Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007



LOCAL NEWS



IN the aftermath of the
arrests last month of five
Bahamians on charges of con-
spiring to import illegal nar-
cotics to the United States,

‘questions have been raised |

within the media regarding the
legal basis for these arrests.
The answer is quite simple
and straightforward. The indi-
viduals were. arrested under

Title 21 US Chapter 13, Sec- .

tions 841 and'846 under which it
is “unlawful for any person
knowingly or intentionally to

manufacture, distribute, or dis-.

pense, or possess with intent to
manufacture, distribute, or dis-
pense, a controlled substance,”

or to attempt or conspire to’

commit such an offence.

As a result of investigations in
the United States and the
Bahama over an extended
period’ of time, evidence was
collected in regard to a number
of individuals and sealed indict-
ments were prepared.by-a
Grand Jury, which determined
that there was a eeene




Only drug smugglers fail to respect

Bahamas sovereignty, writes
US ambassador, John Rood

basis to arrest ts dividuals
involved in the distribution of

. illegal narcotics to the United

States through the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport.
When some of these suspects
travelled to the United States,

they were arrested on the basis
of these’Grand Jury indict-

ments. Other individuals
involved: have been arrested in
the Bahamas:and will likely be

~ tried here, and more charges |

could follow. all cases where\.’

* individuals were atrested in the

“US, there was a strong US.,
nexus to the charges.

Many have asked why the

individuals were arrested in the’
United Stales The short panne

is: the individuals were arrésted
in the United States base
they violated US law and}were
subject to arrest upon entering
US territory. They entere*US
territory on their own volition,
and were not kidnapped, :
‘whisked away,’ or any of the
other vivid but inaccurate

- descriptions I have seen in the
* media. In fact, prior to the most
recent arrests, seven other

Bahamians were arrested
between March and November
2006 for trafficking drugs to the
United States.on flights origi-
nating in the Bahamas.

‘Any American citizen or any
foreign national who violates
US lays and is'physically pre-

sent in the United States is sub-
ee In the same way, if
an ‘American citizen was wanted
in the Bahamas for violations
of your country's laws and
entered your territory, you
would expect your law enforce-
ment authorities to arrest that
individual.

I also would like to address a
serious and. unsubstantiated
allegation that has been raised
in some quarters suggesting that
the individuals arrested in the
United States will not enjoy due
process of the law or a pre-
sumption of innocence. The
reality is that these individuals
will have the same rights as any
American citizen — they will be

b pagans ze I hats ler arrests

THE country’s sovereignty

has been violated through the
“entrapment” of the five bag-
gage handlers from Nassau
Flight Services, former. Sen-
ate president J Henry. Bost-
wick said yesterday on More

FM’s talk show Real Talk

Live.
“J begin to wonder bs hein
one state abrogates unto itself

the legal right endorsed by .
their supreme court to enter |
into the territory of another |.

nation and to do what they
lave done to these men in the

manner admitted to by the US |
Embassy.~ I begin to wonder
if sovereignty isa thing of the
_ dent said that he was not con-
cerned with whether they are.

past. ° 3
“They have stated that they

‘had the co-operation of the

Bahamian police; assitming
that they are telling the truth
and I accept that they are
telling the truth, our-law
enforcement agenciés,aré
















; complicit i in. the us authori.
ties in having abducted these

five Bahamian citizens,” Mr
Bostwick said. © .
Three of the five baggage

-handlers from Nassau Flight

Services have had their first
arraignment in a Miami fed-

“eral ‘court,

The men were all charged

“with possession with intent to
distribute ‘cocaine, and were »
issued‘an order of detention | .
vas they: were considered a
- flight risk, Therefore, as out, .
‘lined by a US attorney, the
mien will not ue eligible; a a
“bail. op
The former Senate presi- ‘i
\ Bostwick said.

innocent or. guilty, but rather
with the mamner.in:which they

‘were “kidnapped” on arrival |
in Florida...
a “For this t oh



~ peliéved.

“ly coinnidtted in the Bahamas

known to the Bahamian police
acting in concert with the
American police, for us to
allow that to happen in that
manner is an unpardonable
intrusion into human rights
and the rule of law and the
due process that we all adhere

~ to,” Mr Bostwick said.

However, more often than
not, he noted, the US gets
what the US wants.

“J would be less than honest
if I would say that they did
not have their ways of indi-
cating whether or not the gov-
ernment of the day finds
favour with them or not,” Mr

He said that it does not take

much — if the: Americans feel
, 80 inclined — for them to do
whatever they:see fit in the
~~ Babiainas..

The lawyer also said that he
that the manner in

“On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

Visit or call your Agent
at our convenient new location,
Nephone number 326-1040,

emium payment functions will be
insferred from Collins Avenue to our
irbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

INSURANCE
COMPANY

E; EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

which Samuel “90” Knowles
was taken out of the country
was an offence against the rule
of law.

“The reason I-say that is
because the man had an ongo-
ing appeal before the Privy
Council. which was pending

and which may still be heard. ,
Before that could be heard, -

he was secreted outside of the
Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Bostwick said that
Knowles should have been
given a chance to have his
final appeal disposed of, which
may have resulted in him
being not extradited — but it
appears as if the US is not pre-
pared to “dilly dally” with the
extradition process.

“What is equally question-
able is the detention of these
persons for inordinate lengths
of time while their cases get
prosecuted,” Mr Bostwick
added.



ILY
UARDIAN



presumed innocent until proven
guilty, they will have the right to
an attorney, and they will
receive a fair trial. As I noted to
the media last week: “If they
are found guilty they will serve

.. time;-and if they are found not
guilty they will be set free.”

Any suggestion that there is
no “presumption of innocence”
in the US is simply wrong. The
presumption of innocence is an
inviolable element of US law,
just as it is here in the Bahamas.

The individuals arrested and
charged have, however, been
arrested because of compelling
evidence that they were
involved in drug trafficking to
our shores. A court of law will
determine whether that evi-
dence warrants a conviction.

All co-operation between the
United States and the Bahamas
on this matter has taken place
“within the ambit of the law”
and with full respect for
Bahamian sovereignty. The
only people who have not
respected national sovereignty



THE TRIBUNE

families, and ruins lives.

The United States greatly
respects the relationship that
exists between our countries
and ofiflaw enforcement agen-

cies

5) co-operation is a model
for others because of our will-
ingness to share manpower,
intelligence, and technology,
and to prosecute criminals who
commit crimes that cross bor-
ders in both of our jurisdictions
in accordance with the rule of
law and our co-operative agree- —
ments.

RO
butterfly spreads
across Caribbean

By JONATHAN M. KATZ
Associated Press Writer

SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican Republic (AP) - An
Asian butterfly known for rav-
aging the leaves of young cit-
rus trees has spread from the
Dominican Republic to other
Caribbean islands and could
soon strike fruit producers in
Florida and South America,
agriculture experts said.

The Papilo Demoleus butter-
fly was spotted in the Domini-
can Republic three years ago _
the first recorded sighting in the
Western Hemisphere, said Bri-
an Farrell, a Harvard biology
professor who led. the field
study that found it.

The insect, known also as the
lime swallowtail, has since
appeared in Jamaica and Puer-
to Rico. U.S. officials worried
about Florida's $9 billion citrus
industry have criticized the local
government for not doing
enough to control the pests.
U.S. officials worry the pest
could be brought into the Unit-
ed States by a tourist, or smug-
gled into the country with ille-
gally transported fruit. Known
as a strong flier suited for island
hopping in Asia, the butterfly
might make the trip on its own.

"I don't think the (Domini-
can agriculture) ministry is
doing anything. They don't see
it as a problem," said Russell
Duncan, of the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture's Animal
and Plant Health Inspection

* Service in Santo Domingo.

The director of the Agricul-
ture Ministry's fruit department,
Damian Andujar, said there
was no need for a widespread
eradication campaign. "This
isn't a big problem for us, it's
under control," he said.

The butterflies, distinguished

TROPICAL |
EXTERMINATORS
UM sy Aah
PHONE: 822-2157



by red and yellow wing mark-
ings and bright blue eyespots,
have such a taste for citrus
leaves that they often strip trees
of all but their branches.

A year after they were dis-
covered in the Dominican
Republic, an infestation
destroyed more than 4,000
young trees owned by produce
giant Grupo Rica _ 3 percent
of its nursery stock, said Felipe
Mendez, a company official.

Caterpillars ate every leaf on
many of the trees they attacked,
Mendez said. Damage to the
company's orchards in the
country's south central region
has since been contained by
workers trained to pick leaves at
the first sign of butterfly eggs.

"We realized we had a nat-
ural enemy," Mendez said.

Workers in Jamaica's St.
Catherine region also have been
trying to kill the caterpillars by
hand. An aerial spraying cam-
paign has not been attempted
for fear of damaging nearby
beekeepers' hives, Agriculture



- Minister Roger Clarke told the
. Jamaica Observer.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 3





Dick’s Point ‘land
destruction’ outrage



ON THE ROCKS - Boulders block waterfront access

By KRYSTEL ROLLE

RESIDENTS living in East-
ern New Providence are out-
raged at neighbours for
“destroying the land.”

The quiet, peaceful small
cove known as Dick’s Point has
been transformed into a con-
struction site, residents say, and



Bostwick

supports
Lyons on
judiciary

AGREEING with the .
position put forth by justice
John Lyons that the judicia-
Ty is in a state of crisis
because of the delay of gov-
ernment’s review of judges’
salaries, former Senate pres-
ident J Henry Bostwick said
the appeal by Attorney
General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson on the matter is out
of order.

Mr Bostwick made the
statement yesterday on
More FM’s Real Talk Live.
' “There is nothing to
appeal — the resolution of
that matter is not before the
courts. It is a political
responsibility of the govern-
ment of the day seeing how
and when the salaries are to
be reviewed and it is that
which has not happened.
They allowed the time to
lapse twice.”

Mr Bostwick said that Jus-
tice Lyons was not out of
line to make the comments
he did, but he perhaps
should not have pronounced
them from the bench.

“But that’s his court and
he has the prerogative.
What is significant is that
have you heard any mem-
ber of the judiciary contra-
dict him? Not a single one,”
Mr Bostwick noted.

Speaking at the opening
of the legal year Thursday,
Bar Association president
Wayne Munroe focused on
the importance of adequate
remuneration for judges to
maintain an independent
judicial system..

He read from the year-
end report on the United
States’ federal judiciary by
US Chief Justice John
Roberts, who is arguing that
pay for federal judges is so
inadequate that it threatens
to undermine the judiciary’s
independence.’

Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer, in
responding to Mr Munroe,
said the judiciary can never
be considered a department
because it cannot be con-
trolled by anyone, or even
appear to be controlled.

She said that vigilante jus-
tice takes over when it is
perceived that the indepen-
dence of the judicial system

-is lost.

Dame Joan said the pub-
lic needs to understand that
the relevant statute was
enacted so the judiciary
could have a method for
their salaries to be adjusted
“without going to a politi-
cian every time...”





the work being done is com-
pletely wrecking the environ-
ment.

One resident claimed the sit-
uation was so out of hand that it
should be labelled a “national
matter.”

“The whole situation is a
mess,” she said. “This is a
national matter and everyone

needs to wake up because this is
just another example of how
everything has been shoved
around in this country.”

She said she has had to deal
with this for over a year, and
has finally had enough. Her
neighbours began dredging the
land early in 2006, seemingly in
an effort to expand the harbour.



“They have already destroyed
the sea bed with the dredging
and I thought there is nothing
more that they can do, but they
are at it again. The dredging is
finished and now they are
reclaiming land,” she explained.
This time the work hit closer to
home. Rocks have been piled
in front of her beach front prop-

Salaries link
to judicial



The Chief Justice of Canada, Beverley McLachlin

By CHESTER ROBARDS

SALARIES for judges is
indeed a factor in judicial inde-
pendence, according to the
Chief Justice of Canada.

In the wake of controversy
regarding the independence of
the Judiciary in the Bahamas,
the Rt Honourable Beverly
McLachlin spoke yesterday to
an audience of lawyers and
judges in Nassau about just
that.

Justice McLachlin said she
wrote her speech long before
she knew that the independence

of the bar and bench was sucha .

“hot” topic in the Bahamas.

She told her ‘audience that
should the judiciary lose its
independence, the ultimate vic-
tim would be the Bahamas’
democratic way of life.

“Without independent
lawyers and independent judges
our countries would not enjoy
the rule of law and the individ-
ual and collective right that are
our citizens’ entitlement,” she
said.

Recently, the independence
of the judiciary of the Bahamas
was called into question when
Justice John Lyons ruled that
the government neglected to
review the salaries of judges —
an exercise which was to be exe-
cuted this year — consequently
rendering the judiciary depen-
dent on the executive.

According to Justice
McLachlin, the first and most
important condition of judicial
independent lies in the minds
and hearts of judges.

“The single most. important
factor is in maintaining judicial
independence is the individual
judges personal and unwaver-
ing commitment to his or her
independence and impartiali-
ty,” she said. “Judges must be
in no one’s corner or in no one’s
pocket.”

Within Justice McLachlin’s
ten commandments for judicial
independence was included the
importance of financial security.

“If a proper process for deter-
mining adequate remuneration
is not in place the appearance
and perhaps the reality of inde-
pendence may be insidiously
undercut,” she said.

“A judge who does not have
enough to live on and support
his family may be tempted to
accept illicit benefits even as
minor as a chicken from a liti-
gant who is seeking justice — the
prospect of judges being
required to enter into negotia-
tions with the government
about salaries and pensions may
raise questions in the public’s
mind into whether the judge
just might favour the state in a
matter in order to ensure a
favourable outcome in the
negotiations.”

Like the Bahamas, Canada’s
government appoints a com-
mission to review the salaries
of judges, the outcome of which
is not binding.

The lack of action from this
commission was the basis of

Judge Lyon’s controversial

November ruling — which is up
for appeal some time this year.

independence @

SOY

Residents claim construction
wrecking the environment

erty blocking her in, and bar-
ring her entrance to the water-
front.

“This is disgusting, that’s all I
can say,” she said in exaspera-
tion. “They are creating their
own empire here and they can’t
do that. The land belongs to the
Bahamas. They dug up the sea
bed — they have no claims to
the sea bed,” she said. “It looks
atrocious.”

“Vve just had it. P’ve lived
with this for a whole year. The
only one that is being punished
by my silence is me. This is not
right. Everything is a total mess.
I no longer have access to the
beach unless I climb this moun-
tain,” she said referring to the

rocks. “I’ve just had it.”

Residents have a right to be
enraged, according to environ-
mentalist Sam Duncombe,
founder of REEARTH. She
warned that such activities
could have major repercussions
on the land.

“Anytime you begin to alter .

the coastline you are affecting
the environment and we have
a lot of coastal development
that has already been affected
the environment,” she said.
“This is an area where the
birds and various animals come
in at different times of the day
with the tide to feed and do
what they need to do and if they
are actually dredging and fill-

SEE page 11

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited |

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

. TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

The first US energy president

Now that President Gerald Ford has
been buried with all the honours he
deserved, it is time to discuss a proper
memorial. I would suggest the Gerald Ford
Energy Independence Act.

Few people remember today, but “Ger-
ald Ford was the first U.S. president to
really use the levers of the presidency to try
to break our addiction to oil,” said the
energy economist Philip Verleger Jr. “He
was way ahead of his time.” —

Well, his time has come again — and
thensome. .

The greatest thing George Bush could do
— for President Ford’s legacy and his own
— would be to dedicate his upcoming State
of the Union address to completing the
energy independence agenda that Ford ini-
tiated 32 years ago in the wake of the 1973
Arab oil embargo and energy shock.

As the page titled “Energy” from the
Ford presidential library Web site reminds
us: “Early in his administration, President
Ford said that he would not sit by and
watch the nation continue to talk about.an
energy crisis and do nothing about it. Nor,
he said, would he accept halfway measures
which failed to change the direction that
has made our nation so vulnerable to for-
eign economic interests. The president pro-
posed firm but necessary measures
designed to achieve energy independence
for the U.S. by 1985, and to regain our
position of world leadership in energy.”

In his 1975 State of the Union speech,
Ford laid out his vision: “I have a very

deep belief in America’s capabilities. With- —

in the next 10 years, my programme envi-
sions: 200 major nuclear power plants; 250
major new coal mines; 150 major coal-fired
power plants; 30 major new (oil) refineries;
20 major new synthetic fuel plants; the
drilling of many thousands of new oil wells;
the insulation of 18 million homes; and the
manufacturing and the sale of millions of
new. automobiles, trucks and buses that
use much less fuel. In another crisis — the
one in 1942 — President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt said this country would build 60,000
military aircraft. By 1943, production in
that programme had reached 125,000 air-
craft annually. They did it then. We can
do it now.”

Obviously, Ford’s emphasis on coal and
domestic oil came in an age when most
people were unaware of climate change.
Still, Ford wasn’t just all talk on energy. He
used his presidential powers to impose a $3-

WE, THE FAMILY OF THE LATE
EDNA WINIERED PINDER - TURNER

for your prayers, visits, telephone call
arrangements, and other acts’ of ki
during our time of bere



a-barrel fee on imported oil to reduce con-
sumption. That was a big deal, noted Ver-
leger, because the average cost of import-
ed crude at the time was only $10.76 a bar-
rel. Yes, you read that right. A Republican
president actually imposed an import fee
on oil to curb consumption! Yes, President
Bush, it can be done! The republic sur-
vived!

Thanks to the Energy Policy Conserva-
tion Act of 1975 and other measures, Ford’s
energy legacy includes: the creation of the
Strategic Petroleum Reserve for use in an
emergency; the phasing out of domestic
price controls on oil to encourage more
exploration; major investment in alterna-
tive energy research; assistance to states
in developing energy conservation pro-
grammes; and, most important, the cre-
ation of the first compulsory mileage stan-
dards for U.S. automobiles.

Those mileage standards have barely
been tightened since 1975 — because some
idiotic congressmen from Michigan, who
thought they were protecting Detroit, have
blocked efforts to raise them. So, Japanese
automakers innovated more in that area,
and the rest is history — or in the case of
Detroit, obituary.

Every 10 years we say to ourselves, “If
only we had done the right thing 10 years
ago.” Well, Bush has a chance in his State
of the Union to call on Americans to hon-
our Ford by completing his vision. But it
means asking Americans to do some hard
things: accepting a gasoline or carbon tax;
inducing Detroit to make more fuel-effi-
cient cars, trucks and plug-in hybrids; set-
ting a national requirement for utilities to
provide 20 per cent of their electricity from
renewable wind, solar, hydro or nuclear
power by 2015; and, finally, making large-
scale investments in mass transit.

It is stunning that since 9/11 the Bush
team has never mounted a campaign to
get Americans to conserve energy.

“Ford called for zero oil imports by
1985,” said Verleger. “Instead, we import-
ed 5 million barrels a day then. In 2006,
imports will average almost 14 million bar-
rels a day. Had we achieved everything

Ford proposed, the price of oil today would

be $20 a barrel, not $60, the polar ice caps
might not be melting, the polar bear might
still have a chance, and our children would
have a future.”

(¢ This article is by Thomas Friedman of
The New York Times — © 2006) .










intend to change my

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ETIENNE DIEUJUSTE OF
HOPE TOWN, ABACO, BAHAMAS. GENERAL Delivery
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30th day of December, 2006
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Abaco, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN LUE FAUSTIN OF
COLLINS AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX SB-50766
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



EDITOR, The Tribune.

YOU just have. to love our
people — if not for their stu-
pidity at least for their insulari-
ty.
Clearly, no one seems to
understand that the minute you
pass the customs and immigra-
tion checkpoint at the pre-
cleared department area you
are, de facto, on United States
soil and have submitted to its
jurisdiction. Case closed!

Those Bahamians who work
behind that line, whether they
are baggage handlers, security
agents, airline staff, bar and
restaurant employees, airplane
caterers, or whatever, surely
must appreciate where they are
and under whose rules they are
playing. I cannot see the US
Government operating such a
facility under any other terms.
In fact I am constantly surprised
that they do not have their own
Federal Police and other law
enforcement people behind the
line.

We have enjoyed the privi-
lege of pre-clearance facilities
for so long now that I am sure
most Bahamians travelling to
the US have no concept of what
the alternative would be for us

[euesonevinenncelenaci



Bag weaS

Bahamians or our US tourists if
Uncle Sam decided one day to
withdraw, yes withdraw, the
privilege. No, neither Perry
Christie nor Fred Mitchell, nor
even Hubert Ingraham has any
control over that I’m afraid.
And the alternative is to arrive
at a US Immigration and Cus-
toms facility wherever you land
and, for most of them, you will
tow a line behind anything up to
five to ten thousand people, for
two to three hours, in most cas-
es, just to get past immigration.
Pre-cleared Bahamians have
their rentals cars, are checked
into their hotels and are in

. Dadeland before their counter-

parts from any other Caribbean
country have even cleared their
luggage.

And we are going to protest
when some jack asses working
at the airport put that kind of
privilege in jeopardy? Are we
crazy? Or do Bahamians think
that pre-clearance is a right and
Uncle Sam has to do it? Get
real people.

THE TRIBUNE





I would have thought that the
newspapers would be full of
official government apologies
to the US Government over this
issue rather than all the crap
that is being covered each day.
Mr Mitchell should have, his
backside up in DC.apologising
for his people’s alleged miscon-
duct. Our Minister of Tourism
should also be there because if
the US passport issue has the
expected adverse affect on our
tourism numbers the withdraw-
al of our pre-clearance facility
would just shut the door for
good.

But you see, sadly, when it
comes to illegal drugs, we have
always had a soft spot for the
people involved. We have and
continue to revere the Prime
Minister under whose watch the
drug transhipment business first
flourished in the sixties seven-
ties and eighties. We have
named our airport after him!
Yes, the same airport that-is
now the subject of our national
angst. Appropriate don’t you
think?

BRUCE G RAINE
Nassau,
January 4, 2007.

White Bahamian
golfers hurt, too

EDITOR, The Tribune. _ .

I READ the article in Tues-
day’s edition concerning the
protests that Bahamian golfers
are carrying out about the
Cable Beach course.

I love the game of golf, and I,
too, find it distressing that the
game has become a very expen-
sive sport. I am retired, and $80
for a golf game is almost
beyond my pocket book. How-
ever, what distressed me most

about the article was Henry
Bostwick’s statements that
inferred that only black
Bahamians were affected. I per-
sonally take offence to his com-
ments, namely: “Today that seg-
regation is being resurrected
again...”

Mr Bostwick is the one who is
doing the segregating. I would
like to point out to him that I
am a white Bahamian, do not
belong to Lyford Cay or Par-
adise Island clubs, and would

very much like to have a course
to play where I don’t have to
take out a loan at the RBC.
There are a number of other
white Bahamian golfers who
feel the same way.

So please, let’s keep the
colour out of the discussion —
we are Bahamians one.

ALISON ALBURY
Nassau;
January, 2007.

Justice well served |
by Saddam hanging

EDITOR, The Tribune

IT is 10.20pm, Friday,
December 29, 2006, and I have
just heard that Saddam Hussein



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PAULA DAWKINS
of the Settlement of on the Island of Abaco, Bahamas
name to MISTY PAULA
DAWKINS DAVIS. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box SS-
792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

has been executed. What a jolly
good start to the new year. If I
sound a bit too joyous about a
very somber event, it’s because
Iam not retarded in my think-
ing by a very liberal, new age
education. I have fortunately
been left — intellectually speak-
ing — to develop my own per-
spectives on life’s offerings.
When the rest of us get to
that place where we think with
our hearts, and not by the stan-
dards of man-devised educa-
tional systems, then the world

* will come back into balance. Of

course we will never see that
day again, yet it is nice to dream
about it from time to time.
Congratulations to the peo-
ple of Iraq who have grieved
for loved ones that disappeared

at the hands of Saddam
Hussien. While the liberal
media — which is also very active
here in the Bahamas — would
try to convince us that Saddam’s
execution will not make any-
thing better in Iraq, we Know
that it will give a lot of people
some resolution to the hell they
have been living through in
Iraq. With regard to this par-
ticular execution, America’s fate
in Iraq is almost secondary. Jus-
tice, in some small measure, has
been served. An era of EVIL
has been silenced. That makes
me feel one hell of a lot better.

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS

Abaco,

December 29, 2006.

National Health
could be ‘garbage’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IF you like the way they handle your garbage, you're gonna
love the way they'll look after your healthcare.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
December 5, 2006.



Sess

DUE to an error, a letter about the National Health Insurance
scheme appeared in The Tribune over the name Wallace Rolle, In
fact, Mr Rolle was not the author of the letter aud we apologise tor
any inconvenience and embarrassment caused,



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian awaits approval

for Eleuthera investment

WELL-KNOWN Bahamian
architect and developer Gerard
Higgs has announced the initia-
tion of the first phase of a major
North Eleuthera development
which will include a luxury
marina, only the second in the
Bahamas to accommodate the
world’s largest mega-yachts —
those more than 300 feet in
length.

Located on Egg Island, 15
miles from Harbour Island and
39 miles from Nassau, the luxu-
ry yachting/residential develop-
ment project was formally pre-
sented to Prime Minister Perry
Christie in 2002 in architectural
concept. According to Mr Hig-
gs, the plan was greatly wel-
comed.

The yacht marina will include
40 luxury mega-yacht slips, with
future plans within a one to
three year period to develop
luxury residential villas, lagoon
bungalows and an intimate bou-
tique resort and spa.

Mr Higgs said an important
aspect of this project is a strong
connection to the community.
Therefore, he.said, a percent-
age of the project’s profits will
be placed into a trust fund to
assist underprivileged Bahami-
ans and provide them with
numerous economic opportu-
nities. :

“I am proud to initiate a pro- .

ject such as this which is cur-




By Arthia Nixon-Stack

tors to Eleuthera would have
noticed a generation gap — as
school age students walked
about and those over 40
worked to make ends meet.

Spotting anyone between
the ages of 18 and 30 might
take some time, as most
islanders in that demographic
left for greener pastures in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama, Exuma or the Unit-
ed States.

Now that Eleuthera is expe-
riencing an economic upturn,
the lost generation is return-
ing home and taking on jobs
in many arenas or creating
new industries.

Some of them are finding
themselves sharing coffee with
their former teachers who are
now colleagues while bankers
who helped them open junior
savings accounts are now
answering to them as subor-
dinates.

Instead of staying abroad,
many Eleuthera youths have
returned and are working to
develop their island and pro-
vide jobs away from the
tourism sector — which failed
their families following major
hurricanes and closures of
prominent properties like
Club Med.

One such example is 23-
year-old Celon Cooper, who
left for Nassau almost imme-
diately after finishing Central
Eleuthera High School. The
Palmetto Point native lived
with relatives in the capital
but returned home to help out
the women in his life.

“TI felt an obligation to be
here with my mom, sister and
grandmother because I was
the only man in the family,"
he said. "There are a lot of
opportunities here but you
just have to be creative and
know how to be unique at the
same time."

‘He found his success liter-
ally from right in the front of
his house, where he has set
up the settlement's most suc-
cessful car-wash.

While a car-wash might be
the norm in New Providence,
Mr Cooper has tapped into a
market which has not reached
the level of standards he is
able to set.

“T have the vacuums and
the sheen and I have four
employees so far,” he said.
“Sometimes it’s overwhelm-
ing because we have more
business than we can handle.
Being right here in the settle-
ment makes it convenient, but
it's helping out a whole lot.”

Only in business for six
months, Mr Cooper is already
‘thinking of expanding.

. “I’m looking for Nassau
agents to help with getting the
products I need shipped and
I'm going to put a sense of

Young workers
lured back home

For the past decade, visi- _

rently 100 per cent Bahamian-
owned. Through local invest-
ment it could remain that way,”
said Mr Higgs.

He added that the project will
provide many jobs in the North
Eleuthera area and excellent
opportunities for Bahamian
investors.

Mr Higgs’ family descended
from the Eleutheran Adven-
turers, with roots in this area
going back over 350 years. His
family has owned a leasehold
on the island since 1949, farm-
ing and grazing livestock to this
day.

“J am very positive about the
future of the North Eleuthera
area, and am honoured to have
been one of the initial architects

of the Royal Island develop-

ment adjacent to my family’s
island,” Mr Higgs said.

As the principal at Higgs and
Associates Ltd Architects, Mr
Higgs has completed many lux-
ury private island designs and
developments throughout the
Bahamas.

His projects have been fea-
tured in three of the world’s
most exclusive, elite magazines
— Fortune Magazine, Robb
Report and Showboats Inter-
national.

Currently Mr Higgs is pursu-
ing approvals from the govern-
ment to proceed with this devel-
opment. -




professionalism by adding uni-
forms,” he said. “What I like
most is that I am here in
Eleuthera and not in Nassau
because the city is getting
tough, man.”

Also in Palmetto Point,
Juliette Culmer found success
as a photographer with clients
flocking to her studio from as
far as 50 miles away for pic-
tures and T-shirts for all occa-
sions. °

Across town, Dawn Sands
is in the same business but
stands out with her web-host-
ing and design company, one
of the first on her island. At
21, Ms Sands is already the
recipient of a business.award.

“It’s great to go out and get
exposure, but in the end, there
is no place like home,” said
Camille Campbell from her
family’s beach-front home in
Savannah Sound.

At 25, she had left her job
of a few years in New Provi-
dence for the slower-paced
Family Island life when she
settled in Exuma.

Despite finding work at the
Four Seasons Resort, she
came home every holiday and
weekend she was able to
afford.

On one such occasion, the
island athlete who competed
locally and internationally,
volunteered her time to coach
a team at a Windermere High
School.

That led to a permanent
position as the school's PE
teacher — the first time a for-
mer student has held that
position.

“It’s kind of funny to be
grading some of these kids
who are only a few years :
younger than me and who
know me as Camille to be
calling me Ms Campbell,” she
said. “Then a lot of the teach-
ers who are here now are the
same ones who taught me, so
it’s weird but I love the fact
that ’'m home and able to do
it.”

Tarpum Bay's Margo
McCartney is glad to be back
in Eleuthera, especially since
she has a family to take care
of. The 23-year-old mother
has worked in various areas
of the tourism sector as a wait-
ress, barmaid, SCUBA
instructor and more. She is
now one of the senior life
guards at Half Moon Cay.

“I get to see my family dai-
ly and in Nassau that would
not have happened,” she said.
“It’s a long ride to get to my
job and then I have to catch a
boat but at the end of the day
I am home to make sure my
daughter gets to school and
my ma who gets sick some-
times is taken care of. You
can go off to learn something
new, but at the end of the day

SEE page 7






























BS







An impression of the marina for the proposed development on Egg Island in north Eleuthera



THE Bahamas International
Film Festival will kick off this
year's film series on Saturday,
January 27, with the winner of
the audience award for-best
documentary film, Eleutheran
Adventure. -

This Bahamian film was
made on a very low budget sup-
ported by Bahamian producers
George Wyckoff and Johnathan
Morris. Director Kareem Mor-
timer has captured a never
before seen slice of Bahamian
culture.

The public has been invited
to join BIFF and Kareem in
Rawson Square on Saturday,
January 27, at 7.30pm to see the
film free of charge.

“BIFF is very proud to pro-
vide an opportunity for
Bahamian filmmakers to gain
exposure, not only throughout
The Bahamas but also in the
international film world,” said
the festival organisers.

Kareem Mortimer is prepar-
ing to,continue his networking
opportunities at this year's
Berlin International Film Festi-
val from February 8 to 16,
where he has been accepted
into the Berlinale Talent Cam-
pus.

The statement noted that as
the summit received 3678 appli-
cations from 129 countries this
year, Kareem's acceptance is
“great recognition” of his
potential.

“Kareem is the - first
Caribbean filmmaker to attend



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and shaye your story.



Share your news

the Talent Campus at the Berli-
nale,” said founder and execu-
tive director of BIFF Leslie
Vanderpool.

Leslie introduced Kareem to
the programme when she
returned from the Cannes Film
Festival in May. “I am so proud
that he took advantage of this
opportunity. The setting pro-
vides filmmakers with a gate-
way which could boost their
careers to the next level. Mak-
ing contacts with other budding












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Top documentary film
set to kick-off festival

filmmakers of the world is a
valuable gift. Only a select few
are a part of the programme
and this could be a tremendous
reward if the programme is ful-
ly taken advantage of,” says Ms
Vanderpool. ;

Mortimer is no stranger to
such programmes, as last year
he was a part of the first Film-
maker Residency Programme
that the Bahamas International
Film Festival provided to six
Bahamian filmmakers.

This programme was created
to provide Bahamian and
Caribbean filmmakers with
mentors who are leading indus-
try professionals in the world
of cinema.

BIFF's Filmmakers Residen-
cy Programme was also instru-
mental in facilitating interna-
tional funding and a producer





for the film RAIN.

The Eleutheran Adventure is
a documentary film that
involves Kareem Mortimer and
cameraman Kevin Taylor hitch-
hiking from Spanish Wells to
the Southernmost point on the
island of Eleuthera with only
$150 in hand.

Along the way they meet a
collection of interesting charac-
ters that give them an honest
and entertaining look of life on
the island. The film explores
Eleutheran culture and what it
means to be Bahamian.

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| NOTICE

NOTICE: is hereby given that JILIO JOSEPH OF
SOLDIER ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registratign/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any“person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE MARTHE MICHEL OF
McKinney Drive, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Spidey, Harry
promise great
things in ‘07

By JASON DONALD

Okay, 2006 is gone — and let’s
be grateful. Whenever a Casino
Royale got our pulses raising,
there was always an Eragon or
two around the comer to pull us
down again. In other words, not »
a particularly great year for
movies.

So what does 2007 have in
store?

Well, blockbuster-wise, we’re
spoiled for choice. A certain
web-slinger makes his return in
what is sure to be the biggest
box office stampede of the year.

Yes, Spiderman 3 hits the
screens in May and, if it’s any-

thing like the grandiose specta-
cle of the second flick in the
franchise, it will go a long way
to helping us recover from last
summer’s distinctly un-super
Superman Returns.






















a ry COVENANT SUNDAY
11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM



Bernard Road
11:00AM

Zion Boulevard

10:00AM

9:30AM

Avenue
8:00AM
9:30AM

11:00AM
7:00PM

RADIO PROGRAMMES

Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter (AP Photo/Warner Bros./Murray Close)

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 7TH, 2007
11:30 a.m. Speaker: Elder Elliott Neilly
A Week of Spiritual Emphasis -
(Jan 7, 8, 9, 10 ,12, 14)

7:30 Nightly
Please Come and Join Us!

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
MNO" CHURCH SERVICES
AMM) SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 2007

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC .
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Pastor Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill

Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Rev. William Higgs/HC
No Service

HORII AIA AI IAI AAA AA IAI IAAI AAAI AISA ANSI IAI AI ISIN IIIA IASI IAI AIA II ISN IIASA IA





Not only does Spidey have to
deal with new villain Sandman
(Sideways’ Thomas Hayden
Church) but — get this — him-
self! (thanks to him getting coat-
ed in some evil gooey stuff).

A fantastic preview gives all
indications that this one will
rock. Join the queue now.

Who wants to see giant
robots smashing each other to



bits? No one? What if I mention
the name ‘Transformers?

Now I’ve got your attention
(and you’re showing your age).
Yes, everybody’s favourite
‘robots in disguise’ get their first



big screen outing in July - and
it’s only 20 years too late.
While I’m willing to admit
this could turn out to be a big
robotic cheesefest, the preview
has some mightily impressive
special effects and with direc-
tor Michael Bay at the helm and
an intriguing cast (Bernie Mac,
John Turturro) you know it

-won’t be dull.

Speaking of neat previews,
an action packed taster of
Ghost Rider appeared in cine-
mas before last year’s end and
went down a storm when I saw
it.

Nicolas Cage stars in this big
screen outing for comic book
character Johnny Blaze - a
stunt motorcyclist who hosts a
‘spirit of vengeance’. Expect
flaming skulls, amazing stunts
and action galore when this
arrives in February.

And last, but by no means
least, is the latest in the Harry
Potter series — The Order of the
Phoenix — due out in July.

The Harry Potter movies are
actually getting better and bet-
ter as the franchise bounces
along, and after the suitably
intense Goblet of Fire, ’m
looking forward to this one.

Still, it’s going to be quite a
feat to top that creepy maze
scene in the last film and it
remains to be seen if enough
foundation can be found to
keep the cast looking like
teenagers.

Time will tell.

So there you have it — not a
bad little selection there, I’m
sure you'll agree.

Wait a minute — didn’t I say
the same thing last year?

Tobey Maguire returns as Spider-
man this summer (AP FILE Photo)



Albany House takes centre -
stage for two film events

ALBANY House, the
sprawling South Ocean man-
sion which sits at the southwest
corner of New Providence
Island, has found itself at the
centre of two important film
events in the Bahamas.

Last month, Albany House
was featured prominently in the
latest James Lond film, Casino
Royale, which stars Daniel
Craig as the new 007. The home
was used for several scenes and
was featured prominently as the
home of a key villain in the film.

The estate — owned by
investors Joe Lewis, Tiger

- Woods and Ernie Els — now sits

on 565 acres and is soon to be
the centre of the beach club
activities at the newly-approved
luxury resort development,
Albany Golf and Beach Club.

Given the famous parties
behind this project and its

intended positive impact to the

Bahamian economy, the
Albany development has gar-
nered widespread attention.

According to the developers,
when completed, it promises to
be one of the most beautiful
communities with world class
resort-styled amenities.

Built as a private home in
1991, the luxurious home fea-
tures lengthy colonnades, airy
rooms, captivating beach and
sunset views.

. Speaking about Albany’s
prominence in Casino Royale,
Jason Callender, a director for

the Albany development com-
pany, noted, “The filmmakers
were here for five days of shoot-
ing and captured much of the
beauty of the Bahamas at
Albany House. Some key
scenes were shot here that
showcased our beautiful
turquoise waters and the fabu-
lous lifestyle of the islands,
including one scene of Bond
swimming in the ocean and two
other scenes featuring the beau-
tiful Italian actress in the film,
Caterina Murino [Solange], rid-
ing horseback on. the beach and
one very memorable scene in a
beach side hammock.

“In the movie, people were
led to believe that the house
was just down the beach from
the Ocean Club, but in fact it
is really on the southwest end of
New Providence,” he contin-
ued. “We were thrilled to be
featured in the film because it is
one of the best Bond films ever
made and is doing very well at
the box office. It does such a
nice job of illustrating the won-
der of the Bahamas - our nice
people, beautiful beaches, and
exciting island nightlife.”

Albany House also had a
starring role when it hosted the
Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF) 2006 Filmmak-
ers’ Retreat, at which actor
Nicolas Cage was a special
guest, and 44 other film industry
executives enjoyed a wonder-
ful reception and dinner at

Albany.

The BIFF annual event is
designed to. promote the
Bahamas as a great place to film
movies and also spur the film
industry within the islands by
featuring many films during the
four-day festival.

“BIFF does a terrific job pro-
moting the Bahamas to film
production companies, in fact,
BIFF’s founder, Leslie Vander-
pool, is the person who encour-
aged the Casino Royale site
scouts to explore using Albany
for the film,” said Mr Callen-
der.

“] grew up with Jason and we
have discussed economic devel-
opment opportunities related
to the film industry for years,
and I was pleased to help him
secure the Bond film at Albany,
plus we were delighted to host
one of our key events at this
property,” said Ms Vanderpool.
“We try to showcase the best
of the Bahamas and show
world-class filmmakers what
wonderful people, locations and

settings we have to offer in the
Bahamas. The festival. brings
the industry to the islands and it
builds bridges to local, aspiring
filmmakers. Albany House was
the perfect setting for us this
year and the staff did an amaz-
ing job for all of our guests —
everyone had’a lovely time,”
she said.

“We are extremely proud of
Albany House. It is both a fit-
ting star in Casino Royale and
plays a great host for events like
the BIFF affair.

* It is one small beautiful pic-
ture of the Bahamas and we
have spectacular plans for the
property which will begin to
materialise early in the New
Year.

“The house will become the
beach club house for our new
resort development, and it will
be one of the defining compo-
nents in Albany that exemplifies
what many people love about
the Bahamas — the calm, sooth-
ing luxury of island living at its
very best,” said Mr Callender.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
ate M ale cM Co Mattel alg
on Mondays



LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church

RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

‘METHODIST MOMENTS’

on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

BAHAMAS METHODIST WOMEN’S FELLOWSHIP - NASSAU REGION will be holding
their New Year's Meeting and Fellowship on Monday, January 8, 2007 at Ebenezer
Methodist Church, East Shirley Street at 7:30pm.

Grounded In The Past & 1

Geared To The Future
















A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America
1D AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED)














Worship time: Ham & ‘ih Worship time: Ilam & 7pm ‘ 4 .

Prayer time: 10:15 - 10:45a.m.

Sunday School: 9:45am
Church School during Worship Service

Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:




Candlelight Service - Dec. 17@ 7p.m. A
>) Christmas Eve Service - Dec. 24 @ 11:00 pm"
Watchnight Service - Dec. 31 @ 11:00 p.m. \

The Madeira Shopping



The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)
‘SUNDAY JANUARY 7TH, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Tezel Anderson
10:00 p.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Children, Youth & Young Adults (HC)





Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

Center : %

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles "
P.O.Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-5712

EMAIL - lynnk @batelnet.bs





P.O.Box $S-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE



“Casting IMAC TMT LoLAN nt LAR OLA alr TAceSni OLA SIN OL) clas)





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS








U.N. troops and local police
raided a slum on Friday and
arrested an alleged gang
member wanted in the slay-
ing of two Jordanian peace-
keeping troops, the U.N. mis-
sion in Haiti said.

No shots were fired during
the pre-dawn operation in
Port-au-Prince's Cite Soleil
slum, a base for well-armed
gangs blamed for a spate of
kidnappings and shooting
deaths, the mission said in a



The ‘lost generation’

Haitian gang member is
arrested for UN murders









statement.

An alleged gang member
identified only as Zachari was
captured and turned over to
Haitian police for the Nov. 10
killing of the Jordanians, who
were driving back to base
when their jeep came under
heavy gunfire.

A suspected kidnapper also
was arrested in the raid. .

The U.N. mission said
Zachari directed kidnappings
for the feared Beloney gang.












returns to Eleuthera

FROM page five

you can come back home. I
don't want that Nassau life for
my children."

Bahamas Merit Scholar
Andrea Culmer, who is study-
ing medicine at McGill Univer-
sity in Canada, also plans to
practice on her native island
once she completes her studies,
while college graduate Holly
Stewart is already making plans
to bring art appreciation to the

island.

“T really miss Eleuthera,” says
the 24 year-old newlywed.
“There is no place in the world
like Eleuthera. It's one thing to
do something but it’s another
to create something and to help
other people. I am not getting in
tourism because that failed
before and we need to do things
for our people to maintain. A
close friend of mine and I are

collaborating on a couple of dif-
ferent projects now. Trust me,
we are working on getting
Eleuthera on the map.”

As for Eleuthera’s parents,
they are happy their children
can now come home and have
something to do.

“It’s easy to say you want to
come home but why come
home and do nothing when you
can profit elsewhere?” said
Cathy Burrows, who spent the
holiday with her two college
graduate daughters who came
home from Fort Lauderdale.

“Stephanie plans to come
home with her culinary train-
ing. She’s been as far away as
Italy with it. There are a few
places she can work for coming
on stream but if she wants to
do her own thing she can.
Eleuthera can benefit if all
those who go away come back —
if only to say thanks.”

PM: Bahamas ready
for general election

FROM page one

Bahamians have registered to
vote, he said.

Based on the last general
election where 140,000 Bahami-
ans cast their vote, “we are still
40,000 short,’ Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said that
- government is projecting that
there are up to 160,000 people
eligible to vote.

Efforts will be made in the
coming days to encourage
increased voter registration, he
said.

Mr Christie said that the Con-
stituency Commission can only
make decisions on whether new
constituencies need to be cre-
ated or existing ones should be
expanded when they get a more
accurate i¢ >a of voter numbers.

Regarding the platform on
which the opposition will cam-
paign, Mr Christie said he
expects the FNM to touch on
the high number of murders in
2006.

“The opposition would be
quite correct to express concern
over 60 murders even though
they had 65 themselves in one
year.

“If the opposition would
choose to exploit it politically I
would not be surprised,” he
said.

However, he added, he does
not believe that making the
murder rate an issue will cause
the FNM to win the next elec-
tion.

“Bahamians are fully aware
that it is our children doing
these things, that we have some
challenges to face,” he said.

Guana Cay
developers
tackle worries

FROM page one

“Tt’s like slavery all over
again,” he said.

“On top of them not paying
us our Christmas bonus as yet,
right now we need machines to
dig some of these big holes, but
they don’t provide us with any,
so we have to use our hands.”

The Guana Cay develop-
ment has made national head-
lines on numerous occasions
throughout the year.

The Save Guana Cay Reef
Association, led by Attorney
Fred Smith had accused the
developers of not being envi-

‘ronmentally friendly and the
association was awarded an
injunction against the Discov-
ery Land Company, the devel-
opers of Baker’s Bay, to stop
work on the project.

However, in October the
$175 million Baker's Bay Golf
and Ocean Club development
won a legal battle against oppo-
nents of the marina and golf
community and work was
resumed on the project.

Responding to the court
decision, Mike Meldman, Chair-
man and CEO of Discovery
Land Company, said he was sat-
isfied and delighted with, but
not surprised by the Supreme
Court decision.

"It has been a long wait and
a hard fight but we remained
committed to the Baker's Bay
project and to The Bahamas.
We were always confident that
the outcome would be
favourable. We fully expected
that the truth would be recog-

nized and justice would be
served. The truth, of course, is
that the Baker's Bay project has
abided by the laws of The
Bahamas in all of our dealings
and that we have consulted and
respected the views of the peo-
ple of Great Guana Cay and
Abaco and will continue to do
so," Mr Meldman said.

Dr. Livingstone Marshall,
spokesman for Baker’s Bay,
said that management met with
the landscapers yesterday morn-
ing, and the workers were given
the opportunity to air all of their
concerns.

According to Dr Marshall,
Baker’s Bay has provided all of
its employees with appropriate
equipment, and as far as he
knows, only in specific cases
would landscapers have to use
their hands when dealing with
plants with delicate roots.

In respect to the workers’
allegations about not being paid
their Christmas bonus, he said
the company normally pays
bonuses at the end of a com-
plete calendar year, and that
the workers could expect this
issue to be resolved this month.

Dr Marshall agreed that
there were “kinks” in the new
time clock system that had to
be addressed, but he assured
The Tribune reporter that the
landscapers would be paid any
monies owed to them by the
end of the day.

“Everything is fine with Bak-
er’s Bay and its employees at
the moment,” said Dr Marshall.

He said the company was
committed to finding ways to
resolve employee concerns.



The impact of dredging and construction at Dick’s Point

FROM page three

ing in the areas where those ani-
mals have been foraging for
food then obviously they are
going to impact those animals
and impact the ecosystem, that
is struggling to survive out there
anyway with all the develop-
ment that has happened.”

Mrs Duncombe said she_has
been concerned with this pe

of action for years. “People
have been allowed to do what
they want. Whether they’ve
been given permission to do it is
another matter. And I under-
stand in the Family Islands it’s
like the wild, wild west because
there is no one to monitor them.
The country is totally out of
control. It’s insanity that every-
one can do what they want.”
Blaming the government, Mrs

Job frustration

FROM page one

“If a woman has three children and she get paid $150 at the end of
the week, that money will go like that.” The only money-making
options she would have left would be unfavourable, he said.

Mr Knowles, who described himself as ‘‘multi-talented,”’ said that
“it’s only so long before we begin taking action. This is just the

beginning.”

3}

. to enjoy*why th }
property there, Tt’s really fidici'' “busy up to press time. The Tri-

Call for tighter government
environmental regulation

Duncombe said, they need to
tighten the reins and make sure
that when things are done, they
are properly researched so that
minimal damage is caused.
“And I’m afraid that’s not hap-
pening.” she said. “If the gov-
ernment has given them
approval; then they shouldn’t
have.”

“It’s not fair on the people.
who have putcHased tobe ablent i
jey*purchased?_ “De



-

aR OR





ple wake up and realise how
badly all our environment is
being affected and do some-
thing about it, she added. .
“People need to highlight the

issues as much as possible then
authorities need to come in and
investigate and do what needs
to be done to stop or mitigate
the problem.”

The Tribune attempted to
fact the Lands and Surveys

2

partment, but the phone was



lous. Why should Thy quality of “Bune also tried to reach the Port

life be completely obliterated
for somebody else?” she asked.
“How does that work?”

The only way this type of
activity is going to stop is if peo-

CONFERENCE

Controller who was also
unavailable as were the persons
responsible for the operation,
whose names were not listed in
the phone book.

offe THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS 3

\ ¥ ¥ }

/



OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS |
L‘EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
ET LES AMERIQUES xe

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES 4



108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE
CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John Wesley)

“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness

for Christ in The Bahamas”

THE SECOND LORD’S DAY AFTER THE NATIVITY,
BAPTISM OF THE LORD, JANUARY 7, 2007

INTROIT AND COLLECT:

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
beta ee LL LEU} ae

SUNDAY SERVICES

Moming Worship Service ....... 8.30 am.
Sunday School forall ages... 9.45 am.
Adult Education 945.am,
-WoIship S@IVICE viccssenens « 1.00 am.
Evening Worship Service.
Summer 7.00 p.m,
i Winter 6.88 om,
_ WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

_ Selective Bile Teachin

~ Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-12
Missioneties (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.
FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m. -

Youth Ministry Meeting —

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m, - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Premise Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

-EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

Ot SPA IE CUM EE ee Acta LL(S
Tel; 3228304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O, Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org







Lord of all time and eternity, you opened the heavens and
revealed yourself as Father in the baptism of Jesus your beloved
Son: by the power of your Spirit complete the heavenly work
of our rebirth through the waters of the new creation; through
Jesus Christ our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)

9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)

10:00 a.m. Rey. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/Rev. Emily A. Demeritte/
Sis. Kelli Jolly (Holy Communion)

.6:30 p.m. Prayer Band

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,

Fox Hill)

L1:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr. (Holy Communion)

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)

11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST

CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

3:00 p.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)

GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH (20 Cedar
Terrace, Tall Pines)

10:00 a.m. At Rhodes Memorial Church
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)

6:30 p.m. Providence Youth
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
Circuit Christian Believer Programs

Tuesdays 6:45 p.m. Wesley Methodist Church,

Malcolm Road, East
Thursday 6:45 p.m. Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church.
FASTING FOR JUSTICE — All Methodists of the Conference
are urged to fast for Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases.
The fast begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday
and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly:
“My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS | at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns of
Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; “Family
Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the Glory” ZNS
1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.

PRAYERS
For Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases. Our brothers and
sisters in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes and other
natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.

-

\,



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007





The Workers’ Voice

The official organ of The Bahamas Federation of Labonr’ ~





January 19567

When labour :
struck back’

EARLIER this week, the family of Sir Randol Fawkes hit

out at the government for neglecting and disregarding
the legacy of the late trade unionist and labour leader.
The family said that whenever the history of the
Bahamas is recounted, Sir Randol’s name is intentionally
left out, “or passed over in a great haste.” With this in
mind, In Days Gone By looks back at the General Strike
of 1958 - which brought the country to its knees - as
well as other special moments in the life and career of
Sir Randol Fawkes. |

ONE FOR ALL AND ALL FOR BNE







Dear Brothers and Sisters,



This is our Supreme hour:

It is absolutely necessary for all of us to keep

our heads and stay calm.

We can only lose this battle if we resort to vio-

ponents wish us to act foolishly so

lence. (Our op
vse to use armed force against

that they oan have an 6xo
us.

LET US WIN THIS BATTLE WITH A MIGHTY MEEKNESS
VIOTORY SHALL BE OURS

Fraternally yours
THE BAHAMAS FEDERATION OF LABOUR.

RANDOL F. FAWKES
President.



The labour leader’s message of
non-violence to the striking workers

All photos oittates
of Rosalie Fawkes

QAO,

Sanson

es :
NS



A striker appeals to visitors

Pricing Information As Of:

Frid

5 J

2007

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
D ;



ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

52wk-Low Fund Name _

Previous Clase Today's Close

Change “Daily Vol.

“0.203
1.689
0.796
0.265
0.199
0.170
0.715
0.078
0.943
0.134
0.295
0.552
0.779
0.921
1.476

-0.170
0.532
0.588

1,220

2,000



Last 12 Months Div $

Yield %

Ww“

P/E Yie

THE original dispute that led
to the General Strike of 1958
surfaced on November 1, 1957
as a result of government's
granting to the white owned
tour companies the exclusive
franchise to operate trans-
portation services between the
new Nassau International Air-
port and the city.

To cope with this lion's share
of the business, the tour com-
panies purchased a fleet of cars
and buses and informed mem-
bers of the Bahamas Taxi-Cab
Union, their former employees,
that their services were no
longer required. The officers of
the union wandered, in vain,
from "pillar to post" in search
of a government department
that would listen to their griev-
ances.

So in desperation on Satur-
day, November 1, 1957, the Taxi
Cab Union under the leader-
ship of Clifford Darling, Nick
Musgrove, Lochinvar Lockhart,
Jimmy Shepherd, Cyril Fergu-

son and Wilbert Moss, blocked
all traffic to and from Nassau
International Airport for hours
while the commissioner and his
policemen looked on helplessly.

On the afternoon of Sunday,
November 2, the Bahamas
Taxi-Cab Union called on the
Bahamas Federation of Labour,
led by Randol Fawkes, for assis-
tance. A General Strike ,fol-
lowed..

On January 29, 1958, the gov-
ernment at last brought repre-
sentatives of the tour compa-
nies and the taxi union together
at a top level conference.

At the end of the talks, the
officers of each organisation
signed a detailed agreement
providing for the more equi-
table division of transportation
of passengers to and from the
airport.

The Bahamas Federation of
Labour therefore called an end
to the general strike and the
workers were ordered to return
to their jobs.

7.321587"
2.9449""*
2.500211"*
1.207441"*
11.2596""""*

Colina Money Market Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Bond Fund

delity Prime Income Fund
Se ae

ee





Sea S
YIELD - last 12 month dividends dividad by NAV KEY
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidolity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior weak
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

*- 29 Dacamber 2006

** 34 December 2006

*** . 30 November 2006



nN

****. 30 November 2006 wens

Lord Ranfurly greets the crowd on the
first unofficial Labonr Day in 1956,



ae
ie





THE TRIBUNE

5 R WS free?
FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 3

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 9



LEFT: Nassau is a ghost town after-the strike is called. Striking
workers make their point peacefully above and below



Labour leader Randol Fawkes talks with supporters and fellow activist Milo
Butler (second left), later the first Bahamian governor-general of the Bahamas.

Sr eee Ee eee oe





A Festival of Nine Lessons &
Carols for Christmas





Sa





ane







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. outh Beach Shopping Centre, East Street South
i
) P.O. Box SB-51628 - Nassau, Bahamas

| Phone / Fax: 242-392-4100 + 242-324-




®
e

The Public Is
We








11:00am

Other Opportunities For Worship






Sunday 10:15am Sunday School _
11:00am —_ Divine Worship Service _

Monday (3rd) 7:30pm Ladies Ministry _

Wednesday 7:30pm

Thursday 7:30pm

Saturday 3:00pm Chi



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TRIBUNE SPORTS



|

~ SATURDAY EVENING

|G WEOR lebiity news. (N)
1 (CC)

JANUARY 6, 2007

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS

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pearances he By Adetour in shall, Dan Duryea. A vixen-like Southern matriarch presides over a sly

acinth Tees Off |the country. family.

The Insider Cel- |Cold Case The mother of amur- Without a Trace “Requiem” Lookin
for a widower and his kids. 1 (cc)

One Season

WPBT |Wonders

48 Hours Mystery “Endgame” A
i is charged with the murder of

dered boy finds a letter suggesting eat wie (Rh (CC)
is first wife,

his death was not random.











“SUNDAY EVENING

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WPBT iareee Welk |tahs, leopards a bons in Africa.
Show 1 (CC) (DVS) (CC)
:00) 60 Minutes |Cold Case Lilly and Jeffries reopen |Cold Case “Knuckle Up” Lilly re-
@ WFOR i CV (CC). Jacase which involved the shoot opens the 2006 case aa ce
_ of a cabaret singer. (CC) bound man’s disappearance. (N)

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7B



JANUARY 7, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30_
NETWORK CHANNELS ‘

David Atten

Theatre ‘The
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Elizabeth |. (CC) (DVS)

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team searches for an ait-traffic con-
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THE TRIBUNE.



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007




LOCAL NEWS
By Franklyn G Ferguson







AMER

“ NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON. CAMERA | <










: arrister Alva enjoys ‘classy’ 60th

Alva Stewart-Coakley celebrated her 60th birthday in elegant style among family and friends on
December 20 at The Summit, home of Dr Nicholas Hepburn on Love Beach.
: Guests dined before dancing the night away. Sharing in the special occasion were members of Ms
Stewart-Coakley’s high school graduating class, the Government High School Class of 1965.
. The’ Class is shown above, standing from left: Zelia Bethel, retired nurse; Harrison Lockhart,
: president, Industrial Tribunal; Arabella Cambridge, Businesswoman, Kendal Munnings, CPA; Ros-
oe: alind, Bethel, Entrepreneur; Derek Cambridge, Casino Executive, (not a member of the class of 65),
Cynthia Hall, Human Resources Executive, ZNS; Dr Mac Campbell, ENT; Kendal Pyfrom, Insurance
Executive; Bernard (Porky) Dorsette, Businessman; Pandora Sawyer, Insurance Executive. Seated:
Justice Anita Allen Justice of the Supreme Court; Sandra Collie, retired Bank Executive; Judy
Lewis, Grief Counselor, Ottawa, Canada; Alva Stewart Coakley, Barrister-at-Law; Dr Nicholas
Hepburn, Surgeon; Yvonne Moncur, retired Bank Executive, and Isadora Bethel, Bank Executive.





Dr Hubert Minnis; Particia Minnis; Micro Biologist; Leah Jones of Atlanta, Georgia; and Sir

Clement Maynard.



Be Sash i i

a Claudine Stubbs, legal secretary, Higgs & Johnson; Alva Stewart-Coakley, Barrister-at-Law, and
Ruby Roker, office administrator.







Dr Nicholas Hepburn, surgeon; Mrs Garikapathi; Dr Krikanth Carikapathi, surgeon. Kendal Pyfrom, insurance executive; Dr Nicholas Hepburn; and Rosalind Bethel, entre,


a.



For further information on High Society Pictures please contact

AE

Ree :






DS “Lene Really isa,

JJ











SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com




@ SAILING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

SAILORS will gather in
Montagu Bay over the
weekend of January 26-28
to compete in the New
Year’s Day Regatta.

Minister of Local Govern-
ment and Consumer Affairs
V. Alfred Gray, who orches-
trated the move io bring all
of the concerned parties
back together under one
umbrella, said at a press
conference at his office yes-
terday that the event will be
dubbed the “Government
Invitational Regatta” and
will officially launch the
2007 regatta season.

Surrounded by members
of the Bahamas Boat Own-
ers and Sailors Association,
the Nassau Sailing Associa-

tion and the Commonwealth:

Sailing Association, as well
as members of his staff, Mr
Gray said Prime Minister
Perry Christie will declare
the season open at 2.30pm
on Saturday, January 27.

And Governor General

Arthur D. Hanna will host
the awards presentation in
grand style in a banquet at
7.30pm at Government
House with six men being
honoured for their contri-
bution to the growth and
development of regattas in

- the Bahamas.

“Regattas, in our collec-
tive view as sailing enthusi-

.". asts, have really not been



given the vintage or the
exposure on a national level
as it should, outside of the
Exuma Regatta,” Gray said.

Committee

“And it was thought by
the committee and the min-
istry that regattas have

See become so important to the

cultural life of our country
that there such-be a single

. regatta to launch regatta
2 2007.”

With all of the associa-

“» tions coming together in one

ing.

place at the same time, Gray

said they will be entertained
throughout the weekend by

. the Royal Bahamas Police
Force band and a junkanoo |

rush-out.

Gray said he is just as
excited about the regatta as
all of the representatives

_. who were present at the ,
‘conference because boats ©

from all of the associations
and throughout’ the
Bahamas will be participat-

Bernadette Smith, who
works at the regatta desk at
the ministry, revealed that
the following boats have
already confirmed to com-
pete in the three class of
sailing:

Class A - Good News,
Lucayan Lady, Pieces of
Eight, Silent Partner, Red
Stripe, New Courageous,
Tida Wave, New Southern
Cross, Red Hot Thunder-

bird and Sea Star.

Class B - Cobra, Ants
Nest, Ansbacher Queen,
William’s Auto (who will
change her name to Six Sis-
ters), Passion, Humming-
bird, Lady Natalie, Eudeva,
Barbarian, Healthcliff, Sonia
and the Lonesome Dove.

Class C - Irene Good
night, Queen Brigetta, Ack-
lins Moustache, Crazy Part-
ner, Legal Weapon, Lady

AAT LAL RE LENE LED LN AY ERE APTN

“Government Invitational
Reyatta’ to launch season



DRE R I EI UN



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

|_| MINISTER of Local Government and Consumer Affairs

V. Alfred Gray (seated centre) along with his Permanent Sec-

retary, the Rey. Harrison Thompson (left), and BBOSA com-
modore the Rey. Dr. Philip McPhee (right), pose above with
members of the various regatta associations as they announced
plans for the New Year’s Regatta in Montagu Bay, January 26-

28.

Eunice, Paparazzi, Magic, -

Thunderbird, Barbarian I],
Fugitive, Lady Ruthnell and
Bulla Reg.

Gray said the prize money
will be given out during the
gala awards banquet in the
ballroom of Government
House as the government
shows the boat owners, skip-
pers and sailors how much
they are appreciated.

Last year in April, Gray
said all of the associations
came together when they
met and ironed out all of
their differences and they
came up with a Sailor’s
Accord, an agreement that
all signed, signaling the end
of the splinter group and
now they are going to make
it official during the New
Year’s Regatta.

Rev. Dr. Philip McPhee,
the commodore of the
BBOSA and the official
spokesman for regatta in the
country, said because of
Gray’s intervention, the
New Year’s Regatta will be
considered the. greatest
event to be held in the coun-
try.

“We owe a lot to Minister
Gray for being instrumental
in being the magnet that has
drawn all of us together
under one umbrella in peace
and harmony,” McPhee
stressed.

Sheldon Gibson, the com-
modore of the CSA, said
he’s happy that they are all
together, trying to do the
best for sailing in the coun-
try, and he too congratulat-
ed Gray for his efforts.

“Our motto is competitive
and positive and we’re try-
ing to carry that out,” he

(Photo: Chris Ingraham)

stated. “We are going to be
positive in whatever we do
and when we come out, we
will try to do that.”

Also representing the
BBOSA was Sidney Forbes,
who noted that he is over-
joyed by the unity and con-
sistency that has been
demonstrated by all of the
parties involved.

“Once we come to Mon-
tagu Bay on January 26-28,
you will see camaraderie,
you will see consistency, you
see the best sailing that you
will ever see in New Provi-
dence ever,” he said.

Cohesive

While the BBOSA have
been responsible for the
hosting of the New Year’s
Day Regatta, Forbes said
they are pleased to defer it
to the government so that
they can bring about a cohe-
sive unit.

And Richard Munroe, the
commodore of the NSA,
said he’s been actively in
sailing for more than 50
years and this is the first
time that he’s seen such a
thrust with a minister play-
ing a prominent role.

“The only other minister
who did this before or came
close to his level was Alger-
non Allen,” Munroe reflect-
ed. “But I think this minister
has surpassed him.”

As the race coordinator,
Munroe warned all of the
sailors that the racers will
be starting on time and he
warned that they should be
prepared in advance or they
will get left at the starting
line.



Ua RE SS TTR





2

Chandra aims for
show of strength —

M@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

AFTER taking a year off
to undergo surgery last year
to replace a hernia disc,
sprinter Chandra Sturrup is
hoping to get back to full
strength this year.

And with her former
coach Trevor Graham being
indicted by a US Federal
Grand Jury last year for his
alleged role in the BALCO
steroid case, the biggest per-
formance-enhancing drug
scandal in US sports history,
Sturrup. said she will be
making her comeback train-
ing on her own in Raleigh,
North Carolina.

“Tm doing things on my
own,” said Sturrup, in an
interview with The Tribune
yesterday. “I guess things
are going alright. I won’t know until I start
competing.

“But it’s a hard road because I’ve been
out for so long and IJ had to try to motivate
myself to get back into the shape that I was
in. So it’s a work in progress.

“I’m going to stick with what I’ve been
doing,” she insisted. “I know what got me
there so far and I’m going to stick with it. I

just have to be mentally strong. But that’s no

problem for me. It’s just going to take an
extra push this year.”

As she plans her comeback, 35-year-old
Sturrup said if she’s not fully ready for
indoors, expect to see her making strides
during the outdoor season.

Her prime focus is to trim off some of the
weight she put on during her off year and
she hopes that she doesn’t suffer another
injury to set her back again.



@ CHANDRA STURRUP

“T feel alright. I just have
to get back into the swing
of things,” admitted Sturrup,
who last won an interna-
tional medal at the 2001
World Indoor Champi-
onships in the 60 metres.

“I’m not where I was
before, but I don’t think it
will take me that long. It
didn’t take me long before,
so by the end of the month,
I should be getting there
because I started training
since November.”

There’s no timetable for
Sturrup to compete or any
time for her to run. She just
wants to wait to see how her
body reacts when she picks
up her intensity in training.

In May, Sturrup was
forced to call off the remain-
der of her season.

“But it wasn’t until the
end of September, she had
surgery to replace a hernia
disc in her neck.

“Just for me to get back on the track would
be great,” she proclaimed. “I’m looking to
compete at a competitive level, but I can’t say
how competitive I would be.”

Sturrup said her goal is to be ready to rep-
resent the Bahamas at the Pan American
Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in July and
the IAAF World Championships in Osaka,

Japan in August.

Her former coach Trevor Graham has
denied any direct knowledge or involvement
in the steroid case.

On August 3, the United States Olympic
Committee banned him from its training
facilities.

Sturrup declined to comment on the issue,
only to say that she’s now training on her
own and she doesn’t intend to take on a new
coach in the future.

~

Sant



Murray upsets top-seed
-Davydenko to reach fi

’

_ Cabot Basketball Club aiming for ‘best of the best’

‘+ advancing to the Qatar Open

.. denko during the semi finals

TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ TENNIS
DOHA, Qatar
. Associated Press

ANDY MURRAY capital-
ized on Nikolay Davydenko’s
injury to upset the top-seeded

-. Russian 7-5, 6-2 on Friday,

. ‘final.

“It is not in every tourna-
ment you get to beat the
World No. 3. So, this is a good
win,” Murray said.

_ The fourth-seeded Briton

. will face No. 2 Ivan Ljubicic in
‘Saturday’s title match. The
‘Croat beat Robin Soderling of
Sweden 3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5) in the
other semifinal.

Davydenko scored a break
in the fifth game and led 4-2,
but needed injury breaks after
the sixth and eighth games to
tend to an apparent shin
injury. Murray broke Davy-
denko to even the first set 4-4
as the Russian increased his
unforced errors into the net
and wide. ;

Davydenko’s form deterio-
rated in the second set. Mur-
ray broke him in the second
game and jumped out to a 4-1
lead before serving out for the
match.

“It is big task playing the
No. 5 in the world,” Murray
said referring to Ljubicic. “He
is a very good server, and if I
can break his serve I should be
OK.”

Ljubicic’s had 21 aces,
including five in the tie-break-
er, in his match. He rallied
from 3-5 down in third set to
defeat the 25th-ranked Soder-
ling.



B® ANDY MURRAY of
Great Britain returns the ball
to Russia's Nikolay Davy-

of the Qatar Open in Doha,
Qatar Friday Jan. 5, 2007.
(AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Pearse tits,
Sete noe O ceri utenieciia
- Doha, Qatar Friday Jan. 5, 200

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



CABOT Basketball Club is hoping to
stage the “Best-of-the-Best” Primary

- School Basketball Tournament.

Wayde Watson and Sean ‘Bass’ Bast-
ian, directors of the club, said they intend
to bring all of the championship teams
from the islands that participate in pri-

ui e ball to Andy
nals of Qatar Openi

(Al Photo/Kamran BOT

They will play over the weekend of

April 5-7 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um to determine exactly who has the
best primary school team in the coun-
try, Watson revealed.

The tournament is expected to take
on a similar format to that of the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Classic for senior
boys basketball teams that will follow
two weeks later at the gym.

IVs anticipated that a total of 12 teams

SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 20



elimination tournament that will only be
open to players who are in primary
schools, not those who are still cligible to
play, but are in junior high school.

To add some excitement to the tour-
nament, Watson said they have invited
two coaches from Florida to come in and
view the players with the view of expos-

ing them to high school basketball, if

they are interested.
“These players will be going.into junior

much exposure as we can,” Watson said.
“And if they can get that exposure in
the United States, we will help them with
that too.”

Watson also revealed that they intend
to provide a number of exciting prizes
to the deserving athletes.

Among the list is a fully loaded com-
puter and a full ride to a University of
Miami camp in July to the most out-
standing plavers.

the onrly staees of our

































































sying to see if
ry,” Watson
gotten the
head with

planning because we we
we could first secure
stressed. “Now that W
gym, we can go full 9
our plans.”

Watson said interes
Family Islands can co}
at the College of the Bt
details.

“We feel this will
tournament for the fan§
jected,

a
ms on the

or Bastian
for further

exciting
Yatson pro












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Low: 70° F/21






High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 66° F/19°C

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highs and tonights's lows.



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62/46 43/6 Washington, DC 73/22

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High: 80° | High: 80°
Low: 68° | __ Low: 67°

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humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and.
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Statistics are for Nassau through 14 0 m. 1. yesterday
Temperatiire 520 esse



High :-2ceecceectats 83° F/28° C
OW Seccatpdiasceositteanese 73° F/23° C
Normal high ......... 78° F/25° C
Normal low. ...... 66° F/19° C
Last year’s high 80° F/27° C
Last year’s low 65° F/19° C
Precipitation: s02° 770-2 i a
As Of 1 p.m. yesterday w...scesssssessessreesersseese (ACE
Ne@antO: Cate 5 sess ctspicpidactsansstccvoses vsebesrscsivenne WACO
Normal year to date o...sssessssessssesssseecsseeese 0.29"
AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

_@ SAN SALVADOR
-——_Wiigh: 84°F 29°C:
Low: 71° F/22°C



RAGGED ISLAND |
High: 83° F/28°C —
Low: 68° F/20° CG










Sunrise...... 6:56 a.m.
Sunset....... 5:35 p.m.



_ Low. 70°F/21°C



Low: 72" F/22° G

GREAT INAGUA
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 70° F/21°C



US aL




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_ MAYAGUANA
High: 85°F/29°C









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Monday’ 10:52am. 23 4:37am.







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PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007



i
4

poe ey

Be SOP DLS TREES ACAI SAGEM ESLER

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BBE RA GEL EF SEE EET SE EST

SESE ra







Keeos_—s MONDAY
S HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure

and cholesterol testing is available. For more

info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-
tors Hospital conference room.

& CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm e Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
suonth in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times.and.places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. e

Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at °

7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets

.each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of

the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach © Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room e Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials.

4 HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the











AROUND

IHE |HIBUNE. - -



NASSAU

Aur: maine

ate

Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas thraugh
mediums ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. i contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imagination,



public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are
held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
ter Blake Road. For more information call
327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,
Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support
Group meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm
to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors
south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

&@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets
every Wednesday. from 1pm —- 2pm at East
Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the lst and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the
world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on



Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at
large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the'second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend « TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from lpm to 2pm.









PHOTOS WELCOME

FRIDAY



@ HEALTH 2
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to
attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.

SATURDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid class-
es are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

n CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

RE

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

SUNDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness
Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-
ed persons are welcome to attend. For more
information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.



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BAHAMAS EDITION



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Volume: 103 No.38

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

PRICE — 75¢.



PM webes ny arrests

Christie ‘stunned’
if government
not informed on
baggage handlers

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said he would be sur-
prised if not at least one gov-
ernment agency had been
informed about the investiga-
tion and the arrest. of the. five
Bahamian baggage handlers
before their arrest in Florida.

Speaking with the press after
a special luncheon at the new.
police conference centre, Mr
Christie said he has launched
his own investigation into the
circumstances of the arrest of
five Nassau Flight Services
(NFS) employees by US author-
ities.

Although the prime minister
concurred with Attorney Gen-
eral Allyson Maynard-Gibson

Christie |
sticks to
eléction

ETC



By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

DESPITE speculations to
the contrary, Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie yesterday
maintained that he will call
the next general election on
or before May 2.

Mr Christie speaking to.
the press after a special lun-
cheon at the new police con-
ference centre said he
believes that the Bahamas
is emotionally ready for an
election.

The prime minister said
that within the “next day or
two days’’ the PLP will have
selected all its candidates in
the Family Islands and will
then turn its attention to
New Providence.

““All who believe they are
candidates in the next gen-
eral election, are working as
candidates in the next gen-
eral election,” he said.

Mr Christie said he
believes, that Bahamians
have seen enough of his and
NM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham’s leadership style and
that they understand the
country’s challenges well
enough to make a decision

_on how to vote.
However, when it comes
to voter registration, Mr
| Christie said, the numbers
are not yet where govern-
ment would like them to be.
As of yesterday 101,000

SEE page 7











that no member of government
had been informed about the
controversial arrests, he said
that “there are some agencies
of the government that ought
to know if they are part of a
joint investigation.”

“T would be surprised if such
an agency: was not informed,”
he said,

Mr Christie said that he is
now receiving reports on the
incident and will hopefully soon
be in a position “to speak com-
prehensively and in detail to the
subject.”

“T have made a salient effort
to inquire fully into all of the
details because it has become
an important point in public
interest that I think I should
respond to as prime minister.

“For me it involves the vari-
ous agencies, including private
sector agencies like Spirit Air-
lines,” he said.

Five baggage handlers were
arrested and charged with traf-
ficking cocaine on local and
international flights through the
Lynden Pindling International

‘Airport when they arrived in

Florida to participate in a train-
ing course on December 17.
According to reports, the
men were not allowed to dis-
embark the Spirit Airlines flight
before they were arrested.

On Thursday three of the five’
. baggage handlers had their first

arraignment hearing before a
Miami federal court.

Family members of the men
claim that the five men were
entrapped in a sting operation
by Bahamian and US officials.

Prime Minister Christie at the
police luncheon yesterday
emphasised that the local'police
force had, “in writing”, assured
him that they had no knowl-
edge of the arrests before they
occurred.

He said that he is confident
that Bahamian police have in
no way circumvented any extra-
dition laws in this matter.

Mr Christie pointed out that
cross-border investigations and
joint operations have taken
place since the inception of the
Bahamian police, and that inter-
national law enforcement agen-
cies have gathered information
on criminal activities by
Bahamians for many years.

“Without questioning those
constitutional rights, there is a
bank of information on citizens
and institutions that have been
gathered over years and years
and years, and whether you like
it or not that information is
shared and known by (interna-
tional) law enforcement agen-
cies,” Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said that
“on the face of it” persons com-
mitting criminal offences in the
Bahamas should be charged
according to Bahamian laws
and heard before Bahamian
courts,





ENFORCING THE LAW - Prime Minister Perry Christie (centre) arrives for a special luncheon
at the new police conference centre. Pictured to his right is Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson



By KRYSTEL ROLLE

CLAIMING he © will
“increase the violence” if
government does not supply
him with a job, one young
man said he is tired of the
empty promises the goyern-
ment hands out-during the
election period.



Derek Knowles, 19, resi-°
‘dent of Johnson Street in Fox

Hill, said he has been out of a
job for more than three
months, and has become so
frustrated that he is prepared
to start a “riot” if mecessary.

He quit his previous job,
claiming that he was under-
paid, overworked and taken
advantage of. Since then he
has not been able to secure
another job.

Mr Knowles, and four of
his friends plan to take their
message to the masses. Yes-
terday they staged a protest
in the Farrington Road area
in an effort to get others to
join “their cause.” He
believes that once the “word”
gets out he wiil have hundreds
of supporters.

According to him several
of his friends have been out of

work for more,than a year, It
has got to the point where
they are willing to do “any-

thing” for money, he said. “If

they don’t give us more jobs
we’re going to increase the
violence: I will do whatever I
have to do to get a job — Pl
have to get money. anyway I
can.”

When asked why he was
taking such extreme mea-

sures, he replied: “That’s what |

Maleohn X did. You have to
sped ak out until someone —
you.”

Unatraid of what the reper.
cussions of his actions could.

be, he stated: “I want to start

a riot. If they don’t want that -

to happen, then they need to
find us jobs. People in the
ghetto aren’t getting the right
support they need.”

He said that this exercise

was not just for his benefit or.

the benefit of his friends, “Pm
speaking for the community
— for the black community.”
Mr Knowles is also peti-
tioning governinent to
increase the minimum wage.

SEE page 7 —

Photo: Tim Clarke

sKoor ea eieae Guana Cay

‘riot’ for job

workers in
pay protest

By ALEXANDRIO

MORLEY :
Tribune Staff Reporter,

ABACO - Baker’s Bay
employees staged a protest out-
side the developer’s head office
in Marsh Harbour yesterday

‘morning, demanding overdue

bonuses, fair pay, and proper
work equipment.

A source, who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity, told The
Tribune that about 30 land-
Scapers employed with the Bak-
er's Bay Golf course decided
not to go to. work yesterday

because they have not received

the Christmas bonuses, they
claimed they were promised
before the Christmas vacation.
They were also upset about the
newly-installed time clock that
employees now haye to use.
According to the source:
“The time clock is the problem,

Before the time clock, we were’

all getting paid for working 40

hours per week, but now we get

‘paid for about 30 hours per:

week.”

At the moment, suid the -

source, none of the landscapers >

trust thé new time clock system,

which was installed three weeks .>
ago, because their salaries have -

been reduced drastically since’

its impicmentation,

“We used to be able to carry .

home over $400 per week, but
now at the end of the week we

carry home $220,” the worker —

said.

The source said the land- ©

scapers continue to work the
same number of hours, but on
pay day their cheques do not
accurately reflect the amount
of work done. :

The source also told The Tri-
bune that the landscapers are
expected to dig holes on the
grounds of the development
with their hands,

SEE page 7





t
1
1
(
1
1
!
‘
1
'
|
'






PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

Malisse beats
Santoro, wil





the semifinal

fi TENNIS
CHENNAI, India
Associated Press .



THIRD-SEEDED Xavier
Malisse of Belgium overcame a
jittery second set to defeat Fab-
rice Santoro 6-4, 4-6, 6-0 on Fri-
day and set up a semifinal
match against Rafael Nadal at
the Chennai Open.

Nadal, ranked No. 2, beat
Davide Sanguinetti 6-3, 6-2 in
another quarterfinal match.

‘Two-time winner and fifth-
seeded Carlos Moya clinched
five straight tiebreaker points
to overcome big-serving Ivo
Karlovic 6-4, 7-6 (6). Moya’s
opponent in the semifinal will
be Stefan Koubek of Austria,
who shocked third-seeded
Julien Benneteau of France 6-1,
6-2.

Malisse said he was looking
forward to playing Nadal on the
hardcourt surface. Nadal has
not won a title since his triumph
in the French Open last year.

“I played six tournaments

-after the France Open. You
can’t win them all, but I think I
did quite well,” Nadal said.

After the Grand Slam tri-
umph in Paris, Nadal went on to
reach the final at Wimbledon,
the quarterfinals in the U.S.

Me

AIN'S Carlos Moya

AS

Open and the semifinals in the
Masters Cup.

“Pve only played him once
and lost,” said Malisse, ranked
37th. “That was on clay and
everybody loses of Nadal on
clay, but it should be a good
match on the hard surface
here.”

Malisse said his match against
the 52nd-ranked Santoro, who
begins his 19th year on the ATP.
Tour, was his best so far.

“Everyone will be looking at
the few errors, but they
occurred because | played more
aggressively,” he said.

Santoro was presented a
plaque for his sportsmanship by
former Indian Davis Cup cap-
tain Vijay Amritraj

“For me tennis isn’t about
winning, but for presenting a
good image of yourself and your
country to the world,” Santoro
said. “I think I’ve still got a lot
of tennis in me.”



H@ BELGIUM'S Xavier
Malisse plays a shot against
France's Fabrice Santoro,
unseen, during their quarter
final match of the men's singles
final in the ATP Chennai Ten-
nis Championship in Chennai,
India, Friday Jan. 5, 2007.

(AP Photo/M. Lakshman)



the crowd on winning the quarter final match against
Soca ; : ; ;
Croatia's Ivo Karlovic, unseen, in the ATP Chennai Tennis Char

mpionship in Chennai, India, Friday, ATP Chennai Tennis Championship in Chennai, India, Friday Jan. 5, 2007.
Jan. 5, 2007. Moya won the match by 6-4, 7-6.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

_ SPORTS
















































rves against









Italy's David



SPAIN'S Rafael Nadal, ¢ Sanguinetti, in the quarter final match of the

“(AP Photo/M. Lakshinay) (AP Photo/M. Lakshman) sg



Liverpool a
off in FA C

PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Larsson set to make Man United
debut in FA Cup game against Villa

m SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

HENRIK LARSSON could
make his Manchester United
debut alongside Ole Gunnar Sol-
skjaer against Aston Villa in the
FA Cup on Sunday.

United could be fielding a Scan-
dinavian attack with a combined
age of 68.

Former Celtic and FC
Barcelona striker Larsson has
joined the Red Devils on loan
from Swedish club Helsingborg
and should make his debut at Old
Trafford at age 35.

"T've been very pleased with his
training. He's been very sharp and
shown good finishing," Ferguson
said. "I hope he scores — that will
be nice."

With Louis Saha injured and
Wayne Rooney likely to be rested,
United manager Alex Ferguson
is expected to also start Solskjaer,
who turns 34 in February. The
Norwegian striker has returned
from two years of injury problems
with eight goals this season.

Knowledge

"Both players will be involved.
I have to decide whether to start
with both or just one of them,"
Ferguson said. "Like Ole, Henrik
is a good finisher. They are both
experienced and they can use that
knowledge. Certainly their posi-
tional play in the penalty box is
the great strength of both of
them." '

After the tough midwinter spell
of four Premier League games in
10 days, Ferguson will rest sever-
al of his regulars ahead of next
month's Champions League
games against Lille. Poland goal-
keeper Tomasz Kuszezak will take
over from Edwin van der Sar to
make his fourth appearance of the
season.

"With European football beck-
oning next month it is important ©
Tomasz gets a bit of football,"
Ferguson said. "Edwin has been

@ SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

LIVERPOOL and Arsenal meet in the
FA Cup on Saturday with each team on a
roll.

Premier League teams enter the third
round of the competition this weekend,
with defending champion Liverpool and
Arsenal — who have 17 titles between
them — both thinking like they have a
chance of winning the famous old tro-
phy.

Liverpool is coming off a 3-0 Premier
League win over Bolton that extended
its unbeaten streak at Anfield to 20
games. Benfica was the last team to win in
Liverpool, knocking the then-defending
champions out of the Champions League
quarterfinals with a 2-0 win in March.

Though third-place Liverpool leads
Arsenal by one point in the Premier
League, the Gunners arrive at Anfield
with a healthy Thierry Henry and a little
bit of history on its side.

The Gunners are perfect at Anfield in
FA Cup play, though their one win came
71 years ago.

But a 3-0 league win over the Reds on
Nov. 12 has the north London side look-
ing to emulate Benfica.

"The draw could have been kinder, but
the important thing is we are at home,"
captain Steven Gerrard said Thursday.
"They will be fearing the tie more than we
will. They are a top side with top players
and we know it's going to be a very diffi-
cult game."

Gerrard has scored three goals in his
last six games, while striker Peter Crouch
got on the score sheet for the first time in
10 games against Bolton. The Reds have
held opponents scoreless in its last five
wins.

"As a manager of a team that has a
gocd balance between attack and defense,
I am very happy with the consistency of
the team, the chances we are creating,
the good football we are playing and also
the clean sheets," manager Rafael Benitez
said. "I think it will be a good month for
us.”

Arsenal only lost once in the seven
matches without Henry, but can still take
heart from the Frenchman's return for
the Gunners 4-0 win over Charlton on

- 2-1. Its only appearance in the

‘old either," he said. "I can see

fantastic but I think he under-
stands we need to give the boy
some experience."

Six points ahead at the top of
the Premier League, United is
aiming to take its record number
of FA Cup triumphs to 12 and six
since Ferguson arrived at the club
in 1986.

With seven triumphs, Villa is
tied for fourth in the list of FA
Cup winners, although it hasn't
won soccer's most famous domes-
tic cup competition since 1957,
when it beat Manchester United

final since then was in 2000, when
it lost 1-0 to Chelsea.

Villa hasn't won in 10 games
and manager Martin O'Neill, who
had Larsson in his team at Celtic,
is aware that United has strength
in depth to cause problems, espe-
cially at Old Trafford.

"Against Manchester United,
you know it won't necessarily be a
free-kick or a set-piece that will be
your undoing because they have
the capabilities of playing through
you," O'Neill said.

"If we play like we have recent-
ly, certainly going forward, we
look as if we're going to create
things. I've been delighted with
the team, and we've played some
really great stuff. But we need a
marked improvement before we
start calling ourselves a quality
team."

O'Neill said he believed Larsson
still had plenty to offer United,
even at age 35.

"Henrik has been and still is a
quality player. He is also not too





exactly why Sir Alex Ferguson has
gone for him because he will need
a number of quality players in Jan-
uary-February and Henrik is cer-
tainly that."

@ MANCHESTER United's
new loan signing, the Swedish
Helsingborg footballer Henrik
Larsson, left, smiles at a press
conference with manager Sir
Alex Ferguson at the side's Car-
rington training ground.

(AP Photo/Jon Super)

.



cer match at Anfield Stadium, Liverpool, England, Monday Jan. 1, 2007.

Tuesday, where the striker scored his first

goal since November.

"We have won so many games while
missing important players, so | think peo-
ple should give credit to the players who
deserve it," Henry said.

The Gunners still arrive without
Emmanuel Adebayor, Freddie Ljung-
berg and Theo Walcott, while Robin van
Persie — who has five goals in his last four
games — and midfielder Cesc Fabregas
are suspended.

Fullback Emmanuel Ebouc ts set to
return from an ankle iijury that has Kept

him out of action for several weeks.

The two sides will meet three days lat-
er to replay the Dec. 19 League Cup quar-
terfinal (hat was postponed due to fog.

In Saturday's other games, League
Championship leader Birmingham hosts
Newcastle, Bolton travels to Doncaster,
Hull plays Middlesbrough, Portsmouth
faces Wigan, Reading welcomes Burn-
ley, Sheffield United plays Swansea, Wat-
ford hosts Stockport, and West Ham
looks to end a three-game slide against
Brighton.

Also Saturday, Macclesiicid travels to

@ LIVERPOOL'S Steven Gerrard, right, and Peter Crouch, left, celebrate Gerrard scoring against Bolton Wanderers during their English Premie

Stamford Bridge to face Premier League
champions Chelsea.

"You never know what might happen,"
Macclesfield manager Paul Ince said.."We
are playing well and it is important we
go there and stamp our mark on the
game, and not be overawed by the stars,
the stadium and the crowd. "We are going
to go there to try to win the game."

Ince was December's League Two
manager of the month after leading the
Silkmen to wins in five of six games as
part of an eight-game unbeaten run.

Chelsea will use a makeshift central





_ SNS a

Ms AS
r League soc-

SS

(AP Photo/Dave Thompson)

defense with John Terry still recovering
from back surgery. He is joined on the
sidelines by Khalid Boulahrouz — who
injured his knee in Tuesday's 0-0 draw
with Aston Villa — and Ricardo Carvalho,
who is suspended.

In Sunday's other matches, Tottenham
travels to Cardiff, Shefticld Wednesday
plays Manchester City, and Everton takes
on Blackburn in the only other match
between Premier League clubs.

On Friday, Bristol Rovers play Here-
ford and Stoke faces 2005 runner-up Mill-
wall.



-round -



SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5B

TRIBUNE SPORTS





ss

SS ss S SS aS

@ SOUTH AFRICA'S batsman Graeme Smith, center, misplays a shot as India's fielders Sourav Ganguly, left, and VVS Laxman, right, looks on during the fourth day of the 3rd and final Test match agains
India at Newlands stadium in Cape Town, South Africa, Friday, Jan. 5, 2007.



(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe

South Africa loses two wicket:
in chase fo India

i CRICKET
CAPE TOWN,
South Africa
Associated Press

DALE STEYN took four wickets to help
dismiss India for 169 before stumps Friday on
the fourth day and leave South Africa 211 runs
to win the third test and the series.

South Africa was 55-2 at the close, requiring
another 156 runs for victory at the Newlands
Stadium. “

A.B de Villiers was caught by wicketkeeper
Dinesh Karthik for 22 off Zaheer Khan and
Hashim Amla was leg-before-wicket to Anil
Kumble for 10 in the final over. Graeme Smith
was not out 21 at stumps.

India, which scored 414 in its first innings and
then dismissed South Africa for 373, lost its last
seven second-innings wickets for 79 runs. Steyn
had the best figures with four for 30 off seven
overs.

‘. In the morning, Steyn induced Virender
Sehwag — who batted back at the top of the
order — to drive loosely outside off stump on 4

_+_+, and give wicketkeeper Mark Boucher an easy

->+7+ ‘catch.

*. Inthe next over, Makhaya Ntini got a delivery
to climb sharply on Wasim Jaffer, who gloved it
to De Villiers at first slip to depart for 2.

There was a long delay before Sourav Gan-

--_- guly came in at No. 4. Sachin Tendulkar was due

-.7.7-in, but because he was off the field when South

j Africa's innings closed overnight, he had to wait

an equivalent amount of time before he could
bat.

Ganguly was not ready and the umpires con-
ferred with South Africa captain Smith and
asked him not to appeal for a timed-out dis-
missal in the interests of sportsmanship.

Smith agreed, and Ganguly took eight min-
utes to get to the crease. India went to lunch at
73-2.

Ganguly was the first batsman to be dismissed
after the break, guiding a simple catch to Her-
schelle Gibbs in the gully off Jacques Kallis for
46.

Rahul Dravid was caught-and-bowled for 47
by left-arm spinner Paul Harris and India was
114-4.

One run later, V.V.S Laxman was run out
for 1 by a powerful throw from Shaun Pollock at
square leg.

Pollock then had Tendulkar out leg-before-
wicket for 14 just before tea. ee

The last four wickets fell in just five overs
for 22 runs after tea.

Kumble was caught by Gibbs off Steyn for 6.
Khan was run out for 1 by De Villiers at extra
cover.

Sree Sreesanth was caught by Kallis off Steyn
for 4, and Munaf Patel was caught for a duck by
Pollock on Steyn's very next ball — the seventh,
as the umpires miscounted.

The series is tied at 1-1.



@ INDIA'S batsman Zaheer Khan, left, rais-

es his bat near the ball as South Africa's bowler

:. Jacques Kallis, right, attempts to field as he

makes a run on during the fourth day of the

3rd and final Test match against South Africa at

Newlands stadium in Cape Town, South Africa,
Friday, Jan. 5, 2007.

(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)



oe ce te ie ee ee Sy Sa ae, Sage a, ES Sy og ee

a

PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007
















yOu

BAIT STATION
TRAYS ARE

EMPTY... AND
ONAWED ON/






SEE, YOUR

WE'RE

ARE YOU ENJOYING THE PARTY

—

be
i

SS

1 CATEREO FOR YOU?

MARVIN



RRR

NON

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PoLAW BAYAW GoT STUCK
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SEQUITUR

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# 10

ACROSS
1 = The odd street light (5)

6 Material good when hot (5)

9 ‘1s colourful, excellent in brown,
maybe (7)

Go furtively like a
wriggling snake (5)

Sign used in calibrating (5)

Nasty nolee from the organ (5)
Having lost one, he’s short (7)
Familiar sleuth in a white coat (3)
Soon to be nameless (4)

Dan's upset about Eva
being in a state (6)

' Bent on sounding pained in bed? (5)
TV business person; fierce, one
imagines (6)

A fishy mouthful doggedly taken? (4)
Money, some of which

Is retumed (3)

How to address raiders,

possibly? (4,3)

Person supporter with a
companionable air? (5)

Paper spoitt by a spill of oil (5)
Breaks into pictures? (5)

Badly lit (7)

Possibly fired for being Franch? (5)
Rattled off a kind letter (5)

11
12
13
15
17
18

283.8

Yesterday's cryptic solutions

22, Putin 23, Test 26, Atlas 28, Far 29, Hearst 30,
S-E-nora 31, Hens 32, Air force 33, Direct

She'd

THAT IMPLY

OVERRUN
WITH MICES

WE NEEDED To NAWKK

TeGETAAN To GET THIS
NNAINE CINK of (CE:
To REND BACK NATH.



CRYPTIC PUZZLE .

DOWN

2

BR

Bs

ACROSS: 1, Jet-Sam 7, Altitude 8, R-if-t. 10, Trikes 11,
Deluge 14, Ten 16, Roses 17, Road 19, S-p-itt 21, F-O-ray

DOWN: 1, Jester 2, S-pike-d 3, Mats 4, Miser-L-y 5, Tutus
6, Me-Des 8, Rita 9, Fen 12, L-ot 13, Gears 15, Sprig 18,
Oraie 19, Sot 20, lan 21, F-US-spot 22, Par 23, Tanner 24,
Eros 25, T-ea se-T 26, A-he-ad. 27, La-AR-y 28, Fee 30,

* Animal talk? (3)

_ bushy talled (5)

C2008 by Norm Amerce Syrciaste, inc. World egies meaved.

s
tN

NX

(C2008 by tarts Aemerics Syndicate, re. Yorld fights reserved.

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fate © '06 WILEY IPK, INC. :
KAN pret. ot Urwerene PRES SID,



WILE IPR @ GARTEN

HOW'? HE GET

THE JOB POSING
FOR THAT
PICTURE 7

Container used by an ancient
Peruvian in outer Taiwan (3,3)
Catherine’s place, historically (6)

Show contempt of

a short drink (5)

Comforted when a good card's sold
out (7)

Doubles partner? (4)

Made me enter the shallow

part (6)

In general, to make good

progress (3,2)

Bow-legged, big headed and

Had he a nose for conquest? (5)
Tha payment is for the hire cars (5)
Supply grub in front of a pillar (5)

I's perpetually negative (5) .
Early career as a young ruffian? (7)
Regarding wrought iron,

a great artist (6)

Just the drink for a railman? (6)
Alittle cash, less than ample for a
regular drink (6)

The last place to dump anything (5)
It's In the notes to quote from (4)

All you need in Morse telegraphy (3)

EASY PUZZLE

Pa ne PS NN a ra

Yesterday's easy soiuuons

ACROSS: 1, Hermit 7, Recalled 8, Brie 10, Malice 11,
Manure 14, One 16, Rotor 17, Rate 19, Refer 21, Merit 22,
Cedar 23, Drew 26, Spoon 28, Leo 29, Lean-to 30, Locust
31, Abet 32, Prisoner 33, Dither

DOWN: 1, Hammer 2, Marine 3, Tree 4, Cabaret 5, Clout 6,
Adder 8, Biot 9, Ice 12, Nor 13, Rouse 15, Feral 18, Agape
19, Red 20, Fir 21, Mention 22, Con 23, Decent 24, Rout
25, Wither 26, Slope 27, Oasis 28,

Lob 30, Lard

dl

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ALL EXCEPT THE
ONES IN PLAIN. VIEWS

PT Dif len
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CAN SHE



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INTERRUPT YOUR
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x N

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ACROSS

Month (5)
Attain (5)
Rested (7)
Witches’
group (5)
About (5)
Custom (5)
Idler (7)
Place (3)
Plant (4)
Small

case (6)
Royal (5)
Rescued (6)
Meadows (4)

Pitch (3)

Angry reply (7)
Cold

dish (5)
Characteristic (5)
Salary (5)

Lack (7)
War-horse (5)
Molars (5)

COMICS PAGE:















“CHRISTMAS MUST BE GETTIN’CLosE. My
MoM TOLD ME THE CLOSET IS ‘OFF LIMITS?”

TATION GIVES WAY TO A

Bidding Quiz

Partner bids One Diamond, and
the next player passes, neither side
vulnerable. What would you bid now
with each of the following four
hands?

1. @ 93 ¥ 85 @ KQ862 & AJ73

2. @ KIO V AK8 @ 107 & Q9862

3.@AJ7VA10 © KJ643 & AJ8

4. @AQ93 Y AQ87 @ — # A9875

eee

1. Two clubs. You don’t quite have
the values for a jump to three dia-
monds (forcing to game), and are too
good for a single raise to two dia-
monds (which would indicate six to
10 points). As usual, when faced
with this dilemma, you bid a side suit
initially — in this case, clubs —
planning to show diamond support at
your next opportunity without jump-
ing the bidding.

By combining these two bids, you
indicate a hand of 11 or 12 points that
originally was worth a raise to two
and a half diamonds. Partner may
then go on to game or not, depending
upon the strength of his hand.

2. Two notrump. With a hand so
well-suited for notrump play, there is
no particularly good reason for
responding two clubs. Ordinarily, a
five-card suit is not suppressed, but
when it is a minor and an 11-trick
contract is only a distant hope, while
a nine-trick game at notrump is very
promising, the minor suit can be con-
cealed. Two notrump shows 13 to 15
points and is forcing to game.

3. Three clubs. You can’t settle for
less than a slam with a holding of 18

high-card points, excellent trump
support and controls in every suit. In
such cases, it is normal to start by
making a jump-shift in another suit
in order to alert partner to the possi-
bility of a small or grand slam.

However, here you have no gen-
uine side suit in which to jump-shift.
So, at the risk of temporarily deceiv-
ing partner (you plan to support dia-
monds strongly from here on in), you
manufacture a suit because that is the
only way you can apprise him of the
potential for slam. Clubs are chosen
rather than spades because it is dan-
gerous to make a jump-shift in a suit
higher in rank than the one you plan
as the ultimate trump suit.

An immediate jump to four
notrump (Blackwood) is also accept-
able, but you might find yourself
guessing whether to bid a grand slam
if partner shows up with, say, an ace
and two kings. Keeping the bidding
lower may allow you to get a better
picture of partner’s hand, and you
can always use Blackwood later on.

4. Two clubs. This is a fine hand to
have opposite an opening bid, but it
loses much of its luster when partner
starts with one diamond. A jump-
shift would be decidedly out of order
because it is not wise to eat up valu- -
able bidding space when you have no
idea where you're. going. The best
approach is to respond in your
longest suit first, planning to bid
spades and hearts later (if necessary)
and thus describe your 4-4-0-5 distri-
bution.

mit ay



The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)
HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain
the centre letter and there must
be at least one nine-letter word.
No plurals.





=
a
o

.

Pe
Pe aS

DOWN
2 — Unprincipled (6)
3 Invent (6)
4 Domestic
fowl (3)
5 Neighbouring (5)

6 Performance (7)
7 Revise (4)

8 Prickly plant (6)
12 Chopped (5)
13 Middle (5)

14 Of the sun (5)
15 Years (5)

16 Anxious (5)
18 Acceptable (5)
19 Told (7)

21 Tropical bird (6)
Find (6)
Affirm (6)
Quick (5)
Team (4)
Humour (3)

23
25

TODAY'S TARGET
Good 15; very good 23; excellent
30 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

derive derv devise dive diver
diverse divert divest drive
duvet ever evert restive revise
revised revue rive rivet serve
served SERVITUDE sever
sieve strive veer verse

versed vest vested vesture
vied virtue virus









new
word

punishment to a
team for break-
Taye MAUL Cwe LaLa 4
game play.

Ni Hua v Alexander Morozevicn,
China v Russia, world team
championship 2005. It was the last
game of the tournament to finish,
and gold and silver medals
depended on the result. China's
young players had led throughout
until a late charge by the
experienced Russians. A draw
would suffice for Ni Hua, and
material is level with a blocked
position. But Moro, a world top 10
grandmaster, has an active
position with queen, rook and
bishop all controlling key squares,
so the defence is difficult. White's °
obvious try is 14, but Ni Hua
feared the reply Qc2 with threats
like Qe2 Rael Qa2 when the white

HOW'S YOUR
SNOW ART
PROGRESSING ?

BY ABANDONING REPRESEN:
TATIONALISM, I'M FREE TO
EXPRESS MYSELF WITH PURE
FORM. SPECIFIC INTERPRE-

MORE VISCERAL RESPONSE



queen is tied to stopping Qg2 mate.
So the 22-year-old went 1 Rel, which
stops Qc2 but allows a different
tactical trick. What happened?

TRIBUNE SPORTS





THIS PIECE 1S ABOUT
THE INADEQUACY OF
TRADITIONAL IMAGERY
AND SYMBOLS TO
CONVEY MEANING:
IN TODAYS WORLD.















OFVYRE 1S

WELL C'MON,
MONOCHROMATIC .

IT's WST
SNOW.



SATURDAY,

JANUARY 6 ve

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20

Don’t worry about bad news you'll
receive this week, Aries. It’s more of a
misunderstanding than anything else.
Ignore the dire warnings and proceed
with your plans.

TAURUS -— Apr 21/May 21
Advice you’ll receive from a friend ©
can’t be trusted, Taurus. This person ,
is not qualified to speak about cer-

tain topics, and especially not the ~

one you have concerns about.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

A surprise guest knocks on your '
door in the days to come, Gemini.
Be warm and accommodating even .
though it’s an imposition. The visit
will be a short one.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

A: positive attitude will help you ,
tackle a project more easily than a

negative one will, Cancer. Cast your ~

doubts aside that you’ll never get the .
job done and get to it.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Putting your trust in a family mem- *
ber’s hands will end with suprising ©

results, Leo. You can’t avoid the sit- -

uation, so there’s no point Worrying -

about it in advance.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22
This is a critical time at work, so be
on your best behavior, Virgo, or you’

may be passed up for a promotion. .

Don’t sabotage what you’ve worked”
so hard to attain. ,

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 :

A move that you made a few months

se hee

ago is not panning out. Admit defeat. . - ~

and cut your losses. Don’t worry,

friends and family will support you .

until you’re back on your feet.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

A promotion at work has resulted in ”
more assignments on your plate.

While you enjoy the status, you,’ .

didn’t expect so many extf'a responsi-
bilities. Speak up if you need help. *
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21 .
Several financial blunders left you in
the red at the end of last year. Make
a resolution this time around to be
more frugal with your purchases, or
the same results will ensué.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
A proposition has been made to you,
and you’ve accepted. Big changes are
in store in the weeks to come,
Capricom, so hang on tight and enjoy
the bumpy ride... ;

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

- yee

a

Now that things are stable on the -.°.°.

homefront, Aquarius, concentrate ! +"

+

on what you’re going to do at .*.°

work. It just may be time to seek -
out a promotion. :

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
After a year of hard work, consider
taking some time off for a much-
needed vacation, Pisces. You’ll be
glad you got a break.

CHESS by Leonard Barden |

EHR

CHESS

SOLUTIONS

pre er RF FS EN ESE SEE TREE AP

aVeW TY ZUM +19) HENRY E HEY TEN Z #BsNEIIq
umed pe au) SUM [HOY TAY T WORRTIOS SAND



a



Se

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 22



Grand Bahama

school sees rise |

in autistic pupils

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Beacon
School is seeing a growing num-
ber of students with autism,
according to school Principal
Sheryl Wood.

Ms Wood reported that eight
children at the school have been
identified as autistic so far, with
the help of a US expert in
autism.

Diane Adrion of the Univer-
sity of Miami, who has about
25 years of experience with
autism, conducted a workshop
for special education teachers
at the Beacon School on Fri-
day.

Ms Wood said that an invita-
tion was extended to teachers
from the private and public
schools, healthcare profession-
als, the Department of Social
Services, and other ancillary

_-agencies connected with special

education.
“Autism is one of those dis-
orders that we (in Grand

Bahama) know very little about

so we thought it was prudent to
invite somebody like Ms Adrion
who has many years of experi-
ence — in fact more than 25
years of experience in the field

‘of autism,” she said.
Ms Wood said she felt that:

the workshop was important
because “we have a growing
population of students who pre-
sent with autistic trait or full
blown autism.”

“We wanted to learn how to
identify them better. At the
moment we suspected it, but
with the help of an expert like
Ms Adrion who visited the
classrooms and did sorne obser-
vation of those students .and

‘helped us to identify whether

they were autistic.”
Ms Wood said that teachers

. were able gain important strate-

gies and methodology to inter-
vene with autistic children more
effectively.
Teachers, she said, learned
some of the characteristics
exhibited by autistic children.
Some of the characteristics
include children who have prob-

lems attaching to their care
givers, children who show little
or no emotion, children who
have unusual self-stimulating
behaviour such as, hand flap-
ping, rocking back and forth,
twirling of the hair, or making
unusual sounds. :

Ms Wood said children who
are preoccupied with a particu-
lar object like a rotating fan, or
a child who seems to be in their
own world are traits to look for
when identifying autism. .

She said Ms Adrion shared
several strategies on how to
apply effective behaviour man-
agement techniques — the
Lavaase behaviour manage-
ment approach, the ABC
(antecedent behaviour conse-
quences) approach, and the
applied behaviour analysis the-

ory — to better cope with and.

teach autistic children.

Ms Wood said the techniques
will assist them in changing
behaviour and getting autistic
children in a more appropriate
frame of mind for education.



By ALISON YOUNG
Cox News Service

ATLANTA -- After'a nasty
stomach bug struck more than
400 passengers aboard the
world's largest cruise ship last
month, the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention issued a

- rare "no sail" recommendation

so the vessel could be thor-
oughly sanitized.

But the outbreaks that swept
through Royal Caribbean's
Freedom of the Seas were
ainong at least 37 that hit cruise
ships during 2006, making it a
record year for shipboard out-
breaks, according to CDC
reports.

More than 4,480 people were
sickened in the outbreaks and in
nearly every case the confirmed
or.suspected cause has been the
same: noroviruses.

This highly contagious group
of viruses causes what is com-
monly called the "stomach flu,"
a miserable one- or two-day
bout of vomiting, diarrhea and
cramping.

Nobody knows for sure how
many norovirus cases there are
in the United States each year.
But the CDC says it is the most
common form of gastrointesti-
nal illness, sickening an esti-
mated 23 million people each

. year in nursing homes, schools,

restaurants and families. While
nobody tracks the nationwide
incidence of norovirus disease,
some scientists believe it may
be on the increase - possibly
contributing to the vexing rise in
cruise ship outbreaks in recent
years.

As travelers board ships for
winter cruises, CDC officials
said they should focus on good
hygiene practices, particularly
thorough hand washing, to
avoid getting ill - whether on
land or at sea. About 10 mil-
lion people cruise annually in
North America, according to
the Cruise Lines International
Association.

~ Passengers also need to keep
cruise outbreaks in perspective,
the CDC and cruise line indus-
try officials said.

"There's a lot of norovirus in
the general population in the
United States," said Dave For-
ney, chief of the CDC's Vessel
Sanitation Program for the past
decade until he retired at the
end of December. "With so
much of it in the general popu-
lation, we see that much more
in the cruise environment."

Unlike on land where doc-
tors aren't required to test for or

‘report norovirus illness, cruise:

ships are required to record

details of all passengers who.

become ill with gastrointestinal
symptoms and report those
numbers to the CDC.
Norovirus outbreaks aboard
cruise ships generally are less a
problem caused by the ship and
more a problem caused by ill

passengers who don't want to -
miss their long-planned vaca- .

tion, said Forney. By going
ahead with their voyage, these

sick travelers bring norovirus-

es. aboard, contaminating sur-
faces they touch with unwashed
hands. :

Cruise industry officials are
acutely aware of public con-
cerns about norovirus outbreaks
aboard their ships and say they
have taken extraordinary steps
to stem any spread by passen-
gers: From denying boarding or
offering to change cruise dates
for ill passengers, to quaranti-
ning those sickened at sea, to
repeated cleaning of high-touch
areas and promoting hand
washing aboard ships.

But they also say cruises have
been tagged with an unfair asso-
ciation with the illnesses
because the CDC lists ship-
board outbreaks on the Web at
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/vsp/sur
v/Gllist.htm.

Michael Crye, executive vice
president of the International
Council of Cruise Lines, an
industry group, said people are
more likely to catch norovirus-
es on airplanes, in shopping
malls and elsewhere in their
hometowns than aboard cruise
ships that have rigorous sanita-
tion programs.

Still, cruise ship outbreaks ©

can result in large numbers -of
sick, people, CDC records show.
And some ships had more than
one outbreak in 2006, while oth-
ers had none - something For-

ney and industry officials can't _

explain.

Among some of the recent
outbreaks: ;

‘During the Carnival Liber-
ty's 16-day trans-Atlantic voy-
age in November, 536 of its
2,804 passengers were sickened
with diarrhea and vomiting. It
was the largest cruise outbreak
reported in 2006, according to
CDC data, both in number and
percentage of passengers sick-
ened. "Since the outbreak that

occurred on the ship's transat- .

lantic crossing in November,
there have been no further
norovirus outbreaks since that
voyage," Carnival spokesman
Vance Gulliksen said in a writ-
ten statement.

Two Princess Cruise Line
ships - the Regal Princess and










from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

j area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

2006 a record year

BOSE Pastor pedals to
illness outbreaks his bd mi

Sun Princess - were returned to
port last month because of out-
breaks of vomiting and diarrhea
aboard. On the Regal Princess

75 of 1,479 passengers got sick‘

ona Dec. 7-27 voyage. Aboard

the Sun Princess 112 of 2,018:

were ill on a Noy. 30-Dec. 10
cruise. Princess spokeswoman
Julie Benson said both ships
continue on their regular sched-
ule of cruising without disrup-
tion. "Cruise ship outbreaks of
norovirus almost always begin
from passengers who bring the
illness on board," Benson said
in a written statement.

The CDC issued a rare "no
sail" recommendation Dec. 10
to Royal Caribbean's Freedom
of the Seas after it had three
consecutive voyages with high-
er than expected cases of ill-
ness, Forney said. Two of the
voyages made CDC's outbreak

list.

The ship's largest outbreak,
on a cruise from Nov. 26-Dec. 3,
sickened 338 of the ship's 3,823
passengers. On the next cruise,
from Dec. 3-10, passengers con-
tinued to get sick. Despite inten-
sive cleaning “it still wasn't
under control," Forney said. So
the CDC recommended the
ship be taken out of service for
48 hours to allow additional
crew to do more sanitizing.

Royal Catibbean spokes-
woman Lynn Martenstein said
that while some arriving pas-
sengers were disappointed to
have their cruise delayed and
shortened, "We had a remark-
able number of people who
seemed to appreciate the situa-
tion." She said the ship hasn't
had any outbreak problems
since. The CDC has inspected
and overseen cruise ship sani-
tation issues since the 1970s,
when the industry had several
outbreaks. In the early years,
Forney said, the biggest culprits
were contaminated water and
food-borne diseases caused by
keeping hot and cold food at
improper temperatures.

But as the CDC and the
cruise industry worked together
on better ship designs - includ-
ing greater capacity for refrig-
eration and hot holding capaci-

_ty - bacterial outbreaks were

largely engineered out of ships,
Forney said. Now, noroviruses
are the main culprit.



|







‘






High School in Freeport.

ing back to the school.

that they receive.”

NEXT Tuesday marks the
82nd birthday of cycling pastor

. Bertram Newton, who can trace

his seminole roots in Red Bay,

Andros, all the way back to.

1845. .

That's when the Lewis family,
from whom the popular church-
man is descended, first arrived
on the island in canoes from
Florida. :

His great grandfather Moses
Newton - also of seminole stock
- lived to be 112 “and'still had
all his teeth in his. head”,
according to Rev Newton.

He remembers sitting on the
old man’s lap at Staniel Cay
when he was a child. “Every
hair on his head was white,” he
told The Tribune. .

Rev Newton’s great grand-
mother, Mary Lewis, was the
forebear who landed from
Florida. Red Bay became the
centre of the island’s seminole
population. Many descendants
of the indians - including the
Bowlegs - live in Andros today.

In spite of his advanced age,
Rev Newton has no thoughts of
retiring. He still writes his own
sermons and can trace: his
preaching career back 54 years.

“Nowadays, I do mostly
administrative work,” he said,

“but T still deliver sermons as
well.”

When The Tribune called,
Rev Newton had just been out
for a bike ride, an activity that
helps to keep him fit. He is one

of several elderly Red Bay folk:
who go out for a spin most days

round the settlement.

Though things change little

in Red Bay itself, Rev Newton
bemoans the decline of human
behaviour in modern times.

“Every time] read a news-
paper or switch on the radio,
my heart fails me,” he said.
“People are more dishonest
than they used to be. Even in
island communities, things have
declined.”

Rev Newton is not sure what

parishioners at his New Salem
Baptist Church have planned
for his big day. But he said he
will probably spend it quietly
with his wife.

“I'll get some food from the
restaurant and we’ll have a nice
time,” he added.

His mother-in-law, Omelia
Marshall, is Red Bay’s oldest
resident at 89. She introduced
straw work to the community.

¢ BOOMING economies cre-
ate big newspapers, which was
why The Abaconian’s pre*
Christmas issue ran to a record
72 pages. - :

The Marsh: Harbour bi-
monthly paper was split into
three sections for the first time
since its launch in the early
1990s.

“It’s hard work but we enjoy
it,” said Kathleen Ralph, who

\Pat’s Uniform, Grand Bahama’s leading dis-
tributor of school uniforms, presented, a new
computer and a cheque to the Sir Jack Hayward

The management said it was their way of giv-

“We're happy that Pat’s Uniform and the
Millennium Mall are able to make this donation
of a computer and it comes in a timely fashion
in light of the recent incident at the school
when the senior master’s office was destroyed,
including his computer and equipment, said
the school’s principal Ben Stubbs. “We have a
special association with Pat’s Uniform relative
to our uniforms, and we’re especially pleased
with the reports from our parents on the service

Michael Sweeting, manager of Pat’s Uniform,
and the Millennium Mall also.presented the
school with a cheque representing part of the
proceeds from the sale of uniform shirts and
blouses that now come with the school’s crest



.

sat

—_

Uniform supplier aids school

attached.

ward High,”

edits and publishes The Aba- .
conian with husband, Dave.

f Education

“Pat’s Uniform is the only distributor now,
providing the school’s crest already embroi-
. dered on the uniform pockets, thus eliminating
the need for schools’to sell the pockets and
parents to have to sew them on the shirts,” said
Mr Sweeting. “We initiated a programme to
give back to schools participating in the pro-
gramme, and we’re happy to be here today to
present a computer and a cheque to Jack Hay-

Mr Sweeting made the-presentation to senior
mistress Delotes Kellman-Jones, senior mas-
_ter and Mr Stubbs. :

Pictured accepting the donations from left to
right are, Mrs Deloris Kellman-Jones, senior
mistress; Mr Benjamin Stubbs, principal; Mr
Michael Sweeting, manager of Pat’s Uniform
and Millennium Mall; and Mr Ivan Butler,
senior master. |

(Photo: GRECHRIS)





















birthday

“The island, was so backward
I don’t suppose the land was

However,,the couple are still... worth anything then. Now

keen to sell the thriving paper,’
which is expanding alongside
Abaco’s buoyant economy, so
they can enjoy a well-earned
retirement. -

e Last week’s Tribune story
about the property boom in
Crooked Island brought back
memories for someone who
remembers the Colonel Hill
area of the 1960s. :

“The'island was such a quiet,
simple place in those days,” said -
a Tribune reader who recalls’
the days when businessman
Basil Kélly was the'local MP.



) parcels of property are changing

hands at $500,000 a time.”
With one or two tourist pro-

jects on the go, and increasing

interest:from foreign home-buy-

_ ers, the island once regarded as

one of the most unfashionable

in the Bahamas could yet

become the one to watch.
Even neighbouring Acklins

is showing signs of life after cen-

turies of slumber.

- Long-term resident Donald

‘McMillan is not surprised by

the mounting interest. “This
must be one of the best places
on earth,” he said.

TSC l a

For the stories behind
aM eect Li
on Mondays



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltg
Montrose Avenue
' Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452



pay



Full Text
j

p

1

4

r

PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007



LOCAL NEWS



IN the aftermath of the
arrests last month of five
Bahamians on charges of con-
spiring to import illegal nar-
cotics to the United States,

‘questions have been raised |

within the media regarding the
legal basis for these arrests.
The answer is quite simple
and straightforward. The indi-
viduals were. arrested under

Title 21 US Chapter 13, Sec- .

tions 841 and'846 under which it
is “unlawful for any person
knowingly or intentionally to

manufacture, distribute, or dis-.

pense, or possess with intent to
manufacture, distribute, or dis-
pense, a controlled substance,”

or to attempt or conspire to’

commit such an offence.

As a result of investigations in
the United States and the
Bahama over an extended
period’ of time, evidence was
collected in regard to a number
of individuals and sealed indict-
ments were prepared.by-a
Grand Jury, which determined
that there was a eeene




Only drug smugglers fail to respect

Bahamas sovereignty, writes
US ambassador, John Rood

basis to arrest ts dividuals
involved in the distribution of

. illegal narcotics to the United

States through the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport.
When some of these suspects
travelled to the United States,

they were arrested on the basis
of these’Grand Jury indict-

ments. Other individuals
involved: have been arrested in
the Bahamas:and will likely be

~ tried here, and more charges |

could follow. all cases where\.’

* individuals were atrested in the

“US, there was a strong US.,
nexus to the charges.

Many have asked why the

individuals were arrested in the’
United Stales The short panne

is: the individuals were arrésted
in the United States base
they violated US law and}were
subject to arrest upon entering
US territory. They entere*US
territory on their own volition,
and were not kidnapped, :
‘whisked away,’ or any of the
other vivid but inaccurate

- descriptions I have seen in the
* media. In fact, prior to the most
recent arrests, seven other

Bahamians were arrested
between March and November
2006 for trafficking drugs to the
United States.on flights origi-
nating in the Bahamas.

‘Any American citizen or any
foreign national who violates
US lays and is'physically pre-

sent in the United States is sub-
ee In the same way, if
an ‘American citizen was wanted
in the Bahamas for violations
of your country's laws and
entered your territory, you
would expect your law enforce-
ment authorities to arrest that
individual.

I also would like to address a
serious and. unsubstantiated
allegation that has been raised
in some quarters suggesting that
the individuals arrested in the
United States will not enjoy due
process of the law or a pre-
sumption of innocence. The
reality is that these individuals
will have the same rights as any
American citizen — they will be

b pagans ze I hats ler arrests

THE country’s sovereignty

has been violated through the
“entrapment” of the five bag-
gage handlers from Nassau
Flight Services, former. Sen-
ate president J Henry. Bost-
wick said yesterday on More

FM’s talk show Real Talk

Live.
“J begin to wonder bs hein
one state abrogates unto itself

the legal right endorsed by .
their supreme court to enter |
into the territory of another |.

nation and to do what they
lave done to these men in the

manner admitted to by the US |
Embassy.~ I begin to wonder
if sovereignty isa thing of the
_ dent said that he was not con-
cerned with whether they are.

past. ° 3
“They have stated that they

‘had the co-operation of the

Bahamian police; assitming
that they are telling the truth
and I accept that they are
telling the truth, our-law
enforcement agenciés,aré
















; complicit i in. the us authori.
ties in having abducted these

five Bahamian citizens,” Mr
Bostwick said. © .
Three of the five baggage

-handlers from Nassau Flight

Services have had their first
arraignment in a Miami fed-

“eral ‘court,

The men were all charged

“with possession with intent to
distribute ‘cocaine, and were »
issued‘an order of detention | .
vas they: were considered a
- flight risk, Therefore, as out, .
‘lined by a US attorney, the
mien will not ue eligible; a a
“bail. op
The former Senate presi- ‘i
\ Bostwick said.

innocent or. guilty, but rather
with the mamner.in:which they

‘were “kidnapped” on arrival |
in Florida...
a “For this t oh



~ peliéved.

“ly coinnidtted in the Bahamas

known to the Bahamian police
acting in concert with the
American police, for us to
allow that to happen in that
manner is an unpardonable
intrusion into human rights
and the rule of law and the
due process that we all adhere

~ to,” Mr Bostwick said.

However, more often than
not, he noted, the US gets
what the US wants.

“J would be less than honest
if I would say that they did
not have their ways of indi-
cating whether or not the gov-
ernment of the day finds
favour with them or not,” Mr

He said that it does not take

much — if the: Americans feel
, 80 inclined — for them to do
whatever they:see fit in the
~~ Babiainas..

The lawyer also said that he
that the manner in

“On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avenue
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

Visit or call your Agent
at our convenient new location,
Nephone number 326-1040,

emium payment functions will be
insferred from Collins Avenue to our
irbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

INSURANCE
COMPANY

E; EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

which Samuel “90” Knowles
was taken out of the country
was an offence against the rule
of law.

“The reason I-say that is
because the man had an ongo-
ing appeal before the Privy
Council. which was pending

and which may still be heard. ,
Before that could be heard, -

he was secreted outside of the
Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Bostwick said that
Knowles should have been
given a chance to have his
final appeal disposed of, which
may have resulted in him
being not extradited — but it
appears as if the US is not pre-
pared to “dilly dally” with the
extradition process.

“What is equally question-
able is the detention of these
persons for inordinate lengths
of time while their cases get
prosecuted,” Mr Bostwick
added.



ILY
UARDIAN



presumed innocent until proven
guilty, they will have the right to
an attorney, and they will
receive a fair trial. As I noted to
the media last week: “If they
are found guilty they will serve

.. time;-and if they are found not
guilty they will be set free.”

Any suggestion that there is
no “presumption of innocence”
in the US is simply wrong. The
presumption of innocence is an
inviolable element of US law,
just as it is here in the Bahamas.

The individuals arrested and
charged have, however, been
arrested because of compelling
evidence that they were
involved in drug trafficking to
our shores. A court of law will
determine whether that evi-
dence warrants a conviction.

All co-operation between the
United States and the Bahamas
on this matter has taken place
“within the ambit of the law”
and with full respect for
Bahamian sovereignty. The
only people who have not
respected national sovereignty



THE TRIBUNE

families, and ruins lives.

The United States greatly
respects the relationship that
exists between our countries
and ofiflaw enforcement agen-

cies

5) co-operation is a model
for others because of our will-
ingness to share manpower,
intelligence, and technology,
and to prosecute criminals who
commit crimes that cross bor-
ders in both of our jurisdictions
in accordance with the rule of
law and our co-operative agree- —
ments.

RO
butterfly spreads
across Caribbean

By JONATHAN M. KATZ
Associated Press Writer

SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican Republic (AP) - An
Asian butterfly known for rav-
aging the leaves of young cit-
rus trees has spread from the
Dominican Republic to other
Caribbean islands and could
soon strike fruit producers in
Florida and South America,
agriculture experts said.

The Papilo Demoleus butter-
fly was spotted in the Domini-
can Republic three years ago _
the first recorded sighting in the
Western Hemisphere, said Bri-
an Farrell, a Harvard biology
professor who led. the field
study that found it.

The insect, known also as the
lime swallowtail, has since
appeared in Jamaica and Puer-
to Rico. U.S. officials worried
about Florida's $9 billion citrus
industry have criticized the local
government for not doing
enough to control the pests.
U.S. officials worry the pest
could be brought into the Unit-
ed States by a tourist, or smug-
gled into the country with ille-
gally transported fruit. Known
as a strong flier suited for island
hopping in Asia, the butterfly
might make the trip on its own.

"I don't think the (Domini-
can agriculture) ministry is
doing anything. They don't see
it as a problem," said Russell
Duncan, of the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture's Animal
and Plant Health Inspection

* Service in Santo Domingo.

The director of the Agricul-
ture Ministry's fruit department,
Damian Andujar, said there
was no need for a widespread
eradication campaign. "This
isn't a big problem for us, it's
under control," he said.

The butterflies, distinguished

TROPICAL |
EXTERMINATORS
UM sy Aah
PHONE: 822-2157



by red and yellow wing mark-
ings and bright blue eyespots,
have such a taste for citrus
leaves that they often strip trees
of all but their branches.

A year after they were dis-
covered in the Dominican
Republic, an infestation
destroyed more than 4,000
young trees owned by produce
giant Grupo Rica _ 3 percent
of its nursery stock, said Felipe
Mendez, a company official.

Caterpillars ate every leaf on
many of the trees they attacked,
Mendez said. Damage to the
company's orchards in the
country's south central region
has since been contained by
workers trained to pick leaves at
the first sign of butterfly eggs.

"We realized we had a nat-
ural enemy," Mendez said.

Workers in Jamaica's St.
Catherine region also have been
trying to kill the caterpillars by
hand. An aerial spraying cam-
paign has not been attempted
for fear of damaging nearby
beekeepers' hives, Agriculture



- Minister Roger Clarke told the
. Jamaica Observer.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 3





Dick’s Point ‘land
destruction’ outrage



ON THE ROCKS - Boulders block waterfront access

By KRYSTEL ROLLE

RESIDENTS living in East-
ern New Providence are out-
raged at neighbours for
“destroying the land.”

The quiet, peaceful small
cove known as Dick’s Point has
been transformed into a con-
struction site, residents say, and



Bostwick

supports
Lyons on
judiciary

AGREEING with the .
position put forth by justice
John Lyons that the judicia-
Ty is in a state of crisis
because of the delay of gov-
ernment’s review of judges’
salaries, former Senate pres-
ident J Henry Bostwick said
the appeal by Attorney
General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson on the matter is out
of order.

Mr Bostwick made the
statement yesterday on
More FM’s Real Talk Live.
' “There is nothing to
appeal — the resolution of
that matter is not before the
courts. It is a political
responsibility of the govern-
ment of the day seeing how
and when the salaries are to
be reviewed and it is that
which has not happened.
They allowed the time to
lapse twice.”

Mr Bostwick said that Jus-
tice Lyons was not out of
line to make the comments
he did, but he perhaps
should not have pronounced
them from the bench.

“But that’s his court and
he has the prerogative.
What is significant is that
have you heard any mem-
ber of the judiciary contra-
dict him? Not a single one,”
Mr Bostwick noted.

Speaking at the opening
of the legal year Thursday,
Bar Association president
Wayne Munroe focused on
the importance of adequate
remuneration for judges to
maintain an independent
judicial system..

He read from the year-
end report on the United
States’ federal judiciary by
US Chief Justice John
Roberts, who is arguing that
pay for federal judges is so
inadequate that it threatens
to undermine the judiciary’s
independence.’

Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer, in
responding to Mr Munroe,
said the judiciary can never
be considered a department
because it cannot be con-
trolled by anyone, or even
appear to be controlled.

She said that vigilante jus-
tice takes over when it is
perceived that the indepen-
dence of the judicial system

-is lost.

Dame Joan said the pub-
lic needs to understand that
the relevant statute was
enacted so the judiciary
could have a method for
their salaries to be adjusted
“without going to a politi-
cian every time...”





the work being done is com-
pletely wrecking the environ-
ment.

One resident claimed the sit-
uation was so out of hand that it
should be labelled a “national
matter.”

“The whole situation is a
mess,” she said. “This is a
national matter and everyone

needs to wake up because this is
just another example of how
everything has been shoved
around in this country.”

She said she has had to deal
with this for over a year, and
has finally had enough. Her
neighbours began dredging the
land early in 2006, seemingly in
an effort to expand the harbour.



“They have already destroyed
the sea bed with the dredging
and I thought there is nothing
more that they can do, but they
are at it again. The dredging is
finished and now they are
reclaiming land,” she explained.
This time the work hit closer to
home. Rocks have been piled
in front of her beach front prop-

Salaries link
to judicial



The Chief Justice of Canada, Beverley McLachlin

By CHESTER ROBARDS

SALARIES for judges is
indeed a factor in judicial inde-
pendence, according to the
Chief Justice of Canada.

In the wake of controversy
regarding the independence of
the Judiciary in the Bahamas,
the Rt Honourable Beverly
McLachlin spoke yesterday to
an audience of lawyers and
judges in Nassau about just
that.

Justice McLachlin said she
wrote her speech long before
she knew that the independence

of the bar and bench was sucha .

“hot” topic in the Bahamas.

She told her ‘audience that
should the judiciary lose its
independence, the ultimate vic-
tim would be the Bahamas’
democratic way of life.

“Without independent
lawyers and independent judges
our countries would not enjoy
the rule of law and the individ-
ual and collective right that are
our citizens’ entitlement,” she
said.

Recently, the independence
of the judiciary of the Bahamas
was called into question when
Justice John Lyons ruled that
the government neglected to
review the salaries of judges —
an exercise which was to be exe-
cuted this year — consequently
rendering the judiciary depen-
dent on the executive.

According to Justice
McLachlin, the first and most
important condition of judicial
independent lies in the minds
and hearts of judges.

“The single most. important
factor is in maintaining judicial
independence is the individual
judges personal and unwaver-
ing commitment to his or her
independence and impartiali-
ty,” she said. “Judges must be
in no one’s corner or in no one’s
pocket.”

Within Justice McLachlin’s
ten commandments for judicial
independence was included the
importance of financial security.

“If a proper process for deter-
mining adequate remuneration
is not in place the appearance
and perhaps the reality of inde-
pendence may be insidiously
undercut,” she said.

“A judge who does not have
enough to live on and support
his family may be tempted to
accept illicit benefits even as
minor as a chicken from a liti-
gant who is seeking justice — the
prospect of judges being
required to enter into negotia-
tions with the government
about salaries and pensions may
raise questions in the public’s
mind into whether the judge
just might favour the state in a
matter in order to ensure a
favourable outcome in the
negotiations.”

Like the Bahamas, Canada’s
government appoints a com-
mission to review the salaries
of judges, the outcome of which
is not binding.

The lack of action from this
commission was the basis of

Judge Lyon’s controversial

November ruling — which is up
for appeal some time this year.

independence @

SOY

Residents claim construction
wrecking the environment

erty blocking her in, and bar-
ring her entrance to the water-
front.

“This is disgusting, that’s all I
can say,” she said in exaspera-
tion. “They are creating their
own empire here and they can’t
do that. The land belongs to the
Bahamas. They dug up the sea
bed — they have no claims to
the sea bed,” she said. “It looks
atrocious.”

“Vve just had it. P’ve lived
with this for a whole year. The
only one that is being punished
by my silence is me. This is not
right. Everything is a total mess.
I no longer have access to the
beach unless I climb this moun-
tain,” she said referring to the

rocks. “I’ve just had it.”

Residents have a right to be
enraged, according to environ-
mentalist Sam Duncombe,
founder of REEARTH. She
warned that such activities
could have major repercussions
on the land.

“Anytime you begin to alter .

the coastline you are affecting
the environment and we have
a lot of coastal development
that has already been affected
the environment,” she said.
“This is an area where the
birds and various animals come
in at different times of the day
with the tide to feed and do
what they need to do and if they
are actually dredging and fill-

SEE page 11

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited |

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

. TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

The first US energy president

Now that President Gerald Ford has
been buried with all the honours he
deserved, it is time to discuss a proper
memorial. I would suggest the Gerald Ford
Energy Independence Act.

Few people remember today, but “Ger-
ald Ford was the first U.S. president to
really use the levers of the presidency to try
to break our addiction to oil,” said the
energy economist Philip Verleger Jr. “He
was way ahead of his time.” —

Well, his time has come again — and
thensome. .

The greatest thing George Bush could do
— for President Ford’s legacy and his own
— would be to dedicate his upcoming State
of the Union address to completing the
energy independence agenda that Ford ini-
tiated 32 years ago in the wake of the 1973
Arab oil embargo and energy shock.

As the page titled “Energy” from the
Ford presidential library Web site reminds
us: “Early in his administration, President
Ford said that he would not sit by and
watch the nation continue to talk about.an
energy crisis and do nothing about it. Nor,
he said, would he accept halfway measures
which failed to change the direction that
has made our nation so vulnerable to for-
eign economic interests. The president pro-
posed firm but necessary measures
designed to achieve energy independence
for the U.S. by 1985, and to regain our
position of world leadership in energy.”

In his 1975 State of the Union speech,
Ford laid out his vision: “I have a very

deep belief in America’s capabilities. With- —

in the next 10 years, my programme envi-
sions: 200 major nuclear power plants; 250
major new coal mines; 150 major coal-fired
power plants; 30 major new (oil) refineries;
20 major new synthetic fuel plants; the
drilling of many thousands of new oil wells;
the insulation of 18 million homes; and the
manufacturing and the sale of millions of
new. automobiles, trucks and buses that
use much less fuel. In another crisis — the
one in 1942 — President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt said this country would build 60,000
military aircraft. By 1943, production in
that programme had reached 125,000 air-
craft annually. They did it then. We can
do it now.”

Obviously, Ford’s emphasis on coal and
domestic oil came in an age when most
people were unaware of climate change.
Still, Ford wasn’t just all talk on energy. He
used his presidential powers to impose a $3-

WE, THE FAMILY OF THE LATE
EDNA WINIERED PINDER - TURNER

for your prayers, visits, telephone call
arrangements, and other acts’ of ki
during our time of bere



a-barrel fee on imported oil to reduce con-
sumption. That was a big deal, noted Ver-
leger, because the average cost of import-
ed crude at the time was only $10.76 a bar-
rel. Yes, you read that right. A Republican
president actually imposed an import fee
on oil to curb consumption! Yes, President
Bush, it can be done! The republic sur-
vived!

Thanks to the Energy Policy Conserva-
tion Act of 1975 and other measures, Ford’s
energy legacy includes: the creation of the
Strategic Petroleum Reserve for use in an
emergency; the phasing out of domestic
price controls on oil to encourage more
exploration; major investment in alterna-
tive energy research; assistance to states
in developing energy conservation pro-
grammes; and, most important, the cre-
ation of the first compulsory mileage stan-
dards for U.S. automobiles.

Those mileage standards have barely
been tightened since 1975 — because some
idiotic congressmen from Michigan, who
thought they were protecting Detroit, have
blocked efforts to raise them. So, Japanese
automakers innovated more in that area,
and the rest is history — or in the case of
Detroit, obituary.

Every 10 years we say to ourselves, “If
only we had done the right thing 10 years
ago.” Well, Bush has a chance in his State
of the Union to call on Americans to hon-
our Ford by completing his vision. But it
means asking Americans to do some hard
things: accepting a gasoline or carbon tax;
inducing Detroit to make more fuel-effi-
cient cars, trucks and plug-in hybrids; set-
ting a national requirement for utilities to
provide 20 per cent of their electricity from
renewable wind, solar, hydro or nuclear
power by 2015; and, finally, making large-
scale investments in mass transit.

It is stunning that since 9/11 the Bush
team has never mounted a campaign to
get Americans to conserve energy.

“Ford called for zero oil imports by
1985,” said Verleger. “Instead, we import-
ed 5 million barrels a day then. In 2006,
imports will average almost 14 million bar-
rels a day. Had we achieved everything

Ford proposed, the price of oil today would

be $20 a barrel, not $60, the polar ice caps
might not be melting, the polar bear might
still have a chance, and our children would
have a future.”

(¢ This article is by Thomas Friedman of
The New York Times — © 2006) .










intend to change my

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ETIENNE DIEUJUSTE OF
HOPE TOWN, ABACO, BAHAMAS. GENERAL Delivery
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30th day of December, 2006
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Abaco, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN LUE FAUSTIN OF
COLLINS AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX SB-50766
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



EDITOR, The Tribune.

YOU just have. to love our
people — if not for their stu-
pidity at least for their insulari-
ty.
Clearly, no one seems to
understand that the minute you
pass the customs and immigra-
tion checkpoint at the pre-
cleared department area you
are, de facto, on United States
soil and have submitted to its
jurisdiction. Case closed!

Those Bahamians who work
behind that line, whether they
are baggage handlers, security
agents, airline staff, bar and
restaurant employees, airplane
caterers, or whatever, surely
must appreciate where they are
and under whose rules they are
playing. I cannot see the US
Government operating such a
facility under any other terms.
In fact I am constantly surprised
that they do not have their own
Federal Police and other law
enforcement people behind the
line.

We have enjoyed the privi-
lege of pre-clearance facilities
for so long now that I am sure
most Bahamians travelling to
the US have no concept of what
the alternative would be for us

[euesonevinenncelenaci



Bag weaS

Bahamians or our US tourists if
Uncle Sam decided one day to
withdraw, yes withdraw, the
privilege. No, neither Perry
Christie nor Fred Mitchell, nor
even Hubert Ingraham has any
control over that I’m afraid.
And the alternative is to arrive
at a US Immigration and Cus-
toms facility wherever you land
and, for most of them, you will
tow a line behind anything up to
five to ten thousand people, for
two to three hours, in most cas-
es, just to get past immigration.
Pre-cleared Bahamians have
their rentals cars, are checked
into their hotels and are in

. Dadeland before their counter-

parts from any other Caribbean
country have even cleared their
luggage.

And we are going to protest
when some jack asses working
at the airport put that kind of
privilege in jeopardy? Are we
crazy? Or do Bahamians think
that pre-clearance is a right and
Uncle Sam has to do it? Get
real people.

THE TRIBUNE





I would have thought that the
newspapers would be full of
official government apologies
to the US Government over this
issue rather than all the crap
that is being covered each day.
Mr Mitchell should have, his
backside up in DC.apologising
for his people’s alleged miscon-
duct. Our Minister of Tourism
should also be there because if
the US passport issue has the
expected adverse affect on our
tourism numbers the withdraw-
al of our pre-clearance facility
would just shut the door for
good.

But you see, sadly, when it
comes to illegal drugs, we have
always had a soft spot for the
people involved. We have and
continue to revere the Prime
Minister under whose watch the
drug transhipment business first
flourished in the sixties seven-
ties and eighties. We have
named our airport after him!
Yes, the same airport that-is
now the subject of our national
angst. Appropriate don’t you
think?

BRUCE G RAINE
Nassau,
January 4, 2007.

White Bahamian
golfers hurt, too

EDITOR, The Tribune. _ .

I READ the article in Tues-
day’s edition concerning the
protests that Bahamian golfers
are carrying out about the
Cable Beach course.

I love the game of golf, and I,
too, find it distressing that the
game has become a very expen-
sive sport. I am retired, and $80
for a golf game is almost
beyond my pocket book. How-
ever, what distressed me most

about the article was Henry
Bostwick’s statements that
inferred that only black
Bahamians were affected. I per-
sonally take offence to his com-
ments, namely: “Today that seg-
regation is being resurrected
again...”

Mr Bostwick is the one who is
doing the segregating. I would
like to point out to him that I
am a white Bahamian, do not
belong to Lyford Cay or Par-
adise Island clubs, and would

very much like to have a course
to play where I don’t have to
take out a loan at the RBC.
There are a number of other
white Bahamian golfers who
feel the same way.

So please, let’s keep the
colour out of the discussion —
we are Bahamians one.

ALISON ALBURY
Nassau;
January, 2007.

Justice well served |
by Saddam hanging

EDITOR, The Tribune

IT is 10.20pm, Friday,
December 29, 2006, and I have
just heard that Saddam Hussein



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PAULA DAWKINS
of the Settlement of on the Island of Abaco, Bahamas
name to MISTY PAULA
DAWKINS DAVIS. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box SS-
792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

has been executed. What a jolly
good start to the new year. If I
sound a bit too joyous about a
very somber event, it’s because
Iam not retarded in my think-
ing by a very liberal, new age
education. I have fortunately
been left — intellectually speak-
ing — to develop my own per-
spectives on life’s offerings.
When the rest of us get to
that place where we think with
our hearts, and not by the stan-
dards of man-devised educa-
tional systems, then the world

* will come back into balance. Of

course we will never see that
day again, yet it is nice to dream
about it from time to time.
Congratulations to the peo-
ple of Iraq who have grieved
for loved ones that disappeared

at the hands of Saddam
Hussien. While the liberal
media — which is also very active
here in the Bahamas — would
try to convince us that Saddam’s
execution will not make any-
thing better in Iraq, we Know
that it will give a lot of people
some resolution to the hell they
have been living through in
Iraq. With regard to this par-
ticular execution, America’s fate
in Iraq is almost secondary. Jus-
tice, in some small measure, has
been served. An era of EVIL
has been silenced. That makes
me feel one hell of a lot better.

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS

Abaco,

December 29, 2006.

National Health
could be ‘garbage’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IF you like the way they handle your garbage, you're gonna
love the way they'll look after your healthcare.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,
December 5, 2006.



Sess

DUE to an error, a letter about the National Health Insurance
scheme appeared in The Tribune over the name Wallace Rolle, In
fact, Mr Rolle was not the author of the letter aud we apologise tor
any inconvenience and embarrassment caused,
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian awaits approval

for Eleuthera investment

WELL-KNOWN Bahamian
architect and developer Gerard
Higgs has announced the initia-
tion of the first phase of a major
North Eleuthera development
which will include a luxury
marina, only the second in the
Bahamas to accommodate the
world’s largest mega-yachts —
those more than 300 feet in
length.

Located on Egg Island, 15
miles from Harbour Island and
39 miles from Nassau, the luxu-
ry yachting/residential develop-
ment project was formally pre-
sented to Prime Minister Perry
Christie in 2002 in architectural
concept. According to Mr Hig-
gs, the plan was greatly wel-
comed.

The yacht marina will include
40 luxury mega-yacht slips, with
future plans within a one to
three year period to develop
luxury residential villas, lagoon
bungalows and an intimate bou-
tique resort and spa.

Mr Higgs said an important
aspect of this project is a strong
connection to the community.
Therefore, he.said, a percent-
age of the project’s profits will
be placed into a trust fund to
assist underprivileged Bahami-
ans and provide them with
numerous economic opportu-
nities. :

“I am proud to initiate a pro- .

ject such as this which is cur-




By Arthia Nixon-Stack

tors to Eleuthera would have
noticed a generation gap — as
school age students walked
about and those over 40
worked to make ends meet.

Spotting anyone between
the ages of 18 and 30 might
take some time, as most
islanders in that demographic
left for greener pastures in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama, Exuma or the Unit-
ed States.

Now that Eleuthera is expe-
riencing an economic upturn,
the lost generation is return-
ing home and taking on jobs
in many arenas or creating
new industries.

Some of them are finding
themselves sharing coffee with
their former teachers who are
now colleagues while bankers
who helped them open junior
savings accounts are now
answering to them as subor-
dinates.

Instead of staying abroad,
many Eleuthera youths have
returned and are working to
develop their island and pro-
vide jobs away from the
tourism sector — which failed
their families following major
hurricanes and closures of
prominent properties like
Club Med.

One such example is 23-
year-old Celon Cooper, who
left for Nassau almost imme-
diately after finishing Central
Eleuthera High School. The
Palmetto Point native lived
with relatives in the capital
but returned home to help out
the women in his life.

“TI felt an obligation to be
here with my mom, sister and
grandmother because I was
the only man in the family,"
he said. "There are a lot of
opportunities here but you
just have to be creative and
know how to be unique at the
same time."

‘He found his success liter-
ally from right in the front of
his house, where he has set
up the settlement's most suc-
cessful car-wash.

While a car-wash might be
the norm in New Providence,
Mr Cooper has tapped into a
market which has not reached
the level of standards he is
able to set.

“T have the vacuums and
the sheen and I have four
employees so far,” he said.
“Sometimes it’s overwhelm-
ing because we have more
business than we can handle.
Being right here in the settle-
ment makes it convenient, but
it's helping out a whole lot.”

Only in business for six
months, Mr Cooper is already
‘thinking of expanding.

. “I’m looking for Nassau
agents to help with getting the
products I need shipped and
I'm going to put a sense of

Young workers
lured back home

For the past decade, visi- _

rently 100 per cent Bahamian-
owned. Through local invest-
ment it could remain that way,”
said Mr Higgs.

He added that the project will
provide many jobs in the North
Eleuthera area and excellent
opportunities for Bahamian
investors.

Mr Higgs’ family descended
from the Eleutheran Adven-
turers, with roots in this area
going back over 350 years. His
family has owned a leasehold
on the island since 1949, farm-
ing and grazing livestock to this
day.

“J am very positive about the
future of the North Eleuthera
area, and am honoured to have
been one of the initial architects

of the Royal Island develop-

ment adjacent to my family’s
island,” Mr Higgs said.

As the principal at Higgs and
Associates Ltd Architects, Mr
Higgs has completed many lux-
ury private island designs and
developments throughout the
Bahamas.

His projects have been fea-
tured in three of the world’s
most exclusive, elite magazines
— Fortune Magazine, Robb
Report and Showboats Inter-
national.

Currently Mr Higgs is pursu-
ing approvals from the govern-
ment to proceed with this devel-
opment. -




professionalism by adding uni-
forms,” he said. “What I like
most is that I am here in
Eleuthera and not in Nassau
because the city is getting
tough, man.”

Also in Palmetto Point,
Juliette Culmer found success
as a photographer with clients
flocking to her studio from as
far as 50 miles away for pic-
tures and T-shirts for all occa-
sions. °

Across town, Dawn Sands
is in the same business but
stands out with her web-host-
ing and design company, one
of the first on her island. At
21, Ms Sands is already the
recipient of a business.award.

“It’s great to go out and get
exposure, but in the end, there
is no place like home,” said
Camille Campbell from her
family’s beach-front home in
Savannah Sound.

At 25, she had left her job
of a few years in New Provi-
dence for the slower-paced
Family Island life when she
settled in Exuma.

Despite finding work at the
Four Seasons Resort, she
came home every holiday and
weekend she was able to
afford.

On one such occasion, the
island athlete who competed
locally and internationally,
volunteered her time to coach
a team at a Windermere High
School.

That led to a permanent
position as the school's PE
teacher — the first time a for-
mer student has held that
position.

“It’s kind of funny to be
grading some of these kids
who are only a few years :
younger than me and who
know me as Camille to be
calling me Ms Campbell,” she
said. “Then a lot of the teach-
ers who are here now are the
same ones who taught me, so
it’s weird but I love the fact
that ’'m home and able to do
it.”

Tarpum Bay's Margo
McCartney is glad to be back
in Eleuthera, especially since
she has a family to take care
of. The 23-year-old mother
has worked in various areas
of the tourism sector as a wait-
ress, barmaid, SCUBA
instructor and more. She is
now one of the senior life
guards at Half Moon Cay.

“I get to see my family dai-
ly and in Nassau that would
not have happened,” she said.
“It’s a long ride to get to my
job and then I have to catch a
boat but at the end of the day
I am home to make sure my
daughter gets to school and
my ma who gets sick some-
times is taken care of. You
can go off to learn something
new, but at the end of the day

SEE page 7






























BS







An impression of the marina for the proposed development on Egg Island in north Eleuthera



THE Bahamas International
Film Festival will kick off this
year's film series on Saturday,
January 27, with the winner of
the audience award for-best
documentary film, Eleutheran
Adventure. -

This Bahamian film was
made on a very low budget sup-
ported by Bahamian producers
George Wyckoff and Johnathan
Morris. Director Kareem Mor-
timer has captured a never
before seen slice of Bahamian
culture.

The public has been invited
to join BIFF and Kareem in
Rawson Square on Saturday,
January 27, at 7.30pm to see the
film free of charge.

“BIFF is very proud to pro-
vide an opportunity for
Bahamian filmmakers to gain
exposure, not only throughout
The Bahamas but also in the
international film world,” said
the festival organisers.

Kareem Mortimer is prepar-
ing to,continue his networking
opportunities at this year's
Berlin International Film Festi-
val from February 8 to 16,
where he has been accepted
into the Berlinale Talent Cam-
pus.

The statement noted that as
the summit received 3678 appli-
cations from 129 countries this
year, Kareem's acceptance is
“great recognition” of his
potential.

“Kareem is the - first
Caribbean filmmaker to attend



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and shaye your story.



Share your news

the Talent Campus at the Berli-
nale,” said founder and execu-
tive director of BIFF Leslie
Vanderpool.

Leslie introduced Kareem to
the programme when she
returned from the Cannes Film
Festival in May. “I am so proud
that he took advantage of this
opportunity. The setting pro-
vides filmmakers with a gate-
way which could boost their
careers to the next level. Mak-
ing contacts with other budding












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set to kick-off festival

filmmakers of the world is a
valuable gift. Only a select few
are a part of the programme
and this could be a tremendous
reward if the programme is ful-
ly taken advantage of,” says Ms
Vanderpool. ;

Mortimer is no stranger to
such programmes, as last year
he was a part of the first Film-
maker Residency Programme
that the Bahamas International
Film Festival provided to six
Bahamian filmmakers.

This programme was created
to provide Bahamian and
Caribbean filmmakers with
mentors who are leading indus-
try professionals in the world
of cinema.

BIFF's Filmmakers Residen-
cy Programme was also instru-
mental in facilitating interna-
tional funding and a producer





for the film RAIN.

The Eleutheran Adventure is
a documentary film that
involves Kareem Mortimer and
cameraman Kevin Taylor hitch-
hiking from Spanish Wells to
the Southernmost point on the
island of Eleuthera with only
$150 in hand.

Along the way they meet a
collection of interesting charac-
ters that give them an honest
and entertaining look of life on
the island. The film explores
Eleutheran culture and what it
means to be Bahamian.

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| NOTICE

NOTICE: is hereby given that JILIO JOSEPH OF
SOLDIER ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registratign/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any“person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE MARTHE MICHEL OF
McKinney Drive, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of January, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Spidey, Harry
promise great
things in ‘07

By JASON DONALD

Okay, 2006 is gone — and let’s
be grateful. Whenever a Casino
Royale got our pulses raising,
there was always an Eragon or
two around the comer to pull us
down again. In other words, not »
a particularly great year for
movies.

So what does 2007 have in
store?

Well, blockbuster-wise, we’re
spoiled for choice. A certain
web-slinger makes his return in
what is sure to be the biggest
box office stampede of the year.

Yes, Spiderman 3 hits the
screens in May and, if it’s any-

thing like the grandiose specta-
cle of the second flick in the
franchise, it will go a long way
to helping us recover from last
summer’s distinctly un-super
Superman Returns.






















a ry COVENANT SUNDAY
11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM



Bernard Road
11:00AM

Zion Boulevard

10:00AM

9:30AM

Avenue
8:00AM
9:30AM

11:00AM
7:00PM

RADIO PROGRAMMES

Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter (AP Photo/Warner Bros./Murray Close)

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 7TH, 2007
11:30 a.m. Speaker: Elder Elliott Neilly
A Week of Spiritual Emphasis -
(Jan 7, 8, 9, 10 ,12, 14)

7:30 Nightly
Please Come and Join Us!

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
MNO" CHURCH SERVICES
AMM) SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 2007

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC .
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Pastor Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill

Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Rev. William Higgs/HC
No Service

HORII AIA AI IAI AAA AA IAI IAAI AAAI AISA ANSI IAI AI ISIN IIIA IASI IAI AIA II ISN IIASA IA





Not only does Spidey have to
deal with new villain Sandman
(Sideways’ Thomas Hayden
Church) but — get this — him-
self! (thanks to him getting coat-
ed in some evil gooey stuff).

A fantastic preview gives all
indications that this one will
rock. Join the queue now.

Who wants to see giant
robots smashing each other to



bits? No one? What if I mention
the name ‘Transformers?

Now I’ve got your attention
(and you’re showing your age).
Yes, everybody’s favourite
‘robots in disguise’ get their first



big screen outing in July - and
it’s only 20 years too late.
While I’m willing to admit
this could turn out to be a big
robotic cheesefest, the preview
has some mightily impressive
special effects and with direc-
tor Michael Bay at the helm and
an intriguing cast (Bernie Mac,
John Turturro) you know it

-won’t be dull.

Speaking of neat previews,
an action packed taster of
Ghost Rider appeared in cine-
mas before last year’s end and
went down a storm when I saw
it.

Nicolas Cage stars in this big
screen outing for comic book
character Johnny Blaze - a
stunt motorcyclist who hosts a
‘spirit of vengeance’. Expect
flaming skulls, amazing stunts
and action galore when this
arrives in February.

And last, but by no means
least, is the latest in the Harry
Potter series — The Order of the
Phoenix — due out in July.

The Harry Potter movies are
actually getting better and bet-
ter as the franchise bounces
along, and after the suitably
intense Goblet of Fire, ’m
looking forward to this one.

Still, it’s going to be quite a
feat to top that creepy maze
scene in the last film and it
remains to be seen if enough
foundation can be found to
keep the cast looking like
teenagers.

Time will tell.

So there you have it — not a
bad little selection there, I’m
sure you'll agree.

Wait a minute — didn’t I say
the same thing last year?

Tobey Maguire returns as Spider-
man this summer (AP FILE Photo)



Albany House takes centre -
stage for two film events

ALBANY House, the
sprawling South Ocean man-
sion which sits at the southwest
corner of New Providence
Island, has found itself at the
centre of two important film
events in the Bahamas.

Last month, Albany House
was featured prominently in the
latest James Lond film, Casino
Royale, which stars Daniel
Craig as the new 007. The home
was used for several scenes and
was featured prominently as the
home of a key villain in the film.

The estate — owned by
investors Joe Lewis, Tiger

- Woods and Ernie Els — now sits

on 565 acres and is soon to be
the centre of the beach club
activities at the newly-approved
luxury resort development,
Albany Golf and Beach Club.

Given the famous parties
behind this project and its

intended positive impact to the

Bahamian economy, the
Albany development has gar-
nered widespread attention.

According to the developers,
when completed, it promises to
be one of the most beautiful
communities with world class
resort-styled amenities.

Built as a private home in
1991, the luxurious home fea-
tures lengthy colonnades, airy
rooms, captivating beach and
sunset views.

. Speaking about Albany’s
prominence in Casino Royale,
Jason Callender, a director for

the Albany development com-
pany, noted, “The filmmakers
were here for five days of shoot-
ing and captured much of the
beauty of the Bahamas at
Albany House. Some key
scenes were shot here that
showcased our beautiful
turquoise waters and the fabu-
lous lifestyle of the islands,
including one scene of Bond
swimming in the ocean and two
other scenes featuring the beau-
tiful Italian actress in the film,
Caterina Murino [Solange], rid-
ing horseback on. the beach and
one very memorable scene in a
beach side hammock.

“In the movie, people were
led to believe that the house
was just down the beach from
the Ocean Club, but in fact it
is really on the southwest end of
New Providence,” he contin-
ued. “We were thrilled to be
featured in the film because it is
one of the best Bond films ever
made and is doing very well at
the box office. It does such a
nice job of illustrating the won-
der of the Bahamas - our nice
people, beautiful beaches, and
exciting island nightlife.”

Albany House also had a
starring role when it hosted the
Bahamas International Film
Festival (BIFF) 2006 Filmmak-
ers’ Retreat, at which actor
Nicolas Cage was a special
guest, and 44 other film industry
executives enjoyed a wonder-
ful reception and dinner at

Albany.

The BIFF annual event is
designed to. promote the
Bahamas as a great place to film
movies and also spur the film
industry within the islands by
featuring many films during the
four-day festival.

“BIFF does a terrific job pro-
moting the Bahamas to film
production companies, in fact,
BIFF’s founder, Leslie Vander-
pool, is the person who encour-
aged the Casino Royale site
scouts to explore using Albany
for the film,” said Mr Callen-
der.

“] grew up with Jason and we
have discussed economic devel-
opment opportunities related
to the film industry for years,
and I was pleased to help him
secure the Bond film at Albany,
plus we were delighted to host
one of our key events at this
property,” said Ms Vanderpool.
“We try to showcase the best
of the Bahamas and show
world-class filmmakers what
wonderful people, locations and

settings we have to offer in the
Bahamas. The festival. brings
the industry to the islands and it
builds bridges to local, aspiring
filmmakers. Albany House was
the perfect setting for us this
year and the staff did an amaz-
ing job for all of our guests —
everyone had’a lovely time,”
she said.

“We are extremely proud of
Albany House. It is both a fit-
ting star in Casino Royale and
plays a great host for events like
the BIFF affair.

* It is one small beautiful pic-
ture of the Bahamas and we
have spectacular plans for the
property which will begin to
materialise early in the New
Year.

“The house will become the
beach club house for our new
resort development, and it will
be one of the defining compo-
nents in Albany that exemplifies
what many people love about
the Bahamas — the calm, sooth-
ing luxury of island living at its
very best,” said Mr Callender.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
ate M ale cM Co Mattel alg
on Mondays



LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church

RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

‘METHODIST MOMENTS’

on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

BAHAMAS METHODIST WOMEN’S FELLOWSHIP - NASSAU REGION will be holding
their New Year's Meeting and Fellowship on Monday, January 8, 2007 at Ebenezer
Methodist Church, East Shirley Street at 7:30pm.

Grounded In The Past & 1

Geared To The Future
















A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America
1D AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED)














Worship time: Ham & ‘ih Worship time: Ilam & 7pm ‘ 4 .

Prayer time: 10:15 - 10:45a.m.

Sunday School: 9:45am
Church School during Worship Service

Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:




Candlelight Service - Dec. 17@ 7p.m. A
>) Christmas Eve Service - Dec. 24 @ 11:00 pm"
Watchnight Service - Dec. 31 @ 11:00 p.m. \

The Madeira Shopping



The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)
‘SUNDAY JANUARY 7TH, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Tezel Anderson
10:00 p.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Children, Youth & Young Adults (HC)





Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

Center : %

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles "
P.O.Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-5712

EMAIL - lynnk @batelnet.bs





P.O.Box $S-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE



“Casting IMAC TMT LoLAN nt LAR OLA alr TAceSni OLA SIN OL) clas)


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS








U.N. troops and local police
raided a slum on Friday and
arrested an alleged gang
member wanted in the slay-
ing of two Jordanian peace-
keeping troops, the U.N. mis-
sion in Haiti said.

No shots were fired during
the pre-dawn operation in
Port-au-Prince's Cite Soleil
slum, a base for well-armed
gangs blamed for a spate of
kidnappings and shooting
deaths, the mission said in a



The ‘lost generation’

Haitian gang member is
arrested for UN murders









statement.

An alleged gang member
identified only as Zachari was
captured and turned over to
Haitian police for the Nov. 10
killing of the Jordanians, who
were driving back to base
when their jeep came under
heavy gunfire.

A suspected kidnapper also
was arrested in the raid. .

The U.N. mission said
Zachari directed kidnappings
for the feared Beloney gang.












returns to Eleuthera

FROM page five

you can come back home. I
don't want that Nassau life for
my children."

Bahamas Merit Scholar
Andrea Culmer, who is study-
ing medicine at McGill Univer-
sity in Canada, also plans to
practice on her native island
once she completes her studies,
while college graduate Holly
Stewart is already making plans
to bring art appreciation to the

island.

“T really miss Eleuthera,” says
the 24 year-old newlywed.
“There is no place in the world
like Eleuthera. It's one thing to
do something but it’s another
to create something and to help
other people. I am not getting in
tourism because that failed
before and we need to do things
for our people to maintain. A
close friend of mine and I are

collaborating on a couple of dif-
ferent projects now. Trust me,
we are working on getting
Eleuthera on the map.”

As for Eleuthera’s parents,
they are happy their children
can now come home and have
something to do.

“It’s easy to say you want to
come home but why come
home and do nothing when you
can profit elsewhere?” said
Cathy Burrows, who spent the
holiday with her two college
graduate daughters who came
home from Fort Lauderdale.

“Stephanie plans to come
home with her culinary train-
ing. She’s been as far away as
Italy with it. There are a few
places she can work for coming
on stream but if she wants to
do her own thing she can.
Eleuthera can benefit if all
those who go away come back —
if only to say thanks.”

PM: Bahamas ready
for general election

FROM page one

Bahamians have registered to
vote, he said.

Based on the last general
election where 140,000 Bahami-
ans cast their vote, “we are still
40,000 short,’ Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said that
- government is projecting that
there are up to 160,000 people
eligible to vote.

Efforts will be made in the
coming days to encourage
increased voter registration, he
said.

Mr Christie said that the Con-
stituency Commission can only
make decisions on whether new
constituencies need to be cre-
ated or existing ones should be
expanded when they get a more
accurate i¢ >a of voter numbers.

Regarding the platform on
which the opposition will cam-
paign, Mr Christie said he
expects the FNM to touch on
the high number of murders in
2006.

“The opposition would be
quite correct to express concern
over 60 murders even though
they had 65 themselves in one
year.

“If the opposition would
choose to exploit it politically I
would not be surprised,” he
said.

However, he added, he does
not believe that making the
murder rate an issue will cause
the FNM to win the next elec-
tion.

“Bahamians are fully aware
that it is our children doing
these things, that we have some
challenges to face,” he said.

Guana Cay
developers
tackle worries

FROM page one

“Tt’s like slavery all over
again,” he said.

“On top of them not paying
us our Christmas bonus as yet,
right now we need machines to
dig some of these big holes, but
they don’t provide us with any,
so we have to use our hands.”

The Guana Cay develop-
ment has made national head-
lines on numerous occasions
throughout the year.

The Save Guana Cay Reef
Association, led by Attorney
Fred Smith had accused the
developers of not being envi-

‘ronmentally friendly and the
association was awarded an
injunction against the Discov-
ery Land Company, the devel-
opers of Baker’s Bay, to stop
work on the project.

However, in October the
$175 million Baker's Bay Golf
and Ocean Club development
won a legal battle against oppo-
nents of the marina and golf
community and work was
resumed on the project.

Responding to the court
decision, Mike Meldman, Chair-
man and CEO of Discovery
Land Company, said he was sat-
isfied and delighted with, but
not surprised by the Supreme
Court decision.

"It has been a long wait and
a hard fight but we remained
committed to the Baker's Bay
project and to The Bahamas.
We were always confident that
the outcome would be
favourable. We fully expected
that the truth would be recog-

nized and justice would be
served. The truth, of course, is
that the Baker's Bay project has
abided by the laws of The
Bahamas in all of our dealings
and that we have consulted and
respected the views of the peo-
ple of Great Guana Cay and
Abaco and will continue to do
so," Mr Meldman said.

Dr. Livingstone Marshall,
spokesman for Baker’s Bay,
said that management met with
the landscapers yesterday morn-
ing, and the workers were given
the opportunity to air all of their
concerns.

According to Dr Marshall,
Baker’s Bay has provided all of
its employees with appropriate
equipment, and as far as he
knows, only in specific cases
would landscapers have to use
their hands when dealing with
plants with delicate roots.

In respect to the workers’
allegations about not being paid
their Christmas bonus, he said
the company normally pays
bonuses at the end of a com-
plete calendar year, and that
the workers could expect this
issue to be resolved this month.

Dr Marshall agreed that
there were “kinks” in the new
time clock system that had to
be addressed, but he assured
The Tribune reporter that the
landscapers would be paid any
monies owed to them by the
end of the day.

“Everything is fine with Bak-
er’s Bay and its employees at
the moment,” said Dr Marshall.

He said the company was
committed to finding ways to
resolve employee concerns.



The impact of dredging and construction at Dick’s Point

FROM page three

ing in the areas where those ani-
mals have been foraging for
food then obviously they are
going to impact those animals
and impact the ecosystem, that
is struggling to survive out there
anyway with all the develop-
ment that has happened.”

Mrs Duncombe said she_has
been concerned with this pe

of action for years. “People
have been allowed to do what
they want. Whether they’ve
been given permission to do it is
another matter. And I under-
stand in the Family Islands it’s
like the wild, wild west because
there is no one to monitor them.
The country is totally out of
control. It’s insanity that every-
one can do what they want.”
Blaming the government, Mrs

Job frustration

FROM page one

“If a woman has three children and she get paid $150 at the end of
the week, that money will go like that.” The only money-making
options she would have left would be unfavourable, he said.

Mr Knowles, who described himself as ‘‘multi-talented,”’ said that
“it’s only so long before we begin taking action. This is just the

beginning.”

3}

. to enjoy*why th }
property there, Tt’s really fidici'' “busy up to press time. The Tri-

Call for tighter government
environmental regulation

Duncombe said, they need to
tighten the reins and make sure
that when things are done, they
are properly researched so that
minimal damage is caused.
“And I’m afraid that’s not hap-
pening.” she said. “If the gov-
ernment has given them
approval; then they shouldn’t
have.”

“It’s not fair on the people.
who have putcHased tobe ablent i
jey*purchased?_ “De



-

aR OR





ple wake up and realise how
badly all our environment is
being affected and do some-
thing about it, she added. .
“People need to highlight the

issues as much as possible then
authorities need to come in and
investigate and do what needs
to be done to stop or mitigate
the problem.”

The Tribune attempted to
fact the Lands and Surveys

2

partment, but the phone was



lous. Why should Thy quality of “Bune also tried to reach the Port

life be completely obliterated
for somebody else?” she asked.
“How does that work?”

The only way this type of
activity is going to stop is if peo-

CONFERENCE

Controller who was also
unavailable as were the persons
responsible for the operation,
whose names were not listed in
the phone book.

offe THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS 3

\ ¥ ¥ }

/



OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS |
L‘EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
ET LES AMERIQUES xe

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES 4



108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE
CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John Wesley)

“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness

for Christ in The Bahamas”

THE SECOND LORD’S DAY AFTER THE NATIVITY,
BAPTISM OF THE LORD, JANUARY 7, 2007

INTROIT AND COLLECT:

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
beta ee LL LEU} ae

SUNDAY SERVICES

Moming Worship Service ....... 8.30 am.
Sunday School forall ages... 9.45 am.
Adult Education 945.am,
-WoIship S@IVICE viccssenens « 1.00 am.
Evening Worship Service.
Summer 7.00 p.m,
i Winter 6.88 om,
_ WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

_ Selective Bile Teachin

~ Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-12
Missioneties (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.
FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m. -

Youth Ministry Meeting —

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m, - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Premise Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

-EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

Ot SPA IE CUM EE ee Acta LL(S
Tel; 3228304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O, Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org







Lord of all time and eternity, you opened the heavens and
revealed yourself as Father in the baptism of Jesus your beloved
Son: by the power of your Spirit complete the heavenly work
of our rebirth through the waters of the new creation; through
Jesus Christ our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)

9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)

10:00 a.m. Rey. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/Rev. Emily A. Demeritte/
Sis. Kelli Jolly (Holy Communion)

.6:30 p.m. Prayer Band

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,

Fox Hill)

L1:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr. (Holy Communion)

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)

11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST

CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

3:00 p.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)

GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH (20 Cedar
Terrace, Tall Pines)

10:00 a.m. At Rhodes Memorial Church
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)

6:30 p.m. Providence Youth
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
Circuit Christian Believer Programs

Tuesdays 6:45 p.m. Wesley Methodist Church,

Malcolm Road, East
Thursday 6:45 p.m. Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church.
FASTING FOR JUSTICE — All Methodists of the Conference
are urged to fast for Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases.
The fast begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday
and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly:
“My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS | at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns of
Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; “Family
Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the Glory” ZNS
1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.

PRAYERS
For Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases. Our brothers and
sisters in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes and other
natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.

-

\,
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007





The Workers’ Voice

The official organ of The Bahamas Federation of Labonr’ ~





January 19567

When labour :
struck back’

EARLIER this week, the family of Sir Randol Fawkes hit

out at the government for neglecting and disregarding
the legacy of the late trade unionist and labour leader.
The family said that whenever the history of the
Bahamas is recounted, Sir Randol’s name is intentionally
left out, “or passed over in a great haste.” With this in
mind, In Days Gone By looks back at the General Strike
of 1958 - which brought the country to its knees - as
well as other special moments in the life and career of
Sir Randol Fawkes. |

ONE FOR ALL AND ALL FOR BNE







Dear Brothers and Sisters,



This is our Supreme hour:

It is absolutely necessary for all of us to keep

our heads and stay calm.

We can only lose this battle if we resort to vio-

ponents wish us to act foolishly so

lence. (Our op
vse to use armed force against

that they oan have an 6xo
us.

LET US WIN THIS BATTLE WITH A MIGHTY MEEKNESS
VIOTORY SHALL BE OURS

Fraternally yours
THE BAHAMAS FEDERATION OF LABOUR.

RANDOL F. FAWKES
President.



The labour leader’s message of
non-violence to the striking workers

All photos oittates
of Rosalie Fawkes

QAO,

Sanson

es :
NS



A striker appeals to visitors

Pricing Information As Of:

Frid

5 J

2007

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
D ;



ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

52wk-Low Fund Name _

Previous Clase Today's Close

Change “Daily Vol.

“0.203
1.689
0.796
0.265
0.199
0.170
0.715
0.078
0.943
0.134
0.295
0.552
0.779
0.921
1.476

-0.170
0.532
0.588

1,220

2,000



Last 12 Months Div $

Yield %

Ww“

P/E Yie

THE original dispute that led
to the General Strike of 1958
surfaced on November 1, 1957
as a result of government's
granting to the white owned
tour companies the exclusive
franchise to operate trans-
portation services between the
new Nassau International Air-
port and the city.

To cope with this lion's share
of the business, the tour com-
panies purchased a fleet of cars
and buses and informed mem-
bers of the Bahamas Taxi-Cab
Union, their former employees,
that their services were no
longer required. The officers of
the union wandered, in vain,
from "pillar to post" in search
of a government department
that would listen to their griev-
ances.

So in desperation on Satur-
day, November 1, 1957, the Taxi
Cab Union under the leader-
ship of Clifford Darling, Nick
Musgrove, Lochinvar Lockhart,
Jimmy Shepherd, Cyril Fergu-

son and Wilbert Moss, blocked
all traffic to and from Nassau
International Airport for hours
while the commissioner and his
policemen looked on helplessly.

On the afternoon of Sunday,
November 2, the Bahamas
Taxi-Cab Union called on the
Bahamas Federation of Labour,
led by Randol Fawkes, for assis-
tance. A General Strike ,fol-
lowed..

On January 29, 1958, the gov-
ernment at last brought repre-
sentatives of the tour compa-
nies and the taxi union together
at a top level conference.

At the end of the talks, the
officers of each organisation
signed a detailed agreement
providing for the more equi-
table division of transportation
of passengers to and from the
airport.

The Bahamas Federation of
Labour therefore called an end
to the general strike and the
workers were ordered to return
to their jobs.

7.321587"
2.9449""*
2.500211"*
1.207441"*
11.2596""""*

Colina Money Market Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Bond Fund

delity Prime Income Fund
Se ae

ee





Sea S
YIELD - last 12 month dividends dividad by NAV KEY
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidolity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior weak
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

*- 29 Dacamber 2006

** 34 December 2006

*** . 30 November 2006



nN

****. 30 November 2006 wens

Lord Ranfurly greets the crowd on the
first unofficial Labonr Day in 1956,



ae
ie


THE TRIBUNE

5 R WS free?
FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 3

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 9



LEFT: Nassau is a ghost town after-the strike is called. Striking
workers make their point peacefully above and below



Labour leader Randol Fawkes talks with supporters and fellow activist Milo
Butler (second left), later the first Bahamian governor-general of the Bahamas.

Sr eee Ee eee oe





A Festival of Nine Lessons &
Carols for Christmas





Sa





ane







cr

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\
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. outh Beach Shopping Centre, East Street South
i
) P.O. Box SB-51628 - Nassau, Bahamas

| Phone / Fax: 242-392-4100 + 242-324-




®
e

The Public Is
We








11:00am

Other Opportunities For Worship






Sunday 10:15am Sunday School _
11:00am —_ Divine Worship Service _

Monday (3rd) 7:30pm Ladies Ministry _

Wednesday 7:30pm

Thursday 7:30pm

Saturday 3:00pm Chi



AQ EEE OW OW_d_-|_.-_-/-| WWM MCTBGD_DMiaijivibFii

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



|

~ SATURDAY EVENING

|G WEOR lebiity news. (N)
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JANUARY 6, 2007

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS

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pearances he By Adetour in shall, Dan Duryea. A vixen-like Southern matriarch presides over a sly

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The Insider Cel- |Cold Case The mother of amur- Without a Trace “Requiem” Lookin
for a widower and his kids. 1 (cc)

One Season

WPBT |Wonders

48 Hours Mystery “Endgame” A
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dered boy finds a letter suggesting eat wie (Rh (CC)
is first wife,

his death was not random.











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@ WFOR i CV (CC). Jacase which involved the shoot opens the 2006 case aa ce
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7B



JANUARY 7, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30_
NETWORK CHANNELS ‘

David Atten

Theatre ‘The
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| “INFL Football: [NFL Football NFC Wildcard -- Dallas Cowboys at Seattle Seahawks, Tony Romo leads the Dallas Cowboys ( Grease: You're the One That | Want (Series Pre-
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THE TRIBUNE.



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007




LOCAL NEWS
By Franklyn G Ferguson







AMER

“ NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON. CAMERA | <










: arrister Alva enjoys ‘classy’ 60th

Alva Stewart-Coakley celebrated her 60th birthday in elegant style among family and friends on
December 20 at The Summit, home of Dr Nicholas Hepburn on Love Beach.
: Guests dined before dancing the night away. Sharing in the special occasion were members of Ms
Stewart-Coakley’s high school graduating class, the Government High School Class of 1965.
. The’ Class is shown above, standing from left: Zelia Bethel, retired nurse; Harrison Lockhart,
: president, Industrial Tribunal; Arabella Cambridge, Businesswoman, Kendal Munnings, CPA; Ros-
oe: alind, Bethel, Entrepreneur; Derek Cambridge, Casino Executive, (not a member of the class of 65),
Cynthia Hall, Human Resources Executive, ZNS; Dr Mac Campbell, ENT; Kendal Pyfrom, Insurance
Executive; Bernard (Porky) Dorsette, Businessman; Pandora Sawyer, Insurance Executive. Seated:
Justice Anita Allen Justice of the Supreme Court; Sandra Collie, retired Bank Executive; Judy
Lewis, Grief Counselor, Ottawa, Canada; Alva Stewart Coakley, Barrister-at-Law; Dr Nicholas
Hepburn, Surgeon; Yvonne Moncur, retired Bank Executive, and Isadora Bethel, Bank Executive.





Dr Hubert Minnis; Particia Minnis; Micro Biologist; Leah Jones of Atlanta, Georgia; and Sir

Clement Maynard.



Be Sash i i

a Claudine Stubbs, legal secretary, Higgs & Johnson; Alva Stewart-Coakley, Barrister-at-Law, and
Ruby Roker, office administrator.







Dr Nicholas Hepburn, surgeon; Mrs Garikapathi; Dr Krikanth Carikapathi, surgeon. Kendal Pyfrom, insurance executive; Dr Nicholas Hepburn; and Rosalind Bethel, entre,


a.



For further information on High Society Pictures please contact

AE

Ree :






DS “Lene Really isa,

JJ








SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com




@ SAILING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

SAILORS will gather in
Montagu Bay over the
weekend of January 26-28
to compete in the New
Year’s Day Regatta.

Minister of Local Govern-
ment and Consumer Affairs
V. Alfred Gray, who orches-
trated the move io bring all
of the concerned parties
back together under one
umbrella, said at a press
conference at his office yes-
terday that the event will be
dubbed the “Government
Invitational Regatta” and
will officially launch the
2007 regatta season.

Surrounded by members
of the Bahamas Boat Own-
ers and Sailors Association,
the Nassau Sailing Associa-

tion and the Commonwealth:

Sailing Association, as well
as members of his staff, Mr
Gray said Prime Minister
Perry Christie will declare
the season open at 2.30pm
on Saturday, January 27.

And Governor General

Arthur D. Hanna will host
the awards presentation in
grand style in a banquet at
7.30pm at Government
House with six men being
honoured for their contri-
bution to the growth and
development of regattas in

- the Bahamas.

“Regattas, in our collec-
tive view as sailing enthusi-

.". asts, have really not been



given the vintage or the
exposure on a national level
as it should, outside of the
Exuma Regatta,” Gray said.

Committee

“And it was thought by
the committee and the min-
istry that regattas have

See become so important to the

cultural life of our country
that there such-be a single

. regatta to launch regatta
2 2007.”

With all of the associa-

“» tions coming together in one

ing.

place at the same time, Gray

said they will be entertained
throughout the weekend by

. the Royal Bahamas Police
Force band and a junkanoo |

rush-out.

Gray said he is just as
excited about the regatta as
all of the representatives

_. who were present at the ,
‘conference because boats ©

from all of the associations
and throughout’ the
Bahamas will be participat-

Bernadette Smith, who
works at the regatta desk at
the ministry, revealed that
the following boats have
already confirmed to com-
pete in the three class of
sailing:

Class A - Good News,
Lucayan Lady, Pieces of
Eight, Silent Partner, Red
Stripe, New Courageous,
Tida Wave, New Southern
Cross, Red Hot Thunder-

bird and Sea Star.

Class B - Cobra, Ants
Nest, Ansbacher Queen,
William’s Auto (who will
change her name to Six Sis-
ters), Passion, Humming-
bird, Lady Natalie, Eudeva,
Barbarian, Healthcliff, Sonia
and the Lonesome Dove.

Class C - Irene Good
night, Queen Brigetta, Ack-
lins Moustache, Crazy Part-
ner, Legal Weapon, Lady

AAT LAL RE LENE LED LN AY ERE APTN

“Government Invitational
Reyatta’ to launch season



DRE R I EI UN



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

|_| MINISTER of Local Government and Consumer Affairs

V. Alfred Gray (seated centre) along with his Permanent Sec-

retary, the Rey. Harrison Thompson (left), and BBOSA com-
modore the Rey. Dr. Philip McPhee (right), pose above with
members of the various regatta associations as they announced
plans for the New Year’s Regatta in Montagu Bay, January 26-

28.

Eunice, Paparazzi, Magic, -

Thunderbird, Barbarian I],
Fugitive, Lady Ruthnell and
Bulla Reg.

Gray said the prize money
will be given out during the
gala awards banquet in the
ballroom of Government
House as the government
shows the boat owners, skip-
pers and sailors how much
they are appreciated.

Last year in April, Gray
said all of the associations
came together when they
met and ironed out all of
their differences and they
came up with a Sailor’s
Accord, an agreement that
all signed, signaling the end
of the splinter group and
now they are going to make
it official during the New
Year’s Regatta.

Rev. Dr. Philip McPhee,
the commodore of the
BBOSA and the official
spokesman for regatta in the
country, said because of
Gray’s intervention, the
New Year’s Regatta will be
considered the. greatest
event to be held in the coun-
try.

“We owe a lot to Minister
Gray for being instrumental
in being the magnet that has
drawn all of us together
under one umbrella in peace
and harmony,” McPhee
stressed.

Sheldon Gibson, the com-
modore of the CSA, said
he’s happy that they are all
together, trying to do the
best for sailing in the coun-
try, and he too congratulat-
ed Gray for his efforts.

“Our motto is competitive
and positive and we’re try-
ing to carry that out,” he

(Photo: Chris Ingraham)

stated. “We are going to be
positive in whatever we do
and when we come out, we
will try to do that.”

Also representing the
BBOSA was Sidney Forbes,
who noted that he is over-
joyed by the unity and con-
sistency that has been
demonstrated by all of the
parties involved.

“Once we come to Mon-
tagu Bay on January 26-28,
you will see camaraderie,
you will see consistency, you
see the best sailing that you
will ever see in New Provi-
dence ever,” he said.

Cohesive

While the BBOSA have
been responsible for the
hosting of the New Year’s
Day Regatta, Forbes said
they are pleased to defer it
to the government so that
they can bring about a cohe-
sive unit.

And Richard Munroe, the
commodore of the NSA,
said he’s been actively in
sailing for more than 50
years and this is the first
time that he’s seen such a
thrust with a minister play-
ing a prominent role.

“The only other minister
who did this before or came
close to his level was Alger-
non Allen,” Munroe reflect-
ed. “But I think this minister
has surpassed him.”

As the race coordinator,
Munroe warned all of the
sailors that the racers will
be starting on time and he
warned that they should be
prepared in advance or they
will get left at the starting
line.



Ua RE SS TTR





2

Chandra aims for
show of strength —

M@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

AFTER taking a year off
to undergo surgery last year
to replace a hernia disc,
sprinter Chandra Sturrup is
hoping to get back to full
strength this year.

And with her former
coach Trevor Graham being
indicted by a US Federal
Grand Jury last year for his
alleged role in the BALCO
steroid case, the biggest per-
formance-enhancing drug
scandal in US sports history,
Sturrup. said she will be
making her comeback train-
ing on her own in Raleigh,
North Carolina.

“Tm doing things on my
own,” said Sturrup, in an
interview with The Tribune
yesterday. “I guess things
are going alright. I won’t know until I start
competing.

“But it’s a hard road because I’ve been
out for so long and IJ had to try to motivate
myself to get back into the shape that I was
in. So it’s a work in progress.

“I’m going to stick with what I’ve been
doing,” she insisted. “I know what got me
there so far and I’m going to stick with it. I

just have to be mentally strong. But that’s no

problem for me. It’s just going to take an
extra push this year.”

As she plans her comeback, 35-year-old
Sturrup said if she’s not fully ready for
indoors, expect to see her making strides
during the outdoor season.

Her prime focus is to trim off some of the
weight she put on during her off year and
she hopes that she doesn’t suffer another
injury to set her back again.



@ CHANDRA STURRUP

“T feel alright. I just have
to get back into the swing
of things,” admitted Sturrup,
who last won an interna-
tional medal at the 2001
World Indoor Champi-
onships in the 60 metres.

“I’m not where I was
before, but I don’t think it
will take me that long. It
didn’t take me long before,
so by the end of the month,
I should be getting there
because I started training
since November.”

There’s no timetable for
Sturrup to compete or any
time for her to run. She just
wants to wait to see how her
body reacts when she picks
up her intensity in training.

In May, Sturrup was
forced to call off the remain-
der of her season.

“But it wasn’t until the
end of September, she had
surgery to replace a hernia
disc in her neck.

“Just for me to get back on the track would
be great,” she proclaimed. “I’m looking to
compete at a competitive level, but I can’t say
how competitive I would be.”

Sturrup said her goal is to be ready to rep-
resent the Bahamas at the Pan American
Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in July and
the IAAF World Championships in Osaka,

Japan in August.

Her former coach Trevor Graham has
denied any direct knowledge or involvement
in the steroid case.

On August 3, the United States Olympic
Committee banned him from its training
facilities.

Sturrup declined to comment on the issue,
only to say that she’s now training on her
own and she doesn’t intend to take on a new
coach in the future.

~

Sant
Murray upsets top-seed
-Davydenko to reach fi

’

_ Cabot Basketball Club aiming for ‘best of the best’

‘+ advancing to the Qatar Open

.. denko during the semi finals

TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ TENNIS
DOHA, Qatar
. Associated Press

ANDY MURRAY capital-
ized on Nikolay Davydenko’s
injury to upset the top-seeded

-. Russian 7-5, 6-2 on Friday,

. ‘final.

“It is not in every tourna-
ment you get to beat the
World No. 3. So, this is a good
win,” Murray said.

_ The fourth-seeded Briton

. will face No. 2 Ivan Ljubicic in
‘Saturday’s title match. The
‘Croat beat Robin Soderling of
Sweden 3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5) in the
other semifinal.

Davydenko scored a break
in the fifth game and led 4-2,
but needed injury breaks after
the sixth and eighth games to
tend to an apparent shin
injury. Murray broke Davy-
denko to even the first set 4-4
as the Russian increased his
unforced errors into the net
and wide. ;

Davydenko’s form deterio-
rated in the second set. Mur-
ray broke him in the second
game and jumped out to a 4-1
lead before serving out for the
match.

“It is big task playing the
No. 5 in the world,” Murray
said referring to Ljubicic. “He
is a very good server, and if I
can break his serve I should be
OK.”

Ljubicic’s had 21 aces,
including five in the tie-break-
er, in his match. He rallied
from 3-5 down in third set to
defeat the 25th-ranked Soder-
ling.



B® ANDY MURRAY of
Great Britain returns the ball
to Russia's Nikolay Davy-

of the Qatar Open in Doha,
Qatar Friday Jan. 5, 2007.
(AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Pearse tits,
Sete noe O ceri utenieciia
- Doha, Qatar Friday Jan. 5, 200

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



CABOT Basketball Club is hoping to
stage the “Best-of-the-Best” Primary

- School Basketball Tournament.

Wayde Watson and Sean ‘Bass’ Bast-
ian, directors of the club, said they intend
to bring all of the championship teams
from the islands that participate in pri-

ui e ball to Andy
nals of Qatar Openi

(Al Photo/Kamran BOT

They will play over the weekend of

April 5-7 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um to determine exactly who has the
best primary school team in the coun-
try, Watson revealed.

The tournament is expected to take
on a similar format to that of the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Classic for senior
boys basketball teams that will follow
two weeks later at the gym.

IVs anticipated that a total of 12 teams

SPORTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 20



elimination tournament that will only be
open to players who are in primary
schools, not those who are still cligible to
play, but are in junior high school.

To add some excitement to the tour-
nament, Watson said they have invited
two coaches from Florida to come in and
view the players with the view of expos-

ing them to high school basketball, if

they are interested.
“These players will be going.into junior

much exposure as we can,” Watson said.
“And if they can get that exposure in
the United States, we will help them with
that too.”

Watson also revealed that they intend
to provide a number of exciting prizes
to the deserving athletes.

Among the list is a fully loaded com-
puter and a full ride to a University of
Miami camp in July to the most out-
standing plavers.

the onrly staees of our

































































sying to see if
ry,” Watson
gotten the
head with

planning because we we
we could first secure
stressed. “Now that W
gym, we can go full 9
our plans.”

Watson said interes
Family Islands can co}
at the College of the Bt
details.

“We feel this will
tournament for the fan§
jected,

a
ms on the

or Bastian
for further

exciting
Yatson pro









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:82°F/28°C
Low: 70° F/21






High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 66° F/19°C

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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today
highs and tonights's lows.



78/25 58/14
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72 4Mi6 po 52/11 404 pe Las Vegas

44/6 pe By





Los Angeles
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San Antonio
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San Francisco






Charleston, SC 76/24



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Minneapolis

15/-9 pe
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New Orleans Tallahassee
Oklahoma City

62/46 43/6 Washington, DC 73/22

Mostly cloudy, a | Partly sunny and

shower possible. - | breezy.
High: 80° | High: 80°
Low: 68° | __ Low: 67°

eee a a De

humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and.
Is. Temperatures jee ite high and the low for the Hay.



Statistics are for Nassau through 14 0 m. 1. yesterday
Temperatiire 520 esse



High :-2ceecceectats 83° F/28° C
OW Seccatpdiasceositteanese 73° F/23° C
Normal high ......... 78° F/25° C
Normal low. ...... 66° F/19° C
Last year’s high 80° F/27° C
Last year’s low 65° F/19° C
Precipitation: s02° 770-2 i a
As Of 1 p.m. yesterday w...scesssssessessreesersseese (ACE
Ne@antO: Cate 5 sess ctspicpidactsansstccvoses vsebesrscsivenne WACO
Normal year to date o...sssessssessssesssseecsseeese 0.29"
AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

_@ SAN SALVADOR
-——_Wiigh: 84°F 29°C:
Low: 71° F/22°C



RAGGED ISLAND |
High: 83° F/28°C —
Low: 68° F/20° CG










Sunrise...... 6:56 a.m.
Sunset....... 5:35 p.m.



_ Low. 70°F/21°C



Low: 72" F/22° G

GREAT INAGUA
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 70° F/21°C



US aL




MODERATE

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.









9:34am. 2.6 3:07 a.m.

9:53p.m. 23 3









1:18pm. 22 5:05pm. 00
day (0:32am. 2.1 5:23am.
Tuesday —. 5:44 p.m. 0.1
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New First





_ MAYAGUANA
High: 85°F/29°C









-0.2
49 p.m. -0.1

Sunday 10:13 a.m. 2.5 3:52am. -0.1
Pie 10:35p.m. 2.2 4:27p.m. -0.1

Monday’ 10:52am. 23 4:37am.







ioosrisa 84 p.m.
Moonset .....9:17 a.m.



Weather (W): s-sunny,
storms, f-

Today Sunday
Low W High Low W



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ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet
ESE at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet
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Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

LZ ene

cE BROKERS & AGENTS
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_WATER TEMPS.







ANNAN Be , 6

Stationary angen

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PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007



i
4

poe ey

Be SOP DLS TREES ACAI SAGEM ESLER

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BBE RA GEL EF SEE EET SE EST

SESE ra







Keeos_—s MONDAY
S HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure

and cholesterol testing is available. For more

info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-
tors Hospital conference room.

& CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm e Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
suonth in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times.and.places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. e

Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at °

7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets

.each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of

the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach © Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room e Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials.

4 HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the











AROUND

IHE |HIBUNE. - -



NASSAU

Aur: maine

ate

Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas thraugh
mediums ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. i contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Bahamian artistic
imagination,



public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are
held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
ter Blake Road. For more information call
327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,
Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support
Group meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm
to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors
south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

&@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets
every Wednesday. from 1pm —- 2pm at East
Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the lst and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the
world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on



Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at
large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the'second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend « TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from lpm to 2pm.









PHOTOS WELCOME

FRIDAY



@ HEALTH 2
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to
attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.

SATURDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid class-
es are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

n CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

RE

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

SUNDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness
Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-
ed persons are welcome to attend. For more
information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.



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'The Tribune

Che Miami Herald |

BAHAMAS EDITION



Te Ah
MARINA PROJECT pg 5



Volume: 103 No.38

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UCR eg es eS meee ee |

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

PRICE — 75¢.



PM webes ny arrests

Christie ‘stunned’
if government
not informed on
baggage handlers

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said he would be sur-
prised if not at least one gov-
ernment agency had been
informed about the investiga-
tion and the arrest. of the. five
Bahamian baggage handlers
before their arrest in Florida.

Speaking with the press after
a special luncheon at the new.
police conference centre, Mr
Christie said he has launched
his own investigation into the
circumstances of the arrest of
five Nassau Flight Services
(NFS) employees by US author-
ities.

Although the prime minister
concurred with Attorney Gen-
eral Allyson Maynard-Gibson

Christie |
sticks to
eléction

ETC



By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

DESPITE speculations to
the contrary, Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie yesterday
maintained that he will call
the next general election on
or before May 2.

Mr Christie speaking to.
the press after a special lun-
cheon at the new police con-
ference centre said he
believes that the Bahamas
is emotionally ready for an
election.

The prime minister said
that within the “next day or
two days’’ the PLP will have
selected all its candidates in
the Family Islands and will
then turn its attention to
New Providence.

““All who believe they are
candidates in the next gen-
eral election, are working as
candidates in the next gen-
eral election,” he said.

Mr Christie said he
believes, that Bahamians
have seen enough of his and
NM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham’s leadership style and
that they understand the
country’s challenges well
enough to make a decision

_on how to vote.
However, when it comes
to voter registration, Mr
| Christie said, the numbers
are not yet where govern-
ment would like them to be.
As of yesterday 101,000

SEE page 7











that no member of government
had been informed about the
controversial arrests, he said
that “there are some agencies
of the government that ought
to know if they are part of a
joint investigation.”

“T would be surprised if such
an agency: was not informed,”
he said,

Mr Christie said that he is
now receiving reports on the
incident and will hopefully soon
be in a position “to speak com-
prehensively and in detail to the
subject.”

“T have made a salient effort
to inquire fully into all of the
details because it has become
an important point in public
interest that I think I should
respond to as prime minister.

“For me it involves the vari-
ous agencies, including private
sector agencies like Spirit Air-
lines,” he said.

Five baggage handlers were
arrested and charged with traf-
ficking cocaine on local and
international flights through the
Lynden Pindling International

‘Airport when they arrived in

Florida to participate in a train-
ing course on December 17.
According to reports, the
men were not allowed to dis-
embark the Spirit Airlines flight
before they were arrested.

On Thursday three of the five’
. baggage handlers had their first

arraignment hearing before a
Miami federal court.

Family members of the men
claim that the five men were
entrapped in a sting operation
by Bahamian and US officials.

Prime Minister Christie at the
police luncheon yesterday
emphasised that the local'police
force had, “in writing”, assured
him that they had no knowl-
edge of the arrests before they
occurred.

He said that he is confident
that Bahamian police have in
no way circumvented any extra-
dition laws in this matter.

Mr Christie pointed out that
cross-border investigations and
joint operations have taken
place since the inception of the
Bahamian police, and that inter-
national law enforcement agen-
cies have gathered information
on criminal activities by
Bahamians for many years.

“Without questioning those
constitutional rights, there is a
bank of information on citizens
and institutions that have been
gathered over years and years
and years, and whether you like
it or not that information is
shared and known by (interna-
tional) law enforcement agen-
cies,” Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said that
“on the face of it” persons com-
mitting criminal offences in the
Bahamas should be charged
according to Bahamian laws
and heard before Bahamian
courts,





ENFORCING THE LAW - Prime Minister Perry Christie (centre) arrives for a special luncheon
at the new police conference centre. Pictured to his right is Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson



By KRYSTEL ROLLE

CLAIMING he © will
“increase the violence” if
government does not supply
him with a job, one young
man said he is tired of the
empty promises the goyern-
ment hands out-during the
election period.



Derek Knowles, 19, resi-°
‘dent of Johnson Street in Fox

Hill, said he has been out of a
job for more than three
months, and has become so
frustrated that he is prepared
to start a “riot” if mecessary.

He quit his previous job,
claiming that he was under-
paid, overworked and taken
advantage of. Since then he
has not been able to secure
another job.

Mr Knowles, and four of
his friends plan to take their
message to the masses. Yes-
terday they staged a protest
in the Farrington Road area
in an effort to get others to
join “their cause.” He
believes that once the “word”
gets out he wiil have hundreds
of supporters.

According to him several
of his friends have been out of

work for more,than a year, It
has got to the point where
they are willing to do “any-

thing” for money, he said. “If

they don’t give us more jobs
we’re going to increase the
violence: I will do whatever I
have to do to get a job — Pl
have to get money. anyway I
can.”

When asked why he was
taking such extreme mea-

sures, he replied: “That’s what |

Maleohn X did. You have to
sped ak out until someone —
you.”

Unatraid of what the reper.
cussions of his actions could.

be, he stated: “I want to start

a riot. If they don’t want that -

to happen, then they need to
find us jobs. People in the
ghetto aren’t getting the right
support they need.”

He said that this exercise

was not just for his benefit or.

the benefit of his friends, “Pm
speaking for the community
— for the black community.”
Mr Knowles is also peti-
tioning governinent to
increase the minimum wage.

SEE page 7 —

Photo: Tim Clarke

sKoor ea eieae Guana Cay

‘riot’ for job

workers in
pay protest

By ALEXANDRIO

MORLEY :
Tribune Staff Reporter,

ABACO - Baker’s Bay
employees staged a protest out-
side the developer’s head office
in Marsh Harbour yesterday

‘morning, demanding overdue

bonuses, fair pay, and proper
work equipment.

A source, who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity, told The
Tribune that about 30 land-
Scapers employed with the Bak-
er's Bay Golf course decided
not to go to. work yesterday

because they have not received

the Christmas bonuses, they
claimed they were promised
before the Christmas vacation.
They were also upset about the
newly-installed time clock that
employees now haye to use.
According to the source:
“The time clock is the problem,

Before the time clock, we were’

all getting paid for working 40

hours per week, but now we get

‘paid for about 30 hours per:

week.”

At the moment, suid the -

source, none of the landscapers >

trust thé new time clock system,

which was installed three weeks .>
ago, because their salaries have -

been reduced drastically since’

its impicmentation,

“We used to be able to carry .

home over $400 per week, but
now at the end of the week we

carry home $220,” the worker —

said.

The source said the land- ©

scapers continue to work the
same number of hours, but on
pay day their cheques do not
accurately reflect the amount
of work done. :

The source also told The Tri-
bune that the landscapers are
expected to dig holes on the
grounds of the development
with their hands,

SEE page 7


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PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

Malisse beats
Santoro, wil





the semifinal

fi TENNIS
CHENNAI, India
Associated Press .



THIRD-SEEDED Xavier
Malisse of Belgium overcame a
jittery second set to defeat Fab-
rice Santoro 6-4, 4-6, 6-0 on Fri-
day and set up a semifinal
match against Rafael Nadal at
the Chennai Open.

Nadal, ranked No. 2, beat
Davide Sanguinetti 6-3, 6-2 in
another quarterfinal match.

‘Two-time winner and fifth-
seeded Carlos Moya clinched
five straight tiebreaker points
to overcome big-serving Ivo
Karlovic 6-4, 7-6 (6). Moya’s
opponent in the semifinal will
be Stefan Koubek of Austria,
who shocked third-seeded
Julien Benneteau of France 6-1,
6-2.

Malisse said he was looking
forward to playing Nadal on the
hardcourt surface. Nadal has
not won a title since his triumph
in the French Open last year.

“I played six tournaments

-after the France Open. You
can’t win them all, but I think I
did quite well,” Nadal said.

After the Grand Slam tri-
umph in Paris, Nadal went on to
reach the final at Wimbledon,
the quarterfinals in the U.S.

Me

AIN'S Carlos Moya

AS

Open and the semifinals in the
Masters Cup.

“Pve only played him once
and lost,” said Malisse, ranked
37th. “That was on clay and
everybody loses of Nadal on
clay, but it should be a good
match on the hard surface
here.”

Malisse said his match against
the 52nd-ranked Santoro, who
begins his 19th year on the ATP.
Tour, was his best so far.

“Everyone will be looking at
the few errors, but they
occurred because | played more
aggressively,” he said.

Santoro was presented a
plaque for his sportsmanship by
former Indian Davis Cup cap-
tain Vijay Amritraj

“For me tennis isn’t about
winning, but for presenting a
good image of yourself and your
country to the world,” Santoro
said. “I think I’ve still got a lot
of tennis in me.”



H@ BELGIUM'S Xavier
Malisse plays a shot against
France's Fabrice Santoro,
unseen, during their quarter
final match of the men's singles
final in the ATP Chennai Ten-
nis Championship in Chennai,
India, Friday Jan. 5, 2007.

(AP Photo/M. Lakshman)



the crowd on winning the quarter final match against
Soca ; : ; ;
Croatia's Ivo Karlovic, unseen, in the ATP Chennai Tennis Char

mpionship in Chennai, India, Friday, ATP Chennai Tennis Championship in Chennai, India, Friday Jan. 5, 2007.
Jan. 5, 2007. Moya won the match by 6-4, 7-6.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

_ SPORTS
















































rves against









Italy's David



SPAIN'S Rafael Nadal, ¢ Sanguinetti, in the quarter final match of the

“(AP Photo/M. Lakshinay) (AP Photo/M. Lakshman) sg
Liverpool a
off in FA C

PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Larsson set to make Man United
debut in FA Cup game against Villa

m SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

HENRIK LARSSON could
make his Manchester United
debut alongside Ole Gunnar Sol-
skjaer against Aston Villa in the
FA Cup on Sunday.

United could be fielding a Scan-
dinavian attack with a combined
age of 68.

Former Celtic and FC
Barcelona striker Larsson has
joined the Red Devils on loan
from Swedish club Helsingborg
and should make his debut at Old
Trafford at age 35.

"T've been very pleased with his
training. He's been very sharp and
shown good finishing," Ferguson
said. "I hope he scores — that will
be nice."

With Louis Saha injured and
Wayne Rooney likely to be rested,
United manager Alex Ferguson
is expected to also start Solskjaer,
who turns 34 in February. The
Norwegian striker has returned
from two years of injury problems
with eight goals this season.

Knowledge

"Both players will be involved.
I have to decide whether to start
with both or just one of them,"
Ferguson said. "Like Ole, Henrik
is a good finisher. They are both
experienced and they can use that
knowledge. Certainly their posi-
tional play in the penalty box is
the great strength of both of
them." '

After the tough midwinter spell
of four Premier League games in
10 days, Ferguson will rest sever-
al of his regulars ahead of next
month's Champions League
games against Lille. Poland goal-
keeper Tomasz Kuszezak will take
over from Edwin van der Sar to
make his fourth appearance of the
season.

"With European football beck-
oning next month it is important ©
Tomasz gets a bit of football,"
Ferguson said. "Edwin has been

@ SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

LIVERPOOL and Arsenal meet in the
FA Cup on Saturday with each team on a
roll.

Premier League teams enter the third
round of the competition this weekend,
with defending champion Liverpool and
Arsenal — who have 17 titles between
them — both thinking like they have a
chance of winning the famous old tro-
phy.

Liverpool is coming off a 3-0 Premier
League win over Bolton that extended
its unbeaten streak at Anfield to 20
games. Benfica was the last team to win in
Liverpool, knocking the then-defending
champions out of the Champions League
quarterfinals with a 2-0 win in March.

Though third-place Liverpool leads
Arsenal by one point in the Premier
League, the Gunners arrive at Anfield
with a healthy Thierry Henry and a little
bit of history on its side.

The Gunners are perfect at Anfield in
FA Cup play, though their one win came
71 years ago.

But a 3-0 league win over the Reds on
Nov. 12 has the north London side look-
ing to emulate Benfica.

"The draw could have been kinder, but
the important thing is we are at home,"
captain Steven Gerrard said Thursday.
"They will be fearing the tie more than we
will. They are a top side with top players
and we know it's going to be a very diffi-
cult game."

Gerrard has scored three goals in his
last six games, while striker Peter Crouch
got on the score sheet for the first time in
10 games against Bolton. The Reds have
held opponents scoreless in its last five
wins.

"As a manager of a team that has a
gocd balance between attack and defense,
I am very happy with the consistency of
the team, the chances we are creating,
the good football we are playing and also
the clean sheets," manager Rafael Benitez
said. "I think it will be a good month for
us.”

Arsenal only lost once in the seven
matches without Henry, but can still take
heart from the Frenchman's return for
the Gunners 4-0 win over Charlton on

- 2-1. Its only appearance in the

‘old either," he said. "I can see

fantastic but I think he under-
stands we need to give the boy
some experience."

Six points ahead at the top of
the Premier League, United is
aiming to take its record number
of FA Cup triumphs to 12 and six
since Ferguson arrived at the club
in 1986.

With seven triumphs, Villa is
tied for fourth in the list of FA
Cup winners, although it hasn't
won soccer's most famous domes-
tic cup competition since 1957,
when it beat Manchester United

final since then was in 2000, when
it lost 1-0 to Chelsea.

Villa hasn't won in 10 games
and manager Martin O'Neill, who
had Larsson in his team at Celtic,
is aware that United has strength
in depth to cause problems, espe-
cially at Old Trafford.

"Against Manchester United,
you know it won't necessarily be a
free-kick or a set-piece that will be
your undoing because they have
the capabilities of playing through
you," O'Neill said.

"If we play like we have recent-
ly, certainly going forward, we
look as if we're going to create
things. I've been delighted with
the team, and we've played some
really great stuff. But we need a
marked improvement before we
start calling ourselves a quality
team."

O'Neill said he believed Larsson
still had plenty to offer United,
even at age 35.

"Henrik has been and still is a
quality player. He is also not too





exactly why Sir Alex Ferguson has
gone for him because he will need
a number of quality players in Jan-
uary-February and Henrik is cer-
tainly that."

@ MANCHESTER United's
new loan signing, the Swedish
Helsingborg footballer Henrik
Larsson, left, smiles at a press
conference with manager Sir
Alex Ferguson at the side's Car-
rington training ground.

(AP Photo/Jon Super)

.



cer match at Anfield Stadium, Liverpool, England, Monday Jan. 1, 2007.

Tuesday, where the striker scored his first

goal since November.

"We have won so many games while
missing important players, so | think peo-
ple should give credit to the players who
deserve it," Henry said.

The Gunners still arrive without
Emmanuel Adebayor, Freddie Ljung-
berg and Theo Walcott, while Robin van
Persie — who has five goals in his last four
games — and midfielder Cesc Fabregas
are suspended.

Fullback Emmanuel Ebouc ts set to
return from an ankle iijury that has Kept

him out of action for several weeks.

The two sides will meet three days lat-
er to replay the Dec. 19 League Cup quar-
terfinal (hat was postponed due to fog.

In Saturday's other games, League
Championship leader Birmingham hosts
Newcastle, Bolton travels to Doncaster,
Hull plays Middlesbrough, Portsmouth
faces Wigan, Reading welcomes Burn-
ley, Sheffield United plays Swansea, Wat-
ford hosts Stockport, and West Ham
looks to end a three-game slide against
Brighton.

Also Saturday, Macclesiicid travels to

@ LIVERPOOL'S Steven Gerrard, right, and Peter Crouch, left, celebrate Gerrard scoring against Bolton Wanderers during their English Premie

Stamford Bridge to face Premier League
champions Chelsea.

"You never know what might happen,"
Macclesfield manager Paul Ince said.."We
are playing well and it is important we
go there and stamp our mark on the
game, and not be overawed by the stars,
the stadium and the crowd. "We are going
to go there to try to win the game."

Ince was December's League Two
manager of the month after leading the
Silkmen to wins in five of six games as
part of an eight-game unbeaten run.

Chelsea will use a makeshift central





_ SNS a

Ms AS
r League soc-

SS

(AP Photo/Dave Thompson)

defense with John Terry still recovering
from back surgery. He is joined on the
sidelines by Khalid Boulahrouz — who
injured his knee in Tuesday's 0-0 draw
with Aston Villa — and Ricardo Carvalho,
who is suspended.

In Sunday's other matches, Tottenham
travels to Cardiff, Shefticld Wednesday
plays Manchester City, and Everton takes
on Blackburn in the only other match
between Premier League clubs.

On Friday, Bristol Rovers play Here-
ford and Stoke faces 2005 runner-up Mill-
wall.



-round -
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5B

TRIBUNE SPORTS





ss

SS ss S SS aS

@ SOUTH AFRICA'S batsman Graeme Smith, center, misplays a shot as India's fielders Sourav Ganguly, left, and VVS Laxman, right, looks on during the fourth day of the 3rd and final Test match agains
India at Newlands stadium in Cape Town, South Africa, Friday, Jan. 5, 2007.



(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe

South Africa loses two wicket:
in chase fo India

i CRICKET
CAPE TOWN,
South Africa
Associated Press

DALE STEYN took four wickets to help
dismiss India for 169 before stumps Friday on
the fourth day and leave South Africa 211 runs
to win the third test and the series.

South Africa was 55-2 at the close, requiring
another 156 runs for victory at the Newlands
Stadium. “

A.B de Villiers was caught by wicketkeeper
Dinesh Karthik for 22 off Zaheer Khan and
Hashim Amla was leg-before-wicket to Anil
Kumble for 10 in the final over. Graeme Smith
was not out 21 at stumps.

India, which scored 414 in its first innings and
then dismissed South Africa for 373, lost its last
seven second-innings wickets for 79 runs. Steyn
had the best figures with four for 30 off seven
overs.

‘. In the morning, Steyn induced Virender
Sehwag — who batted back at the top of the
order — to drive loosely outside off stump on 4

_+_+, and give wicketkeeper Mark Boucher an easy

->+7+ ‘catch.

*. Inthe next over, Makhaya Ntini got a delivery
to climb sharply on Wasim Jaffer, who gloved it
to De Villiers at first slip to depart for 2.

There was a long delay before Sourav Gan-

--_- guly came in at No. 4. Sachin Tendulkar was due

-.7.7-in, but because he was off the field when South

j Africa's innings closed overnight, he had to wait

an equivalent amount of time before he could
bat.

Ganguly was not ready and the umpires con-
ferred with South Africa captain Smith and
asked him not to appeal for a timed-out dis-
missal in the interests of sportsmanship.

Smith agreed, and Ganguly took eight min-
utes to get to the crease. India went to lunch at
73-2.

Ganguly was the first batsman to be dismissed
after the break, guiding a simple catch to Her-
schelle Gibbs in the gully off Jacques Kallis for
46.

Rahul Dravid was caught-and-bowled for 47
by left-arm spinner Paul Harris and India was
114-4.

One run later, V.V.S Laxman was run out
for 1 by a powerful throw from Shaun Pollock at
square leg.

Pollock then had Tendulkar out leg-before-
wicket for 14 just before tea. ee

The last four wickets fell in just five overs
for 22 runs after tea.

Kumble was caught by Gibbs off Steyn for 6.
Khan was run out for 1 by De Villiers at extra
cover.

Sree Sreesanth was caught by Kallis off Steyn
for 4, and Munaf Patel was caught for a duck by
Pollock on Steyn's very next ball — the seventh,
as the umpires miscounted.

The series is tied at 1-1.



@ INDIA'S batsman Zaheer Khan, left, rais-

es his bat near the ball as South Africa's bowler

:. Jacques Kallis, right, attempts to field as he

makes a run on during the fourth day of the

3rd and final Test match against South Africa at

Newlands stadium in Cape Town, South Africa,
Friday, Jan. 5, 2007.

(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
oe ce te ie ee ee Sy Sa ae, Sage a, ES Sy og ee

a

PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007
















yOu

BAIT STATION
TRAYS ARE

EMPTY... AND
ONAWED ON/






SEE, YOUR

WE'RE

ARE YOU ENJOYING THE PARTY

—

be
i

SS

1 CATEREO FOR YOU?

MARVIN



RRR

NON

IT TAANED OUT TART THE
PoLAW BAYAW GoT STUCK
ON THE (CE FLOE ESCAPING
KILLAW WHALES, BUT IT

SEQUITUR

KEPT DRIFTING SOUTH,
ANN FROM THE SAFETY



# 10

ACROSS
1 = The odd street light (5)

6 Material good when hot (5)

9 ‘1s colourful, excellent in brown,
maybe (7)

Go furtively like a
wriggling snake (5)

Sign used in calibrating (5)

Nasty nolee from the organ (5)
Having lost one, he’s short (7)
Familiar sleuth in a white coat (3)
Soon to be nameless (4)

Dan's upset about Eva
being in a state (6)

' Bent on sounding pained in bed? (5)
TV business person; fierce, one
imagines (6)

A fishy mouthful doggedly taken? (4)
Money, some of which

Is retumed (3)

How to address raiders,

possibly? (4,3)

Person supporter with a
companionable air? (5)

Paper spoitt by a spill of oil (5)
Breaks into pictures? (5)

Badly lit (7)

Possibly fired for being Franch? (5)
Rattled off a kind letter (5)

11
12
13
15
17
18

283.8

Yesterday's cryptic solutions

22, Putin 23, Test 26, Atlas 28, Far 29, Hearst 30,
S-E-nora 31, Hens 32, Air force 33, Direct

She'd

THAT IMPLY

OVERRUN
WITH MICES

WE NEEDED To NAWKK

TeGETAAN To GET THIS
NNAINE CINK of (CE:
To REND BACK NATH.



CRYPTIC PUZZLE .

DOWN

2

BR

Bs

ACROSS: 1, Jet-Sam 7, Altitude 8, R-if-t. 10, Trikes 11,
Deluge 14, Ten 16, Roses 17, Road 19, S-p-itt 21, F-O-ray

DOWN: 1, Jester 2, S-pike-d 3, Mats 4, Miser-L-y 5, Tutus
6, Me-Des 8, Rita 9, Fen 12, L-ot 13, Gears 15, Sprig 18,
Oraie 19, Sot 20, lan 21, F-US-spot 22, Par 23, Tanner 24,
Eros 25, T-ea se-T 26, A-he-ad. 27, La-AR-y 28, Fee 30,

* Animal talk? (3)

_ bushy talled (5)

C2008 by Norm Amerce Syrciaste, inc. World egies meaved.

s
tN

NX

(C2008 by tarts Aemerics Syndicate, re. Yorld fights reserved.

he |
mY PN
it
aN AN

® THEN WHEN A PIECE
oF NY WRECKED
BokT FLOATED BN,
UNAS ATT NITRA AN
BIRO of GENIUS...

HEY, PICK
TRAT UP,
\NE Got

IS
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fate © '06 WILEY IPK, INC. :
KAN pret. ot Urwerene PRES SID,



WILE IPR @ GARTEN

HOW'? HE GET

THE JOB POSING
FOR THAT
PICTURE 7

Container used by an ancient
Peruvian in outer Taiwan (3,3)
Catherine’s place, historically (6)

Show contempt of

a short drink (5)

Comforted when a good card's sold
out (7)

Doubles partner? (4)

Made me enter the shallow

part (6)

In general, to make good

progress (3,2)

Bow-legged, big headed and

Had he a nose for conquest? (5)
Tha payment is for the hire cars (5)
Supply grub in front of a pillar (5)

I's perpetually negative (5) .
Early career as a young ruffian? (7)
Regarding wrought iron,

a great artist (6)

Just the drink for a railman? (6)
Alittle cash, less than ample for a
regular drink (6)

The last place to dump anything (5)
It's In the notes to quote from (4)

All you need in Morse telegraphy (3)

EASY PUZZLE

Pa ne PS NN a ra

Yesterday's easy soiuuons

ACROSS: 1, Hermit 7, Recalled 8, Brie 10, Malice 11,
Manure 14, One 16, Rotor 17, Rate 19, Refer 21, Merit 22,
Cedar 23, Drew 26, Spoon 28, Leo 29, Lean-to 30, Locust
31, Abet 32, Prisoner 33, Dither

DOWN: 1, Hammer 2, Marine 3, Tree 4, Cabaret 5, Clout 6,
Adder 8, Biot 9, Ice 12, Nor 13, Rouse 15, Feral 18, Agape
19, Red 20, Fir 21, Mention 22, Con 23, Decent 24, Rout
25, Wither 26, Slope 27, Oasis 28,

Lob 30, Lard

dl

“4
KX]
E
x

ALL EXCEPT THE
ONES IN PLAIN. VIEWS

PT Dif len
Ld
N





Livk. Be




WHERE
CAN SHE



IHOPE I DIDN'T
INTERRUPT YOUR
REM SLEEP

Le]
\ |
KK

[x PS?

x N

N









ACROSS

Month (5)
Attain (5)
Rested (7)
Witches’
group (5)
About (5)
Custom (5)
Idler (7)
Place (3)
Plant (4)
Small

case (6)
Royal (5)
Rescued (6)
Meadows (4)

Pitch (3)

Angry reply (7)
Cold

dish (5)
Characteristic (5)
Salary (5)

Lack (7)
War-horse (5)
Molars (5)

COMICS PAGE:















“CHRISTMAS MUST BE GETTIN’CLosE. My
MoM TOLD ME THE CLOSET IS ‘OFF LIMITS?”

TATION GIVES WAY TO A

Bidding Quiz

Partner bids One Diamond, and
the next player passes, neither side
vulnerable. What would you bid now
with each of the following four
hands?

1. @ 93 ¥ 85 @ KQ862 & AJ73

2. @ KIO V AK8 @ 107 & Q9862

3.@AJ7VA10 © KJ643 & AJ8

4. @AQ93 Y AQ87 @ — # A9875

eee

1. Two clubs. You don’t quite have
the values for a jump to three dia-
monds (forcing to game), and are too
good for a single raise to two dia-
monds (which would indicate six to
10 points). As usual, when faced
with this dilemma, you bid a side suit
initially — in this case, clubs —
planning to show diamond support at
your next opportunity without jump-
ing the bidding.

By combining these two bids, you
indicate a hand of 11 or 12 points that
originally was worth a raise to two
and a half diamonds. Partner may
then go on to game or not, depending
upon the strength of his hand.

2. Two notrump. With a hand so
well-suited for notrump play, there is
no particularly good reason for
responding two clubs. Ordinarily, a
five-card suit is not suppressed, but
when it is a minor and an 11-trick
contract is only a distant hope, while
a nine-trick game at notrump is very
promising, the minor suit can be con-
cealed. Two notrump shows 13 to 15
points and is forcing to game.

3. Three clubs. You can’t settle for
less than a slam with a holding of 18

high-card points, excellent trump
support and controls in every suit. In
such cases, it is normal to start by
making a jump-shift in another suit
in order to alert partner to the possi-
bility of a small or grand slam.

However, here you have no gen-
uine side suit in which to jump-shift.
So, at the risk of temporarily deceiv-
ing partner (you plan to support dia-
monds strongly from here on in), you
manufacture a suit because that is the
only way you can apprise him of the
potential for slam. Clubs are chosen
rather than spades because it is dan-
gerous to make a jump-shift in a suit
higher in rank than the one you plan
as the ultimate trump suit.

An immediate jump to four
notrump (Blackwood) is also accept-
able, but you might find yourself
guessing whether to bid a grand slam
if partner shows up with, say, an ace
and two kings. Keeping the bidding
lower may allow you to get a better
picture of partner’s hand, and you
can always use Blackwood later on.

4. Two clubs. This is a fine hand to
have opposite an opening bid, but it
loses much of its luster when partner
starts with one diamond. A jump-
shift would be decidedly out of order
because it is not wise to eat up valu- -
able bidding space when you have no
idea where you're. going. The best
approach is to respond in your
longest suit first, planning to bid
spades and hearts later (if necessary)
and thus describe your 4-4-0-5 distri-
bution.

mit ay



The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)
HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain
the centre letter and there must
be at least one nine-letter word.
No plurals.





=
a
o

.

Pe
Pe aS

DOWN
2 — Unprincipled (6)
3 Invent (6)
4 Domestic
fowl (3)
5 Neighbouring (5)

6 Performance (7)
7 Revise (4)

8 Prickly plant (6)
12 Chopped (5)
13 Middle (5)

14 Of the sun (5)
15 Years (5)

16 Anxious (5)
18 Acceptable (5)
19 Told (7)

21 Tropical bird (6)
Find (6)
Affirm (6)
Quick (5)
Team (4)
Humour (3)

23
25

TODAY'S TARGET
Good 15; very good 23; excellent
30 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

derive derv devise dive diver
diverse divert divest drive
duvet ever evert restive revise
revised revue rive rivet serve
served SERVITUDE sever
sieve strive veer verse

versed vest vested vesture
vied virtue virus









new
word

punishment to a
team for break-
Taye MAUL Cwe LaLa 4
game play.

Ni Hua v Alexander Morozevicn,
China v Russia, world team
championship 2005. It was the last
game of the tournament to finish,
and gold and silver medals
depended on the result. China's
young players had led throughout
until a late charge by the
experienced Russians. A draw
would suffice for Ni Hua, and
material is level with a blocked
position. But Moro, a world top 10
grandmaster, has an active
position with queen, rook and
bishop all controlling key squares,
so the defence is difficult. White's °
obvious try is 14, but Ni Hua
feared the reply Qc2 with threats
like Qe2 Rael Qa2 when the white

HOW'S YOUR
SNOW ART
PROGRESSING ?

BY ABANDONING REPRESEN:
TATIONALISM, I'M FREE TO
EXPRESS MYSELF WITH PURE
FORM. SPECIFIC INTERPRE-

MORE VISCERAL RESPONSE



queen is tied to stopping Qg2 mate.
So the 22-year-old went 1 Rel, which
stops Qc2 but allows a different
tactical trick. What happened?

TRIBUNE SPORTS





THIS PIECE 1S ABOUT
THE INADEQUACY OF
TRADITIONAL IMAGERY
AND SYMBOLS TO
CONVEY MEANING:
IN TODAYS WORLD.















OFVYRE 1S

WELL C'MON,
MONOCHROMATIC .

IT's WST
SNOW.



SATURDAY,

JANUARY 6 ve

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20

Don’t worry about bad news you'll
receive this week, Aries. It’s more of a
misunderstanding than anything else.
Ignore the dire warnings and proceed
with your plans.

TAURUS -— Apr 21/May 21
Advice you’ll receive from a friend ©
can’t be trusted, Taurus. This person ,
is not qualified to speak about cer-

tain topics, and especially not the ~

one you have concerns about.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

A surprise guest knocks on your '
door in the days to come, Gemini.
Be warm and accommodating even .
though it’s an imposition. The visit
will be a short one.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

A: positive attitude will help you ,
tackle a project more easily than a

negative one will, Cancer. Cast your ~

doubts aside that you’ll never get the .
job done and get to it.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Putting your trust in a family mem- *
ber’s hands will end with suprising ©

results, Leo. You can’t avoid the sit- -

uation, so there’s no point Worrying -

about it in advance.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22
This is a critical time at work, so be
on your best behavior, Virgo, or you’

may be passed up for a promotion. .

Don’t sabotage what you’ve worked”
so hard to attain. ,

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 :

A move that you made a few months

se hee

ago is not panning out. Admit defeat. . - ~

and cut your losses. Don’t worry,

friends and family will support you .

until you’re back on your feet.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

A promotion at work has resulted in ”
more assignments on your plate.

While you enjoy the status, you,’ .

didn’t expect so many extf'a responsi-
bilities. Speak up if you need help. *
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21 .
Several financial blunders left you in
the red at the end of last year. Make
a resolution this time around to be
more frugal with your purchases, or
the same results will ensué.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
A proposition has been made to you,
and you’ve accepted. Big changes are
in store in the weeks to come,
Capricom, so hang on tight and enjoy
the bumpy ride... ;

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

- yee

a

Now that things are stable on the -.°.°.

homefront, Aquarius, concentrate ! +"

+

on what you’re going to do at .*.°

work. It just may be time to seek -
out a promotion. :

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
After a year of hard work, consider
taking some time off for a much-
needed vacation, Pisces. You’ll be
glad you got a break.

CHESS by Leonard Barden |

EHR

CHESS

SOLUTIONS

pre er RF FS EN ESE SEE TREE AP

aVeW TY ZUM +19) HENRY E HEY TEN Z #BsNEIIq
umed pe au) SUM [HOY TAY T WORRTIOS SAND



a
Se

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 22



Grand Bahama

school sees rise |

in autistic pupils

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Beacon
School is seeing a growing num-
ber of students with autism,
according to school Principal
Sheryl Wood.

Ms Wood reported that eight
children at the school have been
identified as autistic so far, with
the help of a US expert in
autism.

Diane Adrion of the Univer-
sity of Miami, who has about
25 years of experience with
autism, conducted a workshop
for special education teachers
at the Beacon School on Fri-
day.

Ms Wood said that an invita-
tion was extended to teachers
from the private and public
schools, healthcare profession-
als, the Department of Social
Services, and other ancillary

_-agencies connected with special

education.
“Autism is one of those dis-
orders that we (in Grand

Bahama) know very little about

so we thought it was prudent to
invite somebody like Ms Adrion
who has many years of experi-
ence — in fact more than 25
years of experience in the field

‘of autism,” she said.
Ms Wood said she felt that:

the workshop was important
because “we have a growing
population of students who pre-
sent with autistic trait or full
blown autism.”

“We wanted to learn how to
identify them better. At the
moment we suspected it, but
with the help of an expert like
Ms Adrion who visited the
classrooms and did sorne obser-
vation of those students .and

‘helped us to identify whether

they were autistic.”
Ms Wood said that teachers

. were able gain important strate-

gies and methodology to inter-
vene with autistic children more
effectively.
Teachers, she said, learned
some of the characteristics
exhibited by autistic children.
Some of the characteristics
include children who have prob-

lems attaching to their care
givers, children who show little
or no emotion, children who
have unusual self-stimulating
behaviour such as, hand flap-
ping, rocking back and forth,
twirling of the hair, or making
unusual sounds. :

Ms Wood said children who
are preoccupied with a particu-
lar object like a rotating fan, or
a child who seems to be in their
own world are traits to look for
when identifying autism. .

She said Ms Adrion shared
several strategies on how to
apply effective behaviour man-
agement techniques — the
Lavaase behaviour manage-
ment approach, the ABC
(antecedent behaviour conse-
quences) approach, and the
applied behaviour analysis the-

ory — to better cope with and.

teach autistic children.

Ms Wood said the techniques
will assist them in changing
behaviour and getting autistic
children in a more appropriate
frame of mind for education.



By ALISON YOUNG
Cox News Service

ATLANTA -- After'a nasty
stomach bug struck more than
400 passengers aboard the
world's largest cruise ship last
month, the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention issued a

- rare "no sail" recommendation

so the vessel could be thor-
oughly sanitized.

But the outbreaks that swept
through Royal Caribbean's
Freedom of the Seas were
ainong at least 37 that hit cruise
ships during 2006, making it a
record year for shipboard out-
breaks, according to CDC
reports.

More than 4,480 people were
sickened in the outbreaks and in
nearly every case the confirmed
or.suspected cause has been the
same: noroviruses.

This highly contagious group
of viruses causes what is com-
monly called the "stomach flu,"
a miserable one- or two-day
bout of vomiting, diarrhea and
cramping.

Nobody knows for sure how
many norovirus cases there are
in the United States each year.
But the CDC says it is the most
common form of gastrointesti-
nal illness, sickening an esti-
mated 23 million people each

. year in nursing homes, schools,

restaurants and families. While
nobody tracks the nationwide
incidence of norovirus disease,
some scientists believe it may
be on the increase - possibly
contributing to the vexing rise in
cruise ship outbreaks in recent
years.

As travelers board ships for
winter cruises, CDC officials
said they should focus on good
hygiene practices, particularly
thorough hand washing, to
avoid getting ill - whether on
land or at sea. About 10 mil-
lion people cruise annually in
North America, according to
the Cruise Lines International
Association.

~ Passengers also need to keep
cruise outbreaks in perspective,
the CDC and cruise line indus-
try officials said.

"There's a lot of norovirus in
the general population in the
United States," said Dave For-
ney, chief of the CDC's Vessel
Sanitation Program for the past
decade until he retired at the
end of December. "With so
much of it in the general popu-
lation, we see that much more
in the cruise environment."

Unlike on land where doc-
tors aren't required to test for or

‘report norovirus illness, cruise:

ships are required to record

details of all passengers who.

become ill with gastrointestinal
symptoms and report those
numbers to the CDC.
Norovirus outbreaks aboard
cruise ships generally are less a
problem caused by the ship and
more a problem caused by ill

passengers who don't want to -
miss their long-planned vaca- .

tion, said Forney. By going
ahead with their voyage, these

sick travelers bring norovirus-

es. aboard, contaminating sur-
faces they touch with unwashed
hands. :

Cruise industry officials are
acutely aware of public con-
cerns about norovirus outbreaks
aboard their ships and say they
have taken extraordinary steps
to stem any spread by passen-
gers: From denying boarding or
offering to change cruise dates
for ill passengers, to quaranti-
ning those sickened at sea, to
repeated cleaning of high-touch
areas and promoting hand
washing aboard ships.

But they also say cruises have
been tagged with an unfair asso-
ciation with the illnesses
because the CDC lists ship-
board outbreaks on the Web at
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/vsp/sur
v/Gllist.htm.

Michael Crye, executive vice
president of the International
Council of Cruise Lines, an
industry group, said people are
more likely to catch norovirus-
es on airplanes, in shopping
malls and elsewhere in their
hometowns than aboard cruise
ships that have rigorous sanita-
tion programs.

Still, cruise ship outbreaks ©

can result in large numbers -of
sick, people, CDC records show.
And some ships had more than
one outbreak in 2006, while oth-
ers had none - something For-

ney and industry officials can't _

explain.

Among some of the recent
outbreaks: ;

‘During the Carnival Liber-
ty's 16-day trans-Atlantic voy-
age in November, 536 of its
2,804 passengers were sickened
with diarrhea and vomiting. It
was the largest cruise outbreak
reported in 2006, according to
CDC data, both in number and
percentage of passengers sick-
ened. "Since the outbreak that

occurred on the ship's transat- .

lantic crossing in November,
there have been no further
norovirus outbreaks since that
voyage," Carnival spokesman
Vance Gulliksen said in a writ-
ten statement.

Two Princess Cruise Line
ships - the Regal Princess and










from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

j area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

2006 a record year

BOSE Pastor pedals to
illness outbreaks his bd mi

Sun Princess - were returned to
port last month because of out-
breaks of vomiting and diarrhea
aboard. On the Regal Princess

75 of 1,479 passengers got sick‘

ona Dec. 7-27 voyage. Aboard

the Sun Princess 112 of 2,018:

were ill on a Noy. 30-Dec. 10
cruise. Princess spokeswoman
Julie Benson said both ships
continue on their regular sched-
ule of cruising without disrup-
tion. "Cruise ship outbreaks of
norovirus almost always begin
from passengers who bring the
illness on board," Benson said
in a written statement.

The CDC issued a rare "no
sail" recommendation Dec. 10
to Royal Caribbean's Freedom
of the Seas after it had three
consecutive voyages with high-
er than expected cases of ill-
ness, Forney said. Two of the
voyages made CDC's outbreak

list.

The ship's largest outbreak,
on a cruise from Nov. 26-Dec. 3,
sickened 338 of the ship's 3,823
passengers. On the next cruise,
from Dec. 3-10, passengers con-
tinued to get sick. Despite inten-
sive cleaning “it still wasn't
under control," Forney said. So
the CDC recommended the
ship be taken out of service for
48 hours to allow additional
crew to do more sanitizing.

Royal Catibbean spokes-
woman Lynn Martenstein said
that while some arriving pas-
sengers were disappointed to
have their cruise delayed and
shortened, "We had a remark-
able number of people who
seemed to appreciate the situa-
tion." She said the ship hasn't
had any outbreak problems
since. The CDC has inspected
and overseen cruise ship sani-
tation issues since the 1970s,
when the industry had several
outbreaks. In the early years,
Forney said, the biggest culprits
were contaminated water and
food-borne diseases caused by
keeping hot and cold food at
improper temperatures.

But as the CDC and the
cruise industry worked together
on better ship designs - includ-
ing greater capacity for refrig-
eration and hot holding capaci-

_ty - bacterial outbreaks were

largely engineered out of ships,
Forney said. Now, noroviruses
are the main culprit.



|







‘






High School in Freeport.

ing back to the school.

that they receive.”

NEXT Tuesday marks the
82nd birthday of cycling pastor

. Bertram Newton, who can trace

his seminole roots in Red Bay,

Andros, all the way back to.

1845. .

That's when the Lewis family,
from whom the popular church-
man is descended, first arrived
on the island in canoes from
Florida. :

His great grandfather Moses
Newton - also of seminole stock
- lived to be 112 “and'still had
all his teeth in his. head”,
according to Rev Newton.

He remembers sitting on the
old man’s lap at Staniel Cay
when he was a child. “Every
hair on his head was white,” he
told The Tribune. .

Rev Newton’s great grand-
mother, Mary Lewis, was the
forebear who landed from
Florida. Red Bay became the
centre of the island’s seminole
population. Many descendants
of the indians - including the
Bowlegs - live in Andros today.

In spite of his advanced age,
Rev Newton has no thoughts of
retiring. He still writes his own
sermons and can trace: his
preaching career back 54 years.

“Nowadays, I do mostly
administrative work,” he said,

“but T still deliver sermons as
well.”

When The Tribune called,
Rev Newton had just been out
for a bike ride, an activity that
helps to keep him fit. He is one

of several elderly Red Bay folk:
who go out for a spin most days

round the settlement.

Though things change little

in Red Bay itself, Rev Newton
bemoans the decline of human
behaviour in modern times.

“Every time] read a news-
paper or switch on the radio,
my heart fails me,” he said.
“People are more dishonest
than they used to be. Even in
island communities, things have
declined.”

Rev Newton is not sure what

parishioners at his New Salem
Baptist Church have planned
for his big day. But he said he
will probably spend it quietly
with his wife.

“I'll get some food from the
restaurant and we’ll have a nice
time,” he added.

His mother-in-law, Omelia
Marshall, is Red Bay’s oldest
resident at 89. She introduced
straw work to the community.

¢ BOOMING economies cre-
ate big newspapers, which was
why The Abaconian’s pre*
Christmas issue ran to a record
72 pages. - :

The Marsh: Harbour bi-
monthly paper was split into
three sections for the first time
since its launch in the early
1990s.

“It’s hard work but we enjoy
it,” said Kathleen Ralph, who

\Pat’s Uniform, Grand Bahama’s leading dis-
tributor of school uniforms, presented, a new
computer and a cheque to the Sir Jack Hayward

The management said it was their way of giv-

“We're happy that Pat’s Uniform and the
Millennium Mall are able to make this donation
of a computer and it comes in a timely fashion
in light of the recent incident at the school
when the senior master’s office was destroyed,
including his computer and equipment, said
the school’s principal Ben Stubbs. “We have a
special association with Pat’s Uniform relative
to our uniforms, and we’re especially pleased
with the reports from our parents on the service

Michael Sweeting, manager of Pat’s Uniform,
and the Millennium Mall also.presented the
school with a cheque representing part of the
proceeds from the sale of uniform shirts and
blouses that now come with the school’s crest



.

sat

—_

Uniform supplier aids school

attached.

ward High,”

edits and publishes The Aba- .
conian with husband, Dave.

f Education

“Pat’s Uniform is the only distributor now,
providing the school’s crest already embroi-
. dered on the uniform pockets, thus eliminating
the need for schools’to sell the pockets and
parents to have to sew them on the shirts,” said
Mr Sweeting. “We initiated a programme to
give back to schools participating in the pro-
gramme, and we’re happy to be here today to
present a computer and a cheque to Jack Hay-

Mr Sweeting made the-presentation to senior
mistress Delotes Kellman-Jones, senior mas-
_ter and Mr Stubbs. :

Pictured accepting the donations from left to
right are, Mrs Deloris Kellman-Jones, senior
mistress; Mr Benjamin Stubbs, principal; Mr
Michael Sweeting, manager of Pat’s Uniform
and Millennium Mall; and Mr Ivan Butler,
senior master. |

(Photo: GRECHRIS)





















birthday

“The island, was so backward
I don’t suppose the land was

However,,the couple are still... worth anything then. Now

keen to sell the thriving paper,’
which is expanding alongside
Abaco’s buoyant economy, so
they can enjoy a well-earned
retirement. -

e Last week’s Tribune story
about the property boom in
Crooked Island brought back
memories for someone who
remembers the Colonel Hill
area of the 1960s. :

“The'island was such a quiet,
simple place in those days,” said -
a Tribune reader who recalls’
the days when businessman
Basil Kélly was the'local MP.



) parcels of property are changing

hands at $500,000 a time.”
With one or two tourist pro-

jects on the go, and increasing

interest:from foreign home-buy-

_ ers, the island once regarded as

one of the most unfashionable

in the Bahamas could yet

become the one to watch.
Even neighbouring Acklins

is showing signs of life after cen-

turies of slumber.

- Long-term resident Donald

‘McMillan is not surprised by

the mounting interest. “This
must be one of the best places
on earth,” he said.

TSC l a

For the stories behind
aM eect Li
on Mondays



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltg
Montrose Avenue
' Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452



pay





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