount of divi-
dends paid on restricted stock



DAMIAN DOVARGANES/AP

NEW GADGETS: While the new iphone was shaking things up in San Francisco, other
tech firms were showing off new wares too at the 2007 International Consumer
Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Blogger Steven Fruchter, above, streams live
video off a Sony UX180 ultra portable computer at the Intel booth.

liant’ phones,” he said. “Cell
phones are on track to
become the largest platform
for digital music playback and
Apple needed to make this
move to help defend their

iPod franchise as well as

extend it beyond a dedicated
music environment.”

Apple currently commands
about 75 percent of the mar-
ket for downloaded music and
portable music players. But
it’s expected to lose market
share on both fronts as rivals
introduce their own gadgets
and music stores.

that has not yet vested.

“We're talking about, in
some cases, millions,” said
Brian T. Foley, an indepen-
dent executive compensation
consultant based in White
Plains, N.Y.

Besides the tallies, the
other telling section could be
a new is a compensation dis-
cussion and analysis, which
will require the company to
answer questions such as:
What are the objectives of the
company’s compensation pro-
grams? What is the compen-
sation program designed to
reward?

“They’re good questions,”
Zion said. But he said compa-
nies’ answers may be no more
than “legalese.”

Another addition: Details
of the pay an executive stands
to get under “change of con-
trol agreements” in place if
the company is sold. But they

Jobs said Apple expects to
sell 10 million iPhones in
2008, the first full year in
which they’ll be available.
That’s about 1 percent of the
global market for mobile
phones; 957 million were sold
worldwide in 2006.

SHIPS IN JUNE

The Apple phones, which
will operate exclusively on
AT&T’s Cingular Wireless
network, will start shipping in
June. A 4-gigabyte model will
cost $499, while an 8-gigabyte
iPhone will be $599. While

wireless carriers typically
offer discounts and rebates on
new devices when they agree
to sign a two-year service
contact, Cingular said it was
unclear whether this would
be the case with the iPhone.

Cingular declined to com-
ment on its financial arrange-
ment with Apple.

Apple shares jumped $7.10
to close at $92.57 on the
Nasdaq Stock Market.

Nearly 120 million Apple
shares were traded on Tues-
day, more than four times the
average daily volume.

to be scrutinized

won’t appear in the total pay
tables; investors will have to
read deeper in the filing to
find them.

The requirements also
include disclosure of the dat-
ing of stock option grants to
executives, including whether
the company ‘“backdates”
options. Options give the
recipient a right to buy stock
at a fixed strike price, gener-
ally set at the stocks’ market
price the day the option was
granted.

In a scandal that has led to
federal investigations at more
than 100 companies, execu-
tives and directors picked
option grant dates when their
stock prices were at a low,
enhancing the holder’s poten-
tial for greater profit.

Advocates are unhappy
with one change the SEC
made late last month on
options after intensive lobby-

ing from the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce and other busi-
ness interests.

Under the rules as they
were initially adopted in July,
the full amount of an option
award to an executive had to
be listed for the year. So, if an
executive received options
valued at $10 million, the
company would have to
record that $10 million in its
compensation table.

After the December
change, companies can list a
smaller amount for the first
year, spreading the remainder
over later years as the execu-
tive becomes eligible to exer-
cise the options. So a $10 mil-
lion options grant could look
like $2 million.

The options’ full value will
still be in company filings,
just not in the summary com-
pensation tables, Borrus said.







MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

BUSINESS BRIEFS



DANIEL R. PATMORE/AP

BUSINESS BOOMING: Fred Westbrook inspects the
finished rolls of aluminum as they come off the last
stage of the production line at the Alcoa Warrick
Operations in Newburgh, Ind., in April.

Alcoa profit jumps 60%
on higher prices, demand

From Herald Wire Services
'’ Aluminum producer Alcoa (AA) said fourth-quarter
profit jumped 60 percent, driven by higher metal prices and

strong market demand.

Net income increased to $359 million, or 41 cents per share,
from $224 million, or 26 cents per share, during the same
period a year earlier. The results include after-tax charges of
$386 million, or 44 cents per share, for costs related to a
restructuring program that includes the elimination of 6,700

jobs.

Income from continuing operations was $258 million, or
29 cents per share. Excluding restructuring and impairment
charges, the company earned $644 million, or 74 cents per

share.

e TIRE MANUFACTURER

GOODYEAR SAYS
STRIKE WORTH $350M

The world’s third-largest
tiremaker said the multimil-
lion dollar cost of a three-
month strike by union work-
ers is well worth the long-
term savings Goodyear
Tire & Rubber (GT)
expects to see from the new
labor deal.

During a conference call
with analysts, Goodyear
chief financial officer Rich-
ard Kramer said the strike
that began Oct. 5 and ended
last week drained between
$30 million and $35 million a
week from the company.

Kramer and Goodyear .

Chief Executive Robert Kee-

gan cushioned the news by.
saying the company plans to
save $610 million over three
years because of the agree-
ment reached with the

union and annual savings of ©

about $300 million.

e AIRLINES

NORTHWEST READY
TO BUY OUT MESABA

Northwest Airlines
(NWACQ.PK) moved
closer to buying out its
bankrupt feeder carrier
Mesaba Aviation on Tues-
day by making an agreement
with Mesaba’s corporate
parent, the two firms said.

Northwest, which is
expected to file its own
bankruptcy reorganization
plan next week, has said it
plans to acquire the feeder
airline in exchange for giv-
ing Mesaba a $145 million
unsecured claim in North-
west’s bankruptcy case.
Terms of the deal were
expected to be disclosed late
Tuesday.

MAIR shares dropped a
penny to close at $7.31 on the
Nasdaq.

e PETROLEUM

BP SAYS PRODUCTION
UNLIKELY TO CHANGE

BP PLC (BP), Europe’s
second-largest oil company
by market value, said pro-
duction in the fourth quarter
is unlikely to change com-
pared with the previous
three months, following
more than a year of declin-

. ing output.

The company expects to
report production of 3.82
million barrels of oil equiva-
lent per day in the quarter
ended Dec. 31, slightly
higher than the daily aver-
age of 3.816 million barrels
in the third quarter, BP said.

e SUPERMARKETS

SUPERVALU EARNINGS.
RISE 51 PERCENT

Supervalu (SVU), the
nation’s No. 3 supermarket
chain, said its third-quarter
earnings jumped almost
51 percent because of its
purchase of grocery chain
Albertson’s. But the results
missed analysts’ expecta-
tions, and its shares fell
nearly 2 percent.

Supervalu shares fell
61 cents, or 1.7 percent, to
close at $35.16 on the New
York Stock Exchange. They
have traded in a 52-week
range of $26.14 to $36.64.
Supervalu said it earned
$113 million, or 54.cents per
share, in the three months

_ended Dec. 2, up from .
$75 million, or 53 cents per
share, during the same
period last year.

e ALASKA

BUSH LIFTS OIL,
GAS DRILLING BAN

President Bush lifted a
ban Tuesday on oil and gas
drilling in Alaska’s Bristol
Bay, an area known for its
endangered whales and the
world’s largest run of sock- ©
eyesalmon. .

The action clears the way
for the Interior Department
to open 5.6 million acres of
the fish-rich waters north-
west of the Alaska Peninsula
as part of its next five-year
leasing plan.

“There will be significant
opportunities for study and
public comment before any
oil and gas development
could take place,” said Inte-
rior Secretary Dirk Kempth-
orne.

e EUROPE

EUROPEAN CENTRAL
BANK WEIGHS RATES

Economic growth shows
little sign of abating as the
European Central Bank
meets Thursday for the first
time this year on whether to
adjust a key interest rate for
the 13 nations that use the
euro.

While fears of a U.S.
slowdown are on the rise,
ECB President Jean-Claude
Trichet has appeared confi-
dent that the euro zone will
weather any related rough
patch.

Instead, he is likely to set
the stage Thursday for a rate
increase in February or
March from the current3.5 _ ._
percent. Analysts are confi-
dent that another hike is
coming.

4pm 635 pm. Late
stock Thr, ose ese” Chg, vohume



4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Thr. de close Chg. volume
AT&T Inc = T 33.94 33.94 % 108918
Nasd100T QQQQ 44.10 44.10 : 78466
SPDR SPY 141.07 141.08 +.01 53686
GnMotr GM 30.77 30.45 -.32 50937
GM db33_ GPM 22.96 22.96 $ 40000
CitzComm = CZN 14.07 14.08 +01 32224
FidINFin FNF 23,52 23.53 +01 = 23431
Recksn RA 45.69 45.70 +01 16490
CMSEng CMS 16.30 16.30 = 15881
ISRIKG nya IWF 55.43 55.46 +03 14700
Indymac = NDE = 43.77 43.78 = +.01— 12281

igrp c ;
iSRus1K nya [WB 76.46 0 -.14

Expedia wt2 EXPEZ 10.21 1021. ° 10508
BkofAm BAC 5350 5350 * 10413
Gibraltar ROCK 2392 2400 +08 10381
WellsFgos WFC 35.59 3559 * 10342
Medimun MEDI 34.83 = 34.83 10147
CaremkRx CMX 55.55 55.52 -.03 10101
iSR2KV nya IWN 79.01 - 78.49 -52 10002
TechOlyUS TOA 9.25 9.25 10000
Expedia EXPE 21.42 21.42 * 9375
Intel INTC =—-21.03 21.03 * 8979
Timewarm TWX = 22.25 22.25 * 8803
Ameren AEE 53.34 53.35 +01 = 8564



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business





}

THE TRIBUNE





@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GINN Development Company
has signed contracts worth “in
excess of $50 million” with Bahami-
an contractors to work on site clear-
ing and other projects, a senior
executive said yesterday, expressing
“fears” about where the $4.9 bil-
lion development would find all its
workers from.

John Davies, Ginn’s vice-presi-
dent for its southeastern region,
told the Bahamas Business Out-
look Conference that the company
would employ several thousand
people “at the high point of con-
struction” on its project, which is
modelled after the former French
royal palace at Versailles.

“The fear we have is that we
have almost exhausted the local
community [for employees] at this
time,” Mr Davies said.

“Our fear is: Where are the
workers going to come from?
Where are they going to stay? West
End is a very small community, with
an estimated 2,000 people living
there. Many workers are coming
from other areas, so we have to
house and feed them.”

When Ginn sur mer was com-
pleted, Mr Davies said permanent
housing would be needed for full-
time staff. :

“This, in my mind, will create the
need for another small town in

Ginn gives $50m in contracts to Bahamians

West End,” he added.

When 70 per cent of all Ginn sur
mer’s 5,000 condos and 1850 single
family homes were occupied, and
a full complement of staff was
working, Mr Davies estimated that
an extra 16,000 people would be in
the West End area. He added that
apart from creating employment
opportunities, the presence of Ginn
would generate “tremendous
opportunities” for Bahamian entre-
preneurs and business spin-offs.

Mr Davies confirmed that Ginn
had taken over operations at the
Old Bahama Bay resort last week,
having come to an agreement with
its US-based owners to take over

the management and “eventually.

become the owners”.

All 175 staff at Old Bahama Bay
have been retained, Mr Davies
added, explaining that they were to
become the first full-time, opera-
tional staff at Ginn sur mer.

“There will be some changes at
the resort, and some improvements
made that had not taken place pre-
viously because of a lack of capi-
tal,” Mr Davies said. “That will take
place over the next two to three
months.” He added that Ginn had
spent almost $6 million so far in
clearing the 2,000 acre site, which
contained hurricane debris and the
remains of the old Jack Tar Resort.

Mr Davies said the company was
“almost at the point of completing
that exercise”, and about to start



building the pads for the first of the
residential units.

This process, he added, would go
on for two to three years, and some
120 pieces of earth moving equip-
ment, including 100-ton dump
trucks and some of the heaviest
construction equipment imported
to the Bahamas were now on-site.

Some 150 people were presently
employed on the Ginn site, with all
equipment operated by Bahamians.
Mr Davies said more workers with
new skill sets would be required
later this year, as Ginn started to
install roads and utilities, and begin
vertical construction on the mixed-
use resort’s properties.

Apart from the residential com-
ponent, Ginn sur mer will include a
casino, two marinas with Blue Flag
status, two golf courses designed
by Jack Nicklaus and Arnold
Palmer with training schools and
driving ranges, a private airport,
retail, restaurant and meeting space,
multiple spas and a water theme
park.

The main part of the resort, Mr
Davies said, would be 25 storeys
high, and the entire site be con-
nected by a system of canals and
water taxis.

Ginn, he added, would invest
some. $18-$19 million in the West
End community through its foun-
dation, improve the community and
its water supply, and build a reverse
osmosis plant.



_ BUSINESS CENTER

PM UNEMPLOYMENT, from page 1B

The unemployment rate is expected to further
decline once certain tourism projects come on line in
2007,” he said.

The Prime Minister Christie noted that employers
were now resorting to major display advertisements
in the newspapers.

He suggested that as the economy improves, it
may be difficult for employers to find enough
employees, not because none are qualified, but
because so many persons will already be employed.

The Prime Minister said one effect of such a
strong and employed society will be an increase in
the demand for foreign exchange.

“In other words, in our economy — which imports
more than 80 per cent of what we consume —
increased employment and increased housing often
leads to an increase in demand for automobiles,
durable goods; more travel and ultimately, more
credit for both capital and consumer goods,” Mr
Christie said. -

“Accordingly, total credit in 2006 grew by 11.8 per
cent versus 9.1 per cent a year agg. During the same
period, the value of oil imports increased by 50 per
cent to $353 million, reflecting the escalation in the
per barrel price of oil from $45.63 at the beginning
of the year to $74.27 at year end.”

Mr Christie added that the liquidity decline and
fall in the external reserves demonstrated that it
was important that there be thoughtful and prudent
management of the Bahamian economy over the
next few years.

’ The Prime Minister noted that 2006 was a banner

year for the country, and predicted that 2007 will
continue that trend.

“The recent IMF Mission projected that growth
will continue to accelerate, reaching 6.5 per cent
for the fiscal year 2006-07 and 6.7 per cent for 2007-
08,” said Mr Christie.

The projected volume of inward investment is at
least $8 billion over the next few years, he added.

“In relation to the size of the economy, this is a
scale of inward investment without parallel any-
where in the world. The volume of investment is well
in excess of the 2005 GDP of the Bahamas of $5.9
billion,” Mr Christie said.

He added that more than 430 foreign investment
projects were submitted to the Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments in the past four years, and
of the total number, 53 projects with a total com-
bined value of $13.6 billion were in construction.

Mr Christie said the Government had agreed to
establish a National Training Agency, and solar-
energised lighting for airports in the Berry Islands,
Bimini and Sandy Point would be installed in the
coming weeks, leaving no government airport with-
out emergency lighting.

Mr Christie added: “The fiscal position continued
to strengthen in 2006, as total recurrent expenditure
stood at $1.228 billion and expenditure for the last six
months of 2006 remained consistently below the
forecast for the period.

“Revenue for 2006 stood at $1.189 billion, which
was $59.5 million above forecast, and $152 million
above 2005.”” ras , abeoe ae dere Bey seein

a
C”"ABLE BAHAMAS
VACANCY

APPLICATION DEVELOPER

Are you a developer looking for a great opportunity to
work in a fast paced environment on the leading edge of
technology? We have an immediate need for web

application developers

familiar

with the latest

development tools, such as Lasso, SOAP, Perl and XML.

If you feel you have the skills required to meet these
requirements, and you are a young energetic individual
who is a team player with the creativity and initiative,
then we have a great opportunity for you.

Requirements:

Bachelors Degree in any area of application
development specialization
3-5 years experience in application development,

design and deployment

Experienced with programming including: C++,
Java, LDML, ASP, Microsoft Visual Studio, Lasso
Demonstrable knowledge and understanding of

SQL and PL/SQL

Experienced with scripting HTML, JAVA and Visual

Basic

Familiarity with TOMCAT and Apache
Demonstrable experience with cross-browser and
cross-platform compatibility issues

Demonstrable troubleshooting/research ability
Strong computer skills (Windows/MacOS/ Unix)
Experienced with text editors to be used writing

source code

Familiar with Object Oriented Analysis, Design and
Development fundamentals

Strong desire to fill a niche within the team
Excellent written and oral communication skills

Interested candidates should submit detailed
resumes to rbadderley@cablebahamas.com
by January 15, 2007.



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 5B

WANTED

Store Manager &
Sales Associates



» COMPUTER
. TRAINING

Small Retail Store Specializing in girls accessories is |
secking a dynamic, energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager with prior retail managerial experience
to handle all aspects of store operations.

[] Office Professional

[] Computer Fundamental
[] PC Repair

[] Word

[] Excel

[] Access

{] PowerPoint

[] Publisher

[] And more ....

-BIZJET

Only persons 30 years and older need apply.
Vacancy, also exists for sales associates.
Please send resumes by e-mail to
ecooke @ coralwave.com

Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

Phone:394-7019

| PHONE: (242) 356-5760

NOTICE

FREEPORT CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED (BISX:FCC) hereby
gives notice that it has applied to the Bahamas International Securities
Exchange(BISX) foran extension to 12th January, 2007 to file its audited financial
results for the year ended 3 1st August, 2006 and has been granted such extension.

The extension was requested as the Company is projecting a loss of
approximately $2 million for the year ended 3 1stAugust, 2006 asa result of which
the Company’s auditors, KPMG, have undertaken further audit procedures, and
the company has had to meet additional financial statement disclosure
requirements.

Preliminary results indicate that the company’s gross profit was
seriously impacted in the 4th quarter primarily as a result of the delayed
opening of the Home Centre Superstore on Atlantic Drive in Freeport, the
significant costs associated with the transitioning of the Company’s stores
and reduction in inventory value due to obsolescence, damage and shrinkage.

The Company shall publish its audited financial results for the
year ended 3lst August, 2006 on or before 12th January, 2007.



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager
Bahamas

Qualifications:

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).
Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.
Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives. ,
Sound experience in global capital markets

Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development
processes.

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual
stock picks .

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@ FirstCaribbeanBank.com
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) |

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
' (No.45 of 2000)

AIRLEASE FOUR LIMITED AIRLEASE SEVEN LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in, accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE SEVEN LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 29th day of December, 2006

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, the Dissolution of AURLEASE FOUR LIMITED

| has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution ‘was
the 29th day of December, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

fore :

Pricing Information As Of:

=) FIDELITY

QUO EON MORE OA
ee

KERRASSsw ESSN SN

Securit Dail Vol.

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank

Consolidated Water BDRs

; ohence:

No.45 of



THE TRIBUNE

HURRICANE, from page 1B

whether the Government and
the general public would have
the capacity to shoulder the bur-
den of such losses and rebuild.

The Bahamas First president
pointed out that access to quali-
ty, competitively priced reinsur-
ance was key for Bahamian
insurance carriérs, especially giv-
en the estimated $925 million in
losses for New Providence alone.
This compared to the $63 mil-
lion in combined equity that the
five Bahamian general insurance
carriers possessed at the end of
2005.

Bahamian general insurance
companies have to buy huge
quantities of reinsurance to
enable them to underwrite risk
and accept business, due to their
relatively thin capital bases.
Without reinsurance, they would
be unable to cover many losses.

Mr Ward also questioned
whether the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system was
robust enough to cope with the
influx of insurance and reinsur-
ance monies after a major storm,
plus the demand from the public
for loans to help fund rebuilding.

The Cayman Islands has suc-
cessfully used the post-Ivan
funds to finance new construc-
tion and rebuilding, and one
question Mr Ward suggested
should be asked was whether the
Central Bank was flexible
enough to allow for the inflows
and outflows of funds involving

the Bahamas.

Disaster preparedness, miti-
gation and management were
key, Mr Ward added, question-
ing whether mitigation plans
would encompass all the anchor
projects currently under con-
struction and include them in
disaster recovery efforts.

The Bahamas First president
also asked whether there were
gaps in existing legislation that
could hamper recovery efforts.
Hurricanes, he said, could elim-
inate people’s key assets, their
major store of wealth, revenue
streams and way of life.

Mr Ward said it was estimated
that some $12.5 billion worth of
personal and commercial prop-
erty risks were insured by

’ Bahamian insurers. These com-

panies also insured a further
$500 million in buildings under
construction; $400 million worth
of motor vehicles; and $150 mil-
lion in marine risks.

Some 70 per cent of all these
assets were located in New Prov-
idence, a further 20 per cent in
Grand Bahama, and another 10
per cent in the Family Islands.

Mr Ward said he estimated
the Bahamas First had 34 per
cent of the domestic insurance
market, followed by RoyalStar
Assurance at 27 per cent; Insur-

.ance Company of the Bahamas

at 17 per cent; Summit at 14 per
cent; and Security & General at
8 per cent.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXINE ORELIEN OF
PODOLEO ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of. the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of JANUARY,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco
FirstCaribbean . :
Focol “ ‘ 0.00 ‘ : ‘ ; for
Freeport Concrete : ; _ 0.00
ICD Utilities i : 0.00
a oc See : - ae

— ae ee

<= 25 Bahamas SETS
ee oe Oa idk aoe (Pref)

re Ban
RS

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARLENE SATINE OF
UNION VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-3331, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
PHONE # 326-4111 is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Sa une Non —
=~ Scae
2.6262
2.3220
Se oon

1 sear
2.9449**"
2.500211**

Colina Woe rarest Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

a eens Bond ee 1.207411"***
ae = La a“ oe etn .2596"**** os

in SHARE | MARKET TERMS

cae Hi - Highest ee a price in bei 52 ge”

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §.- Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



ey THN SRERAERES
YIELD ~ “last 12 Ponin dividen vided by

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



* - 29 December 2006
*-31 December 2006
* - 30 November 2006

ea - 30 November 2006



ee 2006
SEK

saages SOARS NESS SARA OES OS Ss

WEVA AAAI WBA GOW GENTS GIRS AAW) 8
O2 F010 (DELAY S42 S660 768 f ROR MOR ATA BINFORMANIC!



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILNER THERVIL OF
BACARDI ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54736, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

“Mother” Pra



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CHELSEA LOFT HOLDINGS
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, the Dissolution of CHELSEA LOFT HOLDINGS
(BAHAMAS). LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 29th day of December, 2006

Date and Starting Time: Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 6.30a.m.

Registration Fee: $5.00 Adults

Entry Deadline: January 12, 2007
For additional information, please contact Tel. 302-4525 or 302-4592

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUINATOR







Be acacia ape ea LEGALNOTICE

Date of Birth: . . NOTICE

Telephone Contact: _ = a eee ae ee. : ,

Walker[ ] Runner[ ] Male{ ] Female[ ] INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

Under-14[ ] Under20[{ ]. Under-30[ ] Under-40[ |] Under-50[ ] Underéo[ ] 60Plus[{ |

RUNNERS AIRLEASE THREE LIMITED

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge, Prospect Ridge to J.F. Kennedy Drive
to Gladstone Road junction, Gladstone Road junction back to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road,
Tucker Road to the back entrance of The College of The Bahamas

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45_ of
2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE THREE LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

WALKERS

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge,
Prospect Ridge to J. Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road, Tucker Road to the back entrance of The
College of The Bahamas re

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 29th day of December, 2006






Race Committee will not be held responsible for injuries incurred.



Signature of Waiver:



ALRENA MOXBY



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 7B

Freeport Concrete to incur $2m loss NOTICE

FROM page 1B



NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA CHRISTINA BUCHANAN
or rere F-42915, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
A ’

is applying to the Minister responsible for

The publicly-quoted firm said
in a statement that its gross prof-
it “was seriously impacted in the

‘. fourth quarter” due to several

factors, including what it
described as the “delayed open-
ing” of its Home Centre Super-
store on Freeport’s Atlantic dri-
ve,

In a note signed by Gregory

*. Moss, Freeport Concrete’s com-

pany secretary and attorney for
both the firm and Mr Bababk,
the loss was also blamed on “the
significant costs associated with
the transitioning of the compa-
ny’s stores, and reduction in
inventory value due to obsoles-
cence, damage and shrinkage”.

Freeport Concrete added that
its auditors, KMPG, had under-
taken “further audit proce-
dures”, although these were not
detailed. The firm said it had to
meet “additional disclosure
requirements”, and had applied
to BISX for an extension until
January 12, 2007, to publish its
fiscal 2006 year- -end accounts.

This means the company’s
financial are likely to be signed
off by the end of this week, but
the announcement caught both
the market and analysts by sur-
prise.

One source told The Tribune

Bahamas urged to export ‘u

-/nology company, was “unique”
‘in terms of the information it
provided on the quality of visitor
experiences and tourist desires
and preferences.

The CTO secretary-general
said “there’s no equal on this
earth” in respect to the

he had projected that Freeport
Concrete would suffer a loss in
fiscal 2006, but that this would
have been less than half of what
the company estimated yester-
day, below $1 million.

One analyst added that having
sold its Nassau-based Robin
Hood retail operations back to
Sandy Schaefer and his group
last year, Freeport Concrete had
reverted to a firm solely reliant
on the Home Centre and its
Grand Bahama-based concrete
plant.

This meant that the company
was relying heavily on Grand

- Bahama’s economy, and partic-

ularly its construction industry,
to drive sales and profits. But
the Grand Bahama economy has
been moribund since the 2004
hurricane season and Royal
Oasis closure, and is now relying
heavily on the Ginn prcioct to
propel its growth upwards

One source said of Freeport
Concrete; “The prospects are
dismal.” This view appears to
be shared by many investors, the
company’s closing price on BISX
standing at $0.55 on Monday,
just above its 52-week low of
$0.50 and well below the $1,15
high, The price has nosedived
since the firm went public,

Mr Babak owns the largest

He added that the creation of
a “single economic space” on
February 1, 2007, through the
coming into effect of the
Caribbean single market - a step
involving 10 nations - would

stake in Freeport Concrete,
standing at some 43 per cent,
When contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, he said he had just
returned to Grand Bahama from
Europe, and was on his way toa
meeting with Freeport Con-
crete’s chief executive, Ray
Simpson, to learn more about
the situation.

‘He directed The Tribune to
Mr Simpson. Mr Simpson did
not return this newspaper’s call,
a receptionist advising The Tri-
bune that he was in a meeting
with KPMG auditors, and then
had a meeting with Freeport
Concrete’s bank.

The company has failed to
perform since it went public with
its 2001 initial public offering
(IPO), and at the end of fiscal
2005 had run up accumulated
losses of $3,385 million.

Thus fiscal 2006’s $2 million
loss, if yesterday’s estimate is
accurate, will reduce Freeport
Concrete’s net surplus - assets
over liabilities - to just $1.87 mil-
lion, giving the company little
financial flexibility.

Freeport Concrete has a con-
tributed surplus of $5.774 mil-
lion, which the fiscal 2006 loss
will just about wipe out by tak-
ing accumulated losses to just
over $5,5 million. The compa-

eliminate customs and immigra-
tion controls between those
states, This, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said, would aid the
movement of business ideas and
flows.

ny, though, enjoys a $1.433 mil-
lion appraisal excess, which is
the difference between the
appraised market value of its
real estate holdings and the cost
of these holdings, It owns some
126.75 acres, valued at over $1.5
million,

The gross profit that Freeport
Concrete said had been badly
impacted is its sales, net of dis-
counts, minus the costs of those
sales,

Freeport Concrete’s Home
Centre has already courted con-
troversy this year, filing a writ
with the Supreme Court seek-
ing an injunction to stop Cus-
toms charging about $800,000
worth of duties on all products
displayed on open shelves in its
new $6 million store,

The new Home Centre build-
ing on West Atlantic Drive was
built by H&F Babak Construc-
tion Company, a firm previously
owned by Mr Babak, tt was con-
structed with an 80,000 square-
foot retail showroom after the
former building it leased on Peel
Street was destroyed by Hurri-
cane Frances,

It was said to have exceeded
the company’s sales expectations
during the first three weeks fol-
lowing its soft September 7
opening.

nique’ tourism services

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR

Nationality and Citizenship,

| and Citizenship,



NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL FAR EAST HOLDINGS LTD, is in dissolution

under the provisions of the International Business Companies

Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
8th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

‘(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Janice K. Goodwin,
601 Jefferson, Houston, Texas 77002, U.S.A.

Dated the 9th day of January A.D., 2007.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company



for registrationmaturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of
JANAUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
P.O,Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

.. domestic product (GDP), the

. the Caribbean”. He added that

Bahamas’ immigration card, and
added that “selling these services
to other is also what should be
done”.

The Bahamas should, he
added, export tourism consul-
tancy services to other nations.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
that in terms of per capita gross

SENIOR ASSOCIATES
PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate,

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL FAR EAST HOLDINGS LID.

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 8th

Bahamas with its more than

$18,000 average “is the king of The positions offer-challenging work in the financial services industry and

others area of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high
performance, In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical i insurance
and provident fund benefits,

? és ‘ BSS

there was no evidence this was
likely to change in the short-
term.

The CTO secretary-general
urged the Bahamas, and
Bahamian businesses, to look
outside this nation for further
opportunities, as major growth
would never happen if they just
confined themselves to the local
economy.

Mr Vanderpool-Waliace
pointed our that before they
expanded abroad, US multina-
tionals practiced their trade at
- home.

February, 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator,

Dated the 9th day of January, A.D., 2007. Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to;

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

Janice K. Goodwin
Liquidator
601 Jefferson
Houston, Texas 77002, U.S.A.



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,



With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands and
the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial services
group offering a comprehensive range of insurance services, domestic
and international banking, estate planning, pension services and corporate
finaiice as well as other financial products and services, Fidelity is now
inviting applications for a:

is seeking candidates for the position of
GLOBAL FEE
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated
recovery management. The successful candidate will also be

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS COUNTRY MANAGER—
INSURANCE OPERATIONS

Reporting directly to the VP & Regional Marketing Manager, the
successful candidate will have the following minimum requirements:-

e Business related Bachelor's Degree Qualification responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
¢ Professional Insurance Qualification, ie, FCM, ACI or cPcuU~ saaAneReE nee ue all fee agreements ig well as
« Ten years relevant insurance experience
e Proven track record in new business development poe EONS eRPRH eas ag ne ane imaging -
* Self motivated in addition to being an excellent team leader OTS PPOnRN SS:
° Excellent organizational and analytical skills ss
® Strong computer literacy in Microsoft Word, Excel & KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

Powerpoint ‘ ‘ ‘ . ’ i i
e Ability to relocate and reside in the Turks & Caicos Islands Ape ideal candicale with @ Bachelor a Deghee in ACcOuAUDS,

Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three

e Ability to prepare & deliver high level presentations : ‘ Gee us
’ r & F (3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution,

e Knowledge of the local insurance market would be an advantage

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution, |
communication, organization and pc skills, The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

The successful applicant will manage Fidelity's Turks & Caicos
Insurance operations and will focus on new business development as well
as inaintaining & developing existing client & carrier relationships across
a broad range of products & services,

An attractive compensation package that includes a large performance
related component, plus a comprehensive range of employee benefits and

oa Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
relocation allowance is being offered.

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O, Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR

Email: betty.roberts@citigroup.com .

The deadline for applications is January 31st 2007, —

TCI Country Manager——Insurance Operations
SteppingStones Recruitment
P.O. Box 10091
Grand Cayman KY1-1001
Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836

ae Deadline for application is Friday, January 19, 2007.
Email jobs@steppingstonescaymar 1L.com





8B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007.

GLOBAL TRADE

Canada
files WTO
complaint

BY BRADLEY S. KLAPPER
Associated Press

GENEVA — Canada has
lodged a complaint against
the United States over what
it claims are illegal govern-
ment handouts to American
corn growers, and it is chal-
lenging whether the billions
of dollars in overall farm
subsidies paid out by the
U.S. government comply
with international com-
merce rules, officials said
Tuesday.

The request for consulta-
tions, filed Monday by
Ottawa at the Geneva-based
World Trade Organization,
could open a new trade dis-
pute between the North
American neighbors, which
only recently resolved a
long and at times bitter con-
frontation over softwood
lumber.

Under WTO rules, a |

three-month consultation
period is required before a
country can ask the trade
body to launch a formal
investigation. A WTO case
can result in punitive sanc-
’ tions being authorized, but
. panels take many months,
and sometimes years, to
reach a decision.

“The United States has

been providing subsidies to |

its agricultural producers
that create unfair market
advantages,” Trade Minister
David Emerson said,

Gretchen Hamel, a
spokeswoman for U.S.
Trade Representative Susan
Schwab, said officials in
Washington were still
studying Canada’s request
in detail and could not com-
ment on the claim that its
overall farm subsidy levels
constituted an infringement
of WTO rules.

Canada argues that the
United States has exceeded
the permitted level of trade-
distorting subsidies for
years on farm products
including wheat, sugar and
soybeans. It urged Washing-
ton to address its concerns
when it soon begins to draft



anew Farm Bill.

BRITAIN

EUROPE

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS





Russia maintains stance

in Belarusian oil dispute

Mi Russia believes Belarus
will cave in to its demands
when the the small nation
runs out of oil reserves in
about a week.

BY HENRY MEYER
Associated Press

MOSCOW — Russia dug in
its heels Tuesday over a two-
day-old pipeline transit dis-
pute with Belarus that has
interrupted Russian oil ship-
ments to Germany and much

| of Eastern Europe as well as

the former Soviet republic,
amid mounting European
Union criticism of the disrup-
tion,

The second Russian-related
energy stoppage to affect the
EU in 12 months has intensi-
fied European concerns about
reliance on Russian oil and
gas,

But. President Vladimir
Putin's calculation appears to
be that Belarus’ authoritarian

leader Alexander Lukashenko -

will have to climb down in a
matter of days when his coun-
try runs out of oil reserves,
analysts said,

Putin on Tuesday ordered
his Cabinet to consider a pos-
sible reduction in oil output —
an indication the standoff
could drag on, Russia has a
limited capacity for refining
oil and would have to cut
crude output if its exports
decrease suddenly,

Once close allies, the two
former Soviet nations’ rela-
tions have grown increasingly
tense amid impatience in Mos-
cow at subsidizing the econ-
omy of Belarus’ isolated
regime through cheap energy.

The ongoing spat was
sparked by a Russian decision
late last year-to impose duties
on oil exports to Belarus, Last
week, Minsk said it would slap
duties on Russian oil pumped
across Belarus to Europe as
Lukashenko lashed out at what
he called the Kremlin’s
“shameless” conduct.

On Monday, Russia
stopped pumping oil to

- Europe via the Druzhba, or



NATALIA KOLESNIKOVA/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

ENERGY AND ECONOMICS: Russian President Viadimir Putin
no longer wants to subsidize the economies of former
Soviet republics, like Belarus, with cheap energy.

Friendship, pipeline that
crosses Belarus, accusing its
neighbor of siphoning off oil,
and by Tuesday, the stoppage
had pinched supplies to
Ukraine, Germany, Poland,
Hungary, the Czech Republic
and Slovakia,

RATTLED MARKETS

The dispute also rattled
Russian equity markets, with
the dollar-dominated bench-
mark RTS index dropping 6.4
percent Tuesday, OAO Lukoil,
one of Russia’s largest oil pro-
ducers, was hit hard with
shares dropping 9 percent.

As a delegation led by Bela-
rusian Vice Premier Andrei
Kobyakov flew to Moscow on
Tuesday for talks, Deputy For-
eign Minister Andrei
Yevdochenko accused Russia
of making unreasonable
demands,

“Everything should be
placed on the negotiation table
without any preliminary con-
ditions or preliminary
demands. We are ready for

dialogue,” Yevdochenko told a
news conference at the Bela-
rusian Embassy.

Russian officials say talks
could resume only if Belarus
annuls the oil transit fee.

“These are our uncondi-
tional demands, and we will
not enter into talks until these
conditions are satisfied,”
Trade and Economics Minis-
ter German Gref said after
meeting with Kobyakov,

Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Viktor Khristenko. said
state-controlled pipeline oper-
ator OAO Transneft had filed
a lawsuit against its Belarusian
partner,

Khristenko also said Russia
could cope with the shutdown
in the medium term, but noted
that other pipelines were filled
to capacity and that Russia
could try to compensate for
the shortfall only by shipping
more oil by railways and river
transport,

“If these measures aren’t
enough, it could be necessary
to reduce oil output,” he told a

news conference,

Russia would also try to
expand its pipeline network in
the northwest and the Baltics
from 75 million tons annually
to 110 million tons over the
next two to three years, he
said, And officials would try to
speed up construction of new
pipelines in Eastern Siberia
and under the Baltic Sea —
outlets that would give Rus-
sian oil exports more access to
foreign markets.

BELARUS’ WEAKNESS

Belarusian experts say the
country has at most enough oil
reserves to last a week,
although the government
refuses to disclose such statis-
tics, The country’s inefficient,
Soviet-style, state-dominated
economy depends heavily on
subsidized Russian energy.

“Belarus’ reserves of cheap
oil will last.a few days, a week
at most. After that it will have
to buy oil [at a high price] tak-
ing into account Russian
export duties,” said indepen-
dent economist Yaroslav
Romanchuk,

The disruption of Russian
oil to Europe came a year after
a price dispute with Ukraine
led to a natural gas cutoff for
Kiev and brief shortages of
Russian gas pumped to several
EU nations, The incident
alarmed European officials
and led to calls for energy
diversification, Russia cur-
rently supplies a quarter of the
EU’s oil and over two-fifths of
its natural gas.

In unusually harsh lan-
guage, EU Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso and
German Chancellor Angela
Merkel said Tuesday that it
was “not acceptable” for
energy transit or supplier
countries to halt deliveries
without consultation.

Merkel also said that Ger-
many must find ways to cut its
dependence on a single source
of oil and gas, from conserva-
tion to renewable energy and
must take a fresh look at
nuclear power.

EU rules threaten U.K. boatmen

B Anew EU licensing
system threatens to
undermine centuries-old
traditional aprenticeships
among boatman on the
Thames River.

BY SUE LEEMAN
Associated Press

LONDON — Since the 16th
century, when they ferried
King Henry VIII between his
riverside palaces, Thames
boatmen have plied the
waters, fathers passing
detailed knowledge of the
river to their sons,

Now a new licensing sys-
tem designed by the European
Union threatens to mee





A kesidentia/Sale_|
Mh) Residential/Sale
Multi-Property

AUCTION



















+3 Commercial Properties

Located in Fort Myers, Cape Coral,
Lehigh Acres, Estero, Punta Gorda
St, James City & Alva

Purchase Southwest
Florida Real Estate
at Auction Prices

Two Day Auction:
11am Friday, January 19
llam Saturday, January 20
} 7pm Saturday, January 20

Call for Complete information

Opp

Cnt. Ch



800-257-4161

www.Higgenbotham.com
ME. Higgenbotham, CAI, FL Lict AU305/AB158

ea tt) a1 5

For adve rtising information please reweranevi i

Residential
Real Estate/Rent

i ’ Central

120+Prime roperties| [3 _ Arts‘Concosy | [SAiMidneeaanemiann
ve lownhouses/Rent

51 Homes » 66 Residential Lots WESTCHESTER

995
a4 $880, 2/1 $104
Exc. Ubicacion
305.229.8180 0 al
305.229.9897

Finance



° siness/
4 invartinent
ortunities

Learning Center
Rroftanle, Learnin

HIGGENBOTHAM sale. / ie, for 122 Kido.
UCTIONEERS Gall Sonia Alfaro

INTERNATIONAL, LTD., INC.
“A Licensed Real Estate Broker pera) ran ea Maas

THINK GLOBAL

away centuries of tradition
and, the boatmen say, under-
mine safety.

The system abolishes
apprenticeships — completed
by generations of London
boatmen — which last as long
as seven years, In its place

comes a license that can be.

obtained in less than half the
time.

“After all these centuries,
the government has changed a
perfectly good system without
asking us,” said Gary Hancock,
as he maneuvered his 400-seat
Thames riverboat Sarpedon

under an arch of Charing

Cross Bridge. “We are very
iain

crussell@herald.com

° ‘ siness/
si nvasim nt
hal == Opportunities

Learnin Center
apert
ae ppariuntt ty.
garnin
WE Kids, Ow Io. tor

Binie




onl sins
786- 348-




d Care fo





ALASTAIR GRANT/AP

THREATENED: Gary Hancock, skipper of the Sarpedon, has plied the Thames for 30
years, the sixth generation of his family to work the river since the 1700s.

'A burly, avuncular figure
who knows every bend and
bridge on the river, Hancock,
44, has plied the Thames for
30 years, the sixth generation
of his family to work the river
since the 1700s, His 16-year-
old son, James, will soon fol-
low him — but the pair fear for
the future of their dynasty.

“Now you're going to get
boatmen from other countries
coming in and undercutting us
— it’s just not right,” said Han-
cock, who regales tourists
with anecdotes about Queen
Elizabeth I and architect
Christopher Wren,

The German, Belgian and
Dutch governments have
negotiated opt-outs from the
new system for their boatmen,
and the Company of Water-
men and Lightermen had
hoped the British government
would do the same.

But the government says
the new regime will harmo-

nize rules nationwide and pro-
vide additional safeguards,
including a practical assess-
ment for applicants and a reas-
sessment of local knowledge
every five years.

“It is a quality training
regime for the 2lst century —
for the first time there will be
a nationally recognized quali-
fication,” said Martin Garside
of the Port of London Author-
ity, which handles more than
50 million tons of oil, coal,
cereals and other freight each
year, mainly at deeper ports
like Tilbury near the river
mouth,

He conceded that boatmen
from continental Europe
would be able to work in Brit-
ain — but pointed out that
British boatmen would be able
to work over there, too. “So it
actually improves their pros-
pects.”

Opponents of the system
hope lawmakers will scrap it

after a parliamentary debate
today, But the governing
Labour Party, which supports
the measures, is likely to keep
them in place — ending the
tradition.

In the 16th century, kings
like Henry traveled every-
where on the water when they
were in London, commuting
between riverside royal resi-
dences like Hampton Court
and Windsor Castle,

But drunken boatmen
tended to get out of hand and
in 1555, Parliament established
the Company of Watermen
and Lightermen to regulate
the industry.

Colin Middlemiss, clerk to
the Company of Watermen
and Lightermen, says the
industry is thriving, with 640
licensed watermen, who ferry
passengers, and lightermen,
who captain freight vessels,
Some 120 apprentices were
taken on last year,





_...MiamiHerald.com. | THE MIAMI HERALD



@ BRAZIL

JUDGE LIFTS BAN
ON YOUTUBE, VIDEO

A judge reversed course
Tuesday and lifted his order
banning YouTube from
being viewed in Brazil
because of a sexy video of
supermodel Daniela Cicar-
elli that circulated widely on
the video sharing site.

Telecommunications
companies and Internet pro-
viders had blocked You-
Tube in much of Brazil in
recent days, saying they
were unable to simply pro-
hibit Internet users from
viewing the video of Cicar-
elli and her boyfriend.

The order for its removal
was issued after they sued
and won a ruling that the
clips of it on YouTube vio-
lated their right to privacy.

But the video became
even more popular after
announcement of the Brazil
YouTube ban made head-
lines worldwide and users in
Brazil and beyond posted it
to other websites,

PETROBRAS TO KEEP
VENEZUELAN PLANS

The president of Brazil’s
state-owned oil company,
Petréleo Brasileiro, or su
Petrobras, said Tuesday that
Venezuela’s plans to nation-
alize key industries, includ-
ing the energy sector, will
not affect the company’s
plans to invest in that coun-

On Monday, Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez
announced plans to nation-
alize power and telecom
companies and said oil pro-
jects in the Orinoco River
basin involving foreign oil
companies should also come
under national ownership.

e COLOMBIA

ISA BOOSTS STAKE
IN BRAZILIAN UTILITY

Colombia’s state-owned
electricity grid Interconex-
ion Electrica SA said Tues-
day it paid $352 million to
raise its stake in Brazilian
electric power transmission
company Companhia de
Transmissao de Energia Ele-
trica Paulista.

For it’s 39 percent stake,
ISA paid $14.29 for each lot
of 1,000 common shares
held by minority sharehold-
ers — sligh'
$14.15 offered when its take-
over bid was launched Dec.
4, the company said in a fil-
ing to Colombia’s securities
regulator.

The acquisition, which
was carried out in a public
tender offer on the Sao
Paulo stock exchange, raises
ISA’s stake in Transmissao
Paulista to 89 percent.

e CARIBBEAN

SUN AIRLINE
SHUT DOWN

Caribbean Sun Airlines
will close at the end of this
month and lay off workers at
its San Juan hub as a sister
carrier takes over some of
its routes, the president of
both airlines said Tuesday,

Caribbean Sun was cre-
ated because the U.S, Fed-
eral Aviation Administra-
tion did not authorize
airlines from Antigua, where
Caribbean Star is based, to
fly to U.S, territories includ-
ing Puerto Rico, President
and CEO Skip Barnette said,

The FAA upgraded Anti-
gua’s air regulatory commis-
sion last year, allowing
Caribbean Star to take on
service to those islands,

e JAPAN

UPGRADE TO ALLOW
FASTER VIDEO VIEWING

Japan’s largest mobile
phone carrier will upgrade
its wireless network to make
its data transmission hun-
dreds of times faster,
enabling subscribers to
watch high-quality video
just as they can over fiber-
optic cables,

NTT DoCoMo will begin
testing the technology this
year and could have the sys-
tem deployed by 2010.
DoCoMo spokesman Nobuo
Hori would not discuss
costs, but the Nikkei news-
paper reported that spend-
ing on the project could
reach $17 billion.

tly more than the es



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

SPORTS|
NBRIEF

@ TENNIS

KNOWLES/NESTOR
ADVANCE

Mark Knowles and doubles
partner Daniel Nestor
advanced to the second round
of play in the Medibank Inter-
national yesterday.

The number two seeds need-
ed three sets to defeat Frank-
tisek Cermak and Jaroslav
Levinsky of the Czech Repub-
lic, 6-7; 3-6 and 10-6.

Now in the quarter finals, the
team will square off with Paul
Goldstein and Jim Thomas
today.

Last year Knowles and
Nestor were finalists in the
tournament behind Mike and
Bob Bryan.

@ BASKETBALL

GIANTS STAY
UNDEFEATED

The St Johns College
(Giants) winning streak con-
tinued on Monday afternoon.

The team destroyed the St
Andrews Hurricanes, 55-6.

Top scorer in the game was
Ricardo Moultrie with 21
points, 13 rebounds and five
steals, chipping in was Denzel
Barr with 16 points, seven
rebounds and four steals.

@ COLLEGE
BASKETBALL

BAHAMIANS IN
ACTION

Magnum Rolle continues to
make his presence felt in the
LSU Tigers camp. .

Rolle, coming off an excep-
tional game on Sunday, was
scheduled to play again last
night against Alabama. Results
from this game will be posted in
tomorrow’s edition.

Jeremy Barr will be in action
on the weekend for the USC
Trojans, his team will take on
UCLA.

@ SWIMMING
BARRACUDA’S MEET

The Barracuda Swim Club
is hosting the first meet of 2007

on Friday 12th and Saturday

13th of January at the Betty
Kelly Kenning National Aquat-
ic Complex.

This is the 23rd annual swim
meet sponsored by Insurance
Management (Bahamas) Ltd.
On Friday the meet starts at
6:00 p.m. and the events to be
swam will be the 200 Individual
Medley, 200 Backstroke, 200
Breaststroke and 200 Butter-
fly.

On Saturday morning the
meet will resume at 8:30 a.m.
with the 400 Individual Med-
ley, 50 Freestyle, 50 Butterfly,
200 Freestyle, 50 Breaststroke
and 50 Backstroke.

All the swim clubs in the
Bahamas have been invited to
attend. Notably, a contingent
from Freeport will be here for
the two-day meet. It is an
opportunity for swimmers to
make qualifying times for
Carifta which will be held in
Jamaica over the Easter week-
end.

The general public is encour-
aged to attend. Admission is
$2.00 per person for each ses-
sion. All supporters will be wel-
come.

& SQUASH

CORRECTION

Barbara Albury is not the
new owner of the Bahamas
Squash Club, Village Road, as
reported on Tuesday. She’s the
new manager. The Tribune
apologises for the error.

@ FOOTBALL

CORRECTION

Ian ‘Big Bahama’ Symonette
is a defensive linesman with the
University of Miami Hurri-
canes and the not the Univer-
sity of Florida, as reported in
The Tribune on Monday. The
Tribune apologises for the
error.

Ministry hosts
Florida team for
slowpitch game

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

VETERAN softball players got an
opportunity to play a new version of
a game they mastered for years.

The Ministry of Tourism’s Sports
Division, in conjunction with the
Masters Softball League, hosted a
visiting team of players from Orlan-
do, Florida.

After playing among themselves
in Grand Bahama on Monday, the
players came to town yesterday
where they mixed and mingled with
members of the MSL yesterday at

_ the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

They played in two games, but
while the scores didn’t really matter
(as proper statistics were not kept), it

was the way they played the game

that drew all of the attention.

MSL’s president Anthony ‘Boots’
Weech said they enjoyed participat-
ing with the visitors and it was a
learning experience at the same time.

“It’s a grand time,” Weech
stressed. “We’ve been working on
getting something like this organ-
ised. We’ve spoken with persons
from Port St. Lucie with the view of
them coming here.

“As we progress, we intend to get
some more things like this organ-
ised.”

Rather than playing the modified
pitch that they play in their league
during the regular season, Weech
and about six other members of the
MSL played a new version of slow-
pitch.

In order to speed up the game and
to avoid any serious injuries at the
plate, two lines were drawn slightly
away from home plate. Instead of
touching the bag, the players ran
towards the line.

Runs

On the offensive side, once a team
scored five consecutive runs, their
turn at bat ended. When a home run
was hit, the player only had to touch
first base. And a pinch runner was
allowed to run for the batter from
home plate, instead of waiting until

’ they got on base.

“It was quite interesting,” Weech
reflected. “In fact, it was injury-free.
You don’t have to run home and get
tagged, you have your own individual
plate and run towards the line when
you scored. It protected you. That
mean that we could go longer.”

Weech said they will definitely
look at the new rules and see ‘how
they can apply them to their league
play, in an attempt to “save our legs
so that we could play longer.”

Among some of the other local
players who participated were Adlia
‘Mossah’ Moss, Anthony Johnson,
Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven, Bertie Murray
Jr and Alfred ‘Skater’ Munnings.

Shelby Simmons is responsible for
bringing the players to the Bahamas
on the Carnival Cruise Line. The
majority of the players are retirees,
who play in senior leagues in the
Orlando area. They range in age
from 55 to 79-years-old.

“Most of us play in the day leagues
in Orlando and what we call the Half
Century League where you have to
be 50 years and older to play,” he
noted.

“You play in your groups of 55s,
60s, 65s, 70s and over. We play one
tournament a month, but most of us
play at least five days a week, some
of us play seven days. We just play to
stay healthy. Naturally the competi-
tion comes.”

Simmons said now they have made



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS





RR EE i

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE





i WILBUR BRUCE, a 79-year-old player from Orlando, Fidrida, demonstrates his power as he cracks a home run
in the slowpitch game yesterday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

contact with Weech, they intend to
come back in the future with their
team to take on an All-Star team
from the MSL.

Those present got a great treat as
Wilbur Bruce, the oldest player play-
ing, showed his versatility and speed,
running down a couple fly balls and
cracking a three-run home run.

“T love to hit the ball,” said Bruce,
was has been playing since he was
six-years-old at basketball, fast-pitch

and slowpitch in softball, as well as
football. “It was like old time.”

Bruce, 79, played on the 80-year-
old team from Clearmount, Florida
in October that won the World Mas-
ters Championship title for their age
group.

Bruce, who proclaimed that he was
a speedster in his youth — running
the 100 metres, knocked in the
game’s winning run for his 80-year-
old team.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Retired Golden Girl Eldece Clarke
said it was fun being around the “old
timers” because she didn’t realise
that they could have as much fun as
they did playing the game.

“Tt was.fun,” said Clarke, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s Sports Tourism
manager for the ‘Nassau and South-
ern Bahamas. “This is something that
our minister (Obie Wilchcombe)

‘wants to develop. So hopefully we

will have more of this in the future.”



PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS



Anica ioe

ew role for Golden

’

ece Clarke




Sailors
prepare for
the ‘biggest
regatta’

@ SAILING
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports

Reporter

THE sailing community
is making last minute
preparations for what
they are calling the
‘biggest regatta to hit the



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



SINCE retiring from active
competition, Golden Girl
Eldece Clarke has now set-
tled down into her new

capital.’

Although the season career. — ;
doesn’t officially open A year ago, she switched
until January 27th, with over from the Ministry of
races being held the day Youth, Sports and Housing

where she served as a Sports
Officer to the Ministry of
Tourism where she’s now the
Sports Tourism Manager for
Nassau. and Southern
Bahamas.

Her role is to assist the var-
ious sporting associations in
promoting the Bahamas as a

before in the C-Class, the
excitement is building
and, according to Phillip
McPhee, consultant to
Ministry of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer
Affairs, all parties
involved are ready to start
the new sailing season

with a bang. sports destination, not just for
The annual New Years track and field and basketball,
Day regatta will be held but for all of the sports that

we participate in.
“Hopefully, the spin off

from this would be that every-

body, including the straw ven-

at Montagu Beach and
will set the tone for the ;
jam-packed sailing sea- iy

son.

McPhee, who also dors, taxi drivers and hotels
heads the Thunderbird, and restaurants can all bene-
said that this New Year’s fit,” she proclaimed.

Day Regatta should not At the same time, Clarke

said her goal is to also ensure
that when the visitors come
to our shores, they get the
opportunity to participate in
sporting activities with the
local teams and athletes.
Her first venture this year
was over the past two days
when a team of retired players
from Orlando, Florida played
in a series of softball games

be missed by anyone, and
encourages Bahamians
from all areas to come
and witness three days of
stiff competition.

According to McPhee,
this year’s regatta com-
mittee has already
received responses from
top sailors, who have

® MEMBERS of the 4x100-meter relay team from the Bahamas
(including Eldece Clarke on the right) hold up the their gold
medals during the medal cermony at the Summer Olympics, Sat-
urday, Sept. 30, 2000, at Olympic Stadium in Sydney.

(AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau)

Games in Sydney, Australia. can have another great year.”

reassured him that they
will bring down their
fastest boats and best
sailors so they can take
home the crown: .

The season will start off
with races in the C class
on January 26th, followed
by the drawings for the A
and B classes. Races will
start at 12 noon on this
day. ‘

On Saturday, sailors
will hit the water at 9am
with the official opening
taking place at 2pm. Offi-
cially declaring the season
open will be Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie.

McPhee said: “This

in Grand Bahama and New
Providence.

‘For Clarke, her interna-

tional experience as a track
athlete is paying off big divi-
dends in her new career.

“Tt has given me an oppor-

tunity to draw back on my
experience,” she reflected. “I
can better relate to what the

-athletes-are-looking for when
they come here.”

Clarke: was a member of the

Bahwiias'women’s 4 x 100
metre relay team

that

clinched the gold medal at the
1999 IAAF World Champi-
onships in Seville, Spain
before they duplicated the
feat at the 2000 Olympic

The latter event brought
the curtain down on Clarke’s
track career. But as she remi-
nisces on her tenure in sports,
Clarke said she hopes that the
Bahamas can regain the glory
days that they have experi-
enced.

“With the Olympic Games
coming up next year, I hope
that we can repeat our per-
formance in 2000 or even
Tonique Williams-Darling’s
performance in 2004 (when
she won the gold at the
Olympics in Athens, Greece)
and our men’s 4 x 400,”
Clarke projected.

“I want to wish them the
best of luck and hope that we

As for the replacement of
the aging and retired Golden
Girls, Clarke said she would
like to see high school sprint-
ers running }1.2 and 11.3 sec-
onds — as they did when they
graduated. |

“It’s going to be very
important for them to be run-
ning at 11.5 or faster so that
they can be competitive with
the American sprinters when
they ga; to college,” she
summedaip.

“But the talent is there. It’s
just up to them to perform at
junior world class level so that
they can work towards mak-
ing that next step at the senior
level.”









® RETIRED Golden Girl Eldece Clarke.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

regatta will set the tone
for the other regattas and
will show the entire
Bahamas community that
regattas are officially
back. It will also signal to
all the associations that
regatta is now at a new
level and we are hoping
to make this year the best
in sailing in our country.

“This regatta will be
sponsored by the govern-
ment of the Bahamas and
we are also trying to solic-
it some other sponsorship
from corporate business
to make sure this regatta
is successful.

“We would like to
thank the Minister
responsible for sloop sail-
ing in the country, V
Alfred Gray, for his
genius.and commitment
to sport in the country.
He has also given a
tremendous effort to
make sure that this event
is a success. We would
also like to thank all of
the associations and the
commodores, those from
all the clubs for their
commitment to this
event.”

Boats competing in the
annual New Year’s Day
regatta will represent
Long Island, Exuma,









Abaco, Andros, Ragged =
Island, and Eleuthera. @ ABOVE: The visiting team
Boats will be brought from Orlando, Florida and

down from the various
islands on Thursday.

McPhee also said that
all the associations have
agreed to participate in
the first official regatta,
adding that the arguments
that brewed between all
associations have been
resolved and the future of
the sport looks bright.

Another feature event
for the New Year’s Day
regatta will be the awards
banquet, set for Monday
at the Government
House.

The gala event will hon-
our six of the country’s
top sailors for their con-
tributions to the sports.
All sailors are invited to
attend.

members of the Masters Soft-
ball League pose above at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex for yesterday’s slowpitch
game.



RIGHT: One of the, players
from Orlando, Florida delivers

a pitch from the mound |
yesterday.



¢e SEE SPORTS FRONT
FOR FULL STORY

(Photos: Tim Clarke)





oe

THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.c





INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BASKETBALL | HOCKEY



PRO BASKETBALL

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 |SE





~ Prince is a royal pain for Sixers

From Miami Herald Wire Services

PHILADELPHIA — Tayshaun Prince
scored a career-high 33 points and Richard
Hamilton had 22 to lead the Detroit Pistons
to a 98-89 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers
on Tuesday night.

Flip Murray had a career-high 12 assists
for the Pistons.

Rasheed Wallace did not start the game
because of a coach’s decision, played only 29
minutes and scored eight points.

Samuel Dalembert had 14 points and 17
rebounds, Andre Iguodala scored 15 points
and Andre Miller had 10 assists for the Six-
ers, who lost their third consecutive game.

The Sixers played again without Chris
Webber, who sat out officially with foot and
ankle injuries.

But the 33-year-old former All-Star could
be on his way out of Philadelphia with a con-
tract buyout in the works. Webber has
missed 10 of the past 13 games.

NETS 101, RAPTORS 86

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Vince
Carter scored 32 points and Richard Jeffer-
son added 21 to lead the Nets to the victory in
a matchup of the top teams in the weak
Atlantic Division.

Jason Kidd added 10 points, 14 assists and
eight rebounds just hours after filing for
divorce from his wife of 10 years, accusing
her of “extreme cruelty” throughout their
marriage.

Carter was forced to leave the game late
after being poked in the eye by Anthony
Parker.

Mikki Moore added 12 points ‘and eight
rebounds for the Nets, who shot 50 percent
from the field and limited the Raptors to 38
second-half points.

Top draft pick Andrea Bargnani scored 22
points to lead the Raptors, but only six came
in the second half.

Florida thumps Arkansas;

From Miami Herald Wire Services

RUSTY KENNEDY/AP

THERE’S NO STOPPING HIM: Pistons forward
Tayshaun Prince drives against 76ers
swingman Andre Iguodala on Tuesday.
Prince scored a game-high 33 points.

PACERS 91, HAWKS 72

INDIANAPOLIS — Al Harrington scored
18 points and sparked a second-half run as
the Pacers beat the Hawks.

Harrington, who spent two seasons with
Atlanta before returning to the Pacers,
scored 14 points in the second half after
shooting 1-for-8 from the field in the first
half.

Danny Granger had 15 points: Stephen
Jackson scored 12 and Jermaine O’Neal
added 10 points, eight rebounds and four
blocks for the Pacers (19-16), who held
Atlanta to 32 percent shooting.

Speedy Claxton had 12 poiits for the Hawks.



SPURS 98, BLAZERS 84

SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan led a bal-
anced attack with 16 points, and the Spurs
beat the Trail Blazers.

Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker had 14
points apiece, Brent Barry added 13 and
Bruce Bowen scored 12 points — all on

3-pointers — for the Spurs.

GRIZZLIES 128, LAKERS 118

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Pau Gasol had 25
points and 13 rebounds, Mike Miller scored
14 of his 25 in a record-setting third quarter,
and the Grizzlies beat the Lakers.

Memphis, which had seven players in
double figures, built the lead in the third

period, outscoring the Lakers 46-22, includ-
ing 13 unanswered points over a three-min-
ute span. The 46 points was a Grizzlies fran-
chise record for points in a quarter.

ELSEWHERE

e Hornets: Backup guard Bobby Jackson
has five cracked ribs — not one as first
thought — stemming from an injury in a
November game. A CT scan Tuesday
revealed the additional injuries, and the team
said his status remains day to day.

e Bobcats: Forwards Gerald Wallace
and Melvin Ely will miss Charlotte’s game at
Detroit tonight because of injuries. Wallace
hasn’t played since he separated his right
shoulder in a victory at Indiana on Dec. 30.
Ely strained his right calf in practice Monday
and wasn’t able to practice Tuesday. Also,
guard Brevin Knight began rehabilitation this
week after undergoing surgery to repair a
torn abdominal muscle. Knight hopes to
return in three weeks.

e Wizards: Center Etan Thomas will
return to the Wizards for tonight’s game
against the Bulls after missing a month with a

sprained left ankle. Thomas practiced Tues-

day for the second consecutive day.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

|
|





NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE













SOUTHEAST W L_ Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Orlando 21 14 600 - 64 W4 146 7-8 12-9
Washington 19 14 576 1 7-3 L-l 133 6-11 12-9
Miami 1419 424 6 46 Wl 89 610 6-10
Atlanta 10 22 313 9% 19 Ll 59 5-13 614
Charlotte 9 23 .28110% 3-7 L2 Gll 3-12 613
ATLANTIC. WL Pet GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
New Jersey 15 19 441 - 55 Wel 11-10 49 11-9
Toronto 15 20 429 % 55 Ll 10-5 5-15 10-8
New York 15 21 417 1 6-4 W-2 810 7-11 9-12
Boston 12 21.364 2% 2-8 Ll 411 8-10 8-12
Philadelphia 9 25 265 46 13 48 5-17 6-13
CENTRAL WL _ Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Cont
Cleveland 21 12-636 = - «=o 7-3 ~W-4 15-3 6-9 15-10
Detroit 20 12 625 % 64 Wl 95 1-7 146
Chicago 2015 571. 2 55 Ld 15-4 5-11 17-5
Indiana 19 16 543 3 6-4 W-2 10-5 9-11 149
Milwaukee 16 18 471 54% 64 L3 95 7-13 613
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pet. GB LIO Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 288 778 - 91 W-l 16-3 12-5 20-6
San Antonio. 25 11 694 3 5-5 W-2 136 125 17-7
Houston 22 13 629 5% 7-3 Wl 12-3 10-10 10-11
New Orleans 12 22 .353 15 28 L5 7-10 5-12 6-16.
Memphis 9 27 250 19 37 Wl Tl 2-16 4-15
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 24 11 686 - 64 Ll 143 10-8 16-7
Denver 17 15 531 5% 46 Wl 108 7-7 5-9
Minnesota 17°15 531 5% 7-3 W-4 11-5 6-10 10-9
Portland 14 22 .38910% 28 L2 7-11 7-11 9-10
Seattle 13 24 351 12 37 LS 98 416 5-15
PACIFIC WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 268 765 - 82 W-7? 15-3 11-5 127
LA.Lakers ‘23 12 657 3% 7-3 Ll 16-4 7-8 15-6
Golden State 18 18 500 9 6-4 L-l 145 4-13 12-13
LA. Clippers 16 19 .45710% 6-4 W-l 12-6 4-13 10-15
45210% 46 L2 10-9 48 813

Sacramento 14417

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
Indiana 91, Atlanta 72 Mia. at Sea., 10 LA.C. 100, N.O 90
Detroit 98, Phil. 89 Chi. at Was., 7 Hou. 84, Chi. 77

NJ. 101, Toronto 86 N.O. at Atl., 7 ; Den. 104, Mil. 92
Mem. 128, Lakers 118 Ind. at Bos., 7:30

S.A: 98, Portland 84 Phi. at N.Y., 7:30

Phoenix 113, Sea. 102 Cha. at Det. 7:30

Dallas 108, Utah 105 Tor. at Mil., 8

Cle. at Sac., late LA.C. at Min., 8

LA.L. at Hou., 8:30
Por. at Dal., 8:30
S.A. at Den., 9

Ori. at G.S., 10:30



’Bama beats LSU

Taurean Green scored 17 points,

’ and Corey Brewer added 13, leading

No. 2 Florida to a 79-72 victory over
Arkansas on Tuesday night in
Gainesville, Fla.

At halftime, the sellout crowd at
the O’Connell Center welcomed the
Gators football team, which beat
Ohio State 41-14 on Monday night in
the BCS Championship Game. That
made Florida the first school to hold
the national titles in Division I foot-
ball and basketball at the same time.

The Gators (15-2, 2-0 SEC) built an

‘ early 12-point lead, then spent the

rest of the night holding off the
Razorbacks (12-4, 1-1), who briefly
took the lead before faltering over
the last 10 minutes of the game.
Joakim Noah and Al Horford each

scored ll points for Florida, which .

has all five starters back from the
team that won the school’s first

NHL STANDINGS ae |

NCAA basketball title last spring.

Darian Townes led Arkansas with
18 points, and Sonny Weems had 13.

With Noah and Horford riding the
bench for much of the first half with
two fouls each, Florida squandered
most of their 12-point lead before set-
tling for a 37-36 halftime lead.

e No. 14 Alabama 71, No. 13
LSU 61: Richard Hendrix scored 18
points, and the host Crimson Tide

pulled the upset, taking advantage of

cold shooting by the Tigers.

Rebounding from a 27-point loss
at Arkansas, Alabama (14-2, 1-1 SEC)
held the Louisiana State to just 35
percent shooting and led by nine
points at halftime.

LSU (11-4), playing in its SEC
opener, had a five-game winning
streak snapped despite a big perfor-
mance from an ailing Glen Davis.

Playing with sore ribs and right
knee from a two-car accident after



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

LOCKED UP: Joakim Noah, left,
of Florida tangles with Arkansas’
Vincent Hunter in the first half.

Saturday night’s victory over No. 24
Connecticut, Davis had 24 points and
17 rebounds.

e No. 8 Texas. A&M 61, Baylor
51: Joseph Jones had six points and
three rebounds in the stretch that



finally put Texas A&M ahead to stays:

in a road game, and Acie Law IV

drove for consecutive layups late to:
push the Aggies (14-2, 2-0 Big 12) to:

their seventh victory in a row.

Law finished with 20 points, and
Jones had 14 points and 12 rebounds.

Kevin Rogers had 19 points to lead
Baylor (10-5, 0-2).

e No. 17 Clemson 87, North
Carolina State 76: Vernon Hamil-
ton scored 21 pojnts, and Clemson,
playing on the road, matched the best
start in school history and remained
the only unbeaten team in Division I.

K.C. Rivers and James Mays both
added 16 points for Clemson (17-0,
3-0 ACC) , which also started the sea-
son 17-0 in 1986-87.

Gavin Grant had 22 points and Ben
McCauley added 15 for outmanned
N.C. State (10-6, 0-3).

e No. 18 Air Force 65, New
Mexico 57: Dan Nwaelele scored 22

HOCKEY

points and host Air Force (16-1, 3- 0
‘Mountain West) rallied from a 15-

point halftime deficit for its 12th con-
““gecuitive victory.

Darren Prentice had 18 points for
the Lobos (11-7, 0-3).

e No. 22 Notre-Dame 61, No. 21
West Virginia 58: Russell Carter
scored 19 points for the host Irish and
kept West Virginia’s Frank Young
from taking a shot at the buzzer.

Colin Falls scored 14 points for
Notre Dame, (14-2, 2-1 Big East), and
Luke Harangody added 11.

Alex Ruoff led West Virginia (13-2,
3-1) with 14 points. Young added 13.

LATE MONDAY

e No. 19 Nevada 90, Boise
State 86: Marcelus Kemp scored 27
points and host Nevada (14-1, 2-0
Western Athletic Conference) went
ona 9-0 run down the stretch to rally
for the win over Boise State (7-6, 1-1).



Islanders win battle of New York

BLUES 4, BLUE JACKETS 3 (SO)

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Lee Stempniak



EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST Ww L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Atlanta 24 13 6 2 56139 138 11-5-3-1 13-8-3-1 11-4-4-1
Carolina 23 18 2 2 50 134 134 8 12-7-0-1 11-11-2-1 10-3-0-0 a ; ‘
Washington 19 17 2 5 45134 145 11-10-1-2 8-7-1-3. 6-6-1-1 From Miami Herald. Wire Services
Tampa Bay 21 21 #1 41 44138 138 11-11-0-0 10-10-1-1 9-7-0-0 — Mj Wi
Florida 15 20 3 6 39119 143 10-B4-1 5-12-25 2-10-1-0 NEW YORK > Mike Sillinger scored
his second goal of the game 27 seconds
L SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV after Viktor Kozlov snapped a third-pe-
e 0 4 54113 100 14-3-0-3 11-10-0-1 9-4-0-1 riod tie, and the New York Islanders
N.Y. Rangers 22 18 3.- 1 48 132 136 9-8-3-0 - 13-10-0-1 8-8-0-0 broke a six-game losing streak with a 5-3
N.Y. Islanders 20 19 1 2 43122 119 11-8-1-1 9-11-0-1. 8-6-1-0 ict 8 the Ne < rk Ra
Pittsburgh 18 16 3 4 43127 131 10-8-2-2 881-2 11-5-L-1 VICIOLY,-OVGF OM eter eae
Philadelphia 11 28 2 2 26104 165 3-11-22 8-17-0-0 3-10-0-2 | ‘Tuesday night.
NORTHEAST | Madison Square Garden has become a
a SEAT ee eS iperr iema Bea | safe haven for the Islanders, who hadn’t
uffalo -5-1- -4-1- -6- : :
Montreal oe fia De 14es3 teil esaa | WOn-anywhere since beating the Rangers
Ottawa 24 19 2 0 50-148 127 11-10-1-0 13-9-1-0 —10-7-0-0 there on Dec. 26.
Toronto 19 19 2 4 44145 148 10-11-1-2 9-8-1-2 7-8-2-2 Despite not scoring on the power play
Boston 2017 1 2 43120 147 1280-1 891-1 97-0-1 | again, the Islanders shook off the tying
goal at the start of the third period and
knocked off the Rangers for the fourth







| time this season and fifth in a row overall.
Sillinger gave the Islanders a 3-2 lead

SENATORS 5, BRUINS 2
OTTAWA —

CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DV. h : fi ‘
Nashville M2 1 Gl 8 1d 143-21 1880-0 1131-0 | im the second period after the teams split
Detroit 26 12 2 3 57129 105 1431-2 1291-1 920-1 | four goals in the first.
Chicago 17 20 1 4 39105 124 10-10-0-1 7-10-1-3 -9-9-0-0
columns 16 22 2 3 37 141 134 9-9-1-2. _7-13-1-1 5-8-0-2 CANADIENS 4, THRASHERS 2
t. Louis 14 21 4 3 35100 132 8-11-2-1 6-10-2-2 6 -10-2-2 .

eae MONTREAL — Michael Ryder had
NORTHWEST Wo oL OL SLPTS GF GA == HOME AWAY a. piv __ two goals and an assist as the Canadiens
Nancie, 2418 0 1 49107 111 15-7-0-0 9-11-0-1 9-9-0-1 | ended a three-game losing streak.
algary 22.15 2 2 48125 106 17-5-0-0 5-10-2-2 9 7-5-1-1 ‘ :.
Colorado . 21 18 2 1 45 134 120 11-9-1-1 10-9-1-0 9410 gg ee Bees . ee
Minnesota 2119 0 3 45118 117 17-4-0-2 4-15-0-1 —5-5-0-2 resse also scored for Montreal, an
Edmonton 20 18 2 2 44119 123 13-7-1-l 7-11-1-1 — 7-7-1-0 Koivu had an assist for his 500th career

point.

recrie __W_L OL SLPTS of CA WOME AWAY __BY | Greg de Vries and Brad Larsen had
San Jose 28°14 0 0 56130 100 15-7-0-0 13-7-0-0 —8-8-0-0 goals for Atlanta, which is 1-3-2 in its past
Dallas 26 17 O 1 53119 107 13-7-0-0 13-10-0-1 —12-4-0-0 SIX.
Phoenix 20 20 1 1 42118 140 11-8-1-0 9-12-0-1 — 6-10-1-1
LosAngeles 16 22 3 3 38125 156 11-9-3-3 5-13-0-0 6-11-0-2 | HURRICANES 4, MAPLE LEAFS 1

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

* Monday’s results
Edmonton 2, LA. 1 (OT)

Tuesday’s results

St. Louis 4, Col. 3 (SO)
Washington 6, Phil. 2
Islanders 5, Rangers 3
Ottawa 5, Boston 2
Montreal 4, Atlanta 2
Carolina 4, Toronto 1

T.B. 3, Pittsburgh 2
Nashville 5, Anaheim 4 (OT)
Phoenix 5, Dallas 2
Calgary 3, Minnesota 0
Detroit 4, Colorado 3 (SO)

Tonight’s games '

Pitt. at Florida, 7:30

St. Louis at NJ., 7:30
Buffalo at Chicago, 8
Edmonton at SJ., 10:30 p.m.

TORONTO —



including Darcy Tucker.

Eric Staal,
Walker, Eric Belanger and Justin Williams
scored to lead the Hurricanes.

Ray Whitney had two assists for the
defending Stanley Cup champion Hurri-
canes, who have won two in a row follow-
ing a three-game losing skid.

Bryan McCabe scored the lone goal for
the Maple Leafs, who were missing four
regular players because of injuries,

one of his testicles.
Scott

TAMPA, Fla. —

ning beat the Penguins.

the Penguins 22-3.

LIGHTNING 3, PENGUINS 2

Martin St. Louis had a
goal and two assists, helping the Light-



JULIE JACOBSON/AP

A BIG APPLE BOUT: Arron Asham, left,
of the Islanders takes out Darius
Kasparaitis of the Rangers during
Tuesday night’s game in New York.

Daniel Alfredsson
scored 12:25 into the third period and the
Senators spoiled Boston rookie Phil Kes-
sel’s return from cancer with five goals in
the final period in the comeback victory.

Kessel, who was diagnosed with testic-
ular cancer a month ago, returned to the
Bruins’ lineup for his first NHL game
since having surgery on Dec. ll to remove

Vincent Lecavalier and Andreas Karls-
son also scored for Tampa Bay, which has
an ll-game winning streak against Pitts-
burgh. Five of the victories have come at
home, where Tampa Bay has outscored

scored the winning shootout goal and
added two assists to lead the Blues over
the Blue Jackets.

After the first five shooters scored,
goaltender Manny Legace stopped Fred-
rik Modin to end the game. Legace fin-
ished with 19 saves.

CAPITALS 6, FLYERS 2

WASHINGTON — Alex Ovechkin
scored his 27th and 28th goals, and the
Capitals celebrated the franchise’s first
season sweep of the slumping Flyers.

PREDATORS 5, DUCKS 4 (OT)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Steve Sullivan
scored with 1:48 left in overtime, and the
Predators beat the Ducks for their third
consecutive victory and llth victory in 14
games.

COYOTES 5, STARS 2

DALLAS — Ed Jovanovski and Shane
Doan scored power-play goals during a
span of 2:21 in the second period and the
Coyotes extended their season-best win-
ning streak to seven games.

ELSEWHERE

e Red Wings: Defenseman Chris
Chelios returned to the ice late Tuesday
against the Avalanche, less than a week
after leaving the team to help employees
of his Detroit sports bar cope with the
stabbing deaths of two co-workers.

e@ Coyotes: Center Mike Ricci was
placed on injured reserve because of
recurring neck problems.

LATE MONDAY

e Oilers 2, Kings 1 (OT): Jan Hejda
scored his first NHL goal 1:14 into over-
time to lift visiting Edmonton.

a EE TEAL I NL AT ERO TN TE TEN TE NN

\

\



Full Text
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE






Bahamas on collision course
with destruction, claims BDM |

FORTY years after the advent
of Majority Rule, the Bahamas is
“on a collision course with
destruction,” Bahamas Democ-
ratic Movement leader Cassius
Stuart warned.

Mr‘Stuart said the country
must realise that education is
the only solution to economic
instability.

“It is evidently clear that edu-
cation in the Bahamas has been
sacrificed on the altar of the
almighty dollar,” he said. “With
over 60 per cent of our popula-
tion under the age of 30, edu-
cation should and must become
our primary industry for the
development of the Bahamas.”

In a statement issued yester-
day, the party leader said that
only through education can
Bahamians offset “the poten-
tial quagmires of a fickle
tourism sector that is beholden
to external and extemporane-
ous forces”.

He said future governments
must not only address the lack
of emphasis on education but
must also restructure invest-
ment policy so that Bahamians
can have the opportunity to
become significant investors,
partners and shareholders in
future hotel and resort devel-
opments. .

According to Mr Stuart, the

country has been led to the
edge of crisis because the histo-
ry of the Bahamas keeps repeat-
ing itself.

He noted that after the stag-
nation of the first PLP era, a
charismatic individual emerged
in Bahamian politics “with jobs,
jobs, jobs as his battle cry.”

Under Hubert Ingraham and
the FNM, he said, the tourism
sector underwent a “much-
needed resurgence”.

Unfortunately, Mr Stuart
said, the new government recy-
cled the ‘tourism first’ policy of
its predecessor, once again rel-

egating education to second

place.

“The new FNM government
failed miserably to realise the
original vision of educating the
masses and all but ignored the
plan of the further educational
development of the Bahamas.
Under the leadership of the new
administration, the education-
al standards of the country
descended to an all time low,”
he said.

Mr Stuart said that again in
2002, history repeated itself.

“Once again, market forces cou-_

pled with the September 11
attacks and a second Gulf War,
initiated a downturn in the
Bahamian economy and as a
result, many Bahamians became

MAJORITY RULE DAY

jobless once again.

“The unemployment list again
grew to unprecedented levels
exhibiting a familiar client: une-
ducated young Bahamians.
Again the masses began a des-
perate plea for help just as they

had done in the past. Once again.

the private sector could not con-
sume the larger numbers of the
unemployed.”

Mr Stuart said that once
again a charismatic figure
appeared on the political scene
— this time the battle cry was
“help and hope is on the way”.

“Just as they had done a
decade earlier, the masses, still
uneducated and still desperate
for economic relief, took that
message and responded in the
ballot box.

“Just like his predecessors,
this new leader echoed the same
message preached throughout
the years: ‘We will build more
hotels so that the uneducated
mass can have a job’. Hence the
birth of the Anchor Projects
which will bring more hotel and
resort developments to the
Bahamas then both former
administrations combined.

“A number of billion-dollar
developments were announced

~ over the last four-plus years

with education again suffering
the consequences.”

@ BDM leader Cassius Stuart

He said that in addition,
Bahamians will once again suf-
fer the indignity of being rele-
gated to the position of “wait-
ers, bartenders and the like.”

“The BDM offers a fresh
new, comprehensive and sub-
stantive plan of action for the
next 40 years to repair the bro-



ken system of education,
restructure our economic and
investment policy and to nur-
ture a new way of thinking for
every Bahamian who truly
believes that the Bahamas has
yet to scratch the surface of its
unlimited potential,” the party
leader said.

Pindling era blamed for current social disintegration

THE social disintegration evi-
dent in today’s Bahamas has its
roots in the Pindling govern-
ment’s decision to turn a blind
eye to the scourge of drugs, it
has been claimed.

In a statement on majority
rule issued yesterday, Cassius
Stuart, the leader of the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment said that the first PLP gov-
ernment began its tenure with
noble aims, which included edu-
cating the masses out of igno-

Start saving
today and
have a merrier
Christmas in
2007!

rance.

“This ambitious policy com-
menced with the primary objec-
tive of providing the Bahami-
an masses, to whom govern-
mental power and authority was
historically’denied, with oppor-
tunities to elevate their educa-
tional, political, social and socio-
economic status,” he said.

However; Mr Stuart said, this
“idealistic-and egalitarian agen-
da” did not endure.

“Less than a generation

removed from the historic
achievement of Majority Rule,
the vision of a developing, first
world Bahamas became severe-
ly compromised,” he said. “The
emergence of the illegal drug
trade in the 1980's inflicted a
severe blow to the social life
and reputation of the country.

Mr Stuart noted that many
promising young Bahamians
who under normal circum-
stances would have sought to
secure a college education or a

Playing Santa can be easier in
2007 with the Royal Bank

$aving$ Club.

Save now through November”

so you can:

> Accumulate a down
payment for a home or lot

> Paint your house

> Buy new furniture

> Shop for family and friends

Caltl con witsilt aumy: REC Reonycall Baume, cof Cavmeandtin
evaenecttn (owe dhathaillss, “Who wailltvdlnanwalls allkononerdl
wimtil December 1, 2OO7..



vocational trade, opted instead
to become drug dealers.

“The era of quick money,
instant gratification and instant
success brought on by engaging
in a profitable yet illegal enter-
prise tore at the very fabric of
our social life. There was a mass
exodus from our schools to by
young men chasing the dream
of instant wealth. Violent crime
and criminal activity inextrica-
bly linked to the drug trade
became an everyday occurrence
on the streets of the Bahamas.

“Moreover, many men and

women, young and old, found. .

them selves on the other side
of the drug trade addicted to
these illegal drugs. Cocaine
addiction in particular spread
like cancer throughout our soci-
ety in the 1980’s and many
young children were abandoned
or left to be raised by grand-
parents, themselves or other
older relatives.”

Mr Stuart said that as a result,
a generation of Bahamian chil-
dren was raised without adult
supervision and without a prop-
er education.

“To make matters worse, not
only did the PLP government





@ BDM leader Cassius Stuart
has blamed social decay in the
Bahamas on the moral
collapse of the administration
under Sir Lynden Pindling

- (above)

turn a blind eye to the scourge
of the illegal drug-trade inflict-
ing social disintegration on our
society, but there were allega-
tions that some of our govern-
ment leaders and high ranking
government officials were com-
plicit in its success,” Mr Stuart
added.

Leader of slave revolt
‘should be recognised’

l@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE leader of the Exuma
slave revolt should be recog-
nised as a national hero accord-
ing to Dion Hanna, the director
of the Eugene Dupuch Legal
Aid Centre.

Yesterday The Tribune spoke
to the long-time Rastafarian,
law lecturer, pan-Africanist and
human rights activist about his
views on Majority Rule — and
also who he believes should be
recognised as a national hero.

According to Mr Hanna:
“Our power is an illusion
because all the power that we
think we have is in the hands
of these people; the Royal
Banks of Canadas, the
Solomons Mines, the insurance
companies and all these other
powerful institutions.”

Mr Hanna claimed that it
would be a “farce” for Bahami-
ans to celebrate Majority Rule,
because “common Bahamians
still don’t control anything.”

“Asa mater of fact, I believe
we have gone backwards,
because back in the day we had
the Penny Savings Bank, which
was for the common man, but
we don’t even have that any-
more,” explained Mr Hanna.

When asked by The Tribune
who he believes should receive
national recognition for their
contribution to history, the vet-
eran attorney replied “Pom-
pey”.

In 1829, a young slave named
Pompey led a small rebellion
on Exuma.

Rolleville was the largest
slave settlement on the island

during Lord John Rolle’s time
and the site of several slave

uprisings in the 1820s and 1830s,

when Pompey journeyed along
the beach from Steventon to
Rolleville to inform the
Rolleville slaves about the
revolt.

Today, descendants of Rolle
are still claiming land from Lord
Rolle's Estate.

As historians Michael Craton
and Gail Saunders have noted,
the Pompey slave revolt was so
significant that it “firmly estab-
lished the principle that
Bahamian slaves could not be
moved with impunity against
their will.”

And for all of his troubles
Pompey received a public flog-
ging of 39 lashes.

“Heroes are people who actu-

ally go in the trenches and make .

fundamental changes,” said Mr
Hanna.

With respect to majority rule,
Mr Hanna claimed that the
Pompey revolt was probably the
most “effective act” that has
occurred in the history of the
Bahamas.

“1967 was a change of politi-
cal power but it was not a
change of the dynamics that we
face, and we:still have the same
economic disempowerment of
the majority of Bahamians.”

Mr Hanna also accused the
government of. practising
“apartheid”.

He said: “There are Rasta
children who are still refused
entry into schools in this coun-
try, and until we change that,
please don’t talk to me about
Majority Rule.”

Tourism
dollar lure
‘destroyed
our hopes

for an
educated
populace’

THE old PLP’s vision of
an educated, enterprising
and self-determining
Bahamas was drowned by
the lure of the tourist dol-
lar, according to Cassius Stu-
art.

Mr Stuart said that along
with the problem of illegal
drugs in the 1980s, tourism
was the defining force of the
post-majority rule Bahamas.

“The tourist dollar
became our major legal
source of income as a nation
and tourism was touted as
our primary industry,” he
said. “Hotel developments
became a common fixture
of the Bahamian landscape
and job opportunities in the
tourism sector were preva-
lent. Once again young
Bahamians left school for
the lure of the thriving
tourism sector and hefty tips
from tourists.”

He said the government
of the day increased the
problem by not enforcing
educational requirements.

“The tourism Industry
absorbed a plethora of job
seekers from. gardeners to
pool attendants to bell man
to bar tenders. Many
promising young Bahamians
left school to occupy the low
level entry jobs, while mid-
dle and senior level man-
agement job opportunities
were reserved for the for-
eign expatriates, Mr Stuart
said.

He said that as a result,
the goal of many young
Bahamian became, “Get a
job in a hotel and you are
set for life”.

However, the party leader
said, this goal was soon
exposed as shortsighted by
“the sobering forces of real-
ity”.

He noted that the
unprecedented prosperity
seen in the Bahamas in the
1980s came as a result of the
illegal drug trade — tourism,
however, became the scape-
goat for this success. “The
deception prevailed with
impunity, so much so that
the new catch-phrase
became ‘Tourism is Our
Nation’s Bread and But- |
ter.”

This continued until real-
ity came crashing down
around the Bahamas as a
result of “unpredictable and
unforeseeable global mar-
ket forces.”

“In the early 1990s the
American economy began
to experience an economic
recession. Thus, the would-
be American tourist had lit-
tle or no discretionary or dis-
posable income and as a
result the airline and travel |
industry experienced signif-
icant downturns. As a con-
sequence, the Bahamas
experienced a critical blow
to its tourism industry with
hotel occupancy drastically
declining and dipping to
records low,” Mr Stuart said.

“Maintenance on many
hotel properties was neglect-
ed and the overall standards
of quality and excellence in
many of our hotel became
substandard,” he said.
“Adding further to the
downturn in the market was
the first Gulf War in the ear-
ly 1990’s which injected
additional problems to the
once healthy tourism mar-
ket.”

Mr Stuart said Bahamians
began losing jobs and many
found their job positions
made redundant. It was
clear, he said, that the econ-
omy was headed into crisis.

He continued: “Many
Bahamians found them-
selves in an obvious quag-
mire, with little or no edu-
cation and no employment.
The ‘blessing’ of the
Bahamas now became its
‘curse’. Unemployment rose
to unprecedented levels and
became a nightmare for the
government. The private
sector could not consume
the large numbers of unem-
ployed and uneducated indi-
viduals seeking jobs. Facing
an impending crisis and with
the 1992 elections approach-
ing, the government played
politics as usual. As a result,
hundreds of Bahamians
were absorbed into the pub-
lic sector prior to the elec-
tions.”


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.




Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Faxx (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Saddam is history; his crimes live on

SADDAM Hussein is history, his chok-
ing grip on Iraqi society broken by a noose.
His merciless crimes, however, live on in
photographs, grainy videos and, not least,
in the memories of those who suffered his
rule. ,

If the former dictator had lived and met his
end in one of the great civilizations of
Mesopotamia he tried to emulate — Sad-
dam fancied himself the successor to Ham-
murabi and Nebuchadnezzar — his adver-
saries might also have extirpated him from
history.

The ancients didn’t only destroy the phys-
ical presence of reviled leaders, scattering
their bodies to the four winds. They also
erased all records of the lives and deeds of
the vanquished. They renamed cities, They
chiseled names off monuments. They put
blood relatives to the sword.

Plenty of people around the world today
would be happy to emulate antiquity, to wipe
the history books clean of Saddam. In life, he
was variously regarded as a champion of
pan-Arabism, a defender of Islam, a proxy
USS. ally in a troubled region and a lone
antagonist against American hegemony.

In death, his three decades of absolute
rule in Iraq and the atrocities he committed
are, now, embarrassments. Without the
Baathist propaganda machine churning out
encomiums and Saddam enforcing the glo-
rification of his own greatness, the truth
about the modern-day Hammurabi is harder

‘ to ignore.

Those who celebrated Saddam as the stan-
dard bearer of Arab pride and unity would
like to conceal the fact that his most inti-
mate victims were fellow Arabs — hundreds
of thousands of Iraqi citizens, then tens of
thousands of Kuwaitis.

A man regarded as an Arab hero for
championing the extremist cause against
Israel was responsible in 24 years for Arab
death on a scale that dwarfs the casualties of
all the Arab-Israeli conflicts combined.

Those who bizarrely came to view Sad-

dam as a defender of Islam would like to
obscure his homicidal secularism and the
detail that his victims — well more than a
‘million in all — were overwhelmingly Mus-
lim. Islamists who condemn the U.S.-led war
on terror as a purported war on Islam have a
hard time explaining Saddam’s very real wars
against Iraqi and Iranian Shiites and Sunni
Kurds.

Foreign policy realists in the United States
did more than merely accept Saddam as the
enemy of our Iranian enemy. A succession of
American leaders, beginning with the Carter
administration, aligned U.S. interests with
Baathist interests, supplying money,
weapons, intelligence and training ‘despite
full knowledge of Saddam’s psychopathic

repression, mass murder and use of chemical ,

weapons. 5
An international cadre of politicians, busi-
nessmen and United Nations employees

_ enriched themselves by skimming money off

a U.N. programme that was supposed to pro-
vide food and medicine to the Iraqi people.
So many people would like to see history
buried along with Saddam. Dr. ;
Najmaldin Karim is not one of them.
In 1972, Karim abandoned his medical
career in northern Iraq to join the Kurdish

‘resistance. Today he is an American neuro-

surgeon and the president of the Washington
Kurdish Institute. While he escaped Sad-
dam’s murderous reign, members of his fam-
ily didnot.

Writing recently in the New York Times,

he called Saddam’s execution an act of jus- -

tice. But, he wrote, the execution came both
too late and too early:

“Too late, because had Saddam Hussein
been removed from the scene many years
ago, many lives would have been saved.

*Killing Saddam now, however, for order-
ing the massacre at Dujail in 1982, means
that he will not face justice for his greatest
crimes: the so-called Anfal campaign. against
the Kurds in the late 1980s, the genocidal
assault on the Marsh Arabs in the 1990s,
and the slaughtering of the Shiite Arabs and
Kurds who rose up against him, with Amer-
ican encouragement, in 1991.”

Three thousand years ago, the death of a
megalomaniac like Saddam would have per-
mitted his successors to wipe clean the his-
torical slate. Perhaps that’s why history is
filled with so many megalomaniacs.

Remembering Saddam’s atrocities and
holding to account the accomplices and apol-
ogists who helped him gain and retain pow-
er is the best way to prevent history from
repeating. Which is why his regime’s trial
should go on, even though Saddam is dead.

(This article is written by
Jonathan Gurwitz of the
San Antonio Express-News ¢.2007).












DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT



Donald Newman Archer,
70 yrs.

Died peacefully ,at his home

after a long illness on Saturday,

6th January. He is survived by

his wife Vivien; three daughters:

Lisa Archer, Jennifer Archer of

England, and, Melody Levarity

of Freeport; two sons: Patrick and

a ® Nicholas of England; two daughters-
in-law: Irene Archer and Julia Archer; one son-in-law: Marcian
Levarity of Freeport; one sistet: Sylvia (Billie) Phillips of
England; one brother-in-law: Allan Garland of En land; seven
grandchildren: Aaron, Andre, Benjamin, Carol¥M, ‘Yasmin,
Shenique and Sherice; three aunts: Ulrica Bethel, Patricia Lady
Isaacs, and Ella Garland of Scotland; one uncle: Basil North;
five nephews and neices: Brian, John and David Phillips,
Jacqueline Qwen and Lindsay Garland, all of England. Many
other relatives and special friends including: the Archer and
Isaacs families, Greschan Sands, Jan and Frusan Bethell, Dr.
Anthony Bethell, Dr. Henri Podlewski and Sandra, Adrian
Burrows, John and Sandra Rolle, Margaret Hall, Peter Pateman,
Claire Cash, Noreen Major, Billy Styles, Johnny Pratt, Michael
and Joan Knowles, Dr. Ian Kelly, "Auntie Clee" Dean, Lynden

Curry and the "Andros family."

A Memorial service will be held at
St. Matthews Church, Shirley Street,
Monday, 15th January 2007 at 2.00 p.m.

—"”



In leiu of flowers donations may be made to The Cancer Society.

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer

‘99 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
“03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low mileage

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

QUALITY sates

Paying tribute to

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I FIRST met Mr Everette
L. Cartwright, better known
as ELC, on my first day at
NGM Major High School on

September 2, 1981. My first -

impression was “Oh my God,
this ride is going to be rough;
he must’ve been a drill
sergeant in the British
Navy.”

Well suffice to say, I sur-
vived the six years with ELC
at the helm of an education-
al masterpiece. He was seri-
ous, but yet humorous; he
was an intellect, but yet
down to earth, and, most of
all, he was truly a mentor to
hundreds. He inspired a lot

‘of us (students) to reach for

higher grounds, to aim for
the stars and for God’s sake
don’t fall below the tree tops.
He was an enemy to igno-
rance, a champion for edu-
cation and a true example of
a Christian. He defined the
essence of one of God’s mes-
sengers. He lived by the
Divine God’s code, he
walked the walk and trust me
he talked the talk. He
ensured that all of his stu-
dents were taught the word
of God. Why? Because he
was the teacher. Religious
Knowledge was my best sub-
ject and best grade through-
out high school. I guess it
was my way of showing him
respect. Whenever I did
wrong in school, he would
preach to fe everytime and
everytime the words would
be the same.

. SBarryl, when,.are you ,

going to change, your Dad is
working hard and all you’re
doing is skylarking, assume
the position.” Then the
tamarind switch would do
the talking. Then the note to
my Dad would follow and I
would look forward to
another whooping at home.
Discipline was one of his
strong attributes; he made
sure that respect and order
was in place. No monkey
business, no skylarking, no
fooling around and the list
can go on and on. He
enforced educational and
moral values; they were the
benchmarks of his entire
legacy. I am forever grateful
that I met and was a small

_ part in Mr ELC’s life. He

was a God-given gift to me
and I am indeed blessed to
have known him. He was a

=r

A ane CUE er
Ae

5h
me

|



LIMITED

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 © 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ud for similar deais * Queen's Highway + 352-4122

Mr Everette L.
Cartwright (ELC)

detail. Most of all I know he
is praying for all of us. May
he rest in peace, in the loving
arms of his loving God.

My heartfelt condolences
to Mrs Cartwright, and all of
your children and grandchil-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

Long Island hero, a great

father, a great teacher, a dren.

great leader and most of alla

great person. I know he will ©

be greatly missed, however, I DARRYL DARVILLE
know ELC is with God in Nassau,

heaven giving a report about Bahamas.

his time on earth, detail by

We did not vote for some
unknown speech-writer

EDITOR, The Tribune.

’ HERE we go again copying America and reducing the historic
practice of the Westminster style of parliamentary debating to
scripts written by some speech writer who the people did not elect.

Mr Speaker, Hon Oswald Ingraham, MP — as we come into 2007
I request that you will enforce the rules of the House of Assembly
that unless an MP is making a ‘communication’ they may not use,
read-off pre-written speeches, scripts, etc..

Over the past months we see more and more MPs with their lap-
tops which are again questionable under the rules as with the use
of messenger an MP can have the unfair advantage in a debate with
the input by persons not elected to the House with the use of
direct IT connection.

The recent Health Insurance debate showed the lack of parlia-
mentary debating skills to the extreme — possibly only four MPs

- could actually stand on their feet and talk without a script for 15

minutes! Even the leader of the Loyal Opposition, Rt Hon Hubert
Ingraham read his 30 minutes speech word-for-word off obvious-
ly a prepared speech by one of his speech writers.

This is a total breach of the Rules of our Honourable House of
Assembly and in total violation of the Westminster Rules of Par-
liament — it is no different in the Senate so here, Madam President,
Ms Sharon Wilson, lay the rules down and get back to the rules.

It is so laughable when one hears the objection to the foreign
influence in Bahamian matters as it seems today we copy everything
foreign, even our practice in the House of Assembly and the Sen-
atejust likethe US.Congress and Senate.

Mr Speaker, Président of The Senate, read the rules and enforce
them please. We did not vote for some unknown speech-writer and
if the MPs-and potential candidates seemingly can’t'speak with basic
notes then surely they do not qualify to represent the people or be
offered as a candidate. Incredibly the majority of the MPs are
attorneys who use the skill of oratory to defend a defendant — sure-
ly the skills of oratory have been lowered this tar below any accept-
able level of standard?

J WILLIAMS
Nassau,
December 21, 2006.

(As far as we know Mr Ingraham writes his own speecsoo, —

Pex
ateey

A whole new meaning
to Bahamian time

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS following brings a
whole new meaning to
Bahamian time. I was driving
from Cable Beach to the
Marathon Mall yesterday,
when I reached Harrold Road
I got myself prepared (as I
always do) to ride the rollar-
coaster you know the stretch
of road I mean 400 yards from



LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

JFK Drive when to my utter
surprise no more roller-coast-
er the road had been levelled
out, not bad after 25 years —
keep up the good work ha!
ha! have a happy and safe new
year.

PAUL HANNA
Nassau
January 4, 2007

CA










We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department.
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.

Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter
‘ 4
no later than 31st January 2007 to:

HR Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE





0 In brief

BHA ‘continues
to voice its
concerns

over NHI plan’

THE Bahamas Hotel
Association, as a member
of the National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform,
continues encourage gov-
ernment to slow down the
implementation of the
National Health Insurance
plan, the association’s new
president Russell Miller
said yesterday.

Despite the bill to create
the NHI scheme having
been passed in parliament
in December, the BHA
continues to voice their
concerns and provide input
for the ongoing discussion,
Mr Miller told Rotarians of
the Nassau Yacht Club yes-
terday.

Mr Miller said that while
the BHA, with its 220 mem-
bers, is supportive of the
concept of universal insur-
ance coverage, it has seri-
ous concerns about the
scheme’s sustainability and
the restrictions it places on
Bahamians.

“We are moving very
quickly on this, too quickly
when there is in fact a lot
more to review and not all
concerns have been heard
yet,” he said.

The National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform last
week told The Tribune that
it was concerned about sev-
eral findings in the Interna-
tional Labour Organisa-
tion’s (ILO) report on the
NHI scheme.

The Coalition was espe-
cially concerned that the
ILO projected that contri-
bution rates would have to
become “significantly high-
er” than the initial pro-
posed 5.3 per cent.

Dominica
approves
special visa
for cricket
World Cup fans

B ROSEAU, Dominica

DOMINICA'S Parlia-
ment has approved use of -
a special tourist visa for
visitors traveling to the
region for the cricket
World Cup, according to
Associated Press.

. Jamaica, Barbados and

St. Kitts and Nevis also

have approved the visa,
established by the
Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) to facilitate
travel at border check
points in the nine coun-
tries hosting play and
Dominica. They can be
used starting Feb. 1 and
are good until May 15.

Dominica's Parliament
passed the legislation
Monday night.

Dominica is not hosting
matches during the March
13-April 28 tournament,
but hopes its proximity to
countries that are will
help lure cricket fans to
the island. Tourism Minis-
ter Yvor Nassief worried
that those without a visa
may be dissuaded from
coming to Dominica dur-
ing the tournament.

Parliament also passed a
law designed to share
information with authori-
ties throughout the region
during the World Cup as
part of stepped up securi-
ty measures.

More than 100,000 visi-
tors are expected to
attend the tournament,
which is being held for the
first time in the
Caribbean. ,

@ By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE tourism director-general
said yesterday that the Bahamas
had yet to fully exploit the indus-
try’s potential to fuel economic
growth and development, even
though in 2005 visitors spent
$6,600 for every Bahamian man,
woman and child - one of the
highest figures in the world.

Vernice Walkine said the
Bahamas had to find a way to
increase the visitor spend per
capita if the country was to fully
exploit the tourism product.

Despite projections that sug-
gest tourism will drive forecasted
real economic growth of 3-4 per
cent in 2007, Ms Walkine said
that for the most part Bahamians
have simply taken what the
industry has given them.

Visitors

Of the $6,600 spent by visitors
for every Bahamian man, woman
and child, she added: “That is
the number we need to keep our
eyes focused on when we focus
on the interest of the Bahamian
people. That is where the jobs
come from, that is where the
wages, tips and salaries come
from.”

Ms Walkine said that while the
tourism product had been large-
ly resort-based, with the bulk of
tourism dollars concentrated
there, the unrealised potential of
the industry was vast.

* “The more small Bahamian
businesses participating in sup-
plying and servicing the needs of

LOCAL NEWS














the industry, the greater the eco-
nomic benefits derived by the
Bahamas,” she added.

Ms Walkine said Bahamians
needed to take advantage of the
opportunities available for areas
that are reserved for Bahamians
only.

Linkages between these sec-
tors and the so-called anchor
projects were one avenue to do
this, as was the potential to sup-
ply the varied needs of owners of
mixed-use resorts and the visiting
homeowner.

“Tn fact, in most instances, the
spin-off businesses linked to such

. ii VERNICE
WALKINE, Director
‘ourism, speaks at
he opening of the
ahamas Business
utlook Conference.
hoto Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



projects enjoy less capitalisation
and better margins or higher

‘return on investment than those

anchor projects,” the director-
general said.

These businesses included pro-
viding housing for workers at
these projects, supplying items
consumed by owners and guests
at these projects, such as food,
drink, dining and excursions, art-
work and handicrafts.

Ms Walkine added that the
impact of the major resort pro-
jects also influences air access
that benefits an entire destina-



Strike vote to be taken
against GB Shipyard

B By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Union officials announced yes-
terday that a strike vote will be taken next week
against the Grand Bahama Shipyard to ensure the
protection of workers.

Harold Grey, president of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority Workers Union (GBPAWU),
claimed there are still serious safety and envi-
ronmental concerns at the facility and that the
safety of employees is threatened.

Mr Grey accused the management of taking a
“lackadaisical and carefree” approach to safety
and environmental concerns at the shipyard,
where he says there have been three deaths and
numerous injuries in the last six years.

The first fatal accident, which took place in
January 2004, claimed the life of Bahamian Wen-
dell “Sarge” Maxxam, after an explosion on a
barge.

Safety

Following Maxxam’s death, safety protocols
at the shipyard were reviewed by an internation-
al safety expert and steps were immediately tak-
en, including the appointment of safety officers.

However, Mr Grey claims that there continue
to be safety and environmental concerns at the
shipyard.

He said the facility is not being closely moni-
tored by Environmental Health officials, and
called on the relevant authorities to conduct thor-

ough investigations.

Although six safety officers are employed at the
facility, Mr Grey believes that the safety depart-
ment is understaffed.

He claims that management refuses to hire
additional safety officers and that sometimes,
one officer is left alone to patrol and inspect the
entire shipyard.

According to. the union president, the lack of
sufficient manpower led to the wrongful suspen-
sion of a safety officer on November 25.

He explained that the officer was on duty with
four ships in the yard, and while patrolling the
compound came across an injured employee who
had suffered a burn.

The officer escorted the injured worker to the
First Aid station and did what he could to help.

However, at the same time, an X-ray procedure
was being performed on one of the ships which
required the area to be curtained off.

Mr Grey claims that when a management rep-
resentative visited the area and realised that the
safety officer was not present, he instructed that
the officer be suspended pending an investigation.

The Tribune attempted to reach the manage-
ment representative for comment, but calls were
not returned up to press time on Tuesday.

Mr Grey said that the safety officer was doing
what he was required to do. He said that one
officer cannot sufficiently man the entire ship-
yard.

He stated that the suspension of the officer
was a Violation of the union’s labour agreement.

He pointed out that the agreement requires
that a worker is given a warning before being
suspended.

Mr Grey said the union had filed a dispute
against management with the Labour Depart-
ment, but that discussions have reached an
impasse and remain unresolved.

In addition to the inadequate staffing in the
safety department, Mr Grey said the
union is deeply troubled over environmerital con-
cerns.

He claims that two sunken barges at the ship-
yard which contain fuel, oil and human waste,
could have serious environmental implications.

Mr Grey said that the union has reported the
matter to the Bahamas Environmental Science
and Technology (BEST) Commission, but noth-
ing has been done.

“According to the heads of agreement, the
government is supposed to have a full-time envi-
ronmentalist at the shipyard and they don’t have
anyone.

“There are serious environmental and safety
concerns, and no authority visits the shipyard,” he
said.

“We feel the only way these matters can be
settled is to take a strike vote to force the com-
pany to address our concerns. We will have a
general meeting next week with workers to get
them ready for the strike vote in order to do
what is necessary to protect the workers at the
shipyard,” Mr Grey said.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 5

‘The Bahamas ‘yet to fully
et urine

tion, and improves the financial
performance of all tourism-relat-
ed businesses in the impacted
communities.

A prime example of this would
be the commencement of two
direct flights by American and
Continental between Exuma and
the United States as a result of
the Four Seasons at Emerald
Bay.

The Ministry of Tourism, she
said, was working to establish
similar linkages with the cruise
lines. ;

“We are now engaging the
major cruise lines with a view to
entering into agreements where-
by many more entrepreneurial
options are available to Bahami-
ans as suppliers to their ships and
private ports,” Ms Walkine said.

She added that these ranged
from providing all water sports
options, providing stronger
Bahamian entertainment, and
developing more adventure / fun
driven tour options.

Attractions

Further, she said that an
increased number of attractions
in the country can broaden visi-
tor spend and employ Bahami-
ans beyond hotels.

Ms Walkine said arrivals and
visitor spending numbers for
2006 were in line with projec-
tions, after visitor spending
exceeded $2 billion for the first
time in 2005. That same year,
real GDP growth was estimated
to have been 2.73 per cent, the
strongest level for five years.

Some 32 per cent of visitor
spending went towards paying
for accommodations; 25 per cent
went on prepaid packages; some
16 per cent on meals and drinks;
11 per cent in the casinos; 7 per
cent on shopping; 5 per cent on
sporting activities; 3 per cent on
transportation; and less than 1
per cent on inter-island trans-
portation.

Ms Walkine said there were
numerous “unrealised” oppor-
tunities to exploit tourism and
achieve a broader distribution of
its revenues among Bahamians.

She added that a key way to
achieve this was to increase the
number of small Bahamian,busi-

Hite





nesses servicing the industry, as
this. generated increased eco-
nomic benefits, while more |
Bahamian ownership would
enhance its sustainability.

To maintain the Bahamian
tourism industry’s competitive-
ness, Ms Walkine said people
had to stop viewing its resiliency,
viability and sustainability with
suspicion.

She added that the “most
destructive” practice in the
Caribbean was to view tourism
as “the employer of last resort”,
rather than attempt to attract —
their best citizens to work in the
sector.

TROPICAL .
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
ba 74a fa





eee

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 10TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM

8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
9:00 Bullwinkle & Friends

9:30 King Leonardo

10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Real Moms, Real Stories,









Real Savvy
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update



12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd |
1:00 Island Lifestyles

1:30 — Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 Little Robots

4:30 | Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 One Cubed














6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30

10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30

1:30am Community Page 1540AM

Neyiswa\ Sen aRiiesa sls
right to make last minute —
programme changes!




News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Faces Of The Islands
Keith Glinton - 2006 Junior |
Junkanoo Highlights
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response















at




Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452





On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of Majority Rule we
challenge the PLP Government to bring the five kidnapped boys

back home to stand trial in The Bahamas and uphold the
Sovereignty of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

(paid for by the political action committee of the Workers Party)

Se STRAT MORE EY AAR PP EE PT TT YS AS LR NE TR OE aT



RU TET PT MUI LAT AY ISELIN LT LOPLI TORY BTID IT PL IIT aM EEN SE AN IATL RT TN TRIN ETE RN NE UA MMT MMT
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007










THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic
Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.






ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 — Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901— Human Resource Management II



Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional development
in both private and public sectors with the added recognition that these courses have



EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBOOKS :

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I



been equated to courses taken toward a degree programme.







SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Education majors are asked to note the following meetings:










Dr. Beulah Gardiner-Farquhars

on will be holding an Orientation

Meeting on Friday, January 12, 2007 @ 6:00 p.m. in the E-Block,
Room 12 for all students taking the following web courses:















EDU 301 Section: WB-02

EDU 325 Section: WB
EDU 329 Section: WB
EDU 429 Section: WB

Ms. Wendy Riley will be holding a meeting for all students registered
for Web Based EDU 301—Information Technology, Section WB-
01 on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 in the E-Block Room 12 at















on 0] Om enaar

All students concerned must attend.



i

R Ny
wee

LE















for a course today.




























ENQUIRIES
Email :: perdev@cob.edu.bs







and Course Materials.






















Have you done anything
special for yourself today?" *

With one of our courses, you can gain

new job skills, increase your chances for
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success

in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up














All fees are included with the exception of
the application tee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule

ACCOUNTING

Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB's ACCAQOD Ot
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901_— 0

ACCAQ]02 a1

BUSINESS

BUSI9O0" 01
CUST9O0 Ot
BUSIQO4 Ot

COMPUTERS
COMPSO1 ot
COMPSO4 2

~ COMP902 = 01
COMP903 1
COMP 941 oF
COMPS53) OF
COMPS60 01
COMPS30 OT

COSMBD2 OI
COSM804 Of
COSM807 4

DECORATING
pecosoa =
pecose! 01
FioRs0o =
FLoReOT =O
FLoR802 Ot

ENGLISH
ENG 900 v4
ESL 900 01








MASG900 01
MASG901 01
HLTH9O0 Ot

MGMT900 01
MGMT9O1 01

MEDICAL
MEDT900 v

SEWING

SEW 800 01
SEW 802 01
SEW 805 Ot
SEW 806 01
SEW811 01
SEW 804 01



MANAGEMENT

This course is for the beginner who knows

very little about computers and does not

understand how It works. This course

covers ihe major computer concepts with

extensive hands-on practice using various

software, including:

(l) Microsoft Office - Word Processing

(ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet

(iil) Microsoft Access - Database
Management.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007
6:00pm - 9:00pm
Section 01 (CEES)

Saturday, 3rd February, 2007
10:00am - 1:00pm
Section 02 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fuition; $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 11

This course covers the advanced concepts

with extensive hands-on practice using

various software, including:

(l) Microsoft Office - Word Processing

(ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet

(ili) Microsoft Access - Database
Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications |
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007

Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00

Pre-requisite: None -
Begins: Monday 12th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Monday & Wednesday
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTG Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designed to provide
participants wilh an overview of the
fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It
focuses on developing effective and dynamic
PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisile: None

Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007
Time: 9:30am ~ 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day ;
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: _ 160,00

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 1

This course covers basic concapts of
Information Technology. The course pravides
training in these areas: Basic Hardware
Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency,
Operating System Proficiency, Internet and
Email Proficiency.

Pre-reguisite: None

Begins: Wednesday, 7th February
2007
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Duration: 12 weeks

Venue: © CEES Consputer Lab
Fees: $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

This course is a hands-on intraductian to
technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the
following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs,

This course trains new and existing small
business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
amployees} in organizing and managing their
accounting using QuickBooks Pro software.
Students will learn how to set up their
company files, chart of accounts, budget and
customer, vendor and employee files.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 3:00pm

Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

‘Targeting persons who would like to create
their personal web pages, this course

will cover Web page creation, Web site
management and HTML. Specific topics will
include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Pre-requisife: Participants must be
computer Jiterate and have
abasic knowledge of

word processing
Bates: ist & 2nd March, 2007
cd
Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: GEES Computer Lab
Fees: $650.00



All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (ane time). When submitting application,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course. ‘

COURSE SECT COURSE

DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS |
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ill

CREDIT & COLLECTIONS |

Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

TIME DAY

6:00-8:00pm MonWed 12-Feb 10 wks $250
§:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $275
6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $300

6:00-9:00pm Tue

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS |

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 5
QUICKBOOKS

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S

~ WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

COSMETOLOGY

MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAIL ART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING |
INTERIOR DECORATING Il
FLORAL DESIGN |
FLORAL DESIGN
FLORAL DESIGN tll

EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:30pn

HEALTH & FITNESS

, 6:00-9:00pm Thurs

6:00-9-00pm = Mon
10:00am-1:00pm Sat
6:00-9:00pm = Thurs
§:00-9:00pm Wed
6:00-9:00pm Tue

§:00-7:30pm MorWed 12-Feb 12 wks $500

§.30am-4:30pm Thurs

6:00-9:00pm Man
6:00-2:00pm Tue

6:00-9:00pm MovThurs 26-Feb 6 wks $500

§:00-9:00pm Wed
§:00-9:00pm Tue
6:00-9:00pm Tue
6:00-9:00pm Mon
6:00-9:00pm Thurs

6:00-9:00pn Tue

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pn Thurs
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il 6:00-9:00pm Mon

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

§:00-9:00prr Wed

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT! 6:00-9:30prr Thurs

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT If 6:00-9:30pir Mon





6:00-9:00pn Thurs



BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pn Mon
BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thurs

DRAPERY MAKING |
DRAPERY MAKING II
UPHOLSTERY MAKING |
BEDROOM DECORATING |

6:00-9:00pm Tues
6:00-9:00pm Wed

6:00-9:00pm Wed '

1:00-10:00pm — Sat

9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs/Fri 1-Mar 2 days $950

Mover 26-Feb TO wks $250



START DUR FEE

27-Feb Bwks $225
22-Feb day $170
{-Mar 10 wks $225










5-Feb 12 wks $450
3-Feb 12wks $480
8-Feb 12 wks $550
7-Feb 12 wks $450
27-Feb Gwks $330




8-Mar day $160

26-Feb Bwks $225
27-Feb Swks $225

28-Feb Swks $225
27-Feb Swks $250
27-Feb 1Owks $225
26-Feb 10 wks $250
i-Mar 10 wks $300




27-Feb Bwks $225





29.Feb 1d wks $465
o6-Feb 1d wks $820
98-Feb 1dwks $400




8-Feb 12 wks $250
5-feb 12 wks $300






22-Feb 10 wks $225





26-Feb 10 wks $225
20-Feb 1Owks $250
27-Feb 10 wks $225
28-Feb 10 wks $250
28-Feb 10 wks $225
24-Feb 10 wks $225


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



i aos oe rr

Governor General’s Youth |
Award’s 20th anniversary |

y OU may not know
this, but Tough

Call grew up with Prince
Charles.

He and I are about the
same age, we went to
the Clifford Park Indepen-
dence celebrations togeth-
er, and we still haven't fig-
ured out what we are sup-
posed to do in life.

I clearly recall Charles’
troubled childhood. But
while he may have had dis-
tant and pre-occupied par-

ents, he certainly enjoyed a:

much finer education than
I did.

During the 1960s, while
I was lectured by a Scot
named Roger Kelty in un-
air conditioned classrooms
at Queen's College, Charles
was at Gordonstoun — an
elite school set in a 17th
century Scottish estate that
could have been the model
for Harry Potter's Hogwarts
Academy.

Students at Gordonstoun
and its associated schools
are committed to "academ-
ic excellence, personal
development and responsi-
bility ...achieved by partici-
pating in community ser-

vice, work projects,
exchange programmes and
adventuring." .

Wow! Other than picking
‘up rocks on the playing field
_and writing lines about “tri-

fling in de corridor” (set by
prefect Winston Jones), all I
can remember from my
school days are Mr Kelty's
literary jokes (as in "There's
a divinity that shapes our
ends...") — which he con-
tinues to e-mail me from his
Lifeless Cay office.
Whereas in a recent
interview Charles described
his own experience thusly:
"The thing about Gordon-
stoun was that it encour-

aged people to take the ini-
tiative and not sit around
expecting others to do
everything. The main prin-
ciple underlying the school
was that in order to help the
transition from childhood to
adulthood you needed to
give young adolescents
responsibilities."



burgh, had attended way
back in the day.

While Prince Philip was
at Gordonstoun, he partici-
pated in the school's award
programme. And in a fit of
nostalgia in 1956 he set up a
national youth programme
along the same lines, called
the Duke of Edinburgh's

ee
“ The GGYA is part of an
international network that has
processed almost six million
young people in over 100
countries since 1956. It is
divided into bronze, silver
and gold awards so that
participants can choose
different levels of participation
in areas like community

service, skills development,

physical recreation and
adventurous journeying.”

a

Gordonstoun was set
up in 1934 by a Jewish
refugee from Nazi Germany
named Kurt Hahn. It was
an international boarding
school committed to a
"sound mind and a sound
body." And it was the same
school that Charles’ dad,

the iron Duke of Edin-

WAS





on

Stueeting’s Colonial
) Mortuary And Crematorium

84 Blue Hill Road ¢ P.O. Box N-8161 ¢ Tel: 325-7867

° Fax: 325-7867

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

MARGARET

PALACIOUS,

a resident of Dominica Way and
formerly of Matthew Town, Inagua
will be held on Wednesday 10th
January 2007 at St. Gregory’s Anglican
Church, Carmichael Road at 4:00 p,m.
Officiating will be Father Atma Budhu
assisted by other Ministers.

___2002 BMW XS

















MRS.

VILNA

75




eo

Award, to promote the
development of British 14-

‘to 25-year-olds, regardless

of gender, background or
ability.

"It's a do-it yourself
growing-up kit," the Duke
explained in a recent inter-
view. "The idea was to pro-
vide young people with a
broad range of choices of
what they could do. Ina
sense they decide how they
are going to educate them-
selves. The principle was
that they decide what they
are going to do, and when
and how much."

More than three million
young people in Britain
have gone through the pro-
gramme since then. And
surely it would be a fine
thing to have such a scheme
in the Bahamas, where old-



er folks like us wring our
hands in despair at the
spaced out lifestyles of the
younger generation.

There should be a chal-
lenging outlet for young
Bahamians. Something
that's not punitive but
inspiring.

Something that's available
to all, that bridges social
divides and builds positive
life experiences.

Well, turns out there is
just such a programme. It
was originally named after
the Duke of Edinburgh in
the 1970s, but later re-
branded as the Governor-
General's Youth Award,
and more than 8000 young
Bahamians have received a
better start in life because
of it.

he GGYA teaches

skills outside of the
classroom such as leader-
ship, self-confidence and
teamwork. And in addition
to about a thousand young-
sters from regular public
and private high schools, it
includes dozens of kids from
the National Youth Service
as well as 15 juvenile
offenders at the Simpson-
Penn School.

It was re-started in Nas-
sau in 1987, with the help
of Robert Nihon — the son
of a Belgian butcher named
Alexis Nihon who became
a real estate magnate in

Canada and made the.

Bahamas his third home.
Currently, the GGYA is
chaired by Dr Davidson
Hepburn, a former ambas-
sador to the United Nations,

who says the annual cost

runs to some $200,000. But,
he adds, the returns are
immeasurable.

As Esso dealer Hender-
son Burrows told Tough
Call: "The Award strength-
ens character, sharpens
skills, increases stamina,
gives back to the commu-
nity and let's you venture
on expeditions to see and
do things that you will
remember all your life."

Burrows joined the
GGYA through the Cathe-
dral scout troop, and to
complete his gold award he
spent three days hiking the
length of Rose Island with a
dozen other youngsters liv-

Cynthia Louise Henfield, age 73 years of

Strachan Subdivision off So
Of Turks and Caicos Islands, W.
[died at Doctor’s Hospital on Wedn«
27th, 2006, and not at Princess

formerly

December

dier Road, and

esday,

Margaret Hospital as previously reported.

She is survived by Four Sons, Norman,

Milton, Lealon and Vernon
Gloria and Judith, Henfield

Daughters

enfield; Five

Shirleen Clarke, Maxine Robinson an

Black w/ Two Tone Beige Leather
Premium Package
Xenon Headlamps
Excellent Condition
Premium 20 inch Alloy Wheels
Rear Shades
Fully Loaded PWR Everything

$42,500.00
Call 424-0352
_omar@piranajoe.com

ANE ECFA NLA CN LENE

Thelma Vanalstine; Four Sisters, Enith and
Annis Henfield, Hessie Arthur, and Lilleth
Harvey; One Brother, Alphas Smith,
Fourteen Nieces, Twenty-Four Nephews,
and a host of other Relatives and Friends.

Funeral arrangements will be
announced later.

ing off the land. One of his
companions was Victor
Chandler of J. S. Johnson.
Other gold awardees (and

‘there are more than 180 in

all) have included Patricia
Hermanns of Family
Guardian, and Jackie Light-
bourn at the Kirk.

The GGYA is part of an
international network that
has processed almost six
million young people in
over 100 countries since
1956. ;

It is divided into bronze,
silver and gold awards so
that participants can choose
different levels of participa-
tion in areas like communi-
ty service, skills develop-
ment, physical recreation
and adventurous journey-
ing. Currently, there are
about a thousand partici-
pants on New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera, Andros and Exu-
ma.

They are led by 35
trained instructors who
include personalities like
Nurse Donna Saunders
from St Augustine's Col-
lege, Constance Miller of
the Girl Guides, Henry Cur-
ry of the Boy's Brigade,
Roger Thompson of the
College of The Bahamas
and Alan Pinto of GHS. All
the instructors — as well as
their helpers — are volun-
teers. Only three staffers
are paid, including the pro-
gramme's chief coordinator
since 1991 — Denise Mor-
timer.

"Anyone can do the
Award," Mortimer told
Tough Call. "There are no
limitations — you just need
to be motivated. It's the top
accolade that any Bahamian
youth can achieve, and it's
the only award that some
will ever get in their life-
times. It changes lives and it
definitely helps to bridge
social gaps."

That was the view of a
recent Bahamian participant
from St Andrew's named
Aliya: "One of my best
memories was a camping
trip where we walked all
day with maps and huge
bags to Adelaide village,
cooked for ourselves,
bathed in the sea and fought
off stray goats and dogs. We
were able to meet and inter-
act with GGYA members
from other schools and I
still have friends that I met
on that trip years ago."



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

Perhaps the most unusu-
al part of the GGYA pro-
gramme is the annual expe-
dition — a 10-day field trip
to a Family Island for more
than a hundred youngsters.
These excursions have
included camping on Cat
Island and the Inagua
National Park; hiking on
Abaco and Eleuthera;
kayaking in the Lucayan
National Park; and sailing
on the Captain Moxey to
several islands.

Kids pay a small portion
of the cost for this once-in-
a-lifetime experience (and
it's the only part of the pro-
gramme they have to pay
for). .
The bulk of GGYA
expenses are subsidised by)
donors. These sponsors
have included the Ministry
of Youth, Teekay Shipping,
Cable Bahamas and Lyford
Cay.

On top of this, GGYA
gold awardees take part ina
yearly trip to different
islands in the Caribbean,
where they join with other
regional participants to
climb mountains.

he GGYA cele-
brates its 20th

anniversary this year
and coordinators are seek-
ing to extend the program-
me's reach by subsidising
more inner city school chil-
dren from Nassau. But the
main goal is to raise enough
money to set up an endow-
ment fund so that the
Award can be self-sustain-
ing.

And guess who's coming
to dinner? None other than
Charles' younger brother —
Edward Antony Richard
Louis Mountbatten-Wind-
sor (otherwise known as the
Earl of Wessex - seventh in
line to the British throne).

Edward was just a baby
when Charles and I were —
growing up, but he is now
chairman of the interna-
tional division of the Duke
of Edinburgh's Award. He
arrives in Nassau February
2 to hand out awards, meet
participants and star at
fund-raising events to sup-
port "a programme without
boundaries." .

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tri-
bunemedia.net
Or visit

-www.bahamapundit.com














NOTICE

Arthur Vince of Devon, England,
husband of Barbara, father of
Joan Bethel and Patriach of the

Barber, Jackson, Lester, Redgrave
and Bethel Families, died on 21st

December, 2006,

years.

at the age of 99

He had visits to The Bahamas over
about 40 years and many will

remember him.

PERE PETE SAN EN


_ THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 9





SIR Jack Hayward, the
Freeport-based multi-mil-
lionaire, is reportedly ready
to sell the English soccer club
he has owned for many years.

Former Scottish interna-
tional footballer Graeme
Souness has offered £20 mil-
lion for Wolverhampton
Wanderers, the Midlands
club which has been close to
Sir Jack’s heart since boy-
hood.

“Last week I made an
offer, subject to an examina-
tion of the club’s books and
accounts, of £20 million,
which is the figure Sir Jack
had publicly declared he was
looking for,” Souness told the
Daily Telegraph of London.

“T was told ‘no’ by Jez
Moxey (chief executive) but
the offer still stands. It is Sir
Jack’s football club and if he
chooses mot to sell at this
time, that’s his prerogative.

“He can do what he wants.
I have a partner and I see the
club having vast potential
and I will put money into it if
| got the opportunity.” .

LOCAL NEWS





Tourism Ministry heads |

to south Florida for
Superbowl promotion

As American Football Con-
ference and National Football
Conference teams battle for the
title of NFL champions, the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
will be in South Florida enhanc-
ing the Super Bowl experience
for thousands of international
guests.

The ministry is an official
sponsor of the Super Bow! XLI
Host Committee, a group of

influential business and commu-
nity leaders from Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach coun-
ties responsible for co-ordinating
South Florida’s Super Bowl
efforts leading up to and during
the February 4, 2007 game at
Miami’s Dolphin Stadium.
Among the entertainment
attractions, sports clinics and
autograph sessions will be a cul-
tural welcoming committee of

Come to the

Junkanoo, delicious Bahamian
cuisine, and contest giveaways
in 230 Publix supermarkets
through South Florida, touting a
chance to win a relaxing vaca-
tion on Grand Bahama Island.

The Bahamas will also
receive exposure at a VIP gala
of 2,000 attendees and a media
party, where roughly 3,500 jour-
nalists will get a preview of
island life.

Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing
Body Healing, Spiritual imparting

Life Transforming and

Soul Restoring

Evangelistic Crusade

Sunday, January 14th to Friday, January 19th, 2007

At 7:30p.m. Nightly at

The East Street Tabernacle

East Street and Sunlight Village

Under the Theme:

‘IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudolph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.O.G)

ir, the.
ahs

Scott Wilson

he

Come and be blessed, inspired, challenged and

changed!

“This is a highly strategic
partnership for The Bahamas,”
said Vernice Walkine, director-
general of tourism for the Min-
istry of Tourism. “The Super
Bowl is perhaps the largest,
most visible sporting event in
the US, and we now have a
medium to bring the beauty and
culture of the Bahamas to an
international audience in only
a matter of days.”

OC
\ \ \ X
CX \ N



Sir Jack Hayward ‘to sell Wolverhampton Wanderers’

@ MANCHESTER United’s Wayne Rooney, left, holds off
Wolverhampton Wanderers’ Seol during the FA Cup fourth
round soccer match at Molineux, Wolverhampton, England,
Sunday Jan. 29, 2006.

(AP Photo/ Nick Potts, PA)

Share your news |

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













The Art of Istand Living

Le a |

Sale Starts fan Sth |
Soe he CUS Thy:

“Bay St., 2 Doors West of Victoria Ave.
© Tel: 242-356-7302
Mar AM ToL TAG) eae elt ody



2006 FORD F150 |
$34,300.00 |

4.6L V6 Automatic
Reg Cab STX

“Ss The worlds

best selling
full size
truck

_ (other
modeis

2007 FORD SPORT T

$39,700.00

4.0L V6 Automatic

Limited
Edition,
loaded
with
leather
interior

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 ¢ FAX: 328-6094

S

SmartChoice

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com PART OF YOUR LIFE


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



THE TRIBUNE PRESENTS



rr i (fast 58: jriale J stor Z ~











“ TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
JANUARY 16 - MARCH 23

ay
vo

“READ THIS COMPELLING NINETEEN PART.
«STORY ABOUT MELI AND HER FAMILY'S
QUEST FOR A BETTER LIFE.

: Long Road Home





by Katherine Paterson ~ illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully

When Meli, an Albanian 11-year-old
girl, begins her story, she and her large,
close-knit family are happily—if not
securely—living in their ancestral
community in Kosovo. But in 1999
Slobodan Milosevic’s rule drives ethnic
Albanians from their homes. Family
enough. The

closeness is not

‘intervention of U.S. forces is not
enough. As Meli tells her gripping tale,
the family must flee, embarking on a
_ dangerous journey ‘im search of safety."
Though, family ties and tradition are



severely tested, they eventually reach
the U.S. and the tranquility of a
Vermont town. It is there that Meli



experiences both the welcoming American spirit and the post-9/11 distrust of
Muslims. Her response is an inspiration for all.

Based on a true story, Long Road Home presents a warm and compassionate family’s

response to conflict and emigration to America.



he Tribune believes that reading helps

| people to focus on constructive

choices through exposure to worlds beyond

their immediate environment. Breakfast Serials

provides the great gift of fine literature, read in

convenient installments - so that the reader keeps
coming back for more.









Read. Learn. Enjoy.

Read "Long Road Home" with us...
every Tuesday and Friday from
January 16 to March 23, 2007.

pune |

=. |







Breakfast Se

ood Books Unbound

For more information about The Tribune's
NIE Literacy Programme, contact
nie@tribunemedia.net or call 502-2394.

tases eee





: LOCAL NEWS ia

LLL

@ THE Bahamas National Geographic Information Systems Centre (BNGISC) continued its
ongoing training schedule with an introductory course to ArcGIS at the centre’s headquarters on
East Bay Street. Pictured (back row from left) are: Troy McIntosh (Road Traffic Department),
Mark Allen (Ministry of Works), Shanty Richards (Department of Environmental Health
Services), Randolph Burrows (Bahamas National Trust), Wendell Rigby (National Emergency
Management Agency) and Duane Miller, BNGIS Céntre technician. Pictured (from left in front
row) are: Tia Hinsey (Department of Statistics), Antonique Sweeting (analyst, BNGIS Centre),
Delores Stubbs (Department of Environmental Health Services), Elaine Bullard (Registrar
General’s Department), Carolann Albury (Director, BNGIS Centre), Valerie Grant-Harry
(authorised instructor), Shakira Simms (Ministry of Works), Danielle Hanek (analyst, BNGIS
Centre) and Karen Mortimer (Road Traffic Department).

(BIS photo: Kristaan Ingraham)

Training week on
new geographic
system technology

@ By Bahamas
Information Services

GEOGRAPHIC Informa-
tion Systems experts at the
Bahamas National Geographic
Information Systems Centre

-have launched a week-long

series of training exercises in
the fundamentals of ArcGIS
Technology for public service
employees and representatives
of the Bahamas National Trust.

The course is designed to
teach participants the funda-
mental concepts of Graphic
Information Systems (GIS)
while allowing them to become
more familiar with the range of
functions in ArcGIS — an inte-
grated collection of GIS soft-
ware and products used to build
a complete GIS wherever it is
needed; be it on desktops,
servers, custom applications,
over the Internet or in the field.

Representatives from 25
agencies throughout the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas,
including Local Government
officials, will participate in the
training sessions.

At the end of the course, par-

ticipants will be able to use the

technology to compliment their
daily job functions, which is
expected to help create larger
databases within the public ser-
vice, while improving informa-
tion collection, sharing, acces-
sibility and management.

Future

Carolann Albury, director of
the BNGIS Centre, part of the
Office of the Prime Minister,
said the training is essential to
addressing the country’s infor-
mation management needs,
particularly when dealing with
land information or spatially
inherent data and providing
local technicians and decision-
makers with modern tools to
discover new ways of display-
ing and analysing data. This,
she said is “the wave of the
future.”

“The training will help offi-
cers to locate new businesses,
track building applications and
environmental degradation,
plan housing developments and
major investment projects and
even help to provide and
improve emergency services

and so much more,” Ms Albury
said.

“GIS technology, along with
reliable data and the necessary
skills such as urban planning,
geography, engineering and
many. other disciplines is the
solution that is being employed
by thousands of persons all over
the world and it is the intent of
the Office of the Prime Minis-
ter, that we do everything in our
power to catch up,” Ms Albury
said.

The ArcGIS course is the
third in a series of training pro-
grammes in GIS use being
delivered by the Centre under
the Land Use Policy and
Administration Project
(LUPAP). Component two and
will be facilitated through the
use of lectures, demonstrations
and hands-on exercises in which
participants will work with
ArcGIS desktop viewing and
manipulating data which will
allow them to be able to cap-
ture, store, analyse, query and
display data.

Another function will be to
allow them to output various
map products in the form of
reports, graphs and documents.

Seat eeeeeeneeceneeeenenceeeeseneeseneeseneeseneenenens ences en eneeneeseneeeenees esses eens eens eee aa seen eae se ene ee eae ee ees eeE eee ee ee SSeS eee eens EeeSs Reena eeeee tees eacesenseneebensensantetensenenstececees

Plans to mark the
abolition of slavery
for Majority Rule Day

FROM pag e one

“There was a great surge of
people saying we want to goy-
ern ourselves and we can,” he
said.

“J don't think it was hatred; it
was doubt,” added Sir Clement.

Many people indeed recog-
nised the key role some whites
had played as "intermediaries"
in helping the black majority
achieve a more representative
democracy.

In addition, Mr Darling com-
mented that he felt "something
tangible" should be done in

honour of Sir Randol Fawkes, :

the trade unionist who went
over to the PLP in 1967, break-

‘ing the 18-18 seat tie between

the two parties.

Sir Clement, however, said of
Fawkes: “We can't do anything
greater for him than has already
been done, he is the number
one trade unionist — he brought
about the revolution — the

‘ change.”

“No one can erase that, noth-
ing can be done to take away
from that,” he said.

Some commentators spoke
of how partisanship has so far
held back the chance of
appreciating the “purity of







Mi SIR Arthur Foulkes

the achievement.”

According to Tribune colum-
nist and FNM candidate Zhivar-
go Laing, as the party who led
the country towards majority
rule, the PLP have traditionally

cited the day as their achieve-
ment and one which indicates
that they should be "forever
regarded as the appropriate par-
ty to govern in the future.”

Yesterday, he questioned
why the PLP had failed to
declare the day a national holi-
day during their five year
tenure. “Iam baftled,” he said,
adding that he thinks it “speaks
something to their genuine
belief about that day.” _

It has also been suggested
that some have manipulated
popular awareness of the event
in an effort to incite racial ten-
sions.

For this reason, the gravity
of the day is sometimes tar-
nished, it has been suggested.

Sir Arthur is among those
who believe that the day should
be commemorated — though not
necessarily as a public holiday —
but in a way which truly fur-
thers people's understanding of
its significance.

“Forty years later we have
achieved much but there is still
a host of challenges which we
still need to overcome in order
to make the Bahamas the free,
progressive, peaceful and devel-
oped country for which we all
strive,” added Sir Orville.

\
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 11



Visitors
FROM page one

he bélieves that it will have lit-
tle impact on tourists travel-
ling to the Bahamas.

“It is a concern, but I don’t
think it will have too much of
an impact on us with our prox-
imity to the US,” he said.

Mr Miller said he considers
the potential increase in the
price of air travel due to this
proposed tax “the cost of
doing business.”

The European parliament
last year called for airlines to
pay taxes on aviation fuel, and
to make it part of the EU’s
carbon emissions trading
scheme (ETS).

According to reports in the
international media, British
Airways is pushing for a deal
in which only intra-EU flights
are included in the scheme,
while American Airlines have
threatened to take the EU to
court if it includes
cross-Atlantic flights in the
ETS.

The EU made the ETS pro-
posal after it was determined
that airplane travel is the
fastest growing source of car-
bon emissions, and that that
sector is not covered by the
Kyoto Protocol.

The EU’s report recom-
mends that the airline industry
should no longer get an
exemption from paying Value
Added Tax (VAT) on avia-
tion fuel, and that an addi-
tional fuel tax should be
brought in.

Opponents to the scheme
have described the ETS as just
another tax on passengers.

Speaking at the luncheon
yesterday, Mr Miller said he
thinks that neither the avia-
tion fuel tax nor the US’ new
passport rules will significant-
ly affect the Bahamas’ tourism
industry.

He said he does believe that
the soon to be launched West-
erm Hemisphere Travel Initia-
tive — which requires US trav-
ellers to obtain a passport for
all international air travel as
of January 23 — will prove to
be quite the financial blow to
the industry as observers have
previously predicted.

“T see. it as an issue, unlike a
lot of people I am not overly
concerned. I think there is a
concern, but I think we will
continue to have people come
here. I think our tourism prod-
uct.sells itself and will continue
to do so,” he said.



















4 ite



FROM page one

until Sunday, January 7, accord-
ing to a BahaMar representative.

This said membership would
no longer be accepted as of Sat-
urday, the day before the sign was
displayed.

In addition, those wishing to
renew their membership could
not do so after Saturday, leaving
members angry because “not
enough warning was given.”

One member claimed this was
an attempt to keep Bahamians
out of the gym.

The member said that if they
had been told in sufficient time
they would have renewed their
membership earlier, but they
were never given that opportuni-
ty.

” This member felt particularly

hurt because for years, he
claimed, he had been going to
that gym.

Even members who renewed

their membership in time are -

angry because some of their
favourite training partners will
not be allowed to train there any-
more.

“If they are going to take
smalls steps like this it’s an indi-
cation of where the hotel is

Cable Beach hotel gym users

going,” the member said.

However, Baha Mar’s Robert
Sands said the Uecision to bar
prospective members, and renew-
al of membership, had nothing to
do with the hotel not wanting
Bahamian members.

He said: “Bahamians are a big
supporter of our facility, but this
facility is of limited size, so it is in
dire need of upgrading and at
some point these facilities must
undergo revamping and redevel-
opment.”

He added: “We are not taking
new membership — the difficulty
remains at the level of the prod-
uct that we are offering.

“We are in the process where
we are about to upgrade and we
cannot allow people to invest
money in membership and we are
not delivering a product and a
service to them that we are satis-
fied with.

“The equipment is about to be
replaced. It’s been a cry of theirs
as well having the amount of

available operating equipment. |

A number of those things are on
order. And we had to suspend

some of our operations while we
make some meaningful improve-
ments to our facility.”

Because the Radisson and Nas-
sau Beach Hotels were also being
renovated, their gym now had an
extra responsibility to accommo-

"date their guests.

“Which is putting tremendous
pressure on this particular gym
facility,” he said.

Responding specifically to
claims that it was Baha Mar’s
intention to stop locals using the
facilities, he said: “Let me answer
you like this: any Bahamian can

check in at any time and have’

complete access to any facility
within the hotel. And so why
would we, on one end, say
Bahamians and locals are not
allowed to use the facilities when

we have a policy where Bahami- ‘

ans contribute tremendously to
our business?

“When they are guests of the
hotel they have complimentary
use of the facility — so that
(claim) does not hold water to
me.

“First of all it’s a hotel facility

Deen ee senna eeeeseeeeneeeeeeeeeeaeeees eens eeeDaRPeSeeONE DOES eRHEGED EERE ESS ES EU SEESEGSSGEDAGEODESH EGE GESGEOEGEEOEGGOEENHRH EEE DEEAESEDAOREOE ESE OH EL EEAEGECH ERO SHNO OHIO EAH RO EERO R SURO R ANGE EROS DERE SS EES



Monday, January 22, TO

HOUSEKEEPING IN THE 21ST CENTURY
New methods and best practices for
housekeeping.

uct. SECURITY PROTOCOLS IN 2007

importance
protocols and filtering information to front
line agents in a timely fashion.

mgt HR BEST PRACTICES
6 Develipaneat and training for the changing - 2:00pm- —

Wescay, Janucry 23, 2007

IBM LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Wyndham Nassau Resort

FROM page one

on December 25, 2006 intentionally caused the death
of Cecil Coakley.

As for Sawyer, the police alleged that she aided
and abetted Miller in the murder. Attorney Langton
Hilton represented Sawyer.

On January 2, Mr Hilton presented the court with
submissions about why his client should be granted
bail.

He told the court there were certain offences in
the Bail-Act for which bail would not be granted,
inclusive of treason, armed robbery and conspiracy.

However, Mr. Hilton stated that his client had
been in court since 5.10 pm on December 26 and he
suspected that it was illegal to keep someone for so
long without granting bail.

Further, Mr Hilton had argued that the continued
detention of his client could give rise to depriva-
tion of liberty which could be viewed as a breach of
his client’s constitutional rights.

Mr Hilton said that his client was charged with a

bailable offence and that bail could be granted on-.

the discretion of the court.

The prosecutor had argued that bail could not
be granted to the defendant as the punishment for
abetment to murder was the same as murder. The
prosecution submitted that Sawyer was not entitled
to bail and should be remanded.

Chief Magistrate Gomez made no ruling on the
application of bail.and remanded the pair to prison.

Yesterday, the prosecution presented the Chief
Magistrate with the same argument that Sawyer

‘was not entitled to bail and he told the judge he

had case law that backed up the submission.

The Chief Justice told the lawyers to come back at
3 pm so that he could hear further submissions from
both sides on the bail issue.

J a Se
MUbahamas

marketplace



Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach

INVESTING IN TOURISM OPPORTUNITIES
Making the most out of the billions of dollars
in tourism related developments.

DELIVERING BRAND PROMISE
Case Study: The islands OF The Bzhamas 9:00am — 11:00¢

=e ae 11:00am - 1:

mc* ARE YOU LISTENING TO WHAT THE VISITORS.

5 ARE SAYING ABOUT YOU?
How best to make the information we are

gathering work for us in a competitive
environment.

12:30pm

Register online at

» WwWw.ntwbahamas.com ‘W) s

or email
events@bahamas.com

for downloadable
registration forms

and fax 0 302-2098 |















9:00am — 11:00am

9:00am — 11:00a

11:00am — 1:00

session

Woman granted bail

At 3 pm the prosecutor presented the court with

the case of Edward Cunnigham vs The Commis-
sioner of Police, a criminal matter on which Justice
Anita Allen gave a ruling on May 22, 1998.

The case involved an application for bail in respect
of a defendant who had been charged with abet-
ment to commit armed robbery.

In the Edward’s case, the attorney for the defen-
dant argued that the offence of abetment to commit
armed robbery was not included under Section 4
and Part B or C of the schedule to the Bail Act and
therefore it fell within the discretionary powers of
the court to grant bail.

Counsel for the respondent submitted that the
offence of abetment to commit armed robbery fell
within Part C of the Bail Act because section 85(2)
of the Penal Code deems a person guilty of the
offence if the crime which is abetted is actually com-
pleted.

Justice Allen rejected the submission of the attor-

‘ney for the respondent.

In her ruling, Justice Allen said that abetment to” acer how (he meanaice xpect-

commit armed robbery was not included in Part B or
C of the schedule to the Bail Act 1994.

After presenting the Edwards’ case, the prose-
cutor acceded that the magistrate’s court did in fact
have the authority to grant bail in respect of Sawyer.

The prosecution also conceded to the court that
any amendments to the Bail Act, such as including
abetment for serious criminal matters, had to be
made by Parliament.

Magistrate Gomez granted Sawyer bail in the
amount of $20,000 with one surety. The conditions
of the bail are that she has to report to the police sta-

tion every Wednesday and Saturday and surrender.

her travel documents to the police.







13

13



per

Making the most of new technologies in
advancing your business.
ARE WE BUILDING HOTELS AND ee G

ways to integrate more Bahamian
entertainment in restaurants and hotels.




Find out how to break into the multi-billion
dollar weddings and honeymoon industry.

wary 20-26, 2007

and we’ve opened it up to a lim-
ited number of outside member-
ships. We can’t just have it
open wide. It’s a limited-size facil-
ity.
ad at some point in time we
have to step back and do what is
absolutely necessary if we are
going to provide a product that
people expect,” he said.
In a few weeks the hotel will
close its ballroom, but not
because they don’t want locals to

come in,” he said, “but because
the need is there to upgrade,
improve and change so that we
have a product that locals and
non-locals can be proud of.”

Mr Sands could not say

‘whether the hotel would offer

membership to prospective mem-
bers after renovations are com-
plete.

“We will revisit the whole issue
at that time. Our notice simply
said we have suspended and dis-
continued at this point until fur-
ther notice, but when the time
comes we will revisit the issue,"»
he said.

Search for suspect

FROM page one
the nightclub.

Ferguson told police that he was at Native Hut around lam
dancing with a woman friend when a man, whose face he knows,
began touching the woman from behind in an indecent manner.

He said when he confronted the man about his behaviour, the
man pulled out a sharp object and stabbed him in his neck, feft *
shoulder and upper back. His attacker then fled the scene on foot.’

A police search is underway.

FROM page one

and Rolle families have also had
an opportunity to speak with
the Jawyers — many of them
privately. Only one of the

~accused has a US government

appointed lawyer.

All three men are expected
to appear again before Magis-
trate Judge Ted E Bandstra.

This will be the second time
that they will appear for
arraignment as the first sitting
was postponed to this morning.

Of the three men, only Bain
is represented by Mr Michael
David Spivak of the Federal
Public Defender’s Office. Rolle

is represented by Mr Roderick .

Darrell Vereen, and Rigby has
since changed lawyers from his
appointed attorney Michael
Gary Smith. He is now repre-
sented by a private attorney, Mr
Abe Anselheart Bailey.

Mrs Adams said she had ho

ed to plead.
The men are being held at

the Federal Detention Centre |

in downtown Miami.

It is still unknown when the
two other men, Roney Tony,
and John Peters will have their
cases heard.

The three men being
arraigned, Bain, Rigby, and
Rolle, have all been denied bail
and issued an “order of “deten-

tion” as-they have been regis-



Get tips on how to break into the industry
from those who know.

PROFILING THE NEW WORKER IN THE WC
invovanve methods weed new best peace

empower employees and increase

12 PROFITING FROM YOUR ARTISTIC TALENT
Find out what's hot and what's not in the sf
handicraft industry. nn OM — AD

Mcé PROFITING FROM RELIGIOUS TOURISM
Leam the secrets of this rapidly growing niche 2:00pm oD)

wc? GET PROMOTED AND INCREASE
14 your EARNING POWER

Learn the secrets to success from top Human
Resources Executives.

Register online at
rm

or email
events@

for downloadable
registration forms

and fax 10302-2098

2:30pm

11:00am - 1:

11:00am — 1:

com

com

Baggage handlers

tered as flight risks.

The governing Progressive
Liberal Party has been severely
criticised for allegedly aiding in
what has been described as a
conscious effort to circumvent
Bahamian laws by having the
men arrested in the US, instead
of the Bahamas. Government
has denied all knowledge.

Since the arrests on Decem-
ber 18, government has been
criticised in the newspapers as
well as on various radio stations
for their “silence” on the mat-
ter.

Since then, Prime Minister

Perry Christie has announced
that he will “personally” inves-
tigate the matter. He said it was
unacceptable that no one in his
cabinet knew anything of the
joint US/Bahamas law enforce-
ment operation that resulted in
the men’s arrest.
According to information
released by the US Embassy,
the baggage handlers had been
under surveillance for over a
year. It said that besides the
federal charges, additional crim-
inal charges were expected to
be filed against them.

The five NFS employees were
arrested and charged with
smuggling illicit drugs into the
United States on local and inter-

_ national flights at the Lynden

Pindling International Airport.












11:00am — 1x
































PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Starbucks and customers’ help

Sra

life

Your look at what’s going on in your community

HE stockings were not hung
by the chimney, but the toy and
book drive baskets at Starbucks
stores were filled with gifts for
children of the Bilney Lane
Home and Nazareth Centre.

Tremendous support for the
drive was given by partners,
customers and the public at
large.

On December 18, Starbucks
partners sprang into action and
treated -the Bilney Lane Chil-

dren’s Home to an afternoon

of excitement.

The children enjoyed face
painting, arts and crafts, music
and dancing, eats and treats and
finally a surprise visit from San-
ta.



Royal Bahamas Defence
Force officer Lt Michael Hanna
has been selected to attend a
three month training course at
the US Coast Guard Center in
Yorktown, Virginia. |

The course, sponsored by the
US Embassy's Naval Liaison
Office at an estimated cost of
$18,000, will run from January 4
to April 7.

- Prior to leaving for Virginia,
Lt Hanna paid a courtesy call
on US Charge d’Affaires Dr
Brent Hardt, who commended
him on his selection and encour-
aged him to take full advantage
of the training and information
he will receive over the three-
month period.

During the training, Lt Han-
na will participate in three
courses. The first, a crisis com-
mand and control course, is
designed to provide the skills
necessary for decision-makers
to manage emergency incidents.

The course consists of train-
ing on risk communications,
risk-based decision making, best
response to a disaster, contin-
gency planning, the Incident
Command System, exercise
design and development, and a
day of challenging hands-on:
media relations training.

Lt Hanna will also take part
in a two-day crisis management



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

i SOME of those attending Nove
Thief starring Jamaica’s Oliver did more than
member Myrna Dawkins (centre) won a pair of round
producer and CEO of Capital City Marketing Kathy
Cancer Society of the Bahamas Terry Fountain (righ

ohare your news

The Tribune wants to hear

| you are raising funds for a



The partners of Starbucks
were off again on December 28,
giving of their time as they
shared holiday cheer with chil-
dren of the Nazareth Centre.

Administrator of the home
sister Joan gave the partners a
tour of the facility and gifts were
given to children to celebrate
the season.

“Starbucks Bahamas’ com-
mitment to community was evi-
dent over the holiday” said
Colleen Ferguson, the store

manager of Starbucks Harbour .

Bay, “It was a rewarding expe-
rience for all those involved; all
of us at Starbucks feel great
about what we’ve done. Star-
bucks Bahamas cares about



i JANET Brown, administrator of the Bilney Lane Home,
shown receiving gifts from Starbucks partner James Walkine.

people and giving certainly
helps to keep things in perspec-
tive” .

“We had overwhelming sup-
port from our customers and
partners for this year's toy and
book drive,” said Peter Rounce,



mber’s one night only performance of the play The Assistant
“Jaugh ‘til dem belly bust”. Lucky audience

-trip tickets to Kingston, Jamaica. Show
Ingraham (left) assisted president of the
t) draw Ms Dawkins’ name. Part of the
proceeds of the sold-out show went to the Cancer Society.

exercise using computer simu-
lation software in which partic-
ipants will work in groups to’
resolve a series simulated crises.

The second course, interna-
tional leadership and manage-
ment, is designed specifically
for international mid-grade and
senior Officers.

The objective is to enhance
supervisory skills in communi-
cation to promote better under-
standing.

The curriculum uses the
instructional systems design
(ISD) process in which each
concept is introduced, discussed,
and applied in a measurable
fashion.

In addition, each student is
given individual feedback on
strengths and weaknesses in
applying the skills learned.

The training relies on role-
playing, case studies and group
activities to facilitate the stu-
dents’ learning.

The third and final course is
scheduled for January 28 to
April 7 and will focus on the
roles and responsibilities of the
international maritime officer.

The training was made possi-
ble as an ongoing joint effort
between US and Bahamian law
enforcement agencies, promot-
ing partnership and protecting
both borders.

















operations manager for Star-
bucks Bahamas. “Our efforts
paid off to make the drive a suc-
cess. We were excited to bring
love to the underprivileged and
reach out to assist the needy in
our community.



Pa AE

ing hand for children’s homes



@ (LEFT to right) Inga Bowleg, director of business develop-
ment for the John Bull Group of Companies; Peter Rounce,
operations manager for Starbucks Bahamas; Sister Joan, admin-
istrator of the Nazareth Centre, Timothy Pinder, IT/partner
asset protection manager for Starbucks Bahamas; Noel Sturrup,
partner resources manager for Starbucks Bahamas and Leonard
Sands, construction manager for Starbucks Bahamas.

“The partners at Starbucks
are a wonderful group of dedi-
cated people,” he said. “They

all make’a great team, both in
work and out of work. I am very
proud of our partners.”



@ SPONSORS and producers congratulate Oliver Samuels, star of the sold out success The Assis-

tant Thief after a stellar performance.
ing; Kathy Ingraham, producer. and CEO, Capital City Marketing;
Samuels; show sponsors Mrs and Mr Jacque Cadet of Village Har

Pictured left to right: Gloria Darville, Capital City Market-
Jamaican king of comedy Oliver
dware and Building Supplies. ©

(Photo by Arthia Nixon-Stack, Capital City Marketing)









our continuing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

Visit or call your Agent
at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

Premium payment functions will be
) transferred from Collins Avenue to our
Harbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.



FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY



SECTION

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

BUSINESS

ninew@tituneneaianee Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Siw



HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



$2.7bn in damages from
catastrophic hurricane

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

catastrophic

hurricane that

struck all the

major Bahami-

an islands would
cause a minimum $2,7 billion in
total damages, Bahamas First’s
president and chief executive
warned yesterday, with about 30
_ per cent of those assets likely to
be either uninsured or underin-
sured.

Patrick Ward gave the
Bahamas Business Outlook a
graphic illustration of the impact
on this-nation and its economy
from a ‘once in 100 years’ event,
such as Hurricane [van’s impact
on the Cayman Islands in 2004,

The $2.7 billion figure, he said,
was based upon the assessments
of damage experts, who had cal-
culated that a catastrophic cate-
gory five hurricane hitting the



a | PRIME Minister = Peiry Christie speaks with BEC general
manager Kevin Basden (left) during the Bahamas Business
Outlook Conference yesterday.

(Photo; Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

PM: ‘Unemployment |
close to a ‘minimum’ |

a By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

grihune Business Reporter

KERZNER International’s ‘eens -launched job recruit-
ment drive for more than 1500 persons will further decrease the
Bahamas’ unemployment rate, which is now approaching an_ |

“irreducible minimum”, the Prime Minister said yesterday,

‘Perry Christie told the Bahamas Business Outlook Conference |
that the hiring of persons to sustain the third phase at Atlantis _|
was just one example of the fact that “jobs are everywhere in evi- |
dence and in all sectors of the economy”,

“Tam advised that the preliminary unemployment figure for
2006 is 6.9 per cent, which is a decline of 3.3 points below that of
2005 (10.2 per cent), and the

lowest for the last four years.

Bahamas First chief says 30 per cent of assets uninsured or
underinsured, raising serious concern about rebuilding ability

Bahamas would result in a “min-
imum” loss of 10 per cent of all
property, auto and marine
assets,

There were an estimated $27
billion worth of such assets in
the Bahamas, Mr Ward said,

excluding major resort develop- |

ments, meaning that the $2.7 bil-
lion damage figure was likely to
occur if a catastrophic category
five hurricane hit the major
islands of New Pravidence, Aba-
co and Grand Bahama,

Mr Ward said the minimum
loss estimates for personal and
commercial property assets in
this situation was 10 per cent,
the same ratio also being applied



SEE page 5B

Bahamas urged to export
‘unique’ tourism services

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas should exploit
its “unique” tourism products
and knowledge by selling these
services to the rest of the world,
the Caribbean Tourism Organi-
sation’s (CTO) secretary-gener-
al said yesterday.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
the former Bahamas tourism
director-general, told the annu-
al Bahamas Business Outlook
conference that this nation “has
the potential to be recognised”,
not just as a leading Caribbean
destination for visitors, but as

“the regional hub for tourism _

thinking”.

He added that there “is no
reason on God’s earth why the
Bahamas should not have” one
of the world’s leading hospitali-
ty and tourism management
schools, capitalising on the
decades of experience and

' knowledge it had built-up in the

tourism sector.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the Ministry of Tourism’s immi-
gration card, a venture in col-
laboration with the Indusa tech-

SEE page 7B



to buildings in the course of con-
struction. He added that major
tourism properties were again
excluded from this calculation.

On vehicles, | per cent would
be lost, the ratio for marine vehi-
cles being 2 per cent.

In such a scenario, Mr Ward
estimated that on New Provi-
dence alone, a catastrophic hur-
ricane would inflict some $1.9
billion worth of damage, given
that this island housed about
$19.4 billion in exposed assets.

This consisted of $16.6 billion
in personal and commercial
properties that were exposed;
$2.345 billion in buildings under
construction; $370 million in

vehicles; and $160 million worth
of marine vehicles and boats,

Mr Ward had previously esti-
mated that just 48 per cent, or
just below $13.5 billion, of the
$27 billion in Bahamas-based
assets eligible for insurance were
covered by Bahamian general
insurers and their reinsurance
partners.

A further $6 billion or 21.7

per cent of assets were covered
by overseas insurers, such as the
Lloyds of London market, while
more than $8 billion in assets
was either underinsured or not
insured at all,

The final figure, Mr Ward
said, suggested that some 30 per

cent of property, motor and
marine assets in the Bahamas
were not properly covered by
general insurance, raising ques-
tions about how many Bahami-
ans will be unable to rebuild
their lives in the event disaster
strikes.

Based on the New Providence
total damage estimate of $1.9
billion, Mr Ward said about $925
million of this would be covered
by Bahamian general insurance
carriers and their reinsurers. A
further $400 million would be
covered by offshore insurance,
but some $563 million in dam-
ages in New Providence would
either be uninsured or underin-

sured.

Mr Ward said among the
uninsured properties were likely
to be a number of government
buildings, and he questioned
whether - in the aftermath of a
disaster - foreign insurers cov-
ering 21 per cent of the exposed
assets in New Providence and
the wider Bahamas would still
have the appetite to “reinvest”
and reinsure clients for the fol-
lowing year.

With almost one- sthied of all
assets underinsured or unin-
sured, Mr Ward questioned

SEE page 6B

Freeport Concrete to incur $2m loss

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete, the company
chaired by embattled Grand Bahama Port
Authority-(GBPA)-head-Hannes Bababk,



231510 re TROL mes
CHECKING & SNe eee LE

Cone FUNDS

an

Seeks Bahamas International Securities Exchange filing extension

yesterday announced it was likely to incur a
$2 million loss for the fiscal year ended
August-31,-2006,:-having- requested an exten-

Fidelity - More than a Bank

sion from BISX for the filing of its accounts.
SEE. page.7B.





Fidelity is Gary’s one stop for all NEMEL CTE eat tete ee

CDs

MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS

FINANCIAL PLANNING

~ FREE INTERNET BANKING.

TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING

Cree Wie

FREDERICK
RHI el

We]
ROAD

y one of the oldest technology ;
fi ms in the alba i



= ) FIDELITY.

HOME EQUITY LOANS

ie el Eder tS)

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT



More than.a Bank

Nassau: T 356.7764 F 326.3000

Freeport:

PARADISE
ISLAND





T 352.6676/7

an ue aoeP

ha FREEPORT

POBox § een
242,328.30 AO
fax: 242,328. 3043 |

VA VAPIAY mioranet.
SUSIN

anne Neate ASAE TONE AE ARE AREA TE AT TT

_wammeaeaneeeetaceretaNNG NHN LARNER AAN NETH HAN mH NNT TT

The Miami Herald





THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B
pow30 —1z,416.60~—«-6.89 W
S&P 500 iain -0.73 W
NASDAQ 2,443.83 +5.63 AL
10-YR NOTE 474 NIC
CRUDE OIL 55.64

a3

Stocks —







after

_ BY JOE BEL BRUNO © -
AssociatedPress
_ NEW YORK — Wall Street _
was mixed in an erratic session _
Tuesday as investors, uneasy _
- about approaching earnings
reports, debated whether the _
drop in oil prices would eventu- _
ally bring stocks down as well.

’ Investors had already lost —

some of their recent ebullience |
going into the earnings season, _
worried that 18 straight quarters _
of double-digit growth in Stan- _
dard & Poor’s 500 companies _
_ might be ending. The market _
_ was skittish after Sprint Nextel —
warned that its 2007 results will _
miss analyst projections, and _
- after another half-dozen compa- _
nies warned Monday that —
fourth-quarter results will come —
up short. | So

But investors also wrestled _
with the positive and negative —
effects of a continuing slide in _
oil prices: Warm weather in the
Northeast has weakened
demand for energy, and at one —
point drove a barrel of oil to.
below $54abarrel

Not only did this drag shares _
of major oil and gasoline com- _
panies to two-month lows, but
‘caused institutional investors _
like hedge funds to rethink their
positions, analysts said. Some
big investors might be taking
cash off the table on concern
demand for crude might not re-
emerge in the near term, ana-
lysts said. 1

The Dow fell 6.89, or 0.06
percent, to 12,416.60. Mean-
while, the broader S&P 500
index dropped 0.73, or 0.05 per- _
cent, to 1,412.11.

Technology stocks went —
against the overall market, with
the Nasdaq composite index ris- _
ing 5.63, or 0.23 percent, to
2,443.83. Leading the composite
was Apple Computer, which
unveiled its long-anticipated
iPhone.

While there were plenty of
fluctuations in stocks, fixed-in-
come trading remained range
bound with little economic
news for traders to act on.

Bond prices edged lower,
with the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury up to
4.66 percent from 4.65 percent
Monday.

The dollar was higher
against other major currencies,
and gold prices moved up along
with it. Lower oil prices have
made currencies and gold more
attractive to investors looking
for a safer place to stow cash.

The drop in oil prices was
originally one of the market’s
biggest motivators, sending
shares of transports and retail-
ers higher. 5

' Investors bet lower prices at
the pump would cause consum-
ers to spend more in stores, and
trucking companies would
spend less to fuel their fleets.

But that decline in turn sent
shares of major oil and gasoline
companies sliding as lower
prices could cut into profits.

Advancers outnumbered
decliners by about 3 to 2 on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 1.70 bil-
lion shares.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies fell 1.34, or
0.17 percent, to 778.33.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed up 0.86
percent after being closed Mon-
day due to a public holiday.

At the‘close, Britain’s FTSE
100 was up 0.03 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index rose 0.10
percent, and France’s CAC-40

added 0.26 percent.














. The iPhone, which will start at
$499 when it launches in June, is
controlled by touch, plays music,
surfs the Internet and runs the





AIRLINES

ELECTRONICS

READY FOR THE WORLD: Apple CEO Steve Jobs shows off the new iPhone during his keynote address
at the Macworld Conference and Expo on Tuesday in San Francisco.

APPLE SHINES WITH |
NEW NAME, iPHONE.

CHAIRMAN STEVE JOBS UNVEILS LONG-AWAITED
WIRELESS PHONE AND FIRM’S NEW FOCUS

BY RACHEL KONRAD
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs on Tuesday
announced the iPod maker’s long-awaited leap into the mobile phone
business and renamed the company just “Apple Inc.,” reflecting its
increased focus on consumer electronics.

Macintosh computer operating sys-
tem. Jobs said it will “reinvent”
wireless communications and
“leapfrog” past the current genera-

United may get first
nonstop Washington
to China daily flight

@ A final approval by the
Department of Transportation is
all that stands between United
getting the route from
Washington to Beijing, which
could be worth $200 million.

BY DAN CATERINICCHIA —
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — United Air-
lines won tentative approval on
Tuesday to operate the first nonstop
daily flight between Washington and
Beijing, a 14-hour trip that links the
countries’ capitals as their economies
become more intertwined.

The Department of Transporta-
tion’s final OK would give UAL’s
United a route coveted by executives
and government officials and poten-
tially worth $200 million a year.

Washington-based fliers who
make regular trips to Beijing
applauded the news.

“Jt means that I probably save two
to three hours in my flight,” said
Richard Bush, a senior fellow at the
Brookings Institution. “Anything that
gets you into the hotel ahead of the
evening rush hour [in Beijing] is
great.”

United did not immediately say
how much it would charge for the
flight. Existing fares for travel
between Washington and Beijing
start at under $1,000 for economy

class and can top $15,000 for first
class.

If it wins final approval from the
government, the Elk Grove Village,

Ill.-based airline can begin nonstop -

service between Washington Dulles
International Airport and Beijing’s
China Peking Capital Airport on

“March 25.

“It’s overdue,” said James Mill-
ward, an associate professor of Chi-
nese history at Georgetown Univer-
sity. “It shortens the time and
shortens the fatigue that is part of
international travel.”

United beat out AMR’s American
Airlines, which sought to fly between
Dallas/Fort Worth and Beijing; Con-
tinental Airlines, which applied for
service between Newark, N.J., and
Shanghai; and Northwest Airlines,
which applied for Detroit-Shanghai
service.

The Transportation Department
said United’s rivals have 14 days to
file objections.

The new route would strengthen
United’s already-extensive Pacific
network and provide an injection of
cash when the carrier is still trying to
regain its former financial strength
after a three-year bankruptcy
restructuring that ended in February.

Airline analyst Roger King esti-

° TURN TO UNITED



ESSSSPORTS

tT NAE SEER R EEE TOELEM A NRL TEENA LL TI SSO OS MOEN OULU EUS ESOT ESTADO NN ENON E LEVEN EOIN AEN M VALE ATA

¢



PAUL SAKUMA/AP

tion of smart phones.

“Every once in a while a revolu-
tionary product comes along that
changes everything,” he said during
his keynote address at the annual
Macworld Conference and Expo.
“It’s very fortunate if you can work
on just one of these in your career.
... Apple’s been very fortunate in
that it’s introduced a few of these.”

He said the company’s name ©
change is meant to reflect Apple’s
transformation from a computer
manufacturer to a full-fledged con-
sumer electronics company.

°* TURN TO APPLE



3B

SALARIES

Executive
pay to be
heavily
scrutinized

@ When the salaries and benefits
of top executives at public
companies are disclosed later
this month, investors angered
over previous numbers will have a
scorecard from which to proceed.

BY MARCY GORDON
Associated Press

Investors will soon have a new
scorecard designed to lay out in plain
English just how much pay and perks
are being lavished on top executives
at public companies. If the goals of

_ federal regulators are met, you won’t

need an MBA to decipher the num-
bers.

The new disclosures, in annual
reports and proxy statements that
will begin arriving later this month,
will come closer than ever to a full
accounting of total compensation for
companies’ top two executives and
the next three highest-paid execu-
tives.

“The SEC, in a very short amount
of time for a regulator, has pushed
through very sweeping pay disclo-
sures that, for the first time, will give
investors a very clear picture of CEO
pay,” said Amy Borrus, deputy direc-
tor of the Council of Institutional
Investors. “The big picture is a very
big win for investors.”

Investor anger over executive pay
has spread from union activists to
buttoned-down mutual fund trustees.
The AFL-CIO singled out Home
Depot’s CEO Bob Nardelli for loud
criticism of his pay package, but
almost all mutual funds in the
$308.1 billion T. Rowe Price more
quietly withheld their votes for the
majority of Home Depot's ll directors
at the company’s May annual meet-
ing. On Jan. 3, Nardelli resigned
abruptly — with a severance package
worth roughly $210 million.

Investors wondering whether
executives at their companies are
getting similarly stratospheric pay
have always been able to look for evi-
dence in companies’ annual reports
and proxies. But key parts of the
information often were buried in
footnotes. :

What will be new in the reports
for public companies whose fiscal
year ends after Dec. 15 are total fig-
ures that add up executives’ annual

° TURN TO EXECUTIVES

DONNA MCWILLIAM/AP

ROUGH TIMES: Chairman Donald Horton said his company continues
to experience ‘higher than normal cancellation rates and an
increased use of sales incentives in many of our markets.’ Above, a
sign shows a newly built Horton house for sale in Fort Worth, Texas.

Horton’s first-quarter
orders fall 23 percent

§& Horton’s net sales orders
dropped from 11,453 last year to
8,771, and order cancellations
were at 33 percent from

40 percent in the fourth quarter.

BY PETER WOODIFIELD
Bloomberg News

D.R. Horton, the largest U.S. hom-
ebuilder, said orders dropped 23 per-
cent in its fiscal first quarter as
declining prices sapped the confi-
dence of buyers.

Net sales orders slid to 8,771
homes from 11,453 a year earlier and

_ the average price of an ordered home

dropped 6.1 percent to $262,000, the
Fort Worth, Texas-based company
said in a statement Tuesday. Order
cancellations fell to 33 percent from
40 percent in the fourth quarter.
Tumbling home prices are causing
some potential buyers to wait, wor-
ried that the value of their purchases
will erode, and keeping inventories of
unsold properties near record highs.
The U.S. median price of a new home
this quarter is $231,700, down 5.5 per-
cent from a year ago, according to
David Berson, chief economist at

* TURN TO HORTON





IN MY OPINION

ISRAEL GUTIERRE

igutlerrez@Miamitieraia cK



Urban Meyer's.
top 10 reasons —
to stay a Gator ©

t was less than 24 hours after |

l Urban Meyer was crowned king

_ of college football, and already
there were conversations about the
Florida coach possibly going pro.

There are at least 10 reasons
Meyer shouldn’t even consider that:

1. Because sometimes a great
college coach is just that. Nick
Saban’s two-year tragedy with the —
Miami Dolphins is the only the most
recent reminder that college coaches
who are good at their college jobs

should remain at their
college jobs. And Meyer
is the prototypical col-
lege football coach.He
creates family atmo- -
spheres, he preaches —
strong character, and he
develops people as well
as players.

_ 2. Because the
money’s there. NFL —
coaches make scywhere

< in the neighborhood of

$2 million to $4 million. But Saban.
just took a $4-million-a-year job with

Alabama. And that sets a standard -

_ that could more than double Meyer's"

contract next year. Meyer reportedly _
has a provision in his contract stating
that the athletics department “will
review the adequacy” of his contract
upon his request after the 2007 sea-
son. This season he made less than
$2 million. Think there’s any chance
he won’t make that request?

3. Because he’s just getting

. started. Sure, that Florida defense,

which made Troy Smith look like he _

should return the Heisman Trophy
and apologize for accepting it under
false pretenses, could lose as many as

10 players. And, yes, Meyer is losing .

Chris Leak, his MVP senior quarter-

back. But Meyer is just beginning to

run the spread-option offense he per-
fected with Alex Smith at Utah. With
sophomores-to-be Percy Harvin and

Tim Tebow as the staples of Meyer’s

offense next season, it will be the true

test of whether his system can work
in the Southeastern Conference.

And Meyer’s second set of recruits,
the ones who aren’t supposed to be in
school until next year, already are get-
ting a head start. Nine of them are
enrolled in school this semester.

“T can’t think of anybody in the
country that has nine [freshman] guys
that showed up for class on Monday,”
Meyer said.

4. Because Tebow is his cre-
ation. Even though Meyer said after
Monday’s game that he and Chris
Leak will be connected for the next
30 years, it’s Tebow who is supposed
to be Meyer’s signature quarterback.
And why would he leave before see-
ing what Tebow can really do? How
could Meyer leave Tebow’s future in
- another coach’s hands?

_ 5. Because the Atlanta Falcons

job already is filled. Unless Meyer

goes to Oakland and drafts LSU quar-
terback JaMarcus Russell first overall,
he won’t have a running quarterback
to play anything resembling his style
of offense at the pro level.

6. Because his style of offense
shouldn’t be played in the NFL. Of
course, that’s the same thing people
said when he got to the SEC, but let’s
just assume it’s true and move on.



MORE
INSIDE —

BY RONALD BLUM
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Cal Ripken Jr.

- and Tony Gwynn easily made the

Hall of Fame, but Mark McGwire

~ fell far short in his first try for the

baseball’s highest honor, picked by
just 23.5 percent of the voters.
Tarnished by accusations of ste-
roid use, McGwire appeared on 128
of a record 545 ballots
in voting released
Tuesday by the Base-
ball Writers’ Associa-
tion of America.
Ripken was picked
by 537 voters and appeared on
98.53 percent of ballots, finishing
with the third-highest percentage
ever, behind Tom Seaver (98.84
percent) and Nolan Ryan (98.29).
The former Baltimore Orioles
shortstop said he was both relieved
and euphoric. If he had been
picked by two of the eight voters





BASEBALL | HALL OF FAME VOTING

Ripken, Gwynn score; McGwire whiffs

EZRA SHAW/ALLSPORT

IRON MAN: Cal Ripken Jr. once
played in 2,632 games in a row.

who didn’t select him: at all, he
would have set the percentage
record — but he didn’t mind.

“All I wanted to hear was,
‘You're in,’” Ripken said during a
conference call. “I really didn’t get





TODD WARSHAW/ALLSPORT

WHAT A HITTER: Tony Gwynn had
a .338 career batting average.

caught up with wanting to be unan-
imous or wanting to be the most.”

Gwynn received 532 votes, for
97.61 percent, the seventh-highest
ever, also trailing Ty Cobb, George
Brett and Hank Aaron.

3E

eee

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

’ “It’s an unbelievable feeling to
know that people think that what
you did was worthy,” Gwynn said.
“For me, it’s kind of validation. The
type of player that I was doesn’t
get a whole lot of credit in today’s
game.”

Goose Gossage finished third,
with 388 votes, falling 21 shy of the
necessary 409. His percentage
increased from 64.6 to 712, putting
him in good position to reach the
necessary 75 percent next year.

‘Jim Rice was fourth, with 346
votes, his percentage dropping to
63.5 from 64.8 last year. He was fol-
lowed by Andre Dawson (309),
Bert Blyleven (260), Lee Smith
(217) and Jack Morris (202).
McGwire was ninth, and Tommy
John (125) finished 10th.

Jose Canseco, on the ballot for
the first time, received six votes,
well below the 5 percent threshold
needed to stay on future ballots.



PRO BASKETBALL | DALLAS 108, UTAH 105

- Mavs claw past Jazz



Nowitzki gets 38,
and late comeback
wins it for Dallas

Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — Dirk Nowitzki scored a
season-high 38 points, including two free throws
_.With 10.2 remaining in the game, to help the Dal-
las Mavericks beat the Utah Jazz 108-105 on
Tuesday night.

_ Nowitzki, who: has averaged more than
30‘points per game in his past six games, scored
25 points in the second half as the
Mavs avenged a 101-79 loss to
Utah on Dec. 11, when Dallas shot
a season-low 37.7 percent. ,

The Mavs had no trouble this
time, as they made 53 percent of
their field goals and handed the
Jazz their just their third home
loss of the season.

Mavs swingman Jerry Stack-



house was kicked out of the game after getting
called for his second flagrant foul. He also was
hit with a technical in the first half for an argu-

ment with Utah coach Jerry Sloan.

Josh Howard scored 21 points for the Mavs,
and Jason Terry shook off a recent slump to
score ll of his 18 points in the fourth quarter.
The Mavs, who have the NBA’s best record, at
28-8, bounced back after falling 101-98 to the Los
Angeles Lakers on Sunday, breaking their 13-
game victory streak.

The Jazz, who were led by Carlos Boozer’s 29
points, shot just 8-of-21 in the final period after
hitting 57 percent to that point.

The Jazz led 94-91 on Derek Fisher’s
3-pointer to beat the shot clock. But Terry’s free
throws capped an 11-3 run as the Mavs held the
Jazz without a field goal for more than 4 minutes
to take a 102-97 lead with 2:38 to play.

Utah had three chances to draw even in the
last minute after Josh Howard missed a layup
and two tip attempts, Devin Harris threw a bad
pass, and Nowitzki inexplicably drove for a
layup and missed before the final buzzer.

But the Jazz could not convert any of their
last-minute 3-point attempts, including Mehmet

DOUGLAS PIZAC/AP

7. Because he can dominate the Okur’s desperation turnaround shot when Utah

South in recruiting now that Miami
and Florida State are rebuilding
jobs in progress. It actually might
help Meyer in recruiting that he could
lose as many as 17 starters off this
championship team.

“I know where I would want to
go,” Meyer said. “Am I allowed to say
that for recruiting? Print that. I know
where I would want to go.

“What’s the future look like? I
think it looks really good.”

8. Because the pressure is off.
After winning the 1996 title,Steve
Spurrier won just one SEC title in the |
next five years, but he never heard the
first word about a disappointed fan
base or a lack of job security. For at
least another half-decade, Meyer can
do no wrong — because he is at least
as beloved as Spurrier now that he
brought home a title in two seasons.

9. Because his wife is a bundle
of energy and support. Shelley
Meyer is the first lady of college foot-
ball. Could you imagine a title like
that for any pro coach’s wife?

10, Because if he leaves now,
everyone will say he won with Ron
Zook’s players. And any man who
has his thunder stolen by Ron Zook
will never be a happy man.

RIM SHOT: Mavericks forward Josh Howard beats Jazz defender Andrei Kirilenko for a

dunk in the first half Tuesday night in Salt Lake City. Howard had 21 points in the game.

inbounded with just 0.3 seconds to play.

e NBA REPORT



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 3 WISCONSIN 72, NO. 5 OHIO STATE 69

Badgers escape after late rally by Buckeyes

BY CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. — Kammron
Taylor scored 25 points Tuesday
night, and No. 3 Wisconsin sur-
vived a late charge by freshman
Greg Oden and No. 5 Ohio State to
hold on for a tight, 72-69 victory.
The Badgers (16-1, 2-0
Big Ten) used a 14-0 run
midway through the
second half to appar-
ently take control
in an early-season
matchup of conference favorites.
But the Buckeyes (13-3, 2-1) ral-
lied to close within 69-64 on a
dunk by Oden with 37 seconds left.
Taylor then made one of two
free throws on the other end, and



the Buckeyes’ Ron Lewis hit a
3-pointer to cut the lead to three
with 25 seconds left.

Joe Krabbenhoft hit one of two
free throws for Wisconsin, and
Oden again scored on a dunk with
8.9 seconds left to cut the lead to

71-69. After Taylor again hit one of

two free throws, Jamar
Butler missed a poten-
tial game-tying
3-pointer at the buzzer.

Alando Tucker
added 17 points for the
Badgers. Ivan Harris led Ohio State
with 17 points.

It was a breakout performance
for Wisconsin sophomore forward
Marcus Landty, who had 10 points
and four blocked shots.



ANDY MANIS/AP

ON THE LOOSE: Alando Tucker of
Wisconsin drives to the basket
past Ron Lewis of Ohio State.

The Badgers led 43-41 after a
3-pointer by Butler, but Krabben-
hoft scored inside to start Wiscon-
sin’s 14-0 run, which featured sev-
eral key plays by Landry, who sat
out part of last season after being

ruled academically ineligible.

A block by Landry led to an end-
to-end layup by Michael Flowers
that put Wisconsin ahead 47-41.
Landry rebounded his own miss
and scored on a putback to put the
Badgers up 55-41

Oden blocked Landry on the
Badgers’ next possession, but he
got the ball back and then got it to
Flowers, who drove the lane and
scored to put Wisconsin ahead
57-41 with 9:20 remaining.

Landry hit a 3-pointer with 8:04
left to play that made it 60-47.

But Ohio State went on a 17-9
run as Wisconsin’s shaky free-
throw shooting kept the Buckeyes
in the game until the end.

e@ MORE GAMES


4E || WeNESDAY, JANUARY 10,2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP RECAP





FLORIDA 41, OHIO STATE 14

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

NO. 1: Florida wide receiver Andre Caldwell celebrates after his 1-yard touchdown reception late in the second quarter of the Gators’ 41-14 victory.



Gators laugh last with a blowout victory

BY MIKE PHILLIPS
mphillips@MiamiHerald.com ;

GLENDALE, Ariz. — For-
get the style points.

Forget the voters, the com-
puters and the politics. Forget
coach Lloyd Carr and all the
crying at Michigan. Forget all
that and more.

Remember this: The Flor-
ida Gators, the team that

believed it could win it all.

when no one believed in them,
celebrated .100 years of foot-
ball Monday night by playing a

game for the ages, blowing out.

top-ranked Ohio State 41-14 to
win the Bowl Championship
Series title.

“We are a team of destiny,”
defensive end Jarvis Moss said
Nov. 11, when no one in the
nation gave the Gators a
chance to reach the title game.

Carr said his Wolverines,
who lost to OSU 42-39,
deserved a rematch, while
most of the BCS voters
expected Southern Cal to meet
the Buckeyes, who were
everyone’s No. 1 team in
August.

But somehow, these Gators
just kept believing. Now
everyone believes.

“It’s just a matter of compe-
tition, and the competition is a
lot better in our conference,”
said Moss, who had two sacks.
“We played against better
teams than Ohio State during
the season. I can name four or
five teams in the SEC that
could play with or beat Ohio
State.”

The Gators embarrassed
Buckeyes quarterback and
Heisman Trophy winner Troy
Smith, who completed just 4
of 14 passes for 35 yards with
one interception.

“We play against great
quarterbacks in the SEC,”
Moss said. “The competition
is just so much better. That’s
the difference.”

DEFENSE SLAMS DOOR

In the end, UF’s defense,
which carried it all season,
stopped one of the best
offenses in the nation, and
Chris Leak, the quarterback
who never received a Heisman




FIRST QUARTER

e Highlights: The rest of the
quarter belonged to the Gators,
but the first play of the game cer-
tainly sent a sobering jolt through
the Florida fans. On Ohio State’s
first play in seven weeks, kick
returner Ted Ginn Jr. dazzled the
crowd by racing 93 yards fora
Buckeyes touchdown.

vote, outplayed the Heisman
winner. And Urban Meyer,
who grew up in Astabula,
Ohio, dreaming of coaching
the Buckeyes, beat his friend
Jim Tressel to become seventh
coach to win it all in his sec-
ond season at a school.

“Well, what this means is
that we are going to hang out
together for the next 30 years,
because we won the national
title together,” said Meyer, in
his sixth season overall as a
head coach.

“How do I feel?’ Meyer
said. “This is a once-in-a-life-
time deal.”

Florida is the first school to
hold men’s basketball and
football national titles simulta-
neously. It has never felt this
great to be a Florida Gator,
which is what many fans
started chanting with 14 min-

UARTER | BY JEFF DARLINGTON, MIAMI HERALD STAF

SECOND QUARTER

e Highlights: After hitting on just
4 of 13 field-goal attempts this
season, Florida kicker Chris Het-
land made both tries. Hetland hit
a 42-yard attempt and followed it
with a 40-yard kick on the next
drive. Pretty impressive, consid-
ering that he hadn’t made one
longer than 33 yards all season.

utes left in the game.
It was that big of a blowout.
Leak, who vowed to win a
national title four years ago
when he was freshman, was

the MVP, completing 25 of 36 |

passes for 213 yards, with a
touchdown and no intercep-
tions. ,

“My legacy was to get Flor-
ida back (on top), and along
with my coaches and team-
mates, we did it,” Leak said.
“This is the greatest feeling in
the world. All the hard work
and sacrifice we went through
to get here makes it unbeliev-
able. This was special.”

Leak completed his first
nine passes for 99 yards, and
by the time he completed his
ninth, the Gators were driving
for their third touchdown and
a 21-7 lead. He went 5 for 5 and
found Dallas Baker for a 14-

THIRD QUARTER

e Highlights: Not every quarter
was filled with highlights. But
even though Florida's offense
wasn't as effective as it was the
rest of the game, the defense
played brilliantly. On Ohio State’s
first drive, the Buckeyes lost 4
yards on the first carry, gaining
just 3 more on the next two.

yard touchdown to complete
the first drive, and completed
his only pass —.a 20-yarder to
Cornelius Ingram to the Buck-
eyes’ 7 — on the second drive,
capped by a a 4-yard run by
Percy Harvin.

PILING ON

Reggie Lewis intercepted a
Smith pass, and UF went 71
yards in 10 plays, capped by
DeShawn Wynn’s spinning
2-yard run into the end zone
on the first play of the second
quarter for a 21-7 lead.

“No one respected us. No
one thought we deserved to be
here, and we played with a
chip on our shoulder most of
the year,” said Harvin, who
caught nine passes for 60
yards and rushed for 22 more.

He nearly had as many
receiving yards as Ohio State’s



’ AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF
ROUGH PLAY: Donald Washington of Ohio State grabs Brandon James’ facemask during the first quarter Monday.

wo
71

FOURTH QUARTER

© Highlights: Though this night
belonged to Chris Leak, the
Gators also managed to show
that the future still is bright at
quarterback. Freshman Tim
Tebow scrambled for a touch-
down Monday. Indeed, everyone
was getting a piece of this cham-
pionship pie.

total on offense (82).

The Buckeyes (12-1) had
won 19 ina row. They missed
Ted Ginn Jr., who lett because
of an ankle injury shortly after
returning the opening kickoff
93 yards for a touchdown. It
was OSU’s only lead.

The Gators couldn’t have
dreamed of a better first half,
taking a 34-14 lead on two
touchdown runs, two touch-
down passes and two Chris
Hetland field goals. That’s
right, Hetland, who missed 9
of 13 attempts this season, hit
from 42 and 40 yards. He
hadn’t kicked a field goal lon-
ger than 33 yards this season
and hadn’t had two field goals
in a game since last year
against Florida State.

“We were a team of des-
tiny,” Moss said. “We always
knew it.”

|



t
t
i
i
i



{
|





Solo

HOW THEY SCORED
Florida 144200 7 - 41:
Ohio State 770 0 -'4 -
FIRST QUARTER

Ohio St.: Ginn 93 kickoff return (Pettrey
kick). Time: 14:44 left. Key play: Ginn brings
finds a crease to his right on opening kickoff,
jets past UF’s Nelson and sprints down the
sideline untouched. Ohio St. 7, Florida 0.

Florida: Baker 14 pass from Leak (Hetland
kick). Drive: 46 yards, 7 plays. Time: 10:31
left. Key plays: Leak goes 5-for-5 on drive for
35 yards, also finding Baker to convert 3rd-
and-3 down to OSU 36. Florida 7, Ohio St. 7.

Florida: Harvin 5 run (Hetland kick).
Drive: 34 yards, 5 plays. Time: 5:51 left. Key
play: Ingram takes short 3rd-down pass from
Leak for 20 yards down to OSU 7. Florida 14,
Ohio St. 7. :
SECOND QUARTER

Florida: Wynn 2 run (Hetland kick). Drive:
71 yards, 10 plays. Time: 14:56 left. Key
plays: Leak hits his first three passes on
drive, finding Ingram and Cornelius on con-
secutive 19-yarders down to OSU 28. Florida
21, Ohio St. 7.

Ohio St.: Pittman 18 run (Pettrey kick).
Drive: 64 yards, 4 plays. Time: 13:32 left. Key
play: T.Smith gets untracked with 13-yard
pass to Hartline on firstsnap, with 15 tacked
on for roughing flag against UF's Siler. Flori-
da 21, Ohio St. 14, :

Florida: FG Hetland. 43. Drive: 32 yards, 9
plays. Time: 6:00 left. Key plays: Leak again
hits first three passes, amassing 29 yards
down to OSU 21 before drive stalls. Florida
24, Ohio St. 14.

Florida: FG Hetland 40. Drive: 6 yards, 4
plays. Time: 1:53 left. Key play: Everett stuffs
OSU's C.Wells short on 4th-and-1 gamble,
giving Gators possession at OSU 29. Florida
27, Ohio St. 14.

Florida: Caldwell 1 pass from Tebow (Het-
land kick). Drive: 5 yards, 3 plays. Time: :23
left. Key play: Moss strips OSU’s. T.Smith
from behind, with Harvey returning fumble 4
yards to Buckeyes 5. Florida 34, Ohio St. 14.
FOURTH QUARTER

Florida: Tebow 1 run (Hetland kick).
Drive: 39 yards, 8 plays. Time: 10:20 left. Key
plays: Leak accounts for 35 yards on drive,
with two passes for 21 yards and a 14-yard
sels early in the series. Florida 41, Ohio
St. 14. :

Paid attendance: 74,628. eT.

TEAM STATISTICS
UF OSU
First downs - total 21 14
First downs rushing 6 5
First downs passing 14 1
First downs by penalty 1 2
Third-down efficiency 10-19 1-9
Fourth-down efficiency 2-3 0-1
Total net yards 7 82
Total offensive plays 37 37
Avg. gain per play 10.0 2.2
Net yards rushing 156 47
Rushing plays 43 23
Avg. gain per rush 3.6 2.0
Net yards passing 214 35
Sacks by 5-51 1-7
Passes attempted 37 14
Passescompleted . 26 4
Interceptions suffered 0 1
Punts/average 2 6-37.8
Had blocked 0
Total return yardage 70 206
Punt returns-yards 4-28 1-13
Kickoff returns-yards 1-33 6-193
Int. returns-yards 1-0 0-0
Penalties-yards 6-50 5-50
Fumbles-lost 0-0 1-1
FG made-attempts 2-2 0-0
Time of possession 40:48 19:12
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
FLORIDA GATORS
PASSING — Att.Com. Pct.- Yds. TD INT
i Leak 36 «625 69.4 213 1 0
. < Tebow Polpw0o0 P11 0
RUSHING No. Yds Avg. Lg
Wynn 19 69 36 17
Tebow 10 39 39 10
Harvin 5 22 44 6
Caldwell 3 23 43
RECEIVING No. Yds Avg. Lg
Harvin 9 6 67 7
Cornelius 5 50 10.0 19
Ingram: 4 58 145 20
Baker 4 23 58 14
PUNTING No. Avg. Lg TB [20
Wilbur 4442 59 2 #O
PUNT RETURNS No. Avg. Lg
James 470!
KICK RETURNS * No. Avg. lg.
James 1 33.0 33
INTERCEPTIONS No.. Avg. lg
Lewis 1 0.0 0
TACKLES Solo Ass. Tot.
Everett 5 2 7
Siler 4 0 4
Harvey 4 0 4
McDonald 0 3 3
* Munroe 2 0 2
McColum 2 0 2
Moss 2 0 2
Smith 2 0 2
Cooper 1 0 1
Murphy 1 0 1
Crum 1 0 1
Joiner 0 1 1
Brooks 0 1 1
Smith 0 1 1
Harris 0 1 1
Nelson 0 1 1

Sacks: McDonald 3-31, Moss 2-20.
Kicking: Hetland 2-2 (42, 40).

OHIO STATE BUCKEYES

PASSING Att.Com. Pct. Yds TD INT
Smith 14 4 288 «#35 2 (0) 1
RUSHING No. Yds Avg. _ Lg
Pittman 10 62 6.2 18
Wells 2 9 45 7
Whitner 1 5 5.0 5
Smith 10-29-29 0
RECEIVING No. Yds _ Avg. _ tg
Gonzalez 2. “Al <55 8
Whitner 1 13. 13.0 13
Pittman ods MO
PUNTING No. Avg. Lg TB [20
Trapassa 6 37.8 44 0 2
PUNTRETURNS NO. Avg. _ihg
Gonzalez 1 13.0 13
KICK RETURNS NO. Avg. _ig
Ginn 1 93.0 93
Wells 1 22.0 22
Gonzalez 2 215 31
Hall
TACKLES Solo Ass. Tot.
Laurinaitis 10 5 15
Freeman 9 6 15
Mitchell 6 3 9
Ashton 6 1 ie
O'Neal 3 3 6
Gholston 2 3 5
Smith 2 3 5
Haw 3 1 4
Patterson 3, 1 4
Penton 2 1 3
Pitcock 1 2 3
Sacks: Gholston 1-7. 5
UF SCHEDULE AND RESULTS ~ ~

DATE OPPONENT TIME/RESULT
Sept. 2S. Mississippi W, 34-7
Sept.9 UCF W, 42-0
Sept. 16 @Tennessee W, 21-20
Sept. 24 Kentucky W, 26-7
Sept. 31 Alabama W, 28-13
Oct.7 LSU W, 23-10
Oct. 14 @Auburn L, 27-17
Oct. 28 vs Georgia W, 21-14
Nov.4 @ Vanderbilt W, 25-19
Nov. 11S. Carolina W, 17-16
Nov. 18 W. Carolina W, 62-0
Nov. 25 @FSU W, 21-14
Dec.2 Arkansas W, 38-21
Jan.8 — Ohio State W, 41-14

BCS CHAMPIONS

2007: Florida 41, Ohio State 14

2006: Texas 41, Southern California 38
2005: Southern California 55, Oklahoma 19
2004: Louisiana State 21, Oklahoma 14
2003: Ohio State 31, Miami 24 (20T)

2062: Miami 37, Nebraska 14

2001: Oklahoma 13, Florida State 2

2000: Florida State. 46, Virginia Tech 29
1999: Tennessee 23, Florida State 16
6E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 _

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP RECAP

INTERNATIONALEDITION





INSIDE THE GATORS | QUARTERBACK CHRIS LEAK

Leak’s concentrated effort

UF quarterback Chris
Leak brought his focused
state onto the field and led
the Gators to the title he
envisioned as a freshman.

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Ina
dimly-lit tunnel just a few
yards away from the field
where he would solidify his
legacy, Florida quarterback
Chris Leak still had work to
do.

He was throwing passes.
Hard ones. The kind that
snapped every time they left
his hand and popped every
time teammate Tim Tebow
caught them.

Maybe this was a strange
place to be warming up, espe-
cially since only a few minutes

separated him from the BCS |

national championship game.
Then again, maybe it wasn’t.
Maybe this was perfect.

“Are you ready?” Tebow
said, breaking the silence in an
otherwise quiet, dark area
beneath University of Phoenix
Stadium.

Leak didn’t answer him. He
just turned his body toward
the field and walked silently
away, exhibiting the same
focus that has led him through
four roller-coaster years. |

Indeed, this was tunnel
vision. On Monday, Leak had
it from start to finish.

“We're national champs,”
Leak said. “That’s what you
dream about. My legacy was
to get University of Florida
_ football back here. What bet-
ter way then to play against a
great team like Ohio State?”

Less than an hour after his
last-minute warm-up, as the
first quarter came to an end,
Leak was nearly perfect. And
he had his team rolling toward
a second national champion-
ship in a dominating fashion
few expected.

LEAK completed 9 of 10
attempts for 99 yards and one
touchdown in one of his finest
quarters as a college quarter-
back in undoubtedly the most
important game of his life.

At the season’s start, there
were plenty of questions about
whether Leak would be able to
handle pressure like this.
Whether he would be able to
limit himself from making
those costly mistakes that
caused “Tebow” chants to fill
Ben Hill Griffin Stadium.

On Monday? No questions
at all. Leak was sacked only
once and didn’t throw an
interception.

And as a result, in a game

GATORS | DEFENSE

CHRIS LEAK:
BY THE NUMBERS

s Collegiate starts /
4 472 forteak,who
guaranteed mul

- tiple SEC and national.
s autles when he eto UF.











ams: won three North: oe



: ~ national
and state.
~ passing —
ue ore

that would forever define him
in the storied history of Flor-
ida football, the Gators left
Arizona with their second
national championship.

This was what he had envi-
sioned for so long, the way he
saw himself ending his career.
He wanted championships.

No, he didn’t win them
every year, like he had hoped
he would as a freshman phe-
nom. No, he wasn’t always the
campus’ favorite quarterback,
instead enduring moments
when many wanted someone
more fitting for Urban Mey-
er’s system to take over.

When Meyer first arrived,
he even tried to get Leak to
relax. But that’s not Leak’s
nature. He remained a student
of the game, preparing for
weeks to face Ohio State.

On Monday, he proved why
focus matters so much.

“There’s been only two
quarterbacks to win a national
championship in 100 years of
Florida football,” Meyer said.
“And Chris Leak is one of
them.”

x12 When Leak first committed

to, Florida, his focus was as
blatant as it was before and
during Monday’s game. Some-

times, it was even alarming. |

This was a man who said he
wouldn’t date women until he
won a national title, a man
who spoke with short clichés.

“He spent hours in film ses-
sions, sometimes so late into
the night, he would be given a
key to lock up the building
because everyone else had
gone home. But after all those
years of devotion, committing

himself so devoutly to football, '

it all started to make sense.

‘You can call him crazy. But
now, you must also call him a
champion.

2 47: LeakasaQBin
S high school. His -





_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

A VICTORY TO CHERISH: Florida quarterback Chris Leak holds aloft the BCS national
championship trophy after leading the Gators to a huge triumph against Ohio State.

Fast and furious unit stifles Buckeyes

EA The Gators’ defense
limited Ohio State’s
offense to 82 total yards
during Florida’s 41-14
victory over the Buckeyes.

BY LOUIS ANASTASIS
Miami Herald Writer

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Over- -

rated Florida speed, where?

The Gators shocked a
Buckeyes team Monday night.
But though the final score was
certainly surprising on some
fronts, the way Florida won
wasn't.

Defense. Defense. Defense.

It has been the Gators’ ral-
lying cry all season.

“Take that Ohio State!”
linebacker Brian Crum said.
“They were supposedly one of
the most storied programs in
the nation, and that’s all I had
been hearing about all week.
We just came out and just hit
them in the mouth on every
play.”

The Gators limited Ohio
State to 82 yards of total
offense.

Florida’s defense also set up .

an easy score before halftime
when defensive end Jarvis
Moss stripped the ball from
quarterback Troy Smith.

Fellow defensive end Der-
rick Harvey scooped up the
ball and returned it to the
Buckeyes’ 5-yard line.

The Gators scored three
plays later when backup quar-
terback Tim Tebow faked a



run to the right, moved to the
left, then looked up to find
receiver Andre Caldwell for a
l1-yard touchdown.

“We were just playing our

game, using our speed and our





athleticism,” Moss said. “We
just had to get after him. It was
just something we had been
doing all season. To play the
way we did tonight may have
come as a surprise to some

DOWNED:
Florida
defensive
end Derrick
Harvey
sacks Troy
Smith
during the
first quarter
Monday
night. Smith
completed
just 2 of 8
passes for
24 yards
and was
sacked
three times
in the first
half alone.

a

AL DIAZ/
MIAMI HERALD STAFF

people, but not to us.”

Said Florida co-defensive
coordinator Greg Mattison:
“We had a meeting before the
game where I pulled aside the

guys and told them, eeeee”

PR TE CR TINE TN ANTE TEN ET NTT TE



prepares harder than you
guys. >”

During a Sunday interview
with ESPN, Florida coach
Urban Meyer was asked how
to stop Ohio State’s Heisman
Trophy-winning quarterback
Troy Smith.

“You don’t stop him, but
you try to contain him,” Meyer
responded.

Go figure. Smith completed
4 of 14 passes for 35 yards, no
touchdowns and one intercep-
tion.

- “He hadn’t seen any pres-
sure like this all year,” Crum
said. “We just thought if we
got some pressure on them
with Moss and Harvey and
Steve [Harris], he can’t really
get into his reads and find any-

body open.”

Florida’s suffocating front
four stymied Smith all game.
Any time one of the linemen
came free, a foot race would
ensue. And once that: hap-
pened, the play usually
resulted in an incomplete pass.

The intriguing part about it
were the sacks. The Gators
had just four in their previous
four games. But the disarray
Florida caused accounted for
Smith being sacked three
times in the first half.

Part of the equation was the
secondary.

The Gators tightly covered
Ohio State’s receivers — who
played without a hobbled Ted
Ginn Jr. for most of the game.

SRT







NOTEBOOK

STILL HURTING

GLENDALE, Ariz. —
The most difficult moment
Monday came before the
kickoff, a silent tug at the
heart for UF safety Reggie

_ Nelson, whose mother,

Mary Lakes, died Dec. 21
after a three-year battle
with cancer.

The Gators don’t permit
cellphones in the locker
room, but no one said any-
thing to Nelson, who
always spoke to his mother
just before taking the field.

“That call won’t be made ~
this tirne, and that’s going
to be tough on Reggie,” said
UF co-defensive coordina-
tor Charlie Strong earlier
this week. “She was a spe-
cial lady.”

The Gators did every-
thing they could to protect
Nelson from the national
media horde in Arizona.
The BCS contract states all
players must be made avail-
able to the media during
media day. But UF reached
an agreement with the BCS,
and that clause in the con-
tract was waived for Nel-
son.

“Reggie Nelson is the
heart of this defense,” UF
linebacker Brandon Siler
said. “He’s the best player
I’ve ever played wi

Nelson, an All-American
who is called “Eraser” by
his teammates, did talk
about facing Ohio State
before leaving Gainesville.

“We're just going to let
them talk and we’re going
to continue like we’ve been
doing,” Nelson said.

“That’s motivation. We’re
the underdogs, but like I
said, we’ve just got to go
out and keep playing foot-

- ball and not worry about

the media or anybody else.”

SPLIT LOYALTIES

There has been much
written about Urban Mey-
er’s Ohio roots, but this has
been a difficult time for his
wife, Shelley, who also is a
native of Ohio.

“We go back to the
Buckeyes from birth,” said
Shelley, who still carries a
lucky Buckeye nut with her.
“T’ve been carrying two
Florida coins and a Buck-
eye all season long, and
we're playing Ohio State
for the national title. I have
been saying how ironic it is,
but it’s not just ironic. It’s
eerie.

“All season long Ohio
State was doing so well,
and all season long ’m
rooting for them all season.
I never thought this would
happen. I was in denial.

“It’s been crazy. Our
friends are [in Ohio]. Our
families are there. We have
a lot of people confused
about this game,” Shelley
said. “Our families are say-
ing, ‘We will be happy
either way.’ How often do
you hear that? Most of
them knowit’s really
important for us to win. But
it’s hard for them. I don’t
blame them. It runs deep.

“T’ve told them, ‘You
can’t come to the game ona
ticket from me if you’re not
wearing orange and blue.’
We had over 200 ask for
tickets, and I told everyone

-who got a ticket they better

wear orange and blue.”

Shelly even had some
advice for former Ohio
State coach Earle Bruce,
who is close to Urban .
Meyer and Ohio State
coach Jim Tressel, who
both worked for Bruce.
Shelly told Bruce he could
wear Ohio State red, but he
should at least wear some
Gator underwear.

ULTIMATE UNDERDOGS

The media didn’t have
much faith in the Gators.

The Jacksonville Times-
Union polled members of
the media from across the
United States, and only ll of
the 25 polled picked the
Gators to win Monday
night.

USA Today polled its
writers, and 1 of 12 writers
picked Ohio State.

— MIKE PHILLIPS

TET EL LTTE TT TT
PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Australia are just too |
good again for Englan

@ CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

AUSTRALIA thrashed
England by 77 runs Tuesday
after setting a record target
for a Twenty20 internation-
al in the shortest version of
cricket, just four days after
completing a 5-0 Ashes
series sweep in the tradi-
tional game.

Adam Gilchrist clubbed
five sixes in his 48 and
shared a 69-run second-
wicket stand with skipper
Ricky Ponting that pro-
pelled Australia to a record
221 in a Twenty20 interna-
tional. .

Michael Vaughan, return-
ing as England skipper after
missing the Ashes series
with a knee injury, held the
top of the innings together
before he was out for 27 and
the tourists slumped to 54

- for four.

Combined

Paul Nixon (not out 31)
and Jamie Dalrymple (32)
combined in a 49-run sev-
enth-wicket stand to help
England recover to 144 for
nine.

"It's good to be back. I'd
have liked a win, but...
they're a powerful team,"
Vaughan said. "We didn't
get off to.a good start, but it
was always going to be a tall
order with that target."

Jon Lewis' was the most
costly of the four missed
catches, dropping Ponting at
mid-on for 16. Ponting went
on to make 47 from 26 balls
before Lewis caught him
behind square leg off Paul
Collingwood's bowling.

Opener Matthew Hayden _

set the Australians in

@ ENGLAND'S Jamie Dalrymple, right, plays a reverse sweep shot in front of Australia’

ney Cricket Ground in Sydney, Australia, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2007. Australia won by 77 runs.

motion, hitting 20 from eight
balls at the top of the order
while Gilchrist, who initially
struggled against Andrew
Flintoff, plundered 48 from
28 balls.
Gilchrist's innings con-
tained two boundaries and
five massive sixes, including
three off consecutive balls

from one James Anderson
over that netted Australia
21 runs.

Cameron White finished
unbeaten on 40 with four
sixes and a four and shared
a 66-run sixth-wicket stand
in 5.4 overs with Andrew
Symonds, who was not out
39.

England lost wickets in
the first and second overs in
reply.

Nathan Bracken dismissed
Ed Joyce for one in the first
over and Shane Harwood
had Flintoff out for a duck
in the second over.

‘Harwood ran out Kevin
Pietersen for 11 with a direct

hit from out near the bound-
ary after Pietersen turned a
Nathan Bracken ball behind
square and attempted a sec-
ond run, making the tourists
32 for three after 4.1 overs
and virtually ending the run
chase.

It was only the second
Twenty20 international

COE IE
Pe ee rate ed ea
Ask for them in-store ULL



Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause
Heart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases.





s wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist in their 20/20 cricket match at the Syd:

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

played in Australia, follow-
ing the 95-run win by the
Australians over South
Africa in Brisbane last
year. :
England and Australia
meet again Friday in the
opening match of the limit-
ed-overs tri-series that also
involves New Zealand.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 3





Uproar
in PLP
about

George
Smith
remarks

FROM page one

voice of advancement for the
Bahamian people.”

The party said Mr Smith’s
views suggested new PLP
incumbents were unworthy
of nomination.

“He went so far as to say
that most aspiring MPs want
this office simply for the
glamour and power of it or
just to rottenly enrich them-
selves.”

Describing his remarks as
a “sad indictment” of the
PLP’s parliamentary team,
the party blamed Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie for
encouraging them to. be
“slackers” in their con-
stituencies.

“The Workers Party is
aware from intelligence
reports coming out of the
PLP that Prime Minister
Christie is leaning towards
firing many of his sitting MPs
and presenting a new face to
the Bahamian people.”

Such a move, it said, would
meet with “strong and over-
whelming public approval”
and greatly enhance the
PLP’s chances at the polls.

The party said it hoped
both Mr Christie and FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham
would use Mr Smith’s com-
ments to “clean house” and
present the best candidates
possible.



Preval says
US not doing
enough on
narcotics

B HAITI
Port-au-Prince

_ PRESIDENT Rene Preval
said Haiti remained a “vic-
tin of drug-consuming coun-
tries” in a speech Monday,
accusing the United States in

| particular of not doing
enough to help his impover-
ished nation fight the nar-
cotics trade, according to
Associated Press. .

Renewing a criticism he
made in his first presidential
term, Preval accused rich,
drug-consuming countries of
blaming Haiti for failing to
stop the flow of illegal drugs
while doing little to boost the
Caribbean country’s weak
defences.

“Since I made that speech,
thas the situation changed? I
don’t think so,” Preval said.

‘FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157



oem eeoe e@ 8 @ @

~ Cushions



MAJORITY RULE DAY

Plans to mark the abolition of



slavery for Majority Rule Day

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TODAY, the 40th anniver-
sary of Majority Rule in the
Bahamas, has been declared a
“national day of reflection” by
the government.

The
announced plans to commemo-
rate another historical milestone
— the 200th anniversary of the
abolition of the trans-Atlantic
slave trade — with an ecumenical
service at the Southern Recre-

ation Grounds, an area which

has been central “to black
Bahamian political life through-
out the 20th century,” it was
revealed yesterday.

“Through its celebration of
these important historic mile-
stones, the government will
ensure that the legacies of past
Bahamians live on from gener-
ation to generation," said Min-
ister of Works and Utilities, Mr

: _ Bradley Roberts.





He said Majority Rule Day
is to be reflected upon as ush-
ering in “the opportunity for all
Bahamians to have constitu-
tional, political, social, cultural
and economic rights” in the
wake of the traditional disen-

franchisement of the majority ©

government also”

ll THE new Cabinet in 1967

under the rule of what has been
commonly described as a “priv-
ileged elite”.

Whereas before 1958 only
male Bahamians with property
over the age of 21 could vote —

‘while those owning property,

or companies, had multiple
votes — recommendations made
by Secretary of State for
Colonies Allen Lennox Boyd
that year saw this constitutional
inequality dismantled, with the
result that the 1962 election was
the first in which universal suf-
frage was exercised.



However, Majority Rule was
yet again delayed, after the PLP
were denied power despite win-
ning a majority of votes.

They finished with fewer
seats than the primarily white
United Bahamian Party, politi-
cal home of the ruling "Bay
street Boys"-
— due to what many commen-
tators have described as "ger-
rymandering" — the manipula-
tion of constituency boundaries
for political ends.

The UBP’s political domi-
nance continued until 1967

Black minority controls Bahamas,
claims social activist Duncombe

MAJORITY Rule was dis-
missed as a myth yesterday by a
social activist who claims a
wealthy black minority now
controls the Bahamas.

Fathers rights leader Clever
Duncombe said the PLP and
FNM had both taken on the
faults of the former white oli-
garchy.

“They have all aspired to
become filthy rich at the
expense of the ordinary man,”
he said. ;

As a result, poor blacks wh
were promised a “Square Deal”
during the general election cam-
paign of 1967 are still as poorly
off as they always were. -

While maybe 15 or 20 per cent
of blacks had prospered from
so-called Majority Rule, most
were still struggling from pay
cheque to pay cheque, he said.

His hard-hitting comments
came 40 years to the day since
the PLP won power from the
former UBP with the help of
two “outsiders” - Labour leader
Randol Fawkes and Eleuthera
representative Alvin Braynen.

Mr Duncombe said succes-
sive governments had betrayed
the parents and grandparents
who had sacrificed so much in
the past.

Black politicians had repeat-
ed all the faults of the former
white rulers, getting rich off the
backs of the people and helping
their cronies.

“Meanwhile, the masses are
still suffering,” he told The Tri-
bune. ;

Mr Duncombe said many of
the old divisive laws left on the
statute books since colonial
times were still there.

Affiliation laws designed to
split families and make individ-
uals less able to function suc-
cessfully in society had been
retained.

“I don’t want to make it a
racial issue because it is not
white on black anymore, it is a
black on black situation.

“We need to get rid of these
discriminatory laws as they.
relate to our socio-economic
structure,” he said. &

On the growing disparity in
wealth, Mr Duncombe said some
people are “still living from pay
cheque to pay cheque and many
have no pay cheques at all.”

Mr Duncombe drewia com-
parison between the fortunes
of the late prime minister Sir
Lynden Pindling - who ended
up in a mansion on a hill - and
those who were supposed to
benefit from his “Square Deal”.

And he decried the decline
in educational standards which
- 40 years after the PLP
takeover - left children lan-
guishing with D-plus grades.

It was only now, four decades
on, that a national health scheme
was being mentioned, he added.

“It is a sad indictment on suc-
cessive governments when you
consider where we are today,”
he said. .

The country’s social fibre had
deteriorated badly, with 60 mur-
ders last year, 52 the year before
and a record 70 in the year 2000.

“Crime has increased by unac-
ceptable numbers,” said Mr Dun-
combe, “We have 520 reported
cases of abuse on children.”

Referring to political intimi-
dation and victimisation, he
said: “They can’t take us under
the fig tree and whip us any-
more, but what they can do is
intimidate us for speaking out.

“The politicians have not
been motivated by ideals and I
would challenge any politician
who has served over the last 40
years to refute that.”

He said today’s rulers did not
even abide by the provisions of





the Public Disclosure Act,
which required them to reveal
details of their wealth.

“They have refused to accept

high standards, and this is a

challenge we have to meet over °

the next 40 years,” he added.

“In 1967, our parents and
grandparents had a legitimate
claim as they were experienc-
ing unjustified oppression and
felt that the PLP were the sav-
iours from above. It was easy
for them to buy into the ideolo-
gy of the PLP.”

But the party was irrelevant
now. “I don’t see any reason to
support the PLP in terms of
their philosophy,” he said.

“After all, while ordinary peo-

le wili be receiving pensions of

200 per month, the black politi-
cians will be retiring on pensions
running into hundreds of thou-
sands. We have replaced one
hierarchy with another.

He added: “Vote buying is
still big business in the Bahamas
today. They know an issue-
based campaign will open the
eyes of the people, so they
resort to rallies, where politi-
cians crack jokes and soon. |"

“They are using the same

. machinery our’ parents and

grandparents fought so hard to
eliminate.”

Mr Duncombe, who is con-
testing Golden Gates as an inde-
pendent in the election, pointed
out that it was an independent
candidate who made the differ-
ence on January 10, 1967.

“We are paying the price of
social neglect by successive gov-
ernments. Where do we go now
from here?”



Decorations
Poinsettias
Garlands
Wreaths
Trees
Picks
Lights



ee SoS

The management and Rea aL) Pars.

Christmas candles
Christmas ribbon

despite having won fewer votes,
but, as Carlton Francis put it,
"they stood on the beach of his-
tory but they could not hold
back the tide."

Reform |

Yesterday, commentators
spoke of the significance of this
day in 1967, on which the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party was at
last victorious in the general
election, having finally been in a
position to benefit from the new
political rights of the majority of
Bahamians, as well as the stren-
uously called-for electoral
reform.

The happily non-violent
transformation of power came
after years of claims on all sides
that the black majority were
"not ready" be governed by a
party made up of “their own”
said Sir Clifford Darling and Sir
Clement Maynard, two of the
PLP members voted into par-
liament in 1967, on the Real
Talk Live show on ZNS yester-
day.

Sir Arthur Foulkes, anothe
of the successful PLP candi-
dates that day, said that it was
“perhaps the most significant

day in our history...even the

most important since emanci-
pation.”

He and his political allies
were "euphoric" on the day that
they, and their PLP party, were
ushered into the country's cor-
ridors of power, and he looks
back on it as the greatest in his
political career, he said.

Former governor general Sir
Orville Turnquest, another PLP
parliamentarian of the era, said
January 10 “signalled the begin-
ning of an era in our centuries’
old history when the opportu-
nity for leadership and involve-
ment in all areas of our country
was now open to all our citizens
without discrimination on
account of race, colour or
creed.”

Sir Clifford and Sir Clement
agreed that the move towards
Majority Rule was facilitated
by collective action such as
woman's suffrage in 1961 and
the general strike of 1957.

Mr Darling said that the lead-
ing elite were not pushed out
because they were white, but
because “it was felt that they
were not trying to go all the way
with the majority rule.”

SEE page 10

ESAS SSSA

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com .

Sa








Rd i) rr
Christmas












a

\\\

customers sincere thanks for continued support over the past year.
We wish you a New Year of Peace, Lael) and Success.

Where Fabrics, Cralts & Inspiration Meet

Home Fabrics

PON a WRyee PeS OCU e224 ye


+p eaedae es

ana ere

=F 9% a,

$4.47

ae

2 a & & 6.8.8 D4 .F.9_*_*

tte #7

2 tas te

ogee ee ea & 9 PLE! See a a eS LL

~7 ee eo

BS nn we ®

7 VT TT
a a Ay

2 Re

st we @.0.0.9.F Ir ors

eee Be 6 SP FPF

ek

oe Raa se 2.

ws Et

RPT eG eee FSS

ee ey

7?

€€ @ PLR UBS S 4 Bf 6s! tA SE

2
es



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs







THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007

av We

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE ;
‘This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee

motivation.
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007
Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm Be:






Venue: To be announced
Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $160.00




















WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.
Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tultion:

Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007
9:30am - 4:30pm, é
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00












All fees are inciuded with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

perdev cob.edu.bs
Brae vic,
328-0093

Contact the Coordinator -





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007












MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS i
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS U

This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments, Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.














Starting: | Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: ‘6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

C ontact the Coordinator - f erdev (@cob.edu.bs



THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 7

SSS SSS







@ HIGH sea breaks against the port side
breeches buoy is rigged up with destroyer

the grave of missing submarine Thresher.

Historic vessel 1

of the research vessel Atlantis II, April 14, 1963, as a
Hazelwood for the transfer of sonar equipment to seek





(AP Photo/Sir)



Grand Bahama

A piece of history has arrived
on the shores of Grand
Bahama.

Atlantis I, the vessel famous
for the discovery and first film-
ing of the Titanic, arrived in
Grand Bahama in late 2006, and
is now undergoing restoration.

After being saved from a
shipyard in Louisiana and sur-
viving Hurricane Katrina, the
ship and its new crew endured
the five-day trip across the Gulf
of Mexico to the Bahamas,
which will become its new
home.

Atlantis II was the first
research vessel ever built in the
US and the first to get the RV
designation.

She was built for the Woods
Hole Oceanographic Institution
(WHOI) and was considered
the flagship of their fleet..The
ship travelled around the world
and was involved with every
type of ocean science explo-
ration.

In 1979 Atlantis II underwent
a major mid-life refit. The con-
version’ of the power source
from steam to diesel reduced
the vessel’s operating cost,
increased its range of travel, and
increased its selection of ports.

In 1983 a deck hanger and A-
frame were installed enabling
her to handle the launch and
recovery of the submersible
oceanographic vehicle, Alvin.

- for restoration

Atlantis II served as Alvin’s te:

_ der from 1984 to 1996.

Atlantis II concluded 34 yez
of service, over one milliv:
miles sailed for science, a)
more than 8,000 days at sea, «
record unequalled by ai.
research vessel.

Decommissioned in 1996, s!:
sat quiet for a number of ye:

~ changing hands several tin

without realising any signific::
new purpose. That has chang:

Just why is the Atlantis ||
here? The reason will unfold
the weeks to come, So Stu\
tuned.

e Photo and history excerpts
from www.whoi.edu

Activist: Fewer political
prisoners, but Cuban
dissidents still harassed

m@ HAVANA

THE number of political pris-
oners held in Cuba dropped in
the second half of last year, but
harassment of dissidents con-
tinues, a veteran human rights
activist said Tuesday.

Elizardo Sanchez of the
Cuban Commission on Human

Rights and National Reconcili-_,

ation said in his twice-yearly
update that his group counted
283 prisoners of conscience,
down from 316 in early July.

The commission counted 333
political prisoners in Cuba a
year ago.

Sanchez attributed the drop
to “selective” releases of pris-
oners, such as Hector Palacios,
an opposition leader who was
recently set free on medical
parole.

Palacios was one of 75 dissi-
dents arrested in a broad crack-
down in 2003. Besides Palacios,
fifteen of those arrested have
since been freed for health rea-
sons.

But Sanchez said that even
as some prisoners have been
released, Cuba’s communist-
run government continues to
harass dissidents with short
detentions, interrogations and
monitoring.

The rights activist also said
he had no hope for,a major
change under Raul Castro, the
defense minister named acting
president when his older broth-
er Fidel Castro stepped aside
in late July after intestinal
surgery.

“There is nothing pressuring
Raul to make changes,” said
Sanchez. “My vision is pes-
simistic.”

Cuba’s communist govern-



IS <

@ CUBAN dissident Elizardo Sanchez is seen on the porch of








his home in the Cuban capital of Havana in this September 1994

photo.

ment denies holding prisoners

of conscience, characterising

them as common criminals.
Because there are no public

(CP Photo/Jose Goitia)

records available about the pris-
oners, rights activists count on
family members and others to
bring cases to their attention.
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com __





NOTEBOOK

cotinine

THE COST OF WINNING

GLENDALE, Ariz. — As
college football’s hierarchy
tries to digest (probably
with antacids) the details of
Nick Saban’s contract at
the University of Alabama,
Ohio State officials were
bracing for immediate ram-
ifications.

A clause in coach Jim
Tressel’s contract, signed
last May, voids the deal if
the Buckeyes win the
national title.

The language was
inserted after OSU won the
2002 crown, and it was kept
in his most recent deal.

“T didn’t even know I
’ had it,” Tressel said after

’ OSU’s first practice in the
desert last week.

If Saban, who won a
national title at LSU in .
2003, is worth a reported $4
million a year, what would
Tressel be worth with two
crowns?

“T don’t know. A lot,”
receiver Anthony Gonza-
lez said. “To me, Coach
Tressel is the best coach in
the country, so he ought to
be compensated that way.”

Tressel is completing
the first of a seven-year
deal that pays him at least
$2.38 million this season
and rises incrementally
each year. He’s not even
the highest-paid coach in
the Big Ten; that honor
belongs to Iowa’s Kirk Fer-
entz ($2.84 million).

Until Saban took Ala-
bama’s offer last week,
Oklahoma’s Bob Stoops
($3.4 million) and Notre

‘Dame’s Charlie Weis (esti-
mated $3.3 million) were at
the top of the national
charts.

OSU athletic director
Gene Smith told reporters
he wants to see details of
Saban’s contract to learn
how much is money, com-
pared to perks such as cars,
housing aid and the like.

‘My philosophy,” Smith
said, “is to look at our
coaches and see where they
are competitively in the
marketplace with their
peers... . We'll look first at
the [Big Ten], then we'll
look at peers.”

BOOKS TO HIT
The Ohio State players

-"+ had to return to Columbus

” facing a challenge not
encountered by any previ-
ous Buckeyes squad:

Five days of classes to

*. make up.

Ohio State operates on a
quarter system, and classes
for the winter quarter
began last Wednesday. It’s
a byproduct of the new
BCS model that plays the
final game later than any
previous season’s end.

To ease the transition,
OSU sent six tutors to Ari-
zona to set up a computer
lab and help the players
with class outlines and
assignments. Some players

have been subject toaman- -

-datory study table.

“The culture is in place
to allow them to reach
championship perfor-
mances, both on the field
and in the classroom,” said

. John P. Bruno, Ohio
State’s faculty athletics rep- _
resentative.

The Buckeyes had to
obtain NCAA waivers for
its nine graduated players
to compete without regis-
tering.

Florida’s new semester,
by the way, began Monday.

UNFAMILIAR ZONE

The Gators’ first-half
scoring output left Ohio
- State in some uncomfort-
* able territory. The Buck-
eyes had trailed in just
three games during the reg-
ular season. Cincinnati,
Penn State and Indiana all
managed to score first in
their meetings.

All told, Ohio State
’ trailed for just a total of
23:17 in the regular season.
The Gators exceeded that
by intermission, holding
the lead for the final 24:09
of the opening half.

— JEFF SHAIN

















INSIDE THE GAME | OHIO STATE

Buckeyes fell into a ‘lls hole

@ Ohio State was left
confused by Florida’s
multiple-formation and
high-octane offense- and
Ted Ginn Jr. was injured.

BY JEFF SHAIN
jshain@MiamiHerald.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Ohio
State got only 10 minutes out
of Ted Ginn Jr. That alone was
ominous enough.

Ginn’s presence, though,
would have done little to mask
the defensive deficiencies
Florida exploited in Monday
night’s 41-14 romp, which left
the Buckeyes short of college

_ football’s summit.

The Gators’ wide array of
offensive looks and superior
speed combined to roll up 220
yards and 34 points by half-
time, putting the Buckeyes in a
hole even their offensive
weapons couldn’t blast their
way out of.

“When you look at what
transpired in the game, it’s not
surprising that it turned out
the way it did,” OSU coach Jim
Tressel said. “We gave them
every opportunity to make it a
40-whatever game. Did that
hurt? No question.”

Nor did it help that the

Buckeyes were without their |

fastest offensive weapon.
After taking the opening kick-
off 93 yards for a touchdown,
Ginn was on the field for just
three snaps and two more
kickoffs before leaving the
game with a suspected ankle
injury.

“That was very noticeable,”
said Troy Smith, OSU’s Heis-
man Trophy quarterback.
“Not having him definitely
took a little bit away from the
team. But, at the same time,
you can’t harp on it.”

Ohio State (12-1) was seek+
ing to become the first team
since Florida State in 1999 to
go wire-to-wire as the nation’s
No. 1 team. Instead they could
only shake their heads at their
most lopsided loss in 2 1/2 sea-
sons.

The Buckeyes had held
nine of their 12 regular-season‘
opponents to less than 10
points this season, holding the

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



__ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 | 7



‘



JOE RIMKUS JR./MIAMI HERALD STAFF

STEAMROLLED: Florida back DeShawn Wynn barrels tHrodah the Ohio State defense on his way into the end zone.

line even after games were
decided and benches emptied.

But no one on OSU’s sched-
ule could have prepared the
Buckeyes for all the different
variations Florida’s offense
threw at them.

Six different Gators caught
passes, all on short out pat-
terns or crossing routes. No
completion all night went for
more than 20 yards. UF also
utilized six rushers, including
two listed as wideouts.

The Gators even used three
quarterbacks — not only
bringing in Tim Tebow for his

usual job running in short-
yardage situations but giving
fellow freshman Percy Harvin
more direct snaps than any
previous outing.

On at least three occasions,
Chris Leak either lined up
wide or went in motion as
Tebow or Harvin stood in
shotgun formation.

All of it left the Buckeyes
on their heels. Though Ohio
State frequently dropped eight
men into coverage, Leak had
time to find receivers in the
seams or the flat.

“We didn’t cause any turn-

overs; lost the turnover mar-
gin,” defensive tackle David
Patterson said. “We just didn’t
do the things it takes to win.”

By the time it was finished,
Ohio State had given up 371
yards — eight shy of what
Michigan rolled up as the sea-
son high for a Buckeyes oppo-
nent.

Ginn, meanwhile, could do
nothing more than watch.

It took only 16 seconds for
the speedster to put the Buck-

eyes in front, breaking through -

a crease to outrace the Gators
to the end zone with the open-

ing kickoff.

But things quickly went
downhill after that. OSU went
three-and-out on its first
offensive series, and Ginn took
himself out of the deep return
spot after UF took a 14-7 lead.

He limped off the field as
the rest of the offense trotted
on, never to return.

“When you lose a guy that’s
a big part of what you do and

_constantly gives you big

sparks, I think it affects you,“
Tressel said.

the board.”



Urban legend 1 is thriving ahead of schedule

t’s only fitting that the
l Gators played Monday in
a stadium that resembles a
grounded UFO.
Because this championship
was ahead of its time.
What took Steve Spurrier
seven years to earn was sup-
posed to take
-at least a:cou-
ple more
years for
Urban Meyer
to duplicate.
Urban.
wasn’t sup-
posed to
- igutlerrez _ become a leg-
_ MiamiHerald.c end quite this
- quickly.

‘ And yet, he is. And these
Gators are champs — legiti-
mate champs that only Boise
State can make the mildest of
cases against. Champs that
brought home a crystal foot-
ball way before Gainesville
could have expected sucha
lovely gift.

Even in his most disillu-
sioned of moments, clouded
by that occasionally arrogant
orange-and-blue pride, Meyer
couldn’t have imagined a
national championship would
come this soon. Not when he
was playing with a quarter-
back who’s far from ideal for
his system. Not when he was
playing a second quarterback
just to make his game plan
work. Not when his best pure
running back couldn’t average
60 yards a game this season.

Granted, one of the themes
of the early season was that
Meyer’s offense tends,to take
flight in his second season at a
school. But this?

Chris Leak calmly carving
his way down the field at will,
sometimes from a comfortable
pocket, and other times toss-
ing pinpoint passes on a
designed rollouts? Percy Har-
vin taking snaps from the cen-
ter, bullets from the quarter-
back and an option pitch for a
touchdown? DeShawn Wynn
muscling in a touchdown from

2 yards out? Tim Tebow actu-
ally throwing a touchdown
pass? And doing it all against
the top scoring defense i in the
nation?

Nothing about this Gators
season warned that this was
coming. Based on the body of
work, nothing about the
Gators season said the team
could absolutely dominate. At
best, it said Meyer was making
due with his less-than-ideal
roster and piecing together a
better-than-expected season.
But it wasn’t supposed to
translate into a clean whoop-
ing of the No. 1 team in the
nation — the team that was
supposed to have the better
game-day technician on its
sideline with the best quarter-
back and the best wide
receiver also wearing scarlet.

There were clues all sea-
son, some subtle, some smack-
ing you in the face, that
showed the Gators weren’t
ready to run over good teams.

Consider that Meyer called
four fake punts this season

ELITE COMPANY



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

WAY TO GO: Urban Meyer, who won the BCS title in his second season coaching the
Gators, celebrates the final moments of Monday’s 41-14 victory against Ohio State.

By winning the BCS title in his second season as coach of AQ
Florida, Urban Meyer joined some elite company. Inthe nine —
seasons the BCS has been in place, six teams have won the _
title within the first four yeoke ofa Roach taking over.

Year Champion ¢
2000 Oklahoma Bc
2001 Miami

2002 Ohio State






2006 “Florida

because he felt his team
needed an immediate change
of momentum. All four
worked. Teams that are good
enough to control a national .
title game aren’t supposed to
need those kinds of desperate
acts that often in a season.
Consider that Meyer had to
find gimmicky ways to run the
football, including using a
freshman quarterback and a
pair of receivers as his most

Coach eA

Larry Coker wi wins title | in n his first year
im Tressel win title i in his second year

itle j in| his fourth vyear |

Hh wins title | in his. fourth year

Urban Meyer. wins title in his second year

consistent threats. In fact, six
of the team’s top nine rushers
weren't even running backs.
That wasn’t supposed to work
for 12 regular-season games, a
conference title game and a
national championship game
against an Ohio State team
that trailed for 23 minutes all
season.

Consider that the Gators
needed two blocked field-goal
attempts by Jarvis Moss,

including the game-winning
attempt, to beat an OK South
Carolina team in its Swamp.
Runaway national champion-
ships are not supposed to
require that much fortune to

. win games like that against

opponents like those.

And when Ohio State’s
Tedd Ginn Jr. ran back the
opening kickoff Monday to put
the Gators behind 7-0 in 16
seconds, evoking memories of
the historical 62-24 drubbing
at the hands of Nebraska in the
1995 title game, it appeared the
Buckeyes were ready to prove
all these signals as accurate
indicators of a national title
mismatch.

Instead, it was Florida not
only recovering from the early
Ohio State fireworks, but
squeezing all the venom out of
that poisonous nut and spit-
ting it right back at the Buck-
eyes.

The only possible predictor
that something like this could
occur was a Gators defense
that played the part of bully in
the already-physical South-
eastern Conference. And it
certainly helped that Harvin,
who had been’bothered by
nagging injuries all season,
was healthy enough to show
his full potential. He was
Joakim Noah with a helmet
and pads, affecting nearly
every offensive play (he didn’t
finish with jump-off-the-page
stats, but Noah rarely does,
either) and ensuring he will
enter next season with Reggie
Bush-like acclaim.

In a way, these Gators are
quite similar to the reigning
hoops champs. They both
entered their championship
rounds as relative after-
thoughts. And they both ended
their seasons hoisting tro-
phies, waving index fingers
and making the Gator chomp
the official celebratory act in
college sports today.

Turns out these Gators are
hot, too.

Who knew?

ELEN EE TE OTL TSN SLL GEL ET TOL OA

“But we just ~
didn’t get the job done across. .:


cme tasty’ {






HIGH
LOW



Te



lovin’

TIF
__65F

PARTLY




'

It.

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION













in da








i



ee

ee



Pe

ayes from |

_ WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007









PLP uproar over Smith remarks

Former MP’s
comments stun
many senior
party members

ON. A day when it
thought it might capitalise
on the events of 40 years
ago, the PLP today finds
itself in uproar over the
remarks of an MP from the
Majority Rule era.

George Smith’s com-
ments about many current
PLP MPs being unfit to run
in the general election have
stunned many senior party
members.

And, according to
sources close to the PLP
‘hierarchy, it has been
‘branded as an “act of
‘betrayal” in the run-up to
the election.

Mr Smith’s controversial
remarks came during a
Love 97 interview when he
said there was a “serious
disconnect” between some
PLP MPs and their con-
stituencies.

And he compounded the
problem by claiming many
of them sought elected
‘office only for the glamour
and power.

Mr Smith, senior mem-
ber of the PLP’s candidates
committee, was appearing
on the Jones and Compa-
ny radio show at the week-
end.

A source told The Tri-
























,

bune: “This has caused an
uproar in the PLP. Some
members are yelling
‘betrayal’, but others feel
he is telling the truth.”

There is undoubtedly dis-
quiet within the party over
the quality of some PLP
MPs. Some -were
“makeweight” candidates
at the 2002 election who
found themselves in parlia-
ment only because of the
party’s unexpected land-
slide victory. :

Now the PLP is taking a
close look at the “failures”
within its parliamentary
ranks in a bid to improve
the quality of its candidates
for the upcoming poll.

Mr Smith was one of the

new MPs swept to power.

when the PLP won the Jan-
uary 10, 1967, election.

And last night he was
praised by the Workers
Party for “sanitised and
clear thinking”.

“We feel that Mr Smith
has paid his dues and has
emerged from the long
night of his personal holo-
caust during the Commis-
sion of Inquiry in 1984 as a
refreshing and vigorous

SEE page two





Street obstruction angers motorists

il
—

& MOTORISTS on Shirley Street were frus-
trated by this obstruction, which blocked an entire
lane and brought traffic to a standstill. Many dri-
vers, who could be seen turning off the road to
search for another route, said what angered them
most was that although the signs advised that
maintenance work was underway, the site seemed

abandoned for hours.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Woman suspected

of involvement in
murder granted bail

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE woman suspected of
being involved in the Christmas
Day murder of Cecil Coakley was
granted bail yesterday — but only
after the prosecution was made
to concede that the offence
charged was in fact a bailable
offence.

James Miller of Malcolm
Allotment, and his girlfriend,
Kacie Sawyer of Blair Estates,
were charged in connection with
Coakley’s murder and appeared
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez to answer to the charges.

The police alleged that Miller

SEE page 11



Possible aviation
fuel tax is ‘not |

expected to affect
visitor numbers’

! Ml By KARIN HERIG
i Tribune Staff Reporter i

i DESPITE the introduction of a :
i possible new aviation fuel tax —
: which could lead to higher prices
: for airline tickets — visitor num- :
: bers to the Bahamas are not :
i expected to decrease, the Bahamas;
Hotel Association’s new president {3
: Russell Miller said yesterday. ;
: Speaking yesterday at the week- i
: ly meeting of the Nassau Rotary i
: Club, Mr Miller said that while the ;
: Hotel Association is aware of the
: concerns regarding the European :
: Union’s proposed aviation fuel tax, i

SEE page 11

ASL SA OR
hour imeonite
eR LOLATA LUNA





Cable Beach
hotel gym
users claim
discrimination

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

GYM users at a Cable Beach
hotel claim they are victims of
discrimination after being told
their membership is not being
renewed.

They claim Baha Mar’s deci-
sion to close the gym at Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort was an
attempt to keep out Bahamians.

A sign, which was put up at the
entrance to the gym, was the first
indication that changes would be
made.

But the sign did not materialise

SEE page 11

. Shitley
www.ssibahamas

Three
baggage
handlers
expected
in court

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ LESTER Bain, Delvino Rig-

by and Marcus Rolle are
expected to appear before a
Miami Federal court magistrate
at 10 o’clock this morning on
charges of possession with
intent to distribute cocaine to
the United States.

The three men, part of a
group of five Nassau Flight Ser-
vices (NFS) baggage handlers
arrested in the US, are the first
to be arraigned before a US
Federal court.

According to Mrs Alma
Adams, Bahamas Consul Gen-
eral for Miami, Florida, the
three have had an opportunity
to speak with their lawyers.

Mrs Adams told The Tribune
yesterday that the Bain, Rigby,

SEE page 11

e

Search for
suspect after
man stabbed

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter



FREEPORT - Police are
investigating an incident at the
New Native Hut Nightclub and
Restaurant, where a 20-year-
old Freeport man was stabbed
several times.

Supt Basil Rahming said
police are searching for the sus-
pect in connection with the stab-
bing.

Police received a report from
the duty nurse at Rand Memo-
rial Hospital around 1.30am on
Monday about a patient who
had been brought into the hos-
pital suffering from multiple
stab wounds.

An officer went to the Acci-
dent and Emergency section at
the hospital and spoke with the
victim, Gem Godfrey Ferguson,
20, of Caravel Beach, who told
police what had happened at

SEE page 11

Si


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Legal Notice

NOTICE

BABI VALLEY ENTERPRISES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BABI VALLEY ENTERPRISES INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Making your business |
a harder crime target .

IS the workplace safe?
Before we say ‘yes’, the follow-
ing should be considered. It
depends on where you work,
what you do and what time of
the day you do it. It, of course,
means work, and the individ-
ual who decides to commit a
crime has to consider these
options.

They, too, must consider the
risk involved with where, when
and what type of crime to com-



THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is e implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world,

aoeucations are invited from suitably quale individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

ti |

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in Speen the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College's efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint conference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter. ;

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
eed basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

Specific duties in the international relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and
coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students’ application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
ang ueae is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°"' January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P.O, Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas



The College of The Bahamas

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
CULINARY COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 012007

DUR, IME: THITION 8
3 FRE

. : f (ADDITIONAT

’ } SAPP PRE
tas : FOR NEW |
; | , STUDENTS)
1, Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 J January 18 SOE YI ce | 6:00-9:00pmi | $2.25,00

2, Gourmet Cooking | - COOK 823 Mon. H 6:00-9:00pm

3, Gourmet Cooking Il COOK 824 Mon.

$200,00

$225.00

4, Cake & Pastry Making! | COOK 813 | January 16 Tues/Thurs
5, Cake & Pastry Making HT COOK 814 Tues/Thurs
i, Bread Making COOK 810 Thurs,

6:00-9:00pm_ J $225.00

Mon/Wed — # 6:00-9:00pm_ | $225.00

1
1
1
,

8, Cake Decoration IT COOK 818 | January 15
% Jntro. to Bartending ITPB 9038 \ Tanuary i)
Skills :

| Mon/Wed )6:00-0-00pin | $402.98

eorrveneregen
6 weeks

7. Cake Decorating I COOK 817 Mon/Wed

mit. So, if we were to asses

RESOURCE
MATERIALS

$10 - $12 per week

\ heer
$20 per week

$20 per week

$250.00 $10 - $15 per week | CHMI Pastry | 15
Kitchen
6:00-9:00pm 7 $200.00 $5 - S10 per week
S1O- $15 perweek J CHMI Larder
Kitchen

$10- $15 per week

$225.00 $10-$15 per week | CHMI Larder
Kitchen

1 ornnemrearasal

these factors from a criminal’s
viewpoint, what would we come
up with. I believe a better
understanding, with effective
countermeasures developed
and implemented, meaning
many robbery situations can be
prevented, and those which do
occur, properly managed. |

Let us consider the business
owner of a cell phone retail
store, as opposed to a cell
phone wholesaler, What would
make either enterprise more
attractive to criminal minds?
Initially, let’s look at revenue.
We all would agree that the
wholesaler should have more
money than the retailer,-but in
what form is this money in?

This is the problem the crim-
inal must consider, as he is
quite aware that the whole-
saler’s revenues might be in the
form of credit card payments
and money transfers. So, upon
consideration, even though
more funds are available at the
wholesaler’s location, the crim-
inal may think it more worth-
while to make his/her robbery
attempt at the retailer’s loca-
tion, because more ‘cash’ is per-
ceived to be available, Also,
access to the offices where the
wholesaler handles funds may
be difficult, whereas the retail-
er’s cash register, in some
instances, can be seen from the
street.

On the flip side of this exam-
ple is the action of a criminal
who prefers using fraudulent
documents, The attraction or
perceived opportunity is that
there are so many forms and
documents being handled by
the wholesale operation, he/she
may be able to obtain cell
phones with the presentation
of fraudulent checks or pur-
chase orders.

Both examples raise ques-
tions on what actions are nec-
essary on behalf of the perpe-
trator t6 bésuccessful. We must
remember that the robbers, too,
generally tall into three cate-
gories: ©

* 1. The Amateur
* 2, The intermediate
* 3. The professional

The method of attack will
vary, but it will usually corre-
spond with the degree of expe-
rience, discipline and available
resources the robber has. These
methods can include:

* The lone gunman who
passes a note,

* The gang, who takes the
lobby over for a period of time

* The coordinated attackers

* The fraudster

* The identity thief

Considering that actions at
the retail level will be more
direct, and person-to-person,
how does the criminal convince
the business owner to handover
the cash. A gun, a note or even
taking some other person like a
wife or child hostage are all
ways that can be used to per-
suade the business owner to
hand over the cash. Yet the
thief who goes about his/her
activity using fraud does not
necessarily have to resort to
such hostile behaviour.

Does this mean retail stores
are more at risk than large
wholesale outlets and suppli-

Max, Enrol,

CHMI Main

Kitchen
5
. 1
5

1 CLM Main ol
Kitehen
CHMI Main eos
Kitehen

CHMI Pastry 2]

Kitchen

1s

15

13
CHMI Larder | 15
Kitchen

5

5

§

CHMI
Dinning
Room

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute |

j at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 328-8175

“pe DE thy



Visit our website at www.cob,edu.bs



sggenngg eo: ry On ee \ ge AR a Ne

EDUCATING & TRAINING






ers? The numbers suggest that
retail stores are more suscepti-
ble to violent crimes, not nec-
essarily less crime, We must not
forget location, as any market-
ing guru will tell you the cus-
tomer has to be able to ‘easily’
access your product and ser-
vices. So questions about tar-
get hardening should come to
mind. How do J, then, make
my business less attractive to

would-be robbers, yet not turn °
- it into a fortress that likewise

scares off my customers?

‘Time, too, plays a role in this
equation, as we have only thus
far considered the type of busi-
ness and location. What about
operational hours? We are find-
ing that most retailers ‘must’
operate into the evening, as
every one works a basic 9am to
Spm day. So, to be more acces-
sible, retailers must now stay
open maybe until 7pm or 8pm.
The wholesaler or supplier,
because of the business type,
has more control over opera-
tional hours.

From an individual stand-
point, what exactly is your role
in the organisation. Do. you
hold all the keys and combina-
tions, or are you the filing

clerk? Your function will deter-

mine if: you are a target the

criminal should be going after,

How accessible are you? You
may be the filing clerk,-with lit-
tle or no access to valuables,
but vou are easy to reach. You
may be used as an indirect
avenue to persons or individu-
als who have direct access to
valuables.

Key to determining vulnera-
bility is access to the target and
access to assets required, At
this point, access must be seen
as not entry and exit, but also
movement in and around the
business. For example, access
to a bank is easy, but move-
ment in and around that office
may be restricted and limited,
But how does access relate to
safety in the workplace? When

|By Gamal Newry

Safe &
Secure





we consider these five elements
of crime from the perspective of
access, then the relationship
hopefully becomes a bit clearer

1. Motivation — This can be
seen as lack of access to certain
living conditions the perpetra-
tors may not have available to
him /her, such as food and shel-
ter

2. Opportunity — This relates
back to perceived easy access to
varying assets, in order to satis-
fy the motivating factors
addressed above.

3. Ability on the part of the
perpetrator — access to resources,
be they tools or knowledge, and
a plan of action. /

4. A reasonable expectation
of escape. How will my
access/exiting of the scene be
denied? ;

5. A low probability for detec-
tion and apprehension — how
accessible am I, after the event.

Some will argue that there
are numerous other relation-
ships that can be drawn, and
there are many more elements
to crime. Certainly there are,
but it is my opinion that these
five listed above make crime a
bit more real to prevention
efforts: Additionally, access - a
way in and out - is key, and [
am using it to blanket several
conditions, but again I think it
best describes the.concept of

“‘easé to accomplish the crimi-

nal act. :

_ NB; Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss prevention and
asset protection training and
consulting company, specialis-
ing in policy and procedure
development, business securi-
ty reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis manage-
ment. Comments can be sent,
to PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas, or e-mail
gnewry@coralwave.com

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GREENSTONE TRADING LIMITED

Notice is hereby
Section 138 (8) of

given that in
the International

accordance with
Business

Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of GREENSTONE
TRADING LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

Small Offshore Company
‘urgently requires
office space to rent/lease-
in downtown area. approx

a

| 000 square feet

Telephone: 323-7460/2


4B_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

HOMEBUILDERS



__INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Horton’s 1Q orders tumble 23%

*HORTON

Fannie Mae, the largest mort-
gage buyer.

“Cancellations have sub-
sided a little bit, but it appears
the deterioration in terms of
gross orders is accelerating,”
Rick Murray, a homebuilding
analyst at Raymond James,
who does not own shares of
D.R. Horton, said in an inter-
view. “It’s going to be a chal-

_lenging environment for hom-
ebuilders for the foreseeable
future.”

Another homebuilder,
Meritage Homes, the 13th
largest, said its fourth-quarter
net sales plunged 51 percent,
and analysts say they expect a
dismal season for homebuild-
ers across the country.

AIRLINES

Some consumers are hav-
ing difficulty selling their
existing home and are unable
to buy a new home they have
agreed to purchase. “They
don’t want to carry two mort-
gages,” Robert Curran, a man-
aging director at Fitch Rat-
ings, said in an interview.

MORE CANCELLATIONS

Chairman Donald Horton
said in the statement that the
company continues to experi-
ence “higher than normal can-
cellation rates and an
increased use of sales incen-
tives in many of our markets.”

D.R. Horton, which sells
houses priced from $90,000
to more than $900,000, sold

‘some of its land holdings in"

the second half of its last fis-

cal year as home sales
declined. The company said
in November it didn’t expect
the market to improve soon.
Homebuilders are seeing
their profits fall as they offer
incentives, such as making
mortgage payments for cus-
tomers, in a bid to move

unsold homes. In an adver- .

tisement in the Dec. 29 Chi-
cago Sun-Times, D.R. Horton

advertised free 42-inch

plasma televisions “plus thou-
sands in additional savings”
for customers who buy in
December and move in before
March 30.

SHARES RISE

Shares of D.R. Horton rose
8 cents to $25.47 in New York
Stock Exchange composite

trading. D.R. Horton’s stock
has fallen 35 percent in the
past year, compared with a 32
percent decline in the Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500 Home-
building Index.

Meritage, based in Scotts-
dale, Ariz., said profit will be
reduced by $1.25 to $1.50 a
share in the quarter. In a
statement Tuesday, it blamed
the decline on $55 million to

- $65 million of pretax expenses

to cancel options contracts
and to write down the value
of its inventory. Meritage will
report earnings for the period
on Jan. 24.

Shares of Meritage fell 8
cents to $43.34. The shares are
down 35 percent over the past
year.

United may get Washington to China route

* UNITED

mated that the route could
bring United roughly
$200 million a year in addi-
tional revenue, based on daily
16,000-mile, round-trip
flights.

The flights, he said, are
certain to draw executives
and politicians willing to pay
business-class fares, which
can cost as much as $10,000.

“It further cements their

ELECTRONICS

dominant position among the
American carriers in Asia,”
said King, airline sector ana-
lyst at CreditSights.

The cachet of capital-to-
capital flights was probably
the deciding factor in United
winning the route, King said,
though he and other analysts
said alternate regions of the
U.S. and China would be bet-
ter served by more nonstop
service.

Terry Trippler, an airline

travel analyst based in Minne-
sota, said a flight to Shanghai
— the industrial and financial
center of China — would have
offered more economic bene-
fits and he predicted it is
likely to get stronger consid-
eration for the next U.S. route
in 2008.

The government said Unit-
ed’s proposal had the poten-
tial td benefit the greatest
number of passengers, since
more people travel to China

from the Washington metro
area than any other city that
does not have nonstop U.S.-
China service.

United’s service will offer
more than 253,000 seats annu-
ally, the government said.

Shares of UAL added 4
cents to end at $46.84 on the
Nasdaq Stock Market, while
AMR rose 63 cents to close at
$34, and Continental added

$1.10, or 2.5 percent, to $45.72, ©

both on the NYSE.

Apple unveils new name, phone |

° APPLE

During his speech, Jobs
also unveiled a TV set-top
box that allows people to send
video from their computers
and announced the number of
songs sold on its iTunes
Music Store has topped 2 bil-
lion.

SHARES JUMP

Apple shares jumped more
than 8 percent on the
announcements, while the
stock of rival smart-phone
makers plunged. The run on
Apple stock created about $6
billion in shareholder wealth.

While Jobs noted the
explosive growth of the cell
phone market, it’s not clear
that a device as alluring as the
iPhone poses a threat to main-
stream handset makers due to
the price, said Avi Greengart,
mobile device analyst for the
research firm Current Analy-
sis.

“My initial reaction is that
this product actually lives up
to the extensive hype, and I’m
not easily impressed,” he said.
“But the vast majority of
phones sold cost way less

than $500.” Instead, the rivals .

most likely to face new com-
petition from Apple’s handset
are makers of higher-end
smart phones such as Palm
Inc.

Tim Bajarin, principal ana-
lyst with Creative Strategies,
said the iPhone could revolu-
tionize the way cell phones
are designed and sold.

“This goes beyond smart
phones and should be given
its own category called ‘bril-

SALARIES

Exec pay numbers

° EXECUTIVES

salary, bonus, stock awards,
stock option awards, other
“incentive” compensation,
changes in the value of the
pension and all. other com-

pensation.
The tallies were mandated
by the Securities and

Exchange Commission last
July, as part of the agency’s
biggest overhaul of executive
pay disclosure since 1992.

“In our view, this is a step
in the right direction; how-
ever, in some respects, it still
doesn’t go far enough,” said
David Zion, an accounting
analyst at Credit Suisse.

Shareholder advocates say
the tallies, likely to be the
most scrutinized parts of the
reports, are missing some
important components of pay,
such as the amount of divi-
dends paid on restricted stock



DAMIAN DOVARGANES/AP

NEW GADGETS: While the new iphone was shaking things up in San Francisco, other
tech firms were showing off new wares too at the 2007 International Consumer
Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Blogger Steven Fruchter, above, streams live
video off a Sony UX180 ultra portable computer at the Intel booth.

liant’ phones,” he said. “Cell
phones are on track to
become the largest platform
for digital music playback and
Apple needed to make this
move to help defend their

iPod franchise as well as

extend it beyond a dedicated
music environment.”

Apple currently commands
about 75 percent of the mar-
ket for downloaded music and
portable music players. But
it’s expected to lose market
share on both fronts as rivals
introduce their own gadgets
and music stores.

that has not yet vested.

“We're talking about, in
some cases, millions,” said
Brian T. Foley, an indepen-
dent executive compensation
consultant based in White
Plains, N.Y.

Besides the tallies, the
other telling section could be
a new is a compensation dis-
cussion and analysis, which
will require the company to
answer questions such as:
What are the objectives of the
company’s compensation pro-
grams? What is the compen-
sation program designed to
reward?

“They’re good questions,”
Zion said. But he said compa-
nies’ answers may be no more
than “legalese.”

Another addition: Details
of the pay an executive stands
to get under “change of con-
trol agreements” in place if
the company is sold. But they

Jobs said Apple expects to
sell 10 million iPhones in
2008, the first full year in
which they’ll be available.
That’s about 1 percent of the
global market for mobile
phones; 957 million were sold
worldwide in 2006.

SHIPS IN JUNE

The Apple phones, which
will operate exclusively on
AT&T’s Cingular Wireless
network, will start shipping in
June. A 4-gigabyte model will
cost $499, while an 8-gigabyte
iPhone will be $599. While

wireless carriers typically
offer discounts and rebates on
new devices when they agree
to sign a two-year service
contact, Cingular said it was
unclear whether this would
be the case with the iPhone.

Cingular declined to com-
ment on its financial arrange-
ment with Apple.

Apple shares jumped $7.10
to close at $92.57 on the
Nasdaq Stock Market.

Nearly 120 million Apple
shares were traded on Tues-
day, more than four times the
average daily volume.

to be scrutinized

won’t appear in the total pay
tables; investors will have to
read deeper in the filing to
find them.

The requirements also
include disclosure of the dat-
ing of stock option grants to
executives, including whether
the company ‘“backdates”
options. Options give the
recipient a right to buy stock
at a fixed strike price, gener-
ally set at the stocks’ market
price the day the option was
granted.

In a scandal that has led to
federal investigations at more
than 100 companies, execu-
tives and directors picked
option grant dates when their
stock prices were at a low,
enhancing the holder’s poten-
tial for greater profit.

Advocates are unhappy
with one change the SEC
made late last month on
options after intensive lobby-

ing from the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce and other busi-
ness interests.

Under the rules as they
were initially adopted in July,
the full amount of an option
award to an executive had to
be listed for the year. So, if an
executive received options
valued at $10 million, the
company would have to
record that $10 million in its
compensation table.

After the December
change, companies can list a
smaller amount for the first
year, spreading the remainder
over later years as the execu-
tive becomes eligible to exer-
cise the options. So a $10 mil-
lion options grant could look
like $2 million.

The options’ full value will
still be in company filings,
just not in the summary com-
pensation tables, Borrus said.







MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

BUSINESS BRIEFS



DANIEL R. PATMORE/AP

BUSINESS BOOMING: Fred Westbrook inspects the
finished rolls of aluminum as they come off the last
stage of the production line at the Alcoa Warrick
Operations in Newburgh, Ind., in April.

Alcoa profit jumps 60%
on higher prices, demand

From Herald Wire Services
'’ Aluminum producer Alcoa (AA) said fourth-quarter
profit jumped 60 percent, driven by higher metal prices and

strong market demand.

Net income increased to $359 million, or 41 cents per share,
from $224 million, or 26 cents per share, during the same
period a year earlier. The results include after-tax charges of
$386 million, or 44 cents per share, for costs related to a
restructuring program that includes the elimination of 6,700

jobs.

Income from continuing operations was $258 million, or
29 cents per share. Excluding restructuring and impairment
charges, the company earned $644 million, or 74 cents per

share.

e TIRE MANUFACTURER

GOODYEAR SAYS
STRIKE WORTH $350M

The world’s third-largest
tiremaker said the multimil-
lion dollar cost of a three-
month strike by union work-
ers is well worth the long-
term savings Goodyear
Tire & Rubber (GT)
expects to see from the new
labor deal.

During a conference call
with analysts, Goodyear
chief financial officer Rich-
ard Kramer said the strike
that began Oct. 5 and ended
last week drained between
$30 million and $35 million a
week from the company.

Kramer and Goodyear .

Chief Executive Robert Kee-

gan cushioned the news by.
saying the company plans to
save $610 million over three
years because of the agree-
ment reached with the

union and annual savings of ©

about $300 million.

e AIRLINES

NORTHWEST READY
TO BUY OUT MESABA

Northwest Airlines
(NWACQ.PK) moved
closer to buying out its
bankrupt feeder carrier
Mesaba Aviation on Tues-
day by making an agreement
with Mesaba’s corporate
parent, the two firms said.

Northwest, which is
expected to file its own
bankruptcy reorganization
plan next week, has said it
plans to acquire the feeder
airline in exchange for giv-
ing Mesaba a $145 million
unsecured claim in North-
west’s bankruptcy case.
Terms of the deal were
expected to be disclosed late
Tuesday.

MAIR shares dropped a
penny to close at $7.31 on the
Nasdaq.

e PETROLEUM

BP SAYS PRODUCTION
UNLIKELY TO CHANGE

BP PLC (BP), Europe’s
second-largest oil company
by market value, said pro-
duction in the fourth quarter
is unlikely to change com-
pared with the previous
three months, following
more than a year of declin-

. ing output.

The company expects to
report production of 3.82
million barrels of oil equiva-
lent per day in the quarter
ended Dec. 31, slightly
higher than the daily aver-
age of 3.816 million barrels
in the third quarter, BP said.

e SUPERMARKETS

SUPERVALU EARNINGS.
RISE 51 PERCENT

Supervalu (SVU), the
nation’s No. 3 supermarket
chain, said its third-quarter
earnings jumped almost
51 percent because of its
purchase of grocery chain
Albertson’s. But the results
missed analysts’ expecta-
tions, and its shares fell
nearly 2 percent.

Supervalu shares fell
61 cents, or 1.7 percent, to
close at $35.16 on the New
York Stock Exchange. They
have traded in a 52-week
range of $26.14 to $36.64.
Supervalu said it earned
$113 million, or 54.cents per
share, in the three months

_ended Dec. 2, up from .
$75 million, or 53 cents per
share, during the same
period last year.

e ALASKA

BUSH LIFTS OIL,
GAS DRILLING BAN

President Bush lifted a
ban Tuesday on oil and gas
drilling in Alaska’s Bristol
Bay, an area known for its
endangered whales and the
world’s largest run of sock- ©
eyesalmon. .

The action clears the way
for the Interior Department
to open 5.6 million acres of
the fish-rich waters north-
west of the Alaska Peninsula
as part of its next five-year
leasing plan.

“There will be significant
opportunities for study and
public comment before any
oil and gas development
could take place,” said Inte-
rior Secretary Dirk Kempth-
orne.

e EUROPE

EUROPEAN CENTRAL
BANK WEIGHS RATES

Economic growth shows
little sign of abating as the
European Central Bank
meets Thursday for the first
time this year on whether to
adjust a key interest rate for
the 13 nations that use the
euro.

While fears of a U.S.
slowdown are on the rise,
ECB President Jean-Claude
Trichet has appeared confi-
dent that the euro zone will
weather any related rough
patch.

Instead, he is likely to set
the stage Thursday for a rate
increase in February or
March from the current3.5 _ ._
percent. Analysts are confi-
dent that another hike is
coming.

4pm 635 pm. Late
stock Thr, ose ese” Chg, vohume



4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Thr. de close Chg. volume
AT&T Inc = T 33.94 33.94 % 108918
Nasd100T QQQQ 44.10 44.10 : 78466
SPDR SPY 141.07 141.08 +.01 53686
GnMotr GM 30.77 30.45 -.32 50937
GM db33_ GPM 22.96 22.96 $ 40000
CitzComm = CZN 14.07 14.08 +01 32224
FidINFin FNF 23,52 23.53 +01 = 23431
Recksn RA 45.69 45.70 +01 16490
CMSEng CMS 16.30 16.30 = 15881
ISRIKG nya IWF 55.43 55.46 +03 14700
Indymac = NDE = 43.77 43.78 = +.01— 12281

igrp c ;
iSRus1K nya [WB 76.46 0 -.14

Expedia wt2 EXPEZ 10.21 1021. ° 10508
BkofAm BAC 5350 5350 * 10413
Gibraltar ROCK 2392 2400 +08 10381
WellsFgos WFC 35.59 3559 * 10342
Medimun MEDI 34.83 = 34.83 10147
CaremkRx CMX 55.55 55.52 -.03 10101
iSR2KV nya IWN 79.01 - 78.49 -52 10002
TechOlyUS TOA 9.25 9.25 10000
Expedia EXPE 21.42 21.42 * 9375
Intel INTC =—-21.03 21.03 * 8979
Timewarm TWX = 22.25 22.25 * 8803
Ameren AEE 53.34 53.35 +01 = 8564



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business


}

THE TRIBUNE





@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GINN Development Company
has signed contracts worth “in
excess of $50 million” with Bahami-
an contractors to work on site clear-
ing and other projects, a senior
executive said yesterday, expressing
“fears” about where the $4.9 bil-
lion development would find all its
workers from.

John Davies, Ginn’s vice-presi-
dent for its southeastern region,
told the Bahamas Business Out-
look Conference that the company
would employ several thousand
people “at the high point of con-
struction” on its project, which is
modelled after the former French
royal palace at Versailles.

“The fear we have is that we
have almost exhausted the local
community [for employees] at this
time,” Mr Davies said.

“Our fear is: Where are the
workers going to come from?
Where are they going to stay? West
End is a very small community, with
an estimated 2,000 people living
there. Many workers are coming
from other areas, so we have to
house and feed them.”

When Ginn sur mer was com-
pleted, Mr Davies said permanent
housing would be needed for full-
time staff. :

“This, in my mind, will create the
need for another small town in

Ginn gives $50m in contracts to Bahamians

West End,” he added.

When 70 per cent of all Ginn sur
mer’s 5,000 condos and 1850 single
family homes were occupied, and
a full complement of staff was
working, Mr Davies estimated that
an extra 16,000 people would be in
the West End area. He added that
apart from creating employment
opportunities, the presence of Ginn
would generate “tremendous
opportunities” for Bahamian entre-
preneurs and business spin-offs.

Mr Davies confirmed that Ginn
had taken over operations at the
Old Bahama Bay resort last week,
having come to an agreement with
its US-based owners to take over

the management and “eventually.

become the owners”.

All 175 staff at Old Bahama Bay
have been retained, Mr Davies
added, explaining that they were to
become the first full-time, opera-
tional staff at Ginn sur mer.

“There will be some changes at
the resort, and some improvements
made that had not taken place pre-
viously because of a lack of capi-
tal,” Mr Davies said. “That will take
place over the next two to three
months.” He added that Ginn had
spent almost $6 million so far in
clearing the 2,000 acre site, which
contained hurricane debris and the
remains of the old Jack Tar Resort.

Mr Davies said the company was
“almost at the point of completing
that exercise”, and about to start



building the pads for the first of the
residential units.

This process, he added, would go
on for two to three years, and some
120 pieces of earth moving equip-
ment, including 100-ton dump
trucks and some of the heaviest
construction equipment imported
to the Bahamas were now on-site.

Some 150 people were presently
employed on the Ginn site, with all
equipment operated by Bahamians.
Mr Davies said more workers with
new skill sets would be required
later this year, as Ginn started to
install roads and utilities, and begin
vertical construction on the mixed-
use resort’s properties.

Apart from the residential com-
ponent, Ginn sur mer will include a
casino, two marinas with Blue Flag
status, two golf courses designed
by Jack Nicklaus and Arnold
Palmer with training schools and
driving ranges, a private airport,
retail, restaurant and meeting space,
multiple spas and a water theme
park.

The main part of the resort, Mr
Davies said, would be 25 storeys
high, and the entire site be con-
nected by a system of canals and
water taxis.

Ginn, he added, would invest
some. $18-$19 million in the West
End community through its foun-
dation, improve the community and
its water supply, and build a reverse
osmosis plant.



_ BUSINESS CENTER

PM UNEMPLOYMENT, from page 1B

The unemployment rate is expected to further
decline once certain tourism projects come on line in
2007,” he said.

The Prime Minister Christie noted that employers
were now resorting to major display advertisements
in the newspapers.

He suggested that as the economy improves, it
may be difficult for employers to find enough
employees, not because none are qualified, but
because so many persons will already be employed.

The Prime Minister said one effect of such a
strong and employed society will be an increase in
the demand for foreign exchange.

“In other words, in our economy — which imports
more than 80 per cent of what we consume —
increased employment and increased housing often
leads to an increase in demand for automobiles,
durable goods; more travel and ultimately, more
credit for both capital and consumer goods,” Mr
Christie said. -

“Accordingly, total credit in 2006 grew by 11.8 per
cent versus 9.1 per cent a year agg. During the same
period, the value of oil imports increased by 50 per
cent to $353 million, reflecting the escalation in the
per barrel price of oil from $45.63 at the beginning
of the year to $74.27 at year end.”

Mr Christie added that the liquidity decline and
fall in the external reserves demonstrated that it
was important that there be thoughtful and prudent
management of the Bahamian economy over the
next few years.

’ The Prime Minister noted that 2006 was a banner

year for the country, and predicted that 2007 will
continue that trend.

“The recent IMF Mission projected that growth
will continue to accelerate, reaching 6.5 per cent
for the fiscal year 2006-07 and 6.7 per cent for 2007-
08,” said Mr Christie.

The projected volume of inward investment is at
least $8 billion over the next few years, he added.

“In relation to the size of the economy, this is a
scale of inward investment without parallel any-
where in the world. The volume of investment is well
in excess of the 2005 GDP of the Bahamas of $5.9
billion,” Mr Christie said.

He added that more than 430 foreign investment
projects were submitted to the Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments in the past four years, and
of the total number, 53 projects with a total com-
bined value of $13.6 billion were in construction.

Mr Christie said the Government had agreed to
establish a National Training Agency, and solar-
energised lighting for airports in the Berry Islands,
Bimini and Sandy Point would be installed in the
coming weeks, leaving no government airport with-
out emergency lighting.

Mr Christie added: “The fiscal position continued
to strengthen in 2006, as total recurrent expenditure
stood at $1.228 billion and expenditure for the last six
months of 2006 remained consistently below the
forecast for the period.

“Revenue for 2006 stood at $1.189 billion, which
was $59.5 million above forecast, and $152 million
above 2005.”” ras , abeoe ae dere Bey seein

a
C”"ABLE BAHAMAS
VACANCY

APPLICATION DEVELOPER

Are you a developer looking for a great opportunity to
work in a fast paced environment on the leading edge of
technology? We have an immediate need for web

application developers

familiar

with the latest

development tools, such as Lasso, SOAP, Perl and XML.

If you feel you have the skills required to meet these
requirements, and you are a young energetic individual
who is a team player with the creativity and initiative,
then we have a great opportunity for you.

Requirements:

Bachelors Degree in any area of application
development specialization
3-5 years experience in application development,

design and deployment

Experienced with programming including: C++,
Java, LDML, ASP, Microsoft Visual Studio, Lasso
Demonstrable knowledge and understanding of

SQL and PL/SQL

Experienced with scripting HTML, JAVA and Visual

Basic

Familiarity with TOMCAT and Apache
Demonstrable experience with cross-browser and
cross-platform compatibility issues

Demonstrable troubleshooting/research ability
Strong computer skills (Windows/MacOS/ Unix)
Experienced with text editors to be used writing

source code

Familiar with Object Oriented Analysis, Design and
Development fundamentals

Strong desire to fill a niche within the team
Excellent written and oral communication skills

Interested candidates should submit detailed
resumes to rbadderley@cablebahamas.com
by January 15, 2007.



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 5B

WANTED

Store Manager &
Sales Associates



» COMPUTER
. TRAINING

Small Retail Store Specializing in girls accessories is |
secking a dynamic, energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager with prior retail managerial experience
to handle all aspects of store operations.

[] Office Professional

[] Computer Fundamental
[] PC Repair

[] Word

[] Excel

[] Access

{] PowerPoint

[] Publisher

[] And more ....

-BIZJET

Only persons 30 years and older need apply.
Vacancy, also exists for sales associates.
Please send resumes by e-mail to
ecooke @ coralwave.com

Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

Phone:394-7019

| PHONE: (242) 356-5760

NOTICE

FREEPORT CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED (BISX:FCC) hereby
gives notice that it has applied to the Bahamas International Securities
Exchange(BISX) foran extension to 12th January, 2007 to file its audited financial
results for the year ended 3 1st August, 2006 and has been granted such extension.

The extension was requested as the Company is projecting a loss of
approximately $2 million for the year ended 3 1stAugust, 2006 asa result of which
the Company’s auditors, KPMG, have undertaken further audit procedures, and
the company has had to meet additional financial statement disclosure
requirements.

Preliminary results indicate that the company’s gross profit was
seriously impacted in the 4th quarter primarily as a result of the delayed
opening of the Home Centre Superstore on Atlantic Drive in Freeport, the
significant costs associated with the transitioning of the Company’s stores
and reduction in inventory value due to obsolescence, damage and shrinkage.

The Company shall publish its audited financial results for the
year ended 3lst August, 2006 on or before 12th January, 2007.



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager
Bahamas

Qualifications:

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).
Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.
Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives. ,
Sound experience in global capital markets

Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development
processes.

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual
stock picks .

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@ FirstCaribbeanBank.com
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) |

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
' (No.45 of 2000)

AIRLEASE FOUR LIMITED AIRLEASE SEVEN LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in, accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE SEVEN LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 29th day of December, 2006

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, the Dissolution of AURLEASE FOUR LIMITED

| has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution ‘was
the 29th day of December, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

fore :

Pricing Information As Of:

=) FIDELITY

QUO EON MORE OA
ee

KERRASSsw ESSN SN

Securit Dail Vol.

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank

Consolidated Water BDRs

; ohence:

No.45 of



THE TRIBUNE

HURRICANE, from page 1B

whether the Government and
the general public would have
the capacity to shoulder the bur-
den of such losses and rebuild.

The Bahamas First president
pointed out that access to quali-
ty, competitively priced reinsur-
ance was key for Bahamian
insurance carriérs, especially giv-
en the estimated $925 million in
losses for New Providence alone.
This compared to the $63 mil-
lion in combined equity that the
five Bahamian general insurance
carriers possessed at the end of
2005.

Bahamian general insurance
companies have to buy huge
quantities of reinsurance to
enable them to underwrite risk
and accept business, due to their
relatively thin capital bases.
Without reinsurance, they would
be unable to cover many losses.

Mr Ward also questioned
whether the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system was
robust enough to cope with the
influx of insurance and reinsur-
ance monies after a major storm,
plus the demand from the public
for loans to help fund rebuilding.

The Cayman Islands has suc-
cessfully used the post-Ivan
funds to finance new construc-
tion and rebuilding, and one
question Mr Ward suggested
should be asked was whether the
Central Bank was flexible
enough to allow for the inflows
and outflows of funds involving

the Bahamas.

Disaster preparedness, miti-
gation and management were
key, Mr Ward added, question-
ing whether mitigation plans
would encompass all the anchor
projects currently under con-
struction and include them in
disaster recovery efforts.

The Bahamas First president
also asked whether there were
gaps in existing legislation that
could hamper recovery efforts.
Hurricanes, he said, could elim-
inate people’s key assets, their
major store of wealth, revenue
streams and way of life.

Mr Ward said it was estimated
that some $12.5 billion worth of
personal and commercial prop-
erty risks were insured by

’ Bahamian insurers. These com-

panies also insured a further
$500 million in buildings under
construction; $400 million worth
of motor vehicles; and $150 mil-
lion in marine risks.

Some 70 per cent of all these
assets were located in New Prov-
idence, a further 20 per cent in
Grand Bahama, and another 10
per cent in the Family Islands.

Mr Ward said he estimated
the Bahamas First had 34 per
cent of the domestic insurance
market, followed by RoyalStar
Assurance at 27 per cent; Insur-

.ance Company of the Bahamas

at 17 per cent; Summit at 14 per
cent; and Security & General at
8 per cent.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXINE ORELIEN OF
PODOLEO ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of. the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of JANUARY,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco
FirstCaribbean . :
Focol “ ‘ 0.00 ‘ : ‘ ; for
Freeport Concrete : ; _ 0.00
ICD Utilities i : 0.00
a oc See : - ae

— ae ee

<= 25 Bahamas SETS
ee oe Oa idk aoe (Pref)

re Ban
RS

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARLENE SATINE OF
UNION VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-3331, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
PHONE # 326-4111 is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Sa une Non —
=~ Scae
2.6262
2.3220
Se oon

1 sear
2.9449**"
2.500211**

Colina Woe rarest Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

a eens Bond ee 1.207411"***
ae = La a“ oe etn .2596"**** os

in SHARE | MARKET TERMS

cae Hi - Highest ee a price in bei 52 ge”

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §.- Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



ey THN SRERAERES
YIELD ~ “last 12 Ponin dividen vided by

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



* - 29 December 2006
*-31 December 2006
* - 30 November 2006

ea - 30 November 2006



ee 2006
SEK

saages SOARS NESS SARA OES OS Ss

WEVA AAAI WBA GOW GENTS GIRS AAW) 8
O2 F010 (DELAY S42 S660 768 f ROR MOR ATA BINFORMANIC!



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILNER THERVIL OF
BACARDI ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54736, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

“Mother” Pra



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CHELSEA LOFT HOLDINGS
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, the Dissolution of CHELSEA LOFT HOLDINGS
(BAHAMAS). LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Register. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 29th day of December, 2006

Date and Starting Time: Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 6.30a.m.

Registration Fee: $5.00 Adults

Entry Deadline: January 12, 2007
For additional information, please contact Tel. 302-4525 or 302-4592

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUINATOR







Be acacia ape ea LEGALNOTICE

Date of Birth: . . NOTICE

Telephone Contact: _ = a eee ae ee. : ,

Walker[ ] Runner[ ] Male{ ] Female[ ] INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

Under-14[ ] Under20[{ ]. Under-30[ ] Under-40[ |] Under-50[ ] Underéo[ ] 60Plus[{ |

RUNNERS AIRLEASE THREE LIMITED

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge, Prospect Ridge to J.F. Kennedy Drive
to Gladstone Road junction, Gladstone Road junction back to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road,
Tucker Road to the back entrance of The College of The Bahamas

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45_ of
2000, the Dissolution of AIRLEASE THREE LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

WALKERS

Chapter One Bookstore Thompson Boulevard to J.F. Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge,
Prospect Ridge to J. Kennedy Drive to Thompson Boulevard to Tucker Road, Tucker Road to the back entrance of The
College of The Bahamas re

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 29th day of December, 2006






Race Committee will not be held responsible for injuries incurred.



Signature of Waiver:



ALRENA MOXBY
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007, PAGE 7B

Freeport Concrete to incur $2m loss NOTICE

FROM page 1B



NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA CHRISTINA BUCHANAN
or rere F-42915, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
A ’

is applying to the Minister responsible for

The publicly-quoted firm said
in a statement that its gross prof-
it “was seriously impacted in the

‘. fourth quarter” due to several

factors, including what it
described as the “delayed open-
ing” of its Home Centre Super-
store on Freeport’s Atlantic dri-
ve,

In a note signed by Gregory

*. Moss, Freeport Concrete’s com-

pany secretary and attorney for
both the firm and Mr Bababk,
the loss was also blamed on “the
significant costs associated with
the transitioning of the compa-
ny’s stores, and reduction in
inventory value due to obsoles-
cence, damage and shrinkage”.

Freeport Concrete added that
its auditors, KMPG, had under-
taken “further audit proce-
dures”, although these were not
detailed. The firm said it had to
meet “additional disclosure
requirements”, and had applied
to BISX for an extension until
January 12, 2007, to publish its
fiscal 2006 year- -end accounts.

This means the company’s
financial are likely to be signed
off by the end of this week, but
the announcement caught both
the market and analysts by sur-
prise.

One source told The Tribune

Bahamas urged to export ‘u

-/nology company, was “unique”
‘in terms of the information it
provided on the quality of visitor
experiences and tourist desires
and preferences.

The CTO secretary-general
said “there’s no equal on this
earth” in respect to the

he had projected that Freeport
Concrete would suffer a loss in
fiscal 2006, but that this would
have been less than half of what
the company estimated yester-
day, below $1 million.

One analyst added that having
sold its Nassau-based Robin
Hood retail operations back to
Sandy Schaefer and his group
last year, Freeport Concrete had
reverted to a firm solely reliant
on the Home Centre and its
Grand Bahama-based concrete
plant.

This meant that the company
was relying heavily on Grand

- Bahama’s economy, and partic-

ularly its construction industry,
to drive sales and profits. But
the Grand Bahama economy has
been moribund since the 2004
hurricane season and Royal
Oasis closure, and is now relying
heavily on the Ginn prcioct to
propel its growth upwards

One source said of Freeport
Concrete; “The prospects are
dismal.” This view appears to
be shared by many investors, the
company’s closing price on BISX
standing at $0.55 on Monday,
just above its 52-week low of
$0.50 and well below the $1,15
high, The price has nosedived
since the firm went public,

Mr Babak owns the largest

He added that the creation of
a “single economic space” on
February 1, 2007, through the
coming into effect of the
Caribbean single market - a step
involving 10 nations - would

stake in Freeport Concrete,
standing at some 43 per cent,
When contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, he said he had just
returned to Grand Bahama from
Europe, and was on his way toa
meeting with Freeport Con-
crete’s chief executive, Ray
Simpson, to learn more about
the situation.

‘He directed The Tribune to
Mr Simpson. Mr Simpson did
not return this newspaper’s call,
a receptionist advising The Tri-
bune that he was in a meeting
with KPMG auditors, and then
had a meeting with Freeport
Concrete’s bank.

The company has failed to
perform since it went public with
its 2001 initial public offering
(IPO), and at the end of fiscal
2005 had run up accumulated
losses of $3,385 million.

Thus fiscal 2006’s $2 million
loss, if yesterday’s estimate is
accurate, will reduce Freeport
Concrete’s net surplus - assets
over liabilities - to just $1.87 mil-
lion, giving the company little
financial flexibility.

Freeport Concrete has a con-
tributed surplus of $5.774 mil-
lion, which the fiscal 2006 loss
will just about wipe out by tak-
ing accumulated losses to just
over $5,5 million. The compa-

eliminate customs and immigra-
tion controls between those
states, This, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said, would aid the
movement of business ideas and
flows.

ny, though, enjoys a $1.433 mil-
lion appraisal excess, which is
the difference between the
appraised market value of its
real estate holdings and the cost
of these holdings, It owns some
126.75 acres, valued at over $1.5
million,

The gross profit that Freeport
Concrete said had been badly
impacted is its sales, net of dis-
counts, minus the costs of those
sales,

Freeport Concrete’s Home
Centre has already courted con-
troversy this year, filing a writ
with the Supreme Court seek-
ing an injunction to stop Cus-
toms charging about $800,000
worth of duties on all products
displayed on open shelves in its
new $6 million store,

The new Home Centre build-
ing on West Atlantic Drive was
built by H&F Babak Construc-
tion Company, a firm previously
owned by Mr Babak, tt was con-
structed with an 80,000 square-
foot retail showroom after the
former building it leased on Peel
Street was destroyed by Hurri-
cane Frances,

It was said to have exceeded
the company’s sales expectations
during the first three weeks fol-
lowing its soft September 7
opening.

nique’ tourism services

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR

Nationality and Citizenship,

| and Citizenship,



NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL FAR EAST HOLDINGS LTD, is in dissolution

under the provisions of the International Business Companies

Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
8th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

‘(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Janice K. Goodwin,
601 Jefferson, Houston, Texas 77002, U.S.A.

Dated the 9th day of January A.D., 2007.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company



for registrationmaturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of
JANAUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
P.O,Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

.. domestic product (GDP), the

. the Caribbean”. He added that

Bahamas’ immigration card, and
added that “selling these services
to other is also what should be
done”.

The Bahamas should, he
added, export tourism consul-
tancy services to other nations.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
that in terms of per capita gross

SENIOR ASSOCIATES
PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate,

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL FAR EAST HOLDINGS LID.

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 8th

Bahamas with its more than

$18,000 average “is the king of The positions offer-challenging work in the financial services industry and

others area of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high
performance, In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical i insurance
and provident fund benefits,

? és ‘ BSS

there was no evidence this was
likely to change in the short-
term.

The CTO secretary-general
urged the Bahamas, and
Bahamian businesses, to look
outside this nation for further
opportunities, as major growth
would never happen if they just
confined themselves to the local
economy.

Mr Vanderpool-Waliace
pointed our that before they
expanded abroad, US multina-
tionals practiced their trade at
- home.

February, 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator,

Dated the 9th day of January, A.D., 2007. Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to;

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

Janice K. Goodwin
Liquidator
601 Jefferson
Houston, Texas 77002, U.S.A.



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,



With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands and
the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial services
group offering a comprehensive range of insurance services, domestic
and international banking, estate planning, pension services and corporate
finaiice as well as other financial products and services, Fidelity is now
inviting applications for a:

is seeking candidates for the position of
GLOBAL FEE
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated
recovery management. The successful candidate will also be

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS COUNTRY MANAGER—
INSURANCE OPERATIONS

Reporting directly to the VP & Regional Marketing Manager, the
successful candidate will have the following minimum requirements:-

e Business related Bachelor's Degree Qualification responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
¢ Professional Insurance Qualification, ie, FCM, ACI or cPcuU~ saaAneReE nee ue all fee agreements ig well as
« Ten years relevant insurance experience
e Proven track record in new business development poe EONS eRPRH eas ag ne ane imaging -
* Self motivated in addition to being an excellent team leader OTS PPOnRN SS:
° Excellent organizational and analytical skills ss
® Strong computer literacy in Microsoft Word, Excel & KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

Powerpoint ‘ ‘ ‘ . ’ i i
e Ability to relocate and reside in the Turks & Caicos Islands Ape ideal candicale with @ Bachelor a Deghee in ACcOuAUDS,

Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three

e Ability to prepare & deliver high level presentations : ‘ Gee us
’ r & F (3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution,

e Knowledge of the local insurance market would be an advantage

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution, |
communication, organization and pc skills, The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

The successful applicant will manage Fidelity's Turks & Caicos
Insurance operations and will focus on new business development as well
as inaintaining & developing existing client & carrier relationships across
a broad range of products & services,

An attractive compensation package that includes a large performance
related component, plus a comprehensive range of employee benefits and

oa Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
relocation allowance is being offered.

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O, Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR

Email: betty.roberts@citigroup.com .

The deadline for applications is January 31st 2007, —

TCI Country Manager——Insurance Operations
SteppingStones Recruitment
P.O. Box 10091
Grand Cayman KY1-1001
Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836

ae Deadline for application is Friday, January 19, 2007.
Email jobs@steppingstonescaymar 1L.com


8B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007.

GLOBAL TRADE

Canada
files WTO
complaint

BY BRADLEY S. KLAPPER
Associated Press

GENEVA — Canada has
lodged a complaint against
the United States over what
it claims are illegal govern-
ment handouts to American
corn growers, and it is chal-
lenging whether the billions
of dollars in overall farm
subsidies paid out by the
U.S. government comply
with international com-
merce rules, officials said
Tuesday.

The request for consulta-
tions, filed Monday by
Ottawa at the Geneva-based
World Trade Organization,
could open a new trade dis-
pute between the North
American neighbors, which
only recently resolved a
long and at times bitter con-
frontation over softwood
lumber.

Under WTO rules, a |

three-month consultation
period is required before a
country can ask the trade
body to launch a formal
investigation. A WTO case
can result in punitive sanc-
’ tions being authorized, but
. panels take many months,
and sometimes years, to
reach a decision.

“The United States has

been providing subsidies to |

its agricultural producers
that create unfair market
advantages,” Trade Minister
David Emerson said,

Gretchen Hamel, a
spokeswoman for U.S.
Trade Representative Susan
Schwab, said officials in
Washington were still
studying Canada’s request
in detail and could not com-
ment on the claim that its
overall farm subsidy levels
constituted an infringement
of WTO rules.

Canada argues that the
United States has exceeded
the permitted level of trade-
distorting subsidies for
years on farm products
including wheat, sugar and
soybeans. It urged Washing-
ton to address its concerns
when it soon begins to draft



anew Farm Bill.

BRITAIN

EUROPE

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS





Russia maintains stance

in Belarusian oil dispute

Mi Russia believes Belarus
will cave in to its demands
when the the small nation
runs out of oil reserves in
about a week.

BY HENRY MEYER
Associated Press

MOSCOW — Russia dug in
its heels Tuesday over a two-
day-old pipeline transit dis-
pute with Belarus that has
interrupted Russian oil ship-
ments to Germany and much

| of Eastern Europe as well as

the former Soviet republic,
amid mounting European
Union criticism of the disrup-
tion,

The second Russian-related
energy stoppage to affect the
EU in 12 months has intensi-
fied European concerns about
reliance on Russian oil and
gas,

But. President Vladimir
Putin's calculation appears to
be that Belarus’ authoritarian

leader Alexander Lukashenko -

will have to climb down in a
matter of days when his coun-
try runs out of oil reserves,
analysts said,

Putin on Tuesday ordered
his Cabinet to consider a pos-
sible reduction in oil output —
an indication the standoff
could drag on, Russia has a
limited capacity for refining
oil and would have to cut
crude output if its exports
decrease suddenly,

Once close allies, the two
former Soviet nations’ rela-
tions have grown increasingly
tense amid impatience in Mos-
cow at subsidizing the econ-
omy of Belarus’ isolated
regime through cheap energy.

The ongoing spat was
sparked by a Russian decision
late last year-to impose duties
on oil exports to Belarus, Last
week, Minsk said it would slap
duties on Russian oil pumped
across Belarus to Europe as
Lukashenko lashed out at what
he called the Kremlin’s
“shameless” conduct.

On Monday, Russia
stopped pumping oil to

- Europe via the Druzhba, or



NATALIA KOLESNIKOVA/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

ENERGY AND ECONOMICS: Russian President Viadimir Putin
no longer wants to subsidize the economies of former
Soviet republics, like Belarus, with cheap energy.

Friendship, pipeline that
crosses Belarus, accusing its
neighbor of siphoning off oil,
and by Tuesday, the stoppage
had pinched supplies to
Ukraine, Germany, Poland,
Hungary, the Czech Republic
and Slovakia,

RATTLED MARKETS

The dispute also rattled
Russian equity markets, with
the dollar-dominated bench-
mark RTS index dropping 6.4
percent Tuesday, OAO Lukoil,
one of Russia’s largest oil pro-
ducers, was hit hard with
shares dropping 9 percent.

As a delegation led by Bela-
rusian Vice Premier Andrei
Kobyakov flew to Moscow on
Tuesday for talks, Deputy For-
eign Minister Andrei
Yevdochenko accused Russia
of making unreasonable
demands,

“Everything should be
placed on the negotiation table
without any preliminary con-
ditions or preliminary
demands. We are ready for

dialogue,” Yevdochenko told a
news conference at the Bela-
rusian Embassy.

Russian officials say talks
could resume only if Belarus
annuls the oil transit fee.

“These are our uncondi-
tional demands, and we will
not enter into talks until these
conditions are satisfied,”
Trade and Economics Minis-
ter German Gref said after
meeting with Kobyakov,

Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Viktor Khristenko. said
state-controlled pipeline oper-
ator OAO Transneft had filed
a lawsuit against its Belarusian
partner,

Khristenko also said Russia
could cope with the shutdown
in the medium term, but noted
that other pipelines were filled
to capacity and that Russia
could try to compensate for
the shortfall only by shipping
more oil by railways and river
transport,

“If these measures aren’t
enough, it could be necessary
to reduce oil output,” he told a

news conference,

Russia would also try to
expand its pipeline network in
the northwest and the Baltics
from 75 million tons annually
to 110 million tons over the
next two to three years, he
said, And officials would try to
speed up construction of new
pipelines in Eastern Siberia
and under the Baltic Sea —
outlets that would give Rus-
sian oil exports more access to
foreign markets.

BELARUS’ WEAKNESS

Belarusian experts say the
country has at most enough oil
reserves to last a week,
although the government
refuses to disclose such statis-
tics, The country’s inefficient,
Soviet-style, state-dominated
economy depends heavily on
subsidized Russian energy.

“Belarus’ reserves of cheap
oil will last.a few days, a week
at most. After that it will have
to buy oil [at a high price] tak-
ing into account Russian
export duties,” said indepen-
dent economist Yaroslav
Romanchuk,

The disruption of Russian
oil to Europe came a year after
a price dispute with Ukraine
led to a natural gas cutoff for
Kiev and brief shortages of
Russian gas pumped to several
EU nations, The incident
alarmed European officials
and led to calls for energy
diversification, Russia cur-
rently supplies a quarter of the
EU’s oil and over two-fifths of
its natural gas.

In unusually harsh lan-
guage, EU Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso and
German Chancellor Angela
Merkel said Tuesday that it
was “not acceptable” for
energy transit or supplier
countries to halt deliveries
without consultation.

Merkel also said that Ger-
many must find ways to cut its
dependence on a single source
of oil and gas, from conserva-
tion to renewable energy and
must take a fresh look at
nuclear power.

EU rules threaten U.K. boatmen

B Anew EU licensing
system threatens to
undermine centuries-old
traditional aprenticeships
among boatman on the
Thames River.

BY SUE LEEMAN
Associated Press

LONDON — Since the 16th
century, when they ferried
King Henry VIII between his
riverside palaces, Thames
boatmen have plied the
waters, fathers passing
detailed knowledge of the
river to their sons,

Now a new licensing sys-
tem designed by the European
Union threatens to mee





A kesidentia/Sale_|
Mh) Residential/Sale
Multi-Property

AUCTION



















+3 Commercial Properties

Located in Fort Myers, Cape Coral,
Lehigh Acres, Estero, Punta Gorda
St, James City & Alva

Purchase Southwest
Florida Real Estate
at Auction Prices

Two Day Auction:
11am Friday, January 19
llam Saturday, January 20
} 7pm Saturday, January 20

Call for Complete information

Opp

Cnt. Ch



800-257-4161

www.Higgenbotham.com
ME. Higgenbotham, CAI, FL Lict AU305/AB158

ea tt) a1 5

For adve rtising information please reweranevi i

Residential
Real Estate/Rent

i ’ Central

120+Prime roperties| [3 _ Arts‘Concosy | [SAiMidneeaanemiann
ve lownhouses/Rent

51 Homes » 66 Residential Lots WESTCHESTER

995
a4 $880, 2/1 $104
Exc. Ubicacion
305.229.8180 0 al
305.229.9897

Finance



° siness/
4 invartinent
ortunities

Learning Center
Rroftanle, Learnin

HIGGENBOTHAM sale. / ie, for 122 Kido.
UCTIONEERS Gall Sonia Alfaro

INTERNATIONAL, LTD., INC.
“A Licensed Real Estate Broker pera) ran ea Maas

THINK GLOBAL

away centuries of tradition
and, the boatmen say, under-
mine safety.

The system abolishes
apprenticeships — completed
by generations of London
boatmen — which last as long
as seven years, In its place

comes a license that can be.

obtained in less than half the
time.

“After all these centuries,
the government has changed a
perfectly good system without
asking us,” said Gary Hancock,
as he maneuvered his 400-seat
Thames riverboat Sarpedon

under an arch of Charing

Cross Bridge. “We are very
iain

crussell@herald.com

° ‘ siness/
si nvasim nt
hal == Opportunities

Learnin Center
apert
ae ppariuntt ty.
garnin
WE Kids, Ow Io. tor

Binie




onl sins
786- 348-




d Care fo





ALASTAIR GRANT/AP

THREATENED: Gary Hancock, skipper of the Sarpedon, has plied the Thames for 30
years, the sixth generation of his family to work the river since the 1700s.

'A burly, avuncular figure
who knows every bend and
bridge on the river, Hancock,
44, has plied the Thames for
30 years, the sixth generation
of his family to work the river
since the 1700s, His 16-year-
old son, James, will soon fol-
low him — but the pair fear for
the future of their dynasty.

“Now you're going to get
boatmen from other countries
coming in and undercutting us
— it’s just not right,” said Han-
cock, who regales tourists
with anecdotes about Queen
Elizabeth I and architect
Christopher Wren,

The German, Belgian and
Dutch governments have
negotiated opt-outs from the
new system for their boatmen,
and the Company of Water-
men and Lightermen had
hoped the British government
would do the same.

But the government says
the new regime will harmo-

nize rules nationwide and pro-
vide additional safeguards,
including a practical assess-
ment for applicants and a reas-
sessment of local knowledge
every five years.

“It is a quality training
regime for the 2lst century —
for the first time there will be
a nationally recognized quali-
fication,” said Martin Garside
of the Port of London Author-
ity, which handles more than
50 million tons of oil, coal,
cereals and other freight each
year, mainly at deeper ports
like Tilbury near the river
mouth,

He conceded that boatmen
from continental Europe
would be able to work in Brit-
ain — but pointed out that
British boatmen would be able
to work over there, too. “So it
actually improves their pros-
pects.”

Opponents of the system
hope lawmakers will scrap it

after a parliamentary debate
today, But the governing
Labour Party, which supports
the measures, is likely to keep
them in place — ending the
tradition.

In the 16th century, kings
like Henry traveled every-
where on the water when they
were in London, commuting
between riverside royal resi-
dences like Hampton Court
and Windsor Castle,

But drunken boatmen
tended to get out of hand and
in 1555, Parliament established
the Company of Watermen
and Lightermen to regulate
the industry.

Colin Middlemiss, clerk to
the Company of Watermen
and Lightermen, says the
industry is thriving, with 640
licensed watermen, who ferry
passengers, and lightermen,
who captain freight vessels,
Some 120 apprentices were
taken on last year,





_...MiamiHerald.com. | THE MIAMI HERALD



@ BRAZIL

JUDGE LIFTS BAN
ON YOUTUBE, VIDEO

A judge reversed course
Tuesday and lifted his order
banning YouTube from
being viewed in Brazil
because of a sexy video of
supermodel Daniela Cicar-
elli that circulated widely on
the video sharing site.

Telecommunications
companies and Internet pro-
viders had blocked You-
Tube in much of Brazil in
recent days, saying they
were unable to simply pro-
hibit Internet users from
viewing the video of Cicar-
elli and her boyfriend.

The order for its removal
was issued after they sued
and won a ruling that the
clips of it on YouTube vio-
lated their right to privacy.

But the video became
even more popular after
announcement of the Brazil
YouTube ban made head-
lines worldwide and users in
Brazil and beyond posted it
to other websites,

PETROBRAS TO KEEP
VENEZUELAN PLANS

The president of Brazil’s
state-owned oil company,
Petréleo Brasileiro, or su
Petrobras, said Tuesday that
Venezuela’s plans to nation-
alize key industries, includ-
ing the energy sector, will
not affect the company’s
plans to invest in that coun-

On Monday, Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez
announced plans to nation-
alize power and telecom
companies and said oil pro-
jects in the Orinoco River
basin involving foreign oil
companies should also come
under national ownership.

e COLOMBIA

ISA BOOSTS STAKE
IN BRAZILIAN UTILITY

Colombia’s state-owned
electricity grid Interconex-
ion Electrica SA said Tues-
day it paid $352 million to
raise its stake in Brazilian
electric power transmission
company Companhia de
Transmissao de Energia Ele-
trica Paulista.

For it’s 39 percent stake,
ISA paid $14.29 for each lot
of 1,000 common shares
held by minority sharehold-
ers — sligh'
$14.15 offered when its take-
over bid was launched Dec.
4, the company said in a fil-
ing to Colombia’s securities
regulator.

The acquisition, which
was carried out in a public
tender offer on the Sao
Paulo stock exchange, raises
ISA’s stake in Transmissao
Paulista to 89 percent.

e CARIBBEAN

SUN AIRLINE
SHUT DOWN

Caribbean Sun Airlines
will close at the end of this
month and lay off workers at
its San Juan hub as a sister
carrier takes over some of
its routes, the president of
both airlines said Tuesday,

Caribbean Sun was cre-
ated because the U.S, Fed-
eral Aviation Administra-
tion did not authorize
airlines from Antigua, where
Caribbean Star is based, to
fly to U.S, territories includ-
ing Puerto Rico, President
and CEO Skip Barnette said,

The FAA upgraded Anti-
gua’s air regulatory commis-
sion last year, allowing
Caribbean Star to take on
service to those islands,

e JAPAN

UPGRADE TO ALLOW
FASTER VIDEO VIEWING

Japan’s largest mobile
phone carrier will upgrade
its wireless network to make
its data transmission hun-
dreds of times faster,
enabling subscribers to
watch high-quality video
just as they can over fiber-
optic cables,

NTT DoCoMo will begin
testing the technology this
year and could have the sys-
tem deployed by 2010.
DoCoMo spokesman Nobuo
Hori would not discuss
costs, but the Nikkei news-
paper reported that spend-
ing on the project could
reach $17 billion.

tly more than the es
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

SPORTS|
NBRIEF

@ TENNIS

KNOWLES/NESTOR
ADVANCE

Mark Knowles and doubles
partner Daniel Nestor
advanced to the second round
of play in the Medibank Inter-
national yesterday.

The number two seeds need-
ed three sets to defeat Frank-
tisek Cermak and Jaroslav
Levinsky of the Czech Repub-
lic, 6-7; 3-6 and 10-6.

Now in the quarter finals, the
team will square off with Paul
Goldstein and Jim Thomas
today.

Last year Knowles and
Nestor were finalists in the
tournament behind Mike and
Bob Bryan.

@ BASKETBALL

GIANTS STAY
UNDEFEATED

The St Johns College
(Giants) winning streak con-
tinued on Monday afternoon.

The team destroyed the St
Andrews Hurricanes, 55-6.

Top scorer in the game was
Ricardo Moultrie with 21
points, 13 rebounds and five
steals, chipping in was Denzel
Barr with 16 points, seven
rebounds and four steals.

@ COLLEGE
BASKETBALL

BAHAMIANS IN
ACTION

Magnum Rolle continues to
make his presence felt in the
LSU Tigers camp. .

Rolle, coming off an excep-
tional game on Sunday, was
scheduled to play again last
night against Alabama. Results
from this game will be posted in
tomorrow’s edition.

Jeremy Barr will be in action
on the weekend for the USC
Trojans, his team will take on
UCLA.

@ SWIMMING
BARRACUDA’S MEET

The Barracuda Swim Club
is hosting the first meet of 2007

on Friday 12th and Saturday

13th of January at the Betty
Kelly Kenning National Aquat-
ic Complex.

This is the 23rd annual swim
meet sponsored by Insurance
Management (Bahamas) Ltd.
On Friday the meet starts at
6:00 p.m. and the events to be
swam will be the 200 Individual
Medley, 200 Backstroke, 200
Breaststroke and 200 Butter-
fly.

On Saturday morning the
meet will resume at 8:30 a.m.
with the 400 Individual Med-
ley, 50 Freestyle, 50 Butterfly,
200 Freestyle, 50 Breaststroke
and 50 Backstroke.

All the swim clubs in the
Bahamas have been invited to
attend. Notably, a contingent
from Freeport will be here for
the two-day meet. It is an
opportunity for swimmers to
make qualifying times for
Carifta which will be held in
Jamaica over the Easter week-
end.

The general public is encour-
aged to attend. Admission is
$2.00 per person for each ses-
sion. All supporters will be wel-
come.

& SQUASH

CORRECTION

Barbara Albury is not the
new owner of the Bahamas
Squash Club, Village Road, as
reported on Tuesday. She’s the
new manager. The Tribune
apologises for the error.

@ FOOTBALL

CORRECTION

Ian ‘Big Bahama’ Symonette
is a defensive linesman with the
University of Miami Hurri-
canes and the not the Univer-
sity of Florida, as reported in
The Tribune on Monday. The
Tribune apologises for the
error.

Ministry hosts
Florida team for
slowpitch game

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

VETERAN softball players got an
opportunity to play a new version of
a game they mastered for years.

The Ministry of Tourism’s Sports
Division, in conjunction with the
Masters Softball League, hosted a
visiting team of players from Orlan-
do, Florida.

After playing among themselves
in Grand Bahama on Monday, the
players came to town yesterday
where they mixed and mingled with
members of the MSL yesterday at

_ the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

They played in two games, but
while the scores didn’t really matter
(as proper statistics were not kept), it

was the way they played the game

that drew all of the attention.

MSL’s president Anthony ‘Boots’
Weech said they enjoyed participat-
ing with the visitors and it was a
learning experience at the same time.

“It’s a grand time,” Weech
stressed. “We’ve been working on
getting something like this organ-
ised. We’ve spoken with persons
from Port St. Lucie with the view of
them coming here.

“As we progress, we intend to get
some more things like this organ-
ised.”

Rather than playing the modified
pitch that they play in their league
during the regular season, Weech
and about six other members of the
MSL played a new version of slow-
pitch.

In order to speed up the game and
to avoid any serious injuries at the
plate, two lines were drawn slightly
away from home plate. Instead of
touching the bag, the players ran
towards the line.

Runs

On the offensive side, once a team
scored five consecutive runs, their
turn at bat ended. When a home run
was hit, the player only had to touch
first base. And a pinch runner was
allowed to run for the batter from
home plate, instead of waiting until

’ they got on base.

“It was quite interesting,” Weech
reflected. “In fact, it was injury-free.
You don’t have to run home and get
tagged, you have your own individual
plate and run towards the line when
you scored. It protected you. That
mean that we could go longer.”

Weech said they will definitely
look at the new rules and see ‘how
they can apply them to their league
play, in an attempt to “save our legs
so that we could play longer.”

Among some of the other local
players who participated were Adlia
‘Mossah’ Moss, Anthony Johnson,
Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven, Bertie Murray
Jr and Alfred ‘Skater’ Munnings.

Shelby Simmons is responsible for
bringing the players to the Bahamas
on the Carnival Cruise Line. The
majority of the players are retirees,
who play in senior leagues in the
Orlando area. They range in age
from 55 to 79-years-old.

“Most of us play in the day leagues
in Orlando and what we call the Half
Century League where you have to
be 50 years and older to play,” he
noted.

“You play in your groups of 55s,
60s, 65s, 70s and over. We play one
tournament a month, but most of us
play at least five days a week, some
of us play seven days. We just play to
stay healthy. Naturally the competi-
tion comes.”

Simmons said now they have made



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS





RR EE i

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE





i WILBUR BRUCE, a 79-year-old player from Orlando, Fidrida, demonstrates his power as he cracks a home run
in the slowpitch game yesterday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

contact with Weech, they intend to
come back in the future with their
team to take on an All-Star team
from the MSL.

Those present got a great treat as
Wilbur Bruce, the oldest player play-
ing, showed his versatility and speed,
running down a couple fly balls and
cracking a three-run home run.

“T love to hit the ball,” said Bruce,
was has been playing since he was
six-years-old at basketball, fast-pitch

and slowpitch in softball, as well as
football. “It was like old time.”

Bruce, 79, played on the 80-year-
old team from Clearmount, Florida
in October that won the World Mas-
ters Championship title for their age
group.

Bruce, who proclaimed that he was
a speedster in his youth — running
the 100 metres, knocked in the
game’s winning run for his 80-year-
old team.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Retired Golden Girl Eldece Clarke
said it was fun being around the “old
timers” because she didn’t realise
that they could have as much fun as
they did playing the game.

“Tt was.fun,” said Clarke, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s Sports Tourism
manager for the ‘Nassau and South-
ern Bahamas. “This is something that
our minister (Obie Wilchcombe)

‘wants to develop. So hopefully we

will have more of this in the future.”
PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS



Anica ioe

ew role for Golden

’

ece Clarke




Sailors
prepare for
the ‘biggest
regatta’

@ SAILING
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports

Reporter

THE sailing community
is making last minute
preparations for what
they are calling the
‘biggest regatta to hit the



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



SINCE retiring from active
competition, Golden Girl
Eldece Clarke has now set-
tled down into her new

capital.’

Although the season career. — ;
doesn’t officially open A year ago, she switched
until January 27th, with over from the Ministry of
races being held the day Youth, Sports and Housing

where she served as a Sports
Officer to the Ministry of
Tourism where she’s now the
Sports Tourism Manager for
Nassau. and Southern
Bahamas.

Her role is to assist the var-
ious sporting associations in
promoting the Bahamas as a

before in the C-Class, the
excitement is building
and, according to Phillip
McPhee, consultant to
Ministry of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer
Affairs, all parties
involved are ready to start
the new sailing season

with a bang. sports destination, not just for
The annual New Years track and field and basketball,
Day regatta will be held but for all of the sports that

we participate in.
“Hopefully, the spin off

from this would be that every-

body, including the straw ven-

at Montagu Beach and
will set the tone for the ;
jam-packed sailing sea- iy

son.

McPhee, who also dors, taxi drivers and hotels
heads the Thunderbird, and restaurants can all bene-
said that this New Year’s fit,” she proclaimed.

Day Regatta should not At the same time, Clarke

said her goal is to also ensure
that when the visitors come
to our shores, they get the
opportunity to participate in
sporting activities with the
local teams and athletes.
Her first venture this year
was over the past two days
when a team of retired players
from Orlando, Florida played
in a series of softball games

be missed by anyone, and
encourages Bahamians
from all areas to come
and witness three days of
stiff competition.

According to McPhee,
this year’s regatta com-
mittee has already
received responses from
top sailors, who have

® MEMBERS of the 4x100-meter relay team from the Bahamas
(including Eldece Clarke on the right) hold up the their gold
medals during the medal cermony at the Summer Olympics, Sat-
urday, Sept. 30, 2000, at Olympic Stadium in Sydney.

(AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau)

Games in Sydney, Australia. can have another great year.”

reassured him that they
will bring down their
fastest boats and best
sailors so they can take
home the crown: .

The season will start off
with races in the C class
on January 26th, followed
by the drawings for the A
and B classes. Races will
start at 12 noon on this
day. ‘

On Saturday, sailors
will hit the water at 9am
with the official opening
taking place at 2pm. Offi-
cially declaring the season
open will be Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie.

McPhee said: “This

in Grand Bahama and New
Providence.

‘For Clarke, her interna-

tional experience as a track
athlete is paying off big divi-
dends in her new career.

“Tt has given me an oppor-

tunity to draw back on my
experience,” she reflected. “I
can better relate to what the

-athletes-are-looking for when
they come here.”

Clarke: was a member of the

Bahwiias'women’s 4 x 100
metre relay team

that

clinched the gold medal at the
1999 IAAF World Champi-
onships in Seville, Spain
before they duplicated the
feat at the 2000 Olympic

The latter event brought
the curtain down on Clarke’s
track career. But as she remi-
nisces on her tenure in sports,
Clarke said she hopes that the
Bahamas can regain the glory
days that they have experi-
enced.

“With the Olympic Games
coming up next year, I hope
that we can repeat our per-
formance in 2000 or even
Tonique Williams-Darling’s
performance in 2004 (when
she won the gold at the
Olympics in Athens, Greece)
and our men’s 4 x 400,”
Clarke projected.

“I want to wish them the
best of luck and hope that we

As for the replacement of
the aging and retired Golden
Girls, Clarke said she would
like to see high school sprint-
ers running }1.2 and 11.3 sec-
onds — as they did when they
graduated. |

“It’s going to be very
important for them to be run-
ning at 11.5 or faster so that
they can be competitive with
the American sprinters when
they ga; to college,” she
summedaip.

“But the talent is there. It’s
just up to them to perform at
junior world class level so that
they can work towards mak-
ing that next step at the senior
level.”









® RETIRED Golden Girl Eldece Clarke.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

regatta will set the tone
for the other regattas and
will show the entire
Bahamas community that
regattas are officially
back. It will also signal to
all the associations that
regatta is now at a new
level and we are hoping
to make this year the best
in sailing in our country.

“This regatta will be
sponsored by the govern-
ment of the Bahamas and
we are also trying to solic-
it some other sponsorship
from corporate business
to make sure this regatta
is successful.

“We would like to
thank the Minister
responsible for sloop sail-
ing in the country, V
Alfred Gray, for his
genius.and commitment
to sport in the country.
He has also given a
tremendous effort to
make sure that this event
is a success. We would
also like to thank all of
the associations and the
commodores, those from
all the clubs for their
commitment to this
event.”

Boats competing in the
annual New Year’s Day
regatta will represent
Long Island, Exuma,









Abaco, Andros, Ragged =
Island, and Eleuthera. @ ABOVE: The visiting team
Boats will be brought from Orlando, Florida and

down from the various
islands on Thursday.

McPhee also said that
all the associations have
agreed to participate in
the first official regatta,
adding that the arguments
that brewed between all
associations have been
resolved and the future of
the sport looks bright.

Another feature event
for the New Year’s Day
regatta will be the awards
banquet, set for Monday
at the Government
House.

The gala event will hon-
our six of the country’s
top sailors for their con-
tributions to the sports.
All sailors are invited to
attend.

members of the Masters Soft-
ball League pose above at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex for yesterday’s slowpitch
game.



RIGHT: One of the, players
from Orlando, Florida delivers

a pitch from the mound |
yesterday.



¢e SEE SPORTS FRONT
FOR FULL STORY

(Photos: Tim Clarke)


oe

THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.c





INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BASKETBALL | HOCKEY



PRO BASKETBALL

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007 |SE





~ Prince is a royal pain for Sixers

From Miami Herald Wire Services

PHILADELPHIA — Tayshaun Prince
scored a career-high 33 points and Richard
Hamilton had 22 to lead the Detroit Pistons
to a 98-89 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers
on Tuesday night.

Flip Murray had a career-high 12 assists
for the Pistons.

Rasheed Wallace did not start the game
because of a coach’s decision, played only 29
minutes and scored eight points.

Samuel Dalembert had 14 points and 17
rebounds, Andre Iguodala scored 15 points
and Andre Miller had 10 assists for the Six-
ers, who lost their third consecutive game.

The Sixers played again without Chris
Webber, who sat out officially with foot and
ankle injuries.

But the 33-year-old former All-Star could
be on his way out of Philadelphia with a con-
tract buyout in the works. Webber has
missed 10 of the past 13 games.

NETS 101, RAPTORS 86

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Vince
Carter scored 32 points and Richard Jeffer-
son added 21 to lead the Nets to the victory in
a matchup of the top teams in the weak
Atlantic Division.

Jason Kidd added 10 points, 14 assists and
eight rebounds just hours after filing for
divorce from his wife of 10 years, accusing
her of “extreme cruelty” throughout their
marriage.

Carter was forced to leave the game late
after being poked in the eye by Anthony
Parker.

Mikki Moore added 12 points ‘and eight
rebounds for the Nets, who shot 50 percent
from the field and limited the Raptors to 38
second-half points.

Top draft pick Andrea Bargnani scored 22
points to lead the Raptors, but only six came
in the second half.

Florida thumps Arkansas;

From Miami Herald Wire Services

RUSTY KENNEDY/AP

THERE’S NO STOPPING HIM: Pistons forward
Tayshaun Prince drives against 76ers
swingman Andre Iguodala on Tuesday.
Prince scored a game-high 33 points.

PACERS 91, HAWKS 72

INDIANAPOLIS — Al Harrington scored
18 points and sparked a second-half run as
the Pacers beat the Hawks.

Harrington, who spent two seasons with
Atlanta before returning to the Pacers,
scored 14 points in the second half after
shooting 1-for-8 from the field in the first
half.

Danny Granger had 15 points: Stephen
Jackson scored 12 and Jermaine O’Neal
added 10 points, eight rebounds and four
blocks for the Pacers (19-16), who held
Atlanta to 32 percent shooting.

Speedy Claxton had 12 poiits for the Hawks.



SPURS 98, BLAZERS 84

SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan led a bal-
anced attack with 16 points, and the Spurs
beat the Trail Blazers.

Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker had 14
points apiece, Brent Barry added 13 and
Bruce Bowen scored 12 points — all on

3-pointers — for the Spurs.

GRIZZLIES 128, LAKERS 118

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Pau Gasol had 25
points and 13 rebounds, Mike Miller scored
14 of his 25 in a record-setting third quarter,
and the Grizzlies beat the Lakers.

Memphis, which had seven players in
double figures, built the lead in the third

period, outscoring the Lakers 46-22, includ-
ing 13 unanswered points over a three-min-
ute span. The 46 points was a Grizzlies fran-
chise record for points in a quarter.

ELSEWHERE

e Hornets: Backup guard Bobby Jackson
has five cracked ribs — not one as first
thought — stemming from an injury in a
November game. A CT scan Tuesday
revealed the additional injuries, and the team
said his status remains day to day.

e Bobcats: Forwards Gerald Wallace
and Melvin Ely will miss Charlotte’s game at
Detroit tonight because of injuries. Wallace
hasn’t played since he separated his right
shoulder in a victory at Indiana on Dec. 30.
Ely strained his right calf in practice Monday
and wasn’t able to practice Tuesday. Also,
guard Brevin Knight began rehabilitation this
week after undergoing surgery to repair a
torn abdominal muscle. Knight hopes to
return in three weeks.

e Wizards: Center Etan Thomas will
return to the Wizards for tonight’s game
against the Bulls after missing a month with a

sprained left ankle. Thomas practiced Tues-

day for the second consecutive day.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

|
|





NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE













SOUTHEAST W L_ Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Orlando 21 14 600 - 64 W4 146 7-8 12-9
Washington 19 14 576 1 7-3 L-l 133 6-11 12-9
Miami 1419 424 6 46 Wl 89 610 6-10
Atlanta 10 22 313 9% 19 Ll 59 5-13 614
Charlotte 9 23 .28110% 3-7 L2 Gll 3-12 613
ATLANTIC. WL Pet GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
New Jersey 15 19 441 - 55 Wel 11-10 49 11-9
Toronto 15 20 429 % 55 Ll 10-5 5-15 10-8
New York 15 21 417 1 6-4 W-2 810 7-11 9-12
Boston 12 21.364 2% 2-8 Ll 411 8-10 8-12
Philadelphia 9 25 265 46 13 48 5-17 6-13
CENTRAL WL _ Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Cont
Cleveland 21 12-636 = - «=o 7-3 ~W-4 15-3 6-9 15-10
Detroit 20 12 625 % 64 Wl 95 1-7 146
Chicago 2015 571. 2 55 Ld 15-4 5-11 17-5
Indiana 19 16 543 3 6-4 W-2 10-5 9-11 149
Milwaukee 16 18 471 54% 64 L3 95 7-13 613
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pet. GB LIO Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 288 778 - 91 W-l 16-3 12-5 20-6
San Antonio. 25 11 694 3 5-5 W-2 136 125 17-7
Houston 22 13 629 5% 7-3 Wl 12-3 10-10 10-11
New Orleans 12 22 .353 15 28 L5 7-10 5-12 6-16.
Memphis 9 27 250 19 37 Wl Tl 2-16 4-15
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 24 11 686 - 64 Ll 143 10-8 16-7
Denver 17 15 531 5% 46 Wl 108 7-7 5-9
Minnesota 17°15 531 5% 7-3 W-4 11-5 6-10 10-9
Portland 14 22 .38910% 28 L2 7-11 7-11 9-10
Seattle 13 24 351 12 37 LS 98 416 5-15
PACIFIC WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 268 765 - 82 W-7? 15-3 11-5 127
LA.Lakers ‘23 12 657 3% 7-3 Ll 16-4 7-8 15-6
Golden State 18 18 500 9 6-4 L-l 145 4-13 12-13
LA. Clippers 16 19 .45710% 6-4 W-l 12-6 4-13 10-15
45210% 46 L2 10-9 48 813

Sacramento 14417

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
Indiana 91, Atlanta 72 Mia. at Sea., 10 LA.C. 100, N.O 90
Detroit 98, Phil. 89 Chi. at Was., 7 Hou. 84, Chi. 77

NJ. 101, Toronto 86 N.O. at Atl., 7 ; Den. 104, Mil. 92
Mem. 128, Lakers 118 Ind. at Bos., 7:30

S.A: 98, Portland 84 Phi. at N.Y., 7:30

Phoenix 113, Sea. 102 Cha. at Det. 7:30

Dallas 108, Utah 105 Tor. at Mil., 8

Cle. at Sac., late LA.C. at Min., 8

LA.L. at Hou., 8:30
Por. at Dal., 8:30
S.A. at Den., 9

Ori. at G.S., 10:30



’Bama beats LSU

Taurean Green scored 17 points,

’ and Corey Brewer added 13, leading

No. 2 Florida to a 79-72 victory over
Arkansas on Tuesday night in
Gainesville, Fla.

At halftime, the sellout crowd at
the O’Connell Center welcomed the
Gators football team, which beat
Ohio State 41-14 on Monday night in
the BCS Championship Game. That
made Florida the first school to hold
the national titles in Division I foot-
ball and basketball at the same time.

The Gators (15-2, 2-0 SEC) built an

‘ early 12-point lead, then spent the

rest of the night holding off the
Razorbacks (12-4, 1-1), who briefly
took the lead before faltering over
the last 10 minutes of the game.
Joakim Noah and Al Horford each

scored ll points for Florida, which .

has all five starters back from the
team that won the school’s first

NHL STANDINGS ae |

NCAA basketball title last spring.

Darian Townes led Arkansas with
18 points, and Sonny Weems had 13.

With Noah and Horford riding the
bench for much of the first half with
two fouls each, Florida squandered
most of their 12-point lead before set-
tling for a 37-36 halftime lead.

e No. 14 Alabama 71, No. 13
LSU 61: Richard Hendrix scored 18
points, and the host Crimson Tide

pulled the upset, taking advantage of

cold shooting by the Tigers.

Rebounding from a 27-point loss
at Arkansas, Alabama (14-2, 1-1 SEC)
held the Louisiana State to just 35
percent shooting and led by nine
points at halftime.

LSU (11-4), playing in its SEC
opener, had a five-game winning
streak snapped despite a big perfor-
mance from an ailing Glen Davis.

Playing with sore ribs and right
knee from a two-car accident after



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

LOCKED UP: Joakim Noah, left,
of Florida tangles with Arkansas’
Vincent Hunter in the first half.

Saturday night’s victory over No. 24
Connecticut, Davis had 24 points and
17 rebounds.

e No. 8 Texas. A&M 61, Baylor
51: Joseph Jones had six points and
three rebounds in the stretch that



finally put Texas A&M ahead to stays:

in a road game, and Acie Law IV

drove for consecutive layups late to:
push the Aggies (14-2, 2-0 Big 12) to:

their seventh victory in a row.

Law finished with 20 points, and
Jones had 14 points and 12 rebounds.

Kevin Rogers had 19 points to lead
Baylor (10-5, 0-2).

e No. 17 Clemson 87, North
Carolina State 76: Vernon Hamil-
ton scored 21 pojnts, and Clemson,
playing on the road, matched the best
start in school history and remained
the only unbeaten team in Division I.

K.C. Rivers and James Mays both
added 16 points for Clemson (17-0,
3-0 ACC) , which also started the sea-
son 17-0 in 1986-87.

Gavin Grant had 22 points and Ben
McCauley added 15 for outmanned
N.C. State (10-6, 0-3).

e No. 18 Air Force 65, New
Mexico 57: Dan Nwaelele scored 22

HOCKEY

points and host Air Force (16-1, 3- 0
‘Mountain West) rallied from a 15-

point halftime deficit for its 12th con-
““gecuitive victory.

Darren Prentice had 18 points for
the Lobos (11-7, 0-3).

e No. 22 Notre-Dame 61, No. 21
West Virginia 58: Russell Carter
scored 19 points for the host Irish and
kept West Virginia’s Frank Young
from taking a shot at the buzzer.

Colin Falls scored 14 points for
Notre Dame, (14-2, 2-1 Big East), and
Luke Harangody added 11.

Alex Ruoff led West Virginia (13-2,
3-1) with 14 points. Young added 13.

LATE MONDAY

e No. 19 Nevada 90, Boise
State 86: Marcelus Kemp scored 27
points and host Nevada (14-1, 2-0
Western Athletic Conference) went
ona 9-0 run down the stretch to rally
for the win over Boise State (7-6, 1-1).



Islanders win battle of New York

BLUES 4, BLUE JACKETS 3 (SO)

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Lee Stempniak



EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST Ww L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Atlanta 24 13 6 2 56139 138 11-5-3-1 13-8-3-1 11-4-4-1
Carolina 23 18 2 2 50 134 134 8 12-7-0-1 11-11-2-1 10-3-0-0 a ; ‘
Washington 19 17 2 5 45134 145 11-10-1-2 8-7-1-3. 6-6-1-1 From Miami Herald. Wire Services
Tampa Bay 21 21 #1 41 44138 138 11-11-0-0 10-10-1-1 9-7-0-0 — Mj Wi
Florida 15 20 3 6 39119 143 10-B4-1 5-12-25 2-10-1-0 NEW YORK > Mike Sillinger scored
his second goal of the game 27 seconds
L SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV after Viktor Kozlov snapped a third-pe-
e 0 4 54113 100 14-3-0-3 11-10-0-1 9-4-0-1 riod tie, and the New York Islanders
N.Y. Rangers 22 18 3.- 1 48 132 136 9-8-3-0 - 13-10-0-1 8-8-0-0 broke a six-game losing streak with a 5-3
N.Y. Islanders 20 19 1 2 43122 119 11-8-1-1 9-11-0-1. 8-6-1-0 ict 8 the Ne < rk Ra
Pittsburgh 18 16 3 4 43127 131 10-8-2-2 881-2 11-5-L-1 VICIOLY,-OVGF OM eter eae
Philadelphia 11 28 2 2 26104 165 3-11-22 8-17-0-0 3-10-0-2 | ‘Tuesday night.
NORTHEAST | Madison Square Garden has become a
a SEAT ee eS iperr iema Bea | safe haven for the Islanders, who hadn’t
uffalo -5-1- -4-1- -6- : :
Montreal oe fia De 14es3 teil esaa | WOn-anywhere since beating the Rangers
Ottawa 24 19 2 0 50-148 127 11-10-1-0 13-9-1-0 —10-7-0-0 there on Dec. 26.
Toronto 19 19 2 4 44145 148 10-11-1-2 9-8-1-2 7-8-2-2 Despite not scoring on the power play
Boston 2017 1 2 43120 147 1280-1 891-1 97-0-1 | again, the Islanders shook off the tying
goal at the start of the third period and
knocked off the Rangers for the fourth







| time this season and fifth in a row overall.
Sillinger gave the Islanders a 3-2 lead

SENATORS 5, BRUINS 2
OTTAWA —

CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DV. h : fi ‘
Nashville M2 1 Gl 8 1d 143-21 1880-0 1131-0 | im the second period after the teams split
Detroit 26 12 2 3 57129 105 1431-2 1291-1 920-1 | four goals in the first.
Chicago 17 20 1 4 39105 124 10-10-0-1 7-10-1-3 -9-9-0-0
columns 16 22 2 3 37 141 134 9-9-1-2. _7-13-1-1 5-8-0-2 CANADIENS 4, THRASHERS 2
t. Louis 14 21 4 3 35100 132 8-11-2-1 6-10-2-2 6 -10-2-2 .

eae MONTREAL — Michael Ryder had
NORTHWEST Wo oL OL SLPTS GF GA == HOME AWAY a. piv __ two goals and an assist as the Canadiens
Nancie, 2418 0 1 49107 111 15-7-0-0 9-11-0-1 9-9-0-1 | ended a three-game losing streak.
algary 22.15 2 2 48125 106 17-5-0-0 5-10-2-2 9 7-5-1-1 ‘ :.
Colorado . 21 18 2 1 45 134 120 11-9-1-1 10-9-1-0 9410 gg ee Bees . ee
Minnesota 2119 0 3 45118 117 17-4-0-2 4-15-0-1 —5-5-0-2 resse also scored for Montreal, an
Edmonton 20 18 2 2 44119 123 13-7-1-l 7-11-1-1 — 7-7-1-0 Koivu had an assist for his 500th career

point.

recrie __W_L OL SLPTS of CA WOME AWAY __BY | Greg de Vries and Brad Larsen had
San Jose 28°14 0 0 56130 100 15-7-0-0 13-7-0-0 —8-8-0-0 goals for Atlanta, which is 1-3-2 in its past
Dallas 26 17 O 1 53119 107 13-7-0-0 13-10-0-1 —12-4-0-0 SIX.
Phoenix 20 20 1 1 42118 140 11-8-1-0 9-12-0-1 — 6-10-1-1
LosAngeles 16 22 3 3 38125 156 11-9-3-3 5-13-0-0 6-11-0-2 | HURRICANES 4, MAPLE LEAFS 1

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

* Monday’s results
Edmonton 2, LA. 1 (OT)

Tuesday’s results

St. Louis 4, Col. 3 (SO)
Washington 6, Phil. 2
Islanders 5, Rangers 3
Ottawa 5, Boston 2
Montreal 4, Atlanta 2
Carolina 4, Toronto 1

T.B. 3, Pittsburgh 2
Nashville 5, Anaheim 4 (OT)
Phoenix 5, Dallas 2
Calgary 3, Minnesota 0
Detroit 4, Colorado 3 (SO)

Tonight’s games '

Pitt. at Florida, 7:30

St. Louis at NJ., 7:30
Buffalo at Chicago, 8
Edmonton at SJ., 10:30 p.m.

TORONTO —



including Darcy Tucker.

Eric Staal,
Walker, Eric Belanger and Justin Williams
scored to lead the Hurricanes.

Ray Whitney had two assists for the
defending Stanley Cup champion Hurri-
canes, who have won two in a row follow-
ing a three-game losing skid.

Bryan McCabe scored the lone goal for
the Maple Leafs, who were missing four
regular players because of injuries,

one of his testicles.
Scott

TAMPA, Fla. —

ning beat the Penguins.

the Penguins 22-3.

LIGHTNING 3, PENGUINS 2

Martin St. Louis had a
goal and two assists, helping the Light-



JULIE JACOBSON/AP

A BIG APPLE BOUT: Arron Asham, left,
of the Islanders takes out Darius
Kasparaitis of the Rangers during
Tuesday night’s game in New York.

Daniel Alfredsson
scored 12:25 into the third period and the
Senators spoiled Boston rookie Phil Kes-
sel’s return from cancer with five goals in
the final period in the comeback victory.

Kessel, who was diagnosed with testic-
ular cancer a month ago, returned to the
Bruins’ lineup for his first NHL game
since having surgery on Dec. ll to remove

Vincent Lecavalier and Andreas Karls-
son also scored for Tampa Bay, which has
an ll-game winning streak against Pitts-
burgh. Five of the victories have come at
home, where Tampa Bay has outscored

scored the winning shootout goal and
added two assists to lead the Blues over
the Blue Jackets.

After the first five shooters scored,
goaltender Manny Legace stopped Fred-
rik Modin to end the game. Legace fin-
ished with 19 saves.

CAPITALS 6, FLYERS 2

WASHINGTON — Alex Ovechkin
scored his 27th and 28th goals, and the
Capitals celebrated the franchise’s first
season sweep of the slumping Flyers.

PREDATORS 5, DUCKS 4 (OT)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Steve Sullivan
scored with 1:48 left in overtime, and the
Predators beat the Ducks for their third
consecutive victory and llth victory in 14
games.

COYOTES 5, STARS 2

DALLAS — Ed Jovanovski and Shane
Doan scored power-play goals during a
span of 2:21 in the second period and the
Coyotes extended their season-best win-
ning streak to seven games.

ELSEWHERE

e Red Wings: Defenseman Chris
Chelios returned to the ice late Tuesday
against the Avalanche, less than a week
after leaving the team to help employees
of his Detroit sports bar cope with the
stabbing deaths of two co-workers.

e@ Coyotes: Center Mike Ricci was
placed on injured reserve because of
recurring neck problems.

LATE MONDAY

e Oilers 2, Kings 1 (OT): Jan Hejda
scored his first NHL goal 1:14 into over-
time to lift visiting Edmonton.

a EE TEAL I NL AT ERO TN TE TEN TE NN

\

\



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E86W5YFNJ_Y7XXIX INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T14:56:11Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02789
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES