Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



imi a a a ee

Basic principles are

for all

seasons, not for expediency

illiam Roper; So, now you
give the Devil the benefit of
law!

Sir Thomas More: Yes! What would
you do? Cut a great road through the
law to get after the Devil?

William Roper: Yes, I’d cut down
every law in England to that!

Sir Thomas More: Oh? And when
the last law was down, and the Devil
turned ’round on you, where would
you hide, Roper, the laws all being
flat? This country is planted thick with
laws, from coast to coast, Man ’s laws,
not God's! And if you cut them down,
and you’re just the man to do it, do
you really think you could stand
upright in the winds that would blow
then? Yes, I’d give the Devil benefit of
law, for my own safety’s sake!

That exchange is from the celebrat-
ed play, A Man For All Seasons, by
Robert Bolt, which was first staged in
Britain in 1960 and several years later
made into a movie. It is, of course,
about Sir Thomas More, the brilliant
scholar, lawyer and statesman who
was Lord Chancellor under Henry
VI.

Sir Thomas was a deeply religious
man and he believed in certain prin-
ciples, including the rule of law, When
he refused to bend to the will of the
king in what were to him matters of
principle and conviction, he was sent
to the Tower of London, put on trial

for treason and beheaded in July, . .

1535. Four hundred years later he was
canonised by the Catholic Church.

* % *

n December 18, 2006, five

employees of Nassau Flight
Services were arrested when they land-
ed in Fort Lauderdale on a Spirit Airline
flight from Nassau. They were part of a
group of 20 employees picked for a
mandatory training course in Fort Laud-
erdale,

The five were arrested on board the
plane and charged with trafficking drugs
to the United States through Lynden
Pindling International Airport. It was
reported to be the culmination a year-



After nearly three |
weeks Prime Minister
Perry Christie, always
slow to recognise a
matter of serious
national concern,
announced that he
had launched an
inquiry and promised
that he will share his
findings with the
Bahamian people.



long undercover operation conducted
jointly by Bahamian and American offi-
cers. The circumstances clearly indicate
that the five were tricked into going to







the US so they could be picked by US
law enforcement officers and put on tri-
al in that country.

Nobody objects one little bit. to under-
coveroperations being conducted
against suspected criminal activity, In
fact, citizens take it for granted that such
operations are ongoing in order to pro-
tect the public and bring criminals to
justice.

But citizens have a right and a duty to
ask questions when it appears that
Bahamian authorities may have collud-
ed with agents of another country to
bypass the sovereignty and due process-
es of the laws of The Bahamas in order
to render Bahamian suspects to anoth-
er jurisdiction.

That, of course, is exactly what did
happen. Many Bahamians were
alarmed at what they heard and very
rightly started to ask questions of their
government,

They wanted to know if the Govern-
ment of The Bahamas or any of its agen-
cies or agents knew about and approved
of what appeared to be the extrajudicial
rendition of Bahamian citizens to anoth-
er country, They wanted to know why,
after many months of investigation, the
Bahamian suspects were not arrested
and charged in Bahamian courts,

After all, if the alleged offences were

committed in The Bahamas, then the ~

evidence, or much of it, must have been
gathered in The Bahamas, That was
borne out by the fact that several others
who are alleged to have been part of a
drug-smuggling operation at the airport
were subsequently arrested and charged

_in The Bahamas,

he citizens who dared to ask
questions about all this were
immediately set upon and accused of
all sorts of things: they were in sympathy

And Appliance Centr

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-38

with criminals, they were more con-
cerned about drug traffickers than secu-
rity, and they did not care that this
could endanger pre-clearance facilities
-at the airport.

This is a classic case of the proverbial
red herring. It is all absolutely wrong,
grossly unfair to law-abiding citizens
and utterly irrelevant to the questions at
hand.

As usual, the PLP Government’s
response to public agitation over this
matter has been quite inadequate. Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell
assured the public that Minister of
Transport and Aviation Glenys Han-
na had no prior knowledge of the oper-
ation.

He did not say if any other minister
had.

Attorney General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson has had more to say about this
affair than any other member of the
Cabinet and she has denied that “the
Government” was in any way complic-
it in what appears to be an extrajudicial
rendition of Bahamians to another juris-
diction.

But Mrs Gibson also did not say if
any other minister of the Government
had prior knowledge.

After nearly three weeks Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, always slow to
recognise a matter of serious national
concern, announced that he had
launched an inquiry and promised that
he will share his findings with the

_ Bahamian people. He said he will speak

comprehensively and in detail.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of National Security Cynthia Pratt has
had little or nothing to say about it pub-
licly.

[ee are a few in our commu-
nity who out of willful igno-
rance or for other motives appear not to
understand the issues involved or want
to confuse them. They say that a drug
smuggling operation at the airport
endangers our pre-clearance privileges
and our security,

Of course it does, and every Bahami-
an is aware of that. But that does not

‘explain why, after many months of sur-

veillance and gathering evidence, all the
suspects were not arrested at the earliest
propitious moment, removed from the
airport and charged before our courts,

Bahamians are indeed concerned
about the economic implications of secu-
rity breaches at our airport and the dan-
ger drug trafficking poses to both The
Bahamas and the US. We are also just
as concerned as the Americans about
our own personal safety when travel-
ling and we expeet those responsible to
leave no stone unturned to ensure our
safety,

But no-one has explained how the
rendition of Bahamian suspects to
another jurisdiction makes us any safer.

nother argument is that our
courts are overburdened, inef-
ficient and in some cases too lenient,
that extradition takes too long, so it is to
our advantage to render suspects to the
US for trial, or even invite the Ameri-
cans to come into our country and clean
things up for us!
It may be true that there is a lot wrong
with law enforcement and judicial
processes in The Bahamas, but it is our

ALL YOUR DECORATING

ees On The Island”

MONDAY - THURSD
FRIDAY - SATURD/




BILLY'S DREAM
TILL ALIVE

responsibility to fix what is wrong. It is
our responsibility to givé our law
enforcement agencies the resqurces and
support they need, It is our responsi-
bility to make sure our courts are ade-
quately resourced and populated.

It would be utterly irresponsible for us
to abdicate these constitutional, legal
and moral responsibilities to another
country, however friendly. _

The Americans do liave tremendous



Citizens have a right
and a duty to ask
questions when it
appears that
Bahamian authorities
may have colluded
with agents of another
country to bypass the
sovereignty and due
processes of the laws
of The Bahamas.

resources and they believe in the rule of
law. But Bahamians see it as a big prob-
lem when suspects are put on trial and
convicted in the US media, and are
understandably alarmed when an Amer-
ican official attempts to do the same in
The Bahamas,

The Americans also have problems
with law enforcement and judicial
processes, It is not an unknown phe-
nomenon in America that people who
should be behind bars are let out by the
system to murder and rape again. There
was a case just recently in Indiana where
a child-murderer on parole killed a 16-
year-old girl,

Dozens of Americans convicted of
serious crimes, including murder, have
subsequently been proven innocent by
new evidence including DNA. Under
the present US administration, respect
for the rule of law is not held in the
highest regard at home or abroad.

Phestenore assurances about
due process in the US will like-
ly fall on deaf ears if due process in
The Bahamas is not respected by our
American friends. Due process can
sometimes take long in The Bahamas
but cases can go on for many years in
the US as well.

It is to our shame, unfortunately, that
too many Bahamians see nothing wrong
with drug trafficking or benefiting from
this nefarious trade, but it is wrong to
extrapolate from this that all Bahamians
are corrupt. The vast majority of us are
law-abiding and anxious to see those
who threaten our reputation, peace and
security put behind bars,

But we will not be persuaded to cut a
great road through the law because then
we will be exposed to lawlessness and
the loss of rights we have cherished for
many generations, even during the colo-
nial era. -

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www. bahamapundit, typepad.com



from people who are
making news in their

for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





*

:

neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

¢

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

© In brief

AOUPE READ NeD OOO eSeRPeEReOeeF eR EDF eR aeRER Naren Tereeserenrenneney,

Ladies in
White invite
Sheehan to
pay a visit
@ HAVANA

WIVES and mothers of
Cuban political prisoners urged
US peace activist Cindy Shee-
han on Monday to visit the
island’s state-run jails during
her weeklong trip to Cuba to
call for the closure of the US-
operated Guantanamo prison,
according to Associated Press.

The Ladies in White, a group
of women demanding the release
of their loved ones, described
what they called “inhumane”
conditions at Cuba’s prisons in
a letter for Sheehan that was sent
to international reporters, The
group said it was trying to get a
copy to Sheehan as well.

“At the same time you and
your noble followers fight for the
closure of the US prison at the
Guantanamo naval.base.., just a
few miles away at the provincial
Guantanamo prison in Cuban
territory, peaceful and defenseless
political prisoners suffer inhu-
mane conditions, (living) with-
out potable water and with poor
nutrition, deficient medical assis-
tance, insects and rodents, limited
visits and precarious communi-
cation,” the letter said.

"We exhort you to visit the
prisons of Cuba, chosen ran-
domly, and not those prepared”
by authorities, it added.

Sheehan arrived in Havana
on Saturday with a dozen other
peace activists and plans to
attend a human rights confer-
ence in the eastern Cuban city
of Guantanamo on Wednesday.
On Thursday, the group is to
hold a protest outside the US
Navy’s Guantanamo base,
where nearly 400 men are being
held on suspicion of links to al-
Qaida or the Taliban.

In the letter, the Ladies in
White said they are a peaceful
group that faces constant harass-
ment from Cuban officials. They
also asked Sheehan to meet with
them so she “could know this
other reality of Cuban society.”

Their jailed husbands and
sons are among 75 activists
rounded up in the spring of
2003 and sentenced to prison
terms ranging from six to 28
years, Sixteen of those prisoners
have since been released for
health reasons, but more than
300 human rights activists, inde-
ee journalists and mem-

ers of outlawed political par-
ties remain behind bars, accord-
ing to rights groups.

Thursday’s protest outside
the US military base will coin-
cide with demonstrations
around the world to mark the
fifth anniversary of the first pris-
oners’ arrival.

rats: ee
STEEL NS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

















*



THE TRIBUNE _ TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 3

om brie’ Dredging at Dick’s Point ix:
accused of | . message’
over five



being in car

theft ring

FOUR men accused of
being a part of a car theft ring
were arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday after-
noon.

A warrant of arrest was
issued yesterday for another
man who failed to appear in
court.

Lamar McNeil, 21, of
Carmichael Road; Renaldo
Clarke and Kierran Cephas,
both 22 of Sunset Park; and
Marcello McKenzie were
arraigned before Magistrate
Renee McKay at court six on
Parliament Street.

The men were accused of
stealing 20 vehicles, namely
1996 and 1997 Honda cars.

The thefts, it is alleged,
took place between Thurs-
day, July 27, 2006 and
Wednesday, January 3, 2007.

The men, who were all rep-
resented by an attorney,
pleaded not guilty to all theft
charges.

Michael Hanna, who is also
charged in connection with
the thefts, did not appear in
court yesterday and a war-
rant was issued for his arrest.

The men who did appear
were remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. They will
return to court on January 17
' for a bail hearing.

Inspector Bradley Sands,
who is prosecuting the case,
said he was advised that some
of the men are currently
before the court on similar
charges. :

Attorney Wilbert Moss
asked that his clients, McNeil
and Cephas, be taken to
Princess Margaret Hospital
before being taken to the
prison.

According to Mr Moss,
there was a mark on the left
side of Cephas’ mouth, which
he claimed resulted from
being kicked in the face by a":
police officer.

The magistrate ordered
that the men be taken to hos-
pital before they were :
remanded.

Man jailed
for two years
on weapons
charge

A MAN was sentenced to
serve time in prison yester-
day after pleading guilty to
weapons charges.

Carlton Smith, 22,. of
Pizewood Gardens, appeared
befcre Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at court eight in Bank
Lane yesterday.

_ It was alleged that on Sat-
urday, January 6, Smith was
found in possession of an
unlicensed chrome and black
.380 Lorcin pistol.

A second charge alleged
that he was also found in pos-
session of 40 rounds of .380
ammunition.

Smith pleaded guilty to
both charges and was sen-
tenced to serve two years in
prison on each. The sentences
are to run concurrently.

Marijuana
and cocaine
possession
is denied

A MAN was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday
on marijuana and cocaine
possession charges.

Court dockets alleged that
Terry Collie, 28, of Coral
Harbour was found on Janu-
ary 6 in possession of a quan-
tity of marijuana which
authorities believed he
intended to supply to another.

A second charge alleged
that on that same date, Collie
was found in possession of a
quantity of cocaine which
authorities believed he
intended to supply to another.

Collie, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel, pleaded not guilty to
both charges and was
remanded to prison.

__ He will return to court on
January 15 for a bail hearing.

According to the prosecu-
tion, Collie is charged with
being found in possession of
half an ounce of marijuana
and five grams of cocaine.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE.
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
822-2157



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

COMPLAINTS made about
dredging at Dick's Point Close
are “definitely personal," as
work being done in the area is
restoring rather than destroy-
ing the natural environment,
according to project manager,
Bernie Minnis.

On Saturday, a resident told
The Tribune that work done in
the waterfront in front of her
Eastern Road home was “dis-
gusting” and a “national mat-
ter”. She complained that her
quiet, peaceful environment had
been transformed into a
construction site”.

However, it is not only this
resident who claims to have the
best interests of the natural
environment in mind.

Yesterday, the two home-
owners behind the dredging
work, Jeff and Mary Waterous,

who are currently out of the

country, responded to Saturday’s
article through representatives.

They said that rather than
having destroyed the environ-
ment for their own convenience
— part of the work included
creating a deep passage way for
their yacht — they have cleaned
up the environment and are in
the process of creating a “bio-
logically productive marine
ecosystem”.

Bernie Minnis, long term pro-
ject manager and president of
the Artistic Group, said that pri-
or to his bosses' decision to
dredge the area — in the
process creating a sandy beach
in front of, and alongside the
other resident's property — the
waterfront was a mess of green,
odorous sludge: the result of 25
years of “toxic waste satura-
tion” from septic tanks in sur-
rounding neighbourhoods.

Now, the shallow turquoise
waters are clear with a sandy
bottom, unlike further down the
coast, and marine life — includ-
ing one large school of fish at
the time the press conference

A VIEW of boulders separating

house at Dick’s Point Close

was held — can be seen popu-
lating the area, Mr Minnis said.

However, mangroves were
removed from the flats that
have been dredged and though
the couple said in a press state-
ment that they intend to restore
the plants — which create a nurs-
ery for young sea life — in line
with conditions imposed by goy-
ernment at the time their permit
was issued, the area is currently
devoid of aquatic flora.

Meanwhile, pictures of the:

shores before the dredging
show that it was a greenish,
mossy and less sandy area —
but, as has been pointed out by
environmentalist Sam Dun-
combe, these shallow areas can
provide crucial feeding grounds
for marine life.

In Mr Minnis’ opinion, how-
ever, the area was "dead" prior
to the Waterous' decision to
dredge it, while the Watérous'
say that the completion of their

dss

"vision" of creating a "bird and
marine habitat" as part of their
project have been delayed due
to "circumstances beyond
(their) control" — possibly
referring to the "stop order"
issued by government follow-
ing the resident's complaints.

Mr Minnis said that he could
understand why the neighbour
was upset at the time she origi-
nally complained — dredging
has created a 15 foot high pile of
sand and rubble in front of her
property.

However, he added: “As
with everything, things are
going to have to look bad
before they look good.”

The complaining resident,
however — who appeared on

the scene during the press con- -

ference — angrily described the

' area asa "mess".

She encouraged the press to
return to view the scene at
lowtide. At that time, boulders

‘to clean up enviroment’.



the dredged from shallow area in front of an angry resident’s

(Photo: Ana-Bianca Marin)

lining the dredged passage way
stand exposed out of the water

— “blocking” her access to the |}

ocean, and the passage by which

sealife would have entered the

area previously, she claims.
She added — and Mr Minnis

- confirmed — that the foreign

couple only live in the Bahamas
on a temporary basis, while she,
and her children, live with the
work and its consequences on a
daily basis.

Mr and Mrs Waterous have
invited members of the public
to view the work done in the
area: “Interested members of
the public are welcome to come
and see the improved quality of
beach front...(and) restored
ecosystem and improved quali-
ty of beach now existing at
Dick's Point Close.”

Relevant government min-
istries have stopped the work
at Dick’s Point while investiga-
tions are conducted.

baggage
handlers

FORMER MP Lester
Turnquest yesterday lashed
out at the FNM for a state-
ment on the arrests of five
baggage handlers which he
described as "cynical and
manipulative."

In its weekly news release,
the FNM claimed that a
smoke and mirrors public
relations campaign is being
used to cover up the highly
irregular manner in which
five Bahamian citizens may
have been lured and arrested
in the United States for
alleged drug trafficking.

The party said "the public
wants to know and has a right
to know the details of the
case so that a balanced judg-
ment can be made on what
are now _ inconclusive
reports.”

The party said the key
issues at stake are “not the
reputations of the prime min-
ister and his colleagues, but
rather the Bahamian sover-
eignty and the integrity of the
country's laws."

According to Mr Turn-
quest, once chairman of Nas-
sau Flight Services, the FNM
is sending the wrong message
to young people.

Mr Turnquest referred to
the FNM's news release as
"cheap politics."

"The youth of this coun-
try deserve better," he said.
"This statement is a cynical
and manipulative statement
and I pray that the commu-
nity leaders can see it for
what it is," he said.

"If the allegation is that
narcotics were transported to
the United States, the US is
well within its rights to arrest
you if you land in the US.
The Bahamas is well within
its rights to arrest you if you.
stay within the Bahamas. The
US authorities moved first,"
Mr Turnquest said: > >*- =

Chavez to nationalise companies in new
move to ‘socialist republic of Venezuela’

B@ VENEZUELA
Caracas



PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
announced plans Monday to
nationalise Venezuela’s electri-
cal and telecommunications
companies and amend the con-
stitution as he moves to trans-
form his country into a socialist
state, according to Associated
Press.

“All of that which was priva-
tised, let it be nationalised,”
Chavez said in a televised
speech, referring to “all of those
sectors in an area so important
and strategic for all of us as is
electricity.”

“The nation should recover
its ownership of strategic sec-
tors,” he added after swearing
in a new Cabinet.

Chavez also said he wanted
a constitutional amendment to
eliminate the autonomy of the
Central Bank. ,

“We're moving toward a
socialist republic of Venezuela,
and that requires a deep reform
of our national constitution,”
Chavez said.

Before Chavez was re-elected
by a wide margin last month,
he promised to take a more rad-
ical turn toward socialism. Mon-
day’s announcement appeared
likely to affect Electricidad de
Caracas, owned by Arlington,
Virginia-based AES Corp, and
C.A. Nacional Telefonos de
Venezuela, known as CANTV,
the country’s largest publicly
traded company.

Chavez also said he would
soon ask the National Assem-
bly, which is solidly controlled
by his allies, to approve a law
giving him powers to approve
such changes by decree.

Chavez said that lucrative oil
projects in the Orinoco River
basin involving foreign oil com-
panies should be under nation-
al ownership. He didn’t spell
out whether that meant a com-
plete nationalisation, but said
any vestiges of private control
over the energy sector should
be undone.

“I’m referring to how inter-
national companies have con-

..trol and power over all those

processes of improving the
heavy crudes of the Orinoco



@ HUGO Chavez

(Photo: AP)

belt — no — that should become
the property of the nation,”
Chavez said. .

In the oil sector, it didn’t
appear Chavez was ruling out
all private investment. Since last
year, his government has been
in talks with foreign investors
on forming “mixed companies”
with a majority stake held by
the state to upgrade heayy
crude in the Orinoco. Such joint
ventures have already been
formed in other parts of the
country.

Chavez threatened last
August to nationalize CANTV,
a Caracas-based former state
firm that was privatized in 1991,






Restoration Specialist.




ata fraction of replacement cost.

Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone

* Marble Polishing, Restoration & Care





CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Most THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB 1s FREE!
NASSAU’S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.

Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &

Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new

Carpet, Sofa’s, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,

* Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
www.prochemsystem.com * www.stonetechpro.com ® www.tierc,org
* psp @coralwave.com

unless it adjusted its pension
payments to current minimum-
wage levels, which have been
repeatedly increased by his gov-
ernment.

After Chavez’s announce-
ment, American Depositary
Receipts of CANTV immedi-
ately plunged 14.2 per cent on
the New York Stock Exchange
to US$16.84 before the
exchange halted trading. An
NYSE spokesman said it was
unknown when trading might
resume for CANTY, the only
Venezuelan company listed on
the Big Board.

Investors with sizable hold-
ings in CANTV’s ADRs
include some well-known
names on Wall Street, includ-
ing Deutsche Bank Securities
Inc., UBS Securities LLC and
Morgan Stanley & Co. But the
biggest shareholder, according
to Thomson Financial, appears
to be Brandes Investment Part-
ners LP, an investment adviso-
ry company in California. Also
holding a noteworthy stake is
Julius Baer Investment Man-
agement LLC, a Swiss invest-
ment manager.

Chavez’s nationalisation
announcement came in his first
speech of the year, a fiery
address in which he used a vul-
gar word roughly meaning
“idiot” to refer to Organization
of American States Secretary-
General Jose Miguel Insulza.

Chavez lashed out at Insulza












- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)






for questioning his governmen-
t’s decision not to renew the
licence of an opposition-aligned
TV station.

“Dr Insulza is quite an idiot, a
true idiot,” Chavez said. “The
insipid Dr Insulza should resign
from the secretariat of the
Organisation of American States
for daring to play that role.”










Fabulous Shopping

-RITCHARD DESIGN GROUP

Cuba nationalised major
industries shortly after Fidel
Castro came to power in 1959,
and Bolivia’s Evo Morales
moved to nationalize key sec-
tors after taking office last year.
The two countries are Chavez’s
closest allies in Latin America,
where many leftists have come
to power in recent years.





Nassau’s Premier Store

For eri 4

&

N

BAYPARL BUILDING on

PARLIAMENT STREET
Tel: 323-6145 Fax: 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121
email: pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

A suggestion for govt. to consider

IN THIS column yesterday we discussed
how England is turning to private medicine to
help bolster its collapsing National Health Ser-
vice.

Last week British newspapers published arti-
cles on operations being cancelled as that coun-
try’s “NHS;runs out of money.”

Prime Minister Perry Christie sees such sit-
uations as “challenges” to be solved by the
system. We see it, especially after all the fan-
fare and high hopés when it was introduced in
England 59 years ago, as a dismal failure.

But what is interesting is that England is
solving its failures — from which it cannot
politically escape — by a system suggested by
Dr Conville Brown who heads the Bahamas
Heart Centre on Collins Avenue.

Instead of seriously considering the service
that Britain is now trying to ease into, for some
unknown reason the Christie government is
going to take a plunge head-first into the fail-
ing system from which that country is now try-
ing to escape. The PLP government has
promised the people “free medicine” — the
paternalistic “cradle to the grave” approach
— as an election gimmick. What is interesting
is that it would appear that government will go
into the election with just a promise — “free”
health care. We doubt that they would have the
nerve to even attempt to implement it before
the election, because, while it took the British
system 59 years to get bogged down, it will
take the Bahamian people only a few weeks to
discover that they have been sold a bitter
lemon, the frustration of which — when they
fail to get the services promised — will only
increase their hypertension.

We see a Cancer Centre sign at the Princess
Margaret Hospital, which we are told spe-
cialises in chemotherapy treatment for cancer
patients. We have also heard patients com-
plain that very often this centre runs out of
the chemotherapy and they have to buy it
themselves to get their treatment. Of course,
our politicians will probably tell you that such
a thing will not happen under their nation-
alised health system, but anyone who believes

_ this has truly earned for himself a free bed in
Sandilands:

Let’s take the Bahamas Heart Centre as a
possibility of what could be done with a part-
nership between government and private med-
icine. For the past two years government has
contracted the Heart Centre to do the radiation
treatment for its patients rather than send
them to Miami as it once did.

Here is a state-of-the-art clinic, which spe-
cialises in heart and cancer, and on which pri-
vate enterprise has invested $15 million. This



‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer}
‘99 HYUNDAI ELANTRA |
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘(04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low milec.ge

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

investment represents 10 per cent of govern-
ment’s $185 million budget for health care,

_ and $40 million for environmental protection.

If government — at the special half prices
offered indigent patients — contracted this
private clinic to take care of its patients, it
would represent a tremendous saving to the
Treasury. A clinic — far superior to anything
government could afford — that would be
responsible for its own staffing and mainte-
nance, would release funds that government
could spend in other areas of health care.

As someone remarked: “When you enter
the lobby of that clinic, those feet planted on
the same marble floor are the feet of people
from Lyford Cay, the Eastern Road and Goal
Alley. To look at them no one would know
the difference. They are all treated by the same
highly skilled doctors, the same high quality
equipment, the best medicines — there is no
diminution of services or treatment for the
poor man. One patient can afford to pay his
bills privately, the other by insurance, and the
poor man with a 50 per cent discount paid for
by government. But once their feet touch that
marble floor, they are all equal in the eyes of
their doctors.”

At present the Princess Margaret Hospital
cannot handle the patients it now has without
long waiting lines. The pressure and anger of

“waiting patients will only increase when the

already overworked government doctors will

‘not be able to care for their needs, despite all
‘othe national health insurance promises by

politicians.

Some smart wag remarked that government
probably planned to import Cuban doctors to
fill the gap, and staff the Family Island clinics.
Everything is possible, but it is now time for the
Coalition for Health Care Reform to speak
up to let Bahamians know what's happening,
because government has suddenly gone mute.

On Monday, December 11, The Tribune
published an article from the Coalition
announcing that sometime that week its mem-
bers would meet with Health Minister Bernard
Nottage to discuss their concerns with the
National Health Insurance scheme as present-
ly drafted.

Did that meeting ever take place? If so
what was the outcome? We know that to date
doctors have not received the much promised
working notes and actuarial report promised by
Dr Nottage to determine how government
arrived at the $235 million figure as the annu-
al cost of the plan. .

The Bahamian people were certainly misled
on the not-so-optimistic “thumbs up” ILO
report. How else are we being hoodwinked?



Majority Rule -
forty years later

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE was a very spe-
cial spirit that guided and
empowered those Bahami-
an warriors whose hard
work paved the way to the
stunning victory at the polls
on January 10, 1967. As we
observe the fortieth mile-
stone, I would challenge
Bahamians to bring that
spirit to life again. Even
though we are in a far better
place than were those nation
builders forty years ago, that
bold and courageous spirit
is needed today more than
ever. The Bahamas needs
those kind of men and
women to continue the
social and economic revolu-
tion, who refuse to become
complacent with the status
quo as many have become
today. We need more peo-
ple with that January 10th
vision, people who know
that without vigilance, his-
tory does repeat itself.

I would like to see all
Bahamians remember and
appreciate that while some
would have us believe that
those were the “good old
days” those days were really
not good. Instead, they were
times that inspired men and
women to take great risks
and display amazing
courage, the kind of courage
I believe our society needs
now more than ever, in
order to make the sweeping
changes that we need today.

Looking back to that era,

an election was then, as it is:

today,.an occasion for spir-
ited debate and attention-
grabbing rhetoric. Whether
it came every seven years,
as it did until the 1960’s, or
every, five years, as it does
today,,it was always a time
for. lively discussion,
notwithstanding that. the
outcome was usually accept-
ed as a foregone conclusion.
However, when the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party was
founded in 1953, a belief
began to grow in the hearts
of men and women that they
could have a real impact on
the electoral process instead
of just casting their vote in
the way that they were
expected to do in order to
remain secure in their jobs
and their lives.
Bahamians did _ this
because, for a very long
time, they were afraid that,
if they did not do as was
expected, their very survival
would be in jeopardy, their
jobs in peril and.their mort-
gages held by those same
businessmen called in and
their homes lost. It was this

Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

For all of your hydraulic hose requirements
contact

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net i



sweeping fear of reprisal
and recrimination that kept
Bahamians voting as they
did for so long, electing
members of the so-called
“Bay Street Boys” to the
House of Assembly.

The election of 1962, the
first time women could vote,
was a severe and crushing
disappointment to the
majority of Bahamian vot-
ers. It also seemed to con-
firm what they had feared:
that no matter how they vot-
ed, the ruling group would
somehow manage to retain
their stranglehold on the
House of Assembly and the
lives of the majority of the
people. It was that election
when the Progressive Liber-
al Party polled the most
votes, but still won a minor-
ity number of seats in the
House, proving beyond a
shadow of doubt that the
“Bay Street Boys” would do
anything to stay in power.

However, the election of
62 was a defining moment
for the PLP. From this
moment, they knew their
job was to build up a rock-
hard resolve and determina-
tion in the Bahamian peo-
ple that the majority voice
would prevail in the next
election. For the next five
years, perseverance, dedica-
tion and bravery in the face
of threats to their very wel-
fare were demonstrated by
men and women who
believed in the cause, who
believed that the majority

of Bahamians had a right to"
be heard and a right to have.

a voice in choosing their
government. They worked
ceaselessly, in New Provi-
dence and in the Family
Islands. They worked to
inspire their brothers and
sisters; they worked to ease
the fears that were being
cultivated by those politi-
cians who were terrified of
being out of power. Little
by little, Bahamians began
to believe in themselves and
to believe that the stories
about how black men and
women could not govern
and that jobs would disap-
pear if they came to power
were nothing but lies spread
by cowardly and dishonest
men to confuse the elec-
torate and maintain them as
second class citizens in their
own country.

Moments like the bold
events of Black Tuesday and
the Delegation of Eight’s
visit to the United Nations
in 1965 only served to
strengthen the resolve of the
Bahamian people who had
been denied their rightful
place in their country for so
long. By the time the UBP
had prorogued the House
and called an early election
for January 10, 1967,
Bahamians were ready to do
what they had to do in order







Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter
no later than 31st January 2007 to:

LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

FT

We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department,
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.

to lay claim to their nation.
Despite having to campaign
in the Christmas season, by
the time January 10th
dawned, minds were firmly
made up and the electorate
went to the polls determined
to have their voices heard.

And, when January 11th
dawned bright and clear, all
the work and struggle of the
past decade bore fruit. The
PLP tied the UBP with the
number of men elected to
the House of Assembly. It
was only when Labour’s
Randol Fawkes decided to
throw his support behind
the PLP and Independent
MP Alvin Braynen agreed
to assume the post of Speak-
er of the House that Lynden
Pindling became the first
PLP Premier of The
Bahamas.

It is this unquenchable
and inspiring spirit of our
people who laboured long
and hard in order to create
the victory of January 10,
1967 that carried The
Bahamas forward to Inde-
pendence, that led to the
formation of institutions like
Government secondary
schools, the Central Bank,
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, the College — soon to
be university = of The
Bahamas, the Bahamianisa-
tion of our work force, the
burgeoning pride in our cul-
ture, the nurturing of our
medal winning athletes and
the explosion of our exem-
plary Tourism industry that
is the envy of the region.

And it is this January 10th
spirit that needs to be
reawakened today, in the
hearts and minds of every
Bahamian who cares to see
his nation and his fellow
countrymen continue to
develop and reach the
heights of their professions.
We can no longer assume
that the hard-won freedoms
represented by the victory
of January 10, 1967 do not
need to be protected and
defended. We need to work
hard to ensure that the clock
is not turned backward. We
must not lose focus nox + lax
our vigilance.

As we come togethes YD
commemorate the ivima
decades since the majority’s
voice was heard clearly
throughout our land, let us

resolve that the best way to ~.

celebrate those freedom
fighters would be to emu-
late their spirit and allow no
one in today’s or tomor-
row’s Bahamas to silence
our voices or thrust us back-
ward. Let us resolve to
always keep that fearless
dedication foremost in our
minds so that forty years
from today our children and
their children can celebrate
our vision and our courage
at keeping freedom and
prosperity alive for all who
live in our Bahamas.

SENATOR PHILIP
GALANIS

Nassau,

January 7, 2007.


















= HR Manager
QUALITY: rms

ais Benie Ria Versatility Productivity Reliability Nassau, Bahamas



Crawford St., Oakes Field

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 © 325-3079 Tel: 323-5171 Fax: 322-6969

Visit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway ° 352-6122





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5



@In brief Workers Party steps up call
- for sacking of Fred Mitchell

Two women
in hospital
after car
accident

FREEPORT - Two
women were hospitalised
early Monday morning when
the vehicle they were in over-
turned and crashed into a
house on Bayshore Road,
Eight Mile Rock.

According to reports, the
accident occurred in the Rus-
sell Town area around
12.27am when Anastacia
Cooper, 21, of Hanna Hill,
EMR, lost control of a
maroon coloured Ford Tau-
rus, licence number 39750.

_ Shauna Theog, 20, also a
resident of Hanna Hill, was a
passenger in the car.

The vehicle skidded off the

_road and overturned several
times before crashing into the
residence of Mr Philip Out-
ten and another vehicle that
was parked in the ‘yard.

Ms Cooper’s vehicle was
extensively damaged. A por-
tion of Mr Outten’s home
and a vehicle that was parked
in the yard was also exten-
sively damage.

Both women were injured
and taken by ambulance to
the Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, where they underwent
surgery. They are both list-

- ed in stable condition.

No one inside the house
was injured.

Although police are still
continuing their investiga-
tions, Mr Rahming said that
excessive speed appears to
be the cause of the accident.

Turnquest:
I left FNM

because of
leadership

FORMER MP Lester
Turnquest claims that FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham’s
style of leadership was the
main reason he left his for-
mer party and is now backing
the PLP. .

Speaking with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Turn-
quest said that Mr Ingraham
had his time to govern and
he would have liked to have
seen new leadership for the
FNM.

“Mr Ingraham had his

_time. Mr Ingraham’s style of
leadership is not one that I
like, nor is it one that I can
support. It is as simple as
that,” Mr Turnquest said.

"What I would have want-
ed to see in the Free Nation-
al Movement would have
been a changing of the
guard,” Mr Turnquest said.

“In reality that has not
happened and the party is
entitled and well within its
rights to go back to the past
and say that they want Mr
Ingraham to lead them, but,
as a young Bahamian man, I
prefer to move forward,” Mr
Turnquest said.

“My position is that, what-
ever failings Prime Minister
Christie may have, as we all
have, Mr Christie seeks to
unite and Mr Ingraham in
reality is a divider,” Mr Turn-

quest said.

TV 18 SCHEDULE

TUESDAY,
JANUARY 9

6:00 Community page 1540am
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
Island Life Destinations
Ethnic Health America
Thousand Dollar Bee

Aqua Kids

Kemp Road Ministries

Ernest Leonard

Little Robots

Carmen San Diego

ZNS News Update

The Fun Farm

One Cubed

News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

Kristen Penn-Davis Launch
Ceremony

Island Lifestyles

Holby City

10: 00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves tne
right to make last minute






























THE Workers Party has
renewed its call for the sacking
of Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell, claiming his former
website had launched a “sexist”
attack on appeal court presi-
‘dent Dame Joan Sawyer.

It said Dame Joan had
become the latest person to be
“knifed” on the former fred-
mitchelluncensored website for
saying something critical of the
government.

The party blamed Prime Min-
ister Pony Christie for allowing

the website to continue under
another name, saying he was
“too weak and indecisive to halt
this filthy and sexist diatribe.”

And it said the site should
have ended with Mr Mitchell’s
appointment to the Cabinet.

The party had previously
called for Mr Mitchell’s dismissal
for allegedly “dropping the ball”
in the case of The Florida Five -
the baggage handlers arrested
in Fort Lauderdale for alleged
drug smuggling.

It has alleged that the gov-

ernment was involved in a con-
spiracy to undermine Bahamian
sovereignty and circumvent the
extradition process.

In a speech last week, Dame
Joan asked what justice in the
Bahamas meant, referring to

- 200 cases that had remained

unresolved since the 1990s.

@ FRED Mitchell has
been criticised by the
Workers Party



New security initiative to be
opened at container port



JOHN Rood is expected for
the opening of the security
programme

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Contain-
er Security Initiative pro-
gramme, which allows for pre-
screening of containers at
Freeport Container Port, will
be officially launched on
Wednesday.

US Ambassador John Rood
and Prime Minister Perry
Christie are expected to arrive
in Freeport for the official
launching ceremony that will
take place at 10am at the con-
tainer port.

Mr William Heffelinger III,
Deputy Assistant Commission-
er in the Office of Field Opera-
tions, also will attend and speak
at the commissioning.

In August 2006, US Customs

and Border Protection (CBP)
and the government signed an
agreement to participate in the
Container Security Initiative
(CSI) programme that ensures
that all maritime cargo destined
for the United States through
the port of Freeport will be pre-
screened for terrorist and
weapons.

According to a press release
issued by the US Embassy, CSI
is a key initiative designed to
prevent global maritime cargo
from being exploited by terror-
ists intent to cause harm in
America and other nations
worldwide.

The container port is located
65 miles from Fort Lauderdale.
About 40 per cent of cargo con-
tainers at FCP are destined for
ports in the US.

Initially, when the memo-
randum of understanding was
signed between the Depart-
ment of Energy of the United
States of America and the Min-
istry of Finance in December
of 2004, the Bahamas became
the first country in the
Caribbean to participate in the
initiative.

Last October, the equipment
that will be used to pre-screen
containers were installed at the
port. US Customs officials also
will be deployed at the site.

The Megaport Initiative
works with foreign governments
to install sophisticated equip-
ment to deter, detect and inter-
dict illicit trafficking in nuclear
and other radioactive materi-
als.

The initiative helps to make

the Bahamas’ port safer by
reducing the probability that
such materials could be used in
a weapon of mass destruction
or a radiological dispersal
device against communities in
the United States.

While in Freeport, Ambas-
sador Rood is also expected to
visit two primary schools on the
island.

He will first visit Mary, Star
of the Sea School at 2pm, and
then Martin Town Primary at
2.40pm. Mr Rood will present
each school with an auto-
graphed photo along with a per-
sonalised letter from first lady
Laura Bush thanking the
schools for participating in
Ambassador Rood’s Reading
Initiative Programme.

ecu tLbg 0k eieGtdoaZs on ssn ide sbvusbennvdduasssae)tebsvdeaseovsvecuascheoubassndusccctstendgsaaades usetyaeaaeatuckevasa cauepseOelaneeheedh deeds nenees betas HEE TENET ane ee ee ne ee ee a ee eat tet nt te a ee ee ne eae eee eee eee SET

800 new students expected for spring term at COB

ANOTHER semester is
about to begin at The College
of The Bahamas as it maintains
its momentum towards full uni-
versity status in the near future.
Committed to expanding its stu-
dent population, the College is
welcoming about 800 new stu-
dents — 600 in Nassau and 200 in
Grand Bahama -— for the Spring
Semester 2007.

To put these first-year stu-
dents firmly on the path to suc-
cess in their college career,
COB began its annual orienta-
tion for new students on Janu-
ary 3 this year.

Student Orientation, Advise-
ment and Registration (SOAR)
is a programme of activities
comprising a variety of presen-
tations, mini-lectures, socials
and a parents evening, is
designed to give the new stu-

dents the opportunity to accli-
matize themselves to the chal-
lenges and opportunities of col-
lege life generally, particularly
by providing information to
help new students understand
ways to make the most of their
time at COB. WIN

Vice-President of Student
Affairs, Colyn Major, explained:
“There are all sorts of academ-
ic rules, including dates and
deadlines, social rules, includ-
ing do’s and don’ts. There are
also many available services
that the new students really
need to know about if they are
to function to the best of their
academic potential and devel-
op individually as people. We
try to give them an overview of
all these in the orientation
process.”

Dr Rhonda Chipman-John-

COB appoints new head of
hospitality propgramme

THE College of the
Bahamas has appointed a new
executive director to head ‘its
Culinary and Hospitality Man-
agement Institute.

Dr Liacoln Marshall, a pro-
fessional with many awards to
his credit, is to help the insti-
tute realise its potential as a
major player in developing
young Bahamian talent to take
advantage of increasing oppor-
tunities in a burgeoning
Bahamas tourism and hospital-
ity industry — particularly in
connection with the new resort
anchor projects throughout the
islands.

A man with strong links to
the country and the College of
the Bahamas and a wealth of
experience in both academics

and the hospitality industry, Dr’

Marshall returns to COB 28
years after his first stint at the
Oakes Field campus.

He worked in the office of
admissions from 1977 to 1979
and spent four years at the
Bahamas Hotel Training College
in the 1980s. Dr Marshall has
also worked in France, Mada-
gascar, Grand Bahama, Cable
Beach and Washington, DC.

When he was a student at
Government High School, Dr
Keva Bethel, COB’s first presi-
dent, was his homeroom
teacher and during his first spell
at the college, the current pres-
ident, Janyne Hodder, was
teaching reading in the Human-
ities Department. -

“I regard COB rather like
an old girl friend,” he said, “and
I am looking forward to becom-
ing reacquainted.

Born in Over-the-Hill Mil-
ton Street, Dr Marshall attend-
ed St John’s College before

moving on to Government High
to study for his ‘A’ levels. Upon
graduating, he went to Grinnell
College in Iowa for his first
degrees before attending The
George Washington Universi-
ty to complete his PhD.

Dr Marshall is a hands-on
trainer and educator for the hos-
pitality industry. “I was director
of Training and Development at
Carnival’s Crystal Palace when it
first opened on Cable Beach,”
he recollects, “and I set up a
training and service academy
that was unique at its time. It
was very much the forerunner
to what Atlantis is doing now.”

Prior to returning to the
Bahamas he was working at the
George Washington Universi-
ty’s School of Business in the
Tourism and Hospitality
Department. Once again focus-
ing on training for the industry,
he designed and developed six
hotel certificate programmes for
students already working in the
industry, in addition to work-
ing with the National Indian
Gaming Association.

Excited to be back in the
Bahamas and sensing the great
opportunities that COB’s pre-
sent direction is offering, Dr
Marshall has already devised a
strategic plan for the Institute
for the next three years and
brings with him energy and
desire to succeed. “I am not a sit
in my office type of director,”
he says, “I like to go walkabout
and move around. I believe this
will be essential if we are to
build the type of relationships
that we need to maintain the
Institute’s and COB’s position
in the forefront of culinary, hos-
pitality and tourism develop-
ment in the country.”

son, Vice-President Academic
Affairs, sees the orientation
process as essential for students
who are taking their first steps
in the waters of tertiary educa-
tion. “We want our students to
become familiar with the Col-
lege’s policies and procedurés
from the people who know,”
she said. “We don’t want them
to hear about them second hand
from a friend.”

Among the presentations
organized at this semester’s ori-
entation day were sessions on
“Reaching Your Academic
Potential”, “Libraries Informa-
tion”, “Using Technology”,
“Safety and Security” and
“Sex”. In addition to these top-
ics that were presented by COB
counsellors, administrators and
Management Information Ser-
vices personnel, COB Union of

Accredited + Registered -

Contact us now for

Students representatives spoke

about student life at COB.
Aware of the role parents

can play in assisting their young

adults in. college life, the Stu-

dent Services personnel also
invited parents to play a.role in
the: orientation process.In\a
presentation designed to
encourage them to treat their
offspring as adults, parents were
encouraged to let go of the
apron strings, but to continue
to monitor so they know exact-
ly what is going on.
Improvements in the regis-
tration process were a welcome
highlight of SOAR this year.
College administration took
steps to reduce the long lines

by decentralizing the process..

“Returning students were able
to register on-line and eventu-
ally, on-line registration will

eliminate the lines altogether,”
said Director of Counselling
and Health Services, Stan
Smith.

Approximately 400 students
attended the orientation pro-
gramme in Nassau and a anoth-
er 100 on the Freeport campus.
“A 60 per cent turnout was
encouraging,” said Mr Major,
“but we won’t be satisfied until
we have all our first year stu-
dents attending.” .

The College is determined
to improve its student services
and Dr Chipman-Johnson
believes that one improvement
would be to hold a second part
to the orientation programme
later in the semester to rein-
force what was presented at the
initial meeting. “It really is a lot
to take in at one sitting,” she
explained.

Diploma in Education

A Specially-Designed
Ya eM MELE LAG LLL LLM LO
Convenient Weekend Class Schedule
Hands-on Practicum (Reacher Training)
Lixperienced, Respected Lecturers and Xssessors

U.S. Certification (Praxis) Component
Atfordable Tuition Rates
Payment Plan Available

Classes begin on gth February, 2006

oe now for nO information

Call us at Ph: 394-8570 + Or Fax: 394- ee)

TCE ELUTE UEC HLS Ce LULL ald visit us at http:sojournerdouglassblogspot.com
Claes Colt Circle A EE) a! Street.

‘erseateat tint ontatrenAe

canton “ae BN con ET ANE OMNES MNT







THE TRIBUNE

Farquharson: we'll be
prepared for elections

THIS year the Royal
Bahamas Police Force is expect-
ed to ensure that they are prop-
erly prepared and equipped for
the upcoming general elections,
police commissioner Paul Far-

quharson said yesterday at the |

Senior officers attend seminars on keeping peace



delivery of his annual report to
the nation.

Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

For the 2007/2008 School Year will be
held on January 13, 2007 at 8:00 am
at Kingsway Academy High School,
located on Bernard Road.

The examination is for those
students wishing to enter grades 7-10.

Application forms

are available

at the High School Office. The

application fee

is thirty

dollars

($30.00), to be made payable at
Kingsway Business Office on or before

Friday January 12, 2007

For Further
information Call

324-8811 or 324-3409









SmartChoice

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com



2006 FORD FUSION
$29,200.00

2.3L 4Cylinder Automatic
Full size luxury, loaded with leather
Make the SmartChoice!

See the full line of your favourite Ford vehicles at

IENDLY MOTORS LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ¢ TEL.: 356-7100 « FAX: 328-6094

¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

“All senior officers have been
put on notice since our last day
away and we are now in the
advance stages of ensuring that
officers are (equipped) with the
relevant laws and regulations
as they relate to the role of the
police in a general election,”
Mr Farquharson said.

In the commissioner’s policy
statement he said the force is
to ensure peaceful general elec-
tions.

He said that this election
promises to be as vibrant, active

cand challenging as those in the

past.

“We are fortunate to have a
populus that has historically
approached the general elec-
tions without violence. Howev-
er, the Royal Bahamas Police
Force will approach this elec-
tion season with strategic plan-
ning and training,” the com-

Rapes
three

@ By PAULG TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

REPORTED rapes in the
Bahamas have been on a “con-
tinual decline” over the past three
years, police revealed yesterday
during the annual press briefing at
Police Headquarters.

Last year, there were 72 report-
ed rape matters - a 12 per cent
decrease compared to the 82
reported in 2005, and a 16 per
cent decrease compared to the 86
reported in 2004.

Reports of attempted rape



PART OF YOUR LIFE

missioner said.

He said that officers must be
prepared for all incidents that
relate to public nuisance and
disturbances. “Accordingly offi-

cers are not to display any.

appearance of nepotism and
shall remain professional in
policing the 2007 general elec-
tions,” the commissioner said.

During 2006 senior comman-
ders and middle managers
attended seminars and meet-
ings to plan for the general elec-
tion. Topics of discussion
included:

e The role and authority of
the parliamentary registratio
department;

e The electoral process and
procedures;

e Public order and enforce-

* ment of all laws under the par-

liamentary registration act and
e limitations and obligations









@ PAUL Farquharson during the delivery of his annual report

yesterday

of the police before during and
after the election period. |

It is expected that officers will
utilise their training in public
order and crowd control so as to
prevent any disruptions at polit-
ical rallies and polling stations.

“Meanwhile we must ensure
that voters are not subject to

fear or any form of intimida-
tion. No form of anarchy will
be tolerated and such behav-
iour is non-negotiable. Officers
will exercise reasonable discre-
tion and prudent judgment in
the execution of their duties,”
Commissioner Farquharson
said.

in decline over past
ears, report reveals

showed a 26 per cent decline from
31 in 2004 to 23 in 2005 and 2006.
“It is interesting to note,” the
report stated, “that for the rape
matters reported in 2006, 40 of
the rape victims knew or were
acquainted with the assailant pri-
or to the commission of the crime.
“This victim-suspect ‘relation’
is a possible explanation for why
residences, whether victim or sus-
pect, was the most common
venue for the commission of the
crime followed by the suspect’s
vehicle which accounted for nine
cases, or 13 per cent of rapes.
“The rémainder occurred in
bushes With nine (13 per cent),

on beaches, seven (10 per cent),
hotels, four (six per cent) and at
other business establishments,
two (three per cent).”

The majority of these rapes, it
was revealed, occurred in the
Carmichael Division (10), with
the Southern Division coming a
close second with nine.

Eight matters were reported in
the Bain Town area, with four
being linked with other crimes,
such as armed robbery and bur-
glaries.

The Central Division also
reported eight rapes, with the
South-eastern Division reporting
seven. The Western Division had

six rape cases, and the Eastern
and the Grove Divisions both
reported four.

The North-eastern Division
recorded the least rapes with
three.

However, Grand Bahama
recorded 14 rapes, while the rest
of the seven cases were shared
among Abaco, Andros, Long
Island and San Salvador.

“Coupled with the fact that
there has been a constant
decrease of reported rapes within
recent years, the relentless efforts
of investigators have ensured that
the detection of rapes has height-
ened,” the report stated.



Fire blazes through
market in Port-au-Prince







@ ABOVE: A marked ven-
dor throws a bucket of water
as smoke billows after a fire
ripped through the La Cou-
ple market destroying mer-
chandise but causing no
injuries in the suburb of
Petionville in Port-au-Prince,
Monday, Jan. 8, 2007. The
cause of the blaze wasn't
immediately clear, but some
bystanders accused political
militants of torching the mar-
ket in a feud over last mon-
th's disputed local elections.
Police did not immediately
comment on the fire.



@ LEFT: A market vendor
carries his pet through the
burned out La Couple mar-
ket.

(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)



THE TRIBUNE

|



Gun crime reported

POLICE REPORT 2007

-as down in 2006



Detective Unit

@ CHIEF Supt Marvin Dames, officer in charge of the Central



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE re-focused fight
against illegal firearms is prov-
ing successful — as the use of
guns in both murders and
armed robberies decreased in
20006.

Speaking yesterday at the
police’s 2007 “meet the press
event” Chief Supt Marvin

~ Dames, officer in charge of the

Central Detective Unit, said
that last year the force record-
ed significant successes in their
effort to remove guns from the
country’s streets.

Mr Dames pointed out that
although there was a 15 per
cent increase of murders in
2006 compared to the previ-
ous year, there was a five per
cent drop in the use of
firearms during the commis-
sion of homicides.

In 2005, 65 per cent of all
murders were committed with
guns; in 2006 gunshot wounds
were the cause of death in 60
per cent of cases.

In the case of armed rob-
beries, Mr Dames said, police

saw a 35 per cent decrease in
the use of firearms.

Police officers, he said, have
done “a tremendous job in
keeping the firearm holders at
bay.” /

“The most common type of
firearm used to commit mur-
der was the 9mm, which has
been a trend in the last 15
years,” said the Central Detec-
tive Unit in its report for 2006.

A 9mm revolver was used
in 18, or 49 per cent, of all gun-
related murders.

“Hence, the vast majority of
gun related murders were
committed with the use of ille-
gal firearms, 90 per cent being
handguns,” the report said. _

The CDU further reported
that a significant increase in
the use of shotguns during the
commission of armed rob-
beries was observed last year.

The use of shotguns
increased by 55 per cent; from
29 cases in 2005 to 45 in 2006.

“It is believed that many of
these weapons were stolen
from the homes of licensed
shotgun holders,” the CDU
said.

Public claims that fear of crime
affecting their peace of mind

lm By CRYSTAL
JOHNSON-COLLIE

THE fear of robbery, rape
_and murder is destroying the
peace of mind of more and
more Bahamians who feel the
country is spiralling towards
chaos.

Members of the public say
they are aware that every day, a
murder or attempted murder is
committed somewhere in the
Bahamas — or a house is bur-
gled, a woman or child raped, or
someone physically abused.

Now, they say, the curse of
violent crime is not just in the
ghettos or depressed areas —
where it has long had a pres-
ence — but in all urban areas
and many suburbs and former-
ly quiet neighbourhoods.

In response to the spreading
fear, Bahamians are increasing-
ly arming themselves. “This is a
very serious issue, and I feel the
government needs to enforce
much more strict penalties for
persons caught breaking the
law,” said Patrick Wright, a res-
ident of the Fox Hill communi-

YOUR CONNECTION TO T

ty. “Many Bahamians have lost
confidence in our law enforce-
ment officials and strongly
believe that the police cannot
protect them.”

Other ordinary citizens who
spoke with The Tribune said
they are buying guard dogs, sup-
plies of Mace, knives and even
guns.

Locksmiths and burglar alarm

businesses are flourishing, as _

are martial arts and target
shooting schools. Banks have
long waiting lists for safety-
deposit boxes and many citizens
feel the nation’s sidewalks are
filled with muggers; both young
and old dread walking in cer-
tain areas.

But what is the reality behind
the growing fear? Crime statis-
tics have always been consid-
ered incomplete, as many vic-
tims avoid police, the courts or

-exposure of any kind.

While murders are almost
always recorded, it is widely
accepted that rape is under-
reported.

Historically, officers in charge
of police stations were suspect-

6

ed of down-playing the figures
in an effort to defend the image
of the force.

As one. senior officer
explains: “When I was a recruit
at several of the police stations,
no police chief worth his sweat
would admit they couldn't con-
trol crime — and they proved it
by controlling crime statistics.”

Since then, the force has
become more accountable — and
with this change has come the
realisation that the vast majori-
ty of law-abidig citizens are
being held hostage by the
unreasonable behaviour of a
relatively small cadre of career
criminals.

“Crime is the most serious
thing we face today,” said a
local judge. “It has an enormous
impact on the quality of peo-
ple's lives. It determines where
we walk, what time we walk,
even whether we play dominoes
at night and whether we go to
the theater.”

Those who stand on the front
line of the battle against crime
insist all Bahamians must break
out of their fortresses and join the

HE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE
Bae

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited (BTC) wishes to inform our valued
customers and the general public that BTC
will be conducting a routine service upgrade
to our cable network beginning Thursday
January 4° and concluding Friday January
12'", 2007. Due to this service upgrade,
subscribers in the following areas may
experience interruptions in land line services;
Blue Hill Road South between Cowpen Road
and Marshall Road, Zion Blvd to Zion Baptist
Church South Beach and Jasmine Gardens.
BTC values our customers and apologizes for
any inconvenience caused during this time.



fight — not in a physical way,
but as part of the search for
solutions. Drug traffickers can
be shunned, those who carry
illegal guns can be reported,
the criminal justice system can
be improved, and citizens turn
their fear and anger into the
kind of public pressure that will
make a difference.

Above all, police officers
argue, citizens must care
about their neighbors' safety
as well as their own.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7







FARA ARG HON 9 SSE EEE

BRAY RAMMING:






EMERGENCY 3 Eo
CRIME TIPSTERS 242-328-8474
cpu iy QUARTERS - NASSAU



Royal Bahamas Police Force
2007 MOST WANTED






POLICE CONTROL - NASSAL
TAMIA ENE R CL cent I ts
DE Peepers meats Prec kod Wile te






STAN AMEEY

sy, eters Hoobi toe



WATNE MAHER

2 REPRE BEN





PL CERES RSI
MA 242-380-3014
ee)











UUSVARED BY THE CAN TBA OF





@ POLICE have released this poster of their ‘mosted wanted’
for 2007. Anyone with information should call Crime Tipsters on
328-8474 or the CDU on 322-2561-3

Large drop in fire deaths

THERE was a 33 per cent
decrease in fire deaths last year,
fire chief Jeffrey Deveaux has
revealed.

In- addition, there was a 19
per cent fall-off in injured per-
sons and a successful rescue by
firemen of a male from a burn-
ing two-storey building in July.

Total reported emergency
incidents in 2005 were 1,931.
For 2006 fire calls totalled 1,776.
This reduction by 155 repre-
sents an eight per cent decrease.

The major contributor to this
decrease were garbage fires,
which fell by 30 per cent, and
the special service category with
a 46 per cent decline.

All other categories showed |.

slight increases except: yessel
fires and miscellaneous items,

with increases of 100“per-cent-

Come to the

and 50 per cent respectively.

There was a I|7 per cent
increase in what the department
considered “significant fires”
whereas overall fire damage
increased by 74 per cent.

The fire service saw an over-
all reduction in emergencies and
an increase in equipment.

Included in daily training
exercises were 31 new fire offi-
cers who joined in July last year.

Entry level training for this
team of 25 men and six women
began in March, 2006, at the
Police Training College.

Upon graduating, the officers
received eight weeks of rigor-
ous practical training.

The water supply section con-
ducted weekly checks of fire
hydrants, borewells and excavat-
ed wells ready for any emergency: ~

hurch of God of Prophec

Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing ©
Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and

~ Evangelistic Crusa e

Sunday, January [4th to Friday, January 19th, 2007

At 7:30p.m. Nightly at

The East Street Tabernacle
East Street and Sunlight Village

Under the Theme:

“IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

Dynamuc Speakers are:

Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudolph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.O.G)

Hear our anointed Soloists, Antoine Cunningham,
hiliy , Gerard Butler, Shanette

National Crusade (
Tabernacle Concert Choir, the
Team and by the Chur





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 9



are commemorated

Women immortalised
on marble plaque



@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE —

AFTER 118 years of self-
less service to the Bahamas’
social and educational devel-
opment, the Sisters of Charity,
who “blessed the Bahamas”
with their presence, have been
commemorated.

In a ceremony on Thursday,
January 4, the names of those
women were immortalised.

A marble plaque, was set in
stone on the walls of the cathe-
dral during the liturgical cele-
bration at St Francis Xavier.
It reads, “This plaque com-
memorates our eternal grati-
tude to the Sisters of Charity
of Mount St. Vincent on the
Hudson, New York who were
the first permanent Catholic
Missionaries in the Bahamas.
Upon their arrival in Nassau
on October 28, 1889, the sisters
immediately set about estab-
lishing schools, clinics, com-
munity programmes and
administering to the poor.”

It was over a century ago
when the first five nuns,
accompanied by Mother Gen-
eral Mary Ambrosia Sweeney,
arrived in the Bahamas at the
request of Archbishop Michael
Corrigan of New York. It is
these five nuns and 203 of their
sisters who followed, whose
names are on the wall of the
Cathedral.

Stopping first in Nassau the
Sisters of Charity came to lend
a hand to a parish desperate
for assistance. In addition to
helping the struggling St Fran-
cis Xavier parish, and opening
the school for the impover-
ished, the nuns opened sever-
al clinics, day care centres and
often visited the prison.

During a period in the
Bahamas when racial and
social lines separated those
who were educated from those
who were not — the Sisters of
Charity, who opened a free
school for poor children, rep-
resented hope — that change
was on the horizon.

They came during a time
when the Bahamas needed
them most, some observers
believe.

In the past, no other non-
government agency in the
Bahamas devoted so much

an energetic (€AM player with a desire to work with the very .












_ the past 118 years.

Charity.

time and money to the educa-
tion of the poor.

Now, only one Sister of
Charity remains. "The last of
the Mohicans" is how she
describes herself. Having spent
43 years in the Bahamas —
more time than she has spent
in her hometown, New York
— Sister Joan Anderson said
Nassau is her second home.

The only remaining Sister
of Charity in the Bahamas
described the honour a special
one and one that would always
be dear to her heart.

Dedicating her life to her
work here in the Bahamas, Sis-
ter Joan serves as the admin-
istrator of the Nazareth Cen-
tre, a home for abused chil-
dren and women.

Describing her feelings after
the plaque was unveiled, she
said, “It was a very emotional
feeling. The whole Mass and
all of the people that came out
for it — it gives you a really
good feeling of people being
grateful to the sisters for their
many years of work here.”

Although many deceased
some even buried locally, each
name, engraved on the plaque
will stand as a reminder of the
sisters’ dedication to the finan-
cially distressed people of the
Bahamas.

Each name represents the
enormous sacrifice, and the
huge effort it took to complete
the monumental task of edu-
cating and uplifting the down-
trodden in the Bahamas.

Over the past 118 years of
the Sisters of Charity’s exis-
tence in the Bahamas, 208
nuns have contributed to the
development of the Bahamas,
including two Bahamians, Sis-
ter Elizabeth Claridge and Sis-
ter Theresa Symonette (now
deceased). Facing a dire
future, being the last sister in
the Bahamas, Sister Joan
hopes that the line will contin-
ue. Always optimistic, she said,
“You never know what the
future will bring.”

During the ceremony, cur-
rent president of the Sisters of
Charity, Sister Dorothy Metz,
thanked the people of the
Bahamas for allowing the sis-
ters to work among them for

yy

LE

ty

(Photo: Ana-Bianca Marin)

@ A STATUE of the Virgin Mary and
Baby Jesus stands in front of a plaque
bearing the names of the 208 Sisters of

Job Opportunity

Warehouse Manager

Are yo

We are seeking a passionate, results orientated
Leader to manage our Warehouse. Primary
responsibilities include team development
in warehousing & delivery, with 100%
customer satisfaction in terms of product
quality, timeliness 8 courtesy.

Plus Group of Companies is an established
Bahamian owned group that is growing &
continuing to build it's team of professionals
in various areas.

We offer a competitive salary & benefits
package as well as ongoing professional
ining & development.

ua

Skills Required:

Experience in high volume
warehousing & delivery a plus:

Excellent leadership, coaching &

communication skills

A strong team player able to interact with
many departments

A strong work ethic with a high
attention to detail
A desire to learn new skills & improvement

An ability to keep damages, returns &
exchanges at or below company targets




If we've piqued your interest, Let's Ta’ k! ! .










” Limited

Please submit your application by Mail to:

Director of Human Resources
The Plus Group
PO. Box N713

_ Nassau, Bahamas

or eMail: jobs@theplusgroup.com

We thank all applicants, however only those
~ selected for an interview will be contacted,

Furniture ¢ Appliances © Electronics



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 11



aa oa ee
Chamber of Commerce plans after hours

event following Mix ‘n’ Mingle success _

ON THE heels of an
extremely successful pre-
Christmas “Mix ‘n Mingle”
networking event, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce has announced the cre-
ation of the monthly Business
After Hours event.

Business After Hours will be
held the last Thursday of each
month at various New Provi-
dence business establishments.
Designed to be smaller, more
intimate networking events,
Business After Hours will also
give local businesses an oppor-
tunity to showcase their prod-
ucts and services to attendees.

“We've come to realise that
the Bahamian business com-
munity craves and needs net-
working opportunities in a
social setting,” said BCOC
president Tanya Wright. “Part
of our role as the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce is to
help create and facilitate such
opportunities.”

Over Christmas week, the
BCOC teamed up with San-

dals Royal Bahamian and the ~

Burns House Group to throw
what has become known in the
Bahamian business arena as a
premier networking event —
the Mix n Mingle.

Hundreds of the country’s
most influential business-peo-
ple came out to meet new
acquaintances and. re-connect
with old ones at the holiday
event.

“Throughout the room you
could see introductions being
_ made. And when you know
the people and the businesses
they represent, it was clear that
some important business con-
nections happened that
evening,” said Philip Simon,
executive director of the

Bahamas Chamber of Com-

merce.

The holiday Mix n Mingle
far exceeded expectations, the
organisers said. This time, the

Arrests, prosecutions —
for drug related = -
offences down in ’06

m By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY the year,

Tribune Staff Reporter

cecevcavevcescereparsenccccescecoqesveneneusereseegesonuseaeaeoneneensagesynunsranpnavanngacescasanengeanreranangscsaager ert

event was opened up to non-
members as well, to give more
business people an‘opportuni-
ty to better understand the
benefits of chamber member-
ship.

The team at Sandals Royal ‘
Bahamian hosted the event in oe es ee
April and again in December ca .
and according to director of
sales Andre Newbold, the pay-
off has been tremendous.

“We wanted to have an
opportunity to showcase our
services to the business com-
munity, and the Mix n Mingle
has been a tremendous success
for us. It was important for us
to present the right image to
corporate Bahamas and by
linking up with a reputable
organisation like the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, we
were able to do just that,” he
said,

Sandals used the opportuni-
ty to promote its ballroom
facilities and catering services
as well as the day spa that is
open to the Bahamian public.































@ ABOVE: Mark Ageeb was
one of the first 100 attendees to
register and won a Blackberry.
Presenting him with his prize
Tanya Wright, president of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce. Andre Newbold, director
of sales at Sandals and Antoinette
Butler, BCOC project manager,
are also pictured.

@ LEFT: Judy Hamilton, Ginn
Sur Mer; Danielle Woodside and
Sheria Bacchus of Island Desti-
nations; and Richa Sands had a
great time at the BCOC Mix n
Mingle.


















: heer

The commander also reported that
transnational drug traffickers continued to

PERSONS arrested and prosecuted for
drug-related offences for 2006 totalled 1219,
compared to 1401 for 2005, according to
Raymond Gibson, Commander of the Drug
Enforcement Unit.

In his presentation to the press yester-
day, Commander Gibson said illicit drug
trafficking contributed significantly to the
continuance of serious crimes, inclusive of
rape, robberies, burglary, serious harm, mur-
der and other criminal activities in 2006.

Successful

He reported that the Drug Enforcement
Unit was successful in seizing millions of
dollars from proceeds derived from drug
trafficking, as well as vessels, vehicles and
other properties, which were used in the
trafficking of illicit drugs. ,

The Drug Enforcement Unit then pre-
sented the press with a video presentation,
which was narrated by Commander Gibson,
of drug matters and statistics for the year
2006,

Commander Gibson said the cultivation of
marijuana in various family islands contin-
ues to be a recurring trend in the Bahamas,

"In 2006, five marijuana fields were dis-
covered in Andros, four in Eleuthera, two in
Grand Bahama and one in Cat Island,

"Sometime on January 20, 2006, officers
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, while
on helicopter patrol in the Owens Town,
North Andros area observed a male con-
cealing himself in a bush area. A check of
the area revealed a make-shift structure,
with personal effects, food and cooking
utensils, Officers while checking a clearing
next to the tent discovered over 2,000 mar-
ijuana plants. Two Jamaican males were lat-
er arrested and charged for illegal drug cul-
tivation,"

The top cop of the drug unit said the DEU
and the Defence Force Harbour Patrol Unit
confiscated a number of Haitian sloops in
2006, after significant amounts of marijuana
and cocaine were discovered concealed
between the ribs of these vessels throughout

use various methods of concealment to
import illicit drugs into the Bahamas
through international airports.

"On Friday, 3 November, 2006, officers
of the Drug Enforcement Unit Freeport
Office, along with Bahamas Customs, and
Container Port Security Department, act-
ing on information, searched a container
transiting through the Bahamas and des-
tined for Nigeria, 26 boxes filled with 285
grey, black and clear packages of cocaine
were in this container totalling 627 pounds."

"On Sunday, 26 March, 2006, officers
while at Roses, Long Island observed a Mit-
subishi vehicle with two male occupants. A
search of the area and arrest of the sub-
jects, revealed 30 bales of marijuana with a
weight of 1,353 pounds hidden in some
bushes, The subjects and two others were

_ later charged for this matter."

According to Commander Gibson, statis-
tics for 2006 showed cocaine seizures
totalled 2,680 lbs, marijuana totalled 11,733
lbs, and marijuana plants confiscated
totalled 41,068,

Seized

Additionally, he said, for the same period
$2,061,497,78 suspected to be proceeds
derived from criminal conduct was seized
by the Drug Enforcement Unit.

Chief Superintendent Marvin Dames, the
former head of the DEU and current officer
in charge of the Criminal Detective Unit,
also commented on drug matters for 2006.

He said: "During the past year officers of
the DEU have put a number of persons out
of business and behind bars. Some of these
were barons who were operating what can
only be described as drug super markets,
while others were running small operations
in some of the more challenged communi-
ties,"

Superintendent Dames said he wanted to
serve notice on all drug dealers, "be they the
king-pin, or the mom and pop petty dealer",
that they will be targeted and brought
before the courts in 2007.

A FRIENDLY REMINDER |

MASS DISCONNECTION EXERCISES
_IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

¢ Rosetta * Kemp Road and all side corners

° Village Road ¢ Soldier Road ¢ Prince Charles Dr. to
Village Road * Dannottage Estates Village Estate, =|
« Nassau Village « Blair Estate * Fox Hill {

e Yamacraw Beach « Monastery Park ¢ College Gardens
¢ East Park Estate * Seabreeze Estate & Imperial Park
¢ Hillside Park * Bay St. & Victoria Ave. « Centreville i
¢ Palmdale including Madeira St.* Mt. Royal Ave.and
Mt. Rose Ave. and all side corners.

PRIORITIZE! |

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!





(

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon
or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations

a —





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

| ee rr ee





Your look at what’s going on in your community















our new location.



Street (the former IBM Building).

| Visit or call your Agent
| at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

’remium payment functions will be
nsferred from Collins Avenue to our
arbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

FAMILY





our continuing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay

GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY

} RE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O, BOX SS 6232



NEVILLETT Pearce, author
OF Science for Junior High- A
Complete Course for Bahamian
Junior Schools, has made a $1000
donation to a local non-profit
environmental agency.

Mrs Pearce said she wanted
to show her appreciation for the
impact that the Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational
Foundation (BREEF) has had
on her career,

This summer Mrs Pearce,
who is also the head of the sci-
ence department at Kingsway
Academy, attended BREEF’s
10-day Marine Conservation
Teacher Training Workshop,
held annually in San Salvador,

At the workshop, 23 teachers
from throughout the Bahamas
had the opportunity to experi-
ence and learn about the
Bahamian marine environment.

She said the experience has

- left an indelible impression on

her and affects her teaching,
At the end of the workshop
she commented, “I anxiously
look forward to sharing the
wealth of knowledge and expe-

PEUP EAP OED EOP EO ROT EO pO ROE ERED E EES Trent enereeer renee reeeren enn en er

Local teacher
and author gives
_ back to BREEF .

*

3

riences that I have gained with
my students and colleagues.”

’ Her donation will go to sup-
port BREEF’s work and help
give other teachers the same
opportunity.

Mrs Pearce said she attribut-
es the success of her text book
in part to BREEF.

With the organisation’s help,
she was able to write about the
ecology of the Bahamas, expos-
ing students to local examples
not covered in foreign texts. °,

“J am humbled that God should
choose to use.me in this way, and
I want to express my gratitude | to
Him for giving me the vision, and
bringing together all the people,
resources and circumstances ‘to
accomplish His purpose in the
writing of this book.”

BREEF’s executive director
Casuarina McKinney expressed
her sincere thanks to Mrs
Pearce, one of BREEF’s newest
members,

This year the annual teacher
training workshop will be held
from July 15 to 22 at the Gerace
Research Center on San Salvador.



Youth RT CRIES GG



@ MEMBERS of the Governor General Youth Awards Com-
mittee paid a courtesy call Governor General Arthur Hanna at.
Government House on Wednesday 22nd November. Pictured
from left are Jacquetta Lightbourne, Gold Award-halder; Jason .
Curry, Gold Award holder; Arthur Hanna; Davidson Hepburn, -
chairman of committee; Susan Glinton, National Council mem="

_ber.and Helen Adderley; fi field-officer.” >=
(BIS photo by Kris Ingraham)



BAHAMAS FIRST

FIRST IN INSURANCE. TODAY. TOMORROW.













a Ea oa tt

JE

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 The Tribune

B BUSINESS

| Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010







business@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas banker’s group

to acquire Film Studios

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

n investor
group put
together by a
Bahamian
banker has
reached an agreement to
acquire the rights to develop
the Bahamas Film Studios, the
3,500-acre site in Grand
Bahama where the two Pirates
of the Caribbean films were
shot, sources confirmed to The
Tribune yesterday.
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional, the group structured by
Owen Bethel, president of the
Montaque Group, a Nassau-
based financial services

provider, is [eu
understood
to have
sealed the
deal with
Ross Fuller,
chairman of
the Studios’
immediate
holding
company,
Gold Rock
Cree XK
Enterprises.

Details on
the agreement were sketchy,
but The Tribune understands
the deal is still subject to gov-
ernment approval.

@ BETHEL

Mr Bethel declined to com-

ment when contacted by The



Tribune yesterday, while Mr
Fuller and the Bahamas Film
Studios’ acting operations man-
ager, Diana McGonigal, did not
respond to The Tribune's e-mail
seeking a response before press
deadline last night.

Gold Rock Creek’s ultimate
owner, Bermuda-listed Ashby
Corporation, said last month
that two seperate “eight figure”

offers had been made for the

Bahamas Film Studios, and a
decision on which one to accept
was to be taken “within the
week”.

Mr Fuller said at the time:
“This capital investment will
allow the Studio to move for-
ward with its plans to complete
the additions necessary to make

our Studio a fully-functioning,
full-service facility, and assist
us in promoting the Bahamas
as a destination for the film and
television industry, the music
recording industry and, of
course, as a tourist destination.

“We are fully committed to
adding a film school, a Bahami-

an Cultural and Historical Vil-’

lage, and to completing the
work necessary for the Studio.
These portions of the: project
will all assist us in becoming a
viable, competitive and highly
successfl Studio.”

It. is understood that
Bahamas FilmInvest will buy
out Mr Fuller’s interest in the
Bahamas Film Studios com-
pletely, allowing him to exit the

project.

It is also understood that Mr
Fuller will take care of the pro-
ject’s existing debts and liabili-
ties. A lawsuit filed against the
Bahamas Film Studios by a for-
mer potential investor in the
project, Bjorn Monteine, had
alleged that “the project was
undercapitalised, and there was
significant debts owed to vari-
ous investors and institutions”.

The lawsuit listed thesesdebts
as including EUR $3.6 million
from AIG Private Bank and
and $9.95 million from First-
Caribbean International Bank.
It alleged that the Bahamas
Film Studios had been unable to
meet its $100,000 per week
operating expenses, or raise $30

million to complete the project.

All these allegations have
been denied by Mr Fuller.

The $76 million Bahamas ,
Film Studios were the first pro-
ject to receive a signed Heads of
Agreement from the current
PLP administration back in
2002, and still represent a small
- but significant - piece of eco-
nomic diversification away from
the economy’s reliance on
hotels, golf courses and tourism.

Yet Mr Bethel and his group,
if they complete the purchase,
will have much work to do to
revitalise the project, attract
new films and television pro-
ductions to use it, and restore a
reputation that has been bat-
tered by recent lawsuits. °

Kerzner closing in on
Hurricane Hole plaza

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



KERZNER International
yesterday declined to comment
“at this time” on reports that
the company was close to com-
pleting the acquisition of the
Hurricane Hole Shopping Plaza
_ on Paradise Island.

Retailers based in the plaza
have told The Tribune they
have received no official notifi-
cation from either Kerzner
International or the existing
owners that there has been a
change in ownership, but

Company declines
to comment on
acquisition reports
‘at this time’
Kerzner personnel they have
spoken to told them a deal has

been done.
It is understood that the

potential purchase price is like- .

ly to be about $25 million.

SEE page 7B

Armed robberies of businesses

fall 38 per cent during 2006 |

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

ARMED robberies of Bahamian businesses fell by 38 per cent in
2006, although store break-ins rose by 4 per cent, statistics presented
by the Royal Bahamas Police Force revealed yesterday.

At the police force’s annual press briefing, the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) announced that in 2006, armed robberies of business
establishments declined from the 320 cases recorded in 2005 to 197

in 2006.

Despite this reduction, the police there was an increase - more
than double - in the number of armed robberies that took place on
the Family Islands, rising from three in 2005 to seven last year.

Police officials said it was no coincidence.that those islands
impacted (Bimini, Abaco and Exuma) were currently experiencing
rapid economic and population growth.

During 2006, cash taken in
armed robberies totaled an esti-
mated $446,329, while property

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Employers
Confederation (BECon) has
slammed as “unconscionable”
the Government’s failure to
release publicly ali the studies
and documents on the proposed
National Health Insurance
(NHI) plan, adding: “The level
of secrecy in government is
alarming.”

In a public commentary,
BECon, which is a member of
the National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, said the
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) report on the NHI
scheme showed how the Gov-
ernment was using the studies in



Financial Services: Is there room for cooperation ? ae

SEE page 6B

Employers say failure to
release all documents
‘unconscionable’

its possession for “propaganda
purposes” to sell the plan.
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, other Cabinet minis-
ters and PLP MPs had fre-
quently touted the ILO report
as giving the NHI scheme a
‘thumbs-up’ and its “firm sup-
port”, yet BECon said these
assertions did not match the
report’s content once it was

SEE page 5B

_ Find out at The Nassau Conference 2007.

B By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Government is optimistic that draft
regulations to covern all aspects of the pro-
posed AES Ocean Express liquetied natural
gas (LNG) project will be completed before
the end of next month, the minister for
energy and the environment told The Tri-
bune-yesterday,

Senator Dr Marcus Bethel said the mul-

ti-million dollar AES LNG project, ear-
marked for Ocean Cay, a man-made island
near Bimini, was still before the Cabinet.

The Government was awaiting the sub-
mission of draft regulations from its inter-
national consultants before it could pro-
ceed any further in deciding whether to
approve the project.

"We're dependent on the international*



consultants to conclude negotiations. Our
hope is that we have it by the end of Feb-
ruary. It is a very detailed process, ensuring
that the highest standards are maintained,”
Dr Bethel said.

Dr Bethel also responded to a recent Tri-
bune Business article, which reported how
AES Corporation had told US regulators

that “unanticipated delays” in securing .
_ approvals fromthe Bahamian government

had forced it to seek an extension to the
date at which Ocean Cay will begin sup-
plying Florida's power stations with LNG
from January 29, 2007, to January 29, 2011.

The article was based on documents filed
with the Federal Energy Regulatory Com-
mission (FERC), which have been seen by
The Tyibune.

Dr Bethel said he had read the article, but
felt it was “speculative”.

LNG regulations completed by February end

According to the document drafted by
AES’ US attorneys, Baker Botts, delays
had been caused by the Bahamian govern-
ment deciding to draft regulations to govern
how the Ocean Cay terminal operated
before the project was approved. ,

“An extension of the in-service date is
necessary because Ocean Express has been
unable to commence construction of the
pipeline due to unanticipated delays in
securing final approval from the Common-
‘wealth of the Bahamas for the construc-
tion of related facilities,” the AES motion
said. :

The. “interdependence” of the proposed
Bahamian and US facilities has led AES
Ocean Express to argue that it cannot begin

SEE page 6B

»

ae a teyas ue Esto la Ls

Fidelity is Gary’s one ety) oar} mals financial needs.

P43 Col oel TROL MoS

MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS. ©. HOME EQUITY Wey NS

CHECKING & SAVINGS ACCOUNTS © CDs © FREEINTERNETBANKING. PENSION PLANS :

MUTUAL FUNDS © FINANCIAL PLANNING ~ INSU ete Ccle.

Choose Wisely
Choose Fidelity ©



TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING »

=) FIDELITY |

More than a Bank

Nassau: 1 356.7764 F326.3000

Freeport: T 352.6676/7

MACKEY / PARADISE

STREET

‘Wealth Man emer
Delivering Expertise inA

ssau

CONFERENCE. February 6, 2007



F 352.2695
jo |

Registration & more information:
nassauconference.com

KWAN}



Sponsors:

ASSOCIATION, -
t . -
ane hy {





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

MUTUAL
FUNDS

The list includes the largest mutual funds supplied by
the National Association of Securities Dealers.
NAV Is net asset value. Tkr is ticker symbol

Fund Thr, _NAV_Chg.



Rind Thr, _NAV_Chg.

AIM Funds

DivrDivp LCEAX 13.57
AIM investments A:

BasicBal p BBLAX 13.21
BasValA p GTVLX 36.28
CapDevp ACDAX 1833
ChartAp CHTRX 15.26

Constp CSTGX 26.07 .
DvMktA p GTDDX 25.98 -
EuroGrp AEDAX 4030. -

IntGvAp AGOVX 854

IntiGrow = AIIEX 29.36 -.
IntlSmall p IEGAX 23.59 -

CGAt LCGAX 11.45

MadCpCEq

PGTAGX 25.81 -

Realést p IARAX 33.13
SmCGA p GTSAX 28.84
AIM Investments B:

BasVIBt GTVBX 33.65
ChartBt BCHTX 14.55. -.

ConstBt CSTBX 24.05
EurGrBt AEDBX 3813

HYIGB t

AHYBX = 4.53

AIM Investor Ck

DivrsDivp LCEIX 13.56 -
FIDYX 21.03
PSTEX 36.11

Dynm

Gold&Prec FGLDX 5.65

IntiCEg t

IIBCX 14.55

t ACAPX 10.71

LgCpGBt AFGPX 10.55
SmCapGr tALSCX 5.88
Alger Funds instts

MidCpGri ALMRX 16.71

ak

Allegiant
SCapVip AMRIX 18.44
AlfianceBer

A

BalanAp CABNX 17.92
BIWIStrA pABWAX 13.47
GiGvinc ANAGX~ 7.74
GIbTchA p ALTFX 65.39
GrincAp CABDX 4.42
GrowthA p AGRFX 36.93
HIYIdA pp AHYAX 5.97
IntGroA p AWPAX 18.66
IntiValA p ABIAX 22.06

LgCpGrA pAPGAX 20.64 -.

MuFLAp AFLAX 10.32
NUMuA p ALTHX 10.21
SmCpGrA QUASX 26.49
TMgBIWI p AGIAX 12.54
USGovtA pABUSX 6.82
AlfianceBem Adv:

IntValAdv ABIYX 22.39
AllianceBern B:

BalanBt CABBX 16.96
EmMDbtB pAGDBX 8.89
GrincBp CBBDX 4.35

a

5
z

i

11.05
12.56

t PNECX 16.72

it
i

5

i
[
F

i
i

i
EEE

[
i

5

&

a

i
i;
B

5

:
3
g

LALyeH
E
B

:
z
i

Util

Valuelny TWVLX 7.54
Veedotr AMVIX 6.35
Vista TWCVX 16.89
American Funds A:

AmcpAp AMCPX 20.09 -

AMutlA p AMRMX 29.05
BalAp ABALX 18.97
BondAp ABNDX 13.34
CapWA p CWBFX 19.14
CapiBAp CAIBX 60.44
CapWGA pCWGIX 41.38
EupacA p AEPGX 46.00
FdinvAp ANCFX 39.43
GovtAp AMUSX 13.39

GwthAp AGTHX 32.70 -.

HITrAp AHITX 12.61
HilnMunA AMHIX 15.85

IncoAp AMECX 20.19 -..

IntBdA p AIBAX 13.45
ICAAp —AIVSX 33.29
NEcoAp ANEFX 26.70
NPerAp ANWPX 31.42

NEWFX 47.62
SmCpA p SMCWX 38.44

BondBt BFABX 13.34
CapIBBt CIBBX 60.44
CpWGrB tCWGBX 41.19

ErpacBt AEGBX 45.49 -,
AFIBX 39.34
GrwthBt AGRBX 31.68 -.

FdinvB t

HITrBt AHTBX 12.61

IncoB t

IFABX 20.07

ICABt — AICBX 33.14
NwPersp t NPFBX 30.93
SmCpBt SCWBX 37.05
WashBt WSHBX 34.40

WORLD MARKETS



18.42 -.

Li:

-10

31
+18












Acorn t

StrtinA

IntBdZ
IntEqZ
IntVIZ

StratO t
CG Cap Mkt Fds:

TIEUX 14.48 -.18
lgGrv = TLGUX 14.00 -.06
TLVUX 12.35 -.08

IntlEq

Lgval
Copley
Credit Suisse Adv:

IntFocus p CUFAX 16.24 -.29
DFA Funds:
USCorEq2 DFQTX 11.65 -11

KTRAX ‘974 -05
BluChipA KBCAX 20.44 -.11
DrHiRA KDHAX 50.64 -.26
DSmCaVI KDSAX 36.85 -.48
GlbOppA KGDAX 41.09 -.47

Ariel Mutual Fis:

Apprec CAAPX 4823 -.36
Ariel ARGFX 51.51 -.47
Artisan Funds:

Intl
IntiSmCp r

IntiValr — ARTKX = 27.72. -.32
MidCap ARTMX 3055 *
MidCapVal ARTQX 20.04 -.16
SmCap ARTSX 18.06 -.29
SCapVal ARTVX 17.65 -.28

GvtSec ASGMX 998 *

GroOpp

Strincp ATSAX 4.56 -.01
Baron Funds:

Asset. BARAX 59.79 -.40
Growth BGRFX 49.56 -.47
Partners p BPTRX 22.41 -.17
SmCap BSCFX 22.61 -.31
Berkshire Funds:

Focus BFOCX 813 -.07
Bernstein Fis:

IntDur

CaMu =SNCAX 14.18 -.01
DivMu = SNDPX 14.00 -.01
NYMu — SNNYX 13.82 -.01

TxMgintV

IntVal2 SIMTX 25.59 -.42
EmMits cea 37.36 -.81
Berwyn

Fund BERWX he -38

Income
BjrmMCG p
BlackRock

AuroraA SSRAX 26.97 -.36
BalCapA pMDCPX 27.26 -.09
BaVIAp MDBAX 32.92 -.23
FdGrAp MDFGX 19.42 -.11
GIAIAr MDLOX 18.02 -.12
Gvinclny CCGAX 10.77 -.04
HiYinvA BHYAX 815 -.01
LgCpCA p MDLRX 13.96 -.07
LgCVAp MDLVX 18.69 -.11
S&P500 p MDSRX 17.26 -.11
BlackRock B&C:

GIAIBt. MBLOX 17.65 -.11
GIAICt_ =MCLOX 17.04 -.12
lgCpCCt MCLRX 13.22 -.08

BlackRock

TotRetil CCBBX 954 *
BlackRock Instt:

IntlValr =MAIVX 30.62 -.45
BaVil_ © MABAX 33,08 -.23
BalCapl MACPX 27.33. -.09
TotRetll BFMCX 952 *
GlbAlloc r MALOX 18.07 -.12
FundiGl MAFGX 19.89 -.12
NatMun MANLX 10.58 -.01
S&P500 MASRX 17.30 -.11
LgCpCri MALRX 14.20 -.07

Growth p BRGRX 1844 -.07

Brandywine
BlueFd = BLUEX 31.30 -.19
Bmdywn BRWIX 33.91 -31

USCMkt
BrwnSmcl

Balancd BUFBX 11.65 *
SmCap BUFSX 2699 -.28

CapDv LOMCX 25.53 -.42
Focus CGMFX 33.66 -39
Realty CGMRX 26.65 -.49

MdCpVIl CRIMX 29.64 -.16
Calamos Funds:

ConvAp CCVIX 19.03 -.07
Gr&lncC t CVTCX 31.60 -.19
Gr&incA p CVTRX 31.40 -.19
GrwthA p CVGRX 53.68 -.42
GrowthB t CVGBX 54.88 -.42
GrowthC t CVGCX 50.76 -.39
Calvert Group:

Inco p

LgCpGrt CLGAX 31.65 -23
SocEGAp CSIEX 37.02 -34

Causeway
Institutn! r
Investorr CIVVX 19.42. -.29

Century Funds;
ShsTrinst CENSX 27.32 -.16
Citizens Funds:
CitCGSt WAIDX 20.66 -.12
CitEGrSt WAEGX 1661 -.12
CitGbIst WAGEX 19.55 -.21

Class A:

LACAX 2881-33
AcornSelt LTFAX 25.98 -.17
FocEqAt NFEAX 21.86 -.16
IntivalA r NIVLX 25.06 -.33
LgCpValA NVLEX 14,92 -.10
21CntryA tNMTAX 14.18 -.10
MarsGrAt NMGIX 20.04 -.14
MidCpValACMUAX 14.40 -.14
COSIX 5.99 -.01
COLTX 13.77 -.03

AstAl — GAATX 15.70 -.09
CoreBdZ GHQTX 1059 -.01
FocEqZt NFEPX 22.26 -.16
SRBFX 887 -.01
IntTEBd SETMX 10.36 -.01
NIEQX 17.19 -.28
IntlStkZ CMISX 1847 -.29
EMIEX 25.20. -.32
LCpCrZ NSEPX 14.56 -.10
CapGr GEGTX 23.93 -.12
LgCpldxZ NINDX 27.27 -.16
LCpVIZ_ NVLUX 14.94 -,09
MarsGrZ NGIPX 20.39 -.14
MrinOpZ rNMOAX 15.08 -.24
MCpGthZ CLSPX 24.94 -21
MdCpidxZNMPAX 12.03 -.13
MdCpVIZ pNAMAX 14.41 -.14
STincZ NSTMX 980 -.01
SmCpCorZSMCEX 19.01 -.30
SmCpIPZ NMSCX 21.61 -.33
TaxExZ = CTEZX 13.77 -.03
TotRetBd NSFIX 9.76 -.02
Comstock Partners:

CapVIA DRCVX 2.20 +.02
CPSFX 2.51 +.01

ARTIX 28.67 -.26
ARTIX 21.42. -.16

ASGIX 24.63 -.16

SNIDX 1320 *

SNIVX 25.98 -.43

BERIX 12.29 -.05
BMCFX 2040 -.40
A:

Fas Birk:

Funds:
BRSIX 19.25 -.31
BCSIX 32.25 -.46

CFICX 1683 -.01

CIVIX 19.51 -.29

InstiRity — CSRIX 55.63 -.86 | p,
RityShrs CSRSX 88.08 -1.35
SpecFocsl CSSPX 69.20 -.96
Columbia

COPLX 53.13 -.66












TMG1.0

Fund Thr. __NAV_Cha.

HilncA — KHYAX
MgdMuni pSMLAX
NYTXA —KNTAX
RREEF p RRRAX
StratincA KSTAX
TechA —KTCAX
USGovA KUSAX
DWS Scudder Cl
DreHIRC KDHCX
DWS Scudder Cl
CapGrth r SCGSX
CorPlsinc SCSBX
EmMkin SCEMX
EmMkGr r SEMGX
EuroEq SCGEX
GNMAS — SGINX
GlbBdS r SSTGX
GlbIThem SCOBX
Gold&Pre SCGDX
GrolncS SCDGX
HithCare r SCHLX
HiYIdTx — SHYTX
IntTxAMT SCMTX
Intl FdS = SCINX
LgCpVis r KDCSX
LgCoGro SCQGX
LatAmrEq SLAFX
MgdMuni SSCMBX
MATFS SCMAX
PacOpps r SCOPX
SP500S_ = SCPIX
ShtTmBdS SCSTX

5.45
9.10

1088 -
26.16 -

4.68

11.88 -,

8.43
c
50.55
Ss
50.51
12.70
12.31

21.04 -.

55,66
9.12

14.25 -,
2136 -

18.70
9.90

DWS Scudder Insti:

EqSO0IL —BTIIX

159,61

DWS Scudder Inv:

Eq500Inv BTIEX
IntlEq — BTEQX
Davis Funds A:
NYVen A NYVIX
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B NYVBX

158.01

31.60 -,

38.09
36.51

Davis Funds C & Y:

NYVenY DNVYX
NYVenC NYVCX
Delafield — DEFIX

38.52

36.75 -.

25.39

Delaware Invest A:

Diver Inc p DPDFX
FLinsA —-VFLIX
IntEqAp DEGIX
LgCpVIA DELDX
TrendAp DELTX
TxPaA p —_DELIX
TXUSA p : DMTFX

876 -

11.17
15.42

20.59 -.

20.07

8.12 -.
11.65 -

Delaware Invest B:

DelBIB —_ DELBX
IntlEqBt DEIEX
SelGrBt DVEBX
Del-Pooled Trust:
IntlEq DPIEX
Labrintl — DELPX
Dimensional Fis:
EmMktV DFEVX
IntSmVa_—DISVX
LgCoinidx DFUSX
TM USSm_ DFTSX
USLgCo DFLCX
USLgVa_ DFLVX
USLgVa3_ DFUVX
US Micro DFSCX
US Small DFSTX
US SmVa_DFSVX
IntiSmCo _DFISX
EmgMkt + DFEMX
Fi DFIHX
Govt DFFGX
IntVa DFIVX
IntVa3 DFVIX
GIb5FxInc_ DFGBX
LCapint DFALX
TM USSV DTMVX
TM IntVa DTMIX
TMMktwVDTMMX
TMMtV2 DFMVX
TMUSEq DTMEX
2YGIFxd = DFGFX
OFARIE DFREX
Diversified Inst:
Val&lnc pp DIVIX
Diversifd Inv Fis:
Groincp DVGIX
Val&Inc — DVEIX

Balanced DODBX
Income. DODIX
(ntiStk — DODFX

Stock DODGX 152.66 -1.

Domini Soc Inv:
ISclEq — DIEQX
SoclEq DSEFX

Dreyf DREVX
DryMidr ~PESPX
Dr500Int ~PEOPX
Emgld — DRELX
FLintr — DFLIX
GNYt = GNYMX
UTGrR_ = DLGRX
LTGrinR = DGIRX
MdcpVI r DMCVX
MunBdr = DRTAX
NY Taxr DRNYX
NYTEr — DRNIX
SmCStkr DISSX
SmCoVal DSCVX

18.55
15.25

24.68 -

23.11
20.86

31.06 -,
20.84 «
11.02. -,
26.02 -

41.33

25.03 -
19.20 -.

15.46
21.09
29.

19.17. -

25.52
10.17
10,32
22.97

21.62 -

10.54
23.89

24.82 -

19.61
17.69
17.59

14.79

10.14
31.51

13.17. -

22.41
25.79

86.84 -

12.61
43.15

20.12
33.23

13.52 -

43.28
29.24
35.11
10.41
29,11

39.76 -

34.41
12.99

19.42 -,

17,52
16.01

31.97 -

11,92
14.85

18.00. -

23.16
25.21

Dreyfus Founders:

DiscvF p _ FOISX
EqGrthF FRMUX
IntlEgA — FOIAX
reyfus Premier:
AlphaGrA DPWAX
BalOpCt DBOCX
CoreBdA DSINX
CorVivp DCVIX
EmgMktA DRFMX
FLMA PSFLX
LgStkA p DRDEX
LtdHYdC p° PTHIX
LtdHYdA p DPLTX
LtdHYdB p DLTBX
MAMA — PSMAX
MIMUA —PSMIX
MCpStkR DDMRX
MuBdA = PTEBX
NwldA — DNLDX
TchGroA DTGRX
ThrdCnZ DRTHX
E Trade Funds:
KobrenGr KOGRX
Eaton Vance Adv:
FitRatet EABLX

29.50
5.89
16.45

22.69 -

20.12
14.36
31.66
20.72

1427 -,
24.78 -

731
7.30
731
471
15.24
14.55
13.16

47.49 -.

25.05

9.44 -

14.71
9.86

Eaton Vance Cl A:

ChinaA p EVCGX
FloatRt EVBLX
HIthSA p ETHSX
InBosA —_EVIBX
LgCpVal EHSTX
NatlMun EANAX

TMG1.1 ETTGX
TradGvA EVGOX

UtilA = EVTMX

CAPEX 599.66 -

22.80
10.19

45-4

Eaton Vance C] B:

ChinaBt EMCGX

FLMBt — EVFLX

HilncBt — EVHIX
HIYMBt EVHYX

BalanA — EKBAX
FLMunA EFMAX

HiyidA — EKHAX

IntlEgA — EKZAX
MunBdA EKEAX

OmegA EKOAX

PreMtlA EKWAX
Util&Tel =~ EVUAX

Evergreen B:
AStAIIBt EABFX 14.58 -,

EqincB_ — ETRBX
EqlndBp ESIOX

22.79
1.15

5.28
10.72

StrincBt EVSGX 7.49
TMG1.1t EMTGX 24.76
Eaton Vance Cl C:

FloatRtt ECBLX 9.85
NatIMCt ECHMX 11.94 -J
TMSGC ECMGX 11,71

Empire Builder:

TF Bond EMBTX 17.62 -
EndowGl — ENDIX
E A:
AstAllp EAAFX

15.38

14.74
9.34
9.35

3.34 -,

10.44

7.55
27.53
53.00

SpValuA p ESPAX 26.99
13.94 -.

23.04
52.43









-01

Cor

Int
Intl

Sht

Sm

Foc

Nw

Am

US

Tecl
Util

Nw

FF
FF2

Frin

Grol

MA
Mid

Sm

Cc

AStAlIC t EACFX
OmegaC t EKOCX

k
| ESBIX

AdjRatel EKIZX

Bdi = ESICX
Eq! = EKZYX

LgCpEql EVSYX

IntBd = ESFIX

SpecVal — ESPIX
StrGrol —_ ESGIX

Excelsior Funds:
EmgMkt rUMEMX
ValRestr UMBIX
FAM Funds;

Value FAMVX
FBR Funds:

GasUtlld r GASFX

Cap FBRVX

FMI Funds:

US FMIOX

FPA Funds:
Capit. FPPTX

Inc FPNIX

FPACres FPACX 26,
Fairholme —_ FAIRX
Federated A:

LdrA = FALDX

CapApA FEDEX
KaufmA p KAUAX
MktOpA p FMAAX
MuSecA LMSFX

GvtA FUSGX

Federated B:

AldrBt — FALBX
FdTcBp FCTEX
KaufmB p KAUBX
Federated C:

Kaufmnc tKAUCX
MktOppC FMRCX
Federated Instl:
Hi Yid FHYTX
Kaufmn — KAUFX

HT FATEX
ities | FAUFX

Advisor I:

Insgtt__FINSX

nay Advisor T:
BalancT — FAIGX
DivintT p —FADIX
DivGrT pe FOGTX
EMkinT — FAEMX
EqGrTp FAEGX
Eqinte —_FEIRX
GrOppT FAGOX
HilnAdT p FAHYX
MidCpT peFMCAX
Nwinsgh p FNITX
SmICpT p FSCTX
StrinT FSIAX

000 = FFFBX
010 = FFFCX

FF2015 — FEVFX
FF2020 _ FFFDX

FFTYX

Fated t FFRHX
FLMur FLIX
FocsdStk r FTQGX

One FFNOX

GNMA — FGMNX
Govtinc FGOVX
GroCo — FDGRX

Inc FGRIX

HighIncr =SPHIX
Indepn — FDFFX
InProBd + FINPX
IntBd = FTHRX
IntmMu — FLTMX
IntiDisc — FIGRX
IntISCpr FISMX
IntlSCOp r FSCOX
InvGB = FBNDX
Japan FIPNX
JpnSm FISCX
LCpvl FSLVX
LatAm FLATX
LevCoStk FLVCX
LowPr — FLPSX
Magelln FMAGX

Mun FOMMX
(Cap ~FMCSX

MCpVI_ FSMVX
MtgSec FMSFX
Munilnc — FHIGX
NJ Munr FNJHX
NwMktr FNMIX
NwMille — FMILX
NY Mun FTFMX
Nordic — FNORX
OTC FOCPX
Ovrsea FOSFX
PcBas — FPBFX
PAMunr —FPXTX
Puritn © FPURX
RealE FRESX
StintMu FSTFX
STBF FSHBX
SmCapInd FDSCX

ICpS r FSLCX

SCpValur FCPVX
SEAsia FSEAX
StrDvine FSDIX
Stratinc —_ FSICX
StrReRtr FSRRX
TotalBd == FTBFX
Trend == FTRNX
USBI FBIDX
UIShBdr — FUSFX
Utility FIUIX
ValueDisc FVDFX
ValStra te FSLSX

Find Thr, _NAV_ Chg.

FLHIBp EFHBX
HiVIdBt EKHBX
LgCoGBt EKJBX
OmegBt EKOBX
PreMtiB t EKWBX
StrincBr ~EKSBX
Util&Tel t EVUBX

28.19

24.38
24.20
5.61

12.57 +.02

10.70

7.10 +

5.41

1248 +.02

6.09

5.61 -.

HithCrA r FACDX 22.48
Fidelity Adv
EnergyT FAGNX 38.13
FinSvcT — FAFSX
HitCarT — FACTX

Foc T;

22.37
22.01

18.30 -
19.05 -
Fidelity Advisor A:

DivintlAr FDVAX 22.54
EqGrAt EPGAX
EqinA pe FEIAX 29.33 -
MdCpA peFMCDX 24.08 -
Nwinsgh p FNIAX 18.31
StrinA —-FSTAX 11.75
Fidelity Advisor
GrolncBe FGISX 1887 -.
Fidelity Advisor
DivintCt FADCX 21.73. -
Nwinsght FNICX 17.94 -.
Fidelity
Divintl = FDVIX
DivGthle FDGIX 13.53 -
EqGri EQPGX
Eqinle

51.35 -

B:
C:

22.86

54.36 -
EQPIX 30.09 -1.82
18.46 -.

1636 -.

22.31

13.34 -.
1237 -

51.36












Val

Fin

InE

Madi

Eql

Intl
Tot!

Eql

Ball
Bio!
Cal
C

Gol

GE

GE
Inti

For
Intl
Intl

Em

Intl
Intl

(nfl
Inti

Intl

Intl



Selected stocks from various international world stock markets.



Advantst rs
Alumina
AsiaSat
BHP BillLt
CNOOC
Canons
ChinaMble
ChinaNet
CityTicm
GeneticTch
HutchTel
Introtinitd
JHardie
Konami
MetalStm
MizuhoF n
NIS Grp s
NTTDoCo
NtAust
Nidec
NippnTT
Nissan
Novogen
Orix
PCCW Ltd
Pharmax

55.00
19.04
18.15
37.16
88.40
54,90
43.24
51.80
2.08
7.50
36.20
8.74
37.31
29.44
2.78
14.46
4.69
16.21
155.03
19.17
25.44
24.26
11.59
146.03
6.15
34.89

-1.62
-0.55
+0.30
-0.58
“3.17
“1.19
-1.19
-2.02
+0.05
-0.29
-0.30
0.14
-0.28
-0.78
+0.02
+0.09
+0.02
+0.01
-2.63
-0.30
-0.30
-0.30
+0.08
-1.08
-0.02
-0.51

PranaBio
pSivida
Rinker
Toyota
TrendMic
Westpac
ABB Ltd °
ABN Amro
AXA
Adecco
Ahold
AFrance
Aixtron
AlcatelLuc
Allianz
AltanaAG
AmarinCp
Amvescp
BASF

BG Grp
BHPBil plc
BT Grp
BcBilVArg
Bklrelnd
BarcBk pr
Barclay

3.05 -0.10
165 0.16
70.30 -1.26
133.72 -4.05
29.52 +0.52
92.25 -2.25
16.93 -0.32
31.80 — -0.66
40.60 -0.62
16.78 -0.22
10.42 -0.23

» 4439 +0.99
482 0.02
14.78 -0.29
$20.49 -0.46
61.97 -0.68
2.27 +0.09
22.77 -0.43
95.36 -1.34
63.18 -2.08
34.55 -0.35
61.85 -0.67
24.27 -0.34
90.22 -0.37
26.37 +0.07
58.25 -1.26

BioProg
BritAir
BritATob
BritSky
Buhrman
Bunzl PLC
BusnObj
CadbyS
CarnUK
CibaSpCh
CoGnGeo
Converm
CredSuiss
Crucell
Danone
Delhaize
DeutTel
Diageo
DucatiM
E.ON AG
EDP Enrg
ENIs
Elan
Enel
Epcos
EuroTrust

14.00
106.33
56.15
41.01
14.29
61.18
38.82
42.38
51.55
32.81
40.45
6.86
68.77
26.20
32.60
84.25
18.82
77.28
11.45
42.37
49.74
65.10
13.68
50.70
19.50

+0.36
-0.17
-0.96
-0.07
-0.31
“1.14
-0.12
-0.51
-1.01
-0.24
-0.65
+0.18
-1.27
-0.07
0.25
-0.84
-0.12
“177
-0A7
-2.12
-0.16
0.45
-0.39

FranceTel
FresenM
Gallaher
Gemplus
Genesys rs
GlaxoSKIn
HSBC
Hanson
ING
IconPLC s
llog
ImpTob
Infineon
InfVista
IntCtlHtl rs
lonaTech
KPN
LafargeSA
LloydTSB
Metso
NDS Grp
NTL Inch
NatGrid
Natuzzi
NokiaCp

28.20
44.58
87.80

397

1.62
53.96
91.45
75.35
43.84
37.82
12.76
79.43
13.95

1.5
23.37

5.09
14.77
36.55
44.80
48.82
45.45
24.14
69.55

8.81

-0.24
-0.67
-0.89
+0.02
+0.08
-0.76
0.82
-0.65
-0.75
+0.05
-0,30
“1.21
-0.25

-0.38
+0.06
-0.07
-0.92
~0.62
-0.70
71.50
-0.35
-2.10
+0.05
-1.08

Health
HomF — FSVLX

Fidelity Spart
EqldxAd FUSVX 49.89 -.
Intadr —_FSIVX
500Adr — FSMAX
TotMktAd rFSTVX 39.31
First Amer Fas Y:
CoreBd —_FFIIX

ue FDVLX

Wridw = FWWFX

Banking —FSRBX

itch = FBIOX

Brokr FSLBX
Chem FSCHX
ComEquip FSDCX
Comp FDCPX
DfAer —- FSDAX
Electr FSELX
Enroy FSENX
EngSv _ FSESX

79.84
19.88

49.48
33.78
65.59
73.91
66.03
20.58
40.12
81.56
44,22
46.14 +.
62.69 +.

SV FIDSX 117.90 -1

Goldr — FSAGX
FSPHX 124.87 -1.

‘qp FSCGX

Insur FSPCX
Material FSDPX
MedDl — FSHCX

EqSys FSMEX

Multmd — FBMPX
NtGas FSNGX
NatResr FNARX
Paper FSPFX
Retail FSRPX
Softwr — FSCSX
Tech FSPTX
Telcm FSTCX
Trans FSRFX
Wireless FWRLX
Fidelity Spartan:

dxInv. FUSEX

ExtMkin FSEMX
500Inxinv rFSMKX

Inxinv —_ FSIIX
Mktiny FSTMX

ncp FAQIX

Eqldxip —_FEIIX
Intl
MCpGrOp_FISGX
First

FAICX
Eagle:

GIbIA SGENX
OverseasA SGOVX
SGenGld p SGGDX
Firsthand Funds:

eCommr TEFQX
GlbTech GTFQX
Techinny —TIFQX
Tech Lead TLFQX
Tech Val TVFQX
Forward Funds:
HoovSCap FFSCX
Frank/Temp nk A:

AGEAp AGEFX 2.12

Invp — FRBSX
DIsA p FBDIX
InsA p FRCIX
GrA FKREX

DbITFA FPRTX
FedTFAp FKTIX
FixCpGrA FKCGX
FIRtDA p. FAFRX
FLTFAp — FRFLX
FoundAl p FFALX

dPrM A FKRCX

GrwthA p_ FKGRX
HYTFAp — FRHIX
IncomA p FKINX
InsTFAp —-FTFIX
MATFAp FMISX
NYInsA p FRNYX-
NYTFAp FNYTX
RisDvA p FROPX

CpGrA FRSGX

Stratinc p FRSTX
USGovA p FKUSX
UtilsA pp FUTX

TEBIX

Deck TEDIX
EuropAp TEMIX
QualiAt Tegh
SharesA _TESIX
SharesB p FMUBX

34.58

49.64
30.71
70,32
46.35
47,94
22.91
48.24

35.94 +.
26.40 +,

32.31
52.40

69.05
48.32
50.29

7.07 -.

49.88
38.16

97.39 -.

43.64
39.31

Adv:

43.64 -.

97.39. -.60

10.99
15.06

26.11 -.

15.08 -
40.63

45.35
24.81
19,69"

4.09
4AT

10.04 -.

20.61
36.32

20.11

65.78

60.23 +.

12.72
11.87
12.00
12.14
42.60
10.07
11.92. -.
13.89
29.64
41.89. -
11.03

2.63
12.29

11,60
11.80
35.69
37.53

FATF Adv FAFTX 12. 15 “J
IncmeAd FRIAX 2.62
Frank/Temp Fink B:
IncomB1 p FICBX 2.63
IncomeBt FBICX 2.62 -
Frank/Temp Fk C:
FoundAlp FFACX 13.70 -.
IncomCt —FCISX

pe ene ae

2.65 -.

2390
23.91
22,62
21.62
25.76 -.
2521

Mt c:

DiscC tt TEDSX
SharesC tt TEMTX 25.49 -

Elfun S&S:

S&S Inc GESLX
S&S PM GESSX
TaxEx ELFTX

Inst] Funds:

E GIEIX 16.17
GMOEMMKV rGEMVX20.34 -.
GMO Trust Il:
Foreign GMFRX
GMO Trust Ill:
EmMkr GMOEX

GMOFX
GrEq +=GMIGX
trv = GMOIX

IntSm GMISX
TxMgdlE GTMIX
USQltyEq GQETX
USCoreEq GMUEX
GMO Trust IV:

CorePlusBdGPBFX
EmCnDt GMDFX

Mkt GMEFX

Foreign GMFFX

CorEq GMIRX
IntrVI_ GMCFX

USQualEq GQEFX
GMO Trust VI:
EmgMkts rGEMMX 20.36

IndxPl_ GMIPX
CorEq GCEFX

USCoreEqGMCQX
Gabelli Funds:

ABCp GABCX
Asset GABAX 46.97 -.
20.83 -.

Eqincp GABEX
17.86 | -.

GIOpAAA pGABOX
GwthAAA GABGX

NationwD MUIFX
Gartmore Fis Inst:

dx! _GIXIX

NwBdldxl GBXIX 10.81
S&P500Ins GRMIX 12.01
Gartmore Fas Serv:
IDModAg pNDMSX 11.03
IDModp NSDMX 10.92
Gateway Funds:
Gateway GATEX 27.09
Glenmede Funds:

GTCIX

Novartis
NovoNdk
Pearson
PfeifVac
PortgITel
Protherics
Prud UK
Publicis
Quilrnes
ReedElsNV
ReedEls plc
Repsol
Rhodia
SAP AG
STMicro
Sanofi
Scor
ScotPwr n
SeronoSA
Shire
SkIHSoft
SkyePh
Smith&Nn
Sodexho
SparkNet n
Spirent
Statoil
StoraEnso
Suez
Swisscom
Syngenta
TNT NV
Technip
TelefEsp



29.69 -.20

A

Frank/Temp Temp
DvMKtA p TEDMX 27.37. -
ForgnA pp TEMFX 13.48 -.
GIBdAp TPINX 10.99
GISCoA p TEMGX 8.95
GrwthA p_TEPLX 25.50
WorldA p TEMWX 19.35.
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
FronAv —sTFFAX
GrthAv TGADX
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
ForgnC p TEFTX
GrwthC p TEGTX
GAMCO Funds:
GIConAAA GAGCX
GITelAAA GABTX
MathrAAA MATRX

13.43

25.53 -.25

13.29

24.89 -.25

5.48 +.

22.47 -.28

10,36 +.
11.18

+21
+21

50 | int
30 | intr
~88 | Scpviinst HASCX
jing Loevner:
EmgMktr HLEMX 43.91 -.65
45 Hartford Fds A:
“™ | AdvrsAp —ITTAX
60) CpAppAp ITHAX 37.35 -31
DivGthA p IHGIX 20.68 -.14
FitRateA pxHFLAX 10.12

-31

+59

“15 | JI
Zo GwthAdv p VHIAX

InvBalp OGIAX 12.70 -.05

Pund Tle, NAV Chg. | Fund
«12 | HiYleldA GSHAX 8.12 .
-.20 | HYMUA p GHYAX 11.56 -.01
MdCVA p GCMAX 38.28 -.25
~42 | SmCapA GSSMX 43.38 -.74
-.40 | Goldman Sachs B:

+15 | CapGrB pp GSCBX 20.45 -.06
-13 | GrincBp GSGBX 28.46 -.23
-53) HIYIdBp GSHBX 813 *
~46 | Goldman Sachs C:

-11] CapGrC = GSPCX 20.42 -.06
~18 | Goldman Sachs Inst:

MARKET REVIEW

Thr.

~67 | CoreFxd — GSFIX

32

Hivield — GSHIX

“14 HYMuni — GHYIX
13 | MidCapV GSMCX 38.57 -.25



06 | Hard

HABDX

HAINX

NAV _C

9.89 -.0
8.13
11.56 -,01

~39 | StrulgVa GCVIX 14.40 -.08
12] Struint — GCIIX
+36 | GrnCntBl p GCBLX 17.80 -.08
~.20 | GuideStone Funds:
59 Gropasa GCOZX
GIEqGS4 GGBZX
“AT | GrincGS4_ GGIZX
GrEqGS4 GGEZX
+23] IntEqGS4 GIEZX
34 | MdDrGS4 GMDZX
08 | ValEqGS4_ GVEZX
~27 | Harbor Funds:
“AT | Bond
66.30 ~41 Capapinst HACAX
Invt—HIINX

14,96 -.18

16.00 -.09
1714-12
14.61 -.06
17.87 -.08
18.90 -18
13.48 -.01
18.45 -.12

11.62 -.02
33.58 -.11
60.52 -1.00
60.97 -1.01
20.94 -.32

17.02. 11

MidCpA p HFMCX 22.18 -.14

30 | Hartford Fds B:
CpAppBp IHCAX 33.93 -.29
79g | Hartford

CapApC t HCACX 34.09 -.29

Fds C:

FitRateC txHFLCX 10.11 -.01

“Ol Hartford HLS 1A :
16 CapApp _HIACX

DiscEq HIAGX
"hq | Dvr HIADX
"| Glblldrs = HIALX 19.99 -.22

52,53 -.44
13.94 -.08
22.49 -.16

GrwthOpp HAGOX 29.82 -.25

HSTAX
HIAIX

IntlOpp —_ HIAOX

~04 | Midcap
~05 | TotRetBd HIABX 11.29 -.01
1! Hartford HLS IB :

HIMCX

+36 | advisers HADAX 2255-14
Stock
Index

52.31 -.45
32.17 -.20
15.05 -.18
26.86 -.16

Advisors p HAIBX 22.73 -.14

~50
Capa HIBCX 52.25 -.44 | Leg
vegan AgGrBt

Div&Gro p HDGBX 22.42 -.16

Fis:
HRTVX

on | Gr&lncA HRCVX

-12 | HIYIdA p HRIDX

“4 | MCStkA pHMCAX

735 | ICM SmCo
“py | ICON Fads:

“19 SCapAp HRSCX

“s | ConDisc ICCCX

Eqinclp —1OEIX
Hithcare ICHCX
1 | InfoTech ICTEX

Materials ICBMX
ING Funds Cl A:

02 | CompldrA LEXCX

“2 HiYIdA pp IHYAX

IntValA p NIVAX

u RussiaA p LETRX
02 | ING Funds Ci B:
IntiSCpB p NAPBX

ING Partners:

221 jpMFint! — ISGIX
SBAggGrl IMEIX
«13 | TRPGrEqI__ITGIX
15 | ING TM,Q&:
IntSCpQ_ NAGUX
IntVall——_NIIVX
ISI Runds:
NoAmp NOAMX
IXIS Advisor Cl A:
HarFocVl NRSAX 11.54 -.10
HarLCVIA NEFOX 15.50 -.11
15 | LSCrBGA NEFRX 11.32 -.02
qq | USDivrA p NEFSX 22.89 -.18
“11 | IXIS Advisor Cl B:
=26 | USDivBp NESBX 20.29 -.16
-.16 | Ivy Funds:
CoreEgc tWTRCX 9.41 ~.03
+15 | CoreEqB t WCEBX 9.32 -.03
GINatRSA pIGNAX 2823-21
GINtRSC p IGNCX 26.07 -.19

Funds:

TotRetp HBNBX 11.24 -.01
, | Heartland
Value

~67 | Henderson Gibl Fils:

02 | intOppA p HFOAX 23.39. -.21
~All Hennessy :
AT | CorGrow - HECGX
cor CorValu HFCVX
w'59 | Focus30r HFTFX
+ | Heritage Funds:

50.29 -.59

17.74 +24
15.07 -.15
12.57 -.07

14.60 -.13

TM
27.66 -.22
35.59 -.52

“oy | Hotchkis & Wiley:

<2 | CoreVall HWCIX 14.33 -.13
eet Be 2
+01 | LOCRVIA p 05 -

th =a MCpVIA pHWMAX 29.51 -.26 | Legg
<1 | MidCpVal HWMIX. 29.69. -.27
HussmnStrGrHSGFX £5.62 +.04
ICSCX 36.84 -.47

12,92. -.12
14.99 -.16
16.65 -.12

9.47 -.07
M28 -.12

21.49 -.07

a9
20.66 -.23
60.82 -.83
51.97 -.73

16.16 -.22
48.95 -.22
59.28 -.33

53.99 -.75

Fund
UtilityA

Growth!
TechC

Thr, NAV

PRUAX 13.81 -.19
ValueA p PBEAX 20.91 -.13
JennisonD:

PTYCX

© PIFCX 15,08 -.06

8.05 -.06

JennisonDryden Z&l;

Growth:

Jensen J

Z

John Hancock A:
BondAp JHNBX 1

ClassicVI p PZFVX

HSciA

LCpSel
RgBkA
SMCpE
SvinvA
USGIbL

p MSBFX 1

FRBAX 37.49 -.48
21.96 -.43
p SOVIX 18.86 -.08
29.08 -.14

aA SPVAX
dr USGLX

John Hancock C:

Hi¥ldc

p JHYCX

John Hancock Cl 1:

LSAggr

LSBalane

LSModer

JILAX 14.50 -.15
JILBX 14.22 -.08
LsConsry JILCX 13.27 -.04
USGrwth JILGX 14.55.11
JILMX 13.48 -.06

Julius Baer Funds:

IntlEql
IntlEqA
Intell

r

Ir

Kinetics Funds:

Internet WWWFX 28,87 +.04
IntEmGr WWWEX 4,97 -.03
Medical MEDRX 18.09 -.08
WWNPX 25.61 -.10
LSWalEq LSVEX 18.93 -.14

Pdm

Laudus Funds:

IntIMstrl SWOIX
* | Lazard Insti:
EmgMktl LZEMX

Legg Mason: Fd

Oppt-Fl p LMOFX
OpporTr t LMOPX

27.74 +25
JHGRX 38,15 -.30

JIEIX 42.65 -.56
BJBIX 41.78 -.55
JETIX 14.95 -.22
KeelsmCp p KSCVX 25.28 -.35

PIFZX 17.04 -.06
JENSX 26.92 -.09

4.90 -.02

9.15 -.10

566 = *



20.35 -.24
20.12 -.31

19.16 -.15
18.82 -.15

Splnvp LMASX 38.72 -.27
LMVTX 72.75 -.55
Legg Mason Instl:
ValTtFl pp LMVFX 79.40 -.60
ValTrinst LMNVX 80.90 -.61
Legg Mason Ptrs A:

AgGrAp SHRAX 114.89 -.44

ValTr p

ApprAp SHAPX
CapincA SOPAX

FdValA

LgCpGA p SBLGX
MgMuA pSHMMX
MCapCA pSBMAX
MDLCGV t SPSAX

15.39 -.10
16.97 -.05

p SHFVX 15,97) -.15

24.14 «19
15.62 -.01
20.86 -.13
10.42 -.05

MuFLA = SBFLX 13.13. -.01

SocAwA p SSIAX
9 Mason Ptrs B:
SAGBX 101.89 -.40

20.85 -.11

ApprBt SAPBX 15.01 -.09
CoreBdBt TRBBX 11.75 -.02

Financi
FvalB t

HilnB t

LgCpGBt SBLBX
MDLCGB t SPSBX

al p SBFBX

15.56 -.13

SFVBX 14.90 -.14
GrthBt © SGRBX 13.49 -.08

SHIBX

6.98 -.01

2252 -.18
10.04 -.05

TechFdBt SBTBX 4.33 -.05
Legg Mason Ptrs C:
AggGrC * SAGCX 102.81 -.41

HilncC

SHICX

6.99 -.01

MDLCGC t SPSLX 10.04 -.05

Legg Mason Ptrs I;

hen rolt SAGYX 119.95 -.46

LgCpGrl

SBLYX 24,99 -.20

Legg Mason Ptrs 0:
SABRX 15.40 -.10

Equi

DvStr1
Grinc 1

Intl

SmCap
Loomis

Mason Ptrs 1:

CSGWX 18.13) -.12

CGINX 17.62 -.11

Corelnvst LCORX 1852 -.16
Partners:

Partners LLPFX 34.97 -.13
LLINX 18.91 -.13

LLSCX 30.14 -.13

Sayles:
LSBondl LSBDX 14.30 -.02

LSSCVR p LSCRX
StrincC NECZX
LSBondR LSBRX
StrincA — NEFZX

Lord Abbett A:
AflAp — LAFFX 15.12 -.09
LDFVX 12.23. -.09
BalStratA XLABFX 11.74 -.09
BdDebA px LBNDX

AllValA

MidCpA p LAVLX
RsSmCA_LRSCX

25.83 -.44
14,90 -.03
14.26 -.02
14.84 -.02

7.98 -.05

22.29 -.17
29.15 -.54

TaRAp UANSX 11.55 -.01
p LAMAX 13.12 -.09

20.66 -.23 | RsAm
TFFLAp — LAFLX

7.36 -.01

A Class:

727 -.06

01 | ING&IAp ONGIX 1436-08

01 | JP

46.19 -.24 | Bond

11.75

51.56 -.30

18.13 -.28

20.40

1820 -.28

30.65
34.22
12.68

20.11 -.34

21.88

1478 -.

10.39
10.54

20.35 -Â¥
18.20 -.29
3817 -.59

34.20
21.90

24.96 -

14.75 -.

9.98 -

30.56
17.49 -.

18.90
10.74

2056 -.27
Goldman Sachs A:

CapGrA GSCGX 22.23
GriStrA GOIAX 12.87
GrincA — GSGRX
GrOppsA GGOAX 21.61
GrstrA — GGSAX

29.27 -.23

14.47

i IntEq
ve IntrepGr JPGSX
MCpVal = JMVSX
35 | ShtTmBd —JSBSX
44 | USEquity JUESX 11.25 -.07
JPMorgan Sel Cis:
CoreBd WOBDX
CorePIBd = HLIPX
as | Ealndx —_HLEIX
“53 | GvBond = HLGAX
43 | HIYIdBd OHYFX
wgg | IntmTFBd VSITX
“16 IntlEq! OIEAX
“34 | IntrdAmer JPIAX
“19 LgCpVl_ HLQVX
10 MICMkNe rOGNIX

Munilnc — HLTAX



MdCp'
-.02 | J

MCpVal p JAMCX

Insti:
FLMVX

Select:

JBSEX
VSIEX

SmCpCor VSSCX

Ol} TyFrBd— PRBIX

a [JP Ultra:
MtgBckd JMBUX

Janus :

..4g | Balanced = JABAX

«19 | Contrarian JSVAX

CoreEq —_JAEIX
4 Enterpr JAENX

105 | FedTe

JATEX

FixBnd JAFIX
38.16 --58 Fund

Grinc

Orion

JANSX

11) GI Lifesci r JAGLX
GlbOpp JGVAX
GlTechr JAGTX

JAGIX

2 Mercury JAMRX
M4 MCVilnst JMIVX
“| MdCpVal_ JMCVX
Olympus JAOLX

JORNX

~13 | Ovrseasr JAOSX

SCVinst —JSIVX

~16} scvinv JSCVX
MCpMkidxGMXIX 15.21. -

“16 | Twenty JAVLX

* | Forty

“| Janus Aspen

+01) Ventur = JAVTX
~08 | WridWr JAWWX
Janus Adv S Shrs:

JARTX

25.51 -.22
25.87 -.23

929 -.01
37.26 -54
2252) -.11

953

10.61 -.01
174-01
32.08 -.19
10.10 -.01
851 +.01
10.64 .
2759-43
27.66 -.16
16.98 -.12
11.05 +.01
9.76 -.01
46.96 -.85
12.69 -.01

10.45 -.01

24.38 -.06
16.81 --.07
25.70 -.03
4744-33

7.02 -,01

945-01
2822 -.08
19.66 -.07
14.19 -.07
12.91 -.10
37.88 -.08
2492 -.12
23.70 -.14
23.60 -.15
33.50 *

9.85 -.09
45.24 -57
25.73 -.42
25.50 -.42
54.32 +.03
61.58 -.69
50.50 -.33

3046 -.05

Instl:

Balanced JABLX 27.86 -.06

JapanFd

BlendA PBQAX

+0.27
+1.20
+0.03
-3.33
-0.03
+0.06
-0.51
-0.58
+0.02
+0.21
+0.60
0.42
-0.03
-0.24
0.32
-0.17
+0.02
-0.68
+0.02
+0.26
-0.05
-0.09
-0.94
-0.61
+0.01
+0.09
“0.14
-0.22
-2.23
“0.11
-0.40
-0.61
+0.06

-.06 | GlbTotRtA GTRAX
-10 | GrowthA —PIFAX
HIYIdA p PBHAX
-.14 | STCrpBdA PBSMX 10.78 +01
-.13 | TechA

PTYAX

Telenor
Tenaris s
Ternium n
ThmsnADS
Total SA s
Trintech
UPM Ky
UtdUtils
VanMool
VeoliaEnv
Wavecm
Wolseley s
AMovilL
AMovilA
Cemex s
CCFemsa
FEMSA
Gruma
GAerPac n
GpAerCN n
GpoASur
GCSaba
GrpoFin
GpoSimec
HomexDev
IndBach
Metrogas
TrGasSur

~04 | WridwGr JAWGX 32.50 -.21
SIPNX 12.37. -.29
JennisonDryden A:

664-03
1654 -.06

852 -.07

58.32
47.30
28.04
19.27
68.98
4.23
24.45
29.40
5.75
69.28
14.89
24.87
44.74
44.65
33.14
36.88
114.02
12.94
38.23
23.28
42.22
26.45
9.25
13.10
57.20
25.91
4.10
7.00

TxNYAp LANYX

Lord Abbett B:
p LAFBX 15.18 -.09

AffildB
BdDbB

px LBNBX

Lord Abbett C:
p LAFCX 15.15 -.08

AffildC
BdDbC

AfY

MITA

MIGA

BondA
CapOp
EmGA
GITotA
GrAllA

MCapA
MuBdA
MuHiA
MFLA

RschA
RelnA
TotRA
UtilA
ValueA

MIGB
MCapB
TotRB
utiB *
ValueB

TotRC
Value

RelnT
Valuel

IntiEq

IntlB p

ICAPEq
MAP |

Global



SpclEq
Grow p
+0.91
+0.40
-0.21
-0.33
-0.34
-0.02
-0.41
-0.85
-0.20
-2.33
+0.24
-0.38
-1.44
145
-0.57
-0.40
-0.93
-0.10
-0.39
+0.13
0.56
-0.40
-0.21
0.21
“2.15
-0.18
+0.22



MdCVC p LMCCX
Lord Abbett Y:

IntNwOA MIDAX

ResBdA = MRBFX

GITotB p. MFWBX

ICAPSIEq

EmMkEt

px BDLAX

4.74 -01

11.29 -,01

LAFYX 15.15 -.09

MCapVI p LMCYX 22.25 “6
RschSCY LRSYX
M Funds:
Brandesins BIIEX
MFS Funds A:
IntIDVA = MDIDX 15.37 -.19

MITTX 20.70 -.07
MIGFX 13.86 -.06
MFBFX 12.66 -.02
MCOFX 15.46 -.11
MFEGX 37.40 -.23

t MFWTX

MAGWX 14.70 -.08

OTCAX

MMBFX 10.47 -.01

t MMHYX

MFFLX 10.14 -.01

MFRFX 23.80 -.09
MRSAX 18.93 -.27
MSFRX 16.14 -.05
MMUFX 15.96 -.19
MEIAX 26.56 -.13

MFS Funds B:
MAITB = -MITBX 20.25 -.06
CapOpB MCOBX

14.07 -.11

MIGBX 12.58 -.05

OTCBX

14.59 -.09

882 -.05

MTRBX 16.13 -.05
MMUBX 15.90 -.20
MFEBX 26.41 -.13

MFS Funds C:
MTRCX 16.20. -.05
MEICX 26.38 -.13
MEFS RPunds |:
MRSIX 19.41 -.28
MEIIX 26.67 -.13
MEFS Runds Insti:
MIEIX 19.74 +25
CoreStkB MMPGX
IntmincB_ MMPIX
MMPNX 13.85 -.16
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA MHCAX 651 = *
MainStay
HYIdBBt MKHCX 6.47 = *
MainStay

Funds B:
Funds I:

ICAEX 44.47 -.33
MUBFX 37.23 -.23
ICSLX 41.23 -.25
S&P500ldx MSPIX 32.48 -.20
SmCpOpl MOPIX 20.51 -.37
Mairs & Power:
Growth MPGFX 76.99 -.61
Managers Funds:
FremntBd MBDFX
FrmtGlbl MMAFX 1
EssxLCGr MGCAX

14.59 -.10

9.70 -.01



10.28 -.02| Op

4.64 -.13

29.40 -.11
MEMEX 23.81 -.50

MGGBX 21.08 -.06

IntDurGv MGIDX 1
ShDurGv MGSDX

056 ©
965 *

MGSEX 82.33 -1.16
Marsico Funds:

Focusp MFOCX 1:
MGRIX 20.06 -.11

9.27 -.10

Fund Th,

NAV

2istCnt pp MXXIX 15.25 -.08

Master Select:

Equity | MSEFX 15.65 -.07
Intl MSILX 18.46 -.18
Matthews Asian:

AsiaPacr MPACX 16.69 -.19
AsianG&l MACSX 18.49 -.13
PacTiger MAPTX 23.28 -.14

Melton Funds:

BondFd MPBFX 12,32 -.01
EmgMkts MEMKX 20.68 -.32
IntlFd MPITX 16.91 -.17
LgCpStk MPLCX 10.78 -.06
MdCpStk MPMCX 12.82 -.12
Mellon Inst Funds:

IntlEqty SDIEX 41.97 -.57
MergerFd MERFX 15.63 = *
Meridian Funds:

Growth MERDX 39.46 -.48
Value MVALX 35.35 -.34
Metro West Fas:

TotRtBdl MWTIX 9.76 -.01

Midas Funds:

Midas Fd MIDSX 3.94 -.09

Monetta Funds:

MidCap pMMCEX 8.29 -.08
Monetta MONTX 12.78 -.07
MontagGr! MCGIX 25.52 -.08
Morgan Stanley A:

DivGthA DIVAX 20.91 -.11
EqWtdA p VADAX 41.51 -.31
FocGroA AMOAX 27.92 -.18
GIbDvA GLBAX 15.86 -.15
HiYidA HYLAX 178 *
USGvtA USGAX 9.00 *
Morgan Stanley B:

DivGtB = DIVBX 21.06 -.10
EuroB EUGBX 21.64 -.26
FocGroB AMOBX 25.97 -.17
GIbDivB = GLBBX 16.07 -.15
IntiValBt IVQBX 12.98 -.15
PacGrB- TGRBX 20.03 -.24
SP500B SPIBX 14.78 -.09
SpcValB SVFBX 15.57 -.26
USGvtB USGBX 9.00 -.01
UtiB UTLBX 14.66 -.25
Valuep VLUBX 14.52 -.12
Morgan Stanley D:

FocGroD AMODX 28.62 -.18
IntValD = IVQDX 13.12) -15
MorganStanley Inst:

Actinth MSACX 14.91 -.23
EmMkt MGEMX 28.60 -.60
CrPiFinst MPFIX 11.31 f
IntlSCpA MSISX 23.68 -.16
IntlEq MSIQX 20.42 -.24
IntlEqB pp MIQBX 20.24 -.24
LtdDur MPLDX 10.27 *
MCapGr MPEGX 27.20 -17
MCGrAd pMACGX 26.52 -.17
SmCoGrA MSSGX 13.25 -.19
USLCpGrAMSEQX 20.30 -.13
USReal MSUSX 27.78 -.41
Muhlenk = MUHLX 85.17 -.26
Munder Funds A:

MdCpCGr tMGOAX 24.77 -.25
Munder Funds C/II:
HithcreC pMFHCX 23.56 -.09
Munder Funds Y:

RIEStEY MURYX 24.00 -,38

FinSvZ TEFAX 22.61 -.13
BeacnZ BEGRX 16.65 -.12
Disc = MDISX 30.21 -.21
EuropZ MEURX 24.30 -.26
QualfdzZ MQIFX 21.74 -.15
SharesZ MUTHX 25.94 -.20
Navellier Perform:

MidCpG NPMDX 30.55 -.28

Growth p NEEGX 3856 -.42
‘&Berm Inv:

Focus NBSSX 31.22 -.247

Genesis NBGNX 32.74 -.23
Genesinst NBGIX 44.87 -.32
Guard = NGUAX 1873 -.17
Intl r NBISX 23.92 -.23
Manhat NMANX 9.03. -.07
Partner NPRTX 30.10 -.12
SocResp NBSRX 25.55 -.20
Neuberger&Berm Tr:

Genesis NBGEX 46.84 -.34
Partner NBPTX 23.24 -.09
NewAlt — NALFX 43.13 -.74

Nicholas Gi

rOup:
Nich NICSX 57.64 -.41
NichLt! NCLEX 19.50 -.20

Northeast Investors:
Growth NTHFX 20.06 -.08
Trust NTHEX 7.76 -.01
Northern Funds:

Fixin NOFIX 9.90 -.01
GrEq NOGEX 16.00 -.10
HiYFxInc NHFIX 8.20 ‘
IntTxEx NOITX 10.20 -.01
IntlEqldx r NOINX ¢
IntGrEq NOIGX 12.96 -.18
LgCapVal NOLVX 13.51 -.12
SmCpGr NSGRX 13.07. -.21
TxExpt = NOTEX 10.49 -.01
Technly =NTCHX 12.34 -.11
USGovt NOUGX 9.82 -.01

Nuveen Cl A:

FLMBp -FLOTX 10.22 -.01
HYMuBd pNHMAX 22.85 -.01
GrwthA p NRGAX 22.80 -.11

Nuveen Cl B:

GrwthB p NRGBX 21.31 -.10
LrgCVB p NNGBX 26.97 -.20

Nuveen Ci C:

HYMuBd tNHMCX 22.83 -.01

Nuveen Cl R:

InMunR NITNX 10.86 -.01
IntDMBd NUVBX 9.02 -.01

Oak Assoc Fis;

PinOkAg POGSX 22.18 -.13
WhitOkKSGWOGSX 32.58 -.23
OakValue OAKVX 28.05 -.23
Oakmark Funds |:

EqtyIncr OAKBX 25.73 -.05
Globall OAKGX 25.29 -.22
Intl tr OAKIX 25.27 -.28
IntSmCp r OAKEX 22.51 -.15
Oakmark rOAKMX 45.70 -.30
Selectr OAKLX 33.38 -.26
Old Mutual Adv It:

GwthZ OBHGX 22.72. -.21
tgCpZ OLCVX 15.61 -.12
MdCpZ OBMEX 15.92 -.16
SelGrZ QBHEX 25.06 -.14
TS&WSCVZOSMVX 24.95 -.38
Tc&ComZ OBTCX 13.03 -.08
Old Westbury Fis:

Intl OWEIX 13,71 -.13
MidCpEq pOWMCX 16.14 -.18
RealRet OWRRX 11.42 -.09

Olstein Funds:

AllCpValC_ OFALX 17.23 -.17
er A:

AMTFMu OPTAX 10.34 -.01

AMTFNY OPNYX* 13.32 -.02

CapApA p OPTFX 46.24 -.26

CapincA p OPPEX 13.13. -.03

DvMI

Ghmpinch pOPCHX 953 *
pODMAX 40.18 -.69

Discp OPOCX 45.62 -.59
EquityA OEQAX 10.81 -.07
GlobAp OPPAX 73.22 -.61
GlbOppA OPGIX 35.80 -.31
Goldp OPGSX 2677 -.27
GrthAp OPPSX 31.53 -.15
IntBdA p .OIBAX 5.96 -.04
IntGrwp- OIGAX 27.48 -.32
IntiSmCA OSMAX 25.99" +01
LTGVAp OPGVX 9.95

LtdTmMu OPITX 15.95 -.02
MnStFdA MSIGX 40.42 -.26
MnStOA pOMSOX 14.65 -.10
MSSCA p OPMSX 21.93 -.30
S&MdCpVIQVSCX 36.61 -.28
StrinAp OPSIX 429 *
ValueA p CGRWX 25.82 -.20

imer B:

GlobIBt OGLBX 68.10 -.57
IntBdBt OIBBX 5.94 -.04
MnStFdB OMSBX 39.32 -.25
StrincBt OPSGX 4.30. -.01
Oppenheimer C&M:

DevMktC tODVCX 39.31 -.67
GlobIC pp OGLCX 69.31 . -.58
IntBdC = OIBCX 5.94 -.04
MnStFdC MIGCX 39.20 -.25
StrinCt OSICX 428 -.01

HIGHS & LOWS

NEW HIGHS
ACMMD
AGL Res
AZZ
AFrance
AFrance wt
AlaP46GG n
AlbertoC n
AlliedCap
Altria
AMuninc
Angelic
AssistLivn
AtlasPH n
AvalonBay
Avaya
Avnet
BMC Stt
BIkCAMB
BIKFLIT
BIKNJIT
BIKNYIT
Blockbstr
BickbstrB
CAE Incg
CBL pfD
CabcoJCP97
CablvNY s
Cap&lnco
CarMax
CenterPnt

ChurchDwt
Cohen&Str
CohStPIR
Converm
CopaHold
CortsJCP97
CortPrva8
ConWY32
CrystalR n
DeutTel
DuPnt pfA
DuPnt pfB
Edwards
EEIChile
Ennis Inc
FstMarb s
GMAC33
GoldS pfD
Goodyear
GIPins ptA
GMP
HitCrREIT
HithCr pi
HelinTel
HewlettP
HuanPwr
IntentlEx
LAN Air
LeAGC45
LehMO27
LehBH piN

Malaysa
MLLTD33 n
MLFord31
MS HiYid
MSLTD33 n
MS May
MunAdv
NBTY
Navistar It
NtwkEq
NEgPrmG
NuvFloat
NuvFitOp
NuvNYSel
NuvOPI3
NuvSnin
NvTxAdFit
OneLibrty
OneBeacn n
PimcoMun
PSEG piA
RgeyC pfE
Revion rt
RobbMyr
Saks s
Seaspan
ServiceCp
Stryker
TelefEsp
TxPac
Ultrapar
VKSrine

VinaCone

NEW LOWS
AdvEngy
AlphaNRs
BU Svcs
BarcGSOil n
BarcGsci36 n
Bombay
BrownFB
DWs GCm
DmRsBW
DoralFin
FstFinFd
FDelMnt
GMH CmTr
HarvstEn g
HoustEx
HugotnR
iShGSCl n
LenoxGrp
MeridRes
Motorola
NwCentFn
PennWst gn
PaREIT pt
Primew g
SmithtF
TrinaSol n
Valassis
Viacoms5 n





INTERNATIONAL EDITION



Fund Thr, Vv

Oppenheim
QBalA = QVGIX 18.69 ~09
QBalC QGRCX 1835 -.10
QBalB QGRBX 1834 -.09
QintValA p QIVAX 21.88 -.18
Gosh QVOPX 29.77 -.18
nheimer Roch:
fa YAp LTNYX 3.40 -.01
LNYCt LTNCX 339 *
RoNtMuC tORNCX 12.87 -.01
RoNtMuB tORNBX 12.92 -.01
RoMu Ap RMUNX 18.84 -.02
RcNtMuA ORNAX 12.89 -.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdpPSFAX 9.96 *
TotRtAd PTRAX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AllAsset PAAIX 12.50 -.05
ComodRR PCRIX 13.25 -.13
DevicMk r PLMIX 10.60 -.04
Divinc PDIIX 11.12 -.03
EmMkBd PEBIX 11.06 -.04
Fitinc r PFIIX 10.57 "
ForBdUnr PFUIX 10.09 -.04
FrgnBd = PFORX 10.18 -.01
GlbIBd PIGLX 9.75 -.03
HiYid PHIYX 9,89 -.01
LowDu PTLDX 9.93 -.02
LTUSG PGOVX 10.72 -.03
ModDur PMDRX 9.98 -.02
RealRet PRAIX 11.10 -.02
RealRtn! PRRIX 10.67 -.02
ShortT PTSHX 9.96 *
TotRt PTTRX 10.43 -.02
TRII PMBIX 9.91 -.02
TRIII PTSAX 9.24 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AllAsset p PASAX 12.44 -.05
ComRRp PCRAX 13.16 -.13
lwDurA PTLAX =9.93 -.02
RealRtA p PRTNX 10.67 -.02
TotRtA —PTTAX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Funds B;
TRRtBt PTTBX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Funds C:
AllAssett PASCX 12.36 -.04
ComRRp PCRCX 13.03 -.13
RealRtC p PRTCX 1067 -.02
TotRtCt PTTCX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Funds D;
CommRR pPCRDX 13.17 -.13
RealRtn p PRRDX 10.67 -.02
TRtInp = PTTDX 10.43 -.02
Pax World:
Balanced PAXWX 24.44 -.14
Growth PXWGX 12.42. -.12

Paydenfunds: DEIt US Global Investors: :
aa PYCBX 10.19 -.01| LgCpEqt ALEBX 5.75 -.03| AllAm GBTFX 24,77 -.24 aual ae ney a
MktRet_ PYMRX 11.61 -.09 | Robeco Invest Fas: EstnEurp EUROX’ 43.91 -83]quscr VIMSX 2531 -39
PennM{C p RYPCX 10.74 -.13] SValInvt BPSCX 20.93 -.35 Gs SPP tg 743 USGro VWUSX 1819 09
PhoenixFunds A: Royce Funds: r * :
BalanA PHBLX 14.58 -.05 | LwPrSkSvrRYLPX 16.50 -.15| HolmesGr ACBGX 1833 -.14 or il i at
CapGrA PHGRX 15.58 -.14} MicroCapl RYOTX 16.98 -.20| USChina USCOX 1035 -.11 ie
EmMKtA PEMAX 890 -.03 | Opptyir RYPNX 12.90 -.17| WIdPrcMnUNWPX 2534 ..27| Wellin VWELX 32.20 -.19
GrincA PDIAX 17.22 -.10 | PennMul r PENNX 11.41 -.14 | USAA Group: et We ance
MidGrA PHSKX 16.36 -.06 | Premierlr RYPRX 17.49 -.17| AgvGt USAUX 3297. -.17 i
Wa AMA HE] SN Bs Ba ae 2 ae
uISStA p 76 * | TotRetlr RYTRX 13.60 -.17 | Emg “ “
ReEA — PHRAX 3547 -56| VIPISvc RYVPX 13.91 -12] FStrtGr UFSGX 10.36 -.06| Balanced VBINX 2131 -.10
PhoenixFunds B: Russell Funds S: GNMA USGNX 955 -.01] DevMkt VDMIX 1246 -.20
EnMAt pPEMBK 838 “03 Dwegs REX foie cag) Greie | USGRK 1804 m p “4 EGS RDESX 48.18 - 2 rope a
Pioneer Funds A: EmerMkts REMSX 20.23 -.32| IncStk —-USISX 16.71 -12] Extend VEXMX 3837 -A4
Cullen CVFCX 19.85 -.17 (aiecs alts io “i ee an ae cit FTSESoc VFTSX 921 -.06
ClassBalA AOBLX 10.62 -.06 | MstrtBdS ~O1 | IntTerBd “OL | Growth — VIGRX 29.78 -.17
HVA p TAHYX 175 ~04 Quantéxs ROESK 4054 B Intl 100 usin ae = (Bnd = VBIIX 10.28 -.02
IntlValA —PIIFX 24.19 -.43 Lo -, Nasdq “991 (TBnd =“ VBLIX 1161 -.03
MACVAp PCGRX 22.58 -.18 | ShDrBdS RFBSX 1863-01] PrecMM USAGX 25.65 -37 | yudray yiysy i “B
‘ GrS RSPSX 50.06 -71| S&PIdx USSPX 21.12 -.13 :
Re tk | a | em He elke ck ae
ES 3254 : “
ValueAp PIOTX 1678 -13]EqIi REASX 32.88 -20| ShtTBnd UsSBX age -.o1 | REMTr Be
; ThFin = UFLTX 10.16" -1 | SmCap NAESK 3221 -48
Pioneer Funds B: EqgQ! -REDSX 37.15 -21 SmicpGth VISGX 1B15 .23
i ‘ “eq | TE. = USATX 13.21 -.02
HivIdBt TBHYX 10.80 04 Intl] RINSX 46.74 64] HEL USAIN. 1321 2) rl VISVX 1680 23
Hier -PYiCX 1090 04] Agpstep RALOK 1220 10 i ai 1 col De Be
Price Funds Adv: BalStrC p RBLCX 11.93 -08 : Totlinth © VGTSX 1748 30
Egincp PAFDX 29.29 -22 | Russell LfePts R3: tei ae ee :
Growth p TRSAX : 07 | MdCpldx VMIDX 23.17 25] TotStk © VISMX 33.87 -.25
ee ass oll Ryden by oan 12.02 07) scitech VCSTX 12.66 -.10| Value VIVA 2628-18
p - Dynami -
Value PAVLX 26.72 -20/| InvSP5OOH RYTPX 31.83 +42) sirepl VCSIX 1772-32 Se re ik
Price Funds: InvOTCH RYVNX 1669 +16] Vatuttra VCULK 947 06 ae
Balance RPBAX 21.19 -13/OTCH RYVYX 23.79 -23| vatue Line Fil DvMktinst VIDMX 12.35 -.20
BIChip TRBCX 35.69 -.18] S&P500C pRYTNX 46.89 -.60 Euroinst VESIX 35.72 -.57
CapApp PRWCX 2055 -.11 | Rydex H Class: cain WAGIX 5.05 OL) extn VIEIK 3841-43
DWGIO. PROGX 2519 “AB | MOpASYPRYMOX 3854-631 Fund VUIFX 1248-14] nore VPDE ae a
i “ Investor: 3 :
may eae ait lee, Rk elie iy Se aloe oe
. r 1.06 +. ss “
EmMKES PRMSX 31.67 59] Nova RYNVX 3048 -30|Vareckpumier oo | Totlddkbe VITEX 5049-07
Eine Pen 234-23) OTC RYOCK 11.87 -051 emguika pGBFAX 13.04 -a2| MStTStidk VITNX 3052-22
Europe PRESX 1999 23 | Sel Portfolios: InvGldA ~INIVX 14.90 -17| InsTStPlus VITPX 3052-22
CorefxA TRIVX 104 -.01| Van Kamp Funds A: MidCplst VMCIX 19.68 -.13
Sb re 1e oe Emalktp oe °26) rggGrAp VAGAX 1640 -.12| Paclnst VPKIX 1234 -.19
725 | Eq TROIX 4126 25] crea Tyg | SCinst VSCIX 32.23 -49
GNMA PRGMK 940 -O1) vivid SHYAX 853 Ol] Emap? AGEN ia99 cie| TBSt VBTIX 1002-02
Growth — PRGFX 31.60.17 | intMuniA SEIMX 10.85 -.01 EqincAp ACEIX 912 -05| TSinst VITSX 3388-25
Gr&in —PRGIX 22.00 -16| inega “SEITX 1430 19 pipers) incor eae
GibFranp VGFAX 2639 -.22 viv 18
hive PREVX “704 01 | SCUBA SELCK 2119 -10| Gyscap Acc 1002 “01 Fis:
“ee | LgCValA 69 +. 3 <
IntiBond RPIBK 958-05 | smocra sscGx 1987 -30] GuVAP, ACGIX 2201-18) AggrOpp VPAOX 1274-12
IntDis PRIDX 46.89. -.45 7 p CreBdidl VPCIX 9.80 -.01
SmCValA SESVX 20.76 -34) HYMUAp ACTHX 1121 -01
InthG&l TRIGX 1736-25 5 p Eqinc VPEIX 9.84 -.07
Inistk PRT 1655-21 | SoA pundse | IMTFAD VKMTX 1857-03) Growth VPGRX 360. "06
Ja PRIPX 10.91 -.22 Mi PVGRAX 25.92 -.16| Grwgine VPGIX 11.44 -.07
Lavi PRLAX 3648 1.01 | EMMA SSEMX 22.84 -37| PaveAp ACPAK 1083 “07/ (uy pane iy 0
MDBond MDXBX 10.68 ~o1 | stock SSAIX 1363-18) REsth ACREX 30.75 -45| wpigre vpLGX 2449 16
MediaT! PRMTX 43.60 19] STAM ,SVSPX 2315-15 SOE GG ee 2 i mptdcr evox 2422-13
MidCap RPMGX 53.42 -.34 unin ot | Victory Funds:
755 | CapAppl STCAX 12.88 -.12] US MtgeAVKMGX 1337 ..01 | Victory
Nena PRWak Seat 733] Hividl’ SAMHX 10.77 01 | van Kamp Runds B: DvsStd SRVEX 18.04 -11
: “7, | IntEql STITX 16.04 -.26] AggGrBp VAGBX 14.94 -.11 | WM Blair Fis inst:
NAsia PRASX 14.00 -.14 p
New Era PRNEX 43.45 -20 InElndl SIEIX 17.66 -23] CmstBt ACSWX 1922 -.16| IntGr WBIIX 19.16 -.26
NHoriz PRNHX 31.86 -.40 LCpRIVII CRVAX 17.66 -.11 EqincBt ACEQX 896 -.05| WM Blair Mi Ris:
Ninc PRIX 894-92 | QUGISKKCESTTFX 25.08 -10) HarbBt ACHAX 1552 -.05] IntiGthlr BIGIX 27.78 -38
NJ Bond NJTFX 11.77 ~.02 | SmMCPGr SSCTX 19.92 +-.26) REstBt ACRBX 30.74 451 WM Grp of Fils A:

NYBond PRNYX 11.36 -.02
PSBal = TRPBX 20.00 -.12
PSGrow TRSGX 25.24 -.19
RealEst TRREX 24.91 -39
R2010 TRRAX 15.81 -.10
R2015 TRRGX 12.32 -.08
R2020. = TRRBX 17.27 -.12
R2025. TRRHX 12.80 -.09
R2030 TRRCX 1850 -.14
R2040 TRRDX 18.65 -.14
SciTec PRSCX 21.29 -.18
ShtBd = PRWBX 4.69 -.01
SmCpStk OTCFX 33.77 -.55
SmCapVal PRSVX 40.39 -.64
SpecGr PRSGX 20.26 -.18
Specin - RPSIX 12.17 -.04
TFinc PRTAX 10.06 -.01
TxFrH = PRFHX 12.16 -.01
TxAS! = PRFSX 534 *
Totindex POMIX 15.20 -.12
USTLg —- PRULX 11.45 -.04
Value TRVLX 26.90 -.21
Principal Funds:

L72030In. PMTIX 13.49 -.10

Inv:

BdMtgin PMSIX 10.69 -.01
DiscLCinst PILBX 15.92 -.12
IntlGthinst PITIX 12.46 -.14
(72020In PLWIX 13.55 -.10
PtriVIn = PLVIX 15.21 -.10
PtrLGi In PLGIX 832 -.04
Ptrintin — PINIX 15.23. -.20
TotRetp PURIX 22.42 -.24
Putnam Funds A:

AABalAp PABAX 1231 -.06
AAGrAp PAEAX 14.05 -.11
OvrinAp PDINX 10.02 -.01
EqinAp PEYAX 17.47. -10

EuEq PEUGX 29.56 -.33 | Spectra Funds:

FLIXA = PTFLX 9.14 -.01
GeoAp PGEOX -17.96 -.09
GIbEqty p PEQUX 10.94 -.09
GrinAp PGRWX 19.83 -.12
HithAp PHSTX 58.88 -.10
HiYdAp PHIGX 811 “01
IncmAp PINCX 6.78

IntEqp POVSX 31.06 -39
IntCapO p PNVAX 36.37 -.43
InvAp —-PINVX 15.33 -.09
NwOpAp PNOPX 49.35 -.37
NwValAp PANVX 19.10 -.09
OTCAp POEGX 891 -.09
PATE = PTEPX 9.13.01
RsrchAp PNRAX 16.07 -.08
TxExAp PTAEX 878 -.01
TFInAp’ PPNAX 14,86 -.02
TFHYA = PTHAX. 13.11 -.01
USGVAp PGSIX 1313 *








Fund Thr, _NAV_ Clig.

VstaA p
VoyA p

Putnam Funds B:

CapAprt
ConvB t






PVISX 11.22 -11
PVOYX 1841 -.07

PCABX 21.07 ~.15
PCNBX 19.11 -.07

Value

Fund Tha. _NAV_Chg.

TCW Funds N:
SelEQNp TGCNX 1884 -.07
Tamarack

Funds:

MicroCpValTMVSX 22.38 -.44
TVASX 39.68 -.24





DvrinBt —PSIBX 9.93 -.02 | Temmpeton Instit CapValue VCVLX 1267 14
oe re aes = EmMSp TEEMX 20.18 -42|CapOpp VHCOX 36.69 -31
GrinBt —PGIBX 1952 12] FOES TFEQX 26.30 -30| DivdGro VDIGK 1443-09
HIthBt PHSBX 5226 09 Third Avenue Fads: i Energy VGENX 61.25 +.08
Hither PHSBX $2.26 -09 intr TAVIX 21.72 -07] Eqinc —VEIPX 2507-19
IntlEqp POVBX 2993 -37| RIESIVIr TAREX 34.23 22) Explr —VEXPK 74.29. -83
NwOpBt PNOBK 4391 34] SMiCap TASCX 2545 -21| pur VFLIX 11463. -2
orcet poTex 780 07 | Yaue TAVPX 59.31 031 GNMA VFX 1025 *
ResrchBt, PRFBX 15.16 -.03 | Thornburg Fds C: VHGEX 22.67 -.25
VistaBt | PVTBX 9:70 -.09| ImtValCt THGCX 2690 21) Groinc VONPX 3551-3
VoyBt — PVOBX 15.98 -.07 | Thomburg Fas: GrthEq VGEQX 1112 -09
Putiaii Fisals Ce IntvalAp TGVAX 28.15 -221 Hvcorp VWEHX 622 1
GrOmecp POGEX. 1393-05 | MCBUMAt TIBAX 2023-13 | Heer Wanex ates ot
Putnam Funds Mi (nivalue | TGVIX 2867-23 infiPro VIPSK 1182-1
Pues Rue oe eae TVIRK S06 | IEW: | NN OEM 922
Income CYX 01 LgCpStk AALGX 27.80 -18 4 -02
inl” POWK 3127-291 Widcpar LaMGX 1540 “11 TTSy VEIN 1079 02
oy 19.04 --07) Midcpsk AASCX 16.09 -.13| LifeCon VSCGX 1656 -.08
CeaBe CUPEK 2549-24 ee tise, ASK (ast be
fa Tocqui i
ane Se ae “73 | Gold TGLOX 4807-55 ied ec a
“16 | orrny Fone :
Rents p RauRK 2840 wll Fund” TORY. 41.61 -26 ue et eo
Value RSVAX 27.22 -20 | Touchstone Family: ie a a er
SmCoGr p RSSGX 20.80 -25) MCPGrA TEGAX 23.09 -21 | Hh a
Rainier Inv Mgt: TA IDEX A: Mulnsig VILPX 12.64 -02
SmMCap_RIMSX 36.28 38 | ASAIMG p IMLAX 12.76 -.09) Mulnt = VWITX 13.36 -.01
S/MCplnst RAISX 36.73, -36 | Janarow p IDET 25.86 * |) MMM WEN OL =a
eee fA DEX C: mt .
Feeds in: soar -a4| ASMModt IMOLX 1220 -07| Mush WWSTX 1557 -01
Opty» ROPEX 1322 13{ AAMdGrt IMLX 1271-09] NLT = VWWTX 1189-02
eee “13 AsalGrwt IAALX 1296-11] NYLT © VNYIX 1131. ~02
BalanceA INMUX 11.04 05 | Tumer Funds: PALT ne yea 1135-2
DisnEGAp AGEAX G80 oe | MidcpGth TMGFX 29.22 -24 | PrecMtisrVGPMX 2616-57
DEI INDZX 12.67 -.10 Browne: PrmnepCor VPCCX 12.64 -.06
DivrBd INBNX 4.86 | *| Glob TBGVX 30.99 -15] Prmcpr VPMCX 68.89 -.33
DvOppA INUTX 8.84 -.09 | UBS Funds Cl A: SelValur VASVX 21.01 -.18
Eqval IEVAX. 13.24 -.08 Dynal ha tBNAAX 11.69 +.02|STAR | VGSTX 20.92 -.12
Growth INIDK 31.79 «20 | GlobAllot BNGLX 14.10 -.09] STIGrade VFSTX 1058 *
HIVIdBd INEAX 2.95 * | UBS Funds CIC: sired VSGBX 1030 -01
HIYATEA INHYX 4.41 -.01 | GlobAllop BNPCX 13.84 -.091 STIsry — VFISX 10.29 -.01
IntlSelVip APIAX 10.44 -.18 | UBS PACE Fils P: StratEq VSEQX 2352 -23
LgCpEqp ALEAX 5.85 -.03] IntEqtyP PCIEX 19.30 -.26| TgtRe2005 VIOVX 11.46 -.06
MCpGrA INVPX 10.68 -07|LCGEP PCLCX 17.84 -11| totme2005 VITVX 1297 10

MidCpVi pAMVAX 8.77 -.08

StrtgcAlA

TxSnGrl p STTAX 27.07 -.10
SandsCpGri CISGX 11.34 -.04

Schroder
NAmEqIn

Schwab Runds:
CoreEq SWANX 1849 -.14

DivEqInv
DivEgSel

HdgEqS! rSWHEX 15.87 -.09

IntSS r
MT AIlEq

MTGro SWHGX 18.99 -.17

1000Inv r
1000Sel
S&P Inv
S&P Sel
S&PinstSl
SmCps!
TotBond

ViewpointSWOBX 12.89 -.08
YidPis|_ SWYPX 9.69 *

YidPlsSI
Equity
AmShD
AmShs p

Seligman
Comund t
GrowthA
HYdBD t
MAMuniA

Funds:
SECEX 6.62 -.04
Funds;

Sentinel Group:

ComS Ap
IntlEgA p

SmCoA p SAGWX 7.41 -.09

ola
IneEq
SoundSh

Fund N

St FarmAssoc:

Balan

soe

ia

Dividend

SunAmerica Funds:

NwCenA p
NwCenB t

SunAmerica Focus:

FelntEqc

TCW Funds:

DivFocus
SelEqty!






IMRFX 11.43 -.09
B:
IDEBX 12.68 -.10

Funds:
SNAEX 12.00 -.07

SWDIX 14.60 -.12
SWDSX 14.57 -.12

SWISX 21.34 -31
SWEGX 13.73 -.15

SNXFX 41.00 -.27
SNXSX 40.98 -.26
SWPIX 21.71 -14
SWPPX 21.78 -.13
ISLCX 11.11 -.07
SWSSX 23.18 -36
SWLBX 9.87 -.01

SWYSX 9.69 *

SLADX 45.58 -.30
SLASX 45.57 -.30

Group:

SLMCX 33.61 -.21
SGRFX 4.48 -.01
SHYDX 3.40 *
SMATX 7.95 -.01

SENCX 32.66 -20
SWRLX 20.35 -.22

SEQUX152.44 -1.86
SKSEX 25.72 -.40
SSHFX 38.90 -38

SPECX. 8.92 -.05

STFGX 56.38 -.39
SPSCX pron +25
PAK 2726-27
STMDX 38.17 '-.57

SEGAX 20.36 -.09
SEGBX 17.79 +.08

FINTX 19.01 -.19

TGIGX 13.20 -11
TGCEX 1932 -.07



BalAdml

Energy

500Adm|
GNMA Ad VFUX
GroincAd VGIAX
GrwAdm —VIGAX
HithCr = VGHAX 61.
HividCp VWEAX
InfProAd — VAIPX
Insd\TAd VILQX 12.
TTBdAdm! = VBILX
TsryAdml_ VFIUX
IntGrAdm VWILX
TTAdml = VWIUX 1336 -.01
MGrAdm —VFIDX
LtdTrAd = VMLUX
LTGrAdm! VWETX
LTsyAdml_ VUSUX
LT Adml = VWLUX

MuHYAdmVWALX
PrmCapr VPMAX 71.
PacfAdml VPADX
ReitAdmr VGSLX 107.55 -1.69
STsyAdml_ VFIRX
STBdAdm! VBIRX
ShtTrAd = VWSUX
STFdAd = VSGDX
STIGrAd VFSUX
SmCAdm VSMAX
TxMCapr VTCLX
KMGrin rt VTGLX
TUBAdm! =VBTLX 10,
TStkAdm VTSAX
USGrAdm VWUAX 47.
ValAdml VVIAX 26.28 -.18
WellsiAdm VWIAX 52.
WelltnAdmVWENX 55,62 -.32

LCGEqP = PCLVX 21.39 -.14
UMB Scout Funds:
World UMBWX 3231 -36

SelGrthB r VBSGX 5.43 -.02
StrGwth ACEMX 36.13 -.18
Van Kamp Funds C:
AggGrCt VAGCX 14.98 -.11
ComStkC ACSYX 1923 -.16
EgincCt ACERX 9.00 -.05
Van Wagoner Funds:

EmgGro pVWEGX 458 -.05
MicroCp pVWMCX 9.59 -.09

Admirak

AsstAdm! VAARX 6421 -.4l
VBIAX 2131-11
CAITAdm VCADX 11.03 -.01
CpOpAd! VHCAX 84.77 -71
VGELX 115.02 +.14
EqinAdmn VEIRX 5254 -Al
EuroAdml VEUSX 83.83 -1.33
ExplAdml VEXRX 69.16 -.77
ExtdAdm VEXAX 3839 -.44
FLUTAdm VFLRX 11.63 -.02
VFIAX 129.82. -.80
1025 *
5798 -22
29.79 -.16



622 -.01
2321-03

10.28 -.02
10.79 -.02
75.20 -1.07

974 -.02
1071 -.01
932 -.02
1120-3
1133-01
89.06 -.60

1029 -.01
991 -01
1557 -.01
10.30 ~al

6306 -39
3387-25







62 -.41

64 -.02

02 -.02
11 -.24
74. -.24

BalCt

VangA

Wasatch:
CoreGr WGROX 39.58 -.44
Mic-Cap WMICX 651 -.07
SmCpGr WAAEX 36.30 -.53

Value

Index

DivEq |

IntiMM!

TgtRe2015 VIXVX 1242 -.08
‘TgtRe2035 VITHX 13.78 -.12
ae VTIVX 1423 -.12

EqincAp CMPBX 21.87 -.15
WCstEq CMNWX 43.20 -33
WM Str Asset Mgmt:

BalancA p SABPX 14.62 -.08
BalancBt SBBPX 1459 -.09
SCBPX 14.51 -.09
ConGrBt SBGPX 16.16 -.12
ConGrA p SAGPX 16.65 -.12
ConGrwC tSCGPX 16.03 -.12
StrGAp SACAX 1841 -.15
Waddell & Reed Adv: |

Acem = UNACX 7.52. -.03
AssetSp UNASX 9.22 -.07
CoreinvA UNCMX 6.13 -.02
NCcptA p UNECX 11.03 -.13
ScTechA UNSCX 11.13 -.05
UNVGX 896 -.02

Hickory WEHIX 39.91 -.33
PartVal WPVLX 24.44 -.16
WVALX 40.26 -.26
Wells Fargo Ad Adm:

ConsAlloc NVCBX 19.30 -.05
NVINX 5541-34
Wells Fargo Adv A:

AStAIIA = SFAAX 2148 -.13

AsiaPc_ — SASPX 12.44 -.04
CmStkZ STCSX 19.93 -.10
Enterpr SENTX 29.98 -21
Grwthinv SGROX 22.72. -.15
Opptyinv SOPFX 41.41 -.24

SCApValZ pSSMVX 30.27 -.34
UitStiny =STADX 911 *
UIStMulncSMUAX 4.77 *
Wells Fargo Admin:

NVDEX 39.00 -34
GrBal = NVGBX 30.24 -21
UgCoGri NVLCX 50.96 -.39
CrBdPtFl pWAPIX 11.39 -.02
CorePlus WACPX 10.59 -.01
Core WATFX 11.39 -.02

BalAAA = WEBAX 11.57 -.04
MMitsAA pWEMMX 15.03 -.08

IntiGthN = WBIGX 27.38 -37
Ris:
WMIIX 1044 -.13

NEW YORK CORPORATION BONDS

Ytd. Close Chg.
CORPORATION BONDS
BurN 8.15s20N 7.06 115Â¥2 -
Deere 8.95819 8.21 109 -1
DelcoR 85807 9.868742 wt
FedNM 2zr14 Bie +048
FordCr 63808 6.49 9898 a}

GMAC 61808 614 997%

GiulfMo 5s5t is
HSBC Fn6%11 6.46
JPMChse 61808 6,08
JPMChse 6§08" 6.63
Leucadia 79413 7.38
MBNA8.28s26 8.00
MeDnl 8 11 7.87

Close Chg.
73 2
104Â¥2 =
100% = +48
101% Ve
105 Ve
10342 8
12% 2%

Ytd. Clese Chg.
MPac 48420f 90% =
NatwFS 8s27 7.72 «108% te
Noram 6312 ov 99Â¥2 oe
Ryder 9816 857 1085 +198
Safwy 9.3807 9.81 G9%s -1Y2
TVA8Y442 7.24114 ts
Tenet 73813 808 91% ss



FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Foreign currency
in dollars
Today Yesterday °

Argent {Peso} 3247 3255
Australia (Dollar) 7787 7846
Bahrain (Dinar) 2.6523 2.6523
Brazil (Real) 4643 A661
Britain (Pound) 1.9301 1.9443
Canada (Dollar) 8526 +8492
Chile (Peso) 1001846 = .001848
China (Yuan) +1280 1281
Colombia (Peso) 000447 = .000451
Czech Rep (Koruna) .0470 0473
Denmark (Krone) 1745 1756
Dominican Rep (Peso) .0296 0296
Egypt (Pound, +1752 «1752
Euro (Euro) 1.3009 1.3086
Hong Kong (Dollar) 1283 +1284
Hungary (Forint) 0051 0052
India (Rupee) 0226 0226
Indnsia (Rupiah) 000112 000112
Israel (Shekel) .2358 2366
Japan (Yen) 008432 008398
Jordan (Dinar) 1.4112 1.4109
Kenya Sug 20144 0144
Kuwalt (Dinar 3.4590 3.4586
Lebanon (Pound) 000662 — .000662

Dollar in Foreign currency
foreign curr in dollars
Today Ye jay Today Yesterday
3.0795 3.0725 | Malaysia (Ringgit) .2847 2840
1.2841 1.2745 | Mexico (Peso) 091436 = 091825
3770 3770 | N. Zealand (Dollar) 6866 6976
2.1537 2.1455 | Norway (Krone) 15771579
pial, rik3 | Pakistan (Rupee) 0164 164
B71 541.13 | Peru (New Sol) 3133 3134
7.8130 7.8089 | Philpins (Peso) 02050205
2237.50 2217.50 | Poland (Zloty) 3353 3360
21.26 21.15 | Russia (Ruble) 0377 0379
5.7293 5.6952 | Saudi Arab (Riyal) — .2666 2666
33.74 33.74 | Singapore (Dollar) — .6503 +6502
5.7085 5.7085 | Slovak Rep (Koruna) .0377 0379
.1687 -T641 | So, Africa (Rand) +1376 1408
7.7321 7.7887 | So, Korea (Won) .001071 .001074
15 yal Sweden (Krona) 14351441
8928.57 me Switzerlnd (Franc) — .8093 Sill
4.2415 4.2263 | Taiwan (Dollar) 0306 0307
118.60 119,03 | Thailand (Baht) 02800 .02798
(7086 .7087 | Turkey (Lira) 6902+ .7024
69.52 69.55 | U.A.E. (Dirham) 2723 2723
2891 -2891 | Uruguay (New Peso) .0409 0412
1510.57 1510.57 | Venzuel (Bolivar) 000466 000466

Dollar in
foreign currency
Today Yesterday
35125 3.5215
10.9366 10.8903
1.4565 (1.4334
6.3413 6.3314
61.05 60.90
3.192 3.191
48.86 48.86
2.98 2.98
26.4915 26.3978
3.7507 3.1507
15377 1.5379
26.49 26.41
7.2652 7.1026
933.71 931.10
69682 6.9403
1.2356 1.2329
32.70 32.59
35.71 35.74
1.4488 1.4238
3.6727 3.6729
24.4248 24.2996

2145.92 2145.92







SHASTRA

SPORTS —



TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007



PRO FOOTBALL
COACH OF THE YEAR



ALEX BRANDON/AP

HEAD COACH: New Orleans Saints
coach Sean Payton listens to
questions from the media at a
press conference in Metairie, La.,
on Saturday. He was named
Associated Press NFL Coach of
the Year for 2006.

Saints’ Payton
beats out an |
outstanding six

BY BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — As Sean Pay-
ton settled into his first head coaching
job with a reeling New Orleans Saints
franchise, he remained mindful of a
couple key pointers from his former
boss, Bill Parcells.

“His advice was to find out —
quickly — what’s kept this team from
. winning, if you can, and then make

oe the appropriate changes,” Payton

“Hee recalled. “He also emphasized the

importance of finding the right quar-
terback.” ‘

Check, and check.

In Payton’s first season in New
Orleans, the Saints (10-6) improved
their victory total by seven en route
to securing the second seed in the
NFC playoffs. And when the rebuilt
Louisiana Superdome plays host to a
second-round NFL playoff game for
the first time ever Saturday night, the
Saints’ offense will be led on the field
by a quarterback in Drew Brees who
led the league in passing yardage.

Viewing the Saints fast and trium-
phant turnaround in the context of
how their success held the potential
to revitalize the spirit of a city
rebuilding from a natural disaster, it
was hardly a surprise Payton was
selected as The Associated Press
Coach of the Year.

Payton received 44 votes in a sea-
son when there were a half-dozen
outstanding coaching performances.
Eric Mangini of the New York Jets,
another first-year head coach, got
three votes, while San Diego’s Marty
Schottenheimer, the 2004 winner,
received two. Jeff Fisher of Tennessee
got one. .

“I’m honored and somewhat hum-
bled. This is a time in our league right
now where there are probably seven
or eight Hall of Fame coaches cur-
rently coaching in our league,” Payton
said Saturday after learning of the
award. “I still have tags hanging out of
my Reebok gear on the sidelines.”

Payton became the third Saints
coach to win the award, joining Has-
lett (2000) and Jim Mora (1987). Last
year’s winner was Chicago’s Lovie
Smith.

With New Orleans ravaged by
Hurricane Katrina in late August
2005, the Saints became nomads that
year, winding up 3-13 under Jim Has-
lett. Payton, an assistant coach in Dal-
las, was hired to revive one of the
NFL’s historically unsuccessful fran-
chises.

The new coach of the Saints was
going to be faced with the unique
challenge of rebuilding a roster while
his community was recovering from
devastation. Yet, Payton embraced
that, understanding how uplifting the
Saints’ success could be to those
struggling to put together their lives
again.

“You have to trust your gut a lot
and follow your heart,” Payton said.
“There certainly were going to be
some challenges coming into this
region at this time. But I think the city

- is very committed to this team and it’s
really an amazing fan base we have,
not just in New Orleans, but in this
whole Gulf South area.

“T'm excited we can provide a little
juice for these people during the
course of the week, get them excited
about football — and certainly excited
about the postseason now,” Payton
said. “Those things all make it very
worthwhile. It’s pretty powerful right
now and it’s a little unique to maybe
any other job.”

Upon his arrival, Payton scoured
film of the 2005 season and found a
team that lost more because of undis-
ciplined, mistake-prone play than a
lack of talent.

Leadership was a key component
Payton wanted to address, and he

° TURN TO COACH













3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO FOOTBALL | NFL ALL-PRO TEAM

Tomlinson, Taylor, Bailey unanimous picks

BY BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

LaDainian Tomlinson, Jason Taylor and
Champ Bailey capped superb seasons by unani-
mously making The Associated Press NFL All-
Pro team announced Monday.

Tomlinson, San Diego’s record-setting run-
ning back, also won the AP Most Valuable
Player and Offensive Player of the Year awards.
Miami end Taylor was the Defensive Player of
the Year.

Bailey tied for the league lead with 10 inter-
ceptions even though opponents tried to avoid
throwing to the Broncos cornerback’s side of
the field.

“My whole idea to go out on a Sunday is to
be a pain in the butt for the other team,” said
Taylor, who had 62 tackles, 13 1/2 sacks, 14 quar-
terback hurries, two interceptions — both
returned for TDs — ll passes defensed, 10 fum-
bles forced and two fumbles recovered.

“If I can be a pain in their butt and give
somebody a headache, then more times than
not, it’s going to work out well for myself.”

It worked out so well for him, Tomlinson —





TAYLOR

TOMLINSON BAILEY

who set NFL records for points with 186, touch-
downs with 31 and TDs rushing with 28 — and
Bailey that they received all 50 votes from a
nationwide panel of sports writers and broad-
casters who cover the NFL.

Two others, both Chicago Bears, came close
to sweeping the vote. Devin Hester, who set a
league mark with six kick returns for touch-
downs, was the only rookie on the team, earn-
ing 48% votes. Middle linebacker Brian
Urlacher, a repeater from last year, got 48.

Asked about the respect he was shown as a
rookie, Hester said: “Right, most definitely. I
really didn’t want to look into this season. I just
kind of wanted to establish myself and feel at



home. Toward the offseason, that’s when I
really start looking at some stuff like that.”

In all, the Chargers had the most All-Pros
with five: Tomlinson, tight end Antonio Gates,
fullback Lorenzo Neal, defensive tackle Jamal
Williams and linebacker Shawne Merriman,
who made it despite serving a four-game sus-
pension for violating the league’s steroids pol-
icy. Merriman still wound up with a league-best
17 sacks.

“When you've got five guys on the All-Pro
team, that says a lot,” said Tomlinson, who did a
lot to give San Diego the league’s best record,
14-2. ““I think that’s significant and ... I’m obvi-
ously very happy to be named on it.”

The Bears were next with four All-Pros:
Urlacher, Hester, center Olin Kreutz and kicker
Robbie Gould.

Saints quarterback Drew Brees edged the
Colts’ Peyton Manning 25 votes to 24 for the
quarterback spot. It was the first time since
2002 that Manning was not the first-team quar-
terback.

° TURN TO ALL-PRO

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP GAME | FLORIDA 41, OHIO STATE 14

Gators running wild ©



POINTING THE WAY: Florida wide receiver Andre Caldwell celebrates a second-quarter TD
catch against Ohio State during Monday night’s victory in the BCS national title game.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT | DANGERS FOR ATHLETES

Cornerback’s slaying haunts Hodge

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Leak leads Florida’s
offense as defense
smothers Ohio St.

BY BEN WALKER
Associated Press

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Not even close.

Florida — yes Florida — owned the field it
wasn’t supposed to be on, embarrassing Heis-
man Trophy winner Troy Smith and No. 1 Ohio
State 41-14 on Monday night to run away with
the national championship.

Chris Leak and Tim Tebow showed off
coach Urban Meyer’s twin quarterback system
to perfection as the No. 2 Gators became the
first Division I school to hold football and bas-
ketball titles at the same time.

Now, only one question remains: What
about Boise State? Playing on the very same
field where the undefeated Broncos stunned
Oklahoma in the Fiesta Bowl on New Year’s
Day, Florida (13-1) routed the previously
unbeaten Buckeyes (12-1).

Former Gators star Emmitt Smith did the
chomp on the sidelines, punctuating the amaz-
ingly easy victory. That left Florida, Wisconsin
and Louisville each with one loss, and surely
will renew calls for a playoff system.

Ted Ginn Jr. returned the opening kickoff 93
yards for a touchdown, then it quickly fell apart
for the Buckeyes. He hobbled off minutes later

‘with an injury and by the time he returned for

the second half on crutches, Florida led 34-14.

Leak, maligned for never winning the big
one, completed 25 of 36 passes for 213 yards and
a touchdown. The Rambo-like Tebow threw for
one TD and ran for another. ;

Smith, meanwhile, joined a long list of Heis-
man Trophy quarterbacks — Jason White, Eric
Crouch and Gino Torretta, among them — to
fall apart in bowl games. He was just 4-for-14
with one interception and never showed off his
elusive running.

Instead, defensive ends Derrick Harvey and
Jarvis Moss made it a miserable night for Smith.
And linebacker Earl Everett ran down Smith
despite missing his helmet.

Florida won its second national title, adding
to the one Heisman winner Danny Wuerffel got
in 1996 under coach Steve Spurrier with a 52-20
over Florida St. in the Sugar Bowl.



BY ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

DENVER — For Denver Nug-
gets guard Julius Hodge, the New
Year’s Day death of Broncos cor-
nerback Darrent Williams was an
unnecessary
reminder to cele-
brate every day.

Williams was
shot in the neck
and two other
people were
wounded when
at least 14 bullets
were fired into a
stretch Hummer
after Williams left a New Year’s
Eve party.

Last April, Hodge had left a



HODGE

Denver nightclub and was driving
on Interstate 76 when a gunman
pulled up alongside him, spraying
his vehicle with bullets. The
6-foot-7 point guard was hit five
times.

“It just shows that I’m really
blessed to be here still, and I never
take anything for granted,” said
Hodge, who made his first NBA
start since the shooting last Friday.
“Not a minute, a second, a millisec-
ond of my life.”

Police investigating Williams’
death said they have no indication
the two cases are related.

Williams was the third pro ath-
lete to be involved in a Denver-
area shooting.

In 2003, Pittsburgh Steelers

AW

linebacker Joey Porter, who played
at Colorado State, was one of six
people shot outside a Denver
nightclub in an attack that left one
person dead.

“Since then, I carry myself in a

different type of way,” Porter said
last week. “I respect my situation
whenever I go out. I take a whole
different outlook when I go out. I
make sure I feel like I’m safe, and if
I’m not, I’m not going.”

All three cases remain unsolved.

“I have to move on,” Hodge said
of the case. “They haven’t found
who shot me and I’ve pretty much
let it go, but I pray that they find
whoever shot (Williams).”

* TURN TO SLAYING



SHARON STEINMAN/MCT

FINAL FAREWELL: Pall bearers
carry the casket of Darrent
Williams toward the horse-
drawn carriage that will take
him to the cemetery in Fort
Worth, Texas, on Saturday.



/

t
‘

vi¢
O5Â¥e t

om

6

ee A ee ee

+

1 wd

uty 476
. a

+ lee »

1

tt 8 4G 9% @ BY

a a

“

8 me

a4.

59 DOM Bet b eH AE

2

Pea



4E | TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 _|

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER | EXTRA TIME

FIFA report omits Zidane’s head-butt

BY ROBERT MILLWARD
Associated Press

LONDON — Maybe Zine-
dine Zidane’s head-butt in the
World Cup final never hap-
pened.

The unforgettable moment
in soccer’s biggest game came
when the France captain
reacted to something Marco
Materazzi said by planting his
head firmly into the Italian’s
chest.

Because the ball was fur-
ther down the field, few
among the 69,000 fans in Ber-
lin’s Olympic Stadium saw
what happened and were
amazed Zidane was sent off.

FIFA, it seems, didn’t see it
at all. There’s certainly no
mention of the episode in the
soccer body’s official World
Cup 2006 report. It’s not even
noted that Zidane was ejected
— in the last game of his
career! :

Even in retirement, Zidane
was suspended for three
games and fined for the out-
burst. Before he considers
suing FIFA, there may be rea-
sons why the governing body

SOCCER NOTES

Adu heads

Associated Press

Freddy Adu headed the
list of 20 players selected
Monday for the U.S. roster in
qualifying for the FIFA U-20
World Cup.

Michael Bradley, son of
interim U.S. national team
coach Bob Bradley, was not
made available for the qualify-
ing tournament by his Dutch
club, Heerenveen, the U.S.
Soccer Federation said. Heer-
enveen did allow forward
Robbie Rogers to take part
in qualifiers, which will take
place from Jan. 17-21 at Pan-
ama City, Panama.

Adu played in the tourna-
ment in 2003 and 2005, when
it was known as the FIFA
World Youth Championship.

Nine of the players
selected by under-20 coach
Thomas Rongen are profes-
sionals, including six from
Major League Soccer. Among
the pros are forwards Pres-
ton Zimmerman of Ham-
burg in Germany and Johann
Smith of Bolton in England.

The Americans gather in
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on
Wednesday, leave Saturday
for Panama and play Haiti on
Jan. 17, Guatemala on Jan. 19
and Panama on Jan. 21. The
top two teams in the group
advance to the U-20 World
Cup, to be played in Canada
from June 30-July 22. Two
more teams will qualify when
Costa Rica, Jamaica, Mexico
and St. Kitts and Nevis com-
pete in the other group, from
Feb. 21-25 at Culiacan, Mexico.

The roster includes goal-
keepers Brian Perk (UCLA)
and Chris Seitz (Maryland);
defenders Quavas Kirk (L.A.
Galaxy), Ofori Sarkodie
(Indiana), Nathan Sturgis
(Los Angeles Galaxy), Julian
Valentin (Wake Forest),
Anthony Wallace (South
Florida) and Tim Ward
(Columbus Crew); midfield-
ers Adu (Real Salt Lake),
Bryan Arguez (West Kendal
Optimists), Tony Beltran

didn’t include details of the
head-butt in its report.
Zidane’s ejection for an act
of blatant violence provided a
shameful end to a champion-
ship that FIFA had lauded as
one of the best. Maybe it didn’t
want to take the shine off an
otherwise glowing report.
The 2006 World Cup was
widely acclaimed as well orga-
nized by the host Germans
despite fears about ticketing
and security. There was little

crowd trouble inside or out-.

side the stadiums despite the
arrival of thousands of
drunken fans from England
and neighboring Netherlands.
There were standout goals
- and saves and some top qual-
ity performances in the early
stages of the competition.
Although the big names faded
in the second half and Brazil,
Argentina, Spain and England
went home earlier than
expected, FIFA believed it had
plenty of reasons to give the
World Cup top marks.
The final stages of the last
game was 110 minutes old,
deep into extra time, with the

U.S. under-



STEVE WILSON/AP

A PLAYER: Freddy Adu will
play for the U.S. under-20
World Cup team.

(UCLA), Amaechi Igwe:
(Santa Clara), Danny Szetela
(Columbus Crew) and Jona-
than Villanueva (Virginia);
and forwards Andre Akpan
(Harvard), Josmer Altidore
(N.Y. Red Bulls), Rogers,
Smith (Bolton, England), Zim-
merman and Sal Zizzo
(UCLA).

FAKING INJURIES

FIFA criticized players at
the World Cup for the
“deplorable habit” of faking
injuries, disruptions that the
governing body said marred
last summer’s tournament.

In its official report on the
2006 World Cup, FIFA also
praised German organizers
for a staging a trouble-free
event, which Italy won by
beating France on a penalty-
kick shootout in the final.

FIFA president Sepp Blat-
ter, in a foreword to the
report, described the organi-
zation of the World Cup as
“faultless” and the fan behav-
ior ‘“‘a complete success.”
FIFA, however, clearly was
displeased by the trend of
players falling to field as if
injured.

“At this World Cup, the
deplorable habit that involves
players staying down for no
apparent reason after minor



BASEBALL NOTES

Seay, Perez

Associated Press

Left-hander Bobby Seay
and outfielder Timo Perez
have agreed to minor league
contracts with the AL cham-
pion Detroit Tigers.

Seay appeared in 14 games
and had a 6.46 ERA with the
American League champions
last season. The Tigers
demoted him in June and he
went on to go 1-2 with a 4.74
ERA in one start and 23 relief
appearances at Triple-A
Toledo. He has pitched in 76
major league games over five
seasons in Detroit, Colorado
and Tampa Bay and is 1-1 with
a 5.02 ERA.

If added to the 40-man ros-
ter under the deal announced
Monday, he would get a one-



MICHAEL PROBST/AP

CARDED: France’s Zinedine Zidane gets a red card from
referee Horacio Elizondo after head-butting Italy’s
Marco Materazzi in the chest during extra time in the
final game of the World Cup between Italy and France

in Berlin on July 9.

20 roster

collisions, thus causing fre-
quent breaks in play, was
increasingly in evidence,”
said the report of the FIFA
Technical Committee.

When players go down
injured, the team in posses-
sion traditionally puts the ball
out of play. From the restart,
the ball is then passed back to
the team which deliberately
put the ball out.

Now, FIFA warns. that
coaches and players are
unfairly taking advantage.

“In some cases, the player
lying on the ground was
treated for quite a while
before being led off the pitch
and was often ready to come
back on before the game had
been restarted,” the World
Cup report said. “When play
eventually continued, the ball
was played back to the team
who had been in possession
... but in a place that put
them at a clear disadvantage.”

The report said the inter-
ruptions destroyed the flow of
the game.

D.C. UNITED

Former Duke co-captains
Brian Davis and Christian
Laettner wore black and red
soccer scarves instead of bas-
ketball jerseys Monday as
MLS unveiled a new, minori-
ty-led ownership group that is
paying a league-record $33
million for the operating
rights to D.C. United.

Now comes the hard part
— finding a way to build the
team a new stadium in the
poorest section of the city.

Davis and Laettner joined a
group called D.C. United
Holdings and led by San Fran-
cisco businessmen Victor
MacFarlane and Will Chang.
MacFarlane and Davis are the
first black owners in MLS,
commissioner Don Garber
said. Chang, one of the own-
ers of baseball’s San Francisco
Giants, is the first Chinese-
American MLS _ owner,
according to Garber.

get minor-league deals

year contract that would pay
$450,000 in the major leagues
and $120,000 in the minors.

Perez hit 194 with three
RBIs in 23 games last year for
the World Series champion St.
Louis Cardinals and was cut
in August. In seven seasons
with the New York Mets, Chi-
cago White Sox and St. Louis,
he has a .262 batting average
with 26 homers and 172 RBIs.

If added to the major
league roster, Perez would get
a one-year contract that
would pay $450,000 in the
majors and $72,000 in the
minors.

METS

Reliever Duaner Sanchez
and the New York Mets

agreed Monday to an
$850,000, one-year contract,
more than double the
$399,500 he earned last sea-
son.

Sanchez was acquired from
the Los Angeles Dodgers on
Jan. 4 last year, and the 27-
year-old right-hander went 5-1
with 2.60 ERA in 49 relief
appearances.

In addition to his salary,
Sanchez could earn $100,000
in performance bonuses:
$25,000 each for 50, 55, 60 and
65 games.

Three Mets remain eligible
to file for salary arbitration by
Friday. They are catcher
Ramon Castro, outfielder
Endy Chavez and left-hander
Oliver Perez.

game laboring toward a pen-
alty shootout when the

‘Zidane-Materazzi flare-up

happened and the Frenchman
was shown a red card.

As the three-time FIFA
Player of the Year walked past
the World Cup trophy, the
smiles of satisfaction disap-
peared from the faces of Sepp
Blatter and his FIFA col-
leagues.

They knew that the 2006
World Cup — which has the
letters “FIFA” at the head of
its official title — would for-
ever be known as the competi-
tion where one of the greatest
players the game has ever seen
ended his career by head-butt-
ing an opponent.

When the official report
came out six months later,
Blatter, UEFA president Len-
nart Johansson and local orga-
nizing committee chairman
Frank Beckenbauer all wrote
forewords to the document
without making reference to
Zidane’s head-butt or even his
ejection.

While rightly praising the
organizational skills of the



SPORTS ROUNDUP



_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Germans, the report skipped
over some glaring errors by
some of the referees — like
England’s Graham Poll, who
showed three yellow cards to
one player before finally eject-
ing him. .

To its credit, the report
criticized players and coaches
for the increasing practice of
feigning injuries as a tactical
ploy. It lamented that some of
the rising young stars made no
impact at the World Cup and
the fact that Asian and African
nations didn’t fulfill the prom-
ise they had shown in previous
World Cups.

But it simply ignored the
tournament’s single biggest
moment.

The World Cup was an
organizational triumph. Too
bad that Zidane didn’t stay
around for the finish.

The FIFA report makes
brief mention of Zidane’s con-
tributions right up to the 104th
minute of the final when his
header was saved by Italy
goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon.

Somehow, the final header
of his career got missed.

HE KEPT TRUCKIN’:
Bobby Hamilton
celebrates winning
the NASCAR
Craftsman Truck
Series Florida Dodge
Dealers 250 at the
NASCAR Nextel Cup
Daytona 500 on Feb.
18, 2005 in Daytona,
Fla. Hamilton died
from cancer at the
age of 49 on Sunday
at his home with ~
family.

AALAND A RADIA

NASCAR's Hamilton dies

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Bobby Hamilton paid his
early bills driving a wrecker,
got his NASCAR break driv-
ing a car used in Days of
Thunder and won the 2004
Craftsman Truck champion-
ship in his own truck.

Following his death Sun-
day of cancer at the age of 49,
Hamilton was remembered
for his love of the sport, kind-
ness and blue-collar persona.

Nextel Cup driver Sterling
Marlin, a fellow Tennessee
native, said Sunday night that
a lot of people didn’t get to
know Hamilton well, but that
the driver who started with
nothing and never had the
best equipment would be
missed.

“He would give you the
shirt off his back, and he
helped me out a lot through
the years,” Marlin said.

Born in Nashville in 1957,
Hamilton got his start on local
tracks and qualified fifth in his
first Cup race at Phoenix in
1989 with a car used in the
movie Days of Thunder. He
drove in all of NASCAR’s top
three divisions, making 371
Cup starts and winning four
races in what is now the Nex-
tel Cup series, including the
2001 Talladega 500.

The death was shocking to
people who had not seen him
recently. His racing team
announced only last month
that Ken Schrader would
drive its truck this season.

“NASCAR is saddened by
the passing of Bobby Hamil-
ton,” said Jim Hunter,
NASCAR’s vice president of
communications. “Bobby was
a great competitor, dedicated
team owner and friend. Our
thoughts and prayers go out
to all of the Hamilton family.”

Hamilton won 10 times in
the truck series, including
four victories in 2004 when
he became the first owner-
driver to win a NASCAR
series title since the late Alan
Kulwicki won the Winston

Cup championship in 1992.

Hamilton was diagnosed in
February with head and neck
cancer. A malignant growth
was found when swelling
from dental surgery did not
go down.

He raced in the first three
truck races of the season, with
a best finish of 14th at Atlanta
Motor Speedway, before turn-
ing over the wheel to his son,
Bobby Hamilton Jr. The
senior Hamilton then started
chemotherapy and radiation
treatment. :

By August, he returned to
work at Bobby Hamilton Rac-
ing in Mount Juliet, about 20
miles east of Nashville. It was
his fourth race shop, a facility
lacking for nothing and built
to prove he could stay in Ten-
nessee and compete in a place
he kept so clean he often
walked around barefoot.

Doctors indicated his CAT
scans looked good. But micro-
scopic cancer cells remained
on the right side of his neck.

“Cancer is an ongoing bat-
tle, and once you are diag-
‘nosed you always live with
the thought of the disease in
your body,” Hamilton said in
an article posted on
NASCAR’s website last
month. “It is the worst thing
you could ever imagine.”

Hamilton’s Nextel Cup

wins, in addition to Talladega,
came at Phoenix, Rockingham
and Martinsville. His best sea-
son was in 1996 when he fin-
ished ninth in the season
standings. He won his first
Cup race that year, at Phoe-
nix.
Hamilton drove in the top-
level NASCAR series from
1989-05, earning $14.3 million
and racing to 20 top-five fin-
ishes.

He became a full-time driv-
er-owner in the truck series in
2003.

Another NASCAR favorite,
1973 Winston Cup champion
Benny Parsons, was diag-
nosed with cancer in his left
lung in July. He was checked

into intensive care last week
at a North Carolina hospital.

DAKAR RALLY

ER RACHIDIA, Morocco
— Giniel de Villiers won the
third stage of the Dakar Rally
on Monday, while Carlos
Sainz took the overall lead.

De Villiers, a South African
driving a Volkswagen, fin-
ished in 2 hours, 46 minutes,
12 seconds on the 156-mile
timed section of the 402-mile
trek from Nador to Er Rachi-
dia.
Sainz, also driving a Volks-
wagen, was 25 seconds
behind. The Spaniard won the
second stage Sunday, from
Portimao, Portugal, to Malaga,
Spain.

Stephane Peterhansel of
France, in a Mitsubishi, fin-
ished third Monday, 3:18
behind De Villiers.

Overall, Sainz leads De Vil-
liers by 1:02. Carlos Sousa of
Portugal, in a Volkswagen, is
4:26 behind.

This year’s Dakar Rally has
a record number of competi-
tors with 525 teams, including
250 motorcycles, 187 cars and
88 trucks contesting the 4,918-
mile race through Europe and
Africa. The race finishes in
Dakar, Senegal, on Jan. 20.

OLYMPIC BIDS

LONDON — The three cit-
ies hoping to host the 2014
Winter Games completed
their final bids, which will be
handed over to the Interna-

‘ tional Olympic Committee by
Wednesday’s deadline.

The candidates are
Pyeongchang, South Korea;
Salzburg, Austria; and Sochi,
Russia. The IOC will select
the host city July 4 in Guate-
mala City.

Sochi submitted its bid
Monday, with Pyeongchang
expected to follow today.
Salzburg’s bid will be submit-
ted Wednesday. The next step
for the three cities is a visit
from the IOC’s evaluation
commission.

*

EBT ES PD SOE I TO ST TT TS TTR RT TS TOT GT TEU TTS







SATISFACTION: Patriots quarterback Tom Brady celebrates

ELISE AMENDOLA/AP

his fourth-quarter touchdown pass to Kevin Faulk

during his team’s 37-16 victory over the Jets in an AFC

wild-card game in Foxborough, Mass., on Sunday.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT
Saints’ Payton is
Coach of the Year

*COACH

started by bringing in Brees,
seen at the time as a risk
because the quarterback was
rehabbing from complicated
offséason surgery on his
throwing shoulder.

But Payton trusted Brees
when the quarterback prom-
ised to work tirelessly to
come back stronger than
before. Brees has silenced
the doubters, throwing for
4,418 yards and 26 touch-
downs, good enough to start
for the NFC in the Pro Bowl.

Payton added a handful of
key veterans to the mix,
including center Jeff Faine,
defensive tackle Hollis

Thomas, and new lineback- |

ers Scott Fujita, Mark Simo-
neau and Scott Shanle.
“We wanted to make sure

we were looking for players »

that were tough, had good
character, that wanted to
win and be a part of the
team,” Payton said. “All of
those things we thought
were very important, along
with talent.”

By the time training camp

was over, nearly half the ros-
ter had changed and several

rookies had become key
starters.

Payton lucked out when
Reggie Bush was bypassed
at the top of the draft by
Houston, and Bush was a
dynamic rookie as a runner,
receiver and punt returner.
Then there was seventh-
round pick Marques Col-
ston, who became an elite
rookie with more than 1,000
yards receiving and eight
TDs.

Payton wisely alternated
running back Deuce McAI-
lister, coming off a serious
knee injury, with Bush, and
McAllister finished with
1,057 yards rushing and 10
touchdowns.

“You can just tell that
he’s had a plan about when
he became a head coach how
he was going to create this

‘winning attitude and win-

ning atmosphere around the
clubhouse and that’s what

‘he’s done,” Brees said.

“He’s brought in a lot of
good people. Good players
that are great people, and I
think that that’s really what
it’s all about when you talk
about coming together as a
team,” Brees added.



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

All-Pro team chosen

° ALL-PRO

Brees engineered the
turnaround in New Orleans
from 3-13 to 10-6 and. an NFC
South division title.

He was joined on the All-

/ Pro squad by Saints second-
“year tackle Jammal Brown.

Kansas City’s Larry John-
son was selected in the back-
field with Brees, a former
Charger, and the two San
Diego backs.

The wideouts are Marvin
Harrison of Indianapolis and
Chad Johnson of Cincinnati.

Another Bengal, tackle
Willie Anderson, is on the
offensive line, where he’s
joined by Philadelphia guard
Shawn Andrews and Pitts-
burgh guard Alan Faneca.

Taylor anchors a defense
also featuring end Carolina
end Julius Peppers, Minne-
sota tackle Kevin Williams,
Baltimore linebacker Adal-

ius Thomas, Miami line-
backer Zach Thomas, Jack-
sonville cornerback Rashean
Mathis, Philadelphia safety
Brian Dawkins and Balti-
more safety Ed Reed.

“It means a lot,” said
Adalius Thomas, a first-time
All-Pro. “It’s a tribute not to
myself, but to a lot of the
guys up front. I don’t think
you could have a good line-
backing corps without good
defensive linemen..That’s a
tribute to Kelly Gregg, Hal-
oti Ngata, Trevor Pryce and
all those guys and the other
linebackers, Ray Lewis, Bart
Scott and Terrell Suggs.”

Buffalo’s Brian Moorman
is the punter.

Repeaters from 2005 are
Gates, Chad Johnson, Ander-
son, Faneca, Jamal Williams,
Urlacher, Bailey and Moor-
man.

There are 18 AFC players
and 10 from the NFC.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Recurring nightmare

* SLAYING

Williams’ death has
brought flashbacks of his
own shooting.

That April 8 night, three
bullets sliced right through
Hodge’s legs, and two
lodged in him.

“The first one I took out
myself when it happened, in
my right leg,” Hodge said.
“And I had one in my left
thigh they took out not too
much later.”

One of the bullets nar-
rowly missed his femoral
artery, and Hodge said doc-
tors told him he was five
minutes away from bleeding

to death.

Since the shooting, Hodge
said he has learned to appre-
ciate the little things.

“It definitely gave me a
greater outlook on life,” he
said. “It made me realize
there’s every opportunity in
every area of my life that I
need to take full advantage
of, to not walk around being
upset maybe because I
didn’t get any minutes in the
basketball game.”

Now, Hodge is celebrat-
ing a new life, too: “I have a
little girl on the way within
two weeks. I’m happy. I’m
about to be a father. It’s a
blessing.”





AFC PLAYOFFS | NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Brady is scaring playoff teams again

BY DAVE GOLDBERG
Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass —
When Tom Brady was over-
looked in this year’s Pro Bowl
voting, his reaction demon-
strated exactly what he is all
about.
“There’s only one bowl ’'m
interested in and it’s not the
Pro Bowl,” he said.
After Sunday’s win over the
New York Jets, the New Eng-

land Patriots’ star quarterback ~

is two wins away from getting
back to that Bowl for the
fourth time. He’s 3-0 in the
Super Bowl and now is ll-1 in
playoff games, the main rea-
son the lowest-seeded team of
the four left in the AFC might
be the scariest.

In fact, San Diego, Balti-
more and Indianapolis saw
what they knew — and possi-
ble feared they’d see — in the
Patriots’ 37-16 win over the
Jets: 22-for-34 for 212 yards
and two touchdowns as Brady
simply picked apart a team
that battered him less than two
months ago at the same venue,
when New York won 17-14.

That’s classic Brady: resil-
ient and remarkably consis-
tent.

In six seasons as New Eng-
land’s starter, his passer rating
has been between 85.7 (2002)
and 92.6, and his touchdown to

NFC PLAYOFFS | PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

interception ratio just about.

2-1. He was right there this
season despite a receiving
corps that might have been the
worst of any playoff team’s: an
87.9 rating with 24 TDs and 12

. interceptions.

That makes the Pro Bowl
slight even more curious,
although Pro Bowl selections
normally are curious by defi-
nition. The other AFC QBs are
Peyton Manning (automatic),
Carson Palmer (OK) and
Philip Rivers of the Chargers,
who is in his first season as a
starter and slid a bit toward
the end of the season.

Anyone want to bet Marty
Schottenheimer would rather
have Brady than Rivers when
his Chargers (14-2 in the regu-
lar season) play host next Sun-
day to the Patriots?

One simple stat from Sun-
day’s game illustrates how
good Brady is. Jabar Gaffney,
unemployed until October,
had eight catches for 104 yards
after having only 11 all season
and just a single 100-yard
game since 2001.

In fact, pedestrian receivers
or worse are who Brady has
thrown to this season after the
departures of David Givens
and Deion Branch, his regular
targets in the Super Bowl sea-
sons. Reche Caldwell, who led
the team with 61 receptions, is

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

at best a No. 2 receiver and
probably a No. 3. Troy Brown
is 35, the senior Patriot in
length of service, but rarely
more than a third receiver,
return man and occasional
cornerback.

In fact, his most reliable
pass catchers are the two tight
ends, Benjamin Watson and
Daniel Graham and the third-
down back, Kevin Faulk Gra-
ham and Faulk caught his TD
passes on Sunday.

“Tom has been harping all
year that if we get open, he’s
going to get us the ball,” Gra-
ham said after the game.

“Today it was Jabar’s day,”
he added.

Says Caldwell: “When we
need key plays he makes them.
Even if he had to run, what-
ever it takes to get us into
position to win the ballgame,
that’s what he’s going to do
when he’s out there.”

Run?

That’s what happened in
the 17-13 win over Chicago on
Nov. 26. With the game tied at
10 in the fourth quarter, Brady
took off on a third-and-9 from
the Bears 14, getting a first
down by dodging the fearsome
Brian Urlacher, last year’s
defensive player of the year
and an All-Pro this season.
Then he threw a 2-yard TD
pass to Watson for the go-

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 | SE



ahead score.

Against the Jets on Sunday,
it was as much his mastery of
the offense as his skills as a
passer or runner that won the
game.

“As a quarterback you
always like it when the
defense is off-balance,” he
said. “I think we got into a sit-
uation where we were forcing
them to get their stuff called
and lined up the right way or
else they were going to have a
hard time stopping us. I think,
at times, we really forced the
issue on them.”

Said modestly, of course.
With little hint that few other
quarterbacks can get a defense
off-balance the way Brady can.

“He’s the field general,”
Watson says. “He never sits
down when we're off the field
and he’s always rallying the

troops. He’s a fiery guy and a

great competitor. He was
locked in from the beginning.

“He lets us hear it when we
don’t do stuff right, but it’s
constructive and we know he
just wants to win. When I was
in college, he was out here
winning Super Bowls, so
there’s no quarterback I’d
rather have,” Watson contin-
ued.

Especially in the playoffs.
The Pro Bowl?

Who cares.

Mediocre effort was — may not be — enough

BY ROB MAADDI
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — The
Philadelphia Eagles’ up-and-
down season lives on, despite
a mediocre performance.

The offense was inconsis-
tent, the defense resorted back
to its soft form at times and
special teams committed a
costly penalty in a 23-20 vic-
tory over the New York Giants
in Sunday’s NFC wild-card
playoff game.

Philadelphia (11-6) will
need a better performance to
beat the New Orleans Saints
(10-6) in a second-round
matchup on Saturday night.

“YI don’t want to say we
dodged a bullet,” coach Andy
Reid said Monday. “Our guys
played very hard. We knew it
was going to be a knockdown-
dragout fight. That’s how it is
when we play the Giants.
They’re all the same. The
games come right down to the
end and this one wasn’t any
different.”

Take out the 17 points the
Eagles scored on three sec-
ond-quarter possessions, and
it was an anemic offensive
performance against the
Giants.

Unlike previous weeks, the
offense was out of sync early,
going three-and-out on the
first three drives. The team led
17-10 at the half on the strength
of some nifty runs by Brian
Westbrook ‘and some crisp
passes from Jeff Garcia.

The second half started
much like the first, and the
Eagles managed 13 yards on
their first two drives. They
managed just a pair of field
goals in the second half, on
drives of 45 and 46 yards.

Fortunately, the final one
came when it mattered most;
Philadelphia ended the game
with a ten-play drive to set up
David Akers’ winning 38-yard
field goal in the final seconds.

“There where times during
the game where we had

NFL NOTES



RON CORTES/PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER/MCT

BREAKING AWAY: Eagles receiver Donte Stallworth breaks
away from Giants defensive back R.W. McQuarters for a
touchdown in the first half of Philadelphia’s 23-20
victory over New York in an NFC wild-card game in

Philadelphia on Sunday.

opportunities to create points
and we just weren’t efficient
enough, and that falls upon
me, and that falls upon us,”
said Garcia, who improved to
6-1 as a starter since Donovan
McNabb’s season-ending knee
injury. “That is something that
we need to get better at if we
are going to be able to com-
pete next week.”

Garcia threw for 153 yards
and one touchdown. He didn’t
have any interceptions and
was sacked twice. Perhaps too
anxious in his first postseason
start in four years, the fiery



Garcia just missed connecting
for big plays on a couple
passes.

In Philly’s new balanced
attack, Garcia doesn’t have to
win games with his arm. West-
brook has become a focal
point as Reid and offensive
coordinator Marty Mornhin-
weg finally have embraced the
running game.

Westbrook had a career-
high 141 yards on 20 carries,
including a sensational 49-
yard TD run that started the
scoring for the offense.

“We've been doing it these

jobs on the final play.

last few weeks and we've got-
ten better and better,” said
Westbrook, who finished with
1,217 yards rushing in the regu-
lar season. “Coach Reid has
confidence in it. The offensive
line has confidence in them-

) selves and they have confi-

dence in me. If they cover up
their man, then we will get the
job done. And they’ve been
doing a great job these last few
weeks.”

Some of the problems that
plagued the defense through-
out the season were evident
against the Giants. A run
defense that once gave up
more than 200 yards rushing
four times in a six-game span
allowed Tiki Barber to run for
137 yards.

Eli Manning hardly was
pressured and got sacked only
once. The secondary couldn’t
make key stops, allowing three
straight pass completions of
18, 14 and 11 yards after the
Giants faced a second-and-30
on their tying scoring drive in
the fourth quarter. During the
drive, Pro Bowl cornerback
Lito Sheppard dislocated his
right elbow and will miss the
game against the Saints.

New York scored TDs on
its first and last possessions. In
between, the Eagles held the
Giants to only two field goals
and forced six three-and-outs
in nine drives.

“They came out and did a
lot of different stuff,” defen-
sive tackle Darwin Walker
said. “They came out and did

St BAN Va ees
th Re S ew # FB

SH @ &

ok eo ey

some things that we hadn’t ~ f

seen.”

On special teams, rookie
Torrance Daniels made a cru-
cial mistake when his penalty
for an illegal block nullified
Westbrook’s 65-yard punt
return for a score in the third
quarter.

But the unit made up for it
when Akers, holder Koy Det-
mer and snapper Jon Doren-
bos perfectly executed their

Jets’ Martin says his career is probably over

Associated Press

While the New York Jets
cleaned out their lockers fol-
lowing a surprisingly success-
ful season, Curtis Martin
acknowledged he might have
emptied his for the last time.

The NFL’s No. 4 rusher
reiterated Monday that he has
probably played his last game
because of a bone-on-bone
right knee injury that sidelined
him all season.

FALCONS

Atlanta lured Louisville
coach Bobby Petrino away

from the college ranks on Sun-
day, moving quickly to find a
new head coach after firing
Jim Mora.

A formal announcement
was made Monday afternoon
at the Falcons’ suburban train-
ing complex in Flowery
Branch — exactly one week
after Mora was let go.

DOLPHINS

Miami owner Wayne Hui-
zenga’s travel itinerary sug-
gests he’s trying to lure South-
ern California coach Pete
Carroll back to the NFL.

A Huizenga-owned plane
flew Sunday to Costa Rica,
where Carroll reportedly has
been vacationing. The same
plane was used to take Dol-
phins officials to Pittsburgh,
Chicago and San Diego to
interview candidates to
replace Nick Saban.

A team spokesman declined
to say whether Huizenga met
with Carroll, and an USC

spokesman didn’t immediately.

return a call seeking comment.

REDSKINS

Long snapper Ethan

Albright re-signed with
Washington on Monday.
EAGLES

Philadelphia Pro Bowl cor-
nerback Lito Sheppard will
miss Saturday’s second-round
playoff game against New
Orleans with a dislocated right
elbow.

Sheppard was injured going
for a tackle on a running play
in the fourth quarter of Sun-
day’s 23-20 victory over the
New York Giants. :

He was replaced by Rod
Hood.

Soe @ & oe

te ew es
‘ ‘



SE | TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007. IN



GMAC BOWL | SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 28, OHIO 7

Fletcher, second quarter lift

BY JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. — Damion
Fletcher ran for two touch-
downs and Southern Miss
scored 21 points in the second
quarter en route to a 28-7 vic-
tory over Ohio late Sunday
night in the GMAC Bowl,
spoiling the Bobcats’ return to
the postseason.

The Golden Eagles (9-5)
thoroughly dominated after a
scoreless first quarter for their
third consecutive postseason
win.

Frank Solich’s Bobcats (9-5)
were making their first bowl
appearance since 1968, but
that euphoria wore off quickly
as the game turned into a mis-
match

They are 0-3 in bowl games
~ and failed to match their
school record of 10 wins. It
was a rough ending to a feel-
good story that saw Solich, a
former Nebraska coach, revive
a struggling program that won
only four games in his debut
season.

The Golden Eagles used a
series of big plays in the final
8:33 of the first half to break
open the scoreless game, then
had a marathon march to open

MEN’S BASKETBALL |

TOP 25 POLL



the third quarter.

First, backup tailback Tory
Harrison scampered for a 43-
yard touchdown run, only his
second of the season. Jeremy
Young then set up Fletcher’s
2-yard TD plunge with a 30-
yard pass to Josh Barnes on
third-and-10.

The defense added points,
too. James Denley returned an
interception of Ohio backup
quarterback Brad Bower 18
yards for a score with 1:13 left
before the half.

It was the Golden Eagles’
seventh non-oftensive TD of
the season, the most under
coach Jeff Bower.

The teams had combined
for just 82 offensive yards
after one quarter, but South-
ern Miss racked up 150 in the
second.

The Golden Eagles then
monopolized the ball, opening
the second half with a17-play,
80-yard drive that worked 9:55
off the clock and severely
damaged any hopes for a
comeback by Ohio’s plodding
offense.

If was the team’s longest
drive of the season in both
plays and time consumed.

Fletcher ended it by revers-

ATIONAL EDITION

ing field behind the line and
outrunning the defenders for a
9-yard TD.

The darting, 175-pound
freshman managed just 58
yards on 20 carries but it was
enough for him to earn game
Most Valuable Player honors.
Young was selected the offen-
sive MVP after passing for 160

-yards.

Denley was the top defen-
sive player while punter Britt
Barefoot claimed special
teams honors.

Ohio tailback Kalvin
McRae capped a difficult week
with a 10-carry, 37-yard per-
formance. The two-time All-
Mid-American Conference
performer only arrived in
Mobile Friday evening after
his 7-month-old nephew’s
death.

Both offenses struggled.
Southern Miss managed just
284 yards compared to 224 for
Ohio.

The Bobcats finally scored
on Everson’s 13-yard touch-
down pass to John Christy
with 9:34 left in the fourth
quarter.

It was the first loss by a
MAC team in six GMAC Bowl
appearances. |

UNC moves into
the No. 1 spot

BY JIM O’CONNELL
Associated Press

North Carolina is No. 1 in
The Associated Press’ college
basketball poll for the first
time in almost six years. The
wait has been quite a bit lon-
ger for Washington State,
which is ranked for the first
time in almost 24 years.

The Tar Heels (14-1) moved
into the top spot Monday after
three weeks at No..2 following
UCLA’s loss at Oregon last
weekend. :

It is North Carolina’s first
time at No. 1 since a two-week
run in February 2001, and it’s
the first time the Tar Heels are
there in the three-plus sea-
sons, including the 2005
national championship, under
coach Roy Williams.

“I feel good where we are, -

but it’s so, so early,” Williams
said Monday. “We have 15
more battles to go in the con-
ference, so we'll see what hap-
pens.”

Williams is no stranger to
having a top-ranked team. In
seven of 15 seasons at Kansas,
the Jayhawks reached No. 1,
including a 15-week stretch in
1996-97.

“T’ve been No. 1 before, and
if you don’t finish that way at
the end of the year, it means
you had a good little stretch,”
he said.

Washington State (14-2) is
having an unexpected stretch,
and the quick start has the
Cougars tied for 22nd in the
poll, their first ranking since a
one-week stint in February
1983. :

Picked last in the Pac-10’s
preseason media poll, the Cou-
gars have gotten off to an
impressive start under first-
year coach Tony Bennett,
including wins over Gonzaga
and last weekend’s 77-73 over-

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL GAME

time win against Arizona.
“We've had different guys

step up at different times,” —

Bennett said Monday. “We
have mostly sophomores and
juniors, and they’re kids who
have taken their lumps and
have some legitimate game
experience with some heart-
breaking losses and some bad
losses. It’s a start, and that’s all
it is. We're in the No. 1-ranked
conference in the country, and
we have 14 games to go, So we
have to keep that same fight-
ing mentality.”

North Carolina received 64
first-place votes and 1,788
points from the 72-member
national media panel to easily
outdistance No. 2 Florida
(14-2), which had three No. 1
votes and 1,682 points in mov-
ing up one spot from last
week. The Gators were No. 1
in the preseason poll and for
the first two weeks of the reg-
ular season. :

Wisconsin (15-1) received
one first-place vote and
moved from fourth to third,
the highest ranking in school
history, while UCLA dropped
from first to fourth.

The Bruins (14-1), who
received four first-place votes,
held the No. 1 spot for six
weeks until the 68-66 loss at
Oregon on Saturday.

Ohio State moved up one
place to fifth and was followed
by Kansas, Pittsburgh, Texas
A&M, Oklahoma State and
Arizona.

Duke, which dropped six
spots after its home loss to
Virginia Tech on Saturday,
was lith and was followed by
Butler, LSU, Alabama, Oregon,
Tennessee, Clemson, Air
Force, Nevada and Memphis.

West Virginia was 21st with
Notre Dame and Washington
State tied for No. 22, while

COLLEGES

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMIHERALD









STEVE COLEMAN/AP

ELUSIVE INTERCEPTOR: Southern Mississippi's James Denley, left, eludes Ohio’s Matt
Coppage while returning an interception for a touchdown in the second quarter of
the GMAC Bowl on Sunday in Mobile, Ala. Southern Mississippi won 28-7.



GERRY BROOME/AP

CALLING THE SHOTS: UNC coach Roy Williams coaches his
team against Florida State on Sunday.

Connecticut and Texas
rounded out the Top 25.

This is North Carolina’s
82nd poll with a No. 1 ranking,

‘fourth on the all-time list

behind UCLA (134), Duke (110)
and Kentucky (98).

The Tar Heels’ lone loss
was to Gonzaga in the semifi-
nals of the NIT Season
Tip-Off. They have won ll
straight since, including the
84-58 victory over Florida
State in their Atlantic Coast
Conference opener Sunday.

“Defensively we are getting
better the last four, five games
and I appreciate their attitude,
but we have'so far to go,” Wil-
liams said. “We also have to
work on our freelance offense.
When we don’t have a set play
called we can do such a better
job with spacing and getting
on the backboard. We have
stood around instead of get-
ting everyone involved.”

The last time Washington
State was ranked George Rav-
eling was the coach and Craig
Ehlo and Guy Williams were
the stars of a team that fin-

. ished 23-7 and reached the

second round of the NCAA
tournament. Since then,
Washington State has made
one NCAA appearance in
1994,

“J’m sure the kids will enjoy
this, but what I’m concerned
with as a coach is where we’re
ranked at the end of the year,”
Bennett said. “This indicates
we have some quality wins
that people recognized.”

North Carolina overruns Virginia

Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. —.,
North Carolina coach Sylvia

Hatchell sent a message by :

going to her bench.

After watching Virginia go
on a run that trimmed the No.
2 Tar Heels’ lead to a mere 18
points in the second half,
Hatchell substituted five
reserves. They restored order
and the chastised starters
returned to finish off the Cava-
liers 96-62 on Monday night.

“Our play wasn’t what I
wanted it to be at the start of
the second half, so I substi-
tuted those five,’ Hatchell

said. “A 20-point lead against



Virginia is nothing.”

After the Cavaliers’ 10-2
run, Hatchell sent in Trinity
Bursey, Alex Miller, Heather
Claytor, Iman McFarland and
Jessica Breland. The reserves

‘stretched the lead to 59-35 on

two free throws by Miller with
14:14 to play.

“She warned us, and then
she did it,” starter LaToya
Pringle said of the 3:21 she and
the four other starters spent
on the bench.

Erlana Larkins and Camille
Little scored 17 points apiece
to lead North Carolina (18-0,
3-0 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence) to its 10th straight win

over Virginia (10-5, 3-0). Ivory
Latta hit four 3-pointers and
finished with 14 points. Pringle
chipped in 11.

Hatchell was displeased by
North Carolina’s 34-of-92
shooting (41 percent), espe-
cially a 16-of-48 second half.

“Tt was like the rim monster
was out there,” Hatchell said.
“We missed a lot of good
shots.”

The Tar Heels scored 29
points off 32 Virginia turn-
overs. Larkins had 13 rebounds
and Pringle 11 to help North
Carolina dominate the boards
59-48 and outscore the Cava-
liers 19-10 off offensive

Texas (11-3) was the other
poll newcomer this week,
coming in off a 102-78 victory
over Colorado in its Big 12
Conference opener.

The Longhorns were 2lst in
the preseason poll and moved
to No. 19 in the first regular-
season voting before falling
out after losses to Michigan
State: and Gonzaga. Their
other loss was 11-105 at Ten-
nessee in overtime; while their
most impressive win was also
in overtime, 76-75 over LSU.

Marquette (13-4) fell out
from 15th following losses to
Providence and Syracuse last
week. The Golden Eagles were
16th in the preseason poll and
reached as high as No. 8
before home losses to North
Dakota State and Wisconsin,

Washington (11-4) dropped
out from 24th after splitting
home games last week with
Arizona and Arizona State.
The 96-87 loss to the Wildcats
was the Huskies’ third straight
as they opened Pac-l0 play
with losses at UCLA and
Southern California. Washing-
ton, which also lost to Gon-
zaga, was 17th in the preseason
poll and reached as high as No.
13.

There are five games
between ranked teams this
week, and three are on Tues-
day: Ohio State at Wisconsin;
LSU at Alabama; and West
Virginia at Notre Dame. Okla-

-homa State is at Kansas on

Wednesday, and Oregon is at
Arizona on Sunday.

rebounds.

“Rebounding is always crit-
ical against Carolina,” Virgin-
ia’s Debbie Ryan said. “The
whole inside game was both-
ersome for us tonight.”

North Carolina jumped out
to a 15-0 lead. Larkins scored 13
points in the first half and
North Carolina led 51-25 at the
break. Virginia missed its first
nine shots and didn’t score
until Monica Wright hit a
3-pointer with 14:06 left in the
first half.

“We missed layups. We
missed free throws,” Ryan
said. “And every point in the
first half was so important. “If
we could have kept it closer in
the first half, it would have
been a completely different
ball game.”

Lyndra Littles had 19 points
to lead Virginia. Wright had 17.

FOOTBALL NOTES

Louisville to move
quickly on a coach

Associated Press

Louisville athletic director
Tom Jurich said Monday
that he expects to move
quickly to replace coach
Bobby Petrino, who left the
program Sunday to become
coach of the Atlanta Falcons.

Jurich said the list of
potential candidates was
“very short” but did not
identify any.specitic coaches.

“[’m going to rely on my
gut a lot,” Jurich said. “I want
somebody that’s gotten a
proven track record. I’m not
going to talk about those
names.”

Petrino’s departure comes
in the middle of recruiting
season, and with national
signing day less than a month
away Jurich knows the
sooner he names a successor
to Petrino, the faster the new
coach will be able to hit the
recruiting trail.

The Louisville Athletic
Association Board of Direc-
tors’ personnel committee
has scheduled a meeting for
today at 4 p.m. in case a can-
didate is selected. Any new
hire must be approved by the
committee. Sports informa-
tion director Kenny Klein
said Jurich will be interview-
ing candidates today and the
meeting could be pushed
back if a finalist is not
selected.

NFL DRAFT

e Louisiana State’s
JaMarcus Russell will
announce Wednesday
whether he is entering the
NEL drait.

LSU spokesman Michael
Bonnette said Monday that
university officials were
helping Russell set up the
announcement, but labeled
as “premature” recent
reports that the quarterback
had already decided to turn
pro.

“Tt don’t think he’s made
his mind up yet. People are
jumping the gun,” Bonnette
said. “He still has a couple
days to think things through
and make the best decision
for himself and his family.”

ESPN.com reported Sun-
day that Russell was entering
the draft.

At 6-foot-6, 257 pounds,
Russell has imposing physi-
cal stature for a quarterback
and would likely be a first-
round draft pick.

Russell threw for 332
yards and two touchdowns
in the Sugar Bowl last week
in LSU’s rout of Notre Dame.

If Russell turns pro, he
would end his LSU career
with 6,525 yards and 52
touchdowns in three seasons.
He was a full-time starter to
past two years.




e For Calvin Johnson,
this was a no-brainer.

Georgia Tech’s_ star
receiver announced Monday
that he will give up his senior
season to enter the NFL
draft, fully aware that he
should be one of the top
players selected. ~

Even his parents, who are
adamant that he get his col-
lege degree, knew there was
no use putting off the pros
any longer.

“It’s one of those situa-
tions where he’s got to maxi-
mize the moment,” Calvin
Johnson Sr. said. “These
opportunities don’t come
along very often. He made
the right decision for himself.
He didn’t feel a lot of pres-
sure from us.”

The younger Johnson
runs a 4.4 40-yard dash and
has a 45-inch vertical leap —
a combination that makes
him difficult to defend, even
with a scheme keyed to stop
him.

By most accounts, John-
son will be one of the top
players selected in the April
draft. In fact, he could go first
overall to the Oakland Raid-

ers, who are desperate to
improve an offense that aver-
aged just 10.5 points a game »
and might not bring back dis-
gruntled wideouts Randy
Moss and Jerry Porter.

e Alan Branch is skip-
ping his senior season at
Michigan to enter the NFL
draft, delivering a blow to the
Wolverines a week after they
lost the Rose Bowl.

The 6-foot-6, 3ll-pound
defensive tackle, a second-
team All-American, is pro-
jected as a first-round pick in
April’s draft.

“It’s always been a child-
hood dream for me, but it.
was surprising how tough of
a decision it was,” Branch
said Monday.

KICKER’S DEATH

An autopsy was per-
formed Monday in Los Ange-
les on Southern California
kicker Mario Danelo, but
the findings probably will be
listed as “inconclusive” until
officials receive results of
toxicological tests, the coro-
ner’s office said.

It could take weeks to
determine whether alcohol
or drugs were in Danelo’s
system at the time of his
death. Foul play has been
ruled out. Danelo’s body was
found Saturday about -120
feet down a rocky cliff in San
Pedro, police said.

“There’s no crime,” Los
Angeles Police Dept. officer
Mike Lopez said Sunday. “It
was either an accident or a
suicide.”



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Calling Cartwright — National Heroes
~Committee launches search for ‘Bill’

Baker’s Bay

GOLF et OCEAN CLUB



As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians on
our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to apply
for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Responsibilities will include:

Attributes:

-% Must have 8-10 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading Golf Club
“ Must have knowledge of all phases of Golf course
design and construction activities including vertical golf
construction (club houses, maintenance facilities,
irrigation pump stations)
Must have a thorough understanding ‘of all phases of
maintenance and repair to courses, practice range and
: equipment
“* Must have extensive experience working with city
planners, engineers, architects, and contractors
“Must be knowledgeable in all phases of construction
contracts related to golf projects
** Must be a detail oriented, a skilled planner and
- prioritizer with excellent communication skills
“ Must be computer literate
“~~ — Must be willing to live on an out island
** Ability to work on own initiative is important

9,
“ye

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need

apply. | |

Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards
Director, Human Resources and Training
. P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

Bakers Bay Golf & Ocean Club is a $500 million project
under development on Great Guana Cay. It includes 381

residential homes, a 70-acre cnvironmental preserve, a 180-slip

marina, a championship golf course and a 70-room laxury
hotel.



MONTROSE AVE. PHONE: 322-1722, FAX:



PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE FREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION FULL SET FLOO!
PARTS & SERVICE ASSURED :

bf rr




cesT

RA



FULL TANK OF GAS
R MATS

EFFORTS to recognise
William Cartwright’s contribu-
tion to Bahamian history have
hit a snag — as the National
Heroes Committee is having
trouble locating him.

The committee yesterday
asked for the public’s assistance
in contacting Mr Cartwright,
one of the founding members
of the Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP).

Father Sebastian Campbell,
the chairman of the committee,
said that a certificate of recog-
nition has been printed for Mr
Cartwright, and that the mem-
bers are eager to present it to
him.

During his life, Mr Cartwright
suffered “indignity and much
humiliation,” Father Campbell
said, adding that the country
needs to “give him a chance
now in his twilight years to
know that he did something,
that he is a man of worth and
the country owes him a debt of
gratitude for what he did.”

William “Bill” Cartwright
joined Henry Taylor, Cyril St
John Stevenson and others in
founding the PLP, which led the
country to majority rule in the
Bahamas in 1967.

The party was officially
founded on November 23,1953,
when months of feverish prepa-
ration: by the founders and a
small band of supporters finally
led to the establishment of the
first political party in the histo-
ry of the Bahamas.

Bill Cartwright and Cyril
Stevenson visited England in
June of 1953 — ostensibly to coy-
er the Coronation of Her
Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for
The Bahamian Review, but
with a firm determination to



BS

@ CYRIL Stevenson

seek support and assistance:

from officials of the Labour Par-
ty and the Fabian Society for
the establishment of a political
party in the Bahamas.

At the time, Mr Cartwright
was a member of the House of
Assembly representing the Cat
Island Constituency, and Mr
Stevenson was employed on the
editorial staff of The Nassau
Guardian.

In London the two men spent
much of their time talking with
Labour Party leaders, officials,
members of parliament and
officials of the Fabian Society.

Encouraged by the outcome
of their discussions, Mr Steven-
son and Mr Cartwright returned
to Nassau more determined
than ever to put their plans into
action.

Within 10 days of their
return, they left for Kingston,
Jamaica, where they spent three



WILLIAM ‘Bill’ Cartwright

weeks studying political plan-
ning and intelligence.

‘They held discussions with Sir
Alexander Bustamante, Leader
of the Jamaica Labour Party;
Prime Minister Norman Man-
ley, Leader of the People’s
National Party; Rose Leon,
Minister of Health and Hous-
ing; and several other officials.

On their return to Nassau,
they telephoned Mr Taylor (lat-
er Sir Henry) and told him what
they planned to do. Sir Henry
agreed to join them.

The first meeting to lay the
foundation of the party was
held in Sir Henry’s home in
East Street, opposite the Police
Barracks.

Subsequent meetings were
held in Mr Cartwright’s office in





the Lightbourne Building, on
the corner of Bay and Frederick
Streets.

In October a final decision
was reached, and a working
plan agreed upon.

Out of 30 or more persons
approached to take an active
role, only six came forward.
They were: Mr Clément Pinder,
Mr Holberton “Holly” Brown,
Mr U H Knowles, Mr John S
Carey, Mr Paul Farrington and
Mr Felix Russell. :

The group became the first
self-appointed executive board
and elected the following offi-
cers: Sir Henry, chairman; Mr
Stevenson, secretary-general;
Mr Carey, vice-chairman; Mr
Cartwright, treasurer; Mr
Knowles, chaplain.

Montserrat volcano shoots ash
cloud five miles into the sky



7452



~ MITSUBISHI
MOTORS






SS



@ SUPERHEATED ash and lava is visible inside the cone of the Soufriere Hills volcano, which

has been active lately, as seen from Olveston, Montserrat last Thursday. Yesterday a cloud of ash
and gas reportedly shot up from the volcano more than 5 miles into the sky, and authorities warn
that more significant activity is possible in the coming days.

@ MONTSERRAT
Olveston



THE Soufriere Hills volcano
that destroyed the island’s cap-
ital in 1997 shot.a cloud of ash
more than five miles into the
sky on Monday, according to
Associated Press,

The island’s British governor
said she would order some
homes evacuated because of the
likelihood of more activity, and
that police would enforce the
order.

The blast, accompanied by
increased seismic rumbling,
released gases and steam from
inside a lava dome that has
grown rapidly over the last
week, said Dr Vicky Hards,
director of the Montserrat Vol-
cano Observatory.

“I think it was a warning call
.. Of what it can do,” Hards said.

The explosion near sunrise
also sent a flow of volcanic
material cascading two miles
down the volcano’s north-west
flank, but did not immediately
threaten any of the British
Caribbean island’s 5,000 inhab-
itants, Hards said. Sirens alerted
people to listen to the radio for
updates.

The government has
advised about 50 households

volcano’s base that their
homes would be at risk from
flows of blistering gas and
debris if the dome collapses.
Officials conducted door-to-
door briefings in the low-lying

Belham Valley over the week- ‘

end.

Gov Deborah Barnes Jones
said she planned to sign an
evacuation order Monday that
will make it illegal for people
to remain in that area.

“People in the affected area
know who they are and should
work urgently on packing up
and arranging for alternative
accommodations,” she said in
a radio address.

“It will be an offence to be
in the unsafe zone, and the
police will prosecute offenders,”
Barnes Jones added.

Wind blowing from the east
pushed the dark gray ash over
the “exclusion zone,” a barren,
uninhabited area extending
from the 3,000-foot (900-meter)
high volcano across the south-
west to the coast. Open water
lies west of the island.

A hotel located near exclu-
sion zone has already emptied,
and only “a handful” of resi-
dents were believed to still be
living in the threatened area,
said Mark Twieg. head of the

(AP Photo/Wayne Fenton)

“This causes genuine hard-
ship tor people who have to
leave, and this is taken lightly by
nobody,” he said.

The volcano’s latest burst of
activity began on Dec 24. Glow-
ing streaks of red from the pyro-
clastic flows have created night-
time spectacles visible across
much of the island. The vol-
cano’s rising dome remained in
place after Monday’s explosion,
raising fears of a bigger event
soon,

“The flows also could have
opened a line to go. farther
down the valley,” Twigg said.

The Soufriere Hills volcano
became active in 1995, and
more than half the territory’s
12,000 inhabitants moved away.
An eruption in 1997 buried
much of the south, including the
capital of Plymouth, and killed
19 people.

Since then, the mountain-
ous, teardrop-shaped island
has gone on a building binge.
A new city center is planned
for Little Bay, the future cap-
ital, in northwest Montserrat.
The island has a new airport
to replace the one that was
engulfed by pyroclastic flows
and a 700-seat concert hall.
A new parliament, court-
house and cricket field are



PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 .
i eee
‘End massive decay of social values’

15 per cent increase in homicides tops agenda at police Meet the Press event | double



® By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the murder count reach-
ing 60 for the first time in six
years and homicides up by almost
50 per cent in the capital, police
yesterday urged Bahamians to
stop the “massive decay” of social
values.

Last year’s 15 per cent increase
in homicides topped the agenda
at this:year’s Meet the Press event
held at police headquarters yes-
terday morning, with senior police
officers lamenting the attitude
towards crime in the country.

“There are still far too, many
among us that live as though they
are ruled by the jungle mentality.

“The greed and insatiable
desire that seem to drive people
to risk body and soul in order to
get that elusive dollar has caused
many once respected citizens to
turn their back on their Christ-
ian values and give in to their
base instincts which results in the
slaying of another human being,”
Assistant Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson, officer in-
charge of crime, said addressing
the special press conference at
the new police conference cen-
tre.

In its preliminary year end
overview, the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) reported that the
murder count has increased by

FROM page one

side his house when he was brutally attacked at

around 9pm.

According to the family, a man approached
Felix and asked him for something, but he told the

man to leave him alone.

“My brother started to walk away and the man

eight in 2006 compared to 2005
when the country recorded 52
homicides.

The Bahamas averaged about
54 murder incidents annually
between 2000 and 2006.

The last time the murder count
exceeded 60 was in 2000 when
the homicide rate climbed to 74.

Speaking at yesterday’s event,
Chief Supt Marvin Dames, head
of CDU, said that whereas the
Family Islands and Grand
Bahama experienced a 29 per
cent decrease in murders, New
Providence saw a 44 per cent
increase in homicide cases. i

However, Mr Dames pointed
out that police were able to solve
78 per cent of those cases in 2006
—a detection rate that equalled
the one recorded in 2005.

Of the 10 murders committed.
at the end of the year in the
month of December, Mr Dames
said, the majority have already
been solved.

“T challenge you to go any-
where outside of this country and
find figures as good as that,” he
said.

Mr Dames said that the statis-
tics clearly reflect the message
that “if you commit murder in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
you will be caught.”

The officer in-charge of the
CDU further pointed out that
drug-related murders doubled in

2006 compared to the previous
year.

Of the 60 murders committed,
20, or 12 per cent, were related to
drugs.

He said that these figures show
that Bahamians who get involved
in the drug trade often sign their
own death sentences.

Assistant Commissioner Fer-
guson said that too many
Bahamians take a casual
approach to crime.

“Tf this is the example that we
expect to set for the next genera-
tion, then we are sowing to the
wind and therefore will reap a
whirlwind.

“The future is dismal and at
best their chances of success are
seriously undermined,” he said.

Paul Farquharson, Commis-
sioner of Police, also said that he
was saddened by the fact that
Bahamians are still plagued with
the inability to effectively deal
with issues.

“There is a growing trend
among many in the criminal class

’ that are becoming more embold-

ened in the commission of crime.

“This perhaps accounts for a
number of daring serious
offences, including murder which
are committed in broad daylight
hours or correspondingly within
the view of potential witnesses,”
he said.

Mr Farquharson said that this

19-year-old

er. We still ain’t come to grips with his death yet.

the sister.

We still can’t believe it really happened,” said

A 35-year-old man of Martin Town was taken

into custody early Monday morning and is assist-

behaviour is tantamount to saying
that the culprit does not care
when or where he commits his
act of criminality.
“As people we must rise u
against these persons with one
resolve and that must be that of

’ demonstrating to our errant

brothers that we will not tolerate
their behaviour any longer,” he
said.

In New Providence, murders

tripled in the southeastern part
of the island in 2006 compared to
the previous year.

The northeastern part of the
island recorded its second highest
with eight murders — a 17 per cent
increase over 2005.

“This was followed by the

- Carmichael and Grove (police)

divisions with each recording sev-
en incidents (a 15 per cent
increase),” the CDU reported.

The majority of murders — 42
per cent — were committed in the
months of September and
December. The most popular
month for murders was Decem-
ber when 10 homicides — 17 per
cent of murders — were record-
ed.

The profile of the average mur-
der victim is a Bahamian male
between the ages of 26 and 35,
single, unemployed, with a prior
criminal record, and for the most
part resident in the southeast of
New Providence.

“Tt is interesting to note that a

‘Zero tolerance’

FROM page one

’

significant number of murder vic-
tims had been previously involved
in criminal activity and have had
contact with the police,” the CDU
reported.

Cruise
ship
bomb

scare
FROM page one

that accepts convention size ves-
sels have in place these contin-
gencies, these plans, these safe
measures for these same eventu-
alities.

“This shows that it actually
works and it pays off to have
these checks. Something was sus-
picious and it was checked out
further, and we are all mandated
to have such measures in place,”
he said. ;

The Royal Caribbean’s
Majesty of the Seas along with
its 2,356 guests and 812 member
crewmen are still scheduled to
visit the Bahamas for five days.”

The ship was expected to leave
port last night as scheduled, |:

Mr Ferguson said that the police is often frustrated by the fact that
many Bahamians do not view number games as a “real crime.”

ran behind him and started beating on him,”
recalled one sister.

When The Tribune visited the Mitchell’s home
in Martin Town, several family members and

fondo w smbhlet
preparations, while close friends stood outside
comforting their distraught father.

Felix was described as a very friendly person.
After graduating from Eight Mile Rock: High
School in 2005, he wanted to work at the Con-
‘ tainer Port and had applied for a job there.

“He was always a happy person who always
enjoyed making people laugh. We will misgdeas-..
ly. 2

“Right now, we are just leaning on. one anoth-

ing police with their investigations.

According to Chief Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming, press liaison officer, the incident
occurred around 9pm on Sunday at the LEM

. Plavs where police saw the body of a young man

; 1 the ground.

The victim was wearing a white T-shirt, blue
jeans and white tennis shoes. The body was posi-
tioned on the left side, a short distance south of
Queen’s Highway.

Mr Rahming said reports are that Mitchell was
near LEM Plaza when he was attacked by a man.
He said that Mitchell is believed to have been

-struck.in.the.head with what is believed to be a

‘baseball bat.
Police are continuing their investigation into the
matter. ,

“If you are paying to protect your illegal operations, this is corrup-
tion, this is real crime. When the man playing domino under the
almond tree realises that the number thrown, he did not win, he
decides to ‘pull a vibe’ and rob the bag man but instead shoots and kills
him in the process. This is murder, this is real crime,” he said.

Attempts to silence winners and prevent them from claiming their
money by strong-arm tactics of coercion and intimidation is done for
a fee, he explained.

“This is a real crime directly connected to the numbers racket.
Sophisticated though it may be, the numbers racket is still a crime in the

Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said that although police are actively fighting to uncov-
er and put a stop to operations of illegal gambling houses, the Bahami-
an public must-also develop a zero-tolerance approach to numbers rack-

In addition to the police and community effort, Mr Ferguson said, the
relevant government agencies who award gambling houses — often
disguised as web shops — business licences must also join in the fight

er to find the strength to get through’ this togeth-

Monday - Friday 4pm

against these illegal rackets.
FROM page one

In New Providence, the num-
ber of traffic fatalities decreased
by four last year — from 33 to
29, in Abaco, from 4 to 3, while in
Eleuthera, the number remained
stable at 2.

The biggest success story of
the year, however, was Grand
Bahama, which saw a run away

wumber of fatal traffic accidents

in 2005 reined in, as 2006 saw a
decrease of over 55 per cent.
The Grand Bahama traffic
division attributed the reduction
on that island to new initiatives
such as the City Cycle Patrol
Unit, which monitored traffic

accident "hot spots", wider use .

of the Pro Laser 3 Speed Gun,
and a generally higher level of
police visibility on the streets.

However, police from that
division said that if any further
reduction is to be achieved, a
change in the public's driving
habits must be effected.

In New Providence as well,
police recognised that reckless
and aggressive driving, and speed-
ing in high risk areas — such as
Carmichael Road, which was list-

Traffic

ed as the biggest traffic accident
hot spot on the island — contin-
ues to challenge them.

Across the island chain, the
increase in traffic accidents —
from 4,195 to 3,576 — was attrib-
uted to a range of potentially dan-
gerous behaviour, such as speed-
ing, driving while using a phone,
applying make-up or "transport-
ing an insecure load," police said.

According to officers, they are
considering a variety of approach-
es to achieve a further reduction
in fatalities in the coming year.

Thése include taking their
road safety education programme
to the family islands, further tar-
geting of drunk, reckless and
underage drivers, motorcyclists
without helmets, and unlicensed,
uninspected and uninsured vehi-
cles.

Other areas to be addressed -

include identifying locations
where there is a need for pedes-
trian crossings, and ensuring that
traffic division officers are "out
in full force" during rush hours,
said police.

Saturday & Sunday 2pm

25 GREAT RIDES!

2 NEW Rides Twister & Scrambler
RIDE. THE

Kami Kaze
Mega Drop
Flying Bobs

Pirate Ship

Graviton



eee RCC CCN
gone the LE is not.



Armed robbery suspect released

FROM page one

With his gun licence and "ski mask" in tow, he sat down and explained
how he was arrested, spent a pointless night in jail and as a result had
to miss work, all because he had his licensed gun out of the case.

The “ski mask”, which is really the top half of a woman's stocking
that is sometimes used as a hair cap, was left in his car by his wife who
usually does her hair and make-up in his car as he takes her to work in
the mornings, he explained.

About the shotgun, “I’m a hunter,” he said. “I had just come from the
shooting range and I stopped by my mother (who lives in the Flint
Street area) to return some bowls which she asked me to bring by, and
as I was headed back home, the officers made me stop the car and get
out.”

He said he saw the officers long before they saw him, but knowing
he was innocent and that he could explain the gun and bullets if
stopped, he continued driving towards them, even though he had
enough time to switch directions, he said.

After the police asked him to stop the car, “They shined the light in
my face for about 20 seconds, it was so bright I had to put my hand up,”
he explained. When he was ordered to get out of his car, he said he
explained to the officers that he had a licensed shot gun in his car. The
officer took the gun and license, then put him under arrest for “armed
robbery.” He said the officer locked the handcuffs on him so tightly that
tears came to his eyes.

The officers’ only excuse, according to the victim, was that no one
could be underestimated on the streets.

After which he was taken to the Central Police Station on East
Street where he spent the night. Officers from the Central Detective
Unit reportedly searched his house, found nothing out of the ordinary
and he was released the next day.

The 28-year-old said he did not want to cause problems, but he just
wanted his side of the story to be heard. “I don’t want this to be a bat-
tle between myself and the press and the police because we should all
be crime fighters. It is not my intention to bring strife,” he said.

The Tribune attempted to contact Inspector Walter Evans, police
press liaison officer, late yesterday afternoon, but he was away from the
office and did not have access to his files. He promised to look into the
case today.

THE TRIBUNE

Reported
cases of
imcest

FROM page one

“Note, however, that none
of these parties were con-
cerned together. This
denotes, too, an increasing
level of promiscuity among
adolescents and predators
alike,” the report read.

Also, unlawful sexual
intercourse (USI) has
increased by 11 per cent in
2006 to 208 reported cases,
over the 183 reported in
2005.

The average age of victims
for USI for 2006 was also 13
years of age. During this
same time, the average age
of suspects was 23, suggest-
ing that adult males preyed
on the generally less expe-
rienced, first-time teens.

Reported
complaints
against

police are
up by 12%

FROM page one

an increase of 12 per cent of
the reported complaints.

“Ninety-nine of the
reported complaints were
completed. Fifty-nine were
sub judice and 125 are still
under active investigation.

"Twenty-one of the com-
pleted matters were recom-
mended to the tribunal, 13
were not substantiated, 28
with insufficient evidence,
11 were unfounded, 10 were
withdrawn, and a total of 16
were informally resolved.

“These were complaints
which consisted of com-
plainants being: compensat-
ed, counselling recommend-
ed, severe reprimands,
warnings and officers who
had resigned with com-
plaints against them under
investigation."

The officer said there
were a total of 901 com-
plaints brought to a closure
during 2006, and that the
majority of complaints
against police officers were
for minor assaults, unlawful
arrest and unethical behav-
iour.

"There was an increase by
226 per cent of matters com-
pleted during the year 2006,
compared to the previous
year," said Supt Dames. .

"Five per cent of the com-
pleted matters were recom-
mended to the Police Tri-
bunal, 25 per cent were not
substantiated, 14 per cent
were unfounded, 23 per cent
were of insufficient evi-
dence, nine per cent were
withdrawn and the remain-
ing 24 per cent were infor-
mally resolved."

According to the superin-

tendent, during the year
2006 a total of 15 corruption
matters were reported, 10 of
which were brought to a clo-
sure with five still under
investigation.
- Two of those corruption
matters, he said, emanated
from two other government
departments.

"During the previous year
eight corruption matters
were reported, four were
completed and three are still
under active investigation,"
said Supt Dames.

The officer said discipline
- "the chief pillar" of the
force - had been gradually
eroded over the years, and
that if this continued the
organisation would be com-
promised and held up to
public disdain and mistrust.

He said: "Three police
officers were dismissed from
the organisation during 2006
as a result of conviction
from the Police Court of
Enquiry Tribunal. Seven
police officers resigned from
the organisation who had
matters against them pend-
ing or under investigation."

The officer said 15 police
officers were indicted dur-
ing 2006, with nine of those
charges pending before the
criminal courts and six
charges pending before the
tribunal.

Supt Dames said all mem-
bers of the force accused by
the public or colleagues of
corruption, abuse of author-
ity, or unethical behaviour
would be investigated fairly
and vigorously.



PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

WELL, we are now into
2007, and as is customary we
tend during this time of year to
reflect on the past and plan
for the future. As we closed
out 2006, both the minister of
state for finance and the Gov-
ernor of the Central Bank
gave the Bahamian economy a
‘thumbs-up’, the consensus of
the two being that the econo-
my would show 3 per cent to 4
per cent economic growth for
2006. There is no doubt that
this is another good economic
performance. However, both
commentators expressed con-
cerns about the level of “liq-
uidity’ in the banking system.
The common observation was
that “liquidity was tight”. To
the average person, the con-
cept of liquidity and its impor-
tance is not understood.

How is liquidity defined?

Liquidity within the bank-
ing system is a measure of
banks’ ability to fund loans
and commitments to their cus-
tomers. From time to time,
consumers might be told their
loan has been approved but
they may have to wait a while
before funds are actually
advanced. This occurs mostly
when liquidity is ‘tight’.

In order to fund loans,
banks must attract long-term
deposits or add additional cap-
ital. In order to attract
deposits, banks must compete
by offering more attractive
interest rates. During the
October through December
period, commercial banks
experienced strong loan
demand which resulted in
them scrambling to secure new
deposits.» - :

Banks usually set deposit.

rates at | per cent to 2 per cent








below the prime interest rate,
which is currently 5.5 per cent.
The prime interest rate is the
interest rate charged by banks
to their most creditworthy cus-
tomers, usually the most
prominent and stable business
customers.

However, if you had large
cash amounts to deposit, you
could have locked in interest
rates’ in excess of the current
prime interest rate for periods
up to one year.

Last week, The Tribune
reported the minister of state
for finance as saying that the
liquidity problem should have
bottomed out in the first two
weeks in December, and that
he expected it would begin to
stabilise in January and Feb-
ruary.

Why do banks pay higher
interest rates when liquidity is
tight?

Banks make their money by
taking deposits at one rate,

* then Jending the funds out to

borrowers at a higher rate.
The difference between what
they pay for deposits and the
rate they lend money out at is
called the ‘spread’y:

In the run-up to Christmas,

traditionally there is strong

Set 3H t

Financial

By Larry Gibson _

Focus





credit demand from business-
es to finance inventories and
from consumers to fund
Christmas purchases. Con-
sumer loans are the most prof-
itable for banks, as they have
the highest spreads. I am told
that the rate of interest on con-
sumer loans can range any-
where from 11 per cent to 17
per cent per year.

Periods of tight liquidity
tend to only last for relatively
short periods of time, so taking
a smaller spread for a few
months on a three-five year
loan is neither here nor there,
and once liquidity returns to
manageable levels, banks are
able to restore their usual
spreads as deposit rates fall.

Liquidity and

Foreign Reserves

According to the Central
Bank, credit expanded by 11.3
per cent during the first 10
months of 2006. This growth
in credit, in turn, has resulted
in downward pressure on the
country’s foreign reserves.

Because we manufacture or
produce very little of what we
consume, most of the new
credit-is immediately spent
abroad, hence the need to con-
vert Bahamian dollars to US

dollars to fund consumer pur-
chases and inventory building.
As at the end of October 2006,
our foreign reserves stood at
around $400 million, down
about 50 per cent from Octo-
ber 2005 levels...then pur-
ported to be about $800 mil-
lion.

Credit Quality

One significant concern
when credit expands rapidly
relates to the quality of loans
being granted. Are banks gen-
erating loans that will come
back to haunt them later on?
If the system writes poor qual-
ity loans, the entire economy
could face repercussions as
these loans go bad. I surveyed
my contacts at several banks,
and they all reported that
“...their loan book is in good
shape”.

Ross McDonald, regional
vice-president of Royal Bank
of Canada, was quoted as say-
ing: “Many people believe
undisciplined lending practices
in the Bahamas are to blame
for the liquidity problem, but

that is not true about us (Roy-

al Bank). The rate of delin-
quencies and defaults is the
lowest it’s been in the last
three years.”

Conclusion

Liquidity is a key indicator
of economic conditions. When
liquidity is tight, interest rates
on deposits tend to rise. Simi-
larly, when the system is ‘flush’
with funds, interest rates on
deposits decline sharply. In the
post-September 11 period, the
Central Bank imposed credit
restrictions on banks. This

resulted:in excess liquidity in-

were regtijcted in making new



loans. The imposition of cred-
it controls tends to slow down
the economy, while the
absence of such controls tends
to boost consumption and
credit expansion.

Ross McDonald summed up
the current situation well when
he said: “This really is a tem-
porary liquidity problem. As
the investments now in the
pipeline come on stream, the
situation will improve. The
(current) liquidity situation is
exacerbated by the fact that
there were large foreign
exchange transfers out as a
result of Bahamians buying
assets formerly foreign-owned
and the high price of oil.”

Until next week...

Postscript

I take this opportunity to
thank all my readers for their
comments and words of
encouragement throughout
the past year. Best wishes for a
most productive and successful
2007.

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst, is
vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions: or com-

ments to rigibson@atlantic--

house.com.bs

THE TRIBUNE

fi HOOPER

Baha Mar
promotes two
top Bahamian
executives












BAHA
Mar has
promoted
two senior
executives.
It has
moved
Michael
Hooper,
the former
British Colonial Hilton’s
general manager, from vice-
president of operations for
Cable Beach Resorts to
senior vice-president of
Cable Beach Resorts oper- ©
ations.

And Robert Sands, cur-
rently vice-president of
external affairs for Cable
Beach Resorts, has been
promoted to senior vice-
president of
government/external affairs
for Cable Beach Resorts
and Baha Mar.

Mr Sands will be respon-
sible for executing Baha
Mar’s corporate outreach
initiatives, maintaining the
company’s presence in the
community, its working
relationships with the Gov-
ernment, interfacing with
the numerous external busi-
ness partners that will be
supporting the vision of:
Baha Mar, industrial rela-,
tions ‘and human capital”
projects. : i








@SANDS




































MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



MARKET REVIEW





+



















































































































































































WORLD MARKET PROFILE WHAT THE U.S. MARKETS DID 0} INNERS AND LOSERS STOCKS FOOTNOTES
World Stocks Latin American Stocks NYSE NASDAQ AMEX NYSE NASDAQ AMEX Definitions apply
Traded In New York Prev. Prev. Prev. : “
Today ‘day, ‘Wik ‘Tow’ | ccremsa 34e 40500 37.5 3667 3688-40 Today day Today day Todry day |__Most Active ‘Most Active __‘Most Active _
Advanced 346 534] Advanced 810 1744 | Advanced 346 534] Name Volume Ck. Name Volume Cis. %Chg | Name Volume Cls. %Ch
Amsterdam 49405 500.33 5018041287 | Empica 4,300 43.70 43.20 43.32 -47 | Declined 702 546 | Declined 2270 ‘1324 | Declined 702546 %Chg | Name Volume _Cls. %Chg | Name_ Volume _Cls. %Chy_
Bangkok 628.19 6482278538 622.14 Unchanged 92 75.| Unchanged 110 139 | Unchanged 92 75 | Motorola 16227500 18.94 -1.61 | NasdLOOTr117339400 43.85 -.21 | SPOR 68523700 140.54 -1.13
Mumbai 13860.52 1387171 1401492 8929.44] GCSaba —.50e 1,300 26.76 26.45 26.45 -.40 New Highs 3 42} NewHighs 46 82 | New Highs 31 n FordM 40416400 7.62 -.08 | Yahoo 64076600 27.74 +.89 | ISHR2K nya53354200 76.73 -1.64
Brussels 4381.56 4421.26 4471.90 3445.10 ech: SAD 1a:eu dia dead soa} NewlOns 16 | Newlows 44 32.| New Lows "4 16 | NokiaCp 33496600 19.84 -1.08 Intel 62345400 21.10 -.07 | SPEngy 37943200 55.92 +37
Buenas 2063.88 2073.08 208785 agra | GPoRadio Gle 5) “| Adv. volume 730,910 1,393,810 | Adv. volume 635,045 1,624,937 | Adv. volume 106,294 213,743 |. AT&T Inc 32844400 33.96 -54 | Cisco 61977400 28.47 +.01 | SemiHTr 16682600 33.85 -34
Caracas 5341331 55648.95 $5648.95 20163.09 | Goosimec * 351,600 13.18 12.50 13.10 -.21 | Decl volume 2.252.522 161,172 | Decl. volume 1,428,500 511,083 Decl volume 293,327 191,972 | Pfizer . 31023100 2630 -.08 | Level3 51024200 5.93 +.36 | OilSvHT 15586000 130.75 +.74
Frankfurt DAX 6593.09 6674.40 6704.04 358.69 Tt. vol. (000) 3,022,631 3,042,478 | TEL vol. (000) 2,081,193 2,163,549 | TH vol. (000) 407,920 414,078 | TimeWam 27166800 22.23 -.19 | SiriusS 49444100 3.80 +.03 | iShEmMMkt 10858200 110.23 -3.32
FISE 100 6220.10 6287.00 6322.00 5467.40 | GTelevsas .16e 2,115,500 27.55 26.94 27.00 -.55 GenElec 26819800 3756 -19 | SunMicro 47055400 5,60 09 | DMA Diam 9078300 12374 94
Hong Kong idx 2021.28, 22556 2055458 MMS | aae 9 497200 28.46 27.50 27.59 -81 Most Widely Held U.S. Stocks Hallibtn s 24846000 29.00 -.23 | Microsoft 44075600 29.64 -.17 | IShEAFE 8736000. 72.20 -1.12
SE eS ee eee tne Pe ar Ry Set tea see > sate Ramune ExxonMbl 24419600 73.24 +52 | Oracle 33572200 17.64 -04 | Yamanag 8335800 1165 -22
Jakarta 1832.55 1824.10 1834.70 A Vitro 08e «62,200 5.84 5.54 5.56 -.14 | Performance of the 15 issues wit! the-most s areho! ers: EMC Cp 24383500 13.61 +.08. | Dell Inctf 33378800 26.16 -08 | SPMatls 6980900 34.22 -23
CACAO SSI735 SS7A56 56267 A6IBAN T Corvecer 2.08e 15,300 30,00 29.26 29.48 -.22 | Stock Div. PE’ Sales. High © Low = Close Ch.
SRE ee eee eee eee | aRiGhile «ade. WaStDOY S7BI-GEA6 uGEAciIO ATEUIN L42f 18.0 328444 34.54 3395 33.96 54 :
rata prs — ssetle Ne one ' ee "| Verizoncm 162 16.0 159928 38.06 3732 37.38 -.65 Gainers Gainers Gainers
Madri 1 ; x Enersis .20e 510,200 15.80 15.38 15.57 -31 k a
Manila 2996.39 3012.74 3020.70 205777 | Madero + a 11.30 11.00 11.29 +.08 cn too 7083733028 20694026 60 | Name___Last Chg %Cbg | Name Last _Chg ‘Chg | Name Last chy %chy
Mexico 26135.60 26566.28 2699.10 6653.15 i . ¢ gah tks | Electri 1.12f. 23.0 268198 37.76 37.31 37.56 -19 | NYMtgTr 3.28 +30 410.1] AthrGnc 12.06 +234 +241) AdcareHitn 2.75 +55 +25.0
0. 2 General Electric i ‘
Nikkei 225 17091.59 17353.67 17563.37 1445.53 | SOCQ&M = 2.80e 46,500 134.20 129.01 130.20-4.25 | jaiy 120. 17.0 71618 97.95 9691 97.42 -.89 | NYSEGpn 10239 47.29 +7:7| Datatrak 6.24 +1.18, +233] Zion0&Gn 12.50 42.10 +202
Seoul 1385.76 1397.29 1464.70 1203.86 | VinaConc .40e 12,100 32.80 31.60 u32.42+.92 NtwkEq = 6.71 +48 +7.7 | SyntaxBril 10.74 +1.25 +132] NDynMng 748 +69 +102
Singapore 3029.04 3023.80 3037.74 2280.67 | Metrogas * 23,100 4.10 4.02 4.10 +.22 Afrancewt 12.25 +85 +7.5|HinesH 2.09 +24 +130) Memry 2.40 +20 49,1
SaoPaulo 4245.16 44019.77 44526.36 3287.61 | Ticmarg * 118,300 20.72 20.35 20.40 -.10 THorton gn 31.31 +200 +68) SabaSoft 6.84 +.70 +114] DebtResn 4.20 +30 +77
Sydney 5572.00 5584.80 5649.30 4721.10 | ypF Soc 1.97e 3,000 46.97 45.96 46.80+1.09 CAEIncg 9.60 +53 +58 ZarebaSys 5.30 +54 +113] Aspyra 2.09 +14 472
bal |
Taipei 7835.57 793451, 793451 6257-80 | aracruz 2.208 613,200 62.05 60.90 61.13 -.65 Metrogas 4.10 +22 +56] Arotechrs 3.75 +36 +106| Vitafd © 2.05 +12 +62
Toronto DAT ST W380. ASAT meh TelBrasH 204r 24,000 29.63 28.12 28.33-1.40 | Daily nese for the past yea: Dug pfE 42.00 42.00 +5.0| AtAm | 342 +31 4100) CVDEqp 549 +31 +60
Zurich eesti < Geen 14000 Se Protlife 5035 4235 +49] AllionHit 6.99 +63 +9.9| Telkonet 2.94 +17 +60
SURE a LR : Salesforce 39.52 +164 +43] OnstreamM 295 +26 +9.7| ChadThr 2.42 4.13 45.7
NewZealand 4035.26 4028.96 4055.46 3303.26 yaaa an \is
Milan 31936,00 32057.00 3259.00 26543.00 ; 19250
Johannesburg 24261.06 24201.02 24985.81 18244.64 N.Y. Comex ¢ , close 12398.01 Losers Losers Losers
Athens 4560.14 4536.69 4536.69 3379.28 ele
Stockholm 1147.22 1149.68 115838 878.16 we. Close Chg. 12500 +4] down 82.68 Name Last Chg %Chg | Name Last Chg %Chg | Name Last Chg %Chg
Topix 1675.33 1698.95 1783.72. 1458.30 | Gold raed led cL ae LenoxGrp 419-244-368 Voxwaren 3.95 -130 -248| SulphCo 3.85. 61 -13.7
Zurich SPI 7015.51 7033.64 7033.64 5573.99 | Silver Market Price Bh ot Herbalife 29.74 -956 -24.3| Omtool 358-79 -181| Arizld 12.59 1.80 -12.5
ShanghaiB 13345 1313813138. 62.01 Handy & Harman GlobPay 41.09 -7.96 16.2] JamesRiv 6.69 1.40 -17.3| Goldcy nya 6.00 -75 -ILL
MIB 30 41571.00 41824.00 4218.00 39045.00 Close Chg. GtChina 26.97 -4.03 13.0] MWavehrs 2.46 -.51 -17.2| iMergent 26.34 -2.95 -10.1
; Gold Market Price 609.50 -19.20 PinnclEnt 30.51 -3.35 9.9] Westaff 4.76 -.97 -16.9| BodisnBioh 452-45 9.1
a rnatcat Tienes Ine-tinennat tities ne. Silver Market Price $2,090 40.680 DoralFin 2.22 --24 -9.8] NeurMtrx 12.12 -1.81 -13.0] Indonesia 11.00 -1.00 -83
indices de Precios y Cotizaciones, cc-CAC London Afternoon BrilChina 2015 203 -92| BPOhts 2.77 -37 -11.8| InvCaphid 550-49 -82
40, ao-all Ordinaries, ndj-Nikkel Dow Jones, Close Chg. ChinaLfes 48.07 -4.78 -9.0] Quigley 5.09 -.61 -10.7| JedOilg 2.47 21-78
available, mM Telematico,xholiday,, [S84 tat) “a6T0 Acims 265 19s a0| fam , 2005 G51 S| Ath ater tas aE
available, m-MIB Telematico, x-holiday. Silver 12.170 -0. nas 22.65 -1. eam 351 - y 67-1! :
_____Vol. High Low Close Chg. ____ Vol. High Low Close Chg. | _ _ Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low, Close Chg.
Nl | EndoPhrm 2444 28.76 27.20 28.70 +1.47 | IntcntlEx 4378 126.65 121.00 124.56 +3.55 | NovaStar 2146 25.79 24.87 25.12 -85|SixFlags 1798 5.75 5.60 5.74 +.05| TractSupp 2075 48.44 45.77 47.99 +1.80
U S ARKE EngyConv 1364 34.32 32.50 33.27 -L.19] Intermec 1048 24.10 23.10 23.38 -.54| NvtlWrls 1763 10.50 10.20 10.40 +.25| SkywksSol 10027 7.26 6.64 6.75 -.59|Tmsmeta 1725 «1.13 (1.09 1.10 -.02
a a EngyPrt 1094 24.07 23.31 23.98 +33] IntrNAPrs 617° 20.63 19.96 20.49 +.06|/Novavax 1805 4.23 4.00 4.07 *|Smithinth 4379 37.83 36.80 37.12 -.38| Transocn 6566 76.98 7539 7655 +.98
ENSCO 5U4 49.74 47.45 48.36 +.80/1BM . 7161 97.95 9691 97.42 -89}Novelllf 3014 641 631 637 -.03| Smithfr 1122 25.17 24.84 24.87 -.28 | Triad 1427 41.14 40.03 40.16 -.94
Entergy 2205 93.69 91.28 91.76 -2.32] InthCoal «1343. «5.12 4.91 4.98 -.15 | Novlus 6967 34.58 33.58 33.65 -1.17| SmurfStne 2623 10.33 10.18 10.23. -.10] Tribune «1113 31.06 3081 3081-08
Selected stocks from the EqOfPT 5794 48.37 48.08 48.26 +16] IntlGame 2103 45.99 45.41 45.71 -.43| NuanceCm 2647 11.90 11.52 11.61 -.30| Solectrn 11851 3.37 3.23. 3.34 +.04|TridentMic 2785 1961 1880 1905 -61
New York and American exchanges and from NASDAQ. EqtyRsd «2160 50.75 49.58 49.92 -1.00| intPap 2968 34.24 33.43 33.46 -.70 | Nucor s 4209 55.69 5416 5473 -19|SonicCps 1345 22.49 22.16 22.29 -.31| Trinitys 1095 35.12 34.30 3439 -28
EricsnTl 1850 41.18 40.22 40.93 -.62} Interpublic 4450 12.38 12.17 12.28 -.04 | Nuvelo 1751 3.93) 3.85 3.85) -.05] Sonus 5704 7.45) 7.30 7.40 -.10 | TriQuint 1584 4.55 4.40 445 -18
Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low Close Chg. | EvrgrSlr © 2965 742 7.13 7.33. -.02 | Intersil 1827 24.46 23.91 2399-46] Nvidias 20603 35.20 33.42 33.66 -2.25| Sonycp 3130 45.60 43.96 44.80 +1.00| Tweeter 2298 2.08 157 1.62 -48
ae Exelon 2929 61.64 60.12 60.39 1.49 intuit 2103 3003 2949 2983 a SouthnCo «3738 -36.95 36.38 36.44 -.56 | Tycointl 4880 30.71 30.10 3035 -.44
CBSBnh 6361 31.40. 30,77 30.89 -.44| Expedia 2727) 21.35 21.08 21.26 -.01 | Isis 1010 11,38 11.00 11.32_ +, ~29| SthnCopps 2398 51.03 49.61 50.96 +.44 | Tyson 1630 16.55 16.13 16.50 +.22
ia ORS ee a ce eae wate ee ae ee ae Ospina? 3430 333 nas pg| Sut S07 1545 542 1550-15 | map
ABB Lt 7 17.00 16 “32 /CHRobins 1418 43.71 42.96. 43.05 -.44| ExpScrip 09 67.96 68.86 -1. : iqeee ant “31 | SwstnEngy 4942 34.07 32.24 3355 +.41
ACELtd 1236 59.61 58.86 59.13 -43| CIT Gp 1574 56.78 55.89 55.91 -40| ExtNetwif 2597 4.23 4.01 4.10 -.11 | JDS Unirs © 4519 17.82 17.40 17.66 -.27 reales oe en a ae at Spinner 2828 2577 2548 2560 -19|UALn 2332 47.35 45.83 46.55 -.80
ACMMD 38 7.92 7.85 7.87 04) CMGI T1537 1.30 1.31 -.06 | ExxonMbl 24419 73.38 72.22 73.24 +.52] JPMorgCh 9905 48.25 47.63 47.79 at Offepot. -3031.«-3784 3735 3758 #08] SPansionA 8159 1425 1370 1412 -40/UAPHIdg 1938 22.75 «21.66 22.23 -1.87
CMM} 19 373 370 370) CMS eng §— 2164 1669 1642 1647-27 | I 0 Sr Fe “Geo -La0|ONSVHT 18586 13160 12898 13075 #74| Spectran 3779 2939 2831 2886 -19|UCBHHId 12071798 1759 17.65 -26
ADC Telr 3121, 15.61 15.15 15.29 -.13| CNET If 1989 897 8.79 8.90 -.09 . retry "30-29 | oil 42-31 | SpiritFn 2933 12.36 12.19 12.25 -15|USAirwy 1641 59.15 57.90 58.29 -.55
FPLGrp «2269 55.00 54.05 54.33 73] JanusCap 1224 21.59 21.24 21.30 -.29| OilStates 2209 28.90 28.20 28 r
AES Corp = 3346.21.95 21.07 21.32 -.63 | CSXs 4457 35.00 34.15 34.28 -.72] 2. ~"4g| SprintNex 20995 19.65 19.14 19.21 -.44 | USGlobal 3171 60.09 53.18 54.54 -1.01
a FairchldS ©1767 17.40 16.99 17.31 -17 | JetBlue 4093 15.32 1493 1499 -.39/OmegaHit 1460 17.48 1662 17.04 -.48| SD
ATLAC ey ey Deo Done ge cvethera 1179.13.93, 1347 1347-46) Fannie it 2453 59.84 59.20 5957 29] Johnin «8095 67.25 6650 6662 —61|Omncre 1143 3956 3858 39.14 +.06|SPDR 68523 141.40 140.38 140.54 -113| USG 1238 55.00 52.61 52.84 -.84
nen 7586 1614 1613 1630 233 ( Unie, IBS $25 3069 3117 +17) rastenal 15603758 3627 3643-106) Johnsnctl 1876 8568 8428 8475 -L14|Omnivisn 2804 1315 1280 1287 -38/SPMid 2651 14683 145.33 14533 -193) UST Inc 1167 58.00 5695 57.12 -1.02
Morr c- eas tees S13 163) 33] CablNYs 1721 29.11 2880 2899 +05] Fagexcy 1339. 10853 107.04 107.53 ~95 | Joycibl 2249 4643 44.86 45.24 38 | OnSmend 9282 7.67 7.36 7.51 -11/SPMatls 6980 34.46 33.98 34.22 -23|UTStrem 1502 895 863 BIT -.27
Id $328 2476 2450 2475 a1 fCUYS, M27 42.52 A231 42.38 51) Fedrpss 9967 37.42 36.72 36.89 ~42| InprNtwif 9604 19.98 19.26 1993 +43|On2Tech 5159) 139 122 136 +08/SPHItHC 1528 3391 3361 3369 -19|UltraPtg 1921 47.05 45.48 46.88 +1.18
ASME Hid. = S28 ot rag ga | cadence 2879 18.19 17.89 18.06 +94) Fideipsh ©1162 39.86 3932 39.33 -43 OnstreamM 2736 3.08 269 295 +.26/SPCnSt 1355 26.34 26.07 26.14 -19|UnilevNVs 1030 26.92 2669 26.82 -39
aioe see eek AA Gh oe Gamecogs 208 3G 36.70 3726 All FidINFin,§—«2077 23.77 23.46 2357-14 _ TS) 4036 4805 48/250 [ODN -S3OL_ ALT 1090 1145 +47) SPConsum 1013, 38.56 38.20 3825-26 UnionPac 1600 91.78 SO5B 90.66 -114
a as. aoe | came! 1 Ao 34 le 1002 40.55 39.99 40.34 -.14 | KBHome .36 48. -501 QpenTvV —«-2152,-2.70«-249«-2.60 +.13| SP 37943 56.08 55.19 55.92 +.37 | Unisys : 6 -
Aastrom 4341-148 1.40 1.45 +06 }CampSp- 2147 38.50 37.86 37.96 ~68| FldNinfo a3 “ai [KUATaclf 3832 50:19 49.26 50.15 +10 | opnwvs 3837 «939889 893-54 P rae 6424 36.78 36.44 36.49 -.31] UtdMicro 23900 349 341 341 -.11
Abtlab 6866 5000 4927 4990 * FifthThird 3062 40.84 39.94 40.18 -.81 | Opnwvsy s
Abertitc 3560 7538 7340 7401 +9) CONRSS — 3578 A751 45.77 46.84 4.63) Finisar if 7415 «3.293.223.2309 Kellogg ©1374 50.05 4954 49.72 -34lOpsware. 1541 845 809 818 -31|SPinds 3408 3508 3477 3496 12 /UPSB 3544 ‘75.04 7362 7415 94
Abiibig §—-1745=«253 (24824 ane ates an ae se 93 | Fstmcp if 1607 42.51 41.09 42.20 41.12 | Keycorp 1553 37.76 37.20 37-32-43 | Oracle 33572 17.76 17.44 17.64 _-.04| SPTech 1630-2354 23.35 23.50 -19|USBancrp 5572 36.19 35.70 35.77 -43
Accenture 1768 3699 3645 3668 -s2\crmuca” 24 TO 7716 | FifstDatas 5158 25.69 25.25 25.46 -.22| Kimbclk 1915 68.70 68.18 6844-27 SPUtl 3774 36.67 35.99 36.11 -66/USOIIFdn 3594 47.93 46.89 47.83 +48
ves : apne PLAT) SAT 2 GB TT IG FirstEn 1364 60.39 58.90 59.11 -1.28 | Kimco 1631 44.56 44.01 44.08.67 179 USSteel 3759 71.01 69.03 69.72 -.92
Activisn 4027 17.30 16.76 17.20. -.10 | CpstnTrb 1619 19 114° 215 =| [irstengy ; PGREC 3219 46.53 45.46 45.49 -1.13 | standex 51 30.80 29.17 29.17 -1.79
Adobesy 2721 4090 40.12 4062 -20|Chamtith sed? kas ude eae 3 | Fiserv TL 52.85 5210 Oa AOA ee ee oe ee ee eay ABHS 4843 “1-13 StanlWk ©1132 5119 5059 50.90 -20/ UtdTech © 4318 62.99 62.07 62.68 -19
AdolorCp 2058-750 7.06 7.09 -.45| CareerEd 1083 25.35 2471 2531 +27 Flextn 6573" 1.60 1125 11.59, 4.06 | ered tety 1924) IRR? 1899 28 PPLG 1130 3606 3536 3555 63| Staples 5065 26.50 25.77 26.02 -.22| UtdhithIf 6152 53.05 51.93 52.55 -.36
: pee Fluor 1009 80.00 78.14 78.37 -1.68 | KnghtCap . orp StarGas 1025. 3.49.«3.27«-3.49 +.14| Univision 2803 35.64 35.59 35.60 -.04
Adtran 1622 24.10 23.05 23.32, -.85] CaremkRx 5379 56.92 55.93 56.35 +10 ; Kohls 3293 68.47 66.55 66.80 -.88 | Paccars 1716 65.01 64.48 64.70 +10
Mion RE NS lesa BM Bm See is Salem, OSL Le Le liye Su Ses See / eho Hr fem ib at “is] Sule aR Gt RN“ mm 1 OB
AMD 15765 19.91 19.54° 19.71 -.08 63 49.75 49.88 99 94 34.52 34.75 + c 39 2009 | 71 60.71 60.90 -J 04 23. p
AdvEn 1268 1050 975 1043-441 |Goreke gos veg “(225 M08 Py FrdgCCTg 1631 19.89 19.42 19.8) ~18| Kraft 2432 35.59 SABA 3518-40 | Pacer 2074 2039 1B 20.09 50 | SeateStr 1971 68.56. 6807 6840 -21|UtahMedh . 11 33:13 3250 32.75 30
gy 2 Carreker = 2054 7.90 7.86 7.87. -.02 2 Kroger 6065 23.71 23.30 23.60 +.01 | Pactiv 1113 35.36 34.68 35.18 +.18
Aeropstl 1706. 34.54 33.69 33.93. --28| Caterpillar 6154 60.92 59.95 60.22 -.7g| Forestlab 2401 50.45 50.05 50.20 35 | Md IG? ays B39. RAT. 20 | PallC 1156 3425 3361 3375 94|Stemcells 8401 3.42 3.21332 +21 | ULI 1317 131.40 129.30. 129.82 --2.02
Aetnas 4829 42.10 41.11 4140 72) Celanese 1852 25.17 2467 25.06 -4] orestolls UN? 31.52 31.02 3122 +02 | ae, as Palmincs AT@4 1491 1440 1469 04 | STGold 10677 60.78 59.66 60.17 -1.48
Affymetrix 1516 22.28 21.68 21.72 -54|CeleraGrp 313 14461399 14.24 16] ForutNW HBB AaB + 22 a ee pest ll 201 2388 -28|STHomen 1111 36.31 35.89 35.98.33 | RTE aT TET
AgereSys 3633 19.77 19.36 19.59 -.20/ Celesticg 1384 8.02 7.74 7.82 16] Fotwwh 1336 4984 4817 4002 cep [eSItoo 8128. 9.28 9129.20 ~11 | parracos —»«1203-« 42.23.93 409 4.12 STKDWRBn 1188 50.66 49.66 49.70 -1.05 vaalco ee ee ek
Agilent 2460 34.40 34.00 34.09 -32) Celgenes 2947 58.14 56.90 57.58 -46] FH roa 1999 30.80 a012 a0-AT cog | LAOCP 1457 73.79 73.21 73.49 -.26 | parpet 1039 1655 1610 1615 -.09|STDUStx50 2115 48.39 47.81 47.91 -,89 | Valassis 1589 1 1330 13.79 -30
Agnicog 2865 38.15 36.40 3744-35} Cemexs 2113 33.62 32.84 33.14 -57| poindey if 466? 1528 1473. 1522. 422 | Laidlaw 2028 30.16 28.97 29.09 +139) parmtcrs 1579 18.01 17.50 17.72 -.29 StrideRt 143 15.30 14.86 14.96.36 | ValTech 1750 1781.31 1.35 -35
AirProd 2457 70.27 69.06 69.35 -.98| CenterPnt 6075 7.47 16.67 16.79 -.29| fr Mie 9849 6770 6662 669) -102 | LAMRSch «3063.51.85 50.55 51.85 -.07 | parkHan 1533 77.62 76.21 7638 +.19 | Stryker 1773 55.93 55.32 55.83 +23] ValeroE = 12541 49.47 48.48 49.36 +.47
AirTran 1863 11.86 11.43 1147 -.42 | Centex 1667 54.40 53.28 53.48 -.69) Fricg 7159 5242 4994 5148 4.52 | Sands 1194 92.02 89.88 90.94 -1.17 | pattuTl 4528 22.13 21.54 21.93 +.19 | SturmRug 120 9.54 9.26 9.38 +.08| ValueClick © 1550 23.92 23.25 23.49 -.50
AkamaiT 2862 53.78 52.42 53.19 -.11 | Cental 1078 41.90 39.30 39.40 -2.64 EMG 1895 808 793 800 .15|tawsnSft 2263 7.16 6.88 7.15. +.04 | paychex 1763 40.20 39.78 40.03 +.02 | SulphCo 1307 437 3.80 3.85 -~61| VarianMed 1244 48.00 47.61 47.99 -.32
AlskAir 504 41.45 39.74 40.30 -1.51 | Cephin 1067 69.99 69.17 69.75 -.23 Frontoils 1706 2747 2688 2735 +08 LearCorp 1809 29.89 28.35 28.83 -1.15 | payishoe 1050 32.93 32.07 32.16 -1.02] SunMicro 47055 5.66 5.56 5.60 -.09| VarianSs 1175 45.83 44.83 45.61 +.01
AlbertoCn 1101 22.98 2247 22.77 +.14] Ceradynelf 536 58.82 , 57.50 58.63 +.62 Frontline 1256 30.66 30.17 30.41 ~60 LeggMason 1037 9812 96.66 97.19 -.44 PeabdyEs 9687 37.48 36.20 37.22 +.72| Suncor g 4625 72.86 70.67 72.65 +1.97 | VascoDta 1190 13.73 12.90 13.67 +71
Alcan 2103 45.52 44.55 44.73 -1.26 | CerusCp 242, 5.60 5.39 5.39 -.15 Furia 572 2665 2605 2640 -.20 LehmnBrs 5104 77.42, 76.20 76.74 -.10 | pengrth g 1492 16.41 15.81 16.25 +.10| Sunoco 3141 59.97 58.60 59.68 +.16| Vasogengh 1513 35 0 (320-01
Alcatelluc 10696 14.89 14.64 14.78 -.29 | ChmpE 1780 858 807 824 -.4l FurnBrds 1081 1606 1566 1594 +10 LennarA 1885 50.15 49.43 49.66 -.43 | panNGm 1073 40.95 40.12 40.22 -.73| Suntech 1496 33.50 32.55 33.33. +.61 | Verisign 3658 24.62 2420 2459 +.01
i i a ne an 735 chanen 10381 3.26 3.13 3.25 4.16} coir 1346 1530 1414 1440 65 Loess i ae Be a 24 PennWst gn 1314 28.93 27.50 2845 +.46| SunTrst 1531 83.64 82.39 82.85 -1.10 | VeritDGC 2759 82.30 80.98 aie ‘e
erm . Chattem 2230 55.71 54.09 54.89 +2.16 ~ ; 5 may | LEUCNat! s , 83-108 | Penney 2841 77.78 76.14 7658 -.24]| Supeni 2396 30.00 29.00 29.25 -.5g| VerizonCm 15992 38.06 37.32 37.38 -,
AllgeEngy 1069 4560 4445 4.74 -96 | ChiPoint, 2536. 22.10 21.46 2197-72] I | orcs 51024 595558593 +35] pemwest 12881739 1626 167! #44 | ecm Fee Seer Seeg Seas sca |veruPh 1547 37.08 3878 SSRI “LIB
AllegTch 2284 86.93 85.10 85.97 -98| Cheesecake 1121 25.07 24.59 24.66 -.44) GMarketn 1046 22.96 22.12 22.33. -1.04 | Lexmark 1569 72.31 71.40 72.00 -.40 | pepsiBott 1779 30.65 30.46 30.57 +14] Sycamore 1299 ~ 3.81 3.75 3.76 -.06|ViacomB 3586 41.81. 41.14 41.47 +23
AldWaste 2048 12.69. 12.50 12.51 -.07|ChesEng 14307 28.13. 27.52 27.95 +.23] G-llls 99 20.00 19.52 19.84 +.07 | LibGlobA 1093 29.24 28.77 29.04 -.07 | pepsico 4474 63.22 62.70 6295 -20] Symantec 11534 21.60 21.27 21.34 -32| Viragenh 170. .4a6 25 36 *
Allstate 2207 «65.40 64.92 65.18 -.18 Chevron 9532 71.12 70.12 70.55 +.27] GameStp 1342 56.06 55.31 55.49 +.08| LibMinthn 2022.22.21 21.60 21.77 -.36 | prsetch 1852 27.84 27.81 27.84 +.03 Synopsys 1270 2678 2616 2654 -36| Vishay 2307 «13.79 13.44 13.47 -39
Alltel 2882 62.00 61.30 61.90 -.01 | Chicos 3162 21.20 20.48 20.58. -.76 | Gannett 1161 59.80 59.40 59.55 +.10 | Lifecell 1399 24.94 24.25 24.45 -.16 | perkEim 1283 21.65 21.40 21.56 ~02| Synovus 758 31.08 30.47 30.61 -.50 | Visteon 2127-859 «8.05 «818 -.48
AlteraCp If 5857 20.04 19.76 19.96 -11)Chinalfes 4874 50.44 47.00 48.07 -4.78 Gap 10879 19.58 18.81 18.89 -55|ligandPhn 1961 11.35 10.96 11.31 +.15 PerryEllis s 160 26.43 25.45 25.95 -.40 SyntaxBril 7125 10.82 9.61 (10.74 +1.25 | VivoPart Bll 3.82 358 373 -J1l
fon 8110 as aa ae ia ChinaMble 2023.44.99 43.12 43,24 -1.19] Garmins 2584 55.00 53.75 54.88 -.18 IVER ae a ae aoe a Petrohawk 7419 10.66 10.32 10.63 +.08| Sysog 1924 36.07 35.76 3589 -11| Vodafone 2875 2862 2812 2818 -J7
fran” 6516 3879 7a) Mea? -=8| Chin 160s S18 1435 4 [Ce ee ee ee ee nat 18 oes ee00 Geir cya [BRUNA BD $BAD BSAS $679 2291 Stemax i602 1851 1809 18.00 76) Vrado 290 PLA 11824 11855 208
Amdocs 1127 38.58 3801 3845 -.07|Chubbs 2472-5282 52.17 52.29 -50|Genaerah 1847 28-25-27 +01 | LinearTch 3837 3093 30.20 3071596 | phizer 31023 2663 2617 2630-08
AMovilL 5085 46.15. 44.66. 44.74 1.44) ChungTel 100629.91 19.53 1959en4k:Genentch 3976 85.00 83.18 83.68 -.35 | LizClaib 1008 44.72 44.14 egy PrSwebh 1851.29 171.29 4.07] TD Ameritr 3998 16.54 16.20 16.28 -30|WHolding 1873. 609 552 5.70 -.39
AmAxle 1255 18.43 17.91 17.93 -.66}CienaCprs 4594 29.87 28.01 29.29 +.44 GenDyn s 1492 74.76 74.03 74.59 +.17 | LockhdM 1949 92.57 91.37 92.02 +33 | phmHtr 2100 78.34 77.48 77.70 -.63| THO 1297 32.34 31.34 31.92 -.62 | WCICmts 1950 19.53 19.02 19.45 +18
AgagleOs 6867 33.61 31.96 32.32 -.66 | Cimarex 1180 36.61 35.94 36.31 +.10/ GenElec 26819 37.76 37.31 37.56 -.19 | Loews s 1784 40.68 40.25 40.37 -.37| phelpsDs 4022-116.84 115.26 116.51 +.91 | qx 3262 29.75 28.89 29.08 -.64] WD 40 81 3427 33.34 3335 -.84
AEP 1329 42.84 42.00 42.04 -.80 | CinciBell 1028 4.66 «4.48 «4.53 -.15] GnGrthPrp = 1303; 52.43 51.44 51.51 -.80 | LaPac 1489 21.98 21.41 21.83 -.01 PhilipsEl 1047 37.01 36.57 3672-87! TviAInc 1351 5 78 "84-15 | Wachovia 4919 57.32 5630 5648 -.79
Amp 6315.59.87. 58.90 59.13. -79 | Cintas M37. 40.67° 39.93 40.29 -.18} GenMills, 1346 57.36 56.91 56.97 -42|Lowess 8229. 32.41 31.59 31-79-39 pier 1 2421 G07 5.92 5.96 -07) TxUCor S116 53.66 52.96 53.58 +.07| WalMart 13334 47.80 4715 4739-39
ey 1336 ae ae a a CircCity 11526 20.65 19.23 19.29 -.71] GnMotr 10437 30.28 29.69 30.24 +.60 Lyondell 2710 25.37 24.81 25.03 -.48 Pinnclent 2528 32.91 30.51 30.51 -3.35] Taiwan 31 18.82 1840 18.45 -.42 | Walgrn 3655 46.31 45.39 45.50 -.66
ROSA A. SORE SLTE TAGE: TER Gd eee og ghee HED TSS tal | Gonestier: “ANS «1014. 9.85. 288-2 PionDril = 1136 12.30 11.80 12.01 +18) TaiwSemi 12533 10.90 10.58 10.69 -28|Wamerchn 1182 1388 1332 1335-48
AmeMed 3767 1917 1777 1885 +20|Gitom S301 Sh0S Srae seay ‘gy | Gente 238 7862 76.76 7686 “175! wey —— 2948 4053 3951 40.29 76) PION «1486 3847 37.47 301-15] TakeTWo «39541769 16.61 1683 -83|WAMutl | 3692 4549 45.02 4508 45
AmOrBio 1002 1233 1195 1203 -13|CitzComm 1717. 1423 1402 1411 208 | Qe esth «ee gate aaee age gu; MGlPhr ~ 1500 18.29 1792 1798-31 | PlumCrk A shet sean SRS x22 | TalismE gs 4586 15.59 15.13 1549 +.16 | WREIT 362 40.36 39.25 39.56 -89
APwCnv 2139.30.67 30.58 30.63 +.01 | Citrixs 3920 2811 2750 2785 -10| Gen 3537 G68 GS09 Roe. 4.35 | MGIC 1104 63.63 63.03 6328-42 [Poloom = ARN ALG 30.72 3128 46 | Taget 2934 58.10 57.15 57.27 -.32] WsteMinc 2473 36.53 35.93 35.98 -.59
AmStand 1397 4500 4538 4559 -48| clearchan 2877 3553 3538 3543 -06| Gago 4779.07 t850 tego 3g /MRVCm — 1039378 3.64 3.71 10 Pech. “Oa gabe TeeaL dave: eee | 1214 2.40 2.22 2.39 +02) Weathfdint 8102 38.08 36.91 37.86 +.94
AmTower 3110 38.16 37.09 37.52 -33|Clevcliffss 1165 4743 46.00 4641 -1.09| G : 39 15.57. -56 | Malaysa M6 745 7.25 7.27 -.10 ¢ TASER 1889 8.20 7.90 8.07 +08] WellPoint 3218 78.95 78.29 78.49 +.62
cd 43 46.00 46.41 -1.09] Gerdaus 1726 16.28 1539 15.57 -56 ’ Powrwav 5061. G74 6.50 6.53 -.22
: “60 546.2 : Mamma 9511 “5.97 5.55 5.60 +30 " TelNorL 4983 14.31 13.63 13.79 -.32]WellsFgos 10247 35.83 35.51 35.60 -.20
aun, ime sea ees eee oe Wed ASS gas MAO 0g] eee, IS 9.25 9.01 9.13 +06 T anpwl 1023 768:25-7482 75.01 -137| Praxair 3102 58.30 5832 $899 +14) Tier, 9432 2846 2750 2759 BI Wendyss 1450 33.98 3277 33.81 +15
Amgen 10364 7208 7L01 7150 +17 | coo 27 2040 * | GlaoSkin 108 Ska? 3S Sag “yg| Marathon 5581 86.37 8400 85.92 +1.68| Preccastot 1050 8159 8019 8123-36 roetech 131 2498 2429-2485 4.52 | Wetisthl?: 213 11.09 11.04 11.06 *
AmkorTit 3030 995 959 981 ~A7|cocacl S778 ABST MBL ABI6 -24|Glenind” MOse Gao ath azar “ig lMMGoldn 1865 37.34 3665 a7.ai si |Precrl 1697 22.36 2150 2227 +22] TH” aes) “4S aut 448 03 (Wadinon 201 10 Ges 6G 04
‘01 ™ . ms i a 4 7 : i “t + . . . i re n >
in 3171 3628 3761 +112 | coowr “Te | Globes Sond ane, ace AGs 728] Marintas — 3302 4600 4499 4510 -Lo7 | PriceTRs — 1683 4638 4589 4606 09] TEE Ta ae nt) ae lwo, 5509 2h10 See Ise
Amylin , 2020 36.28 37.61 Coeur 12199 4.62 4.37 447-16] GlobPay «9010 44.51 39.75 41.09 -7.96 Prideintl 3769.27.74 27.20 27.48 +.02 gi
Anadarks 8578 41,64 40.53 41.31 +28) CogTech 1522 78.33 75.80 77.11 -1.05) GlobalSFe 4017 57.06 54.62 °55.76 +1.03 | MarshM 2621 31.50 31.00 3134-29) ican, | aoe 53.66 52.60 53.00 +80| Templein 1138 46.39 45.80 46.29 +.02| WstnUnn 5520 22.97 2230 2233-58
Anadigc «1740. 8.72 8.45 8.49 -49} Cognosg «1327 42.87 41.96 42.71 +16] GoldFltd 41131742 16.93 17.34 -22| Marvell SIF 12604 19.58 19.17 1941-54) eS" Gone chon ca'ag 63:50 55 | Tenariss 2349 47.73 46.51 47.30 +40] WetSeal | 1279 661 628 635 -24
AnalogDev 2610 33.30 32.65 33.03 -38}ColdwtrCs 1545 24.36 23.72 23.96 -43| Golderpg 11855. 2618 25.44 2567 -.77 | Masco eae eee seas coy | Proorssén 1608 49.54 4847 4870 -80|TenetHlth 3135 7.14 7.05 7.10 ~.01 | Weyerh 1485 71.96 7112 7154 -23
Andrew 1268 10.36 10.10 10.25 -.18 | ColgPal 1797 65.90 65.34 65.46 -30)GoldStrg 1814 2.88 2.77 2.87 +.05 passeye 2909 10220 9900 1006 og} ProcCps 2668 2416 23.60 23.75 -.48 | Teradyn 2467 15.40 15.13 15.29 -.17 | WholeFd 1924 47.26 46.32 46.63 -.36
AngloAms 1517. 22.97 22.27 22.52 82) ColumLab- 2435.02 4.81 4.88 -.10) GoldmanS 5836. 200.00 197.90 199.05 +20) MANcean Sank Whe Oe ID “yq| Protogis 1111 59.92 5870 59.02 -.90| Terexs 1973 58.66 57.67 57.98 -77|WmsCos 4743 25.92 2544 25.76 +14
AnglogidA 1405 44.94 43.75 44.46 -.43 | Comcast 8543 43.06 42.32 42.55. -.50]| Goodyear 8734 23.53 22.29 23.28 +.61 | davis ip 4636 3173 3110 3131 51 | Protlife 1097 50.45 48.25 50.35 +2.35| Terra 1256 11.95 11.53 11.74 -.17 | WmsSon 2000 31.17 30.61 3141 -.03
Anheusr 4706 49.16 48.53 48.80 +.05)Comesp 4325 42.51 41.82 42.02 -.47] Google 6769 487.50 478.11 487.19 +393] sicciatchy 473 ALIB 4083 40.97 .23/ PrOVETQ 1380 1031 998 10.21. +16] Tesoro 1150 65.79 64.30 65.67 +.65| Windstrm 2446 14.01 13.79 13.90 -.09
fm, Be ie Ge Bp “elem, ie ea fe Ri cn/deint 2S 28 25 A ckliels om aa Ge So in| Reed, ee RP ae alee Me Be ae Be celine be ae
naly 10. 1372 13.73 -. s AT 24.60 25.16 -.24] GtChina, «1267-3050 26.50 26.97 -4, 32 43:34 4354 + | PugetEngy 1562 25.71 2454 2462 -1.12| TevaPhrm 64 32.21 +57] Worthgtn 1234 17.12 16.76 16.84 -.35
Aon Corp 2578 35.87 35.58 3558 -21/CVRDs = 9946 28.48 27.11 27.51 -96| GreyWolf 3274660 6.46 6.53 +02 | Moma © SER ASAD ARIA. ARS | pulteH 19983212 31.55 3194 +03| Texinst 20913 2894 2858 2876 -34| weit’ 3708. S78 SLI9 S135 38
Apache 4599 65.50 63.85 65.25 41.55 | CVRD pfs 3633 24.70 23.48 23.71 1.08] GTelevsas 2115. 27.55. 26.94 27.00 -55) MON nk Rep GoaR BBR ta a se 1076 94.80 93.75 94.22 -.13] wynn 1664 97.75 95.76 96.88 +.57
ApolloG if 1906 41.56 40.40 40.76 67 | CompScilf 1058 52.14 51.47 51.83 +03] Gymbree 1371 43.88 42.91 43.25 +15| Monessen T0IR SA.GR SAOS SIT +01 | ThermoFis 1941 45.60 44.82 45.01 -.63
Apolloinv 1171-2237 21.70 22.04 -54|Compuwre 1066 862 847 852 -.06 MeDatsA «3577 556 S58 -E4G sop | Qmodan — 1696 17.40 1650 1671 ~731 3com 5359. 412 402 403 09
AppleCptr 29335 96.20 84.40 85.05 ~61 | Comversif 2794 21.38 2077 21.03 -14| So Lene | Merduco Lolo 282 2eBE ISL go (Qlogics 1957 2211 2172 2186-19] aurco 2732-7790 77.01 77.42 -53 XMSat 12023 -15.45 14.58 1532 +.34
Applebees 1536 24.29 23.60 23.95 -.49 | ConAgra 4286 27.73. 27.25 27.33. -.19 Hallibin 24846 29.40 2860 2900 .23| Medimun 5121 3475 3361 3432 +80 Qualcom 18192 38.94 37.87 38.69 -.46 | Tibeostt 2578 971 947 9.68 * XTO Enay 5327 45.62 44.30 45.28 +.34
ApldMatl 30994 18.75 18.42 18.67 -.13|Conexant- 6870 2.18 210 211 -.08 HancFab 57 333-321 323 09 |Medarex If 2210. 1441 1394 1408 -39 QuestCapg 1178 2.99 2.75 2.81 -.01 | Tidwir 1488 46.92 45.36 46.37 +.11 XcelEngy 1434 23.45 22.86 22.98 -.47
AMCC If 3046 «3.66 «3.53 3.56 -.10]/ConocPhil 16040 67.65 66.07 67.42 +1.35 J. i p 15|MedcoHlth - 2340 §387 5290 .5367 +47 | stDiag 1256 51.74 51.25 51.34 -.50 Tiffany 1597 39.39 3841 3851 -.56 Xerox 2160 16.99 16.65 16.73 -.16
AquaAm 1048 23.26 22.50 22.57 -.03}ConorMd 1480 32.33 31.80 31.95 +.19 Hanes ae fri ae ae aD Medtnic 4398 S360 b276 e336 ete | QuestSftif 1465 1472 1428 1466 +.19 THorton gn 2102 31.31 29.44 31.31 42.00 Xilinx . 4888 24.30 23.74” 23.95 -.22
Anes. ABIL 2808 20a2 ret cag | Couseee, (MOB. 2021 1398 20.00 09) Freens 270034343424 3428 4G | MelcoPBLn 3457 21.60 2051 2078 87 {Questar 1037771 7682 77.38 -58| Timewam 27166 2244 2214 2223-19 Yyratex «1941-2138 1940 2122 +82
ia oo oe ie ao ee CoE Ee ee Baa HarleyD 2047 70.50 69.16 69.53 -I:13| Mellonfnc 2172 42.61 41.95 42.21 -.24] QwestCm = 18405 8.38 8.27 835 +06} TWoele 1280 20.30 19.67 19.74 -47 YRCWwde 1056 39.83 39.04 39.12 -.35
arches 2 ee ee ye een 162 A31 47.32 47-63-68) armonyG 3743-1483 1398 1427 -55|MemryPh 2065362 303 337 +23, RFMicD 17242 6926.55 6.65 -44| Ttanmts 1479-2957 2894 29.24 418 Yahoo 64076 2787 2666 2774 +89
m = «1553 58.17 56.87 57.11 -1.06|ConstellA 7192 24.92 24.07 24.41 -.74 y' 953 13.95 14.27 -. RTIIntM 1044.73.28 70.80 71.16 -2.23 68 1132 1165 -.22
Aribainc -:1240-«7.78-=«752.—=«752-~-28|ConstellEn 1165 70°89 6999 7002 .a7|HarrahE | 2507 82.60 82.31 82.47 -.12 | MensW M158 3942 3871 39.23 07 | A ae Tee eae gg Tivoinc = 2972 S47 5.20 $45 +20 Yamanag 8385 1.68 11.32 11.65.22
Arris 2676 13.02 1268 1295 -06|CtiAirB 5247 4581 4434 4471 -96|HarrisCorp 1390 49.33 48.20 48.69 -.14 | MentGr 464 18.76 18.39 18.74 03 | Radosh IAL -30| Todco 1726 33.07 31.80 3265 +.23 YankCdl 1147 34,31 34.20 34.29
ArvMerit 1050 17.86 17.37 17.49 41 | Cooperco. 2091.47.51 45,09 47.01 +1.40| HartfdFn 1605.93.25 91.55 91.67 -1.58 | Merck 10571 45.10 44.18 44.30.81 | Rambus If 3214 19.48 1892 19.17 -33 | ToliBros 2079 31.29 30.65 31.06 +04 ZiCorp 2017 2.32 1.92 2.05 +14
AstraZe 1116 5584 5495 5553 +24|Cooverinds 371 9010 8942 a9'80 32 |Harvsteng 1704 2049 19.70 20.29 -1|MeridGld 1425 2549 2473 25.34 -.23] RangeRs 2051 26.96 25.69 26.27 +58} Totalsas 1477 69.28 6841 6898-34 Zimmer 1210 78.96 77.93 7877 -.05
n . operinds =. 371 5 4 . “. x ill 0 51 91.63 92.00 -.04 | Raytheon 2116 51.92 51.31 51.63 +30 7 x i +32
Athrcnc —-«G147--12.50 10.00 12.06 +234| Coming 20974 19.64 1891 19.04 50| Hasbro 1026 27.50 27.17 27.36 -.17 Merrily ae Hol Eee Mee ctor erate ae AL 1028 133.87 132.55 133.72 -4.05 ZweigTl 1574 5.74460 5.40 3
Atheros 2422 23.14 22.12 23.04 +.51 | Costco 3494 54.24 53.11 53.41 -.66 | Hawaiiél 208 27.34 26.80 26.83 -.57 | Methanx : ; 0g : : as. eae —
. 6 37.68 37.35 37.50 +.01 | Metlife 2252 60.52 59.51 59.80 -71|Realogyn 3533 30.07 29.95 30.02
Pe cee anes nee ean wae ab ie alae Re MRCVREIT. 16I ASST. Aad” goes | Mere 754 Ingo 91 982-88) RedHat 000 2250 10 2224 43 TORONTO STOCKS
Ene Ae der wie ee td en TU caeht Fe Aca oe Healthnys i713 #91 4295 AAT “LOT Micon? 1dr 13681352 1388 “ai RegionsFn 2757 37.82 36.96 37.19 -65/Vol. High Low Close Chg. | Vol. High Low Close Chg.
Avanex 4048 2.12 2.01 2.08 02 | Credsys 2935. 5.10 4.96 499 -12| Hela = 2810. 7.407. mA Ment? dglwres Seer’ ange sagt oe een 150, AGT RSE 1387-23) 2901941 ACEAViationA38.62 38.15 38.32 ~.08 | 1356680 LionoreMng 12.58 12.22 12.36 +09
Nrertnen 1109 UBL. 019 2041 146] Grcag’ tM 182 1888 1908 36 Helnén 1526 3000 2941 2979 413 Micsn 2629 38 352 370 04 RschMatn 13626 14192 13580 14130 4273 1138790 ARCEgyTUn21.00 20.19 20.65 +.46 | 1831668 ManulfeFin 3965 39.09 39.19 ~58
AvisBudget 1732 22.29 22.04 22.25 +1 criincetle 2027, 32.50 31.75 32.09 +04] HelmPays 2602" 23.39 22.95 23.13 +.07 | MillPhar 4358 «11.13 10.76 11.00 -.05 | RetailHT 2960 100.77 99.28 99,38 -1.27 | 5574365 AbitibiCons 2.97 2.90 2.91 -.02] 1092508 MiramarMng 4.93 4.60 4.87 +.11
Avnet 1511 27.26 26.68 26.84 -.26|Crystalxg 3135. 3.81 3.56 3.80 +12|Hemisphrx 1662.28 2.23 2.27 -.03 | Mindspeed = 1539 1.85 1.78 1.80 -05} Revlonrt 2421.10 0708S * 41259049 Alcaninc 53.75 52.21 52.49 -1.61] 1674786 Nexen Inc 61.38 59.33 59.80 -.45
Avon 1398 33.72 33.34 33.45 -.32 | CubistPh 1188 17.54 17.06 17.37 +.29| Herbalife |. 11174 37.97 29.25 29.74 -9.56 | Miramar 1064 ae 3.89 A oe Revlon 2244 1.41 1.33 1.39 +.05 | 1838857 AllianceAtlB 51.82 50.82 51.20 +1.22 | 2438542 NorOriono 4.20. 4.00 4.18 +.14
onsen Jess aks Haat “zee Ieee A ay a Ma Be al SB lReins IG] Gee G2 Alt L6H lasion aummencian ars 2080 =| io NrehewohtnGt2980 2852 2
BBAT Cp 1519 43.66 42.99 43.08 58 | cutogen eae enema | Hewlett? 17315 4227 4148 42.20 +52| Mittalstl 1237 4047 39.76 4001 +01 nw legos ties gq 8 | 1967508 BCE Inc — 31.10 30.19 30.19 -.85} 1557592 NorthgateMin3.72 3.46 3.72 *
BE Aero 1424 27.69 2616 27.21 +.56 : Hilton 4418 34.82 33.86 34.43 +.19| MobileTel 1762 49.80 47.37 47.38 -2.54| Ritenid 8019 559 544 557 +.08| 3108171 BarrickGold 34.67 33.97 34.58 -42] 2705957 NuvoResearch 67 63.65 +.01
BEA Sys if 11323 12.99 12.73 12.87 -.05|DCTIndIn 1533 -11.63 11.40 11.50 -10| HomeDp 21482 40.63 39.72 39.79 -.78| MoneyGrm 1226 30.90 29.74 29,74 -1.44 RockwlAut 1432 60.15 59.32 59,80 -.35 | 5859711 BemaGldo 5.77 5.56 5.75 +.07 | 2359569 PaladinOrdo 7.77 7.45 7.73 +.08
BHP Bilt 4349 37.69 36.88 37.16 5B} DUIADiam 9078 124.50 123.52 123.74 -.94] Honwllinth 3016 45.11 44.29 44,65 -43] Monsanto's 3542 51.37 50.00 51.22 +43 possstrs 1808 31.91 31,00 3141 +201 2526951 BlovallCorp 2549 24.75 25.17 -.18 | ose7gei RasonSysterns1?.96-39.25- 12.66 422
BISYSIf ©1577, 12.71 12.28 12.35 -.35| DPL 1153 27.66 27.37 27.57 -.15| Hospira 1305 34.00 33.70 3385 -11|MonstrWw 1175 47.44 46.58 46.81 -.30 | Rowan 4038 3082 2997 3048 +04 5 aaa ag ao06Fe25 : :
BiSwcs B17 27.03 2630 26.17 +07 | DRHorton 2935 26.25 25.69 25.84 14 HostHotls 1573 24.50 23.88 23.97 53 | Morgstan 4413 81.59 80.36 80.86 -L05} pce prt, 1572 2418 2397 2404 0B| errors oh NeoaaIneccn ana may aap | 1130088 PennWestun33.92 3232 33.79 +.84
BJs Whis 1618 30.18 29.61 29.72 -.83)DRDGOLD 4142 82 75 78 -.03 | HotTopic 1499 11.22 10.83 10.95 -.28| Motorola 162277 19.25 18.00 18,94 -1.61 RylCarb 1108 43.76 4275 4337 43 | 120242 BluePeariMng9.50 9.13 9.47 +12) 2641021 PetroCanadad4.68 43.90 44.54 +42
BMCSft 2299 35.25 34.57 34.92 -.15 DTE 1096 48,70 47.36 47.67 1.10} HovnanE 1015 31.86 31.31 Ji.41 -.39 | MovieGal 1863 3.19296 300-12! Rovnchiia 20606753 GE 6739 1.26 | D569102 BombdrBSV 4.18 4.03 4.06 ~10] 3147091 Railpowero 138 116 128 ~07
BP PLC 3184 65:05 6426 6487 ~14| Danaher 1456 71.75 TOA 71.05 80] HudsCity 4089 14.02 13.92 13,96 09] MurphO 1279 48.50 47.59 48.19 +.20 | RUAIA tome OFA, SEBS TM “L2G | 96337 BreakwaterResl.67 1.61 1.65 ~03] ss41579 RogersCommB35,30 3488 35.10 -35
BT Grp 283 62.31 61.50 61.85 -.67 | Darden 2051 39.74 39.02 39.13 -82| HumGen 1050 12.63 12.26 1231 -19|Mylantab 1020 20.44 20.11 20.28 -.08 OD nl) 923862 CAE Inc 1135 1077 1122 +47 ‘
Baidu.com 2485 124.94 121.98 122.50 -3.50 | Deere 2605 92.20 90.23. 90.89 -1.29] Humana 3915 54.54 52.60 52.98 -2.37 1019426 CalpinePwrnl3,04 12.95 13.03 0 | 2182839 Roval Bnk 85.17 $4.25 54.50 -.60
BakrHu 7060 69.00 67.46 67.77 -51|Dellincif 33378 2653 25.76 26.16 -.08| HuntiB 1879 23.13 22.49 22.67 -.48 | Vv i465 4240 4179 42.11.17 /SAPLINKH 1592.09.00 P 4422 43.12 43.70 63 | 1308208 RoyalHostun 6.55 6.42 6.50 +.04
BcoBrades 1900 41.73 39.70 39.99 -1.74 | Denbury 1761 26.64 26.06 26.55 +.49| HuntBnk 2221 24.05 23.70 23.78 -.22| vera, 1997 2944 2840 2847 24 | SAICN 116 1808 1752 1755 -54| 2298478 CamecoCorp44. . 70 631 1349499 SXRUraniumJ15.09 13.86 14.48 +.23
Bncoltau 1965 36.70 34.92 35.40 -1.15 | DevonE 6756 65.73 63.75 65.32 +1.62| HyperSol 1303 34.66 34.08 34.35 -.32 | NET9 44 28.40, 2847-21) oan 'aG 2354 5368 5283 5337 24| 1483450 CampbellRes 12 10.1 -.01 :
BkofAm 10151 5359 5303 53.24 -43|Diadffs 2770 77.88 75.88 727 +128 aes NRGEY 1565 S867 SH43 GAoL cgo|SBACom — 38442791 27.00 27.33 75| 1404293 CdnNatRail 49.68 48.89 48,99 9] {P0257 SHelcanadads’e WT) AA 08
ea Se a ie ah Pa PaT|NILInh 2703 2478 2397 d4id 36 |SIMCp 2998 4996 4918 49.66 +16 | 3022430 CdnNatRes 55.73 53.88 5491 +53] 1855758 Sherrittintl 1197 1149 11.80 +27
BarnesNb If 1035 40.34 39.95 40.05 -.03| Dginsght 1363 38.56 38.50 38.55 +.03| !ACInter = 2306 37.89 37.28 37.53 -.37 ut . . s14 1680134 ShoreGldo 6.23 5.95 6.10 +.07
Bai ICICI Bk 1653 42.50 41.56 41.90 -.26 | NYMEX n 1459 120.54 117.40 118.86 -2.13 | STMIcro 1186 18.59 18.37 18.39 -.32 | 2532341 CdnOilSndsT29.56 28.47 28.89 +.02
rrPhm 1305 52.49 51.01 52.31 +.91 | Digitas 3463 13.40 13.37 13.37 -.01 o x i. 5 02.39 +7.29 | SabaSoft 1095 7.12 632 6.84 +70 1114500 SthAmerGldo .04 04.04 +.01
Barrick 7268 2950 7890 29.50 -13| pilards 1684 3392 33.08 3331-65] INGGRE . 1385 2255 2132 2188-77) NYSEGpn 13314 10295 96.80 102.39 +7.29 | SabaSoft ‘97 31.89 31.94 ~02 | 1662723 Celestia 9.8 9.0) 955-33) no2a144 SuncorEnay 85.41 8338 85.09 41.7
Baxter 3225 47.00 46.45 46.79 -.19| DirecTV 8006 24.77 24.34 24.36 -.37 | ‘ShBrazil ©7842 46.10 43.85 44.47 -1.63) Naborss 7804 28.78 28.11 28.55 +35 | SabreHold == 1995 31.97 31.89 3194-02) >559975 Coalcorpwto 20. 20.202 * gy 85.41) 83.38" 183.094:
BearSt 1347 162.68" 161.55 162.32 -.32 | Disney 10150 34.44 33.99 34.19 -.28| ISHHK 4074, 16.15 15.87 15.87 -.12 | Nasd1OOTr 117339 43.95 43.48 43.85 -.21 Safeway 8626 33.55 33.14 33.23 -.17 1385356 DenisonMinesi0.95 10.50 10.75 -.06 1617720 TD Bank 69.89 69.15 69.24 -.50
Feangpi CORKS POD eee aa acon 15 2353 2397 +467| iShapan 17886" 14.14 13.98 13.98 -.37 | Nasdaq 3703 33.48 31.97 33.10 +1.21 | Stlude 3949 35.71 34.90 35.00 72 195 10.50 10.75 -.06 | sc51906 TallsmanEgy 1833 17.79 18.18 +20
g DivX n 1247 24.15 23.53 23.97
; i iShMex nya 2690 51.48 49.90 50.05. -1.20 | NatlCity 4615 36.57 35.86 35.90 -67 | StPaulTrav 2062 «53.17 52.34 52.41 ~.69 | 1455467 DuluthMetlso 1.04 = .88_— 95. +.07
BebeStrs 2103 17.76 17.07 17.09 -.18| DobsonCm 2603 8.63 838 8.52 -.01 | IShMex ny 48 49.90 50.05 -1. : ‘ : 1852134 TeckComBSV79.35 77.52 77.82. -.72
BectDck. 1451-7022 69.30 70.00 +15 | DollarG 7923 1717 1638 1648 42 | iShSing 2571 11.39 11.26 11.28 ~14|NOilVarco 3837 56.81 55.61 56.35 +.26 | Saks s 3200 18.47 17.93 18.07 +.11] 3438351 EldoradoGld 6.22 5.75 6.07 +.05
BedBath 3035 38.97 3868 3887 +.09 DilrTree 4079 32.78 30.61 32.03 +1.38| iShTaiwan 3824 14.56 14.39 14.41 -.37 | NatSemi 6384 22.45 21.93 22.03 -.69] Salesforce 2902 39.97 37.10 39.52 +1.64 | 3423362 EnCanaCorp 52.99 51.75 52.59 +.51 | 1047763 Telus Corp 54.00 53.36 53.61 +.09
93 471-490 41 "44 8193 8224 120] iSHSP100 cbo 1113 66.04 64.00 65.77 -.45 | Navios 2142 5.32 5.27 530-01] SanDisk 10354 43.34 41.70 43.30 +1.09 1088325 Theratechnigs7.04 6.58 7.04 +33
BemaGold 6410 4.93 4.71 4.90 +.09|DomRes 2757 83.44 1.93 82.24 -1.20] | i : 1506982 EqnoxMnrlso 1.72 1.63 1.71. +05
BenchElec 1134 25.15 24.75 24.89 -.28 | OmRsBW 76 24.15 23.50 23.95 -.15| ShChin2s 4848 110.36 105.34 105.95 -6.35 | Navistar If 1293 35.65 34.73 35.28 +15 | Sanmina 8547. 3.543.433.4409 a oany EirctNickelo 59 55 59 +04 | 2093300 Tiberono 3,59 356 3.57 -01
BestBuy 12777 51.80 49.77 50.00 +.16| DonlleyRR 1124 36.31 35.68 35.87 -.37 | iShSP500 1219 141.60 140.66 140.91 -1.09 | NektarTh 1927 14.85 14.41 14.52 -.33 | Sanofi 2134 46.32 45.50 45.88 -.17 3 5625. 53 6.00 43.35 | 1490888. TransCdaCorp39.90 38.80 39.19 -.90
BigLots 1382 23.57 22.71 23.22. +.08 | DoralFin 6633 2:50 204 2.22 -.24| IShEmMkt 10858 112.65 110.22 110.23 -3,32 | Netflix 2158 25,34 24.45 24.81 -.54 | Sarat 3659 16.89 16.74 16.84 +.01 | 1615085 FirstQntumo 56.25 53.65 5 3
Bingentdc 2213 5033 4951 49.76 +.01 DowChm 4975 40.00 39.61 39.71 -.39| ISH EAFE 8736 72.79 72.10 72,20 -1.12 | NetwkAp 3958 39.65 38.76 39.07 -.50 | SavientPh 897 11.89 11.45 11.66 -.09 |5314973 Goldcorpinc 30.74 30.00 30.19 -.98 | 1146915 TrueEnergyUn6.83 6.50 6.66 -.09
BioMarin 1587 16.57 16.33 16.51 -.04] DressBns 1180 23.92 2259 2262 -1.37 iShNqBio 1061 79.02 78.28 78.85 +.01'| NeurMtrx 1358 13.83 11.94 12.12 -1.81 | Schergpl 4912 23.70 23.21 23.40 -.32 | 1855533 HudBayMnrlso20.71 20,03 20.69 +.16 | 2958754 UTSEngyCorp4.17 4.10 4.15 7
Biomet 2913 41.69 4148 41.59 +03) DrilQuips 1079 35.24 34.31 34.87 +30) /SRIAV nya 1762 82.08 BIT 81.54 -.65| Neurochg 1245 18.11 16.00 16.50 -1.73 | schimbs 10185 60.07 59.10 59.20 -10 | 1916387 IGMFinancial47.44 45.55 45.97 -1.13] 1372136 WiLaninc 5.65 481 5.53 +63
Seba Tees Pat «PEE Sha beater Re ate ene ee RRNA CALE Seti tees EARS CARTNCEAIEE: OAD ANAES ALLY oe cs Sag eet 2601.39 [541481 ISharesCDNG072.66 72.04 72.30 40] 1013490 XillixTech 07.06.06 ~.01
SNDebiStis 488. FAO 738 2-7 AUT 0B Deter boas eek eat sltle ott) ispakv nya 2553 8012 7859 7872 -164|NYCmtyB 1847 1627 1615 1624 03 sean 1636 1457 1435. 1453 12 | 1484866 lamgoldCorp 9.77 9.50 9,66 -.13| 4723615 YamanaGldo 13,70 13,33 13.53 -.42
BIMunyNYI 42.13.63 13.56 13.63 +.02 Rize ISRAKG nya 2395 78.49 77.24 77.24 -1.64) NY Times 3567 24.16 23.34 24.03 +.69 | Searsidgs 1709 167.78 165.05 166.04 -.96 | 1088488 ImperialOil 40.21 39.07 39.30 -.93 | 1713749 YellowPgsUn13.00 12.77 13.00 +.10
BlockHR = 1112 73.28 22.87 22.95 -33 | ERR Mt he EE ee ee ae ee, Ge fetee Me aiade ogee ae £03) Semin 16682 34.05 3361 3385-34] 1261031 InmetMng 52.13 50.85 51.75 +.98 | 1293139 ZarlinkSemi 275 2.71 2.72 -.04
K 3 ; =, e 5 . 5 “ 5 5 .99 -1, * 5 27 55.08 5519 1.08 | oannrsonratnncn tee seach panndstnnicaioia
Bate caer. aR aa ole Sone eBay TMS HLS 3055 3078 -BL/IsnsPSmi_ 19M G4 GAY 2-73) NewmiM” TI 3.09 ARB A865 35 Se Tee eno: coabl eLBO 454 DIVIDENDS ©
i EGL Inc 7.92 37.50 37.57 -.46] ITTCorps 1563 58.05 56.79 57.68 +.79| NewsCp 46 2114 21. . :
Bovdom, 1480 4693 Agus Aeaz tor {EMCCp 24383 13.75 1342 1361 +08| tcagen” 1296150 107 L40 +26 | NewsCpB 54292229 2211 2222 +06 4 |gem eee cer gery ine
Brandyw 1087 32.52 31.95 32.08 -.4g | E0G Res 6477 63.00 60.90 62.68 +1.98| ITWs 2292 46.28 45.68 46,00 -.17 | NexCen 1191 8.50 7.84 8.34 +37 ShawGi 1059 32.70 31.63 31.88 -82 FRIDAY DIVIDENDS DECLARED REGULAR
mace, 12 Gi Sbt Gap ip/GMk 2 LES in MIL el a) teem sla a ee re SL AR cantons OAS RT
it p b f 63 -.22 | Imclone , 5 -12 Isource , 5 f _ riod rate record able ‘
CT ee ee a | ccoab 1333 44.22 43.76 43.96 +01] Immucrs 1653 32.38 31.52 31.96 -.39 | NikeB 1828 99-41 97-70 98.83 +.16| SiderNac 1354 29.15 28.04 28.76 62 IRREGULAR ae Laidlaw Int'l Q 7 be
Brinkers 1533 30.54 29.84 30.30 +.38 H SierrPac 928 17.05 16.56 16.64 -43
BrMySq 7949 26.73 26.05 26.18 -.51 | Edisonint 2307 «44.98 43.75 43.98 -.94| ImunoGn 56 5.05 «4,90 4,95 -.09 ante at Ce 70.42) 71.44 +67 SigmaDg if 1268 2447 2340 23.59 74 Fairfax FnelHidgs . 275 125 2-8 6Movado Group Q .06 1-17 1-31
Brdcomsif 21161 3280 3197 3250 -107|ElPasoCp 5756 14.74 1450 14.57 -.06| ImpacMtg 1101 8.82 8.69 8.78 +12 | NobleEn 408 48.05 46.62 47.78 +.68 772 3800 41 | Sabine Royalty Tr 2838 1-16 1-30 Nisource inc 3h B20
Bredecm 8917 840 804 836 +26 | Elan 4014 14.07 13.61 13.68 -.39| Indusinth 3321. «3.83 «3.76 «3.81 -+.05| NokiaCp 33496 19.97 19.69 19.84 -1.08 | SlgmAls WM 38.75 37.7 7 AL INCREASED Q
BroncoDrl 1242 15.38 1454 1456-64 | EldorGldg — 1620 5.30 4.76 5.16 4.05} Infineon 1274 14.07 13.86 1395 -.25] Nordstrm 2658 $2.26 51.15 51.28 -98 seed 13 a a a on Compass Diversif T3018 1.24 Northwest NaturalGas Q 355 1312-15
Br. LAN «dt ae dae Te Fecits 5158 5363 528 5307 ad Iason's i018 573 ead B49 a2 Norte fs wu 2580 2546 355 3 Slenware 1502771 728 746-22 INITIAL Otient-Express Hotels Q .025 1-19-25
eta LoL Zi 5s | ie 3790 27.23 26.63 26.68 -.34| Infosys , 1472 5550 54.64 5514-26 | Norirst 1575 61.35 59.95 59.97 -.80| SilvStdg 1466 28.90 27.60 2857 -.71 Due Bret Ce Q a zi at Pacific Cap Bncp = 22 2B DB
Emdeon 4154 12.67 12.50 12.60 +.03] IngerRd 2385 39.62 39.00 39.39 +.64 | NthfldLb 1607 4.42 4.02 4,03 -.36 | SilvWhtng 3248 9.44 9,06 9.43.17 SpectraEnergyCp Q_ . “WS TSR Inc Q 08 «2225
CA Inc 3739 24.51 23.78 24.04 ~.07 | EmersnEls 1839 43.72 43.18 43.48 -.38| InputOut 1089 12.80 12.45 12.64 +.05] NthgtMg 5255 3.17 2.95 3.10 -07|Smplich 1551 12.62 11.77 11.96 -.68 ys) CORRECTION wertadveetes Q 0375 118 Lt
CBRElliss: 1369 33.60 32.80 33.10 -.24| EnCana 4466 45.18 44.00 44.87 +.71| IntgDv 3007 15.59 15.28 15.51 -.15| Northrop} 1473 67.55 66.23 67.28 +.33| Sina 1658 31.46 30.70 31.09 +03} CBRichardéllisGrp x .125 1-16 sists Goaceaannde
CBRLGrp 1032 45.50 45.00 45.07 -.39|EncysiveP 2747 4.10. 3.88 4.04 +.11| Intel 62345 21.15 20.76 21.10 -.07 | Novartis 1950 59.48 58.92 59.25 +.27| Siriuss 49444 «3.85 «3.70 3.80 +03 x- Co did not declare this dividend, g- payable in Canadian fun





TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7E

Baptist Sports Council to



hold AGM ahead of season

Plans for coming
year to be outlined

THE Baptist Sports Council
earing up for another great
ear.

_ But before it gets started,
the executive board will host
its annual general meeting on
Saturday at the Bahamas Bap-
tist College, Jean Street, when

is 2

o
c

“<

they hope to bring all of the ©

participating churches and
those wishing to participate to
be updated on its plans.

At the AGM, which starts
at 10am director Brent Stubbs
will give his address and trea-
surer Olympia Morris will pro-
vide a financial report.

It is expected that the Rev.
Everette Brown, the youth
minister for the Bahamas
National Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention,
and the Rev. Derick Munroe,
president of the Baptist
Young People's Fellowship,
will bring remarks.

sabes ene eb eee eeeeneeaen bed



During the AGM, Stubbs
will also outline the plans for
the new year, including the
Rev. Clinton Minnis Family
Fun Run/Walk Race that will
kick off the new year's sport-
ing calendar on Saturday, Jan-
uary 27, and the Rev. Tyrone

Knowles Basketball Classic .

that starts on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 3.

Application forms for the
road race and registration for
the basketball classic will take
place at the same time. A $5
fee for all participants in the
road race and $100.00 per

Falcons put
brakes on

Machines

PRINCE Williams Falcons in
action against St Augustine’s Col-
lege Big Red Machines yesterday.

The Falcons never looked back
after opening up a 26 point lead in
the first quarter and eventually
closed the game with a score of 73-

42.
e SEE STORY

ON SPORTS FRONT

(Photos: Tim Clarke)





teenee Lek eedecdedeedbb anes bb edd assed eases en edd sede aceneeneasededbedeasesssenasenswenar ns es hen gene

team plus $5 per player in bas-
ketball will be charged.

As was the case last year
when the BSC honoured some
of the persons who made
invaluable contributions to the
league since its re-vilalisation
in 2000 - Rey. Harrison
Thompson, Minister Dereck
Munroe, Deaconess Joanne
Webb and Minister Clinton
Minnis - Stubbs said they
intend to continue in that vain
this year.

However, he said the focus
will be placed on some of the
past executives, who con-



tributed to the growth and
development of the league pri-
or to 2000.

While he revealed that the
road race will be named in
honour of Minnis (the imme-
diate past youth director, who
helped to re-established the
BSC in 2000) and basketball
in honour of Knowles; they
also intend to honour Bradley
Moxey in cycling; Rev. Hart-
man Nixon in volleyball; Rev.
George Bodie in track and
field and Deacon Lennox
Greene in softball.

Stubbs said its important
that they take the time out to
give these men and women
their just rewards while they
are alive because it not only
lets them and their family
know that they appreciate the
contribution that they made,
but it also provides those per-
sons who participate with a

NAR bE RHONA NADA OOO ES AMANO AREER EEA RA ADEN BORG RO eA EER EE EEE E RHEE ECR Ey

better appreciation of those
who paved the way.

While 2006 was another suc-
cessful year, Stubbs said they
are hoping to double the size
of the teams and ultimately
the number of participants in
all of their disciplines this year.

He publicly thanked his cur-
rent executive board, com-
prising of assistant director
Joyce Minis, secretary Nicola
Major, treasurer Olympia
Mossi, special projects officer
Renee ‘Sunshine' Sweeting
and softball commissioner
Frank 'Pancho' Rahming.

_ Special commendation was
-also given to Van Hutchinson,
who headed the basketball
officiating; BACO for their
- officiating of the road race;
Crystal Forbes and Tom 'the

Bird' Grant Sr and Jr in vol-:

leyball and Carlton ‘Carlie’
Ingraham, who headed the

de senabeneeee bedeeeeeeeb este enebenaes bebeb bee eteeeuee beebeseeeenee

abe eadeaeennsaeaaes

officiating team in softball, as

well as Arthur Pritchard for
the upkeep of the softball
field.

Stubbs said he hopes that

-others will see the need to

come along and join the exec-
utive board to help make the
BSC the most vibrant recre-
ational sporting league in the
country. Those interested can
attend the meeting on Satur-
day and fill those vacant exec-
utive positions.

Outside of the school sys-
tem, the BSC is the only
organisation in the country
that provides a full compli-
ment of sporting activities for
all ages throughout the year.
The programme runs from the
end of January to the end of
November with sporting activ-
ities held every Saturday
between the hours of 10am
and 4pm.

bbb beeeeeee rerrrrrry Paeben neh eeebsebseeaenabedoees











a
| vm lovin’ it. |

| } | } ' \ \ ia
; \ , . | fy ae ine

HIGH of) TE TAPER IN Gin

<< m | The Miami Hera

BAHAMAS EDITION ! ane:

“Sie
i)

== Lhe Tribune















Volume: 103 No.40

Bahamas banker's
group to acquire
Film Studios

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION







UESDAY, JANUARY9,2007.. ae



Cruise ship
mb scare

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

TOURISM | stakeholders
across the country breathed a
sigh of relief yesterday after
learning that reports of military-
grade explosives being found
aboard a Nassau-bound cruise
ship were false.

US authorities were on high
alert after Miami-Dade police
infercepted a bag believed to
contain the plastic explosive C4
as it was about to be placed
onboard the vessel.

The Royal Caribbean’s
Majesty of the Seas was docked
at Terminal H at the port of Mia-
mi when officials were alerted
about the suspicious package.

The package was tested six
times, and each time it registered
positive for C4 —a common form
of plastic explosives.

Because of how easy it is to
use the compound, and its result-
ing destructive power, C4 has
gained notoriety with terrorists
_ and guerilla fighters the world
over.

However, after exploding the



package, bomb experts discov-
ered that it was not explosives
that were inside the package, but
sprinkler equipment,

Reportedly, there was a com-
pound in the sprinkler equip-
ment, similar to that used in the
production of plastic explosives,
which confused the port’s scan-
ning equipment.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Port Comptroller Cap-
tain Anthony Allens said that
such searches are a testament to
the rigid screening that Interna-
tional Ship and Port (ISP) facili-
ties must adhere to, This, he said,
is in keeping with the security
code implemented by the Inter-

national Maritime Organization *

(IMO) in 2004,

He also advised that the
Bahamas also has its own screen-
ing equipment to check packages
such as this, and that the port has
its own set of strategic plans in
place for such eventualities,

“That is what the ISP code
calls for, that every port facility

SEE page 10

Police declare ‘zero tolerance’
on illegal numbers games

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ CONDEMNING gambling houses as the origin of such crimes as
murder and coercion, police yesterday declared “zero tolerance” on ille-
‘gal numbers games,

Assistant Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson, officer in-
charge of crime, speaking at the annual Meet the Press event, said that
capital offences often have their genesis in numbers rackets.

“There was a time, not so long ago when a day’s work was expected
for a day’s pay. Not so anymore. Too many of us want to gamble our
way to success by playing games of chance and living on the proceeds
thereof,” he said addressing the media at the new comstat room at
police headquarters.

SEE page 10






























DEAR (|
A14" Brookiys Style Pizza; stretched
thin ond cut into 6 big slices. It's got extra large,
pepperoni or sausage toppings, perfect for
folding. You've got to fold a slice this big.

Try it today!

swf REE

2-liter CocaCola | ae
with the purchase ~4.(99"
of every ae
Brooklyn Style Pizza's

(ra FTL)











Reported cases
of incest double

W By PAUL TURNQUEST

‘ Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE have revealed that
reported cases of incest have

ep Ris rnc)

@ THE released man

had been foundwith a

shot gun, and "skimask"

and 13 live rounds of

7 ammunition,

(Photo; Ana-Bianca
Marin)

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE man suspected of
armed-robbery and who
police thought could be a
possible link into the crimi-
nal activity that continues
to plague the Farm Road
community was released
from police custody. He is
no longer under suspicion.
The 28-year-old resident
of Flamingo Gardens, who
was found in the Flint
Street area — where the
two deadly shootings took
place in the past weeks —
harbouring a shot gun, a
"ski mask" and 13 live
rounds of ammunition, by
officers from Operation
Quiet Storm, was taken into
police custody and regarded
as a criminal, despite evi-
dence to the contrary,
After being released the |
man visited The Tribune to
give "his side of the story",

SEE page 10


























,-

Reported
complaints
against police
up by 12%

m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

REPORTED complaints
against the police during the
year 2006 showed a 12 per
cent increase compared to
complaints made in 2005, says
Supt Franklyn Dames.

Supt Dames was address-
ing the media on statistics of
the Complaints and Corrup-
tion Branch for 2006 in the
police's annual report to the
press,

"During the year 2006,
there were a total of 283 com-
plaints made against the
police, compared to 253 dur-”
ing the year 2005, which was

SEE page 10













}
;
i
i
;
:

3
}
}





increased by more than 100 per
cent in 2006 over the 2005 fig-
ures.

According to force’s prelimi-
nary report on crime, this sig-
nificant increase was predomi-
nantly inflicted upon children
averaging no more than 13
years of age. ,

The average age of their
assailants, the report revealed,
was 29,

“It is important to note that
fathers are the leading suspects
in incest matters, accounting for
13 (or 57 per cent), This is fol-
lowed by brothers, uncles, and
cousins with five, three, and two

reported matters respectively,” —

the report revealed.

The Carmichael and Central
Divisions have the highest
reports of incest, with four each.

‘Grand Bahama followed with:

three cases, which tied with the

South-eastern Division.

“The.occurrence of incest in
the Bahamian community has
significantly increased. During
2006, 23 matters were reported
as compared to 11 matters in
2005, and a 92 per cent increase
from the 12 matters in 2004.

“Alternatively, reports of
unnatural sex have decreased
42 per cent from 12 in 2005 to
seven in 2006. The detection
rate for incest matters also show
an increase with seven (58 per
cent) in 2004, nine (82 per cent)
in 2005, and 91 per cent in 2006
representing 21 cases,” the
report stated.

Also, there were three vic-
tims who were involved in mul-
tiple sexual offence matters.
Similarly three suspects were in
multiple sexual offences,

SEE page 10

Increase of 619 traffic
accidents in 2006

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter:





DRIVERS became increasingly impatient, discourteous, and less
friendly towards each other in 2006, with the result that there was an
overall increase of 619 traffic accidents in the Bahamas compared
with the previou. year, said police yesterday,

This came despite a concerted effort on. behalf of the police that year
to educate the public about road safety, it was admitted.

However, there was a silver lining to this cloud, as despite the over-
all hike in traffic accidents, the number of fatal incidents diminished,

Among the unfortunate deaths that were recorded, men died ata
higher rate than women in all categories, whether as drivers, pedestrians
or passengers — in line with traditional expectations,

19-year-old is
beaten to death

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport

Reporter

FREEPORT - The sisters of
Felix Mitchell are in shock over
the “senseless” murder of their
brother who was beaten to
death less than 50 yards away
from his home, Mitchell’s death
is Grand Bahama’s first mur-
der for the year,

According to family mem-

bers, Felix,, 19, the third



youngest of 20 children, had @ FELIX MITCHELL
made plans to go into West End

on Sunday evening. He was

awaiting his ride at a corner out- SEE page 10



F idelity Free Financial Planning

(or: | | i coker: Naame DE IDELITY |

Nassau: T 356.7764 @ Freeport



\\



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5B



Tourism arrivals fall

8.5 per cent in Q3_

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



TOURISM arrivals to the Bahamas
declined by 8.5 per cent to 1.04 million
during the 2006 third quarter, reversing
the previous year’s growth of 3.5 per cent,
with big declines experienced in New Prov-
idence and Grand Bahama.

The Central Bank of the Bahamas’
review of third quarter economic activity
found that air traffic in the three months to
September 30, 2006, dropped by 7 per cent
to 333,737, as opposed to a 12.8 per cent

gain in 2005.

a During the same period, sea arrivals,
-’ which accounted for 67.8 per cent of visi-
tors, fell by 9.2 per cent to 702,789.

The Central Bank said New Providence
received 60.3 of the third quarter’s arrivals,
_ but saw the total number drop by 9.4 per

cent due to 7.1 per cent and 10.7 per cent
declines in air and sea arrivals respective-
ly.

, Grand Bahama saw a 24.5 per cent fall in
visitor arrivals, with air and sea arrivals
off 9.5 per cent and 30.5 per cent respec-
tively. Due to increased cruise arrivals, the
Family Islands, though, saw.a 2.9 per cent
rebound.

’ The data is likely to revive concern that
the Bahamas is losing its competitive edge
and attraction for visitors, both higher
spending stopovers and cruise passengers.
However, fears of hurricanes are likely to
have prevented many from travelling dur-
ing the third quarter.

Also showing declines was the fisheries
sector, with export volumes down by 35
per cent during the third quarter to one
million pounds.

As a result, the industry’s earnings fell by

41.1 per cent to $16.8 million compared to
the same period in 2005.

The Central Bank said: “Crawfish export
receipts, which accounted for 97 per cent of
total sales, slackened by 40.9 per cent to
$16.3 million, with a 33.9 per cent drop in
volume.

“A similar pattern was observed for the
first nine months of 2006, as fisheries
export volumes decreased by 28.3 per cent
to 2.8 million pounds, while receipts were
reduced by 31.7 per cent to $41.5 million.”

Data from banks, insurance companies
and the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation
showed that the total value of mortgage

loans made during the 2006 third quarter .

rose by 11.3 per cent to $179.5 million,
compared to the previous year, boosting
the construction industry.

Most of this total was for residential
housing, which saw total loans rise by 15.4

Government NHI secrecy ‘is alarming’

FROM page 1B

released into the public domain.

These claims, it added, caused
“the truth of the limited actu-
arial review [to be] stretched
past the breaking point”.

The Tribune had previously
reported that the [LO itself
acknowledged the report was
of “fairly limited scope”. The
report reiterated a number of
concerns previously expressed
by Bahamian private sector
and medical groups over NHI’s
financing, costs and adminis-
tration, something that the
employers’ organisation picke¢
up on in its latest news bu-
letin.

BECon said: “The levelof
secrecy in Government Is
alarming. It is unconscion*ble
that Government has yd to
release all of the releant
reports and facts on the pro-
posed National Health nsur-
ance scheme to the Bajamian

-_ public.

* Although these repeats have
not been released;Goernment
is using them for prgaganda
purposes as we can s¢.from the
example of the ILO 2port. The
misinformation beng dished
out are half-truth and erro-
neous statements,which bring
to mind the quotdrom Austin
O'Malley: "Thos who think it

For thestories
ern rom ul
new;, read

eke ]p) me)
Mcndays.










Win §







‘Top ten finalists will be notified by January 19 via email.
Finalists will present cheir essays before a panct of judges Saturday, February 24, 2007, at the
Sunshine Insurance headquarters on Shirley Surect.

is permissible to tell white lies
soon grow colour-blind." It is
frightening, isn't it?” :

BECon noted that the ILO
said its report was confined to
an analytical and technical
review of the studies performed
by the Government, particular-
ly in calculating the contribu-
tion rates.

The ILO noted that further
work was needed, and con-
firmed previous warnings on the
plan’s costs, finding that the 5.3
per cent contribution rate will
in future have to “significantly”
increase to cope with the extra
medical demands of an ageing
population.

BECon said: “This statement
confirms the conclusion of
Nadeem Esmail of the Fraser

Institute, on page 11 of his
report commissioned by the
Nassau Institute, which is avail-
able on BECon's website,
where he states that: ‘The
Bahamas' current health care
programme is more costly than
those found in any other devel-
oped nation except for the US,
once the relatively small pro-
portion of Bahamians over age
65 is accounted for’.”

BECon also. pointed out that
the ILO report was only
released by the Government
once it became clear that the
document was likely to come
into the public domain.

This was a result of BECon’s
pressure, and the fact that it is
recognised as the voice of the
employer for the Bahamas.

Rent/Lease
Small Offshore Company

urgently requires
office space to rent/lease
in downtown area. approx

1,000 square feet.

Telephone: 323-7460/2



2)06 EC SIFE @ Sunshine Insurance

SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION |

How would YOU ahi ,
boost the Bahami N
post the en ®

Essay Contest Rules:
@ Explain how you would improve the Bahamian economy

@ Competition open to all High School sophomores, juniots and seniors
@ Essays should be 500-1000 words
®@ Essays should he double-spaced

@ Submissions will be accepted via email at kawwoodO7@elmira.edu

Deadline: Monday, January 15, 2007

Please include your name, home address, telephone number and personal email. address with your exsay submission.

Elinira College will hold an Open House at the Sunshine Insurance healquarcers during the
comperition for all interested in studying at the College.

For more information, please contact:

Fran Wilson, Dicector of Serwhine Insurance, 242-394-0013
Mike Ragers, Assistant to the President, Horira College, O04- 735-1804

Elmira College Seudents In Free Enterprise (EC SIFE} create sustainable positive change by impenviag businesses
and organizations through teaching and practicing the principles of free enterprise,

) towards an Elmira College education



<

—

LE

4

























per cent to $165.6 million, while commer-
cial real estate loans dropped by 21.9 per
cent to $13.9 million.

Mortgage. commitments for new con-
struction and repairs,.though, an indicator
of forward-looking activity, fell by 36.9 per .
cent to 335, while their value also fell to
$39.4 million.

Residential loan approvals declined in
number by 36.5 per cent to 323, with their
value dropping by a similar percentage to
$35.9 million.

Total outstanding mortgages increased
by 18.3 per cent to $2.432 billion. .

During the 2006 third quarter, domestic
credit grew by 3.6 per cent to $6.525 billion,
with private sector credit rising by 4.4 per
cent. Residential mortgages, personal over-
drafts and consumer credit grew by 4.7 per
cent, 6.6 per cent and 3.9 per cent respec-
tively.

and share your story.



PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR -
SENIOR ASSOCIATES



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,

campaigning for

improvements in the
area or have won an
award. f
If so, call us on 322-1986 |




PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer

literate.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
others area of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high

and provident fund benefits.

performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:



Qualifications:

Human Resources Partner

PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANE

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager

Bahamas

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).

Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.
Sound experience in global capital markets
Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development

processes.

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual

stock picks

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience
Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgroynds.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux @ FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thnks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

LNG regulations :

Legal Notice

NOTICE |

HARIMAU RISINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of HARIMAU RISINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EVIMAR HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
EVIMAR HOLDINGS’ LIMITED has _ been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
* (Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DEDRIE ALPS INC.

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DEDRIE ALPS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FLORISSA HILL
INVESTMENTS LID.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
| Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
FLORISSA HILL INVESTMENTS LID. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

«

ST. JOSEPH INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
| Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
ST. JOSEPH INVESTMENTS LID. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MISTY SKY INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution. of MISTY SKY INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.

—ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

DRIVEN POWER LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
DRIVEN POWER LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

JUMPSTART REWARDS INC.

—o—

given that in accordance with
of the International Business
Companies 2000, the dissolution of
JUMPSTART REWARDS INC. has __ been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

Notice
Section

is hereby
138 (8)
Act

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WIMPOLE LID.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of WIMPOLE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRUFFLEY |
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution —of
TRUFFLEY INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued |

and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE TRIBUNE



completed by
February end

FROM page 1B

construction in either nation
until all approvals are in from
both jurisdictions.

“When Ocean Express first
requested an extension of time,
it anticipated that Bahamian
approval of, the non-jurisdic-
tional facilities would soon be
forthcoming,” AES pleaded to
FERC.

“As a result of unexpected
delays, however, including the
time required for the develop-
ment and issuance of regula-
tions to govern the operation,
construction and decommis-
sioning phases of Bahamian
LNG facilities, formal Bahami-
an approval has not been issued.

“Ocean Express understands

Armed robberies of businesses

that the Bahamian government
is now undertaking a final
review of the regulations to gov-
ern LNG facilities, and that this
process will soon be complete.”

Denying AES’s motion to
extend the project completion
deadline would, the company
said, “cause Ocean Express to
lose millions already invested
and deprive gas and electric cus-

tomers in the southeastern '

Florida area of much needed
access to additional supplies of
competitively priced gas”. -

ve

r 2 @

e

eo.
.

The AES LNG terminal on :

Ocean Cay would re-gas LNG

brought by ship to the island in ©

liquid form. A 95-mile pipeline
would then take some 842,000

dekatherms of LNG to Florida *)*.-_’

a

per day, where it will supply the elit

state’s electricity needs.

fall 38 per cent during 2006

FROM page 1B

taken was valued at an estimat-
ed $313,876.

CDU officials said it would
be vital to improve their intelli-
gence and capabilities, intensify
their presence in robbery hot
spots, and increase the targeting

of serious and serial offenders “

to reduce armed robberies.

The police also reported that.

in 2006, shop break-ins
increased by 4 per cent. CDU
records indicated that there
were 1,377 break-ins, with the
preferred items of choice for

thieves being DVD players, ..”

computers and jewellery.

Legal Ndice
NOTICE
MAWAR INVESIVIENT LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as folows:

(a) MAWAR INVESTMENT LT). is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisiot; of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Cmpanies Act 2000.

2
t

The, dissolution of the said compny commenced

on the 4th January, 2007 when thcArticles of
Dissolution were submitted to andegistered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said companys; Dizame
Consulting S.A., Pasea Estate, Roacfown,

Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 9th day of January, A.D. 2007

Dizame Consulting S.A.
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

GARDINER LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sction
138 (8) of the International Business Companie Act
2000, the dissolution of GARDINER LID. his been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has beenissued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Rgister.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FOREA HOLDINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance vith
Section 138 (8) of the International Busiess
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
FOREA HOLDINGS LTD. has been completeg a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

tte wow mw oe





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7B



ae an ee eee
Kerzner closing in on
Hurricane Hole plaza

FROM page 1B

Ed Fields, vice-president of
public affairs for Kerzner
international (Bahamas), said
in an e-mailed response to The
Tribune’s inquiries: “On the
matter of Hurricane Hole, we
have no comment at this time.”

This indicates that while no
agreement may have been
sealed, something is likely to be
in the works. Mr Fields did not
flat-out deny the reports of
Kerzner International’s inter-
est in the plaza, indicating that
the two parties may have
reached an agreement in prin-
ciple and are close to complet-
ing negotiations, although noth-
ing is set in stone yet.

Several'retailers based in the
plaza have expressed concerns

to The. Tribune over whether:

they would fit in with Kerzner
International’s plans for the
location, and whether the
Atlantis and;One & Only
Ocean Club owner would make
it uneconomic for them to
remain in the'plaza by increas-
ing rental rates.

A Kerzner International
acquisition of the Hurricane
Hole. Shopping Plaza would
make logical and strategic sense
for the company, though.

The plaza is one of the few
remaining plots of land between
Atlantis and the Hurricane
Hole Marina that it does not

own. Club Land’Or, One Mari-
na Drive and the Paradise
Island Ferry Terminal are also
owned separately.

‘Kerzner International
acquired the Hurricane Hole
Marina, the nearby condomini-
ums and 11 acres of surrounding
land for $23 million in June
2005, giving it control of all the
‘main waterborne access points
to Paradise Island.

The marina was purchased
from Driftwood and its finan-
cial backer, Lehman Brothers’
private equity arm, but the Hur-
ricane Hole Shopping Plaza’s
ownership was different,
Among its owners is believed
to be Emanuel Alexiou, an
attorney and principal in A.F.
Holdings, owner of the Colina
group of companies.

Kerzner International is
understood to have long been
interested in the Hurricane
Hole Shopping Plaza, and its
acquisition would enable it to
be redeveloped to fit in with the
company’s plans to redevelop
the marina and surrounding
area.

Among the retailers current-
ly operating in the plaza are the
News Cafe, an Italian restau-
rant that shares the News cafe’s
ownership, a Solomon’s Mines
outlet, two food stores, another
restaurant and a mix of outlets
catering to tourists. Several
have expressed concerns about
whether they will have to vacate
the plaza.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ANGSANA INVESTMENT LTD.

| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ANGSANA INVESTMENT LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under'the provisions of Section’137-(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 4th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Dizame
Consulting S.A., Pasea Estate, Road Town,

Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 9th day of January, A.D. 2007

Dizame Consulting S.A.
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MORETON VISTA
INVESMENTS LTD.

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

| Section : 138 (8) of

the

International Business

| Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of MORETON
| VISTA INVESMENTS LTD. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the

‘Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HORIZON INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act

2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on January
8,2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of
2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Kerzner International is plan-
ning to redevelop the Hurri-
cane Hole Marina in partner-
ship with New York-based
Island Global Yachting once
government approvals are
obtained, the latter’s chairman
and chief executive, Andrew
Farkas, told The Tribune last
month. This newspaper has
been told that a June 2007 start

’ date for the marina is being

eyed.

Meanwhile, Canadian tele-
coms provider Nortel Net-
works said yesterday that
Kerzner International had
selected it to provide in-house
telecoms services for guests at
the Cove Atlantis, the 600-
room all-suite hotel due to
open in March 2007 as part of
the Phase III expansion.

Nortel said the Cove would
be equipped with its hospitali-
ty messaging system, provid-
ing guests and staff with access
to instant messaging for mini-
bar management, housekeep-
ing/room service and automat-
ic wake-up.

Each suite in the Cove will
have a minimum of two IP
phones to provide gateways to
information about tours, con-
certs and Atlantis events. The

Nortel facilities will include ©

VoIP, and expand on the IP
network currently installed
within Atlantis and the One &
Only Ocean Club.

The Cove will use Nortel
Contact Centre solutions at an
in-house contact centre, featur-
ing of 40 to 45 Atlantis-
employed agents, supporting
guests' needs for booking
restaurants, tours or casino
tables. Guests will receive real-
time responses through a vari-
ety of communication vehicles
such as IP telephony, while low-

» ering total cost of ownership

> and creating a simplified man-

agement:environment. bel

A ‘Personal Butler’ service
for guests staying at the Cove's
high-end, luxury suites - Pent-
house, Presidential, Sapphire or
Azure Suites - will be able to
message staff through mobile
handsets to receive real-time
service regardless of location
within the resort.

“When completed, The Cove
Atlantis will truly be one of the
most high-tech resorts in the
Caribbean with the latest com-
munications technology specif-
ically designed to support the
resort's business objectives for
delivering an exemplary guest
experience," said Norberto
Milan, vice-president, Enter-
prise Networks, Nortel
Caribbean and Latin America.

“Nortel's care in blending the
new communications capabili-
ties at The Cove with the exist-
ing Atlantis resort ensures the
same level of personalisation,
and service excellence is main-
tained through the entire com-
plex."

"Kerzner International is
known worldwide for provid-
ing excellence in service for our
guests, including advanced tech-
nological solutions to help make

Pricing Information As Of:






Benchmark

Fidelity Bank

Famguard
Finco

Focol

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson






G2wk-Hi 52wk
74.30
10.14




10.00









Re

RAINE
S2wk-H





Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bahk
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
FirstCaribbean

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
mbol

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Bahamas Supermarkets



INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

NOTICE OF VACANCY

2nd chef for The Landing Restaurant, Harbour Island.

‘Applicant must have working knowledge of preparation of

|| “Sydney” cuisine with at least 5 years experience working in

Australian kitchens. Successful applicant will be able to devise

and prepare daily specials. Successful applicant will also be
fully responsible for the preparation of all desserts.



their stay more, comfortable,"
said Rick Garvin, chief infor-
mation officer at Kerzner Inter-
national.

“The Cove will open with
superb service levels, and
through our collaboration with
Nortel, those high service levels
will include streamlining com-
munications for our guests,
allowing us to promote addi-
tional services such as event and
tour booking and real-time
updates on guest room house-
keeping status.









The Landing has 10 year reputation for its fine cuisine with
| a distinctive Australian accent. Applicant must be adaptable,
friendly and professional.




All responses can be sent to:







“Nortel's solutions are also The Landing
helping to lower operational Chef Position
costs by increasing staff pro- P.O. Box 190
ductivity with the ability to stay Harbour Island
in touch on work assignments Bahamas
through mobile communica- Fax: 242-333-2650




tions access wherever they are

in the resort." e-mail: thelanding@ coralwave.com



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of

GLOBAL FEE |
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated
recovery management. The successful candidate will also be
responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
management, maintenance of all fee agreements, as well as
document management including filing and imaging of
correspondence. eg ae eee | .

Eel

4 PAETRANTIC

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting,
Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three
(3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution.

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution,
communication, organization and pc skills. The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

Email: betty.roberts @citigroup.com

Deadline for application is Monday, January 12, 2007.



Slain




3.64%]
3.24%
2.63%
3.43%
3.97%
2.40%
2.11%
§.42%|
0.84%
0.00%
4.15%
4.74%
3.53%


























st Price Weekly Vol.
14.00
10.00

0:20













Div $ Yield %

52wk-Low Fund Name
. ‘ : 1.3216 1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund 1.321687
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company 3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G &| Fund —-2.9449""* :
2.6002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.600211"*

are required on or before the 8th day of February, 2007 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.

1.2074 1,.207411****

11.2696

1.1442
spd 9i 0900

Colina Bond Fund
come Fund






* = 29 December 2006

YIELD - last 12 month dividande divided by closing price
Bld $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price ~ Last traded over-the-counter price

Weokly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
NAV - Not Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1094 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
62wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
§2wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks o
Previous Close ~- Previous day's weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume

Change ~ Change In closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**~ 31 December 2008

*** - 30 November 2006

January 8, 2007

“** . 30 November 2006



ALISA RICHARDSON
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

** ~ 30 November 2008



CROR VIGNE



ALE OOLINA:





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

Fraud complaints

Counterfeit

currency
seizures on

increase valu

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE amount of counter-
feit money in Bahamian and
US currency seized by police
increased in 2006.

According to the latest
police statistics, $44,634 was
confiscated last year, mark-
ing a 19 per cent increase
over the $37,582 seized in
2005.

Police said the quality of ©

the counterfeit bills was
poor, which indicated the
vast majority were locally

produced by inexperienced.

persons using inferior tech-
nology.

The value of counterfeit
US bills quadrupled last
year up to $32,736 compared
to $6,886 the year before.

According to financial
investigators, most of these
funds originated out of the
US, Panama and the
Bahamas.

Police attributed the

increase in counterfeit |

seizures to several factors,
particularly the fact that
there has been increased

_ training provided to the

business community by
financial investigators.

Grand Bahama officials
noted there was a decrease
in the amount of Bahamian
counterfeit currency in cir-
culation.

Elsehwhere, the police |

noted that in 2006, seizures |

of counterfeit DVDs and
CDs from roadside vendors
decreased by 62 per cent.

Officers said that in 2005,

5,550 items were seized |
compared to the 2,088 |

seized Jast year.

Police also reported that |

87 persons were victims of ||
ATM fraud as.a result of |

skimming, and more than
$100,0000 was stolen.

@ POLICE Commissioner
Paul Farquharson speaks
yesterday during the annual
press briefing by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

(Photo: Tim Clarke/
Tribune Staff)









» THE TRIBUNE





e rises by $6m

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

ALTHOUGH the volume of fraud
complaints decreased by 47 per cent in
2006, the dollar value involved increased
by more than $6 million, with $5 million of
that coming from a single company.

During the annual press briefing by the |: '

Royal Bahamas Police Force, the Central .
Detective Unit (CDU) revealed that there -
had been 271 fraud complaints reported in
2006, with the dollar value increasing from
the $1.190 million reported in 2005 to
$7.552 million last year.

Police attributed the downturn in com- . ws F
plaint numbers to the fact that four. .”

notable serial offenders had been incar-
cerated.

The four persons now jailed, police said,
were responsible for 8 per cent or 41 of the
total matters reported in 2005.

The report indicated that 2006 saw an
increase in fraud complaints involving gov-
ernment departments, this number rising
by 44 per cent. There were nine matters
reported in 2005, compared to the 13
reported in 2006.

Police said the suspects in these cases
were senior persons placed in positions
of trust, and said the dollar valued believed
to be taken was $360,000.

The police reported that money laun-
dering and other offences, such as the 419
Nigerian Scam, accounted for losses in
excess of $446,360.23

Matters such as stealing by reason of
employment, stealing by reason of ser-
vice, and stealing accounted for an esti-
mated $7.105 million in losses last year.
Police also reported that their detection
rate of these offences had improved by
38. per cent from 2005. i

In 2006, 142 of the 271 fraud matters
reported were detected for a 53 per cent
rate. i

On the island of Grand Bahama, police
reported that they were successful on 45
matters out of a reported total of 98, with
35 being charged in court.

Police on that island reported that there
was also an increase in reports involving
auto salesmen and unscrupulous contrac-
tors who received monies from persons _
to provide services.

| Ae ie AO ae RUC Leia tt
— oe i Te Cee ee
/ pepeakla. a C - _ Ask for them in-store today.

oe

“ia



”

Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause
Heart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases.



a | | ,



TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398



@ TENNIS

KNOWLES/NESTOR
IN SYDNEY

MARK Knowles and
his Canadian doubles
partner Daniel Nestor
are currently playing at
the Medibank Interna-
tional in Sydney, Aus-
tralia.

Knowles and Nestor
are the number two
seeds behind the world’s
top ranked team of
American twin brothers
Bob and Mike Bryan.

Knowles and Nestor
are scheduled to play
their first round match
against the team of Fran-
tisek and Jaroslav from
the Czech Republic. No
date or time was given
for their match.

This is their second
tournament for the year.
They played in Doha,
Qatar last week, losing in
the semifinal. From Syd-
ney, they will travel to
Melbourne for the Aus-
tralian Open, the first
Grand Slam for the year.

The Australian Open is
scheduled to start on
January 15.

@ WALK

MOSS PLACED
THIRD OU
PHILIP Moss contin-
ues to make his presence

felt in walk racing. This
weekend, he took part in
the 60th Bay Harbour

’ Island Road Race in
Miami, Florida.

It was a 5K road race,
but Moss walked the
entire course, finishing
third in his age category -
50-54, in a personal best
time of 22 minutes and
55 seconds.

At age 52, Moss said
his goal is to clock 19
minutes in a SK race and
he feels he will accom-
plish that feat soon as he
continues to walk faster
and faster in every race
he competes in.

He said when the race
was finished and the
~ announcer called his
time, everybody congrat-
ulated him because they
couldn’t believe that he
walked that fast.

@ ROAD RACE

CYNTHIA
‘MOTHER’ PRATT
RACE

ENTHUSIASM is
building up for the 14th
annual Cynthia ‘Mother’
Pratt Fun Run/Walk,
organised by the College
of the Bahamas. The
event is scheduled for
Saturday, starting at 6:30
Astilss

The runners will follow
the tried and trusted
route along Thompson
Boulevard to JF
Kennedy Drive and the
lights at Gladstone Road
and then back to the
Tucker Road entrance of
the College, a distance of
approximately five and a
half miles.

The walkers will turn .
around at JF Kennedy
Drive, thus reducing
their route by about a
mile.

Application forms can
be collected from the
Student Services Office
at the College of the
Bahamas and the regis-
tration fee is $5.00.

Interested individuals
requiring further infor-
mation should call 302-
4525 or 302-4592.

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ST AUGUSTINE’S Col-
lege Big Red Machines were

haunted by Ollen Smith:

when he returned to their
court yesterday.

The former Big Red
Machine joined forces with
Rashard Williams and the
Prince Williams Falcons to
destroy the school’s senior
boy’s team. The Falcons nev-
er looked back after open-
ing up a 26 point lead in the
first quarter and eventually
closed the game with a score
of 73-42.

In the opening four min-
utes of the game, the Smith
and Williams combination
had picked off 15 of the Big
Red Machines’ balls, con-
verting on nine. Thanks to
the 2-2-1 press, the team
placed the Big Red Machines
in quick foul trouble, leav-
ing them no other choice but
to rely on their bench play-
ers...

A huge loss for the Big
Red Machines was Lawrence
Benoit, who had to sit out
two quarters because of foul

‘trouble. With Benoit out of

the game, Williams and
Smith’s job became easier.

Advance

The Big Red Machines had
moved back into a zone
defensive stand, giving the
Falcons an easier road to
advance the ball over the
half court. With no hesita-
tion the Falcons accepted the
gift being offered to them
and made the Big Red
Machines pay.

The team who showed
much dominance in the first
quarter brought the tricks
out of the bag for the fans in
the second. The swift passes
and the flawless ball move-
ments freed up their big
men, who wasted no time in
putting the ball down.

But the Big Red Machines
would find a way to break
the Falcons’ press and score.
The team closed out the sec-
ond quarter with 11 points.

Smith said: “It is always a
pleasure to return to the
court of a former school and
play. Some may look at this
game as a statement, I don’t.
I have a job to do for my
team, they count on me to
play hard all the time so I
owe it to them to do so.

“J am sorry we had to play
my old school and beat them
like we did today, but our
team is on a mission. We are
out to win the title and have
a clean record doing so. This

Kendal Isaacs gym sch

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

WITH the AF Adderley
Gymnasium currently under
renovation, the annual Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic
is being scheduled for the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
next month.

Tournament director Ricar-
do Ferguson said they are
working diligently with the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Housing to host the entire
week-long competition from
February 19-26.

‘The Tribune



is a good team, Rashard and
I are good ball handlers and
we both can shoot. It will be
hard for a team to come in
and beat us, we have a good
coach who is dedicated and
all the players are commit-
ted.

“We know that there will
be schools coming after us
but as long as we continue
to play hard and execute the
plays we’ve learned in prac-
tice I don’t see why we
should lose. This is close
knitted team and we all have
the same goal, that is to win.
This game is not a statement
for SAC but to the other
schools telling them beware
because we’re coming to get
what is ours.”

The Big Red Machines
opened the second half with
new defensive stand. Apply-
ing the man-to-man defence
surprised the Falcons and
forced them to call a quick
time-out. But when the Fal-
cons returned to the court it
was business as usual.

The ball movement by the
Falcons became too much
for the Big Red Machines
once again even though they
opened up the second half of
play with just three of their
starting players.

With a commanding lead
and things flowing the way
the Falcons liked, the team
brought in their second
string players to finish off the
job.

This was a big moment for
Big Red Machines’ head
coach Devon Johnson who
wasted no time in bringing
Benoit back.

His presence made a huge
difference in the team’s
offence. By the end of the
third quarter the Big Red
Machines had scored 12, the
most points since the open-
ing tip. .

Benoit’s smooth ball con-
trol help to spread the court,
finding Remero Stubbs to
score the easy basket. Stubbs
would end the game as the
top scorer for the Big Red
Machines with 14 points,
with Benoit chipping in with
eight.

Top scorer for the Falcons
was Williams with 20 points,
Jonathon Moss contributed
with 15 points and Smith
with 10.

The win kept the Falcons’
hopes for a perfect season
alive with a 5-0 record while
the Big Red Machines’
record is 2-3.

@ PRINCE William Fal-

‘cons and the Big Red

Machines battle it out yes-
terday. .
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

This is the 25th anniversary
of the nation's biggest basket-
ball tournament that is played
between senior boys teams
and, according to Ferguson,
they plan to make this an his-
toric one.

"We have spoken to Grand
Bahama and they have indi-
cated that all of the teams are
coming," said Ferguson, who
noted that the six teams from
the nation's second city make
the competition that much
more exciting.

"We have also heard from
the Turks & Caicos Islands
and they have indicated that

”
;

|

PORT

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS





ee eS ee oe errr

they are expected to bring in a
team this year. So we are look-
ing forward to them adding to
the excitement."

There is also the possibility
that a team from further afield
in the Caribbean may be a part
of this year's field of 32 teams
participating in the tourna-
ment. But Ferguson declined
to confirm or deny that and
said they will hold a press con-
ference next Tuesday to dis-
close all details of the tourna-
ment,

Ferguson, however, said
they will host four divisions of
eight teams each in the double

eduled for Hugh Campbell event

elimination format as they
march towards crowning
another champion.

The CI Gibson Rattlers
clinched their third straight last
year and their fourth in five
years as they nipped the Sir
Jack Hayward Wildcats 67-65.

The only other teams from
New Providence to win the
prestigious title were the LW
Young Golden Eagles, who
claimed the initial crown in
1982 and the hosts, AF Adder-
ley Fighting Tigers, who cap-
tured back-to-back crowns and
the CR Walker Knights, the
last winners before the Rat-

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE





tlers took over.

Grand Bahama has domi-
nated the rest of the spots on
the championship list.

From last year, Ferguson
said they knew that the AF
Adderley Gym would not
have been available, but they
have still continued their plan-
ning with the hopes of hosting
this year's event at the Kendal
Isaacs Gym.

"We knew that the gym was-
n't going to be ready, so we
didn't make any plans around
there," he said. "So we just
decided to look at Kendal
Isaacs.”

alcons Smith returns
o haunt the Machines:

' jm BASKETBALL



PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Fernander
stars for Barry
University

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALEXANDER ‘Shag’ Fer-
nander is hitting form for the
Barry University Buccaneers.

The 6-foot, senior centre
has been holding court for the
Bucs through their first 11
games of the season.

According to Sports Infor-
mation Officer Dennis Jezek,
Fernander is shooting 44.9
per cent from the field, 67.9

from the free throw line and

is averaging 11.4 rebounds
per game, leading the Bucs
and the NCAA Division II
Sunshine State Conference.

And she’s averaging 12.3

points per game as her team
P pers

sit ninth in the conference
and in the nation, Addition-
ally, Fernander has also com-
piled a total of 13 assists, 12
steals and seven block shots.

Versatility

In seven games, Jezek said
Fernander has showed her
versatility with a double-dou-
ble in points and rebounds
and has amassed double fig-
ure rebounds in seven of their
last eight games.

“She’s dominant. At this
point, she’s our most domi-
nant player in the post in our
conference,” Jezek summed
up. “The more she touches
the ball, the better we play.
She’s definitely our most
important player right now.”

Coach Bill Sullivan said

#1 AUTO

Fernander’s performance has
certainly made his debut
coaching his first women’s
team at Barry University that
much easier.

“She’s a post player that is
strong around the basket and
she can also face the basket
and shoot it,” Sullivan said.
“She’s our dominant force
inside, our post presence.”

Fernander, in her second
year at Barry University, had
one of her best games on Sat-
urday night at home at the
Health and Sports Centre.

She recorded a double-dou-
ble with team highs of 18
points and 12 rebounds as the
Bucs knocked off the Uni-
versity of Tampa Spartans 61-
54 to win their-second straight
conference game.

“She's had to overcome
injuries, a bad knee and a
brace she’s still wearing on
her risk, and she’s battled
through all of that,” said Sul-
livan of one of the Bucs’ team
captains.

“She’s played wonderful.
She’s the reason we are 2-0
in the conference right now.
My hope is that she will be
an All-Conference player.
She’s putting up those type
of numbers.”

With Fernander’s leader-
ship, Sullivan said it would be
the icing on the cake for a
great season if they can go all
the way and win the confer-
ence title.

“We are going to try and
do that with Alex leading us,”
Sullivan projected.

Fernander, who. was

ra adeeb

unavailable for comments, is
the first player that Sullivan
has coached and if there are
others like her, Sullivan said
he would be glad to bring
them on to play for the Bucs.

“She’s improved on her
free throwing shooting,” he
reflected, “At the beginning
of the season, she struggled,
but now she’s making her free
throws. But on the whole, I
don’t have a lot of complaint
about Alex. -

Effective

“She’s a leader and I have
nothing but good things to
say about her. She’s been
doing great, averaging a dou-
ble-double, which is not easy
to-do. But we try to get her
the ball because she’s been
effective in the low post and
she’s been playing great for
us.”

The Bucs will be back in
action on Wednesday when
they play at Nova Southeast-
ern in Davie, Florida.

On Saturday, they will
return to the HSC to play
their third conference game
against Florida Southern.

Their regular season will
come to a close on Saturday,
February 24 when they host
Rollins in the last of two
games. Rollins, last year, went
undefeated in the conference.

The conference tournament
will be played this year in
Boca Raton from Wednes-

_ day, February 28 to Thurs-
day, March 1.

ck

with Commonwealth Ba





DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS.

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 32243775 * 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Solas (Freeport! Led for similar deals, Quoons Hwy, 352-4122
ar Abeco Mater Mall, on bockKoy dvd, 34729 1h





A



@ ALEXANDER ‘Shag’ Fernander rises above the competition
(Phato: Barry Sports Information/JC Ridley)



Squash club
is open for
business in ‘07

@ SQUASH
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

UNDER new management,
the Village Road Squash Club
will begin 2007 with the New
Year’s Squash League.

It will get underway today
and will be played every Tues-
day until the final round is
contested on Friday, February
9,

New owner Barbara Albury
said the league intends to Let
the public know that the club



Mi SAILING

SPORTS NBRIEF

is indeed open for business

again,

Thompson Trading,
Bahamas Wholesale Agencies,
Lightbourn Trading and Asa
H. Pritchard are some of the
sponsors who will be involved
in the tournament.

Albury said there will be six
teams of five players each par-
ticipating in competition every
Tuesday between the hours of

6-9 p.m. and the players will’

be ranked according to their
performances in the game.
Here’s a list of the: players



THE sailing community is mourning the passing of ‘Ted Johnson,
an outstanding 'bowman', who sailed in numerous regattas.

Johnson is one of six persons set to be honoured on January 29th
by the government for his contributions to sailing in the country. He
passed away on Sunday at his home,

Extending condolences to the family on behalf of the entire
sailing community and the government was Rev Phillip McPhee,

TRACK AND FIELD

THE indoor season officially opened for collegiate athletes this

past weekend and Bahamians made sure that they were on top of

their game.

Getting things started in their first indoor meet at the Universi-
ty of Maryland Eastern Shore were teammates Reginald Sands and
Kenrick Brathwaithe, representing Norfolk State University.

Brathwaithe opened up his season with a win in the men's long
jump. ‘The sophomore soared 7.36 (24-fect-1 inch) to take the vic-

tory over Chris Walker and Corey Vinston who had a best of

723m,

In the shot put event Sands had to settle for fifth with a best throw
of 13.53m (44-feet-4 inches), Winning the event was Kimani Kirton
of Maryland Eastern Shore with a throw of 15.82m.

Also competing at the meet was Jamahl Strachan, in both the

high jump and pole vault events.

In both events Strachan 'no heighted', closing each course in the
fifth spot. Brathwaithe was expected to take part in the high jump

_ event but “did not show.”

The indoor action will continue this weekend with meets sched-
uled for North Carolina, Atlanta and Florida.

\

|

named to the respective teams:

Team One Lightning - Billy
Albury, Scott Jupp, Jan
Oyens, David Slatter and
Dilys Anderson.

Gatorade - Jimmy Light-
bourn, Sean Cartwright, Ryan
Reid, Michael Lever and Lil- »
lian Russell.

Act II Poppers - Adrian
Burrows, Alister McKellar,
Alex Paine, Ted Smith and
Chantelle Euteneuer.

Team Four - Pembroke
Williams, Sean McCarroll,
Barbara Albury, Ted O’Brien
and Hilary Lockhart.

Ensueno - Colin Light-
bourn, Mike Fields, Calvin
Lockhart, Len Davies, Pat
Whiteland and RC Smith.

Team Six - Keith Kelty,
Henio Podlewski, Joe
Eutenecuer, James Burnett and
MAJ/Sandy.

“We're trying to increase
our membership at the club
because we are in the process
of buying the premises as
well,” Albury charged. “I’m
just trying to get squash back
out there in the open.”

While Albury also organises
a youth league every Satur-
day, she indicated that Jen-
nifer Isaacs, the physical edu-
cation lecturer at the College
of the Bahamas, has expressed
an interest in putting on a pro-
gramme for the COB Caribs
sports department.

“I’m just really trying to
make people aware that the
club is not closed,” she
stressed. “We hope that this
league will help to generate
some interest again.”

Tonight as the league gets
underway, Team One will play
Gatorade Lightning on court
one; Act II Poppers will play
Team Four on court II
and Ensueno will play Team
Six,



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



_ NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE









SOUTHEAST WL _ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Orlando 21 14 600 - 6-4 W-4 14-6 7-8 12-9
Washington 19 14 576 1 7-3 L-l 13-3 6-11 12-9
Miami 14 19 .424 6 55 W-1 8-9 6-10 6-10
Atlanta 10 21 323 9 2-8 W-l 59 5-12 6-13
Charlotte 9 23 .28110% 3-7 L2 G11 3-12 6-13
ATLANTIC = Wk Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 15 19 .441 - 5-5 W-2 10-5 5-14 10-7
New Jersey 144 19 .424 % 5-5 L-1 10-10 4-9 10-9
New York 15 21 .417 1 6-4 W-2 810 7-11 9-12
Boston 12 21 .364 2% 2-8 L-l 4-11 8-10 8-12
Philadelphia 9 24. .273 5% 46 L2 4-7 5-17 6-12
c t. 1 way _ Cont
Cc 636 5 -9 15-10
Detroit 613 1 64 \L-l 9-5 10-7 13-6
Chicago 571 2 5-5 L-l 15-4 5-11 17-5
Indiana 529 3% 64 W-l1 9-5 9-11 13-9
Milwaukee 16 ATL 5% 6-4 L3 9-5 7-13 6-13
WESTERN CONFERENCE





‘686





San Antonio 3 -
Houston 22 629 5 12-3 10-10 10-11
New Orleans = 12 353 14% 7-10 5-12 6-16
Memphis 8 229° 19 6-11 2-16 3-15
NORTHWEST WoL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 24 10 .706 - 6-4 W-1l 14-2 10-8 16-6
Denver 17 15) 5310 6 4-6 Wel 10-8 7-7 5-9
Minnesota 715) «531673 W415) 6-10 10-9
Portland 14 21 .40010% 3-7 L-l 7-11 7-10 9-9
Seattle 1323 «361 12 3-7 L-4 9-8 4-15 5-14
PACIFIC = WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 25 8 .758 - 82 W-6 14-3 11-5 11-7
L.A. Lakers 23 11 «#676 2% ‘7-3 W-4 16-4 7-7) 15-5
Golden State 18 18 500 8% 6-4 L-l 14-5 4-13 12-13
LA. Clippers 16 19 .457 10 6-4 W-1 12-6 4-13 10-15
Sacramento 144,17 .452 10 46 L-2 = 10-9 4-8 8-13
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Monday’s results Tonight’s games Sunday’s results

Clippers 100, N.O 90 Atl. at Ind., 7 Mia. 93, Port. 90
Houston 84, Chicago 77 Det. at Phi., 7 Tor. 116, Wash. 111
Denver 104, Mil. 92 Tor. at NJ., 7:30 Minn. 103, Hou. 99 (OT)

L.A.L. at Mem., 8 S.A. 110, Mem. 96

Por. at S.A., 8 Orl. 87, Bos. 79

Dal. at Utah, 9 Pho. 128, G.S. 105

Sea. at Pho., 9 LA.L. 101, Dal. 98

Cle. at Sac., 10

Currie top pick
in dispersal draft

BY MIKE CRANSTON
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Guard Monique Currie
was selected by the Chicago Sky. with the No.1 pick .
in the WNBA dispersal draft on Monday.

Currie was one of ll former Charlotte Sting play-
ers taken. The Sting, an original member ‘of ‘the °
WNBA, folded last week after 10 seasons. Currie
was the No. 3 overall pick in last year’s college draft.

Tangela Smith, 30, the Sting’s leading scorer last
season at 13.1 points per game, was selected No. 2 by
the Minnesota Lynx.

Janel McCarville, the No. 1 overall pick in the
2005 college draft, was taken third by New York.
McCarville has struggled in her first two WNBA
seasons, averaging 3.2 points and 3.1 rebounds.

San Antonio selected guard Helen Darling with
the fourth pick and Phoenix took guard Kelly Maz-
zante with the fifth selection.

Washington drafted Teana Miller, who missed
last season due to pregnancy, with the sixth pick.
Seattle then selected Tye’sha Fluker, Houston took
Yelena Leuchanka, Indiana drafted veteran Sheri
Sam, Sacramento went with LaToya Bond and Los.
Angeles selected Ayana Walker. Detroit and Con-
necticut did not select a player.

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE



|



{
|
i
i

|



SOUTHEAST =oW LOL SLPTS GF GA = =HOME == AWAY
Atlanta 24 12 2 56 137 134 = =11-5-3-1_—:13-7-3-1
Carolina 22 18 2 2 48130 133 = 12-7-0-1 10-11-2-1
Washington 18 17 2 5 43 128 143 10-10-1-2 8-7-1-3
Tampa Bay 20 21 1 1 42 135 136 10-11-0-0 10-10-1-1
Florida 15 20 3 6 39119 143 10-8-1-1 5-12-2-5
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
New Jersey 25° 13 4 54 113 100 14-3-0-3. 11-10-0-1
N.Y. Rangers 22 17 3 1 48129 131 9-7-3-0 13-10-0-1
Pittsburgh 18 15 3 4 43125 128 10-8-2-2 8-7-1-2
N.Y. Islanders 19 19 1 °'2 41117 116 11-8-1-1 8-11-0-1
Philadelphia 11 27° 2 2 26102 159 3-11-2-2 8-16-0-0
NORTHEAST W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Buffalo 30 9 2 1 63 164 122 14-5-1-1 16-4-1-0
Montreal 23 14 1 4 #51127 118 13-6-0-3 = 10-8-1-1
Ottawa 23 19 2 O 48143 125 10-10-1-0 13-9-1-0
Toronto 19 18 2 4 44144 144 10-10-1-2 9-8-1-2
Boston 20 16 1 2 43118 142 12-8-0-1 8-8-1-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL = Wt OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME = AWAY
Nashville 28 11 2 1 59144 109 13-3-2-1 = 15-8-0-0
Detroit 25 12 2 3 55125 102) 14-3-1-2 = 11-9-1-1
Chicago 17 20 1 4 39105 124 10-10-0-1 7-10-1-3
Columbus 16 22 2 2 36108 130 9-9-1-1 —_7-13-1-1
St. Louis 13 21 4 3 33 96 129 8-11-2-1 5-10-2-2
NORTHWEST W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Vancouver 24 18 O 1 49107 111 15-7-0-0 9-11-0-1
Calgary 21 15 2 2 46122 106 16-5-0-0 5-10-2-2
Minnesota 21 18 O 3 45118 114 17-4-0-2 4-14-0-1
Colorado 21 18 2 O 44131 116 11-9-1-0 10-9-1-0
Edmonton 19 18 2 2 42117 122 = 13-7-1-1 6-11-1-1
PaciFic == -W_ iL OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME = AWAY
Anaheim 29 9 1 5 64151 108 16-3-1-3 13-6-0-2
San Jose 28 14 0 O 56130 100 15-7-0-0 13-7-0-0
Dallas 26 16 O 1 53117 102 13-6-0-0 13-10-0-1
‘Phoenix 19 20 1 1 40113 138 11-8-1-0 8-12-0-1
- Los Angeles 1622 2 3 37124 154 = 11-9-2-3 5-13-0-0

| “NUGGETS 104, BUCKS 92



PRO BASKETBALL

McGrady ignites Rockets

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CHICAGO — Tracy McGrady scored 25
of his 31 points in the second half and hit the
go-ahead jumper to lift the Houston Rockets
to an 84-77 victory over the Chicago Bulls on
Monday night.

McGrady’s long jumper with 1:19 left
broke a 77-77 tie. Houston’s Shane Battier
blocked a driving layup by Ben Gordon with

25 seconds left. McGrady then hit one of two °

free throws to make it a three-point game
and Chuck Hayes and Luther Head added
two apiece.

It was the fifth 30-point performance in
six games for McGrady, who hit just three of
10 shots in the first half.

Juwan Howard added 16 points and nine
rebounds, Dikembe Mutombo grabbed a sea-
son-high 16 rebounds, and the Rockets won
for the sixth time in eight games since Yao
Ming broke a bone in his right leg.

Gordon led Chicago with 24 points, and
Luol Deng scored 20 after finishing with 30
in Saturday’s 106-89 victory over Detroit.

CLIPPERS 100, HORNETS 90

OKLAHOMA CITY Sam Cassell
scored 31 points, Cuttino Mobley added 20
and the Clippers started to look healthy
again in the victory.

Playing for,the first time in three weeks,
Cassell scored 10 points during the Clippers’
decisive 17-3 fourth-quarter surge, including
a 3-pointer that gave Los Angeles the lead for
good at 79-77 with 9:12 to play. He sand-
wiched another 3-pointer between two jump-
ers, and Mobley added a jumper for a 91-80
Clippers lead.

Cassell had missed seven games with
plantar fasciitis in his left heel before return-
ing against the Hornets, and Mobley hyper-
extended his left elbow last week at Miami.

They showed no mercy against the Hor-
nets, who are without injured starters Chris
Paul (sprained ankle), Peja Stojakovic (back
surgery) and David West (right elbow sur-
gery).

Desmond Mason led New Orleans with 28
points for the second consecutive game,
picking up his first consecutive 20-point
games since his final three games with Mil-
waukee at the end of the 2004-05 season.

ee



» DENVER — Earl Boykins scored:26 points

-~and‘Allen‘Iverson had 23'to lead the! Nuggets

past the depleted Bucks.

The Bucks were without injured guard
Michael Redd and lost his backcourt mate
Mo Williams during the game. Ruben Patter-
son, who played in Denver last season,
started in Redd’s spot and scored 29 points,
three shy of his career high, and had 1l
boards.

The Nuggets know how Milwaukee feels.
Denver has been without the NBA’s top scor-
ing tandem since Carmelo Anthony and J.R.
Smith brawled with the New York Knicks
last month.

Marcus Camby added 19 points and 15
rebounds for the Nuggets, who snapped a
five-game losing streak.

ELSEWHERE
e Bucks: A meaningless dunk is coming

HOCKEY

lian OV
11-4-4-1
10-3-0-0
6-6-1-1 From Miami Herald Wire Services
inch The Phoenix Coyotes on Monday
acquired center Kevyn Adams from the
DIV Carolina Hurricanes in exchange for
9-4-0-1 | defenseman Dennis Seidenberg.
ey Adams served as an alternate captain
7-6-1-0 and skated in all 25 postseason games for
3-10-0-2 last year’s Stanley Cup champions. He
pIV scored a career-high 15 goals while play-
ree ing in all 82 regular-season games in
-6-1-0
84.0.4 | 2005-06.
9-7-0-0 Adams, 32, recently returned to action
7-8-2-2 after missing nine games following wrist
9-6-0-1 : :
surgery and a staph infection.
Seidenberg had one goal and one assist
in 32 games for the Coyotes.
piv ELSEWHERE
“11-3-1-0 e Bruins: The team recalled goalie
9-2-0-1 Hannu Toivonen and defenseman Jona-
ST than Sigalet from its minor-league affiliate
5-10-2-2 in Providence and sent goalie Philippe
Sauve to the American Hockey League
DIV farm club.

PRO BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

Toivonen played Sunday, making 15
saves in Providence’s 7-2 victory over
Springfield. He had been sent to Provi- :
dence earlier that day after backing up ae
Tim Thomas but not playing in Boston’s

}
; sa 4-3 victory over Philadelphia on Saturday.
8-8-0-0 | Sigalet has eight goals and eight assists
12-3-0-0 | in 35 games with Providence.
ees e Avalanche: Defenseman John-Mi-

chael Liles will miss up to a month with a

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 | 3





NAM Y. HUH/AP

BATTLE OF THE BIG MEN: Rockets center Dikembe Mutombo pulls down one of his
16 rebounds, reaching over Bulls center Ben Wallace in Monday night’s game.

back to haunt Michael Redd and the Bucks.
Redd learned that he'll miss four-to-six
weeks because of an injured left knee.

Redd, the NBA’s fifth-leading scorer at
27.7 points per game, was hurt when he went
up for a dunk with J4 seconds left in the
Bucks’ 95-86 loss to Cleveland on Friday
night. He strained his patellar tendon, which
connects the kneecap to the shin bone.

The severity of the injury took the Bucks
by surprise.

point guard Mo Williams said before the
Bucks’ game at Denver on Monday night in
which he, too, was injured. “We thought it
was a couple of games maybe. A game or
two, rest it. We didn’t think it was this seri-
ous.”

Williams sprained his left shoulder in the
second quarter against the Nuggets and is
day to day.

A two-time winner of the Eastern Confer-
ence Player of the Week award this season,
Redd is on pace to increase his scoring aver-
age for the seventh consecutive year. Redd
also averages 3.8 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 13
steals.

Ruben Patterson started in Redd’s place
Monday night at Denver, where Patterson
played briefly. last season, and said he was
sure Milwaukee could withstand Redd’s
absence.

The Bucks also are without forward Char-
lie Villanueva, Milwaukee’s major offseason





MARK J. TERRILL/AP

Mote: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Monday’s results
Edmntn at L.A., 10:30

Tonight’s games

St. Louis at Columbus, 7
Phil. at Washington, 7
Islanders at Rangers, 7
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30
Atlanta at Montreal, 7:30
Carolina at Toronto, 7:30
Pitt. at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Anaheim at Nashville, 8
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30
Detroit at Colorado, 9
Minnesota at Calgary, 9

Sunday’s results

Vancouver 4, Florida 3 (SO)
Phoenix 4, Chicago 2

New Jersey 3, Montreal 0
Ottawa 6, Philadelphia 1

T. Bay 3, Pittsburgh 2 (SO)
Anaheim 4, Detroit 2



broken left foot. Liles was injured in the
first period of the Avs’ game at Minnesota
on Saturday night.

Liles’ 10 goals is fourth-most among
NHL defensemen. He’s tied for 12th in
scoring with 29 points and is the first
defenseman to score 10 or more goals in
each of his first three NHL seasons since
Steve Duchesne from 1986-89.

e Devils: Prudential Financial will
pay $105.3 million over 20 years to call the

NOW HE’S HEADING EAST: Defenseman
Dennis Seidenberg, above, had one
goal and one assist in 32 games this
season for the Coyotes. He was

traded Monday to the Hurricanes in
exchange for center Kevyn Adams.

Devils’ new arena the Prudential Center.

The $375 million downtown venue,
under construction nearly across the

addition, who missed his third consecutive
game with an injured right shoulder. He got a
cortisone injection Monday and will be re-
evaluated in another week. Villanueva is
averaging 12.7 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.2
assists. ;

e 76ers: Basketball Hall of Fame coach
Larry Brown officially returned to the 76ers
on Monday and dismissed speculation he
might eventually return to the bench. After
one disastrous NBA season with the Knicks,
Brown said-he-wants to help the 76ers only in
his new role as an executive vice president.

Brown; fired, by the Knicks in June after

‘going 23-59 and-clashing with team president

Isiah Thomas in Brown’s only season in New
York, had been acting as an unofficial 76ers
consultant this season. He’s kept a low pro-
file in Philadelphia, visiting one practice and
attending one game, and offered feedback to
team president and close friend Billy King on
the Allen Iverson trade.

e Bobcats: Forward Melvin Ely is still
smiling and joking with his teammates. He
has nothing but good things to say about
coach and general manager Bernie Bicker-
statt.

He’s probably one of the happiest players
ever to have asked to be traded. Ely said on
Monday he asked to be traded before a game
against the Lakers on Dec. 29.

e Clippers: Luke Jackson, a former first-
round draft choice of the Cavaliers, signed a
10-day contract with the Clippers.

Coyotes trade for K. Adams

street from the world headquarters of the
life insurance and investment giant, is
expected to open for the 2007-2008 NHL
season.

The city of Newark, N.J., is contribut-
ing $210 million to the arena, which was
initially expected to cost $310 million. ‘The
Devils are paying for cost overruns.

The arena is to seat 17,625 people for
ice hockey games, 18,500 for basketball
games and 19,500 for concerts. Amenities
are to include a 350-seat restaurant, 2,200
club seats and 78 luxury suites.

The Devils now play at the Continental
Airlines Arena in East Rutherford. The
NHL team shares the building with the
New Jersey Nets, whose new owner is
moving forward with plans to build an
arena for the NBA team in Brooklyn, N.Y.

LATE SUNDAY

e Canucks 4, Panthers 3 (SO): Josh
Green scored in the sixth round of the
shootout to give host Vancouver the vic-
tory.

The triumph extended Vancouver's
season-high winning streak to seven
games, while the Panthers dropped their
third in a row on the road:

Green beat Florida goalie Ed Belfour
high to the stick side from 20 feet out for
the winner and then had to stand by and
watch nervously as Vancouver’s Roberto
Luongo stopped Jozef Stumpel at the
other end to preserve the victory.

For much of the game, it appeared that
Luongo was going to steal one from his
former club, as he held the Panthers at
bay for two periods. But the 27-year-old
gave up a pair of weak third-period goals
to give Florida some hope.

This was the first time Luongo, who
faced 36 shots, had taken on his former
team since coming over to the Canucks in
the biggest trade of last summer.







Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENUS6T98U_Q7F886 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T16:21:07Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02788
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES




PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



imi a a a ee

Basic principles are

for all

seasons, not for expediency

illiam Roper; So, now you
give the Devil the benefit of
law!

Sir Thomas More: Yes! What would
you do? Cut a great road through the
law to get after the Devil?

William Roper: Yes, I’d cut down
every law in England to that!

Sir Thomas More: Oh? And when
the last law was down, and the Devil
turned ’round on you, where would
you hide, Roper, the laws all being
flat? This country is planted thick with
laws, from coast to coast, Man ’s laws,
not God's! And if you cut them down,
and you’re just the man to do it, do
you really think you could stand
upright in the winds that would blow
then? Yes, I’d give the Devil benefit of
law, for my own safety’s sake!

That exchange is from the celebrat-
ed play, A Man For All Seasons, by
Robert Bolt, which was first staged in
Britain in 1960 and several years later
made into a movie. It is, of course,
about Sir Thomas More, the brilliant
scholar, lawyer and statesman who
was Lord Chancellor under Henry
VI.

Sir Thomas was a deeply religious
man and he believed in certain prin-
ciples, including the rule of law, When
he refused to bend to the will of the
king in what were to him matters of
principle and conviction, he was sent
to the Tower of London, put on trial

for treason and beheaded in July, . .

1535. Four hundred years later he was
canonised by the Catholic Church.

* % *

n December 18, 2006, five

employees of Nassau Flight
Services were arrested when they land-
ed in Fort Lauderdale on a Spirit Airline
flight from Nassau. They were part of a
group of 20 employees picked for a
mandatory training course in Fort Laud-
erdale,

The five were arrested on board the
plane and charged with trafficking drugs
to the United States through Lynden
Pindling International Airport. It was
reported to be the culmination a year-



After nearly three |
weeks Prime Minister
Perry Christie, always
slow to recognise a
matter of serious
national concern,
announced that he
had launched an
inquiry and promised
that he will share his
findings with the
Bahamian people.



long undercover operation conducted
jointly by Bahamian and American offi-
cers. The circumstances clearly indicate
that the five were tricked into going to







the US so they could be picked by US
law enforcement officers and put on tri-
al in that country.

Nobody objects one little bit. to under-
coveroperations being conducted
against suspected criminal activity, In
fact, citizens take it for granted that such
operations are ongoing in order to pro-
tect the public and bring criminals to
justice.

But citizens have a right and a duty to
ask questions when it appears that
Bahamian authorities may have collud-
ed with agents of another country to
bypass the sovereignty and due process-
es of the laws of The Bahamas in order
to render Bahamian suspects to anoth-
er jurisdiction.

That, of course, is exactly what did
happen. Many Bahamians were
alarmed at what they heard and very
rightly started to ask questions of their
government,

They wanted to know if the Govern-
ment of The Bahamas or any of its agen-
cies or agents knew about and approved
of what appeared to be the extrajudicial
rendition of Bahamian citizens to anoth-
er country, They wanted to know why,
after many months of investigation, the
Bahamian suspects were not arrested
and charged in Bahamian courts,

After all, if the alleged offences were

committed in The Bahamas, then the ~

evidence, or much of it, must have been
gathered in The Bahamas, That was
borne out by the fact that several others
who are alleged to have been part of a
drug-smuggling operation at the airport
were subsequently arrested and charged

_in The Bahamas,

he citizens who dared to ask
questions about all this were
immediately set upon and accused of
all sorts of things: they were in sympathy

And Appliance Centr

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-38

with criminals, they were more con-
cerned about drug traffickers than secu-
rity, and they did not care that this
could endanger pre-clearance facilities
-at the airport.

This is a classic case of the proverbial
red herring. It is all absolutely wrong,
grossly unfair to law-abiding citizens
and utterly irrelevant to the questions at
hand.

As usual, the PLP Government’s
response to public agitation over this
matter has been quite inadequate. Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell
assured the public that Minister of
Transport and Aviation Glenys Han-
na had no prior knowledge of the oper-
ation.

He did not say if any other minister
had.

Attorney General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson has had more to say about this
affair than any other member of the
Cabinet and she has denied that “the
Government” was in any way complic-
it in what appears to be an extrajudicial
rendition of Bahamians to another juris-
diction.

But Mrs Gibson also did not say if
any other minister of the Government
had prior knowledge.

After nearly three weeks Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, always slow to
recognise a matter of serious national
concern, announced that he had
launched an inquiry and promised that
he will share his findings with the

_ Bahamian people. He said he will speak

comprehensively and in detail.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of National Security Cynthia Pratt has
had little or nothing to say about it pub-
licly.

[ee are a few in our commu-
nity who out of willful igno-
rance or for other motives appear not to
understand the issues involved or want
to confuse them. They say that a drug
smuggling operation at the airport
endangers our pre-clearance privileges
and our security,

Of course it does, and every Bahami-
an is aware of that. But that does not

‘explain why, after many months of sur-

veillance and gathering evidence, all the
suspects were not arrested at the earliest
propitious moment, removed from the
airport and charged before our courts,

Bahamians are indeed concerned
about the economic implications of secu-
rity breaches at our airport and the dan-
ger drug trafficking poses to both The
Bahamas and the US. We are also just
as concerned as the Americans about
our own personal safety when travel-
ling and we expeet those responsible to
leave no stone unturned to ensure our
safety,

But no-one has explained how the
rendition of Bahamian suspects to
another jurisdiction makes us any safer.

nother argument is that our
courts are overburdened, inef-
ficient and in some cases too lenient,
that extradition takes too long, so it is to
our advantage to render suspects to the
US for trial, or even invite the Ameri-
cans to come into our country and clean
things up for us!
It may be true that there is a lot wrong
with law enforcement and judicial
processes in The Bahamas, but it is our

ALL YOUR DECORATING

ees On The Island”

MONDAY - THURSD
FRIDAY - SATURD/




BILLY'S DREAM
TILL ALIVE

responsibility to fix what is wrong. It is
our responsibility to givé our law
enforcement agencies the resqurces and
support they need, It is our responsi-
bility to make sure our courts are ade-
quately resourced and populated.

It would be utterly irresponsible for us
to abdicate these constitutional, legal
and moral responsibilities to another
country, however friendly. _

The Americans do liave tremendous



Citizens have a right
and a duty to ask
questions when it
appears that
Bahamian authorities
may have colluded
with agents of another
country to bypass the
sovereignty and due
processes of the laws
of The Bahamas.

resources and they believe in the rule of
law. But Bahamians see it as a big prob-
lem when suspects are put on trial and
convicted in the US media, and are
understandably alarmed when an Amer-
ican official attempts to do the same in
The Bahamas,

The Americans also have problems
with law enforcement and judicial
processes, It is not an unknown phe-
nomenon in America that people who
should be behind bars are let out by the
system to murder and rape again. There
was a case just recently in Indiana where
a child-murderer on parole killed a 16-
year-old girl,

Dozens of Americans convicted of
serious crimes, including murder, have
subsequently been proven innocent by
new evidence including DNA. Under
the present US administration, respect
for the rule of law is not held in the
highest regard at home or abroad.

Phestenore assurances about
due process in the US will like-
ly fall on deaf ears if due process in
The Bahamas is not respected by our
American friends. Due process can
sometimes take long in The Bahamas
but cases can go on for many years in
the US as well.

It is to our shame, unfortunately, that
too many Bahamians see nothing wrong
with drug trafficking or benefiting from
this nefarious trade, but it is wrong to
extrapolate from this that all Bahamians
are corrupt. The vast majority of us are
law-abiding and anxious to see those
who threaten our reputation, peace and
security put behind bars,

But we will not be persuaded to cut a
great road through the law because then
we will be exposed to lawlessness and
the loss of rights we have cherished for
many generations, even during the colo-
nial era. -

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www. bahamapundit, typepad.com



from people who are
making news in their

for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





*

:

neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

¢

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

© In brief

AOUPE READ NeD OOO eSeRPeEReOeeF eR EDF eR aeRER Naren Tereeserenrenneney,

Ladies in
White invite
Sheehan to
pay a visit
@ HAVANA

WIVES and mothers of
Cuban political prisoners urged
US peace activist Cindy Shee-
han on Monday to visit the
island’s state-run jails during
her weeklong trip to Cuba to
call for the closure of the US-
operated Guantanamo prison,
according to Associated Press.

The Ladies in White, a group
of women demanding the release
of their loved ones, described
what they called “inhumane”
conditions at Cuba’s prisons in
a letter for Sheehan that was sent
to international reporters, The
group said it was trying to get a
copy to Sheehan as well.

“At the same time you and
your noble followers fight for the
closure of the US prison at the
Guantanamo naval.base.., just a
few miles away at the provincial
Guantanamo prison in Cuban
territory, peaceful and defenseless
political prisoners suffer inhu-
mane conditions, (living) with-
out potable water and with poor
nutrition, deficient medical assis-
tance, insects and rodents, limited
visits and precarious communi-
cation,” the letter said.

"We exhort you to visit the
prisons of Cuba, chosen ran-
domly, and not those prepared”
by authorities, it added.

Sheehan arrived in Havana
on Saturday with a dozen other
peace activists and plans to
attend a human rights confer-
ence in the eastern Cuban city
of Guantanamo on Wednesday.
On Thursday, the group is to
hold a protest outside the US
Navy’s Guantanamo base,
where nearly 400 men are being
held on suspicion of links to al-
Qaida or the Taliban.

In the letter, the Ladies in
White said they are a peaceful
group that faces constant harass-
ment from Cuban officials. They
also asked Sheehan to meet with
them so she “could know this
other reality of Cuban society.”

Their jailed husbands and
sons are among 75 activists
rounded up in the spring of
2003 and sentenced to prison
terms ranging from six to 28
years, Sixteen of those prisoners
have since been released for
health reasons, but more than
300 human rights activists, inde-
ee journalists and mem-

ers of outlawed political par-
ties remain behind bars, accord-
ing to rights groups.

Thursday’s protest outside
the US military base will coin-
cide with demonstrations
around the world to mark the
fifth anniversary of the first pris-
oners’ arrival.

rats: ee
STEEL NS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

















*
THE TRIBUNE _ TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 3

om brie’ Dredging at Dick’s Point ix:
accused of | . message’
over five



being in car

theft ring

FOUR men accused of
being a part of a car theft ring
were arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday after-
noon.

A warrant of arrest was
issued yesterday for another
man who failed to appear in
court.

Lamar McNeil, 21, of
Carmichael Road; Renaldo
Clarke and Kierran Cephas,
both 22 of Sunset Park; and
Marcello McKenzie were
arraigned before Magistrate
Renee McKay at court six on
Parliament Street.

The men were accused of
stealing 20 vehicles, namely
1996 and 1997 Honda cars.

The thefts, it is alleged,
took place between Thurs-
day, July 27, 2006 and
Wednesday, January 3, 2007.

The men, who were all rep-
resented by an attorney,
pleaded not guilty to all theft
charges.

Michael Hanna, who is also
charged in connection with
the thefts, did not appear in
court yesterday and a war-
rant was issued for his arrest.

The men who did appear
were remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. They will
return to court on January 17
' for a bail hearing.

Inspector Bradley Sands,
who is prosecuting the case,
said he was advised that some
of the men are currently
before the court on similar
charges. :

Attorney Wilbert Moss
asked that his clients, McNeil
and Cephas, be taken to
Princess Margaret Hospital
before being taken to the
prison.

According to Mr Moss,
there was a mark on the left
side of Cephas’ mouth, which
he claimed resulted from
being kicked in the face by a":
police officer.

The magistrate ordered
that the men be taken to hos-
pital before they were :
remanded.

Man jailed
for two years
on weapons
charge

A MAN was sentenced to
serve time in prison yester-
day after pleading guilty to
weapons charges.

Carlton Smith, 22,. of
Pizewood Gardens, appeared
befcre Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at court eight in Bank
Lane yesterday.

_ It was alleged that on Sat-
urday, January 6, Smith was
found in possession of an
unlicensed chrome and black
.380 Lorcin pistol.

A second charge alleged
that he was also found in pos-
session of 40 rounds of .380
ammunition.

Smith pleaded guilty to
both charges and was sen-
tenced to serve two years in
prison on each. The sentences
are to run concurrently.

Marijuana
and cocaine
possession
is denied

A MAN was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday
on marijuana and cocaine
possession charges.

Court dockets alleged that
Terry Collie, 28, of Coral
Harbour was found on Janu-
ary 6 in possession of a quan-
tity of marijuana which
authorities believed he
intended to supply to another.

A second charge alleged
that on that same date, Collie
was found in possession of a
quantity of cocaine which
authorities believed he
intended to supply to another.

Collie, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel, pleaded not guilty to
both charges and was
remanded to prison.

__ He will return to court on
January 15 for a bail hearing.

According to the prosecu-
tion, Collie is charged with
being found in possession of
half an ounce of marijuana
and five grams of cocaine.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE.
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
822-2157



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

COMPLAINTS made about
dredging at Dick's Point Close
are “definitely personal," as
work being done in the area is
restoring rather than destroy-
ing the natural environment,
according to project manager,
Bernie Minnis.

On Saturday, a resident told
The Tribune that work done in
the waterfront in front of her
Eastern Road home was “dis-
gusting” and a “national mat-
ter”. She complained that her
quiet, peaceful environment had
been transformed into a
construction site”.

However, it is not only this
resident who claims to have the
best interests of the natural
environment in mind.

Yesterday, the two home-
owners behind the dredging
work, Jeff and Mary Waterous,

who are currently out of the

country, responded to Saturday’s
article through representatives.

They said that rather than
having destroyed the environ-
ment for their own convenience
— part of the work included
creating a deep passage way for
their yacht — they have cleaned
up the environment and are in
the process of creating a “bio-
logically productive marine
ecosystem”.

Bernie Minnis, long term pro-
ject manager and president of
the Artistic Group, said that pri-
or to his bosses' decision to
dredge the area — in the
process creating a sandy beach
in front of, and alongside the
other resident's property — the
waterfront was a mess of green,
odorous sludge: the result of 25
years of “toxic waste satura-
tion” from septic tanks in sur-
rounding neighbourhoods.

Now, the shallow turquoise
waters are clear with a sandy
bottom, unlike further down the
coast, and marine life — includ-
ing one large school of fish at
the time the press conference

A VIEW of boulders separating

house at Dick’s Point Close

was held — can be seen popu-
lating the area, Mr Minnis said.

However, mangroves were
removed from the flats that
have been dredged and though
the couple said in a press state-
ment that they intend to restore
the plants — which create a nurs-
ery for young sea life — in line
with conditions imposed by goy-
ernment at the time their permit
was issued, the area is currently
devoid of aquatic flora.

Meanwhile, pictures of the:

shores before the dredging
show that it was a greenish,
mossy and less sandy area —
but, as has been pointed out by
environmentalist Sam Dun-
combe, these shallow areas can
provide crucial feeding grounds
for marine life.

In Mr Minnis’ opinion, how-
ever, the area was "dead" prior
to the Waterous' decision to
dredge it, while the Watérous'
say that the completion of their

dss

"vision" of creating a "bird and
marine habitat" as part of their
project have been delayed due
to "circumstances beyond
(their) control" — possibly
referring to the "stop order"
issued by government follow-
ing the resident's complaints.

Mr Minnis said that he could
understand why the neighbour
was upset at the time she origi-
nally complained — dredging
has created a 15 foot high pile of
sand and rubble in front of her
property.

However, he added: “As
with everything, things are
going to have to look bad
before they look good.”

The complaining resident,
however — who appeared on

the scene during the press con- -

ference — angrily described the

' area asa "mess".

She encouraged the press to
return to view the scene at
lowtide. At that time, boulders

‘to clean up enviroment’.



the dredged from shallow area in front of an angry resident’s

(Photo: Ana-Bianca Marin)

lining the dredged passage way
stand exposed out of the water

— “blocking” her access to the |}

ocean, and the passage by which

sealife would have entered the

area previously, she claims.
She added — and Mr Minnis

- confirmed — that the foreign

couple only live in the Bahamas
on a temporary basis, while she,
and her children, live with the
work and its consequences on a
daily basis.

Mr and Mrs Waterous have
invited members of the public
to view the work done in the
area: “Interested members of
the public are welcome to come
and see the improved quality of
beach front...(and) restored
ecosystem and improved quali-
ty of beach now existing at
Dick's Point Close.”

Relevant government min-
istries have stopped the work
at Dick’s Point while investiga-
tions are conducted.

baggage
handlers

FORMER MP Lester
Turnquest yesterday lashed
out at the FNM for a state-
ment on the arrests of five
baggage handlers which he
described as "cynical and
manipulative."

In its weekly news release,
the FNM claimed that a
smoke and mirrors public
relations campaign is being
used to cover up the highly
irregular manner in which
five Bahamian citizens may
have been lured and arrested
in the United States for
alleged drug trafficking.

The party said "the public
wants to know and has a right
to know the details of the
case so that a balanced judg-
ment can be made on what
are now _ inconclusive
reports.”

The party said the key
issues at stake are “not the
reputations of the prime min-
ister and his colleagues, but
rather the Bahamian sover-
eignty and the integrity of the
country's laws."

According to Mr Turn-
quest, once chairman of Nas-
sau Flight Services, the FNM
is sending the wrong message
to young people.

Mr Turnquest referred to
the FNM's news release as
"cheap politics."

"The youth of this coun-
try deserve better," he said.
"This statement is a cynical
and manipulative statement
and I pray that the commu-
nity leaders can see it for
what it is," he said.

"If the allegation is that
narcotics were transported to
the United States, the US is
well within its rights to arrest
you if you land in the US.
The Bahamas is well within
its rights to arrest you if you.
stay within the Bahamas. The
US authorities moved first,"
Mr Turnquest said: > >*- =

Chavez to nationalise companies in new
move to ‘socialist republic of Venezuela’

B@ VENEZUELA
Caracas



PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
announced plans Monday to
nationalise Venezuela’s electri-
cal and telecommunications
companies and amend the con-
stitution as he moves to trans-
form his country into a socialist
state, according to Associated
Press.

“All of that which was priva-
tised, let it be nationalised,”
Chavez said in a televised
speech, referring to “all of those
sectors in an area so important
and strategic for all of us as is
electricity.”

“The nation should recover
its ownership of strategic sec-
tors,” he added after swearing
in a new Cabinet.

Chavez also said he wanted
a constitutional amendment to
eliminate the autonomy of the
Central Bank. ,

“We're moving toward a
socialist republic of Venezuela,
and that requires a deep reform
of our national constitution,”
Chavez said.

Before Chavez was re-elected
by a wide margin last month,
he promised to take a more rad-
ical turn toward socialism. Mon-
day’s announcement appeared
likely to affect Electricidad de
Caracas, owned by Arlington,
Virginia-based AES Corp, and
C.A. Nacional Telefonos de
Venezuela, known as CANTV,
the country’s largest publicly
traded company.

Chavez also said he would
soon ask the National Assem-
bly, which is solidly controlled
by his allies, to approve a law
giving him powers to approve
such changes by decree.

Chavez said that lucrative oil
projects in the Orinoco River
basin involving foreign oil com-
panies should be under nation-
al ownership. He didn’t spell
out whether that meant a com-
plete nationalisation, but said
any vestiges of private control
over the energy sector should
be undone.

“I’m referring to how inter-
national companies have con-

..trol and power over all those

processes of improving the
heavy crudes of the Orinoco



@ HUGO Chavez

(Photo: AP)

belt — no — that should become
the property of the nation,”
Chavez said. .

In the oil sector, it didn’t
appear Chavez was ruling out
all private investment. Since last
year, his government has been
in talks with foreign investors
on forming “mixed companies”
with a majority stake held by
the state to upgrade heayy
crude in the Orinoco. Such joint
ventures have already been
formed in other parts of the
country.

Chavez threatened last
August to nationalize CANTV,
a Caracas-based former state
firm that was privatized in 1991,






Restoration Specialist.




ata fraction of replacement cost.

Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone

* Marble Polishing, Restoration & Care





CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Most THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB 1s FREE!
NASSAU’S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.

Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &

Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new

Carpet, Sofa’s, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,

* Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
www.prochemsystem.com * www.stonetechpro.com ® www.tierc,org
* psp @coralwave.com

unless it adjusted its pension
payments to current minimum-
wage levels, which have been
repeatedly increased by his gov-
ernment.

After Chavez’s announce-
ment, American Depositary
Receipts of CANTV immedi-
ately plunged 14.2 per cent on
the New York Stock Exchange
to US$16.84 before the
exchange halted trading. An
NYSE spokesman said it was
unknown when trading might
resume for CANTY, the only
Venezuelan company listed on
the Big Board.

Investors with sizable hold-
ings in CANTV’s ADRs
include some well-known
names on Wall Street, includ-
ing Deutsche Bank Securities
Inc., UBS Securities LLC and
Morgan Stanley & Co. But the
biggest shareholder, according
to Thomson Financial, appears
to be Brandes Investment Part-
ners LP, an investment adviso-
ry company in California. Also
holding a noteworthy stake is
Julius Baer Investment Man-
agement LLC, a Swiss invest-
ment manager.

Chavez’s nationalisation
announcement came in his first
speech of the year, a fiery
address in which he used a vul-
gar word roughly meaning
“idiot” to refer to Organization
of American States Secretary-
General Jose Miguel Insulza.

Chavez lashed out at Insulza












- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)






for questioning his governmen-
t’s decision not to renew the
licence of an opposition-aligned
TV station.

“Dr Insulza is quite an idiot, a
true idiot,” Chavez said. “The
insipid Dr Insulza should resign
from the secretariat of the
Organisation of American States
for daring to play that role.”










Fabulous Shopping

-RITCHARD DESIGN GROUP

Cuba nationalised major
industries shortly after Fidel
Castro came to power in 1959,
and Bolivia’s Evo Morales
moved to nationalize key sec-
tors after taking office last year.
The two countries are Chavez’s
closest allies in Latin America,
where many leftists have come
to power in recent years.





Nassau’s Premier Store

For eri 4

&

N

BAYPARL BUILDING on

PARLIAMENT STREET
Tel: 323-6145 Fax: 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121
email: pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

A suggestion for govt. to consider

IN THIS column yesterday we discussed
how England is turning to private medicine to
help bolster its collapsing National Health Ser-
vice.

Last week British newspapers published arti-
cles on operations being cancelled as that coun-
try’s “NHS;runs out of money.”

Prime Minister Perry Christie sees such sit-
uations as “challenges” to be solved by the
system. We see it, especially after all the fan-
fare and high hopés when it was introduced in
England 59 years ago, as a dismal failure.

But what is interesting is that England is
solving its failures — from which it cannot
politically escape — by a system suggested by
Dr Conville Brown who heads the Bahamas
Heart Centre on Collins Avenue.

Instead of seriously considering the service
that Britain is now trying to ease into, for some
unknown reason the Christie government is
going to take a plunge head-first into the fail-
ing system from which that country is now try-
ing to escape. The PLP government has
promised the people “free medicine” — the
paternalistic “cradle to the grave” approach
— as an election gimmick. What is interesting
is that it would appear that government will go
into the election with just a promise — “free”
health care. We doubt that they would have the
nerve to even attempt to implement it before
the election, because, while it took the British
system 59 years to get bogged down, it will
take the Bahamian people only a few weeks to
discover that they have been sold a bitter
lemon, the frustration of which — when they
fail to get the services promised — will only
increase their hypertension.

We see a Cancer Centre sign at the Princess
Margaret Hospital, which we are told spe-
cialises in chemotherapy treatment for cancer
patients. We have also heard patients com-
plain that very often this centre runs out of
the chemotherapy and they have to buy it
themselves to get their treatment. Of course,
our politicians will probably tell you that such
a thing will not happen under their nation-
alised health system, but anyone who believes

_ this has truly earned for himself a free bed in
Sandilands:

Let’s take the Bahamas Heart Centre as a
possibility of what could be done with a part-
nership between government and private med-
icine. For the past two years government has
contracted the Heart Centre to do the radiation
treatment for its patients rather than send
them to Miami as it once did.

Here is a state-of-the-art clinic, which spe-
cialises in heart and cancer, and on which pri-
vate enterprise has invested $15 million. This



‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer}
‘99 HYUNDAI ELANTRA |
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘(04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low milec.ge

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

investment represents 10 per cent of govern-
ment’s $185 million budget for health care,

_ and $40 million for environmental protection.

If government — at the special half prices
offered indigent patients — contracted this
private clinic to take care of its patients, it
would represent a tremendous saving to the
Treasury. A clinic — far superior to anything
government could afford — that would be
responsible for its own staffing and mainte-
nance, would release funds that government
could spend in other areas of health care.

As someone remarked: “When you enter
the lobby of that clinic, those feet planted on
the same marble floor are the feet of people
from Lyford Cay, the Eastern Road and Goal
Alley. To look at them no one would know
the difference. They are all treated by the same
highly skilled doctors, the same high quality
equipment, the best medicines — there is no
diminution of services or treatment for the
poor man. One patient can afford to pay his
bills privately, the other by insurance, and the
poor man with a 50 per cent discount paid for
by government. But once their feet touch that
marble floor, they are all equal in the eyes of
their doctors.”

At present the Princess Margaret Hospital
cannot handle the patients it now has without
long waiting lines. The pressure and anger of

“waiting patients will only increase when the

already overworked government doctors will

‘not be able to care for their needs, despite all
‘othe national health insurance promises by

politicians.

Some smart wag remarked that government
probably planned to import Cuban doctors to
fill the gap, and staff the Family Island clinics.
Everything is possible, but it is now time for the
Coalition for Health Care Reform to speak
up to let Bahamians know what's happening,
because government has suddenly gone mute.

On Monday, December 11, The Tribune
published an article from the Coalition
announcing that sometime that week its mem-
bers would meet with Health Minister Bernard
Nottage to discuss their concerns with the
National Health Insurance scheme as present-
ly drafted.

Did that meeting ever take place? If so
what was the outcome? We know that to date
doctors have not received the much promised
working notes and actuarial report promised by
Dr Nottage to determine how government
arrived at the $235 million figure as the annu-
al cost of the plan. .

The Bahamian people were certainly misled
on the not-so-optimistic “thumbs up” ILO
report. How else are we being hoodwinked?



Majority Rule -
forty years later

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE was a very spe-
cial spirit that guided and
empowered those Bahami-
an warriors whose hard
work paved the way to the
stunning victory at the polls
on January 10, 1967. As we
observe the fortieth mile-
stone, I would challenge
Bahamians to bring that
spirit to life again. Even
though we are in a far better
place than were those nation
builders forty years ago, that
bold and courageous spirit
is needed today more than
ever. The Bahamas needs
those kind of men and
women to continue the
social and economic revolu-
tion, who refuse to become
complacent with the status
quo as many have become
today. We need more peo-
ple with that January 10th
vision, people who know
that without vigilance, his-
tory does repeat itself.

I would like to see all
Bahamians remember and
appreciate that while some
would have us believe that
those were the “good old
days” those days were really
not good. Instead, they were
times that inspired men and
women to take great risks
and display amazing
courage, the kind of courage
I believe our society needs
now more than ever, in
order to make the sweeping
changes that we need today.

Looking back to that era,

an election was then, as it is:

today,.an occasion for spir-
ited debate and attention-
grabbing rhetoric. Whether
it came every seven years,
as it did until the 1960’s, or
every, five years, as it does
today,,it was always a time
for. lively discussion,
notwithstanding that. the
outcome was usually accept-
ed as a foregone conclusion.
However, when the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party was
founded in 1953, a belief
began to grow in the hearts
of men and women that they
could have a real impact on
the electoral process instead
of just casting their vote in
the way that they were
expected to do in order to
remain secure in their jobs
and their lives.
Bahamians did _ this
because, for a very long
time, they were afraid that,
if they did not do as was
expected, their very survival
would be in jeopardy, their
jobs in peril and.their mort-
gages held by those same
businessmen called in and
their homes lost. It was this

Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

For all of your hydraulic hose requirements
contact

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net i



sweeping fear of reprisal
and recrimination that kept
Bahamians voting as they
did for so long, electing
members of the so-called
“Bay Street Boys” to the
House of Assembly.

The election of 1962, the
first time women could vote,
was a severe and crushing
disappointment to the
majority of Bahamian vot-
ers. It also seemed to con-
firm what they had feared:
that no matter how they vot-
ed, the ruling group would
somehow manage to retain
their stranglehold on the
House of Assembly and the
lives of the majority of the
people. It was that election
when the Progressive Liber-
al Party polled the most
votes, but still won a minor-
ity number of seats in the
House, proving beyond a
shadow of doubt that the
“Bay Street Boys” would do
anything to stay in power.

However, the election of
62 was a defining moment
for the PLP. From this
moment, they knew their
job was to build up a rock-
hard resolve and determina-
tion in the Bahamian peo-
ple that the majority voice
would prevail in the next
election. For the next five
years, perseverance, dedica-
tion and bravery in the face
of threats to their very wel-
fare were demonstrated by
men and women who
believed in the cause, who
believed that the majority

of Bahamians had a right to"
be heard and a right to have.

a voice in choosing their
government. They worked
ceaselessly, in New Provi-
dence and in the Family
Islands. They worked to
inspire their brothers and
sisters; they worked to ease
the fears that were being
cultivated by those politi-
cians who were terrified of
being out of power. Little
by little, Bahamians began
to believe in themselves and
to believe that the stories
about how black men and
women could not govern
and that jobs would disap-
pear if they came to power
were nothing but lies spread
by cowardly and dishonest
men to confuse the elec-
torate and maintain them as
second class citizens in their
own country.

Moments like the bold
events of Black Tuesday and
the Delegation of Eight’s
visit to the United Nations
in 1965 only served to
strengthen the resolve of the
Bahamian people who had
been denied their rightful
place in their country for so
long. By the time the UBP
had prorogued the House
and called an early election
for January 10, 1967,
Bahamians were ready to do
what they had to do in order







Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter
no later than 31st January 2007 to:

LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

FT

We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department,
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.

to lay claim to their nation.
Despite having to campaign
in the Christmas season, by
the time January 10th
dawned, minds were firmly
made up and the electorate
went to the polls determined
to have their voices heard.

And, when January 11th
dawned bright and clear, all
the work and struggle of the
past decade bore fruit. The
PLP tied the UBP with the
number of men elected to
the House of Assembly. It
was only when Labour’s
Randol Fawkes decided to
throw his support behind
the PLP and Independent
MP Alvin Braynen agreed
to assume the post of Speak-
er of the House that Lynden
Pindling became the first
PLP Premier of The
Bahamas.

It is this unquenchable
and inspiring spirit of our
people who laboured long
and hard in order to create
the victory of January 10,
1967 that carried The
Bahamas forward to Inde-
pendence, that led to the
formation of institutions like
Government secondary
schools, the Central Bank,
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, the College — soon to
be university = of The
Bahamas, the Bahamianisa-
tion of our work force, the
burgeoning pride in our cul-
ture, the nurturing of our
medal winning athletes and
the explosion of our exem-
plary Tourism industry that
is the envy of the region.

And it is this January 10th
spirit that needs to be
reawakened today, in the
hearts and minds of every
Bahamian who cares to see
his nation and his fellow
countrymen continue to
develop and reach the
heights of their professions.
We can no longer assume
that the hard-won freedoms
represented by the victory
of January 10, 1967 do not
need to be protected and
defended. We need to work
hard to ensure that the clock
is not turned backward. We
must not lose focus nox + lax
our vigilance.

As we come togethes YD
commemorate the ivima
decades since the majority’s
voice was heard clearly
throughout our land, let us

resolve that the best way to ~.

celebrate those freedom
fighters would be to emu-
late their spirit and allow no
one in today’s or tomor-
row’s Bahamas to silence
our voices or thrust us back-
ward. Let us resolve to
always keep that fearless
dedication foremost in our
minds so that forty years
from today our children and
their children can celebrate
our vision and our courage
at keeping freedom and
prosperity alive for all who
live in our Bahamas.

SENATOR PHILIP
GALANIS

Nassau,

January 7, 2007.


















= HR Manager
QUALITY: rms

ais Benie Ria Versatility Productivity Reliability Nassau, Bahamas



Crawford St., Oakes Field

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 © 325-3079 Tel: 323-5171 Fax: 322-6969

Visit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway ° 352-6122


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5



@In brief Workers Party steps up call
- for sacking of Fred Mitchell

Two women
in hospital
after car
accident

FREEPORT - Two
women were hospitalised
early Monday morning when
the vehicle they were in over-
turned and crashed into a
house on Bayshore Road,
Eight Mile Rock.

According to reports, the
accident occurred in the Rus-
sell Town area around
12.27am when Anastacia
Cooper, 21, of Hanna Hill,
EMR, lost control of a
maroon coloured Ford Tau-
rus, licence number 39750.

_ Shauna Theog, 20, also a
resident of Hanna Hill, was a
passenger in the car.

The vehicle skidded off the

_road and overturned several
times before crashing into the
residence of Mr Philip Out-
ten and another vehicle that
was parked in the ‘yard.

Ms Cooper’s vehicle was
extensively damaged. A por-
tion of Mr Outten’s home
and a vehicle that was parked
in the yard was also exten-
sively damage.

Both women were injured
and taken by ambulance to
the Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal, where they underwent
surgery. They are both list-

- ed in stable condition.

No one inside the house
was injured.

Although police are still
continuing their investiga-
tions, Mr Rahming said that
excessive speed appears to
be the cause of the accident.

Turnquest:
I left FNM

because of
leadership

FORMER MP Lester
Turnquest claims that FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham’s
style of leadership was the
main reason he left his for-
mer party and is now backing
the PLP. .

Speaking with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Turn-
quest said that Mr Ingraham
had his time to govern and
he would have liked to have
seen new leadership for the
FNM.

“Mr Ingraham had his

_time. Mr Ingraham’s style of
leadership is not one that I
like, nor is it one that I can
support. It is as simple as
that,” Mr Turnquest said.

"What I would have want-
ed to see in the Free Nation-
al Movement would have
been a changing of the
guard,” Mr Turnquest said.

“In reality that has not
happened and the party is
entitled and well within its
rights to go back to the past
and say that they want Mr
Ingraham to lead them, but,
as a young Bahamian man, I
prefer to move forward,” Mr
Turnquest said.

“My position is that, what-
ever failings Prime Minister
Christie may have, as we all
have, Mr Christie seeks to
unite and Mr Ingraham in
reality is a divider,” Mr Turn-

quest said.

TV 18 SCHEDULE

TUESDAY,
JANUARY 9

6:00 Community page 1540am
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
Island Life Destinations
Ethnic Health America
Thousand Dollar Bee

Aqua Kids

Kemp Road Ministries

Ernest Leonard

Little Robots

Carmen San Diego

ZNS News Update

The Fun Farm

One Cubed

News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

Kristen Penn-Davis Launch
Ceremony

Island Lifestyles

Holby City

10: 00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves tne
right to make last minute






























THE Workers Party has
renewed its call for the sacking
of Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell, claiming his former
website had launched a “sexist”
attack on appeal court presi-
‘dent Dame Joan Sawyer.

It said Dame Joan had
become the latest person to be
“knifed” on the former fred-
mitchelluncensored website for
saying something critical of the
government.

The party blamed Prime Min-
ister Pony Christie for allowing

the website to continue under
another name, saying he was
“too weak and indecisive to halt
this filthy and sexist diatribe.”

And it said the site should
have ended with Mr Mitchell’s
appointment to the Cabinet.

The party had previously
called for Mr Mitchell’s dismissal
for allegedly “dropping the ball”
in the case of The Florida Five -
the baggage handlers arrested
in Fort Lauderdale for alleged
drug smuggling.

It has alleged that the gov-

ernment was involved in a con-
spiracy to undermine Bahamian
sovereignty and circumvent the
extradition process.

In a speech last week, Dame
Joan asked what justice in the
Bahamas meant, referring to

- 200 cases that had remained

unresolved since the 1990s.

@ FRED Mitchell has
been criticised by the
Workers Party



New security initiative to be
opened at container port



JOHN Rood is expected for
the opening of the security
programme

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Contain-
er Security Initiative pro-
gramme, which allows for pre-
screening of containers at
Freeport Container Port, will
be officially launched on
Wednesday.

US Ambassador John Rood
and Prime Minister Perry
Christie are expected to arrive
in Freeport for the official
launching ceremony that will
take place at 10am at the con-
tainer port.

Mr William Heffelinger III,
Deputy Assistant Commission-
er in the Office of Field Opera-
tions, also will attend and speak
at the commissioning.

In August 2006, US Customs

and Border Protection (CBP)
and the government signed an
agreement to participate in the
Container Security Initiative
(CSI) programme that ensures
that all maritime cargo destined
for the United States through
the port of Freeport will be pre-
screened for terrorist and
weapons.

According to a press release
issued by the US Embassy, CSI
is a key initiative designed to
prevent global maritime cargo
from being exploited by terror-
ists intent to cause harm in
America and other nations
worldwide.

The container port is located
65 miles from Fort Lauderdale.
About 40 per cent of cargo con-
tainers at FCP are destined for
ports in the US.

Initially, when the memo-
randum of understanding was
signed between the Depart-
ment of Energy of the United
States of America and the Min-
istry of Finance in December
of 2004, the Bahamas became
the first country in the
Caribbean to participate in the
initiative.

Last October, the equipment
that will be used to pre-screen
containers were installed at the
port. US Customs officials also
will be deployed at the site.

The Megaport Initiative
works with foreign governments
to install sophisticated equip-
ment to deter, detect and inter-
dict illicit trafficking in nuclear
and other radioactive materi-
als.

The initiative helps to make

the Bahamas’ port safer by
reducing the probability that
such materials could be used in
a weapon of mass destruction
or a radiological dispersal
device against communities in
the United States.

While in Freeport, Ambas-
sador Rood is also expected to
visit two primary schools on the
island.

He will first visit Mary, Star
of the Sea School at 2pm, and
then Martin Town Primary at
2.40pm. Mr Rood will present
each school with an auto-
graphed photo along with a per-
sonalised letter from first lady
Laura Bush thanking the
schools for participating in
Ambassador Rood’s Reading
Initiative Programme.

ecu tLbg 0k eieGtdoaZs on ssn ide sbvusbennvdduasssae)tebsvdeaseovsvecuascheoubassndusccctstendgsaaades usetyaeaaeatuckevasa cauepseOelaneeheedh deeds nenees betas HEE TENET ane ee ee ne ee ee a ee eat tet nt te a ee ee ne eae eee eee eee SET

800 new students expected for spring term at COB

ANOTHER semester is
about to begin at The College
of The Bahamas as it maintains
its momentum towards full uni-
versity status in the near future.
Committed to expanding its stu-
dent population, the College is
welcoming about 800 new stu-
dents — 600 in Nassau and 200 in
Grand Bahama -— for the Spring
Semester 2007.

To put these first-year stu-
dents firmly on the path to suc-
cess in their college career,
COB began its annual orienta-
tion for new students on Janu-
ary 3 this year.

Student Orientation, Advise-
ment and Registration (SOAR)
is a programme of activities
comprising a variety of presen-
tations, mini-lectures, socials
and a parents evening, is
designed to give the new stu-

dents the opportunity to accli-
matize themselves to the chal-
lenges and opportunities of col-
lege life generally, particularly
by providing information to
help new students understand
ways to make the most of their
time at COB. WIN

Vice-President of Student
Affairs, Colyn Major, explained:
“There are all sorts of academ-
ic rules, including dates and
deadlines, social rules, includ-
ing do’s and don’ts. There are
also many available services
that the new students really
need to know about if they are
to function to the best of their
academic potential and devel-
op individually as people. We
try to give them an overview of
all these in the orientation
process.”

Dr Rhonda Chipman-John-

COB appoints new head of
hospitality propgramme

THE College of the
Bahamas has appointed a new
executive director to head ‘its
Culinary and Hospitality Man-
agement Institute.

Dr Liacoln Marshall, a pro-
fessional with many awards to
his credit, is to help the insti-
tute realise its potential as a
major player in developing
young Bahamian talent to take
advantage of increasing oppor-
tunities in a burgeoning
Bahamas tourism and hospital-
ity industry — particularly in
connection with the new resort
anchor projects throughout the
islands.

A man with strong links to
the country and the College of
the Bahamas and a wealth of
experience in both academics

and the hospitality industry, Dr’

Marshall returns to COB 28
years after his first stint at the
Oakes Field campus.

He worked in the office of
admissions from 1977 to 1979
and spent four years at the
Bahamas Hotel Training College
in the 1980s. Dr Marshall has
also worked in France, Mada-
gascar, Grand Bahama, Cable
Beach and Washington, DC.

When he was a student at
Government High School, Dr
Keva Bethel, COB’s first presi-
dent, was his homeroom
teacher and during his first spell
at the college, the current pres-
ident, Janyne Hodder, was
teaching reading in the Human-
ities Department. -

“I regard COB rather like
an old girl friend,” he said, “and
I am looking forward to becom-
ing reacquainted.

Born in Over-the-Hill Mil-
ton Street, Dr Marshall attend-
ed St John’s College before

moving on to Government High
to study for his ‘A’ levels. Upon
graduating, he went to Grinnell
College in Iowa for his first
degrees before attending The
George Washington Universi-
ty to complete his PhD.

Dr Marshall is a hands-on
trainer and educator for the hos-
pitality industry. “I was director
of Training and Development at
Carnival’s Crystal Palace when it
first opened on Cable Beach,”
he recollects, “and I set up a
training and service academy
that was unique at its time. It
was very much the forerunner
to what Atlantis is doing now.”

Prior to returning to the
Bahamas he was working at the
George Washington Universi-
ty’s School of Business in the
Tourism and Hospitality
Department. Once again focus-
ing on training for the industry,
he designed and developed six
hotel certificate programmes for
students already working in the
industry, in addition to work-
ing with the National Indian
Gaming Association.

Excited to be back in the
Bahamas and sensing the great
opportunities that COB’s pre-
sent direction is offering, Dr
Marshall has already devised a
strategic plan for the Institute
for the next three years and
brings with him energy and
desire to succeed. “I am not a sit
in my office type of director,”
he says, “I like to go walkabout
and move around. I believe this
will be essential if we are to
build the type of relationships
that we need to maintain the
Institute’s and COB’s position
in the forefront of culinary, hos-
pitality and tourism develop-
ment in the country.”

son, Vice-President Academic
Affairs, sees the orientation
process as essential for students
who are taking their first steps
in the waters of tertiary educa-
tion. “We want our students to
become familiar with the Col-
lege’s policies and procedurés
from the people who know,”
she said. “We don’t want them
to hear about them second hand
from a friend.”

Among the presentations
organized at this semester’s ori-
entation day were sessions on
“Reaching Your Academic
Potential”, “Libraries Informa-
tion”, “Using Technology”,
“Safety and Security” and
“Sex”. In addition to these top-
ics that were presented by COB
counsellors, administrators and
Management Information Ser-
vices personnel, COB Union of

Accredited + Registered -

Contact us now for

Students representatives spoke

about student life at COB.
Aware of the role parents

can play in assisting their young

adults in. college life, the Stu-

dent Services personnel also
invited parents to play a.role in
the: orientation process.In\a
presentation designed to
encourage them to treat their
offspring as adults, parents were
encouraged to let go of the
apron strings, but to continue
to monitor so they know exact-
ly what is going on.
Improvements in the regis-
tration process were a welcome
highlight of SOAR this year.
College administration took
steps to reduce the long lines

by decentralizing the process..

“Returning students were able
to register on-line and eventu-
ally, on-line registration will

eliminate the lines altogether,”
said Director of Counselling
and Health Services, Stan
Smith.

Approximately 400 students
attended the orientation pro-
gramme in Nassau and a anoth-
er 100 on the Freeport campus.
“A 60 per cent turnout was
encouraging,” said Mr Major,
“but we won’t be satisfied until
we have all our first year stu-
dents attending.” .

The College is determined
to improve its student services
and Dr Chipman-Johnson
believes that one improvement
would be to hold a second part
to the orientation programme
later in the semester to rein-
force what was presented at the
initial meeting. “It really is a lot
to take in at one sitting,” she
explained.

Diploma in Education

A Specially-Designed
Ya eM MELE LAG LLL LLM LO
Convenient Weekend Class Schedule
Hands-on Practicum (Reacher Training)
Lixperienced, Respected Lecturers and Xssessors

U.S. Certification (Praxis) Component
Atfordable Tuition Rates
Payment Plan Available

Classes begin on gth February, 2006

oe now for nO information

Call us at Ph: 394-8570 + Or Fax: 394- ee)

TCE ELUTE UEC HLS Ce LULL ald visit us at http:sojournerdouglassblogspot.com
Claes Colt Circle A EE) a! Street.

‘erseateat tint ontatrenAe

canton “ae BN con ET ANE OMNES MNT




THE TRIBUNE

Farquharson: we'll be
prepared for elections

THIS year the Royal
Bahamas Police Force is expect-
ed to ensure that they are prop-
erly prepared and equipped for
the upcoming general elections,
police commissioner Paul Far-

quharson said yesterday at the |

Senior officers attend seminars on keeping peace



delivery of his annual report to
the nation.

Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

For the 2007/2008 School Year will be
held on January 13, 2007 at 8:00 am
at Kingsway Academy High School,
located on Bernard Road.

The examination is for those
students wishing to enter grades 7-10.

Application forms

are available

at the High School Office. The

application fee

is thirty

dollars

($30.00), to be made payable at
Kingsway Business Office on or before

Friday January 12, 2007

For Further
information Call

324-8811 or 324-3409









SmartChoice

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com



2006 FORD FUSION
$29,200.00

2.3L 4Cylinder Automatic
Full size luxury, loaded with leather
Make the SmartChoice!

See the full line of your favourite Ford vehicles at

IENDLY MOTORS LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ¢ TEL.: 356-7100 « FAX: 328-6094

¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

“All senior officers have been
put on notice since our last day
away and we are now in the
advance stages of ensuring that
officers are (equipped) with the
relevant laws and regulations
as they relate to the role of the
police in a general election,”
Mr Farquharson said.

In the commissioner’s policy
statement he said the force is
to ensure peaceful general elec-
tions.

He said that this election
promises to be as vibrant, active

cand challenging as those in the

past.

“We are fortunate to have a
populus that has historically
approached the general elec-
tions without violence. Howev-
er, the Royal Bahamas Police
Force will approach this elec-
tion season with strategic plan-
ning and training,” the com-

Rapes
three

@ By PAULG TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

REPORTED rapes in the
Bahamas have been on a “con-
tinual decline” over the past three
years, police revealed yesterday
during the annual press briefing at
Police Headquarters.

Last year, there were 72 report-
ed rape matters - a 12 per cent
decrease compared to the 82
reported in 2005, and a 16 per
cent decrease compared to the 86
reported in 2004.

Reports of attempted rape



PART OF YOUR LIFE

missioner said.

He said that officers must be
prepared for all incidents that
relate to public nuisance and
disturbances. “Accordingly offi-

cers are not to display any.

appearance of nepotism and
shall remain professional in
policing the 2007 general elec-
tions,” the commissioner said.

During 2006 senior comman-
ders and middle managers
attended seminars and meet-
ings to plan for the general elec-
tion. Topics of discussion
included:

e The role and authority of
the parliamentary registratio
department;

e The electoral process and
procedures;

e Public order and enforce-

* ment of all laws under the par-

liamentary registration act and
e limitations and obligations









@ PAUL Farquharson during the delivery of his annual report

yesterday

of the police before during and
after the election period. |

It is expected that officers will
utilise their training in public
order and crowd control so as to
prevent any disruptions at polit-
ical rallies and polling stations.

“Meanwhile we must ensure
that voters are not subject to

fear or any form of intimida-
tion. No form of anarchy will
be tolerated and such behav-
iour is non-negotiable. Officers
will exercise reasonable discre-
tion and prudent judgment in
the execution of their duties,”
Commissioner Farquharson
said.

in decline over past
ears, report reveals

showed a 26 per cent decline from
31 in 2004 to 23 in 2005 and 2006.
“It is interesting to note,” the
report stated, “that for the rape
matters reported in 2006, 40 of
the rape victims knew or were
acquainted with the assailant pri-
or to the commission of the crime.
“This victim-suspect ‘relation’
is a possible explanation for why
residences, whether victim or sus-
pect, was the most common
venue for the commission of the
crime followed by the suspect’s
vehicle which accounted for nine
cases, or 13 per cent of rapes.
“The rémainder occurred in
bushes With nine (13 per cent),

on beaches, seven (10 per cent),
hotels, four (six per cent) and at
other business establishments,
two (three per cent).”

The majority of these rapes, it
was revealed, occurred in the
Carmichael Division (10), with
the Southern Division coming a
close second with nine.

Eight matters were reported in
the Bain Town area, with four
being linked with other crimes,
such as armed robbery and bur-
glaries.

The Central Division also
reported eight rapes, with the
South-eastern Division reporting
seven. The Western Division had

six rape cases, and the Eastern
and the Grove Divisions both
reported four.

The North-eastern Division
recorded the least rapes with
three.

However, Grand Bahama
recorded 14 rapes, while the rest
of the seven cases were shared
among Abaco, Andros, Long
Island and San Salvador.

“Coupled with the fact that
there has been a constant
decrease of reported rapes within
recent years, the relentless efforts
of investigators have ensured that
the detection of rapes has height-
ened,” the report stated.



Fire blazes through
market in Port-au-Prince







@ ABOVE: A marked ven-
dor throws a bucket of water
as smoke billows after a fire
ripped through the La Cou-
ple market destroying mer-
chandise but causing no
injuries in the suburb of
Petionville in Port-au-Prince,
Monday, Jan. 8, 2007. The
cause of the blaze wasn't
immediately clear, but some
bystanders accused political
militants of torching the mar-
ket in a feud over last mon-
th's disputed local elections.
Police did not immediately
comment on the fire.



@ LEFT: A market vendor
carries his pet through the
burned out La Couple mar-
ket.

(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)
THE TRIBUNE

|



Gun crime reported

POLICE REPORT 2007

-as down in 2006



Detective Unit

@ CHIEF Supt Marvin Dames, officer in charge of the Central



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE re-focused fight
against illegal firearms is prov-
ing successful — as the use of
guns in both murders and
armed robberies decreased in
20006.

Speaking yesterday at the
police’s 2007 “meet the press
event” Chief Supt Marvin

~ Dames, officer in charge of the

Central Detective Unit, said
that last year the force record-
ed significant successes in their
effort to remove guns from the
country’s streets.

Mr Dames pointed out that
although there was a 15 per
cent increase of murders in
2006 compared to the previ-
ous year, there was a five per
cent drop in the use of
firearms during the commis-
sion of homicides.

In 2005, 65 per cent of all
murders were committed with
guns; in 2006 gunshot wounds
were the cause of death in 60
per cent of cases.

In the case of armed rob-
beries, Mr Dames said, police

saw a 35 per cent decrease in
the use of firearms.

Police officers, he said, have
done “a tremendous job in
keeping the firearm holders at
bay.” /

“The most common type of
firearm used to commit mur-
der was the 9mm, which has
been a trend in the last 15
years,” said the Central Detec-
tive Unit in its report for 2006.

A 9mm revolver was used
in 18, or 49 per cent, of all gun-
related murders.

“Hence, the vast majority of
gun related murders were
committed with the use of ille-
gal firearms, 90 per cent being
handguns,” the report said. _

The CDU further reported
that a significant increase in
the use of shotguns during the
commission of armed rob-
beries was observed last year.

The use of shotguns
increased by 55 per cent; from
29 cases in 2005 to 45 in 2006.

“It is believed that many of
these weapons were stolen
from the homes of licensed
shotgun holders,” the CDU
said.

Public claims that fear of crime
affecting their peace of mind

lm By CRYSTAL
JOHNSON-COLLIE

THE fear of robbery, rape
_and murder is destroying the
peace of mind of more and
more Bahamians who feel the
country is spiralling towards
chaos.

Members of the public say
they are aware that every day, a
murder or attempted murder is
committed somewhere in the
Bahamas — or a house is bur-
gled, a woman or child raped, or
someone physically abused.

Now, they say, the curse of
violent crime is not just in the
ghettos or depressed areas —
where it has long had a pres-
ence — but in all urban areas
and many suburbs and former-
ly quiet neighbourhoods.

In response to the spreading
fear, Bahamians are increasing-
ly arming themselves. “This is a
very serious issue, and I feel the
government needs to enforce
much more strict penalties for
persons caught breaking the
law,” said Patrick Wright, a res-
ident of the Fox Hill communi-

YOUR CONNECTION TO T

ty. “Many Bahamians have lost
confidence in our law enforce-
ment officials and strongly
believe that the police cannot
protect them.”

Other ordinary citizens who
spoke with The Tribune said
they are buying guard dogs, sup-
plies of Mace, knives and even
guns.

Locksmiths and burglar alarm

businesses are flourishing, as _

are martial arts and target
shooting schools. Banks have
long waiting lists for safety-
deposit boxes and many citizens
feel the nation’s sidewalks are
filled with muggers; both young
and old dread walking in cer-
tain areas.

But what is the reality behind
the growing fear? Crime statis-
tics have always been consid-
ered incomplete, as many vic-
tims avoid police, the courts or

-exposure of any kind.

While murders are almost
always recorded, it is widely
accepted that rape is under-
reported.

Historically, officers in charge
of police stations were suspect-

6

ed of down-playing the figures
in an effort to defend the image
of the force.

As one. senior officer
explains: “When I was a recruit
at several of the police stations,
no police chief worth his sweat
would admit they couldn't con-
trol crime — and they proved it
by controlling crime statistics.”

Since then, the force has
become more accountable — and
with this change has come the
realisation that the vast majori-
ty of law-abidig citizens are
being held hostage by the
unreasonable behaviour of a
relatively small cadre of career
criminals.

“Crime is the most serious
thing we face today,” said a
local judge. “It has an enormous
impact on the quality of peo-
ple's lives. It determines where
we walk, what time we walk,
even whether we play dominoes
at night and whether we go to
the theater.”

Those who stand on the front
line of the battle against crime
insist all Bahamians must break
out of their fortresses and join the

HE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE
Bae

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited (BTC) wishes to inform our valued
customers and the general public that BTC
will be conducting a routine service upgrade
to our cable network beginning Thursday
January 4° and concluding Friday January
12'", 2007. Due to this service upgrade,
subscribers in the following areas may
experience interruptions in land line services;
Blue Hill Road South between Cowpen Road
and Marshall Road, Zion Blvd to Zion Baptist
Church South Beach and Jasmine Gardens.
BTC values our customers and apologizes for
any inconvenience caused during this time.



fight — not in a physical way,
but as part of the search for
solutions. Drug traffickers can
be shunned, those who carry
illegal guns can be reported,
the criminal justice system can
be improved, and citizens turn
their fear and anger into the
kind of public pressure that will
make a difference.

Above all, police officers
argue, citizens must care
about their neighbors' safety
as well as their own.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7







FARA ARG HON 9 SSE EEE

BRAY RAMMING:






EMERGENCY 3 Eo
CRIME TIPSTERS 242-328-8474
cpu iy QUARTERS - NASSAU



Royal Bahamas Police Force
2007 MOST WANTED






POLICE CONTROL - NASSAL
TAMIA ENE R CL cent I ts
DE Peepers meats Prec kod Wile te






STAN AMEEY

sy, eters Hoobi toe



WATNE MAHER

2 REPRE BEN





PL CERES RSI
MA 242-380-3014
ee)











UUSVARED BY THE CAN TBA OF





@ POLICE have released this poster of their ‘mosted wanted’
for 2007. Anyone with information should call Crime Tipsters on
328-8474 or the CDU on 322-2561-3

Large drop in fire deaths

THERE was a 33 per cent
decrease in fire deaths last year,
fire chief Jeffrey Deveaux has
revealed.

In- addition, there was a 19
per cent fall-off in injured per-
sons and a successful rescue by
firemen of a male from a burn-
ing two-storey building in July.

Total reported emergency
incidents in 2005 were 1,931.
For 2006 fire calls totalled 1,776.
This reduction by 155 repre-
sents an eight per cent decrease.

The major contributor to this
decrease were garbage fires,
which fell by 30 per cent, and
the special service category with
a 46 per cent decline.

All other categories showed |.

slight increases except: yessel
fires and miscellaneous items,

with increases of 100“per-cent-

Come to the

and 50 per cent respectively.

There was a I|7 per cent
increase in what the department
considered “significant fires”
whereas overall fire damage
increased by 74 per cent.

The fire service saw an over-
all reduction in emergencies and
an increase in equipment.

Included in daily training
exercises were 31 new fire offi-
cers who joined in July last year.

Entry level training for this
team of 25 men and six women
began in March, 2006, at the
Police Training College.

Upon graduating, the officers
received eight weeks of rigor-
ous practical training.

The water supply section con-
ducted weekly checks of fire
hydrants, borewells and excavat-
ed wells ready for any emergency: ~

hurch of God of Prophec

Mind Changing, Heart Cleansing ©
Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and

~ Evangelistic Crusa e

Sunday, January [4th to Friday, January 19th, 2007

At 7:30p.m. Nightly at

The East Street Tabernacle
East Street and Sunlight Village

Under the Theme:

“IT’S ALL BECAUSE OF JESUS”

Dynamuc Speakers are:

Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, National Overseer, Bishop Charles
Gardiner, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Bishop Victor Johnson, Bishop Rudolph
W. Arthur and Bishop Dr. John N. Humes, National Overseer (C.O.G)

Hear our anointed Soloists, Antoine Cunningham,
hiliy , Gerard Butler, Shanette

National Crusade (
Tabernacle Concert Choir, the
Team and by the Chur


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 9



are commemorated

Women immortalised
on marble plaque



@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE —

AFTER 118 years of self-
less service to the Bahamas’
social and educational devel-
opment, the Sisters of Charity,
who “blessed the Bahamas”
with their presence, have been
commemorated.

In a ceremony on Thursday,
January 4, the names of those
women were immortalised.

A marble plaque, was set in
stone on the walls of the cathe-
dral during the liturgical cele-
bration at St Francis Xavier.
It reads, “This plaque com-
memorates our eternal grati-
tude to the Sisters of Charity
of Mount St. Vincent on the
Hudson, New York who were
the first permanent Catholic
Missionaries in the Bahamas.
Upon their arrival in Nassau
on October 28, 1889, the sisters
immediately set about estab-
lishing schools, clinics, com-
munity programmes and
administering to the poor.”

It was over a century ago
when the first five nuns,
accompanied by Mother Gen-
eral Mary Ambrosia Sweeney,
arrived in the Bahamas at the
request of Archbishop Michael
Corrigan of New York. It is
these five nuns and 203 of their
sisters who followed, whose
names are on the wall of the
Cathedral.

Stopping first in Nassau the
Sisters of Charity came to lend
a hand to a parish desperate
for assistance. In addition to
helping the struggling St Fran-
cis Xavier parish, and opening
the school for the impover-
ished, the nuns opened sever-
al clinics, day care centres and
often visited the prison.

During a period in the
Bahamas when racial and
social lines separated those
who were educated from those
who were not — the Sisters of
Charity, who opened a free
school for poor children, rep-
resented hope — that change
was on the horizon.

They came during a time
when the Bahamas needed
them most, some observers
believe.

In the past, no other non-
government agency in the
Bahamas devoted so much

an energetic (€AM player with a desire to work with the very .












_ the past 118 years.

Charity.

time and money to the educa-
tion of the poor.

Now, only one Sister of
Charity remains. "The last of
the Mohicans" is how she
describes herself. Having spent
43 years in the Bahamas —
more time than she has spent
in her hometown, New York
— Sister Joan Anderson said
Nassau is her second home.

The only remaining Sister
of Charity in the Bahamas
described the honour a special
one and one that would always
be dear to her heart.

Dedicating her life to her
work here in the Bahamas, Sis-
ter Joan serves as the admin-
istrator of the Nazareth Cen-
tre, a home for abused chil-
dren and women.

Describing her feelings after
the plaque was unveiled, she
said, “It was a very emotional
feeling. The whole Mass and
all of the people that came out
for it — it gives you a really
good feeling of people being
grateful to the sisters for their
many years of work here.”

Although many deceased
some even buried locally, each
name, engraved on the plaque
will stand as a reminder of the
sisters’ dedication to the finan-
cially distressed people of the
Bahamas.

Each name represents the
enormous sacrifice, and the
huge effort it took to complete
the monumental task of edu-
cating and uplifting the down-
trodden in the Bahamas.

Over the past 118 years of
the Sisters of Charity’s exis-
tence in the Bahamas, 208
nuns have contributed to the
development of the Bahamas,
including two Bahamians, Sis-
ter Elizabeth Claridge and Sis-
ter Theresa Symonette (now
deceased). Facing a dire
future, being the last sister in
the Bahamas, Sister Joan
hopes that the line will contin-
ue. Always optimistic, she said,
“You never know what the
future will bring.”

During the ceremony, cur-
rent president of the Sisters of
Charity, Sister Dorothy Metz,
thanked the people of the
Bahamas for allowing the sis-
ters to work among them for

yy

LE

ty

(Photo: Ana-Bianca Marin)

@ A STATUE of the Virgin Mary and
Baby Jesus stands in front of a plaque
bearing the names of the 208 Sisters of

Job Opportunity

Warehouse Manager

Are yo

We are seeking a passionate, results orientated
Leader to manage our Warehouse. Primary
responsibilities include team development
in warehousing & delivery, with 100%
customer satisfaction in terms of product
quality, timeliness 8 courtesy.

Plus Group of Companies is an established
Bahamian owned group that is growing &
continuing to build it's team of professionals
in various areas.

We offer a competitive salary & benefits
package as well as ongoing professional
ining & development.

ua

Skills Required:

Experience in high volume
warehousing & delivery a plus:

Excellent leadership, coaching &

communication skills

A strong team player able to interact with
many departments

A strong work ethic with a high
attention to detail
A desire to learn new skills & improvement

An ability to keep damages, returns &
exchanges at or below company targets




If we've piqued your interest, Let's Ta’ k! ! .










” Limited

Please submit your application by Mail to:

Director of Human Resources
The Plus Group
PO. Box N713

_ Nassau, Bahamas

or eMail: jobs@theplusgroup.com

We thank all applicants, however only those
~ selected for an interview will be contacted,

Furniture ¢ Appliances © Electronics
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 11



aa oa ee
Chamber of Commerce plans after hours

event following Mix ‘n’ Mingle success _

ON THE heels of an
extremely successful pre-
Christmas “Mix ‘n Mingle”
networking event, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce has announced the cre-
ation of the monthly Business
After Hours event.

Business After Hours will be
held the last Thursday of each
month at various New Provi-
dence business establishments.
Designed to be smaller, more
intimate networking events,
Business After Hours will also
give local businesses an oppor-
tunity to showcase their prod-
ucts and services to attendees.

“We've come to realise that
the Bahamian business com-
munity craves and needs net-
working opportunities in a
social setting,” said BCOC
president Tanya Wright. “Part
of our role as the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce is to
help create and facilitate such
opportunities.”

Over Christmas week, the
BCOC teamed up with San-

dals Royal Bahamian and the ~

Burns House Group to throw
what has become known in the
Bahamian business arena as a
premier networking event —
the Mix n Mingle.

Hundreds of the country’s
most influential business-peo-
ple came out to meet new
acquaintances and. re-connect
with old ones at the holiday
event.

“Throughout the room you
could see introductions being
_ made. And when you know
the people and the businesses
they represent, it was clear that
some important business con-
nections happened that
evening,” said Philip Simon,
executive director of the

Bahamas Chamber of Com-

merce.

The holiday Mix n Mingle
far exceeded expectations, the
organisers said. This time, the

Arrests, prosecutions —
for drug related = -
offences down in ’06

m By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY the year,

Tribune Staff Reporter

cecevcavevcescereparsenccccescecoqesveneneusereseegesonuseaeaeoneneensagesynunsranpnavanngacescasanengeanreranangscsaager ert

event was opened up to non-
members as well, to give more
business people an‘opportuni-
ty to better understand the
benefits of chamber member-
ship.

The team at Sandals Royal ‘
Bahamian hosted the event in oe es ee
April and again in December ca .
and according to director of
sales Andre Newbold, the pay-
off has been tremendous.

“We wanted to have an
opportunity to showcase our
services to the business com-
munity, and the Mix n Mingle
has been a tremendous success
for us. It was important for us
to present the right image to
corporate Bahamas and by
linking up with a reputable
organisation like the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, we
were able to do just that,” he
said,

Sandals used the opportuni-
ty to promote its ballroom
facilities and catering services
as well as the day spa that is
open to the Bahamian public.































@ ABOVE: Mark Ageeb was
one of the first 100 attendees to
register and won a Blackberry.
Presenting him with his prize
Tanya Wright, president of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce. Andre Newbold, director
of sales at Sandals and Antoinette
Butler, BCOC project manager,
are also pictured.

@ LEFT: Judy Hamilton, Ginn
Sur Mer; Danielle Woodside and
Sheria Bacchus of Island Desti-
nations; and Richa Sands had a
great time at the BCOC Mix n
Mingle.


















: heer

The commander also reported that
transnational drug traffickers continued to

PERSONS arrested and prosecuted for
drug-related offences for 2006 totalled 1219,
compared to 1401 for 2005, according to
Raymond Gibson, Commander of the Drug
Enforcement Unit.

In his presentation to the press yester-
day, Commander Gibson said illicit drug
trafficking contributed significantly to the
continuance of serious crimes, inclusive of
rape, robberies, burglary, serious harm, mur-
der and other criminal activities in 2006.

Successful

He reported that the Drug Enforcement
Unit was successful in seizing millions of
dollars from proceeds derived from drug
trafficking, as well as vessels, vehicles and
other properties, which were used in the
trafficking of illicit drugs. ,

The Drug Enforcement Unit then pre-
sented the press with a video presentation,
which was narrated by Commander Gibson,
of drug matters and statistics for the year
2006,

Commander Gibson said the cultivation of
marijuana in various family islands contin-
ues to be a recurring trend in the Bahamas,

"In 2006, five marijuana fields were dis-
covered in Andros, four in Eleuthera, two in
Grand Bahama and one in Cat Island,

"Sometime on January 20, 2006, officers
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, while
on helicopter patrol in the Owens Town,
North Andros area observed a male con-
cealing himself in a bush area. A check of
the area revealed a make-shift structure,
with personal effects, food and cooking
utensils, Officers while checking a clearing
next to the tent discovered over 2,000 mar-
ijuana plants. Two Jamaican males were lat-
er arrested and charged for illegal drug cul-
tivation,"

The top cop of the drug unit said the DEU
and the Defence Force Harbour Patrol Unit
confiscated a number of Haitian sloops in
2006, after significant amounts of marijuana
and cocaine were discovered concealed
between the ribs of these vessels throughout

use various methods of concealment to
import illicit drugs into the Bahamas
through international airports.

"On Friday, 3 November, 2006, officers
of the Drug Enforcement Unit Freeport
Office, along with Bahamas Customs, and
Container Port Security Department, act-
ing on information, searched a container
transiting through the Bahamas and des-
tined for Nigeria, 26 boxes filled with 285
grey, black and clear packages of cocaine
were in this container totalling 627 pounds."

"On Sunday, 26 March, 2006, officers
while at Roses, Long Island observed a Mit-
subishi vehicle with two male occupants. A
search of the area and arrest of the sub-
jects, revealed 30 bales of marijuana with a
weight of 1,353 pounds hidden in some
bushes, The subjects and two others were

_ later charged for this matter."

According to Commander Gibson, statis-
tics for 2006 showed cocaine seizures
totalled 2,680 lbs, marijuana totalled 11,733
lbs, and marijuana plants confiscated
totalled 41,068,

Seized

Additionally, he said, for the same period
$2,061,497,78 suspected to be proceeds
derived from criminal conduct was seized
by the Drug Enforcement Unit.

Chief Superintendent Marvin Dames, the
former head of the DEU and current officer
in charge of the Criminal Detective Unit,
also commented on drug matters for 2006.

He said: "During the past year officers of
the DEU have put a number of persons out
of business and behind bars. Some of these
were barons who were operating what can
only be described as drug super markets,
while others were running small operations
in some of the more challenged communi-
ties,"

Superintendent Dames said he wanted to
serve notice on all drug dealers, "be they the
king-pin, or the mom and pop petty dealer",
that they will be targeted and brought
before the courts in 2007.

A FRIENDLY REMINDER |

MASS DISCONNECTION EXERCISES
_IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

¢ Rosetta * Kemp Road and all side corners

° Village Road ¢ Soldier Road ¢ Prince Charles Dr. to
Village Road * Dannottage Estates Village Estate, =|
« Nassau Village « Blair Estate * Fox Hill {

e Yamacraw Beach « Monastery Park ¢ College Gardens
¢ East Park Estate * Seabreeze Estate & Imperial Park
¢ Hillside Park * Bay St. & Victoria Ave. « Centreville i
¢ Palmdale including Madeira St.* Mt. Royal Ave.and
Mt. Rose Ave. and all side corners.

PRIORITIZE! |

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!





(

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon
or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations

a —


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

| ee rr ee





Your look at what’s going on in your community















our new location.



Street (the former IBM Building).

| Visit or call your Agent
| at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

’remium payment functions will be
nsferred from Collins Avenue to our
arbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

FAMILY





our continuing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay

GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY

} RE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O, BOX SS 6232



NEVILLETT Pearce, author
OF Science for Junior High- A
Complete Course for Bahamian
Junior Schools, has made a $1000
donation to a local non-profit
environmental agency.

Mrs Pearce said she wanted
to show her appreciation for the
impact that the Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational
Foundation (BREEF) has had
on her career,

This summer Mrs Pearce,
who is also the head of the sci-
ence department at Kingsway
Academy, attended BREEF’s
10-day Marine Conservation
Teacher Training Workshop,
held annually in San Salvador,

At the workshop, 23 teachers
from throughout the Bahamas
had the opportunity to experi-
ence and learn about the
Bahamian marine environment.

She said the experience has

- left an indelible impression on

her and affects her teaching,
At the end of the workshop
she commented, “I anxiously
look forward to sharing the
wealth of knowledge and expe-

PEUP EAP OED EOP EO ROT EO pO ROE ERED E EES Trent enereeer renee reeeren enn en er

Local teacher
and author gives
_ back to BREEF .

*

3

riences that I have gained with
my students and colleagues.”

’ Her donation will go to sup-
port BREEF’s work and help
give other teachers the same
opportunity.

Mrs Pearce said she attribut-
es the success of her text book
in part to BREEF.

With the organisation’s help,
she was able to write about the
ecology of the Bahamas, expos-
ing students to local examples
not covered in foreign texts. °,

“J am humbled that God should
choose to use.me in this way, and
I want to express my gratitude | to
Him for giving me the vision, and
bringing together all the people,
resources and circumstances ‘to
accomplish His purpose in the
writing of this book.”

BREEF’s executive director
Casuarina McKinney expressed
her sincere thanks to Mrs
Pearce, one of BREEF’s newest
members,

This year the annual teacher
training workshop will be held
from July 15 to 22 at the Gerace
Research Center on San Salvador.



Youth RT CRIES GG



@ MEMBERS of the Governor General Youth Awards Com-
mittee paid a courtesy call Governor General Arthur Hanna at.
Government House on Wednesday 22nd November. Pictured
from left are Jacquetta Lightbourne, Gold Award-halder; Jason .
Curry, Gold Award holder; Arthur Hanna; Davidson Hepburn, -
chairman of committee; Susan Glinton, National Council mem="

_ber.and Helen Adderley; fi field-officer.” >=
(BIS photo by Kris Ingraham)



BAHAMAS FIRST

FIRST IN INSURANCE. TODAY. TOMORROW.










a Ea oa tt

JE

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 The Tribune

B BUSINESS

| Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010







business@tribunemedia.net

Bahamas banker’s group

to acquire Film Studios

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

n investor
group put
together by a
Bahamian
banker has
reached an agreement to
acquire the rights to develop
the Bahamas Film Studios, the
3,500-acre site in Grand
Bahama where the two Pirates
of the Caribbean films were
shot, sources confirmed to The
Tribune yesterday.
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional, the group structured by
Owen Bethel, president of the
Montaque Group, a Nassau-
based financial services

provider, is [eu
understood
to have
sealed the
deal with
Ross Fuller,
chairman of
the Studios’
immediate
holding
company,
Gold Rock
Cree XK
Enterprises.

Details on
the agreement were sketchy,
but The Tribune understands
the deal is still subject to gov-
ernment approval.

@ BETHEL

Mr Bethel declined to com-

ment when contacted by The



Tribune yesterday, while Mr
Fuller and the Bahamas Film
Studios’ acting operations man-
ager, Diana McGonigal, did not
respond to The Tribune's e-mail
seeking a response before press
deadline last night.

Gold Rock Creek’s ultimate
owner, Bermuda-listed Ashby
Corporation, said last month
that two seperate “eight figure”

offers had been made for the

Bahamas Film Studios, and a
decision on which one to accept
was to be taken “within the
week”.

Mr Fuller said at the time:
“This capital investment will
allow the Studio to move for-
ward with its plans to complete
the additions necessary to make

our Studio a fully-functioning,
full-service facility, and assist
us in promoting the Bahamas
as a destination for the film and
television industry, the music
recording industry and, of
course, as a tourist destination.

“We are fully committed to
adding a film school, a Bahami-

an Cultural and Historical Vil-’

lage, and to completing the
work necessary for the Studio.
These portions of the: project
will all assist us in becoming a
viable, competitive and highly
successfl Studio.”

It. is understood that
Bahamas FilmInvest will buy
out Mr Fuller’s interest in the
Bahamas Film Studios com-
pletely, allowing him to exit the

project.

It is also understood that Mr
Fuller will take care of the pro-
ject’s existing debts and liabili-
ties. A lawsuit filed against the
Bahamas Film Studios by a for-
mer potential investor in the
project, Bjorn Monteine, had
alleged that “the project was
undercapitalised, and there was
significant debts owed to vari-
ous investors and institutions”.

The lawsuit listed thesesdebts
as including EUR $3.6 million
from AIG Private Bank and
and $9.95 million from First-
Caribbean International Bank.
It alleged that the Bahamas
Film Studios had been unable to
meet its $100,000 per week
operating expenses, or raise $30

million to complete the project.

All these allegations have
been denied by Mr Fuller.

The $76 million Bahamas ,
Film Studios were the first pro-
ject to receive a signed Heads of
Agreement from the current
PLP administration back in
2002, and still represent a small
- but significant - piece of eco-
nomic diversification away from
the economy’s reliance on
hotels, golf courses and tourism.

Yet Mr Bethel and his group,
if they complete the purchase,
will have much work to do to
revitalise the project, attract
new films and television pro-
ductions to use it, and restore a
reputation that has been bat-
tered by recent lawsuits. °

Kerzner closing in on
Hurricane Hole plaza

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



KERZNER International
yesterday declined to comment
“at this time” on reports that
the company was close to com-
pleting the acquisition of the
Hurricane Hole Shopping Plaza
_ on Paradise Island.

Retailers based in the plaza
have told The Tribune they
have received no official notifi-
cation from either Kerzner
International or the existing
owners that there has been a
change in ownership, but

Company declines
to comment on
acquisition reports
‘at this time’
Kerzner personnel they have
spoken to told them a deal has

been done.
It is understood that the

potential purchase price is like- .

ly to be about $25 million.

SEE page 7B

Armed robberies of businesses

fall 38 per cent during 2006 |

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

ARMED robberies of Bahamian businesses fell by 38 per cent in
2006, although store break-ins rose by 4 per cent, statistics presented
by the Royal Bahamas Police Force revealed yesterday.

At the police force’s annual press briefing, the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) announced that in 2006, armed robberies of business
establishments declined from the 320 cases recorded in 2005 to 197

in 2006.

Despite this reduction, the police there was an increase - more
than double - in the number of armed robberies that took place on
the Family Islands, rising from three in 2005 to seven last year.

Police officials said it was no coincidence.that those islands
impacted (Bimini, Abaco and Exuma) were currently experiencing
rapid economic and population growth.

During 2006, cash taken in
armed robberies totaled an esti-
mated $446,329, while property

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Employers
Confederation (BECon) has
slammed as “unconscionable”
the Government’s failure to
release publicly ali the studies
and documents on the proposed
National Health Insurance
(NHI) plan, adding: “The level
of secrecy in government is
alarming.”

In a public commentary,
BECon, which is a member of
the National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, said the
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) report on the NHI
scheme showed how the Gov-
ernment was using the studies in



Financial Services: Is there room for cooperation ? ae

SEE page 6B

Employers say failure to
release all documents
‘unconscionable’

its possession for “propaganda
purposes” to sell the plan.
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, other Cabinet minis-
ters and PLP MPs had fre-
quently touted the ILO report
as giving the NHI scheme a
‘thumbs-up’ and its “firm sup-
port”, yet BECon said these
assertions did not match the
report’s content once it was

SEE page 5B

_ Find out at The Nassau Conference 2007.

B By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Government is optimistic that draft
regulations to covern all aspects of the pro-
posed AES Ocean Express liquetied natural
gas (LNG) project will be completed before
the end of next month, the minister for
energy and the environment told The Tri-
bune-yesterday,

Senator Dr Marcus Bethel said the mul-

ti-million dollar AES LNG project, ear-
marked for Ocean Cay, a man-made island
near Bimini, was still before the Cabinet.

The Government was awaiting the sub-
mission of draft regulations from its inter-
national consultants before it could pro-
ceed any further in deciding whether to
approve the project.

"We're dependent on the international*



consultants to conclude negotiations. Our
hope is that we have it by the end of Feb-
ruary. It is a very detailed process, ensuring
that the highest standards are maintained,”
Dr Bethel said.

Dr Bethel also responded to a recent Tri-
bune Business article, which reported how
AES Corporation had told US regulators

that “unanticipated delays” in securing .
_ approvals fromthe Bahamian government

had forced it to seek an extension to the
date at which Ocean Cay will begin sup-
plying Florida's power stations with LNG
from January 29, 2007, to January 29, 2011.

The article was based on documents filed
with the Federal Energy Regulatory Com-
mission (FERC), which have been seen by
The Tyibune.

Dr Bethel said he had read the article, but
felt it was “speculative”.

LNG regulations completed by February end

According to the document drafted by
AES’ US attorneys, Baker Botts, delays
had been caused by the Bahamian govern-
ment deciding to draft regulations to govern
how the Ocean Cay terminal operated
before the project was approved. ,

“An extension of the in-service date is
necessary because Ocean Express has been
unable to commence construction of the
pipeline due to unanticipated delays in
securing final approval from the Common-
‘wealth of the Bahamas for the construc-
tion of related facilities,” the AES motion
said. :

The. “interdependence” of the proposed
Bahamian and US facilities has led AES
Ocean Express to argue that it cannot begin

SEE page 6B

»

ae a teyas ue Esto la Ls

Fidelity is Gary’s one ety) oar} mals financial needs.

P43 Col oel TROL MoS

MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS. ©. HOME EQUITY Wey NS

CHECKING & SAVINGS ACCOUNTS © CDs © FREEINTERNETBANKING. PENSION PLANS :

MUTUAL FUNDS © FINANCIAL PLANNING ~ INSU ete Ccle.

Choose Wisely
Choose Fidelity ©



TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING »

=) FIDELITY |

More than a Bank

Nassau: 1 356.7764 F326.3000

Freeport: T 352.6676/7

MACKEY / PARADISE

STREET

‘Wealth Man emer
Delivering Expertise inA

ssau

CONFERENCE. February 6, 2007



F 352.2695
jo |

Registration & more information:
nassauconference.com

KWAN}



Sponsors:

ASSOCIATION, -
t . -
ane hy {


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

MUTUAL
FUNDS

The list includes the largest mutual funds supplied by
the National Association of Securities Dealers.
NAV Is net asset value. Tkr is ticker symbol

Fund Thr, _NAV_Chg.



Rind Thr, _NAV_Chg.

AIM Funds

DivrDivp LCEAX 13.57
AIM investments A:

BasicBal p BBLAX 13.21
BasValA p GTVLX 36.28
CapDevp ACDAX 1833
ChartAp CHTRX 15.26

Constp CSTGX 26.07 .
DvMktA p GTDDX 25.98 -
EuroGrp AEDAX 4030. -

IntGvAp AGOVX 854

IntiGrow = AIIEX 29.36 -.
IntlSmall p IEGAX 23.59 -

CGAt LCGAX 11.45

MadCpCEq

PGTAGX 25.81 -

Realést p IARAX 33.13
SmCGA p GTSAX 28.84
AIM Investments B:

BasVIBt GTVBX 33.65
ChartBt BCHTX 14.55. -.

ConstBt CSTBX 24.05
EurGrBt AEDBX 3813

HYIGB t

AHYBX = 4.53

AIM Investor Ck

DivrsDivp LCEIX 13.56 -
FIDYX 21.03
PSTEX 36.11

Dynm

Gold&Prec FGLDX 5.65

IntiCEg t

IIBCX 14.55

t ACAPX 10.71

LgCpGBt AFGPX 10.55
SmCapGr tALSCX 5.88
Alger Funds instts

MidCpGri ALMRX 16.71

ak

Allegiant
SCapVip AMRIX 18.44
AlfianceBer

A

BalanAp CABNX 17.92
BIWIStrA pABWAX 13.47
GiGvinc ANAGX~ 7.74
GIbTchA p ALTFX 65.39
GrincAp CABDX 4.42
GrowthA p AGRFX 36.93
HIYIdA pp AHYAX 5.97
IntGroA p AWPAX 18.66
IntiValA p ABIAX 22.06

LgCpGrA pAPGAX 20.64 -.

MuFLAp AFLAX 10.32
NUMuA p ALTHX 10.21
SmCpGrA QUASX 26.49
TMgBIWI p AGIAX 12.54
USGovtA pABUSX 6.82
AlfianceBem Adv:

IntValAdv ABIYX 22.39
AllianceBern B:

BalanBt CABBX 16.96
EmMDbtB pAGDBX 8.89
GrincBp CBBDX 4.35

a

5
z

i

11.05
12.56

t PNECX 16.72

it
i

5

i
[
F

i
i

i
EEE

[
i

5

&

a

i
i;
B

5

:
3
g

LALyeH
E
B

:
z
i

Util

Valuelny TWVLX 7.54
Veedotr AMVIX 6.35
Vista TWCVX 16.89
American Funds A:

AmcpAp AMCPX 20.09 -

AMutlA p AMRMX 29.05
BalAp ABALX 18.97
BondAp ABNDX 13.34
CapWA p CWBFX 19.14
CapiBAp CAIBX 60.44
CapWGA pCWGIX 41.38
EupacA p AEPGX 46.00
FdinvAp ANCFX 39.43
GovtAp AMUSX 13.39

GwthAp AGTHX 32.70 -.

HITrAp AHITX 12.61
HilnMunA AMHIX 15.85

IncoAp AMECX 20.19 -..

IntBdA p AIBAX 13.45
ICAAp —AIVSX 33.29
NEcoAp ANEFX 26.70
NPerAp ANWPX 31.42

NEWFX 47.62
SmCpA p SMCWX 38.44

BondBt BFABX 13.34
CapIBBt CIBBX 60.44
CpWGrB tCWGBX 41.19

ErpacBt AEGBX 45.49 -,
AFIBX 39.34
GrwthBt AGRBX 31.68 -.

FdinvB t

HITrBt AHTBX 12.61

IncoB t

IFABX 20.07

ICABt — AICBX 33.14
NwPersp t NPFBX 30.93
SmCpBt SCWBX 37.05
WashBt WSHBX 34.40

WORLD MARKETS



18.42 -.

Li:

-10

31
+18












Acorn t

StrtinA

IntBdZ
IntEqZ
IntVIZ

StratO t
CG Cap Mkt Fds:

TIEUX 14.48 -.18
lgGrv = TLGUX 14.00 -.06
TLVUX 12.35 -.08

IntlEq

Lgval
Copley
Credit Suisse Adv:

IntFocus p CUFAX 16.24 -.29
DFA Funds:
USCorEq2 DFQTX 11.65 -11

KTRAX ‘974 -05
BluChipA KBCAX 20.44 -.11
DrHiRA KDHAX 50.64 -.26
DSmCaVI KDSAX 36.85 -.48
GlbOppA KGDAX 41.09 -.47

Ariel Mutual Fis:

Apprec CAAPX 4823 -.36
Ariel ARGFX 51.51 -.47
Artisan Funds:

Intl
IntiSmCp r

IntiValr — ARTKX = 27.72. -.32
MidCap ARTMX 3055 *
MidCapVal ARTQX 20.04 -.16
SmCap ARTSX 18.06 -.29
SCapVal ARTVX 17.65 -.28

GvtSec ASGMX 998 *

GroOpp

Strincp ATSAX 4.56 -.01
Baron Funds:

Asset. BARAX 59.79 -.40
Growth BGRFX 49.56 -.47
Partners p BPTRX 22.41 -.17
SmCap BSCFX 22.61 -.31
Berkshire Funds:

Focus BFOCX 813 -.07
Bernstein Fis:

IntDur

CaMu =SNCAX 14.18 -.01
DivMu = SNDPX 14.00 -.01
NYMu — SNNYX 13.82 -.01

TxMgintV

IntVal2 SIMTX 25.59 -.42
EmMits cea 37.36 -.81
Berwyn

Fund BERWX he -38

Income
BjrmMCG p
BlackRock

AuroraA SSRAX 26.97 -.36
BalCapA pMDCPX 27.26 -.09
BaVIAp MDBAX 32.92 -.23
FdGrAp MDFGX 19.42 -.11
GIAIAr MDLOX 18.02 -.12
Gvinclny CCGAX 10.77 -.04
HiYinvA BHYAX 815 -.01
LgCpCA p MDLRX 13.96 -.07
LgCVAp MDLVX 18.69 -.11
S&P500 p MDSRX 17.26 -.11
BlackRock B&C:

GIAIBt. MBLOX 17.65 -.11
GIAICt_ =MCLOX 17.04 -.12
lgCpCCt MCLRX 13.22 -.08

BlackRock

TotRetil CCBBX 954 *
BlackRock Instt:

IntlValr =MAIVX 30.62 -.45
BaVil_ © MABAX 33,08 -.23
BalCapl MACPX 27.33. -.09
TotRetll BFMCX 952 *
GlbAlloc r MALOX 18.07 -.12
FundiGl MAFGX 19.89 -.12
NatMun MANLX 10.58 -.01
S&P500 MASRX 17.30 -.11
LgCpCri MALRX 14.20 -.07

Growth p BRGRX 1844 -.07

Brandywine
BlueFd = BLUEX 31.30 -.19
Bmdywn BRWIX 33.91 -31

USCMkt
BrwnSmcl

Balancd BUFBX 11.65 *
SmCap BUFSX 2699 -.28

CapDv LOMCX 25.53 -.42
Focus CGMFX 33.66 -39
Realty CGMRX 26.65 -.49

MdCpVIl CRIMX 29.64 -.16
Calamos Funds:

ConvAp CCVIX 19.03 -.07
Gr&lncC t CVTCX 31.60 -.19
Gr&incA p CVTRX 31.40 -.19
GrwthA p CVGRX 53.68 -.42
GrowthB t CVGBX 54.88 -.42
GrowthC t CVGCX 50.76 -.39
Calvert Group:

Inco p

LgCpGrt CLGAX 31.65 -23
SocEGAp CSIEX 37.02 -34

Causeway
Institutn! r
Investorr CIVVX 19.42. -.29

Century Funds;
ShsTrinst CENSX 27.32 -.16
Citizens Funds:
CitCGSt WAIDX 20.66 -.12
CitEGrSt WAEGX 1661 -.12
CitGbIst WAGEX 19.55 -.21

Class A:

LACAX 2881-33
AcornSelt LTFAX 25.98 -.17
FocEqAt NFEAX 21.86 -.16
IntivalA r NIVLX 25.06 -.33
LgCpValA NVLEX 14,92 -.10
21CntryA tNMTAX 14.18 -.10
MarsGrAt NMGIX 20.04 -.14
MidCpValACMUAX 14.40 -.14
COSIX 5.99 -.01
COLTX 13.77 -.03

AstAl — GAATX 15.70 -.09
CoreBdZ GHQTX 1059 -.01
FocEqZt NFEPX 22.26 -.16
SRBFX 887 -.01
IntTEBd SETMX 10.36 -.01
NIEQX 17.19 -.28
IntlStkZ CMISX 1847 -.29
EMIEX 25.20. -.32
LCpCrZ NSEPX 14.56 -.10
CapGr GEGTX 23.93 -.12
LgCpldxZ NINDX 27.27 -.16
LCpVIZ_ NVLUX 14.94 -,09
MarsGrZ NGIPX 20.39 -.14
MrinOpZ rNMOAX 15.08 -.24
MCpGthZ CLSPX 24.94 -21
MdCpidxZNMPAX 12.03 -.13
MdCpVIZ pNAMAX 14.41 -.14
STincZ NSTMX 980 -.01
SmCpCorZSMCEX 19.01 -.30
SmCpIPZ NMSCX 21.61 -.33
TaxExZ = CTEZX 13.77 -.03
TotRetBd NSFIX 9.76 -.02
Comstock Partners:

CapVIA DRCVX 2.20 +.02
CPSFX 2.51 +.01

ARTIX 28.67 -.26
ARTIX 21.42. -.16

ASGIX 24.63 -.16

SNIDX 1320 *

SNIVX 25.98 -.43

BERIX 12.29 -.05
BMCFX 2040 -.40
A:

Fas Birk:

Funds:
BRSIX 19.25 -.31
BCSIX 32.25 -.46

CFICX 1683 -.01

CIVIX 19.51 -.29

InstiRity — CSRIX 55.63 -.86 | p,
RityShrs CSRSX 88.08 -1.35
SpecFocsl CSSPX 69.20 -.96
Columbia

COPLX 53.13 -.66












TMG1.0

Fund Thr. __NAV_Cha.

HilncA — KHYAX
MgdMuni pSMLAX
NYTXA —KNTAX
RREEF p RRRAX
StratincA KSTAX
TechA —KTCAX
USGovA KUSAX
DWS Scudder Cl
DreHIRC KDHCX
DWS Scudder Cl
CapGrth r SCGSX
CorPlsinc SCSBX
EmMkin SCEMX
EmMkGr r SEMGX
EuroEq SCGEX
GNMAS — SGINX
GlbBdS r SSTGX
GlbIThem SCOBX
Gold&Pre SCGDX
GrolncS SCDGX
HithCare r SCHLX
HiYIdTx — SHYTX
IntTxAMT SCMTX
Intl FdS = SCINX
LgCpVis r KDCSX
LgCoGro SCQGX
LatAmrEq SLAFX
MgdMuni SSCMBX
MATFS SCMAX
PacOpps r SCOPX
SP500S_ = SCPIX
ShtTmBdS SCSTX

5.45
9.10

1088 -
26.16 -

4.68

11.88 -,

8.43
c
50.55
Ss
50.51
12.70
12.31

21.04 -.

55,66
9.12

14.25 -,
2136 -

18.70
9.90

DWS Scudder Insti:

EqSO0IL —BTIIX

159,61

DWS Scudder Inv:

Eq500Inv BTIEX
IntlEq — BTEQX
Davis Funds A:
NYVen A NYVIX
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B NYVBX

158.01

31.60 -,

38.09
36.51

Davis Funds C & Y:

NYVenY DNVYX
NYVenC NYVCX
Delafield — DEFIX

38.52

36.75 -.

25.39

Delaware Invest A:

Diver Inc p DPDFX
FLinsA —-VFLIX
IntEqAp DEGIX
LgCpVIA DELDX
TrendAp DELTX
TxPaA p —_DELIX
TXUSA p : DMTFX

876 -

11.17
15.42

20.59 -.

20.07

8.12 -.
11.65 -

Delaware Invest B:

DelBIB —_ DELBX
IntlEqBt DEIEX
SelGrBt DVEBX
Del-Pooled Trust:
IntlEq DPIEX
Labrintl — DELPX
Dimensional Fis:
EmMktV DFEVX
IntSmVa_—DISVX
LgCoinidx DFUSX
TM USSm_ DFTSX
USLgCo DFLCX
USLgVa_ DFLVX
USLgVa3_ DFUVX
US Micro DFSCX
US Small DFSTX
US SmVa_DFSVX
IntiSmCo _DFISX
EmgMkt + DFEMX
Fi DFIHX
Govt DFFGX
IntVa DFIVX
IntVa3 DFVIX
GIb5FxInc_ DFGBX
LCapint DFALX
TM USSV DTMVX
TM IntVa DTMIX
TMMktwVDTMMX
TMMtV2 DFMVX
TMUSEq DTMEX
2YGIFxd = DFGFX
OFARIE DFREX
Diversified Inst:
Val&lnc pp DIVIX
Diversifd Inv Fis:
Groincp DVGIX
Val&Inc — DVEIX

Balanced DODBX
Income. DODIX
(ntiStk — DODFX

Stock DODGX 152.66 -1.

Domini Soc Inv:
ISclEq — DIEQX
SoclEq DSEFX

Dreyf DREVX
DryMidr ~PESPX
Dr500Int ~PEOPX
Emgld — DRELX
FLintr — DFLIX
GNYt = GNYMX
UTGrR_ = DLGRX
LTGrinR = DGIRX
MdcpVI r DMCVX
MunBdr = DRTAX
NY Taxr DRNYX
NYTEr — DRNIX
SmCStkr DISSX
SmCoVal DSCVX

18.55
15.25

24.68 -

23.11
20.86

31.06 -,
20.84 «
11.02. -,
26.02 -

41.33

25.03 -
19.20 -.

15.46
21.09
29.

19.17. -

25.52
10.17
10,32
22.97

21.62 -

10.54
23.89

24.82 -

19.61
17.69
17.59

14.79

10.14
31.51

13.17. -

22.41
25.79

86.84 -

12.61
43.15

20.12
33.23

13.52 -

43.28
29.24
35.11
10.41
29,11

39.76 -

34.41
12.99

19.42 -,

17,52
16.01

31.97 -

11,92
14.85

18.00. -

23.16
25.21

Dreyfus Founders:

DiscvF p _ FOISX
EqGrthF FRMUX
IntlEgA — FOIAX
reyfus Premier:
AlphaGrA DPWAX
BalOpCt DBOCX
CoreBdA DSINX
CorVivp DCVIX
EmgMktA DRFMX
FLMA PSFLX
LgStkA p DRDEX
LtdHYdC p° PTHIX
LtdHYdA p DPLTX
LtdHYdB p DLTBX
MAMA — PSMAX
MIMUA —PSMIX
MCpStkR DDMRX
MuBdA = PTEBX
NwldA — DNLDX
TchGroA DTGRX
ThrdCnZ DRTHX
E Trade Funds:
KobrenGr KOGRX
Eaton Vance Adv:
FitRatet EABLX

29.50
5.89
16.45

22.69 -

20.12
14.36
31.66
20.72

1427 -,
24.78 -

731
7.30
731
471
15.24
14.55
13.16

47.49 -.

25.05

9.44 -

14.71
9.86

Eaton Vance Cl A:

ChinaA p EVCGX
FloatRt EVBLX
HIthSA p ETHSX
InBosA —_EVIBX
LgCpVal EHSTX
NatlMun EANAX

TMG1.1 ETTGX
TradGvA EVGOX

UtilA = EVTMX

CAPEX 599.66 -

22.80
10.19

45-4

Eaton Vance C] B:

ChinaBt EMCGX

FLMBt — EVFLX

HilncBt — EVHIX
HIYMBt EVHYX

BalanA — EKBAX
FLMunA EFMAX

HiyidA — EKHAX

IntlEgA — EKZAX
MunBdA EKEAX

OmegA EKOAX

PreMtlA EKWAX
Util&Tel =~ EVUAX

Evergreen B:
AStAIIBt EABFX 14.58 -,

EqincB_ — ETRBX
EqlndBp ESIOX

22.79
1.15

5.28
10.72

StrincBt EVSGX 7.49
TMG1.1t EMTGX 24.76
Eaton Vance Cl C:

FloatRtt ECBLX 9.85
NatIMCt ECHMX 11.94 -J
TMSGC ECMGX 11,71

Empire Builder:

TF Bond EMBTX 17.62 -
EndowGl — ENDIX
E A:
AstAllp EAAFX

15.38

14.74
9.34
9.35

3.34 -,

10.44

7.55
27.53
53.00

SpValuA p ESPAX 26.99
13.94 -.

23.04
52.43









-01

Cor

Int
Intl

Sht

Sm

Foc

Nw

Am

US

Tecl
Util

Nw

FF
FF2

Frin

Grol

MA
Mid

Sm

Cc

AStAlIC t EACFX
OmegaC t EKOCX

k
| ESBIX

AdjRatel EKIZX

Bdi = ESICX
Eq! = EKZYX

LgCpEql EVSYX

IntBd = ESFIX

SpecVal — ESPIX
StrGrol —_ ESGIX

Excelsior Funds:
EmgMkt rUMEMX
ValRestr UMBIX
FAM Funds;

Value FAMVX
FBR Funds:

GasUtlld r GASFX

Cap FBRVX

FMI Funds:

US FMIOX

FPA Funds:
Capit. FPPTX

Inc FPNIX

FPACres FPACX 26,
Fairholme —_ FAIRX
Federated A:

LdrA = FALDX

CapApA FEDEX
KaufmA p KAUAX
MktOpA p FMAAX
MuSecA LMSFX

GvtA FUSGX

Federated B:

AldrBt — FALBX
FdTcBp FCTEX
KaufmB p KAUBX
Federated C:

Kaufmnc tKAUCX
MktOppC FMRCX
Federated Instl:
Hi Yid FHYTX
Kaufmn — KAUFX

HT FATEX
ities | FAUFX

Advisor I:

Insgtt__FINSX

nay Advisor T:
BalancT — FAIGX
DivintT p —FADIX
DivGrT pe FOGTX
EMkinT — FAEMX
EqGrTp FAEGX
Eqinte —_FEIRX
GrOppT FAGOX
HilnAdT p FAHYX
MidCpT peFMCAX
Nwinsgh p FNITX
SmICpT p FSCTX
StrinT FSIAX

000 = FFFBX
010 = FFFCX

FF2015 — FEVFX
FF2020 _ FFFDX

FFTYX

Fated t FFRHX
FLMur FLIX
FocsdStk r FTQGX

One FFNOX

GNMA — FGMNX
Govtinc FGOVX
GroCo — FDGRX

Inc FGRIX

HighIncr =SPHIX
Indepn — FDFFX
InProBd + FINPX
IntBd = FTHRX
IntmMu — FLTMX
IntiDisc — FIGRX
IntISCpr FISMX
IntlSCOp r FSCOX
InvGB = FBNDX
Japan FIPNX
JpnSm FISCX
LCpvl FSLVX
LatAm FLATX
LevCoStk FLVCX
LowPr — FLPSX
Magelln FMAGX

Mun FOMMX
(Cap ~FMCSX

MCpVI_ FSMVX
MtgSec FMSFX
Munilnc — FHIGX
NJ Munr FNJHX
NwMktr FNMIX
NwMille — FMILX
NY Mun FTFMX
Nordic — FNORX
OTC FOCPX
Ovrsea FOSFX
PcBas — FPBFX
PAMunr —FPXTX
Puritn © FPURX
RealE FRESX
StintMu FSTFX
STBF FSHBX
SmCapInd FDSCX

ICpS r FSLCX

SCpValur FCPVX
SEAsia FSEAX
StrDvine FSDIX
Stratinc —_ FSICX
StrReRtr FSRRX
TotalBd == FTBFX
Trend == FTRNX
USBI FBIDX
UIShBdr — FUSFX
Utility FIUIX
ValueDisc FVDFX
ValStra te FSLSX

Find Thr, _NAV_ Chg.

FLHIBp EFHBX
HiVIdBt EKHBX
LgCoGBt EKJBX
OmegBt EKOBX
PreMtiB t EKWBX
StrincBr ~EKSBX
Util&Tel t EVUBX

28.19

24.38
24.20
5.61

12.57 +.02

10.70

7.10 +

5.41

1248 +.02

6.09

5.61 -.

HithCrA r FACDX 22.48
Fidelity Adv
EnergyT FAGNX 38.13
FinSvcT — FAFSX
HitCarT — FACTX

Foc T;

22.37
22.01

18.30 -
19.05 -
Fidelity Advisor A:

DivintlAr FDVAX 22.54
EqGrAt EPGAX
EqinA pe FEIAX 29.33 -
MdCpA peFMCDX 24.08 -
Nwinsgh p FNIAX 18.31
StrinA —-FSTAX 11.75
Fidelity Advisor
GrolncBe FGISX 1887 -.
Fidelity Advisor
DivintCt FADCX 21.73. -
Nwinsght FNICX 17.94 -.
Fidelity
Divintl = FDVIX
DivGthle FDGIX 13.53 -
EqGri EQPGX
Eqinle

51.35 -

B:
C:

22.86

54.36 -
EQPIX 30.09 -1.82
18.46 -.

1636 -.

22.31

13.34 -.
1237 -

51.36












Val

Fin

InE

Madi

Eql

Intl
Tot!

Eql

Ball
Bio!
Cal
C

Gol

GE

GE
Inti

For
Intl
Intl

Em

Intl
Intl

(nfl
Inti

Intl

Intl



Selected stocks from various international world stock markets.



Advantst rs
Alumina
AsiaSat
BHP BillLt
CNOOC
Canons
ChinaMble
ChinaNet
CityTicm
GeneticTch
HutchTel
Introtinitd
JHardie
Konami
MetalStm
MizuhoF n
NIS Grp s
NTTDoCo
NtAust
Nidec
NippnTT
Nissan
Novogen
Orix
PCCW Ltd
Pharmax

55.00
19.04
18.15
37.16
88.40
54,90
43.24
51.80
2.08
7.50
36.20
8.74
37.31
29.44
2.78
14.46
4.69
16.21
155.03
19.17
25.44
24.26
11.59
146.03
6.15
34.89

-1.62
-0.55
+0.30
-0.58
“3.17
“1.19
-1.19
-2.02
+0.05
-0.29
-0.30
0.14
-0.28
-0.78
+0.02
+0.09
+0.02
+0.01
-2.63
-0.30
-0.30
-0.30
+0.08
-1.08
-0.02
-0.51

PranaBio
pSivida
Rinker
Toyota
TrendMic
Westpac
ABB Ltd °
ABN Amro
AXA
Adecco
Ahold
AFrance
Aixtron
AlcatelLuc
Allianz
AltanaAG
AmarinCp
Amvescp
BASF

BG Grp
BHPBil plc
BT Grp
BcBilVArg
Bklrelnd
BarcBk pr
Barclay

3.05 -0.10
165 0.16
70.30 -1.26
133.72 -4.05
29.52 +0.52
92.25 -2.25
16.93 -0.32
31.80 — -0.66
40.60 -0.62
16.78 -0.22
10.42 -0.23

» 4439 +0.99
482 0.02
14.78 -0.29
$20.49 -0.46
61.97 -0.68
2.27 +0.09
22.77 -0.43
95.36 -1.34
63.18 -2.08
34.55 -0.35
61.85 -0.67
24.27 -0.34
90.22 -0.37
26.37 +0.07
58.25 -1.26

BioProg
BritAir
BritATob
BritSky
Buhrman
Bunzl PLC
BusnObj
CadbyS
CarnUK
CibaSpCh
CoGnGeo
Converm
CredSuiss
Crucell
Danone
Delhaize
DeutTel
Diageo
DucatiM
E.ON AG
EDP Enrg
ENIs
Elan
Enel
Epcos
EuroTrust

14.00
106.33
56.15
41.01
14.29
61.18
38.82
42.38
51.55
32.81
40.45
6.86
68.77
26.20
32.60
84.25
18.82
77.28
11.45
42.37
49.74
65.10
13.68
50.70
19.50

+0.36
-0.17
-0.96
-0.07
-0.31
“1.14
-0.12
-0.51
-1.01
-0.24
-0.65
+0.18
-1.27
-0.07
0.25
-0.84
-0.12
“177
-0A7
-2.12
-0.16
0.45
-0.39

FranceTel
FresenM
Gallaher
Gemplus
Genesys rs
GlaxoSKIn
HSBC
Hanson
ING
IconPLC s
llog
ImpTob
Infineon
InfVista
IntCtlHtl rs
lonaTech
KPN
LafargeSA
LloydTSB
Metso
NDS Grp
NTL Inch
NatGrid
Natuzzi
NokiaCp

28.20
44.58
87.80

397

1.62
53.96
91.45
75.35
43.84
37.82
12.76
79.43
13.95

1.5
23.37

5.09
14.77
36.55
44.80
48.82
45.45
24.14
69.55

8.81

-0.24
-0.67
-0.89
+0.02
+0.08
-0.76
0.82
-0.65
-0.75
+0.05
-0,30
“1.21
-0.25

-0.38
+0.06
-0.07
-0.92
~0.62
-0.70
71.50
-0.35
-2.10
+0.05
-1.08

Health
HomF — FSVLX

Fidelity Spart
EqldxAd FUSVX 49.89 -.
Intadr —_FSIVX
500Adr — FSMAX
TotMktAd rFSTVX 39.31
First Amer Fas Y:
CoreBd —_FFIIX

ue FDVLX

Wridw = FWWFX

Banking —FSRBX

itch = FBIOX

Brokr FSLBX
Chem FSCHX
ComEquip FSDCX
Comp FDCPX
DfAer —- FSDAX
Electr FSELX
Enroy FSENX
EngSv _ FSESX

79.84
19.88

49.48
33.78
65.59
73.91
66.03
20.58
40.12
81.56
44,22
46.14 +.
62.69 +.

SV FIDSX 117.90 -1

Goldr — FSAGX
FSPHX 124.87 -1.

‘qp FSCGX

Insur FSPCX
Material FSDPX
MedDl — FSHCX

EqSys FSMEX

Multmd — FBMPX
NtGas FSNGX
NatResr FNARX
Paper FSPFX
Retail FSRPX
Softwr — FSCSX
Tech FSPTX
Telcm FSTCX
Trans FSRFX
Wireless FWRLX
Fidelity Spartan:

dxInv. FUSEX

ExtMkin FSEMX
500Inxinv rFSMKX

Inxinv —_ FSIIX
Mktiny FSTMX

ncp FAQIX

Eqldxip —_FEIIX
Intl
MCpGrOp_FISGX
First

FAICX
Eagle:

GIbIA SGENX
OverseasA SGOVX
SGenGld p SGGDX
Firsthand Funds:

eCommr TEFQX
GlbTech GTFQX
Techinny —TIFQX
Tech Lead TLFQX
Tech Val TVFQX
Forward Funds:
HoovSCap FFSCX
Frank/Temp nk A:

AGEAp AGEFX 2.12

Invp — FRBSX
DIsA p FBDIX
InsA p FRCIX
GrA FKREX

DbITFA FPRTX
FedTFAp FKTIX
FixCpGrA FKCGX
FIRtDA p. FAFRX
FLTFAp — FRFLX
FoundAl p FFALX

dPrM A FKRCX

GrwthA p_ FKGRX
HYTFAp — FRHIX
IncomA p FKINX
InsTFAp —-FTFIX
MATFAp FMISX
NYInsA p FRNYX-
NYTFAp FNYTX
RisDvA p FROPX

CpGrA FRSGX

Stratinc p FRSTX
USGovA p FKUSX
UtilsA pp FUTX

TEBIX

Deck TEDIX
EuropAp TEMIX
QualiAt Tegh
SharesA _TESIX
SharesB p FMUBX

34.58

49.64
30.71
70,32
46.35
47,94
22.91
48.24

35.94 +.
26.40 +,

32.31
52.40

69.05
48.32
50.29

7.07 -.

49.88
38.16

97.39 -.

43.64
39.31

Adv:

43.64 -.

97.39. -.60

10.99
15.06

26.11 -.

15.08 -
40.63

45.35
24.81
19,69"

4.09
4AT

10.04 -.

20.61
36.32

20.11

65.78

60.23 +.

12.72
11.87
12.00
12.14
42.60
10.07
11.92. -.
13.89
29.64
41.89. -
11.03

2.63
12.29

11,60
11.80
35.69
37.53

FATF Adv FAFTX 12. 15 “J
IncmeAd FRIAX 2.62
Frank/Temp Fink B:
IncomB1 p FICBX 2.63
IncomeBt FBICX 2.62 -
Frank/Temp Fk C:
FoundAlp FFACX 13.70 -.
IncomCt —FCISX

pe ene ae

2.65 -.

2390
23.91
22,62
21.62
25.76 -.
2521

Mt c:

DiscC tt TEDSX
SharesC tt TEMTX 25.49 -

Elfun S&S:

S&S Inc GESLX
S&S PM GESSX
TaxEx ELFTX

Inst] Funds:

E GIEIX 16.17
GMOEMMKV rGEMVX20.34 -.
GMO Trust Il:
Foreign GMFRX
GMO Trust Ill:
EmMkr GMOEX

GMOFX
GrEq +=GMIGX
trv = GMOIX

IntSm GMISX
TxMgdlE GTMIX
USQltyEq GQETX
USCoreEq GMUEX
GMO Trust IV:

CorePlusBdGPBFX
EmCnDt GMDFX

Mkt GMEFX

Foreign GMFFX

CorEq GMIRX
IntrVI_ GMCFX

USQualEq GQEFX
GMO Trust VI:
EmgMkts rGEMMX 20.36

IndxPl_ GMIPX
CorEq GCEFX

USCoreEqGMCQX
Gabelli Funds:

ABCp GABCX
Asset GABAX 46.97 -.
20.83 -.

Eqincp GABEX
17.86 | -.

GIOpAAA pGABOX
GwthAAA GABGX

NationwD MUIFX
Gartmore Fis Inst:

dx! _GIXIX

NwBdldxl GBXIX 10.81
S&P500Ins GRMIX 12.01
Gartmore Fas Serv:
IDModAg pNDMSX 11.03
IDModp NSDMX 10.92
Gateway Funds:
Gateway GATEX 27.09
Glenmede Funds:

GTCIX

Novartis
NovoNdk
Pearson
PfeifVac
PortgITel
Protherics
Prud UK
Publicis
Quilrnes
ReedElsNV
ReedEls plc
Repsol
Rhodia
SAP AG
STMicro
Sanofi
Scor
ScotPwr n
SeronoSA
Shire
SkIHSoft
SkyePh
Smith&Nn
Sodexho
SparkNet n
Spirent
Statoil
StoraEnso
Suez
Swisscom
Syngenta
TNT NV
Technip
TelefEsp



29.69 -.20

A

Frank/Temp Temp
DvMKtA p TEDMX 27.37. -
ForgnA pp TEMFX 13.48 -.
GIBdAp TPINX 10.99
GISCoA p TEMGX 8.95
GrwthA p_TEPLX 25.50
WorldA p TEMWX 19.35.
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
FronAv —sTFFAX
GrthAv TGADX
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
ForgnC p TEFTX
GrwthC p TEGTX
GAMCO Funds:
GIConAAA GAGCX
GITelAAA GABTX
MathrAAA MATRX

13.43

25.53 -.25

13.29

24.89 -.25

5.48 +.

22.47 -.28

10,36 +.
11.18

+21
+21

50 | int
30 | intr
~88 | Scpviinst HASCX
jing Loevner:
EmgMktr HLEMX 43.91 -.65
45 Hartford Fds A:
“™ | AdvrsAp —ITTAX
60) CpAppAp ITHAX 37.35 -31
DivGthA p IHGIX 20.68 -.14
FitRateA pxHFLAX 10.12

-31

+59

“15 | JI
Zo GwthAdv p VHIAX

InvBalp OGIAX 12.70 -.05

Pund Tle, NAV Chg. | Fund
«12 | HiYleldA GSHAX 8.12 .
-.20 | HYMUA p GHYAX 11.56 -.01
MdCVA p GCMAX 38.28 -.25
~42 | SmCapA GSSMX 43.38 -.74
-.40 | Goldman Sachs B:

+15 | CapGrB pp GSCBX 20.45 -.06
-13 | GrincBp GSGBX 28.46 -.23
-53) HIYIdBp GSHBX 813 *
~46 | Goldman Sachs C:

-11] CapGrC = GSPCX 20.42 -.06
~18 | Goldman Sachs Inst:

MARKET REVIEW

Thr.

~67 | CoreFxd — GSFIX

32

Hivield — GSHIX

“14 HYMuni — GHYIX
13 | MidCapV GSMCX 38.57 -.25



06 | Hard

HABDX

HAINX

NAV _C

9.89 -.0
8.13
11.56 -,01

~39 | StrulgVa GCVIX 14.40 -.08
12] Struint — GCIIX
+36 | GrnCntBl p GCBLX 17.80 -.08
~.20 | GuideStone Funds:
59 Gropasa GCOZX
GIEqGS4 GGBZX
“AT | GrincGS4_ GGIZX
GrEqGS4 GGEZX
+23] IntEqGS4 GIEZX
34 | MdDrGS4 GMDZX
08 | ValEqGS4_ GVEZX
~27 | Harbor Funds:
“AT | Bond
66.30 ~41 Capapinst HACAX
Invt—HIINX

14,96 -.18

16.00 -.09
1714-12
14.61 -.06
17.87 -.08
18.90 -18
13.48 -.01
18.45 -.12

11.62 -.02
33.58 -.11
60.52 -1.00
60.97 -1.01
20.94 -.32

17.02. 11

MidCpA p HFMCX 22.18 -.14

30 | Hartford Fds B:
CpAppBp IHCAX 33.93 -.29
79g | Hartford

CapApC t HCACX 34.09 -.29

Fds C:

FitRateC txHFLCX 10.11 -.01

“Ol Hartford HLS 1A :
16 CapApp _HIACX

DiscEq HIAGX
"hq | Dvr HIADX
"| Glblldrs = HIALX 19.99 -.22

52,53 -.44
13.94 -.08
22.49 -.16

GrwthOpp HAGOX 29.82 -.25

HSTAX
HIAIX

IntlOpp —_ HIAOX

~04 | Midcap
~05 | TotRetBd HIABX 11.29 -.01
1! Hartford HLS IB :

HIMCX

+36 | advisers HADAX 2255-14
Stock
Index

52.31 -.45
32.17 -.20
15.05 -.18
26.86 -.16

Advisors p HAIBX 22.73 -.14

~50
Capa HIBCX 52.25 -.44 | Leg
vegan AgGrBt

Div&Gro p HDGBX 22.42 -.16

Fis:
HRTVX

on | Gr&lncA HRCVX

-12 | HIYIdA p HRIDX

“4 | MCStkA pHMCAX

735 | ICM SmCo
“py | ICON Fads:

“19 SCapAp HRSCX

“s | ConDisc ICCCX

Eqinclp —1OEIX
Hithcare ICHCX
1 | InfoTech ICTEX

Materials ICBMX
ING Funds Cl A:

02 | CompldrA LEXCX

“2 HiYIdA pp IHYAX

IntValA p NIVAX

u RussiaA p LETRX
02 | ING Funds Ci B:
IntiSCpB p NAPBX

ING Partners:

221 jpMFint! — ISGIX
SBAggGrl IMEIX
«13 | TRPGrEqI__ITGIX
15 | ING TM,Q&:
IntSCpQ_ NAGUX
IntVall——_NIIVX
ISI Runds:
NoAmp NOAMX
IXIS Advisor Cl A:
HarFocVl NRSAX 11.54 -.10
HarLCVIA NEFOX 15.50 -.11
15 | LSCrBGA NEFRX 11.32 -.02
qq | USDivrA p NEFSX 22.89 -.18
“11 | IXIS Advisor Cl B:
=26 | USDivBp NESBX 20.29 -.16
-.16 | Ivy Funds:
CoreEgc tWTRCX 9.41 ~.03
+15 | CoreEqB t WCEBX 9.32 -.03
GINatRSA pIGNAX 2823-21
GINtRSC p IGNCX 26.07 -.19

Funds:

TotRetp HBNBX 11.24 -.01
, | Heartland
Value

~67 | Henderson Gibl Fils:

02 | intOppA p HFOAX 23.39. -.21
~All Hennessy :
AT | CorGrow - HECGX
cor CorValu HFCVX
w'59 | Focus30r HFTFX
+ | Heritage Funds:

50.29 -.59

17.74 +24
15.07 -.15
12.57 -.07

14.60 -.13

TM
27.66 -.22
35.59 -.52

“oy | Hotchkis & Wiley:

<2 | CoreVall HWCIX 14.33 -.13
eet Be 2
+01 | LOCRVIA p 05 -

th =a MCpVIA pHWMAX 29.51 -.26 | Legg
<1 | MidCpVal HWMIX. 29.69. -.27
HussmnStrGrHSGFX £5.62 +.04
ICSCX 36.84 -.47

12,92. -.12
14.99 -.16
16.65 -.12

9.47 -.07
M28 -.12

21.49 -.07

a9
20.66 -.23
60.82 -.83
51.97 -.73

16.16 -.22
48.95 -.22
59.28 -.33

53.99 -.75

Fund
UtilityA

Growth!
TechC

Thr, NAV

PRUAX 13.81 -.19
ValueA p PBEAX 20.91 -.13
JennisonD:

PTYCX

© PIFCX 15,08 -.06

8.05 -.06

JennisonDryden Z&l;

Growth:

Jensen J

Z

John Hancock A:
BondAp JHNBX 1

ClassicVI p PZFVX

HSciA

LCpSel
RgBkA
SMCpE
SvinvA
USGIbL

p MSBFX 1

FRBAX 37.49 -.48
21.96 -.43
p SOVIX 18.86 -.08
29.08 -.14

aA SPVAX
dr USGLX

John Hancock C:

Hi¥ldc

p JHYCX

John Hancock Cl 1:

LSAggr

LSBalane

LSModer

JILAX 14.50 -.15
JILBX 14.22 -.08
LsConsry JILCX 13.27 -.04
USGrwth JILGX 14.55.11
JILMX 13.48 -.06

Julius Baer Funds:

IntlEql
IntlEqA
Intell

r

Ir

Kinetics Funds:

Internet WWWFX 28,87 +.04
IntEmGr WWWEX 4,97 -.03
Medical MEDRX 18.09 -.08
WWNPX 25.61 -.10
LSWalEq LSVEX 18.93 -.14

Pdm

Laudus Funds:

IntIMstrl SWOIX
* | Lazard Insti:
EmgMktl LZEMX

Legg Mason: Fd

Oppt-Fl p LMOFX
OpporTr t LMOPX

27.74 +25
JHGRX 38,15 -.30

JIEIX 42.65 -.56
BJBIX 41.78 -.55
JETIX 14.95 -.22
KeelsmCp p KSCVX 25.28 -.35

PIFZX 17.04 -.06
JENSX 26.92 -.09

4.90 -.02

9.15 -.10

566 = *



20.35 -.24
20.12 -.31

19.16 -.15
18.82 -.15

Splnvp LMASX 38.72 -.27
LMVTX 72.75 -.55
Legg Mason Instl:
ValTtFl pp LMVFX 79.40 -.60
ValTrinst LMNVX 80.90 -.61
Legg Mason Ptrs A:

AgGrAp SHRAX 114.89 -.44

ValTr p

ApprAp SHAPX
CapincA SOPAX

FdValA

LgCpGA p SBLGX
MgMuA pSHMMX
MCapCA pSBMAX
MDLCGV t SPSAX

15.39 -.10
16.97 -.05

p SHFVX 15,97) -.15

24.14 «19
15.62 -.01
20.86 -.13
10.42 -.05

MuFLA = SBFLX 13.13. -.01

SocAwA p SSIAX
9 Mason Ptrs B:
SAGBX 101.89 -.40

20.85 -.11

ApprBt SAPBX 15.01 -.09
CoreBdBt TRBBX 11.75 -.02

Financi
FvalB t

HilnB t

LgCpGBt SBLBX
MDLCGB t SPSBX

al p SBFBX

15.56 -.13

SFVBX 14.90 -.14
GrthBt © SGRBX 13.49 -.08

SHIBX

6.98 -.01

2252 -.18
10.04 -.05

TechFdBt SBTBX 4.33 -.05
Legg Mason Ptrs C:
AggGrC * SAGCX 102.81 -.41

HilncC

SHICX

6.99 -.01

MDLCGC t SPSLX 10.04 -.05

Legg Mason Ptrs I;

hen rolt SAGYX 119.95 -.46

LgCpGrl

SBLYX 24,99 -.20

Legg Mason Ptrs 0:
SABRX 15.40 -.10

Equi

DvStr1
Grinc 1

Intl

SmCap
Loomis

Mason Ptrs 1:

CSGWX 18.13) -.12

CGINX 17.62 -.11

Corelnvst LCORX 1852 -.16
Partners:

Partners LLPFX 34.97 -.13
LLINX 18.91 -.13

LLSCX 30.14 -.13

Sayles:
LSBondl LSBDX 14.30 -.02

LSSCVR p LSCRX
StrincC NECZX
LSBondR LSBRX
StrincA — NEFZX

Lord Abbett A:
AflAp — LAFFX 15.12 -.09
LDFVX 12.23. -.09
BalStratA XLABFX 11.74 -.09
BdDebA px LBNDX

AllValA

MidCpA p LAVLX
RsSmCA_LRSCX

25.83 -.44
14,90 -.03
14.26 -.02
14.84 -.02

7.98 -.05

22.29 -.17
29.15 -.54

TaRAp UANSX 11.55 -.01
p LAMAX 13.12 -.09

20.66 -.23 | RsAm
TFFLAp — LAFLX

7.36 -.01

A Class:

727 -.06

01 | ING&IAp ONGIX 1436-08

01 | JP

46.19 -.24 | Bond

11.75

51.56 -.30

18.13 -.28

20.40

1820 -.28

30.65
34.22
12.68

20.11 -.34

21.88

1478 -.

10.39
10.54

20.35 -Â¥
18.20 -.29
3817 -.59

34.20
21.90

24.96 -

14.75 -.

9.98 -

30.56
17.49 -.

18.90
10.74

2056 -.27
Goldman Sachs A:

CapGrA GSCGX 22.23
GriStrA GOIAX 12.87
GrincA — GSGRX
GrOppsA GGOAX 21.61
GrstrA — GGSAX

29.27 -.23

14.47

i IntEq
ve IntrepGr JPGSX
MCpVal = JMVSX
35 | ShtTmBd —JSBSX
44 | USEquity JUESX 11.25 -.07
JPMorgan Sel Cis:
CoreBd WOBDX
CorePIBd = HLIPX
as | Ealndx —_HLEIX
“53 | GvBond = HLGAX
43 | HIYIdBd OHYFX
wgg | IntmTFBd VSITX
“16 IntlEq! OIEAX
“34 | IntrdAmer JPIAX
“19 LgCpVl_ HLQVX
10 MICMkNe rOGNIX

Munilnc — HLTAX



MdCp'
-.02 | J

MCpVal p JAMCX

Insti:
FLMVX

Select:

JBSEX
VSIEX

SmCpCor VSSCX

Ol} TyFrBd— PRBIX

a [JP Ultra:
MtgBckd JMBUX

Janus :

..4g | Balanced = JABAX

«19 | Contrarian JSVAX

CoreEq —_JAEIX
4 Enterpr JAENX

105 | FedTe

JATEX

FixBnd JAFIX
38.16 --58 Fund

Grinc

Orion

JANSX

11) GI Lifesci r JAGLX
GlbOpp JGVAX
GlTechr JAGTX

JAGIX

2 Mercury JAMRX
M4 MCVilnst JMIVX
“| MdCpVal_ JMCVX
Olympus JAOLX

JORNX

~13 | Ovrseasr JAOSX

SCVinst —JSIVX

~16} scvinv JSCVX
MCpMkidxGMXIX 15.21. -

“16 | Twenty JAVLX

* | Forty

“| Janus Aspen

+01) Ventur = JAVTX
~08 | WridWr JAWWX
Janus Adv S Shrs:

JARTX

25.51 -.22
25.87 -.23

929 -.01
37.26 -54
2252) -.11

953

10.61 -.01
174-01
32.08 -.19
10.10 -.01
851 +.01
10.64 .
2759-43
27.66 -.16
16.98 -.12
11.05 +.01
9.76 -.01
46.96 -.85
12.69 -.01

10.45 -.01

24.38 -.06
16.81 --.07
25.70 -.03
4744-33

7.02 -,01

945-01
2822 -.08
19.66 -.07
14.19 -.07
12.91 -.10
37.88 -.08
2492 -.12
23.70 -.14
23.60 -.15
33.50 *

9.85 -.09
45.24 -57
25.73 -.42
25.50 -.42
54.32 +.03
61.58 -.69
50.50 -.33

3046 -.05

Instl:

Balanced JABLX 27.86 -.06

JapanFd

BlendA PBQAX

+0.27
+1.20
+0.03
-3.33
-0.03
+0.06
-0.51
-0.58
+0.02
+0.21
+0.60
0.42
-0.03
-0.24
0.32
-0.17
+0.02
-0.68
+0.02
+0.26
-0.05
-0.09
-0.94
-0.61
+0.01
+0.09
“0.14
-0.22
-2.23
“0.11
-0.40
-0.61
+0.06

-.06 | GlbTotRtA GTRAX
-10 | GrowthA —PIFAX
HIYIdA p PBHAX
-.14 | STCrpBdA PBSMX 10.78 +01
-.13 | TechA

PTYAX

Telenor
Tenaris s
Ternium n
ThmsnADS
Total SA s
Trintech
UPM Ky
UtdUtils
VanMool
VeoliaEnv
Wavecm
Wolseley s
AMovilL
AMovilA
Cemex s
CCFemsa
FEMSA
Gruma
GAerPac n
GpAerCN n
GpoASur
GCSaba
GrpoFin
GpoSimec
HomexDev
IndBach
Metrogas
TrGasSur

~04 | WridwGr JAWGX 32.50 -.21
SIPNX 12.37. -.29
JennisonDryden A:

664-03
1654 -.06

852 -.07

58.32
47.30
28.04
19.27
68.98
4.23
24.45
29.40
5.75
69.28
14.89
24.87
44.74
44.65
33.14
36.88
114.02
12.94
38.23
23.28
42.22
26.45
9.25
13.10
57.20
25.91
4.10
7.00

TxNYAp LANYX

Lord Abbett B:
p LAFBX 15.18 -.09

AffildB
BdDbB

px LBNBX

Lord Abbett C:
p LAFCX 15.15 -.08

AffildC
BdDbC

AfY

MITA

MIGA

BondA
CapOp
EmGA
GITotA
GrAllA

MCapA
MuBdA
MuHiA
MFLA

RschA
RelnA
TotRA
UtilA
ValueA

MIGB
MCapB
TotRB
utiB *
ValueB

TotRC
Value

RelnT
Valuel

IntiEq

IntlB p

ICAPEq
MAP |

Global



SpclEq
Grow p
+0.91
+0.40
-0.21
-0.33
-0.34
-0.02
-0.41
-0.85
-0.20
-2.33
+0.24
-0.38
-1.44
145
-0.57
-0.40
-0.93
-0.10
-0.39
+0.13
0.56
-0.40
-0.21
0.21
“2.15
-0.18
+0.22



MdCVC p LMCCX
Lord Abbett Y:

IntNwOA MIDAX

ResBdA = MRBFX

GITotB p. MFWBX

ICAPSIEq

EmMkEt

px BDLAX

4.74 -01

11.29 -,01

LAFYX 15.15 -.09

MCapVI p LMCYX 22.25 “6
RschSCY LRSYX
M Funds:
Brandesins BIIEX
MFS Funds A:
IntIDVA = MDIDX 15.37 -.19

MITTX 20.70 -.07
MIGFX 13.86 -.06
MFBFX 12.66 -.02
MCOFX 15.46 -.11
MFEGX 37.40 -.23

t MFWTX

MAGWX 14.70 -.08

OTCAX

MMBFX 10.47 -.01

t MMHYX

MFFLX 10.14 -.01

MFRFX 23.80 -.09
MRSAX 18.93 -.27
MSFRX 16.14 -.05
MMUFX 15.96 -.19
MEIAX 26.56 -.13

MFS Funds B:
MAITB = -MITBX 20.25 -.06
CapOpB MCOBX

14.07 -.11

MIGBX 12.58 -.05

OTCBX

14.59 -.09

882 -.05

MTRBX 16.13 -.05
MMUBX 15.90 -.20
MFEBX 26.41 -.13

MFS Funds C:
MTRCX 16.20. -.05
MEICX 26.38 -.13
MEFS RPunds |:
MRSIX 19.41 -.28
MEIIX 26.67 -.13
MEFS Runds Insti:
MIEIX 19.74 +25
CoreStkB MMPGX
IntmincB_ MMPIX
MMPNX 13.85 -.16
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA MHCAX 651 = *
MainStay
HYIdBBt MKHCX 6.47 = *
MainStay

Funds B:
Funds I:

ICAEX 44.47 -.33
MUBFX 37.23 -.23
ICSLX 41.23 -.25
S&P500ldx MSPIX 32.48 -.20
SmCpOpl MOPIX 20.51 -.37
Mairs & Power:
Growth MPGFX 76.99 -.61
Managers Funds:
FremntBd MBDFX
FrmtGlbl MMAFX 1
EssxLCGr MGCAX

14.59 -.10

9.70 -.01



10.28 -.02| Op

4.64 -.13

29.40 -.11
MEMEX 23.81 -.50

MGGBX 21.08 -.06

IntDurGv MGIDX 1
ShDurGv MGSDX

056 ©
965 *

MGSEX 82.33 -1.16
Marsico Funds:

Focusp MFOCX 1:
MGRIX 20.06 -.11

9.27 -.10

Fund Th,

NAV

2istCnt pp MXXIX 15.25 -.08

Master Select:

Equity | MSEFX 15.65 -.07
Intl MSILX 18.46 -.18
Matthews Asian:

AsiaPacr MPACX 16.69 -.19
AsianG&l MACSX 18.49 -.13
PacTiger MAPTX 23.28 -.14

Melton Funds:

BondFd MPBFX 12,32 -.01
EmgMkts MEMKX 20.68 -.32
IntlFd MPITX 16.91 -.17
LgCpStk MPLCX 10.78 -.06
MdCpStk MPMCX 12.82 -.12
Mellon Inst Funds:

IntlEqty SDIEX 41.97 -.57
MergerFd MERFX 15.63 = *
Meridian Funds:

Growth MERDX 39.46 -.48
Value MVALX 35.35 -.34
Metro West Fas:

TotRtBdl MWTIX 9.76 -.01

Midas Funds:

Midas Fd MIDSX 3.94 -.09

Monetta Funds:

MidCap pMMCEX 8.29 -.08
Monetta MONTX 12.78 -.07
MontagGr! MCGIX 25.52 -.08
Morgan Stanley A:

DivGthA DIVAX 20.91 -.11
EqWtdA p VADAX 41.51 -.31
FocGroA AMOAX 27.92 -.18
GIbDvA GLBAX 15.86 -.15
HiYidA HYLAX 178 *
USGvtA USGAX 9.00 *
Morgan Stanley B:

DivGtB = DIVBX 21.06 -.10
EuroB EUGBX 21.64 -.26
FocGroB AMOBX 25.97 -.17
GIbDivB = GLBBX 16.07 -.15
IntiValBt IVQBX 12.98 -.15
PacGrB- TGRBX 20.03 -.24
SP500B SPIBX 14.78 -.09
SpcValB SVFBX 15.57 -.26
USGvtB USGBX 9.00 -.01
UtiB UTLBX 14.66 -.25
Valuep VLUBX 14.52 -.12
Morgan Stanley D:

FocGroD AMODX 28.62 -.18
IntValD = IVQDX 13.12) -15
MorganStanley Inst:

Actinth MSACX 14.91 -.23
EmMkt MGEMX 28.60 -.60
CrPiFinst MPFIX 11.31 f
IntlSCpA MSISX 23.68 -.16
IntlEq MSIQX 20.42 -.24
IntlEqB pp MIQBX 20.24 -.24
LtdDur MPLDX 10.27 *
MCapGr MPEGX 27.20 -17
MCGrAd pMACGX 26.52 -.17
SmCoGrA MSSGX 13.25 -.19
USLCpGrAMSEQX 20.30 -.13
USReal MSUSX 27.78 -.41
Muhlenk = MUHLX 85.17 -.26
Munder Funds A:

MdCpCGr tMGOAX 24.77 -.25
Munder Funds C/II:
HithcreC pMFHCX 23.56 -.09
Munder Funds Y:

RIEStEY MURYX 24.00 -,38

FinSvZ TEFAX 22.61 -.13
BeacnZ BEGRX 16.65 -.12
Disc = MDISX 30.21 -.21
EuropZ MEURX 24.30 -.26
QualfdzZ MQIFX 21.74 -.15
SharesZ MUTHX 25.94 -.20
Navellier Perform:

MidCpG NPMDX 30.55 -.28

Growth p NEEGX 3856 -.42
‘&Berm Inv:

Focus NBSSX 31.22 -.247

Genesis NBGNX 32.74 -.23
Genesinst NBGIX 44.87 -.32
Guard = NGUAX 1873 -.17
Intl r NBISX 23.92 -.23
Manhat NMANX 9.03. -.07
Partner NPRTX 30.10 -.12
SocResp NBSRX 25.55 -.20
Neuberger&Berm Tr:

Genesis NBGEX 46.84 -.34
Partner NBPTX 23.24 -.09
NewAlt — NALFX 43.13 -.74

Nicholas Gi

rOup:
Nich NICSX 57.64 -.41
NichLt! NCLEX 19.50 -.20

Northeast Investors:
Growth NTHFX 20.06 -.08
Trust NTHEX 7.76 -.01
Northern Funds:

Fixin NOFIX 9.90 -.01
GrEq NOGEX 16.00 -.10
HiYFxInc NHFIX 8.20 ‘
IntTxEx NOITX 10.20 -.01
IntlEqldx r NOINX ¢
IntGrEq NOIGX 12.96 -.18
LgCapVal NOLVX 13.51 -.12
SmCpGr NSGRX 13.07. -.21
TxExpt = NOTEX 10.49 -.01
Technly =NTCHX 12.34 -.11
USGovt NOUGX 9.82 -.01

Nuveen Cl A:

FLMBp -FLOTX 10.22 -.01
HYMuBd pNHMAX 22.85 -.01
GrwthA p NRGAX 22.80 -.11

Nuveen Cl B:

GrwthB p NRGBX 21.31 -.10
LrgCVB p NNGBX 26.97 -.20

Nuveen Ci C:

HYMuBd tNHMCX 22.83 -.01

Nuveen Cl R:

InMunR NITNX 10.86 -.01
IntDMBd NUVBX 9.02 -.01

Oak Assoc Fis;

PinOkAg POGSX 22.18 -.13
WhitOkKSGWOGSX 32.58 -.23
OakValue OAKVX 28.05 -.23
Oakmark Funds |:

EqtyIncr OAKBX 25.73 -.05
Globall OAKGX 25.29 -.22
Intl tr OAKIX 25.27 -.28
IntSmCp r OAKEX 22.51 -.15
Oakmark rOAKMX 45.70 -.30
Selectr OAKLX 33.38 -.26
Old Mutual Adv It:

GwthZ OBHGX 22.72. -.21
tgCpZ OLCVX 15.61 -.12
MdCpZ OBMEX 15.92 -.16
SelGrZ QBHEX 25.06 -.14
TS&WSCVZOSMVX 24.95 -.38
Tc&ComZ OBTCX 13.03 -.08
Old Westbury Fis:

Intl OWEIX 13,71 -.13
MidCpEq pOWMCX 16.14 -.18
RealRet OWRRX 11.42 -.09

Olstein Funds:

AllCpValC_ OFALX 17.23 -.17
er A:

AMTFMu OPTAX 10.34 -.01

AMTFNY OPNYX* 13.32 -.02

CapApA p OPTFX 46.24 -.26

CapincA p OPPEX 13.13. -.03

DvMI

Ghmpinch pOPCHX 953 *
pODMAX 40.18 -.69

Discp OPOCX 45.62 -.59
EquityA OEQAX 10.81 -.07
GlobAp OPPAX 73.22 -.61
GlbOppA OPGIX 35.80 -.31
Goldp OPGSX 2677 -.27
GrthAp OPPSX 31.53 -.15
IntBdA p .OIBAX 5.96 -.04
IntGrwp- OIGAX 27.48 -.32
IntiSmCA OSMAX 25.99" +01
LTGVAp OPGVX 9.95

LtdTmMu OPITX 15.95 -.02
MnStFdA MSIGX 40.42 -.26
MnStOA pOMSOX 14.65 -.10
MSSCA p OPMSX 21.93 -.30
S&MdCpVIQVSCX 36.61 -.28
StrinAp OPSIX 429 *
ValueA p CGRWX 25.82 -.20

imer B:

GlobIBt OGLBX 68.10 -.57
IntBdBt OIBBX 5.94 -.04
MnStFdB OMSBX 39.32 -.25
StrincBt OPSGX 4.30. -.01
Oppenheimer C&M:

DevMktC tODVCX 39.31 -.67
GlobIC pp OGLCX 69.31 . -.58
IntBdC = OIBCX 5.94 -.04
MnStFdC MIGCX 39.20 -.25
StrinCt OSICX 428 -.01

HIGHS & LOWS

NEW HIGHS
ACMMD
AGL Res
AZZ
AFrance
AFrance wt
AlaP46GG n
AlbertoC n
AlliedCap
Altria
AMuninc
Angelic
AssistLivn
AtlasPH n
AvalonBay
Avaya
Avnet
BMC Stt
BIkCAMB
BIKFLIT
BIKNJIT
BIKNYIT
Blockbstr
BickbstrB
CAE Incg
CBL pfD
CabcoJCP97
CablvNY s
Cap&lnco
CarMax
CenterPnt

ChurchDwt
Cohen&Str
CohStPIR
Converm
CopaHold
CortsJCP97
CortPrva8
ConWY32
CrystalR n
DeutTel
DuPnt pfA
DuPnt pfB
Edwards
EEIChile
Ennis Inc
FstMarb s
GMAC33
GoldS pfD
Goodyear
GIPins ptA
GMP
HitCrREIT
HithCr pi
HelinTel
HewlettP
HuanPwr
IntentlEx
LAN Air
LeAGC45
LehMO27
LehBH piN

Malaysa
MLLTD33 n
MLFord31
MS HiYid
MSLTD33 n
MS May
MunAdv
NBTY
Navistar It
NtwkEq
NEgPrmG
NuvFloat
NuvFitOp
NuvNYSel
NuvOPI3
NuvSnin
NvTxAdFit
OneLibrty
OneBeacn n
PimcoMun
PSEG piA
RgeyC pfE
Revion rt
RobbMyr
Saks s
Seaspan
ServiceCp
Stryker
TelefEsp
TxPac
Ultrapar
VKSrine

VinaCone

NEW LOWS
AdvEngy
AlphaNRs
BU Svcs
BarcGSOil n
BarcGsci36 n
Bombay
BrownFB
DWs GCm
DmRsBW
DoralFin
FstFinFd
FDelMnt
GMH CmTr
HarvstEn g
HoustEx
HugotnR
iShGSCl n
LenoxGrp
MeridRes
Motorola
NwCentFn
PennWst gn
PaREIT pt
Primew g
SmithtF
TrinaSol n
Valassis
Viacoms5 n





INTERNATIONAL EDITION



Fund Thr, Vv

Oppenheim
QBalA = QVGIX 18.69 ~09
QBalC QGRCX 1835 -.10
QBalB QGRBX 1834 -.09
QintValA p QIVAX 21.88 -.18
Gosh QVOPX 29.77 -.18
nheimer Roch:
fa YAp LTNYX 3.40 -.01
LNYCt LTNCX 339 *
RoNtMuC tORNCX 12.87 -.01
RoNtMuB tORNBX 12.92 -.01
RoMu Ap RMUNX 18.84 -.02
RcNtMuA ORNAX 12.89 -.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdpPSFAX 9.96 *
TotRtAd PTRAX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AllAsset PAAIX 12.50 -.05
ComodRR PCRIX 13.25 -.13
DevicMk r PLMIX 10.60 -.04
Divinc PDIIX 11.12 -.03
EmMkBd PEBIX 11.06 -.04
Fitinc r PFIIX 10.57 "
ForBdUnr PFUIX 10.09 -.04
FrgnBd = PFORX 10.18 -.01
GlbIBd PIGLX 9.75 -.03
HiYid PHIYX 9,89 -.01
LowDu PTLDX 9.93 -.02
LTUSG PGOVX 10.72 -.03
ModDur PMDRX 9.98 -.02
RealRet PRAIX 11.10 -.02
RealRtn! PRRIX 10.67 -.02
ShortT PTSHX 9.96 *
TotRt PTTRX 10.43 -.02
TRII PMBIX 9.91 -.02
TRIII PTSAX 9.24 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AllAsset p PASAX 12.44 -.05
ComRRp PCRAX 13.16 -.13
lwDurA PTLAX =9.93 -.02
RealRtA p PRTNX 10.67 -.02
TotRtA —PTTAX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Funds B;
TRRtBt PTTBX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Funds C:
AllAssett PASCX 12.36 -.04
ComRRp PCRCX 13.03 -.13
RealRtC p PRTCX 1067 -.02
TotRtCt PTTCX 10.43 -.02
PIMCO Funds D;
CommRR pPCRDX 13.17 -.13
RealRtn p PRRDX 10.67 -.02
TRtInp = PTTDX 10.43 -.02
Pax World:
Balanced PAXWX 24.44 -.14
Growth PXWGX 12.42. -.12

Paydenfunds: DEIt US Global Investors: :
aa PYCBX 10.19 -.01| LgCpEqt ALEBX 5.75 -.03| AllAm GBTFX 24,77 -.24 aual ae ney a
MktRet_ PYMRX 11.61 -.09 | Robeco Invest Fas: EstnEurp EUROX’ 43.91 -83]quscr VIMSX 2531 -39
PennM{C p RYPCX 10.74 -.13] SValInvt BPSCX 20.93 -.35 Gs SPP tg 743 USGro VWUSX 1819 09
PhoenixFunds A: Royce Funds: r * :
BalanA PHBLX 14.58 -.05 | LwPrSkSvrRYLPX 16.50 -.15| HolmesGr ACBGX 1833 -.14 or il i at
CapGrA PHGRX 15.58 -.14} MicroCapl RYOTX 16.98 -.20| USChina USCOX 1035 -.11 ie
EmMKtA PEMAX 890 -.03 | Opptyir RYPNX 12.90 -.17| WIdPrcMnUNWPX 2534 ..27| Wellin VWELX 32.20 -.19
GrincA PDIAX 17.22 -.10 | PennMul r PENNX 11.41 -.14 | USAA Group: et We ance
MidGrA PHSKX 16.36 -.06 | Premierlr RYPRX 17.49 -.17| AgvGt USAUX 3297. -.17 i
Wa AMA HE] SN Bs Ba ae 2 ae
uISStA p 76 * | TotRetlr RYTRX 13.60 -.17 | Emg “ “
ReEA — PHRAX 3547 -56| VIPISvc RYVPX 13.91 -12] FStrtGr UFSGX 10.36 -.06| Balanced VBINX 2131 -.10
PhoenixFunds B: Russell Funds S: GNMA USGNX 955 -.01] DevMkt VDMIX 1246 -.20
EnMAt pPEMBK 838 “03 Dwegs REX foie cag) Greie | USGRK 1804 m p “4 EGS RDESX 48.18 - 2 rope a
Pioneer Funds A: EmerMkts REMSX 20.23 -.32| IncStk —-USISX 16.71 -12] Extend VEXMX 3837 -A4
Cullen CVFCX 19.85 -.17 (aiecs alts io “i ee an ae cit FTSESoc VFTSX 921 -.06
ClassBalA AOBLX 10.62 -.06 | MstrtBdS ~O1 | IntTerBd “OL | Growth — VIGRX 29.78 -.17
HVA p TAHYX 175 ~04 Quantéxs ROESK 4054 B Intl 100 usin ae = (Bnd = VBIIX 10.28 -.02
IntlValA —PIIFX 24.19 -.43 Lo -, Nasdq “991 (TBnd =“ VBLIX 1161 -.03
MACVAp PCGRX 22.58 -.18 | ShDrBdS RFBSX 1863-01] PrecMM USAGX 25.65 -37 | yudray yiysy i “B
‘ GrS RSPSX 50.06 -71| S&PIdx USSPX 21.12 -.13 :
Re tk | a | em He elke ck ae
ES 3254 : “
ValueAp PIOTX 1678 -13]EqIi REASX 32.88 -20| ShtTBnd UsSBX age -.o1 | REMTr Be
; ThFin = UFLTX 10.16" -1 | SmCap NAESK 3221 -48
Pioneer Funds B: EqgQ! -REDSX 37.15 -21 SmicpGth VISGX 1B15 .23
i ‘ “eq | TE. = USATX 13.21 -.02
HivIdBt TBHYX 10.80 04 Intl] RINSX 46.74 64] HEL USAIN. 1321 2) rl VISVX 1680 23
Hier -PYiCX 1090 04] Agpstep RALOK 1220 10 i ai 1 col De Be
Price Funds Adv: BalStrC p RBLCX 11.93 -08 : Totlinth © VGTSX 1748 30
Egincp PAFDX 29.29 -22 | Russell LfePts R3: tei ae ee :
Growth p TRSAX : 07 | MdCpldx VMIDX 23.17 25] TotStk © VISMX 33.87 -.25
ee ass oll Ryden by oan 12.02 07) scitech VCSTX 12.66 -.10| Value VIVA 2628-18
p - Dynami -
Value PAVLX 26.72 -20/| InvSP5OOH RYTPX 31.83 +42) sirepl VCSIX 1772-32 Se re ik
Price Funds: InvOTCH RYVNX 1669 +16] Vatuttra VCULK 947 06 ae
Balance RPBAX 21.19 -13/OTCH RYVYX 23.79 -23| vatue Line Fil DvMktinst VIDMX 12.35 -.20
BIChip TRBCX 35.69 -.18] S&P500C pRYTNX 46.89 -.60 Euroinst VESIX 35.72 -.57
CapApp PRWCX 2055 -.11 | Rydex H Class: cain WAGIX 5.05 OL) extn VIEIK 3841-43
DWGIO. PROGX 2519 “AB | MOpASYPRYMOX 3854-631 Fund VUIFX 1248-14] nore VPDE ae a
i “ Investor: 3 :
may eae ait lee, Rk elie iy Se aloe oe
. r 1.06 +. ss “
EmMKES PRMSX 31.67 59] Nova RYNVX 3048 -30|Vareckpumier oo | Totlddkbe VITEX 5049-07
Eine Pen 234-23) OTC RYOCK 11.87 -051 emguika pGBFAX 13.04 -a2| MStTStidk VITNX 3052-22
Europe PRESX 1999 23 | Sel Portfolios: InvGldA ~INIVX 14.90 -17| InsTStPlus VITPX 3052-22
CorefxA TRIVX 104 -.01| Van Kamp Funds A: MidCplst VMCIX 19.68 -.13
Sb re 1e oe Emalktp oe °26) rggGrAp VAGAX 1640 -.12| Paclnst VPKIX 1234 -.19
725 | Eq TROIX 4126 25] crea Tyg | SCinst VSCIX 32.23 -49
GNMA PRGMK 940 -O1) vivid SHYAX 853 Ol] Emap? AGEN ia99 cie| TBSt VBTIX 1002-02
Growth — PRGFX 31.60.17 | intMuniA SEIMX 10.85 -.01 EqincAp ACEIX 912 -05| TSinst VITSX 3388-25
Gr&in —PRGIX 22.00 -16| inega “SEITX 1430 19 pipers) incor eae
GibFranp VGFAX 2639 -.22 viv 18
hive PREVX “704 01 | SCUBA SELCK 2119 -10| Gyscap Acc 1002 “01 Fis:
“ee | LgCValA 69 +. 3 <
IntiBond RPIBK 958-05 | smocra sscGx 1987 -30] GuVAP, ACGIX 2201-18) AggrOpp VPAOX 1274-12
IntDis PRIDX 46.89. -.45 7 p CreBdidl VPCIX 9.80 -.01
SmCValA SESVX 20.76 -34) HYMUAp ACTHX 1121 -01
InthG&l TRIGX 1736-25 5 p Eqinc VPEIX 9.84 -.07
Inistk PRT 1655-21 | SoA pundse | IMTFAD VKMTX 1857-03) Growth VPGRX 360. "06
Ja PRIPX 10.91 -.22 Mi PVGRAX 25.92 -.16| Grwgine VPGIX 11.44 -.07
Lavi PRLAX 3648 1.01 | EMMA SSEMX 22.84 -37| PaveAp ACPAK 1083 “07/ (uy pane iy 0
MDBond MDXBX 10.68 ~o1 | stock SSAIX 1363-18) REsth ACREX 30.75 -45| wpigre vpLGX 2449 16
MediaT! PRMTX 43.60 19] STAM ,SVSPX 2315-15 SOE GG ee 2 i mptdcr evox 2422-13
MidCap RPMGX 53.42 -.34 unin ot | Victory Funds:
755 | CapAppl STCAX 12.88 -.12] US MtgeAVKMGX 1337 ..01 | Victory
Nena PRWak Seat 733] Hividl’ SAMHX 10.77 01 | van Kamp Runds B: DvsStd SRVEX 18.04 -11
: “7, | IntEql STITX 16.04 -.26] AggGrBp VAGBX 14.94 -.11 | WM Blair Fis inst:
NAsia PRASX 14.00 -.14 p
New Era PRNEX 43.45 -20 InElndl SIEIX 17.66 -23] CmstBt ACSWX 1922 -.16| IntGr WBIIX 19.16 -.26
NHoriz PRNHX 31.86 -.40 LCpRIVII CRVAX 17.66 -.11 EqincBt ACEQX 896 -.05| WM Blair Mi Ris:
Ninc PRIX 894-92 | QUGISKKCESTTFX 25.08 -10) HarbBt ACHAX 1552 -.05] IntiGthlr BIGIX 27.78 -38
NJ Bond NJTFX 11.77 ~.02 | SmMCPGr SSCTX 19.92 +-.26) REstBt ACRBX 30.74 451 WM Grp of Fils A:

NYBond PRNYX 11.36 -.02
PSBal = TRPBX 20.00 -.12
PSGrow TRSGX 25.24 -.19
RealEst TRREX 24.91 -39
R2010 TRRAX 15.81 -.10
R2015 TRRGX 12.32 -.08
R2020. = TRRBX 17.27 -.12
R2025. TRRHX 12.80 -.09
R2030 TRRCX 1850 -.14
R2040 TRRDX 18.65 -.14
SciTec PRSCX 21.29 -.18
ShtBd = PRWBX 4.69 -.01
SmCpStk OTCFX 33.77 -.55
SmCapVal PRSVX 40.39 -.64
SpecGr PRSGX 20.26 -.18
Specin - RPSIX 12.17 -.04
TFinc PRTAX 10.06 -.01
TxFrH = PRFHX 12.16 -.01
TxAS! = PRFSX 534 *
Totindex POMIX 15.20 -.12
USTLg —- PRULX 11.45 -.04
Value TRVLX 26.90 -.21
Principal Funds:

L72030In. PMTIX 13.49 -.10

Inv:

BdMtgin PMSIX 10.69 -.01
DiscLCinst PILBX 15.92 -.12
IntlGthinst PITIX 12.46 -.14
(72020In PLWIX 13.55 -.10
PtriVIn = PLVIX 15.21 -.10
PtrLGi In PLGIX 832 -.04
Ptrintin — PINIX 15.23. -.20
TotRetp PURIX 22.42 -.24
Putnam Funds A:

AABalAp PABAX 1231 -.06
AAGrAp PAEAX 14.05 -.11
OvrinAp PDINX 10.02 -.01
EqinAp PEYAX 17.47. -10

EuEq PEUGX 29.56 -.33 | Spectra Funds:

FLIXA = PTFLX 9.14 -.01
GeoAp PGEOX -17.96 -.09
GIbEqty p PEQUX 10.94 -.09
GrinAp PGRWX 19.83 -.12
HithAp PHSTX 58.88 -.10
HiYdAp PHIGX 811 “01
IncmAp PINCX 6.78

IntEqp POVSX 31.06 -39
IntCapO p PNVAX 36.37 -.43
InvAp —-PINVX 15.33 -.09
NwOpAp PNOPX 49.35 -.37
NwValAp PANVX 19.10 -.09
OTCAp POEGX 891 -.09
PATE = PTEPX 9.13.01
RsrchAp PNRAX 16.07 -.08
TxExAp PTAEX 878 -.01
TFInAp’ PPNAX 14,86 -.02
TFHYA = PTHAX. 13.11 -.01
USGVAp PGSIX 1313 *








Fund Thr, _NAV_ Clig.

VstaA p
VoyA p

Putnam Funds B:

CapAprt
ConvB t






PVISX 11.22 -11
PVOYX 1841 -.07

PCABX 21.07 ~.15
PCNBX 19.11 -.07

Value

Fund Tha. _NAV_Chg.

TCW Funds N:
SelEQNp TGCNX 1884 -.07
Tamarack

Funds:

MicroCpValTMVSX 22.38 -.44
TVASX 39.68 -.24





DvrinBt —PSIBX 9.93 -.02 | Temmpeton Instit CapValue VCVLX 1267 14
oe re aes = EmMSp TEEMX 20.18 -42|CapOpp VHCOX 36.69 -31
GrinBt —PGIBX 1952 12] FOES TFEQX 26.30 -30| DivdGro VDIGK 1443-09
HIthBt PHSBX 5226 09 Third Avenue Fads: i Energy VGENX 61.25 +.08
Hither PHSBX $2.26 -09 intr TAVIX 21.72 -07] Eqinc —VEIPX 2507-19
IntlEqp POVBX 2993 -37| RIESIVIr TAREX 34.23 22) Explr —VEXPK 74.29. -83
NwOpBt PNOBK 4391 34] SMiCap TASCX 2545 -21| pur VFLIX 11463. -2
orcet poTex 780 07 | Yaue TAVPX 59.31 031 GNMA VFX 1025 *
ResrchBt, PRFBX 15.16 -.03 | Thornburg Fds C: VHGEX 22.67 -.25
VistaBt | PVTBX 9:70 -.09| ImtValCt THGCX 2690 21) Groinc VONPX 3551-3
VoyBt — PVOBX 15.98 -.07 | Thomburg Fas: GrthEq VGEQX 1112 -09
Putiaii Fisals Ce IntvalAp TGVAX 28.15 -221 Hvcorp VWEHX 622 1
GrOmecp POGEX. 1393-05 | MCBUMAt TIBAX 2023-13 | Heer Wanex ates ot
Putnam Funds Mi (nivalue | TGVIX 2867-23 infiPro VIPSK 1182-1
Pues Rue oe eae TVIRK S06 | IEW: | NN OEM 922
Income CYX 01 LgCpStk AALGX 27.80 -18 4 -02
inl” POWK 3127-291 Widcpar LaMGX 1540 “11 TTSy VEIN 1079 02
oy 19.04 --07) Midcpsk AASCX 16.09 -.13| LifeCon VSCGX 1656 -.08
CeaBe CUPEK 2549-24 ee tise, ASK (ast be
fa Tocqui i
ane Se ae “73 | Gold TGLOX 4807-55 ied ec a
“16 | orrny Fone :
Rents p RauRK 2840 wll Fund” TORY. 41.61 -26 ue et eo
Value RSVAX 27.22 -20 | Touchstone Family: ie a a er
SmCoGr p RSSGX 20.80 -25) MCPGrA TEGAX 23.09 -21 | Hh a
Rainier Inv Mgt: TA IDEX A: Mulnsig VILPX 12.64 -02
SmMCap_RIMSX 36.28 38 | ASAIMG p IMLAX 12.76 -.09) Mulnt = VWITX 13.36 -.01
S/MCplnst RAISX 36.73, -36 | Janarow p IDET 25.86 * |) MMM WEN OL =a
eee fA DEX C: mt .
Feeds in: soar -a4| ASMModt IMOLX 1220 -07| Mush WWSTX 1557 -01
Opty» ROPEX 1322 13{ AAMdGrt IMLX 1271-09] NLT = VWWTX 1189-02
eee “13 AsalGrwt IAALX 1296-11] NYLT © VNYIX 1131. ~02
BalanceA INMUX 11.04 05 | Tumer Funds: PALT ne yea 1135-2
DisnEGAp AGEAX G80 oe | MidcpGth TMGFX 29.22 -24 | PrecMtisrVGPMX 2616-57
DEI INDZX 12.67 -.10 Browne: PrmnepCor VPCCX 12.64 -.06
DivrBd INBNX 4.86 | *| Glob TBGVX 30.99 -15] Prmcpr VPMCX 68.89 -.33
DvOppA INUTX 8.84 -.09 | UBS Funds Cl A: SelValur VASVX 21.01 -.18
Eqval IEVAX. 13.24 -.08 Dynal ha tBNAAX 11.69 +.02|STAR | VGSTX 20.92 -.12
Growth INIDK 31.79 «20 | GlobAllot BNGLX 14.10 -.09] STIGrade VFSTX 1058 *
HIVIdBd INEAX 2.95 * | UBS Funds CIC: sired VSGBX 1030 -01
HIYATEA INHYX 4.41 -.01 | GlobAllop BNPCX 13.84 -.091 STIsry — VFISX 10.29 -.01
IntlSelVip APIAX 10.44 -.18 | UBS PACE Fils P: StratEq VSEQX 2352 -23
LgCpEqp ALEAX 5.85 -.03] IntEqtyP PCIEX 19.30 -.26| TgtRe2005 VIOVX 11.46 -.06
MCpGrA INVPX 10.68 -07|LCGEP PCLCX 17.84 -11| totme2005 VITVX 1297 10

MidCpVi pAMVAX 8.77 -.08

StrtgcAlA

TxSnGrl p STTAX 27.07 -.10
SandsCpGri CISGX 11.34 -.04

Schroder
NAmEqIn

Schwab Runds:
CoreEq SWANX 1849 -.14

DivEqInv
DivEgSel

HdgEqS! rSWHEX 15.87 -.09

IntSS r
MT AIlEq

MTGro SWHGX 18.99 -.17

1000Inv r
1000Sel
S&P Inv
S&P Sel
S&PinstSl
SmCps!
TotBond

ViewpointSWOBX 12.89 -.08
YidPis|_ SWYPX 9.69 *

YidPlsSI
Equity
AmShD
AmShs p

Seligman
Comund t
GrowthA
HYdBD t
MAMuniA

Funds:
SECEX 6.62 -.04
Funds;

Sentinel Group:

ComS Ap
IntlEgA p

SmCoA p SAGWX 7.41 -.09

ola
IneEq
SoundSh

Fund N

St FarmAssoc:

Balan

soe

ia

Dividend

SunAmerica Funds:

NwCenA p
NwCenB t

SunAmerica Focus:

FelntEqc

TCW Funds:

DivFocus
SelEqty!






IMRFX 11.43 -.09
B:
IDEBX 12.68 -.10

Funds:
SNAEX 12.00 -.07

SWDIX 14.60 -.12
SWDSX 14.57 -.12

SWISX 21.34 -31
SWEGX 13.73 -.15

SNXFX 41.00 -.27
SNXSX 40.98 -.26
SWPIX 21.71 -14
SWPPX 21.78 -.13
ISLCX 11.11 -.07
SWSSX 23.18 -36
SWLBX 9.87 -.01

SWYSX 9.69 *

SLADX 45.58 -.30
SLASX 45.57 -.30

Group:

SLMCX 33.61 -.21
SGRFX 4.48 -.01
SHYDX 3.40 *
SMATX 7.95 -.01

SENCX 32.66 -20
SWRLX 20.35 -.22

SEQUX152.44 -1.86
SKSEX 25.72 -.40
SSHFX 38.90 -38

SPECX. 8.92 -.05

STFGX 56.38 -.39
SPSCX pron +25
PAK 2726-27
STMDX 38.17 '-.57

SEGAX 20.36 -.09
SEGBX 17.79 +.08

FINTX 19.01 -.19

TGIGX 13.20 -11
TGCEX 1932 -.07



BalAdml

Energy

500Adm|
GNMA Ad VFUX
GroincAd VGIAX
GrwAdm —VIGAX
HithCr = VGHAX 61.
HividCp VWEAX
InfProAd — VAIPX
Insd\TAd VILQX 12.
TTBdAdm! = VBILX
TsryAdml_ VFIUX
IntGrAdm VWILX
TTAdml = VWIUX 1336 -.01
MGrAdm —VFIDX
LtdTrAd = VMLUX
LTGrAdm! VWETX
LTsyAdml_ VUSUX
LT Adml = VWLUX

MuHYAdmVWALX
PrmCapr VPMAX 71.
PacfAdml VPADX
ReitAdmr VGSLX 107.55 -1.69
STsyAdml_ VFIRX
STBdAdm! VBIRX
ShtTrAd = VWSUX
STFdAd = VSGDX
STIGrAd VFSUX
SmCAdm VSMAX
TxMCapr VTCLX
KMGrin rt VTGLX
TUBAdm! =VBTLX 10,
TStkAdm VTSAX
USGrAdm VWUAX 47.
ValAdml VVIAX 26.28 -.18
WellsiAdm VWIAX 52.
WelltnAdmVWENX 55,62 -.32

LCGEqP = PCLVX 21.39 -.14
UMB Scout Funds:
World UMBWX 3231 -36

SelGrthB r VBSGX 5.43 -.02
StrGwth ACEMX 36.13 -.18
Van Kamp Funds C:
AggGrCt VAGCX 14.98 -.11
ComStkC ACSYX 1923 -.16
EgincCt ACERX 9.00 -.05
Van Wagoner Funds:

EmgGro pVWEGX 458 -.05
MicroCp pVWMCX 9.59 -.09

Admirak

AsstAdm! VAARX 6421 -.4l
VBIAX 2131-11
CAITAdm VCADX 11.03 -.01
CpOpAd! VHCAX 84.77 -71
VGELX 115.02 +.14
EqinAdmn VEIRX 5254 -Al
EuroAdml VEUSX 83.83 -1.33
ExplAdml VEXRX 69.16 -.77
ExtdAdm VEXAX 3839 -.44
FLUTAdm VFLRX 11.63 -.02
VFIAX 129.82. -.80
1025 *
5798 -22
29.79 -.16



622 -.01
2321-03

10.28 -.02
10.79 -.02
75.20 -1.07

974 -.02
1071 -.01
932 -.02
1120-3
1133-01
89.06 -.60

1029 -.01
991 -01
1557 -.01
10.30 ~al

6306 -39
3387-25







62 -.41

64 -.02

02 -.02
11 -.24
74. -.24

BalCt

VangA

Wasatch:
CoreGr WGROX 39.58 -.44
Mic-Cap WMICX 651 -.07
SmCpGr WAAEX 36.30 -.53

Value

Index

DivEq |

IntiMM!

TgtRe2015 VIXVX 1242 -.08
‘TgtRe2035 VITHX 13.78 -.12
ae VTIVX 1423 -.12

EqincAp CMPBX 21.87 -.15
WCstEq CMNWX 43.20 -33
WM Str Asset Mgmt:

BalancA p SABPX 14.62 -.08
BalancBt SBBPX 1459 -.09
SCBPX 14.51 -.09
ConGrBt SBGPX 16.16 -.12
ConGrA p SAGPX 16.65 -.12
ConGrwC tSCGPX 16.03 -.12
StrGAp SACAX 1841 -.15
Waddell & Reed Adv: |

Acem = UNACX 7.52. -.03
AssetSp UNASX 9.22 -.07
CoreinvA UNCMX 6.13 -.02
NCcptA p UNECX 11.03 -.13
ScTechA UNSCX 11.13 -.05
UNVGX 896 -.02

Hickory WEHIX 39.91 -.33
PartVal WPVLX 24.44 -.16
WVALX 40.26 -.26
Wells Fargo Ad Adm:

ConsAlloc NVCBX 19.30 -.05
NVINX 5541-34
Wells Fargo Adv A:

AStAIIA = SFAAX 2148 -.13

AsiaPc_ — SASPX 12.44 -.04
CmStkZ STCSX 19.93 -.10
Enterpr SENTX 29.98 -21
Grwthinv SGROX 22.72. -.15
Opptyinv SOPFX 41.41 -.24

SCApValZ pSSMVX 30.27 -.34
UitStiny =STADX 911 *
UIStMulncSMUAX 4.77 *
Wells Fargo Admin:

NVDEX 39.00 -34
GrBal = NVGBX 30.24 -21
UgCoGri NVLCX 50.96 -.39
CrBdPtFl pWAPIX 11.39 -.02
CorePlus WACPX 10.59 -.01
Core WATFX 11.39 -.02

BalAAA = WEBAX 11.57 -.04
MMitsAA pWEMMX 15.03 -.08

IntiGthN = WBIGX 27.38 -37
Ris:
WMIIX 1044 -.13

NEW YORK CORPORATION BONDS

Ytd. Close Chg.
CORPORATION BONDS
BurN 8.15s20N 7.06 115Â¥2 -
Deere 8.95819 8.21 109 -1
DelcoR 85807 9.868742 wt
FedNM 2zr14 Bie +048
FordCr 63808 6.49 9898 a}

GMAC 61808 614 997%

GiulfMo 5s5t is
HSBC Fn6%11 6.46
JPMChse 61808 6,08
JPMChse 6§08" 6.63
Leucadia 79413 7.38
MBNA8.28s26 8.00
MeDnl 8 11 7.87

Close Chg.
73 2
104Â¥2 =
100% = +48
101% Ve
105 Ve
10342 8
12% 2%

Ytd. Clese Chg.
MPac 48420f 90% =
NatwFS 8s27 7.72 «108% te
Noram 6312 ov 99Â¥2 oe
Ryder 9816 857 1085 +198
Safwy 9.3807 9.81 G9%s -1Y2
TVA8Y442 7.24114 ts
Tenet 73813 808 91% ss



FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Foreign currency
in dollars
Today Yesterday °

Argent {Peso} 3247 3255
Australia (Dollar) 7787 7846
Bahrain (Dinar) 2.6523 2.6523
Brazil (Real) 4643 A661
Britain (Pound) 1.9301 1.9443
Canada (Dollar) 8526 +8492
Chile (Peso) 1001846 = .001848
China (Yuan) +1280 1281
Colombia (Peso) 000447 = .000451
Czech Rep (Koruna) .0470 0473
Denmark (Krone) 1745 1756
Dominican Rep (Peso) .0296 0296
Egypt (Pound, +1752 «1752
Euro (Euro) 1.3009 1.3086
Hong Kong (Dollar) 1283 +1284
Hungary (Forint) 0051 0052
India (Rupee) 0226 0226
Indnsia (Rupiah) 000112 000112
Israel (Shekel) .2358 2366
Japan (Yen) 008432 008398
Jordan (Dinar) 1.4112 1.4109
Kenya Sug 20144 0144
Kuwalt (Dinar 3.4590 3.4586
Lebanon (Pound) 000662 — .000662

Dollar in Foreign currency
foreign curr in dollars
Today Ye jay Today Yesterday
3.0795 3.0725 | Malaysia (Ringgit) .2847 2840
1.2841 1.2745 | Mexico (Peso) 091436 = 091825
3770 3770 | N. Zealand (Dollar) 6866 6976
2.1537 2.1455 | Norway (Krone) 15771579
pial, rik3 | Pakistan (Rupee) 0164 164
B71 541.13 | Peru (New Sol) 3133 3134
7.8130 7.8089 | Philpins (Peso) 02050205
2237.50 2217.50 | Poland (Zloty) 3353 3360
21.26 21.15 | Russia (Ruble) 0377 0379
5.7293 5.6952 | Saudi Arab (Riyal) — .2666 2666
33.74 33.74 | Singapore (Dollar) — .6503 +6502
5.7085 5.7085 | Slovak Rep (Koruna) .0377 0379
.1687 -T641 | So, Africa (Rand) +1376 1408
7.7321 7.7887 | So, Korea (Won) .001071 .001074
15 yal Sweden (Krona) 14351441
8928.57 me Switzerlnd (Franc) — .8093 Sill
4.2415 4.2263 | Taiwan (Dollar) 0306 0307
118.60 119,03 | Thailand (Baht) 02800 .02798
(7086 .7087 | Turkey (Lira) 6902+ .7024
69.52 69.55 | U.A.E. (Dirham) 2723 2723
2891 -2891 | Uruguay (New Peso) .0409 0412
1510.57 1510.57 | Venzuel (Bolivar) 000466 000466

Dollar in
foreign currency
Today Yesterday
35125 3.5215
10.9366 10.8903
1.4565 (1.4334
6.3413 6.3314
61.05 60.90
3.192 3.191
48.86 48.86
2.98 2.98
26.4915 26.3978
3.7507 3.1507
15377 1.5379
26.49 26.41
7.2652 7.1026
933.71 931.10
69682 6.9403
1.2356 1.2329
32.70 32.59
35.71 35.74
1.4488 1.4238
3.6727 3.6729
24.4248 24.2996

2145.92 2145.92




SHASTRA

SPORTS —



TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007



PRO FOOTBALL
COACH OF THE YEAR



ALEX BRANDON/AP

HEAD COACH: New Orleans Saints
coach Sean Payton listens to
questions from the media at a
press conference in Metairie, La.,
on Saturday. He was named
Associated Press NFL Coach of
the Year for 2006.

Saints’ Payton
beats out an |
outstanding six

BY BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — As Sean Pay-
ton settled into his first head coaching
job with a reeling New Orleans Saints
franchise, he remained mindful of a
couple key pointers from his former
boss, Bill Parcells.

“His advice was to find out —
quickly — what’s kept this team from
. winning, if you can, and then make

oe the appropriate changes,” Payton

“Hee recalled. “He also emphasized the

importance of finding the right quar-
terback.” ‘

Check, and check.

In Payton’s first season in New
Orleans, the Saints (10-6) improved
their victory total by seven en route
to securing the second seed in the
NFC playoffs. And when the rebuilt
Louisiana Superdome plays host to a
second-round NFL playoff game for
the first time ever Saturday night, the
Saints’ offense will be led on the field
by a quarterback in Drew Brees who
led the league in passing yardage.

Viewing the Saints fast and trium-
phant turnaround in the context of
how their success held the potential
to revitalize the spirit of a city
rebuilding from a natural disaster, it
was hardly a surprise Payton was
selected as The Associated Press
Coach of the Year.

Payton received 44 votes in a sea-
son when there were a half-dozen
outstanding coaching performances.
Eric Mangini of the New York Jets,
another first-year head coach, got
three votes, while San Diego’s Marty
Schottenheimer, the 2004 winner,
received two. Jeff Fisher of Tennessee
got one. .

“I’m honored and somewhat hum-
bled. This is a time in our league right
now where there are probably seven
or eight Hall of Fame coaches cur-
rently coaching in our league,” Payton
said Saturday after learning of the
award. “I still have tags hanging out of
my Reebok gear on the sidelines.”

Payton became the third Saints
coach to win the award, joining Has-
lett (2000) and Jim Mora (1987). Last
year’s winner was Chicago’s Lovie
Smith.

With New Orleans ravaged by
Hurricane Katrina in late August
2005, the Saints became nomads that
year, winding up 3-13 under Jim Has-
lett. Payton, an assistant coach in Dal-
las, was hired to revive one of the
NFL’s historically unsuccessful fran-
chises.

The new coach of the Saints was
going to be faced with the unique
challenge of rebuilding a roster while
his community was recovering from
devastation. Yet, Payton embraced
that, understanding how uplifting the
Saints’ success could be to those
struggling to put together their lives
again.

“You have to trust your gut a lot
and follow your heart,” Payton said.
“There certainly were going to be
some challenges coming into this
region at this time. But I think the city

- is very committed to this team and it’s
really an amazing fan base we have,
not just in New Orleans, but in this
whole Gulf South area.

“T'm excited we can provide a little
juice for these people during the
course of the week, get them excited
about football — and certainly excited
about the postseason now,” Payton
said. “Those things all make it very
worthwhile. It’s pretty powerful right
now and it’s a little unique to maybe
any other job.”

Upon his arrival, Payton scoured
film of the 2005 season and found a
team that lost more because of undis-
ciplined, mistake-prone play than a
lack of talent.

Leadership was a key component
Payton wanted to address, and he

° TURN TO COACH













3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO FOOTBALL | NFL ALL-PRO TEAM

Tomlinson, Taylor, Bailey unanimous picks

BY BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

LaDainian Tomlinson, Jason Taylor and
Champ Bailey capped superb seasons by unani-
mously making The Associated Press NFL All-
Pro team announced Monday.

Tomlinson, San Diego’s record-setting run-
ning back, also won the AP Most Valuable
Player and Offensive Player of the Year awards.
Miami end Taylor was the Defensive Player of
the Year.

Bailey tied for the league lead with 10 inter-
ceptions even though opponents tried to avoid
throwing to the Broncos cornerback’s side of
the field.

“My whole idea to go out on a Sunday is to
be a pain in the butt for the other team,” said
Taylor, who had 62 tackles, 13 1/2 sacks, 14 quar-
terback hurries, two interceptions — both
returned for TDs — ll passes defensed, 10 fum-
bles forced and two fumbles recovered.

“If I can be a pain in their butt and give
somebody a headache, then more times than
not, it’s going to work out well for myself.”

It worked out so well for him, Tomlinson —





TAYLOR

TOMLINSON BAILEY

who set NFL records for points with 186, touch-
downs with 31 and TDs rushing with 28 — and
Bailey that they received all 50 votes from a
nationwide panel of sports writers and broad-
casters who cover the NFL.

Two others, both Chicago Bears, came close
to sweeping the vote. Devin Hester, who set a
league mark with six kick returns for touch-
downs, was the only rookie on the team, earn-
ing 48% votes. Middle linebacker Brian
Urlacher, a repeater from last year, got 48.

Asked about the respect he was shown as a
rookie, Hester said: “Right, most definitely. I
really didn’t want to look into this season. I just
kind of wanted to establish myself and feel at



home. Toward the offseason, that’s when I
really start looking at some stuff like that.”

In all, the Chargers had the most All-Pros
with five: Tomlinson, tight end Antonio Gates,
fullback Lorenzo Neal, defensive tackle Jamal
Williams and linebacker Shawne Merriman,
who made it despite serving a four-game sus-
pension for violating the league’s steroids pol-
icy. Merriman still wound up with a league-best
17 sacks.

“When you've got five guys on the All-Pro
team, that says a lot,” said Tomlinson, who did a
lot to give San Diego the league’s best record,
14-2. ““I think that’s significant and ... I’m obvi-
ously very happy to be named on it.”

The Bears were next with four All-Pros:
Urlacher, Hester, center Olin Kreutz and kicker
Robbie Gould.

Saints quarterback Drew Brees edged the
Colts’ Peyton Manning 25 votes to 24 for the
quarterback spot. It was the first time since
2002 that Manning was not the first-team quar-
terback.

° TURN TO ALL-PRO

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP GAME | FLORIDA 41, OHIO STATE 14

Gators running wild ©



POINTING THE WAY: Florida wide receiver Andre Caldwell celebrates a second-quarter TD
catch against Ohio State during Monday night’s victory in the BCS national title game.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT | DANGERS FOR ATHLETES

Cornerback’s slaying haunts Hodge

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Leak leads Florida’s
offense as defense
smothers Ohio St.

BY BEN WALKER
Associated Press

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Not even close.

Florida — yes Florida — owned the field it
wasn’t supposed to be on, embarrassing Heis-
man Trophy winner Troy Smith and No. 1 Ohio
State 41-14 on Monday night to run away with
the national championship.

Chris Leak and Tim Tebow showed off
coach Urban Meyer’s twin quarterback system
to perfection as the No. 2 Gators became the
first Division I school to hold football and bas-
ketball titles at the same time.

Now, only one question remains: What
about Boise State? Playing on the very same
field where the undefeated Broncos stunned
Oklahoma in the Fiesta Bowl on New Year’s
Day, Florida (13-1) routed the previously
unbeaten Buckeyes (12-1).

Former Gators star Emmitt Smith did the
chomp on the sidelines, punctuating the amaz-
ingly easy victory. That left Florida, Wisconsin
and Louisville each with one loss, and surely
will renew calls for a playoff system.

Ted Ginn Jr. returned the opening kickoff 93
yards for a touchdown, then it quickly fell apart
for the Buckeyes. He hobbled off minutes later

‘with an injury and by the time he returned for

the second half on crutches, Florida led 34-14.

Leak, maligned for never winning the big
one, completed 25 of 36 passes for 213 yards and
a touchdown. The Rambo-like Tebow threw for
one TD and ran for another. ;

Smith, meanwhile, joined a long list of Heis-
man Trophy quarterbacks — Jason White, Eric
Crouch and Gino Torretta, among them — to
fall apart in bowl games. He was just 4-for-14
with one interception and never showed off his
elusive running.

Instead, defensive ends Derrick Harvey and
Jarvis Moss made it a miserable night for Smith.
And linebacker Earl Everett ran down Smith
despite missing his helmet.

Florida won its second national title, adding
to the one Heisman winner Danny Wuerffel got
in 1996 under coach Steve Spurrier with a 52-20
over Florida St. in the Sugar Bowl.



BY ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

DENVER — For Denver Nug-
gets guard Julius Hodge, the New
Year’s Day death of Broncos cor-
nerback Darrent Williams was an
unnecessary
reminder to cele-
brate every day.

Williams was
shot in the neck
and two other
people were
wounded when
at least 14 bullets
were fired into a
stretch Hummer
after Williams left a New Year’s
Eve party.

Last April, Hodge had left a



HODGE

Denver nightclub and was driving
on Interstate 76 when a gunman
pulled up alongside him, spraying
his vehicle with bullets. The
6-foot-7 point guard was hit five
times.

“It just shows that I’m really
blessed to be here still, and I never
take anything for granted,” said
Hodge, who made his first NBA
start since the shooting last Friday.
“Not a minute, a second, a millisec-
ond of my life.”

Police investigating Williams’
death said they have no indication
the two cases are related.

Williams was the third pro ath-
lete to be involved in a Denver-
area shooting.

In 2003, Pittsburgh Steelers

AW

linebacker Joey Porter, who played
at Colorado State, was one of six
people shot outside a Denver
nightclub in an attack that left one
person dead.

“Since then, I carry myself in a

different type of way,” Porter said
last week. “I respect my situation
whenever I go out. I take a whole
different outlook when I go out. I
make sure I feel like I’m safe, and if
I’m not, I’m not going.”

All three cases remain unsolved.

“I have to move on,” Hodge said
of the case. “They haven’t found
who shot me and I’ve pretty much
let it go, but I pray that they find
whoever shot (Williams).”

* TURN TO SLAYING



SHARON STEINMAN/MCT

FINAL FAREWELL: Pall bearers
carry the casket of Darrent
Williams toward the horse-
drawn carriage that will take
him to the cemetery in Fort
Worth, Texas, on Saturday.



/

t
‘

vi¢
O5Â¥e t

om

6

ee A ee ee

+

1 wd

uty 476
. a

+ lee »

1

tt 8 4G 9% @ BY

a a

“

8 me

a4.

59 DOM Bet b eH AE

2

Pea
4E | TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 _|

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER | EXTRA TIME

FIFA report omits Zidane’s head-butt

BY ROBERT MILLWARD
Associated Press

LONDON — Maybe Zine-
dine Zidane’s head-butt in the
World Cup final never hap-
pened.

The unforgettable moment
in soccer’s biggest game came
when the France captain
reacted to something Marco
Materazzi said by planting his
head firmly into the Italian’s
chest.

Because the ball was fur-
ther down the field, few
among the 69,000 fans in Ber-
lin’s Olympic Stadium saw
what happened and were
amazed Zidane was sent off.

FIFA, it seems, didn’t see it
at all. There’s certainly no
mention of the episode in the
soccer body’s official World
Cup 2006 report. It’s not even
noted that Zidane was ejected
— in the last game of his
career! :

Even in retirement, Zidane
was suspended for three
games and fined for the out-
burst. Before he considers
suing FIFA, there may be rea-
sons why the governing body

SOCCER NOTES

Adu heads

Associated Press

Freddy Adu headed the
list of 20 players selected
Monday for the U.S. roster in
qualifying for the FIFA U-20
World Cup.

Michael Bradley, son of
interim U.S. national team
coach Bob Bradley, was not
made available for the qualify-
ing tournament by his Dutch
club, Heerenveen, the U.S.
Soccer Federation said. Heer-
enveen did allow forward
Robbie Rogers to take part
in qualifiers, which will take
place from Jan. 17-21 at Pan-
ama City, Panama.

Adu played in the tourna-
ment in 2003 and 2005, when
it was known as the FIFA
World Youth Championship.

Nine of the players
selected by under-20 coach
Thomas Rongen are profes-
sionals, including six from
Major League Soccer. Among
the pros are forwards Pres-
ton Zimmerman of Ham-
burg in Germany and Johann
Smith of Bolton in England.

The Americans gather in
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on
Wednesday, leave Saturday
for Panama and play Haiti on
Jan. 17, Guatemala on Jan. 19
and Panama on Jan. 21. The
top two teams in the group
advance to the U-20 World
Cup, to be played in Canada
from June 30-July 22. Two
more teams will qualify when
Costa Rica, Jamaica, Mexico
and St. Kitts and Nevis com-
pete in the other group, from
Feb. 21-25 at Culiacan, Mexico.

The roster includes goal-
keepers Brian Perk (UCLA)
and Chris Seitz (Maryland);
defenders Quavas Kirk (L.A.
Galaxy), Ofori Sarkodie
(Indiana), Nathan Sturgis
(Los Angeles Galaxy), Julian
Valentin (Wake Forest),
Anthony Wallace (South
Florida) and Tim Ward
(Columbus Crew); midfield-
ers Adu (Real Salt Lake),
Bryan Arguez (West Kendal
Optimists), Tony Beltran

didn’t include details of the
head-butt in its report.
Zidane’s ejection for an act
of blatant violence provided a
shameful end to a champion-
ship that FIFA had lauded as
one of the best. Maybe it didn’t
want to take the shine off an
otherwise glowing report.
The 2006 World Cup was
widely acclaimed as well orga-
nized by the host Germans
despite fears about ticketing
and security. There was little

crowd trouble inside or out-.

side the stadiums despite the
arrival of thousands of
drunken fans from England
and neighboring Netherlands.
There were standout goals
- and saves and some top qual-
ity performances in the early
stages of the competition.
Although the big names faded
in the second half and Brazil,
Argentina, Spain and England
went home earlier than
expected, FIFA believed it had
plenty of reasons to give the
World Cup top marks.
The final stages of the last
game was 110 minutes old,
deep into extra time, with the

U.S. under-



STEVE WILSON/AP

A PLAYER: Freddy Adu will
play for the U.S. under-20
World Cup team.

(UCLA), Amaechi Igwe:
(Santa Clara), Danny Szetela
(Columbus Crew) and Jona-
than Villanueva (Virginia);
and forwards Andre Akpan
(Harvard), Josmer Altidore
(N.Y. Red Bulls), Rogers,
Smith (Bolton, England), Zim-
merman and Sal Zizzo
(UCLA).

FAKING INJURIES

FIFA criticized players at
the World Cup for the
“deplorable habit” of faking
injuries, disruptions that the
governing body said marred
last summer’s tournament.

In its official report on the
2006 World Cup, FIFA also
praised German organizers
for a staging a trouble-free
event, which Italy won by
beating France on a penalty-
kick shootout in the final.

FIFA president Sepp Blat-
ter, in a foreword to the
report, described the organi-
zation of the World Cup as
“faultless” and the fan behav-
ior ‘“‘a complete success.”
FIFA, however, clearly was
displeased by the trend of
players falling to field as if
injured.

“At this World Cup, the
deplorable habit that involves
players staying down for no
apparent reason after minor



BASEBALL NOTES

Seay, Perez

Associated Press

Left-hander Bobby Seay
and outfielder Timo Perez
have agreed to minor league
contracts with the AL cham-
pion Detroit Tigers.

Seay appeared in 14 games
and had a 6.46 ERA with the
American League champions
last season. The Tigers
demoted him in June and he
went on to go 1-2 with a 4.74
ERA in one start and 23 relief
appearances at Triple-A
Toledo. He has pitched in 76
major league games over five
seasons in Detroit, Colorado
and Tampa Bay and is 1-1 with
a 5.02 ERA.

If added to the 40-man ros-
ter under the deal announced
Monday, he would get a one-



MICHAEL PROBST/AP

CARDED: France’s Zinedine Zidane gets a red card from
referee Horacio Elizondo after head-butting Italy’s
Marco Materazzi in the chest during extra time in the
final game of the World Cup between Italy and France

in Berlin on July 9.

20 roster

collisions, thus causing fre-
quent breaks in play, was
increasingly in evidence,”
said the report of the FIFA
Technical Committee.

When players go down
injured, the team in posses-
sion traditionally puts the ball
out of play. From the restart,
the ball is then passed back to
the team which deliberately
put the ball out.

Now, FIFA warns. that
coaches and players are
unfairly taking advantage.

“In some cases, the player
lying on the ground was
treated for quite a while
before being led off the pitch
and was often ready to come
back on before the game had
been restarted,” the World
Cup report said. “When play
eventually continued, the ball
was played back to the team
who had been in possession
... but in a place that put
them at a clear disadvantage.”

The report said the inter-
ruptions destroyed the flow of
the game.

D.C. UNITED

Former Duke co-captains
Brian Davis and Christian
Laettner wore black and red
soccer scarves instead of bas-
ketball jerseys Monday as
MLS unveiled a new, minori-
ty-led ownership group that is
paying a league-record $33
million for the operating
rights to D.C. United.

Now comes the hard part
— finding a way to build the
team a new stadium in the
poorest section of the city.

Davis and Laettner joined a
group called D.C. United
Holdings and led by San Fran-
cisco businessmen Victor
MacFarlane and Will Chang.
MacFarlane and Davis are the
first black owners in MLS,
commissioner Don Garber
said. Chang, one of the own-
ers of baseball’s San Francisco
Giants, is the first Chinese-
American MLS _ owner,
according to Garber.

get minor-league deals

year contract that would pay
$450,000 in the major leagues
and $120,000 in the minors.

Perez hit 194 with three
RBIs in 23 games last year for
the World Series champion St.
Louis Cardinals and was cut
in August. In seven seasons
with the New York Mets, Chi-
cago White Sox and St. Louis,
he has a .262 batting average
with 26 homers and 172 RBIs.

If added to the major
league roster, Perez would get
a one-year contract that
would pay $450,000 in the
majors and $72,000 in the
minors.

METS

Reliever Duaner Sanchez
and the New York Mets

agreed Monday to an
$850,000, one-year contract,
more than double the
$399,500 he earned last sea-
son.

Sanchez was acquired from
the Los Angeles Dodgers on
Jan. 4 last year, and the 27-
year-old right-hander went 5-1
with 2.60 ERA in 49 relief
appearances.

In addition to his salary,
Sanchez could earn $100,000
in performance bonuses:
$25,000 each for 50, 55, 60 and
65 games.

Three Mets remain eligible
to file for salary arbitration by
Friday. They are catcher
Ramon Castro, outfielder
Endy Chavez and left-hander
Oliver Perez.

game laboring toward a pen-
alty shootout when the

‘Zidane-Materazzi flare-up

happened and the Frenchman
was shown a red card.

As the three-time FIFA
Player of the Year walked past
the World Cup trophy, the
smiles of satisfaction disap-
peared from the faces of Sepp
Blatter and his FIFA col-
leagues.

They knew that the 2006
World Cup — which has the
letters “FIFA” at the head of
its official title — would for-
ever be known as the competi-
tion where one of the greatest
players the game has ever seen
ended his career by head-butt-
ing an opponent.

When the official report
came out six months later,
Blatter, UEFA president Len-
nart Johansson and local orga-
nizing committee chairman
Frank Beckenbauer all wrote
forewords to the document
without making reference to
Zidane’s head-butt or even his
ejection.

While rightly praising the
organizational skills of the



SPORTS ROUNDUP



_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Germans, the report skipped
over some glaring errors by
some of the referees — like
England’s Graham Poll, who
showed three yellow cards to
one player before finally eject-
ing him. .

To its credit, the report
criticized players and coaches
for the increasing practice of
feigning injuries as a tactical
ploy. It lamented that some of
the rising young stars made no
impact at the World Cup and
the fact that Asian and African
nations didn’t fulfill the prom-
ise they had shown in previous
World Cups.

But it simply ignored the
tournament’s single biggest
moment.

The World Cup was an
organizational triumph. Too
bad that Zidane didn’t stay
around for the finish.

The FIFA report makes
brief mention of Zidane’s con-
tributions right up to the 104th
minute of the final when his
header was saved by Italy
goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon.

Somehow, the final header
of his career got missed.

HE KEPT TRUCKIN’:
Bobby Hamilton
celebrates winning
the NASCAR
Craftsman Truck
Series Florida Dodge
Dealers 250 at the
NASCAR Nextel Cup
Daytona 500 on Feb.
18, 2005 in Daytona,
Fla. Hamilton died
from cancer at the
age of 49 on Sunday
at his home with ~
family.

AALAND A RADIA

NASCAR's Hamilton dies

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Bobby Hamilton paid his
early bills driving a wrecker,
got his NASCAR break driv-
ing a car used in Days of
Thunder and won the 2004
Craftsman Truck champion-
ship in his own truck.

Following his death Sun-
day of cancer at the age of 49,
Hamilton was remembered
for his love of the sport, kind-
ness and blue-collar persona.

Nextel Cup driver Sterling
Marlin, a fellow Tennessee
native, said Sunday night that
a lot of people didn’t get to
know Hamilton well, but that
the driver who started with
nothing and never had the
best equipment would be
missed.

“He would give you the
shirt off his back, and he
helped me out a lot through
the years,” Marlin said.

Born in Nashville in 1957,
Hamilton got his start on local
tracks and qualified fifth in his
first Cup race at Phoenix in
1989 with a car used in the
movie Days of Thunder. He
drove in all of NASCAR’s top
three divisions, making 371
Cup starts and winning four
races in what is now the Nex-
tel Cup series, including the
2001 Talladega 500.

The death was shocking to
people who had not seen him
recently. His racing team
announced only last month
that Ken Schrader would
drive its truck this season.

“NASCAR is saddened by
the passing of Bobby Hamil-
ton,” said Jim Hunter,
NASCAR’s vice president of
communications. “Bobby was
a great competitor, dedicated
team owner and friend. Our
thoughts and prayers go out
to all of the Hamilton family.”

Hamilton won 10 times in
the truck series, including
four victories in 2004 when
he became the first owner-
driver to win a NASCAR
series title since the late Alan
Kulwicki won the Winston

Cup championship in 1992.

Hamilton was diagnosed in
February with head and neck
cancer. A malignant growth
was found when swelling
from dental surgery did not
go down.

He raced in the first three
truck races of the season, with
a best finish of 14th at Atlanta
Motor Speedway, before turn-
ing over the wheel to his son,
Bobby Hamilton Jr. The
senior Hamilton then started
chemotherapy and radiation
treatment. :

By August, he returned to
work at Bobby Hamilton Rac-
ing in Mount Juliet, about 20
miles east of Nashville. It was
his fourth race shop, a facility
lacking for nothing and built
to prove he could stay in Ten-
nessee and compete in a place
he kept so clean he often
walked around barefoot.

Doctors indicated his CAT
scans looked good. But micro-
scopic cancer cells remained
on the right side of his neck.

“Cancer is an ongoing bat-
tle, and once you are diag-
‘nosed you always live with
the thought of the disease in
your body,” Hamilton said in
an article posted on
NASCAR’s website last
month. “It is the worst thing
you could ever imagine.”

Hamilton’s Nextel Cup

wins, in addition to Talladega,
came at Phoenix, Rockingham
and Martinsville. His best sea-
son was in 1996 when he fin-
ished ninth in the season
standings. He won his first
Cup race that year, at Phoe-
nix.
Hamilton drove in the top-
level NASCAR series from
1989-05, earning $14.3 million
and racing to 20 top-five fin-
ishes.

He became a full-time driv-
er-owner in the truck series in
2003.

Another NASCAR favorite,
1973 Winston Cup champion
Benny Parsons, was diag-
nosed with cancer in his left
lung in July. He was checked

into intensive care last week
at a North Carolina hospital.

DAKAR RALLY

ER RACHIDIA, Morocco
— Giniel de Villiers won the
third stage of the Dakar Rally
on Monday, while Carlos
Sainz took the overall lead.

De Villiers, a South African
driving a Volkswagen, fin-
ished in 2 hours, 46 minutes,
12 seconds on the 156-mile
timed section of the 402-mile
trek from Nador to Er Rachi-
dia.
Sainz, also driving a Volks-
wagen, was 25 seconds
behind. The Spaniard won the
second stage Sunday, from
Portimao, Portugal, to Malaga,
Spain.

Stephane Peterhansel of
France, in a Mitsubishi, fin-
ished third Monday, 3:18
behind De Villiers.

Overall, Sainz leads De Vil-
liers by 1:02. Carlos Sousa of
Portugal, in a Volkswagen, is
4:26 behind.

This year’s Dakar Rally has
a record number of competi-
tors with 525 teams, including
250 motorcycles, 187 cars and
88 trucks contesting the 4,918-
mile race through Europe and
Africa. The race finishes in
Dakar, Senegal, on Jan. 20.

OLYMPIC BIDS

LONDON — The three cit-
ies hoping to host the 2014
Winter Games completed
their final bids, which will be
handed over to the Interna-

‘ tional Olympic Committee by
Wednesday’s deadline.

The candidates are
Pyeongchang, South Korea;
Salzburg, Austria; and Sochi,
Russia. The IOC will select
the host city July 4 in Guate-
mala City.

Sochi submitted its bid
Monday, with Pyeongchang
expected to follow today.
Salzburg’s bid will be submit-
ted Wednesday. The next step
for the three cities is a visit
from the IOC’s evaluation
commission.

*

EBT ES PD SOE I TO ST TT TS TTR RT TS TOT GT TEU TTS




SATISFACTION: Patriots quarterback Tom Brady celebrates

ELISE AMENDOLA/AP

his fourth-quarter touchdown pass to Kevin Faulk

during his team’s 37-16 victory over the Jets in an AFC

wild-card game in Foxborough, Mass., on Sunday.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT
Saints’ Payton is
Coach of the Year

*COACH

started by bringing in Brees,
seen at the time as a risk
because the quarterback was
rehabbing from complicated
offséason surgery on his
throwing shoulder.

But Payton trusted Brees
when the quarterback prom-
ised to work tirelessly to
come back stronger than
before. Brees has silenced
the doubters, throwing for
4,418 yards and 26 touch-
downs, good enough to start
for the NFC in the Pro Bowl.

Payton added a handful of
key veterans to the mix,
including center Jeff Faine,
defensive tackle Hollis

Thomas, and new lineback- |

ers Scott Fujita, Mark Simo-
neau and Scott Shanle.
“We wanted to make sure

we were looking for players »

that were tough, had good
character, that wanted to
win and be a part of the
team,” Payton said. “All of
those things we thought
were very important, along
with talent.”

By the time training camp

was over, nearly half the ros-
ter had changed and several

rookies had become key
starters.

Payton lucked out when
Reggie Bush was bypassed
at the top of the draft by
Houston, and Bush was a
dynamic rookie as a runner,
receiver and punt returner.
Then there was seventh-
round pick Marques Col-
ston, who became an elite
rookie with more than 1,000
yards receiving and eight
TDs.

Payton wisely alternated
running back Deuce McAI-
lister, coming off a serious
knee injury, with Bush, and
McAllister finished with
1,057 yards rushing and 10
touchdowns.

“You can just tell that
he’s had a plan about when
he became a head coach how
he was going to create this

‘winning attitude and win-

ning atmosphere around the
clubhouse and that’s what

‘he’s done,” Brees said.

“He’s brought in a lot of
good people. Good players
that are great people, and I
think that that’s really what
it’s all about when you talk
about coming together as a
team,” Brees added.



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

All-Pro team chosen

° ALL-PRO

Brees engineered the
turnaround in New Orleans
from 3-13 to 10-6 and. an NFC
South division title.

He was joined on the All-

/ Pro squad by Saints second-
“year tackle Jammal Brown.

Kansas City’s Larry John-
son was selected in the back-
field with Brees, a former
Charger, and the two San
Diego backs.

The wideouts are Marvin
Harrison of Indianapolis and
Chad Johnson of Cincinnati.

Another Bengal, tackle
Willie Anderson, is on the
offensive line, where he’s
joined by Philadelphia guard
Shawn Andrews and Pitts-
burgh guard Alan Faneca.

Taylor anchors a defense
also featuring end Carolina
end Julius Peppers, Minne-
sota tackle Kevin Williams,
Baltimore linebacker Adal-

ius Thomas, Miami line-
backer Zach Thomas, Jack-
sonville cornerback Rashean
Mathis, Philadelphia safety
Brian Dawkins and Balti-
more safety Ed Reed.

“It means a lot,” said
Adalius Thomas, a first-time
All-Pro. “It’s a tribute not to
myself, but to a lot of the
guys up front. I don’t think
you could have a good line-
backing corps without good
defensive linemen..That’s a
tribute to Kelly Gregg, Hal-
oti Ngata, Trevor Pryce and
all those guys and the other
linebackers, Ray Lewis, Bart
Scott and Terrell Suggs.”

Buffalo’s Brian Moorman
is the punter.

Repeaters from 2005 are
Gates, Chad Johnson, Ander-
son, Faneca, Jamal Williams,
Urlacher, Bailey and Moor-
man.

There are 18 AFC players
and 10 from the NFC.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Recurring nightmare

* SLAYING

Williams’ death has
brought flashbacks of his
own shooting.

That April 8 night, three
bullets sliced right through
Hodge’s legs, and two
lodged in him.

“The first one I took out
myself when it happened, in
my right leg,” Hodge said.
“And I had one in my left
thigh they took out not too
much later.”

One of the bullets nar-
rowly missed his femoral
artery, and Hodge said doc-
tors told him he was five
minutes away from bleeding

to death.

Since the shooting, Hodge
said he has learned to appre-
ciate the little things.

“It definitely gave me a
greater outlook on life,” he
said. “It made me realize
there’s every opportunity in
every area of my life that I
need to take full advantage
of, to not walk around being
upset maybe because I
didn’t get any minutes in the
basketball game.”

Now, Hodge is celebrat-
ing a new life, too: “I have a
little girl on the way within
two weeks. I’m happy. I’m
about to be a father. It’s a
blessing.”





AFC PLAYOFFS | NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Brady is scaring playoff teams again

BY DAVE GOLDBERG
Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass —
When Tom Brady was over-
looked in this year’s Pro Bowl
voting, his reaction demon-
strated exactly what he is all
about.
“There’s only one bowl ’'m
interested in and it’s not the
Pro Bowl,” he said.
After Sunday’s win over the
New York Jets, the New Eng-

land Patriots’ star quarterback ~

is two wins away from getting
back to that Bowl for the
fourth time. He’s 3-0 in the
Super Bowl and now is ll-1 in
playoff games, the main rea-
son the lowest-seeded team of
the four left in the AFC might
be the scariest.

In fact, San Diego, Balti-
more and Indianapolis saw
what they knew — and possi-
ble feared they’d see — in the
Patriots’ 37-16 win over the
Jets: 22-for-34 for 212 yards
and two touchdowns as Brady
simply picked apart a team
that battered him less than two
months ago at the same venue,
when New York won 17-14.

That’s classic Brady: resil-
ient and remarkably consis-
tent.

In six seasons as New Eng-
land’s starter, his passer rating
has been between 85.7 (2002)
and 92.6, and his touchdown to

NFC PLAYOFFS | PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

interception ratio just about.

2-1. He was right there this
season despite a receiving
corps that might have been the
worst of any playoff team’s: an
87.9 rating with 24 TDs and 12

. interceptions.

That makes the Pro Bowl
slight even more curious,
although Pro Bowl selections
normally are curious by defi-
nition. The other AFC QBs are
Peyton Manning (automatic),
Carson Palmer (OK) and
Philip Rivers of the Chargers,
who is in his first season as a
starter and slid a bit toward
the end of the season.

Anyone want to bet Marty
Schottenheimer would rather
have Brady than Rivers when
his Chargers (14-2 in the regu-
lar season) play host next Sun-
day to the Patriots?

One simple stat from Sun-
day’s game illustrates how
good Brady is. Jabar Gaffney,
unemployed until October,
had eight catches for 104 yards
after having only 11 all season
and just a single 100-yard
game since 2001.

In fact, pedestrian receivers
or worse are who Brady has
thrown to this season after the
departures of David Givens
and Deion Branch, his regular
targets in the Super Bowl sea-
sons. Reche Caldwell, who led
the team with 61 receptions, is

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

at best a No. 2 receiver and
probably a No. 3. Troy Brown
is 35, the senior Patriot in
length of service, but rarely
more than a third receiver,
return man and occasional
cornerback.

In fact, his most reliable
pass catchers are the two tight
ends, Benjamin Watson and
Daniel Graham and the third-
down back, Kevin Faulk Gra-
ham and Faulk caught his TD
passes on Sunday.

“Tom has been harping all
year that if we get open, he’s
going to get us the ball,” Gra-
ham said after the game.

“Today it was Jabar’s day,”
he added.

Says Caldwell: “When we
need key plays he makes them.
Even if he had to run, what-
ever it takes to get us into
position to win the ballgame,
that’s what he’s going to do
when he’s out there.”

Run?

That’s what happened in
the 17-13 win over Chicago on
Nov. 26. With the game tied at
10 in the fourth quarter, Brady
took off on a third-and-9 from
the Bears 14, getting a first
down by dodging the fearsome
Brian Urlacher, last year’s
defensive player of the year
and an All-Pro this season.
Then he threw a 2-yard TD
pass to Watson for the go-

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 | SE



ahead score.

Against the Jets on Sunday,
it was as much his mastery of
the offense as his skills as a
passer or runner that won the
game.

“As a quarterback you
always like it when the
defense is off-balance,” he
said. “I think we got into a sit-
uation where we were forcing
them to get their stuff called
and lined up the right way or
else they were going to have a
hard time stopping us. I think,
at times, we really forced the
issue on them.”

Said modestly, of course.
With little hint that few other
quarterbacks can get a defense
off-balance the way Brady can.

“He’s the field general,”
Watson says. “He never sits
down when we're off the field
and he’s always rallying the

troops. He’s a fiery guy and a

great competitor. He was
locked in from the beginning.

“He lets us hear it when we
don’t do stuff right, but it’s
constructive and we know he
just wants to win. When I was
in college, he was out here
winning Super Bowls, so
there’s no quarterback I’d
rather have,” Watson contin-
ued.

Especially in the playoffs.
The Pro Bowl?

Who cares.

Mediocre effort was — may not be — enough

BY ROB MAADDI
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — The
Philadelphia Eagles’ up-and-
down season lives on, despite
a mediocre performance.

The offense was inconsis-
tent, the defense resorted back
to its soft form at times and
special teams committed a
costly penalty in a 23-20 vic-
tory over the New York Giants
in Sunday’s NFC wild-card
playoff game.

Philadelphia (11-6) will
need a better performance to
beat the New Orleans Saints
(10-6) in a second-round
matchup on Saturday night.

“YI don’t want to say we
dodged a bullet,” coach Andy
Reid said Monday. “Our guys
played very hard. We knew it
was going to be a knockdown-
dragout fight. That’s how it is
when we play the Giants.
They’re all the same. The
games come right down to the
end and this one wasn’t any
different.”

Take out the 17 points the
Eagles scored on three sec-
ond-quarter possessions, and
it was an anemic offensive
performance against the
Giants.

Unlike previous weeks, the
offense was out of sync early,
going three-and-out on the
first three drives. The team led
17-10 at the half on the strength
of some nifty runs by Brian
Westbrook ‘and some crisp
passes from Jeff Garcia.

The second half started
much like the first, and the
Eagles managed 13 yards on
their first two drives. They
managed just a pair of field
goals in the second half, on
drives of 45 and 46 yards.

Fortunately, the final one
came when it mattered most;
Philadelphia ended the game
with a ten-play drive to set up
David Akers’ winning 38-yard
field goal in the final seconds.

“There where times during
the game where we had

NFL NOTES



RON CORTES/PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER/MCT

BREAKING AWAY: Eagles receiver Donte Stallworth breaks
away from Giants defensive back R.W. McQuarters for a
touchdown in the first half of Philadelphia’s 23-20
victory over New York in an NFC wild-card game in

Philadelphia on Sunday.

opportunities to create points
and we just weren’t efficient
enough, and that falls upon
me, and that falls upon us,”
said Garcia, who improved to
6-1 as a starter since Donovan
McNabb’s season-ending knee
injury. “That is something that
we need to get better at if we
are going to be able to com-
pete next week.”

Garcia threw for 153 yards
and one touchdown. He didn’t
have any interceptions and
was sacked twice. Perhaps too
anxious in his first postseason
start in four years, the fiery



Garcia just missed connecting
for big plays on a couple
passes.

In Philly’s new balanced
attack, Garcia doesn’t have to
win games with his arm. West-
brook has become a focal
point as Reid and offensive
coordinator Marty Mornhin-
weg finally have embraced the
running game.

Westbrook had a career-
high 141 yards on 20 carries,
including a sensational 49-
yard TD run that started the
scoring for the offense.

“We've been doing it these

jobs on the final play.

last few weeks and we've got-
ten better and better,” said
Westbrook, who finished with
1,217 yards rushing in the regu-
lar season. “Coach Reid has
confidence in it. The offensive
line has confidence in them-

) selves and they have confi-

dence in me. If they cover up
their man, then we will get the
job done. And they’ve been
doing a great job these last few
weeks.”

Some of the problems that
plagued the defense through-
out the season were evident
against the Giants. A run
defense that once gave up
more than 200 yards rushing
four times in a six-game span
allowed Tiki Barber to run for
137 yards.

Eli Manning hardly was
pressured and got sacked only
once. The secondary couldn’t
make key stops, allowing three
straight pass completions of
18, 14 and 11 yards after the
Giants faced a second-and-30
on their tying scoring drive in
the fourth quarter. During the
drive, Pro Bowl cornerback
Lito Sheppard dislocated his
right elbow and will miss the
game against the Saints.

New York scored TDs on
its first and last possessions. In
between, the Eagles held the
Giants to only two field goals
and forced six three-and-outs
in nine drives.

“They came out and did a
lot of different stuff,” defen-
sive tackle Darwin Walker
said. “They came out and did

St BAN Va ees
th Re S ew # FB

SH @ &

ok eo ey

some things that we hadn’t ~ f

seen.”

On special teams, rookie
Torrance Daniels made a cru-
cial mistake when his penalty
for an illegal block nullified
Westbrook’s 65-yard punt
return for a score in the third
quarter.

But the unit made up for it
when Akers, holder Koy Det-
mer and snapper Jon Doren-
bos perfectly executed their

Jets’ Martin says his career is probably over

Associated Press

While the New York Jets
cleaned out their lockers fol-
lowing a surprisingly success-
ful season, Curtis Martin
acknowledged he might have
emptied his for the last time.

The NFL’s No. 4 rusher
reiterated Monday that he has
probably played his last game
because of a bone-on-bone
right knee injury that sidelined
him all season.

FALCONS

Atlanta lured Louisville
coach Bobby Petrino away

from the college ranks on Sun-
day, moving quickly to find a
new head coach after firing
Jim Mora.

A formal announcement
was made Monday afternoon
at the Falcons’ suburban train-
ing complex in Flowery
Branch — exactly one week
after Mora was let go.

DOLPHINS

Miami owner Wayne Hui-
zenga’s travel itinerary sug-
gests he’s trying to lure South-
ern California coach Pete
Carroll back to the NFL.

A Huizenga-owned plane
flew Sunday to Costa Rica,
where Carroll reportedly has
been vacationing. The same
plane was used to take Dol-
phins officials to Pittsburgh,
Chicago and San Diego to
interview candidates to
replace Nick Saban.

A team spokesman declined
to say whether Huizenga met
with Carroll, and an USC

spokesman didn’t immediately.

return a call seeking comment.

REDSKINS

Long snapper Ethan

Albright re-signed with
Washington on Monday.
EAGLES

Philadelphia Pro Bowl cor-
nerback Lito Sheppard will
miss Saturday’s second-round
playoff game against New
Orleans with a dislocated right
elbow.

Sheppard was injured going
for a tackle on a running play
in the fourth quarter of Sun-
day’s 23-20 victory over the
New York Giants. :

He was replaced by Rod
Hood.

Soe @ & oe

te ew es
‘ ‘
SE | TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007. IN



GMAC BOWL | SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 28, OHIO 7

Fletcher, second quarter lift

BY JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. — Damion
Fletcher ran for two touch-
downs and Southern Miss
scored 21 points in the second
quarter en route to a 28-7 vic-
tory over Ohio late Sunday
night in the GMAC Bowl,
spoiling the Bobcats’ return to
the postseason.

The Golden Eagles (9-5)
thoroughly dominated after a
scoreless first quarter for their
third consecutive postseason
win.

Frank Solich’s Bobcats (9-5)
were making their first bowl
appearance since 1968, but
that euphoria wore off quickly
as the game turned into a mis-
match

They are 0-3 in bowl games
~ and failed to match their
school record of 10 wins. It
was a rough ending to a feel-
good story that saw Solich, a
former Nebraska coach, revive
a struggling program that won
only four games in his debut
season.

The Golden Eagles used a
series of big plays in the final
8:33 of the first half to break
open the scoreless game, then
had a marathon march to open

MEN’S BASKETBALL |

TOP 25 POLL



the third quarter.

First, backup tailback Tory
Harrison scampered for a 43-
yard touchdown run, only his
second of the season. Jeremy
Young then set up Fletcher’s
2-yard TD plunge with a 30-
yard pass to Josh Barnes on
third-and-10.

The defense added points,
too. James Denley returned an
interception of Ohio backup
quarterback Brad Bower 18
yards for a score with 1:13 left
before the half.

It was the Golden Eagles’
seventh non-oftensive TD of
the season, the most under
coach Jeff Bower.

The teams had combined
for just 82 offensive yards
after one quarter, but South-
ern Miss racked up 150 in the
second.

The Golden Eagles then
monopolized the ball, opening
the second half with a17-play,
80-yard drive that worked 9:55
off the clock and severely
damaged any hopes for a
comeback by Ohio’s plodding
offense.

If was the team’s longest
drive of the season in both
plays and time consumed.

Fletcher ended it by revers-

ATIONAL EDITION

ing field behind the line and
outrunning the defenders for a
9-yard TD.

The darting, 175-pound
freshman managed just 58
yards on 20 carries but it was
enough for him to earn game
Most Valuable Player honors.
Young was selected the offen-
sive MVP after passing for 160

-yards.

Denley was the top defen-
sive player while punter Britt
Barefoot claimed special
teams honors.

Ohio tailback Kalvin
McRae capped a difficult week
with a 10-carry, 37-yard per-
formance. The two-time All-
Mid-American Conference
performer only arrived in
Mobile Friday evening after
his 7-month-old nephew’s
death.

Both offenses struggled.
Southern Miss managed just
284 yards compared to 224 for
Ohio.

The Bobcats finally scored
on Everson’s 13-yard touch-
down pass to John Christy
with 9:34 left in the fourth
quarter.

It was the first loss by a
MAC team in six GMAC Bowl
appearances. |

UNC moves into
the No. 1 spot

BY JIM O’CONNELL
Associated Press

North Carolina is No. 1 in
The Associated Press’ college
basketball poll for the first
time in almost six years. The
wait has been quite a bit lon-
ger for Washington State,
which is ranked for the first
time in almost 24 years.

The Tar Heels (14-1) moved
into the top spot Monday after
three weeks at No..2 following
UCLA’s loss at Oregon last
weekend. :

It is North Carolina’s first
time at No. 1 since a two-week
run in February 2001, and it’s
the first time the Tar Heels are
there in the three-plus sea-
sons, including the 2005
national championship, under
coach Roy Williams.

“I feel good where we are, -

but it’s so, so early,” Williams
said Monday. “We have 15
more battles to go in the con-
ference, so we'll see what hap-
pens.”

Williams is no stranger to
having a top-ranked team. In
seven of 15 seasons at Kansas,
the Jayhawks reached No. 1,
including a 15-week stretch in
1996-97.

“T’ve been No. 1 before, and
if you don’t finish that way at
the end of the year, it means
you had a good little stretch,”
he said.

Washington State (14-2) is
having an unexpected stretch,
and the quick start has the
Cougars tied for 22nd in the
poll, their first ranking since a
one-week stint in February
1983. :

Picked last in the Pac-10’s
preseason media poll, the Cou-
gars have gotten off to an
impressive start under first-
year coach Tony Bennett,
including wins over Gonzaga
and last weekend’s 77-73 over-

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL GAME

time win against Arizona.
“We've had different guys

step up at different times,” —

Bennett said Monday. “We
have mostly sophomores and
juniors, and they’re kids who
have taken their lumps and
have some legitimate game
experience with some heart-
breaking losses and some bad
losses. It’s a start, and that’s all
it is. We're in the No. 1-ranked
conference in the country, and
we have 14 games to go, So we
have to keep that same fight-
ing mentality.”

North Carolina received 64
first-place votes and 1,788
points from the 72-member
national media panel to easily
outdistance No. 2 Florida
(14-2), which had three No. 1
votes and 1,682 points in mov-
ing up one spot from last
week. The Gators were No. 1
in the preseason poll and for
the first two weeks of the reg-
ular season. :

Wisconsin (15-1) received
one first-place vote and
moved from fourth to third,
the highest ranking in school
history, while UCLA dropped
from first to fourth.

The Bruins (14-1), who
received four first-place votes,
held the No. 1 spot for six
weeks until the 68-66 loss at
Oregon on Saturday.

Ohio State moved up one
place to fifth and was followed
by Kansas, Pittsburgh, Texas
A&M, Oklahoma State and
Arizona.

Duke, which dropped six
spots after its home loss to
Virginia Tech on Saturday,
was lith and was followed by
Butler, LSU, Alabama, Oregon,
Tennessee, Clemson, Air
Force, Nevada and Memphis.

West Virginia was 21st with
Notre Dame and Washington
State tied for No. 22, while

COLLEGES

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMIHERALD









STEVE COLEMAN/AP

ELUSIVE INTERCEPTOR: Southern Mississippi's James Denley, left, eludes Ohio’s Matt
Coppage while returning an interception for a touchdown in the second quarter of
the GMAC Bowl on Sunday in Mobile, Ala. Southern Mississippi won 28-7.



GERRY BROOME/AP

CALLING THE SHOTS: UNC coach Roy Williams coaches his
team against Florida State on Sunday.

Connecticut and Texas
rounded out the Top 25.

This is North Carolina’s
82nd poll with a No. 1 ranking,

‘fourth on the all-time list

behind UCLA (134), Duke (110)
and Kentucky (98).

The Tar Heels’ lone loss
was to Gonzaga in the semifi-
nals of the NIT Season
Tip-Off. They have won ll
straight since, including the
84-58 victory over Florida
State in their Atlantic Coast
Conference opener Sunday.

“Defensively we are getting
better the last four, five games
and I appreciate their attitude,
but we have'so far to go,” Wil-
liams said. “We also have to
work on our freelance offense.
When we don’t have a set play
called we can do such a better
job with spacing and getting
on the backboard. We have
stood around instead of get-
ting everyone involved.”

The last time Washington
State was ranked George Rav-
eling was the coach and Craig
Ehlo and Guy Williams were
the stars of a team that fin-

. ished 23-7 and reached the

second round of the NCAA
tournament. Since then,
Washington State has made
one NCAA appearance in
1994,

“J’m sure the kids will enjoy
this, but what I’m concerned
with as a coach is where we’re
ranked at the end of the year,”
Bennett said. “This indicates
we have some quality wins
that people recognized.”

North Carolina overruns Virginia

Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. —.,
North Carolina coach Sylvia

Hatchell sent a message by :

going to her bench.

After watching Virginia go
on a run that trimmed the No.
2 Tar Heels’ lead to a mere 18
points in the second half,
Hatchell substituted five
reserves. They restored order
and the chastised starters
returned to finish off the Cava-
liers 96-62 on Monday night.

“Our play wasn’t what I
wanted it to be at the start of
the second half, so I substi-
tuted those five,’ Hatchell

said. “A 20-point lead against



Virginia is nothing.”

After the Cavaliers’ 10-2
run, Hatchell sent in Trinity
Bursey, Alex Miller, Heather
Claytor, Iman McFarland and
Jessica Breland. The reserves

‘stretched the lead to 59-35 on

two free throws by Miller with
14:14 to play.

“She warned us, and then
she did it,” starter LaToya
Pringle said of the 3:21 she and
the four other starters spent
on the bench.

Erlana Larkins and Camille
Little scored 17 points apiece
to lead North Carolina (18-0,
3-0 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence) to its 10th straight win

over Virginia (10-5, 3-0). Ivory
Latta hit four 3-pointers and
finished with 14 points. Pringle
chipped in 11.

Hatchell was displeased by
North Carolina’s 34-of-92
shooting (41 percent), espe-
cially a 16-of-48 second half.

“Tt was like the rim monster
was out there,” Hatchell said.
“We missed a lot of good
shots.”

The Tar Heels scored 29
points off 32 Virginia turn-
overs. Larkins had 13 rebounds
and Pringle 11 to help North
Carolina dominate the boards
59-48 and outscore the Cava-
liers 19-10 off offensive

Texas (11-3) was the other
poll newcomer this week,
coming in off a 102-78 victory
over Colorado in its Big 12
Conference opener.

The Longhorns were 2lst in
the preseason poll and moved
to No. 19 in the first regular-
season voting before falling
out after losses to Michigan
State: and Gonzaga. Their
other loss was 11-105 at Ten-
nessee in overtime; while their
most impressive win was also
in overtime, 76-75 over LSU.

Marquette (13-4) fell out
from 15th following losses to
Providence and Syracuse last
week. The Golden Eagles were
16th in the preseason poll and
reached as high as No. 8
before home losses to North
Dakota State and Wisconsin,

Washington (11-4) dropped
out from 24th after splitting
home games last week with
Arizona and Arizona State.
The 96-87 loss to the Wildcats
was the Huskies’ third straight
as they opened Pac-l0 play
with losses at UCLA and
Southern California. Washing-
ton, which also lost to Gon-
zaga, was 17th in the preseason
poll and reached as high as No.
13.

There are five games
between ranked teams this
week, and three are on Tues-
day: Ohio State at Wisconsin;
LSU at Alabama; and West
Virginia at Notre Dame. Okla-

-homa State is at Kansas on

Wednesday, and Oregon is at
Arizona on Sunday.

rebounds.

“Rebounding is always crit-
ical against Carolina,” Virgin-
ia’s Debbie Ryan said. “The
whole inside game was both-
ersome for us tonight.”

North Carolina jumped out
to a 15-0 lead. Larkins scored 13
points in the first half and
North Carolina led 51-25 at the
break. Virginia missed its first
nine shots and didn’t score
until Monica Wright hit a
3-pointer with 14:06 left in the
first half.

“We missed layups. We
missed free throws,” Ryan
said. “And every point in the
first half was so important. “If
we could have kept it closer in
the first half, it would have
been a completely different
ball game.”

Lyndra Littles had 19 points
to lead Virginia. Wright had 17.

FOOTBALL NOTES

Louisville to move
quickly on a coach

Associated Press

Louisville athletic director
Tom Jurich said Monday
that he expects to move
quickly to replace coach
Bobby Petrino, who left the
program Sunday to become
coach of the Atlanta Falcons.

Jurich said the list of
potential candidates was
“very short” but did not
identify any.specitic coaches.

“[’m going to rely on my
gut a lot,” Jurich said. “I want
somebody that’s gotten a
proven track record. I’m not
going to talk about those
names.”

Petrino’s departure comes
in the middle of recruiting
season, and with national
signing day less than a month
away Jurich knows the
sooner he names a successor
to Petrino, the faster the new
coach will be able to hit the
recruiting trail.

The Louisville Athletic
Association Board of Direc-
tors’ personnel committee
has scheduled a meeting for
today at 4 p.m. in case a can-
didate is selected. Any new
hire must be approved by the
committee. Sports informa-
tion director Kenny Klein
said Jurich will be interview-
ing candidates today and the
meeting could be pushed
back if a finalist is not
selected.

NFL DRAFT

e Louisiana State’s
JaMarcus Russell will
announce Wednesday
whether he is entering the
NEL drait.

LSU spokesman Michael
Bonnette said Monday that
university officials were
helping Russell set up the
announcement, but labeled
as “premature” recent
reports that the quarterback
had already decided to turn
pro.

“Tt don’t think he’s made
his mind up yet. People are
jumping the gun,” Bonnette
said. “He still has a couple
days to think things through
and make the best decision
for himself and his family.”

ESPN.com reported Sun-
day that Russell was entering
the draft.

At 6-foot-6, 257 pounds,
Russell has imposing physi-
cal stature for a quarterback
and would likely be a first-
round draft pick.

Russell threw for 332
yards and two touchdowns
in the Sugar Bowl last week
in LSU’s rout of Notre Dame.

If Russell turns pro, he
would end his LSU career
with 6,525 yards and 52
touchdowns in three seasons.
He was a full-time starter to
past two years.




e For Calvin Johnson,
this was a no-brainer.

Georgia Tech’s_ star
receiver announced Monday
that he will give up his senior
season to enter the NFL
draft, fully aware that he
should be one of the top
players selected. ~

Even his parents, who are
adamant that he get his col-
lege degree, knew there was
no use putting off the pros
any longer.

“It’s one of those situa-
tions where he’s got to maxi-
mize the moment,” Calvin
Johnson Sr. said. “These
opportunities don’t come
along very often. He made
the right decision for himself.
He didn’t feel a lot of pres-
sure from us.”

The younger Johnson
runs a 4.4 40-yard dash and
has a 45-inch vertical leap —
a combination that makes
him difficult to defend, even
with a scheme keyed to stop
him.

By most accounts, John-
son will be one of the top
players selected in the April
draft. In fact, he could go first
overall to the Oakland Raid-

ers, who are desperate to
improve an offense that aver-
aged just 10.5 points a game »
and might not bring back dis-
gruntled wideouts Randy
Moss and Jerry Porter.

e Alan Branch is skip-
ping his senior season at
Michigan to enter the NFL
draft, delivering a blow to the
Wolverines a week after they
lost the Rose Bowl.

The 6-foot-6, 3ll-pound
defensive tackle, a second-
team All-American, is pro-
jected as a first-round pick in
April’s draft.

“It’s always been a child-
hood dream for me, but it.
was surprising how tough of
a decision it was,” Branch
said Monday.

KICKER’S DEATH

An autopsy was per-
formed Monday in Los Ange-
les on Southern California
kicker Mario Danelo, but
the findings probably will be
listed as “inconclusive” until
officials receive results of
toxicological tests, the coro-
ner’s office said.

It could take weeks to
determine whether alcohol
or drugs were in Danelo’s
system at the time of his
death. Foul play has been
ruled out. Danelo’s body was
found Saturday about -120
feet down a rocky cliff in San
Pedro, police said.

“There’s no crime,” Los
Angeles Police Dept. officer
Mike Lopez said Sunday. “It
was either an accident or a
suicide.”
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Calling Cartwright — National Heroes
~Committee launches search for ‘Bill’

Baker’s Bay

GOLF et OCEAN CLUB



As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians on
our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to apply
for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Responsibilities will include:

Attributes:

-% Must have 8-10 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading Golf Club
“ Must have knowledge of all phases of Golf course
design and construction activities including vertical golf
construction (club houses, maintenance facilities,
irrigation pump stations)
Must have a thorough understanding ‘of all phases of
maintenance and repair to courses, practice range and
: equipment
“* Must have extensive experience working with city
planners, engineers, architects, and contractors
“Must be knowledgeable in all phases of construction
contracts related to golf projects
** Must be a detail oriented, a skilled planner and
- prioritizer with excellent communication skills
“ Must be computer literate
“~~ — Must be willing to live on an out island
** Ability to work on own initiative is important

9,
“ye

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need

apply. | |

Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards
Director, Human Resources and Training
. P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

Bakers Bay Golf & Ocean Club is a $500 million project
under development on Great Guana Cay. It includes 381

residential homes, a 70-acre cnvironmental preserve, a 180-slip

marina, a championship golf course and a 70-room laxury
hotel.



MONTROSE AVE. PHONE: 322-1722, FAX:



PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE FREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION FULL SET FLOO!
PARTS & SERVICE ASSURED :

bf rr




cesT

RA



FULL TANK OF GAS
R MATS

EFFORTS to recognise
William Cartwright’s contribu-
tion to Bahamian history have
hit a snag — as the National
Heroes Committee is having
trouble locating him.

The committee yesterday
asked for the public’s assistance
in contacting Mr Cartwright,
one of the founding members
of the Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP).

Father Sebastian Campbell,
the chairman of the committee,
said that a certificate of recog-
nition has been printed for Mr
Cartwright, and that the mem-
bers are eager to present it to
him.

During his life, Mr Cartwright
suffered “indignity and much
humiliation,” Father Campbell
said, adding that the country
needs to “give him a chance
now in his twilight years to
know that he did something,
that he is a man of worth and
the country owes him a debt of
gratitude for what he did.”

William “Bill” Cartwright
joined Henry Taylor, Cyril St
John Stevenson and others in
founding the PLP, which led the
country to majority rule in the
Bahamas in 1967.

The party was officially
founded on November 23,1953,
when months of feverish prepa-
ration: by the founders and a
small band of supporters finally
led to the establishment of the
first political party in the histo-
ry of the Bahamas.

Bill Cartwright and Cyril
Stevenson visited England in
June of 1953 — ostensibly to coy-
er the Coronation of Her
Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for
The Bahamian Review, but
with a firm determination to



BS

@ CYRIL Stevenson

seek support and assistance:

from officials of the Labour Par-
ty and the Fabian Society for
the establishment of a political
party in the Bahamas.

At the time, Mr Cartwright
was a member of the House of
Assembly representing the Cat
Island Constituency, and Mr
Stevenson was employed on the
editorial staff of The Nassau
Guardian.

In London the two men spent
much of their time talking with
Labour Party leaders, officials,
members of parliament and
officials of the Fabian Society.

Encouraged by the outcome
of their discussions, Mr Steven-
son and Mr Cartwright returned
to Nassau more determined
than ever to put their plans into
action.

Within 10 days of their
return, they left for Kingston,
Jamaica, where they spent three



WILLIAM ‘Bill’ Cartwright

weeks studying political plan-
ning and intelligence.

‘They held discussions with Sir
Alexander Bustamante, Leader
of the Jamaica Labour Party;
Prime Minister Norman Man-
ley, Leader of the People’s
National Party; Rose Leon,
Minister of Health and Hous-
ing; and several other officials.

On their return to Nassau,
they telephoned Mr Taylor (lat-
er Sir Henry) and told him what
they planned to do. Sir Henry
agreed to join them.

The first meeting to lay the
foundation of the party was
held in Sir Henry’s home in
East Street, opposite the Police
Barracks.

Subsequent meetings were
held in Mr Cartwright’s office in





the Lightbourne Building, on
the corner of Bay and Frederick
Streets.

In October a final decision
was reached, and a working
plan agreed upon.

Out of 30 or more persons
approached to take an active
role, only six came forward.
They were: Mr Clément Pinder,
Mr Holberton “Holly” Brown,
Mr U H Knowles, Mr John S
Carey, Mr Paul Farrington and
Mr Felix Russell. :

The group became the first
self-appointed executive board
and elected the following offi-
cers: Sir Henry, chairman; Mr
Stevenson, secretary-general;
Mr Carey, vice-chairman; Mr
Cartwright, treasurer; Mr
Knowles, chaplain.

Montserrat volcano shoots ash
cloud five miles into the sky



7452



~ MITSUBISHI
MOTORS






SS



@ SUPERHEATED ash and lava is visible inside the cone of the Soufriere Hills volcano, which

has been active lately, as seen from Olveston, Montserrat last Thursday. Yesterday a cloud of ash
and gas reportedly shot up from the volcano more than 5 miles into the sky, and authorities warn
that more significant activity is possible in the coming days.

@ MONTSERRAT
Olveston



THE Soufriere Hills volcano
that destroyed the island’s cap-
ital in 1997 shot.a cloud of ash
more than five miles into the
sky on Monday, according to
Associated Press,

The island’s British governor
said she would order some
homes evacuated because of the
likelihood of more activity, and
that police would enforce the
order.

The blast, accompanied by
increased seismic rumbling,
released gases and steam from
inside a lava dome that has
grown rapidly over the last
week, said Dr Vicky Hards,
director of the Montserrat Vol-
cano Observatory.

“I think it was a warning call
.. Of what it can do,” Hards said.

The explosion near sunrise
also sent a flow of volcanic
material cascading two miles
down the volcano’s north-west
flank, but did not immediately
threaten any of the British
Caribbean island’s 5,000 inhab-
itants, Hards said. Sirens alerted
people to listen to the radio for
updates.

The government has
advised about 50 households

volcano’s base that their
homes would be at risk from
flows of blistering gas and
debris if the dome collapses.
Officials conducted door-to-
door briefings in the low-lying

Belham Valley over the week- ‘

end.

Gov Deborah Barnes Jones
said she planned to sign an
evacuation order Monday that
will make it illegal for people
to remain in that area.

“People in the affected area
know who they are and should
work urgently on packing up
and arranging for alternative
accommodations,” she said in
a radio address.

“It will be an offence to be
in the unsafe zone, and the
police will prosecute offenders,”
Barnes Jones added.

Wind blowing from the east
pushed the dark gray ash over
the “exclusion zone,” a barren,
uninhabited area extending
from the 3,000-foot (900-meter)
high volcano across the south-
west to the coast. Open water
lies west of the island.

A hotel located near exclu-
sion zone has already emptied,
and only “a handful” of resi-
dents were believed to still be
living in the threatened area,
said Mark Twieg. head of the

(AP Photo/Wayne Fenton)

“This causes genuine hard-
ship tor people who have to
leave, and this is taken lightly by
nobody,” he said.

The volcano’s latest burst of
activity began on Dec 24. Glow-
ing streaks of red from the pyro-
clastic flows have created night-
time spectacles visible across
much of the island. The vol-
cano’s rising dome remained in
place after Monday’s explosion,
raising fears of a bigger event
soon,

“The flows also could have
opened a line to go. farther
down the valley,” Twigg said.

The Soufriere Hills volcano
became active in 1995, and
more than half the territory’s
12,000 inhabitants moved away.
An eruption in 1997 buried
much of the south, including the
capital of Plymouth, and killed
19 people.

Since then, the mountain-
ous, teardrop-shaped island
has gone on a building binge.
A new city center is planned
for Little Bay, the future cap-
ital, in northwest Montserrat.
The island has a new airport
to replace the one that was
engulfed by pyroclastic flows
and a 700-seat concert hall.
A new parliament, court-
house and cricket field are
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 .
i eee
‘End massive decay of social values’

15 per cent increase in homicides tops agenda at police Meet the Press event | double



® By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the murder count reach-
ing 60 for the first time in six
years and homicides up by almost
50 per cent in the capital, police
yesterday urged Bahamians to
stop the “massive decay” of social
values.

Last year’s 15 per cent increase
in homicides topped the agenda
at this:year’s Meet the Press event
held at police headquarters yes-
terday morning, with senior police
officers lamenting the attitude
towards crime in the country.

“There are still far too, many
among us that live as though they
are ruled by the jungle mentality.

“The greed and insatiable
desire that seem to drive people
to risk body and soul in order to
get that elusive dollar has caused
many once respected citizens to
turn their back on their Christ-
ian values and give in to their
base instincts which results in the
slaying of another human being,”
Assistant Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson, officer in-
charge of crime, said addressing
the special press conference at
the new police conference cen-
tre.

In its preliminary year end
overview, the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) reported that the
murder count has increased by

FROM page one

side his house when he was brutally attacked at

around 9pm.

According to the family, a man approached
Felix and asked him for something, but he told the

man to leave him alone.

“My brother started to walk away and the man

eight in 2006 compared to 2005
when the country recorded 52
homicides.

The Bahamas averaged about
54 murder incidents annually
between 2000 and 2006.

The last time the murder count
exceeded 60 was in 2000 when
the homicide rate climbed to 74.

Speaking at yesterday’s event,
Chief Supt Marvin Dames, head
of CDU, said that whereas the
Family Islands and Grand
Bahama experienced a 29 per
cent decrease in murders, New
Providence saw a 44 per cent
increase in homicide cases. i

However, Mr Dames pointed
out that police were able to solve
78 per cent of those cases in 2006
—a detection rate that equalled
the one recorded in 2005.

Of the 10 murders committed.
at the end of the year in the
month of December, Mr Dames
said, the majority have already
been solved.

“T challenge you to go any-
where outside of this country and
find figures as good as that,” he
said.

Mr Dames said that the statis-
tics clearly reflect the message
that “if you commit murder in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
you will be caught.”

The officer in-charge of the
CDU further pointed out that
drug-related murders doubled in

2006 compared to the previous
year.

Of the 60 murders committed,
20, or 12 per cent, were related to
drugs.

He said that these figures show
that Bahamians who get involved
in the drug trade often sign their
own death sentences.

Assistant Commissioner Fer-
guson said that too many
Bahamians take a casual
approach to crime.

“Tf this is the example that we
expect to set for the next genera-
tion, then we are sowing to the
wind and therefore will reap a
whirlwind.

“The future is dismal and at
best their chances of success are
seriously undermined,” he said.

Paul Farquharson, Commis-
sioner of Police, also said that he
was saddened by the fact that
Bahamians are still plagued with
the inability to effectively deal
with issues.

“There is a growing trend
among many in the criminal class

’ that are becoming more embold-

ened in the commission of crime.

“This perhaps accounts for a
number of daring serious
offences, including murder which
are committed in broad daylight
hours or correspondingly within
the view of potential witnesses,”
he said.

Mr Farquharson said that this

19-year-old

er. We still ain’t come to grips with his death yet.

the sister.

We still can’t believe it really happened,” said

A 35-year-old man of Martin Town was taken

into custody early Monday morning and is assist-

behaviour is tantamount to saying
that the culprit does not care
when or where he commits his
act of criminality.
“As people we must rise u
against these persons with one
resolve and that must be that of

’ demonstrating to our errant

brothers that we will not tolerate
their behaviour any longer,” he
said.

In New Providence, murders

tripled in the southeastern part
of the island in 2006 compared to
the previous year.

The northeastern part of the
island recorded its second highest
with eight murders — a 17 per cent
increase over 2005.

“This was followed by the

- Carmichael and Grove (police)

divisions with each recording sev-
en incidents (a 15 per cent
increase),” the CDU reported.

The majority of murders — 42
per cent — were committed in the
months of September and
December. The most popular
month for murders was Decem-
ber when 10 homicides — 17 per
cent of murders — were record-
ed.

The profile of the average mur-
der victim is a Bahamian male
between the ages of 26 and 35,
single, unemployed, with a prior
criminal record, and for the most
part resident in the southeast of
New Providence.

“Tt is interesting to note that a

‘Zero tolerance’

FROM page one

’

significant number of murder vic-
tims had been previously involved
in criminal activity and have had
contact with the police,” the CDU
reported.

Cruise
ship
bomb

scare
FROM page one

that accepts convention size ves-
sels have in place these contin-
gencies, these plans, these safe
measures for these same eventu-
alities.

“This shows that it actually
works and it pays off to have
these checks. Something was sus-
picious and it was checked out
further, and we are all mandated
to have such measures in place,”
he said. ;

The Royal Caribbean’s
Majesty of the Seas along with
its 2,356 guests and 812 member
crewmen are still scheduled to
visit the Bahamas for five days.”

The ship was expected to leave
port last night as scheduled, |:

Mr Ferguson said that the police is often frustrated by the fact that
many Bahamians do not view number games as a “real crime.”

ran behind him and started beating on him,”
recalled one sister.

When The Tribune visited the Mitchell’s home
in Martin Town, several family members and

fondo w smbhlet
preparations, while close friends stood outside
comforting their distraught father.

Felix was described as a very friendly person.
After graduating from Eight Mile Rock: High
School in 2005, he wanted to work at the Con-
‘ tainer Port and had applied for a job there.

“He was always a happy person who always
enjoyed making people laugh. We will misgdeas-..
ly. 2

“Right now, we are just leaning on. one anoth-

ing police with their investigations.

According to Chief Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming, press liaison officer, the incident
occurred around 9pm on Sunday at the LEM

. Plavs where police saw the body of a young man

; 1 the ground.

The victim was wearing a white T-shirt, blue
jeans and white tennis shoes. The body was posi-
tioned on the left side, a short distance south of
Queen’s Highway.

Mr Rahming said reports are that Mitchell was
near LEM Plaza when he was attacked by a man.
He said that Mitchell is believed to have been

-struck.in.the.head with what is believed to be a

‘baseball bat.
Police are continuing their investigation into the
matter. ,

“If you are paying to protect your illegal operations, this is corrup-
tion, this is real crime. When the man playing domino under the
almond tree realises that the number thrown, he did not win, he
decides to ‘pull a vibe’ and rob the bag man but instead shoots and kills
him in the process. This is murder, this is real crime,” he said.

Attempts to silence winners and prevent them from claiming their
money by strong-arm tactics of coercion and intimidation is done for
a fee, he explained.

“This is a real crime directly connected to the numbers racket.
Sophisticated though it may be, the numbers racket is still a crime in the

Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said that although police are actively fighting to uncov-
er and put a stop to operations of illegal gambling houses, the Bahami-
an public must-also develop a zero-tolerance approach to numbers rack-

In addition to the police and community effort, Mr Ferguson said, the
relevant government agencies who award gambling houses — often
disguised as web shops — business licences must also join in the fight

er to find the strength to get through’ this togeth-

Monday - Friday 4pm

against these illegal rackets.
FROM page one

In New Providence, the num-
ber of traffic fatalities decreased
by four last year — from 33 to
29, in Abaco, from 4 to 3, while in
Eleuthera, the number remained
stable at 2.

The biggest success story of
the year, however, was Grand
Bahama, which saw a run away

wumber of fatal traffic accidents

in 2005 reined in, as 2006 saw a
decrease of over 55 per cent.
The Grand Bahama traffic
division attributed the reduction
on that island to new initiatives
such as the City Cycle Patrol
Unit, which monitored traffic

accident "hot spots", wider use .

of the Pro Laser 3 Speed Gun,
and a generally higher level of
police visibility on the streets.

However, police from that
division said that if any further
reduction is to be achieved, a
change in the public's driving
habits must be effected.

In New Providence as well,
police recognised that reckless
and aggressive driving, and speed-
ing in high risk areas — such as
Carmichael Road, which was list-

Traffic

ed as the biggest traffic accident
hot spot on the island — contin-
ues to challenge them.

Across the island chain, the
increase in traffic accidents —
from 4,195 to 3,576 — was attrib-
uted to a range of potentially dan-
gerous behaviour, such as speed-
ing, driving while using a phone,
applying make-up or "transport-
ing an insecure load," police said.

According to officers, they are
considering a variety of approach-
es to achieve a further reduction
in fatalities in the coming year.

Thése include taking their
road safety education programme
to the family islands, further tar-
geting of drunk, reckless and
underage drivers, motorcyclists
without helmets, and unlicensed,
uninspected and uninsured vehi-
cles.

Other areas to be addressed -

include identifying locations
where there is a need for pedes-
trian crossings, and ensuring that
traffic division officers are "out
in full force" during rush hours,
said police.

Saturday & Sunday 2pm

25 GREAT RIDES!

2 NEW Rides Twister & Scrambler
RIDE. THE

Kami Kaze
Mega Drop
Flying Bobs

Pirate Ship

Graviton



eee RCC CCN
gone the LE is not.



Armed robbery suspect released

FROM page one

With his gun licence and "ski mask" in tow, he sat down and explained
how he was arrested, spent a pointless night in jail and as a result had
to miss work, all because he had his licensed gun out of the case.

The “ski mask”, which is really the top half of a woman's stocking
that is sometimes used as a hair cap, was left in his car by his wife who
usually does her hair and make-up in his car as he takes her to work in
the mornings, he explained.

About the shotgun, “I’m a hunter,” he said. “I had just come from the
shooting range and I stopped by my mother (who lives in the Flint
Street area) to return some bowls which she asked me to bring by, and
as I was headed back home, the officers made me stop the car and get
out.”

He said he saw the officers long before they saw him, but knowing
he was innocent and that he could explain the gun and bullets if
stopped, he continued driving towards them, even though he had
enough time to switch directions, he said.

After the police asked him to stop the car, “They shined the light in
my face for about 20 seconds, it was so bright I had to put my hand up,”
he explained. When he was ordered to get out of his car, he said he
explained to the officers that he had a licensed shot gun in his car. The
officer took the gun and license, then put him under arrest for “armed
robbery.” He said the officer locked the handcuffs on him so tightly that
tears came to his eyes.

The officers’ only excuse, according to the victim, was that no one
could be underestimated on the streets.

After which he was taken to the Central Police Station on East
Street where he spent the night. Officers from the Central Detective
Unit reportedly searched his house, found nothing out of the ordinary
and he was released the next day.

The 28-year-old said he did not want to cause problems, but he just
wanted his side of the story to be heard. “I don’t want this to be a bat-
tle between myself and the press and the police because we should all
be crime fighters. It is not my intention to bring strife,” he said.

The Tribune attempted to contact Inspector Walter Evans, police
press liaison officer, late yesterday afternoon, but he was away from the
office and did not have access to his files. He promised to look into the
case today.

THE TRIBUNE

Reported
cases of
imcest

FROM page one

“Note, however, that none
of these parties were con-
cerned together. This
denotes, too, an increasing
level of promiscuity among
adolescents and predators
alike,” the report read.

Also, unlawful sexual
intercourse (USI) has
increased by 11 per cent in
2006 to 208 reported cases,
over the 183 reported in
2005.

The average age of victims
for USI for 2006 was also 13
years of age. During this
same time, the average age
of suspects was 23, suggest-
ing that adult males preyed
on the generally less expe-
rienced, first-time teens.

Reported
complaints
against

police are
up by 12%

FROM page one

an increase of 12 per cent of
the reported complaints.

“Ninety-nine of the
reported complaints were
completed. Fifty-nine were
sub judice and 125 are still
under active investigation.

"Twenty-one of the com-
pleted matters were recom-
mended to the tribunal, 13
were not substantiated, 28
with insufficient evidence,
11 were unfounded, 10 were
withdrawn, and a total of 16
were informally resolved.

“These were complaints
which consisted of com-
plainants being: compensat-
ed, counselling recommend-
ed, severe reprimands,
warnings and officers who
had resigned with com-
plaints against them under
investigation."

The officer said there
were a total of 901 com-
plaints brought to a closure
during 2006, and that the
majority of complaints
against police officers were
for minor assaults, unlawful
arrest and unethical behav-
iour.

"There was an increase by
226 per cent of matters com-
pleted during the year 2006,
compared to the previous
year," said Supt Dames. .

"Five per cent of the com-
pleted matters were recom-
mended to the Police Tri-
bunal, 25 per cent were not
substantiated, 14 per cent
were unfounded, 23 per cent
were of insufficient evi-
dence, nine per cent were
withdrawn and the remain-
ing 24 per cent were infor-
mally resolved."

According to the superin-

tendent, during the year
2006 a total of 15 corruption
matters were reported, 10 of
which were brought to a clo-
sure with five still under
investigation.
- Two of those corruption
matters, he said, emanated
from two other government
departments.

"During the previous year
eight corruption matters
were reported, four were
completed and three are still
under active investigation,"
said Supt Dames.

The officer said discipline
- "the chief pillar" of the
force - had been gradually
eroded over the years, and
that if this continued the
organisation would be com-
promised and held up to
public disdain and mistrust.

He said: "Three police
officers were dismissed from
the organisation during 2006
as a result of conviction
from the Police Court of
Enquiry Tribunal. Seven
police officers resigned from
the organisation who had
matters against them pend-
ing or under investigation."

The officer said 15 police
officers were indicted dur-
ing 2006, with nine of those
charges pending before the
criminal courts and six
charges pending before the
tribunal.

Supt Dames said all mem-
bers of the force accused by
the public or colleagues of
corruption, abuse of author-
ity, or unethical behaviour
would be investigated fairly
and vigorously.
PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

WELL, we are now into
2007, and as is customary we
tend during this time of year to
reflect on the past and plan
for the future. As we closed
out 2006, both the minister of
state for finance and the Gov-
ernor of the Central Bank
gave the Bahamian economy a
‘thumbs-up’, the consensus of
the two being that the econo-
my would show 3 per cent to 4
per cent economic growth for
2006. There is no doubt that
this is another good economic
performance. However, both
commentators expressed con-
cerns about the level of “liq-
uidity’ in the banking system.
The common observation was
that “liquidity was tight”. To
the average person, the con-
cept of liquidity and its impor-
tance is not understood.

How is liquidity defined?

Liquidity within the bank-
ing system is a measure of
banks’ ability to fund loans
and commitments to their cus-
tomers. From time to time,
consumers might be told their
loan has been approved but
they may have to wait a while
before funds are actually
advanced. This occurs mostly
when liquidity is ‘tight’.

In order to fund loans,
banks must attract long-term
deposits or add additional cap-
ital. In order to attract
deposits, banks must compete
by offering more attractive
interest rates. During the
October through December
period, commercial banks
experienced strong loan
demand which resulted in
them scrambling to secure new
deposits.» - :

Banks usually set deposit.

rates at | per cent to 2 per cent








below the prime interest rate,
which is currently 5.5 per cent.
The prime interest rate is the
interest rate charged by banks
to their most creditworthy cus-
tomers, usually the most
prominent and stable business
customers.

However, if you had large
cash amounts to deposit, you
could have locked in interest
rates’ in excess of the current
prime interest rate for periods
up to one year.

Last week, The Tribune
reported the minister of state
for finance as saying that the
liquidity problem should have
bottomed out in the first two
weeks in December, and that
he expected it would begin to
stabilise in January and Feb-
ruary.

Why do banks pay higher
interest rates when liquidity is
tight?

Banks make their money by
taking deposits at one rate,

* then Jending the funds out to

borrowers at a higher rate.
The difference between what
they pay for deposits and the
rate they lend money out at is
called the ‘spread’y:

In the run-up to Christmas,

traditionally there is strong

Set 3H t

Financial

By Larry Gibson _

Focus





credit demand from business-
es to finance inventories and
from consumers to fund
Christmas purchases. Con-
sumer loans are the most prof-
itable for banks, as they have
the highest spreads. I am told
that the rate of interest on con-
sumer loans can range any-
where from 11 per cent to 17
per cent per year.

Periods of tight liquidity
tend to only last for relatively
short periods of time, so taking
a smaller spread for a few
months on a three-five year
loan is neither here nor there,
and once liquidity returns to
manageable levels, banks are
able to restore their usual
spreads as deposit rates fall.

Liquidity and

Foreign Reserves

According to the Central
Bank, credit expanded by 11.3
per cent during the first 10
months of 2006. This growth
in credit, in turn, has resulted
in downward pressure on the
country’s foreign reserves.

Because we manufacture or
produce very little of what we
consume, most of the new
credit-is immediately spent
abroad, hence the need to con-
vert Bahamian dollars to US

dollars to fund consumer pur-
chases and inventory building.
As at the end of October 2006,
our foreign reserves stood at
around $400 million, down
about 50 per cent from Octo-
ber 2005 levels...then pur-
ported to be about $800 mil-
lion.

Credit Quality

One significant concern
when credit expands rapidly
relates to the quality of loans
being granted. Are banks gen-
erating loans that will come
back to haunt them later on?
If the system writes poor qual-
ity loans, the entire economy
could face repercussions as
these loans go bad. I surveyed
my contacts at several banks,
and they all reported that
“...their loan book is in good
shape”.

Ross McDonald, regional
vice-president of Royal Bank
of Canada, was quoted as say-
ing: “Many people believe
undisciplined lending practices
in the Bahamas are to blame
for the liquidity problem, but

that is not true about us (Roy-

al Bank). The rate of delin-
quencies and defaults is the
lowest it’s been in the last
three years.”

Conclusion

Liquidity is a key indicator
of economic conditions. When
liquidity is tight, interest rates
on deposits tend to rise. Simi-
larly, when the system is ‘flush’
with funds, interest rates on
deposits decline sharply. In the
post-September 11 period, the
Central Bank imposed credit
restrictions on banks. This

resulted:in excess liquidity in-

were regtijcted in making new



loans. The imposition of cred-
it controls tends to slow down
the economy, while the
absence of such controls tends
to boost consumption and
credit expansion.

Ross McDonald summed up
the current situation well when
he said: “This really is a tem-
porary liquidity problem. As
the investments now in the
pipeline come on stream, the
situation will improve. The
(current) liquidity situation is
exacerbated by the fact that
there were large foreign
exchange transfers out as a
result of Bahamians buying
assets formerly foreign-owned
and the high price of oil.”

Until next week...

Postscript

I take this opportunity to
thank all my readers for their
comments and words of
encouragement throughout
the past year. Best wishes for a
most productive and successful
2007.

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst, is
vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions: or com-

ments to rigibson@atlantic--

house.com.bs

THE TRIBUNE

fi HOOPER

Baha Mar
promotes two
top Bahamian
executives












BAHA
Mar has
promoted
two senior
executives.
It has
moved
Michael
Hooper,
the former
British Colonial Hilton’s
general manager, from vice-
president of operations for
Cable Beach Resorts to
senior vice-president of
Cable Beach Resorts oper- ©
ations.

And Robert Sands, cur-
rently vice-president of
external affairs for Cable
Beach Resorts, has been
promoted to senior vice-
president of
government/external affairs
for Cable Beach Resorts
and Baha Mar.

Mr Sands will be respon-
sible for executing Baha
Mar’s corporate outreach
initiatives, maintaining the
company’s presence in the
community, its working
relationships with the Gov-
ernment, interfacing with
the numerous external busi-
ness partners that will be
supporting the vision of:
Baha Mar, industrial rela-,
tions ‘and human capital”
projects. : i








@SANDS

































MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



MARKET REVIEW





+



















































































































































































WORLD MARKET PROFILE WHAT THE U.S. MARKETS DID 0} INNERS AND LOSERS STOCKS FOOTNOTES
World Stocks Latin American Stocks NYSE NASDAQ AMEX NYSE NASDAQ AMEX Definitions apply
Traded In New York Prev. Prev. Prev. : “
Today ‘day, ‘Wik ‘Tow’ | ccremsa 34e 40500 37.5 3667 3688-40 Today day Today day Todry day |__Most Active ‘Most Active __‘Most Active _
Advanced 346 534] Advanced 810 1744 | Advanced 346 534] Name Volume Ck. Name Volume Cis. %Chg | Name Volume Cls. %Ch
Amsterdam 49405 500.33 5018041287 | Empica 4,300 43.70 43.20 43.32 -47 | Declined 702 546 | Declined 2270 ‘1324 | Declined 702546 %Chg | Name Volume _Cls. %Chg | Name_ Volume _Cls. %Chy_
Bangkok 628.19 6482278538 622.14 Unchanged 92 75.| Unchanged 110 139 | Unchanged 92 75 | Motorola 16227500 18.94 -1.61 | NasdLOOTr117339400 43.85 -.21 | SPOR 68523700 140.54 -1.13
Mumbai 13860.52 1387171 1401492 8929.44] GCSaba —.50e 1,300 26.76 26.45 26.45 -.40 New Highs 3 42} NewHighs 46 82 | New Highs 31 n FordM 40416400 7.62 -.08 | Yahoo 64076600 27.74 +.89 | ISHR2K nya53354200 76.73 -1.64
Brussels 4381.56 4421.26 4471.90 3445.10 ech: SAD 1a:eu dia dead soa} NewlOns 16 | Newlows 44 32.| New Lows "4 16 | NokiaCp 33496600 19.84 -1.08 Intel 62345400 21.10 -.07 | SPEngy 37943200 55.92 +37
Buenas 2063.88 2073.08 208785 agra | GPoRadio Gle 5) “| Adv. volume 730,910 1,393,810 | Adv. volume 635,045 1,624,937 | Adv. volume 106,294 213,743 |. AT&T Inc 32844400 33.96 -54 | Cisco 61977400 28.47 +.01 | SemiHTr 16682600 33.85 -34
Caracas 5341331 55648.95 $5648.95 20163.09 | Goosimec * 351,600 13.18 12.50 13.10 -.21 | Decl volume 2.252.522 161,172 | Decl. volume 1,428,500 511,083 Decl volume 293,327 191,972 | Pfizer . 31023100 2630 -.08 | Level3 51024200 5.93 +.36 | OilSvHT 15586000 130.75 +.74
Frankfurt DAX 6593.09 6674.40 6704.04 358.69 Tt. vol. (000) 3,022,631 3,042,478 | TEL vol. (000) 2,081,193 2,163,549 | TH vol. (000) 407,920 414,078 | TimeWam 27166800 22.23 -.19 | SiriusS 49444100 3.80 +.03 | iShEmMMkt 10858200 110.23 -3.32
FISE 100 6220.10 6287.00 6322.00 5467.40 | GTelevsas .16e 2,115,500 27.55 26.94 27.00 -.55 GenElec 26819800 3756 -19 | SunMicro 47055400 5,60 09 | DMA Diam 9078300 12374 94
Hong Kong idx 2021.28, 22556 2055458 MMS | aae 9 497200 28.46 27.50 27.59 -81 Most Widely Held U.S. Stocks Hallibtn s 24846000 29.00 -.23 | Microsoft 44075600 29.64 -.17 | IShEAFE 8736000. 72.20 -1.12
SE eS ee eee tne Pe ar Ry Set tea see > sate Ramune ExxonMbl 24419600 73.24 +52 | Oracle 33572200 17.64 -04 | Yamanag 8335800 1165 -22
Jakarta 1832.55 1824.10 1834.70 A Vitro 08e «62,200 5.84 5.54 5.56 -.14 | Performance of the 15 issues wit! the-most s areho! ers: EMC Cp 24383500 13.61 +.08. | Dell Inctf 33378800 26.16 -08 | SPMatls 6980900 34.22 -23
CACAO SSI735 SS7A56 56267 A6IBAN T Corvecer 2.08e 15,300 30,00 29.26 29.48 -.22 | Stock Div. PE’ Sales. High © Low = Close Ch.
SRE ee eee eee eee | aRiGhile «ade. WaStDOY S7BI-GEA6 uGEAciIO ATEUIN L42f 18.0 328444 34.54 3395 33.96 54 :
rata prs — ssetle Ne one ' ee "| Verizoncm 162 16.0 159928 38.06 3732 37.38 -.65 Gainers Gainers Gainers
Madri 1 ; x Enersis .20e 510,200 15.80 15.38 15.57 -31 k a
Manila 2996.39 3012.74 3020.70 205777 | Madero + a 11.30 11.00 11.29 +.08 cn too 7083733028 20694026 60 | Name___Last Chg %Cbg | Name Last _Chg ‘Chg | Name Last chy %chy
Mexico 26135.60 26566.28 2699.10 6653.15 i . ¢ gah tks | Electri 1.12f. 23.0 268198 37.76 37.31 37.56 -19 | NYMtgTr 3.28 +30 410.1] AthrGnc 12.06 +234 +241) AdcareHitn 2.75 +55 +25.0
0. 2 General Electric i ‘
Nikkei 225 17091.59 17353.67 17563.37 1445.53 | SOCQ&M = 2.80e 46,500 134.20 129.01 130.20-4.25 | jaiy 120. 17.0 71618 97.95 9691 97.42 -.89 | NYSEGpn 10239 47.29 +7:7| Datatrak 6.24 +1.18, +233] Zion0&Gn 12.50 42.10 +202
Seoul 1385.76 1397.29 1464.70 1203.86 | VinaConc .40e 12,100 32.80 31.60 u32.42+.92 NtwkEq = 6.71 +48 +7.7 | SyntaxBril 10.74 +1.25 +132] NDynMng 748 +69 +102
Singapore 3029.04 3023.80 3037.74 2280.67 | Metrogas * 23,100 4.10 4.02 4.10 +.22 Afrancewt 12.25 +85 +7.5|HinesH 2.09 +24 +130) Memry 2.40 +20 49,1
SaoPaulo 4245.16 44019.77 44526.36 3287.61 | Ticmarg * 118,300 20.72 20.35 20.40 -.10 THorton gn 31.31 +200 +68) SabaSoft 6.84 +.70 +114] DebtResn 4.20 +30 +77
Sydney 5572.00 5584.80 5649.30 4721.10 | ypF Soc 1.97e 3,000 46.97 45.96 46.80+1.09 CAEIncg 9.60 +53 +58 ZarebaSys 5.30 +54 +113] Aspyra 2.09 +14 472
bal |
Taipei 7835.57 793451, 793451 6257-80 | aracruz 2.208 613,200 62.05 60.90 61.13 -.65 Metrogas 4.10 +22 +56] Arotechrs 3.75 +36 +106| Vitafd © 2.05 +12 +62
Toronto DAT ST W380. ASAT meh TelBrasH 204r 24,000 29.63 28.12 28.33-1.40 | Daily nese for the past yea: Dug pfE 42.00 42.00 +5.0| AtAm | 342 +31 4100) CVDEqp 549 +31 +60
Zurich eesti < Geen 14000 Se Protlife 5035 4235 +49] AllionHit 6.99 +63 +9.9| Telkonet 2.94 +17 +60
SURE a LR : Salesforce 39.52 +164 +43] OnstreamM 295 +26 +9.7| ChadThr 2.42 4.13 45.7
NewZealand 4035.26 4028.96 4055.46 3303.26 yaaa an \is
Milan 31936,00 32057.00 3259.00 26543.00 ; 19250
Johannesburg 24261.06 24201.02 24985.81 18244.64 N.Y. Comex ¢ , close 12398.01 Losers Losers Losers
Athens 4560.14 4536.69 4536.69 3379.28 ele
Stockholm 1147.22 1149.68 115838 878.16 we. Close Chg. 12500 +4] down 82.68 Name Last Chg %Chg | Name Last Chg %Chg | Name Last Chg %Chg
Topix 1675.33 1698.95 1783.72. 1458.30 | Gold raed led cL ae LenoxGrp 419-244-368 Voxwaren 3.95 -130 -248| SulphCo 3.85. 61 -13.7
Zurich SPI 7015.51 7033.64 7033.64 5573.99 | Silver Market Price Bh ot Herbalife 29.74 -956 -24.3| Omtool 358-79 -181| Arizld 12.59 1.80 -12.5
ShanghaiB 13345 1313813138. 62.01 Handy & Harman GlobPay 41.09 -7.96 16.2] JamesRiv 6.69 1.40 -17.3| Goldcy nya 6.00 -75 -ILL
MIB 30 41571.00 41824.00 4218.00 39045.00 Close Chg. GtChina 26.97 -4.03 13.0] MWavehrs 2.46 -.51 -17.2| iMergent 26.34 -2.95 -10.1
; Gold Market Price 609.50 -19.20 PinnclEnt 30.51 -3.35 9.9] Westaff 4.76 -.97 -16.9| BodisnBioh 452-45 9.1
a rnatcat Tienes Ine-tinennat tities ne. Silver Market Price $2,090 40.680 DoralFin 2.22 --24 -9.8] NeurMtrx 12.12 -1.81 -13.0] Indonesia 11.00 -1.00 -83
indices de Precios y Cotizaciones, cc-CAC London Afternoon BrilChina 2015 203 -92| BPOhts 2.77 -37 -11.8| InvCaphid 550-49 -82
40, ao-all Ordinaries, ndj-Nikkel Dow Jones, Close Chg. ChinaLfes 48.07 -4.78 -9.0] Quigley 5.09 -.61 -10.7| JedOilg 2.47 21-78
available, mM Telematico,xholiday,, [S84 tat) “a6T0 Acims 265 19s a0| fam , 2005 G51 S| Ath ater tas aE
available, m-MIB Telematico, x-holiday. Silver 12.170 -0. nas 22.65 -1. eam 351 - y 67-1! :
_____Vol. High Low Close Chg. ____ Vol. High Low Close Chg. | _ _ Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low, Close Chg.
Nl | EndoPhrm 2444 28.76 27.20 28.70 +1.47 | IntcntlEx 4378 126.65 121.00 124.56 +3.55 | NovaStar 2146 25.79 24.87 25.12 -85|SixFlags 1798 5.75 5.60 5.74 +.05| TractSupp 2075 48.44 45.77 47.99 +1.80
U S ARKE EngyConv 1364 34.32 32.50 33.27 -L.19] Intermec 1048 24.10 23.10 23.38 -.54| NvtlWrls 1763 10.50 10.20 10.40 +.25| SkywksSol 10027 7.26 6.64 6.75 -.59|Tmsmeta 1725 «1.13 (1.09 1.10 -.02
a a EngyPrt 1094 24.07 23.31 23.98 +33] IntrNAPrs 617° 20.63 19.96 20.49 +.06|/Novavax 1805 4.23 4.00 4.07 *|Smithinth 4379 37.83 36.80 37.12 -.38| Transocn 6566 76.98 7539 7655 +.98
ENSCO 5U4 49.74 47.45 48.36 +.80/1BM . 7161 97.95 9691 97.42 -89}Novelllf 3014 641 631 637 -.03| Smithfr 1122 25.17 24.84 24.87 -.28 | Triad 1427 41.14 40.03 40.16 -.94
Entergy 2205 93.69 91.28 91.76 -2.32] InthCoal «1343. «5.12 4.91 4.98 -.15 | Novlus 6967 34.58 33.58 33.65 -1.17| SmurfStne 2623 10.33 10.18 10.23. -.10] Tribune «1113 31.06 3081 3081-08
Selected stocks from the EqOfPT 5794 48.37 48.08 48.26 +16] IntlGame 2103 45.99 45.41 45.71 -.43| NuanceCm 2647 11.90 11.52 11.61 -.30| Solectrn 11851 3.37 3.23. 3.34 +.04|TridentMic 2785 1961 1880 1905 -61
New York and American exchanges and from NASDAQ. EqtyRsd «2160 50.75 49.58 49.92 -1.00| intPap 2968 34.24 33.43 33.46 -.70 | Nucor s 4209 55.69 5416 5473 -19|SonicCps 1345 22.49 22.16 22.29 -.31| Trinitys 1095 35.12 34.30 3439 -28
EricsnTl 1850 41.18 40.22 40.93 -.62} Interpublic 4450 12.38 12.17 12.28 -.04 | Nuvelo 1751 3.93) 3.85 3.85) -.05] Sonus 5704 7.45) 7.30 7.40 -.10 | TriQuint 1584 4.55 4.40 445 -18
Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low Close Chg. | EvrgrSlr © 2965 742 7.13 7.33. -.02 | Intersil 1827 24.46 23.91 2399-46] Nvidias 20603 35.20 33.42 33.66 -2.25| Sonycp 3130 45.60 43.96 44.80 +1.00| Tweeter 2298 2.08 157 1.62 -48
ae Exelon 2929 61.64 60.12 60.39 1.49 intuit 2103 3003 2949 2983 a SouthnCo «3738 -36.95 36.38 36.44 -.56 | Tycointl 4880 30.71 30.10 3035 -.44
CBSBnh 6361 31.40. 30,77 30.89 -.44| Expedia 2727) 21.35 21.08 21.26 -.01 | Isis 1010 11,38 11.00 11.32_ +, ~29| SthnCopps 2398 51.03 49.61 50.96 +.44 | Tyson 1630 16.55 16.13 16.50 +.22
ia ORS ee a ce eae wate ee ae ee ae Ospina? 3430 333 nas pg| Sut S07 1545 542 1550-15 | map
ABB Lt 7 17.00 16 “32 /CHRobins 1418 43.71 42.96. 43.05 -.44| ExpScrip 09 67.96 68.86 -1. : iqeee ant “31 | SwstnEngy 4942 34.07 32.24 3355 +.41
ACELtd 1236 59.61 58.86 59.13 -43| CIT Gp 1574 56.78 55.89 55.91 -40| ExtNetwif 2597 4.23 4.01 4.10 -.11 | JDS Unirs © 4519 17.82 17.40 17.66 -.27 reales oe en a ae at Spinner 2828 2577 2548 2560 -19|UALn 2332 47.35 45.83 46.55 -.80
ACMMD 38 7.92 7.85 7.87 04) CMGI T1537 1.30 1.31 -.06 | ExxonMbl 24419 73.38 72.22 73.24 +.52] JPMorgCh 9905 48.25 47.63 47.79 at Offepot. -3031.«-3784 3735 3758 #08] SPansionA 8159 1425 1370 1412 -40/UAPHIdg 1938 22.75 «21.66 22.23 -1.87
CMM} 19 373 370 370) CMS eng §— 2164 1669 1642 1647-27 | I 0 Sr Fe “Geo -La0|ONSVHT 18586 13160 12898 13075 #74| Spectran 3779 2939 2831 2886 -19|UCBHHId 12071798 1759 17.65 -26
ADC Telr 3121, 15.61 15.15 15.29 -.13| CNET If 1989 897 8.79 8.90 -.09 . retry "30-29 | oil 42-31 | SpiritFn 2933 12.36 12.19 12.25 -15|USAirwy 1641 59.15 57.90 58.29 -.55
FPLGrp «2269 55.00 54.05 54.33 73] JanusCap 1224 21.59 21.24 21.30 -.29| OilStates 2209 28.90 28.20 28 r
AES Corp = 3346.21.95 21.07 21.32 -.63 | CSXs 4457 35.00 34.15 34.28 -.72] 2. ~"4g| SprintNex 20995 19.65 19.14 19.21 -.44 | USGlobal 3171 60.09 53.18 54.54 -1.01
a FairchldS ©1767 17.40 16.99 17.31 -17 | JetBlue 4093 15.32 1493 1499 -.39/OmegaHit 1460 17.48 1662 17.04 -.48| SD
ATLAC ey ey Deo Done ge cvethera 1179.13.93, 1347 1347-46) Fannie it 2453 59.84 59.20 5957 29] Johnin «8095 67.25 6650 6662 —61|Omncre 1143 3956 3858 39.14 +.06|SPDR 68523 141.40 140.38 140.54 -113| USG 1238 55.00 52.61 52.84 -.84
nen 7586 1614 1613 1630 233 ( Unie, IBS $25 3069 3117 +17) rastenal 15603758 3627 3643-106) Johnsnctl 1876 8568 8428 8475 -L14|Omnivisn 2804 1315 1280 1287 -38/SPMid 2651 14683 145.33 14533 -193) UST Inc 1167 58.00 5695 57.12 -1.02
Morr c- eas tees S13 163) 33] CablNYs 1721 29.11 2880 2899 +05] Fagexcy 1339. 10853 107.04 107.53 ~95 | Joycibl 2249 4643 44.86 45.24 38 | OnSmend 9282 7.67 7.36 7.51 -11/SPMatls 6980 34.46 33.98 34.22 -23|UTStrem 1502 895 863 BIT -.27
Id $328 2476 2450 2475 a1 fCUYS, M27 42.52 A231 42.38 51) Fedrpss 9967 37.42 36.72 36.89 ~42| InprNtwif 9604 19.98 19.26 1993 +43|On2Tech 5159) 139 122 136 +08/SPHItHC 1528 3391 3361 3369 -19|UltraPtg 1921 47.05 45.48 46.88 +1.18
ASME Hid. = S28 ot rag ga | cadence 2879 18.19 17.89 18.06 +94) Fideipsh ©1162 39.86 3932 39.33 -43 OnstreamM 2736 3.08 269 295 +.26/SPCnSt 1355 26.34 26.07 26.14 -19|UnilevNVs 1030 26.92 2669 26.82 -39
aioe see eek AA Gh oe Gamecogs 208 3G 36.70 3726 All FidINFin,§—«2077 23.77 23.46 2357-14 _ TS) 4036 4805 48/250 [ODN -S3OL_ ALT 1090 1145 +47) SPConsum 1013, 38.56 38.20 3825-26 UnionPac 1600 91.78 SO5B 90.66 -114
a as. aoe | came! 1 Ao 34 le 1002 40.55 39.99 40.34 -.14 | KBHome .36 48. -501 QpenTvV —«-2152,-2.70«-249«-2.60 +.13| SP 37943 56.08 55.19 55.92 +.37 | Unisys : 6 -
Aastrom 4341-148 1.40 1.45 +06 }CampSp- 2147 38.50 37.86 37.96 ~68| FldNinfo a3 “ai [KUATaclf 3832 50:19 49.26 50.15 +10 | opnwvs 3837 «939889 893-54 P rae 6424 36.78 36.44 36.49 -.31] UtdMicro 23900 349 341 341 -.11
Abtlab 6866 5000 4927 4990 * FifthThird 3062 40.84 39.94 40.18 -.81 | Opnwvsy s
Abertitc 3560 7538 7340 7401 +9) CONRSS — 3578 A751 45.77 46.84 4.63) Finisar if 7415 «3.293.223.2309 Kellogg ©1374 50.05 4954 49.72 -34lOpsware. 1541 845 809 818 -31|SPinds 3408 3508 3477 3496 12 /UPSB 3544 ‘75.04 7362 7415 94
Abiibig §—-1745=«253 (24824 ane ates an ae se 93 | Fstmcp if 1607 42.51 41.09 42.20 41.12 | Keycorp 1553 37.76 37.20 37-32-43 | Oracle 33572 17.76 17.44 17.64 _-.04| SPTech 1630-2354 23.35 23.50 -19|USBancrp 5572 36.19 35.70 35.77 -43
Accenture 1768 3699 3645 3668 -s2\crmuca” 24 TO 7716 | FifstDatas 5158 25.69 25.25 25.46 -.22| Kimbclk 1915 68.70 68.18 6844-27 SPUtl 3774 36.67 35.99 36.11 -66/USOIIFdn 3594 47.93 46.89 47.83 +48
ves : apne PLAT) SAT 2 GB TT IG FirstEn 1364 60.39 58.90 59.11 -1.28 | Kimco 1631 44.56 44.01 44.08.67 179 USSteel 3759 71.01 69.03 69.72 -.92
Activisn 4027 17.30 16.76 17.20. -.10 | CpstnTrb 1619 19 114° 215 =| [irstengy ; PGREC 3219 46.53 45.46 45.49 -1.13 | standex 51 30.80 29.17 29.17 -1.79
Adobesy 2721 4090 40.12 4062 -20|Chamtith sed? kas ude eae 3 | Fiserv TL 52.85 5210 Oa AOA ee ee oe ee ee eay ABHS 4843 “1-13 StanlWk ©1132 5119 5059 50.90 -20/ UtdTech © 4318 62.99 62.07 62.68 -19
AdolorCp 2058-750 7.06 7.09 -.45| CareerEd 1083 25.35 2471 2531 +27 Flextn 6573" 1.60 1125 11.59, 4.06 | ered tety 1924) IRR? 1899 28 PPLG 1130 3606 3536 3555 63| Staples 5065 26.50 25.77 26.02 -.22| UtdhithIf 6152 53.05 51.93 52.55 -.36
: pee Fluor 1009 80.00 78.14 78.37 -1.68 | KnghtCap . orp StarGas 1025. 3.49.«3.27«-3.49 +.14| Univision 2803 35.64 35.59 35.60 -.04
Adtran 1622 24.10 23.05 23.32, -.85] CaremkRx 5379 56.92 55.93 56.35 +10 ; Kohls 3293 68.47 66.55 66.80 -.88 | Paccars 1716 65.01 64.48 64.70 +10
Mion RE NS lesa BM Bm See is Salem, OSL Le Le liye Su Ses See / eho Hr fem ib at “is] Sule aR Gt RN“ mm 1 OB
AMD 15765 19.91 19.54° 19.71 -.08 63 49.75 49.88 99 94 34.52 34.75 + c 39 2009 | 71 60.71 60.90 -J 04 23. p
AdvEn 1268 1050 975 1043-441 |Goreke gos veg “(225 M08 Py FrdgCCTg 1631 19.89 19.42 19.8) ~18| Kraft 2432 35.59 SABA 3518-40 | Pacer 2074 2039 1B 20.09 50 | SeateStr 1971 68.56. 6807 6840 -21|UtahMedh . 11 33:13 3250 32.75 30
gy 2 Carreker = 2054 7.90 7.86 7.87. -.02 2 Kroger 6065 23.71 23.30 23.60 +.01 | Pactiv 1113 35.36 34.68 35.18 +.18
Aeropstl 1706. 34.54 33.69 33.93. --28| Caterpillar 6154 60.92 59.95 60.22 -.7g| Forestlab 2401 50.45 50.05 50.20 35 | Md IG? ays B39. RAT. 20 | PallC 1156 3425 3361 3375 94|Stemcells 8401 3.42 3.21332 +21 | ULI 1317 131.40 129.30. 129.82 --2.02
Aetnas 4829 42.10 41.11 4140 72) Celanese 1852 25.17 2467 25.06 -4] orestolls UN? 31.52 31.02 3122 +02 | ae, as Palmincs AT@4 1491 1440 1469 04 | STGold 10677 60.78 59.66 60.17 -1.48
Affymetrix 1516 22.28 21.68 21.72 -54|CeleraGrp 313 14461399 14.24 16] ForutNW HBB AaB + 22 a ee pest ll 201 2388 -28|STHomen 1111 36.31 35.89 35.98.33 | RTE aT TET
AgereSys 3633 19.77 19.36 19.59 -.20/ Celesticg 1384 8.02 7.74 7.82 16] Fotwwh 1336 4984 4817 4002 cep [eSItoo 8128. 9.28 9129.20 ~11 | parracos —»«1203-« 42.23.93 409 4.12 STKDWRBn 1188 50.66 49.66 49.70 -1.05 vaalco ee ee ek
Agilent 2460 34.40 34.00 34.09 -32) Celgenes 2947 58.14 56.90 57.58 -46] FH roa 1999 30.80 a012 a0-AT cog | LAOCP 1457 73.79 73.21 73.49 -.26 | parpet 1039 1655 1610 1615 -.09|STDUStx50 2115 48.39 47.81 47.91 -,89 | Valassis 1589 1 1330 13.79 -30
Agnicog 2865 38.15 36.40 3744-35} Cemexs 2113 33.62 32.84 33.14 -57| poindey if 466? 1528 1473. 1522. 422 | Laidlaw 2028 30.16 28.97 29.09 +139) parmtcrs 1579 18.01 17.50 17.72 -.29 StrideRt 143 15.30 14.86 14.96.36 | ValTech 1750 1781.31 1.35 -35
AirProd 2457 70.27 69.06 69.35 -.98| CenterPnt 6075 7.47 16.67 16.79 -.29| fr Mie 9849 6770 6662 669) -102 | LAMRSch «3063.51.85 50.55 51.85 -.07 | parkHan 1533 77.62 76.21 7638 +.19 | Stryker 1773 55.93 55.32 55.83 +23] ValeroE = 12541 49.47 48.48 49.36 +.47
AirTran 1863 11.86 11.43 1147 -.42 | Centex 1667 54.40 53.28 53.48 -.69) Fricg 7159 5242 4994 5148 4.52 | Sands 1194 92.02 89.88 90.94 -1.17 | pattuTl 4528 22.13 21.54 21.93 +.19 | SturmRug 120 9.54 9.26 9.38 +.08| ValueClick © 1550 23.92 23.25 23.49 -.50
AkamaiT 2862 53.78 52.42 53.19 -.11 | Cental 1078 41.90 39.30 39.40 -2.64 EMG 1895 808 793 800 .15|tawsnSft 2263 7.16 6.88 7.15. +.04 | paychex 1763 40.20 39.78 40.03 +.02 | SulphCo 1307 437 3.80 3.85 -~61| VarianMed 1244 48.00 47.61 47.99 -.32
AlskAir 504 41.45 39.74 40.30 -1.51 | Cephin 1067 69.99 69.17 69.75 -.23 Frontoils 1706 2747 2688 2735 +08 LearCorp 1809 29.89 28.35 28.83 -1.15 | payishoe 1050 32.93 32.07 32.16 -1.02] SunMicro 47055 5.66 5.56 5.60 -.09| VarianSs 1175 45.83 44.83 45.61 +.01
AlbertoCn 1101 22.98 2247 22.77 +.14] Ceradynelf 536 58.82 , 57.50 58.63 +.62 Frontline 1256 30.66 30.17 30.41 ~60 LeggMason 1037 9812 96.66 97.19 -.44 PeabdyEs 9687 37.48 36.20 37.22 +.72| Suncor g 4625 72.86 70.67 72.65 +1.97 | VascoDta 1190 13.73 12.90 13.67 +71
Alcan 2103 45.52 44.55 44.73 -1.26 | CerusCp 242, 5.60 5.39 5.39 -.15 Furia 572 2665 2605 2640 -.20 LehmnBrs 5104 77.42, 76.20 76.74 -.10 | pengrth g 1492 16.41 15.81 16.25 +.10| Sunoco 3141 59.97 58.60 59.68 +.16| Vasogengh 1513 35 0 (320-01
Alcatelluc 10696 14.89 14.64 14.78 -.29 | ChmpE 1780 858 807 824 -.4l FurnBrds 1081 1606 1566 1594 +10 LennarA 1885 50.15 49.43 49.66 -.43 | panNGm 1073 40.95 40.12 40.22 -.73| Suntech 1496 33.50 32.55 33.33. +.61 | Verisign 3658 24.62 2420 2459 +.01
i i a ne an 735 chanen 10381 3.26 3.13 3.25 4.16} coir 1346 1530 1414 1440 65 Loess i ae Be a 24 PennWst gn 1314 28.93 27.50 2845 +.46| SunTrst 1531 83.64 82.39 82.85 -1.10 | VeritDGC 2759 82.30 80.98 aie ‘e
erm . Chattem 2230 55.71 54.09 54.89 +2.16 ~ ; 5 may | LEUCNat! s , 83-108 | Penney 2841 77.78 76.14 7658 -.24]| Supeni 2396 30.00 29.00 29.25 -.5g| VerizonCm 15992 38.06 37.32 37.38 -,
AllgeEngy 1069 4560 4445 4.74 -96 | ChiPoint, 2536. 22.10 21.46 2197-72] I | orcs 51024 595558593 +35] pemwest 12881739 1626 167! #44 | ecm Fee Seer Seeg Seas sca |veruPh 1547 37.08 3878 SSRI “LIB
AllegTch 2284 86.93 85.10 85.97 -98| Cheesecake 1121 25.07 24.59 24.66 -.44) GMarketn 1046 22.96 22.12 22.33. -1.04 | Lexmark 1569 72.31 71.40 72.00 -.40 | pepsiBott 1779 30.65 30.46 30.57 +14] Sycamore 1299 ~ 3.81 3.75 3.76 -.06|ViacomB 3586 41.81. 41.14 41.47 +23
AldWaste 2048 12.69. 12.50 12.51 -.07|ChesEng 14307 28.13. 27.52 27.95 +.23] G-llls 99 20.00 19.52 19.84 +.07 | LibGlobA 1093 29.24 28.77 29.04 -.07 | pepsico 4474 63.22 62.70 6295 -20] Symantec 11534 21.60 21.27 21.34 -32| Viragenh 170. .4a6 25 36 *
Allstate 2207 «65.40 64.92 65.18 -.18 Chevron 9532 71.12 70.12 70.55 +.27] GameStp 1342 56.06 55.31 55.49 +.08| LibMinthn 2022.22.21 21.60 21.77 -.36 | prsetch 1852 27.84 27.81 27.84 +.03 Synopsys 1270 2678 2616 2654 -36| Vishay 2307 «13.79 13.44 13.47 -39
Alltel 2882 62.00 61.30 61.90 -.01 | Chicos 3162 21.20 20.48 20.58. -.76 | Gannett 1161 59.80 59.40 59.55 +.10 | Lifecell 1399 24.94 24.25 24.45 -.16 | perkEim 1283 21.65 21.40 21.56 ~02| Synovus 758 31.08 30.47 30.61 -.50 | Visteon 2127-859 «8.05 «818 -.48
AlteraCp If 5857 20.04 19.76 19.96 -11)Chinalfes 4874 50.44 47.00 48.07 -4.78 Gap 10879 19.58 18.81 18.89 -55|ligandPhn 1961 11.35 10.96 11.31 +.15 PerryEllis s 160 26.43 25.45 25.95 -.40 SyntaxBril 7125 10.82 9.61 (10.74 +1.25 | VivoPart Bll 3.82 358 373 -J1l
fon 8110 as aa ae ia ChinaMble 2023.44.99 43.12 43,24 -1.19] Garmins 2584 55.00 53.75 54.88 -.18 IVER ae a ae aoe a Petrohawk 7419 10.66 10.32 10.63 +.08| Sysog 1924 36.07 35.76 3589 -11| Vodafone 2875 2862 2812 2818 -J7
fran” 6516 3879 7a) Mea? -=8| Chin 160s S18 1435 4 [Ce ee ee ee ee nat 18 oes ee00 Geir cya [BRUNA BD $BAD BSAS $679 2291 Stemax i602 1851 1809 18.00 76) Vrado 290 PLA 11824 11855 208
Amdocs 1127 38.58 3801 3845 -.07|Chubbs 2472-5282 52.17 52.29 -50|Genaerah 1847 28-25-27 +01 | LinearTch 3837 3093 30.20 3071596 | phizer 31023 2663 2617 2630-08
AMovilL 5085 46.15. 44.66. 44.74 1.44) ChungTel 100629.91 19.53 1959en4k:Genentch 3976 85.00 83.18 83.68 -.35 | LizClaib 1008 44.72 44.14 egy PrSwebh 1851.29 171.29 4.07] TD Ameritr 3998 16.54 16.20 16.28 -30|WHolding 1873. 609 552 5.70 -.39
AmAxle 1255 18.43 17.91 17.93 -.66}CienaCprs 4594 29.87 28.01 29.29 +.44 GenDyn s 1492 74.76 74.03 74.59 +.17 | LockhdM 1949 92.57 91.37 92.02 +33 | phmHtr 2100 78.34 77.48 77.70 -.63| THO 1297 32.34 31.34 31.92 -.62 | WCICmts 1950 19.53 19.02 19.45 +18
AgagleOs 6867 33.61 31.96 32.32 -.66 | Cimarex 1180 36.61 35.94 36.31 +.10/ GenElec 26819 37.76 37.31 37.56 -.19 | Loews s 1784 40.68 40.25 40.37 -.37| phelpsDs 4022-116.84 115.26 116.51 +.91 | qx 3262 29.75 28.89 29.08 -.64] WD 40 81 3427 33.34 3335 -.84
AEP 1329 42.84 42.00 42.04 -.80 | CinciBell 1028 4.66 «4.48 «4.53 -.15] GnGrthPrp = 1303; 52.43 51.44 51.51 -.80 | LaPac 1489 21.98 21.41 21.83 -.01 PhilipsEl 1047 37.01 36.57 3672-87! TviAInc 1351 5 78 "84-15 | Wachovia 4919 57.32 5630 5648 -.79
Amp 6315.59.87. 58.90 59.13. -79 | Cintas M37. 40.67° 39.93 40.29 -.18} GenMills, 1346 57.36 56.91 56.97 -42|Lowess 8229. 32.41 31.59 31-79-39 pier 1 2421 G07 5.92 5.96 -07) TxUCor S116 53.66 52.96 53.58 +.07| WalMart 13334 47.80 4715 4739-39
ey 1336 ae ae a a CircCity 11526 20.65 19.23 19.29 -.71] GnMotr 10437 30.28 29.69 30.24 +.60 Lyondell 2710 25.37 24.81 25.03 -.48 Pinnclent 2528 32.91 30.51 30.51 -3.35] Taiwan 31 18.82 1840 18.45 -.42 | Walgrn 3655 46.31 45.39 45.50 -.66
ROSA A. SORE SLTE TAGE: TER Gd eee og ghee HED TSS tal | Gonestier: “ANS «1014. 9.85. 288-2 PionDril = 1136 12.30 11.80 12.01 +18) TaiwSemi 12533 10.90 10.58 10.69 -28|Wamerchn 1182 1388 1332 1335-48
AmeMed 3767 1917 1777 1885 +20|Gitom S301 Sh0S Srae seay ‘gy | Gente 238 7862 76.76 7686 “175! wey —— 2948 4053 3951 40.29 76) PION «1486 3847 37.47 301-15] TakeTWo «39541769 16.61 1683 -83|WAMutl | 3692 4549 45.02 4508 45
AmOrBio 1002 1233 1195 1203 -13|CitzComm 1717. 1423 1402 1411 208 | Qe esth «ee gate aaee age gu; MGlPhr ~ 1500 18.29 1792 1798-31 | PlumCrk A shet sean SRS x22 | TalismE gs 4586 15.59 15.13 1549 +.16 | WREIT 362 40.36 39.25 39.56 -89
APwCnv 2139.30.67 30.58 30.63 +.01 | Citrixs 3920 2811 2750 2785 -10| Gen 3537 G68 GS09 Roe. 4.35 | MGIC 1104 63.63 63.03 6328-42 [Poloom = ARN ALG 30.72 3128 46 | Taget 2934 58.10 57.15 57.27 -.32] WsteMinc 2473 36.53 35.93 35.98 -.59
AmStand 1397 4500 4538 4559 -48| clearchan 2877 3553 3538 3543 -06| Gago 4779.07 t850 tego 3g /MRVCm — 1039378 3.64 3.71 10 Pech. “Oa gabe TeeaL dave: eee | 1214 2.40 2.22 2.39 +02) Weathfdint 8102 38.08 36.91 37.86 +.94
AmTower 3110 38.16 37.09 37.52 -33|Clevcliffss 1165 4743 46.00 4641 -1.09| G : 39 15.57. -56 | Malaysa M6 745 7.25 7.27 -.10 ¢ TASER 1889 8.20 7.90 8.07 +08] WellPoint 3218 78.95 78.29 78.49 +.62
cd 43 46.00 46.41 -1.09] Gerdaus 1726 16.28 1539 15.57 -56 ’ Powrwav 5061. G74 6.50 6.53 -.22
: “60 546.2 : Mamma 9511 “5.97 5.55 5.60 +30 " TelNorL 4983 14.31 13.63 13.79 -.32]WellsFgos 10247 35.83 35.51 35.60 -.20
aun, ime sea ees eee oe Wed ASS gas MAO 0g] eee, IS 9.25 9.01 9.13 +06 T anpwl 1023 768:25-7482 75.01 -137| Praxair 3102 58.30 5832 $899 +14) Tier, 9432 2846 2750 2759 BI Wendyss 1450 33.98 3277 33.81 +15
Amgen 10364 7208 7L01 7150 +17 | coo 27 2040 * | GlaoSkin 108 Ska? 3S Sag “yg| Marathon 5581 86.37 8400 85.92 +1.68| Preccastot 1050 8159 8019 8123-36 roetech 131 2498 2429-2485 4.52 | Wetisthl?: 213 11.09 11.04 11.06 *
AmkorTit 3030 995 959 981 ~A7|cocacl S778 ABST MBL ABI6 -24|Glenind” MOse Gao ath azar “ig lMMGoldn 1865 37.34 3665 a7.ai si |Precrl 1697 22.36 2150 2227 +22] TH” aes) “4S aut 448 03 (Wadinon 201 10 Ges 6G 04
‘01 ™ . ms i a 4 7 : i “t + . . . i re n >
in 3171 3628 3761 +112 | coowr “Te | Globes Sond ane, ace AGs 728] Marintas — 3302 4600 4499 4510 -Lo7 | PriceTRs — 1683 4638 4589 4606 09] TEE Ta ae nt) ae lwo, 5509 2h10 See Ise
Amylin , 2020 36.28 37.61 Coeur 12199 4.62 4.37 447-16] GlobPay «9010 44.51 39.75 41.09 -7.96 Prideintl 3769.27.74 27.20 27.48 +.02 gi
Anadarks 8578 41,64 40.53 41.31 +28) CogTech 1522 78.33 75.80 77.11 -1.05) GlobalSFe 4017 57.06 54.62 °55.76 +1.03 | MarshM 2621 31.50 31.00 3134-29) ican, | aoe 53.66 52.60 53.00 +80| Templein 1138 46.39 45.80 46.29 +.02| WstnUnn 5520 22.97 2230 2233-58
Anadigc «1740. 8.72 8.45 8.49 -49} Cognosg «1327 42.87 41.96 42.71 +16] GoldFltd 41131742 16.93 17.34 -22| Marvell SIF 12604 19.58 19.17 1941-54) eS" Gone chon ca'ag 63:50 55 | Tenariss 2349 47.73 46.51 47.30 +40] WetSeal | 1279 661 628 635 -24
AnalogDev 2610 33.30 32.65 33.03 -38}ColdwtrCs 1545 24.36 23.72 23.96 -43| Golderpg 11855. 2618 25.44 2567 -.77 | Masco eae eee seas coy | Proorssén 1608 49.54 4847 4870 -80|TenetHlth 3135 7.14 7.05 7.10 ~.01 | Weyerh 1485 71.96 7112 7154 -23
Andrew 1268 10.36 10.10 10.25 -.18 | ColgPal 1797 65.90 65.34 65.46 -30)GoldStrg 1814 2.88 2.77 2.87 +.05 passeye 2909 10220 9900 1006 og} ProcCps 2668 2416 23.60 23.75 -.48 | Teradyn 2467 15.40 15.13 15.29 -.17 | WholeFd 1924 47.26 46.32 46.63 -.36
AngloAms 1517. 22.97 22.27 22.52 82) ColumLab- 2435.02 4.81 4.88 -.10) GoldmanS 5836. 200.00 197.90 199.05 +20) MANcean Sank Whe Oe ID “yq| Protogis 1111 59.92 5870 59.02 -.90| Terexs 1973 58.66 57.67 57.98 -77|WmsCos 4743 25.92 2544 25.76 +14
AnglogidA 1405 44.94 43.75 44.46 -.43 | Comcast 8543 43.06 42.32 42.55. -.50]| Goodyear 8734 23.53 22.29 23.28 +.61 | davis ip 4636 3173 3110 3131 51 | Protlife 1097 50.45 48.25 50.35 +2.35| Terra 1256 11.95 11.53 11.74 -.17 | WmsSon 2000 31.17 30.61 3141 -.03
Anheusr 4706 49.16 48.53 48.80 +.05)Comesp 4325 42.51 41.82 42.02 -.47] Google 6769 487.50 478.11 487.19 +393] sicciatchy 473 ALIB 4083 40.97 .23/ PrOVETQ 1380 1031 998 10.21. +16] Tesoro 1150 65.79 64.30 65.67 +.65| Windstrm 2446 14.01 13.79 13.90 -.09
fm, Be ie Ge Bp “elem, ie ea fe Ri cn/deint 2S 28 25 A ckliels om aa Ge So in| Reed, ee RP ae alee Me Be ae Be celine be ae
naly 10. 1372 13.73 -. s AT 24.60 25.16 -.24] GtChina, «1267-3050 26.50 26.97 -4, 32 43:34 4354 + | PugetEngy 1562 25.71 2454 2462 -1.12| TevaPhrm 64 32.21 +57] Worthgtn 1234 17.12 16.76 16.84 -.35
Aon Corp 2578 35.87 35.58 3558 -21/CVRDs = 9946 28.48 27.11 27.51 -96| GreyWolf 3274660 6.46 6.53 +02 | Moma © SER ASAD ARIA. ARS | pulteH 19983212 31.55 3194 +03| Texinst 20913 2894 2858 2876 -34| weit’ 3708. S78 SLI9 S135 38
Apache 4599 65.50 63.85 65.25 41.55 | CVRD pfs 3633 24.70 23.48 23.71 1.08] GTelevsas 2115. 27.55. 26.94 27.00 -55) MON nk Rep GoaR BBR ta a se 1076 94.80 93.75 94.22 -.13] wynn 1664 97.75 95.76 96.88 +.57
ApolloG if 1906 41.56 40.40 40.76 67 | CompScilf 1058 52.14 51.47 51.83 +03] Gymbree 1371 43.88 42.91 43.25 +15| Monessen T0IR SA.GR SAOS SIT +01 | ThermoFis 1941 45.60 44.82 45.01 -.63
Apolloinv 1171-2237 21.70 22.04 -54|Compuwre 1066 862 847 852 -.06 MeDatsA «3577 556 S58 -E4G sop | Qmodan — 1696 17.40 1650 1671 ~731 3com 5359. 412 402 403 09
AppleCptr 29335 96.20 84.40 85.05 ~61 | Comversif 2794 21.38 2077 21.03 -14| So Lene | Merduco Lolo 282 2eBE ISL go (Qlogics 1957 2211 2172 2186-19] aurco 2732-7790 77.01 77.42 -53 XMSat 12023 -15.45 14.58 1532 +.34
Applebees 1536 24.29 23.60 23.95 -.49 | ConAgra 4286 27.73. 27.25 27.33. -.19 Hallibin 24846 29.40 2860 2900 .23| Medimun 5121 3475 3361 3432 +80 Qualcom 18192 38.94 37.87 38.69 -.46 | Tibeostt 2578 971 947 9.68 * XTO Enay 5327 45.62 44.30 45.28 +.34
ApldMatl 30994 18.75 18.42 18.67 -.13|Conexant- 6870 2.18 210 211 -.08 HancFab 57 333-321 323 09 |Medarex If 2210. 1441 1394 1408 -39 QuestCapg 1178 2.99 2.75 2.81 -.01 | Tidwir 1488 46.92 45.36 46.37 +.11 XcelEngy 1434 23.45 22.86 22.98 -.47
AMCC If 3046 «3.66 «3.53 3.56 -.10]/ConocPhil 16040 67.65 66.07 67.42 +1.35 J. i p 15|MedcoHlth - 2340 §387 5290 .5367 +47 | stDiag 1256 51.74 51.25 51.34 -.50 Tiffany 1597 39.39 3841 3851 -.56 Xerox 2160 16.99 16.65 16.73 -.16
AquaAm 1048 23.26 22.50 22.57 -.03}ConorMd 1480 32.33 31.80 31.95 +.19 Hanes ae fri ae ae aD Medtnic 4398 S360 b276 e336 ete | QuestSftif 1465 1472 1428 1466 +.19 THorton gn 2102 31.31 29.44 31.31 42.00 Xilinx . 4888 24.30 23.74” 23.95 -.22
Anes. ABIL 2808 20a2 ret cag | Couseee, (MOB. 2021 1398 20.00 09) Freens 270034343424 3428 4G | MelcoPBLn 3457 21.60 2051 2078 87 {Questar 1037771 7682 77.38 -58| Timewam 27166 2244 2214 2223-19 Yyratex «1941-2138 1940 2122 +82
ia oo oe ie ao ee CoE Ee ee Baa HarleyD 2047 70.50 69.16 69.53 -I:13| Mellonfnc 2172 42.61 41.95 42.21 -.24] QwestCm = 18405 8.38 8.27 835 +06} TWoele 1280 20.30 19.67 19.74 -47 YRCWwde 1056 39.83 39.04 39.12 -.35
arches 2 ee ee ye een 162 A31 47.32 47-63-68) armonyG 3743-1483 1398 1427 -55|MemryPh 2065362 303 337 +23, RFMicD 17242 6926.55 6.65 -44| Ttanmts 1479-2957 2894 29.24 418 Yahoo 64076 2787 2666 2774 +89
m = «1553 58.17 56.87 57.11 -1.06|ConstellA 7192 24.92 24.07 24.41 -.74 y' 953 13.95 14.27 -. RTIIntM 1044.73.28 70.80 71.16 -2.23 68 1132 1165 -.22
Aribainc -:1240-«7.78-=«752.—=«752-~-28|ConstellEn 1165 70°89 6999 7002 .a7|HarrahE | 2507 82.60 82.31 82.47 -.12 | MensW M158 3942 3871 39.23 07 | A ae Tee eae gg Tivoinc = 2972 S47 5.20 $45 +20 Yamanag 8385 1.68 11.32 11.65.22
Arris 2676 13.02 1268 1295 -06|CtiAirB 5247 4581 4434 4471 -96|HarrisCorp 1390 49.33 48.20 48.69 -.14 | MentGr 464 18.76 18.39 18.74 03 | Radosh IAL -30| Todco 1726 33.07 31.80 3265 +.23 YankCdl 1147 34,31 34.20 34.29
ArvMerit 1050 17.86 17.37 17.49 41 | Cooperco. 2091.47.51 45,09 47.01 +1.40| HartfdFn 1605.93.25 91.55 91.67 -1.58 | Merck 10571 45.10 44.18 44.30.81 | Rambus If 3214 19.48 1892 19.17 -33 | ToliBros 2079 31.29 30.65 31.06 +04 ZiCorp 2017 2.32 1.92 2.05 +14
AstraZe 1116 5584 5495 5553 +24|Cooverinds 371 9010 8942 a9'80 32 |Harvsteng 1704 2049 19.70 20.29 -1|MeridGld 1425 2549 2473 25.34 -.23] RangeRs 2051 26.96 25.69 26.27 +58} Totalsas 1477 69.28 6841 6898-34 Zimmer 1210 78.96 77.93 7877 -.05
n . operinds =. 371 5 4 . “. x ill 0 51 91.63 92.00 -.04 | Raytheon 2116 51.92 51.31 51.63 +30 7 x i +32
Athrcnc —-«G147--12.50 10.00 12.06 +234| Coming 20974 19.64 1891 19.04 50| Hasbro 1026 27.50 27.17 27.36 -.17 Merrily ae Hol Eee Mee ctor erate ae AL 1028 133.87 132.55 133.72 -4.05 ZweigTl 1574 5.74460 5.40 3
Atheros 2422 23.14 22.12 23.04 +.51 | Costco 3494 54.24 53.11 53.41 -.66 | Hawaiiél 208 27.34 26.80 26.83 -.57 | Methanx : ; 0g : : as. eae —
. 6 37.68 37.35 37.50 +.01 | Metlife 2252 60.52 59.51 59.80 -71|Realogyn 3533 30.07 29.95 30.02
Pe cee anes nee ean wae ab ie alae Re MRCVREIT. 16I ASST. Aad” goes | Mere 754 Ingo 91 982-88) RedHat 000 2250 10 2224 43 TORONTO STOCKS
Ene Ae der wie ee td en TU caeht Fe Aca oe Healthnys i713 #91 4295 AAT “LOT Micon? 1dr 13681352 1388 “ai RegionsFn 2757 37.82 36.96 37.19 -65/Vol. High Low Close Chg. | Vol. High Low Close Chg.
Avanex 4048 2.12 2.01 2.08 02 | Credsys 2935. 5.10 4.96 499 -12| Hela = 2810. 7.407. mA Ment? dglwres Seer’ ange sagt oe een 150, AGT RSE 1387-23) 2901941 ACEAViationA38.62 38.15 38.32 ~.08 | 1356680 LionoreMng 12.58 12.22 12.36 +09
Nrertnen 1109 UBL. 019 2041 146] Grcag’ tM 182 1888 1908 36 Helnén 1526 3000 2941 2979 413 Micsn 2629 38 352 370 04 RschMatn 13626 14192 13580 14130 4273 1138790 ARCEgyTUn21.00 20.19 20.65 +.46 | 1831668 ManulfeFin 3965 39.09 39.19 ~58
AvisBudget 1732 22.29 22.04 22.25 +1 criincetle 2027, 32.50 31.75 32.09 +04] HelmPays 2602" 23.39 22.95 23.13 +.07 | MillPhar 4358 «11.13 10.76 11.00 -.05 | RetailHT 2960 100.77 99.28 99,38 -1.27 | 5574365 AbitibiCons 2.97 2.90 2.91 -.02] 1092508 MiramarMng 4.93 4.60 4.87 +.11
Avnet 1511 27.26 26.68 26.84 -.26|Crystalxg 3135. 3.81 3.56 3.80 +12|Hemisphrx 1662.28 2.23 2.27 -.03 | Mindspeed = 1539 1.85 1.78 1.80 -05} Revlonrt 2421.10 0708S * 41259049 Alcaninc 53.75 52.21 52.49 -1.61] 1674786 Nexen Inc 61.38 59.33 59.80 -.45
Avon 1398 33.72 33.34 33.45 -.32 | CubistPh 1188 17.54 17.06 17.37 +.29| Herbalife |. 11174 37.97 29.25 29.74 -9.56 | Miramar 1064 ae 3.89 A oe Revlon 2244 1.41 1.33 1.39 +.05 | 1838857 AllianceAtlB 51.82 50.82 51.20 +1.22 | 2438542 NorOriono 4.20. 4.00 4.18 +.14
onsen Jess aks Haat “zee Ieee A ay a Ma Be al SB lReins IG] Gee G2 Alt L6H lasion aummencian ars 2080 =| io NrehewohtnGt2980 2852 2
BBAT Cp 1519 43.66 42.99 43.08 58 | cutogen eae enema | Hewlett? 17315 4227 4148 42.20 +52| Mittalstl 1237 4047 39.76 4001 +01 nw legos ties gq 8 | 1967508 BCE Inc — 31.10 30.19 30.19 -.85} 1557592 NorthgateMin3.72 3.46 3.72 *
BE Aero 1424 27.69 2616 27.21 +.56 : Hilton 4418 34.82 33.86 34.43 +.19| MobileTel 1762 49.80 47.37 47.38 -2.54| Ritenid 8019 559 544 557 +.08| 3108171 BarrickGold 34.67 33.97 34.58 -42] 2705957 NuvoResearch 67 63.65 +.01
BEA Sys if 11323 12.99 12.73 12.87 -.05|DCTIndIn 1533 -11.63 11.40 11.50 -10| HomeDp 21482 40.63 39.72 39.79 -.78| MoneyGrm 1226 30.90 29.74 29,74 -1.44 RockwlAut 1432 60.15 59.32 59,80 -.35 | 5859711 BemaGldo 5.77 5.56 5.75 +.07 | 2359569 PaladinOrdo 7.77 7.45 7.73 +.08
BHP Bilt 4349 37.69 36.88 37.16 5B} DUIADiam 9078 124.50 123.52 123.74 -.94] Honwllinth 3016 45.11 44.29 44,65 -43] Monsanto's 3542 51.37 50.00 51.22 +43 possstrs 1808 31.91 31,00 3141 +201 2526951 BlovallCorp 2549 24.75 25.17 -.18 | ose7gei RasonSysterns1?.96-39.25- 12.66 422
BISYSIf ©1577, 12.71 12.28 12.35 -.35| DPL 1153 27.66 27.37 27.57 -.15| Hospira 1305 34.00 33.70 3385 -11|MonstrWw 1175 47.44 46.58 46.81 -.30 | Rowan 4038 3082 2997 3048 +04 5 aaa ag ao06Fe25 : :
BiSwcs B17 27.03 2630 26.17 +07 | DRHorton 2935 26.25 25.69 25.84 14 HostHotls 1573 24.50 23.88 23.97 53 | Morgstan 4413 81.59 80.36 80.86 -L05} pce prt, 1572 2418 2397 2404 0B| errors oh NeoaaIneccn ana may aap | 1130088 PennWestun33.92 3232 33.79 +.84
BJs Whis 1618 30.18 29.61 29.72 -.83)DRDGOLD 4142 82 75 78 -.03 | HotTopic 1499 11.22 10.83 10.95 -.28| Motorola 162277 19.25 18.00 18,94 -1.61 RylCarb 1108 43.76 4275 4337 43 | 120242 BluePeariMng9.50 9.13 9.47 +12) 2641021 PetroCanadad4.68 43.90 44.54 +42
BMCSft 2299 35.25 34.57 34.92 -.15 DTE 1096 48,70 47.36 47.67 1.10} HovnanE 1015 31.86 31.31 Ji.41 -.39 | MovieGal 1863 3.19296 300-12! Rovnchiia 20606753 GE 6739 1.26 | D569102 BombdrBSV 4.18 4.03 4.06 ~10] 3147091 Railpowero 138 116 128 ~07
BP PLC 3184 65:05 6426 6487 ~14| Danaher 1456 71.75 TOA 71.05 80] HudsCity 4089 14.02 13.92 13,96 09] MurphO 1279 48.50 47.59 48.19 +.20 | RUAIA tome OFA, SEBS TM “L2G | 96337 BreakwaterResl.67 1.61 1.65 ~03] ss41579 RogersCommB35,30 3488 35.10 -35
BT Grp 283 62.31 61.50 61.85 -.67 | Darden 2051 39.74 39.02 39.13 -82| HumGen 1050 12.63 12.26 1231 -19|Mylantab 1020 20.44 20.11 20.28 -.08 OD nl) 923862 CAE Inc 1135 1077 1122 +47 ‘
Baidu.com 2485 124.94 121.98 122.50 -3.50 | Deere 2605 92.20 90.23. 90.89 -1.29] Humana 3915 54.54 52.60 52.98 -2.37 1019426 CalpinePwrnl3,04 12.95 13.03 0 | 2182839 Roval Bnk 85.17 $4.25 54.50 -.60
BakrHu 7060 69.00 67.46 67.77 -51|Dellincif 33378 2653 25.76 26.16 -.08| HuntiB 1879 23.13 22.49 22.67 -.48 | Vv i465 4240 4179 42.11.17 /SAPLINKH 1592.09.00 P 4422 43.12 43.70 63 | 1308208 RoyalHostun 6.55 6.42 6.50 +.04
BcoBrades 1900 41.73 39.70 39.99 -1.74 | Denbury 1761 26.64 26.06 26.55 +.49| HuntBnk 2221 24.05 23.70 23.78 -.22| vera, 1997 2944 2840 2847 24 | SAICN 116 1808 1752 1755 -54| 2298478 CamecoCorp44. . 70 631 1349499 SXRUraniumJ15.09 13.86 14.48 +.23
Bncoltau 1965 36.70 34.92 35.40 -1.15 | DevonE 6756 65.73 63.75 65.32 +1.62| HyperSol 1303 34.66 34.08 34.35 -.32 | NET9 44 28.40, 2847-21) oan 'aG 2354 5368 5283 5337 24| 1483450 CampbellRes 12 10.1 -.01 :
BkofAm 10151 5359 5303 53.24 -43|Diadffs 2770 77.88 75.88 727 +128 aes NRGEY 1565 S867 SH43 GAoL cgo|SBACom — 38442791 27.00 27.33 75| 1404293 CdnNatRail 49.68 48.89 48,99 9] {P0257 SHelcanadads’e WT) AA 08
ea Se a ie ah Pa PaT|NILInh 2703 2478 2397 d4id 36 |SIMCp 2998 4996 4918 49.66 +16 | 3022430 CdnNatRes 55.73 53.88 5491 +53] 1855758 Sherrittintl 1197 1149 11.80 +27
BarnesNb If 1035 40.34 39.95 40.05 -.03| Dginsght 1363 38.56 38.50 38.55 +.03| !ACInter = 2306 37.89 37.28 37.53 -.37 ut . . s14 1680134 ShoreGldo 6.23 5.95 6.10 +.07
Bai ICICI Bk 1653 42.50 41.56 41.90 -.26 | NYMEX n 1459 120.54 117.40 118.86 -2.13 | STMIcro 1186 18.59 18.37 18.39 -.32 | 2532341 CdnOilSndsT29.56 28.47 28.89 +.02
rrPhm 1305 52.49 51.01 52.31 +.91 | Digitas 3463 13.40 13.37 13.37 -.01 o x i. 5 02.39 +7.29 | SabaSoft 1095 7.12 632 6.84 +70 1114500 SthAmerGldo .04 04.04 +.01
Barrick 7268 2950 7890 29.50 -13| pilards 1684 3392 33.08 3331-65] INGGRE . 1385 2255 2132 2188-77) NYSEGpn 13314 10295 96.80 102.39 +7.29 | SabaSoft ‘97 31.89 31.94 ~02 | 1662723 Celestia 9.8 9.0) 955-33) no2a144 SuncorEnay 85.41 8338 85.09 41.7
Baxter 3225 47.00 46.45 46.79 -.19| DirecTV 8006 24.77 24.34 24.36 -.37 | ‘ShBrazil ©7842 46.10 43.85 44.47 -1.63) Naborss 7804 28.78 28.11 28.55 +35 | SabreHold == 1995 31.97 31.89 3194-02) >559975 Coalcorpwto 20. 20.202 * gy 85.41) 83.38" 183.094:
BearSt 1347 162.68" 161.55 162.32 -.32 | Disney 10150 34.44 33.99 34.19 -.28| ISHHK 4074, 16.15 15.87 15.87 -.12 | Nasd1OOTr 117339 43.95 43.48 43.85 -.21 Safeway 8626 33.55 33.14 33.23 -.17 1385356 DenisonMinesi0.95 10.50 10.75 -.06 1617720 TD Bank 69.89 69.15 69.24 -.50
Feangpi CORKS POD eee aa acon 15 2353 2397 +467| iShapan 17886" 14.14 13.98 13.98 -.37 | Nasdaq 3703 33.48 31.97 33.10 +1.21 | Stlude 3949 35.71 34.90 35.00 72 195 10.50 10.75 -.06 | sc51906 TallsmanEgy 1833 17.79 18.18 +20
g DivX n 1247 24.15 23.53 23.97
; i iShMex nya 2690 51.48 49.90 50.05. -1.20 | NatlCity 4615 36.57 35.86 35.90 -67 | StPaulTrav 2062 «53.17 52.34 52.41 ~.69 | 1455467 DuluthMetlso 1.04 = .88_— 95. +.07
BebeStrs 2103 17.76 17.07 17.09 -.18| DobsonCm 2603 8.63 838 8.52 -.01 | IShMex ny 48 49.90 50.05 -1. : ‘ : 1852134 TeckComBSV79.35 77.52 77.82. -.72
BectDck. 1451-7022 69.30 70.00 +15 | DollarG 7923 1717 1638 1648 42 | iShSing 2571 11.39 11.26 11.28 ~14|NOilVarco 3837 56.81 55.61 56.35 +.26 | Saks s 3200 18.47 17.93 18.07 +.11] 3438351 EldoradoGld 6.22 5.75 6.07 +.05
BedBath 3035 38.97 3868 3887 +.09 DilrTree 4079 32.78 30.61 32.03 +1.38| iShTaiwan 3824 14.56 14.39 14.41 -.37 | NatSemi 6384 22.45 21.93 22.03 -.69] Salesforce 2902 39.97 37.10 39.52 +1.64 | 3423362 EnCanaCorp 52.99 51.75 52.59 +.51 | 1047763 Telus Corp 54.00 53.36 53.61 +.09
93 471-490 41 "44 8193 8224 120] iSHSP100 cbo 1113 66.04 64.00 65.77 -.45 | Navios 2142 5.32 5.27 530-01] SanDisk 10354 43.34 41.70 43.30 +1.09 1088325 Theratechnigs7.04 6.58 7.04 +33
BemaGold 6410 4.93 4.71 4.90 +.09|DomRes 2757 83.44 1.93 82.24 -1.20] | i : 1506982 EqnoxMnrlso 1.72 1.63 1.71. +05
BenchElec 1134 25.15 24.75 24.89 -.28 | OmRsBW 76 24.15 23.50 23.95 -.15| ShChin2s 4848 110.36 105.34 105.95 -6.35 | Navistar If 1293 35.65 34.73 35.28 +15 | Sanmina 8547. 3.543.433.4409 a oany EirctNickelo 59 55 59 +04 | 2093300 Tiberono 3,59 356 3.57 -01
BestBuy 12777 51.80 49.77 50.00 +.16| DonlleyRR 1124 36.31 35.68 35.87 -.37 | iShSP500 1219 141.60 140.66 140.91 -1.09 | NektarTh 1927 14.85 14.41 14.52 -.33 | Sanofi 2134 46.32 45.50 45.88 -.17 3 5625. 53 6.00 43.35 | 1490888. TransCdaCorp39.90 38.80 39.19 -.90
BigLots 1382 23.57 22.71 23.22. +.08 | DoralFin 6633 2:50 204 2.22 -.24| IShEmMkt 10858 112.65 110.22 110.23 -3,32 | Netflix 2158 25,34 24.45 24.81 -.54 | Sarat 3659 16.89 16.74 16.84 +.01 | 1615085 FirstQntumo 56.25 53.65 5 3
Bingentdc 2213 5033 4951 49.76 +.01 DowChm 4975 40.00 39.61 39.71 -.39| ISH EAFE 8736 72.79 72.10 72,20 -1.12 | NetwkAp 3958 39.65 38.76 39.07 -.50 | SavientPh 897 11.89 11.45 11.66 -.09 |5314973 Goldcorpinc 30.74 30.00 30.19 -.98 | 1146915 TrueEnergyUn6.83 6.50 6.66 -.09
BioMarin 1587 16.57 16.33 16.51 -.04] DressBns 1180 23.92 2259 2262 -1.37 iShNqBio 1061 79.02 78.28 78.85 +.01'| NeurMtrx 1358 13.83 11.94 12.12 -1.81 | Schergpl 4912 23.70 23.21 23.40 -.32 | 1855533 HudBayMnrlso20.71 20,03 20.69 +.16 | 2958754 UTSEngyCorp4.17 4.10 4.15 7
Biomet 2913 41.69 4148 41.59 +03) DrilQuips 1079 35.24 34.31 34.87 +30) /SRIAV nya 1762 82.08 BIT 81.54 -.65| Neurochg 1245 18.11 16.00 16.50 -1.73 | schimbs 10185 60.07 59.10 59.20 -10 | 1916387 IGMFinancial47.44 45.55 45.97 -1.13] 1372136 WiLaninc 5.65 481 5.53 +63
Seba Tees Pat «PEE Sha beater Re ate ene ee RRNA CALE Seti tees EARS CARTNCEAIEE: OAD ANAES ALLY oe cs Sag eet 2601.39 [541481 ISharesCDNG072.66 72.04 72.30 40] 1013490 XillixTech 07.06.06 ~.01
SNDebiStis 488. FAO 738 2-7 AUT 0B Deter boas eek eat sltle ott) ispakv nya 2553 8012 7859 7872 -164|NYCmtyB 1847 1627 1615 1624 03 sean 1636 1457 1435. 1453 12 | 1484866 lamgoldCorp 9.77 9.50 9,66 -.13| 4723615 YamanaGldo 13,70 13,33 13.53 -.42
BIMunyNYI 42.13.63 13.56 13.63 +.02 Rize ISRAKG nya 2395 78.49 77.24 77.24 -1.64) NY Times 3567 24.16 23.34 24.03 +.69 | Searsidgs 1709 167.78 165.05 166.04 -.96 | 1088488 ImperialOil 40.21 39.07 39.30 -.93 | 1713749 YellowPgsUn13.00 12.77 13.00 +.10
BlockHR = 1112 73.28 22.87 22.95 -33 | ERR Mt he EE ee ee ae ee, Ge fetee Me aiade ogee ae £03) Semin 16682 34.05 3361 3385-34] 1261031 InmetMng 52.13 50.85 51.75 +.98 | 1293139 ZarlinkSemi 275 2.71 2.72 -.04
K 3 ; =, e 5 . 5 “ 5 5 .99 -1, * 5 27 55.08 5519 1.08 | oannrsonratnncn tee seach panndstnnicaioia
Bate caer. aR aa ole Sone eBay TMS HLS 3055 3078 -BL/IsnsPSmi_ 19M G4 GAY 2-73) NewmiM” TI 3.09 ARB A865 35 Se Tee eno: coabl eLBO 454 DIVIDENDS ©
i EGL Inc 7.92 37.50 37.57 -.46] ITTCorps 1563 58.05 56.79 57.68 +.79| NewsCp 46 2114 21. . :
Bovdom, 1480 4693 Agus Aeaz tor {EMCCp 24383 13.75 1342 1361 +08| tcagen” 1296150 107 L40 +26 | NewsCpB 54292229 2211 2222 +06 4 |gem eee cer gery ine
Brandyw 1087 32.52 31.95 32.08 -.4g | E0G Res 6477 63.00 60.90 62.68 +1.98| ITWs 2292 46.28 45.68 46,00 -.17 | NexCen 1191 8.50 7.84 8.34 +37 ShawGi 1059 32.70 31.63 31.88 -82 FRIDAY DIVIDENDS DECLARED REGULAR
mace, 12 Gi Sbt Gap ip/GMk 2 LES in MIL el a) teem sla a ee re SL AR cantons OAS RT
it p b f 63 -.22 | Imclone , 5 -12 Isource , 5 f _ riod rate record able ‘
CT ee ee a | ccoab 1333 44.22 43.76 43.96 +01] Immucrs 1653 32.38 31.52 31.96 -.39 | NikeB 1828 99-41 97-70 98.83 +.16| SiderNac 1354 29.15 28.04 28.76 62 IRREGULAR ae Laidlaw Int'l Q 7 be
Brinkers 1533 30.54 29.84 30.30 +.38 H SierrPac 928 17.05 16.56 16.64 -43
BrMySq 7949 26.73 26.05 26.18 -.51 | Edisonint 2307 «44.98 43.75 43.98 -.94| ImunoGn 56 5.05 «4,90 4,95 -.09 ante at Ce 70.42) 71.44 +67 SigmaDg if 1268 2447 2340 23.59 74 Fairfax FnelHidgs . 275 125 2-8 6Movado Group Q .06 1-17 1-31
Brdcomsif 21161 3280 3197 3250 -107|ElPasoCp 5756 14.74 1450 14.57 -.06| ImpacMtg 1101 8.82 8.69 8.78 +12 | NobleEn 408 48.05 46.62 47.78 +.68 772 3800 41 | Sabine Royalty Tr 2838 1-16 1-30 Nisource inc 3h B20
Bredecm 8917 840 804 836 +26 | Elan 4014 14.07 13.61 13.68 -.39| Indusinth 3321. «3.83 «3.76 «3.81 -+.05| NokiaCp 33496 19.97 19.69 19.84 -1.08 | SlgmAls WM 38.75 37.7 7 AL INCREASED Q
BroncoDrl 1242 15.38 1454 1456-64 | EldorGldg — 1620 5.30 4.76 5.16 4.05} Infineon 1274 14.07 13.86 1395 -.25] Nordstrm 2658 $2.26 51.15 51.28 -98 seed 13 a a a on Compass Diversif T3018 1.24 Northwest NaturalGas Q 355 1312-15
Br. LAN «dt ae dae Te Fecits 5158 5363 528 5307 ad Iason's i018 573 ead B49 a2 Norte fs wu 2580 2546 355 3 Slenware 1502771 728 746-22 INITIAL Otient-Express Hotels Q .025 1-19-25
eta LoL Zi 5s | ie 3790 27.23 26.63 26.68 -.34| Infosys , 1472 5550 54.64 5514-26 | Norirst 1575 61.35 59.95 59.97 -.80| SilvStdg 1466 28.90 27.60 2857 -.71 Due Bret Ce Q a zi at Pacific Cap Bncp = 22 2B DB
Emdeon 4154 12.67 12.50 12.60 +.03] IngerRd 2385 39.62 39.00 39.39 +.64 | NthfldLb 1607 4.42 4.02 4,03 -.36 | SilvWhtng 3248 9.44 9,06 9.43.17 SpectraEnergyCp Q_ . “WS TSR Inc Q 08 «2225
CA Inc 3739 24.51 23.78 24.04 ~.07 | EmersnEls 1839 43.72 43.18 43.48 -.38| InputOut 1089 12.80 12.45 12.64 +.05] NthgtMg 5255 3.17 2.95 3.10 -07|Smplich 1551 12.62 11.77 11.96 -.68 ys) CORRECTION wertadveetes Q 0375 118 Lt
CBRElliss: 1369 33.60 32.80 33.10 -.24| EnCana 4466 45.18 44.00 44.87 +.71| IntgDv 3007 15.59 15.28 15.51 -.15| Northrop} 1473 67.55 66.23 67.28 +.33| Sina 1658 31.46 30.70 31.09 +03} CBRichardéllisGrp x .125 1-16 sists Goaceaannde
CBRLGrp 1032 45.50 45.00 45.07 -.39|EncysiveP 2747 4.10. 3.88 4.04 +.11| Intel 62345 21.15 20.76 21.10 -.07 | Novartis 1950 59.48 58.92 59.25 +.27| Siriuss 49444 «3.85 «3.70 3.80 +03 x- Co did not declare this dividend, g- payable in Canadian fun


TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7E

Baptist Sports Council to



hold AGM ahead of season

Plans for coming
year to be outlined

THE Baptist Sports Council
earing up for another great
ear.

_ But before it gets started,
the executive board will host
its annual general meeting on
Saturday at the Bahamas Bap-
tist College, Jean Street, when

is 2

o
c

“<

they hope to bring all of the ©

participating churches and
those wishing to participate to
be updated on its plans.

At the AGM, which starts
at 10am director Brent Stubbs
will give his address and trea-
surer Olympia Morris will pro-
vide a financial report.

It is expected that the Rev.
Everette Brown, the youth
minister for the Bahamas
National Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention,
and the Rev. Derick Munroe,
president of the Baptist
Young People's Fellowship,
will bring remarks.

sabes ene eb eee eeeeneeaen bed



During the AGM, Stubbs
will also outline the plans for
the new year, including the
Rev. Clinton Minnis Family
Fun Run/Walk Race that will
kick off the new year's sport-
ing calendar on Saturday, Jan-
uary 27, and the Rev. Tyrone

Knowles Basketball Classic .

that starts on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 3.

Application forms for the
road race and registration for
the basketball classic will take
place at the same time. A $5
fee for all participants in the
road race and $100.00 per

Falcons put
brakes on

Machines

PRINCE Williams Falcons in
action against St Augustine’s Col-
lege Big Red Machines yesterday.

The Falcons never looked back
after opening up a 26 point lead in
the first quarter and eventually
closed the game with a score of 73-

42.
e SEE STORY

ON SPORTS FRONT

(Photos: Tim Clarke)





teenee Lek eedecdedeedbb anes bb edd assed eases en edd sede aceneeneasededbedeasesssenasenswenar ns es hen gene

team plus $5 per player in bas-
ketball will be charged.

As was the case last year
when the BSC honoured some
of the persons who made
invaluable contributions to the
league since its re-vilalisation
in 2000 - Rey. Harrison
Thompson, Minister Dereck
Munroe, Deaconess Joanne
Webb and Minister Clinton
Minnis - Stubbs said they
intend to continue in that vain
this year.

However, he said the focus
will be placed on some of the
past executives, who con-



tributed to the growth and
development of the league pri-
or to 2000.

While he revealed that the
road race will be named in
honour of Minnis (the imme-
diate past youth director, who
helped to re-established the
BSC in 2000) and basketball
in honour of Knowles; they
also intend to honour Bradley
Moxey in cycling; Rev. Hart-
man Nixon in volleyball; Rev.
George Bodie in track and
field and Deacon Lennox
Greene in softball.

Stubbs said its important
that they take the time out to
give these men and women
their just rewards while they
are alive because it not only
lets them and their family
know that they appreciate the
contribution that they made,
but it also provides those per-
sons who participate with a

NAR bE RHONA NADA OOO ES AMANO AREER EEA RA ADEN BORG RO eA EER EE EEE E RHEE ECR Ey

better appreciation of those
who paved the way.

While 2006 was another suc-
cessful year, Stubbs said they
are hoping to double the size
of the teams and ultimately
the number of participants in
all of their disciplines this year.

He publicly thanked his cur-
rent executive board, com-
prising of assistant director
Joyce Minis, secretary Nicola
Major, treasurer Olympia
Mossi, special projects officer
Renee ‘Sunshine' Sweeting
and softball commissioner
Frank 'Pancho' Rahming.

_ Special commendation was
-also given to Van Hutchinson,
who headed the basketball
officiating; BACO for their
- officiating of the road race;
Crystal Forbes and Tom 'the

Bird' Grant Sr and Jr in vol-:

leyball and Carlton ‘Carlie’
Ingraham, who headed the

de senabeneeee bedeeeeeeeb este enebenaes bebeb bee eteeeuee beebeseeeenee

abe eadeaeennsaeaaes

officiating team in softball, as

well as Arthur Pritchard for
the upkeep of the softball
field.

Stubbs said he hopes that

-others will see the need to

come along and join the exec-
utive board to help make the
BSC the most vibrant recre-
ational sporting league in the
country. Those interested can
attend the meeting on Satur-
day and fill those vacant exec-
utive positions.

Outside of the school sys-
tem, the BSC is the only
organisation in the country
that provides a full compli-
ment of sporting activities for
all ages throughout the year.
The programme runs from the
end of January to the end of
November with sporting activ-
ities held every Saturday
between the hours of 10am
and 4pm.

bbb beeeeeee rerrrrrry Paeben neh eeebsebseeaenabedoees








a
| vm lovin’ it. |

| } | } ' \ \ ia
; \ , . | fy ae ine

HIGH of) TE TAPER IN Gin

<< m | The Miami Hera

BAHAMAS EDITION ! ane:

“Sie
i)

== Lhe Tribune















Volume: 103 No.40

Bahamas banker's
group to acquire
Film Studios

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION







UESDAY, JANUARY9,2007.. ae



Cruise ship
mb scare

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

TOURISM | stakeholders
across the country breathed a
sigh of relief yesterday after
learning that reports of military-
grade explosives being found
aboard a Nassau-bound cruise
ship were false.

US authorities were on high
alert after Miami-Dade police
infercepted a bag believed to
contain the plastic explosive C4
as it was about to be placed
onboard the vessel.

The Royal Caribbean’s
Majesty of the Seas was docked
at Terminal H at the port of Mia-
mi when officials were alerted
about the suspicious package.

The package was tested six
times, and each time it registered
positive for C4 —a common form
of plastic explosives.

Because of how easy it is to
use the compound, and its result-
ing destructive power, C4 has
gained notoriety with terrorists
_ and guerilla fighters the world
over.

However, after exploding the



package, bomb experts discov-
ered that it was not explosives
that were inside the package, but
sprinkler equipment,

Reportedly, there was a com-
pound in the sprinkler equip-
ment, similar to that used in the
production of plastic explosives,
which confused the port’s scan-
ning equipment.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Port Comptroller Cap-
tain Anthony Allens said that
such searches are a testament to
the rigid screening that Interna-
tional Ship and Port (ISP) facili-
ties must adhere to, This, he said,
is in keeping with the security
code implemented by the Inter-

national Maritime Organization *

(IMO) in 2004,

He also advised that the
Bahamas also has its own screen-
ing equipment to check packages
such as this, and that the port has
its own set of strategic plans in
place for such eventualities,

“That is what the ISP code
calls for, that every port facility

SEE page 10

Police declare ‘zero tolerance’
on illegal numbers games

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ CONDEMNING gambling houses as the origin of such crimes as
murder and coercion, police yesterday declared “zero tolerance” on ille-
‘gal numbers games,

Assistant Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson, officer in-
charge of crime, speaking at the annual Meet the Press event, said that
capital offences often have their genesis in numbers rackets.

“There was a time, not so long ago when a day’s work was expected
for a day’s pay. Not so anymore. Too many of us want to gamble our
way to success by playing games of chance and living on the proceeds
thereof,” he said addressing the media at the new comstat room at
police headquarters.

SEE page 10






























DEAR (|
A14" Brookiys Style Pizza; stretched
thin ond cut into 6 big slices. It's got extra large,
pepperoni or sausage toppings, perfect for
folding. You've got to fold a slice this big.

Try it today!

swf REE

2-liter CocaCola | ae
with the purchase ~4.(99"
of every ae
Brooklyn Style Pizza's

(ra FTL)











Reported cases
of incest double

W By PAUL TURNQUEST

‘ Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE have revealed that
reported cases of incest have

ep Ris rnc)

@ THE released man

had been foundwith a

shot gun, and "skimask"

and 13 live rounds of

7 ammunition,

(Photo; Ana-Bianca
Marin)

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE man suspected of
armed-robbery and who
police thought could be a
possible link into the crimi-
nal activity that continues
to plague the Farm Road
community was released
from police custody. He is
no longer under suspicion.
The 28-year-old resident
of Flamingo Gardens, who
was found in the Flint
Street area — where the
two deadly shootings took
place in the past weeks —
harbouring a shot gun, a
"ski mask" and 13 live
rounds of ammunition, by
officers from Operation
Quiet Storm, was taken into
police custody and regarded
as a criminal, despite evi-
dence to the contrary,
After being released the |
man visited The Tribune to
give "his side of the story",

SEE page 10


























,-

Reported
complaints
against police
up by 12%

m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

REPORTED complaints
against the police during the
year 2006 showed a 12 per
cent increase compared to
complaints made in 2005, says
Supt Franklyn Dames.

Supt Dames was address-
ing the media on statistics of
the Complaints and Corrup-
tion Branch for 2006 in the
police's annual report to the
press,

"During the year 2006,
there were a total of 283 com-
plaints made against the
police, compared to 253 dur-”
ing the year 2005, which was

SEE page 10













}
;
i
i
;
:

3
}
}





increased by more than 100 per
cent in 2006 over the 2005 fig-
ures.

According to force’s prelimi-
nary report on crime, this sig-
nificant increase was predomi-
nantly inflicted upon children
averaging no more than 13
years of age. ,

The average age of their
assailants, the report revealed,
was 29,

“It is important to note that
fathers are the leading suspects
in incest matters, accounting for
13 (or 57 per cent), This is fol-
lowed by brothers, uncles, and
cousins with five, three, and two

reported matters respectively,” —

the report revealed.

The Carmichael and Central
Divisions have the highest
reports of incest, with four each.

‘Grand Bahama followed with:

three cases, which tied with the

South-eastern Division.

“The.occurrence of incest in
the Bahamian community has
significantly increased. During
2006, 23 matters were reported
as compared to 11 matters in
2005, and a 92 per cent increase
from the 12 matters in 2004.

“Alternatively, reports of
unnatural sex have decreased
42 per cent from 12 in 2005 to
seven in 2006. The detection
rate for incest matters also show
an increase with seven (58 per
cent) in 2004, nine (82 per cent)
in 2005, and 91 per cent in 2006
representing 21 cases,” the
report stated.

Also, there were three vic-
tims who were involved in mul-
tiple sexual offence matters.
Similarly three suspects were in
multiple sexual offences,

SEE page 10

Increase of 619 traffic
accidents in 2006

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter:





DRIVERS became increasingly impatient, discourteous, and less
friendly towards each other in 2006, with the result that there was an
overall increase of 619 traffic accidents in the Bahamas compared
with the previou. year, said police yesterday,

This came despite a concerted effort on. behalf of the police that year
to educate the public about road safety, it was admitted.

However, there was a silver lining to this cloud, as despite the over-
all hike in traffic accidents, the number of fatal incidents diminished,

Among the unfortunate deaths that were recorded, men died ata
higher rate than women in all categories, whether as drivers, pedestrians
or passengers — in line with traditional expectations,

19-year-old is
beaten to death

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport

Reporter

FREEPORT - The sisters of
Felix Mitchell are in shock over
the “senseless” murder of their
brother who was beaten to
death less than 50 yards away
from his home, Mitchell’s death
is Grand Bahama’s first mur-
der for the year,

According to family mem-

bers, Felix,, 19, the third



youngest of 20 children, had @ FELIX MITCHELL
made plans to go into West End

on Sunday evening. He was

awaiting his ride at a corner out- SEE page 10



F idelity Free Financial Planning

(or: | | i coker: Naame DE IDELITY |

Nassau: T 356.7764 @ Freeport



\\
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5B



Tourism arrivals fall

8.5 per cent in Q3_

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



TOURISM arrivals to the Bahamas
declined by 8.5 per cent to 1.04 million
during the 2006 third quarter, reversing
the previous year’s growth of 3.5 per cent,
with big declines experienced in New Prov-
idence and Grand Bahama.

The Central Bank of the Bahamas’
review of third quarter economic activity
found that air traffic in the three months to
September 30, 2006, dropped by 7 per cent
to 333,737, as opposed to a 12.8 per cent

gain in 2005.

a During the same period, sea arrivals,
-’ which accounted for 67.8 per cent of visi-
tors, fell by 9.2 per cent to 702,789.

The Central Bank said New Providence
received 60.3 of the third quarter’s arrivals,
_ but saw the total number drop by 9.4 per

cent due to 7.1 per cent and 10.7 per cent
declines in air and sea arrivals respective-
ly.

, Grand Bahama saw a 24.5 per cent fall in
visitor arrivals, with air and sea arrivals
off 9.5 per cent and 30.5 per cent respec-
tively. Due to increased cruise arrivals, the
Family Islands, though, saw.a 2.9 per cent
rebound.

’ The data is likely to revive concern that
the Bahamas is losing its competitive edge
and attraction for visitors, both higher
spending stopovers and cruise passengers.
However, fears of hurricanes are likely to
have prevented many from travelling dur-
ing the third quarter.

Also showing declines was the fisheries
sector, with export volumes down by 35
per cent during the third quarter to one
million pounds.

As a result, the industry’s earnings fell by

41.1 per cent to $16.8 million compared to
the same period in 2005.

The Central Bank said: “Crawfish export
receipts, which accounted for 97 per cent of
total sales, slackened by 40.9 per cent to
$16.3 million, with a 33.9 per cent drop in
volume.

“A similar pattern was observed for the
first nine months of 2006, as fisheries
export volumes decreased by 28.3 per cent
to 2.8 million pounds, while receipts were
reduced by 31.7 per cent to $41.5 million.”

Data from banks, insurance companies
and the Bahamas Mortgage Corporation
showed that the total value of mortgage

loans made during the 2006 third quarter .

rose by 11.3 per cent to $179.5 million,
compared to the previous year, boosting
the construction industry.

Most of this total was for residential
housing, which saw total loans rise by 15.4

Government NHI secrecy ‘is alarming’

FROM page 1B

released into the public domain.

These claims, it added, caused
“the truth of the limited actu-
arial review [to be] stretched
past the breaking point”.

The Tribune had previously
reported that the [LO itself
acknowledged the report was
of “fairly limited scope”. The
report reiterated a number of
concerns previously expressed
by Bahamian private sector
and medical groups over NHI’s
financing, costs and adminis-
tration, something that the
employers’ organisation picke¢
up on in its latest news bu-
letin.

BECon said: “The levelof
secrecy in Government Is
alarming. It is unconscion*ble
that Government has yd to
release all of the releant
reports and facts on the pro-
posed National Health nsur-
ance scheme to the Bajamian

-_ public.

* Although these repeats have
not been released;Goernment
is using them for prgaganda
purposes as we can s¢.from the
example of the ILO 2port. The
misinformation beng dished
out are half-truth and erro-
neous statements,which bring
to mind the quotdrom Austin
O'Malley: "Thos who think it

For thestories
ern rom ul
new;, read

eke ]p) me)
Mcndays.










Win §







‘Top ten finalists will be notified by January 19 via email.
Finalists will present cheir essays before a panct of judges Saturday, February 24, 2007, at the
Sunshine Insurance headquarters on Shirley Surect.

is permissible to tell white lies
soon grow colour-blind." It is
frightening, isn't it?” :

BECon noted that the ILO
said its report was confined to
an analytical and technical
review of the studies performed
by the Government, particular-
ly in calculating the contribu-
tion rates.

The ILO noted that further
work was needed, and con-
firmed previous warnings on the
plan’s costs, finding that the 5.3
per cent contribution rate will
in future have to “significantly”
increase to cope with the extra
medical demands of an ageing
population.

BECon said: “This statement
confirms the conclusion of
Nadeem Esmail of the Fraser

Institute, on page 11 of his
report commissioned by the
Nassau Institute, which is avail-
able on BECon's website,
where he states that: ‘The
Bahamas' current health care
programme is more costly than
those found in any other devel-
oped nation except for the US,
once the relatively small pro-
portion of Bahamians over age
65 is accounted for’.”

BECon also. pointed out that
the ILO report was only
released by the Government
once it became clear that the
document was likely to come
into the public domain.

This was a result of BECon’s
pressure, and the fact that it is
recognised as the voice of the
employer for the Bahamas.

Rent/Lease
Small Offshore Company

urgently requires
office space to rent/lease
in downtown area. approx

1,000 square feet.

Telephone: 323-7460/2



2)06 EC SIFE @ Sunshine Insurance

SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION |

How would YOU ahi ,
boost the Bahami N
post the en ®

Essay Contest Rules:
@ Explain how you would improve the Bahamian economy

@ Competition open to all High School sophomores, juniots and seniors
@ Essays should be 500-1000 words
®@ Essays should he double-spaced

@ Submissions will be accepted via email at kawwoodO7@elmira.edu

Deadline: Monday, January 15, 2007

Please include your name, home address, telephone number and personal email. address with your exsay submission.

Elinira College will hold an Open House at the Sunshine Insurance healquarcers during the
comperition for all interested in studying at the College.

For more information, please contact:

Fran Wilson, Dicector of Serwhine Insurance, 242-394-0013
Mike Ragers, Assistant to the President, Horira College, O04- 735-1804

Elmira College Seudents In Free Enterprise (EC SIFE} create sustainable positive change by impenviag businesses
and organizations through teaching and practicing the principles of free enterprise,

) towards an Elmira College education



<

—

LE

4

























per cent to $165.6 million, while commer-
cial real estate loans dropped by 21.9 per
cent to $13.9 million.

Mortgage. commitments for new con-
struction and repairs,.though, an indicator
of forward-looking activity, fell by 36.9 per .
cent to 335, while their value also fell to
$39.4 million.

Residential loan approvals declined in
number by 36.5 per cent to 323, with their
value dropping by a similar percentage to
$35.9 million.

Total outstanding mortgages increased
by 18.3 per cent to $2.432 billion. .

During the 2006 third quarter, domestic
credit grew by 3.6 per cent to $6.525 billion,
with private sector credit rising by 4.4 per
cent. Residential mortgages, personal over-
drafts and consumer credit grew by 4.7 per
cent, 6.6 per cent and 3.9 per cent respec-
tively.

and share your story.



PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR -
SENIOR ASSOCIATES



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,

campaigning for

improvements in the
area or have won an
award. f
If so, call us on 322-1986 |




PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer

literate.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
others area of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high

and provident fund benefits.

performance. In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:



Qualifications:

Human Resources Partner

PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANE

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager

Bahamas

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).

Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.
Sound experience in global capital markets
Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development

processes.

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual

stock picks

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience
Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgroynds.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux @ FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thnks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

LNG regulations :

Legal Notice

NOTICE |

HARIMAU RISINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of HARIMAU RISINGS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EVIMAR HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
EVIMAR HOLDINGS’ LIMITED has _ been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
* (Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DEDRIE ALPS INC.

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DEDRIE ALPS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FLORISSA HILL
INVESTMENTS LID.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
| Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
FLORISSA HILL INVESTMENTS LID. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

«

ST. JOSEPH INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
| Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
ST. JOSEPH INVESTMENTS LID. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MISTY SKY INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution. of MISTY SKY INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.

—ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

DRIVEN POWER LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
DRIVEN POWER LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

JUMPSTART REWARDS INC.

—o—

given that in accordance with
of the International Business
Companies 2000, the dissolution of
JUMPSTART REWARDS INC. has __ been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

Notice
Section

is hereby
138 (8)
Act

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WIMPOLE LID.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of WIMPOLE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRUFFLEY |
INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution —of
TRUFFLEY INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued |

and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE TRIBUNE



completed by
February end

FROM page 1B

construction in either nation
until all approvals are in from
both jurisdictions.

“When Ocean Express first
requested an extension of time,
it anticipated that Bahamian
approval of, the non-jurisdic-
tional facilities would soon be
forthcoming,” AES pleaded to
FERC.

“As a result of unexpected
delays, however, including the
time required for the develop-
ment and issuance of regula-
tions to govern the operation,
construction and decommis-
sioning phases of Bahamian
LNG facilities, formal Bahami-
an approval has not been issued.

“Ocean Express understands

Armed robberies of businesses

that the Bahamian government
is now undertaking a final
review of the regulations to gov-
ern LNG facilities, and that this
process will soon be complete.”

Denying AES’s motion to
extend the project completion
deadline would, the company
said, “cause Ocean Express to
lose millions already invested
and deprive gas and electric cus-

tomers in the southeastern '

Florida area of much needed
access to additional supplies of
competitively priced gas”. -

ve

r 2 @

e

eo.
.

The AES LNG terminal on :

Ocean Cay would re-gas LNG

brought by ship to the island in ©

liquid form. A 95-mile pipeline
would then take some 842,000

dekatherms of LNG to Florida *)*.-_’

a

per day, where it will supply the elit

state’s electricity needs.

fall 38 per cent during 2006

FROM page 1B

taken was valued at an estimat-
ed $313,876.

CDU officials said it would
be vital to improve their intelli-
gence and capabilities, intensify
their presence in robbery hot
spots, and increase the targeting

of serious and serial offenders “

to reduce armed robberies.

The police also reported that.

in 2006, shop break-ins
increased by 4 per cent. CDU
records indicated that there
were 1,377 break-ins, with the
preferred items of choice for

thieves being DVD players, ..”

computers and jewellery.

Legal Ndice
NOTICE
MAWAR INVESIVIENT LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as folows:

(a) MAWAR INVESTMENT LT). is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisiot; of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Cmpanies Act 2000.

2
t

The, dissolution of the said compny commenced

on the 4th January, 2007 when thcArticles of
Dissolution were submitted to andegistered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said companys; Dizame
Consulting S.A., Pasea Estate, Roacfown,

Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 9th day of January, A.D. 2007

Dizame Consulting S.A.
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

GARDINER LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sction
138 (8) of the International Business Companie Act
2000, the dissolution of GARDINER LID. his been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has beenissued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Rgister.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FOREA HOLDINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance vith
Section 138 (8) of the International Busiess
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
FOREA HOLDINGS LTD. has been completeg a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

tte wow mw oe


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7B



ae an ee eee
Kerzner closing in on
Hurricane Hole plaza

FROM page 1B

Ed Fields, vice-president of
public affairs for Kerzner
international (Bahamas), said
in an e-mailed response to The
Tribune’s inquiries: “On the
matter of Hurricane Hole, we
have no comment at this time.”

This indicates that while no
agreement may have been
sealed, something is likely to be
in the works. Mr Fields did not
flat-out deny the reports of
Kerzner International’s inter-
est in the plaza, indicating that
the two parties may have
reached an agreement in prin-
ciple and are close to complet-
ing negotiations, although noth-
ing is set in stone yet.

Several'retailers based in the
plaza have expressed concerns

to The. Tribune over whether:

they would fit in with Kerzner
International’s plans for the
location, and whether the
Atlantis and;One & Only
Ocean Club owner would make
it uneconomic for them to
remain in the'plaza by increas-
ing rental rates.

A Kerzner International
acquisition of the Hurricane
Hole. Shopping Plaza would
make logical and strategic sense
for the company, though.

The plaza is one of the few
remaining plots of land between
Atlantis and the Hurricane
Hole Marina that it does not

own. Club Land’Or, One Mari-
na Drive and the Paradise
Island Ferry Terminal are also
owned separately.

‘Kerzner International
acquired the Hurricane Hole
Marina, the nearby condomini-
ums and 11 acres of surrounding
land for $23 million in June
2005, giving it control of all the
‘main waterborne access points
to Paradise Island.

The marina was purchased
from Driftwood and its finan-
cial backer, Lehman Brothers’
private equity arm, but the Hur-
ricane Hole Shopping Plaza’s
ownership was different,
Among its owners is believed
to be Emanuel Alexiou, an
attorney and principal in A.F.
Holdings, owner of the Colina
group of companies.

Kerzner International is
understood to have long been
interested in the Hurricane
Hole Shopping Plaza, and its
acquisition would enable it to
be redeveloped to fit in with the
company’s plans to redevelop
the marina and surrounding
area.

Among the retailers current-
ly operating in the plaza are the
News Cafe, an Italian restau-
rant that shares the News cafe’s
ownership, a Solomon’s Mines
outlet, two food stores, another
restaurant and a mix of outlets
catering to tourists. Several
have expressed concerns about
whether they will have to vacate
the plaza.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ANGSANA INVESTMENT LTD.

| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ANGSANA INVESTMENT LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under'the provisions of Section’137-(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 4th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Dizame
Consulting S.A., Pasea Estate, Road Town,

Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 9th day of January, A.D. 2007

Dizame Consulting S.A.
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MORETON VISTA
INVESMENTS LTD.

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

| Section : 138 (8) of

the

International Business

| Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of MORETON
| VISTA INVESMENTS LTD. has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the

‘Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HORIZON INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act

2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on January
8,2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of
2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Kerzner International is plan-
ning to redevelop the Hurri-
cane Hole Marina in partner-
ship with New York-based
Island Global Yachting once
government approvals are
obtained, the latter’s chairman
and chief executive, Andrew
Farkas, told The Tribune last
month. This newspaper has
been told that a June 2007 start

’ date for the marina is being

eyed.

Meanwhile, Canadian tele-
coms provider Nortel Net-
works said yesterday that
Kerzner International had
selected it to provide in-house
telecoms services for guests at
the Cove Atlantis, the 600-
room all-suite hotel due to
open in March 2007 as part of
the Phase III expansion.

Nortel said the Cove would
be equipped with its hospitali-
ty messaging system, provid-
ing guests and staff with access
to instant messaging for mini-
bar management, housekeep-
ing/room service and automat-
ic wake-up.

Each suite in the Cove will
have a minimum of two IP
phones to provide gateways to
information about tours, con-
certs and Atlantis events. The

Nortel facilities will include ©

VoIP, and expand on the IP
network currently installed
within Atlantis and the One &
Only Ocean Club.

The Cove will use Nortel
Contact Centre solutions at an
in-house contact centre, featur-
ing of 40 to 45 Atlantis-
employed agents, supporting
guests' needs for booking
restaurants, tours or casino
tables. Guests will receive real-
time responses through a vari-
ety of communication vehicles
such as IP telephony, while low-

» ering total cost of ownership

> and creating a simplified man-

agement:environment. bel

A ‘Personal Butler’ service
for guests staying at the Cove's
high-end, luxury suites - Pent-
house, Presidential, Sapphire or
Azure Suites - will be able to
message staff through mobile
handsets to receive real-time
service regardless of location
within the resort.

“When completed, The Cove
Atlantis will truly be one of the
most high-tech resorts in the
Caribbean with the latest com-
munications technology specif-
ically designed to support the
resort's business objectives for
delivering an exemplary guest
experience," said Norberto
Milan, vice-president, Enter-
prise Networks, Nortel
Caribbean and Latin America.

“Nortel's care in blending the
new communications capabili-
ties at The Cove with the exist-
ing Atlantis resort ensures the
same level of personalisation,
and service excellence is main-
tained through the entire com-
plex."

"Kerzner International is
known worldwide for provid-
ing excellence in service for our
guests, including advanced tech-
nological solutions to help make

Pricing Information As Of:






Benchmark

Fidelity Bank

Famguard
Finco

Focol

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson






G2wk-Hi 52wk
74.30
10.14




10.00









Re

RAINE
S2wk-H





Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bahk
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
FirstCaribbean

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
mbol

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Bahamas Supermarkets



INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

NOTICE OF VACANCY

2nd chef for The Landing Restaurant, Harbour Island.

‘Applicant must have working knowledge of preparation of

|| “Sydney” cuisine with at least 5 years experience working in

Australian kitchens. Successful applicant will be able to devise

and prepare daily specials. Successful applicant will also be
fully responsible for the preparation of all desserts.



their stay more, comfortable,"
said Rick Garvin, chief infor-
mation officer at Kerzner Inter-
national.

“The Cove will open with
superb service levels, and
through our collaboration with
Nortel, those high service levels
will include streamlining com-
munications for our guests,
allowing us to promote addi-
tional services such as event and
tour booking and real-time
updates on guest room house-
keeping status.









The Landing has 10 year reputation for its fine cuisine with
| a distinctive Australian accent. Applicant must be adaptable,
friendly and professional.




All responses can be sent to:







“Nortel's solutions are also The Landing
helping to lower operational Chef Position
costs by increasing staff pro- P.O. Box 190
ductivity with the ability to stay Harbour Island
in touch on work assignments Bahamas
through mobile communica- Fax: 242-333-2650




tions access wherever they are

in the resort." e-mail: thelanding@ coralwave.com



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,
a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries
and over 100 million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of

GLOBAL FEE |
BILLING UNIT SPECIALIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

In providing fee billing processing support across several global
locations, the candidate will be specifically responsible for the
general administration of fee invoicing, collection, and associated
recovery management. The successful candidate will also be
responsible for payment of any client related expenses, database
management, maintenance of all fee agreements, as well as
document management including filing and imaging of
correspondence. eg ae eee | .

Eel

4 PAETRANTIC

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting,
Finance or similar discipline, combined with a minimum of three
(3) years of Trust related experience in a global institution.

Additionally, he/she must have strong problem-resolution,
communication, organization and pc skills. The ability to work
in a global capacity with flexible working hours to address time
zone related issues and excellent interpersonal skills are also
necessary. Fluency in Spanish, German or French is also required.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

Human Resources

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-1576,

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

Email: betty.roberts @citigroup.com

Deadline for application is Monday, January 12, 2007.



Slain




3.64%]
3.24%
2.63%
3.43%
3.97%
2.40%
2.11%
§.42%|
0.84%
0.00%
4.15%
4.74%
3.53%


























st Price Weekly Vol.
14.00
10.00

0:20













Div $ Yield %

52wk-Low Fund Name
. ‘ : 1.3216 1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund 1.321687
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company 3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G &| Fund —-2.9449""* :
2.6002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.600211"*

are required on or before the 8th day of February, 2007 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.

1.2074 1,.207411****

11.2696

1.1442
spd 9i 0900

Colina Bond Fund
come Fund






* = 29 December 2006

YIELD - last 12 month dividande divided by closing price
Bld $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price ~ Last traded over-the-counter price

Weokly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
NAV - Not Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1094 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
62wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
§2wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks o
Previous Close ~- Previous day's weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume

Change ~ Change In closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**~ 31 December 2008

*** - 30 November 2006

January 8, 2007

“** . 30 November 2006



ALISA RICHARDSON
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

** ~ 30 November 2008



CROR VIGNE



ALE OOLINA:


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

Fraud complaints

Counterfeit

currency
seizures on

increase valu

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE amount of counter-
feit money in Bahamian and
US currency seized by police
increased in 2006.

According to the latest
police statistics, $44,634 was
confiscated last year, mark-
ing a 19 per cent increase
over the $37,582 seized in
2005.

Police said the quality of ©

the counterfeit bills was
poor, which indicated the
vast majority were locally

produced by inexperienced.

persons using inferior tech-
nology.

The value of counterfeit
US bills quadrupled last
year up to $32,736 compared
to $6,886 the year before.

According to financial
investigators, most of these
funds originated out of the
US, Panama and the
Bahamas.

Police attributed the

increase in counterfeit |

seizures to several factors,
particularly the fact that
there has been increased

_ training provided to the

business community by
financial investigators.

Grand Bahama officials
noted there was a decrease
in the amount of Bahamian
counterfeit currency in cir-
culation.

Elsehwhere, the police |

noted that in 2006, seizures |

of counterfeit DVDs and
CDs from roadside vendors
decreased by 62 per cent.

Officers said that in 2005,

5,550 items were seized |
compared to the 2,088 |

seized Jast year.

Police also reported that |

87 persons were victims of ||
ATM fraud as.a result of |

skimming, and more than
$100,0000 was stolen.

@ POLICE Commissioner
Paul Farquharson speaks
yesterday during the annual
press briefing by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

(Photo: Tim Clarke/
Tribune Staff)









» THE TRIBUNE





e rises by $6m

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

ALTHOUGH the volume of fraud
complaints decreased by 47 per cent in
2006, the dollar value involved increased
by more than $6 million, with $5 million of
that coming from a single company.

During the annual press briefing by the |: '

Royal Bahamas Police Force, the Central .
Detective Unit (CDU) revealed that there -
had been 271 fraud complaints reported in
2006, with the dollar value increasing from
the $1.190 million reported in 2005 to
$7.552 million last year.

Police attributed the downturn in com- . ws F
plaint numbers to the fact that four. .”

notable serial offenders had been incar-
cerated.

The four persons now jailed, police said,
were responsible for 8 per cent or 41 of the
total matters reported in 2005.

The report indicated that 2006 saw an
increase in fraud complaints involving gov-
ernment departments, this number rising
by 44 per cent. There were nine matters
reported in 2005, compared to the 13
reported in 2006.

Police said the suspects in these cases
were senior persons placed in positions
of trust, and said the dollar valued believed
to be taken was $360,000.

The police reported that money laun-
dering and other offences, such as the 419
Nigerian Scam, accounted for losses in
excess of $446,360.23

Matters such as stealing by reason of
employment, stealing by reason of ser-
vice, and stealing accounted for an esti-
mated $7.105 million in losses last year.
Police also reported that their detection
rate of these offences had improved by
38. per cent from 2005. i

In 2006, 142 of the 271 fraud matters
reported were detected for a 53 per cent
rate. i

On the island of Grand Bahama, police
reported that they were successful on 45
matters out of a reported total of 98, with
35 being charged in court.

Police on that island reported that there
was also an increase in reports involving
auto salesmen and unscrupulous contrac-
tors who received monies from persons _
to provide services.

| Ae ie AO ae RUC Leia tt
— oe i Te Cee ee
/ pepeakla. a C - _ Ask for them in-store today.

oe

“ia



”

Warning: Tobacco Smoking may cause
Heart Disease or Lung Cancer among other diseases.



a | | ,
TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398



@ TENNIS

KNOWLES/NESTOR
IN SYDNEY

MARK Knowles and
his Canadian doubles
partner Daniel Nestor
are currently playing at
the Medibank Interna-
tional in Sydney, Aus-
tralia.

Knowles and Nestor
are the number two
seeds behind the world’s
top ranked team of
American twin brothers
Bob and Mike Bryan.

Knowles and Nestor
are scheduled to play
their first round match
against the team of Fran-
tisek and Jaroslav from
the Czech Republic. No
date or time was given
for their match.

This is their second
tournament for the year.
They played in Doha,
Qatar last week, losing in
the semifinal. From Syd-
ney, they will travel to
Melbourne for the Aus-
tralian Open, the first
Grand Slam for the year.

The Australian Open is
scheduled to start on
January 15.

@ WALK

MOSS PLACED
THIRD OU
PHILIP Moss contin-
ues to make his presence

felt in walk racing. This
weekend, he took part in
the 60th Bay Harbour

’ Island Road Race in
Miami, Florida.

It was a 5K road race,
but Moss walked the
entire course, finishing
third in his age category -
50-54, in a personal best
time of 22 minutes and
55 seconds.

At age 52, Moss said
his goal is to clock 19
minutes in a SK race and
he feels he will accom-
plish that feat soon as he
continues to walk faster
and faster in every race
he competes in.

He said when the race
was finished and the
~ announcer called his
time, everybody congrat-
ulated him because they
couldn’t believe that he
walked that fast.

@ ROAD RACE

CYNTHIA
‘MOTHER’ PRATT
RACE

ENTHUSIASM is
building up for the 14th
annual Cynthia ‘Mother’
Pratt Fun Run/Walk,
organised by the College
of the Bahamas. The
event is scheduled for
Saturday, starting at 6:30
Astilss

The runners will follow
the tried and trusted
route along Thompson
Boulevard to JF
Kennedy Drive and the
lights at Gladstone Road
and then back to the
Tucker Road entrance of
the College, a distance of
approximately five and a
half miles.

The walkers will turn .
around at JF Kennedy
Drive, thus reducing
their route by about a
mile.

Application forms can
be collected from the
Student Services Office
at the College of the
Bahamas and the regis-
tration fee is $5.00.

Interested individuals
requiring further infor-
mation should call 302-
4525 or 302-4592.

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ST AUGUSTINE’S Col-
lege Big Red Machines were

haunted by Ollen Smith:

when he returned to their
court yesterday.

The former Big Red
Machine joined forces with
Rashard Williams and the
Prince Williams Falcons to
destroy the school’s senior
boy’s team. The Falcons nev-
er looked back after open-
ing up a 26 point lead in the
first quarter and eventually
closed the game with a score
of 73-42.

In the opening four min-
utes of the game, the Smith
and Williams combination
had picked off 15 of the Big
Red Machines’ balls, con-
verting on nine. Thanks to
the 2-2-1 press, the team
placed the Big Red Machines
in quick foul trouble, leav-
ing them no other choice but
to rely on their bench play-
ers...

A huge loss for the Big
Red Machines was Lawrence
Benoit, who had to sit out
two quarters because of foul

‘trouble. With Benoit out of

the game, Williams and
Smith’s job became easier.

Advance

The Big Red Machines had
moved back into a zone
defensive stand, giving the
Falcons an easier road to
advance the ball over the
half court. With no hesita-
tion the Falcons accepted the
gift being offered to them
and made the Big Red
Machines pay.

The team who showed
much dominance in the first
quarter brought the tricks
out of the bag for the fans in
the second. The swift passes
and the flawless ball move-
ments freed up their big
men, who wasted no time in
putting the ball down.

But the Big Red Machines
would find a way to break
the Falcons’ press and score.
The team closed out the sec-
ond quarter with 11 points.

Smith said: “It is always a
pleasure to return to the
court of a former school and
play. Some may look at this
game as a statement, I don’t.
I have a job to do for my
team, they count on me to
play hard all the time so I
owe it to them to do so.

“J am sorry we had to play
my old school and beat them
like we did today, but our
team is on a mission. We are
out to win the title and have
a clean record doing so. This

Kendal Isaacs gym sch

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

WITH the AF Adderley
Gymnasium currently under
renovation, the annual Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic
is being scheduled for the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
next month.

Tournament director Ricar-
do Ferguson said they are
working diligently with the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Housing to host the entire
week-long competition from
February 19-26.

‘The Tribune



is a good team, Rashard and
I are good ball handlers and
we both can shoot. It will be
hard for a team to come in
and beat us, we have a good
coach who is dedicated and
all the players are commit-
ted.

“We know that there will
be schools coming after us
but as long as we continue
to play hard and execute the
plays we’ve learned in prac-
tice I don’t see why we
should lose. This is close
knitted team and we all have
the same goal, that is to win.
This game is not a statement
for SAC but to the other
schools telling them beware
because we’re coming to get
what is ours.”

The Big Red Machines
opened the second half with
new defensive stand. Apply-
ing the man-to-man defence
surprised the Falcons and
forced them to call a quick
time-out. But when the Fal-
cons returned to the court it
was business as usual.

The ball movement by the
Falcons became too much
for the Big Red Machines
once again even though they
opened up the second half of
play with just three of their
starting players.

With a commanding lead
and things flowing the way
the Falcons liked, the team
brought in their second
string players to finish off the
job.

This was a big moment for
Big Red Machines’ head
coach Devon Johnson who
wasted no time in bringing
Benoit back.

His presence made a huge
difference in the team’s
offence. By the end of the
third quarter the Big Red
Machines had scored 12, the
most points since the open-
ing tip. .

Benoit’s smooth ball con-
trol help to spread the court,
finding Remero Stubbs to
score the easy basket. Stubbs
would end the game as the
top scorer for the Big Red
Machines with 14 points,
with Benoit chipping in with
eight.

Top scorer for the Falcons
was Williams with 20 points,
Jonathon Moss contributed
with 15 points and Smith
with 10.

The win kept the Falcons’
hopes for a perfect season
alive with a 5-0 record while
the Big Red Machines’
record is 2-3.

@ PRINCE William Fal-

‘cons and the Big Red

Machines battle it out yes-
terday. .
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

This is the 25th anniversary
of the nation's biggest basket-
ball tournament that is played
between senior boys teams
and, according to Ferguson,
they plan to make this an his-
toric one.

"We have spoken to Grand
Bahama and they have indi-
cated that all of the teams are
coming," said Ferguson, who
noted that the six teams from
the nation's second city make
the competition that much
more exciting.

"We have also heard from
the Turks & Caicos Islands
and they have indicated that

”
;

|

PORT

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS





ee eS ee oe errr

they are expected to bring in a
team this year. So we are look-
ing forward to them adding to
the excitement."

There is also the possibility
that a team from further afield
in the Caribbean may be a part
of this year's field of 32 teams
participating in the tourna-
ment. But Ferguson declined
to confirm or deny that and
said they will hold a press con-
ference next Tuesday to dis-
close all details of the tourna-
ment,

Ferguson, however, said
they will host four divisions of
eight teams each in the double

eduled for Hugh Campbell event

elimination format as they
march towards crowning
another champion.

The CI Gibson Rattlers
clinched their third straight last
year and their fourth in five
years as they nipped the Sir
Jack Hayward Wildcats 67-65.

The only other teams from
New Providence to win the
prestigious title were the LW
Young Golden Eagles, who
claimed the initial crown in
1982 and the hosts, AF Adder-
ley Fighting Tigers, who cap-
tured back-to-back crowns and
the CR Walker Knights, the
last winners before the Rat-

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE





tlers took over.

Grand Bahama has domi-
nated the rest of the spots on
the championship list.

From last year, Ferguson
said they knew that the AF
Adderley Gym would not
have been available, but they
have still continued their plan-
ning with the hopes of hosting
this year's event at the Kendal
Isaacs Gym.

"We knew that the gym was-
n't going to be ready, so we
didn't make any plans around
there," he said. "So we just
decided to look at Kendal
Isaacs.”

alcons Smith returns
o haunt the Machines:

' jm BASKETBALL
PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Fernander
stars for Barry
University

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALEXANDER ‘Shag’ Fer-
nander is hitting form for the
Barry University Buccaneers.

The 6-foot, senior centre
has been holding court for the
Bucs through their first 11
games of the season.

According to Sports Infor-
mation Officer Dennis Jezek,
Fernander is shooting 44.9
per cent from the field, 67.9

from the free throw line and

is averaging 11.4 rebounds
per game, leading the Bucs
and the NCAA Division II
Sunshine State Conference.

And she’s averaging 12.3

points per game as her team
P pers

sit ninth in the conference
and in the nation, Addition-
ally, Fernander has also com-
piled a total of 13 assists, 12
steals and seven block shots.

Versatility

In seven games, Jezek said
Fernander has showed her
versatility with a double-dou-
ble in points and rebounds
and has amassed double fig-
ure rebounds in seven of their
last eight games.

“She’s dominant. At this
point, she’s our most domi-
nant player in the post in our
conference,” Jezek summed
up. “The more she touches
the ball, the better we play.
She’s definitely our most
important player right now.”

Coach Bill Sullivan said

#1 AUTO

Fernander’s performance has
certainly made his debut
coaching his first women’s
team at Barry University that
much easier.

“She’s a post player that is
strong around the basket and
she can also face the basket
and shoot it,” Sullivan said.
“She’s our dominant force
inside, our post presence.”

Fernander, in her second
year at Barry University, had
one of her best games on Sat-
urday night at home at the
Health and Sports Centre.

She recorded a double-dou-
ble with team highs of 18
points and 12 rebounds as the
Bucs knocked off the Uni-
versity of Tampa Spartans 61-
54 to win their-second straight
conference game.

“She's had to overcome
injuries, a bad knee and a
brace she’s still wearing on
her risk, and she’s battled
through all of that,” said Sul-
livan of one of the Bucs’ team
captains.

“She’s played wonderful.
She’s the reason we are 2-0
in the conference right now.
My hope is that she will be
an All-Conference player.
She’s putting up those type
of numbers.”

With Fernander’s leader-
ship, Sullivan said it would be
the icing on the cake for a
great season if they can go all
the way and win the confer-
ence title.

“We are going to try and
do that with Alex leading us,”
Sullivan projected.

Fernander, who. was

ra adeeb

unavailable for comments, is
the first player that Sullivan
has coached and if there are
others like her, Sullivan said
he would be glad to bring
them on to play for the Bucs.

“She’s improved on her
free throwing shooting,” he
reflected, “At the beginning
of the season, she struggled,
but now she’s making her free
throws. But on the whole, I
don’t have a lot of complaint
about Alex. -

Effective

“She’s a leader and I have
nothing but good things to
say about her. She’s been
doing great, averaging a dou-
ble-double, which is not easy
to-do. But we try to get her
the ball because she’s been
effective in the low post and
she’s been playing great for
us.”

The Bucs will be back in
action on Wednesday when
they play at Nova Southeast-
ern in Davie, Florida.

On Saturday, they will
return to the HSC to play
their third conference game
against Florida Southern.

Their regular season will
come to a close on Saturday,
February 24 when they host
Rollins in the last of two
games. Rollins, last year, went
undefeated in the conference.

The conference tournament
will be played this year in
Boca Raton from Wednes-

_ day, February 28 to Thurs-
day, March 1.

ck

with Commonwealth Ba





DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS.

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 32243775 * 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Solas (Freeport! Led for similar deals, Quoons Hwy, 352-4122
ar Abeco Mater Mall, on bockKoy dvd, 34729 1h





A



@ ALEXANDER ‘Shag’ Fernander rises above the competition
(Phato: Barry Sports Information/JC Ridley)



Squash club
is open for
business in ‘07

@ SQUASH
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

UNDER new management,
the Village Road Squash Club
will begin 2007 with the New
Year’s Squash League.

It will get underway today
and will be played every Tues-
day until the final round is
contested on Friday, February
9,

New owner Barbara Albury
said the league intends to Let
the public know that the club



Mi SAILING

SPORTS NBRIEF

is indeed open for business

again,

Thompson Trading,
Bahamas Wholesale Agencies,
Lightbourn Trading and Asa
H. Pritchard are some of the
sponsors who will be involved
in the tournament.

Albury said there will be six
teams of five players each par-
ticipating in competition every
Tuesday between the hours of

6-9 p.m. and the players will’

be ranked according to their
performances in the game.
Here’s a list of the: players



THE sailing community is mourning the passing of ‘Ted Johnson,
an outstanding 'bowman', who sailed in numerous regattas.

Johnson is one of six persons set to be honoured on January 29th
by the government for his contributions to sailing in the country. He
passed away on Sunday at his home,

Extending condolences to the family on behalf of the entire
sailing community and the government was Rev Phillip McPhee,

TRACK AND FIELD

THE indoor season officially opened for collegiate athletes this

past weekend and Bahamians made sure that they were on top of

their game.

Getting things started in their first indoor meet at the Universi-
ty of Maryland Eastern Shore were teammates Reginald Sands and
Kenrick Brathwaithe, representing Norfolk State University.

Brathwaithe opened up his season with a win in the men's long
jump. ‘The sophomore soared 7.36 (24-fect-1 inch) to take the vic-

tory over Chris Walker and Corey Vinston who had a best of

723m,

In the shot put event Sands had to settle for fifth with a best throw
of 13.53m (44-feet-4 inches), Winning the event was Kimani Kirton
of Maryland Eastern Shore with a throw of 15.82m.

Also competing at the meet was Jamahl Strachan, in both the

high jump and pole vault events.

In both events Strachan 'no heighted', closing each course in the
fifth spot. Brathwaithe was expected to take part in the high jump

_ event but “did not show.”

The indoor action will continue this weekend with meets sched-
uled for North Carolina, Atlanta and Florida.

\

|

named to the respective teams:

Team One Lightning - Billy
Albury, Scott Jupp, Jan
Oyens, David Slatter and
Dilys Anderson.

Gatorade - Jimmy Light-
bourn, Sean Cartwright, Ryan
Reid, Michael Lever and Lil- »
lian Russell.

Act II Poppers - Adrian
Burrows, Alister McKellar,
Alex Paine, Ted Smith and
Chantelle Euteneuer.

Team Four - Pembroke
Williams, Sean McCarroll,
Barbara Albury, Ted O’Brien
and Hilary Lockhart.

Ensueno - Colin Light-
bourn, Mike Fields, Calvin
Lockhart, Len Davies, Pat
Whiteland and RC Smith.

Team Six - Keith Kelty,
Henio Podlewski, Joe
Eutenecuer, James Burnett and
MAJ/Sandy.

“We're trying to increase
our membership at the club
because we are in the process
of buying the premises as
well,” Albury charged. “I’m
just trying to get squash back
out there in the open.”

While Albury also organises
a youth league every Satur-
day, she indicated that Jen-
nifer Isaacs, the physical edu-
cation lecturer at the College
of the Bahamas, has expressed
an interest in putting on a pro-
gramme for the COB Caribs
sports department.

“I’m just really trying to
make people aware that the
club is not closed,” she
stressed. “We hope that this
league will help to generate
some interest again.”

Tonight as the league gets
underway, Team One will play
Gatorade Lightning on court
one; Act II Poppers will play
Team Four on court II
and Ensueno will play Team
Six,
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



_ NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE









SOUTHEAST WL _ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Orlando 21 14 600 - 6-4 W-4 14-6 7-8 12-9
Washington 19 14 576 1 7-3 L-l 13-3 6-11 12-9
Miami 14 19 .424 6 55 W-1 8-9 6-10 6-10
Atlanta 10 21 323 9 2-8 W-l 59 5-12 6-13
Charlotte 9 23 .28110% 3-7 L2 G11 3-12 6-13
ATLANTIC = Wk Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 15 19 .441 - 5-5 W-2 10-5 5-14 10-7
New Jersey 144 19 .424 % 5-5 L-1 10-10 4-9 10-9
New York 15 21 .417 1 6-4 W-2 810 7-11 9-12
Boston 12 21 .364 2% 2-8 L-l 4-11 8-10 8-12
Philadelphia 9 24. .273 5% 46 L2 4-7 5-17 6-12
c t. 1 way _ Cont
Cc 636 5 -9 15-10
Detroit 613 1 64 \L-l 9-5 10-7 13-6
Chicago 571 2 5-5 L-l 15-4 5-11 17-5
Indiana 529 3% 64 W-l1 9-5 9-11 13-9
Milwaukee 16 ATL 5% 6-4 L3 9-5 7-13 6-13
WESTERN CONFERENCE





‘686





San Antonio 3 -
Houston 22 629 5 12-3 10-10 10-11
New Orleans = 12 353 14% 7-10 5-12 6-16
Memphis 8 229° 19 6-11 2-16 3-15
NORTHWEST WoL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 24 10 .706 - 6-4 W-1l 14-2 10-8 16-6
Denver 17 15) 5310 6 4-6 Wel 10-8 7-7 5-9
Minnesota 715) «531673 W415) 6-10 10-9
Portland 14 21 .40010% 3-7 L-l 7-11 7-10 9-9
Seattle 1323 «361 12 3-7 L-4 9-8 4-15 5-14
PACIFIC = WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 25 8 .758 - 82 W-6 14-3 11-5 11-7
L.A. Lakers 23 11 «#676 2% ‘7-3 W-4 16-4 7-7) 15-5
Golden State 18 18 500 8% 6-4 L-l 14-5 4-13 12-13
LA. Clippers 16 19 .457 10 6-4 W-1 12-6 4-13 10-15
Sacramento 144,17 .452 10 46 L-2 = 10-9 4-8 8-13
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Monday’s results Tonight’s games Sunday’s results

Clippers 100, N.O 90 Atl. at Ind., 7 Mia. 93, Port. 90
Houston 84, Chicago 77 Det. at Phi., 7 Tor. 116, Wash. 111
Denver 104, Mil. 92 Tor. at NJ., 7:30 Minn. 103, Hou. 99 (OT)

L.A.L. at Mem., 8 S.A. 110, Mem. 96

Por. at S.A., 8 Orl. 87, Bos. 79

Dal. at Utah, 9 Pho. 128, G.S. 105

Sea. at Pho., 9 LA.L. 101, Dal. 98

Cle. at Sac., 10

Currie top pick
in dispersal draft

BY MIKE CRANSTON
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Guard Monique Currie
was selected by the Chicago Sky. with the No.1 pick .
in the WNBA dispersal draft on Monday.

Currie was one of ll former Charlotte Sting play-
ers taken. The Sting, an original member ‘of ‘the °
WNBA, folded last week after 10 seasons. Currie
was the No. 3 overall pick in last year’s college draft.

Tangela Smith, 30, the Sting’s leading scorer last
season at 13.1 points per game, was selected No. 2 by
the Minnesota Lynx.

Janel McCarville, the No. 1 overall pick in the
2005 college draft, was taken third by New York.
McCarville has struggled in her first two WNBA
seasons, averaging 3.2 points and 3.1 rebounds.

San Antonio selected guard Helen Darling with
the fourth pick and Phoenix took guard Kelly Maz-
zante with the fifth selection.

Washington drafted Teana Miller, who missed
last season due to pregnancy, with the sixth pick.
Seattle then selected Tye’sha Fluker, Houston took
Yelena Leuchanka, Indiana drafted veteran Sheri
Sam, Sacramento went with LaToya Bond and Los.
Angeles selected Ayana Walker. Detroit and Con-
necticut did not select a player.

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE



|



{
|
i
i

|



SOUTHEAST =oW LOL SLPTS GF GA = =HOME == AWAY
Atlanta 24 12 2 56 137 134 = =11-5-3-1_—:13-7-3-1
Carolina 22 18 2 2 48130 133 = 12-7-0-1 10-11-2-1
Washington 18 17 2 5 43 128 143 10-10-1-2 8-7-1-3
Tampa Bay 20 21 1 1 42 135 136 10-11-0-0 10-10-1-1
Florida 15 20 3 6 39119 143 10-8-1-1 5-12-2-5
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
New Jersey 25° 13 4 54 113 100 14-3-0-3. 11-10-0-1
N.Y. Rangers 22 17 3 1 48129 131 9-7-3-0 13-10-0-1
Pittsburgh 18 15 3 4 43125 128 10-8-2-2 8-7-1-2
N.Y. Islanders 19 19 1 °'2 41117 116 11-8-1-1 8-11-0-1
Philadelphia 11 27° 2 2 26102 159 3-11-2-2 8-16-0-0
NORTHEAST W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Buffalo 30 9 2 1 63 164 122 14-5-1-1 16-4-1-0
Montreal 23 14 1 4 #51127 118 13-6-0-3 = 10-8-1-1
Ottawa 23 19 2 O 48143 125 10-10-1-0 13-9-1-0
Toronto 19 18 2 4 44144 144 10-10-1-2 9-8-1-2
Boston 20 16 1 2 43118 142 12-8-0-1 8-8-1-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL = Wt OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME = AWAY
Nashville 28 11 2 1 59144 109 13-3-2-1 = 15-8-0-0
Detroit 25 12 2 3 55125 102) 14-3-1-2 = 11-9-1-1
Chicago 17 20 1 4 39105 124 10-10-0-1 7-10-1-3
Columbus 16 22 2 2 36108 130 9-9-1-1 —_7-13-1-1
St. Louis 13 21 4 3 33 96 129 8-11-2-1 5-10-2-2
NORTHWEST W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
Vancouver 24 18 O 1 49107 111 15-7-0-0 9-11-0-1
Calgary 21 15 2 2 46122 106 16-5-0-0 5-10-2-2
Minnesota 21 18 O 3 45118 114 17-4-0-2 4-14-0-1
Colorado 21 18 2 O 44131 116 11-9-1-0 10-9-1-0
Edmonton 19 18 2 2 42117 122 = 13-7-1-1 6-11-1-1
PaciFic == -W_ iL OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME = AWAY
Anaheim 29 9 1 5 64151 108 16-3-1-3 13-6-0-2
San Jose 28 14 0 O 56130 100 15-7-0-0 13-7-0-0
Dallas 26 16 O 1 53117 102 13-6-0-0 13-10-0-1
‘Phoenix 19 20 1 1 40113 138 11-8-1-0 8-12-0-1
- Los Angeles 1622 2 3 37124 154 = 11-9-2-3 5-13-0-0

| “NUGGETS 104, BUCKS 92



PRO BASKETBALL

McGrady ignites Rockets

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CHICAGO — Tracy McGrady scored 25
of his 31 points in the second half and hit the
go-ahead jumper to lift the Houston Rockets
to an 84-77 victory over the Chicago Bulls on
Monday night.

McGrady’s long jumper with 1:19 left
broke a 77-77 tie. Houston’s Shane Battier
blocked a driving layup by Ben Gordon with

25 seconds left. McGrady then hit one of two °

free throws to make it a three-point game
and Chuck Hayes and Luther Head added
two apiece.

It was the fifth 30-point performance in
six games for McGrady, who hit just three of
10 shots in the first half.

Juwan Howard added 16 points and nine
rebounds, Dikembe Mutombo grabbed a sea-
son-high 16 rebounds, and the Rockets won
for the sixth time in eight games since Yao
Ming broke a bone in his right leg.

Gordon led Chicago with 24 points, and
Luol Deng scored 20 after finishing with 30
in Saturday’s 106-89 victory over Detroit.

CLIPPERS 100, HORNETS 90

OKLAHOMA CITY Sam Cassell
scored 31 points, Cuttino Mobley added 20
and the Clippers started to look healthy
again in the victory.

Playing for,the first time in three weeks,
Cassell scored 10 points during the Clippers’
decisive 17-3 fourth-quarter surge, including
a 3-pointer that gave Los Angeles the lead for
good at 79-77 with 9:12 to play. He sand-
wiched another 3-pointer between two jump-
ers, and Mobley added a jumper for a 91-80
Clippers lead.

Cassell had missed seven games with
plantar fasciitis in his left heel before return-
ing against the Hornets, and Mobley hyper-
extended his left elbow last week at Miami.

They showed no mercy against the Hor-
nets, who are without injured starters Chris
Paul (sprained ankle), Peja Stojakovic (back
surgery) and David West (right elbow sur-
gery).

Desmond Mason led New Orleans with 28
points for the second consecutive game,
picking up his first consecutive 20-point
games since his final three games with Mil-
waukee at the end of the 2004-05 season.

ee



» DENVER — Earl Boykins scored:26 points

-~and‘Allen‘Iverson had 23'to lead the! Nuggets

past the depleted Bucks.

The Bucks were without injured guard
Michael Redd and lost his backcourt mate
Mo Williams during the game. Ruben Patter-
son, who played in Denver last season,
started in Redd’s spot and scored 29 points,
three shy of his career high, and had 1l
boards.

The Nuggets know how Milwaukee feels.
Denver has been without the NBA’s top scor-
ing tandem since Carmelo Anthony and J.R.
Smith brawled with the New York Knicks
last month.

Marcus Camby added 19 points and 15
rebounds for the Nuggets, who snapped a
five-game losing streak.

ELSEWHERE
e Bucks: A meaningless dunk is coming

HOCKEY

lian OV
11-4-4-1
10-3-0-0
6-6-1-1 From Miami Herald Wire Services
inch The Phoenix Coyotes on Monday
acquired center Kevyn Adams from the
DIV Carolina Hurricanes in exchange for
9-4-0-1 | defenseman Dennis Seidenberg.
ey Adams served as an alternate captain
7-6-1-0 and skated in all 25 postseason games for
3-10-0-2 last year’s Stanley Cup champions. He
pIV scored a career-high 15 goals while play-
ree ing in all 82 regular-season games in
-6-1-0
84.0.4 | 2005-06.
9-7-0-0 Adams, 32, recently returned to action
7-8-2-2 after missing nine games following wrist
9-6-0-1 : :
surgery and a staph infection.
Seidenberg had one goal and one assist
in 32 games for the Coyotes.
piv ELSEWHERE
“11-3-1-0 e Bruins: The team recalled goalie
9-2-0-1 Hannu Toivonen and defenseman Jona-
ST than Sigalet from its minor-league affiliate
5-10-2-2 in Providence and sent goalie Philippe
Sauve to the American Hockey League
DIV farm club.

PRO BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

Toivonen played Sunday, making 15
saves in Providence’s 7-2 victory over
Springfield. He had been sent to Provi- :
dence earlier that day after backing up ae
Tim Thomas but not playing in Boston’s

}
; sa 4-3 victory over Philadelphia on Saturday.
8-8-0-0 | Sigalet has eight goals and eight assists
12-3-0-0 | in 35 games with Providence.
ees e Avalanche: Defenseman John-Mi-

chael Liles will miss up to a month with a

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2007 | 3





NAM Y. HUH/AP

BATTLE OF THE BIG MEN: Rockets center Dikembe Mutombo pulls down one of his
16 rebounds, reaching over Bulls center Ben Wallace in Monday night’s game.

back to haunt Michael Redd and the Bucks.
Redd learned that he'll miss four-to-six
weeks because of an injured left knee.

Redd, the NBA’s fifth-leading scorer at
27.7 points per game, was hurt when he went
up for a dunk with J4 seconds left in the
Bucks’ 95-86 loss to Cleveland on Friday
night. He strained his patellar tendon, which
connects the kneecap to the shin bone.

The severity of the injury took the Bucks
by surprise.

point guard Mo Williams said before the
Bucks’ game at Denver on Monday night in
which he, too, was injured. “We thought it
was a couple of games maybe. A game or
two, rest it. We didn’t think it was this seri-
ous.”

Williams sprained his left shoulder in the
second quarter against the Nuggets and is
day to day.

A two-time winner of the Eastern Confer-
ence Player of the Week award this season,
Redd is on pace to increase his scoring aver-
age for the seventh consecutive year. Redd
also averages 3.8 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 13
steals.

Ruben Patterson started in Redd’s place
Monday night at Denver, where Patterson
played briefly. last season, and said he was
sure Milwaukee could withstand Redd’s
absence.

The Bucks also are without forward Char-
lie Villanueva, Milwaukee’s major offseason





MARK J. TERRILL/AP

Mote: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Monday’s results
Edmntn at L.A., 10:30

Tonight’s games

St. Louis at Columbus, 7
Phil. at Washington, 7
Islanders at Rangers, 7
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30
Atlanta at Montreal, 7:30
Carolina at Toronto, 7:30
Pitt. at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Anaheim at Nashville, 8
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30
Detroit at Colorado, 9
Minnesota at Calgary, 9

Sunday’s results

Vancouver 4, Florida 3 (SO)
Phoenix 4, Chicago 2

New Jersey 3, Montreal 0
Ottawa 6, Philadelphia 1

T. Bay 3, Pittsburgh 2 (SO)
Anaheim 4, Detroit 2



broken left foot. Liles was injured in the
first period of the Avs’ game at Minnesota
on Saturday night.

Liles’ 10 goals is fourth-most among
NHL defensemen. He’s tied for 12th in
scoring with 29 points and is the first
defenseman to score 10 or more goals in
each of his first three NHL seasons since
Steve Duchesne from 1986-89.

e Devils: Prudential Financial will
pay $105.3 million over 20 years to call the

NOW HE’S HEADING EAST: Defenseman
Dennis Seidenberg, above, had one
goal and one assist in 32 games this
season for the Coyotes. He was

traded Monday to the Hurricanes in
exchange for center Kevyn Adams.

Devils’ new arena the Prudential Center.

The $375 million downtown venue,
under construction nearly across the

addition, who missed his third consecutive
game with an injured right shoulder. He got a
cortisone injection Monday and will be re-
evaluated in another week. Villanueva is
averaging 12.7 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.2
assists. ;

e 76ers: Basketball Hall of Fame coach
Larry Brown officially returned to the 76ers
on Monday and dismissed speculation he
might eventually return to the bench. After
one disastrous NBA season with the Knicks,
Brown said-he-wants to help the 76ers only in
his new role as an executive vice president.

Brown; fired, by the Knicks in June after

‘going 23-59 and-clashing with team president

Isiah Thomas in Brown’s only season in New
York, had been acting as an unofficial 76ers
consultant this season. He’s kept a low pro-
file in Philadelphia, visiting one practice and
attending one game, and offered feedback to
team president and close friend Billy King on
the Allen Iverson trade.

e Bobcats: Forward Melvin Ely is still
smiling and joking with his teammates. He
has nothing but good things to say about
coach and general manager Bernie Bicker-
statt.

He’s probably one of the happiest players
ever to have asked to be traded. Ely said on
Monday he asked to be traded before a game
against the Lakers on Dec. 29.

e Clippers: Luke Jackson, a former first-
round draft choice of the Cavaliers, signed a
10-day contract with the Clippers.

Coyotes trade for K. Adams

street from the world headquarters of the
life insurance and investment giant, is
expected to open for the 2007-2008 NHL
season.

The city of Newark, N.J., is contribut-
ing $210 million to the arena, which was
initially expected to cost $310 million. ‘The
Devils are paying for cost overruns.

The arena is to seat 17,625 people for
ice hockey games, 18,500 for basketball
games and 19,500 for concerts. Amenities
are to include a 350-seat restaurant, 2,200
club seats and 78 luxury suites.

The Devils now play at the Continental
Airlines Arena in East Rutherford. The
NHL team shares the building with the
New Jersey Nets, whose new owner is
moving forward with plans to build an
arena for the NBA team in Brooklyn, N.Y.

LATE SUNDAY

e Canucks 4, Panthers 3 (SO): Josh
Green scored in the sixth round of the
shootout to give host Vancouver the vic-
tory.

The triumph extended Vancouver's
season-high winning streak to seven
games, while the Panthers dropped their
third in a row on the road:

Green beat Florida goalie Ed Belfour
high to the stick side from 20 feet out for
the winner and then had to stand by and
watch nervously as Vancouver’s Roberto
Luongo stopped Jozef Stumpel at the
other end to preserve the victory.

For much of the game, it appeared that
Luongo was going to steal one from his
former club, as he held the Panthers at
bay for two periods. But the 27-year-old
gave up a pair of weak third-period goals
to give Florida some hope.

This was the first time Luongo, who
faced 36 shots, had taken on his former
team since coming over to the Canucks in
the biggest trade of last summer.