Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
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9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

Call for live public debates
ahead of general election

WITH less than five
months to go to the next gen-
eral election, a new call has
been made for all candidates
to be subjected to live public
debates.

In this way, voters will be
spared “lame duck” and
“makeweight” candidates -
and get a chance to assess the
characters of.candidates
before they go to the polls.

The call came yesterday
from Clever Duncombe, the
fathers’ rights champion who
is contesting Immigration
Minister Shane Gibson’s
Golden Gates seat as an inde-
pendent.

He said too many MPs had
been elected in the past who
were clearly not up to the job.

COUNTDOWN



They were political choices
who had none of the qualities
required for parliament.

Mr Duncombe said: “Prime
Minister Perry Christie ought
to jump at the chance to. have
all candidates involved in
public debates.

“After all, he won debating
compétitions while at college,
so he ought to be very excited
about it.”







Mr Duncombe has in the
past criticised low-grade MPs
who had neither the character
nor intellect to be parliamen-
tary representatives.

He said live debates in pub-
lic forums - all televised by
ZNS - would expose poor
candidates and give voters a
chance to assess the worth of
those they were voting for.

“We need to eliminate the
rhetoric and separate fact
from fiction in our politics,”

_ he added, “that’s why I am

advocating live debates, so
that we can get a better
understanding of what is
going on.”

In the past, political parties
had relied heavily on pre-elec-
tion rallies. But these were
not debating exercises, only
occasions for rhetoric and slo-
gans, Mr Duncombe believes.

To raise the standard of
MPs, all candidates ought to
be subjected to live debates +
as with US presidential can-

didates - so that their views

can be tested on the spot.

“We want commonsense
and intelligence as prerequi-
sites for anyone being elected
to parliament and live debates
ought to be incorporated into
all election campaigns.”

The PLP was criticised after

_ the 2002 election for select-

ing “makeweight” candidates
for constituencies it was not

expecting to win.

However, because of the
party’s unexpected victory,
many of these sub-standard
candidates ended up in par-

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‘



PART OF YOUR LIFE



@ FATHERS’ rights champion Clever Duncombe

liament, to the embarrass-
ment of all concerned.

Mr Duncombe said he
looks forward to meeting Mr
Gibson in a live debate along
with any other candidate
standing for the Golden
Gates constituency.

“Tn all my travels round the

constituency, it is felt that the
minister has failed miserably
to articulate any plan for the
area. As a result, I feel he
could lose. Our response from
Golden Gates has been great,
and it’s clear that Mr
Gibson has no firm grip on
the area.”



’ 1A

na Nicole

is given 21
days to have
DNA test

ANNA NICOLE SMITH
has been given 21 days to
complete DNA testing on
her three-month-old daugh-
ter,

A Los Angeles judge has
ordered the former reality
star to complete tests by Jan-
uary 23 or face the legal con-
sequences.

The ruling by Superior
Court judge Robert Schnider
is the result of action taken
through the Californian
courts by her former
boyfriend, Larry Birkhead.

Mr Birkhead, a press pho-
tographer, said Ms Smith’s
baby Dannie Lynn Hope is
the product of a two-year
relationship he had with the
cover girl.

Ms Smith gave birth at
Doctors Hospital, Nassau,
on September 7 last year —
three days before her 20-
year-old son Daniel was
found dead at her bedside.

She had reportedly fled to
the Bahamas to escape a
media frenzy in California.
But Mr Birkhead alleges that
she left the United States to
evade his paternity claims.

Since then, Mr Birkhead ~
helped by celebrity attorney
Debra Opri — has been lob-
bying for recognition as the
baby’s true father,

The judge’s ruling puts
more pressure on Ms Smith
as she takes refuge at Hori-
zons, the Eastern Road
house now at the centre of

TROPICAL
Oars Re) Gy

ay MH tb
seal



LAK

a ANNA NICOLE SMITH
(AP FILE Photo)

litigation brought by another

- ex-boyfriend, South Carolina

realtor Ben Thompson.

It leaves her under a legal
obligation to undergo the
DNA tests, or face the judg-
ment of the Californian
courts.

Ms Smith’s lawyer-lover,
Howard K_ Stern, has
claimed to be the baby’s
father and his name is on the
birth certificate,

Mr Birkhead has begun
action in the Bahamas
Supreme Court against Ms
Smith and Mr Stern alleging
fraud and slander.



















THE TRIBUNE



Firearm and
drugs are |
confiscated

OFFICERS from the |
mobile division confiscated a
firearm and small amount of
drugs while patrolling
through Flint Street on Mon-
day night.

According to Inspector |
Walter Evans, the incident
took place sometime around
1ipm.

He explained that a man in
the area dropped a jacket
upon seeing the officers.

“The officers approached

.and they found that under-
neath the jacket he con-
cealed a sawed-off shot gun
which contained two live
rounds of ammunition.

“In addition, he had some
substance in his pocket in a
clear plastic bag, the grassy
substance was found to be
Marijuana,” Inspector Evans
reported.

A man has been detained
and is being questioned in
connection with the matter.

Actor Edward
James Olmos
accuses Puerto
Rico, Washington
of delaying
Vieques cleanup

@ SAN JUAN,
Puerto Rico

ACTOR Edward James
Olmos on Tuesday criti- -
cized the United States
and Puerto Rico for not _
moving faster to clean up
the site of a former bomb-
ing range on Vieques
Island, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Olmos, an Oscar nomi-
nee for the 1988 movie
"Stand and Deliver," said
officials "have done noth-
ing" to restore an area
that environmentalists say
is tainted by dangerous
pollutants nearly four
years after the departure
of the U.S. Navy.

“We are not going to
stop until we make them
see that a (cleanup) is
necessary," Olmos said at
a news conference in the
Puerto Rican capital of
San Juan.

The Navy, which with-
drew from Vieques in
May 2003 following three
years of steady protests,
has begun controlled det-
onations of unexploded
bombs in sections of the
21-mile-long (33-kilome-
ter-long) island and near-
by waters.

This has sparked
renewed protests by resi-
dents who say the explo-
sions are causing more
environmental damage on
Vieques, some 6 miles (10
kilometers) off the south-
eastern coast of mainland
Puerto Rico.

Olmos also urged Puer-
to Rican legislators to
block the construction of
large tourist resorts on
undeveloped beaches in
the U.S. Caribbean terri-
tory.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Ye



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 3



se ae re

0 In brief

Still no
update on
‘peating’ of
journalist

AS one year approaches since
the alleged beating of a an
American journalist by Defence
Force officers outside the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, police are still unable
to give an update on the status
of the investigation into the
matter.

Chief Superintendent Hulan
Hanna said yesterday that he is
unable to say where the inves-
tigation is at this point, but
assured the press that the inci-
dent has not been ignored or
put aside.

"The matter is pretty much
at the forefront and I'm hoping
that it is only a matter of time
before the public and principals
involved would know how the
matter is to be fully and finally
determined. It is not out of sight
and not out of mind," he said.

"There are many times when
an investigation may move out
of the public and you're doing
things in the background and it
is from one agency to the next,
but I know it is not something
that has been silently put away."

According to Mr Hanna, the
international media is still mon-
itoring the progress of the inves-
tigation, inquiring about it from
time to time.

The assault caused protests
and calls for a tourism boycott
on the Bahamas by Cuban-
Americans, in the shadow of a
contentious immigration issue
involving two Cuban dentists.

No charges |
so far over
alleged RBDF
assault

CHARGES have yet to be
brought as a result of the inves-
tigation into the alleged assault
by Defence Force officers on
an Inagua man.

Chief Superintendent of
Police ‘Hulan Hanna said that
"the police have done their duty
regarding the investigation and
again it is one of those instances
where the file has been for-
warded."

‘"No charges have been
brought, but the investigations
have pretty much been done
and the file has been forwarded
with observations and recom-
mendations," he said

"Again the persons in the
community of Inagua need not
be perturbed that they will not
gei the final results and conclu-
sions, because that information
will be sent out."

Two weeks ago, a source

close to the police told The Tri- :

bune that a disturbing number
of criminal files are being
requested by the office of the
Attorney General.
. It was alleged that this has
created hold-ups in the timely
prosecution of cases and
delayed the administration of
justice.

Young man
suspected of
attempted
housebreaking

THE POLICE are asking the
public to be on the look out for
a young man suspected of
attempted housebreaking.

He is of medium build, about
five feet 10 inches tall, is in his
mid-20s and weighs around
180lbs.

The attempted break-in took
place on December 12 at
11.14am on Mount Royal
- Avenue.

' The pubic is advised to con-
tact the police with any infor-
mation concerning this individ-
ual at 919, 322-3333, Crime Tip-
sters at 328-8477, or the Cen-
tral Detective Unit at 32-22561.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning -
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.






CRITICS of the proposed
new Bahamas health insurance
scheme have been given a big
boost by the latest troubles in
the British national health ser-
vice.

Hospitals in parts of the UK
have been told not to operate
on patients until they have
been on a waiting list for up to
20 weeks, according to leaked
documents seen by London’s
Daily Telegraph.

The move, it is claimed, is
aimed at coping with the-finan-
cial crisis in the country’s health
scheme, which has made treat-
ment available to all since the
1940s.

Instructions have gone

out to hospital administra-
tors saying treatment should
be delayed as long as pos-
sible.

In one letter, according to
the Telegraph, hospital man-
agers are told to work out how
many operations can be put off
until the start of the new finan-
cial year in April.

The disclosures, said the

_paper, show how much effect a

£1.3 billion deficit run up by
health trusts is having on
patient care.

Instructions to delay treat-
ment have been sent to man-
agers in eastern England, the
worst-performing area. They
have been told of the urgent

need to “get a grip” on bud-
gets.

Delays

This was leading to “artifi-
cial delays” in patient care.
Shadow health secretary
Andrew Lansley told the Tele-
graph: “These patients are
being deliberately obstructed
in accessing treatment they
need, despite hospitals having
paid for the staff who can treat
them.”

The proposed Bahamas
scheme, which has now been
voted through the House of
Assembly, has come in for

Baha Mar management says
decision to raise course
prices ‘purely commercial’

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE decision to increase
the prices of the Cable Beach
Golf Course remains
unchanged — despite the fact
that local golfers have threat-
ened to continue agitation
about what they describe as
“discriminatory” practices.

On December 21 the Baha
Mar Group, which is behind
the 2.3 billion redevelopment
plan for the Cable Beach strip,
raised fees for the peek win-
ter season on the golf course.

At the moment, guests of

. Radisson Cable Beach, Nas-
sau Beach Hotel and Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort pay $110
for a weekend round of golf.

Guests of the Crystal Palace
Casino pay $90, walk-in guests
— Bahamians and tourist not
staying at the above mentioned

hotels — pay $185 and
Bahamas Golf Federation
members pay $90.

Last week, a group of local
golfers demonstrated at the
course, claiming the course’s
management was trying to
“price out” local golfers.

One of the members of the
group, veteran politician Hen-
ry Bostwick warned that the
protesters would not be
“pushed back into the ghetto”
and he threatened the course’s
management with further
demonstrations.

Yesterday, Mr Robert
“Sandy” Sands, spokesman for
the Baha Mar Group, told The
Tribune the decision to
increase prices was purely
commercial, and was dictated
by market prices.

“While we appreciate the
patronage of the local golfers,
we have to ensure that our golf

course remains a financially
viable option that can only be
derived from the income of the
operation of the course,” said
Mr Sands.

He said local golfers who are
intent on protesting the
increase in prices at the course
should look at the rates of oth-
er golf courses in the country —
because, he claimed, “the rates
at the Cable Beach Course are
very concessionary.”

But, according to Mr Bost-
wick, “What they are attempt-
ing to do is duplicate at Cable
Beach, what has in fact hap-
pened at Paradise Island.

“Unless you have wealthy
friends who are residents on
Paradise Island or members of
a club its difficult to play,
because the locals have been
priced out of Paradise Island,
and that’s exactly what has hap-
pened to Cable Beach at the

Future of former frequent Bahamas
visitor the Queen Mary uncertain

FORTY years ago, she
could sometimes be seen
moored resplendently “over
the bar” outside Nassau har-
bour.

The Queen Mary, and. her
sister ship the Queen Eliza-
beth, were frequent visitors to
the Bahamas during their
many years as Cunard liners.

However, today the Queen
Mary is a rusting hulk stand-
ing among tankers, cranes and
container ships at Long
Beach, California.

And her future lies in the
balance with her owners in
bankruptcy and Long Beach
councillors seeking bids for
rights to the ship and the 55-
acre site surrounding it.

During her time in Long
Beach, the Queen Mary has
been a hotel and tourist attrac-
‘tion. But her future is now
uncertain as politicians try to
thrash out a deal with poten-
tial buyers.

So far, according to The
Guardian of London, 17 bids
have been received, and Long
Beach officials hope the ship
will be refurbished by any new
owner.

While many Californians
want the old liner to stay in
Long Beach, at least one
British businessman wants her
back in Glasgow, where she
was launched in 1934.

Property developer Alan
Pocock has a £5 million plan
to take the 80,774-ton Queen
Mary “back home” to become
a tourist attraction on the Riv-
er Clyde.

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Wi THE Queen Mary 2, the world’s largest ocean liner, top



right, moves near its historic namesake the Queen Mary,
docked below on Thursday, Feb. 23, 2006, at the Long Beach

Harbor, in Long Beach, Calif.

But Long Beach locals
describe the ship as “an icon
of our city” and are deter-
mined to keep her where they
feel she belongs.

The Queen Mary was taken
to California in December,
1967, after her cruising career
was over. She was greeted by
a million spectators at the time
and still draws 1.2 million vis-
itors a year, many lured by her
reputation as the most haunt-
ed liner in history.

During her heyday as a
transatlantic liner linking
Britain with New York, she
provided luxurious transport
for royalty, film stars and
world leaders, including Win-
ston Churchill, who was later
to give his name to the ship’s


















ioe i?

- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)







(Photo/Damian Dovarganes) ,

state dining room. -

During the war, both the
Queen Mary and Queen Eliza-
beth were used as troop ships.
The Queen Elizabeth eventu-
ally came to grief in Hong Kong
harbour after serving as a Flori-
da tourist attraction.

heavy fire from critics.

They say the $235 million
earmarked for the scheme will
be insufficient to meet the
country’s needs - and probably
have an adverse effect on
patient care.

While accepting the princi-

ple of “medical care for all”,
they feel a compulsory health
insurance scheme for everyone
could lead to financial disaster.

One critic said: “Bahamians
are going to be forced to pay
money off their pay cheques
every month for a service
which will be open to every-
one, and that includes immi-
grants, legal and illegal.

“As the British national

moment,” stated Mr Bostwick.
The Tribune attempted to
contact other golf courses for a

@ A PROTESTER making his point last week

‘UK health system problems
spark fears over NHI future

health service has proved,
something seen as a ‘free’ ser-
vice sends up demand at an
alarming rate.”

The PLP government has
been accused of introducing

the health scheme as a vote- |

catcher in the run-up to the
general election without think-
ing through the financial con-
sequences.

While the British scheme
works well in some areas, it
often falls down in congested
urban districts where demand
exceeds resources.

Long. queues, long waiting
lists for operations, and mixed
wards are among the short-

‘comings of the British system.

THES
TO BAWTITANS



copy of their price lists, but calls
were not returned up to press
time.

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Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com







VU bie ‘

PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

a ——————
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR . .

The Tribune Limited Thoughts on |

&

+

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

ke

ro

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Nassau Fax: -

(242) 328-2398

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Stopping drugs is our real focus

FARM ROAD residents live in fear of esca-
lating crime in their community — in fact all
Bahamians today fear for their lives at the
hands of the criminal.

Many of these crimes are probably rooted in
the growing drug trade, yet emotionalism over
the arrest of five baggage handlers is diverting
attention from what should be our present
focus — stopping drug trafficking and reducing
crime.

This is not to suggest that our laws can be
broken by arresting any of our citizens, but
neither are we saying that any Bahamian should
be allowed to use our laws to circumvent the
consequences of their illegal acts.

We are making no judgment on the bag-
gage handlers. We are not speculating on their
guilt or innocence. We trust that their cases
will be thoroughly investigated and that they
will have a fair trial. If found innocent they
will be returned to their families, if not they will
suffer the consequences of their own free choice
— breaking society’s laws.

Demonstrations, attempts to bring down a
government, and what seems to be a tendency
for many Bahamians to turn drug dealers like

“Ninety” Knowles into folk heroes, should not
be allowed to cloud the real issues — the
Bahamas does not have a secure airport. If
drugs can be smuggled, so can bombs be plant-
ed. But what is most worrying is that drug deal-
ing in this country is being tolerated and pro-
tected by too many.

When The Tribune started to investigate
the case of the baggage handlers, too’ many
airport workers seemed to know what was
going on, too many appeared not to be sur-
prised at what had happened — in fact they
had anticipated it. If our impressions are correct
then why were arrests not made sooner? Are
we slipping back into the eighties when
Bahamians were afraid to talk, drug dealers
were accepted into society because they had
rings on their fingers, baubles around their
necks, drove flashy cars and waved $100 bills,
while dazzled young Bahamians wrote school
essays about wanting to be drug dealers when
they grew up?

This is where our attention should be
focused — to raise society’s moral standards
and stop this downward trend into degrada-
tion. And if any of the baggage handlers can
give any information that will help to identify
the middle men, leading to the head of the
smuggling ring, they would be doing this coun-
try a great service.

Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son, as a guest on a radio talk show, admitted
that she did not know why Bahamian police
chose not to arrest the five suspects. However,
she was confident that they had a “very good

“MARINE NAVIGATION

COURSES

In a nation of islands it is essential to be able
to navigate over the horizon with confidence.
Prepare for safe voyaging by enrolling in the
Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by The
Bahamas School of Marine Navigation. Plan
to attend the free first class on Monday, January
8th, at 7 p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
535-6234 or
pgk434@netscape.net. Other courses include ,

Seamanship and Celestial Navigation.

Bay Street. Details: 364-2861,



To All Valued Patients of

Dr. Richard E. Crawford’s Office
Located on Mackey Street, The Plaza
Please be advised that the office will Reopen

Tuesday Jan. 2nd, 2007

With Yasmine Williams Robinson MBBS,
DRCOG, MRCGP Family Medicine Specialist
Tel: 242-393-3025/Fax: 242-393-8452



“way that the police can nab the

reason.”

Neither do we pretend to know why. Many
Bahamian cynics will probably dismiss it by
suggesting that some policemen are probably in
cahoots with the dealers. This is an easy way
out. We know that there are some questionable
police officers on the force, but we also know
that the force has many honourable men and
women. Our contention has always been that
our judicial system needs a complete overhaul.
Some sentences handed down suggest that
some of our magistrates live on another planet
and. are not aware of the seriousness of the
escalating crime — and the need for tough pun-
ishment.

It would be interesting to know how many
persons charged with murder are out on bail
and walking our streets. Just as a special traffic
court was “opened to take care of traffic
offences, there should be a special court to
hear all the murder cases pending.

It is not uncommon to hear policemen com-
plain that they no sooner get an offender to
the bar ofthe court than he is back on the

street on bail, and they are having to hunt him

down again for another crime.

Faced with such a situation anyone would be

happy to facilitate arrests where there is in fact

“swift justice” and the sentence fits the crime.
The serious penalties for drugs in the United
States — five to LO years or even longer — are
certainly an inducement for those lower down
the drug chain to sing like canaries. And that,
unfortunately, in dealing with crime is the only
“godfather”
of the lot.

We suggest that the only reason the Amer-
icans are interested in the baggage handlers is
that they are the first route to those who are
actually calling the tune.

Today our full attention should be on the
security of our airport and the reduction of
drug peddling. Nothing should distract us from
that objective. If the drug handlers are innocent,
they'll come home.

Meanwhile those who are in the drug trade
should get out immediately. It is a dangerous
business that everyone who takes it up knows
has major risks. If they are prepared to take the
risks, then they should be adult enough to face
the consequences. We do not approve of an
illegal arrest — which is not to suggest that the
baggage handlers were arrested illegally — but

the drug dealer should know that that is anoth-.

er risk he is taking.

If drug dealers persist in their nefarious busi-
hess and are caught, don’t cry foul for we can
assure you that this is one newspaper that will
not come to your defence. You and your trade
have done too much damage to the moral fibre
of our country to warrant a sympathetic ear.



airport’s US
pre-clearance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE comments by His
Excellency The US Ambas-
sador in a recent interview
with one of the media houses
rather surprises me as I think
he should know and fully
understand that if it was not
for his country’s security
requirements, Homeland
Security/TSA no person
would have to be at the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport two-three hours prior
to a flight.

You have to be at the air-

port, ready to check-in, not
heading to the airport two-
three hours prior to the flight.

Our airport, probably the
only airport in the world, for
some reason we have to go
through metal detectors and
baggage screening twice
although we have been in a
secure and sterile area effec-
tively immediately after
checking-in. If the second
inspection on the first floor of
the Departure Lounge was
eliminated check-in would be
speeded-up considerably and
effectively there would be no
loss of security.

Whilst dealing with Home-
land Security - US Pre-clear-
ance— checked recently with
my travel agent and to my
shock I discovered that there
is a fee of US $26 for each pas-
senger passing through US
Pre-clearance in The
Bahamas. I roughly calculate
that’s total revenue stream for
the US Treasury right here
generated through our spend-
ing US $40 million on pro-
moting our destination in
excess of US $40,000,000 plus
and guess what all we get out
of that is the facility!

Imagine if The Bahamas
was to receive 50 per cent? In
10-years we could pay in full
for a $200 million spanking
new International Airport
without adding one new dime
in fees or passenger service
charges, coming soon folks at
The Lynden Pindling Airport.

It’s sort of like the revenue
The Bahamas is unable to col-
lect from ‘over-flights’, planes
flying over 12,000 ft over The
Bahamas, again estimated to
exceed a potential revenue of
$40 million. Even if we only
received 50 per cent here
again we could collect over
$40,000,000 every year till thy
kingdom comes and pay for
everything at The Lynden Pin-
dling Airport within five-
years!

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Opportunity Exist for:

Graphic Artist

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To apply for this position please
send resume to

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“+,

a

4

r
af

surely you can politely speak ,
to your fellas in Washington |;
and get them to share a little ©
of this with The Bahamas?

Das mbs tS

letters@tribunemedia.net








Dear Mr Ambassador, we H HUMES
are sad that you are leaving Naseais wr
us but as a parting gesture December: 2006 i

2006 has been:
an ‘annus
miriabilis’ for
the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS year has been an ‘annus miriabilis’ for The Bahamas...
We have faced several challenges in the societal and economic-;
areas but, over all, we did not do too badly in 2006.

Of course, the average politician continues to baffle theo
expectations of his/her constituents but, it ain’t long now. The".
looming general elections will be decisive and will decide the.”
way forward, or backwards, for the nation. 1G

There were far too many homicides and assaults against the~
person during 2006 and it is my prayer that we Bahamians will”.
learn to resolve our apparent conflicts without resorting eae
blood shed and mayhem.

On the economic front we have seen and heard about numer-—
ous ‘anchor projects’ but far too many small Bahamians are *
unable to access a small affordable piece of land on which to.
construct a modest home. We need foreign investment but we
cannot continue to ‘sell’ out our choice real estate, willy-nilly, for -
a few dollars and a handful of construction jobs.

If I were to have one more wish I would ask that the govern-_
ment bring resolution to the tragedy of the living victims and sur-
vivors of the celebrated ‘Sea Hauler’ episode. It cannot be:,
right that these people, like the displaced workers down at the
Royal Oasis, should not have an enjoyable and merry Christmas.
while the rest of us, pig out on ham and turkey.

On balance, however, those of us who will live tc see this |
Christmas, have much to be thankful for. As we prepare to.
leap into the New Year, let us not forget that we are still our:
brother’s keeper. To God then, that Great Deliverer aml Sus’
tainer, in all things, b@the glory.

ORTLAND H Mo
BODIE JR
Nassau,

December 21, 2006.

‘Promises made |
by Perry Christie”

EDITOR, The Tribune.
DO YOU recall these

promises made by Perry G
Christie, now four and a half

e And, most important of,
all, I promise you that all my;
efforts as your Prime Minis-
ter will be directed to only one,

years later, is the promise he — end: x
made was fulfilled. to end human suffering.
E-mail m e- where I find it; &,)
(petertcarey@yahoo.ca) and to give hope where I see}
let me know what you think... despair;
The Hon Perry G Christie - to bring compassion where!
Clifford Park April 26, 2002. see cruelty; *
¢ I promise you good gov- to plant love in place of
ernment. hate; and ®
e I promise you honest gov- to join hands and heart$
ernment. with you as we walk together
e | promise you competent out of the darkness into the
government. redeeming light of a new era

of peace and prosperity for

e I promise you compas-
all Bahamians, united and

sionate government.

e I promise you a govern- free! Cn
ment of humility and not of I have my views but I ang
arrogance; dying to hear yours first. :

e | promise you a govern- The Bahamas, the capital of
ment for all Bahamians, black — the World.

and white, rich and poor, PLP Please register to vote.
and FNM, CDR and BDM.

e | promise you that I will
dedicate my life in public
office to being your servant

and not your master.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are —
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PETER T CAREY :
Nassau,
December 26, 2006.

ae













SN SAN
\
S



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Man denies
charge of
marijuana
possession

A PINEWOOD Gardens
man was granted $5,000 bail
yesterday after pleading not
guilty to a drug possession
charge.

Randy Mackey, 29, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel at court eight
in Bank Lane yesterday.

He was charged with pos-
session of marijuana with the
intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Satur-
day, December 30, Mackey
was found in possession of
half an ounce of marijuana.

The case was adjourned to
May 21.

Cuban priests
foresee better
economy in
yearly forecast

@ HAVANA

TOP priests of Cuba’s
African-influenced Santeria
religion issued their yearly
forecast on Tuesday, predict-
ing that the island will enjoy a
better economy but suffer
more health problems in 2007,
according to Associated Press.

Competing groups of San-
teria priests, or babalaos,
gather every New Year's Eve
for religious ceremonies that
include chanting and animal
sacrifices. Cubans eagerly
look forward to the so-called
Letter of the Year released in
the next days, containing
vague predictions which can
be interpreted in many ways.

This year’s letter did not
say much about likely the
biggest question on Cubans'
minds: the uncertain health
of 80-year-old leader Fidel
Castro, who temporarily
stepped aside five months
ago following emergency
surgery for intestinal bleed-
ing. He has not been seen in
public since.

‘But Victor Betancourt of
the Miguel Febres Padron
gtoup of some 950 Santeria
priests said Castro's physi-
cians could draw some advice
from the letter.

“The doctors attending to
that case should be careful
there are no complications ...
or an infection,” Betancourt
told reporters.

But Cubans — and people
around the world — this year
must watch out for epidemics,
changes in personal relation-
ships, broken agreements and
possible military interven-
tions, Betancourt added.

The smaller Yoruba Asso-
ciation of Cuba predicted that
health will be a major issue
for Cuba in the new year and
cautioned Cubans to take care
of themselves and eat well.

Santeria is a mix of spiritu-
al traditions carried here by
African slaves and Catholi-
cism brought by Spaniards.
The faith is practiced
throughout Cuba and even
many members of the Com-
munist Party follow its rituals.

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@ By ARTHIA NIXON-STACK

ELEUTHERA is looking
forward to a happy new year,
thanks to a dramatic rise in
tourism business over the fes-
tive season.

An island which has been in
the doldrums for decades
enjoyed a powerful infusion of
foreign money over the Christ-
mas and New Year holidays.

From college-aged visitors at
the Governor's Harbour fish fry
outnumbering locals to David
Curoso, star of CSI:Miami,
pulling up in his private plane,
Eleuthera proved to be the hol-
iday hotspot for quite a few
Germans, Italians, Canadians
and Americans.

Even beaches that boast
seclusion were crowded daily
with sunbathers, bone fisher-
men and yuppies scouting out
property.

Relieved residents, who have
witnessed an economic depres-
sion in recent years, have final-
ly reached a comfort level with
the new growth in business.

"Thad to turn down four jobs
on New Year's Eve," said
Arthur Nixon, a Bahamahost
tour-taxi driver who owns one
of the few 10-seater vehicles on
the island.

"All of the private homes are
booked and all of my cars have

been rented. We've been quite

busy and it looks like we still
have a few more weeks of this
left so all we can do is take

advantage of it and reap the

benefits."

Mr Nixon, who is also care-
taker of several vacation homes
and owner of the Airport
Liquor Store, reported that
while he was taking renters
back to the airport, he received
calls that more were arriving.

"It's been a mad rush but one
can't complain," he said. "It's
just been amazing to see par-
ties of over 20 and 30 coming in
on almost a daily basis. This
week I have pulled up to local
resorts only to have bookings
managers tell me that they sold
their last rooms the night
before.

“The only thing we can do in

a situation like that is to get in
our little network and see if we
can pull some strings to assist
our visitors in finding a place
to spend their holiday."
CocoDiMama, Dolce Vita,
Tippy's Unique Village and

Joe's Bar and-Grill. were all ”

booked out for New Year's par-
ties that went on well beyond
dawn. Most island properties
were sold out at some point
during the season, quite an
accomplishment for an island
stagnant since the late 1980s and
early 1990s.

Packed

Things have become so over-
whelming for JJ the Ninja
Conch Salad Man, he has had to
get assistance from his daughter,
singer Janelle Hepburn.

“There are more tourists here
than locals," she said. "They
aren't here for a weekend. Quite
a number have been in town for
a week and some as long as a
month so I suspect things may
continue through April. This is
one of the best winter seasons
we've had in a while. I person-
ally haven't seen the fish fry
lines so long in a while and it
seems everyone is going after
conch, Kalik and fish.”

There have been no reports
of overcharging or deception to
visitors among those in the
tourism industry.

First time visitor and native
Spaniard Pia Durban is so in
love with the island she joked
she wants to buy a home there.

“The people are so warm and
nice,” she said. “Nothing like
Nassau. I can’t believe that my
family and I are living in town
and went out for several hours
with all the windows open and
doors unlocked and no-one
came in. The tranquillity of the
island is unreal."

Ms Durban, who is also an
artist, attributes her surge of
inspiration to the charming Vic-
torian-style homes in Gover-
nor's Harbour surrounded by
tropical foliage. ‘

“My son is married to a
Bahamian from Eleuthera but





i Neues

@ A BAHAMAHOST graduate



and island tour guid

e points out the joining of the Caribbean Sea





and Atlantic Ocean on a hill overlooking the famous Glass Window Bridge in North Eleuthera



RK :
@ PIA Durban of Spain sits on a sand bank with her son

Antonio and grand-daughter Alejandra on New Year’s Day on

one of Eleuthera’s beaches

they live in Nassau with my lit-
tle grand-daughter,” she said.
“Eleuthera and islands like it

(Photo by Arthia Nixon-Stack)

are the real Bahamas. I've been
to Nassau several times and
there is nothing as natural and



serene as this. I've taken so
many photographs and this is
while walking alone and getting
lost. I feel so safe and at home
here — the bakery is wonderful;
Bishop Clifford Petty and his
wife's church was so welcom-
ing and the lady Jenny at our
home here was like family to
me. I don't want to go back to
the snow in Canada."

Former parliamentarian
Philip Bethel also noted that
store hours were extended
slightly to accommodate the
surge of customers at his family-
run business, Eleuthera Supply.

"It's certainly good for us all,"
he said. "Things have been slow
for years, but now we can enjoy
it."

Speaker of the House and
representative for South
Eleuthera Oswald Ingraham
eagerly joined in the festivities
as well in a larger than usual
Junkanoo parade in Rock
Sound. Junkanoo was also held
in Harbour Island.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
' Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Although
businesses in the International
Bazaar enjoyed robust sales
over the holiday season, mer-
chants remain concerned about
what 2007 will bring.

Chris Payne, chairman of the
Bazaar Owners Association,
reported that business was
exceptionally good over Christ-
mas, but that his members fear
they will again face challenges
in the new year.

This feeling, he said, is based

on the lack of positive news
from the government regarding
the sale and re-opening of the
Royal Oasis Resort..

Since the closure of the resort
in 2004 due to hurricane dam-
age, many shop owners have

coming challenges in 2007

Bazaar owners increasingly uneasy over lack of news on
Royal Oasis sale - government criticised for its silence



had to their close stores.

Of the 85 shops in 2004, only
38, including three restaurants,
are still open.

In an effort to drum up sales
over the holidays, the Bazaar
Owners Association held a spe-
cial grand raffle promotion to
attract local shoppers.

Mr Payne reported that the
promotion went very well.

“The response from cus-
tomers was good. We had entry
coupons for every $20 that was
spent, and we printed over 7,000
coupons which were all given
out,” he said.

“T think it exceeded (the mer-
chants’) expectations in many
ways and I think we were all
very grateful to have the sup-
port of the local residents over
the holidays,” he said.

Mr Payne announced that
local resident Sophia Thomp-
son, an employee of Sugar Lips,
emerged as the grand prize win-
ner — winning gifts such as a
colour TV and VCR, handbags,
watches, a diamond ring, a bas-
ket of perfume, toys and beach-
wear.

“We have tried contacting
her on her cellular phone, but

she is off the island, but as soon
we get a hold her we will be
making a presentation,” he said.

Mr Payne warned that the
month of January is usually very
slow and said that shop owners
will have to again rely on Min-
istry of Tourism to help drive
business to the Bazaar.

During November and
December, the ministry bused
‘tourists to the Bazaar three days
a week from the hotels and
timeshare properties.

“It helped out to some
degree, but again the numbers
are very small and I think we

will be looking for them to try
again to help us with similar
programme in the new year,”
said Mr Payne.

He stressed that the situation
at the Bazaar will have to be
addressed urgently as small
groups of tourists cannot ade-
quately sustain the businesses
for long.

“I think the major concern is
not just predominantly for the
Bazaar, but what is the story on
the hotel. The government is
being very silent and not say-
ing anything positive,” Mr
Payne said.

Lecturer thankful

A POPULAR Nassau jour-
nalism lecturer got more than
he bargained for when he flew
off to start a new life in “peace-
loving” Thailand.

He landed in the country’s
capital, Bangkok, on the day a
string of bomb attacks left three
dead and many more injured.

Fortunately for Steve Lay, a
former College of the Bahamas
lecturer, he was nowhere near
the scenes of the attacks at the
time.

But he admitted to wife Car-
ole, who joins him in Thailand
next month, that the news was a
bit unnerving as he stepped off
the plane after a 24-hour jour-
ney from the Bahamas.

Steve, 59, is keeping his fin-
gers crossed that the attacks
were a “one-off” event in
response to the peaceful coup in
October.

But Thailand has experienced
sectarian unrest in southern
areas in recent years and some

observers fear trouble-makers
could have brought their griev-
ances to the capital for the first
time.

For Carole, who has been a
keen helper in Fox Hill Prison’s
reading programme for inmates,
the news came as a jolt, espe-
cially as Bangkok is rated one of
the safest cities in the world.
But she is nevertheless looking
forward to her Thai adventure.

She and Steve spent more
than 20 years in Alaska before
arriving in Nassau just over
three years ago.

Steve spent two years at COB,
where he taught Bahamian jour-
nalism students, before joining
Dupuch Publications as a senior
editor. He is also a keen wildlife
photographer and accomplished
cook, having published a book
on Alaskan cuisine.

In Thailand, he will work as a
communications lecturer at a
community college some miles
outside Bangkok



x

@ A BANGKOK Bor

RUE wean SSS
ad

nb Squ





SSS

officer searches for clues at the sce



ne of a bomb explosion on

Sunday in downtown Bangkok, Thailand. At least two people were killed in a series of four
explosions that rocked the Thai capital on New Year’s Eve.

(AP Photo/David Longstreath)



Eleuthera traders optimistic.
after booming festive season

Bahama businesses worried

,



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



HUNDREDS of children in
the St Cecilia community had
a Christmas treat, thanks to the
work of the Santa Claus Christ-
mas Committee.

About 1,800 children com-
munities arrived at a party host-
ed.by constituency MP and
Deputy prime MinisterCynthia
‘Mother’ Pratt.

Hundreds of presents — fund-
ed by contributions collected by
the Santa Claus Committee —
had been loaded into a truck to
bring smiles to the faces of the
youngsters: :

Children received finger-
painting kits, plastic guitar, vol-
leyballs, Ninja Turtle motorcy-
cles and other treats

The event was just one of sev-
eral made possible by the com-
mittee, which also arranged par-
ties in North Andros, the Berry
Islands, Crooked Island, Ack-
lins, Inagua, and Fox Hill in
New Providence.

The Tribune's Santa Claus
Committee was founded by the
late Sir Etienne Dupuch as a
way of providing some Christ-
mas cheer to Bahamian chil-
dren who would otherwise have
gone without. It is now chaired
by Robert Carron, managing
director of The Tribune and one
of his grandsons.

Mr Carron said: “All told we
delivered just over 4,200 chil-
dren a Christmas gift this year.
All of this would not have been
possible without the faith, trust
and support of our wonderful
sponsors, who year in and year
out make this event possible.

“On behalt of the Santa Claus
Christmas Committee, The Tri-







bune, 100 Jamz and most of all
the children, I would like to

thank them for their amazing
generosity.”







THREE of the 1,800 children at
the St Cecilia party show of their
presents. More than 4,200
youngsters in all received gifts

this year courtesy of the Santa
Claus Committee, both on New
Providence and on the Family
Islands

DRTRETA

SCOOTER

































































M@ MANY hundreds
turned out for the St
Cecilia party

# DISTRIBUTING
the gifts

B SANTA Claus
Committee
chairman Robert
Carron lends a
helping hand

B VOLUN-
TEERS make
sure the day
goes smoothly







@ CYNTHIA ‘Mother’ Pratt helps a youngster
with his gift y





@ A GIANT Elmo was the gift for this. . \ ‘ ~
. |



“
~\
delighted youngster -







\

MMS



B YOUNG-
STERS com-
pare notes on
their gifts

MCYNTHIA
Pratt helps a
group with
their gifts



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7





Origins of the ‘cultura



relic’ of Junkanoo

"It is now the month of
December, when the greatest
part of the city is in a bustle.

Loose reins are given to pub- |

lic dissipation; everywhere
you may hear the sound of
great preparations"

HIS is not a descrip-
tion of the lead-up to
Junkanoo. It was written by a
Roman not long after the
death of Jesus. The writer,
Seneca, was referring to the
celebration of Saturnalia, a
time marked by “drinking
and being drunk, noise and
games and dice, appointing
of kings and feasting of
slaves, and singing naked.”
During this time the slaves
also had licence to ridicule
their masters — something
scholars mistakenly refer to
as “social inversion”.
But Saturnalia has even
more ancient roots. It was all
about the winter solstice —



LARRY SMITH

This might escape most
people today, but it was
clearly big stuff in ancient
times. For example, New-
grange — a 5,000-year-old
site in Ireland that is older
than Stonehenge — was built
to receive a shaft of sunlight

nto its central chamber at

dawn on. the winter solstice.
And a 6,000-year-old stone
circle in southern Egypt is
said to be the world's oldest
astronomically aligned site.
The early Church super-
imposed Christ's mass on the
old celebration of’ the sun,
and Christmas gradually took
on the form we know today,
borrowing from many pagan



“There are many theories as
to where the actual
term, Junkanoo (or John
Canoe), came from, but Bethel
and others seem to lean
towards the Kono dances of
the Bambara people of Mali
and the Ivory Coast. In these
cultures, the Kono society was
a custodian of tradition, and
dancers used animal masks in
agricultural rituals.”



which has to do with the tilt
of the Earth as it spins on its
axis. AS someone once said,
"The cycles of nature have
been here since before there
were people to even mark
their turning."

The midwinter celebration
of the solstice is perhaps the
world's oldest and most uni-
versal cultural event. It is the
time after which the days get
progressively longer and
warmer. It is a calendrical
hinge — the day that the sun
returns, or is reborn.







traditions across Europe. In
the Bahamas, Junkanoo has
always happened at Christ-
mas — the time of the winter
solstice — as a matter of
necessity. It was the only hol-
iday that enslaved Africans
in the New World were

allowed.
That's because Junkanoo
is a cultural relic — "a vestige

of African rituals" that sur-
vives today only in our little
country. But since agricul-
tural calendars and rain

schedules were as important
in Africa as elsewhere, there

are literally hundreds of

stone circles scattered across
the continent. And among
some West African peoples,
the sun god traditionally pre-
sides over December and the
doors of houses are aligned
to the midwinter sunset.

According to the late
Bahamian scholar, Clement
Bethel, Junkanoo originated
as "a fusion of disparate ele-
ments" from West African
cultures. Among them were
the harvest festivals of tribes
in what is now Ghana, Nige-
ria and Sierra Leone. These
festivals featured secret soci-
eties, masked and costumed
dancers, as well as feasting
and drinking.

There are many theories
as to where the actual
term, Junkanoo (or John
Canoe), came from, but
Bethel and others seem to
lean towards the Kono
dances of the Bambara peo-
ple of Mali and the Ivory
Coast. In these cultures, the
Kono society was a custodian
of tradition, and dancers used
animal masks in agricultural
rituals.

In fact, masked folk danc-
ing, involving the stamping

of feet and the wearing of

animal headdresses, is an ear-
ly part of most cultures. And
since we all emerged from
Africa some 80,000 years ago,
the origins of Junkanoo can

be seen as an expression of

primal religion — a homage
to the ancient Earth goddess.

Once the most important
slave celebration of the Eng-
lish New World, Junkanoo
was a Christmastime activity
in Belize, St Vincent and
Jamaica — all the way up to
Bermuda and North Caroli-
na.

As Yale University pro-
fessor Jonathon Holloway
explained: "When slaves
found themselves on planta-
tions without another mem-
ber of their own African
community to turn to, the



B WHATEVER its origins, Junkanoo today is not African at all. It is uniquely Bahamian.

merging of their similar ritu-
als and traditions soon took
place, rituals and tradi-
tions...based on numerous
West and Central African
cultures brought together col-
lectively..." lo preserve con-
nections with the past.

Junkanoo died in America
soon after emancipation, but
the following description by a
former slave named [larriet
Jacobs is reminiscent of the
Bahamian Junkanoo of the
time:

"Every child rises early on
Christmas morning to see the
Johnkankus... These compa-
nies of a hundred cach, turn
out early in the morning and
are allowed to go around
until midnight...Cows' tails
are fastened to their backs,
and their heads are decorated
with horns. A box, covered
with sheepskin, is called the

SASK

gumbo box. A dozen beat on
this. while others strike tri-
angles and jawbones, to
which bands of dancers keep
time."

Speculation is that the cel-
ebration withered in the face
of racial disdain. In fact,
American experts say the
derogatory term "coon" is
derived from John. Canoe.
And we all know what being
1 'Junkanoo' used to mean
among Bahamians. The activ-
ity survived here largely due
to the thousands of liberat-
ed Africans who were settled
on the islands by the British
after the abolition of the
slave trade.

The pre-Lenten carnivals
held in Trinidad, Brazil, New
Orleans and other places
have similar African roots,
but are regarded as a blend
of European influences that

6 CD DISC CHANGER
TRAILER TOW GROUP
_RUNNING BOARDS

fit appropriately into th
Catholic calendar. Junkans

however, was seen more as
challenge to Christmas an
the European establishme;
— a resistance to domin

tion.
But whatever its origin
Junkanoo today is 1

African at all. [t is unique!
Bahamian: As Cleme
Bethel's daughter, Nicole!
wrote recently, "Junkano
fundamental to, nol inci
tal to, Bahamian identity
festival can take ant thi
into itself and remak. &
And it does jt iba
twice every veal

What.do you think? Sen
comments to larry@frilune
media.net

Or visit www. bahamapun
dit.com







Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

MONTROSE AV

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE FR
LICENSE & INSPECTION



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A

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ATA ssa AAAhAAaahianeAnnn AN








THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Workers Party plans protest outside ministry = AG: Bahamian police involved

over the arrests of five baggage handlers

THE Workers Party is plan-
ning a placard protest outside
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
over the arrests of five
Bahamian baggage handlers in
the United States.

The party is holding Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
responsible for what relatives
of the arrested men are call-
ing a “kidnapping” - a sting
operation to trick them into an
American trap.

Mr Mitchell has been tar-
geted by the party for “drop-
ping the ball yet again” in a
law enforcement matter
involving the Americans, “as
he did with Ninety Knowles.”

Leader Rodney Moncur said
yesterday that the party was
drawing up placards ready for
a protest outside Mr Mitchell’s

ministry. This is likely to hap-

pen within a few days.

He said it was “scandalous”
that the government had been
involved in a “conspiracy” to

' drive the baggage handlers

into US hands, and said Mr
Mitchell was now “the most
vulnerable minister” in the
Cabinet.

“He has failed to defend the
sovereignty of the Bahamas,”
he added.

The men, who were
employed by Nassau Flight
Services, face drug smuggling
charges in the States and jail
terms of between ten and 15
years if found guilty.

They were arrested after
being “selected” for a special
training course in Florida. The
men were seized after landing
in Fort Lauderdale.

However, the Workers Party
claims that - regardless of the
men’s guilt or otherwise - they
were entitled to due process
under Bahamian law.

The government’s action in
allowing the men to be “set
up” was in breach of the coun-
try’s extradition laws, and sup-
ported Justice John Lyons’
claim that the Bahamas judi-
ciary was not independent, it
said.

Yesterday, The Tribune
reported the party’s claim that
the PLP government could fall
as a result of this matter alone.

The party said Bahamians
were livid over the circumven-

tion of Bahamian laws - and
the subsequent loss of sover-
eignty - in allowing the men to
fall into American hands and
were determined to make the
government pay at the polls.

For Prime Minister Perry
Christie; the arrest of the bag-
gage handlers has created yet
another pre-election headache.

The last few months of 2006
saw the government enmeshed
in a string of vote-losing scan-
dals, including the ongoing
Anna Nicole Smith affair and
the Sea Hauler tragedy.

Now 2007 has dawned with a

problem likely to cause even |

greater damage, with Mr
Mitchell seen as the number
one culprit.

Mr Moncur said the govern- ,

ment’s complicity in the arrests
was obvious, especially as a
PLP general employed by Nas-
sau Flight Services was fore-
warned of the sting and with-
drew from the training course.

However, government
sources say the Cabinet knew
nothing about the events
leading up to the men being
seized.



@ GRAFFITI on a sign at Sadie Curtis Primary School
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

FROM page one

Dean, who has a daughter in the fourth grade
at the school, said he was very disturbed by

the incident.

“J am very disturbed that people could
actually take the time out to vandalize a
school that their children may one day end

up going,” said Mr Dean.

Mr Dean said the fact that the culprits
used the fire house to vandalize the school
showed they had no regard for the safety of

the school’s students.

“I hope these people are brought to justice
and made an example of,” said the popular

radio disc jockey.

Mrs Patricia Collie, who has a son in sec-
ond grade at Sadie Curtis, said she was also

FROM page one

After the charge was read to
both accused, Miller instructed
Mr Hilton who had already indi-
cated that he was appearing on
behalf of both Miller and Sawyer,
that he did want legal represen-
tation at that stage. Miller also
asked for court documents and
was told by the magistrate that
those would not be available to
him at that stage.

Mr Hilton submitted yester-
day that Ms Sawyer be released
on bail as it would be illegal to
have her detained any longer.
According to Mr Hilton, his client
had been taken into custody near-
ly a full seven days prior to her
arraignment yesterday. Unlawful
detention, he said, was a depra-
vation of liberty which makes
government liable for damages.
He told the court that Sawyer had
been arrested and taken into

FROM page one



outraged by the break-in.
“Sadie Curtis is a good school,” said Mrs»

dents.”

Collie, and “I can’t believe that people could
be so insensitive to the needs of the~stu-

According to the Ministry of Education,
the security guard who was supposed to be at
work on the day of the break-in was off for

personal reasons, which made it easier for the

grounds.

vandals to have access to the school’s

The vandals also went as far as destroying

the school’s staff room, breaking ceiling lights

walls.

and pulling out electrical cables from the

The police said they have already assessed

Charged

police custody at 5.10 pm on
Tuesday, December 26.

According to Mr Hilton, by
law, police can detain a suspect
for 48 hours for questioning and if
more time is needed can apply to
the court for an additional 48
hours. However, after that point if
the person is not charged they
must be released. Mr Hilton
asked that the court consider
Sawyer’s entitlement and to have
her released and granted bail due
to the fact that she had been in
police custody for more than 96
hours and was also the mother of
a five-month-old child who need-
ed to be breast fed. According to
Mr Hilton abetment was an
offence for which bail could be
granted.

ASP Glenroy McKenzie, who
appeared for the prosecution, told
the court that Sawyer had been

the extent of the damage and an investigation
into the matter has started.

told by police on December 28,
that police intended to detain her
for another 48 hours. ASP
McKenzie submitted that Sawyer
be denied bail and be remanded
in custody.

According to him the bail act
was silent on the offence of abet-
ment.

According to ASP McKenzie
abetment to murder was just as
though the person had committed
the offence themselves.

Mr Hilton then argued that if
the magistrate had doubts about
his arguments then he should
adjourn the matter and that pros-
ecution be afforded a lawyer who
would be more competent with
dealing with such matters of
law.

In the end, Magistrate Gomez
remanded both Miller and
Sawyer to prison until January
11, which is when the matter will
continue in Court Five Bank
Lane.

Honours

continues to “drag its fect” in the passing of the
National Heroes and Honours Bill.

According to Father Campbell, the Bill was tabled
in 2001 by the Free National Movement adminis-
tration, six months before the 2002 general elec-
tion. However, he said, the Christie government
has fallen short of its promise to implement the leg-
islation. ;

“In 2002 the prime minister appointed the
National Cultural Development Commission to con-
sult with the people about this same issue, and in
2003 the commission reported its findings and rec-
ommendations to the government.”

But, said Father Campbell, government keeps on
“slunking” to implement the commission’s recom-
mendations.

The Commission had made detailed representa-
tions for a National Heroes system to replace the
present British honours system. Guidelines regard-
ing the renaming or declaration of national holi-
days were also made.

The chairman of the heroes committee said the
Bahamas was “lagging behind” other countries in the
Caribbean who have already created their own
national honours system.

The Anglican clergyman said that in order for the
commission’s suggested honour system to work
effectively, the present British honour’s system had
to be done away with completely. He severely crit-
icised religious leaders for accepting the Queen’s
New Year’s awards.

“T am equally disappointed that church leaders

are still accepting these awards,” said Father Camp-
bell.

In the past, Father Campbell has criticised Bish-
op Neil Ellis, of Mount Tabor church for accepting
a British honour, claiming that the British awards are
from an “enslaving colonial master who dehuman-
ized us with the intolerable burden of colonialism for
hundreds of years.”

Yesterday, he told The Tribune: “The church 1s

_ supposed to be leading society in its development, so

‘am calling on the church leaders to reject these
awards and support a national honours system
instead.”

The new honours Bill, recommended by the com-
mission, seeks to create four societies of honours: the
Order of the Bahamas, the Companion of the Order
of the Bahamas, the Order of Merit and the Order
of Distinction.

At present, said Father Campbell, the British
awards are about honouring “party stooges” and
he hopes the Christie administration implements
the national awards system before the next general
election.

Among the religious leaders honoured are: the
Right Reverend Gilbert Thompson for dedicated
service to the Anglican Diocese, the Most Excellent
Order of the British Empire went to Bishop Albert
Hepburn, Bishop William Johnson and Reverend
Dr. John Rolle were honoured for religion, and
Reverend Dr Henry Pratt was also awarded the
British Empire Medal.






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PaAuc v



in investigation but had no

knowledge of NF

FROM page one

General said that local police
were conducting an investiga-
tion into “certain malice”
occurring at Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA).

She also emphasised that
after “some investigations”
into the matter, she can say
that her office, and the gov-
ernment on the whole, knew
nothing ofthe arrests in Fort
Lauderdale until after they
occurred on December 18 ona
Spirit Airlines flight.

“Our police are quite
adamant and I believe them

that they were involved in an:

investigation and there was no
knowledge on their part of the
arrests,” she said.

Five baggage handlers — all
employed at the Nassau Flight
Services (NFS) — were arrested
and charged with trafficking
cocaine on local and interna-
tional flights through the LPIA
when they arrived in Florida
to participate in a training
course.

According to reports, the
men were not allowed to dis-
embark the flight before they
were arrested.

It has been speculated and
alleged by family members of
the men that the baggage han-
dlers were entrapped in a sting
operation by Bahamian and
US officials.

Attorney General Maynard-
Gibson yesterday vehemently
refuted all such allegations.

“There is not one scintilla of
evidence that the government
of the Bahamas was in anyway
complicit in any illegal activi-
ties, any collusion, any luring,
any entrapment. It simply nev-
er happened,” she said.

Responding to claims that
this matter has called into
question the sovereignty of the
Bahamas’ justice system, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that she
sees “no evidence of our judi-

cial process either having been .

circumvented or aborted.”
The Attorney General
pointed out that local police
frequently conduct undercover
investigations and that the
bilateral arrangement of

Eo in
LEM UALem Seg)

@ ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Allyson Maynard-Gibson

OPBAT enables Bahamian
and US authorities to carry out
joint operations on a regular
basis.

“There’s nothing unusual
about either of them,” she said.

At the same time Mrs May-
nard-Gibson emphasised that
the NFS “quite separately and
quite routinely sent some of
its staff members away on a

- training course.”

The Attorney General also
said that it is the sovereign
right of US authorities to
arrest men who they suspect
to have committed offences
within their country’s bound-
aries.

Baggage











said.

I” she said.

ee



DY acm Relate

Ranked | 6th in the UK
Five specializations availa
Marketing, Finance, T

Relations, and IT Managemen




handlers



FROM page one

opportunity when the men were on US soil to make the
arrests, and that they were not “kidnapped.” .
However, Mrs Tony said that she takes grave exception to
comments made by US Ambassador John Rood about the
possible lavish conditions that she lives in.
“Right now I have $20 in my car. We don’t have any mon-—
ey. I can’t tell you how the next day is going to be,” Mrs Tony

“If my husband was a drug trafficker shouldn’t he have
something to show for it? I ain’t scared of nobody. I will
continue to talk cause this is a free country. Ambassador
Rood was out of order. If he could say something, then so can

Mee

S staff arrest

These statements by Mrs
Maynard-Gibson come as the
FNM calls on the government
to give a full account of its
knowledge and involvement in
an “operation which resulted
ih the enticement of five
Bahamians to the United
States to have them arrested
in that country on drug
charges.”

“We expressed our disap-
proval of any operation that
would require Bahamians to
travel to a foreign jurisdiction
under false pretences in order’
to have them arrested and put’
on trial in that jurisdiction. ©

“We regard this as extra-
judicial rendition of Bahamian
citizens and we again reiterate

_ our strong disapproval of it,”

the FNM said.

The opposition party also
emphasised that it does not
support drug trafficking, and
is concerned about security
measures at Bahamian air-
ports. ;

“Asa matter of fact, we are
wholeheartedly and unalter-
ably opposed to it as, indeed,
we are opposed to all forms of
criminality.

“We are extremely con-
cerned about security mea-
sures at the airport and else-
where. Bahamians know first
hand the damage caused to
countless Bahamian families
by crime and addiction asso-
ciated with illicit drugs,” the
FNM said.

-www.rdi-usa.com

p





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

*



“WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY 3, 2007

8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 |

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THE TRIBUNE



§ By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE phase three develop-
ment plans for the SuperClubs
Breezes resort are being
delayed by the lack of progress
on Baha Mar's long awaited
street re-routing project.

During an awards ceremony
honouring 117 employees who
have been with the resort for
more than a decade, the com-

. pany’s chairman John Issa

‘-touched on the plans for the
resort's renovations, which can
only begin after the road relo-
cation — which to date has not
started.

"When we were ready to
commence the suites and other
facilities at a further cost of $25
million, we were advised that
West Bay Street would be
moved, thus this phase of the
investment had to be put on
hold," explained Mr Issa.

Baha Mar was scheduled to

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have already re-routed the traf-
fic flow on West Bay Street so
that construction of their own
multi-million dollar resort facil-
ity could begin.

"Certainly Bah Mar has made
certain pronouncements saying
that the road should have been
started at the beginning of this
year," said general manager of
Breezes, Jackson Weech. "We
remain cautiously optimistic. "

According to Mr Issa, Super-
Clubs has since had its plans
pre-approved and has applied
for reinstatement of duty and
tax concessions.

"In the short term, there is no
effect — we have a 391 full inven-
tory of rooms and certainly we
are renting them as occupancy
dictates," said Mr Weech. "The
ideal situation is, of course, they
(Baha Mar) would have been a
little bit further ahead in terms
of road works, so that we cer-
tainly could have started our

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Breezes development delayed by
slow pace of Baha Mar roadworks

phase three."

Breezes plans to refurbish its
rooms with solid mahogany fur-
niture, new sliding doors and
crown moulding, and the bath-
rooms will be completely refit-
ted with granite, in keeping with
the standard of the new suites,
according to Breezes manage-
ment.

"Mahogany furniture is a
very high-end finish product
that we are implementing here
in the rooms and we've done
throughout our rooms in
Jamaica," Mr Weech said.

The mahogany furniture is,
according to Mr Weech, in
keeping with the standard of
Breezes’ sister resort in
Jamaica.

"The construction of new
suites will commence as soon
as West Bay Street has been
relocated. When completed,
Breezes will be an even more
exciting resort," said Mr Issa.

ed iterate to be honoured



@ CHIEF Superintendent of Police Hulan Hanna (second right) shakes hands, on January 2 with

Commander Stephen Russell during the announcement of activities to salute legends of the
Bahamas' armed forces. The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB,) in conjunction
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF) and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF)
will host a slate of events to recognise the contributions made by officers, past and present, and the
camaraderie and between the two forces. Among the events will be a basketball game between
police and Defence Force officers on February 10. Also pictured, from left, are BCB deputy
general manager for sales and marketing Diana Swann, BCB General manager Anthony Foster,
BCB senior deputy general manager for news Carlton Smith and RBPF Senior Lieutenant Shawn

Thurston.

(Photo: BIS/Derek Smith)

dececesccccecscavceccsecsbeceseecceecsechsensssseaneuesesebebae esses see eeeesbe ARE ese teases eesee sane eee es ase ss ness aasnsessnseasnssnsnaussanenensenssnensyssusnsassasssensssstssSHs esses ss sales esses sss ses

Thousands turn out for
Grand Bahama parades

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

THE evening New Year’s
Junkanoo Parade in Grand
Bahama is proving to be a suc-
cess, as thousands turned out
this year for the highly antici-
pated event.

’ Throngs of residents and vis-
itors flooded in and around the
Post Office Building in down-
town Freeport, and along the
main parade route on Explor-
er’s Way and Bank Lane to
watch the six competing
junkanoo groups participating
in the parade.

The costumes were elaborate,
the dancing well choreo-
graphed, and the music res-
onated in the streets.

Spectators both young and
old moved to the beat of the
goat skin drums, and the sounds
of cowbells, whistles, and well
polished band instruments.
. Derrick King, chairman of
‘- the Grand Bahama Junkanoo
Committee, said he was pleased
with the turnout — which was
estimated at between 20,000
and 25,000.

“We had quite a bit of spec-

tators out to watch the parade ~

and we were very pleased with
tremendous support of Grand
Bahama residents,” he said.

The official results for this
year’s parade were not avail-
able up to press time on Tues-
day. z

Mr King told The Tribune
that the committee was still very
busy around 5.30pm tallying the
points.

In addition to the major
groups such as Swingers, Classic
Dancers, Superstar Rockers,

Majestic Crusaders, Arawak
Invaders and Harbour Boys,
four non-competing groups also
took part in the parade — includ-
ing the Rotary Club, Bushwack-
er, Fun Time and the Victory
Boys.

The parade started at 6pm
and ended at 12pm, with each
group performing two laps
around the parade route.

Although the overall parade
was very good, Mr King said
that there is still need for
improvement in several areas.

The committee, he said, will
be revisiting the process of tick-
eting and seating arrangements.

Mr King also pointed out that
the length of time it takes one
group to follow the next group
is too wide and was a major
concern for both spectators and
committee members.

“Each group went around the
parade-route twice and we think
... We just need to tighten up on
some areas and we should be
able to achieve our goals for the
parade,” he said.

When asked about the cash
prize, Mr King said that it is still
under discussion by the com-
mittee.

He encourages more resi-
dents to use bleacher seating.
Even though bleachers were set
up to accommodate over 1,000
persons, there were still a few
empty sections.

“The Grand Bahama com-
munity needs to realise that
seating we put out there is to
help us defray the cost of
putting on the parade. We just
sell the tickets to help us under-
write some of the cost that goes
towards the prize for the

groups.

“We can’t pay group mem-
bers for what they do. We had
1,000 seats and I think we had
close to about maybe 800 or 900
sold ~ we still had empty bleach-
ers on the lower end still stand-
ing around,” he said.

Mr King thanked the spon-
sors, including the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, Grand
Bahama Power Company, and
Freeport businessman Mario
Donato for use of the Regent
Centre as a junkanoo head-
quarters.

He also thanked the police
for their assistance and the San-
itation Services for the clean-
up job.












The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

} neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

—_



@ GENERAL manager Jackson Weech, financial controller Camille Tynes Miller and awardee
Michael Sherman during the awards ceremony

Top award
| for senior in
United States

BAHAMIAN college senior
Kendrick Knowles, son of Kendal
Knowles and Sharon Miller, has
been named a Collegiate All-Amer-
ican Scholar.

An accounting major at Liberty
University in Lynchburg, Virginia,
Kendrick qualified for the award by
earning a 3.3 grade point average.

The Collegiate All-American
Scholar is a prestigious honour
awarded to very few students.

The academy recognises fewer
than 10 per cent of all college stu-
dents in the US.

To be eligible, students must earn
3.3 or higher grade point average.

Only scholars selected by a school
official or other qualified sponsor, Te aan
are accepted for the nomination. @ KENDRICK Knowles

} agniare



RF BEBRRT &
Rarer 8 Sant :

Crystal Palace Casino

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the
single largest resort investment in the history of The Bahamas. Baha Mar
owns and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino,
the Radisson Cable & Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position:

FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

This individual will be responsible for ensuring excellence of food and beverage
services by overseeing all aspects of multi-unit food service, dining and catering
operations. The successful candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day food
and beverage operation, staffing and budget.

Top contenders for this position must possess the following:

¢ Organizational skills to set-up systems such as point of sale, position specific
check list and proper follow-up.

© Evolving new food and beverage concepts.

¢ Controls costs of all food and beverage outlets by overseeing all purchasing
of food beverage, supplies and equipment; estimating product and personnel
levels; utilizing labour scheduling tool to adjust salary and hourly schedules
following demand patterns and occupancy levels, budget and local labour
laws; maintaining effective inventory and shortage controls; traking expenses
including payroll, supplies, maintenance and generating monthly inventory
and cost of sales reports as well as other reports requested by management and.
works with the General Manager to develop an annual food and beverage plan
and budget.

¢ Ensure a pleasant dining experience in all outlets by collaborating with the
Executive Chef in the creation of menus and menu pricing.

* Maximize food and beverage sales by identifying and targeting sales
opportunities through marketing including promotions and special events,

¢ Maintain customer satisfaction and employee productivity by handling
customer inquiries, concerns or comments and providing solutions; acquiring
feed back from customers and co-workers in order to ensure satisfaction
and/or implement service improvement ideas; developing new concepts
to ensure customer satisfaction and repeat business.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume to

the attention of Director of Human Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or
fax to (242) 677-4140







PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

IRAmLSNUE 110 : fo

Your look at what’s going on in your community

Gifts for High Rock youngsters



Canadian Chief STE ice visits AG









@ THE Chief Justice of Canada Beverley McLachlin tapala a sities call on Attoenay Genin ana!
Minister of Legal Affairs Allyson Maynard-Gibson at the Office of the Attorney General on
Tuesday; January 2. Shown from left are Frank McArdle, Chief Justice McLachlin, the attorney
general, Court of Appeal registrar Indira Francis-Demeritte, and deputy permanent secretary
Leroy Sumner.

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)



a DR Doswell Coakley, the next Progiosslve Liberal Party ‘andideis for High I Rock, Selies a
smile to children’s face as he gives Christmas presents to pupils at High Rock Primary School,
Grand Bahama. Dr ene went into every settlement of High Rock to present gifts.

Candidate donates
to Fox Hill Library





THE Fox Hill Library was
the recipient of a computer, a
cheque for $300 and a compi-
lation of documents about the
history of Fox Hill, courtesy
of Dr Jacinta Higgs.

Dr Higgs, in presenting the
gifts, reminisced on her earliest
memories of visiting the
library when she was a student
at Sandilands Primary and lat-
er LW Young High School.

The FNM candidate for the









tion.

Fox Hill constituency
described more recent experi-
ences of spending many nights
at the library researching infor-
mation to complete her Doctor
of Education degree disserta-

The candidate said she
appreciated the help received
from Marina Minnis and the
other library staff who guided
her research on Fox Hill.

Dr Higgs said she fears that

Wy



Glac. ack DOIly:



lack of computer access and
training will serve as a major
limitation for many Bahami-
ans seeking employment and
education opportunities as the
culture of globalisation takes
hold.

Marina Minnis, supervisor

of the library, expressed her
gratitude and welcomed more
Fox Hillians to contribute and
help the library in any way
possible.



bahamas “9

marketplace

econ cnsicl Palace Resort, Cable Beach



were served, with around 200 Christmas gifts pre-
sented.

Sponsored by an anonymous donor and the
Rotary Club of West Nassau, the event is the
highlight of the Christmas season for Bain Town
locals.

MOUNT Olive Baptist Church held its 17th
annual senior citizens programme at Town Cen-
tre, Meadow and Augusta Streets, Bain-Town.

.. Pastor C B Moss said this year’s event was the
lan est and most successful ever.
jllowing Carol sifging, more than 400 meals


















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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



The Tribune

BUSINESS



iain

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Liquidity crunch ‘bottomed
out’ during late December

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he liquidity crunch
in the Bahamian
commercial bank-
ing sector was like-
ly to have “bot-
tomed out” in the last two weeks
of December, the minister of
state for finance told The Tri-
bune yesterday, and it was
unlikely to have any negative
impact on the Government's fis-
cal position.

James Smith said government
revenues at the half-way point
in the 2006-2007 fiscal year were
some 3-4 per cent ahead of Bud-
getary projections, while recur-
rent spending - the Governmen-
t’s fixed costs, such as wages and
rents - were “around the target”
although ahead of the previous
year.

Excess liquidity in the
Bahamian commercial banking
system stood at just $55.21 mil-
lion at the end of October 2006,
meaning that the surplus assets
banks have available: for lend-
ing purposes are relatively lim-
ited.

-The Central Bank of the
Bahamas previously confirmed
that this tightening would slow
down the rapid pace of credit
growth witnessed in 2006, and
this could also impact demand



@ JAMES SMITH

by Bahamian gonsumers for
imports, particularly luxury
goods.

The Government earns
between 50-60 per cent of its
annual revenues from customs
duties levied on imports, and
there had been some concern
that the credit slowdown would
also hurt the public finances, but
Mr Smith yesterday said that he
expected the impact would be
“nothing dramatic”.

The minister added that he
believed the Central Bank has
“a fairly good handle” on the
liquidity situation, which falls

Security Association
aims to raise standards

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUSINESSES and individu-
als employed in the private secu-
rity industry are aiming to
increase the level of profession-
alism in a sector that has become
“big business” by establishing a
Security Association in the
Bahamas, it was revealed yes-
terday.

Gamal Newry, a Tribune
columnist and co-chairman for
the steering committee that is
seeking to establish the Security
Association, said the body - if
created - aimed to create a
framework to formalise the pri-
vate security industry, with a
focus on training and developing
standards and certification for
workers in the sector.

Mr Newry said: “What we’re .

seeing is a disjointed and unreg-
ulated group of individuals, and
the standard of professionalism
is what we’re concerned about.

“We're trying to increase the
level of professionalism to pro-

vide much greater help to the
police, the community and our
clients.”

Improving standards will be a
focus at all levels in the profes-
sion, from officer to supervisor,
manager and owner.

Mr Newry said the creation of
a Security Association had been
under consideration since the
late 1970s, adding that industry
participants hoped this was “the
final attempt” to establish one.

The Association, if formed,
would draw its membership
from both private security firms
and those security officers and
professionals employed ‘in-
house’ by large corporate enti-
ties, such as hotels and banks,
and the Government.

“Number-wise, we’re estimat-
ing that over 300 entities,” Mr
Newry replied when asked how
many private security firms were
operating in the Bahamas.

“That doesn’t include differ-

SEE page 5B

Liquidity may affect

_ Minister says government revenues 3-4% ahead of projections,

with deficit ‘under control’, as government pins hopes on
investment and tourist spending to right system

under monetary policy.
The Central Bank has auton-

omy in the conduct of monetary

policy, and Mr Smith said the
liquidity tightening in late
November and early December
was likely to “begin to stabilise”
during January, February and
the 2007 first quarter.

Liquidity traditionally falls
during the fourth quarter of
every year, due to increased
credit demand and drawdowns
as both consumers and busi-
nesses prepare for the Christ-
mas shopping season.

Mr Smith said of the present _

liquidity situation: “It’s not
unusual in terms of trends, but it
was deeper in the last quarter
of the year, the extent to which
credit exceeded deposit taking.”

Yet he added that the liquidi-
ty position was set to correct
itself automatically as a result of
how the Bahamian monetary
system was designed,

Mr Smith said the capital
inflows associated with foreign
direct investment projects in the

Bahamas, coupled with tourist
spending, which is traditionally
“higher in the first quarter,
should stabilise the market”.

In addition, the demand for
credit from Bahamians and
money supply growth were like-
ly to slacken in the 2007 first
quarter post-Christmas, a period
that was also peak tourist sea-
son.

“T think the automatic sta-
bilisers are in place, and this [liq-
uidity crunch] bottomed out in
the last two weeks of Decem-
ber,” Mr Smith added.

On the fiscal front, he said:
“Bearing in mind we’re half-way
through the fiscal period, we’re
ahead on revenue projections by
3-4 per cent, and even recurrent
expenditure, while growing, is
still around the target.

“The fiscal deficit is under
control, headed downwards and
likely to come close to - certain-
ly within - projections. From the
fiscal point of view, I think we’re
right on target.”

Mr Smith said recurrent

spending was around Budget
projections, and had not been
exceeded yet, while capital
spending was “not far off”. How-
ever, he pointed out that capital
releases had been “pretty fast”
as a result of the infrastructure

projects the Government was:

undertaking.

“Fiscally, it’s fair to say, with
the same amount of caution,
we’re on target and feel some-
what comfortable,” Mr Smith
said. “Barring any unforeseen
shocks, if this continues into the
next quarter and the next half,
we'll be looking pretty good.”

Apart from the traditional
drawdown on credit associated
with the Christmas season, the
corporate sector’s demand for
financing to complete mergers
and acquisitions and raise capital
to fuel further growth is another
factor behind the liquidity tight-
ening.

The $54 million acquisition of
Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake
in Bahamas Supermarkets by
BSL Holdings involved $24 mil-

lion in bank debt and a $5 mil-
lion preference share issue -
some $29 million - plus $15 mil-
lion in Bahamian$ equity, while
the takeover of Caribbean Bot-
tling by Walter Wells and his
group has taken more capital
out of the system.

In addition, Commonwealth
Bank and Bank of the Bahamas
International raised $24.1 mil-
lion and $15 million respectively
via preference share issues,
effectively redeploying capital
by taking money out of the sys-
tem to strengthen their capital
base and then relending it.

Others redeploying capital
were FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) and the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) with $20 million and
$100 million bond issues respec-
tively.

Although BEC’s only had a
$53 million Bahamian$ compo-
nent, a large chunk of this is like-
ly to be converted to foreign cur-
rency to finance overseas equip-
ment purchases.

City Markets hoping for Winn-Dixie break ‘by June’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

$1.3m Cable Beach store to have ‘major impact’ when it opens



BAHAMAS Supermarkets’ chief execu-

tive yesterday said the company was likely to
complete the transition from Winn-Dixie’s
ownership by “June or before”, with its new
$1.3 million flagship Cable Beach store set to
have a “major impact on our company”

when it opens later this month.

Ken Burns told The Tribune that con-
struction work on the store was “probably 98 ny.

per cent complete”, adding: “We're still look-
ing to open that later this month,

“Tt will be quite an upgrade from our pre-
sent Cable Beach facility. It will be 12,000
square feet larger, and have a bigger parking

lot, with space for 98 vehicles rather than

”

18. It will be a major impact on our compa-

Mr Burns said Bahamas Supermarkets,
which operates nine City Markets stores on
New Providence and a further three on
Grand Bahama, had “quite an aggressive
capital expenditure plan” in place.

SEE page 4B

2007 retail prospects

WAY

Fidelity ; Se eNite| Banking

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE upcoming general election is likely to have a major impact on
retail sales in the Bahamas during 2007, the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s executive director said yesterday, as will the level of liq-
uidity in the banking sector.

Philip Simon said it was obviously the business sector’s hope that
2007 will be a better year than 2006, ;

He added that factoring into this will be the impact of any exter-
nal factors or shocks which may affect the Bahamian economy.

“Generally, 2006 was a good year, relatively over 2005, and then
relatively over 2004, Hopefully, 2007 will be a better year econom-
ically for the country,” he said.

Mr Simon said the impending general elections, which have to be
called by May 2007, will help add to a busy year and should gener- fee
ate spending. ' ;

He also predicted that the Bahamas would see a surge in economic insta

activity as the promised “anchor properties” come on stream. Rae
Mr Simon acknowledged that the current liquidity tightening Choose Wi Ted WY]
Choose Fidelity

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faced by the banking sector may be a factor in dampening retail sales.

However, he said that perhaps liquidity would improve as mer-
chants, bolstered by strong holiday sales, deposited their income into
the banks oyer the next few weeks.

Bahamian retailers are expressing mixed views on how well their
sales and profits will fare in 2007.

Some merchants expressed optimism that 2007 will be a banner a
WULFF





year for retail sales following a strong Christmas holiday season, while MACKEY PARADISE FREEPORT
panes took'a more somber view of ROAD STREET ISLAND
e coming year. ay
A store manager for Michael SEE page 5B A OR
a Sid rant ana NR SR NETS SUS
v # : y .



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2UU/, PAGE 3b



aaa Eee eee
Bahamian companies will lose by
staying outside trade agreements



@ JAMAICAN ECONOMIST LINCOLN PRICE

(Photo courtesy)

BAHAMIAN companies will lose
out if they are left without transparent,
legal access to global markets via free
trade agreements, a Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM) economist has warned.

Lincoln Price, Jamaican economist
and private sector liaison with the
CRNM, said: “Bahamian firms will
remain locked out of a mechanism
that can promote greater private sec-
tor partnerships, via encouraging joint
ventures, and other alliances, where
their government does not activate
trade agreements that CARICOM has
signed by acceding to the common
market.

Noteworthy

“It is noteworthy to recognise that
the list of countries that do not have
trade agreements is shrinking, and
Bahamian firms do not stand to gain
being the only ones left without legal-
ly transparent access into the global
market.”

Mr Price said companies encour-

aged governments to enter trade talks
for practical reasons, such as elimi-
nating market access problems that
impeded their efforts to expand and
grow sales in foreign markets.

Firms

“Where micro firms are interested
in growing sales and expanding glob-
ally, there will be a strong motivation
to partner and build business alliances.
This is the essence of what trade nego-
tiators are seeking to accomplish in
the gamut of discussions they are
involved in,” Mr Price added.

“However, many CARICOM firms,
including firms in the Bahamas,
remain sceptical of the whole process
of negotiating trade agreements. But it
is noteworthy to recognise that those
firms that have excelled regionally are
those that have embraced the man-
date of growth, rather than stability,
and have sought to build those
alliances to overcome their short-
comings based on small size and local
market constraints, for example,

financing and poor infrastructure.”

Mr. Price will address the topic,
Greater private sector linkages
through external trade negotiations, at
the 16th annual Bahamas Business
Outlook on Tuesday, January 9.

The forum will be held at the Radis-
son Cable Beach Resort under the
theme, Economic year 2007: Oppor-
tunities, Plans and Anticipated Out-
comes.

Research |

With over 10 years’ experience in
market research, trade negotiations
and strategic planning, Mr Price is
currently employed with the CRNM
as the private sector liaison, and his
responsibilities are geared towards
maximising the benefits of trade
agreements for the region’s private
sector. ,

Prior to his tenure at the CRNM,
Lincoln Price worked as manager of
the policy and planning unit of
Jamaica’s Investment and Export
Development Agency (JAMPRO).



Lawsuit alleges Hard Rock deal was ‘rigged’

FORT LAUDERDALE,
Fla. (AP) — A rejected suitor
for the Hard Rock chain of
cafes, casinos and related busi-

nesses claims in a lawsuit that

the Seminole Tribe of Florida
was the successful buyer
because of improper collusion
and bid-rigging.

The Baltimore-based devel-
opment firm The Cordish Co.
and an affiliate, Power Plant
Entertainment LLC, contend
that Hard Rock Cafe Interna-
tional Inc. management secret-
ly negotiated with the Semi-
noles for seven months before

plans to sell were announced in
July.

Power: Plant, a partnership

between Cordish and Coastal
Development LLC, was the
original developer of the Semi-
nole Hard Rock casinos and
hotels in Hollywood and Tam-
pa.
« The Seminoles announced
the $965 million purchase of
the Hard Rock empire from
London-based Rank Group
PLC on Dec. 7, marking the
first time an American Indian
tribe had purchased a major
international corporation.

The Cordish lawsuit, how-
ever, said the company and its
banker, Goldman Sachs & Co.,
were refused the right to bid
for the business even though
they could have made a larger
offer. The lawsuit was filed late
Friday in Broward County Cir-
cuit Court.

“We were declined the
opportunity to bid, which is
kind of amazing. We believe
we would have prevailed,” said
Marty Steinberg, the Miami-
based attorney for Cordish.

The Seminoles agreed to
keep Hard Rock managers in

Scotiabank’

VACANCY

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of :

Job 1: A Senior Analyst

assist in hedge fund analysis for hedge fund incubator and fund of
fund financing businesses
assist in investment analysis of structured credit, asset-backed, fixed
income, and derivative products for investment advisory business

development and ongoing maintenance of asset/credit reporting and
monitoring systems
liaising with head office analytical and support groups + external parties
preparation of reporting/MIS documentation for internal and external

parties

ensuring compliance with local and head office regulatory policies and

guidelines

assist in business case writings, other reports/requests

Skills: strong analytical experience and ability (credit/equities/funds/structured
products), good understanding of fundamental and technical features of debt,
equity, and alternative asset classes (and their derivatives), familiarity with
the Bank's internal systems and processes, self-starter, ability to work in a

smaller environment

Job 2: A Bookrunner

responsible for deal input and ongoing monitoring of positions held in
SCTL, including hedge fund financing, hedge fund investment, credit
derivatives and other related products
responsible for the risk management and hedging of SCTL positions

responsible for the development of risk management systems and reports
to properly control and monitor exposures
responsible for the funding of exposures in an efficient manner

must be able to liaise effectively with SC trading and structuring
personnel in other locations

Skills: strong attention to detail, good product knowledge of debt, equity,
alternative assets and their derivatives, strong familiarity with the Bank's
dealing and risk management systems, experience managing funding and

liquidity.

place and provide them with
“additional financial benefits”
if the tribe was the successful
bidder, according to the law-
suit.

“Their actions were moti-
vated by self-dealing and a
desire to enrich themselves,”
the lawsuit says.

A spokesman for Hard Rock
Cafe International declined
comment Tuesday.

In a statement, the Semi-
noles accused Cordish of being
“a sore loser” and insisted the
deal went through “a lengthy
and open bidding process.”

“This is part of a pattern of
Cordish obstructing the suc-
cessful enterprises of Seminole
Hard Rock Entertainment and
the Seminole Tribe of Flori-
da,” the statement said. “The
lawsuit has no merit.”

The lawsuit seeks unspeci-
fied damages, which could be
tripled under Florida law.

The Seminole-Hard Rock
deal includes 124 Hard Rock
Cafes, four hotels, two casino
hotels, two concert venues and
stakes in three unbranded
hotels. Rank shareholders are
scheduled to vote next Mon-

day on whether to approve the
sale.
Allegations of bid-rigging

were also made in a separate |. .
lawsuit by Power Plant against ‘-‘-

investment banker Merrill
Lynch, which also was a finan-
cial adviser to the Seminole
tribe.

That lawsuit, filed in Miami-
Dade Circuit Court in Decem-
ber, contends that Power Plant
was stopped from making a
deal to cash out its interests in
the Florida casinos because of
improper pressure from the
Seminoles.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SBARRO THE ITALIAN EATERY IS EXPANDING THEIR
OPERATIONS ONTO THE CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF
THE BAHAMAS AND WE NEED THE EXPERTISE OF ALL OF

THE FOLLOWING

SHIFT MANAGERS
COOKS

KITCHEN PREP
PIZZA MAKERS
CASHIERS

FOOD SERVERS
UTILITY WORKERS

PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA SITE (JUST OF
TUCKER ROAD) ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DAYS AND
TIME FOR AN INTERVIEW.

10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.

JANUARY 3RD 2007
JANUARY 4TH 2007
JANUARY 5TH 2007

WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY

Interested persons should submit applications in writing marked Private and
Confidential to:

Manager, Caribbean Treasury Limited
P. O. Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas
Applications should be received no later than Monday, January 15, 2007.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com







New Year's

honour for pitch

‘perfect softhall
veteran Linda

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT WAS a historic day for

veteran (slingshot) pitcher Lin-
da Ford when she was named a
Member of the Most Excellent
Order of the British Empire
(Civil Division) in the Queen’s
New Year honours list for
2007. .
Ford, who. has enjoyed an
illustrious career that has
spanned more than three
decades, said she hasn’t
received the award yet, but
she’s already feeling the effects
of being an MBE with all of the
praise and congratulations she’s
been receiving. ©

“I know it’s a big honour, so
it’s really a good feeling,” said
Ford, who remained as humble
as she’s been throughout the
years that she wore her different
softball uniforms. “It’s a top
honour.”

It’s the first time that any
Bahamian softball player has
been awarded in such a way by
the Queen, but Ford said it
won’t change her demeanor at
all.

“T’ve been playing softball for
more than 36 years and it won’t
make me any different than I’ve
been, but it’s good to know that
somebody is giving me my flow-
ers while I’m alive,” she reflect-
ed, :
“It’s a good feeling, but I’m
sure that it won’t change me a

bit, I’ve been the same way all
the time.”

At the age of 16, Ford began
her career as a second base
woman with BEC at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds, now
known as the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park. ,

She would eventually helped
to form a team called the Holi-
day Inn Crows where she
moved to the mound, launch-
ing the beginning of her stint as
a pitcher in 1974,

Three years later, Ford made
her breakthrough in Belize,
Central America in 1977 as a
member of the Bahamas ladies’
national softball team that
clinched the Caribbean Softball
Championship (CAST).

“T was actually throwing
windmill and I saw this girl
throwing the slingshot and I
came back home pracusing it
and that was how I learned to
pitch,” she stated,

“T think it was a natural for
me because once I got started
throwing the slingshot, it was
just as easy for me as it was
when I started pitching,”

Ford would go on to repre-
sent the Bahamas at just about
every international tournament,
including when the team fin-
ished number three at the
World Fastpitch Tournament
in Santa Clara, California,

Locally, she achieved every
award possible by a pitcher and

she played an integral role for
the Colina Crows, who domi-
nated the sport for more than a
decade.

Today, Ford is still making
her contribution, even though
she’s not actively involved as a

itcher. She’s lending more of
er time as a coach with the
Whirpool Eagles.

In 1996 when she traveled
with the national team in
Colombia, she had one of her
biggest setbacks when she was
hit in her head and she suffered
a hairline fracture,

The latter injury prevented
Ford from participating in the
tournament, but it didn’t stop
her from playing competitive-
ly. She made her last interna-
tional trip in 2003 to the Pan
American Games in Santo
Domingo.

She played up until 2005
because, last year, she had a
lipoma surgery on her shoulder
for a recurring injury.

As she turns 52 on January
15, the question is what is ahead
for this legendary player?

2007 I will be back playing,
more as a coach because I love
playing softball,” she insisted.
“It keeps me going because it’s
the love of my life.”

‘BS LINDA FORD, named in
the Queen’s New Year Hon-
ours list as an MBE.

SUPE E PO ERERGERARAROURPESEREOREONNDEOSERSORROERUERONGRRORREDOOR UOT ERUROEGINSERSURANGROEORSDEOHERSESEGHORETSERT NP ODI AGRON SEES

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“Training in Bahamas has Mavericks in t

ns 7 a
cc ,






























@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE University of Nebras-
ka at Omaha Mavericks
female swim team are enjoy- |
ing the warm, sunny condi-
tions in the Bahamas instead
of the 15 degrees they would |
be experiencing back home in |
Omaha. ;

Head coach Todd Salmon.
said their 24-member team is,
having a ball as they use the
Betty Kelly Kenning Swim’ |
Complex during their winter
training,

“It’s wonderful,” Samland
stressed.

“We're always pretty open
to the different facilities and
what they have to offer and
we're glad that they have a 50
metre pool here,”

The Mavericks arrived in
town on New Year's Day and:
will be here until January 7.
They have joined Michigan
State, who are here from
December 28-January 6;
Stevens Tech from January 3-
10; George Washington from





atten eneeneeneneneeenenenannaeneeneeeEeganengeeesweesegaeeeeaePeteeea Gea eeeeneneesey =

ae |

e swim —

- January 3-10 and LaSalle from
» January 2-10.

Kevin Colebrooke, the
manager of the swim complex,

' ‘said these are just some of the
collegiate teams that have tak-.- |.
en advantage of the warm:*.’.

weather that the Bahamas has
to offer,

He said they hosted Roger
William University from
December 16-22 and when
these teams leave, the New
York Athletic Club will be in
town from January 10-15.

Additionally, Colebrooke.
revealed that four swimmers
from the Austria national
team will be here for the
entire month of January, train-
ing for the 12th FINA World
Swimming Championships ,
March 17 to April 1 in Mel-
bourne, Australia,

Even though they have a-.-. .

large number of visiting swim:
mers occupying the pool,

Colebrooke said there are still

some lanes available for the

local swimmers.

SEE page 6B

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INTERNATIONAL EDITION





UNA LOLAE8t

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

104TH YEAR, NO. 111 | ©2007 THE MIAMI HERALD





FORMER MAYOR OF
JERUSALEM DIES AT 95.

@ Theodor Kollek, the
irrepressible champion of
Jerusalem during a nearly
three-decade tenure as mayor
that spanned war, uprising and :
shifting demographics, died
Tuesday. He was 95, 6A.

EL SALVADOR’S CIVIL
WAR IS TOURISM DRAW |

e Gun fragments, photos,
combat plans and mountain
hide-outs. These are the latest
tourist attractions in formerly
war-torn El Salvador. The country
has been at peace since 1992, 8A.

GAZA STRIP
CROSSING ATTACKED

e Palestinian militants attacked
the Gaza Strip’s main cargo
crossing with mortar fire early



t

t

Tuesday, lightly. wounding an |
Israeli truck driver in the latest |
flare-up of violence in the coastal —
strip, 6A.



ONE BIG VICTORY,
AND AGIANTLEAP

e@ When lan Johnson, above,
scored on a two-point conversion
play late Monday night during
overtime at the Fiesta Bowl, it
didn’t just win the game for Boise.
State. The Broncos’ victory —
against mighty Oklahoma, ina
BCS bowl game — is proof that
Boise State has arrived as a
big-time football program, 7B, 9B.

MEASURE TO HALT GAY —
MARRIAGE STILL ALIVE

e Ina suspense-filled final day
of the legislative session,
Massachusetts lawmakers kept
alive a proposed constitutional
amendment that would put a stop
to gay marriage in the only state
that allgws same-sex couples to
wed, 3A.

DEMOCRATS’ GOALS
ARE WIDELY POPULAR

@ People overwhelmingly
support two of the Democrats’
top goals — increasing the
minimum wage and making it
easier to buy prescription drugs
from other countries — as the
party takes control of Congress
for the first time in 12 years, 3A.

COPS CHARGED IN NEW
ORLEANS SHOOTING

e Seven New Orleans policemen
charged in a deadly shooting in
the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina turned themselves in at
the city jail, where more than 200
supporters greeted them ina
show of solidarity, 3A,



GERALD R. FORD



MARK WusoW/AFe-ceTiY. IMAGES

DIGNITARIES: Attending the Ford funeral, first row: from left, Prasidant Bush, Laura Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, wife Lynne Cheney,
former President Jimmy Carter, Rosalynn Carter, Nancy Reagan. Second row: President George H.W. Bush, wife Barbara, daughter Doro
Bush, former President Clinton, Sen. Hillary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

Nation’s capital pays its highest respects

§& Political luminaries celebrated
former President Ford as a
humble Midwesterner who
brought his common sense and
decency to the White House.

BY WILLIAM DOUGLAS

bdouglas@mcclatchyde.com
WASHINGTON — The nation’s

political elite and ordinary citizens

Surprising
longer life:

& The one social factor that
researchers agree is consistently
linked to longer lives in every
country where it has been
studied is education.

BY GINA KOLATA
New York Times Service

James Smith, a health economist
at the RAND Corp., has heard a vari-
ety of hypotheses about what it takes
to live a long life — money, lack of
stress, a loving family, lots of friends.
But he has been a skeptic.

Yes, he says, it is clear that on
average some groups in every soci-
ety live longer than others. The. rich
live longer than the poor, whites live
longer than blacks in the United
States. Longevity, in general, is not
evenly distributed in the population.
But what, he asks, is cause and what
is effect? And how can they be disen-
tangled?

He is venturing, of course, into
one of the prevailing mysteries of
aging — the persistent differences
seen in the life spans of large groups.
In every country, there is an average
life span for the nation as a whole
and there are average life spans for

UNITED NATIONS

said goodbye to Gerald R. Ford on
Tuesday at a state funeral at Wash-
ington National Cathedral, fondly
remembering the 38th president as a
common man who guided the coun-
try through the uncommgn times of
Watergate and the end of the Viet-
nam War.

The service at the majestic cathe-
dral highlighted a day of pageantry

secret to
education

different subsets, based on race,
geography, education and even
churchgoing.

But the questions for researchers
like Smith are why? And what really
matters?

The answers, he and others say,
have been a surprise. The one social
factor that researchers agree is con-
sistently linked to longer lives in
every country where it has been
studied is education. It is more
important than race; it obliterates
any effects of income.

Year after year, in study after
study, says Richard Hodes, director
of the National Institute on Aging,
education “keeps coming up.”

And, health economists say, those
factors that are popularly believed to

be crucial — money and health
insurance, for example — pale in
comparison.

Smith explains: “Giving people
more Social Security income, or less
for that matter, will not really affect
people’s health. It is a good thing to
do for other. reasons, but not for
health.”

° TURN TO AGING, 2A

and poignancy, in whicti Washing-
ton’s old guard, three former presi-
dents and a host of foreign luminar-
ies assembled to pay tribute to the
humble Midwesterner who aspired
to be speaker of the House of Repre-
sentatives but wound up occupying
the Oval Office instead.

“In President Ford, the world saw
the best of America, and America



| HUSSEIN EXECUTION PROTEST



found a man whose character aed
leadership would bring calm and
healing to one of the most divisive
moments in our nation’s history,”
President Bush told the 3,000
mourners who packed the cathedral.

Eulogizing Ford, the current and
former Presidents Bush and former

Ee |

* TURN TO FORD, 2A

TAMAL ROY/AP

The chaotic scene at Sodeam Hussein’s execution, captured
on video, has deepened Iraq’s sectarian rift and sparked
condemnation around the world. Above, an Indian Muslim

| shouts anti-U.S. slogans at a rally in Siliguri, India. In Iraq, as

| Hussein’s supporters protested in Sunni Arab enclaves, the
Shiite-led government said it had launched an investigation
into the execution. Meanwhile, the government reported that
| 13,900 Iraqis were killed last year. Story, 3A

| yenewiniantidyatnnnteentnernhneas nner ver nboentrrter resi wo rin nnewmeem Wn ore

On first day, U.N. chiefs remark raises eyebrows

U.N. Secretary General Ban
Ki-moon’s remark on Saddam
Hussein’s execution puta
question mark over the U.N.’s
stance on the death penalty.

BY EDITH M. LEDERER
Associated Press |”

. UNITED NATIONS — Ban Ki-
moon ran into trouble on his first
day of work as U.N. secretary gen-
eral on Tuesday over Saddam Hus-
sein’s execution when he twice
failed to state the United Nations’
opposition to the death penalty and
stressed instead that capital punish-
ment should be a decision of every
country.

Michele Montas, his new spokes-

. person, insisted that there was no

change in U.N. policy, and what Ban
said “was his own nuance” on the

. death penalty.

“The U.N. policy still remains
that the organization is not for capi-
tal punishment,” she said. “However,
the way the law is applied in differ-
ent countries, he left it open to those
different countries.”

But Ban’s ambiguous answer put
a question mark over the U.N.’s
stance on the death penalty. It also
gave the new U.N. chief an early



EVAN SCHNEIDER/UNITED NATIONS VIA AP

EARLY MISSTEP? The new United Nations Secretary-General, Ban
Ki-moon, failed to state the U.N.’s opposition to the death penalty
while cormmenting on the execution of Saddam Hussein on

Tuesday, his first day on the job.

taste of how tricky and difficult
global issues are, and how every
word can make a difference.

The former South Korean foreign
minister took over the reins of the
U.N. on New Year’s Day from Kofi
Annan, the first Asian to serve as

secretary general in 35 years, but it
was a U.N. holiday so Tuesday was
his first day at U.N. headquarters.
Dozens of staffers applauded and
joined a throng of television crews
and photographers snapping photos
as he entered the 39-story building.

He immediately went to the Medita-
tion Room and bowed his head in
tribute to U.N. peacekeepers and
staff members who died in service.

Then, the new secretary general
launched into a series of meetings
with U.N. staff. Speaking to report-
ers earlier, Ban vowed to end mis-
trust of the United Nations and
called for action to tackle “daunting”
problems from crises in Darfur, Leb-
anon, Iran and Iraq to. cutting
extreme poverty by half by 2015. He
renewed his promise to give priority
to the North Korean nuclear issue
and to defend human rights.

Ban also announced that his first
overseas trip will be to attend the
African Union summit in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia, on Jan. 29-30.

He said he will meet his special
envoy on Darfur, Jan Eliasson, today
and put “my highest attention on
this” issue in hopes of resolving the
conflict peacefully as soon as possi-
ble. Ban will chair a meeting Thurs-
day of the Darfur Task Force, Mon-
tas said.

But it was Ban’s response when
asked whether Hussein should have
been executed that raised questions,

*TURN TO UNITED NATIONS, 2A





2A_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

GERALD R. FORD

D.C. pays
highest
respects

*FORD, FROM 1A

Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer spoke of a good man
whose word was solid, whose
politics were principled and
whose heart was devoid of
lust for power.

“In his understated way he
did his duty as a leader, not as
a performer playing to the
gallery,” Kissinger said. “Ger-

ald Ford had the virtues of
small-town America: sincer-
ity, serenity and integrity.”

Former President George
H.W. Bush recalled Ford as “a
Norman Rockwell painting
come to life, an avuncular fig-
ure quick to smile, frequently
with a pipe in his mouth,” and
someone with “a heart as big
and open as the Midwest
plains on which he was born.”

The elder Bush was one of
several speakers who sug-
gested that Ford’s unassum-
ing manner may have resulted
in his being underappreci-
ated, if not an underrated
president. Bush equated
Ford’s leadership after Rich-
ard Nixon’s Watergate resig-
nation as one of. history’s
great presidential moments.

‘MAN AND MOMENT’

“History has a way of
meshing man and moment,”
he said. “Just as President Lin-
coln’s stubborn devotion to
our Constitution kept the
union together during the
Civil War, and just as FDR’s
optimism was the perfect
answer to the despair of the
Great Depression, so, too, can
we say that Jerry Ford’s
decency was the ideal remedy
for the deception of Water-

gate.”
Kissinger noted that Ford



FINAL HOME: Pallbearers carry the casket of former President Gerald

AMY LEANG/DETROIT FREE PRESS
R. Ford upon its

arrival at the airport named in his honor in Grand Rapids, Mich.

left office with a thick portfo-
lio of international accom-
plishments, including the first
political agreement between
Israel and Egypt, helping to
keep ethnic conflicts in
Cyprus and Lebanon from
igniting into a regional war
and helping to establish the
modern human-rights move-
ment by backing the Helsinki
Accords of 1975. —

At the time, Ronald Reagan
and other conservatives criti-
cized that agreement as a land
giveaway to the Soviet Union,
despite a provision forcing
Moscow to recognize human
and religious rights.

“History has shown that it
helped bring down the Soviet
Union, as courageous men
and women behind the Iron
Curtain used it to demand
their God-given liberties,” the
current President Bush said.

The elder Bush lightened
the solemn service by recall-
ing Ford’s sense of humor and
his approval of comedian
Chevy Chase’s stumbling,
bumbling imitation of him on
NBC’s Saturday Night Live,
even though Ford was, in fact,
a superb athlete.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Bush said Ford taught him

to laugh at himself. The for-~

mer president wanted to tell
more but, breaking into an
imitation of Saturday Night
Live alum Dana Carvey imi-
tating him, said, “Na gonna do
it. Wouldn’t be prudent.”

If Ford was underappreci-
ated in life, he’s been viewed

“with reverence and purpose

since his passing Dec. 26 at
age 93.

Thousands lined up to
view his flag-draped casket as
it lay in state at the Capitol
Rotunda over the weekend.

In a solemn ceremony
Tuesday, the casket was
moved from the Capitol to a
hearse as Army gunners fired
a 21-gun salute and a military
band played Hail to the Chief.

A slow motorcade left the
Capitol and made a brief pass
by the White House, which
Ford occupied from Aug. 9,
1974, to Jan. 20, 1977.

PRAYER SAID

The Right Rev. John Bry-
son Chane, the Episcopal
bishop of Washington,
greeted Ford’s casket at the
cathedral steps and said a

prayer over it.

Inside the cathedral, Presi-
dent Bush escorted a frail but
stoic widow Betty Ford down
the long central aisle to the
front pew, which housed the
rest of the Ford family.

All three living former
presidents — the elder Bush,
Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton
— attended the service, as did
three former secretaries of
state: Kissinger, Colin Powell
and James A. Baker. Former
New York Mayor Rudolph
Giuliani and Sen. Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton, D-N.Y. — each a
possible presidential candi-
date — also attended.

Former Sen. Bob Dole,
R-Kan., who was Ford’s vice-
presidential running mate in
1976, served as an honorary
pallbearer, along with former
Defense Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld, Vice President
Dick Cheney, former National
Security Advisor Brent Scow-
croft and members of Ford’s
Cabinet.

After the service, Ford’s
body was flown aboard a
presidential 747 to Grand
Rapids, Mich., where he gre
up.

Researchers pore over Ford papers

BY P. J. HUFFSTUTTER
Los Angeles Times Service

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — If
archivist David Horrocks
could point to a favorite his-
torical gem housed inside the
Gerald R. Ford Presidential
Library, it would be this:
a single sheet of paper,
outlining a 1975 senior staff
meeti ;

Ford had called the staff
into the Oval Office; to iron
out key staff changes.

Donald Rumsfeld would
become secretary of defense.

HOW TO REACH US

Che Miami Herad

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President and Publisher

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Dick Cheney would be named
chief of staff. George Bush
would replace Bill Colby at the
CIA.

“It’s the future unfolding,”
said Horrocks, the library’s
supervisory archivist who has
worked with the collection
since it arrived here in 1977.
“To search through these
papers is the closest thing

most people will ever get to"
sitting in the same room with °

the former president.”
Inside a modest brick build-
ing at the University of Michi-





LEGEND



Clouds T-storms

> Day
a OR
oy Cold front

“yer

Sunny PB Cloudy





Flurrles Snow

TD, rip



TODAY’S SELECTED MAJOR CITIES FORECASTS

ARUBA NASSAU

Mostly sunny skies and very warm Partly cloudy, chance of
conditions. thunderstorms.

High: 91 °F, 33°C Low: 77°F, 25°C High: 78 °F; 26°C Low: 69°F, 21°C
BERMUDA NEW YORK

Mostly sunny skies and cool Mostly sunny skies with mild
conditions. conditions.

High: 65 °F, 18°C Low: 54°F, 12°C High: 55 °F, 13°C Low: 40°F, 4°C
CANCUN PANAMA

Partly cloudy skies and warm Partly cloudy skies and hot
conditions. conditions.

High: 87 °F, 31°C Low: 75°F, 24°C High: 90 °F, 32°C Low: 72°F, 22°C
CURACAO/BONAIRE QUITO.

Mostly sunny skies and very warm Partly cloudy with a chance of
conditions, showers.

High: 91 °F, 33°C Low: 76°F, 24°C High: 69 °F, 21°C Low: 47°F, 8°C
MEXICO CITY ST. MAARTEN

Mostly cloudy with a chance of Partly cloudy, chance of
showers. thunderstorms.

High: 70 °F, 21°C Low: 51°F, 11°C High: 84 °F, 29°C Low: 75°F, 24°C
MIAMI SANTO DOMINGO

Partly cloudy with a slight chance Partly cloudy, chance of

of thunderstorms. thunderstorms.

High: 82 °F, 28°C Low: 73°F, 23°C



rfMeneatliMen Stationary front
Warm front Mitegyg lng

High: 86 °F, 30°C Low: 75°F, 24°C

gan’s northern campus rests
the world’s preeminent collec-
tion of Ford’s papers — a trea-
sure trove of written docu-
ments from one of this
country’s most controversial
periods.

Buried amid this mountain
of paperwork, photographs,
audiotapes and video clips are
insights into Ford’s most
enduring legacy — a staff of
strong and powerful personal-
ities, who still wield political
influence today, say academics
and researchers.

WEATHER CENTRAL INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS FORECAST
,

NORTH AMERICA

City Hi
Atlanta 58
Denver 48
Houston 54
Kansas City 54
Mexico City 70
San Francisco 55
Toronto 43
Vancouver 45
Washington 59

City HI
Berlin 37
Brussels 52
Jerusalem 64
Lisbon 67
London 55
Madrid 56
Moscow 26
Paris 54
Rome 44
Zurich 37

SOUTH AMERICA







Rain

Shi
OS





(seas)

EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly
cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers,
t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flur-
ries, sn-snow, i-ice, ts-rain/snow

All forecasts and maps provided by Weather Central Inc. © 2005



That tie has lured hundreds
of journalists, authors and his-
torians here to pore over the
presidential papers, looking
for clues about the Bush
administration and explana-
tions for the decisions it has
made — particularly as a
growing number of documents
has been declassified in the
past decade.

The amount of documents
gathered during Ford’s brief
presidency is as large as that
saved by Franklin D. Roose-
velt.



LATIN AMERICA
lo W_ City Hi Lo W
45 Os Asuncion 89 74 ¢t
22. pe ‘Barranquilla 90 78 s

45 Belo Horizonte 75 63 pc

37: Os Guadalajara ° 70 #50 t.
51 sh GuatemalaCity 78 60 sh
49 Cc Guayaquil 89 72 pe
29 Os Havana 85° 72s
39 sh La Paz, Bo. 58 42. sh
39 Os Managua 91 71 ss
Medellin 81 64 pc
Monterrey 67 52 fr

Lo W_ Montevideo 8 73 ¢t
Rio de Janeiro 82 70 ¢t

6
: a San PedroSula 86 67 sh
40 «5 Santa Cruz 8 75 pe
50s Santiago 81 55 5s
42 sh
: *__ ASIA PACIFIC
2
aoe ally Hi Lo W
35° pc __ Beijing 33 20 «6s
29° ¢ Singapore 87 75 ¢t
Sydney 74 61s ope
Taipei 71 61 6c
Tokyo 51 42 pe

weather.com

Brasilia. ©
VIA r
> PARAGUAY — Rio de Ja
U
i fey

Sg] a
?

Buenos
Aires 1

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

AGING

Education:
secrettoa

longer

° AGING, FROM 1A

Health insurance, too,
Smith says, “is vastly over-
rated in the policy debate.”

Instead, he and others say,
what may make the biggest
difference is keeping young
people in school. A few extra
years of school is associated
with extra years of life and
vastly improve health decades
later, in old age.

It is mot the only factor, or
course. There is smoking,
which sharply curtails life
span. There is a connection
between having a network of

‘friends and family and living a

long and healthy life. And
there is evidence that people
with more powerful jobs and,
presumably, with more con-
trol over their work lives, are
healthier and longer lived.
But there is little dispute
about the primacy of educa-
tion. The first rigorous
attempt to decide whether
education really changes peo-
ple so they live longer began
in a most inauspicious way.

PROMPTED BY DEGREE

It was 1999 and a Columbia
University graduate student,
Adriana Lleras-Muney, was
casting about for a topic for
her doctoral dissertation in
economics. She found an idea
in a paper published in 1969.
Three economists noted the
correlation between educa-
tion and health and gave some
advice: If you want to
improve health, you will get
more return by investing in
education than by investing in
medical care.

It had been an inflamma-
tory statement, Lleras-Muney
says. And for good reason. It
could only be true if educa-
tion in and of itself caused
good health.

But there were at least two
other possibilities. Maybe sick
children did not go to school,
or dropped out early because
they were ill. Or maybe edu-
cation was a proxy for wealth
and it was wealth that led to
health.

How, she asked herself,
could she sort out causes and
effects? It was the chicken-
and-egg problem that plagues
such research.

The answer came one day
when Lleras-Muney was read-
ing another economics paper.
It indicated that about 100
years ago, different states

_ Started passing laws forcing

children to go to school for
longer periods of time. She
knew what to do.

“The idea was, when a
state changed compulsory
schooling from, say, six years
to seven years, would the peo-
ple who were forced to go to
school for six-years live as
long as the people the next
year who had to go for seven
years,” Lleras-Muney asked.

When her analysis was fin-
ished, Lleras-Muney says, it
turned out that life expect-
ancy at age 35 was extended
by as much as one and a half
years simply by going to
school for one extra year.

UNITED NATIONS

New U.N
runs into

* UNITED NATIONS, FROM 1A

because Annan always reiter-
ated the U.N.’s policy against
capital punishment, and the
top U.N. envoy in Iraq, Ashraf
Qazi, restated it again on Sat-
urday after the former Iraqi
leader was hanged.

Qazi said that while the
U.N. stands firmly against
impunity and understands the
desire for justice, it remains
opposed to capital punish-
ment, even in the case of war
crimes, crimes against
humanity and genocide.

Ban, however, took a dif-
ferent approach.

“Saddam Hussein was
responsible for committing
heinous crimes and unspeak-
able atrocities against Iraqi
people and we should never
forget victims of his crime,”

l i fi

Now, others papers have
appeared, examining the
effects of changed laws on
‘compulsory education in
Sweden, Denmark, England
and Wales. In every country,
compelling children to spend
a longer time in school led to
better health.

That, though, leaves the
question of why the education
effect occurs. |

Lleras-Muney and others
point to one plausible expla-
nation — as a group, less-edu-
cated people are less able to
plan for the future and to
delay gratification. If true,
that may, for example, explain
the differences in smoking
rates between more- and less-
educated people.

Smokers are at least twice
as likely to die at any age as
people who never smoked,
says Samuel Preston, a
demographer at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. And not
only are poorly educated peo-
ple more likely to smoke but,
he says, “everybody knows
that smoking can be deadly.”

But education, Smith at
RAND finds, may somehow
teach people to delay gratifi-
cation. For example, he
reported that in one large fed-
eral study of middle-aged
people, those with less educa-
tion were less able to think
ahead.

“Most of adherence is
unpleasant,” Smith says. “You
have to be willing to do some-
thing that is not pleasant now
and you have to stay with it
and think about the future.”

SOMETHING STRIKING

In the late 1970s, Lisa Berk-
man, now a professor of pub-
lic policy at Harvard’s School
of Public Health, worked at a
San Francisco health care
center. It drew people from
Chinatown and the city’s Ital-
ian neighborhood, North.
Beach, as well as from the
Tenderloin district, a poor
area with many homeless and
mentally ill people. And she
noticed something striking.

“In Chinatown and North
Beach, there were these
tightly bound social net-
works,” she recalls. “You saw
old people with young people.
In the Tenderloin, people
were just sort of dumped.
People were really isolated.”

A few years later, in gradu-
ate school, she was studying
Seventh-day Adventists when
she began to wonder whether
the standard explanation for
their longer lives — a healthy,
vegetarian diet was
enough.

“They were at decreased
risk from many, many dis-
eases, even ones where diet
was not implicated,” Berkman
says. And, she adds, “‘it
seemed they simply had a
slower rate of aging.”

Seventh-day Adventists,
like the people in Chinatown
and North Beach, had
“incredibly cohesive social
networks,” Berkman notes.
Could that be the clue?

Thirty years later, studies
have borne out her hunch.

. chief ,
trouble

he said. “The issue of capital
punishment is for each and
every member state to
decide.”

“As the secretary general,
at the same time, while I am
firmly against impunity, I also
hope that members of the
international community
should pay due regard to all
aspects of international
humanitarian laws. During
my entire tenure, I'll try my
best to help member states,
international community, to
strengthen the rule of law,” he
said.

Asked whether Ban may
have been tacitly referring to
prohibitions on the death pen-
alty in international humani-
tarian law, Montas said, “Yes,
I think that’s what he was tac-

itly referring to.”

SSS





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

NEWSEXTRA





KHALID MOHAMMED/AP

MORE BOMBINGS: An Iraqi inspects a house damaged
in a roadside bomb explosion in Baghdad, Iraq,
Tuesday.

Government says
13,900 Iraqis were
killed in 2006

@ The war in Iraq claimed the lives of 13,900 Iraqis
last year, the government reported.

BY STEVEN R. HURST
Associated Press

BAGHDAD — Iraq reported Tuesday that about 12,000
civilians were killed last year — the third full year since
the U.S.-led invasion — with a dramatic rise in the last
three months, when 5,000 died. Only about half as many
Iraqi soldiers died in 2006 as American troops.

But the number of Iraqi security forces killed jumps to
1,643, nearly double the American death count for the year,
when the deaths of police, who conduct paramilitary oper-
ations, were added to the number of slain Iraqi soldiers.

In all, the Iraqi ministries of Health, Defense and Inte-
rior reported a total of 13,900 Iraqi civilians, police and sol-
diers died last year, a figure that is only 162 greater than
the tabulation kept by The Associated Press. .

The AP count, assembled from its daily news reports,
was always believed to be substantially lower than the
actual number of deaths because the news cooperative
does not have daily access to official accounting by the
Iraqi ministries. Many deaths were thought to have gone
unreported by AP.

While the United States government and military pro-
vide no death totals for Iraqis, the United Nations Assis-
tance Ministry for Iraq, UNAMI, does keep a count based
on reports it gathers from the Baghdad morgue, Ministry
of Health, and Medico-Legal Institute.

The figures for November and December are not yet
available from the U.N., but as of the end of October the
organization had reported 26,782 deaths in the first 10
months of 2006, nearly double what the Iraqi government
and the AP reported for the entire year. ~

In its last report, the U.N. said 3,709 Iraqi civilians were
killed in October alone and that citizens were fleeing the
country at a pace of 100,000 each month. The organization
estimates at least 1.6 million Iraqis have left since the war
began in March 2003.

Life for Iraqis, especially in Baghdad and cities and
towns in the center of the country, has become increas-
ingly untenable. Many schools failed to open at all in Sep-
tember, and professionals — especially professors, physi-
cians, politicians and journalists — are falling to sectarian
killers at a stunning pace.

At the time of the last U.N. report, Iraqi government
spokesman Ali al Dabbagh called it “inaccurate and exag-
gerated” because it was not based on official government
reports.

The Iraqi Minister of Health, in a statement made in
Vienna in early November, indicated that as many as
150,000 Iraqi civilians might have been violently killed
since 2003. But there are no known statistics for the early
months of the U.S.-led invasion.

After a violence-free start to 2007, Iraqi authorities
reported on Tuesday that at least 57 Iraqis were killed in
sectarian violence, including 45 tortured bodies that were
found dumped in Baghdad and five in Kut to the south.

Three Iraqi civilians were killed in a roadside bombing
Tuesday morning in eastern Baghdad, police reported. In
Baqouba, gunmen killed Diyala provincial council member
Ali Majeed and three members of his family. The four
were gunned down while driving near the town of al Waji-
hiya, Diyala provincial police said.

BATTLE TOLL

e AUS. soldier was killed Monday by a roadside
bomb southwest of Baghdad, the military announced
Tuesday. The blast wounded three. others, including an -
interpreter, as they talked with residents about sectar-
ian violence, the military said.

© As of Tuesday, at least 3,004 members of the U.S.
military have died since the beginning of the lraq war in
March 2003, according to an Associated Press count.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

® U.S. troops killed a suspected al Qaeda weapons
dealer and two other people in Baghdad raids Tuesday.
@ A U.S. Marine fatally wounded an Iraqi soldier in an
altercation at the guard post they shared in Fallujah,
the U.S. military said. The confrontation took place Sat-
urday between members of U.S. and Iraqi units
assigned to combined security posts at the Fallujah
Government Center. The Marine has been assigned to
administrative duties while the military investigates.

@ Nouri al Maliki, jraq’s prime minister, ordered an
investigation Tuesday into Saddam Hussein's execution
to try to uncover who taunted the former dictator in
the last minutes of his life and who leaked inflammatory
footage taken by camera phone of the hanging.













MASSACHUSETTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 | 3A

Measure aimed to halt
say marriage still alive

W@ Massachusetts
lawmakers gave the first
round of approval on an
amendment that would
stop gay marriage.

BY STEVE LEBLANC
Associated Press

BOSTON — Ina suspense-
filled final day of the legisla-
tive session, Massachusetts
lawmakers kept alive a pro-
posed constitutional amend-
ment Tuesday that would put
a stop to gay marriage in the
only state that allows same-
sex couples to wed.

The vote came after weeks
of mounting legal and political
pressure on legislators from
both sides in the debate.

With a combination of par-
liamentary maneuvering, flip-
flopping and brinkmanship,
lawmakers gave the first
round of approval necessary
for the amendment to appear
on the ballot in 2008. The
measure still needs the
endorsement of the next legis-
lative session.

AMENDMENT

If the amendment makes it
on the ballot and residents
approve it, it will leave Massa-
chusetts’ 8,000 existing gay
marriages intact but ban any
new ones.

“This is democracy in
action. It’s not a vengeance
campaign. It’s not a hate cam-
paign. It’s just an opportunity
for the people to vote,” said
Kris Mineau of the Massachu-
setts Family Institute, a cgn-
servative group that opposes
gay marriage.

If lawmakers had failed to

NEW ORLEANS





ELISE AMENDOLA/AP

LOUD AND CLEAR: Opponents of gay marriage protest on Tuesday outside the
statehouse in Boston. Massachusetts is the only state where gay marriage is legal.

act on the amendment Tues-
day, the measure would have
died, and opponents of gay
marriage who collected
170,000 signatures to try to put
the issue on the ballot would
have had to start over again.
The pressure on lawmakers
came from all sides: Gay rights
activists and Democratic Gov.-
elect Deval Patrick called on
the Legislature to let the mea-
sure die without a vote. Gay
rights opponents — and Mas-
sachusetts’ highest court —
demanded an up-or-down
vote. The state Supreme Judi-
cial Court — the same court
that ruled in 2003 that gays
have a constitutional right to
marry — declared last week

ALEX BRANDON/AP

SHOW OF SUPPORT: Sgt. Robert Gisevius Jr., center, hugs a
fellow officer on Tuesday in New Orleans.

7 police surrender; —
charged in shooting -

BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Seven
policemen charged in a deadly
shooting in the chaotic after-
math of Hurricane Katrina
turned themselves in Tuesday
at the city jail, where more
than 200 supporters greeted
them in a show of solidarity.

Each of the indicted men
faces at least one charge of
murder or attempted murder
in the Sept. 4, 2005, shootings
on the Danziger Bridge less
than a week after the hurri-
cane hit New Orleans. Two
people died and four people
were wounded.

Defense attorneys say the
officers are innocent.

Sgts. Kenneth Bowen and
Robert Gisevius, officer
Anthony Villavaso and former
officer Robert Faulcon were
charged with first-degree mur-
dér. Officers Robert Barrios
and Mike Hunter were
charged with attempted first-
degree murder, and Ignatius
Hills was charged with
attempted second-degree
murder.

A first-degree murder con-
viction carries a possible death
sentence. A spokesman for

District Attorney Eddie Jordan |

said Monday that prosecutors
haven’t decided yet whether
to seek the death penalty.

Those accused of first-
degree murder will get no bail
and bail will be $100,000 per
count for the other three, a
judge said.

The officers are scheduled
to be arraigned Friday.

Police say the officers were
responding to a report of other
officers down, and that they
thought one of the men, Ron-
ald Madison, was reaching for
a gun. Madison, a 40-year-old
mentally retarded man, and
James Brissette, 19, were killed
on the bridge. The coroner
said Madison was shot seven
times — five wounds in the
back.

Madison’s brother Lance,
who was also on the bridge
and was cleared of attempted
murder charges, said he and
his brother were not armed.

The Rev. Raymond Brown,
of the New Orleans chapter of
the National Action Network,
said racism was a factor in the
shootings, even though four of
the officers, like the two vic-
tims, are black.

“We see the black officer
as just following their master,”
Brown said.

that lawmakers had shirked
their constitutional duties by
refusing to vote on an amend-
ment submitted by the people.
But the justices acknowledged
they had no authority to force
action.

THE NEXT ROUND

To advance to the next
round, the amendment needed
the approval of only 50 of the
200 members of the Legisla-
ture. On Tuesday, 61 lawmak-
ers voted in favor, while 132
were opposed.

A few hours later, the law- _ |
makers agreed to reconsider.”

But then they largely affirmed
the original result, with 62 vot-
ing in favor of the amendment.

Earlier in the day, the gov-
ernor-elect, who supports gay
marriage, met with the leaders
of the Democratic-controlled
Legislature to argue against a
vote.

Patrick said the amendment
process was being used to
“consider reinserting discrimi-
nation into the constitution.”

“This is not just another
question for popular decision.
This is a question, under the
equal protection clause, about
what freedoms the minority is
entitled to,” Patrick said. —

Republican, opposes gay mar-
riage.

CONGRESS | PUBLIC OPINION

Democrats’
goals popular

@ As Congress prepares to
convene, a national survey
finds strong public support
for Democrats’ plans on
minimum wage and
prescription drugs.

BY DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — People
overwhelmingly support two
of the Democrats’ top goals —
increasing the minimum wage

» and making it easier to buy

prescription drugs from other
countries — as the party takes
control of Congress for the
first time in a dozen years.

By a smaller margin, the
public also favors relaxing
restrictions on federal funding
of embryonic stem cell
research, a third issue Demo-
crats have promised to tackle
during their first 100 hours in
charge.

The jury is out on incoming
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
Most people say they do not
know enough yet to have an
opinion about the California
Democrat who will be the first
woman in that office, an Asso-
ciated Press-AOL News poll
found.

The survey results come as
the 110th Congress is set to
convene Thursday at noon.
Voters in November toppled
Republican majorities in both
the Senate and House, exas-
perated by investigations into
the ethics of GOP lawmakers
and unhappy with the war in
Iraq. ‘

Democrats will hold a
233-202 edge in the House and
will control the Senate by
51-49.

A boost to the $5.15-an-hour
federal minimum wage would
be the first since 1997. Demo-
cratic leaders have proposed
raising it in stages to $7.25 an
hour. President Bush has said
he supports the idea, along
with help for small businesses.

Fully 80 percent of survey

respondents favor an increase,
too.

Support is strongest among
Democrats, 91 percent, while
65 percent of Republicans
back the idea. Women, men
without college degrees and
single women all are espe-
cially likely to favor a mini-
mum wage hike.

Nearly seven of 10 adults,
69 percent, favor the govern-
ment taking steps to make it
easier for people to buy pre-
scription drugs from other
countries, where some medi-
cines cost significantly less
than in the United States.

Importing prescription
drugs to the United States is

‘illegal, but the Food and Drug

Administration generally does
not bar individuals from bring-
ing in small amounts for per-
sonal use. At the same time,
the government has estimated
that buying drugs from other
countries would do little to
influence what they cost here
at home.

Roughly 56 percent of
adults support easing restric-
tions on using federal money
to pay for research on embry-
onic stem cells. Supporters say
such research could lead to
treatments for everything
from Parkinson’s disease to
spinal cord injuries. Bush and
other opponents say the
embryos from which the cells
are extracted are human lives
that should not be destroyed
in the name of science.

Bush kept a promise in 2001

when he limited federally
funded research to lines of
embryonic stem cells that had
been created by that time. Last
summer, he used the first veto
of his presidency to reject a
bill that would have directed
more federal dollars toward
embryonic stem cell research.

Democrats have pledged to
reverse that outcome, setting
up a possible veto showdown
with the president.

.. Patrick takes the oath of <
office Thursday. His predeces-' »
sor, Gov. Mitt Romney, a>



4A | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

CALIFORNIA







BRIAN VAN DER BRUG/THE LOS ANGELES TIMES VIA AP

REACHING OUT: Judge Mark Juhas has tried to tackle the problem of divorces that
weren't finalized by calling about 100 people a month and asking whether they
need help completing the process.

Breaking up is difficul
to do for many col!

By JESSICA GARRISON
Los Angeles Times Service

LOS ANGELES — When
Yanic Chan and Vanessa Van
split up in 1995, they could
not afford a lawyer. So, like
thousands of other people
without money, they filled
out the divorce paperwork
themselves, with help from a
friend and courthouse staff.

In November 1997, Van
went to the Riverside County
Courthouse to enter.a final
judgment. “The clerk put the

. stamp on it,” Van said. “I
asked, ‘Everything finished?’
She. said ‘Yes.’”

Chan returned to his
native Cambodia, fell in love
and married again. Then, in
2006, he tried to bring his
new wife to this country.
That’s when Van and Chan
got a nasty surprise, one that
court officials fear could be
awaiting thousands of other
former California couples:
Their divorce had not gone
through.

Driven by rising legal fees,
a shortage of legal-aid law-
yers and a do-it-yourself phi-
losophy, about 80 percent of
people in California handle
their own divorces. 2

Many of them are not
‘quite as divorced as they
think they are. Some, like
Chan, are even accidental
bigamists, carrying not only
hopes and dreams but also an
earlier marriage to their new
one.

Tens of thousands of oth-

_ ers have some understanding
that their divorces are not
done. But stumped by com-
plex paperwork and court
procedures and unable to
afford thousands of dollars
for attorneys, they simply let
their cases languish.

A BIG PROBLEM

Court officials across the
state say they suspect the
problem is vast. In Los Ange-
les County, perhaps more
than one-third of all divorce
petitions filed have not been
finalized, according to Kath-
leen Dixon, who heads the
Los Angeles County Superior
Court’s programs for self-
represented people. —

Officials don’t have statis-
tics because they don’t moni-

CELEBRITIES

tor cases to make sure they
are finished. But the evidence
they have worries them.

One Los Angeles County
Superior Court judge, Mark
Juhas, found that about one-
third of the roughly 3,600
divorce cases filed in 2001
and 2002 and assigned to his
courtroom remained open.
Some of those couples may
have reconciled, but Juhas
suspects that many more are
stuck or may even think they
are divorced when they are
not.

Bonnie Hough is supervis-
ing attorney for the Center
for Families, Children and the
Courts, a division of the state
Judicial Council’s Adminis-
trative Office of the Courts.
She noted a study in Placer
County in the 1980s*that
found that 30 percent of peo-
ple there ‘who’ filed for

divorce did not complete the .

process.

MANY SURPRISED

At one legal services cen-
ter in the Van Nuys district of
Los Angeles, officials say they
see 20 people a month who
wrongly thought they were
divorced.

“They come in scream-
ing,” said Norma Valencia, a

paralegal at the center oper-

ated by Neighborhood Legal
Services. “They say, ‘You
don’t understand my situa-
tion. I want a divorce right
now.”

Others show up weeping:

. They’ve remarried without a

finalized divorce, and they’re
afraid to tell their new
spouse.

Many people, Valencia
said, think divorce is like a
traffic ticket — if they fail to
take care of it properly the
court will track them down
and notify them.

But it doesn’t work like
that. In California, getting
divorced takes at least three
steps: filing divorce papers,
serving them upon the spouse
and then writing and process-
ing a judgment with the
court. The process can be
more complicated if there are
children, or fights over assets.

Increasingly, across Cali-
fornia and the nation, people
are handling their own civil





court matters. li San Diego
County, one ot the. few coun-
ties where siatistics are avail-
able, 46 percent of people
represented themselves in
divorces in 1992, but by 2000

that figure had climbed to 77
percent.
One reason: increasing

tees for lawyers combined
with decreasing legal-aid ser-
vices tor poor people, said
Richard Zorzo, who coordi-
nates a national network af
organizations working on
self-representation.

Also a tactor, he said, is a
“Home Depot philosophy of



people feeling they can do
things on thcir own.” But the
legal systei wasn’t organized

do-it-yourself
ieant to be

with a
approach. lt
mavigited by lawyers with

graduate degrees. And people
without legal training often
make mistakes.

Juhas said the problem





was brought liome to him a

few years ago, when a couple
came before him on a routine
matter. hey had filed fora
divorce a few years earlier,
and both husband and wife
had since remarried. Juhas




said he looked down at their
file and then back up at the
couple. ‘TI said, ‘Do you real-

ize your judgment was never
entered?’ ”

STARTED CALLING

In plain that
means they weren’t divorced.
Luckily tor the couple — and
their new spouses — Juhas
finalized their divorce with-
out invalidating their new
matriages.

But it got him’ thinking,
what about the thousands of
files

English,

other people whose
remain open?

East spring, the judge, one
of more than 40 who handle
family law in Los Angeles
County, bean calling in

about 100 people a month
whose divorce cases had lan-





guished and asking them
whether they needed help.

About i0 perecnt said they
have re Hed. An addi-
tional 30 percent ignored his
summolis. :

But more than half, he said,
wanted to be divorced but
needed same help to get there,

It’s like it never happened

BY LISA DE MORAES
Washington Post Service

If you looked forward to
the Kennedy Center Honors
broadcast last Tuesday night
just to see Jessica Simpson’s
redo performance of 9 to 5
during the tribute to Dolly
Parton?

Ha! It was
gone.

CBS agreed
to expunge
Simpson
entirely from
the broadcast.
Through the
miracle of
; modern tech-
nology, it appeared as though
she was never there.



SIMPSON



[ERATE LEO LDL EF '6)84 8 et

The decision to yank the
performance was made, a
Simpson rep said, after her
client had been sent an
advance copy of what would
be broadcast and “she didn’t
like what she saw.”

We asked why Simpson
hadn’t rehearsed her song
better before the night of the
Honors. She appeared to be
relying heavily on cards for
the lyrics during the taping.

Simpson had learned the
song and rehearsed but “was
also shooting a mov‘ > which
was consuming a Jot of her
time, Blonde Ambition,” the
rep said.

According to The Wash-
ington Post’s Reliable Source

«

coluinn, Sitapsen was a mess
backstaye before she per-
formed, crying during the
tribute to Parton and pacing
nervously while others per-
formed their Parton songs.
Carrie Underwood, Kenny
Rogers, Alison Krauss and
Shania ‘{wain got through
their sones without tretdent,
After the show,
was asked to resshoot her
song while the rest of the
group bad dinner out in the
Kennedy Coster lobby, and
she did. “Atti v reviewing the
tape of the ‘re-do’ p
mance (hit was tiln
the liv a felt it
was not w! had hoped
to achivy said

Simpson

“elOoy

fatter





‘





TTR

eople





COMPILED BY
MICHAEL HAMERSLY

FROM HERALD STAFF
AND WIRE REPORTS







Actor Robert Loggia is 77. Actor Dabney Coleman is 75. Singer Stephen

Stills is 62. Bassist John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin) is 61. Actress
Victoria Principal is 57. Actor Mel Gibson is 51: Actor Jason Marsden is

32. Actor Nicholas Gonzalez (The O.C.) is 31.



Paulson and Ferrell

Will Ferrell,
wife have a boy

Will Ferrell and his wife,
Viveca Paulson, celebrated
the New Year early — with
the birth of their second son
on Saturday, People magazine
reports

Mattias Ferrell was born
just after 2 a.m. on Dec. 30,
publicist Matt Labov
announced.

Ferrell and Paulson, 37, an
art auctioneer, already have
one son, Magnus, 2.

In November, while on The
Late Show with David Letter-
man to promote his movie
Stranger Than Fiction, Farrell
revealed that the baby would
be a boy.

When asked by Letterman
if he knew the baby’s gender,
Ferrell, 39, responded: “You
know, I don’t know if I do,” he
said. “I’ve gotta check my
BlackBerry.”

He continued, “Well, we do
know, but I forget if we’re tell-
ing people. I told the Today
show we weren't telling them.
But it’s a boy.”

TELEVISION REVIEWS



Moss denies marriage

A spokesman for Kate
Moss denied Tuesday reports
that the supermodel and
rocker Pete Doherty had tied
the knot during a candlelit
Buddhist ceremony in Thai-
land on New Year’s Day, The
Associated Press reports.

Stuart Higgins said Moss,
32, was vacationing in Thai-
land, but hadn’t married Doh-
erty, frontman for Baby-
shambles.

“There has not been any
kind of marriage ceremony in
Thailand. She is on holiday,”
Higgins said.

British newspapers
reported that Moss and Doh-
erty had held the wedding cer-
emony in the Thai resort of
Phuket.

Neither the Sun nor the
Daily Mirror provided sources



‘Indiana Jones’
a go again

Is 60 the new 30? It is for
the action movie hero.

First, Sylvester Stallone,
60, enters the ring for the sixth
time in
Rocky Bal-
boa; now
filmmaker
George
Lucas says
he finally
has a script

Wa of the Indi-
Ford ana Jones
franchise —
with Harrison Ford, 62, once
again cracking the whip in the
name of archaeological adven-



One may live long,
but the other could be DOA

® The Knights of Prosper-
ity, 9-9:30 EST tonight, ABC

e In Case of Emergency,
9:30-10 EST tonight, ABC

BY GLENN GARVIN

ggarvin@MiamiHerald.com
Don’t worry about the bul-

let-riddled corpses of New

Year’s resolutions scattered all
over your living room. Just
pull up a chair, pop a cold one
(oops, there goes No. 172,
Don’t Get Wasted In Mid-

_Week) and flip on the tube

(arrgh, No. 173, Cut TV View-
ing To 80 Hours. A Week).
ABC has thoughtfully pro-
vided a couple of new sitcoms
about losers whose efforts to
turn their lives around are
bombing even worse than
yours. (Dammit, No. 174, Don’t
Gloat Over The Misfortunes
Of Others.)

Both The Knights of Pros-
perity and In Case of Emer-
gency are about lovable screw-
ups trying to rescue lives
imired in financial and emo-
tional muck. By far the more
successful of the two is The
Knights of Prosperity, a tale of
an off-kilter group of Robin
Hoods who brag that they’re
“stealing from the rich to give
to the poor — us.”

The ringleader is janitor
Eugene Gurkin, who has a
nightmarish vision of his (lit-
erally) dead-end future when
an elderly colleague keels over
and dies. “The man died mop-
ping on the night shift — what
kind of life is that?” Eugene
demands indignantly. “Below
average,’ agrees his pal
Squatch Squacier. When he
can’t finance his dream of
opening a bar, Eugene turns to
the obvious solution: forming
a gang to rob Mick Jagger’s
luxury Manhattan apartment.

Knights is brought to life by
a cast low in profile but high in
comic talent. It includes Donal
Logue (Grounded for Life) as
Kugene; Lenny Venito (Rescue
Me) as Squatch; Sofia Vergara
(Hot Properties) as Colombi-
an-narcotrafticker-moll
~turned-waitress Esperanza;
Maz Jobrani (Friday After
Next) as New-Delhi-lawyer-



turned-cabbie Gourishankar;
Kevin Michael Richardson as a
cookie-addicted security
guard named Rockefeller
Butts, recruited for his “gigan-
tic black-guy superstrength”;
and Josh Grisetti as nerdy col-
lege kid Louis, destined to fail
at even so humble an ambition
as becoming a TV censor.

This is last year’s hit sitcom
My Name is Earl in reverse:
half-a-dozen decent if bum-
bling people, kicked around by
life, who decide to reverse
their karma at gunpoint.

From Jagger’s occasional
cameos mocking his own
swinishly rich celebrity (he
luxuriates in yogurt baths
while his dogs swim in their
own indoor pool; his elevator
plays a Mantovani version of
Start Me Up) to Vergara’s ear-
nest offering to the cause of
folkloric talismans of her
native culture (a bag full of
assault rifles), its raffish ethnic
and class humor takes no pris-
oners.

In Case of Emergency, too,
bears a resemblance to
another show, but in this case,
it’s not flattering.

for part four,



Doherty and Moss



for the information.

The Mirror quoted an
unnamed friend of Moss as
saying the ceremony was an
expression of the couple’s
mutual devotion.

Higgins called the reports
“entirely false.”

ture.

During a break from duties
as grand marshal of Monday’s
Rose Parade, Lucas, also 62,
said filming of the long-
awaited fourth Indiana Jones
would begin this year. “It’s
going to be fantastic. It’s going
to be the best one yet.”

Ford starred in the three
earlier flicks (most recently in
1989’s Indiana Jones and the
Last Crusade.

“Mostly it’s the charm of
Harrison that makes it work,”
Lucas said.

He added that he and Ste-
ven Spielberg recently final-
ized the script.

Ford said he was “fit to con-
tinue” to play the title role
despite his age.

prosper,



ABC TELEVISION

WE THINK. WE HAVE A WINNER: The screw-ups of the show
Knights of Prosperity, above, just may find success.

This chronicle of four high-
school classmates thrown
together 20-years later, won-
dering how the sunny predic-
tions in their yearbooks could
have been so dismally wrong,
seems like a first draft of the
CBS sitcom The Class that
debuted this fall.

But where The Class is
warm and charming, Emer-
gency is crude and overdrawn.
When the captain of the
debate team runs into the class
valedictorian at a massage par-
lor where she’s turning tricks,
he comforts her: “We’re all
whores. IJ was gonna be Kurt
Vonnegut, and now I write
greeting cards.” Well, I hope
she feels better after that.

Emergency seems well-
intentioned, and the cast —
David Arquette (Scream), Jon-
athan Silverman (Weekend At
Bernie’s), Greg Germann (Ally
McBeal) and Kelly Hu (The
Scorpion King) — struggles
mantully to make it work. But

‘ when one of them exclaims,

“We're not these guys, we’re
not losers,” it’s pretty hard to
shake the feeling that he’s
dead wrong.







THE MIAMI HERALD | Miami









sential -
Constituting or being part of the essence of
“something; inherent. Basic or indispensable;
necessary: essential ingredients.










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6A_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

TEDDY KOLLEK —

WORLD NEWS

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Former mayor of J erusalem dies at 95

BY SCOTT WILSON
Washington Post Service

JERUSALEM — Theodor
Kollek, the irrepressible cham-
pion of this volatile city during
a nearly three-decade tenure
as mayor that spanned war,
uprising and shifting demo-
graphics, died Tuesday. He

"was 95.

Kollek, known universally
as Teddy, was. elected six
times to lead Jerusalem start-
ing in 1965. Over those years,
Kollek employed an avuncular
populism to promote Jewish-
Arab coexistence in a city
physically divided until Israel
annexed the eastern neighbor-
hoods following the 1967 Mid-
dle East War.

Although his vision of a
united city remains elusive in
many ways, Kollek was hailed
Tuesday as the driving force
behind Jerusalem’s evolution
from a parochial hilltop town
coveted by the world’s leading
religions and contested by the
Palestinian people to a mod-
ern metropolis of arts, tourism
and the numerous cultural
landmarks he engineered dur-
ing his decades in office.

“Teddy was Jerusalem and
Jerusalem was Teddy,” Uri
Lupolianski, Jerusalem’s cur-
rent mayor, said in a statement
announcing Kollek’s death.
“With his spirit and personal-

PHILIPPINES

Marine |
turnover

to U.S.
defended

BY HRVOJE HRANJSKI
Associated Press



MANILA, Philippines —

Philippine officials defended
their decision Tuesday to
transfer a U.S. Marine con-
victed of rape from a local
jail to the
American
Embassy,
and a lawyer
for the vic-
tim filed a
contempt of
court com-
plaint



SMITH against them.
T he
United States. also

announced that it would go
ahead with joint military
exercises with Philippine
forces in February — exer-
cises that the U.S. had earlier
canceled, citing the custody
dispute.

The victim’s lawyer, Eva-
lyn Ursua, alleged that the
Philippine secretaries of the
interior and justice violated
the order of the Court of
Appeals to keep Lance Cpl.
Daniel Smith, 21, of St. Louis,
in a Manila jail while he
appeals his conviction and
40-year prison sentence.

A 23-year-old Filipino
woman accused Smith of
sexually assaulting her in
November 2005, as three
other Marines allegedly
cheered him on.

President Gloria Macapa-
gal Arroyo said the govern-
ment had to take action “in
order to forestall the further
deterioration in our strategic
relationship with the United
States. “I wish to appeal for
understanding from the peo-
ple that this action will not
affect the substantive issues
at bar, nor impede justice
and the rule of law,” Arroyo
said in a statement.

About 50 protesters, most
of them women, burned an
American flag near the U.S.
Embassy and called Smith “a
fugitive.”

The case has strained

relations and tested a joint
military pact between the
two countries, under which
U.S. troops have trained Fili-
pino forces in counterterror-
ism tactics.

That training has been
credited with helping local
forces make gains against
Muslim extremists.

In addition to accusing
government officials of con-
tempt, Ursua asked the court
to dismiss Smith’s appeal





and issue a warrant for his
arrest.

ity he symbolized the true uni-
fied Jerusalem, the capital of
Israel.”

Named for the chief theo-
rist of modern Zionism, Theo-
dor Herzl, Kollek was born in
Nagyvaszony near Budapest in
1911 and raised in Vienna. He
immigrated to Palestine, then
under British authority, in 1934
and helped found Kibbutz Ein
Gev on the shores of the Sea of
Galilee.

HELPED JEWS

During World War II, Kol-
lek worked to help European
Jews escape Nazi persecution,
securing the transfer of thou-
sands from concentration
camps to Great Britain. After
the war, he organized weap-
ons shipments to the nascent
Jewish state’s fledgling armed
forces before the United
Nations partition of Palestine
in 1947.

He was appointed Israel’s
envoy to Washington follow-
ing the state’s founding in May
1948, and later ran the office of
Prime Minister David Ben-
Gurion for a decade.

But Kollek gained interna-
tional acclaim in the years fol-

lowing his 1965 election as’

mayor, a tenure marked by a
mix of cheerful globe-trotting
to promote Jerusalem and
raise money on its behalf and



tireless work developing the
city itself.

After Israeli forces occu-
pied East Jerusalem in June
1967, Kollek reached out to
Arab residents in an effort to
bridge religious and cultural
divides that persist in this city
of 700,000 residents. Israel’s
annexation of East Jerusalem,
including the Old City, is not
recognized internationally.

He established an Arab liai-
son office to address inequali-
ties in education funding, pub-

GALI TIBBON/AFP-GETTY IMAGES FILE
EX-MAYOR: Teddy Kollek, shown in 2002, promoted
Jewish- Arab coexistence.

lic transit and other municipal
services between the city’s
Arab and Jewish neighbor-
hoods. He walked the streets
daily, and despite his fame,
continued to list his home
number in telephone directo-
ries throughout his tenure.
Kollek once said, ‘We
proved that Jerusalem is a bet-
ter city united than divided.”
But after the start of the most
recent Palestinian uprising in
the fall of 2000, Kollek sug-
gested that some of the city’s

Arab neighborhoods be turned
over to Palestinian control,
saying “I think we need to give
something to them and have
part for ourselves. It will never
be easy.”

CULTURAL FLAVOR

Kollek permanently altered
the city’s landscape, adding
world-class cultural institu-
tions that have expanded Jeru-
salem’s draw as a tourist desti-
nation. The Israel Museum,
which cascades down a promi-
nent ridgeline in the city’s cen-
ter, and the Jerusalem Theater
are among his most important
cultural legacies. The modern
soccer venue, known as Teddy
Stadium, was dedicated to
him.
“This /is the most difficult
job there is,” Kollek said in an
interview with the Washing-
ton Post in 1993. “It’s not the
most important job, but it is a
more difficult job than being
prime minister and foreign
minister.”

At 82, Kollek ran reluc-
tantly and unsuccessfully for a
seventh term later in 1993. His
defeat by Ehud Olmert, the
Likud Party candidate, repre-
sented the end of the Labor
Party’s domination of Jerusa-
lem politics and reflected the
city’s demographic shift to a
more religious and conserva-



AFP-GETTY IMAGES

TV celebrity Oprah Winfrey opens the doors Tuesday of The Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls, a
multimillion dollar school for academically talented, disadvantaged girls she founded near Johannesburg. Winfrey
hopes the students will become ‘the future leaders on the path to peace in South Africa and the rest of the world.’

INDONESIA | PLANE CRASH

False report angers travelers’ kin

BY ZAKKI HAKIM
Associated Press

MAKASSAR, Indonesia —
Relatives waiting for news
about a missing jetliner broke
down in tears Tuesday after
learning that senior Indone-
sian officials erroneously
reported the Boeing 737’s
charred wreckage had been
found and that a dozen people
may have survived.

“Oh, what is happening to
us?” wailed Dorce Sundalangi,
whose daughter was on the
flight, after hearing the report
was based on rumors from vil-
lagers that reached the highest
levels of government. “They
had given us hope of seeing
our beloved relatives ... but it
was false hope.”

The Adam Air plane carry-
ing 102 people sent out two
distress signals in stormy
weather Monday halfway
through its two-hour journey
from Indonesia’s main island
of Java to Manado, on the
northern tip of Sulawesi, one
of the largest islands in the
sprawling archipelago.

Three of those aboard were
American citizens, the U.S.
Embassy said. A U.S. National
Transportation Safety Board
team was to arrive Friday to
offer assistance. It was unclear
if any other foreigners were on
the plane.

Search-and-rescue teams
hiked slippery forest paths in
heavy rain for more than 10
hours Tuesday but , found
nothing, calling off their
search along Sulawesi’s moun-
tainous western coast as dark-
ness fell and vowing to set off

again at dawn today.

Bambang Karnoyudho, the
head of the National Search
and Rescue Agency, said the
search would be expanded to
include the nearby Makassar
Strait.

EARLY REPORTS

The announcement capped
a day of hope and anguish for
relatives of those on Flight KI-
574. Police Chief Col. Genot
Hariyanto earlier said rescue
teams arrived at the crash site.
Setyo Raharjo, head of the
National Commission on
Transportation Safety, said 90
bodies were found near the
wreckage and that the search
for the 12 others was continu-
ing.

The claims were repeated
by the chief of Adam Air —
who extrapolated to say that a
dozen people survived —
senior aviation officials, high-
ranking military officials and
police.

Descriptions were vivid,
with officials saying corpses
and debris from the plane
were scattered over a 300-
yard area of forests and jagged
cliffs, highlighting the often
unreliable and chaotic nature
of disaster-relief efforts in the
world’s largest archipelagic
nation.

Eventually, Transport Min-
ister Hatta Radjasa acknowl-
edged the news was based on
rumors from villagers, spark-
ing a series of reversals from
other officials.

“The search-and-rescue
team is still looking for the
location,” the minister told El-







Shinta radio. “It has not yet
been found.”

Karnoyudho said much of
the original information came
from Hariyanto, who said he
received the news from subor-
dinates after they spoke to a
village chief.

“Once he went to check for
himself, he found it was not
true,” Karnoyudho said, refer-
ring to the local police chief.

APOLOGY

Air force Rear Cmdr. Eddy
Suyanto — among those who
earlier confirmed the plane
crashed in the mountainous
Sulawesi region of Polewali —
acknowledged the error late
Tuesday and apologized.

But that provided little con-
solation to relatives awaiting

* ASTRIT WISKEY/AP

ANGUISH: A relative of a plane crash victim weeps at
Juanda airport in Surabaya, Indonesia, on Tuesday.

news about the missing.

Some were camped out at
the Adam Air counter at the
Manado airport — the destina-
tion of the ill-fated plane —

and others were in the south-

ern Sulawesi city of Makassar,
believed to be closer to where
the plane went down.

“{ don’t understand how
the authorities could be so
heartless and spread rumors
without thinking of the suffer-
ing of those waiting for news
of their loved ones,” said Ima
Kulata, who was awaiting
word about her cousin and
two nieces.

“It’s ridiculous,” she said,
crying after learning there
may be no survivors after all.
“How come they make such
fools of us?”

tive population. That trend
persists today, and Jerusalem’s
arts advocates say funding has
fallen for cultural programs
since his departure.

“Teddy Kollek was one of
the builders of the New Jeru-
salem after the 1967 Six Day
War,” Olmert, now the prime
minister, said Tuesday in a
statement issued by his office.

“When he was elected
mayor, Jerusalem was a
divided city with a status
unworthy of itself. When he
left the mayor’s office in 1993,
Jerusalem was a great, modern
and united city. Teddy Kollek
sang Jerusalem’s praises
around the world. He deci-
sively influenced the city’s
way of life, culture, vistas,
institutions as well as the rela-
tionships of its residents.”

Since leaving office, Kollek
‘continued his work for the
Jerusalem Foundation, an
organization he helped found
40 years ago.

Flags along Safra Square in
front of City Hall, another Kol-
lek project, were lowered to
half-staff following the
announcement of his death.
Kollek is scheduled to be bur-
ied Thursday following a state
funeral.

He is survived by his
widow, Tamar, a son, Amos,
and a daughter, Osnat.

MIDDLE EAST

Gaza
Strip
crossing
attacked

BY IBRAHIM BARZAK

Associated Press

GAZA CITY; Gaza Strip
Palestinian militants.

attacked the Gaza Strip’s

main cargo crossing with

mortar fire early Tuesday,

lightly wounding an Israeli

truck driver in the latest

flare-up of violence in the

| coastal strip.

The attack on the Karni

crossing came shortly after

| warring Palestinian factions

| resumed their violent

| ‘infighting following a one-"

week pause, and gunmen

abducted a foreign news

photographer.

The Israeli army said the
mortar attack hit a truck that
was delivering building
materials to Gaza. It said the
attack did not disrupt the
flow of goods into Gaza.

Israeli Prime Minister
Ehud Olmert has pledged to
increase the movement of
goods in and out of Gaza in
an effort to boost the moder-
ate Palestinian president,
Mahmoud Abbas, in his
power struggle with the
Islamic militant group
Hamas.

There was no claim of
responsibility for the attack.
Medical officials said the
truck’s driver was lightly |
wounded and taken to a hos-
pital.

Karni is the main transit
point for Gaza’s imports and
exports, and is critical to the
area’s fragile economy. Traf-
fic through the crossing has
been severely restricted dur-
ing months of fighting
between Israel and Palestin-
ian militants.

Internal Palestinian ten-
sions also have erupted into
violence over the past
month.

Late Monday, clashes in
the Jebaliya refugee camp
near Gaza City broke a
weeklong lull in the contfron-
tation between Hamas,
which controls the govern-
ment, and Abbas’ Fatah. In
the past few weeks, 17 peo-
ple have been killed in the
internal fighting, leading to
fears of civil war.

At least two people were
wounded in the gunfire on
Monday, security officials
said, and media reports said
18 Hamas gunmen and four
from Fatah were kidnapped.
Seven of the Hamas mili-
tants were later freed.

In the past, kidnapped
militants have usually been
released unharmed



PR ES ES SE TE ES TT



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS





_U.S. NEWS

RIC FRANCIS/AP FILE, 2005

OPERATIONS AFTER KATRINA: A police officer wears a two-way radio at a temporary command operation set up outside
Harrah’s Casino in New Orleans in September 2005 following Hurricane Katrina.

Few high marks for responders

BY DEVLIN BARRETT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Only
six of 75 U.S. metropolitan
areas won the highest grades
for their emergency agencies’
ability to communicate during
a disaster, five years after the
Sept. ll terrorist attacks,
according to a federal report
obtained Tuesday by The
Associated Press.

A draft portion of the
report, to be released today,
gives the best ratings to Wash-
ington, D.C.; San Diego; Min-
neapolis-St. Paul; Columbus,
Ohio; Sioux Falls, S.D., and
Laramie County, Wyo.

The lowest scores went to
Chicago; Cleveland; Baton
Rouge, La.; Mandan, N.D., and
American Samoa. The report
included large and small cities
and their suburbs, along with
US. territories.

POLICIES IN PLACE

In‘an overview, the report
said:all 75:areas surveyed have

CONGRESS

Lobbyists

BY JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — New
Democratic lawmakers aren’t
the only ones measuring for
drapes and unsealing boxes.
In a job-swapping cycle
unseen for some time, Demo-
cratic congressional aides and
former members are leaping
to lucrative lobbying posts,
Democratic lobbyists are grab-
bing for influential jobs in
Congress and advocacy
groups are waging bidding
wars for the best talent.
Call it a six-year itch.
Washington’s $2.3 billion
lobbying industry is undergo-
ing one of its periodic adjust-
ments to shifts in government
power — the first since the
White House changed hands
in 2001. Accustomed to deal-
ing with Republicans and at
times discouraged by Republi-
can lawmakers from hiring
Democrats, lobbying firms and
business groups are now fill-
ing their ranks with policy
experts and lobbyists more
closely aligned with the new
leadership on Capitol Hill. —
“Nobody on our side is tell-
ing them fire the Republicans,
but they certainly understand

CAMPAIGN 2008

policies in place for helping
their emergency workers com-
municate. But it cautioned that
regular testing and exercises
are heeded “‘to effectively link
disparate systems.” .

It also said that while coop-
eration among emergency
workers is strong, “formalized
governance [leadership and
planning] across regions has

lagged.”
The study, conducted by
the Homeland Security

Department, was likely to add
fuel to what looms as a battle
in Congress this year. Demo-
crats who take over the major-
ity this week have promised to
try fixing the problem emer-
gency agencies have commu-
nicating with each other but
have not said specifically what
they will do, how much it will
cost or how they will pay for
it.

“Five years after 9/ll, we
continue to turn a deaf ear to
gaps in interoperable commu-
nications,” — the term used

for emergency agencies’ abili-
ties to talk to each other, said
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.
“If it didn’t have such poten-
tially devastating conse-
quences, it would be laugh-
able.”

Homeland Security spokes-
man Russ Knocke would not
comment on the report, saying
only that in releasing it today ,
Homeland Security Secretary
Michael Chertoff will “talk
about nationwide assessments
for interoperable communica-
tions.”

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001,
revealed major problems in
how well emergency agencies
were able to talk to each other
during a catastrophe. Many
firefighters climbing the
World Trade Center towers
died when they were unable to
hear police radio warnings to
leave the crumbling buildings.

In New York now, the
report said, first responders
were found to have well-estab-
lished systems to communi-

adapt to party shift

they need to have a bipartisan
team if they want to get any-
thing done,” said Steve Elmen-
dorf, a top advisor to former
Rep. Richard Gephardt,
D-Mo., who took up lobbying
with Bryan Cave Strategies
last year and opened his own
shop after the election.

The changes under way can
be felt all the way to the top of
influential organizations.

The Alliance of Automobile
Manufacturers last month
named former Democratic
Rep. Dave McCurdy of Okla-
homa as the trade group’s new
president. McCurdy left Con-
gress in 1994 and mounted an
unsuccessful run for Senate.

Some lobbying firms
already have a head start. For
example, the Federalist Group,
a Republican firm, hired for-
mer Louisiana Democratic
Rep. Chris John in March and
is now adding more Demo-
crats.

“The firms that will be in
trouble are the ones that
stayed the course — you can
use those three words, ‘stayed
the course’ and were
blinded by what was happen-
ing in the Congress,” said
John, one of the leaders of the

Guiliani’s strategy

WASHINGTON — (AP) —
The presidential campaign
strategy for former New York’
Mayor Rudy
Giuliani
complete with
a $100 million
fundraising
target for this
year — is out |
of the bag.

The 140-
page schedule
for the Repub-
lican’s budding presidential
bid was reported in Tuesday’s
editions of the New York
Daily News.

The paper said an anony-
mous source obtained the doc-
ument after it was left behind



GIULIANI

on a campaign swing in 2006,
but Giuliani spokeswoman
Sunny Mindel said it was actu-
ally pilfered from luggage
from a private flight.

“This wasn’t left in a hotel,”
Mindel told The Associated
Press. “This is clearly a dirty
trick.”

Mindel said that while
working on the 2006 campaign
trail, a Giuliani aide lost a
piece of luggage containing
the paper.

“After repeated requests
over the course of a few days,
the bag was finally returned
with the document inside.”

She did not say exactly
where or when the document
was lost, or what was in it, but

moderate to conservative Blue
Dog Democrats in the House.

“Those are the ones that
are going to be hurt.”

The Federalist Group, a
subsidiary of Ogilvy Public
Relations Worldwide, will
now become Ogilvy Govern-
ment Relations, shedding a
name that had become synon-
ymous with Republican lobby-
ing. John also recently hired
Moses Mercado, deputy exec-
utive director of the Demo-
cratic National Committee.

Some lobbyists concede
that after years of seeking to
influence Republicans, those
lobbying firms and trade
groups predominantly made
up of Republicans will have to
work harder to be heard.

Still, the reality in Washing-
ton is that neither side holds
the upper hand.

A Republican president still
has the White House and the
51-49 Democratic margin in
the Senate is so slim that any
substantive legislation would
require a bloc of GOP votes.

“Anything you do in this
town, you have to work both
sides of the aisle,” said Bruce
Josten, the top lobbyist for the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

revealed

Mindel played down its
importance, saying it is “sim-
ply someone’s ideas which
were committed to paper over
three months ago.”

The Daily News said the
schedule includes a plan to
raise at least $100 million in
2007 by reeling in major GOP
donors such as Lew Eisenberg
and Larry Bathgate, both from
New Jersey, and Fred Smith,
the CEO of FedEx. Those
three are already supporting
Arizona Sen. John McCain’s
bid.

The document also predicts
some $100 million could be
spent against Giuliani to high-
light political vulnerabilities
like his three marriages.

LT A SIT TO TE

cate among each other — but
not the best possible. Thirteen
U.S. cities scored better than
New York.

In the study, communities
were judged in three catego-
ries: operating procedures in
place, use of communications
systems and how effectively
local governments have coor-
dinated in preparation for a
disaster.

SOUTH FLORIDA

South Florida — Monroe,
Miami-Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties — did
better than Jacksonville and
Tampa in all three areas.

Overall, 16 percent of the
communities were given the
highest score for the commu-
nications procedures they
have in place and 1 percent got
the lowest rating.

Nineteen percent got the
top grade for their plans for
coordinating during a disaster
and 8 percent received the
worst.

FOOD SAFETY

BY LIBBY QUAID
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Mau-
reen Cohen read a newspaper
article about cancer-causing
acrylamide in her kids’ favor-
ite snacks and wanted to know
more.

“I just got curious,” said
Cohen, a mother of three in
Vienna, Va. “If it’s known that
it’s a cancer-causing sub-
stance, I sure would like some-
body to look into it and find
out.”

Acrylamide turns up in all
kinds of foods, including

breakfast cereals, cookies and
crackers. But it’s difficult for
consumers to figure out how
much acrylamide is in a partic-
ular meal or snack.

Nobody puts acrylamide in
food. The chemical is a natural
byproduct of cooking starchy
food at high temperature.

So while you might find
acrylamide in potatoes that
are fried or baked at high tem-
peratures, you might not find
it in potatoes that are boiled
and mashed.

French fries and potato
chips already are well up on
the list of bad-for-you foods.

Acrylamide also forms in
plenty of other starches, like
the toasted oats in Cheerios,
the flour in hard pretzels or
even the sweet potatoes in
Gerber Tender Harvest
organic baby food.

But compared with other
worrisome chemicals in food,
such as mercury in fish or ben-
zene in soda, relatively little is
known about how acrylamide
forms, how it affects people or
what to do about it. High lev-
els of acrylamide in food were
first reported by Swedish
researchers in 2002.

Cohen looked on the Food

and Drug Administration web-"
sité to see how much acrylam-
ide was in her potato chips — ©

french fries, potato chips, |

INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007. | 7A.

Alarm raised over
chemical found
in some foods

reduced-fat Pringles — but
that kind of Pringles wasn’t
listed. She called the company
but was told to provide a letter
from her doctor. Then she
mentioned it to her father-in-
law, who works for a nutrition
and health advocacy group,
the Center for Science in the
Public Interest.

Already aware of the chem-
ical, CSPI began surveying
manufacturers of 30 products.
None provided information on
how much acrylamide is cur-
rently in their products.

Now the group wants the
government to publish more
data on acrylamide in major
brands. The most recent FDA
data on brand-name foods is
more than two years old.

Consumers, especially par-
ents of young children, need
the information so they can
pressure companies to reduce
the amount of acrylamide in
food, the center’s executive
director said last month in a
letter to the FDA.

“Consumers rely on the
government to ensure the
safety of these products, and
the government simply isn’t
doing it,” said CSPI’s Michael
Jacobsen.

the FDA said it is research-
ing whether acrylamide poses
a health risk to people. The
agency’s focus is to calculate
exposure to the chemical.

“We have already done
extensive sampling to make
this determination on expo-
sure,’ FDA spokeswoman
Julie Zawisza said. “We don’t
believe additional sampling
will inform our exposure
assessment significantly.”

Also unknown is exactly
how acrylamide affects people
— studies have shown it
causes cancer in lab mice and
rats. Yet studies that looked at
specific cancers in people
have not shown there is a link
to acrylamide.









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e BRAZIL

EFS



Troops may be used
to fight gang violence

From Miami Herald Wire Services

RIO DE JANEIRO — Rio de Janeiro’s new government and
Brazil’s top security official will meet today to discuss send-
ing federal troops to the city to combat a wave of gang vio-
lence that President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has called “ter-

rorism,” officials said.

National Security Secretary Luiz Fernando Correa and Rio
de Janeiro State Security Secretary José Mariano Beltrame
will weigh options on how to crack down on gangs in this
morning’s meetings, the press office of Rio’s public safety

department said Tuesday.

Correa will consider “a series of projects, including the
possibility of sending National Security Forces to operate in

the state,” Beltrame said.

Last week, drug gangs opened fire on police stations and
set fire to buses in attacks that left 19 people dead and have
hurt tourism in Rio, Brazil’s second-largest city. Eight victims
were bus passengers whose bodies were charred beyond rec-

ognition.

Late Tuesday, assailants ordered passengers off a bus then
set it on fire in Sao Joao de Meriti, a crime-infested suburb on
the outskirts of Rio, the Folha online news service said. No
one was injured. Police were not immediately available to

confirm the attack.

The attacks have been attributed to Rio’s drug gangs
angered by increased pressure from anti-criminal militias,
reportedly run by former and active duty police officers and

soldiers.

Authorities are concerned whether police can guarantee
security as Rio prepares to host a Mercosur trade bloc sum-
mit, the 2007 Pan American Games and its annual five-day _

Carnival bash.

e VENEZUELA

BATTLE FOR CONTROL
OF PRISON KILLS 16

CARACAS — Rival gangs
battled for control of a
prison in eastern Venezuela
Tuesday, killing 16 inmates
and injuring 13, authorities
said Tuesday.

Fanny Marquez, a federal
prison official, said some
inmates were killed with
guns and knives and others
were hanged before prison
authorities regained control
of Uribana Prison near the
city of Barquisimeto, 175
miles west of the capital of... _,
Caracas. National Guard
troops restored order Tues-,

broke out overnight,
Marquez told the state-run
Bolivarian News Agency.

“Tt was a fight for control
of two cellblocks,” Marquez
said. “We have the situation
under control.”

Violence is common in
Venezuela’s overcrowded

e MEXICO

OFFICERS DISPATCHED
TO QUELL VIOLENCE

in Mexico’s violent border
city of Tijuana said Tuesday
that 300 federal police offi-
cers had arrived to help
combat organized crime.

Felipe Calderén also sent
federal police to central
Michoacan state to fight
drug traffickers. Tijuana
Mayor Jorge Hank Rhon
said he would like federal
authorities to join regular

patrols and security check-
points being established ran-

...domly around the city.

day morning after the riot guess iso." ar \;

e COLOMBIA

FOUR LEADERS SHOT

BY LEFTIST REBELS



els dragged four community
leaders from their homes
and shot them in a park in
rural Colombia, authorities



TIJUANA — Authorities

Last month, President



BOGOTA — Leftist reb-





and understaffed prisons, said. In a separate incident, a
where about 20,000 inmates police officer was killed in a
live in 30 facilities built to gun battle with rebels,

hold 15,000. police said.
VENEZUELA

Cardinal pleads to
keep station on air

CARA-
CAS — (AP)
— Venezue-
la’s top
Roman Cath-
olic prelate
urged Presi-
dent Hugo
Chavez’s.
government
to reconsider a decision not to
renew the broadcast license of
an opposition-aligned televi-
sion station, saying in com-
ments published Tuesday that
the move would hurt freedom
of expression.

“The country wins if there
are different media and there
is complete freedom of opin-
ion,” Cardinal Jorge Urosa
Savino was quoted as saying in
the Venezuelan newspaper El



CHAVEZ

Universal. “It’s necessary that |

this decision that has yet to
take effect be revised.”

Chavez announced last
week that the government
would not renew the license
for Radio Caracas Television,
or RCTV, when it expires in
May.

Information Minister Wil-
lian Lara, responding to Urosa
Savino’s comments Tuesday,
said the decision not to renew
RCTV’s concession was “irre-
versible” and “indisputable.”

Lara also denied that the
diversity of the nation’s media
is threatened, saying that the
total number of radio, TV,
Internet and print outlets has
increased in recent years.

RCTV is one of two major
private channels — along with

Globovisi6n — that remain
vehemently critical of
Chavéz’s leftist administra-
tion.

During a 2002 coup that
briefly ousted Chavez, several
private channels broadcast
regular programs like cartoons
and movies instead of the
leader’s return to power dur-
ing gidnt street protests. Pro-
Chavez mobs gathered outside
TV stations, including RCTV,
during the coup, shouting
insults and in some cases hurl-
ing rocks.

Two other privately owned
channels, Televen and Venevi-
sién, once were fiercely anti-
Chavez but have become less
so since an opposition-led
strike failed to unseat Chavez
in 2003.

Government officials have
denied the RCTV decision is
political, saying the channel’s
license is simply expiring May
28.

The station argues it has a
legal right to continue broad-
casting for years to come.

Lara said last week that the
government is considering
turning over the channel used
by RCTV to community
media, using it for a half-pub-
lic, half-private channel, or for
a state-run entertainment sta-
tion.

The press freedom group
Reporters Without Borders
said in a statement Tuesday
that “no decision should be
taken without the agreement
of RCTV’s owners.”

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION

CUBA

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

‘Funereal’ future in the cards?

BY RUI FERREIRA
El Nuevo Herald

In separate and virtually
competing new-year predic-
tions, two groups of Cuban
Santeria priests are predicting
a “funereal” future but also an
“ideal” moment for an eco-
nomic recovery.

The island’s babalawos
have long been split into sev-
eral groups, with one group:
relatively loyal to the govern-
ment. But their annual predic-
tions nevertheless are anx-
iously awaited by the many
Cubans who practice the mix-
ture of African and Catholic
religions.

This year, the predictions
were awaited with special
interest because of Fidel Cas-
tro’s still-unknown ailment,
which has kept him out of the
public eye since July 26 and
sparked speculation that he’s
seriously ill.

On Monday, the Yoruba
priests who make up the rela-
tively independent Commis-
sion for the Year’s Letter
announced that 2007 would be
marked by wars and “military
interventions” although the
island will see an economic
improvement based on the
discovery of oil and mineral
deposits.

While they refused to speak
specifically about Castro’s
health, babalawo Lazaro
Cuesta, who read the year’s
prediction, made comments
that seemed to be directed at
the Cuban leader’s ailment.

“The panorama that pre-
sents itself to us is a little fune-
real,” he said. “When one

EL SALVADOR

doesn’t leave his place at its
proper time, one runs the risk
that unpredictable things hap-
pen.”

Castro surrendered power
for the first time in 47 years
after undergoing intestinal
surgery in late July. A Spanish
surgeon who visited him two
weeks ago said Castro was
recovering from “complica-
tions” following “very grave
surgery.”

The 80-year-old Castro
turned over most of his power
temporarily to his younger
brother Raul, who is believed
by many Cuba-watchers to be
more willing than his brother
to open the island’s economy
to more market forces.

“Twas powerfully
impressed that they [the baba-

lawos] were so categoric on



this,” said Maria I. Faguaga
Iglesias, a Havana anthropolo-
gist who took part in the pro-
cess of developing the com-
mission’s predictions.

Although the Cuban baba-
lawos usually avoid making
statements with political
implications, this year they
raised eyebrows when they
called for more care and atten-
tion to the island’s youth
“because today’s youth will be
called to rule from a house to a
country in the not-too-distant
future.”

The babalawos’ comments
coincided with recent state-
ments by Raul Castro that the
generation that fought in and
led the Castro revolution is
reaching the end of its time
“and we must give way to new
generations.”

FORECAST: Lazaro
Cuesta, a Santeria
priest, shows his
predictions for Cuba in
2007 at his house in
Havana on Tuesday.
Top priests of Cuba’s
African-influenced
Santeria religion issued
their yearly forecast,
including Fidel Castro’s
health and the
economy.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Meanwhile, the Cuban
Council of Senior Ifa Priests,
considered to be more loyal to
the government, said its pre-
dictions “speak of legal prob-
lems and their repercussions,
which could bring as a conce-
quence an increase in corrup-
tion and crime.”

A third group of babalawos
in Miami, which will make its
own predictions public today,
said the true forecast falls
somewhere between the two
Havana groups.

“If we take a piece of each
letter to make up one real let-
ter, if out of all this mess we
take a little bit of each, this
year, simply put, the letter is
predicting something bad,”
said Miami babalawo José
Montoya.



EDGAR ROMERO/AP

MORTARS ON EXHIBIT: An unidentified U.S. soldier looks at mortars on display at the Museum of the Revolution in
Perquin, El Salvador. Perquin was considered the ‘guerrilla capital’ during the country’s 12-year civil war.

Civil war is tourism draw

BY DIEGO MENDEZ
Associated Press

PERQUIN, El Salvador —
Gun fragments, photos, com-
bat plans and mountain
hide-outs. These are the latest
tourist attractions in formerly
war-torn El Salvador.

The country has been at
peace since 1992. But the 12-
year civil war left 76,000 dead,
thousands injured and an
imprint of violence on the
country that residents in eco-
nomically depressed areas are
trying to turn into a profit.

For a fee, former guerrillas
will take visitors on tours of
former battlefields or moun-
tain hide-outs, while museums
display war memorabilia. The
government has applauded the
effort as a way to draw more
tourists to El Salvador.

‘PEACE ROUTE’

The former Farabundo
Marti National Liberation
Front, or FMLN, which led the
guerrilla uprising, has teamed
up with local business leaders
to create the so-called “peace
route.”

The mountain town of Per-
quin, 175 miles east of San Sal-
vador, was considered the
“guerrilla capital” during the
fighting, and it served as the
FMLN’s headquarters. Today,
it is home to the “Museum of
the Revolution,” and features

cannons, uniforms, pieces of
Soviet weaponry and other
weapons of war once used by
the FMLN.

“The objective of the
museum is simply to serve as a
point of historical reference
‘for future generations,” said
Rolando Caceres, the muse-
um’s director.

The museum — a small,
adobe house — was founded
in the mid-1990s, but has
become increasingly popular
with visitors, both foreign and
Salvadoran.



LUIS ROMERO/AP FILE, 2006

GUERRILLA MUSEUM: Carlos Enrique Consalvi, a former
announcer for the guerrilla-run We Will Win Radio,
opened his own museum to display video, audio and
photos from El Salvador’s civil war.

“We came to learn the real
history of our country,” said
Stephanie Acevedo, on a field
trip with 180 other students.

Amanda Navarro, who has
lived in New York for the past
35 years, said she hadn’t been
back to El Salvador for years
and “the first thing that I
wanted to do was come to the
museum.” She said she had
wanted to know the real story
of her country’s conflict.

In San Salvador, Carlos
Enrique Consalvi, a former
announcer for the guerrilla-

run We Will Win Radio,
opened his own museum to
display video, audio and pho-
tos from the conflict. The
museum also includes a
library and writings about the
war.

MAKING A CONTRIBUTION

“This is an independent
effort on the part of civil soci-
ety to contribute something to
the history of the country,”
Consalvi said.

In the northern area of
Chalatenango, another group
of former guerrillas recently
formed a cooperative to
restore a series of mountain
caves and other bunkers used
for everything from hospitals
to hide-outs. The group even
built small cabins for visitors
who want to spend the night.

Tourism Minister Rubén
Rochi applauds efforts, argu-
ing that anything that pro-
motes tourism in E] Salvador
is good. The tiny country is
the first in Central America to
build a tourism industry
around its former civil war
history.

Between 1996 and 2006, 7.3
million visitors helped gener-
ated a record $1.7 billion.

Most tourists are seeking
out El Salvador’s beaches, but
more and more are becoming
interested in the country’s
infamous past.



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



amily requests for Labour Day to be

renamed in Sir Randol Fawkes honour

A WEEK away from the
celebration of Majority Rule
Day on January 10, the family
of Sir Randol Fawkes is
requesting that the Govern-
ment enact legislation to
rename Labour Day in his
honour.

As one of the chief archi-
tects of majority rule, Sir Ran-
dol was instrumental in bring-
ing into existence the first
black government of the
Bahamas.

He is also the recognised
father of the Free Trade
Union Movement, which is
still a formidable force in the
country.

It is because of Sir Randol
Fawkes that a bill was piloted
through the House of Assem-
bly making Labour Day a paid
public holiday.

In 1967, as an elected
Labour leader, he and Alvin
Braynen broké the deadlock
between the United Bahami-
an Party (UBP) and the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party (PLP)
by throwing their vote in with
the PLP.

A spokesperson for the
family said in a release yes-
terday that naming the holi-
day Sir Randol Fawkes
Labour Day would be a fit-
ting way to celebrate and hon-
our Sir Randol’s legacy and
would also be a testament to
his work with the oppressed
labouring masses and to the
Labour vote that he gave to
the Progressive Liberal Party
in 1967.

As the Bahamas prepares
to celebrate Majority Rule



Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE |
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.0.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

1962, Unemployment March.

Day, the family has asked that
the public takes the time to
reflect on the struggle that
caused “our forefathers to
have to rise up against a sys-
tem that did not recognise the
dignity and self-worth of each
individual.




an ayaa anal

MONTE ALCION THOMPSON, 34

a resident of Gleniston
Gardens, will be held at
Zion Baptist Church,
East and Shirley Streets,
on Thursday, January 4,
2007 at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev.
T.G. Morrison.
Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Cherished memory held
by his son, Alcion Jai;
father, Monte
Thompson; mother,
Marilyn Olga Smith;



grandparents, Donald and Emily Aranha; two sisters,
Shekcatha and Tamica Thompson; two adopted brothers,
Sean Saunders and Mario Duncan; five uncles, Fred Paul,
Anthony Plakaris, Tyrone Smith, Philip Ingraham Sr., and
Kenhugh Rolle; eight aunts, Gweneth Paul, Magnal,
Hermane and Velma Thompson, Althea Neely, Anna Smith,
Carmetta Ingraham and Antonia Lesbott; two grandaunts,
Vera Smith and Vernell Stubbs; two godmothers, Julia

Outten and Barbara Neeley.

A host of other relatives and friends including Kirkwood
and Kailecia Thompson, Anthony II, Ajike, Adrian and
Alexander Plakaris, Claudine Cayden and Donavan Moxey,
Mark, Makyle, Simone, Sharia, Shamaal, Doyle Paul,
Garnett and Sandrene OCoghiel, Della Reese and Patrick
Carey, Sonobia Williams, Quintyann, TJ, Tyrell, Sean,
Tenniel and Jermaine, Britney, Tamika, Jr, Frisco, Delvano,
Laroona Trembley, Danielle and Maurcio Thompson,
Larandel, CJ, LJ and Tevin, Andrew, Alfred and Charlene
- Stubbs, Elizabeth Aranha, Beryl Russell, Keto Aranha,
Susan O'Brien, Therese Broomsfield, Dianne Rolle, Perry
Smith, Iesha Percentie, Brad Smith, Henrietta Smith and
family, Carolyn and Elliott Johnson, Corine Stewart and
family, Lamont Fisher and the Boys of Golden Gates #2,
Stephen Outten, Pamela Randle, Simone Outten, Sheryl
Smith and family, Dorothy Russell, Maggie Martin, Erika
Brown, Sylvano, Patrico, Treco, Ray and Lil Phil Grant,
Anthony Rolle, Quinten, Carvin, Ritchie and Kevin Gray, '
management and staff of Botanical Gardens, Heather Grant
and family, \Wilkeisha Dorsette and family, Julia Bain,
Carolyn Demeritte, Beverley Bain, Anna Dola Smith,
William and Philmon Wilson and family, Philip and Mary
Moxey, Mae Armbrister and family, Dolly Foster and family,
Ruth Miller and family, Orville Gibson and family, Alfred
and Gloria Brown and family, Evelyn Deveaux and family,
Jason Stubbs, Ann Stubbs and family, Bernice Roker Collins
and family, Kenneth Poitier and family, Henrietta Poitier
and family, Magnus Swan, Leon Sweeting, Elvia Hart and
family, Daphne Lamm and family, Adelma Penn family,
Frances Johnson and family, Yvonne Roberts and family,
Kathy Davis and family, Clarice Verence and family, Kendal
Marshall, Cheyanne Bain and family and the entire Bain
Town, Golden Gates #2 and Peter Avenue communities.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on
Wednesday from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the
church on Thursday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

NINES CMD TREN. ORT LMT LLN CAI i Tt TRA TONLE OEE USAR ORR RN AU 4

@ ABOVE: Sir Randol Fawkes is hoisted above heads during the

@ RIGHT: Sir Randol Fawkes

“The values that these men
displayed should be enshrined
and preserved so as be a
source of inspiration to the
young people who will have
to continue with the nation
building that was started so
many years ago.

“Carter Woodson, better
known as the father of Black
History, once said that, those
who have no record of what
their forebears have accom-
plished lose the inspiration
which comes from the teach-
ing of biography and history,”
the family said.

KEMPS FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE
JOAN EUNICE ALBURY, 83




of Buen Retiro Road,
Nassau, The Bahamas
who died on December
31, 2006 at her
residence, will be held
at Ebenezer Methodist
Church, East Shirley
Street, Nassau, on
Friday, Janaury 5, 2007
-at 3:00 p.m.








Pastor Martin Loyley
and Reverend Charles A. Sweeting will officiate
and interment will be in Ebenezer Methodist
Cemetery, East Shirley Street, Nassau. ~





Mrs. Albury is predeceased by her husband, Dr.
E. Paul Albury; brothers, Philip, Frederick,
Lester, Neville and Godfrey Brown; a sister,
Angela Brown and is survived by her sons,
Daniel and Lester Albury; daughters, Anne
Lawlor and Elizabeth Smith; grandsons,
Benjamin and Paul Albury; granddaughters,
Lisa and Vikki Lawlor, Cathy Dorton, Susan
Lakeman, Kristen Albury, Laura and Sarah
Smith; great granddaughter, Dejay Albury; great
grandson, Christopher Lawlor; brothers, Anton
and Geoffrey Brown Sr.; sisters, Barbara and
Sylvia Brown; son-in-law, James Lawlor;
daughter-in-law, Denise Albury, grand daughter-
in-law, Carla Albury; sisters-in-law, Dorothea,
Mary and Geraldine Brown, Louise and Lorraine
Albury; numerous nephews, nieces, cousins and
many other relatives and special friends
including, Marsha Stewart, Nancy Cleare, Violet
Esfakis and Pearline Adderley, Bruce Smith,
Rosamund Sandbrook, Alice Bates and Maxine
Kerr and Bridgette Knowles (Deceased).























Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be made to The Bahamas Historical
Society, P.O. Box SS-6833, Nassau, Bahamas
in memory of Joan E. Albury.







2 acpeadan ee ecenesesecssenececvcescccsecconeccecasccccenscceccnccecnceseucesevecsaseresscccsssccessessscosoese,

Family hits out
FROM page one

“The Fawkes family is ask-
ing that Sir Randol’s contribu-
tion not be ignored or misrep-
resented. .

“The years of service and
sacrifice given to the country
should be acknowledged at
some point by a grateful peo-
ple. The freedoms and privi-
leges that black Bahamians
now enjoy and the right to gov-
ern themselves should not be .
taken for granted as they were
not given to the people but
obtained for them through the
personal sacrifice of coura-
geous individuals.

“The bravery of all who left
the comfort of their homes to
challenge the governing and
repressive regime of the day,
who fought to break down bar-
riers, who were ostracized for
the stance that they took, and
who put their lives and the
lives of their family on the line
must not be forgotten,” a
spokes person for the family
said in a release yesterday.

According to the family,
Lady Fawkes spoke with Prime
Minister Perry Christie in June
of 2004 at a ceremony that was
held at Workers’ House to
launch the Memorial Edition
of The Faith That Moved the
Mountain, a book authored by
her late husband.

“Lady Fawkes recalls that
on that occasion, the Prime
Minister made an appearance
at the conclusion of the cere-
mony and when she inquired
about national recognition for
the contributions that her hus-
band had made to this coun-
try, she was told by Mr Christie
:. that the Cultural Commission
had made.a recommendation
with regard to memorializing
Sir Randol’s contributions to
the nation and that he (Prime
Minister) was trying to get the
unanimous support of parlia-
mentarians for legislation to be
brought before the House of
Assembly,” the family
spokesperson said.

Lady Fawkes, according to
the spokesperson, said that she
never heard from Mr Christie
again and the family has not
been successful in obtaining an
appointment to meet with him.

The Fawkes family said that
they lived through a great his-
tory-making period in the
Bahamas and is shocked at
government’s frequent. omis-
sion of known facts.

Fears in Farm Road
over rise in crime

FROM page one

place around 8pm. The victim
was walking past a family mem-
ber’s home when a gold-
coloured vehicle pulled up. “As
the vehicle pulled up the occu-

« pants in the car fired shots and

the victim was hit multiple
times about the body,” Inspec-
tor Evan reported.

One of Mr Eve’s family
members said she was sitting

* nearby when he was shot. After

witnessing the shooting, the
family member said she was
shaken to the core. “Iam a
wreck,” she admitted.

After the perpetrators bran-
dished their weapons, she said
all she could do was scramble to
get inside. “They emptied out
about eight bullets on him,” she
reported.

The family member, who
herself has a son, said she is
worried that the same fate may
befall him as he returns late
from work every night.

“Every night it’s gun shoot-
ing. How could I feel safe?” she
asked. “I don’t even know why
this happened, because he
(Eve) never bothered any-
body.”

When asked about the police
presence in the neighbourhood
she said that the police needed
to have a stronger presence in
that area.

“The police need to do a bet-
ter job, this is the time they
should be coming now,” she
said.

Mr Eve's niece, who also
lives in the area, said loss of his
presence has left a void in her
life.

Describing him as a happy,

cheerful person, she said she

was absolutely shocked when
the news of the shooting
reached her.

“Tam in so much shock
because he wasn’t a part of any-
thing like that. He was such an
innocent person, he never both-
ered anyone,” she said.

This incident follows just
hours after the first murder of
the year and a week after the
shooting death of Cecil Coakley
rocked the neighbourhood.

Coakley, 28, was shot to
death on Christmas Day, just a
week before this most recent
shooting.

the deceased, said she heard
the shots, but had no idea that
it was her son who was killed.

“The people in the road was
standing up looking, and they
said that it was Cecil who was
shot.”

Every year, Christmas will be
marred by this tragedy she said.
“We will always remember
that.”

Surprised that her son was

- gunned down, she said, “He

didn’t have no dealings with
anyone like that with violence.
If he did he would have never
been walking on the streets like
that.”

The crime in the neighbour-
hood is “ridiculous,” she said.
“We are always hearing guns
going off. The police need to
do something with it, betause
too much young people are
dying.”

Ms Ferguson, who was emo-
tionally calm during the inter-
view, said, “God is holding me
up, but we are feeling it. I
standing here because of God.”

Another family member said
in their neighbourhood the
blood of one person does not
have a chance to dry before the
blood of another is spilled.

David Deveaux, Second in
Command at the Central Police
Station, admitted that the com-
munity is in trouble. “There’s
obviously a problem,” he said.

Yesterday, members of the
police force, and the depart-
ment of Social Services
patrolled the area surrounding
Flint Street in an effort to calm
the fears of the residents in the
neighbourhood.

After the patrol, Inspector
Evans said, “No home will be
rendered unsafe and it is the
thrust the police ensure that.
We wish to reassure the com-
munity of our presence and
support. We cannot have a few
persons making us live in fear
of our community. Crime is not
necessarily an issue in the |
Bahamas it’s the fear of crime
that pervades, and it’s the
organisation’s goal to ensure
that that fear is eliminated.”

ASP Stephen Dean, coordi-
nator of the Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project, said that
nothing could substitute the
presence of police and efforts to
patrol the neighbourhood
would continue indefinitely.



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiainiHerald.com

GARFIELD

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I PUT MY PANTS | x
ON BACKWARDS } fr
SN AGAIN



DILBERT .

HOW'S YOUR
DIET COMING
ALONG?

scottadams@aol.com

www.dilbert.com





{©2007 CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC. wvew.cre ators. coun





ALL THEY EVER DO Is EAT!
ALL THEY ve THINK
ABOUT iS EATING!





xing Fealures Syndcele, inc. Word gis ‘eserves

2006 by



WHEN I WAS INTERNING IN
AFGHANISTAN, I LAUNCHEP
A HELLAIRE MISSILE BY MIS-
TAKE. SOL GOT A BAD WRITE
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HOROSCOPE

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY: Your path
ahead may be filled with bliss if you remain
realistic and keep your feet planted firmly on
the ground. A romantic encounter could seem
too good to be true in February, so let time
pass and be sure you can trust your feelings.

i

° CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Play nice, chil-
dren. Today’s full moon could make you more
aware of how much you rely upon others.

* AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When you
explore new technologies or try sornething

JUMBLE



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ee ace
2007 Tribune te: i

All Rights Reserved

[ _LAMEY_

bok. t+
— Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as.

| CORBON
L nes S suggested by the above cartoon

Answer: THEY ae [ t 1 )”
SNS oS .

(Answers tomorrow)
AHEAD MAIZE We
What the tailor did with the foolbell siar —
“SIZED” HIM UP










CATBUD WHAT HAPPENED
TO THE BAKER'S
SALES WHEN THE

amc COVEN BROKE?

Jumbles
Answer:



Yesterday's





DI YoU KNOW THAT THE COURTS MUST HAVE
INTHE BIBLE, PEOPLE PEEN REALLY LIBERAL IN
Got PUNISHED BY THOSE DAYS |

GETTING SIONED*



ANP? THE TAX COLLECTOR WANTS TO
KNOW WHERE HE BURIEP IT /



(MARLENE ) My ASSISTANT
( TOLD YOU THAT?!

See YOU! J. (Nei
( WHO TOLD “V Tp
\ you THAT?! J 2S?
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DIVERSIONS

BY JIM DAVIS

AND ANOTHER NEW YEAR'S
RESOLUTION GOES BLOOEY





ayea1DUAS S$esd FessaAIUN AQ PAINQUISIC

AJNO SN_Zy98z 01 GTSIHVD Dal

BY SCOTT ADAMS

IT’S HARD TO PICK
THE ONE BEST DOUGHNUT
T’‘VE EVER HAD, BUT
THIS ONE IS IN MY
TOP FIVE.

.397 ©2007Scott Adams, Inc./Dist. by UFS, Inc.



BY JOHNNY HART









(ov CAN SAY
Oat AGAIN!







WAIT A MINUTE. SOME -
ONE HELP YOU ACCOUNT-
ABLE FOR MESSING UP ©






PESees
Badia Ie




OH, FOR PETE'S SAKE! WHY )
"00 YOU ALWAYS TRY TO
NO PIN ME DOWN?! IT WAS

S & ove DAY LAST WEEK!





werw.Bioncie.com

new, you will be happiest behind closed doors.

° PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Make a change.
Some of the goals you once thought highly
important could seem insignificant now.

° ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get behind the
eight ball. The season for family fun and vaca-
tions could be at an end.

* TAURUS (April 20-May 20): People enjoy
your wry sense of humor, generous nature and
vivid imagination.

¢ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As the lunar cycle
hits a peak you may add up all those holiday
costs, but recall all the joy it brought as well.

* CANCER (June 21-July 22): Friendships fulfill
a need. The full moon in your sign brings your
relationships with others into sharp focus.

» LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Look for a safe ref-
uge. This full moon could mark a time when
you crave peace and quiet.

¢ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A co-worker or
business acquaintance might have the creative
touch needed to pull off a business deal.

° LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The full moon
might shed some light on the numerous tasks
you manage each and every day.

* SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Ideas from the
internet, computer software or an electronic
gadget might make work run more smoothly.

e SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you take
the first step by sharing financial concerns with
a loved one, you may find that there is an alter-
native solution.

- My husband is the only man I have ever
slept with.

‘had an unhealt

‘I’m 47 now. I want to know, what makes a

‘ rooms, hangi

INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 | 9A.







ACES ON BRIDGE

NORTH Opening lead — ¥ king
2QJ56 :
v6 When I’m given problems to
@975 oN a oe whether
to to do the no g, or try
Sees to be brilliant. Here, some col-
WEST EAST leagues and I were given only
a3 4752 the West and North hands and
VAK854 ¥Q3932 asked to defend four spades
@K643 @J10g When partner (East) plays the
&AG3 &82 heart queen under the king.
My partner opined that
SOUTH dummy’s clubs looked danger-
4AK10984 ous. He suggested that West
Â¥107 needed to attack in diamonds,
@AQ2 playing partner for the queen
a7s and jack, before his club ace

was knocked out.

Another player pointed out
that if East had the queen and
jack of diamonds, that would
not leave South with much for

Vulnerable: East-West
Dealer: South

The bidding: the opening. bid, let alone his
free bid of four spades.
South West North East He suggested continuing
14 2Â¥ 3&8 49% with the heart ace, forcing
44 All pass +3 dummy to ruff. If declarer had
CHESS QUIZ





8
7
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WHITE WINS THE QUEEN
Hint: Kill on the seventh rank.

‘[90.
O1jSeD B1DIeD-Suodd OfayjeA] WSUIM YOZYO
"S LIX YOZIXY “7 LOM [YOBUH ‘| UOPNIOS

DEAR ABBY

Abby:

My husband returned from Iraq a few
days ago, and, of course, my parents wanted
to talk to him. Well, when they called, Dad
and Mom both made off-color comments to
me about our sex life. They always want to
joke about it, but I never do. It’s none of their
business.

I don’t discuss my sex We even with my
closest female friend. I believe sex is something
that is private between a husband and wife.

My parents, especially my father, always

iE RSAL .
Sudoku Puzzle

only six spades, then East had
three, and by _ shortening
dummy’s trumps, declarer
would have no outside entry to
dummy’s clubs. (East’s count
signal would indicate when to
take the ace.)

Relieved, our questioner
replied that this is what he had
done. But declarer let the heart
ace win. Now he ruffed the
heart continuation in hand,
played a club, and the hand
was all over. Declarer drew
trumps ending in dummy and
discarded his losing diamonds
on the clubs.

Now we all saw the point.
What West should have done
was continue with a low heart
to partner’s jack. Now if declar-
er fails to trump in dummy,
East can return a diamond
before the club ace is knocked
out, guaranteeing the defeat of
the contract.

—BOBBY WOLFF



CRE POLLO








Complete the grid
so every row,
column and

3x 3 box contains
every digit from }
to 9 inclusively.

RAY RENAN RECTAN .





| [5]
per

© NEM Kaight FratereyDasteioeted by Ueiversal Press Syndicate ; 2 #

this before. It’s kind of embarrassing. My guys
tease me, but I laugh it off.

Am I just getting older (which I don’t want to
admit) or out of practice? I’m not losing sleep
over this, just wondering why.

“Vince” in Vallejo, Calif.

It could be that you are out of practice,
or it could be something else. I am a firm
believer in intuition, and if yours is telling

ou that you should avoid heights, it could

e that your sense of balance is “off.”

“My advice is to schedule a physical exam
with your-doctor and discuss this change in

have some kind of dirty joke or question about a normal pattern of behavior. There could *

our relationship when I go home to visit, and
Iam tired of it. They are easily insulted and
angered, especially my father (who once
thought it would be funny to accuse me of
hopping into bed with my husband the first
chance I got while we were dating), so I can’t
just say, “I don’t like those jokes — stop it!”
What can I do? It always
makes for an embarrassing
moment.
Embarrassed in Tennessee
Leave eve
To paraphrase an old
saying, “Those who can,
do; those who can’t, talk
about it.” Your parents
may be trying to show you
how “with it” they are by making these
comments. Or your father may have always
y preoccupation with your

shoes, jewe
are, tell him



sex life.

They have no business asking you
personal questions about it. Therefore,
there is nothing wrong with telling them it
makes you “uncomfortable” and you want it
stopped. And if they take offense — so be it.
Let them sulk.




Dear Abby: .
I have been in construction since I was I9.

man lose his courage?

I started my own business two years ago,
and since then I have been doing mostly
interior work — remodeling kitchens, bath-
doors, etc. My most recent
job is a second-story add-on, and while I
have been working on it I have found myself
nervous about heights.

Ihave never been afraid of heights before,
but I was uneasy walking the walls and
working off a ladder. I have never felt like

CROSSWORD

ACROSS

1 Stereo components
5 Ref’s throw

9 Leave ina hurry,

52 Source of 3-D pictures?
53> MAJORS

57 Togetherness

58 Get excited, in a way

house. I’m afraid if I keep “reminding”
T'll come across as a mother figure.

e a physical reason for your sudden anxiety
about heights, and you should not ignore it.

Abby:

How do I get my husband to pick up his
belongings? His shoes, jewelry, and all sorts
of items of clothing are spread all over the

” him,
Terry in Houston

ing where it is, and when

your husband starts asking you where his
and other items of clothing
ey are right where he left
them. Once you begin picking them up and
putting them away, he will expect you to
continue for the rest of your life.

ANSWER TO TUESDAY’S PUZZLE:

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slangily 59 Responsibility
13. Lummox 60 Charged amount
14 Golden 61 Rams’ partners
15 Legion 62 Graceful architectural
16 MAJORS detail
19 Young __: tykes, in

dialect DOWN
20 Source of the Getty 1 Philatelist’s book

fortune 2 Honolulu’s Ala__,
21 “House” and “Little world’s largest open

House ...,” but not air shopping

“Full House” center
22 Streamer-decorated 3 Treads warily

post 4 Sault Marie
24 Polygraph flunker, 5 Ina weak way

probably 6 Calmed deceptively
25 MAJORS 7 Bar none
30 Like most old bread 8 Salon stuff
31 Santa’s sackful 9 Spade player
32 Teachers’ gp. 10 __ lily: calla
33 Civil engineer's subj. Il Light bulb, in comics
34 __ choy 12 Minus presumptuous "38 Heaven-sent food 48 Russia-Manchuria
35 Riverside 15 Pester 28 Fender bender: 39 Nonessential body border river
46 Picnic crasher 17 Reacted to a bad call, result tissues 49 One of Columbus's
: a with valence pai 29 Tibetan beast 40. Squeezed (out), as three

S dance craze 18 Spiritually enlighten 0 ¢ lst t | 50 Set d

AT MAJORS 23 Apothecary inventory 32. Course li wet towels et down
44 Convent residents item 33 Looker’s leg 42 Provoke 54 Pastrami holder
45 Hardly commonplace 24 Glance 34 OPEC units 43 Modest 55 Tree yielding elastic
48 Popular analgesic 26 Detached type 35 Action at Sotheby's 46 Debate wood
51 AOL rival 27 Not at all 37 Sharpness 47 Crinkly gauze fabric 56 Seek to gain, as fame



TOA_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 INTERNATIONALEDITION MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD








HEALTH & FITNESS

QUICK STUDY

THE QUESTION: How often
do breast cancer patients fail
to take a commonly pre-
scribed drug?

THE CONTEXT: Previous
studies have found that many
patients fail to take drugs as
prescribed. Anastrozole, sold
under the brand name Arimi-
dex, is commonly prescribed
to post-menopausal women
with early-stage breast can-
cer. The drug is taken oncea
day, and can cause a wide
range of side effects, including
joint pain, hot flashes, fatigue
and nausea.

THE STUDY: Using data

‘from a national commercial
health plan, researchers found
1,498 women with early-stage
breast cancer who received
new prescriptions for anastro-
zole between January 2002
and March 2004. They then

For information on conditions such as depression,
chronic pain or high blood pressure, visit www.
TheHealthCentralNetwork.com. The site has more
than 30 health and wellness Web properties, each in
simple language with interactive tools to help you

c manage and improve your
health. If you’re just seeking

*t Know About. . .
OLIDAY WEIGHT LOSS

] Today’s topic: Everybody’s favorite

studied patterns of prescrip-
tion refills to determine how
often the women would have
been without pills.

THE RESULTS: In the first
year of taking the drugs,
nearly one in five women took
their drugs less than 80 per-
cent of the time. For a smaller
group of women who were
tracked for three years, nearly
one in three took their drugs
less than 80 percent of the
time by the third year.

The study was presented
earlier this month at the San
Antonio Breast Cancer Sym-
posium. An abstract of the
study is available online at
www.abstracts
2view.com/sabcsO6/. In the
search box, type “adherence
anastrozole.”

— JACOB GOLDSTEIN
jgoldstein@MiamiHerald.com

New Year’s resolution: shedding
weight. The average person puts on 2-7
pounds around this festive period, says .
Sherry Torkos, author of Winning at
Weight Loss (Wiley) among other self-help
books. Not to worry — it’s only natural
because we spend more time socializing
(translation: stuffing faces).
Heed the tips you’ve heard through-
2 out the year, Torkos says. E.g., drink a
full glass of water before your meal.
Eat slowly to give your belly a chance to
send the message to your brain that you’re
sated. Fill up on greens (beans, broccoli,
salad) — they are both high in nutrients and
low in calories.
An added boost: Fiber, ingested
through food or supplements, is like a
bulletproof vest in the battle of the
bulge, Torkos says. ‘It helps to keep us feel-
ing full, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.‘
So you're less likely to freak out on your
mother in law.
4 Carb control: Torkos advises pop-



ping a starch neutralizer about 20

minutes before chowing down on
bread, potatoes, rice and the like. The tabs,
made from white kidney bean extract, help
to inhibit the digestive enzyme (alpha amy-
lase) before it can convert starch into glu-

JANE SNOWITH/MCT FILE

PLASTICSURGERY101
Droopy eyelid
requires expert

» Q:Ihave a self-diagnosed cosmetic/medical
condition. One eyelid droops considerably
when I am tired, 'stressed, etc. Based on my own
Internet research (I Googled “droopy eyelid”) I
think the condition is called ptosis. What is
_ involved in correcting it? What is the success
. rate? What are the risks?
_ A: Ptosis can be a congenital condition or
_ an acquired condition. Before you go about
fixing the problem it’s important to figure out
why you have the condition. If you have had it
for a long time it probably is not something to worry about.
However, I recommend that if you have true ptosis, a droopi-
ness of the eye lid, you should have a full work up to deter-
mine that it is benign. Ptosis can be caused by various types
of illnesses including brain tumors, aneurysms and some neu-
rological disorders. You should see an ophthalmologist to
determine the cause.

Now, once you know there is nothing seriously wrong, you
must determine whether you have a true ptosis. If your lid is
the cause of your droopy eye, repair should be done by some-
one who does this routinely. An Oculo-plastic surgeon is your
best bet. Oculo-plastic surgeons have very specifically
trained in both ophthalmology and plastic surgery of the eye.
If you choose a facial plastic surgeon or a plastic surgeon,
make sure you ask if they are experienced in repairing ptosis.
Ptosis repair is a complicated procedure and should be done
only when the difference between the eyes is significant
and/or you have a functional (trouble seeing) problem
because the repair may need some tweaking in the future.

If you have droopy eyes and you do not have true ptosis
you can have either a forehead lift for droopy eyebrows or a
blepharoplasty (eye lift) for droopy skin above your eyelids.
Ptosis repair may be done at the same time as a blepharo-
plasty, but each physician has his/her own preference.

Dr. Carlos Wolf is a board certified facial plastic surgeon
practicing in Miami. The advice in this column is not a substi-
tute for consulting a physician. Write to him at carloswolfmd@
‘aol.com.












JOCK DOC

Only orthopedist can tell

Q: I’m a high school wrestler who got a rib
_ injury. It hurts when I touch it and it bothers
me when I laugh or take a deep breath. I’m not
sure whether it is bruised or cracked. How long
.. will it take to heal?
|} | A: You need to see an orthopedic surgeon







; OR HARLAN to determine whether you have a bruise, mus-
_ SELESNICK: cle strain or fractured rib. The diagnosis will
ee _.. determine how long you will have to be out of

wrestling.

Q: I was doing a bench press when I felt a
sharp pain and a pop in my left shoulder. I have a lot bruising
and I’ve noticed that my pecs are not symmetrical any more. I
went to the emergency room where X-rays showed that nothing
was broken. However, I’m still feeling weakness and pain.
What should I do?

A: Ruptures of the pectoralis major tendon where it
attaches to the bone or the muscle itself are common weight-
lifting injuries. These injuries can also occur in sports such as
football or wrestling. If the tendon is pulled from the bone it
will usually require surgical repair for a successful result in
terms of. symmetry and strength. An MRI scan may be helpful
in establishing a correct diagnosis.

See your orthopedic surgeon as soon as possible because
surgery is easier if performed soon after the injury.

Dr. Harlan Selesnick is the Miami Heat physician. The
advice in this column is not a substitute for consulting a physi-
cian. Write to him at jockdoc69@aol.com.









cose (sugar), and then fat. Find ’em at phar-
macies or vitamin stores.
Stay active: Not necessarily a major
5 time investment. Torkos recommends
doing a 10 minute power walk out-
doors, or 10 minute marching or stair clim-
‘bing indoors. Follow with 20 leg lunges,
push-ups and squats, then repeat the
sequence twice (three sets in all).

— MADELEINE MARR
mmarr@MiamiHerald.com

NANCY COLE, PERSONAL TRAINER:
DECLINE DOUBLE TWISTED CRUNCH







Every once in a while; | have to throw in some
advanced exercises for those hard core individuals
with a hard core. This exercise may seem really twisted
to the rest of you, but it’s effective for making over
your midsection.

1, Position a decline bench to a high angle.
While holding a weight plate in front of your
chest, secure your feet under the foot pads
and sit up on the bench.

2. Slowly recline until you are about eight to 10
inches from touching the bench. Make sure
your abdominals are contracted and that you
maintain the slight natural curve in your spine
during the lowering movement.

3. Then, pause at the bottom of the movement
and slowly twist to the left side and then to the
right side, working from your torso not your
shoulders. Return to the center and crunch
back up to the starting position. A big exhale at the top
of the exercise will help you get a nice strong contrac-
tion. Repeat for 15 reps.

2)
-

— nancyfitness@bellsouth.net

‘Stats: 190

' total fat; 0.5 g










KIDS’ HEALTH
Bad diet info
on Web is trap

Here’s another reason to
limit your kids’ use of the com-
puter.

According to a new Stan-
ford University study pub-
lished in Pediatrics, many ado-
lescents with diagnosed eating
disorders are visiting websites
that encourage anorexia and
bulimia and the majority of
parents are unaware of their
Web journeys.

The sites provide “thinspira-
tion” (images of extremely thin
women) and reinforce disor-
dered eating habits, said
Rebecka Peebles, one of the
study’s authors. Ninety-six
percent of the adolescents
who visited such sites reported
learning potentially harmful
tips and techniques — about
laxatives, diet pills and supple-
ments as well as suggestions
for weight loss and purging.

Tell your kids: Computer off.
Go outside and play. Eat.

— HOWARD COHEN
hcohen@MiamiHerald.com

EAT THIS/
NOT THAT

CEREALS






Eat This

Kashi Heart Hea

to Heart DS
Golden Seve
Brown Maple 8 Sa

Instant
Oatmeal
Stats: 160
calories; 2g \
total fat;no sat Sms
fat or trans fat; 100 mg
sodium; 12 g sugar; 4g
protein.

Not That

Quaker Instant
Oatmeal
Mixed Berry
Crunch

calories; 2.59



sat fat, no
trans fat;
250 mg sodium; 16 g sugar; 4
g protein.

Why: It’s a shame we can’t
recommend the Quaker
oatmeal over the Kashi. With
its whole grain oatmeal and
nifty “crunchy cluster packets”
which give the cereal texture,
the Quaker brand handily
bests the rather tasteless Kashi
in terms of flavor and sex
appeal.

But one can’t ignore the higher
counts in calories, sodium,
sugar and slight increase in fat
inthe Quaker variety. Plus,
scan Quaker’s list of
ingredients and the word
sugar appears twice at the top,
bookending ‘sweetened and
colored strawberry and
blueberry pieces” and high
fructose corn syrup.

HOWARD COHEN

diet tips as you plan your
' 2007 resolutions, click on |
MyDietExercise.com. If you’re
having insomnia, click on i
\Y MySleepCentral.com. |

HECTOR CASANOVA/MCT FILE i








—DESONTAHOLDER |
dholder@MiamiHerald.com



BY THE
NUMBERS —

42%

Of children hurt
in school bus
accidents, the
percentage
whose injuries
were caused by
a collision of a
school bus and
another vehicle

24%

Percentage
whose injuries
occurred while
getting on or
off a bus or
approaching a

bus
Percentage
under age 10

who suffered
head injuries

— WASHINGTON t

POST SERVICE
Source: From a study on school
bus-related injuries treated in
U.S. emergency departments
from 2001 to 2003. The study
appeared in the journal Pediat-
rics.

HEALTHY READS

Boost your metabolism,
shape up and build muscle
mass with Strength Training,
a deck of 52 cards with
instruc-
tions on
one side
and illus-
trations
=} onthe
other.
| Exercises

include
wall
squats,
calf raises

~~ and inner-

thigh lifts. Go through the
entire deck and tone yourself
from top to bottom without
bulking up. $12.95 at
www.dk.com.





'



12A_ | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

BIOLOGY

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SCIENCE / HEALTH NEWS

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Tiniest microbes may help redefine life

BY ROBERT S. BOYD
rboydiameclatchydc.com

WASHINGTON The
discovery of what may be the
smallest living creature on
Earth raises anew the ancient
question: What is life?

Tiny microbes detected in
acid waste from a California
gold mine are smaller than any
other known life form, a team
of scientists reported in last
week’s Science magazine.

If further study confirms
that the little bugs are truly
alive, it may be necessary to

redefine “the minimum condi-
tions for life,” the report’s
authors said.

Despite what appears to be
a wide gulf between living and
nonliving things, scientists say
there’s no definitive way to
distinguish between them.

It’s an unsolved problem in
science, philosophy and reli-
gion.

‘In spite of generations of
work by hundreds of thou-
sands of biologists, in spite of
countless studies of living

CANCER CARE

organisms at every scale, from
molecules to continents, we
still have no widely accepted
definition” of life, geobiologist
Robert Hazen, of the Carnegie’
Institution of Washington,
wrote in his recent book, Gen-
esis.

“It’s impossible to draw a
precise distinction between
living and nonliving things,”
George Dyson, a science histo-
rian at the University of
Washington in Seattle, writes
in a forthcoming book, Dan-
gerous Ideas.

REAL-LIFE QUESTION

This isn’t merely a seman-
tic question. It has real-life
consequences, such as decid-
ing when life begins in a fertil-
ized egg or whether life ends
when doctors declare a person
to be brain-dead.

Instead of a bright line
between life and nonlife, the
world contains a range of
objects, from simple, carbon-
based molecules to complex
strings of DNA, from genes

‘The transitions are gradual, and the point at
which one chooses to apply the term “life”
becomes a matter of personal taste, not

science.’

- ROBERT SHAPIRO, New York University professor of chemistry

and proteins to entire cells,
from organs such as a heart or
a liver to a human being, tree
or mouse.

Where to draw the line on
that continuum is a puzzle.

“The transitions are grad-
ual, and the point at which one
chooses to apply the term ‘life’
becomes a matter of personal
taste, not science,” Robert
Shapiro, a professor of chem-

_istry at New York University,
said in an e-mail.

A common definition of life
among scientists has four
basic elements:

e Every living thing must
be enclosed in a cell, separat-
ing what’s inside from what’s

outside.



Teamwork might
be best medicine

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Reluc-
tant to get a second opinion?
Consider this: Over half of
breast cancer patients had.
their initial treatment
changed when they sought a
review at a specialty center.

But the question remains
whether everybody with can-
cer really needs to go'shop-
ping for a second opinion.
And if the first two doctors
disagree, do you need a tie-
breaker? ;

' Better than serial doc-
shopping may be what Dr.
Michael Sabel, a University
,of Michigan breast cancer
surgeon, calls the team
approach. It’s where special-
ists in different aspects of
cancer care — the radiologist
and pathologist, surgeon,
medical oncologist and radi-
ation oncologist — all get
together, usually with the
patient, to reread the tests
and hash out the best treat-
ment.

That, not run-of-the-mill
second opinions, is what
Sabel set out to study when
he examined what happened
to 149 breast cancer patients
who, in one year alone, came
to Michigan’s Comprehen-
sive Cancer Center after
being diagnosed, biopsied
and getting a treatment rec-
ommended from a doctor
elsewhere.

HEALTH

“This, was very eye-
opening,” he said of the
results. Now he wonders, “Is
there a benefit to the multi-
disciplinary approach
upfront, rather than seeing a
surgeon, then going to the
next doctor, then to the next
doctor?”

The study examined just
recommendations for initial
surgi reatment, not later
chem@Merapy or radiation
— yet 52 percent of the
women had one or-more
changes urged by the spe-
cialty tumor board, Sabel
reported in the journal Can-
cer. Sometimes it was
because the original doctor
didn’t follow national treat-
ment guidelines. Five
patients, for example, had
been told to get a mastec-
tomy when they were good
candidates for breast-con-
serving lumpectomy instead.

Sometimes the original
advice didn’t take into
account newer techniques,
such as using chemotherapy
to shrink the tumor before
operating so the breast could
be saved.

Sometimes surgeons
thought women were good
lumpectomy candidates —
only to have an oncologist
determine they couldn’t tol- .
erate the radiation required
afterward, and these sur-
geons ended up recommend-
ing a mastectomy instead.

Homesi ckness erips
some freshmen

DETROIT — (AP) — Jan-
ise Stone spent her first
semester in college dreaming
of home — literally.

Stone, 18, would get up in
the morning and grudgingly
attend classes at Paine Col-
lege in Augusta, Ga. But the
minute she returned to her
dormitory, she curled up and
thought of family in India-
‘napolis as she slept the day
away.

She isn’t alone.

Almost everyone experi-
ences occasional homesick-
ness, but many young people
suffer from a particularly
intense form that interferes
with normal activities,
according to a new study by
the American Academy of
Pediatrics.

The report in the January
issue of the journal Pediat-
rics offers several tips to
physicians for recognizing
risk factors among patients
who are leaving home for the
first time.

“Leaving home is a uni-
versal developmental mile-
stone,” said Dr. Edward Wal-
ton, co-author of the report
and an assistant professor of
pediatrics and emergency
medicine at the University of
Michigan. “Our goal is for
them not to lose time and
experience in the adjusting,”

he said.

Walton co-wrote the
study with Christopher
Thurber, staff psychologist at
Phillips Exeter Academy, a

boarding school in New

Hampshire.

About 95 percent of young
people say they miss some-
thing about home the first
time they are away, Thurber
said.

Most of them simply miss
their Xbox or their mother’s
cooking.

But a smaller percentage
— about lin 14 — suffer from
what Thurber calls “intense
homesickness.”

“They’re not eating or
sleeping right, not playing
with others,” said Thurber.
“Or they have an intense pre-
occupation with home,
they’re not thinking about
anything else.”

Those behaviors and atti-
tudes can “seriously impair”
experiences while away at
camp, boarding school, col-
lege or the hospital, he said.

The study outlines how to
ease children into their first
separation, including giving
them practice time away
from home; never offering to
pick them up before the sep-
aration is scheduled to end;
and inyolving them in every

Wot the decision.





CONSERVATION

e An organism must con-
sume energy and produce
waste, a process called metab-
olism.

oA living creature must
be able to reproduce, passing
on its genes to the next gener-
ation.

e An organism must
evolve as it adapts to changes
in its environment and muta-
tions in its genes.

TROUBLED DEFINITIONS

But every definition,
including this one, faces prob-
lems and counterarguments,
according to Carol Cleland, a
philosopher of science at the
University of Colorado in
Boulder.

“They include phenomena
that most are reluctant to con-
sider to be alive or exclude
entities that clearly are,” Cle-
land said.

For instance, if the ability to
reproduce is an essential
requirement for life, is a sterile
hybrid such as a mule not
alive?

A LONELY RABBIT

Similarly, two rabbits can
reproduce like crazy, but how
about one rabbit?

Another example: If life
means the ability to consume
energy, is a candle flame alive?

One definition of life
“might be based on the ability
to consume and convert
energy in order to move, grow
or reproduce,” Cleland writes
in a forthcoming book, Planets
and Life. “But fire, and perhaps
even automobiles, might be
said to satisfy some or all of
these criteria.”

Some scientists suggest that
there should be three catego-
ries: living, nonliving and in

between. A virus, which can’t

live by itself but must hijack
the genetic material of a cell,
would belong in the third

group.
‘RICHER TAXONOMY’

“J advocate a much richer
taxonomy than just ‘alive’ or
‘not alive, ” Hazen wrote in an
e-mail. “That’s a false dichot-
omy.”

Some theorists even con-
tend that computers and
robots eventually will become
so intelligent that they should
be considered alive.

Despite the difficulties, sci-
entists haven’t given up trying
to define life, especially since
some researchers are trying to
re-create life in the laboratory
and others are hoping to find it
on Mars or other worlds.

_ Said Cleland: “Someday we
may have a well confirmed,
adequately general theory of
life that will allow us to formu-
late... ..a scientifically satisfy-
ing answer to the question
‘What is life?’ ”



CHRISTOPHER SMITH/AP

A DYING BREED: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Cary Myler counts tiny Bruneau hot springsnails that thrive in
geothermally heated springs seeping along the Bruneau River in southwestern Idaho.

Idaho snail species still dwindling

BY CHRISTOPHER SMITH
Associated Press ‘

BRUNEAJU, Idaho — After
clambering down a canyon
wall, ducking poison ivy vines
and wading chest-deep across
a lukewarm stream, Cary
Myler spied some flecks that
look like pepper sprinkled on a
wet rock and announced,
“Found some.”

The pinhead-sized dots are
Bruneau hot springsnails.

The tiny mollusks that
thrive in water as warm as 100
degrees are found nowhere
else in the world but here, in
the bottom of this southwest-
ern Idaho desert canyon rid-
dled with hot springs 70 miles
southeast of Boise.

A decade ago, the snails
were at the center of a national
battle over federal laws
designed to protect endan-
Se ae Today, years

WEIGHT LOSS

after the lawsuits were
decided and most of the rheto-
ric retired, they are closer to
extinction than ever before.

The level of the under-
ground geothermal aquifer
that feeds the seeps and
springs of hot water where the
snails live keeps dropping.
Rock faces are now dry and
bare of the films of the hot
water that oharbored thou-
sands of the tiny algae-eating
snails a few years ago.

Some blame the decline in
the aquifer on drought. Others,
including the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, suspect the
primary cause is pumping of
the hot water to irrigate sur-
rounding farmland.

Congress appropriated $1
million six years ago for Bru-
neau Valley farmers to switch
from flood irrigation to more
efficient sprinkler pivots on

their land. Meanwhile, crop
land that had lain fallow for
years under a federal conser-
vation reserve program was
put back into production.

The amount of groundwa-
ter pumped from beneath the
Bruneau Valley to irrigate the
fields has increased to nearly
10,000 acre-feet annually,
almost double what it was in
1995. ,

“We've put $1 million into
pivots and we’re still seeing a
decline in the aquifer,” said
Myler, a Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice biologist who’s preparing
a report on whether the snail
should remain on the endan-
gered species list. “More water
is being pumped now than it
was when the snail was listed
and we're finding fewer hot
springs every year.”

First collected in this
remote stretch along the Bru-

neau Rive in 1952, the Bru-
neau hot springsnail was origi-
nally proposed for inclusion
on the list in 1985 after the Ser-
vice documented a steady
drop in the aquifer.

That triggered a legal battle
over just how far the Endan-
gered Species Act should go in
preventing human activities
that might jeopardize the sur-
vival of a creature the size of a
poppy seed.

The local Farm Bureau,
Owyhee County and the Owy-
hee Cattlemen’s Association
sued in 1992 to stop the listing,
fearing it would drive family
farms to extinction.

Idaho’s U.S. Senate delega-
tion threatened to withhold
funding for all endangered
species if the Fish and Wildlife
Service didn’t back off on
plans to list the microdot mol- |
lusk.

Diet articles tied to teen eating disorders

BY CARLA K. JOHNSON
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Magazine
headlines entice teenage girls
with promises: “Get the body
you want” and “Hit your
dream weight now!” But a new
study suggests reading articles
about diet and weight loss
could have unhealthy conse-
quences later.

Teenage girls who fre-
quently read magazine articles
about dieting were more likely
five years later to practice
extreme weight-loss measures
such as vomiting than girls
who never read such articles,
the University of Minnesota
study found. It didn’t seem to
matter whether the girls were
overweight when they started
reading about weight loss, nor
whether they considered their
weight important. After taking
those factors into account,
researchers still found reading
articles about dieting pre-
dicted later unhealthy weight
loss behavior.

Girls in middle school who
read dieting articles were
twice as likely five years later
to try to lose weight by fasting
or smoking cigarettes, com-
pared to girls who never read
such articles. They were three
times more likely to use mea-
sures such as vomiting or tak-
ing laxatives, the study found.

“The articles may be offer-
ing advice such as cutting out
trans fats and soda, and those
are good ideas for everybody,”
said Alison Field of Harvard
Medical School, who has done
similar research but wasn’t
involved in the new study.
“But the underlying messages
these articles send are ‘You
should be concerned about
your weight and you should be
doing something.’ ”

The study appeared in Jan-
uary’s issue of the journal
Pediatrics. Its findings were
based on surveys and weight-
height measurements of 2,516
middle school students in 1999
and of the same teens again in

‘The underlying
messages these
articles send are
should be concerned
about your weight.” ’

“You

~ ALISON FIELD,

Harvard Medical School researcher

2004. About 45 percent of the
students were boys.

Only 14 percent of boys
reported reading diet articles
frequently, compared to
44 percent of girls. For those
boys who did read about
weight loss, there was no simi-
lar lasting effect on behavior.

In the new study, it was
unclear whether it was the diet
articles themselves or accom-
panying photographs of thin
models that made a difference.
The study didn’t ask teenagers
which magazines they read,
only how frequently they read
magazine articles “in which

dieting or weight loss are dis-
cussed.”

The study was based on
students’ self-reports about
their behavior and, like all sur-
veys, could be skewed by teen-
agers telling researchers what
they think they want to hear,
said study co-author Patricia

van den Berg. She said parents
should carefully consider
whether they want their
daughters reading about
weight loss.

“It possibly would be help-
ful to teen girls if their moth-
ers didn’t have those types of
magazines around,” van den
Berg said. Parents also should
discuss magazines’ messages
with their daughters, she said.

“Talk to your kids about
where these messages are
coming from,” she said.

Doctors’ waiting rooms are
no place for magazines pro-
moting weight loss, she said,
“in the same way you don’t
have materials promoting
smoking in waiting rooms.”







Pm lovin’ Its
| HIGH 82

PARTIAL
~ SUNSHINE



‘LOW —s70F



Volume: 103 No.35

PUN Lae





oF
70F

Liquidity crunch
‘bottomed out’ during
late December

AST ae sta TES RS) te

Bageage handlers are
“questioned behind bars’

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

US INTERROGATORS are
questioning the five baggage
handlers from Nassau Flight
Services for the names of the
persons in charge of the traf-
ficking ring at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport, The
Tribune has learned.

Yesterday, the wife of one of
the accused men, Mrs Ladera
Tony, said that this and other
“questions have Been asked of
her husband during intense
questioning on his first night
behind bars.

She said that the interroga-
tors have asked where the drugs
were being kept in the
Bahamas, and who was the
organizers behind the scheme
to place them onboard interna-
tional flights.

The men are expected to go
_ before the courts in Fort Laud-

erdale on Thursday morning.
The men could face at least 10
years behind bars for each

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

count of attempting to import
and distribute narcotics within
the US. \

Legal and political minds
have questioned the manner in
which the five men were
“Jured” aboard and arrested. It
was claimed that behind this



manoeuvre was the c conscious

extradition hearings as with the

Samuel “Ninety” Knowles case..

Political pundits warn that the
handling of the matter could
play a vital role in the upcoming
general election as callers to
radio shows express their grow-
ing displeasure at the way that
legislation seemed to be cir-
cumvented.

However, the US Embassy
has stated that authorities in
their country simply took the

SEE page nine

The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

The Miami Herald

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007



PCy Orie

Parents’



TM aaa IU)



PRICE — 75¢ -





fury after school 1 is vandalised

RS AE ost Mite ts sad

a THE culprits marked the school’s walls with graffiti, broke lights, destroyed files and smashed valida

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



IRATE parents say that persons who
vandalized the Sadie C “urtis Primary
school on New Yeatr’s day should be pun-
ished to the full extent of the law for
their lack of respect for the education of
the students.

Officials at the Nassau Village school

opened the school on Monday after the
yuletide break only to discover that the
school had been vandalized.

The culprits marked the school’s walls -

with graffiti, broke lights, destroyed files,

- smashed windows with a fire hose and

then turned on the connected hydrant
and flooded the entire front office of the
school.

The water damaged photo copiers,

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

television sets, and the carpets in the
administrator’s offices.

Lilian Culmer, principal of the school,
told the media she was very disappointed
over the incident. She said that the New
Year’s break-in was the second to occur
in the last two weeks.

Popular Radio DJ Sean “The Butler”

SEE page nine



AG: Bahamian police involved in investigation

_qbuthad no knowledge of NES saffarrest eats iy | National Heroes | Sip Randol Fawkes’ | Man charged with
Tribune Staff Reporter d ' Committee chairman family hits out over Christmas Day \ \
BAHAMIAN police were involved in an undercover investiga- Farm Roa calls for religious 0 ‘ hootin de th

| : alleged ‘historical S g dea
tion - ate hoe baggage pans but: ee a rae of ee leaders to reject g ;
t t e ; ee e , :

Mimic of egal Svs alyon Maynare-Gtson stated yes OVEL TISE New Year’s Honours revisionism’ =" 2-NATAROMeKENZIE_

t e e ; : ed wi e

oie Maynard-Gibson conceded that she does not know why in crime â„¢ Snr ee hig petneng ea at what they : Gatidtnas Day. chepGing death of

; described as the

Bahamian police chose not to arrest the five suspected drug traf-
fickers, but she is confident that they had a “very good reason.’
Speaking as a guest on Love97’s Issues of the Day, the Attorney

SEE page nine

AUTO INSURANCE

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

ete ta
We AD) 992-2802 1 TC ch



MByKRYSTELROLLE _

THE upsurge in crime in the }
Farm Road area has left the :
community shaking with fear ;
and the police concerned that }

a disturbing trend has started.

In the past two weeks three }
murders, and three injuries, all :
in that area has left several res- ;
idents questioning the compe- }
tence of the police and fearing }
that the next murder could be }

theirs.

The most recent incident !
occurred Monday night on Flint |

Street. While Kevin Eve, 43,

was not killed, he was shot mul-
tiple times about his body, and }
left in critical condition. He is ;
now fighting for his life in the :

Princess Margaret Hospital.

According to Inspector Wal-
ter Evans, the shooting took :

SEE page eight




Tribune Staff Reporter i

reject the Queen’s New Year’s

Honours because they are rem- }
nants of the colonial past, accord-_

ing to Rev Sebastian Campbell,

Committee.

Father Campbell’s comments

came after the Governor Gener-

named in the Queen’s New
Year’s honours for 2007.

Those honoured included Lady

guerite Pindling, with knight- } Cai,

i Sir Randol’s family also ;
: expressed what they described as ;
: their dissatisfaction with the gov- :
: ernment’s “blatant neglect and :
; disregard for the legacy of the :
i late trade unionist and labour :

because the PLP government } leader.”

hoods going to Baltron Bethel ;

and businessman, Garret “Tiger”
Finlayson.

The Anglican clergyman said
he was “absolutely disappointed”
about the Queen’s honour’s list,

SEE page nine

FUIMISICKS
STHAIST S| [5c

Nrtsittocess &

SEE page eight



AS oN

3

“historical revi-
sionism” that has occurred since ;
: i the death of Sir Randol Fawkes in ;
RELIGIOUS leaders should : June of 2000, the family of the ;
i late labour leader is calling on ;
government and others to “cease }
i and desist in the use of selective :
chairman of the National Heroes bir eeeneee ee ape
i According to the family, many ;
people in the community have :
: complained to them that evenin :

al’s announcement that several } death, unfair treatment is being |

prominent Bahamians have been : meted out to the legacy of Sir
? Randol. i
: “When reporting the history of :
: He aa tae ->), | the nation, his name is intention- ;
Marguerite Pindling, who will; ally left out or passed over in a
now be addressed as Dame Mar- }

Cecil Coakley, 29, and the young
mother accused of abetting the
murder were arraigned in magis-
trate’s court yesterday. -

James Miller, 28, of Malcolm
Allotment was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
in Court One Bank Lane yester-

} day on the murder charge.

According to reports, Coakley,
a resident of Pinewood Gardens,
was found dead near the basket-
ball courts opposite Salem Baptist
Church. He had been shot multi-

: ple times, according to police.

Kacie Sawyer, 23, was also
arraigned before Magistrate

i; Gomez yesterday on the charge
: great haste,” Sir Randol’s family i
: alleged that she purposely aided

of abetment to murder. It is

and abetted Miller and another
in causing the death of Cecil
Coakley. Both accused were rep-
resented by lawyer Langton
Hilton. Family members of both
accused were present at court yes-

; terday.

SEE page nine

(Pagers SRD









PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

ee Oe eee ee eee ee
Businessman has two appeal avenues left

A BAHAMIAN businessman still
has two possible avenues of appeal
left after his attempt to overturn a
fraud conviction was quashed, a
spokesman for the US Attorney’s
Office in the southern district of Flori-
da told The Tribune, adding that they
were unlikely to succeed,

Hubert Garland Evans last week
saw the US 11th Circuit Court of
Appeals find that a jury sitting in
southern Florida was correct to con-
clude that he caused a fax to be sent
on May 22, 1997, “for the purpose of
executing” a scheme to obtain credit
insurance from the Export-Import

Bank of the United States.

A spokesman for the US Attor-
ney’s Office confirmed to The Tri-
bune that it was now up to the judge
who heard the original case, Adal-
berto Jordan, to “sign an order for
Hubert Garland Evans to surrender
himself” to the US authorities, a
move that was likely to happen this

‘month,

If he fails to surrender himself, that
will likely force the US authorities to
launch extradition proceedings
against him in the Bahamas,

Mr Evans was originally sentenced
to 18 months in a US jail, and ordered

to pay a $700,000 fine by Judge Jor-
dan. However, he was freed on bond
and allowed to return to the Bahamas
until the appeal to the 11th Circuit
Court of Appeals was heard.

The US Attorney’s Office said its
financial litigation unit would now
seek payment of the $700,000 fine,
but Mr Evans still had two possible
appeal avenues left.

He has 30 days to. file a petition for
a hearing in the Florida district court,
seeking a fresh appeal, or 90 days to
file a petition to the US Supreme
Court.

The US Attorney’s Office said both

appeals were unlikely to succeed,

adding that they would have to be
filed while Mr Evans was in jail.

Mr Evans has always vigorously
denied the charges against him, and
has mounted consistent attempts to
overturn the verdict against him,

The 11th circuit US appeals court
said the charges against Mr Evans
related to when he was president of
Bahamas-based Jagar Ltd, a whole-
saler that imported grocery products
to the Bahamas for resale.

Jagar’s primary supplier was US-
based Produce Direct Inc (PDI),
which obtained credit insurance from

THE TRIBUNE

the Ex-Im Bank in 1995 to cover any
possible non-payments by Jagar.

In mid-1996, PDI requested that
Jagar provide it with a report on its
financial condition so it could apply
for a renewal of the credit insurance.

The US appeals court said Jagar
produced “a financial statement
showing the company as profitable
through the fiscal year ending June
30, 1996, even though an indepen-
dent auditor’s report prepared in Feb-
ruary 1997 showed Jagar suffered a
net loss of almost $1 million during
that fiscal year, and described its sur-

>”

vival as in ‘substantial doubt’.

_ BFSB competition finalists are named

THE finalists for the Bahamas
Financial Services Board’s (BFSB)
school essay and speech competi-
tionareshownhere,

Front Row, L to R: Jonathan
Farrington, C,V, Bethel Senior
High; Tawana Patton-Burrows, St.
John's College; Charles M.N, Not-
tage, Prince Williams High, Lacoda
Evans, St Augustine's College;
lege; Rashad Rolle, Doris John-
son Senior High; Blair Bethel,
Doris Johnson Senior High; Tebby

Burrows, St Andrew's School;.

Denise Theophilus, St Andrew's
School, (Missing is Daniel Thomp-
son of Queen's College)

ESSAY eh
COMPETITION FINALISTS
*BlairBethel
*LacodaEvans

¢ Charles M_N, Nottage

° Tawana Patton-Burrows

¢ Denise Theophilus |

¢ Daniel Thompson —

SPEECH
COMPETITION FINALISTS
¢ Tebby Burrows
¢ Jonathan Farrington
° Krystal Morley

* Rashad Rolle

HESS







y, St Augustine's Col-



Partners

Associate

Dwayne A. Gibson
Raynard §, Rigby

Melissa L. Selver

Public Notice

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

Notaries Public

reernntee re nerentettedentmeeees retin rhaaatbapemananaes eames page

Chambers
East Street Shopping Centre
P, O, Box $$-6836
Nassau, Bahamas
&
George Town
Queens Highway
Exuma, Bahamas

The public is hereby advised that Roshar G, Brown is no longer affiliated
with Gibson, Rigby & Co. and is no longer authorized to conduct business
on the firm’s behalf, If there are any concerns or questions please contact
our offices at the numbers listed below,

Tel: (242) 393-6000
Fax: (242) 393-7000
E-mail; gibrig.com@batelnet.bs

Tel: (242) 336-3485
Fax; (242) 336-3487





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Social, religious funds could
with some New Year’s resolutions |

@ By TIM PARADIS
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall
Street presumably isn’t a place
where those hoping to mend
their ways in the new year
might turn for inspiration. But
some investors looking to better
align their social or religious
convictions with their invest-
ments have found sizable
returns. ;

Mutual funds that incorpo-
rate such principles range from

those that invest with an eye
toward helping the environment
to those that avoid companies
that extend health benefits to
unwed couples. And while some
investors are predisposed to
invest in funds whose agendas
match their own, even investors
who don’t necessarily share a
fund’s beliefs can still find value.

Consider the Amana Funds,
which invest according to Islam-
ic principles. The funds avoid
companies that sell or promote
liquor, pornography, gambling

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIBILLA FIRE FUND LID.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 SIBILLA FIRE FUND

LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the

Commencement of

dissolution was 21st

December 2006. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P O. Box N 3917 is the Liquida-
tor of SIBILLA FIRE FUND LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send _ their
address and particulars of their. debts to the Liquidator before the

22nd January 2007.



NOTICE TO PENSIONERS

Act Now To Avoid Suspension Of
Benefit/Assistance

and pork products. In adhering
to Islamic law, the funds also

exclude companies such as bro- |

kerages that make a business of
charging or receiving interest
or companies that carry exces-
sive debt.

While the restrictions could
appear limiting, the funds have
flourished. The Amana Trust
Income fund, a large-capital-
ization value fund, saw a return
of about 19.3 per cent in 2006.
The fund, which has assets of
about $111 million, carries a
five-star rating from Morn-
ingstar Inc., which evaluates
funds.

Nicholas Kaiser runs the
Amana funds, which like many
other funds that incorporate
social or religious principles,
seek outside advice on what
types of investments aren’t per-
missible. The funds follow
broad recommendations by a
group of experts that interprets
Islamic law in North America.

While Kaiser notes, for exam-
ple, that the prohibition on
investments within the financial
sector could make it harder on
the Amana Funds in years when
Wall Street favours such stocks,
the discipline imposed by the
fund has also proven fortuitous.

The funds had invested in
Enron Corp. “When the debt

City Markets

FROM page 3B

?



Persons who are in receipt of monthly Long-Term Benefit or Assistance

from the National Insurance Board, who fail to be verified in their assigned
months, or anytime after, are advised that no further pension cheques will be
issued to them-either though bank accounts or through pay stations-until they

have submitted themselves to the verification process.

Pensioners in New Providence are urged to present themselves to the Fox
Hill Local Office, the Wulff Road Local Office, or the Jumbey Village Local
Office, immediately for verification. Pensioners in Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands are urged to present themselves to the nearest Local Office.

Cheque(s) for pensioners who are not verified on or before January 29, 2007.
will be held and will only be released to pensioners when they have been

verified.

Pensioners are required to produce their National Insurance ID card, along
with a driver’s license, a passport or current voter’s card.

For more information you may contact the Verifications Department at your

nearest Local Office.

BIs

Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets





Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

idelit, Prime Income Fund

2.2982

1.1442
1 eo is oon F d mae
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 0: 00!
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close ~- Current day‘s welghted price for dally volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



1.320246"
2.9449***
2.472341**
1.207411°***

11.2596"

(Adad 1 VT 34 88% 12008

=LD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price



=WDitTaiiey

Last 12 Months

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
_ Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter prico
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

numbers got to be such (as they
were), we sold it,” Kaiser said,
noting the sale allowed the fund
to sidestep losses from the ener-
gy company’s implosion.

Another group of funds that
apply religion to investing are
the Ave Maria Mutual Funds,
which follow Catholic princi-
ples and prohibit investments
in companies that draw profits
from pornography, abortion or
those that donate to Planned
Parenthood. The parameter
that trips up most companies,
however, is one requiring that
they don’t offer benefits to
unmarried couples.

George Schwartz, who over-
sees the funds, said an ample
number of companies manage
to merit consideration under
the fund’s principles.

“I’m not a theologian. ’'m a
portfolio manager,” said
Schwartz, adding the restrictions
still allow him to assemble a
robust portfolio. “We’ve got to
have the investment perfor-
mance.”

The Ave Maria Catholic Val-
ues Fund, with assets of about
$258 million and a four-star
Morningstar rating, posted a
return of about 14.2 per cent
last year. While investors ordi-
narily rely on the cold calculus
of a fund’s returns when evalu-

ating where to put their money;
others supportive of a fund’s
social bent are likely to be more
patient should returns lag,
observers say.

“There’s a thirst among some
Catholics that truly have found

‘ ahome among these funds. It’s

almost like they don’t even care
about our investment perfor-
mance,” Schwartz said. He said
the approach isn’t swayed too
heavily by dogma, however, and
noted that the Ave Maria funds
don’t lobby companies for
change but look for those that
are the best investment under
the Ave Maria parameters.
Jeff Tjornehoj, an analyst
with fund-tracker Lipper Inc.,
warns that good deeds don’t
necessarily make good invest-
ments, “The biggest thing is to
treat these as if you’re buying
any other funds. Consider the
performance and risk.”

He notes that some funds that \

employ a social or religious fil-
ter can be expensive to run giv-
en the level of screening many
investments require.

Tjornehoj offered his own
New Year’s wish for investors
considering a socially or reli-
giously minded fund: “Read the
prospectus carefully. It requires
more attention than your typical
investment.”

fit

He contends investors can in
many cases advance a cause or
belief by investing where
returns are greatest, regardless
of the type of investments.

“Tf you found a low-cost
index fund that included a sin
stock then sometimes it pays to
be in that kind of fund to do
well and then donate to a cause
you like,” Tjornehoj said.

.One fund whose patron saint
would more likely be Gordon
Gekko than a social or religious
champion is the Vice Fund,
which invests in alcohol, gam-
ing, tobacco and defense.

“T call them bulletproof in
terms of their sensitivity to the
economic cycle,” said Charles
Norton, who runs the fund.
“They’re steady performers in
good times and bad.”

“We're not advocates or pro-
moters of these sectors,” Nor-
ton said, noting that doing well
by investors is the most impor-
tant purpose of a fund. The
mid-cap blend fund, which
Morningstar gives four stars,
has assets of about $75 million
and showed a return of about
23.2 per cent last year.

“We just invest in these sec-
tors by design because we think
they offer such true investment

_ Merit that tends to be over-

looked.”

hoping for Winn-Dixie break ‘by June’

This was a carry over from
Winn-Dixie’s majority owner-
ship, the US grocery retailer hav-
ing sold its 78 per cent stake to
Bahamian-led buyout group
BSL Holdings for $54 million in
a deal completed on August 9.

Bahamas Supermarkets has
two stores, at Oakes Field and
Village Road, “under planning”
for upgrades, with the rest also
set for revamps in the future. Mr
Burns said the upgrade plans

fruition”. :

would “hopefully come to

The: Bahamas Supermarkets:

chief executive said the retailer
was deeply immersed in the
transition from its previous
majority owner, as “as virtually
everything was done through
Winn-Dixie stores. Everything’s
got to change”.

“From a retail standpoint,
there will be changes,” Mr Burns
said. “Those changes will be on
the technology side, installing
scanning, electronic communi-
cations with the stores, and the
SMS buying system.”

He said SMS was an integrat-
ed buying, receiving and ware-
housing technology platform,
that also managed “the front end
of the store”.

Barbados Shipping & Trad-
ing’s subsidiary, Retail & Dis-
tribution International (RDI),
will replace Winn-Dixie on the
sourcing of produce and mer-
chandise, and develop retail, dis-
tribution and financial manage-
ment systems.

During the initial three-year
agreement, RDI will earn a
$100,000 one-off fee for signing
the deal, and a further $25,000



ww SÂ¥>j

* - 22 December 2006

** . 30 November 2006

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



*** - 30 November 2006

“*** - 30 November 2006

- 30 November 2006



per month, ensuring it will earn
$300,000 per annum from the
operating partner agreement.

Mr Burns said yesterday: “I
think we will be completely
through the transition from
Winn-Dixie, totally, by June
[2007] or before.

“We like the prospect of being
a standalone company much
more than an absentee owner;
being a Bahamian company with
Bahamian investors. The Board
of Directors are here on the
island, and they are very aggres-
sive about what they want to do
with the company and moving
it forward.”

Bahamas Supermarkets also
has a transition services agree-
ment with Winn-Dixie for a year
until August 9, 2007. The US
retailer will earn flat a $1 mil-
lion fee plus 5 per cent of the
costs of goods it procures for
Bahamas Supermarkets.

Mr Burns yesterday confirmed
to The Tribune that Bahamas
Supermarkets could cancel the
agreement with 60 days notice.

“Certainly, we want to end it
as soon as possible. It would be a
savings for us,” he added.

Mr Burns indicated the tran-

sition services agreement with -

Winn-Dixie would be ended
once Bahamas Supermarkets
had installed its new accounting
systems and information tech-
nology (IT) platforms.
Bahamas Supermarkets can
also rescind the notice of its
agreement cancellation if the
installation of the two systems

NOTICE

will not be completed before the
agreement is cancelled.

During fiscal years 2006 and
2005, Winn-Dixie and the
Bahamian company that held its
78 per cent stake, W-D
(Bahamas), earned $1.397 mil-
lion in service charges and man-
agement fees.

_ Mr Burns said the US retailer
was likely to earn a similar
amount from the transition ser-

_ vices agreement Winn-Dixie, so

significant cost savings to
Bahamas Supermarkets were
unlikely to accrue to the com-
pany until fiscal year ending
June 28, 2008.

Mr Burns said rising global oil
prices, and BEC’s fuel sur-
charges, had had a “dramatic”
effect on Bahamas Supermar-
kets’ costs. Shipping and trans-
portation costs for produce had
risen, and he said the retailer
had absorbed these rather than
pass them on to the consumer.

Mr Burns did not deny that
Bahamas Supermarkets’ elec-
tricity costs for November 2006
had risen by $100,000 compared
to the previous year as a result of
the fuel surcharge, and said the
company’s results for fiscal 2007
would depend on costs that were
largely outside its control.

“We have a very aggressive
plan to implement scanning in
every store this year, if not
quicker,” Mr Burns said.

“There’s a lot of infrastruc-
ture to look at, and a lot of tech-
nology to implement in the next
six to eight months.”

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXINE ORELIEN OF
PODOLEO ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,

should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of JANUARY,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, | PO.Box

N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

HELP

Progressive medical practice requires the services
of an accountant with the following qualifications:

1. CPA or BSc with a minimum of 5 years

experience.

2. Working knowledge of all Quickbooks modules.

3. Bahamian citizenship.

’ Please email response to

info@ gtbahamas.com





Mt

see we wt & FE



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5B



The Tribune

Royal Oasis talks ‘active’

NEGOTIATIONS for the sale of the
stricken Royal Oasis resort on Grand
Bahama are still very active, the Hotel
Corporation’s managing director, Sir Bal-
tron Bethel, told The Tribune yesterday.

Sir Bethel said he could not comment
any further, preferring either the Prime
Minister or Lehman Brothers’ private
equity arm, the resort’s mortgagee and
seller, to speak publicly.

However, he said the negotiations con-
tinue to progress at an advanced stage.

The sale of the much-troubled resort,
which dramatically impacted the Grand
Bahama economy when it closed follow-
ing the 2004 hurricane season, has met
many setbacks and roadblocks.

Freeport residents are hopefulthat this
year a deal can finally be reached so the
property can be reopened.

The Government has recently

approached Harcourt Developments, the
Dublin-based property developer, to see
if it remains interested in acquiring the
Royal Oasis.

Sources

Sources close to the situation in Grand
Bahama said the Government had
renewed talks with Harcourt two to three
weeks ago, as part of contingency plans in
case the Florida-based group, World
Investments Holdings, failed to complete
its purchase of the resort that has been
closed for more than two years.

World Investments Holdings had split
apart after the group failed to raise the
necessary financing to complete its $40
million purchase. The financing had been
contingent on its ability to find a casino
partner.

Some of the original investors in World

Investments Holdings are part of a new ~

group that is attempting to conclude the
purchase.

Harcourt was said to still be keen on
acquiring the Royal Oasis as part of its
wider investment plans on Grand
Bahama.

World Investment Holdings’ Bahamian ~

partner is Lawrence Chisholm & Associ-
ates, an architectural and planning firm
based on Elizabeth Avenue in Nassau.
The company will be the lead architect
and planner in the investors’ bid to revive
the Royal Oasis, once the deal is closed.

The resort’s attraction to investors has
been reduced because it is not located
on the beach, and it will need massive
redevelopment and investment to
upgrade the properties before they can be
opened.

Liquidity may affect

2007 retail prospects



FROM page 1B

Anthony Jewelers said it was
hard to predict how 2007 will gc
“You can only really hope ard
pray that you have a good yerr.
‘Christmas shapes up the year
and we had a good Christm:s,”
she said.

The manager said that, i she

used previous trends, the year
should shape up well, because
“2006 was a much better year
than 2005. But it is hard to say.”
A Quality Jewelry spokes-
woman said the manufacture
and repair store had to wait for
the jewelry stores to determine
how their year will be, because
they get the majority of their
business from Bay Street.

Security Association
. aims to raise standards

FROM page 13

ent departments inhotels and
government. That’s 10t in-house.
It’s a pretty big goup. I'd say
it’s a three-to-on; ratio when
compared to the pice, three of
us to one of them

“Almost everyproperty has a
security officer a‘their location.
It’s very much bg business, and
that’s a concer - people just
coming in for tle buck, and not
worried about quality of service
delivered to th: customer.”

Mr Newry aid the Security
Association wuld look to work
with the Minstry of National
Security on ecurity issues, its
“prime concan” being training
and certificaion.

The Gov:rnment currently
licences all private security firms,
who are sipposed to pay fees
that genemte revenue, and Mr
Newry sail it was unlikely that

.the admisistration would want
to give tiis and regulating the
industryup completely.

He acded that the Security
Associaion would develop doc-
uments such as ‘White Papers’
that it vould submit to the Gov-
ernment on issues such as train-
ing, saying: “We can work hand-
in-hand together to make sure
the standard of competency is

. there.”

Mr Newry said the private

security industry in the Bahamas
went beyond “the guard at the
“door”, including persons such as
consultants, trainers, alarm tech-
nicians and close-circuit televi-
sion technicians.
- Trained security officers, Mr
Newry added, could assist police
in dealing with incidents, carry-
ing out-preliminary investiga-
tions and taking witness state-
ments, writing reports, securing
the scene and protecting evi-
dence.

He said that over the next
three months, the private secu-
rity industry would be “coming
together” to develop a document
on forming the Security Associ-
ation that would then be circu-
_ lated to the sector for feedback.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the Association said: “The
security industry in the Bahamas

has great potential as it pertains
to the management of crime pre-
vention activities. In a time when
criminality and safety concerns
can have a detrimental affect on
our quality of life, there is an
urgent need to call all hands on

deck.

“Our profession is a noble
one, and we believe that the
unification of our forces and
resources would enhance the

"commendable job already being

-, done by our National Security

*. agencies such as the Police

Force, Defence Force, Immigra-
tion, Customs and Prisons Ser-
vices.
“When one considers the vol-
ume of professionals perform-

ing private security tasks
throughout the Bahamas today,
the numbers demonstrate a force
to be reckoned with. By pooling
such resources we can establish a
conglomerate that can readily
feed into efforts afoot by our
local authorities with security
responsibilities.”

Over the next 90 days, the
Association said it would con-
duct “wide consultations with
members of the security industry
throughout the Bahamas, in
view of ascertaining their views
on the best way forward for a
unified association, and how it
may best serve the collective”.

It would also draft an Asso-
ciation Constitution and rele-
vant Articles and Memorandum
of Association.

The statement added: “With-
in four weeks of agreement of

’ the relevant documentation, the

process of ratification and sub-
sequent election of officers
would be accordingly conduct-
ed.”

committee '

The Interim Steering Com-
mittee to establish a Private
Security Association in the
Bahamas includes:

New Providence

Gamal Newry — co-chairman,
president Preventative Measures

Captain Glen Bain — president
& chief executive, Bahamas
Maritime Connection

Stanley Toote — assistant
director of security, Kerzner
International

Anton Saunders — coordina-
tor security and transport, Doc-
tors Hospital

Hugh Gray — director of secu-
rity, Old Fort Bay

Grand Bahama

Cleveland Duncombe — com-
mittee co-chairman, president
and chief executive - Candid
Security

Ryan Lowe - president and
chief executive - Nelsons Locks
and Safe

Henri Williams - director of
security - Our Lucaya Resort

Linden Wilchcombe — director
of security - Ginn Sur Mer
Resorts

Denise Tynes — director of
security - GB, Airport, Harbour,
Container Port

The advisory board includes:

Henry Wemyss - president
and chief executive, Wemco
Security and Collections

Lioyd Deveaux - director of
security, Abaco Beach Resort

Morris Simmons - president
and chief executive, Simmons
Security & Investigations

Chris Lowe - president,
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce

Hank Bain -— manager,
Armoured Car Services Ltd

Wayne Munroe - attorney

“In January, we do very well
because we get a lot of orders
for repairs and jewelry in the
New Year, so I hope it contin-
ues,” she said.

Another merchant took a
gloomier view, noting that the
2007 retail season will be severe-
ly impacted by the impending
general election.

“T actually think that 2007 will .

be down from 2006, based on
election anxiety and what is to
come. Of course, there will be
spending by the various MPs and
MP-elects on their constituents.
But in general, I foresee it being
a slightly slower year for retail-
ers,” the manager said.

Several other merchants indi-
cated it was simply too early to
tell.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OCEANIS ASSETS CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the Intermational Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of OCEANIS ASSETS CORP.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been st-uck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CROSSWIND TRADING LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
CROSSWIND TRADING LTD. has been disolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
18th day of December, 2006.

LUIS PINEYRUA PITTALUGA
Juncal 1305, 21st Floor
Montevideo, Uruguay

Liquidator —



Legal Notice

MNexu(eD |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

HAINE S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Legal Notice

NOTICE

REGAN VILLAGE INC.
we Oy

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of REGAN VILLAGE INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BBB HOLDINGS LTD.
— 6)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with -
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BBB HOLDINGS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS LTD.

INSURANCE BROKING OPPORTUNITY

CMA isa progressive, successful and reputable
property & liability insurance brokerage. We need
an ambitious, energetic and enthusiastic person to
join our small, dedicated and professional team.
This will be an office-based position with scope for
real advancement. Insurance experience though
desirable is not essential. Full training will be provided.



We are looking for:

¢ A well-groomed person, professional in
appearance.

e Excellent written and oral communication skills.

¢ Competence in Microsoft applications such as
Word, Excel & Outlook.

¢ A self-starter, with initiative and a willing team
player

¢ Commitment to study for insurance exams.

We are offering:

A competitive salary and benefits package
commensurate with experience. Our office is
located on East Bay Street near Fort Montagu, with
free staff parking.

Applicants should submit a full resume and a
covering letter in a sealed envelope marked “Private
and Confidential”. This should be posted or delivered
by hand to:

The General Manager

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
HAINE S.A. has been disolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 22nd day of November, 2006.

JOHN KILLMISTER
Beresford House,
Bellozanne Road, St. Helier
Jersey, JE2 3) W
Liquidator



CMA Insurance Brokers & Agents Lid
P.O. Box SS-19067
Bahamas Realty Building
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

Postal applications should be post-marked no later
than January Sth, 2007, The deadline for receipt of
all (posted or delivered) applications will be
Wednesday, January 10, 2007.

We respect fully the confidentiality of all applications.
All applications will be acknowledged.





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



@ TRACK
ODD DISTANCE MEET

tion of Athletic Associations
have announced that their

men ‘Coach of the Year’ hosts —

After another banner year: @ @ 9
that ended with the gala : ) Tr r
awards banquet on Saturday _ : U Iii Ce 1 be AC C QO ac ;
night, the Bahamas Associa- :

2007 season will kick off with
the Odd Distance Track and
Field Meet.

The meet is scheduled for
Saturday, January 13 at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre, starting at 2:30 p.m.
For further information, per-
sons are urged to contact the
BAAA’s office at the
Colony Club or telephone
323-5863.

@ BSC
AGM/BASKETBALL
MEETING

The Baptist Sports Council
will kick off its 2007 season
on Saturday, January 13 at
the Bahamas Baptist Col-
lege, Jean Street when the
annual general meeting will
take place.

During the AGM, the BSC
will hold elections for the
following positions: assistant
secretary, assistant treasurer,
basketball chairman, volley-
ball chairman, softball chair-
man, track and field chair-
man and cycling chairman.

@ SOFTBALL
MASTERS TEAM
MEETING

The Masters Softball
League is calling all team
managers and coaches to an
important meeting at 7 p.m.
today at the office of Antho-
ny ‘Rake-n-Scrape’ Bowe.

The meeting will be held
to discuss plans for the
resumption of the season,
which will begin this week-
end at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

A double header will take
place on Saturday with the
Miller Lite Royals taking on
the Miller Panthers in the
opening game at 1 p.m. The
feature game at 3 p.m. will





@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



TWO days after being named the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations’ Coach of the Year,
Peter Pratt played host to Ron
Mann, the head track and field coach
at the University of Louisville, on a
fact finding mission.

Mann was in town on. New Year’s
Day before he headed to Miami,
Florida for the UofL Cardinals’ 2007
FedEx Orange Bowl football game at
Dolphin Stadium against the Wake
Forest Demon Deacons.

“TI didn’t know that he was going to
be so famous because he’s now the
Coach of the Year,” said Mann,
about Pratt, whom he has developed
a relationship with over the years.

“I’m not just meeting with an old
friend, but a very honoured old
friend. So I’m glad to be here and
at the same time develop a relation-
ship with some of the other coaches
here.”

Delighted

Pratt, who won the award over
Ronald Cartwright, David Charlton,
Fritz Grant and Grand Bahamian
Dwayne Jennings, said he’s delighted
to have Mann in town, even though it
was just for a short period of time.

But Pratt said in the few hours that
Mann spent here, he introduced him
to some of the coaches who were
available as well as the officers of
the Bahamas Scholarship Founda-
tion for Student Athletes, headed by
Harrison Petty.

“Y’m just looking for athletes in
the area because we’re here to help,”
Mann said. “Too many times US
coaches get a rap for not getting the
athletes to graduate, but due to oth-
er sports, not track and field.

“So I’m just here to let everybody
know that we are running a quality
programme and if they attend UofL,
we will do whatever is necessary for
them to succeed.”

Mann said currently there are no
Bahamian athletes on athletic schol-

but he was delighted to be back ata.
time when everybody was in such a
festive mood, coming off the New
Year’s Day junkanoo parade.

Mann said that having secured a
personal contact with Pratt and oth-
ers, he intend to be making frequent.
visits to the Bahamas in a bid to lure
more student-athletes to UofL. ;

Pratt said he’s been trying to get
some local jumpers into Mann’s pro-
gramme for quite a while and he’s
confident that evéntually the
Bahamas will make its presence felt
at UofL, like they’re done elsewhere. . '

“It’s good for us because it’s evi-*.
dent that we have contacts overseas,” '
Pratt said of his new relationship ©
with Mann. “It is evident that there’
are people overseas, who want to be.
in contact with us and help our pro-—
gramme. So this is one of the better
ways for us to go.”

Additionally, Pratt said he’s still
celebrating from being named the
BAAA’s Coach of the Year.

“It was a surprise because I did’
no’ train my athletes to become
Cozch of the Year. So it was a sur-
prise,” he stated.

“Even though the president (Mike ,
Sands) called me on the day, I had -
already promised my ticket to one

of my ¢thletes. ree

“Not until he told me to please
show upand bring Rudon Bastian, I :
decided to go. I had to go and sup- -
port Rudon, who was one of the ath- '
letes I cocched.” .

Bastian vas also an award winner
- named th: Junior Male Athlete of
the Year.

“It was a food feeling,” Pratt stat-
ed. “So I wil work as usual, but my
goal is to havt my athletes jump well '
enough to quiify for athletic schol-
arships to unversities and colleges ,
and if they arezood enough to make
the national tems.

“But most of ul, I want to develop..."

a discipline so hat they can get a’.
good job and be:ome a quality role.
model citizen.”

Pratt, one of the pioneer triple
jumpers in the ©untry, has been
coaching for morethan 30 years. He

’ spent three years - 000-2003 - coach-

be played between the arship with the UofL Cardinals, but; riebect? ;
Joshua Knights and the : this Vest they are hoping to attract ne fubtane 3 DAE ATAU DEToNS:
mae Lions. ss eeheduled? : ®@ BAAA’s Coach of the Year, Peter Pratt (left) and his son, Jamie (right) their first member or members. mae a Beene it at Phe
ne game is scheduledto : i iversi isvi is Visi i S a :
8g : share a moment with University of Louisville head track and field coach Ron As for his visit, Mann said he has Ministry of Youth, Sjorts and Hous-:
n’t been here in more than ten years,

be played on Sunday. Mann during his visit to the Bahamas on New Year’s Day. ing

Training in the Bahamas has.

4

the Mavericks in the swim .

FROM page one

“We are encouraging them to come out and

participate with these clubs,” he said. “Hopeful-
ly it will help them in their training sessions.”

One of the local swimmers who took advan-
tage of the opportunity was Franshon Francis, a
member of the Sea Bees Swim Club.

Francis, a 17-year-old 12th grader at St.
Augustine’s College, said the experience will only
benefit her as she looks ahead to a collegiate
career once she graduates.

“I think it’s a good idea having them come

down since we don’t go away to train,” Francis
said. “We could train with them and help to push
us.
“I know it’s good for me since I’m preparing to
go off to school next year. By training with them,
I can see where my level is and if I can compete
with them.”

While here, Samland said his team has been
enjoying the hospitality, especially the warm pool
and the clock at their disposal at the swim com-
plex.

He said it will only get them prepared for the
remainder of their season later this month.

“The biggest thing is that it’s just swimming. No
work, no family, no boyfriends,” he charged.
“We're just going to hang out, swim, eat, hang
together, swim and eat.

“It gives us a chance to just focus on swimming
and that is what we’re going to do. The 50 metre
pool gives us the opportunity to work a lot more
on our conditioning so that is good.”

Samland said it would be good if at the end of
this experience, his Mavericks can return to Oma-
ha and if not duplicate last year’s sixth ranking in
the NCAA division II, then surpass it.

Lisa Wemhoff, a senior from Norfolk, Nebras-
ka, said her initial appearance here has been all
that she anticipated.

“T love it,” she stated. “We’ve only been here a
day, but the beaches are beautiful. The pool is
also very nice and we’re swimming very well in
it.”

@ THE Mavericks use the swim facilities yesterday.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

=





TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7B

&§ a i ~... SPORTS

Jaffer hits century to give India
upper hand on first day of third test

Mt CRICKET
CAPE TOWN, South
Africa
Associated Press |





WASIM Jaffer scored his

third test century on Tuesday

*.°. to lead India to 254 for three

wickets on day one of the third

and final test against South
Africa.

Jaffer's 116 took him past
1,000 test runs, but was. ended
when he edged the second new
ball delivery from Dale Steyn
. “to Jacques Kallis at second ship.
“If was Kallis' 100th catch in
tests, going alongside his 8,072
runs and 202 wickets.

He reached his century off
: the 19 balls and his innings last-

ed through lunch and tea, total-
ing exactly six hours, and con-
tained 15 fours in a chanceless
innings.

Sachin Tendulkar was on 28
at the close, together with
V.V.S. Laxman on 4...

Jaffer and Dinesh Karthik
built an opening partnership of
153, but Karthik was dismissed
with the first ball after tea, giv-
ing debut-making left-arm spin-
ner Paul Harris his first test

.’.’.Wicket. Karthik was adjudged

-_ to have got an inside edge onto

his pad and looped up a simple
catch to Hashim Amla at short
leg.

He had been dropped on:32
by Graeme Smith at first slip
off the bowling of Shaun Pol-
lock. A surprise choice as open-
er, Karthik withstood a short-
pitched barrage from Jacques
Kallis just before tea. |

India captain Rahul Dravid
won the toss'and was the only
other batsman to fall on a tough
day for the bowlers. He was on
. 29 when he edged a lifting deliv-

.cery from Pollock for wicket-
“keeper Mark Boucher to take
an easy catch.

The three-match series is tied
at 1-1 after India won the first

-.- test by 123 runs and South
_-. Africa the second by 174 runs; °

Harris worked hard, bowling
24 overs on his first day in test ~~ ~ ;
cricket, and finished with 1-74, a SOUTH AFRICA'S I bowler Paul Harris, center, celebrates with teammates after dismissing India's batsman Dinesh Karthik, left, for 63 runs on the first day of tlie
Pollock had. 1-32, and steve 3rd and final Test match against India at Newlands stadium in Cape Town, South Africa, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2007.
took 1-41 in 20 overs. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)





Chelsea de Ww again |
in the title race ;

CHELSEA'S French midfielder, Claude Makelele, right,
battles.for the ball with Aston Villa midfielder Steve Davies,
during their English Premier League soccer match at Villa
Park, Birmingham, England. Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2007. The
match finished 0-0 and Chelsea, the reigning: champions,
are now six points behind league leaders Manchester Unif-
ed.





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)



DAVID LANDSBERG, PUBLISHER | TOM FIEDLER, EXEC

OP



UTIVE EDITOR | JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR



INTERNA



NAL EDITION

__WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 | THA,





Is America becoming politically mature?

BY ELLEN GOODMAN

ellengoodman@globe.com

M aybe it wasn’t such a great Christ-
mas gift after all. The baseball

caps, emblazoned with the last day of

the Bush presidency — Jan. 19, 2009 —

seemed to offer my favorite Democratic

couple a light at the end ,,

of the tunnel. But some-

times it’s easier to see

the tunnel than the light.

Nevertheless, Janu-
ary is about to mark the
earliest opening for any
presidential campaign Ree
in memory. So allow me GOODMAN
to end the old year and begin the new by
taking a look at the question dominating
the news magazines and talk shows: Is
America ready for a president who isn’t
a white male?

The only Democrats who so far have
actually announced their candidacies are
indeed white and male, from Tom Vil-
sack to John Edwards. But the sexier and
racier question dominating the early
chatter is the possible mano-a-womano,
black-and-white matchup that could be
offered with Hillary Rodham Clinton or
Barack Hussein Obama atop the national
ticket.





Ready? Political readiness is not
exactly like reading readiness. For gen-

A resolution to do
the Right thing

BY CAL THOMAS
calthomas@tribune.com

othing focuses the political

mind like defeat. With
Democrats about to assume con-
trol of the House and Senate for
the first time in 12 years, Repub-
licans in general, conservatives
in particular and conservative
Christians especially have an
important choice to make.

For at least the next two”
years, they can forget about con-
firming many,’if any, judges who
disbelieve in legislating age:
from the bench. There |Â¥
won't be any John Rob-
ertses or Samuel Alitos
getting confirmed (or
probably nominated).
No Judiciary Committee
headed by Sen. Patrick

BS

Leahy, D-Vt., will allow THOMAS

any through, and while the fate
of the “Gang of 14” who vowed
in the last session not to partici-
pate in any filibuster of judicial
nominees except in extreme cir-
cumstances has yet to be deter-
mined, my guess is that their
influence will not be as great ina
Democratic Senate. Neither will
there be a “nuclear option”
because there will be no Repub-
lican majority leader who might
use it.

Cross most important social
issues off the conservative-reso-
lution list for the next two years.
Socially conservative freshman
Democrats are unlikely to press
them on a liberal leadership.
Liberals were happy to sleep
with pro-life and anti-same-sex-
marriage Democrats during the
campaign, but don’t look for
them to be respected in the post-
election morning.

Cross most important
social issues off

the conservative-
resolution list for

the next two years.

The choice conservative
Republicans must make is what
to do for the next two years.
They might consider following
the example of Sen. Sam
Brownback, R-Kansas. In some
ways Brownback, who is run-
ning for president, is trying to
reinvent what it means to be a
social conservative. To be more
precise, he is trying to take the
movement back to first princi-
ples, demonstrating what he is
for, rather than what or whom
he is against.

World magazine, a conserva-
tive evangelical publication, fol-
lowed Brownback into the infa-
mous Louisiana penitentiary at
Angola, which became known
to the public through the films
Monster’s Ball and Dead Man
Walking. Earlier this month,
Brownback addressed 700
inmates in the prison chapel

and then spent the night in a jail _



cell along with writer Marvin
Olasky, who says his “neigh-
bors” were a serial rapist and a
drug-cartel killer.

Brownback answered ques-
tions from the inmates, who are
used to hearing: “tough on
crime” messages from conser-
vative. Republicans, none of
whom to my recollection ever
began a presidential campaign
in a place like Angola. When
they got up the next morning,
Brownback and Olasky visited

‘Death Row. A cynic might say

Brownback was grand-
standing, but that cynic
would have to answer
“for whom?” People
who back prison reform
and social-justice issues
have mostly been Dem-
ocrats and political lib-
erals. Such issues don’t
play well among the “lock ‘em
up and throw away the key”
crowd.

What I find most appealing
about Brownback’s approach is
his positive tone. It came from a
cancer scare he had in 1995. For
nine months he was unsure of
the outcome. “That’s when I felt
helpless,” he said. He emerged
from cancer with a clean bill of
health and also a spiritual trans-
formation. “Before 1995, I was
in attack mode,” he told Olasky.
Now he’s a changed person.
The tone, though not the sub-
stance, of his politics has also
changed.

Social conservatives and
Republicans might consider
Brownback’s example. If they
keep in mind the end, but
change tactics, their prospects
for achieving their ends might
be greatly improved. Too many
of their constituents have been

_conditioned by the negative

approach.

In fundraising letters, in pub-
lic pronouncements and from
some pulpits has come political
and ideological invective that is
not only unbecoming to the
source of such statements but
serves as a bad example to oth-
ers. It has the added downside
of converting no one to the con-
servative point of view and
turning off even some people
who niight otherwise be
inclined to vote for Republi-
cans.

Here’s my suggested resolu-
tion for the Republican conser-
vative-Christian voter, courtesy
of singer-songwriter Glen
Campbell:

You got to try a little kindness

Yes show a little kindness

Just shine your light for every-
one to see

And if you try a little kindness

Then you’ll overlook the
blindness

Of narrow-minded people on
the narrow-minded streets.

From a political standpoint,
the best part of this strategy is
that it works and might even
prompt more people to vote
Republican in 2008.

©2006 Tribune Media Services

erations, strategists and psychologists
have posed the same chicken-and-egg
riddle for social change. Do you need a
change in attitudes before you can suc-
ceed in changing real life? Or does a
change in reality produce a change in
attitudes?

The answer is, of course, yes.

Having lived through enormous
change, having seen people resist
change, adjust and then protect and pro-
mote one new “status quo” after
another, I think we operate with too
much fear about “readiness” and too
much pessimism about backlash.

I sometimes think we have two very
different national attitudes toward the
pace of technological change and the

‘pace of political change. It’s as if we

were all eager, early adopters when it
comes to iPods, and late adopters when
it comes to presidents.

As we turn to 2007 and 2008, I don’t
think we have to be cockeyed optimists
to believe that Americans can get
beyond seeing “a female” and “a black”
to seeing a candidate.

Consider Massachusetts, where a
Mormon Republican white man is being
followed into the governor’s office by an
African-American Democratic man who
defeated a white Republican woman?
Was Massachusetts “ready” for “a” Mor-
mon before Mitt Romney? Was it ready

for “an” African-American before Deval
Patrick?

Let's take the briefest stock of the
individual strengths and weaknesses of
the two way-too-early front-runners in
the Democratic Party. There is no doubt
that Democrats have developed a crush
on Obama, a man of thoughtful charm,
relaxed intelligence and ineffable
authenticity. The reservations against
him are that he’s unknown, untested and
“young.” (Memo to the baby-boomer
media dubbing him as young: No, you
were not young at 45.)

Whether that crush becomes a com-
mitment depends on how his “authentic-
ity” survives delivering a stump speech
14 times a day under a Jon Stewart
watchdog. And how resilient he is after
the inevitable YouTube moment.

As for Hillary? If Barack is the new
boy on the block, Hillary is the smarter, ,
sadder-but-wiser gal. For the first time
in history, a female candidate is the most
experienced, the most ready-on-Day-
One option for the Oval Office.

Yet the reservations about her have
to do with her baggage, her husband and
her haters. Hillary’s success will depend
perversely on whether she can convince
those Democrats who would vote for
her that others will too. Her election
depends on being seen as “electable.”

I don’t dismiss racism and sexism in

these equations. I watched the campaign
ads against Harold Ford Jr. in Tennes-
see. | heard Rahm Emanuel ask, “What
the %*&* happened to my women?,”
when only three of 17 Democratic
women candidates challenging Republi-
cans for congressional seats won. But
Clinton and Obama are individuals with
very personal stories. Not class actions.

In Newsweek, 93 percent of Ameri-
cans said they would vote for an Afri-
can-American for president but only 56
percent believed that the country is
ready for one. Similarly, 86 percent said
they would vote for a woman but only 55
percent believed the country. was ready
for one.

Traditionally, if cynically, we assume
that the lower figure is the one that mat-
ters, the real one. But maybe that gap
between us and them — open-minded us
and close-minded them — doesn’t grow
out of an inflated view of ourselves but a
deflated view of our country.

Is the country ready? Almost all
Americans believe or want to believe
that they would vote for a president
without prejudice. That’s either an agent
for change or an indicator of change. If
we believe we vote for the person, not
the race or the gender, maybe we will.
2007, 2008. Ready — or not — here we

0.
: ©2006 Washington Post Writers Group



CWS/NYTS
KAL/THE ECONOMIST, LONDON, ENGLAND

Last year’s goofs and corrections

BY DAVID S. BRODER
davidbroder@washpost.com

he controversies of the year past —

Iraq, immigration, domestic sur-
veillance and the rest, plus the political
battles that climaxed in the Democratic
victories in November — all contrib-
uted to an exception- -
ally heavy load of
reader-generated cor-
rections and objec-
tions. Thanks to e-mail,
many more of you are
now contributing to
this annual year-end |@aial
“goofs” column, where BRODER
I review (and repent) some of the judg-
ments and misjudgments of the past
year.

e To start with the simplest, in an
August piece about Ohio politics, I
wrote that Ted Strickland was trying to
become the first congressman since
Rutherford B. Hayes to be elected gov-
ernor of Ohio. Several of you pointed
out that I had ignored two subsequent
figures who moved from Congress to
that governorship, James M. Cox and
Frank B. Willis.

’ @ Aninterview with Bill Gates pro-

duced a wave of protests. The Micro-
soft billionaire was in Washington to
lobby for an expansion of the H-1B visa
program, which provides entry for
foreign-born scientists and engineers
who hold job offers in the United States.
Gates said the limit on their numbers
was hurting America’s competitive
position.

The letter-writers, many of whom
identified themselves as unemployed or
underemployed people with similar
skills, claimed that the H-1B workers
were taking their jobs and working at
lower wages. I waded through a mass of
testimony and evidence, supplied by



both sides in the controversy, without
being able to resolve the issue. It will
likely come up again when the next
Congress tackles immigration reform,
and this time, I promise I’ll look at both
sides before I write about it.

e | had a similar experience when I
wrote about Sen. Joe Biden’s proposal
for decentralizing the government of
Iraq, allowing more authority for sepa-
rate Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish regions. I
commended the Biden proposal as a
step forward from what was already,
last May, a seriously stalemated and
deteriorating situation in Iraq.

But after the column appeared, I
received several communications from
people with as much knowledge of Iraq
as Biden possesses. They argued that
such a step toward federalism had seri-
ous dangers. It would be difficult to
apply in urban areas such as Baghdad,
where populations are mixed, and it
risked, the correspondents said, inviting
other countries such as Iran and Turkey
to spread their influence into a parti-
tioned Iraq.

Those same objections have blocked
adoption of the Biden plan, but mean-
time, Iraqis fleeing violence have
increasingly separated themselves into
Shiite or Sunni strongholds, leaving the
situation even worse than if there had
been an orderly and legal division of
authority.

e Another column that drew great
protest was one where I took my col-
leagues in the media to task for their
treatment of Karl Rove in the Valerie
Plame leak investigation. When the spe-
cial prosecutor announced he was not
charging Rove with anything, I
reviewed some of the many articles that
had accused the White House aide of
masterminding the “outing” of Plame
and said that an apology was in order.

The e-mail and letter-writers argued

that the simple fact that Rove had
escaped prosecution did not mean that
he was innocent of using his position to
harass and frustrate critics of the
administration. He had, after all, con-
firmed Plame’s identity to at least two
reporters working on the story. Even if
the original leak came from elsewhere,
these letter-writers said, Rove was no
innocent.

But I still believe there is an impor-
tant cautionary tale for the press in the
Rove-Plame story. Too many of us got
way ahead of the facts and let our suspi-
cions grow into assumptions and asser-
tions for which we had no evidence.
That tendency to get ahead of the story
is rampant in the media just now, fed by
the speedup of news delivery through
the Internet and cable. Just look at the
stories announcing — in 2006 — who
are “serious” candidates for president
in 2008.

e Speaking of politics, I’m embar-
rassed to say that the one state I wrote
about that I got wrong was Michigan,
where I spent enough time to have
known better. I thought Gov. Jennifer
Granholm was going to be sunk by the
auto industry unemployment, but she
put on a great campaign and won.

On the other hand, I saw both stages
of the Connecticut race correctly — Joe
Lieberman losing the primary but win-
ning as an independent in November.
And the downfall of the Republican
Congress and rise of an independent
breed of Democrats was forecast here
from early March onward.

e But a column about Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton, touching lightly on the
state of her marriage, drew lots of cat-
calls — a tip-off that this subject will be
a tough one to handle if she ehters the
presidential race.

Bring on 2007.

©2006 Washington Post Writers Group

The next Congress most likely will tackle the issue of immigration reform.
This time, I promise I'll look at both sides before I write about it.



Full Text


me

PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

Call for live public debates
ahead of general election

WITH less than five
months to go to the next gen-
eral election, a new call has
been made for all candidates
to be subjected to live public
debates.

In this way, voters will be
spared “lame duck” and
“makeweight” candidates -
and get a chance to assess the
characters of.candidates
before they go to the polls.

The call came yesterday
from Clever Duncombe, the
fathers’ rights champion who
is contesting Immigration
Minister Shane Gibson’s
Golden Gates seat as an inde-
pendent.

He said too many MPs had
been elected in the past who
were clearly not up to the job.

COUNTDOWN



They were political choices
who had none of the qualities
required for parliament.

Mr Duncombe said: “Prime
Minister Perry Christie ought
to jump at the chance to. have
all candidates involved in
public debates.

“After all, he won debating
compétitions while at college,
so he ought to be very excited
about it.”







Mr Duncombe has in the
past criticised low-grade MPs
who had neither the character
nor intellect to be parliamen-
tary representatives.

He said live debates in pub-
lic forums - all televised by
ZNS - would expose poor
candidates and give voters a
chance to assess the worth of
those they were voting for.

“We need to eliminate the
rhetoric and separate fact
from fiction in our politics,”

_ he added, “that’s why I am

advocating live debates, so
that we can get a better
understanding of what is
going on.”

In the past, political parties
had relied heavily on pre-elec-
tion rallies. But these were
not debating exercises, only
occasions for rhetoric and slo-
gans, Mr Duncombe believes.

To raise the standard of
MPs, all candidates ought to
be subjected to live debates +
as with US presidential can-

didates - so that their views

can be tested on the spot.

“We want commonsense
and intelligence as prerequi-
sites for anyone being elected
to parliament and live debates
ought to be incorporated into
all election campaigns.”

The PLP was criticised after

_ the 2002 election for select-

ing “makeweight” candidates
for constituencies it was not

expecting to win.

However, because of the
party’s unexpected victory,
many of these sub-standard
candidates ended up in par-

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‘



PART OF YOUR LIFE



@ FATHERS’ rights champion Clever Duncombe

liament, to the embarrass-
ment of all concerned.

Mr Duncombe said he
looks forward to meeting Mr
Gibson in a live debate along
with any other candidate
standing for the Golden
Gates constituency.

“Tn all my travels round the

constituency, it is felt that the
minister has failed miserably
to articulate any plan for the
area. As a result, I feel he
could lose. Our response from
Golden Gates has been great,
and it’s clear that Mr
Gibson has no firm grip on
the area.”



’ 1A

na Nicole

is given 21
days to have
DNA test

ANNA NICOLE SMITH
has been given 21 days to
complete DNA testing on
her three-month-old daugh-
ter,

A Los Angeles judge has
ordered the former reality
star to complete tests by Jan-
uary 23 or face the legal con-
sequences.

The ruling by Superior
Court judge Robert Schnider
is the result of action taken
through the Californian
courts by her former
boyfriend, Larry Birkhead.

Mr Birkhead, a press pho-
tographer, said Ms Smith’s
baby Dannie Lynn Hope is
the product of a two-year
relationship he had with the
cover girl.

Ms Smith gave birth at
Doctors Hospital, Nassau,
on September 7 last year —
three days before her 20-
year-old son Daniel was
found dead at her bedside.

She had reportedly fled to
the Bahamas to escape a
media frenzy in California.
But Mr Birkhead alleges that
she left the United States to
evade his paternity claims.

Since then, Mr Birkhead ~
helped by celebrity attorney
Debra Opri — has been lob-
bying for recognition as the
baby’s true father,

The judge’s ruling puts
more pressure on Ms Smith
as she takes refuge at Hori-
zons, the Eastern Road
house now at the centre of

TROPICAL
Oars Re) Gy

ay MH tb
seal



LAK

a ANNA NICOLE SMITH
(AP FILE Photo)

litigation brought by another

- ex-boyfriend, South Carolina

realtor Ben Thompson.

It leaves her under a legal
obligation to undergo the
DNA tests, or face the judg-
ment of the Californian
courts.

Ms Smith’s lawyer-lover,
Howard K_ Stern, has
claimed to be the baby’s
father and his name is on the
birth certificate,

Mr Birkhead has begun
action in the Bahamas
Supreme Court against Ms
Smith and Mr Stern alleging
fraud and slander.



















THE TRIBUNE



Firearm and
drugs are |
confiscated

OFFICERS from the |
mobile division confiscated a
firearm and small amount of
drugs while patrolling
through Flint Street on Mon-
day night.

According to Inspector |
Walter Evans, the incident
took place sometime around
1ipm.

He explained that a man in
the area dropped a jacket
upon seeing the officers.

“The officers approached

.and they found that under-
neath the jacket he con-
cealed a sawed-off shot gun
which contained two live
rounds of ammunition.

“In addition, he had some
substance in his pocket in a
clear plastic bag, the grassy
substance was found to be
Marijuana,” Inspector Evans
reported.

A man has been detained
and is being questioned in
connection with the matter.

Actor Edward
James Olmos
accuses Puerto
Rico, Washington
of delaying
Vieques cleanup

@ SAN JUAN,
Puerto Rico

ACTOR Edward James
Olmos on Tuesday criti- -
cized the United States
and Puerto Rico for not _
moving faster to clean up
the site of a former bomb-
ing range on Vieques
Island, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Olmos, an Oscar nomi-
nee for the 1988 movie
"Stand and Deliver," said
officials "have done noth-
ing" to restore an area
that environmentalists say
is tainted by dangerous
pollutants nearly four
years after the departure
of the U.S. Navy.

“We are not going to
stop until we make them
see that a (cleanup) is
necessary," Olmos said at
a news conference in the
Puerto Rican capital of
San Juan.

The Navy, which with-
drew from Vieques in
May 2003 following three
years of steady protests,
has begun controlled det-
onations of unexploded
bombs in sections of the
21-mile-long (33-kilome-
ter-long) island and near-
by waters.

This has sparked
renewed protests by resi-
dents who say the explo-
sions are causing more
environmental damage on
Vieques, some 6 miles (10
kilometers) off the south-
eastern coast of mainland
Puerto Rico.

Olmos also urged Puer-
to Rican legislators to
block the construction of
large tourist resorts on
undeveloped beaches in
the U.S. Caribbean terri-
tory.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Ye
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 3



se ae re

0 In brief

Still no
update on
‘peating’ of
journalist

AS one year approaches since
the alleged beating of a an
American journalist by Defence
Force officers outside the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, police are still unable
to give an update on the status
of the investigation into the
matter.

Chief Superintendent Hulan
Hanna said yesterday that he is
unable to say where the inves-
tigation is at this point, but
assured the press that the inci-
dent has not been ignored or
put aside.

"The matter is pretty much
at the forefront and I'm hoping
that it is only a matter of time
before the public and principals
involved would know how the
matter is to be fully and finally
determined. It is not out of sight
and not out of mind," he said.

"There are many times when
an investigation may move out
of the public and you're doing
things in the background and it
is from one agency to the next,
but I know it is not something
that has been silently put away."

According to Mr Hanna, the
international media is still mon-
itoring the progress of the inves-
tigation, inquiring about it from
time to time.

The assault caused protests
and calls for a tourism boycott
on the Bahamas by Cuban-
Americans, in the shadow of a
contentious immigration issue
involving two Cuban dentists.

No charges |
so far over
alleged RBDF
assault

CHARGES have yet to be
brought as a result of the inves-
tigation into the alleged assault
by Defence Force officers on
an Inagua man.

Chief Superintendent of
Police ‘Hulan Hanna said that
"the police have done their duty
regarding the investigation and
again it is one of those instances
where the file has been for-
warded."

‘"No charges have been
brought, but the investigations
have pretty much been done
and the file has been forwarded
with observations and recom-
mendations," he said

"Again the persons in the
community of Inagua need not
be perturbed that they will not
gei the final results and conclu-
sions, because that information
will be sent out."

Two weeks ago, a source

close to the police told The Tri- :

bune that a disturbing number
of criminal files are being
requested by the office of the
Attorney General.
. It was alleged that this has
created hold-ups in the timely
prosecution of cases and
delayed the administration of
justice.

Young man
suspected of
attempted
housebreaking

THE POLICE are asking the
public to be on the look out for
a young man suspected of
attempted housebreaking.

He is of medium build, about
five feet 10 inches tall, is in his
mid-20s and weighs around
180lbs.

The attempted break-in took
place on December 12 at
11.14am on Mount Royal
- Avenue.

' The pubic is advised to con-
tact the police with any infor-
mation concerning this individ-
ual at 919, 322-3333, Crime Tip-
sters at 328-8477, or the Cen-
tral Detective Unit at 32-22561.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning -
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.






CRITICS of the proposed
new Bahamas health insurance
scheme have been given a big
boost by the latest troubles in
the British national health ser-
vice.

Hospitals in parts of the UK
have been told not to operate
on patients until they have
been on a waiting list for up to
20 weeks, according to leaked
documents seen by London’s
Daily Telegraph.

The move, it is claimed, is
aimed at coping with the-finan-
cial crisis in the country’s health
scheme, which has made treat-
ment available to all since the
1940s.

Instructions have gone

out to hospital administra-
tors saying treatment should
be delayed as long as pos-
sible.

In one letter, according to
the Telegraph, hospital man-
agers are told to work out how
many operations can be put off
until the start of the new finan-
cial year in April.

The disclosures, said the

_paper, show how much effect a

£1.3 billion deficit run up by
health trusts is having on
patient care.

Instructions to delay treat-
ment have been sent to man-
agers in eastern England, the
worst-performing area. They
have been told of the urgent

need to “get a grip” on bud-
gets.

Delays

This was leading to “artifi-
cial delays” in patient care.
Shadow health secretary
Andrew Lansley told the Tele-
graph: “These patients are
being deliberately obstructed
in accessing treatment they
need, despite hospitals having
paid for the staff who can treat
them.”

The proposed Bahamas
scheme, which has now been
voted through the House of
Assembly, has come in for

Baha Mar management says
decision to raise course
prices ‘purely commercial’

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE decision to increase
the prices of the Cable Beach
Golf Course remains
unchanged — despite the fact
that local golfers have threat-
ened to continue agitation
about what they describe as
“discriminatory” practices.

On December 21 the Baha
Mar Group, which is behind
the 2.3 billion redevelopment
plan for the Cable Beach strip,
raised fees for the peek win-
ter season on the golf course.

At the moment, guests of

. Radisson Cable Beach, Nas-
sau Beach Hotel and Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort pay $110
for a weekend round of golf.

Guests of the Crystal Palace
Casino pay $90, walk-in guests
— Bahamians and tourist not
staying at the above mentioned

hotels — pay $185 and
Bahamas Golf Federation
members pay $90.

Last week, a group of local
golfers demonstrated at the
course, claiming the course’s
management was trying to
“price out” local golfers.

One of the members of the
group, veteran politician Hen-
ry Bostwick warned that the
protesters would not be
“pushed back into the ghetto”
and he threatened the course’s
management with further
demonstrations.

Yesterday, Mr Robert
“Sandy” Sands, spokesman for
the Baha Mar Group, told The
Tribune the decision to
increase prices was purely
commercial, and was dictated
by market prices.

“While we appreciate the
patronage of the local golfers,
we have to ensure that our golf

course remains a financially
viable option that can only be
derived from the income of the
operation of the course,” said
Mr Sands.

He said local golfers who are
intent on protesting the
increase in prices at the course
should look at the rates of oth-
er golf courses in the country —
because, he claimed, “the rates
at the Cable Beach Course are
very concessionary.”

But, according to Mr Bost-
wick, “What they are attempt-
ing to do is duplicate at Cable
Beach, what has in fact hap-
pened at Paradise Island.

“Unless you have wealthy
friends who are residents on
Paradise Island or members of
a club its difficult to play,
because the locals have been
priced out of Paradise Island,
and that’s exactly what has hap-
pened to Cable Beach at the

Future of former frequent Bahamas
visitor the Queen Mary uncertain

FORTY years ago, she
could sometimes be seen
moored resplendently “over
the bar” outside Nassau har-
bour.

The Queen Mary, and. her
sister ship the Queen Eliza-
beth, were frequent visitors to
the Bahamas during their
many years as Cunard liners.

However, today the Queen
Mary is a rusting hulk stand-
ing among tankers, cranes and
container ships at Long
Beach, California.

And her future lies in the
balance with her owners in
bankruptcy and Long Beach
councillors seeking bids for
rights to the ship and the 55-
acre site surrounding it.

During her time in Long
Beach, the Queen Mary has
been a hotel and tourist attrac-
‘tion. But her future is now
uncertain as politicians try to
thrash out a deal with poten-
tial buyers.

So far, according to The
Guardian of London, 17 bids
have been received, and Long
Beach officials hope the ship
will be refurbished by any new
owner.

While many Californians
want the old liner to stay in
Long Beach, at least one
British businessman wants her
back in Glasgow, where she
was launched in 1934.

Property developer Alan
Pocock has a £5 million plan
to take the 80,774-ton Queen
Mary “back home” to become
a tourist attraction on the Riv-
er Clyde.

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Wi THE Queen Mary 2, the world’s largest ocean liner, top



right, moves near its historic namesake the Queen Mary,
docked below on Thursday, Feb. 23, 2006, at the Long Beach

Harbor, in Long Beach, Calif.

But Long Beach locals
describe the ship as “an icon
of our city” and are deter-
mined to keep her where they
feel she belongs.

The Queen Mary was taken
to California in December,
1967, after her cruising career
was over. She was greeted by
a million spectators at the time
and still draws 1.2 million vis-
itors a year, many lured by her
reputation as the most haunt-
ed liner in history.

During her heyday as a
transatlantic liner linking
Britain with New York, she
provided luxurious transport
for royalty, film stars and
world leaders, including Win-
ston Churchill, who was later
to give his name to the ship’s


















ioe i?

- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)







(Photo/Damian Dovarganes) ,

state dining room. -

During the war, both the
Queen Mary and Queen Eliza-
beth were used as troop ships.
The Queen Elizabeth eventu-
ally came to grief in Hong Kong
harbour after serving as a Flori-
da tourist attraction.

heavy fire from critics.

They say the $235 million
earmarked for the scheme will
be insufficient to meet the
country’s needs - and probably
have an adverse effect on
patient care.

While accepting the princi-

ple of “medical care for all”,
they feel a compulsory health
insurance scheme for everyone
could lead to financial disaster.

One critic said: “Bahamians
are going to be forced to pay
money off their pay cheques
every month for a service
which will be open to every-
one, and that includes immi-
grants, legal and illegal.

“As the British national

moment,” stated Mr Bostwick.
The Tribune attempted to
contact other golf courses for a

@ A PROTESTER making his point last week

‘UK health system problems
spark fears over NHI future

health service has proved,
something seen as a ‘free’ ser-
vice sends up demand at an
alarming rate.”

The PLP government has
been accused of introducing

the health scheme as a vote- |

catcher in the run-up to the
general election without think-
ing through the financial con-
sequences.

While the British scheme
works well in some areas, it
often falls down in congested
urban districts where demand
exceeds resources.

Long. queues, long waiting
lists for operations, and mixed
wards are among the short-

‘comings of the British system.

THES
TO BAWTITANS



copy of their price lists, but calls
were not returned up to press
time.

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Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com




VU bie ‘

PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

a ——————
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR . .

The Tribune Limited Thoughts on |

&

+

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

ke

ro

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Nassau Fax: -

(242) 328-2398

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Stopping drugs is our real focus

FARM ROAD residents live in fear of esca-
lating crime in their community — in fact all
Bahamians today fear for their lives at the
hands of the criminal.

Many of these crimes are probably rooted in
the growing drug trade, yet emotionalism over
the arrest of five baggage handlers is diverting
attention from what should be our present
focus — stopping drug trafficking and reducing
crime.

This is not to suggest that our laws can be
broken by arresting any of our citizens, but
neither are we saying that any Bahamian should
be allowed to use our laws to circumvent the
consequences of their illegal acts.

We are making no judgment on the bag-
gage handlers. We are not speculating on their
guilt or innocence. We trust that their cases
will be thoroughly investigated and that they
will have a fair trial. If found innocent they
will be returned to their families, if not they will
suffer the consequences of their own free choice
— breaking society’s laws.

Demonstrations, attempts to bring down a
government, and what seems to be a tendency
for many Bahamians to turn drug dealers like

“Ninety” Knowles into folk heroes, should not
be allowed to cloud the real issues — the
Bahamas does not have a secure airport. If
drugs can be smuggled, so can bombs be plant-
ed. But what is most worrying is that drug deal-
ing in this country is being tolerated and pro-
tected by too many.

When The Tribune started to investigate
the case of the baggage handlers, too’ many
airport workers seemed to know what was
going on, too many appeared not to be sur-
prised at what had happened — in fact they
had anticipated it. If our impressions are correct
then why were arrests not made sooner? Are
we slipping back into the eighties when
Bahamians were afraid to talk, drug dealers
were accepted into society because they had
rings on their fingers, baubles around their
necks, drove flashy cars and waved $100 bills,
while dazzled young Bahamians wrote school
essays about wanting to be drug dealers when
they grew up?

This is where our attention should be
focused — to raise society’s moral standards
and stop this downward trend into degrada-
tion. And if any of the baggage handlers can
give any information that will help to identify
the middle men, leading to the head of the
smuggling ring, they would be doing this coun-
try a great service.

Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son, as a guest on a radio talk show, admitted
that she did not know why Bahamian police
chose not to arrest the five suspects. However,
she was confident that they had a “very good

“MARINE NAVIGATION

COURSES

In a nation of islands it is essential to be able
to navigate over the horizon with confidence.
Prepare for safe voyaging by enrolling in the
Terrestrial Navigation Course offered by The
Bahamas School of Marine Navigation. Plan
to attend the free first class on Monday, January
8th, at 7 p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
535-6234 or
pgk434@netscape.net. Other courses include ,

Seamanship and Celestial Navigation.

Bay Street. Details: 364-2861,



To All Valued Patients of

Dr. Richard E. Crawford’s Office
Located on Mackey Street, The Plaza
Please be advised that the office will Reopen

Tuesday Jan. 2nd, 2007

With Yasmine Williams Robinson MBBS,
DRCOG, MRCGP Family Medicine Specialist
Tel: 242-393-3025/Fax: 242-393-8452



“way that the police can nab the

reason.”

Neither do we pretend to know why. Many
Bahamian cynics will probably dismiss it by
suggesting that some policemen are probably in
cahoots with the dealers. This is an easy way
out. We know that there are some questionable
police officers on the force, but we also know
that the force has many honourable men and
women. Our contention has always been that
our judicial system needs a complete overhaul.
Some sentences handed down suggest that
some of our magistrates live on another planet
and. are not aware of the seriousness of the
escalating crime — and the need for tough pun-
ishment.

It would be interesting to know how many
persons charged with murder are out on bail
and walking our streets. Just as a special traffic
court was “opened to take care of traffic
offences, there should be a special court to
hear all the murder cases pending.

It is not uncommon to hear policemen com-
plain that they no sooner get an offender to
the bar ofthe court than he is back on the

street on bail, and they are having to hunt him

down again for another crime.

Faced with such a situation anyone would be

happy to facilitate arrests where there is in fact

“swift justice” and the sentence fits the crime.
The serious penalties for drugs in the United
States — five to LO years or even longer — are
certainly an inducement for those lower down
the drug chain to sing like canaries. And that,
unfortunately, in dealing with crime is the only
“godfather”
of the lot.

We suggest that the only reason the Amer-
icans are interested in the baggage handlers is
that they are the first route to those who are
actually calling the tune.

Today our full attention should be on the
security of our airport and the reduction of
drug peddling. Nothing should distract us from
that objective. If the drug handlers are innocent,
they'll come home.

Meanwhile those who are in the drug trade
should get out immediately. It is a dangerous
business that everyone who takes it up knows
has major risks. If they are prepared to take the
risks, then they should be adult enough to face
the consequences. We do not approve of an
illegal arrest — which is not to suggest that the
baggage handlers were arrested illegally — but

the drug dealer should know that that is anoth-.

er risk he is taking.

If drug dealers persist in their nefarious busi-
hess and are caught, don’t cry foul for we can
assure you that this is one newspaper that will
not come to your defence. You and your trade
have done too much damage to the moral fibre
of our country to warrant a sympathetic ear.



airport’s US
pre-clearance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE comments by His
Excellency The US Ambas-
sador in a recent interview
with one of the media houses
rather surprises me as I think
he should know and fully
understand that if it was not
for his country’s security
requirements, Homeland
Security/TSA no person
would have to be at the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport two-three hours prior
to a flight.

You have to be at the air-

port, ready to check-in, not
heading to the airport two-
three hours prior to the flight.

Our airport, probably the
only airport in the world, for
some reason we have to go
through metal detectors and
baggage screening twice
although we have been in a
secure and sterile area effec-
tively immediately after
checking-in. If the second
inspection on the first floor of
the Departure Lounge was
eliminated check-in would be
speeded-up considerably and
effectively there would be no
loss of security.

Whilst dealing with Home-
land Security - US Pre-clear-
ance— checked recently with
my travel agent and to my
shock I discovered that there
is a fee of US $26 for each pas-
senger passing through US
Pre-clearance in The
Bahamas. I roughly calculate
that’s total revenue stream for
the US Treasury right here
generated through our spend-
ing US $40 million on pro-
moting our destination in
excess of US $40,000,000 plus
and guess what all we get out
of that is the facility!

Imagine if The Bahamas
was to receive 50 per cent? In
10-years we could pay in full
for a $200 million spanking
new International Airport
without adding one new dime
in fees or passenger service
charges, coming soon folks at
The Lynden Pindling Airport.

It’s sort of like the revenue
The Bahamas is unable to col-
lect from ‘over-flights’, planes
flying over 12,000 ft over The
Bahamas, again estimated to
exceed a potential revenue of
$40 million. Even if we only
received 50 per cent here
again we could collect over
$40,000,000 every year till thy
kingdom comes and pay for
everything at The Lynden Pin-
dling Airport within five-
years!

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“+,

a

4

r
af

surely you can politely speak ,
to your fellas in Washington |;
and get them to share a little ©
of this with The Bahamas?

Das mbs tS

letters@tribunemedia.net








Dear Mr Ambassador, we H HUMES
are sad that you are leaving Naseais wr
us but as a parting gesture December: 2006 i

2006 has been:
an ‘annus
miriabilis’ for
the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS year has been an ‘annus miriabilis’ for The Bahamas...
We have faced several challenges in the societal and economic-;
areas but, over all, we did not do too badly in 2006.

Of course, the average politician continues to baffle theo
expectations of his/her constituents but, it ain’t long now. The".
looming general elections will be decisive and will decide the.”
way forward, or backwards, for the nation. 1G

There were far too many homicides and assaults against the~
person during 2006 and it is my prayer that we Bahamians will”.
learn to resolve our apparent conflicts without resorting eae
blood shed and mayhem.

On the economic front we have seen and heard about numer-—
ous ‘anchor projects’ but far too many small Bahamians are *
unable to access a small affordable piece of land on which to.
construct a modest home. We need foreign investment but we
cannot continue to ‘sell’ out our choice real estate, willy-nilly, for -
a few dollars and a handful of construction jobs.

If I were to have one more wish I would ask that the govern-_
ment bring resolution to the tragedy of the living victims and sur-
vivors of the celebrated ‘Sea Hauler’ episode. It cannot be:,
right that these people, like the displaced workers down at the
Royal Oasis, should not have an enjoyable and merry Christmas.
while the rest of us, pig out on ham and turkey.

On balance, however, those of us who will live tc see this |
Christmas, have much to be thankful for. As we prepare to.
leap into the New Year, let us not forget that we are still our:
brother’s keeper. To God then, that Great Deliverer aml Sus’
tainer, in all things, b@the glory.

ORTLAND H Mo
BODIE JR
Nassau,

December 21, 2006.

‘Promises made |
by Perry Christie”

EDITOR, The Tribune.
DO YOU recall these

promises made by Perry G
Christie, now four and a half

e And, most important of,
all, I promise you that all my;
efforts as your Prime Minis-
ter will be directed to only one,

years later, is the promise he — end: x
made was fulfilled. to end human suffering.
E-mail m e- where I find it; &,)
(petertcarey@yahoo.ca) and to give hope where I see}
let me know what you think... despair;
The Hon Perry G Christie - to bring compassion where!
Clifford Park April 26, 2002. see cruelty; *
¢ I promise you good gov- to plant love in place of
ernment. hate; and ®
e I promise you honest gov- to join hands and heart$
ernment. with you as we walk together
e | promise you competent out of the darkness into the
government. redeeming light of a new era

of peace and prosperity for

e I promise you compas-
all Bahamians, united and

sionate government.

e I promise you a govern- free! Cn
ment of humility and not of I have my views but I ang
arrogance; dying to hear yours first. :

e | promise you a govern- The Bahamas, the capital of
ment for all Bahamians, black — the World.

and white, rich and poor, PLP Please register to vote.
and FNM, CDR and BDM.

e | promise you that I will
dedicate my life in public
office to being your servant

and not your master.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are —
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PETER T CAREY :
Nassau,
December 26, 2006.

ae













SN SAN
\
S
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Man denies
charge of
marijuana
possession

A PINEWOOD Gardens
man was granted $5,000 bail
yesterday after pleading not
guilty to a drug possession
charge.

Randy Mackey, 29, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel at court eight
in Bank Lane yesterday.

He was charged with pos-
session of marijuana with the
intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Satur-
day, December 30, Mackey
was found in possession of
half an ounce of marijuana.

The case was adjourned to
May 21.

Cuban priests
foresee better
economy in
yearly forecast

@ HAVANA

TOP priests of Cuba’s
African-influenced Santeria
religion issued their yearly
forecast on Tuesday, predict-
ing that the island will enjoy a
better economy but suffer
more health problems in 2007,
according to Associated Press.

Competing groups of San-
teria priests, or babalaos,
gather every New Year's Eve
for religious ceremonies that
include chanting and animal
sacrifices. Cubans eagerly
look forward to the so-called
Letter of the Year released in
the next days, containing
vague predictions which can
be interpreted in many ways.

This year’s letter did not
say much about likely the
biggest question on Cubans'
minds: the uncertain health
of 80-year-old leader Fidel
Castro, who temporarily
stepped aside five months
ago following emergency
surgery for intestinal bleed-
ing. He has not been seen in
public since.

‘But Victor Betancourt of
the Miguel Febres Padron
gtoup of some 950 Santeria
priests said Castro's physi-
cians could draw some advice
from the letter.

“The doctors attending to
that case should be careful
there are no complications ...
or an infection,” Betancourt
told reporters.

But Cubans — and people
around the world — this year
must watch out for epidemics,
changes in personal relation-
ships, broken agreements and
possible military interven-
tions, Betancourt added.

The smaller Yoruba Asso-
ciation of Cuba predicted that
health will be a major issue
for Cuba in the new year and
cautioned Cubans to take care
of themselves and eat well.

Santeria is a mix of spiritu-
al traditions carried here by
African slaves and Catholi-
cism brought by Spaniards.
The faith is practiced
throughout Cuba and even
many members of the Com-
munist Party follow its rituals.

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@ By ARTHIA NIXON-STACK

ELEUTHERA is looking
forward to a happy new year,
thanks to a dramatic rise in
tourism business over the fes-
tive season.

An island which has been in
the doldrums for decades
enjoyed a powerful infusion of
foreign money over the Christ-
mas and New Year holidays.

From college-aged visitors at
the Governor's Harbour fish fry
outnumbering locals to David
Curoso, star of CSI:Miami,
pulling up in his private plane,
Eleuthera proved to be the hol-
iday hotspot for quite a few
Germans, Italians, Canadians
and Americans.

Even beaches that boast
seclusion were crowded daily
with sunbathers, bone fisher-
men and yuppies scouting out
property.

Relieved residents, who have
witnessed an economic depres-
sion in recent years, have final-
ly reached a comfort level with
the new growth in business.

"Thad to turn down four jobs
on New Year's Eve," said
Arthur Nixon, a Bahamahost
tour-taxi driver who owns one
of the few 10-seater vehicles on
the island.

"All of the private homes are
booked and all of my cars have

been rented. We've been quite

busy and it looks like we still
have a few more weeks of this
left so all we can do is take

advantage of it and reap the

benefits."

Mr Nixon, who is also care-
taker of several vacation homes
and owner of the Airport
Liquor Store, reported that
while he was taking renters
back to the airport, he received
calls that more were arriving.

"It's been a mad rush but one
can't complain," he said. "It's
just been amazing to see par-
ties of over 20 and 30 coming in
on almost a daily basis. This
week I have pulled up to local
resorts only to have bookings
managers tell me that they sold
their last rooms the night
before.

“The only thing we can do in

a situation like that is to get in
our little network and see if we
can pull some strings to assist
our visitors in finding a place
to spend their holiday."
CocoDiMama, Dolce Vita,
Tippy's Unique Village and

Joe's Bar and-Grill. were all ”

booked out for New Year's par-
ties that went on well beyond
dawn. Most island properties
were sold out at some point
during the season, quite an
accomplishment for an island
stagnant since the late 1980s and
early 1990s.

Packed

Things have become so over-
whelming for JJ the Ninja
Conch Salad Man, he has had to
get assistance from his daughter,
singer Janelle Hepburn.

“There are more tourists here
than locals," she said. "They
aren't here for a weekend. Quite
a number have been in town for
a week and some as long as a
month so I suspect things may
continue through April. This is
one of the best winter seasons
we've had in a while. I person-
ally haven't seen the fish fry
lines so long in a while and it
seems everyone is going after
conch, Kalik and fish.”

There have been no reports
of overcharging or deception to
visitors among those in the
tourism industry.

First time visitor and native
Spaniard Pia Durban is so in
love with the island she joked
she wants to buy a home there.

“The people are so warm and
nice,” she said. “Nothing like
Nassau. I can’t believe that my
family and I are living in town
and went out for several hours
with all the windows open and
doors unlocked and no-one
came in. The tranquillity of the
island is unreal."

Ms Durban, who is also an
artist, attributes her surge of
inspiration to the charming Vic-
torian-style homes in Gover-
nor's Harbour surrounded by
tropical foliage. ‘

“My son is married to a
Bahamian from Eleuthera but





i Neues

@ A BAHAMAHOST graduate



and island tour guid

e points out the joining of the Caribbean Sea





and Atlantic Ocean on a hill overlooking the famous Glass Window Bridge in North Eleuthera



RK :
@ PIA Durban of Spain sits on a sand bank with her son

Antonio and grand-daughter Alejandra on New Year’s Day on

one of Eleuthera’s beaches

they live in Nassau with my lit-
tle grand-daughter,” she said.
“Eleuthera and islands like it

(Photo by Arthia Nixon-Stack)

are the real Bahamas. I've been
to Nassau several times and
there is nothing as natural and



serene as this. I've taken so
many photographs and this is
while walking alone and getting
lost. I feel so safe and at home
here — the bakery is wonderful;
Bishop Clifford Petty and his
wife's church was so welcom-
ing and the lady Jenny at our
home here was like family to
me. I don't want to go back to
the snow in Canada."

Former parliamentarian
Philip Bethel also noted that
store hours were extended
slightly to accommodate the
surge of customers at his family-
run business, Eleuthera Supply.

"It's certainly good for us all,"
he said. "Things have been slow
for years, but now we can enjoy
it."

Speaker of the House and
representative for South
Eleuthera Oswald Ingraham
eagerly joined in the festivities
as well in a larger than usual
Junkanoo parade in Rock
Sound. Junkanoo was also held
in Harbour Island.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
' Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Although
businesses in the International
Bazaar enjoyed robust sales
over the holiday season, mer-
chants remain concerned about
what 2007 will bring.

Chris Payne, chairman of the
Bazaar Owners Association,
reported that business was
exceptionally good over Christ-
mas, but that his members fear
they will again face challenges
in the new year.

This feeling, he said, is based

on the lack of positive news
from the government regarding
the sale and re-opening of the
Royal Oasis Resort..

Since the closure of the resort
in 2004 due to hurricane dam-
age, many shop owners have

coming challenges in 2007

Bazaar owners increasingly uneasy over lack of news on
Royal Oasis sale - government criticised for its silence



had to their close stores.

Of the 85 shops in 2004, only
38, including three restaurants,
are still open.

In an effort to drum up sales
over the holidays, the Bazaar
Owners Association held a spe-
cial grand raffle promotion to
attract local shoppers.

Mr Payne reported that the
promotion went very well.

“The response from cus-
tomers was good. We had entry
coupons for every $20 that was
spent, and we printed over 7,000
coupons which were all given
out,” he said.

“T think it exceeded (the mer-
chants’) expectations in many
ways and I think we were all
very grateful to have the sup-
port of the local residents over
the holidays,” he said.

Mr Payne announced that
local resident Sophia Thomp-
son, an employee of Sugar Lips,
emerged as the grand prize win-
ner — winning gifts such as a
colour TV and VCR, handbags,
watches, a diamond ring, a bas-
ket of perfume, toys and beach-
wear.

“We have tried contacting
her on her cellular phone, but

she is off the island, but as soon
we get a hold her we will be
making a presentation,” he said.

Mr Payne warned that the
month of January is usually very
slow and said that shop owners
will have to again rely on Min-
istry of Tourism to help drive
business to the Bazaar.

During November and
December, the ministry bused
‘tourists to the Bazaar three days
a week from the hotels and
timeshare properties.

“It helped out to some
degree, but again the numbers
are very small and I think we

will be looking for them to try
again to help us with similar
programme in the new year,”
said Mr Payne.

He stressed that the situation
at the Bazaar will have to be
addressed urgently as small
groups of tourists cannot ade-
quately sustain the businesses
for long.

“I think the major concern is
not just predominantly for the
Bazaar, but what is the story on
the hotel. The government is
being very silent and not say-
ing anything positive,” Mr
Payne said.

Lecturer thankful

A POPULAR Nassau jour-
nalism lecturer got more than
he bargained for when he flew
off to start a new life in “peace-
loving” Thailand.

He landed in the country’s
capital, Bangkok, on the day a
string of bomb attacks left three
dead and many more injured.

Fortunately for Steve Lay, a
former College of the Bahamas
lecturer, he was nowhere near
the scenes of the attacks at the
time.

But he admitted to wife Car-
ole, who joins him in Thailand
next month, that the news was a
bit unnerving as he stepped off
the plane after a 24-hour jour-
ney from the Bahamas.

Steve, 59, is keeping his fin-
gers crossed that the attacks
were a “one-off” event in
response to the peaceful coup in
October.

But Thailand has experienced
sectarian unrest in southern
areas in recent years and some

observers fear trouble-makers
could have brought their griev-
ances to the capital for the first
time.

For Carole, who has been a
keen helper in Fox Hill Prison’s
reading programme for inmates,
the news came as a jolt, espe-
cially as Bangkok is rated one of
the safest cities in the world.
But she is nevertheless looking
forward to her Thai adventure.

She and Steve spent more
than 20 years in Alaska before
arriving in Nassau just over
three years ago.

Steve spent two years at COB,
where he taught Bahamian jour-
nalism students, before joining
Dupuch Publications as a senior
editor. He is also a keen wildlife
photographer and accomplished
cook, having published a book
on Alaskan cuisine.

In Thailand, he will work as a
communications lecturer at a
community college some miles
outside Bangkok



x

@ A BANGKOK Bor

RUE wean SSS
ad

nb Squ





SSS

officer searches for clues at the sce



ne of a bomb explosion on

Sunday in downtown Bangkok, Thailand. At least two people were killed in a series of four
explosions that rocked the Thai capital on New Year’s Eve.

(AP Photo/David Longstreath)



Eleuthera traders optimistic.
after booming festive season

Bahama businesses worried

,
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



HUNDREDS of children in
the St Cecilia community had
a Christmas treat, thanks to the
work of the Santa Claus Christ-
mas Committee.

About 1,800 children com-
munities arrived at a party host-
ed.by constituency MP and
Deputy prime MinisterCynthia
‘Mother’ Pratt.

Hundreds of presents — fund-
ed by contributions collected by
the Santa Claus Committee —
had been loaded into a truck to
bring smiles to the faces of the
youngsters: :

Children received finger-
painting kits, plastic guitar, vol-
leyballs, Ninja Turtle motorcy-
cles and other treats

The event was just one of sev-
eral made possible by the com-
mittee, which also arranged par-
ties in North Andros, the Berry
Islands, Crooked Island, Ack-
lins, Inagua, and Fox Hill in
New Providence.

The Tribune's Santa Claus
Committee was founded by the
late Sir Etienne Dupuch as a
way of providing some Christ-
mas cheer to Bahamian chil-
dren who would otherwise have
gone without. It is now chaired
by Robert Carron, managing
director of The Tribune and one
of his grandsons.

Mr Carron said: “All told we
delivered just over 4,200 chil-
dren a Christmas gift this year.
All of this would not have been
possible without the faith, trust
and support of our wonderful
sponsors, who year in and year
out make this event possible.

“On behalt of the Santa Claus
Christmas Committee, The Tri-







bune, 100 Jamz and most of all
the children, I would like to

thank them for their amazing
generosity.”







THREE of the 1,800 children at
the St Cecilia party show of their
presents. More than 4,200
youngsters in all received gifts

this year courtesy of the Santa
Claus Committee, both on New
Providence and on the Family
Islands

DRTRETA

SCOOTER

































































M@ MANY hundreds
turned out for the St
Cecilia party

# DISTRIBUTING
the gifts

B SANTA Claus
Committee
chairman Robert
Carron lends a
helping hand

B VOLUN-
TEERS make
sure the day
goes smoothly







@ CYNTHIA ‘Mother’ Pratt helps a youngster
with his gift y





@ A GIANT Elmo was the gift for this. . \ ‘ ~
. |



“
~\
delighted youngster -







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B YOUNG-
STERS com-
pare notes on
their gifts

MCYNTHIA
Pratt helps a
group with
their gifts
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4 ¢

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7





Origins of the ‘cultura



relic’ of Junkanoo

"It is now the month of
December, when the greatest
part of the city is in a bustle.

Loose reins are given to pub- |

lic dissipation; everywhere
you may hear the sound of
great preparations"

HIS is not a descrip-
tion of the lead-up to
Junkanoo. It was written by a
Roman not long after the
death of Jesus. The writer,
Seneca, was referring to the
celebration of Saturnalia, a
time marked by “drinking
and being drunk, noise and
games and dice, appointing
of kings and feasting of
slaves, and singing naked.”
During this time the slaves
also had licence to ridicule
their masters — something
scholars mistakenly refer to
as “social inversion”.
But Saturnalia has even
more ancient roots. It was all
about the winter solstice —



LARRY SMITH

This might escape most
people today, but it was
clearly big stuff in ancient
times. For example, New-
grange — a 5,000-year-old
site in Ireland that is older
than Stonehenge — was built
to receive a shaft of sunlight

nto its central chamber at

dawn on. the winter solstice.
And a 6,000-year-old stone
circle in southern Egypt is
said to be the world's oldest
astronomically aligned site.
The early Church super-
imposed Christ's mass on the
old celebration of’ the sun,
and Christmas gradually took
on the form we know today,
borrowing from many pagan



“There are many theories as
to where the actual
term, Junkanoo (or John
Canoe), came from, but Bethel
and others seem to lean
towards the Kono dances of
the Bambara people of Mali
and the Ivory Coast. In these
cultures, the Kono society was
a custodian of tradition, and
dancers used animal masks in
agricultural rituals.”



which has to do with the tilt
of the Earth as it spins on its
axis. AS someone once said,
"The cycles of nature have
been here since before there
were people to even mark
their turning."

The midwinter celebration
of the solstice is perhaps the
world's oldest and most uni-
versal cultural event. It is the
time after which the days get
progressively longer and
warmer. It is a calendrical
hinge — the day that the sun
returns, or is reborn.







traditions across Europe. In
the Bahamas, Junkanoo has
always happened at Christ-
mas — the time of the winter
solstice — as a matter of
necessity. It was the only hol-
iday that enslaved Africans
in the New World were

allowed.
That's because Junkanoo
is a cultural relic — "a vestige

of African rituals" that sur-
vives today only in our little
country. But since agricul-
tural calendars and rain

schedules were as important
in Africa as elsewhere, there

are literally hundreds of

stone circles scattered across
the continent. And among
some West African peoples,
the sun god traditionally pre-
sides over December and the
doors of houses are aligned
to the midwinter sunset.

According to the late
Bahamian scholar, Clement
Bethel, Junkanoo originated
as "a fusion of disparate ele-
ments" from West African
cultures. Among them were
the harvest festivals of tribes
in what is now Ghana, Nige-
ria and Sierra Leone. These
festivals featured secret soci-
eties, masked and costumed
dancers, as well as feasting
and drinking.

There are many theories
as to where the actual
term, Junkanoo (or John
Canoe), came from, but
Bethel and others seem to
lean towards the Kono
dances of the Bambara peo-
ple of Mali and the Ivory
Coast. In these cultures, the
Kono society was a custodian
of tradition, and dancers used
animal masks in agricultural
rituals.

In fact, masked folk danc-
ing, involving the stamping

of feet and the wearing of

animal headdresses, is an ear-
ly part of most cultures. And
since we all emerged from
Africa some 80,000 years ago,
the origins of Junkanoo can

be seen as an expression of

primal religion — a homage
to the ancient Earth goddess.

Once the most important
slave celebration of the Eng-
lish New World, Junkanoo
was a Christmastime activity
in Belize, St Vincent and
Jamaica — all the way up to
Bermuda and North Caroli-
na.

As Yale University pro-
fessor Jonathon Holloway
explained: "When slaves
found themselves on planta-
tions without another mem-
ber of their own African
community to turn to, the



B WHATEVER its origins, Junkanoo today is not African at all. It is uniquely Bahamian.

merging of their similar ritu-
als and traditions soon took
place, rituals and tradi-
tions...based on numerous
West and Central African
cultures brought together col-
lectively..." lo preserve con-
nections with the past.

Junkanoo died in America
soon after emancipation, but
the following description by a
former slave named [larriet
Jacobs is reminiscent of the
Bahamian Junkanoo of the
time:

"Every child rises early on
Christmas morning to see the
Johnkankus... These compa-
nies of a hundred cach, turn
out early in the morning and
are allowed to go around
until midnight...Cows' tails
are fastened to their backs,
and their heads are decorated
with horns. A box, covered
with sheepskin, is called the

SASK

gumbo box. A dozen beat on
this. while others strike tri-
angles and jawbones, to
which bands of dancers keep
time."

Speculation is that the cel-
ebration withered in the face
of racial disdain. In fact,
American experts say the
derogatory term "coon" is
derived from John. Canoe.
And we all know what being
1 'Junkanoo' used to mean
among Bahamians. The activ-
ity survived here largely due
to the thousands of liberat-
ed Africans who were settled
on the islands by the British
after the abolition of the
slave trade.

The pre-Lenten carnivals
held in Trinidad, Brazil, New
Orleans and other places
have similar African roots,
but are regarded as a blend
of European influences that

6 CD DISC CHANGER
TRAILER TOW GROUP
_RUNNING BOARDS

fit appropriately into th
Catholic calendar. Junkans

however, was seen more as
challenge to Christmas an
the European establishme;
— a resistance to domin

tion.
But whatever its origin
Junkanoo today is 1

African at all. [t is unique!
Bahamian: As Cleme
Bethel's daughter, Nicole!
wrote recently, "Junkano
fundamental to, nol inci
tal to, Bahamian identity
festival can take ant thi
into itself and remak. &
And it does jt iba
twice every veal

What.do you think? Sen
comments to larry@frilune
media.net

Or visit www. bahamapun
dit.com







Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

MONTROSE AV

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE FR
LICENSE & INSPECTION



PART = & SI

TRVICE





ASSURED





A

PHONE: 322-1722 FAX: 326 - 7452

K OF GAS

FULL SET FLOOR MATS

ATA ssa AAAhAAaahianeAnnn AN





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Workers Party plans protest outside ministry = AG: Bahamian police involved

over the arrests of five baggage handlers

THE Workers Party is plan-
ning a placard protest outside
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
over the arrests of five
Bahamian baggage handlers in
the United States.

The party is holding Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
responsible for what relatives
of the arrested men are call-
ing a “kidnapping” - a sting
operation to trick them into an
American trap.

Mr Mitchell has been tar-
geted by the party for “drop-
ping the ball yet again” in a
law enforcement matter
involving the Americans, “as
he did with Ninety Knowles.”

Leader Rodney Moncur said
yesterday that the party was
drawing up placards ready for
a protest outside Mr Mitchell’s

ministry. This is likely to hap-

pen within a few days.

He said it was “scandalous”
that the government had been
involved in a “conspiracy” to

' drive the baggage handlers

into US hands, and said Mr
Mitchell was now “the most
vulnerable minister” in the
Cabinet.

“He has failed to defend the
sovereignty of the Bahamas,”
he added.

The men, who were
employed by Nassau Flight
Services, face drug smuggling
charges in the States and jail
terms of between ten and 15
years if found guilty.

They were arrested after
being “selected” for a special
training course in Florida. The
men were seized after landing
in Fort Lauderdale.

However, the Workers Party
claims that - regardless of the
men’s guilt or otherwise - they
were entitled to due process
under Bahamian law.

The government’s action in
allowing the men to be “set
up” was in breach of the coun-
try’s extradition laws, and sup-
ported Justice John Lyons’
claim that the Bahamas judi-
ciary was not independent, it
said.

Yesterday, The Tribune
reported the party’s claim that
the PLP government could fall
as a result of this matter alone.

The party said Bahamians
were livid over the circumven-

tion of Bahamian laws - and
the subsequent loss of sover-
eignty - in allowing the men to
fall into American hands and
were determined to make the
government pay at the polls.

For Prime Minister Perry
Christie; the arrest of the bag-
gage handlers has created yet
another pre-election headache.

The last few months of 2006
saw the government enmeshed
in a string of vote-losing scan-
dals, including the ongoing
Anna Nicole Smith affair and
the Sea Hauler tragedy.

Now 2007 has dawned with a

problem likely to cause even |

greater damage, with Mr
Mitchell seen as the number
one culprit.

Mr Moncur said the govern- ,

ment’s complicity in the arrests
was obvious, especially as a
PLP general employed by Nas-
sau Flight Services was fore-
warned of the sting and with-
drew from the training course.

However, government
sources say the Cabinet knew
nothing about the events
leading up to the men being
seized.



@ GRAFFITI on a sign at Sadie Curtis Primary School
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

FROM page one

Dean, who has a daughter in the fourth grade
at the school, said he was very disturbed by

the incident.

“J am very disturbed that people could
actually take the time out to vandalize a
school that their children may one day end

up going,” said Mr Dean.

Mr Dean said the fact that the culprits
used the fire house to vandalize the school
showed they had no regard for the safety of

the school’s students.

“I hope these people are brought to justice
and made an example of,” said the popular

radio disc jockey.

Mrs Patricia Collie, who has a son in sec-
ond grade at Sadie Curtis, said she was also

FROM page one

After the charge was read to
both accused, Miller instructed
Mr Hilton who had already indi-
cated that he was appearing on
behalf of both Miller and Sawyer,
that he did want legal represen-
tation at that stage. Miller also
asked for court documents and
was told by the magistrate that
those would not be available to
him at that stage.

Mr Hilton submitted yester-
day that Ms Sawyer be released
on bail as it would be illegal to
have her detained any longer.
According to Mr Hilton, his client
had been taken into custody near-
ly a full seven days prior to her
arraignment yesterday. Unlawful
detention, he said, was a depra-
vation of liberty which makes
government liable for damages.
He told the court that Sawyer had
been arrested and taken into

FROM page one



outraged by the break-in.
“Sadie Curtis is a good school,” said Mrs»

dents.”

Collie, and “I can’t believe that people could
be so insensitive to the needs of the~stu-

According to the Ministry of Education,
the security guard who was supposed to be at
work on the day of the break-in was off for

personal reasons, which made it easier for the

grounds.

vandals to have access to the school’s

The vandals also went as far as destroying

the school’s staff room, breaking ceiling lights

walls.

and pulling out electrical cables from the

The police said they have already assessed

Charged

police custody at 5.10 pm on
Tuesday, December 26.

According to Mr Hilton, by
law, police can detain a suspect
for 48 hours for questioning and if
more time is needed can apply to
the court for an additional 48
hours. However, after that point if
the person is not charged they
must be released. Mr Hilton
asked that the court consider
Sawyer’s entitlement and to have
her released and granted bail due
to the fact that she had been in
police custody for more than 96
hours and was also the mother of
a five-month-old child who need-
ed to be breast fed. According to
Mr Hilton abetment was an
offence for which bail could be
granted.

ASP Glenroy McKenzie, who
appeared for the prosecution, told
the court that Sawyer had been

the extent of the damage and an investigation
into the matter has started.

told by police on December 28,
that police intended to detain her
for another 48 hours. ASP
McKenzie submitted that Sawyer
be denied bail and be remanded
in custody.

According to him the bail act
was silent on the offence of abet-
ment.

According to ASP McKenzie
abetment to murder was just as
though the person had committed
the offence themselves.

Mr Hilton then argued that if
the magistrate had doubts about
his arguments then he should
adjourn the matter and that pros-
ecution be afforded a lawyer who
would be more competent with
dealing with such matters of
law.

In the end, Magistrate Gomez
remanded both Miller and
Sawyer to prison until January
11, which is when the matter will
continue in Court Five Bank
Lane.

Honours

continues to “drag its fect” in the passing of the
National Heroes and Honours Bill.

According to Father Campbell, the Bill was tabled
in 2001 by the Free National Movement adminis-
tration, six months before the 2002 general elec-
tion. However, he said, the Christie government
has fallen short of its promise to implement the leg-
islation. ;

“In 2002 the prime minister appointed the
National Cultural Development Commission to con-
sult with the people about this same issue, and in
2003 the commission reported its findings and rec-
ommendations to the government.”

But, said Father Campbell, government keeps on
“slunking” to implement the commission’s recom-
mendations.

The Commission had made detailed representa-
tions for a National Heroes system to replace the
present British honours system. Guidelines regard-
ing the renaming or declaration of national holi-
days were also made.

The chairman of the heroes committee said the
Bahamas was “lagging behind” other countries in the
Caribbean who have already created their own
national honours system.

The Anglican clergyman said that in order for the
commission’s suggested honour system to work
effectively, the present British honour’s system had
to be done away with completely. He severely crit-
icised religious leaders for accepting the Queen’s
New Year’s awards.

“T am equally disappointed that church leaders

are still accepting these awards,” said Father Camp-
bell.

In the past, Father Campbell has criticised Bish-
op Neil Ellis, of Mount Tabor church for accepting
a British honour, claiming that the British awards are
from an “enslaving colonial master who dehuman-
ized us with the intolerable burden of colonialism for
hundreds of years.”

Yesterday, he told The Tribune: “The church 1s

_ supposed to be leading society in its development, so

‘am calling on the church leaders to reject these
awards and support a national honours system
instead.”

The new honours Bill, recommended by the com-
mission, seeks to create four societies of honours: the
Order of the Bahamas, the Companion of the Order
of the Bahamas, the Order of Merit and the Order
of Distinction.

At present, said Father Campbell, the British
awards are about honouring “party stooges” and
he hopes the Christie administration implements
the national awards system before the next general
election.

Among the religious leaders honoured are: the
Right Reverend Gilbert Thompson for dedicated
service to the Anglican Diocese, the Most Excellent
Order of the British Empire went to Bishop Albert
Hepburn, Bishop William Johnson and Reverend
Dr. John Rolle were honoured for religion, and
Reverend Dr Henry Pratt was also awarded the
British Empire Medal.






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PaAuc v



in investigation but had no

knowledge of NF

FROM page one

General said that local police
were conducting an investiga-
tion into “certain malice”
occurring at Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA).

She also emphasised that
after “some investigations”
into the matter, she can say
that her office, and the gov-
ernment on the whole, knew
nothing ofthe arrests in Fort
Lauderdale until after they
occurred on December 18 ona
Spirit Airlines flight.

“Our police are quite
adamant and I believe them

that they were involved in an:

investigation and there was no
knowledge on their part of the
arrests,” she said.

Five baggage handlers — all
employed at the Nassau Flight
Services (NFS) — were arrested
and charged with trafficking
cocaine on local and interna-
tional flights through the LPIA
when they arrived in Florida
to participate in a training
course.

According to reports, the
men were not allowed to dis-
embark the flight before they
were arrested.

It has been speculated and
alleged by family members of
the men that the baggage han-
dlers were entrapped in a sting
operation by Bahamian and
US officials.

Attorney General Maynard-
Gibson yesterday vehemently
refuted all such allegations.

“There is not one scintilla of
evidence that the government
of the Bahamas was in anyway
complicit in any illegal activi-
ties, any collusion, any luring,
any entrapment. It simply nev-
er happened,” she said.

Responding to claims that
this matter has called into
question the sovereignty of the
Bahamas’ justice system, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that she
sees “no evidence of our judi-

cial process either having been .

circumvented or aborted.”
The Attorney General
pointed out that local police
frequently conduct undercover
investigations and that the
bilateral arrangement of

Eo in
LEM UALem Seg)

@ ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Allyson Maynard-Gibson

OPBAT enables Bahamian
and US authorities to carry out
joint operations on a regular
basis.

“There’s nothing unusual
about either of them,” she said.

At the same time Mrs May-
nard-Gibson emphasised that
the NFS “quite separately and
quite routinely sent some of
its staff members away on a

- training course.”

The Attorney General also
said that it is the sovereign
right of US authorities to
arrest men who they suspect
to have committed offences
within their country’s bound-
aries.

Baggage











said.

I” she said.

ee



DY acm Relate

Ranked | 6th in the UK
Five specializations availa
Marketing, Finance, T

Relations, and IT Managemen




handlers



FROM page one

opportunity when the men were on US soil to make the
arrests, and that they were not “kidnapped.” .
However, Mrs Tony said that she takes grave exception to
comments made by US Ambassador John Rood about the
possible lavish conditions that she lives in.
“Right now I have $20 in my car. We don’t have any mon-—
ey. I can’t tell you how the next day is going to be,” Mrs Tony

“If my husband was a drug trafficker shouldn’t he have
something to show for it? I ain’t scared of nobody. I will
continue to talk cause this is a free country. Ambassador
Rood was out of order. If he could say something, then so can

Mee

S staff arrest

These statements by Mrs
Maynard-Gibson come as the
FNM calls on the government
to give a full account of its
knowledge and involvement in
an “operation which resulted
ih the enticement of five
Bahamians to the United
States to have them arrested
in that country on drug
charges.”

“We expressed our disap-
proval of any operation that
would require Bahamians to
travel to a foreign jurisdiction
under false pretences in order’
to have them arrested and put’
on trial in that jurisdiction. ©

“We regard this as extra-
judicial rendition of Bahamian
citizens and we again reiterate

_ our strong disapproval of it,”

the FNM said.

The opposition party also
emphasised that it does not
support drug trafficking, and
is concerned about security
measures at Bahamian air-
ports. ;

“Asa matter of fact, we are
wholeheartedly and unalter-
ably opposed to it as, indeed,
we are opposed to all forms of
criminality.

“We are extremely con-
cerned about security mea-
sures at the airport and else-
where. Bahamians know first
hand the damage caused to
countless Bahamian families
by crime and addiction asso-
ciated with illicit drugs,” the
FNM said.

-www.rdi-usa.com

p


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

*



“WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY 3, 2007

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THE TRIBUNE



§ By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE phase three develop-
ment plans for the SuperClubs
Breezes resort are being
delayed by the lack of progress
on Baha Mar's long awaited
street re-routing project.

During an awards ceremony
honouring 117 employees who
have been with the resort for
more than a decade, the com-

. pany’s chairman John Issa

‘-touched on the plans for the
resort's renovations, which can
only begin after the road relo-
cation — which to date has not
started.

"When we were ready to
commence the suites and other
facilities at a further cost of $25
million, we were advised that
West Bay Street would be
moved, thus this phase of the
investment had to be put on
hold," explained Mr Issa.

Baha Mar was scheduled to

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have already re-routed the traf-
fic flow on West Bay Street so
that construction of their own
multi-million dollar resort facil-
ity could begin.

"Certainly Bah Mar has made
certain pronouncements saying
that the road should have been
started at the beginning of this
year," said general manager of
Breezes, Jackson Weech. "We
remain cautiously optimistic. "

According to Mr Issa, Super-
Clubs has since had its plans
pre-approved and has applied
for reinstatement of duty and
tax concessions.

"In the short term, there is no
effect — we have a 391 full inven-
tory of rooms and certainly we
are renting them as occupancy
dictates," said Mr Weech. "The
ideal situation is, of course, they
(Baha Mar) would have been a
little bit further ahead in terms
of road works, so that we cer-
tainly could have started our

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Breezes development delayed by
slow pace of Baha Mar roadworks

phase three."

Breezes plans to refurbish its
rooms with solid mahogany fur-
niture, new sliding doors and
crown moulding, and the bath-
rooms will be completely refit-
ted with granite, in keeping with
the standard of the new suites,
according to Breezes manage-
ment.

"Mahogany furniture is a
very high-end finish product
that we are implementing here
in the rooms and we've done
throughout our rooms in
Jamaica," Mr Weech said.

The mahogany furniture is,
according to Mr Weech, in
keeping with the standard of
Breezes’ sister resort in
Jamaica.

"The construction of new
suites will commence as soon
as West Bay Street has been
relocated. When completed,
Breezes will be an even more
exciting resort," said Mr Issa.

ed iterate to be honoured



@ CHIEF Superintendent of Police Hulan Hanna (second right) shakes hands, on January 2 with

Commander Stephen Russell during the announcement of activities to salute legends of the
Bahamas' armed forces. The Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB,) in conjunction
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF) and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF)
will host a slate of events to recognise the contributions made by officers, past and present, and the
camaraderie and between the two forces. Among the events will be a basketball game between
police and Defence Force officers on February 10. Also pictured, from left, are BCB deputy
general manager for sales and marketing Diana Swann, BCB General manager Anthony Foster,
BCB senior deputy general manager for news Carlton Smith and RBPF Senior Lieutenant Shawn

Thurston.

(Photo: BIS/Derek Smith)

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Thousands turn out for
Grand Bahama parades

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

THE evening New Year’s
Junkanoo Parade in Grand
Bahama is proving to be a suc-
cess, as thousands turned out
this year for the highly antici-
pated event.

’ Throngs of residents and vis-
itors flooded in and around the
Post Office Building in down-
town Freeport, and along the
main parade route on Explor-
er’s Way and Bank Lane to
watch the six competing
junkanoo groups participating
in the parade.

The costumes were elaborate,
the dancing well choreo-
graphed, and the music res-
onated in the streets.

Spectators both young and
old moved to the beat of the
goat skin drums, and the sounds
of cowbells, whistles, and well
polished band instruments.
. Derrick King, chairman of
‘- the Grand Bahama Junkanoo
Committee, said he was pleased
with the turnout — which was
estimated at between 20,000
and 25,000.

“We had quite a bit of spec-

tators out to watch the parade ~

and we were very pleased with
tremendous support of Grand
Bahama residents,” he said.

The official results for this
year’s parade were not avail-
able up to press time on Tues-
day. z

Mr King told The Tribune
that the committee was still very
busy around 5.30pm tallying the
points.

In addition to the major
groups such as Swingers, Classic
Dancers, Superstar Rockers,

Majestic Crusaders, Arawak
Invaders and Harbour Boys,
four non-competing groups also
took part in the parade — includ-
ing the Rotary Club, Bushwack-
er, Fun Time and the Victory
Boys.

The parade started at 6pm
and ended at 12pm, with each
group performing two laps
around the parade route.

Although the overall parade
was very good, Mr King said
that there is still need for
improvement in several areas.

The committee, he said, will
be revisiting the process of tick-
eting and seating arrangements.

Mr King also pointed out that
the length of time it takes one
group to follow the next group
is too wide and was a major
concern for both spectators and
committee members.

“Each group went around the
parade-route twice and we think
... We just need to tighten up on
some areas and we should be
able to achieve our goals for the
parade,” he said.

When asked about the cash
prize, Mr King said that it is still
under discussion by the com-
mittee.

He encourages more resi-
dents to use bleacher seating.
Even though bleachers were set
up to accommodate over 1,000
persons, there were still a few
empty sections.

“The Grand Bahama com-
munity needs to realise that
seating we put out there is to
help us defray the cost of
putting on the parade. We just
sell the tickets to help us under-
write some of the cost that goes
towards the prize for the

groups.

“We can’t pay group mem-
bers for what they do. We had
1,000 seats and I think we had
close to about maybe 800 or 900
sold ~ we still had empty bleach-
ers on the lower end still stand-
ing around,” he said.

Mr King thanked the spon-
sors, including the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, Grand
Bahama Power Company, and
Freeport businessman Mario
Donato for use of the Regent
Centre as a junkanoo head-
quarters.

He also thanked the police
for their assistance and the San-
itation Services for the clean-
up job.












The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

} neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

—_



@ GENERAL manager Jackson Weech, financial controller Camille Tynes Miller and awardee
Michael Sherman during the awards ceremony

Top award
| for senior in
United States

BAHAMIAN college senior
Kendrick Knowles, son of Kendal
Knowles and Sharon Miller, has
been named a Collegiate All-Amer-
ican Scholar.

An accounting major at Liberty
University in Lynchburg, Virginia,
Kendrick qualified for the award by
earning a 3.3 grade point average.

The Collegiate All-American
Scholar is a prestigious honour
awarded to very few students.

The academy recognises fewer
than 10 per cent of all college stu-
dents in the US.

To be eligible, students must earn
3.3 or higher grade point average.

Only scholars selected by a school
official or other qualified sponsor, Te aan
are accepted for the nomination. @ KENDRICK Knowles

} agniare



RF BEBRRT &
Rarer 8 Sant :

Crystal Palace Casino

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the
single largest resort investment in the history of The Bahamas. Baha Mar
owns and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino,
the Radisson Cable & Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position:

FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

This individual will be responsible for ensuring excellence of food and beverage
services by overseeing all aspects of multi-unit food service, dining and catering
operations. The successful candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day food
and beverage operation, staffing and budget.

Top contenders for this position must possess the following:

¢ Organizational skills to set-up systems such as point of sale, position specific
check list and proper follow-up.

© Evolving new food and beverage concepts.

¢ Controls costs of all food and beverage outlets by overseeing all purchasing
of food beverage, supplies and equipment; estimating product and personnel
levels; utilizing labour scheduling tool to adjust salary and hourly schedules
following demand patterns and occupancy levels, budget and local labour
laws; maintaining effective inventory and shortage controls; traking expenses
including payroll, supplies, maintenance and generating monthly inventory
and cost of sales reports as well as other reports requested by management and.
works with the General Manager to develop an annual food and beverage plan
and budget.

¢ Ensure a pleasant dining experience in all outlets by collaborating with the
Executive Chef in the creation of menus and menu pricing.

* Maximize food and beverage sales by identifying and targeting sales
opportunities through marketing including promotions and special events,

¢ Maintain customer satisfaction and employee productivity by handling
customer inquiries, concerns or comments and providing solutions; acquiring
feed back from customers and co-workers in order to ensure satisfaction
and/or implement service improvement ideas; developing new concepts
to ensure customer satisfaction and repeat business.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume to

the attention of Director of Human Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or
fax to (242) 677-4140




PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

IRAmLSNUE 110 : fo

Your look at what’s going on in your community

Gifts for High Rock youngsters



Canadian Chief STE ice visits AG









@ THE Chief Justice of Canada Beverley McLachlin tapala a sities call on Attoenay Genin ana!
Minister of Legal Affairs Allyson Maynard-Gibson at the Office of the Attorney General on
Tuesday; January 2. Shown from left are Frank McArdle, Chief Justice McLachlin, the attorney
general, Court of Appeal registrar Indira Francis-Demeritte, and deputy permanent secretary
Leroy Sumner.

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)



a DR Doswell Coakley, the next Progiosslve Liberal Party ‘andideis for High I Rock, Selies a
smile to children’s face as he gives Christmas presents to pupils at High Rock Primary School,
Grand Bahama. Dr ene went into every settlement of High Rock to present gifts.

Candidate donates
to Fox Hill Library





THE Fox Hill Library was
the recipient of a computer, a
cheque for $300 and a compi-
lation of documents about the
history of Fox Hill, courtesy
of Dr Jacinta Higgs.

Dr Higgs, in presenting the
gifts, reminisced on her earliest
memories of visiting the
library when she was a student
at Sandilands Primary and lat-
er LW Young High School.

The FNM candidate for the









tion.

Fox Hill constituency
described more recent experi-
ences of spending many nights
at the library researching infor-
mation to complete her Doctor
of Education degree disserta-

The candidate said she
appreciated the help received
from Marina Minnis and the
other library staff who guided
her research on Fox Hill.

Dr Higgs said she fears that

Wy



Glac. ack DOIly:



lack of computer access and
training will serve as a major
limitation for many Bahami-
ans seeking employment and
education opportunities as the
culture of globalisation takes
hold.

Marina Minnis, supervisor

of the library, expressed her
gratitude and welcomed more
Fox Hillians to contribute and
help the library in any way
possible.



bahamas “9

marketplace

econ cnsicl Palace Resort, Cable Beach



were served, with around 200 Christmas gifts pre-
sented.

Sponsored by an anonymous donor and the
Rotary Club of West Nassau, the event is the
highlight of the Christmas season for Bain Town
locals.

MOUNT Olive Baptist Church held its 17th
annual senior citizens programme at Town Cen-
tre, Meadow and Augusta Streets, Bain-Town.

.. Pastor C B Moss said this year’s event was the
lan est and most successful ever.
jllowing Carol sifging, more than 400 meals


















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ANEL DISCUSSION





Exploring ways to integrate more Bahamian =—-Ye"B(iynyy
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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



The Tribune

BUSINESS



iain

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

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Tel: (242) 351-3010





Liquidity crunch ‘bottomed
out’ during late December

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he liquidity crunch
in the Bahamian
commercial bank-
ing sector was like-
ly to have “bot-
tomed out” in the last two weeks
of December, the minister of
state for finance told The Tri-
bune yesterday, and it was
unlikely to have any negative
impact on the Government's fis-
cal position.

James Smith said government
revenues at the half-way point
in the 2006-2007 fiscal year were
some 3-4 per cent ahead of Bud-
getary projections, while recur-
rent spending - the Governmen-
t’s fixed costs, such as wages and
rents - were “around the target”
although ahead of the previous
year.

Excess liquidity in the
Bahamian commercial banking
system stood at just $55.21 mil-
lion at the end of October 2006,
meaning that the surplus assets
banks have available: for lend-
ing purposes are relatively lim-
ited.

-The Central Bank of the
Bahamas previously confirmed
that this tightening would slow
down the rapid pace of credit
growth witnessed in 2006, and
this could also impact demand



@ JAMES SMITH

by Bahamian gonsumers for
imports, particularly luxury
goods.

The Government earns
between 50-60 per cent of its
annual revenues from customs
duties levied on imports, and
there had been some concern
that the credit slowdown would
also hurt the public finances, but
Mr Smith yesterday said that he
expected the impact would be
“nothing dramatic”.

The minister added that he
believed the Central Bank has
“a fairly good handle” on the
liquidity situation, which falls

Security Association
aims to raise standards

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUSINESSES and individu-
als employed in the private secu-
rity industry are aiming to
increase the level of profession-
alism in a sector that has become
“big business” by establishing a
Security Association in the
Bahamas, it was revealed yes-
terday.

Gamal Newry, a Tribune
columnist and co-chairman for
the steering committee that is
seeking to establish the Security
Association, said the body - if
created - aimed to create a
framework to formalise the pri-
vate security industry, with a
focus on training and developing
standards and certification for
workers in the sector.

Mr Newry said: “What we’re .

seeing is a disjointed and unreg-
ulated group of individuals, and
the standard of professionalism
is what we’re concerned about.

“We're trying to increase the
level of professionalism to pro-

vide much greater help to the
police, the community and our
clients.”

Improving standards will be a
focus at all levels in the profes-
sion, from officer to supervisor,
manager and owner.

Mr Newry said the creation of
a Security Association had been
under consideration since the
late 1970s, adding that industry
participants hoped this was “the
final attempt” to establish one.

The Association, if formed,
would draw its membership
from both private security firms
and those security officers and
professionals employed ‘in-
house’ by large corporate enti-
ties, such as hotels and banks,
and the Government.

“Number-wise, we’re estimat-
ing that over 300 entities,” Mr
Newry replied when asked how
many private security firms were
operating in the Bahamas.

“That doesn’t include differ-

SEE page 5B

Liquidity may affect

_ Minister says government revenues 3-4% ahead of projections,

with deficit ‘under control’, as government pins hopes on
investment and tourist spending to right system

under monetary policy.
The Central Bank has auton-

omy in the conduct of monetary

policy, and Mr Smith said the
liquidity tightening in late
November and early December
was likely to “begin to stabilise”
during January, February and
the 2007 first quarter.

Liquidity traditionally falls
during the fourth quarter of
every year, due to increased
credit demand and drawdowns
as both consumers and busi-
nesses prepare for the Christ-
mas shopping season.

Mr Smith said of the present _

liquidity situation: “It’s not
unusual in terms of trends, but it
was deeper in the last quarter
of the year, the extent to which
credit exceeded deposit taking.”

Yet he added that the liquidi-
ty position was set to correct
itself automatically as a result of
how the Bahamian monetary
system was designed,

Mr Smith said the capital
inflows associated with foreign
direct investment projects in the

Bahamas, coupled with tourist
spending, which is traditionally
“higher in the first quarter,
should stabilise the market”.

In addition, the demand for
credit from Bahamians and
money supply growth were like-
ly to slacken in the 2007 first
quarter post-Christmas, a period
that was also peak tourist sea-
son.

“T think the automatic sta-
bilisers are in place, and this [liq-
uidity crunch] bottomed out in
the last two weeks of Decem-
ber,” Mr Smith added.

On the fiscal front, he said:
“Bearing in mind we’re half-way
through the fiscal period, we’re
ahead on revenue projections by
3-4 per cent, and even recurrent
expenditure, while growing, is
still around the target.

“The fiscal deficit is under
control, headed downwards and
likely to come close to - certain-
ly within - projections. From the
fiscal point of view, I think we’re
right on target.”

Mr Smith said recurrent

spending was around Budget
projections, and had not been
exceeded yet, while capital
spending was “not far off”. How-
ever, he pointed out that capital
releases had been “pretty fast”
as a result of the infrastructure

projects the Government was:

undertaking.

“Fiscally, it’s fair to say, with
the same amount of caution,
we’re on target and feel some-
what comfortable,” Mr Smith
said. “Barring any unforeseen
shocks, if this continues into the
next quarter and the next half,
we'll be looking pretty good.”

Apart from the traditional
drawdown on credit associated
with the Christmas season, the
corporate sector’s demand for
financing to complete mergers
and acquisitions and raise capital
to fuel further growth is another
factor behind the liquidity tight-
ening.

The $54 million acquisition of
Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake
in Bahamas Supermarkets by
BSL Holdings involved $24 mil-

lion in bank debt and a $5 mil-
lion preference share issue -
some $29 million - plus $15 mil-
lion in Bahamian$ equity, while
the takeover of Caribbean Bot-
tling by Walter Wells and his
group has taken more capital
out of the system.

In addition, Commonwealth
Bank and Bank of the Bahamas
International raised $24.1 mil-
lion and $15 million respectively
via preference share issues,
effectively redeploying capital
by taking money out of the sys-
tem to strengthen their capital
base and then relending it.

Others redeploying capital
were FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) and the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) with $20 million and
$100 million bond issues respec-
tively.

Although BEC’s only had a
$53 million Bahamian$ compo-
nent, a large chunk of this is like-
ly to be converted to foreign cur-
rency to finance overseas equip-
ment purchases.

City Markets hoping for Winn-Dixie break ‘by June’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

$1.3m Cable Beach store to have ‘major impact’ when it opens



BAHAMAS Supermarkets’ chief execu-

tive yesterday said the company was likely to
complete the transition from Winn-Dixie’s
ownership by “June or before”, with its new
$1.3 million flagship Cable Beach store set to
have a “major impact on our company”

when it opens later this month.

Ken Burns told The Tribune that con-
struction work on the store was “probably 98 ny.

per cent complete”, adding: “We're still look-
ing to open that later this month,

“Tt will be quite an upgrade from our pre-
sent Cable Beach facility. It will be 12,000
square feet larger, and have a bigger parking

lot, with space for 98 vehicles rather than

”

18. It will be a major impact on our compa-

Mr Burns said Bahamas Supermarkets,
which operates nine City Markets stores on
New Providence and a further three on
Grand Bahama, had “quite an aggressive
capital expenditure plan” in place.

SEE page 4B

2007 retail prospects

WAY

Fidelity ; Se eNite| Banking

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE upcoming general election is likely to have a major impact on
retail sales in the Bahamas during 2007, the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s executive director said yesterday, as will the level of liq-
uidity in the banking sector.

Philip Simon said it was obviously the business sector’s hope that
2007 will be a better year than 2006, ;

He added that factoring into this will be the impact of any exter-
nal factors or shocks which may affect the Bahamian economy.

“Generally, 2006 was a good year, relatively over 2005, and then
relatively over 2004, Hopefully, 2007 will be a better year econom-
ically for the country,” he said.

Mr Simon said the impending general elections, which have to be
called by May 2007, will help add to a busy year and should gener- fee
ate spending. ' ;

He also predicted that the Bahamas would see a surge in economic insta

activity as the promised “anchor properties” come on stream. Rae
Mr Simon acknowledged that the current liquidity tightening Choose Wi Ted WY]
Choose Fidelity

ZERODOWNLOTLOANS © MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS —_ HOME EQUITY LOANS
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MUTUALFUNDS FINANCIAL PLANNING —_ INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

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faced by the banking sector may be a factor in dampening retail sales.

However, he said that perhaps liquidity would improve as mer-
chants, bolstered by strong holiday sales, deposited their income into
the banks oyer the next few weeks.

Bahamian retailers are expressing mixed views on how well their
sales and profits will fare in 2007.

Some merchants expressed optimism that 2007 will be a banner a
WULFF





year for retail sales following a strong Christmas holiday season, while MACKEY PARADISE FREEPORT
panes took'a more somber view of ROAD STREET ISLAND
e coming year. ay
A store manager for Michael SEE page 5B A OR
a Sid rant ana NR SR NETS SUS
v # : y .
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2UU/, PAGE 3b



aaa Eee eee
Bahamian companies will lose by
staying outside trade agreements



@ JAMAICAN ECONOMIST LINCOLN PRICE

(Photo courtesy)

BAHAMIAN companies will lose
out if they are left without transparent,
legal access to global markets via free
trade agreements, a Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM) economist has warned.

Lincoln Price, Jamaican economist
and private sector liaison with the
CRNM, said: “Bahamian firms will
remain locked out of a mechanism
that can promote greater private sec-
tor partnerships, via encouraging joint
ventures, and other alliances, where
their government does not activate
trade agreements that CARICOM has
signed by acceding to the common
market.

Noteworthy

“It is noteworthy to recognise that
the list of countries that do not have
trade agreements is shrinking, and
Bahamian firms do not stand to gain
being the only ones left without legal-
ly transparent access into the global
market.”

Mr Price said companies encour-

aged governments to enter trade talks
for practical reasons, such as elimi-
nating market access problems that
impeded their efforts to expand and
grow sales in foreign markets.

Firms

“Where micro firms are interested
in growing sales and expanding glob-
ally, there will be a strong motivation
to partner and build business alliances.
This is the essence of what trade nego-
tiators are seeking to accomplish in
the gamut of discussions they are
involved in,” Mr Price added.

“However, many CARICOM firms,
including firms in the Bahamas,
remain sceptical of the whole process
of negotiating trade agreements. But it
is noteworthy to recognise that those
firms that have excelled regionally are
those that have embraced the man-
date of growth, rather than stability,
and have sought to build those
alliances to overcome their short-
comings based on small size and local
market constraints, for example,

financing and poor infrastructure.”

Mr. Price will address the topic,
Greater private sector linkages
through external trade negotiations, at
the 16th annual Bahamas Business
Outlook on Tuesday, January 9.

The forum will be held at the Radis-
son Cable Beach Resort under the
theme, Economic year 2007: Oppor-
tunities, Plans and Anticipated Out-
comes.

Research |

With over 10 years’ experience in
market research, trade negotiations
and strategic planning, Mr Price is
currently employed with the CRNM
as the private sector liaison, and his
responsibilities are geared towards
maximising the benefits of trade
agreements for the region’s private
sector. ,

Prior to his tenure at the CRNM,
Lincoln Price worked as manager of
the policy and planning unit of
Jamaica’s Investment and Export
Development Agency (JAMPRO).



Lawsuit alleges Hard Rock deal was ‘rigged’

FORT LAUDERDALE,
Fla. (AP) — A rejected suitor
for the Hard Rock chain of
cafes, casinos and related busi-

nesses claims in a lawsuit that

the Seminole Tribe of Florida
was the successful buyer
because of improper collusion
and bid-rigging.

The Baltimore-based devel-
opment firm The Cordish Co.
and an affiliate, Power Plant
Entertainment LLC, contend
that Hard Rock Cafe Interna-
tional Inc. management secret-
ly negotiated with the Semi-
noles for seven months before

plans to sell were announced in
July.

Power: Plant, a partnership

between Cordish and Coastal
Development LLC, was the
original developer of the Semi-
nole Hard Rock casinos and
hotels in Hollywood and Tam-
pa.
« The Seminoles announced
the $965 million purchase of
the Hard Rock empire from
London-based Rank Group
PLC on Dec. 7, marking the
first time an American Indian
tribe had purchased a major
international corporation.

The Cordish lawsuit, how-
ever, said the company and its
banker, Goldman Sachs & Co.,
were refused the right to bid
for the business even though
they could have made a larger
offer. The lawsuit was filed late
Friday in Broward County Cir-
cuit Court.

“We were declined the
opportunity to bid, which is
kind of amazing. We believe
we would have prevailed,” said
Marty Steinberg, the Miami-
based attorney for Cordish.

The Seminoles agreed to
keep Hard Rock managers in

Scotiabank’

VACANCY

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of :

Job 1: A Senior Analyst

assist in hedge fund analysis for hedge fund incubator and fund of
fund financing businesses
assist in investment analysis of structured credit, asset-backed, fixed
income, and derivative products for investment advisory business

development and ongoing maintenance of asset/credit reporting and
monitoring systems
liaising with head office analytical and support groups + external parties
preparation of reporting/MIS documentation for internal and external

parties

ensuring compliance with local and head office regulatory policies and

guidelines

assist in business case writings, other reports/requests

Skills: strong analytical experience and ability (credit/equities/funds/structured
products), good understanding of fundamental and technical features of debt,
equity, and alternative asset classes (and their derivatives), familiarity with
the Bank's internal systems and processes, self-starter, ability to work in a

smaller environment

Job 2: A Bookrunner

responsible for deal input and ongoing monitoring of positions held in
SCTL, including hedge fund financing, hedge fund investment, credit
derivatives and other related products
responsible for the risk management and hedging of SCTL positions

responsible for the development of risk management systems and reports
to properly control and monitor exposures
responsible for the funding of exposures in an efficient manner

must be able to liaise effectively with SC trading and structuring
personnel in other locations

Skills: strong attention to detail, good product knowledge of debt, equity,
alternative assets and their derivatives, strong familiarity with the Bank's
dealing and risk management systems, experience managing funding and

liquidity.

place and provide them with
“additional financial benefits”
if the tribe was the successful
bidder, according to the law-
suit.

“Their actions were moti-
vated by self-dealing and a
desire to enrich themselves,”
the lawsuit says.

A spokesman for Hard Rock
Cafe International declined
comment Tuesday.

In a statement, the Semi-
noles accused Cordish of being
“a sore loser” and insisted the
deal went through “a lengthy
and open bidding process.”

“This is part of a pattern of
Cordish obstructing the suc-
cessful enterprises of Seminole
Hard Rock Entertainment and
the Seminole Tribe of Flori-
da,” the statement said. “The
lawsuit has no merit.”

The lawsuit seeks unspeci-
fied damages, which could be
tripled under Florida law.

The Seminole-Hard Rock
deal includes 124 Hard Rock
Cafes, four hotels, two casino
hotels, two concert venues and
stakes in three unbranded
hotels. Rank shareholders are
scheduled to vote next Mon-

day on whether to approve the
sale.
Allegations of bid-rigging

were also made in a separate |. .
lawsuit by Power Plant against ‘-‘-

investment banker Merrill
Lynch, which also was a finan-
cial adviser to the Seminole
tribe.

That lawsuit, filed in Miami-
Dade Circuit Court in Decem-
ber, contends that Power Plant
was stopped from making a
deal to cash out its interests in
the Florida casinos because of
improper pressure from the
Seminoles.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SBARRO THE ITALIAN EATERY IS EXPANDING THEIR
OPERATIONS ONTO THE CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF
THE BAHAMAS AND WE NEED THE EXPERTISE OF ALL OF

THE FOLLOWING

SHIFT MANAGERS
COOKS

KITCHEN PREP
PIZZA MAKERS
CASHIERS

FOOD SERVERS
UTILITY WORKERS

PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA SITE (JUST OF
TUCKER ROAD) ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DAYS AND
TIME FOR AN INTERVIEW.

10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.
10 A.M.-3 P.M.

JANUARY 3RD 2007
JANUARY 4TH 2007
JANUARY 5TH 2007

WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY

Interested persons should submit applications in writing marked Private and
Confidential to:

Manager, Caribbean Treasury Limited
P. O. Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas
Applications should be received no later than Monday, January 15, 2007.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com







New Year's

honour for pitch

‘perfect softhall
veteran Linda

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT WAS a historic day for

veteran (slingshot) pitcher Lin-
da Ford when she was named a
Member of the Most Excellent
Order of the British Empire
(Civil Division) in the Queen’s
New Year honours list for
2007. .
Ford, who. has enjoyed an
illustrious career that has
spanned more than three
decades, said she hasn’t
received the award yet, but
she’s already feeling the effects
of being an MBE with all of the
praise and congratulations she’s
been receiving. ©

“I know it’s a big honour, so
it’s really a good feeling,” said
Ford, who remained as humble
as she’s been throughout the
years that she wore her different
softball uniforms. “It’s a top
honour.”

It’s the first time that any
Bahamian softball player has
been awarded in such a way by
the Queen, but Ford said it
won’t change her demeanor at
all.

“T’ve been playing softball for
more than 36 years and it won’t
make me any different than I’ve
been, but it’s good to know that
somebody is giving me my flow-
ers while I’m alive,” she reflect-
ed, :
“It’s a good feeling, but I’m
sure that it won’t change me a

bit, I’ve been the same way all
the time.”

At the age of 16, Ford began
her career as a second base
woman with BEC at the South-
ern Recreation Grounds, now
known as the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park. ,

She would eventually helped
to form a team called the Holi-
day Inn Crows where she
moved to the mound, launch-
ing the beginning of her stint as
a pitcher in 1974,

Three years later, Ford made
her breakthrough in Belize,
Central America in 1977 as a
member of the Bahamas ladies’
national softball team that
clinched the Caribbean Softball
Championship (CAST).

“T was actually throwing
windmill and I saw this girl
throwing the slingshot and I
came back home pracusing it
and that was how I learned to
pitch,” she stated,

“T think it was a natural for
me because once I got started
throwing the slingshot, it was
just as easy for me as it was
when I started pitching,”

Ford would go on to repre-
sent the Bahamas at just about
every international tournament,
including when the team fin-
ished number three at the
World Fastpitch Tournament
in Santa Clara, California,

Locally, she achieved every
award possible by a pitcher and

she played an integral role for
the Colina Crows, who domi-
nated the sport for more than a
decade.

Today, Ford is still making
her contribution, even though
she’s not actively involved as a

itcher. She’s lending more of
er time as a coach with the
Whirpool Eagles.

In 1996 when she traveled
with the national team in
Colombia, she had one of her
biggest setbacks when she was
hit in her head and she suffered
a hairline fracture,

The latter injury prevented
Ford from participating in the
tournament, but it didn’t stop
her from playing competitive-
ly. She made her last interna-
tional trip in 2003 to the Pan
American Games in Santo
Domingo.

She played up until 2005
because, last year, she had a
lipoma surgery on her shoulder
for a recurring injury.

As she turns 52 on January
15, the question is what is ahead
for this legendary player?

2007 I will be back playing,
more as a coach because I love
playing softball,” she insisted.
“It keeps me going because it’s
the love of my life.”

‘BS LINDA FORD, named in
the Queen’s New Year Hon-
ours list as an MBE.

SUPE E PO ERERGERARAROURPESEREOREONNDEOSERSORROERUERONGRRORREDOOR UOT ERUROEGINSERSURANGROEORSDEOHERSESEGHORETSERT NP ODI AGRON SEES

ADOOaPOeeeaeeeOsEneReeeeNseneenenPeneeeeeeeeNTeFEOBENECTEHGCHEEUHEnegaeengHsagaeseesans yee ay as ant ere se ean eH ene eagnN ee yen arene ses yaens, Pe ayeeeee.



“Training in Bahamas has Mavericks in t

ns 7 a
cc ,






























@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE University of Nebras-
ka at Omaha Mavericks
female swim team are enjoy- |
ing the warm, sunny condi-
tions in the Bahamas instead
of the 15 degrees they would |
be experiencing back home in |
Omaha. ;

Head coach Todd Salmon.
said their 24-member team is,
having a ball as they use the
Betty Kelly Kenning Swim’ |
Complex during their winter
training,

“It’s wonderful,” Samland
stressed.

“We're always pretty open
to the different facilities and
what they have to offer and
we're glad that they have a 50
metre pool here,”

The Mavericks arrived in
town on New Year's Day and:
will be here until January 7.
They have joined Michigan
State, who are here from
December 28-January 6;
Stevens Tech from January 3-
10; George Washington from





atten eneeneeneneneeenenenannaeneeneeeEeganengeeesweesegaeeeeaePeteeea Gea eeeeneneesey =

ae |

e swim —

- January 3-10 and LaSalle from
» January 2-10.

Kevin Colebrooke, the
manager of the swim complex,

' ‘said these are just some of the
collegiate teams that have tak-.- |.
en advantage of the warm:*.’.

weather that the Bahamas has
to offer,

He said they hosted Roger
William University from
December 16-22 and when
these teams leave, the New
York Athletic Club will be in
town from January 10-15.

Additionally, Colebrooke.
revealed that four swimmers
from the Austria national
team will be here for the
entire month of January, train-
ing for the 12th FINA World
Swimming Championships ,
March 17 to April 1 in Mel-
bourne, Australia,

Even though they have a-.-. .

large number of visiting swim:
mers occupying the pool,

Colebrooke said there are still

some lanes available for the

local swimmers.

SEE page 6B

GUINNESS \v

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ONLY OPEN TO CONSUMERS ABOVE
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non eeegt negonaacetanaane NRA TEA ARCANE.



Lee ANSLEONLLA EGO i883

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





UNA LOLAE8t

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

104TH YEAR, NO. 111 | ©2007 THE MIAMI HERALD





FORMER MAYOR OF
JERUSALEM DIES AT 95.

@ Theodor Kollek, the
irrepressible champion of
Jerusalem during a nearly
three-decade tenure as mayor
that spanned war, uprising and :
shifting demographics, died
Tuesday. He was 95, 6A.

EL SALVADOR’S CIVIL
WAR IS TOURISM DRAW |

e Gun fragments, photos,
combat plans and mountain
hide-outs. These are the latest
tourist attractions in formerly
war-torn El Salvador. The country
has been at peace since 1992, 8A.

GAZA STRIP
CROSSING ATTACKED

e Palestinian militants attacked
the Gaza Strip’s main cargo
crossing with mortar fire early



t

t

Tuesday, lightly. wounding an |
Israeli truck driver in the latest |
flare-up of violence in the coastal —
strip, 6A.



ONE BIG VICTORY,
AND AGIANTLEAP

e@ When lan Johnson, above,
scored on a two-point conversion
play late Monday night during
overtime at the Fiesta Bowl, it
didn’t just win the game for Boise.
State. The Broncos’ victory —
against mighty Oklahoma, ina
BCS bowl game — is proof that
Boise State has arrived as a
big-time football program, 7B, 9B.

MEASURE TO HALT GAY —
MARRIAGE STILL ALIVE

e Ina suspense-filled final day
of the legislative session,
Massachusetts lawmakers kept
alive a proposed constitutional
amendment that would put a stop
to gay marriage in the only state
that allgws same-sex couples to
wed, 3A.

DEMOCRATS’ GOALS
ARE WIDELY POPULAR

@ People overwhelmingly
support two of the Democrats’
top goals — increasing the
minimum wage and making it
easier to buy prescription drugs
from other countries — as the
party takes control of Congress
for the first time in 12 years, 3A.

COPS CHARGED IN NEW
ORLEANS SHOOTING

e Seven New Orleans policemen
charged in a deadly shooting in
the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina turned themselves in at
the city jail, where more than 200
supporters greeted them ina
show of solidarity, 3A,



GERALD R. FORD



MARK WusoW/AFe-ceTiY. IMAGES

DIGNITARIES: Attending the Ford funeral, first row: from left, Prasidant Bush, Laura Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, wife Lynne Cheney,
former President Jimmy Carter, Rosalynn Carter, Nancy Reagan. Second row: President George H.W. Bush, wife Barbara, daughter Doro
Bush, former President Clinton, Sen. Hillary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

Nation’s capital pays its highest respects

§& Political luminaries celebrated
former President Ford as a
humble Midwesterner who
brought his common sense and
decency to the White House.

BY WILLIAM DOUGLAS

bdouglas@mcclatchyde.com
WASHINGTON — The nation’s

political elite and ordinary citizens

Surprising
longer life:

& The one social factor that
researchers agree is consistently
linked to longer lives in every
country where it has been
studied is education.

BY GINA KOLATA
New York Times Service

James Smith, a health economist
at the RAND Corp., has heard a vari-
ety of hypotheses about what it takes
to live a long life — money, lack of
stress, a loving family, lots of friends.
But he has been a skeptic.

Yes, he says, it is clear that on
average some groups in every soci-
ety live longer than others. The. rich
live longer than the poor, whites live
longer than blacks in the United
States. Longevity, in general, is not
evenly distributed in the population.
But what, he asks, is cause and what
is effect? And how can they be disen-
tangled?

He is venturing, of course, into
one of the prevailing mysteries of
aging — the persistent differences
seen in the life spans of large groups.
In every country, there is an average
life span for the nation as a whole
and there are average life spans for

UNITED NATIONS

said goodbye to Gerald R. Ford on
Tuesday at a state funeral at Wash-
ington National Cathedral, fondly
remembering the 38th president as a
common man who guided the coun-
try through the uncommgn times of
Watergate and the end of the Viet-
nam War.

The service at the majestic cathe-
dral highlighted a day of pageantry

secret to
education

different subsets, based on race,
geography, education and even
churchgoing.

But the questions for researchers
like Smith are why? And what really
matters?

The answers, he and others say,
have been a surprise. The one social
factor that researchers agree is con-
sistently linked to longer lives in
every country where it has been
studied is education. It is more
important than race; it obliterates
any effects of income.

Year after year, in study after
study, says Richard Hodes, director
of the National Institute on Aging,
education “keeps coming up.”

And, health economists say, those
factors that are popularly believed to

be crucial — money and health
insurance, for example — pale in
comparison.

Smith explains: “Giving people
more Social Security income, or less
for that matter, will not really affect
people’s health. It is a good thing to
do for other. reasons, but not for
health.”

° TURN TO AGING, 2A

and poignancy, in whicti Washing-
ton’s old guard, three former presi-
dents and a host of foreign luminar-
ies assembled to pay tribute to the
humble Midwesterner who aspired
to be speaker of the House of Repre-
sentatives but wound up occupying
the Oval Office instead.

“In President Ford, the world saw
the best of America, and America



| HUSSEIN EXECUTION PROTEST



found a man whose character aed
leadership would bring calm and
healing to one of the most divisive
moments in our nation’s history,”
President Bush told the 3,000
mourners who packed the cathedral.

Eulogizing Ford, the current and
former Presidents Bush and former

Ee |

* TURN TO FORD, 2A

TAMAL ROY/AP

The chaotic scene at Sodeam Hussein’s execution, captured
on video, has deepened Iraq’s sectarian rift and sparked
condemnation around the world. Above, an Indian Muslim

| shouts anti-U.S. slogans at a rally in Siliguri, India. In Iraq, as

| Hussein’s supporters protested in Sunni Arab enclaves, the
Shiite-led government said it had launched an investigation
into the execution. Meanwhile, the government reported that
| 13,900 Iraqis were killed last year. Story, 3A

| yenewiniantidyatnnnteentnernhneas nner ver nboentrrter resi wo rin nnewmeem Wn ore

On first day, U.N. chiefs remark raises eyebrows

U.N. Secretary General Ban
Ki-moon’s remark on Saddam
Hussein’s execution puta
question mark over the U.N.’s
stance on the death penalty.

BY EDITH M. LEDERER
Associated Press |”

. UNITED NATIONS — Ban Ki-
moon ran into trouble on his first
day of work as U.N. secretary gen-
eral on Tuesday over Saddam Hus-
sein’s execution when he twice
failed to state the United Nations’
opposition to the death penalty and
stressed instead that capital punish-
ment should be a decision of every
country.

Michele Montas, his new spokes-

. person, insisted that there was no

change in U.N. policy, and what Ban
said “was his own nuance” on the

. death penalty.

“The U.N. policy still remains
that the organization is not for capi-
tal punishment,” she said. “However,
the way the law is applied in differ-
ent countries, he left it open to those
different countries.”

But Ban’s ambiguous answer put
a question mark over the U.N.’s
stance on the death penalty. It also
gave the new U.N. chief an early



EVAN SCHNEIDER/UNITED NATIONS VIA AP

EARLY MISSTEP? The new United Nations Secretary-General, Ban
Ki-moon, failed to state the U.N.’s opposition to the death penalty
while cormmenting on the execution of Saddam Hussein on

Tuesday, his first day on the job.

taste of how tricky and difficult
global issues are, and how every
word can make a difference.

The former South Korean foreign
minister took over the reins of the
U.N. on New Year’s Day from Kofi
Annan, the first Asian to serve as

secretary general in 35 years, but it
was a U.N. holiday so Tuesday was
his first day at U.N. headquarters.
Dozens of staffers applauded and
joined a throng of television crews
and photographers snapping photos
as he entered the 39-story building.

He immediately went to the Medita-
tion Room and bowed his head in
tribute to U.N. peacekeepers and
staff members who died in service.

Then, the new secretary general
launched into a series of meetings
with U.N. staff. Speaking to report-
ers earlier, Ban vowed to end mis-
trust of the United Nations and
called for action to tackle “daunting”
problems from crises in Darfur, Leb-
anon, Iran and Iraq to. cutting
extreme poverty by half by 2015. He
renewed his promise to give priority
to the North Korean nuclear issue
and to defend human rights.

Ban also announced that his first
overseas trip will be to attend the
African Union summit in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia, on Jan. 29-30.

He said he will meet his special
envoy on Darfur, Jan Eliasson, today
and put “my highest attention on
this” issue in hopes of resolving the
conflict peacefully as soon as possi-
ble. Ban will chair a meeting Thurs-
day of the Darfur Task Force, Mon-
tas said.

But it was Ban’s response when
asked whether Hussein should have
been executed that raised questions,

*TURN TO UNITED NATIONS, 2A


2A_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

GERALD R. FORD

D.C. pays
highest
respects

*FORD, FROM 1A

Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer spoke of a good man
whose word was solid, whose
politics were principled and
whose heart was devoid of
lust for power.

“In his understated way he
did his duty as a leader, not as
a performer playing to the
gallery,” Kissinger said. “Ger-

ald Ford had the virtues of
small-town America: sincer-
ity, serenity and integrity.”

Former President George
H.W. Bush recalled Ford as “a
Norman Rockwell painting
come to life, an avuncular fig-
ure quick to smile, frequently
with a pipe in his mouth,” and
someone with “a heart as big
and open as the Midwest
plains on which he was born.”

The elder Bush was one of
several speakers who sug-
gested that Ford’s unassum-
ing manner may have resulted
in his being underappreci-
ated, if not an underrated
president. Bush equated
Ford’s leadership after Rich-
ard Nixon’s Watergate resig-
nation as one of. history’s
great presidential moments.

‘MAN AND MOMENT’

“History has a way of
meshing man and moment,”
he said. “Just as President Lin-
coln’s stubborn devotion to
our Constitution kept the
union together during the
Civil War, and just as FDR’s
optimism was the perfect
answer to the despair of the
Great Depression, so, too, can
we say that Jerry Ford’s
decency was the ideal remedy
for the deception of Water-

gate.”
Kissinger noted that Ford



FINAL HOME: Pallbearers carry the casket of former President Gerald

AMY LEANG/DETROIT FREE PRESS
R. Ford upon its

arrival at the airport named in his honor in Grand Rapids, Mich.

left office with a thick portfo-
lio of international accom-
plishments, including the first
political agreement between
Israel and Egypt, helping to
keep ethnic conflicts in
Cyprus and Lebanon from
igniting into a regional war
and helping to establish the
modern human-rights move-
ment by backing the Helsinki
Accords of 1975. —

At the time, Ronald Reagan
and other conservatives criti-
cized that agreement as a land
giveaway to the Soviet Union,
despite a provision forcing
Moscow to recognize human
and religious rights.

“History has shown that it
helped bring down the Soviet
Union, as courageous men
and women behind the Iron
Curtain used it to demand
their God-given liberties,” the
current President Bush said.

The elder Bush lightened
the solemn service by recall-
ing Ford’s sense of humor and
his approval of comedian
Chevy Chase’s stumbling,
bumbling imitation of him on
NBC’s Saturday Night Live,
even though Ford was, in fact,
a superb athlete.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Bush said Ford taught him

to laugh at himself. The for-~

mer president wanted to tell
more but, breaking into an
imitation of Saturday Night
Live alum Dana Carvey imi-
tating him, said, “Na gonna do
it. Wouldn’t be prudent.”

If Ford was underappreci-
ated in life, he’s been viewed

“with reverence and purpose

since his passing Dec. 26 at
age 93.

Thousands lined up to
view his flag-draped casket as
it lay in state at the Capitol
Rotunda over the weekend.

In a solemn ceremony
Tuesday, the casket was
moved from the Capitol to a
hearse as Army gunners fired
a 21-gun salute and a military
band played Hail to the Chief.

A slow motorcade left the
Capitol and made a brief pass
by the White House, which
Ford occupied from Aug. 9,
1974, to Jan. 20, 1977.

PRAYER SAID

The Right Rev. John Bry-
son Chane, the Episcopal
bishop of Washington,
greeted Ford’s casket at the
cathedral steps and said a

prayer over it.

Inside the cathedral, Presi-
dent Bush escorted a frail but
stoic widow Betty Ford down
the long central aisle to the
front pew, which housed the
rest of the Ford family.

All three living former
presidents — the elder Bush,
Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton
— attended the service, as did
three former secretaries of
state: Kissinger, Colin Powell
and James A. Baker. Former
New York Mayor Rudolph
Giuliani and Sen. Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton, D-N.Y. — each a
possible presidential candi-
date — also attended.

Former Sen. Bob Dole,
R-Kan., who was Ford’s vice-
presidential running mate in
1976, served as an honorary
pallbearer, along with former
Defense Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld, Vice President
Dick Cheney, former National
Security Advisor Brent Scow-
croft and members of Ford’s
Cabinet.

After the service, Ford’s
body was flown aboard a
presidential 747 to Grand
Rapids, Mich., where he gre
up.

Researchers pore over Ford papers

BY P. J. HUFFSTUTTER
Los Angeles Times Service

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — If
archivist David Horrocks
could point to a favorite his-
torical gem housed inside the
Gerald R. Ford Presidential
Library, it would be this:
a single sheet of paper,
outlining a 1975 senior staff
meeti ;

Ford had called the staff
into the Oval Office; to iron
out key staff changes.

Donald Rumsfeld would
become secretary of defense.

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Dick Cheney would be named
chief of staff. George Bush
would replace Bill Colby at the
CIA.

“It’s the future unfolding,”
said Horrocks, the library’s
supervisory archivist who has
worked with the collection
since it arrived here in 1977.
“To search through these
papers is the closest thing

most people will ever get to"
sitting in the same room with °

the former president.”
Inside a modest brick build-
ing at the University of Michi-





LEGEND



Clouds T-storms

> Day
a OR
oy Cold front

“yer

Sunny PB Cloudy





Flurrles Snow

TD, rip



TODAY’S SELECTED MAJOR CITIES FORECASTS

ARUBA NASSAU

Mostly sunny skies and very warm Partly cloudy, chance of
conditions. thunderstorms.

High: 91 °F, 33°C Low: 77°F, 25°C High: 78 °F; 26°C Low: 69°F, 21°C
BERMUDA NEW YORK

Mostly sunny skies and cool Mostly sunny skies with mild
conditions. conditions.

High: 65 °F, 18°C Low: 54°F, 12°C High: 55 °F, 13°C Low: 40°F, 4°C
CANCUN PANAMA

Partly cloudy skies and warm Partly cloudy skies and hot
conditions. conditions.

High: 87 °F, 31°C Low: 75°F, 24°C High: 90 °F, 32°C Low: 72°F, 22°C
CURACAO/BONAIRE QUITO.

Mostly sunny skies and very warm Partly cloudy with a chance of
conditions, showers.

High: 91 °F, 33°C Low: 76°F, 24°C High: 69 °F, 21°C Low: 47°F, 8°C
MEXICO CITY ST. MAARTEN

Mostly cloudy with a chance of Partly cloudy, chance of
showers. thunderstorms.

High: 70 °F, 21°C Low: 51°F, 11°C High: 84 °F, 29°C Low: 75°F, 24°C
MIAMI SANTO DOMINGO

Partly cloudy with a slight chance Partly cloudy, chance of

of thunderstorms. thunderstorms.

High: 82 °F, 28°C Low: 73°F, 23°C



rfMeneatliMen Stationary front
Warm front Mitegyg lng

High: 86 °F, 30°C Low: 75°F, 24°C

gan’s northern campus rests
the world’s preeminent collec-
tion of Ford’s papers — a trea-
sure trove of written docu-
ments from one of this
country’s most controversial
periods.

Buried amid this mountain
of paperwork, photographs,
audiotapes and video clips are
insights into Ford’s most
enduring legacy — a staff of
strong and powerful personal-
ities, who still wield political
influence today, say academics
and researchers.

WEATHER CENTRAL INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS FORECAST
,

NORTH AMERICA

City Hi
Atlanta 58
Denver 48
Houston 54
Kansas City 54
Mexico City 70
San Francisco 55
Toronto 43
Vancouver 45
Washington 59

City HI
Berlin 37
Brussels 52
Jerusalem 64
Lisbon 67
London 55
Madrid 56
Moscow 26
Paris 54
Rome 44
Zurich 37

SOUTH AMERICA







Rain

Shi
OS





(seas)

EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly
cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers,
t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flur-
ries, sn-snow, i-ice, ts-rain/snow

All forecasts and maps provided by Weather Central Inc. © 2005



That tie has lured hundreds
of journalists, authors and his-
torians here to pore over the
presidential papers, looking
for clues about the Bush
administration and explana-
tions for the decisions it has
made — particularly as a
growing number of documents
has been declassified in the
past decade.

The amount of documents
gathered during Ford’s brief
presidency is as large as that
saved by Franklin D. Roose-
velt.



LATIN AMERICA
lo W_ City Hi Lo W
45 Os Asuncion 89 74 ¢t
22. pe ‘Barranquilla 90 78 s

45 Belo Horizonte 75 63 pc

37: Os Guadalajara ° 70 #50 t.
51 sh GuatemalaCity 78 60 sh
49 Cc Guayaquil 89 72 pe
29 Os Havana 85° 72s
39 sh La Paz, Bo. 58 42. sh
39 Os Managua 91 71 ss
Medellin 81 64 pc
Monterrey 67 52 fr

Lo W_ Montevideo 8 73 ¢t
Rio de Janeiro 82 70 ¢t

6
: a San PedroSula 86 67 sh
40 «5 Santa Cruz 8 75 pe
50s Santiago 81 55 5s
42 sh
: *__ ASIA PACIFIC
2
aoe ally Hi Lo W
35° pc __ Beijing 33 20 «6s
29° ¢ Singapore 87 75 ¢t
Sydney 74 61s ope
Taipei 71 61 6c
Tokyo 51 42 pe

weather.com

Brasilia. ©
VIA r
> PARAGUAY — Rio de Ja
U
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Aires 1

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

AGING

Education:
secrettoa

longer

° AGING, FROM 1A

Health insurance, too,
Smith says, “is vastly over-
rated in the policy debate.”

Instead, he and others say,
what may make the biggest
difference is keeping young
people in school. A few extra
years of school is associated
with extra years of life and
vastly improve health decades
later, in old age.

It is mot the only factor, or
course. There is smoking,
which sharply curtails life
span. There is a connection
between having a network of

‘friends and family and living a

long and healthy life. And
there is evidence that people
with more powerful jobs and,
presumably, with more con-
trol over their work lives, are
healthier and longer lived.
But there is little dispute
about the primacy of educa-
tion. The first rigorous
attempt to decide whether
education really changes peo-
ple so they live longer began
in a most inauspicious way.

PROMPTED BY DEGREE

It was 1999 and a Columbia
University graduate student,
Adriana Lleras-Muney, was
casting about for a topic for
her doctoral dissertation in
economics. She found an idea
in a paper published in 1969.
Three economists noted the
correlation between educa-
tion and health and gave some
advice: If you want to
improve health, you will get
more return by investing in
education than by investing in
medical care.

It had been an inflamma-
tory statement, Lleras-Muney
says. And for good reason. It
could only be true if educa-
tion in and of itself caused
good health.

But there were at least two
other possibilities. Maybe sick
children did not go to school,
or dropped out early because
they were ill. Or maybe edu-
cation was a proxy for wealth
and it was wealth that led to
health.

How, she asked herself,
could she sort out causes and
effects? It was the chicken-
and-egg problem that plagues
such research.

The answer came one day
when Lleras-Muney was read-
ing another economics paper.
It indicated that about 100
years ago, different states

_ Started passing laws forcing

children to go to school for
longer periods of time. She
knew what to do.

“The idea was, when a
state changed compulsory
schooling from, say, six years
to seven years, would the peo-
ple who were forced to go to
school for six-years live as
long as the people the next
year who had to go for seven
years,” Lleras-Muney asked.

When her analysis was fin-
ished, Lleras-Muney says, it
turned out that life expect-
ancy at age 35 was extended
by as much as one and a half
years simply by going to
school for one extra year.

UNITED NATIONS

New U.N
runs into

* UNITED NATIONS, FROM 1A

because Annan always reiter-
ated the U.N.’s policy against
capital punishment, and the
top U.N. envoy in Iraq, Ashraf
Qazi, restated it again on Sat-
urday after the former Iraqi
leader was hanged.

Qazi said that while the
U.N. stands firmly against
impunity and understands the
desire for justice, it remains
opposed to capital punish-
ment, even in the case of war
crimes, crimes against
humanity and genocide.

Ban, however, took a dif-
ferent approach.

“Saddam Hussein was
responsible for committing
heinous crimes and unspeak-
able atrocities against Iraqi
people and we should never
forget victims of his crime,”

l i fi

Now, others papers have
appeared, examining the
effects of changed laws on
‘compulsory education in
Sweden, Denmark, England
and Wales. In every country,
compelling children to spend
a longer time in school led to
better health.

That, though, leaves the
question of why the education
effect occurs. |

Lleras-Muney and others
point to one plausible expla-
nation — as a group, less-edu-
cated people are less able to
plan for the future and to
delay gratification. If true,
that may, for example, explain
the differences in smoking
rates between more- and less-
educated people.

Smokers are at least twice
as likely to die at any age as
people who never smoked,
says Samuel Preston, a
demographer at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. And not
only are poorly educated peo-
ple more likely to smoke but,
he says, “everybody knows
that smoking can be deadly.”

But education, Smith at
RAND finds, may somehow
teach people to delay gratifi-
cation. For example, he
reported that in one large fed-
eral study of middle-aged
people, those with less educa-
tion were less able to think
ahead.

“Most of adherence is
unpleasant,” Smith says. “You
have to be willing to do some-
thing that is not pleasant now
and you have to stay with it
and think about the future.”

SOMETHING STRIKING

In the late 1970s, Lisa Berk-
man, now a professor of pub-
lic policy at Harvard’s School
of Public Health, worked at a
San Francisco health care
center. It drew people from
Chinatown and the city’s Ital-
ian neighborhood, North.
Beach, as well as from the
Tenderloin district, a poor
area with many homeless and
mentally ill people. And she
noticed something striking.

“In Chinatown and North
Beach, there were these
tightly bound social net-
works,” she recalls. “You saw
old people with young people.
In the Tenderloin, people
were just sort of dumped.
People were really isolated.”

A few years later, in gradu-
ate school, she was studying
Seventh-day Adventists when
she began to wonder whether
the standard explanation for
their longer lives — a healthy,
vegetarian diet was
enough.

“They were at decreased
risk from many, many dis-
eases, even ones where diet
was not implicated,” Berkman
says. And, she adds, “‘it
seemed they simply had a
slower rate of aging.”

Seventh-day Adventists,
like the people in Chinatown
and North Beach, had
“incredibly cohesive social
networks,” Berkman notes.
Could that be the clue?

Thirty years later, studies
have borne out her hunch.

. chief ,
trouble

he said. “The issue of capital
punishment is for each and
every member state to
decide.”

“As the secretary general,
at the same time, while I am
firmly against impunity, I also
hope that members of the
international community
should pay due regard to all
aspects of international
humanitarian laws. During
my entire tenure, I'll try my
best to help member states,
international community, to
strengthen the rule of law,” he
said.

Asked whether Ban may
have been tacitly referring to
prohibitions on the death pen-
alty in international humani-
tarian law, Montas said, “Yes,
I think that’s what he was tac-

itly referring to.”

SSS


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

NEWSEXTRA





KHALID MOHAMMED/AP

MORE BOMBINGS: An Iraqi inspects a house damaged
in a roadside bomb explosion in Baghdad, Iraq,
Tuesday.

Government says
13,900 Iraqis were
killed in 2006

@ The war in Iraq claimed the lives of 13,900 Iraqis
last year, the government reported.

BY STEVEN R. HURST
Associated Press

BAGHDAD — Iraq reported Tuesday that about 12,000
civilians were killed last year — the third full year since
the U.S.-led invasion — with a dramatic rise in the last
three months, when 5,000 died. Only about half as many
Iraqi soldiers died in 2006 as American troops.

But the number of Iraqi security forces killed jumps to
1,643, nearly double the American death count for the year,
when the deaths of police, who conduct paramilitary oper-
ations, were added to the number of slain Iraqi soldiers.

In all, the Iraqi ministries of Health, Defense and Inte-
rior reported a total of 13,900 Iraqi civilians, police and sol-
diers died last year, a figure that is only 162 greater than
the tabulation kept by The Associated Press. .

The AP count, assembled from its daily news reports,
was always believed to be substantially lower than the
actual number of deaths because the news cooperative
does not have daily access to official accounting by the
Iraqi ministries. Many deaths were thought to have gone
unreported by AP.

While the United States government and military pro-
vide no death totals for Iraqis, the United Nations Assis-
tance Ministry for Iraq, UNAMI, does keep a count based
on reports it gathers from the Baghdad morgue, Ministry
of Health, and Medico-Legal Institute.

The figures for November and December are not yet
available from the U.N., but as of the end of October the
organization had reported 26,782 deaths in the first 10
months of 2006, nearly double what the Iraqi government
and the AP reported for the entire year. ~

In its last report, the U.N. said 3,709 Iraqi civilians were
killed in October alone and that citizens were fleeing the
country at a pace of 100,000 each month. The organization
estimates at least 1.6 million Iraqis have left since the war
began in March 2003.

Life for Iraqis, especially in Baghdad and cities and
towns in the center of the country, has become increas-
ingly untenable. Many schools failed to open at all in Sep-
tember, and professionals — especially professors, physi-
cians, politicians and journalists — are falling to sectarian
killers at a stunning pace.

At the time of the last U.N. report, Iraqi government
spokesman Ali al Dabbagh called it “inaccurate and exag-
gerated” because it was not based on official government
reports.

The Iraqi Minister of Health, in a statement made in
Vienna in early November, indicated that as many as
150,000 Iraqi civilians might have been violently killed
since 2003. But there are no known statistics for the early
months of the U.S.-led invasion.

After a violence-free start to 2007, Iraqi authorities
reported on Tuesday that at least 57 Iraqis were killed in
sectarian violence, including 45 tortured bodies that were
found dumped in Baghdad and five in Kut to the south.

Three Iraqi civilians were killed in a roadside bombing
Tuesday morning in eastern Baghdad, police reported. In
Baqouba, gunmen killed Diyala provincial council member
Ali Majeed and three members of his family. The four
were gunned down while driving near the town of al Waji-
hiya, Diyala provincial police said.

BATTLE TOLL

e AUS. soldier was killed Monday by a roadside
bomb southwest of Baghdad, the military announced
Tuesday. The blast wounded three. others, including an -
interpreter, as they talked with residents about sectar-
ian violence, the military said.

© As of Tuesday, at least 3,004 members of the U.S.
military have died since the beginning of the lraq war in
March 2003, according to an Associated Press count.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

® U.S. troops killed a suspected al Qaeda weapons
dealer and two other people in Baghdad raids Tuesday.
@ A U.S. Marine fatally wounded an Iraqi soldier in an
altercation at the guard post they shared in Fallujah,
the U.S. military said. The confrontation took place Sat-
urday between members of U.S. and Iraqi units
assigned to combined security posts at the Fallujah
Government Center. The Marine has been assigned to
administrative duties while the military investigates.

@ Nouri al Maliki, jraq’s prime minister, ordered an
investigation Tuesday into Saddam Hussein's execution
to try to uncover who taunted the former dictator in
the last minutes of his life and who leaked inflammatory
footage taken by camera phone of the hanging.













MASSACHUSETTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 | 3A

Measure aimed to halt
say marriage still alive

W@ Massachusetts
lawmakers gave the first
round of approval on an
amendment that would
stop gay marriage.

BY STEVE LEBLANC
Associated Press

BOSTON — Ina suspense-
filled final day of the legisla-
tive session, Massachusetts
lawmakers kept alive a pro-
posed constitutional amend-
ment Tuesday that would put
a stop to gay marriage in the
only state that allows same-
sex couples to wed.

The vote came after weeks
of mounting legal and political
pressure on legislators from
both sides in the debate.

With a combination of par-
liamentary maneuvering, flip-
flopping and brinkmanship,
lawmakers gave the first
round of approval necessary
for the amendment to appear
on the ballot in 2008. The
measure still needs the
endorsement of the next legis-
lative session.

AMENDMENT

If the amendment makes it
on the ballot and residents
approve it, it will leave Massa-
chusetts’ 8,000 existing gay
marriages intact but ban any
new ones.

“This is democracy in
action. It’s not a vengeance
campaign. It’s not a hate cam-
paign. It’s just an opportunity
for the people to vote,” said
Kris Mineau of the Massachu-
setts Family Institute, a cgn-
servative group that opposes
gay marriage.

If lawmakers had failed to

NEW ORLEANS





ELISE AMENDOLA/AP

LOUD AND CLEAR: Opponents of gay marriage protest on Tuesday outside the
statehouse in Boston. Massachusetts is the only state where gay marriage is legal.

act on the amendment Tues-
day, the measure would have
died, and opponents of gay
marriage who collected
170,000 signatures to try to put
the issue on the ballot would
have had to start over again.
The pressure on lawmakers
came from all sides: Gay rights
activists and Democratic Gov.-
elect Deval Patrick called on
the Legislature to let the mea-
sure die without a vote. Gay
rights opponents — and Mas-
sachusetts’ highest court —
demanded an up-or-down
vote. The state Supreme Judi-
cial Court — the same court
that ruled in 2003 that gays
have a constitutional right to
marry — declared last week

ALEX BRANDON/AP

SHOW OF SUPPORT: Sgt. Robert Gisevius Jr., center, hugs a
fellow officer on Tuesday in New Orleans.

7 police surrender; —
charged in shooting -

BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Seven
policemen charged in a deadly
shooting in the chaotic after-
math of Hurricane Katrina
turned themselves in Tuesday
at the city jail, where more
than 200 supporters greeted
them in a show of solidarity.

Each of the indicted men
faces at least one charge of
murder or attempted murder
in the Sept. 4, 2005, shootings
on the Danziger Bridge less
than a week after the hurri-
cane hit New Orleans. Two
people died and four people
were wounded.

Defense attorneys say the
officers are innocent.

Sgts. Kenneth Bowen and
Robert Gisevius, officer
Anthony Villavaso and former
officer Robert Faulcon were
charged with first-degree mur-
dér. Officers Robert Barrios
and Mike Hunter were
charged with attempted first-
degree murder, and Ignatius
Hills was charged with
attempted second-degree
murder.

A first-degree murder con-
viction carries a possible death
sentence. A spokesman for

District Attorney Eddie Jordan |

said Monday that prosecutors
haven’t decided yet whether
to seek the death penalty.

Those accused of first-
degree murder will get no bail
and bail will be $100,000 per
count for the other three, a
judge said.

The officers are scheduled
to be arraigned Friday.

Police say the officers were
responding to a report of other
officers down, and that they
thought one of the men, Ron-
ald Madison, was reaching for
a gun. Madison, a 40-year-old
mentally retarded man, and
James Brissette, 19, were killed
on the bridge. The coroner
said Madison was shot seven
times — five wounds in the
back.

Madison’s brother Lance,
who was also on the bridge
and was cleared of attempted
murder charges, said he and
his brother were not armed.

The Rev. Raymond Brown,
of the New Orleans chapter of
the National Action Network,
said racism was a factor in the
shootings, even though four of
the officers, like the two vic-
tims, are black.

“We see the black officer
as just following their master,”
Brown said.

that lawmakers had shirked
their constitutional duties by
refusing to vote on an amend-
ment submitted by the people.
But the justices acknowledged
they had no authority to force
action.

THE NEXT ROUND

To advance to the next
round, the amendment needed
the approval of only 50 of the
200 members of the Legisla-
ture. On Tuesday, 61 lawmak-
ers voted in favor, while 132
were opposed.

A few hours later, the law- _ |
makers agreed to reconsider.”

But then they largely affirmed
the original result, with 62 vot-
ing in favor of the amendment.

Earlier in the day, the gov-
ernor-elect, who supports gay
marriage, met with the leaders
of the Democratic-controlled
Legislature to argue against a
vote.

Patrick said the amendment
process was being used to
“consider reinserting discrimi-
nation into the constitution.”

“This is not just another
question for popular decision.
This is a question, under the
equal protection clause, about
what freedoms the minority is
entitled to,” Patrick said. —

Republican, opposes gay mar-
riage.

CONGRESS | PUBLIC OPINION

Democrats’
goals popular

@ As Congress prepares to
convene, a national survey
finds strong public support
for Democrats’ plans on
minimum wage and
prescription drugs.

BY DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — People
overwhelmingly support two
of the Democrats’ top goals —
increasing the minimum wage

» and making it easier to buy

prescription drugs from other
countries — as the party takes
control of Congress for the
first time in a dozen years.

By a smaller margin, the
public also favors relaxing
restrictions on federal funding
of embryonic stem cell
research, a third issue Demo-
crats have promised to tackle
during their first 100 hours in
charge.

The jury is out on incoming
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
Most people say they do not
know enough yet to have an
opinion about the California
Democrat who will be the first
woman in that office, an Asso-
ciated Press-AOL News poll
found.

The survey results come as
the 110th Congress is set to
convene Thursday at noon.
Voters in November toppled
Republican majorities in both
the Senate and House, exas-
perated by investigations into
the ethics of GOP lawmakers
and unhappy with the war in
Iraq. ‘

Democrats will hold a
233-202 edge in the House and
will control the Senate by
51-49.

A boost to the $5.15-an-hour
federal minimum wage would
be the first since 1997. Demo-
cratic leaders have proposed
raising it in stages to $7.25 an
hour. President Bush has said
he supports the idea, along
with help for small businesses.

Fully 80 percent of survey

respondents favor an increase,
too.

Support is strongest among
Democrats, 91 percent, while
65 percent of Republicans
back the idea. Women, men
without college degrees and
single women all are espe-
cially likely to favor a mini-
mum wage hike.

Nearly seven of 10 adults,
69 percent, favor the govern-
ment taking steps to make it
easier for people to buy pre-
scription drugs from other
countries, where some medi-
cines cost significantly less
than in the United States.

Importing prescription
drugs to the United States is

‘illegal, but the Food and Drug

Administration generally does
not bar individuals from bring-
ing in small amounts for per-
sonal use. At the same time,
the government has estimated
that buying drugs from other
countries would do little to
influence what they cost here
at home.

Roughly 56 percent of
adults support easing restric-
tions on using federal money
to pay for research on embry-
onic stem cells. Supporters say
such research could lead to
treatments for everything
from Parkinson’s disease to
spinal cord injuries. Bush and
other opponents say the
embryos from which the cells
are extracted are human lives
that should not be destroyed
in the name of science.

Bush kept a promise in 2001

when he limited federally
funded research to lines of
embryonic stem cells that had
been created by that time. Last
summer, he used the first veto
of his presidency to reject a
bill that would have directed
more federal dollars toward
embryonic stem cell research.

Democrats have pledged to
reverse that outcome, setting
up a possible veto showdown
with the president.

.. Patrick takes the oath of <
office Thursday. His predeces-' »
sor, Gov. Mitt Romney, a>
4A | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

CALIFORNIA







BRIAN VAN DER BRUG/THE LOS ANGELES TIMES VIA AP

REACHING OUT: Judge Mark Juhas has tried to tackle the problem of divorces that
weren't finalized by calling about 100 people a month and asking whether they
need help completing the process.

Breaking up is difficul
to do for many col!

By JESSICA GARRISON
Los Angeles Times Service

LOS ANGELES — When
Yanic Chan and Vanessa Van
split up in 1995, they could
not afford a lawyer. So, like
thousands of other people
without money, they filled
out the divorce paperwork
themselves, with help from a
friend and courthouse staff.

In November 1997, Van
went to the Riverside County
Courthouse to enter.a final
judgment. “The clerk put the

. stamp on it,” Van said. “I
asked, ‘Everything finished?’
She. said ‘Yes.’”

Chan returned to his
native Cambodia, fell in love
and married again. Then, in
2006, he tried to bring his
new wife to this country.
That’s when Van and Chan
got a nasty surprise, one that
court officials fear could be
awaiting thousands of other
former California couples:
Their divorce had not gone
through.

Driven by rising legal fees,
a shortage of legal-aid law-
yers and a do-it-yourself phi-
losophy, about 80 percent of
people in California handle
their own divorces. 2

Many of them are not
‘quite as divorced as they
think they are. Some, like
Chan, are even accidental
bigamists, carrying not only
hopes and dreams but also an
earlier marriage to their new
one.

Tens of thousands of oth-

_ ers have some understanding
that their divorces are not
done. But stumped by com-
plex paperwork and court
procedures and unable to
afford thousands of dollars
for attorneys, they simply let
their cases languish.

A BIG PROBLEM

Court officials across the
state say they suspect the
problem is vast. In Los Ange-
les County, perhaps more
than one-third of all divorce
petitions filed have not been
finalized, according to Kath-
leen Dixon, who heads the
Los Angeles County Superior
Court’s programs for self-
represented people. —

Officials don’t have statis-
tics because they don’t moni-

CELEBRITIES

tor cases to make sure they
are finished. But the evidence
they have worries them.

One Los Angeles County
Superior Court judge, Mark
Juhas, found that about one-
third of the roughly 3,600
divorce cases filed in 2001
and 2002 and assigned to his
courtroom remained open.
Some of those couples may
have reconciled, but Juhas
suspects that many more are
stuck or may even think they
are divorced when they are
not.

Bonnie Hough is supervis-
ing attorney for the Center
for Families, Children and the
Courts, a division of the state
Judicial Council’s Adminis-
trative Office of the Courts.
She noted a study in Placer
County in the 1980s*that
found that 30 percent of peo-
ple there ‘who’ filed for

divorce did not complete the .

process.

MANY SURPRISED

At one legal services cen-
ter in the Van Nuys district of
Los Angeles, officials say they
see 20 people a month who
wrongly thought they were
divorced.

“They come in scream-
ing,” said Norma Valencia, a

paralegal at the center oper-

ated by Neighborhood Legal
Services. “They say, ‘You
don’t understand my situa-
tion. I want a divorce right
now.”

Others show up weeping:

. They’ve remarried without a

finalized divorce, and they’re
afraid to tell their new
spouse.

Many people, Valencia
said, think divorce is like a
traffic ticket — if they fail to
take care of it properly the
court will track them down
and notify them.

But it doesn’t work like
that. In California, getting
divorced takes at least three
steps: filing divorce papers,
serving them upon the spouse
and then writing and process-
ing a judgment with the
court. The process can be
more complicated if there are
children, or fights over assets.

Increasingly, across Cali-
fornia and the nation, people
are handling their own civil





court matters. li San Diego
County, one ot the. few coun-
ties where siatistics are avail-
able, 46 percent of people
represented themselves in
divorces in 1992, but by 2000

that figure had climbed to 77
percent.
One reason: increasing

tees for lawyers combined
with decreasing legal-aid ser-
vices tor poor people, said
Richard Zorzo, who coordi-
nates a national network af
organizations working on
self-representation.

Also a tactor, he said, is a
“Home Depot philosophy of



people feeling they can do
things on thcir own.” But the
legal systei wasn’t organized

do-it-yourself
ieant to be

with a
approach. lt
mavigited by lawyers with

graduate degrees. And people
without legal training often
make mistakes.

Juhas said the problem





was brought liome to him a

few years ago, when a couple
came before him on a routine
matter. hey had filed fora
divorce a few years earlier,
and both husband and wife
had since remarried. Juhas




said he looked down at their
file and then back up at the
couple. ‘TI said, ‘Do you real-

ize your judgment was never
entered?’ ”

STARTED CALLING

In plain that
means they weren’t divorced.
Luckily tor the couple — and
their new spouses — Juhas
finalized their divorce with-
out invalidating their new
matriages.

But it got him’ thinking,
what about the thousands of
files

English,

other people whose
remain open?

East spring, the judge, one
of more than 40 who handle
family law in Los Angeles
County, bean calling in

about 100 people a month
whose divorce cases had lan-





guished and asking them
whether they needed help.

About i0 perecnt said they
have re Hed. An addi-
tional 30 percent ignored his
summolis. :

But more than half, he said,
wanted to be divorced but
needed same help to get there,

It’s like it never happened

BY LISA DE MORAES
Washington Post Service

If you looked forward to
the Kennedy Center Honors
broadcast last Tuesday night
just to see Jessica Simpson’s
redo performance of 9 to 5
during the tribute to Dolly
Parton?

Ha! It was
gone.

CBS agreed
to expunge
Simpson
entirely from
the broadcast.
Through the
miracle of
; modern tech-
nology, it appeared as though
she was never there.



SIMPSON



[ERATE LEO LDL EF '6)84 8 et

The decision to yank the
performance was made, a
Simpson rep said, after her
client had been sent an
advance copy of what would
be broadcast and “she didn’t
like what she saw.”

We asked why Simpson
hadn’t rehearsed her song
better before the night of the
Honors. She appeared to be
relying heavily on cards for
the lyrics during the taping.

Simpson had learned the
song and rehearsed but “was
also shooting a mov‘ > which
was consuming a Jot of her
time, Blonde Ambition,” the
rep said.

According to The Wash-
ington Post’s Reliable Source

«

coluinn, Sitapsen was a mess
backstaye before she per-
formed, crying during the
tribute to Parton and pacing
nervously while others per-
formed their Parton songs.
Carrie Underwood, Kenny
Rogers, Alison Krauss and
Shania ‘{wain got through
their sones without tretdent,
After the show,
was asked to resshoot her
song while the rest of the
group bad dinner out in the
Kennedy Coster lobby, and
she did. “Atti v reviewing the
tape of the ‘re-do’ p
mance (hit was tiln
the liv a felt it
was not w! had hoped
to achivy said

Simpson

“elOoy

fatter





‘





TTR

eople





COMPILED BY
MICHAEL HAMERSLY

FROM HERALD STAFF
AND WIRE REPORTS







Actor Robert Loggia is 77. Actor Dabney Coleman is 75. Singer Stephen

Stills is 62. Bassist John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin) is 61. Actress
Victoria Principal is 57. Actor Mel Gibson is 51: Actor Jason Marsden is

32. Actor Nicholas Gonzalez (The O.C.) is 31.



Paulson and Ferrell

Will Ferrell,
wife have a boy

Will Ferrell and his wife,
Viveca Paulson, celebrated
the New Year early — with
the birth of their second son
on Saturday, People magazine
reports

Mattias Ferrell was born
just after 2 a.m. on Dec. 30,
publicist Matt Labov
announced.

Ferrell and Paulson, 37, an
art auctioneer, already have
one son, Magnus, 2.

In November, while on The
Late Show with David Letter-
man to promote his movie
Stranger Than Fiction, Farrell
revealed that the baby would
be a boy.

When asked by Letterman
if he knew the baby’s gender,
Ferrell, 39, responded: “You
know, I don’t know if I do,” he
said. “I’ve gotta check my
BlackBerry.”

He continued, “Well, we do
know, but I forget if we’re tell-
ing people. I told the Today
show we weren't telling them.
But it’s a boy.”

TELEVISION REVIEWS



Moss denies marriage

A spokesman for Kate
Moss denied Tuesday reports
that the supermodel and
rocker Pete Doherty had tied
the knot during a candlelit
Buddhist ceremony in Thai-
land on New Year’s Day, The
Associated Press reports.

Stuart Higgins said Moss,
32, was vacationing in Thai-
land, but hadn’t married Doh-
erty, frontman for Baby-
shambles.

“There has not been any
kind of marriage ceremony in
Thailand. She is on holiday,”
Higgins said.

British newspapers
reported that Moss and Doh-
erty had held the wedding cer-
emony in the Thai resort of
Phuket.

Neither the Sun nor the
Daily Mirror provided sources



‘Indiana Jones’
a go again

Is 60 the new 30? It is for
the action movie hero.

First, Sylvester Stallone,
60, enters the ring for the sixth
time in
Rocky Bal-
boa; now
filmmaker
George
Lucas says
he finally
has a script

Wa of the Indi-
Ford ana Jones
franchise —
with Harrison Ford, 62, once
again cracking the whip in the
name of archaeological adven-



One may live long,
but the other could be DOA

® The Knights of Prosper-
ity, 9-9:30 EST tonight, ABC

e In Case of Emergency,
9:30-10 EST tonight, ABC

BY GLENN GARVIN

ggarvin@MiamiHerald.com
Don’t worry about the bul-

let-riddled corpses of New

Year’s resolutions scattered all
over your living room. Just
pull up a chair, pop a cold one
(oops, there goes No. 172,
Don’t Get Wasted In Mid-

_Week) and flip on the tube

(arrgh, No. 173, Cut TV View-
ing To 80 Hours. A Week).
ABC has thoughtfully pro-
vided a couple of new sitcoms
about losers whose efforts to
turn their lives around are
bombing even worse than
yours. (Dammit, No. 174, Don’t
Gloat Over The Misfortunes
Of Others.)

Both The Knights of Pros-
perity and In Case of Emer-
gency are about lovable screw-
ups trying to rescue lives
imired in financial and emo-
tional muck. By far the more
successful of the two is The
Knights of Prosperity, a tale of
an off-kilter group of Robin
Hoods who brag that they’re
“stealing from the rich to give
to the poor — us.”

The ringleader is janitor
Eugene Gurkin, who has a
nightmarish vision of his (lit-
erally) dead-end future when
an elderly colleague keels over
and dies. “The man died mop-
ping on the night shift — what
kind of life is that?” Eugene
demands indignantly. “Below
average,’ agrees his pal
Squatch Squacier. When he
can’t finance his dream of
opening a bar, Eugene turns to
the obvious solution: forming
a gang to rob Mick Jagger’s
luxury Manhattan apartment.

Knights is brought to life by
a cast low in profile but high in
comic talent. It includes Donal
Logue (Grounded for Life) as
Kugene; Lenny Venito (Rescue
Me) as Squatch; Sofia Vergara
(Hot Properties) as Colombi-
an-narcotrafticker-moll
~turned-waitress Esperanza;
Maz Jobrani (Friday After
Next) as New-Delhi-lawyer-



turned-cabbie Gourishankar;
Kevin Michael Richardson as a
cookie-addicted security
guard named Rockefeller
Butts, recruited for his “gigan-
tic black-guy superstrength”;
and Josh Grisetti as nerdy col-
lege kid Louis, destined to fail
at even so humble an ambition
as becoming a TV censor.

This is last year’s hit sitcom
My Name is Earl in reverse:
half-a-dozen decent if bum-
bling people, kicked around by
life, who decide to reverse
their karma at gunpoint.

From Jagger’s occasional
cameos mocking his own
swinishly rich celebrity (he
luxuriates in yogurt baths
while his dogs swim in their
own indoor pool; his elevator
plays a Mantovani version of
Start Me Up) to Vergara’s ear-
nest offering to the cause of
folkloric talismans of her
native culture (a bag full of
assault rifles), its raffish ethnic
and class humor takes no pris-
oners.

In Case of Emergency, too,
bears a resemblance to
another show, but in this case,
it’s not flattering.

for part four,



Doherty and Moss



for the information.

The Mirror quoted an
unnamed friend of Moss as
saying the ceremony was an
expression of the couple’s
mutual devotion.

Higgins called the reports
“entirely false.”

ture.

During a break from duties
as grand marshal of Monday’s
Rose Parade, Lucas, also 62,
said filming of the long-
awaited fourth Indiana Jones
would begin this year. “It’s
going to be fantastic. It’s going
to be the best one yet.”

Ford starred in the three
earlier flicks (most recently in
1989’s Indiana Jones and the
Last Crusade.

“Mostly it’s the charm of
Harrison that makes it work,”
Lucas said.

He added that he and Ste-
ven Spielberg recently final-
ized the script.

Ford said he was “fit to con-
tinue” to play the title role
despite his age.

prosper,



ABC TELEVISION

WE THINK. WE HAVE A WINNER: The screw-ups of the show
Knights of Prosperity, above, just may find success.

This chronicle of four high-
school classmates thrown
together 20-years later, won-
dering how the sunny predic-
tions in their yearbooks could
have been so dismally wrong,
seems like a first draft of the
CBS sitcom The Class that
debuted this fall.

But where The Class is
warm and charming, Emer-
gency is crude and overdrawn.
When the captain of the
debate team runs into the class
valedictorian at a massage par-
lor where she’s turning tricks,
he comforts her: “We’re all
whores. IJ was gonna be Kurt
Vonnegut, and now I write
greeting cards.” Well, I hope
she feels better after that.

Emergency seems well-
intentioned, and the cast —
David Arquette (Scream), Jon-
athan Silverman (Weekend At
Bernie’s), Greg Germann (Ally
McBeal) and Kelly Hu (The
Scorpion King) — struggles
mantully to make it work. But

‘ when one of them exclaims,

“We're not these guys, we’re
not losers,” it’s pretty hard to
shake the feeling that he’s
dead wrong.




THE MIAMI HERALD | Miami









sential -
Constituting or being part of the essence of
“something; inherent. Basic or indispensable;
necessary: essential ingredients.










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6A_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

TEDDY KOLLEK —

WORLD NEWS

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Former mayor of J erusalem dies at 95

BY SCOTT WILSON
Washington Post Service

JERUSALEM — Theodor
Kollek, the irrepressible cham-
pion of this volatile city during
a nearly three-decade tenure
as mayor that spanned war,
uprising and shifting demo-
graphics, died Tuesday. He

"was 95.

Kollek, known universally
as Teddy, was. elected six
times to lead Jerusalem start-
ing in 1965. Over those years,
Kollek employed an avuncular
populism to promote Jewish-
Arab coexistence in a city
physically divided until Israel
annexed the eastern neighbor-
hoods following the 1967 Mid-
dle East War.

Although his vision of a
united city remains elusive in
many ways, Kollek was hailed
Tuesday as the driving force
behind Jerusalem’s evolution
from a parochial hilltop town
coveted by the world’s leading
religions and contested by the
Palestinian people to a mod-
ern metropolis of arts, tourism
and the numerous cultural
landmarks he engineered dur-
ing his decades in office.

“Teddy was Jerusalem and
Jerusalem was Teddy,” Uri
Lupolianski, Jerusalem’s cur-
rent mayor, said in a statement
announcing Kollek’s death.
“With his spirit and personal-

PHILIPPINES

Marine |
turnover

to U.S.
defended

BY HRVOJE HRANJSKI
Associated Press



MANILA, Philippines —

Philippine officials defended
their decision Tuesday to
transfer a U.S. Marine con-
victed of rape from a local
jail to the
American
Embassy,
and a lawyer
for the vic-
tim filed a
contempt of
court com-
plaint



SMITH against them.
T he
United States. also

announced that it would go
ahead with joint military
exercises with Philippine
forces in February — exer-
cises that the U.S. had earlier
canceled, citing the custody
dispute.

The victim’s lawyer, Eva-
lyn Ursua, alleged that the
Philippine secretaries of the
interior and justice violated
the order of the Court of
Appeals to keep Lance Cpl.
Daniel Smith, 21, of St. Louis,
in a Manila jail while he
appeals his conviction and
40-year prison sentence.

A 23-year-old Filipino
woman accused Smith of
sexually assaulting her in
November 2005, as three
other Marines allegedly
cheered him on.

President Gloria Macapa-
gal Arroyo said the govern-
ment had to take action “in
order to forestall the further
deterioration in our strategic
relationship with the United
States. “I wish to appeal for
understanding from the peo-
ple that this action will not
affect the substantive issues
at bar, nor impede justice
and the rule of law,” Arroyo
said in a statement.

About 50 protesters, most
of them women, burned an
American flag near the U.S.
Embassy and called Smith “a
fugitive.”

The case has strained

relations and tested a joint
military pact between the
two countries, under which
U.S. troops have trained Fili-
pino forces in counterterror-
ism tactics.

That training has been
credited with helping local
forces make gains against
Muslim extremists.

In addition to accusing
government officials of con-
tempt, Ursua asked the court
to dismiss Smith’s appeal





and issue a warrant for his
arrest.

ity he symbolized the true uni-
fied Jerusalem, the capital of
Israel.”

Named for the chief theo-
rist of modern Zionism, Theo-
dor Herzl, Kollek was born in
Nagyvaszony near Budapest in
1911 and raised in Vienna. He
immigrated to Palestine, then
under British authority, in 1934
and helped found Kibbutz Ein
Gev on the shores of the Sea of
Galilee.

HELPED JEWS

During World War II, Kol-
lek worked to help European
Jews escape Nazi persecution,
securing the transfer of thou-
sands from concentration
camps to Great Britain. After
the war, he organized weap-
ons shipments to the nascent
Jewish state’s fledgling armed
forces before the United
Nations partition of Palestine
in 1947.

He was appointed Israel’s
envoy to Washington follow-
ing the state’s founding in May
1948, and later ran the office of
Prime Minister David Ben-
Gurion for a decade.

But Kollek gained interna-
tional acclaim in the years fol-

lowing his 1965 election as’

mayor, a tenure marked by a
mix of cheerful globe-trotting
to promote Jerusalem and
raise money on its behalf and



tireless work developing the
city itself.

After Israeli forces occu-
pied East Jerusalem in June
1967, Kollek reached out to
Arab residents in an effort to
bridge religious and cultural
divides that persist in this city
of 700,000 residents. Israel’s
annexation of East Jerusalem,
including the Old City, is not
recognized internationally.

He established an Arab liai-
son office to address inequali-
ties in education funding, pub-

GALI TIBBON/AFP-GETTY IMAGES FILE
EX-MAYOR: Teddy Kollek, shown in 2002, promoted
Jewish- Arab coexistence.

lic transit and other municipal
services between the city’s
Arab and Jewish neighbor-
hoods. He walked the streets
daily, and despite his fame,
continued to list his home
number in telephone directo-
ries throughout his tenure.
Kollek once said, ‘We
proved that Jerusalem is a bet-
ter city united than divided.”
But after the start of the most
recent Palestinian uprising in
the fall of 2000, Kollek sug-
gested that some of the city’s

Arab neighborhoods be turned
over to Palestinian control,
saying “I think we need to give
something to them and have
part for ourselves. It will never
be easy.”

CULTURAL FLAVOR

Kollek permanently altered
the city’s landscape, adding
world-class cultural institu-
tions that have expanded Jeru-
salem’s draw as a tourist desti-
nation. The Israel Museum,
which cascades down a promi-
nent ridgeline in the city’s cen-
ter, and the Jerusalem Theater
are among his most important
cultural legacies. The modern
soccer venue, known as Teddy
Stadium, was dedicated to
him.
“This /is the most difficult
job there is,” Kollek said in an
interview with the Washing-
ton Post in 1993. “It’s not the
most important job, but it is a
more difficult job than being
prime minister and foreign
minister.”

At 82, Kollek ran reluc-
tantly and unsuccessfully for a
seventh term later in 1993. His
defeat by Ehud Olmert, the
Likud Party candidate, repre-
sented the end of the Labor
Party’s domination of Jerusa-
lem politics and reflected the
city’s demographic shift to a
more religious and conserva-



AFP-GETTY IMAGES

TV celebrity Oprah Winfrey opens the doors Tuesday of The Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls, a
multimillion dollar school for academically talented, disadvantaged girls she founded near Johannesburg. Winfrey
hopes the students will become ‘the future leaders on the path to peace in South Africa and the rest of the world.’

INDONESIA | PLANE CRASH

False report angers travelers’ kin

BY ZAKKI HAKIM
Associated Press

MAKASSAR, Indonesia —
Relatives waiting for news
about a missing jetliner broke
down in tears Tuesday after
learning that senior Indone-
sian officials erroneously
reported the Boeing 737’s
charred wreckage had been
found and that a dozen people
may have survived.

“Oh, what is happening to
us?” wailed Dorce Sundalangi,
whose daughter was on the
flight, after hearing the report
was based on rumors from vil-
lagers that reached the highest
levels of government. “They
had given us hope of seeing
our beloved relatives ... but it
was false hope.”

The Adam Air plane carry-
ing 102 people sent out two
distress signals in stormy
weather Monday halfway
through its two-hour journey
from Indonesia’s main island
of Java to Manado, on the
northern tip of Sulawesi, one
of the largest islands in the
sprawling archipelago.

Three of those aboard were
American citizens, the U.S.
Embassy said. A U.S. National
Transportation Safety Board
team was to arrive Friday to
offer assistance. It was unclear
if any other foreigners were on
the plane.

Search-and-rescue teams
hiked slippery forest paths in
heavy rain for more than 10
hours Tuesday but , found
nothing, calling off their
search along Sulawesi’s moun-
tainous western coast as dark-
ness fell and vowing to set off

again at dawn today.

Bambang Karnoyudho, the
head of the National Search
and Rescue Agency, said the
search would be expanded to
include the nearby Makassar
Strait.

EARLY REPORTS

The announcement capped
a day of hope and anguish for
relatives of those on Flight KI-
574. Police Chief Col. Genot
Hariyanto earlier said rescue
teams arrived at the crash site.
Setyo Raharjo, head of the
National Commission on
Transportation Safety, said 90
bodies were found near the
wreckage and that the search
for the 12 others was continu-
ing.

The claims were repeated
by the chief of Adam Air —
who extrapolated to say that a
dozen people survived —
senior aviation officials, high-
ranking military officials and
police.

Descriptions were vivid,
with officials saying corpses
and debris from the plane
were scattered over a 300-
yard area of forests and jagged
cliffs, highlighting the often
unreliable and chaotic nature
of disaster-relief efforts in the
world’s largest archipelagic
nation.

Eventually, Transport Min-
ister Hatta Radjasa acknowl-
edged the news was based on
rumors from villagers, spark-
ing a series of reversals from
other officials.

“The search-and-rescue
team is still looking for the
location,” the minister told El-







Shinta radio. “It has not yet
been found.”

Karnoyudho said much of
the original information came
from Hariyanto, who said he
received the news from subor-
dinates after they spoke to a
village chief.

“Once he went to check for
himself, he found it was not
true,” Karnoyudho said, refer-
ring to the local police chief.

APOLOGY

Air force Rear Cmdr. Eddy
Suyanto — among those who
earlier confirmed the plane
crashed in the mountainous
Sulawesi region of Polewali —
acknowledged the error late
Tuesday and apologized.

But that provided little con-
solation to relatives awaiting

* ASTRIT WISKEY/AP

ANGUISH: A relative of a plane crash victim weeps at
Juanda airport in Surabaya, Indonesia, on Tuesday.

news about the missing.

Some were camped out at
the Adam Air counter at the
Manado airport — the destina-
tion of the ill-fated plane —

and others were in the south-

ern Sulawesi city of Makassar,
believed to be closer to where
the plane went down.

“{ don’t understand how
the authorities could be so
heartless and spread rumors
without thinking of the suffer-
ing of those waiting for news
of their loved ones,” said Ima
Kulata, who was awaiting
word about her cousin and
two nieces.

“It’s ridiculous,” she said,
crying after learning there
may be no survivors after all.
“How come they make such
fools of us?”

tive population. That trend
persists today, and Jerusalem’s
arts advocates say funding has
fallen for cultural programs
since his departure.

“Teddy Kollek was one of
the builders of the New Jeru-
salem after the 1967 Six Day
War,” Olmert, now the prime
minister, said Tuesday in a
statement issued by his office.

“When he was elected
mayor, Jerusalem was a
divided city with a status
unworthy of itself. When he
left the mayor’s office in 1993,
Jerusalem was a great, modern
and united city. Teddy Kollek
sang Jerusalem’s praises
around the world. He deci-
sively influenced the city’s
way of life, culture, vistas,
institutions as well as the rela-
tionships of its residents.”

Since leaving office, Kollek
‘continued his work for the
Jerusalem Foundation, an
organization he helped found
40 years ago.

Flags along Safra Square in
front of City Hall, another Kol-
lek project, were lowered to
half-staff following the
announcement of his death.
Kollek is scheduled to be bur-
ied Thursday following a state
funeral.

He is survived by his
widow, Tamar, a son, Amos,
and a daughter, Osnat.

MIDDLE EAST

Gaza
Strip
crossing
attacked

BY IBRAHIM BARZAK

Associated Press

GAZA CITY; Gaza Strip
Palestinian militants.

attacked the Gaza Strip’s

main cargo crossing with

mortar fire early Tuesday,

lightly wounding an Israeli

truck driver in the latest

flare-up of violence in the

| coastal strip.

The attack on the Karni

crossing came shortly after

| warring Palestinian factions

| resumed their violent

| ‘infighting following a one-"

week pause, and gunmen

abducted a foreign news

photographer.

The Israeli army said the
mortar attack hit a truck that
was delivering building
materials to Gaza. It said the
attack did not disrupt the
flow of goods into Gaza.

Israeli Prime Minister
Ehud Olmert has pledged to
increase the movement of
goods in and out of Gaza in
an effort to boost the moder-
ate Palestinian president,
Mahmoud Abbas, in his
power struggle with the
Islamic militant group
Hamas.

There was no claim of
responsibility for the attack.
Medical officials said the
truck’s driver was lightly |
wounded and taken to a hos-
pital.

Karni is the main transit
point for Gaza’s imports and
exports, and is critical to the
area’s fragile economy. Traf-
fic through the crossing has
been severely restricted dur-
ing months of fighting
between Israel and Palestin-
ian militants.

Internal Palestinian ten-
sions also have erupted into
violence over the past
month.

Late Monday, clashes in
the Jebaliya refugee camp
near Gaza City broke a
weeklong lull in the contfron-
tation between Hamas,
which controls the govern-
ment, and Abbas’ Fatah. In
the past few weeks, 17 peo-
ple have been killed in the
internal fighting, leading to
fears of civil war.

At least two people were
wounded in the gunfire on
Monday, security officials
said, and media reports said
18 Hamas gunmen and four
from Fatah were kidnapped.
Seven of the Hamas mili-
tants were later freed.

In the past, kidnapped
militants have usually been
released unharmed



PR ES ES SE TE ES TT
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS





_U.S. NEWS

RIC FRANCIS/AP FILE, 2005

OPERATIONS AFTER KATRINA: A police officer wears a two-way radio at a temporary command operation set up outside
Harrah’s Casino in New Orleans in September 2005 following Hurricane Katrina.

Few high marks for responders

BY DEVLIN BARRETT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Only
six of 75 U.S. metropolitan
areas won the highest grades
for their emergency agencies’
ability to communicate during
a disaster, five years after the
Sept. ll terrorist attacks,
according to a federal report
obtained Tuesday by The
Associated Press.

A draft portion of the
report, to be released today,
gives the best ratings to Wash-
ington, D.C.; San Diego; Min-
neapolis-St. Paul; Columbus,
Ohio; Sioux Falls, S.D., and
Laramie County, Wyo.

The lowest scores went to
Chicago; Cleveland; Baton
Rouge, La.; Mandan, N.D., and
American Samoa. The report
included large and small cities
and their suburbs, along with
US. territories.

POLICIES IN PLACE

In‘an overview, the report
said:all 75:areas surveyed have

CONGRESS

Lobbyists

BY JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — New
Democratic lawmakers aren’t
the only ones measuring for
drapes and unsealing boxes.
In a job-swapping cycle
unseen for some time, Demo-
cratic congressional aides and
former members are leaping
to lucrative lobbying posts,
Democratic lobbyists are grab-
bing for influential jobs in
Congress and advocacy
groups are waging bidding
wars for the best talent.
Call it a six-year itch.
Washington’s $2.3 billion
lobbying industry is undergo-
ing one of its periodic adjust-
ments to shifts in government
power — the first since the
White House changed hands
in 2001. Accustomed to deal-
ing with Republicans and at
times discouraged by Republi-
can lawmakers from hiring
Democrats, lobbying firms and
business groups are now fill-
ing their ranks with policy
experts and lobbyists more
closely aligned with the new
leadership on Capitol Hill. —
“Nobody on our side is tell-
ing them fire the Republicans,
but they certainly understand

CAMPAIGN 2008

policies in place for helping
their emergency workers com-
municate. But it cautioned that
regular testing and exercises
are heeded “‘to effectively link
disparate systems.” .

It also said that while coop-
eration among emergency
workers is strong, “formalized
governance [leadership and
planning] across regions has

lagged.”
The study, conducted by
the Homeland Security

Department, was likely to add
fuel to what looms as a battle
in Congress this year. Demo-
crats who take over the major-
ity this week have promised to
try fixing the problem emer-
gency agencies have commu-
nicating with each other but
have not said specifically what
they will do, how much it will
cost or how they will pay for
it.

“Five years after 9/ll, we
continue to turn a deaf ear to
gaps in interoperable commu-
nications,” — the term used

for emergency agencies’ abili-
ties to talk to each other, said
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.
“If it didn’t have such poten-
tially devastating conse-
quences, it would be laugh-
able.”

Homeland Security spokes-
man Russ Knocke would not
comment on the report, saying
only that in releasing it today ,
Homeland Security Secretary
Michael Chertoff will “talk
about nationwide assessments
for interoperable communica-
tions.”

The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001,
revealed major problems in
how well emergency agencies
were able to talk to each other
during a catastrophe. Many
firefighters climbing the
World Trade Center towers
died when they were unable to
hear police radio warnings to
leave the crumbling buildings.

In New York now, the
report said, first responders
were found to have well-estab-
lished systems to communi-

adapt to party shift

they need to have a bipartisan
team if they want to get any-
thing done,” said Steve Elmen-
dorf, a top advisor to former
Rep. Richard Gephardt,
D-Mo., who took up lobbying
with Bryan Cave Strategies
last year and opened his own
shop after the election.

The changes under way can
be felt all the way to the top of
influential organizations.

The Alliance of Automobile
Manufacturers last month
named former Democratic
Rep. Dave McCurdy of Okla-
homa as the trade group’s new
president. McCurdy left Con-
gress in 1994 and mounted an
unsuccessful run for Senate.

Some lobbying firms
already have a head start. For
example, the Federalist Group,
a Republican firm, hired for-
mer Louisiana Democratic
Rep. Chris John in March and
is now adding more Demo-
crats.

“The firms that will be in
trouble are the ones that
stayed the course — you can
use those three words, ‘stayed
the course’ and were
blinded by what was happen-
ing in the Congress,” said
John, one of the leaders of the

Guiliani’s strategy

WASHINGTON — (AP) —
The presidential campaign
strategy for former New York’
Mayor Rudy
Giuliani
complete with
a $100 million
fundraising
target for this
year — is out |
of the bag.

The 140-
page schedule
for the Repub-
lican’s budding presidential
bid was reported in Tuesday’s
editions of the New York
Daily News.

The paper said an anony-
mous source obtained the doc-
ument after it was left behind



GIULIANI

on a campaign swing in 2006,
but Giuliani spokeswoman
Sunny Mindel said it was actu-
ally pilfered from luggage
from a private flight.

“This wasn’t left in a hotel,”
Mindel told The Associated
Press. “This is clearly a dirty
trick.”

Mindel said that while
working on the 2006 campaign
trail, a Giuliani aide lost a
piece of luggage containing
the paper.

“After repeated requests
over the course of a few days,
the bag was finally returned
with the document inside.”

She did not say exactly
where or when the document
was lost, or what was in it, but

moderate to conservative Blue
Dog Democrats in the House.

“Those are the ones that
are going to be hurt.”

The Federalist Group, a
subsidiary of Ogilvy Public
Relations Worldwide, will
now become Ogilvy Govern-
ment Relations, shedding a
name that had become synon-
ymous with Republican lobby-
ing. John also recently hired
Moses Mercado, deputy exec-
utive director of the Demo-
cratic National Committee.

Some lobbyists concede
that after years of seeking to
influence Republicans, those
lobbying firms and trade
groups predominantly made
up of Republicans will have to
work harder to be heard.

Still, the reality in Washing-
ton is that neither side holds
the upper hand.

A Republican president still
has the White House and the
51-49 Democratic margin in
the Senate is so slim that any
substantive legislation would
require a bloc of GOP votes.

“Anything you do in this
town, you have to work both
sides of the aisle,” said Bruce
Josten, the top lobbyist for the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

revealed

Mindel played down its
importance, saying it is “sim-
ply someone’s ideas which
were committed to paper over
three months ago.”

The Daily News said the
schedule includes a plan to
raise at least $100 million in
2007 by reeling in major GOP
donors such as Lew Eisenberg
and Larry Bathgate, both from
New Jersey, and Fred Smith,
the CEO of FedEx. Those
three are already supporting
Arizona Sen. John McCain’s
bid.

The document also predicts
some $100 million could be
spent against Giuliani to high-
light political vulnerabilities
like his three marriages.

LT A SIT TO TE

cate among each other — but
not the best possible. Thirteen
U.S. cities scored better than
New York.

In the study, communities
were judged in three catego-
ries: operating procedures in
place, use of communications
systems and how effectively
local governments have coor-
dinated in preparation for a
disaster.

SOUTH FLORIDA

South Florida — Monroe,
Miami-Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties — did
better than Jacksonville and
Tampa in all three areas.

Overall, 16 percent of the
communities were given the
highest score for the commu-
nications procedures they
have in place and 1 percent got
the lowest rating.

Nineteen percent got the
top grade for their plans for
coordinating during a disaster
and 8 percent received the
worst.

FOOD SAFETY

BY LIBBY QUAID
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Mau-
reen Cohen read a newspaper
article about cancer-causing
acrylamide in her kids’ favor-
ite snacks and wanted to know
more.

“I just got curious,” said
Cohen, a mother of three in
Vienna, Va. “If it’s known that
it’s a cancer-causing sub-
stance, I sure would like some-
body to look into it and find
out.”

Acrylamide turns up in all
kinds of foods, including

breakfast cereals, cookies and
crackers. But it’s difficult for
consumers to figure out how
much acrylamide is in a partic-
ular meal or snack.

Nobody puts acrylamide in
food. The chemical is a natural
byproduct of cooking starchy
food at high temperature.

So while you might find
acrylamide in potatoes that
are fried or baked at high tem-
peratures, you might not find
it in potatoes that are boiled
and mashed.

French fries and potato
chips already are well up on
the list of bad-for-you foods.

Acrylamide also forms in
plenty of other starches, like
the toasted oats in Cheerios,
the flour in hard pretzels or
even the sweet potatoes in
Gerber Tender Harvest
organic baby food.

But compared with other
worrisome chemicals in food,
such as mercury in fish or ben-
zene in soda, relatively little is
known about how acrylamide
forms, how it affects people or
what to do about it. High lev-
els of acrylamide in food were
first reported by Swedish
researchers in 2002.

Cohen looked on the Food

and Drug Administration web-"
sité to see how much acrylam-
ide was in her potato chips — ©

french fries, potato chips, |

INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007. | 7A.

Alarm raised over
chemical found
in some foods

reduced-fat Pringles — but
that kind of Pringles wasn’t
listed. She called the company
but was told to provide a letter
from her doctor. Then she
mentioned it to her father-in-
law, who works for a nutrition
and health advocacy group,
the Center for Science in the
Public Interest.

Already aware of the chem-
ical, CSPI began surveying
manufacturers of 30 products.
None provided information on
how much acrylamide is cur-
rently in their products.

Now the group wants the
government to publish more
data on acrylamide in major
brands. The most recent FDA
data on brand-name foods is
more than two years old.

Consumers, especially par-
ents of young children, need
the information so they can
pressure companies to reduce
the amount of acrylamide in
food, the center’s executive
director said last month in a
letter to the FDA.

“Consumers rely on the
government to ensure the
safety of these products, and
the government simply isn’t
doing it,” said CSPI’s Michael
Jacobsen.

the FDA said it is research-
ing whether acrylamide poses
a health risk to people. The
agency’s focus is to calculate
exposure to the chemical.

“We have already done
extensive sampling to make
this determination on expo-
sure,’ FDA spokeswoman
Julie Zawisza said. “We don’t
believe additional sampling
will inform our exposure
assessment significantly.”

Also unknown is exactly
how acrylamide affects people
— studies have shown it
causes cancer in lab mice and
rats. Yet studies that looked at
specific cancers in people
have not shown there is a link
to acrylamide.









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e BRAZIL

EFS



Troops may be used
to fight gang violence

From Miami Herald Wire Services

RIO DE JANEIRO — Rio de Janeiro’s new government and
Brazil’s top security official will meet today to discuss send-
ing federal troops to the city to combat a wave of gang vio-
lence that President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has called “ter-

rorism,” officials said.

National Security Secretary Luiz Fernando Correa and Rio
de Janeiro State Security Secretary José Mariano Beltrame
will weigh options on how to crack down on gangs in this
morning’s meetings, the press office of Rio’s public safety

department said Tuesday.

Correa will consider “a series of projects, including the
possibility of sending National Security Forces to operate in

the state,” Beltrame said.

Last week, drug gangs opened fire on police stations and
set fire to buses in attacks that left 19 people dead and have
hurt tourism in Rio, Brazil’s second-largest city. Eight victims
were bus passengers whose bodies were charred beyond rec-

ognition.

Late Tuesday, assailants ordered passengers off a bus then
set it on fire in Sao Joao de Meriti, a crime-infested suburb on
the outskirts of Rio, the Folha online news service said. No
one was injured. Police were not immediately available to

confirm the attack.

The attacks have been attributed to Rio’s drug gangs
angered by increased pressure from anti-criminal militias,
reportedly run by former and active duty police officers and

soldiers.

Authorities are concerned whether police can guarantee
security as Rio prepares to host a Mercosur trade bloc sum-
mit, the 2007 Pan American Games and its annual five-day _

Carnival bash.

e VENEZUELA

BATTLE FOR CONTROL
OF PRISON KILLS 16

CARACAS — Rival gangs
battled for control of a
prison in eastern Venezuela
Tuesday, killing 16 inmates
and injuring 13, authorities
said Tuesday.

Fanny Marquez, a federal
prison official, said some
inmates were killed with
guns and knives and others
were hanged before prison
authorities regained control
of Uribana Prison near the
city of Barquisimeto, 175
miles west of the capital of... _,
Caracas. National Guard
troops restored order Tues-,

broke out overnight,
Marquez told the state-run
Bolivarian News Agency.

“Tt was a fight for control
of two cellblocks,” Marquez
said. “We have the situation
under control.”

Violence is common in
Venezuela’s overcrowded

e MEXICO

OFFICERS DISPATCHED
TO QUELL VIOLENCE

in Mexico’s violent border
city of Tijuana said Tuesday
that 300 federal police offi-
cers had arrived to help
combat organized crime.

Felipe Calderén also sent
federal police to central
Michoacan state to fight
drug traffickers. Tijuana
Mayor Jorge Hank Rhon
said he would like federal
authorities to join regular

patrols and security check-
points being established ran-

...domly around the city.

day morning after the riot guess iso." ar \;

e COLOMBIA

FOUR LEADERS SHOT

BY LEFTIST REBELS



els dragged four community
leaders from their homes
and shot them in a park in
rural Colombia, authorities



TIJUANA — Authorities

Last month, President



BOGOTA — Leftist reb-





and understaffed prisons, said. In a separate incident, a
where about 20,000 inmates police officer was killed in a
live in 30 facilities built to gun battle with rebels,

hold 15,000. police said.
VENEZUELA

Cardinal pleads to
keep station on air

CARA-
CAS — (AP)
— Venezue-
la’s top
Roman Cath-
olic prelate
urged Presi-
dent Hugo
Chavez’s.
government
to reconsider a decision not to
renew the broadcast license of
an opposition-aligned televi-
sion station, saying in com-
ments published Tuesday that
the move would hurt freedom
of expression.

“The country wins if there
are different media and there
is complete freedom of opin-
ion,” Cardinal Jorge Urosa
Savino was quoted as saying in
the Venezuelan newspaper El



CHAVEZ

Universal. “It’s necessary that |

this decision that has yet to
take effect be revised.”

Chavez announced last
week that the government
would not renew the license
for Radio Caracas Television,
or RCTV, when it expires in
May.

Information Minister Wil-
lian Lara, responding to Urosa
Savino’s comments Tuesday,
said the decision not to renew
RCTV’s concession was “irre-
versible” and “indisputable.”

Lara also denied that the
diversity of the nation’s media
is threatened, saying that the
total number of radio, TV,
Internet and print outlets has
increased in recent years.

RCTV is one of two major
private channels — along with

Globovisi6n — that remain
vehemently critical of
Chavéz’s leftist administra-
tion.

During a 2002 coup that
briefly ousted Chavez, several
private channels broadcast
regular programs like cartoons
and movies instead of the
leader’s return to power dur-
ing gidnt street protests. Pro-
Chavez mobs gathered outside
TV stations, including RCTV,
during the coup, shouting
insults and in some cases hurl-
ing rocks.

Two other privately owned
channels, Televen and Venevi-
sién, once were fiercely anti-
Chavez but have become less
so since an opposition-led
strike failed to unseat Chavez
in 2003.

Government officials have
denied the RCTV decision is
political, saying the channel’s
license is simply expiring May
28.

The station argues it has a
legal right to continue broad-
casting for years to come.

Lara said last week that the
government is considering
turning over the channel used
by RCTV to community
media, using it for a half-pub-
lic, half-private channel, or for
a state-run entertainment sta-
tion.

The press freedom group
Reporters Without Borders
said in a statement Tuesday
that “no decision should be
taken without the agreement
of RCTV’s owners.”

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION

CUBA

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

‘Funereal’ future in the cards?

BY RUI FERREIRA
El Nuevo Herald

In separate and virtually
competing new-year predic-
tions, two groups of Cuban
Santeria priests are predicting
a “funereal” future but also an
“ideal” moment for an eco-
nomic recovery.

The island’s babalawos
have long been split into sev-
eral groups, with one group:
relatively loyal to the govern-
ment. But their annual predic-
tions nevertheless are anx-
iously awaited by the many
Cubans who practice the mix-
ture of African and Catholic
religions.

This year, the predictions
were awaited with special
interest because of Fidel Cas-
tro’s still-unknown ailment,
which has kept him out of the
public eye since July 26 and
sparked speculation that he’s
seriously ill.

On Monday, the Yoruba
priests who make up the rela-
tively independent Commis-
sion for the Year’s Letter
announced that 2007 would be
marked by wars and “military
interventions” although the
island will see an economic
improvement based on the
discovery of oil and mineral
deposits.

While they refused to speak
specifically about Castro’s
health, babalawo Lazaro
Cuesta, who read the year’s
prediction, made comments
that seemed to be directed at
the Cuban leader’s ailment.

“The panorama that pre-
sents itself to us is a little fune-
real,” he said. “When one

EL SALVADOR

doesn’t leave his place at its
proper time, one runs the risk
that unpredictable things hap-
pen.”

Castro surrendered power
for the first time in 47 years
after undergoing intestinal
surgery in late July. A Spanish
surgeon who visited him two
weeks ago said Castro was
recovering from “complica-
tions” following “very grave
surgery.”

The 80-year-old Castro
turned over most of his power
temporarily to his younger
brother Raul, who is believed
by many Cuba-watchers to be
more willing than his brother
to open the island’s economy
to more market forces.

“Twas powerfully
impressed that they [the baba-

lawos] were so categoric on



this,” said Maria I. Faguaga
Iglesias, a Havana anthropolo-
gist who took part in the pro-
cess of developing the com-
mission’s predictions.

Although the Cuban baba-
lawos usually avoid making
statements with political
implications, this year they
raised eyebrows when they
called for more care and atten-
tion to the island’s youth
“because today’s youth will be
called to rule from a house to a
country in the not-too-distant
future.”

The babalawos’ comments
coincided with recent state-
ments by Raul Castro that the
generation that fought in and
led the Castro revolution is
reaching the end of its time
“and we must give way to new
generations.”

FORECAST: Lazaro
Cuesta, a Santeria
priest, shows his
predictions for Cuba in
2007 at his house in
Havana on Tuesday.
Top priests of Cuba’s
African-influenced
Santeria religion issued
their yearly forecast,
including Fidel Castro’s
health and the
economy.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Meanwhile, the Cuban
Council of Senior Ifa Priests,
considered to be more loyal to
the government, said its pre-
dictions “speak of legal prob-
lems and their repercussions,
which could bring as a conce-
quence an increase in corrup-
tion and crime.”

A third group of babalawos
in Miami, which will make its
own predictions public today,
said the true forecast falls
somewhere between the two
Havana groups.

“If we take a piece of each
letter to make up one real let-
ter, if out of all this mess we
take a little bit of each, this
year, simply put, the letter is
predicting something bad,”
said Miami babalawo José
Montoya.



EDGAR ROMERO/AP

MORTARS ON EXHIBIT: An unidentified U.S. soldier looks at mortars on display at the Museum of the Revolution in
Perquin, El Salvador. Perquin was considered the ‘guerrilla capital’ during the country’s 12-year civil war.

Civil war is tourism draw

BY DIEGO MENDEZ
Associated Press

PERQUIN, El Salvador —
Gun fragments, photos, com-
bat plans and mountain
hide-outs. These are the latest
tourist attractions in formerly
war-torn El Salvador.

The country has been at
peace since 1992. But the 12-
year civil war left 76,000 dead,
thousands injured and an
imprint of violence on the
country that residents in eco-
nomically depressed areas are
trying to turn into a profit.

For a fee, former guerrillas
will take visitors on tours of
former battlefields or moun-
tain hide-outs, while museums
display war memorabilia. The
government has applauded the
effort as a way to draw more
tourists to El Salvador.

‘PEACE ROUTE’

The former Farabundo
Marti National Liberation
Front, or FMLN, which led the
guerrilla uprising, has teamed
up with local business leaders
to create the so-called “peace
route.”

The mountain town of Per-
quin, 175 miles east of San Sal-
vador, was considered the
“guerrilla capital” during the
fighting, and it served as the
FMLN’s headquarters. Today,
it is home to the “Museum of
the Revolution,” and features

cannons, uniforms, pieces of
Soviet weaponry and other
weapons of war once used by
the FMLN.

“The objective of the
museum is simply to serve as a
point of historical reference
‘for future generations,” said
Rolando Caceres, the muse-
um’s director.

The museum — a small,
adobe house — was founded
in the mid-1990s, but has
become increasingly popular
with visitors, both foreign and
Salvadoran.



LUIS ROMERO/AP FILE, 2006

GUERRILLA MUSEUM: Carlos Enrique Consalvi, a former
announcer for the guerrilla-run We Will Win Radio,
opened his own museum to display video, audio and
photos from El Salvador’s civil war.

“We came to learn the real
history of our country,” said
Stephanie Acevedo, on a field
trip with 180 other students.

Amanda Navarro, who has
lived in New York for the past
35 years, said she hadn’t been
back to El Salvador for years
and “the first thing that I
wanted to do was come to the
museum.” She said she had
wanted to know the real story
of her country’s conflict.

In San Salvador, Carlos
Enrique Consalvi, a former
announcer for the guerrilla-

run We Will Win Radio,
opened his own museum to
display video, audio and pho-
tos from the conflict. The
museum also includes a
library and writings about the
war.

MAKING A CONTRIBUTION

“This is an independent
effort on the part of civil soci-
ety to contribute something to
the history of the country,”
Consalvi said.

In the northern area of
Chalatenango, another group
of former guerrillas recently
formed a cooperative to
restore a series of mountain
caves and other bunkers used
for everything from hospitals
to hide-outs. The group even
built small cabins for visitors
who want to spend the night.

Tourism Minister Rubén
Rochi applauds efforts, argu-
ing that anything that pro-
motes tourism in E] Salvador
is good. The tiny country is
the first in Central America to
build a tourism industry
around its former civil war
history.

Between 1996 and 2006, 7.3
million visitors helped gener-
ated a record $1.7 billion.

Most tourists are seeking
out El Salvador’s beaches, but
more and more are becoming
interested in the country’s
infamous past.
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



amily requests for Labour Day to be

renamed in Sir Randol Fawkes honour

A WEEK away from the
celebration of Majority Rule
Day on January 10, the family
of Sir Randol Fawkes is
requesting that the Govern-
ment enact legislation to
rename Labour Day in his
honour.

As one of the chief archi-
tects of majority rule, Sir Ran-
dol was instrumental in bring-
ing into existence the first
black government of the
Bahamas.

He is also the recognised
father of the Free Trade
Union Movement, which is
still a formidable force in the
country.

It is because of Sir Randol
Fawkes that a bill was piloted
through the House of Assem-
bly making Labour Day a paid
public holiday.

In 1967, as an elected
Labour leader, he and Alvin
Braynen broké the deadlock
between the United Bahami-
an Party (UBP) and the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party (PLP)
by throwing their vote in with
the PLP.

A spokesperson for the
family said in a release yes-
terday that naming the holi-
day Sir Randol Fawkes
Labour Day would be a fit-
ting way to celebrate and hon-
our Sir Randol’s legacy and
would also be a testament to
his work with the oppressed
labouring masses and to the
Labour vote that he gave to
the Progressive Liberal Party
in 1967.

As the Bahamas prepares
to celebrate Majority Rule



Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE |
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.0.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

1962, Unemployment March.

Day, the family has asked that
the public takes the time to
reflect on the struggle that
caused “our forefathers to
have to rise up against a sys-
tem that did not recognise the
dignity and self-worth of each
individual.




an ayaa anal

MONTE ALCION THOMPSON, 34

a resident of Gleniston
Gardens, will be held at
Zion Baptist Church,
East and Shirley Streets,
on Thursday, January 4,
2007 at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev.
T.G. Morrison.
Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Cherished memory held
by his son, Alcion Jai;
father, Monte
Thompson; mother,
Marilyn Olga Smith;



grandparents, Donald and Emily Aranha; two sisters,
Shekcatha and Tamica Thompson; two adopted brothers,
Sean Saunders and Mario Duncan; five uncles, Fred Paul,
Anthony Plakaris, Tyrone Smith, Philip Ingraham Sr., and
Kenhugh Rolle; eight aunts, Gweneth Paul, Magnal,
Hermane and Velma Thompson, Althea Neely, Anna Smith,
Carmetta Ingraham and Antonia Lesbott; two grandaunts,
Vera Smith and Vernell Stubbs; two godmothers, Julia

Outten and Barbara Neeley.

A host of other relatives and friends including Kirkwood
and Kailecia Thompson, Anthony II, Ajike, Adrian and
Alexander Plakaris, Claudine Cayden and Donavan Moxey,
Mark, Makyle, Simone, Sharia, Shamaal, Doyle Paul,
Garnett and Sandrene OCoghiel, Della Reese and Patrick
Carey, Sonobia Williams, Quintyann, TJ, Tyrell, Sean,
Tenniel and Jermaine, Britney, Tamika, Jr, Frisco, Delvano,
Laroona Trembley, Danielle and Maurcio Thompson,
Larandel, CJ, LJ and Tevin, Andrew, Alfred and Charlene
- Stubbs, Elizabeth Aranha, Beryl Russell, Keto Aranha,
Susan O'Brien, Therese Broomsfield, Dianne Rolle, Perry
Smith, Iesha Percentie, Brad Smith, Henrietta Smith and
family, Carolyn and Elliott Johnson, Corine Stewart and
family, Lamont Fisher and the Boys of Golden Gates #2,
Stephen Outten, Pamela Randle, Simone Outten, Sheryl
Smith and family, Dorothy Russell, Maggie Martin, Erika
Brown, Sylvano, Patrico, Treco, Ray and Lil Phil Grant,
Anthony Rolle, Quinten, Carvin, Ritchie and Kevin Gray, '
management and staff of Botanical Gardens, Heather Grant
and family, \Wilkeisha Dorsette and family, Julia Bain,
Carolyn Demeritte, Beverley Bain, Anna Dola Smith,
William and Philmon Wilson and family, Philip and Mary
Moxey, Mae Armbrister and family, Dolly Foster and family,
Ruth Miller and family, Orville Gibson and family, Alfred
and Gloria Brown and family, Evelyn Deveaux and family,
Jason Stubbs, Ann Stubbs and family, Bernice Roker Collins
and family, Kenneth Poitier and family, Henrietta Poitier
and family, Magnus Swan, Leon Sweeting, Elvia Hart and
family, Daphne Lamm and family, Adelma Penn family,
Frances Johnson and family, Yvonne Roberts and family,
Kathy Davis and family, Clarice Verence and family, Kendal
Marshall, Cheyanne Bain and family and the entire Bain
Town, Golden Gates #2 and Peter Avenue communities.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on
Wednesday from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the
church on Thursday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

NINES CMD TREN. ORT LMT LLN CAI i Tt TRA TONLE OEE USAR ORR RN AU 4

@ ABOVE: Sir Randol Fawkes is hoisted above heads during the

@ RIGHT: Sir Randol Fawkes

“The values that these men
displayed should be enshrined
and preserved so as be a
source of inspiration to the
young people who will have
to continue with the nation
building that was started so
many years ago.

“Carter Woodson, better
known as the father of Black
History, once said that, those
who have no record of what
their forebears have accom-
plished lose the inspiration
which comes from the teach-
ing of biography and history,”
the family said.

KEMPS FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE
JOAN EUNICE ALBURY, 83




of Buen Retiro Road,
Nassau, The Bahamas
who died on December
31, 2006 at her
residence, will be held
at Ebenezer Methodist
Church, East Shirley
Street, Nassau, on
Friday, Janaury 5, 2007
-at 3:00 p.m.








Pastor Martin Loyley
and Reverend Charles A. Sweeting will officiate
and interment will be in Ebenezer Methodist
Cemetery, East Shirley Street, Nassau. ~





Mrs. Albury is predeceased by her husband, Dr.
E. Paul Albury; brothers, Philip, Frederick,
Lester, Neville and Godfrey Brown; a sister,
Angela Brown and is survived by her sons,
Daniel and Lester Albury; daughters, Anne
Lawlor and Elizabeth Smith; grandsons,
Benjamin and Paul Albury; granddaughters,
Lisa and Vikki Lawlor, Cathy Dorton, Susan
Lakeman, Kristen Albury, Laura and Sarah
Smith; great granddaughter, Dejay Albury; great
grandson, Christopher Lawlor; brothers, Anton
and Geoffrey Brown Sr.; sisters, Barbara and
Sylvia Brown; son-in-law, James Lawlor;
daughter-in-law, Denise Albury, grand daughter-
in-law, Carla Albury; sisters-in-law, Dorothea,
Mary and Geraldine Brown, Louise and Lorraine
Albury; numerous nephews, nieces, cousins and
many other relatives and special friends
including, Marsha Stewart, Nancy Cleare, Violet
Esfakis and Pearline Adderley, Bruce Smith,
Rosamund Sandbrook, Alice Bates and Maxine
Kerr and Bridgette Knowles (Deceased).























Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be made to The Bahamas Historical
Society, P.O. Box SS-6833, Nassau, Bahamas
in memory of Joan E. Albury.







2 acpeadan ee ecenesesecssenececvcescccsecconeccecasccccenscceccnccecnceseucesevecsaseresscccsssccessessscosoese,

Family hits out
FROM page one

“The Fawkes family is ask-
ing that Sir Randol’s contribu-
tion not be ignored or misrep-
resented. .

“The years of service and
sacrifice given to the country
should be acknowledged at
some point by a grateful peo-
ple. The freedoms and privi-
leges that black Bahamians
now enjoy and the right to gov-
ern themselves should not be .
taken for granted as they were
not given to the people but
obtained for them through the
personal sacrifice of coura-
geous individuals.

“The bravery of all who left
the comfort of their homes to
challenge the governing and
repressive regime of the day,
who fought to break down bar-
riers, who were ostracized for
the stance that they took, and
who put their lives and the
lives of their family on the line
must not be forgotten,” a
spokes person for the family
said in a release yesterday.

According to the family,
Lady Fawkes spoke with Prime
Minister Perry Christie in June
of 2004 at a ceremony that was
held at Workers’ House to
launch the Memorial Edition
of The Faith That Moved the
Mountain, a book authored by
her late husband.

“Lady Fawkes recalls that
on that occasion, the Prime
Minister made an appearance
at the conclusion of the cere-
mony and when she inquired
about national recognition for
the contributions that her hus-
band had made to this coun-
try, she was told by Mr Christie
:. that the Cultural Commission
had made.a recommendation
with regard to memorializing
Sir Randol’s contributions to
the nation and that he (Prime
Minister) was trying to get the
unanimous support of parlia-
mentarians for legislation to be
brought before the House of
Assembly,” the family
spokesperson said.

Lady Fawkes, according to
the spokesperson, said that she
never heard from Mr Christie
again and the family has not
been successful in obtaining an
appointment to meet with him.

The Fawkes family said that
they lived through a great his-
tory-making period in the
Bahamas and is shocked at
government’s frequent. omis-
sion of known facts.

Fears in Farm Road
over rise in crime

FROM page one

place around 8pm. The victim
was walking past a family mem-
ber’s home when a gold-
coloured vehicle pulled up. “As
the vehicle pulled up the occu-

« pants in the car fired shots and

the victim was hit multiple
times about the body,” Inspec-
tor Evan reported.

One of Mr Eve’s family
members said she was sitting

* nearby when he was shot. After

witnessing the shooting, the
family member said she was
shaken to the core. “Iam a
wreck,” she admitted.

After the perpetrators bran-
dished their weapons, she said
all she could do was scramble to
get inside. “They emptied out
about eight bullets on him,” she
reported.

The family member, who
herself has a son, said she is
worried that the same fate may
befall him as he returns late
from work every night.

“Every night it’s gun shoot-
ing. How could I feel safe?” she
asked. “I don’t even know why
this happened, because he
(Eve) never bothered any-
body.”

When asked about the police
presence in the neighbourhood
she said that the police needed
to have a stronger presence in
that area.

“The police need to do a bet-
ter job, this is the time they
should be coming now,” she
said.

Mr Eve's niece, who also
lives in the area, said loss of his
presence has left a void in her
life.

Describing him as a happy,

cheerful person, she said she

was absolutely shocked when
the news of the shooting
reached her.

“Tam in so much shock
because he wasn’t a part of any-
thing like that. He was such an
innocent person, he never both-
ered anyone,” she said.

This incident follows just
hours after the first murder of
the year and a week after the
shooting death of Cecil Coakley
rocked the neighbourhood.

Coakley, 28, was shot to
death on Christmas Day, just a
week before this most recent
shooting.

the deceased, said she heard
the shots, but had no idea that
it was her son who was killed.

“The people in the road was
standing up looking, and they
said that it was Cecil who was
shot.”

Every year, Christmas will be
marred by this tragedy she said.
“We will always remember
that.”

Surprised that her son was

- gunned down, she said, “He

didn’t have no dealings with
anyone like that with violence.
If he did he would have never
been walking on the streets like
that.”

The crime in the neighbour-
hood is “ridiculous,” she said.
“We are always hearing guns
going off. The police need to
do something with it, betause
too much young people are
dying.”

Ms Ferguson, who was emo-
tionally calm during the inter-
view, said, “God is holding me
up, but we are feeling it. I
standing here because of God.”

Another family member said
in their neighbourhood the
blood of one person does not
have a chance to dry before the
blood of another is spilled.

David Deveaux, Second in
Command at the Central Police
Station, admitted that the com-
munity is in trouble. “There’s
obviously a problem,” he said.

Yesterday, members of the
police force, and the depart-
ment of Social Services
patrolled the area surrounding
Flint Street in an effort to calm
the fears of the residents in the
neighbourhood.

After the patrol, Inspector
Evans said, “No home will be
rendered unsafe and it is the
thrust the police ensure that.
We wish to reassure the com-
munity of our presence and
support. We cannot have a few
persons making us live in fear
of our community. Crime is not
necessarily an issue in the |
Bahamas it’s the fear of crime
that pervades, and it’s the
organisation’s goal to ensure
that that fear is eliminated.”

ASP Stephen Dean, coordi-
nator of the Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project, said that
nothing could substitute the
presence of police and efforts to
patrol the neighbourhood
would continue indefinitely.
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiainiHerald.com

GARFIELD

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I PUT MY PANTS | x
ON BACKWARDS } fr
SN AGAIN



DILBERT .

HOW'S YOUR
DIET COMING
ALONG?

scottadams@aol.com

www.dilbert.com





{©2007 CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC. wvew.cre ators. coun





ALL THEY EVER DO Is EAT!
ALL THEY ve THINK
ABOUT iS EATING!





xing Fealures Syndcele, inc. Word gis ‘eserves

2006 by



WHEN I WAS INTERNING IN
AFGHANISTAN, I LAUNCHEP
A HELLAIRE MISSILE BY MIS-
TAKE. SOL GOT A BAD WRITE
IN

NO, I DIPNT
"LOSE" IT,
JUST WASNT |
OFFERED A
POSITION. \ ef









HOROSCOPE

IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY: Your path
ahead may be filled with bliss if you remain
realistic and keep your feet planted firmly on
the ground. A romantic encounter could seem
too good to be true in February, so let time
pass and be sure you can trust your feelings.

i

° CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Play nice, chil-
dren. Today’s full moon could make you more
aware of how much you rely upon others.

* AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When you
explore new technologies or try sornething

JUMBLE



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ee ace
2007 Tribune te: i

All Rights Reserved

[ _LAMEY_

bok. t+
— Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as.

| CORBON
L nes S suggested by the above cartoon

Answer: THEY ae [ t 1 )”
SNS oS .

(Answers tomorrow)
AHEAD MAIZE We
What the tailor did with the foolbell siar —
“SIZED” HIM UP










CATBUD WHAT HAPPENED
TO THE BAKER'S
SALES WHEN THE

amc COVEN BROKE?

Jumbles
Answer:



Yesterday's





DI YoU KNOW THAT THE COURTS MUST HAVE
INTHE BIBLE, PEOPLE PEEN REALLY LIBERAL IN
Got PUNISHED BY THOSE DAYS |

GETTING SIONED*



ANP? THE TAX COLLECTOR WANTS TO
KNOW WHERE HE BURIEP IT /



(MARLENE ) My ASSISTANT
( TOLD YOU THAT?!

See YOU! J. (Nei
( WHO TOLD “V Tp
\ you THAT?! J 2S?
ee ee ae 2

~ Gy

DIVERSIONS

BY JIM DAVIS

AND ANOTHER NEW YEAR'S
RESOLUTION GOES BLOOEY





ayea1DUAS S$esd FessaAIUN AQ PAINQUISIC

AJNO SN_Zy98z 01 GTSIHVD Dal

BY SCOTT ADAMS

IT’S HARD TO PICK
THE ONE BEST DOUGHNUT
T’‘VE EVER HAD, BUT
THIS ONE IS IN MY
TOP FIVE.

.397 ©2007Scott Adams, Inc./Dist. by UFS, Inc.



BY JOHNNY HART









(ov CAN SAY
Oat AGAIN!







WAIT A MINUTE. SOME -
ONE HELP YOU ACCOUNT-
ABLE FOR MESSING UP ©






PESees
Badia Ie




OH, FOR PETE'S SAKE! WHY )
"00 YOU ALWAYS TRY TO
NO PIN ME DOWN?! IT WAS

S & ove DAY LAST WEEK!





werw.Bioncie.com

new, you will be happiest behind closed doors.

° PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Make a change.
Some of the goals you once thought highly
important could seem insignificant now.

° ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get behind the
eight ball. The season for family fun and vaca-
tions could be at an end.

* TAURUS (April 20-May 20): People enjoy
your wry sense of humor, generous nature and
vivid imagination.

¢ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As the lunar cycle
hits a peak you may add up all those holiday
costs, but recall all the joy it brought as well.

* CANCER (June 21-July 22): Friendships fulfill
a need. The full moon in your sign brings your
relationships with others into sharp focus.

» LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Look for a safe ref-
uge. This full moon could mark a time when
you crave peace and quiet.

¢ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A co-worker or
business acquaintance might have the creative
touch needed to pull off a business deal.

° LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The full moon
might shed some light on the numerous tasks
you manage each and every day.

* SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Ideas from the
internet, computer software or an electronic
gadget might make work run more smoothly.

e SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you take
the first step by sharing financial concerns with
a loved one, you may find that there is an alter-
native solution.

- My husband is the only man I have ever
slept with.

‘had an unhealt

‘I’m 47 now. I want to know, what makes a

‘ rooms, hangi

INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 | 9A.







ACES ON BRIDGE

NORTH Opening lead — ¥ king
2QJ56 :
v6 When I’m given problems to
@975 oN a oe whether
to to do the no g, or try
Sees to be brilliant. Here, some col-
WEST EAST leagues and I were given only
a3 4752 the West and North hands and
VAK854 ¥Q3932 asked to defend four spades
@K643 @J10g When partner (East) plays the
&AG3 &82 heart queen under the king.
My partner opined that
SOUTH dummy’s clubs looked danger-
4AK10984 ous. He suggested that West
Â¥107 needed to attack in diamonds,
@AQ2 playing partner for the queen
a7s and jack, before his club ace

was knocked out.

Another player pointed out
that if East had the queen and
jack of diamonds, that would
not leave South with much for

Vulnerable: East-West
Dealer: South

The bidding: the opening. bid, let alone his
free bid of four spades.
South West North East He suggested continuing
14 2Â¥ 3&8 49% with the heart ace, forcing
44 All pass +3 dummy to ruff. If declarer had
CHESS QUIZ





8
7
yy MEE
> Mifti,
3
2



a bc def gih

WHITE WINS THE QUEEN
Hint: Kill on the seventh rank.

‘[90.
O1jSeD B1DIeD-Suodd OfayjeA] WSUIM YOZYO
"S LIX YOZIXY “7 LOM [YOBUH ‘| UOPNIOS

DEAR ABBY

Abby:

My husband returned from Iraq a few
days ago, and, of course, my parents wanted
to talk to him. Well, when they called, Dad
and Mom both made off-color comments to
me about our sex life. They always want to
joke about it, but I never do. It’s none of their
business.

I don’t discuss my sex We even with my
closest female friend. I believe sex is something
that is private between a husband and wife.

My parents, especially my father, always

iE RSAL .
Sudoku Puzzle

only six spades, then East had
three, and by _ shortening
dummy’s trumps, declarer
would have no outside entry to
dummy’s clubs. (East’s count
signal would indicate when to
take the ace.)

Relieved, our questioner
replied that this is what he had
done. But declarer let the heart
ace win. Now he ruffed the
heart continuation in hand,
played a club, and the hand
was all over. Declarer drew
trumps ending in dummy and
discarded his losing diamonds
on the clubs.

Now we all saw the point.
What West should have done
was continue with a low heart
to partner’s jack. Now if declar-
er fails to trump in dummy,
East can return a diamond
before the club ace is knocked
out, guaranteeing the defeat of
the contract.

—BOBBY WOLFF



CRE POLLO








Complete the grid
so every row,
column and

3x 3 box contains
every digit from }
to 9 inclusively.

RAY RENAN RECTAN .





| [5]
per

© NEM Kaight FratereyDasteioeted by Ueiversal Press Syndicate ; 2 #

this before. It’s kind of embarrassing. My guys
tease me, but I laugh it off.

Am I just getting older (which I don’t want to
admit) or out of practice? I’m not losing sleep
over this, just wondering why.

“Vince” in Vallejo, Calif.

It could be that you are out of practice,
or it could be something else. I am a firm
believer in intuition, and if yours is telling

ou that you should avoid heights, it could

e that your sense of balance is “off.”

“My advice is to schedule a physical exam
with your-doctor and discuss this change in

have some kind of dirty joke or question about a normal pattern of behavior. There could *

our relationship when I go home to visit, and
Iam tired of it. They are easily insulted and
angered, especially my father (who once
thought it would be funny to accuse me of
hopping into bed with my husband the first
chance I got while we were dating), so I can’t
just say, “I don’t like those jokes — stop it!”
What can I do? It always
makes for an embarrassing
moment.
Embarrassed in Tennessee
Leave eve
To paraphrase an old
saying, “Those who can,
do; those who can’t, talk
about it.” Your parents
may be trying to show you
how “with it” they are by making these
comments. Or your father may have always
y preoccupation with your

shoes, jewe
are, tell him



sex life.

They have no business asking you
personal questions about it. Therefore,
there is nothing wrong with telling them it
makes you “uncomfortable” and you want it
stopped. And if they take offense — so be it.
Let them sulk.




Dear Abby: .
I have been in construction since I was I9.

man lose his courage?

I started my own business two years ago,
and since then I have been doing mostly
interior work — remodeling kitchens, bath-
doors, etc. My most recent
job is a second-story add-on, and while I
have been working on it I have found myself
nervous about heights.

Ihave never been afraid of heights before,
but I was uneasy walking the walls and
working off a ladder. I have never felt like

CROSSWORD

ACROSS

1 Stereo components
5 Ref’s throw

9 Leave ina hurry,

52 Source of 3-D pictures?
53> MAJORS

57 Togetherness

58 Get excited, in a way

house. I’m afraid if I keep “reminding”
T'll come across as a mother figure.

e a physical reason for your sudden anxiety
about heights, and you should not ignore it.

Abby:

How do I get my husband to pick up his
belongings? His shoes, jewelry, and all sorts
of items of clothing are spread all over the

” him,
Terry in Houston

ing where it is, and when

your husband starts asking you where his
and other items of clothing
ey are right where he left
them. Once you begin picking them up and
putting them away, he will expect you to
continue for the rest of your life.

ANSWER TO TUESDAY’S PUZZLE:

BOER OOO wo
DOA OSE08
[s[M[A[R| Tali e/C| km] 1 |
HEDDEH OEE
fE[D[ TMM Als|P{s
IG{LE|






RU FILE|





slangily 59 Responsibility
13. Lummox 60 Charged amount
14 Golden 61 Rams’ partners
15 Legion 62 Graceful architectural
16 MAJORS detail
19 Young __: tykes, in

dialect DOWN
20 Source of the Getty 1 Philatelist’s book

fortune 2 Honolulu’s Ala__,
21 “House” and “Little world’s largest open

House ...,” but not air shopping

“Full House” center
22 Streamer-decorated 3 Treads warily

post 4 Sault Marie
24 Polygraph flunker, 5 Ina weak way

probably 6 Calmed deceptively
25 MAJORS 7 Bar none
30 Like most old bread 8 Salon stuff
31 Santa’s sackful 9 Spade player
32 Teachers’ gp. 10 __ lily: calla
33 Civil engineer's subj. Il Light bulb, in comics
34 __ choy 12 Minus presumptuous "38 Heaven-sent food 48 Russia-Manchuria
35 Riverside 15 Pester 28 Fender bender: 39 Nonessential body border river
46 Picnic crasher 17 Reacted to a bad call, result tissues 49 One of Columbus's
: a with valence pai 29 Tibetan beast 40. Squeezed (out), as three

S dance craze 18 Spiritually enlighten 0 ¢ lst t | 50 Set d

AT MAJORS 23 Apothecary inventory 32. Course li wet towels et down
44 Convent residents item 33 Looker’s leg 42 Provoke 54 Pastrami holder
45 Hardly commonplace 24 Glance 34 OPEC units 43 Modest 55 Tree yielding elastic
48 Popular analgesic 26 Detached type 35 Action at Sotheby's 46 Debate wood
51 AOL rival 27 Not at all 37 Sharpness 47 Crinkly gauze fabric 56 Seek to gain, as fame
TOA_| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 INTERNATIONALEDITION MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD








HEALTH & FITNESS

QUICK STUDY

THE QUESTION: How often
do breast cancer patients fail
to take a commonly pre-
scribed drug?

THE CONTEXT: Previous
studies have found that many
patients fail to take drugs as
prescribed. Anastrozole, sold
under the brand name Arimi-
dex, is commonly prescribed
to post-menopausal women
with early-stage breast can-
cer. The drug is taken oncea
day, and can cause a wide
range of side effects, including
joint pain, hot flashes, fatigue
and nausea.

THE STUDY: Using data

‘from a national commercial
health plan, researchers found
1,498 women with early-stage
breast cancer who received
new prescriptions for anastro-
zole between January 2002
and March 2004. They then

For information on conditions such as depression,
chronic pain or high blood pressure, visit www.
TheHealthCentralNetwork.com. The site has more
than 30 health and wellness Web properties, each in
simple language with interactive tools to help you

c manage and improve your
health. If you’re just seeking

*t Know About. . .
OLIDAY WEIGHT LOSS

] Today’s topic: Everybody’s favorite

studied patterns of prescrip-
tion refills to determine how
often the women would have
been without pills.

THE RESULTS: In the first
year of taking the drugs,
nearly one in five women took
their drugs less than 80 per-
cent of the time. For a smaller
group of women who were
tracked for three years, nearly
one in three took their drugs
less than 80 percent of the
time by the third year.

The study was presented
earlier this month at the San
Antonio Breast Cancer Sym-
posium. An abstract of the
study is available online at
www.abstracts
2view.com/sabcsO6/. In the
search box, type “adherence
anastrozole.”

— JACOB GOLDSTEIN
jgoldstein@MiamiHerald.com

New Year’s resolution: shedding
weight. The average person puts on 2-7
pounds around this festive period, says .
Sherry Torkos, author of Winning at
Weight Loss (Wiley) among other self-help
books. Not to worry — it’s only natural
because we spend more time socializing
(translation: stuffing faces).
Heed the tips you’ve heard through-
2 out the year, Torkos says. E.g., drink a
full glass of water before your meal.
Eat slowly to give your belly a chance to
send the message to your brain that you’re
sated. Fill up on greens (beans, broccoli,
salad) — they are both high in nutrients and
low in calories.
An added boost: Fiber, ingested
through food or supplements, is like a
bulletproof vest in the battle of the
bulge, Torkos says. ‘It helps to keep us feel-
ing full, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.‘
So you're less likely to freak out on your
mother in law.
4 Carb control: Torkos advises pop-



ping a starch neutralizer about 20

minutes before chowing down on
bread, potatoes, rice and the like. The tabs,
made from white kidney bean extract, help
to inhibit the digestive enzyme (alpha amy-
lase) before it can convert starch into glu-

JANE SNOWITH/MCT FILE

PLASTICSURGERY101
Droopy eyelid
requires expert

» Q:Ihave a self-diagnosed cosmetic/medical
condition. One eyelid droops considerably
when I am tired, 'stressed, etc. Based on my own
Internet research (I Googled “droopy eyelid”) I
think the condition is called ptosis. What is
_ involved in correcting it? What is the success
. rate? What are the risks?
_ A: Ptosis can be a congenital condition or
_ an acquired condition. Before you go about
fixing the problem it’s important to figure out
why you have the condition. If you have had it
for a long time it probably is not something to worry about.
However, I recommend that if you have true ptosis, a droopi-
ness of the eye lid, you should have a full work up to deter-
mine that it is benign. Ptosis can be caused by various types
of illnesses including brain tumors, aneurysms and some neu-
rological disorders. You should see an ophthalmologist to
determine the cause.

Now, once you know there is nothing seriously wrong, you
must determine whether you have a true ptosis. If your lid is
the cause of your droopy eye, repair should be done by some-
one who does this routinely. An Oculo-plastic surgeon is your
best bet. Oculo-plastic surgeons have very specifically
trained in both ophthalmology and plastic surgery of the eye.
If you choose a facial plastic surgeon or a plastic surgeon,
make sure you ask if they are experienced in repairing ptosis.
Ptosis repair is a complicated procedure and should be done
only when the difference between the eyes is significant
and/or you have a functional (trouble seeing) problem
because the repair may need some tweaking in the future.

If you have droopy eyes and you do not have true ptosis
you can have either a forehead lift for droopy eyebrows or a
blepharoplasty (eye lift) for droopy skin above your eyelids.
Ptosis repair may be done at the same time as a blepharo-
plasty, but each physician has his/her own preference.

Dr. Carlos Wolf is a board certified facial plastic surgeon
practicing in Miami. The advice in this column is not a substi-
tute for consulting a physician. Write to him at carloswolfmd@
‘aol.com.












JOCK DOC

Only orthopedist can tell

Q: I’m a high school wrestler who got a rib
_ injury. It hurts when I touch it and it bothers
me when I laugh or take a deep breath. I’m not
sure whether it is bruised or cracked. How long
.. will it take to heal?
|} | A: You need to see an orthopedic surgeon







; OR HARLAN to determine whether you have a bruise, mus-
_ SELESNICK: cle strain or fractured rib. The diagnosis will
ee _.. determine how long you will have to be out of

wrestling.

Q: I was doing a bench press when I felt a
sharp pain and a pop in my left shoulder. I have a lot bruising
and I’ve noticed that my pecs are not symmetrical any more. I
went to the emergency room where X-rays showed that nothing
was broken. However, I’m still feeling weakness and pain.
What should I do?

A: Ruptures of the pectoralis major tendon where it
attaches to the bone or the muscle itself are common weight-
lifting injuries. These injuries can also occur in sports such as
football or wrestling. If the tendon is pulled from the bone it
will usually require surgical repair for a successful result in
terms of. symmetry and strength. An MRI scan may be helpful
in establishing a correct diagnosis.

See your orthopedic surgeon as soon as possible because
surgery is easier if performed soon after the injury.

Dr. Harlan Selesnick is the Miami Heat physician. The
advice in this column is not a substitute for consulting a physi-
cian. Write to him at jockdoc69@aol.com.









cose (sugar), and then fat. Find ’em at phar-
macies or vitamin stores.
Stay active: Not necessarily a major
5 time investment. Torkos recommends
doing a 10 minute power walk out-
doors, or 10 minute marching or stair clim-
‘bing indoors. Follow with 20 leg lunges,
push-ups and squats, then repeat the
sequence twice (three sets in all).

— MADELEINE MARR
mmarr@MiamiHerald.com

NANCY COLE, PERSONAL TRAINER:
DECLINE DOUBLE TWISTED CRUNCH







Every once in a while; | have to throw in some
advanced exercises for those hard core individuals
with a hard core. This exercise may seem really twisted
to the rest of you, but it’s effective for making over
your midsection.

1, Position a decline bench to a high angle.
While holding a weight plate in front of your
chest, secure your feet under the foot pads
and sit up on the bench.

2. Slowly recline until you are about eight to 10
inches from touching the bench. Make sure
your abdominals are contracted and that you
maintain the slight natural curve in your spine
during the lowering movement.

3. Then, pause at the bottom of the movement
and slowly twist to the left side and then to the
right side, working from your torso not your
shoulders. Return to the center and crunch
back up to the starting position. A big exhale at the top
of the exercise will help you get a nice strong contrac-
tion. Repeat for 15 reps.

2)
-

— nancyfitness@bellsouth.net

‘Stats: 190

' total fat; 0.5 g










KIDS’ HEALTH
Bad diet info
on Web is trap

Here’s another reason to
limit your kids’ use of the com-
puter.

According to a new Stan-
ford University study pub-
lished in Pediatrics, many ado-
lescents with diagnosed eating
disorders are visiting websites
that encourage anorexia and
bulimia and the majority of
parents are unaware of their
Web journeys.

The sites provide “thinspira-
tion” (images of extremely thin
women) and reinforce disor-
dered eating habits, said
Rebecka Peebles, one of the
study’s authors. Ninety-six
percent of the adolescents
who visited such sites reported
learning potentially harmful
tips and techniques — about
laxatives, diet pills and supple-
ments as well as suggestions
for weight loss and purging.

Tell your kids: Computer off.
Go outside and play. Eat.

— HOWARD COHEN
hcohen@MiamiHerald.com

EAT THIS/
NOT THAT

CEREALS






Eat This

Kashi Heart Hea

to Heart DS
Golden Seve
Brown Maple 8 Sa

Instant
Oatmeal
Stats: 160
calories; 2g \
total fat;no sat Sms
fat or trans fat; 100 mg
sodium; 12 g sugar; 4g
protein.

Not That

Quaker Instant
Oatmeal
Mixed Berry
Crunch

calories; 2.59



sat fat, no
trans fat;
250 mg sodium; 16 g sugar; 4
g protein.

Why: It’s a shame we can’t
recommend the Quaker
oatmeal over the Kashi. With
its whole grain oatmeal and
nifty “crunchy cluster packets”
which give the cereal texture,
the Quaker brand handily
bests the rather tasteless Kashi
in terms of flavor and sex
appeal.

But one can’t ignore the higher
counts in calories, sodium,
sugar and slight increase in fat
inthe Quaker variety. Plus,
scan Quaker’s list of
ingredients and the word
sugar appears twice at the top,
bookending ‘sweetened and
colored strawberry and
blueberry pieces” and high
fructose corn syrup.

HOWARD COHEN

diet tips as you plan your
' 2007 resolutions, click on |
MyDietExercise.com. If you’re
having insomnia, click on i
\Y MySleepCentral.com. |

HECTOR CASANOVA/MCT FILE i








—DESONTAHOLDER |
dholder@MiamiHerald.com



BY THE
NUMBERS —

42%

Of children hurt
in school bus
accidents, the
percentage
whose injuries
were caused by
a collision of a
school bus and
another vehicle

24%

Percentage
whose injuries
occurred while
getting on or
off a bus or
approaching a

bus
Percentage
under age 10

who suffered
head injuries

— WASHINGTON t

POST SERVICE
Source: From a study on school
bus-related injuries treated in
U.S. emergency departments
from 2001 to 2003. The study
appeared in the journal Pediat-
rics.

HEALTHY READS

Boost your metabolism,
shape up and build muscle
mass with Strength Training,
a deck of 52 cards with
instruc-
tions on
one side
and illus-
trations
=} onthe
other.
| Exercises

include
wall
squats,
calf raises

~~ and inner-

thigh lifts. Go through the
entire deck and tone yourself
from top to bottom without
bulking up. $12.95 at
www.dk.com.





'
12A_ | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

BIOLOGY

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SCIENCE / HEALTH NEWS

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Tiniest microbes may help redefine life

BY ROBERT S. BOYD
rboydiameclatchydc.com

WASHINGTON The
discovery of what may be the
smallest living creature on
Earth raises anew the ancient
question: What is life?

Tiny microbes detected in
acid waste from a California
gold mine are smaller than any
other known life form, a team
of scientists reported in last
week’s Science magazine.

If further study confirms
that the little bugs are truly
alive, it may be necessary to

redefine “the minimum condi-
tions for life,” the report’s
authors said.

Despite what appears to be
a wide gulf between living and
nonliving things, scientists say
there’s no definitive way to
distinguish between them.

It’s an unsolved problem in
science, philosophy and reli-
gion.

‘In spite of generations of
work by hundreds of thou-
sands of biologists, in spite of
countless studies of living

CANCER CARE

organisms at every scale, from
molecules to continents, we
still have no widely accepted
definition” of life, geobiologist
Robert Hazen, of the Carnegie’
Institution of Washington,
wrote in his recent book, Gen-
esis.

“It’s impossible to draw a
precise distinction between
living and nonliving things,”
George Dyson, a science histo-
rian at the University of
Washington in Seattle, writes
in a forthcoming book, Dan-
gerous Ideas.

REAL-LIFE QUESTION

This isn’t merely a seman-
tic question. It has real-life
consequences, such as decid-
ing when life begins in a fertil-
ized egg or whether life ends
when doctors declare a person
to be brain-dead.

Instead of a bright line
between life and nonlife, the
world contains a range of
objects, from simple, carbon-
based molecules to complex
strings of DNA, from genes

‘The transitions are gradual, and the point at
which one chooses to apply the term “life”
becomes a matter of personal taste, not

science.’

- ROBERT SHAPIRO, New York University professor of chemistry

and proteins to entire cells,
from organs such as a heart or
a liver to a human being, tree
or mouse.

Where to draw the line on
that continuum is a puzzle.

“The transitions are grad-
ual, and the point at which one
chooses to apply the term ‘life’
becomes a matter of personal
taste, not science,” Robert
Shapiro, a professor of chem-

_istry at New York University,
said in an e-mail.

A common definition of life
among scientists has four
basic elements:

e Every living thing must
be enclosed in a cell, separat-
ing what’s inside from what’s

outside.



Teamwork might
be best medicine

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Reluc-
tant to get a second opinion?
Consider this: Over half of
breast cancer patients had.
their initial treatment
changed when they sought a
review at a specialty center.

But the question remains
whether everybody with can-
cer really needs to go'shop-
ping for a second opinion.
And if the first two doctors
disagree, do you need a tie-
breaker? ;

' Better than serial doc-
shopping may be what Dr.
Michael Sabel, a University
,of Michigan breast cancer
surgeon, calls the team
approach. It’s where special-
ists in different aspects of
cancer care — the radiologist
and pathologist, surgeon,
medical oncologist and radi-
ation oncologist — all get
together, usually with the
patient, to reread the tests
and hash out the best treat-
ment.

That, not run-of-the-mill
second opinions, is what
Sabel set out to study when
he examined what happened
to 149 breast cancer patients
who, in one year alone, came
to Michigan’s Comprehen-
sive Cancer Center after
being diagnosed, biopsied
and getting a treatment rec-
ommended from a doctor
elsewhere.

HEALTH

“This, was very eye-
opening,” he said of the
results. Now he wonders, “Is
there a benefit to the multi-
disciplinary approach
upfront, rather than seeing a
surgeon, then going to the
next doctor, then to the next
doctor?”

The study examined just
recommendations for initial
surgi reatment, not later
chem@Merapy or radiation
— yet 52 percent of the
women had one or-more
changes urged by the spe-
cialty tumor board, Sabel
reported in the journal Can-
cer. Sometimes it was
because the original doctor
didn’t follow national treat-
ment guidelines. Five
patients, for example, had
been told to get a mastec-
tomy when they were good
candidates for breast-con-
serving lumpectomy instead.

Sometimes the original
advice didn’t take into
account newer techniques,
such as using chemotherapy
to shrink the tumor before
operating so the breast could
be saved.

Sometimes surgeons
thought women were good
lumpectomy candidates —
only to have an oncologist
determine they couldn’t tol- .
erate the radiation required
afterward, and these sur-
geons ended up recommend-
ing a mastectomy instead.

Homesi ckness erips
some freshmen

DETROIT — (AP) — Jan-
ise Stone spent her first
semester in college dreaming
of home — literally.

Stone, 18, would get up in
the morning and grudgingly
attend classes at Paine Col-
lege in Augusta, Ga. But the
minute she returned to her
dormitory, she curled up and
thought of family in India-
‘napolis as she slept the day
away.

She isn’t alone.

Almost everyone experi-
ences occasional homesick-
ness, but many young people
suffer from a particularly
intense form that interferes
with normal activities,
according to a new study by
the American Academy of
Pediatrics.

The report in the January
issue of the journal Pediat-
rics offers several tips to
physicians for recognizing
risk factors among patients
who are leaving home for the
first time.

“Leaving home is a uni-
versal developmental mile-
stone,” said Dr. Edward Wal-
ton, co-author of the report
and an assistant professor of
pediatrics and emergency
medicine at the University of
Michigan. “Our goal is for
them not to lose time and
experience in the adjusting,”

he said.

Walton co-wrote the
study with Christopher
Thurber, staff psychologist at
Phillips Exeter Academy, a

boarding school in New

Hampshire.

About 95 percent of young
people say they miss some-
thing about home the first
time they are away, Thurber
said.

Most of them simply miss
their Xbox or their mother’s
cooking.

But a smaller percentage
— about lin 14 — suffer from
what Thurber calls “intense
homesickness.”

“They’re not eating or
sleeping right, not playing
with others,” said Thurber.
“Or they have an intense pre-
occupation with home,
they’re not thinking about
anything else.”

Those behaviors and atti-
tudes can “seriously impair”
experiences while away at
camp, boarding school, col-
lege or the hospital, he said.

The study outlines how to
ease children into their first
separation, including giving
them practice time away
from home; never offering to
pick them up before the sep-
aration is scheduled to end;
and inyolving them in every

Wot the decision.





CONSERVATION

e An organism must con-
sume energy and produce
waste, a process called metab-
olism.

oA living creature must
be able to reproduce, passing
on its genes to the next gener-
ation.

e An organism must
evolve as it adapts to changes
in its environment and muta-
tions in its genes.

TROUBLED DEFINITIONS

But every definition,
including this one, faces prob-
lems and counterarguments,
according to Carol Cleland, a
philosopher of science at the
University of Colorado in
Boulder.

“They include phenomena
that most are reluctant to con-
sider to be alive or exclude
entities that clearly are,” Cle-
land said.

For instance, if the ability to
reproduce is an essential
requirement for life, is a sterile
hybrid such as a mule not
alive?

A LONELY RABBIT

Similarly, two rabbits can
reproduce like crazy, but how
about one rabbit?

Another example: If life
means the ability to consume
energy, is a candle flame alive?

One definition of life
“might be based on the ability
to consume and convert
energy in order to move, grow
or reproduce,” Cleland writes
in a forthcoming book, Planets
and Life. “But fire, and perhaps
even automobiles, might be
said to satisfy some or all of
these criteria.”

Some scientists suggest that
there should be three catego-
ries: living, nonliving and in

between. A virus, which can’t

live by itself but must hijack
the genetic material of a cell,
would belong in the third

group.
‘RICHER TAXONOMY’

“J advocate a much richer
taxonomy than just ‘alive’ or
‘not alive, ” Hazen wrote in an
e-mail. “That’s a false dichot-
omy.”

Some theorists even con-
tend that computers and
robots eventually will become
so intelligent that they should
be considered alive.

Despite the difficulties, sci-
entists haven’t given up trying
to define life, especially since
some researchers are trying to
re-create life in the laboratory
and others are hoping to find it
on Mars or other worlds.

_ Said Cleland: “Someday we
may have a well confirmed,
adequately general theory of
life that will allow us to formu-
late... ..a scientifically satisfy-
ing answer to the question
‘What is life?’ ”



CHRISTOPHER SMITH/AP

A DYING BREED: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Cary Myler counts tiny Bruneau hot springsnails that thrive in
geothermally heated springs seeping along the Bruneau River in southwestern Idaho.

Idaho snail species still dwindling

BY CHRISTOPHER SMITH
Associated Press ‘

BRUNEAJU, Idaho — After
clambering down a canyon
wall, ducking poison ivy vines
and wading chest-deep across
a lukewarm stream, Cary
Myler spied some flecks that
look like pepper sprinkled on a
wet rock and announced,
“Found some.”

The pinhead-sized dots are
Bruneau hot springsnails.

The tiny mollusks that
thrive in water as warm as 100
degrees are found nowhere
else in the world but here, in
the bottom of this southwest-
ern Idaho desert canyon rid-
dled with hot springs 70 miles
southeast of Boise.

A decade ago, the snails
were at the center of a national
battle over federal laws
designed to protect endan-
Se ae Today, years

WEIGHT LOSS

after the lawsuits were
decided and most of the rheto-
ric retired, they are closer to
extinction than ever before.

The level of the under-
ground geothermal aquifer
that feeds the seeps and
springs of hot water where the
snails live keeps dropping.
Rock faces are now dry and
bare of the films of the hot
water that oharbored thou-
sands of the tiny algae-eating
snails a few years ago.

Some blame the decline in
the aquifer on drought. Others,
including the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, suspect the
primary cause is pumping of
the hot water to irrigate sur-
rounding farmland.

Congress appropriated $1
million six years ago for Bru-
neau Valley farmers to switch
from flood irrigation to more
efficient sprinkler pivots on

their land. Meanwhile, crop
land that had lain fallow for
years under a federal conser-
vation reserve program was
put back into production.

The amount of groundwa-
ter pumped from beneath the
Bruneau Valley to irrigate the
fields has increased to nearly
10,000 acre-feet annually,
almost double what it was in
1995. ,

“We've put $1 million into
pivots and we’re still seeing a
decline in the aquifer,” said
Myler, a Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice biologist who’s preparing
a report on whether the snail
should remain on the endan-
gered species list. “More water
is being pumped now than it
was when the snail was listed
and we're finding fewer hot
springs every year.”

First collected in this
remote stretch along the Bru-

neau Rive in 1952, the Bru-
neau hot springsnail was origi-
nally proposed for inclusion
on the list in 1985 after the Ser-
vice documented a steady
drop in the aquifer.

That triggered a legal battle
over just how far the Endan-
gered Species Act should go in
preventing human activities
that might jeopardize the sur-
vival of a creature the size of a
poppy seed.

The local Farm Bureau,
Owyhee County and the Owy-
hee Cattlemen’s Association
sued in 1992 to stop the listing,
fearing it would drive family
farms to extinction.

Idaho’s U.S. Senate delega-
tion threatened to withhold
funding for all endangered
species if the Fish and Wildlife
Service didn’t back off on
plans to list the microdot mol- |
lusk.

Diet articles tied to teen eating disorders

BY CARLA K. JOHNSON
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Magazine
headlines entice teenage girls
with promises: “Get the body
you want” and “Hit your
dream weight now!” But a new
study suggests reading articles
about diet and weight loss
could have unhealthy conse-
quences later.

Teenage girls who fre-
quently read magazine articles
about dieting were more likely
five years later to practice
extreme weight-loss measures
such as vomiting than girls
who never read such articles,
the University of Minnesota
study found. It didn’t seem to
matter whether the girls were
overweight when they started
reading about weight loss, nor
whether they considered their
weight important. After taking
those factors into account,
researchers still found reading
articles about dieting pre-
dicted later unhealthy weight
loss behavior.

Girls in middle school who
read dieting articles were
twice as likely five years later
to try to lose weight by fasting
or smoking cigarettes, com-
pared to girls who never read
such articles. They were three
times more likely to use mea-
sures such as vomiting or tak-
ing laxatives, the study found.

“The articles may be offer-
ing advice such as cutting out
trans fats and soda, and those
are good ideas for everybody,”
said Alison Field of Harvard
Medical School, who has done
similar research but wasn’t
involved in the new study.
“But the underlying messages
these articles send are ‘You
should be concerned about
your weight and you should be
doing something.’ ”

The study appeared in Jan-
uary’s issue of the journal
Pediatrics. Its findings were
based on surveys and weight-
height measurements of 2,516
middle school students in 1999
and of the same teens again in

‘The underlying
messages these
articles send are
should be concerned
about your weight.” ’

“You

~ ALISON FIELD,

Harvard Medical School researcher

2004. About 45 percent of the
students were boys.

Only 14 percent of boys
reported reading diet articles
frequently, compared to
44 percent of girls. For those
boys who did read about
weight loss, there was no simi-
lar lasting effect on behavior.

In the new study, it was
unclear whether it was the diet
articles themselves or accom-
panying photographs of thin
models that made a difference.
The study didn’t ask teenagers
which magazines they read,
only how frequently they read
magazine articles “in which

dieting or weight loss are dis-
cussed.”

The study was based on
students’ self-reports about
their behavior and, like all sur-
veys, could be skewed by teen-
agers telling researchers what
they think they want to hear,
said study co-author Patricia

van den Berg. She said parents
should carefully consider
whether they want their
daughters reading about
weight loss.

“It possibly would be help-
ful to teen girls if their moth-
ers didn’t have those types of
magazines around,” van den
Berg said. Parents also should
discuss magazines’ messages
with their daughters, she said.

“Talk to your kids about
where these messages are
coming from,” she said.

Doctors’ waiting rooms are
no place for magazines pro-
moting weight loss, she said,
“in the same way you don’t
have materials promoting
smoking in waiting rooms.”




Pm lovin’ Its
| HIGH 82

PARTIAL
~ SUNSHINE



‘LOW —s70F



Volume: 103 No.35

PUN Lae





oF
70F

Liquidity crunch
‘bottomed out’ during
late December

AST ae sta TES RS) te

Bageage handlers are
“questioned behind bars’

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

US INTERROGATORS are
questioning the five baggage
handlers from Nassau Flight
Services for the names of the
persons in charge of the traf-
ficking ring at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport, The
Tribune has learned.

Yesterday, the wife of one of
the accused men, Mrs Ladera
Tony, said that this and other
“questions have Been asked of
her husband during intense
questioning on his first night
behind bars.

She said that the interroga-
tors have asked where the drugs
were being kept in the
Bahamas, and who was the
organizers behind the scheme
to place them onboard interna-
tional flights.

The men are expected to go
_ before the courts in Fort Laud-

erdale on Thursday morning.
The men could face at least 10
years behind bars for each

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

count of attempting to import
and distribute narcotics within
the US. \

Legal and political minds
have questioned the manner in
which the five men were
“Jured” aboard and arrested. It
was claimed that behind this



manoeuvre was the c conscious

extradition hearings as with the

Samuel “Ninety” Knowles case..

Political pundits warn that the
handling of the matter could
play a vital role in the upcoming
general election as callers to
radio shows express their grow-
ing displeasure at the way that
legislation seemed to be cir-
cumvented.

However, the US Embassy
has stated that authorities in
their country simply took the

SEE page nine

The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

The Miami Herald

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007



PCy Orie

Parents’



TM aaa IU)



PRICE — 75¢ -





fury after school 1 is vandalised

RS AE ost Mite ts sad

a THE culprits marked the school’s walls with graffiti, broke lights, destroyed files and smashed valida

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



IRATE parents say that persons who
vandalized the Sadie C “urtis Primary
school on New Yeatr’s day should be pun-
ished to the full extent of the law for
their lack of respect for the education of
the students.

Officials at the Nassau Village school

opened the school on Monday after the
yuletide break only to discover that the
school had been vandalized.

The culprits marked the school’s walls -

with graffiti, broke lights, destroyed files,

- smashed windows with a fire hose and

then turned on the connected hydrant
and flooded the entire front office of the
school.

The water damaged photo copiers,

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

television sets, and the carpets in the
administrator’s offices.

Lilian Culmer, principal of the school,
told the media she was very disappointed
over the incident. She said that the New
Year’s break-in was the second to occur
in the last two weeks.

Popular Radio DJ Sean “The Butler”

SEE page nine



AG: Bahamian police involved in investigation

_qbuthad no knowledge of NES saffarrest eats iy | National Heroes | Sip Randol Fawkes’ | Man charged with
Tribune Staff Reporter d ' Committee chairman family hits out over Christmas Day \ \
BAHAMIAN police were involved in an undercover investiga- Farm Roa calls for religious 0 ‘ hootin de th

| : alleged ‘historical S g dea
tion - ate hoe baggage pans but: ee a rae of ee leaders to reject g ;
t t e ; ee e , :

Mimic of egal Svs alyon Maynare-Gtson stated yes OVEL TISE New Year’s Honours revisionism’ =" 2-NATAROMeKENZIE_

t e e ; : ed wi e

oie Maynard-Gibson conceded that she does not know why in crime â„¢ Snr ee hig petneng ea at what they : Gatidtnas Day. chepGing death of

; described as the

Bahamian police chose not to arrest the five suspected drug traf-
fickers, but she is confident that they had a “very good reason.’
Speaking as a guest on Love97’s Issues of the Day, the Attorney

SEE page nine

AUTO INSURANCE

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

ete ta
We AD) 992-2802 1 TC ch



MByKRYSTELROLLE _

THE upsurge in crime in the }
Farm Road area has left the :
community shaking with fear ;
and the police concerned that }

a disturbing trend has started.

In the past two weeks three }
murders, and three injuries, all :
in that area has left several res- ;
idents questioning the compe- }
tence of the police and fearing }
that the next murder could be }

theirs.

The most recent incident !
occurred Monday night on Flint |

Street. While Kevin Eve, 43,

was not killed, he was shot mul-
tiple times about his body, and }
left in critical condition. He is ;
now fighting for his life in the :

Princess Margaret Hospital.

According to Inspector Wal-
ter Evans, the shooting took :

SEE page eight




Tribune Staff Reporter i

reject the Queen’s New Year’s

Honours because they are rem- }
nants of the colonial past, accord-_

ing to Rev Sebastian Campbell,

Committee.

Father Campbell’s comments

came after the Governor Gener-

named in the Queen’s New
Year’s honours for 2007.

Those honoured included Lady

guerite Pindling, with knight- } Cai,

i Sir Randol’s family also ;
: expressed what they described as ;
: their dissatisfaction with the gov- :
: ernment’s “blatant neglect and :
; disregard for the legacy of the :
i late trade unionist and labour :

because the PLP government } leader.”

hoods going to Baltron Bethel ;

and businessman, Garret “Tiger”
Finlayson.

The Anglican clergyman said
he was “absolutely disappointed”
about the Queen’s honour’s list,

SEE page nine

FUIMISICKS
STHAIST S| [5c

Nrtsittocess &

SEE page eight



AS oN

3

“historical revi-
sionism” that has occurred since ;
: i the death of Sir Randol Fawkes in ;
RELIGIOUS leaders should : June of 2000, the family of the ;
i late labour leader is calling on ;
government and others to “cease }
i and desist in the use of selective :
chairman of the National Heroes bir eeeneee ee ape
i According to the family, many ;
people in the community have :
: complained to them that evenin :

al’s announcement that several } death, unfair treatment is being |

prominent Bahamians have been : meted out to the legacy of Sir
? Randol. i
: “When reporting the history of :
: He aa tae ->), | the nation, his name is intention- ;
Marguerite Pindling, who will; ally left out or passed over in a
now be addressed as Dame Mar- }

Cecil Coakley, 29, and the young
mother accused of abetting the
murder were arraigned in magis-
trate’s court yesterday. -

James Miller, 28, of Malcolm
Allotment was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
in Court One Bank Lane yester-

} day on the murder charge.

According to reports, Coakley,
a resident of Pinewood Gardens,
was found dead near the basket-
ball courts opposite Salem Baptist
Church. He had been shot multi-

: ple times, according to police.

Kacie Sawyer, 23, was also
arraigned before Magistrate

i; Gomez yesterday on the charge
: great haste,” Sir Randol’s family i
: alleged that she purposely aided

of abetment to murder. It is

and abetted Miller and another
in causing the death of Cecil
Coakley. Both accused were rep-
resented by lawyer Langton
Hilton. Family members of both
accused were present at court yes-

; terday.

SEE page nine

(Pagers SRD






PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

ee Oe eee ee eee ee
Businessman has two appeal avenues left

A BAHAMIAN businessman still
has two possible avenues of appeal
left after his attempt to overturn a
fraud conviction was quashed, a
spokesman for the US Attorney’s
Office in the southern district of Flori-
da told The Tribune, adding that they
were unlikely to succeed,

Hubert Garland Evans last week
saw the US 11th Circuit Court of
Appeals find that a jury sitting in
southern Florida was correct to con-
clude that he caused a fax to be sent
on May 22, 1997, “for the purpose of
executing” a scheme to obtain credit
insurance from the Export-Import

Bank of the United States.

A spokesman for the US Attor-
ney’s Office confirmed to The Tri-
bune that it was now up to the judge
who heard the original case, Adal-
berto Jordan, to “sign an order for
Hubert Garland Evans to surrender
himself” to the US authorities, a
move that was likely to happen this

‘month,

If he fails to surrender himself, that
will likely force the US authorities to
launch extradition proceedings
against him in the Bahamas,

Mr Evans was originally sentenced
to 18 months in a US jail, and ordered

to pay a $700,000 fine by Judge Jor-
dan. However, he was freed on bond
and allowed to return to the Bahamas
until the appeal to the 11th Circuit
Court of Appeals was heard.

The US Attorney’s Office said its
financial litigation unit would now
seek payment of the $700,000 fine,
but Mr Evans still had two possible
appeal avenues left.

He has 30 days to. file a petition for
a hearing in the Florida district court,
seeking a fresh appeal, or 90 days to
file a petition to the US Supreme
Court.

The US Attorney’s Office said both

appeals were unlikely to succeed,

adding that they would have to be
filed while Mr Evans was in jail.

Mr Evans has always vigorously
denied the charges against him, and
has mounted consistent attempts to
overturn the verdict against him,

The 11th circuit US appeals court
said the charges against Mr Evans
related to when he was president of
Bahamas-based Jagar Ltd, a whole-
saler that imported grocery products
to the Bahamas for resale.

Jagar’s primary supplier was US-
based Produce Direct Inc (PDI),
which obtained credit insurance from

THE TRIBUNE

the Ex-Im Bank in 1995 to cover any
possible non-payments by Jagar.

In mid-1996, PDI requested that
Jagar provide it with a report on its
financial condition so it could apply
for a renewal of the credit insurance.

The US appeals court said Jagar
produced “a financial statement
showing the company as profitable
through the fiscal year ending June
30, 1996, even though an indepen-
dent auditor’s report prepared in Feb-
ruary 1997 showed Jagar suffered a
net loss of almost $1 million during
that fiscal year, and described its sur-

>”

vival as in ‘substantial doubt’.

_ BFSB competition finalists are named

THE finalists for the Bahamas
Financial Services Board’s (BFSB)
school essay and speech competi-
tionareshownhere,

Front Row, L to R: Jonathan
Farrington, C,V, Bethel Senior
High; Tawana Patton-Burrows, St.
John's College; Charles M.N, Not-
tage, Prince Williams High, Lacoda
Evans, St Augustine's College;
lege; Rashad Rolle, Doris John-
son Senior High; Blair Bethel,
Doris Johnson Senior High; Tebby

Burrows, St Andrew's School;.

Denise Theophilus, St Andrew's
School, (Missing is Daniel Thomp-
son of Queen's College)

ESSAY eh
COMPETITION FINALISTS
*BlairBethel
*LacodaEvans

¢ Charles M_N, Nottage

° Tawana Patton-Burrows

¢ Denise Theophilus |

¢ Daniel Thompson —

SPEECH
COMPETITION FINALISTS
¢ Tebby Burrows
¢ Jonathan Farrington
° Krystal Morley

* Rashad Rolle

HESS







y, St Augustine's Col-



Partners

Associate

Dwayne A. Gibson
Raynard §, Rigby

Melissa L. Selver

Public Notice

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

Notaries Public

reernntee re nerentettedentmeeees retin rhaaatbapemananaes eames page

Chambers
East Street Shopping Centre
P, O, Box $$-6836
Nassau, Bahamas
&
George Town
Queens Highway
Exuma, Bahamas

The public is hereby advised that Roshar G, Brown is no longer affiliated
with Gibson, Rigby & Co. and is no longer authorized to conduct business
on the firm’s behalf, If there are any concerns or questions please contact
our offices at the numbers listed below,

Tel: (242) 393-6000
Fax: (242) 393-7000
E-mail; gibrig.com@batelnet.bs

Tel: (242) 336-3485
Fax; (242) 336-3487


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Social, religious funds could
with some New Year’s resolutions |

@ By TIM PARADIS
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall
Street presumably isn’t a place
where those hoping to mend
their ways in the new year
might turn for inspiration. But
some investors looking to better
align their social or religious
convictions with their invest-
ments have found sizable
returns. ;

Mutual funds that incorpo-
rate such principles range from

those that invest with an eye
toward helping the environment
to those that avoid companies
that extend health benefits to
unwed couples. And while some
investors are predisposed to
invest in funds whose agendas
match their own, even investors
who don’t necessarily share a
fund’s beliefs can still find value.

Consider the Amana Funds,
which invest according to Islam-
ic principles. The funds avoid
companies that sell or promote
liquor, pornography, gambling

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIBILLA FIRE FUND LID.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 SIBILLA FIRE FUND

LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the

Commencement of

dissolution was 21st

December 2006. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P O. Box N 3917 is the Liquida-
tor of SIBILLA FIRE FUND LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send _ their
address and particulars of their. debts to the Liquidator before the

22nd January 2007.



NOTICE TO PENSIONERS

Act Now To Avoid Suspension Of
Benefit/Assistance

and pork products. In adhering
to Islamic law, the funds also

exclude companies such as bro- |

kerages that make a business of
charging or receiving interest
or companies that carry exces-
sive debt.

While the restrictions could
appear limiting, the funds have
flourished. The Amana Trust
Income fund, a large-capital-
ization value fund, saw a return
of about 19.3 per cent in 2006.
The fund, which has assets of
about $111 million, carries a
five-star rating from Morn-
ingstar Inc., which evaluates
funds.

Nicholas Kaiser runs the
Amana funds, which like many
other funds that incorporate
social or religious principles,
seek outside advice on what
types of investments aren’t per-
missible. The funds follow
broad recommendations by a
group of experts that interprets
Islamic law in North America.

While Kaiser notes, for exam-
ple, that the prohibition on
investments within the financial
sector could make it harder on
the Amana Funds in years when
Wall Street favours such stocks,
the discipline imposed by the
fund has also proven fortuitous.

The funds had invested in
Enron Corp. “When the debt

City Markets

FROM page 3B

?



Persons who are in receipt of monthly Long-Term Benefit or Assistance

from the National Insurance Board, who fail to be verified in their assigned
months, or anytime after, are advised that no further pension cheques will be
issued to them-either though bank accounts or through pay stations-until they

have submitted themselves to the verification process.

Pensioners in New Providence are urged to present themselves to the Fox
Hill Local Office, the Wulff Road Local Office, or the Jumbey Village Local
Office, immediately for verification. Pensioners in Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands are urged to present themselves to the nearest Local Office.

Cheque(s) for pensioners who are not verified on or before January 29, 2007.
will be held and will only be released to pensioners when they have been

verified.

Pensioners are required to produce their National Insurance ID card, along
with a driver’s license, a passport or current voter’s card.

For more information you may contact the Verifications Department at your

nearest Local Office.

BIs

Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets





Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

idelit, Prime Income Fund

2.2982

1.1442
1 eo is oon F d mae
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 0: 00!
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close ~- Current day‘s welghted price for dally volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



1.320246"
2.9449***
2.472341**
1.207411°***

11.2596"

(Adad 1 VT 34 88% 12008

=LD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price



=WDitTaiiey

Last 12 Months

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
_ Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter prico
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

numbers got to be such (as they
were), we sold it,” Kaiser said,
noting the sale allowed the fund
to sidestep losses from the ener-
gy company’s implosion.

Another group of funds that
apply religion to investing are
the Ave Maria Mutual Funds,
which follow Catholic princi-
ples and prohibit investments
in companies that draw profits
from pornography, abortion or
those that donate to Planned
Parenthood. The parameter
that trips up most companies,
however, is one requiring that
they don’t offer benefits to
unmarried couples.

George Schwartz, who over-
sees the funds, said an ample
number of companies manage
to merit consideration under
the fund’s principles.

“I’m not a theologian. ’'m a
portfolio manager,” said
Schwartz, adding the restrictions
still allow him to assemble a
robust portfolio. “We’ve got to
have the investment perfor-
mance.”

The Ave Maria Catholic Val-
ues Fund, with assets of about
$258 million and a four-star
Morningstar rating, posted a
return of about 14.2 per cent
last year. While investors ordi-
narily rely on the cold calculus
of a fund’s returns when evalu-

ating where to put their money;
others supportive of a fund’s
social bent are likely to be more
patient should returns lag,
observers say.

“There’s a thirst among some
Catholics that truly have found

‘ ahome among these funds. It’s

almost like they don’t even care
about our investment perfor-
mance,” Schwartz said. He said
the approach isn’t swayed too
heavily by dogma, however, and
noted that the Ave Maria funds
don’t lobby companies for
change but look for those that
are the best investment under
the Ave Maria parameters.
Jeff Tjornehoj, an analyst
with fund-tracker Lipper Inc.,
warns that good deeds don’t
necessarily make good invest-
ments, “The biggest thing is to
treat these as if you’re buying
any other funds. Consider the
performance and risk.”

He notes that some funds that \

employ a social or religious fil-
ter can be expensive to run giv-
en the level of screening many
investments require.

Tjornehoj offered his own
New Year’s wish for investors
considering a socially or reli-
giously minded fund: “Read the
prospectus carefully. It requires
more attention than your typical
investment.”

fit

He contends investors can in
many cases advance a cause or
belief by investing where
returns are greatest, regardless
of the type of investments.

“Tf you found a low-cost
index fund that included a sin
stock then sometimes it pays to
be in that kind of fund to do
well and then donate to a cause
you like,” Tjornehoj said.

.One fund whose patron saint
would more likely be Gordon
Gekko than a social or religious
champion is the Vice Fund,
which invests in alcohol, gam-
ing, tobacco and defense.

“T call them bulletproof in
terms of their sensitivity to the
economic cycle,” said Charles
Norton, who runs the fund.
“They’re steady performers in
good times and bad.”

“We're not advocates or pro-
moters of these sectors,” Nor-
ton said, noting that doing well
by investors is the most impor-
tant purpose of a fund. The
mid-cap blend fund, which
Morningstar gives four stars,
has assets of about $75 million
and showed a return of about
23.2 per cent last year.

“We just invest in these sec-
tors by design because we think
they offer such true investment

_ Merit that tends to be over-

looked.”

hoping for Winn-Dixie break ‘by June’

This was a carry over from
Winn-Dixie’s majority owner-
ship, the US grocery retailer hav-
ing sold its 78 per cent stake to
Bahamian-led buyout group
BSL Holdings for $54 million in
a deal completed on August 9.

Bahamas Supermarkets has
two stores, at Oakes Field and
Village Road, “under planning”
for upgrades, with the rest also
set for revamps in the future. Mr
Burns said the upgrade plans

fruition”. :

would “hopefully come to

The: Bahamas Supermarkets:

chief executive said the retailer
was deeply immersed in the
transition from its previous
majority owner, as “as virtually
everything was done through
Winn-Dixie stores. Everything’s
got to change”.

“From a retail standpoint,
there will be changes,” Mr Burns
said. “Those changes will be on
the technology side, installing
scanning, electronic communi-
cations with the stores, and the
SMS buying system.”

He said SMS was an integrat-
ed buying, receiving and ware-
housing technology platform,
that also managed “the front end
of the store”.

Barbados Shipping & Trad-
ing’s subsidiary, Retail & Dis-
tribution International (RDI),
will replace Winn-Dixie on the
sourcing of produce and mer-
chandise, and develop retail, dis-
tribution and financial manage-
ment systems.

During the initial three-year
agreement, RDI will earn a
$100,000 one-off fee for signing
the deal, and a further $25,000



ww SÂ¥>j

* - 22 December 2006

** . 30 November 2006

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



*** - 30 November 2006

“*** - 30 November 2006

- 30 November 2006



per month, ensuring it will earn
$300,000 per annum from the
operating partner agreement.

Mr Burns said yesterday: “I
think we will be completely
through the transition from
Winn-Dixie, totally, by June
[2007] or before.

“We like the prospect of being
a standalone company much
more than an absentee owner;
being a Bahamian company with
Bahamian investors. The Board
of Directors are here on the
island, and they are very aggres-
sive about what they want to do
with the company and moving
it forward.”

Bahamas Supermarkets also
has a transition services agree-
ment with Winn-Dixie for a year
until August 9, 2007. The US
retailer will earn flat a $1 mil-
lion fee plus 5 per cent of the
costs of goods it procures for
Bahamas Supermarkets.

Mr Burns yesterday confirmed
to The Tribune that Bahamas
Supermarkets could cancel the
agreement with 60 days notice.

“Certainly, we want to end it
as soon as possible. It would be a
savings for us,” he added.

Mr Burns indicated the tran-

sition services agreement with -

Winn-Dixie would be ended
once Bahamas Supermarkets
had installed its new accounting
systems and information tech-
nology (IT) platforms.
Bahamas Supermarkets can
also rescind the notice of its
agreement cancellation if the
installation of the two systems

NOTICE

will not be completed before the
agreement is cancelled.

During fiscal years 2006 and
2005, Winn-Dixie and the
Bahamian company that held its
78 per cent stake, W-D
(Bahamas), earned $1.397 mil-
lion in service charges and man-
agement fees.

_ Mr Burns said the US retailer
was likely to earn a similar
amount from the transition ser-

_ vices agreement Winn-Dixie, so

significant cost savings to
Bahamas Supermarkets were
unlikely to accrue to the com-
pany until fiscal year ending
June 28, 2008.

Mr Burns said rising global oil
prices, and BEC’s fuel sur-
charges, had had a “dramatic”
effect on Bahamas Supermar-
kets’ costs. Shipping and trans-
portation costs for produce had
risen, and he said the retailer
had absorbed these rather than
pass them on to the consumer.

Mr Burns did not deny that
Bahamas Supermarkets’ elec-
tricity costs for November 2006
had risen by $100,000 compared
to the previous year as a result of
the fuel surcharge, and said the
company’s results for fiscal 2007
would depend on costs that were
largely outside its control.

“We have a very aggressive
plan to implement scanning in
every store this year, if not
quicker,” Mr Burns said.

“There’s a lot of infrastruc-
ture to look at, and a lot of tech-
nology to implement in the next
six to eight months.”

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXINE ORELIEN OF
PODOLEO ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,

should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of JANUARY,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, | PO.Box

N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

HELP

Progressive medical practice requires the services
of an accountant with the following qualifications:

1. CPA or BSc with a minimum of 5 years

experience.

2. Working knowledge of all Quickbooks modules.

3. Bahamian citizenship.

’ Please email response to

info@ gtbahamas.com





Mt

see we wt & FE
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5B



The Tribune

Royal Oasis talks ‘active’

NEGOTIATIONS for the sale of the
stricken Royal Oasis resort on Grand
Bahama are still very active, the Hotel
Corporation’s managing director, Sir Bal-
tron Bethel, told The Tribune yesterday.

Sir Bethel said he could not comment
any further, preferring either the Prime
Minister or Lehman Brothers’ private
equity arm, the resort’s mortgagee and
seller, to speak publicly.

However, he said the negotiations con-
tinue to progress at an advanced stage.

The sale of the much-troubled resort,
which dramatically impacted the Grand
Bahama economy when it closed follow-
ing the 2004 hurricane season, has met
many setbacks and roadblocks.

Freeport residents are hopefulthat this
year a deal can finally be reached so the
property can be reopened.

The Government has recently

approached Harcourt Developments, the
Dublin-based property developer, to see
if it remains interested in acquiring the
Royal Oasis.

Sources

Sources close to the situation in Grand
Bahama said the Government had
renewed talks with Harcourt two to three
weeks ago, as part of contingency plans in
case the Florida-based group, World
Investments Holdings, failed to complete
its purchase of the resort that has been
closed for more than two years.

World Investments Holdings had split
apart after the group failed to raise the
necessary financing to complete its $40
million purchase. The financing had been
contingent on its ability to find a casino
partner.

Some of the original investors in World

Investments Holdings are part of a new ~

group that is attempting to conclude the
purchase.

Harcourt was said to still be keen on
acquiring the Royal Oasis as part of its
wider investment plans on Grand
Bahama.

World Investment Holdings’ Bahamian ~

partner is Lawrence Chisholm & Associ-
ates, an architectural and planning firm
based on Elizabeth Avenue in Nassau.
The company will be the lead architect
and planner in the investors’ bid to revive
the Royal Oasis, once the deal is closed.

The resort’s attraction to investors has
been reduced because it is not located
on the beach, and it will need massive
redevelopment and investment to
upgrade the properties before they can be
opened.

Liquidity may affect

2007 retail prospects



FROM page 1B

Anthony Jewelers said it was
hard to predict how 2007 will gc
“You can only really hope ard
pray that you have a good yerr.
‘Christmas shapes up the year
and we had a good Christm:s,”
she said.

The manager said that, i she

used previous trends, the year
should shape up well, because
“2006 was a much better year
than 2005. But it is hard to say.”
A Quality Jewelry spokes-
woman said the manufacture
and repair store had to wait for
the jewelry stores to determine
how their year will be, because
they get the majority of their
business from Bay Street.

Security Association
. aims to raise standards

FROM page 13

ent departments inhotels and
government. That’s 10t in-house.
It’s a pretty big goup. I'd say
it’s a three-to-on; ratio when
compared to the pice, three of
us to one of them

“Almost everyproperty has a
security officer a‘their location.
It’s very much bg business, and
that’s a concer - people just
coming in for tle buck, and not
worried about quality of service
delivered to th: customer.”

Mr Newry aid the Security
Association wuld look to work
with the Minstry of National
Security on ecurity issues, its
“prime concan” being training
and certificaion.

The Gov:rnment currently
licences all private security firms,
who are sipposed to pay fees
that genemte revenue, and Mr
Newry sail it was unlikely that

.the admisistration would want
to give tiis and regulating the
industryup completely.

He acded that the Security
Associaion would develop doc-
uments such as ‘White Papers’
that it vould submit to the Gov-
ernment on issues such as train-
ing, saying: “We can work hand-
in-hand together to make sure
the standard of competency is

. there.”

Mr Newry said the private

security industry in the Bahamas
went beyond “the guard at the
“door”, including persons such as
consultants, trainers, alarm tech-
nicians and close-circuit televi-
sion technicians.
- Trained security officers, Mr
Newry added, could assist police
in dealing with incidents, carry-
ing out-preliminary investiga-
tions and taking witness state-
ments, writing reports, securing
the scene and protecting evi-
dence.

He said that over the next
three months, the private secu-
rity industry would be “coming
together” to develop a document
on forming the Security Associ-
ation that would then be circu-
_ lated to the sector for feedback.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the Association said: “The
security industry in the Bahamas

has great potential as it pertains
to the management of crime pre-
vention activities. In a time when
criminality and safety concerns
can have a detrimental affect on
our quality of life, there is an
urgent need to call all hands on

deck.

“Our profession is a noble
one, and we believe that the
unification of our forces and
resources would enhance the

"commendable job already being

-, done by our National Security

*. agencies such as the Police

Force, Defence Force, Immigra-
tion, Customs and Prisons Ser-
vices.
“When one considers the vol-
ume of professionals perform-

ing private security tasks
throughout the Bahamas today,
the numbers demonstrate a force
to be reckoned with. By pooling
such resources we can establish a
conglomerate that can readily
feed into efforts afoot by our
local authorities with security
responsibilities.”

Over the next 90 days, the
Association said it would con-
duct “wide consultations with
members of the security industry
throughout the Bahamas, in
view of ascertaining their views
on the best way forward for a
unified association, and how it
may best serve the collective”.

It would also draft an Asso-
ciation Constitution and rele-
vant Articles and Memorandum
of Association.

The statement added: “With-
in four weeks of agreement of

’ the relevant documentation, the

process of ratification and sub-
sequent election of officers
would be accordingly conduct-
ed.”

committee '

The Interim Steering Com-
mittee to establish a Private
Security Association in the
Bahamas includes:

New Providence

Gamal Newry — co-chairman,
president Preventative Measures

Captain Glen Bain — president
& chief executive, Bahamas
Maritime Connection

Stanley Toote — assistant
director of security, Kerzner
International

Anton Saunders — coordina-
tor security and transport, Doc-
tors Hospital

Hugh Gray — director of secu-
rity, Old Fort Bay

Grand Bahama

Cleveland Duncombe — com-
mittee co-chairman, president
and chief executive - Candid
Security

Ryan Lowe - president and
chief executive - Nelsons Locks
and Safe

Henri Williams - director of
security - Our Lucaya Resort

Linden Wilchcombe — director
of security - Ginn Sur Mer
Resorts

Denise Tynes — director of
security - GB, Airport, Harbour,
Container Port

The advisory board includes:

Henry Wemyss - president
and chief executive, Wemco
Security and Collections

Lioyd Deveaux - director of
security, Abaco Beach Resort

Morris Simmons - president
and chief executive, Simmons
Security & Investigations

Chris Lowe - president,
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce

Hank Bain -— manager,
Armoured Car Services Ltd

Wayne Munroe - attorney

“In January, we do very well
because we get a lot of orders
for repairs and jewelry in the
New Year, so I hope it contin-
ues,” she said.

Another merchant took a
gloomier view, noting that the
2007 retail season will be severe-
ly impacted by the impending
general election.

“T actually think that 2007 will .

be down from 2006, based on
election anxiety and what is to
come. Of course, there will be
spending by the various MPs and
MP-elects on their constituents.
But in general, I foresee it being
a slightly slower year for retail-
ers,” the manager said.

Several other merchants indi-
cated it was simply too early to
tell.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OCEANIS ASSETS CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the Intermational Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of OCEANIS ASSETS CORP.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been st-uck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CROSSWIND TRADING LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
CROSSWIND TRADING LTD. has been disolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the
18th day of December, 2006.

LUIS PINEYRUA PITTALUGA
Juncal 1305, 21st Floor
Montevideo, Uruguay

Liquidator —



Legal Notice

MNexu(eD |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

HAINE S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Legal Notice

NOTICE

REGAN VILLAGE INC.
we Oy

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of REGAN VILLAGE INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BBB HOLDINGS LTD.
— 6)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with -
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BBB HOLDINGS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS LTD.

INSURANCE BROKING OPPORTUNITY

CMA isa progressive, successful and reputable
property & liability insurance brokerage. We need
an ambitious, energetic and enthusiastic person to
join our small, dedicated and professional team.
This will be an office-based position with scope for
real advancement. Insurance experience though
desirable is not essential. Full training will be provided.



We are looking for:

¢ A well-groomed person, professional in
appearance.

e Excellent written and oral communication skills.

¢ Competence in Microsoft applications such as
Word, Excel & Outlook.

¢ A self-starter, with initiative and a willing team
player

¢ Commitment to study for insurance exams.

We are offering:

A competitive salary and benefits package
commensurate with experience. Our office is
located on East Bay Street near Fort Montagu, with
free staff parking.

Applicants should submit a full resume and a
covering letter in a sealed envelope marked “Private
and Confidential”. This should be posted or delivered
by hand to:

The General Manager

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
HAINE S.A. has been disolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 22nd day of November, 2006.

JOHN KILLMISTER
Beresford House,
Bellozanne Road, St. Helier
Jersey, JE2 3) W
Liquidator



CMA Insurance Brokers & Agents Lid
P.O. Box SS-19067
Bahamas Realty Building
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

Postal applications should be post-marked no later
than January Sth, 2007, The deadline for receipt of
all (posted or delivered) applications will be
Wednesday, January 10, 2007.

We respect fully the confidentiality of all applications.
All applications will be acknowledged.


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



@ TRACK
ODD DISTANCE MEET

tion of Athletic Associations
have announced that their

men ‘Coach of the Year’ hosts —

After another banner year: @ @ 9
that ended with the gala : ) Tr r
awards banquet on Saturday _ : U Iii Ce 1 be AC C QO ac ;
night, the Bahamas Associa- :

2007 season will kick off with
the Odd Distance Track and
Field Meet.

The meet is scheduled for
Saturday, January 13 at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre, starting at 2:30 p.m.
For further information, per-
sons are urged to contact the
BAAA’s office at the
Colony Club or telephone
323-5863.

@ BSC
AGM/BASKETBALL
MEETING

The Baptist Sports Council
will kick off its 2007 season
on Saturday, January 13 at
the Bahamas Baptist Col-
lege, Jean Street when the
annual general meeting will
take place.

During the AGM, the BSC
will hold elections for the
following positions: assistant
secretary, assistant treasurer,
basketball chairman, volley-
ball chairman, softball chair-
man, track and field chair-
man and cycling chairman.

@ SOFTBALL
MASTERS TEAM
MEETING

The Masters Softball
League is calling all team
managers and coaches to an
important meeting at 7 p.m.
today at the office of Antho-
ny ‘Rake-n-Scrape’ Bowe.

The meeting will be held
to discuss plans for the
resumption of the season,
which will begin this week-
end at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

A double header will take
place on Saturday with the
Miller Lite Royals taking on
the Miller Panthers in the
opening game at 1 p.m. The
feature game at 3 p.m. will





@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



TWO days after being named the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations’ Coach of the Year,
Peter Pratt played host to Ron
Mann, the head track and field coach
at the University of Louisville, on a
fact finding mission.

Mann was in town on. New Year’s
Day before he headed to Miami,
Florida for the UofL Cardinals’ 2007
FedEx Orange Bowl football game at
Dolphin Stadium against the Wake
Forest Demon Deacons.

“TI didn’t know that he was going to
be so famous because he’s now the
Coach of the Year,” said Mann,
about Pratt, whom he has developed
a relationship with over the years.

“I’m not just meeting with an old
friend, but a very honoured old
friend. So I’m glad to be here and
at the same time develop a relation-
ship with some of the other coaches
here.”

Delighted

Pratt, who won the award over
Ronald Cartwright, David Charlton,
Fritz Grant and Grand Bahamian
Dwayne Jennings, said he’s delighted
to have Mann in town, even though it
was just for a short period of time.

But Pratt said in the few hours that
Mann spent here, he introduced him
to some of the coaches who were
available as well as the officers of
the Bahamas Scholarship Founda-
tion for Student Athletes, headed by
Harrison Petty.

“Y’m just looking for athletes in
the area because we’re here to help,”
Mann said. “Too many times US
coaches get a rap for not getting the
athletes to graduate, but due to oth-
er sports, not track and field.

“So I’m just here to let everybody
know that we are running a quality
programme and if they attend UofL,
we will do whatever is necessary for
them to succeed.”

Mann said currently there are no
Bahamian athletes on athletic schol-

but he was delighted to be back ata.
time when everybody was in such a
festive mood, coming off the New
Year’s Day junkanoo parade.

Mann said that having secured a
personal contact with Pratt and oth-
ers, he intend to be making frequent.
visits to the Bahamas in a bid to lure
more student-athletes to UofL. ;

Pratt said he’s been trying to get
some local jumpers into Mann’s pro-
gramme for quite a while and he’s
confident that evéntually the
Bahamas will make its presence felt
at UofL, like they’re done elsewhere. . '

“It’s good for us because it’s evi-*.
dent that we have contacts overseas,” '
Pratt said of his new relationship ©
with Mann. “It is evident that there’
are people overseas, who want to be.
in contact with us and help our pro-—
gramme. So this is one of the better
ways for us to go.”

Additionally, Pratt said he’s still
celebrating from being named the
BAAA’s Coach of the Year.

“It was a surprise because I did’
no’ train my athletes to become
Cozch of the Year. So it was a sur-
prise,” he stated.

“Even though the president (Mike ,
Sands) called me on the day, I had -
already promised my ticket to one

of my ¢thletes. ree

“Not until he told me to please
show upand bring Rudon Bastian, I :
decided to go. I had to go and sup- -
port Rudon, who was one of the ath- '
letes I cocched.” .

Bastian vas also an award winner
- named th: Junior Male Athlete of
the Year.

“It was a food feeling,” Pratt stat-
ed. “So I wil work as usual, but my
goal is to havt my athletes jump well '
enough to quiify for athletic schol-
arships to unversities and colleges ,
and if they arezood enough to make
the national tems.

“But most of ul, I want to develop..."

a discipline so hat they can get a’.
good job and be:ome a quality role.
model citizen.”

Pratt, one of the pioneer triple
jumpers in the ©untry, has been
coaching for morethan 30 years. He

’ spent three years - 000-2003 - coach-

be played between the arship with the UofL Cardinals, but; riebect? ;
Joshua Knights and the : this Vest they are hoping to attract ne fubtane 3 DAE ATAU DEToNS:
mae Lions. ss eeheduled? : ®@ BAAA’s Coach of the Year, Peter Pratt (left) and his son, Jamie (right) their first member or members. mae a Beene it at Phe
ne game is scheduledto : i iversi isvi is Visi i S a :
8g : share a moment with University of Louisville head track and field coach Ron As for his visit, Mann said he has Ministry of Youth, Sjorts and Hous-:
n’t been here in more than ten years,

be played on Sunday. Mann during his visit to the Bahamas on New Year’s Day. ing

Training in the Bahamas has.

4

the Mavericks in the swim .

FROM page one

“We are encouraging them to come out and

participate with these clubs,” he said. “Hopeful-
ly it will help them in their training sessions.”

One of the local swimmers who took advan-
tage of the opportunity was Franshon Francis, a
member of the Sea Bees Swim Club.

Francis, a 17-year-old 12th grader at St.
Augustine’s College, said the experience will only
benefit her as she looks ahead to a collegiate
career once she graduates.

“I think it’s a good idea having them come

down since we don’t go away to train,” Francis
said. “We could train with them and help to push
us.
“I know it’s good for me since I’m preparing to
go off to school next year. By training with them,
I can see where my level is and if I can compete
with them.”

While here, Samland said his team has been
enjoying the hospitality, especially the warm pool
and the clock at their disposal at the swim com-
plex.

He said it will only get them prepared for the
remainder of their season later this month.

“The biggest thing is that it’s just swimming. No
work, no family, no boyfriends,” he charged.
“We're just going to hang out, swim, eat, hang
together, swim and eat.

“It gives us a chance to just focus on swimming
and that is what we’re going to do. The 50 metre
pool gives us the opportunity to work a lot more
on our conditioning so that is good.”

Samland said it would be good if at the end of
this experience, his Mavericks can return to Oma-
ha and if not duplicate last year’s sixth ranking in
the NCAA division II, then surpass it.

Lisa Wemhoff, a senior from Norfolk, Nebras-
ka, said her initial appearance here has been all
that she anticipated.

“T love it,” she stated. “We’ve only been here a
day, but the beaches are beautiful. The pool is
also very nice and we’re swimming very well in
it.”

@ THE Mavericks use the swim facilities yesterday.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

=


TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7B

&§ a i ~... SPORTS

Jaffer hits century to give India
upper hand on first day of third test

Mt CRICKET
CAPE TOWN, South
Africa
Associated Press |





WASIM Jaffer scored his

third test century on Tuesday

*.°. to lead India to 254 for three

wickets on day one of the third

and final test against South
Africa.

Jaffer's 116 took him past
1,000 test runs, but was. ended
when he edged the second new
ball delivery from Dale Steyn
. “to Jacques Kallis at second ship.
“If was Kallis' 100th catch in
tests, going alongside his 8,072
runs and 202 wickets.

He reached his century off
: the 19 balls and his innings last-

ed through lunch and tea, total-
ing exactly six hours, and con-
tained 15 fours in a chanceless
innings.

Sachin Tendulkar was on 28
at the close, together with
V.V.S. Laxman on 4...

Jaffer and Dinesh Karthik
built an opening partnership of
153, but Karthik was dismissed
with the first ball after tea, giv-
ing debut-making left-arm spin-
ner Paul Harris his first test

.’.’.Wicket. Karthik was adjudged

-_ to have got an inside edge onto

his pad and looped up a simple
catch to Hashim Amla at short
leg.

He had been dropped on:32
by Graeme Smith at first slip
off the bowling of Shaun Pol-
lock. A surprise choice as open-
er, Karthik withstood a short-
pitched barrage from Jacques
Kallis just before tea. |

India captain Rahul Dravid
won the toss'and was the only
other batsman to fall on a tough
day for the bowlers. He was on
. 29 when he edged a lifting deliv-

.cery from Pollock for wicket-
“keeper Mark Boucher to take
an easy catch.

The three-match series is tied
at 1-1 after India won the first

-.- test by 123 runs and South
_-. Africa the second by 174 runs; °

Harris worked hard, bowling
24 overs on his first day in test ~~ ~ ;
cricket, and finished with 1-74, a SOUTH AFRICA'S I bowler Paul Harris, center, celebrates with teammates after dismissing India's batsman Dinesh Karthik, left, for 63 runs on the first day of tlie
Pollock had. 1-32, and steve 3rd and final Test match against India at Newlands stadium in Cape Town, South Africa, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2007.
took 1-41 in 20 overs. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)





Chelsea de Ww again |
in the title race ;

CHELSEA'S French midfielder, Claude Makelele, right,
battles.for the ball with Aston Villa midfielder Steve Davies,
during their English Premier League soccer match at Villa
Park, Birmingham, England. Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2007. The
match finished 0-0 and Chelsea, the reigning: champions,
are now six points behind league leaders Manchester Unif-
ed.


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)



DAVID LANDSBERG, PUBLISHER | TOM FIEDLER, EXEC

OP



UTIVE EDITOR | JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR



INTERNA



NAL EDITION

__WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2007 | THA,





Is America becoming politically mature?

BY ELLEN GOODMAN

ellengoodman@globe.com

M aybe it wasn’t such a great Christ-
mas gift after all. The baseball

caps, emblazoned with the last day of

the Bush presidency — Jan. 19, 2009 —

seemed to offer my favorite Democratic

couple a light at the end ,,

of the tunnel. But some-

times it’s easier to see

the tunnel than the light.

Nevertheless, Janu-
ary is about to mark the
earliest opening for any
presidential campaign Ree
in memory. So allow me GOODMAN
to end the old year and begin the new by
taking a look at the question dominating
the news magazines and talk shows: Is
America ready for a president who isn’t
a white male?

The only Democrats who so far have
actually announced their candidacies are
indeed white and male, from Tom Vil-
sack to John Edwards. But the sexier and
racier question dominating the early
chatter is the possible mano-a-womano,
black-and-white matchup that could be
offered with Hillary Rodham Clinton or
Barack Hussein Obama atop the national
ticket.





Ready? Political readiness is not
exactly like reading readiness. For gen-

A resolution to do
the Right thing

BY CAL THOMAS
calthomas@tribune.com

othing focuses the political

mind like defeat. With
Democrats about to assume con-
trol of the House and Senate for
the first time in 12 years, Repub-
licans in general, conservatives
in particular and conservative
Christians especially have an
important choice to make.

For at least the next two”
years, they can forget about con-
firming many,’if any, judges who
disbelieve in legislating age:
from the bench. There |Â¥
won't be any John Rob-
ertses or Samuel Alitos
getting confirmed (or
probably nominated).
No Judiciary Committee
headed by Sen. Patrick

BS

Leahy, D-Vt., will allow THOMAS

any through, and while the fate
of the “Gang of 14” who vowed
in the last session not to partici-
pate in any filibuster of judicial
nominees except in extreme cir-
cumstances has yet to be deter-
mined, my guess is that their
influence will not be as great ina
Democratic Senate. Neither will
there be a “nuclear option”
because there will be no Repub-
lican majority leader who might
use it.

Cross most important social
issues off the conservative-reso-
lution list for the next two years.
Socially conservative freshman
Democrats are unlikely to press
them on a liberal leadership.
Liberals were happy to sleep
with pro-life and anti-same-sex-
marriage Democrats during the
campaign, but don’t look for
them to be respected in the post-
election morning.

Cross most important
social issues off

the conservative-
resolution list for

the next two years.

The choice conservative
Republicans must make is what
to do for the next two years.
They might consider following
the example of Sen. Sam
Brownback, R-Kansas. In some
ways Brownback, who is run-
ning for president, is trying to
reinvent what it means to be a
social conservative. To be more
precise, he is trying to take the
movement back to first princi-
ples, demonstrating what he is
for, rather than what or whom
he is against.

World magazine, a conserva-
tive evangelical publication, fol-
lowed Brownback into the infa-
mous Louisiana penitentiary at
Angola, which became known
to the public through the films
Monster’s Ball and Dead Man
Walking. Earlier this month,
Brownback addressed 700
inmates in the prison chapel

and then spent the night in a jail _



cell along with writer Marvin
Olasky, who says his “neigh-
bors” were a serial rapist and a
drug-cartel killer.

Brownback answered ques-
tions from the inmates, who are
used to hearing: “tough on
crime” messages from conser-
vative. Republicans, none of
whom to my recollection ever
began a presidential campaign
in a place like Angola. When
they got up the next morning,
Brownback and Olasky visited

‘Death Row. A cynic might say

Brownback was grand-
standing, but that cynic
would have to answer
“for whom?” People
who back prison reform
and social-justice issues
have mostly been Dem-
ocrats and political lib-
erals. Such issues don’t
play well among the “lock ‘em
up and throw away the key”
crowd.

What I find most appealing
about Brownback’s approach is
his positive tone. It came from a
cancer scare he had in 1995. For
nine months he was unsure of
the outcome. “That’s when I felt
helpless,” he said. He emerged
from cancer with a clean bill of
health and also a spiritual trans-
formation. “Before 1995, I was
in attack mode,” he told Olasky.
Now he’s a changed person.
The tone, though not the sub-
stance, of his politics has also
changed.

Social conservatives and
Republicans might consider
Brownback’s example. If they
keep in mind the end, but
change tactics, their prospects
for achieving their ends might
be greatly improved. Too many
of their constituents have been

_conditioned by the negative

approach.

In fundraising letters, in pub-
lic pronouncements and from
some pulpits has come political
and ideological invective that is
not only unbecoming to the
source of such statements but
serves as a bad example to oth-
ers. It has the added downside
of converting no one to the con-
servative point of view and
turning off even some people
who niight otherwise be
inclined to vote for Republi-
cans.

Here’s my suggested resolu-
tion for the Republican conser-
vative-Christian voter, courtesy
of singer-songwriter Glen
Campbell:

You got to try a little kindness

Yes show a little kindness

Just shine your light for every-
one to see

And if you try a little kindness

Then you’ll overlook the
blindness

Of narrow-minded people on
the narrow-minded streets.

From a political standpoint,
the best part of this strategy is
that it works and might even
prompt more people to vote
Republican in 2008.

©2006 Tribune Media Services

erations, strategists and psychologists
have posed the same chicken-and-egg
riddle for social change. Do you need a
change in attitudes before you can suc-
ceed in changing real life? Or does a
change in reality produce a change in
attitudes?

The answer is, of course, yes.

Having lived through enormous
change, having seen people resist
change, adjust and then protect and pro-
mote one new “status quo” after
another, I think we operate with too
much fear about “readiness” and too
much pessimism about backlash.

I sometimes think we have two very
different national attitudes toward the
pace of technological change and the

‘pace of political change. It’s as if we

were all eager, early adopters when it
comes to iPods, and late adopters when
it comes to presidents.

As we turn to 2007 and 2008, I don’t
think we have to be cockeyed optimists
to believe that Americans can get
beyond seeing “a female” and “a black”
to seeing a candidate.

Consider Massachusetts, where a
Mormon Republican white man is being
followed into the governor’s office by an
African-American Democratic man who
defeated a white Republican woman?
Was Massachusetts “ready” for “a” Mor-
mon before Mitt Romney? Was it ready

for “an” African-American before Deval
Patrick?

Let's take the briefest stock of the
individual strengths and weaknesses of
the two way-too-early front-runners in
the Democratic Party. There is no doubt
that Democrats have developed a crush
on Obama, a man of thoughtful charm,
relaxed intelligence and ineffable
authenticity. The reservations against
him are that he’s unknown, untested and
“young.” (Memo to the baby-boomer
media dubbing him as young: No, you
were not young at 45.)

Whether that crush becomes a com-
mitment depends on how his “authentic-
ity” survives delivering a stump speech
14 times a day under a Jon Stewart
watchdog. And how resilient he is after
the inevitable YouTube moment.

As for Hillary? If Barack is the new
boy on the block, Hillary is the smarter, ,
sadder-but-wiser gal. For the first time
in history, a female candidate is the most
experienced, the most ready-on-Day-
One option for the Oval Office.

Yet the reservations about her have
to do with her baggage, her husband and
her haters. Hillary’s success will depend
perversely on whether she can convince
those Democrats who would vote for
her that others will too. Her election
depends on being seen as “electable.”

I don’t dismiss racism and sexism in

these equations. I watched the campaign
ads against Harold Ford Jr. in Tennes-
see. | heard Rahm Emanuel ask, “What
the %*&* happened to my women?,”
when only three of 17 Democratic
women candidates challenging Republi-
cans for congressional seats won. But
Clinton and Obama are individuals with
very personal stories. Not class actions.

In Newsweek, 93 percent of Ameri-
cans said they would vote for an Afri-
can-American for president but only 56
percent believed that the country is
ready for one. Similarly, 86 percent said
they would vote for a woman but only 55
percent believed the country. was ready
for one.

Traditionally, if cynically, we assume
that the lower figure is the one that mat-
ters, the real one. But maybe that gap
between us and them — open-minded us
and close-minded them — doesn’t grow
out of an inflated view of ourselves but a
deflated view of our country.

Is the country ready? Almost all
Americans believe or want to believe
that they would vote for a president
without prejudice. That’s either an agent
for change or an indicator of change. If
we believe we vote for the person, not
the race or the gender, maybe we will.
2007, 2008. Ready — or not — here we

0.
: ©2006 Washington Post Writers Group



CWS/NYTS
KAL/THE ECONOMIST, LONDON, ENGLAND

Last year’s goofs and corrections

BY DAVID S. BRODER
davidbroder@washpost.com

he controversies of the year past —

Iraq, immigration, domestic sur-
veillance and the rest, plus the political
battles that climaxed in the Democratic
victories in November — all contrib-
uted to an exception- -
ally heavy load of
reader-generated cor-
rections and objec-
tions. Thanks to e-mail,
many more of you are
now contributing to
this annual year-end |@aial
“goofs” column, where BRODER
I review (and repent) some of the judg-
ments and misjudgments of the past
year.

e To start with the simplest, in an
August piece about Ohio politics, I
wrote that Ted Strickland was trying to
become the first congressman since
Rutherford B. Hayes to be elected gov-
ernor of Ohio. Several of you pointed
out that I had ignored two subsequent
figures who moved from Congress to
that governorship, James M. Cox and
Frank B. Willis.

’ @ Aninterview with Bill Gates pro-

duced a wave of protests. The Micro-
soft billionaire was in Washington to
lobby for an expansion of the H-1B visa
program, which provides entry for
foreign-born scientists and engineers
who hold job offers in the United States.
Gates said the limit on their numbers
was hurting America’s competitive
position.

The letter-writers, many of whom
identified themselves as unemployed or
underemployed people with similar
skills, claimed that the H-1B workers
were taking their jobs and working at
lower wages. I waded through a mass of
testimony and evidence, supplied by



both sides in the controversy, without
being able to resolve the issue. It will
likely come up again when the next
Congress tackles immigration reform,
and this time, I promise I’ll look at both
sides before I write about it.

e | had a similar experience when I
wrote about Sen. Joe Biden’s proposal
for decentralizing the government of
Iraq, allowing more authority for sepa-
rate Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish regions. I
commended the Biden proposal as a
step forward from what was already,
last May, a seriously stalemated and
deteriorating situation in Iraq.

But after the column appeared, I
received several communications from
people with as much knowledge of Iraq
as Biden possesses. They argued that
such a step toward federalism had seri-
ous dangers. It would be difficult to
apply in urban areas such as Baghdad,
where populations are mixed, and it
risked, the correspondents said, inviting
other countries such as Iran and Turkey
to spread their influence into a parti-
tioned Iraq.

Those same objections have blocked
adoption of the Biden plan, but mean-
time, Iraqis fleeing violence have
increasingly separated themselves into
Shiite or Sunni strongholds, leaving the
situation even worse than if there had
been an orderly and legal division of
authority.

e Another column that drew great
protest was one where I took my col-
leagues in the media to task for their
treatment of Karl Rove in the Valerie
Plame leak investigation. When the spe-
cial prosecutor announced he was not
charging Rove with anything, I
reviewed some of the many articles that
had accused the White House aide of
masterminding the “outing” of Plame
and said that an apology was in order.

The e-mail and letter-writers argued

that the simple fact that Rove had
escaped prosecution did not mean that
he was innocent of using his position to
harass and frustrate critics of the
administration. He had, after all, con-
firmed Plame’s identity to at least two
reporters working on the story. Even if
the original leak came from elsewhere,
these letter-writers said, Rove was no
innocent.

But I still believe there is an impor-
tant cautionary tale for the press in the
Rove-Plame story. Too many of us got
way ahead of the facts and let our suspi-
cions grow into assumptions and asser-
tions for which we had no evidence.
That tendency to get ahead of the story
is rampant in the media just now, fed by
the speedup of news delivery through
the Internet and cable. Just look at the
stories announcing — in 2006 — who
are “serious” candidates for president
in 2008.

e Speaking of politics, I’m embar-
rassed to say that the one state I wrote
about that I got wrong was Michigan,
where I spent enough time to have
known better. I thought Gov. Jennifer
Granholm was going to be sunk by the
auto industry unemployment, but she
put on a great campaign and won.

On the other hand, I saw both stages
of the Connecticut race correctly — Joe
Lieberman losing the primary but win-
ning as an independent in November.
And the downfall of the Republican
Congress and rise of an independent
breed of Democrats was forecast here
from early March onward.

e But a column about Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton, touching lightly on the
state of her marriage, drew lots of cat-
calls — a tip-off that this subject will be
a tough one to handle if she ehters the
presidential race.

Bring on 2007.

©2006 Washington Post Writers Group

The next Congress most likely will tackle the issue of immigration reform.
This time, I promise I'll look at both sides before I write about it.



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