Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Christie: more resorts will make a |

larger police presence necessary

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THERE is an immediate
need for an expanded police
presence in New Providence,
particularly in the South West —
as well as the Family Islands —
due to the many resort devel-
opments underway, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie said.

The prime minister made the
statement during a special lun-
cheon at the new police confer-
ence centre last week.

Mr Christie said this urgent

‘










Government negotiates land and facilities
for RBPF in heads of agreement



need for new stations and more
officers came as a result of the
many developments on New
Providence being unable to sup-
ply themselves with adequate
security and “the climate that
presents itself when a small coun-
try is facing an economic boom.”

He said that this issue is more
necessary on the Family Islands.
To meet this challenge Mr

’ Christie said that government

has negotiated in the heads of
agreements of many of these
developments provisions that
would make land and facilities



WITH HICKORY SIMOKED BACON AND NATURAL SWISS




















CL Cale meee
ea iP leche i tee

available for the Royal
Bahamas Police Force to meet
this challenge.

Mr Christie said that a new
development on Eleuthera has
led him to negotiate that every
single officer placed on that
island will have everything paid
for, including housing.

In Bimini, he said, the devel-
oper has agreed to put up a pri-
mary school and also help with
the police station.

The massive development on
Rum Cay, he said, has sparked
the need for greater police par-
ticipation on that island.

Government has asked that
the developers there assist with
the provision of a police station
which Mr Christie encouraged
the commissioner to have some
input on.

The contribution of investors
to the nation’s infrastructure,
he said, will be the case wher-
ever developers go and govern-
ment has “found the investors
to be very receptive to this
approach.”

The prime minister said that
when one goes from island to
island the great many challenges
facing the Royal Bahamas
Police Force can be seen.

However, Mr Christie said
that he has “great confidence”
that the police force will be able
to meet these challenges head
on.







Don't try to
influence
juniors, PM —
tells senior
officers

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie encouraged senior offi-
cers not to politically influence
junior officers in the upcoming
general election.

The prime minister made the
statement at a special luncheon
at the new Police Conference
Centre last Friday.

“In our own national make
up we have PLPs and FNMs
and obviously each of s must
have the right that we jealously
guard to believe in what we
believe in and to vote for who
we would like to vote for and
whatever political organization
we would like to vote for,” Mr
Christie said.

He encouraged the officers
to ensure the leadership they
exercise as police officers
ensures free and fair and peace-
ful elections. #

“The kind of leadership Iam
talking about is leadership by
example. Many of you will have
under your command lots of
young officers and you will be
expected to be able to demon-
strate that you can do your
work without leaning on them
politically one way or the oth-
er,” Mr Christie said.

He told the officers that they
are on the front-line of guarding
the country’s heritage of being

able to have free, fair and

peaceful elections.

“We would wish the next
elections to be no different. I
have indicated to every devel-
oper who comes in that one of
the wonderful things about the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is that as a sitting
prime minister it really makes
no difference in terms of their
development as to who sits in
my chair today.

“Tam convinced of that. That
the political process has
matured to the point in our
country that Perry Christie
could be standing here today
and someone tomorrow. That
is the security we have come to
in this country and the police
force has helped to bring that
about,” Mr Christie said.

TROPICAL
> Gest EV cela ts)

ARH GLE
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“AV 9 OS

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~~ Sew 6 285 E eg!



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of letter

“appearance of censorship”.

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3

eee Leth ch hse ee rennet



on brief

Country gets
ready to
remember
Majority Rule

ON January 10 the coun-
try will celebrate one of the
most important social and
political turning points in its
history.

Majority Rule in 1967
marked not only the end of
segregation in the Bahamas
but was the catalyst to inter-
nal self governance.

These men made up the
First Bahamas Cabinet under
Majority Rule. They are: Cecil

GOVERNMENT, upon the
endorsement of the Bahamas
Cultural Commission, has
agreed to erect a monument at

ee ee the site of the Southern Recre-
Bain Jeffrey Thompson Can ation Ground to celebrate the

leton Francis, Randol Fawkes, “struggle and victory” of black

Warren Lavarity, Curtis
McMillan, Clement Maynard
and Lynden Pindling.

Correction
over author

Making the announcement
yesterday Works and Utilities
Minister Bradley Roberts chair-
man of the cabinet subcommit-
tee for the Majority Rule cele-
brations said that this memorial
will take the form of something
“inanimate, like an obelisk, in
recognition of the very central
place that the Southern Recre-
ation Ground has played
throughout its 170-year history
in the struggle of the masses of
Bahamians to free themselves;
the monument will be a memo-
rial to all Bahamian freedom
fighters, named and unnamed.”

To this end, the Government
of the Bahamas will commence
its activities in recognition of
this milestone on Majority Rule
Day, Wednesday, 10th January,
2007. A national Ecumenical
Service will be held at the
Southern Recreation Grounds,
under the direction of the
Bahamas Christian Council, fol-

about NHI

DUE to an error, a letter
about:the National Health
Insurance scheme appeared :
in The\Tribune over the. :
name Wallace Rolle. In fact,
Mr Rolle was not the author
of the letter and we apolo-
gise for any inconvenience
and embarassment caused.

Venezuela
calls for OAS
to withdraw

es lowed by a cultural display.
criticism The Southern Recreation
Ground was initially established
= eo under the aegis of Governor Sir
BYACas Francis Cockburn as a place of
recreation and meeting for the
THE government demand- newly-freed population of the

ed on Saturday that the Orga-
nization of American States
retract comments criticising
Venezuela’s decision not to
renew the licence of an oppo-
sition-aligned TV station,
according to Associated Press.

On Friday, OAS Secretary-
General Jose Miguel Insulza
warned that President‘Hugo
Chavez’s decision not to
renew the broadcast licence
of Radio Caracas Television,
or RCTYV, when it expires in
May would be seen as a
“form of censorship against
the freedom of expression”
and serve as a warning to oth-
er media outlets critical of the
government.

In a statement, the Foreign
Ministry accused Insulza of
“improperly meddling in a
matter that is the strict com-
petency” of Venezuelan
authorities and denied the
licensing decision had any

city of Nassau.

The Ground was a central
gathering spot for black Bahami-
ans from its establishment during
the Emancipation period until
the achievement of majority rule
in 1967; and may have played
host to nineteenth-century free-
dom fighters such as Prince
Williams, Stephen Dillet, Robert

THE driver of a boat that
killed a two-year-old British boy
on holiday in the Bahamas test-
ed positive for marijuana, UK
newspaper The Evening Stan-
dard reported yesterday.

' The findings, according to a
confidential police report, the
newspaper said, have prompted
calls for the driver to be tried

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Bahamians over oppression. ~ -

New monument
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“over op









Mi MINISTER of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts
announced that a monument will be erected at the Souther

Recreation Ground

Love, Wilfred Campbell Adder-
ley, William Parliament Adder-
ley, and others.

“The centrality of the
Ground to black Bahamian
political life continued through-
out the twentieth century,
where it served as the main

‘focus of political speeches and

rallies throughout the years of
minority rule, hosting such lumi-
naries as Marcus Garvey, Adam
Clayton Powell and Martin
Luther King, among countless
others,” said Mr Roberts.

“It also served as a place for
black members, of Parliament
to address their supporters, pro-
viding a meeting place for
labourers during the Burma
Road Riots of 1942. The PLP
rallies of the 1950s and 1960s,
which culminated in Majority
Rule, were the pinnacle of a
long history of freedom pant



for manslaughter.

Toddler Paul Gallagher died
in 2002 after being hit by an
out-of-control speedboat which
ran up the beach as he slept on
a sunbed.

He died five days later from
head injuries, described by sur-
geons as the worst they had
ever seen.

His father Paul, 42, and moth-
er Andrea, 40, from Orpington,
Kent, hit out at the Bahamian
government for failing to pros-
ecute whoever might have been
responsible for their son's
death.

Two Metropolitan Police offi-
cers flew to the Bahamas last
summer to review the case with
local police.

Their report reveals that after
the crash, the driver provided
blood and urine. samples. The
Gallaghers were told these were
never tested at the time.

When the samples were test-
ed by the British team, they
showed that the driver’s blood
contained 5.1 nanograms of car-
boxy-tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC), an active ingredient in

ushion is fade and mildew
resistant, and. is available in

ing centred around the South-
ern Recreation Ground,” Mr
Roberts said.

The government also plans
to hold*ecumenical services,
under the aegis of the Bahamas
Christian Council in a number
of Family Islands on dates to
be announced.

“Through its celebration of
these important historic mile-
stones, the government will
ensure that the legacies of past
Bahamuans live on from gener-
ation to generation.

“It took some 133 years for
the masses to achieve majority
rule following the emancipation
of slaves. However, the growth
and development we have expe-
rienced over the past forty years
in the Bahamas has been

remarkable when,compareds..

with other countriesaround the.
world,” Mr Roberts said.

Driver of speedboat that killed toddler
‘tested positive for marijuana’

marijuana plants.

The Bahamian police claim
that while this indicated the dri-
ver had been using cannabis, it
did not mean that his ability to
drive or control the boat yas
impaired.

However, the new report
warns that the samples may
have deteriorated since 2002
because of the way they were
stored and the readings may
have been higher at the time
they were taken.

The British officers also

Tevealed that the driver was

operating without a proper
licence or insurance. It claimed
that the original investigation
was “flawed.”

They urged Bahamian police
to reopen the case to determine
the “criminal culpability of the
boat owners and operators.”



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
_ Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES |
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

THE TRIBUNE

Mail facilities
need fixing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

POSTAL facilities and ser-
vices in the Bahamas are
stuck in 19th century technol-
ogy with no indication that
long term planning is being
done.

It would certainly require
only a couple of finish car-

‘penters to expand and reno-

vate the Shirley Street office’s
outgoing mail bins so that on
week ends and other busy
times the outgoing mail would
not pile-up so high that the
choked up slot makes mail
accessible to any lurker
inclined to snatch a few



ficient explanation as to what
approximate delivery time
each option will entail? All of
the foregoing might also be
nicely incorporated into each
year’s telephone book.

And maybe someone could
look into why a cross town
mailing should take a week
or two for delivery.




eee

ADunemeadcda met



would likely love to dispatch
their colour post cards into
some of these if we have any
on Bay Street; perhaps with ©
a special cancellation stamp
bearing a bold plug for the
Bahamas.

Why can’t each post office
clearly display an updated list-
ing of current postal rates,
charges and a complete sched-
ule of all services available
and the cost of each with suf-

ONE WHO BELIEVES
THERE IS STILL A
NEED FOR “SNAIL
MAIL”

Nassau,

January 4, 2007.

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



National Health failing in England

IN CLOSING the debate on government’s
national health insurance plan, Prime Minister
Christie revealed how out of touch he is with

' national insurance problems in the real world.

Responding to the criticism that nationali-
sation of health insurance has failed in other
countries, Mr Christie recited a long list of coun-
tries, which he said has fully functioning nation-
al health insurance schemes. Among them Eng-
land and Canada.

“Many countries, the world over, have a uni-
versal health care programme, similar to the
proposed National Health Insurance plan (for
the Bahamas),” said Mr Christie.

He emphasised that “none of these systems
are without their challenges, but none, not a
single one, has sought to abandon their plan
because of these challenges.”

In the case of England and Canada — par-
ticularly England — we think that Mr Christie
would have been more accurate had he used the
word “failures”, instead of the word “chal-
lenges.”

As for Mr Christie’s comment that not a sin-
gle country was seeking to abandon the nation-
alised plan because of the “challenges”, if the
truth be known they are not seeking to abandon
anything because they don’t know how. If Mr
Christie had closely studied the situation in oth-
er countries, he would have discovered that the
greatest challenge to a politician today is how to
get out of something that has proved a failure,
which had been promised not only to succeed,
but to be the nearest earthly balm, short of a
direct ticket to heaven. The fact is that people

have been promised free medicine, and they’

expect their politicians to figure out how to
deliver on that promise. Today’s pohiticians
haven’t got the answers, and worse still, having
made such an exaggerated promise, they don’t
know how to admit failure.

However, the greatest worry is Mr Christie’s
statement that the proposed health scheme for
the Bahamas is similar to those in England and
Canada, which can hardly be considered suc-
cessful. Mr Christie has promised that Bahami-
ans will stop dying from lack of health care,
while in England, they are dying because they
can’t get the health care promised.

The situation is so bad in England that gov-
ernment is looking to private companies to bail
them out of their medical dilemma. Doctors
are breaking away from NHS, forming groups
and contracting their services back to NHS. In
other words the UK government is slowly
returning to private medicine through the back
door, while here in the Bahamas, we are walk-
ing into the chaos through the front door —
with eyes wide open.

Government, particularly Health Minister



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Dr Bernard Nottage, has promised local doctors
a copy of the actuarial report so that they can
determine for themselves the accuracy of gov-
ernment’s figures and how the projected $235
million cost of the plan was calculated. Already,
readers will note that it was only after the bill
had been safely manoevred through parliament
and the doctors were convinced to remain silent,
that Dr Nottage admitted that the insurance
plan could cost more than $235 million. He
acknowledged that drug costs and salaries, could
force up the NHI bill. This was obviously -in
preparation for the release of the ILO report,
which, contrary to what Mr Christie had told
Bahamians, did not give the Bahamas’ health
plan the “thumbs up.”

So far Bahamian doctors, despite the many
promises, have received nothing from govern-
ment.

On January 4 The Times of London report-
ed that in England NHS “patients are being
denied basic operations, including treatments for
varicose veins, wisdom teeth and bad backs, as
hospitals try frantically to balance the books
by the end of the financial year.

“NHS trusts throughout the country are mak-
ing sweeping cuts to services and delaying
appointments in an attempt to address their
debts before the end of March. Family doctors
have been told to send fewer patients to hospi-
tal. Accident and Emergency departments have
been instructed to turn people away, and a wide
range of routine procedures has been suspend-
ed.

“In one example of the cash-saving strategies,
seen by The Times, a primary care trust in York-
shire has told hospitals that they will not be
paid for some non-essential operations, while
patients will not be given a hospital appointment
in under eight weeks. Similar tactics have
emerged at hospitals in Norfolk and Surrey,
while dozens of trusts have resorted to closing
beds and offering voluntary redundancy in
recent months. Devon Primary Care Trust has
offered voluntary redundancy to all 5,000 staff.”

All non-urgent admission must be approved
by an assessment team or they will not be paid

_ for. Accident and Emergency departments in

several areas have been told that they will not be
paid for treating patients with minor ailments

_ who could go elsewhere — presumably to a

private doctor.

“No patients will be given a hospital appoint-
ment in less than eight weeks, and none admit-
ted for elective surgery unless they have waited
a minimum of 12 to 16 weeks. Those treated
quicker will not be paid for,” The Times reports.

This is what Bahamians have to look forward
to, especially as we are a country not noted for
balancing our books efficiently.

envelopes. If we really can’t
afford the carpentry, then let’s
just move the slot in the out-
side wall 12 or 18 inches high-
er so a larger catch bin can be
provided beneath the slots..
If someone bothered to think
about it there are no doubt
numerous ways to solve that
office’s security problem.

At the Fox Hill post office
the outgoing slot is located
only slightly above floor level,
and so poorly marked a

stranger wouldn’t have a clue

where to drop his outgoing
mail without asking the
friendly staff for guidance..

We have excellent sign
makers in the community.
Why then must the Shirley
Street post office have only a
filthy, crudely scribbled, faded
marker pen on a dirty wall
designating “Foreign” and
“Domestic” mail slots?

At the main downtown post
office in particular where
parking is always inadequate
why not provide a pull-in lane
where outgoing mail can be
deposited from autos into col-
lection boxes.? Why not at
most:-post offices?

Why not machine market
small booklets of stamps using
dollar bill-reading machines.
The US imposes a slight pre-
mium charge for such conve-
nient stamp booklets. This
could amortise the machines
in a drive through lane.

Why can’t each post office
have a posted printed collec-
tion time schedule so that cus-
tomers will know at what
hours and on what days their
mail is likely to be dis-
patched?

There used to be a number
of the typical handsome red
cast iron British PO collec-
tion boxes around town
(unless they’ve been aban-
doned). Could we not graph-
ically indicate the location of
them with expectation that
each will bear an updated col-
lection schedule on its side?
Our North American tourists

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Deviation from an
area’s original design

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE accept my best wishes for a prosperous, healthy
and happy New Year.

Sometimes the only way to get some action on certain
existing problems is to make them public by asking that arti-
cles be included in your daily newspaper. To that end I ask
you to print the following.

This is specific to the Coral Harbour area, but has implica-
tions for the whole of the Bahamas.

With few exceptions, Coral Harbour has been designated
as a single-family residential area. Despite this designation
the Physical Planning Department has approved multiple
dwellings to be built. The writer’s contention is that when a
deviation from the original design for the area is requested
that due notice be given (through a notice in the newspapers)
to the area residents so that they may comment upon the
deviation. After all the residents are the persons most affect-
ed. Also, it is very noticeable that, in the newer construction
processes, contractors ignore the reserves between buildings
and lot lines both at the rear and front of the properties. One
might ask just “where are the inspectors? It would appear, at
least to this contributor, that they should be making periodic
visits to sites and not wait for the contractors to request
approvals as certain phases are completed. It is much too
easy, at that point, to let transgressions pass. (To say nothing
about possible payouts for turning a “blind eye”.) Add to the
above, contractors have the bad habit of mixing cement on
paved roads, allowing heavy delivery trucks to drive over
verges and leave the area an environmental mess. Vigilance
by “frequent” inspections and heavy fines could eliminate
this.
Additionally, I would like to comment on the propensity of
residents who think that they have a right to extend their lot
lines onto the verges of the main road; some as much as 30
feet. In my opinion this is downright thievery. For over two
years now our committee has contacted those residents, the
relevant government departments, our elected representative
and the Minister of Works who all agree that this has to be
stopped, but have failed to follow through. Ironically some of
the transgressors are working for the government, the Police
and the Defence Force. So much for the slogan, “Help us to
Help you”. We have gone to the trouble of recording lot
numbers, names and locations and forwarded the same so
that it will be easier for the necessary follow-up. A letter

- should be hand-delivered by an inspector explaining the

transgression and the amount of time allocated for the cor-
rection. Failure to comply will lead to the Ministry of Works
removing the fencing, etc. There should be a heavy fine and
all cost to be borne by the resident who has not complied. If
there is no authority for this; apply to the courts for relief and
immediately pass legislation applicable to alleviating the
problem.

The time has come for all to get off their “duffs” and do:
their jobs. Paying salaries for people who only want to collect
a paycheck will no longer be tolerated and I urge all persons
to adopt the phrase, “We’ve had enough and we refuse to
take anymore.”

MS C
Nassau,
January 4, 2007.

LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

PAT A

We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department.
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.






Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter
no later than 31st January 2007 to:










HR Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas

a ee

+ ¢°s



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5





oln brief

Man denies |
marijuana
possession
charge

A NASSAU Village man
pleaded not guilty in Magis-
trate's Court Friday to a mar-
ijuana possession charge.

It was alleged that on
Thursday, January 4, Joseph
Dickinson, 21, was found in
possession of a quantity of
marijuana which authorities
believed he intended to sup-
ply to another.

Dickinson, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in court eight in Bank
Lane, pleaded not guilty to
the charge of possession with
intent to supply and was
granted $5,000 bail.

According to the prosecu-
tion, Dickinson was found in
possession of six grams of
marijuana. The case was
adjourned to May 23.

Canadian
admits to
having

marijuana

A CANADIAN appeared
in Magistrate's Court yester-
day to be charged with pos-
session of marijuana.

James Kaiser, 23, appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel. It was alleged that
Kaiser was found in posses-
sion of a quantity of marijua-
na while at Cabbage Beach
on Thursday, January 4.

Kaiser pleaded guilty to the
charge and was fined $250.

He was told that failure to
pay the fine would result in a
three-month prison sentence.

Four men

arrested after :

grouper are
discovered

POLICE arrested four
men on Cat Island Friday in
connection with the discoy-
ery of 900 pounds of Nassau
Grouper.

Taking, landing, process-
ing, selling or purchasing
Nassau Grouper is prohibit-
ed in the Bahamas from
December 1, 2006, through
February 28, 2007.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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MC aC Cae
eT 2aby/



Government has achieved
‘shockingly little’, says FNM

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Move-
ment issued a scathing attack
on the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty yesterday, claiming that after
almost four years in office the
“so-said so-done” government
has said “too much” and done
“shockingly little.”

According to the FNM, the

PLP, believing they could not:

be “outdone by the annual car-
nival”, utilised its own set of
“smoke and mirrors” in Decem-
ber, complete with “junkanoo
shuffles and verbal gymnastics”.

“We recently learned that a
government which boasts of
consultation may have withheld
important information relating
to National Health Insurance.
The PLP simply do not trust the
people with the facts.

“And almost three and a half
years after leading the nation
in mourning for the Sea Hauler
victims and making many



@ PERRY Christie is accused
of talking too much and
accomplishing little

' promises to them and their fam-

ilies, the Prime Minister and his
colleagues abandoned their
promises along with those who
still suffer from this tragedy,”
the party said.

The commentary continued
that it is with issues such as
these that accountability is

needed.

Since the Sea Hauler tragedy,
an independent Commission
appointed by the government
found that the Port Department
failed to adequately consider all
factors affecting a realistic
determination of the number of
passengers for whom approval
should have been given; failed
to obtain vital passenger infor-

. mation before boarding them;

failed to ensure that only the
approved number boarded;
failed to obtain an accurate
count of the number of passen-
gers; and failed to carry out stip-
ulations contained in the
approval letter by Port Officials
of the first mate or the captain.

The Commission also found
the Sea Hauler non-compliant,
because too many people were
allowed to sail aboard the ship
and that the port failed by
allowing the Sea Hauler to sail
with 150 person on board.

“In this and too many other
instances talkin’ fool is a very,

Man pleads with Immigration
to allow son-in-law to remain

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE father of a woman, mar-
ried to a Jamaican about to be
deported from the country, is
pleading for the Department of
Immigration to reconsider their
refusal of a resident spousal per-
mit, to allow his son-in-law to
stay in the Bahamas.

Reportedly the husband has
only 21 days before he must
vacate the country, and accord-

Po ing to the letter from the Immi-

gration department, his failure
to comply with this order will

result in him being “arrested,
detained, and deported”.

According to the father, his
daughter has a three year old
son with her husband; so to
force him from the country
would in essence be breaking
up a young family.

The father, who spoke on
condition of anonymity, said
that the young couple have
been married for “a little over a
year” and that they “can not
work”.

Reportedly they have fallen
behind on their rent in the past
and have been forced to take

up residence with a relative.

“With that Anna Nicole thing
they (Department of Immigra-
tion) said they were being effi-
cient — that this is how good
they are doing things? Well this
don’t seem to be good.

“And this situation needs to
be addressed because they have
a 3-year-old son. Now the fella’,
without him being able to work,
he has to leave the country
because they turned down his
spousal permit. Now the girl is
stuck here with a little child. I

call that breaking up a family,”

the father said.’

police

Armed robbers flee.from

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A HIGH speed police chase
resulted in two robbers crash-
ing their vehicle and having
to flee the scene on foot, leav-
ing a generator that they had
stolen only a short time earli-
er.

According to police press
liaison inspector Walter Evans,
around 11 o’clock Friday night,
a black Nissan Sentra pulled
up to a house, presently under
construction in the Westridge
area.

The home, he said, was being
manned by a security guard.
Despite this, however, the two
occupants of the Sentra got out
of the car, and demanded the
keys for the home. Reportedly

avi
ae

one of MRC WR carrying a
handgun.

The security guard was tied
up, and the men stole a genera-
tor from the home before flee-
ing the scene.

Mr Evans said that officers
in the Cable Beach-area had no
idea that the incident had
occurred, but while they were
on general patrol, they spotted
the vehicle. When the occupants
saw the patrol car, they sped
off.

A high speed chase followed,
Mr Evans said, and the Sentra
soon crashed into a fence.

“The occupants of the
vehicle escaped on foot, how-
ever the police were able to
recover the vehicle and the
generator that was stolen,”
he said.

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very serious thing. And Mr
Christie needs to remember
that ‘as Prime Minister’ talk is
not always cheap,” The FNM
said.

“Refusing to answer legiti-

mate questions on these and

other national issues is a dere-
liction of duty by the Prime
Minister who is duty bound to
uphold our laws, protect the
Constitution and guard our sov-
ereignty.

“Many have now come to the
conclusion that Mr Christie —
‘as Prime Minister’ — prefers
the trappings of office and not
the tough responsibilities that
come with the trust the people
have reposed in him. Bahami-
ans no longer trust Mr Christie’s

ability to make tough decisions, ,

to tell the whole truth, and to

discipline his own government,”

. the FNM said.

The party continued that
under the PLP transparency
and accountability have gone
the way of help and hope,
becoming “smoke and mirrors”.

“People are looking for more
substance and less pomp and
circumstance, for more effec-
tive governance and less empty
promises. In the next election
they will demonstrate that they
know exactly where to find it!

“The FNM trusts the
Bahamian people. The FNM
will not hide or disguise the
truth from the Bahamian peo-
ple. The FNM will restore
accountability and renew trust
in government so that we can
build a ‘better future for all,”
the party said.

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PART OF YOUR LIFE





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7







Ju

—— : a diciary members

attend Red Mass

CHIEF Justice Sir Burton
Hall and President of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer, with members of the
Bahamas judiciary, attended
the annual Red Mass held at
St Francis Cathedral yester-
day.

Archbishop Patrick Pinder
was the celebrant.

Also attending was Chief,

Justice of Canada Beverly
McLachlin and her husband
Frank McArdle.

The Red Mass is celebrat-
ed annually at the opening of
the judicial year for judges,
prosecutors, attorneys, law
school professors, law stu-
dents, and government offi-
cials.

The Mass requests guidance
from the Holy Spirit for all
who seek justice, and offers

the opportunity to reflect on |
what Catholics believe is the

God-given power and respon-
sibility of all in the legal pro-
fession.

The Red Mass takes its
name from the red vestments
worn by the celebrant and
judges. In the Roman Catholic
liturgy, red vestments sym-
bolize the Holy Spirit.

Additionally, judges of the
High Court of England and
all doctors of law wear red
robes.

One of the better-known
Red Masses is the one cele-
brated each fall at the Cathe-
dral of St Matthew the Apos-
tle in Washington, DC, on the
Sunday before the first Mon-
day in October — the
Supreme Court convenes on
the first Monday in October.

(Photo by
Franklyn G
Ferguson)







Features

Large Open Living Room with French Doors
Spacious outdoor patio for entertainment

270 Degree Wraparound balcony on second floor
Open Kitchen Plan

Additional Living space from converted garage
Detached Garage

Fully enclosed lot with lush native foliage

Bars and Security Alarm, Automatic Gate

Paved Driveway into property

Underground utilities at the lot

ASKING PRICE $550,000
557-1891 or E-mail greenwoodhome24@yahoo.com

Location: Greenwood Road — off Village Road
Lot Size: 200 x 144 average

House Size: 3200 Square Feet

Bedrooms: 3 (Optional 4th)

Bathrooms: 3.5

BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED



Bacardi & Company Limited, one of a global group of companies, is seeking
candidates for the position of Financial Analyst. The Company has been
based in Nassau for over 40 years with significant manufacturing operations
in the areas of bulk rum production and bottling of various spirit beverages,
primarily for export markets.

The Financial Analyst will report to the Assistant Financial Controller, and
will be responsible for the budgeting and analysis functions within the Finance
Department and the planning and implementation of the annual budget and
quarterly revised estimate processes across the entire organization.

In addition, the successful candidate is expected to manage the budget reporting
submissions to the parent company, including treasury forecasts. Other key
duties include monthly production reporting to our Global Operations Center,
management of our global product costing system, the quarterly financial
statement variance analyses, and other tasks as required by the Assistant
Financial Controller.

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation, a ‘CA’ or ‘CPA’
is preferred, with three (3) to five (5) years experience. The individual must
also possess the ability to work independently under pressure to consistently
meet deadlines, and must be a self starter and a team player.
Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum vitae directly
to Bacardi & Company Limited, P.O. Box N-4880, Nassau, Bahamas, Attention:
The Human Resources Manager.

Information may also be forwarded via email to: mlstuart@bacardi.com

Application Deadline: January 15, 2007. a

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUC



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic
Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.





ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 — Accounting for Beginners II

MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901-— Human Resource Management II




Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional development
_ in both private and public sectors with the added recognition that these courses have


























been equated to courses taken toward a degree programme. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBOOKS
This course is for the beginner who knows PRESENTATIONS ' This course trains new and existing small
3 y 5 very little about computers and does not This workshop is designed to provide business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
' understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the employees) in organizing and managing their
covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It accounting using QuickBooks Pro software,
| extensive hands-on practice using various foguses on developing effective and dynamic Students will learn how to set up their
pe rl art sl ee ro Ree ee software, including: PowerPoint presentations: f company files, chart of accounts, budget and
: (I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing customer, vendor and employee files.
(ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite; None
S H A H H A (iil) Microsoft Access - Database Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007 Pre-requisite: None
ss d Ele) at ion Mm rs ors are as K e d to a ote i h e fo | OW | n g aa) e€ CF a) g Ss: Management. Time: 9:30am ~ 4:30pm Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
‘ Duration: 1 day Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
S 4 Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: 6 weeks
0 rl ri 5 . we ei % :
DYem=t-(0it-lamer-tcellacleumr-lcelUlarclevelamWUlimercMare)celiarmeclamela(aleciivelammm °c elev. Sh ebnay, 07 Fees: S16000 re seeegeen
{ LJ =
_ Meeting on Friday, January Vena @ 6:00 p.m. in the E-Block, Section 01 (CEES) eG et so). aleeieceen dona
b Saturday, 3rd February, 2007 —_ Information Technology. The course provides Targeling persons who would like to create
a oom i 7 fo re | | 5 Saction 02 (CEES) Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, will caver Web page creation, Web site
5 Duration: 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML. Specific topics will
= D 8 30 a Se ctl on: AY 3 CS 02 Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
. 5 Tuition; $450.00 Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages,
EDU 325 Section: WB Pre-requisite: None :
c ; 5 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Begins: Wednesday, 7th February Pre-requisife: Participants must be
= D U 329 Sectio n: Vi) B This course covers the advanced concepts 2007 computer Iterate and have
o with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm a basic knowledge of
= D U 429 Sectio a W B : various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word processing
(}} Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: . CEES Computer Lab Dates: {st & 2nd March, 2007
‘ ° (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00
, 0 n H , H (ili) Microsoft Access - Database Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Ms. Wendy Riley will be holding a meeting for all students registered Management, ‘PG UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration; 2 days

This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Computer Lab

for Web Based EDU 301—Information Technology, Section et Pre-requisite; Computer Applications ! technology systems for use in information Fees: $850.00
(0 BRoYaMANAY ste lat=XXol-WANNFclalUrclaVAMROMMAOOVANlaMiialcMsci=llelel@inelelsa Mm Paclam te Sone come foun tonics Base Nerdnare, Opeatng






5 G @) @) m D Duration: 12 weeks Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
oI p S D Venue: CEES Computer Lab




: i Fees: $550,00 Pre-requisite: None
‘ Begins: Monday 12th February 2007

\N DBC «sa

All students concerned must attend. : .

Time: 6:00pm - 7:30pm
\N Monday & Wednesday






































Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
00.00



Duration: 12 weeks
\



kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course.

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs.

4 325-5714. «320-0093
__ 325-1930 - 302-4300 ext. 5202








Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

— von done anything COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE
special for yourself today? “= *° "rm


































: ACCOUNTING
Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’s —ccagag so} ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm MonWed 12-Feb 10 wks $250
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901 01. ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $275
5 ‘ ACCAQO2 Ot ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III §:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $300
With one of our courses, you can gain
new job skills, increase your chances for BUSINESS .
promotion or just learn something new for pusigo0 -«O1_—s CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225
personal satisfaction. With your success CUST900 «OTs SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:309m Thurs 22-Feb 1day $170
in courses such as Massage Therapy, BUSI90d ~=—»sOT_~—_— INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs «= 1-Mar = 10. wks $225
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you COMPUTERS
could even start a small business. Sign up COMPS01 Q1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-00pm Mon 5-Feb 12 wks $450
for a course today. COMPS01 Q2 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10:00am-1:00pm_ Sat 3-Feb 12 wks $450
; COMPS02 Q1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS {I 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb 12 wks $580
COMPS03 Ot INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | §:00-9:00pm Wed f-Feb 12wks $450
COMP 941 04 QUICKBOOKS §:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Gwks $330
COMP953 a PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm = MonWed = 12-Feb 12 wks $500
COMP96O QO} EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs &Mar tday $160
COMP930 Qt WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm — ThursfFri t-Mar 2 days $550





COSMETOLOGY




COSM802 (1) MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-8:00pm Mon 26-Feb 8 wks $225
COSM804 0 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-8:00pm Tue 2i-Feb Swks $225
GOSM80? Q1 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm MonThurs 26-Feb wks $500







DECORATING











DECOsOO —«01_—_—sINTERIOR DECORATING | _6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb Swks $225
DECO8O1 01 INTERIOR.DECORATINGH =~ 6:00-9:00pm =~ Tue 27-Feb Bwks $250
FLOR80O =O} FLORAL DESIGN | ~~ 6:00-9:00om Tue 27-Feb 10 wks $225
FLORBOL —-O1_~—- FLORAL DESIGN 6:00-9:00pm = Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $250
ENQUIRIES FLORGO2 01 FLORAL DESIGN tl 6:00-9:00pm’ Thurs = t-Mar 10. wks $300



Email :: perdev@cob.edu.bs







ENGLISH
ENG 900 0 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue d7-Feb Bwks $225
“ol 900 ) ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:20pm Mover 26-Feb 10 wks $250




All fees are included with the exception of
the application tee of $40.00 (one time).

+








CEES reserves the right to change ‘Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule
and Course Materials,




HEALTH & FITNESS

AASGIOO 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 2é-Feb TO wks $465
RASGSOt Q1 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $620
ALTH9OO 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $400





ee











MANAGEMENT
GMT900 = 01 ~~ HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT| 6:00-9:30pm Thurs 8-Feb 12 wks $250
GMT901 01 = HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT If 6:00-9:30pm Mon 5-Feb 12 wks $300

Contact the Coordinator




z=







MEDICAL

EDTSO0 Of MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 1Owks $225

me







SEWING
SEW 800 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 802 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING IT 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $250










SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Tues 27-Feb 1Owks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:00-9:00pm = Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $250
SEW814 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING | 1:00-10:00pm — Sat 24-Feb 10 wks $225




{
°



FES ew se tci2sa

eo ee ae

ee ee

= we me wut

seme me ew



\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAI

Visit our website at www.cab.edtbs EDUCATING & TRAINING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007 |

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide'participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee
motivation.

Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007

Time: 30am - 4:30pm

Venue: To be announced

Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm :

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $160.00

WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.

Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007

Time: 9:30am’. 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tultlon: $550.00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs
325-5714
er cleser

EPzcrerte

ext. 5202

Rie sia

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS i
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007

Time: 6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundarnentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hat Stone Therapy.
Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-2:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620.00 :
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: § Wednesday, 28th February, 2007

Time: 6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator 7 erdev(Mcob.edu.bs
326-0093
i i...

ley) 2 Rielen a. wA0y2



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS _—



Workers Party —
accuses PLP of

compromising

sovereignty

1 By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Perry Christie led Gov-
rnment has catastrophically
quashed the much anticipated
2lebration of the 40th anniver-
ary of majority rule by com-
romising the sovereignty of the
‘commonwealth of The
‘ahamas, Rodney Moncur
sader of the Workers Party
laimed in a release yesterday.

The PLP he said has aban-
oned the very principle and
2net of MILAT by allowing
five young Bahamian airport
‘orkers to be used as scape-
oats in a legal exercise in Mia-
u, Florida, that cannot pass the

crutiny of the British legal sys- .

2m of which the Bahamas was
nce an irrevocable partner.”

“Until the Government

egins to agitate in every inter-
ational fora available to it for
ie return of those five airport
vorkers to stand trial here in
he Commonwealth of The
sahamas where they allegedly
ommitted some heinous
ffences any attempt to cele-
‘rate or mark majority
ule should be regarded as far-
ical and hypocritical,” Mr
Moncur said.

The party leader said that this
‘overnment has taken away the
lignity of the Bahamian peo-
»le and Bahamians are no
onger able to hold their heads
1igh within the region because
hey have been found to be

RODNEY Moncur has accused the government of being



complicit in the arrest of five airport workers in the US

complicit in entrapping “these
five young Bahamian scape-
goats.”

“The Workers Party calls on
the nation and our religious
and civic leaders to continue
to recognize that drug traffick-
ing is a despicable offence
which all right thinking
Bahamians condemn and
abhor, but by the same token,
we will not tolerate the tram-
pling or abuse of the Constitu-
tional rights of any Bahamian
or the compromising of our
national sovereignty in a case
where the Royal Bahamas
Police Force need only to have
done its job and arrest and

charge those men here in the

Bahamas,” he said.
Instead, he pointed out, the

these men to work at the Sir.
Lynden Pindling Internationa!
Airport for almost six months
after the government was con-
fronted with a sealed indictment
out of a Miami District Court
against these men and yet the
government did nothing to pro-

- tect the integrity and national

security of that airport and
Bahamian people.

“A Government that does
not believe in the rule of law
and bends the rules to fit its own
peculiar position cannot be
trusted to negotiate in the bes!
interest of the Bahamian peo-
ple. This PLP administration
has now subjected the name of
Sir Lynden Pindling to once
again to be besmirched in Mia-
mi as it relates to drug traffick-
ing,” Mr Moncur claimed.

government and police allowed

E BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is to implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

International Liaison Officer (ILO)

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint ccnference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and. offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

_-Specific duties in the internationa! relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and

coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students' application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up- date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°’ January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF T.

Visit our website at www.cob.ediu.bs SOMO NSH GC WW





Fire in their bellies: Do
Caribbean leaders have it?

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat).

THE heads of government
of the 15-nation Caribbean
Community (CARICOM)

countries will meet shortly to
decide how they could take
their nations forward economi-
cally in a highly competitive
global environment.

Amongst the matters they
will consider is the governance
of CARICOM and a specific
proposal that they should estab-
lish a Commission which would

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oversee certain agreed matters
such as the external trade rela-
tions of the grouping and the
development of the Caribbean
Single Market (CSM) which
was established last year.

The Bahamas has indicated
that it will not be a part of the
Single Market, and Haiti is
restricted from joining for the
time being

The proposal for a CARI-
COM Commission was made
15 years ago by the West Indian
Commission, but it was never
implemented.

Recently, a former Prime
Minister of Jamaica, Edward
Seaga, predicted that CARI-
COM is “likely to face a slide,
not a climb, in the future”
because of the absence from
regional decision-making at a
governmental level of certain
leaders. Specifically, he named
two former Prime Ministers, P J
Patterson of Jamaica and Ken-
ny Anthony of St Lucia.

He claimed that apart from
Owen Arthur of Barbados
(who, he said, has indicated that
he will be retiring soon) and
Ralph Gonsalves of St Vincent,

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“the present group of leaders
are supporters but have far less
fire in their bellies to carry on a
campaign (for greater regional
economic integration) with pas-
sion”.

Mr Seaga also posited the
view that the establishment of a
CARICOM Commission would
not work, and that anyone who
believes that it would “does not
understand the psyche of
Caribbean leaders nor, indeed,
the people”.

Implicit in Mr Seaga’s pre-
sentation is that neither the
majority of the present crop of
CARICOM leaders, nor the
majority of the people, want a
more economically integrated
region, and, certainly, they do
not want a CARICOM Com-
mission making decisions for

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‘Heads of Government.



their countries.

Of course, on the matter of
the Commission, Mr Seaga’s
presentation overlooks the spe-
cific recommendation of every
proposal that any Commission
must take instructions from, and
be answerable to, CARICOM
Fur-
ther, the Commission will have
delegated authority and
accountability only for such
matters as national govern-

ments assign to it particularly*

because those matters are better
handled with the collective
strength of regional govern-
ments than by a weaker nation-
al government on its own.

As to the issue of whether
leaders have “less fire in their
bellies” for the regional inte-
gration project generally and a
CARICOM Commission in
particular, time will tell and the
forthcoming meeting of Heads
of Government will be a good
indicator. If the establishment
of the Commission is again
delayed despite three reports
that strongly recommend it,
then CARICOM leaders would
have proved Mr Seaga to be
right.

And, there would be wider
implications for the region.

Many businesses in the mem-
ber states of CARICOM are
eager to widen their markets
beyond their national bound-
aries and into the wider
Caribbean community. They
are anxious that governments
should provide the environment
by which they can do so; they
want the barriers to trade lifted
in both goods and services.

Financial institutions — insur-
ance companies and banks —
based in Trinidad, Barbados
and Jamaica are already engag-

_ ing in pan-Caribbean transac-

tions providing capital to gov-
ernments and businesses —
Jamaica, Barbados, Belize and
several of the Leeward and
Windward islands have been
beneficiaries of such financing.
The financial institutions could
do more if the cross-border con-
trols and restrictions are lifted.

Governments might well
wake up one morning to find
that, to a certain extent, both
market and production integra-
tion have taken place around
them. But, in this scenario there
will be more losers in the busi-
ness community than there
might be if the process of liber-
alization is orderly and regulat-
ed.

Already, there should have
been deeper. and more mean-
ingful involvement of the
region’s private sector and its
trade unions in both the devel-
opment of the Caribbean Single
Market and in the trade and
investment negotiations with



La CASITA

The Art of Island Living

THE TRIBUNE

@ SIR Ronald Sanders

the European Union (EU) and
at the World Trade Organiza-
tion (WTO). However, theo-
retically sound may be the stud-
ies of the region’s technical
experts, there is a practicality
to doing business whose
requirements are best addressed
by business people themselves.

Both at the national and
regional levels, the private sec-
tor ought to be integral parties
to negotiations.

Some businesses in the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands,
the members of the Organiza-
tion of Eastern Caribbean
States (OECS), are worried
about being displaced in their
own domestic markets by firms
from the larger CARICOM
countries.

In this connection, there is a
crying need for the private sec-
tor throughout the region to
map out their own strategy for
sharing the Single Market
through mergers, alliances or
cooperation. There is urgency
for a bargain between them
which allows for equity in how
the market is shared. Whatever
formula results from a bargain
will hurt some businesses, but
no bargain will harm far more.

Further, the private sector
should have a team that plays
an advisory and consultative
role to the region’s trade and
aid negotiators.

The initiative for such activ-
ity should be taken by the
regional private sector itself. If it
fails to do so, it cannot com-
plain if it is dissatisfied with the
results of the trade and invest-
ment negotiations in which
CARICOM governments are
now involved. In this regard, the
Caribbean Hotels Association
(CHA) have shown the way by
being forceful in pushing
tourism on to the agenda of dis-
cussion between the EU and
the Caribbean. Others in the
services industry should follow.

It is to be hoped that there is
still “fire in the bellies” for
deeper regional integration not
only of the private sector firms
that are already forging ahead,
but of government leaders, the
trade union movement and oth-
ers in the CARICOM business
community.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com



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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

Cuba’s youth newspaper

warns against consumerism
ater rise in holiday shopping

m@ HAVANA

CUBA'S official youth
newspaper on Sunday report-
ed an increase in holiday toy
shopping this year and
expressed concern that grow-
ing celebration of religious
holidays could bring a rise in
consumerism on the commu-
nist-run island, according to
Associated Press.

In a two-page article, the
Communist Party's Juventud
Rebelde newspaper report-
ed on the revival in Cuba of
the Jan. 6 "Three Kings
Day," a Latin American tra-
dition of gift-giving for chil-
dren that commemorates the
arrival of three wise men
who, according to the Bible,
offered the newborn Jesus
gifts of gold, frankincense
and myrrh.

Tradition

"A tradition that seemed
extinct in Cuban society rises
again," the state-run news-
paper said: "Although no one
sees celebrating the millen-
nial festivity of the Three
Kings as heresy, the danger
could be in (the holiday)
accentuating consumerist
habits and social differences."

Christmas is a low-key
affair on the communist-run
island, where the adoption of
official atheism in 1962 led
leaders to discourage reli-
gious celebrations.

Cubans weren't given a day
off for Christmas between
1969 and 1997, when the hol-
iday was restored ahead of a
historic visit by Pope John
Paul II in 1998 and as restric-
tions on religion were eased.

Even so state-run depart-
ment stores offer no special
promotions or sales on toys





PLACE MATS
TABLE CLOTHS

Eb Sb Cts ED EBs EID Es WEG WED EBs EB Wl Es CD Be Ds EBs Ba WE “Ela ts tela ls Sas WE Ela lo EDs ED SER Els CD OE le a i a Ws at Wil ts Weis ta CD El YE eld Wits io ih ts a ts ike ta ite to Waa ik ts Wh Wile EDs Cl ts EB EB EBs A EE GES Gry

THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS

MAIN STREET BATH TOWELS
TOUCH OF VELVET SHEET SETS

THE TRIBUNE

Article reports on
the revival of
‘Three Kings Day’



this time of year.

Those interviewed for the
Juventud Rebelde article
attributed the increase of gift-
giving in Cuba to the influ-
ence of globalization and vis-
its by Cuban-Americans and
others living abroad.

"During these days, one
can hardly move around the
toy department of stores" in
Havana, the article said.

The newspaper published
photographs of shoppers
holding several bags and chil-
dren playing with toys. Raisa
Vazquez, a manager of
Havana's La Epoca depart-
ment store, was quoted as
saying toy sales were the
highest this year since the
store reopened in 1998.

"The enormous demand
has forced us to spread out
the toys to other depart-
ments, like the hardware sec-
tion or the area with school
supplies, so that the customer
doesn't have to wait in such
an immense line," Vazquez
told the newspaper.

No specific sales numbers
were reported.

Some of those interviewed
by Juventud Rebelde
expressed disdain for the
resurgence of the holiday,
calling it "a tradition of cap-
italist countries" and saying
that children should be given
presents for good behavior
and academic performance
rather than for religious or
cultural reasons.

SSS OP GD WP GAY GH WY 4H GUT GAP GY WG HF A ANY AP GAY AY GI HG GY GH AP GAT OY GND AT GS AV GP AP GT GS AY AE AG AY QP AS AF GH GV GF GG A GT GT AH



SINGLE POTS & FRY PANS

FITTED & FLAT SHEETS

WINDOW CURTAINS & PANELS
PFALTZGRAFF DINNERWARE SETS
POPULAR BATH WINDOW

& SHOWER CURTAINS

Eisen e450 Ge aH ED AOD EINE GND ANN HEED SEED GE HEND HRD HER HIND GON IEE AND GUAT ND NT ENE ANID AINE UNE NN ENN HED HED aN HUD HN HED AED HEN HEED URN aE HEED HER ERR NH HT HED NED EW HY

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

University professors
warned that universal gift-
giving can highlight econom-
ic differences and make some
children feel bad.

Objective

"What should worry us is
the social connotation that
this could have, making it an
objective of families to buy
the most ostentatious gift,"
Teresa Munoz, a sociology
professor at the University
of Havana, told the newspa-

er.

"The solution is not to pro-
hibit (the celebration) but
rather to be conscientious of
the consequences we could
face creating consumerist

habits that deform little ones

and make them feel superior
to their companions."

The Three Kings Day tra-
dition comes from Spain and
was so ingrained in Cuba that
the rebels led by Castro in
the 1950s gave toys on the
holiday to children in the
mountains where they were
fighting the Cuban revolu-
tion.

On Monday, the office of
Havana's city historian will
distribute 100,000 toys to ,
children at schools in Old
Havana, celebrating not only
the holiday but also to honor
Castro's Jan. 8 entrance into
Havana after the triumph of
his revolution.



KG

PICTURE FRAMES

oS

2D GD, GL CB Gy GL CR > Lt Wits ln With ite Uta Ulte Wte Ulta Utes lite Wilh. Wt tte Ute le Uta Wilts Wie te tte Ulta Wt tite Wil Wht» ite Wile Ute Ut Ute lt Uta Wht “tht Ut We Uta We, “tt Ul Wtltn Wht itt, Ute With Whit tite Ulla Wilts te ‘tte tle Cl Ulett Uhl lle Uhh Ulls “tte Ulla Wt “ite Uli titty Wille Ute Wits Cie Cle Cio Cia






THE TRIBUNE




ff LONDON

TREASURY chief Gordon
Brown, expected to succeed
‘Yony Blair as prime minister
by September, suggested Sun-
day that he will pursue an Iraq
policy that is more independent
of Washington than the current
government, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Brown acknowledged that
mistakes were made in the
aftermath of the invasion and
promised to be “very frank”
with President Bush. He also
said that Britain is likely to
scale down its commitment of
troops to Iraq over the next
year — even as the White
House is considering dispatch-
ing thousands more, at least
temporarily.

Brown’s comments, aired on
the British Broadcasting
Corp.’s Sunday AM program,
seemed intended to distinguish
himself from Blair, who has
been criticized in Britain for his
strong support for Bush and the
war, both unpopular here.

“T look forward, if I am in a
new position, to working with
the president of the United
States, George Bush,” Brown
said. “Obviously, people who
know me know that I will speak
my mind. I will be very frank.
The British national interest is
what I and my colleagues are
about.”

A spokesman for the U.S.
State Department declined to
comment on Brown’s interview.

Blair has said he will step
down as prime minister and
leader of the governing Labour
party before September.
Brown, who is credited with
helping Blair reinvigorate the
Labour party, is unlikely to face
any credible challenge when the
party elects a new leader,
who will automatically
become Britain’s new prime
minister.

Brown, in the BBC interview,
also said that Saddam Hussein’s
execution — in which Saddam,
a Sunni Arab, was taunted with

B® BRITISH Treasury chief
Gordon Brown
(AP FILE Photo)

the name of a-radical Shiite
cleric — had done nothing to
help stem Iraq’s sectarian vio-
lence.

“Now that we know the full
picture of what happened, we
can sum this up as a deplorable
set of events,” Brown told the
BBC. “It is something, of
course, which the Iraqi govern-
ment has now expressed its
anxiety and shame at.”

Blair, who previously
declined to comment on the
hanging, said through his press
office Sunday that the manner
of Saddam’s execution was
“completely wrong.”

Brown also told the BBC
that he believed the ideologi-
cal battle for the hearts and
minds of young Muslims was
as crucial as the battle against
communism was for previous
generations.

Brown, in charge of Britain’s
Treasury since 1997, said he
had worked with officials across
the American political divide
and remained close to ex-Fed-

Come to the



eral Reserve chairman Alan
Greenspan and former
Treasury Secretary Robert
Rubin.

In the interview, recorded on
Saturday, Brown also said he
believed there should be some
form of inquiry into the after-
math of the 2003 U.S.-led inva-
sion.

“There are lessons to be
learnt, particularly from what
happened immediately after
Saddam Hussein fell,” he told
the BBC.

“One is that in Iraq itself
there is absolutely no doubt —
and L think people will agree
on this in time — that the pas-
sage of authority to the local
population should have begun a
lot earlier, so they had to take
more responsibility for what
was happening in their own
country.”

He said the experience of
insurgency in Iraq and Islamic
extremist terrorism had proven
that “we will not win against
extreme terrorist activities and
propaganda activities unless we
have this battle for hearts and
minds as well.”

The Treasury chief said he
believed Britain was unlikely
to join any future U.S. plan to
temporarily increase troop
numbers in Iraq, aimed at
stemming the current blood-
shed. .

Britain would “continue to
move troops from combat to
training, to complete the rede-
velopment work” and was like-
ly to scale down their presence
over the next few months.

Britain has around 7,000 sol-
diers stationed in southern Iraq,
mainly based around the city
of Basra.

“L believe it is true to say that
by the end of the year, there
may be thousands less in Iraq
than there are now,” Brown
said.

Parliament would also have a
stronger role under his leader-
ship, Brown said, and be more
able to hold the government to
account.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 15



New childbirth-related training



and certification courses available

THE Childbirth and Post-
partum Professional Associa-
tion announced that it now
has seven new childbirth-relat-
ed training and certification

courses available for health-
care professionals in Grand
Bahama and_ elsewhere
throughout the Bahamas.

is the Advanced Adoption
Certification Programme.
This programme provides
the candidate with informa-
tion and training so that they

Women encouraged |



Among them, said CAPPA, '

to register to vote |



CALLING on the women of the FNM to
rally around the party’s Women’s Associa-
tion, association president Caron Shepherd
encouraged all women to ensure that they
are registered to vote in the upcoming Gen-
eral Election.

“Women have always been the driving
force behind the elections. Our women have
always stepped up to the plate; it has been
women for every election that have cast
their ballots more than their male counter-
parts and we anticipate that this time will be
no different,” Ms Shepherd said.

The association ‘president said that the

General Election. We the women of our
great party will be called upon to band
together in a number activities,” she said.

She challenged the women in her group
to take a more hands on approach and to be
more visible in their respective communi-
ties.

“It will be incumbent upon us to contin-
ue to influence our issues on women and
position ourselves to be able to present
legislation that will affect change for
women.

“These laws will improve the conditions
of women in all aspects of our society. We
must therefore be ready to defend our sis-

FNM’s women’s association can look for-
ward to an exciting year.

“I encourage all women to ensure that
they are registered to vote in the upcoming



Cindy Sheehan, other
activists arrive in Cuba
for Guantanamo protest

HAVANA



_ AMERICAN "peace mom" Cindy Sheehan called for the clo-
sure of the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo, Cuba, as she and
other activists arrived here Saturday to draw attention to the
nearly 400 terror suspects still held at the remote site, according
to Associated Press.

Sheehan is among 12 human sights and anti-war activists
who will travel across this Caribbean island next week, arriving
at the main gate of the Guantanamo base on Thursday — five
years after the first prisoners were flown in.

" Anyone who knows me knows that I am not afraid of any-
thing," Sheehan said when asked about the possibility of U.S.
sanctions for traveling to communist-run Cuba, which remains
under an American trade embargo. \

"What is more important is the inhumanity that my govern-
ment is perpetrating at Guantanamo," she told reporters.

Sheehan, 49, of Vacaville, California, became an anti-war
activist known as the "peace mom" after her 24-year-old son
Casey was killed in Iraq in April 2004. She drew international
attention by camping outside U.S. President George W. Bush's
ranch to protest the war, and has been arrested numerous times
for trespassing.

Sheehan arrived in Havana early Saturday evening with trip
organizer Medea Benjamin, of the California nonprofit groups
Global Exchange and Codepink.

Benjamin said the protesters believe they are exempt from
U.S. travel restrictions on Cuba because they were traveling as
professional human rights activists who will attend a daylong
international conference in the Cuban city of Guantanamo on
Wednesday. j :

Arriving in the same group was former Army Col. Ann
Wright, who resigned-over the war in Iraq; Tiffany Burns of
Gold Star Families for Peace, representing relatives of soldiers
killed in Iraq; and Adele Welty, mother of firefighter Timothy
Welty, who died in the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

The other seven activists were expected to arrive in Havana
over the weekend. < - oe a pee

"In the names of my son and all the others who died in 9/11,
great acts of inhumanity are being perpetuated in Guantanamo
and Iraq," Welty said. ' Wee

The U.S. military still holds about 395 men on suspicion of
links to al-Oaida or the Taliban, including about 85 who have
been cleared to be released or transferred to other countries.
The military says it wants to’ charge 60 to 80 detainees and
bring them to trial.

Wright said that the group's protest outside the Guantanamo
base will coincide with demonstrations around the world calling
on the United States to shut the remote prison.

"There needs to be justice, just not with a military prison," she
said, adding that the prisoners should be subjected to a "real
judicial process" in U.S, federal courts.

In December 2005, American Christians with the Witness
oo. Torture activist group held a protest march outside
the base.

ioe +" So che) SMUT Fol CA Sa



ters in the right causes and let them knew
that we do care, how large or small it may
be,” Ms Shepherd said.



@ WOMEN’S Association
president Caron Shepherd

may better support and assist
those involved in an adoption.

The process will provide
childbirth professionals with
tools and understanding to







assist both birth parents and
adoptive parents throughout
the process of labour and
delivery as well as the post-
partum period.

The course will produce
professionals who have train-
ing in the various emotional
and physical aspects that are
unique to the adoption situa-
tion, and who are prepared to
offer support as well as refer
clients to qualified personnel
within the community.

Also, CAPPA will offer
additional training and certi-
fication in Teen Childbirth
Support and Adoption.

The organisation explained
that expectant teens, due to
their unique needs, present

‘ special challenges.

“As childbirth profession-
als it is our responsibility to
be familiar with the issues and
topics that are pertinent to
expectant young families,”
CAPPA said in a statement.

The CAPPA Teen Support
Programme candidate will
learn how to:

e Establish the unique needs

We want to express our appreciation

of expectant teens.

e Summarise the vital com-

ponents of a childbirth edu-
cation class or teen support
group.
e Identify the various
resources available to assist
childbirth professionals
who work with pregnant
teens.

¢ Understand the conflicts
of pregnancy during the ado-
lescent stage of development.

e Establish skills necessary
to teach and support pregnant
and parenting teens.

CAPPA, a non-profit
organisation, has two fold mis-
sion: to provide professional
membership and training in
related women’s health fields,
and to provide the
public access to these profes-
sionals.

These consist of childbirth
and lactation educators,
antepartum, labour and post-
partum doulas, advanced cer-
tifications in teen support, and
adoption support; and the
Advanced Comfort Measures
training class.



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THE TRIBUNE

BAY STREET, from 1B

future”, ‘

In response to a question about
the dirty streets in between Eliza-
beth Avenue and the British Colo-
nial Hilton, Ms Walkine said the
Ministry of Tourism had been
“pushing for quite some time” for a
Downtown Authority with the pow-
ers and resources to tackle all the
issues surrounding the operation
and maintenance of downtown Nas-
sau.

She added that creating such an
Authority “hadn’t been as easy” as
some may have thought, as it
required legislation and other things
to fall into place.

However, the Prime Minister’s
Office and Nassau Economic and
Development Commission had

_begun to move the initiative for-

.”-ward. Ms Walkine said the Ministry

of Tourism had itself spent “a dis-
proportionate amount of money on
cleaning the streets”, adding that
the “Bay Street owners need to be
pulled together”.

“It’s a challenge. We’re closer
now than for quite some time to
getting resolution to that particu-

_. lar problem,” Ms Walkine said.

The Western Hemisphere Trav-
el Initiative (WHTI), which comes
into effect on January 23, 2007, and
requires US citizens traveling to the
Bahamas to possess a passport to
re-enter their home country. The
Bahamian tourism industry is con-
cerned that this could reduce the
number of US visitors, as the cost
and difficulty of obtaining passports
might encourage them to vacation
at home or choose other destina-
tions.

Ms Walkine said the Ministry of
Tourism’s own research indicated
that “more than” 70 per cent of
Americans who visited the
Bahamas possessed passports,

although this did not mean they all

used them to travel to this nation.
Currently, a driver’s licence is good
enough for re-entry.

The Tourism director-general
said the previously more relaxed
US re-entry policy had “shored up
our comparative advantage of prox-
imity” to the US, its major tourism
market.

Ms Walkine said: “We could
potentially lose the franchise we’ve
now held for a long time, that of
the quick getaway destination.” The
Bahamas had long appealed to
impulse travelers, particularly from
Florida, who could decide on a Fri-
day night to travel to the Bahamas
the next day. If they do not have
passports, that will no longer be
possible.

Ms Walkine added that most oth-
er Caribbean nations faced the
same issues in relation to the WHTI
as the Bahamas, and this nation’s
proximity to the US and other
advantages “stand us in very good
stead” compared to regional rivals.

She added the processing and
issuing of passports on the US side
had been “unbelievably stepped
up”, but said the process of edu-
cating Americans about the pass-
port requirement had “started later
than it should” in Washington.

“The Caribbean countries have
done better about getting the word
out on this passport requirement
than the US government,” Ms
Walkine said. ;

Ms Walkine told Rotarians that
competition in the global tourism
industry was increasing, with guests
becoming increasingly demanding
and expecting their expectations to
be exceeded.

She pointed out that in the
Caribbean, Mexico, Dominican
Republic and Cuba all had much
higher stopover visitor volumes
than the Bahamas, the Dominican
Republic’s being more than dou-
ble despite having half the per capi-
ta GDP of the Bahamas.

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5B

Japan boasted man-made beach-
es, with sand and blue water, in an
indoor complex, while the United
Arab Emirates was manufacturing
beaches, private islands and snow
resorts.

The advent of the Internet had
given tourists even more freedom to
choose their vacation destinations,
meaning the Bahamas had to raise
its competitiveness and enter new
markets, while growing and sus-
taining existing ones.

Ms Walkine said this nation had
to sell “the experiences of the
islands of the Bahamas”. She
added: “The experience is not the
hotel brand that can be found in
other parts of the world, nor the
products and services required to
maintain that brand, which are usu-
ally standard for brand groups.

“But the experience is everything
else. From the second a visitor steps
off of an aircraft or boat, to the
moment of departure, and it is all
things in between that we ‘need
Bahamians to take ownership of
that will help us to continually meet
and rise above the challenge of the
new tourism global order.”

Ms Walkine said the Bahamas
had to identify and cultivate things
that were “uniquely Bahamian” as
it could not compete on infrastruc-
ture with the likes of Dubai and
Japan.

She pointed out that Caribbean
Travel & Life magazine’s ‘Best of
the Caribbean 2007’ poll of visitor
favourites did not rank the
Bahamas among the top seven that
were best for local food. Nor did
the Bahamas make the top eight in
the best adventure destination cat-
egory.

The Bahamas ranked fifth in the
snorkeling and scuba diving cate-
gories, while Kalik was fourth
among Caribbean beers. Its people
ranked as the second friendliest
after Jamaica, and some resort
properties were also ranked highly.



RESORT, from 1B

wanted, was not the scale we want-
ed”.
Mr Lauth said he and his group

- wanted to avoid a high density

a development, instead preferring a

y

- project where all the real estate was
“set back from the ocean. Paul
Thompson, former managing direc-

tor of the Lyford Cay Club, will run
the hotel and resort operations once
it is constructed.

Mr Lauth said French Leave had
been unable to start real estate sales
because it was still waiting on Town
Planning approval from the Gov-
ernment, something the project
hoped to have “imminently”. He
added that he understood his attor-
ney, Valentine Grimes, had

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

BENTLEY LIMITED

IBC No 105,342 B

dn Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with
Section 137 (1)(G) of the International Business
‘Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, Bentley
Limited has been dissolved and has been struck off the |
Register of Companies with effect from the 15th

day of December, 2006.



NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

CUSHMAN INTERNATIONAL LTD.
Liquidator’s Notice

Pursuant To Section 137 (6) Of
The International Business Companies Act.

We, Captain Salihu Baba Shafii and Obioha Jude Idigbe,
Liquidators of CUSHMAN INTERNATIONAL LTD.,
hereby clarify that the winding-up and dissolution of
CUSHMAN INTERNATIONAL LTD., has been
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated this 17th day of November 2006.

Signed











friendly and professional.

NOTICE OF VACANCY

2nd chef for The Landing Restaurant, Harbour Island.
Applicant must have working knowledge of preparation of
“Sydney” cuisine with at least 5 years experience working in
Australian kitchens. Successful applicant will be able to devise
and prepare daily specials. Successful applicant will also be
fully responsible for the preparation of all desserts.

The Landing has 10 year reputation for its fine cuisine with
a distinctive Australian accent. Applicant must be adaptable,

All responses can be sent to:

The Landing

Chef Position

P.O. Box 190

Harbour Island
Bahamas
Fax: 242-333-2650

e-mail: thelanding@ coralwave.com



received a communication from the
Government on Friday, although
lhe did not know what was in it.

Mr Lauth acknowledged that
there had been “a lot of frustra-
tion” over his project getting start-
ed. He added that ‘soft sales’ to the
project’s ‘founders’, the first group
of people to show an interest in the
project, had begun in mid-Decem-
ber and were due to last for 60-90
days. French Leave had received
over 1,000 inquiries to its website,
Mr Lauth added.

“We’ve completed the design
process, and are waiting to see what
approvals we’ve got from the
Bahamian government,” he said.
“What we’re actually doing right
now is waiting for the final town
planning agreement with the Gov-
ernment.”

The first phase at French Leave
will consist of 68 luxury condo-
miniums, all no higher than two-
storeys, on the oceanfront. If¢lud-
ed among the condos will be 10 cot-
tages.

Other components of the first
phase include 17 villas and 10
oceanfront home sites, plus a 50-
slip marina at Governor’s Harbour

‘for luxury yachts.

Approvals for that marina are
still awaited, but Mr Lauth indicat-
ed he was unlikely to praceed with
plans for a second marina on the
Atlantic side of Eleuthera at Savan-
nah Sound. No approvals for that
have yet been received, and Prime
Minister Perry Christie had previ-
ously expressed concerns about the
environmental impact such a mari-
na development might have on the
Sound.

Mr Lauth said the first phase
would cover about 200 acres.
Future expansions after that will
include interior home sites on the
ridge overlooking Governor’s Har-
bour, and one to two-bed antique
cottages around the Governor’s
Harbour marina.

He added that French Leave was
likely to employ “a few hundred
people” during the construction
phase, and “easily”100 full-time
workers once it became fully oper-
ational. The project, Mr Lauth said,
was also likely to generate at least
100 spin-off jobs, and French Leave
was also seeking government
approval to use wind turbines and
solar panels to generate its elec-
tricity.

Mr Lauth said French Leave had
also set aside 50 acres of land on
the southern ridge of Governor’s
Harbour to be developed by
Bahamians only. There were also
plans for a clinic and police station. ©

CODE
‘

Ms Walkine acknowledged that
on local entertainment, friendly
people, beaches and quality service,
the Bahamas “tends to rank lower
than we’d like, and that’s a concern
to us”.

However, she said the outcome
of such surveys often depended on
variables such as the publication’s
target audience, when the questions
were asked and where people had
taken their vacations.

Ms Walkine said repeat visitor
numbers to the Family Islands were
“very strong”, and were getting bet-
ter on Nassau/Paradise Island,
although there was work to do on
Grand Bahama.

She added that 23 per cent of
tourism’s direct contribution to
GDP was real estate, 19 per cent
recreation; 9 per cent transporta-
tion; 5 per cent real estate. Tourism
also generated 70 per cent of all
restaurant sales in the Bahamas,
and two-thirds of all service pro-
duction.



















literate.

SS

(SHI




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PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 THE TRIBUNE .~



Liquidator’s ‘co-mingling’ concern over Suisse Security missing funds

FROM page 1B

rity on the grounds that the
bank’s Privy Council appeal had
yet to be heard.

Mr Winder’s attorneys, McK-
inney, Turner & Co, wrote to Mr
Ryan on November 10, 2005,
seeking information on the funds
held by the two IBCs, SSH and
SSI. SSH, which was registered
at the office of Mr Ryan’s law
firm, Ryan & Co, held accounts

with UBS Geneva. SSI held the
funds at the-then Barclays Bank
(now FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank) in Nassau, and Mr
Harajchi’s son, Michel, was its
sole shareholder.

The letter said Mr Winder was
unable to obtain any information
on the UBS account held by SSH,
while communications on SSI’s
behalf by Ryan & Co, on March
13, 2001, and on April 11, 2001,
by Suisse security’s managing

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
; (No.45 of 2000)

ARTCOMPUTER LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)

of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
.2000, the Dissolution of ARTCOMPUTER LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
December 29, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT |
(No.45 of 2000)

SUTHERLAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of SUTHERLAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
December 29, 2006

director, Chris Lunn, and Tara
Butler closed the SSI accounts
with Barclays.

McKinney, Turner: & Co,
requested information on where
the funds held with UBS and Bar-
clays were located, and sought
letters from SSH and SSI autho-
rising institutions who now held
the funds to co-operate with the
liquidator.

Mr Ryan, though, replied on
November 15, 2005, that the
undertaking would only take
effect once the Privy Council

‘appeal was heard. Then, on

March 14, 2006, Mr Ryan sent a

letter advising that Mr Harajchi .

had “engaged the services of
forensic accountants in Europe
to undertake the tracing of funds”
that Mr Winder had alleged were
missing.

These were the funds held by

SSH at UBS Geneva, and Mr
Ryan requested that Mr Winder
allow the accountants to audit
Suisse Security’s accounts with
Tucker Anthony, now RBC Dain
Rauscher, the bank’s former cor-
respondent broker, as part of the
effort. He also produced SSH’s
bank statements with UBS Gene-
va.
Mr Winder’s attorneys replied
on March 15, 2006, recalling a
conversation “in which Mr Ryan
stated that his client, Mr Hara-
jehi, had instructed UBS Switzer-
land to wire between $22-$23 mil-
lion to Tucker Anthony, New
York”.

Some 13 debit advices, detail-
ing transactions between July 27,
2000, and November 28, 2000,

showing transactions authorised
by Mr Harajchi for sums totalling
$26 million to be transferred’ to
Suisse Security from UBS Gene-
va were provided to Mr Winder.

However, Mr Winder’s attor-
neys said the debit advices “fall
far short of the information” he
requested. “My attorneys remind-
ed Mr Ryan that Mr Harajchi had
assured us that his only interest at
this time was to ensure that his
name is not besmirched, and to
this end he had said he would
cooperate fully with me,” Mr
Winder wrote.

“Mr Harajchi indicated that he
would send me copies of bank
confirmations and statements
which Mr Ryan had in his pos-
session so that all questions with
respect to monies due to the bank
could be cleared up....... ”

Mr Ryan provided Mr Winder
with the accountants’ report, dat-
ed March 23, 2006, on April 3.
The report, by Synergie & Parte-

naires Societe Fiduciare, stated °

“that the money is transferred
from Suisse Security Holdings to
Suisse Security Bank & Trust.
The report added that the same
SSH account “was used from Mr
Harajchi for private businesses”.

A frustrated Mr Winder said
the debit advices analysed by the
accountants were for dates well
before Suisse Security’s licence
was revoked in 2001, and his
appointment. As a result, they
were all transactions included in
the bank and broker balances he
had seen.

He added that Mr Harajchi’s
Swiss attorneys sent McKinney,

Baker’s Bay

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for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Responsibilities will include:

Attributes:

Turner & Co a letter on April 24,
2006, stating that their client was
“unable to provide me with the
documents and data processing
information which I requested
simply because all of the docu-
ments are in my care”.

Mr Winder wrote: “With
regards to SSI, Mr Harajchi’s
Swiss attorneys stated that Mr
Harajchi has no objections to me
going to Barclays Bank in Nas-
sau to check into the movements
of the account.

“As regards SSH, Mr Hara-
jehi’s attorneys stated that Mr
Harajchi’s position is that he
transferred the sum of $29.799
million to the account of the bank
in New York at Tucker Anthony.

“He added that out of that sum
transferred, $2.7 million belonged
to Mr Harajchi personally. He
also stated that an audit was car-
ried out on all the amounts exit-
ing from the UBS Geneva
account.”

Mr Winder added: “If it is
indeed the case, the co-mingling
of Mr Harajchi’s personal funds,
along with the funds of the bank
and other private businesses, into
the same SSH account at UBS
Geneva, speaks volumes as to the
management of the accounts by
Mr Harajchi and his management
team. “Moreover, it is abundant-

ly clear that in the same way that.

Mr Harajchi has authorised UBS
Geneva to permit his auditors to
have access to SSH’s account
information, he could authorise
UBS Geneva to co-operate with
me in the execution of my duties
as the official liquidator, for the
benefit of the depositors, credi-
tors and shareholders of the
bank.”

Mr Winder said that since the
Privy Council verdict, he had met
with both Mr Ryan and Mr Lunn
to seek Mr Harajchi’s co-opera-
tion, and had a brief telephone
conference with the latter.

“Mr Harajchi had promised me
that he would assist me in my
efforts to track down these funds.
However, the letter and accoun-
tants report, along with other cor-
respondence sent to me by Mr

Ryan and Mr Harajchi’s Swiss
attorneys have served no useful
purpose, as I am still unable to
locate the funds.”

Apart from the depositor -°

monies held by the IBCs, the oth-

er key assets for Mr Winder to ©

cover are related to sums lodged
in the US courts relating to legal
actions brought against the bank.

Mr Winder said Suisse Securi- »

ty had lost its appeal against an

adverse ruling in a case brought ‘

against it in the Middle District
Court in Florida, and stood to

lose almost $1.6 million as a °‘
result. However, the bank’s finan- *

cial statements indicated that Mr

Harajchi had pledged to cover °-'

this loss from his own financial
resources.

There was better news, though, *

for long-suffering creditors and
depositors in relation to the other
legal action in which Suisse Secu-
rity is embroiled, with some $3
million of its assets at risk.

The US Court of Appeals had ©

ruled in Suisse Security’s favour
on March 10, 2006, and Mr
Winder had applied to the court
for damages to cover the bank’s

$715,385 in costs and fees ‘

incurred in defending two feder-
al appeals. ;
Mr Winder had also filed an

zr.

application to cover costs with ~*~

the lower district court, the bank

having incurred some $906,224 in '-

legal fees and costs there.
As a result, Mr Winder said he

had submitted proof of $2.103 -
million in fees incurred with the ‘

US courts on November 30, 2006.
He also applied for more than

_ $1.62 million in interest, levied at

a rate of 9 per cent since Novem-

ber 17, 2000, on the $3 million

security Suisse Security had been

required to lodge and lost the use

of.

- Mr Winder said there was
“strong precedent” for Suisse
Security to recover costs, fees and
be awarded the damages it was
seeking, in addition to regaining
the $3 million. As a result, this
may represent one of the best
sources of recovery for the bank’s
depositors and creditors.

Legal Notice

“+ Must have 8-10 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading Golf Club

** Must have knowledge of all phases of Golf course
design and construction activities including vertical golf
construction (club houses, maintenance facilities,
irrigation pump stations) “3

“Must have a thorough understanding of all phases of
maintenance and repair to courses, practice range and
equipment

* Must have extensive experience working with city

3 planners, engineers, architects, and contractors
LEGAL NOTICE * Must be knowledgeable in all phases of construction
“contracts related to golf projects
Must be a detail oriented, a skilled planner and

~ NOTICE Must be ad
prioritizer with excellent communication skills

** Must be computer literate

| INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ** Must be willing to live on an out island’
COMPANIES ACT ** Ability to work on own initiative is important
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
apply.
Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4)
_of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, MEGA SECURITIES LIMITED is in dissolution.
Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-names company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before February 5, 2007.

Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards
Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club is 2 S500 million project
under development on Great Guana Cay. It includes 381
residential hones, a 7-acre environmental preserve. 2 TS80-Ship
marina. a2 championship golf course and a2 70-roam luxury
OG

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

BISK

Pricing Information As Of:



i

= FIDELITY



Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

P ;

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
H



is 1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund 1.321587*
3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G &lFund . 2.9449"""
2.5002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211""

1.1442 Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Pri |

1.207411°****









- lec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last §52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by cl
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

* - 29 December 2006

Previous Close - Previous day‘s weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

** -~ 31 December 2006
*** - 30 November 2006
**** . 30 November 2006

sana - 30 November 2006 N

BES: (764 / FOR MORE bata s fro cm HON CALL (24 2505.








INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

WTC CAPITAL INVESTMENTS UK LIMITED
: In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
WTC CAPITAL INVESTMENTS UK LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
4th day of December, 2006.

JOHN GRIMSHAW
Nautilus House, La Cour des Casernes
St. Helier, Jersey, JE1 3NH
Liquidator






_ NOTICE

B.A. NOMINEE TRUST LTD.

(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
at 35a Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize city, Belize on or before
the Twelfth of January 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the Twenty-Seventh day of December 2006.

INTERNATIONAL LIQUIDATOR SERVICES INC.
LIQUIDATOR
OF ‘

1.B.A NOMINEE TRUST LTD.

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LITTLE PLANE FOUR LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,

the Dissolution of LITTLE PLANE FOUR LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
December 29, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR








-7F © R&B see



ace? THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



As ; oF - National Tourism Week Church Service
Zion Baptist Church, Shirley Street
eon naar

“Behind the Yellow Line’ . ,
Dundas Centre for the Performing Ars, Mackey stre _ =

on: FREE | : >...

Marketplace of the Future
Industry Careers Fair

Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium

8:30 GM. - 3:00 P.M.

IBM Luncheon Presentation
Wyndham Nassau Resor

inister
Oe h

1ith Annual Cacique Aw Ceremony ee 5
inforest Theatre, Wynanc he) oe ce
cee Oh optag ae ke

For More Informati

mae oct

nga





’

PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007







m3] AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

“It’s a totally

‘different ball

game than high

school. But once

I calmed down,

I was able to

get back into

the flow of

things and

started to play.”

- JAN ‘Big Bahama’ Symonette only
played in five games in his rookie
season for the University of Miami
Hurricanes before he went down
with an injury.

But with a new coaching staff,
Symonette said he’s looking forward
to making an even greater impact as
an offensive linesman during his
sophomore season next year.

“With a new coaching staff, a lot of
things have changed,” said Symon-
ette, who will play under coach
Randy Shannonr, who replaced Lar-
ry Coker after he was dismissed on
November 24. “We’re just trying to
get ready for a new season.”

During the season, the Hurricanes
also lost senior defensive end Bryan
Pata, who was killed in front of his
home on Tuesday, November 7.

“It was a horrible season for the
university,” said Symonette, of their
6-7 win-loss season that ended on
December 31 with their 21-20 victo-

‘ry over Nevada in the MPC Com-
puters Bow! game that was the last
coached by Coker.

Recruited out of St. Pius High
School in Houston, Texas where he
played for two years after he left St.
Augustine’s College, Symonette said
it was a big adjustment for him, espe-
cially when he made his debut.

“Coming out of the tunnel in our
first game was a great feeling,” he
noted. “The atmosphere is just some-
thing that I have to get used to.

“It’s a totally different ball game
than high school. But once I calmed
down, I was able to get back into the
flow of things and started to play.”

Next season when he’s called upon
by coach Shannonr to play, Symon-
ette said he hopes to step it up and
perform like a sophomore.

“Everybody on the team is like a
family. They help each other ouf.*
he said. “They look after each other: ~
and support each other. The night:
that Pata got shot, we stayed in the
locker room.

“The team stands by you, the -
coaches stand by you. Everybody was
just there foreach other.” |

Symonette said he would definite-
ly remember Pata because the senior

Ian Symonette

was one of those players who tried to
encourage him during his freshman
season.

At 6-foot-9 and 338 pounds,
Symonette, who has been home for
the past two weeks, said he’s enjoying
his time with his family and friends.

On Sunday, he attended the Orry
J. Sands Pros’ game against the
Stingrays as they went on to pull off
a 14-0 victory to remain undefeated
at 2-0 in the Commonwealth Ameti-
can Football League.

Symonette, who got his start play-
ing with the Pros, said it was good
to be on the sidelines watching them
play.

“When I came back | went to prac-
tice to help them out,” he reflected.
“As a university player, I was able to
teach them a few drills.

“T also tried to let them know that
they have to keep their head in the
game because it’s a team effort. They
just have to work hard and keep
doing what they are doing.”

Symonette, 20, will be here until
January 14 before he returns to the

niversity of Florida to continue his
fudies in culinary arts with a major

in business...
But it will be a while before he
puts on his pads to start practicing
for the 2007/2008 season. In the
meantime, he said he hopes to be
fully recuperated from the knee
injury so that he can make a contri-
bution for the Hurricanes during his
sophomore season.















@ PRO’S running back Charlie Edwards takes
hand off from QB Mikheal Forster
poe (BIS Photo: Patrick Hanna)





TRIBUNE SPORTS



@ LAN SYMONETTE takes in yesterday’s
game between the Pros and the Stingrays
(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)










fa PRO'S running back No5 Charlie Edwards with a strong run during yesterday

(BIS Photo:



°s i"
Patrick Hanna)





KEVIN CASEY/AP

CRADLING THE BALL: The Seahawks’ Jerramy Stevens, left, catches a 37-yard
touchdown pass in front of the Cowboys’ Roy Williams on Saturday.

Seahawks get to exhale

BY GREGG BELL
Associated Press

SEATTLE — The same
Seahawks who all season
couldn’t buy a break with all
of team owner Paul Allen’s
Microsoft zillions finally got
lucky.

But now they’re going to
have to be good, too. Or at
least better than they’ve been.

All of Seattle — players,
coaches and fans alike — rev-

eled in advancing to the’

NFC’s divisional playoffs. The
day of exhale Sunday was
time for reflection upon the
Seahawks’ eighi-point rally
over the final seven minutes
of the previous night’s amaz-
ing 21-20 win over Dallas.

It was also part apprecia-
tion for Jordan Babineaux pre-
serving the season by tripping
Tony Romo with a shoe tackle
after the Cowboys quarter-
back and holder dropped the
snap on a 19-yard field goal
attempt with 1:19 to go.

“The players certainly
deserve Sunday off. And I’m
looking forward to spending
Sunday with my family,”
coach Mike Holmgren said
late Saturday night.

But Sunday also included
some important evaluation.

Seattle (10-7) must now
travel to either top-seeded
Chicago (13-3) or second-
seeded New Orleans (10-6)
next weekend, depending on
the outcome of Sunday’s
game between the New York
Giants and Philadelphia.

Chicago destroyed Seattle
37-6 at Soldier Field earlier
this season.

“Obviously, that was prob-
ably the worst we have played
as a team this year — and for
sure me,” quarterback Matt
Hasselbeck said of that Octo-
ber night.

He was 16-for-35, a season
low 45.7 completion percent-
‘age, with two interceptions at
Chicago, the first of six games
Shaun Alexander missed with

a broken foot.

“The best defense in the
NFL. You might have to be
crazy to want to play them, I
don’t know,” Hasselbeck said
of the Bears.

Whether in Chicago or
New Orleans, the Seahawks,
winners of just two of their
last five games, know they
must improve immediately to
return to the NFC champion-
ship game for the second con-
secutive January. —

“We have to worry about
ourselves,” defensive Bryce
Fisher said. “We are our own
biggest enemy.”

Foremost, Hasselbeck must
improve.

Last season’s Super Bowl
and Pro Bowl starter was 18-
for-36 for 240 yards Saturday,
with two touchdown passes to
Jerramy Stevens. The second
gave Seattle a 21-20 lead with
4:24 left.

But Hasselbeck also threw
two more interceptions that
led to two Dallas field: goals.
He has thrown 10 intercep-
tions in seven games since
returning from a four-game
absence with a sprained knee.

Hasselbeck and a trainer
were fiddling with the brace
covering the knee on the
bench twice during his
7-for-19 first half. But he and
Holmgren have said repeat-

_edly in recent weeks that the

knee does not bother Hassel-
beck anymore.

Hasselbeck also is playing
with a wrap and glove on his
left, non-throwing hand that is
either badly bruised or has a
cracked bone. That, offensive
coordinator Gil Haskell said,
is bothering the quarterback.

It didn’t look that way ini-
tially against Dallas. Hassel-
beck was 4-for-6 for 57 yards
on the opening drive. He
found Bobby Engram mis-
matched against lineback-
er/end DeMarcus Ware down
the middle for 36 of those
yards to set up Josh Brown’s



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Eagles to face the Seahawks

°NFC

back signed this week specifi-
cally to be the holder, had no
trouble putting Jon Doren-
-bos’ snap down for Akers.
Dorenbos replaced injured
long-snapper Mike Bartrum
last month.

“J just told Koy, ’Hold it
like a normal kick.’ And, I hit
it nice and easy. It was fun to
end the game that way,”
Akers said. “Kicking balls are
very, very slick. That might
be something that needs to be
addressed. A lot of people
take the snap, hold and kick
for granted. It just shows you
how technical that is.”

A few players could barely
watch on the sideline, prefer-
ring to let the crowd’s reac-
tion tell them the outcome.

“It did cross my mind,”
linebacker Jeremiah Trotter
said of Romo’s problem in the
Cowboys’ loss. “But I was
confident in our special
teams. We were ready to
party.”

Led by Garcia and a reju-
venated defense, Philadelphia
turned its season around
after a 24-point loss in India-
napolis, captured its fifth
division title in six years and
earned the No. 3 seed in the
conference.

Meanwhile, the dysfunc-
tional Giants (8-9) fell apart
after a 6-2 start. They lost
four in a row and six of seven
before a win at Washington
last week put them in the

playoffs.

While the Eagles moved
within one victory of their
fifth trip to the NFC champi-
onship game in six years, the
Giants face an uncertain off-
season. Coach Tom Coughlin
might not be back, Barber is
retiring and the embattled
Manning probably will hear
more criticism after failing to
win a playoff game for the
second straight year.

Manning was 16-of-27 for
161 yards, two TDs and one
interception. Garcia was 17-
of-31,

“He did a nice job,” Eagles
coach Andy Reid said of Gar-
cia. “He was off by a hair ona
couple throws. He battled.”

The Eagles went ahead
17-10 late in the second quar-
ter on Garcia’s 28-yard TD
pass to Donte’ Stallworth.
Garcia completed 6-of-7
passes on the drive, capping
it with a perfect strike to
Stallworth, who beat corner-
back R.W. McQuarters.

Akers kicked a 48-yard
field goal — the longest in the
playoffs in team history — to
give Philadelphia a 20-10 lead
with 2:37 left in the third.

Jay Feely’s 24-yarder cut it
to 20-13 early in the fourth.

After going three-and-out
on their first three drives, the
Eagles finally got it going on
their fourth possession. Gar-
cia scrambled seven yards up
the middle on third-and-6 for
a first down. Two plays later,
Westbrook electrified the

23-yard field goal.

But over the Seahawks’
final six drives of the half,
Hasselbeck was 3-for-13 for 23
yards. His first interception
was a wobbly, slow-arriving
pass for Deion Branch that
Anthony Henry intercepted at
the Seahawks 39. Hasselbeck
punched the air after that mis-
take.

“I came into this game

thinking, ’Positive plays.
Throw the ball away. Get the
ball out of your hands. No
sacks. No turnovers.’,” Has-
selbeck said.
_ “Ironically, I threw two
interceptions right away. I
know [ have to be better than
that.”

Hasselbeck threw one of
his better passes to put Seattle
up 13-10 in the third quarter.
His dart was perfectly timed
to Stevens’ break outside
away from Roy Williams for a
15-yard touchdown.

But he was errant again on
fourth-and-goal from the Dal-
las 2 with 6:48 left and his
team down 20-13. Hassel-
beck’s bootleg pass to tight
end Will Heller sailed 3 yards
out of bounds.

More reason for concern:
Seattle lost leading receiver
Darrell Jackson again to a toe
ligament injury after he ran
about two dozen plays on it
Saturday without a catch. It
was his first action in four
weeks. Backup D.J. Hackett
was already ailing with a right
hip flexor before he sprained
an ankle Saturday.

Thus, the Seahawks must .

also get more from Alexander
next week than 69 yards on 24
carries. Twenty of those yards
came on the first play after
Babineaux’s heroic stop, push-
ing Seattle backwards and
essentially ending the game.

“We always have to go
back and redefine who we
are,” Alexander said. “Our
offense has some things to
do.”

frenzied crowd at Lincoln
Financial Field with a run for
the highlight reels.
Westbrook burst through
the line, bounced outside,

kept his balance after getting |

tripped, cut back inside at the
20, reversed direction at the
15 and sprinted toward the
end zone pylon to tie it at 7. It
was reminiscent of Wilbert
Montgomery’s 42-yard TD

run in Philadelphia’s 20-7 vic-

tory over Dallas in the 1980
NFC championship game.

On the ensuing possession,
Sheldon Brown intercepted
Manning’s pass for Burress
and the offense started at the
Giants 37. The Eagles had a
first down at the 4, but settled
for Akers’ 19-yard field. that
made it 10-7.

Barber’s 41-yard run to the
Eagles 3 put New York in
position to go ahead. But
Philadelphia’s defense tight-
ened and Feely kicked a 20-
yard field goal to make it
10-10.

New York’s offense was
crisp at the start. Manning
capped a 67-yard drive with a
17-yard TD pass to a wide-
open Burress across the mid-
dle. Burress also had a 29-
yard catch on the first play
from scrimmage.

The Giants lost at home to '

Carolina, 23-0, in a first-
round playoff game last year.
The Eagles, who lost to New
England in the Super Bowl
two years ago, finished 6-10
last season.



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



AFC PLAYOFFS

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 | BE

Colts must regain
success on the road

BYMICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Tony
Dungy understands how a
loud crowd affects playoff
games. Home teams get off
snaps quicker, players feed off
the energy, and visiting teams
tend to make more mistakes.

Indianapolis took full
advantage of its home field on
Saturday, but next weekend,
in the Colts’ former home-
town of Baltimore, they'll con-
tend with the same issues
from a different perspective.
The Ravens now will have the
home-field edge.

Dungy believes his team,
one of the league’s best road
teams in recent years, is expe-
rienced enough to know what
it will take to win.

“We’ve won in tough ven-
ues before, so I don’t think we
fear going on the road,”
Dungy said Sunday, a day
after advancing to the divi-
sional round with a 23-8 vic-
tory over Kansas City. “We've

- just got to find a way to play

better.”

Sounds simple enough.

Through Dungy’s first 414
seasons as coach, the Colts
(13-4) proved masterful road
warriors, going 28-8 and
never losing more than three
road games during a regular
season. Some even argued
Indy was better outside the
RCA Dome than inside it.

Earlier this season, the
Colts won at two of the NFL’s
toughest venues, Denver and
New England, in back-to-back
weeks and also won twice in

four weeks at The Meadow-
lands, which is notoriously
windy.

Recently, though, they’ve
struggled.

Indianapolis enters next
week’s game trying to snap a
four-game road losing streak
that includes two losses on
long field goals as time
expired.

While the stumbles didn’t
prevent the Colts from win-
ning their fourth straight AFC
South title or becoming the
second team in league history
with four consecutive 12-win
seasons, it did cost them a
first-round bye.

Dungy believes it won’t
take much for Indy to revert
to its old form.

“I think it is a fine line,”
Dungy said. “We have strug-
gled lately, but what we’ve got
to do is find a way to dupli-
cate what we did yesterday —
and play better.”

The perception around the
league is that the Colts’ style
isn’t conducive to playing out-
doors in the cold, blustery
weather typical of January.
Past playoff performances
have reinforced that image.

In nine seasons, two-time
MVP Peyton Manning is 3-2 in
home playoff games, 1-4 on
the road — with the lone vic-
tory coming on a mild, sunny
day in Kansas City three years
ago.

Going to Baltimore, how-
ever, creates additional prob-
lems.

The Ravens (13-3) won the
AFC North with an aggressive

defense that thrives on mis-
takes and uses quick, hard-
hitting players to shut down
opposing offenses.

Add to that a crowd that
will likely include many fans
who are still bitter about the
way the Colts departed Balti-
more in March 1984, leaving
the city without an NFL team
for more than a decade.

The Colts have played in
Baltimore twice since moving
to Indy with mixed results.
They lost 38-31 in 1998, Man-
ning’s rookie season, and won
24-7 in the 2005 season
opener.

But this is the first time
they’ve been back for a play-

off game, and the high stakes -

are likely to evoke strong
emotions.

“Playing Baltimore is tough
enough,” Manning said after
Saturday’s game. “Add to that
the fact you have to go there,
which I think is one of the
tougher places to play. It will
be a tremendous challenge.”

Dungy spent Sunday urg-
ing his team to play with the
same energy, focus and
aggressiveness it did against
the Chiefs. He also added one
caveat: playing error-free.

“You have to like what
they do on defense,” Dungy
said. “But every defense has
strengths and weaknesses and
we never feel we can go any
place and not move the ball.
They overwhelm you defen-
sively and they’re very tough
to run on. We just have to be
able to keep our composure.”



JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

GOT HIM COVERED: Kansas City’s Trent Green, bottom, covered up by Indianapolis’
Cato June, left, and Josh Thomas after Green fell down on a third and goal play in

second quarter on Saturday.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Patriots down Jets, advance

° AFC

Oilers on Dec. 31, 1978. The
Jets made things interesting
early, taking a 10-7 lead in the
second quarter on a 77-yard
touchdown catch and run by
Jerricho Cotchery.

But it was all New England
from that point in the teams’
second-ever meeting in the
playoffs, the last also a vic-
tory by the Patriots in 1985.

“We just fight,” Bruschi
said.

With the Patriots leading
23-16, Brady engineered the
type of drive that has made
him so deadly in big games.
New England took over at its
37 and with a series of short
passes and runs got to the
Jets 7.

Brady then found Kevin
Faulk with a short pass and
the running back zipped into
the end zone with 5:16 left as
the Patriots quarterback put
up both hands and pointed
skyward.

Brady finished 22-of-34 for
212 yards and two touch-
downs, while Jabbar Gaffney
had eight catches for 104
yards. The Patriots also out-
rushed the Jets 148-70.

New England also took
advantage of a big mistake by
the Jets late in the third quar-
ter.

Chad Pennington’s pass
was knocked down by Rosev-

elt Colvin and picked up by
Vince Wilfork, who rumbled
31 yards to the Jets 15 before
being tackled by Cotchery.
The play was ruled a back-
ward pass and a fumble, and
the ruling was upheld after a
challenge by Mangini.

“T think it was something
that broke the game open for
us,” defensive tackle Richard
Seymour said.

Four plays later, Stephen
Gostkowski kicked a 28-yard
field goal to give New Eng-
land a 23-13 lead.

Mike Nugent’s 37-yard
field goal 3:21 into the fourth
quarter made it 23-16.

“You look at the big pic-
ture and say it was a good job
on our part,” Jets linebacker
Jonathan Vilma said. “But if
you’re competitive, if you’re
a player, you don’t want to go
10-6 and lose in the first
round of the playoffs.”

The Patriots got things
started early on Corey Dil-
lon’s ll-yard touchdown run
3:07 in.

It was an efficient drive
conducted without a huddle
by Brady, who completed
three of his four passes to
Gaffney. On third-and-12
from the Jets 27, Brady hit
Troy Brown with a 16-yard
pass. Dillon then took a hand-
off, ran into a crowd in the
middle before bouncing to
the right side and high-step-

ping into the end zone.
The Jets took advantage of
a turnover when Dewayne
Robertson knocked the ball
out of Dillon’s hands and
Hank Poteat recovered.
Nugent kicked a 28-yard field
goal to make it 7-3. ;
Cotchery put the Jets
ahead 10-7 with his 77-yard
touchdown score, the longest
in team postseason history.
Pennington found Cotch-
ery open with James Sanders,
in for the injured Rodney
Harrison, back in zone cover-
age. Sanders took a bad angle
on the receiver before Cotch-
ery blew past him and down
the right sideline with a trail
of Patriots behind him.
Gostkowski kicked a 20-
yard field goal to tie it at 10.
The Patriots again had a
long drive late in the first
half, capped by Graham’s
l-yard TD catch. New Eng-
land started at its 20 with 7:05
remaining in the half. After
Laurence Maroney’s 5-yard
run put the ball at the 1, the
Jets stopped Heath Evans and
Maroney for no gain. On
third-and-goal, Brady found
Graham in the back of the
end zone just out of the reach
of linebacker Brad Kassell for
a 17-10 lead, capping a 15-play,
80-play drive that took 6:54.
“I just put it up there and
tried to let that big guy make
a play for us,” Brady said.

FREER? 7 ES OP OS TSS SL EL TE ET



4E\ onpAy, JANUARY 8, 2007



WHAT 10

WATCH
THIS WEEK

posting up



WHAT’S YOUR
MOST
MEMORABLE
NONBASKETBALL
SPORTS MOMENT?

e Dorell Wright: |
was playing a base-
ball game in my
senior year before |
went to prep school.
Back then, (Southern Cal basketball) Coach
(Henry) Bibby was coming to recruit me.
There was this long walkway from the parking
lot to the field, and he was walking up that. |
didn’t know he was coming, and | hit a home
run. As | was:‘coming around third base, | saw
him, and he was like, ‘Hey.’

e Michael Doleac: It was my best sporting .
weekend of all time. My freshman year at
Utah, we beat BYU at Utah to win the WAC
championship on Saturday night. And Sunday
morning, myself, Paul Jonas, Drew Hansen
and Andy Preston, we go out and play nine
holes at the University of Utah course. | lob
one in, 133-yard par-3 hole-in-one. It didn’t
even bounce. | flew it right in the cup. | went
back later and stole the flag, like an idiot.







MATT CARROLL, BOBCATS

e. Fantasy: Not many fantasy owners have
probably realized that Carroll is worth having
ona roster. But the Bobcats guard is one of
the better shooters in the leagué‘andican’—
have a nice night from distance. In his past
three games entering this weekend, Carroll hit
13 threes, averaged 22.7 points and didn’t
miss a free throw in 15 attempts. In fact, Car-
roll deads the league in free-throw shooting
percentage at 96 percent.

e Reality: Though Adam Morrison is a lot
better at creating his own shot and has more
variety to his game, Carroll is clearly Char-
lotte’s best shooter, and with players such as
Raymond Felton, Gerald Wallace and Sean
May initiating the offense much of the time,
sometimes a catch-and-shoot player is all the
Bobcats need.

e Winner: Reality.



GROUNDED



ELEVATED



JASON KAPONO W. SZCZERBIAK
HEAT CELTICS
Not Wally
every- Szezer-
thing is biak is
going finding



life without.an
injured Paul Pierce
hard. Not only that,
but Szczerbiak is
playing on bad
ankles that are
clearly affecting his
productivity. After
missing three
games with ankle .
issues, Szczerbiak
shot 28.1 percent in’
his next five games,

wrong with the
Miami Heat. In con-
secutive games

- against the Magic
and Clippers,
Kapono hit all
seven of his three-
point attempts and
averaged 17 points.
Kapono entered
the weekend as the
league’s top three-
point shooter,

shooting 54 per- including 2 of 14
cent from three- (14.3 percent) from
point range. three-point range.

Guard

6-6/215



3 305 A885




INTERNATIONALEDITION

CAVALIERS @ SUNS, 10:30 P.M. THURSDAY, TNT

Any time LeBron James, right, can get a chance in the open
court, it’s worth watching. And playing in Phoenix, he'll
probably have multiple chances. The key, however, might
be whether the Cavs can take advantage of their size by

Ilgauskas is a part of the game and not taken out of it by
Phoenix's speed.



OFF «DEF «=oRPG=SsAPG:SsSPG-~=—s BPG STO. PF PPG

ne

NBA E









James, as well as making sure Zyrdunas

One of the most compelling
stories in basketball this season
didn’t happen on the big stage of
the NBA.

This one started in Bismarck,
N.LD., during a practice session of
the NBDL’s Dakota Wizards on
Dec. 21. It was there that Bulls
prospect Martynas Andriuskevi-
cius, a 7-2 second-year center
from Lithuania,
nearly lost his
life.
What started
as an argument
between Andri- . JJ
uskevicius and
former Wash-
ington Wizards
forward Awvee
Storey ended
with Andri-

uskevicius taking a sucker punch
and a long fall. His head struck
the floor violently after being
knocked unconscious by the
unexpected punch to the jaw, and
it caused Andriuskevicius to sus-
tain a skull fracture, severe con-
cussion and develop a two-centi-
meter hematoma on the left side
of his brain.

Andriuskevicius, who
attended a recent Bulls practice
and is recovering in Chicago
rather than returning to Luthu-
ania, described the argument as
an altercation that was hardly
deserving of:a blow to the face.

“J was coming from the other

_side trying to get an offensive
rebound,” Andriuskevicius said.
“He hit me in the neck with an
elbow. I was mad. He was like, ‘I

‘didn’t do nothing.’

. “We started an argument. I
didn’t say anything really bad,
but I was yelling. I think I was
ready to turn my head and leave,
then bam. I don’t remember
much. From the minute when we
started arguing, I just woke up in
the hospital.” :

Andriuskevicius’ agent, Herb
Rudoy, said his client was lucky
to be alive.

RECOVERY

Andriuskevicius spent time in
intensive care at a Bismarck hos-
pital, and the initial prognosis
included an arduous recovery.
Andriuskevicius said doctors told
him it would be months before he
was able to speak properly again.
But the big man’s speech is
nearly back to normal after only
about two weeks. He said he’s
feeling relatively normal, though
his hearing remains an issue and
he might still have to undergo
speech therapy. '

“The headache was gone two
or three days ago,” he said. “The
only thing right now is I’m hav-
ing some problem talking and the
hearing. Everything else is nor-
mal.”

Everything, of course, except
his basketball career. Doctors
weren’t sure initially whether
Andriuskevicius would be able to
resume his basketball career.

4

nts



errez@
N jamiHerald.com ‘

said Andriuskevicius, who spent
last season with the Cleveland
Cavaliers. “So it doesn’t matter
how bad it’s going to be or even if
I’m not going to heal totally, ’m
still going to play basketball.”
Perhaps more remarkable
than Andriuskevicius’ recovery is
his willingness to let bygones be
bygones. The Lithuanian doesn’t
want to speak to nor hear from
Storey, but he also doesn’t intend
on pressing charges on the 6-6,
29-year-old forward from Ari-
zona State. His agent, however,
says they haven't entirely ruled
out taking action against Storey,
_ who is represented by Mark Bar-

But he insists he’ll try it telstein, the same agent who rep-
because it’s what the 20-year-old _ resents Antoine Walker and
does best. James Posey.

“I was thinking, ‘What am I
going to do now?’ But then I just
realized that basketball is the
only thing I’m doing in my life,”

“[’m not pressing charges,”
Andriuskevicius said. “I’m just
going to leave it like this: This is a
sport, and things like this will





THE EDGE: MICHAEL REDD VS. KYLE KORVER. WHO’S THE BETTER GUNNER?

Comparing Korver, who is just getting into the mode of volume shooting, to a bona fide star in Redd
might seem unfair, but the two are similar in their strengths and might be at different stages in their
Allen Iverson left the team, Korver has been utilized a lot
more effectively, and his confidence is growing as a result. His release might be the quickest in the
league, and he does not have to have his feet or body set in order to make a shot. Korver, at 6-7, also
has the ability to work in the post against smaller shooting guards. Though he doesn’t get as many
attempts as Redd, Korver is the better percentage shooter, hitting 45 percent of his threes this season.
different dimension to his offensive game every season, and
this season it’s an ability to get to the foul line more often. But his strength remains his ability to release
such an awkward shot, with the release coming from behind his
head, that it becomes very difficult to block or even alter. Redd has more of an ability to create his own
developed a cross-over that can make a defender look
silly at times. It also helps that Redd is left-handed, making him that much more of a mystery to defend.
quick shot in the air.

careers with different opportunities. Since

Michael Redd seems to add a slightly
his shot in a split second. Redd also has
shot off the dribble than Korver, and has even

e@ The Edge: Redd just has more ways, and opportunities, to get his

21)



300 380 22 13 B ra Is



WHO HAS THE EDGE?



Team G

Phila, 3I



WIZARDS @ SPURS, 8 P.M. SATURDAY, NBA LEAGUE PASS

Agent Zero might face his toughest case to date, beating the
Spurs in San Antonio. But given Gilbert Arenas’

possible for the Eastern Conference’s leading scorer. The Spurs
might force him into a handful of bad shots with Bruce Bowen

shots to be effective.



JOE MURPHY/GETTY IMAGES

DETERMINED: ‘I’m still going to play basketball,’ said Martynas
Andriuskevicius, who is trying to return from a skull fracture.

happen. This was more unlucky.”

Storey wasn’t entirely fortu-

‘nate, either. He was released by
the Dakota Wizards for conduct

detrimental to the team.

UNDER THE RADAR

Andriuskevicius’ NBA career

hasn’t exactly. been the stuff of

NBA legend. A strong perimeter

player for a player his size,

Andriuskevicius was drafted 45th

by the Orlando Magic in 2005
and was traded to the Cavs
before being traded last offsea-

son to the Bulls, who sent him to

the D-League on assignment.

But if his career continues, it
will be one of the more remark-
able comeback stories the league

has seen.
“T feel I’m going to heal

totally,” he said. “If everything is

getting better that fast, I'll be
back. Maybe this season.”

MPG =FG% = 3%
| 315 AS?

GS FI% == OFF

Add 8B SO

accomplishments already this season, it seems even this is
i playing defense, but Arenas doesn’t necessarily need great

EASTERN
CONFERENCE



After Mike Fratello was let go
in Memphis, Nets president
Rod Thorn gave his struggling’
team’s coach a form of job
security by placing the pres-
sure to improve strictly on his
players. “There comes a time
when you have to take a
stand because the games
inexorably slip away,” Thorn
said. “We've got players with
reputations who have set
standards in this league.
When things aren't going for
us, like they’re going, then you
would hope that would show
up.” ... Kyle Korver was one
of the few players who
worked with the synthetic
| basketball from the time it
was introduced to the players
last summer. So it was no sur-
prise that he was one of the
few players who didn’t like
the switch back to leather. “I
didn’t want to go back to the
other ball but we haven’t had
any say, it seems, no matter
which way they go,” Korver
said. ... Part of the problem
Allen Iverson had with the
Sixers’ style of play was hav-
ing, Andre Iguodala spend
time at point guard. “I just
thought that Andre playing
the point guard position
wasn’t the right move for us
| but they wanted to do it.”...
| Jalen Rose is now playing out
| West, so he’s free to mock the
| Eastern Conference. ‘You
have the Atlantic Division,”
| Rose said. “Somebody’s
going to be below .50O0 and
host a playoff game?”







‘WESTERN
CONFERENCE

|
|
ee
|
|
|
|





Mike Fratello getting fired
wasn't the only sign that the
front office was unhappy with

| the style of play in Memphis.

| When assistant coach Lionel

| Hollins was overlooked as the
interim head coach in favor of
player personnel direct Tony
Barone Sr., who had no NBA
head-coaching experience, it
showed that the team wanted
someone who would do as
management asked. And Bar-
one certainly has his players
running, which is what Fra-
tello was criticized for not
doing.... After a rough
November, Wolves rookie
Randy Foye was named
Western Conference Rookie
of the Month for December.
And the compliments he’s
receiving sound similar to the
ones Dwyane Wade got as a
rookie. “He’s got a good sense
about him, a good pace,”
Spurs.coach Gregg Popovich
said. “He’s aggressive.” ...
When the league released the
first shipment of leather balls
to teams, it included a letter
that said each ball had been
“officially bounced 50 times
and is ready for play.” Spurs
resident comedian Brent
Barry couldn't help himself ~
after reading it. “Il want to see
this facility or who they have
hired to do this,” Barry joked.



PPG
Wd

RPG | OAPGOSPG: BPG

350 «M4 I 2% «6142 2.60










PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS | Te













Celebrating Feast
of the Epiphany

@ RIGHT: Members of the Greek Orthodox community cel-
ebrating the Feast of the Epiphany gather at the Western
Esplanade yesterday.

& BELOW RIGHT: Bishop Savas of Troas, Chancellor of the
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of the Americas (right of picture).
This is his fourth visit to the Bahamas. Rev Fr Teodor Bita,
priest of Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church (front of pic-
ture).

& BOTTOM RIGHT: The cross is caught by 15-year-old
Zachary Lyons.

(Photos By Franklyn G Ferguson)

_ Paint Professionals Trust



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AN ETAL PORTLET SEO ON AR MAISTO MENTS Lat ARAN






F

oy aes See ERR NMRA

TRIRUNE

LOCAL NEWS





MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 11







The Royal Bahamas Police
Force holds annual parade

MEMBERS of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force gathered
yesterday for their annual
parade. Yesterday marked for
the force, two important ser-
vices of commemoration.

Before taking to their parade
route, marching from the Col-
lege of the Bahamas heading
east on Poinciana Drive, north
on Blue Hill Road to Bay Street
and then south to the Police

Headquarters, officers held a
service for officers fallen in the
line of duty followed by the
annual church service held at the
Hillview Seventh-Day Adven-
tist Church on Harrold Road.










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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7B



‘Abaco Markets debt is ‘lowest for five years’



~ FROM page 1B

Again, this has enhanced Aba-
co Markets’liquidity and freed up
some capital that can be used for
capital expenditure and invest-
ment purposes, Mr Watchorn
said, as the company attempts to
return to profitability following
*. four years of heavy losses.

Mr Watchorn told The Tribune
that the 55,000 square foot Cedar
Street property sale was.a sale
-_.and leaseback agreement, as Aba-
co Markets had secured a 10-year
lease on the site for its Cost Right
Freeport format.

_ That store is currently located
om Milton Street, and Abaco
Markets plans to relocate it to its
former Solomon’s SuperCentre
site in summer 2007. The prop-

“. erty has been empty since the
- .roof was badly damaged by Hur-

ricane Frances in September
2004, with Solomon’s Super-
Centre now based at Queen’s
Highway.
‘Mr Watchorn told The Tribune
that the roof had been repaired
last year, and although the Cedar
Street property was currently “an
empty shell, that suits us”. This
was because of Cost Right’s Club
‘Store model, which relies on an
-. open-plan, empty warehouse for-
mat.
The Abaco Markets’ president

'. ‘described the Cedar Street sale

as “a win-win for us”, as the com-
pany was now leasing the store,
which meant it was no longer a
landlord with the associated
expenses of property deprecia-
tion and insurance appearing in
its annual accounts.

“It provides us with capital to
pay down, and the big part of is
that we don’t have to pay
$250,000 a month,” Mr Watchorn
said. “As you can imagine, it’s a
big saving to the company.”

He added that the Cedar Street
sale would “significantly improve
our liquidity”, while moving Cost
Right to that location would
“establish a broader base for
growth” for Abaco Markets’
Grand Bahama operations.

Mr Watchorn said the remain-
ing $3.4 million in Royal Bank
debt consisted of $1 million relat-
ing to the purchase of the now-
renamed Cost Right store in
Turks & Caicos. The remainder is
the $2.4 million Abaco Markets
invested for a 10 per cent stake in
BSL Holdings, the company that
acquired the majority 78 per cent
stake in Bahamas Supermarkets
for $54 million.

Mr Watchorn said the $1 mil-
lion debt portion would be taken
care of when Abaco Markets sold
its Turks & Caicos operations.
He added: “We’re talking to a
couple of people. We don’t have
anything definitive yet, but we
have discussions going with a cou-
ple of interested groups.”

Abaco Markets is also trying
to sell its Cost Right store on
Abaco, the former Abaco Whole-
sale, as part of its strategy to
divest loss-making and non-core
operations, and focus solely on
the major New Providence and
Grand Bahama markets.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco Mar-
kets was currently exploring its
options with regard to Cost Right
Abaco, and was likely to decide
upon the direction it would take
“in a couple of weeks. We got a

number of offers, had a number .

of interested people, but did not
get an offer that suited us and an
offer that suited them”.
Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn
explained that the preference
share restructuring would leave
Class A shares operating under
the same terms and conditions as
a 2004 agreement, with the prin-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TERRA INCOGNITA CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

1 Section 138 (8) of

the

International Business

.- | Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of TERRA

| INCOGNITA.. CORP. « -has. ybeen’ “completed, » a
Certificate of Dissolution:chas.i beenissued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of

BANQUE PASCHIE
[BTS Private Banking

Vacancy for:

Credit & Controls Officer

t The Credit & Controls Officer reports directly to the Chief
# Operations Officer and Deputy Director.

Responsibilities:

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:
Reconciliations of all Internal & External Bank |

Accounts

Credit Lines and Limit Controls of Loans

Net Asset Value Weekly & Monthly Calculations
Preparation & Approval of Wire Transfers

Daily & Weekly reporting and controls
Retrocession calculations for External Managers
Preparation and Closing of accounts

documentation

Approval of all daily transactions
Disbursement of Banks expenses
Assist with all back office operations

hould posses

’

Candidates should possess the following

| qualifications:

2 5-10 years Private Banking Experience
Associates or Bachelors degree in Accounting,
Business Administration or relevant field:
Proficient in use of software applications such as
MS Word, MS Excel & MS outlook;

Good oral and written communication skills;
Ability to operate a variety of office machines
(computer, fax , photocopy & calculator);

Apply in writing to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: narmstrong@pasche.ch

(No phone calls please)



cipal redeemed in instalments of
$2 million at the end of 2006,
2007, and 2008, and the remain-
der paid by December 31, 2009.

Class B shares, representing 47
per cent of the total issued pref-
erence shares, have extended the
redemption dates by three years.
Redemptions will start on
December 31, 2009, and last until
that same date in 2012, with hold-
ers of Class B shares receiving an
8.5 per cent interest rate during
the extension years.

Mr Watchorn said the first $1
million redemption payment to
the Class A preference share
holders was due to have been
made on December 31, 2006, but
this had been financed by one
Class B shareholder who had
“wanted to take more shares”.
As a result, the proportion of
preference shares now classified
as Class B has increased to 63 per
cent.

Mr Watchorn said the restruc- _

turing would enable the company
to pay off its preference share
debt over a six-year period,
instead of four years.

He added: “The main benefit
is, instead of having to pay out
$2 million every year, we can use
that to finance the Cedar Street
project. Over the medium term,
this will help improve our liquid-
ity and allow us to divert some
resources towards capital expen-
ditures for projects that will con-
tribute to sales growth.”

Mr Watchorn said the Christ-
mas period, when some retailers

generate between 40-60 per cent
of their annual sales, “went well

increases all around. We had a
good Christmas — it started a little
slowly, but it came around in the
last few weeks for us. It worked
out very well”.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco Mar-
kets was “there or thereabouts”
in terms of its Christmas period
financial targets, although its Cost

Right store at the Town Centre:

Mall “did much better than
expected. Since the roadworks
finished here, business has really
rebounded”,

Abaco Markets results for the
year ending on January 31, 2007,
are likely to be impacted by
restructuring charges associated
with its divestment strategy, and
losses in its discontinuing opera-
tions.

Long-suffering investors in the
company may be feeling that
Abaco Markets will never turn
around and return to consistent
profitability, but Mr Watchorn
said: “We are seeing improve-
ments in continuing operations,
and the divestment plan we’ve
come up with is proving to be the
right decision to have been made.

“We’re seeing improvements
month-on-month, quarter-on-
quarter, in our continuing opera-
tions, and expect them to follow
that trend in 2007. It’s been a long
road and we’re not there yet.
There’s still work to do, but the
divestment is going to take us a

Major firm in the financial and
legal services industry
Invites applicants for the function of

IT

Administrator

¢ Degree in Computer Science preferred
e AT, MCP CCNA and N+ certification —
¢ Knowledge of active directories,

SQL, CISCO Systems and Routing

e Web Page Management

e 3 years experience

¢ Salary commensurate with experience
e Attractive benefits

Reply in confidence to:

Fax (242) 394-8430.

N





Surnames



G-M

A-F



N-Z

January 26, 2007

To: All Members of The Public Workers’
Co-operative Credit Union Limited

Dividend/Christmas
Savings Distributions

Dividend
Distribution

November 13 - November17, 2006
November 20 - November 24, 2006

November 27 - December i, 2006

Thereafter, dividend cheques will be distributed until

Distribution of Christmas Savings sheques begins
Monday December 4, 2006



Dates




















long way to where we need to _ starting to see the benefits from
go.” establishing new vendor relation-

Mr Watchorn said Abaco Mar- __ ships and sourcing new products.
kets’ clothing business had “real- | He added that a better product
ly rebounded”, with the company — mix would increases sales.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SINO GLOBAL CAPITAL
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SINO GLOBAL CAPITAL
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

4

ARGOSA CORP. INC. |
(Liquidator)

BARISTAS
WANTED

(Coffee Bar Specialist)

Know what it means to give outstanding
customer service

Have an interest in Food and Beverage sales
and management

Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our
company

Have a customer first attitude

Preferably have 1-2 years customer service
experience in a retail or restaurant environment

A great group of people to work with
A competitive salary and benefits package

All of the training you'll need to be highly
successful

All interested applicants should bring in person to:
Starbucks Coffee (Prince George Wharf, Marina Viliage,
Wyndham Casino, Palmdale and Harbour Bay) a
completed application form, current resume, passport
picture, current police record, copy of passport, copy of
NIB card and job references.

Incomplete applications that do not include all supporting »
documents will not be processed. aye

If you want to learn more about Starbucks please visit:

www.starbucks.com






ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

For the 2007/2008 School Year ‘will be
held on January 13th, 2007 at 8:00 am
at Kingsway Academy High School,
located on Bernard Road.




The examination is for those
students wishing to enter grades 7-10..



Applications forms are available
at the High School Office. The
application fee is thirty dollars
($30.00), to be made payable at
Kingsway Business Office on or before

Friday January 12th, 2007

For Further
information

324-8811 or 324-3409
















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THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WoL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Orlando 2114 «600 - 64 W4 146 7-8 12-9
Washington 19 14 .576 1 7-3 LL 133 611 12-9
Miami 1419 424 6 5:5 Wl 89 6-10 6-10
Atlanta 10 21 323 9 28 Wel 59 5-12 6-13
Charlotte 9 23 .28110% 3-7 L-2 611 312 613
ATLANTIC = WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 15 19 441. - 5-5 W-2 10-5 5-14 10-7
New Jersey 14 19 .424 % 5-5 Ll 10-10 4-9 10-9
. NewYork 15 21 417 1 6-4 W2 810 7-11 9-12
” Boston 12 21 364 2% 2-8 Ll 411 810 812

-” Philadelphia 9 24

273 5% 46 L2 4-7 5-17 6-12
CENTRAL = WoL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Cleveland 21 12 636 - 7-3 W-4 15-3 6-9 15-10
Detroit 19 12 613 1 64 Ll 9-5 10-7 13-6
Chicago 20 14 588 1% 6-4 W-l 15-3 5-11 17-5
Indiana 18 16 529 3% 6-4 W-1 9-5 9-11 13-9
Milwaukee 16617 485 5 7-3 L-2 9-5 7-12 6-13

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 27 8 771 - 91 L-l 16-3 11-5 19-6
San Antonio 24 11 686 3 5-5 W-l 12-6 12-5 16-7
Houston 21 13° 618 5% 6-4 L-l 12-3 9-10 10-11
New Orleans 12 21 .364 14 2-8 L-4 7-9 5-12) 6-15
Memphis 8 27 .229 19 2-8 L-2 G11 2-16 3-15
NORTHWEST WoL Pct. GB L10 Str, Home Away Conf
Utah 24 10 .706 - 6-4 W-1 142 10-8 16-6
Minnesota 17 15) «5310-6 7-3 W-4 11-56-10 10-9
Denver 16 15 516 6% 4-6 L-5 9-8 1-7 5-9
Portland 144 21) + .40010% 3-7 L-l 7-11 7-10 9-9
Seattle 13:23) 361 12 «43-7 L-4 9-8 4-15 5-14
PACIFIC



Phoenix 8-2 W-6 14-3 11-5 11-7
LA. Lakers 7-3 W-4 16-4 7-7) 15-5
Golden State 6-4 L-l 14-5 4-13) 12-13
Sacramento 4-6 L-2 10-9 4-8 8-13
L.A. Clippers 5-5 L-2) 12-6 3-13 9-15
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES :
“ Sunday’s results Tonight’s games Saturday’s results

Mia. 93, Port. 90 Clippr vs. N.O. @0.C., 8 Atl. 86, LAC. 74
Tor. 116, Wash. 111 Youston at Chi, 8:30 Cle. 96, NJ. 91

Minn. 103, Hou. 99 (OT) Milw. at Den., 9 Ind. 100, NO. 93
S.A. 110, Mem. 96 Chi. 106, Det. 89

Utah 96, Den. 84
Por. 110, Sac. 105, OT
G.S. 108, Sea. 104

Orl. 87, Bos. 79
Pho. 128, G.S.W. 105
LA.L. 101, Dallas 98



DON RYAN/AP

HE’S BACK: Miami guard Dwayne Wade, back
in uniform, keeps the ball out of the reach of
Portland guard Jarrett Jack during
second-half action in Portland, Ore., on
Sunday. Wade led the Heat in scoring with 33
points to beat the Blazers 93-90.

SEA LPL eR

EASTERN CONFERENCE





INTERNATIONAL EDITION

“PRO ) BASKETBALL IF HOCKEY

NBA GAMES



MONDAY, JANUARY 8,



Garnett leads Timberwolve

Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Garnett had 26
points and 13 rebounds to help the Minnesota
Timberwolves beat the Houston Rockets
103-99 in overtime on Sunday.

Mark Blount continued his recent strong
play for Minnesota, adding 21 points and 10
rebounds.

The Timberwolves have won four
straight, including the last three in overtime.
They have won seven of nine overall.

Tracy McGrady scored 31 points for
Houston, his fourth straight game with 30 or

‘more, but Houston’s four-game winning
streak was snapped. Shane Battier added 20
points for the Rockets and Juwan Howard 19,
but the Rockets went 12-for-19 from the free
throw line while the Wolves were 34-for-40.

e@ Spurs 110, Grizzlies 96: In Memphis,
Tenn., Manu Ginobili scored a season-high
34 points as San Antonio snapped its first
three-game losing streak of the season.

Ginobili, who averaged 25.5 points in the
previous two games, was 10-of-15 from the
field, including 6-of-8 from 3-point range.

Robert Horry had 18 points, Michael Fin-
ley added 12 points, and Tim Duncan and
Bruce Bowen had 10 apiece.

The Spurs played without guard Tony
Parker. He injured his right hip against Dallas
on Friday night.

Pau Gasol led Memphis with 24 points,
and Mike Miller, who left the game briefly in
the third quarter because of a jammed right
thumb, finished with 14. Damon Stoudamire
added 13 points, and Alexander Johnson had
10. .

e Raptors 116, Wizards 111: In Toronto,

Chris Bosh had 24 points and 15 rebounds to

lead Toronto.

TJ. Ford added 20 points for the Raptors,
who had six players score in double figures
in improving their home record to 10-5.

Gilbert Arenas had 33 points, but went
7-for-19 from the field for the Wizards,
whose three-game winning streak ended.

The Raptors played with a full team for
the first time in almost a month. Ford
returned after missing three games with a
sprained right ankle and Jorge Garbajosa
returned after missing two games with a
strained right calf. Toronto is 2-1 since Bosh
returned from a 12-game absence.

e Magic 87, Celtics 79: In Orlando, Fla,

Sis Grant Hill scored 2] points and Dwight How-
“ ard had 18 points and 12 rebounds as Orlando
~ won its fourth straight.

Tony Allen led the Celtics with 2. points
and a season-high nine rebounds, while
Delonte West added 13 points and Al Jeffer-
son had 12 points and seven rebounds.

The Celtics played their eighth straight
game without Paul Pierce, who is resting a
sore left foot, and have won just two of their
last 10.

e Suns 128, Warriors 105: In Phoenix,
James Jones scored 25 points, two shy of his
career high, and Phoenix cruised to its sixth
win in a row.

Fellow reserve Leandro Barbosa scored 26
and Shawn Marion had. 24 points and 17
rebounds in the Suns’ 22nd victory in their
last 24 games. Steve Nash had 14 points and
10 assists, then didn’t play in the fourth quar-
ter.

Monta Ellis scored 22 for Golden State but

NHL GAMES









JIM MONE/AP

MEETING THE CHALLENGE: The Timberwolves’ Kevin Garnett, right, defends as the
Rockets’ Tracy McGrady takes a shot in third quarter on Sunday in Minneapolis.
McGrady led all scorers with 31 points followed by Garnett with 26 points as the
Timberwolves went on to win, 103-99, in overtime.

committed nine of the Warriors’ 25 turn-
overs and was in foul trouble much of the
night. Baron Davis scored 17 and Kelenna
Azubuike 16. Mickael Pietrus and Mike Dun-
leavy added 15 apiece for the Warriors.

Golden State’s Andris Biedrins matched
his career high with 17 rebounds.

@ Heat 93, Trail Blazers 90: In Port-
land, Ore., Dwyane Wade’s return ended
Miami’s losing streak.

Wade scored 33 points and the Heat beat
the Portland Trail Blazers 93-90 Sunday
night to snap a five-game skid.

Wade, who had 25 points in the first half,

had missed four games with a wrist injury.
He helped Miami rally from a 16-point defi-
cit.

The Heat closed to 81-79 on Wade’s dunk,
before Jason Kapono hit a 3-pointer that gave
Miami its first lead of the second half, ‘82-81.

Zach Randolph’s jumper with 2:19 left
gave the Blazers the lead back, but after a
Portland free throw, Kapono again hit a
3-pointer to make it 85-84 for Miami.

Randolph again hit a jumper, but Alonzo
Mourning answered with a hook shot and
Wade dunked to make it 89-86.

LaMarcus Aldridge’s jumper got the Blaz-
ers closer with 23 seconds left before Wade
made a pair of free throws. Ime Udoka made
a layup for the Blazers with 8.6 seconds left.

Wade made another pair of free throws
for the final margin. Brandon Roy’s 3-point
attempt for the Blazers at the buzzer fell
short.

Roy led the Blazers with 18 points.

e Lakers 101, Mavericks 98: In San
Antonio, Sasha Vujacic made the go-ahead
3-pointer with 28.5 seconds left, and the Los

Angeles Lakers beat Dallas 101-98 Sunday
night to snap the Mavericks’ 13-game win-
ning streak.

Vujacic scored nine of his career-high 16
points in the fourth quarter. '

Kobe Bryant ‘had 26 points, eight
rebounds and six assists and Luke Walton
scored 21 for the Lakers, who presented.
coach Phil Jackson with his 900th victory.

Jackson ranks ninth on. the NBA’s career
wins list, and became the fastest to reach
900, doing so in 1,264 games. Former Lakers
coach Pat Riley accomplished the feat in

‘1,278 games.

Dirk Nowitzki’s jumper with 42 seconds
remaining gave the Mavericks a 98-97 lead,
but Vujacic’s long jumper put the Lakers

ahead for.goad, A free throw by Walton with

10.6 seconds, to.play completed the scoring.

Devean George, a former Laker, missed a
potential game-tying 3-pointer with 4 sec-
onds left, and Bryant got the rebound. Time
expired before the Mavericks were able to
commit a foul.

LATE SATURDAY

e Jazz 96, Nuggets 84: In Denver,
Deron Williams tied a career high with 28
points and Carlos Boozer shrugged off a slow
start to finish with 24 for Utah.

e Warriors 108, SuperSonics 104: In
Oakland, Calif., Baron Davis had 22 points
and ll assists to lead Golden State to its sixth
straight home win.

.@ Blazers 110, Kings 105 (om): In Sac-
ramento, Calif., Zach Randolph had 32 points
and 15 rebounds for the Trail Blazers, who
tied the game at the buzzer in regulation and
went on to win in overtime.

. Brodeur saves the Devils again

Fleury stopped Brad Richards and Vin-
cent Lecavalier to start the shootout, but

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY

Atlanta «24 12 «6+~«2~«S56 137 134 11-531 13-7-3-111-4-4-1

Carolina 22:18 2 2 48130 133 12-7-0-1 10-11-2-1 —0-3-0-0

Washington 18 17° 2 5 43128 143 10-10-1-2 8-7-1-3 6-6-1-1 Associated Press

TampaBay 20 21 1 1 42135 136 10-11-0-0 10-10-1-1 9-7-0-0 j

Florida 15 20 3 5 38116 139 10-B1-1 5-12-2-4 2-10-10 MONTREAL — Martin Brodeur made
28 saves for his league-leading seventh

ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY Div shutout of the season and Brian Gionta

11-10-0-1 9-4-0-1
13-10-0-1 8-7-0-0

4 54113 100 14-3-0-3
1 48 129 131 9-7-3-0

New Jersey 25. 13
N.Y. Rangers 22 17



3
Pittsburgh 18 15 3 4 43125 128 10-8-2-2 8-7-1-2. 11-5-1-1
N.Y. Islanders 19 19 1 2 41117 116 11-8-1-1 8-11-0-1 7-6-1-0
Philadelphia 11 27° 2 2 26102 159 3-11-2-2 8-16-0-0 — 3-10-0-2
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Buffalo 30 9 2 #1 63 164 122 14-5-1-1 16-4-1-0 8-6-1-0
Montreal 23 14° 1 «+4 «51127 118 = 13-6-0-3 10-8-1-1 8-4-0-4
Ottawa 23,19 2 O 48 143 125 10-10-1-0 13-9-1-0 9-7-0-0
Toronto 19.18 2 4 44144 144 = 10-10-1-2 9-8-1-2 7-8-2-2
Boston 20 16 1 2 43 118 142 12-8-0-1 8-8-1-1 9-6-0-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _IV
Nashville 2% 11 2 #21 «591 144, 109 =: 13-3-2-1 15-8-0-0 =: 11-3-1-0
Detroit 25 12 2 3 55125 102 14-3-1-2 11-9-1-1 9-2-0-1
Chicago 17 20 1 = «=4 #39105 124 10-10-0-1 7-10-1-3 9-9-0-0.
Columbus. 16 22 2 2 36 108 130 9-9-1-17-13-1-1 5-8-0-1
St., Louis 13 21 4 3 33 96 129 8-11-2-1 5-10-2-2 5-10-2-2
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY piv
Vancouver 23 18 O 1 47 103 108 14- 7- 0-0- 9- 11 0- 1 9-9-0-1
Calgary 21 15 2 2 46122 106 16-5-0-0 5-10-2-2 6-5-1-1
Minnesota 21 18 O 3 45118 114 17-4-0-2 4-14-0-1 5-4-0-2
Colorado 21 18 2 O 44 131 116 11-9-1-0 10-9-1-0 9-4-1-0
Edmonton 19 18 2 2 42117 122 13-7-1-1 6-11-1-1 T-7-1-0
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _ DIV
Anaheim 29 9 #1 64 151 108 16-3-1-3 13-6-0-2 9-3-0-1
San Jose 28 14 0 O 56 130 100 15-7-0-0 13-7-0-0 8-8-0-0
Dallas 26 16 O 1 53117 102 13-6-0-0 —13-10-0-1 12-3-0-0
Phoenix 19 20 1 1 40113 138 11-8-1-0 8-12-0-1 —_5-10-1-1
Los Angeles 16 22 2 3 37124 154 11-9-2-3 5-13-0-0 — 6-11-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Saturday’s results

Boston 4, Philadelphia 3
New Jersey 3, Ottawa 2

N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 3
Buffalo 4, Toronto 3
Washington 3, Atlanta 2, OT
Carolina 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
Nashville 3, St. Louis 2
Colorado 2, Minnesota 1, SO
Calgary 4, Dallas 2

San Jose 5, Columbus 2
Los Angeles 4, Detroit 2

Tonight’s games
Edmntn at L.A., 10:30

Sunday’s results

Florida at Vanc., late
Phoenix 4, Chicago 2
New Jersey 3, Montreal 0
Tbay3 6, 6, Philadelphia 1

eens. ‘SO)

4



scored twice, lifting the New Jersey Dev-
ils to a 3-0 win over the Montreal Cana-
diens on Sunday.

Brodeur, who leads the league with 25

wins, is third in career shutouts with 87.
He trails George Hainsworth (94) and
Terry Sawchuck (103).
’ Gionta, who scored late in the first to
put New Jersey up 2-0, got his second of
the game — his team-leading 19th — ona
power-play 12:47 into the third.

Mike Rupp scored his third goal 2:21 in,
and Scott Gomez and Brian Rafalski each
had two assists for the Devils, who have
won three in a row, and six while remain-
ing undefeated in regulation in their last
seven (6-0-1).

e Senators 6, Flyers 1: In Ottawa,
Dany Heatley had two goals and an assist,
and linemate Daniel Alfredsson added a
goal and two assists in the Senators’ vic-
tory over the Flyers.

The third member of that line, Chris
Kelly, had a goal and an assist to help the
Senators win for the sixth time in their
last eight games. Rookie Josh Hennessy
added his first NHL goal, and Joe Corvo
also scored.

Martin Gerber, making a rare home
start in place of Ray Emery, made 20
saves, allowing only R.J. Umberger’s goal.

Antero Niittymaki made 37 saves for
Philadelphia in his lth straight loss.

e Coyotes 4, Blackhawks 2: In Chi-
cago, Jeremy Roenick had a goal and an
assist and the Coyotes won their season-
high sixth straight, beating the Black-
hawks.

Michael Zigomanis, Fredrik Sjostrom
and Oleg Saprykin also scored for Phoe-
nix, which hasn’t lost in regulation in its



PAUL CHIASSON/CP/AP

MASKING A SMILE: Devils goaltender
Martin Brodeur smiles as he skates
off the ice on Sunday in Montreal
after collecting his 87th shutout.

last eight, going 7-0-1.

The Coyotes’ Mikael Tellqvist made 32
saves, including several on tough chances
in the third period.

Phoenix was 2-for-5 on the power play
against Chicago, and is 10-for-31 with the
advantage in its last seven games.

Patrick Sharp and Peter Bondra scored
for the Blackhawks, who lost their third
straight overall and third straight at home.
Chicago has dropped five of its last six.

e Lightning 3, Penguins 2 (SO): In
Pittsburgh, Martin St. Louis put a back-
hander between Marc-Andre Fleury’s
pads in a shootout and the Tampa Bay
Lightning shook off a remarkable goal by
Sidney Crosby to beat the Penguins.

St. Louis skated down the slot and faked
out Fleury by going to his backhand and
then slipping the puck between the goal-
ie’s legs. Crosby had a chance to send the
shootout to another round but, like Eric
Christensen and Evgeni Maklkin before
him, couldn’t get the puck past Johan
Holmavist.

Holmgvist has stopped all 10 skaters he
has faced in shootouts this season.

e Ducks 4, Red Wings 2: In Ana-
heim; Calif., Bjorn Melin scored in his
NHL debut and the Ducks also got goals
from Travis Moen and Ryan Getzlaf to
beat the Red Wings, ending a four-game
losing streak.

Ilya Bryzgalov, making his third con-
secutive start in net because of Jean-Se-
bastien Giguere’s groin injury, made 33
saves to help send Detroit to its third
straight loss. Rob Niedermayer added an
empty-net goal with 4.1 seconids left.

Mikael Samuelsson and Tomas Holms-
trom scored power-play goals for the Red
Wings, who are 0-3 on their five-game
trip.

LATE SATURDAY

e Kings 4, Red Wings 2: In Los
Angeles, Michael Cammalleri and
Lubomir Visnovsky each had a goal and
an assist, and Rob Blake also scored to
lead Los Angeles to a victory that snapped
its 12-game losing streak to Detroit.

e Sharks 5, Blue Jackets 2: In San
Jose, Calif., Ryane Clowe had his first
three-goal game, Joe Thornton got three
assists and San Jose’s formidable power
play overwhelmed another opponent.

e Flames 4, Stars 2: In Calgary,
Alberta, Dustin Boyd scored his first NHL
goal with 2:17 left, snapping a tie and car-
rying Calgary over Dallas.

REESE TO SIS OT NS OES TE EET oS OE SS TT SE ENE ST RE TERT



6E | MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BCS CHAMPIONSHIP GAME | OHIO STATE VS. FLORIDA

Too big to call it a bow! —

BY RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — A
new era of college football
begins Monday night with No.
1 Ohio State and No. 2 Florida
playing a game that’s grown
too big to be called a bowl.

A week after New Year’s
Day, after all the bowls have
been played, the Buckeyes and
Gators meet in the first BCS
national championship game.

“Tt’s the Super Bowl of col- .

lege football and I think col-
lege football needed that,”
Gators coach Urban Meyer
said Sunday.

What the bigger — if not
better — Bow! Championship
Series got for its new show-
case event is a1 vs. 2 matchup
that had many skeptical at first
about it’s legitimacy.

Heisman Trophy winner
Troy Smith and the Buckeyes
(12-0) were a no-brainer. The
Big Ten champions have been
No. 1 since the preseason, and
already have a pair of victories
against teams ranked No. 2.

“You know the only time
we thought for sure that we
were going to be in the
national championship is

when that game (against.

Michigan) ended Nov. 18
because we knew going in you
have to win them all,” sdid
Ohio State coach Jim Tressel,
seeking his second national

_ title in his sixth season with
the Buckeyes.

But Florida? The Gators
(12-1) lived on the edge, navi-
gating a brutal Southeastern
Conference schedule by
orchestrating several great
escapes. Blocked kicks, late
rallies and a healthy dose of
trickery — Florida used it all.
It’s enough to make some say
good fortune has been the
Gators’ best friend.

They see it another way.

“We don’t really believe in
destiny,” defensive tackle Ray
McDonald. “We believe when

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD









CHARLES KRUPA/AP

RALLY ROUSER: Ohio State Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Troy Smith gestures to Buckeye fans during a rally
at Chase Field in Phoenix, on Sunday. At left is head coach Jim Tressel. .

your number’s called you
make that play.”

Still, Florida needed help to
get here.

Southern California’s loss
to UCLA on the last day of the
regular season opened the
door for Florida, and a sea
change among poll voters
allowed the Gators to jump
over Michigan in the final BCS
standings — and into a

_ matchup with the Buckeyes.

Then USC helped out Flor-
ida again, pounding the Wol-
verines in the Rose Bowl last
week and removing any ques-
tions about whether the win-
ner of Monday’s night game at
shiny new University of Phoe-
nix Stadium in Glendale
should be national champion.

Ohio State’s won four
national titles, the last in 2002

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Police rule on
kicker’s death:
likely accident
or a suicide

BY ANA BEATRIZ CHOLO
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Foul play
probably was not a factor in
the death of Southern Califor-
nia kicker Mario Danelo,
whose body was found about
120 feet down a rocky cliff,
police said Sunday.

“Tt was fairly apparent that
this was
either an acci-
dent or sui-
cide,” said Lt.
Paul Vernon.

Danelo’s
brother said
Sunday that
‘dt was an
unfortunate



ee

DANELO

accident.”

“He was a good kid,” Joey
Danelo said during a phone
interview with The Associated
Press. “There was not a person
I know that didn’t like him.”

Investigators were examin-
ing evidence recovered after
Danelo’s body was found Sat-
urday afternoon near Point
Fermin lighthouse in the city’s
San Pedro section.

While police have not com-
pletely ruled out foul play,
Vernon said “there didn’t
appear to be a crime
involved.” An autopsy could
be performed as early as Mon-
day, coroner’s officials said.

Someone flying a remote-
control airplane noticed some-
thing at the bottom of the cliff
Saturday and a friend hiked
down to the beach and discov-
ered the body, police said.

Investigators were looking
into whether Danelo was out

with friends Friday night. He
was last seen around midnight,
authorities said.

A makeshift memorial was
placed near the top of the
steep cliff where Danelo fell. A
flag bearing the USC logo was
spread out, surrounded by
flowers and candles and a
message reading “Rest in
Peace Danelo” spraypainted
on the ground.

Nearby, a sign warned:
“Danger Do Not Enter Unsta-
ble and Slippery Surfaces
Steep Drops.”

Fire Department spokes-
man Brian Humphrey said
investigators did not find a
surf board, scuba-diving tanks
or anything else to indicate
Danelo might have been down
there for any of the recre-
ational activities common to
the area.

Humphrey said over the
years a handful of people had
fallen from the cliff.

“It’s entirely possible that
he fell,” Humphrey said.

Danelo, the 21-year-old son
of former NFL kicker Joe
Danelo, made 15 of 16 field
goals this season and led the
Trojans in scoring with 89
points. The junior made two
field goals in the Rose Bowl on
Monday to help USC beat
Michigan 32-18.

He only missed two field
goals in his career, going 26-
for-28, and was 127-of-134 on
extra points. In 2005, he set
NCAA single-season records
with 83 extra points and 86
attempts.

Speaking on behalf of Tro-

when Maurice Clarett and the
Buckeyes shocked a powerful
Miami team in a double-over-
time classic in Arizona. A fifth
title would match USC and
Miami for the fourth-most in
major college football.

But this one would be
unique for Ohio State. Only
Florida State in 1999 and USC
in 2004 have gone from pre-
season to post-bowls as No. 1.
in The Associated Press Top
25.

Athletic director Gene
Smith challenged the Buck-
eyes before the season to set
themselves apart by going
wire-to-wire as No. 1.

“T’ve always felt that in
great programs you need to
find ways to differentiate
yourself from history,” he said.
“What is your mark as a senior

class? I just felt that that’s just
something they should focus
on, trying to leave their legacy.
“I got lucky with that.”
With Troy Smith on their
side, the Buckeyes didn’t need
much luck.
Smith was brilliant in his

senior season, throwing for.

2,507 yards and 30 touch-
downs as the Buckeyes out-
scored the opposition by 26
per game. He turned the Heis-
man voting into another rout,
winning in a record-breaking
landslide.

Of course, Heisman win-
ners have found themselves on
the losing end more often than
not when playing for a BCS
national title. Five have done
so since 2000, and only one —
USC’s Matt Leinart in 704 —
has won.



MATT SAYLES/AP

DEATH OF A TROJAN: Above, USC kicker Mario Danelo,
right, kicks a field goal against the University of
Washington in the second half in Los Angeles on Oct. 7.
The Trojan kicker was found dead on Saturday about
120 feet down a rocky cliff near Point Fermin lighthouse

in San Pedro, Calif., below.

jans coach Pete Carroll, USC
spokesman Tim Tessalone
said: “We were stunned to
hear about this tragedy. This is
a great loss. Mario was a won-
derful young man of high char-
acter.

“He was one heck of a
kicker. He was a key ingredi-
ent in our success the past two
years. The thoughts and
prayers of the entire Trojan



” RICFRANCIS/AP

family go out to the Danelo
family on this sad, sad day.”

USC linebacker Dallas
Sartz said Danelo would be
remembered for his upbeat
personality and dependable
kicking.

“J just remember Mario was
the guy who always had a
smile on his face and would
always cheer you up,” said
Sartz, a team captain.

Smith said the Heisman
isn’t a burden.

“I am not going into this
game thinking I am the Heis-
man Trophy winner so I have
to do this,” he said. “For every-
body out there, I want them to
know that I think the Heisman
Trophy is a team award. If my
team is not undefeated, I am
probably not in this kind of sit-
uation.”

Make no mistake, Ohio
State wouldn’t be here without
Smith, who’s 25-2. as a starter
and been at his best against the
best.

In Ohio State’s first two 1-2
games against Texas and
Michigan, Smith threw for 585
yards and six touchdowns.
And if he needs to run, he can
do that, too.

The Gators are underdogs

* DAHLBERG

conferences, who seem
intent on keeping outsiders
away from both their title
game andthe plentiful.
riches that go along with it.

| Press poll owe no such alle-

giances. And some would

| pick Boise State No. 1
because it was the only team
to win every game.

“Obviously, Ohio State
has the tougher schedule
and plays in the Big Ten .
with a bulls-eye on its back
all year,” said Greg Archu-

-leta, college football
reporter for the Albuquer-
que Journal. “But if they lose
Ihave no qualms about vot-
ing Boise State No. l. They
did what they had to do.
They’ll be the only one
undefeated.”

The first BCS national
championship bowl game is
fittingly being played at a
university stadium. That
would be the University of
Phoenix, which not only has
no football team itself, but
no other teams of any kind,
either.

The school, though,
makes enough off its courses
to pay $154.5 million for the
naming rights to the home’
field of the Arizona Cardi-
nals in this nondescript
Phoenix suburb.

That’s big money, but col-
lege football has become a
game of big money. The BCS
game is the record 32nd

bowl game in a season that
began nearly three weeks
ago with the Poinsettia Bowl
and included seemingly
every school besides the
University of Phoenix.

The total payoffs to
schools are estimated to be
some $210 million, which
will help keep the budgets of
a lot of athletic departments
healthy. It will also allow
schools to keep paying mil-



Voters in The Associated ©

but undaunted.

“We're not afraid of Troy
Smith at all,” said linebacker
Brandon Siler, who leads a
defense ranked in the top 10
nationally in yards and points
allowed. “He is a great player.
He has a great arm and he can
run the ball. Don’t get it con-
fused, we are not afraid at all.”

Smith has already secured a

place among the greatest and ~

most beloved Buckeyes.’

For his counterpart, Chris
Leak, the game could define a
career that has looked great on
paper but has left many fans
unsatisfied. The four-year
starter has thrown for 11,000
yards and 87 TDs, but he’s not
even the most popular quar-
terback on campus. That title
goes to fiery freshman Tim
Tebow, who’s tough running
has complemented Leak’s
passing.

Meyer makes it clear that
it’s Leak’s team.

-“Tf he’s getting killed (by
fans), I will tell you what, if he

wins this game he willbe one.
of the two top quarterbacks to ,

’
t
4
4

’

play at Florida,” Meyer said. -”

“You are measured by wins
and championships.”

- The Gators won their only
national title in 1996, when
Danny Wuerffel directed
Steve Spurrier’s Fun-and-Gun
offense.

No one is more adored in
Gainesville than Spurrier, who
turned the Gators into a pow-
erhouse in the ’90s. Now

Meyer, in his second season —+'-°-’

with Florida, can match the

*& © eee
ose

+
e
+
4

Ball Coach’s greatest achieve- « .

ment.

It’s been 51 days since the
Buckeyes played, and 37 for
the Gators. By Sunday, they’d
had enough hype.

“I just visited with Coach
Tressel,” Meyer said. “We are
both ready to go play a foot-
ball game. I know our players

are ready to play. It has been a _

long time.”

EROM THE SPORTS FRONT

BCS title game
generates little buzz

lionaire coaches even more
millions to try and make
- boosters happy.

Ohio State’s Jim Tressel
not only got a $200,000
bonus for getting his team
into the game, but has a
clause in his contract that
allows him to renegotiate his
$2.6 million annual salary if
the Buckeyes win the
national title.

The labor, meanwhile,
labors for a lot less. Players
got satellite radios, com-
memorative wristwatches
and a few threads, but
NCAA rules prohibit them
from receiving anything
worth more than $500 total.

That led to some grum-
bling this week when some

members of the media trying .°

to add a spark to a dreary
week of bland coaches and
even blander quotes asked
players whether they should
be sharing in the riches
when they are doing the
actual work.

“We all deserve more
money,” Ohio State senior
guard T.J. Downing said.
“We're the reason this mon-
ey’s coming in. We're the
guys out there sacrificing
our bodies. We’re taking
years off our lives out here
hitting each other, and we’re
not being compensated for
it.”

There figures to be some
more grumbling Monday
night in Glendale, but this
time among residents of the
city. Their homes will be
shaking when the Air Force
sends one of its noisier jets,
the four-engine B-1B

bomber, on a low-level flight ,

over the stadium just as the
national anthem is winding
down.

That, presumably, shows
what a big game this is. But

e

the fans inside the stadium

won't see a thing.

closed.

The stadium roof willbe *



2007, PAGE 7E

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TED WARREN/AP

THE LOBBYIST: Florida head coacn
Urban Meyer talks to reporters
on Sunday in Scottsdale, Ariz.
With the help of his lobbying
effort, Florida will face Ohio.
State tonight in the BCS college
football championship game.

The title game
has a tough
act to follow —

3 ®
BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press ARS

GLENDALE, Ariz. — It’s gota
crummy name and an awfully tough
act to follow. . ee

The little team that could from
Idaho already captured America’s
imagination, and it feels like a semes-
ter or two have passed since Ohio
State and Florida last took the field.

The prime-time game is worth mil-
lions, but they forgot to pay someone
to come up with a title better than the
Bowl Championship Series national
championship game. No matter what
they call it, the game has to fight to
get noticed a week removed from the
New Year’s hangover and in the mid-
dle of the NFL playoffs. cone

The other day some of the players
grumbled that they came all the way
to Arizona and all they got for their
‘efforts was a portable satellite radio
and a few lousy T-shirts. .

To top it off, there might still be
room for some debate over who really
is No. 1 when the bowl season finally
comes to a merciful end Monday
night. on

Is this any way to crown a national
champion? gets

The people who run the hotels,
restaurants and bars in the Phoenix
area sure think so. They’ve been
packed with fans wearing school col-
ors and spending money faster than
Florida can change quarterbacks.

A certain television network _

looking for big ratings certainly hopes —

so. Fox spent $320 million for a four-
year deal that also includes rights to
the Fiesta, Orange and Sugar bowls,
never figuring that a team from Boise
State would steal:some thunder from
the finalgame. ~ :

And, of course, two coaches with a
lot at stake would have you believe |
it’s the greatest game ever. :

“I can’t imagine a better bowl to be
in,” Florida’s Urban Meyer said. -

Meyer likes it so much he literally
helped talk his team’s way into this
game. With the BCS computers para-
lyzed by indecision, he lobbied BCS
poll voters to give his team the edge
over Michigan and they responded by
voting once-beaten Florida into the
gameyes2.5) ay
Turns out Michigan didn’t really
belong in this game anyway. USC:
made sure of that on the field when it
manhandled the Wolverines in the
RoseBowl,

An outside case might be made,
though, forthe only other unbeaten
major college team in the country
besides Ohio State. Actually, Boise
State made a case for itself in the
same stadium on New Year’s Day
when the Broncos parlayed some
plays usually run on sandlots to beat
befuddled Oklahoma in the Fiesta
Bowl. seas

‘The hook and ladder tied the game.

The Statue of Liberty won it.

Then the running back who scored
the winning points capped a story-
book night by getting down on one
knee and proposing to his cheerleader
girlfriend. Ps one ei

It was the kind of stuff they make
movies about in Hollywood. And the

_ reason why, for much of the week, the
first question asked coaches and play-
ers here was: “Did you see the Boise
State game?”

At least one workaholic coach
didn’t.

“I fell asleep and my wife kept hit-.
ting me,” Meyer said. “She said it was
the greatest football game she ever
saw.”

So could Boise State, which went
43-0 in the lightly regarded Western
Athletic Conference, be the national
champion if Florida overcomes the
odds and beats Ohio State?

Not in the BCS, it.couldn’t. The
bowl system is controlled by the top

°TURN TO DAHLBERG

PRO FOOTBALL | AFC PLAYOFFS: NEW ENGLAND 37, NEW YORK JETS 16 |

Patriots advance with a rou

BY DENNIS WASZAK Jr.
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The teacher had
the upper hand in this game — and so did Tom
Brady, his quarterback.

Brady capped long scoring drives with short
touchdown passes to Daniel Graham and Kevin
Faulk, and Asante Samuel sealed it with a 36-
yard interception return for a score with 4:54
left in the game as Bill Belichick’s three-time
Super Bow] champions beat the New York Jets
37-16 on Sunday.

New England (13-4), the only team to win a
playoff game in each of the last four seasons,
will play at top-seeded San Diego (14-2) next
Sunday. The Patriots are going for their fourth
Super Bowl title in six seasons.

“It’s a huge challenge, the best team in the
NEL this year, the MVP,” linebacker Tedy Brus-
chi said of the Chargers and running back
LaDainian Tomlinson. “It’s a huge challenge.”

_ The loss ended a surprising run by the Jets,
who won their last three. regular-season games
to get into the playoffs in what was supposed to







be a rebuilding season under rookie coach Man-
gini. Belichick’s former assistant showed he
learned a lot in his six years in New England,
but the mentor still had some lessons left to
teach. ,

After the game, the two coaches, whose rela-
tionship has cooled since Mangini left to
become coach of the Jets, met at midfield and
Belichick hugged Mangini. | I, :

Brady improved to 10-2 against the Jets
(10-7), and played much better than in the
teams’ last meeting, when New York frustrated
the quarterback with blitzes and won 17-14. This
time, Brady was in control right from the start.

“J think we had a great plan,” Brady said.
“This is a pressure defense, and I think we were
prepared much more for the pressure this time
around.”

‘New England, which has won seven of eight
since that loss to New York, improved to 9-1 at
home in the playoffs, and hasn’t lost in the post-
season since a 31-14 defeat against the Houston

* TURN TO AFC

acess AcE DSO ES ASCE NB OEE ESCUELA D CEEOL DOE ASRS,

INTERNATIONAL EDITION “:,







Davi POKRESS/NEWSDAY/MCT
THE BREAK-UP: Patriots linebacker Mike
Vrabel, left, breaks up a pass intended for
Jets wide receiver Jerricho Cotchery
during first-half AFC playoff action
Sunday in Foxboro, Mass. New England
defeated New York 37-16 to advance.

NFC PLAYOFFS | PHILADELPHIA 25, NEW YORK GIANTS 20



Kicking perf



SURE-FOOTED: Eagles kicker David Akers kicks the winning field goal to give host
Philadelphia a 23-20 win over the New York Giants in Sunday’s NFL wild card game.

GOLF | MERCEDES-BENZ CHAMPIONSHIP

Singh opens season with a victory

ection

Akers’ 38-yard
field goal lifts
Eagles over Giants

BY ROB MAADDI .
Associated Press :

PHILADELPHIA — The snap was there, the
hold. was good and the kick was perfect.

David Akers hit a 38-yard field goal with no
time remaining to give the Philadelphia Eagles a
23-20 victory over the New York Giants in a
wild-card playoff game Sunday.

A day after Dallas lost to Seattle when quar-
terback Tony Romo fumbled the hold on what
could have been a go-ahead field goal, the
Eagles executed the seemingly routine play that
has cost teams important games in recent
weeks.

Brian Westbrook had 141 yards rushing,
including a spectacular, slashing 49-yard TD
run in the second quarter. His 65-yard punt
return for an apparent score in the third quarter
was nullified by a penalty on rookie Torrance
Daniels. -

Jeff Garcia threw for 153 yards, one touch-
down and played efficiently enough to win for
the sixth time in seven starts since replacing an
injured Donovan McNabb.

Eli Manning threw two touchdown passes to
Plaxico Burress, including an ll-yard strike that
tied it at 20 with 5:04 left.

In what probably was his last game, Tiki Bar-
ber ran for 137 yards for the Giants. A three-
time Pro Bowl running back, Barber plans to

yetire after 10 seasons in the NEL.

The Eagles are far from finished, though.

Counted out after a knee injury ended
McNabb’s season in Week Il, the Eagles (11-6)
have won six straight games. They’ll play at
New Orleans (10-6) next Saturday night.

The Giants overcame a second-and-30 on
their tying scoring drive as Manning completed
consecutive passes of 18, 14 and 11 yards to Bur-
ress.

But the Eagles drove right down the field,
mixing in short passes and Westbrook runs.

That set up Akers’ winning kick, a moment
with a little extra drama in the wake of the
botched hold in the Dallas-Seattle game and a
bad snap on a critical extra point in a late-sea-
son game between Cincinnati and Denver.

Koy Detmer, the longtime backup quarter-

*TURN TO NFC

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii — The new
era in golf brought out the old ver-
sion of Vijay Singh.

Coming off his least productive
season in five years, the 43-year-
old Singh delivered a strong state-
ment Sunday that he’s still around
by closing with a 3-under 70 for a
two-shot victory over Adam Scott
in the season-opening Mercedes-
Benz Championship.

It was the 30th victory of his
PGA Tour career and 18th since he
turned 40, breaking the record held
by Sam Snead.

And Singh finally walked off the
Plantation course at Kapalua with
the winner’s lei around his neck
and the keys to a new car, which he
said he would give to his son. He
has been runner-up twice in the
last three years, and has never fin-
ished worse than eighth since this
winners-only tournament moved
to Maui.

This time, no one stood a
chance.

He doubled the size of his three-
shot lead after two holes, and only
a late charge by Scott kept it inter-
esting.

Singh finished at 14-under 278

and along with $1.1 million to push
him over $50 million for his career,
he earned 4,500 points for the new
FedExCup competition.

The tour has called this a “new
era in golf,” and the hype has been
so strong that Singh said he was
tired of listening to it. All he cared
about was winning, and he took
care of that with ease.

Scott led by three shots when he
played with Singh in the final
round of the season-ending Tour
Championship two months ago.



WATCHING THE BALL’S FLIGHT: .
Tournament winner Vijay
Singh follows his drive off the
third tee of the Plantation
Course during the final round
of the Mercedes-Benz
Championship in Kapalua,
Hawaii., on Sunday.







| LOW __70F |

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MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

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SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE TWO






PRICE-75¢.

Pct esas yee aac

‘Boned!’ from arrests briefing

Bahamian representatives
in US briefed on baggage
handlers operation
without Ministry of

Legal Affairs official

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff. Reporter



AN OFFICIAL from the
Ministry of Legal Affairs was
barred from attending a meet-
ing in Washington last year
when Bahamian representa-
tives were briefed on the oper-
ation to arrest the baggage
handlers from Nassau Flight
Services, The Tribune has
learned.

Sources close to the PLP
cabinet reveal that Bernard
Turner, the director of public
prosecutions and the assistant
commissioner of police Mr
Reginald Ferguson were the
only two officials scheduled
to attend the annual briefing.
However, it is alleged that due
to departmental in-fighting,
Mr Turner was barred from
attending that meeting.

This deterioration in proto-
col, it was claimed, could be at
the heart of the prime minis-
ter’s “surprise” at hearing that
no one in his cabinet had any
knowledge of the operation.

The US Embassy has stated
that the relevant local agen-
cies were informed, namely
the Attorney General’s office,
and thé Royal Bahamas Police
Force.

These agencies, along with
the US Attorney’s Office, the
Drug Enforcement Agency
(DEA), the Department of
Homeland Security, and the

Customs and Border Protec-
tion Agency were said to have
been involved in the Decem-
ber 18 arrests.

However, Attorney Gener-
al Allyson Maynard-Gibson
has stated that no one from
the government was aware of
the operation.

Since then, Prime Minister
Perry Christie has advised that
he will personally be investi-
gating the matter as someone
in the government ought to
have known about the opera-
tion.

“J have made a salient effort
to inquire fully into all of the
details because it has become
an important point in public
interest that I think I should
respond to as prime minister,”
he said.

However critics state that
“once again”, no real judg-
ment will prevail as scandal
after scandal has gone unchal-
lenged by Mr Christie.

The Tribune revealed last
month that no one in Mr
Christie’s cabinet knew any-
thing of the investigation, in
particular the Ministry of
Legal Affairs, which by all
accounts had in fact been
approached to take part in the
planning.

. Five men from NFS were
arrested before disembarking
their Spirit Airlines flight
when it landed in Fort Laud-

SEE page 14



@ A POLICE motorcyclist

looks on yesterday during the |
Royal Bahamas Police Force |
annual parade after Workers }
Party protesters took to the |
street over the arrest of five |

Bahamian airport workers.
e SEE PAGE NINE

(Photo: Felipé Major/ \

Tribune staff)

1



FNM hits ©
out over |
arrests of
baggage ©
handlers

m By RUPERT

MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

A SMOKE and mirrors
public relations campaign is
being used to cover-up the
highly irregular manner in
which five Bahamian citi-
zens may have been lured
from the’ Bahamas and
arrested in the United
States for alleged drug traf-
ficking, the opposition said
yesterday in its weekly news
release. -

While the opposition said
that it is strongly commit-:
ted to stemming the flow of
illegal drugs, vigorously
enhancing air transport
security, and cooperating
with valued partners in
combating cross-border
crimes and international
terrorism, these critical
goals must be pursued by
respecting Bahamian laws
and bilateral and multilat-
eral agreements. :

“The public wants to
know. — and has a right to

- know — the details of this
-case so that a balanced

judgment can be made on
what are now inconclusive
reports. The country wants
to know the facts: who in
the government knew what
and when,” the FNM said.

SEE page 14

MP ‘still waiting’ on Ministry over boat

“og

building yard residents attribute to illness

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter






concerns in October .

A group of residents met with the
Prime Minister then, and told him that
they were dissatisfied with the course of
the government-led investigations into
the cause of severe respiratory problems
suffered by some residents in the Man-
grove Bush settlement.

Some of the residents have blamed it

SEE page 14

the issue again when the House of
Assembly reopens after the Christmas
recess as he has heard nothing substantial
from anyone in the Ministry of Health
or environmental services. The House
reopens on Wednesday.

This, comes after Prime Minister
Christie personally requested a “fuller
investigation” into the health complaints
of a number of Long Island résidents
when they approached him with their



LONG Island MP Larry Cartwright
said he is still waiting word from the Min-
istry of Health on when a boat building
yard in Mangrove Bush will close after
residents of the area have become ill from
air-borne illnesses, which they attribute to
activities at the boatyard.

Mr Cartwright said he intends to raise

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FROM page one

The party said that the
renutations of the Prime
Minister and that of his col-
leagues are not the key
matters at stake and point-
ed out that the key issues
are Bahamian sovereignty
and the integrity of the
country’s laws.

On Friday, speaking with
the press after a special lun-
cheon at the new police
conference centre, Mr
Christie said he has
launched his own investiga-
tion into the circumstances
of the arrest of five Nassau
Flight Services (NFS)

-employees by US authori-

ties.

Although the prime min-
ister concurred with Attor-
ney General Allyson May-

PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

nard-Gibson that no mem-
ber of government had
been informed about the
controversial arrests, he
said that “there are some
agencies of the government
that ought to know if they
are part of a joint investi-
gation.”

Nevertheless, the opposi-
tion said, the public is wit-
nessing the “Christie shuf-
fle: ignore what’s happen-
ing; try to switch the sub-
ject; then, when publicly
confronted with the facts,
try to shuffle out of respon-
sibility with tortured expla-
nations and theatrical sen-
timents.”

“One issue after critical
issue which the public have
a democratic right to know
about, the ever-talking and
speechifying Prime Minis-

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ter Perry Christie has bro-
ken trust with the Bahami-
an people and rather than

being accountable has been .

elusive, silent or disingen-
uous,” the party said.

The opposition accused
the prime minister of col-
luding with colleagues to
hide from or duck responsi-

Endangered Siberian tigers chill

@ SIBERIAN tigers relax at a
than 100 Siberian tigers, one of t
breeding center in China's northeast. At least 50
in the city of Harbin are ex
ed by the official Xinhua News Agency.
vive in the wild, about 20 of them in China and the rest in Russia.

pected to give birth,

bility for blunders, scandals
and domestic and interna-
tional embarrassments.
“While a prime minister
need not comment on every
matter, there are critical
moments when the people
want and need to hear a
frank articulation of policy
and process from the chief

S

SS



Nature park in Harbin, China, Sunday, Jan. 7, 2007. More
he rarest animals, are expected to be born this year at a
female tigers at the Manchurian Tiger Park
said general manager Wang Ligang, quot-
Fewer than 400 Siberian tigers are believed to sur-

executive.

“They want a leader who
has a command of the facts
and one who knows what is
going on in his government.
Mr Christie, distracted by
the scandals and corruption
gives only rambling rumi-
nations and clumsy gover-
nance,” the FNM said.










(AP Photo/Elizabeth Dalziel)





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“Arrests
briefing

FROM page one

erdale. The men had been
under surveillance for
over a year by both US
and local law enforce-
ment. They were accused
of placing illegal narcotics
onto local and interna-
tional flights at Lynden
Pindling International
Airport.

The men made up a
group of 20 NFS employ-
ees who were sent to the
US for “mandatory” TSA
training. However, it is
has been claimed that at
the heart of this plan was

ensure that the men were
on US soil at the time of
their arrest. Also, the ruse
of including other
employees — not under
surveillance for trans-
shipment of cocaine —
was allegedly done to
ease the fears of those
being targeted.

Since their arrest, it has
mainly been only the US
Embassy that has
applauded the operation,
with numerous voices
calling for government to
explain its role in the
investigation.

MP ‘still waiting’
on Ministry over
boat building
yard residents

attribute
to illness

FROM page one

on a boat-building opera-
tion there, stating that

they felt that the inquiry.

had been “one sided.”
In response, Mr
Christie telephoned direc-
tor of environmental ser-
vices Ron Pinder and
reportedly requested that
there be “a full audit into
the findings” made so far
by government officials.
Since then, little has
been done to ease the

concerns of residents in

the area.

Sources indicate that
Mr Christie expressed an
interest in arranging a fur-
ther set of community
meetings on the island, to
be attended by govern-
ment delegates, and, in
addition, to bringing
Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage to look
into the investigations.

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007



LOCAL NEWS

Nocturne golf |
tournament |

aids Samaritan
ministries

IT all began with a small idea
and mushroomed into a spec-
tacular, unforgettable event.
Such was the Nocturne Ltd
New Year’s Invitational Golf
Tournament held at the Cable
Beach Golf Course.

The sumptuous _ post-
Junkanoo breakfast of boiled
fish and stewed fish with grits
and johnny cake, catered by
Mountbatten House, portend-
ed to participants that this was
no ordinary event. This reality

was further punctuated by a
team of pickets protesting the
recent increase in golf fees by
Cable Beach Golf Course,
which effectively discouraged
persons who would have other-
wise participated in the Tour-
nament — all proceeds from
which benefited the Samaritan
Ministries.

Vanria Munnings and
Yvonne Shaw led off the two-
man scramble format. Faced
with a wide open golf course,
accentuated by a blue sky and
balmy breezes, they thoroughly
enjoyed the privilege — and nev-
er looked back.

Rounding out the competi-
tion were two teams pitting

giants of the Bahamas Junior.

Golf ranks, one against the oth-
er. Riccardo Davis, Bahamas
Male Junior Champion, 2006
and Georgette Rolle, Bahamas
Female Champion, 2006 found
themselves in unfamiliar roles.
Both are teammates, stars of
the Texas Southern University
Golf Team, where Georgette is
a senior and Riccardo is a bur-
geoning freshman.

What started out as friendly
competition quickly turned into
a slug fest of mammoth pro-
portions. Riccardo and his part-
ner, Dr Howard Spencer, Med-
ical Director of the University
of the West Indies’ Clinical
Training Faculty in The
Bahamas, started off.on the
front nine with a steady,
respectable score of 2-under par
34. Meanwhile, Georgette and
her partner, Tyrone Sawyer,
Director of Airlift Development
at the Ministry of Tourism,
stumbled through the front nine
with a score of six over par, 42.

To her credit, never once did -

Georgette complain that her
bag was full of new clubs
(woods and irons) that she was
trying out for the first time.

On the Back Nine, however, —

Georgette and Tyrone gelled
better as a team and wasted no
time in scrambling back to
respectability. They shot a
birdie on hole number 10. Then
proceeded to execute a “tap-
in” par on hole number 11. This
was followed by another birdie
on par-three hole number 12,
after Tyrone “drained” a 20ft.
putt. Instead of easing up, Geor-
gette’s team dug even deeper.
They proceeded to score a two-
under eagle on hole number 13,
replete with a monstrous drive
by Georgette, complimented by






|
i
\
i
i
\
\

But protesters picket at Cable Beach Golf Course !



an accurate approach shot by
Tyrone, capped off by a radar-
like putt to complete the effort.

The surreal episode did not
end there: Georgette tapped in
a birdie putt on the intimidating
over-water signature 14th hole,
after Tyrone outdid himself and
teed off to within eight inches of
the pin.

This prolific scoring burst by
Georgette’s team, needless to
say, commanded Riccardo’s full
attention. He and Dr Spencer,
after cruising to an early lead,
found themselves in the throes
of a real dog fight. Both teams
scored an even par on hole
number 15, before Riccardo’s
team bought themselves some
“breathing room” when they
birdied the 16th hole.

Finale

Both teams shot an even par
on hole number 17; and going
into the final hole, only three
points separated them. On the
18th tee, Ricardo made a hero-
ic attempt to reach the green,
but his tee shot got caught in
the wind and landed off to the
right in the only out-of-bounds
area of the course. Georgette
made a mighty swing off the tee
— with much better results.

Her tee shot perched on an
elevated grassy mound on the
north side of the green.
Tyrone’s chip shot rolled to
within six inches of:the hole,
culminating with a birdie score
on the last hole. This gave
Georgette’s team a 30, repre-
senting a prolific twelve-shot
scoring improvement on the
Back Nine compared to their
score on the Front Nine, for
total score of 72. The pressure
was firmly on Ricardo’s team: it
was their tournament to lose.

Forced to shoot his approach.
shot from 200ft away, Ricardo
delivered in grand style by calm-
ly stroking his ball, which
embedded itself on the green

@ GEORGETTE Rolle,
Bahamas Female Champion,
College Golfer, Texas
Southern University

about 28ft away from the flag.
They two-putted for a par score
on the 18th hole - and the Tour-
nament victory.

When asked if he was wor-
ried about the great play of his
opponents on the Back Nine,
Ricardo. nodded _ stoically
betraying his strong competi-
tive streak, “They. played very
well,” he explained, “forcing us
to pull out all the stops to
ensure a win; but it was a very
enjoyable day.” .

The ultimate winner of the

Tournament} stated Shawn
Thomas, president of Nocturne
Ltd, is the Samaritan Ministries,
a charity led by unpaid volun-
teers dedicated to the care of

4” Brooklyn Style Pizza, stretched thin and cut into |

persons with HIV and AIDS. |
At the awards presentation, she |
thanked the Ministry of,
Tourism for its sponsorship of ,
the cocktail reception/dinner. '
She also thanked Eden Labo-

ratories for its sponsorship of
the tournament. “Our goal,” |
said Ms Thomas, “is to help per- |
sons in need, while building

‘ goodwill, love and comraderie | |

through the sport of golf.”
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe praised Ms
Thomas for her humanitarian
efforts. “After recently under-
going a bone marrow trans-
plant, herself,” he told atten-
dees, “rather than focusing on;
her own health, Ms Thomas is 1
|

our contin

i

big slices. It's got extra large pepperoni or sausage toppings,
perfect for folding. You've got to fold a slice this big.

», Try it today!

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i
1
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Aa
Ee
:
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I
1

@ RICCARDO Rolle, National Junior




focusing instead on helping the
needy and downtrodden of our
society. | commend you, Shawn
“for your humanitarian efforts.”
The Minister also thanked Noc-
turne for its contribution to the
development of sports tourism
in The Bahamas, and for hon-
ouring local Bahamian Golf
Professional, Donald “Nine”
Rolle on the occasion of the

‘New Year’s Invitational Golf
. Tournament.

At the presentation ceremony
following the Tournament, Sis-
ter Clare Rolle, Director of
Samaritan Ministries, expressed
her thanks to Nocturne. “It is
the quality, not the quantity of
the effort,” she assured the
group. “I have never been on a
golf course,” she said; “and to
see ‘the young people perform
so well does my heart so
proud.”





THE TRIBUNE

'





i DR Howard Spencer,
medical director, University .*,
of the West Indies’ Clinical ~~;
Faculty

uing commitment









business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

SECTION






_ The Tribune

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street











'Colinalmperial.

Insurance Ltd,



_ Liquidator’s ‘co-mingling’ concern |
~ over Suisse Security missing funds —

Accounting report claims $12m transferred back to
Harajchi bank; Winder rails over non-cooperation

forensic account-

ing report has

alleged that more

than $12 million

belonging to

depositors of Suisse Security
Bank & Trust was transferred to
the bank from a Geneva account
held by an affiliated Internation-
al Business Company (IBC), a
claim the bank’s liquidator says
raises questions about whether
the bank’s funds were “co-min-
gled” with those belonging to its
chairman, Mohammed Harajchi.
In his first report to the
Supreme Court as Suisse Securi-
ty’s official liquidator, Raymond
Winder, senior partner at Deloitte
& Touche (Bahamas), reiterated
that some $22.317 million in the
bank’s assets remained to be
recovered. Most of this is $17.712
million in depositer funds that



@ MOHAMMED HARAJCHI

(FILE photo)

were deposited with two Bahami-
an IBCs, Suisse Security Hold-
ings (SSH) and Suisse Security
Investments (SSI).

His report detailed how Suisse

« Resort hoping for
‘imminent’ approvals

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE principal investor behind a
multi-million dollar resort project
earmarked for the former Club
Med site at Governor’s Harbour,

— Eleuthera, is hoping to have key
government approvals in place

“imminently”, and aims to begin
real estate sales to the public on
February 1.

Eddie Lauth said his EIC
Resorts group had decided to scale
down the size of their 260-acre
French Leave project to ensure it
was more in keeping with the infra-
structure and character of the Fam-
ily Islands, a move that cost them
their potential hotel operating part-
ner.

“It’s a very upscale project,” Mr
Lauth told The Tribune. “We real-
ly spent a lot of time on planning,
and came to the conclusion with
the Family Islands that what’s being
done [generally] does not work for
us. The very things that brought us

‘No deal’ with Park
Hyatt as operator

’ to Eleuthera, we want to protect

and preserve, not ruin.
“This site, there’s no question
- about it. It’s one of the single best
sites in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, and I’m passionate
about doing it the right way.”

Mr Lauth said he and his fellow
investors were “not able to come
to an agreement with Park Hyatt”
to act as the operating/manage-
ment/brand partner for French
Leave.

They turned to Park Hyatt after
a previous choice, Starwood’s St
Regis, signed up with Baha Mar,
but Mr Lauth explained they were
unable to reach an agreement with
the former because “the scale they

SEE page 5B

Abaco Markets debt is
‘lowest for five years’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ABACO Markets, the BISX-
listed retailer, said it had
improved cash flow and reduced
its Royal Bank of Canada debt
to just $3.4 million, due to the
$4.2 million sale of its former
Solomon’s SuperCentre property
in Freeport and a preference
share restructuring.

Gavin Watchorn, Abaco Mar-
kets’ president, said the Cedar
Street property’s sale to Menas
Enterprises — a company The Tri-
bune understands is headed by
farmer and businessman, Menas
Verdoulis — had reduced the com-
pany’s debt to its “lowest level in
more than five years”, eliminating

Royal Bank payments
drop $250k due to
$4.2m Cedar Street sale;
preference shares
restructured

$250,000 in monthly debt pay-
ments to Royal Bank.

In addition, the retailer said it
had reached an agreement with
holders of its $7.9 million prefer-
ence share debt to restructure this
into two separate classes, Class
A and Class B.

SEE page 7B

Bay Street not giving ‘quality’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is failing to pro-
vide cruise ship visitors to down-
town Nassau with “a quality down-
town experience”, the director-gen-
eral of tourism said, adding that the
area’s dirty streets and rundown
feel was “particularly embarrassing
for her”.

Addressing the Rotary Club of
East Nassau, Vernice Walkine said
the Bahamas was negating the
advantage of having a major cruise
ship port in the heart of its city due
to the state of downtown Bay
Street.

She added of the cruise ship pas-
sengers: “We’re. not giving them a
quality downtown experience.” This
has been reflected in the visitor per
capita spending and numbers, with
cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise
Island down 10 per cent for the year

j
t
\

1

to July 2006. ,

Though the arrivals figures had
recovered somewhat towards the
end of the year, total visitor arrivals
by sea for the year to October 2006

were down by 7 per cent for the ,

Bahamas overall.

This suggests that the Bahamas is
losing its competitive edge and
attraction for the cruise ship indus-
try, with the various lines increas-
ingly using their private islands, par-
ticularly as a first point of entry.
This reduces the income trickle
down effect for Bahamian tour
operators, attraction and excursion
providers, retailers, transportation
providers and others.

Ms Walkine said she was “look-
ing forward to the restoration, rein-
vigoration and revitalisation of
downtown in the not too distant

SEE page 5B

Security is currently insolvent by
some $15.363 million, the differ-
ence by which liabilities exceed
assets, a sum that could increase
given that Mr Winder has now
advertised for all creditors and
depositors to submit claims to
him of how much the bank owes
them.

Mr Winder’s report details con-
tinued prevarication, obfuscation
and general non co-operation by
Mr Harajchi and his attorney,
Derek Ryan, plus other members

team in assisting him to recover
the missing depositor funds.

“The matter of gravest concern
to me is that a large part of the
bank’s assets remain under the
control of the management, direc-
tors and shareholders of the
bank,” Mr Winder wrote.

“As long as these funds remain
under the control of management
this bank is rendered insolvent,
as the assets presently available to
me are insufficient to cover the
bank’s liabilities to depositors and
creditors.”

The Suisse Security affair has
done, and continues to do, dam-
age to the Bahamas’ reputation as
a first-class financial services cen-
tre, although whether this will be
lasting is unknown.

Mr Winder said the drawn-out
legal proceedings involving Suisse
Security’s attempts to overturn
its April 2001 licence revocation,
which delayed the bank’s final
winding-up by the Central Bank
of the Bahamas until November
13, 2006, had caused “much loss”

He described how he had
attempted to ensure Mr Harajchi
and Mr Ryan co-operated with a
guarantee given by the latter that
they would co-operate with the
liquidator over the depositor
funds. This undertaking had
resulted from an October 18,
2005, Supreme Court ruling by
Justice Vera Watkins, who had
denied the Central Bank’s
attempt to wind-up Suisse: Secu-

SEE page 6B

of Suisse Security’s management

to depositors and creditors.

Bahamian project hopes for start in three months

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

A BAHAMIAN architect aims to begin
construction on the first phase of a luxury
tourism development off mainland Eleuthera
in two to three months, with the project
expected to employ at least 200-300 workers
at the peak of construction.

Gerard Higgs, the developer behind the
project for Egg Island, located 15 miles from
Harbour Island and 39 miles from Nassai,
explained that the project will include luxury
residences and only the second marina in the
Bahamas large enough to accommodate mega
yachts - those more than 300 feet in length.

In addition to the 40 mega yacht slips, there
are plans to create luxury residential villas,
lagoon bungalows and a boutique resort and
spa within one to three years.

Mr Higgs told The Tribune that once the
Attorney General’s office transfers the lease-
hold for the land on which the project is locat-
ed, work is expected to begin within two to
three months. The first phase will include a
partial marina and an amenities building.

In addition, pre-selling of the residences is
also expected to start around that time.

Mr Higgs explained that initially the devel-

UF

Seeking investors for Egg Island project, which could
employ 200-300 construction workers, 200-500 full-time

opment was to be a joint venture between
himself and the developers of Royal Island,
Dallas-based Staubach, but said that company
pulled out.

Nonetheless, he said he was determined
and made a conscious decision to forge ahead
with the project.

Mr Higgs added that he will.soon be seek-

ing outside capital and investors to invest in
the project, soliciting funds through advertis-
ing and Bahamian investment companies.

He said the extent of the offering will be
determined by the response, but noted that
“we won’t be asking for a tremendous
amount”.

Once completed Egg Island is expected to
employ at least 200-500 full-time permanent
employees.

Mr Higgs said it was important for the pro-
ject to have a strong connection to the
Eleuthera community. A percentage of the
project's profits will be placed into a trust
fund to assist underprivileged Bahamians and

Whe

provide them with numerous economic oppor-
tunities.

"I am proud to initiate a project such as
this, which is currently 100 percent Bahamian-

_ owned. Through local investment it could ~
remaiii that Way,” Mr Higgs said.

His family is descended from the Eleuther-
an Adventurers, with roots in this area going
back over 350 years. His family has owned a
leasehold on the island since 1949, farming
and grazing livestock to this day.

"Tam very positive about the future of the
North Eleuthera area, and am honoured to
have been one of the initial architects of the
Royal Island development adjacent to my
family's island,” Mr Higgs said.

As the principal at Higgs and Associatés
Ltd, Mr Higgs has completed luxury private
island designs and developments throughout
the Bahamas. His projects have been featured
in three of the world's most exclusive, elite
magazines — Fortune Magazine, Robb Report
and Showboats International.

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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The General Public is advised that the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
will be performing disconnection activities in the following areas:

Rosetta, Kemp Road and all side corners, Village Road, Soldier Road,
Prince Charles Dr. to Village Road, Dannottage Estate, Village Estate,
Nassau Village, Blair Estate, Fox Hill, Yamacraw Beach, Monastery Park,
College Gardens, East Park Estate, Sea Breeze Estate and Imperial Park,

. Hillside Park, Bay St. and Victoria Ave, Centreville, Palmdale including
Madeira St, Mt. Royal Ave and Mt. Rose Ave. and all side corners

All consumers with overdue accounts are advised to pay the arrears on
their electricity accounts immediately, in order to avoid the disconnection .
of your electrical service.

_ The public is also advised that all overdue payments should be made
directly to the Corporation. Those payments can be made at Head Office on
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the main Post Office
on East Hill Street.

7 ATH
> ig SOO
: ten | uel 3

Act Now To Avoid Suspension Of |
Benefit/Assistance





Persons who are in receipt of monthly Long-Term Benefit or Assistance

from the National Insurance Board, who fail to be verified in their assigned
months, or anytime after, are advised that no further pension cheques will be
issued to them-either though bank accounts or through pay stations-until they
have submitted themselves to the verification process.





Pensioners in New Providence are urged to present themselves to the Fox
Hill Local Office, the Wulff Road Local Office, or the Jumbey Village Local
Office, immediately for verification. Pensioners in Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands are urged to present themselves to the nearest Local Office.







Cheque(s) for pensioners who are not verified on or before January 29, 2007.
will be held and will only be released to pensioners when they have been
verified.







Pensioners are required to produce their National Insurance ID card, along
with a driver’s license, a passport or current voter’s card.




For more information you may contact the Verifications Department at your‘
nearest Local Office. : ‘






The American Embassy is presently considering
applications for the following position: ©

VOUCHER EXAMINER’

Serves as the Voucher Examiner responsible for examining and processing
a variety of vouchers submission to the certifying officer. The Voucher

Examiner also serves as the back up to the Chief Time-Keeper.
This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- An Associate Degree in the area of Accounting or Finance.
- Two years accounting experience or related fiscal work is required.
- Must have a good working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must have ability to meet deadlines in a timely manner and work
independenly with minimum supervision
- Must possess good oral and written communication skills.



The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life

insurance pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or citizens who are eligible for

employment under Bahamian laws and regulations

Applications forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street.
Completed applications should be returned to the Embassy addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than Thursday, January 11, 2007.

f
DOTA RANI OTRAS YT LOTTA NE Fifa RUIN:



sf

a



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



ki By Fidelity Capital
Markets

A MODERATE level of
trading activity took place dur-
ing the first week of 2007, with
55,525 shares changing
hands. The market saw five out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which three advanced and two
remained unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) with 44,605 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 80 per cent of the total
shares. traded. The big
advancer for the week was also
CBL, gaining $0.03 to end the
week at $12.54,

For 2006, CBL's share price
appreciated by over 37 per

cent. Also, posting a gain this
week was ICD Utilities (ICD), °

up $0.05 to close the week at
$7.20.

The FINDEX gained 0.34
points for the week, to close
at 742.44, For 2006, FINDEX
was up 34.47 per cent versus
26.09 per cent in 2005.

Investors Tip of the Week-

CHANCES are you might
be one of many persons who
have made a resolution or two
pertaining to your financial
health in 2007. Therefore, we
thought to start the year off by
suggesting some resolutions

al BizJet Office
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) FIDELITY MARKET WRAP

The Bahamian Stock Market



FINDEX 742.44 YTD 0.05%



BISX
SYMBOL PRICE



AML $0.61 $-
BAB $1.26 $0.01
BBL $0.76 $-
BOB $8.03 $-
BPF $11.30 $-
BSL $14.60 $-
BWL $1.75 $-
CAB $10.00 $-
CBL $12.54 $0.03
CHL $1.90 $-
CIB $14.15 $-
CWCB $4.87 $-0.37
DHS - $2.50 ¢
FAM / — $5.79 $-
FCC $0.55 $- .
FCL $12.55 $-
FIN $12.02 $-
ICD $7.20 $0.05
ISJ $8.60 $-
PRE $10.00 $-

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

ber 31, 2006.

that can assist you on your
journey to financial well being.

Resolution 1 — J will pay
off all credit card balances and
consumer loans. I will then
commit myself to a regular and
systematic savings plan.

Resolution 2 — I will not
invest or buy shares in a com-
pany based on speculation, a
hunch or personal bias. I will
strive to make an informed
investment decision based on
available financial information
about the entity.

Resolution 3 — I will not

CLOSING CHANGE

¢ CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR, payable
on February 7, 2007, to all shareholders of record date Decem-

¢ Bahamas Supermarkets (BSL) will hold its Annual Gener-
al Meeting at 6pm on January 23, 2007, at the British Colonial
‘Hilton Hotel, 1 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. ©








VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE







0 0.00%
1 0.80%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0
0
0






0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.24%
0 - 0.00%
0.00%
-7.06%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.70%
0.00%
0.00%



ooooco

S



oom




















just look at the dividends. The
total return earned on a stock
is made up of both dividends
and price appreciation.

Resolution 4 — I will read
the financial statements and
attend the Annual General
Meetings of companies whose
shares I own. This will allow
me to keep abreast. of the
financial health and overall
management of the company.

Resolution 5-— I will meet
with a professional financial
advisor for an assessment of
my investment goals and objec-
tives at least once a year.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager

Qualifications:

eo © @ @ @

Bahamas

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).
Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s

investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.

processes.

Sound experience in global capital markets
Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment

‘management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and __
_analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual

stock picks

General Requirements/Responsibilities: .

¢ Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
* Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net

worth clients.

e Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment

advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both

: corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
i includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Ki vere

"
ba SULA A ND NAT



MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3B

THE TRIBUNE



RA,

t's BORG



MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

=’ SPORTS

Fax: (242) 328-2398

)

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Ballou s
stare to
‘the Buccaneers

m@ RUGBY
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

BAILLOU Rugby Club
had their biggest scare of the
season when the Buccaneers
took to the Winton Field with
an explosive first half of play.

The Buccaneers’ aggression
surprised the Baillou at first,
but,.as the match went on,
Baillou came back to clinch
the game 20-13.

Baillou had a low key first
half, missing passes and strug-
gling defensively.

But this would all change in
the second period.

ae Hie NH

- Baillou captain Garfield

Morrison admitted that his
team came into the game with
a sluggish attitude and he said
they will have to play a full
two halves in order to end the
season with a blemish free
record. '

“This team (Buccaneers) is
still a good side so we couldn’t
just come in and assume we
were going to beat them easi-
ly,” he said. “Just like us, they
want to win, so we definitely
had to pull up our socks in the
second half and do some hit-
ting.

“After the first half I told
everyone that they needed to
get in gear and the fact that
we are supposed to be unde-

Perfect record
stays intact after
tough first half

feated we will-have to fight
hard if we want to maintain
that. We owe this win to our
backs, they were holding onto
a lot more balls in the second
half than they did in the first.

“Yes we did get a couple of
yellow cards, that happens
when the game gets out of
control and the players’ tem-
pers start to fly. But overall
we have to maintain and the
referee has to try and take
control of the game so some of
our players received one or
two yellow cards, but these
things happen.”

But Baillou team leader
Kevin Salabie believes his
team is unable to play the first
half aggressively because they
are out of shape. —

Salabie said all of his team-
mates need to turn out to
practice \

“When you have only some

- players coming to practice it is

hard for us to be organise



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

urvive
(lefeat

when we come to games,” said
Salabie.

“Everyone need have to be
there in order to execute the
required plays. We can’t come
into games and allow teams
to get the better. of us in the
first half, that is unacceptable
for a team that hopes to go
through the league undefeat-
ed.

“But through it all I am
pleased with the play, it could
have been better but I can’t
ask for more. Hopefully all
the players would see what
they need to work on after this
game and do the right thing.”

Salabie is hoping his team
will snag another win this Sat-
urday, so he can celebrate his
birthday in grand style.

@ BAILLOU keep posses-

sion against the Buccaneers.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)









- Pros

a AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Orry J Pros survived a defen-

whitewash the Stingrays

‘Battle of the undefeated’

sive battle against the youthful Stingrays
to remain the only undefeated team in
the Commonwealth American Foot-
ball League.

In the “battle of the undefeated” on
Sunday at the DW Davis playing field,
the Pros walked away with a 14-0 white-
wash to hand the Stingrays their first
loss in two games. ;

“They played excellent,” said Pros’
coach Sherwin Johnson about their
opponents, who provided their stiffest
challenge so far this year.

The Pros would strike first in the first
quarter of the game that was plagued
with penalties when former baseball
player Luthon Delancy avoided going
inside and pitched outside for the first

ends in 14-0 victory



touchdown.

However, they missed the two-point
conversion.

Both teams struggled offensively in
the next two quarters, although wide
receiver Charlie Ward'came close to
getting the Pros’ second TD in the third
quarter.

But he was stripped offi the ball just as
he crossed the line.

After attempts to either get wide
receiver Alec Rolle to score from the
outside or Ward to pack it inside, the
Pros finally got Philip Moxey Jr., the

{

centre for the CR Walker Knights, to
score their second touchdown of the
game.
And this time, veteran quarter-back
Michael Foster ran in the extra two-
point conversion to seal the victory.
Foster had to come into the game
during the third quarter to replace Rolle
after he struggled to get the job done.
Rolle, an outstanding softball and base-
ball player, said he tried his best, but he
guessed it wasn’t enough. 4
“Once again, I got the opportunity to
start at quarterback, but I didn’t get



the job done,” he admitted. “I felt I
had ample opportunity to get it done,
but I didn’t.

“J came in initially as a wide receiv-
er and they tried to make me into a
quarterback, so once Foster came in, I
went back to my original position.”

Coach Johnson said they had a rel-
atively slow start and that was because
their linemen were not blocking as
well as they should have for the quar-
terback.

“He’s still a young quarterback, so

it’s just a matter of getting him into the

game situation. That is why we
brought in our veteran quarterback
Foster to show him how it’s done in
game situation,” he stressed.

As for the game, Johnson said they
couldn’t ask for a better start to their
season, but he said it’s not something
that they didn’t envision.

“We have a good mixture of youth

and veteran ballplayers, the majority
being veterans,” he charged. “But I
must give credit to the Stingrays’
defence. They are very young and
quick.”

The Stingrays, coached by Lawrence
Hepburn, suffered their first loss in
two games, but rookie quarterback
Nesley Lucien said he blew it.

“We had some good plays, but we. |

didn’t capitalise on all of them,” he
admitted. “It was a good effort, but we
still didn’t do what we were supposed
to do.

“J know I’m personally disappoint-
ed because I made some mistakes.
But I’m proud of the way the defence.
held up. I made some mistakes. I tried».
to move the ball, but I was a little dis-..
appointed in what I did.”

@ IAN SYMONETTE OUT TO
MAKE AN IMPACT - See page 2B.





Full Text


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Christie: more resorts will make a |

larger police presence necessary

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THERE is an immediate
need for an expanded police
presence in New Providence,
particularly in the South West —
as well as the Family Islands —
due to the many resort devel-
opments underway, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie said.

The prime minister made the
statement during a special lun-
cheon at the new police confer-
ence centre last week.

Mr Christie said this urgent

‘










Government negotiates land and facilities
for RBPF in heads of agreement



need for new stations and more
officers came as a result of the
many developments on New
Providence being unable to sup-
ply themselves with adequate
security and “the climate that
presents itself when a small coun-
try is facing an economic boom.”

He said that this issue is more
necessary on the Family Islands.
To meet this challenge Mr

’ Christie said that government

has negotiated in the heads of
agreements of many of these
developments provisions that
would make land and facilities



WITH HICKORY SIMOKED BACON AND NATURAL SWISS




















CL Cale meee
ea iP leche i tee

available for the Royal
Bahamas Police Force to meet
this challenge.

Mr Christie said that a new
development on Eleuthera has
led him to negotiate that every
single officer placed on that
island will have everything paid
for, including housing.

In Bimini, he said, the devel-
oper has agreed to put up a pri-
mary school and also help with
the police station.

The massive development on
Rum Cay, he said, has sparked
the need for greater police par-
ticipation on that island.

Government has asked that
the developers there assist with
the provision of a police station
which Mr Christie encouraged
the commissioner to have some
input on.

The contribution of investors
to the nation’s infrastructure,
he said, will be the case wher-
ever developers go and govern-
ment has “found the investors
to be very receptive to this
approach.”

The prime minister said that
when one goes from island to
island the great many challenges
facing the Royal Bahamas
Police Force can be seen.

However, Mr Christie said
that he has “great confidence”
that the police force will be able
to meet these challenges head
on.







Don't try to
influence
juniors, PM —
tells senior
officers

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie encouraged senior offi-
cers not to politically influence
junior officers in the upcoming
general election.

The prime minister made the
statement at a special luncheon
at the new Police Conference
Centre last Friday.

“In our own national make
up we have PLPs and FNMs
and obviously each of s must
have the right that we jealously
guard to believe in what we
believe in and to vote for who
we would like to vote for and
whatever political organization
we would like to vote for,” Mr
Christie said.

He encouraged the officers
to ensure the leadership they
exercise as police officers
ensures free and fair and peace-
ful elections. #

“The kind of leadership Iam
talking about is leadership by
example. Many of you will have
under your command lots of
young officers and you will be
expected to be able to demon-
strate that you can do your
work without leaning on them
politically one way or the oth-
er,” Mr Christie said.

He told the officers that they
are on the front-line of guarding
the country’s heritage of being

able to have free, fair and

peaceful elections.

“We would wish the next
elections to be no different. I
have indicated to every devel-
oper who comes in that one of
the wonderful things about the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is that as a sitting
prime minister it really makes
no difference in terms of their
development as to who sits in
my chair today.

“Tam convinced of that. That
the political process has
matured to the point in our
country that Perry Christie
could be standing here today
and someone tomorrow. That
is the security we have come to
in this country and the police
force has helped to bring that
about,” Mr Christie said.

TROPICAL
> Gest EV cela ts)

ARH GLE
aR Tera BY)



+

“AV 9 OS

e«

~~ Sew 6 285 E eg!
J

of letter

“appearance of censorship”.

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3

eee Leth ch hse ee rennet



on brief

Country gets
ready to
remember
Majority Rule

ON January 10 the coun-
try will celebrate one of the
most important social and
political turning points in its
history.

Majority Rule in 1967
marked not only the end of
segregation in the Bahamas
but was the catalyst to inter-
nal self governance.

These men made up the
First Bahamas Cabinet under
Majority Rule. They are: Cecil

GOVERNMENT, upon the
endorsement of the Bahamas
Cultural Commission, has
agreed to erect a monument at

ee ee the site of the Southern Recre-
Bain Jeffrey Thompson Can ation Ground to celebrate the

leton Francis, Randol Fawkes, “struggle and victory” of black

Warren Lavarity, Curtis
McMillan, Clement Maynard
and Lynden Pindling.

Correction
over author

Making the announcement
yesterday Works and Utilities
Minister Bradley Roberts chair-
man of the cabinet subcommit-
tee for the Majority Rule cele-
brations said that this memorial
will take the form of something
“inanimate, like an obelisk, in
recognition of the very central
place that the Southern Recre-
ation Ground has played
throughout its 170-year history
in the struggle of the masses of
Bahamians to free themselves;
the monument will be a memo-
rial to all Bahamian freedom
fighters, named and unnamed.”

To this end, the Government
of the Bahamas will commence
its activities in recognition of
this milestone on Majority Rule
Day, Wednesday, 10th January,
2007. A national Ecumenical
Service will be held at the
Southern Recreation Grounds,
under the direction of the
Bahamas Christian Council, fol-

about NHI

DUE to an error, a letter
about:the National Health
Insurance scheme appeared :
in The\Tribune over the. :
name Wallace Rolle. In fact,
Mr Rolle was not the author
of the letter and we apolo-
gise for any inconvenience
and embarassment caused.

Venezuela
calls for OAS
to withdraw

es lowed by a cultural display.
criticism The Southern Recreation
Ground was initially established
= eo under the aegis of Governor Sir
BYACas Francis Cockburn as a place of
recreation and meeting for the
THE government demand- newly-freed population of the

ed on Saturday that the Orga-
nization of American States
retract comments criticising
Venezuela’s decision not to
renew the licence of an oppo-
sition-aligned TV station,
according to Associated Press.

On Friday, OAS Secretary-
General Jose Miguel Insulza
warned that President‘Hugo
Chavez’s decision not to
renew the broadcast licence
of Radio Caracas Television,
or RCTYV, when it expires in
May would be seen as a
“form of censorship against
the freedom of expression”
and serve as a warning to oth-
er media outlets critical of the
government.

In a statement, the Foreign
Ministry accused Insulza of
“improperly meddling in a
matter that is the strict com-
petency” of Venezuelan
authorities and denied the
licensing decision had any

city of Nassau.

The Ground was a central
gathering spot for black Bahami-
ans from its establishment during
the Emancipation period until
the achievement of majority rule
in 1967; and may have played
host to nineteenth-century free-
dom fighters such as Prince
Williams, Stephen Dillet, Robert

THE driver of a boat that
killed a two-year-old British boy
on holiday in the Bahamas test-
ed positive for marijuana, UK
newspaper The Evening Stan-
dard reported yesterday.

' The findings, according to a
confidential police report, the
newspaper said, have prompted
calls for the driver to be tried

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Bahamians over oppression. ~ -

New monument
— to mark victory
“over op









Mi MINISTER of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts
announced that a monument will be erected at the Souther

Recreation Ground

Love, Wilfred Campbell Adder-
ley, William Parliament Adder-
ley, and others.

“The centrality of the
Ground to black Bahamian
political life continued through-
out the twentieth century,
where it served as the main

‘focus of political speeches and

rallies throughout the years of
minority rule, hosting such lumi-
naries as Marcus Garvey, Adam
Clayton Powell and Martin
Luther King, among countless
others,” said Mr Roberts.

“It also served as a place for
black members, of Parliament
to address their supporters, pro-
viding a meeting place for
labourers during the Burma
Road Riots of 1942. The PLP
rallies of the 1950s and 1960s,
which culminated in Majority
Rule, were the pinnacle of a
long history of freedom pant



for manslaughter.

Toddler Paul Gallagher died
in 2002 after being hit by an
out-of-control speedboat which
ran up the beach as he slept on
a sunbed.

He died five days later from
head injuries, described by sur-
geons as the worst they had
ever seen.

His father Paul, 42, and moth-
er Andrea, 40, from Orpington,
Kent, hit out at the Bahamian
government for failing to pros-
ecute whoever might have been
responsible for their son's
death.

Two Metropolitan Police offi-
cers flew to the Bahamas last
summer to review the case with
local police.

Their report reveals that after
the crash, the driver provided
blood and urine. samples. The
Gallaghers were told these were
never tested at the time.

When the samples were test-
ed by the British team, they
showed that the driver’s blood
contained 5.1 nanograms of car-
boxy-tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC), an active ingredient in

ushion is fade and mildew
resistant, and. is available in

ing centred around the South-
ern Recreation Ground,” Mr
Roberts said.

The government also plans
to hold*ecumenical services,
under the aegis of the Bahamas
Christian Council in a number
of Family Islands on dates to
be announced.

“Through its celebration of
these important historic mile-
stones, the government will
ensure that the legacies of past
Bahamuans live on from gener-
ation to generation.

“It took some 133 years for
the masses to achieve majority
rule following the emancipation
of slaves. However, the growth
and development we have expe-
rienced over the past forty years
in the Bahamas has been

remarkable when,compareds..

with other countriesaround the.
world,” Mr Roberts said.

Driver of speedboat that killed toddler
‘tested positive for marijuana’

marijuana plants.

The Bahamian police claim
that while this indicated the dri-
ver had been using cannabis, it
did not mean that his ability to
drive or control the boat yas
impaired.

However, the new report
warns that the samples may
have deteriorated since 2002
because of the way they were
stored and the readings may
have been higher at the time
they were taken.

The British officers also

Tevealed that the driver was

operating without a proper
licence or insurance. It claimed
that the original investigation
was “flawed.”

They urged Bahamian police
to reopen the case to determine
the “criminal culpability of the
boat owners and operators.”



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
_ Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES |
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

THE TRIBUNE

Mail facilities
need fixing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

POSTAL facilities and ser-
vices in the Bahamas are
stuck in 19th century technol-
ogy with no indication that
long term planning is being
done.

It would certainly require
only a couple of finish car-

‘penters to expand and reno-

vate the Shirley Street office’s
outgoing mail bins so that on
week ends and other busy
times the outgoing mail would
not pile-up so high that the
choked up slot makes mail
accessible to any lurker
inclined to snatch a few



ficient explanation as to what
approximate delivery time
each option will entail? All of
the foregoing might also be
nicely incorporated into each
year’s telephone book.

And maybe someone could
look into why a cross town
mailing should take a week
or two for delivery.




eee

ADunemeadcda met



would likely love to dispatch
their colour post cards into
some of these if we have any
on Bay Street; perhaps with ©
a special cancellation stamp
bearing a bold plug for the
Bahamas.

Why can’t each post office
clearly display an updated list-
ing of current postal rates,
charges and a complete sched-
ule of all services available
and the cost of each with suf-

ONE WHO BELIEVES
THERE IS STILL A
NEED FOR “SNAIL
MAIL”

Nassau,

January 4, 2007.

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



National Health failing in England

IN CLOSING the debate on government’s
national health insurance plan, Prime Minister
Christie revealed how out of touch he is with

' national insurance problems in the real world.

Responding to the criticism that nationali-
sation of health insurance has failed in other
countries, Mr Christie recited a long list of coun-
tries, which he said has fully functioning nation-
al health insurance schemes. Among them Eng-
land and Canada.

“Many countries, the world over, have a uni-
versal health care programme, similar to the
proposed National Health Insurance plan (for
the Bahamas),” said Mr Christie.

He emphasised that “none of these systems
are without their challenges, but none, not a
single one, has sought to abandon their plan
because of these challenges.”

In the case of England and Canada — par-
ticularly England — we think that Mr Christie
would have been more accurate had he used the
word “failures”, instead of the word “chal-
lenges.”

As for Mr Christie’s comment that not a sin-
gle country was seeking to abandon the nation-
alised plan because of the “challenges”, if the
truth be known they are not seeking to abandon
anything because they don’t know how. If Mr
Christie had closely studied the situation in oth-
er countries, he would have discovered that the
greatest challenge to a politician today is how to
get out of something that has proved a failure,
which had been promised not only to succeed,
but to be the nearest earthly balm, short of a
direct ticket to heaven. The fact is that people

have been promised free medicine, and they’

expect their politicians to figure out how to
deliver on that promise. Today’s pohiticians
haven’t got the answers, and worse still, having
made such an exaggerated promise, they don’t
know how to admit failure.

However, the greatest worry is Mr Christie’s
statement that the proposed health scheme for
the Bahamas is similar to those in England and
Canada, which can hardly be considered suc-
cessful. Mr Christie has promised that Bahami-
ans will stop dying from lack of health care,
while in England, they are dying because they
can’t get the health care promised.

The situation is so bad in England that gov-
ernment is looking to private companies to bail
them out of their medical dilemma. Doctors
are breaking away from NHS, forming groups
and contracting their services back to NHS. In
other words the UK government is slowly
returning to private medicine through the back
door, while here in the Bahamas, we are walk-
ing into the chaos through the front door —
with eyes wide open.

Government, particularly Health Minister



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Dr Bernard Nottage, has promised local doctors
a copy of the actuarial report so that they can
determine for themselves the accuracy of gov-
ernment’s figures and how the projected $235
million cost of the plan was calculated. Already,
readers will note that it was only after the bill
had been safely manoevred through parliament
and the doctors were convinced to remain silent,
that Dr Nottage admitted that the insurance
plan could cost more than $235 million. He
acknowledged that drug costs and salaries, could
force up the NHI bill. This was obviously -in
preparation for the release of the ILO report,
which, contrary to what Mr Christie had told
Bahamians, did not give the Bahamas’ health
plan the “thumbs up.”

So far Bahamian doctors, despite the many
promises, have received nothing from govern-
ment.

On January 4 The Times of London report-
ed that in England NHS “patients are being
denied basic operations, including treatments for
varicose veins, wisdom teeth and bad backs, as
hospitals try frantically to balance the books
by the end of the financial year.

“NHS trusts throughout the country are mak-
ing sweeping cuts to services and delaying
appointments in an attempt to address their
debts before the end of March. Family doctors
have been told to send fewer patients to hospi-
tal. Accident and Emergency departments have
been instructed to turn people away, and a wide
range of routine procedures has been suspend-
ed.

“In one example of the cash-saving strategies,
seen by The Times, a primary care trust in York-
shire has told hospitals that they will not be
paid for some non-essential operations, while
patients will not be given a hospital appointment
in under eight weeks. Similar tactics have
emerged at hospitals in Norfolk and Surrey,
while dozens of trusts have resorted to closing
beds and offering voluntary redundancy in
recent months. Devon Primary Care Trust has
offered voluntary redundancy to all 5,000 staff.”

All non-urgent admission must be approved
by an assessment team or they will not be paid

_ for. Accident and Emergency departments in

several areas have been told that they will not be
paid for treating patients with minor ailments

_ who could go elsewhere — presumably to a

private doctor.

“No patients will be given a hospital appoint-
ment in less than eight weeks, and none admit-
ted for elective surgery unless they have waited
a minimum of 12 to 16 weeks. Those treated
quicker will not be paid for,” The Times reports.

This is what Bahamians have to look forward
to, especially as we are a country not noted for
balancing our books efficiently.

envelopes. If we really can’t
afford the carpentry, then let’s
just move the slot in the out-
side wall 12 or 18 inches high-
er so a larger catch bin can be
provided beneath the slots..
If someone bothered to think
about it there are no doubt
numerous ways to solve that
office’s security problem.

At the Fox Hill post office
the outgoing slot is located
only slightly above floor level,
and so poorly marked a

stranger wouldn’t have a clue

where to drop his outgoing
mail without asking the
friendly staff for guidance..

We have excellent sign
makers in the community.
Why then must the Shirley
Street post office have only a
filthy, crudely scribbled, faded
marker pen on a dirty wall
designating “Foreign” and
“Domestic” mail slots?

At the main downtown post
office in particular where
parking is always inadequate
why not provide a pull-in lane
where outgoing mail can be
deposited from autos into col-
lection boxes.? Why not at
most:-post offices?

Why not machine market
small booklets of stamps using
dollar bill-reading machines.
The US imposes a slight pre-
mium charge for such conve-
nient stamp booklets. This
could amortise the machines
in a drive through lane.

Why can’t each post office
have a posted printed collec-
tion time schedule so that cus-
tomers will know at what
hours and on what days their
mail is likely to be dis-
patched?

There used to be a number
of the typical handsome red
cast iron British PO collec-
tion boxes around town
(unless they’ve been aban-
doned). Could we not graph-
ically indicate the location of
them with expectation that
each will bear an updated col-
lection schedule on its side?
Our North American tourists

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Deviation from an
area’s original design

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE accept my best wishes for a prosperous, healthy
and happy New Year.

Sometimes the only way to get some action on certain
existing problems is to make them public by asking that arti-
cles be included in your daily newspaper. To that end I ask
you to print the following.

This is specific to the Coral Harbour area, but has implica-
tions for the whole of the Bahamas.

With few exceptions, Coral Harbour has been designated
as a single-family residential area. Despite this designation
the Physical Planning Department has approved multiple
dwellings to be built. The writer’s contention is that when a
deviation from the original design for the area is requested
that due notice be given (through a notice in the newspapers)
to the area residents so that they may comment upon the
deviation. After all the residents are the persons most affect-
ed. Also, it is very noticeable that, in the newer construction
processes, contractors ignore the reserves between buildings
and lot lines both at the rear and front of the properties. One
might ask just “where are the inspectors? It would appear, at
least to this contributor, that they should be making periodic
visits to sites and not wait for the contractors to request
approvals as certain phases are completed. It is much too
easy, at that point, to let transgressions pass. (To say nothing
about possible payouts for turning a “blind eye”.) Add to the
above, contractors have the bad habit of mixing cement on
paved roads, allowing heavy delivery trucks to drive over
verges and leave the area an environmental mess. Vigilance
by “frequent” inspections and heavy fines could eliminate
this.
Additionally, I would like to comment on the propensity of
residents who think that they have a right to extend their lot
lines onto the verges of the main road; some as much as 30
feet. In my opinion this is downright thievery. For over two
years now our committee has contacted those residents, the
relevant government departments, our elected representative
and the Minister of Works who all agree that this has to be
stopped, but have failed to follow through. Ironically some of
the transgressors are working for the government, the Police
and the Defence Force. So much for the slogan, “Help us to
Help you”. We have gone to the trouble of recording lot
numbers, names and locations and forwarded the same so
that it will be easier for the necessary follow-up. A letter

- should be hand-delivered by an inspector explaining the

transgression and the amount of time allocated for the cor-
rection. Failure to comply will lead to the Ministry of Works
removing the fencing, etc. There should be a heavy fine and
all cost to be borne by the resident who has not complied. If
there is no authority for this; apply to the courts for relief and
immediately pass legislation applicable to alleviating the
problem.

The time has come for all to get off their “duffs” and do:
their jobs. Paying salaries for people who only want to collect
a paycheck will no longer be tolerated and I urge all persons
to adopt the phrase, “We’ve had enough and we refuse to
take anymore.”

MS C
Nassau,
January 4, 2007.

LENNOX PATON

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

PAT A

We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department.
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.






Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter
no later than 31st January 2007 to:










HR Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas

a ee

+ ¢°s
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5





oln brief

Man denies |
marijuana
possession
charge

A NASSAU Village man
pleaded not guilty in Magis-
trate's Court Friday to a mar-
ijuana possession charge.

It was alleged that on
Thursday, January 4, Joseph
Dickinson, 21, was found in
possession of a quantity of
marijuana which authorities
believed he intended to sup-
ply to another.

Dickinson, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in court eight in Bank
Lane, pleaded not guilty to
the charge of possession with
intent to supply and was
granted $5,000 bail.

According to the prosecu-
tion, Dickinson was found in
possession of six grams of
marijuana. The case was
adjourned to May 23.

Canadian
admits to
having

marijuana

A CANADIAN appeared
in Magistrate's Court yester-
day to be charged with pos-
session of marijuana.

James Kaiser, 23, appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel. It was alleged that
Kaiser was found in posses-
sion of a quantity of marijua-
na while at Cabbage Beach
on Thursday, January 4.

Kaiser pleaded guilty to the
charge and was fined $250.

He was told that failure to
pay the fine would result in a
three-month prison sentence.

Four men

arrested after :

grouper are
discovered

POLICE arrested four
men on Cat Island Friday in
connection with the discoy-
ery of 900 pounds of Nassau
Grouper.

Taking, landing, process-
ing, selling or purchasing
Nassau Grouper is prohibit-
ed in the Bahamas from
December 1, 2006, through
February 28, 2007.

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Government has achieved
‘shockingly little’, says FNM

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Move-
ment issued a scathing attack
on the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty yesterday, claiming that after
almost four years in office the
“so-said so-done” government
has said “too much” and done
“shockingly little.”

According to the FNM, the

PLP, believing they could not:

be “outdone by the annual car-
nival”, utilised its own set of
“smoke and mirrors” in Decem-
ber, complete with “junkanoo
shuffles and verbal gymnastics”.

“We recently learned that a
government which boasts of
consultation may have withheld
important information relating
to National Health Insurance.
The PLP simply do not trust the
people with the facts.

“And almost three and a half
years after leading the nation
in mourning for the Sea Hauler
victims and making many



@ PERRY Christie is accused
of talking too much and
accomplishing little

' promises to them and their fam-

ilies, the Prime Minister and his
colleagues abandoned their
promises along with those who
still suffer from this tragedy,”
the party said.

The commentary continued
that it is with issues such as
these that accountability is

needed.

Since the Sea Hauler tragedy,
an independent Commission
appointed by the government
found that the Port Department
failed to adequately consider all
factors affecting a realistic
determination of the number of
passengers for whom approval
should have been given; failed
to obtain vital passenger infor-

. mation before boarding them;

failed to ensure that only the
approved number boarded;
failed to obtain an accurate
count of the number of passen-
gers; and failed to carry out stip-
ulations contained in the
approval letter by Port Officials
of the first mate or the captain.

The Commission also found
the Sea Hauler non-compliant,
because too many people were
allowed to sail aboard the ship
and that the port failed by
allowing the Sea Hauler to sail
with 150 person on board.

“In this and too many other
instances talkin’ fool is a very,

Man pleads with Immigration
to allow son-in-law to remain

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE father of a woman, mar-
ried to a Jamaican about to be
deported from the country, is
pleading for the Department of
Immigration to reconsider their
refusal of a resident spousal per-
mit, to allow his son-in-law to
stay in the Bahamas.

Reportedly the husband has
only 21 days before he must
vacate the country, and accord-

Po ing to the letter from the Immi-

gration department, his failure
to comply with this order will

result in him being “arrested,
detained, and deported”.

According to the father, his
daughter has a three year old
son with her husband; so to
force him from the country
would in essence be breaking
up a young family.

The father, who spoke on
condition of anonymity, said
that the young couple have
been married for “a little over a
year” and that they “can not
work”.

Reportedly they have fallen
behind on their rent in the past
and have been forced to take

up residence with a relative.

“With that Anna Nicole thing
they (Department of Immigra-
tion) said they were being effi-
cient — that this is how good
they are doing things? Well this
don’t seem to be good.

“And this situation needs to
be addressed because they have
a 3-year-old son. Now the fella’,
without him being able to work,
he has to leave the country
because they turned down his
spousal permit. Now the girl is
stuck here with a little child. I

call that breaking up a family,”

the father said.’

police

Armed robbers flee.from

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A HIGH speed police chase
resulted in two robbers crash-
ing their vehicle and having
to flee the scene on foot, leav-
ing a generator that they had
stolen only a short time earli-
er.

According to police press
liaison inspector Walter Evans,
around 11 o’clock Friday night,
a black Nissan Sentra pulled
up to a house, presently under
construction in the Westridge
area.

The home, he said, was being
manned by a security guard.
Despite this, however, the two
occupants of the Sentra got out
of the car, and demanded the
keys for the home. Reportedly

avi
ae

one of MRC WR carrying a
handgun.

The security guard was tied
up, and the men stole a genera-
tor from the home before flee-
ing the scene.

Mr Evans said that officers
in the Cable Beach-area had no
idea that the incident had
occurred, but while they were
on general patrol, they spotted
the vehicle. When the occupants
saw the patrol car, they sped
off.

A high speed chase followed,
Mr Evans said, and the Sentra
soon crashed into a fence.

“The occupants of the
vehicle escaped on foot, how-
ever the police were able to
recover the vehicle and the
generator that was stolen,”
he said.

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very serious thing. And Mr
Christie needs to remember
that ‘as Prime Minister’ talk is
not always cheap,” The FNM
said.

“Refusing to answer legiti-

mate questions on these and

other national issues is a dere-
liction of duty by the Prime
Minister who is duty bound to
uphold our laws, protect the
Constitution and guard our sov-
ereignty.

“Many have now come to the
conclusion that Mr Christie —
‘as Prime Minister’ — prefers
the trappings of office and not
the tough responsibilities that
come with the trust the people
have reposed in him. Bahami-
ans no longer trust Mr Christie’s

ability to make tough decisions, ,

to tell the whole truth, and to

discipline his own government,”

. the FNM said.

The party continued that
under the PLP transparency
and accountability have gone
the way of help and hope,
becoming “smoke and mirrors”.

“People are looking for more
substance and less pomp and
circumstance, for more effec-
tive governance and less empty
promises. In the next election
they will demonstrate that they
know exactly where to find it!

“The FNM trusts the
Bahamian people. The FNM
will not hide or disguise the
truth from the Bahamian peo-
ple. The FNM will restore
accountability and renew trust
in government so that we can
build a ‘better future for all,”
the party said.

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PART OF YOUR LIFE


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7







Ju

—— : a diciary members

attend Red Mass

CHIEF Justice Sir Burton
Hall and President of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer, with members of the
Bahamas judiciary, attended
the annual Red Mass held at
St Francis Cathedral yester-
day.

Archbishop Patrick Pinder
was the celebrant.

Also attending was Chief,

Justice of Canada Beverly
McLachlin and her husband
Frank McArdle.

The Red Mass is celebrat-
ed annually at the opening of
the judicial year for judges,
prosecutors, attorneys, law
school professors, law stu-
dents, and government offi-
cials.

The Mass requests guidance
from the Holy Spirit for all
who seek justice, and offers

the opportunity to reflect on |
what Catholics believe is the

God-given power and respon-
sibility of all in the legal pro-
fession.

The Red Mass takes its
name from the red vestments
worn by the celebrant and
judges. In the Roman Catholic
liturgy, red vestments sym-
bolize the Holy Spirit.

Additionally, judges of the
High Court of England and
all doctors of law wear red
robes.

One of the better-known
Red Masses is the one cele-
brated each fall at the Cathe-
dral of St Matthew the Apos-
tle in Washington, DC, on the
Sunday before the first Mon-
day in October — the
Supreme Court convenes on
the first Monday in October.

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candidates for the position of Financial Analyst. The Company has been
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in the areas of bulk rum production and bottling of various spirit beverages,
primarily for export markets.

The Financial Analyst will report to the Assistant Financial Controller, and
will be responsible for the budgeting and analysis functions within the Finance
Department and the planning and implementation of the annual budget and
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Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum vitae directly
to Bacardi & Company Limited, P.O. Box N-4880, Nassau, Bahamas, Attention:
The Human Resources Manager.

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Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUC



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic
Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.





ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 — Accounting for Beginners II

MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901-— Human Resource Management II




Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional development
_ in both private and public sectors with the added recognition that these courses have


























been equated to courses taken toward a degree programme. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBOOKS
This course is for the beginner who knows PRESENTATIONS ' This course trains new and existing small
3 y 5 very little about computers and does not This workshop is designed to provide business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
' understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the employees) in organizing and managing their
covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It accounting using QuickBooks Pro software,
| extensive hands-on practice using various foguses on developing effective and dynamic Students will learn how to set up their
pe rl art sl ee ro Ree ee software, including: PowerPoint presentations: f company files, chart of accounts, budget and
: (I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing customer, vendor and employee files.
(ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite; None
S H A H H A (iil) Microsoft Access - Database Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007 Pre-requisite: None
ss d Ele) at ion Mm rs ors are as K e d to a ote i h e fo | OW | n g aa) e€ CF a) g Ss: Management. Time: 9:30am ~ 4:30pm Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
‘ Duration: 1 day Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
S 4 Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: 6 weeks
0 rl ri 5 . we ei % :
DYem=t-(0it-lamer-tcellacleumr-lcelUlarclevelamWUlimercMare)celiarmeclamela(aleciivelammm °c elev. Sh ebnay, 07 Fees: S16000 re seeegeen
{ LJ =
_ Meeting on Friday, January Vena @ 6:00 p.m. in the E-Block, Section 01 (CEES) eG et so). aleeieceen dona
b Saturday, 3rd February, 2007 —_ Information Technology. The course provides Targeling persons who would like to create
a oom i 7 fo re | | 5 Saction 02 (CEES) Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, will caver Web page creation, Web site
5 Duration: 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML. Specific topics will
= D 8 30 a Se ctl on: AY 3 CS 02 Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
. 5 Tuition; $450.00 Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages,
EDU 325 Section: WB Pre-requisite: None :
c ; 5 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Begins: Wednesday, 7th February Pre-requisife: Participants must be
= D U 329 Sectio n: Vi) B This course covers the advanced concepts 2007 computer Iterate and have
o with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm a basic knowledge of
= D U 429 Sectio a W B : various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word processing
(}} Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: . CEES Computer Lab Dates: {st & 2nd March, 2007
‘ ° (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00
, 0 n H , H (ili) Microsoft Access - Database Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Ms. Wendy Riley will be holding a meeting for all students registered Management, ‘PG UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration; 2 days

This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Computer Lab

for Web Based EDU 301—Information Technology, Section et Pre-requisite; Computer Applications ! technology systems for use in information Fees: $850.00
(0 BRoYaMANAY ste lat=XXol-WANNFclalUrclaVAMROMMAOOVANlaMiialcMsci=llelel@inelelsa Mm Paclam te Sone come foun tonics Base Nerdnare, Opeatng






5 G @) @) m D Duration: 12 weeks Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
oI p S D Venue: CEES Computer Lab




: i Fees: $550,00 Pre-requisite: None
‘ Begins: Monday 12th February 2007

\N DBC «sa

All students concerned must attend. : .

Time: 6:00pm - 7:30pm
\N Monday & Wednesday






































Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
00.00



Duration: 12 weeks
\



kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course.

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs.

4 325-5714. «320-0093
__ 325-1930 - 302-4300 ext. 5202








Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

— von done anything COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE
special for yourself today? “= *° "rm


































: ACCOUNTING
Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’s —ccagag so} ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm MonWed 12-Feb 10 wks $250
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901 01. ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $275
5 ‘ ACCAQO2 Ot ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III §:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $300
With one of our courses, you can gain
new job skills, increase your chances for BUSINESS .
promotion or just learn something new for pusigo0 -«O1_—s CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225
personal satisfaction. With your success CUST900 «OTs SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:309m Thurs 22-Feb 1day $170
in courses such as Massage Therapy, BUSI90d ~=—»sOT_~—_— INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs «= 1-Mar = 10. wks $225
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you COMPUTERS
could even start a small business. Sign up COMPS01 Q1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-00pm Mon 5-Feb 12 wks $450
for a course today. COMPS01 Q2 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10:00am-1:00pm_ Sat 3-Feb 12 wks $450
; COMPS02 Q1 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS {I 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb 12 wks $580
COMPS03 Ot INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | §:00-9:00pm Wed f-Feb 12wks $450
COMP 941 04 QUICKBOOKS §:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Gwks $330
COMP953 a PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm = MonWed = 12-Feb 12 wks $500
COMP96O QO} EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs &Mar tday $160
COMP930 Qt WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm — ThursfFri t-Mar 2 days $550





COSMETOLOGY




COSM802 (1) MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-8:00pm Mon 26-Feb 8 wks $225
COSM804 0 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-8:00pm Tue 2i-Feb Swks $225
GOSM80? Q1 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm MonThurs 26-Feb wks $500







DECORATING











DECOsOO —«01_—_—sINTERIOR DECORATING | _6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb Swks $225
DECO8O1 01 INTERIOR.DECORATINGH =~ 6:00-9:00pm =~ Tue 27-Feb Bwks $250
FLOR80O =O} FLORAL DESIGN | ~~ 6:00-9:00om Tue 27-Feb 10 wks $225
FLORBOL —-O1_~—- FLORAL DESIGN 6:00-9:00pm = Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $250
ENQUIRIES FLORGO2 01 FLORAL DESIGN tl 6:00-9:00pm’ Thurs = t-Mar 10. wks $300



Email :: perdev@cob.edu.bs







ENGLISH
ENG 900 0 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue d7-Feb Bwks $225
“ol 900 ) ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:20pm Mover 26-Feb 10 wks $250




All fees are included with the exception of
the application tee of $40.00 (one time).

+








CEES reserves the right to change ‘Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule
and Course Materials,




HEALTH & FITNESS

AASGIOO 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 2é-Feb TO wks $465
RASGSOt Q1 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $620
ALTH9OO 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $400





ee











MANAGEMENT
GMT900 = 01 ~~ HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT| 6:00-9:30pm Thurs 8-Feb 12 wks $250
GMT901 01 = HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT If 6:00-9:30pm Mon 5-Feb 12 wks $300

Contact the Coordinator




z=







MEDICAL

EDTSO0 Of MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 1Owks $225

me







SEWING
SEW 800 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 802 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING IT 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $250










SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Tues 27-Feb 1Owks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:00-9:00pm = Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $250
SEW814 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING | 1:00-10:00pm — Sat 24-Feb 10 wks $225




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\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAI

Visit our website at www.cab.edtbs EDUCATING & TRAINING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007 |

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide'participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee
motivation.

Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007

Time: 30am - 4:30pm

Venue: To be announced

Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm :

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $160.00

WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.

Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007

Time: 9:30am’. 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tultlon: $550.00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs
325-5714
er cleser

EPzcrerte

ext. 5202

Rie sia

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS i
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007

Time: 6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundarnentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hat Stone Therapy.
Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-2:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620.00 :
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: § Wednesday, 28th February, 2007

Time: 6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator 7 erdev(Mcob.edu.bs
326-0093
i i...

ley) 2 Rielen a. wA0y2



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS _—



Workers Party —
accuses PLP of

compromising

sovereignty

1 By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Perry Christie led Gov-
rnment has catastrophically
quashed the much anticipated
2lebration of the 40th anniver-
ary of majority rule by com-
romising the sovereignty of the
‘commonwealth of The
‘ahamas, Rodney Moncur
sader of the Workers Party
laimed in a release yesterday.

The PLP he said has aban-
oned the very principle and
2net of MILAT by allowing
five young Bahamian airport
‘orkers to be used as scape-
oats in a legal exercise in Mia-
u, Florida, that cannot pass the

crutiny of the British legal sys- .

2m of which the Bahamas was
nce an irrevocable partner.”

“Until the Government

egins to agitate in every inter-
ational fora available to it for
ie return of those five airport
vorkers to stand trial here in
he Commonwealth of The
sahamas where they allegedly
ommitted some heinous
ffences any attempt to cele-
‘rate or mark majority
ule should be regarded as far-
ical and hypocritical,” Mr
Moncur said.

The party leader said that this
‘overnment has taken away the
lignity of the Bahamian peo-
»le and Bahamians are no
onger able to hold their heads
1igh within the region because
hey have been found to be

RODNEY Moncur has accused the government of being



complicit in the arrest of five airport workers in the US

complicit in entrapping “these
five young Bahamian scape-
goats.”

“The Workers Party calls on
the nation and our religious
and civic leaders to continue
to recognize that drug traffick-
ing is a despicable offence
which all right thinking
Bahamians condemn and
abhor, but by the same token,
we will not tolerate the tram-
pling or abuse of the Constitu-
tional rights of any Bahamian
or the compromising of our
national sovereignty in a case
where the Royal Bahamas
Police Force need only to have
done its job and arrest and

charge those men here in the

Bahamas,” he said.
Instead, he pointed out, the

these men to work at the Sir.
Lynden Pindling Internationa!
Airport for almost six months
after the government was con-
fronted with a sealed indictment
out of a Miami District Court
against these men and yet the
government did nothing to pro-

- tect the integrity and national

security of that airport and
Bahamian people.

“A Government that does
not believe in the rule of law
and bends the rules to fit its own
peculiar position cannot be
trusted to negotiate in the bes!
interest of the Bahamian peo-
ple. This PLP administration
has now subjected the name of
Sir Lynden Pindling to once
again to be besmirched in Mia-
mi as it relates to drug traffick-
ing,” Mr Moncur claimed.

government and police allowed

E BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

The mandate of the Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
is to implement strategies that build alliances and partnerships with universities around the
world.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position in the
Office of Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations:

International Liaison Officer (ILO)

The College/University of The Bahamas seeks an individual to coordinate its international
relations efforts in supporting the College’s goal of building alliances and partnerships with
universities around the world. The position will serve as the primary point of support for
the College’s efforts to build university alliances and to ensuring the successful implementation
of those alliances and partnerships including partnerships which involve research collaboration,
faculty and student exchange, joint ccnference planning and other forms of institutional
cooperation. The position will have specific focus on the planning, coordinating and
implementing of cultural, educational and professional student exchange programmes.
The International Liaison Officer also manages the Study Abroad programmes. Other
responsibilities include programme evaluation, development of cultural and extra-curricular
activities for international students attending The College of The Bahamas and publishing
an Exchange Newsletter.

The International Liaison Officer reports directly to the Vice President, Research, Graduate
Programmes and International Relations but works closely with the Office of the President
and other key senior COB administrative offices to ensure the success of the Office and
the achievement of its international mandate. The ILO also works closely with relevant
departments to assist with the academic advising of students participating in international
study opportunities, pre-departure preparation and orientation for outgoing students
including those enrolled in Study Abroad Programmes, providing support and counsel for
incoming exchange students. S/he coordinates the administrative and logistical services
provided to these students and liaises closely with respective administrators in institutions
abroad who lead exchange and study abroad programmes. This position interacts on a
regular basis with many internal and external constituencies, including staff from international
offices at overseas universities, students, parents, vendors, affiliated institutions and
organisations, and. offices abroad, such as embassies and consulates.

_-Specific duties in the internationa! relations areas entail travel and itinerary planning and

coordination of meetings with overseas universities, coordination of incoming university
visits, preparation of briefing notes and detailed travel itineraries for the President, Vice
President and other senior team members as required. In the student exchange and study
aboard areas, overseeing enrolment of assigned programmes by guiding students' application
process, advising applicants on programme choice, monitoring programme enrolment and
operational status, reviewing applications for admission and follow-up with students as
necessary; serving as principal contact person for programmes within the portfolio; managing
phone and e-mail communication from students and parents regarding programmes, health
and safety concerns including ensuring The College of The Bahamas’ duty of care
responsibilities, credit transfer issues, financial aid, billing, pre-departure preparation, travel
arrangements, and passports and visas.

The ideal candidate should have a Master’s degree in International Studies, Education,
Humanities or a related field with an international emphasis. A minimum of three years of
experience in intercultural programming is desirous. Computer literacy and familiarity with
computer information resources, two years of professional experience in international
education administration and living, working, studying, or conducting research abroad for
a significant length of time would be advantageous. Conversational proficiency in a second
language is an asset. Other competencies include demonstrated tact and diplomacy,
analytical ability and attention to detail; along with the ability to present programmes in a
professional and enthusiastic manner. The candidate must be able to work cooperatively
and sensitively with students, parents, Academic Deans/Heads, in-country staff and sending
college administrators.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up- date transcripts, along with three work
references no later than 30°’ January 2007 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P.,, The Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF T.

Visit our website at www.cob.ediu.bs SOMO NSH GC WW


Fire in their bellies: Do
Caribbean leaders have it?

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat).

THE heads of government
of the 15-nation Caribbean
Community (CARICOM)

countries will meet shortly to
decide how they could take
their nations forward economi-
cally in a highly competitive
global environment.

Amongst the matters they
will consider is the governance
of CARICOM and a specific
proposal that they should estab-
lish a Commission which would

MARINE. NAVIGATION
COURSES

In a nation of islands it is essential to be able
to navigate over the ‘horizon with confidence.
Prepare for safe voyaging by enrolling in the

Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by The
Bahamas School of Marine Navigation. Plan
to attend the free first class on Monday, January
8th, at 7 p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East

Bay Street.

Details: 364-2861,

535-6234 or

pak434@netscape.net. Other courses include

Seamanship and Celestial Navigation.

Specials Good Thru Mon., RET ie












TURKEY —
WINGS

PER-LB.

99°




GWALTNEY
REGULAR/THICK SLICED

BOLOGNA

PER-LB.



SHRIMPS



PORK LOIN

PER-LB.

$769

U.S.D.A. CHOICE

GROUND CHUCK

Be FRIED "DELI SLICED
BREADED :

Gre BREAST/ |

19

& CHEESE

JACK FROST




END CUT CHOPS ‘|

oversee certain agreed matters
such as the external trade rela-
tions of the grouping and the
development of the Caribbean
Single Market (CSM) which
was established last year.

The Bahamas has indicated
that it will not be a part of the
Single Market, and Haiti is
restricted from joining for the
time being

The proposal for a CARI-
COM Commission was made
15 years ago by the West Indian
Commission, but it was never
implemented.

Recently, a former Prime
Minister of Jamaica, Edward
Seaga, predicted that CARI-
COM is “likely to face a slide,
not a climb, in the future”
because of the absence from
regional decision-making at a
governmental level of certain
leaders. Specifically, he named
two former Prime Ministers, P J
Patterson of Jamaica and Ken-
ny Anthony of St Lucia.

He claimed that apart from
Owen Arthur of Barbados
(who, he said, has indicated that
he will be retiring soon) and
Ralph Gonsalves of St Vincent,

7.25 OZ.

GOLDEN RIPE

BANANAS

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POPCORN
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$789






















RST SAINTS

THRIFTY MAID JUICE



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CROWN POINT FLAKE TUNA
6-02,

LUCKY MACKE’









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12-0Z.

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ASSORTED RED & WHITE 10.5 OZ

SQUEEZE 15-OZ.ecscsssssscssssesessssseces





BRKT REG. or W/BLCH. .......sccseevee

taversaase $1.29

taneacese 2/89¢

RAL
TOMATO SAUCE & OIL - 15-OZ, ....ssessserssee 99¢ :

NASSAU: City Market ° John 8.



| KELLOGG’S CORN FLAKES
18-0Z
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shat $10.99 ' WHOLE KERNEL 15-0Z...........+



ahhad $3.99 |

BAHAMA

CORNED BEEF 12-02. ....sssessssssssonsssssersesese 99¢

ANGEL. SOFT SOFT W/DOUBLE ROLL
isaeasoagassesdsssssscties $3.89

CHAMPION DICED TOMATOES

OZ. sc sscsscescssstaeéens coat tosstadiensnatessasesseassosaned 99¢

sbeeneaevccesevccscessccrsevsncscececeeves:

SAV-A-CHEK Redemption Centres
George ° Samdy’s > Home Fabrics - Galleria Cimemas °

° GNC Nutritional Centres ° John Bull Business Centre.

PENT RI RARTC SET EPR ERT NINN ERT ERT

FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre > Playtime Sports Epic Battery » GNC Nutritional Centres.
STORE HOURS: Monday ~ Saturday: 7:00am - 9:00pm ° Sunday: 7:00am - Noon except Cable Beach and Harbour Bay which are open until 2:00pm

_ STRAWBERRIES

PINT

SE $89

Epic Automotive & Battery



“the present group of leaders
are supporters but have far less
fire in their bellies to carry on a
campaign (for greater regional
economic integration) with pas-
sion”.

Mr Seaga also posited the
view that the establishment of a
CARICOM Commission would
not work, and that anyone who
believes that it would “does not
understand the psyche of
Caribbean leaders nor, indeed,
the people”.

Implicit in Mr Seaga’s pre-
sentation is that neither the
majority of the present crop of
CARICOM leaders, nor the
majority of the people, want a
more economically integrated
region, and, certainly, they do
not want a CARICOM Com-
mission making decisions for

Wed., Jan. 10th

SAV-A-CHEK

Save $1.00 on any item
with a value of $1.00 or
more with your filled

Sav-A-Chek Certificate.

DOUBLE STAMPS ON
LYN

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“Labels for learning
Details in store”


















‘Heads of Government.



their countries.

Of course, on the matter of
the Commission, Mr Seaga’s
presentation overlooks the spe-
cific recommendation of every
proposal that any Commission
must take instructions from, and
be answerable to, CARICOM
Fur-
ther, the Commission will have
delegated authority and
accountability only for such
matters as national govern-

ments assign to it particularly*

because those matters are better
handled with the collective
strength of regional govern-
ments than by a weaker nation-
al government on its own.

As to the issue of whether
leaders have “less fire in their
bellies” for the regional inte-
gration project generally and a
CARICOM Commission in
particular, time will tell and the
forthcoming meeting of Heads
of Government will be a good
indicator. If the establishment
of the Commission is again
delayed despite three reports
that strongly recommend it,
then CARICOM leaders would
have proved Mr Seaga to be
right.

And, there would be wider
implications for the region.

Many businesses in the mem-
ber states of CARICOM are
eager to widen their markets
beyond their national bound-
aries and into the wider
Caribbean community. They
are anxious that governments
should provide the environment
by which they can do so; they
want the barriers to trade lifted
in both goods and services.

Financial institutions — insur-
ance companies and banks —
based in Trinidad, Barbados
and Jamaica are already engag-

_ ing in pan-Caribbean transac-

tions providing capital to gov-
ernments and businesses —
Jamaica, Barbados, Belize and
several of the Leeward and
Windward islands have been
beneficiaries of such financing.
The financial institutions could
do more if the cross-border con-
trols and restrictions are lifted.

Governments might well
wake up one morning to find
that, to a certain extent, both
market and production integra-
tion have taken place around
them. But, in this scenario there
will be more losers in the busi-
ness community than there
might be if the process of liber-
alization is orderly and regulat-
ed.

Already, there should have
been deeper. and more mean-
ingful involvement of the
region’s private sector and its
trade unions in both the devel-
opment of the Caribbean Single
Market and in the trade and
investment negotiations with



La CASITA

The Art of Island Living

THE TRIBUNE

@ SIR Ronald Sanders

the European Union (EU) and
at the World Trade Organiza-
tion (WTO). However, theo-
retically sound may be the stud-
ies of the region’s technical
experts, there is a practicality
to doing business whose
requirements are best addressed
by business people themselves.

Both at the national and
regional levels, the private sec-
tor ought to be integral parties
to negotiations.

Some businesses in the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands,
the members of the Organiza-
tion of Eastern Caribbean
States (OECS), are worried
about being displaced in their
own domestic markets by firms
from the larger CARICOM
countries.

In this connection, there is a
crying need for the private sec-
tor throughout the region to
map out their own strategy for
sharing the Single Market
through mergers, alliances or
cooperation. There is urgency
for a bargain between them
which allows for equity in how
the market is shared. Whatever
formula results from a bargain
will hurt some businesses, but
no bargain will harm far more.

Further, the private sector
should have a team that plays
an advisory and consultative
role to the region’s trade and
aid negotiators.

The initiative for such activ-
ity should be taken by the
regional private sector itself. If it
fails to do so, it cannot com-
plain if it is dissatisfied with the
results of the trade and invest-
ment negotiations in which
CARICOM governments are
now involved. In this regard, the
Caribbean Hotels Association
(CHA) have shown the way by
being forceful in pushing
tourism on to the agenda of dis-
cussion between the EU and
the Caribbean. Others in the
services industry should follow.

It is to be hoped that there is
still “fire in the bellies” for
deeper regional integration not
only of the private sector firms
that are already forging ahead,
but of government leaders, the
trade union movement and oth-
ers in the CARICOM business
community.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com



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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

Cuba’s youth newspaper

warns against consumerism
ater rise in holiday shopping

m@ HAVANA

CUBA'S official youth
newspaper on Sunday report-
ed an increase in holiday toy
shopping this year and
expressed concern that grow-
ing celebration of religious
holidays could bring a rise in
consumerism on the commu-
nist-run island, according to
Associated Press.

In a two-page article, the
Communist Party's Juventud
Rebelde newspaper report-
ed on the revival in Cuba of
the Jan. 6 "Three Kings
Day," a Latin American tra-
dition of gift-giving for chil-
dren that commemorates the
arrival of three wise men
who, according to the Bible,
offered the newborn Jesus
gifts of gold, frankincense
and myrrh.

Tradition

"A tradition that seemed
extinct in Cuban society rises
again," the state-run news-
paper said: "Although no one
sees celebrating the millen-
nial festivity of the Three
Kings as heresy, the danger
could be in (the holiday)
accentuating consumerist
habits and social differences."

Christmas is a low-key
affair on the communist-run
island, where the adoption of
official atheism in 1962 led
leaders to discourage reli-
gious celebrations.

Cubans weren't given a day
off for Christmas between
1969 and 1997, when the hol-
iday was restored ahead of a
historic visit by Pope John
Paul II in 1998 and as restric-
tions on religion were eased.

Even so state-run depart-
ment stores offer no special
promotions or sales on toys





PLACE MATS
TABLE CLOTHS

Eb Sb Cts ED EBs EID Es WEG WED EBs EB Wl Es CD Be Ds EBs Ba WE “Ela ts tela ls Sas WE Ela lo EDs ED SER Els CD OE le a i a Ws at Wil ts Weis ta CD El YE eld Wits io ih ts a ts ike ta ite to Waa ik ts Wh Wile EDs Cl ts EB EB EBs A EE GES Gry

THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS

MAIN STREET BATH TOWELS
TOUCH OF VELVET SHEET SETS

THE TRIBUNE

Article reports on
the revival of
‘Three Kings Day’



this time of year.

Those interviewed for the
Juventud Rebelde article
attributed the increase of gift-
giving in Cuba to the influ-
ence of globalization and vis-
its by Cuban-Americans and
others living abroad.

"During these days, one
can hardly move around the
toy department of stores" in
Havana, the article said.

The newspaper published
photographs of shoppers
holding several bags and chil-
dren playing with toys. Raisa
Vazquez, a manager of
Havana's La Epoca depart-
ment store, was quoted as
saying toy sales were the
highest this year since the
store reopened in 1998.

"The enormous demand
has forced us to spread out
the toys to other depart-
ments, like the hardware sec-
tion or the area with school
supplies, so that the customer
doesn't have to wait in such
an immense line," Vazquez
told the newspaper.

No specific sales numbers
were reported.

Some of those interviewed
by Juventud Rebelde
expressed disdain for the
resurgence of the holiday,
calling it "a tradition of cap-
italist countries" and saying
that children should be given
presents for good behavior
and academic performance
rather than for religious or
cultural reasons.

SSS OP GD WP GAY GH WY 4H GUT GAP GY WG HF A ANY AP GAY AY GI HG GY GH AP GAT OY GND AT GS AV GP AP GT GS AY AE AG AY QP AS AF GH GV GF GG A GT GT AH



SINGLE POTS & FRY PANS

FITTED & FLAT SHEETS

WINDOW CURTAINS & PANELS
PFALTZGRAFF DINNERWARE SETS
POPULAR BATH WINDOW

& SHOWER CURTAINS

Eisen e450 Ge aH ED AOD EINE GND ANN HEED SEED GE HEND HRD HER HIND GON IEE AND GUAT ND NT ENE ANID AINE UNE NN ENN HED HED aN HUD HN HED AED HEN HEED URN aE HEED HER ERR NH HT HED NED EW HY

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

University professors
warned that universal gift-
giving can highlight econom-
ic differences and make some
children feel bad.

Objective

"What should worry us is
the social connotation that
this could have, making it an
objective of families to buy
the most ostentatious gift,"
Teresa Munoz, a sociology
professor at the University
of Havana, told the newspa-

er.

"The solution is not to pro-
hibit (the celebration) but
rather to be conscientious of
the consequences we could
face creating consumerist

habits that deform little ones

and make them feel superior
to their companions."

The Three Kings Day tra-
dition comes from Spain and
was so ingrained in Cuba that
the rebels led by Castro in
the 1950s gave toys on the
holiday to children in the
mountains where they were
fighting the Cuban revolu-
tion.

On Monday, the office of
Havana's city historian will
distribute 100,000 toys to ,
children at schools in Old
Havana, celebrating not only
the holiday but also to honor
Castro's Jan. 8 entrance into
Havana after the triumph of
his revolution.



KG

PICTURE FRAMES

oS

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THE TRIBUNE




ff LONDON

TREASURY chief Gordon
Brown, expected to succeed
‘Yony Blair as prime minister
by September, suggested Sun-
day that he will pursue an Iraq
policy that is more independent
of Washington than the current
government, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Brown acknowledged that
mistakes were made in the
aftermath of the invasion and
promised to be “very frank”
with President Bush. He also
said that Britain is likely to
scale down its commitment of
troops to Iraq over the next
year — even as the White
House is considering dispatch-
ing thousands more, at least
temporarily.

Brown’s comments, aired on
the British Broadcasting
Corp.’s Sunday AM program,
seemed intended to distinguish
himself from Blair, who has
been criticized in Britain for his
strong support for Bush and the
war, both unpopular here.

“T look forward, if I am in a
new position, to working with
the president of the United
States, George Bush,” Brown
said. “Obviously, people who
know me know that I will speak
my mind. I will be very frank.
The British national interest is
what I and my colleagues are
about.”

A spokesman for the U.S.
State Department declined to
comment on Brown’s interview.

Blair has said he will step
down as prime minister and
leader of the governing Labour
party before September.
Brown, who is credited with
helping Blair reinvigorate the
Labour party, is unlikely to face
any credible challenge when the
party elects a new leader,
who will automatically
become Britain’s new prime
minister.

Brown, in the BBC interview,
also said that Saddam Hussein’s
execution — in which Saddam,
a Sunni Arab, was taunted with

B® BRITISH Treasury chief
Gordon Brown
(AP FILE Photo)

the name of a-radical Shiite
cleric — had done nothing to
help stem Iraq’s sectarian vio-
lence.

“Now that we know the full
picture of what happened, we
can sum this up as a deplorable
set of events,” Brown told the
BBC. “It is something, of
course, which the Iraqi govern-
ment has now expressed its
anxiety and shame at.”

Blair, who previously
declined to comment on the
hanging, said through his press
office Sunday that the manner
of Saddam’s execution was
“completely wrong.”

Brown also told the BBC
that he believed the ideologi-
cal battle for the hearts and
minds of young Muslims was
as crucial as the battle against
communism was for previous
generations.

Brown, in charge of Britain’s
Treasury since 1997, said he
had worked with officials across
the American political divide
and remained close to ex-Fed-

Come to the



eral Reserve chairman Alan
Greenspan and former
Treasury Secretary Robert
Rubin.

In the interview, recorded on
Saturday, Brown also said he
believed there should be some
form of inquiry into the after-
math of the 2003 U.S.-led inva-
sion.

“There are lessons to be
learnt, particularly from what
happened immediately after
Saddam Hussein fell,” he told
the BBC.

“One is that in Iraq itself
there is absolutely no doubt —
and L think people will agree
on this in time — that the pas-
sage of authority to the local
population should have begun a
lot earlier, so they had to take
more responsibility for what
was happening in their own
country.”

He said the experience of
insurgency in Iraq and Islamic
extremist terrorism had proven
that “we will not win against
extreme terrorist activities and
propaganda activities unless we
have this battle for hearts and
minds as well.”

The Treasury chief said he
believed Britain was unlikely
to join any future U.S. plan to
temporarily increase troop
numbers in Iraq, aimed at
stemming the current blood-
shed. .

Britain would “continue to
move troops from combat to
training, to complete the rede-
velopment work” and was like-
ly to scale down their presence
over the next few months.

Britain has around 7,000 sol-
diers stationed in southern Iraq,
mainly based around the city
of Basra.

“L believe it is true to say that
by the end of the year, there
may be thousands less in Iraq
than there are now,” Brown
said.

Parliament would also have a
stronger role under his leader-
ship, Brown said, and be more
able to hold the government to
account.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 15



New childbirth-related training



and certification courses available

THE Childbirth and Post-
partum Professional Associa-
tion announced that it now
has seven new childbirth-relat-
ed training and certification

courses available for health-
care professionals in Grand
Bahama and_ elsewhere
throughout the Bahamas.

is the Advanced Adoption
Certification Programme.
This programme provides
the candidate with informa-
tion and training so that they

Women encouraged |



Among them, said CAPPA, '

to register to vote |



CALLING on the women of the FNM to
rally around the party’s Women’s Associa-
tion, association president Caron Shepherd
encouraged all women to ensure that they
are registered to vote in the upcoming Gen-
eral Election.

“Women have always been the driving
force behind the elections. Our women have
always stepped up to the plate; it has been
women for every election that have cast
their ballots more than their male counter-
parts and we anticipate that this time will be
no different,” Ms Shepherd said.

The association ‘president said that the

General Election. We the women of our
great party will be called upon to band
together in a number activities,” she said.

She challenged the women in her group
to take a more hands on approach and to be
more visible in their respective communi-
ties.

“It will be incumbent upon us to contin-
ue to influence our issues on women and
position ourselves to be able to present
legislation that will affect change for
women.

“These laws will improve the conditions
of women in all aspects of our society. We
must therefore be ready to defend our sis-

FNM’s women’s association can look for-
ward to an exciting year.

“I encourage all women to ensure that
they are registered to vote in the upcoming



Cindy Sheehan, other
activists arrive in Cuba
for Guantanamo protest

HAVANA



_ AMERICAN "peace mom" Cindy Sheehan called for the clo-
sure of the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo, Cuba, as she and
other activists arrived here Saturday to draw attention to the
nearly 400 terror suspects still held at the remote site, according
to Associated Press.

Sheehan is among 12 human sights and anti-war activists
who will travel across this Caribbean island next week, arriving
at the main gate of the Guantanamo base on Thursday — five
years after the first prisoners were flown in.

" Anyone who knows me knows that I am not afraid of any-
thing," Sheehan said when asked about the possibility of U.S.
sanctions for traveling to communist-run Cuba, which remains
under an American trade embargo. \

"What is more important is the inhumanity that my govern-
ment is perpetrating at Guantanamo," she told reporters.

Sheehan, 49, of Vacaville, California, became an anti-war
activist known as the "peace mom" after her 24-year-old son
Casey was killed in Iraq in April 2004. She drew international
attention by camping outside U.S. President George W. Bush's
ranch to protest the war, and has been arrested numerous times
for trespassing.

Sheehan arrived in Havana early Saturday evening with trip
organizer Medea Benjamin, of the California nonprofit groups
Global Exchange and Codepink.

Benjamin said the protesters believe they are exempt from
U.S. travel restrictions on Cuba because they were traveling as
professional human rights activists who will attend a daylong
international conference in the Cuban city of Guantanamo on
Wednesday. j :

Arriving in the same group was former Army Col. Ann
Wright, who resigned-over the war in Iraq; Tiffany Burns of
Gold Star Families for Peace, representing relatives of soldiers
killed in Iraq; and Adele Welty, mother of firefighter Timothy
Welty, who died in the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

The other seven activists were expected to arrive in Havana
over the weekend. < - oe a pee

"In the names of my son and all the others who died in 9/11,
great acts of inhumanity are being perpetuated in Guantanamo
and Iraq," Welty said. ' Wee

The U.S. military still holds about 395 men on suspicion of
links to al-Oaida or the Taliban, including about 85 who have
been cleared to be released or transferred to other countries.
The military says it wants to’ charge 60 to 80 detainees and
bring them to trial.

Wright said that the group's protest outside the Guantanamo
base will coincide with demonstrations around the world calling
on the United States to shut the remote prison.

"There needs to be justice, just not with a military prison," she
said, adding that the prisoners should be subjected to a "real
judicial process" in U.S, federal courts.

In December 2005, American Christians with the Witness
oo. Torture activist group held a protest march outside
the base.

ioe +" So che) SMUT Fol CA Sa



ters in the right causes and let them knew
that we do care, how large or small it may
be,” Ms Shepherd said.



@ WOMEN’S Association
president Caron Shepherd

may better support and assist
those involved in an adoption.

The process will provide
childbirth professionals with
tools and understanding to







assist both birth parents and
adoptive parents throughout
the process of labour and
delivery as well as the post-
partum period.

The course will produce
professionals who have train-
ing in the various emotional
and physical aspects that are
unique to the adoption situa-
tion, and who are prepared to
offer support as well as refer
clients to qualified personnel
within the community.

Also, CAPPA will offer
additional training and certi-
fication in Teen Childbirth
Support and Adoption.

The organisation explained
that expectant teens, due to
their unique needs, present

‘ special challenges.

“As childbirth profession-
als it is our responsibility to
be familiar with the issues and
topics that are pertinent to
expectant young families,”
CAPPA said in a statement.

The CAPPA Teen Support
Programme candidate will
learn how to:

e Establish the unique needs

We want to express our appreciation

of expectant teens.

e Summarise the vital com-

ponents of a childbirth edu-
cation class or teen support
group.
e Identify the various
resources available to assist
childbirth professionals
who work with pregnant
teens.

¢ Understand the conflicts
of pregnancy during the ado-
lescent stage of development.

e Establish skills necessary
to teach and support pregnant
and parenting teens.

CAPPA, a non-profit
organisation, has two fold mis-
sion: to provide professional
membership and training in
related women’s health fields,
and to provide the
public access to these profes-
sionals.

These consist of childbirth
and lactation educators,
antepartum, labour and post-
partum doulas, advanced cer-
tifications in teen support, and
adoption support; and the
Advanced Comfort Measures
training class.



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THE TRIBUNE

BAY STREET, from 1B

future”, ‘

In response to a question about
the dirty streets in between Eliza-
beth Avenue and the British Colo-
nial Hilton, Ms Walkine said the
Ministry of Tourism had been
“pushing for quite some time” for a
Downtown Authority with the pow-
ers and resources to tackle all the
issues surrounding the operation
and maintenance of downtown Nas-
sau.

She added that creating such an
Authority “hadn’t been as easy” as
some may have thought, as it
required legislation and other things
to fall into place.

However, the Prime Minister’s
Office and Nassau Economic and
Development Commission had

_begun to move the initiative for-

.”-ward. Ms Walkine said the Ministry

of Tourism had itself spent “a dis-
proportionate amount of money on
cleaning the streets”, adding that
the “Bay Street owners need to be
pulled together”.

“It’s a challenge. We’re closer
now than for quite some time to
getting resolution to that particu-

_. lar problem,” Ms Walkine said.

The Western Hemisphere Trav-
el Initiative (WHTI), which comes
into effect on January 23, 2007, and
requires US citizens traveling to the
Bahamas to possess a passport to
re-enter their home country. The
Bahamian tourism industry is con-
cerned that this could reduce the
number of US visitors, as the cost
and difficulty of obtaining passports
might encourage them to vacation
at home or choose other destina-
tions.

Ms Walkine said the Ministry of
Tourism’s own research indicated
that “more than” 70 per cent of
Americans who visited the
Bahamas possessed passports,

although this did not mean they all

used them to travel to this nation.
Currently, a driver’s licence is good
enough for re-entry.

The Tourism director-general
said the previously more relaxed
US re-entry policy had “shored up
our comparative advantage of prox-
imity” to the US, its major tourism
market.

Ms Walkine said: “We could
potentially lose the franchise we’ve
now held for a long time, that of
the quick getaway destination.” The
Bahamas had long appealed to
impulse travelers, particularly from
Florida, who could decide on a Fri-
day night to travel to the Bahamas
the next day. If they do not have
passports, that will no longer be
possible.

Ms Walkine added that most oth-
er Caribbean nations faced the
same issues in relation to the WHTI
as the Bahamas, and this nation’s
proximity to the US and other
advantages “stand us in very good
stead” compared to regional rivals.

She added the processing and
issuing of passports on the US side
had been “unbelievably stepped
up”, but said the process of edu-
cating Americans about the pass-
port requirement had “started later
than it should” in Washington.

“The Caribbean countries have
done better about getting the word
out on this passport requirement
than the US government,” Ms
Walkine said. ;

Ms Walkine told Rotarians that
competition in the global tourism
industry was increasing, with guests
becoming increasingly demanding
and expecting their expectations to
be exceeded.

She pointed out that in the
Caribbean, Mexico, Dominican
Republic and Cuba all had much
higher stopover visitor volumes
than the Bahamas, the Dominican
Republic’s being more than dou-
ble despite having half the per capi-
ta GDP of the Bahamas.

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5B

Japan boasted man-made beach-
es, with sand and blue water, in an
indoor complex, while the United
Arab Emirates was manufacturing
beaches, private islands and snow
resorts.

The advent of the Internet had
given tourists even more freedom to
choose their vacation destinations,
meaning the Bahamas had to raise
its competitiveness and enter new
markets, while growing and sus-
taining existing ones.

Ms Walkine said this nation had
to sell “the experiences of the
islands of the Bahamas”. She
added: “The experience is not the
hotel brand that can be found in
other parts of the world, nor the
products and services required to
maintain that brand, which are usu-
ally standard for brand groups.

“But the experience is everything
else. From the second a visitor steps
off of an aircraft or boat, to the
moment of departure, and it is all
things in between that we ‘need
Bahamians to take ownership of
that will help us to continually meet
and rise above the challenge of the
new tourism global order.”

Ms Walkine said the Bahamas
had to identify and cultivate things
that were “uniquely Bahamian” as
it could not compete on infrastruc-
ture with the likes of Dubai and
Japan.

She pointed out that Caribbean
Travel & Life magazine’s ‘Best of
the Caribbean 2007’ poll of visitor
favourites did not rank the
Bahamas among the top seven that
were best for local food. Nor did
the Bahamas make the top eight in
the best adventure destination cat-
egory.

The Bahamas ranked fifth in the
snorkeling and scuba diving cate-
gories, while Kalik was fourth
among Caribbean beers. Its people
ranked as the second friendliest
after Jamaica, and some resort
properties were also ranked highly.



RESORT, from 1B

wanted, was not the scale we want-
ed”.
Mr Lauth said he and his group

- wanted to avoid a high density

a development, instead preferring a

y

- project where all the real estate was
“set back from the ocean. Paul
Thompson, former managing direc-

tor of the Lyford Cay Club, will run
the hotel and resort operations once
it is constructed.

Mr Lauth said French Leave had
been unable to start real estate sales
because it was still waiting on Town
Planning approval from the Gov-
ernment, something the project
hoped to have “imminently”. He
added that he understood his attor-
ney, Valentine Grimes, had

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dn Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with
Section 137 (1)(G) of the International Business
‘Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, Bentley
Limited has been dissolved and has been struck off the |
Register of Companies with effect from the 15th

day of December, 2006.



NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

CUSHMAN INTERNATIONAL LTD.
Liquidator’s Notice

Pursuant To Section 137 (6) Of
The International Business Companies Act.

We, Captain Salihu Baba Shafii and Obioha Jude Idigbe,
Liquidators of CUSHMAN INTERNATIONAL LTD.,
hereby clarify that the winding-up and dissolution of
CUSHMAN INTERNATIONAL LTD., has been
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated this 17th day of November 2006.

Signed











friendly and professional.

NOTICE OF VACANCY

2nd chef for The Landing Restaurant, Harbour Island.
Applicant must have working knowledge of preparation of
“Sydney” cuisine with at least 5 years experience working in
Australian kitchens. Successful applicant will be able to devise
and prepare daily specials. Successful applicant will also be
fully responsible for the preparation of all desserts.

The Landing has 10 year reputation for its fine cuisine with
a distinctive Australian accent. Applicant must be adaptable,

All responses can be sent to:

The Landing

Chef Position

P.O. Box 190

Harbour Island
Bahamas
Fax: 242-333-2650

e-mail: thelanding@ coralwave.com



received a communication from the
Government on Friday, although
lhe did not know what was in it.

Mr Lauth acknowledged that
there had been “a lot of frustra-
tion” over his project getting start-
ed. He added that ‘soft sales’ to the
project’s ‘founders’, the first group
of people to show an interest in the
project, had begun in mid-Decem-
ber and were due to last for 60-90
days. French Leave had received
over 1,000 inquiries to its website,
Mr Lauth added.

“We’ve completed the design
process, and are waiting to see what
approvals we’ve got from the
Bahamian government,” he said.
“What we’re actually doing right
now is waiting for the final town
planning agreement with the Gov-
ernment.”

The first phase at French Leave
will consist of 68 luxury condo-
miniums, all no higher than two-
storeys, on the oceanfront. If¢lud-
ed among the condos will be 10 cot-
tages.

Other components of the first
phase include 17 villas and 10
oceanfront home sites, plus a 50-
slip marina at Governor’s Harbour

‘for luxury yachts.

Approvals for that marina are
still awaited, but Mr Lauth indicat-
ed he was unlikely to praceed with
plans for a second marina on the
Atlantic side of Eleuthera at Savan-
nah Sound. No approvals for that
have yet been received, and Prime
Minister Perry Christie had previ-
ously expressed concerns about the
environmental impact such a mari-
na development might have on the
Sound.

Mr Lauth said the first phase
would cover about 200 acres.
Future expansions after that will
include interior home sites on the
ridge overlooking Governor’s Har-
bour, and one to two-bed antique
cottages around the Governor’s
Harbour marina.

He added that French Leave was
likely to employ “a few hundred
people” during the construction
phase, and “easily”100 full-time
workers once it became fully oper-
ational. The project, Mr Lauth said,
was also likely to generate at least
100 spin-off jobs, and French Leave
was also seeking government
approval to use wind turbines and
solar panels to generate its elec-
tricity.

Mr Lauth said French Leave had
also set aside 50 acres of land on
the southern ridge of Governor’s
Harbour to be developed by
Bahamians only. There were also
plans for a clinic and police station. ©

CODE
‘

Ms Walkine acknowledged that
on local entertainment, friendly
people, beaches and quality service,
the Bahamas “tends to rank lower
than we’d like, and that’s a concern
to us”.

However, she said the outcome
of such surveys often depended on
variables such as the publication’s
target audience, when the questions
were asked and where people had
taken their vacations.

Ms Walkine said repeat visitor
numbers to the Family Islands were
“very strong”, and were getting bet-
ter on Nassau/Paradise Island,
although there was work to do on
Grand Bahama.

She added that 23 per cent of
tourism’s direct contribution to
GDP was real estate, 19 per cent
recreation; 9 per cent transporta-
tion; 5 per cent real estate. Tourism
also generated 70 per cent of all
restaurant sales in the Bahamas,
and two-thirds of all service pro-
duction.



















literate.

SS

(SHI




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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 THE TRIBUNE .~



Liquidator’s ‘co-mingling’ concern over Suisse Security missing funds

FROM page 1B

rity on the grounds that the
bank’s Privy Council appeal had
yet to be heard.

Mr Winder’s attorneys, McK-
inney, Turner & Co, wrote to Mr
Ryan on November 10, 2005,
seeking information on the funds
held by the two IBCs, SSH and
SSI. SSH, which was registered
at the office of Mr Ryan’s law
firm, Ryan & Co, held accounts

with UBS Geneva. SSI held the
funds at the-then Barclays Bank
(now FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank) in Nassau, and Mr
Harajchi’s son, Michel, was its
sole shareholder.

The letter said Mr Winder was
unable to obtain any information
on the UBS account held by SSH,
while communications on SSI’s
behalf by Ryan & Co, on March
13, 2001, and on April 11, 2001,
by Suisse security’s managing

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
; (No.45 of 2000)

ARTCOMPUTER LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)

of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
.2000, the Dissolution of ARTCOMPUTER LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
December 29, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT |
(No.45 of 2000)

SUTHERLAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of SUTHERLAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
December 29, 2006

director, Chris Lunn, and Tara
Butler closed the SSI accounts
with Barclays.

McKinney, Turner: & Co,
requested information on where
the funds held with UBS and Bar-
clays were located, and sought
letters from SSH and SSI autho-
rising institutions who now held
the funds to co-operate with the
liquidator.

Mr Ryan, though, replied on
November 15, 2005, that the
undertaking would only take
effect once the Privy Council

‘appeal was heard. Then, on

March 14, 2006, Mr Ryan sent a

letter advising that Mr Harajchi .

had “engaged the services of
forensic accountants in Europe
to undertake the tracing of funds”
that Mr Winder had alleged were
missing.

These were the funds held by

SSH at UBS Geneva, and Mr
Ryan requested that Mr Winder
allow the accountants to audit
Suisse Security’s accounts with
Tucker Anthony, now RBC Dain
Rauscher, the bank’s former cor-
respondent broker, as part of the
effort. He also produced SSH’s
bank statements with UBS Gene-
va.
Mr Winder’s attorneys replied
on March 15, 2006, recalling a
conversation “in which Mr Ryan
stated that his client, Mr Hara-
jehi, had instructed UBS Switzer-
land to wire between $22-$23 mil-
lion to Tucker Anthony, New
York”.

Some 13 debit advices, detail-
ing transactions between July 27,
2000, and November 28, 2000,

showing transactions authorised
by Mr Harajchi for sums totalling
$26 million to be transferred’ to
Suisse Security from UBS Gene-
va were provided to Mr Winder.

However, Mr Winder’s attor-
neys said the debit advices “fall
far short of the information” he
requested. “My attorneys remind-
ed Mr Ryan that Mr Harajchi had
assured us that his only interest at
this time was to ensure that his
name is not besmirched, and to
this end he had said he would
cooperate fully with me,” Mr
Winder wrote.

“Mr Harajchi indicated that he
would send me copies of bank
confirmations and statements
which Mr Ryan had in his pos-
session so that all questions with
respect to monies due to the bank
could be cleared up....... ”

Mr Ryan provided Mr Winder
with the accountants’ report, dat-
ed March 23, 2006, on April 3.
The report, by Synergie & Parte-

naires Societe Fiduciare, stated °

“that the money is transferred
from Suisse Security Holdings to
Suisse Security Bank & Trust.
The report added that the same
SSH account “was used from Mr
Harajchi for private businesses”.

A frustrated Mr Winder said
the debit advices analysed by the
accountants were for dates well
before Suisse Security’s licence
was revoked in 2001, and his
appointment. As a result, they
were all transactions included in
the bank and broker balances he
had seen.

He added that Mr Harajchi’s
Swiss attorneys sent McKinney,

Baker’s Bay

GOLF et OCEAN CLUB



As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians on -
our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to apply

for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Responsibilities will include:

Attributes:

Turner & Co a letter on April 24,
2006, stating that their client was
“unable to provide me with the
documents and data processing
information which I requested
simply because all of the docu-
ments are in my care”.

Mr Winder wrote: “With
regards to SSI, Mr Harajchi’s
Swiss attorneys stated that Mr
Harajchi has no objections to me
going to Barclays Bank in Nas-
sau to check into the movements
of the account.

“As regards SSH, Mr Hara-
jehi’s attorneys stated that Mr
Harajchi’s position is that he
transferred the sum of $29.799
million to the account of the bank
in New York at Tucker Anthony.

“He added that out of that sum
transferred, $2.7 million belonged
to Mr Harajchi personally. He
also stated that an audit was car-
ried out on all the amounts exit-
ing from the UBS Geneva
account.”

Mr Winder added: “If it is
indeed the case, the co-mingling
of Mr Harajchi’s personal funds,
along with the funds of the bank
and other private businesses, into
the same SSH account at UBS
Geneva, speaks volumes as to the
management of the accounts by
Mr Harajchi and his management
team. “Moreover, it is abundant-

ly clear that in the same way that.

Mr Harajchi has authorised UBS
Geneva to permit his auditors to
have access to SSH’s account
information, he could authorise
UBS Geneva to co-operate with
me in the execution of my duties
as the official liquidator, for the
benefit of the depositors, credi-
tors and shareholders of the
bank.”

Mr Winder said that since the
Privy Council verdict, he had met
with both Mr Ryan and Mr Lunn
to seek Mr Harajchi’s co-opera-
tion, and had a brief telephone
conference with the latter.

“Mr Harajchi had promised me
that he would assist me in my
efforts to track down these funds.
However, the letter and accoun-
tants report, along with other cor-
respondence sent to me by Mr

Ryan and Mr Harajchi’s Swiss
attorneys have served no useful
purpose, as I am still unable to
locate the funds.”

Apart from the depositor -°

monies held by the IBCs, the oth-

er key assets for Mr Winder to ©

cover are related to sums lodged
in the US courts relating to legal
actions brought against the bank.

Mr Winder said Suisse Securi- »

ty had lost its appeal against an

adverse ruling in a case brought ‘

against it in the Middle District
Court in Florida, and stood to

lose almost $1.6 million as a °‘
result. However, the bank’s finan- *

cial statements indicated that Mr

Harajchi had pledged to cover °-'

this loss from his own financial
resources.

There was better news, though, *

for long-suffering creditors and
depositors in relation to the other
legal action in which Suisse Secu-
rity is embroiled, with some $3
million of its assets at risk.

The US Court of Appeals had ©

ruled in Suisse Security’s favour
on March 10, 2006, and Mr
Winder had applied to the court
for damages to cover the bank’s

$715,385 in costs and fees ‘

incurred in defending two feder-
al appeals. ;
Mr Winder had also filed an

zr.

application to cover costs with ~*~

the lower district court, the bank

having incurred some $906,224 in '-

legal fees and costs there.
As a result, Mr Winder said he

had submitted proof of $2.103 -
million in fees incurred with the ‘

US courts on November 30, 2006.
He also applied for more than

_ $1.62 million in interest, levied at

a rate of 9 per cent since Novem-

ber 17, 2000, on the $3 million

security Suisse Security had been

required to lodge and lost the use

of.

- Mr Winder said there was
“strong precedent” for Suisse
Security to recover costs, fees and
be awarded the damages it was
seeking, in addition to regaining
the $3 million. As a result, this
may represent one of the best
sources of recovery for the bank’s
depositors and creditors.

Legal Notice

“+ Must have 8-10 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading Golf Club

** Must have knowledge of all phases of Golf course
design and construction activities including vertical golf
construction (club houses, maintenance facilities,
irrigation pump stations) “3

“Must have a thorough understanding of all phases of
maintenance and repair to courses, practice range and
equipment

* Must have extensive experience working with city

3 planners, engineers, architects, and contractors
LEGAL NOTICE * Must be knowledgeable in all phases of construction
“contracts related to golf projects
Must be a detail oriented, a skilled planner and

~ NOTICE Must be ad
prioritizer with excellent communication skills

** Must be computer literate

| INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ** Must be willing to live on an out island’
COMPANIES ACT ** Ability to work on own initiative is important
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
apply.
Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4)
_of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, MEGA SECURITIES LIMITED is in dissolution.
Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-names company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before February 5, 2007.

Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards
Director, Human Resources and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club is 2 S500 million project
under development on Great Guana Cay. It includes 381
residential hones, a 7-acre environmental preserve. 2 TS80-Ship
marina. a2 championship golf course and a2 70-roam luxury
OG

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

BISK

Pricing Information As Of:



i

= FIDELITY



Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

P ;

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
H



is 1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund 1.321587*
3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G &lFund . 2.9449"""
2.5002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211""

1.1442 Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Pri |

1.207411°****









- lec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last §52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by cl
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

* - 29 December 2006

Previous Close - Previous day‘s weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

** -~ 31 December 2006
*** - 30 November 2006
**** . 30 November 2006

sana - 30 November 2006 N

BES: (764 / FOR MORE bata s fro cm HON CALL (24 2505.








INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

WTC CAPITAL INVESTMENTS UK LIMITED
: In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
WTC CAPITAL INVESTMENTS UK LIMITED, has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
4th day of December, 2006.

JOHN GRIMSHAW
Nautilus House, La Cour des Casernes
St. Helier, Jersey, JE1 3NH
Liquidator






_ NOTICE

B.A. NOMINEE TRUST LTD.

(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
at 35a Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize city, Belize on or before
the Twelfth of January 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the Twenty-Seventh day of December 2006.

INTERNATIONAL LIQUIDATOR SERVICES INC.
LIQUIDATOR
OF ‘

1.B.A NOMINEE TRUST LTD.

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LITTLE PLANE FOUR LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,

the Dissolution of LITTLE PLANE FOUR LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
December 29, 2006

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR








-7F © R&B see
ace? THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



As ; oF - National Tourism Week Church Service
Zion Baptist Church, Shirley Street
eon naar

“Behind the Yellow Line’ . ,
Dundas Centre for the Performing Ars, Mackey stre _ =

on: FREE | : >...

Marketplace of the Future
Industry Careers Fair

Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium

8:30 GM. - 3:00 P.M.

IBM Luncheon Presentation
Wyndham Nassau Resor

inister
Oe h

1ith Annual Cacique Aw Ceremony ee 5
inforest Theatre, Wynanc he) oe ce
cee Oh optag ae ke

For More Informati

mae oct

nga


’

PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007







m3] AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

“It’s a totally

‘different ball

game than high

school. But once

I calmed down,

I was able to

get back into

the flow of

things and

started to play.”

- JAN ‘Big Bahama’ Symonette only
played in five games in his rookie
season for the University of Miami
Hurricanes before he went down
with an injury.

But with a new coaching staff,
Symonette said he’s looking forward
to making an even greater impact as
an offensive linesman during his
sophomore season next year.

“With a new coaching staff, a lot of
things have changed,” said Symon-
ette, who will play under coach
Randy Shannonr, who replaced Lar-
ry Coker after he was dismissed on
November 24. “We’re just trying to
get ready for a new season.”

During the season, the Hurricanes
also lost senior defensive end Bryan
Pata, who was killed in front of his
home on Tuesday, November 7.

“It was a horrible season for the
university,” said Symonette, of their
6-7 win-loss season that ended on
December 31 with their 21-20 victo-

‘ry over Nevada in the MPC Com-
puters Bow! game that was the last
coached by Coker.

Recruited out of St. Pius High
School in Houston, Texas where he
played for two years after he left St.
Augustine’s College, Symonette said
it was a big adjustment for him, espe-
cially when he made his debut.

“Coming out of the tunnel in our
first game was a great feeling,” he
noted. “The atmosphere is just some-
thing that I have to get used to.

“It’s a totally different ball game
than high school. But once I calmed
down, I was able to get back into the
flow of things and started to play.”

Next season when he’s called upon
by coach Shannonr to play, Symon-
ette said he hopes to step it up and
perform like a sophomore.

“Everybody on the team is like a
family. They help each other ouf.*
he said. “They look after each other: ~
and support each other. The night:
that Pata got shot, we stayed in the
locker room.

“The team stands by you, the -
coaches stand by you. Everybody was
just there foreach other.” |

Symonette said he would definite-
ly remember Pata because the senior

Ian Symonette

was one of those players who tried to
encourage him during his freshman
season.

At 6-foot-9 and 338 pounds,
Symonette, who has been home for
the past two weeks, said he’s enjoying
his time with his family and friends.

On Sunday, he attended the Orry
J. Sands Pros’ game against the
Stingrays as they went on to pull off
a 14-0 victory to remain undefeated
at 2-0 in the Commonwealth Ameti-
can Football League.

Symonette, who got his start play-
ing with the Pros, said it was good
to be on the sidelines watching them
play.

“When I came back | went to prac-
tice to help them out,” he reflected.
“As a university player, I was able to
teach them a few drills.

“T also tried to let them know that
they have to keep their head in the
game because it’s a team effort. They
just have to work hard and keep
doing what they are doing.”

Symonette, 20, will be here until
January 14 before he returns to the

niversity of Florida to continue his
fudies in culinary arts with a major

in business...
But it will be a while before he
puts on his pads to start practicing
for the 2007/2008 season. In the
meantime, he said he hopes to be
fully recuperated from the knee
injury so that he can make a contri-
bution for the Hurricanes during his
sophomore season.















@ PRO’S running back Charlie Edwards takes
hand off from QB Mikheal Forster
poe (BIS Photo: Patrick Hanna)





TRIBUNE SPORTS



@ LAN SYMONETTE takes in yesterday’s
game between the Pros and the Stingrays
(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)










fa PRO'S running back No5 Charlie Edwards with a strong run during yesterday

(BIS Photo:



°s i"
Patrick Hanna)


KEVIN CASEY/AP

CRADLING THE BALL: The Seahawks’ Jerramy Stevens, left, catches a 37-yard
touchdown pass in front of the Cowboys’ Roy Williams on Saturday.

Seahawks get to exhale

BY GREGG BELL
Associated Press

SEATTLE — The same
Seahawks who all season
couldn’t buy a break with all
of team owner Paul Allen’s
Microsoft zillions finally got
lucky.

But now they’re going to
have to be good, too. Or at
least better than they’ve been.

All of Seattle — players,
coaches and fans alike — rev-

eled in advancing to the’

NFC’s divisional playoffs. The
day of exhale Sunday was
time for reflection upon the
Seahawks’ eighi-point rally
over the final seven minutes
of the previous night’s amaz-
ing 21-20 win over Dallas.

It was also part apprecia-
tion for Jordan Babineaux pre-
serving the season by tripping
Tony Romo with a shoe tackle
after the Cowboys quarter-
back and holder dropped the
snap on a 19-yard field goal
attempt with 1:19 to go.

“The players certainly
deserve Sunday off. And I’m
looking forward to spending
Sunday with my family,”
coach Mike Holmgren said
late Saturday night.

But Sunday also included
some important evaluation.

Seattle (10-7) must now
travel to either top-seeded
Chicago (13-3) or second-
seeded New Orleans (10-6)
next weekend, depending on
the outcome of Sunday’s
game between the New York
Giants and Philadelphia.

Chicago destroyed Seattle
37-6 at Soldier Field earlier
this season.

“Obviously, that was prob-
ably the worst we have played
as a team this year — and for
sure me,” quarterback Matt
Hasselbeck said of that Octo-
ber night.

He was 16-for-35, a season
low 45.7 completion percent-
‘age, with two interceptions at
Chicago, the first of six games
Shaun Alexander missed with

a broken foot.

“The best defense in the
NFL. You might have to be
crazy to want to play them, I
don’t know,” Hasselbeck said
of the Bears.

Whether in Chicago or
New Orleans, the Seahawks,
winners of just two of their
last five games, know they
must improve immediately to
return to the NFC champion-
ship game for the second con-
secutive January. —

“We have to worry about
ourselves,” defensive Bryce
Fisher said. “We are our own
biggest enemy.”

Foremost, Hasselbeck must
improve.

Last season’s Super Bowl
and Pro Bowl starter was 18-
for-36 for 240 yards Saturday,
with two touchdown passes to
Jerramy Stevens. The second
gave Seattle a 21-20 lead with
4:24 left.

But Hasselbeck also threw
two more interceptions that
led to two Dallas field: goals.
He has thrown 10 intercep-
tions in seven games since
returning from a four-game
absence with a sprained knee.

Hasselbeck and a trainer
were fiddling with the brace
covering the knee on the
bench twice during his
7-for-19 first half. But he and
Holmgren have said repeat-

_edly in recent weeks that the

knee does not bother Hassel-
beck anymore.

Hasselbeck also is playing
with a wrap and glove on his
left, non-throwing hand that is
either badly bruised or has a
cracked bone. That, offensive
coordinator Gil Haskell said,
is bothering the quarterback.

It didn’t look that way ini-
tially against Dallas. Hassel-
beck was 4-for-6 for 57 yards
on the opening drive. He
found Bobby Engram mis-
matched against lineback-
er/end DeMarcus Ware down
the middle for 36 of those
yards to set up Josh Brown’s



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Eagles to face the Seahawks

°NFC

back signed this week specifi-
cally to be the holder, had no
trouble putting Jon Doren-
-bos’ snap down for Akers.
Dorenbos replaced injured
long-snapper Mike Bartrum
last month.

“J just told Koy, ’Hold it
like a normal kick.’ And, I hit
it nice and easy. It was fun to
end the game that way,”
Akers said. “Kicking balls are
very, very slick. That might
be something that needs to be
addressed. A lot of people
take the snap, hold and kick
for granted. It just shows you
how technical that is.”

A few players could barely
watch on the sideline, prefer-
ring to let the crowd’s reac-
tion tell them the outcome.

“It did cross my mind,”
linebacker Jeremiah Trotter
said of Romo’s problem in the
Cowboys’ loss. “But I was
confident in our special
teams. We were ready to
party.”

Led by Garcia and a reju-
venated defense, Philadelphia
turned its season around
after a 24-point loss in India-
napolis, captured its fifth
division title in six years and
earned the No. 3 seed in the
conference.

Meanwhile, the dysfunc-
tional Giants (8-9) fell apart
after a 6-2 start. They lost
four in a row and six of seven
before a win at Washington
last week put them in the

playoffs.

While the Eagles moved
within one victory of their
fifth trip to the NFC champi-
onship game in six years, the
Giants face an uncertain off-
season. Coach Tom Coughlin
might not be back, Barber is
retiring and the embattled
Manning probably will hear
more criticism after failing to
win a playoff game for the
second straight year.

Manning was 16-of-27 for
161 yards, two TDs and one
interception. Garcia was 17-
of-31,

“He did a nice job,” Eagles
coach Andy Reid said of Gar-
cia. “He was off by a hair ona
couple throws. He battled.”

The Eagles went ahead
17-10 late in the second quar-
ter on Garcia’s 28-yard TD
pass to Donte’ Stallworth.
Garcia completed 6-of-7
passes on the drive, capping
it with a perfect strike to
Stallworth, who beat corner-
back R.W. McQuarters.

Akers kicked a 48-yard
field goal — the longest in the
playoffs in team history — to
give Philadelphia a 20-10 lead
with 2:37 left in the third.

Jay Feely’s 24-yarder cut it
to 20-13 early in the fourth.

After going three-and-out
on their first three drives, the
Eagles finally got it going on
their fourth possession. Gar-
cia scrambled seven yards up
the middle on third-and-6 for
a first down. Two plays later,
Westbrook electrified the

23-yard field goal.

But over the Seahawks’
final six drives of the half,
Hasselbeck was 3-for-13 for 23
yards. His first interception
was a wobbly, slow-arriving
pass for Deion Branch that
Anthony Henry intercepted at
the Seahawks 39. Hasselbeck
punched the air after that mis-
take.

“I came into this game

thinking, ’Positive plays.
Throw the ball away. Get the
ball out of your hands. No
sacks. No turnovers.’,” Has-
selbeck said.
_ “Ironically, I threw two
interceptions right away. I
know [ have to be better than
that.”

Hasselbeck threw one of
his better passes to put Seattle
up 13-10 in the third quarter.
His dart was perfectly timed
to Stevens’ break outside
away from Roy Williams for a
15-yard touchdown.

But he was errant again on
fourth-and-goal from the Dal-
las 2 with 6:48 left and his
team down 20-13. Hassel-
beck’s bootleg pass to tight
end Will Heller sailed 3 yards
out of bounds.

More reason for concern:
Seattle lost leading receiver
Darrell Jackson again to a toe
ligament injury after he ran
about two dozen plays on it
Saturday without a catch. It
was his first action in four
weeks. Backup D.J. Hackett
was already ailing with a right
hip flexor before he sprained
an ankle Saturday.

Thus, the Seahawks must .

also get more from Alexander
next week than 69 yards on 24
carries. Twenty of those yards
came on the first play after
Babineaux’s heroic stop, push-
ing Seattle backwards and
essentially ending the game.

“We always have to go
back and redefine who we
are,” Alexander said. “Our
offense has some things to
do.”

frenzied crowd at Lincoln
Financial Field with a run for
the highlight reels.
Westbrook burst through
the line, bounced outside,

kept his balance after getting |

tripped, cut back inside at the
20, reversed direction at the
15 and sprinted toward the
end zone pylon to tie it at 7. It
was reminiscent of Wilbert
Montgomery’s 42-yard TD

run in Philadelphia’s 20-7 vic-

tory over Dallas in the 1980
NFC championship game.

On the ensuing possession,
Sheldon Brown intercepted
Manning’s pass for Burress
and the offense started at the
Giants 37. The Eagles had a
first down at the 4, but settled
for Akers’ 19-yard field. that
made it 10-7.

Barber’s 41-yard run to the
Eagles 3 put New York in
position to go ahead. But
Philadelphia’s defense tight-
ened and Feely kicked a 20-
yard field goal to make it
10-10.

New York’s offense was
crisp at the start. Manning
capped a 67-yard drive with a
17-yard TD pass to a wide-
open Burress across the mid-
dle. Burress also had a 29-
yard catch on the first play
from scrimmage.

The Giants lost at home to '

Carolina, 23-0, in a first-
round playoff game last year.
The Eagles, who lost to New
England in the Super Bowl
two years ago, finished 6-10
last season.



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



AFC PLAYOFFS

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 | BE

Colts must regain
success on the road

BYMICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Tony
Dungy understands how a
loud crowd affects playoff
games. Home teams get off
snaps quicker, players feed off
the energy, and visiting teams
tend to make more mistakes.

Indianapolis took full
advantage of its home field on
Saturday, but next weekend,
in the Colts’ former home-
town of Baltimore, they'll con-
tend with the same issues
from a different perspective.
The Ravens now will have the
home-field edge.

Dungy believes his team,
one of the league’s best road
teams in recent years, is expe-
rienced enough to know what
it will take to win.

“We’ve won in tough ven-
ues before, so I don’t think we
fear going on the road,”
Dungy said Sunday, a day
after advancing to the divi-
sional round with a 23-8 vic-
tory over Kansas City. “We've

- just got to find a way to play

better.”

Sounds simple enough.

Through Dungy’s first 414
seasons as coach, the Colts
(13-4) proved masterful road
warriors, going 28-8 and
never losing more than three
road games during a regular
season. Some even argued
Indy was better outside the
RCA Dome than inside it.

Earlier this season, the
Colts won at two of the NFL’s
toughest venues, Denver and
New England, in back-to-back
weeks and also won twice in

four weeks at The Meadow-
lands, which is notoriously
windy.

Recently, though, they’ve
struggled.

Indianapolis enters next
week’s game trying to snap a
four-game road losing streak
that includes two losses on
long field goals as time
expired.

While the stumbles didn’t
prevent the Colts from win-
ning their fourth straight AFC
South title or becoming the
second team in league history
with four consecutive 12-win
seasons, it did cost them a
first-round bye.

Dungy believes it won’t
take much for Indy to revert
to its old form.

“I think it is a fine line,”
Dungy said. “We have strug-
gled lately, but what we’ve got
to do is find a way to dupli-
cate what we did yesterday —
and play better.”

The perception around the
league is that the Colts’ style
isn’t conducive to playing out-
doors in the cold, blustery
weather typical of January.
Past playoff performances
have reinforced that image.

In nine seasons, two-time
MVP Peyton Manning is 3-2 in
home playoff games, 1-4 on
the road — with the lone vic-
tory coming on a mild, sunny
day in Kansas City three years
ago.

Going to Baltimore, how-
ever, creates additional prob-
lems.

The Ravens (13-3) won the
AFC North with an aggressive

defense that thrives on mis-
takes and uses quick, hard-
hitting players to shut down
opposing offenses.

Add to that a crowd that
will likely include many fans
who are still bitter about the
way the Colts departed Balti-
more in March 1984, leaving
the city without an NFL team
for more than a decade.

The Colts have played in
Baltimore twice since moving
to Indy with mixed results.
They lost 38-31 in 1998, Man-
ning’s rookie season, and won
24-7 in the 2005 season
opener.

But this is the first time
they’ve been back for a play-

off game, and the high stakes -

are likely to evoke strong
emotions.

“Playing Baltimore is tough
enough,” Manning said after
Saturday’s game. “Add to that
the fact you have to go there,
which I think is one of the
tougher places to play. It will
be a tremendous challenge.”

Dungy spent Sunday urg-
ing his team to play with the
same energy, focus and
aggressiveness it did against
the Chiefs. He also added one
caveat: playing error-free.

“You have to like what
they do on defense,” Dungy
said. “But every defense has
strengths and weaknesses and
we never feel we can go any
place and not move the ball.
They overwhelm you defen-
sively and they’re very tough
to run on. We just have to be
able to keep our composure.”



JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

GOT HIM COVERED: Kansas City’s Trent Green, bottom, covered up by Indianapolis’
Cato June, left, and Josh Thomas after Green fell down on a third and goal play in

second quarter on Saturday.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Patriots down Jets, advance

° AFC

Oilers on Dec. 31, 1978. The
Jets made things interesting
early, taking a 10-7 lead in the
second quarter on a 77-yard
touchdown catch and run by
Jerricho Cotchery.

But it was all New England
from that point in the teams’
second-ever meeting in the
playoffs, the last also a vic-
tory by the Patriots in 1985.

“We just fight,” Bruschi
said.

With the Patriots leading
23-16, Brady engineered the
type of drive that has made
him so deadly in big games.
New England took over at its
37 and with a series of short
passes and runs got to the
Jets 7.

Brady then found Kevin
Faulk with a short pass and
the running back zipped into
the end zone with 5:16 left as
the Patriots quarterback put
up both hands and pointed
skyward.

Brady finished 22-of-34 for
212 yards and two touch-
downs, while Jabbar Gaffney
had eight catches for 104
yards. The Patriots also out-
rushed the Jets 148-70.

New England also took
advantage of a big mistake by
the Jets late in the third quar-
ter.

Chad Pennington’s pass
was knocked down by Rosev-

elt Colvin and picked up by
Vince Wilfork, who rumbled
31 yards to the Jets 15 before
being tackled by Cotchery.
The play was ruled a back-
ward pass and a fumble, and
the ruling was upheld after a
challenge by Mangini.

“T think it was something
that broke the game open for
us,” defensive tackle Richard
Seymour said.

Four plays later, Stephen
Gostkowski kicked a 28-yard
field goal to give New Eng-
land a 23-13 lead.

Mike Nugent’s 37-yard
field goal 3:21 into the fourth
quarter made it 23-16.

“You look at the big pic-
ture and say it was a good job
on our part,” Jets linebacker
Jonathan Vilma said. “But if
you’re competitive, if you’re
a player, you don’t want to go
10-6 and lose in the first
round of the playoffs.”

The Patriots got things
started early on Corey Dil-
lon’s ll-yard touchdown run
3:07 in.

It was an efficient drive
conducted without a huddle
by Brady, who completed
three of his four passes to
Gaffney. On third-and-12
from the Jets 27, Brady hit
Troy Brown with a 16-yard
pass. Dillon then took a hand-
off, ran into a crowd in the
middle before bouncing to
the right side and high-step-

ping into the end zone.
The Jets took advantage of
a turnover when Dewayne
Robertson knocked the ball
out of Dillon’s hands and
Hank Poteat recovered.
Nugent kicked a 28-yard field
goal to make it 7-3. ;
Cotchery put the Jets
ahead 10-7 with his 77-yard
touchdown score, the longest
in team postseason history.
Pennington found Cotch-
ery open with James Sanders,
in for the injured Rodney
Harrison, back in zone cover-
age. Sanders took a bad angle
on the receiver before Cotch-
ery blew past him and down
the right sideline with a trail
of Patriots behind him.
Gostkowski kicked a 20-
yard field goal to tie it at 10.
The Patriots again had a
long drive late in the first
half, capped by Graham’s
l-yard TD catch. New Eng-
land started at its 20 with 7:05
remaining in the half. After
Laurence Maroney’s 5-yard
run put the ball at the 1, the
Jets stopped Heath Evans and
Maroney for no gain. On
third-and-goal, Brady found
Graham in the back of the
end zone just out of the reach
of linebacker Brad Kassell for
a 17-10 lead, capping a 15-play,
80-play drive that took 6:54.
“I just put it up there and
tried to let that big guy make
a play for us,” Brady said.

FREER? 7 ES OP OS TSS SL EL TE ET
4E\ onpAy, JANUARY 8, 2007



WHAT 10

WATCH
THIS WEEK

posting up



WHAT’S YOUR
MOST
MEMORABLE
NONBASKETBALL
SPORTS MOMENT?

e Dorell Wright: |
was playing a base-
ball game in my
senior year before |
went to prep school.
Back then, (Southern Cal basketball) Coach
(Henry) Bibby was coming to recruit me.
There was this long walkway from the parking
lot to the field, and he was walking up that. |
didn’t know he was coming, and | hit a home
run. As | was:‘coming around third base, | saw
him, and he was like, ‘Hey.’

e Michael Doleac: It was my best sporting .
weekend of all time. My freshman year at
Utah, we beat BYU at Utah to win the WAC
championship on Saturday night. And Sunday
morning, myself, Paul Jonas, Drew Hansen
and Andy Preston, we go out and play nine
holes at the University of Utah course. | lob
one in, 133-yard par-3 hole-in-one. It didn’t
even bounce. | flew it right in the cup. | went
back later and stole the flag, like an idiot.







MATT CARROLL, BOBCATS

e. Fantasy: Not many fantasy owners have
probably realized that Carroll is worth having
ona roster. But the Bobcats guard is one of
the better shooters in the leagué‘andican’—
have a nice night from distance. In his past
three games entering this weekend, Carroll hit
13 threes, averaged 22.7 points and didn’t
miss a free throw in 15 attempts. In fact, Car-
roll deads the league in free-throw shooting
percentage at 96 percent.

e Reality: Though Adam Morrison is a lot
better at creating his own shot and has more
variety to his game, Carroll is clearly Char-
lotte’s best shooter, and with players such as
Raymond Felton, Gerald Wallace and Sean
May initiating the offense much of the time,
sometimes a catch-and-shoot player is all the
Bobcats need.

e Winner: Reality.



GROUNDED



ELEVATED



JASON KAPONO W. SZCZERBIAK
HEAT CELTICS
Not Wally
every- Szezer-
thing is biak is
going finding



life without.an
injured Paul Pierce
hard. Not only that,
but Szczerbiak is
playing on bad
ankles that are
clearly affecting his
productivity. After
missing three
games with ankle .
issues, Szczerbiak
shot 28.1 percent in’
his next five games,

wrong with the
Miami Heat. In con-
secutive games

- against the Magic
and Clippers,
Kapono hit all
seven of his three-
point attempts and
averaged 17 points.
Kapono entered
the weekend as the
league’s top three-
point shooter,

shooting 54 per- including 2 of 14
cent from three- (14.3 percent) from
point range. three-point range.

Guard

6-6/215



3 305 A885




INTERNATIONALEDITION

CAVALIERS @ SUNS, 10:30 P.M. THURSDAY, TNT

Any time LeBron James, right, can get a chance in the open
court, it’s worth watching. And playing in Phoenix, he'll
probably have multiple chances. The key, however, might
be whether the Cavs can take advantage of their size by

Ilgauskas is a part of the game and not taken out of it by
Phoenix's speed.



OFF «DEF «=oRPG=SsAPG:SsSPG-~=—s BPG STO. PF PPG

ne

NBA E









James, as well as making sure Zyrdunas

One of the most compelling
stories in basketball this season
didn’t happen on the big stage of
the NBA.

This one started in Bismarck,
N.LD., during a practice session of
the NBDL’s Dakota Wizards on
Dec. 21. It was there that Bulls
prospect Martynas Andriuskevi-
cius, a 7-2 second-year center
from Lithuania,
nearly lost his
life.
What started
as an argument
between Andri- . JJ
uskevicius and
former Wash-
ington Wizards
forward Awvee
Storey ended
with Andri-

uskevicius taking a sucker punch
and a long fall. His head struck
the floor violently after being
knocked unconscious by the
unexpected punch to the jaw, and
it caused Andriuskevicius to sus-
tain a skull fracture, severe con-
cussion and develop a two-centi-
meter hematoma on the left side
of his brain.

Andriuskevicius, who
attended a recent Bulls practice
and is recovering in Chicago
rather than returning to Luthu-
ania, described the argument as
an altercation that was hardly
deserving of:a blow to the face.

“J was coming from the other

_side trying to get an offensive
rebound,” Andriuskevicius said.
“He hit me in the neck with an
elbow. I was mad. He was like, ‘I

‘didn’t do nothing.’

. “We started an argument. I
didn’t say anything really bad,
but I was yelling. I think I was
ready to turn my head and leave,
then bam. I don’t remember
much. From the minute when we
started arguing, I just woke up in
the hospital.” :

Andriuskevicius’ agent, Herb
Rudoy, said his client was lucky
to be alive.

RECOVERY

Andriuskevicius spent time in
intensive care at a Bismarck hos-
pital, and the initial prognosis
included an arduous recovery.
Andriuskevicius said doctors told
him it would be months before he
was able to speak properly again.
But the big man’s speech is
nearly back to normal after only
about two weeks. He said he’s
feeling relatively normal, though
his hearing remains an issue and
he might still have to undergo
speech therapy. '

“The headache was gone two
or three days ago,” he said. “The
only thing right now is I’m hav-
ing some problem talking and the
hearing. Everything else is nor-
mal.”

Everything, of course, except
his basketball career. Doctors
weren’t sure initially whether
Andriuskevicius would be able to
resume his basketball career.

4

nts



errez@
N jamiHerald.com ‘

said Andriuskevicius, who spent
last season with the Cleveland
Cavaliers. “So it doesn’t matter
how bad it’s going to be or even if
I’m not going to heal totally, ’m
still going to play basketball.”
Perhaps more remarkable
than Andriuskevicius’ recovery is
his willingness to let bygones be
bygones. The Lithuanian doesn’t
want to speak to nor hear from
Storey, but he also doesn’t intend
on pressing charges on the 6-6,
29-year-old forward from Ari-
zona State. His agent, however,
says they haven't entirely ruled
out taking action against Storey,
_ who is represented by Mark Bar-

But he insists he’ll try it telstein, the same agent who rep-
because it’s what the 20-year-old _ resents Antoine Walker and
does best. James Posey.

“I was thinking, ‘What am I
going to do now?’ But then I just
realized that basketball is the
only thing I’m doing in my life,”

“[’m not pressing charges,”
Andriuskevicius said. “I’m just
going to leave it like this: This is a
sport, and things like this will





THE EDGE: MICHAEL REDD VS. KYLE KORVER. WHO’S THE BETTER GUNNER?

Comparing Korver, who is just getting into the mode of volume shooting, to a bona fide star in Redd
might seem unfair, but the two are similar in their strengths and might be at different stages in their
Allen Iverson left the team, Korver has been utilized a lot
more effectively, and his confidence is growing as a result. His release might be the quickest in the
league, and he does not have to have his feet or body set in order to make a shot. Korver, at 6-7, also
has the ability to work in the post against smaller shooting guards. Though he doesn’t get as many
attempts as Redd, Korver is the better percentage shooter, hitting 45 percent of his threes this season.
different dimension to his offensive game every season, and
this season it’s an ability to get to the foul line more often. But his strength remains his ability to release
such an awkward shot, with the release coming from behind his
head, that it becomes very difficult to block or even alter. Redd has more of an ability to create his own
developed a cross-over that can make a defender look
silly at times. It also helps that Redd is left-handed, making him that much more of a mystery to defend.
quick shot in the air.

careers with different opportunities. Since

Michael Redd seems to add a slightly
his shot in a split second. Redd also has
shot off the dribble than Korver, and has even

e@ The Edge: Redd just has more ways, and opportunities, to get his

21)



300 380 22 13 B ra Is



WHO HAS THE EDGE?



Team G

Phila, 3I



WIZARDS @ SPURS, 8 P.M. SATURDAY, NBA LEAGUE PASS

Agent Zero might face his toughest case to date, beating the
Spurs in San Antonio. But given Gilbert Arenas’

possible for the Eastern Conference’s leading scorer. The Spurs
might force him into a handful of bad shots with Bruce Bowen

shots to be effective.



JOE MURPHY/GETTY IMAGES

DETERMINED: ‘I’m still going to play basketball,’ said Martynas
Andriuskevicius, who is trying to return from a skull fracture.

happen. This was more unlucky.”

Storey wasn’t entirely fortu-

‘nate, either. He was released by
the Dakota Wizards for conduct

detrimental to the team.

UNDER THE RADAR

Andriuskevicius’ NBA career

hasn’t exactly. been the stuff of

NBA legend. A strong perimeter

player for a player his size,

Andriuskevicius was drafted 45th

by the Orlando Magic in 2005
and was traded to the Cavs
before being traded last offsea-

son to the Bulls, who sent him to

the D-League on assignment.

But if his career continues, it
will be one of the more remark-
able comeback stories the league

has seen.
“T feel I’m going to heal

totally,” he said. “If everything is

getting better that fast, I'll be
back. Maybe this season.”

MPG =FG% = 3%
| 315 AS?

GS FI% == OFF

Add 8B SO

accomplishments already this season, it seems even this is
i playing defense, but Arenas doesn’t necessarily need great

EASTERN
CONFERENCE



After Mike Fratello was let go
in Memphis, Nets president
Rod Thorn gave his struggling’
team’s coach a form of job
security by placing the pres-
sure to improve strictly on his
players. “There comes a time
when you have to take a
stand because the games
inexorably slip away,” Thorn
said. “We've got players with
reputations who have set
standards in this league.
When things aren't going for
us, like they’re going, then you
would hope that would show
up.” ... Kyle Korver was one
of the few players who
worked with the synthetic
| basketball from the time it
was introduced to the players
last summer. So it was no sur-
prise that he was one of the
few players who didn’t like
the switch back to leather. “I
didn’t want to go back to the
other ball but we haven’t had
any say, it seems, no matter
which way they go,” Korver
said. ... Part of the problem
Allen Iverson had with the
Sixers’ style of play was hav-
ing, Andre Iguodala spend
time at point guard. “I just
thought that Andre playing
the point guard position
wasn’t the right move for us
| but they wanted to do it.”...
| Jalen Rose is now playing out
| West, so he’s free to mock the
| Eastern Conference. ‘You
have the Atlantic Division,”
| Rose said. “Somebody’s
going to be below .50O0 and
host a playoff game?”







‘WESTERN
CONFERENCE

|
|
ee
|
|
|
|





Mike Fratello getting fired
wasn't the only sign that the
front office was unhappy with

| the style of play in Memphis.

| When assistant coach Lionel

| Hollins was overlooked as the
interim head coach in favor of
player personnel direct Tony
Barone Sr., who had no NBA
head-coaching experience, it
showed that the team wanted
someone who would do as
management asked. And Bar-
one certainly has his players
running, which is what Fra-
tello was criticized for not
doing.... After a rough
November, Wolves rookie
Randy Foye was named
Western Conference Rookie
of the Month for December.
And the compliments he’s
receiving sound similar to the
ones Dwyane Wade got as a
rookie. “He’s got a good sense
about him, a good pace,”
Spurs.coach Gregg Popovich
said. “He’s aggressive.” ...
When the league released the
first shipment of leather balls
to teams, it included a letter
that said each ball had been
“officially bounced 50 times
and is ready for play.” Spurs
resident comedian Brent
Barry couldn't help himself ~
after reading it. “Il want to see
this facility or who they have
hired to do this,” Barry joked.



PPG
Wd

RPG | OAPGOSPG: BPG

350 «M4 I 2% «6142 2.60







PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS | Te













Celebrating Feast
of the Epiphany

@ RIGHT: Members of the Greek Orthodox community cel-
ebrating the Feast of the Epiphany gather at the Western
Esplanade yesterday.

& BELOW RIGHT: Bishop Savas of Troas, Chancellor of the
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of the Americas (right of picture).
This is his fourth visit to the Bahamas. Rev Fr Teodor Bita,
priest of Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church (front of pic-
ture).

& BOTTOM RIGHT: The cross is caught by 15-year-old
Zachary Lyons.

(Photos By Franklyn G Ferguson)

_ Paint Professionals Trust



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a leading financial services institution is searching for an experienced, highly organized
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versatility with respect to project assignments.



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° Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

e Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

e Maintain existing database integrity and standards

e Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
e Create test transactions, refine and debug programs.

¢ Train end-users and technical support staff

Core Competencies:

e Proven project leadership and project implementation

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e Experience with SQL Server

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oy aes See ERR NMRA

TRIRUNE

LOCAL NEWS





MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 11







The Royal Bahamas Police
Force holds annual parade

MEMBERS of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force gathered
yesterday for their annual
parade. Yesterday marked for
the force, two important ser-
vices of commemoration.

Before taking to their parade
route, marching from the Col-
lege of the Bahamas heading
east on Poinciana Drive, north
on Blue Hill Road to Bay Street
and then south to the Police

Headquarters, officers held a
service for officers fallen in the
line of duty followed by the
annual church service held at the
Hillview Seventh-Day Adven-
tist Church on Harrold Road.










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of things we
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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7B



‘Abaco Markets debt is ‘lowest for five years’



~ FROM page 1B

Again, this has enhanced Aba-
co Markets’liquidity and freed up
some capital that can be used for
capital expenditure and invest-
ment purposes, Mr Watchorn
said, as the company attempts to
return to profitability following
*. four years of heavy losses.

Mr Watchorn told The Tribune
that the 55,000 square foot Cedar
Street property sale was.a sale
-_.and leaseback agreement, as Aba-
co Markets had secured a 10-year
lease on the site for its Cost Right
Freeport format.

_ That store is currently located
om Milton Street, and Abaco
Markets plans to relocate it to its
former Solomon’s SuperCentre
site in summer 2007. The prop-

“. erty has been empty since the
- .roof was badly damaged by Hur-

ricane Frances in September
2004, with Solomon’s Super-
Centre now based at Queen’s
Highway.
‘Mr Watchorn told The Tribune
that the roof had been repaired
last year, and although the Cedar
Street property was currently “an
empty shell, that suits us”. This
was because of Cost Right’s Club
‘Store model, which relies on an
-. open-plan, empty warehouse for-
mat.
The Abaco Markets’ president

'. ‘described the Cedar Street sale

as “a win-win for us”, as the com-
pany was now leasing the store,
which meant it was no longer a
landlord with the associated
expenses of property deprecia-
tion and insurance appearing in
its annual accounts.

“It provides us with capital to
pay down, and the big part of is
that we don’t have to pay
$250,000 a month,” Mr Watchorn
said. “As you can imagine, it’s a
big saving to the company.”

He added that the Cedar Street
sale would “significantly improve
our liquidity”, while moving Cost
Right to that location would
“establish a broader base for
growth” for Abaco Markets’
Grand Bahama operations.

Mr Watchorn said the remain-
ing $3.4 million in Royal Bank
debt consisted of $1 million relat-
ing to the purchase of the now-
renamed Cost Right store in
Turks & Caicos. The remainder is
the $2.4 million Abaco Markets
invested for a 10 per cent stake in
BSL Holdings, the company that
acquired the majority 78 per cent
stake in Bahamas Supermarkets
for $54 million.

Mr Watchorn said the $1 mil-
lion debt portion would be taken
care of when Abaco Markets sold
its Turks & Caicos operations.
He added: “We’re talking to a
couple of people. We don’t have
anything definitive yet, but we
have discussions going with a cou-
ple of interested groups.”

Abaco Markets is also trying
to sell its Cost Right store on
Abaco, the former Abaco Whole-
sale, as part of its strategy to
divest loss-making and non-core
operations, and focus solely on
the major New Providence and
Grand Bahama markets.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco Mar-
kets was currently exploring its
options with regard to Cost Right
Abaco, and was likely to decide
upon the direction it would take
“in a couple of weeks. We got a

number of offers, had a number .

of interested people, but did not
get an offer that suited us and an
offer that suited them”.
Meanwhile, Mr Watchorn
explained that the preference
share restructuring would leave
Class A shares operating under
the same terms and conditions as
a 2004 agreement, with the prin-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TERRA INCOGNITA CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

1 Section 138 (8) of

the

International Business

.- | Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of TERRA

| INCOGNITA.. CORP. « -has. ybeen’ “completed, » a
Certificate of Dissolution:chas.i beenissued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of

BANQUE PASCHIE
[BTS Private Banking

Vacancy for:

Credit & Controls Officer

t The Credit & Controls Officer reports directly to the Chief
# Operations Officer and Deputy Director.

Responsibilities:

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:
Reconciliations of all Internal & External Bank |

Accounts

Credit Lines and Limit Controls of Loans

Net Asset Value Weekly & Monthly Calculations
Preparation & Approval of Wire Transfers

Daily & Weekly reporting and controls
Retrocession calculations for External Managers
Preparation and Closing of accounts

documentation

Approval of all daily transactions
Disbursement of Banks expenses
Assist with all back office operations

hould posses

’

Candidates should possess the following

| qualifications:

2 5-10 years Private Banking Experience
Associates or Bachelors degree in Accounting,
Business Administration or relevant field:
Proficient in use of software applications such as
MS Word, MS Excel & MS outlook;

Good oral and written communication skills;
Ability to operate a variety of office machines
(computer, fax , photocopy & calculator);

Apply in writing to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: narmstrong@pasche.ch

(No phone calls please)



cipal redeemed in instalments of
$2 million at the end of 2006,
2007, and 2008, and the remain-
der paid by December 31, 2009.

Class B shares, representing 47
per cent of the total issued pref-
erence shares, have extended the
redemption dates by three years.
Redemptions will start on
December 31, 2009, and last until
that same date in 2012, with hold-
ers of Class B shares receiving an
8.5 per cent interest rate during
the extension years.

Mr Watchorn said the first $1
million redemption payment to
the Class A preference share
holders was due to have been
made on December 31, 2006, but
this had been financed by one
Class B shareholder who had
“wanted to take more shares”.
As a result, the proportion of
preference shares now classified
as Class B has increased to 63 per
cent.

Mr Watchorn said the restruc- _

turing would enable the company
to pay off its preference share
debt over a six-year period,
instead of four years.

He added: “The main benefit
is, instead of having to pay out
$2 million every year, we can use
that to finance the Cedar Street
project. Over the medium term,
this will help improve our liquid-
ity and allow us to divert some
resources towards capital expen-
ditures for projects that will con-
tribute to sales growth.”

Mr Watchorn said the Christ-
mas period, when some retailers

generate between 40-60 per cent
of their annual sales, “went well

increases all around. We had a
good Christmas — it started a little
slowly, but it came around in the
last few weeks for us. It worked
out very well”.

Mr Watchorn said Abaco Mar-
kets was “there or thereabouts”
in terms of its Christmas period
financial targets, although its Cost

Right store at the Town Centre:

Mall “did much better than
expected. Since the roadworks
finished here, business has really
rebounded”,

Abaco Markets results for the
year ending on January 31, 2007,
are likely to be impacted by
restructuring charges associated
with its divestment strategy, and
losses in its discontinuing opera-
tions.

Long-suffering investors in the
company may be feeling that
Abaco Markets will never turn
around and return to consistent
profitability, but Mr Watchorn
said: “We are seeing improve-
ments in continuing operations,
and the divestment plan we’ve
come up with is proving to be the
right decision to have been made.

“We’re seeing improvements
month-on-month, quarter-on-
quarter, in our continuing opera-
tions, and expect them to follow
that trend in 2007. It’s been a long
road and we’re not there yet.
There’s still work to do, but the
divestment is going to take us a

Major firm in the financial and
legal services industry
Invites applicants for the function of

IT

Administrator

¢ Degree in Computer Science preferred
e AT, MCP CCNA and N+ certification —
¢ Knowledge of active directories,

SQL, CISCO Systems and Routing

e Web Page Management

e 3 years experience

¢ Salary commensurate with experience
e Attractive benefits

Reply in confidence to:

Fax (242) 394-8430.

N





Surnames



G-M

A-F



N-Z

January 26, 2007

To: All Members of The Public Workers’
Co-operative Credit Union Limited

Dividend/Christmas
Savings Distributions

Dividend
Distribution

November 13 - November17, 2006
November 20 - November 24, 2006

November 27 - December i, 2006

Thereafter, dividend cheques will be distributed until

Distribution of Christmas Savings sheques begins
Monday December 4, 2006



Dates




















long way to where we need to _ starting to see the benefits from
go.” establishing new vendor relation-

Mr Watchorn said Abaco Mar- __ ships and sourcing new products.
kets’ clothing business had “real- | He added that a better product
ly rebounded”, with the company — mix would increases sales.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SINO GLOBAL CAPITAL
INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SINO GLOBAL CAPITAL
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

4

ARGOSA CORP. INC. |
(Liquidator)

BARISTAS
WANTED

(Coffee Bar Specialist)

Know what it means to give outstanding
customer service

Have an interest in Food and Beverage sales
and management

Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our
company

Have a customer first attitude

Preferably have 1-2 years customer service
experience in a retail or restaurant environment

A great group of people to work with
A competitive salary and benefits package

All of the training you'll need to be highly
successful

All interested applicants should bring in person to:
Starbucks Coffee (Prince George Wharf, Marina Viliage,
Wyndham Casino, Palmdale and Harbour Bay) a
completed application form, current resume, passport
picture, current police record, copy of passport, copy of
NIB card and job references.

Incomplete applications that do not include all supporting »
documents will not be processed. aye

If you want to learn more about Starbucks please visit:

www.starbucks.com






ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

For the 2007/2008 School Year ‘will be
held on January 13th, 2007 at 8:00 am
at Kingsway Academy High School,
located on Bernard Road.




The examination is for those
students wishing to enter grades 7-10..



Applications forms are available
at the High School Office. The
application fee is thirty dollars
($30.00), to be made payable at
Kingsway Business Office on or before

Friday January 12th, 2007

For Further
information

324-8811 or 324-3409
















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THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WoL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Orlando 2114 «600 - 64 W4 146 7-8 12-9
Washington 19 14 .576 1 7-3 LL 133 611 12-9
Miami 1419 424 6 5:5 Wl 89 6-10 6-10
Atlanta 10 21 323 9 28 Wel 59 5-12 6-13
Charlotte 9 23 .28110% 3-7 L-2 611 312 613
ATLANTIC = WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 15 19 441. - 5-5 W-2 10-5 5-14 10-7
New Jersey 14 19 .424 % 5-5 Ll 10-10 4-9 10-9
. NewYork 15 21 417 1 6-4 W2 810 7-11 9-12
” Boston 12 21 364 2% 2-8 Ll 411 810 812

-” Philadelphia 9 24

273 5% 46 L2 4-7 5-17 6-12
CENTRAL = WoL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Cleveland 21 12 636 - 7-3 W-4 15-3 6-9 15-10
Detroit 19 12 613 1 64 Ll 9-5 10-7 13-6
Chicago 20 14 588 1% 6-4 W-l 15-3 5-11 17-5
Indiana 18 16 529 3% 6-4 W-1 9-5 9-11 13-9
Milwaukee 16617 485 5 7-3 L-2 9-5 7-12 6-13

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 27 8 771 - 91 L-l 16-3 11-5 19-6
San Antonio 24 11 686 3 5-5 W-l 12-6 12-5 16-7
Houston 21 13° 618 5% 6-4 L-l 12-3 9-10 10-11
New Orleans 12 21 .364 14 2-8 L-4 7-9 5-12) 6-15
Memphis 8 27 .229 19 2-8 L-2 G11 2-16 3-15
NORTHWEST WoL Pct. GB L10 Str, Home Away Conf
Utah 24 10 .706 - 6-4 W-1 142 10-8 16-6
Minnesota 17 15) «5310-6 7-3 W-4 11-56-10 10-9
Denver 16 15 516 6% 4-6 L-5 9-8 1-7 5-9
Portland 144 21) + .40010% 3-7 L-l 7-11 7-10 9-9
Seattle 13:23) 361 12 «43-7 L-4 9-8 4-15 5-14
PACIFIC



Phoenix 8-2 W-6 14-3 11-5 11-7
LA. Lakers 7-3 W-4 16-4 7-7) 15-5
Golden State 6-4 L-l 14-5 4-13) 12-13
Sacramento 4-6 L-2 10-9 4-8 8-13
L.A. Clippers 5-5 L-2) 12-6 3-13 9-15
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES :
“ Sunday’s results Tonight’s games Saturday’s results

Mia. 93, Port. 90 Clippr vs. N.O. @0.C., 8 Atl. 86, LAC. 74
Tor. 116, Wash. 111 Youston at Chi, 8:30 Cle. 96, NJ. 91

Minn. 103, Hou. 99 (OT) Milw. at Den., 9 Ind. 100, NO. 93
S.A. 110, Mem. 96 Chi. 106, Det. 89

Utah 96, Den. 84
Por. 110, Sac. 105, OT
G.S. 108, Sea. 104

Orl. 87, Bos. 79
Pho. 128, G.S.W. 105
LA.L. 101, Dallas 98



DON RYAN/AP

HE’S BACK: Miami guard Dwayne Wade, back
in uniform, keeps the ball out of the reach of
Portland guard Jarrett Jack during
second-half action in Portland, Ore., on
Sunday. Wade led the Heat in scoring with 33
points to beat the Blazers 93-90.

SEA LPL eR

EASTERN CONFERENCE





INTERNATIONAL EDITION

“PRO ) BASKETBALL IF HOCKEY

NBA GAMES



MONDAY, JANUARY 8,



Garnett leads Timberwolve

Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Garnett had 26
points and 13 rebounds to help the Minnesota
Timberwolves beat the Houston Rockets
103-99 in overtime on Sunday.

Mark Blount continued his recent strong
play for Minnesota, adding 21 points and 10
rebounds.

The Timberwolves have won four
straight, including the last three in overtime.
They have won seven of nine overall.

Tracy McGrady scored 31 points for
Houston, his fourth straight game with 30 or

‘more, but Houston’s four-game winning
streak was snapped. Shane Battier added 20
points for the Rockets and Juwan Howard 19,
but the Rockets went 12-for-19 from the free
throw line while the Wolves were 34-for-40.

e@ Spurs 110, Grizzlies 96: In Memphis,
Tenn., Manu Ginobili scored a season-high
34 points as San Antonio snapped its first
three-game losing streak of the season.

Ginobili, who averaged 25.5 points in the
previous two games, was 10-of-15 from the
field, including 6-of-8 from 3-point range.

Robert Horry had 18 points, Michael Fin-
ley added 12 points, and Tim Duncan and
Bruce Bowen had 10 apiece.

The Spurs played without guard Tony
Parker. He injured his right hip against Dallas
on Friday night.

Pau Gasol led Memphis with 24 points,
and Mike Miller, who left the game briefly in
the third quarter because of a jammed right
thumb, finished with 14. Damon Stoudamire
added 13 points, and Alexander Johnson had
10. .

e Raptors 116, Wizards 111: In Toronto,

Chris Bosh had 24 points and 15 rebounds to

lead Toronto.

TJ. Ford added 20 points for the Raptors,
who had six players score in double figures
in improving their home record to 10-5.

Gilbert Arenas had 33 points, but went
7-for-19 from the field for the Wizards,
whose three-game winning streak ended.

The Raptors played with a full team for
the first time in almost a month. Ford
returned after missing three games with a
sprained right ankle and Jorge Garbajosa
returned after missing two games with a
strained right calf. Toronto is 2-1 since Bosh
returned from a 12-game absence.

e Magic 87, Celtics 79: In Orlando, Fla,

Sis Grant Hill scored 2] points and Dwight How-
“ ard had 18 points and 12 rebounds as Orlando
~ won its fourth straight.

Tony Allen led the Celtics with 2. points
and a season-high nine rebounds, while
Delonte West added 13 points and Al Jeffer-
son had 12 points and seven rebounds.

The Celtics played their eighth straight
game without Paul Pierce, who is resting a
sore left foot, and have won just two of their
last 10.

e Suns 128, Warriors 105: In Phoenix,
James Jones scored 25 points, two shy of his
career high, and Phoenix cruised to its sixth
win in a row.

Fellow reserve Leandro Barbosa scored 26
and Shawn Marion had. 24 points and 17
rebounds in the Suns’ 22nd victory in their
last 24 games. Steve Nash had 14 points and
10 assists, then didn’t play in the fourth quar-
ter.

Monta Ellis scored 22 for Golden State but

NHL GAMES









JIM MONE/AP

MEETING THE CHALLENGE: The Timberwolves’ Kevin Garnett, right, defends as the
Rockets’ Tracy McGrady takes a shot in third quarter on Sunday in Minneapolis.
McGrady led all scorers with 31 points followed by Garnett with 26 points as the
Timberwolves went on to win, 103-99, in overtime.

committed nine of the Warriors’ 25 turn-
overs and was in foul trouble much of the
night. Baron Davis scored 17 and Kelenna
Azubuike 16. Mickael Pietrus and Mike Dun-
leavy added 15 apiece for the Warriors.

Golden State’s Andris Biedrins matched
his career high with 17 rebounds.

@ Heat 93, Trail Blazers 90: In Port-
land, Ore., Dwyane Wade’s return ended
Miami’s losing streak.

Wade scored 33 points and the Heat beat
the Portland Trail Blazers 93-90 Sunday
night to snap a five-game skid.

Wade, who had 25 points in the first half,

had missed four games with a wrist injury.
He helped Miami rally from a 16-point defi-
cit.

The Heat closed to 81-79 on Wade’s dunk,
before Jason Kapono hit a 3-pointer that gave
Miami its first lead of the second half, ‘82-81.

Zach Randolph’s jumper with 2:19 left
gave the Blazers the lead back, but after a
Portland free throw, Kapono again hit a
3-pointer to make it 85-84 for Miami.

Randolph again hit a jumper, but Alonzo
Mourning answered with a hook shot and
Wade dunked to make it 89-86.

LaMarcus Aldridge’s jumper got the Blaz-
ers closer with 23 seconds left before Wade
made a pair of free throws. Ime Udoka made
a layup for the Blazers with 8.6 seconds left.

Wade made another pair of free throws
for the final margin. Brandon Roy’s 3-point
attempt for the Blazers at the buzzer fell
short.

Roy led the Blazers with 18 points.

e Lakers 101, Mavericks 98: In San
Antonio, Sasha Vujacic made the go-ahead
3-pointer with 28.5 seconds left, and the Los

Angeles Lakers beat Dallas 101-98 Sunday
night to snap the Mavericks’ 13-game win-
ning streak.

Vujacic scored nine of his career-high 16
points in the fourth quarter. '

Kobe Bryant ‘had 26 points, eight
rebounds and six assists and Luke Walton
scored 21 for the Lakers, who presented.
coach Phil Jackson with his 900th victory.

Jackson ranks ninth on. the NBA’s career
wins list, and became the fastest to reach
900, doing so in 1,264 games. Former Lakers
coach Pat Riley accomplished the feat in

‘1,278 games.

Dirk Nowitzki’s jumper with 42 seconds
remaining gave the Mavericks a 98-97 lead,
but Vujacic’s long jumper put the Lakers

ahead for.goad, A free throw by Walton with

10.6 seconds, to.play completed the scoring.

Devean George, a former Laker, missed a
potential game-tying 3-pointer with 4 sec-
onds left, and Bryant got the rebound. Time
expired before the Mavericks were able to
commit a foul.

LATE SATURDAY

e Jazz 96, Nuggets 84: In Denver,
Deron Williams tied a career high with 28
points and Carlos Boozer shrugged off a slow
start to finish with 24 for Utah.

e Warriors 108, SuperSonics 104: In
Oakland, Calif., Baron Davis had 22 points
and ll assists to lead Golden State to its sixth
straight home win.

.@ Blazers 110, Kings 105 (om): In Sac-
ramento, Calif., Zach Randolph had 32 points
and 15 rebounds for the Trail Blazers, who
tied the game at the buzzer in regulation and
went on to win in overtime.

. Brodeur saves the Devils again

Fleury stopped Brad Richards and Vin-
cent Lecavalier to start the shootout, but

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY

Atlanta «24 12 «6+~«2~«S56 137 134 11-531 13-7-3-111-4-4-1

Carolina 22:18 2 2 48130 133 12-7-0-1 10-11-2-1 —0-3-0-0

Washington 18 17° 2 5 43128 143 10-10-1-2 8-7-1-3 6-6-1-1 Associated Press

TampaBay 20 21 1 1 42135 136 10-11-0-0 10-10-1-1 9-7-0-0 j

Florida 15 20 3 5 38116 139 10-B1-1 5-12-2-4 2-10-10 MONTREAL — Martin Brodeur made
28 saves for his league-leading seventh

ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY Div shutout of the season and Brian Gionta

11-10-0-1 9-4-0-1
13-10-0-1 8-7-0-0

4 54113 100 14-3-0-3
1 48 129 131 9-7-3-0

New Jersey 25. 13
N.Y. Rangers 22 17



3
Pittsburgh 18 15 3 4 43125 128 10-8-2-2 8-7-1-2. 11-5-1-1
N.Y. Islanders 19 19 1 2 41117 116 11-8-1-1 8-11-0-1 7-6-1-0
Philadelphia 11 27° 2 2 26102 159 3-11-2-2 8-16-0-0 — 3-10-0-2
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Buffalo 30 9 2 #1 63 164 122 14-5-1-1 16-4-1-0 8-6-1-0
Montreal 23 14° 1 «+4 «51127 118 = 13-6-0-3 10-8-1-1 8-4-0-4
Ottawa 23,19 2 O 48 143 125 10-10-1-0 13-9-1-0 9-7-0-0
Toronto 19.18 2 4 44144 144 = 10-10-1-2 9-8-1-2 7-8-2-2
Boston 20 16 1 2 43 118 142 12-8-0-1 8-8-1-1 9-6-0-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _IV
Nashville 2% 11 2 #21 «591 144, 109 =: 13-3-2-1 15-8-0-0 =: 11-3-1-0
Detroit 25 12 2 3 55125 102 14-3-1-2 11-9-1-1 9-2-0-1
Chicago 17 20 1 = «=4 #39105 124 10-10-0-1 7-10-1-3 9-9-0-0.
Columbus. 16 22 2 2 36 108 130 9-9-1-17-13-1-1 5-8-0-1
St., Louis 13 21 4 3 33 96 129 8-11-2-1 5-10-2-2 5-10-2-2
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY piv
Vancouver 23 18 O 1 47 103 108 14- 7- 0-0- 9- 11 0- 1 9-9-0-1
Calgary 21 15 2 2 46122 106 16-5-0-0 5-10-2-2 6-5-1-1
Minnesota 21 18 O 3 45118 114 17-4-0-2 4-14-0-1 5-4-0-2
Colorado 21 18 2 O 44 131 116 11-9-1-0 10-9-1-0 9-4-1-0
Edmonton 19 18 2 2 42117 122 13-7-1-1 6-11-1-1 T-7-1-0
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _ DIV
Anaheim 29 9 #1 64 151 108 16-3-1-3 13-6-0-2 9-3-0-1
San Jose 28 14 0 O 56 130 100 15-7-0-0 13-7-0-0 8-8-0-0
Dallas 26 16 O 1 53117 102 13-6-0-0 —13-10-0-1 12-3-0-0
Phoenix 19 20 1 1 40113 138 11-8-1-0 8-12-0-1 —_5-10-1-1
Los Angeles 16 22 2 3 37124 154 11-9-2-3 5-13-0-0 — 6-11-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Saturday’s results

Boston 4, Philadelphia 3
New Jersey 3, Ottawa 2

N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 3
Buffalo 4, Toronto 3
Washington 3, Atlanta 2, OT
Carolina 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
Nashville 3, St. Louis 2
Colorado 2, Minnesota 1, SO
Calgary 4, Dallas 2

San Jose 5, Columbus 2
Los Angeles 4, Detroit 2

Tonight’s games
Edmntn at L.A., 10:30

Sunday’s results

Florida at Vanc., late
Phoenix 4, Chicago 2
New Jersey 3, Montreal 0
Tbay3 6, 6, Philadelphia 1

eens. ‘SO)

4



scored twice, lifting the New Jersey Dev-
ils to a 3-0 win over the Montreal Cana-
diens on Sunday.

Brodeur, who leads the league with 25

wins, is third in career shutouts with 87.
He trails George Hainsworth (94) and
Terry Sawchuck (103).
’ Gionta, who scored late in the first to
put New Jersey up 2-0, got his second of
the game — his team-leading 19th — ona
power-play 12:47 into the third.

Mike Rupp scored his third goal 2:21 in,
and Scott Gomez and Brian Rafalski each
had two assists for the Devils, who have
won three in a row, and six while remain-
ing undefeated in regulation in their last
seven (6-0-1).

e Senators 6, Flyers 1: In Ottawa,
Dany Heatley had two goals and an assist,
and linemate Daniel Alfredsson added a
goal and two assists in the Senators’ vic-
tory over the Flyers.

The third member of that line, Chris
Kelly, had a goal and an assist to help the
Senators win for the sixth time in their
last eight games. Rookie Josh Hennessy
added his first NHL goal, and Joe Corvo
also scored.

Martin Gerber, making a rare home
start in place of Ray Emery, made 20
saves, allowing only R.J. Umberger’s goal.

Antero Niittymaki made 37 saves for
Philadelphia in his lth straight loss.

e Coyotes 4, Blackhawks 2: In Chi-
cago, Jeremy Roenick had a goal and an
assist and the Coyotes won their season-
high sixth straight, beating the Black-
hawks.

Michael Zigomanis, Fredrik Sjostrom
and Oleg Saprykin also scored for Phoe-
nix, which hasn’t lost in regulation in its



PAUL CHIASSON/CP/AP

MASKING A SMILE: Devils goaltender
Martin Brodeur smiles as he skates
off the ice on Sunday in Montreal
after collecting his 87th shutout.

last eight, going 7-0-1.

The Coyotes’ Mikael Tellqvist made 32
saves, including several on tough chances
in the third period.

Phoenix was 2-for-5 on the power play
against Chicago, and is 10-for-31 with the
advantage in its last seven games.

Patrick Sharp and Peter Bondra scored
for the Blackhawks, who lost their third
straight overall and third straight at home.
Chicago has dropped five of its last six.

e Lightning 3, Penguins 2 (SO): In
Pittsburgh, Martin St. Louis put a back-
hander between Marc-Andre Fleury’s
pads in a shootout and the Tampa Bay
Lightning shook off a remarkable goal by
Sidney Crosby to beat the Penguins.

St. Louis skated down the slot and faked
out Fleury by going to his backhand and
then slipping the puck between the goal-
ie’s legs. Crosby had a chance to send the
shootout to another round but, like Eric
Christensen and Evgeni Maklkin before
him, couldn’t get the puck past Johan
Holmavist.

Holmgvist has stopped all 10 skaters he
has faced in shootouts this season.

e Ducks 4, Red Wings 2: In Ana-
heim; Calif., Bjorn Melin scored in his
NHL debut and the Ducks also got goals
from Travis Moen and Ryan Getzlaf to
beat the Red Wings, ending a four-game
losing streak.

Ilya Bryzgalov, making his third con-
secutive start in net because of Jean-Se-
bastien Giguere’s groin injury, made 33
saves to help send Detroit to its third
straight loss. Rob Niedermayer added an
empty-net goal with 4.1 seconids left.

Mikael Samuelsson and Tomas Holms-
trom scored power-play goals for the Red
Wings, who are 0-3 on their five-game
trip.

LATE SATURDAY

e Kings 4, Red Wings 2: In Los
Angeles, Michael Cammalleri and
Lubomir Visnovsky each had a goal and
an assist, and Rob Blake also scored to
lead Los Angeles to a victory that snapped
its 12-game losing streak to Detroit.

e Sharks 5, Blue Jackets 2: In San
Jose, Calif., Ryane Clowe had his first
three-goal game, Joe Thornton got three
assists and San Jose’s formidable power
play overwhelmed another opponent.

e Flames 4, Stars 2: In Calgary,
Alberta, Dustin Boyd scored his first NHL
goal with 2:17 left, snapping a tie and car-
rying Calgary over Dallas.

REESE TO SIS OT NS OES TE EET oS OE SS TT SE ENE ST RE TERT
6E | MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BCS CHAMPIONSHIP GAME | OHIO STATE VS. FLORIDA

Too big to call it a bow! —

BY RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — A
new era of college football
begins Monday night with No.
1 Ohio State and No. 2 Florida
playing a game that’s grown
too big to be called a bowl.

A week after New Year’s
Day, after all the bowls have
been played, the Buckeyes and
Gators meet in the first BCS
national championship game.

“Tt’s the Super Bowl of col- .

lege football and I think col-
lege football needed that,”
Gators coach Urban Meyer
said Sunday.

What the bigger — if not
better — Bow! Championship
Series got for its new show-
case event is a1 vs. 2 matchup
that had many skeptical at first
about it’s legitimacy.

Heisman Trophy winner
Troy Smith and the Buckeyes
(12-0) were a no-brainer. The
Big Ten champions have been
No. 1 since the preseason, and
already have a pair of victories
against teams ranked No. 2.

“You know the only time
we thought for sure that we
were going to be in the
national championship is

when that game (against.

Michigan) ended Nov. 18
because we knew going in you
have to win them all,” sdid
Ohio State coach Jim Tressel,
seeking his second national

_ title in his sixth season with
the Buckeyes.

But Florida? The Gators
(12-1) lived on the edge, navi-
gating a brutal Southeastern
Conference schedule by
orchestrating several great
escapes. Blocked kicks, late
rallies and a healthy dose of
trickery — Florida used it all.
It’s enough to make some say
good fortune has been the
Gators’ best friend.

They see it another way.

“We don’t really believe in
destiny,” defensive tackle Ray
McDonald. “We believe when

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD









CHARLES KRUPA/AP

RALLY ROUSER: Ohio State Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Troy Smith gestures to Buckeye fans during a rally
at Chase Field in Phoenix, on Sunday. At left is head coach Jim Tressel. .

your number’s called you
make that play.”

Still, Florida needed help to
get here.

Southern California’s loss
to UCLA on the last day of the
regular season opened the
door for Florida, and a sea
change among poll voters
allowed the Gators to jump
over Michigan in the final BCS
standings — and into a

_ matchup with the Buckeyes.

Then USC helped out Flor-
ida again, pounding the Wol-
verines in the Rose Bowl last
week and removing any ques-
tions about whether the win-
ner of Monday’s night game at
shiny new University of Phoe-
nix Stadium in Glendale
should be national champion.

Ohio State’s won four
national titles, the last in 2002

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Police rule on
kicker’s death:
likely accident
or a suicide

BY ANA BEATRIZ CHOLO
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Foul play
probably was not a factor in
the death of Southern Califor-
nia kicker Mario Danelo,
whose body was found about
120 feet down a rocky cliff,
police said Sunday.

“Tt was fairly apparent that
this was
either an acci-
dent or sui-
cide,” said Lt.
Paul Vernon.

Danelo’s
brother said
Sunday that
‘dt was an
unfortunate



ee

DANELO

accident.”

“He was a good kid,” Joey
Danelo said during a phone
interview with The Associated
Press. “There was not a person
I know that didn’t like him.”

Investigators were examin-
ing evidence recovered after
Danelo’s body was found Sat-
urday afternoon near Point
Fermin lighthouse in the city’s
San Pedro section.

While police have not com-
pletely ruled out foul play,
Vernon said “there didn’t
appear to be a crime
involved.” An autopsy could
be performed as early as Mon-
day, coroner’s officials said.

Someone flying a remote-
control airplane noticed some-
thing at the bottom of the cliff
Saturday and a friend hiked
down to the beach and discov-
ered the body, police said.

Investigators were looking
into whether Danelo was out

with friends Friday night. He
was last seen around midnight,
authorities said.

A makeshift memorial was
placed near the top of the
steep cliff where Danelo fell. A
flag bearing the USC logo was
spread out, surrounded by
flowers and candles and a
message reading “Rest in
Peace Danelo” spraypainted
on the ground.

Nearby, a sign warned:
“Danger Do Not Enter Unsta-
ble and Slippery Surfaces
Steep Drops.”

Fire Department spokes-
man Brian Humphrey said
investigators did not find a
surf board, scuba-diving tanks
or anything else to indicate
Danelo might have been down
there for any of the recre-
ational activities common to
the area.

Humphrey said over the
years a handful of people had
fallen from the cliff.

“It’s entirely possible that
he fell,” Humphrey said.

Danelo, the 21-year-old son
of former NFL kicker Joe
Danelo, made 15 of 16 field
goals this season and led the
Trojans in scoring with 89
points. The junior made two
field goals in the Rose Bowl on
Monday to help USC beat
Michigan 32-18.

He only missed two field
goals in his career, going 26-
for-28, and was 127-of-134 on
extra points. In 2005, he set
NCAA single-season records
with 83 extra points and 86
attempts.

Speaking on behalf of Tro-

when Maurice Clarett and the
Buckeyes shocked a powerful
Miami team in a double-over-
time classic in Arizona. A fifth
title would match USC and
Miami for the fourth-most in
major college football.

But this one would be
unique for Ohio State. Only
Florida State in 1999 and USC
in 2004 have gone from pre-
season to post-bowls as No. 1.
in The Associated Press Top
25.

Athletic director Gene
Smith challenged the Buck-
eyes before the season to set
themselves apart by going
wire-to-wire as No. 1.

“T’ve always felt that in
great programs you need to
find ways to differentiate
yourself from history,” he said.
“What is your mark as a senior

class? I just felt that that’s just
something they should focus
on, trying to leave their legacy.
“I got lucky with that.”
With Troy Smith on their
side, the Buckeyes didn’t need
much luck.
Smith was brilliant in his

senior season, throwing for.

2,507 yards and 30 touch-
downs as the Buckeyes out-
scored the opposition by 26
per game. He turned the Heis-
man voting into another rout,
winning in a record-breaking
landslide.

Of course, Heisman win-
ners have found themselves on
the losing end more often than
not when playing for a BCS
national title. Five have done
so since 2000, and only one —
USC’s Matt Leinart in 704 —
has won.



MATT SAYLES/AP

DEATH OF A TROJAN: Above, USC kicker Mario Danelo,
right, kicks a field goal against the University of
Washington in the second half in Los Angeles on Oct. 7.
The Trojan kicker was found dead on Saturday about
120 feet down a rocky cliff near Point Fermin lighthouse

in San Pedro, Calif., below.

jans coach Pete Carroll, USC
spokesman Tim Tessalone
said: “We were stunned to
hear about this tragedy. This is
a great loss. Mario was a won-
derful young man of high char-
acter.

“He was one heck of a
kicker. He was a key ingredi-
ent in our success the past two
years. The thoughts and
prayers of the entire Trojan



” RICFRANCIS/AP

family go out to the Danelo
family on this sad, sad day.”

USC linebacker Dallas
Sartz said Danelo would be
remembered for his upbeat
personality and dependable
kicking.

“J just remember Mario was
the guy who always had a
smile on his face and would
always cheer you up,” said
Sartz, a team captain.

Smith said the Heisman
isn’t a burden.

“I am not going into this
game thinking I am the Heis-
man Trophy winner so I have
to do this,” he said. “For every-
body out there, I want them to
know that I think the Heisman
Trophy is a team award. If my
team is not undefeated, I am
probably not in this kind of sit-
uation.”

Make no mistake, Ohio
State wouldn’t be here without
Smith, who’s 25-2. as a starter
and been at his best against the
best.

In Ohio State’s first two 1-2
games against Texas and
Michigan, Smith threw for 585
yards and six touchdowns.
And if he needs to run, he can
do that, too.

The Gators are underdogs

* DAHLBERG

conferences, who seem
intent on keeping outsiders
away from both their title
game andthe plentiful.
riches that go along with it.

| Press poll owe no such alle-

giances. And some would

| pick Boise State No. 1
because it was the only team
to win every game.

“Obviously, Ohio State
has the tougher schedule
and plays in the Big Ten .
with a bulls-eye on its back
all year,” said Greg Archu-

-leta, college football
reporter for the Albuquer-
que Journal. “But if they lose
Ihave no qualms about vot-
ing Boise State No. l. They
did what they had to do.
They’ll be the only one
undefeated.”

The first BCS national
championship bowl game is
fittingly being played at a
university stadium. That
would be the University of
Phoenix, which not only has
no football team itself, but
no other teams of any kind,
either.

The school, though,
makes enough off its courses
to pay $154.5 million for the
naming rights to the home’
field of the Arizona Cardi-
nals in this nondescript
Phoenix suburb.

That’s big money, but col-
lege football has become a
game of big money. The BCS
game is the record 32nd

bowl game in a season that
began nearly three weeks
ago with the Poinsettia Bowl
and included seemingly
every school besides the
University of Phoenix.

The total payoffs to
schools are estimated to be
some $210 million, which
will help keep the budgets of
a lot of athletic departments
healthy. It will also allow
schools to keep paying mil-



Voters in The Associated ©

but undaunted.

“We're not afraid of Troy
Smith at all,” said linebacker
Brandon Siler, who leads a
defense ranked in the top 10
nationally in yards and points
allowed. “He is a great player.
He has a great arm and he can
run the ball. Don’t get it con-
fused, we are not afraid at all.”

Smith has already secured a

place among the greatest and ~

most beloved Buckeyes.’

For his counterpart, Chris
Leak, the game could define a
career that has looked great on
paper but has left many fans
unsatisfied. The four-year
starter has thrown for 11,000
yards and 87 TDs, but he’s not
even the most popular quar-
terback on campus. That title
goes to fiery freshman Tim
Tebow, who’s tough running
has complemented Leak’s
passing.

Meyer makes it clear that
it’s Leak’s team.

-“Tf he’s getting killed (by
fans), I will tell you what, if he

wins this game he willbe one.
of the two top quarterbacks to ,

’
t
4
4

’

play at Florida,” Meyer said. -”

“You are measured by wins
and championships.”

- The Gators won their only
national title in 1996, when
Danny Wuerffel directed
Steve Spurrier’s Fun-and-Gun
offense.

No one is more adored in
Gainesville than Spurrier, who
turned the Gators into a pow-
erhouse in the ’90s. Now

Meyer, in his second season —+'-°-’

with Florida, can match the

*& © eee
ose

+
e
+
4

Ball Coach’s greatest achieve- « .

ment.

It’s been 51 days since the
Buckeyes played, and 37 for
the Gators. By Sunday, they’d
had enough hype.

“I just visited with Coach
Tressel,” Meyer said. “We are
both ready to go play a foot-
ball game. I know our players

are ready to play. It has been a _

long time.”

EROM THE SPORTS FRONT

BCS title game
generates little buzz

lionaire coaches even more
millions to try and make
- boosters happy.

Ohio State’s Jim Tressel
not only got a $200,000
bonus for getting his team
into the game, but has a
clause in his contract that
allows him to renegotiate his
$2.6 million annual salary if
the Buckeyes win the
national title.

The labor, meanwhile,
labors for a lot less. Players
got satellite radios, com-
memorative wristwatches
and a few threads, but
NCAA rules prohibit them
from receiving anything
worth more than $500 total.

That led to some grum-
bling this week when some

members of the media trying .°

to add a spark to a dreary
week of bland coaches and
even blander quotes asked
players whether they should
be sharing in the riches
when they are doing the
actual work.

“We all deserve more
money,” Ohio State senior
guard T.J. Downing said.
“We're the reason this mon-
ey’s coming in. We're the
guys out there sacrificing
our bodies. We’re taking
years off our lives out here
hitting each other, and we’re
not being compensated for
it.”

There figures to be some
more grumbling Monday
night in Glendale, but this
time among residents of the
city. Their homes will be
shaking when the Air Force
sends one of its noisier jets,
the four-engine B-1B

bomber, on a low-level flight ,

over the stadium just as the
national anthem is winding
down.

That, presumably, shows
what a big game this is. But

e

the fans inside the stadium

won't see a thing.

closed.

The stadium roof willbe *
2007, PAGE 7E

JANUARY 8,

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TED WARREN/AP

THE LOBBYIST: Florida head coacn
Urban Meyer talks to reporters
on Sunday in Scottsdale, Ariz.
With the help of his lobbying
effort, Florida will face Ohio.
State tonight in the BCS college
football championship game.

The title game
has a tough
act to follow —

3 ®
BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press ARS

GLENDALE, Ariz. — It’s gota
crummy name and an awfully tough
act to follow. . ee

The little team that could from
Idaho already captured America’s
imagination, and it feels like a semes-
ter or two have passed since Ohio
State and Florida last took the field.

The prime-time game is worth mil-
lions, but they forgot to pay someone
to come up with a title better than the
Bowl Championship Series national
championship game. No matter what
they call it, the game has to fight to
get noticed a week removed from the
New Year’s hangover and in the mid-
dle of the NFL playoffs. cone

The other day some of the players
grumbled that they came all the way
to Arizona and all they got for their
‘efforts was a portable satellite radio
and a few lousy T-shirts. .

To top it off, there might still be
room for some debate over who really
is No. 1 when the bowl season finally
comes to a merciful end Monday
night. on

Is this any way to crown a national
champion? gets

The people who run the hotels,
restaurants and bars in the Phoenix
area sure think so. They’ve been
packed with fans wearing school col-
ors and spending money faster than
Florida can change quarterbacks.

A certain television network _

looking for big ratings certainly hopes —

so. Fox spent $320 million for a four-
year deal that also includes rights to
the Fiesta, Orange and Sugar bowls,
never figuring that a team from Boise
State would steal:some thunder from
the finalgame. ~ :

And, of course, two coaches with a
lot at stake would have you believe |
it’s the greatest game ever. :

“I can’t imagine a better bowl to be
in,” Florida’s Urban Meyer said. -

Meyer likes it so much he literally
helped talk his team’s way into this
game. With the BCS computers para-
lyzed by indecision, he lobbied BCS
poll voters to give his team the edge
over Michigan and they responded by
voting once-beaten Florida into the
gameyes2.5) ay
Turns out Michigan didn’t really
belong in this game anyway. USC:
made sure of that on the field when it
manhandled the Wolverines in the
RoseBowl,

An outside case might be made,
though, forthe only other unbeaten
major college team in the country
besides Ohio State. Actually, Boise
State made a case for itself in the
same stadium on New Year’s Day
when the Broncos parlayed some
plays usually run on sandlots to beat
befuddled Oklahoma in the Fiesta
Bowl. seas

‘The hook and ladder tied the game.

The Statue of Liberty won it.

Then the running back who scored
the winning points capped a story-
book night by getting down on one
knee and proposing to his cheerleader
girlfriend. Ps one ei

It was the kind of stuff they make
movies about in Hollywood. And the

_ reason why, for much of the week, the
first question asked coaches and play-
ers here was: “Did you see the Boise
State game?”

At least one workaholic coach
didn’t.

“I fell asleep and my wife kept hit-.
ting me,” Meyer said. “She said it was
the greatest football game she ever
saw.”

So could Boise State, which went
43-0 in the lightly regarded Western
Athletic Conference, be the national
champion if Florida overcomes the
odds and beats Ohio State?

Not in the BCS, it.couldn’t. The
bowl system is controlled by the top

°TURN TO DAHLBERG

PRO FOOTBALL | AFC PLAYOFFS: NEW ENGLAND 37, NEW YORK JETS 16 |

Patriots advance with a rou

BY DENNIS WASZAK Jr.
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The teacher had
the upper hand in this game — and so did Tom
Brady, his quarterback.

Brady capped long scoring drives with short
touchdown passes to Daniel Graham and Kevin
Faulk, and Asante Samuel sealed it with a 36-
yard interception return for a score with 4:54
left in the game as Bill Belichick’s three-time
Super Bow] champions beat the New York Jets
37-16 on Sunday.

New England (13-4), the only team to win a
playoff game in each of the last four seasons,
will play at top-seeded San Diego (14-2) next
Sunday. The Patriots are going for their fourth
Super Bowl title in six seasons.

“It’s a huge challenge, the best team in the
NEL this year, the MVP,” linebacker Tedy Brus-
chi said of the Chargers and running back
LaDainian Tomlinson. “It’s a huge challenge.”

_ The loss ended a surprising run by the Jets,
who won their last three. regular-season games
to get into the playoffs in what was supposed to







be a rebuilding season under rookie coach Man-
gini. Belichick’s former assistant showed he
learned a lot in his six years in New England,
but the mentor still had some lessons left to
teach. ,

After the game, the two coaches, whose rela-
tionship has cooled since Mangini left to
become coach of the Jets, met at midfield and
Belichick hugged Mangini. | I, :

Brady improved to 10-2 against the Jets
(10-7), and played much better than in the
teams’ last meeting, when New York frustrated
the quarterback with blitzes and won 17-14. This
time, Brady was in control right from the start.

“J think we had a great plan,” Brady said.
“This is a pressure defense, and I think we were
prepared much more for the pressure this time
around.”

‘New England, which has won seven of eight
since that loss to New York, improved to 9-1 at
home in the playoffs, and hasn’t lost in the post-
season since a 31-14 defeat against the Houston

* TURN TO AFC

acess AcE DSO ES ASCE NB OEE ESCUELA D CEEOL DOE ASRS,

INTERNATIONAL EDITION “:,







Davi POKRESS/NEWSDAY/MCT
THE BREAK-UP: Patriots linebacker Mike
Vrabel, left, breaks up a pass intended for
Jets wide receiver Jerricho Cotchery
during first-half AFC playoff action
Sunday in Foxboro, Mass. New England
defeated New York 37-16 to advance.

NFC PLAYOFFS | PHILADELPHIA 25, NEW YORK GIANTS 20



Kicking perf



SURE-FOOTED: Eagles kicker David Akers kicks the winning field goal to give host
Philadelphia a 23-20 win over the New York Giants in Sunday’s NFL wild card game.

GOLF | MERCEDES-BENZ CHAMPIONSHIP

Singh opens season with a victory

ection

Akers’ 38-yard
field goal lifts
Eagles over Giants

BY ROB MAADDI .
Associated Press :

PHILADELPHIA — The snap was there, the
hold. was good and the kick was perfect.

David Akers hit a 38-yard field goal with no
time remaining to give the Philadelphia Eagles a
23-20 victory over the New York Giants in a
wild-card playoff game Sunday.

A day after Dallas lost to Seattle when quar-
terback Tony Romo fumbled the hold on what
could have been a go-ahead field goal, the
Eagles executed the seemingly routine play that
has cost teams important games in recent
weeks.

Brian Westbrook had 141 yards rushing,
including a spectacular, slashing 49-yard TD
run in the second quarter. His 65-yard punt
return for an apparent score in the third quarter
was nullified by a penalty on rookie Torrance
Daniels. -

Jeff Garcia threw for 153 yards, one touch-
down and played efficiently enough to win for
the sixth time in seven starts since replacing an
injured Donovan McNabb.

Eli Manning threw two touchdown passes to
Plaxico Burress, including an ll-yard strike that
tied it at 20 with 5:04 left.

In what probably was his last game, Tiki Bar-
ber ran for 137 yards for the Giants. A three-
time Pro Bowl running back, Barber plans to

yetire after 10 seasons in the NEL.

The Eagles are far from finished, though.

Counted out after a knee injury ended
McNabb’s season in Week Il, the Eagles (11-6)
have won six straight games. They’ll play at
New Orleans (10-6) next Saturday night.

The Giants overcame a second-and-30 on
their tying scoring drive as Manning completed
consecutive passes of 18, 14 and 11 yards to Bur-
ress.

But the Eagles drove right down the field,
mixing in short passes and Westbrook runs.

That set up Akers’ winning kick, a moment
with a little extra drama in the wake of the
botched hold in the Dallas-Seattle game and a
bad snap on a critical extra point in a late-sea-
son game between Cincinnati and Denver.

Koy Detmer, the longtime backup quarter-

*TURN TO NFC

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii — The new
era in golf brought out the old ver-
sion of Vijay Singh.

Coming off his least productive
season in five years, the 43-year-
old Singh delivered a strong state-
ment Sunday that he’s still around
by closing with a 3-under 70 for a
two-shot victory over Adam Scott
in the season-opening Mercedes-
Benz Championship.

It was the 30th victory of his
PGA Tour career and 18th since he
turned 40, breaking the record held
by Sam Snead.

And Singh finally walked off the
Plantation course at Kapalua with
the winner’s lei around his neck
and the keys to a new car, which he
said he would give to his son. He
has been runner-up twice in the
last three years, and has never fin-
ished worse than eighth since this
winners-only tournament moved
to Maui.

This time, no one stood a
chance.

He doubled the size of his three-
shot lead after two holes, and only
a late charge by Scott kept it inter-
esting.

Singh finished at 14-under 278

and along with $1.1 million to push
him over $50 million for his career,
he earned 4,500 points for the new
FedExCup competition.

The tour has called this a “new
era in golf,” and the hype has been
so strong that Singh said he was
tired of listening to it. All he cared
about was winning, and he took
care of that with ease.

Scott led by three shots when he
played with Singh in the final
round of the season-ending Tour
Championship two months ago.



WATCHING THE BALL’S FLIGHT: .
Tournament winner Vijay
Singh follows his drive off the
third tee of the Plantation
Course during the final round
of the Mercedes-Benz
Championship in Kapalua,
Hawaii., on Sunday.




| LOW __70F |

CLOUDS AND

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The Tribune



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MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

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SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE TWO






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‘Boned!’ from arrests briefing

Bahamian representatives
in US briefed on baggage
handlers operation
without Ministry of

Legal Affairs official

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff. Reporter



AN OFFICIAL from the
Ministry of Legal Affairs was
barred from attending a meet-
ing in Washington last year
when Bahamian representa-
tives were briefed on the oper-
ation to arrest the baggage
handlers from Nassau Flight
Services, The Tribune has
learned.

Sources close to the PLP
cabinet reveal that Bernard
Turner, the director of public
prosecutions and the assistant
commissioner of police Mr
Reginald Ferguson were the
only two officials scheduled
to attend the annual briefing.
However, it is alleged that due
to departmental in-fighting,
Mr Turner was barred from
attending that meeting.

This deterioration in proto-
col, it was claimed, could be at
the heart of the prime minis-
ter’s “surprise” at hearing that
no one in his cabinet had any
knowledge of the operation.

The US Embassy has stated
that the relevant local agen-
cies were informed, namely
the Attorney General’s office,
and thé Royal Bahamas Police
Force.

These agencies, along with
the US Attorney’s Office, the
Drug Enforcement Agency
(DEA), the Department of
Homeland Security, and the

Customs and Border Protec-
tion Agency were said to have
been involved in the Decem-
ber 18 arrests.

However, Attorney Gener-
al Allyson Maynard-Gibson
has stated that no one from
the government was aware of
the operation.

Since then, Prime Minister
Perry Christie has advised that
he will personally be investi-
gating the matter as someone
in the government ought to
have known about the opera-
tion.

“J have made a salient effort
to inquire fully into all of the
details because it has become
an important point in public
interest that I think I should
respond to as prime minister,”
he said.

However critics state that
“once again”, no real judg-
ment will prevail as scandal
after scandal has gone unchal-
lenged by Mr Christie.

The Tribune revealed last
month that no one in Mr
Christie’s cabinet knew any-
thing of the investigation, in
particular the Ministry of
Legal Affairs, which by all
accounts had in fact been
approached to take part in the
planning.

. Five men from NFS were
arrested before disembarking
their Spirit Airlines flight
when it landed in Fort Laud-

SEE page 14



@ A POLICE motorcyclist

looks on yesterday during the |
Royal Bahamas Police Force |
annual parade after Workers }
Party protesters took to the |
street over the arrest of five |

Bahamian airport workers.
e SEE PAGE NINE

(Photo: Felipé Major/ \

Tribune staff)

1



FNM hits ©
out over |
arrests of
baggage ©
handlers

m By RUPERT

MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

A SMOKE and mirrors
public relations campaign is
being used to cover-up the
highly irregular manner in
which five Bahamian citi-
zens may have been lured
from the’ Bahamas and
arrested in the United
States for alleged drug traf-
ficking, the opposition said
yesterday in its weekly news
release. -

While the opposition said
that it is strongly commit-:
ted to stemming the flow of
illegal drugs, vigorously
enhancing air transport
security, and cooperating
with valued partners in
combating cross-border
crimes and international
terrorism, these critical
goals must be pursued by
respecting Bahamian laws
and bilateral and multilat-
eral agreements. :

“The public wants to
know. — and has a right to

- know — the details of this
-case so that a balanced

judgment can be made on
what are now inconclusive
reports. The country wants
to know the facts: who in
the government knew what
and when,” the FNM said.

SEE page 14

MP ‘still waiting’ on Ministry over boat

“og

building yard residents attribute to illness

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter






concerns in October .

A group of residents met with the
Prime Minister then, and told him that
they were dissatisfied with the course of
the government-led investigations into
the cause of severe respiratory problems
suffered by some residents in the Man-
grove Bush settlement.

Some of the residents have blamed it

SEE page 14

the issue again when the House of
Assembly reopens after the Christmas
recess as he has heard nothing substantial
from anyone in the Ministry of Health
or environmental services. The House
reopens on Wednesday.

This, comes after Prime Minister
Christie personally requested a “fuller
investigation” into the health complaints
of a number of Long Island résidents
when they approached him with their



LONG Island MP Larry Cartwright
said he is still waiting word from the Min-
istry of Health on when a boat building
yard in Mangrove Bush will close after
residents of the area have become ill from
air-borne illnesses, which they attribute to
activities at the boatyard.

Mr Cartwright said he intends to raise

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FROM page one

The party said that the
renutations of the Prime
Minister and that of his col-
leagues are not the key
matters at stake and point-
ed out that the key issues
are Bahamian sovereignty
and the integrity of the
country’s laws.

On Friday, speaking with
the press after a special lun-
cheon at the new police
conference centre, Mr
Christie said he has
launched his own investiga-
tion into the circumstances
of the arrest of five Nassau
Flight Services (NFS)

-employees by US authori-

ties.

Although the prime min-
ister concurred with Attor-
ney General Allyson May-

PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

nard-Gibson that no mem-
ber of government had
been informed about the
controversial arrests, he
said that “there are some
agencies of the government
that ought to know if they
are part of a joint investi-
gation.”

Nevertheless, the opposi-
tion said, the public is wit-
nessing the “Christie shuf-
fle: ignore what’s happen-
ing; try to switch the sub-
ject; then, when publicly
confronted with the facts,
try to shuffle out of respon-
sibility with tortured expla-
nations and theatrical sen-
timents.”

“One issue after critical
issue which the public have
a democratic right to know
about, the ever-talking and
speechifying Prime Minis-

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ter Perry Christie has bro-
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an people and rather than

being accountable has been .

elusive, silent or disingen-
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The opposition accused
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luding with colleagues to
hide from or duck responsi-

Endangered Siberian tigers chill

@ SIBERIAN tigers relax at a
than 100 Siberian tigers, one of t
breeding center in China's northeast. At least 50
in the city of Harbin are ex
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pected to give birth,

bility for blunders, scandals
and domestic and interna-
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“While a prime minister
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“They want a leader who
has a command of the facts
and one who knows what is
going on in his government.
Mr Christie, distracted by
the scandals and corruption
gives only rambling rumi-
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“Arrests
briefing

FROM page one

erdale. The men had been
under surveillance for
over a year by both US
and local law enforce-
ment. They were accused
of placing illegal narcotics
onto local and interna-
tional flights at Lynden
Pindling International
Airport.

The men made up a
group of 20 NFS employ-
ees who were sent to the
US for “mandatory” TSA
training. However, it is
has been claimed that at
the heart of this plan was

ensure that the men were
on US soil at the time of
their arrest. Also, the ruse
of including other
employees — not under
surveillance for trans-
shipment of cocaine —
was allegedly done to
ease the fears of those
being targeted.

Since their arrest, it has
mainly been only the US
Embassy that has
applauded the operation,
with numerous voices
calling for government to
explain its role in the
investigation.

MP ‘still waiting’
on Ministry over
boat building
yard residents

attribute
to illness

FROM page one

on a boat-building opera-
tion there, stating that

they felt that the inquiry.

had been “one sided.”
In response, Mr
Christie telephoned direc-
tor of environmental ser-
vices Ron Pinder and
reportedly requested that
there be “a full audit into
the findings” made so far
by government officials.
Since then, little has
been done to ease the

concerns of residents in

the area.

Sources indicate that
Mr Christie expressed an
interest in arranging a fur-
ther set of community
meetings on the island, to
be attended by govern-
ment delegates, and, in
addition, to bringing
Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage to look
into the investigations.

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007



LOCAL NEWS

Nocturne golf |
tournament |

aids Samaritan
ministries

IT all began with a small idea
and mushroomed into a spec-
tacular, unforgettable event.
Such was the Nocturne Ltd
New Year’s Invitational Golf
Tournament held at the Cable
Beach Golf Course.

The sumptuous _ post-
Junkanoo breakfast of boiled
fish and stewed fish with grits
and johnny cake, catered by
Mountbatten House, portend-
ed to participants that this was
no ordinary event. This reality

was further punctuated by a
team of pickets protesting the
recent increase in golf fees by
Cable Beach Golf Course,
which effectively discouraged
persons who would have other-
wise participated in the Tour-
nament — all proceeds from
which benefited the Samaritan
Ministries.

Vanria Munnings and
Yvonne Shaw led off the two-
man scramble format. Faced
with a wide open golf course,
accentuated by a blue sky and
balmy breezes, they thoroughly
enjoyed the privilege — and nev-
er looked back.

Rounding out the competi-
tion were two teams pitting

giants of the Bahamas Junior.

Golf ranks, one against the oth-
er. Riccardo Davis, Bahamas
Male Junior Champion, 2006
and Georgette Rolle, Bahamas
Female Champion, 2006 found
themselves in unfamiliar roles.
Both are teammates, stars of
the Texas Southern University
Golf Team, where Georgette is
a senior and Riccardo is a bur-
geoning freshman.

What started out as friendly
competition quickly turned into
a slug fest of mammoth pro-
portions. Riccardo and his part-
ner, Dr Howard Spencer, Med-
ical Director of the University
of the West Indies’ Clinical
Training Faculty in The
Bahamas, started off.on the
front nine with a steady,
respectable score of 2-under par
34. Meanwhile, Georgette and
her partner, Tyrone Sawyer,
Director of Airlift Development
at the Ministry of Tourism,
stumbled through the front nine
with a score of six over par, 42.

To her credit, never once did -

Georgette complain that her
bag was full of new clubs
(woods and irons) that she was
trying out for the first time.

On the Back Nine, however, —

Georgette and Tyrone gelled
better as a team and wasted no
time in scrambling back to
respectability. They shot a
birdie on hole number 10. Then
proceeded to execute a “tap-
in” par on hole number 11. This
was followed by another birdie
on par-three hole number 12,
after Tyrone “drained” a 20ft.
putt. Instead of easing up, Geor-
gette’s team dug even deeper.
They proceeded to score a two-
under eagle on hole number 13,
replete with a monstrous drive
by Georgette, complimented by






|
i
\
i
i
\
\

But protesters picket at Cable Beach Golf Course !



an accurate approach shot by
Tyrone, capped off by a radar-
like putt to complete the effort.

The surreal episode did not
end there: Georgette tapped in
a birdie putt on the intimidating
over-water signature 14th hole,
after Tyrone outdid himself and
teed off to within eight inches of
the pin.

This prolific scoring burst by
Georgette’s team, needless to
say, commanded Riccardo’s full
attention. He and Dr Spencer,
after cruising to an early lead,
found themselves in the throes
of a real dog fight. Both teams
scored an even par on hole
number 15, before Riccardo’s
team bought themselves some
“breathing room” when they
birdied the 16th hole.

Finale

Both teams shot an even par
on hole number 17; and going
into the final hole, only three
points separated them. On the
18th tee, Ricardo made a hero-
ic attempt to reach the green,
but his tee shot got caught in
the wind and landed off to the
right in the only out-of-bounds
area of the course. Georgette
made a mighty swing off the tee
— with much better results.

Her tee shot perched on an
elevated grassy mound on the
north side of the green.
Tyrone’s chip shot rolled to
within six inches of:the hole,
culminating with a birdie score
on the last hole. This gave
Georgette’s team a 30, repre-
senting a prolific twelve-shot
scoring improvement on the
Back Nine compared to their
score on the Front Nine, for
total score of 72. The pressure
was firmly on Ricardo’s team: it
was their tournament to lose.

Forced to shoot his approach.
shot from 200ft away, Ricardo
delivered in grand style by calm-
ly stroking his ball, which
embedded itself on the green

@ GEORGETTE Rolle,
Bahamas Female Champion,
College Golfer, Texas
Southern University

about 28ft away from the flag.
They two-putted for a par score
on the 18th hole - and the Tour-
nament victory.

When asked if he was wor-
ried about the great play of his
opponents on the Back Nine,
Ricardo. nodded _ stoically
betraying his strong competi-
tive streak, “They. played very
well,” he explained, “forcing us
to pull out all the stops to
ensure a win; but it was a very
enjoyable day.” .

The ultimate winner of the

Tournament} stated Shawn
Thomas, president of Nocturne
Ltd, is the Samaritan Ministries,
a charity led by unpaid volun-
teers dedicated to the care of

4” Brooklyn Style Pizza, stretched thin and cut into |

persons with HIV and AIDS. |
At the awards presentation, she |
thanked the Ministry of,
Tourism for its sponsorship of ,
the cocktail reception/dinner. '
She also thanked Eden Labo-

ratories for its sponsorship of
the tournament. “Our goal,” |
said Ms Thomas, “is to help per- |
sons in need, while building

‘ goodwill, love and comraderie | |

through the sport of golf.”
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe praised Ms
Thomas for her humanitarian
efforts. “After recently under-
going a bone marrow trans-
plant, herself,” he told atten-
dees, “rather than focusing on;
her own health, Ms Thomas is 1
|

our contin

i

big slices. It's got extra large pepperoni or sausage toppings,
perfect for folding. You've got to fold a slice this big.

», Try it today!

’ h Get qa SET A, SE)

2-liter Coca Cola
with the purchase of every

1 \ Brooklyn Style Pizza

i
1
\
Aa
Ee
:
1
I
1

@ RICCARDO Rolle, National Junior




focusing instead on helping the
needy and downtrodden of our
society. | commend you, Shawn
“for your humanitarian efforts.”
The Minister also thanked Noc-
turne for its contribution to the
development of sports tourism
in The Bahamas, and for hon-
ouring local Bahamian Golf
Professional, Donald “Nine”
Rolle on the occasion of the

‘New Year’s Invitational Golf
. Tournament.

At the presentation ceremony
following the Tournament, Sis-
ter Clare Rolle, Director of
Samaritan Ministries, expressed
her thanks to Nocturne. “It is
the quality, not the quantity of
the effort,” she assured the
group. “I have never been on a
golf course,” she said; “and to
see ‘the young people perform
so well does my heart so
proud.”





THE TRIBUNE

'





i DR Howard Spencer,
medical director, University .*,
of the West Indies’ Clinical ~~;
Faculty

uing commitment






business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

SECTION






_ The Tribune

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street











'Colinalmperial.

Insurance Ltd,



_ Liquidator’s ‘co-mingling’ concern |
~ over Suisse Security missing funds —

Accounting report claims $12m transferred back to
Harajchi bank; Winder rails over non-cooperation

forensic account-

ing report has

alleged that more

than $12 million

belonging to

depositors of Suisse Security
Bank & Trust was transferred to
the bank from a Geneva account
held by an affiliated Internation-
al Business Company (IBC), a
claim the bank’s liquidator says
raises questions about whether
the bank’s funds were “co-min-
gled” with those belonging to its
chairman, Mohammed Harajchi.
In his first report to the
Supreme Court as Suisse Securi-
ty’s official liquidator, Raymond
Winder, senior partner at Deloitte
& Touche (Bahamas), reiterated
that some $22.317 million in the
bank’s assets remained to be
recovered. Most of this is $17.712
million in depositer funds that



@ MOHAMMED HARAJCHI

(FILE photo)

were deposited with two Bahami-
an IBCs, Suisse Security Hold-
ings (SSH) and Suisse Security
Investments (SSI).

His report detailed how Suisse

« Resort hoping for
‘imminent’ approvals

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE principal investor behind a
multi-million dollar resort project
earmarked for the former Club
Med site at Governor’s Harbour,

— Eleuthera, is hoping to have key
government approvals in place

“imminently”, and aims to begin
real estate sales to the public on
February 1.

Eddie Lauth said his EIC
Resorts group had decided to scale
down the size of their 260-acre
French Leave project to ensure it
was more in keeping with the infra-
structure and character of the Fam-
ily Islands, a move that cost them
their potential hotel operating part-
ner.

“It’s a very upscale project,” Mr
Lauth told The Tribune. “We real-
ly spent a lot of time on planning,
and came to the conclusion with
the Family Islands that what’s being
done [generally] does not work for
us. The very things that brought us

‘No deal’ with Park
Hyatt as operator

’ to Eleuthera, we want to protect

and preserve, not ruin.
“This site, there’s no question
- about it. It’s one of the single best
sites in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, and I’m passionate
about doing it the right way.”

Mr Lauth said he and his fellow
investors were “not able to come
to an agreement with Park Hyatt”
to act as the operating/manage-
ment/brand partner for French
Leave.

They turned to Park Hyatt after
a previous choice, Starwood’s St
Regis, signed up with Baha Mar,
but Mr Lauth explained they were
unable to reach an agreement with
the former because “the scale they

SEE page 5B

Abaco Markets debt is
‘lowest for five years’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ABACO Markets, the BISX-
listed retailer, said it had
improved cash flow and reduced
its Royal Bank of Canada debt
to just $3.4 million, due to the
$4.2 million sale of its former
Solomon’s SuperCentre property
in Freeport and a preference
share restructuring.

Gavin Watchorn, Abaco Mar-
kets’ president, said the Cedar
Street property’s sale to Menas
Enterprises — a company The Tri-
bune understands is headed by
farmer and businessman, Menas
Verdoulis — had reduced the com-
pany’s debt to its “lowest level in
more than five years”, eliminating

Royal Bank payments
drop $250k due to
$4.2m Cedar Street sale;
preference shares
restructured

$250,000 in monthly debt pay-
ments to Royal Bank.

In addition, the retailer said it
had reached an agreement with
holders of its $7.9 million prefer-
ence share debt to restructure this
into two separate classes, Class
A and Class B.

SEE page 7B

Bay Street not giving ‘quality’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is failing to pro-
vide cruise ship visitors to down-
town Nassau with “a quality down-
town experience”, the director-gen-
eral of tourism said, adding that the
area’s dirty streets and rundown
feel was “particularly embarrassing
for her”.

Addressing the Rotary Club of
East Nassau, Vernice Walkine said
the Bahamas was negating the
advantage of having a major cruise
ship port in the heart of its city due
to the state of downtown Bay
Street.

She added of the cruise ship pas-
sengers: “We’re. not giving them a
quality downtown experience.” This
has been reflected in the visitor per
capita spending and numbers, with
cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise
Island down 10 per cent for the year

j
t
\

1

to July 2006. ,

Though the arrivals figures had
recovered somewhat towards the
end of the year, total visitor arrivals
by sea for the year to October 2006

were down by 7 per cent for the ,

Bahamas overall.

This suggests that the Bahamas is
losing its competitive edge and
attraction for the cruise ship indus-
try, with the various lines increas-
ingly using their private islands, par-
ticularly as a first point of entry.
This reduces the income trickle
down effect for Bahamian tour
operators, attraction and excursion
providers, retailers, transportation
providers and others.

Ms Walkine said she was “look-
ing forward to the restoration, rein-
vigoration and revitalisation of
downtown in the not too distant

SEE page 5B

Security is currently insolvent by
some $15.363 million, the differ-
ence by which liabilities exceed
assets, a sum that could increase
given that Mr Winder has now
advertised for all creditors and
depositors to submit claims to
him of how much the bank owes
them.

Mr Winder’s report details con-
tinued prevarication, obfuscation
and general non co-operation by
Mr Harajchi and his attorney,
Derek Ryan, plus other members

team in assisting him to recover
the missing depositor funds.

“The matter of gravest concern
to me is that a large part of the
bank’s assets remain under the
control of the management, direc-
tors and shareholders of the
bank,” Mr Winder wrote.

“As long as these funds remain
under the control of management
this bank is rendered insolvent,
as the assets presently available to
me are insufficient to cover the
bank’s liabilities to depositors and
creditors.”

The Suisse Security affair has
done, and continues to do, dam-
age to the Bahamas’ reputation as
a first-class financial services cen-
tre, although whether this will be
lasting is unknown.

Mr Winder said the drawn-out
legal proceedings involving Suisse
Security’s attempts to overturn
its April 2001 licence revocation,
which delayed the bank’s final
winding-up by the Central Bank
of the Bahamas until November
13, 2006, had caused “much loss”

He described how he had
attempted to ensure Mr Harajchi
and Mr Ryan co-operated with a
guarantee given by the latter that
they would co-operate with the
liquidator over the depositor
funds. This undertaking had
resulted from an October 18,
2005, Supreme Court ruling by
Justice Vera Watkins, who had
denied the Central Bank’s
attempt to wind-up Suisse: Secu-

SEE page 6B

of Suisse Security’s management

to depositors and creditors.

Bahamian project hopes for start in three months

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

A BAHAMIAN architect aims to begin
construction on the first phase of a luxury
tourism development off mainland Eleuthera
in two to three months, with the project
expected to employ at least 200-300 workers
at the peak of construction.

Gerard Higgs, the developer behind the
project for Egg Island, located 15 miles from
Harbour Island and 39 miles from Nassai,
explained that the project will include luxury
residences and only the second marina in the
Bahamas large enough to accommodate mega
yachts - those more than 300 feet in length.

In addition to the 40 mega yacht slips, there
are plans to create luxury residential villas,
lagoon bungalows and a boutique resort and
spa within one to three years.

Mr Higgs told The Tribune that once the
Attorney General’s office transfers the lease-
hold for the land on which the project is locat-
ed, work is expected to begin within two to
three months. The first phase will include a
partial marina and an amenities building.

In addition, pre-selling of the residences is
also expected to start around that time.

Mr Higgs explained that initially the devel-

UF

Seeking investors for Egg Island project, which could
employ 200-300 construction workers, 200-500 full-time

opment was to be a joint venture between
himself and the developers of Royal Island,
Dallas-based Staubach, but said that company
pulled out.

Nonetheless, he said he was determined
and made a conscious decision to forge ahead
with the project.

Mr Higgs added that he will.soon be seek-

ing outside capital and investors to invest in
the project, soliciting funds through advertis-
ing and Bahamian investment companies.

He said the extent of the offering will be
determined by the response, but noted that
“we won’t be asking for a tremendous
amount”.

Once completed Egg Island is expected to
employ at least 200-500 full-time permanent
employees.

Mr Higgs said it was important for the pro-
ject to have a strong connection to the
Eleuthera community. A percentage of the
project's profits will be placed into a trust
fund to assist underprivileged Bahamians and

Whe

provide them with numerous economic oppor-
tunities.

"I am proud to initiate a project such as
this, which is currently 100 percent Bahamian-

_ owned. Through local investment it could ~
remaiii that Way,” Mr Higgs said.

His family is descended from the Eleuther-
an Adventurers, with roots in this area going
back over 350 years. His family has owned a
leasehold on the island since 1949, farming
and grazing livestock to this day.

"Tam very positive about the future of the
North Eleuthera area, and am honoured to
have been one of the initial architects of the
Royal Island development adjacent to my
family's island,” Mr Higgs said.

As the principal at Higgs and Associatés
Ltd, Mr Higgs has completed luxury private
island designs and developments throughout
the Bahamas. His projects have been featured
in three of the world's most exclusive, elite
magazines — Fortune Magazine, Robb Report
and Showboats International.

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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The General Public is advised that the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
will be performing disconnection activities in the following areas:

Rosetta, Kemp Road and all side corners, Village Road, Soldier Road,
Prince Charles Dr. to Village Road, Dannottage Estate, Village Estate,
Nassau Village, Blair Estate, Fox Hill, Yamacraw Beach, Monastery Park,
College Gardens, East Park Estate, Sea Breeze Estate and Imperial Park,

. Hillside Park, Bay St. and Victoria Ave, Centreville, Palmdale including
Madeira St, Mt. Royal Ave and Mt. Rose Ave. and all side corners

All consumers with overdue accounts are advised to pay the arrears on
their electricity accounts immediately, in order to avoid the disconnection .
of your electrical service.

_ The public is also advised that all overdue payments should be made
directly to the Corporation. Those payments can be made at Head Office on
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the main Post Office
on East Hill Street.

7 ATH
> ig SOO
: ten | uel 3

Act Now To Avoid Suspension Of |
Benefit/Assistance





Persons who are in receipt of monthly Long-Term Benefit or Assistance

from the National Insurance Board, who fail to be verified in their assigned
months, or anytime after, are advised that no further pension cheques will be
issued to them-either though bank accounts or through pay stations-until they
have submitted themselves to the verification process.





Pensioners in New Providence are urged to present themselves to the Fox
Hill Local Office, the Wulff Road Local Office, or the Jumbey Village Local
Office, immediately for verification. Pensioners in Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands are urged to present themselves to the nearest Local Office.







Cheque(s) for pensioners who are not verified on or before January 29, 2007.
will be held and will only be released to pensioners when they have been
verified.







Pensioners are required to produce their National Insurance ID card, along
with a driver’s license, a passport or current voter’s card.




For more information you may contact the Verifications Department at your‘
nearest Local Office. : ‘






The American Embassy is presently considering
applications for the following position: ©

VOUCHER EXAMINER’

Serves as the Voucher Examiner responsible for examining and processing
a variety of vouchers submission to the certifying officer. The Voucher

Examiner also serves as the back up to the Chief Time-Keeper.
This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- An Associate Degree in the area of Accounting or Finance.
- Two years accounting experience or related fiscal work is required.
- Must have a good working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must have ability to meet deadlines in a timely manner and work
independenly with minimum supervision
- Must possess good oral and written communication skills.



The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life

insurance pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or citizens who are eligible for

employment under Bahamian laws and regulations

Applications forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street.
Completed applications should be returned to the Embassy addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than Thursday, January 11, 2007.

f
DOTA RANI OTRAS YT LOTTA NE Fifa RUIN:



sf

a



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



ki By Fidelity Capital
Markets

A MODERATE level of
trading activity took place dur-
ing the first week of 2007, with
55,525 shares changing
hands. The market saw five out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which three advanced and two
remained unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) with 44,605 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 80 per cent of the total
shares. traded. The big
advancer for the week was also
CBL, gaining $0.03 to end the
week at $12.54,

For 2006, CBL's share price
appreciated by over 37 per

cent. Also, posting a gain this
week was ICD Utilities (ICD), °

up $0.05 to close the week at
$7.20.

The FINDEX gained 0.34
points for the week, to close
at 742.44, For 2006, FINDEX
was up 34.47 per cent versus
26.09 per cent in 2005.

Investors Tip of the Week-

CHANCES are you might
be one of many persons who
have made a resolution or two
pertaining to your financial
health in 2007. Therefore, we
thought to start the year off by
suggesting some resolutions

al BizJet Office
© Professional
“ae Ter Ry. We Ve

Stepping Towards Your Career Goals

{] BizJet can provide you
with the training you need
to succeed in today’s
dynamic office with our
Office Professional

Course.

[] Develop confidence in
your ability as a Business
Professional to manage
any professional
environment.

_... BIZJET
BUSINESS CENTER

Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

} PHONE: (242) 356-5760





) FIDELITY MARKET WRAP

The Bahamian Stock Market



FINDEX 742.44 YTD 0.05%



BISX
SYMBOL PRICE



AML $0.61 $-
BAB $1.26 $0.01
BBL $0.76 $-
BOB $8.03 $-
BPF $11.30 $-
BSL $14.60 $-
BWL $1.75 $-
CAB $10.00 $-
CBL $12.54 $0.03
CHL $1.90 $-
CIB $14.15 $-
CWCB $4.87 $-0.37
DHS - $2.50 ¢
FAM / — $5.79 $-
FCC $0.55 $- .
FCL $12.55 $-
FIN $12.02 $-
ICD $7.20 $0.05
ISJ $8.60 $-
PRE $10.00 $-

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

ber 31, 2006.

that can assist you on your
journey to financial well being.

Resolution 1 — J will pay
off all credit card balances and
consumer loans. I will then
commit myself to a regular and
systematic savings plan.

Resolution 2 — I will not
invest or buy shares in a com-
pany based on speculation, a
hunch or personal bias. I will
strive to make an informed
investment decision based on
available financial information
about the entity.

Resolution 3 — I will not

CLOSING CHANGE

¢ CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR, payable
on February 7, 2007, to all shareholders of record date Decem-

¢ Bahamas Supermarkets (BSL) will hold its Annual Gener-
al Meeting at 6pm on January 23, 2007, at the British Colonial
‘Hilton Hotel, 1 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. ©








VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE







0 0.00%
1 0.80%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0
0
0






0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.24%
0 - 0.00%
0.00%
-7.06%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.70%
0.00%
0.00%



ooooco

S



oom




















just look at the dividends. The
total return earned on a stock
is made up of both dividends
and price appreciation.

Resolution 4 — I will read
the financial statements and
attend the Annual General
Meetings of companies whose
shares I own. This will allow
me to keep abreast. of the
financial health and overall
management of the company.

Resolution 5-— I will meet
with a professional financial
advisor for an assessment of
my investment goals and objec-
tives at least once a year.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager

Qualifications:

eo © @ @ @

Bahamas

Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).
Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s

investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.

processes.

Sound experience in global capital markets
Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development

Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment

‘management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and __
_analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual

stock picks

General Requirements/Responsibilities: .

¢ Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
* Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net

worth clients.

e Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.
Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment

advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both

: corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
i includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Ki vere

"
ba SULA A ND NAT
MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3B

THE TRIBUNE



RA,

t's BORG
MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2007

=’ SPORTS

Fax: (242) 328-2398

)

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Ballou s
stare to
‘the Buccaneers

m@ RUGBY
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

BAILLOU Rugby Club
had their biggest scare of the
season when the Buccaneers
took to the Winton Field with
an explosive first half of play.

The Buccaneers’ aggression
surprised the Baillou at first,
but,.as the match went on,
Baillou came back to clinch
the game 20-13.

Baillou had a low key first
half, missing passes and strug-
gling defensively.

But this would all change in
the second period.

ae Hie NH

- Baillou captain Garfield

Morrison admitted that his
team came into the game with
a sluggish attitude and he said
they will have to play a full
two halves in order to end the
season with a blemish free
record. '

“This team (Buccaneers) is
still a good side so we couldn’t
just come in and assume we
were going to beat them easi-
ly,” he said. “Just like us, they
want to win, so we definitely
had to pull up our socks in the
second half and do some hit-
ting.

“After the first half I told
everyone that they needed to
get in gear and the fact that
we are supposed to be unde-

Perfect record
stays intact after
tough first half

feated we will-have to fight
hard if we want to maintain
that. We owe this win to our
backs, they were holding onto
a lot more balls in the second
half than they did in the first.

“Yes we did get a couple of
yellow cards, that happens
when the game gets out of
control and the players’ tem-
pers start to fly. But overall
we have to maintain and the
referee has to try and take
control of the game so some of
our players received one or
two yellow cards, but these
things happen.”

But Baillou team leader
Kevin Salabie believes his
team is unable to play the first
half aggressively because they
are out of shape. —

Salabie said all of his team-
mates need to turn out to
practice \

“When you have only some

- players coming to practice it is

hard for us to be organise



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

urvive
(lefeat

when we come to games,” said
Salabie.

“Everyone need have to be
there in order to execute the
required plays. We can’t come
into games and allow teams
to get the better. of us in the
first half, that is unacceptable
for a team that hopes to go
through the league undefeat-
ed.

“But through it all I am
pleased with the play, it could
have been better but I can’t
ask for more. Hopefully all
the players would see what
they need to work on after this
game and do the right thing.”

Salabie is hoping his team
will snag another win this Sat-
urday, so he can celebrate his
birthday in grand style.

@ BAILLOU keep posses-

sion against the Buccaneers.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)









- Pros

a AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Orry J Pros survived a defen-

whitewash the Stingrays

‘Battle of the undefeated’

sive battle against the youthful Stingrays
to remain the only undefeated team in
the Commonwealth American Foot-
ball League.

In the “battle of the undefeated” on
Sunday at the DW Davis playing field,
the Pros walked away with a 14-0 white-
wash to hand the Stingrays their first
loss in two games. ;

“They played excellent,” said Pros’
coach Sherwin Johnson about their
opponents, who provided their stiffest
challenge so far this year.

The Pros would strike first in the first
quarter of the game that was plagued
with penalties when former baseball
player Luthon Delancy avoided going
inside and pitched outside for the first

ends in 14-0 victory



touchdown.

However, they missed the two-point
conversion.

Both teams struggled offensively in
the next two quarters, although wide
receiver Charlie Ward'came close to
getting the Pros’ second TD in the third
quarter.

But he was stripped offi the ball just as
he crossed the line.

After attempts to either get wide
receiver Alec Rolle to score from the
outside or Ward to pack it inside, the
Pros finally got Philip Moxey Jr., the

{

centre for the CR Walker Knights, to
score their second touchdown of the
game.
And this time, veteran quarter-back
Michael Foster ran in the extra two-
point conversion to seal the victory.
Foster had to come into the game
during the third quarter to replace Rolle
after he struggled to get the job done.
Rolle, an outstanding softball and base-
ball player, said he tried his best, but he
guessed it wasn’t enough. 4
“Once again, I got the opportunity to
start at quarterback, but I didn’t get



the job done,” he admitted. “I felt I
had ample opportunity to get it done,
but I didn’t.

“J came in initially as a wide receiv-
er and they tried to make me into a
quarterback, so once Foster came in, I
went back to my original position.”

Coach Johnson said they had a rel-
atively slow start and that was because
their linemen were not blocking as
well as they should have for the quar-
terback.

“He’s still a young quarterback, so

it’s just a matter of getting him into the

game situation. That is why we
brought in our veteran quarterback
Foster to show him how it’s done in
game situation,” he stressed.

As for the game, Johnson said they
couldn’t ask for a better start to their
season, but he said it’s not something
that they didn’t envision.

“We have a good mixture of youth

and veteran ballplayers, the majority
being veterans,” he charged. “But I
must give credit to the Stingrays’
defence. They are very young and
quick.”

The Stingrays, coached by Lawrence
Hepburn, suffered their first loss in
two games, but rookie quarterback
Nesley Lucien said he blew it.

“We had some good plays, but we. |

didn’t capitalise on all of them,” he
admitted. “It was a good effort, but we
still didn’t do what we were supposed
to do.

“J know I’m personally disappoint-
ed because I made some mistakes.
But I’m proud of the way the defence.
held up. I made some mistakes. I tried».
to move the ball, but I was a little dis-..
appointed in what I did.”

@ IAN SYMONETTE OUT TO
MAKE AN IMPACT - See page 2B.





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INGEST IEID E7FOT67SB_1ND0QL INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T14:12:54Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02787
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES