Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Violence is the big enemy '

in the world and at home |

[ere were glimmers of
hope in 2006 but on the whole
it was not a very good year for the
world.

Bloody conflicts continued to take a
heavy toll in terms of human suffering,
and abundant resources that could
have done so much good for humani-
ty were poured into the bottomless
pits of wars and conflicts.

Nature itself seemed to cry out to
heedless leaders with warnings that
many years of abuse of the natural
environment was approaching a tip-
ping point beyond which there will be
catastrophic and possibly irreversible
consequences for the planet and its
ability to sustain life.

After three years the Iraq war
remained as intractable as ever and
the bloodletting continued to mount.
Estimates of Iraqi casualties ranged
from tens of thousands to hundreds
of thousands and the American people
watched with horror as the death toll
for their armed forces approached the
3,000 mark.

The estimated cost to the US Trea-
sury ran into the hundreds of billions
and some say that by the time it is
over it could be as high as a trillion
dollars. The great tragedy is that this
was from the beginning an unneces-.
sary war based on ideological hubris
and an elaborate web of deception.

Except for a stubborn minority,
everybody came to acknowledge in
2006 that this war was a huge mistake
and that the invasion and occupation
were grossly misconceived and mis-
managed from the beginning. According
to the polls and the. results of the
November elections in the US, the
American people now know that ‘they
were misled.

That was a glimmer of hope but still
small comfort to those who saw the fol-
ly of it from the beginning and warned
the invading coalition against it. The
trouble is that acknowledging the truth
does not provide a way out and many
more people are going to die before it is
finally over. As former US Secretary
of State Colin Powell warned: “If you
break it, you own it.”

So Iraq is quite broken, the volatile

-Middle East is.more.unstable:than-evetie=:
-and the coalition is looking for.a'‘way.



out of a classic Catch-22. Furthermore
the Iraq adventure undermined ¢
legitimate war in Afghanistan and so
the end of that campaign is also
nowhere in sight.












I: the middle of 2006 the Israelis,
with the approval of the US and
Britain, launched an invasion of

- Lebanon. The Israelis blockaded this

democratic West-leaning country and
mercilessly bombed population cen-
tres as well as the country’s infra-

» structure.

While a thousand Lebanese civilians
were killed in the bombardment and
many more were made refugees, UN
Secretary General Kofi Annan and the
Vatican condemned the attack, but for
a whole month the coalition with stun-
ning callousness did nothing to stop the
carnage.

At the same time and with the same
pretext:(the capture of several Israeli
soldiers) Israel unleashed an attack on
the helpiess population of the Palestin-
fan‘ Gaza Strip: The soldiers have not
been retrieved but Lebanon lay in ruins
and instability and the radical elements

Iraq is quite broken, the volatile
‘Middle East is more unstable than ever
and the coalition is looking for a way
out of a classic Catch-22. Furthermore,
the Iraq adventure undermined the
legitimate war in Afghanistan and so
the end of that campaign is also

nowhere in sight.







All over the world there are still too
many people who do not understand
that violence is an obstacle to the
civilisation movement and that
human beings cannot achieve their
higher destiny with guns and bombs.



in Islam were strengthened.

There was a strong glimmer of hope
as one courageous American, former
President Jimmy Carter, published a
book exposing to the American people
the injustice being inflicted on the
Palestinian people. This remains the
most provocative issue in the Middle
East.

Inevitably, Mr Carter was accused of
anti-Semitism but even as a debate got
underway about his book, the Israelis
were planning another illegal settle-
ment on Palestinian land as they con-
tinued their brutal occupation and
campaign of repression against the
Palestinian people.

There are other glimmers of hope
as more Jewish voices inside Israel and
a few in the US are also speaking out.
In a recent article in an American

newspaper, Ira Chernus, Professor of
Religious Studies at the University of
Colorado, said:
“Now Jewish soldiers go out every
day to make war on Palestinians, the
vast majority of whom want nothing
more than to live peaceful, ordinary
lives in a tiny state of their own.’

D espite the world’s “never
again” pledge after Hitler’s
attempt to wipe out the Jews during
World War II, the international com-
munity in 2006 remained largely i impo-
tent in the face of a genocid&ll campaign
against the black African peeple of Dar-
fur, a western province of Sudan.

With the apparent approval of the
Sudanese Government in Khartoum,
rampaging Arab militiamen known as
the Janjaweed have in the last few years
killed an estimated 400,000 people in
Darfur, raped thousands and made
refugees of over a million.

Mr Annan has made passionate
appeals to the international community
for the commitment of resources to stop
this continuing atrocity but the response
has been feeble and any glimmer of
hope in this situation is dim indeed.

As the year ended, another war
broke out on the already war-torn con-
tinent of Africa as Ethiopian troops
crossed into Somalia to support a weak
provisional government and to prevent
a coalition of Islamic courts from set-
ting up a fundamentalist Muslim state
on its border.

This intervention runs the risk of set-
ting off a wider war in the region but
there is a glimmer of hope that the inter-
national community will do what is nec-
essary to help bring peace and unity to

= @_

4
a

ra

Die
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=
oe

# *@ obs

Somalia. It has known neither and been
without an effective government for the
last 15 years.

A the end of World War II 60
years ago, enlightened leaders
got together to establish the United
Nations because they recognised that
the violent history of humankind had to
end if civilisation were to triumph.

But all over the world there are still
too many people who do not under-
stand that violence is an obstacle to the
civilisation movement and that human
beings cannot achieve their higher des-
tiny with guns and bombs.

One glimmer of hope in all. this is

_ that in the West the Iraq fiasco has put

many advocates of violence and ene-
mies of the United Nations to rout, but
not all. There are still those who reject
Winston Churchill’s advice that “it is
better to jaw-jaw than war-war”. They
prefer to drop bombs first rather than
trying to reason with an enemy.

Here at home we have much to cele-
brate and be grateful for. The Bahamas
has never descended into political or
sectarian conflict and it appears that
the Bahamian people are committed to
conserving this rich and blessed her-
itage.

Our democracy has been a great deal:

less than perfect and sometimes quite
messy. But it is a far better way to gov-
ern ourselves and to settle our political
differences than resorting to violence.
This year that democratic process
will once again be put to the test and
there is every indication that the

Bahamian people, along with their

political leaders, will go about elect-
ing the next government in a peaceful
and orderly fashion.

But wonderful though that is, it is not
enough. Criminal violence plagued us
throughout 2006 and resulted in the
death of 60 persons. Furthermore,
domestic violence, including the abuse
of children, seems to be on the increase.

This has the potential not only to
degrade our quality of life but to destroy
everything we hold dear, including eco-
nomic stability and prosperity.

We must resolve in this New Year
and for many years to come to use all
the spiritual, intellectual and material
resources we can muster in a national
campaign against all forms of violence in
our society.

Happy New Year!

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www.bahamapundit.typepad.c om

“the s

6 In brief

MOV eU ea eeeeeeencensscsscscensscesereeceseeeseeceesnensecserecey

President |
and Speaker
to host event
at Atlantis

SENATE president Sharon
Wilson and Speaker of the
House of Assembly Oswald
Ingraham will host the January
2-5, 2007, meetings of the stand-
ing committee of the Confer-
ence of Speakers and Presiding
Officers.

The meetings will be held at
Coral Towers, Atlantis Resort,
on Paradise Island.

The next Conference of
Speakers and Presiding Officers
is scfieduled for England in Jan-
uary,,2008, and the meetings of

tanding committee which
will be held in The Bahamas
will set the agenda and order
of business for the 2008 confer-
ence.

Michael Martin, Speaker of
the House of Commons in
Westminster, London, England,
is chairman of the Conference
and will chair the preparatory
meetings in The Bahamas.

Commissioner
to talk about
policing on
radio show
COMMISSIONER of Police
Paul Farquharson will tonight

appear on Love 97 (8pm) to
talk about “Policing Today”.

Dominican
Republic ups
tax to close
budget gap

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

THE Dominican legislature
has approved fiscal reforms and

tax hikes to close a budget short-

fall, according to Associated Press.
Pgesident Leonel Fernandez,
who proposed the reform pack-

. age ‘after prodding from the

International Monetary Fund,
said this month that fhe‘increas-
es are necessary to.make up for
a US$1.1 billion gap in‘the
US$7.9 billion budget.

The House of Representatives,
which has been controlled by Fer-
nandez’s Dominican Liberation
Party since May elections, voted
late Wednesday to approve the
measures. Opposition members
walked out before the vote after
hours of heated debate.

The bills impose a new
US$0.15 tax per gallon of gaso-
line and a US$0.09 tax on diesel

‘fuel. Taxes will also rise on

tobacco, luxury cars and the
national lottery.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157





ome bine

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 3



BHEA president -
calls for |
upgrades to |
roads, airports
and utilities

ROADS, airports and utili-
ties in the Bahamas must be
“quickly upgraded” to meet
development needs, it was
claimed last night.

And there are “great con-
cerns” about the extent to
which these developments,
upon completion, can be man-
aged and staffed with capable
Bahamians. ve:

The anxieties were :
expressed by Mr J Barrie Far-
rington, president of the :
Bahamas Hotel Employ
Association, ina New Year's :
Day message. ’ t 3

While noting moderate :
growth in 2006 similar to that
of 2005, Mr Farrington
warned that education and
training programmes must be
upgraded and accelerated
without delay to meet new
demands.

He said several significant
tourism-related developments
were announced during the
year, and others under con-
struction moved closer to
completion.

“While this is positive news
and an indication of investor
confidence in the Bahamas, it
does present us with enor-
mous challenges,” he said.

“Our physical infrastruc-
ture, our roads, airports and
utilities must be quickly
upgraded to meet develop-
ment needs.”

Noting the loss during the
year of hotel union boss Pat

Bain and Atlantis supremo i

Butch Kerzner, Mr Farring-
ton said: “Their lives exem-
plified the kind of commit-
ment that we should adopt if
we are to realise our poten-
tial.

education, youth, training and
industry competitiveness mpst
take on a new dimension, void:
of politics and quick fixes. i
“The focus must be cn }
transforming our nation for

the good of our industry, @ur . is

people and our nation.” )

5 ; PO Sete Wee ‘ ¢ .
Economy of

Cuba still ©

recovering
from crisis

HB CUBA
Havana

CUBAN finance officials i,

acknowledged in an unusu-
ally critical year-end report
that the country’s economy
is still suffering the effects of
the severe crisis of the 1990s
but nevertheless grew 12.5 pe
rcent in 2006, according to
Associated Press.
Cuban Economics Minis-
ter Jose Luis Rodriguez:also
defended the method used to
calculate the island's gross
domestic product growth fig-
ure, which includes the free
health, education and other
social services the communist ;
country provides its citizens. 3
“Cuba doesn't falsify its ;
Statistics, nor does it manipu-
late them with electoral:
ends,” Rodriguez told a year-
end session of the Natiénal
Assembly, or parliamenf.
Cuba's methodology makes
the country’s economic growth :
figures difficult to compare, ¢
with those of other countries. :

4




“Our collective pursuit of . ie

Lady Pindling

FROM page one

serves as one of three persons
who became deputies to the

« Governor General when he is

away from The Bahamas.

As Knight Commanders of
the same order, Baltron Bethel
and Garet Finlayson also join
Dame Marguerite as top recip-
ients of the Queen’s honours.

As a recipient of the hon- *

our, Sir Baltron Bethel is being
recognised for more than 50
years of exemplary public ser-
vice in various capacities, most
notably as Director General of
Tourism and deputy chairman
and managing director of the
Hotel Corporation of The
Bahamas.

Sir Baltron is also a leading
member of the Baptist com-
munity, where he serves as
assistant pastor of Salem Bap-
tist Church and is a former

chairman of The Bahamas:

Baptist College.

Like Sir Baltron Bethel, Sir
Garet Finlayson is being hon-
oured for his contribution to
the world of commerce and
business in the Bahamas. ‘

Said to be a living example
of how hard work, vision and
opportunities can raise an indi-
vidual from small beginnings
to becoming a “captain of
industry and a symbol of finan-
cial success,” Sir Garet Fin-
layson steadily built a finan-
cial and corporate empire as
chairman and CEO of Burns
House Ltd.

In making this announce-
ment, Government House also
made available the names of
several other distinguished
Bahamians who received spe-
cial honours from the Queen.

The following is a complete
listing of honorees:

"102 Haitian
‘immigrants ~
apprehended

CREW members aboard
a Defence Force vessel
apprehended 102 Haitian
immigrants off East End
Point at 11.15 on New
Year’s Eve.

According to Defence
Force officers, 86 males and
16 females were found
aboard a Haitian fishing ves-
sel under extremely unsani-
tary conditions, and were
taken to the Coral Harbour
-base, where they were
turned. over to Immigration
officials from Carmichael
Road Detention Centre.

Unsanitary conditions
aboard the vessel were a
result of the lack of toilet
‘facilities for such a large -
number of persons in the
cramped confines of a fish-
ing vessel. ,

“Chief Petty Officer Ralph
McKinney said this was a
yroutine apprehension of a
Haitian vessel, which will
mostly likely be destroyed
because of its condition.

A Defence, Force press
release said the total num-
ber of immigrants held at the
* detention ceptre is now $12. .




















































@ LADY PINDLING is
named Dame Commander of
The Most Distinquished Order
of St Michael and St George

@ The Most Distinquished
Order of St Michael and
St George - Companion

Mr Basil L Sands - honoured
in the field of accountancy as
one of the pioneers in open-
ing the field of accountancy to
scores of Bahamians, as well
as his service to the Anglican

Church, and in the field of con-
sular affairs.

_ The Rt Reverand Gilbert
Arthur Thompson - honoured
for long and dedicatéd service
to the Anglican diocese of the
Bahamas and Turks and
Caicos Islands and for his will-
ingness to serve the communi-
ty during his years as a pastor,
administrator and conciliator.

Mr Alfred Jarrett - hon-
oured for exemplary and out-
standing services to the field
of banking and for his civic and
devoted service to the man-

‘agement of public sector enter-

prises. *

sh »» *
The Most Excellent Order
of the British Empire
(Civil Division, ...

- Officers (OBE): *

Bishop Albert H gfepburn -
religion and commpalty ser-
vice’ °° oreo @ es aoe

Ms Nettica R Symonetter -
tourism and travel 7?"

Mr. Herbert Leon 'Treco -
business and commufity ser-
vice

Bishop William Michael
Johnson - religion and com-
munity service

@ Members (MBE):

Ms Linda Ford - sports and
recreation :

Mr Leon Rahming - entre-
prenuer

Mr Eric Cash - music, art
and education :

Ms Willimae Bridgewater -
trade unionist and community
service

Mr Levi Gibson - real estate
development :

Mr Bruce C Braynen - poli-
tics, business, and community
development

Rev Dr John N T Rolle -
religious service

FREE DELIVERY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT





is now a Dame

@ The British Empire Medal
(BEM) - Civil Division

Mr Eric Wilmott - journal-
ism and community service

Ms Oraline Butler - politics.

and community welfare

Mrs Jane: Adelia Adderley -
business and commerce,
politics and community
service

Mrs Gloria Knowles - busi-
ness and commerce, politics,
and community service

Mrs Cecelia A Grant - poli-

tics and community develop-

ment

Rev Dr Henry Pratt - poli-
tics and community develop-
ment

Mr John Lochley Cooper -
politics and community devel-
opment

Ms Millicent Deveaux - pol-
itics and community develop-
ment

Mr Kenneth J Braynen - pol-
itics and community develop-
ment Miva

@ The Queen’s
Police Medal (QPM)

Mr James A Carey - for ser-
vice to the Royal Bahamas

Police Force and to law

enforcement generally.

Mr Grafton O Ifill, Sr - for
service to the Royal Bahamas
Police Force and to law
enforcement generally.

?

Decorations
Poinsettias
Garlands
Wreaths
Trees
Picks
Lights















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Christmas ribbon

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-435, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Mr Galanis and his memory loss

THREE DAYS before Christmas Sena-
tor Philip Galanis wrote a letter to The Tri-
bune complaining about a political jingle
released by the FNM the week before Christ-
mas. It was played over many of the radio sta-
tions.

In his letter Mr Galanis, a former PLP
MP for Englerston, recalled that in Decem-
ber, forty years ago, the late Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, for 25 years prime minister of the
Bahamas described this time of year as one
“when brotherly love should reign supreme in
our hearts and our minds ought to be turned
to the birth of Our Lord Jesus.”

We can have no argument with that state-
ment.

Sir Lynden made the statement as a criti-
cism of the United Bahamian Party (UBP)
for having chosen the Christmas period to
make the surprise announcement that there
would be an election in 1967, almost imme-
diately after the Christmas/New Year’s holi-
day. Sir Lynden complained that the UBP
gave “no thought as to how the peaceful
Christmas of others might be disturbed.” Mr
Galanis said that Sir Lynden had “called this
disturbance of the holy season ‘unchristian.””
Commented Mr Galanis: “And look what
happened to the UBP after that holiday cam-
paign, when election day dawned on January
10, 1967.”

Mr Galanis submitted “that this nasty and
demeaning jingle that the FNM is, now
assaulting us with as we would all rather hear
the traditional and beautiful music of the
season is just another example, four decades
later, of thoughtless and heartless politicians
disturbing the peace of Christmas for their
own political ends.

“This one disgusting jingle,” he wrote,
“has shown the people of The Bahamas just
what kind of leadership the FNM will offer.
The people want leaders who will lead; the
FNM provides leaders who are busy creating
vulgar jingles.

“The people want to hear about issues that
are important to their future; the FNM would
rather make silly jokes and offer empty slo-
gans.

“T believe that, because of this incident
and the moral decay it reveals about the
FNM, the Progressive Liberal Party, the par-
ty that respects and reveres the time-hon-
oured Christmas traditions of our Christian
nation, will see a victory in 2007 that will be
even more resounding than that of 2002,”
Mr Galanis wrote.

We have no problem with Mr Galanis’ let-
ter, the only problem we have is that neither
Mr Galanis, nor any member of the PLP for
that matter, should be putting pen to paper
on the subject of political jingles during
Christmas week.

We conclude that Mr Galanis must suffer
from the loss of his short term memory. He
had to wander back forty years in time to
discover how a leader of his own party felt
about mixing Christmas and politics.

Really he only had to trot back on memo-
ry lane a short five years to recall Christmas
2001 and the run up to the May, 2002 elec-
tion.

That year — exactly a week before Christ-
mas, 2001 — the PLP, under the leadership of
then Opposition leader Perry Christie, was so
busy avoiding the pressing issues of the day
that it too was busy writing a jingle. And its
jingle was being broadcast in the identical
time frame that the FNM jingle was broadcast
two weeks ago — just the week before Christ-
mas.

If Mr Galanis is serious, and not just play-
ing politics, then, if the FNM’s “latest dis-
graceful and disrespectful stunt” demon-
strates “their disconnection with the
respectable, intelligent Bahamian voter who
needs and wants to hear about issues in order
to make up their minds how to cast their bal-
lots next year,” then he must conclude that
the PLP’s “disrespectful stunt” just before
Christmas 2001 must have also demonstrat-
ed its disconnect with the “respectable, intel-
ligent Bahamian voter.”

Contrary to Mr Galanis’ statement his
Progressive Liberal Party did not respect and
revere “the time-honoured Christmas tradi-
tions of our Christian nation” in 2001, yet it
won the election in 2002. Therefore, why
should the FNM’s jingle on the same theme
— “A fresh wind is blowing” — played at
the identical time that the PLP played theirs
cost the FNM an election? If Mr Galanis is
logical then the FNM should “see a victory in
2007 that will be even more resounding than
that of (the PLP in) 2002.”

Both jingles (PLP-2001 and FNM-2006)
make a play on “a fresh wind blowing”
only the smell in an FNM’s nostrils is that of
a “foul wind” and their jingle vows that it
“ain’t long before this foul wind is gone ...
and we gonna win our country back.”

Now’ that.a new year has dawned, we have
a bit of advice for both Mr Galanis and PLP
chairman Raynard Rigby: This is not the year
to have intermittent memory faults — espe-
cially when going into public print with elec-
tion comments.

They must remember that whenever they
twist or stumble over their facts, all we have
to do is pull a file from our newspaper
morgue to put them straight.

If they don’t improve, they could experi-
ence much embarrassment in the next few
months.

In the meantime we wish all of our readers
a very happy and peaceful new year.



at
RF

Be sure you
have all the
information

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS is something you
want to consider. For or
against it, just be sure you
have all the information.
The plan was presented to
us recently during BICA’s
accountant’s week. On
their own admission (NHI

_representative Ms Pinder),

there are a lot of issues to
be worked out. So why are
they rushing it?

No kidding around,
implemented incorrectly, it
will have devastating con-
sequences. This is your
medical services they are
playing with. Ask questions
and get answers before let-
ting this proceed. Never let
any government take you
for a fool, and not give the
right to weigh your deci-
sion on your health care
services. They could use
the public schools as a
forum and educate the
Bahamian public on the
proposal as they did for us.

Highlights of the presen-
tation:

e Mandatory.

e Caps out at $133 per
month

e All services at the pub-
lic ward of PMH, anything

else is at your own
expense.

e Same for prescription
drugs

e No services abroad if
they can be performed
locally, regardless of wait
list.

e Indigent (illegal immi-
grants,and unemployed)
are fully covered for the
same Services just as some-
one who pays NHI contri-
butions.

e To avoid persons going
abroad for services, saying
they felt bad while on vaca-
tion, travel insurance is
being considered each time
you travel abroad( to pre-
vent fraud).

° Contributions to be
administered through NIB.

Concerns that came out:

e NIB has not been able
to account for funds over
the past four years, and
you plan to give them more
money? —

e General political con-
cerns about handling mon-
ey.

e PMH already running
at capacity and in need of
upgrade

e PMH

scription drugs now with
dependability.

Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative

Credit Union Limited
Chairman’s Christmas Message 2006

eachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union has been a beacon of light for its member:
r the ae thirty vane and it continues to meet the needs of persons from all economic and social str

Je are all about “People Helping People to Help Themselves” and with this philosophy in ‘mind, we have set:

out

oe during this first decade of the new millennium to achieve economic empowerment for our members through
= Joint efforts. We are stressing wealth creation for members and we are encouraging them to make our Credit
Union their primary financial institution.

_ During the past year,, we continued to spread our wings to the Family Islands including Mayaguana in the
far east and Inagua in the deep south. In the northern Bahamas, we completed construction on our modern
office/shopping complex, situated on West Atlantic Drive,Freeport Grand Bahama. Our Freeport Branch oftics
moved out of rented facilities into this complex during the first half of this year. a

tif Heavenly Father continued to shower blessings upon us during 2006 and thus we were able to Assist “

ny of our

o embers in becoming financially independent. As we continue to strive for a higher quality of life for all of
rim,” OUT members, we invite all those persons, especially salaried workers to join this vibrant organization.

peEpristmas is a special time of year for Christians everywhere; a time when family, neighbours, friends and
sitors gather and when many of us welcome those who are along into our homes and hearts. It would be
ing ood to extend this throughout the entire year.

behalf of the Board the Supervisory and Education Committees our Work-Place Representative and our
staff in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco, is is a special pleasure for me to extend best wishes
Holy and Blessed Christmas and a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year to all of our Stakeholders 4 A
out all these islands and cays. May the Love of Jesus, the purpose of his life and the gift of aaa Sh
h your hearts in a special way this Christmas.

Fmonette

of Board of Directors, TSWCCUL



pharmacy’s |
inability to supply pre-




je Maes

letters@trlbunemecia. net





e What incentives would
exist to become a doctor if
compensation is capped by
government? They would
choose another field.

° How will we retain our
doctors?

° How will insurance
companies survive? The
most they could offer is
supplemental insurance.
Significant downsizing of
insurance companies would
take place, and several we
imagine would no longer
exist.

e Your premiums paid on
your plans to date are lost.

e Could it possibly close
Doctor’s Hospital?

Do not let this be a GSM

thing, selling you a service
and then using the pro-
ceeds to try build the infra-
structure. This is your
health care. The govern-
ment needs to prove they
can properly meet the
increased demand before
making it mandatory.

This is a very hot topic. It
headlines every news
media in the country, and
will continue to do so as
the government is pushing
to pass the bill before year
end. Be sure you KNOW.
Pass this on to everyone
you know to give them the
choice!

The Bahamas, the capi-
tal of the World.

Please register to vote.

WALLACE ROLLE
Nassau,
December 9, 2006.

Putting the real meaning
back into Christmas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ALREADY the public relations people have put the bar-
humbug into me simply through annoyance — why do they
wish us to think of Christmas as happy holidays — sea-
sons’ greetings? Are we atheists?

December 25th, is the day set aside to. remember the

birth of Christ.

Okay we know why the minority and I mean the minori-
ty is able to swing that we do not use Merry Christmas or
Christmas greetings is because in the US that business will
get sued, taken to court but do we as a sovereign people, as
alleged Christians. Teject Christ because of the influences.of

foreign habits?

By the first of’ Decembers ust a week away. all’ recep- |

tionists across the length and breath of The Bahamas will be
answering the telephone with some guky statement of ‘hap-
py holidays’ or something totally void of any resemblance as
to the real meaning of this time of the year. ©

Why?

Minister responsible for the public service — please
instruct all government officers that when answering the
telephone the only response is to be Happy Christmas or
Merry Christmas or Christmas greetings — no happy holi-

days, season’s greeting, etc.

I will not this year as I did last year purchase anything at
any business which does not FECORNISG the real reason for

this celebration.

It is time we collectively take a stand and let the majori-
ty opinion stand and stop being copy-cats of our neigh-
bours to the north - 50 per cent of our young people don’t
attend Sunday church now so imagine in 10-years they
might not even know what happy holidays or season’s greet-

ing is celebrating anyway.

Least we do forget the real meaning...Christ was born
and come Good Friday died for our salvation and rédemp-
tion...that’s why we must celebrate the real reason and not
for the almighty dollar going into the hands of the merchant!

H HUMES
Nassau,
November, 2006.

Making efforts to abide
by teachings of Christ

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT WAS Mahatma Gandhi
who said something like “if
more Christians were like
their Christ then the world
would be a better place”. I
think of this often as I see how
many Christians, especially
how the fundamentalist/
protestants are so untforgiv-
ing, and unaccepting of indi-
viduals.

As a Christian myself, I tend
to see the person but, yes, hate
the sin.

It is like these people hate
the sin and also hate the per-
son and pretend to be Lord
and master and condemn all
to a burning hell. Oftentime I
wonder where their self-right-
cous superiority comes from,
to me certainly this is not
Christ-like.

During his time on this
earth Jesus totally rejected the
vengeful eye for an eye, judg-
mental attitudes that are, gen-
erally speaking, typical traits
of many of these fundamen-
tal — Bible-totting Christians.
Jesus opposed the massive
wealth-building, power-wield-
ing materialism that is much
more natural to these evan-

gelical fundamentalist sects.

Last night as I passed by
Bias Street, lots of cars and
people were in the road.
There was much hurrah in the
air. I stopped and inquired. A
young lady started to explain
that the members of St. Paul’s
Baptist Church were having
an argument over who was to
be the pastor of the church. I
do not know the full details
and was not so much interest-
ed after that, but I immedi-
ately felt, certainly Jesus was
not pleased. The police had
to be called in and it was an
awful mess.

None of us is perfect, no not
one, but whether we believe in
a God or not— whether we
follow a religion or we don’t
— if we made efforts to abide
by some of the social teach-
ings attributed to Jesus it
would be a pretty good way
to live our life, wouldn’t it?

And the world would be a
better place, wouldn’t it?

The Bahamas, the capital of
the world. Please register to
vote.

PETER T CAREY
Nassau,
December 14, 2006



THE TRIBUNE

ein brief | Golfers threaten more protests aan
treatment at

1,000 march
to demand
return of
Aristide

B HAITI
Port-au-Prince

ABOUT 1,000 supporters
of ousted former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide
marched through the Hait-
ian capital Thursday to
demand his return from exile
and protest the presence of
UN peacekeepers, according
to Associated Press.

The peaceful demonstra-
tion marked the largest show
of support in months for
Aristide, who fled Haiti in
February 2004 amid a violent
uprising and has been living
in South Africa.

“This is a gift for the end of
the year for President Aris-
tide,” said Deshommes Pre-
sengloire, a spokesman for
Aristide's Lavalas party.

Carrying photographs of the
bespectacled former priest,
demonstrators gathered at a
church where Aristide once
preached and walked to the
National Palace, accompanied
by vans blasting music and a
police escort.

Some of the protesters
accused UN peacekeeping
troops of firing indiscrimi-
nately during gunbattles with
gangsters, killing and wound-
ing civilians. The UN denies
the charge and says its troops,
which arrived in June 2004,
only shoot when attacked.

Preval back
in Haiti after
treatment

in Cuba

HAITI
Port-au-Prince

HAITIAN President Rene
Preval returned to the coun-
try Friday from Cuba, where
he said doctors told him he
did not have prostate cancer,
according to Associated Press.

Haitian National Television
broadcast images of Preval’s
arrival at the airport greeting
the prime minister, Cabinet
members and the police chief
as he stepped out of a Cuban
jet. Other news organisations
were not granted access to his
early morning arrival.

The president said he would
go back to see his Cuban doc-
tors on March 18, but that the
health of his prostate was
“under control” and the can-
cer had not returned. '

“The Constitution says that
if a president is not in good
health, he can’t continue with
his functions but that does-
n’t apply to me because I'm
in good health,” he said in
remarks that were broadcast
some 12 hours after his
arrival in Port-au-Prince.

Preval, 63, revealed earlier
this month that blood tests
in Havana showed possible
signs of cancer but said the
results were inconclusive. He
was diagnosed with prostate
cancer in 2001, the final year
of his first presidential term,
and was treated in Cuba.

“A lot of people who have
had prostate cancer have to
see a doctor on a regular
basis,” he said at the airport.

The president’s disclosure
comes as Haiti struggles
against gang violence and
kidnappings.

WBE RE

TUESDAY,
JANUARY 2

Community page 1540am
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
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10:00 Caribbean Newsline
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Dime cls) lualaal rear el Aes

































m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

LOCAL golfers are threat-
ening to stage another protest at
the Cable Beach Golf Course
if the owners continue to imple-
ment policies that exclude
Bahamians.

Last week, a group of
Bahamian golfers staged a
protest at the golf course claim-
ing that local golfers were being
excluded from using the facility.

At the demonstration, pro-
testers held up placards that
read “Cable Beach is Bahami-
an” and “Pindling would not
have done this to Bahamians.”

Yesterday, The Tribune
spoke with Mr Henry Bostwick,
the designated spokesperson of
the group, about their purpose
and aim.

According to Mr Bostwick, a
‘veteran politician and long-time
attorney, the struggle to allow
black Bahamian golfers an
oppurtunity to play on golf
courses was an integral part of
the country’s political progess,
because golf courses in the

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas were once racially
segregated.

However, Mr Bostwick
claimed those progressive
advances of the past are being
reversed today.

“Today, that segregation is
being resurrected again, and this
time by the sons of those who
desegregated it,” said Mr Bost-
wick.

“What they are attempting to
do is duplicate at Cable Beach
what has, in fact, happened at
Paradise Island.

“Post-1967 Paradise Island
used to be a place where any
one of us could go and enjoy a
game of golf, because there
were no barriers and no gates.

“Now, unless you have
wealthy friends who are resi-
dents on Paradise Island or
members of a club it’s difficult
to play, because the locals have
been priced out of Paradise
Island and that’s exactly what’s
happening to Cable Beach at
the moment,” claimed Mr Bost-
wick.

In a response to the group’s
protest last week, Mr Robert

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 5



Cable Beach course

i TWO of the protesters who took to the streets last week to

A

PEOPLE



protest against the policies at Cable Beach Golf Course

Sands, spokesman for the
Baha Mar group, said that
prices at the Cable Beach Golf
Course were dictated by mar-
ket forces.

And following the protest,
the government announced it
was considering whether to

FNM accuses the PLP of
betraying people’s trust

By MARK HUMES

DEBUNKING the PLP’s
2002 “So Said, So Done” slo-
gan, the FNM continued its cru-
sade against the scandal-
plagued administration and its
inability to deliver on campaign
promises, saying: “They have
betrayed the people’s trust.”

* In a statement released in
time for the new year, the FNM
said: “Though much was
expected of the progressives,
they have delivered very little.

“Many thought the prime
minister was on their side,” the
statement added, “But they
have quickly learned that they
had neither the power, nor the
courage, nor the vision to make
the PLP into a truly progressive
and liberal party.”

The commentary goes on to
point out that, whereas there
were many “things” the “new”
PLP said they wanted to do
when they took office in 2002,
little had actually been done,
and then it went on to list a
number of PLP initiatives that
were “so said, but never done.”

Taking aim at the recently
passed National Health Insur-
ance scheme, the FNM said:
“The PLP claimed during their
campaign that National Health
Insurance (NHI) was a priority.
After nearly five years of pro-
crastination, it conveniently got
around to passing legislation
just in time for the next general
election.”

Knowing “full well that it will
take-even more years to actual-
ly get such a programme up and
running,” the FNM said that if
the PLP were genuinely com-
mitted to a “progressive” pro-
gramme like NHI, they would
have planned the framework
for it prior to the election.

According to the party’s com-
mentary, if the present admin-
istration were genuine about
NHI, they would have dedicat-
ed “the first two years in office
to fleshing out the plan, explain-

oo Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

\

R99 ME TP RR RCT LR ME OT

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 % se

ing its detail to the people,”
enabling its implementation in
the third year. ~

Taking a swipe at those in the
PLP who, in the 2002 elections,
actively campaigned for, spoke
of, and wrote about “progres-
sive” and “liberal” ideas and
policies, the FNM said they had
stood idly by while their gov-
ernment adopted “shortsight-
ed” and “disastrous” economic
policies which “threaten to
make Bahamians second-class
citizens in their own land.”

“The same people who criti-
cised the FNM’s economic poli-
cies literally sat around the Cab-
inet table and gave away
unprecedented amounts of land
and lavish concessions in agree-
ments kept secret from the peo-
ple,” the FNM’s commentary
said.

Land

Pointing out that the PLP, in
its Our Plan, promised that it
would “establish a clear process
for granting of Crown Land,”
the FNM said that, once again,
contrary to its pledge, the gov-
erning party “has adopted a
murky, confused and often
secretive give-away programme
to foreign land speculators who
can use cheaply-acquired
Bahamian land to raise funds
in capital markets.”

Many of these “green-light-
ed projects,” said the opposi-
tion, “are harming our environ-
ment and will make the further
Bahamianisation of our econo-
my more difficult.”

The commentary criticised |

the “return” of ZNS “to the
days when it was micro-man-
aged by a cadre of ministers and
political hatchet men,” the PLP
Cabinet’s failure to push
through campaign finance leg-
islation, “substantive” freedom
of information legislation, and
the administration’s failure to
create newly-styled House of



Assembly committee that
would “hold public sessions
before major pieces of legisla-
tion receive final passage.”.

But of all of the governing
party’s “broken promises,” the
FNM said the tragedy of the
Sea Hauler was one of the most
disturbing examples of how a
government had abandoned
“vulnerable citizens.”

“The prime minister ‘res-
olutely’ assured victims and
their families at gravesides and
bedsides that his government
would respond expeditiously
and compassionately to this
national and personal tragedy,”
the FNM said.

But noting, once again, that
the Christie administration did
not live up to its “So Said, So
Done” promise, the FNM noted
that many of the victims’ fami-
lies are being forced to “resort
to dramatic actions just to get
their voices heard above the
noise of PLP scandals and
Junkanoo shuffles.”

“Some of those who talked
like progressives out of office
suddenly abandoned their pro-
gressive rhetoric and became
defenders of the PLP status
quo,” said the FNM. “They
have betrayed the people’s trust
and simply watched as their
PLP government pursued
regressive policies and ignored
opportunities for bold action
and compassion.”

tae
SS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
ai as 7a dey al LY

WorKs By
ANTONIOUS ROBERTS
Max “PAYtLar
Posr Housk Srupta &&
GALLERY
Sai plan ny
7562



Umbrellas
Loungers —
Drinks Trolleys





-offee Tables <.
d Tables

build a golf range for the local
golfers separate and apart from
the Cable Beach course.
However, Mr Bostwick said
local golfers do not want-to be
moved to another golf course























fe stee over tH Id owe,

ROCKY
LBO

or be prevented from using the
Cable Beach course.

Refusal

“The message is clear. They
want us to go back to where we
came from, but they don’t seem
to understand that we will not
be moved. We, the black
Bahamian golfer, and any other
kind of Bahamian golfer, will
not be moved back into the
ghetto:” said Mr Bostwick.

He said this recent conflict is
a prime example of how the
government had not safeguard-
ed the rights of Bahamians .
when signing heads of agree-
ments with foreign investors.

He also pledged that local
golfers would continue to agi-
tate about the issue until the gov-
ernment or owners of golf cours-
es listened to their concerns.

The Tribune attempted to
contact the owners of golf
courses, but they could not be
reached for comment.

PUI Sut Or antey

~The Maill:at-Marathon







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THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007

WN















SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee

motivation.
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007
Fime: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: To be announced
Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $160.00

Â¥
















WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy

working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web

pages. :
Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007
Time:. 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $550.00




"All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs

Sa yee

PXOIOle
re”
302-4300 ext. 5202



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007
; scl

or

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I ¥
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits); Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials..











Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas











MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.

Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas











GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: | Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm ,
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs

325 5aa
320-0093



328-1936
Blea aioe ext, 5202







THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 7



hief Justice of
Canada meets PM

THE Chief Justice of
Canada Beverley McLachlin,
left, and Frank McArdle
meet Prime Minister Perry
Christie at the New Year's
Junkanoo parade on Bay
Street on Monday, Jan. 1,
2007.

The Chief Justice is being
hosted by the Court of
Appeal on her week-long
visit to the Bahamas and
will make official courtesy
calls to the Attorney Gener-
al and the Governor Gener

seal.

Prime Retail Shop Space
Located on Our Lucaya Property
Freeport, Grand Bahama for qualified tenants

(No Food Service)

Please contact Jon Markoulis

for additional information
Tel: 242-373-4160:



(BIS Photo: Tim Aylei,







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Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448



THE TRIBUNE
















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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page eight

main floats entitled “Distin-
guished Nation Builders”
showed likenesses of Butch
Kerzner, Sir Milo Butler and
Sir Lynden Pindling.

Next on Rawson Square were
Conquerors For Christ, with a
theme of “Heaven or Hell in
Honour of Burgess Smith,” fol-
lowed by the Saxons with
“Pirates of the Caribbean”.

‘Saxons’ leader Vola Francis
told The Tribune that the theme

Now is the Sm

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 9





of pirates was important
because pirates were an inte-
gral part of the Bahamas, espe-
cially in the days of Woodes
Rogers, who expelled pirates
and restored commerce, chang-
ing the economics of the
Bahamas.

Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson was seen rush-
ing with the Sting Junkanoo
group, whose theme was “Tot-
ers”, taken from the popular
KB song which they played on a
sound system aboard their float.

,

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Many more floats than years
past donned strings of lights,
utilising generators to power
them and some powering sound
systems.

Judges, when questioned
about the use of lights and
music, seemed unable to say
whether it was an integral part
of the judging or even if it was a
part at all.

One judge said she wasn’t
sure when the use of lights came
about and that she had only
been judging for four years.

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_. TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 11

Toys are donated to

urban renewal centre

oo Sty

meee:
utlo

F524 6

ape. ond

PET Vee © oie Wr em. atin Be Pes Taek ray oy ee

z ae a I) i
bak att MIMISOHOrs

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@ THE Grand Bahama Port Authority has donated gifts to Pineridge Urban Renewal Centre from

its annual toy drive. Pictured back row, from left, Corporal Leslie Phillips, assistant co-ordinator of —
Pineridge Urban Renewal Center, Nathania Been, instructor Pineridge Urban Renewal Centre, : ‘ pi
Kimberley Miller, public relations officer of Grand Bahama Port Authority and Woman Sergeant Be Ten el th Ar ain a i
Chrystal Johnson, co-ordinator of Pineridge Urban Renewal Centre, with a few children.

Message attributed
to Castro says he
has not given up

@ HAVANA

el ah re Tost! Nap rane

a ee

fox‘iry
SF ,

Se ok

A STATEMENT attributed

to Fidel Castro on the eve of

the revolution’s 48th anniver-

sary assured Cubans Saturday

that the ailing leader could still

recover from his prolonged-il-~

ness, according to Associated

Press.
The message was read by a

newscaster on state television

and radio. Castro traditionally

sends a message to Cuban citi- caer

zens every New Year’sEveto § ee a

mark the anniversary of the a ?

January 1, 1959, revolution that sue = dé

brought him to power. @ TWO workers clean at a government store decorated with a
“Iam grateful to you for your “Happy New Year 2007” im Old tiav ana ox odudas

affection and support,” read the (AP Photo/ Javier Galeano)

message. “Regarding my recov-
ery, I have always warned that it
could be a prolonged process,
but it is far from being a lost
battle.

“J collaborate as a disciplined
patient, attended by the... team
of our doctors.”

Castro purportedly said he
was still “in the loop” when it
came to matters of state. “I
have had exchanges with our
closest comrades always when
cooperation has been necessary
on vitally important issues.”

Earlier on Saturday, Cuba’s
Communist Party daily reported
that Castro telephoned the Chi-
nese ambassador in Havana to
wish President Hu Jintao a hap-
py new year.

The government’s release of
the message and the news about
his call to the Chinese ambas-
sador seemed aimed _.at ensuring
the world that he is recovering,
five months after he underwent
emergency intestinal surgery.

Because Castro’s medical
condition is shrouded in secrecy,
it has been the subject of spec-
ulation and rumour.

Castro, 80, has not been seen
in public since shortly before
July 31 when he announced he
was temporarily stepping aside
while he recovered from his
operation.

He has provisionally ceded ~

power to his brother Raul, the
75-year-old defence minister.

Saturday’s story said Castro
called Chinese Ambassador
Zhao Rongxian on Thursday
evening and they discussed rela-
tions between their countries.
The ambassador also transmit-
ted his president’s wishes for
Castro’s speedy recovery.

The island’s official media has
not commented on a Spanish
surgeon’s declarations earlier

this week that Castro did not

have cancer and was slowly
recovering from a serious oper-
ation.

Jose Luis Garcia Sabrido,
chief surgeon at Madrid’s Gre-
gorio Maranon Hospital, said
he flew to Havana on Decem-
ber 21 to see Castro and consult
with the Cuban leader’s med-

|

ical team on how his treatment
was progressing.

Castro’s medical condition is
a state secret, but Cuban
authorities deny he suffers from
terminal cancer, as US intelli-
gence officials have claimed.
Cuban officials have nonethe-
less stopped insisting Castro will
return to power.

Garcia Sabrido said Castro
could resume the presidency if
his recovery is “absolute".

Some doctors believe Castro
may suffer from diverticular dis-
ease, which can cause bleeding
in the lower intestine, especial-
ly in people over 60. In severe
cases, emergency surgery may
be required.

ia ae oe Nat iat el KOO TOO aK th PN ad =e <0 ve

Or call Eileen Fielder at The Counsellors at 3221 000

er

Ci

lanva Wraht Rea Smith & Christopher Lowe

Veamice Walkine. |

RUM A A Sm LO ee Le S|

VARS AE

outs ele) gatas

baw.

FIRST CARIBBEAN

Pht Na

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATION AL

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THE TRIBUNE

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The Tribune

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

B BUSINE

Jain

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764



FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel:. (242) 351-3010

business@tribunemedia.net

cee ee eee ec hineee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





.. Financial work



permit policy to
~ benefit ‘all parts

of economy’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“ALL sectors of the economy”
will benefit if the Bahamas gets its
Immigration policy towards its
financial services industry correct,
the Financial Services Consultative
Forum’s chairman said, describing
the ‘framework agreement’ on the

’ issue as “a significant development

which will be widely applauded
across the sector”.

Brian Moree, senior partner with
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
said the Bahamas’ problem with
Immigration as it related to the
financial services industry had been
one of perception, rather than real-
ity.
He added that the Immigration

_Department’s commitment to a six-

week turnaround time for properly
completed financial services work
permit applications, and publicly
articulated policies and description
of the factors it would take into
account when assessing applica-
tions, would help to address this.

Acknowledging that Immigra-
tion was “an issue that affects our
future potential for growth and
expansion”, Mr Moree said: “I
think it is true to say that when you
look at the empirical evidence, with
specific reference to the financial
services industry, Immigration has
been fairly responsive and there
have been very few incidences
where work permit applications in
the industry have been turned down
or declined.

“What we have been suffering
from is a perception problem, which
is actually not supported, in my
view, by the facts. Nevertheless, it is
a major problem, because one’s
perception is one’s reality.”

The Bahamas had been per-
ceived as having a much more
restrictive, inflexible and rigid immi-
gration policy than rival interna-
tional financial services centres such
as the Cayman Islands and Bermu-
da, and this had hampered the
development plans of existing finan-
cial services providers.

In addition, institutions had sent
business to other jurisdictions rather

@ BRIAN MOREE

than the Bahamas because they did
not have the required expertise
here, and did not want to be sub-
jected to “delays and inefficiencies”
in processing work permit applica-
tions at the Department of Immi-
gration.

“The perception is that the
Bahamas has a very strict Immi-
gration policy that does not wel-
come and encourage the develop-
ment of business on the back of
expatriates working in the sector,”
Mr Moree’said.

“The adoption and publication
of this policy is going to be extreme-
ly helpful in addressing that per-
ception, and is going to significant-
ly assist us in dispelling these mis-
conceptions — that it is difficult to
get work permits for expatriates in
the financial services sector. It has
caused us various problems.”

Mr Moree added that he thought
it was possible to simultaneously
achieve greater training and
advancement for Bahamians in the
financial services industry, “while
at the same time sending the right
message to the international com-
munity, that the Immigration

_ SEE page 5B

Coalition ‘concerns’
~ over NHI report

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform said it was
“concerned” about several findings
in the International Labour Organ-
isation’s (ILO) report on the
National Health Insurance (NHI)
plan, especially the projection that
contribution rates would have to
become “significantly higher” than
the initial 5.3 per cent.

Winston Rolle, a former
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
president and consultant to the
Coalition, said the organization and
its members had.a number of con-

‘ cerns with the ILO report, not least

the fact that it did not give the NHI
scheme the ‘thumbs up’ that the.
Government had claimed.

“I think it’s safe to say we were
concerned it did not give the Gov-
ernment the ‘thumbs up’,” Mr Rolle
said. “We’ll be meeting in short
order to determine the next steps.”

When contacted by The Tribune
before the New Year’s weekend,
Mr Rolle said the Coalition had yet
to receive any of the promised stud-
ies and documents from govern-
ment that would enable it to
analyse the NHI scheme.

The Coalition has been waiting
for weeks to receive actuarial
reports, economic impact assess-

. ments and other documents from

the Government. Despite repeat-
ed assurances they would receive
the information, it has not been
forthcoming.

“The concern here is not having
access to a lot of the information
being put forward,” Mr Rolle said.
“We’re not sure what real base
they’re using to come up with the
conclusions they are arriving at.”

He added that as a result, this
was causing concerns about
whether the Government and its
NHI team were using the wrong
data, or if they were ignoring data
that did not support their initial
conclusions.

\

}

Mr Rolle said that among the
chief concerns with the ILO report
was the projection that the contri-
bution rate would have to increase
significantly to maintain NHI’s
future financial sustainability, and
that the $5,000 insurable wage ceil-
ing could be adjusted every year in
proportion to earnings.

“Jt [the ILO report] talks of how
the role of private insurance will
change quite sharply, so what is
being done to prepare the private
insurers for a major change and loss
of jobs? All that is very concern-
ing,” Mr Rolle added.

“The scope of the work they
engaged the ILO to conduct was
very limited, and the ILO was prob-
ably willing and wanted to put more
input into the process.”

Mr Rolle said the ILO report
also showed the critical role doc-
tors and other medical professionals
would play in executing NHI, yet “it
seems doctors have been alienated
from the process”.

Mr Rolle pointed out that while
doctors were currently focused sole-
ly on their patients’ needs, under
NHI “that responsibility is going to
change to focus both on the needs
of their patients and the members
of NHI, and the consequences of
treatment for patients”.

The Bill to create the NHI
scheme has now been passed by
Parliament, and just awaits assent
by the Governor-General before it
becomes statute law. The Govern-
ment has promised that it will
undertake more consultation with
affected parties in drawing up the
NHI regulations, which will be crit-
ical in detailing how the plan will
work in practice.

The ILO report warned that the
5.3 per cent contribution rate NHI
plan will in future have to “signifi-
cantly” increase to cope with the
extra medical demands of an ageing
population, and raised concerns

SEE page 5B



Attorney questions

Port asset transfers

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian attorney

has questioned

whether Grand

Bahama Port

Authority (GBPA)
can fulfil its obligations under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement as a
result of its productive assets being
transferred to another ehtity, and
whether this effectively breaches
the agreement.

Maurice Glinton, of Maurice
Glinton and Co, said a letter written
to then Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham in 1992 by Freeport
Licencees Association, expressing
concerns over the GBPA’s decision
to sell a substantial stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company to the
former Southern Electric, showed
the issues surrounding the GBPA,
Freeport and the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement today were nothing
new.

The GBPA and its principal
shareholders, Sir Jack Hayward and
the late Edward St George, over
time transferred ownership of its
productive entities to an affiliate
company they wholly-owned, called

1992 letter to PM shows concerns over whether GBPA
can meet Hawksbill obligations are nothing new:

Port Group Ltd. Then, the pair sold
off stakes in these entities to pri-
vate sector partners.

Hutchison Whampoa is Port
Group Ltd’s 50 per cent partner in
the Freeport Harbour Company
and Grand Bahama Development
Company (Devco); Mirant (for-
merly Southern Electric) is 55 per
cent owner of Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company, although it is selling
this stake; and Onyx is the partner
in Sanitation Services. :

Mr Glinton told The Tribune
that the transfer of these entities

from the GBPA to Port Group Ltd, ©
and the subsequent disposal of.

strategic stakes to private sector
partners, effectively amounted to
“stripping the assets of the GBPA,
and redeploying them in the control
of another entity”.

While the government and
GBPA licensees had been aware
of the Southern Electric transac-
tion, Mr Glinton said they did not

‘know about the creation of Port

Group Ltd, its role and transfer of
the other assets.

This had only come to light as a
result of the dispute between Sir
Jack.and the St George estate over
the former’s 75 per cent ownership
claim on the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, and the various docu-
ments filed in the Supreme Court
by both parties. =)

“What you have now is really
an unsupervised liquidation of the
Port Authority,” Mr Glinton said.
“Tt only exists in name, and has no
productive assets with which to car-
ry. out its obligations under the

-Hawksbill Creek Agreement.” —

The 1992 letter to Mr Ingraham
shows how the current issues sur-
rounding the GBPA - its conflicting
roles as a quasi-governmental
authority and private, for-profit
company, its obligations for the

development and governance of ~

Freeport, and relationship with its

licencees — have frequently reared
their heads over time, as they are
doing today.

The Freeport Licencees Asso-
ciation wrote that GBPA licensees
had “become alarmed at the indif-
ference with which the Port
Authority have approached their
obligations and covenants under

the Hawksbill Creek Agreement’

and their relations with licensees”.

The letter said licensees were
concerned about the “systematic
liquidation of the Port Authority
and the shedding of their public
and contractual obligations under
the Agreement”, and said the pro-
posed sale of the GBPA’s shares
to Southern Electric was causing
“anxiety”.

In relation to that deal, the asso-
ciation told Mr Ingraham: “Plainly
and simply, this has to be appreci-

SEE page 5B

Bahamas Supermarkets’ net income flat

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Supermarkets, operator of the 12
City Markets stores, saw its net income remain
flat for the fiscal year to June 30, 2006, standing
at $8.052 million compared to the previous year’s
$8.06 million as a 6.8 per cent sales rise was can-
celled out by increasing costs.

That year was the last one under Winn-Dixie,
which completed the sale of its majority 78 per
cent stake to BSL Holdings on August 9 for $54
million, meaning the current fiscal year is the
first one in which Bahamas Supermarkets will be
operating as a standalone company.

The firm had previously relied heavily on
Winn-Dixie to provide purchasing expertise,
supply chain and inventory management, Winn-

Dixie own-brand products, computer systems

and other forms of support, with policy decided
at the US retailer’s Jacksonville headquarters,
rather than in the Bahamas.

Bahamas Supermarkets had also been some-
thing of a ‘cash cow’ for Winn-Dixie, the US
parent frequently drawing on large dividend

payments, plus $1.397 million for office service
charges and other fees in fiscal 2006. The
Bahamian operation assumed particular impor-
tance after Winn-Dixie went into Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection in the US.

Bahamas Supermarkets indicated in its 2006
annual report that the current fiscal year will be
a transition one for it, as it takes its first steps as
an independent operator, and enlists the ser-
vices of new management/operating partner,
Barbados Shipping & Trading.

The company said: “Transition is never easy,
and there will be hurdles to overcome as long-
used systems and ways of doing things change. In
addition, there-will be unrelated increases in
costs from time to time, and with all effective

leveraging in place, they will be countered when- .
My

ever possible.......

During fiscal 2006, while net sales rose by $9
million to $141.1 million, compared to $132.1
million the year before, Bahamas Supermarkets
said sales at both its Cable Beach and Indepen-
dence Shopping Centre'were negatively impact-
ed. In the former’s case, it was a reduction in cus-
tomer parking space .as a result of construction on

the new $13 million Cable Beach store, which is :

expected to be completed early this year.
The Independence Shopping Centre City Mar-

kets store was hit by the Blue Hill Road works —

project, and the company said it expected the
negative sales impact to continue until works
were completed.

Bahamas Supermarkets said sales rose in 2005
as a result of/increased buying by consumers
during the 2005 hurricane season, a good Christ-
mas season, reduced prices and less competition
on Grand Bahama.

However, gross margins during the year to
June 28, 2006, fell by 0.3 per cent, while the price
reductions on some food lines to boost compet-
itiveness saw gross profits as a percentage of
sales drop from 27.1 per cent the previous year to

26.8 per cent. A reduction in inventory shrinkage _ : ren

also helped the company’s results.
However, Bahamas Su;
rose by 7.26 per cent to $103.285 million, while

rmarkets’cost of sales a

operating and administrative expenses rose by 7.5 —.-

SEE page 5B

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2UU/, rFAUc op

[Reve Major NP

raked ane

r

esorts report

ws 100 per cent occupancy

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



. Tew Providence’s major

Nese have reported

full houses and 100 per

cent occupancy rates for the New
Year’s holiday weekend.

Ed Fields, vice-president of
public affairs at Kerzner Inter-
national’s Atlantis resort, said:
“We were full going into the New
Year's Holiday.”

A reservations officer at San-
dals said the resort was at 100
per cent for the entire first week
of the year.

Robert Sands, executive vice-
president of administration and
public affairs for Baha Mar,
which owns the Nassau Beach
Hotel, Wyndham Nassau Resort
and the Radisson, said the prop-
erties were operating at 100 per
cent occupancy through to Janu-
ary 2.

He said the three resorts
expected this strong trend to con-
tinue into the rest of January,
adding that bookings were ahead
of last year.

Mr Sands anticipated that
there was likely to be some fall
out when the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative (WHTT),
current business licensing which requires US residents to
regime. aye passports ee ey into

: their country, took effect from

The defendants of this | 5. cuary 23, 2007, but felt it would
not be of a material level.

“The hotels have done a good
job of advising their customers

by John Issa

WE are living in the
twenty-first century, the
century which most believe
is the one in which free
markets rule.

World prosperity is to
come from free trade and
free markets.

Very few statements are

‘. |. absolutely true and neither
are the aforementioned
popularly accepted
“truths”,

It is, however, generally
true that competition and
open markets lead to a bet-
ter quality of life. Entre-
preneurs are constantly try-
ing to “build the better
mousetrap”. This being true
should we not be trying to
nurture this spirit and thus
encourage the energy,
growth and prosperity that
would surely follow? This
‘leads me once again to the
subject of the effect of the

regime, which we must all

remember was once used

to keep the majority of our

people out of business, say

it keeps the economy order-

ly and prevents excesses,
risk and losses.

This columnist believes

_ | that it is deterring a new

~./ generation of young, bright

and energetic Bahamians

from joining the class of

SEE page 4B

Earlier this month, Alex
Dawyes, director of operations
- at the British Colonial Hilton,



\/

proved to be very strong.



OPERATIONS ONTO THE CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF
“|THE FOLLOWING......

> SHIFT MANAGERS |
» COOKS |
» KITCHEN PREP

» PIZZA MAKERS

* CASHIERS

» FOOD SERVERS

» UTILITY WORKERS

PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA SITE (JUST OF
TUCKER ROAD) ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DAYS AND
TIME FOR AN INTERVIEW. | |

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 3RD 2007 10 A.M.-3 P.M.
THURSDAY JANUARY 4TH 2007 10 A.M.-3 P.M.
FRIDAY — JANUARY 5TH 2007 10 A.M.-3 P.M.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS

HRY ARE PROD SSAA ROE BTA RED EY BATAVIA UE A ASD OE A IRE ME TMI STL RRO EY OR LP A HMO SEIT NET AL RE



and travel partners [of the initia- @ ROBERT SANDS, Baha Mar’s executive vice-
~ tive],” Mr Sands said. president of administration and public affairs

told The Tribune that bookings for the New Year weekend were “looking fantastic”.

He said the hotel was predicting a stronger performance this year compared to last, and added
that the WHTI initiative would not negatively impact the hotel because most of its clients were busi-
ness persons who travelled frequently for work, and would have passports already.

The strong performances cap off a Christmas Holiday period which Bahamian hotels said





aT.
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS LID.
DEUS NONekeare sunny

CMA Is a progressive, successful and reputable
property & liability insurance brokerage. We need
an ambitious, energetic and enthusiastic person to
join our small, dedicated and professional team.
This will be an office-based position with scope for
real advancement. Insurance experience though
desirable is not essential. Full training will be provided.

















We are looking for: -




¢ A well-groomed person, professional in
appearance.

¢ Excellent written and oral communication skills.

¢ Competence in Microsoft applications such as
Word, Excel & Outlook.

¢ A self-starter, with initiative and a willing team








layer
¢ Commitment to study for insurance exams.



We are offering:




A competitive salary and benefits package
commensurate with experience. Our office is
located on East Bay Street near Fort Montagu, with
free staff parking.






Applicants should submit a full resume and a
covering letter in a sealed envelope marked “Private
and Confidential”. This should be posted or delivered
by hand to: -







The General Manager
CMA Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd
P.O. Box SS-19067
Bahamas Realty Building
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas








(FILE photo)




Postal applications should be post-marked no later
than January 5th, 2007. The deadline for receipt of
all (posted or delivered) applications will be
Wednesday, January 10,:2007.






We respect fully the confidentiality of all applications.
All applications will be acknowledged.









Crystal Palace Casino

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex
represents the single largest resort investment in the history
of The Bahamas. Baha Mar owns and operates the Wyndham
Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino, the Radisson Cable &
Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a
professional individual for the following position:

ASIAN SOUS CHEF

The Sous Chef - Asian Restaurant must have a flair for creativity and

- the ability to motivate, develop and train a great culinary team.

The successful candidate must have a minimum of 4 years
experience as a managing or lead Chef in a first class Asian
concept restaurant. This will be a highly visible position and
requires a candidate with exceptional culinary, communication and
public relations skills.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive
compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants should
forward a copy of their resume to the attention of Director of Human

Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or fax to (242) 327-5897

Serra rrereNensD











TRIBUNE SPORTS



AMAA

B TENNIS
DOHA, Qatar
Associated Press

THIRD-SEEDED
Marcos Baghdatis
reached the second
round of the Qatar Open
with a hard-fought 6-4,
7-5 win over Philipp
Kohischreiber on Mon-
day.

Baghdatis had to con-
tend with tough condi-
tions on center court at
the Khalifa Tennis stadi-
um on the opening day
of the tournament.

“Tt was very cold and
windy out there,” Bagh-
datis said. “I have not
played for two to three
months, so I found it dif-
ficult to find my
rhythm.”

Kohlschreiber, of Ger-
many, threatened to
break Baghdatis early in
the match and the Cypri-
ot saved six break
points.

Fourth-seeded Andy
Murray of Britain beat
Italy’s Filippo Volandri
4-6, 6-2, 6-4, while fifth-
seeded Mikhail Youzhny
and sixth-seeded Robin
Soderling also won their
first-round matches.

Soderling beat Kristof
Vilgen 6-3, 6-3, while
Youzhny defeated
Daniele Bracciali 7-5, 6-
3.

Christophe Rochus and
Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo
also won.



@ MARCOS BAGH-
DATIS from Cyprus
returns the ball to Ger-
many's Philipp
Kohlschreiber during the
first day of Qatar Open
tennis tournament in
Doha, Qatar, Monday
Jan. 1, 2007.

(AP Photo/

Kamran Jebreili)

)

RS

.. SPORTS

@ MANCHESTER
UNITED'S Cristiano
Ronaldo, left, tussles with
Newcastle's captain Scott
Parker, right, during their
English Premier League
soccer match at St James'
Park, Newcastle, England
Monday Jan. 1, 2607. The
match finished 2-2.

(AP Photo/
Scott Heppell)

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 7B




@ READING'S Brynjar Gun-
narsson celebrates scoring the
opening goal against West Ham
during the English Premiership
soccer match at the Madejski Sta-
dium, Reading, England Monday.,
Jan. 1, 2007. Reading won 6-0.
(AP Photo/
PA, Rebecca Naden)











~ money in the hands of



TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

BEATLES

eae —

presented
to the BAAA

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports

Reporter .

MORE than a year after
the Bahamas hosted a suc-
cessful Senior Central
American and Caribbean
Championships in July,
2005, the event’s organis-
ing committee made a pre-
sentation tothe Bahamas’:
Association of Athletic ;
Associations from the pro- }
ceeds.

Committee chairman
Dr. Bernard Nottage pre-
sented BAAA's president
Mike Sands with a cheque
for $220,000 during the
BAAA's gala awards pre-
sentation on Saturday
night at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel.

It was the largest dona-
tion ever made to the
BAAA, but Nottage, a
former BAAA president,
said it was the goal of his
committee, comprising of
some of the veteranmem- }
bers of the association, to.
host the biggest champi-
onships ever and they did
so to the tune of $1 mil-
lion.

"We did it," he pro-
claimed.

Nottage said an idea by
committee member and
former BAAA's executive
Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson
to offer prize money was
the key to their success
and they entrusted the

Montgomery Brathwaite,
who was then a partner at
Deliotte & Touche.

Brathwaite is now the
chief executive officer of
ColinaImperial Insurance
Company, the major spon-
sor for the championships.

In accepting the cheque,
Sands thanked Nottage
and his team for their
efforts and assured all pre-
sent that the monies will
go towards defraying the |
huge expenses that they
would have encountered.

Nottage, however,
stressed: "I want you to
remember that the
Olympics is in 2008, so
don't worry about me giv-
ing him all this money.

They will need a whole lot

more money. So sponsors
out there, please don't rest
on your laurels.”

Softball veteran
Linda Ford
named in

‘New Year
Honours list

VETERAN pitcher Lin-
da Ford made history
when she became the first
Bahamian softball player
to be honoured in the
Queen’s New Year Hon-
ours list.

Ford has played an
active role in the sport for
the past 35 years, both
locally and internationally
as a player and now as a
coach in the twilight of her
career. ,

She received the Most

Excellent Order ofthe

British Empire (Civil Divi-
sion) Member.

For the full story see
Wednesday’s Tribune





ge



p< 7

@ MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Housing
Neville Wisdom presents
Celavie Henry, the
mother of Christine
Amertil-Ling, with one
of the two awards her
daughter received on
Saturday night at the
~BAAA’s gala awards
banquet at Sandals Roy-
al Bahamian Hotel. iM
- .(Phote: Tim Clarke)

@ By BRENTSTUBBS .
Senior Sports Reporter



AUBURN University bound sprinter Sheni-
qua Ferguson was more than elated to be named
the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associa-
tions' Junior Female Athlete of the Year on Sat-
urday night at Sandals Royal Bahamian Hotel.

"I feel like I had a prosperous season and I
thank God for it," said the Jordan Prince William
High graduating student. "I just want him to help
me as I prepare for 2007."

Ferguson, 17, was awarded the award based
on her stellar performance as the Carifta Games

200 metre champion, Central American and
Caribbean Junior Championships' 100 silver

medalist and IAAF World Junior Championships'
200 eighth place finisher.

_ She ended the year as the IAAF World Junior
15th ranked 200 metre runner and was seventh on

: the IAAF World Youth list.

’ In the process, Ferguson beat out Tracy Mor-
rison, the Carifta javelin champion, NJCAA
champion, national jr record holder and CAC jr
silver medalist; Bianca Stuart, CAC Jr. long jump

‘finalist and IAAF World Jr 28th ranked long
; | jumper and Nivea Smith, the under-17 girls 200
i | champion and 100 bronze medalist.

"It was a very tough decision. Me, Nivea, Bian-
ca and Tracy all went to the same meets and so it
was really tough. I'm just glad that I won," she
said.

Ferguson said her goal this year is to run 11.2
and 22.06 or better in the 100 and 200 as she goes
after a spot on the teams going to the Carifta
Games in the Turks & Caicos Islands in April, but
more importantly to the Pan American Junior
Championships in Fortaleza, Brazil in July before
she heads off to Auburn University in August.

For Rudon Bastian, who won the Junior Male
Athlete of the Year, it was the most important
award he ever collected and he noted that he
will certainly cherish it for a long time.

"T'd like to thank my coach Peter Pratt because
without him, I couldn't have done this," said Bas-
tian, of Pratt, who was named the Coach of the
Year.

"My family and friends encouraged me to keep
on striving for my goals and the Lord has really
blessed me."

As the NAIA long jump bronze medalist, Jr
CAC silver medalist and IAAF World Jr. long
jump finalist, Bastian won the award over Jamal

i Wilson, a Carifta high jump champion and Jr
Sports. i

CAC silver medalist; Dwayne Ferguson, a Carif-

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



delighted
with BAAA awards




@ FORMER quarter-miler turned coach Pauline
Davis-Thompson presents Sheniqua Ferguson
with the BAAA/’s award as the Junior Female
Athlete of the Year

(Photo: Tim Clarke)



@ SPORTS Ambassador Tommy Robinson pre-
sents Rudon Bastian with the BAAA’s Junior
Male Athlete of the Year award

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

ta and Jr CAC 800 finalist and Ramon Miller, a
NAIA 400 finalist and Jr CAC fourth place fin-
isher who was ranked at No.19 on the IAAF
World Jr list.

Bastian, 19, will be transferring to the Univer-
sity of Louisville this month and based on what he
achieved last year, he's confident that he will
have another great year as he uses it as a spring-
board for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing,
China.

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BY VIRTUE of winning a

bronze medal and setting a
NACAC and national record in
the 400 metres at the IAAF
World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia, Christine Amer-
til-Ling was awarded the Charlie

Major Sr. Athlete of the Year.

award.

Her mother, Celavie Henry,
accepted the beautiful crystal
award along with the Female
Athlete of the Year award on Sat-
urday night at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel as she joined
Christopher 'Bay' Brown, who
was named the Male Athlete of
the Year.

The Junior Female Athlete of
the Year award went to high
school sensation Sheniqua Fer-
guson, while collegian Rudon

Bastian carted off the Junior Male:

honour. :

The awards were presented to
the athletes during the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tions' gala awards presentation
that was held under the theme
“Rising Stars - Follow Your
Dreams."

American 2005 IAAF World
Outdoor Championships’ 100
champion Lauryn Williams was
the patron of the event. She is the
training partner of sprinter Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie at the
University of Miami.

Mrs Henry, Amertil-Ling's

mother, was almost lost for words -

when asked to how she felt about
her daughter's achievement.

"I am very happy," she
summed up.

She credited Pauline Davis-
Thompson, her coach, for a lot
of her success.

Married

Davis-Thompson said Amer-
til-Ling, who was married earlier
in the month and is currently in
Indonesia on her honeymoon,
deserved the awards, especially
considering the fact that she cap-
tured an international medal, set
a national record and earned an
IAAF world raking of number
five.

"I believe she's the true win-
ner of this award, which is based
on merits and accomplishments,"
said Davis-Thompson, a former
award winner herself. "She also

’ broke the NACAC record, run-

ning faster than any other athlete
in this area and she won a bronze
medal.

"I believe that the BAAA
operates on a fair system of mer-
it, based on the athlete's perfor-
mance and based on that, I
believe that Christine is the legit-
imate Female Athlete of the
Year."

She won the Female Athlete
of the Year award over sprinter
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, who
made a fantastic comeback after
two surgeries in the previous year;
national shot put and hammer
record breaker Aymara Albury;
Commonwealth Games silver 400
medalist Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling and Commonwealth Games
silver javelin medalist Lavern
Eve.

The Charlie Major award came
over Ferguson-McKenzie; nation-
al 100 record breaker and CAC
silver 100 medalist Derrick Atkins
and Brown, the [AAF World

oR











@ CHRISTINE
AMERTIL-LING

Indoor 400 bronze medalist. ;
Brown won the Male Athlete
of the Year award by beating out |

Atkins; Donald Thomas, the sur- . °. -
prise at the Commonwealth*.

Games with a fourth place finish *
in the high jump and a silver.
medal winner at the NACAC;-
and Trevor Barry, a CAC Games*
high jump silver medalist and long -

jump finalist as well as NAIA.

high jump silver medalist.
Davis-Thompson said Amer-’

til-Ling's performance was just ~ .

the tip of the iceberg for her pro- _
tégé.
"This was a year where you

had the Commonwealth Games - |

|

awards



smacked right after the World’. --*--

Indoor Championships. Christine! > 2~*-‘
was prepared to run in either of

the events. She had a choice’. *
because I told her she won't be - ’

able to do both," she reflected.
"She looked at me like I was

crazy because she wanted to do ~
them both. She said she couldn't: --

imagine as a Bahamian only
being limited to one. But I told
her that because of the closeness
of the event, she can only do one.
She defied my orders and did
both."

Amertil-Ling would only set-

tle for a medal at the World --:.
Indoors. She realised that the .*.*.

fatigue took its toll by the time
she got to Commonwealth and

she didn't perform as well as she. _-,

had anticipated.

However, she would go on to’. °
compete in Europe and ended up. -. -

running the third leg on the
Americas' victorious team at the
World Cup. She was awarded a
fifth place in the IAAF world
ranking that came out the end of
the season.

Now Davis-Thompson said
they are hoping to surpass her
achievements last year as they
prepare for the long haul for 2007
that includes the Sr. CAC Cham-
pionships and Pan Am Games,
both in July and the LAAF World
Outdoor Championships in Osa-
ka, Japan in August.

"She's one of the hardest work-
ing athletes that I know and the
goal is to get Christine on the
podium," Davis-Thompson
stressed. "She's been a brides-
maid for too long and when I say
too long, I mean she's been per-
forming consistently over the
years and she's worked very hard.

"I now believe that the time
has come for Christine to go all
the way. Her body has began to
evolve where she's looking like
a true athlete and I think her
body is beginning to catch up
now. She's physically a lot
stronger in training and in the
weight-room and I can see vast
improvement in her strength."

et |

GUINNESS

OR CALL TOLL FREE IN NASSAU
VST 380-8015. te

TAS MUO SLO La SLO
THE LEGAL DRINKING AGE.
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SUN WITH
SHOWER



Volume: 103 No.34



Financial work perinit
TUT UMUC Lame
naris of economy’





ISEE FRONT PARE OF BUSINESS SECTION

prests row ‘could topple PLP

Workers Party leader
accuses government of
‘complicity and
conspiracy’ in holding
of five baggage handlers

@ By TRIBUNE STAFF

THE growing row over the
arrest of five Bahamian bag-
gage handlers in the United
‘States-could-bring-down the
PLP government, it was claimed
yesterday.

The government was accused
- of “complicity and conspiracy”
in the holding of the five men,
and warned that the Bahamian
people would not take their loss
of sovereignty lying down.

The government was accused
by the Workers Party of con-
spiring with the US government
“because so many of its own
members are compromised
morally, spiritually and politi-
cally.”

Leader Rodney Moncur said
the arrests of the five men
amounted to entrapment and
were in clear breach of extra-
dition arrangements between
the Bahamas and the US.

“It is scandalous and could
bring the PLP down,” he said,
“The government has compro-
mised the sovereignty of the
Bahamas.”

The storm erupted last week
after five baggage handlers
employed by Nassau Flight Ser-
vices were arrested in the US
afteg#Being selected to attend
spectak training there.

Théy now face drug traffick-
ing charges and possible jail

terms of 10 to 15 years after
what their families are describ-
ing as a virtual kidnapping.

Last week, US ambassador
John Rood expressed surprise
that more was not. being made
of the men’s alleged status as
drug traffickers.

But Mr Moncur told The Tri-
bune: “This all goes to show
that the ambassador was not
exposed to a British education
and does not know that people
are presumed innocent until
proven guilty.”

He said the “conspiracy” had
broken extradition agreements
between the two countries and
was clearly a set-up in which
the government was implicat-
ed.

He accused Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell of
“dropping the ball yet again”
in a matter of major importance
“as he did in the case of Ninety
Knowles.”

Mr Moncur backed up his
“conspiracy” claims by alleging
that a PLP general employed
by Nassau Flight Services was
forewarned of the sting opera-
tion and backed out of the train-

ing offer. Subsequently, he

alleged, this man resigned from
the company.

The Workers Party’s outburst
follows fierce denunciation of.

SEE page 10



[= ox






Cay yesterday attended by



She Miami Herald

——————$ $$

BAHAMAS EDITION

Rc EL

=<

| & SAXONS rush their
way to winning the New

Year’s Day Parade.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

THE Shell Saxon Super-

©| stars were named winners
| of the 2007 New Year’s

Day Parade.
At a meeting at Arawak

hundreds of stakeholders,
it was announced that the
group won Group A witha
total of 2,996 points.

Second place went to
One Family, with 2,897
points. The Valley Boys
came in third with 2,886
points.

Roots took fourth place
with 2,789 points, followed
by the Music Makers with
2,536 points.

Rounding out A Group
were the Prodigal Sons, in
sixth place With 2,064
points.

Best Music went to the
Valley Boys, followed by
the Saxons and One Fam-
ily in second and third
place respectively.

In Group B, first place
went to One Love Soldiers
with 2,950 points. In sec-
ond place was Conquerors
for Christ at 2,822, with
Colours Entertainment in
third with 2,799. Fourth
was Colours Junkanoo
Group with 2,424. Fancy
Dancers were fifth with
2,395 and Body of Christ
sixth with 2,313. In seventh
place were Z-Bandits with
1,430. Foundation was a
no-show.

The Junkanoo Corpora-
tion of New Providence
said it will release full
parade results over the
coming week.
¢ SEE PAGES 8 & 9

UESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007



Saxons sail to New Yeat’s Day Parade ara a







PRICE — 75¢

See Unaco.|





l§ By MARK HUMES

LADY PINDLING, widow
of the man dubbed ‘Father of
the Nation’, has been made a
Dame in the New Year’s Hon-
ours.

Knighthoods went. to

’ tourism executive Baltron

Bethel and prominent busi-
nessman Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson, who were both
honoured for “exemplary ser-
vice” to the nation in the

Lady Pindling heads New Year’s Honours

Queen’s 2007 list.

Lady Marguerite Pindling,
widow of late Prime Minister
Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling,
heads the latest honours.

She is named: Dame Com-
mander of The Most Distin-
quished Order of St Michael
and St George for her service
to ‘politics, community devel-
opment, and charities. Lady
Pindling will now be referred
to as Dame Marguerite Pin-
dling.

In addition to her public
profile as the wife of the coun-
try’s first prime minister, Lady
Pindling spent 16 years as
chairperson of the fund-rais-
ing committee of The Bahamas
Red Cross.

She also assisted: with fund-
raising with BASRA, Hope .
Dale School, and the Chil-
dren’s Emergency Hospital.

Presently, Dame Marguerite

SEE page three

Man shot dead in first homicide of 2007

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the 2006 murder tally climbing danger-
ously closer towards the all-time record, the New
Year dawned with yet anothing killing, suggesting
2007 will bring more of the same.

The latest homicide took place on Comfort
Street, between East Street and Market Street,
after a verbal exchange between a group of men
on a basketball court and another group walking
past.
Police said the males on the basketball court
produced handguns and shots were fired, result-
ing in two of the passers-by being shot.

One victim was struck in the hand and taken to
hospital where his condition was classified as not
life-threatening.



The other, aged 21, was hit in the head and
died at the scene.

Police said they had launched an investiga-
tion into the incident, ‘and are asking the public to
assist them with any information that could solve
the case.

The murder count ended at 60 for 2006, seven
more than 2005, but ten short of the record 2000
total. The latest homicide got 2007 off to a brisk
start, but police hope it does not signal another

‘bad year for murders.

This latest homicide also comes on the heels of
the death of 22-year-old Jay Damianos, son of
George Damianos, who heads Damianos Real
Estate.

Mr Damianos’s death was first reported as an

SEE page 10

t resolution for the New Year?”

Call today!



Vee

= ) FIDELITY.



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2006 : THE TRIBUNE

"HIE COLLECE OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs












THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

PERSO! VAL DE \ EL OPMEI \ T | CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
| Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

The following Personal Development courses have been approved
by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.



ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 — Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901— Human Resource Management II

. os . COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBOOKS
Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional This course is for the beginner who knows PRESENTATIONS This course trains new and existing small
very little about computers and does not This workshop is designed to provide business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the employees) in organizing and managing their

development in both private and public sectors with the added
recognition that these courses have been equated to courses taken

covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It accounting using QuickBooks Pro software.
extensive hands-on practice using various focuses on developing effective and dynamic — Students will learn how to set up their
software, Including: PowerPoint presentations. company files, chart of accounts, budget and
























(I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing customer, vendor and employee files,
toward a de gree pro gral nme. (li) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite: None
(ill) Microsoft Access ~ Database Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007 Pre-requisite: None
‘ Management. Time: _ 9:30am - 4:30pm Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Duration: 1 day Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: 6 weeks
Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007’ Fees: $160.00 Venue: CEES Computer Lab
6:00pm - 9:00pm ‘ Fees: $330.00
Section 01 (CEES) _ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
This course covers basic concepts of WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Saturday, 3rd February, 2007 — Information Technology. The course provides Targeting persons who would like to create
? 10:00am - 1:00pm training in these areas: Basic Hardware their personal web pages, this course
i Section 02 (CEES) Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, will cover Web page creation, Web site
i : Duration: © 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML. Specific topics will
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. } include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Tuition: $450.00 . Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: None ©
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Begins: Wednesday, 7th February Pre-requisite: Participants must be
yA (1 December 2006 C ond aa 2007 This course covers the advanced concepts 2007 computer literate and have
| with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm a basic knowledge of
C | | , | | : I] various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word processing
0 ege C ose rom rT AL (I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dates: ist & 2nd March, 2007
5 (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00
(iii) Microsoft Access - Database Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Management. PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration: 2days _
: s "This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Computer Lab
BAS tS start ba UT BE 2007 Pre-requisite: Computer Applications | technology systems for use in information Fees: $550.00
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007 — environments. The course will cover the
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Duration: 12 weeks Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.

* Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00 Pre-requisite: None ;
Begins: Monday 12th February 2007

Advisement & registration for new students



3rd January, 2007 at 8:00 a.m. at COB Bandshell nt es
: . Venue: BHTC Computer Lab eS -
: Fees: $500.00 < a.
POM AL Meee mr UAE RTC Rte CUT: Lees are includes wih he erention of he apnea a esores ihe righ fo change Tato, Fees

EA 6:30 TH Course Content, Course Schedule and Course.
a 8 :
a) Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs

Late registration 9-10th January, 2007 \ — ae 325-5714. - 320-0093
, B 326-1936 - 302-4300 ext. 5202



















Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

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Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’S = —accagon §=—01— ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm MonWed 12-Feb 10wks $250
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901 = 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $275
ACCA902 01 ~—- ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $300

With one of our courses, you can gain












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in courses such as Massage Therapy, BUSI904 01 — INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 6:00-9:00pm ‘Thurs {-Mar 10 wks $225

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could even start a small business. Sign up COMPS$01 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-00pm Mon 5-Feb 12wks $450

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COMPS02 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II -6:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb 12 wks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | 6:00-9:00pm Wed —° 7-Feb i2wks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 6wks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 12-Feb 12 wks . $500
COMP960 01 EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs 8-Mar iday $160

COMP930. =01-~—Ss WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs/Fri 1-Mar 2 days = $550















COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 Q1 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb Swks $225
COSM804- 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Swks $225
COSM807 O1 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs 26-Feb 6 wks $500





DECORATING ,
DECO800 01 — INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 8 wks $225
DECO801 Oi — INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tues 2?-Feb Bwks $250
FLOR800 Oi FLORAL DESIGN | §:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 10 wks $225
FLOR801 O1 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 1Owks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thurs {-Mar 10wks $300








ENQUIRIES
Email :: perdev@cob.edu.bs









ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 8wks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Fri — 26-Feb 10 wks $250




All fees are included with the exception of
the application fee of $40.00 (one time).









CEES reserves the right to change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule
and Course Materials.






HEALTH & FITNESS
MASG900 = 01S MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $465
MASG901 01. ~—- MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm = Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $620
HLTH900 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $400






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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

Man shot dead in first





homicide of 2007

On Saturday, police officers
from Operation Quiet Storm
were in the Bamboo Town area
when they approached a man
who was found in possession}
of a 9mm handgun containing
one live round of ammunition.

Police said the male, 18,
could be charged today.

There was also an armed
robbery on,Sunday around
3am. :

Happy Time Bar on Wulff
Road was robbed by two
masked gunmen of an undeter-
mined: amount of cash.

Reports state the thieves
fled the scene in a Nissan vehi-
cle.

FROM page one

eyparent accident, but it is now
believed, following an autop-
sy, that he was strangled.

There was also a traffic
fatality on Friday morning
involving a motor-cyclist on the
western Paradise Island bridge.

Police said the man was
travelling north when he lost
control of the motorbike and
ran into a concrete wall. The
man was taken to hospital
where he died from his injuries
on Friday evening. The acci-
dent was traffic fatality num-
ber 49 for 2006.








































ES Res
| Le Tribune
Penn eet AA nate PC a ‘e

Cz LT Buyers shai

FROM page one

the government by others who
allege due process has not
been served.

Critics say circumvention of
the Bahamian courts has
proved yet again that Justice
John Lyons was right to rule
a few weeks ago that the
Bahamas. judiciary was not
independent.

In its statement yesterday,
the Workers Party said the
men’s atrest represented “the
biggest, ‘Single. jating of gov"

The University Of The West Indies.
Clinical Programme, Bahamas



Position of
Lecturer/Epidemiologist
Research Unit

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
for the post of Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Epidemiology,
in the Research Unit, UWI Clinical Programme, Bahamas.



Candidates should have training at the masters or doctoral
level in epidemiology. It is desirable for the candidate to have
interest and competence in teaching at the undergraduate level in
community health and family medicine, and overseeing the research
component of all postgraduates programmes. Experience in
the design and conduct of epidemiological ‘projects including
demonstrated ability to attract research grants would be an asset.

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute
to the development of the programme in chronic non-
communicable diseases, especially cardiovascular disease risk while
establishing collaborative projects with other researchers and units
within the Commonwealth of Bahamas and the wider UWI research
community.

Applications and curriculum vitae giving full details of
qualifications, experience, nationality, martial status, names
and full address of three referees and certified copies of degree
certificates should be sent to: The Campus Registrar, Attention:
Director, UWI Clinical Programme, Bahamas, The University, of
the West Indies, Clinical Programme, Bahamas, Shirley Street,
P.O. Box GT-2590, Nassau The Bahamas. The final date for the
receipt of application is January 19, 2007.

In order to expedite the recruitment process, applicants are
advised to ask their referees to send reports under confidential
cover directly to the University at the above address without

waiting to be contacted.

ernment in 40 years” to pro-
tect the average Bahamian
from the weight of foreign
forces.

The party said it joined with
thousands of Bahamians across
the country in calling for Prime
Minister Perry Christie to “do
the right thing” and fire Mr
Mitchell as foreign minister.

“The Workers Party is satis-
fied with its own internal inves-
tigation and appraisal of the
facts surrounding this infamous
international incident,” it
added.

Mencur said the PLP
was now afraid-that FNM

Public



Arrests row ‘could topple PLP’

leader Hubert Ingraham would
make much of this issue in
the run-up to the general elec-
tion. ;

Last week, The Tribune
reported sources close to the
government claiming that the
entire Cabinet was “in the
dark” over the incident.

The sources suggested that
the entire thing had passed
without the Cabinet’s knowl-
edge, implying that civil ser-
vants were to blame.

Whatever the truth of it, the
arrests had left the extradition

wh Ww
Panvained eee



- eds



THE TRIBUNE

Body of man
found on
Bay Street

THE body of a man
believed to be in his 40s was
discovered on Bay Street,

near the British Colonial *,

Hilton, last night.

Police said the body
appeared to have been there
for some time and the man

had suffered a head injury -

possibly from a fall.
There were no further
details at presstime.

Airport Authority
official in hospital

after suffering
a mild stroke

MR JOSEPH RECK-
LEY, acting general »
manager of the Airport’
Authority, is said to
have suffered a mild ~
stroke over the weekend
which has left him hosp}.
talised.

News reaching The.

Tribune said that, late ©

AO BT ea REE

2 OF We tee

Friday night, early Satur- °

day morning, Mr Reck-

ley suffered a stroke and

was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital where
he remains in the Inten-
sive Care Unit.

According to the
unconfirmed reports, the
apparent stroke has left
Mr Reckley unable to
speak, but he is said to
be communicating with
those attending him by
squeezing their hands in
response to inquiries.

Mr Reckley assumed
the role of acting general
manager of the Airport
Authority when he took
over the duties of outgo-
ing acting general man-
ager Mr Idris Reid.

Mr Reckley is expect-
ed to remain in the “act-
ing” position until Van-
couver Airport Services
(YVRAS) assumes con-
trol of airport opera-

tions.

ic Notice

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

Notaries Public

The public is hereby advised that Roshar G, Brown is no longer affiliated
with Gibson, Rigby & Co. and is no longer authorized to conduct business
on the firm’s behalf, If there are any concerns or questions please contact
our offices at the numbers listed below.

Partners

Dwayne A. Gibson
Raynard S. Rigby
Associate '
Melissa L. Selver

Chambers
East Street Shopping Centre
P.O, Box $8-6836
Nassau, Bahamas
&
George Town
Queens Highway
Exuma; Bahamas



Tel: (242) 393-6000
Fax: (242) 393-7000
E-mail: gibrig.com@batelnet.bs

Tel: (242) 336-3485
Fax: (242) 336-3487






SNR

mee,



ci

SNA



‘ Peo)














From the teacher with | ql
knowledge to share... : |

Who taught the IT a.

technician so clever... a



Who minds the computers
for the wholesaler...







Who sent the salesman
to sell the supplies...









To the owner of
the gas station...






Who hired the attendant
fo pump the gas...

Who welcomed the tourists
Who pay for the House
that Tourism Built!





January 20-26,2007
_ For More | mation
events@bahames.

Py a

he uk






















PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

. THE TRIBUNE



i eee

TN aaa

Excellent Career
Opportunity Exist for:

Graphic Artist

~ Key Competencies:
Minimum of 1 year experience

Creative
~ Energetic
‘Self Starter

Required computer knowledge |
in the following areas:
«Photoshop

eQuark
«Adobe Graphic Suite

To apply for this position please
‘send resume to

cshumanresources@aol.com

\



im By Fidelity Capital Markets

IT was a pretty quiet trading
week after the Christmas holiday.
For the week, only 53,323 shares
changed hands. The market saw
six out of its 19 listed stocks trade,
of which two advanced, one
declined and three remained.
unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank (CBL)



FOREX Rates



International Markets

with 18,510 shares changing hands
and accounting for 35 per cent of
the total shares traded.

The big advancer for the week
was Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF), up $0.30 to end the week
at $11.30. On the down side,

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) fell .

by $0.03 to close at $12.51

The FINDEX gained 7.02
points for the week, to close at
742.42.




Weekly % Change








CAD$
GBP
EUR






Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold




DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ

Nikkei.



Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

SENIOR SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR

_ The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications: c

A minimum of four (4) years experience in a

Department of an offshore bank

PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel )

Securities Administration

Knowledge of capital and money markets and instruments (bonds,

_ equities, options, fiduciaries)
Knowledge of payment wire transfer

of +. Experience. with. nautualifunds:administr
ee ef Baenelor s.cgares Nee concentration i
_,,Aecounting or Business Administration (joe.

Personal Qualities:

ation’
Finance; Economics;

- Excellent leadership, organizational and communication skills

- A commitment to service excellence

- Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision

Benefits provided include: .

- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan
- Health and Life insurance
- Other fringe benefits

ONLY PERSONS WITH SECURI TRADI
EXPERIENCE NEED APPLY.

Applications should be submitted:

AND ADMINISTRATION

Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JANUARY 12â„¢, 2007

Pricing Information As Of:
i ber 200 6

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Low ‘
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets

52wk-Low
1.2678
2.5864
2.2982

1.320246"
2.9449"""
2.472341"

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

* Colina Bond Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's welghted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume |
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings





=) Jey Del 1) ye

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



International Stock Market Indexes:



1.1653 0.77
1.9600 0.04
1.3202 0.48







Weekly % Change



$60.94 -2.21
$636.70 2.10
Weekly % Change






12,463.15 0.84
1,418.30: 0.41
2,415.29 0.45
17,225.83 0.71

‘The
right
to take

risk’

business owners and conse+

~“quently*creators-of jobs-and
wealth for the economy.and its...

people.

The current cadre of busi-
nessmen who _ struggled
through the roadblocks of the
system to build fine enterpris-
es should now champion the
cause for opening up the sys-
tem in order to give a new and
larger generation of Bahami-
ans the right to take risks.

Everyone should have the
right to dream and should they
wish, try to fulfil these dreams
whether it leads to success or
failure.

It is generally accepted that
goods and services in the
Bahamas are high priced. Is
that not why so many of our
people go abroad to shop?

Would not a more open
economy lead to more effi-
ciency, lower prices and a high-
er standard of living for all?

Granted there would be
some trauma from the change,
but no doubt when this trauma
subsides it will then be truly
Better in The Bahamas.

0.000
0.400
0.260
0.020
0.060
0.050
0.240
0.040
0.680
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.570
0.500
0.500
0,000
0.135
0.560
0.255

1.080
0.640

0.000
1.320

0.000

* - 22 December 2006

** - 30 November 2006

*** . 30 November 2006

**** _ 30 November 2006

see" . 30 November 2006













The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 742.42 YTD 34.53%

BISX CLOSING CHANGE
SYMBOL PRICE .

VOLUME YTD PRICE
. CHANGE

AML $0.61 $- 0 -16.44%
BAB — $1.25 $- 0 13.64%
BBL $0.76 $- 0 8.57%
BOB $8.03 $- 913 14.71%
BPF $11.00 $0.30 11,000 8.65%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 14.51%
BWL $1.75 $- 0 38.89%
CAB $10.00 $- 5,400 4.71%
CBL $12.51 $-0.03 18,510 37.32%
CHL $1.90 $- 0 15.85%
CIB $14.15 $- 0 30.06%
CWCB~ $ 5.24 $0.37 16,500 7.60%
DHS $2.50 $- 15.21%
FAM $5.79 $- 0 -4.30%
FCC $0.55 $- 1,000 -52.17%
FCL $12.55 $- 0 24.88%
FIN $12.02 $- 0 10.28%
ICD $7.15 $- 0 -28.14%
JSJ $8.60 $- 0 hs -4.97%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%




DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:










e CHL has declared dividends of $0.04 per share payable
within 10 business days after the record date to all shareholders
of record date December 13, 2006.

e CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR, payable
on February 7, 2007, to all shareholders of record date Decem-
ber 31, 2006.

PELE
WANTED

Progressive medical practice requires the services
of an accountant with the following qualifications:

1. CPA or BSc with a minimum of 5 years
experience.

“9. Working knowledge of all Quickbooks modules.
3, Bahamian citizenship.

Please email response to

info@gtbahamas.com



Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of



























BANQUE SASCRE
LATS Private Bonking
Vacancy for:

Credit & Controls Officer

The Credit & Controls Officer reports directly to the Chief
Operations Officer and Deputy Director.



Responsibilities:

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:

° Reconciliations of all Internal & External Bank
Accounts

° Credit Lines and Limit Controls of Loans

° Net Asset Value Weekly & Monthly Calculations

° _ Preparation & Approval of Wire Transfers

° Daily & Weekly reporting and controls

° Retrocession calculations for External Managers

° Preparation and Closing of accounts
documentation

. Approval of all daily transactions

* Disbursement of Banks expenses

Assist with all back office operations



Candidates should possess the following
qualifications:

: 5-10 years Private Banking Experience

° Associates or Bachelors degree in Accounting,
Business Administration or relevant field:

° Proficient in use of software applications such as
MS Word, MS Excel & MS outlook;

° Good oral and written communication skills;

° Ability to operate a-variety of office machines

(computer, fax , photocopy & calculator);






Apply in writing to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: narmstrong@pasche.ch

(No phone calls please)



’ opinion obtained of counsel, the

THE TRIBUNE

that had caused the Bahamian
financial services sector “significant
problems in developing our indus-

But the Forum chairman wamed:
“It is extremely important to live
up to the commitments in that pol-
icy and, on the ground, demonstrate
locally and to the international com-
munity it is not an idle boast, that
we are able to deliver on this com-
mitment, and that work permit
applications for the financial ser-
vices industry will be dealt with in
this manner. “If we drop the ball
on implementation, it will be a
major setback for us, but I’m sure
the Immigration Department is
aware of that and made the neces-
sary changes to ensure work per-
mit applications will be dealt with as
promised.

“Implementation and execution
will be very important for us. The
most effective way this message is
going to be communicated is

Work permit, from 1B

Department and the Government
are going to adopt a reasonable
approach to work permits for senior
personnel, key employees and rain-
makers who control large amounts
of business”.

Mr Moree argued that these two
objectives “are not mutually exclu-
sive”, adding: “A poorly thought-
out Immigration policy or badly-
implemented Immigration policy
can have a very adverse effect on
the financial services industry in the
Bahamas.

“It would make us uncompeti-
tive and drive multinationals and
international companies wanting to
do business in the Bahamas to our
competitors.”

Mr Moree commended Shane
Gibson, minister of labour, train-
ing and immigration, and Harcourt
Brown, director of labour, for
addressing a long-outstanding issue.

Port, from 1B

ated as nothing more than a uni-
lateral act of divestiture by the Port
Authority of its fundamental oblig-
ation under the Agreement on the
one hand and, at the very least, on
the other an...amendment of that
Agreement.

“Based on the considered legal

letter was received by Mr Ingra-
ham, but no reply was forthcom-
ing. “We have to assume the prime
minister was not aware of the sig-
nificance of these things, and what
was being done in terms of the
administration of Freeport,” Mr
Glinton said.

The October 19, 2002, letter to
Mr Ingraham pointed out that four
separate clauses in the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement included the pro-

Association confidently protest the
vision of electricity as being among

proposed sale by the Port Author-

through actual experience. The
actual experience of the various
companies involved in this indus-
try is the best marketing we could
possibly get.”

Mr Moree said that detailing the
factors taken into account by Immi-
gration when assessing work per-
mit applications would provide use-
ful guidance for financial institu-
tions looking to establish opera-
tions in the Bahamas, and wonder-
ing whether they could obtain the
necessary staff.

He added that the ‘framework
agreement’ negotiated between
Immigration and the Bahamas
Financial Services Board (BFSB)
could change the tone of the immi-
gration debate, making it positive
rather than negative. The agree-
ment could become a springboard
for using immigration as a tool for
national development, rather than
impediment, Mr Moree added, with
the benefits felt throughout the

“was very clear” that assets such as
the power company did not per-
sonally belong to the GBPA’s
shareholders. ,

The association’s letter to Mr
Ingraham argued that the power
company sale to Southern Electric
“appears to run headlong into”
Clause 3(7) of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, which prevented the
GBPA from assigning its rights
under the agreement without gov-
ernment approval, or selling more
than five per cent of its share capi-

industry and economy in terms of
more jobs, training and develop-
ment opportunities, new businesses
and an increase in the industry’s
size.

The latter, he said, would boost
gross domestic product (GDP), the
wider economy and the incomes of
many Bahamians employed in oth-
er industries. “There is going to be
a trickle down impact across the
board in our economy if we get this
right,” Mr Moree said. “We will get
the best of both worlds, and all sec-
tors of the community will bene-
fit.” He added of the financial ser-
vices immigration policy: “It’s not
xenophobic, but on the other hand

it’s not an ‘Open Sesame’ policy.”

The Immigration policy becomes
an instrument of progress, rather
than an impediment to develop-
ment, realizing that Bahamians
must be protected if they are suit-
ably qualified and given opportu-
nities in this industry.”

per cent of GBPA licensees.

Finally, the letter drew attention
to Clause 4(2) in the 1960 amend-
ment to the agreement, which
allows for the GBPA to transfer all
its governance, developmental,
licensing and regulatory powers to
a local authority, again provided
this move had 80 per cent licensee
support.

The association concluded by
saying that it seemed the interests
of the GBPA and its shareholders
seemed to always take precedence,

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 5B
SSS SSS Ss essere



cael Notice
NOTICE
TANK LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TANK LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Manex
‘Limited, of The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Manex Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice
NOTICE
WINDY BAY LIMITED



wy

the Port Authority’s primary oblig-
ations.

And the Royal Commission of
Inquiry which reviewed the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement in 1970
reported a year later that electrici-
ty supply was among the utilities | could be made to the agreement _ social progress must remain intact,”
pervised liquidation of the Port “expressly made the exclusive _ without the consent of at least 80 the letter said.

Authority, whilst ignoring one of responsibility of the Port Authori- (b)
their primary obligations under the __ ty”.
Agreement.” Mr Glinton told The Tribune

Mr Glinton said the association _ that the Royal Commission report
Coalition, from1B _

about several of the Governmen-
t’s financial estimates for the
scheme.The Government is esti-
mating that there will be 1.25 mil-
lion claims on the NHI system per
year, yet the ILO warned that the
NHI proposed administration bud-
get did not provide for enough
claims administrators to adminis-
ter the scheme. It said that it was
possible to employ about 50 such
workers, given the financial con-
straints, with salaries and overhead
costs per capita between $60-
$100,000.

Given the 1.25 million claims
expected per year, the ILO said of
the administrators: “Each must
therefore handle an average of
25,000 claims per year, which would
equate to about 100 per day or 15 to
20 per hour. It must also be expect-
ed that a proportion of claims will
be complex or difficult to resolve. : . : :
The conclusion is that, while not ey to De eoeaee ae ae
totally unrealistic, the provision of j;,. » P 8 pu”
adequate claims handling capacity © ;
within the proposed administration
cost envelope is a demanding
assumption.”

Administrative capacity is a

recurrent concern in the ILO
report. It warned: “Care may be
needed to ensure that..... the capac-
_ ity of NIB to administer the scheme
can be matched to the needs of the
scheme, which will include a very
much greater emphasis.on claims
administration than hitherto.”

The ILO warned that given the
likely ageing of the Bahamian pop-
ulation, in 15-20 years time the
Government would have to con-
sider “the degree to which a greater
proportion of national resources
need be devoted to the health needs
of an increasingly elderly popula-
tion.

“Since the NHI does not incor-
porate a mechanism for automatic
increase of contributions, there is
no inherent ‘signal’ to enable gov- .
ernment, potentially, to respond to
such changing demands and pref-
erences for health care in relation to

ity as an unwarranted breach.of the
Agreement, which has the effect of
privatising for personal gain what is
essentially a public franchise and
facility. :

“Tt also has the dreaded effect of
allowing them to continue the unsu-

when the agreement was designed
to be a tripartite solution of equals:
government, GBPA and licensees.

“The integrity of the agreement (a)
as an instrument for economic and

tal to anyone other than Wallace
Groves or his wife without the gov-
ernment’s approval.

And it pointed out that Clause
3(8) stipulated that no amendments

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

WINDY BAY LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Mark
Edward Jackman, c/o 1 Raffles Link
#05-02 Singapore 039393.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

PACIFIC SEAS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

other expenditure opportunities or
needs.” The ILO report urged that
“care needs to be taken” on how
the NHI scheme is presented to the
public by politicians and govern-
ment officials, as the two major (a)
reports produced on NHI showed
that the scheme’s package of bene-
fits would not be unlimited.

“Tt appears that comments have
been offered to reassure the public
as to the ‘comprehensive’ nature of
the health care to be offered under
the scheme,” the ILO report said.

“?Comprehensive’ care is not
intended to mean, as might be
assumed by the public, that every
conceivable medical procedure will
be supported by NHI. The potential
for misunderstanding — and unfor-
tunate inflation of public expecta-
tions — is clear, and it may be help-
ful to prepare a briefing note on

‘this and other items of technical
terminology for the use of officials

PACIFIC SEAS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of

Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms Koh
Bee Eng c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02
Singapore 039393

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Mr Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE

HORMOZ LIMITED

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) HORMOZ LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
“Soir i gntémational Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

ee eon the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General. _ ;
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit
Suisse Trust Geneva, of Rue de Lausanne

17 bis, CH-1211 Geneva 70, Switzerland.

Ms Koh Bee Eng
Liquidator

229



Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Geneva

eet ages fl Meet ate Liquidator

Crystal Palace Casino



Legal Notice
NOTICE

RINGSON LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex
represents the single largest resort investment in the history
of The Bahamas. Baha Mar owns and operates the Wyndham
"Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino, the Radisson Cable &
Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel. .

(a) RINGSON LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., of Pasea Estate, Road Town,
Tortola, BVI.

Supermarkets, 1B

per cent, or $2.1 million, to $30 mil-
lion. The increase in the latter was
generated by operating supply, pay-
roll and utility cost rises, with utili-
ties up by more than $500,000 to
$3.662 million.

Basil Sands, Bahamas Super-
markets chairman, said that in the
current fiscal year the company was
focusing on upgrading customer
service, its stores and product offer-
ings.

Bahamas Supermarkets would
also look for potential new stores,
Mr Sands said, and look to “miti-
gate” the costs of shipping, fuel and
utilities.

Ken Burns, Bahamas Supermar-
kets chief executive, said new
employee uniforms were being pro-
duced, while the number of power
lifts had been increased to improve
the speed and quickness of produce
unloading.

“In the coming year, we will
install scanning for efficient quick
check out. We plan to purchase
bulk produce to maintain consis-
tency of supply,” Mr Burns said.

Barbados Shipping & Trading’s
subsidiary, Retail & Distribution
International (RDI), will replace
Winn-Dixie on the sourcing of pro-
duce and merchandise, and develop
retail, distribution and financial
management systems.

During the initial three-year
agreement, RDI will earn a
$100,000 one-off fee for signing the
deal, and a further $25,000 per
month, ensuring it will earn
$300,000 per annum from the oper-
ating partner agreement.

BSL Holdings also has a transi-
tion services agreement with Winn-
Dixie for a year, the US retailer
earning a $1 million fee plus 5 per
cent of the costs of goods it pro-
cures for Bahamas Supermarkets. It
is understood that Bahamas Super-
markets is looking to end the agree-
ment with Winn-Dixie as rapidly
as possible.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position:

~ EXECUTIVE CHEF

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

The Executive Chef will direct and supervise all aspects of multiple outlet food
operations. This individual will excel in their teaching and training ability and
have the expertise and knowledge to lead the culinary team to achieve
excellence in all aspects of the operation.

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE
PAMOJA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

The successful candidate should possess the following:
Degree in Culinary Arts/Hospitality is preferred.
Minimum of five years as a Senior Chef supervising a similar operations with
multiple outlets serving a variety of cuisines.
Direct and maintain culinary standards and have full working knowledge and
practice of grade manger, saucier rotisserie, entremettier, ice carving, wine
and banquets
Ability to write recipes, menu specifications and maintain product cost.
Ability to develop complex work and production schedules,
Maintain food and labor cost.
Working knowledge of common software programs, such as MS Word &
Excel.

(a) PAMOJA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., of Pasea Estate, Road Town,
Tortola, BVI.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume to

the attention of Director of Human Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or
fax to (242) 327-5897

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator





‘. PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



The Rattlers
‘defeat the
Falcons to
take Holiday
Classic title

*. ® BASKETBALL

THE CI Gibson Rat-
tlers captured the title
in their sixth CI Gibson
Holiday Classic for
senior boys basketball
teams on Saturday
night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

The Rattlers, coached
by Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson,

» pulled off a 79-65 victo-
ry over the Jordan
Prince. William Falcons,
coached by Godfrey
McQuay and Horatio
‘Yellow’ Poitier, to
secure the title.

Nemnon Robson
scored a game high 20
points with 13 rebounds
and two block shots,
Jermaine Storr had 17
points, 10 rebounds and
five assists and David
Taylor added 17 points
with 11 rebounds in the
win.

Rashad Williams had
19 points with five
assists; Ollen Smith
chipped in with 14

' points and D’Andre
‘Scooter’ Reid finished
with 11 points in the
loss.

David Taylor was
named the most valu-

-_ able player in the cham-
pionship game, while
Nemnon Robson was
the championships’ best

-, defensive player.

*-’- In the consolation
game, the Dame Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins

.. clinched third place

-*. with a 74-46 decision
over the Mt Carmel
Cavaliers.

~~ Rebounds

Prince Pinder scored
_ 20 points and Rarsenio
-.: Dorsette had 16 points
~ with nine rebounds for
the Mystic Marlins, who
were coached by Thur-
ment Johnson.

For the Cavaliers,
coached by Ray Evans,
Taquil Ferrier had a
game high 24 points in
the loss.

-_-, Inthe individual
_ awards presented,
Leslie St. Fleur of Doris





impression of the new national stadium

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WORK on the construction of the
new national stadium is expected to
get underway this month and will be
ready by December, 2008, according to
Minister of Youth, Sports and Housing
Neville Wisdom.

His disclosure came on Saturday
night as he delivered the keynote
address at the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations' 7th annual
gala awards banquet at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel.

American IAAF 2005 World Out-
door Championships' 100 metre cham-

pion Lauryn Williams was the special
guest of honour.

Wisdom revealed that on Decem-
ber 15, his government officially turned
over the site at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Center to the contractors for
the construction of the new stadium
that is being built by the Peoples
Republic of China as a gift to the
Bahamian people.

Since December 18, Wisdom fur-
ther noted that the technical personnel
have been fully occupied, setting points,
for the layout of the stadium that will
have a 10,000 seating capacity. i

As of January 15, Wisdom noted
that pile testing will commence and

continue for the next six weeks.

As of March 1, he announced that
the pouring of the actual foundation of
the national stadium will take place.

"Best estimates indicates that the
stadium will be completed in Novem-
ber, 2008, with handover proceedings
occurring a month later as a Christ-
mas gift to the Bahamian people,"
Wisdom projected.

As the government waits for the
completion of the stadium, Wisdom
said they will continue to work towards
preparing the athletes for Project Bei-
jing and Beyond — a long-term pro-.
gramme that he said is geared towards
maximising opportunities for Bahami-



“pa stadium
‘will be ready in 2008’

ans to participate in the 2008 Olympic
Games in Beijing; and advancing a
strategic intervention to expand and
to heighten the sustainability of the
rate at which elite athletes are pro-
duced by the local national system. _

In an effort to achieve these objec-
tives, Wisdom said they will work in
"total harmony" with all relevant
national federations and associations
and, to a lesser extent, with the various
interscholastic sporting bodies through-
out the Bahamas.

"Competent personnel have
already been identified to spearhead
Project Beijing and Beyond," he dis-
closed.

-BAAA receives $220,000

2) 0 Oi B Ee 8

ome ae

eo Sa BO ?e

*. Johnson took home the

.*-most assists and most -
-1. steals awards; Travis

-* Stuart of Mt. Carmel

from event organisers

a 3

5
~

cheque

won the most rebounds;
Alvarez Rahming of the
South Andros Cheetahs
_- won the most blocks

‘and Romell Johnson of
CV Bethel was named
the most offensive play-
er.

In the slam dunk
competition, Nemnon
Robson won the title,
while his CI Gibson
team-mate Cameron
Adderley claimed the
three-point shooting
title.

¢ Named to the All-
Tournament first team
were:

Leslie St. Fleur
(Doris Johnson); Ricar-
do Moultrie (St. ;
John’s); Eugene Bain
(CC Sweeting); Rashad
Williams (Prince
William); Romell John-
son (CV Bethel); Travis
Stuart (Mt. Carmel);
Clint Brown (Kingsway
Academy); Hubert
Williams (Eight Mile
Rock); David Taylor
(CI Gibson) and Jer-
maine Storr (CI Gib-
son).

@ NAMED to the
All-Tournament
second team were:

‘. Alvarez Rahming
(South Andros); Taquil
Ferrier (Mt. Carmel);

. Vincent Strachan (RM

--. Bailey); Patrick Brice

* (Doris Johnson); Nem-
non Robson (CI Gib-

.. son); Renardo Baillou

‘, (CR Walker); Fabian
Thompson (Wolmer’s
High); Ollen Smith
(Prince William); Cruz

-. Simon (CC Sweeting)
and Nathaniel Cooper
(Hight Mile Rock).



@ THE BAHAMAS Association of Athletic Associations received a cheque for $220,000 from the organising committee of the 2005 Central American and Caribbean
Championships. Pictured in front row are Minister of Sports Neville Widsom; accountant Montgomery Brathwaite; BAAA’s president Mike Sands; BAA A’s first
vice president Curt Hollingsworth and committee chairman Dr. Bernard Nottage. In back row are BAAA’s secretary general Foster Dorsett; second vice presi-
dent Anita Doherty; Council Member Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson; treasurer Rosamunde Carey; assistant treasurer Debbie Smith; statistician Tyrone Burrows and
public relations officer Kermit Taylor. ° See story on Sports front.

iT ist Clarke)



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007
LOCAL NEWS:

Crowds take to their feet for New

m By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE New Year’s Day Junkanoo
parade was a vision of the pre-
bleacher days of old, with crowds of
spectators vying for the best stand-
ing and non-bleacher seating views
on Shirley Street, leaving barren
bleachers on Bay Street.

The most noticeably desolate
bleachers were those between
Charlotte and Market Streets, in
front of John Bull.

Also barren up to 4.30 New
Year’s morning was the parade
route, as large groups such as The
Valley Boys had not yet brought
their costumes down to the begin-
ning of the route.

Spectators who watched empty
streets into the early hours of the
morning commented on how scanty
this New Year’s Junkanoo Parade
looked, saying: “The groups look
small and the streets are empty.”

The winners of the Boxing Day
parade, Roots, started things off at
around 2.30 with a theme of “A
Mighty Nation”. One of the group’s

SEE page nine

daca sbs a

moves to the music



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10 - 50% Off

Selected Items

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THE TRIBUNE













~ a ee a



Full Text
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Violence is the big enemy '

in the world and at home |

[ere were glimmers of
hope in 2006 but on the whole
it was not a very good year for the
world.

Bloody conflicts continued to take a
heavy toll in terms of human suffering,
and abundant resources that could
have done so much good for humani-
ty were poured into the bottomless
pits of wars and conflicts.

Nature itself seemed to cry out to
heedless leaders with warnings that
many years of abuse of the natural
environment was approaching a tip-
ping point beyond which there will be
catastrophic and possibly irreversible
consequences for the planet and its
ability to sustain life.

After three years the Iraq war
remained as intractable as ever and
the bloodletting continued to mount.
Estimates of Iraqi casualties ranged
from tens of thousands to hundreds
of thousands and the American people
watched with horror as the death toll
for their armed forces approached the
3,000 mark.

The estimated cost to the US Trea-
sury ran into the hundreds of billions
and some say that by the time it is
over it could be as high as a trillion
dollars. The great tragedy is that this
was from the beginning an unneces-.
sary war based on ideological hubris
and an elaborate web of deception.

Except for a stubborn minority,
everybody came to acknowledge in
2006 that this war was a huge mistake
and that the invasion and occupation
were grossly misconceived and mis-
managed from the beginning. According
to the polls and the. results of the
November elections in the US, the
American people now know that ‘they
were misled.

That was a glimmer of hope but still
small comfort to those who saw the fol-
ly of it from the beginning and warned
the invading coalition against it. The
trouble is that acknowledging the truth
does not provide a way out and many
more people are going to die before it is
finally over. As former US Secretary
of State Colin Powell warned: “If you
break it, you own it.”

So Iraq is quite broken, the volatile

-Middle East is.more.unstable:than-evetie=:
-and the coalition is looking for.a'‘way.



out of a classic Catch-22. Furthermore
the Iraq adventure undermined ¢
legitimate war in Afghanistan and so
the end of that campaign is also
nowhere in sight.












I: the middle of 2006 the Israelis,
with the approval of the US and
Britain, launched an invasion of

- Lebanon. The Israelis blockaded this

democratic West-leaning country and
mercilessly bombed population cen-
tres as well as the country’s infra-

» structure.

While a thousand Lebanese civilians
were killed in the bombardment and
many more were made refugees, UN
Secretary General Kofi Annan and the
Vatican condemned the attack, but for
a whole month the coalition with stun-
ning callousness did nothing to stop the
carnage.

At the same time and with the same
pretext:(the capture of several Israeli
soldiers) Israel unleashed an attack on
the helpiess population of the Palestin-
fan‘ Gaza Strip: The soldiers have not
been retrieved but Lebanon lay in ruins
and instability and the radical elements

Iraq is quite broken, the volatile
‘Middle East is more unstable than ever
and the coalition is looking for a way
out of a classic Catch-22. Furthermore,
the Iraq adventure undermined the
legitimate war in Afghanistan and so
the end of that campaign is also

nowhere in sight.







All over the world there are still too
many people who do not understand
that violence is an obstacle to the
civilisation movement and that
human beings cannot achieve their
higher destiny with guns and bombs.



in Islam were strengthened.

There was a strong glimmer of hope
as one courageous American, former
President Jimmy Carter, published a
book exposing to the American people
the injustice being inflicted on the
Palestinian people. This remains the
most provocative issue in the Middle
East.

Inevitably, Mr Carter was accused of
anti-Semitism but even as a debate got
underway about his book, the Israelis
were planning another illegal settle-
ment on Palestinian land as they con-
tinued their brutal occupation and
campaign of repression against the
Palestinian people.

There are other glimmers of hope
as more Jewish voices inside Israel and
a few in the US are also speaking out.
In a recent article in an American

newspaper, Ira Chernus, Professor of
Religious Studies at the University of
Colorado, said:
“Now Jewish soldiers go out every
day to make war on Palestinians, the
vast majority of whom want nothing
more than to live peaceful, ordinary
lives in a tiny state of their own.’

D espite the world’s “never
again” pledge after Hitler’s
attempt to wipe out the Jews during
World War II, the international com-
munity in 2006 remained largely i impo-
tent in the face of a genocid&ll campaign
against the black African peeple of Dar-
fur, a western province of Sudan.

With the apparent approval of the
Sudanese Government in Khartoum,
rampaging Arab militiamen known as
the Janjaweed have in the last few years
killed an estimated 400,000 people in
Darfur, raped thousands and made
refugees of over a million.

Mr Annan has made passionate
appeals to the international community
for the commitment of resources to stop
this continuing atrocity but the response
has been feeble and any glimmer of
hope in this situation is dim indeed.

As the year ended, another war
broke out on the already war-torn con-
tinent of Africa as Ethiopian troops
crossed into Somalia to support a weak
provisional government and to prevent
a coalition of Islamic courts from set-
ting up a fundamentalist Muslim state
on its border.

This intervention runs the risk of set-
ting off a wider war in the region but
there is a glimmer of hope that the inter-
national community will do what is nec-
essary to help bring peace and unity to

= @_

4
a

ra

Die
A
=
oe

# *@ obs

Somalia. It has known neither and been
without an effective government for the
last 15 years.

A the end of World War II 60
years ago, enlightened leaders
got together to establish the United
Nations because they recognised that
the violent history of humankind had to
end if civilisation were to triumph.

But all over the world there are still
too many people who do not under-
stand that violence is an obstacle to the
civilisation movement and that human
beings cannot achieve their higher des-
tiny with guns and bombs.

One glimmer of hope in all. this is

_ that in the West the Iraq fiasco has put

many advocates of violence and ene-
mies of the United Nations to rout, but
not all. There are still those who reject
Winston Churchill’s advice that “it is
better to jaw-jaw than war-war”. They
prefer to drop bombs first rather than
trying to reason with an enemy.

Here at home we have much to cele-
brate and be grateful for. The Bahamas
has never descended into political or
sectarian conflict and it appears that
the Bahamian people are committed to
conserving this rich and blessed her-
itage.

Our democracy has been a great deal:

less than perfect and sometimes quite
messy. But it is a far better way to gov-
ern ourselves and to settle our political
differences than resorting to violence.
This year that democratic process
will once again be put to the test and
there is every indication that the

Bahamian people, along with their

political leaders, will go about elect-
ing the next government in a peaceful
and orderly fashion.

But wonderful though that is, it is not
enough. Criminal violence plagued us
throughout 2006 and resulted in the
death of 60 persons. Furthermore,
domestic violence, including the abuse
of children, seems to be on the increase.

This has the potential not only to
degrade our quality of life but to destroy
everything we hold dear, including eco-
nomic stability and prosperity.

We must resolve in this New Year
and for many years to come to use all
the spiritual, intellectual and material
resources we can muster in a national
campaign against all forms of violence in
our society.

Happy New Year!

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www.bahamapundit.typepad.c om

“the s

6 In brief

MOV eU ea eeeeeeencensscsscscensscesereeceseeeseeceesnensecserecey

President |
and Speaker
to host event
at Atlantis

SENATE president Sharon
Wilson and Speaker of the
House of Assembly Oswald
Ingraham will host the January
2-5, 2007, meetings of the stand-
ing committee of the Confer-
ence of Speakers and Presiding
Officers.

The meetings will be held at
Coral Towers, Atlantis Resort,
on Paradise Island.

The next Conference of
Speakers and Presiding Officers
is scfieduled for England in Jan-
uary,,2008, and the meetings of

tanding committee which
will be held in The Bahamas
will set the agenda and order
of business for the 2008 confer-
ence.

Michael Martin, Speaker of
the House of Commons in
Westminster, London, England,
is chairman of the Conference
and will chair the preparatory
meetings in The Bahamas.

Commissioner
to talk about
policing on
radio show
COMMISSIONER of Police
Paul Farquharson will tonight

appear on Love 97 (8pm) to
talk about “Policing Today”.

Dominican
Republic ups
tax to close
budget gap

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

THE Dominican legislature
has approved fiscal reforms and

tax hikes to close a budget short-

fall, according to Associated Press.
Pgesident Leonel Fernandez,
who proposed the reform pack-

. age ‘after prodding from the

International Monetary Fund,
said this month that fhe‘increas-
es are necessary to.make up for
a US$1.1 billion gap in‘the
US$7.9 billion budget.

The House of Representatives,
which has been controlled by Fer-
nandez’s Dominican Liberation
Party since May elections, voted
late Wednesday to approve the
measures. Opposition members
walked out before the vote after
hours of heated debate.

The bills impose a new
US$0.15 tax per gallon of gaso-
line and a US$0.09 tax on diesel

‘fuel. Taxes will also rise on

tobacco, luxury cars and the
national lottery.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157


ome bine

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 3



BHEA president -
calls for |
upgrades to |
roads, airports
and utilities

ROADS, airports and utili-
ties in the Bahamas must be
“quickly upgraded” to meet
development needs, it was
claimed last night.

And there are “great con-
cerns” about the extent to
which these developments,
upon completion, can be man-
aged and staffed with capable
Bahamians. ve:

The anxieties were :
expressed by Mr J Barrie Far-
rington, president of the :
Bahamas Hotel Employ
Association, ina New Year's :
Day message. ’ t 3

While noting moderate :
growth in 2006 similar to that
of 2005, Mr Farrington
warned that education and
training programmes must be
upgraded and accelerated
without delay to meet new
demands.

He said several significant
tourism-related developments
were announced during the
year, and others under con-
struction moved closer to
completion.

“While this is positive news
and an indication of investor
confidence in the Bahamas, it
does present us with enor-
mous challenges,” he said.

“Our physical infrastruc-
ture, our roads, airports and
utilities must be quickly
upgraded to meet develop-
ment needs.”

Noting the loss during the
year of hotel union boss Pat

Bain and Atlantis supremo i

Butch Kerzner, Mr Farring-
ton said: “Their lives exem-
plified the kind of commit-
ment that we should adopt if
we are to realise our poten-
tial.

education, youth, training and
industry competitiveness mpst
take on a new dimension, void:
of politics and quick fixes. i
“The focus must be cn }
transforming our nation for

the good of our industry, @ur . is

people and our nation.” )

5 ; PO Sete Wee ‘ ¢ .
Economy of

Cuba still ©

recovering
from crisis

HB CUBA
Havana

CUBAN finance officials i,

acknowledged in an unusu-
ally critical year-end report
that the country’s economy
is still suffering the effects of
the severe crisis of the 1990s
but nevertheless grew 12.5 pe
rcent in 2006, according to
Associated Press.
Cuban Economics Minis-
ter Jose Luis Rodriguez:also
defended the method used to
calculate the island's gross
domestic product growth fig-
ure, which includes the free
health, education and other
social services the communist ;
country provides its citizens. 3
“Cuba doesn't falsify its ;
Statistics, nor does it manipu-
late them with electoral:
ends,” Rodriguez told a year-
end session of the Natiénal
Assembly, or parliamenf.
Cuba's methodology makes
the country’s economic growth :
figures difficult to compare, ¢
with those of other countries. :

4




“Our collective pursuit of . ie

Lady Pindling

FROM page one

serves as one of three persons
who became deputies to the

« Governor General when he is

away from The Bahamas.

As Knight Commanders of
the same order, Baltron Bethel
and Garet Finlayson also join
Dame Marguerite as top recip-
ients of the Queen’s honours.

As a recipient of the hon- *

our, Sir Baltron Bethel is being
recognised for more than 50
years of exemplary public ser-
vice in various capacities, most
notably as Director General of
Tourism and deputy chairman
and managing director of the
Hotel Corporation of The
Bahamas.

Sir Baltron is also a leading
member of the Baptist com-
munity, where he serves as
assistant pastor of Salem Bap-
tist Church and is a former

chairman of The Bahamas:

Baptist College.

Like Sir Baltron Bethel, Sir
Garet Finlayson is being hon-
oured for his contribution to
the world of commerce and
business in the Bahamas. ‘

Said to be a living example
of how hard work, vision and
opportunities can raise an indi-
vidual from small beginnings
to becoming a “captain of
industry and a symbol of finan-
cial success,” Sir Garet Fin-
layson steadily built a finan-
cial and corporate empire as
chairman and CEO of Burns
House Ltd.

In making this announce-
ment, Government House also
made available the names of
several other distinguished
Bahamians who received spe-
cial honours from the Queen.

The following is a complete
listing of honorees:

"102 Haitian
‘immigrants ~
apprehended

CREW members aboard
a Defence Force vessel
apprehended 102 Haitian
immigrants off East End
Point at 11.15 on New
Year’s Eve.

According to Defence
Force officers, 86 males and
16 females were found
aboard a Haitian fishing ves-
sel under extremely unsani-
tary conditions, and were
taken to the Coral Harbour
-base, where they were
turned. over to Immigration
officials from Carmichael
Road Detention Centre.

Unsanitary conditions
aboard the vessel were a
result of the lack of toilet
‘facilities for such a large -
number of persons in the
cramped confines of a fish-
ing vessel. ,

“Chief Petty Officer Ralph
McKinney said this was a
yroutine apprehension of a
Haitian vessel, which will
mostly likely be destroyed
because of its condition.

A Defence, Force press
release said the total num-
ber of immigrants held at the
* detention ceptre is now $12. .




















































@ LADY PINDLING is
named Dame Commander of
The Most Distinquished Order
of St Michael and St George

@ The Most Distinquished
Order of St Michael and
St George - Companion

Mr Basil L Sands - honoured
in the field of accountancy as
one of the pioneers in open-
ing the field of accountancy to
scores of Bahamians, as well
as his service to the Anglican

Church, and in the field of con-
sular affairs.

_ The Rt Reverand Gilbert
Arthur Thompson - honoured
for long and dedicatéd service
to the Anglican diocese of the
Bahamas and Turks and
Caicos Islands and for his will-
ingness to serve the communi-
ty during his years as a pastor,
administrator and conciliator.

Mr Alfred Jarrett - hon-
oured for exemplary and out-
standing services to the field
of banking and for his civic and
devoted service to the man-

‘agement of public sector enter-

prises. *

sh »» *
The Most Excellent Order
of the British Empire
(Civil Division, ...

- Officers (OBE): *

Bishop Albert H gfepburn -
religion and commpalty ser-
vice’ °° oreo @ es aoe

Ms Nettica R Symonetter -
tourism and travel 7?"

Mr. Herbert Leon 'Treco -
business and commufity ser-
vice

Bishop William Michael
Johnson - religion and com-
munity service

@ Members (MBE):

Ms Linda Ford - sports and
recreation :

Mr Leon Rahming - entre-
prenuer

Mr Eric Cash - music, art
and education :

Ms Willimae Bridgewater -
trade unionist and community
service

Mr Levi Gibson - real estate
development :

Mr Bruce C Braynen - poli-
tics, business, and community
development

Rev Dr John N T Rolle -
religious service

FREE DELIVERY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT





is now a Dame

@ The British Empire Medal
(BEM) - Civil Division

Mr Eric Wilmott - journal-
ism and community service

Ms Oraline Butler - politics.

and community welfare

Mrs Jane: Adelia Adderley -
business and commerce,
politics and community
service

Mrs Gloria Knowles - busi-
ness and commerce, politics,
and community service

Mrs Cecelia A Grant - poli-

tics and community develop-

ment

Rev Dr Henry Pratt - poli-
tics and community develop-
ment

Mr John Lochley Cooper -
politics and community devel-
opment

Ms Millicent Deveaux - pol-
itics and community develop-
ment

Mr Kenneth J Braynen - pol-
itics and community develop-
ment Miva

@ The Queen’s
Police Medal (QPM)

Mr James A Carey - for ser-
vice to the Royal Bahamas

Police Force and to law

enforcement generally.

Mr Grafton O Ifill, Sr - for
service to the Royal Bahamas
Police Force and to law
enforcement generally.

?

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-435, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Mr Galanis and his memory loss

THREE DAYS before Christmas Sena-
tor Philip Galanis wrote a letter to The Tri-
bune complaining about a political jingle
released by the FNM the week before Christ-
mas. It was played over many of the radio sta-
tions.

In his letter Mr Galanis, a former PLP
MP for Englerston, recalled that in Decem-
ber, forty years ago, the late Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, for 25 years prime minister of the
Bahamas described this time of year as one
“when brotherly love should reign supreme in
our hearts and our minds ought to be turned
to the birth of Our Lord Jesus.”

We can have no argument with that state-
ment.

Sir Lynden made the statement as a criti-
cism of the United Bahamian Party (UBP)
for having chosen the Christmas period to
make the surprise announcement that there
would be an election in 1967, almost imme-
diately after the Christmas/New Year’s holi-
day. Sir Lynden complained that the UBP
gave “no thought as to how the peaceful
Christmas of others might be disturbed.” Mr
Galanis said that Sir Lynden had “called this
disturbance of the holy season ‘unchristian.””
Commented Mr Galanis: “And look what
happened to the UBP after that holiday cam-
paign, when election day dawned on January
10, 1967.”

Mr Galanis submitted “that this nasty and
demeaning jingle that the FNM is, now
assaulting us with as we would all rather hear
the traditional and beautiful music of the
season is just another example, four decades
later, of thoughtless and heartless politicians
disturbing the peace of Christmas for their
own political ends.

“This one disgusting jingle,” he wrote,
“has shown the people of The Bahamas just
what kind of leadership the FNM will offer.
The people want leaders who will lead; the
FNM provides leaders who are busy creating
vulgar jingles.

“The people want to hear about issues that
are important to their future; the FNM would
rather make silly jokes and offer empty slo-
gans.

“T believe that, because of this incident
and the moral decay it reveals about the
FNM, the Progressive Liberal Party, the par-
ty that respects and reveres the time-hon-
oured Christmas traditions of our Christian
nation, will see a victory in 2007 that will be
even more resounding than that of 2002,”
Mr Galanis wrote.

We have no problem with Mr Galanis’ let-
ter, the only problem we have is that neither
Mr Galanis, nor any member of the PLP for
that matter, should be putting pen to paper
on the subject of political jingles during
Christmas week.

We conclude that Mr Galanis must suffer
from the loss of his short term memory. He
had to wander back forty years in time to
discover how a leader of his own party felt
about mixing Christmas and politics.

Really he only had to trot back on memo-
ry lane a short five years to recall Christmas
2001 and the run up to the May, 2002 elec-
tion.

That year — exactly a week before Christ-
mas, 2001 — the PLP, under the leadership of
then Opposition leader Perry Christie, was so
busy avoiding the pressing issues of the day
that it too was busy writing a jingle. And its
jingle was being broadcast in the identical
time frame that the FNM jingle was broadcast
two weeks ago — just the week before Christ-
mas.

If Mr Galanis is serious, and not just play-
ing politics, then, if the FNM’s “latest dis-
graceful and disrespectful stunt” demon-
strates “their disconnection with the
respectable, intelligent Bahamian voter who
needs and wants to hear about issues in order
to make up their minds how to cast their bal-
lots next year,” then he must conclude that
the PLP’s “disrespectful stunt” just before
Christmas 2001 must have also demonstrat-
ed its disconnect with the “respectable, intel-
ligent Bahamian voter.”

Contrary to Mr Galanis’ statement his
Progressive Liberal Party did not respect and
revere “the time-honoured Christmas tradi-
tions of our Christian nation” in 2001, yet it
won the election in 2002. Therefore, why
should the FNM’s jingle on the same theme
— “A fresh wind is blowing” — played at
the identical time that the PLP played theirs
cost the FNM an election? If Mr Galanis is
logical then the FNM should “see a victory in
2007 that will be even more resounding than
that of (the PLP in) 2002.”

Both jingles (PLP-2001 and FNM-2006)
make a play on “a fresh wind blowing”
only the smell in an FNM’s nostrils is that of
a “foul wind” and their jingle vows that it
“ain’t long before this foul wind is gone ...
and we gonna win our country back.”

Now’ that.a new year has dawned, we have
a bit of advice for both Mr Galanis and PLP
chairman Raynard Rigby: This is not the year
to have intermittent memory faults — espe-
cially when going into public print with elec-
tion comments.

They must remember that whenever they
twist or stumble over their facts, all we have
to do is pull a file from our newspaper
morgue to put them straight.

If they don’t improve, they could experi-
ence much embarrassment in the next few
months.

In the meantime we wish all of our readers
a very happy and peaceful new year.



at
RF

Be sure you
have all the
information

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS is something you
want to consider. For or
against it, just be sure you
have all the information.
The plan was presented to
us recently during BICA’s
accountant’s week. On
their own admission (NHI

_representative Ms Pinder),

there are a lot of issues to
be worked out. So why are
they rushing it?

No kidding around,
implemented incorrectly, it
will have devastating con-
sequences. This is your
medical services they are
playing with. Ask questions
and get answers before let-
ting this proceed. Never let
any government take you
for a fool, and not give the
right to weigh your deci-
sion on your health care
services. They could use
the public schools as a
forum and educate the
Bahamian public on the
proposal as they did for us.

Highlights of the presen-
tation:

e Mandatory.

e Caps out at $133 per
month

e All services at the pub-
lic ward of PMH, anything

else is at your own
expense.

e Same for prescription
drugs

e No services abroad if
they can be performed
locally, regardless of wait
list.

e Indigent (illegal immi-
grants,and unemployed)
are fully covered for the
same Services just as some-
one who pays NHI contri-
butions.

e To avoid persons going
abroad for services, saying
they felt bad while on vaca-
tion, travel insurance is
being considered each time
you travel abroad( to pre-
vent fraud).

° Contributions to be
administered through NIB.

Concerns that came out:

e NIB has not been able
to account for funds over
the past four years, and
you plan to give them more
money? —

e General political con-
cerns about handling mon-
ey.

e PMH already running
at capacity and in need of
upgrade

e PMH

scription drugs now with
dependability.

Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative

Credit Union Limited
Chairman’s Christmas Message 2006

eachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union has been a beacon of light for its member:
r the ae thirty vane and it continues to meet the needs of persons from all economic and social str

Je are all about “People Helping People to Help Themselves” and with this philosophy in ‘mind, we have set:

out

oe during this first decade of the new millennium to achieve economic empowerment for our members through
= Joint efforts. We are stressing wealth creation for members and we are encouraging them to make our Credit
Union their primary financial institution.

_ During the past year,, we continued to spread our wings to the Family Islands including Mayaguana in the
far east and Inagua in the deep south. In the northern Bahamas, we completed construction on our modern
office/shopping complex, situated on West Atlantic Drive,Freeport Grand Bahama. Our Freeport Branch oftics
moved out of rented facilities into this complex during the first half of this year. a

tif Heavenly Father continued to shower blessings upon us during 2006 and thus we were able to Assist “

ny of our

o embers in becoming financially independent. As we continue to strive for a higher quality of life for all of
rim,” OUT members, we invite all those persons, especially salaried workers to join this vibrant organization.

peEpristmas is a special time of year for Christians everywhere; a time when family, neighbours, friends and
sitors gather and when many of us welcome those who are along into our homes and hearts. It would be
ing ood to extend this throughout the entire year.

behalf of the Board the Supervisory and Education Committees our Work-Place Representative and our
staff in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco, is is a special pleasure for me to extend best wishes
Holy and Blessed Christmas and a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year to all of our Stakeholders 4 A
out all these islands and cays. May the Love of Jesus, the purpose of his life and the gift of aaa Sh
h your hearts in a special way this Christmas.

Fmonette

of Board of Directors, TSWCCUL



pharmacy’s |
inability to supply pre-




je Maes

letters@trlbunemecia. net





e What incentives would
exist to become a doctor if
compensation is capped by
government? They would
choose another field.

° How will we retain our
doctors?

° How will insurance
companies survive? The
most they could offer is
supplemental insurance.
Significant downsizing of
insurance companies would
take place, and several we
imagine would no longer
exist.

e Your premiums paid on
your plans to date are lost.

e Could it possibly close
Doctor’s Hospital?

Do not let this be a GSM

thing, selling you a service
and then using the pro-
ceeds to try build the infra-
structure. This is your
health care. The govern-
ment needs to prove they
can properly meet the
increased demand before
making it mandatory.

This is a very hot topic. It
headlines every news
media in the country, and
will continue to do so as
the government is pushing
to pass the bill before year
end. Be sure you KNOW.
Pass this on to everyone
you know to give them the
choice!

The Bahamas, the capi-
tal of the World.

Please register to vote.

WALLACE ROLLE
Nassau,
December 9, 2006.

Putting the real meaning
back into Christmas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ALREADY the public relations people have put the bar-
humbug into me simply through annoyance — why do they
wish us to think of Christmas as happy holidays — sea-
sons’ greetings? Are we atheists?

December 25th, is the day set aside to. remember the

birth of Christ.

Okay we know why the minority and I mean the minori-
ty is able to swing that we do not use Merry Christmas or
Christmas greetings is because in the US that business will
get sued, taken to court but do we as a sovereign people, as
alleged Christians. Teject Christ because of the influences.of

foreign habits?

By the first of’ Decembers ust a week away. all’ recep- |

tionists across the length and breath of The Bahamas will be
answering the telephone with some guky statement of ‘hap-
py holidays’ or something totally void of any resemblance as
to the real meaning of this time of the year. ©

Why?

Minister responsible for the public service — please
instruct all government officers that when answering the
telephone the only response is to be Happy Christmas or
Merry Christmas or Christmas greetings — no happy holi-

days, season’s greeting, etc.

I will not this year as I did last year purchase anything at
any business which does not FECORNISG the real reason for

this celebration.

It is time we collectively take a stand and let the majori-
ty opinion stand and stop being copy-cats of our neigh-
bours to the north - 50 per cent of our young people don’t
attend Sunday church now so imagine in 10-years they
might not even know what happy holidays or season’s greet-

ing is celebrating anyway.

Least we do forget the real meaning...Christ was born
and come Good Friday died for our salvation and rédemp-
tion...that’s why we must celebrate the real reason and not
for the almighty dollar going into the hands of the merchant!

H HUMES
Nassau,
November, 2006.

Making efforts to abide
by teachings of Christ

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT WAS Mahatma Gandhi
who said something like “if
more Christians were like
their Christ then the world
would be a better place”. I
think of this often as I see how
many Christians, especially
how the fundamentalist/
protestants are so untforgiv-
ing, and unaccepting of indi-
viduals.

As a Christian myself, I tend
to see the person but, yes, hate
the sin.

It is like these people hate
the sin and also hate the per-
son and pretend to be Lord
and master and condemn all
to a burning hell. Oftentime I
wonder where their self-right-
cous superiority comes from,
to me certainly this is not
Christ-like.

During his time on this
earth Jesus totally rejected the
vengeful eye for an eye, judg-
mental attitudes that are, gen-
erally speaking, typical traits
of many of these fundamen-
tal — Bible-totting Christians.
Jesus opposed the massive
wealth-building, power-wield-
ing materialism that is much
more natural to these evan-

gelical fundamentalist sects.

Last night as I passed by
Bias Street, lots of cars and
people were in the road.
There was much hurrah in the
air. I stopped and inquired. A
young lady started to explain
that the members of St. Paul’s
Baptist Church were having
an argument over who was to
be the pastor of the church. I
do not know the full details
and was not so much interest-
ed after that, but I immedi-
ately felt, certainly Jesus was
not pleased. The police had
to be called in and it was an
awful mess.

None of us is perfect, no not
one, but whether we believe in
a God or not— whether we
follow a religion or we don’t
— if we made efforts to abide
by some of the social teach-
ings attributed to Jesus it
would be a pretty good way
to live our life, wouldn’t it?

And the world would be a
better place, wouldn’t it?

The Bahamas, the capital of
the world. Please register to
vote.

PETER T CAREY
Nassau,
December 14, 2006
THE TRIBUNE

ein brief | Golfers threaten more protests aan
treatment at

1,000 march
to demand
return of
Aristide

B HAITI
Port-au-Prince

ABOUT 1,000 supporters
of ousted former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide
marched through the Hait-
ian capital Thursday to
demand his return from exile
and protest the presence of
UN peacekeepers, according
to Associated Press.

The peaceful demonstra-
tion marked the largest show
of support in months for
Aristide, who fled Haiti in
February 2004 amid a violent
uprising and has been living
in South Africa.

“This is a gift for the end of
the year for President Aris-
tide,” said Deshommes Pre-
sengloire, a spokesman for
Aristide's Lavalas party.

Carrying photographs of the
bespectacled former priest,
demonstrators gathered at a
church where Aristide once
preached and walked to the
National Palace, accompanied
by vans blasting music and a
police escort.

Some of the protesters
accused UN peacekeeping
troops of firing indiscrimi-
nately during gunbattles with
gangsters, killing and wound-
ing civilians. The UN denies
the charge and says its troops,
which arrived in June 2004,
only shoot when attacked.

Preval back
in Haiti after
treatment

in Cuba

HAITI
Port-au-Prince

HAITIAN President Rene
Preval returned to the coun-
try Friday from Cuba, where
he said doctors told him he
did not have prostate cancer,
according to Associated Press.

Haitian National Television
broadcast images of Preval’s
arrival at the airport greeting
the prime minister, Cabinet
members and the police chief
as he stepped out of a Cuban
jet. Other news organisations
were not granted access to his
early morning arrival.

The president said he would
go back to see his Cuban doc-
tors on March 18, but that the
health of his prostate was
“under control” and the can-
cer had not returned. '

“The Constitution says that
if a president is not in good
health, he can’t continue with
his functions but that does-
n’t apply to me because I'm
in good health,” he said in
remarks that were broadcast
some 12 hours after his
arrival in Port-au-Prince.

Preval, 63, revealed earlier
this month that blood tests
in Havana showed possible
signs of cancer but said the
results were inconclusive. He
was diagnosed with prostate
cancer in 2001, the final year
of his first presidential term,
and was treated in Cuba.

“A lot of people who have
had prostate cancer have to
see a doctor on a regular
basis,” he said at the airport.

The president’s disclosure
comes as Haiti struggles
against gang violence and
kidnappings.

WBE RE

TUESDAY,
JANUARY 2

Community page 1540am
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
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Ethnic Health America
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Aqua Kids
Durone Hepburn
Ernest Leonard
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ZNS News Update
The Fun Farm
One Cubed
News Night 13
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Carifesta IX: Celebrating Our
People
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

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Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the |
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Dime cls) lualaal rear el Aes

































m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

LOCAL golfers are threat-
ening to stage another protest at
the Cable Beach Golf Course
if the owners continue to imple-
ment policies that exclude
Bahamians.

Last week, a group of
Bahamian golfers staged a
protest at the golf course claim-
ing that local golfers were being
excluded from using the facility.

At the demonstration, pro-
testers held up placards that
read “Cable Beach is Bahami-
an” and “Pindling would not
have done this to Bahamians.”

Yesterday, The Tribune
spoke with Mr Henry Bostwick,
the designated spokesperson of
the group, about their purpose
and aim.

According to Mr Bostwick, a
‘veteran politician and long-time
attorney, the struggle to allow
black Bahamian golfers an
oppurtunity to play on golf
courses was an integral part of
the country’s political progess,
because golf courses in the

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas were once racially
segregated.

However, Mr Bostwick
claimed those progressive
advances of the past are being
reversed today.

“Today, that segregation is
being resurrected again, and this
time by the sons of those who
desegregated it,” said Mr Bost-
wick.

“What they are attempting to
do is duplicate at Cable Beach
what has, in fact, happened at
Paradise Island.

“Post-1967 Paradise Island
used to be a place where any
one of us could go and enjoy a
game of golf, because there
were no barriers and no gates.

“Now, unless you have
wealthy friends who are resi-
dents on Paradise Island or
members of a club it’s difficult
to play, because the locals have
been priced out of Paradise
Island and that’s exactly what’s
happening to Cable Beach at
the moment,” claimed Mr Bost-
wick.

In a response to the group’s
protest last week, Mr Robert

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 5



Cable Beach course

i TWO of the protesters who took to the streets last week to

A

PEOPLE



protest against the policies at Cable Beach Golf Course

Sands, spokesman for the
Baha Mar group, said that
prices at the Cable Beach Golf
Course were dictated by mar-
ket forces.

And following the protest,
the government announced it
was considering whether to

FNM accuses the PLP of
betraying people’s trust

By MARK HUMES

DEBUNKING the PLP’s
2002 “So Said, So Done” slo-
gan, the FNM continued its cru-
sade against the scandal-
plagued administration and its
inability to deliver on campaign
promises, saying: “They have
betrayed the people’s trust.”

* In a statement released in
time for the new year, the FNM
said: “Though much was
expected of the progressives,
they have delivered very little.

“Many thought the prime
minister was on their side,” the
statement added, “But they
have quickly learned that they
had neither the power, nor the
courage, nor the vision to make
the PLP into a truly progressive
and liberal party.”

The commentary goes on to
point out that, whereas there
were many “things” the “new”
PLP said they wanted to do
when they took office in 2002,
little had actually been done,
and then it went on to list a
number of PLP initiatives that
were “so said, but never done.”

Taking aim at the recently
passed National Health Insur-
ance scheme, the FNM said:
“The PLP claimed during their
campaign that National Health
Insurance (NHI) was a priority.
After nearly five years of pro-
crastination, it conveniently got
around to passing legislation
just in time for the next general
election.”

Knowing “full well that it will
take-even more years to actual-
ly get such a programme up and
running,” the FNM said that if
the PLP were genuinely com-
mitted to a “progressive” pro-
gramme like NHI, they would
have planned the framework
for it prior to the election.

According to the party’s com-
mentary, if the present admin-
istration were genuine about
NHI, they would have dedicat-
ed “the first two years in office
to fleshing out the plan, explain-

oo Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

\

R99 ME TP RR RCT LR ME OT

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 % se

ing its detail to the people,”
enabling its implementation in
the third year. ~

Taking a swipe at those in the
PLP who, in the 2002 elections,
actively campaigned for, spoke
of, and wrote about “progres-
sive” and “liberal” ideas and
policies, the FNM said they had
stood idly by while their gov-
ernment adopted “shortsight-
ed” and “disastrous” economic
policies which “threaten to
make Bahamians second-class
citizens in their own land.”

“The same people who criti-
cised the FNM’s economic poli-
cies literally sat around the Cab-
inet table and gave away
unprecedented amounts of land
and lavish concessions in agree-
ments kept secret from the peo-
ple,” the FNM’s commentary
said.

Land

Pointing out that the PLP, in
its Our Plan, promised that it
would “establish a clear process
for granting of Crown Land,”
the FNM said that, once again,
contrary to its pledge, the gov-
erning party “has adopted a
murky, confused and often
secretive give-away programme
to foreign land speculators who
can use cheaply-acquired
Bahamian land to raise funds
in capital markets.”

Many of these “green-light-
ed projects,” said the opposi-
tion, “are harming our environ-
ment and will make the further
Bahamianisation of our econo-
my more difficult.”

The commentary criticised |

the “return” of ZNS “to the
days when it was micro-man-
aged by a cadre of ministers and
political hatchet men,” the PLP
Cabinet’s failure to push
through campaign finance leg-
islation, “substantive” freedom
of information legislation, and
the administration’s failure to
create newly-styled House of



Assembly committee that
would “hold public sessions
before major pieces of legisla-
tion receive final passage.”.

But of all of the governing
party’s “broken promises,” the
FNM said the tragedy of the
Sea Hauler was one of the most
disturbing examples of how a
government had abandoned
“vulnerable citizens.”

“The prime minister ‘res-
olutely’ assured victims and
their families at gravesides and
bedsides that his government
would respond expeditiously
and compassionately to this
national and personal tragedy,”
the FNM said.

But noting, once again, that
the Christie administration did
not live up to its “So Said, So
Done” promise, the FNM noted
that many of the victims’ fami-
lies are being forced to “resort
to dramatic actions just to get
their voices heard above the
noise of PLP scandals and
Junkanoo shuffles.”

“Some of those who talked
like progressives out of office
suddenly abandoned their pro-
gressive rhetoric and became
defenders of the PLP status
quo,” said the FNM. “They
have betrayed the people’s trust
and simply watched as their
PLP government pursued
regressive policies and ignored
opportunities for bold action
and compassion.”

tae
SS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
ai as 7a dey al LY

WorKs By
ANTONIOUS ROBERTS
Max “PAYtLar
Posr Housk Srupta &&
GALLERY
Sai plan ny
7562



Umbrellas
Loungers —
Drinks Trolleys





-offee Tables <.
d Tables

build a golf range for the local
golfers separate and apart from
the Cable Beach course.
However, Mr Bostwick said
local golfers do not want-to be
moved to another golf course























fe stee over tH Id owe,

ROCKY
LBO

or be prevented from using the
Cable Beach course.

Refusal

“The message is clear. They
want us to go back to where we
came from, but they don’t seem
to understand that we will not
be moved. We, the black
Bahamian golfer, and any other
kind of Bahamian golfer, will
not be moved back into the
ghetto:” said Mr Bostwick.

He said this recent conflict is
a prime example of how the
government had not safeguard-
ed the rights of Bahamians .
when signing heads of agree-
ments with foreign investors.

He also pledged that local
golfers would continue to agi-
tate about the issue until the gov-
ernment or owners of golf cours-
es listened to their concerns.

The Tribune attempted to
contact the owners of golf
courses, but they could not be
reached for comment.

PUI Sut Or antey

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THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007

WN















SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee

motivation.
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007
Fime: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: To be announced
Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition: $160.00

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WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy

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Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web

pages. :
Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007
Time:. 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $550.00




"All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs

Sa yee

PXOIOle
re”
302-4300 ext. 5202



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007
; scl

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MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I ¥
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits); Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials..











Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas











MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Il
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.

Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas











GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: | Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm ,
Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs

325 5aa
320-0093



328-1936
Blea aioe ext, 5202







THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 7



hief Justice of
Canada meets PM

THE Chief Justice of
Canada Beverley McLachlin,
left, and Frank McArdle
meet Prime Minister Perry
Christie at the New Year's
Junkanoo parade on Bay
Street on Monday, Jan. 1,
2007.

The Chief Justice is being
hosted by the Court of
Appeal on her week-long
visit to the Bahamas and
will make official courtesy
calls to the Attorney Gener-
al and the Governor Gener

seal.

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LOCAL NEWS

FROM page eight

main floats entitled “Distin-
guished Nation Builders”
showed likenesses of Butch
Kerzner, Sir Milo Butler and
Sir Lynden Pindling.

Next on Rawson Square were
Conquerors For Christ, with a
theme of “Heaven or Hell in
Honour of Burgess Smith,” fol-
lowed by the Saxons with
“Pirates of the Caribbean”.

‘Saxons’ leader Vola Francis
told The Tribune that the theme

Now is the Sm

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 9





of pirates was important
because pirates were an inte-
gral part of the Bahamas, espe-
cially in the days of Woodes
Rogers, who expelled pirates
and restored commerce, chang-
ing the economics of the
Bahamas.

Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson was seen rush-
ing with the Sting Junkanoo
group, whose theme was “Tot-
ers”, taken from the popular
KB song which they played on a
sound system aboard their float.

,

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Many more floats than years
past donned strings of lights,
utilising generators to power
them and some powering sound
systems.

Judges, when questioned
about the use of lights and
music, seemed unable to say
whether it was an integral part
of the judging or even if it was a
part at all.

One judge said she wasn’t
sure when the use of lights came
about and that she had only
been judging for four years.

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_. TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 11

Toys are donated to

urban renewal centre

oo Sty

meee:
utlo

F524 6

ape. ond

PET Vee © oie Wr em. atin Be Pes Taek ray oy ee

z ae a I) i
bak att MIMISOHOrs

aD

bai a a

@ THE Grand Bahama Port Authority has donated gifts to Pineridge Urban Renewal Centre from

its annual toy drive. Pictured back row, from left, Corporal Leslie Phillips, assistant co-ordinator of —
Pineridge Urban Renewal Center, Nathania Been, instructor Pineridge Urban Renewal Centre, : ‘ pi
Kimberley Miller, public relations officer of Grand Bahama Port Authority and Woman Sergeant Be Ten el th Ar ain a i
Chrystal Johnson, co-ordinator of Pineridge Urban Renewal Centre, with a few children.

Message attributed
to Castro says he
has not given up

@ HAVANA

el ah re Tost! Nap rane

a ee

fox‘iry
SF ,

Se ok

A STATEMENT attributed

to Fidel Castro on the eve of

the revolution’s 48th anniver-

sary assured Cubans Saturday

that the ailing leader could still

recover from his prolonged-il-~

ness, according to Associated

Press.
The message was read by a

newscaster on state television

and radio. Castro traditionally

sends a message to Cuban citi- caer

zens every New Year’sEveto § ee a

mark the anniversary of the a ?

January 1, 1959, revolution that sue = dé

brought him to power. @ TWO workers clean at a government store decorated with a
“Iam grateful to you for your “Happy New Year 2007” im Old tiav ana ox odudas

affection and support,” read the (AP Photo/ Javier Galeano)

message. “Regarding my recov-
ery, I have always warned that it
could be a prolonged process,
but it is far from being a lost
battle.

“J collaborate as a disciplined
patient, attended by the... team
of our doctors.”

Castro purportedly said he
was still “in the loop” when it
came to matters of state. “I
have had exchanges with our
closest comrades always when
cooperation has been necessary
on vitally important issues.”

Earlier on Saturday, Cuba’s
Communist Party daily reported
that Castro telephoned the Chi-
nese ambassador in Havana to
wish President Hu Jintao a hap-
py new year.

The government’s release of
the message and the news about
his call to the Chinese ambas-
sador seemed aimed _.at ensuring
the world that he is recovering,
five months after he underwent
emergency intestinal surgery.

Because Castro’s medical
condition is shrouded in secrecy,
it has been the subject of spec-
ulation and rumour.

Castro, 80, has not been seen
in public since shortly before
July 31 when he announced he
was temporarily stepping aside
while he recovered from his
operation.

He has provisionally ceded ~

power to his brother Raul, the
75-year-old defence minister.

Saturday’s story said Castro
called Chinese Ambassador
Zhao Rongxian on Thursday
evening and they discussed rela-
tions between their countries.
The ambassador also transmit-
ted his president’s wishes for
Castro’s speedy recovery.

The island’s official media has
not commented on a Spanish
surgeon’s declarations earlier

this week that Castro did not

have cancer and was slowly
recovering from a serious oper-
ation.

Jose Luis Garcia Sabrido,
chief surgeon at Madrid’s Gre-
gorio Maranon Hospital, said
he flew to Havana on Decem-
ber 21 to see Castro and consult
with the Cuban leader’s med-

|

ical team on how his treatment
was progressing.

Castro’s medical condition is
a state secret, but Cuban
authorities deny he suffers from
terminal cancer, as US intelli-
gence officials have claimed.
Cuban officials have nonethe-
less stopped insisting Castro will
return to power.

Garcia Sabrido said Castro
could resume the presidency if
his recovery is “absolute".

Some doctors believe Castro
may suffer from diverticular dis-
ease, which can cause bleeding
in the lower intestine, especial-
ly in people over 60. In severe
cases, emergency surgery may
be required.

ia ae oe Nat iat el KOO TOO aK th PN ad =e <0 ve

Or call Eileen Fielder at The Counsellors at 3221 000

er

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INTERNATION AL

RHE Oe







THE TRIBUNE

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The Tribune

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

B BUSINE

Jain

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764



FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel:. (242) 351-3010

business@tribunemedia.net

cee ee eee ec hineee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





.. Financial work



permit policy to
~ benefit ‘all parts

of economy’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“ALL sectors of the economy”
will benefit if the Bahamas gets its
Immigration policy towards its
financial services industry correct,
the Financial Services Consultative
Forum’s chairman said, describing
the ‘framework agreement’ on the

’ issue as “a significant development

which will be widely applauded
across the sector”.

Brian Moree, senior partner with
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes,
said the Bahamas’ problem with
Immigration as it related to the
financial services industry had been
one of perception, rather than real-
ity.
He added that the Immigration

_Department’s commitment to a six-

week turnaround time for properly
completed financial services work
permit applications, and publicly
articulated policies and description
of the factors it would take into
account when assessing applica-
tions, would help to address this.

Acknowledging that Immigra-
tion was “an issue that affects our
future potential for growth and
expansion”, Mr Moree said: “I
think it is true to say that when you
look at the empirical evidence, with
specific reference to the financial
services industry, Immigration has
been fairly responsive and there
have been very few incidences
where work permit applications in
the industry have been turned down
or declined.

“What we have been suffering
from is a perception problem, which
is actually not supported, in my
view, by the facts. Nevertheless, it is
a major problem, because one’s
perception is one’s reality.”

The Bahamas had been per-
ceived as having a much more
restrictive, inflexible and rigid immi-
gration policy than rival interna-
tional financial services centres such
as the Cayman Islands and Bermu-
da, and this had hampered the
development plans of existing finan-
cial services providers.

In addition, institutions had sent
business to other jurisdictions rather

@ BRIAN MOREE

than the Bahamas because they did
not have the required expertise
here, and did not want to be sub-
jected to “delays and inefficiencies”
in processing work permit applica-
tions at the Department of Immi-
gration.

“The perception is that the
Bahamas has a very strict Immi-
gration policy that does not wel-
come and encourage the develop-
ment of business on the back of
expatriates working in the sector,”
Mr Moree’said.

“The adoption and publication
of this policy is going to be extreme-
ly helpful in addressing that per-
ception, and is going to significant-
ly assist us in dispelling these mis-
conceptions — that it is difficult to
get work permits for expatriates in
the financial services sector. It has
caused us various problems.”

Mr Moree added that he thought
it was possible to simultaneously
achieve greater training and
advancement for Bahamians in the
financial services industry, “while
at the same time sending the right
message to the international com-
munity, that the Immigration

_ SEE page 5B

Coalition ‘concerns’
~ over NHI report

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform said it was
“concerned” about several findings
in the International Labour Organ-
isation’s (ILO) report on the
National Health Insurance (NHI)
plan, especially the projection that
contribution rates would have to
become “significantly higher” than
the initial 5.3 per cent.

Winston Rolle, a former
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
president and consultant to the
Coalition, said the organization and
its members had.a number of con-

‘ cerns with the ILO report, not least

the fact that it did not give the NHI
scheme the ‘thumbs up’ that the.
Government had claimed.

“I think it’s safe to say we were
concerned it did not give the Gov-
ernment the ‘thumbs up’,” Mr Rolle
said. “We’ll be meeting in short
order to determine the next steps.”

When contacted by The Tribune
before the New Year’s weekend,
Mr Rolle said the Coalition had yet
to receive any of the promised stud-
ies and documents from govern-
ment that would enable it to
analyse the NHI scheme.

The Coalition has been waiting
for weeks to receive actuarial
reports, economic impact assess-

. ments and other documents from

the Government. Despite repeat-
ed assurances they would receive
the information, it has not been
forthcoming.

“The concern here is not having
access to a lot of the information
being put forward,” Mr Rolle said.
“We’re not sure what real base
they’re using to come up with the
conclusions they are arriving at.”

He added that as a result, this
was causing concerns about
whether the Government and its
NHI team were using the wrong
data, or if they were ignoring data
that did not support their initial
conclusions.

\

}

Mr Rolle said that among the
chief concerns with the ILO report
was the projection that the contri-
bution rate would have to increase
significantly to maintain NHI’s
future financial sustainability, and
that the $5,000 insurable wage ceil-
ing could be adjusted every year in
proportion to earnings.

“Jt [the ILO report] talks of how
the role of private insurance will
change quite sharply, so what is
being done to prepare the private
insurers for a major change and loss
of jobs? All that is very concern-
ing,” Mr Rolle added.

“The scope of the work they
engaged the ILO to conduct was
very limited, and the ILO was prob-
ably willing and wanted to put more
input into the process.”

Mr Rolle said the ILO report
also showed the critical role doc-
tors and other medical professionals
would play in executing NHI, yet “it
seems doctors have been alienated
from the process”.

Mr Rolle pointed out that while
doctors were currently focused sole-
ly on their patients’ needs, under
NHI “that responsibility is going to
change to focus both on the needs
of their patients and the members
of NHI, and the consequences of
treatment for patients”.

The Bill to create the NHI
scheme has now been passed by
Parliament, and just awaits assent
by the Governor-General before it
becomes statute law. The Govern-
ment has promised that it will
undertake more consultation with
affected parties in drawing up the
NHI regulations, which will be crit-
ical in detailing how the plan will
work in practice.

The ILO report warned that the
5.3 per cent contribution rate NHI
plan will in future have to “signifi-
cantly” increase to cope with the
extra medical demands of an ageing
population, and raised concerns

SEE page 5B



Attorney questions

Port asset transfers

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian attorney

has questioned

whether Grand

Bahama Port

Authority (GBPA)
can fulfil its obligations under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement as a
result of its productive assets being
transferred to another ehtity, and
whether this effectively breaches
the agreement.

Maurice Glinton, of Maurice
Glinton and Co, said a letter written
to then Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham in 1992 by Freeport
Licencees Association, expressing
concerns over the GBPA’s decision
to sell a substantial stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company to the
former Southern Electric, showed
the issues surrounding the GBPA,
Freeport and the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement today were nothing
new.

The GBPA and its principal
shareholders, Sir Jack Hayward and
the late Edward St George, over
time transferred ownership of its
productive entities to an affiliate
company they wholly-owned, called

1992 letter to PM shows concerns over whether GBPA
can meet Hawksbill obligations are nothing new:

Port Group Ltd. Then, the pair sold
off stakes in these entities to pri-
vate sector partners.

Hutchison Whampoa is Port
Group Ltd’s 50 per cent partner in
the Freeport Harbour Company
and Grand Bahama Development
Company (Devco); Mirant (for-
merly Southern Electric) is 55 per
cent owner of Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company, although it is selling
this stake; and Onyx is the partner
in Sanitation Services. :

Mr Glinton told The Tribune
that the transfer of these entities

from the GBPA to Port Group Ltd, ©
and the subsequent disposal of.

strategic stakes to private sector
partners, effectively amounted to
“stripping the assets of the GBPA,
and redeploying them in the control
of another entity”.

While the government and
GBPA licensees had been aware
of the Southern Electric transac-
tion, Mr Glinton said they did not

‘know about the creation of Port

Group Ltd, its role and transfer of
the other assets.

This had only come to light as a
result of the dispute between Sir
Jack.and the St George estate over
the former’s 75 per cent ownership
claim on the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, and the various docu-
ments filed in the Supreme Court
by both parties. =)

“What you have now is really
an unsupervised liquidation of the
Port Authority,” Mr Glinton said.
“Tt only exists in name, and has no
productive assets with which to car-
ry. out its obligations under the

-Hawksbill Creek Agreement.” —

The 1992 letter to Mr Ingraham
shows how the current issues sur-
rounding the GBPA - its conflicting
roles as a quasi-governmental
authority and private, for-profit
company, its obligations for the

development and governance of ~

Freeport, and relationship with its

licencees — have frequently reared
their heads over time, as they are
doing today.

The Freeport Licencees Asso-
ciation wrote that GBPA licensees
had “become alarmed at the indif-
ference with which the Port
Authority have approached their
obligations and covenants under

the Hawksbill Creek Agreement’

and their relations with licensees”.

The letter said licensees were
concerned about the “systematic
liquidation of the Port Authority
and the shedding of their public
and contractual obligations under
the Agreement”, and said the pro-
posed sale of the GBPA’s shares
to Southern Electric was causing
“anxiety”.

In relation to that deal, the asso-
ciation told Mr Ingraham: “Plainly
and simply, this has to be appreci-

SEE page 5B

Bahamas Supermarkets’ net income flat

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Supermarkets, operator of the 12
City Markets stores, saw its net income remain
flat for the fiscal year to June 30, 2006, standing
at $8.052 million compared to the previous year’s
$8.06 million as a 6.8 per cent sales rise was can-
celled out by increasing costs.

That year was the last one under Winn-Dixie,
which completed the sale of its majority 78 per
cent stake to BSL Holdings on August 9 for $54
million, meaning the current fiscal year is the
first one in which Bahamas Supermarkets will be
operating as a standalone company.

The firm had previously relied heavily on
Winn-Dixie to provide purchasing expertise,
supply chain and inventory management, Winn-

Dixie own-brand products, computer systems

and other forms of support, with policy decided
at the US retailer’s Jacksonville headquarters,
rather than in the Bahamas.

Bahamas Supermarkets had also been some-
thing of a ‘cash cow’ for Winn-Dixie, the US
parent frequently drawing on large dividend

payments, plus $1.397 million for office service
charges and other fees in fiscal 2006. The
Bahamian operation assumed particular impor-
tance after Winn-Dixie went into Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection in the US.

Bahamas Supermarkets indicated in its 2006
annual report that the current fiscal year will be
a transition one for it, as it takes its first steps as
an independent operator, and enlists the ser-
vices of new management/operating partner,
Barbados Shipping & Trading.

The company said: “Transition is never easy,
and there will be hurdles to overcome as long-
used systems and ways of doing things change. In
addition, there-will be unrelated increases in
costs from time to time, and with all effective

leveraging in place, they will be countered when- .
My

ever possible.......

During fiscal 2006, while net sales rose by $9
million to $141.1 million, compared to $132.1
million the year before, Bahamas Supermarkets
said sales at both its Cable Beach and Indepen-
dence Shopping Centre'were negatively impact-
ed. In the former’s case, it was a reduction in cus-
tomer parking space .as a result of construction on

the new $13 million Cable Beach store, which is :

expected to be completed early this year.
The Independence Shopping Centre City Mar-

kets store was hit by the Blue Hill Road works —

project, and the company said it expected the
negative sales impact to continue until works
were completed.

Bahamas Supermarkets said sales rose in 2005
as a result of/increased buying by consumers
during the 2005 hurricane season, a good Christ-
mas season, reduced prices and less competition
on Grand Bahama.

However, gross margins during the year to
June 28, 2006, fell by 0.3 per cent, while the price
reductions on some food lines to boost compet-
itiveness saw gross profits as a percentage of
sales drop from 27.1 per cent the previous year to

26.8 per cent. A reduction in inventory shrinkage _ : ren

also helped the company’s results.
However, Bahamas Su;
rose by 7.26 per cent to $103.285 million, while

rmarkets’cost of sales a

operating and administrative expenses rose by 7.5 —.-

SEE page 5B

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2UU/, rFAUc op

[Reve Major NP

raked ane

r

esorts report

ws 100 per cent occupancy

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



. Tew Providence’s major

Nese have reported

full houses and 100 per

cent occupancy rates for the New
Year’s holiday weekend.

Ed Fields, vice-president of
public affairs at Kerzner Inter-
national’s Atlantis resort, said:
“We were full going into the New
Year's Holiday.”

A reservations officer at San-
dals said the resort was at 100
per cent for the entire first week
of the year.

Robert Sands, executive vice-
president of administration and
public affairs for Baha Mar,
which owns the Nassau Beach
Hotel, Wyndham Nassau Resort
and the Radisson, said the prop-
erties were operating at 100 per
cent occupancy through to Janu-
ary 2.

He said the three resorts
expected this strong trend to con-
tinue into the rest of January,
adding that bookings were ahead
of last year.

Mr Sands anticipated that
there was likely to be some fall
out when the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative (WHTT),
current business licensing which requires US residents to
regime. aye passports ee ey into

: their country, took effect from

The defendants of this | 5. cuary 23, 2007, but felt it would
not be of a material level.

“The hotels have done a good
job of advising their customers

by John Issa

WE are living in the
twenty-first century, the
century which most believe
is the one in which free
markets rule.

World prosperity is to
come from free trade and
free markets.

Very few statements are

‘. |. absolutely true and neither
are the aforementioned
popularly accepted
“truths”,

It is, however, generally
true that competition and
open markets lead to a bet-
ter quality of life. Entre-
preneurs are constantly try-
ing to “build the better
mousetrap”. This being true
should we not be trying to
nurture this spirit and thus
encourage the energy,
growth and prosperity that
would surely follow? This
‘leads me once again to the
subject of the effect of the

regime, which we must all

remember was once used

to keep the majority of our

people out of business, say

it keeps the economy order-

ly and prevents excesses,
risk and losses.

This columnist believes

_ | that it is deterring a new

~./ generation of young, bright

and energetic Bahamians

from joining the class of

SEE page 4B

Earlier this month, Alex
Dawyes, director of operations
- at the British Colonial Hilton,



\/

proved to be very strong.



OPERATIONS ONTO THE CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF
“|THE FOLLOWING......

> SHIFT MANAGERS |
» COOKS |
» KITCHEN PREP

» PIZZA MAKERS

* CASHIERS

» FOOD SERVERS

» UTILITY WORKERS

PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA SITE (JUST OF
TUCKER ROAD) ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DAYS AND
TIME FOR AN INTERVIEW. | |

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 3RD 2007 10 A.M.-3 P.M.
THURSDAY JANUARY 4TH 2007 10 A.M.-3 P.M.
FRIDAY — JANUARY 5TH 2007 10 A.M.-3 P.M.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS

HRY ARE PROD SSAA ROE BTA RED EY BATAVIA UE A ASD OE A IRE ME TMI STL RRO EY OR LP A HMO SEIT NET AL RE



and travel partners [of the initia- @ ROBERT SANDS, Baha Mar’s executive vice-
~ tive],” Mr Sands said. president of administration and public affairs

told The Tribune that bookings for the New Year weekend were “looking fantastic”.

He said the hotel was predicting a stronger performance this year compared to last, and added
that the WHTI initiative would not negatively impact the hotel because most of its clients were busi-
ness persons who travelled frequently for work, and would have passports already.

The strong performances cap off a Christmas Holiday period which Bahamian hotels said





aT.
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS LID.
DEUS NONekeare sunny

CMA Is a progressive, successful and reputable
property & liability insurance brokerage. We need
an ambitious, energetic and enthusiastic person to
join our small, dedicated and professional team.
This will be an office-based position with scope for
real advancement. Insurance experience though
desirable is not essential. Full training will be provided.

















We are looking for: -




¢ A well-groomed person, professional in
appearance.

¢ Excellent written and oral communication skills.

¢ Competence in Microsoft applications such as
Word, Excel & Outlook.

¢ A self-starter, with initiative and a willing team








layer
¢ Commitment to study for insurance exams.



We are offering:




A competitive salary and benefits package
commensurate with experience. Our office is
located on East Bay Street near Fort Montagu, with
free staff parking.






Applicants should submit a full resume and a
covering letter in a sealed envelope marked “Private
and Confidential”. This should be posted or delivered
by hand to: -







The General Manager
CMA Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd
P.O. Box SS-19067
Bahamas Realty Building
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas








(FILE photo)




Postal applications should be post-marked no later
than January 5th, 2007. The deadline for receipt of
all (posted or delivered) applications will be
Wednesday, January 10,:2007.






We respect fully the confidentiality of all applications.
All applications will be acknowledged.









Crystal Palace Casino

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex
represents the single largest resort investment in the history
of The Bahamas. Baha Mar owns and operates the Wyndham
Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino, the Radisson Cable &
Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a
professional individual for the following position:

ASIAN SOUS CHEF

The Sous Chef - Asian Restaurant must have a flair for creativity and

- the ability to motivate, develop and train a great culinary team.

The successful candidate must have a minimum of 4 years
experience as a managing or lead Chef in a first class Asian
concept restaurant. This will be a highly visible position and
requires a candidate with exceptional culinary, communication and
public relations skills.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive
compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants should
forward a copy of their resume to the attention of Director of Human

Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or fax to (242) 327-5897

Serra rrereNensD








TRIBUNE SPORTS



AMAA

B TENNIS
DOHA, Qatar
Associated Press

THIRD-SEEDED
Marcos Baghdatis
reached the second
round of the Qatar Open
with a hard-fought 6-4,
7-5 win over Philipp
Kohischreiber on Mon-
day.

Baghdatis had to con-
tend with tough condi-
tions on center court at
the Khalifa Tennis stadi-
um on the opening day
of the tournament.

“Tt was very cold and
windy out there,” Bagh-
datis said. “I have not
played for two to three
months, so I found it dif-
ficult to find my
rhythm.”

Kohlschreiber, of Ger-
many, threatened to
break Baghdatis early in
the match and the Cypri-
ot saved six break
points.

Fourth-seeded Andy
Murray of Britain beat
Italy’s Filippo Volandri
4-6, 6-2, 6-4, while fifth-
seeded Mikhail Youzhny
and sixth-seeded Robin
Soderling also won their
first-round matches.

Soderling beat Kristof
Vilgen 6-3, 6-3, while
Youzhny defeated
Daniele Bracciali 7-5, 6-
3.

Christophe Rochus and
Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo
also won.



@ MARCOS BAGH-
DATIS from Cyprus
returns the ball to Ger-
many's Philipp
Kohlschreiber during the
first day of Qatar Open
tennis tournament in
Doha, Qatar, Monday
Jan. 1, 2007.

(AP Photo/

Kamran Jebreili)

)

RS

.. SPORTS

@ MANCHESTER
UNITED'S Cristiano
Ronaldo, left, tussles with
Newcastle's captain Scott
Parker, right, during their
English Premier League
soccer match at St James'
Park, Newcastle, England
Monday Jan. 1, 2607. The
match finished 2-2.

(AP Photo/
Scott Heppell)

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 7B




@ READING'S Brynjar Gun-
narsson celebrates scoring the
opening goal against West Ham
during the English Premiership
soccer match at the Madejski Sta-
dium, Reading, England Monday.,
Jan. 1, 2007. Reading won 6-0.
(AP Photo/
PA, Rebecca Naden)








~ money in the hands of



TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

BEATLES

eae —

presented
to the BAAA

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports

Reporter .

MORE than a year after
the Bahamas hosted a suc-
cessful Senior Central
American and Caribbean
Championships in July,
2005, the event’s organis-
ing committee made a pre-
sentation tothe Bahamas’:
Association of Athletic ;
Associations from the pro- }
ceeds.

Committee chairman
Dr. Bernard Nottage pre-
sented BAAA's president
Mike Sands with a cheque
for $220,000 during the
BAAA's gala awards pre-
sentation on Saturday
night at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel.

It was the largest dona-
tion ever made to the
BAAA, but Nottage, a
former BAAA president,
said it was the goal of his
committee, comprising of
some of the veteranmem- }
bers of the association, to.
host the biggest champi-
onships ever and they did
so to the tune of $1 mil-
lion.

"We did it," he pro-
claimed.

Nottage said an idea by
committee member and
former BAAA's executive
Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson
to offer prize money was
the key to their success
and they entrusted the

Montgomery Brathwaite,
who was then a partner at
Deliotte & Touche.

Brathwaite is now the
chief executive officer of
ColinaImperial Insurance
Company, the major spon-
sor for the championships.

In accepting the cheque,
Sands thanked Nottage
and his team for their
efforts and assured all pre-
sent that the monies will
go towards defraying the |
huge expenses that they
would have encountered.

Nottage, however,
stressed: "I want you to
remember that the
Olympics is in 2008, so
don't worry about me giv-
ing him all this money.

They will need a whole lot

more money. So sponsors
out there, please don't rest
on your laurels.”

Softball veteran
Linda Ford
named in

‘New Year
Honours list

VETERAN pitcher Lin-
da Ford made history
when she became the first
Bahamian softball player
to be honoured in the
Queen’s New Year Hon-
ours list.

Ford has played an
active role in the sport for
the past 35 years, both
locally and internationally
as a player and now as a
coach in the twilight of her
career. ,

She received the Most

Excellent Order ofthe

British Empire (Civil Divi-
sion) Member.

For the full story see
Wednesday’s Tribune





ge



p< 7

@ MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Housing
Neville Wisdom presents
Celavie Henry, the
mother of Christine
Amertil-Ling, with one
of the two awards her
daughter received on
Saturday night at the
~BAAA’s gala awards
banquet at Sandals Roy-
al Bahamian Hotel. iM
- .(Phote: Tim Clarke)

@ By BRENTSTUBBS .
Senior Sports Reporter



AUBURN University bound sprinter Sheni-
qua Ferguson was more than elated to be named
the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associa-
tions' Junior Female Athlete of the Year on Sat-
urday night at Sandals Royal Bahamian Hotel.

"I feel like I had a prosperous season and I
thank God for it," said the Jordan Prince William
High graduating student. "I just want him to help
me as I prepare for 2007."

Ferguson, 17, was awarded the award based
on her stellar performance as the Carifta Games

200 metre champion, Central American and
Caribbean Junior Championships' 100 silver

medalist and IAAF World Junior Championships'
200 eighth place finisher.

_ She ended the year as the IAAF World Junior
15th ranked 200 metre runner and was seventh on

: the IAAF World Youth list.

’ In the process, Ferguson beat out Tracy Mor-
rison, the Carifta javelin champion, NJCAA
champion, national jr record holder and CAC jr
silver medalist; Bianca Stuart, CAC Jr. long jump

‘finalist and IAAF World Jr 28th ranked long
; | jumper and Nivea Smith, the under-17 girls 200
i | champion and 100 bronze medalist.

"It was a very tough decision. Me, Nivea, Bian-
ca and Tracy all went to the same meets and so it
was really tough. I'm just glad that I won," she
said.

Ferguson said her goal this year is to run 11.2
and 22.06 or better in the 100 and 200 as she goes
after a spot on the teams going to the Carifta
Games in the Turks & Caicos Islands in April, but
more importantly to the Pan American Junior
Championships in Fortaleza, Brazil in July before
she heads off to Auburn University in August.

For Rudon Bastian, who won the Junior Male
Athlete of the Year, it was the most important
award he ever collected and he noted that he
will certainly cherish it for a long time.

"T'd like to thank my coach Peter Pratt because
without him, I couldn't have done this," said Bas-
tian, of Pratt, who was named the Coach of the
Year.

"My family and friends encouraged me to keep
on striving for my goals and the Lord has really
blessed me."

As the NAIA long jump bronze medalist, Jr
CAC silver medalist and IAAF World Jr. long
jump finalist, Bastian won the award over Jamal

i Wilson, a Carifta high jump champion and Jr
Sports. i

CAC silver medalist; Dwayne Ferguson, a Carif-

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



delighted
with BAAA awards




@ FORMER quarter-miler turned coach Pauline
Davis-Thompson presents Sheniqua Ferguson
with the BAAA/’s award as the Junior Female
Athlete of the Year

(Photo: Tim Clarke)



@ SPORTS Ambassador Tommy Robinson pre-
sents Rudon Bastian with the BAAA’s Junior
Male Athlete of the Year award

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

ta and Jr CAC 800 finalist and Ramon Miller, a
NAIA 400 finalist and Jr CAC fourth place fin-
isher who was ranked at No.19 on the IAAF
World Jr list.

Bastian, 19, will be transferring to the Univer-
sity of Louisville this month and based on what he
achieved last year, he's confident that he will
have another great year as he uses it as a spring-
board for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing,
China.

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BY VIRTUE of winning a

bronze medal and setting a
NACAC and national record in
the 400 metres at the IAAF
World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia, Christine Amer-
til-Ling was awarded the Charlie

Major Sr. Athlete of the Year.

award.

Her mother, Celavie Henry,
accepted the beautiful crystal
award along with the Female
Athlete of the Year award on Sat-
urday night at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel as she joined
Christopher 'Bay' Brown, who
was named the Male Athlete of
the Year.

The Junior Female Athlete of
the Year award went to high
school sensation Sheniqua Fer-
guson, while collegian Rudon

Bastian carted off the Junior Male:

honour. :

The awards were presented to
the athletes during the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tions' gala awards presentation
that was held under the theme
“Rising Stars - Follow Your
Dreams."

American 2005 IAAF World
Outdoor Championships’ 100
champion Lauryn Williams was
the patron of the event. She is the
training partner of sprinter Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie at the
University of Miami.

Mrs Henry, Amertil-Ling's

mother, was almost lost for words -

when asked to how she felt about
her daughter's achievement.

"I am very happy," she
summed up.

She credited Pauline Davis-
Thompson, her coach, for a lot
of her success.

Married

Davis-Thompson said Amer-
til-Ling, who was married earlier
in the month and is currently in
Indonesia on her honeymoon,
deserved the awards, especially
considering the fact that she cap-
tured an international medal, set
a national record and earned an
IAAF world raking of number
five.

"I believe she's the true win-
ner of this award, which is based
on merits and accomplishments,"
said Davis-Thompson, a former
award winner herself. "She also

’ broke the NACAC record, run-

ning faster than any other athlete
in this area and she won a bronze
medal.

"I believe that the BAAA
operates on a fair system of mer-
it, based on the athlete's perfor-
mance and based on that, I
believe that Christine is the legit-
imate Female Athlete of the
Year."

She won the Female Athlete
of the Year award over sprinter
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, who
made a fantastic comeback after
two surgeries in the previous year;
national shot put and hammer
record breaker Aymara Albury;
Commonwealth Games silver 400
medalist Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling and Commonwealth Games
silver javelin medalist Lavern
Eve.

The Charlie Major award came
over Ferguson-McKenzie; nation-
al 100 record breaker and CAC
silver 100 medalist Derrick Atkins
and Brown, the [AAF World

oR











@ CHRISTINE
AMERTIL-LING

Indoor 400 bronze medalist. ;
Brown won the Male Athlete
of the Year award by beating out |

Atkins; Donald Thomas, the sur- . °. -
prise at the Commonwealth*.

Games with a fourth place finish *
in the high jump and a silver.
medal winner at the NACAC;-
and Trevor Barry, a CAC Games*
high jump silver medalist and long -

jump finalist as well as NAIA.

high jump silver medalist.
Davis-Thompson said Amer-’

til-Ling's performance was just ~ .

the tip of the iceberg for her pro- _
tégé.
"This was a year where you

had the Commonwealth Games - |

|

awards



smacked right after the World’. --*--

Indoor Championships. Christine! > 2~*-‘
was prepared to run in either of

the events. She had a choice’. *
because I told her she won't be - ’

able to do both," she reflected.
"She looked at me like I was

crazy because she wanted to do ~
them both. She said she couldn't: --

imagine as a Bahamian only
being limited to one. But I told
her that because of the closeness
of the event, she can only do one.
She defied my orders and did
both."

Amertil-Ling would only set-

tle for a medal at the World --:.
Indoors. She realised that the .*.*.

fatigue took its toll by the time
she got to Commonwealth and

she didn't perform as well as she. _-,

had anticipated.

However, she would go on to’. °
compete in Europe and ended up. -. -

running the third leg on the
Americas' victorious team at the
World Cup. She was awarded a
fifth place in the IAAF world
ranking that came out the end of
the season.

Now Davis-Thompson said
they are hoping to surpass her
achievements last year as they
prepare for the long haul for 2007
that includes the Sr. CAC Cham-
pionships and Pan Am Games,
both in July and the LAAF World
Outdoor Championships in Osa-
ka, Japan in August.

"She's one of the hardest work-
ing athletes that I know and the
goal is to get Christine on the
podium," Davis-Thompson
stressed. "She's been a brides-
maid for too long and when I say
too long, I mean she's been per-
forming consistently over the
years and she's worked very hard.

"I now believe that the time
has come for Christine to go all
the way. Her body has began to
evolve where she's looking like
a true athlete and I think her
body is beginning to catch up
now. She's physically a lot
stronger in training and in the
weight-room and I can see vast
improvement in her strength."

et |

GUINNESS

OR CALL TOLL FREE IN NASSAU
VST 380-8015. te

TAS MUO SLO La SLO
THE LEGAL DRINKING AGE.
[Je Wy) dd ese SL








SUN WITH
SHOWER



Volume: 103 No.34



Financial work perinit
TUT UMUC Lame
naris of economy’





ISEE FRONT PARE OF BUSINESS SECTION

prests row ‘could topple PLP

Workers Party leader
accuses government of
‘complicity and
conspiracy’ in holding
of five baggage handlers

@ By TRIBUNE STAFF

THE growing row over the
arrest of five Bahamian bag-
gage handlers in the United
‘States-could-bring-down the
PLP government, it was claimed
yesterday.

The government was accused
- of “complicity and conspiracy”
in the holding of the five men,
and warned that the Bahamian
people would not take their loss
of sovereignty lying down.

The government was accused
by the Workers Party of con-
spiring with the US government
“because so many of its own
members are compromised
morally, spiritually and politi-
cally.”

Leader Rodney Moncur said
the arrests of the five men
amounted to entrapment and
were in clear breach of extra-
dition arrangements between
the Bahamas and the US.

“It is scandalous and could
bring the PLP down,” he said,
“The government has compro-
mised the sovereignty of the
Bahamas.”

The storm erupted last week
after five baggage handlers
employed by Nassau Flight Ser-
vices were arrested in the US
afteg#Being selected to attend
spectak training there.

Théy now face drug traffick-
ing charges and possible jail

terms of 10 to 15 years after
what their families are describ-
ing as a virtual kidnapping.

Last week, US ambassador
John Rood expressed surprise
that more was not. being made
of the men’s alleged status as
drug traffickers.

But Mr Moncur told The Tri-
bune: “This all goes to show
that the ambassador was not
exposed to a British education
and does not know that people
are presumed innocent until
proven guilty.”

He said the “conspiracy” had
broken extradition agreements
between the two countries and
was clearly a set-up in which
the government was implicat-
ed.

He accused Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell of
“dropping the ball yet again”
in a matter of major importance
“as he did in the case of Ninety
Knowles.”

Mr Moncur backed up his
“conspiracy” claims by alleging
that a PLP general employed
by Nassau Flight Services was
forewarned of the sting opera-
tion and backed out of the train-

ing offer. Subsequently, he

alleged, this man resigned from
the company.

The Workers Party’s outburst
follows fierce denunciation of.

SEE page 10



[= ox






Cay yesterday attended by



She Miami Herald

——————$ $$

BAHAMAS EDITION

Rc EL

=<

| & SAXONS rush their
way to winning the New

Year’s Day Parade.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

THE Shell Saxon Super-

©| stars were named winners
| of the 2007 New Year’s

Day Parade.
At a meeting at Arawak

hundreds of stakeholders,
it was announced that the
group won Group A witha
total of 2,996 points.

Second place went to
One Family, with 2,897
points. The Valley Boys
came in third with 2,886
points.

Roots took fourth place
with 2,789 points, followed
by the Music Makers with
2,536 points.

Rounding out A Group
were the Prodigal Sons, in
sixth place With 2,064
points.

Best Music went to the
Valley Boys, followed by
the Saxons and One Fam-
ily in second and third
place respectively.

In Group B, first place
went to One Love Soldiers
with 2,950 points. In sec-
ond place was Conquerors
for Christ at 2,822, with
Colours Entertainment in
third with 2,799. Fourth
was Colours Junkanoo
Group with 2,424. Fancy
Dancers were fifth with
2,395 and Body of Christ
sixth with 2,313. In seventh
place were Z-Bandits with
1,430. Foundation was a
no-show.

The Junkanoo Corpora-
tion of New Providence
said it will release full
parade results over the
coming week.
¢ SEE PAGES 8 & 9

UESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007



Saxons sail to New Yeat’s Day Parade ara a







PRICE — 75¢

See Unaco.|





l§ By MARK HUMES

LADY PINDLING, widow
of the man dubbed ‘Father of
the Nation’, has been made a
Dame in the New Year’s Hon-
ours.

Knighthoods went. to

’ tourism executive Baltron

Bethel and prominent busi-
nessman Garet ‘Tiger’
Finlayson, who were both
honoured for “exemplary ser-
vice” to the nation in the

Lady Pindling heads New Year’s Honours

Queen’s 2007 list.

Lady Marguerite Pindling,
widow of late Prime Minister
Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling,
heads the latest honours.

She is named: Dame Com-
mander of The Most Distin-
quished Order of St Michael
and St George for her service
to ‘politics, community devel-
opment, and charities. Lady
Pindling will now be referred
to as Dame Marguerite Pin-
dling.

In addition to her public
profile as the wife of the coun-
try’s first prime minister, Lady
Pindling spent 16 years as
chairperson of the fund-rais-
ing committee of The Bahamas
Red Cross.

She also assisted: with fund-
raising with BASRA, Hope .
Dale School, and the Chil-
dren’s Emergency Hospital.

Presently, Dame Marguerite

SEE page three

Man shot dead in first homicide of 2007

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the 2006 murder tally climbing danger-
ously closer towards the all-time record, the New
Year dawned with yet anothing killing, suggesting
2007 will bring more of the same.

The latest homicide took place on Comfort
Street, between East Street and Market Street,
after a verbal exchange between a group of men
on a basketball court and another group walking
past.
Police said the males on the basketball court
produced handguns and shots were fired, result-
ing in two of the passers-by being shot.

One victim was struck in the hand and taken to
hospital where his condition was classified as not
life-threatening.



The other, aged 21, was hit in the head and
died at the scene.

Police said they had launched an investiga-
tion into the incident, ‘and are asking the public to
assist them with any information that could solve
the case.

The murder count ended at 60 for 2006, seven
more than 2005, but ten short of the record 2000
total. The latest homicide got 2007 off to a brisk
start, but police hope it does not signal another

‘bad year for murders.

This latest homicide also comes on the heels of
the death of 22-year-old Jay Damianos, son of
George Damianos, who heads Damianos Real
Estate.

Mr Damianos’s death was first reported as an

SEE page 10

t resolution for the New Year?”

Call today!



Vee

= ) FIDELITY.
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2006 : THE TRIBUNE

"HIE COLLECE OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs












THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

PERSO! VAL DE \ EL OPMEI \ T | CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
| Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007

The following Personal Development courses have been approved
by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.



ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 — Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901— Human Resource Management II

. os . COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT QUICKBOOKS
Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional This course is for the beginner who knows PRESENTATIONS This course trains new and existing small
very little about computers and does not This workshop is designed to provide business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the employees) in organizing and managing their

development in both private and public sectors with the added
recognition that these courses have been equated to courses taken

covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It accounting using QuickBooks Pro software.
extensive hands-on practice using various focuses on developing effective and dynamic — Students will learn how to set up their
software, Including: PowerPoint presentations. company files, chart of accounts, budget and
























(I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing customer, vendor and employee files,
toward a de gree pro gral nme. (li) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite: None
(ill) Microsoft Access ~ Database Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007 Pre-requisite: None
‘ Management. Time: _ 9:30am - 4:30pm Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Duration: 1 day Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: 6 weeks
Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007’ Fees: $160.00 Venue: CEES Computer Lab
6:00pm - 9:00pm ‘ Fees: $330.00
Section 01 (CEES) _ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
This course covers basic concepts of WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Saturday, 3rd February, 2007 — Information Technology. The course provides Targeting persons who would like to create
? 10:00am - 1:00pm training in these areas: Basic Hardware their personal web pages, this course
i Section 02 (CEES) Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, will cover Web page creation, Web site
i : Duration: © 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML. Specific topics will
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. } include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Tuition: $450.00 . Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: None ©
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Begins: Wednesday, 7th February Pre-requisite: Participants must be
yA (1 December 2006 C ond aa 2007 This course covers the advanced concepts 2007 computer literate and have
| with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm a basic knowledge of
C | | , | | : I] various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word processing
0 ege C ose rom rT AL (I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dates: ist & 2nd March, 2007
5 (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00
(iii) Microsoft Access - Database Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Management. PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration: 2days _
: s "This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Computer Lab
BAS tS start ba UT BE 2007 Pre-requisite: Computer Applications | technology systems for use in information Fees: $550.00
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007 — environments. The course will cover the
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Duration: 12 weeks Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.

* Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00 Pre-requisite: None ;
Begins: Monday 12th February 2007

Advisement & registration for new students



3rd January, 2007 at 8:00 a.m. at COB Bandshell nt es
: . Venue: BHTC Computer Lab eS -
: Fees: $500.00 < a.
POM AL Meee mr UAE RTC Rte CUT: Lees are includes wih he erention of he apnea a esores ihe righ fo change Tato, Fees

EA 6:30 TH Course Content, Course Schedule and Course.
a 8 :
a) Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs

Late registration 9-10th January, 2007 \ — ae 325-5714. - 320-0093
, B 326-1936 - 302-4300 ext. 5202



















Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

Have you done anything COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE
special for yourself today? "= =" ™=“""™

ACCOUNTING ;

Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’S = —accagon §=—01— ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm MonWed 12-Feb 10wks $250
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services... ACCA901 = 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $275
ACCA902 01 ~—- ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10 wks $300

With one of our courses, you can gain












new job skills, increase your chances for BUSINESS
promotion or just learn something new for BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm — Tue 27-Feb Swks $225
personal satisfaction. With your success CUST900 -«O1.~—-s SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs —-.22-Feb 1 day $170



in courses such as Massage Therapy, BUSI904 01 — INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 6:00-9:00pm ‘Thurs {-Mar 10 wks $225

Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
















Application or Nail Art Technician, you COMPUTERS

could even start a small business. Sign up COMPS$01 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-00pm Mon 5-Feb 12wks $450

for a course today. COMP901 02. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10:00am-1:GOpm Sat 3-Feb i2wks $450
COMPS02 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II -6:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb 12 wks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | 6:00-9:00pm Wed —° 7-Feb i2wks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 6wks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 12-Feb 12 wks . $500
COMP960 01 EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs 8-Mar iday $160

COMP930. =01-~—Ss WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs/Fri 1-Mar 2 days = $550















COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 Q1 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb Swks $225
COSM804- 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Swks $225
COSM807 O1 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs 26-Feb 6 wks $500





DECORATING ,
DECO800 01 — INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 8 wks $225
DECO801 Oi — INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tues 2?-Feb Bwks $250
FLOR800 Oi FLORAL DESIGN | §:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 10 wks $225
FLOR801 O1 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 1Owks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thurs {-Mar 10wks $300








ENQUIRIES
Email :: perdev@cob.edu.bs









ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb 8wks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE — 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Fri — 26-Feb 10 wks $250




All fees are included with the exception of
the application fee of $40.00 (one time).









CEES reserves the right to change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule
and Course Materials.






HEALTH & FITNESS
MASG900 = 01S MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $465
MASG901 01. ~—- MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm = Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $620
HLTH900 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $400






Contact the Coordinator ha eae
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | 6:00-9:30pm Thurs 8-Feb 12wks $250

Fo aN Be >) = Ss fe) i yA MGMT901 01» HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I! 6:00-9:30pm Mon —S-Feb. 12 wks $300

MEDICAL
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 1Owks $225

Bpremeeern

SEWING
oe wy 5 pe / : 6 SEW 800 01 ~ BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING! — 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $225
: De SEW 802 01 BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING II = 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $250






















SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Tues 27-Feb 10 wks $225

pot [ SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:06-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $250

5 O2 vA O 6) Z0,@ r je 6) we SEW811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $225
i a SEW 804 _ BEDROOM DECORATING | 1:00-10:00pm Sat 24-Feb 10 wks $225
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

Man shot dead in first





homicide of 2007

On Saturday, police officers
from Operation Quiet Storm
were in the Bamboo Town area
when they approached a man
who was found in possession}
of a 9mm handgun containing
one live round of ammunition.

Police said the male, 18,
could be charged today.

There was also an armed
robbery on,Sunday around
3am. :

Happy Time Bar on Wulff
Road was robbed by two
masked gunmen of an undeter-
mined: amount of cash.

Reports state the thieves
fled the scene in a Nissan vehi-
cle.

FROM page one

eyparent accident, but it is now
believed, following an autop-
sy, that he was strangled.

There was also a traffic
fatality on Friday morning
involving a motor-cyclist on the
western Paradise Island bridge.

Police said the man was
travelling north when he lost
control of the motorbike and
ran into a concrete wall. The
man was taken to hospital
where he died from his injuries
on Friday evening. The acci-
dent was traffic fatality num-
ber 49 for 2006.








































ES Res
| Le Tribune
Penn eet AA nate PC a ‘e

Cz LT Buyers shai

FROM page one

the government by others who
allege due process has not
been served.

Critics say circumvention of
the Bahamian courts has
proved yet again that Justice
John Lyons was right to rule
a few weeks ago that the
Bahamas. judiciary was not
independent.

In its statement yesterday,
the Workers Party said the
men’s atrest represented “the
biggest, ‘Single. jating of gov"

The University Of The West Indies.
Clinical Programme, Bahamas



Position of
Lecturer/Epidemiologist
Research Unit

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
for the post of Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Epidemiology,
in the Research Unit, UWI Clinical Programme, Bahamas.



Candidates should have training at the masters or doctoral
level in epidemiology. It is desirable for the candidate to have
interest and competence in teaching at the undergraduate level in
community health and family medicine, and overseeing the research
component of all postgraduates programmes. Experience in
the design and conduct of epidemiological ‘projects including
demonstrated ability to attract research grants would be an asset.

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute
to the development of the programme in chronic non-
communicable diseases, especially cardiovascular disease risk while
establishing collaborative projects with other researchers and units
within the Commonwealth of Bahamas and the wider UWI research
community.

Applications and curriculum vitae giving full details of
qualifications, experience, nationality, martial status, names
and full address of three referees and certified copies of degree
certificates should be sent to: The Campus Registrar, Attention:
Director, UWI Clinical Programme, Bahamas, The University, of
the West Indies, Clinical Programme, Bahamas, Shirley Street,
P.O. Box GT-2590, Nassau The Bahamas. The final date for the
receipt of application is January 19, 2007.

In order to expedite the recruitment process, applicants are
advised to ask their referees to send reports under confidential
cover directly to the University at the above address without

waiting to be contacted.

ernment in 40 years” to pro-
tect the average Bahamian
from the weight of foreign
forces.

The party said it joined with
thousands of Bahamians across
the country in calling for Prime
Minister Perry Christie to “do
the right thing” and fire Mr
Mitchell as foreign minister.

“The Workers Party is satis-
fied with its own internal inves-
tigation and appraisal of the
facts surrounding this infamous
international incident,” it
added.

Mencur said the PLP
was now afraid-that FNM

Public



Arrests row ‘could topple PLP’

leader Hubert Ingraham would
make much of this issue in
the run-up to the general elec-
tion. ;

Last week, The Tribune
reported sources close to the
government claiming that the
entire Cabinet was “in the
dark” over the incident.

The sources suggested that
the entire thing had passed
without the Cabinet’s knowl-
edge, implying that civil ser-
vants were to blame.

Whatever the truth of it, the
arrests had left the extradition

wh Ww
Panvained eee



- eds



THE TRIBUNE

Body of man
found on
Bay Street

THE body of a man
believed to be in his 40s was
discovered on Bay Street,

near the British Colonial *,

Hilton, last night.

Police said the body
appeared to have been there
for some time and the man

had suffered a head injury -

possibly from a fall.
There were no further
details at presstime.

Airport Authority
official in hospital

after suffering
a mild stroke

MR JOSEPH RECK-
LEY, acting general »
manager of the Airport’
Authority, is said to
have suffered a mild ~
stroke over the weekend
which has left him hosp}.
talised.

News reaching The.

Tribune said that, late ©

AO BT ea REE

2 OF We tee

Friday night, early Satur- °

day morning, Mr Reck-

ley suffered a stroke and

was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital where
he remains in the Inten-
sive Care Unit.

According to the
unconfirmed reports, the
apparent stroke has left
Mr Reckley unable to
speak, but he is said to
be communicating with
those attending him by
squeezing their hands in
response to inquiries.

Mr Reckley assumed
the role of acting general
manager of the Airport
Authority when he took
over the duties of outgo-
ing acting general man-
ager Mr Idris Reid.

Mr Reckley is expect-
ed to remain in the “act-
ing” position until Van-
couver Airport Services
(YVRAS) assumes con-
trol of airport opera-

tions.

ic Notice

GIBSON, RIGBY & Co.

Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law

Notaries Public

The public is hereby advised that Roshar G, Brown is no longer affiliated
with Gibson, Rigby & Co. and is no longer authorized to conduct business
on the firm’s behalf, If there are any concerns or questions please contact
our offices at the numbers listed below.

Partners

Dwayne A. Gibson
Raynard S. Rigby
Associate '
Melissa L. Selver

Chambers
East Street Shopping Centre
P.O, Box $8-6836
Nassau, Bahamas
&
George Town
Queens Highway
Exuma; Bahamas



Tel: (242) 393-6000
Fax: (242) 393-7000
E-mail: gibrig.com@batelnet.bs

Tel: (242) 336-3485
Fax: (242) 336-3487



SNR

mee,



ci

SNA



‘ Peo)














From the teacher with | ql
knowledge to share... : |

Who taught the IT a.

technician so clever... a



Who minds the computers
for the wholesaler...







Who sent the salesman
to sell the supplies...









To the owner of
the gas station...






Who hired the attendant
fo pump the gas...

Who welcomed the tourists
Who pay for the House
that Tourism Built!





January 20-26,2007
_ For More | mation
events@bahames.

Py a

he uk



















PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

. THE TRIBUNE



i eee

TN aaa

Excellent Career
Opportunity Exist for:

Graphic Artist

~ Key Competencies:
Minimum of 1 year experience

Creative
~ Energetic
‘Self Starter

Required computer knowledge |
in the following areas:
«Photoshop

eQuark
«Adobe Graphic Suite

To apply for this position please
‘send resume to

cshumanresources@aol.com

\



im By Fidelity Capital Markets

IT was a pretty quiet trading
week after the Christmas holiday.
For the week, only 53,323 shares
changed hands. The market saw
six out of its 19 listed stocks trade,
of which two advanced, one
declined and three remained.
unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank (CBL)



FOREX Rates



International Markets

with 18,510 shares changing hands
and accounting for 35 per cent of
the total shares traded.

The big advancer for the week
was Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF), up $0.30 to end the week
at $11.30. On the down side,

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) fell .

by $0.03 to close at $12.51

The FINDEX gained 7.02
points for the week, to close at
742.42.




Weekly % Change








CAD$
GBP
EUR






Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold




DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ

Nikkei.



Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

SENIOR SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR

_ The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications: c

A minimum of four (4) years experience in a

Department of an offshore bank

PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel )

Securities Administration

Knowledge of capital and money markets and instruments (bonds,

_ equities, options, fiduciaries)
Knowledge of payment wire transfer

of +. Experience. with. nautualifunds:administr
ee ef Baenelor s.cgares Nee concentration i
_,,Aecounting or Business Administration (joe.

Personal Qualities:

ation’
Finance; Economics;

- Excellent leadership, organizational and communication skills

- A commitment to service excellence

- Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision

Benefits provided include: .

- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan
- Health and Life insurance
- Other fringe benefits

ONLY PERSONS WITH SECURI TRADI
EXPERIENCE NEED APPLY.

Applications should be submitted:

AND ADMINISTRATION

Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928

Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JANUARY 12â„¢, 2007

Pricing Information As Of:
i ber 200 6

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Low ‘
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets

52wk-Low
1.2678
2.5864
2.2982

1.320246"
2.9449"""
2.472341"

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

* Colina Bond Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's welghted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume |
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings





=) Jey Del 1) ye

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



International Stock Market Indexes:



1.1653 0.77
1.9600 0.04
1.3202 0.48







Weekly % Change



$60.94 -2.21
$636.70 2.10
Weekly % Change






12,463.15 0.84
1,418.30: 0.41
2,415.29 0.45
17,225.83 0.71

‘The
right
to take

risk’

business owners and conse+

~“quently*creators-of jobs-and
wealth for the economy.and its...

people.

The current cadre of busi-
nessmen who _ struggled
through the roadblocks of the
system to build fine enterpris-
es should now champion the
cause for opening up the sys-
tem in order to give a new and
larger generation of Bahami-
ans the right to take risks.

Everyone should have the
right to dream and should they
wish, try to fulfil these dreams
whether it leads to success or
failure.

It is generally accepted that
goods and services in the
Bahamas are high priced. Is
that not why so many of our
people go abroad to shop?

Would not a more open
economy lead to more effi-
ciency, lower prices and a high-
er standard of living for all?

Granted there would be
some trauma from the change,
but no doubt when this trauma
subsides it will then be truly
Better in The Bahamas.

0.000
0.400
0.260
0.020
0.060
0.050
0.240
0.040
0.680
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.570
0.500
0.500
0,000
0.135
0.560
0.255

1.080
0.640

0.000
1.320

0.000

* - 22 December 2006

** - 30 November 2006

*** . 30 November 2006

**** _ 30 November 2006

see" . 30 November 2006













The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 742.42 YTD 34.53%

BISX CLOSING CHANGE
SYMBOL PRICE .

VOLUME YTD PRICE
. CHANGE

AML $0.61 $- 0 -16.44%
BAB — $1.25 $- 0 13.64%
BBL $0.76 $- 0 8.57%
BOB $8.03 $- 913 14.71%
BPF $11.00 $0.30 11,000 8.65%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 14.51%
BWL $1.75 $- 0 38.89%
CAB $10.00 $- 5,400 4.71%
CBL $12.51 $-0.03 18,510 37.32%
CHL $1.90 $- 0 15.85%
CIB $14.15 $- 0 30.06%
CWCB~ $ 5.24 $0.37 16,500 7.60%
DHS $2.50 $- 15.21%
FAM $5.79 $- 0 -4.30%
FCC $0.55 $- 1,000 -52.17%
FCL $12.55 $- 0 24.88%
FIN $12.02 $- 0 10.28%
ICD $7.15 $- 0 -28.14%
JSJ $8.60 $- 0 hs -4.97%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%




DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:










e CHL has declared dividends of $0.04 per share payable
within 10 business days after the record date to all shareholders
of record date December 13, 2006.

e CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR, payable
on February 7, 2007, to all shareholders of record date Decem-
ber 31, 2006.

PELE
WANTED

Progressive medical practice requires the services
of an accountant with the following qualifications:

1. CPA or BSc with a minimum of 5 years
experience.

“9. Working knowledge of all Quickbooks modules.
3, Bahamian citizenship.

Please email response to

info@gtbahamas.com



Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of



























BANQUE SASCRE
LATS Private Bonking
Vacancy for:

Credit & Controls Officer

The Credit & Controls Officer reports directly to the Chief
Operations Officer and Deputy Director.



Responsibilities:

Duties include, but are not limited to the following:

° Reconciliations of all Internal & External Bank
Accounts

° Credit Lines and Limit Controls of Loans

° Net Asset Value Weekly & Monthly Calculations

° _ Preparation & Approval of Wire Transfers

° Daily & Weekly reporting and controls

° Retrocession calculations for External Managers

° Preparation and Closing of accounts
documentation

. Approval of all daily transactions

* Disbursement of Banks expenses

Assist with all back office operations



Candidates should possess the following
qualifications:

: 5-10 years Private Banking Experience

° Associates or Bachelors degree in Accounting,
Business Administration or relevant field:

° Proficient in use of software applications such as
MS Word, MS Excel & MS outlook;

° Good oral and written communication skills;

° Ability to operate a-variety of office machines

(computer, fax , photocopy & calculator);






Apply in writing to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas

Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: narmstrong@pasche.ch

(No phone calls please)
’ opinion obtained of counsel, the

THE TRIBUNE

that had caused the Bahamian
financial services sector “significant
problems in developing our indus-

But the Forum chairman wamed:
“It is extremely important to live
up to the commitments in that pol-
icy and, on the ground, demonstrate
locally and to the international com-
munity it is not an idle boast, that
we are able to deliver on this com-
mitment, and that work permit
applications for the financial ser-
vices industry will be dealt with in
this manner. “If we drop the ball
on implementation, it will be a
major setback for us, but I’m sure
the Immigration Department is
aware of that and made the neces-
sary changes to ensure work per-
mit applications will be dealt with as
promised.

“Implementation and execution
will be very important for us. The
most effective way this message is
going to be communicated is

Work permit, from 1B

Department and the Government
are going to adopt a reasonable
approach to work permits for senior
personnel, key employees and rain-
makers who control large amounts
of business”.

Mr Moree argued that these two
objectives “are not mutually exclu-
sive”, adding: “A poorly thought-
out Immigration policy or badly-
implemented Immigration policy
can have a very adverse effect on
the financial services industry in the
Bahamas.

“It would make us uncompeti-
tive and drive multinationals and
international companies wanting to
do business in the Bahamas to our
competitors.”

Mr Moree commended Shane
Gibson, minister of labour, train-
ing and immigration, and Harcourt
Brown, director of labour, for
addressing a long-outstanding issue.

Port, from 1B

ated as nothing more than a uni-
lateral act of divestiture by the Port
Authority of its fundamental oblig-
ation under the Agreement on the
one hand and, at the very least, on
the other an...amendment of that
Agreement.

“Based on the considered legal

letter was received by Mr Ingra-
ham, but no reply was forthcom-
ing. “We have to assume the prime
minister was not aware of the sig-
nificance of these things, and what
was being done in terms of the
administration of Freeport,” Mr
Glinton said.

The October 19, 2002, letter to
Mr Ingraham pointed out that four
separate clauses in the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement included the pro-

Association confidently protest the
vision of electricity as being among

proposed sale by the Port Author-

through actual experience. The
actual experience of the various
companies involved in this indus-
try is the best marketing we could
possibly get.”

Mr Moree said that detailing the
factors taken into account by Immi-
gration when assessing work per-
mit applications would provide use-
ful guidance for financial institu-
tions looking to establish opera-
tions in the Bahamas, and wonder-
ing whether they could obtain the
necessary staff.

He added that the ‘framework
agreement’ negotiated between
Immigration and the Bahamas
Financial Services Board (BFSB)
could change the tone of the immi-
gration debate, making it positive
rather than negative. The agree-
ment could become a springboard
for using immigration as a tool for
national development, rather than
impediment, Mr Moree added, with
the benefits felt throughout the

“was very clear” that assets such as
the power company did not per-
sonally belong to the GBPA’s
shareholders. ,

The association’s letter to Mr
Ingraham argued that the power
company sale to Southern Electric
“appears to run headlong into”
Clause 3(7) of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, which prevented the
GBPA from assigning its rights
under the agreement without gov-
ernment approval, or selling more
than five per cent of its share capi-

industry and economy in terms of
more jobs, training and develop-
ment opportunities, new businesses
and an increase in the industry’s
size.

The latter, he said, would boost
gross domestic product (GDP), the
wider economy and the incomes of
many Bahamians employed in oth-
er industries. “There is going to be
a trickle down impact across the
board in our economy if we get this
right,” Mr Moree said. “We will get
the best of both worlds, and all sec-
tors of the community will bene-
fit.” He added of the financial ser-
vices immigration policy: “It’s not
xenophobic, but on the other hand

it’s not an ‘Open Sesame’ policy.”

The Immigration policy becomes
an instrument of progress, rather
than an impediment to develop-
ment, realizing that Bahamians
must be protected if they are suit-
ably qualified and given opportu-
nities in this industry.”

per cent of GBPA licensees.

Finally, the letter drew attention
to Clause 4(2) in the 1960 amend-
ment to the agreement, which
allows for the GBPA to transfer all
its governance, developmental,
licensing and regulatory powers to
a local authority, again provided
this move had 80 per cent licensee
support.

The association concluded by
saying that it seemed the interests
of the GBPA and its shareholders
seemed to always take precedence,

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007, PAGE 5B
SSS SSS Ss essere



cael Notice
NOTICE
TANK LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TANK LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Manex
‘Limited, of The Bahamas Financial Centre, 4
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Manex Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice
NOTICE
WINDY BAY LIMITED



wy

the Port Authority’s primary oblig-
ations.

And the Royal Commission of
Inquiry which reviewed the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement in 1970
reported a year later that electrici-
ty supply was among the utilities | could be made to the agreement _ social progress must remain intact,”
pervised liquidation of the Port “expressly made the exclusive _ without the consent of at least 80 the letter said.

Authority, whilst ignoring one of responsibility of the Port Authori- (b)
their primary obligations under the __ ty”.
Agreement.” Mr Glinton told The Tribune

Mr Glinton said the association _ that the Royal Commission report
Coalition, from1B _

about several of the Governmen-
t’s financial estimates for the
scheme.The Government is esti-
mating that there will be 1.25 mil-
lion claims on the NHI system per
year, yet the ILO warned that the
NHI proposed administration bud-
get did not provide for enough
claims administrators to adminis-
ter the scheme. It said that it was
possible to employ about 50 such
workers, given the financial con-
straints, with salaries and overhead
costs per capita between $60-
$100,000.

Given the 1.25 million claims
expected per year, the ILO said of
the administrators: “Each must
therefore handle an average of
25,000 claims per year, which would
equate to about 100 per day or 15 to
20 per hour. It must also be expect-
ed that a proportion of claims will
be complex or difficult to resolve. : . : :
The conclusion is that, while not ey to De eoeaee ae ae
totally unrealistic, the provision of j;,. » P 8 pu”
adequate claims handling capacity © ;
within the proposed administration
cost envelope is a demanding
assumption.”

Administrative capacity is a

recurrent concern in the ILO
report. It warned: “Care may be
needed to ensure that..... the capac-
_ ity of NIB to administer the scheme
can be matched to the needs of the
scheme, which will include a very
much greater emphasis.on claims
administration than hitherto.”

The ILO warned that given the
likely ageing of the Bahamian pop-
ulation, in 15-20 years time the
Government would have to con-
sider “the degree to which a greater
proportion of national resources
need be devoted to the health needs
of an increasingly elderly popula-
tion.

“Since the NHI does not incor-
porate a mechanism for automatic
increase of contributions, there is
no inherent ‘signal’ to enable gov- .
ernment, potentially, to respond to
such changing demands and pref-
erences for health care in relation to

ity as an unwarranted breach.of the
Agreement, which has the effect of
privatising for personal gain what is
essentially a public franchise and
facility. :

“Tt also has the dreaded effect of
allowing them to continue the unsu-

when the agreement was designed
to be a tripartite solution of equals:
government, GBPA and licensees.

“The integrity of the agreement (a)
as an instrument for economic and

tal to anyone other than Wallace
Groves or his wife without the gov-
ernment’s approval.

And it pointed out that Clause
3(8) stipulated that no amendments

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

WINDY BAY LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Mark
Edward Jackman, c/o 1 Raffles Link
#05-02 Singapore 039393.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

PACIFIC SEAS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

other expenditure opportunities or
needs.” The ILO report urged that
“care needs to be taken” on how
the NHI scheme is presented to the
public by politicians and govern-
ment officials, as the two major (a)
reports produced on NHI showed
that the scheme’s package of bene-
fits would not be unlimited.

“Tt appears that comments have
been offered to reassure the public
as to the ‘comprehensive’ nature of
the health care to be offered under
the scheme,” the ILO report said.

“?Comprehensive’ care is not
intended to mean, as might be
assumed by the public, that every
conceivable medical procedure will
be supported by NHI. The potential
for misunderstanding — and unfor-
tunate inflation of public expecta-
tions — is clear, and it may be help-
ful to prepare a briefing note on

‘this and other items of technical
terminology for the use of officials

PACIFIC SEAS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of

Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms Koh
Bee Eng c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02
Singapore 039393

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Mr Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE

HORMOZ LIMITED

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) HORMOZ LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
“Soir i gntémational Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

ee eon the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General. _ ;
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit
Suisse Trust Geneva, of Rue de Lausanne

17 bis, CH-1211 Geneva 70, Switzerland.

Ms Koh Bee Eng
Liquidator

229



Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Geneva

eet ages fl Meet ate Liquidator

Crystal Palace Casino



Legal Notice
NOTICE

RINGSON LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Baha Mar, a 500-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex
represents the single largest resort investment in the history
of The Bahamas. Baha Mar owns and operates the Wyndham
"Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino, the Radisson Cable &
Golf Resort, and the historic Nassau Beach Hotel. .

(a) RINGSON LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., of Pasea Estate, Road Town,
Tortola, BVI.

Supermarkets, 1B

per cent, or $2.1 million, to $30 mil-
lion. The increase in the latter was
generated by operating supply, pay-
roll and utility cost rises, with utili-
ties up by more than $500,000 to
$3.662 million.

Basil Sands, Bahamas Super-
markets chairman, said that in the
current fiscal year the company was
focusing on upgrading customer
service, its stores and product offer-
ings.

Bahamas Supermarkets would
also look for potential new stores,
Mr Sands said, and look to “miti-
gate” the costs of shipping, fuel and
utilities.

Ken Burns, Bahamas Supermar-
kets chief executive, said new
employee uniforms were being pro-
duced, while the number of power
lifts had been increased to improve
the speed and quickness of produce
unloading.

“In the coming year, we will
install scanning for efficient quick
check out. We plan to purchase
bulk produce to maintain consis-
tency of supply,” Mr Burns said.

Barbados Shipping & Trading’s
subsidiary, Retail & Distribution
International (RDI), will replace
Winn-Dixie on the sourcing of pro-
duce and merchandise, and develop
retail, distribution and financial
management systems.

During the initial three-year
agreement, RDI will earn a
$100,000 one-off fee for signing the
deal, and a further $25,000 per
month, ensuring it will earn
$300,000 per annum from the oper-
ating partner agreement.

BSL Holdings also has a transi-
tion services agreement with Winn-
Dixie for a year, the US retailer
earning a $1 million fee plus 5 per
cent of the costs of goods it pro-
cures for Bahamas Supermarkets. It
is understood that Bahamas Super-
markets is looking to end the agree-
ment with Winn-Dixie as rapidly
as possible.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position:

~ EXECUTIVE CHEF

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

The Executive Chef will direct and supervise all aspects of multiple outlet food
operations. This individual will excel in their teaching and training ability and
have the expertise and knowledge to lead the culinary team to achieve
excellence in all aspects of the operation.

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE
PAMOJA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

The successful candidate should possess the following:
Degree in Culinary Arts/Hospitality is preferred.
Minimum of five years as a Senior Chef supervising a similar operations with
multiple outlets serving a variety of cuisines.
Direct and maintain culinary standards and have full working knowledge and
practice of grade manger, saucier rotisserie, entremettier, ice carving, wine
and banquets
Ability to write recipes, menu specifications and maintain product cost.
Ability to develop complex work and production schedules,
Maintain food and labor cost.
Working knowledge of common software programs, such as MS Word &
Excel.

(a) PAMOJA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 29th December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., of Pasea Estate, Road Town,
Tortola, BVI.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume to

the attention of Director of Human Resources at jobs@cablebeachresorts.com or
fax to (242) 327-5897

Dated this 2nd day of January, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator


‘. PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



The Rattlers
‘defeat the
Falcons to
take Holiday
Classic title

*. ® BASKETBALL

THE CI Gibson Rat-
tlers captured the title
in their sixth CI Gibson
Holiday Classic for
senior boys basketball
teams on Saturday
night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

The Rattlers, coached
by Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson,

» pulled off a 79-65 victo-
ry over the Jordan
Prince. William Falcons,
coached by Godfrey
McQuay and Horatio
‘Yellow’ Poitier, to
secure the title.

Nemnon Robson
scored a game high 20
points with 13 rebounds
and two block shots,
Jermaine Storr had 17
points, 10 rebounds and
five assists and David
Taylor added 17 points
with 11 rebounds in the
win.

Rashad Williams had
19 points with five
assists; Ollen Smith
chipped in with 14

' points and D’Andre
‘Scooter’ Reid finished
with 11 points in the
loss.

David Taylor was
named the most valu-

-_ able player in the cham-
pionship game, while
Nemnon Robson was
the championships’ best

-, defensive player.

*-’- In the consolation
game, the Dame Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins

.. clinched third place

-*. with a 74-46 decision
over the Mt Carmel
Cavaliers.

~~ Rebounds

Prince Pinder scored
_ 20 points and Rarsenio
-.: Dorsette had 16 points
~ with nine rebounds for
the Mystic Marlins, who
were coached by Thur-
ment Johnson.

For the Cavaliers,
coached by Ray Evans,
Taquil Ferrier had a
game high 24 points in
the loss.

-_-, Inthe individual
_ awards presented,
Leslie St. Fleur of Doris





impression of the new national stadium

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WORK on the construction of the
new national stadium is expected to
get underway this month and will be
ready by December, 2008, according to
Minister of Youth, Sports and Housing
Neville Wisdom.

His disclosure came on Saturday
night as he delivered the keynote
address at the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations' 7th annual
gala awards banquet at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel.

American IAAF 2005 World Out-
door Championships' 100 metre cham-

pion Lauryn Williams was the special
guest of honour.

Wisdom revealed that on Decem-
ber 15, his government officially turned
over the site at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Center to the contractors for
the construction of the new stadium
that is being built by the Peoples
Republic of China as a gift to the
Bahamian people.

Since December 18, Wisdom fur-
ther noted that the technical personnel
have been fully occupied, setting points,
for the layout of the stadium that will
have a 10,000 seating capacity. i

As of January 15, Wisdom noted
that pile testing will commence and

continue for the next six weeks.

As of March 1, he announced that
the pouring of the actual foundation of
the national stadium will take place.

"Best estimates indicates that the
stadium will be completed in Novem-
ber, 2008, with handover proceedings
occurring a month later as a Christ-
mas gift to the Bahamian people,"
Wisdom projected.

As the government waits for the
completion of the stadium, Wisdom
said they will continue to work towards
preparing the athletes for Project Bei-
jing and Beyond — a long-term pro-.
gramme that he said is geared towards
maximising opportunities for Bahami-



“pa stadium
‘will be ready in 2008’

ans to participate in the 2008 Olympic
Games in Beijing; and advancing a
strategic intervention to expand and
to heighten the sustainability of the
rate at which elite athletes are pro-
duced by the local national system. _

In an effort to achieve these objec-
tives, Wisdom said they will work in
"total harmony" with all relevant
national federations and associations
and, to a lesser extent, with the various
interscholastic sporting bodies through-
out the Bahamas.

"Competent personnel have
already been identified to spearhead
Project Beijing and Beyond," he dis-
closed.

-BAAA receives $220,000

2) 0 Oi B Ee 8

ome ae

eo Sa BO ?e

*. Johnson took home the

.*-most assists and most -
-1. steals awards; Travis

-* Stuart of Mt. Carmel

from event organisers

a 3

5
~

cheque

won the most rebounds;
Alvarez Rahming of the
South Andros Cheetahs
_- won the most blocks

‘and Romell Johnson of
CV Bethel was named
the most offensive play-
er.

In the slam dunk
competition, Nemnon
Robson won the title,
while his CI Gibson
team-mate Cameron
Adderley claimed the
three-point shooting
title.

¢ Named to the All-
Tournament first team
were:

Leslie St. Fleur
(Doris Johnson); Ricar-
do Moultrie (St. ;
John’s); Eugene Bain
(CC Sweeting); Rashad
Williams (Prince
William); Romell John-
son (CV Bethel); Travis
Stuart (Mt. Carmel);
Clint Brown (Kingsway
Academy); Hubert
Williams (Eight Mile
Rock); David Taylor
(CI Gibson) and Jer-
maine Storr (CI Gib-
son).

@ NAMED to the
All-Tournament
second team were:

‘. Alvarez Rahming
(South Andros); Taquil
Ferrier (Mt. Carmel);

. Vincent Strachan (RM

--. Bailey); Patrick Brice

* (Doris Johnson); Nem-
non Robson (CI Gib-

.. son); Renardo Baillou

‘, (CR Walker); Fabian
Thompson (Wolmer’s
High); Ollen Smith
(Prince William); Cruz

-. Simon (CC Sweeting)
and Nathaniel Cooper
(Hight Mile Rock).



@ THE BAHAMAS Association of Athletic Associations received a cheque for $220,000 from the organising committee of the 2005 Central American and Caribbean
Championships. Pictured in front row are Minister of Sports Neville Widsom; accountant Montgomery Brathwaite; BAAA’s president Mike Sands; BAA A’s first
vice president Curt Hollingsworth and committee chairman Dr. Bernard Nottage. In back row are BAAA’s secretary general Foster Dorsett; second vice presi-
dent Anita Doherty; Council Member Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson; treasurer Rosamunde Carey; assistant treasurer Debbie Smith; statistician Tyrone Burrows and
public relations officer Kermit Taylor. ° See story on Sports front.

iT ist Clarke)
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2007
LOCAL NEWS:

Crowds take to their feet for New

m By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE New Year’s Day Junkanoo
parade was a vision of the pre-
bleacher days of old, with crowds of
spectators vying for the best stand-
ing and non-bleacher seating views
on Shirley Street, leaving barren
bleachers on Bay Street.

The most noticeably desolate
bleachers were those between
Charlotte and Market Streets, in
front of John Bull.

Also barren up to 4.30 New
Year’s morning was the parade
route, as large groups such as The
Valley Boys had not yet brought
their costumes down to the begin-
ning of the route.

Spectators who watched empty
streets into the early hours of the
morning commented on how scanty
this New Year’s Junkanoo Parade
looked, saying: “The groups look
small and the streets are empty.”

The winners of the Boxing Day
parade, Roots, started things off at
around 2.30 with a theme of “A
Mighty Nation”. One of the group’s

SEE page nine

daca sbs a

moves to the music



Women’s Full Figured Fashions

After Christmas
Sale

10 - 50% Off

Selected Items

Maderia Shopping Plaza Tel: (242) 326-1879
| P.O. Box SS-5166 Fax: (242) 324-5706
Nassau, Bahamas - E-mail: sizes@coralwave.com











Open: Mon. - Sat.: 10 am - 6pm
TH EET PIPETTE ERT PENN TS

THE TRIBUNE













~ a ee a





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