Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

US petition demands inquest

mith

into death of Daniel S

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie is to receive a 1,000-
name petition from Americans
demanding an inquest into
Daniel Smith’s death.

The petition has been raised
by a weblog group called “The
Mob”, who claim the Bahamas
government is trying, to conceal
the truth.

Copies of the petition will go
to Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson and the Cali-
fornian lawyer Debra Opri ina
bid to get answers about
Daniel’s mysterious demise at
Doctors Hospital last Septem-
ber.

One of the group’s leaders,
Patty from South Carolina, told
The Tribune yesterday: “It is
obvious something is going on
under the rug here. This is
becoming a cause among con-
cerned Americans because
something is just not right.”

The Attorney General has
repeatedly failed to set an
inquest date, claiming at one
point that she was still awaiting
information from the police.

However, the police told The
Tribune several weeks ago that
they had concluded their
inquiries and all papers had

been handed over.

Members of The Mob have
now concluded that the gov-
ernment’s reluctance to speak
up is the result of a desire to
keep the issue under wraps, pos-
sibly to protect certain people.

They also firmly believe that
Daniel had been murdered
when he was found dead by his
mother, reality show star Anna
Nicole Smith, on September 10
last year.

The Mob, with members all
over the States, is now analysing
every aspect of the Daniel
Smith affair in the hope that the
Bahamas government can be
embarrassed into action.

Patty said travel agents in
South Carolina had reported a
65 per cent drop in bookings to
the Bahamas because people
were concerned about legal
arrangements here.

“They feel it is another Aru-
ba,” she said, “where people
cannot get answers from the
legal authorities.”

The Mob have also expressed
concern over Anna Nicole’s
three-month-old baby daughter
Dannie Lynn Hope, who was
born three days before Daniel
died from a lethal cocktail of

drugs, including the heroin sub-
stitute methadone.

Patty said: “Our petition is
being certified by a notary
before we send it out. We
believe there is no way physi-
cally that Daniel could have
committed suicide.

“Daniel was a very sweet kid.
He nurtured his mother. We

have tried to call the Bahamas

attorney general and have also
e-mailed but have received no
reply.

“It seems the government
don’t want people to know and
are hoping it will go away.”

.Ms Smith is now at the centre
of litigation over ownership of
the Eastern Road house where
she lives and the paternity of
her child.

A Californian judge this week
ordered that she subject the
child toa DNA test by January
23 in response to a paternity
claim by photographer Larry
Birkhead.

Ms Smith’s lawyer-compan-
ion Howard K Stern has
claimed to be the father. He and
Ms Smith are being sued
through the Bahamas Supreme
Court by Mr Birkhead for
alleged slander and fraud.



@ ANNA Nicole Smith, right, leaves the US Supreme Court in
Washington with her son Daniel Smith in this February 28, 2006

photo

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

POPereereeeererrreeerrereeeereeeerererereerere eer eeeerere reer ee rere rreree rere tee rc reer er eer er eerie er eer eerie rere rere error ei ee reece eee eeeceereerercirerei rarer rererrerererrerereirirer cr rererrerercrcererrererrerererrererrerererrerer rere eerererrerecrertcecrecccec cece reretrer etter ertertteererirrettrtrt tre rrerer eter terete erat terete rere

Workers Party accuses government
of being guided by selfish ambition



- THE PLP government is
glued together by “the perks
and comforts of office and their
selfish ambitions”, it was
claimed yesterday.

The Workers Party called
poy Christie’s administration

a “bumbling, crumbling, stum-
bling, fumbling” government
which is forcing people to con-
sider the FNM as an alterna-
tive.

It said Mr Christie presided
over a team who shared his
“warped personal philosophy

that it is better to hang together

doing the. wrong thing” and
ignore the national conse-
quences of their actions.

The attack came in response
to government claims that it
knew nothing about the arrests
of five Nassau Flight Services

baggage handlers in the Unit-
ed States on drug smuggling
charges until after they hap-
pened.

The Workers Party says that -
regardless of the men’s guilt or
otherwise - they were entitled to
due process under Bahamian
law.

The party claims Foreign
Minister Fred Mitchell
“dropped the ball” in failing to

’ protect Bahamian sovereignty.

A statement said the govern-
ment had taken “a giant leap
backwards” by abetting US law
enforcement agencies in an
entrapment exercise.

It said this had desecrated the
nation’s sovereignty “and
viciously violates the very con-
stitution the Privy Council is
called on to defend and pro-

tect.”

The party said the PLP prac-
tised double standards because
supporters working for NFS had
been tipped off about the sting
operation by their political boss-
es.

The Bahamian people now
wanted to know if members of
government were so compro-
mised by US law enforcement
agencies that they could no
longer be counted on to safe-
guard people from unjustifiable
search, seizure and arrest, it
said.

“This country spent huge
amounts of money to accom-
modate the MILAT relation-
ship with the US which governs
how Bahamian citizens are sent
to stand trial in the US,” it says.

But these men had been fed

“on a silver platter” to a justice
system that terrorised, raped,
beat and killed detainees while
holding them in illegal jails and
detention centres.

The statement added: “The
Bahamian people condemn
drug trafficking and we support
swift justice and punishment for
all who are so involved and
found guilty by our courts or
any international court where
due process has been seen to
be done.

“But to kidnap Bahamian cit-
izens and offer them safe return
home to be with their families
during Christmas if they admit
to certain offences or implicate
other Bahamians is contrary to
all that is sacrosanct about the
justice system Bahamians are
used to,”

saneeeeaccnensccsaueesanseneusaneususaeeneasseeeensaseeaeneensseesssseessnseneeasssyaEGentenentanensHaensas Sse eBUHEGsESGnS eH HOLES OREHENGSENESEDSEF OSE OSEEEEGRHOS OH ERESE SESE OH ERS GH AREES SESH SENS RENE EES OSDNSEERESUESHSHEREED SRS SSONSED SEES AD SH SRPEREDEESEOS SSE DEDSEEREREEDSERESSEEEDEESEOSSERSEREOSSSEDEEDEDENSESERRADE SEES EE DEREERE EERE E DOOR OR EE

Wyclef Jean named a
‘roving ambassador’
for troubled Haiti

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

WYCLEF Jean has been
named a roving ambassador for
Haiti, the foreign minister
announced Thursday, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The 34-year-old hip-hop star
will promote development in
the country and represent Haiti
at various events abroad, said
Foreign Affairs Minister Rey-
nald Clerisme.

President Rene Preval chose
Jean for the honorary position
as a way to boost the image of
an impoverished country that

is struggling to restore stability
after a violent rebellion in 2004.
“We have so much to recover

from with our bad reputation.

With Wyclef, we can gain a lot,”
Clerisme said.

Jean, a Haitian citizen who
lives in the United States, was
not immediately available for
comment. His Yele Haiti foun-
dation promotes arts, educa-
tion and sports as a way to
bring jobs and development to
Haiti.

He grew up in poverty but
left Haiti for the US at age nine.
Jean later won fame with The
Fugees and as a solo performer.

So
Soe



@ HAITIAN-BORN hip-hop musician Wyclef Jean, dressed as Santa Claus, holds a little girl dur-
ing a gift distribution to about 600 hundreds kids sponsored by his foundation Yele Haiti in Port-
au-Prince in this Noveinber 29, 2006 photo



(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos, file)

&



Anna Nicole
ordered to
have test for
daughter

EMBATTLED US celebri-
ty Anna Nicole Smith has
been ordered by a judge to
have her daughter undergo
paternity testing by January
23,

Superior Court Judge
Robert Schnider has ruled in
favour of Ms Smith’s ex-
boyfriend, photographer Lar-
ry Birkhead, who in October
sued to get a paternity test.

Mr Birkhead claims that
he is the father of four-
month-old baby Dannielynn
Hope Marshall Stern, who
was born last September at
Doctors Hospital in Nassau.

Ms Smith’s lawyer at that
time contested the suit say-
ing the California court had
no jurisdiction over the mat-
ter as the baby was born in
Bahamas.

Meanwhile, US lawyer
Howard K Stern, the former
Playboy playmate’s partner,
maintains that he is the father
of the baby.

Jamaican
premier
_ pledges to
help Haiti

@ JAMAICA
Kingston

JAMAICAN Prime Min-
ister Portia Simpson Miller
told the visiting Haitian pres-
ident that her government is
committed to helping revive
Haiti’s economy, according
to Associated Press.

Simpson Miller made the
comments to Rene Preval
during private talks Wednes-
day in the capital of Kingston
as part of the Haitian lead-
er’s five-day visit, according
to a statement from the
Jamaican government.

Preval and a 10-member
delegation traveled to

Jamaica on Wednesdayin an’ ©

effort to boost ties between ©
the Caribbean neighbors.
Simpson Miller said
Jamaica and the rest of the
15-member Caribbean Com-
: munity will work to create a
? ¢sustainable democracy in
: Haiti while improving its edu-
cation, agriculture and
tourism sectors. She said
details of these programs
would be announced later.
During a news conference
at Jamaica House, the pre-
mier’s official residence,
Preval told reporters he did
not see ousted former Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide
playing a role in the redevel-
opment of the country _ the

poorest nation in the Western
Hemisphere.

Aristide fled. Haiti in Feb-
ruary 2004 amid a violent
uprising and has been living
in South Africa.











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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 3



Hundreds
evacuated
near volcano
in Montserrat

@ MONTSERRAT
Olveston

HUNDREDS of people liv-
ing at the base of Montserrat’s
Soufriere Hills volcano heeded
evacuation sirens Wednesday
as a lava dome grew to danger-
ous levels, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Scientists in the British

- Caribbean island say that the

- , dome could crumble and send

fast-moving pyroclastic flows —

blistering gas and volcanic

debris — down the slopes of the

volcano, potentially destroying

-- homes in the low-lying Belham
Valley.

“Residents in these areas are
advised not to panic and to start
preparations for moving to safe

- area,” Chief Minister Lowell
Lewis said after the first siren
sounded.

Management at the Vue
Pointe Hotel on the island’s
west coast helped guests relo-
cate.

“The hotel is full, but we are
busy making arrangements to
move our guests to other
accommodations in the far
north of the island,” manager
Amanda Osborne told Associ-
ated Press.

The volcanic dome had been
building rapidly and has topped
the highest part of the 920-
metre volcano, which coughs up
ash and bursts its lava cap every
_ few months.

Scientists at the Montserrat
Volcano Observatory said some
pyroclastic flows have already
been observed, but that they
are at a safe distance.

_ However, the observatory
warned that the pyroclastic flows
- could escalate significantly.

Governor
pardons
criminals on
, departure

@ US VIRGIN ISLANDS
Charlotte Amalie

MEN convicted of murder,
rape and the 1999 death of a
Georgia tourist were among
those pardoned by the US Vir-
gin Islands’ outgoing governor,
according to Associated Press.

Former Gov Charles Turn-
bull, a Democrat who left office
Morday after serving the max-
imum of two four-year terms,
quietly pardoned or commuted
the sentences of the criminal
offenders in one of his final acts
before he left the territory’s top
post.

The beneficiaries include four
murderers, six sexual offenders
and three armed robbers,
according to The Virgin Islands

“> Daily News. The list was made

~ public late Tuesday.

The new governor, Democ-
rat John deJongh, expressed
concern about Turnbull’s deci-
~ sion, spokesman Jean Greaux

said Wednesday.

- “He is alarmed to learn of the
number of pardons and com-
mutations,” Greaux said.
“There’s nothing he can do.”

Turnbull commuted the sen- .

tence of Robert Bastian, who
pleaded guilty to first-degree sex-
ual contact and kidnapping of a
15-year-old girl in 2002. His sen-
tence was reduced to time served,
according to the Daily News.
Another beneficiary was
Rashon Lewis, who was 15
when he raped a 19-year-old
British Virgin Islands woman
at gunpoint. Convicted to 25
years in prison in 1996, Lewis
was given another four years
after a 1997 escape attempt.

of things we
think, say or do

1.Is it the TRUTH?

2.|s it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?

4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?

www. rotary.



Pastor

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

NATIONALIST clergyman
Father Sebastian Campbell
says he supports the family of
Sir Randol Fawkes in their
effort to get national recogni-
tion for the acknowledged
father of the trade union
movement in the Bahamas.

Earlier this week, the
Fawkes family issued a state-
ment in which they expressed
dissatisfaction with govern-
ment’s “blatant neglect and
disregard” for the legacy of the
late labour leader.

According to the family,
many people have complained
to them that, even in death,
unfair treatment is being met-
ed out to the legacy of Sir Ran-

. dol.

“When reporting the history
of the nation, his name is inten-
tionally left out or passed over
in a great haste,” the family
said.

As one of the chief archi-
tects of majority rule, Sir Ran-
dol was instrumental in bring-
ing into existence the first
black government of the
Bahamas.

It is because of Sir Randol
that a bill was piloted through
the House of Assembly mak-
ing Labour Day a paid public
holiday.

In 1967 Sir Randol, as an
elected Labour Party MP, and
Alvin Braynen broke the dead-
lock between the United
Bahamian Party (UBP) and
the Progressive Liberal Party

(PLP) by throwing their votes
in with the PLP. .

On Tuesday, Father Camp-
bell, chairman of the National
Heroes Committee, said he
was “absolutely disappointed”
that government continues to
recommend prominent
Bahamians for British knight-
hoods, and called on religious
leaders to reject the Queen’s
New Year’s Honours and sup-
port a national honours sys-
tem instead. ’

Father Campbell also told ©

The Tribune he supported the
Fawkes family in their bid to
get the late trade union leader
nationally recognised.

“To my knowledge, the
Bahamian government has
only ever named Sir Milo But-
ler as a national hero,” Father

Campbell said. “But the first
thing that has to happen is that
the government has to pass the
National Heroes and Honours
Bill, and then persons like Sir
Randol can get their due recog-
nition.” ;

In 2003, the National Cultur-

al Development Commission

made detailed representations
to the government for a Nation-
al Heroes system to replace the
present British honours system.
However, the Christie admin-
istration has yet to bring the
proposed bill to parliament.

The Anglican clergyman said
he hopes the government pass-
es the bill before the next gen-
eral election — because at the
moment, the Queen’s Honours
are only awarded to “party
stooges.”

backs Fawkes family
call for national recognition _





@ SIR Randol Fawkes pictured
with his wife Jacqueline

Man arrested following Flint Street shootings

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

POLICE have a man in cus-
tody who they say could have a
crucial link to the spate of
shootings and murders in the
Flint Street area.

Police Press Liaison officer
Walter Evans said that officers
from “Operation Quiet Storm”
were patrolling in Flint Street
shortly before 9pm on
Wednesday when they spotted
a white Nissan Maxima with
one male occupant.

“That vehicle was stopped
and searched, inside, they (offi-
cers) found a shotgun and 13
live rounds of ammunition for
that weapon,” Inspector Evans
reported. “They also found a ski

mask in that vehicle,” he said.

The 28-year-old man, who
is a resident of Flamingo Gar-
dens, was arrested and taken
into police custody.

Police believe he may be
connected to a spate of shoot-
ings that have caused consid-
erable alarm in that neigh-
bourhood over the past two
weeks.

“We are trying to establish
that now,” Inspector Evans
said, referring to the possibil-
ity of a link. “We can’t say
with certainty, but we are try-
ing to establish that. But any-
thing is possible. The mere
fact that he had a ski mask
and a shot gun in the car — it
could be an indication of what

his intentions were.”

Kevin Eve, 43, was shot mul-
tiple times on Monday night,
on the same street that the 28-
year-old was apprehended.

Mr Eve, who remains listed
in serious condition, was fight-
ing for his life on Tuesday
night. His present condition is
not known.

Hours before that shooting,
a 21-year-old was shot in the
head while walking down
Comfort Street, according to
police.

Comfort Street is just
around the corner from Flint
Street.

Senior police officers say
they are very concerned about
the increased rate of crime in

Teenager arrives in Caribbean
after solo voyage across Atlantic

@ ANTIGUA
St John’s

A BRITISH teenager
became the youngest person to
sail solo across the Atlantic
Ocean on Wednesday, reaching
the Caribbean island of Antigua
after a six-week voyage, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Mike Perham, 14, raised his
fist triumphantly to a crowd of
Antiguan officials and sup-
porters as he docked outside
St John’s on the southeastern
side of the island.

Perham said he was lonely
at times but not afraid as he
made the crossing in the
Cheeky Monkey, his 28-foot
sailboat. He helped pass the
time by studying and chatting
on a satellite phone.

“Tt has been a fantastic jour-
ney. It has been a great expe-
rience,” he said. “I truly
enjoyed it.”

Perham, who was trailed by
his father in another boat, set
sail Nov. 18 from Gibraltar and
made brief stops to replace
satellite phones in the Canary
Islands and Cape Verde. They

on ALL;
Christmas candles
Christmas ribbon
Decorations
Poinsettias
Garlands
Wreaths
Trees

Picks

Lights

The RCs and staff of H

YOUNG British sailor Mike Perham, 14, pictured upon his __ J



arrival to St John’s in Antigua on Wednesday —
(AP Photo/Johnny Jno-Baptiste)

were originally expected to
complete the 3,500-mile trip
just before January 1.

Perham’s father, Peter,
praised his son’s courage and
tenacity and said he hoped the
voyage would inspire others to
attempt similar feats.

“At home in England you
can’t even climb a tree with-
out a safety certificate, so I
hope it will ignite a little spark

ey
Ys

in some families,” he told

reporters. “When a child puts °

their mind to really want to do
something they should be thor-
oughly supported.”

Perham, of Potters Bar,
Hertfordshire, broke the
record held by fellow Briton
Sebastian Clover who was 15
when he sailed solo from the
Canary Islands to Antigua in
2003.





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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE




-EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

. ae 4 6
The Tepamecayents uestions
, ?
and answers’
| @
on LNG issue

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

" SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday ak ENG plant

w

lamainnescrim arrest"

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 )-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



We have to get serious on drugs -

AS THE year 2006 closed, the police had
60 murders on their ledger, including one
committed on the most sacred day of the
Christian year — Christmas day. The new
year opened with two attempted murders
and several incidents of violent crime. In the
past few weeks three persons were sense-
lessly murdered.

Residents are terrified at the escalating
crime in their communities, and yet we have
heard no one suggest a placard-carrying
protest against criminals gone wild. But let

there be a suggestion that a convicted drug ~

offender might be extradited to the United
States to answer for his sins against humani-

_ty, and, by jingo, out come the placards.

When the ruling came down in 2004 that
drug lord; “Ninety” Knowles — turned into
some kind of folk hero by his supporters —
was to be extradited to the United States, a
protest was organised in front of parliament.
The organisers said it was to send a blunt
message to the government not to carry out
the extradition. They claimed it was against
Knowles’ rights as a Bahamian citizen.

But we never hear anything about the
right to life of murdered Bahamians? We see
no placards for them, although much of our
growing crime is undoubtedly rooted in the
drug trade.

We agree with Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson, who on a radio talk show
this week, condemned the community as
“steeped in greed, materialism and dishon-
esty.”

He said that greed and materialism have
led to problems in Bahamian society, includ-
ing the deification of drug dealers.

“You have people going to an early grave,
and when (drug dealers) are caught there
are screams in the community,” he said.
“There is still no understanding of the seri-
ousness of the drug trade and that it has long
negative drawbacks, including violence and
murder.”

Because of the increased incidences of
drugs being put on aircraft at Lynden Pindling
International Airport — despite all the hoop-
la of the security of our airport — many air-
craft from Nassau, having already precleared,
have been searched again on landing in the
US. Unless government takes this matter
seriously, the Bahamas can become a sec-
ond Jamaica with sniffer dogs and the whole
nine yards to greet passengers arriving in the
US from the Bahamas. :



South ¢ P.O. Box a

_ THOUGHT FOR

« Don’t make resolutions,

make revolutions”
SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor

Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

LENNOX PATON












Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law



Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter

no later than 31st January 2007 to:

HR Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas



Min ASS

Ba

We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department.
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.

We have experienced this once when fly-
ing from Kingston to Miami.

For those who haven't, we can say that
nothing is more demeaning than to be lined
up in a secured area while a sniffer dog and
his handler walk slowly up and down, and
officials look at you suspiciously before a
door is opened and dignity and freedom are
once again restored. |

Make no mistake about it, no matter how
many placards are carried in parliament
square, the Americans are not going to solt-
en their position on drug peddlers. Either
we are going to deal with these offenders
ourselves, or as soon as they set foot on
American territory, which starts as soon as a
passenger enters the American zone at Nas-
sau International airport, American officials
will take care of them for us.

Ambassador John Rood warned that the
major weaknesses at the international air-
port have to be addressed immediately, or
else the secondary searches will have to be
continued.

He said that Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell commented that “at one point he
was on an airplane that had gone through
pre-clearance here. It was again checked in
the US, and that’s because of the concerns
that we have with the level of security.

“So, if we can get comfortable with securl-
ty in the Bahamas, we won't be putting the
number of airplanes through the secondary
search process in the US.”

He explained that there will be some

planes that will be pulled in through
a secondary search situation, “but not near
the numbers that we are talking about
now.” :
He pointed out that these extra searches
posed a serious time issue for airlines,
increased cost of flights —as planes have to
be checked twice — and inconvenienced pas
sengers throughout the process.

Unless this problem is quickly brought
under control, the day will come when both
airlines and passengers will turn their backs
on any idea that it might be “better in the
Bahamas” — and fly elsewhere.

And so the problem is now back in our
court. It is up to Bahamians to get their pri-
orities right — or lose all they have gained.
Instead of carrying placards, they should
move into their communities to help educate
young Bahamians of how drugs can destroy
their future.





EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas and LNG

HAVING already written
extensively with regard to the
above captioned, | had deter-
mined, on the basis of my own
conviction, to say no more and
to “keep my mouth shut” on
what has become an unneces-
sarily controversial issue.

The latest, highly emotional-

ly charged “Anti-LNG Rally”,

however, has led me to recon-
sider this decision, and to make
yet another contribution to dis-
cussion on this matter. It is,
therefore, set out in simple
“question and answer” form,
with a view to presenting a bal-
anced, objective easy-to-under-
stand contribution, taking into
consideration the concerns of
the Bahamian environmental-
ists, the interests of the compa-
nies which must invest huge
sums of money, and the overall
potential benefits to the gov-
ernment and people of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

Ten questions (and answers!)
re LNG!

1) What is LNG?

LNG is simply the abbrevia-
tion of ‘liquefied natural gas”
you see, gases fall into two cat-
egories. There are chemical gas-
es, Which are obtained by means
of scientific experiments and/or
as the bye-products of industri-
al activity. Then, there are gas-
es which are found in their nat-
ural state in various parts of the
earth. LNG, in its natural state
belongs to this category. It is to
be found, in huge quantities
along with petroleum, and in
marshlands. It, is then, a natur-
al product, which has been con-
vertedifrom a gaseous to a liq-
uid state. ‘

2) Why is there such a
demand for LNG?

The main source of energy
today is petroleum or oil. How-
ever, the world, consuming oil
at the fantastic rate of more
than 50 million barrels per day,
is rapidly running out of this
commodity. This means that it
will become increasingly expen-
sive, and there are those who
are predicting that it will even-
tually cost as much as $100 per
barrel! There is, therefore, a
real need for alternative fuels
to meet the growing demand
for energy. Amongst these
LNG is considered as a good
alternative because of the vast
quantity still available.

3) Why are there proposals
to construct LNG plants in
Northern Bahamas?

For the same reason that



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there is a container port in the
harbour of Freeport — the
availability of deep water facil-
ities, capable of accommodat-
ing the huge modern ocean
tankers; in close proximity to
the world’s largest market —
the USA. These marine behe-
moths, in excess of 80,000
tonnes dead weight, require
deep harbours in order to deliv-
er their cargo economically.
Note that Panama has just vot-
ed to spend billions of dollars to
expand the Panama Canal to
accommodate them!

4) Does LNG pose a great
danger to the environment?

LNG is a natural product,
and properly managed, it should
pose no great threat to the envi-
ronment of The Bahamas. It is a
harmless, colourless, gas, which
is readily soluble in water.

5) What about explosions?

‘LNG as a sub-zero product,

unlike gasoline, cannot explode
by lighting a match! However,

‘because it is highly compressed

to 1/600th of its natural state, it
can explode only by split sec-
ond conversion to its gaseous
state...with the advances in
modern technology, such explo-
sions are very rare!

It is submitted, that an LNG
plant would pose no more
threat to the environment of the
Bahamas and no greater dan-
ger of explosion than the oil
bunkerage facilities at BORCO
in Freeport, Riding Point in
East Grand Bahama or the oil

storage facilities at Clifton Pier,,

in Nassau, Bahamas, ‘

6) What about the possibility

of terrorism?

There seems to be no logical
reason why terrorists would
want to ‘blow up’ an LNG plant
in the Bahamas.

7) What would be the eco-
nomic benefits to the Bahamas
of an LNG industry?

They are, in the short term,
three-fold:

i) Increased employment
opportunities for Bahamians.
Hundreds of jobs will be pro-
vided in the construction stage;
many hi-tech jobs would be
required for the operation of

ii) Increased revenue to gov- '
ernment millions of dollars .
would flow into the Public Trea-
sury at a time when more rev- »
enue is required to meet the
needs of a young, growing
nation.

iii) Increased economic activ-
ity as more industries are
attracted by the availability of a
cheap source of energy.

8) Any other benefits?

Yes! As noted above, the cost
of oil is expected to increase
greatly in years ahead. This will ,
mean that the cost of electricity —
will also ‘go up’. However, the
possibility of the use of LNG
rather, than oil, may keep the
cost of electricity low for the
benefit of all consumers!

' 9) Are many countries say-
ing “no” to LNG?

Yes, there are, indeed, a num-
ber of nations which have
expressed reservations about,
and objection to the construc-
tion of LNG plants. But, there
are those nations which are say-
ing ‘yes’! ‘

Trinidad, for instance, an
island about the size of Andros, , |
has four LNG plants in opera- .
tion, and, in an effort to reduce
its dependence upon oil, is
preparing to construct more.
There is an LNG plant in the
Dominican Republic and plans
are being discussed for con-
struction of one in Jamaica. : -
Moreover, plans have been
announced to construct in
Dubai, rapidly emerging eco-
nomic Arab state, the world’s
largest LNG plant! In this, as
in all such matters, each nation
must make its own decision on :
the basis of the needs and aspi- °
rations.of its people..

10) Any other comment?

Yes, the government of the
‘Bahamas should seek the advice
of international and Bahamian
financial experts in order to
secure the maximum amount of
revenue, while assuring the
“deep pocketed” energy com-
panies obtain a fair return upon
the expenditure of the vast sums |
of money required for develop- ,
ment of LNG! i

EMMETTE WEIR
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
December, 2006.

Existing and proposed North
American LNG terminals

EDITOR, The Tribune,

WHEN the truth is bent and misinformation is passed to the inno-
cent, asking for their support to stop pending development and
Government approval of a sensitive proposal, this is simply as
damaging as what these folks suggest such a project would be.

Attached is the latest position of Existing and Proposed North

American LNG terminals:

Constructed: 5...Everett, MA - Cove Point, MD - Elba Terminal
GA - Lake Charles, LA and Gulf of Mexico.

Approved by FERC...16 individual projects.

Approved by MARAD/Coast Guard...Port Pelican and off

Louisiana.

Canadian Approved Terminals: 3...St John, NB - Point Tupper,

NS - Kitimat, BC.

Mexican Terminals approved: 3...Altamira, Tamulipas - Baja
California Baja California, off-shore.

Proposed for FERC: 12 Terminals.

Proposed to MARAD/Coast Guard...9 terminals.

Included in the proposed Terminals is the SUEZ Calypso off the
coast of Florida project, which was originally earmarked for Grand
Bahama -approved by FERC includes AES Ocean Express and
Calypso Express. Both these projects have their Bahamas approval

“pending”.

It would certainly assist if Mrs Duncombe would stop misin-

forming the public.

N. RUSSELL
Nassau,
November 26, 2006

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COURSES

In a nation of islands it is essential to be able
to navigate over the horizon with confidence.
Prepare for safe voyaging by enrolling in the

Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by The
Bahamas School of Marine Navigation. Plan
to attend the free first class on Monday, January
8th, at 7 p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
Bay Street. Details: 364-2861, 535-6234 or

pgk434@netscape.net. Other courses include
Seamanship and Celestial Navigation.





THE TRIBUNE




0 In brief

American
Airlines offers —
new choices |
onflightsto |
the Caribbean |

FORT WORTH, Texas—
American Airlines is starting ;
the New Year by offering i
customers on Caribbean
flights new choices in fresh
light meals, snacks, and bot-
tled water — all of which can
be purchased with credit

_cards, debit cards and cash.

“The new choices are part
of American’s continuing
-efforts to give customers
what they value,” said the
airline in a statement.

“Snacks and bottled water
will be available on all flights ;
two hours or longer, and the :
fresh light meals can be pur-
chased on all flights three
hours or longer.”

According to the state-
ment, the changes were
implemented based on cus-
tomer and flight-attendant
feedback indicating that cus- :
tomers wanted more choices. :

“American Airlines regu-
larly engages our customers
to determine their food and
beverage preferences and
what forms of payment they
prefer to use,” said Lauri i
Curtis, American's vice pres- :
ident for onboard service.
“Our customers value
choice, and we believe the
food-for-sale programme
enhancements and multiple
payment options will be
well-received by our cus-
tomers.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

Mey RIL E
PHONE: 322-2157



RRR ah

FRIDAY,



























JANUARY 5TH
6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise
11:00 Immediate Response
Noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response

Cont'd

1:00 A Special Report
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 International Fellowship

] of Christians & Jews
3:30 Ed Young
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm
6:00 Caribbean Passport

1 6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight .
8:00 — Island Wide Crusade:

“Youth Explosion”

10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30. News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540 am










SATURDAY,

JANUARY 6TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 — Int'l Fit Dance
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Little Robots
noon Underdog



NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
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Nassau an

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUAHY 9, 2UU/, FAUE Oo

Offer to reimburse visitors t
d Paradise Islan








for the cost of US passport

IN AN effort to encourage
travel to the Bahamas after the
January 23 deadline of the new
US passport rule, the Nassau/
Paradise Island Promotion
Board is offering to reimburse
visitors for the cost of a new pass-
port.

For a limited time, the pro-
motion board announced, US
travellers — who will now be
required to obtain a passport for
all international air travel — can
acquire the document for free
by booking a trip to Nassau or
Paradise Island.

With passport costs of $97 for
adults and $82 for children, the
reimbursement programme
translates into a potential sav-
ings of $358 for a family of four,
the promotion board said.

Travellers simply need to
download a rebate form from
the promotion board’s web site
www.nassauparadiseisland.com,
which they can then complete
and submit with a copy of their
paid hotel bill, an airline board-
ing pass for all travellers and a
photocopy of each eligible trav-
eller's passport photo page.

Atlantis, the Nassau Beach
Hotel, the One and Only Ocean
Club, the British Colonial Hilton
and the Sandals Resort are just a
few of many hotels that are par-
ticipating in this promotion.

Since the announcement of the
US’ new passport rule — official-
ly known as the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative — repre-
sentatives of the tourism industry
have predicted that this new
requirement will discourage
Americans from travelling
abroad and cost the. Caribbean
region hundreds of millions of
dollars in lost revenue.

News of the new promotion
comes on the heels of the
announcement by Tourism
Director General Vernice
Walkine that there has been a
jump in the number of passport
applications by US citizens in the
last several weeks, indicating that
the "potential fallout" from the
new passport regulations may be



@ TOURISM Director
General Vernice Walkine

"What we're being told by the
Department of State is that .. .
the US media is getting the word
out and Americans are becoming
more aware of the need for a
passport.

“They are applying and there's
been a jump in the number of
applications over the last six
weeks," she said.

According to Ms Walkine,
preparations have also been
made in the US to handle an
influx of passport applications
this month that may be the result
of the belated realisation on the
part of many Americans that
travel will not be permitted with-
out the document.

Ms Walkine's comments fol-
lowed the launch of the min-
istry's new advertising campaign,
"Bahamavention" in front of
Bahamian and US press at the
Mandarin Oriental Hotel in New
York.

According to Ms Walkine,
though the launch of the new $12

Bid to encourage travel to the Bahamas after deadline



incorporate advertising on cable
television, in the print media, on
the Internet, and all over New
York on 570 subway trains —
was not planned specifically to
counteract the effects of the reg-
ulations, it has turned out to be
"very timely" in light of the US
government's decision to go
ahead and impose the new
requirements.

"It wasn't intended that way,
but the timing was to our advan-
tage," she said.

A message informing poten-

tial travellers about the need
for a passport has also been
included in the advertising cam-
paign.

The new regulations, as set out
in the Western Hemisphere
Travel Initiative — set to come
into force on January 23, 2007 —
will require all US citizens trav-
elling to the Bahamas, among
other destinations, to have a
passport to be able to re-enter
the US.

Questioned as to what would
happen to those who are allowed

to leave the US without a pass-
port, only to find that they were
not allowed back in the country,
Ms Walkine stressed that much is
being done to ensure that this
possibility does not become a
reality.

"The airlines are
absolutely going to be checking
because if they allow someone
to leave without a passport the
fines are horrific," said Ms
Walkine, noting that fines of
about $60,000 may be intro-
duced.

mitigated to some degree. million campaign, which will

Bermuda cracks down on
undocumented workers

@ HAMILTON, Bermuda

FOREIGNERS who overstay their visas in Bermuda will soon
become wanted fugitives, as the wealthy enclave adopts new mea-
sures to capture and deport them amid growing public anger over
illegal immigration, according to Associated Press.

The Immigration Ministry has announced it will begin sharing
photos of visa violators with a local anti-crime group, which will post
the images on the Internet and publicize rewards for their capture.

" Anybody who overstays their time is a problem as far as we are
concerned because of the importance we attach to the adherence
to the law," said Robert Horton, the administrative head of the
immigration ministry in the British territory.

Crime Stoppers Bermuda said that within days it will publish the
first photos, of two Jamaican construction workers, on a Web site
that will also feature suspects for other criminal offenses.

The group, which is supported by private donations, said it
would pay rewards of up to US$1,000 to anyone who provides
information leading to the capture of the illegal immigrants. Those
who provide the tips can remain anonymous, said the group's
chairman, Sean Pitcher.

"Bermudians are very law-abiding citizens, but people may be ret-
icent to get involved," Pitcher said.

The government is also considering other measures against ille-
gal immigration, including greater penalties for those caught
employing or sheltering them.

Undocumented residents make up a tiny fraction of Bermuda's
65,000 people, but there have been increased complaints that ille-
gal workers have become a drain on public resources and are tak-
ing jobs, especially in the construction sector.

"They may not be committing a serious crime, but they're basi-
cally taking jobs away from Bermudians," Pitcher said. "What
they're doing is displacing people who could be working legiti-
mately."

Bermuda, a chain of tiny Atlantic Ocean islands 640 miles (1,030
kilometers) east of the U.S., is one of the wealthiest places in the
world.

The territory is generally accessible to immigrant residents only
through guest worker programs, which employ about 9,900 people
ranging from doctors and lawyers to laborers. Visas typically expire
after six years.

Those who deliberately stay past their deadline are deported and
blacklisted from returning, Horton said. Bermuda deports about 20
foreigners each year, including those convicted of crimes.

Guest workers traditionally came from the Caribbean, the Unit-
ed Kingdom and the United States, but a growing number now
come elsewhere, including India and Sri Lanka.

Recent months have seen increased friction over immigration,
including the beating in July of a Portuguese man outside a bar in
the capital of Hamilton. Leaders in the long-established Portuguese
community, which makes up about 9 percent of the population, said
the man was targeted because he was an immigrant.

Immigration Minister Derrick Burgess, who took office in Sep-
tember, has made a personal commitment to deport illegal residents,
Horton said.

The crackdown has been welcomed by some in the construction
field. Louis Somner, an industry spokesman, described the Web site
as “a good effort" and said the government should go further and
fingerprint those who enter Bermuda on short-term permits.

Horton said it was understandable that foreigners would want to
extend their stay on an island known for its mild climate and rare
pink-sand beaches, but ultimately the territory should be reserved
for Bermudians.

"It's not a major problem but it is a problem," he said. "We're a
small society and we are always concerned about strains on our
social system."

Bahamian science scholar to
speak at Business Outlook

A BAHAMIAN science scholar is to speak at
this year’s Bahamas Business Outlook which con-
venes next week Tuesday at the Radisson Cable
Beach Resort under the theme “economic year
2007, opportunities, plans and anticipated out-
comes.”

Peter Blair, a graduate of Duke University and
PhD candidate at Harvard University, said his
presentation, “Vision for the Bahamas: a young
Bahamian’s perspective” will focus on three main
topics: redefining national development by invest-
ing in people, building a better Bahamas through
social partnerships, and Inno Works Bahamas,
which is a case study in social partnerships.

“As the theme of this year’s conference sug-
gests, there will be a number of opportunities in
2007 for the Bahamas to build on the successes of
the past three decades. Moreover, the outlook’s
diverse audience of eminent business and com-
munity leaders makes it a fitting venue for us to
discuss collaborative approaches to the future of
national development,” he said.

Mr Blair graduated from Duke University in
May 2006 with a bachelor of science degree in
physics and mathematics.

While there, he also minored in economics and
French. Prior to this, he obtained an associate
degree in physics and economics from the College
of the Bahamas.

Mr Blair has won many honours, awards and
scholarships — among them, the Graduate Prize
Fellowship at Harvard University, the $100,000 all

s
aw

Bahamas Merit Scholarship, and the Barry Gold-
water Scholarship.

He has attended numerous professional con-
ferences and workshops and conducted indepen-
dent research in his area of study including
“minorities in physics” and “modeling flux ratio
anomalies due to a Chan-Refsdal lens.”

From late 2004 to summer 2005, Blair was a
“vision team member” of Inno Works, where he
collaborated in organising a student-run summer
camp to expose underprivileged minority youths
to cutting edge methods in science and technolo-

In 2007 he will serve as director of Colinalm-
perial Insurance Co Ltd’s community initiative
‘Adventure in Science and Mathematics” sum-
mer camp for outstanding students in the
Bahamas.

Along with Peter Blair, Business Outlook 2007
will feature a slate of distinguished speakers led by
Prime Minister Perry Christie. -

Other speakers include Senator Dr Bernard
Nottage, Minister of Health and National Insur-
ance; Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, secretary
general of the Caribbean Tourism Organisation,
Vernice Walkine, director general of Tourism,
Lincoln Price, private sector liaison, Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machinery; Janyne Hodder,
president of the College of the Bahamas; Tanya
Wright, Reg Smith and Christopher Lowe, respec-
tive presidents of the Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Exuma Chambers of Commerce.



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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007



16th Annual
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Attend The Premier Business Event of the year
The 16th Annual Bahamas Business Outlook.
Register today at www.tclevents.com

or call Eileen Fielder at The Counsellors 3221000

Radisson Cable Beach Resort

Tuesday, January 9, 2007



RtHon Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister
“Economic Year 2007: Opportunities, Plans, Outcomes”

Sen. Hon. Dr. Bemard Notfage, Minister of Health & National Insurance
“Implication of the National Health Insurance for Bahamian Businesses”

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Secretary-General,
Caribbean Tourism Organization

“The United States of the Caribbean — Benefits for Boharicris and
The Bahamas”

Vemice Walkine, Director General, Ministry of Toursm
“Tourism Forecast for 2007”

Lincoln Price, Private Sector Liaison, Carilblbean Regional Maiketing
Machinery - “Greater Private Sector Linkages through Extemal Tracie
Negotiations”

Allen Ten Brock, President & CEO, The Mariner Group, Inc. -
“The Importance of Maximizing oe for
Social & Economic Gro

Janyne Hodder, President, The College of The Bahamas
“From College fo University — The Role of Higher Education in
Developing the Bahamian Society”

Tanya Wright, Reg Smith & Christopher Lowe, Presidents of
_ Bahamas, Exuma and Grand Bahama Chambers of Commerce,
“Facilitating The Bahamian Business Communily in 2007”

Peter Blair, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
“Vision for The Bahamas: A Young Bahamian's Perspective”

FIRSTCARIBBEAN.

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THE TRIBUNE






















B EGINNING this Jan-
uary, the US Con-
gress has legislated that Amer-
ican citizens must have pass-
ports to re-enter the US when
returning from the Bahamas
and Caribbean countries.

Several observers have
pointed to the government’s
affable foreign policy with
‘Cuba, Venezuela and China as
the thrust that led to the
Bahamas’ inclusion among the
group of countries from which
travellers must have passports.

In the October 9, 2006, edi-
tion of The Tribune, Dr Dexter
Johnson, leader of the fringe
political group - the Bahamian
National Party - claimed that
the Bahamas’ foreign policy of
“cosying up” to Cuba,
Venezuela and facilitating Chi-
na’s penetration of the region
puts it at risk of being excluded
from any special treatment
from the US as it relates to the
new passport regulations.

Frankly, it appears that Dr
Johnson is trying to score polit-
ical brownie points and engage
in scaremongering. It seems
that the learned doctor may
simply be seeking a few head-
lines to further his political
agenda.

In the same article, Dr John-
son also asserted that the
Bahamas ignored virtually all
requests for support on major
foreign policy initiatives that
had been proposed by the UK
and the US and had hence
found itself on the opposite
side of the US/UK vote.

However, the US ambas-
sador has consistently affirmed
their close relationship with
the Bahamas, maintaining that
both our countries remain
close allies, though not always
seeing eye-to-eye on some
issues.

For the most part, the claims
of Dr Johnson and others who
blame our budding diplomatic
ties with China, Cuba and
Venezuela for US foreign pol-
icy adjustments all appear to
be erroneous and ideologically
based.

Although the US doesn’t
have significant trade agree-
ments with Cuba, it has monu-
mental agreements with Chi-
na and Venezuela. So, why is it
untenable that the Bahamas
should maintain relations with
these countries?

In fact, Venezuelan oil sus-
tains the US economy, as 60
per cent of all oil imported into
the US comes from Venezuela.
Quite like democratic
Venezuela, communist China




































The Bahamas and
our relationships



KD RLSACN

plays a gargantuan role in US
economic affairs.

The US has a plethora of
trade agreements with China
although there are concerns
about human rights violations,
intimidation of the press, vio-
lence against peaceful protest

_and the existence of a totali-

tarian government.
In fact, China is the US’s

’ biggest trading partner. So, if

the US can establish such a
dependent, far reaching rela-
tionship with communist Chi-
na, why can’t an independent
and sovereign Bahamas?

D r Johnson, and oth-
ers with similar opin-

ions, must understand that if
the US can make decisions and
represent its national interest
through its UN vote, the
Bahamas should be afforded
the same privilege without fear
of “exhausting all our credit”
and not qualifying “for any
special treatment”!

Instead of what seems to be
an attempt to inflame the
Bahamian people, Dr Johnson
should query US Ambassador
John Rood about the US’s
double standard in foreign pol-
icy towards communist Cuba,
while not speaking out against
China but rather strengthen-
ing their relationship! It should
be quite clear, even to the
ambassador, that this is a poli-
cy of sheer hypocrisy!

In the October 12, 2006, edi-
tion of The Tribune, it was
reported that 25 executives
from US companies would
travel to China in November as
part of a trade mission intent
on increasing exports and
reducing America’s huge trade
deficit.

In the same report, US
Commerce Secretary Carlos
Gutierrez said that companies
selected for the trip (eg Home
Depot, Westinghouse
Electrics, etc) would seek busi-
ness opportunities and poten-
tial joint ventures with Chinese
companies.

Today, China is America’s
fourth largest export market
and exports are rapidly
increasing. Also, the US trade
deficit with China stands at a
record $202 billion. With this

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW



Gi BS ON

in mind, it is quite obvious that
without Chinese economic
input, the US economy would
crash.

So, having seen the impact
of these countries upon the US
economy, and in an effort to
establish diplomatic ties in an
increasingly globalised society,
Dr Johnson’s fallacious argu-
ment is without merit.

Dr Johnson, as someone
professing an interest in poli-
tics, shouldn’t you question
why the US refuses to ques-
tion the conditions in China,
while flagrantly violating the
rights of the Cuban people
using an illegal blockade?

OUR GOVERNMENT?’s
FUMBLE

QO: government has
long been aware that

the US intended to place pass-
port regulations on its citizens
for several years now. So why
is it that our government’s
ineptitude, particularly the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
has once again led to them
being caught with their pants
down?

Though the Bahamas econ-
omy may briefly ebb after the
passport policy is initially
enforced, it will recover as
American tourists become
more aware of their new trav-
el arrangements.

Instead of panicking and
concocting improbable plans
to lobby for an extension of
the January deadline, the gov-
ernment should have long
engaged in intense overseas
promotional campaigns, offer-
ing travel incentives and
preparing and adjusting our
economy for one of our first
challenging encounters with
21st century travel (age of ter-
rorism). |

In the long haul, American
tourists possessing passports
would help protect our nation-
al interest and national securi-
ty. It is much easier to forge a
driver’s licence (which Ameri-
can’s currently use to travel
here) than it is to forge a pass-
port, so change, in this
instance, is great!

ajbahama@hotmail.com,
www. weblogbahamas.com

Did the ILO really
give the thumbs up
on NHI programme?
Taser 2

dia Dames in The Bahama
Journal under the headline

Report Outlines ILO's
Approval of NHI Proposal is
curious indeed.

The National Coalition for
Health Care Reform (NCHCR)
has posted this politically cor-
rect statement about this
same ILO report on their web-
site:

After the House and Senate
have passed the National
Health Insurance Bill with some
minor amendments (the revised
document will be posted when
available), the ILO Report tout-
ed by government as giving a
"thumbs up" to NHI has come
into the public domain. Upon
review of the report we find its
scope to be very limited as it is
actually an analytical and tech-
nical review of studies carried
out in The Bahamas.

It would appear the Bahama
Journal was provided with the
government’s press release in
advance of other news organi-
sations in an attempt to "sell"
the NHI working committee's
perspective on the ILO report if
you will before an honest per-
spective of the ILO report could
be rendered.

In My VIEW

TAS



To be fair, the Journal did
print some of the derogatory
points made by the ILO, but
their headline is misleading, to
say the least.

We have previously dis-
cussed the demonisation of the
NCHCR and anyone else who
would dare to offer construc-
tive criticism of this great plan
by the PLP for that matter but
the government approach now
seems to have added deceit to
its approach to the NHI at this
point.

A: an aside, one can't
help but wonder if

this is desperation by a political
party as an election approaches.

However, it seems more like
the "curse of power" that comes
with being the government as
outlined by Matthew d'Ancona
ina piece in The Spectator in
the UK.

He writes: “Power does terri-
ble things to people, disfigut-
ing their sense of normality.
Progressive politicians are par-
ticularly prone to believe that
actions which would ordinarily
be considered wrong are justi-





||

fied by a sense of higher pur-
pose.

The Nassau Institute (NI) has
a catalogue of articles on this
important subject and the diffi-
culties faced in other countries
with socialised medicine and
they are worth the effort to read
them for a better understand-.
ing.

One can only hope that the
government jumps in at the
shallow end of the NHI pool
and stays clear of the deep
water that has caused as much
(and in some cases more) pain
than if the government stayed
out of health care.

As stated ad nauseam, work-
ing Bahamians should buy their
own health care through private
insurers, leaving the govern-
ment to deal with the genuine
hardship cases and those per-
sons who have been locked out
of private health insurance for
legitimate reasons.

When all is said and done,
every Bahamian should read
the ILO report and see for
themselves what the “curse of
power" has done to our coun-
try's leaders.

WWW, weblogbahamas. com



THE TRIBUNE



moyey TNS

Christmas promotion luc

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 7





shopper a host of extra presents

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -— Christmas shop-
ping at the International Bazaar
paid off for Sophia Thompson, who
won over 20 prizes when her name
was selected during a grand ralfle
drawing on New Years’ Eve.

Chris Payne, chairman of the
Bazaar Owners’ Association, said
the raffle was a promotion to boost
sales and attract local residents to
shop at the Bazaar during the fes-
tive holiday season.

“The promotion went very well,
as we had just over 7,500 entry tick-
ets, which indicated that-a lot of
people came to shop in the Bazaar.
And I think all the merchants were
very grateful for the support the
local community had given the

- Bazaar over the Christmas holi-

day,” said Mr Payne.
An entry ticket was presented
for every $20 that was spent in the

Bazaar. The winning entry came
from Freeport Jewelers.

Since the closure of the Royal
Oasis Resort, only 38 of the 85
stores have managed to remain
open at the Bazaar.

Mr Payne said that they hope to
launch a similar promotion with
more than one winner next time.

Sophia Thompson said that she
had spent over $500 in the Bazaar,
purchasing gifts such as perfume,
jewelry, and an oil painting. She
said that the return was definitely
worth it.

“I love coming to the Bazaar to
shop to help support the local busi-
nesses in the Bazaar.

“I am very surprised and very
excited about being the winner... I
had not expected this at all. It was
the perfect New Year’s present,”
she said.

Ms Thompson won 20 prizes val-
ued at nearly $4,000, which includ-
ed a basket of toys, four crystal

glasses, desk top Globe, art and
crystal, $100 gift certificate, swim
wear, handbags, a belt, wallet, two

‘Fossil watches, a basket of fra-

grances, a diamond ring, an original
oil painting, DVD movies, a 27inch
TV, a crystal vase, a ladies watch,
create your own fragrances valued
at $210, and a conch shell with fish
sculpture.

B SOPHIA Thompson

(centre) won over 20 gifts in the
International Bazaar Grand
Raffle. She shopped at the Bazaar
during the Christmas promotion
and spent over $500 at the various
stores. Seen from left are Delyin
Beckles, manager of the

Bazaar Owners’ Association;

Ms Thompson; Mr Dudley Wells
of Freeport Jewelers and Mr
Chris Payne, chairman of the
Bazaar Owners Association and
owner of Paradise Jewels.
(Photos: Denise Maycock)




@ PICTURED left to right are Charles McCartney, Makeisha
Campbell of John Bull, Mary Mortimer and Ann Harding.

HOLIDAY shoppers were
invited to experience the best
of John Bull with a journey
back to the days of tradition.

Through the Holiday Fantasy
2006 “a few of our favourite

‘things” promotion, customers

were given the opportunity to

win one of 24 luxury gifts in a
daily drawing during the month



gD

& Bourke, Tag Heuer, Miki-
moto, David Yurman, Kate

EEIAN Miller, Makeisha Campbell of John Bull, Patrice
Knowles and Urala Johnson.











purchase at any John Bull
owned store — including Carti-

of December. .

The gifts — ranging from time
pieces, fragrances, jewellery,
leather, and home office furni-
ture — featured world famous
lines such as Omega, Dooney

Spade, Gucci, Lacoste, Hugo
Boss and Hon.

Over $20,000 in prizes were
awarded during the 24-day
giveaway leading up to Christ-
mas. Every patron making a

Monday - Friday 4pm
Saturday & Sunday 2pm

25 GREAT RIDES!

2 NEW Rides Twister & Scrambler

Kami Kaze

Mega Drop

Flying Bobs —

RIDE THE



Bumper Cars

Graviton

ea eee the holiday is
gone the Carnival is not. -

er, Coach, David Yurman,
Gucci, Guess, La Parfumerie
and the Business Centre —
became eligible for the prizes.
The promotion did not limit
number of entries, so chances

@ BOB Miller, Gary Farquharson, Nicky Henderson, Makeish2




























Campbell, Lindsay Darville and Chenique Cumberbatch

to win were increased upon
every purchase.

Robin Casale, winner of'a
Kate Spade evening bag valued
at $280, said how surprised and
pleased she was to be a winner.
“T love my bag and Hove shop-
ping at John Bull.”

In addition, BTC teamed vy
with John Bull to offer a te\
of their favourite things. Sey
en cellular phones, includin
the recently launched Blac!
berry, were also given away °s
bonus at various John Ba
locations.

RITISH
AMERICAN

Senior/Junior Programmer (Ss)

British American Insurance Company the oldest insurance company in the Bahamas and
a leading financial services institution is searching for-an experienced, highly organized

Programmer to develop and maintain company-specific applications. The ideal candidate
must be self-motivated to complete initiatives within established timelines and exercise

versatility with respect to project assignments.



Responsibilities:

¢ Support and maintain Oracle database applications

¢ Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

¢ Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

° Maintain existing database integrity and standards

¢ Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
° Create test transactions, refine and debug programs.

° Train end-users and technical support staff

Core Competencies:

* Proven project leadership and project implementation

¢ Experience with formal software development methodologies

* Strong analytical skills and experience in developing applications that meet use
requirements

¢ Must have strong oral and written communication skills

Required Qualifications:

* 34 years of recent programming experience including use of Oracle PL/SQL as primary
programming language

© Bachelor’s degree in CS of equivalent experience and/or education

° Oracle Developer or DBA certifications a plus

Preferred Skills:

* Possess strong Project experience ideally on Oracle Applications implementations,
business systems design, or projects in general
¢ Proficient in MS Project and/or MS Project Server (required)

° Experience with SQL Server

Technical Skills:

CCH, NEV, Oracle 81/91, Developer 61 (Forms & Reports),.PL/SQL, Crystal Reports

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with skills and experience. Attractive benefit package includine

Life, Health and Penston,

Submit Resume to Human Resources Manager, British American Insurance,
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N4815, Nassau, Bahamas or via email to
“dparker@babinsurance.com”





FAGE 8, FHIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2006



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ee ee

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of January 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

SS
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“RIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 9





FBI assist police
in investigation
of rape of girl
on cruise ship

FROM page one

while they were out to sea.

“J think they were heading
to the Bahamas, so they
came in port here at New
Providence so our investiga-
tors went there to see about
it. They have a complaint
and we have a suspect in cus-
tody in connection with this
matter at this time,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said it is like-
ly that the New Yorker will
be arraigned before the
courts in the Bahamas. He
also said it was usual for
police to liaise with US agen-
cies, such as the FBI, to gain
background information to
aid in their investigation.

“As part of protocol we
inform the US Embassy if
any of their citizens are
involved in anything here,
especially if we can get these
matters resolved. So, if we
need any assistance that is
no problem, because we get
it all the time,” he said.

Victims
FROM page one

Omar Smith, Deputy
Leader of the BDM, was
also taken into custody
with the Sea Hauler vic-
tims. He has since stated,
according to Mr Bain, that
certain media houses have
associated him with the Sea
Hauler victims in the
capacity of BDM Deputy
Leader, when in fact, he
said, he had protested just
as a private citizen and not
a political figure.

Lawyer Cc

FROM page one

importance of adequate remu-
neration for judges to main-
tain an independent judicial

system.

He read from the year-end
report on the United States’
federal judiciary by US Chief
Justice John Roberts, who is

arguing that pay for federal
judges is so inadequate that it
threatens to undermine the
judiciary’s independence.

' Dame Joan, in responding

Court of Appeal could have
large backlog of cases ‘if
judges not appointed soon’

FROM page one

tices of this court has had to recuse him or
herself from” — this number could increase

rapidly.

“That small figure can grow and all the
efforts used to clear the backlog which existed
when I first became a full-time member of this
court and to bring these premises to their pre-
sent state where the first working visit of the
judicial committee of the Privy Council could
be accommodated here will prove to have been

in vain,” she said.

Dame Joan said that when she became pres-
ident of the Court of the Appeal in 2001 and
civil and criminal cases were sorted into two
categories to be heard, the majority of long-
pending appeals were disposed of within the

year.

: “The leadership of the judges did that,” she
: said.
i She emphasised that co-operation between

the judiciary and the two other branches
of the government is vital to justice being

carried out.

“Co-operation is key to administration of

justice, without co-operation justice will be
delayed and indeed denied. The history of this
country since the late seventies is proof positive

of that,” she said.

She thanked the executive branch for their
support in 2006, which she said was sometimes
grudgingly given. y

In November last year, after a third case in
just two weeks had to be suspended due a
shortage of Court of Appeal judges, Dame
Joan expressed concern about the conse-

quences of the necessary recurring recusals.

concerned.

Plaintiffs and defendants at that time told
The Tribune that the repeated adjournments
were creating a backlog of unresolved cases
and causing enormous inconvenience for all

Prospective FNM candidate for Fort Char-
lotte Michael Barnett, during his party’s rally in

R M Bailey Park in November, charged that

government’s failure to appoint more Court
of Appeal judges showed that the PLP does not
take the administration of justice seriously.

; cientists Say that 2007
~ could be the world’s
warmest year on record

& LONDON

DEEPENING drought in
Australia. Stronger typhoons
in Asia. Floods in Latin

’ America.

British climate scientists

‘predict that a resurgent El
‘Nino climate trend combined
‘with higher levels of green-
‘house gases could touch off
. ia fresh round of ecological
‘disasters — and make 2007
ithe world’s hottest year on
‘record, according to Associ-
,ated Press.
. “Even a moderate (El
'‘Nino) warming event is
‘enough to push the global
‘temperatures over the top,”
‘said Phil Jones, director of
‘the Climatic Research unit at
'the University of East Anglia.
1 The warmest year on
‘record is 1998, when the aver-
vage global temperature was
\1.2 degrees Fahrenheit higher
ithan the long-term average
‘of 57 degrees. Though such a
;change appears small, incre-
‘mental differences can, for
‘example, add to the ferocity
‘of storms by evaporating
more steam off the ocean.

Temperature

‘ There is a 60 percent
‘chance that the average glob-
al temperature for 2007 will
match or break the record,
_ .Britain’s Meteorological
' Office said Thursday. The
‘consequences of the high
temperatures could be felt
‘worldwide.

El Nino, which is now
(under way in the Pacific
‘Ocean and is expected to last
’- \until May, occurs irregularly.
»But when it does, winters in
‘Southeast Asia tend to
«become milder, summers in
‘Australia get drier, and Pacif-
,ic storms can be more intense.
‘The U.N.’s Food Aid Orga-
; nization has warned that ris-
, ing temperatures could wreak

agricultural havoc.

In Australia, which is strug-
gling through its worst
drought on record, the impact
on farmers could be devas-
tating. The country has
already registered its small-
est wheat harvest in a decade,
food prices are rising, and
severe water restrictions have
put thousands of farmers at
risk of bankruptcy.

In other cases, El Nino’s
effects are more ambiguous.
Rains linked to the phenom-
enon led to bumper crops in
Argentina in 1998, but floods
elsewhere in Latin America
devastated subsistence farm-
ers.

El Nino also can do some
good. It tends to take the
punch out of the Atlantic hur-
ricane season by generating
crosswinds that can rip the
storms apart — good news
for Florida’s orange growers,
for example.

“The short-term effects of
global warming on crop pro-
duction are very uneven,”
said Daniel Hillel, a
researcher at Columbia Uni-
versity’s Center for Climate
Systems Research. “I warn
against making definitive pre-
dictions regarding any one
season’s weather.”

What is clear is that the
cumulative effect of El Nino
and global warming are tak-
ing the Earth’s temperatures
to record heights.

“E] Nino is an independent
variable,” Jones said. “But
the underlying trends in the
warming of the Earth is
almost certainly a result:of
the release of carbon dioxide
into the atmosphere.”

Another more immediate

_ effect of the rising tempera-

tures may be political.
Australian Prime Minister

‘John Howard is already

under fire for refusing to link
his country’s drought to glob-
al warming. In Britain,
Friends of the Earth cam-

paign director Mike Childs
said the weather service's
2007 prediction “underlined

‘the gap between the govern-

ment’s rhetoric and
action.”
Other environmental

groups said the new report
added weight to the move-
ment to control greenhouse
gases.
It came a day after the
weather service reported that
2006 had been Britain’s
warmest year since 1659, and
three months after Sir
Nicholas Stern, a senior gov-
ernment economist, estimat-
ed that the effects of climate
change could eventually cost
nations 5 percent to 20 per-

cent of global gross domestic
product each year.

Figures for 2006 are not yet
complete, but the weather
service said temperatures
were high enough to rank
among the top 10 hottest
years on record.

“The evidence that we’re
doing something very dan-
gerous with the-climate is
now amassing,” said Cam-
paign against Climate Change
coordinator Philip Thornhill.

“We need to put the energy
and priority (into climate
change) that is being put into
a war effort,” he said. “It’s a
political struggle to get action
done — and these reports
help.”



to Mr Munroe, said the judi-
ciary can never be considered a
department because it cannot
be controlled by anyone, or
even appear to be controlled.
She said that vigilante jus-
tice takes over when it is per-
ceived that the independence
of the judicial system is lost.
While Mr Pinder admitted
that judges had always been

_ underpaid, he said that the

judges were long-suffering and
the cost of living had gone up
to such an extent that they
wanted to feel they could sup-
port themselves while doing
the work of justice.

“There are two fundamen-
tal principles of justice. One is
that every man has the right
to be heard and the other is
that no man may be a judge in
his own cause. If the judges are
not properly paid and they
hear matters from the execu-
tive they are being judges in

laims judiciary
‘in crisis over judges’ pay

are working so that they can
get paid,” he said.

Mr Pinder said that judges
should be paid before they
work so they can work inde-
pendently.

“Their salaries are important
because you cannot be inde-
pendent if the man continues
to hold the whip over you for
your salary,” he said.

Mr Pinder said that if a judge

is not financially independent

to do the things he needs to do |
for himself, he cannot adjudi-
cate on a matter for anyone
else.

“You must be put in a state
of independence in order to be
independent as a judge. They
must be compensated accord-
ing to their qualifications. Once
you’re properly compensated
nobody is giving you anything.
They are not giving youa
hand-out, you are being com-
pensated according to your

their own cause because they _ abilities,” Mr Pinder said.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a.
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















Bethel Brothers Morticians
cere Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

Royanne
Johnson



|, 52 of Spikenard
| Road will be held on
Monday, January 8,
2007 at New
Provid.ence
Community Centre,
Blake Road
beginning at 2 pm. Miss Johnson passed
away at her home on December 30 following
a short illness with Lung Cancer.

She is survived by a son Chima Ufarro
Johnson and grandson Chima Juan Johnson;
adopted daughters, Lisa, Eryn and Selyna
Bellot; brothers, Giles, Michael, Charles and
Samuel "Bookie" Johnson and their wives
Geneva and Inez; sisters, Cassandra
Thompson, Elsa "Lassie" McKenzie, Jackie
Bethel, Velma Johnson, Stephanie and
Sandra Carey and Peggy Johnson; adopted
sisters, Cherry Isaacs Upton of Toronto, .
Canada, Eunice "Pinkey" Isaacs Mortimer of
Freeport, Grand Bahama and their husbands
Gavin and Donald, Nettie Isaacs Peakes of
London, England and Debra Isaacs also
numerous nephews and nieces including,
Darmeeko Isaacs and Angelo Mortimer; niece,
Nikera Johnson; nephews, Nikimba, Nicuma
and Nishaka Johnson;3.
friends and relatives include, Natasha Young,
Brazil Been, Howard and Irene Howie,
Eleanor Brennen, Lindsay Shepard, Chia
Coakley, Pandora Clarke, Norman Rolle,
Yolanda and Craig, Stephanie Dean, Donna
Topey, Charmaine Holbert, Lana Smith,
Patrick Reid-Hepburn, Clive Guy, Orlando
Albury, Sharon Taylor, Tanisha Pinder, Leroy
Archer, Marie Stubbs, Vibart Wills, the Major
family especially Jasmine, The Larimors, The
Youngs, The Isaacs, The McKinneys, Kendal
and Ruby Nottage, Dr. Bernard and Portia
Nottage, Phillip Nottage, Sandra Nottage
Sherman and a host of other relatives and
friends.





Ms. Johnson has requested that everyone
celebrates her life at her memorial by wearing
bright colours and being as happy as she
was in life. In Lieu of flowers, donations can
-be made to the Cancer Society.





PAGE 10, FRID+.:, JANUARY 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





MONDAY «©



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month ‘at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-
tors Hospital conference room.

B@ CIVIC CLUBS :
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton,Monday's at 7pm ° Club
612315 meéts Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

THE Masi » hatad?

“ste Counc?!
J SLHC)-mects every oti
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nlenday of the

TUESDAY



@ HEALTH |

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
NageauGroupy Rosetta Street: Tyesday 6pm

Opm:.to.9:30pm.




s€ancér Sociét}edf the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Cal
364.8423 to register for more info. :

B@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at.7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College. Avenue off Moss Road. ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros e Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room @ Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.



WEDNESDAY |

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the

OO ARRIOLA LLL MEMES



"The brewery of The B

ARORA AR ROR ANOSR LORE ALAR NRA IISAMAE AONUMA ARES SSEROLENSES Cl? RSYONCORRMENLLERALSDICESLERA SIAMESE ERLE EMELINE LTE TN TEES NNN AON NE EE EN



public of its meeting times and places: New

rovidence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are
held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-

. ter Blake Road. For more information call

327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,

Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support
Group meets-every Wednesday from 5:30pm
to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors
south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

m CIVIC CLUBS
The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets

every Wednesday from lpm - 2pm at East _

Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail: to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the

- world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on





ahamas"

Ba@ry SHOWS
Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. It contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Baharnian artistic
imagination,





UP UNTIL JAN 297, 2007












Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at
large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at

-6pm in the Doctors Hospital ‘Conference

Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous. wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building
Blue Hill Road.

m CIVIC CLUBS oie)

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British ColoniaI Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am)..

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill. meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome. :

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend ¢ TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:3Opm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.



AROUND








NASSAU




PHOTOS WELCOME





FRIDAY

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
Tpm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

B CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info:call 325.1947 after
4pm, .

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to
attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.

SATURDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid class-
es are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

n CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact

organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
‘Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

SUNDAY

/@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness

Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly

Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-

.ed persons are welcome to attend. For more

information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.







eV de.

oo bh







Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows.



ANA 21/-6 sn
6/-14 -6/-21



AB pe
1 50/10 sh-
58/14 50/10 +

8/-13





54/12 35/1 c
Ss $21 35 c
30/-1 9/-12 sn 35/1 17/-8 pe






Honolulu
Houston:



erie CI peers BEEN. ees



Partly sunny and Partly cloudy.



Low: 72°

pene pi ty 1






High: 81°
Low: 65° F/18°C








Jacksonville Tans ¢ 60/15, c



—
e =

Sete









LOW ¢- 1 HIGH V.HIGH



Partly sunny. intervals of clouds Sun and some Chance for a couple The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
and sunshine. clouds. of showers. ¢ _ 9redler the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 82° High: 82° High: 82° High: 82°
Low: 72° io in Low: as Low: 69°

i Mey peer) /

UNL eed aL




“The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today - 8:53am. 2.8 2:22am. -0.3
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the esate and the low for the bi ; )

Q1ipm. 23 3:10pm. 02



9:53p.m. 2.3 3:49pm. -04

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 0:13am. 25 352am. 01





ABACO Temperature . 10:35pm. 22 4:27pm. 01 |
High: 81° F/27°C Has: ee Monday 1052am. 23 4:37am. 00
Low: 66° F/19°C oe high ie ceeec 11:18pm. 2.2 5:05pm. 0.0
Z Normal loW ........cessesceseeseeee ssecbistcsscses BO” FAIS? C

Last:year's: RIQQ .24sicescxccsceccsssccascseney 80° F/26° C
Last year’s OW ........esessssesececeeeeees seeeee 69° F/21° C
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:56 a.m. Moonrise .... 7:44 p.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday .. 0.00” Sunset.......5:34p.m. Moonset ..... 8:41 a.m.









Year to date 0.00” 7
F/27°C Normal year to date .. 0.23” -= rae i
AccuWeather.com
All forecasts and maps provided by
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007
High: 84° F/29°C
_Low:72°F/22°C
CAT ISLAND :
Z High: 83° F/28°C
z - Low.67° F/A9°C :
SAN SALVADOR
- High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 70° F/21°C"

- -. MAYAGUANA
2 = = High: 85°F/29°C
Low: 71° F/22°C



Today
Low W High
, FAL F/C
, 5040 + B47
63/17





Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR

RAGGED ISLAND : =
High: 83° F/28" C Low:71° F/22°C
Low: 68° F/20° C :

GREAT INAGUA
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 71° F/22°C



St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio







49/9 s 59/15



Washington, DC 66/18







Satirday 9:34am. 26 3:07am. -0.2




















High Low W High Low W
FIC FIC Fe F/t
Acapulco = 8881 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 s—
Amsterdam 48/8 45/7 5 «46/7 39/8 +
“Ankara, Turkey BAM 21-6 Sf 33/0 17/-8 ¢
Athens 49/9 44/6 pc 51/10 =41/5 pe
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St. Thomas 84/28 73/22 pc 85/29 73/22 s°
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Winnipeg ~ 25/-3 10/-12 pe 44/-10 8/-13 pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace





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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



alvation Army setves
Christmas lunch to
more than 500 people

By 11am, Majors Lester and
Beverley Ferguson knew they
would have an overflow crowd,
maybe a record number, for
their annual Christmas lunch.

Already guests were lined up

outside, holiday dress and holi-

day smiles - an elderly man
smoothing out his shirt to cover
the tear in his pants, a woman
straightening a feather on a hat
that had seen better church
days. They came by foot, a few
lucky ones by bus.

“We never know for sure,”
said Major Ferguson, divisional
commander of the Salvation
Army. “After all, it’s not the
kind of invitation that comes
with a request to RSVP.”

But it is the kind of event that
brings rounds of cheer and a
kind of unspoken appreciation.
And this year, more than 500
turned out for the Christmas
service and meal provided by
volunteers and staff at the Sal-



gS

ALVATION Army volunteers served more than 500 persons




gathered at the Citadel, the Salvation Army’s headquarters on
Mackey Street, at the annual Christmas luncheon

vation Army headquarters on
Mackey Street.

"

Voices rang out in church, a
spiritual: appetite builder for

what was to come. Boxed lunch-
es were holiday feasts, Bahami-
an style — ham, turkey, maca-
roni and cheese, peas ’n rice.
Sodas and juices were donated
by Caribbean Bottling Co.
Friends like Bahamas Super-
markets Limited, operators of
City Market stores, helped.
‘The Christmas lunch was the
start of the Salvation Army’s
season for sharing. Staff and
volunteers will be calling on
the elderly, the forgotten, shut-
ins, the needy, often bringing

them the only gifts they will

receive.

Their aim: 3,325 packages of
practical presents - toiletries,
books for children, toys for little
ones. They want to serve 625
meals and distribute 1,225
vouchers for ham, turkey and
other food and grocery items.

They will deliver more than
900 care packages for persons in
hospitals and special care cen-

COB holds science and tec

THE School of Sciences and

Technology at the College of |

the Bahamas held its annual
Science and Technology
Awareness Week from Novem-
ber 6 to 9 this year.

The week was held under the
theme: “students making a dif-
ference in science and technol-
ogy.”

The opening, which featured
alumnus Julian Blair, an engi-
neer at General Motors in
Detroit, Michigan, heralded
four days of exhibitions, pre-
sentations and symposia that all
highlighted the ways in which
COB alumni and present stu-
dents are making or could make
a difference.

“Going hand in hand with
that focus was a very clear
emphasis on healthy’ lifestyles
which included a symposium on
traditional medicine, a town
meeting on the environment
and our health, a blood drive
organised by the Science Club
and an open forum on career
opportunities with the Ministry
of Health and Environment,”
noted COB is a statement.

Pervading all the activities
was the message that “there is
nothing that is not science.”

At the opening ceremony,
Dean of Pure and Applied Sci-
ences, Dr Kathleen Sullivan-
Sealey, emphasised “the impor-
tance of the application of sci-
entific research to the develop-
ment of the quality of life in an
island nation such as the
Bahamas” and college president
Janyne M Hodder stated that
she regards activities such as the
Science and Technology
Awareness Week as “core to
the college’s mission of reaching
out to the community to attract
stellar students to study in the
laboratories of the University
of the Bahamas”.

Mr Blair, whose mother was
chairperson of the Division of
Natural Sciences when Science
Awareness Week first began 21
years ago, and who is still a
member of the science faculty,
spoke about “the different areas
where scientific expertise is
going to be required in our
country: the storage of lique-
fied natural gas, the production
‘ of potable water, the construc-
tion of hotels, the enhanced
information technology in com-
munications and tourism, alter-
native methods of generating
power, improvements in trans-
portation and the area of
health.”

He urged students to be
aware of the “awesome respon-
sibility” they bear towards the
world in which we live and to
embrace new techniques so they
can help to firid innovative solu-
tions to the problems facing the
Bahamas.

Six members of faculty made
presentations at the town meet-
ing on the environment and our
health and covered a wide range
of topics: Lester Flowers, assis-
tant professor of. biology,
focused on automobile emis-
sions; assistant professor of biol-
ogy, Ms Joyanne Thompson,
presented on the unsuitability
of the traditional Bahamian diet
to a healthy lifestyle; Henry
Hepburn, assistant professor in
the technology department,
looked at the built environment
and expressed concern at what
he termed “inconsistencies in
certain policies regarding the
approval for structures to be
built”; head of the Physics
Department, Alex Farley, spoke
about another type of pollution
— noise — and its detrimental
effects; dean of the School of
Sciences and Technology, Dr
Kathleen Sealey, addressed the
topic of deep sea pollution; and
assistant professor of chemistry,
Mrs Judith Blair, spoke about
the dangers of fresh water pol-
lution.

Two alumni who are now
medical doctors, Rickey Davis
and Duvaughn Curling pre-
sented their experiences at the
symposium on traditional med-
icine.

Davis described some of his
experiences at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Accident and
Emergency Department and
Curling, an oncologist, talked

-about cancer and its treatment,

Both also spent time impress-
ing on the student audience the
need for responsible sexual
activity.

The monthly Research Edge
Forum was a presentation by
head of Science at CC Sweeting

Senior High School, Ms Dar-.

lene Edwards, who investigated
student attitudes towards math;
ematics and science in three
Nassau secondary schools.

One of her findings had sci-
ence faculty shaking their heads
in confusion: students felt that
knowledge of math and science
would help them to earn a good
living but they did not expect
to use math or science after they
had left school.

There-was also a student sym-

posium featuring the studies
performed by biology and
chemistry majors, Anastacia
Pierre and Everton Joseph, who
reported respectively on the
invasion of non-indigenous
household geckoes in the
Bahamas and the habitats of
one of the world’s rarest birds,
the Kirtland Warbler, that
migrates to Bahamian shores
each winter.












The open forum on careers
in health care was noteworthy
in that three alumnae were fea-
tured as presenters: Nikessa
Malcolm informed the assem-
bled students of the wealth of
opportunities in health care
and also spoke about projects
for the future such as mini clin-
ics and new hospitals on cer-
tain Family Islands; Pamela
Bowe, senior education officer



tres — senior citizens’ homes,
children’s homes.

“Giving to others, sharing in
spirit and hope and prayer, and
remembering the real reason

in the Ministry of Health and

* National Insurance, explained

the need for health educators
who can supply the population
with self-health management
skills; and Jalna Bullard, a
national blood procurement
officer, informed the audience
about careers in medical tech-
nology. ,

The fourth presenter at this
forum was Carmelta Barnes; a

our new location
our contin

@ HANDING out meals to the grateful guests



for Christmas are what make
the season so special and every
year we are thankful to be part
of it and do our part in it,” said
Major Ferguson.



nutritionist, who gave advice on
careers in food science and
explained the social impact of
food. nie 7

In her remarks at the short
closing ceremony, chairperson
of the School of Sciences and
Technology, Bridget Hogg,
called the week “a wonderful
experience” and encouraged
more students to be presenters
in 2007.

uing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avense
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

| Visit or call your Agent
| at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

emium payment functions will be
ansferred from Collins Avenue to our
arbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY











a





_@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

¢ 6 Unanticipated
delays” in securing
approval from the
Bahamian govern-

ment for its multi-

million dollar liquefied natur-
al gas (LNG) terminal and
pipeline ori Ocean Cay have
forced the AES Corporation
to plead with US regulators
for a four-year extension to



the date when the project will

be completed.

Documents filed with the .

Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission (FERC), which
have been seen by Thé Tri-
bune, contain AES’s request
for US regulators to extend
the date at which Ocean Cay
will begin supplying Florida’s.
power stations with LNG from

- January 29, 2007, to January
29, 2011.

The motion for this exten-
sion, drafted by AES’ US

attorneys, Baker Botts, said .

the delay had been caused by
the Bahamian government
deciding to draft regulation to
govern how the Ocean Cay
terminal operated before the
project. was approved...

“An extension of the in-ser-
vice date is necessary because
Ocean Express has been

unable to commence con-

struction of the pipeline due
to unanticipated delays in
securing final approval from
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas for the construction
of related facilities,” the AES
motion said.

- “This delay is largely due to
the time required for the
Bahamas to develop regula-
tions to govern the LNG ter-
minal that will be built in the
Bahamas, and the associated
non-jurisdictional pipeline

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



ries del oapartine
§ LNG approval in US |

‘Government undertaking ‘final review’ of LNG regulations,



with approval of pipeline and terminal expected ‘soon’ after

facilities that will interconnect

with the Ocean Express

pipeline.

“Ocean Express anticipates
that the Bahamian govern-
ment will soon complete work
on these regulations, followed
thereafter by final Bahamian
approval of the terminal and
pipeline facilities that are sub-
ject to Bahamian jurisdiction.”

AES said it was seeking the
FERC extension to give it
time to obtain approval from
the Bahamas, and complete
construction of the terminal
and pipeline. :

In truth, the extension
request is likely to be
approved by the FERC, giv-
en that there is a precedent
for more time to be granted

to LNG suppliers when facili-

ties in other jurisdictions are

-involved.

In its motion, AES pointed
out that the FERC had recent-
ly granted a request by Port
Arthur LNG for eight years,
rather than the original five,
to build approved LNG facili-
ties in Louisiana and Texas.

The company pointed out
that the situation was similar
to the one it faced in the
Bahamas, with Port Arthur
LNG needing to obtain envi-
ronmental approvals and per-
mits.

AES Ocean Express has
already obtained one exten-
sion from the FERC, which
increased the time to complete
the terminal and pipeline con-
struction from two years to

Association: developers
‘trying to strangle’ us

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Save Guana Cay Reef
Association has accused the
developers behind the contro-
versial $175 million Baker’s Bay
Golf & Ocean Club of “trying
to strangle” its attempts to halt

_the project through legal action,

demanding that it pay a
$100,000 security for costs relat-

ed to its appeal action.

The Association is now await-
ing a date from-the Court of

Appeal at which to appeal the

substantive issues relating to a

Supreme Court verdict by Act- .

ing Justice Norris Carroll, which .

refused all its applications and
arguments to halt the develop-

- ment.
Fred Smith, a partner in Cal-

lender’s & Co and the Associa-
tion’s attorney, told The Tri-

~bune that he was preparing a

motion seeking a “stay” or halt
to all work on Baker’s Bay
“pending the hearing of the
appeal”.

He added: “The developers
are once again trying to strangle
the Association. They have

SEE page 5B

Tax base ‘out of whack’
with GDP growth

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has no choice
but to eventually change its tax-
ation system, the minister of state
for finance indicated yesterday,
because the current revenue base
is “out of wae with the rate of
growth in the overall economy.

James Smith told The Tribune
that any shift from the current
structure, largely based upon cus-
toms and import duties, plus
tourism taxes, was “far away”,

_ and the Ministry of Finance was

still “in the research and devel-
opment stage” of assessing what
alternative system was the best
option. i

Yet whild the project was “a
work in progress” and one for

the long-term that would pass
through several governments, Mr

Smith said.change to the-coun-’

try’s tax structure eventually
seemed inevitable.

“We're not kind of zeroing in
on anything at all, but what we
do know is that the existing sys-
tem lacks the flexibility we need
going forward,” Mr Smith said.

He added ‘that the Govern-
ment needed a tax structure that
“provides more flexibility and
buoyancy”, particularly during
an economic downturn or when
the Bahamian economy suffered
an external shock. —

Mr Smith said VAT (value
added tax) “looks like a more

” SEE page 3B



@ LESLIE MILLER

three years. The final approval
for Ocean Express was
received from the US on Jan-
uary 29, 2004, meaning it has
until the end of this month to
complete - an impossible task
- unless FERC approves the
request.

The “interdependence” of
the proposed Bahamian and
US facilities has led AES
Ocean Express to argue that it
cannot begin construction in
either nation until all
approvals are in from both
jurisdictions.

“When Ocean Express first
requested an extension of
time, it anticipated that
Bahamian approval of the
non-jurisdictional facilities
would soon be forthcoming,”
AES pleaded to FERC.

“As a result of unexpected
delays, however, including the
time required for the develop-
ment and issuance of regula-
tions to govern the operation,
construction and decommis-

| think life insur






sioning phases of Bahamian
LNG facilities, formal
Bahamian approval has not
been issued.
“Ocean Express under-
stands that the Bahamian gov-
ernment is now undertaking a
final review of the regulations

to govern LNG facilities, and.

that this process will soon be
complete.”

And the AES motion
added: “While AES has made
diligent, good faith efforts to
satisfy the requirements of the
Commission orders approving
the project, the necessary
approval is not within Ocean
Express’s control........ ’

“Gas demand in the south-

eastern Florida area continues
to increase, with a significant

part of the increase attribut- .

able to the use of gas to fuel
electric power plants.”

Denying AES’s motion to

extend the project completion
deadline would, the company
said, “cause Ocean Express to
lose millions already invested
and depriye gas and electric
customers in the southeastern
Florida area of much needed
access to additional supplies
of competitively priced gas”.
The AES LNG terminal on
Ocean Cay, a man-made
island near Bimini, would re-
gas LNG brought by ship to
the island in liquid form. A 95-
mile pipeline would then take
some 842,000 dekatherms of
LNG to Florida per day,
where it will supply the state’s
electricity needs. .

- desire for the AES proje

We've got plans tha

Both former Florida gover-
nor Jeb Bush and US officials

have previously impres ed

upon the Government ¢





of



be approved, given the sté
power demand. es
AES has been waiting

patiently for five years - having '

spent some $65 million
between June 2001 and Feb-
ruary 2006 to keep the project
alive - for a decision from the

Prime Minister and his Cabi-~

net.
A Heads of Agreement has
been drafted, and is only

awaiting a final government’

sign-off. Yet the Prime Minis-
ter has proceeded at a cautious
pace on LNG, concerned over
whether it fits in with the
Bahamas’ tourism image, amid
a lobbying campaign against

the project by environmental- -

ists. .
He is-also concerned about

- whether the Bahamas has the

resources and expertise to
monitor and enforce an envi-
ronmental management plan
for Ocean Cay, hence the
drafting of regulations before
the project is approved.

Yet the Bahamas Environ-
ment, Science and Technology
Commission (BEST)
approved AES's Enyiron-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) back in 2003.,

Several sources had previ-

ously expressed concern to

The Tribune that the contin-
ued delay, leaving AES Ocean
Express hanging on by its fin-




Ree




x

F CENTRE: EXST BAY STREET. ASSAY ROL ROSSER!

gerprints, could damage the
Bahamas' reputation in the
eyes of potential foreign
investors - the key driver of
thiseconomy.

In its EIA, completed, back

“in 2002, AES Ocean Express

said the implications of not
proceeding with the project
were "significant" for both the

Bahamas and Florida.

-~"In the Bahamas, the 'no
action' alternative would mean
the loss of additional reliable
and economical natural gas:
and freshwater supplies, and
certain economic and socioe-
conomic benefits associated
with the project, such as per-
manent and temporary

“employment and training

opportunities, tax and other

' revenue streams, and new —
- housing and related facilities

construction," the EIA said.
Leslie Miller, minister of

’ agriculture and fisheries, has

previously said the Bahamas —

- could earn $1.2 billion in rev-
enue over the lifetime of the

AES project.
When completed, the pro-
ject promises to create perma-
nent jobs that could be filled
by Bahamians with. engineer-
ing and science-related
degrees and qualifications.
Such skilled workers have rel-
atively few opportunities in
the current economy, and the
AES project would give much-*
needed diversification.

SEE page 5B

ance only benefits
the ones you

| leave behind?
RealityCheck. = Ey eo iy Fag, 2 ee
t provide savings and protection.

So you can enjoy peace of mind today, :
knowing tomorrow is secure.

Call or log on to www.familyguardian.com today! -





MPANY





THE TRIBUNE




BUSINESS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 200/, PAGE 56

PI condo buyers will not
_have to pay Stamp Tax

gi By CARA BRENNEN- BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter



BUYERS of the 495 units at The Residences
of Atlantis are apparently to be offered a tax
concession when they buy into the exclusive
condominium hotel on Paradise Island.

According to Irish media, buyers will not
have to pay the standard five per cent Stamp
Tax usually required in real estate purchases in
the Bahamas, as this will be covered by the

. developers. The condotel is a joint venture

of the details regarding the tax incentives for
Residences buyers, but said he would gather
additional information for The Tribune.

The Residences at Atlantis is a 22-storey
beachfront condominium scheduled for com-

pletion by next Christmas.

The development includes 495 junior, one
and two-bedroom suites with prices starting

at $700,000.

’. between Kerzner International and Turnberry __ ing.

Associates.

.. Purchases of land or real estate in the
Bahamas require a 10 per cent Stamp Tax pay-
ment to the Public Treasury, which is split

between seller and buyer.

However, in this case the developers have
agreed to pay the entire 10 per cent cost.

Ed Fields, vice-president of public affairs

at Kerzner International, said he was not aware





Chancellors
promotes Storr
to partnership

*. CHANCELLORS Chambers has
promoted Merrit A Storr to the part-
nership with effect from January 1,
2007.

Mr Storr specialises in hotel and
resort development, real estate and
commercial litigation. He has exten-
sive practical experience in the hospi-
tality industry, which assists him in act-
ing for resort and real estate develop-
ments within the Bahamas.

Kenred M. A. Dorsett, the firm’s
managing partner, said Mr Storr’s pro-
motion to the partnership showed the
confidence and respect he had
obtained from the firm’s clients.

Mr Storr will be responsible for the
firm’s Grand Bahama office.



Purchasers will also have access to all the
amenities of the Atlantis resorts.
Construction began last June on The Resi-

dences at Atlantis.

Deposits for 179 units — more than a third
— had been received then, and in July the
joint venture partners finalised a $277 million
loan to finance construction and sales and mar-

keting for the property.

TAX BASE, from page 1B

flexible option”. This tax, which already
operates in many Caribbean countries and
across the world, is levied on services -
the current customs duty system only tax-
es consumption - and is imposed at each
stage in the production chain.

This means that VAT is not only levied
when the product is sold to the final con-
sumer or user, but also when it is sold by
the manufacturer to wholesalers, from
wholesalers to distributors, and from dis-
tributors to retailers.

Mr Smith said that for the Bahamas,
given its small manufacturing base and
generally few links in the chain of pro-
duction, a combination of a Vat and sales
tax might be a better option.

“As we move forward and greater
demand is placed on the public sector for
the provision of services, the ability to do
that is already being constrained in the
sense that we’re only taking taxes on
goods,” Mr Smith said. .

“As the economy is primarily service-
based, the rate of growth in the revenue
base in proportion to GDP is getting out
of whack.”

HIGGS & JOHNSON




f\ O}M"

ior Partner of Higgs & Johnson, is pleased to announce that
ith and Tara A. A. Archer have joined the firm's partnership.

The Residences will have a private owners’
lounge and fully-staffed lobby, swimming pool,
restaurant and 24-hour security and valet park-

He pointed out that the problems
caused by the current omission of services
from taxation, and the relatively narrow
revenue base, were best exposed in the
immediate aftermath of the September
11, 2001, terror attacks.

Flights

With no flights to the Bahamas bringing
in tourists, and the temporary closure of
all US seaports, tourists and imports
“dried up”, Mr Smith said, directly impact-
ing government revenues. However, the
services industries did not stop, and he
added that taxes tied more to consump-
tion and income would give the Bahamas
a better opportunity to “adjust to new cir-
cumstances”.

Mr Smith said a government ream had
visited other Caribbean countries, “par-
ticularly Barbados”, to see how their tasx
systems operated, and submitted a report
and study on this and the options for the
Bahamas. He added that the Bahamas
was still at the first step in tax reform,
research, and that nothing would happen
before the general election. Once the
research was completed, the process
would move to the analysis stage, and










J



\

we



once the way forward was. developed, a
white paper would be released to the
Bahamian public and private sector.

A round of consultation with various
stakeholders would follow, and then the
effort would move to assessing feedback
and briefing policymakers.

Mr Smith said it was critical to the suc-
cess of any tax reform that the initiative
was bought into by the majority of
Bahamians, with education playing a key
part in informing the public how a new tax
would be applied, who was affected by it,
and their obligations under the new
regime. Another critical role would be
played by information technology.

The Government is also engaged in an
effort to maximise the revenues’ derived
from the existing tax system, and Mr
Smith said: “We need to know exactly
what we’re getting from the combination
of taxes we have now, and get it in as effi-
cient a manner as possible.

“We’re seeing some measure of suc-
cess. Any number of loopholes and inef-
ficiencies have been tackled. We’ve seen a
number of gains without applying any new
or increased taxes. We’ve learnt more
about the system, which will help us going
forward.”

H CONSTRUCTION
on the 22-storey
beachfront condo on
Paradise Island began
in June last year.

(FILE photo)



Clarification

IN an article on Page 3B -
of yesterday’s Tribune
Business séction, it was
reported that Robert
Nihon, managing director
We eee Ree toot PTI
Global Partners, had been }
appointed as a director of |
Dynasty Gaming Inc, an

online gaming operation. ©
MAP TOE OM COU PT GOYAL Lee
the Robert Nihon in ques- ©
tion is Robert Nihon II.



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

[N. LEROY SMITH joined Higgs & Johnson in
2000 and is a practitioner in the firm’s Litigation
Practice Group. He has had a particular focus on all
facets. of trust law including representing fiduciaries
individual clients (both private and institutional)
f trust and estate litigation; and advising
cal institutional clients in the
) of Bahamian trusts. In
erience working








CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager
Bahamas

dra ng iG
addition, Mr. Smith ha
in contentious .and no




















and recovery matters), telecommunications la : :
maritime law. He also regularly counsels a nu of =< Qualifications:

local and international companies and insurers in
relation to personal injury, defamation and \
tort-based claims.



N. Leroy Smith

¢ Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).

¢ Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

¢ Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

¢ Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.

¢ Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.

e Sound experience in global capital markets

° Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development
processes.

¢ Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual
stock picks















Mr. Smith obta
to the Bar of
earned an LL.M
Mr. Smith has
editorial board

n LL.B. (Hons.) from the University of Southampton and w
d and Wales and to the Bahamas Bar in 1998. He subs
orporate and Commercial Law at the University College of
ibuted to Tolley’s International Succession Laws and
irm’s client publication, FOCUS. In June 2006 he
e in Company Law and Practice by S.T.E.P. ]




















is a practitioner in the firm's
She has over seven years of
practice is concentrated in
cial litigation, banking and
t law and admiralty law.
or co-counsel in a number
nd local cases, including
iana Limited and Globe-X
cas International Bank (In
Bank Ltd (In Liquidation).
to major international and
ers regarding cross-border
gation, asset-tracing and
nal operations.



General Requirements/Responsibilities:

¢ Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

° Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

° Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.

¢ Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.

¢ Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

¢ Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.












Tara A. A. Archer:

yved as President of the La’
o the Bahamas Barin 199
ind the Center for Internationa
@ College of The Bahamas and.
ber 2006 she was appointed
nal Bar Association. She






he University of Essex, where sh¢
the Bar of England and Wales @






Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux @ FirstCaribbeanBank.com

Ge

from the Management and Staff of HIGGS & JOHNSON.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

HIGGS & JOHNSON

CET a EE

TE

i

oa

\ Pe reRsEr aN NETH ETE ——

SPIE AVY

|
'

a a a



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2006, PAGE 7B











YOU PROMISED
YOu'D HELP ME

CHECK OUT THESE PHOTOS OF )_]

MY GRANDKIOS ON MY NEW
CAMERA PHONE )g









1

~~



THEAL NE WAR, STUCK
ON AN (CG FLO WITH A
POLAK BAAR. ONLY:
KA WIRACLE COULR
SNE US NOW...

‘DIP You SAY
YOUR PRAYERS?

© 2006 by ing Fextures Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved







ACROSS

When Uncle's on the plane, this gets
thrown out (6)

It gives fii;hty fellows lofty airs (8)
8 — Ifinthe right, makes a
- orack (4)
10 Strike in cycle
production (6)
11 Before this, things were 0
antadeluvian! (6)
14 Figure the net return (3)
16 Being thomy, can
"cause soréa (5)
17 The broad highway (4)
1 inadvertently dropped an apple core
into the sediment (5)
21 Sally's love to get
into the fight (5)
22 Apply for the job as president? (3,2)
23 One of tne greatest
trials in port? (4)
26 = it's bound to have
"— mape in (6)
28 Fare reduced for long distance (3)
20 Like Citizen Kane, a
press tycoon (8)
30 Lady upeet by arson out East (6)
31 Poultry inthe kitchen
sink (4)
32 Inflationary service? (3,5)
33 immediate credit
available (6)

Yesterday’s cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 3, Games 8, Manor 10, Stall 11, Car(-e'er) 12,
R-O-te 13, Cent-R-a-L 15, Errol 18, Re-d 19, Den-ote 21,
Mard-mum 22, OK-ay 23, Pert 24, D-apple-d 26, Petrol 29,
Eat 31, Stain 32, Ordered 34, G-alas 35, Rub 36, De-b-it
37, Venus 38, Delta
DOWN: 1, Rao-Ed 2, P-or-tray 4, AW-O-L 5, E-steem 6,
Stem 7, Alot Q, Nan 12, Radi-Cal. 14, Re-X 16, Ro-we-d
17, Leith 19, Oumpers 20, Corps 21, Malta (GC) 23, Peter-
Ed 24, Donete 25, Lad 27, Ether 28, Rigid 30, D-ebut 32,
Oaet 33, Aun

YOU ARE OVERRUN
WITH MICE, MA'AM/

WELL, WHAT DO YOU THINK, MARVIN?
les O

Bp Co
ae

CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

IMPOSSIBLE!’
WE HAVE A
GOOD INDUSTRIAL
Ex TERMINATOR’

GINA, YOU MUSTN'T] HE'S NOT YOUNG )“marco
WMPOSE ON THE ;
PROFESSOR.

ANYMORE. H






PERSONA



DOWN

1
2

BRRBK

8B8

Funny old foo! (6)

Like a drink with something

fishy in it (6)

The drinks may be on them (4)
Being mean means misery around
the corner (7)

As wom, very shortly,

for the ballet (5)

Old associates of the Persians, me
boy! (5)

Woman's charitable heart (4)

Like a low district in parts

of England (3)

Plenty of money to back with! (3)
In cars, they're mostly forward (5)
Holly possibly upsets prigs (5)
Address some of the electorate (5)
Is it almost a toss-up whether he's
sober? (3)

Aname half nailed up (3)

Fathead the Americans see as
pernickety (7)

Standard amount of preparation (3)
Person employed as a beater? (6)
Greek god of cupidity? (4)
Relax during a race (in China?) (3,3)
Amanly advert for getting
on in life (5)
Nominal layabout with a posh car (5)
The price of café espresso (3)
The ship had cast off (4)

Yesterday's easy solutions

88, Edges

33, Tip

RESPECT...
YOU HAVE

INDUSTRIAL
Ex TERMINATOR/

STRRNING, BOT
NV Not THAT



LUN, WARREN , FT WOULDN'T
BOTHER USING “SMILE WHITENER ”
UNTIL I HAD MORE THAN EIGHT TEETH

ENGIENE



LI THINK IM ON |
"CALL WAITING

=
N
=
a



EASY PUZZLE



ACROSS: 3, Stoop 8, Facet 10, Renal 11, Tug 12, Bread 13,
Caravan 15, Taper 18, Tin 19, Polite 21, Steamer 22, Plea
23, Food 24, Halibut 26, Erases 29, Car 91, Dinar 32,
Capital 34, Basin 35, Oil 36, Still 37, Dupes

DOWN: 1, Fatal 2, Regatta 4, Tum 5, Orator 6, Pedal 7,
Cadet 9, Cur 12, Bananas 14, Vie 16, Plot 17, Ready 19,
Pelican 20, Speed 21, Sedan 23, Furious 24,

Herald 25, Bap 27, Plots 28, Sable 30, Valet 22, Cite










WALKS IN
NNSTER ove
WANS, FLO











PS i > au

ACROSS
Recluse (6)

Cutlery item (5)
Zodiac sign (3)
Shed (4-2)
Insect (6)

1

7

8

10

11

14

16

17

19

21
22. ‘Type of wood (5)
23

26

28
29

30

31 Ald in crime (4)
32
33

N
| 4

COMICS PAGE

Good Judgment Is a Key Factor

WEST
1052
Â¥A10865

32

#973

*OH, DENNIS, You
SHOULDN'T HAVE.”





South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH
#K8763
Â¥43
73
“A842
EAST
#Q94
vy92
#10854
#QI6
SOUTH
AJ
Â¥KQ7
@AKQ96
#K 105

The bidding:
South
2NT
oe lead ix of hearts

ing lead —- six of hearts.
Rtost at the decisions one makes
at the table are clear-cut. There is an
obvious bid or play to make, and it is

North East
34 Pass

West
Pass

made without much thought.

But there are times when what
should be done is not so clear, and
these are the times when good judg-
ment is the decisive factor and when
failure to judge correctly can prove

very costly.





!

HOW many words of four

letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must

contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 17; very good 26;
excellent .33 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.








Stain (4)
Frozen water (3)
And not (3)

Excite (5)
Wild (5)

RERan AWN
3
&
8
Ss

=
mw

(5)

=
oo

Cotour (3)
Conifer (3)
Say in passing (7)
Swindle (3)
Proper (6)
Defeat (4)
Wilt (6)
Inctination (5)
Desert’s fertile
patch (5)
Throw (3)
30 Animal fat (4)

28

B NBREBR

“THATS EXACTLY WHAT
T TOLD MY MOM.” :

RGET






































HEY STUPID! 11's TOO WARM
T BUILD A SNONMAN ?



THIS SCULPTURE 1S ABOUT
TRANSIENCE. AS THIS





WEWER TO CONTEMPLATE THE | Ky
EVANESCENCE OF LIFE,
THIS PIECE SPEAKS
TO THE HORROR OF
OUR OWN, MORTALITY!



FRIDAY,
JANUARY 5

ARIES — March 21/April 20
It’s time to save up your pennies,
Aries, there is some rough financial
road ahead. You may want tO con-
sider taking up some temporary part-
‘time work to get you through.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
Expect some major changes. at the
workplace by Wednesday, Taurus.
It is bound to cause some commo-
tion. Extra stress at work makes
home life a little tricky this week.

GEMINI — May 22/June 21
Keep clear of an upset family. mem-
ber on Tuesday, Gemini, this person
is only bound to ruin your good
mood. Your love like takes an unex-
pected turn for the better.
CANCER - June 22/July 22
Sarcasm can be your downfall on
Tuesday, Cancer. Best to keep
quiet for a while and remain busy.
You’ll be needed to put in extra
hours at work, but the rewards will
probably be generous.

LEO - July 23/August 23 .
Life is the cat’s meow for you, Leo. A
big raise seems imminent and a promo-
tion is not too far on the horizon. Your
positive mood can only be enhanced by
a chance encounter this weekend.

VIRGO — Aug -24/Sept 22

It seems that things are looking up
for you, Virgo. You're finally out
of the slump that’s been bogging
you down lately. A better mood
frees up more time for recreation.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 +
Your patience is tested at work on
Thursday. Too many technical diffi-
culties with faulty equipment cause
your temperature to rise. Just be
level-headed and hope for the best.
SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
Stress has driven you over the edge
on more than one occasion in the’
past, but this week you’ve finally
found the formula for remaining
calm. Expect dinner plans for Friday.
SAGITTARIUS — Noy 23/Dee 21
You need to find a new interest,
Sagittarius. Why not adopt a pet to
focus your attention in a different

For example, take this case where
you're in three notrump. West leads
the heart six, and East plays the jack.
Do you win the jack, or do you duck
it?

If you duck, East returns a heart,
and West, a first-class defender, lets
you win the trick. You are now a
dead duck, whatever you do next,
and you go down one.

Now let’s go back to trick one and
take the jack of hearts with the king.
If you blithely cash the A-K-Q of
diamonds, hoping the suit divides 3-
3 or West has four of them, this is not
your lucky day. If and when you lead
another diamond, East takes it with
the ten and returns a heart, and down

you go.

Then how should you play the |
hand, you might ask? The answer is
that you should win the first trick,
cross to dummy with a club and then
return a diamond, planning to finesse
the nine if East follows low.

True, the nine loses to West’s jack,
but you are then on Easy Street.
Whatever West returns, you score
two spades, a heart, four diamonds
and two clubs and are well-rewarded
for the extra energy you expended at
the outset.

grade grader guard radar raga

rage raged rager rare rarer

E
Z
:
:
3

a
5
E
8
5
z
z
g
z

agar area argue argued arguer

arrear auger aura dare darer

dear drag dreg drug gear

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION

leaves you anxious — an old flame
will rattle your nerves.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
Stop butting heads with that coworker.

masking the underlying attraction you
feel for each other, Capricom. Accept
the truth and pursue this atiractive catch.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Stop being so hard on yourself,
Aquarius. You are your own worst
critic — others around you don’t
judge you as harshly. Leave room for
self-indulgence on Friday. i
PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
Your relationship is bound to end. this
week, Pisces, but it’s not your fault.
This person is just not ready for a
long-term commitment. Remember,
there are other fish in the sea.

CHESS by Rte Ike) Barden








new

word
| router |

Cola re aah
transfers mes-
BS: (Cee Yet ac eLeLA)
computers



Anatoly Karpov v Zoltan Ribli,
Dubai Olympiad 1986. Dubal
was a controversial occasion
where the golden Soviets,
even though they were led by
the all-time greats Karpev and
Garry Kasparov, struggled to
contain a strong challenge
from the United States and
England. America's number
one Yasser Seirawan
outplayed Kasparov, and »

ra
in

pel [pe
Bee

i



England were clear with only Bs
two rounds left. Then Russian ne
coaches openly gave advice

during play to the Spaniards g 4h

in their critical encounter with
the English grandmasters,

who lost concentration and found a winning tactic. What
with it the gold medals. One happened?

memorable moment at Dubai

was today’s diagram where

Karpov (White, to move)

LEONARD BARDEN
“es UN A ALT TST TT ET TRL eT eT

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

“AQ /UTYS
16) + 84y 7 96 20 ayeU 95 ¢ 21 +BUY b 9) HUE TUPY
£90 +2HZ LUPOHIeZAPKO T= woRIMOs ssOy)

4

direction. A party on the weekend , -

Your teasing and arguments are-just ~



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Russia
and Spain
advance to
Hopman
cup final

i TENNIS
PERTH, Australia
Associated Press

Fn,

TOP-SEEDED Russia
will play Spain in the Hop-
man Cup mixed teams
final, while the Americans
ead home without a vic-
LOTY.

‘Australia beat the Unit-
ed States 2-1 Thursday
after Alicia Molik and
Nathan Healey won the
deciding mixed doubles
over Ashley Harkleroad
and Mardy Fish 6-4, 7-5.
The U.S. team finished 0-

Molik beat Harkleroad,
a Jate replacement for the
injured Venus Williams, 3-
6, 6-4, 6-4 to give Australia
a 1-0 lead before Fish
evened the match with a
7-5, 7-5 win over Healey.
Russia advanced from
Group A when Nadia
Petrova and Dmitry Tur-
sunov won their singles
matches and combined to
capture the mixed doubles
for a 3-0 win Thursday
over France.
Second-seeded Spain
qualified when it won the
two opening matches of its
final Group B round-robin
against previously unbeat-
en India. 7x
Anabel Medina Gar-
rigues of Spain beat Sania
Mirza of India 3-6, 6-1, 6-3
before Tommy Robredo
defeated Rohan Bopanna
6-2, 6-3.

Russia and Spain will
play Friday night in the
final at Burswood Dome.
The Czech Republic had
an outside chance of mak-
ing it to the final, but lost
2-1 to Croatia in another
late Group B match.

Mirza’s weeklong win-
hing streak ended mostly
hecause of her 61
utnforced errors against
‘Medina Garrigues.

. Petrova of Russia beat
‘Tatiana Golovin of France
7-6 (2), 6-0 and Tursunov

_defeated Jerome Haehnel
6-1, 6-4.

. Petrova and Tursunov
then combined to beat

‘Golovin and Haehnel 6-4,
6-2. France also finished at
2-1 but did not qualify for

_ the final because of its loss

Russia.
Petrova had to over-

: come a painful stomach

' muscle injury to beat
‘Golovin.

“T injured my abdominal

, muscle so I have a bit of

‘pain with serving, and it
was getting worse and
worse with each single
game,” Petrova said. “I

. wasn’t feeling well and it

‘was difficult to find that
motivation, but deep
inside my heart I knew we
stil had a chance in this
competition. So I really
had to find the strength

_and find the will to fight.”

Petrova said the singles
matches would be the key
to Russia’s chances on Fri-
day.

. “Tfit goes down to a

‘mixed doubles as the

_ deciding point, then so be,
it but I think we have real-
'y good chances to win in
singles,” she said.



§ Che Tribune wants to hear
4 from people who are
5 making news in their
} ncighbourhoods. Perhaps
} you are raising funds for a
1 good cause, campaigning
j for improvements in the ,
} area or have won an
f award.
Tf so, call us on 322-1986
J and share your story.

ARIES IEAM

Shamar Sands returns from —

|
i
























Wye) aks




injury for his senior year

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHEN Shamar Sands
graduated from St.
Augustine’s College in 2002,
he headed to Auburn Uni-
versity with high hopes of
being the next great 110
metre hurdler the Bahamas
produces.

But after just one full sea-
son under his belt as an
Auburn Tiger in 2003, he suf-
fered a string of injuries from
2004 that has hindered his
progress.

Now Sands is heading back

to Auburn for his senior year,

and his expectations are just
as high as they were when he
left as a freshman. ;

“T just pray for health. This
is the first off season P’ve had
for years where I’ve been
healthy,” said Sands, in an
interview with The Tribune
while here for the Christmas
break.

“As in previous years, once
I’m healthy, the sky is the
limit. Anything is possible.
Coming off injuries, I’ve been
running average times of
13.8s and 13.9s without any
training. So I know I’m ina
healthy state, the sky is the
limit. Anything is possible.”

Sands, a 21-year-old
accounting major, has record-
ed a personal best of 13.80
seconds in the 110 hurdles,
placing him fourth on
Auburn’s all-time list. The
national record of 13.65 was
set by the late Danny Smith
in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in
1973. P

In his career so far at
Auburn, Sands earned All-
American honours at the
NCAA Indoor Champi-
onships in 2003 and last com-
peted at the Sun Angel Clas-
sic outdoor meet in 2004, and
he is confident that he can get
back on track.



“As in previous years, once
I’m healthy, the sky is the
limit. Anything is possible.
Coming off injuries, ’ve been
running average times of 13.8s
and 13.9s without any training.
So I know I'm in a healthy
state, the sky is the limit.

Anything is possible.”



“1m still determined to be
on top. I’m still determined
to do some big things,”
reflected Sands, who had to
shut down his outdoor sea-
son early in 2004 and didn’t
compete at all in 2005
because of the recurring
injuries.

“It has been difficult, but
I’ve learned to accept things
and to deal with it because
that’s life,” he insisted. “So I
just try to make the best out
of every situation.

“I’m still young, so it’s not
as bad as it was when I first
went to college and I had to
deal with it. I’ve gotten a little
older, so I know how to deal
with it. But don’t get me
wrong, it’s still tough to deal
with.”

Hurdles

Sands will be returning to
Auburn today and his per-
sonal coach Bahamian Henry
Rolle, an assistant at Auburn
who has responsibility for the
hurdles, said he’s looking for-
ward to his protégé having a
banner year - if he can stay
healthy.

“This is his last year and

Shamar Sands

he’s trained well during the
off-season,” Rolle pointed
out. “So if he can stay
healthy, good things should
happen for him.”

Rolle said he would just
like to see Sands complete a
full season as he did in his
freshman year.

“But he experienced some
growing pains that set him
back and he had a lot of prob-
lems with his growth spurt,”
Rolle said. “But if he can stay
healthy, he should run pretty
well.”

As he looks ahead to the
season, Sands reiterated that
his main goal is to stay
healthy.

“Once I stay healthy, every-
thing else will fall into place,”
he proclaimed.

While representing Auburn
at the NCAA Championships
- indoors and outdoors - are
two of his immediate goals,
Sands said his long-term goal
this year is to be a part of the
Bahamian team going to the
IAAF World Outdoor Cham-
pionships in Osaka, Japan in
August.

“Once I’m healthy, any
meet I want to represent this
country, anytime, I know I



he emphasised. “Anything is
possible.”

While three female athletes
- Sheniqua Ferguson, Cache
Armbrister and Crystal Bod-
ie - are expected to become
Auburn Tigers in August,
Sands is expected to compete
with high jumper Donald
Thomas, who has enrolled in
grad school.

“He’s relatively new to
track and field, but he’s now
learning the event,” Rolle
reflected. “So the indoor sea-

son is going to be where he
takes a step backwards so
that he can move forward.

“We couldn’t do much
work because he came in dur-
ing the fall season and he’s
not due back here in Janu-
ary, so everything he did was
on his own.

“It’s just a matter of get-
ting him back in shape.”

Rolle said they will be
grooming Rolle for a shot at
winning the NCAA Outdoor
title.

can do it, once I’m healthy,”



‘Choo Choo’ on track -
to defend his title



@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter —



AFTER going through a near per-
fect season last year, Jermaine
‘Choo Choo’ Mackey said he’s
excited about kicking off the 2007
season.

He will open the year on Friday,
February 2 at Nirvana Beach when
he defends his World Boxing Coun-
cil’s CABOFE (Caribbean Boxing
Federation Championship) super
middleweight title against Anibal
Acevedo from Puerto Rico.

Details of the fight, scheduled as
the main event on the First Class
Promotions show were released by
promoter Michelle Minus yester-
day.

“I’m excited about it and I’m in
great shape. I’m just waiting on the
opportunity,” stressed Mackey, who
will take on Acevedo, who comes
to town with a 14-4-1 win-loss-draw
record.

Last year, Mackey reeled off four
straight victories before he travelled
to Canada and lost the first fight in
his pro career. But he came back
home and bounced back to close
out the year with a victory at Nir-
vana at the beginning of December
to push his record to 12-1.

“Tt’s just about getting in condi-
tioning and getting better,” Mackey
projected. “I just want to go out
there and defend my title that I
fought so hard for.”

As for fighting against an oppo-
nent with a reputation of being a
great fighter, Mackey said, “Every
fighter has two hands. Although
they are born into boxing, I was
boxing since I was 11-12, so I’m just
going into the ring and we will see
who’s the better boxer.”

In the co-main event, Wilson ‘Kid
Wonder’ Theophile (5-2-1) will take
on another Puerto Rican in Joseph
Delos Santos, who is 2-1-0, in a six-
rounder.

Also on the undercard, Alphacino
‘Banger’ Allen (2-0) will face Ricar-
do ‘One Shot’ Bethel (2-4); Antho-
ny ‘Psycho’ Woods (4-4) battles
Hensley ‘Bruiser’ Strachan (2-0)
and Shimon ‘Too Sweet’ Bain (3-
0) goes up against another Puerto
Rican, yet to be named.

All three fights are scheduled for
four rounds.

Minus said they want to start the
year off with a bang and they could-
n’t find a better way to do it than
having Mackey defend his title in
the mandatory six-month period.

“We also have on our shows for
April, which is the FEDECaribe
lightweight title also,” she said
about Meacher ‘Pain’ Major’s title
defence, “So we want to make sure
that these fighters get to defend
their title and hopefully get them-
selves set up for a possible British
Commonwealth title shot.”

Minus, who along with her hus-
band Ray Minus Jr., has put togeth-
er a solid programme where they
have hosted a series of professional
shows, said they are looking for-
ward to making this an exciting
card.

“Wilson Theophile is back on
track and so we want to give him
an opportunity to prove himself
because he gets the opportunity to
fight for one of the local titles,” she
stated.

As early as next week, Minus said
they intend to beef up their promo-
tions and they are urging the public
to contact their office opposite
Whim Automotive Limited on
Wulff Road to get their tickets.

@ JERMAINE ‘CHOO CHOO’ MACKEY

AR eee edna



TRIBUNE SPORTS








SS

@ AUS



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 9B

Wao



SS SS _

TRALIAN wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist, left, captain Ricky Ponting second right, and Matthew Hayden right run to teammate Shane Warne top after they dismissed Engalnd captain Andrew

Flintoff center, on the third day of the fifth and final Ashes cricket test in Sydney, Thursday, Jan. 4, 2007.

Warne

(AP Photo/Mark Baker)

puts Australia on

course for series sweep

mm CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press



KEVIN PIETERSEN
remains the only recognized
batsmen standing between
Australia and an historic 5-0
‘Ashes sweep after another
vintage Shane Warne perfor-
mance against England.

Warné top scored with 71

- - in Australia's first innings 393

in his farewell test, helping the
hosts to a 102-run first-innings
lead, then dismissed England
captain Andrew Flintoff after
Brett Lee and Stuart Clark
picked off batsmen Nos. 1-4.

At stumps on day three of
the fifth test, England was
reeling at 114 for five with
Pietersen on 29 and night
watchman Monty Panesar on
zero.

The English had a 12-run
Jead with only tailend bats-
men to come and two days to
play.

Warne gave the impression’

the Australians would like to
take the last five wickets early
and have the match wrapped
up by lunch on the fourth day.

"If we can get out there and
win tomorrow and go 5-nil up
and whitewash the series, then
that is a fantastic achievement
by a wonderful cricket side,"
-the 37-year-old legspinner
“said.

Flintoff, whose 89 in Eng-
land's first innings 291 was his
highest score in 15 tests, was
out 10 balls before stumps

Thursday, stumped by Adam

"Gilchrist on the decision of a
TV umpire.

‘He had gone to the crease
with England at 98 for four,
still needing four runs to make
Australia bat again, and was
one of the tourists last chances

- of avoiding the first sweep of a

five-test Ashes series in 86
years.

Lee did the early damage;
dismissing Alastair Cook (4)
with the total at five and
felling Andrew Strauss with a
ball that smashed into the side
of his helmet in the same over.

He also remove Ian Bell
(28), needlessly slashing out-
side off stump, to make the
total 64 for three.

Stuart Clark struck in
between Lee's wickets, trap-
ping Strauss lbw for 24, and
then having Paul Collingwood
(17) caught by Matthew Hay-
den, diving in the gully.

Warne clouted nine bound-
aries and two sixes in a typi-
cally attacking tailend dig.

"To middle a few and knock
a couple over the fence was
good," he said.

Australia resumed the third
day at 188 for four and
advanced to 260 for six, still
31 runs behind, when Warne
went in at No. 8.

He shared a 58-run seventh-
wicket partnership with
Gilchrist (62) and a 68-run
ninth-wicket partnership with
Clark (35) before he stepped
down the wicket trying to hit
Monty Panesar out of the
ground again and was
stumped.

Warne, who has a highest
test score of 99, abandoned
hope of reaching his maiden
test hundred in his 145th and
last match when Clark skied
Sajid Mahmood to Pietersen
at extra cover.

He was out next over, leav-
ing fellow test retiree Glenn
McGrath unbeaten on 0.

Gilchrist had ensured Aus-
tralia took a first-innings lead
before being given out caught
behind for 62 to a ball he did-
n't touch,

He shared a 70-run sixth-
wicket stand with Andrew
Symonds (48) before combin-
ing with Warne to keep the
runs flowing from the Aus-
tralian middle order.

Gilchrist's dismissal gave
James Anderson his third
wicket of the innings — more
than he had in the rest of the
series.

Anderson, replacing injured
paceman Matthew Hoggard,
returned 3-98 from 26 overs,
while Steve Harmison had 2-
80 and Panesar returned 2-90
from 19.3 overs.

Unlike the England tail in
the first innings, which crum-
bled for 33, Australia's last
five wickets added 133 runs.

Anderson said the English
lower order needed to follow
Australia's lead on Friday.

"Obviously we need to put

up a good fight. We need to
battle hard and have our tail
wag like theirs did." he said.
"If Kevin stays there for a
while then hopefully we can
get a reasonable total and
have something to bowl at.
There's always hope."

Panesar bowled Symonds to
bring Warne to the crease.
And Warne, who along with
McGrath and opener Justin
Langer is retiring from test
cricket after the Ashes, got off
the mark with a swept bound-
ary and a massive pull over
mid-wicket for six.

He survived a caught
behind decision against Pane-
sar on the last ball of that over
when the ball appeared to
brush Warne's glove on the
way through to the ‘keeper,

Gilchrist was less fortunate.
He chased a wide delivery
from Anderson, his bat hit the
pitch and Chris Read took the
ball. England appealed and
umpire Billy Bowden took his
time before giving Gilchrist
out, the decision greeted with
a loud and sustained boos
from the crowd.

@ AUSTRALIAN play
Adam Gilchrist, right, and
Shane Warne celebrate the
dismissal of England's
captain Andrew Flintoff
on the third day of the fifth
and final Ashes cricket

test in Sydney, Thursday,
Jan. 4, 2007,

(AP Photo/Mark Baker)



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FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

m@ MARK KNOWLES

MTENNIS..
KNOWLES/NESTOR
OUSTED

- AFTER reeling off two
victories at the Qatar
ExxonMobile Open, Mark
‘Knowles and his Canadian
partner Daniel Nestor. —
were eliminated yesterday.
in Doha, Qatar.

Knowles and Nestor,
seeded number two in the

. tournament, lost 7-5, 6-7,
10-2 to the No.3 team of
Martin Damm of the
Czech Republic and Lean-
der Paes of India.

’ Knowles and Nestor
won their first match in
scores of 6-4, 6-4 over.
Julian Knowle and Jurgen
Melzer from Australia
before they busted Sebas-
tian Grosjean and Gael
Monfils from France 6-3,
6-0.

It was the first tourna-
ment for the year for
Knowles and Nestor, who
finished last year as the
fourth ranked team in the
WOT, ase!

They are scheduled to

- travel to Sydney, Aus-

_tralia next week to play in
their next tournament
before they go to the Aus-
tralian Open - the first .
Grand Slam - starting on
January 15.

@ FOOTBALL
-CAFL MATCHES

THE Steering Commit-
tee of the Commonwealth
American Football |
‘League has announced: °.
that they will resume
- their football season this
‘weekend at the DW Davis
playing field. Bitar

On Saturday at 1pm, the
Nassau Sunburners will —
take on the John Bull
Jets. Both teams have yet
to win their first game.

On Sunday at 1pm, it
will be the battle of the
undefeated as the Orry J.
Sands Pros will take on
.the new kids on the block,
the Stingrays. Veteran
Edny Pickstock will be on
the. Pros line against.two
of his nephews playing for

the Stingrays.

@ CYCLING
BCF SEASON
“OPENER.

THE Bahamas Amateur
Cycling Federation will
kick off its 2007 calendar
of events.on Saturday,
January 20 with the first
of two pre-season road
races, organised by Jeff’s
Auto. The second race
will take place on Satur-
day, January 27.



st



E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
KENTONYA Miller was a one-

+ » woman wrecking crew as she led the

Kingsway Academy Saints to a 38-8
rout over the hapless St. Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines.

The quick wheeling-dealing south-
paw point guard lit up the nets for a
game high 24 points as the Saints
marched past the Big Red Machines
in their Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools’ senior

‘girls basketball game yesterday at
‘SAC.

And what Miller didn’t do, centre
Michaela Levarity made up for in the
middle as she contributed eight points
to keep Kingsway Academy unde-
feated at 5-0. Diandra Ferguson
chipped in with four and Paige Hanna
added two.

Saints’ coach Juliet Douglas-Sands
said they were confident coming into
the game that they would win and her
team played up to their potential.

“They had it from BA (Bahamas

a Academy) game and they said they

want to win the championship and »

they came out here and played like a
championship team,” Douglas-Sands
reflected.

Kingsway Academy were all over.
St. Augustine’s College from the start
‘to the finish. In fact, the Saints out-

played the Big Red Machines in every

facet of the game.

The Saints even out-hussled the Big
Red Machines for the loose balls and
they ran the fast-break effectively with
Miller almost unstoppable as she led

@ KINGSWAY Academy Saints’ centre Michaela Levarity goes up for a

lay-up against the St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machines. Levarity scored
eight points in the Saints’ 38-8 win over the Big Red Machines yesterday at

SAC.

the charge.

Miller, in fact, was too quick to the
dribble as she scored Kingsway Acad-
emy’s first three baskets, all on fast-
breaks, as they opened a:6-0 lead.

Diandra Ferguson would hit a base-
line jumper that gave the Saints an
8-0 advantage at the end of the first

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

quarter as they held the Big Red
Machines scoreless,
Miller and Levarity would provide
a 1-2 punch for the Saints as they
marched to a comfortable 16-0 margin
in the second quarter before SAC
finally got on the scoreboard with a
jumper from Alicia Pickstock.

ued to pile up the points.










SAC, after blowit
opportunities to score, :
celebration mood, but it:
lived as Kingsway Academ



?





ahead 22-4 at the half. 2 ajax"
SAC would add another, et. to”
start the third on a jum
Royandra Nairn, but Kingsway Acad
emy reeled off two more, baskets
before the Big Red Machines got their
fourth basket fromlvanna Seymour
for.a 26-8 deficit. Wa ees
The Saints would, end /the: period
with a 2728 lead.) :\.)s9 SBR oe
While Kingsway Acadeniy contii-
ued to run the ball in the fourth, SAC
tried to slow them down by playing’a
little more aggressive, but it was teo
late. aN ya
The Saints would hold the Big Red
Machines scoreless in'the fourth as
they went on an 11-0 tear.to seal the
blowout. a a







SAC’s coach Marco Mullings said it
wasn’t the type of performance he
anticipated, especially SoHE off the
Christmas break. SARS Gy

“We're really not playing. Today,
we didn’t play with any energy,” sajd. >
Mullings, who watched his squad slip °
to 0-2. “We lost by one point in ott
first game. We really wanted to win
that game. \ *

“Today, coming off the Christmas . °.
break, we didn’t come out with ary >.
fire. It was like we didn’t want to pldy :
today. Granted, it’s virtually anew.
team with maybe two girls on the
team who played basketball before,
but we didn’t play today.” We 3S

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







f@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EXCESS liquidity in the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing system tightened by a fur-



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PHONE: (242) 356-5760

ther $3 million to just over $52
million in November 2006, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
revealed yesterday, confirm-
ing that this would “restrain
the strong level of domestic

credit growth over the past 18

months”.

The Central Bank, in its
update on economic develop-
ments in November, confirmed

_ what The Tribune has been

reporting for the past two
months on the liquidity crunch,
and its implications for credit,
consumer demand and wider
economic growth.

During the 2007 first half, at
least, the Bahamas is going to
be far more reliant on capital

WorKS By
ANTONIOUS ROomiekees
Max TV

PER
Posr Housr Srupio &
CHALLE RY
{id RX Ko OY EO De ba ed
Pur 327-7562



To All Valued Patients of

Dr. Richard E. Crawford’s Office
Located on Mackey Street, The Plaza
Please be advised that the office will Reopen

NN



Tuesday Jan. 2nd, 2007

With Yasmine Williams Robinson MBBS,
DRCOG, MRCGP Family Medicine Specialist
Tel: 242-393-3025/Fax: 242-393-8452 _





























and budget.





fax to (242) 677-4140

CahleBac



Resort 8

eaten at Gena mm

Crystal Palace Casino

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the
single largest resort investment in the history of The Bahamas. Baha Mar
owns and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino,
the Radisson Cable & Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position: :

FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

This individual will be responsible for ensuring excellence of food and beverage
services by overseeing all aspects of multi-unit food service, dining and catering
operations. The successful candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day food
and beverage operation, staffing and budget.

Top contenders for this position must possess the following:

* Organizational skills to set-up systems such as point of sale, position specific
check list and proper follow-up.

¢ Evolving new food and beverage concepts.

¢ Controls costs of all food and beverage outlets by overseeing all purchasing
of food beverage, supplies and equipment; estimating product and personnel .
levels; utilizing labour scheduling tool to adjust salary and hourly schedules
following demand patterns and occupancy levels, budget and local labour
laws; maintaining effective inventory and shortage controls; traking expenses
including payroll, supplies, maintenance and generating monthly inventory
and cost of sales reports as well as other reports requested by management and
works with the General Manager to develop an annual food and beverage plan

¢ Ensure a pleasant dining experience in all outlets by collaborating with the
Executive Chef in the creation of menus and menu pricing.

° Maximize food and beverage sales by identifying and targeting sales
opportunities through marketing including promotions and special events.

* Maintain customer satisfaction and employee productivity by handling

customer inquiries, concerns or comments and providing solutions, acquiring

feed back from customers and co-workers in order to ensure satisfaction

and/or implement service improvement ideas; developing new concepts

to ensure customer satisfaction and repeat business.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume to

the attention of Director of Human Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or

from foreign direct investment
inflows, salaries resulting from
these projects, and the peak
first quarter tourism season to
drive the economy.

November

During November, the Cen-
tral Bank found that while the
growth in private sector credit
for the months was 15 per cent
down on the previous year’s
comparative, standing at $60.9
million, total mortgage lend-
ing rose by 50 per cent to $33.4
million.

That will have been more
preferable to the Central Bank
than any increase in consumer
lending. Consumer credit,
which largely goes on expen-
sive luxuries such as cars, fell
by 12.8 per cent in November
to $18.6 million.

However, growth in total
Bahamian dollar credit “more
than doubled” in November to

‘$81.8 million, largely due to a

$23 million increase in the
Government’s net liabilities
owed to the commercial bank-
ing sector.

The slowdown in availability
of credit was evidenced by the
fact that excess liquid assets
declined only by $3 million,

compared to a $37.9 million

drop the year before. :

Excess cash reserves in the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing system rose by $15.8 mil-
lion during the month to $164.8
million, due to the rediscount-
ing and sale of various public
securities.

Total Bahamian dollar
deposits increased by $32.5
million in November, com-
ee to the previous year’s

7.2 million decline, driven by
a $13.2 million rise in demand
deposits and 28 per cent or
$25.1 million rise in savings
deposits.

For the year-to-November
2006, the Central Bank record-
ed that higher oil costs and





increased credit demand saw
excess reserves in the banking

sector fall by $30.6 million, |

three times more than the pre-
vious year.

Excess liquidity contracted

by 40 per cent more at $60.2
million. External reserves fell
at a rate three times’ higher
than in 2005, dropping by
$134.4 million, while the rise
in oil payments saw the Cen-
tral Bank’s net foreign curren-
cy sales to the public sector rise
by 62 per cent to $201.1 mil-

lion. ’
Dollar

Bahamian dollar credit
growth in the first 11 months of
2006 rose by 52 per cent to
$694.6 million, with private sec-
tor credit ahead by 40.3 per
cent to $646.5 million.

Consumer loan growth rose
by $212 million, and for mort-
gages it was up to $308.6 mil-
lion.



The Central Bank said the
economic outlook for 2007

“remains broadly positive” due _

to foreign direct investment
projects in the tourism indus-
try, which were expected to
stimulate employment, the
construction industry and pri-
vate sector demand.

Apart from bank liquidity,
the downside risks included oil
prices and a US economic
downturn.

Consumer price inflation
dropped to 1.74 per cent in
November, compared to 2.01
per cent the previous year.

For the year to October,
total visitor arrivals were down
by 4.7 per cent, a 7 per cent
decline in sea arrivals eclips-
ing a slight 0.5 per cent rise in
higher spending air arrivals.

Tourists to New Providence
fell by 6.7 per cent, while traf-
fic to Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands fell by 1.2 per
cent and 1.8 per cent respec-
tively.



COMMONWEALTH Bank
yesterday said it had achieved
the “most significant financial
milestone in its history”, pass-
ing the $1 billion mark in total
assets.

“We are extremely proud to
report that as of December 20,
2006, Commonwealth Bank
has surpassed $1 billion in total
assets, a milestone that is
momentous by any standard,”
said T. B. Donaldson, Com-
monwealth Bank’s chairman.

“This achievement becomes
even more significant when
you look at the brief history of



Bank passes $1bn mark in total assets

Achievement ‘most significant financial milestone in its history’

the bank, It was only in 1984
that Commonwealth Bank, as
we know it today, was created
out of what had been a Cana-
dian-owned bank that itself
had grown out of a small
finance company.”

Commonwealth Bank
opened with $17 million in
assets, starting off by offering
working Bahamians the oppor-
tunity to, improve their stan-
dard of lighg through con-
sumer loans for everything
from vehicles to vacations,
medical expenses and higher
education.

In 2000, some 40 years after
the original finance company
made its first loan, the Com-
monwealth Bank went public
in an initial public offering
(IPO) that attracted more than
7,000 shareholders.

The bank now has nine
branches in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco



@ TB DONALDSON
(FILE photo)
plus a credit card centre, Share

value has more than doubled
in the six years since it went

50: : ’
iS u ra si

ON
for
Seat

4 Al
md
¢ aC ‘

public, from $6 per share im
2000 to $12.51 on today’s BISX
listing.

In 2006, it also launched a
$10 million loan fund to sup-
port small business, and has:
paid an extraordinary dividend:
every year since 2000.

“From the beginning, Com-
monwealth Bank’s belief in the
Bahamian people and in the

_8trength.and durability of the.
Bahamian economy has served)...
- as the foundation on which our

growth has been built,” Mr
Donaldson said. :

“We believe the success; we
have enjoyed and the mile-
stones we have reached along
the way are testament to the
confidence the Bahamian. pub-
lic has placed in Common-
wealth Bank. We could not
have recorded these achieve-
ments without the constant
support of our dedicated staff
and loyal customers.”



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WEATHER



The Tribune



#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



Volume: 103 No.37

Bahamas delays
UTE eT er a

Claims of wrongful
arrest and
imprisonment

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS

VICTIMS of the Sea Hauler
tragedy plan to file a writ to
sue the Royal Bahamas Police
Force for wrongful arrest and
imprisonment as early as

_ today or by Monday at the lat-

est, according to victims’
spokesman, Lincoln Bain.

Mr Bain claimed the police
broke numerous aspects of
arrest protocol when they
took protesters, who had
handcuffed themselves to the
front gate of Prime Minister
Perry Christie’s residence, into
custody.

“We plan on suing the
police force for unlawful
arrest,” said Mr Bain. “It was
clear that these person’s rights
were Violated.”

According to Mr Bain, he
and the victims were never
read their Miranda rights and
were never made aware of the
charges for which they were
being held. .

“The problem could not
have been loitering because
with loitering, according to
what they taught me in the
police force, you have to warn
the person,” he said.

Mr Bain said he had been
in the police force for 10 years
and had never seen an arrest
carried out the way it was car-
ried out that day.

“You have to first question
them to see why they are there
and if they are not there for
any good reason and you sus-
pect they will commit a crime



you warn them and if the
police officer leaves and
comes back then they can
attempt to charge them with
loitering,” he said.

“With trespassing you also

_ have to warn the person that

2

they are on private property
and the owner wants you be
removed.”

Mr Bain said officers sim-
ply cut the seven protesters
away from the Prime Minis-
ter’s gate and informed them
that they were to be taken
down to the station where
they would be dealt with.

“They just took us out of
the handcuffs, those who were
handcuffed, and at that point
they could have asked us to
leave the area, but they chose
to not say anything,” said Mr
Bain.

“They just threw us in the
vehicles; took us to the sta-
tion; searched us; took our

property and threw us in the .

cell — that doesn't work in
the western hemisphere,” said
Mr Bain.

According to police officials
the group was never formally
charged for the incident. They
were only held for question-
ing. And according to earlier
accounts by Mr Bain the Offi-
cer in charge of the station
where the group was held
apologized for locking them
in cells and allowed them to
spend their remaining time in
the precinct’s lounge.

- SEE page nine:







FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

@ PASSERS-BY became alarmed
yesterday after it was discovered that
the Gambier Clinic was closed to the

public.

A Tribune staff photographer took
a picture of the western district clinic
with its gates locked and chained

around 3pm.

An official at the Ministry of Health
told The Tribune the closure was due
to the fact that nurses were making
home visits in the community.

The official said that normally the
nurses would put up a sign to notify the
public, but they had forgotten to do

so this time.

The official said the nurses were
reminded not to forget the notice
because the public needs to be aware

of the clinic’s closing.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



FBI assist police
in investigation —
of rape of girl —

on cruise ship

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporte

7

AGENTS from the Federal
Bureau of Investigation are
assisting local police with their
investigation of the rape of a
13-year-old Canadian girl
onboard the Disney Wonder
cruise ship.

Assistant Police Commis-

‘sioner Reginald Ferguson said

a 2\-year-old New York man is
being held in connection with
the matter.

The reported assault
occurred on January 1. When
the victim’s family alerted
security on the cruiseline, the
vessel was advised, at the
request of FBI officials, to
dock in New Providence the
following day.

The cruiseline reportedly
issued a statement advising
that they are co-operating with
the investigation of the mat-
ter, stating that “the safety and
security” of their guests are a
“top priority”.

Mr Ferguson said: “We had
a complaint made to us on
Tuesday that a 13-year-old
female was sexually molested

SEE page nine

Three of five NFS

bageage handlers

appear in Miami
federal court

& By PAUL TURNQUEST

THREE of the five baggage
handlers from Nassau Flight Ser-
vices had their first arraignment
in a Miami federal court yester-
day. j

The men were all charged with
possession with intent to distrib-
ule cocaine, and issued an order
of detention as they were con-
sidered a flight risk. Therefore, as
outlined by a US attorney, the
men will not be eligible for bail.

According to the US District
Court docket, USA v. Bain et all,
filed on December 19, 2006,
Lester Bain, 29, Delvino Rigby,
26, and Marcus Rolle, 22, were
seen before magistrate Judge
Ted E Bandstra.

Bain is represented by Mr
Michael David Spivack of the
Federal Public Defender’s
Office, Rigby was represented
by Michael Gary Smith, and
Rolle was represented by Rod-
erick Darrell Vereen of Brink-
ley Henrys and Lewis.

Representing the United
States was Alejandro Oscar Soto
of the US Attorney’s Office.

Calls for comments on how
the proceedings went to either
ol the three men’s attorneys were
not returned up to press time.

linic closed to public

PRICE — 75¢

Thai
Veta Te

:
33
ic
|
Ny

Court of Appeal
‘could have large’

backlog of cases
if judges not
appointed soon’

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE backlog of cases at
the Court of Appeal may
again reach the immense vol-
ume seen in the past if new
judges are not appointed
soon.

This concern was
expressed by president of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer at the opening of the
legal year 2007 on Wednes-
day.

Dame Joan said if no
changes are made at the
Court of Appeal, then all the
work done by her and her fel-
low justices to dispose of the
large number of pending cas-
es will have been for noth-
ing.

Speaking at the special sit-
ting of the Court of Appeal,
Dame Joan. said that
although there are only six
unheard cases in her court —
“which for good and suffi-
cient reason one or all jus-

SEE page nine





Lawyer claims

judiciary in
Crisis Over
judges’ pay

THE Judiciary up to the
level of the Supreme Court is
in a state of crisis due to the
issue of judges’ pay, well-
known lawyer Geoffrey
“Pro” Pinder said yesterday
on Love 97's talk show Issues
of the Day.

When asked why the law
lords sitting in the Bahamas
had not commented on the
“judicial crisis” in the
Bahamas while they were
here, Mr Pinder said that per-
sons visiting were not going
to see the cracks in the sys-
tem.

“But those persons who
have been here, such as
Dame Joan Sawyer, such as
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
such as Justice Lyons, they
can see the cracks but they
soldier on and they give us
service, it’s as if they are
priests who are judges,” he
said,

Speaking at the opening of
the legal year yesterday, Bar
Association president Wayne
Munroe focused on the

SEE page nine



|





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a Ea eee

| NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000






In Voluntary Liquidation




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), BELL VENTURES LIMITED, is in dissolution.

Continental Liquidators Inc. of 60 Market Square, Belize City, Belize






All persons having claims against the above-named
company are reqired to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
February 3, 2007.



For: Continental Liquidatoss, Inc.
Liquidator :

US factory orders post
smaller-than-expected

increase in November

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer



WASHINGTON (AP) —
Orders to United States factories
posted a smaller-than-expected
increase in November as demand
for autos, machinery and steel all
posted declines, reflecting the slow-
down that has hit the manufactur-
ing sector.

Scotiabank’

VACANCY

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of :

Job 1: A Senior Analyst

assist in hedge fund analysis for hedge fund incubator and fund of

fund financing businesses

assist in investment analysis of structured credit, asset-backed, fixed
income, and derivative products for investment advisory business |
development and ongoing maintenance of asset/credit reporting and

monitoring systems

liaising with head office analytical and support groups + external parties
preparation of reporting/MIS documentation for internal and external

parties

ensuring compliance with local and head office regulatory policies and

guidelines

assist in business case writings, other reports/requests

Skills: strong analytical experience and ability (credit/equities/funds/structured
products), good understanding of fundamental and technical features of debt,
equity, and alternative asset classes (and their derivatives), familiarity with
the Bank's internal systems and processes, self-starter, ability to work in a

smaller environment

Job 2: A Bookrunner

° responsible for deal input and ongoing monitoring of positions held in:
SCTL, including hedge fund financing, hedge fund investment, credit

derivatives and other related products

responsible for the risk management and hedging of SCTL positions
responsible for the development of risk management systems and reports

to properly control and monitor exposures

responsible for the funding of exposures in an efficient manner
must be able to liaise effectively with SC trading and structuring

personnel in other locations

Skills: strong attention to detail, good product knowledge of debt, equity,
alternative assets and their derivatives, strong familiarity with the Bank's
dealing and risk management systems, experience managing funding and

liquidity.

Interested persons should submit applications in writing marked Private and

Confidential to:

Manager, Caribbean Treasury Limited

P. O. Box N-7518

Nassau, Bahamas

Applications should be received no later than Monday, January 15, 2007.

— ) FID

Pricing Information As Of:

ee
52wk-Low Securit

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste |

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.05
- 1.64
9.00
4.12
2.20
5.54
10.70
10.88
10.00
0.50
7.15
8.52
1000. 10.00
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.54 0.20 RND Holding
143.00 28.00 ABDAB
14.50
0.60
we
52wk-Hi
1.3216
3.0017
2.4723
1.2074
11.2596

14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings
52wk-Low
1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.2982 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1442 Colina Bond Fund
io 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
ony oy oy pipe oe i
EE m
SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



A Vv
1.321587*
2.9449***
2.472341**
1.207411****





LT
LES NBS



jn ag

Last Price

Last 12 Months

ided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

_The Commerce Department
reported that orders for manufac-
tured goods rose by 0.9 per cent,
only a slight rebound after a sharp
4.5 per cent drop in October. Ana-
lysts had been expecting a stronger
1.4 per cent increase.

The November performance
provided evidence that the slow-
ing economy is beginning to have
an impact on manufacturers, with
auto plants and sectors supplying
the slumping housing industry
among some of the hardest hit.

A separate report showed that
service industries, where most
Americans work, were also expe-
riencing the impact of the economic
slowdown. A closely watched
gauge of nonmanufacturing activi-
ty compiled by the Institute for
Supply Managemement edged
down slightly to a reading of 57.1 in
December compared to 58.9 in
November.

The 0.9 per cent increase in
demand for manufactured goods
pushed total orders to $394.3 bil-
lion. It reflected a 1.6 per cent rise
in demand for durable goods,
slightly below an initial estimate of
1.9 per cent, and an unchanged
reading for nondurable goods.
With the economy slowing'sharply
this year, orders have been down
three of the past five months.

Meanwhile, the nation’s big
retailers reported that the holiday
shopping season turned out to be
worse than expected with retailers
in all categories reporting disap-
pointing results for December.

After a rousing start right after
Thanksgiving, many stores strug-
gled during December as warmer-

fell below expectations were Lim-

than-usual weather depressed sales
for winter clothing.

Analysts said the sales results
were also depressed by the shift to
purchasing gift cards, which are not
counted as sales until they are
redeemed.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. reported a
better-than-expected 1.6 per cent
increase in December at stores
open at least a year, but the gain
followed’ a decline of 0.1 percent
in same-store sales in November,
the first drop in a decade.

Among the retailers whose sales

had been expecting although some
said they believed the rise was
heavily influenced by problems the

seasonal changes around holidays.

Employers have been reluctant
to lay off existing workers although
they have trimmed plans to hire
new workers in the face of the seri-
ous housing slump that has

growth.
unemployment report is released

less rate remained stable at 4.5 per
cent in December as businesses cre-
ated 110,000 new jobs. That would
be down from 132,000 jobs added
in November.

The economy slowed to a lack-
luster growth rate of just two per
cent in the summer as a steep slide
in housing construction trimmed
1.2 percentage points from growth.

ited Brands and Bebe Stores Inc.

In other economic news, the
number of laid-off workers filing
claims for unemployment benefits
shot up to 329,000 last week, a gain
of 10,000 from the previous week
and the largest total since late
November.

The strength in orders in
November was led by a 43.6 per
cent surge in demand for military
aircraft. Orders for commercial air-
planes rose a smaller 0.8 per cent
while-orders for motor vehicles fell
by 2.4 per cent, reflecting a contin-
ued sales slump as consumers turn
away from the once-hot gas guz-
zling sport utility vehicles.

- Industries tied to the slumping
housing market also showed weak-
ness with furniture orders falling
by 3.3 per cent while demand for
household appliances dropped by
7.8 per cent.

The total number of jobless
claims was the largest since 358,000
claims were filed the week of
November 25 and the advance was
well above the increase analysts

tracted a similar amount from
growth in the final three months
of this year and wiil continue to
depress activity through the middle
of 2007.

However; analysts say there is a’
slim chance of a recession as a
result of the problems in housing
and manufacturing.

slowdown will cause the jobless
rate to rise to around five per cent
this year but think economic activ-
ity will pick up in the second half of
2007.

Coca-Cola attempts to block defense lawyer's
request for documents in trade secrets theft case

m@ By HARRY WEBER
AP Business Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — The
Coca-Cola Co. sought Wednes-
day to block a defense lawyer’s
request for documents in a trade
secrets theft case that relate to
products the world’s largest bev-
erage maker developed but nev-
er launched.

The Atlanta-based company
filed a motion in federal court
to quash a subpoena by Joya
Williams’ lawyer for the docu-
ments in preparation for
Williams’ Jan. 16 trial. Williams
is charged with conspiring to
steal trade secrets from Coca-
Cola in an effort to sell them to
rival Pepsi.

Two co-defendants have
already pleaded guilty in the
case, and at least one is expected
to testify against Williams, a for-
mer Coca-Cola secretary who
worked for the company’s glob-
al brand director at its head-
quarters.

According to the motion,
Williams’ lawyer, Janice Singer,
has subpoenaed 19 categories of
records from Coca-Cola:

The company is objecting to
production of two of the cate-
gories: documents reflecting all
products Coca-Cola developed

NAV KEY.
* - 29 December 2006
** - 30 November 2006
*** - 30 November 2006

**** - 30 November 2006





strategies, the unused products
and strategies still very much
constitute trade secrets,” Cowen
wrote. ies :
Singer did not immediately
return a call to her office
Wednesday seeking comment.
Williams, Edmund Duhaney_
and Ibrahim Dimson were
indicted July 11 on federal con-
spiracy charges. The three were
accused of stealing new product
samples and confidential docu-
ments from Coca-Cola and try-
ing to sell them to Purchase,
N.Y.-based PepsiCo Inc.
The alleged plans were foiled
after Pepsi warned Coca-Cola.
Williams has since been fired
from her job at Coca-Cola. She
has pleaded not guilty.

or which were in development
which it decided not to launch
within the last three years, and
documents reflecting all mar-
keting strategies formulated by
or for Coca-Cola that were
termed confidential or secret but
were not used in the last three
years.

Company lawyer Stephen
Cowen said Singer’s request for
those categories of documents
amounts to a “fishing expedi-
tion” for material that is sensi-
tive and considered valuable
trade secret information.

“Although the company may
have determined in the recent
past not to launch certain prod-
ucts under development or not
to adopt certain marketing

NOTICE OF VACANCY

2nd chef for The Landing Restaurant, Harbour Island.
Applicant must have working knowledge of preparation of
“Sydney” cuisine with at least 5 years experience working in
Australian kitchens. Successful applicant will be able to devise
and prepare daily specials. Successful applicant will also be
fully responsible for the preparation of all desserts.

The Landing has 10 year reputation for its fine cuisine with
a distinctive Australian accent. Applicant must be adaptable,
friendly and professional.

All responses can be sent to:
The Landing
Chef Position
P.O. Box 190
Harbour Island
Bahamas
Fax: 242-333-2650
e-mail: thelanding@ coralwave.com



Progressive medical practice requires the services
of an accountant with the following qualifications:

1. CPA or BSc with a minimum of 5 years
experience.

2. Working knowledge of all Quickbooks modules,
3. Bahamian citizenship.

Please email response to

infol@gtbahamas.com

Analysts believe that when the

ers

government has for adjusting for ° :

depressed overall economic |

on Friday it will show that the job-

Analysts believe housing sub-.

In addition to the weakness in’. °
housing, auto manufacturers have’: ’
also been struggling to reduce a.’
high backlog of unsold vehicles. | ’

They also say they believe the °



THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 5B




jo

‘Nation’s retailers report tepid
sales gains for December

@ By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Business Writer



NEW YORK (AP) — An
already disappointing holiday
shopping season turned out to
be even worse than expected
for many of the nation’s retail-
ers, who Thursday reported
tepid sales gains for December.

The downbeat results came
from merchants in all retail cat-
egories, from Limited Brands
Inc. to jewellery chain Zale
Corp. But Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
posted better-than-expected
results for December following
a dismal November, but the dis-
counter’s overall holiday sea-
son was the worst on record,
analysts said.

Ken Perkins, president of
RetailMetrics LLC, a research
company in Swampscott, Mass.,
said retailers were forced to
mark down heavily to bring in
sales.

“Clearly, this was a promo-
tional Christmas,” he said.
“Consumers clearly waited until
the last minute.”

Such aggressive discounting

led a number of merchants.

including Zale, BJ’s Wholesale
Club Inc., Gap Inc. and
AnnTaylor Stores Corp. to cut
their profit outlooks.

After a solid start to the hol-
iday season, many stores strug-
gled with disappointing busi-
ness in December, and a shop-
ping surge in the days just
before and after Christmas was-
n’t strong enough to make up
for lost sales. Merchants tried
to stick to their previously
planned discounts, but at the
seaon’s end they resorted to big-
ger-than-anticipated cuts to pull
shoppers in.

Mild weather across much of
the country meant consumers
were in no hurry to buy cold
weather wear such as coats and
gloves, depressing sales at many
apparel stores. Declining gaso-
line prices and a steady job mar-
ket should have helped mer-
chants, but Perkins believes the
recent drop in home equity
loans —.a big source of buying
power over the past few years
— curtailed spending among
middle-income shoppers.

Sales results were also hurt
by two big shifts in the way con-
sumers are shopping: the
increasing popularity of gift
cards and robust online buying,
which is not included in same-
store results. Gift card sales are
only posted when they are
redeemed rather than bought,
helping to extend the holiday

season into January.
Wal-Mart, which warned ear-
lier in the season that its sales
gain from stores open at least a
year would be no better than
one per cent, posted a 1.6 per
cent for December. Retail
industry analysts polled by

- Thomson Financial expected 1

percent gain.

Sales from'stores open at
least a year, known as same-
store sales are sales; are consid-
ered the industry standard for
measuring a retailer’s health.

The results followed Wal-
Mart’s 0.1 per cent decline in
same-store sales in November,
its first monthly same-store sales
drop in a decade.

Last month’s sales figure was
the company’s weakest Decem-
ber performance since 2000
when Wal-Mart posted a 0.3
percent gain, according to
Thomson Financial. The slim
0.8 per cent increase for
November and December com-
bined was the worst since
Thomson Financial began track-
ing same-store sales data in
1995.

Wal-Mart has struggled with
a mix of problems, including the
fact that its lower-income cus-
tomers were hurt by soaring gas
prices. But the company’s lack-

luster sales have persisted even
as the cost of gas retreated —
partly because its attempt to
broaden its appeal to higher-
income shoppers was poorly
executed, particularly in appat-
el and home furnishings.

Wal-Mart reported Thursday
that it had a strong performance
in electronics and the grocery
business in December.

Rival discounter ‘Target Corp.
had a 4.1 per cent gain in same-
store sales, below the 4.5 per
cent estimate.

Wholesale

Costco Wholesale Corp. post-
ed a nine per cent gain in same-
store sales, beating Wall Street’s
5.7 per cent estimate. BJ’s
Wholesale had a 0.6 per cent
gain in same-store sales, less
than the 1.3 per cent estimate.

Among department stores,
Federated Department Stores
Inc., which acquired May
Department Stores Co. last
year, had a 4.4 per cent gain in
same-store sales, below the 5.5
per cent estimate from Wall
Street. The same-store results
include only the Macy’s and
Bloomingdale’s stores that
existed before September, when
the company transformed most

ASSOCIATION, from Page 1£B—_—<£€£-$-A-7AWNAAADD?J

_ of the former May Co: stores

to Macy’s units.

Terry Lundgren, Federated’s
chairman, president and CEO,
noted that that performance at
the converted May stores
improved in December.

“While December sales were
somewhat softer than expect-
ed, we overcame unseasonably
warm weather in most of the
country and ended the month
strong,” said Lundgren in a
statement.

J.C. Penney Co. Inc. had a

2.6 per cent gain in same-store

sales at its department stores,
slightly better than the 2.4 per
cent estimate. While it said cer-
tain apparel areas were hurt by
unseasonably warm weather,
Penney said it was pleased with
its overall holiday sales perfor-
mance.

Penney’s Internet sales rose

15.2 per cent in December, on
top of a 26 per cent gain in the
year-ago period.

Kohl’s Corp. had a 3.0 per
cent gain in same-store sales,
better than the 0.7 per cent
decline analysts had expected.
The company said the month
was saved by last-minute shop-
ping before Christmas and gift
card redemptions in the last
week of December.

LNG, from 1B

Nordstrom Inc. reported i
robust. nine per cent gain in
same-store sales, exceeding th
4.3 per cent Wall Street est:
mate.

Pier 1 Imports Inc. suffered «
10.7 per cent drop in same-sto)
sales, worse than the 9.4 pe:
cent analysts anticipated.

Zale, which did not break oui
December same-store sales fig
ures, reported a same-stor
sales increase of 2.3 per cent for
November and December. Bu!
it said profil margins wel
below expectations due to mo:
aggressive price cutting.
~ Limited Brands had a fou
per cent gain, well below th:
9.3 per cent Wall Street expec:
ed.

Gap, which has long bees
struggling with its merchandis
ing formula, suffered an eight
per cent drop in same-store .
sales, worse than the five pei
cent estimate. As a result, th:
company said it was slashing it.
annual profit outlook. _

AnnTaylor posted a 5.3 per
cent decline in same-store sales;
analysts predicted a 0.6 per cent
gain. Among teen retailers
Pacific Sunwear of California
Inc. had a 3.2 percent dip in
December, worse than the 2.
percent forecast.



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written and demanded we pay security of
$100,000 for the costs of the appeal.

“This is a non-profit, grassroots associa-
tion. Once again, they are trying to use
their financial might to try and crush local
opposition.” :

Discovery Land Company, the San Fran-

cisco-based company behind the Guana.

Cay development, and its attorneys are like-
ly to say that the demand for the $100,000
security is a justified precaution, given that
the Association has allegedly failed to pay
$10,000 in costs previously ordered by the
Court of Appeal.

A letter to Mr Smith, from Randol














THE FOLLOWING......

« COOKS











WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY

JANUARY 3RD 2007
JANUARY 4TH 2007
JANUARY 5TH 2007

Dorsett, an associate at Graham, Thompson
& Co, said the Association had not paid
the $10,000 despite being served with a
statutory demand to do so in July 2006.

He added that the sum was intended to
compensate Discovery Land Company for
the costs of an appeal that lasted half a day.

“The present appeal is a substantive one,
estimated to occupy the better of five days
(the hearing the court below lasted four-
and-a-half days, and will consist of a review
of all the voluminous material that was
before the learned trial judge,” Mr Dorsett
wrote.

He added that Discovery Land Company

Nb

SBARRO THE ITALIAN EATERY IS EXPANDING THEIR
OPERATIONS ONTO THE CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF
THE BAHAMAS AND WE NEED THE EXPERTISE OF ALL OF

¢ SHIFT MANAGERS

« KITCHEN PREP

« PIZZA MAKERS

¢ CASHIERS

« FOOD SERVERS

¢ UTILITY WORKERS

PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA SITE (JUST OF
TUCKER ROAD) ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DAYS AND
TIME FOR AN INTERVIEW.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS

10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.

would have to use at least two attorneys,
and said: “We therefore propose that the
appellants provide security in the sum of
$100,000, which would cover the prepara-
tory work needed for the hearing of the
appeal, and costs for counsel's appearance
before the Court of Appeal on the days
thereof.”

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said the Associa-
tion was “still strong and committed”. He
added: “The developers are dredging and
excavating as quickly as they can. They are
operating 24/7, it seems, in an attempt to get
as much done in this window of opportunt-
ty. But this is a 10-year project.”





is I

Bank of The Patanias | |

M I

PREFERRED |
DIVIDEND PAYME

The major benefits from the AES Ocean Express project are
likely to come from revenues paid by the company to the
Public Treasury..Apart from annual business licence fees and
sums paid to lease the sea bed and land on Ocean Cay, AES
Ocean Express would also pay a throughput fee linked to |
the Henry Hub natural gas index.

When the price of LNG pumped to Florida by AES exceeds .
the Henry Hub index, the Government would gain a per-
centage of the additional revenues. The Tribune understands

_ that last in 2005, this would have generated an extra $40-$50 |
million for the Government.

Such money, although unbudgeted, could be used to defray
the costs of unanticipated spending in other areas, such as _
BEC's fuel imports. : See's ‘





Ter Tt ie3r

a EB —D

Head Office

Claughton House
Charlotte & Shirley Streets
P.O. Box N-7118

Nassau, Bahamas




NT

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
LIMITED IS PLEASED TO
ANNOUNCE A DIVIDEND
PAYMENT TO ALL HOLDERS
OF CLASS A AND CLASS B
PREFERENCE SHARES AS OF
DECEMBER 31, 2006 PAYABLE
WITHIN TEN BUSINESS DAYS
OF THE RECORD DATE
THROUGH CFAL LTD.



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ee Sea eee ee
US service sector expanded at slower

rate in December than previous month

@ By CHRISTOPHER S
' RUGABER
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The
United States service sector
expanded at a slower rate in
December than in the previous
month, a trade group said Thurs-
day,-signaling a cooling of a criti-
cal;component of overall eco-









notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

‘The Public is hereby advised that |, PHILIP WILLIAMS
of Ridgeland Park West, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
‘change my name to ANTHONY N. RUSSELL. If there
f are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections te the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later
F than thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this



NOTICE

ae | NOTICE is hereby given that VASHTIE ELAINE HEPBURN
_ | OF #475 HAWAIl AVENUE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

’ BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

nomic growth.

The Tempe, Arizona-based
Institute for Supply Management
said that its index of business
activity in the service sector was
57.1 in December versus 58.9 in
November. Analysts were look-
ing for a reading of 57.

A reading above 50 indicates
expansion. December marked the
45th consecutive month of expan-


















Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

“I knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of
December, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

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sion in non-manufacturing indus-
tries.

The index was one of several
negative economic reports
released Thursday. US factories
posted a smaller-than-expected
increase in orders in November,
the Commerce Department said,
while the number of laid-off work-
ers filing claims for unemploy-
ment benefits shot up last week to
the highest level since late
November, according to the
Labor Department.

-The service industries covered
by the ISM report represent
approximately 80 per cent of the
nation’s economic activity, and
economists are looking for the
sector to act as the main driver of
growth in 2007, as the manufac-
turing sector struggles with weak-
ness in the automotive and hous-
ing industries.

“This is still a good, healthy
number,” said Peter Morici, a
University of Maryland econo-
mist.

The report, taken together with
the unexpected increase in manu-
facturing activity reported
Wednesday by the ISM, indicates
that the economy has “positioned
itself for a modest uptick in
growth in the first half of 2007,”
he said.

Both the backlog of orders and
new orders indexes fell. The new
orders index dropped to 54.4 in
December, down from 57.1 the
previous month. The backlog of
orders index dropped for the first
time since August, falling to 48
from 54.5,

The orders backlog index indi-

cates whether unfilled orders are
increasing or decreasing. Some
respondents to the ISM survey
cited “improved shipping” and
year-end efforts to clear backlogs
as a reason for the decline.

Jan Hatzius, an economist at
Goldman Sachs, downplayed the
drop in the backlog of orders. He
said it is likely due to seasonal
factors, such as warmer weather in
December that may have spurred
construction activity.

While healthy, the ISM services
index is down from the first half of
last year, when it regularly topped
60.

“Overall, services is still func-
tioning as a locomotive keeping
the economy going,” Brian
Bethune, an economist at con-
sulting firm Global Insight, said
Wednesday. “But it’s not going
to be as strong a locomotive as it
has been.”

One bright spot, Bethune said, .

is the travel and tourism indus-
try, which has been growing
steadily for the past five years
after being hit hard by the Sep-
tember 11 attacks and is now post-
ing record numbers.

“New York City had a record
number of tourists this year,” he
said.

New York City & Co., former-
ly the New York Convention &
Visitors Bureau, estimated that
37 million Americans had visited
New York City in 2006, up from
29.5 million in 2001, according to
the group’s Web site.

The shipping industry is also in
good shape, Gene Huang, chief
economist for express delivery

company FedEx Corp., said
Wednesday.

The ISM’s manufacturing
report, issued Wednesday, showed
an increase in new orders and a
reduction in manufacturers’ inven-
tory, which could lead to an
increase in shipments, he said.

The services employment
index, meanwhile, moved up to
53.3 from 51.6 last month, mark-
ing the 29th consecutive monthly
gain in non-manufacturing jobs.

The prices paid index jumped
to 59.1 in December from 55.6 in
November, the 57th consecutive
month that prices paid by non-

manufacturing companies for

materials and services increased.

Nine industries reported
growth: real estate, rental and
leasing; finance and insurance;

utilities; wholesale trade; accom-
modation and food services; edu-
cational services; information;
health care and social assistance;
and professional, scientific and
technical services.

Six industries reported con-
traction: mining; management of
companies and support services;
construction; transportation and
warehousing; public administra-
tion; and other services.

Stocks were mixed in late
morning trading. The Dow Jones
index dropped 12.26 to 12,462.26,
while the S&P 500 fell 0.94 to
1,415.69. The Nasdaq moved up
15.74 to 2,438.90.

The ISM is a trade association
representing approximately 40,000
supply management profession-
als.

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INGEST IEID EOWNPICHH_T247GM INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T15:03:59Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02785
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

US petition demands inquest

mith

into death of Daniel S

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie is to receive a 1,000-
name petition from Americans
demanding an inquest into
Daniel Smith’s death.

The petition has been raised
by a weblog group called “The
Mob”, who claim the Bahamas
government is trying, to conceal
the truth.

Copies of the petition will go
to Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson and the Cali-
fornian lawyer Debra Opri ina
bid to get answers about
Daniel’s mysterious demise at
Doctors Hospital last Septem-
ber.

One of the group’s leaders,
Patty from South Carolina, told
The Tribune yesterday: “It is
obvious something is going on
under the rug here. This is
becoming a cause among con-
cerned Americans because
something is just not right.”

The Attorney General has
repeatedly failed to set an
inquest date, claiming at one
point that she was still awaiting
information from the police.

However, the police told The
Tribune several weeks ago that
they had concluded their
inquiries and all papers had

been handed over.

Members of The Mob have
now concluded that the gov-
ernment’s reluctance to speak
up is the result of a desire to
keep the issue under wraps, pos-
sibly to protect certain people.

They also firmly believe that
Daniel had been murdered
when he was found dead by his
mother, reality show star Anna
Nicole Smith, on September 10
last year.

The Mob, with members all
over the States, is now analysing
every aspect of the Daniel
Smith affair in the hope that the
Bahamas government can be
embarrassed into action.

Patty said travel agents in
South Carolina had reported a
65 per cent drop in bookings to
the Bahamas because people
were concerned about legal
arrangements here.

“They feel it is another Aru-
ba,” she said, “where people
cannot get answers from the
legal authorities.”

The Mob have also expressed
concern over Anna Nicole’s
three-month-old baby daughter
Dannie Lynn Hope, who was
born three days before Daniel
died from a lethal cocktail of

drugs, including the heroin sub-
stitute methadone.

Patty said: “Our petition is
being certified by a notary
before we send it out. We
believe there is no way physi-
cally that Daniel could have
committed suicide.

“Daniel was a very sweet kid.
He nurtured his mother. We

have tried to call the Bahamas

attorney general and have also
e-mailed but have received no
reply.

“It seems the government
don’t want people to know and
are hoping it will go away.”

.Ms Smith is now at the centre
of litigation over ownership of
the Eastern Road house where
she lives and the paternity of
her child.

A Californian judge this week
ordered that she subject the
child toa DNA test by January
23 in response to a paternity
claim by photographer Larry
Birkhead.

Ms Smith’s lawyer-compan-
ion Howard K Stern has
claimed to be the father. He and
Ms Smith are being sued
through the Bahamas Supreme
Court by Mr Birkhead for
alleged slander and fraud.



@ ANNA Nicole Smith, right, leaves the US Supreme Court in
Washington with her son Daniel Smith in this February 28, 2006

photo

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

POPereereeeererrreeerrereeeereeeerererereerere eer eeeerere reer ee rere rreree rere tee rc reer er eer er eerie er eer eerie rere rere error ei ee reece eee eeeceereerercirerei rarer rererrerererrerereirirer cr rererrerercrcererrererrerererrererrerererrerer rere eerererrerecrertcecrecccec cece reretrer etter ertertteererirrettrtrt tre rrerer eter terete erat terete rere

Workers Party accuses government
of being guided by selfish ambition



- THE PLP government is
glued together by “the perks
and comforts of office and their
selfish ambitions”, it was
claimed yesterday.

The Workers Party called
poy Christie’s administration

a “bumbling, crumbling, stum-
bling, fumbling” government
which is forcing people to con-
sider the FNM as an alterna-
tive.

It said Mr Christie presided
over a team who shared his
“warped personal philosophy

that it is better to hang together

doing the. wrong thing” and
ignore the national conse-
quences of their actions.

The attack came in response
to government claims that it
knew nothing about the arrests
of five Nassau Flight Services

baggage handlers in the Unit-
ed States on drug smuggling
charges until after they hap-
pened.

The Workers Party says that -
regardless of the men’s guilt or
otherwise - they were entitled to
due process under Bahamian
law.

The party claims Foreign
Minister Fred Mitchell
“dropped the ball” in failing to

’ protect Bahamian sovereignty.

A statement said the govern-
ment had taken “a giant leap
backwards” by abetting US law
enforcement agencies in an
entrapment exercise.

It said this had desecrated the
nation’s sovereignty “and
viciously violates the very con-
stitution the Privy Council is
called on to defend and pro-

tect.”

The party said the PLP prac-
tised double standards because
supporters working for NFS had
been tipped off about the sting
operation by their political boss-
es.

The Bahamian people now
wanted to know if members of
government were so compro-
mised by US law enforcement
agencies that they could no
longer be counted on to safe-
guard people from unjustifiable
search, seizure and arrest, it
said.

“This country spent huge
amounts of money to accom-
modate the MILAT relation-
ship with the US which governs
how Bahamian citizens are sent
to stand trial in the US,” it says.

But these men had been fed

“on a silver platter” to a justice
system that terrorised, raped,
beat and killed detainees while
holding them in illegal jails and
detention centres.

The statement added: “The
Bahamian people condemn
drug trafficking and we support
swift justice and punishment for
all who are so involved and
found guilty by our courts or
any international court where
due process has been seen to
be done.

“But to kidnap Bahamian cit-
izens and offer them safe return
home to be with their families
during Christmas if they admit
to certain offences or implicate
other Bahamians is contrary to
all that is sacrosanct about the
justice system Bahamians are
used to,”

saneeeeaccnensccsaueesanseneusaneususaeeneasseeeensaseeaeneensseesssseessnseneeasssyaEGentenentanensHaensas Sse eBUHEGsESGnS eH HOLES OREHENGSENESEDSEF OSE OSEEEEGRHOS OH ERESE SESE OH ERS GH AREES SESH SENS RENE EES OSDNSEERESUESHSHEREED SRS SSONSED SEES AD SH SRPEREDEESEOS SSE DEDSEEREREEDSERESSEEEDEESEOSSERSEREOSSSEDEEDEDENSESERRADE SEES EE DEREERE EERE E DOOR OR EE

Wyclef Jean named a
‘roving ambassador’
for troubled Haiti

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

WYCLEF Jean has been
named a roving ambassador for
Haiti, the foreign minister
announced Thursday, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The 34-year-old hip-hop star
will promote development in
the country and represent Haiti
at various events abroad, said
Foreign Affairs Minister Rey-
nald Clerisme.

President Rene Preval chose
Jean for the honorary position
as a way to boost the image of
an impoverished country that

is struggling to restore stability
after a violent rebellion in 2004.
“We have so much to recover

from with our bad reputation.

With Wyclef, we can gain a lot,”
Clerisme said.

Jean, a Haitian citizen who
lives in the United States, was
not immediately available for
comment. His Yele Haiti foun-
dation promotes arts, educa-
tion and sports as a way to
bring jobs and development to
Haiti.

He grew up in poverty but
left Haiti for the US at age nine.
Jean later won fame with The
Fugees and as a solo performer.

So
Soe



@ HAITIAN-BORN hip-hop musician Wyclef Jean, dressed as Santa Claus, holds a little girl dur-
ing a gift distribution to about 600 hundreds kids sponsored by his foundation Yele Haiti in Port-
au-Prince in this Noveinber 29, 2006 photo



(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos, file)

&



Anna Nicole
ordered to
have test for
daughter

EMBATTLED US celebri-
ty Anna Nicole Smith has
been ordered by a judge to
have her daughter undergo
paternity testing by January
23,

Superior Court Judge
Robert Schnider has ruled in
favour of Ms Smith’s ex-
boyfriend, photographer Lar-
ry Birkhead, who in October
sued to get a paternity test.

Mr Birkhead claims that
he is the father of four-
month-old baby Dannielynn
Hope Marshall Stern, who
was born last September at
Doctors Hospital in Nassau.

Ms Smith’s lawyer at that
time contested the suit say-
ing the California court had
no jurisdiction over the mat-
ter as the baby was born in
Bahamas.

Meanwhile, US lawyer
Howard K Stern, the former
Playboy playmate’s partner,
maintains that he is the father
of the baby.

Jamaican
premier
_ pledges to
help Haiti

@ JAMAICA
Kingston

JAMAICAN Prime Min-
ister Portia Simpson Miller
told the visiting Haitian pres-
ident that her government is
committed to helping revive
Haiti’s economy, according
to Associated Press.

Simpson Miller made the
comments to Rene Preval
during private talks Wednes-
day in the capital of Kingston
as part of the Haitian lead-
er’s five-day visit, according
to a statement from the
Jamaican government.

Preval and a 10-member
delegation traveled to

Jamaica on Wednesdayin an’ ©

effort to boost ties between ©
the Caribbean neighbors.
Simpson Miller said
Jamaica and the rest of the
15-member Caribbean Com-
: munity will work to create a
? ¢sustainable democracy in
: Haiti while improving its edu-
cation, agriculture and
tourism sectors. She said
details of these programs
would be announced later.
During a news conference
at Jamaica House, the pre-
mier’s official residence,
Preval told reporters he did
not see ousted former Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide
playing a role in the redevel-
opment of the country _ the

poorest nation in the Western
Hemisphere.

Aristide fled. Haiti in Feb-
ruary 2004 amid a violent
uprising and has been living
in South Africa.











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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 3



Hundreds
evacuated
near volcano
in Montserrat

@ MONTSERRAT
Olveston

HUNDREDS of people liv-
ing at the base of Montserrat’s
Soufriere Hills volcano heeded
evacuation sirens Wednesday
as a lava dome grew to danger-
ous levels, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Scientists in the British

- Caribbean island say that the

- , dome could crumble and send

fast-moving pyroclastic flows —

blistering gas and volcanic

debris — down the slopes of the

volcano, potentially destroying

-- homes in the low-lying Belham
Valley.

“Residents in these areas are
advised not to panic and to start
preparations for moving to safe

- area,” Chief Minister Lowell
Lewis said after the first siren
sounded.

Management at the Vue
Pointe Hotel on the island’s
west coast helped guests relo-
cate.

“The hotel is full, but we are
busy making arrangements to
move our guests to other
accommodations in the far
north of the island,” manager
Amanda Osborne told Associ-
ated Press.

The volcanic dome had been
building rapidly and has topped
the highest part of the 920-
metre volcano, which coughs up
ash and bursts its lava cap every
_ few months.

Scientists at the Montserrat
Volcano Observatory said some
pyroclastic flows have already
been observed, but that they
are at a safe distance.

_ However, the observatory
warned that the pyroclastic flows
- could escalate significantly.

Governor
pardons
criminals on
, departure

@ US VIRGIN ISLANDS
Charlotte Amalie

MEN convicted of murder,
rape and the 1999 death of a
Georgia tourist were among
those pardoned by the US Vir-
gin Islands’ outgoing governor,
according to Associated Press.

Former Gov Charles Turn-
bull, a Democrat who left office
Morday after serving the max-
imum of two four-year terms,
quietly pardoned or commuted
the sentences of the criminal
offenders in one of his final acts
before he left the territory’s top
post.

The beneficiaries include four
murderers, six sexual offenders
and three armed robbers,
according to The Virgin Islands

“> Daily News. The list was made

~ public late Tuesday.

The new governor, Democ-
rat John deJongh, expressed
concern about Turnbull’s deci-
~ sion, spokesman Jean Greaux

said Wednesday.

- “He is alarmed to learn of the
number of pardons and com-
mutations,” Greaux said.
“There’s nothing he can do.”

Turnbull commuted the sen- .

tence of Robert Bastian, who
pleaded guilty to first-degree sex-
ual contact and kidnapping of a
15-year-old girl in 2002. His sen-
tence was reduced to time served,
according to the Daily News.
Another beneficiary was
Rashon Lewis, who was 15
when he raped a 19-year-old
British Virgin Islands woman
at gunpoint. Convicted to 25
years in prison in 1996, Lewis
was given another four years
after a 1997 escape attempt.

of things we
think, say or do

1.Is it the TRUTH?

2.|s it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?

4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?

www. rotary.



Pastor

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

NATIONALIST clergyman
Father Sebastian Campbell
says he supports the family of
Sir Randol Fawkes in their
effort to get national recogni-
tion for the acknowledged
father of the trade union
movement in the Bahamas.

Earlier this week, the
Fawkes family issued a state-
ment in which they expressed
dissatisfaction with govern-
ment’s “blatant neglect and
disregard” for the legacy of the
late labour leader.

According to the family,
many people have complained
to them that, even in death,
unfair treatment is being met-
ed out to the legacy of Sir Ran-

. dol.

“When reporting the history
of the nation, his name is inten-
tionally left out or passed over
in a great haste,” the family
said.

As one of the chief archi-
tects of majority rule, Sir Ran-
dol was instrumental in bring-
ing into existence the first
black government of the
Bahamas.

It is because of Sir Randol
that a bill was piloted through
the House of Assembly mak-
ing Labour Day a paid public
holiday.

In 1967 Sir Randol, as an
elected Labour Party MP, and
Alvin Braynen broke the dead-
lock between the United
Bahamian Party (UBP) and
the Progressive Liberal Party

(PLP) by throwing their votes
in with the PLP. .

On Tuesday, Father Camp-
bell, chairman of the National
Heroes Committee, said he
was “absolutely disappointed”
that government continues to
recommend prominent
Bahamians for British knight-
hoods, and called on religious
leaders to reject the Queen’s
New Year’s Honours and sup-
port a national honours sys-
tem instead. ’

Father Campbell also told ©

The Tribune he supported the
Fawkes family in their bid to
get the late trade union leader
nationally recognised.

“To my knowledge, the
Bahamian government has
only ever named Sir Milo But-
ler as a national hero,” Father

Campbell said. “But the first
thing that has to happen is that
the government has to pass the
National Heroes and Honours
Bill, and then persons like Sir
Randol can get their due recog-
nition.” ;

In 2003, the National Cultur-

al Development Commission

made detailed representations
to the government for a Nation-
al Heroes system to replace the
present British honours system.
However, the Christie admin-
istration has yet to bring the
proposed bill to parliament.

The Anglican clergyman said
he hopes the government pass-
es the bill before the next gen-
eral election — because at the
moment, the Queen’s Honours
are only awarded to “party
stooges.”

backs Fawkes family
call for national recognition _





@ SIR Randol Fawkes pictured
with his wife Jacqueline

Man arrested following Flint Street shootings

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

POLICE have a man in cus-
tody who they say could have a
crucial link to the spate of
shootings and murders in the
Flint Street area.

Police Press Liaison officer
Walter Evans said that officers
from “Operation Quiet Storm”
were patrolling in Flint Street
shortly before 9pm on
Wednesday when they spotted
a white Nissan Maxima with
one male occupant.

“That vehicle was stopped
and searched, inside, they (offi-
cers) found a shotgun and 13
live rounds of ammunition for
that weapon,” Inspector Evans
reported. “They also found a ski

mask in that vehicle,” he said.

The 28-year-old man, who
is a resident of Flamingo Gar-
dens, was arrested and taken
into police custody.

Police believe he may be
connected to a spate of shoot-
ings that have caused consid-
erable alarm in that neigh-
bourhood over the past two
weeks.

“We are trying to establish
that now,” Inspector Evans
said, referring to the possibil-
ity of a link. “We can’t say
with certainty, but we are try-
ing to establish that. But any-
thing is possible. The mere
fact that he had a ski mask
and a shot gun in the car — it
could be an indication of what

his intentions were.”

Kevin Eve, 43, was shot mul-
tiple times on Monday night,
on the same street that the 28-
year-old was apprehended.

Mr Eve, who remains listed
in serious condition, was fight-
ing for his life on Tuesday
night. His present condition is
not known.

Hours before that shooting,
a 21-year-old was shot in the
head while walking down
Comfort Street, according to
police.

Comfort Street is just
around the corner from Flint
Street.

Senior police officers say
they are very concerned about
the increased rate of crime in

Teenager arrives in Caribbean
after solo voyage across Atlantic

@ ANTIGUA
St John’s

A BRITISH teenager
became the youngest person to
sail solo across the Atlantic
Ocean on Wednesday, reaching
the Caribbean island of Antigua
after a six-week voyage, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Mike Perham, 14, raised his
fist triumphantly to a crowd of
Antiguan officials and sup-
porters as he docked outside
St John’s on the southeastern
side of the island.

Perham said he was lonely
at times but not afraid as he
made the crossing in the
Cheeky Monkey, his 28-foot
sailboat. He helped pass the
time by studying and chatting
on a satellite phone.

“Tt has been a fantastic jour-
ney. It has been a great expe-
rience,” he said. “I truly
enjoyed it.”

Perham, who was trailed by
his father in another boat, set
sail Nov. 18 from Gibraltar and
made brief stops to replace
satellite phones in the Canary
Islands and Cape Verde. They

on ALL;
Christmas candles
Christmas ribbon
Decorations
Poinsettias
Garlands
Wreaths
Trees

Picks

Lights

The RCs and staff of H

YOUNG British sailor Mike Perham, 14, pictured upon his __ J



arrival to St John’s in Antigua on Wednesday —
(AP Photo/Johnny Jno-Baptiste)

were originally expected to
complete the 3,500-mile trip
just before January 1.

Perham’s father, Peter,
praised his son’s courage and
tenacity and said he hoped the
voyage would inspire others to
attempt similar feats.

“At home in England you
can’t even climb a tree with-
out a safety certificate, so I
hope it will ignite a little spark

ey
Ys

in some families,” he told

reporters. “When a child puts °

their mind to really want to do
something they should be thor-
oughly supported.”

Perham, of Potters Bar,
Hertfordshire, broke the
record held by fellow Briton
Sebastian Clover who was 15
when he sailed solo from the
Canary Islands to Antigua in
2003.





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| oT ends Jan 13th

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THEPURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS =.
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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE




-EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

. ae 4 6
The Tepamecayents uestions
, ?
and answers’
| @
on LNG issue

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

" SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday ak ENG plant

w

lamainnescrim arrest"

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 )-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



We have to get serious on drugs -

AS THE year 2006 closed, the police had
60 murders on their ledger, including one
committed on the most sacred day of the
Christian year — Christmas day. The new
year opened with two attempted murders
and several incidents of violent crime. In the
past few weeks three persons were sense-
lessly murdered.

Residents are terrified at the escalating
crime in their communities, and yet we have
heard no one suggest a placard-carrying
protest against criminals gone wild. But let

there be a suggestion that a convicted drug ~

offender might be extradited to the United
States to answer for his sins against humani-

_ty, and, by jingo, out come the placards.

When the ruling came down in 2004 that
drug lord; “Ninety” Knowles — turned into
some kind of folk hero by his supporters —
was to be extradited to the United States, a
protest was organised in front of parliament.
The organisers said it was to send a blunt
message to the government not to carry out
the extradition. They claimed it was against
Knowles’ rights as a Bahamian citizen.

But we never hear anything about the
right to life of murdered Bahamians? We see
no placards for them, although much of our
growing crime is undoubtedly rooted in the
drug trade.

We agree with Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson, who on a radio talk show
this week, condemned the community as
“steeped in greed, materialism and dishon-
esty.”

He said that greed and materialism have
led to problems in Bahamian society, includ-
ing the deification of drug dealers.

“You have people going to an early grave,
and when (drug dealers) are caught there
are screams in the community,” he said.
“There is still no understanding of the seri-
ousness of the drug trade and that it has long
negative drawbacks, including violence and
murder.”

Because of the increased incidences of
drugs being put on aircraft at Lynden Pindling
International Airport — despite all the hoop-
la of the security of our airport — many air-
craft from Nassau, having already precleared,
have been searched again on landing in the
US. Unless government takes this matter
seriously, the Bahamas can become a sec-
ond Jamaica with sniffer dogs and the whole
nine yards to greet passengers arriving in the
US from the Bahamas. :



South ¢ P.O. Box a

_ THOUGHT FOR

« Don’t make resolutions,

make revolutions”
SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor

Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

LENNOX PATON












Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law



Interested persons must submit a current resume and cover letter

no later than 31st January 2007 to:

HR Manager
Lennox Paton
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, Bahamas



Min ASS

Ba

We are seeking to hire attorneys in the Real Estate Department.
Applicants must be called to The Bahamas Bar and have a
minimum of two years experience in conveyancing.

We have experienced this once when fly-
ing from Kingston to Miami.

For those who haven't, we can say that
nothing is more demeaning than to be lined
up in a secured area while a sniffer dog and
his handler walk slowly up and down, and
officials look at you suspiciously before a
door is opened and dignity and freedom are
once again restored. |

Make no mistake about it, no matter how
many placards are carried in parliament
square, the Americans are not going to solt-
en their position on drug peddlers. Either
we are going to deal with these offenders
ourselves, or as soon as they set foot on
American territory, which starts as soon as a
passenger enters the American zone at Nas-
sau International airport, American officials
will take care of them for us.

Ambassador John Rood warned that the
major weaknesses at the international air-
port have to be addressed immediately, or
else the secondary searches will have to be
continued.

He said that Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell commented that “at one point he
was on an airplane that had gone through
pre-clearance here. It was again checked in
the US, and that’s because of the concerns
that we have with the level of security.

“So, if we can get comfortable with securl-
ty in the Bahamas, we won't be putting the
number of airplanes through the secondary
search process in the US.”

He explained that there will be some

planes that will be pulled in through
a secondary search situation, “but not near
the numbers that we are talking about
now.” :
He pointed out that these extra searches
posed a serious time issue for airlines,
increased cost of flights —as planes have to
be checked twice — and inconvenienced pas
sengers throughout the process.

Unless this problem is quickly brought
under control, the day will come when both
airlines and passengers will turn their backs
on any idea that it might be “better in the
Bahamas” — and fly elsewhere.

And so the problem is now back in our
court. It is up to Bahamians to get their pri-
orities right — or lose all they have gained.
Instead of carrying placards, they should
move into their communities to help educate
young Bahamians of how drugs can destroy
their future.





EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas and LNG

HAVING already written
extensively with regard to the
above captioned, | had deter-
mined, on the basis of my own
conviction, to say no more and
to “keep my mouth shut” on
what has become an unneces-
sarily controversial issue.

The latest, highly emotional-

ly charged “Anti-LNG Rally”,

however, has led me to recon-
sider this decision, and to make
yet another contribution to dis-
cussion on this matter. It is,
therefore, set out in simple
“question and answer” form,
with a view to presenting a bal-
anced, objective easy-to-under-
stand contribution, taking into
consideration the concerns of
the Bahamian environmental-
ists, the interests of the compa-
nies which must invest huge
sums of money, and the overall
potential benefits to the gov-
ernment and people of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

Ten questions (and answers!)
re LNG!

1) What is LNG?

LNG is simply the abbrevia-
tion of ‘liquefied natural gas”
you see, gases fall into two cat-
egories. There are chemical gas-
es, Which are obtained by means
of scientific experiments and/or
as the bye-products of industri-
al activity. Then, there are gas-
es which are found in their nat-
ural state in various parts of the
earth. LNG, in its natural state
belongs to this category. It is to
be found, in huge quantities
along with petroleum, and in
marshlands. It, is then, a natur-
al product, which has been con-
vertedifrom a gaseous to a liq-
uid state. ‘

2) Why is there such a
demand for LNG?

The main source of energy
today is petroleum or oil. How-
ever, the world, consuming oil
at the fantastic rate of more
than 50 million barrels per day,
is rapidly running out of this
commodity. This means that it
will become increasingly expen-
sive, and there are those who
are predicting that it will even-
tually cost as much as $100 per
barrel! There is, therefore, a
real need for alternative fuels
to meet the growing demand
for energy. Amongst these
LNG is considered as a good
alternative because of the vast
quantity still available.

3) Why are there proposals
to construct LNG plants in
Northern Bahamas?

For the same reason that



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there is a container port in the
harbour of Freeport — the
availability of deep water facil-
ities, capable of accommodat-
ing the huge modern ocean
tankers; in close proximity to
the world’s largest market —
the USA. These marine behe-
moths, in excess of 80,000
tonnes dead weight, require
deep harbours in order to deliv-
er their cargo economically.
Note that Panama has just vot-
ed to spend billions of dollars to
expand the Panama Canal to
accommodate them!

4) Does LNG pose a great
danger to the environment?

LNG is a natural product,
and properly managed, it should
pose no great threat to the envi-
ronment of The Bahamas. It is a
harmless, colourless, gas, which
is readily soluble in water.

5) What about explosions?

‘LNG as a sub-zero product,

unlike gasoline, cannot explode
by lighting a match! However,

‘because it is highly compressed

to 1/600th of its natural state, it
can explode only by split sec-
ond conversion to its gaseous
state...with the advances in
modern technology, such explo-
sions are very rare!

It is submitted, that an LNG
plant would pose no more
threat to the environment of the
Bahamas and no greater dan-
ger of explosion than the oil
bunkerage facilities at BORCO
in Freeport, Riding Point in
East Grand Bahama or the oil

storage facilities at Clifton Pier,,

in Nassau, Bahamas, ‘

6) What about the possibility

of terrorism?

There seems to be no logical
reason why terrorists would
want to ‘blow up’ an LNG plant
in the Bahamas.

7) What would be the eco-
nomic benefits to the Bahamas
of an LNG industry?

They are, in the short term,
three-fold:

i) Increased employment
opportunities for Bahamians.
Hundreds of jobs will be pro-
vided in the construction stage;
many hi-tech jobs would be
required for the operation of

ii) Increased revenue to gov- '
ernment millions of dollars .
would flow into the Public Trea-
sury at a time when more rev- »
enue is required to meet the
needs of a young, growing
nation.

iii) Increased economic activ-
ity as more industries are
attracted by the availability of a
cheap source of energy.

8) Any other benefits?

Yes! As noted above, the cost
of oil is expected to increase
greatly in years ahead. This will ,
mean that the cost of electricity —
will also ‘go up’. However, the
possibility of the use of LNG
rather, than oil, may keep the
cost of electricity low for the
benefit of all consumers!

' 9) Are many countries say-
ing “no” to LNG?

Yes, there are, indeed, a num-
ber of nations which have
expressed reservations about,
and objection to the construc-
tion of LNG plants. But, there
are those nations which are say-
ing ‘yes’! ‘

Trinidad, for instance, an
island about the size of Andros, , |
has four LNG plants in opera- .
tion, and, in an effort to reduce
its dependence upon oil, is
preparing to construct more.
There is an LNG plant in the
Dominican Republic and plans
are being discussed for con-
struction of one in Jamaica. : -
Moreover, plans have been
announced to construct in
Dubai, rapidly emerging eco-
nomic Arab state, the world’s
largest LNG plant! In this, as
in all such matters, each nation
must make its own decision on :
the basis of the needs and aspi- °
rations.of its people..

10) Any other comment?

Yes, the government of the
‘Bahamas should seek the advice
of international and Bahamian
financial experts in order to
secure the maximum amount of
revenue, while assuring the
“deep pocketed” energy com-
panies obtain a fair return upon
the expenditure of the vast sums |
of money required for develop- ,
ment of LNG! i

EMMETTE WEIR
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
December, 2006.

Existing and proposed North
American LNG terminals

EDITOR, The Tribune,

WHEN the truth is bent and misinformation is passed to the inno-
cent, asking for their support to stop pending development and
Government approval of a sensitive proposal, this is simply as
damaging as what these folks suggest such a project would be.

Attached is the latest position of Existing and Proposed North

American LNG terminals:

Constructed: 5...Everett, MA - Cove Point, MD - Elba Terminal
GA - Lake Charles, LA and Gulf of Mexico.

Approved by FERC...16 individual projects.

Approved by MARAD/Coast Guard...Port Pelican and off

Louisiana.

Canadian Approved Terminals: 3...St John, NB - Point Tupper,

NS - Kitimat, BC.

Mexican Terminals approved: 3...Altamira, Tamulipas - Baja
California Baja California, off-shore.

Proposed for FERC: 12 Terminals.

Proposed to MARAD/Coast Guard...9 terminals.

Included in the proposed Terminals is the SUEZ Calypso off the
coast of Florida project, which was originally earmarked for Grand
Bahama -approved by FERC includes AES Ocean Express and
Calypso Express. Both these projects have their Bahamas approval

“pending”.

It would certainly assist if Mrs Duncombe would stop misin-

forming the public.

N. RUSSELL
Nassau,
November 26, 2006

MARINE NAVIGATION
COURSES

In a nation of islands it is essential to be able
to navigate over the horizon with confidence.
Prepare for safe voyaging by enrolling in the

Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by The
Bahamas School of Marine Navigation. Plan
to attend the free first class on Monday, January
8th, at 7 p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
Bay Street. Details: 364-2861, 535-6234 or

pgk434@netscape.net. Other courses include
Seamanship and Celestial Navigation.


THE TRIBUNE




0 In brief

American
Airlines offers —
new choices |
onflightsto |
the Caribbean |

FORT WORTH, Texas—
American Airlines is starting ;
the New Year by offering i
customers on Caribbean
flights new choices in fresh
light meals, snacks, and bot-
tled water — all of which can
be purchased with credit

_cards, debit cards and cash.

“The new choices are part
of American’s continuing
-efforts to give customers
what they value,” said the
airline in a statement.

“Snacks and bottled water
will be available on all flights ;
two hours or longer, and the :
fresh light meals can be pur-
chased on all flights three
hours or longer.”

According to the state-
ment, the changes were
implemented based on cus-
tomer and flight-attendant
feedback indicating that cus- :
tomers wanted more choices. :

“American Airlines regu-
larly engages our customers
to determine their food and
beverage preferences and
what forms of payment they
prefer to use,” said Lauri i
Curtis, American's vice pres- :
ident for onboard service.
“Our customers value
choice, and we believe the
food-for-sale programme
enhancements and multiple
payment options will be
well-received by our cus-
tomers.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

Mey RIL E
PHONE: 322-2157



RRR ah

FRIDAY,



























JANUARY 5TH
6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise
11:00 Immediate Response
Noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response

Cont'd

1:00 A Special Report
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 International Fellowship

] of Christians & Jews
3:30 Ed Young
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm
6:00 Caribbean Passport

1 6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight .
8:00 — Island Wide Crusade:

“Youth Explosion”

10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30. News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540 am










SATURDAY,

JANUARY 6TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 — Int'l Fit Dance
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Little Robots
noon Underdog



NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
Peer chcels i \nalnnte mel nvetnNe |e







Nassau an

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUAHY 9, 2UU/, FAUE Oo

Offer to reimburse visitors t
d Paradise Islan








for the cost of US passport

IN AN effort to encourage
travel to the Bahamas after the
January 23 deadline of the new
US passport rule, the Nassau/
Paradise Island Promotion
Board is offering to reimburse
visitors for the cost of a new pass-
port.

For a limited time, the pro-
motion board announced, US
travellers — who will now be
required to obtain a passport for
all international air travel — can
acquire the document for free
by booking a trip to Nassau or
Paradise Island.

With passport costs of $97 for
adults and $82 for children, the
reimbursement programme
translates into a potential sav-
ings of $358 for a family of four,
the promotion board said.

Travellers simply need to
download a rebate form from
the promotion board’s web site
www.nassauparadiseisland.com,
which they can then complete
and submit with a copy of their
paid hotel bill, an airline board-
ing pass for all travellers and a
photocopy of each eligible trav-
eller's passport photo page.

Atlantis, the Nassau Beach
Hotel, the One and Only Ocean
Club, the British Colonial Hilton
and the Sandals Resort are just a
few of many hotels that are par-
ticipating in this promotion.

Since the announcement of the
US’ new passport rule — official-
ly known as the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative — repre-
sentatives of the tourism industry
have predicted that this new
requirement will discourage
Americans from travelling
abroad and cost the. Caribbean
region hundreds of millions of
dollars in lost revenue.

News of the new promotion
comes on the heels of the
announcement by Tourism
Director General Vernice
Walkine that there has been a
jump in the number of passport
applications by US citizens in the
last several weeks, indicating that
the "potential fallout" from the
new passport regulations may be



@ TOURISM Director
General Vernice Walkine

"What we're being told by the
Department of State is that .. .
the US media is getting the word
out and Americans are becoming
more aware of the need for a
passport.

“They are applying and there's
been a jump in the number of
applications over the last six
weeks," she said.

According to Ms Walkine,
preparations have also been
made in the US to handle an
influx of passport applications
this month that may be the result
of the belated realisation on the
part of many Americans that
travel will not be permitted with-
out the document.

Ms Walkine's comments fol-
lowed the launch of the min-
istry's new advertising campaign,
"Bahamavention" in front of
Bahamian and US press at the
Mandarin Oriental Hotel in New
York.

According to Ms Walkine,
though the launch of the new $12

Bid to encourage travel to the Bahamas after deadline



incorporate advertising on cable
television, in the print media, on
the Internet, and all over New
York on 570 subway trains —
was not planned specifically to
counteract the effects of the reg-
ulations, it has turned out to be
"very timely" in light of the US
government's decision to go
ahead and impose the new
requirements.

"It wasn't intended that way,
but the timing was to our advan-
tage," she said.

A message informing poten-

tial travellers about the need
for a passport has also been
included in the advertising cam-
paign.

The new regulations, as set out
in the Western Hemisphere
Travel Initiative — set to come
into force on January 23, 2007 —
will require all US citizens trav-
elling to the Bahamas, among
other destinations, to have a
passport to be able to re-enter
the US.

Questioned as to what would
happen to those who are allowed

to leave the US without a pass-
port, only to find that they were
not allowed back in the country,
Ms Walkine stressed that much is
being done to ensure that this
possibility does not become a
reality.

"The airlines are
absolutely going to be checking
because if they allow someone
to leave without a passport the
fines are horrific," said Ms
Walkine, noting that fines of
about $60,000 may be intro-
duced.

mitigated to some degree. million campaign, which will

Bermuda cracks down on
undocumented workers

@ HAMILTON, Bermuda

FOREIGNERS who overstay their visas in Bermuda will soon
become wanted fugitives, as the wealthy enclave adopts new mea-
sures to capture and deport them amid growing public anger over
illegal immigration, according to Associated Press.

The Immigration Ministry has announced it will begin sharing
photos of visa violators with a local anti-crime group, which will post
the images on the Internet and publicize rewards for their capture.

" Anybody who overstays their time is a problem as far as we are
concerned because of the importance we attach to the adherence
to the law," said Robert Horton, the administrative head of the
immigration ministry in the British territory.

Crime Stoppers Bermuda said that within days it will publish the
first photos, of two Jamaican construction workers, on a Web site
that will also feature suspects for other criminal offenses.

The group, which is supported by private donations, said it
would pay rewards of up to US$1,000 to anyone who provides
information leading to the capture of the illegal immigrants. Those
who provide the tips can remain anonymous, said the group's
chairman, Sean Pitcher.

"Bermudians are very law-abiding citizens, but people may be ret-
icent to get involved," Pitcher said.

The government is also considering other measures against ille-
gal immigration, including greater penalties for those caught
employing or sheltering them.

Undocumented residents make up a tiny fraction of Bermuda's
65,000 people, but there have been increased complaints that ille-
gal workers have become a drain on public resources and are tak-
ing jobs, especially in the construction sector.

"They may not be committing a serious crime, but they're basi-
cally taking jobs away from Bermudians," Pitcher said. "What
they're doing is displacing people who could be working legiti-
mately."

Bermuda, a chain of tiny Atlantic Ocean islands 640 miles (1,030
kilometers) east of the U.S., is one of the wealthiest places in the
world.

The territory is generally accessible to immigrant residents only
through guest worker programs, which employ about 9,900 people
ranging from doctors and lawyers to laborers. Visas typically expire
after six years.

Those who deliberately stay past their deadline are deported and
blacklisted from returning, Horton said. Bermuda deports about 20
foreigners each year, including those convicted of crimes.

Guest workers traditionally came from the Caribbean, the Unit-
ed Kingdom and the United States, but a growing number now
come elsewhere, including India and Sri Lanka.

Recent months have seen increased friction over immigration,
including the beating in July of a Portuguese man outside a bar in
the capital of Hamilton. Leaders in the long-established Portuguese
community, which makes up about 9 percent of the population, said
the man was targeted because he was an immigrant.

Immigration Minister Derrick Burgess, who took office in Sep-
tember, has made a personal commitment to deport illegal residents,
Horton said.

The crackdown has been welcomed by some in the construction
field. Louis Somner, an industry spokesman, described the Web site
as “a good effort" and said the government should go further and
fingerprint those who enter Bermuda on short-term permits.

Horton said it was understandable that foreigners would want to
extend their stay on an island known for its mild climate and rare
pink-sand beaches, but ultimately the territory should be reserved
for Bermudians.

"It's not a major problem but it is a problem," he said. "We're a
small society and we are always concerned about strains on our
social system."

Bahamian science scholar to
speak at Business Outlook

A BAHAMIAN science scholar is to speak at
this year’s Bahamas Business Outlook which con-
venes next week Tuesday at the Radisson Cable
Beach Resort under the theme “economic year
2007, opportunities, plans and anticipated out-
comes.”

Peter Blair, a graduate of Duke University and
PhD candidate at Harvard University, said his
presentation, “Vision for the Bahamas: a young
Bahamian’s perspective” will focus on three main
topics: redefining national development by invest-
ing in people, building a better Bahamas through
social partnerships, and Inno Works Bahamas,
which is a case study in social partnerships.

“As the theme of this year’s conference sug-
gests, there will be a number of opportunities in
2007 for the Bahamas to build on the successes of
the past three decades. Moreover, the outlook’s
diverse audience of eminent business and com-
munity leaders makes it a fitting venue for us to
discuss collaborative approaches to the future of
national development,” he said.

Mr Blair graduated from Duke University in
May 2006 with a bachelor of science degree in
physics and mathematics.

While there, he also minored in economics and
French. Prior to this, he obtained an associate
degree in physics and economics from the College
of the Bahamas.

Mr Blair has won many honours, awards and
scholarships — among them, the Graduate Prize
Fellowship at Harvard University, the $100,000 all

s
aw

Bahamas Merit Scholarship, and the Barry Gold-
water Scholarship.

He has attended numerous professional con-
ferences and workshops and conducted indepen-
dent research in his area of study including
“minorities in physics” and “modeling flux ratio
anomalies due to a Chan-Refsdal lens.”

From late 2004 to summer 2005, Blair was a
“vision team member” of Inno Works, where he
collaborated in organising a student-run summer
camp to expose underprivileged minority youths
to cutting edge methods in science and technolo-

In 2007 he will serve as director of Colinalm-
perial Insurance Co Ltd’s community initiative
‘Adventure in Science and Mathematics” sum-
mer camp for outstanding students in the
Bahamas.

Along with Peter Blair, Business Outlook 2007
will feature a slate of distinguished speakers led by
Prime Minister Perry Christie. -

Other speakers include Senator Dr Bernard
Nottage, Minister of Health and National Insur-
ance; Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, secretary
general of the Caribbean Tourism Organisation,
Vernice Walkine, director general of Tourism,
Lincoln Price, private sector liaison, Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machinery; Janyne Hodder,
president of the College of the Bahamas; Tanya
Wright, Reg Smith and Christopher Lowe, respec-
tive presidents of the Bahamas, Grand Bahama
and Exuma Chambers of Commerce.



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PART OF YOUR LIFE
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007



16th Annual
BAHAMAS

Business

WMutl







Attend The Premier Business Event of the year
The 16th Annual Bahamas Business Outlook.
Register today at www.tclevents.com

or call Eileen Fielder at The Counsellors 3221000

Radisson Cable Beach Resort

Tuesday, January 9, 2007



RtHon Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister
“Economic Year 2007: Opportunities, Plans, Outcomes”

Sen. Hon. Dr. Bemard Notfage, Minister of Health & National Insurance
“Implication of the National Health Insurance for Bahamian Businesses”

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Secretary-General,
Caribbean Tourism Organization

“The United States of the Caribbean — Benefits for Boharicris and
The Bahamas”

Vemice Walkine, Director General, Ministry of Toursm
“Tourism Forecast for 2007”

Lincoln Price, Private Sector Liaison, Carilblbean Regional Maiketing
Machinery - “Greater Private Sector Linkages through Extemal Tracie
Negotiations”

Allen Ten Brock, President & CEO, The Mariner Group, Inc. -
“The Importance of Maximizing oe for
Social & Economic Gro

Janyne Hodder, President, The College of The Bahamas
“From College fo University — The Role of Higher Education in
Developing the Bahamian Society”

Tanya Wright, Reg Smith & Christopher Lowe, Presidents of
_ Bahamas, Exuma and Grand Bahama Chambers of Commerce,
“Facilitating The Bahamian Business Communily in 2007”

Peter Blair, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
“Vision for The Bahamas: A Young Bahamian's Perspective”

FIRSTCARIBBEAN.

IE TER NATIONAL BANK iviae





IN TERNATIONAL



Sun Oil Limited
moines QD









THE TRIBUNE






















B EGINNING this Jan-
uary, the US Con-
gress has legislated that Amer-
ican citizens must have pass-
ports to re-enter the US when
returning from the Bahamas
and Caribbean countries.

Several observers have
pointed to the government’s
affable foreign policy with
‘Cuba, Venezuela and China as
the thrust that led to the
Bahamas’ inclusion among the
group of countries from which
travellers must have passports.

In the October 9, 2006, edi-
tion of The Tribune, Dr Dexter
Johnson, leader of the fringe
political group - the Bahamian
National Party - claimed that
the Bahamas’ foreign policy of
“cosying up” to Cuba,
Venezuela and facilitating Chi-
na’s penetration of the region
puts it at risk of being excluded
from any special treatment
from the US as it relates to the
new passport regulations.

Frankly, it appears that Dr
Johnson is trying to score polit-
ical brownie points and engage
in scaremongering. It seems
that the learned doctor may
simply be seeking a few head-
lines to further his political
agenda.

In the same article, Dr John-
son also asserted that the
Bahamas ignored virtually all
requests for support on major
foreign policy initiatives that
had been proposed by the UK
and the US and had hence
found itself on the opposite
side of the US/UK vote.

However, the US ambas-
sador has consistently affirmed
their close relationship with
the Bahamas, maintaining that
both our countries remain
close allies, though not always
seeing eye-to-eye on some
issues.

For the most part, the claims
of Dr Johnson and others who
blame our budding diplomatic
ties with China, Cuba and
Venezuela for US foreign pol-
icy adjustments all appear to
be erroneous and ideologically
based.

Although the US doesn’t
have significant trade agree-
ments with Cuba, it has monu-
mental agreements with Chi-
na and Venezuela. So, why is it
untenable that the Bahamas
should maintain relations with
these countries?

In fact, Venezuelan oil sus-
tains the US economy, as 60
per cent of all oil imported into
the US comes from Venezuela.
Quite like democratic
Venezuela, communist China




































The Bahamas and
our relationships



KD RLSACN

plays a gargantuan role in US
economic affairs.

The US has a plethora of
trade agreements with China
although there are concerns
about human rights violations,
intimidation of the press, vio-
lence against peaceful protest

_and the existence of a totali-

tarian government.
In fact, China is the US’s

’ biggest trading partner. So, if

the US can establish such a
dependent, far reaching rela-
tionship with communist Chi-
na, why can’t an independent
and sovereign Bahamas?

D r Johnson, and oth-
ers with similar opin-

ions, must understand that if
the US can make decisions and
represent its national interest
through its UN vote, the
Bahamas should be afforded
the same privilege without fear
of “exhausting all our credit”
and not qualifying “for any
special treatment”!

Instead of what seems to be
an attempt to inflame the
Bahamian people, Dr Johnson
should query US Ambassador
John Rood about the US’s
double standard in foreign pol-
icy towards communist Cuba,
while not speaking out against
China but rather strengthen-
ing their relationship! It should
be quite clear, even to the
ambassador, that this is a poli-
cy of sheer hypocrisy!

In the October 12, 2006, edi-
tion of The Tribune, it was
reported that 25 executives
from US companies would
travel to China in November as
part of a trade mission intent
on increasing exports and
reducing America’s huge trade
deficit.

In the same report, US
Commerce Secretary Carlos
Gutierrez said that companies
selected for the trip (eg Home
Depot, Westinghouse
Electrics, etc) would seek busi-
ness opportunities and poten-
tial joint ventures with Chinese
companies.

Today, China is America’s
fourth largest export market
and exports are rapidly
increasing. Also, the US trade
deficit with China stands at a
record $202 billion. With this

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW



Gi BS ON

in mind, it is quite obvious that
without Chinese economic
input, the US economy would
crash.

So, having seen the impact
of these countries upon the US
economy, and in an effort to
establish diplomatic ties in an
increasingly globalised society,
Dr Johnson’s fallacious argu-
ment is without merit.

Dr Johnson, as someone
professing an interest in poli-
tics, shouldn’t you question
why the US refuses to ques-
tion the conditions in China,
while flagrantly violating the
rights of the Cuban people
using an illegal blockade?

OUR GOVERNMENT?’s
FUMBLE

QO: government has
long been aware that

the US intended to place pass-
port regulations on its citizens
for several years now. So why
is it that our government’s
ineptitude, particularly the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
has once again led to them
being caught with their pants
down?

Though the Bahamas econ-
omy may briefly ebb after the
passport policy is initially
enforced, it will recover as
American tourists become
more aware of their new trav-
el arrangements.

Instead of panicking and
concocting improbable plans
to lobby for an extension of
the January deadline, the gov-
ernment should have long
engaged in intense overseas
promotional campaigns, offer-
ing travel incentives and
preparing and adjusting our
economy for one of our first
challenging encounters with
21st century travel (age of ter-
rorism). |

In the long haul, American
tourists possessing passports
would help protect our nation-
al interest and national securi-
ty. It is much easier to forge a
driver’s licence (which Ameri-
can’s currently use to travel
here) than it is to forge a pass-
port, so change, in this
instance, is great!

ajbahama@hotmail.com,
www. weblogbahamas.com

Did the ILO really
give the thumbs up
on NHI programme?
Taser 2

dia Dames in The Bahama
Journal under the headline

Report Outlines ILO's
Approval of NHI Proposal is
curious indeed.

The National Coalition for
Health Care Reform (NCHCR)
has posted this politically cor-
rect statement about this
same ILO report on their web-
site:

After the House and Senate
have passed the National
Health Insurance Bill with some
minor amendments (the revised
document will be posted when
available), the ILO Report tout-
ed by government as giving a
"thumbs up" to NHI has come
into the public domain. Upon
review of the report we find its
scope to be very limited as it is
actually an analytical and tech-
nical review of studies carried
out in The Bahamas.

It would appear the Bahama
Journal was provided with the
government’s press release in
advance of other news organi-
sations in an attempt to "sell"
the NHI working committee's
perspective on the ILO report if
you will before an honest per-
spective of the ILO report could
be rendered.

In My VIEW

TAS



To be fair, the Journal did
print some of the derogatory
points made by the ILO, but
their headline is misleading, to
say the least.

We have previously dis-
cussed the demonisation of the
NCHCR and anyone else who
would dare to offer construc-
tive criticism of this great plan
by the PLP for that matter but
the government approach now
seems to have added deceit to
its approach to the NHI at this
point.

A: an aside, one can't
help but wonder if

this is desperation by a political
party as an election approaches.

However, it seems more like
the "curse of power" that comes
with being the government as
outlined by Matthew d'Ancona
ina piece in The Spectator in
the UK.

He writes: “Power does terri-
ble things to people, disfigut-
ing their sense of normality.
Progressive politicians are par-
ticularly prone to believe that
actions which would ordinarily
be considered wrong are justi-





||

fied by a sense of higher pur-
pose.

The Nassau Institute (NI) has
a catalogue of articles on this
important subject and the diffi-
culties faced in other countries
with socialised medicine and
they are worth the effort to read
them for a better understand-.
ing.

One can only hope that the
government jumps in at the
shallow end of the NHI pool
and stays clear of the deep
water that has caused as much
(and in some cases more) pain
than if the government stayed
out of health care.

As stated ad nauseam, work-
ing Bahamians should buy their
own health care through private
insurers, leaving the govern-
ment to deal with the genuine
hardship cases and those per-
sons who have been locked out
of private health insurance for
legitimate reasons.

When all is said and done,
every Bahamian should read
the ILO report and see for
themselves what the “curse of
power" has done to our coun-
try's leaders.

WWW, weblogbahamas. com
THE TRIBUNE



moyey TNS

Christmas promotion luc

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 7





shopper a host of extra presents

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -— Christmas shop-
ping at the International Bazaar
paid off for Sophia Thompson, who
won over 20 prizes when her name
was selected during a grand ralfle
drawing on New Years’ Eve.

Chris Payne, chairman of the
Bazaar Owners’ Association, said
the raffle was a promotion to boost
sales and attract local residents to
shop at the Bazaar during the fes-
tive holiday season.

“The promotion went very well,
as we had just over 7,500 entry tick-
ets, which indicated that-a lot of
people came to shop in the Bazaar.
And I think all the merchants were
very grateful for the support the
local community had given the

- Bazaar over the Christmas holi-

day,” said Mr Payne.
An entry ticket was presented
for every $20 that was spent in the

Bazaar. The winning entry came
from Freeport Jewelers.

Since the closure of the Royal
Oasis Resort, only 38 of the 85
stores have managed to remain
open at the Bazaar.

Mr Payne said that they hope to
launch a similar promotion with
more than one winner next time.

Sophia Thompson said that she
had spent over $500 in the Bazaar,
purchasing gifts such as perfume,
jewelry, and an oil painting. She
said that the return was definitely
worth it.

“I love coming to the Bazaar to
shop to help support the local busi-
nesses in the Bazaar.

“I am very surprised and very
excited about being the winner... I
had not expected this at all. It was
the perfect New Year’s present,”
she said.

Ms Thompson won 20 prizes val-
ued at nearly $4,000, which includ-
ed a basket of toys, four crystal

glasses, desk top Globe, art and
crystal, $100 gift certificate, swim
wear, handbags, a belt, wallet, two

‘Fossil watches, a basket of fra-

grances, a diamond ring, an original
oil painting, DVD movies, a 27inch
TV, a crystal vase, a ladies watch,
create your own fragrances valued
at $210, and a conch shell with fish
sculpture.

B SOPHIA Thompson

(centre) won over 20 gifts in the
International Bazaar Grand
Raffle. She shopped at the Bazaar
during the Christmas promotion
and spent over $500 at the various
stores. Seen from left are Delyin
Beckles, manager of the

Bazaar Owners’ Association;

Ms Thompson; Mr Dudley Wells
of Freeport Jewelers and Mr
Chris Payne, chairman of the
Bazaar Owners Association and
owner of Paradise Jewels.
(Photos: Denise Maycock)




@ PICTURED left to right are Charles McCartney, Makeisha
Campbell of John Bull, Mary Mortimer and Ann Harding.

HOLIDAY shoppers were
invited to experience the best
of John Bull with a journey
back to the days of tradition.

Through the Holiday Fantasy
2006 “a few of our favourite

‘things” promotion, customers

were given the opportunity to

win one of 24 luxury gifts in a
daily drawing during the month



gD

& Bourke, Tag Heuer, Miki-
moto, David Yurman, Kate

EEIAN Miller, Makeisha Campbell of John Bull, Patrice
Knowles and Urala Johnson.











purchase at any John Bull
owned store — including Carti-

of December. .

The gifts — ranging from time
pieces, fragrances, jewellery,
leather, and home office furni-
ture — featured world famous
lines such as Omega, Dooney

Spade, Gucci, Lacoste, Hugo
Boss and Hon.

Over $20,000 in prizes were
awarded during the 24-day
giveaway leading up to Christ-
mas. Every patron making a

Monday - Friday 4pm
Saturday & Sunday 2pm

25 GREAT RIDES!

2 NEW Rides Twister & Scrambler

Kami Kaze

Mega Drop

Flying Bobs —

RIDE THE



Bumper Cars

Graviton

ea eee the holiday is
gone the Carnival is not. -

er, Coach, David Yurman,
Gucci, Guess, La Parfumerie
and the Business Centre —
became eligible for the prizes.
The promotion did not limit
number of entries, so chances

@ BOB Miller, Gary Farquharson, Nicky Henderson, Makeish2




























Campbell, Lindsay Darville and Chenique Cumberbatch

to win were increased upon
every purchase.

Robin Casale, winner of'a
Kate Spade evening bag valued
at $280, said how surprised and
pleased she was to be a winner.
“T love my bag and Hove shop-
ping at John Bull.”

In addition, BTC teamed vy
with John Bull to offer a te\
of their favourite things. Sey
en cellular phones, includin
the recently launched Blac!
berry, were also given away °s
bonus at various John Ba
locations.

RITISH
AMERICAN

Senior/Junior Programmer (Ss)

British American Insurance Company the oldest insurance company in the Bahamas and
a leading financial services institution is searching for-an experienced, highly organized

Programmer to develop and maintain company-specific applications. The ideal candidate
must be self-motivated to complete initiatives within established timelines and exercise

versatility with respect to project assignments.



Responsibilities:

¢ Support and maintain Oracle database applications

¢ Program new and modify exiting extractions from multiple data sources

¢ Develop reports and provide ongoing technical support for end-users

° Maintain existing database integrity and standards

¢ Participate in special projects with Vendor, system conversions, upgrades, implementations
° Create test transactions, refine and debug programs.

° Train end-users and technical support staff

Core Competencies:

* Proven project leadership and project implementation

¢ Experience with formal software development methodologies

* Strong analytical skills and experience in developing applications that meet use
requirements

¢ Must have strong oral and written communication skills

Required Qualifications:

* 34 years of recent programming experience including use of Oracle PL/SQL as primary
programming language

© Bachelor’s degree in CS of equivalent experience and/or education

° Oracle Developer or DBA certifications a plus

Preferred Skills:

* Possess strong Project experience ideally on Oracle Applications implementations,
business systems design, or projects in general
¢ Proficient in MS Project and/or MS Project Server (required)

° Experience with SQL Server

Technical Skills:

CCH, NEV, Oracle 81/91, Developer 61 (Forms & Reports),.PL/SQL, Crystal Reports

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with skills and experience. Attractive benefit package includine

Life, Health and Penston,

Submit Resume to Human Resources Manager, British American Insurance,
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N4815, Nassau, Bahamas or via email to
“dparker@babinsurance.com”


FAGE 8, FHIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2006



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ee ee

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of January 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

SS
& S

i'm lovin’ it

\ NS
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& YN s Ss

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piss

Mimake great gifts!

|

\

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iMovie Gift Certificates


“RIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 9





FBI assist police
in investigation
of rape of girl
on cruise ship

FROM page one

while they were out to sea.

“J think they were heading
to the Bahamas, so they
came in port here at New
Providence so our investiga-
tors went there to see about
it. They have a complaint
and we have a suspect in cus-
tody in connection with this
matter at this time,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said it is like-
ly that the New Yorker will
be arraigned before the
courts in the Bahamas. He
also said it was usual for
police to liaise with US agen-
cies, such as the FBI, to gain
background information to
aid in their investigation.

“As part of protocol we
inform the US Embassy if
any of their citizens are
involved in anything here,
especially if we can get these
matters resolved. So, if we
need any assistance that is
no problem, because we get
it all the time,” he said.

Victims
FROM page one

Omar Smith, Deputy
Leader of the BDM, was
also taken into custody
with the Sea Hauler vic-
tims. He has since stated,
according to Mr Bain, that
certain media houses have
associated him with the Sea
Hauler victims in the
capacity of BDM Deputy
Leader, when in fact, he
said, he had protested just
as a private citizen and not
a political figure.

Lawyer Cc

FROM page one

importance of adequate remu-
neration for judges to main-
tain an independent judicial

system.

He read from the year-end
report on the United States’
federal judiciary by US Chief
Justice John Roberts, who is

arguing that pay for federal
judges is so inadequate that it
threatens to undermine the
judiciary’s independence.

' Dame Joan, in responding

Court of Appeal could have
large backlog of cases ‘if
judges not appointed soon’

FROM page one

tices of this court has had to recuse him or
herself from” — this number could increase

rapidly.

“That small figure can grow and all the
efforts used to clear the backlog which existed
when I first became a full-time member of this
court and to bring these premises to their pre-
sent state where the first working visit of the
judicial committee of the Privy Council could
be accommodated here will prove to have been

in vain,” she said.

Dame Joan said that when she became pres-
ident of the Court of the Appeal in 2001 and
civil and criminal cases were sorted into two
categories to be heard, the majority of long-
pending appeals were disposed of within the

year.

: “The leadership of the judges did that,” she
: said.
i She emphasised that co-operation between

the judiciary and the two other branches
of the government is vital to justice being

carried out.

“Co-operation is key to administration of

justice, without co-operation justice will be
delayed and indeed denied. The history of this
country since the late seventies is proof positive

of that,” she said.

She thanked the executive branch for their
support in 2006, which she said was sometimes
grudgingly given. y

In November last year, after a third case in
just two weeks had to be suspended due a
shortage of Court of Appeal judges, Dame
Joan expressed concern about the conse-

quences of the necessary recurring recusals.

concerned.

Plaintiffs and defendants at that time told
The Tribune that the repeated adjournments
were creating a backlog of unresolved cases
and causing enormous inconvenience for all

Prospective FNM candidate for Fort Char-
lotte Michael Barnett, during his party’s rally in

R M Bailey Park in November, charged that

government’s failure to appoint more Court
of Appeal judges showed that the PLP does not
take the administration of justice seriously.

; cientists Say that 2007
~ could be the world’s
warmest year on record

& LONDON

DEEPENING drought in
Australia. Stronger typhoons
in Asia. Floods in Latin

’ America.

British climate scientists

‘predict that a resurgent El
‘Nino climate trend combined
‘with higher levels of green-
‘house gases could touch off
. ia fresh round of ecological
‘disasters — and make 2007
ithe world’s hottest year on
‘record, according to Associ-
,ated Press.
. “Even a moderate (El
'‘Nino) warming event is
‘enough to push the global
‘temperatures over the top,”
‘said Phil Jones, director of
‘the Climatic Research unit at
'the University of East Anglia.
1 The warmest year on
‘record is 1998, when the aver-
vage global temperature was
\1.2 degrees Fahrenheit higher
ithan the long-term average
‘of 57 degrees. Though such a
;change appears small, incre-
‘mental differences can, for
‘example, add to the ferocity
‘of storms by evaporating
more steam off the ocean.

Temperature

‘ There is a 60 percent
‘chance that the average glob-
al temperature for 2007 will
match or break the record,
_ .Britain’s Meteorological
' Office said Thursday. The
‘consequences of the high
temperatures could be felt
‘worldwide.

El Nino, which is now
(under way in the Pacific
‘Ocean and is expected to last
’- \until May, occurs irregularly.
»But when it does, winters in
‘Southeast Asia tend to
«become milder, summers in
‘Australia get drier, and Pacif-
,ic storms can be more intense.
‘The U.N.’s Food Aid Orga-
; nization has warned that ris-
, ing temperatures could wreak

agricultural havoc.

In Australia, which is strug-
gling through its worst
drought on record, the impact
on farmers could be devas-
tating. The country has
already registered its small-
est wheat harvest in a decade,
food prices are rising, and
severe water restrictions have
put thousands of farmers at
risk of bankruptcy.

In other cases, El Nino’s
effects are more ambiguous.
Rains linked to the phenom-
enon led to bumper crops in
Argentina in 1998, but floods
elsewhere in Latin America
devastated subsistence farm-
ers.

El Nino also can do some
good. It tends to take the
punch out of the Atlantic hur-
ricane season by generating
crosswinds that can rip the
storms apart — good news
for Florida’s orange growers,
for example.

“The short-term effects of
global warming on crop pro-
duction are very uneven,”
said Daniel Hillel, a
researcher at Columbia Uni-
versity’s Center for Climate
Systems Research. “I warn
against making definitive pre-
dictions regarding any one
season’s weather.”

What is clear is that the
cumulative effect of El Nino
and global warming are tak-
ing the Earth’s temperatures
to record heights.

“E] Nino is an independent
variable,” Jones said. “But
the underlying trends in the
warming of the Earth is
almost certainly a result:of
the release of carbon dioxide
into the atmosphere.”

Another more immediate

_ effect of the rising tempera-

tures may be political.
Australian Prime Minister

‘John Howard is already

under fire for refusing to link
his country’s drought to glob-
al warming. In Britain,
Friends of the Earth cam-

paign director Mike Childs
said the weather service's
2007 prediction “underlined

‘the gap between the govern-

ment’s rhetoric and
action.”
Other environmental

groups said the new report
added weight to the move-
ment to control greenhouse
gases.
It came a day after the
weather service reported that
2006 had been Britain’s
warmest year since 1659, and
three months after Sir
Nicholas Stern, a senior gov-
ernment economist, estimat-
ed that the effects of climate
change could eventually cost
nations 5 percent to 20 per-

cent of global gross domestic
product each year.

Figures for 2006 are not yet
complete, but the weather
service said temperatures
were high enough to rank
among the top 10 hottest
years on record.

“The evidence that we’re
doing something very dan-
gerous with the-climate is
now amassing,” said Cam-
paign against Climate Change
coordinator Philip Thornhill.

“We need to put the energy
and priority (into climate
change) that is being put into
a war effort,” he said. “It’s a
political struggle to get action
done — and these reports
help.”



to Mr Munroe, said the judi-
ciary can never be considered a
department because it cannot
be controlled by anyone, or
even appear to be controlled.
She said that vigilante jus-
tice takes over when it is per-
ceived that the independence
of the judicial system is lost.
While Mr Pinder admitted
that judges had always been

_ underpaid, he said that the

judges were long-suffering and
the cost of living had gone up
to such an extent that they
wanted to feel they could sup-
port themselves while doing
the work of justice.

“There are two fundamen-
tal principles of justice. One is
that every man has the right
to be heard and the other is
that no man may be a judge in
his own cause. If the judges are
not properly paid and they
hear matters from the execu-
tive they are being judges in

laims judiciary
‘in crisis over judges’ pay

are working so that they can
get paid,” he said.

Mr Pinder said that judges
should be paid before they
work so they can work inde-
pendently.

“Their salaries are important
because you cannot be inde-
pendent if the man continues
to hold the whip over you for
your salary,” he said.

Mr Pinder said that if a judge

is not financially independent

to do the things he needs to do |
for himself, he cannot adjudi-
cate on a matter for anyone
else.

“You must be put in a state
of independence in order to be
independent as a judge. They
must be compensated accord-
ing to their qualifications. Once
you’re properly compensated
nobody is giving you anything.
They are not giving youa
hand-out, you are being com-
pensated according to your

their own cause because they _ abilities,” Mr Pinder said.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a.
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















Bethel Brothers Morticians
cere Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

Royanne
Johnson



|, 52 of Spikenard
| Road will be held on
Monday, January 8,
2007 at New
Provid.ence
Community Centre,
Blake Road
beginning at 2 pm. Miss Johnson passed
away at her home on December 30 following
a short illness with Lung Cancer.

She is survived by a son Chima Ufarro
Johnson and grandson Chima Juan Johnson;
adopted daughters, Lisa, Eryn and Selyna
Bellot; brothers, Giles, Michael, Charles and
Samuel "Bookie" Johnson and their wives
Geneva and Inez; sisters, Cassandra
Thompson, Elsa "Lassie" McKenzie, Jackie
Bethel, Velma Johnson, Stephanie and
Sandra Carey and Peggy Johnson; adopted
sisters, Cherry Isaacs Upton of Toronto, .
Canada, Eunice "Pinkey" Isaacs Mortimer of
Freeport, Grand Bahama and their husbands
Gavin and Donald, Nettie Isaacs Peakes of
London, England and Debra Isaacs also
numerous nephews and nieces including,
Darmeeko Isaacs and Angelo Mortimer; niece,
Nikera Johnson; nephews, Nikimba, Nicuma
and Nishaka Johnson;3.
friends and relatives include, Natasha Young,
Brazil Been, Howard and Irene Howie,
Eleanor Brennen, Lindsay Shepard, Chia
Coakley, Pandora Clarke, Norman Rolle,
Yolanda and Craig, Stephanie Dean, Donna
Topey, Charmaine Holbert, Lana Smith,
Patrick Reid-Hepburn, Clive Guy, Orlando
Albury, Sharon Taylor, Tanisha Pinder, Leroy
Archer, Marie Stubbs, Vibart Wills, the Major
family especially Jasmine, The Larimors, The
Youngs, The Isaacs, The McKinneys, Kendal
and Ruby Nottage, Dr. Bernard and Portia
Nottage, Phillip Nottage, Sandra Nottage
Sherman and a host of other relatives and
friends.





Ms. Johnson has requested that everyone
celebrates her life at her memorial by wearing
bright colours and being as happy as she
was in life. In Lieu of flowers, donations can
-be made to the Cancer Society.


PAGE 10, FRID+.:, JANUARY 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





MONDAY «©



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm
to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month ‘at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doc-
tors Hospital conference room.

B@ CIVIC CLUBS :
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton,Monday's at 7pm ° Club
612315 meéts Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

THE Masi » hatad?

“ste Counc?!
J SLHC)-mects every oti
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nlenday of the

TUESDAY



@ HEALTH |

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
NageauGroupy Rosetta Street: Tyesday 6pm

Opm:.to.9:30pm.




s€ancér Sociét}edf the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Cal
364.8423 to register for more info. :

B@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at.7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College. Avenue off Moss Road. ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros e Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room @ Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at
the J P Whitney Building, First Terrace,
Collins Avenue.



WEDNESDAY |

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the

OO ARRIOLA LLL MEMES



"The brewery of The B

ARORA AR ROR ANOSR LORE ALAR NRA IISAMAE AONUMA ARES SSEROLENSES Cl? RSYONCORRMENLLERALSDICESLERA SIAMESE ERLE EMELINE LTE TN TEES NNN AON NE EE EN



public of its meeting times and places: New

rovidence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are
held the first Wednesday of every month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Cen-

. ter Blake Road. For more information call

327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure,

Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support
Group meets-every Wednesday from 5:30pm
to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors
south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors,
their family members and friends are invited
to attend. Phone 323.4482

m CIVIC CLUBS
The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets

every Wednesday from lpm - 2pm at East _

Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship.
If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail: to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the
public to its regular weekly meeting held
every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide ser-
vice organisation dedicated to changing the

- world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and
Petting Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from
10am to 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St
Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chip-
pingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make
reservations. Open to all ages and groups
Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the
4th floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting
Street, at 6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every
Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on





ahamas"

Ba@ry SHOWS
Third National Exhibition (ne3)

An expansive exhibition featuring 23 contemporary
Bahamian artists exploring a variety of ideas through
mediums ranging from photography to installation.
Exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue,

Funky Nassau

This exhibition first opened in Wiesbaden, Germany in
March 2006. It contains the work of eight artists and offers
samples of the best contemporary art being made by
Bahamian artists today. The pieces are edgy and compel-
ling and challenge the boundaries of Baharnian artistic
imagination,





UP UNTIL JAN 297, 2007












Carmichael Road. This event features
upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to
showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at
large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge.
See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at

-6pm in the Doctors Hospital ‘Conference

Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm.
For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous. wishes to inform the
public its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays
- 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and Related Challenges meets from
7pm - 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building
Blue Hill Road.

m CIVIC CLUBS oie)

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning at
7am at the British ColoniaI Hilton Hotel
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am)..

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill. meets
every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross
Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are
welcome. :

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend ¢ TM Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8:3Opm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Board Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its
weekly meeting, every Thursday at Choices
Restaurant on the campus of the College of
the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm,
with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.



AROUND








NASSAU




PHOTOS WELCOME





FRIDAY

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to
Tpm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence
Community Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

B CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s
Monastery. For more info:call 325.1947 after
4pm, .

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the commu-
nity. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to
attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.

SATURDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid class-
es are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

n CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR
Cycling arc pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clin-
ic will be held every Saturday in an effort
to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interest-
ed in registering their children should contact

organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - very
‘Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

SUNDAY

/@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society
Inc - A spiritual teaching society leading you
to greater peace of mind, health, prosperity
and happiness - holds Higher Consciousness

Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly

Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm
at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Interest-

.ed persons are welcome to attend. For more

information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach
pictures if possible) to The Tribune via fax:
328.2398 or e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net - Out there in the subject line.







eV de.

oo bh




Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows.



ANA 21/-6 sn
6/-14 -6/-21



AB pe
1 50/10 sh-
58/14 50/10 +

8/-13





54/12 35/1 c
Ss $21 35 c
30/-1 9/-12 sn 35/1 17/-8 pe






Honolulu
Houston:



erie CI peers BEEN. ees



Partly sunny and Partly cloudy.



Low: 72°

pene pi ty 1






High: 81°
Low: 65° F/18°C








Jacksonville Tans ¢ 60/15, c



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e =

Sete









LOW ¢- 1 HIGH V.HIGH



Partly sunny. intervals of clouds Sun and some Chance for a couple The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
and sunshine. clouds. of showers. ¢ _ 9redler the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 82° High: 82° High: 82° High: 82°
Low: 72° io in Low: as Low: 69°

i Mey peer) /

UNL eed aL




“The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today - 8:53am. 2.8 2:22am. -0.3
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the esate and the low for the bi ; )

Q1ipm. 23 3:10pm. 02



9:53p.m. 2.3 3:49pm. -04

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 0:13am. 25 352am. 01





ABACO Temperature . 10:35pm. 22 4:27pm. 01 |
High: 81° F/27°C Has: ee Monday 1052am. 23 4:37am. 00
Low: 66° F/19°C oe high ie ceeec 11:18pm. 2.2 5:05pm. 0.0
Z Normal loW ........cessesceseeseeee ssecbistcsscses BO” FAIS? C

Last:year's: RIQQ .24sicescxccsceccsssccascseney 80° F/26° C
Last year’s OW ........esessssesececeeeeees seeeee 69° F/21° C
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:56 a.m. Moonrise .... 7:44 p.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday .. 0.00” Sunset.......5:34p.m. Moonset ..... 8:41 a.m.









Year to date 0.00” 7
F/27°C Normal year to date .. 0.23” -= rae i
AccuWeather.com
All forecasts and maps provided by
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007
High: 84° F/29°C
_Low:72°F/22°C
CAT ISLAND :
Z High: 83° F/28°C
z - Low.67° F/A9°C :
SAN SALVADOR
- High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 70° F/21°C"

- -. MAYAGUANA
2 = = High: 85°F/29°C
Low: 71° F/22°C



Today
Low W High
, FAL F/C
, 5040 + B47
63/17





Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR

RAGGED ISLAND : =
High: 83° F/28" C Low:71° F/22°C
Low: 68° F/20° C :

GREAT INAGUA
High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 71° F/22°C



St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio







49/9 s 59/15



Washington, DC 66/18







Satirday 9:34am. 26 3:07am. -0.2




















High Low W High Low W
FIC FIC Fe F/t
Acapulco = 8881 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 s—
Amsterdam 48/8 45/7 5 «46/7 39/8 +
“Ankara, Turkey BAM 21-6 Sf 33/0 17/-8 ¢
Athens 49/9 44/6 pc 51/10 =41/5 pe
‘Auicldar 70/21 58/45 = 74/21. BOI Ss
Bangkok 89/31 72/22 pc 87/30 68/20 r
‘Barbados 85/29. 75123 pe ~3=———~=«~SiHDD»s- G4 ic
59/15 46/7 s 62/16 49/9 pc
25 7s = MA ABs:
58/14 53/11 t 60/15 54/12 5
I 38/8 B20 SA SSA Si
42/5 36/2 c 46/7 33/0 c
70/21 6497s = =—s« 72/22: «GAT s

69/20 45/7 c 70/21 eS




















Budapest 42/5 37/2 5
Buenos Aires. BAT pe >
Cairo 49/9 pc
Calgary

- Cancun

Caracas

Copenhagen 45/7 “40/4 pe

Dublin 50A0 39/3 pe

Frankfurt 40/4 34/16

Geitva 0 BBR BOF sh

Halifax 49/9 37/2 ¢

Havana 882B BEB pe

Helsinki 37/2 35/1

Hong Kong’) 67/19 SIMO

Islamabad 70/21 43/6

Istanbal AiG =) 35/4

Jerusalem 49/9 45/7

Johannesburg 81/27 55/12 -

Kingston 86/30 76/24

Lina Se 76/24. 70/21 c¢ ~=——S*B4/2Be SP 7H/2i cc
London 52/1 43/6 sh 48/8 45/7 r
Madrid 5512 320 pe «+5542 ~—-32/0 pe
Manila 86/30 73/22 pc 87/30 73/22 pc
Mexico City: : 76/24 40/4 pe = 77/25«~=s «40/A Ss
Monterrey : 83/28 55/12 s 58/14 _ 38/3 s
Montreal ~ ae 4577 37/24 —s«- 44/G—C“‘sB
Moscow 29/-1 25/-3 sn 30/-1 29/-1 sn
Munich : “6 3724 ABCD
Nairobi 76/24 S5iM0r —- 80/26_—-$4/12 pe
New Delhi = . 722 43/6 s —— «69/20. 41H s
Oslo 30/-1 25/-3 pe 32/0 28/-2 sn
Paris. - Ales 48/8 467 r =———iéw AS
Prague 42/5 34/1 c 42/5 38/3 5
Rio de Janeiro — 2 B4/OB 7222 t= BID Tale E-
Riyadh 6417 49/9 s 67/19 48/8 s
Rome a _ 5814 40/4 pe - 5AN2 43/6 pe
St. Thomas 84/28 73/22 pc 85/29 73/22 s°
SanJuan . 95/85 69/20 pe —« 91/82 —-GE/18 pc
San Salvador 89/31 68/20 pc 89/31 69/20 pc
Santiago =—s—i<‘as#é(
Santo Dom go 83/28 68/20 pc 83/28 67/19 pc
on 3R2 OAL et 7121 B47
45/7 20/-6 pc 25/-3 15/-9 c
42/5 26/-3 pe 36/2 36/2 c
77/25 66/18 s 84/28 70/21 s
679 56/3 pe 595 © 48/8 pe
48/8 40/4 s 53/11 a ro











Winnipeg ~ 25/-3 10/-12 pe 44/-10 8/-13 pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace





sencndiail

cress

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY
NASSAU = Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet 6-7 Miles
E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-7 Miles
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles















14
ABACO Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots - 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles TF
Saturday E at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles re pal





[= 3&3 T-storms

[0°27 Rain

[* *] Flurries

BK Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

[yy] i precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
ce Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Or you can rest easy knowing that you

have excellent insurance coverage
_no matter which way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Abaco Eleuthera Exego
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1\
J
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



alvation Army setves
Christmas lunch to
more than 500 people

By 11am, Majors Lester and
Beverley Ferguson knew they
would have an overflow crowd,
maybe a record number, for
their annual Christmas lunch.

Already guests were lined up

outside, holiday dress and holi-

day smiles - an elderly man
smoothing out his shirt to cover
the tear in his pants, a woman
straightening a feather on a hat
that had seen better church
days. They came by foot, a few
lucky ones by bus.

“We never know for sure,”
said Major Ferguson, divisional
commander of the Salvation
Army. “After all, it’s not the
kind of invitation that comes
with a request to RSVP.”

But it is the kind of event that
brings rounds of cheer and a
kind of unspoken appreciation.
And this year, more than 500
turned out for the Christmas
service and meal provided by
volunteers and staff at the Sal-



gS

ALVATION Army volunteers served more than 500 persons




gathered at the Citadel, the Salvation Army’s headquarters on
Mackey Street, at the annual Christmas luncheon

vation Army headquarters on
Mackey Street.

"

Voices rang out in church, a
spiritual: appetite builder for

what was to come. Boxed lunch-
es were holiday feasts, Bahami-
an style — ham, turkey, maca-
roni and cheese, peas ’n rice.
Sodas and juices were donated
by Caribbean Bottling Co.
Friends like Bahamas Super-
markets Limited, operators of
City Market stores, helped.
‘The Christmas lunch was the
start of the Salvation Army’s
season for sharing. Staff and
volunteers will be calling on
the elderly, the forgotten, shut-
ins, the needy, often bringing

them the only gifts they will

receive.

Their aim: 3,325 packages of
practical presents - toiletries,
books for children, toys for little
ones. They want to serve 625
meals and distribute 1,225
vouchers for ham, turkey and
other food and grocery items.

They will deliver more than
900 care packages for persons in
hospitals and special care cen-

COB holds science and tec

THE School of Sciences and

Technology at the College of |

the Bahamas held its annual
Science and Technology
Awareness Week from Novem-
ber 6 to 9 this year.

The week was held under the
theme: “students making a dif-
ference in science and technol-
ogy.”

The opening, which featured
alumnus Julian Blair, an engi-
neer at General Motors in
Detroit, Michigan, heralded
four days of exhibitions, pre-
sentations and symposia that all
highlighted the ways in which
COB alumni and present stu-
dents are making or could make
a difference.

“Going hand in hand with
that focus was a very clear
emphasis on healthy’ lifestyles
which included a symposium on
traditional medicine, a town
meeting on the environment
and our health, a blood drive
organised by the Science Club
and an open forum on career
opportunities with the Ministry
of Health and Environment,”
noted COB is a statement.

Pervading all the activities
was the message that “there is
nothing that is not science.”

At the opening ceremony,
Dean of Pure and Applied Sci-
ences, Dr Kathleen Sullivan-
Sealey, emphasised “the impor-
tance of the application of sci-
entific research to the develop-
ment of the quality of life in an
island nation such as the
Bahamas” and college president
Janyne M Hodder stated that
she regards activities such as the
Science and Technology
Awareness Week as “core to
the college’s mission of reaching
out to the community to attract
stellar students to study in the
laboratories of the University
of the Bahamas”.

Mr Blair, whose mother was
chairperson of the Division of
Natural Sciences when Science
Awareness Week first began 21
years ago, and who is still a
member of the science faculty,
spoke about “the different areas
where scientific expertise is
going to be required in our
country: the storage of lique-
fied natural gas, the production
‘ of potable water, the construc-
tion of hotels, the enhanced
information technology in com-
munications and tourism, alter-
native methods of generating
power, improvements in trans-
portation and the area of
health.”

He urged students to be
aware of the “awesome respon-
sibility” they bear towards the
world in which we live and to
embrace new techniques so they
can help to firid innovative solu-
tions to the problems facing the
Bahamas.

Six members of faculty made
presentations at the town meet-
ing on the environment and our
health and covered a wide range
of topics: Lester Flowers, assis-
tant professor of. biology,
focused on automobile emis-
sions; assistant professor of biol-
ogy, Ms Joyanne Thompson,
presented on the unsuitability
of the traditional Bahamian diet
to a healthy lifestyle; Henry
Hepburn, assistant professor in
the technology department,
looked at the built environment
and expressed concern at what
he termed “inconsistencies in
certain policies regarding the
approval for structures to be
built”; head of the Physics
Department, Alex Farley, spoke
about another type of pollution
— noise — and its detrimental
effects; dean of the School of
Sciences and Technology, Dr
Kathleen Sealey, addressed the
topic of deep sea pollution; and
assistant professor of chemistry,
Mrs Judith Blair, spoke about
the dangers of fresh water pol-
lution.

Two alumni who are now
medical doctors, Rickey Davis
and Duvaughn Curling pre-
sented their experiences at the
symposium on traditional med-
icine.

Davis described some of his
experiences at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Accident and
Emergency Department and
Curling, an oncologist, talked

-about cancer and its treatment,

Both also spent time impress-
ing on the student audience the
need for responsible sexual
activity.

The monthly Research Edge
Forum was a presentation by
head of Science at CC Sweeting

Senior High School, Ms Dar-.

lene Edwards, who investigated
student attitudes towards math;
ematics and science in three
Nassau secondary schools.

One of her findings had sci-
ence faculty shaking their heads
in confusion: students felt that
knowledge of math and science
would help them to earn a good
living but they did not expect
to use math or science after they
had left school.

There-was also a student sym-

posium featuring the studies
performed by biology and
chemistry majors, Anastacia
Pierre and Everton Joseph, who
reported respectively on the
invasion of non-indigenous
household geckoes in the
Bahamas and the habitats of
one of the world’s rarest birds,
the Kirtland Warbler, that
migrates to Bahamian shores
each winter.












The open forum on careers
in health care was noteworthy
in that three alumnae were fea-
tured as presenters: Nikessa
Malcolm informed the assem-
bled students of the wealth of
opportunities in health care
and also spoke about projects
for the future such as mini clin-
ics and new hospitals on cer-
tain Family Islands; Pamela
Bowe, senior education officer



tres — senior citizens’ homes,
children’s homes.

“Giving to others, sharing in
spirit and hope and prayer, and
remembering the real reason

in the Ministry of Health and

* National Insurance, explained

the need for health educators
who can supply the population
with self-health management
skills; and Jalna Bullard, a
national blood procurement
officer, informed the audience
about careers in medical tech-
nology. ,

The fourth presenter at this
forum was Carmelta Barnes; a

our new location
our contin

@ HANDING out meals to the grateful guests



for Christmas are what make
the season so special and every
year we are thankful to be part
of it and do our part in it,” said
Major Ferguson.



nutritionist, who gave advice on
careers in food science and
explained the social impact of
food. nie 7

In her remarks at the short
closing ceremony, chairperson
of the School of Sciences and
Technology, Bridget Hogg,
called the week “a wonderful
experience” and encouraged
more students to be presenters
in 2007.

uing commitment

On January 8 our Financial Services
Sales Representatives at Collins Avense
will move to new offices on East Bay
Street (the former IBM Building).

| Visit or call your Agent
| at our convenient new location,
telephone number 326-1040.

emium payment functions will be
ansferred from Collins Avenue to our
arbour Bay (BahamaHealth) office.

FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY








a





_@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

¢ 6 Unanticipated
delays” in securing
approval from the
Bahamian govern-

ment for its multi-

million dollar liquefied natur-
al gas (LNG) terminal and
pipeline ori Ocean Cay have
forced the AES Corporation
to plead with US regulators
for a four-year extension to



the date when the project will

be completed.

Documents filed with the .

Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission (FERC), which
have been seen by Thé Tri-
bune, contain AES’s request
for US regulators to extend
the date at which Ocean Cay
will begin supplying Florida’s.
power stations with LNG from

- January 29, 2007, to January
29, 2011.

The motion for this exten-
sion, drafted by AES’ US

attorneys, Baker Botts, said .

the delay had been caused by
the Bahamian government
deciding to draft regulation to
govern how the Ocean Cay
terminal operated before the
project. was approved...

“An extension of the in-ser-
vice date is necessary because
Ocean Express has been

unable to commence con-

struction of the pipeline due
to unanticipated delays in
securing final approval from
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas for the construction
of related facilities,” the AES
motion said.

- “This delay is largely due to
the time required for the
Bahamas to develop regula-
tions to govern the LNG ter-
minal that will be built in the
Bahamas, and the associated
non-jurisdictional pipeline

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



ries del oapartine
§ LNG approval in US |

‘Government undertaking ‘final review’ of LNG regulations,



with approval of pipeline and terminal expected ‘soon’ after

facilities that will interconnect

with the Ocean Express

pipeline.

“Ocean Express anticipates
that the Bahamian govern-
ment will soon complete work
on these regulations, followed
thereafter by final Bahamian
approval of the terminal and
pipeline facilities that are sub-
ject to Bahamian jurisdiction.”

AES said it was seeking the
FERC extension to give it
time to obtain approval from
the Bahamas, and complete
construction of the terminal
and pipeline. :

In truth, the extension
request is likely to be
approved by the FERC, giv-
en that there is a precedent
for more time to be granted

to LNG suppliers when facili-

ties in other jurisdictions are

-involved.

In its motion, AES pointed
out that the FERC had recent-
ly granted a request by Port
Arthur LNG for eight years,
rather than the original five,
to build approved LNG facili-
ties in Louisiana and Texas.

The company pointed out
that the situation was similar
to the one it faced in the
Bahamas, with Port Arthur
LNG needing to obtain envi-
ronmental approvals and per-
mits.

AES Ocean Express has
already obtained one exten-
sion from the FERC, which
increased the time to complete
the terminal and pipeline con-
struction from two years to

Association: developers
‘trying to strangle’ us

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Save Guana Cay Reef
Association has accused the
developers behind the contro-
versial $175 million Baker’s Bay
Golf & Ocean Club of “trying
to strangle” its attempts to halt

_the project through legal action,

demanding that it pay a
$100,000 security for costs relat-

ed to its appeal action.

The Association is now await-
ing a date from-the Court of

Appeal at which to appeal the

substantive issues relating to a

Supreme Court verdict by Act- .

ing Justice Norris Carroll, which .

refused all its applications and
arguments to halt the develop-

- ment.
Fred Smith, a partner in Cal-

lender’s & Co and the Associa-
tion’s attorney, told The Tri-

~bune that he was preparing a

motion seeking a “stay” or halt
to all work on Baker’s Bay
“pending the hearing of the
appeal”.

He added: “The developers
are once again trying to strangle
the Association. They have

SEE page 5B

Tax base ‘out of whack’
with GDP growth

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has no choice
but to eventually change its tax-
ation system, the minister of state
for finance indicated yesterday,
because the current revenue base
is “out of wae with the rate of
growth in the overall economy.

James Smith told The Tribune
that any shift from the current
structure, largely based upon cus-
toms and import duties, plus
tourism taxes, was “far away”,

_ and the Ministry of Finance was

still “in the research and devel-
opment stage” of assessing what
alternative system was the best
option. i

Yet whild the project was “a
work in progress” and one for

the long-term that would pass
through several governments, Mr

Smith said.change to the-coun-’

try’s tax structure eventually
seemed inevitable.

“We're not kind of zeroing in
on anything at all, but what we
do know is that the existing sys-
tem lacks the flexibility we need
going forward,” Mr Smith said.

He added ‘that the Govern-
ment needed a tax structure that
“provides more flexibility and
buoyancy”, particularly during
an economic downturn or when
the Bahamian economy suffered
an external shock. —

Mr Smith said VAT (value
added tax) “looks like a more

” SEE page 3B



@ LESLIE MILLER

three years. The final approval
for Ocean Express was
received from the US on Jan-
uary 29, 2004, meaning it has
until the end of this month to
complete - an impossible task
- unless FERC approves the
request.

The “interdependence” of
the proposed Bahamian and
US facilities has led AES
Ocean Express to argue that it
cannot begin construction in
either nation until all
approvals are in from both
jurisdictions.

“When Ocean Express first
requested an extension of
time, it anticipated that
Bahamian approval of the
non-jurisdictional facilities
would soon be forthcoming,”
AES pleaded to FERC.

“As a result of unexpected
delays, however, including the
time required for the develop-
ment and issuance of regula-
tions to govern the operation,
construction and decommis-

| think life insur






sioning phases of Bahamian
LNG facilities, formal
Bahamian approval has not
been issued.
“Ocean Express under-
stands that the Bahamian gov-
ernment is now undertaking a
final review of the regulations

to govern LNG facilities, and.

that this process will soon be
complete.”

And the AES motion
added: “While AES has made
diligent, good faith efforts to
satisfy the requirements of the
Commission orders approving
the project, the necessary
approval is not within Ocean
Express’s control........ ’

“Gas demand in the south-

eastern Florida area continues
to increase, with a significant

part of the increase attribut- .

able to the use of gas to fuel
electric power plants.”

Denying AES’s motion to

extend the project completion
deadline would, the company
said, “cause Ocean Express to
lose millions already invested
and depriye gas and electric
customers in the southeastern
Florida area of much needed
access to additional supplies
of competitively priced gas”.
The AES LNG terminal on
Ocean Cay, a man-made
island near Bimini, would re-
gas LNG brought by ship to
the island in liquid form. A 95-
mile pipeline would then take
some 842,000 dekatherms of
LNG to Florida per day,
where it will supply the state’s
electricity needs. .

- desire for the AES proje

We've got plans tha

Both former Florida gover-
nor Jeb Bush and US officials

have previously impres ed

upon the Government ¢





of



be approved, given the sté
power demand. es
AES has been waiting

patiently for five years - having '

spent some $65 million
between June 2001 and Feb-
ruary 2006 to keep the project
alive - for a decision from the

Prime Minister and his Cabi-~

net.
A Heads of Agreement has
been drafted, and is only

awaiting a final government’

sign-off. Yet the Prime Minis-
ter has proceeded at a cautious
pace on LNG, concerned over
whether it fits in with the
Bahamas’ tourism image, amid
a lobbying campaign against

the project by environmental- -

ists. .
He is-also concerned about

- whether the Bahamas has the

resources and expertise to
monitor and enforce an envi-
ronmental management plan
for Ocean Cay, hence the
drafting of regulations before
the project is approved.

Yet the Bahamas Environ-
ment, Science and Technology
Commission (BEST)
approved AES's Enyiron-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) back in 2003.,

Several sources had previ-

ously expressed concern to

The Tribune that the contin-
ued delay, leaving AES Ocean
Express hanging on by its fin-




Ree




x

F CENTRE: EXST BAY STREET. ASSAY ROL ROSSER!

gerprints, could damage the
Bahamas' reputation in the
eyes of potential foreign
investors - the key driver of
thiseconomy.

In its EIA, completed, back

“in 2002, AES Ocean Express

said the implications of not
proceeding with the project
were "significant" for both the

Bahamas and Florida.

-~"In the Bahamas, the 'no
action' alternative would mean
the loss of additional reliable
and economical natural gas:
and freshwater supplies, and
certain economic and socioe-
conomic benefits associated
with the project, such as per-
manent and temporary

“employment and training

opportunities, tax and other

' revenue streams, and new —
- housing and related facilities

construction," the EIA said.
Leslie Miller, minister of

’ agriculture and fisheries, has

previously said the Bahamas —

- could earn $1.2 billion in rev-
enue over the lifetime of the

AES project.
When completed, the pro-
ject promises to create perma-
nent jobs that could be filled
by Bahamians with. engineer-
ing and science-related
degrees and qualifications.
Such skilled workers have rel-
atively few opportunities in
the current economy, and the
AES project would give much-*
needed diversification.

SEE page 5B

ance only benefits
the ones you

| leave behind?
RealityCheck. = Ey eo iy Fag, 2 ee
t provide savings and protection.

So you can enjoy peace of mind today, :
knowing tomorrow is secure.

Call or log on to www.familyguardian.com today! -





MPANY


THE TRIBUNE




BUSINESS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 200/, PAGE 56

PI condo buyers will not
_have to pay Stamp Tax

gi By CARA BRENNEN- BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter



BUYERS of the 495 units at The Residences
of Atlantis are apparently to be offered a tax
concession when they buy into the exclusive
condominium hotel on Paradise Island.

According to Irish media, buyers will not
have to pay the standard five per cent Stamp
Tax usually required in real estate purchases in
the Bahamas, as this will be covered by the

. developers. The condotel is a joint venture

of the details regarding the tax incentives for
Residences buyers, but said he would gather
additional information for The Tribune.

The Residences at Atlantis is a 22-storey
beachfront condominium scheduled for com-

pletion by next Christmas.

The development includes 495 junior, one
and two-bedroom suites with prices starting

at $700,000.

’. between Kerzner International and Turnberry __ ing.

Associates.

.. Purchases of land or real estate in the
Bahamas require a 10 per cent Stamp Tax pay-
ment to the Public Treasury, which is split

between seller and buyer.

However, in this case the developers have
agreed to pay the entire 10 per cent cost.

Ed Fields, vice-president of public affairs

at Kerzner International, said he was not aware





Chancellors
promotes Storr
to partnership

*. CHANCELLORS Chambers has
promoted Merrit A Storr to the part-
nership with effect from January 1,
2007.

Mr Storr specialises in hotel and
resort development, real estate and
commercial litigation. He has exten-
sive practical experience in the hospi-
tality industry, which assists him in act-
ing for resort and real estate develop-
ments within the Bahamas.

Kenred M. A. Dorsett, the firm’s
managing partner, said Mr Storr’s pro-
motion to the partnership showed the
confidence and respect he had
obtained from the firm’s clients.

Mr Storr will be responsible for the
firm’s Grand Bahama office.



Purchasers will also have access to all the
amenities of the Atlantis resorts.
Construction began last June on The Resi-

dences at Atlantis.

Deposits for 179 units — more than a third
— had been received then, and in July the
joint venture partners finalised a $277 million
loan to finance construction and sales and mar-

keting for the property.

TAX BASE, from page 1B

flexible option”. This tax, which already
operates in many Caribbean countries and
across the world, is levied on services -
the current customs duty system only tax-
es consumption - and is imposed at each
stage in the production chain.

This means that VAT is not only levied
when the product is sold to the final con-
sumer or user, but also when it is sold by
the manufacturer to wholesalers, from
wholesalers to distributors, and from dis-
tributors to retailers.

Mr Smith said that for the Bahamas,
given its small manufacturing base and
generally few links in the chain of pro-
duction, a combination of a Vat and sales
tax might be a better option.

“As we move forward and greater
demand is placed on the public sector for
the provision of services, the ability to do
that is already being constrained in the
sense that we’re only taking taxes on
goods,” Mr Smith said. .

“As the economy is primarily service-
based, the rate of growth in the revenue
base in proportion to GDP is getting out
of whack.”

HIGGS & JOHNSON




f\ O}M"

ior Partner of Higgs & Johnson, is pleased to announce that
ith and Tara A. A. Archer have joined the firm's partnership.

The Residences will have a private owners’
lounge and fully-staffed lobby, swimming pool,
restaurant and 24-hour security and valet park-

He pointed out that the problems
caused by the current omission of services
from taxation, and the relatively narrow
revenue base, were best exposed in the
immediate aftermath of the September
11, 2001, terror attacks.

Flights

With no flights to the Bahamas bringing
in tourists, and the temporary closure of
all US seaports, tourists and imports
“dried up”, Mr Smith said, directly impact-
ing government revenues. However, the
services industries did not stop, and he
added that taxes tied more to consump-
tion and income would give the Bahamas
a better opportunity to “adjust to new cir-
cumstances”.

Mr Smith said a government ream had
visited other Caribbean countries, “par-
ticularly Barbados”, to see how their tasx
systems operated, and submitted a report
and study on this and the options for the
Bahamas. He added that the Bahamas
was still at the first step in tax reform,
research, and that nothing would happen
before the general election. Once the
research was completed, the process
would move to the analysis stage, and










J



\

we



once the way forward was. developed, a
white paper would be released to the
Bahamian public and private sector.

A round of consultation with various
stakeholders would follow, and then the
effort would move to assessing feedback
and briefing policymakers.

Mr Smith said it was critical to the suc-
cess of any tax reform that the initiative
was bought into by the majority of
Bahamians, with education playing a key
part in informing the public how a new tax
would be applied, who was affected by it,
and their obligations under the new
regime. Another critical role would be
played by information technology.

The Government is also engaged in an
effort to maximise the revenues’ derived
from the existing tax system, and Mr
Smith said: “We need to know exactly
what we’re getting from the combination
of taxes we have now, and get it in as effi-
cient a manner as possible.

“We’re seeing some measure of suc-
cess. Any number of loopholes and inef-
ficiencies have been tackled. We’ve seen a
number of gains without applying any new
or increased taxes. We’ve learnt more
about the system, which will help us going
forward.”

H CONSTRUCTION
on the 22-storey
beachfront condo on
Paradise Island began
in June last year.

(FILE photo)



Clarification

IN an article on Page 3B -
of yesterday’s Tribune
Business séction, it was
reported that Robert
Nihon, managing director
We eee Ree toot PTI
Global Partners, had been }
appointed as a director of |
Dynasty Gaming Inc, an

online gaming operation. ©
MAP TOE OM COU PT GOYAL Lee
the Robert Nihon in ques- ©
tion is Robert Nihon II.



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

[N. LEROY SMITH joined Higgs & Johnson in
2000 and is a practitioner in the firm’s Litigation
Practice Group. He has had a particular focus on all
facets. of trust law including representing fiduciaries
individual clients (both private and institutional)
f trust and estate litigation; and advising
cal institutional clients in the
) of Bahamian trusts. In
erience working








CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Investment Manager
Bahamas

dra ng iG
addition, Mr. Smith ha
in contentious .and no




















and recovery matters), telecommunications la : :
maritime law. He also regularly counsels a nu of =< Qualifications:

local and international companies and insurers in
relation to personal injury, defamation and \
tort-based claims.



N. Leroy Smith

¢ Recognised Investment qualification (e.g. Chartered Financial Analyst).

¢ Professional Qualification in Banking or Accounting.

¢ Thorough knowledge of Investment and Captive Insurance operations.

¢ Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.

¢ Detailed and technical knowledge of Investment management and the Bank’s
investment product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals,
International Business Companies and Captives.

e Sound experience in global capital markets

° Good knowledge of specific sales management and business development
processes.

¢ Understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management. Including Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and
analytical depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual
stock picks















Mr. Smith obta
to the Bar of
earned an LL.M
Mr. Smith has
editorial board

n LL.B. (Hons.) from the University of Southampton and w
d and Wales and to the Bahamas Bar in 1998. He subs
orporate and Commercial Law at the University College of
ibuted to Tolley’s International Succession Laws and
irm’s client publication, FOCUS. In June 2006 he
e in Company Law and Practice by S.T.E.P. ]




















is a practitioner in the firm's
She has over seven years of
practice is concentrated in
cial litigation, banking and
t law and admiralty law.
or co-counsel in a number
nd local cases, including
iana Limited and Globe-X
cas International Bank (In
Bank Ltd (In Liquidation).
to major international and
ers regarding cross-border
gation, asset-tracing and
nal operations.



General Requirements/Responsibilities:

¢ Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio
management or financial advisory experience

° Must have experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing
social, religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

° Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net
worth clients.

¢ Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable.

¢ Must be able to deliver a high level of service providing expert investment
advice and execution to the Bank’s investment clients, with the aim of
developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

¢ Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both
corporate and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This
includes a full understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of
portfolio diversification.












Tara A. A. Archer:

yved as President of the La’
o the Bahamas Barin 199
ind the Center for Internationa
@ College of The Bahamas and.
ber 2006 she was appointed
nal Bar Association. She






he University of Essex, where sh¢
the Bar of England and Wales @






Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
January 12th, 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux @ FirstCaribbeanBank.com

Ge

from the Management and Staff of HIGGS & JOHNSON.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

HIGGS & JOHNSON

CET a EE

TE

i

oa

\ Pe reRsEr aN NETH ETE ——

SPIE AVY

|
'

a a a
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2006, PAGE 7B











YOU PROMISED
YOu'D HELP ME

CHECK OUT THESE PHOTOS OF )_]

MY GRANDKIOS ON MY NEW
CAMERA PHONE )g









1

~~



THEAL NE WAR, STUCK
ON AN (CG FLO WITH A
POLAK BAAR. ONLY:
KA WIRACLE COULR
SNE US NOW...

‘DIP You SAY
YOUR PRAYERS?

© 2006 by ing Fextures Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved







ACROSS

When Uncle's on the plane, this gets
thrown out (6)

It gives fii;hty fellows lofty airs (8)
8 — Ifinthe right, makes a
- orack (4)
10 Strike in cycle
production (6)
11 Before this, things were 0
antadeluvian! (6)
14 Figure the net return (3)
16 Being thomy, can
"cause soréa (5)
17 The broad highway (4)
1 inadvertently dropped an apple core
into the sediment (5)
21 Sally's love to get
into the fight (5)
22 Apply for the job as president? (3,2)
23 One of tne greatest
trials in port? (4)
26 = it's bound to have
"— mape in (6)
28 Fare reduced for long distance (3)
20 Like Citizen Kane, a
press tycoon (8)
30 Lady upeet by arson out East (6)
31 Poultry inthe kitchen
sink (4)
32 Inflationary service? (3,5)
33 immediate credit
available (6)

Yesterday’s cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 3, Games 8, Manor 10, Stall 11, Car(-e'er) 12,
R-O-te 13, Cent-R-a-L 15, Errol 18, Re-d 19, Den-ote 21,
Mard-mum 22, OK-ay 23, Pert 24, D-apple-d 26, Petrol 29,
Eat 31, Stain 32, Ordered 34, G-alas 35, Rub 36, De-b-it
37, Venus 38, Delta
DOWN: 1, Rao-Ed 2, P-or-tray 4, AW-O-L 5, E-steem 6,
Stem 7, Alot Q, Nan 12, Radi-Cal. 14, Re-X 16, Ro-we-d
17, Leith 19, Oumpers 20, Corps 21, Malta (GC) 23, Peter-
Ed 24, Donete 25, Lad 27, Ether 28, Rigid 30, D-ebut 32,
Oaet 33, Aun

YOU ARE OVERRUN
WITH MICE, MA'AM/

WELL, WHAT DO YOU THINK, MARVIN?
les O

Bp Co
ae

CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

IMPOSSIBLE!’
WE HAVE A
GOOD INDUSTRIAL
Ex TERMINATOR’

GINA, YOU MUSTN'T] HE'S NOT YOUNG )“marco
WMPOSE ON THE ;
PROFESSOR.

ANYMORE. H






PERSONA



DOWN

1
2

BRRBK

8B8

Funny old foo! (6)

Like a drink with something

fishy in it (6)

The drinks may be on them (4)
Being mean means misery around
the corner (7)

As wom, very shortly,

for the ballet (5)

Old associates of the Persians, me
boy! (5)

Woman's charitable heart (4)

Like a low district in parts

of England (3)

Plenty of money to back with! (3)
In cars, they're mostly forward (5)
Holly possibly upsets prigs (5)
Address some of the electorate (5)
Is it almost a toss-up whether he's
sober? (3)

Aname half nailed up (3)

Fathead the Americans see as
pernickety (7)

Standard amount of preparation (3)
Person employed as a beater? (6)
Greek god of cupidity? (4)
Relax during a race (in China?) (3,3)
Amanly advert for getting
on in life (5)
Nominal layabout with a posh car (5)
The price of café espresso (3)
The ship had cast off (4)

Yesterday's easy solutions

88, Edges

33, Tip

RESPECT...
YOU HAVE

INDUSTRIAL
Ex TERMINATOR/

STRRNING, BOT
NV Not THAT



LUN, WARREN , FT WOULDN'T
BOTHER USING “SMILE WHITENER ”
UNTIL I HAD MORE THAN EIGHT TEETH

ENGIENE



LI THINK IM ON |
"CALL WAITING

=
N
=
a



EASY PUZZLE



ACROSS: 3, Stoop 8, Facet 10, Renal 11, Tug 12, Bread 13,
Caravan 15, Taper 18, Tin 19, Polite 21, Steamer 22, Plea
23, Food 24, Halibut 26, Erases 29, Car 91, Dinar 32,
Capital 34, Basin 35, Oil 36, Still 37, Dupes

DOWN: 1, Fatal 2, Regatta 4, Tum 5, Orator 6, Pedal 7,
Cadet 9, Cur 12, Bananas 14, Vie 16, Plot 17, Ready 19,
Pelican 20, Speed 21, Sedan 23, Furious 24,

Herald 25, Bap 27, Plots 28, Sable 30, Valet 22, Cite










WALKS IN
NNSTER ove
WANS, FLO











PS i > au

ACROSS
Recluse (6)

Cutlery item (5)
Zodiac sign (3)
Shed (4-2)
Insect (6)

1

7

8

10

11

14

16

17

19

21
22. ‘Type of wood (5)
23

26

28
29

30

31 Ald in crime (4)
32
33

N
| 4

COMICS PAGE

Good Judgment Is a Key Factor

WEST
1052
Â¥A10865

32

#973

*OH, DENNIS, You
SHOULDN'T HAVE.”





South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH
#K8763
Â¥43
73
“A842
EAST
#Q94
vy92
#10854
#QI6
SOUTH
AJ
Â¥KQ7
@AKQ96
#K 105

The bidding:
South
2NT
oe lead ix of hearts

ing lead —- six of hearts.
Rtost at the decisions one makes
at the table are clear-cut. There is an
obvious bid or play to make, and it is

North East
34 Pass

West
Pass

made without much thought.

But there are times when what
should be done is not so clear, and
these are the times when good judg-
ment is the decisive factor and when
failure to judge correctly can prove

very costly.





!

HOW many words of four

letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must

contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 17; very good 26;
excellent .33 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.








Stain (4)
Frozen water (3)
And not (3)

Excite (5)
Wild (5)

RERan AWN
3
&
8
Ss

=
mw

(5)

=
oo

Cotour (3)
Conifer (3)
Say in passing (7)
Swindle (3)
Proper (6)
Defeat (4)
Wilt (6)
Inctination (5)
Desert’s fertile
patch (5)
Throw (3)
30 Animal fat (4)

28

B NBREBR

“THATS EXACTLY WHAT
T TOLD MY MOM.” :

RGET






































HEY STUPID! 11's TOO WARM
T BUILD A SNONMAN ?



THIS SCULPTURE 1S ABOUT
TRANSIENCE. AS THIS





WEWER TO CONTEMPLATE THE | Ky
EVANESCENCE OF LIFE,
THIS PIECE SPEAKS
TO THE HORROR OF
OUR OWN, MORTALITY!



FRIDAY,
JANUARY 5

ARIES — March 21/April 20
It’s time to save up your pennies,
Aries, there is some rough financial
road ahead. You may want tO con-
sider taking up some temporary part-
‘time work to get you through.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
Expect some major changes. at the
workplace by Wednesday, Taurus.
It is bound to cause some commo-
tion. Extra stress at work makes
home life a little tricky this week.

GEMINI — May 22/June 21
Keep clear of an upset family. mem-
ber on Tuesday, Gemini, this person
is only bound to ruin your good
mood. Your love like takes an unex-
pected turn for the better.
CANCER - June 22/July 22
Sarcasm can be your downfall on
Tuesday, Cancer. Best to keep
quiet for a while and remain busy.
You’ll be needed to put in extra
hours at work, but the rewards will
probably be generous.

LEO - July 23/August 23 .
Life is the cat’s meow for you, Leo. A
big raise seems imminent and a promo-
tion is not too far on the horizon. Your
positive mood can only be enhanced by
a chance encounter this weekend.

VIRGO — Aug -24/Sept 22

It seems that things are looking up
for you, Virgo. You're finally out
of the slump that’s been bogging
you down lately. A better mood
frees up more time for recreation.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 +
Your patience is tested at work on
Thursday. Too many technical diffi-
culties with faulty equipment cause
your temperature to rise. Just be
level-headed and hope for the best.
SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
Stress has driven you over the edge
on more than one occasion in the’
past, but this week you’ve finally
found the formula for remaining
calm. Expect dinner plans for Friday.
SAGITTARIUS — Noy 23/Dee 21
You need to find a new interest,
Sagittarius. Why not adopt a pet to
focus your attention in a different

For example, take this case where
you're in three notrump. West leads
the heart six, and East plays the jack.
Do you win the jack, or do you duck
it?

If you duck, East returns a heart,
and West, a first-class defender, lets
you win the trick. You are now a
dead duck, whatever you do next,
and you go down one.

Now let’s go back to trick one and
take the jack of hearts with the king.
If you blithely cash the A-K-Q of
diamonds, hoping the suit divides 3-
3 or West has four of them, this is not
your lucky day. If and when you lead
another diamond, East takes it with
the ten and returns a heart, and down

you go.

Then how should you play the |
hand, you might ask? The answer is
that you should win the first trick,
cross to dummy with a club and then
return a diamond, planning to finesse
the nine if East follows low.

True, the nine loses to West’s jack,
but you are then on Easy Street.
Whatever West returns, you score
two spades, a heart, four diamonds
and two clubs and are well-rewarded
for the extra energy you expended at
the outset.

grade grader guard radar raga

rage raged rager rare rarer

E
Z
:
:
3

a
5
E
8
5
z
z
g
z

agar area argue argued arguer

arrear auger aura dare darer

dear drag dreg drug gear

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION

leaves you anxious — an old flame
will rattle your nerves.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
Stop butting heads with that coworker.

masking the underlying attraction you
feel for each other, Capricom. Accept
the truth and pursue this atiractive catch.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Stop being so hard on yourself,
Aquarius. You are your own worst
critic — others around you don’t
judge you as harshly. Leave room for
self-indulgence on Friday. i
PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
Your relationship is bound to end. this
week, Pisces, but it’s not your fault.
This person is just not ready for a
long-term commitment. Remember,
there are other fish in the sea.

CHESS by Rte Ike) Barden








new

word
| router |

Cola re aah
transfers mes-
BS: (Cee Yet ac eLeLA)
computers



Anatoly Karpov v Zoltan Ribli,
Dubai Olympiad 1986. Dubal
was a controversial occasion
where the golden Soviets,
even though they were led by
the all-time greats Karpev and
Garry Kasparov, struggled to
contain a strong challenge
from the United States and
England. America's number
one Yasser Seirawan
outplayed Kasparov, and »

ra
in

pel [pe
Bee

i



England were clear with only Bs
two rounds left. Then Russian ne
coaches openly gave advice

during play to the Spaniards g 4h

in their critical encounter with
the English grandmasters,

who lost concentration and found a winning tactic. What
with it the gold medals. One happened?

memorable moment at Dubai

was today’s diagram where

Karpov (White, to move)

LEONARD BARDEN
“es UN A ALT TST TT ET TRL eT eT

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

“AQ /UTYS
16) + 84y 7 96 20 ayeU 95 ¢ 21 +BUY b 9) HUE TUPY
£90 +2HZ LUPOHIeZAPKO T= woRIMOs ssOy)

4

direction. A party on the weekend , -

Your teasing and arguments are-just ~
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Russia
and Spain
advance to
Hopman
cup final

i TENNIS
PERTH, Australia
Associated Press

Fn,

TOP-SEEDED Russia
will play Spain in the Hop-
man Cup mixed teams
final, while the Americans
ead home without a vic-
LOTY.

‘Australia beat the Unit-
ed States 2-1 Thursday
after Alicia Molik and
Nathan Healey won the
deciding mixed doubles
over Ashley Harkleroad
and Mardy Fish 6-4, 7-5.
The U.S. team finished 0-

Molik beat Harkleroad,
a Jate replacement for the
injured Venus Williams, 3-
6, 6-4, 6-4 to give Australia
a 1-0 lead before Fish
evened the match with a
7-5, 7-5 win over Healey.
Russia advanced from
Group A when Nadia
Petrova and Dmitry Tur-
sunov won their singles
matches and combined to
capture the mixed doubles
for a 3-0 win Thursday
over France.
Second-seeded Spain
qualified when it won the
two opening matches of its
final Group B round-robin
against previously unbeat-
en India. 7x
Anabel Medina Gar-
rigues of Spain beat Sania
Mirza of India 3-6, 6-1, 6-3
before Tommy Robredo
defeated Rohan Bopanna
6-2, 6-3.

Russia and Spain will
play Friday night in the
final at Burswood Dome.
The Czech Republic had
an outside chance of mak-
ing it to the final, but lost
2-1 to Croatia in another
late Group B match.

Mirza’s weeklong win-
hing streak ended mostly
hecause of her 61
utnforced errors against
‘Medina Garrigues.

. Petrova of Russia beat
‘Tatiana Golovin of France
7-6 (2), 6-0 and Tursunov

_defeated Jerome Haehnel
6-1, 6-4.

. Petrova and Tursunov
then combined to beat

‘Golovin and Haehnel 6-4,
6-2. France also finished at
2-1 but did not qualify for

_ the final because of its loss

Russia.
Petrova had to over-

: come a painful stomach

' muscle injury to beat
‘Golovin.

“T injured my abdominal

, muscle so I have a bit of

‘pain with serving, and it
was getting worse and
worse with each single
game,” Petrova said. “I

. wasn’t feeling well and it

‘was difficult to find that
motivation, but deep
inside my heart I knew we
stil had a chance in this
competition. So I really
had to find the strength

_and find the will to fight.”

Petrova said the singles
matches would be the key
to Russia’s chances on Fri-
day.

. “Tfit goes down to a

‘mixed doubles as the

_ deciding point, then so be,
it but I think we have real-
'y good chances to win in
singles,” she said.



§ Che Tribune wants to hear
4 from people who are
5 making news in their
} ncighbourhoods. Perhaps
} you are raising funds for a
1 good cause, campaigning
j for improvements in the ,
} area or have won an
f award.
Tf so, call us on 322-1986
J and share your story.

ARIES IEAM

Shamar Sands returns from —

|
i
























Wye) aks




injury for his senior year

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHEN Shamar Sands
graduated from St.
Augustine’s College in 2002,
he headed to Auburn Uni-
versity with high hopes of
being the next great 110
metre hurdler the Bahamas
produces.

But after just one full sea-
son under his belt as an
Auburn Tiger in 2003, he suf-
fered a string of injuries from
2004 that has hindered his
progress.

Now Sands is heading back

to Auburn for his senior year,

and his expectations are just
as high as they were when he
left as a freshman. ;

“T just pray for health. This
is the first off season P’ve had
for years where I’ve been
healthy,” said Sands, in an
interview with The Tribune
while here for the Christmas
break.

“As in previous years, once
I’m healthy, the sky is the
limit. Anything is possible.
Coming off injuries, I’ve been
running average times of
13.8s and 13.9s without any
training. So I know I’m ina
healthy state, the sky is the
limit. Anything is possible.”

Sands, a 21-year-old
accounting major, has record-
ed a personal best of 13.80
seconds in the 110 hurdles,
placing him fourth on
Auburn’s all-time list. The
national record of 13.65 was
set by the late Danny Smith
in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in
1973. P

In his career so far at
Auburn, Sands earned All-
American honours at the
NCAA Indoor Champi-
onships in 2003 and last com-
peted at the Sun Angel Clas-
sic outdoor meet in 2004, and
he is confident that he can get
back on track.



“As in previous years, once
I’m healthy, the sky is the
limit. Anything is possible.
Coming off injuries, ’ve been
running average times of 13.8s
and 13.9s without any training.
So I know I'm in a healthy
state, the sky is the limit.

Anything is possible.”



“1m still determined to be
on top. I’m still determined
to do some big things,”
reflected Sands, who had to
shut down his outdoor sea-
son early in 2004 and didn’t
compete at all in 2005
because of the recurring
injuries.

“It has been difficult, but
I’ve learned to accept things
and to deal with it because
that’s life,” he insisted. “So I
just try to make the best out
of every situation.

“I’m still young, so it’s not
as bad as it was when I first
went to college and I had to
deal with it. I’ve gotten a little
older, so I know how to deal
with it. But don’t get me
wrong, it’s still tough to deal
with.”

Hurdles

Sands will be returning to
Auburn today and his per-
sonal coach Bahamian Henry
Rolle, an assistant at Auburn
who has responsibility for the
hurdles, said he’s looking for-
ward to his protégé having a
banner year - if he can stay
healthy.

“This is his last year and

Shamar Sands

he’s trained well during the
off-season,” Rolle pointed
out. “So if he can stay
healthy, good things should
happen for him.”

Rolle said he would just
like to see Sands complete a
full season as he did in his
freshman year.

“But he experienced some
growing pains that set him
back and he had a lot of prob-
lems with his growth spurt,”
Rolle said. “But if he can stay
healthy, he should run pretty
well.”

As he looks ahead to the
season, Sands reiterated that
his main goal is to stay
healthy.

“Once I stay healthy, every-
thing else will fall into place,”
he proclaimed.

While representing Auburn
at the NCAA Championships
- indoors and outdoors - are
two of his immediate goals,
Sands said his long-term goal
this year is to be a part of the
Bahamian team going to the
IAAF World Outdoor Cham-
pionships in Osaka, Japan in
August.

“Once I’m healthy, any
meet I want to represent this
country, anytime, I know I



he emphasised. “Anything is
possible.”

While three female athletes
- Sheniqua Ferguson, Cache
Armbrister and Crystal Bod-
ie - are expected to become
Auburn Tigers in August,
Sands is expected to compete
with high jumper Donald
Thomas, who has enrolled in
grad school.

“He’s relatively new to
track and field, but he’s now
learning the event,” Rolle
reflected. “So the indoor sea-

son is going to be where he
takes a step backwards so
that he can move forward.

“We couldn’t do much
work because he came in dur-
ing the fall season and he’s
not due back here in Janu-
ary, so everything he did was
on his own.

“It’s just a matter of get-
ting him back in shape.”

Rolle said they will be
grooming Rolle for a shot at
winning the NCAA Outdoor
title.

can do it, once I’m healthy,”



‘Choo Choo’ on track -
to defend his title



@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter —



AFTER going through a near per-
fect season last year, Jermaine
‘Choo Choo’ Mackey said he’s
excited about kicking off the 2007
season.

He will open the year on Friday,
February 2 at Nirvana Beach when
he defends his World Boxing Coun-
cil’s CABOFE (Caribbean Boxing
Federation Championship) super
middleweight title against Anibal
Acevedo from Puerto Rico.

Details of the fight, scheduled as
the main event on the First Class
Promotions show were released by
promoter Michelle Minus yester-
day.

“I’m excited about it and I’m in
great shape. I’m just waiting on the
opportunity,” stressed Mackey, who
will take on Acevedo, who comes
to town with a 14-4-1 win-loss-draw
record.

Last year, Mackey reeled off four
straight victories before he travelled
to Canada and lost the first fight in
his pro career. But he came back
home and bounced back to close
out the year with a victory at Nir-
vana at the beginning of December
to push his record to 12-1.

“Tt’s just about getting in condi-
tioning and getting better,” Mackey
projected. “I just want to go out
there and defend my title that I
fought so hard for.”

As for fighting against an oppo-
nent with a reputation of being a
great fighter, Mackey said, “Every
fighter has two hands. Although
they are born into boxing, I was
boxing since I was 11-12, so I’m just
going into the ring and we will see
who’s the better boxer.”

In the co-main event, Wilson ‘Kid
Wonder’ Theophile (5-2-1) will take
on another Puerto Rican in Joseph
Delos Santos, who is 2-1-0, in a six-
rounder.

Also on the undercard, Alphacino
‘Banger’ Allen (2-0) will face Ricar-
do ‘One Shot’ Bethel (2-4); Antho-
ny ‘Psycho’ Woods (4-4) battles
Hensley ‘Bruiser’ Strachan (2-0)
and Shimon ‘Too Sweet’ Bain (3-
0) goes up against another Puerto
Rican, yet to be named.

All three fights are scheduled for
four rounds.

Minus said they want to start the
year off with a bang and they could-
n’t find a better way to do it than
having Mackey defend his title in
the mandatory six-month period.

“We also have on our shows for
April, which is the FEDECaribe
lightweight title also,” she said
about Meacher ‘Pain’ Major’s title
defence, “So we want to make sure
that these fighters get to defend
their title and hopefully get them-
selves set up for a possible British
Commonwealth title shot.”

Minus, who along with her hus-
band Ray Minus Jr., has put togeth-
er a solid programme where they
have hosted a series of professional
shows, said they are looking for-
ward to making this an exciting
card.

“Wilson Theophile is back on
track and so we want to give him
an opportunity to prove himself
because he gets the opportunity to
fight for one of the local titles,” she
stated.

As early as next week, Minus said
they intend to beef up their promo-
tions and they are urging the public
to contact their office opposite
Whim Automotive Limited on
Wulff Road to get their tickets.

@ JERMAINE ‘CHOO CHOO’ MACKEY

AR eee edna
TRIBUNE SPORTS








SS

@ AUS



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 9B

Wao



SS SS _

TRALIAN wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist, left, captain Ricky Ponting second right, and Matthew Hayden right run to teammate Shane Warne top after they dismissed Engalnd captain Andrew

Flintoff center, on the third day of the fifth and final Ashes cricket test in Sydney, Thursday, Jan. 4, 2007.

Warne

(AP Photo/Mark Baker)

puts Australia on

course for series sweep

mm CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press



KEVIN PIETERSEN
remains the only recognized
batsmen standing between
Australia and an historic 5-0
‘Ashes sweep after another
vintage Shane Warne perfor-
mance against England.

Warné top scored with 71

- - in Australia's first innings 393

in his farewell test, helping the
hosts to a 102-run first-innings
lead, then dismissed England
captain Andrew Flintoff after
Brett Lee and Stuart Clark
picked off batsmen Nos. 1-4.

At stumps on day three of
the fifth test, England was
reeling at 114 for five with
Pietersen on 29 and night
watchman Monty Panesar on
zero.

The English had a 12-run
Jead with only tailend bats-
men to come and two days to
play.

Warne gave the impression’

the Australians would like to
take the last five wickets early
and have the match wrapped
up by lunch on the fourth day.

"If we can get out there and
win tomorrow and go 5-nil up
and whitewash the series, then
that is a fantastic achievement
by a wonderful cricket side,"
-the 37-year-old legspinner
“said.

Flintoff, whose 89 in Eng-
land's first innings 291 was his
highest score in 15 tests, was
out 10 balls before stumps

Thursday, stumped by Adam

"Gilchrist on the decision of a
TV umpire.

‘He had gone to the crease
with England at 98 for four,
still needing four runs to make
Australia bat again, and was
one of the tourists last chances

- of avoiding the first sweep of a

five-test Ashes series in 86
years.

Lee did the early damage;
dismissing Alastair Cook (4)
with the total at five and
felling Andrew Strauss with a
ball that smashed into the side
of his helmet in the same over.

He also remove Ian Bell
(28), needlessly slashing out-
side off stump, to make the
total 64 for three.

Stuart Clark struck in
between Lee's wickets, trap-
ping Strauss lbw for 24, and
then having Paul Collingwood
(17) caught by Matthew Hay-
den, diving in the gully.

Warne clouted nine bound-
aries and two sixes in a typi-
cally attacking tailend dig.

"To middle a few and knock
a couple over the fence was
good," he said.

Australia resumed the third
day at 188 for four and
advanced to 260 for six, still
31 runs behind, when Warne
went in at No. 8.

He shared a 58-run seventh-
wicket partnership with
Gilchrist (62) and a 68-run
ninth-wicket partnership with
Clark (35) before he stepped
down the wicket trying to hit
Monty Panesar out of the
ground again and was
stumped.

Warne, who has a highest
test score of 99, abandoned
hope of reaching his maiden
test hundred in his 145th and
last match when Clark skied
Sajid Mahmood to Pietersen
at extra cover.

He was out next over, leav-
ing fellow test retiree Glenn
McGrath unbeaten on 0.

Gilchrist had ensured Aus-
tralia took a first-innings lead
before being given out caught
behind for 62 to a ball he did-
n't touch,

He shared a 70-run sixth-
wicket stand with Andrew
Symonds (48) before combin-
ing with Warne to keep the
runs flowing from the Aus-
tralian middle order.

Gilchrist's dismissal gave
James Anderson his third
wicket of the innings — more
than he had in the rest of the
series.

Anderson, replacing injured
paceman Matthew Hoggard,
returned 3-98 from 26 overs,
while Steve Harmison had 2-
80 and Panesar returned 2-90
from 19.3 overs.

Unlike the England tail in
the first innings, which crum-
bled for 33, Australia's last
five wickets added 133 runs.

Anderson said the English
lower order needed to follow
Australia's lead on Friday.

"Obviously we need to put

up a good fight. We need to
battle hard and have our tail
wag like theirs did." he said.
"If Kevin stays there for a
while then hopefully we can
get a reasonable total and
have something to bowl at.
There's always hope."

Panesar bowled Symonds to
bring Warne to the crease.
And Warne, who along with
McGrath and opener Justin
Langer is retiring from test
cricket after the Ashes, got off
the mark with a swept bound-
ary and a massive pull over
mid-wicket for six.

He survived a caught
behind decision against Pane-
sar on the last ball of that over
when the ball appeared to
brush Warne's glove on the
way through to the ‘keeper,

Gilchrist was less fortunate.
He chased a wide delivery
from Anderson, his bat hit the
pitch and Chris Read took the
ball. England appealed and
umpire Billy Bowden took his
time before giving Gilchrist
out, the decision greeted with
a loud and sustained boos
from the crowd.

@ AUSTRALIAN play
Adam Gilchrist, right, and
Shane Warne celebrate the
dismissal of England's
captain Andrew Flintoff
on the third day of the fifth
and final Ashes cricket

test in Sydney, Thursday,
Jan. 4, 2007,

(AP Photo/Mark Baker)



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FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

m@ MARK KNOWLES

MTENNIS..
KNOWLES/NESTOR
OUSTED

- AFTER reeling off two
victories at the Qatar
ExxonMobile Open, Mark
‘Knowles and his Canadian
partner Daniel Nestor. —
were eliminated yesterday.
in Doha, Qatar.

Knowles and Nestor,
seeded number two in the

. tournament, lost 7-5, 6-7,
10-2 to the No.3 team of
Martin Damm of the
Czech Republic and Lean-
der Paes of India.

’ Knowles and Nestor
won their first match in
scores of 6-4, 6-4 over.
Julian Knowle and Jurgen
Melzer from Australia
before they busted Sebas-
tian Grosjean and Gael
Monfils from France 6-3,
6-0.

It was the first tourna-
ment for the year for
Knowles and Nestor, who
finished last year as the
fourth ranked team in the
WOT, ase!

They are scheduled to

- travel to Sydney, Aus-

_tralia next week to play in
their next tournament
before they go to the Aus-
tralian Open - the first .
Grand Slam - starting on
January 15.

@ FOOTBALL
-CAFL MATCHES

THE Steering Commit-
tee of the Commonwealth
American Football |
‘League has announced: °.
that they will resume
- their football season this
‘weekend at the DW Davis
playing field. Bitar

On Saturday at 1pm, the
Nassau Sunburners will —
take on the John Bull
Jets. Both teams have yet
to win their first game.

On Sunday at 1pm, it
will be the battle of the
undefeated as the Orry J.
Sands Pros will take on
.the new kids on the block,
the Stingrays. Veteran
Edny Pickstock will be on
the. Pros line against.two
of his nephews playing for

the Stingrays.

@ CYCLING
BCF SEASON
“OPENER.

THE Bahamas Amateur
Cycling Federation will
kick off its 2007 calendar
of events.on Saturday,
January 20 with the first
of two pre-season road
races, organised by Jeff’s
Auto. The second race
will take place on Satur-
day, January 27.



st



E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
KENTONYA Miller was a one-

+ » woman wrecking crew as she led the

Kingsway Academy Saints to a 38-8
rout over the hapless St. Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines.

The quick wheeling-dealing south-
paw point guard lit up the nets for a
game high 24 points as the Saints
marched past the Big Red Machines
in their Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools’ senior

‘girls basketball game yesterday at
‘SAC.

And what Miller didn’t do, centre
Michaela Levarity made up for in the
middle as she contributed eight points
to keep Kingsway Academy unde-
feated at 5-0. Diandra Ferguson
chipped in with four and Paige Hanna
added two.

Saints’ coach Juliet Douglas-Sands
said they were confident coming into
the game that they would win and her
team played up to their potential.

“They had it from BA (Bahamas

a Academy) game and they said they

want to win the championship and »

they came out here and played like a
championship team,” Douglas-Sands
reflected.

Kingsway Academy were all over.
St. Augustine’s College from the start
‘to the finish. In fact, the Saints out-

played the Big Red Machines in every

facet of the game.

The Saints even out-hussled the Big
Red Machines for the loose balls and
they ran the fast-break effectively with
Miller almost unstoppable as she led

@ KINGSWAY Academy Saints’ centre Michaela Levarity goes up for a

lay-up against the St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machines. Levarity scored
eight points in the Saints’ 38-8 win over the Big Red Machines yesterday at

SAC.

the charge.

Miller, in fact, was too quick to the
dribble as she scored Kingsway Acad-
emy’s first three baskets, all on fast-
breaks, as they opened a:6-0 lead.

Diandra Ferguson would hit a base-
line jumper that gave the Saints an
8-0 advantage at the end of the first

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

quarter as they held the Big Red
Machines scoreless,
Miller and Levarity would provide
a 1-2 punch for the Saints as they
marched to a comfortable 16-0 margin
in the second quarter before SAC
finally got on the scoreboard with a
jumper from Alicia Pickstock.

ued to pile up the points.










SAC, after blowit
opportunities to score, :
celebration mood, but it:
lived as Kingsway Academ



?





ahead 22-4 at the half. 2 ajax"
SAC would add another, et. to”
start the third on a jum
Royandra Nairn, but Kingsway Acad
emy reeled off two more, baskets
before the Big Red Machines got their
fourth basket fromlvanna Seymour
for.a 26-8 deficit. Wa ees
The Saints would, end /the: period
with a 2728 lead.) :\.)s9 SBR oe
While Kingsway Acadeniy contii-
ued to run the ball in the fourth, SAC
tried to slow them down by playing’a
little more aggressive, but it was teo
late. aN ya
The Saints would hold the Big Red
Machines scoreless in'the fourth as
they went on an 11-0 tear.to seal the
blowout. a a







SAC’s coach Marco Mullings said it
wasn’t the type of performance he
anticipated, especially SoHE off the
Christmas break. SARS Gy

“We're really not playing. Today,
we didn’t play with any energy,” sajd. >
Mullings, who watched his squad slip °
to 0-2. “We lost by one point in ott
first game. We really wanted to win
that game. \ *

“Today, coming off the Christmas . °.
break, we didn’t come out with ary >.
fire. It was like we didn’t want to pldy :
today. Granted, it’s virtually anew.
team with maybe two girls on the
team who played basketball before,
but we didn’t play today.” We 3S

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







f@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EXCESS liquidity in the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing system tightened by a fur-



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Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue _

PHONE: (242) 356-5760

ther $3 million to just over $52
million in November 2006, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
revealed yesterday, confirm-
ing that this would “restrain
the strong level of domestic

credit growth over the past 18

months”.

The Central Bank, in its
update on economic develop-
ments in November, confirmed

_ what The Tribune has been

reporting for the past two
months on the liquidity crunch,
and its implications for credit,
consumer demand and wider
economic growth.

During the 2007 first half, at
least, the Bahamas is going to
be far more reliant on capital

WorKS By
ANTONIOUS ROomiekees
Max TV

PER
Posr Housr Srupio &
CHALLE RY
{id RX Ko OY EO De ba ed
Pur 327-7562



To All Valued Patients of

Dr. Richard E. Crawford’s Office
Located on Mackey Street, The Plaza
Please be advised that the office will Reopen

NN



Tuesday Jan. 2nd, 2007

With Yasmine Williams Robinson MBBS,
DRCOG, MRCGP Family Medicine Specialist
Tel: 242-393-3025/Fax: 242-393-8452 _





























and budget.





fax to (242) 677-4140

CahleBac



Resort 8

eaten at Gena mm

Crystal Palace Casino

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the
single largest resort investment in the history of The Bahamas. Baha Mar
owns and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino,
the Radisson Cable & Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position: :

FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

This individual will be responsible for ensuring excellence of food and beverage
services by overseeing all aspects of multi-unit food service, dining and catering
operations. The successful candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day food
and beverage operation, staffing and budget.

Top contenders for this position must possess the following:

* Organizational skills to set-up systems such as point of sale, position specific
check list and proper follow-up.

¢ Evolving new food and beverage concepts.

¢ Controls costs of all food and beverage outlets by overseeing all purchasing
of food beverage, supplies and equipment; estimating product and personnel .
levels; utilizing labour scheduling tool to adjust salary and hourly schedules
following demand patterns and occupancy levels, budget and local labour
laws; maintaining effective inventory and shortage controls; traking expenses
including payroll, supplies, maintenance and generating monthly inventory
and cost of sales reports as well as other reports requested by management and
works with the General Manager to develop an annual food and beverage plan

¢ Ensure a pleasant dining experience in all outlets by collaborating with the
Executive Chef in the creation of menus and menu pricing.

° Maximize food and beverage sales by identifying and targeting sales
opportunities through marketing including promotions and special events.

* Maintain customer satisfaction and employee productivity by handling

customer inquiries, concerns or comments and providing solutions, acquiring

feed back from customers and co-workers in order to ensure satisfaction

and/or implement service improvement ideas; developing new concepts

to ensure customer satisfaction and repeat business.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume to

the attention of Director of Human Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or

from foreign direct investment
inflows, salaries resulting from
these projects, and the peak
first quarter tourism season to
drive the economy.

November

During November, the Cen-
tral Bank found that while the
growth in private sector credit
for the months was 15 per cent
down on the previous year’s
comparative, standing at $60.9
million, total mortgage lend-
ing rose by 50 per cent to $33.4
million.

That will have been more
preferable to the Central Bank
than any increase in consumer
lending. Consumer credit,
which largely goes on expen-
sive luxuries such as cars, fell
by 12.8 per cent in November
to $18.6 million.

However, growth in total
Bahamian dollar credit “more
than doubled” in November to

‘$81.8 million, largely due to a

$23 million increase in the
Government’s net liabilities
owed to the commercial bank-
ing sector.

The slowdown in availability
of credit was evidenced by the
fact that excess liquid assets
declined only by $3 million,

compared to a $37.9 million

drop the year before. :

Excess cash reserves in the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing system rose by $15.8 mil-
lion during the month to $164.8
million, due to the rediscount-
ing and sale of various public
securities.

Total Bahamian dollar
deposits increased by $32.5
million in November, com-
ee to the previous year’s

7.2 million decline, driven by
a $13.2 million rise in demand
deposits and 28 per cent or
$25.1 million rise in savings
deposits.

For the year-to-November
2006, the Central Bank record-
ed that higher oil costs and





increased credit demand saw
excess reserves in the banking

sector fall by $30.6 million, |

three times more than the pre-
vious year.

Excess liquidity contracted

by 40 per cent more at $60.2
million. External reserves fell
at a rate three times’ higher
than in 2005, dropping by
$134.4 million, while the rise
in oil payments saw the Cen-
tral Bank’s net foreign curren-
cy sales to the public sector rise
by 62 per cent to $201.1 mil-

lion. ’
Dollar

Bahamian dollar credit
growth in the first 11 months of
2006 rose by 52 per cent to
$694.6 million, with private sec-
tor credit ahead by 40.3 per
cent to $646.5 million.

Consumer loan growth rose
by $212 million, and for mort-
gages it was up to $308.6 mil-
lion.



The Central Bank said the
economic outlook for 2007

“remains broadly positive” due _

to foreign direct investment
projects in the tourism indus-
try, which were expected to
stimulate employment, the
construction industry and pri-
vate sector demand.

Apart from bank liquidity,
the downside risks included oil
prices and a US economic
downturn.

Consumer price inflation
dropped to 1.74 per cent in
November, compared to 2.01
per cent the previous year.

For the year to October,
total visitor arrivals were down
by 4.7 per cent, a 7 per cent
decline in sea arrivals eclips-
ing a slight 0.5 per cent rise in
higher spending air arrivals.

Tourists to New Providence
fell by 6.7 per cent, while traf-
fic to Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands fell by 1.2 per
cent and 1.8 per cent respec-
tively.



COMMONWEALTH Bank
yesterday said it had achieved
the “most significant financial
milestone in its history”, pass-
ing the $1 billion mark in total
assets.

“We are extremely proud to
report that as of December 20,
2006, Commonwealth Bank
has surpassed $1 billion in total
assets, a milestone that is
momentous by any standard,”
said T. B. Donaldson, Com-
monwealth Bank’s chairman.

“This achievement becomes
even more significant when
you look at the brief history of



Bank passes $1bn mark in total assets

Achievement ‘most significant financial milestone in its history’

the bank, It was only in 1984
that Commonwealth Bank, as
we know it today, was created
out of what had been a Cana-
dian-owned bank that itself
had grown out of a small
finance company.”

Commonwealth Bank
opened with $17 million in
assets, starting off by offering
working Bahamians the oppor-
tunity to, improve their stan-
dard of lighg through con-
sumer loans for everything
from vehicles to vacations,
medical expenses and higher
education.

In 2000, some 40 years after
the original finance company
made its first loan, the Com-
monwealth Bank went public
in an initial public offering
(IPO) that attracted more than
7,000 shareholders.

The bank now has nine
branches in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco



@ TB DONALDSON
(FILE photo)
plus a credit card centre, Share

value has more than doubled
in the six years since it went

50: : ’
iS u ra si

ON
for
Seat

4 Al
md
¢ aC ‘

public, from $6 per share im
2000 to $12.51 on today’s BISX
listing.

In 2006, it also launched a
$10 million loan fund to sup-
port small business, and has:
paid an extraordinary dividend:
every year since 2000.

“From the beginning, Com-
monwealth Bank’s belief in the
Bahamian people and in the

_8trength.and durability of the.
Bahamian economy has served)...
- as the foundation on which our

growth has been built,” Mr
Donaldson said. :

“We believe the success; we
have enjoyed and the mile-
stones we have reached along
the way are testament to the
confidence the Bahamian. pub-
lic has placed in Common-
wealth Bank. We could not
have recorded these achieve-
ments without the constant
support of our dedicated staff
and loyal customers.”



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WEATHER



The Tribune



#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



Volume: 103 No.37

Bahamas delays
UTE eT er a

Claims of wrongful
arrest and
imprisonment

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS

VICTIMS of the Sea Hauler
tragedy plan to file a writ to
sue the Royal Bahamas Police
Force for wrongful arrest and
imprisonment as early as

_ today or by Monday at the lat-

est, according to victims’
spokesman, Lincoln Bain.

Mr Bain claimed the police
broke numerous aspects of
arrest protocol when they
took protesters, who had
handcuffed themselves to the
front gate of Prime Minister
Perry Christie’s residence, into
custody.

“We plan on suing the
police force for unlawful
arrest,” said Mr Bain. “It was
clear that these person’s rights
were Violated.”

According to Mr Bain, he
and the victims were never
read their Miranda rights and
were never made aware of the
charges for which they were
being held. .

“The problem could not
have been loitering because
with loitering, according to
what they taught me in the
police force, you have to warn
the person,” he said.

Mr Bain said he had been
in the police force for 10 years
and had never seen an arrest
carried out the way it was car-
ried out that day.

“You have to first question
them to see why they are there
and if they are not there for
any good reason and you sus-
pect they will commit a crime



you warn them and if the
police officer leaves and
comes back then they can
attempt to charge them with
loitering,” he said.

“With trespassing you also

_ have to warn the person that

2

they are on private property
and the owner wants you be
removed.”

Mr Bain said officers sim-
ply cut the seven protesters
away from the Prime Minis-
ter’s gate and informed them
that they were to be taken
down to the station where
they would be dealt with.

“They just took us out of
the handcuffs, those who were
handcuffed, and at that point
they could have asked us to
leave the area, but they chose
to not say anything,” said Mr
Bain.

“They just threw us in the
vehicles; took us to the sta-
tion; searched us; took our

property and threw us in the .

cell — that doesn't work in
the western hemisphere,” said
Mr Bain.

According to police officials
the group was never formally
charged for the incident. They
were only held for question-
ing. And according to earlier
accounts by Mr Bain the Offi-
cer in charge of the station
where the group was held
apologized for locking them
in cells and allowed them to
spend their remaining time in
the precinct’s lounge.

- SEE page nine:







FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

@ PASSERS-BY became alarmed
yesterday after it was discovered that
the Gambier Clinic was closed to the

public.

A Tribune staff photographer took
a picture of the western district clinic
with its gates locked and chained

around 3pm.

An official at the Ministry of Health
told The Tribune the closure was due
to the fact that nurses were making
home visits in the community.

The official said that normally the
nurses would put up a sign to notify the
public, but they had forgotten to do

so this time.

The official said the nurses were
reminded not to forget the notice
because the public needs to be aware

of the clinic’s closing.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



FBI assist police
in investigation —
of rape of girl —

on cruise ship

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporte

7

AGENTS from the Federal
Bureau of Investigation are
assisting local police with their
investigation of the rape of a
13-year-old Canadian girl
onboard the Disney Wonder
cruise ship.

Assistant Police Commis-

‘sioner Reginald Ferguson said

a 2\-year-old New York man is
being held in connection with
the matter.

The reported assault
occurred on January 1. When
the victim’s family alerted
security on the cruiseline, the
vessel was advised, at the
request of FBI officials, to
dock in New Providence the
following day.

The cruiseline reportedly
issued a statement advising
that they are co-operating with
the investigation of the mat-
ter, stating that “the safety and
security” of their guests are a
“top priority”.

Mr Ferguson said: “We had
a complaint made to us on
Tuesday that a 13-year-old
female was sexually molested

SEE page nine

Three of five NFS

bageage handlers

appear in Miami
federal court

& By PAUL TURNQUEST

THREE of the five baggage
handlers from Nassau Flight Ser-
vices had their first arraignment
in a Miami federal court yester-
day. j

The men were all charged with
possession with intent to distrib-
ule cocaine, and issued an order
of detention as they were con-
sidered a flight risk. Therefore, as
outlined by a US attorney, the
men will not be eligible for bail.

According to the US District
Court docket, USA v. Bain et all,
filed on December 19, 2006,
Lester Bain, 29, Delvino Rigby,
26, and Marcus Rolle, 22, were
seen before magistrate Judge
Ted E Bandstra.

Bain is represented by Mr
Michael David Spivack of the
Federal Public Defender’s
Office, Rigby was represented
by Michael Gary Smith, and
Rolle was represented by Rod-
erick Darrell Vereen of Brink-
ley Henrys and Lewis.

Representing the United
States was Alejandro Oscar Soto
of the US Attorney’s Office.

Calls for comments on how
the proceedings went to either
ol the three men’s attorneys were
not returned up to press time.

linic closed to public

PRICE — 75¢

Thai
Veta Te

:
33
ic
|
Ny

Court of Appeal
‘could have large’

backlog of cases
if judges not
appointed soon’

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE backlog of cases at
the Court of Appeal may
again reach the immense vol-
ume seen in the past if new
judges are not appointed
soon.

This concern was
expressed by president of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer at the opening of the
legal year 2007 on Wednes-
day.

Dame Joan said if no
changes are made at the
Court of Appeal, then all the
work done by her and her fel-
low justices to dispose of the
large number of pending cas-
es will have been for noth-
ing.

Speaking at the special sit-
ting of the Court of Appeal,
Dame Joan. said that
although there are only six
unheard cases in her court —
“which for good and suffi-
cient reason one or all jus-

SEE page nine





Lawyer claims

judiciary in
Crisis Over
judges’ pay

THE Judiciary up to the
level of the Supreme Court is
in a state of crisis due to the
issue of judges’ pay, well-
known lawyer Geoffrey
“Pro” Pinder said yesterday
on Love 97's talk show Issues
of the Day.

When asked why the law
lords sitting in the Bahamas
had not commented on the
“judicial crisis” in the
Bahamas while they were
here, Mr Pinder said that per-
sons visiting were not going
to see the cracks in the sys-
tem.

“But those persons who
have been here, such as
Dame Joan Sawyer, such as
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
such as Justice Lyons, they
can see the cracks but they
soldier on and they give us
service, it’s as if they are
priests who are judges,” he
said,

Speaking at the opening of
the legal year yesterday, Bar
Association president Wayne
Munroe focused on the

SEE page nine



|


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a Ea eee

| NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000






In Voluntary Liquidation




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45
of 2000), BELL VENTURES LIMITED, is in dissolution.

Continental Liquidators Inc. of 60 Market Square, Belize City, Belize






All persons having claims against the above-named
company are reqired to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
February 3, 2007.



For: Continental Liquidatoss, Inc.
Liquidator :

US factory orders post
smaller-than-expected

increase in November

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer



WASHINGTON (AP) —
Orders to United States factories
posted a smaller-than-expected
increase in November as demand
for autos, machinery and steel all
posted declines, reflecting the slow-
down that has hit the manufactur-
ing sector.

Scotiabank’

VACANCY

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of :

Job 1: A Senior Analyst

assist in hedge fund analysis for hedge fund incubator and fund of

fund financing businesses

assist in investment analysis of structured credit, asset-backed, fixed
income, and derivative products for investment advisory business |
development and ongoing maintenance of asset/credit reporting and

monitoring systems

liaising with head office analytical and support groups + external parties
preparation of reporting/MIS documentation for internal and external

parties

ensuring compliance with local and head office regulatory policies and

guidelines

assist in business case writings, other reports/requests

Skills: strong analytical experience and ability (credit/equities/funds/structured
products), good understanding of fundamental and technical features of debt,
equity, and alternative asset classes (and their derivatives), familiarity with
the Bank's internal systems and processes, self-starter, ability to work in a

smaller environment

Job 2: A Bookrunner

° responsible for deal input and ongoing monitoring of positions held in:
SCTL, including hedge fund financing, hedge fund investment, credit

derivatives and other related products

responsible for the risk management and hedging of SCTL positions
responsible for the development of risk management systems and reports

to properly control and monitor exposures

responsible for the funding of exposures in an efficient manner
must be able to liaise effectively with SC trading and structuring

personnel in other locations

Skills: strong attention to detail, good product knowledge of debt, equity,
alternative assets and their derivatives, strong familiarity with the Bank's
dealing and risk management systems, experience managing funding and

liquidity.

Interested persons should submit applications in writing marked Private and

Confidential to:

Manager, Caribbean Treasury Limited

P. O. Box N-7518

Nassau, Bahamas

Applications should be received no later than Monday, January 15, 2007.

— ) FID

Pricing Information As Of:

ee
52wk-Low Securit

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste |

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.05
- 1.64
9.00
4.12
2.20
5.54
10.70
10.88
10.00
0.50
7.15
8.52
1000. 10.00
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.54 0.20 RND Holding
143.00 28.00 ABDAB
14.50
0.60
we
52wk-Hi
1.3216
3.0017
2.4723
1.2074
11.2596

14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings
52wk-Low
1.2680 Colina Money Market Fund
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.2982 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1442 Colina Bond Fund
io 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
ony oy oy pipe oe i
EE m
SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



A Vv
1.321587*
2.9449***
2.472341**
1.207411****





LT
LES NBS



jn ag

Last Price

Last 12 Months

ided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

_The Commerce Department
reported that orders for manufac-
tured goods rose by 0.9 per cent,
only a slight rebound after a sharp
4.5 per cent drop in October. Ana-
lysts had been expecting a stronger
1.4 per cent increase.

The November performance
provided evidence that the slow-
ing economy is beginning to have
an impact on manufacturers, with
auto plants and sectors supplying
the slumping housing industry
among some of the hardest hit.

A separate report showed that
service industries, where most
Americans work, were also expe-
riencing the impact of the economic
slowdown. A closely watched
gauge of nonmanufacturing activi-
ty compiled by the Institute for
Supply Managemement edged
down slightly to a reading of 57.1 in
December compared to 58.9 in
November.

The 0.9 per cent increase in
demand for manufactured goods
pushed total orders to $394.3 bil-
lion. It reflected a 1.6 per cent rise
in demand for durable goods,
slightly below an initial estimate of
1.9 per cent, and an unchanged
reading for nondurable goods.
With the economy slowing'sharply
this year, orders have been down
three of the past five months.

Meanwhile, the nation’s big
retailers reported that the holiday
shopping season turned out to be
worse than expected with retailers
in all categories reporting disap-
pointing results for December.

After a rousing start right after
Thanksgiving, many stores strug-
gled during December as warmer-

fell below expectations were Lim-

than-usual weather depressed sales
for winter clothing.

Analysts said the sales results
were also depressed by the shift to
purchasing gift cards, which are not
counted as sales until they are
redeemed.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. reported a
better-than-expected 1.6 per cent
increase in December at stores
open at least a year, but the gain
followed’ a decline of 0.1 percent
in same-store sales in November,
the first drop in a decade.

Among the retailers whose sales

had been expecting although some
said they believed the rise was
heavily influenced by problems the

seasonal changes around holidays.

Employers have been reluctant
to lay off existing workers although
they have trimmed plans to hire
new workers in the face of the seri-
ous housing slump that has

growth.
unemployment report is released

less rate remained stable at 4.5 per
cent in December as businesses cre-
ated 110,000 new jobs. That would
be down from 132,000 jobs added
in November.

The economy slowed to a lack-
luster growth rate of just two per
cent in the summer as a steep slide
in housing construction trimmed
1.2 percentage points from growth.

ited Brands and Bebe Stores Inc.

In other economic news, the
number of laid-off workers filing
claims for unemployment benefits
shot up to 329,000 last week, a gain
of 10,000 from the previous week
and the largest total since late
November.

The strength in orders in
November was led by a 43.6 per
cent surge in demand for military
aircraft. Orders for commercial air-
planes rose a smaller 0.8 per cent
while-orders for motor vehicles fell
by 2.4 per cent, reflecting a contin-
ued sales slump as consumers turn
away from the once-hot gas guz-
zling sport utility vehicles.

- Industries tied to the slumping
housing market also showed weak-
ness with furniture orders falling
by 3.3 per cent while demand for
household appliances dropped by
7.8 per cent.

The total number of jobless
claims was the largest since 358,000
claims were filed the week of
November 25 and the advance was
well above the increase analysts

tracted a similar amount from
growth in the final three months
of this year and wiil continue to
depress activity through the middle
of 2007.

However; analysts say there is a’
slim chance of a recession as a
result of the problems in housing
and manufacturing.

slowdown will cause the jobless
rate to rise to around five per cent
this year but think economic activ-
ity will pick up in the second half of
2007.

Coca-Cola attempts to block defense lawyer's
request for documents in trade secrets theft case

m@ By HARRY WEBER
AP Business Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — The
Coca-Cola Co. sought Wednes-
day to block a defense lawyer’s
request for documents in a trade
secrets theft case that relate to
products the world’s largest bev-
erage maker developed but nev-
er launched.

The Atlanta-based company
filed a motion in federal court
to quash a subpoena by Joya
Williams’ lawyer for the docu-
ments in preparation for
Williams’ Jan. 16 trial. Williams
is charged with conspiring to
steal trade secrets from Coca-
Cola in an effort to sell them to
rival Pepsi.

Two co-defendants have
already pleaded guilty in the
case, and at least one is expected
to testify against Williams, a for-
mer Coca-Cola secretary who
worked for the company’s glob-
al brand director at its head-
quarters.

According to the motion,
Williams’ lawyer, Janice Singer,
has subpoenaed 19 categories of
records from Coca-Cola:

The company is objecting to
production of two of the cate-
gories: documents reflecting all
products Coca-Cola developed

NAV KEY.
* - 29 December 2006
** - 30 November 2006
*** - 30 November 2006

**** - 30 November 2006





strategies, the unused products
and strategies still very much
constitute trade secrets,” Cowen
wrote. ies :
Singer did not immediately
return a call to her office
Wednesday seeking comment.
Williams, Edmund Duhaney_
and Ibrahim Dimson were
indicted July 11 on federal con-
spiracy charges. The three were
accused of stealing new product
samples and confidential docu-
ments from Coca-Cola and try-
ing to sell them to Purchase,
N.Y.-based PepsiCo Inc.
The alleged plans were foiled
after Pepsi warned Coca-Cola.
Williams has since been fired
from her job at Coca-Cola. She
has pleaded not guilty.

or which were in development
which it decided not to launch
within the last three years, and
documents reflecting all mar-
keting strategies formulated by
or for Coca-Cola that were
termed confidential or secret but
were not used in the last three
years.

Company lawyer Stephen
Cowen said Singer’s request for
those categories of documents
amounts to a “fishing expedi-
tion” for material that is sensi-
tive and considered valuable
trade secret information.

“Although the company may
have determined in the recent
past not to launch certain prod-
ucts under development or not
to adopt certain marketing

NOTICE OF VACANCY

2nd chef for The Landing Restaurant, Harbour Island.
Applicant must have working knowledge of preparation of
“Sydney” cuisine with at least 5 years experience working in
Australian kitchens. Successful applicant will be able to devise
and prepare daily specials. Successful applicant will also be
fully responsible for the preparation of all desserts.

The Landing has 10 year reputation for its fine cuisine with
a distinctive Australian accent. Applicant must be adaptable,
friendly and professional.

All responses can be sent to:
The Landing
Chef Position
P.O. Box 190
Harbour Island
Bahamas
Fax: 242-333-2650
e-mail: thelanding@ coralwave.com



Progressive medical practice requires the services
of an accountant with the following qualifications:

1. CPA or BSc with a minimum of 5 years
experience.

2. Working knowledge of all Quickbooks modules,
3. Bahamian citizenship.

Please email response to

infol@gtbahamas.com

Analysts believe that when the

ers

government has for adjusting for ° :

depressed overall economic |

on Friday it will show that the job-

Analysts believe housing sub-.

In addition to the weakness in’. °
housing, auto manufacturers have’: ’
also been struggling to reduce a.’
high backlog of unsold vehicles. | ’

They also say they believe the °
THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007, PAGE 5B




jo

‘Nation’s retailers report tepid
sales gains for December

@ By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Business Writer



NEW YORK (AP) — An
already disappointing holiday
shopping season turned out to
be even worse than expected
for many of the nation’s retail-
ers, who Thursday reported
tepid sales gains for December.

The downbeat results came
from merchants in all retail cat-
egories, from Limited Brands
Inc. to jewellery chain Zale
Corp. But Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
posted better-than-expected
results for December following
a dismal November, but the dis-
counter’s overall holiday sea-
son was the worst on record,
analysts said.

Ken Perkins, president of
RetailMetrics LLC, a research
company in Swampscott, Mass.,
said retailers were forced to
mark down heavily to bring in
sales.

“Clearly, this was a promo-
tional Christmas,” he said.
“Consumers clearly waited until
the last minute.”

Such aggressive discounting

led a number of merchants.

including Zale, BJ’s Wholesale
Club Inc., Gap Inc. and
AnnTaylor Stores Corp. to cut
their profit outlooks.

After a solid start to the hol-
iday season, many stores strug-
gled with disappointing busi-
ness in December, and a shop-
ping surge in the days just
before and after Christmas was-
n’t strong enough to make up
for lost sales. Merchants tried
to stick to their previously
planned discounts, but at the
seaon’s end they resorted to big-
ger-than-anticipated cuts to pull
shoppers in.

Mild weather across much of
the country meant consumers
were in no hurry to buy cold
weather wear such as coats and
gloves, depressing sales at many
apparel stores. Declining gaso-
line prices and a steady job mar-
ket should have helped mer-
chants, but Perkins believes the
recent drop in home equity
loans —.a big source of buying
power over the past few years
— curtailed spending among
middle-income shoppers.

Sales results were also hurt
by two big shifts in the way con-
sumers are shopping: the
increasing popularity of gift
cards and robust online buying,
which is not included in same-
store results. Gift card sales are
only posted when they are
redeemed rather than bought,
helping to extend the holiday

season into January.
Wal-Mart, which warned ear-
lier in the season that its sales
gain from stores open at least a
year would be no better than
one per cent, posted a 1.6 per
cent for December. Retail
industry analysts polled by

- Thomson Financial expected 1

percent gain.

Sales from'stores open at
least a year, known as same-
store sales are sales; are consid-
ered the industry standard for
measuring a retailer’s health.

The results followed Wal-
Mart’s 0.1 per cent decline in
same-store sales in November,
its first monthly same-store sales
drop in a decade.

Last month’s sales figure was
the company’s weakest Decem-
ber performance since 2000
when Wal-Mart posted a 0.3
percent gain, according to
Thomson Financial. The slim
0.8 per cent increase for
November and December com-
bined was the worst since
Thomson Financial began track-
ing same-store sales data in
1995.

Wal-Mart has struggled with
a mix of problems, including the
fact that its lower-income cus-
tomers were hurt by soaring gas
prices. But the company’s lack-

luster sales have persisted even
as the cost of gas retreated —
partly because its attempt to
broaden its appeal to higher-
income shoppers was poorly
executed, particularly in appat-
el and home furnishings.

Wal-Mart reported Thursday
that it had a strong performance
in electronics and the grocery
business in December.

Rival discounter ‘Target Corp.
had a 4.1 per cent gain in same-
store sales, below the 4.5 per
cent estimate.

Wholesale

Costco Wholesale Corp. post-
ed a nine per cent gain in same-
store sales, beating Wall Street’s
5.7 per cent estimate. BJ’s
Wholesale had a 0.6 per cent
gain in same-store sales, less
than the 1.3 per cent estimate.

Among department stores,
Federated Department Stores
Inc., which acquired May
Department Stores Co. last
year, had a 4.4 per cent gain in
same-store sales, below the 5.5
per cent estimate from Wall
Street. The same-store results
include only the Macy’s and
Bloomingdale’s stores that
existed before September, when
the company transformed most

ASSOCIATION, from Page 1£B—_—<£€£-$-A-7AWNAAADD?J

_ of the former May Co: stores

to Macy’s units.

Terry Lundgren, Federated’s
chairman, president and CEO,
noted that that performance at
the converted May stores
improved in December.

“While December sales were
somewhat softer than expect-
ed, we overcame unseasonably
warm weather in most of the
country and ended the month
strong,” said Lundgren in a
statement.

J.C. Penney Co. Inc. had a

2.6 per cent gain in same-store

sales at its department stores,
slightly better than the 2.4 per
cent estimate. While it said cer-
tain apparel areas were hurt by
unseasonably warm weather,
Penney said it was pleased with
its overall holiday sales perfor-
mance.

Penney’s Internet sales rose

15.2 per cent in December, on
top of a 26 per cent gain in the
year-ago period.

Kohl’s Corp. had a 3.0 per
cent gain in same-store sales,
better than the 0.7 per cent
decline analysts had expected.
The company said the month
was saved by last-minute shop-
ping before Christmas and gift
card redemptions in the last
week of December.

LNG, from 1B

Nordstrom Inc. reported i
robust. nine per cent gain in
same-store sales, exceeding th
4.3 per cent Wall Street est:
mate.

Pier 1 Imports Inc. suffered «
10.7 per cent drop in same-sto)
sales, worse than the 9.4 pe:
cent analysts anticipated.

Zale, which did not break oui
December same-store sales fig
ures, reported a same-stor
sales increase of 2.3 per cent for
November and December. Bu!
it said profil margins wel
below expectations due to mo:
aggressive price cutting.
~ Limited Brands had a fou
per cent gain, well below th:
9.3 per cent Wall Street expec:
ed.

Gap, which has long bees
struggling with its merchandis
ing formula, suffered an eight
per cent drop in same-store .
sales, worse than the five pei
cent estimate. As a result, th:
company said it was slashing it.
annual profit outlook. _

AnnTaylor posted a 5.3 per
cent decline in same-store sales;
analysts predicted a 0.6 per cent
gain. Among teen retailers
Pacific Sunwear of California
Inc. had a 3.2 percent dip in
December, worse than the 2.
percent forecast.



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written and demanded we pay security of
$100,000 for the costs of the appeal.

“This is a non-profit, grassroots associa-
tion. Once again, they are trying to use
their financial might to try and crush local
opposition.” :

Discovery Land Company, the San Fran-

cisco-based company behind the Guana.

Cay development, and its attorneys are like-
ly to say that the demand for the $100,000
security is a justified precaution, given that
the Association has allegedly failed to pay
$10,000 in costs previously ordered by the
Court of Appeal.

A letter to Mr Smith, from Randol














THE FOLLOWING......

« COOKS











WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY

JANUARY 3RD 2007
JANUARY 4TH 2007
JANUARY 5TH 2007

Dorsett, an associate at Graham, Thompson
& Co, said the Association had not paid
the $10,000 despite being served with a
statutory demand to do so in July 2006.

He added that the sum was intended to
compensate Discovery Land Company for
the costs of an appeal that lasted half a day.

“The present appeal is a substantive one,
estimated to occupy the better of five days
(the hearing the court below lasted four-
and-a-half days, and will consist of a review
of all the voluminous material that was
before the learned trial judge,” Mr Dorsett
wrote.

He added that Discovery Land Company

Nb

SBARRO THE ITALIAN EATERY IS EXPANDING THEIR
OPERATIONS ONTO THE CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF
THE BAHAMAS AND WE NEED THE EXPERTISE OF ALL OF

¢ SHIFT MANAGERS

« KITCHEN PREP

« PIZZA MAKERS

¢ CASHIERS

« FOOD SERVERS

¢ UTILITY WORKERS

PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA SITE (JUST OF
TUCKER ROAD) ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DAYS AND
TIME FOR AN INTERVIEW.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS

10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.

would have to use at least two attorneys,
and said: “We therefore propose that the
appellants provide security in the sum of
$100,000, which would cover the prepara-
tory work needed for the hearing of the
appeal, and costs for counsel's appearance
before the Court of Appeal on the days
thereof.”

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said the Associa-
tion was “still strong and committed”. He
added: “The developers are dredging and
excavating as quickly as they can. They are
operating 24/7, it seems, in an attempt to get
as much done in this window of opportunt-
ty. But this is a 10-year project.”





is I

Bank of The Patanias | |

M I

PREFERRED |
DIVIDEND PAYME

The major benefits from the AES Ocean Express project are
likely to come from revenues paid by the company to the
Public Treasury..Apart from annual business licence fees and
sums paid to lease the sea bed and land on Ocean Cay, AES
Ocean Express would also pay a throughput fee linked to |
the Henry Hub natural gas index.

When the price of LNG pumped to Florida by AES exceeds .
the Henry Hub index, the Government would gain a per-
centage of the additional revenues. The Tribune understands

_ that last in 2005, this would have generated an extra $40-$50 |
million for the Government.

Such money, although unbudgeted, could be used to defray
the costs of unanticipated spending in other areas, such as _
BEC's fuel imports. : See's ‘





Ter Tt ie3r

a EB —D

Head Office

Claughton House
Charlotte & Shirley Streets
P.O. Box N-7118

Nassau, Bahamas




NT

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
LIMITED IS PLEASED TO
ANNOUNCE A DIVIDEND
PAYMENT TO ALL HOLDERS
OF CLASS A AND CLASS B
PREFERENCE SHARES AS OF
DECEMBER 31, 2006 PAYABLE
WITHIN TEN BUSINESS DAYS
OF THE RECORD DATE
THROUGH CFAL LTD.
PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ee Sea eee ee
US service sector expanded at slower

rate in December than previous month

@ By CHRISTOPHER S
' RUGABER
AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The
United States service sector
expanded at a slower rate in
December than in the previous
month, a trade group said Thurs-
day,-signaling a cooling of a criti-
cal;component of overall eco-









notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

‘The Public is hereby advised that |, PHILIP WILLIAMS
of Ridgeland Park West, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
‘change my name to ANTHONY N. RUSSELL. If there
f are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections te the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later
F than thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this



NOTICE

ae | NOTICE is hereby given that VASHTIE ELAINE HEPBURN
_ | OF #475 HAWAIl AVENUE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

’ BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

nomic growth.

The Tempe, Arizona-based
Institute for Supply Management
said that its index of business
activity in the service sector was
57.1 in December versus 58.9 in
November. Analysts were look-
ing for a reading of 57.

A reading above 50 indicates
expansion. December marked the
45th consecutive month of expan-


















Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

“I knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of
December, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Excellent Career

| Opportunity Exist for:

Graphic Artist
Key Competencies:

BY Minimum. of 1 year. experience...

Energetic _

sion in non-manufacturing indus-
tries.

The index was one of several
negative economic reports
released Thursday. US factories
posted a smaller-than-expected
increase in orders in November,
the Commerce Department said,
while the number of laid-off work-
ers filing claims for unemploy-
ment benefits shot up last week to
the highest level since late
November, according to the
Labor Department.

-The service industries covered
by the ISM report represent
approximately 80 per cent of the
nation’s economic activity, and
economists are looking for the
sector to act as the main driver of
growth in 2007, as the manufac-
turing sector struggles with weak-
ness in the automotive and hous-
ing industries.

“This is still a good, healthy
number,” said Peter Morici, a
University of Maryland econo-
mist.

The report, taken together with
the unexpected increase in manu-
facturing activity reported
Wednesday by the ISM, indicates
that the economy has “positioned
itself for a modest uptick in
growth in the first half of 2007,”
he said.

Both the backlog of orders and
new orders indexes fell. The new
orders index dropped to 54.4 in
December, down from 57.1 the
previous month. The backlog of
orders index dropped for the first
time since August, falling to 48
from 54.5,

The orders backlog index indi-

cates whether unfilled orders are
increasing or decreasing. Some
respondents to the ISM survey
cited “improved shipping” and
year-end efforts to clear backlogs
as a reason for the decline.

Jan Hatzius, an economist at
Goldman Sachs, downplayed the
drop in the backlog of orders. He
said it is likely due to seasonal
factors, such as warmer weather in
December that may have spurred
construction activity.

While healthy, the ISM services
index is down from the first half of
last year, when it regularly topped
60.

“Overall, services is still func-
tioning as a locomotive keeping
the economy going,” Brian
Bethune, an economist at con-
sulting firm Global Insight, said
Wednesday. “But it’s not going
to be as strong a locomotive as it
has been.”

One bright spot, Bethune said, .

is the travel and tourism indus-
try, which has been growing
steadily for the past five years
after being hit hard by the Sep-
tember 11 attacks and is now post-
ing record numbers.

“New York City had a record
number of tourists this year,” he
said.

New York City & Co., former-
ly the New York Convention &
Visitors Bureau, estimated that
37 million Americans had visited
New York City in 2006, up from
29.5 million in 2001, according to
the group’s Web site.

The shipping industry is also in
good shape, Gene Huang, chief
economist for express delivery

company FedEx Corp., said
Wednesday.

The ISM’s manufacturing
report, issued Wednesday, showed
an increase in new orders and a
reduction in manufacturers’ inven-
tory, which could lead to an
increase in shipments, he said.

The services employment
index, meanwhile, moved up to
53.3 from 51.6 last month, mark-
ing the 29th consecutive monthly
gain in non-manufacturing jobs.

The prices paid index jumped
to 59.1 in December from 55.6 in
November, the 57th consecutive
month that prices paid by non-

manufacturing companies for

materials and services increased.

Nine industries reported
growth: real estate, rental and
leasing; finance and insurance;

utilities; wholesale trade; accom-
modation and food services; edu-
cational services; information;
health care and social assistance;
and professional, scientific and
technical services.

Six industries reported con-
traction: mining; management of
companies and support services;
construction; transportation and
warehousing; public administra-
tion; and other services.

Stocks were mixed in late
morning trading. The Dow Jones
index dropped 12.26 to 12,462.26,
while the S&P 500 fell 0.94 to
1,415.69. The Nasdaq moved up
15.74 to 2,438.90.

The ISM is a trade association
representing approximately 40,000
supply management profession-
als.

ew



INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS LTD. |
INSURANCE BROKING OPPORTUNITY

CMA is a progressive, successful and reputable

NOTICE
AUTOTEC CORPORATION

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000, AUTOTEC
CORPORATION is
December 29, 2006.

in dissolution as of

LoAal4e

3 nye

! Matthew Charles Stokes 6f Flat No. 514%-Golden Sands.

No. 5, P.O. Box 9168, Mankhol, Dubai UAE is the

property & liability insurance brokerage. We need
an ambitious, energetic and enthusiastic person to
join our small, dedicated and professional team.
This will be an office-based position with scope for
real advancement. Insurance experience though
desirable is not essential. Full training will be provided.

We are looking for:

_ © A well-groomed person, professional in

appearance.

e Excellent written and oral communication skills.

¢ Competence in Microsoft applications such as
Word, Excel & Outlook.

e A self-starter, with initiative and a willing team
player

¢.Commitment to study for insurance exams.

We are offering:

A competitive salary and benefits package
commensurate with experience. Our office is
located on East Bay Street near Fort Montagu, with
free staff parking.

Applicants should submit a full resume and a

covering letter in a sealed envelope marked “Private .
and Confidential”. This should be posted or delivered |
by hand to: % Ny

The General Manager

CMA Insurance Brokers & Agents Lid
P.O. Box SS-19067
Bahamas Realty Building
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

Liquidator

Self Starter
LIQUIDATOR

Required computer knowledge
Postal applications should be post-marked no later
than January 5th, 2007. The deadline for receipt of

all (posted or delivered) applications will be
. Wednesday, January 10, 2007.

in the following areas:
Photoshop
eQuark
eAdobe Graphic Suite

We respect fully the confidentiality of all applications.
All applications will be acknowledged.

Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of



To apply for this position please
send. resume to

cshumanresources@aol.com

Baker’s Bay

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB



SANQUE PASSE
(AIS Private Banking
Vacancy for:
Credit & Controls Officer

The Credit & Controls Officer reports directly to the Chief
Operations Officer and Deputy Director.
Responsibilities:

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:
Reconciliations of all Internal & External Bank
Accounts

“Credit Lines and Limit Controls of Loans

‘As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians on
our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to apply
for the position of:

Golf Course Construction
Assistant Manager

Responsibilities will include:

Attributes:

Major firm in the financial and
A legal services industry
“" Invites applicants for the function of |
‘= Must have 8-10 years experience in Golf Course
Construction and Management at leading Golf Club

Net Asset Value Weekly & Monthly Calculations “Must have knowledge of all phases of Golf course
Preparation & Approval of Wire Transfers design and construction activities including vertical golf
Daily & Weekly reporting and controls construction (club houses, maintenance facilities,
® @ ' ugh Bi irrigation pump stations)
Retrocession calculations for External Managers “Must have a thorough understanding of all phases of
minis ra or Preparation and Closing of accounts ' maintenance and repair to courses, practice range and
documentation equipment

: é at; Must have extensive experience working with city

App roval. of all daily transactions planners, engineers, architects, and contractors

Disbursement of Banks expenses . & Must be knowledgeable in all phases of construction

Assist with all back office operations contracts related to golf projects

“Must be a detail oriented, a skilled planner and
prioritizer with excellent communication skills

e Degree in Computer Science preferred
e AT, MCP CCNA and N- certification

‘ . . Candidates should possess the following “ Must be computer literate
e Knowledge of active directories, ee “+ Must be willing to live on an out istand
qualifications: Ability to work on own initiative is important

SQL, CISCO Systems and Routing

5-10 years Private Banking Experience
Associates or Bachelors degree in Accounting,
Business Administration or relevant field:
Proficient in use of software applications such as
MS Word, MS Excel & MS outlook;

‘Good oral and written communication skills;
Ability to operate a variety of office machines
(computer, fax , photocopy & calculator),

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
; Web Page Management Sei health benefits. Only qualified applicants need
°3 years experience

e Salary commensurate with experience

e Attractive benefits

Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards

Director, Human Resources and Training

P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Apply in writing to: Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

P.O. Box AP 59241

Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514

Bakers Bay Goll Ocean Club iy a SSOO miittion propeet
PAIK UR PINE LOGS CY NUTT SLA PONCE ONT OL TOO SUC
Kesidentind hones, av FU-vere envivranmrentat preserve, wv ESO stip

Reply in confidence to:

Fax (242) 394-8430



PSETWOLR LT MeN LULL DEKUX LISLE POOeOX OCICS ORE KU SCC KD A

(No vhone calls nlease)