Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





FROM page 1B

his family holds a 64 per cent
stake, objected to the deal,
Dionisio D’Aguilar said his
company was finding it impos-
sible to get “a definitive
answer” from the regulator
when it came to timelines and
how the process would work.

“We have a distinct problem
with the fact that the Securities
Commission are being extreme-
ly vague on what the timeline
is,” Mr D’ Aguilar said, telling
Tribune Business the uncer-
tainty could potentially disrupt
the AML Foods share price
and maintenance of an orderly
Bahamian capital market.

“There’s no definitive law,
and we all have to operate in
this world of best practices,
which I find unacceptable,” Mr
D’ Aguilar added. “The Secu-
rities Commission needs to
show some a little bit of back-
bone and recognise that it can-
not drag this process on indefi-
nitely.

“He’s [Mr Finlayson] got to
put up and make a decision
about what he’s going to do.
It’s causing too much turmoil
in the marketplace. He’s made
an announcement and it’s
mind-boggling to me that he’s
not dotted the ‘1’s’ and crossed
the ‘t’s’ before.

“Now, you’re dithering. To
me, that’s not an option. He’s
either moving forward or he’s
not.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said the uncer-
tainty over whether Mr Fin-
layson would move forward
with the $1.50 per share offer (a
44 per cent premium to the cur-
rent $1.04 market price) to
acquire a 51 per cent stake in
the BISX-listed food retail
group might impact its share
price, and in the absence of
“anything concrete” staff, too,
were also being impacted.

“It’s not an ideal environ-
ment to operate your business
in,” he added. ““We’re going out
hiring professionals, incurring
costs because of this acquisi-
tion. You’re either doing it or
you’re not.”

Mr Finlayson said earlier this
week that his need to satisfy
ABAD shareholders over their
concerns in relation to his pro-
posed AML Foods acquisition
would likely delay the tender
offer’s launch, although he dis-
puted Mr D’Aguilar’s con-
tention that the Securities Com-
mission had given him a dead-

AML Foods chief
tells Commission:
‘Show backbone’



MARK FINLAYSON

line of today by which to do
this.

Explaining that he had “two
issues” moving forward, Mr
Finlayson said: “The immedi-
ate thing I need to address is
my ABDAB shareholders.
They have been with us for a
long, long time, and when they
raised it and said they’re not in
favour of the AML purchase,
it puts us in a bad position.”

The key contention is that
ABDAB shareholders would
have benefited enormously
from Mr Finlayson’s original
City Markets expansion plans,
as their company owns the real
estate for three Super Centre
sites he was targeting - two in
Nassau on JFK Drive and East-
West Highway, and one in
Freeport.

However, if the AML Foods
acquisition is successful, Mr
Finlayson would not need the
East-West Highway and
Freeport real estate, given the
proximity of AML’s existing
two Solomon’s SuperCentre
sites. As a result, ABDAB
investors would only realise
rental income yields from the
JFK Drive property, largely
excluding them from the bene-
fits of a successful AML Foods
purchase.

Pledging that he would pro-
vide “a fair and equitable solu-
tion” to involve ABDAB and
its investors in the AML Foods
transaction, Mr Finlayson said:
“Up until last week, this issue
had not raised its head. It’s only
fair to ABDAB shareholders,
some of whom have been with
us since 1986, to deal with
them.

“T feel an obligation to make
sure they’re satisfied, and feel
quite confident we can satisfy
them and acquire AML as a
result. We’re in talks with a

investor.”

Mr D’Aguilar, though, last ee f
night told Tribune Business } ment, it is being targeted at
that AML Foods had been led }

to believe that Mr Finlayson }

had until today to issue a for-
mal tender offer and circular

accept or reject the shares ten-

60 days.

layson a ‘put up or shut up’ }
message, the AML Foods chair- }
man called on the Securities }
Commission to ensure “this }
state of dither is not allowed to }

persist”.

Adding that AML Foods had
its counter-strategy and plan in } eoriiouetenenwmk
place, Mr D’ Aguilar told Tri- Lewes
one ei Sear ee the Bahamian aircraft operators declined to go
allow the process to drag on }
indefinitely. They have a duty }
to ensure orderly workings of :
the market, and by making this :
announcement and not moving
forward, Mr Finlayson is dis- ;
rupting the market. It behooves ;
them to step in and bring order
? healthy, thriving and profitable aviation sector.
He added that in AML : They outlined a number of things they thought
Foods’ opinion, the Securities | would be helpful in acheiving those goals and
mm : that’s really where we left it,” said the Minister
definitive. We cannot get a def- when asked about the purpose and outcome of
Philip Stubbs, the Securities | ier
Comarssion chairman, while ? the duty demand over aircraft, Mr Vander-
declining to give specifics, told }
Tribune Business earlier this } ay nee
week that the regulator was in there is “no change on the position”.
contact with both sides, and was i _ ree
seeking to ensure the process } Said the Minister.
followed the draft Takeover }

Code it was set to release for :

to the process.”

Commission was “not being

inite answer from them”.

industry consultation shortly.

Request for Proposals
Internal Audit Services

The Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA) 1s the
new Converged Regulator for the electronic communications sector
(ECS) covering radio and television broadcasting, radio spectrum,
internet and data, pay-TV and voice telephony. URCA was
established on 1 August 2009, as a corporate body, by the URCA Act
2009. URCA is the successor to the Public Utilities Commission,
which ceased to exist once URCA came into being.

This Request for Proposals (RFP) is for the provision of internal
audit services by an independent service provider. The RFP can
be downloaded from the URCA website at www.urcabahamas.bs in
the Newsroom section. All responses should be addressed to the
attention of the Chief Executive Officer of URCA, and should be
submitted to URCA by 4:00 p.m. on February 25, 2011.

Gipson, Ricsy & Co.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Noraries PusLIC

The Partners of Gibson, Rigby & Co.
are pleased to announce that

MS. MAGAN S. KNOWLES

&

MS. CANDICE C. FERGUSON

have joined the Firm with effect
from the 31" day of January A.D., 2011



FROM page 1B
As it is a private place-

specific investors, only such
as institutions and high net-

i worths, so ordinary mem-
? bers of the Bahamas public
to the company’s shareholders. ;
7 That would lead to the AML ¢ involved. It is not a public
oods directors issuing their } for
own circular in response, and } onan.
Mr D’ Aguilar said he was }
under the impression that the ; ,
whole process - including the ; declined to comment when
offer duration and Mr Fin-

layson’s decision on whether to }

should not apply to get
Philip Lightbourne, Phil’s
Food Services’ owner,

contacted by Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday afternoon,

? but conceded that he was

dered - would be over within | seeking to raise additional

clive acini Bar capital for the business. He

directed this newspaper to
speak with Mr Longley, but
he did not return phone
messages or e-mails prior to
press time yesterday.

Expansion

Phil’s Food Services last
year revealed plans for a
$2.5 million expansion at its
existing store, so it is possi-
ble some of the capital being
raised is for this purpose.

Mr Lightbourne, who
then employed 125 people
at the Gladstone Road food
store which opened in
December 2009, said last

Food retailer in
$5m capital offer

number of shareholders, and ;
think we can come up with a :
product that satisfies every }

year the expansion would
create 50 jobs and involve
an increase in the number
and variety of retail lines at
Phil's, with a special focus
on growing their produce
sales in the wake of the
Prime Bahamas/Bahamas
Food Services merger.
Wholesale liquor will also
be introduced.

"We are putting in a mas-
sive cooler and taking the
produce market to another
level. Since Prime Bahamas
(recently absorbed by BFS)
shut its doors, the retail mar-
Ket has gone really weak.
We are going to pick up the
slack,” said Mr Lightbourne.

Minister meets sector on plane tax concerns

FROM page 1B

Contacted yesterday for comment, several of

into details about the meeting.

In an interview with Tribune Business, Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace confirmed that he
met with the operators over the Customs tax
issue and other aviation-related matters.

“T think there was a better understanding of
what the Government is trying to achieve, and
an assurance to them that we wish to see a

Asked what the Government’s position is on
pool-Wallace said that as far as he was aware

“That’s a matter for Customs to address,”

Undertaking

However, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said

? there was an undertaking on behalf of the
? companies represented to bring to the Gov-
? ernment evidence of “exactly how the sector is
: performing under the current (tax) regime”, so
? that the Ingraham administration can make
? informed decisions about any potential
; changes to its demands.

He suggested companies operating in the

? domestic aviation sector have “not been
? inclined” to provide such information before.

“Tt is always good to know how they are

doing now under the current regime,” Mr Van-
: derpool-Wallace said.

“They gave an undertaking that made a

? great deal of sense, and have committed to
? go and take a look so that something can be
? provided to tell how they are doing today, so
? that any recommendations that are made are
i supported by the facts.”

“In a country where there is no income tax

? and no need for anyone to provide evidence
? about how a company is performing, it is very
? difficult for the Government to make deci-
i sions about tax-related matters.”

The Department of Customs had suggested

it would take action in January to collect the
; outstanding duty, which it said was owed by
? numerous domestic airline companies who

had imported planes into the Bahamas without
paying the required import and stamp tax, and
by private plane owners. One airline was said
to owe as much as $700,000.

However, airlines and private plane own-
ers have complained about the attempt to col-
lect the tax, which was first brought to their
attention in letters sent out in November last
year. The letters threatened that if the aircraft
operators did not pay up, they could face hav-
ing their craft seized.

The operators have argued that it is unfair
for the Department to attempt to go back and
collect the tax, given their claim that Customs
was well aware that the planes were being
brought into the country, but allegedly oper-
ated a policy of not collecting the revenue at
the time.

They also question on what basis the tax
would be collected - the purchase price of the
plane when new, at the present time, or at the
time it first came into the country - and who
would be asked to pay the tax - whether that
be those whose aircraft are registered in the
Bahamas, or those who are not but have been
in the country for a given period of time, or
both.

Meanwhile, operators have questioned what
happens in the case of those who bought the
planes second hand in The Bahamas from oth-
er people who originally imported them into
the country.

They allege that the Customs Department
has refused to make these distinctions clear.

Industry stakeholders have also insisted that
for the Government to seek to collect the
funds now places a financial stress on an indus-
try which is “vital” to inter-island transporta-
tion and economic activity, and is already
under financial pressure, as well as potential-
ly discouraging high net worth individuals who
might wish to reside or do business in this
country from doing so, on the basis that they
will be taxed for bringing their plane into the
country.

Captain Randy Butler, Sky Bahamas chief
executive, told Tribune Busines in January
that should the Department of Customs not
further clarify the basis upon which any tax
demanded is being calculated, he would take
the Government to court over the demands.

For his part, Customs Comptroller Glenn
Gomez, suggested that the Government is
merely seeking to collect what should have
been obtained in years past. Mr Gomez was
not available for further comment on the sta-
tus of the collection effort yesterday.

-ANew Opportunity in Sales Awaits
You!

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you.

Requirements:

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* Excellent communication skills
Must have own transportation
Basic computer skills
Ability to work flexible hours

Ability to manage all aspects of client accounts, including collections

Successtul candidates will be expected to manage an existing client
portfolio AND actively pursue new clients for the company.

Full training will be provided and an excellent commission based
remuneration package awaits successful candidates.

If you have what it takes to join our team we are waiting to hear from
You......

Please send your applications to:

DA 1257
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Bow N-3207

Nassau

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 5B



BIC’s $37.5m
acquisition

‘veto’ threshold

; Several general questions regarding
: general listing issues” by the Govern-

deputy chairman of the Government-appointed privatisation com- i ment in relation to its plans to float

mittee, told the Rotary Club of West Nassau that the Government : the BTC - valued at between $36-$40

extended BTC’s cellular exclusivity post-privatisation from two } million - to Bahamian investors by

years to three to give Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC) i year-end.

enough time to restructure and get the business ready for compe- :

FROM page 1B

tition, otherwise it would get “creamed”.

This move has forced the Government to table amendments to :
the Communications Sector Policy in the House of Assembly, but }
Mr Francis said: “The Government recognises that if it liberalised executives from international brewing
Se ae Be nae ae . ee a pie y ae ‘o + giant, Heineken, had been in Nassau
give it a little more Tinie to make adjustments, otherwise tiey 1 oo rier this week, meeting with both

“Cable & Wireless said: ‘Look here, government, we need two- BISX and the Securities Commission,
? in relation to the upcoming 25 per cent
The bid process for a second cellular licence will thus start in mid- } ea Commonwealth Brew-
i ery .

2014, with a third such licence only available five years after pri- }

vatisation, but Mr Francis said he was confident liberalisation ; s
? town, and we met with them,” Mr

would get creamed.

and-a-half to three years to get it ready at least.”

would come to the Bahamian mobile phone sector.

He added: “If you look at the existing rates in the Bahamas and ;
in the Caribbean, we expect rates to come down, and don’t think }

they will come back up.”

Comparing the Bahamas’ $0.20-plus per minute cellular rates i
with the $0.02 per minute prevailing in Jamaica, Mr Francis said: }
“The expectation is that when we have fierce competition in this }
sector, it will bring rastes down to where you have just enough prof- i

it to make it a worthwhile business.”

Compensating

alised market, Mr Francis said there were compensating factors.

same-island calls.
In addition, Mr Francis said that with consumers in the Bahamas
and rest of the world increasingly shifting to cell phone use, fixed

making the end to free same-island calls less of an issue.

er. The best we could hope for is that they remain as they are.”

After detailing the product ‘bundling’ solution, he added: “The :

Bahamas, like other places in the world, is moving rapidly to past year has come out of the market," LaSalle Futures Group ana-
mobile. Today, BT'C’s mobile services are 70 per cent of its busi- 3 lyst Matt Zeman said. "So far, there just hasn't been a good driver

ness, and less than 30 per cent is fixed, and we expect that shift is | to really propel it up."

going to continue over time.”

calls situation: “I don’t think that’s going to be a critical issue.”

Adding that a privatised BTC would “provide commercial ser- }
vices on a par with what’s available in Florida and the US,” Mr }
Francis said that among the issues the Government had veto pow- }
er over - the areas it has to agree with CWC before changes can be }
implemented at BTC - were alterations to the company’s corporate }

governance and capital structure.

BTC is also prevented from lending money to other entities in }
the CWC group (it can only lend money within BTC), while bor- }
rowing and making loans above a certain level, placing a mortgage }
on company assets, relocation of operations outside the Bahamas, }
entering into strategic partnerships and joint ventures, and contracts {
outside the normal course of business also require the Govern- }

ment’s approval.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSNA JONASSAINT
of PINEWOOD GARDENS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11‘
day of February, 2011 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SEDRA JULYSSA WILSON
of 24 Glendale Subdivision, PO. BOX SS-6262,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 4'* DAY of February 2011 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-

7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Computer Hardware and Software company
seeks applicants for the post of

FROM page 1B

Business yesterday that the exchange
had already “been contacted and asked

Meeting

And he also told this newspaper that

“There’s no secret. They were in

Davies told Tribune Business, declining

to comment on what was discussed.
Sources familiar with the situation

this week told Tribune Business that



the Burns
House/Com-
monwealth
Brewery
IPO was
being target-
ed for a date
in the late
first quar-
ter/early sec-
ond quarter
of 2011, with
RoyalFideli-
ty selected as
the lead
placement
agent/advi-
sor.

The invest-
ment bank
has been calling around key institu-
tional investors and advisors in the
Bahamian capital markets to inquire
how much of the IPO they and their
clients plan to take up.

“They were calling around last week,
asking how many assets you had under
management, how much you're going

KEITH DAVIES

BISX ‘contacted over BIC's IPO

to take,” said one source. Tribune Busi-
ness understands that while most of
the IPO details have been worked out,
Heineken and Burns House/Com-
monwealth Brewery are now waiting
on the Government to approve the
timing of the IPO.

With the Government having effec-
tively agreed to underwrite the IPO
by picking up all the shares not sub-
scribed for by private investors, Tri-
bune Business understands that the
Ingraham administration has to
approve the launch date, something
that could be impacted by the current
fiscal position.

Other conditions for the IPO are
that Bahamian investors get the same
price, and same terms and conditions,
as Heineken did when it acquired the
Burns House/Commonwealth Brew-
ery Stakes previously held by the Fin-
layson-controlled Associated Bahami-
an Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB)
for a price estimated to range from



py I NIC\A
; _ a > i i



"Investors shift money from gold to riskier assets

i? NEW YORK

While the free intra-island fixed voice landline calls enjoyed ;
by all residents today might become a thing of the past ina liber- ;

Greater confidence in the U.S. economy is leading investors to

: : : : : i move money out of gold and into riskier assets in search of bigger
He pointed out that Bahamas-based carriers, including a priva- } profits y 8 8s
tised BTC, could ‘bundle’ together products such as fixed voice } 5
landline, cellular, Internet and TV, offering some or all of these at : year as more evidence surfaced that the economy is strengthening.

lower price points and thus compensating for the end to free }

Gold prices have fallen 4.2 percent since the beginning of the

More positive economic news came Thursday when The Labor

i Department said the number of Americans applying for unem-
? ployment benefits for the first time fell to the lowest point since ear-
? ly July 2008.

voice services in the home were becoming increasingly obsolete, }

In addition, the Commerce Department said wholesale busi-

i nesses increased inventories 1 percent in December. Economists

Acknowledging that he did not know whether free same-island }
calls would become a thing of the past, Mr Francis said: “As we all }
know, in the Bahamas we enjoy fixed landline costs that could not }

possibly be lower. It would be incorrect to think they could go low- }
i panies, is up 5.1 percent so far this year.

consider that a healthy level for inventories.

Stocks, which are considered riskier assets than gold, have been
rising since the beginning of the year. The Standard & Poor's 500
index, the most widely used measure for stocks of large U.S. com-

"A lot of that flight-to-quality bid that we saw in gold over the

Gold and silver typically are considered safer assets to hold

With fixed landline becoming increasingly important instead during uncertain economic times. Many analysts believe gold
for Internet connectivity, Mr Francis said of the free same-island ; pices will climb nigher ths year ‘because tere-etill are: plobal
. ? economic issues that need to be addressed.

$120-$130 million.

NOTICE is hereby given that ISLET FLORESTAL of
Kemp Road, Nassau, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 11° DAY of February 2011
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, KEVIN TONY of
Stapeldon Gardens.,Nassau, Bahamas intend to change
my name to KEVEN CHERFILS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the

date of publication of this notice.

















Legal Notice

NOTICE
MARISTELLA S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

This notice replaces the publication of 9th October
2009 in this Gazette wherein the name MARISTELLA
S.A. was incorrectly referred to.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL SB FIDELITY

Morty al Work

NOTICE

PRINCE HALL FAMILY CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED
(INVOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 105 of the Co-operative Societies Act,
2005 that PRINCE HALL FAMILY Co-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED is in dissolution.
Dissolution commenced on December 29, 2010 when the Director of Societies exercised his
powers pursuant to the Co-operative Societies Act, 2005,

e7, P.O, Box $$-6229, 4" Floor, Centreville House, 2" Terrace
amas,

The Liqui
West, Cen

ator is James B, Go
eville, Nassau, B

Persons having debts or claims against the Co-operative are required to send particulars to the
Liquidator on or before March 31, 2011. In default, thereof, they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.





Dated: February 10, 2011
JAMES B. GOMEZ
Liquidator

S FG
e

CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 10 FEBURARY 2011
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,472.35 | CHG -0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -27.16 | YTD % -1.81
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low
0.97

Securit_y
AML. Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

1.04
10.63
4.42
0.18

9.67
4.42
0.18
2.70
2.1F
10.24
2.40
6.85
2.10
1.40
5.47
6.51
3.39
5.48
1.00
7.40
9.82
10.00

2.70
2.14
9.62
2.36
5.40.
1.63
1.40
5.47
F ae
8.77
B75
1.00
5.00.
9.82
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS$ Pe
0.123
0.013
0.153

-0.877
0.168
0.016
1.050
0.781
0.488
0.111
0.107
0,357
0,287
0.494
0.452
0.000
0.012
0.859
41.207

Change Daily Vol. Div $
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.04
10.63
4.42
0.18
2.70
a. 1F
10,21
2.40
6.85
2.06
1.40
5.47
6.51
8.39
5.48
1.00
7.40
9.82
10.00

0.00,
0.00.

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Hi__S2wk-Low. Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Interest
6.95%
7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022

30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

P/E

Bid &
5,01

ASK
6.01

Last Pirce
14.00

EPSS$
-2,.945
0,001

Div &
0,000
0.000

Symbol
Banamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Daily Wo.

0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13 31.59 29.00

0.45 0.55 0.55,

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD%

1.5179 5.51%
2.9527
1.5808
2.7049
13.4164
114.3684
106.5528
1.1465
1.1185
1.1491

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0,002

Software/Hardware Technician oe

NAV 6GMTH
1.475244
2.910084
1.533976

Fund Name
CPAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CPFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Last 12 Months %

6.90% 30-Nov-10
31-Jan-11
28-Jan-11
31-Jan-11
31-Jan-11
30-Jun-10
30-Sep-10
31-Dec-10
31-Dec-10
31-Dec-10

1.4076
2.8300
1.5114
2.8522
13.0484
101.6693
99.4177

0.18%
0.43%
0.56%
0.44%
9.98%
4.75%
5.20%
4.73%
5, 35%

1.61%
4.59%
-15.54%
-0.10%
12.49%
7.18%
5.20%
4.73%
5.35%

Salary commensurate with experience and
education.

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

109.392860
100.779540

107.570619
105.776543
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

Addition benefits available. See. eee ene So NYG

10.0000

10.6417 -1.20% 0.50% 30-Nov-10

9.1708
31-Jan-11
31-Jan-11

10.1266 1.27%
8.4510 0.72%
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

1.27%

4.8105 9.95%

Interested applicants should send resumes
and appropriate information to:

jobs@bias-bahamas.com

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





THE TRIBUNE



aa ee
Bahamas lost ‘good.

slice of growth’ on BTC

FROM page 1B

Cable & Wireless Communica-
tions (CWC), as “vastly impor-
tant”, Mr Francis said: “It’s a
pity we couldn’t do this in 1998
or thereabouts 12 years ago.
That’s when we really wanted
to do it.”

Recalling how he served on
the first-ever privatisation com-
mittee created by the Govern-
ment back then, Mr Francis
added: “It would have been far
better for the economy if we’d
been able to do it, but at that
time BTC was not in a position
to do it, as it couldn’t get audit-
ed financial statements.”

The groundwork for BTC’s
privatisation had already been
laid then, with the Ingraham
administration reducing the
company’s workforce by more
than 50 per cent - from 2,600
to 1,200 - sparking rowdy
scenes and protests in Rawson
Square.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has previously said
the failure to privatise BTC was
among the biggest regrets of his
first administration, hinting that
with hindsight he should have
let the process proceed despite
the absence of audited finan-
cial statements.

“T really believe it has cost
the economy tremendously, the
missed opportunity of compe-
tition, lower prices, the exten-
sion of existing services, launch
of new services, more invest-
ment in the sector, all these
kinds of things,” Mr Francis
said of the ‘stop, start’ nature of
the privatisation over the inter-
vening 12 years, including two

5-Day ForEcAST

failed processes. Adding that it
would be a project for an econ-
omist to undertake, the former
Central Bank governor said of
the total opportunity cost
incurred by Bahamian busi-
nesses and the economy: “It
wouldn’t surprise me if you’re
talking a good slice of the GDP
growth.”

Pointing out that the
Bahamas had lagged main
regional rivals when it came to
communications sector liberal-
isation and competition, with
Barbados, for example, getting
Internet services four years
before this nation, Mr Francis
said there was “no question”
about the need to privatise
BTC.

“We need to get this done,
get this behind us, and move
on with life,” he told Tribune
Business.

Partner

The BTC executive chairman
said the privatisation committee
and the Government “could
not have done much better” in
their selection of a strategic
partner in CWC, given its
regional footprint, familiarity
with Caribbean culture and
how to operate in this area, and
the fact that its business model
almost exactly matched BTC’s.

Pointing out that for some
potential buyers “some aspects
of BTC would have no value”,
given that they were focused in
specific sectors, Mr Francis told
Tribune Business: “It’s proba-
bly true to say there’s more syn-
ergy with Cable & Wireless
than any other buyer.”

Adding that no other tele-
coms carrier could provide
“wider and fuller synergies than
Cable & Wireless”, Mr Francis
revealed that during negotia-
tions with the British-head-
quartered operator, he had told
its representatives he felt a pri-
vatised BTC, under their major-
ity control, could be trans-
formed into their best-per-
forming jurisdiction in the
Caribbean.

“T think it is possible that
BTC is going to far outstrip
their other businesses in the
region. I really do,” he added.
“They have the resources, the
synergies and the footprint to
extract the maximum value
from it.

“They, more than anyone
else, can get value out of BTC.
I think it’s a great opportunity
for them, and a great opportu-
nity for us.”

Addressing critics of the pri-
vatisation, Mr Francis told Tri-
bune Business: “Those people
opposed to the 51 per cent sale,
they’re living in the past and
don’t understand where the
economy needs to be, and don’t
understand the reality of glob-
al competition

“Tf you don’t have the big
guys going to bat for you today
in those critical areas of your
business, like procurement, like
roaming arrangements, those
big arrangements that benefit
international business, which is
so important for the Bahamas,
if you do not have that kind of
support in the business, you’re
going to be a second rate play-
er.”

=
x
S
=

WEATHER REPORT [22:22

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 7B

—

- TO OUR VALUABLE CLIENTS:

SL Bahamas would like to thank you for your.
continued patronage during 2010.

ISL Imports - eCast system update
nan effort to serve you even better in 2011, we would
ike to announce the upcoming 2011 release of
SL Imports. This will be fully integrated with the
Customs Department new eCAS system, allowing you
to complete your entries accurately and efficiently in

SL Imports and then electronical

Â¥ make your

document submissions into eC As.

ISL Payroll - NIB Update

To all of our valued ISL Payroll clie

nts we would also

ike to announce that the update for the NIB ceiling
adjustment is now currently available. Ifyou haven't
already done so, kindly contact us to make arrange-

ments to have your ISL Payroll sof

We sincerely appreciate the oppo

tware updated.

rtunity to serve you

all over the past year and wish you all the best for

201 |!

UV INDEX Topay

0|1|2|/3|4|5/6





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

a

Times om ic and
High: 83° Low: 70°

CELLU ete AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel PN CU Lmter Lua EN Cater Lune CCL r Lumet

89° F 73° F 75°-63° F 77°-63° F 80°-64° F 81°-66° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure,
and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

A

a wife

@_ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 76° F/24°C
Low: 60° F/16°C

Low MODERATE

wes | eee | | |

Mostly cloudy, a
shower or two late

ORLANDO.
High: 70°F/21°C
Low: 47° F/8°C
- ey
TAMPA i, f-
High: 64° F/18° C ."s
™ Low: 47° F/8°C

=

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection

Partly sunny, a Sunshine and nice

shower; not as warm
High: 76°
Low: 66°

Partly sunny, breezy
and pleasant
High: 78°
Low: 65°

Mostly sunny, breezy
and pleasant

High: 80°
Low: 66°

on High: 79°
Low: 68° TIDES FoR Nassau
High Ht(ft.)

2.3

Low

=
as



Today :01 a.m. 7:26 a.m.

:08 p.m.

Saturday :59 a.m. 8:28 a.m.

8:22 p.m.

9:31 a.m.
9:24 p.m.

10:29 a.m.
10:25 p.m.

11:23 a.m.
11:23 p.m.

12:12 p.m.

i _

— lll ;
;’ mers Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday
Temperature

82° F/28° C
. 73° F/23° C
fF? F257 C
. 64° F/18° C
Last year's high . 78° F/26° C
Last year's low 64° F/18° C
Precipitation
As of 1 p.m. yesterday
Year to date
Normal year to date ..

Sunday

ABACO
High:79° F/26° C
Low:67°F/19°C



2 |o9 |o9 |oo §

Monday

1
°

Normal high
Normal low



Tuesday 4:54 a.m.

5:13 p.m.

Wednesday5:47 a.m.
6:07 p.m.

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A
— <1 >
mein 7-14 knots
FREEPORT

High: 76° F/24°C
Low: 65° F/18°C



wo [RO lw [OB [uo |4o

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” ad
a

_—a i
i ;

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 76° F/24° C
Low: 58° F/14°C

Thursday 6:36 a.m.

—e 6:58 p.m.

A

10-20 knots

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

YUU Mt

Sunrise...... 6:47 a.m.
Sunset....... 6:01 p.m. Moonset... .

First Full Last

Feb.11 Feb.18 Feb.24 Mar. 4

SAN SALVADOR
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

2

MIAMI
High: 76° F/24°C
Low: 59° F/15°C

ELEUTHERA
High: 83° F/28° C

NASSAU _ Low: 72° F/22°C

High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 70° F/21°C
a

A
a a

=> V
7 = 6-12 knots

ANDROS
High: 84° F/29°C
Low: 70° F/21°C

11:37 a.m.
12:40 a.m.

Moonrise. ...

a
<2
fa

KEY WEST A
High: 74° F/23° C ~
Low: 63° F/17°C

CATISLAND
High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C
4-8 knots

GREAT EXUMA

High: 84° F/29° C
A

<5 <1 & >
Vv

Low: 71° F/22°C
Te. 4
LONG ISLAND
High: 85° F/29°C 6-12 knots
MAYAGUANA
<.
CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT TRACKING Map

¢ n Low: 69° F/21°C
Charlotte e i | High: 87° F/31° C
35) Highs: 5ST F/1.1' °c Shown is today's Low:69° F/21°C
High: 89° F/32° C
Pensacola{ __ savannah RAGGEDISLAND Low:70° F/21°C
a 4 1 ‘ High: 87° F/31°C
1 Highs:54 -F/12° (12°C Highs: 57°F °¢ 7 d $d Low:67° F/19°C {3
} 30 7 : 3 GREAT INAGUA

| Atlanta e : ‘ i ‘ _. weather. Temperatures
are today's highs and

Dayle na Beachy o High: 88° F/31° C a

Low: 70° F/21°C

\
| Highs: leo Rage,
tonight's lows.

Ta .
Highs: 64°F 8°:

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8-16 knots

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6-12 knots

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MARINE FORECAST

Santiago de Cuba WINDS
aioe Bi ° °

pens 83 R/28, c SW at 7-14 Knots

at 12-25 Knots

§ at 4-8 Knots

NE at 12-25 Knots

SSE at 6-12 Knots

$

VES
Feel
Feel
Feel
Feel
Feel

VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
6 Miles 74° F
10 Miles 74°
10 Miles 77°
10 Miles 77
10 Miles he
Saturday: NW at 6-12 Knots Fee! 10 Miles 78°
CROOKED ISLAND jay: ESE at 8-16 Knots Fee’ 10 Miles 77°

Saturday: ESE at 7-14 Knots -4 Fee 10 Miles 77
ELEUTHERA 5 S at 7-14 Knots Feel 10 Miles 76°

Saturday: at 10-20 Knots -7 Fee 6 Miles 76°
FREEPORT 5 NW at 6-12 Knots Feel 10 Miles 75°
= jay: at 12-25 Knots Fee! 10 Miles 75°
\e Managua . T inidad Sod) asl boos GREAT EXUMA : SE at 6-12 Knots Feel 10 Miles 76°

Highs: 92°F/33°C ‘ > Trinida: Saturday: _N at 8-16 Knots -2 Fee 7 Miles 76°

NS ae / =) < GREAT INAGUA z ESE at 8-16 Knots Feel 10 Miles 78°
ia 7 E at 7-14 Knots Fee! 10 Miles 79°
ESE at 7-14 Knots Fee 10 Miles 77°
NE at 7-14 Knots Fee! 6 Miles 77?
ESE at 8-16 Knots Feel 10 Mi fo?
SE at 7-14 Knots Fee! 10 Mi 79°
§ at 6-12 Knots Fee’ 10 Mi 75°
NE at 12-25 Knots Feel 10 Mi £5?
SE at 6-12 Knots Fee’ 10 Mi 78°
NE at 7-14 Knots Fee 10 Mi 78°
SE at 6-12 Knots Fee! 10 Mi Tt?
at 8-16 Knots Fee! 7 Miles 78°

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ABACO lay:
urd
ANDROS ay:
urday:
CAT ISLAND lay:

Port-. ~au- -Prince
Highs: 90° Reo ae

Santa-
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Highs: 85°F/29°C

San Juan
e Highs: 84°F (29°C

(OA Ce

YANN
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Highs: 84°F/29 3°

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Highs: 85°F/29°C

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Highs: 88°F/31°C

Ali

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Limon
Highs: 84°F/29°C



MAYAGUANA



NASSAU

SAN SALVADOR









RAGGED ISLAND

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LATEST NEWS ON WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER
BIGGEST AND BEST

UN aL
WSU ema Ce

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A

SOTA aris:
SU aR aa Ny
sae a

le condemned

Govt hits out at
report on public
servant salaries

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunmedia.net

THE government yester-
day attacked the Opposition
for spreading "a malicious lie”
suggesting that public ser-
vants' votes will be wooed
with an impending lump sum
payment of $2,500 to each
employee and an extra $75 to
their base salary.

A statement from the
Office of the Prime Minister
vehemently denied the "fab-
ricated" report released by
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty, adding that the Ingraham
administration cannot dole
out increments to the public
service due to financial con-
straints.

The statement added that
the government has worked

SEE page eight

MP ‘UNCONCERNED’ WITH
REPORTS THAT CONSTITUENCY

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

TATU SPST SLU Seat USPSA LST

UNION LEADERS
MEET BEHIND
CLOSED DOORS
OVER BIC PLANS

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter

nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

UNION leaders discussed
their plans in a closed-door
session with members last
night, as they continued to
pledge their opposition to the
sale of BTC to Cable and
Wireless Communications
(CWC).

Bernard Evans, president
of the Bahamas Communica-
tions and Public Officers
Union (BCPOU), said there
would be “absolutely no apol-
ogy” for threats made about
turning the country into a
“small Egypt”.

He said members would be
informed in small groups

SEE page eight

THIRD MAN
CHARGED WITH
MURDER OF
PRISON OFFICER

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A THIRD man appeared
in magistrate’s court yester-
day in connection with the
stabbing death of a prison
officer.

Police have charged Pres-
ley Humes, 36, of Faith
Avenue, with the murder of
Juilian Strachan.

Mr Strachan, 37, of Bell-
dock Avenue, was stabbed
multiple times at the

MAY BE CUT INTO TWO

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Carmichael Liquor Store on

SEE page 10



‘UNCONCERNED’:
V Alfred Gray

OPPOSITION MP V Alfred Gray said
he is not concerned with reports that his
constituency may be cut into two for the

SEE page 10

Thigh & Leg

+ Family Fries



PROTEST: The coalition consisting of the National Democratic Party and the Worker’s Party
|_| staged an island wide motorcade protest yesterday against plans to sell BTC to Cable and Wire-

less Communications (CWC).

¢ SEE PAGE THREE



20-YEAR-OLD IN COURT ON 2008 MURDER CHARGE

A 20-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned yes-
terday on a murder charge dating back to 2008.

The man, whose identity is not being
revealed at present for legal reasons, is charged
with the murder of Kendrick Rolle.

Mr Rolle, 21, was found dead on Hanna
Road, Fox Hill, having suffered gunshot
wounds.

He was the third murder victim for 2008.

The accused, who appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane, was not required to enter a plea.

It is alleged that between Thursday, January
10, and Friday, January 11, 2008, he inten-
tionally caused Mr Rolle’s death.

Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez told him he
will stand trial before the juvenile panel as
the offence allegedly occurred when he was
still a minor.

The case has been adjourned to February 24
and transferred to Court Two, Victoria Gar-
dens.

The accused was remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison.

MAN ACCUSED
OF SEX WITH
NINE-YEAR-OLD

FREEPORT: A 59-year-
old man appeared in court
yesterday accused of having
sex with a nine-year-old girl.

Albert Whylly was
arraigned in Court One
before Magistrate Debbie
Ferguson, where he was
charged with having sexual
intercourse with a minor.

It is alleged that the inci-
dent took place on Monday,
February 7.

Whylly, who was repre-
sented by Carlson Shurland,
was not required to plead to
the charge.

He was granted $10,000
bail, with surety, and the mat-
ter was adjourned to June 21.

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

PM: Radical change needed.
in justice system procedure



OVER the next two days,
as part of the government’s
continuing effort to overhaul
the judicial system, politi-
cians, prosecutors and law
enforcement officers will try
to view justice through the
eyes of witnesses and victims.

Opening the Witness Care
Conference yesterday, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
said it is “a given” that there
needs to be a radical trans-
formation in the way justice
is administered in the
Bahamas.

He said changes are need-
ed at all levels — law enforce-
ment, legal and judicial.

The prime minister also
noted that crime and the fear
of crime occupy the minds of

ite
TS

sy
Pe a rar YY



the government and the pop-
ulation everyday, and repeat-
ed his commitment to
increase the human and
financial resources dedicat-
ed to this issue.

He listed several mod-
ernising initiatives in the
works, including: improving
the management and admin-
istration of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force,
acquiring new technology for
crime fighting, upgrading the
courts and adding to their
number, launching a contin-
uous programme of law
reform, introducing stenog-
raphers in courts, amending
the penal code and introduc-
ing electronic monitoring of
persons on bail. The two-day
conference, organised by the
Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral and the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, is designed to
address the “gaps” and “inef-
ficiencies” in the criminal jus-
tice system and to bring
together all partners and
affiliated interest groups to
view the system from the per-

COMPUTERS LIMITED

spective of victims and wit-
nesses.

The event is being held
from February 10-12 at the
Police Conference Centre.

Among those in atten-
dance were: Attorney Gen-
eral and Minister of Legal
Affairs John Delaney; Tom-
my Turnquest, Minister of
National Security; Loretta
Butler-Turner, Minister of
State for Social Develop-
ment; Archie Nairn, perma-
nent secretary; Police Com-
missioner Ellison
Greenslade; Vinette Gra-
ham-Allen, director of public
prosecutions; and Debra
Fraser, director of legal
affairs.

The Royal Bahamas Police
Force provided entertain-
ment for the event.

Consultant Simon Deacy is
serving as the facilitator for
the conference. He is a retired
chief superintendent of police
in the United Kingdom and
was a “National no witness,
no justice” project manager
for England and Wales.



7

Patrick Hanna/BIS Photo

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 3



: NDP AND WORKER’S PARTY COALITION STAGE DEMONSTRATION

Island-wide protest over BIC deal

Online readers
respond to BCPOU
President's ‘Small
Egypt’ statement

WHEN The Tribune's
articles were posted online

ers wasted no time in
expressing their outrage
over the article, "We'll turn
country into small Egypt".
In the story, a union
leader vowed that future
protests against the sale of
the BTC would become a
miniature version of the
unrest that is presently con-
vulsing Egyptian society.
Bahamas Communica-
tions and Public Officers
Union President Bernard
Evans said disruptions in
services could be expected
as aresult of the opposition
to the government's sale of a
majority stake in BTC to
Cable and Wireless Commu-
nications (CWC).
Responding to the story
on tribune242.com, Ricardo
W Wright called the Egypt
comment “stupid”, and
joked that Mr Evans on a
camel would be a “scary
sight.”
No No, called on union
leaders to be more responsi-
ble.

Suffering

"We are already suffering
economically in this little
country of ours. Don't mess

us gat by fooling with the
already inconsistent phone
services BTC provides. No
no no. Think about ALL of
us, not just you all,” the
reader said.

Liz asked: "What empiri-
cal evidence do they have
that the majority of the
Bahamian population dis-
agrees with the sale of 51
per cent of BTC? So, at the
end of the Egypt-like riot-
ing, will 51 per cent of BTC
still be sold?”

While the overwhelming
majority of those who com-
mented disagreed with Mr
Evans’ comment, not all felt
this way.

Lol believes the issue is

bigger than the unions. "It is i

a mounting frustration
among Bahamians from
being dismissed by its gov-
ernment and made second
class citizens in their own

country. When the full effect

of the C&W presence in this
country is known and felt, it
is the average Bahamian
who will suffer — as it was in
Cayman, Barbados, Jamaica
and Panama — that is why
they rioted in Panama.”

BEC management team
Calls on union leaders
to discuss concerns

By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter

cnixon@tribunemedia.net

BEC’s executive manage-
ment team is calling on
union leaders to meet with
them and discuss concerns
after yesterday’s industrial
action.

In a press statement
issued yesterday afternoon,
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation noted that
some of its managerial staff
had “orchestrated and are

engaged in an apparent sick-

out.”

would like to inform its cus-
tomers that measures have
been taken to minimise pos-

sible disruption to electricity

supplies as a result of action
taken by the Bahamas Elec-
trical Utility Managerial
Union (BEUMU).”

BEC’s executive manage-
ment said they are unaware
of any concerns that may
have been discussed at the

union’s meeting on Wednes- ;
day, but reassured the public ;
of the corporation’s commit- }
ment to working closely with ;

the BEUMU in the best
interest of employees and
customers.

“The corporation would
like to encourage the
union’s leadership to make
contact with the executive

management team to discuss }

concerns,” the statement

said.

The statement said: “BEC :

i | By NOELLE NICOLLS
i Tribune Staff Reporter

By LAMECH JOHNSON : nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE third-party coalition

consisting of the National
_ | Democratic Party and the
al 2ptr on Wednesday,tead i Worker’s Party staged an island

i wide protest yesterday.

Party leaders blasted the gov-

i ernment for proceeding with
i plans to sell BTC to Cable and
i Wireless Communications
i (CWC).

A small motorcade of party

i members rode around the city,
i covering Baillou Hill Road,
: Bay Street, Paradise Island,
i Mackey Street, Carmichael
i Road, Coral Harbour and the
? Sir Lynden Pindling Interna-
? tional Airport (LPIA).

The motorcade circled Par-

liament Square and LPIA 10
i times, spreading its message
i using a mobile sound system.

Ethric Bowe, NDP co-ordi-

i? nator for the protest, said: “Our
? message is of ‘Bahamians first’.
? We have no intention of allow-
i ing the sale of BTC to CWC.

FLAG-WAVING: Protesters make their case.

We are resisting it with all of
our might. We feel our govern-
ment has taken a turn towards a
dictatorship. We are acting to
put an end to it. We are tired of
it. The PLP opposition seems
to be colluding with the FNM
to share up the country’s
resources among a few fami-
lies.

“We have a few people get-

ting very rich while the working
class is being left out. We recog-
nise if the working class is
destroyed our society is
destroyed. We are acting to
preserve our Bahamas.”

Mr Bowe said that if the
BTC deal goes through, there is
no point in Bahamians being in
the Bahamas. We need to
shake Bahamians awake

Mitchell backs Christie vow to renegotiate agreement

By NOELLE NICOLLS
i Tribune Staff Reporter
i nnicolls@tribunemdia.net

? Fred Mitchell, opposition member for
? Fox Hill, threw his support behind party i

i leader Perry Christie’s pledge to renego- 5
? tiate any agreement with Cable and Wire-
i less should the Progressive Liberal Party
? form the next government.
i “Let me say that I unequivocally sup-
up what ‘lil business some of ; Port the policy announced by Mr Christie and if
? we get the good fortune to form the next gov-
i ernment I would go further and urge that we do
? in the national interest what the government of
: Belize did, and that is get the controlling interest
i in BTC back again,”
i “Indeed, it appears that so much of what the
? PLP will have to do within the first 100 days of a
? new administration will be to set right the many
? wrongs perpetrated against the Bahamian people
i by this FNM administration,” he said.

i Mr Mitchell accused the government of trying
? to sabotage future attempts of the PLP to revis-
i it its decisions. He referenced the $100 million

said Mr Mitchell.

fixed liability built into the BTC sale agree-
ment should the government choose to
fast-track its liberalisation agenda within
the first year of Cable and Wireless taking

over.

FRED
MITCHELL

he said.

“We all know that this is nonsense and
where there is a will there will be a way.

(Prime Minister Ingraham) wants to

make it impossible for a future PLP
administration to act. He wants to change
things so significantly on the ground that

he will rule from the grave. ‘Ah good sir: dig
one grave, you dig two’,” said Mr Mitchell.

“He is doing it with the national debt as well.
He is maxing out the national credit card so that
when the PLP comes to power, there will be no
money to do anything and he will sit back in his
Abaco rocking chair and say: ‘I told you so’,

dy

Mr Mitchell also reiterated his warning to
investors in the port at Arawak Cay, indicating
that the PLP still intended to “put the port where
it ought to be on the south of New Providence.

“T say to those who are investing in that Port:
Buyer beware!” said Mr Mitchell.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MOTORCADE: Party members rode around the city.

because we have been asleep
too long following this red and
yellow foolishness,” said Mr
Bowe. When the motorcade cir-
cled the airport, Mr Bowe said,
people streamed out to see
what was going on. The circling
10 times, he said, had cultural
significance since the number
10 “has always been a power
number in the Bahamas.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

“We are using our culture to
the max. People in the
Bahamas believe in the power
of prayers.

“We know the government
knows they are doing wrong.
We are invoking our beliefs to
influence him. The government
has no heart, no conscience. We
are determined to get rid of
them,” he said.





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A letter writer’s name 1s finally revealed

THE year was 1962 — October 16.

The Tribune — in those days The Nassau
Daily Tribune — reported that while Tropical
Storm Ella was building and keeping every-
one guessing, a home on Peter Street East
had been stoned for the second night.

Election fever was in the air. In a month’s
time — November 26 — the Bahamas would
exercise universal adult suffrage when voters
would go to the polls. On that day Bahami-
an women would vote for the first time and
all Bahamian men 21 and over would vote
without the property qualification.

The PLP was so confident of victory that
year that on the eve of the election, the par-
ty celebrated on Clifford Park the defeat of
the UBP government. In the days and
months leading up to the election the PLP
tolerated no opposition. That was why Mr
Wellington Ferguson, a Prison Overseer of
Peter Street, believed his house had been
stoned two nights in a row because of his pol-
itics. The second stoning in fact was 3 o’clock
on a Sunday morning when a large rock was
hurled through his front glass door, missing
his wife’s head by inches.

Mr Ferguson was convinced this was the
result of a conversation with Mr Sweeting of
the Bahamas Lumber Company within
earshot of others. In that discussion he open-
ly condemned the “shocking behaviour” of
the PLP.

The death of Paul Bower on January 24
brought back memories of 1962 when the
most interesting news of that October day
was a libel action brought by six PLP bar-
risters against The Nassau Guardian, and
Mr Bower, its editor, for a letter published
by that newspaper. As the action progressed
it was obvious that the litigants were more
interested in outing the author of the letter,
than in the letter itself. However, Mr Bower,
in the tradition of all good journalists refused
to reveal the writer’s identity and was threat-
ened with prison by his good friend, Magis-
trate John Bailey. His refusal put him in
contempt of the court.

We recalled this period, because we sud-
denly realised that with the death of Mr
Bower we were the only person left who
still held the writer’s secret. It was a name
that neither of us dared reveal because of
what the writer would have suffered if it
were discovered that he was a friend of sev-
eral of the litigants, although he had never
joined the PLP. Bert Cambridge was one of

the members of the House of Assembly who
stood by Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1956 when
he moved his anti-discrimination Resolu-
tion. In the election later that year Mr Cam-
bridge was defeated at the polls. In the same
election Sir Lynden Pindling entered the
House for the first time.

We have revealed Mr Cambridge’s name
because he is now beyond being hurt, and
wherever he is we are certain he is having a
good chuckle as he did when alive and his
friends never suspected that he was the
“Western District Voter.” However, his
name is significant for that period because it
shows that although persons like Bert Cam-
bridge, a black man, worked passionately
to elevate his race, he did not approve of
many of the PLP’s methods.

The letter was a comment on the failure of
those responsible to make public what hap-
pened to funds collected for the South
African Relief Fund, which was launched
by the PLP to rival a fund started earlier by
The Tribune. It was the practice of The Tri-
bune to daily publish sums of money donat-
ed to whatever fund it was sponsoring.
“Western District Voter” criticised the PLP
for not adequately informing the public how
their publicly collected funds —£104 15s 2d
— had been dealt with.

The letter in question was an “Open letter
to Mr Paul Adderley”, in which, said Mr
Bower, “no reasonable man would see any-
thing libellous.” He assured the court that
the letter writer was no fiction, but a man Mr
Bower had known for three years and could
not imagine him bearing “any ill will, malice,
or acrimony against Mr Adderley.” Nor pos-
sibly could Mr Adderley, if he had known
the identity of the writer.

One of the difficulties, however, was that
The Tribune had received the same letter,
which its editor heavily edited to make it
legally “safe” before publication. In other
words we deleted what we considered an
innuendo and the names of the six com-
plainants. This led the litigants to believe
that it was either Mr Bower or someone at
The Guardian who had embellished the let-
ter and that the writer was a fiction. Nothing
could have been further from the truth. Both
newspapers received the same letter — in
fact one was a carbon copy. One editor used
her editorial discretion in editing, the other
did not. As a result one was before the
courts, the other was not.

THE TRIBUNE



BIC unions only
seem to be about
their narrow interest

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Generally, I am a strong
supporter of unions, they are
good for a country but there
are times when they are
unreasonable and make
unreasonable demands of
employers.

For instance, I am con-
cerned about demands that
the BTC unions and others
are making regarding the pri-
vatisation of the company by
the government. Based on all
that has been said and in print
on this issue, I am left to con-
clude that the BTC unions
and the ones that support
them are only interested in
themselves and their mem-
bers, but not our nation and
Bahamians.

The BTC unions only seem
to be about their narrow and
singular interest, as opposed
to what they have been saying
— that they are concerned
about Bahamians owning
BTC. What I have heard from
them, is that it is all about
them at a time when things
are tough in this country for a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



lot of people. Their members
have jobs and will have them
for at least three years.

They seem to really be
interested in their jobs and
separation packages.

The unions have stated that
those employees who were
invited to voluntarily separate
and receive packages; should
receive packages more gen-
erous than the government
gave them in 1999. Prime
Minister Ingraham has indi-
cated that the government
cannot afford the 1999 pack-
ages today.

In fact, the Prime Minister
has indicated that the 1999
packages were too generous
in the fIrst instance.

Secondly, they appear to be
interested in one other thing;
getting more than three years
guaranteed employment for
those employees who do not

voluntarily separate. But this
too, Prime Minister Ingraham
has said is just not feasible or
possible.

In fact, Prime Minister
Ingraham has already indi-
cated that Cable & Wireless
sought redundancies to the
tune of 300 employees imme-
diately, so that the company
can have a good chance of
being profitable and compete
with new entries into the mar-
Ket.

Prime Minister Ingraham
also spoke to this issue, indi-
cating that the government
did not intend to give a three
year exclusivity period on cel-
lular, but it ended up doing
so as an offset — ensuring that
no jobs are lost for the same
period.

The BTC unions are about
themselves and no one else.
They are not truly concerned
about you and me, whether
we own BTC or not — it is all
about them.

KIRK DEAN
Nassau,
January 25, 2011.

The Bahamas Humane Society’s
amazing and successful evening

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please once again allow me
some space in your paper.

Saturday night, the Bahamas
Humane Society had the most
amazing and successful evening
at Government House. This
event is now a yearly one and is
held in order to showcase the
B-humane banners that will line
some of the streets of New
Providence this month to pro-
mote awareness and responsi-
ble ownership, as well as, hope-
fully, stamp out animal cruel-
ty.

. Tama great believer of giv-
ing credit where credit is due.
Saturday night was the amazing
success that it was thanks to
many people and groups.

Firstly, the Swiss bank with a
heart of gold, Lombard Odier
Darier Hentschvery kindly, for
the second year running, has
sponsored the Banner cam-
paign for the Bahamas Humane
Society. We are so grateful to
this Swiss institution with a
social conscience. We would
NOT have been able to do it
without their faithful sponsor-
ship.

Secondly the absolutely
amazing photos taken by Patri-
cia Vazquez that grace the ban-
ners are indeed a labour of love
and are beautifully taken. The
BHS is very lucky to have such
a talented photographer so sup-
portive of our efforts.

Thirdly, Government House
and the staff! What an amaz-
ing setting to hold an event. It
was beautiful, the Police band’s
small group played wonderful
music, the young lady who sang
had a terrific voice. The
grounds were lit up magically,
and the actual Government
House staff were so unbeliev-
ably helpful. Chef Jarred pre-
pared the most delicious
food...thank you to them all
from the BHS.

We are very fortunate at the
Bahamas Humane Society to
have such a caring Patron in
His Excellency , our Governor
General, Sir Arthur Foulkes
and Lady Foulkes... Their pres-
ence at our event lent the dig-
nity that the surroundings
deserved..

That evening I announced
that we at the Bahamas
Humane Society intend to
launch a Crusade against Cru-
elty... There are too many
unspeakable acts of cruelty and
neglect going on in our coun-

try...Some are intentional but
many are not. However, igno-
rance cannot always be used as
an excuse... Most people know
the difference between right
from wrong. If you don’t feed
or water an animal...guess what
? IT WILL DIE! I honestly find
it difficult to believe that most
people do not know this.

If you would like to join us
on our Crusade against Cruelty
please contact me at bhs.cru-
sadeagainstcruelty@gmail.com.
We need numbers to spread the
word, please join our cause and
help us.

A huge salute to all the ded-
icated Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety staff who worked so hard
on Saturday night to make the
night so successful, we are
indeed lucky to have you at the
shelter.

KIM ARANHA,
President of the Bahamas
Humane Society,

Nassau,

February 6, 2011.

STH OMTTITAY 3

EDITOR, The Tribune.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLAUDETTE
ROLLE of #19 South Bahamia, Grand Bahama Island,

Bahamas, intend to change my name to CHARMAINE
CLAUDETTE ROLLE. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Deputy Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
F-43536, Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.



In Loving Memory



~

Harold Gardener ~+*

Sadly missed by mother
Louella Prescod, siblings,
children and grandchildren.
We love you wuper dad.





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If so, call us on 322-1986
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Please take your completed
applications to our head office.

It is normal to expect that the Free National Movement will
be challenged by whatever political parties are in existence
next year, but the basis of that challenge will not hinge on
whether the current Prime Minister is compassionate or not; it
may be a factor but it will not be “the factor.” Party members
from all sides are looking for excuses to get at each other, and
they will take whatever they can find, and that is everyday
politics.

The present “compassion issue” is one, that began when
The Nassau Guardian took a statement made by Mr McCartney
out of context. There was a compounding of the problem this
morning as an out of context statement takes on a life of its own
when we read on the front page, ”At the time McCartney pre-
dicted that the FNM would be challenged, in part because of
Ingraham’s lack of compassion toward the Bahamian people.”
Did the reporter listen to the interview? Or anyone else taking
up space on the front page?

Mr Bethel and Mr Roberts, both men of substantial political
currency, have used this opportunity to put forth their party’s
agenda, or the agenda of those within the parties who need
something to throw, at the expense of misinforming the public’s
perception of a particular person and they seem to be doing it
together.

At least, Mr McCartney is fitting the leadership profile,
where everybody is trying to get a piece of you.

On the face of it, is it wise to assume that the misuse of con-
textual references is going to be the norm as we go into 2012?
With the chairmen of both parties getting into the fray as they
usually do at a very caustic level, can the Bahamian public
stand all of this “smoke”? Or are we going to have to check
overall contexts when anything is said about a prospective can-
didate.

Historically, misrepresenting the facts is something that
politicians do without blinking, looking you straight in the face.
If we remember the contextual misrepresentations that the
late Cecil Wallace Whitfield had to contend with, we should also
remember that these misrepresentations were perpetuated by
persons who were his very close friends.

At the end of it, perspective will be everything, and any par-
ticular view that we come up with will depend on how informed
we are on what is going on with, what is needed from, and
what we are expecting from those who presume to lead. And,
ultimately or hopefully we will extend these demands to any and
all who see themselves as participants in the warp and woof of
leadership..

We should all be of the opinion that the leaders we choose
will be those who get the job done, regardless of the misrepre-
sentations they have to endure, and this is not supposed to be
a nice exercise.

If we can remember what goes on a couple of months before
any election in any part of the world, we will endeavour to do
our homework. My only demand is that the institutions charged
with keeping us informed, reject the mischievous impulses that
writers like myself have to contend with daily.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 3, 2011.





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A letter writer’s name 1s finally revealed

THE year was 1962 — October 16.

The Tribune — in those days The Nassau
Daily Tribune — reported that while Tropical
Storm Ella was building and keeping every-
one guessing, a home on Peter Street East
had been stoned for the second night.

Election fever was in the air. In a month’s
time — November 26 — the Bahamas would
exercise universal adult suffrage when voters
would go to the polls. On that day Bahami-
an women would vote for the first time and
all Bahamian men 21 and over would vote
without the property qualification.

The PLP was so confident of victory that
year that on the eve of the election, the par-
ty celebrated on Clifford Park the defeat of
the UBP government. In the days and
months leading up to the election the PLP
tolerated no opposition. That was why Mr
Wellington Ferguson, a Prison Overseer of
Peter Street, believed his house had been
stoned two nights in a row because of his pol-
itics. The second stoning in fact was 3 o’clock
on a Sunday morning when a large rock was
hurled through his front glass door, missing
his wife’s head by inches.

Mr Ferguson was convinced this was the
result of a conversation with Mr Sweeting of
the Bahamas Lumber Company within
earshot of others. In that discussion he open-
ly condemned the “shocking behaviour” of
the PLP.

The death of Paul Bower on January 24
brought back memories of 1962 when the
most interesting news of that October day
was a libel action brought by six PLP bar-
risters against The Nassau Guardian, and
Mr Bower, its editor, for a letter published
by that newspaper. As the action progressed
it was obvious that the litigants were more
interested in outing the author of the letter,
than in the letter itself. However, Mr Bower,
in the tradition of all good journalists refused
to reveal the writer’s identity and was threat-
ened with prison by his good friend, Magis-
trate John Bailey. His refusal put him in
contempt of the court.

We recalled this period, because we sud-
denly realised that with the death of Mr
Bower we were the only person left who
still held the writer’s secret. It was a name
that neither of us dared reveal because of
what the writer would have suffered if it
were discovered that he was a friend of sev-
eral of the litigants, although he had never
joined the PLP. Bert Cambridge was one of

the members of the House of Assembly who
stood by Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1956 when
he moved his anti-discrimination Resolu-
tion. In the election later that year Mr Cam-
bridge was defeated at the polls. In the same
election Sir Lynden Pindling entered the
House for the first time.

We have revealed Mr Cambridge’s name
because he is now beyond being hurt, and
wherever he is we are certain he is having a
good chuckle as he did when alive and his
friends never suspected that he was the
“Western District Voter.” However, his
name is significant for that period because it
shows that although persons like Bert Cam-
bridge, a black man, worked passionately
to elevate his race, he did not approve of
many of the PLP’s methods.

The letter was a comment on the failure of
those responsible to make public what hap-
pened to funds collected for the South
African Relief Fund, which was launched
by the PLP to rival a fund started earlier by
The Tribune. It was the practice of The Tri-
bune to daily publish sums of money donat-
ed to whatever fund it was sponsoring.
“Western District Voter” criticised the PLP
for not adequately informing the public how
their publicly collected funds —£104 15s 2d
— had been dealt with.

The letter in question was an “Open letter
to Mr Paul Adderley”, in which, said Mr
Bower, “no reasonable man would see any-
thing libellous.” He assured the court that
the letter writer was no fiction, but a man Mr
Bower had known for three years and could
not imagine him bearing “any ill will, malice,
or acrimony against Mr Adderley.” Nor pos-
sibly could Mr Adderley, if he had known
the identity of the writer.

One of the difficulties, however, was that
The Tribune had received the same letter,
which its editor heavily edited to make it
legally “safe” before publication. In other
words we deleted what we considered an
innuendo and the names of the six com-
plainants. This led the litigants to believe
that it was either Mr Bower or someone at
The Guardian who had embellished the let-
ter and that the writer was a fiction. Nothing
could have been further from the truth. Both
newspapers received the same letter — in
fact one was a carbon copy. One editor used
her editorial discretion in editing, the other
did not. As a result one was before the
courts, the other was not.

THE TRIBUNE



BIC unions only
seem to be about
their narrow interest

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Generally, I am a strong
supporter of unions, they are
good for a country but there
are times when they are
unreasonable and make
unreasonable demands of
employers.

For instance, I am con-
cerned about demands that
the BTC unions and others
are making regarding the pri-
vatisation of the company by
the government. Based on all
that has been said and in print
on this issue, I am left to con-
clude that the BTC unions
and the ones that support
them are only interested in
themselves and their mem-
bers, but not our nation and
Bahamians.

The BTC unions only seem
to be about their narrow and
singular interest, as opposed
to what they have been saying
— that they are concerned
about Bahamians owning
BTC. What I have heard from
them, is that it is all about
them at a time when things
are tough in this country for a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



lot of people. Their members
have jobs and will have them
for at least three years.

They seem to really be
interested in their jobs and
separation packages.

The unions have stated that
those employees who were
invited to voluntarily separate
and receive packages; should
receive packages more gen-
erous than the government
gave them in 1999. Prime
Minister Ingraham has indi-
cated that the government
cannot afford the 1999 pack-
ages today.

In fact, the Prime Minister
has indicated that the 1999
packages were too generous
in the fIrst instance.

Secondly, they appear to be
interested in one other thing;
getting more than three years
guaranteed employment for
those employees who do not

voluntarily separate. But this
too, Prime Minister Ingraham
has said is just not feasible or
possible.

In fact, Prime Minister
Ingraham has already indi-
cated that Cable & Wireless
sought redundancies to the
tune of 300 employees imme-
diately, so that the company
can have a good chance of
being profitable and compete
with new entries into the mar-
Ket.

Prime Minister Ingraham
also spoke to this issue, indi-
cating that the government
did not intend to give a three
year exclusivity period on cel-
lular, but it ended up doing
so as an offset — ensuring that
no jobs are lost for the same
period.

The BTC unions are about
themselves and no one else.
They are not truly concerned
about you and me, whether
we own BTC or not — it is all
about them.

KIRK DEAN
Nassau,
January 25, 2011.

The Bahamas Humane Society’s
amazing and successful evening

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please once again allow me
some space in your paper.

Saturday night, the Bahamas
Humane Society had the most
amazing and successful evening
at Government House. This
event is now a yearly one and is
held in order to showcase the
B-humane banners that will line
some of the streets of New
Providence this month to pro-
mote awareness and responsi-
ble ownership, as well as, hope-
fully, stamp out animal cruel-
ty.

. Tama great believer of giv-
ing credit where credit is due.
Saturday night was the amazing
success that it was thanks to
many people and groups.

Firstly, the Swiss bank with a
heart of gold, Lombard Odier
Darier Hentschvery kindly, for
the second year running, has
sponsored the Banner cam-
paign for the Bahamas Humane
Society. We are so grateful to
this Swiss institution with a
social conscience. We would
NOT have been able to do it
without their faithful sponsor-
ship.

Secondly the absolutely
amazing photos taken by Patri-
cia Vazquez that grace the ban-
ners are indeed a labour of love
and are beautifully taken. The
BHS is very lucky to have such
a talented photographer so sup-
portive of our efforts.

Thirdly, Government House
and the staff! What an amaz-
ing setting to hold an event. It
was beautiful, the Police band’s
small group played wonderful
music, the young lady who sang
had a terrific voice. The
grounds were lit up magically,
and the actual Government
House staff were so unbeliev-
ably helpful. Chef Jarred pre-
pared the most delicious
food...thank you to them all
from the BHS.

We are very fortunate at the
Bahamas Humane Society to
have such a caring Patron in
His Excellency , our Governor
General, Sir Arthur Foulkes
and Lady Foulkes... Their pres-
ence at our event lent the dig-
nity that the surroundings
deserved..

That evening I announced
that we at the Bahamas
Humane Society intend to
launch a Crusade against Cru-
elty... There are too many
unspeakable acts of cruelty and
neglect going on in our coun-

try...Some are intentional but
many are not. However, igno-
rance cannot always be used as
an excuse... Most people know
the difference between right
from wrong. If you don’t feed
or water an animal...guess what
? IT WILL DIE! I honestly find
it difficult to believe that most
people do not know this.

If you would like to join us
on our Crusade against Cruelty
please contact me at bhs.cru-
sadeagainstcruelty@gmail.com.
We need numbers to spread the
word, please join our cause and
help us.

A huge salute to all the ded-
icated Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety staff who worked so hard
on Saturday night to make the
night so successful, we are
indeed lucky to have you at the
shelter.

KIM ARANHA,
President of the Bahamas
Humane Society,

Nassau,

February 6, 2011.

STH OMTTITAY 3

EDITOR, The Tribune.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLAUDETTE
ROLLE of #19 South Bahamia, Grand Bahama Island,

Bahamas, intend to change my name to CHARMAINE
CLAUDETTE ROLLE. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Deputy Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
F-43536, Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.



In Loving Memory



~

Harold Gardener ~+*

Sadly missed by mother
Louella Prescod, siblings,
children and grandchildren.
We love you wuper dad.





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

T The Shoe Village

Assistant Manager

Needed

+ Bahamian 25 years or older
¢ Minimum 5 years experience in the retail industry
+ Strong communication skills
« Good motivator for achieving goals
+ Salary commensurate with experience
ALL APPLICATIONS RECEIVED WILL BE IN CONFIDENCE

No faned or emailed resumes will be considered,

Please take your completed
applications to our head office.

It is normal to expect that the Free National Movement will
be challenged by whatever political parties are in existence
next year, but the basis of that challenge will not hinge on
whether the current Prime Minister is compassionate or not; it
may be a factor but it will not be “the factor.” Party members
from all sides are looking for excuses to get at each other, and
they will take whatever they can find, and that is everyday
politics.

The present “compassion issue” is one, that began when
The Nassau Guardian took a statement made by Mr McCartney
out of context. There was a compounding of the problem this
morning as an out of context statement takes on a life of its own
when we read on the front page, ”At the time McCartney pre-
dicted that the FNM would be challenged, in part because of
Ingraham’s lack of compassion toward the Bahamian people.”
Did the reporter listen to the interview? Or anyone else taking
up space on the front page?

Mr Bethel and Mr Roberts, both men of substantial political
currency, have used this opportunity to put forth their party’s
agenda, or the agenda of those within the parties who need
something to throw, at the expense of misinforming the public’s
perception of a particular person and they seem to be doing it
together.

At least, Mr McCartney is fitting the leadership profile,
where everybody is trying to get a piece of you.

On the face of it, is it wise to assume that the misuse of con-
textual references is going to be the norm as we go into 2012?
With the chairmen of both parties getting into the fray as they
usually do at a very caustic level, can the Bahamian public
stand all of this “smoke”? Or are we going to have to check
overall contexts when anything is said about a prospective can-
didate.

Historically, misrepresenting the facts is something that
politicians do without blinking, looking you straight in the face.
If we remember the contextual misrepresentations that the
late Cecil Wallace Whitfield had to contend with, we should also
remember that these misrepresentations were perpetuated by
persons who were his very close friends.

At the end of it, perspective will be everything, and any par-
ticular view that we come up with will depend on how informed
we are on what is going on with, what is needed from, and
what we are expecting from those who presume to lead. And,
ultimately or hopefully we will extend these demands to any and
all who see themselves as participants in the warp and woof of
leadership..

We should all be of the opinion that the leaders we choose
will be those who get the job done, regardless of the misrepre-
sentations they have to endure, and this is not supposed to be
a nice exercise.

If we can remember what goes on a couple of months before
any election in any part of the world, we will endeavour to do
our homework. My only demand is that the institutions charged
with keeping us informed, reject the mischievous impulses that
writers like myself have to contend with daily.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 3, 2011.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Union leaders say ZNS |
contract less favourable

By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter
cnixon@tribunemedia.net

UNION leaders say the
poor economic climate and a
decrease in government fund-
ing to ZNS has resulted in a
less favorable industrial agree-
ment for employees.

After almost four years of
negotiations, union leaders
and ZNS management met
yesterday morning to sign the
new contract between the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas (BCB) and the
Bahamas Communications
and Public Managers Unions
(BCPMU).

Tension between the union
and the corporation began in
2008 when staff members
walked off in protest of whey
they described as unbearable
working conditions.

Possible restructuring and
reorganising of the Broad-
casting Corporation was
announced by Minister of

National Security Tommy
Turnquest in May 2009, cul-
minating in budget cuts and
mass lay-offs by the corpora-
tion last year when 71

employees were let go as a
result of overstaffing and
“bloated wages”.

William Carroll, president
of the BCPMU, said the eco-



WILLIAM CARROLL, President of the BCPMU, Michael Moss, Chairman of the BCB, and general manager
Edwin Lightbourn sign the agreement yesterday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Hand-drawn
—~ Portraits from your
favorite photos!

* 454.1979 or 677-9698
eerie Fate



nomic climate has forced the
union to make various con-
cessions to get the agreement
signed.

He said: “This has been a
long process and some of the
what the staff signed off on is
hard to swallow.

“We did not get everything
we wanted but we did the best
we could in these times and
will come back to the table in
2012 so employees are better
off in the next contract.”

According to Mr Carroll,
the union represents 34 of the
70-plus ZNS employees.

Darren Meadows, lead
negotiator for the union,
agreed that the workers did
not receive everything they
wanted but said the union had
to take the economic climate
into consideration and hope
that when the contract is rene-

AGREEMENT: William Carroll,
President of the BCPMU, along
with Michael Moss, Chairman
of the BCB, and general manag-
er Edwin Lightbourn.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

gotiated, employees will get
a better deal.

He said: “In the midst of a
financial recession, we had to
understand the position of the
corporation.”

He added that the Broad-
casting Corporation “has
assured us that employees will
see the fruits of their labour in
the next one”.

Chairman of the BCB
Michael Moss said the process
has been a difficult one and
acknowledged union did have
to make concessions on ben-
efits and salary increases.

According to Mr Moss, the
five year contract which
expires in 2013 will not pro-
vide for any annual increas-
es. Rather, employees will
receive percentage increases
over three years which will
not be attached to any sort of
evaluations.

Incentive payments have
also been taken out of the
agreement while articles with
respect discipline have
remained consistent with pri-
or contracts.

General manager Edwin
Lightbourn said the road has
been a long but fruitful one
and has proven that the two
sides can work together in dif-
ficult circumstances.

“T am happy to put it
behind us, we are ready to
move forward,” said Mr
Lightbourn.

MAN GETS 18 MONTH
SENTENCE IN
CONNECTION WITH
DRUG SEIZURE

A 30-YEAR-OLD
man has been convict-
ed and sentenced to 18
months in prison in
connection with a
major drug seizure in
2006.

Following a trial in
the Magistrates Court,
Deputy Chief Magis-
trate Carolita Bethell
sentenced Androsian
Derick Dion White to
18 months imprison-
ment on Wednesday
on the charge of pos-
session of marijuana
with the intent to sup-
ply.

According to the
prosecution, police
arrested White and
two other men in the
Marshall Road area
on Friday March 24,
2006.

The men were ina
Chevy Astro van
which attempted to
flee the area of a boat
ramp.

Inside the van,
police discovered 20
white crocus bags con-
taining 921 pounds of
marijuana.

His co-accused Ian
Porter was sentenced
to 42 months impris-
onment and fined
$50,000 in January
2009.

A third defendant
was acquitted of the
drug charges.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



TA Thompson Junior High student wins Northwestern District Spelling Bee

Samantha Marc defeats
41 other competitors

TOP SPELLER Saman-
tha Marc of TA Thompson
Junior High School emerged
as the winner of the North-
western District’s Spelling
Bee Competition after
defeating 31 other con-
tenders.

Following close behind
were TG Glover Primary
School students Julian Desir
and third place winner Ari-
annah Bain.

The participants in the

various public primary and
junior high schools, includ-
ing: Albury Sayle, Gambier,
Naomi Blatch, Oakes Field,
TG Glover, Woodcock Pri-
mary, HO Nash and TA
Thompson.

A highlight of the compe-

tition was the speech given
by the outgoing champion
for 2010, Randeika Foulkes,
a ninth grade student of HO
Nash.

Randeika told her fellow
students that they are all
destined to succeed if they

was Howard Newbold,
Superintendent for the
North Western District, who
expressed his pride in the
efforts of all of the partici-
pants.

He said Samantha would
go on to compete against

winners from the other dis-
tricts, in the Bahamas
National Spelling Bee Com-
petition.

One winner will emerge
from this competition, who
will travel to Washington
DC to participate in the

Scripps Howard National
Spelling Bee competition.
Mr Newbold gave his best
wishes to all of contestants,
and assured them that they
are all winners, having met
the requirements to repre-
sent their various schools.

US AILS esi DEFENCE FORCE BASE

Spelling Bee hailed from
are willing to work hard.

She explained that her
journey to winning the dis-
trict spelling competition
began when she was a stu-
dent at Oakes Field Primary
School, but victory did not
come until the eighth grade,
when she was at HO Nash
Junior High School.

Randeika encouraged her
peers to continue to com-
pete and to be proud of their
achievements.

Also bringing remarks

Public invited to annual
Law Enforcement Service

THE public is invited to the annual Law Enforcement Ser-
vice to be held at the Grants Town Seventh-Day Adventist
Church on Wellington Street off Market Street on Saturday,
February 12.

Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes, Director of Immi-
gration Jack Thompson, Customs Comptroller Glenn
Gomez and Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade will
attend.





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ADMIRAL JAMES A WINNEFELD JR and officials from the US Northern Command and the United
States Embassy are taken on a tour of HMBS Coral Harbour by Captain Tellis Bethel and his officers.

ADMIRAL James A Winnefeld Jr, Com-
mander of the North American Aerospace
Defence Command (NORAD) and Unit-
ed States Northern Command, (NORTH-
COM) paid a courtesy call on the Deputy
Commander Defence Force, Captain Tellis
Bethel, at the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force’s Coral Harbour Base on Wednes-
day afternoon.

Admiral Winnefeld was accompanied by
US Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Ziga-Brown
along with other officials from the US
Northern Command and the United States
Embassy. During his visit, the Admiral met
with the Deputy Commander, and was intro-

RBDF photos/Petty Officer Jonathan Rolle

duced to the members of the Defence
Force’s Executive Leadership Team.

Admiral Winnefeld was later taken on a
tour of HMBS Coral Harbour before pro-
ceeding on a short sea trip aboard a Defence
Force patrol craft, which was one of six such
vessels donated to The Bahamas govern-
ment under the US Enduring Friendship
programme.

The Admiral assumed responsibility as
Commander NORTHCOM from General
Victor Renuart in May 2010. He is current-
ly on an official tour of nations within
NORTHCOM’s area of responsibility,
which includes The Bahamas.



ADMIRAL JAMES A WINNEFELD JR being given a short sea trip aboard a Defence Force Patrol craft.
The Admiral and Petty Officer Jonathan Evans are engaged in a brief conversation.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Two men arraigned
on drugs and
firearm charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Man shot in leg after allegedly

sentence charging at police with knife

TWO men were arraigned
on drugs and firearm posses-
sion charges in the Freeport
Magistrates Court.

Neville Cunningham, 32, and
Elsworth Hendfield, 32, of Bass
Lane appeared before Magis-
trate Andrew Forbes in Court
Two.

It is alleged that on Febru-
ary 7, while at Freeport, Grand
Bahama, the accused men were
found in possession of illegal
drugs and a firearm with live
rounds of ammunition.

The men were represented
by Simeon Brown. They plead-
ed not guilty to the charges and
were each granted $7,500 bail.

The matter was adjourned to
August 9 for trial.
eeeeeeeeeeeeoen

Student hospitalised
after being struck in
the head with rock

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

armed with an eight-inch knife had entered the store.

FREEPORT - A 15-year-old
male student at a government
high school was taken to hospi-
tal after being struck in the
head with a rock by another
student on Thursday morning.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
reported that police were sum-
moned to the school at around
8.30am after several students
were seen engaged in an argu-
ment. Ms Mackey said another
male student hit the 11th grad-
er with a stone, causing injury
to the back of his head near his
neck. The student was trans-
ported to the Accident and
Emergency Section of the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
is currently listed in stable con-
dition.

Police are investigating the
matter.

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POLICE SHOOTING: Outside the scene of the robbery and shooting at Job Incorporated on Sapodilla Road, By DENISE MAYCOCK
Eight Mile Rock. Officers responded after a female store owner called police and reported thata man Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man was
shot in the leg by police offi-
cers investigating a robbery in
Eight Mile Rock after he
allegedly charged the officers
while brandishing a knife.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said the 34-year-old Hanna Hill
man was then taken into cus-
tody and transported to hospital
for treatment.

She said the incident unfold-
ed after the officers responded
to a report of a disturbance and
armed robbery at Job Incorpo-
rated on Sapodilla Road in
Hanna Hill.

According to reports, a
female store owner called
police around 8.30am and
reported that a man armed with
an eight-inch knife had entered
the store.

After robbing the owner of
cash, the man reportedly start-

Vandyke Hepburn/Photo

ed acting in a erratic manner,
repeatedly entering and exiting
the store.

Several customers and the
owner ran out, locking the sus-
pect inside the store until the
officers arrived.

When they confronted the
suspect inside the store, Ms
Mackey said, the man refused
to put down knife, then sud-
denly ran toward the officers.

One of the officers cautioned
the man again, but the suspect
continued moving towards the
officer with the knife, Ms Mack-
ey said.

“The officer drew his service
weapon and discharged it, hit-
ting the man in the upper left
thigh. “After being hit, the man
continued to charge the offi-
cers with the knife but was sub-
sequently subdued and arrested
by the officers,” she said.

The man was transported by
ambulance to the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital, where he was
treated by doctors for his injury.





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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PLP ‘malicious lie’ condemned

cafe News

Moroccan Infusion

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FROM page one

hard, however, to ensure that
no civil servants are let go in
the face of fiscal cutbacks.

"The government has
worked tirelessly to ensure
that no public officers were
made redundant and that no
salaries were cut even though
increments cannot be paid and
allowances have been reduced
during the economic crisis,"
said the statement.

"We note the number of
countries in the region and
around the world that have
had to reduce public sector
employment and salaries.

"We condemn the Opposi-
tion for conjuring up this mali-
cious lie. We confirm that the
Government of the Bahamas
does not have the financial
ability to make payments to
public officers as suggested by
the Opposition in what can
best be described as a figment
of their fertile imagination."

The statement also thanked
public servants for their
"restraint" during the worst
economic crisis in the last 60
years.

Meantime, President of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union John Pinder said he
wished the reports were true
adding that an increment pay-
out would ease the financial
burden of those in the civil
service.

Mr Pinder hopes to begin
negotiations on a new indus-
trial agreement for the public
service on February 24 when
he will lobby for more benefits
and raises.

"It would be really nice if
Government could make
good on retroactive payments
to our members and some
other outstanding financial
matters.

"I know that some persons
that were at the maximum of
their salary scales are entitled
to their increments in the form
of a lump sum, there are per-
sons owed tuition reimburse-

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ments and persons who have
had promotions withheld.

"Our (proposed) industrial
agreement speaks to them
Opening up salaries scales and
making good, asking for a
general pay increase and for
health insurance," said the
union leader.

In a statement issued this
week, the PLP said claimed
payments were on the hori-
zon for government workers
and questioned if this was a
ploy to gain voter confi-
dence.

"While we support all legit-
imate payment increases to
public servants, we have to

point out to them the cynical
nature of what is proposed,”
said the statement.

The party said the situation
harks back to 1997, when on
the night before the police
force voted, they were
"reminded" of a $1,500 lump
sum payment due to them the
following morning.

Fortunately, the PLP said,
times have changed and
Bahamians will no longer be
fooled by such tactics — which
they said amount to "seeking
to bribe voters."

The statement said: "The
PLP says take the money but
remember that it was (Prime

Minister) Ingraham's admin-
istration that mistreated pub-
lic servants during this term.
You should reward Mr Ingra-
ham and his FNM colleagues
by voting PLP in the next gen-
eral election."

The party said if reports of
the payments are true, it sug-
gests the existence of a "sinis-
ter plot" in which the govern-
ment failed to honour certain
financial terms of its industri-
al agreement with the Public
Service Union, in addition to
withholding salary increments
and promotions "until it
becomes politically convenient
to do so."

eee eRe IU SS



BCPOU LEADER Bernard Evans with William Carrol of the BCPOU in the House of Assembly this week.

FROM page one

gonna get it,”

said Mr Evans.

His comments brought condemnation from
Dion Foulkes, Minister of Labour, who

“what our plans are going forward.”

Earlier this week, Mr Evans suggested
unionists would take to the streets in a similar
fashion to the ongoing protests in Egypt. His
comments came after the government signed
BTC sale documents with the regional tele-
coms provider Cable and Wireless and laid
documents in the House of Assemble regard-
ing the sale.

“We will continue our stance. The will of
the people is the strength of the people, and I
guess if the Bahamas is ready and the govern-
ment is ready to see a small Egypt then they

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demanded an apology from Mr Evans.

Mr Foulkes said the comments were intend-
ed to “instigate social unrest and to destabilise
the Free National Movement and the Bahami-
an economy.”

“Bernard Evans should apologise to the
members of the BCPOU and to the Bahamian
people for his irresponsible and reckless “small
Egypt’ statement,” said Mr Foulkes.

Earlier this week, union leaders forecast
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 9



Popular fundraiser to |

showcase larger array

of chefs and restaurants

NPCC and Tommy Hilfiger
names as co-sponsors of
third annual Paradise Plates

HANDS For Hunger has
named the New Providence
Development Company
and Tommy Hilfiger as co-
presenting sponsors for
their third annual Paradise
Plates fundraiser.

Both companies have
continued their sponsor-
ships, having donated
$10,000 each for the unique
event, which will feature an
even larger array of
gourmet food this year from
celebrated chefs and restau-
rants in the Bahamas.

Held on Saturday, May
21 from 7pm — 11pm at the
Atlantis Crown Ballroom,
Paradise Plates will feature
an exquisite ensemble of
fine food and drinks, live
entertainment as well as a
raffle and silent auction.

Chefs will gather from
across New Providence
under one roof to prepare
their signature dishes, com-
plemented by drink pur-
veyors serving samples of
wine, local beer and spirits.

All proceeds will benefit
Hands For Hunger, the
non-profit food-rescue pro-
gramme committed to the
elimination of hunger and
the reduction of food waste
in the Bahamas.

“The New Providence
Development Company is
pleased to continue our
sponsorship of Paradise
Plates,” said Rhys Duggan,
president and CEO of New
Providence Development
Company Limited. “Hands
For Hunger fulfills a real
need on the island by pro-
viding food to those who
need it most.

Starting a fledgling non-

a a ; :
LALLA
Mert

+ Hable

profit is not a simple task;
we have seen the tremen-
dous impact that Hands For
Hunger has had in such a
short period of time, and
we continue to. be
impressed with their suc-
cessful approach, opera-
tions and their extensive
reach into the community.
New Providence Develop-
ment Company is proud to
support their efforts as they
expand to make an even
larger positive impact on
our community.”

“Tommy Hilfiger is very
proud to be a co-present-
ing sponsor for Hands For
Hunger's Paradise Plates
for a second consecutive
year,” said Elizabeth Cov-
ington, owner of Tommy
Hilfiger (Bahamas).

“Tommy Hilfiger believes
in taking a proactive stance
and giving back to the com-
munity by working with and
empowering young people
who are trying to make a
difference.

“Supporting these pas-
sionate young Bahamians
who endeavour to address
the problem of hunger in
this country is inspiring and
should remind all of us that
our problems are not insur-
mountable. Hunger can be
alleviated and Hands For
Hunger is doing a fantastic

job. The Bahamas is a
wealthy nation; people
should not go hungry. Tom-
my Hilfiger is proud to con-
tinue to support Hands For
Hunger. We hope more
Bahamians will support this
great and urgent
cause.”

Rosamund Roberts,
director of fundraising for
Hands For Hunger, said:
“The very generous dona-
tions from New Providence
Development Company
and Tommy Hilfiger
(Bahamas) will help to off-
set the costs of Paradise
Plates. We are very grateful
to them and our other spon-
sors for their kind support.
We are so pleased that Par-
adise Plates continues to
receive tremendous
response from the public.

“This year promises to be
even more memorable as
new chefs, restaurants and
venues have joined us to
create an evening unlike
any other.”

Chefs from many of Nas-
sau’s finest restaurants are
returning this year to show-
case their extraordinary
food including: Mesa Grill;
Nobu; Dune; British Colo-
nial Hilton; Old Fort Bay
Club; and Lucianos to name
a few.

Other sponsors include:




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PICTURED (L-R) ARE: posing Roberts, Hands for Hunger (HH) director of fundraising; Andrea
Strommer, co-chair of Paradise Plates 2010: Alanna Rodgers, HH founder and programme co-ordina-
tor; Ashley Lepine, HH executive director; Elizabeth Covington, owner of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas);
Etienne Christen of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas) and Rhys Duggan, President and CEO of New Provi-
dence Development Company at last year’s Paradise Plates.

Atlantis, Mendoza Wine
Imports and Creative Rela-
tions.

All proceeds from Par-
adise Plates will go to
Hands For Hunger and its
food rescue programmes.
Each day, Hands For
Hunger picks-up fresh, high
quality food that would oth-
erwise go to waste and
delivers it to community
centres, shelters, churches
and soup kitchens through-
out New Providence.

“Hunger is a solvable
problem. It is a fact that
there is more than enough
food on this island to amply
feed every single woman,
man and child. Hands For
Hunger functions to con-
nect this excess supply with
the unmet, ever growing
need through the more
equitable and efficient dis-
tribution of resources, ”said
Alanna Rodgers, founder
and programme co-ordina-
tor of Hands For Hunger.
“The proceeds raised from
Paradise Plates will go
directly to addressing a

most basic human need in
our community.”

The array of food and
drink will complemented by
a Silent auction, raffle, live
entertainment and beauti-
ful décor.

For ticket information
call, 327-1660 ext 241 or
email info@hands-
forhunger.org.

Hands For Hunger was

started by a group of
Bahamian student leaders
in early 2008, who were and
still are, committed to mak-
ing a difference in the
world.

The organisation is a reg-
istered, not-for-profit char-
ity that relies on donations
from community groups,
foundations, corporations
and the general public.

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Third man charged with
murder of prison officer

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FROM page one

Carmichael Road on Friday,
July 9.

The victim was taken to
hospital by ambulance where
he later died of his injuries.

Travis Davis, 39, of Bell-
dock Avenue, and Gregory
Armbrister, 34, of Hopkins
Drive, have already been
charged with the murder of
Sergeant Strachan.

Humes, who was not rep-
resented by an attorney, was
not required to enter a plea to
the charge during his arraign-
ment before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane.

Standing in the prisoner’s
dock, Humes told the magis-
trate: “I am in fear for my life
from prison officers. I
received some threats. They
said they would kill me.”

Chief Magistrate Gomez
said the prison authorities
would be notified of his con-
cern.

Sergeant Claudette
McKenzie, the prosecutor,
asked that the matter be
transferred to Court 6, Par-
liament Street.

She informed the court that
on March 14, a Voluntary Bill
of Indictment is expected to
be presented in the case.

Humes was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison and is
expected back in court on
Wednesday, February 16, for
a fixture hearing.



CHARGED: Presley Humes is shown going into court yesterday.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MP ‘unconcerned’

with reports that

constituency may
be cut into two

FROM page one

next general election, vow-
ing that wherever he decides
to run he will soundly defeat
any opponent the FNM
decides to send.

Open
Saturdays

10,00am-
2.00pm



Having represented the
MICAL constituency which
consists of Mayaguana,
Inagua, Crooked Island,
Acklins and Long Cay since
2002, Mr Gray said he has
heard of reports of a possi-
ble split in his constituency
before.

However, the often ram-
bunctious MP said he was
personally assured by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
that his seat would not be
affected by any boundary
changes ahead of the 2012
general election.

Not taking these assur-
ances at face value, Mr Gray
said he is going to “err on
the side of caution” and
watch to see what the Prime
Minister does instead.

At this point, Mr Gray
said he has heard reports
that his constituency may be
split into two - one joining
Inagua and Mayaguana, and

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



the other consisting of Ack-
lins, Long Cay, and Crooked
Island.

If such a split were to
occur, Mr Gray said he
would have to choose which
area to represent.

“If he (Prime Minister)
splits it, I believe I would
have to decide which area I
want to run in, and that is
an easy decision for me
because wherever Acklins is
T will run, and whoever runs
against me will get beat.

“IT can’t control the
Bahamas, but I can defi-
nitely say that in my con-
stituency even Hubert Ingra-
ham can’t beat me,” Mr
Gray laughed.

As proof of his growing
support in the constituency,
Mr Gray said he now has a
former FNM general in the
area campaigning for him.
He wished however not to
reveal the person’s identity,
stating he would prefer to
have that bit of information
to “lick the FNM over the
head with” at the next sit-
ting of the House of Assem-
bly.

“T wait with great antici-
pation for what the final
determination will be. The
earlier I know, the better for
me so I can concentrate on
which area I will be running
in.

“In the meantime I am
concentrating on the whole
area because like the
Prime Minister told me he
can not justify cutting the
seat because the popula-
tion is smaller than it was
in 2007.

“But I know he is looking
for areas to run his men in,
but no matter how he cuts it
he cannot beat me. It’s like
the young people say, I ain’t
on his run. I feel very
secure.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

DU



ines:

FRIDAY,



=

FEBRUARY 11,



Minister meets
Sector on plane
lax Concerns

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net_

Domestic airline opera-
tors and Odyssey Aviation
expressed concerns about
the Department of Customs’
plans to collect allegedly

stamp tax from those who
have brought planes into the
Bahamas in a meeting with
the Minister of Tourism and
Aviation.

According to sources
close to some of the aircraft
operators who attended the
February 3 meeting, which
included representatives
from Golden Wings char-
ters, Sky Bahamas, Take
Flight Charters, Safari Sea-
planes, Odyssey Aviation
and more, the sector was
told they may benefit from
“staying out of the newspa-
per” when it came to the tax
dispute.

spoke to this newspaper on

SEE page 4B

BISK ‘contacted
over BIC's IPO

* Exchange chief met

this week with Heineken

executives over Burns
House/Commonwealth
Brewery IPO

* Offering targeted at
end-Q1/Q2, but awaits
government approval

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Government has
already been in contact
with the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) to inquire about
listing procedures for the 9
per cent of the Bahamas
Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC) that it hopes
to sell to the public later
this year, while Heineken
executives met with
exchange executives this
week over their planned
$60-$65 million initial pub-
lic offering (IPO).

Confirming both develop-

chief executive, told Tribune

SEE page 5B

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Food retailer in
$5m capital offer

| By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor

Phil’s Food Services, the

a i Gladstone Road-based food
eee i retailer and wholesaler, is
i seeking to raise $5 million
: from a private placement
? corporate bond offering, Tri-

: bune Business can reveal.

The retailer, which has

i made a big impact on the
i Nassau groceries scene
:? despite being a relative new-
i comer, is offering to pay
; investors an 8.5 per cent
i interest rate on the bond,
? which has a five-year dura-
i tion before it matures.

An e-mail sent out to

i prospective investors by
i Wesley Percentie, an execu-
i tive with Family Guardian
“They were told that if they } (FG) . Capital Markets,
keep their complaints out of } which is helping to place the
the media then Customs may i | ‘
back off,” said a source, who ; JS currently a private place-
; ment taking place for Phil’s
? Food Services. Phil’s Food

i Services provides wholesale

bond offering, said: “There



SEEKING TO RAISE $5M: Phil’s Food Services.

and retail food distribution
to New Providence and the
Family Islands. “The offer-
ing size is $5 million and the
security offered is an 8.5 per
cent Corporate Bond, with a
term of five years. The offer-
ing will close on February
15, 2011.”

No other details were
forthcoming, though. Tri-

AML FOODS CHAIRMAN TELLS



DIONISIO D’AGUILAR

By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor

AML Foods chairman last

i night urged the Securities Com-
? mission “to show a little back-
: bone” and prevent Mark Fin-
? layson’s $12 million bid to
? acquire majority control of the
i company from “dragging on for
? ever”, telling Tribune Business
i the situation was “causing too
i much turmoil in the market”
? and uncertainty among staff.

Speaking after Mr Finlayson

i earlier this week indicated the
? tender offer to acquire 51 per
i cent of AML Foods may be
, : ? delayed, after investors in Asso-
ments, Keith Davies, BISX’s ; ciated Bahamian Distillers and

i Brewers (ABDAB), in which

SEE page 4B

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Mark Finlayson: ‘Put
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FAMILY GUARDIAN
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FG Capital Markets was
assisting the main placement
agent for Phil’s Food Ser-
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mer CFAL executive who is
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SEE page 4B

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Bahamas lost
‘good slice of
growth’ on BIC

* BIC chairman says ‘a pity’ state-owned incumbent not
privatised back in 1998, as 12-year delay has ‘cost the

economy tremendously’
* Says Bahamas can be CWC’s best performing country
in Caribbean, as buyer has best synergies and fit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Failure to privatise the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) earlier has “cost the economy
tremendously”, the company’s exec-
utive chairman told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday, adding that the
opportunity cost was likely equiva-
lent to “a good slice of gross domes-
tic product growth”.

Julian Francis, who also served as
the Government-appointed privati-
sation committee’s deputy chairman,
told this newspaper it was “a pity”
that the Government did not privatise BTC back in 1998, just
after the first Ingraham administration announced its intention
to do so, a period when telecommunications stocks were at
their peak and buyer interest might have generated a higher pur-
chase price.

Describing BTC’s privatisation, via this week’s signing of
the $210 million agreement for the sale of a 51 per cent stake to

SEE page 7B

BIC’S $37.5M ACQUISITION
‘VETO’ THRESHOLD

JULIAN FRANCIS



By NEIL HARTNELL * { {

Tribune Business Editor Mobile shift and
The Government must first product bundling means

approve any moves bya priva- logs of same-island free

tised Bahamas Telecommuni- ;

cations Company (BTC) to landline calls may not be

acquire rival carriers/operations 4, , ;

worth more than $37.5 million, big issue

its executive chairman con- *

firmed yesterday, adding that Three-year cellular

the possible end to free same- is ‘

island calls may “not be a big exclusivity extension

issue” d h hif

elu heeded to prevent BIC
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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





a



=
=
=
=
=
=
—
=
=
=
=
=
—_
—_—
—
a
—

ED WILCHINSKI

Become a FAN of BIC on Facebook so that you can
participate in our Valentine's Day Competition!
YOU MUST BECOME A FAN IN ORDER TO WIN!

Visit: www.facebook.com/mybic and click ‘LIKE’

HOW MUCH DO | LOVE YOU?
Ler tent toulet thee p Wht

What do | have to do?
Facebook Fans must write to BTC about their significant other. They must list three rea-
sons why they love their mate and elaborate with 50 words on each reason. They will
also have fo include a photo of them and their significant other. Please send your
submission to prébicbahamas.com.

mh | Ana = >
,
"wh

The winning writer will win a PAIR of BlackBerry eee both loaded with two months
of prepaid BlackBerry data services!

BIC will select the best entry and the winner will be
announced at 4:30pm on Valentine's Day, This competition runs from

FaRhruicra rh Farr mane | ee ey i SF IF
rSeOrvary fill = FEeRBIVGaly ivill Gi vom

Winners can collect thelr prizes on Tuesday, February 15th at 1am from
our Marketing Office on Bay Street (in the Old Mikes Shoe Store Building)

Start orem your writing skills now!l!
elines/Rules:
You must be a legal Bohamian resident. Provide o copy of your passport or driver's license
dlong with your submission or It will not be accepted.
. You must be 18 years or older.
You must be o Fan of BIC on Facebook.
You must include 3 reasons you love your mate and elaborate with no less than 50 words and
not exceeding 75 words on each reason.
You must include a photo of you and your mate together.

BTC employees are not eligible to participate.

lf you require further clarification on the promotion, please send an emall to
or@lbtcbahamas.com

To Become a FAN of BTC on Facebook
ae : f = 2 @ el ala / F f
Wy uy WeTz aC CHWUVUA.UC UIT awiye Le
and click ‘LIKE’
Connected Anijtinné... Anipnhere...

3)%

spread ie word ell everyone fo become a ian of BIC on

City Markets appoints
first female chief exec



ORINOCO BETHEL

BENITA RAHMING

City Markets has named Benita Rahming as the supermarket
chain’s first female chief executive in its more than 50-year histo-

Mrs Rahming has previously been employed in posts such as
retail territory manager and market analyst at Esso Standard Oil,
where she was offered the chance to become that company’s first
female chief executive — a position she turned down due to work
in her family business.

She has also headed the mortgage department at Citibank. In
October 2010, she was hired as a consultant at Solomon’s Mines,
and in November she moved to serve as the consultant for Bahamas
Supermarkets, City Markets’ parent company.

Her international work experience includes General Manager of
Modern Bu-Jutsu out of Chicago, Illinois and Financial Analyst for
Van Leer Containers Inc in Illinois. She holds an MBA in
Accounting and Organization Behaviour from the Kellogg Grad-
uate School of Business in Chicago, Illinois

Mark Finlayson, president of Trans-Island Traders, the 78 per
cent majority owner of City Markets, called Mrs Rahming’s
appointment a “no brainer”.

“Apart from her excellent ability to execute the company’s
mandate, Benita is a wife, mother and a shopper. Essentially she
represents a key ingredient in the overall strategy and success of the
City Market chain”, Mr Finlayson said.

“Another major factor in her role as chief executive is the fact
that she retains an executive management team mostly comprised
of women.”

Mrs Rahming added: “We are already out of the gate, and
much of what we intend to do is directly a result of listening to our
customers and our intention to create a shopping and food expe-
rience in this country that is unparalleled.”

Other executive appointments continue the theme of Mr Fin-
layson putting former Solomon’s Mines and Burns House staffers
into his new business.

Ed Wilchinski has been appointed vice-president and chief
administrative officer of Bahamas Supermarkets. Mr Wilchinski will
be responsible for the purchasing of products, special projects
and human resource development.

Prior to joining the company he was general manager of
Bahamas Distillers and Todhunter Mitchell Distillery. He also
served as deputy general manager of Burns House.

Another appointment is Orinoco Bethell as vice-president and
chief operations officer of Bahamas Supermarkets. She will be
responsible for the company’s day-to-day operating activities,
including sales and revenue growth, expenses, cost and margin con-
trol, directing company operations to meet budget and other
financial goals.

Mrs Bethell brings with her 20 years’ work experience, and her
last post was division manager for the Solomon’s Mines Perfume
Bar.

Karen Culmer has been named as chief financial controller of
Bahamas Supermarkets. Miss Culmer will be responsible for the
company’s day- to-day accounting and financial reporting.

Her work experience includes financial controller and account-
ing manager at Burns House, and assistant manager of mutual
funds at MeesPierson (Bahamas) Fundservices.

Judy Terrell has been appointed vice-president and chief strate-
gist at Bahamas Supermarkets. Miss Terrell will be responsible for
working closely with the chief executive and chief operating offi-
cer in directing and executing the company’s vision.

She has more than 20 years combined experience in the elec-
tronic media/broadcasting, corporate communications and public
and private sector, having held the position as communication
director and government liaison at Ginn sur Mer, and news direc-
tor at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas.

Atlantis inducted as cruise
forum’s Platinum member



INDUCTION: Henry Bain, Atlantis’s director of sales and marketing for the
marine and water park division, accepted the induction from the FCCA’s
president, Michelle Paige, and Michael Ronan, Royal Caribbean’s vice-pres-
ident for government relations.

Kerzner International’s Atlantis resort was officially inducted
as a Platinum Member of the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Associa-
tion (FCCA) last month.

Henry Bain, Atlantis’s director of sales and marketing for the
marine and water park division, accepted the induction from the
FCCA’s president, Michelle Paige, and Michael Ronan, Royal
Caribbean’s vice-president for government relations.

“This was a great and important honour, since Atlantis, Paradise
Island, offers numerous types of excursions to cruise lines such as
Aquaventure, Dolphin Interactions, Snorkel tours and Beach Day
packages,” said Mr Bain.

“Tt was a natural fit for us to join the FCCA, and we feel that this
new relationship will help Atlantis be a positive ambassador for the
Bahamas, and help establish even better working relationships
with some of the most prominent figures and decision-makers in the
cruise industry.”

The Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association (FCCA) is a not-
for-profit trade organisation composed of 14 member bruise lines
operating more than 100 vessels in Floridian, Caribbean and Latin
American waters.

Created in 1972, the FCCA’s mandate 1s to provide a forum for
discussion on legislation, tourism development, ports, tour oper-
ations, safety, security and other cruise industry issues.

The FCCA works with governments, ports and all private/pub-
lic sector representatives to maximise cruise passenger, cruise line
and cruise line employee spending, as well as enhancing the des-
tination experience and the amount of cruise passengers returning
as stay-over visitors.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 3B





BAHAMAS ‘FINDS
WAY" TO REWARDS

MasterCard has renewed its commitment to the Bahamas
‘Find Your Way' promotion through a re-launch of the cam-
paign maximising value for Bahamians and tourists alike.

It allows MasterCard card holders armed with a Master-
Card booklet or map and their card to take advantage of
specials offered by participating attractions, excursions,
restaurants, hotels and stores.

The programme has grown by nearly 50 per cent since its
inception in 2009, with some 47 partners participating this
year. The launch, held at the British Colonial Hilton, drew the
Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace; chairman of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce,
Khaalis Rolle; president of the Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) Stuart Bowe; executive vice-president of the BHA,
Frank Comito; MasterCard vice-president of strategic part-
nerships for Latin America and the Caribbean, Patricio
Rubalcaba, and leading merchants, restaurateurs and media.



CREATING VALUE - Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Senator
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace (right) speaks with MasterCard’s
vice-president of strategic partnerships for Latin America and the
Caribbean, Patricio Rubalcaba (left) and MasterCard director of
acceptance, Rafael Fuentes during the launch of the Find Your
Way program. This is the third year MasterCard and the Ministry
of Tourism have partnered in the campaign that Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said added value, helping to give the Bahamas a com-
petitive edge in an environment where savvy vacation shoppers
are searching for a difference. Mr Rubalcaba told the crowd
gathered for the event at the British Colonial Hilton that in addi-
tion to an increase in the number of participating merchants - up
57 per cent since inception in 2009 - the program boosted
actual spend by 5 per cent, while spend in the industry as a
whole declined and, most importantly, showed a customer sat-
isfaction rating of 90 per cent.




z a | aa

THREE HATS, ONE NIGHT - Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
chairman Khaalis Rolle comes up a winner. Barely off the podi-
um as a guest speaker talking to hospitality and business lead-
ers at the re-launch of the MasterCard Find Your Way program
for the third year, he steps back onstage to accept a winner's
cheque for partner of the month for his own tourist excursion
business, Bahamas Undersea Adventures.




JEWELS-BY-THE-LAUNCH -- Rory Dean (centre) of Jewels-by-
the-Sea on West Bay Street, and wife Marcy, chat with Anthony
Smith, marketing manager of Diamonds International in down-
town Nassau, during last week's launch of the MasterCard Find
Your Way program in partnership with the Ministry of Tourism.
Pictured in the background are Michael Wicky, manager of
Anthony's Grill on Paradise Island, and Michael Symonette,
Bahamas Experience Tours.



IT'S IN THE DETAILS - Public relations executive Diane Phillips
co-hosts MasterCard re-launch with Downtown Nassau Part-
nership managing directorm Vaughn Roberts. Her firm manages
the MasterCard Find Your Way program locally, distributing
maps and brochures at the cruise port, to hotel and other
guests, and in stores. Residents who hold MasterCard are able
to take advantage of the program by collecting booklets at par-
ticipating merchants or restaurants, and it was a Bahamian
who won the first Sweepstakes after completing a transaction at
Scotiabank and going online to complete the Sweepstakes entry
form.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Site’s ‘big windfall’
for Bahamas hotels

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A former travel/tourism photographer
who has developed the latest tool for
beach lovers seeking the perfect vaca-
tion destination is encouraging Bahami-
an hoteliers to flaunt their “beach front”
status.

John Everingham, who last week
launched The Beachfront Club, a website
aimed at holidaymakers who want to
find accommodation that lives up to the
true meaning of “beach front”, said that
getting involved with the website could
equal a “big windfall” for Bahamian
hotels.

The site, two years in the making, was
inspired by Mr Everingham’s experience
as a photographer, and later a publisher,
in the travel industry in Thailand and
South East Asia, where he admits he
took and promoted images of hotels
which appeared to be - but were not actu-

ally - “right on the beach”. “Hotels would
ask me to take photos which made it
look like they were right on the beach,
but really there was a busy road in the
way.

“Over the years I saw so many people
who were seriously angry. They want to
be on the beach, they are paying good
money for their hotel and they were so
disappointed to find that the advertising
was misleading. That was really the basis
of what inspired me to start the web-
site,” said Mr Everingham.

At www.thebeachfrontclub.com, visi-
tors can find 7,000 hotels listed - includ-
ing 41 in the Bahamas at present - which
Mr Everingham says his team have iden-
tified as being “truly beach front”.

Hotels have been identified using satel-
lite imagery, aerial photographs
“brochures and whatever information is
available”, said Mr Everingham.

More hotels can be added as they are
identified and achieve their beach front
“credentials”, and those who are already

mapped on the website can get in touch
with The Beachfront Club to take pos-
session of their page on the site, which
will then be populated with details about
the accommodation.

“They can request an invitation. We
will send them one and they can register,
get a password, and claim the hotel for
free,” said Mr Everingham. For a “pre-
mium” $200 a month service, hotels get
to link their own booking system to the
website's hotel pages, and receive higher
visibility on the website's beach maps.

“We need the participation of the
hotels and the beach lovers to really
make this work.”

Mr Everingham said he believes the
website will have a “real impact on the
beach resorts of the world, drawing busi-
ness towards those that are really on the
beach”.

“A beach lover’s first choice is to be
right on the beach. Those who qualify
will find this is a big boon and a big wind-
fall for them,” he said.

Maritime industry is warned on pollution

commit to will make the dif-



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -_ The
Bahamas National Trust’s
(BNT) executive director has
urged the shipping industry
to employ practices that will
help minimise potential neg-
ative impacts on the world’s
oceans and its marine life.

Eric Carey noted that the
world’s oceans are under
threat from pollution and
marine debris related to ship-
ping and land-based activities.

“Our activities constantly
threaten to destroy the ocean
and its wildlife,” Mr Carey
told persons at the Bahamas
Maritime Conference and
Trade Show luncheon in
Freeport last week.

The BNT executive said the
Trust is presently working
with the Dolphin Caribbean
Fisheries Institute on a cam-
paign to create awareness
about marine debris in the
Bahamas.

He indicated they are going
to be working with interna-
tional shipping companies and
land-based companies to
reduce marine debris and pol-
lution in Bahamian waters.

Mr Carey stressed that
everyone has a responsibility
to keep the ocean healthy.

Oceans

“In addition to providing
the means by which many of
you move products and peo-
ple around the globe, we must
not forget that beneath the
waves exists life, and these
oceans provide food, recre-
ation, clean air, carbon miti-
gation and many things we
take for granted,” he
explained.

At the opening of the con-
ference, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the
Bahamian maritime industry
is taking on new and
increased importance in the
overall economy, noting that
the country has an impressive
ship register, one of the
largest in the world with over
52 million gross tons.

Mr Ingraham also noted
that the country has two sig-
nificant fuel and crude oil
transshipment terminals, one
of which is the largest in the
region.

Mr Carey said the move-
ment of petroleum products
is always risky. He noted that
accidental releases and colli-
sions can still occur, despite
the best efforts and highest
environmental standards.

“We need to make sure
that where practical we have
double hull ships carrying
hazard materials and petro-
leum products,” he said.

Mr Carey also noted that
certain paints are not good
for the environment, and
encouraged the use of alter-
native products with less
impact.

“The BNT and Bahamas
Maritime Authority support

high standards for any vessel
carrying the Bahamian flag,”
he said.

“We understand there has
to be impact... but as an
organisation we are charged
with trying to encourage peo-
ple with having minimum
impact.

“On your ships, you can
encourage taking less waste
and reducing packaging so
there is less temptation for
people to throw stuff over-
board.”

Mr Carey said vessels

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, a specialist

should change ballast water
in deeper oceans, rather than
near shore areas.

He also encouraged vessels
to have sludge tanks on board
instead of releasing bilge, with
high petroleum concentration,
into the ocean.

“There are lots of things we
can do as an industry, whether
you work in a corner office in
New York or in a hole of the
ship, everybody has an impor-
tant role to play,” Mr Carey
said.

“And practices that we

ference in whether or not our
oceans remain healthy.”

Mr Carey encouraged
mariners and shipping com-
panies to support conserva-
tion organisations, such as the
BNT and the Nature Conser-
vancy.

“We need support to do
our work. The Government
supports us, but we need the
support of the industry,” he
said.

in private banking,

fiduciary services and wealth management has an opening for the
position of

MANAGER - INTERNAL AUDIT

Reporting to: Audit & Finance Committee & the Managing Director

Responsibilities:

* Performing risk-based internal audits in all areas of the bank

Developing audit work programmes based on risk assessment
drawn from risk matrices

Producing reports for review by the Audit & Finance Committee

& Management

Performing process improvement reviews and reviews of new
systems implemented

Assisting external auditors during any special

investigations

Core competencies:

reviews and

* Bachelor's Degree and hold a professional certification in
accounting or banking

Minimum of five years’ audit experience in a public accounting
firm or financial services company

Knowledge of banking operations including credit operations and

fiduciary services

Analytical capability

Highly proficient in Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, etc) and
knowledge of banking systems

Strong written and verbal communication skills

* Knowledge of regulatory guidelines

All interested and qualified applicants should submit a cover letter and

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited

resume to the attention of:

Human Resources

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: vacancies@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications is Friday February 11, 2011







Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R PLP malicious lie condemned V olume: 107 No.67FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 W EATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 83F LOW 70F B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunmedia.net T HE government yesterday attacked the Opposition for spreading "a malicious lie" s uggesting that public ser vants' votes will be wooed with an impending lump sum payment of $2,500 to eache mployee and an extra $75 to their base salary. A statement from the Office of the Prime Minister vehemently denied the "fabricated" report released by the Progressive Liberal Party, adding that the Ingrahama dministration cannot dole o ut increments to the public service due to financial con straints. T he statement added that the government has worked Go vt hits out at report on public servant salaries M cCOMBO O F THE DAY N E W The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM I N S I D E WEDDINGPLANS? GET YOUR FREE BRIDES GUIDE INSIDE TODAY SIMPLYSUPER GETYOURFREE SPORTSWEEKLY SUPPLEMENT B R I D E S G U I D EC O V E R P H O T O / R O Y L L E R A SEE page eight By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter n nicolls@tribunemedia.net UNION leaders discussed t heir plans in a closed-door s ession with members last night, as they continued to pledge their opposition to the s ale of BTC to Cable and Wireless Communications (CWC B ernard Evans, president o f the Bahamas Communications and Public Officers U nion (BCPOU would be absolutely no apology for threats made about turning the country into a small Egypt. He said members would be informed in small groups FREEPORT: A 59-yearold man appeared in court yesterday accused of having sex with a nine-year-old girl. Albert Whylly was arraigned in Court One before Magistrate Debbie Ferguson, where he was charged with having sexual intercourse with a minor. It is alleged that the incident took place on Monday, February 7. Whylly, who was represented by Carlson Shurland, was not required to plead to the charge. He was granted $10,000 bail, with surety, and the matter was adjourned to June 21. MAN A CCUSED OF SEX WITH NINEYEAR-OLD UNION LEADERS MEET BEHIND CLOSED DOORS OVER BTC PL ANS SEE page eight By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A THIRD man appeared in magistrates court yester d ay in connection with the stabbing death of a prison officer. P olice have charged Presley Humes, 36, of Faith Avenue, with the murder of Juilian Strachan. Mr Strachan, 37, of Bell dock Avenue, was stabbed multiple times at the Carmichael Liquor Store on THIRD MAN CHARGED WITH MURDER OF PRISON OFFICER SEE page 10 By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net OPPOSITION MP V Alfred Gray said he is not concerned with reports that his constituency may be cut into two for the MP UNCONCERNED WITH REPORTS THAT CONSTITUENCY MA Y BE CUT INT O TWO SEE page 10 UNCONCERNED: V Alfred Gray A 20-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned yes terday on a murder charge dating back to 2008. The man, whose identity is not being revealed at present for legal reasons, is charged with the murder of Kendrick Rolle. Mr Rolle, 21, was found dead on Hanna Road, Fox Hill, having suffered gunshot wounds. He was the third murder victim for 2008. The accused, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, was not required to enter a plea. It is alleged that between Thursday, January 10, and Friday, January 11, 2008, he inten tionally caused Mr Rolles death. Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez told him he will stand trial before the juvenile panel as the offence allegedly occurred when he was still a minor. The case has been adjourned to February 24 and transferred to Court Two, Victoria Gar dens. The accused was remanded to Her Majestys Prison. 20YEAR-OLD IN COURT ON 2008 MURDER CHARGE PROTEST: The coalition consisting of the National Democratic Party and the Workers Party staged an island wide motorcade protest yesterday against plans to sell BTC to Cable and Wireless Communications (CWC SEE PAGETHREE C OALITIONSTAGESMOTORCADE PROTEST AGAINST BTCSALE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

OVER the next two days, as part of the governments continuing effort to overhaul the judicial system, politicians, prosecutors and law enforcement officers will try to view justice through the eyes of witnesses and victims. Opening the Witness Care Conference yesterday, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said it is a given that there needs to be a radical transformation in the way justice is administered in the Bahamas. He said changes are needed at all levels law enforcement, legal and judicial. The prime minister also noted that crime and the fearof crime occupy the minds of the government and the population everyday, and repeated his commitment to increase the human and financial resources dedicated to this issue. He listed several modernising initiatives in the works, including: improving the management and administration of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, acquiring new technology for crime fighting, upgrading the courts and adding to their number, launching a continuous programme of law reform, introducing stenographers in courts, amending the penal code and introducing electronic monitoring of persons on bail. The two-day conference, organised by the Office of the Attorney General and the Royal Bahamas Police Force, is designed to address the gaps and inefficiencies in the criminal justice system and to bring together all partners and affiliated interest groups to view the system from the perspective of victims and witnesses. The event is being held from February 10-12 at the Police Conference Centre. Among those in attendance were: Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs John Delaney; Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security; Loretta Butler-Turner, Minister of State for Social Development; Archie Nairn, permanent secretary; Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade; Vinette Graham-Allen, director of public prosecutions; and Debra Fraser, director of legal affairs. The Royal Bahamas Police Force provided entertainment for the event. Consultant Simon Deacy is serving as the facilitator for the conference. He is a retired chief superintendent of police in the United Kingdom and was a National no witness,no justice project manager for England and Wales. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PM: Radical change needed in justice system procedure PM SPEAKS: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham presents the keynote address. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S P h o t o

PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By LAMECH JOHNSON WHEN TheTribune's articles were posted online at 2pm on Wednesday, readers wasted no time in expressing their outrage over the article, "We'll turn country into small Egypt". In the story, a union leader vowed that future protests against the sale of the BTC would become a miniature version of the unrest that is presently convulsing Egyptian society. Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union President Bernard Evans said disruptions in services could be expected as a result of the opposition to the government's sale of a majority stake in BTC to Cable and Wireless Communications (CWC Responding to the story on tribune242.com, Ricardo W Wright called the Egypt comment stupid, and joked that Mr Evans on a camel would be a scary sight. No No called on union leaders to be more responsible. Suffering "We are already suffering economically in this littlecountry of ours. Don't mess up what lil business some of us gat by fooling with the already inconsistent phone services BTC provides. Nono no. Think about ALL of us, not just you all, the reader said. Liz asked: "What empiri cal evidence do they have that the majority of the Bahamian population disagrees with the sale of 51 per cent of BTC? So, at thee nd of the Egypt-like rioting, will 51 per cent of BTC still be sold?" While the overwhelming majority of those who commented disagreed with Mr Evans comment, not all feltt his way. L ol b elieves the issue is bigger than the unions. "It isa mounting frustration among Bahamians from being dismissed by its government and made second class citizens in their own country. When the full effect of the C&W presence in this country is known and felt, itis the average Bahamian who will suffer as it was in Cayman, Barbados, Jamaica and Panama that is why they rioted in Panama. Online readers respond to BCPOU President's Small Egypt statement By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net BECs executive management team is calling on union leaders to meet with them and discuss concerns after yesterdays industrial action. In a press statement issued yesterday afternoon, the Bahamas Electricity Corporation noted that some of its managerial staff had orchestrated and are engaged in an apparent sickout. The statement said: BEC would like to inform its cus tomers that measures have been taken to minimise possible disruption to electricity supplies as a result of action taken by the Bahamas Electrical Utility Managerial Union (BEUMU BECs executive management said they are unaware of any concerns that may have been discussed at the unions meeting on Wednesday, but reassured the public of the corporations commitment to working closely with the BEUMU in the best interest of employees and customers. The corporation would like to encourage the unions leadership to make contact with the executive management team to discuss concerns, the statement said. BEC management team calls on union leaders to discuss concer ns By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net THE third-party coalition consisting of the National Democratic Party and the Workers Party staged an island wide protest yesterday. P arty leaders blasted the gove rnment for proceeding with plans to sell BTC to Cable and Wireless Communications (CWC A small motorcade of party members rode around the city, covering Baillou Hill Road, Bay Street, Paradise Island, Mackey Street, Carmichael Road, Coral Harbour and the S ir Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA The motorcade circled Parliament Square and LPIA 10 times, spreading its message using a mobile sound system. Ethric Bowe, NDP co-ordinator for the protest, said: Our message is of Bahamians first. W e have no intention of allowing the sale of BTC to CWC. W e are resisting it with all of our might. We feel our government has taken a turn towards a dictatorship. We are acting to p ut an end to it. We are tired of i t. The PLP opposition seems to be colluding with the FNM to share up the countrysr esources among a few families. We have a few people gett ing very rich while the working class is being left out. We recognise if the working class is destroyed our society is d estroyed. We are acting to p reserve our Bahamas. Mr Bowe said that if the BTC deal goes through, there isn o point in Bahamians being in the Bahamas. We need tos hake Bahamians awake because we have been asleep too long following this red and yellow foolishness, said Mr B owe. When the motorcade circled the airport, Mr Bowe said, people streamed out to see what was going on. The circling 10 times, he said, had cultural significance since the number 10 has always been a power number in the Bahamas. We are using our culture to the max. People in the Bahamas believe in the power o f prayers. We know the government knows they are doing wrong. We are invoking our beliefs to influence him. The government has no heart, no conscience. We are determined to get rid of them, he said. Island-wide protest over BTC deal B y NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemdia.net Fred Mitchell, opposition member for F ox Hill, threw his support behind party leader Perry Christies pledge to renegotiate any agreement with Cable and Wireless should the Progressive Liberal Party form the next government. Let me say that I unequivocally sup portthe policy announced by Mr Christie and if w e get the good fortune to form the next gov ernment I would go further and urge that we doi n the national interest what the government of Belize did, and that is get the controlling interest i n BTC back again, said Mr Mitchell. Indeed, it appears that so much of what the PLP will have to do within the first 100 days of a new administration will be to set right the many wrongs perpetrated against the Bahamian people b y this FNM administration, he said. Mr Mitchell accused the government of trying t o sabotage future attempts of the PLP to revisit its decisions. He referenced the $100 million fixed liability built into the BTC sale agreem ent should the government choose to fast-track its liberalisation agenda withint he first year of Cable and Wireless taking over. We all know that this is nonsense and where there is a will there will be a way. (Prime Minister Ingraham make it impossible for a future PLP administration to act. He wants to changet hings so significantly on the ground that he will rule from the grave. Ah good sir: dig o ne grave, you dig two, said Mr Mitchell. He is doing it with the national debt as well. H e is maxing out the national credit card so that when the PLP comes to power, there willbe no m oney to do anything and he will sit back in his Abaco rocking chair and say: I told you so, he said. Mr Mitchell also reiterated his warning to investors in the port at Arawak Cay, indicating t hat the PLP still intended to put the port where it ought to be on the south of New Providence. I say to those who are investing in that Port: Buyer beware! said Mr Mitchell. Mitchell backs Christie vow to renegotiate agreement FLAG-WAVING: Protesters make their case. NDP AND W ORKER S P ARTYCOALITIONSTAGEDEMONSTRATION MOTORCADE: Party members rode around the city. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f FRED MITCHELL

PAGE 4

E DITOR, The Tribune. P lease once again allow me some space in your paper. Saturday night, the Bahamas Humane Society had the most amazing and successful evening at Government House. This event is now a yearly one and is held in order to showcase the B-humane banners that will line s ome of the streets of New Providence this month to pro mote awareness and responsible ownership, as well as, hope fully, stamp out animal cruel ty. I am a great believer of giving credit where credit is due. Saturday night was the amazing s uccess that it was thanks to many people and groups. Firstly, the Swiss bank with a heart of gold, Lombard Odier Darier Hentschvery kindly, for the second year running, has sponsored the Banner campaign for the Bahamas Humane Society. We are so grateful to t his Swiss institution with a social conscience. We would NOT have been able to do it without their faithful sponsor ship. Secondly the absolutely amazing photos taken by Patricia Vazquez that grace the ban ners are indeed a labour of lovea nd are beautifully taken. The BHS is very lucky to have such a talented photographer so supportive of our efforts. T hirdly, Government House and the staff! What an amazi ng setting to hold an event. It was beautiful, the Police bands small group played wonderful music, the young lady who sang had a terrific voice. The grounds were lit up magically, and the actual Government House staff were so unbeliev ably helpful. Chef Jarred prep ared the most delicious foodthank you to them all from the BHS. We are very fortunate at the Bahamas Humane Society to have such a caring Patron in His Excellency our Governor General, Sir Arthur Foulkes and Lady FoulkesTheir prese nce at our event lent the dignity that the surroundings deserved.. That evening I announced that we at the Bahamas Humane Society intend to launch a Crusade against Cruelty There are too many unspeakable acts of cruelty and n eglect going on in our coun t rySome are intentional but many are not. However, ignor ance cannot always be used as an excuse Most people know the difference between right from wrong. If you dont feed or water an animalguess what ? IT WILL DIE! I honestly find it difficult to believe that most people do not know this. If you would like to join us o n our Crusade against Cruelty please contact me at bhs.cru sadeagainstcruelty@gmail.com We need numbers to spread the word, please join our cause and help us. A huge salute to all the dedicated Bahamas Humane Soci ety staff who worked so hard o n Saturday night to make the night so successful, we are indeed lucky to have you at the shelter. KIM ARANHA President of the Bahamas Humane Society, Nassau, F ebruary 6, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. Generally, I am a strong supporter of unions, they are good for a country but there are times when they are unreasonable and make unreasonable demands of employers. For instance, I am concerned about demands that the BTC unions and others are making regarding the privatisation of the company by the government. Based on all that has been said and in print on this issue, I am left to conclude that the BTC unions and the ones that support them are only interested in themselves and their members, but not our nation and B ahamians. The BTC unions only seem to be about their narrow and s ingular interest, as opposed to what they have been saying that they are concerned a bout Bahamians owning BTC. What I have heard from them, is that it is all about them at a time when things are tough in this country for a lot of people. Their members have jobs and will have them for at least three years. They seem to really be interested in their jobs and separation packages. The unions have stated that those employees who were invited to voluntarily separate and receive packages; should receive packages more generous than the government gave them in 1999. Prime Minister Ingraham has indicated that the government cannot afford the 1999 packages today. In fact, the Prime Minister has indicated that the 1999 packages were too generous in the fIrst instance. Secondly, they appear to be interested in one other thing; getting more than three years guaranteed employment for those employees who do not voluntarily separate. But this too, Prime Minister Ingraham has said is just not feasible or possible. In fact, Prime Minister Ingraham has already indicated that Cable & Wireless sought redundancies to the tune of 300 employees immediately, so that the company can have a good chance of being profitable and compete with new entries into the market. Prime Minister Ingraham also spoke to this issue, indicating that the government did not intend to give a three year exclusivity period on cellular, but it ended up doing so as an offset ensuring that no jobs are lost for the same p eriod. The BTC unions are about themselves and no one else. T hey are not truly concerned about you and me, whether we own BTC or not it is all a bout them. KIRK DEAN Nassau, January 25, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited N ULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI B eing Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 E ILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972P ublished Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm THE year was 1962 October 16. T he Tribune in those days The Nassau Daily Tribune reported that while Tropical Storm Ella was building and keeping everyone guessing, a home on Peter Street East h ad been stoned for the second night. E lection fever was in the air. In a months time November 26 the Bahamas would exercise universal adult suffrage when voters would go to the polls. On that day Bahamia n women would vote for the first time and all Bahamian men 21 and over would vote without the property qualification. The PLP was so confident of victory that year that on the eve of the election, the part y celebrated on Clifford Park the defeat of the UBP government. In the days and m onths leading up to the election the PLP tolerated no opposition. That was why Mr W ellington Ferguson, a Prison Overseer of Peter Street, believed his house had been stoned two nights in a row because of his politics. The second stoning in fact was 3 oclock on a Sunday morning when a large rock was h urled through his front glass door, missing his wifes head by inches. M r Ferguson was convinced this was the result of a conversation with Mr Sweeting of t he Bahamas Lumber Company within earshot of others. In that discussion he open ly condemned the shocking behaviour of the PLP. The death of Paul Bower on January 24 b rought back memories of 1962 when the most interesting news of that October day w as a libel action brought by six PLP bar risters against The Nassau Guardian, and M r Bower, its editor, for a letter published by that newspaper. As the action progressed it was obvious that the litigants were more interested in outing the author of the letter, than in the letter itself. However, Mr Bower, in the tradition of all good journalists refused to reveal the writers identity and was threate ned with prison by his good friend, Magis trate John Bailey. His refusal put him inc ontempt of the court. We recalled this period, because we sud d enly realised that with the death of Mr Bower we were the only person left who still held the writers secret. It was a namethat neither of us dared reveal because of what the writer would have suffered if itw ere discovered that he was a friend of several of the litigants, although he had never j oined the PLP. Bert Cambridge was one of the members of the House of Assembly who s tood by Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1956 when he moved his anti-discrimination Resolution. In the election later that year Mr Cambridge was defeated at the polls. In the samee lection Sir Lynden Pindling entered the H ouse for the first time. We have revealed Mr Cambridges name because he is now beyond being hurt, and wherever he is we are certain he is having a g ood chuckle as he did when alive and his friends never suspected that he was the Western District Voter. However, his name is significant for that period because it shows that although persons like Bert Camb ridge, a black man, worked passionately to elevate his race, he did not approve of m any of the PLPs methods. The letter was a comment on the failure of t hose responsible to make public what happened to funds collected for the South African Relief Fund, which was launched by the PLP to rival a fund started earlier by The Tribune. It was the practice of The Trib une to daily publish sums of money donated to whatever fund it was sponsoring. Western District Voter criticised the PLP for not adequately informing the public how t heir publicly collected funds 15s 2d had been dealt with. The letter in question was an Open letter to Mr Paul Adderley, in which, said Mr Bower, no reasonable man would see anyt hing libellous. He assured the court that the letter writer was no fiction, but a man Mr B ower had known for three years and could not imagine him bearing any ill will, malice, o r acrimony against Mr Adderley. Nor possibly could Mr Adderley, if he had known the identity of the writer. One of the difficulties, however, was that The Tribune had received the same letter, which its editor heavily edited to make it legally safe before publication. In other w ords we deleted what we considered an innuendo and the names of the six com p lainants. This led the litigants to believe that it was either Mr Bower or someone at T he Guardian who had embellished the let ter and that the writer was a fiction. Nothing could have been further from the truth. Both newspapers received the same letter in fact one was a carbon copy. One editor usedh er editorial discretion in editing, the other did not. As a result one was before the c ourts, the other was not. BTC unions only seem to be about their narrow interest LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A letter writers name is finally revealed 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW&/$8'(77( 52//( RI6RXWK%DKDPLD*UDQG%DKDPD,VODQG %DKDPDVLQWHQGWRFKDQJHQDPHWR&+$50$,1( &/$8'(77(52//( ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWR WKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFK REMHFWLRQVWRWKH'HSXW\&KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU3 *UDQG%DKDPDQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\V DIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH,17(1772&+$1*($0(%<'(('// 38%/,&,&( Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. The Bahamas Humane Societys amazing and successful evening EDITOR, The Tribune. It is normal to expect that the Free National Movement will be challenged by whatever political parties are in existence next year, but the basis of that challenge will not hinge on w hether the current Prime Minister is compassionate or not; it may be a factor but it will not be the factor. Party members from all sides are looking for excuses to get at each other, and they will take whatever they can find, and that is everyday politics. The present compassion issue is one, that began when The Nassau Guardian took a statement made by Mr McCartney out of context. There was a compounding of the problem this morning as an out of context statement takes on a life of its own when we read on the front page, At the time McCartney predicted that the FNM would be challenged, in part because of Ingrahams lack of compassion toward the Bahamian people. Did the reporter listen to the interview? Or anyone else taking up space on the front page? Mr Bethel and Mr Roberts, both men of substantial political currency, have used this opportunity to put forth their partys agenda, or the agenda of those within the parties who need something to throw, at the expense of misinforming the publics perception of a particular person and they seem to be doing it together. At least, Mr McCartney is fitting the leadership profile, where everybody is trying to get a piece of you. On the face of it, is it wise to assume that the misuse of con textual references is going to be the norm as we go into 2012? With the chairmen of both parties getting into the fray as they usually do at a very caustic level, can the Bahamian public stand all of this smoke? Or are we going to have to check overall contexts when anything is said about a prospective candidate. Historically, misrepresenting the facts is something that politicians do without blinking, looking you straight in the face. If we remember the contextual misrepresentations that the late Cecil Wallace Whitfield had to contend with, we should also remember that these misrepresentations were perpetuated by persons who were his very close friends. At the end of it, perspective will be everything, and any par ticular view that we come up with will depend on how informed we are on what is going on with, what is needed from, and what we are expecting from those who presume to lead. And, ultimately or hopefully we will extend these demands to any and all who see themselves as participants in the warp and woof of leadership.. We should all be of the opinion that the leaders we choose will be those who get the job done, regardless of the misrepresentations they have to endure, and this is not supposed to be a nice exercise. If we can remember what goes on a couple of months before any election in any part of the world, we will endeavour to do our homework. My only demand is that the institutions charged with keeping us informed, reject the mischievous impulses that writers like myself have to contend with daily. EDWARD HUTCHESON Nassau, February 3, 2011. Mischievous impulses

PAGE 5

E DITOR, The Tribune. P lease once again allow me some space in your paper. Saturday night, the Bahamas Humane Society had the most amazing and successful evening at Government House. This event is now a yearly one and is held in order to showcase the B-humane banners that will line s ome of the streets of New Providence this month to pro mote awareness and responsible ownership, as well as, hope fully, stamp out animal cruel ty. I am a great believer of giving credit where credit is due. Saturday night was the amazing s uccess that it was thanks to many people and groups. Firstly, the Swiss bank with a heart of gold, Lombard Odier Darier Hentschvery kindly, for the second year running, has sponsored the Banner campaign for the Bahamas Humane Society. We are so grateful to t his Swiss institution with a social conscience. We would NOT have been able to do it without their faithful sponsor ship. Secondly the absolutely amazing photos taken by Patricia Vazquez that grace the ban ners are indeed a labour of lovea nd are beautifully taken. The BHS is very lucky to have such a talented photographer so supportive of our efforts. T hirdly, Government House and the staff! What an amazi ng setting to hold an event. It was beautiful, the Police bands small group played wonderful music, the young lady who sang had a terrific voice. The grounds were lit up magically, and the actual Government House staff were so unbeliev ably helpful. Chef Jarred prep ared the most delicious foodthank you to them all from the BHS. We are very fortunate at the Bahamas Humane Society to have such a caring Patron in His Excellency our Governor General, Sir Arthur Foulkes and Lady FoulkesTheir prese nce at our event lent the dignity that the surroundings deserved.. That evening I announced that we at the Bahamas Humane Society intend to launch a Crusade against Cruelty There are too many unspeakable acts of cruelty and n eglect going on in our coun t rySome are intentional but many are not. However, ignor ance cannot always be used as an excuse Most people know the difference between right from wrong. If you dont feed or water an animalguess what ? IT WILL DIE! I honestly find it difficult to believe that most people do not know this. If you would like to join us o n our Crusade against Cruelty please contact me at bhs.cru sadeagainstcruelty@gmail.com We need numbers to spread the word, please join our cause and help us. A huge salute to all the dedicated Bahamas Humane Soci ety staff who worked so hard o n Saturday night to make the night so successful, we are indeed lucky to have you at the shelter. KIM ARANHA President of the Bahamas Humane Society, Nassau, F ebruary 6, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. Generally, I am a strong supporter of unions, they are good for a country but there are times when they are unreasonable and make unreasonable demands of employers. For instance, I am concerned about demands that the BTC unions and others are making regarding the privatisation of the company by the government. Based on all that has been said and in print on this issue, I am left to conclude that the BTC unions and the ones that support them are only interested in themselves and their members, but not our nation and B ahamians. The BTC unions only seem to be about their narrow and s ingular interest, as opposed to what they have been saying that they are concerned a bout Bahamians owning BTC. What I have heard from them, is that it is all about them at a time when things are tough in this country for a lot of people. Their members have jobs and will have them for at least three years. They seem to really be interested in their jobs and separation packages. The unions have stated that those employees who were invited to voluntarily separate and receive packages; should receive packages more generous than the government gave them in 1999. Prime Minister Ingraham has indicated that the government cannot afford the 1999 packages today. In fact, the Prime Minister has indicated that the 1999 packages were too generous in the fIrst instance. Secondly, they appear to be interested in one other thing; getting more than three years guaranteed employment for those employees who do not voluntarily separate. But this too, Prime Minister Ingraham has said is just not feasible or possible. In fact, Prime Minister Ingraham has already indicated that Cable & Wireless sought redundancies to the tune of 300 employees immediately, so that the company can have a good chance of being profitable and compete with new entries into the market. Prime Minister Ingraham also spoke to this issue, indicating that the government did not intend to give a three year exclusivity period on cellular, but it ended up doing so as an offset ensuring that no jobs are lost for the same p eriod. The BTC unions are about themselves and no one else. T hey are not truly concerned about you and me, whether we own BTC or not it is all a bout them. KIRK DEAN Nassau, January 25, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited N ULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI B eing Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 E ILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972P ublished Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm THE year was 1962 October 16. T he Tribune in those days The Nassau Daily Tribune reported that while Tropical Storm Ella was building and keeping everyone guessing, a home on Peter Street East h ad been stoned for the second night. E lection fever was in the air. In a months time November 26 the Bahamas would exercise universal adult suffrage when voters would go to the polls. On that day Bahamia n women would vote for the first time and all Bahamian men 21 and over would vote without the property qualification. The PLP was so confident of victory that year that on the eve of the election, the part y celebrated on Clifford Park the defeat of the UBP government. In the days and m onths leading up to the election the PLP tolerated no opposition. That was why Mr W ellington Ferguson, a Prison Overseer of Peter Street, believed his house had been stoned two nights in a row because of his politics. The second stoning in fact was 3 oclock on a Sunday morning when a large rock was h urled through his front glass door, missing his wifes head by inches. M r Ferguson was convinced this was the result of a conversation with Mr Sweeting of t he Bahamas Lumber Company within earshot of others. In that discussion he open ly condemned the shocking behaviour of the PLP. The death of Paul Bower on January 24 b rought back memories of 1962 when the most interesting news of that October day w as a libel action brought by six PLP bar risters against The Nassau Guardian, and M r Bower, its editor, for a letter published by that newspaper. As the action progressed it was obvious that the litigants were more interested in outing the author of the letter, than in the letter itself. However, Mr Bower, in the tradition of all good journalists refused to reveal the writers identity and was threate ned with prison by his good friend, Magis trate John Bailey. His refusal put him inc ontempt of the court. We recalled this period, because we sud d enly realised that with the death of Mr Bower we were the only person left who still held the writers secret. It was a namethat neither of us dared reveal because of what the writer would have suffered if itw ere discovered that he was a friend of several of the litigants, although he had never j oined the PLP. Bert Cambridge was one of the members of the House of Assembly who s tood by Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1956 when he moved his anti-discrimination Resolution. In the election later that year Mr Cambridge was defeated at the polls. In the samee lection Sir Lynden Pindling entered the H ouse for the first time. We have revealed Mr Cambridges name because he is now beyond being hurt, and wherever he is we are certain he is having a g ood chuckle as he did when alive and his friends never suspected that he was the Western District Voter. However, his name is significant for that period because it shows that although persons like Bert Camb ridge, a black man, worked passionately to elevate his race, he did not approve of m any of the PLPs methods. The letter was a comment on the failure of t hose responsible to make public what happened to funds collected for the South African Relief Fund, which was launched by the PLP to rival a fund started earlier by The Tribune. It was the practice of The Trib une to daily publish sums of money donated to whatever fund it was sponsoring. Western District Voter criticised the PLP for not adequately informing the public how t heir publicly collected funds 15s 2d had been dealt with. The letter in question was an Open letter to Mr Paul Adderley, in which, said Mr Bower, no reasonable man would see anyt hing libellous. He assured the court that the letter writer was no fiction, but a man Mr B ower had known for three years and could not imagine him bearing any ill will, malice, o r acrimony against Mr Adderley. Nor possibly could Mr Adderley, if he had known the identity of the writer. One of the difficulties, however, was that The Tribune had received the same letter, which its editor heavily edited to make it legally safe before publication. In other w ords we deleted what we considered an innuendo and the names of the six com p lainants. This led the litigants to believe that it was either Mr Bower or someone at T he Guardian who had embellished the let ter and that the writer was a fiction. Nothing could have been further from the truth. Both newspapers received the same letter in fact one was a carbon copy. One editor usedh er editorial discretion in editing, the other did not. As a result one was before the c ourts, the other was not. BTC unions only seem to be about their narrow interest LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A letter writers name is finally revealed 7KH3XEOLFLVKHUHE\DGYLVHGWKDW&/$8'(77( 52//( RI6RXWK%DKDPLD*UDQG%DKDPD,VODQG %DKDPDVLQWHQGWRFKDQJHQDPHWR&+$50$,1( &/$8'(77(52//( ,IWKHUHDUHDQ\REMHFWLRQVWR WKLVFKDQJHRIQDPH'HHG3ROO\RXPD\ZULWHVXFK REMHFWLRQVWRWKH'HSXW\&KLHI3DVVSRUW2IFHU3 *UDQG%DKDPDQRODWHUWKDQWKLUW\GD\V DIWHUWKHGDWHRISXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLVQRWLFH,17(1772&+$1*($0(%<'(('// 38%/,&,&( Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. The Bahamas Humane Societys amazing and successful evening EDITOR, The Tribune. It is normal to expect that the Free National Movement will be challenged by whatever political parties are in existence next year, but the basis of that challenge will not hinge on w hether the current Prime Minister is compassionate or not; it may be a factor but it will not be the factor. Party members from all sides are looking for excuses to get at each other, and they will take whatever they can find, and that is everyday politics. The present compassion issue is one, that began when The Nassau Guardian took a statement made by Mr McCartney out of context. There was a compounding of the problem this morning as an out of context statement takes on a life of its own when we read on the front page, At the time McCartney predicted that the FNM would be challenged, in part because of Ingrahams lack of compassion toward the Bahamian people. Did the reporter listen to the interview? Or anyone else taking up space on the front page? Mr Bethel and Mr Roberts, both men of substantial political currency, have used this opportunity to put forth their partys agenda, or the agenda of those within the parties who need something to throw, at the expense of misinforming the publics perception of a particular person and they seem to be doing it together. At least, Mr McCartney is fitting the leadership profile, where everybody is trying to get a piece of you. On the face of it, is it wise to assume that the misuse of con textual references is going to be the norm as we go into 2012? With the chairmen of both parties getting into the fray as they usually do at a very caustic level, can the Bahamian public stand all of this smoke? Or are we going to have to check overall contexts when anything is said about a prospective candidate. Historically, misrepresenting the facts is something that politicians do without blinking, looking you straight in the face. If we remember the contextual misrepresentations that the late Cecil Wallace Whitfield had to contend with, we should also remember that these misrepresentations were perpetuated by persons who were his very close friends. At the end of it, perspective will be everything, and any par ticular view that we come up with will depend on how informed we are on what is going on with, what is needed from, and what we are expecting from those who presume to lead. And, ultimately or hopefully we will extend these demands to any and all who see themselves as participants in the warp and woof of leadership.. We should all be of the opinion that the leaders we choose will be those who get the job done, regardless of the misrepresentations they have to endure, and this is not supposed to be a nice exercise. If we can remember what goes on a couple of months before any election in any part of the world, we will endeavour to do our homework. My only demand is that the institutions charged with keeping us informed, reject the mischievous impulses that writers like myself have to contend with daily. EDWARD HUTCHESON Nassau, February 3, 2011. Mischievous impulses

PAGE 6

By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net U NION leaders say the p oor economic climate and a decrease in government funding to ZNS has resulted in a less favorable industrial agreem ent for employees. A fter almost four years of n egotiations, union leaders and ZNS management met yesterday morning to sign then ew contract between the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB Bahamas Communications a nd Public Managers Unions (BCPMU Tension between the union a nd the corporation began in 2 008 when staff members w alked off in protest of whey they described as unbearablew orking conditions. P ossible restructuring and reorganising of the Broadcasting Corporation was announced by Minister of N ational Security Tommy T urnquest in May 2009, culminating in budget cuts and mass lay-offs by the corporation last year when 71 e mployees were let go as a r esult of overstaffing and bloated wages. William Carroll, president of the BCPMU, said the econ omic climate has forced the u nion to make various concessions to get the agreement signed. He said: This has been a long process and some of the what the staff signed off on is hard to swallow. We did not get everything we wanted but we did the best we could in these times and w ill come back to the table in 2 012 so employees are better o ff in the next contract. According to Mr Carroll, the union represents 34 of the7 0-plus ZNS employees. Darren Meadows, lead negotiator for the union, agreed that the workers didn ot receive everything they w anted but said the union had to take the economic climate into consideration and hopet hat when the contract is rene g otiated, employees will get a better deal. He said: In the midst of a f inancial recession, we had to understand the position of the corporation. H e added that the Broadc asting Corporation has a ssured us that employees will see the fruits of their labour int he next one. C hairman of the BCB Michael Moss said the process has been a difficult one and acknowledged union did have to make concessions on ben-e fits and salary increases. According to Mr Moss, the f ive year contract which expires in 2013 will not pro-v ide for any annual increase s. Rather, employees will receive percentage increases over three years which will not be attached to any sort of evaluations. Incentive payments have also been taken out of the a greement while articles with r espect discipline have remained consistent with prio r contracts. G eneral manager Edwin L ightbourn said the road has been a long but fruitful one and has proven that the two sides can work together in dif f icult circumstances. I am happy to put it behind us, we are ready tom ove forward, said Mr Lightbourn. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A 30-YEAR-OLD man has been convicted and sentenced to 18 months in prison in connection with a m ajor drug seizure in 2 006. F ollowing a trial in the Magistrates Court, Deputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethell sentenced Androsian Derick Dion White to 18 months imprisonm ent on Wednesday o n the charge of poss ession of marijuana with the intent to supply. According to the prosecution, police arrested White and two other men in the M arshall Road area o n Friday March 24, 2006. T he men were in a C hevy Astro van w hich attempted to flee the area of a boat ramp. I nside the van, police discovered 20 white crocus bags containing 921 pounds of m arijuana. His co-accused Ian Porter was sentenced t o 42 months impriso nment and fined $ 50,000 in January 2009. A third defendant w as acquitted of the drug charges. WILLIAM CARROLL President of the BCPMU, Michael Moss, Chairman of the BCB, and general manager Edwin Lightbourn sign the agreement yesterday. Felip Major /Tribune staff Union leaders say ZNS contract less favourable AGREEMENT: William Carroll, President of the BCPMU, along with Michael Moss, Chairman of the BCB, and general manag-e r Edwin Lightbourn. Felip Major /Tribune staff M AN GETS 18 MONTH S ENTENCE IN C ONNECTION WITH D RUG SEIZURE

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L OCAL NEWS P AGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T OP SPELLER Samantha Marc of TA Thompson Junior High School emerged as the winner of the Northwestern Districts Spelling B ee Competition after d efeating 31 other contenders. Following close behind were TG Glover Primary School students Julian Desir and third place winner Ariannah Bain. T he participants in the S pelling Bee hailed from various public primary and j unior high schools, includi ng: Albury Sayle, Gambier, N aomi Blatch, Oakes Field, TG Glover, Woodcock Primary, HO Nash and TA Thompson. A highlight of the competition was the speech given b y the outgoing champion f or 2010, Randeika Foulkes, a ninth grade student of HO Nash. Randeika told her fellow students that they are all destined to succeed if they are willing to work hard. She explained that her j ourney to winning the dist rict spelling competition b egan when she was a student at Oakes Field Primary School, but victory did not come until the eighth grade, w hen she was at HO Nash Junior High School. Randeika encouraged her p eers to continue to comp ete and to be proud of their a chievements. A lso bringing remarks w as Howard Newbold, Superintendent for the North Western District, who expressed his pride in the efforts of all of the particip ants. H e said Samantha would go on to compete against w inners from the other districts, in the Bahamas National Spelling Bee Competition. One winner will emerge f rom this competition, who w ill travel to Washington DC to participate in the S cripps Howard National Spelling Bee competition. Mr Newbold gave his best wishes to all of contestants, and assured them that they a re all winners, having met t he requirements to represent their various schools. THE public is invited to the annual Law Enforcement Service to be held at the Grants Town Seventh-Day Adventist Church on Wellington Street off Market Street on Saturday, February 12. Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes, Director of Immigration Jack Thompson, Customs Comptroller Glenn G omez and Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade will a ttend. Public invited to annual Law Enforcement Service TA Thompson Junior High student wins Northwestern District Spelling Bee Samantha Marc defeats 31 other competitors US ADMIRAL VISITS DEFENCE FORCE BASE ADMIRAL JAMES A WINNEFELD JR and officials from the US Northern Command and the United States Embassy are taken on a tour of HMBS Coral Harbour by Captain Tellis Bethel and his officers. R BDF photos / Petty Officer Jonathan Rolle A DMIRALJames A Winnefeld Jr, Comm ander of the North American Aerospace D efence Command (NORAD ed States Northern Command, (NORTH-C OM) paid a courtesy call on the Deputy C ommander Defence Force, Captain Tellis Bethel, at the Royal Bahamas Defence Forces Coral Harbour Base on Wednes day afternoon. Admiral Winnefeld was accompanied by US Charg dAffaires Timothy Ziga-Brown along with other officials from the US Northern Command and the United StatesE mbassy. During his visit, the Admiral met with the Deputy Commander, and was introd uced to the members of the Defence F orces Executive Leadership Team. A dmiral Winnefeld was later taken on a tour of HMBS Coral Harbour before pro-c eeding on a short sea trip aboard a Defence F orce patrol craft, which was one of six such vessels donated to The Bahamas government under the US Enduring Friendship programme. The Admiral assumed responsibility as Commander NORTHCOM from General Victor Renuart in May 2010. He is currently on an official tour of nations withinN ORTHCOMs area of responsibility, which includes The Bahamas. ADMIRAL JAMES A WINNEFELD JR being given a short sea trip aboard a Defence Force Patrol craft. The Admiral and Petty Officer Jonathan Evans are engaged in a brief conversation.

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BY DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A 15-year-old m ale student at a government high school was taken to hospital after being struck in the head with a rock by another s tudent on Thursday morning. A sst Supt Loretta Mackey reported that police were summ oned to the school at around 8.30am after several students w ere seen engaged in an argument. Ms Mackey said another male student hit the 11th grader with a stone, causing injury to the back of his head near his n eck. The student was transported to the Accident and E mergency Section of the Rand Memorial Hospital, where he i s currently listed in stable condition. Police are investigating the matter. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT A man was s hot in the leg by police offic ers investigating a robbery in Eight Mile Rock after he a llegedly charged the officers while brandishing a knife. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey s aid the 34-year-old Hanna Hill m an was then taken into custody and transported to hospitalf or treatment. S he said the incident unfolde d after the officers responded to a report of a disturbance and armed robbery at Job Incorpo rated on Sapodilla Road in Hanna Hill. According to reports, a f emale store owner called p olice around 8.30am and r eported that a man armed with an eight-inch knife had entered the store. After robbing the owner of cash, the man reportedly start ed acting in a erratic manner, repeatedly entering and exiting the store. Several customers and the o wner ran out, locking the sus p ect inside the store until the officers arrived. W hen they confronted the suspect inside the store, Ms Mackey said, the man refused to put down knife, then sud denly ran toward the officers. O ne of the officers cautioned the man again, but the suspect continued moving towards theo fficer with the knife, Ms Macke y said. The officer drew his service weapon and discharged it, hit ting the man in the upper left thigh. After being hit, the man continued to charge the offi cers with the knife but was sub-s equently subdued and arrested b y the officers, she said. T he man was transported by ambulance to the Rand Memo rial Hospital, where he was treated by doctors for his injury. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net TWOmen were arraigned on drugs and firearm possess ion charges in the Freeport Magistrates Court. Neville Cunningham, 32, and Elsworth Hendfield, 32, of Bass Lane appeared before Magis-t rate Andrew Forbes in Court Two. It is alleged that on February 7, while at Freeport, Grand B ahama, the accused men were found in possession of illegal drugs and a firearm with live rounds of ammunition. The men were represented b y Simeon Brown. They pleaded not guilty to the charges andwere each granted $7,500 bail. The matter was adjourned to A ugust 9 for trial. Student hospitalised after being struck in the head with rock Two men arraigned on drugs and firearm charges Man shot in leg after allegedly charging at police with knife POLICE SHOOTING: Outside the scene of the robbery and shooting at Job Incorporated on Sapodilla Road, Eight Mile Rock. Officers responded after a female store owner called police and reported that a man armed with an eight-inch knife had entered the store. V a n d y k e H e p b u r n / P h o t o

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h ard, however, to ensure that no civil servants are let go in the face of fiscal cutbacks. "The government has worked tirelessly to ensure that no public officers werem ade redundant and that no s alaries were cut even though increments cannot be paid and allowances have been reduced during the economic crisis," said the statement. We note the number of countries in the region and a round the world that have had to reduce public sector employment and salaries. "We condemn the Opposition for conjuring up this mali-c ious lie. We confirm that the G overnment of the Bahamas does not have the financiala bility to make payments to p ublic officers as suggested by the Opposition in what can b est be described as a figment of their fertile imagination." The statement also thanked p ublic servants for their "restraint" during the worst economic crisis in the last 60 years. Meantime, President of the Bahamas Public Service Union John Pinder said hew ished the reports were true adding that an increment payout would ease the financial burden of those in the civil service. M r Pinder hopes to begin n egotiations on a new indust rial agreement for the public service on February 24 when he will lobby for more benefitsa nd raises. "It would be really nice if G overnment could make g ood on retroactive payments t o our members and some other outstanding financial matters. I know that some persons that were at the maximum of their salary scales are entitled to their increments in the form o f a lump sum, there are per sons owed tuition reimburse ments and persons who have h ad promotions withheld. "Our (proposed agreement speaks to them opening up salaries scales and making good, asking for a general pay increase and for health insurance," said theu nion leader. In a statement issued this week, the PLP said claimed payments were on the horizon for government workers a nd questioned if this was a ploy to gain voter confid ence. "While we support all legitimate payment increases to public servants, we have to point out to them the cynical n ature of what is proposed," said the statement. The party said the situation harks back to 1997, when on the night before the police force voted, they were "reminded" of a $1,500 lumps um payment due to them the following morning. Fortunately, the PLP said, times have changed and Bahamians will no longer be f ooled by such tactics which they said amount to "seeking t o bribe voters." The statement said: "The PLP says take the money but remember that it was (Prime Minister) Ingraham's admini stration that mistreated public servants during this term. You should reward Mr Ingraham and his FNM colleagues by voting PLP in the next general election." The party said if reports of t he payments are true, it suggests the existence of a "sinister plot" in which the government failed to honour certain financial terms of its industria l agreement with the Public Service Union, in addition to w ithholding salary increments and promotions "until it becomes politically convenient to do so." L OCAL NEWS P AGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM what our plans are going forward. E arlier this week, Mr Evans suggested unionists would take to the streets in a similar fashion to the ongoing protests in Egypt. His comments came after the government signedB TC sale documents with the regional telecoms provider Cable and Wireless and laid documents in the House of Assemble regard i ng the sale. We will continue our stance. The will of the people is the strength of the people, and I guess if the Bahamas is ready and the govern m ent is ready to see a small Egypt then they gonna get it, said Mr Evans. His comments brought condemnation from D ion Foulkes, Minister of Labour, who demanded an apology from Mr Evans. Mr Foulkes said the comments were intende d to instigate social unrest and to destabilise the Free National Movement and the Bahami an economy. Bernard Evans should apologise to the m embers of the BCPOU and to the Bahamian people for his irresponsible and reckless small Egypt statement, said Mr Foulkes. E arlier this week, union leaders forecast an interruption of services to the public. It is unclear when this will take effect, and in what f orm. FROM page one PLP malicious lie condemned FROM page one BCPOU LEADER Bernard Evans with William Carrol of the BCPOU in the House of Assembly this week. UNION LEADERS MEET BEHIND CLOSED DOORS

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HANDS For Hunger has named the New Providence Development Company and Tommy Hilfiger as cop resenting sponsors for t heir third annual Paradise P lates fundraiser. Both companies have continued their sponsorships, having donated $ 10,000 each for the unique e vent, which will feature an e ven larger array of g ourmet food this year from c elebrated chefs and restaur ants in the Bahamas. Held on Saturday, May 21 from 7pm 11pm at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom, Paradise Plates will feature an exquisite ensemble of fine food and drinks, live e ntertainment as well as a r affle and silent auction. Chefs will gather from a cross New Providence under one roof to prepare t heir signature dishes, complemented by drink purveyors serving samples of w ine, local beer and spirits. All proceeds will benefit H ands For Hunger, the non-profit food-rescue programme committed to the elimination of hunger and the reduction of food wastei n the Bahamas. The New Providence D evelopment Company is p leased to continue our sponsorship of Paradise P lates, said Rhys Duggan, president and CEO of New Providence Development Company Limited. HandsF or Hunger fulfills a real n eed on the island by pro viding food to those who n eed it most. S tarting a fledgling nonp rofit is not a simple task; w e have seen the tremend ous impact that Hands For H unger has had in such a short period of time, andw e continue to be i mpressed with their successful approach, operations and their extensive reach into the community. New Providence Development Company is proud to support their efforts as they e xpand to make an even l arger positive impact on o ur community. Tommy Hilfiger is very p roud to be a co-presenti ng sponsor for Hands For Hunger's Paradise Plates for a second consecutive year, said Elizabeth Covington, owner of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas Tommy Hilfiger believes i n taking a proactive stance and giving back to the community by working with and e mpowering young people w ho are trying to make a d ifference. Supporting these passionate young Bahamians w ho endeavour to address the problem of hunger in this country is inspiring and should remind all of us thato ur problems are not insurm ountable. Hunger can be alleviated and Hands For Hunger is doing a fantastic j ob. The Bahamas is a w ealthy nation; people s hould not go hungry. Tomm y Hilfiger is proud to continue to support Hands ForH unger. We hope more B ahamians will support this great and urgent cause. Rosamund Roberts, director of fundraising for Hands For Hunger, said: The very generous donat ions from New Providence D evelopment Company a nd Tommy Hilfiger ( Bahamas) will help to offs et the costs of Paradise P lates. We are very grateful to them and our other sponsors for their kind support. We are so pleased that Paradise Plates continues to receive tremendous response from the public. This year promises to be even more memorable as new chefs, restaurants and v enues have joined us to c reate an evening unlike a ny other. Chefs from many of Nassaus finest restaurants are r eturning this year to showcase their extraordinary food including: Mesa Grill; Nobu; Dune; British Colo n ial Hilton; Old Fort Bay C lub; and Lucianos to name a few. Other sponsors include: Atlantis, Mendoza Wine Imports and Creative Relat ions. A ll proceeds from Paradise Plates will go to H ands For Hunger and its f ood rescue programmes. E ach day, Hands For Hunger picks-up fresh, highq uality food that would oth e rwise go to waste and delivers it to community centres, shelters, churches and soup kitchens throughout New Providence. Hunger is a solvable problem. It is a fact that t here is more than enough f ood on this island to amply f eed every single woman, m an and child. Hands For H unger functions to conn ect this excess supply with the unmet, ever growing need through the more equitable and efficient dis-t ribution of resources, said Alanna Rodgers, founder and programme co-ordina-t or of Hands For Hunger. The proceeds raised from Paradise Plates will go directly to addressing a most basic human need in our community. T he array of food and d rink will complemented by a silent auction, raffle, live e ntertainment and beautif ul dcor. F or ticket information call, 327-1660 ext 241 ore mail info@hands f orhunger.org. Hands For Hunger was started by a group of Bahamian student leaders i n early 2008, who were and s till are, committed to making a difference in the w orld. T he organisation is a reg i stered, not-for-profit charity that relies on donationsf rom community groups, f oundations, corporations and the general public. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Popular fundraiser to showcase larger array of chefs and restaurants NPCC and Tommy Hilfiger names as co-sponsors of third annual Paradise Plates PICTURED (L-R Rosamund Roberts, Hands for Hunger (HH Strommer, co-chair of Paradise Plates 2010; Alanna Rodgers, HH founder and programme co-ordinator; Ashley Lepine, HH executive director; Elizabeth Covington, owner of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas E tienne Christen of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas d ence Development Company at last years Paradise Plates.

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next general election, vow ing that wherever he decides to run he will soundly defeat any opponent the FNM decides to send. Having represented the MICAL constituency which c onsists of Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked Island, Acklins and Long Cay since 2002, Mr Gray said he has heard of reports of a possi ble split in his constituency before. However, the often rambunctious MP said he was personally assured by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham that his seat would not be affected by any boundary changes ahead of the 2012 general election. Not taking these assurances at face value, Mr Gray said he is going to err on the side of caution and watch to see what the Prime Minister does instead. At this point, Mr Gray said he has heard reports that his constituency may be split into two one joining Inagua and Mayaguana, and the other consisting of Acklins, Long Cay, and Crooked I sland. If such a split were to occur, Mr Gray said he would have to choose which area to represent. If he (Prime Minister splits it, I believe I would have to decide which area I want to run in, and that is an easy decision for me because wherever Acklins is I will run, and whoever runs against me will get beat. I cant control the Bahamas, but I can definitely say that in my constituency even Hubert Ingraham cant beat me, Mr Gray laughed. As proof of his growing support in the constituency, Mr Gray said he now has a former FNM general in the area campaigning for him. He wished however not to reveal the persons identity, stating he would prefer to have that bit of information to lick the FNM over the head with at the next sitting of the House of Assembly. I wait with great antici pation for what the final determination will be. The earlier I know, the better for me so I can concentrate on which area I will be running in. In the meantime I am concentrating on the whole area because like the Prime Minister told me he can not justify cutting the seat because the popula tion is smaller than it was in 2007. But I know he is looking for areas to run his men in, but no matter how he cuts it he cannot beat me. Its like the young people say, I aint on his run. I feel very secure. Carmichael Road on Friday, J uly 9. The victim was taken to h ospital by ambulance where he later died of his injuries. Travis Davis, 39, of Belldock Avenue, and Gregory Armbrister, 34, of HopkinsD rive, have already been charged with the murder of Sergeant Strachan. Humes, who was not represented by an attorney, was n ot required to enter a plea to t he charge during his arraignment before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One,B ank Lane. Standing in the prisoners dock, Humes told the magis-t rate: I am in fear for my life f rom prison officers. I r eceived some threats. They said they would kill me. C hief Magistrate Gomez said the prison authorities would be notified of his conc ern. S ergeant Claudette McKenzie, the prosecutor, asked that the matter be t ransferred to Court 6, Par liament Street. She informed the court that o n March 14, a Voluntary Bill o f Indictment is expected to be presented in the case. Humes was remanded to Her Majestys Prison and is expected back in court on Wednesday, February 16, fora fixture hearing. L OCAL NEWS P AGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Have you heard the good news? You CAN save money!If you need a lower premium,low deductibles,generous benefits and a fast claims service,pick up the phone and ask NIBA for a great insurance deal.Its time to pay less for insuring your car! Tel.677-6422 or visit www.nibaquote.com NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com Open Saturdays10.00am2.00pm CHARGED: Presley Humes is shown going into court yesterday. Felip Major /Tribune staff Third man charged with murder of prison officer F ROM page one MP unconcerned with reports that constituency may be cut into two Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FROM page one

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Phils Food Services, the G ladstone Road-based food retailer and wholesaler, is seeking to raise $5 millionf rom a private placement corporate bond offering, Tribune Business can reveal. The retailer, which has m ade a big impact on the Nassau groceries scene d espite being a relative newcomer, is offering to pay investors an 8.5 per centi nterest rate on the bond, which has a five-year duration before it matures. An e-mail sent out to prospective investors byW esley Percentie, an executive with Family Guardian (FG w hich is helping to place the bond offering, said: There is currently a private place-m ent taking place for Phils Food Services. Phils Food Services provides wholesale and retail food distribution t o New Providence and the Family Islands. The offering size is $5 million and thes ecurity offered is an 8.5 per cent Corporate Bond, with a term of five years. The offer ing will close on February 15, 2011. N o other details were forthcoming, though. Tri bune Business was told that F G Capital Markets was assisting the main placement agent for Phils Food Ser v ices, Sean Longley, the for mer CFAL executive who is now running his own busi ness, Leno Corporate Ser vices. SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.75 $4.77 $4.69 secure future leave your children nancially secure provide a safety net for your loved ones ensure a bright future for your familyall of the above A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating call us today at (242396-1300 A SUBSIDIARY OFNASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I FINANCIAL CENTRE I CORPORATE CENTRE I www.famguardbahamas.com B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AML Foods chairman last n ight urged the Securities Com mission to show a little backbone and prevent Mark Finlaysons $12 million bid to acquire majority control of the company from dragging on for ever, telling Tribune Business the situation was causing too much turmoil in the market and uncertainty among staff. Speaking after Mr Finlayson earlier this week indicated the tender offer to acquire 51 per cent of AML Foods may be delayed, after investors in Asso ciated Bahamian Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB AML F OODS CHAIRMAN TELL S COMMISSION: SHOW BACKBONE Urges regulator to maintain orderly market by not letting $12m offer drag on indefinitely, affecting share price and staff Effectively tells Mark Finlayson: Put up or shut up SEE page 4B DIONISIO DAGUILAR By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Failure to privatise the Bahamas T elecommunications Company (BTC t remendously, the companys executive chairman told Tribune Busi-n ess yesterday, adding that the opportunity cost was likely equival ent to a good slice of gross domestic product growth. Julian Francis, who also served as the Government-appointed privatisation committees deputy chairman,t old this newspaper it was a pity that the Government did not privatise BTC back in 1998, justa fter the first Ingraham administration announced its intention to do so, a period when telecommunications stocks were at t heir peak and buyer interest might have generated a higher purchase price. Describing BTCs privatisation, via this weeks signing of the $210 million agreement for the sale of a 51 per cent stake to Bahamas lost good slice of growth on BTC BTC chairman says a pity state-owned incumbent not privatised back in 1998, as 12-year delay has cost the economy tremendously Says Bahamas can be CWCs best performing country in Caribbean, as buyer has best synergies and fit JULIAN FRANCIS SEE page 7B SEEKINGTORAISE$5M: Phils Food Services. B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government must first approve any moves by a privatised Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC a cquire rival carriers/operations worth more than $37.5 million, i ts executive chairman con firmed yesterday, adding that t he possible end to free sameisland calls may not be a big issue due to the consumer shift to cellular. Julian Francis, who was also BTCS $3 7.5M ACQUISITION VET O THRESHOLD Mobile shift and product bundling means loss of same-island free landline calls may not be big issue Three-year cellular exclusivity extension needed to prevent BTC getting creamed by competition SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor The Government has already been in contact with the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX listing procedures for the 9 per cent of the Bahamas Telecommunications Com pany (BTC to sell to the public later this year, while Heineken executives met with exchange executives this week over their planned $60-$65 million initial public offering (IPO Confirming both develop ments, Keith Davies, BISXs chief executive, told Tribune BISX contacted over BTCs IPO Exchange chief met this week with Heineken executives over Burns House/Commonwealth Brewery IPO Offering targeted at end-Q1/Q2, but awaits government approval SEE page 5B Food retailer in $5m capital offer SEE page 4B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Domestic airline operat ors and Odyssey Aviation expressed concerns about the Department of Customs plans to collect allegedly outstanding import duty and stamp tax from those who have brought planes into the Bahamas in a meeting with the Minister of Tourism and Aviation. According to sources close to some of the aircraft operators who attended the February 3 meeting, which included representatives from Golden Wings charters, Sky Bahamas, Take Flight Charters, Safari Seaplanes, Odyssey Aviation and more, the sector was told they may benefit from staying out of the newspaper when it came to the tax dispute. They were told that if they keep their complaints out of the media then Customs may back off, said a source, who spoke to this newspaper on Minister meets sector on plane tax concerns S EE page 4B

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM City Markets has named Benita Rahming as the supermarket chains first female chief executive in its more than 50-year history. M rs Rahming has previously been employed in posts such as retail territory manager and market analyst at Esso Standard Oil, where she was offered the chance to become that companys first female chief executive a position she turned down due to work in her family business. S he has also headed the mortgage department at Citibank. In O ctober 2010, she was hired as a consultant at Solomons Mines, and in November she moved to serve as the consultant for Bahamas Supermarkets, City Markets parent company. Her international work experience includes General Manager of Modern Bu-Jutsu out of Chicago, Illinois and Financial Analyst forV an Leer Containers Inc in Illinois. She holds an MBA in Accounting and Organization Behaviour from the Kellogg Grad-u ate School of Business in Chicago, Illinois Mark Finlayson, president of Trans-Island Traders, the 78 per c ent majority owner of City Markets, called Mrs Rahmings appointment a no brainer. Apart from her excellent ability to execute the companys mandate, Benita is a wife, mother and a shopper. Essentially she represents a key ingredient in the overall strategy and success of theC ity Market chain, Mr Finlayson said. Another major factor in her role as chief executive is the fact t hat she retains an executive management team mostly comprised of women. M rs Rahming added: We are already out of the gate, and much of what we intend to do is directly a result of listening to our c ustomers and our intention to create a shopping and food expe rience in this country that is unparalleled. Other executive appointments continue the theme of Mr Finlayson putting former Solomons Mines and Burns House staffers into his new business. E d Wilchinski has been appointed vice-president and chief administrative officer of Bahamas Supermarkets. Mr Wilchinski willb e responsible for the purchasing of products, special projects and human resource development. P rior to joining the company he was general manager of Bahamas Distillers and Todhunter Mitchell Distillery. He also served as deputy general manager of Burns House. Another appointment is Orinoco Bethell as vice-president and chief operations officer of Bahamas Supermarkets. She will be responsible for the companys day-to-day operating activities, including sales and revenue growth, expenses, cost and margin con t rol, directing company operations to meet budget and other financial goals. M rs Bethell brings with her 20 years work experience, and her last post was division manager for the Solomons Mines Perfume Bar. Karen Culmer has been named as chief financial controller of Bahamas Supermarkets. Miss Culmer will be responsible for the companys dayto-day accounting and financial reporting. Her work experience includes financial controller and account i ng manager at Burns House, and assistant manager of mutual funds at MeesPierson (Bahamas J udy Terrell has been appointed vice-president and chief strategist at Bahamas Supermarkets. Miss Terrell will be responsible for working closely with the chief executive and chief operating officer in directing and executing the companys vision. She has more than 20 years combined experience in the electronic media/broadcasting, corporate communications and public and private sector, having held the position as communication d irector and government liaison at Ginn sur Mer, and news direc tor at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas. City Markets appoints first female chief exec Kerzner Internationals Atlantis resort was officially inducted as a Platinum Member of the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association (FCCA Henry Bain, Atlantiss director of sales and marketing for the marine and water park division, accepted the induction from the FCCAs president, Michelle Paige, and Michael Ronan, Royal Caribbeans vice-president for government relations. This was a great and important honour, since Atlantis, Paradise Island, offers numerous types of excursions to cruise lines such as Aquaventure, Dolphin Interactions, Snorkel tours and Beach Day packages, said Mr Bain. It was a natural fit for us to join the FCCA, and we feel that this new relationship will help Atlantis be a positive ambassador for the Bahamas, and help establish even better working relationships with some of the most prominent figures and decision-makers in the cruise industry. The Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association (FCCA for-profit trade organisation composed of 14 member bruise lines operating more than 100 vessels in Floridian, Caribbean and Latin American waters. Created in 1972, the FCCAs mandate is to provide a forum for discussion on legislation, tourism development, ports, tour oper ations, safety, security and other cruise industry issues. The FCCA works with governments, ports and all private/public sector representatives to maximise cruise passenger, cruise line and cruise line employee spending, as well as enhancing the des tination experience and the amount of cruise passengers returning as stay-over visitors. Atlantis inducted as cruise forums Platinum member BENITA RAHMING INDUCTION: Henry Bain, Atlantiss director of sales and marketing for the marine and water park division, accepted the induction from the FCCAs president, Michelle Paige, and Michael Ronan, Royal Caribbeans vice-pres ident for government relations. ED WILCHINSKI J UDY TERRELL KAREN CULMER ORINOCO BETHEL

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Bahamas National Trusts (BNT urged the shipping industry to employ practices that will help minimise potential neg ative impacts on the worlds oceans and its marine life. Eric Carey noted that the worlds oceans are under threat from pollution and marine debris related to shipping and land-based activities. Our activities constantly threaten to destroy the ocean and its wildlife, Mr Carey told persons at the Bahamas Maritime Conference and Trade Show luncheon in Freeport last week. The BNT executive said the Trust is presently working with the Dolphin Caribbean Fisheries Institute on a campaign to create awareness about marine debris in the Bahamas. He indicated they are going to be working with interna tional shipping companies and land-based companies to reduce marine debris and pol lution in Bahamian waters. Mr Carey stressed that everyone has a responsibility to keep the ocean healthy. Oceans In addition to providing the means by which many of you move products and people around the globe, we must not forget that beneath the waves exists life, and these oceans provide food, recre ation, clean air, carbon mitigation and many things we take for granted, he explained. At the opening of the conference, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said the Bahamian maritime industry is taking on new and increased importance in the overall economy, noting that the country has an impressive ship register, one of the largest in the world with over 52 million gross tons. Mr Ingraham also noted that the country has two significant fuel and crude oil transshipment terminals, one of which is the largest in the region. Mr Carey said the movement of petroleum products is always risky. He noted that accidental releases and collisions can still occur, despite the best efforts and highest environmental standards. We need to make sure that where practical we have double hull ships carrying hazard materials and petroleum products, he said. Mr Carey also noted that certain paints are not good for the environment, and encouraged the use of alternative products with less impact. The BNT and Bahamas Maritime Authority support high standards for any vessel carrying the Bahamian flag, he said. We understand there has to be impact but as an o rganisation we are charged with trying to encourage people with having minimum impact. On your ships, you can encourage taking less waste and reducing packaging so there is less temptation for people to throw stuff overboard. Mr Carey said vessels should change ballast water in deeper oceans, rather than near shore areas. He also encouraged vessels to have sludge tanks on board i nstead of releasing bilge, with high petroleum concentration, into the ocean. There are lots of things we can do as an industry, whether you work in a corner office in New York or in a hole of the ship, everybody has an important role to play, Mr Carey said. And practices that we commit to will make the dif ference in whether or not our oceans remain healthy. Mr Carey encouraged mariners and shipping companies to support conservation organisations, such as the BNT and the Nature Conservancy. We need support to do our work. The Government supports us, but we need the support of the industry, he said. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM MasterCard has renewed its commitment to the Bahamas 'Find Your Way' promotion through a re-launch of the cam-p aign maximising value for Bahamians and tourists alike. It allows MasterCard card holders armed with a MasterCard booklet or map and their card to take advantage of specials offered by participating attractions, excursions, r estaurants, hotels and stores. The programme has grown by nearly 50 per cent since its inception in 2009, with some 47 partners participating this year. The launch, held at the British Colonial Hilton, drew the Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-W allace; chairman of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis Rolle; president of the Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA Frank Comito; MasterCard vice-president of strategic partn erships for Latin America and the Caribbean, Patricio Rubalcaba, and leading merchants, restaurateurs and media. IT'S IN THE DETAILS Public relations executive Diane Phillips co-hosts MasterCard re-launch with Downtown Nassau Partnership managing directorm Vaughn Roberts. Her firm manages the MasterCard Find Your Way program locally, distributing maps and brochures at the cruise port, to hotel and other guests, and in stores. Residents who hold MasterCard are able to take advantage of the program by collecting booklets at participating merchants or restaurants, and it was a Bahamian who won the first Sweepstakes after completing a transaction at Scotiabank and going online to complete the Sweepstakes entry form. CREATING VALUE Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Senator Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace (right vice-president of strategic partnerships for Latin America and the Caribbean, Patricio Rubalcaba (left acceptance, Rafael Fuentes during the launch of the Find Your Way program. This is the third year MasterCard and the Ministry of Tourism have partnered in the campaign that Mr VanderpoolWallace said added value, helping to give the Bahamas a competitive edge in an environment where savvy vacation shoppers are searching for a difference. Mr Rubalcaba told the crowd gathered for the event at the British Colonial Hilton that in addition to an increase in the number of participating merchants up5 7 per cent since inception in 2009 the program boosted actual spend by 5 per cent, while spend in the industry as a whole declined and, most importantly, showed a customer sat isfaction rating of 90 per cent. THREE HATS, ONE NIGHT Bahamas Chamber of Commerce chairman Khaalis Rolle comes up a winner. Barely off the podi um as a guest speaker talking to hospitality and business leaders at the re-launch of the MasterCard Find Your Way programf or the third year, he steps back onstage to accept a winner's cheque for partner of the month for his own tourist excursion business, Bahamas Undersea Adventures. JEWELS-BY-THE-LAUNCH -Rory Dean (centre the-Sea on West Bay Street, and wife Marcy, chat with Anthony Smith, marketing manager of Diamonds International in down town Nassau, during last week's launch of the MasterCard Find Your Way program in partnership with the Ministry of Tourism. Pictured in the background are Michael Wicky, manager of Anthony's Grill on Paradise Island, and Michael Symonette, Bahamas Experience Tours. BAHAMAS FINDS WAY TO REWARDS By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A former travel/tourism photographer who has developed the latest tool for beach lovers seeking the perfect vacation destination is encouraging Bahamian hoteliers to flaunt their beach front status. John Everingham, who last week launched The Beachfront Club, a website aimed at holidaymakers who want to find accommodation that lives up to the true meaning of beach front, said that getting involved with the website could equal a big windfall for Bahamian hotels. The site, two years in the making, was inspired by Mr Everinghams experience as a photographer, and later a publisher, in the travel industry in Thailand and South East Asia, where he admits he took and promoted images of hotels which appeared to be but were not actually right on the beach. Hotels would ask me to take photos which made it look like they were right on the beach, but really there was a busy road in the way. Over the years I saw so many people who were seriously angry. They want to be on the beach, they are paying good money for their hotel and they were so disappointed to find that the advertising was misleading. That was really the basis of what inspired me to start the website, said Mr Everingham. At www.thebeachfrontclub.com, visitors can find 7,000 hotels listed including 41 in the Bahamas at present which Mr Everingham says his team have identified as being truly beach front. Hotels have been identified using satellite imagery, aerial photographs brochures and whatever information is available, said Mr Everingham. More hotels can be added as they are identified and achieve their beach front credentials, and those who are already mapped on the website can get in touch with The Beachfront Club to take possession of their page on the site, which will then be populated with details about the accommodation. They can request an invitation. We will send them one and they can register, get a password, and claim the hotel for free, said Mr Everingham. For a premium $200 a month service, hotels get to link their own booking system to the website's hotel pages, and receive higher visibility on the website's beach maps. We need the participation of the hotels and the beach lovers to really make this work. Mr Everingham said he believes the website will have a real impact on the beach resorts of the world, drawing business towards those that are really on the beach. A beach lovers first choice is to be right on the beach. Those who qualify will find this is a big boon and a big windf all for them, he said. Sites big windfall for Bahamas hotels Maritime industry is warned on pollution

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BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5HTXHVWIRUURSRVDOV ,QWHUQDO$XGLWHUYLFHV7KH8WLOLWLHV5HJXODWLRQDQG&RPSHWLWLRQ$XWKRULW\&$f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his family holds a 64 per cent stake, objected to the deal, Dionisio DAguilar said his company was finding it impossible to get a definitivea nswer from the regulator when it came to timelines and how the process would work. We have a distinct problem w ith the fact that the Securities Commission are being extremely vague on what the timeline is, Mr DAguilar said, telling Tribune Business the uncer-t ainty could potentially disrupt the AML Foods share price and maintenance of an orderly Bahamian capital market. Theres no definitive law, and we all have to operate in this world of best practices, which I find unacceptable, Mr DAguilar added. The Secu-r ities Commission needs to show some a little bit of backbone and recognise that it can-not drag this process on indefin itely. Hes [Mr Finlayson] got to put up and make a decision about what hes going to do. Its causing too much turmoili n the marketplace. Hes made an announcement and its mind-boggling to me that hes not dotted the is and crossed the ts before. Now, youre dithering. To me, thats not an option. Hes e ither moving forward or hes not. Mr DAguilar said the uncertainty over whether Mr Finlayson would move forwardw ith the $1.50 per share offer (a 44 per cent premium to the cur-r ent $1.04 market price) to acquire a 51 per cent stake in t he BISX-listed food retail group might impact its share price, and in the absence of anything concrete staff, too, were also being impacted. Its not an ideal environment to operate your business i n, he added. Were going out hiring professionals, incurring costs because of this acquisition. Youre either doing it or youre not. M r Finlayson said earlier this week that his need to satisfy A BAD shareholders over their concerns in relation to his prop osed AML Foods acquisition would likely delay the tender offers launch, although he disputed Mr DAguilars con tention that the Securities Com m ission had given him a deadline of today by which to do t his. Explaining that he had two issues moving forward, Mr Finlayson said: The immediate thing I need to address ism y ABDAB shareholders. They have been with us for a long, long time, and when they raised it and said theyre not in f avour of the AML purchase, it puts us in a bad position. The key contention is that ABDAB shareholders would h ave benefited enormously from Mr Finlaysons original C ity Markets expansion plans, as their company owns the real e state for three Super Centre sites he was targeting two in Nassau on JFK Drive and East-W est Highway, and one in Freeport. H owever, if the AML Foods acquisition is successful, Mr F inlayson would not need the East-West Highway and F reeport real estate, given the proximity of AMLs existing two Solomons SuperCentres ites. As a result, ABDAB investors would only realise r ental income yields from the JFK Drive property, largely e xcluding them from the benefits of a successful AML Foods p urchase. Pledging that he would pro vide a fair and equitable solution to involve ABDAB and its investors in the AML Foods transaction, Mr Finlayson said: Up until last week, this issue had not raised its head. Its only fair to ABDAB shareholders, s ome of whom have been with us since 1986, to deal with them. I feel an obligation to make sure theyre satisfied, and feel quite confident we can satisfy them and acquire AML as ar esult. Were in talks with a number of shareholders, and think we can come up with a product that satisfies every i nvestor. M r DAguilar, though, last night told Tribune Business that AML Foods had been led to believe that Mr Finlaysonh ad until today to issue a formal tender offer and circular to the companys shareholders. That would lead to the AML F oods directors issuing their o wn circular in response, and Mr DAguilar said he was under the impression that the whole process including theo ffer duration and Mr Finlaysons decision on whether to accept or reject the shares tendered would be over within 6 0 days. E ffectively sending Mr Finl ayson a put up or shut up message, the AML Foods chair-m an called on the Securities Commission to ensure this s tate of dither is not allowed to persist. Adding that AML Foods had its counter-strategy and plan in place, Mr DAguilar told Tri-b une Business: I just want to ensure the regulators donta llow the process to drag on indefinitely. They have a duty t o ensure orderly workings of the market, and by making this announcement and not moving forward, Mr Finlayson is disrupting the market. It behoovest hem to step in and bring order to the process. H e added that in AML Foods opinion, the Securities C ommission was not being definitive. We cannot get a def inite answer from them. Philip Stubbs, the Securities Commission chairman, while d eclining to give specifics, told Tribune Business earlier this w eek that the regulator was in contact with both sides, and was s eeking to ensure the process followed the draft Takeover Code it was set to release for industry consultation shortly. AML Foods chief tells Commission: Show backbone F ROM page 1B MARK FINLAYSON Food retailer in $5m capital offer As it is a private placement, it is being targeted ats pecific investors, only such as institutions and high networths, so ordinary members of the Bahamas publics hould not apply to get involved. It is not a public offering. P hilip Lightbourne, Phils Food Services owner, d eclined to comment when contacted by Tribune Business yesterday afternoon,b ut conceded that he was seeking to raise additional c apital for the business. He directed this newspaper to speak with Mr Longley, but he did not return phonem essages or e-mails prior to press time yesterday. Expansion P hils Food Services last year revealed plans for a $ 2.5 million expansion at its existing store, so it is possible some of the capital beingr aised is for this purpose. Mr Lightbourne, who t hen employed 125 people at the Gladstone Road food store which opened inD ecember 2009, said last year the expansion would create 50 jobs and involve an increase in the numbera nd variety of retail lines at Phil's, with a special focus on growing their produce sales in the wake of the Prime Bahamas/Bahamas Food Services merger.W holesale liquor will also be introduced. "We are putting in a mass ive cooler and taking the produce market to another l evel. Since Prime Bahamas (recently absorbed by BFS shut its doors, the retail mar-k et has gone really weak. We are going to pick up the s lack," said Mr Lightbourne. FROM page 1B Minister meets sector on plane tax concerns condition of anonymity. Contacted yesterday for comment, several of the Bahamian aircraft operators declined to go into details about the meeting. In an interview with Tribune Business, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace confirmed that he met with the operators over the Customs tax issue and other aviation-related matters. I think there was a better understanding of what the Government is trying to achieve, and an assurance to them that we wish to see a healthy, thriving and profitable aviation sector. They outlined a number of things they thought would be helpful in acheiving those goals and thats really where we left it, said the Minister when asked about the purpose and outcome of the meeting. Asked what the Governments position is on the duty demand over aircraft, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said that as far as he was aware there is no change on the position. Thats a matter for Customs to address, said the Minister. Undertaking However, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said there was an undertaking on behalf of the companies represented to bring to the Government evidence of exactly how the sector is performing under the current (tax that the Ingraham administration can make informed decisions about any potential changes to its demands. He suggested companies operating in the domestic aviation sector have not been inclined to provide such information before. It is always good to know how they are doing now under the current regime, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. They gave an undertaking that made a great deal of sense, and have committed to go and take a look so that something can be provided to tell how they are doing today, so that any recommendations that are made are supported by the facts. In a country where there is no income tax and no need for anyone to provide evidence about how a company is performing, it is very difficult for the Government to make decisions about tax-related matters. The Department of Customs had suggested it would take action in January to collect the outstanding duty, which it said was owed by numerous domestic airline companies who had imported planes into the Bahamas without paying the required import and stamp tax, and by private plane owners. One airline was said to owe as much as $700,000. However, airlines and private plane owners have complained about the attempt to collect the tax, which was first brought to their attention in letters sent out in November last year. The letters threatened that if the aircraft operators did not pay up, they could face having their craft seized. The operators have argued that it is unfair for the Department to attempt to go back and collect the tax, given their claim that Customs was well aware that the planes were being brought into the country, but allegedly operated a policy of not collecting the revenue at the time. They also question on what basis the tax would be collected the purchase price of the plane when new, at the present time, or at the time it first came into the country and who would be asked to pay the tax whether that be those whose aircraft are registered in the Bahamas, or those who are not but have been in the country for a given period of time, or both. Meanwhile, operators have questioned what happens in the case of those who bought the planes second hand in The Bahamas from other people who originally imported them into the country. They allege that the Customs Department has refused to make these distinctions clear. Industry stakeholders have also insisted that for the Government to seek to collect the funds now places a financial stress on an industry which is vital to inter-island transporta tion and economic activity, and is already under financial pressure, as well as potential l y discouraging high net worth individuals who might wish to reside or do business in this country from doing so, on the basis that they will be taxed for bringing their plane into the country. Captain Randy Butler, Sky Bahamas chief executive, told Tribune Busines in January that should the Department of Customs not further clarify the basis upon which any tax demanded is being calculated, he would take the Government to court over the demands. For his part, Customs Comptroller Glenn Gomez, suggested that the Government is merely seeking to collect what should have been obtained in years past. Mr Gomez was not available for further comment on the status of the collection effort yesterday. F ROM page 1B

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .260.97AML Foods Limited1.041.040.000.1230.0408.53.85% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 6.184.42Bank of Bahamas4.424.420.001,3000.1530.10028.92.26% 0.580.18Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.492.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0160.040135.61.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas10.2110.210.001.0500.3109.73.04%2 .842.36Colina Holdings2.402.400.000.7810.0403.11.67% 7.005.40Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.856.850.000.4880.26014.03.80% 3.651.63Consolidated Water BDRs2.102.06-0.040.1110.04518.62.18% 2.551.40Doctor's Hospital1.401.400.000.1070.11013.17.86% 6.995.47Famguard5.475.470.000.3570.24015.34.39% 10.207.23Finco6.516.510.000.2870.00022.70.00% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.399.390.000.4940.35019.03.73% 5.513.75Focol (S)5.485.480.005,5000.4520.16012.12.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.405.00ICD Utilities7.407.400.000.0120.240616.73.24% 10.509.82J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029THURSDAY, 10 FEBURARY 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,472.35 | CHG -0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -27.16 | YTD % -1.81BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas Supermarkets5.016.0114.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%L ast 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.95272.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.95270.18%1.61%2.918697 1.58091.5114CFAL Money Market Fund1.58080.43%4.59%1.550241 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.41640.44%-0.10% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14915.35%5.35% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.12669.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.12661.27%1.27% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.45100.72%9.95% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jan-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 31-Dec-10 31-Jan-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 31-Jan-11 28-Jan-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.910084 1.533976 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 31-Dec-10 30-Nov-10 31-Jan-11 6('5$-8/<66$:,/621 RI*OHQGDOH6XEGLYLVLRQ3%2; 1$66$8%$+$0$6 (03/2<0(17 23325781,7<&RPSXWHU+DUGZDUHDQG6RIWZDUHFRPSDQ\ VHHNVDSSOLFDQWVIRUWKHSRVWRI6RIWZDUH+DUGZDUHHFKQLFLDQ6DODU\FRPPHQVXUDWHZLWKH[SHULHQFHDQG HGXFDWLRQ $GGLWLRQEHQHWVDYDLODEOH ,QWHUHVWHGDSSOLFDQWVVKRXOGVHQGUHVXPHV DQGDSSURSULDWHLQIRUPDWLRQWR MREV#ELDVEDKDPDVFRP ,6/(7 )/25(67$/RI .HPS5RDG1DVVDX%DKDPDV N N O O T T I I C C E E PRINCE HALL FAMILY CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED (IN VOLUNTARY LI QUIDATION) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 105 of the Co-operative Societies Act, 2005 that PRINCE HALL FAMILY CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNIONLIMITED is in dissolution. Dissolution commenced on December 29, 2010 when the Director of Societies exercised his powers pursuant to the Co-operative Societies Act, 2005. The Liquidator is James B. Gomez, P. O. Box SS-6229, 4th Floor, Centreville House, 2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. Persons having debts or claims against the Co-operative are required to send particulars to the Liquidator on or before March 31, 2011 In default, thereof, they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved. Dated: February 10, 2011 JAMES B. GOMEZ Liquidator 5261$-21$66$,17 RI3,1(:22'*$5'(16 / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 7KLVQRWLFHUHSODFHVWKHSXEOLFDWLRQRI2FWREHU LQWKLV*D]HWWHZKHUHLQWKHQDPH0$5,67(//$ 6$ZDVLQFRUUHFWO\UHIHUUHGWR 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI2FWREHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf NEW YORK Greater confidence in the U.S. economy is leading investors to m ove money out of gold and into riskier assets in search of bigger profits. G old prices have fallen 4.2 percent since the beginning of the year as more evidence surfaced that the economy is strengthening. M ore positive economic news came Thursday when The Labor Department said the number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits for the first time fell to the lowest point since early July 2008. In addition, the Commerce Department said wholesale busin esses increased inventories 1 percent in December. Economists consider that a healthy level for inventories. S tocks, which are considered riskier assets than gold, have been rising since the beginning of the year. The Standard & Poor's 500 i ndex, the most widely used measure for stocks of large U.S. companies, is up 5.1 percent so far this year. "A lot of that flight-to-quality bid that we saw in gold over the past year has come out of the market," LaSalle Futures Group ana lyst Matt Zeman said. "So far, there just hasn't been a good driver to really propel it up." Gold and silver typically are considered safer assets to hold during uncertain economic times. Many analysts believe gold prices will climb higher this year because there still are global e conomic issues that need to be addressed. deputy chairman of the Government-appointed privatisation committee, told the Rotary Club of West Nassau that the Government extended BTCs cellular exclusivity post-privatisation from two years to three to give Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC enough time to restructure and get the business ready for competition, otherwise it would get creamed. This move has forced the Government to table amendments to the Communications Sector Policy in the House of Assembly, but M r Francis said: The Government recognises that if it liberalised [cellular] today, BTC would not be entirely ready for it. It needs to give it a little more time to make adjustments, otherwise they would get creamed. Cable & Wireless said: Look here, government, we need twoand-a-half to three years to get it ready at least. The bid process for a second cellular licence will thus start in mid2014, with a third such licence only available five years after privatisation, but Mr Francis said he was confident liberalisationw ould come to the Bahamian mobile phone sector. He added: If you look at the existing rates in the Bahamas and in the Caribbean, we expect rates to come down, and dont think they will come back up. C omparing the Bahamas $0.20-plus per minute cellular rates with the $0.02 per minute prevailing in Jamaica, Mr Francis said: The expectation is that when we have fierce competition in this sector, it will bring rastes down to where you have just enough prof-i t to make it a worthwhile business. Compensating W hile the free intra-island fixed voice landline calls enjoyed by all residents today might become a thing of the past in a libera lised market, Mr Francis said there were compensating factors. He pointed out that Bahamas-based carriers, including a privatised BTC, could bundle together products such as fixed voice landline, cellular, Internet and TV, offering some or all of these at lower price points and thus compensating for the end to free s ame-island calls. In addition, Mr Francis said that with consumers in the Bahamas and rest of the world increasingly shifting to cell phone use, fixed voice services in the home were becoming increasingly obsolete, making the end to free same-island calls less of an issue. A cknowledging that he did not know whether free same-island calls would become a thing of the past, Mr Francis said: As we all k now, in the Bahamas we enjoy fixed landline costs that could not possibly be lower. It would be incorrect to think they could go lower. The best we could hope for is that they remain as they are. A fter detailing the product bundling solution, he added: The Bahamas, like other places in the world, is moving rapidly to m obile. Today, BTCs mobile services are 70 per cent of its busi ness, and less than 30 per cent is fixed, and we expect that shift is g oing to continue over time. With fixed landline becoming increasingly important instead for Internet connectivity, Mr Francis said of the free same-islandc alls situation: I dont think thats going to be a critical issue. Adding that a privatised BTC would provide commercial serv ices on a par with whats available in Florida and the US, Mr Francis said that among the issues the Government had veto powe r over the areas it has to agree with CWC before changes can be implemented at BTC were alterations to the companys corporate governance and capital structure. BTC is also prevented from lending money to other entities in the CWC group (it can only lend money within BTC rowing and making loans above a certain level, placing a mortgageon company assets, relocation of operations outside the Bahamas, entering into strategic partnerships and joint ventures, and contracts outside the normal course of business also require the Govern ments approval. BTCs $37.5m acquisition veto threshold F ROM page 1B B usiness yesterday that the exchange had already been contacted and asked several general questions regarding general listing issues by the Government in relation to its plans to floatt he BTC valued at between $36-$40 million to Bahamian investors by year-end. Meeting A nd he also told this newspaper that executives from international brewing g iant, Heineken, had been in Nassau earlier this week, meeting with both B ISX and the Securities Commission, in relation to the upcoming 25 per cent Burns House/Commonwealth Brew-e ry IPO. Theres no secret. They were in t own, and we met with them, Mr Davies told Tribune Business, declining to comment on what was discussed. S ources familiar with the situation this week told Tribune Business that the Burns H ouse/Commonwealth Brewery IPO was being target-e d for a date i n the late first quarter/early second quarter of 2011, withR oyalFidelity selected as the leadp lacement a gent/advisor. T he investment bank has been calling around key institu-t ional investors and advisors in the Bahamian capital markets to inquire h ow much of the IPO they and their clients plan to take up. They were calling around last week, a sking how many assets you had under management, how much youre going to take, said one source. Tribune Busin ess understands that while most of the IPO details have been worked out, H eineken and Burns House/Comm onwealth Brewery are now waiting on the Government to approve the timing of the IPO. With the Government having effectively agreed to underwrite the IPO by picking up all the shares not subs cribed for by private investors, Tribune Business understands that the Ingraham administration has to approve the launch date, something that could be impacted by the current fiscal position. O ther conditions for the IPO are t hat Bahamian investors get the same price, and same terms and conditions, as Heineken did when it acquired the Burns House/Commonwealth Brewery stakes previously held by the Finlayson-controlled Associated Bahamia n Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB f or a price estimated to range from $ 120-$130 million. BISX contacted over BTCs IPO F ROM page 1B KEITHDAVIES OVERSEAS NEWS Investors shift money fr om gold to riskier assets

PAGE 17

BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ANDROS C AT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO S hown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA O RLANDOL ow: 47F/8C L ow: 47F/8C L ow: 60F/16C L ow: 58F/14C Low: 59F/15C Low: 63F/17C L ow: 70F/21C Low: 65F/18C H igh: 70F/21C H igh: 64F/18C High: 76F/24C High: 76F/24C High: 76F/24C High: 74F/23C H igh: 83F/28C L ow: 67F/19C High: 79F/26C Low: 72F/22C H igh: 83F/28CRAGGED ISLANDL ow: 67F/19C H igh: 87F/31C L ow: 71F/22C H igh: 84F/29C L ow: 67F/19C High: 82F/28C L ow: 67F/19C H igh: 85F/29C Low: 70F/21C High: 89F/32C L ow: 69F/21C H igh: 85F/29C Low: 69F/21C High: 87F/31C Low: 70F/21C High: 88F/31C L ow: 70F/21C H igh: 84F/29C H igh: 76F/24CF REEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DA YFO RECASTTimes of clouds and s un Mostly cloudy, a shower or two late Partly sunny, a shower; not as warm Partly sunny, breezy and pleasant M ostly sunny, breezy and pleasant High:8 Low:7 High:7 High:7 High:8 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeelS unshine and nice High:79Low:6 Low:6 Low:6 AccuWeather RealFeel 8 F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperaturei s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 73F 75-63F 77-63F 80-64F 81-66F Low:6 T ODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY AL MANACHigh ..................................................82F/28C Low ....................................................73F/23C Normal high ......................................77F/25C Normal low ........................................64F/18C Last year's high ..................................78F/26CL ast year's low ..................................64F/18C A s of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Y ear to date ..................................................1.68" N ormal year to date ......................................2.38" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SU NANDMO ON TIDESFORNASSAU F irst FullLast New F eb. 11Feb. 18Feb. 24Mar. 4Sunrise . . . 6:47 a.m. Sunset . . . 6:01 p.m. Moonrise . . 11:37 a.m. Moonset . . 12:40 a.m. Today S aturday Sunday Monday H ighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:01 a.m.2.37:26 a.m.0.6 1:08 p.m.1.97:23 p.m.0.1 1:59 a.m.2.48:28 a.m.0.6 2:09 p.m.1.98:22 p.m.0.1 3 :00 a.m.2.59:31 a.m.0.4 3 :13 p.m.1.99:24 p.m.0.0 3:59 a.m.2.610:29 a.m.0.3 4 :15 p.m.2.110:25 p.m.-0.3 Tuesday W ednesday T hursday 4 :54 a.m.2.811:23 a.m.0.0 5:13 p.m.2.411:23 p.m.-0.4 5:47 a.m.3.012:12 p.m.-0.3 6:07 p.m.2.5----6:36 a.m.3.212:18 a.m.-0.7 6 :58 p.m.2.81:00 p.m.-0.7 MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. ABACO ANDROS CAT ISLAND CROOKED ISLAND ELEUTHERA FREEPORT GREAT EXUMA GREAT INAGUA LONG ISLAND MAYAGUANA NASSAU SAN SALVADOR RAGGED ISLAND Today:SW at 7-14 Knots4-7 Feet6 Miles74F Saturday:N at 12-25 Knots5-9 Feet10 Miles74F Today:S at 4-8 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles77F Saturday:NNE at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles77F Today:SSE at 6-12 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles77F Saturday:NNW at 6-12 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles78F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles77F Saturday:ESE at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles77F Today:S at 7-14 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles76F Saturday:N at 10-20 Knots4-7 Feet6 Miles76F Today:NNW at 6-12 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles75F Saturday:N at 12-25 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles75F Today:SE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles76F Saturday:N at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet7 Miles76F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles78F Saturday:E at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles79F Today:ESE at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles77F Saturday:NNE at 7-14 Knots1-2 Feet6 Miles77F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots5-9 Feet10 Miles79F Saturday:SE at 7-14 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles79F Today:S at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles75F Saturday:NNE at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles75F Today:SE at 6-12 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles78F Saturday:NNE at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles78F Today:SE at 6-12 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles77F Saturday:N at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet7 Miles78F U V INDEXTODAYThe higher the AccuWeather UV IndexT Mnumber, the g reater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by A ccuWeather, Inc. AccuWeather.com L Atlanta A t l a n t a Highs: 50F/10C H i g h s : 5 0 F / 1 0 C Kingston K i n g s t o n Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Caracas C a r a c a s Highs: 88F/31C H i g h s : 8 8 F / 3 1 C Panama City P a n a m a C i t y Highs: 91F/33C H i g h s : 9 1 F / 3 3 C Limon L i m o n Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Managua Ma n a g u a Highs: 92F/33C H i g h s : 9 2 F / 3 3 C Cozumel C o z u m e l Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Belize B e l i z e Highs: 78F/26C H i g h s : 7 8 F / 2 6 C Charlotte C h a r l o t t e Highs: 51F/11C H i g h s : 5 1 F / 1 1 C Charleston C h a r l e s t o n Highs: 54F/12C H i g h s : 5 4 F / 1 2 C Savannah S a v a n n a h Highs: 57F/14C H i g h s : 5 7 F / 1 4 C Pensacola P e n s a c o l a Highs: 54F/12C H i g h s : 5 4 F / 1 2 C Daytona Beach D a y t o n a B e a c h Highs: 69F/21C H i g h s : 6 9 F / 2 1 C Tampa T a m p a Highs: 64F/18C H i g h s : 6 4 F / 1 8 C Freeport F r e e p o r t Highs: 76F/24C H i g h s : 7 6 F / 2 4 C Miami Mi a m i Highs: 76F/24C H i g h s : 7 6 F / 2 4 C Nassau N a s s a u Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Havana H a v a n a Highs: 77F/25C H i g h s : 7 7 F / 2 5 C Santiago de Cuba S a n t i a g o d e C u b a Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C San Juan S a n J u a n Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Santa S a n t a Domingo D o m i n g o Highs: 85F/29C H i g h s : 8 5 F / 2 9 C Trinidad T r i n i d a d Tobago T o b a g o Highs: 88F/31C H i g h s : 8 8 F / 3 1 C Port-au-Prince P o r t a u P r i n c e Highs: 90F/32C H i g h s : 9 0 F / 3 2 C Cape Hatteras C a p e H a t t e r a s H ighs: 44F/7C H i g h s : 4 4 F / 7 C Aruba Curacao A r u b a C u r a c a o Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Antigua A n t i g u a Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Barbados B a r b a d o s Highs: 85F/29C H i g h s : 8 5 F / 2 9 C Bermuda B e r m u d a Highs: 66F/19C H i g h s : 6 6 F / 1 9 C Atlanta Highs: 50F/10C Kingston Highs: 86F/30C Caracas Highs: 88F/31C Panama City Highs: 91F/33C Limon Highs: 84F/29C Managua Highs: 92F/33C Cozumel Highs: 83F/28C Belize Highs: 78F/26C C harlotte Highs: 51F/11C Charleston Highs: 54F/12C Savannah Highs: 57F/14C Pensacola Highs: 54F/12C Daytona Beach Highs: 69F/21C Tampa Highs: 64F/18C Freeport Highs: 76F/24C Miami Highs: 76F/24C Nassau Highs: 83F/28C Havana Highs: 77F/25C Santiago de Cuba Highs: 83F/28C San Juan Highs: 84F/29C Santa Domingo Highs: 85F/29C Trinidad Tobago Highs: 88F/31C Port-au-Prince Highs: 90F/32C Cape Hatteras H ighs: 44F/7C Aruba Curacao Highs: 87F/31C Antigua Highs: 84F/29C Barbados Highs: 85F/29C Bermuda Highs: 66F/19C INSURANCEMANAGEMENTTRACKINGMAP Showers Warm Cold Stationary Rain T-storms Flurries Snow IceShown is today's weather. Temperatures a re today's highs and tonight's lows. N S EW S E 1 0-20 knots N S EW S E 7 -14 knots N S EW S E 7 -14 knots N S EW S E 6-12 knots N S EW S E 6 -12 knots N S EW S E 8-16 knots N S EW S E 6-12 knots N S EW N S S S 4-8 knots Cable & Wireless Communications (CWCt ant, Mr Francis said: Its a pity we couldnt do this in 1998 or thereabouts 12 years ago. Thats when we really wanted t o do it. Recalling how he served on the first-ever privatisation committee created by the Government back then, Mr Francisa dded: It would have been far better for the economy if wed been able to do it, but at that time BTC was not in a position t o do it, as it couldnt get audited financial statements. The groundwork for BTCs privatisation had already been laid then, with the Ingrahama dministration reducing the companys workforce by more than 50 per cent from 2,600 to 1,200 sparking rowdy s cenes and protests in Rawson Square. P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham has previously saidt he failure to privatise BTC was among the biggest regrets of his f irst administration, hinting that with hindsight he should have l et the process proceed despite t he absence of audited financial statements. I really believe it has cost the economy tremendously, the m issed opportunity of competition, lower prices, the extens ion of existing services, launch of new services, more investm ent in the sector, all these kinds of things, Mr Francis said of the stop, start nature of the privatisation over the intervening 12 years, including two f ailed processes. Adding that it would be a project for an economist to undertake, the former C entral Bank governor said of the total opportunity cost incurred by Bahamian busi-n esses and the economy: It wouldnt surprise me if youre talking a good slice of the GDP growth. Pointing out that the Bahamas had lagged main regional rivals when it came to communications sector liberalisation and competition, with Barbados, for example, getting Internet services four yearsb efore this nation, Mr Francis said there was no question about the need to privatise BTC. We need to get this done, get this behind us, and moveo n with life, he told Tribune Business. Partner The BTC executive chairman said the privatisation committee a nd the Government could n ot have done much better in their selection of a strategic partner in CWC, given its r egional footprint, familiarity with Caribbean culture and how to operate in this area, and the fact that its business modela lmost exactly matched BTCs. Pointing out that for some p otential buyers some aspects o f BTC would have no value, g iven that they were focused in specific sectors, Mr Francis told T ribune Business: Its probab ly true to say theres more synergy with Cable & Wireless than any other buyer. A dding that no other telecoms carrier could provide wider and fuller synergies than Cable & Wireless, Mr Francis r evealed that during negotiations with the British-headquartered operator, he had told its representatives he felt a privatised BTC, under their majority control, could be transformed into their best-perf orming jurisdiction in the Caribbean. I think it is possible that BTC is going to far outstrip their other businesses in the region. I really do, he added. They have the resources, thes ynergies and the footprint to extract the maximum value from it. They, more than anyone else, can get value out of BTC. I think its a great opportunity for them, and a great opportun ity for us. Addressing critics of the privatisation, Mr Francis told Trib une Business: Those people opposed to the 51 per cent sale, t heyre living in the past and dont understand where the economy needs to be, and dontu nderstand the reality of global competition If you dont have the big guys going to bat for you todayi n those critical areas of your business, like procurement, like roaming arrangements, those big arrangements that benefit international business, which is so important for the Bahamas, if you do not have that kind ofs upport in the business, youre going to be a second rate play er. Bahamas lost good slice of growth on BTC FROM page 1B




PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





FROM page 1B

his family holds a 64 per cent
stake, objected to the deal,
Dionisio D’Aguilar said his
company was finding it impos-
sible to get “a definitive
answer” from the regulator
when it came to timelines and
how the process would work.

“We have a distinct problem
with the fact that the Securities
Commission are being extreme-
ly vague on what the timeline
is,” Mr D’ Aguilar said, telling
Tribune Business the uncer-
tainty could potentially disrupt
the AML Foods share price
and maintenance of an orderly
Bahamian capital market.

“There’s no definitive law,
and we all have to operate in
this world of best practices,
which I find unacceptable,” Mr
D’ Aguilar added. “The Secu-
rities Commission needs to
show some a little bit of back-
bone and recognise that it can-
not drag this process on indefi-
nitely.

“He’s [Mr Finlayson] got to
put up and make a decision
about what he’s going to do.
It’s causing too much turmoil
in the marketplace. He’s made
an announcement and it’s
mind-boggling to me that he’s
not dotted the ‘1’s’ and crossed
the ‘t’s’ before.

“Now, you’re dithering. To
me, that’s not an option. He’s
either moving forward or he’s
not.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said the uncer-
tainty over whether Mr Fin-
layson would move forward
with the $1.50 per share offer (a
44 per cent premium to the cur-
rent $1.04 market price) to
acquire a 51 per cent stake in
the BISX-listed food retail
group might impact its share
price, and in the absence of
“anything concrete” staff, too,
were also being impacted.

“It’s not an ideal environ-
ment to operate your business
in,” he added. ““We’re going out
hiring professionals, incurring
costs because of this acquisi-
tion. You’re either doing it or
you’re not.”

Mr Finlayson said earlier this
week that his need to satisfy
ABAD shareholders over their
concerns in relation to his pro-
posed AML Foods acquisition
would likely delay the tender
offer’s launch, although he dis-
puted Mr D’Aguilar’s con-
tention that the Securities Com-
mission had given him a dead-

AML Foods chief
tells Commission:
‘Show backbone’



MARK FINLAYSON

line of today by which to do
this.

Explaining that he had “two
issues” moving forward, Mr
Finlayson said: “The immedi-
ate thing I need to address is
my ABDAB shareholders.
They have been with us for a
long, long time, and when they
raised it and said they’re not in
favour of the AML purchase,
it puts us in a bad position.”

The key contention is that
ABDAB shareholders would
have benefited enormously
from Mr Finlayson’s original
City Markets expansion plans,
as their company owns the real
estate for three Super Centre
sites he was targeting - two in
Nassau on JFK Drive and East-
West Highway, and one in
Freeport.

However, if the AML Foods
acquisition is successful, Mr
Finlayson would not need the
East-West Highway and
Freeport real estate, given the
proximity of AML’s existing
two Solomon’s SuperCentre
sites. As a result, ABDAB
investors would only realise
rental income yields from the
JFK Drive property, largely
excluding them from the bene-
fits of a successful AML Foods
purchase.

Pledging that he would pro-
vide “a fair and equitable solu-
tion” to involve ABDAB and
its investors in the AML Foods
transaction, Mr Finlayson said:
“Up until last week, this issue
had not raised its head. It’s only
fair to ABDAB shareholders,
some of whom have been with
us since 1986, to deal with
them.

“T feel an obligation to make
sure they’re satisfied, and feel
quite confident we can satisfy
them and acquire AML as a
result. We’re in talks with a

investor.”

Mr D’Aguilar, though, last ee f
night told Tribune Business } ment, it is being targeted at
that AML Foods had been led }

to believe that Mr Finlayson }

had until today to issue a for-
mal tender offer and circular

accept or reject the shares ten-

60 days.

layson a ‘put up or shut up’ }
message, the AML Foods chair- }
man called on the Securities }
Commission to ensure “this }
state of dither is not allowed to }

persist”.

Adding that AML Foods had
its counter-strategy and plan in } eoriiouetenenwmk
place, Mr D’ Aguilar told Tri- Lewes
one ei Sear ee the Bahamian aircraft operators declined to go
allow the process to drag on }
indefinitely. They have a duty }
to ensure orderly workings of :
the market, and by making this :
announcement and not moving
forward, Mr Finlayson is dis- ;
rupting the market. It behooves ;
them to step in and bring order
? healthy, thriving and profitable aviation sector.
He added that in AML : They outlined a number of things they thought
Foods’ opinion, the Securities | would be helpful in acheiving those goals and
mm : that’s really where we left it,” said the Minister
definitive. We cannot get a def- when asked about the purpose and outcome of
Philip Stubbs, the Securities | ier
Comarssion chairman, while ? the duty demand over aircraft, Mr Vander-
declining to give specifics, told }
Tribune Business earlier this } ay nee
week that the regulator was in there is “no change on the position”.
contact with both sides, and was i _ ree
seeking to ensure the process } Said the Minister.
followed the draft Takeover }

Code it was set to release for :

to the process.”

Commission was “not being

inite answer from them”.

industry consultation shortly.

Request for Proposals
Internal Audit Services

The Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA) 1s the
new Converged Regulator for the electronic communications sector
(ECS) covering radio and television broadcasting, radio spectrum,
internet and data, pay-TV and voice telephony. URCA was
established on 1 August 2009, as a corporate body, by the URCA Act
2009. URCA is the successor to the Public Utilities Commission,
which ceased to exist once URCA came into being.

This Request for Proposals (RFP) is for the provision of internal
audit services by an independent service provider. The RFP can
be downloaded from the URCA website at www.urcabahamas.bs in
the Newsroom section. All responses should be addressed to the
attention of the Chief Executive Officer of URCA, and should be
submitted to URCA by 4:00 p.m. on February 25, 2011.

Gipson, Ricsy & Co.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Noraries PusLIC

The Partners of Gibson, Rigby & Co.
are pleased to announce that

MS. MAGAN S. KNOWLES

&

MS. CANDICE C. FERGUSON

have joined the Firm with effect
from the 31" day of January A.D., 2011



FROM page 1B
As it is a private place-

specific investors, only such
as institutions and high net-

i worths, so ordinary mem-
? bers of the Bahamas public
to the company’s shareholders. ;
7 That would lead to the AML ¢ involved. It is not a public
oods directors issuing their } for
own circular in response, and } onan.
Mr D’ Aguilar said he was }
under the impression that the ; ,
whole process - including the ; declined to comment when
offer duration and Mr Fin-

layson’s decision on whether to }

should not apply to get
Philip Lightbourne, Phil’s
Food Services’ owner,

contacted by Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday afternoon,

? but conceded that he was

dered - would be over within | seeking to raise additional

clive acini Bar capital for the business. He

directed this newspaper to
speak with Mr Longley, but
he did not return phone
messages or e-mails prior to
press time yesterday.

Expansion

Phil’s Food Services last
year revealed plans for a
$2.5 million expansion at its
existing store, so it is possi-
ble some of the capital being
raised is for this purpose.

Mr Lightbourne, who
then employed 125 people
at the Gladstone Road food
store which opened in
December 2009, said last

Food retailer in
$5m capital offer

number of shareholders, and ;
think we can come up with a :
product that satisfies every }

year the expansion would
create 50 jobs and involve
an increase in the number
and variety of retail lines at
Phil's, with a special focus
on growing their produce
sales in the wake of the
Prime Bahamas/Bahamas
Food Services merger.
Wholesale liquor will also
be introduced.

"We are putting in a mas-
sive cooler and taking the
produce market to another
level. Since Prime Bahamas
(recently absorbed by BFS)
shut its doors, the retail mar-
Ket has gone really weak.
We are going to pick up the
slack,” said Mr Lightbourne.

Minister meets sector on plane tax concerns

FROM page 1B

Contacted yesterday for comment, several of

into details about the meeting.

In an interview with Tribune Business, Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace confirmed that he
met with the operators over the Customs tax
issue and other aviation-related matters.

“T think there was a better understanding of
what the Government is trying to achieve, and
an assurance to them that we wish to see a

Asked what the Government’s position is on
pool-Wallace said that as far as he was aware

“That’s a matter for Customs to address,”

Undertaking

However, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said

? there was an undertaking on behalf of the
? companies represented to bring to the Gov-
? ernment evidence of “exactly how the sector is
: performing under the current (tax) regime”, so
? that the Ingraham administration can make
? informed decisions about any potential
; changes to its demands.

He suggested companies operating in the

? domestic aviation sector have “not been
? inclined” to provide such information before.

“Tt is always good to know how they are

doing now under the current regime,” Mr Van-
: derpool-Wallace said.

“They gave an undertaking that made a

? great deal of sense, and have committed to
? go and take a look so that something can be
? provided to tell how they are doing today, so
? that any recommendations that are made are
i supported by the facts.”

“In a country where there is no income tax

? and no need for anyone to provide evidence
? about how a company is performing, it is very
? difficult for the Government to make deci-
i sions about tax-related matters.”

The Department of Customs had suggested

it would take action in January to collect the
; outstanding duty, which it said was owed by
? numerous domestic airline companies who

had imported planes into the Bahamas without
paying the required import and stamp tax, and
by private plane owners. One airline was said
to owe as much as $700,000.

However, airlines and private plane own-
ers have complained about the attempt to col-
lect the tax, which was first brought to their
attention in letters sent out in November last
year. The letters threatened that if the aircraft
operators did not pay up, they could face hav-
ing their craft seized.

The operators have argued that it is unfair
for the Department to attempt to go back and
collect the tax, given their claim that Customs
was well aware that the planes were being
brought into the country, but allegedly oper-
ated a policy of not collecting the revenue at
the time.

They also question on what basis the tax
would be collected - the purchase price of the
plane when new, at the present time, or at the
time it first came into the country - and who
would be asked to pay the tax - whether that
be those whose aircraft are registered in the
Bahamas, or those who are not but have been
in the country for a given period of time, or
both.

Meanwhile, operators have questioned what
happens in the case of those who bought the
planes second hand in The Bahamas from oth-
er people who originally imported them into
the country.

They allege that the Customs Department
has refused to make these distinctions clear.

Industry stakeholders have also insisted that
for the Government to seek to collect the
funds now places a financial stress on an indus-
try which is “vital” to inter-island transporta-
tion and economic activity, and is already
under financial pressure, as well as potential-
ly discouraging high net worth individuals who
might wish to reside or do business in this
country from doing so, on the basis that they
will be taxed for bringing their plane into the
country.

Captain Randy Butler, Sky Bahamas chief
executive, told Tribune Busines in January
that should the Department of Customs not
further clarify the basis upon which any tax
demanded is being calculated, he would take
the Government to court over the demands.

For his part, Customs Comptroller Glenn
Gomez, suggested that the Government is
merely seeking to collect what should have
been obtained in years past. Mr Gomez was
not available for further comment on the sta-
tus of the collection effort yesterday.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 5B



BIC’s $37.5m
acquisition

‘veto’ threshold

; Several general questions regarding
: general listing issues” by the Govern-

deputy chairman of the Government-appointed privatisation com- i ment in relation to its plans to float

mittee, told the Rotary Club of West Nassau that the Government : the BTC - valued at between $36-$40

extended BTC’s cellular exclusivity post-privatisation from two } million - to Bahamian investors by

years to three to give Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC) i year-end.

enough time to restructure and get the business ready for compe- :

FROM page 1B

tition, otherwise it would get “creamed”.

This move has forced the Government to table amendments to :
the Communications Sector Policy in the House of Assembly, but }
Mr Francis said: “The Government recognises that if it liberalised executives from international brewing
Se ae Be nae ae . ee a pie y ae ‘o + giant, Heineken, had been in Nassau
give it a little more Tinie to make adjustments, otherwise tiey 1 oo rier this week, meeting with both

“Cable & Wireless said: ‘Look here, government, we need two- BISX and the Securities Commission,
? in relation to the upcoming 25 per cent
The bid process for a second cellular licence will thus start in mid- } ea Commonwealth Brew-
i ery .

2014, with a third such licence only available five years after pri- }

vatisation, but Mr Francis said he was confident liberalisation ; s
? town, and we met with them,” Mr

would get creamed.

and-a-half to three years to get it ready at least.”

would come to the Bahamian mobile phone sector.

He added: “If you look at the existing rates in the Bahamas and ;
in the Caribbean, we expect rates to come down, and don’t think }

they will come back up.”

Comparing the Bahamas’ $0.20-plus per minute cellular rates i
with the $0.02 per minute prevailing in Jamaica, Mr Francis said: }
“The expectation is that when we have fierce competition in this }
sector, it will bring rastes down to where you have just enough prof- i

it to make it a worthwhile business.”

Compensating

alised market, Mr Francis said there were compensating factors.

same-island calls.
In addition, Mr Francis said that with consumers in the Bahamas
and rest of the world increasingly shifting to cell phone use, fixed

making the end to free same-island calls less of an issue.

er. The best we could hope for is that they remain as they are.”

After detailing the product ‘bundling’ solution, he added: “The :

Bahamas, like other places in the world, is moving rapidly to past year has come out of the market," LaSalle Futures Group ana-
mobile. Today, BT'C’s mobile services are 70 per cent of its busi- 3 lyst Matt Zeman said. "So far, there just hasn't been a good driver

ness, and less than 30 per cent is fixed, and we expect that shift is | to really propel it up."

going to continue over time.”

calls situation: “I don’t think that’s going to be a critical issue.”

Adding that a privatised BTC would “provide commercial ser- }
vices on a par with what’s available in Florida and the US,” Mr }
Francis said that among the issues the Government had veto pow- }
er over - the areas it has to agree with CWC before changes can be }
implemented at BTC - were alterations to the company’s corporate }

governance and capital structure.

BTC is also prevented from lending money to other entities in }
the CWC group (it can only lend money within BTC), while bor- }
rowing and making loans above a certain level, placing a mortgage }
on company assets, relocation of operations outside the Bahamas, }
entering into strategic partnerships and joint ventures, and contracts {
outside the normal course of business also require the Govern- }

ment’s approval.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSNA JONASSAINT
of PINEWOOD GARDENS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration’
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11‘
day of February, 2011 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SEDRA JULYSSA WILSON
of 24 Glendale Subdivision, PO. BOX SS-6262,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 4'* DAY of February 2011 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-

7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Computer Hardware and Software company
seeks applicants for the post of

FROM page 1B

Business yesterday that the exchange
had already “been contacted and asked

Meeting

And he also told this newspaper that

“There’s no secret. They were in

Davies told Tribune Business, declining

to comment on what was discussed.
Sources familiar with the situation

this week told Tribune Business that



the Burns
House/Com-
monwealth
Brewery
IPO was
being target-
ed for a date
in the late
first quar-
ter/early sec-
ond quarter
of 2011, with
RoyalFideli-
ty selected as
the lead
placement
agent/advi-
sor.

The invest-
ment bank
has been calling around key institu-
tional investors and advisors in the
Bahamian capital markets to inquire
how much of the IPO they and their
clients plan to take up.

“They were calling around last week,
asking how many assets you had under
management, how much you're going

KEITH DAVIES

BISX ‘contacted over BIC's IPO

to take,” said one source. Tribune Busi-
ness understands that while most of
the IPO details have been worked out,
Heineken and Burns House/Com-
monwealth Brewery are now waiting
on the Government to approve the
timing of the IPO.

With the Government having effec-
tively agreed to underwrite the IPO
by picking up all the shares not sub-
scribed for by private investors, Tri-
bune Business understands that the
Ingraham administration has to
approve the launch date, something
that could be impacted by the current
fiscal position.

Other conditions for the IPO are
that Bahamian investors get the same
price, and same terms and conditions,
as Heineken did when it acquired the
Burns House/Commonwealth Brew-
ery Stakes previously held by the Fin-
layson-controlled Associated Bahami-
an Distillers and Brewers (ABDAB)
for a price estimated to range from



py I NIC\A
; _ a > i i



"Investors shift money from gold to riskier assets

i? NEW YORK

While the free intra-island fixed voice landline calls enjoyed ;
by all residents today might become a thing of the past ina liber- ;

Greater confidence in the U.S. economy is leading investors to

: : : : : i move money out of gold and into riskier assets in search of bigger
He pointed out that Bahamas-based carriers, including a priva- } profits y 8 8s
tised BTC, could ‘bundle’ together products such as fixed voice } 5
landline, cellular, Internet and TV, offering some or all of these at : year as more evidence surfaced that the economy is strengthening.

lower price points and thus compensating for the end to free }

Gold prices have fallen 4.2 percent since the beginning of the

More positive economic news came Thursday when The Labor

i Department said the number of Americans applying for unem-
? ployment benefits for the first time fell to the lowest point since ear-
? ly July 2008.

voice services in the home were becoming increasingly obsolete, }

In addition, the Commerce Department said wholesale busi-

i nesses increased inventories 1 percent in December. Economists

Acknowledging that he did not know whether free same-island }
calls would become a thing of the past, Mr Francis said: “As we all }
know, in the Bahamas we enjoy fixed landline costs that could not }

possibly be lower. It would be incorrect to think they could go low- }
i panies, is up 5.1 percent so far this year.

consider that a healthy level for inventories.

Stocks, which are considered riskier assets than gold, have been
rising since the beginning of the year. The Standard & Poor's 500
index, the most widely used measure for stocks of large U.S. com-

"A lot of that flight-to-quality bid that we saw in gold over the

Gold and silver typically are considered safer assets to hold

With fixed landline becoming increasingly important instead during uncertain economic times. Many analysts believe gold
for Internet connectivity, Mr Francis said of the free same-island ; pices will climb nigher ths year ‘because tere-etill are: plobal
. ? economic issues that need to be addressed.

$120-$130 million.

NOTICE is hereby given that ISLET FLORESTAL of
Kemp Road, Nassau, Bahamas, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 11° DAY of February 2011
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, KEVIN TONY of
Stapeldon Gardens.,Nassau, Bahamas intend to change
my name to KEVEN CHERFILS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the

date of publication of this notice.

















Legal Notice

NOTICE
MARISTELLA S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

This notice replaces the publication of 9th October
2009 in this Gazette wherein the name MARISTELLA
S.A. was incorrectly referred to.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL SB FIDELITY

Morty al Work

NOTICE

PRINCE HALL FAMILY CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED
(INVOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 105 of the Co-operative Societies Act,
2005 that PRINCE HALL FAMILY Co-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED is in dissolution.
Dissolution commenced on December 29, 2010 when the Director of Societies exercised his
powers pursuant to the Co-operative Societies Act, 2005,

e7, P.O, Box $$-6229, 4" Floor, Centreville House, 2" Terrace
amas,

The Liqui
West, Cen

ator is James B, Go
eville, Nassau, B

Persons having debts or claims against the Co-operative are required to send particulars to the
Liquidator on or before March 31, 2011. In default, thereof, they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.





Dated: February 10, 2011
JAMES B. GOMEZ
Liquidator

S FG
e

CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 10 FEBURARY 2011
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,472.35 | CHG -0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -27.16 | YTD % -1.81
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

S2wk-Low
0.97

Securit_y
AML. Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

1.04
10.63
4.42
0.18

9.67
4.42
0.18
2.70
2.1F
10.24
2.40
6.85
2.10
1.40
5.47
6.51
3.39
5.48
1.00
7.40
9.82
10.00

2.70
2.14
9.62
2.36
5.40.
1.63
1.40
5.47
F ae
8.77
B75
1.00
5.00.
9.82
10.00

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS$ Pe
0.123
0.013
0.153

-0.877
0.168
0.016
1.050
0.781
0.488
0.111
0.107
0,357
0,287
0.494
0.452
0.000
0.012
0.859
41.207

Change Daily Vol. Div $
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.04
10.63
4.42
0.18
2.70
a. 1F
10,21
2.40
6.85
2.06
1.40
5.47
6.51
8.39
5.48
1.00
7.40
9.82
10.00

0.00,
0.00.

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Hi__S2wk-Low. Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Interest
6.95%
7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022

30 May 2013
29 May 2015

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

P/E

Bid &
5,01

ASK
6.01

Last Pirce
14.00

EPSS$
-2,.945
0,001

Div &
0,000
0.000

Symbol
Banamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Daily Wo.

0.35 0.40 0.55
CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

30.13 31.59 29.00

0.45 0.55 0.55,

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD%

1.5179 5.51%
2.9527
1.5808
2.7049
13.4164
114.3684
106.5528
1.1465
1.1185
1.1491

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0,002

Software/Hardware Technician oe

NAV 6GMTH
1.475244
2.910084
1.533976

Fund Name
CPAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CPFAL Money Market Fund
Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Last 12 Months %

6.90% 30-Nov-10
31-Jan-11
28-Jan-11
31-Jan-11
31-Jan-11
30-Jun-10
30-Sep-10
31-Dec-10
31-Dec-10
31-Dec-10

1.4076
2.8300
1.5114
2.8522
13.0484
101.6693
99.4177

0.18%
0.43%
0.56%
0.44%
9.98%
4.75%
5.20%
4.73%
5, 35%

1.61%
4.59%
-15.54%
-0.10%
12.49%
7.18%
5.20%
4.73%
5.35%

Salary commensurate with experience and
education.

Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

109.392860
100.779540

107.570619
105.776543
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

Addition benefits available. See. eee ene So NYG

10.0000

10.6417 -1.20% 0.50% 30-Nov-10

9.1708
31-Jan-11
31-Jan-11

10.1266 1.27%
8.4510 0.72%
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

1.27%

4.8105 9.95%

Interested applicants should send resumes
and appropriate information to:

jobs@bias-bahamas.com

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


THE TRIBUNE



aa ee
Bahamas lost ‘good.

slice of growth’ on BTC

FROM page 1B

Cable & Wireless Communica-
tions (CWC), as “vastly impor-
tant”, Mr Francis said: “It’s a
pity we couldn’t do this in 1998
or thereabouts 12 years ago.
That’s when we really wanted
to do it.”

Recalling how he served on
the first-ever privatisation com-
mittee created by the Govern-
ment back then, Mr Francis
added: “It would have been far
better for the economy if we’d
been able to do it, but at that
time BTC was not in a position
to do it, as it couldn’t get audit-
ed financial statements.”

The groundwork for BTC’s
privatisation had already been
laid then, with the Ingraham
administration reducing the
company’s workforce by more
than 50 per cent - from 2,600
to 1,200 - sparking rowdy
scenes and protests in Rawson
Square.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham has previously said
the failure to privatise BTC was
among the biggest regrets of his
first administration, hinting that
with hindsight he should have
let the process proceed despite
the absence of audited finan-
cial statements.

“T really believe it has cost
the economy tremendously, the
missed opportunity of compe-
tition, lower prices, the exten-
sion of existing services, launch
of new services, more invest-
ment in the sector, all these
kinds of things,” Mr Francis
said of the ‘stop, start’ nature of
the privatisation over the inter-
vening 12 years, including two

5-Day ForEcAST

failed processes. Adding that it
would be a project for an econ-
omist to undertake, the former
Central Bank governor said of
the total opportunity cost
incurred by Bahamian busi-
nesses and the economy: “It
wouldn’t surprise me if you’re
talking a good slice of the GDP
growth.”

Pointing out that the
Bahamas had lagged main
regional rivals when it came to
communications sector liberal-
isation and competition, with
Barbados, for example, getting
Internet services four years
before this nation, Mr Francis
said there was “no question”
about the need to privatise
BTC.

“We need to get this done,
get this behind us, and move
on with life,” he told Tribune
Business.

Partner

The BTC executive chairman
said the privatisation committee
and the Government “could
not have done much better” in
their selection of a strategic
partner in CWC, given its
regional footprint, familiarity
with Caribbean culture and
how to operate in this area, and
the fact that its business model
almost exactly matched BTC’s.

Pointing out that for some
potential buyers “some aspects
of BTC would have no value”,
given that they were focused in
specific sectors, Mr Francis told
Tribune Business: “It’s proba-
bly true to say there’s more syn-
ergy with Cable & Wireless
than any other buyer.”

Adding that no other tele-
coms carrier could provide
“wider and fuller synergies than
Cable & Wireless”, Mr Francis
revealed that during negotia-
tions with the British-head-
quartered operator, he had told
its representatives he felt a pri-
vatised BTC, under their major-
ity control, could be trans-
formed into their best-per-
forming jurisdiction in the
Caribbean.

“T think it is possible that
BTC is going to far outstrip
their other businesses in the
region. I really do,” he added.
“They have the resources, the
synergies and the footprint to
extract the maximum value
from it.

“They, more than anyone
else, can get value out of BTC.
I think it’s a great opportunity
for them, and a great opportu-
nity for us.”

Addressing critics of the pri-
vatisation, Mr Francis told Tri-
bune Business: “Those people
opposed to the 51 per cent sale,
they’re living in the past and
don’t understand where the
economy needs to be, and don’t
understand the reality of glob-
al competition

“Tf you don’t have the big
guys going to bat for you today
in those critical areas of your
business, like procurement, like
roaming arrangements, those
big arrangements that benefit
international business, which is
so important for the Bahamas,
if you do not have that kind of
support in the business, you’re
going to be a second rate play-
er.”

=
x
S
=

WEATHER REPORT [22:22

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 7B

—

- TO OUR VALUABLE CLIENTS:

SL Bahamas would like to thank you for your.
continued patronage during 2010.

ISL Imports - eCast system update
nan effort to serve you even better in 2011, we would
ike to announce the upcoming 2011 release of
SL Imports. This will be fully integrated with the
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To all of our valued ISL Payroll clie

nts we would also

ike to announce that the update for the NIB ceiling
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all over the past year and wish you all the best for

201 |!

UV INDEX Topay

0|1|2|/3|4|5/6





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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High: 83° Low: 70°

CELLU ete AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel PN CU Lmter Lua EN Cater Lune CCL r Lumet

89° F 73° F 75°-63° F 77°-63° F 80°-64° F 81°-66° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure,
and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

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@_ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 76° F/24°C
Low: 60° F/16°C

Low MODERATE

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ORLANDO.
High: 70°F/21°C
Low: 47° F/8°C
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TAMPA i, f-
High: 64° F/18° C ."s
™ Low: 47° F/8°C

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greater the need for eye and skin protection

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shower; not as warm
High: 76°
Low: 66°

Partly sunny, breezy
and pleasant
High: 78°
Low: 65°

Mostly sunny, breezy
and pleasant

High: 80°
Low: 66°

on High: 79°
Low: 68° TIDES FoR Nassau
High Ht(ft.)

2.3

Low

=
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Today :01 a.m. 7:26 a.m.

:08 p.m.

Saturday :59 a.m. 8:28 a.m.

8:22 p.m.

9:31 a.m.
9:24 p.m.

10:29 a.m.
10:25 p.m.

11:23 a.m.
11:23 p.m.

12:12 p.m.

i _

— lll ;
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82° F/28° C
. 73° F/23° C
fF? F257 C
. 64° F/18° C
Last year's high . 78° F/26° C
Last year's low 64° F/18° C
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As of 1 p.m. yesterday
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Sunday

ABACO
High:79° F/26° C
Low:67°F/19°C



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High: 76° F/24°C
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High: 76° F/24° C
Low: 58° F/14°C

Thursday 6:36 a.m.

—e 6:58 p.m.

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10-20 knots

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

YUU Mt

Sunrise...... 6:47 a.m.
Sunset....... 6:01 p.m. Moonset... .

First Full Last

Feb.11 Feb.18 Feb.24 Mar. 4

SAN SALVADOR
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

2

MIAMI
High: 76° F/24°C
Low: 59° F/15°C

ELEUTHERA
High: 83° F/28° C

NASSAU _ Low: 72° F/22°C

High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 70° F/21°C
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ANDROS
High: 84° F/29°C
Low: 70° F/21°C

11:37 a.m.
12:40 a.m.

Moonrise. ...

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KEY WEST A
High: 74° F/23° C ~
Low: 63° F/17°C

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High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 67° F/19°C
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GREAT EXUMA

High: 84° F/29° C
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Low: 71° F/22°C
Te. 4
LONG ISLAND
High: 85° F/29°C 6-12 knots
MAYAGUANA
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CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT TRACKING Map

¢ n Low: 69° F/21°C
Charlotte e i | High: 87° F/31° C
35) Highs: 5ST F/1.1' °c Shown is today's Low:69° F/21°C
High: 89° F/32° C
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a 4 1 ‘ High: 87° F/31°C
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are today's highs and

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VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
6 Miles 74° F
10 Miles 74°
10 Miles 77°
10 Miles 77
10 Miles he
Saturday: NW at 6-12 Knots Fee! 10 Miles 78°
CROOKED ISLAND jay: ESE at 8-16 Knots Fee’ 10 Miles 77°

Saturday: ESE at 7-14 Knots -4 Fee 10 Miles 77
ELEUTHERA 5 S at 7-14 Knots Feel 10 Miles 76°

Saturday: at 10-20 Knots -7 Fee 6 Miles 76°
FREEPORT 5 NW at 6-12 Knots Feel 10 Miles 75°
= jay: at 12-25 Knots Fee! 10 Miles 75°
\e Managua . T inidad Sod) asl boos GREAT EXUMA : SE at 6-12 Knots Feel 10 Miles 76°

Highs: 92°F/33°C ‘ > Trinida: Saturday: _N at 8-16 Knots -2 Fee 7 Miles 76°

NS ae / =) < GREAT INAGUA z ESE at 8-16 Knots Feel 10 Miles 78°
ia 7 E at 7-14 Knots Fee! 10 Miles 79°
ESE at 7-14 Knots Fee 10 Miles 77°
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Limon
Highs: 84°F/29°C



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LATEST NEWS ON WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER
BIGGEST AND BEST

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SOTA aris:
SU aR aa Ny
sae a

le condemned

Govt hits out at
report on public
servant salaries

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunmedia.net

THE government yester-
day attacked the Opposition
for spreading "a malicious lie”
suggesting that public ser-
vants' votes will be wooed
with an impending lump sum
payment of $2,500 to each
employee and an extra $75 to
their base salary.

A statement from the
Office of the Prime Minister
vehemently denied the "fab-
ricated" report released by
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty, adding that the Ingraham
administration cannot dole
out increments to the public
service due to financial con-
straints.

The statement added that
the government has worked

SEE page eight

MP ‘UNCONCERNED’ WITH
REPORTS THAT CONSTITUENCY

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

TATU SPST SLU Seat USPSA LST

UNION LEADERS
MEET BEHIND
CLOSED DOORS
OVER BIC PLANS

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter

nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

UNION leaders discussed
their plans in a closed-door
session with members last
night, as they continued to
pledge their opposition to the
sale of BTC to Cable and
Wireless Communications
(CWC).

Bernard Evans, president
of the Bahamas Communica-
tions and Public Officers
Union (BCPOU), said there
would be “absolutely no apol-
ogy” for threats made about
turning the country into a
“small Egypt”.

He said members would be
informed in small groups

SEE page eight

THIRD MAN
CHARGED WITH
MURDER OF
PRISON OFFICER

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A THIRD man appeared
in magistrate’s court yester-
day in connection with the
stabbing death of a prison
officer.

Police have charged Pres-
ley Humes, 36, of Faith
Avenue, with the murder of
Juilian Strachan.

Mr Strachan, 37, of Bell-
dock Avenue, was stabbed
multiple times at the

MAY BE CUT INTO TWO

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Carmichael Liquor Store on

SEE page 10



‘UNCONCERNED’:
V Alfred Gray

OPPOSITION MP V Alfred Gray said
he is not concerned with reports that his
constituency may be cut into two for the

SEE page 10

Thigh & Leg

+ Family Fries



PROTEST: The coalition consisting of the National Democratic Party and the Worker’s Party
|_| staged an island wide motorcade protest yesterday against plans to sell BTC to Cable and Wire-

less Communications (CWC).

¢ SEE PAGE THREE



20-YEAR-OLD IN COURT ON 2008 MURDER CHARGE

A 20-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned yes-
terday on a murder charge dating back to 2008.

The man, whose identity is not being
revealed at present for legal reasons, is charged
with the murder of Kendrick Rolle.

Mr Rolle, 21, was found dead on Hanna
Road, Fox Hill, having suffered gunshot
wounds.

He was the third murder victim for 2008.

The accused, who appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank
Lane, was not required to enter a plea.

It is alleged that between Thursday, January
10, and Friday, January 11, 2008, he inten-
tionally caused Mr Rolle’s death.

Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez told him he
will stand trial before the juvenile panel as
the offence allegedly occurred when he was
still a minor.

The case has been adjourned to February 24
and transferred to Court Two, Victoria Gar-
dens.

The accused was remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison.

MAN ACCUSED
OF SEX WITH
NINE-YEAR-OLD

FREEPORT: A 59-year-
old man appeared in court
yesterday accused of having
sex with a nine-year-old girl.

Albert Whylly was
arraigned in Court One
before Magistrate Debbie
Ferguson, where he was
charged with having sexual
intercourse with a minor.

It is alleged that the inci-
dent took place on Monday,
February 7.

Whylly, who was repre-
sented by Carlson Shurland,
was not required to plead to
the charge.

He was granted $10,000
bail, with surety, and the mat-
ter was adjourned to June 21.

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

PM: Radical change needed.
in justice system procedure



OVER the next two days,
as part of the government’s
continuing effort to overhaul
the judicial system, politi-
cians, prosecutors and law
enforcement officers will try
to view justice through the
eyes of witnesses and victims.

Opening the Witness Care
Conference yesterday, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
said it is “a given” that there
needs to be a radical trans-
formation in the way justice
is administered in the
Bahamas.

He said changes are need-
ed at all levels — law enforce-
ment, legal and judicial.

The prime minister also
noted that crime and the fear
of crime occupy the minds of

ite
TS

sy
Pe a rar YY



the government and the pop-
ulation everyday, and repeat-
ed his commitment to
increase the human and
financial resources dedicat-
ed to this issue.

He listed several mod-
ernising initiatives in the
works, including: improving
the management and admin-
istration of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force,
acquiring new technology for
crime fighting, upgrading the
courts and adding to their
number, launching a contin-
uous programme of law
reform, introducing stenog-
raphers in courts, amending
the penal code and introduc-
ing electronic monitoring of
persons on bail. The two-day
conference, organised by the
Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral and the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, is designed to
address the “gaps” and “inef-
ficiencies” in the criminal jus-
tice system and to bring
together all partners and
affiliated interest groups to
view the system from the per-

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spective of victims and wit-
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The event is being held
from February 10-12 at the
Police Conference Centre.

Among those in atten-
dance were: Attorney Gen-
eral and Minister of Legal
Affairs John Delaney; Tom-
my Turnquest, Minister of
National Security; Loretta
Butler-Turner, Minister of
State for Social Develop-
ment; Archie Nairn, perma-
nent secretary; Police Com-
missioner Ellison
Greenslade; Vinette Gra-
ham-Allen, director of public
prosecutions; and Debra
Fraser, director of legal
affairs.

The Royal Bahamas Police
Force provided entertain-
ment for the event.

Consultant Simon Deacy is
serving as the facilitator for
the conference. He is a retired
chief superintendent of police
in the United Kingdom and
was a “National no witness,
no justice” project manager
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 3



: NDP AND WORKER’S PARTY COALITION STAGE DEMONSTRATION

Island-wide protest over BIC deal

Online readers
respond to BCPOU
President's ‘Small
Egypt’ statement

WHEN The Tribune's
articles were posted online

ers wasted no time in
expressing their outrage
over the article, "We'll turn
country into small Egypt".
In the story, a union
leader vowed that future
protests against the sale of
the BTC would become a
miniature version of the
unrest that is presently con-
vulsing Egyptian society.
Bahamas Communica-
tions and Public Officers
Union President Bernard
Evans said disruptions in
services could be expected
as aresult of the opposition
to the government's sale of a
majority stake in BTC to
Cable and Wireless Commu-
nications (CWC).
Responding to the story
on tribune242.com, Ricardo
W Wright called the Egypt
comment “stupid”, and
joked that Mr Evans on a
camel would be a “scary
sight.”
No No, called on union
leaders to be more responsi-
ble.

Suffering

"We are already suffering
economically in this little
country of ours. Don't mess

us gat by fooling with the
already inconsistent phone
services BTC provides. No
no no. Think about ALL of
us, not just you all,” the
reader said.

Liz asked: "What empiri-
cal evidence do they have
that the majority of the
Bahamian population dis-
agrees with the sale of 51
per cent of BTC? So, at the
end of the Egypt-like riot-
ing, will 51 per cent of BTC
still be sold?”

While the overwhelming
majority of those who com-
mented disagreed with Mr
Evans’ comment, not all felt
this way.

Lol believes the issue is

bigger than the unions. "It is i

a mounting frustration
among Bahamians from
being dismissed by its gov-
ernment and made second
class citizens in their own

country. When the full effect

of the C&W presence in this
country is known and felt, it
is the average Bahamian
who will suffer — as it was in
Cayman, Barbados, Jamaica
and Panama — that is why
they rioted in Panama.”

BEC management team
Calls on union leaders
to discuss concerns

By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter

cnixon@tribunemedia.net

BEC’s executive manage-
ment team is calling on
union leaders to meet with
them and discuss concerns
after yesterday’s industrial
action.

In a press statement
issued yesterday afternoon,
the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation noted that
some of its managerial staff
had “orchestrated and are

engaged in an apparent sick-

out.”

would like to inform its cus-
tomers that measures have
been taken to minimise pos-

sible disruption to electricity

supplies as a result of action
taken by the Bahamas Elec-
trical Utility Managerial
Union (BEUMU).”

BEC’s executive manage-
ment said they are unaware
of any concerns that may
have been discussed at the

union’s meeting on Wednes- ;
day, but reassured the public ;
of the corporation’s commit- }
ment to working closely with ;

the BEUMU in the best
interest of employees and
customers.

“The corporation would
like to encourage the
union’s leadership to make
contact with the executive

management team to discuss }

concerns,” the statement

said.

The statement said: “BEC :

i | By NOELLE NICOLLS
i Tribune Staff Reporter

By LAMECH JOHNSON : nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE third-party coalition

consisting of the National
_ | Democratic Party and the
al 2ptr on Wednesday,tead i Worker’s Party staged an island

i wide protest yesterday.

Party leaders blasted the gov-

i ernment for proceeding with
i plans to sell BTC to Cable and
i Wireless Communications
i (CWC).

A small motorcade of party

i members rode around the city,
i covering Baillou Hill Road,
: Bay Street, Paradise Island,
i Mackey Street, Carmichael
i Road, Coral Harbour and the
? Sir Lynden Pindling Interna-
? tional Airport (LPIA).

The motorcade circled Par-

liament Square and LPIA 10
i times, spreading its message
i using a mobile sound system.

Ethric Bowe, NDP co-ordi-

i? nator for the protest, said: “Our
? message is of ‘Bahamians first’.
? We have no intention of allow-
i ing the sale of BTC to CWC.

FLAG-WAVING: Protesters make their case.

We are resisting it with all of
our might. We feel our govern-
ment has taken a turn towards a
dictatorship. We are acting to
put an end to it. We are tired of
it. The PLP opposition seems
to be colluding with the FNM
to share up the country’s
resources among a few fami-
lies.

“We have a few people get-

ting very rich while the working
class is being left out. We recog-
nise if the working class is
destroyed our society is
destroyed. We are acting to
preserve our Bahamas.”

Mr Bowe said that if the
BTC deal goes through, there is
no point in Bahamians being in
the Bahamas. We need to
shake Bahamians awake

Mitchell backs Christie vow to renegotiate agreement

By NOELLE NICOLLS
i Tribune Staff Reporter
i nnicolls@tribunemdia.net

? Fred Mitchell, opposition member for
? Fox Hill, threw his support behind party i

i leader Perry Christie’s pledge to renego- 5
? tiate any agreement with Cable and Wire-
i less should the Progressive Liberal Party
? form the next government.
i “Let me say that I unequivocally sup-
up what ‘lil business some of ; Port the policy announced by Mr Christie and if
? we get the good fortune to form the next gov-
i ernment I would go further and urge that we do
? in the national interest what the government of
: Belize did, and that is get the controlling interest
i in BTC back again,”
i “Indeed, it appears that so much of what the
? PLP will have to do within the first 100 days of a
? new administration will be to set right the many
? wrongs perpetrated against the Bahamian people
i by this FNM administration,” he said.

i Mr Mitchell accused the government of trying
? to sabotage future attempts of the PLP to revis-
i it its decisions. He referenced the $100 million

said Mr Mitchell.

fixed liability built into the BTC sale agree-
ment should the government choose to
fast-track its liberalisation agenda within
the first year of Cable and Wireless taking

over.

FRED
MITCHELL

he said.

“We all know that this is nonsense and
where there is a will there will be a way.

(Prime Minister Ingraham) wants to

make it impossible for a future PLP
administration to act. He wants to change
things so significantly on the ground that

he will rule from the grave. ‘Ah good sir: dig
one grave, you dig two’,” said Mr Mitchell.

“He is doing it with the national debt as well.
He is maxing out the national credit card so that
when the PLP comes to power, there will be no
money to do anything and he will sit back in his
Abaco rocking chair and say: ‘I told you so’,

dy

Mr Mitchell also reiterated his warning to
investors in the port at Arawak Cay, indicating
that the PLP still intended to “put the port where
it ought to be on the south of New Providence.

“T say to those who are investing in that Port:
Buyer beware!” said Mr Mitchell.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MOTORCADE: Party members rode around the city.

because we have been asleep
too long following this red and
yellow foolishness,” said Mr
Bowe. When the motorcade cir-
cled the airport, Mr Bowe said,
people streamed out to see
what was going on. The circling
10 times, he said, had cultural
significance since the number
10 “has always been a power
number in the Bahamas.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

“We are using our culture to
the max. People in the
Bahamas believe in the power
of prayers.

“We know the government
knows they are doing wrong.
We are invoking our beliefs to
influence him. The government
has no heart, no conscience. We
are determined to get rid of
them,” he said.


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A letter writer’s name 1s finally revealed

THE year was 1962 — October 16.

The Tribune — in those days The Nassau
Daily Tribune — reported that while Tropical
Storm Ella was building and keeping every-
one guessing, a home on Peter Street East
had been stoned for the second night.

Election fever was in the air. In a month’s
time — November 26 — the Bahamas would
exercise universal adult suffrage when voters
would go to the polls. On that day Bahami-
an women would vote for the first time and
all Bahamian men 21 and over would vote
without the property qualification.

The PLP was so confident of victory that
year that on the eve of the election, the par-
ty celebrated on Clifford Park the defeat of
the UBP government. In the days and
months leading up to the election the PLP
tolerated no opposition. That was why Mr
Wellington Ferguson, a Prison Overseer of
Peter Street, believed his house had been
stoned two nights in a row because of his pol-
itics. The second stoning in fact was 3 o’clock
on a Sunday morning when a large rock was
hurled through his front glass door, missing
his wife’s head by inches.

Mr Ferguson was convinced this was the
result of a conversation with Mr Sweeting of
the Bahamas Lumber Company within
earshot of others. In that discussion he open-
ly condemned the “shocking behaviour” of
the PLP.

The death of Paul Bower on January 24
brought back memories of 1962 when the
most interesting news of that October day
was a libel action brought by six PLP bar-
risters against The Nassau Guardian, and
Mr Bower, its editor, for a letter published
by that newspaper. As the action progressed
it was obvious that the litigants were more
interested in outing the author of the letter,
than in the letter itself. However, Mr Bower,
in the tradition of all good journalists refused
to reveal the writer’s identity and was threat-
ened with prison by his good friend, Magis-
trate John Bailey. His refusal put him in
contempt of the court.

We recalled this period, because we sud-
denly realised that with the death of Mr
Bower we were the only person left who
still held the writer’s secret. It was a name
that neither of us dared reveal because of
what the writer would have suffered if it
were discovered that he was a friend of sev-
eral of the litigants, although he had never
joined the PLP. Bert Cambridge was one of

the members of the House of Assembly who
stood by Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1956 when
he moved his anti-discrimination Resolu-
tion. In the election later that year Mr Cam-
bridge was defeated at the polls. In the same
election Sir Lynden Pindling entered the
House for the first time.

We have revealed Mr Cambridge’s name
because he is now beyond being hurt, and
wherever he is we are certain he is having a
good chuckle as he did when alive and his
friends never suspected that he was the
“Western District Voter.” However, his
name is significant for that period because it
shows that although persons like Bert Cam-
bridge, a black man, worked passionately
to elevate his race, he did not approve of
many of the PLP’s methods.

The letter was a comment on the failure of
those responsible to make public what hap-
pened to funds collected for the South
African Relief Fund, which was launched
by the PLP to rival a fund started earlier by
The Tribune. It was the practice of The Tri-
bune to daily publish sums of money donat-
ed to whatever fund it was sponsoring.
“Western District Voter” criticised the PLP
for not adequately informing the public how
their publicly collected funds —£104 15s 2d
— had been dealt with.

The letter in question was an “Open letter
to Mr Paul Adderley”, in which, said Mr
Bower, “no reasonable man would see any-
thing libellous.” He assured the court that
the letter writer was no fiction, but a man Mr
Bower had known for three years and could
not imagine him bearing “any ill will, malice,
or acrimony against Mr Adderley.” Nor pos-
sibly could Mr Adderley, if he had known
the identity of the writer.

One of the difficulties, however, was that
The Tribune had received the same letter,
which its editor heavily edited to make it
legally “safe” before publication. In other
words we deleted what we considered an
innuendo and the names of the six com-
plainants. This led the litigants to believe
that it was either Mr Bower or someone at
The Guardian who had embellished the let-
ter and that the writer was a fiction. Nothing
could have been further from the truth. Both
newspapers received the same letter — in
fact one was a carbon copy. One editor used
her editorial discretion in editing, the other
did not. As a result one was before the
courts, the other was not.

THE TRIBUNE



BIC unions only
seem to be about
their narrow interest

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Generally, I am a strong
supporter of unions, they are
good for a country but there
are times when they are
unreasonable and make
unreasonable demands of
employers.

For instance, I am con-
cerned about demands that
the BTC unions and others
are making regarding the pri-
vatisation of the company by
the government. Based on all
that has been said and in print
on this issue, I am left to con-
clude that the BTC unions
and the ones that support
them are only interested in
themselves and their mem-
bers, but not our nation and
Bahamians.

The BTC unions only seem
to be about their narrow and
singular interest, as opposed
to what they have been saying
— that they are concerned
about Bahamians owning
BTC. What I have heard from
them, is that it is all about
them at a time when things
are tough in this country for a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



lot of people. Their members
have jobs and will have them
for at least three years.

They seem to really be
interested in their jobs and
separation packages.

The unions have stated that
those employees who were
invited to voluntarily separate
and receive packages; should
receive packages more gen-
erous than the government
gave them in 1999. Prime
Minister Ingraham has indi-
cated that the government
cannot afford the 1999 pack-
ages today.

In fact, the Prime Minister
has indicated that the 1999
packages were too generous
in the fIrst instance.

Secondly, they appear to be
interested in one other thing;
getting more than three years
guaranteed employment for
those employees who do not

voluntarily separate. But this
too, Prime Minister Ingraham
has said is just not feasible or
possible.

In fact, Prime Minister
Ingraham has already indi-
cated that Cable & Wireless
sought redundancies to the
tune of 300 employees imme-
diately, so that the company
can have a good chance of
being profitable and compete
with new entries into the mar-
Ket.

Prime Minister Ingraham
also spoke to this issue, indi-
cating that the government
did not intend to give a three
year exclusivity period on cel-
lular, but it ended up doing
so as an offset — ensuring that
no jobs are lost for the same
period.

The BTC unions are about
themselves and no one else.
They are not truly concerned
about you and me, whether
we own BTC or not — it is all
about them.

KIRK DEAN
Nassau,
January 25, 2011.

The Bahamas Humane Society’s
amazing and successful evening

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please once again allow me
some space in your paper.

Saturday night, the Bahamas
Humane Society had the most
amazing and successful evening
at Government House. This
event is now a yearly one and is
held in order to showcase the
B-humane banners that will line
some of the streets of New
Providence this month to pro-
mote awareness and responsi-
ble ownership, as well as, hope-
fully, stamp out animal cruel-
ty.

. Tama great believer of giv-
ing credit where credit is due.
Saturday night was the amazing
success that it was thanks to
many people and groups.

Firstly, the Swiss bank with a
heart of gold, Lombard Odier
Darier Hentschvery kindly, for
the second year running, has
sponsored the Banner cam-
paign for the Bahamas Humane
Society. We are so grateful to
this Swiss institution with a
social conscience. We would
NOT have been able to do it
without their faithful sponsor-
ship.

Secondly the absolutely
amazing photos taken by Patri-
cia Vazquez that grace the ban-
ners are indeed a labour of love
and are beautifully taken. The
BHS is very lucky to have such
a talented photographer so sup-
portive of our efforts.

Thirdly, Government House
and the staff! What an amaz-
ing setting to hold an event. It
was beautiful, the Police band’s
small group played wonderful
music, the young lady who sang
had a terrific voice. The
grounds were lit up magically,
and the actual Government
House staff were so unbeliev-
ably helpful. Chef Jarred pre-
pared the most delicious
food...thank you to them all
from the BHS.

We are very fortunate at the
Bahamas Humane Society to
have such a caring Patron in
His Excellency , our Governor
General, Sir Arthur Foulkes
and Lady Foulkes... Their pres-
ence at our event lent the dig-
nity that the surroundings
deserved..

That evening I announced
that we at the Bahamas
Humane Society intend to
launch a Crusade against Cru-
elty... There are too many
unspeakable acts of cruelty and
neglect going on in our coun-

try...Some are intentional but
many are not. However, igno-
rance cannot always be used as
an excuse... Most people know
the difference between right
from wrong. If you don’t feed
or water an animal...guess what
? IT WILL DIE! I honestly find
it difficult to believe that most
people do not know this.

If you would like to join us
on our Crusade against Cruelty
please contact me at bhs.cru-
sadeagainstcruelty@gmail.com.
We need numbers to spread the
word, please join our cause and
help us.

A huge salute to all the ded-
icated Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety staff who worked so hard
on Saturday night to make the
night so successful, we are
indeed lucky to have you at the
shelter.

KIM ARANHA,
President of the Bahamas
Humane Society,

Nassau,

February 6, 2011.

STH OMTTITAY 3

EDITOR, The Tribune.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLAUDETTE
ROLLE of #19 South Bahamia, Grand Bahama Island,

Bahamas, intend to change my name to CHARMAINE
CLAUDETTE ROLLE. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Deputy Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
F-43536, Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.



In Loving Memory



~

Harold Gardener ~+*

Sadly missed by mother
Louella Prescod, siblings,
children and grandchildren.
We love you wuper dad.





Share your news

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If so, call us on 322-1986
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Please take your completed
applications to our head office.

It is normal to expect that the Free National Movement will
be challenged by whatever political parties are in existence
next year, but the basis of that challenge will not hinge on
whether the current Prime Minister is compassionate or not; it
may be a factor but it will not be “the factor.” Party members
from all sides are looking for excuses to get at each other, and
they will take whatever they can find, and that is everyday
politics.

The present “compassion issue” is one, that began when
The Nassau Guardian took a statement made by Mr McCartney
out of context. There was a compounding of the problem this
morning as an out of context statement takes on a life of its own
when we read on the front page, ”At the time McCartney pre-
dicted that the FNM would be challenged, in part because of
Ingraham’s lack of compassion toward the Bahamian people.”
Did the reporter listen to the interview? Or anyone else taking
up space on the front page?

Mr Bethel and Mr Roberts, both men of substantial political
currency, have used this opportunity to put forth their party’s
agenda, or the agenda of those within the parties who need
something to throw, at the expense of misinforming the public’s
perception of a particular person and they seem to be doing it
together.

At least, Mr McCartney is fitting the leadership profile,
where everybody is trying to get a piece of you.

On the face of it, is it wise to assume that the misuse of con-
textual references is going to be the norm as we go into 2012?
With the chairmen of both parties getting into the fray as they
usually do at a very caustic level, can the Bahamian public
stand all of this “smoke”? Or are we going to have to check
overall contexts when anything is said about a prospective can-
didate.

Historically, misrepresenting the facts is something that
politicians do without blinking, looking you straight in the face.
If we remember the contextual misrepresentations that the
late Cecil Wallace Whitfield had to contend with, we should also
remember that these misrepresentations were perpetuated by
persons who were his very close friends.

At the end of it, perspective will be everything, and any par-
ticular view that we come up with will depend on how informed
we are on what is going on with, what is needed from, and
what we are expecting from those who presume to lead. And,
ultimately or hopefully we will extend these demands to any and
all who see themselves as participants in the warp and woof of
leadership..

We should all be of the opinion that the leaders we choose
will be those who get the job done, regardless of the misrepre-
sentations they have to endure, and this is not supposed to be
a nice exercise.

If we can remember what goes on a couple of months before
any election in any part of the world, we will endeavour to do
our homework. My only demand is that the institutions charged
with keeping us informed, reject the mischievous impulses that
writers like myself have to contend with daily.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 3, 2011.


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A letter writer’s name 1s finally revealed

THE year was 1962 — October 16.

The Tribune — in those days The Nassau
Daily Tribune — reported that while Tropical
Storm Ella was building and keeping every-
one guessing, a home on Peter Street East
had been stoned for the second night.

Election fever was in the air. In a month’s
time — November 26 — the Bahamas would
exercise universal adult suffrage when voters
would go to the polls. On that day Bahami-
an women would vote for the first time and
all Bahamian men 21 and over would vote
without the property qualification.

The PLP was so confident of victory that
year that on the eve of the election, the par-
ty celebrated on Clifford Park the defeat of
the UBP government. In the days and
months leading up to the election the PLP
tolerated no opposition. That was why Mr
Wellington Ferguson, a Prison Overseer of
Peter Street, believed his house had been
stoned two nights in a row because of his pol-
itics. The second stoning in fact was 3 o’clock
on a Sunday morning when a large rock was
hurled through his front glass door, missing
his wife’s head by inches.

Mr Ferguson was convinced this was the
result of a conversation with Mr Sweeting of
the Bahamas Lumber Company within
earshot of others. In that discussion he open-
ly condemned the “shocking behaviour” of
the PLP.

The death of Paul Bower on January 24
brought back memories of 1962 when the
most interesting news of that October day
was a libel action brought by six PLP bar-
risters against The Nassau Guardian, and
Mr Bower, its editor, for a letter published
by that newspaper. As the action progressed
it was obvious that the litigants were more
interested in outing the author of the letter,
than in the letter itself. However, Mr Bower,
in the tradition of all good journalists refused
to reveal the writer’s identity and was threat-
ened with prison by his good friend, Magis-
trate John Bailey. His refusal put him in
contempt of the court.

We recalled this period, because we sud-
denly realised that with the death of Mr
Bower we were the only person left who
still held the writer’s secret. It was a name
that neither of us dared reveal because of
what the writer would have suffered if it
were discovered that he was a friend of sev-
eral of the litigants, although he had never
joined the PLP. Bert Cambridge was one of

the members of the House of Assembly who
stood by Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1956 when
he moved his anti-discrimination Resolu-
tion. In the election later that year Mr Cam-
bridge was defeated at the polls. In the same
election Sir Lynden Pindling entered the
House for the first time.

We have revealed Mr Cambridge’s name
because he is now beyond being hurt, and
wherever he is we are certain he is having a
good chuckle as he did when alive and his
friends never suspected that he was the
“Western District Voter.” However, his
name is significant for that period because it
shows that although persons like Bert Cam-
bridge, a black man, worked passionately
to elevate his race, he did not approve of
many of the PLP’s methods.

The letter was a comment on the failure of
those responsible to make public what hap-
pened to funds collected for the South
African Relief Fund, which was launched
by the PLP to rival a fund started earlier by
The Tribune. It was the practice of The Tri-
bune to daily publish sums of money donat-
ed to whatever fund it was sponsoring.
“Western District Voter” criticised the PLP
for not adequately informing the public how
their publicly collected funds —£104 15s 2d
— had been dealt with.

The letter in question was an “Open letter
to Mr Paul Adderley”, in which, said Mr
Bower, “no reasonable man would see any-
thing libellous.” He assured the court that
the letter writer was no fiction, but a man Mr
Bower had known for three years and could
not imagine him bearing “any ill will, malice,
or acrimony against Mr Adderley.” Nor pos-
sibly could Mr Adderley, if he had known
the identity of the writer.

One of the difficulties, however, was that
The Tribune had received the same letter,
which its editor heavily edited to make it
legally “safe” before publication. In other
words we deleted what we considered an
innuendo and the names of the six com-
plainants. This led the litigants to believe
that it was either Mr Bower or someone at
The Guardian who had embellished the let-
ter and that the writer was a fiction. Nothing
could have been further from the truth. Both
newspapers received the same letter — in
fact one was a carbon copy. One editor used
her editorial discretion in editing, the other
did not. As a result one was before the
courts, the other was not.

THE TRIBUNE



BIC unions only
seem to be about
their narrow interest

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Generally, I am a strong
supporter of unions, they are
good for a country but there
are times when they are
unreasonable and make
unreasonable demands of
employers.

For instance, I am con-
cerned about demands that
the BTC unions and others
are making regarding the pri-
vatisation of the company by
the government. Based on all
that has been said and in print
on this issue, I am left to con-
clude that the BTC unions
and the ones that support
them are only interested in
themselves and their mem-
bers, but not our nation and
Bahamians.

The BTC unions only seem
to be about their narrow and
singular interest, as opposed
to what they have been saying
— that they are concerned
about Bahamians owning
BTC. What I have heard from
them, is that it is all about
them at a time when things
are tough in this country for a

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



lot of people. Their members
have jobs and will have them
for at least three years.

They seem to really be
interested in their jobs and
separation packages.

The unions have stated that
those employees who were
invited to voluntarily separate
and receive packages; should
receive packages more gen-
erous than the government
gave them in 1999. Prime
Minister Ingraham has indi-
cated that the government
cannot afford the 1999 pack-
ages today.

In fact, the Prime Minister
has indicated that the 1999
packages were too generous
in the fIrst instance.

Secondly, they appear to be
interested in one other thing;
getting more than three years
guaranteed employment for
those employees who do not

voluntarily separate. But this
too, Prime Minister Ingraham
has said is just not feasible or
possible.

In fact, Prime Minister
Ingraham has already indi-
cated that Cable & Wireless
sought redundancies to the
tune of 300 employees imme-
diately, so that the company
can have a good chance of
being profitable and compete
with new entries into the mar-
Ket.

Prime Minister Ingraham
also spoke to this issue, indi-
cating that the government
did not intend to give a three
year exclusivity period on cel-
lular, but it ended up doing
so as an offset — ensuring that
no jobs are lost for the same
period.

The BTC unions are about
themselves and no one else.
They are not truly concerned
about you and me, whether
we own BTC or not — it is all
about them.

KIRK DEAN
Nassau,
January 25, 2011.

The Bahamas Humane Society’s
amazing and successful evening

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please once again allow me
some space in your paper.

Saturday night, the Bahamas
Humane Society had the most
amazing and successful evening
at Government House. This
event is now a yearly one and is
held in order to showcase the
B-humane banners that will line
some of the streets of New
Providence this month to pro-
mote awareness and responsi-
ble ownership, as well as, hope-
fully, stamp out animal cruel-
ty.

. Tama great believer of giv-
ing credit where credit is due.
Saturday night was the amazing
success that it was thanks to
many people and groups.

Firstly, the Swiss bank with a
heart of gold, Lombard Odier
Darier Hentschvery kindly, for
the second year running, has
sponsored the Banner cam-
paign for the Bahamas Humane
Society. We are so grateful to
this Swiss institution with a
social conscience. We would
NOT have been able to do it
without their faithful sponsor-
ship.

Secondly the absolutely
amazing photos taken by Patri-
cia Vazquez that grace the ban-
ners are indeed a labour of love
and are beautifully taken. The
BHS is very lucky to have such
a talented photographer so sup-
portive of our efforts.

Thirdly, Government House
and the staff! What an amaz-
ing setting to hold an event. It
was beautiful, the Police band’s
small group played wonderful
music, the young lady who sang
had a terrific voice. The
grounds were lit up magically,
and the actual Government
House staff were so unbeliev-
ably helpful. Chef Jarred pre-
pared the most delicious
food...thank you to them all
from the BHS.

We are very fortunate at the
Bahamas Humane Society to
have such a caring Patron in
His Excellency , our Governor
General, Sir Arthur Foulkes
and Lady Foulkes... Their pres-
ence at our event lent the dig-
nity that the surroundings
deserved..

That evening I announced
that we at the Bahamas
Humane Society intend to
launch a Crusade against Cru-
elty... There are too many
unspeakable acts of cruelty and
neglect going on in our coun-

try...Some are intentional but
many are not. However, igno-
rance cannot always be used as
an excuse... Most people know
the difference between right
from wrong. If you don’t feed
or water an animal...guess what
? IT WILL DIE! I honestly find
it difficult to believe that most
people do not know this.

If you would like to join us
on our Crusade against Cruelty
please contact me at bhs.cru-
sadeagainstcruelty@gmail.com.
We need numbers to spread the
word, please join our cause and
help us.

A huge salute to all the ded-
icated Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety staff who worked so hard
on Saturday night to make the
night so successful, we are
indeed lucky to have you at the
shelter.

KIM ARANHA,
President of the Bahamas
Humane Society,

Nassau,

February 6, 2011.

STH OMTTITAY 3

EDITOR, The Tribune.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLAUDETTE
ROLLE of #19 South Bahamia, Grand Bahama Island,

Bahamas, intend to change my name to CHARMAINE
CLAUDETTE ROLLE. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Deputy Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
F-43536, Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.



In Loving Memory



~

Harold Gardener ~+*

Sadly missed by mother
Louella Prescod, siblings,
children and grandchildren.
We love you wuper dad.





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

T The Shoe Village

Assistant Manager

Needed

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¢ Minimum 5 years experience in the retail industry
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« Good motivator for achieving goals
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ALL APPLICATIONS RECEIVED WILL BE IN CONFIDENCE

No faned or emailed resumes will be considered,

Please take your completed
applications to our head office.

It is normal to expect that the Free National Movement will
be challenged by whatever political parties are in existence
next year, but the basis of that challenge will not hinge on
whether the current Prime Minister is compassionate or not; it
may be a factor but it will not be “the factor.” Party members
from all sides are looking for excuses to get at each other, and
they will take whatever they can find, and that is everyday
politics.

The present “compassion issue” is one, that began when
The Nassau Guardian took a statement made by Mr McCartney
out of context. There was a compounding of the problem this
morning as an out of context statement takes on a life of its own
when we read on the front page, ”At the time McCartney pre-
dicted that the FNM would be challenged, in part because of
Ingraham’s lack of compassion toward the Bahamian people.”
Did the reporter listen to the interview? Or anyone else taking
up space on the front page?

Mr Bethel and Mr Roberts, both men of substantial political
currency, have used this opportunity to put forth their party’s
agenda, or the agenda of those within the parties who need
something to throw, at the expense of misinforming the public’s
perception of a particular person and they seem to be doing it
together.

At least, Mr McCartney is fitting the leadership profile,
where everybody is trying to get a piece of you.

On the face of it, is it wise to assume that the misuse of con-
textual references is going to be the norm as we go into 2012?
With the chairmen of both parties getting into the fray as they
usually do at a very caustic level, can the Bahamian public
stand all of this “smoke”? Or are we going to have to check
overall contexts when anything is said about a prospective can-
didate.

Historically, misrepresenting the facts is something that
politicians do without blinking, looking you straight in the face.
If we remember the contextual misrepresentations that the
late Cecil Wallace Whitfield had to contend with, we should also
remember that these misrepresentations were perpetuated by
persons who were his very close friends.

At the end of it, perspective will be everything, and any par-
ticular view that we come up with will depend on how informed
we are on what is going on with, what is needed from, and
what we are expecting from those who presume to lead. And,
ultimately or hopefully we will extend these demands to any and
all who see themselves as participants in the warp and woof of
leadership..

We should all be of the opinion that the leaders we choose
will be those who get the job done, regardless of the misrepre-
sentations they have to endure, and this is not supposed to be
a nice exercise.

If we can remember what goes on a couple of months before
any election in any part of the world, we will endeavour to do
our homework. My only demand is that the institutions charged
with keeping us informed, reject the mischievous impulses that
writers like myself have to contend with daily.

EDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau,
February 3, 2011.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Union leaders say ZNS |
contract less favourable

By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter
cnixon@tribunemedia.net

UNION leaders say the
poor economic climate and a
decrease in government fund-
ing to ZNS has resulted in a
less favorable industrial agree-
ment for employees.

After almost four years of
negotiations, union leaders
and ZNS management met
yesterday morning to sign the
new contract between the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas (BCB) and the
Bahamas Communications
and Public Managers Unions
(BCPMU).

Tension between the union
and the corporation began in
2008 when staff members
walked off in protest of whey
they described as unbearable
working conditions.

Possible restructuring and
reorganising of the Broad-
casting Corporation was
announced by Minister of

National Security Tommy
Turnquest in May 2009, cul-
minating in budget cuts and
mass lay-offs by the corpora-
tion last year when 71

employees were let go as a
result of overstaffing and
“bloated wages”.

William Carroll, president
of the BCPMU, said the eco-



WILLIAM CARROLL, President of the BCPMU, Michael Moss, Chairman of the BCB, and general manager
Edwin Lightbourn sign the agreement yesterday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Hand-drawn
—~ Portraits from your
favorite photos!

* 454.1979 or 677-9698
eerie Fate



nomic climate has forced the
union to make various con-
cessions to get the agreement
signed.

He said: “This has been a
long process and some of the
what the staff signed off on is
hard to swallow.

“We did not get everything
we wanted but we did the best
we could in these times and
will come back to the table in
2012 so employees are better
off in the next contract.”

According to Mr Carroll,
the union represents 34 of the
70-plus ZNS employees.

Darren Meadows, lead
negotiator for the union,
agreed that the workers did
not receive everything they
wanted but said the union had
to take the economic climate
into consideration and hope
that when the contract is rene-

AGREEMENT: William Carroll,
President of the BCPMU, along
with Michael Moss, Chairman
of the BCB, and general manag-
er Edwin Lightbourn.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

gotiated, employees will get
a better deal.

He said: “In the midst of a
financial recession, we had to
understand the position of the
corporation.”

He added that the Broad-
casting Corporation “has
assured us that employees will
see the fruits of their labour in
the next one”.

Chairman of the BCB
Michael Moss said the process
has been a difficult one and
acknowledged union did have
to make concessions on ben-
efits and salary increases.

According to Mr Moss, the
five year contract which
expires in 2013 will not pro-
vide for any annual increas-
es. Rather, employees will
receive percentage increases
over three years which will
not be attached to any sort of
evaluations.

Incentive payments have
also been taken out of the
agreement while articles with
respect discipline have
remained consistent with pri-
or contracts.

General manager Edwin
Lightbourn said the road has
been a long but fruitful one
and has proven that the two
sides can work together in dif-
ficult circumstances.

“T am happy to put it
behind us, we are ready to
move forward,” said Mr
Lightbourn.

MAN GETS 18 MONTH
SENTENCE IN
CONNECTION WITH
DRUG SEIZURE

A 30-YEAR-OLD
man has been convict-
ed and sentenced to 18
months in prison in
connection with a
major drug seizure in
2006.

Following a trial in
the Magistrates Court,
Deputy Chief Magis-
trate Carolita Bethell
sentenced Androsian
Derick Dion White to
18 months imprison-
ment on Wednesday
on the charge of pos-
session of marijuana
with the intent to sup-
ply.

According to the
prosecution, police
arrested White and
two other men in the
Marshall Road area
on Friday March 24,
2006.

The men were ina
Chevy Astro van
which attempted to
flee the area of a boat
ramp.

Inside the van,
police discovered 20
white crocus bags con-
taining 921 pounds of
marijuana.

His co-accused Ian
Porter was sentenced
to 42 months impris-
onment and fined
$50,000 in January
2009.

A third defendant
was acquitted of the
drug charges.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



TA Thompson Junior High student wins Northwestern District Spelling Bee

Samantha Marc defeats
41 other competitors

TOP SPELLER Saman-
tha Marc of TA Thompson
Junior High School emerged
as the winner of the North-
western District’s Spelling
Bee Competition after
defeating 31 other con-
tenders.

Following close behind
were TG Glover Primary
School students Julian Desir
and third place winner Ari-
annah Bain.

The participants in the

various public primary and
junior high schools, includ-
ing: Albury Sayle, Gambier,
Naomi Blatch, Oakes Field,
TG Glover, Woodcock Pri-
mary, HO Nash and TA
Thompson.

A highlight of the compe-

tition was the speech given
by the outgoing champion
for 2010, Randeika Foulkes,
a ninth grade student of HO
Nash.

Randeika told her fellow
students that they are all
destined to succeed if they

was Howard Newbold,
Superintendent for the
North Western District, who
expressed his pride in the
efforts of all of the partici-
pants.

He said Samantha would
go on to compete against

winners from the other dis-
tricts, in the Bahamas
National Spelling Bee Com-
petition.

One winner will emerge
from this competition, who
will travel to Washington
DC to participate in the

Scripps Howard National
Spelling Bee competition.
Mr Newbold gave his best
wishes to all of contestants,
and assured them that they
are all winners, having met
the requirements to repre-
sent their various schools.

US AILS esi DEFENCE FORCE BASE

Spelling Bee hailed from
are willing to work hard.

She explained that her
journey to winning the dis-
trict spelling competition
began when she was a stu-
dent at Oakes Field Primary
School, but victory did not
come until the eighth grade,
when she was at HO Nash
Junior High School.

Randeika encouraged her
peers to continue to com-
pete and to be proud of their
achievements.

Also bringing remarks

Public invited to annual
Law Enforcement Service

THE public is invited to the annual Law Enforcement Ser-
vice to be held at the Grants Town Seventh-Day Adventist
Church on Wellington Street off Market Street on Saturday,
February 12.

Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes, Director of Immi-
gration Jack Thompson, Customs Comptroller Glenn
Gomez and Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade will
attend.





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ADMIRAL JAMES A WINNEFELD JR and officials from the US Northern Command and the United
States Embassy are taken on a tour of HMBS Coral Harbour by Captain Tellis Bethel and his officers.

ADMIRAL James A Winnefeld Jr, Com-
mander of the North American Aerospace
Defence Command (NORAD) and Unit-
ed States Northern Command, (NORTH-
COM) paid a courtesy call on the Deputy
Commander Defence Force, Captain Tellis
Bethel, at the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force’s Coral Harbour Base on Wednes-
day afternoon.

Admiral Winnefeld was accompanied by
US Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Ziga-Brown
along with other officials from the US
Northern Command and the United States
Embassy. During his visit, the Admiral met
with the Deputy Commander, and was intro-

RBDF photos/Petty Officer Jonathan Rolle

duced to the members of the Defence
Force’s Executive Leadership Team.

Admiral Winnefeld was later taken on a
tour of HMBS Coral Harbour before pro-
ceeding on a short sea trip aboard a Defence
Force patrol craft, which was one of six such
vessels donated to The Bahamas govern-
ment under the US Enduring Friendship
programme.

The Admiral assumed responsibility as
Commander NORTHCOM from General
Victor Renuart in May 2010. He is current-
ly on an official tour of nations within
NORTHCOM’s area of responsibility,
which includes The Bahamas.



ADMIRAL JAMES A WINNEFELD JR being given a short sea trip aboard a Defence Force Patrol craft.
The Admiral and Petty Officer Jonathan Evans are engaged in a brief conversation.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Two men arraigned
on drugs and
firearm charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Man shot in leg after allegedly

sentence charging at police with knife

TWO men were arraigned
on drugs and firearm posses-
sion charges in the Freeport
Magistrates Court.

Neville Cunningham, 32, and
Elsworth Hendfield, 32, of Bass
Lane appeared before Magis-
trate Andrew Forbes in Court
Two.

It is alleged that on Febru-
ary 7, while at Freeport, Grand
Bahama, the accused men were
found in possession of illegal
drugs and a firearm with live
rounds of ammunition.

The men were represented
by Simeon Brown. They plead-
ed not guilty to the charges and
were each granted $7,500 bail.

The matter was adjourned to
August 9 for trial.
eeeeeeeeeeeeoen

Student hospitalised
after being struck in
the head with rock

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

armed with an eight-inch knife had entered the store.

FREEPORT - A 15-year-old
male student at a government
high school was taken to hospi-
tal after being struck in the
head with a rock by another
student on Thursday morning.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
reported that police were sum-
moned to the school at around
8.30am after several students
were seen engaged in an argu-
ment. Ms Mackey said another
male student hit the 11th grad-
er with a stone, causing injury
to the back of his head near his
neck. The student was trans-
ported to the Accident and
Emergency Section of the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
is currently listed in stable con-
dition.

Police are investigating the
matter.

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POLICE SHOOTING: Outside the scene of the robbery and shooting at Job Incorporated on Sapodilla Road, By DENISE MAYCOCK
Eight Mile Rock. Officers responded after a female store owner called police and reported thata man Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man was
shot in the leg by police offi-
cers investigating a robbery in
Eight Mile Rock after he
allegedly charged the officers
while brandishing a knife.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said the 34-year-old Hanna Hill
man was then taken into cus-
tody and transported to hospital
for treatment.

She said the incident unfold-
ed after the officers responded
to a report of a disturbance and
armed robbery at Job Incorpo-
rated on Sapodilla Road in
Hanna Hill.

According to reports, a
female store owner called
police around 8.30am and
reported that a man armed with
an eight-inch knife had entered
the store.

After robbing the owner of
cash, the man reportedly start-

Vandyke Hepburn/Photo

ed acting in a erratic manner,
repeatedly entering and exiting
the store.

Several customers and the
owner ran out, locking the sus-
pect inside the store until the
officers arrived.

When they confronted the
suspect inside the store, Ms
Mackey said, the man refused
to put down knife, then sud-
denly ran toward the officers.

One of the officers cautioned
the man again, but the suspect
continued moving towards the
officer with the knife, Ms Mack-
ey said.

“The officer drew his service
weapon and discharged it, hit-
ting the man in the upper left
thigh. “After being hit, the man
continued to charge the offi-
cers with the knife but was sub-
sequently subdued and arrested
by the officers,” she said.

The man was transported by
ambulance to the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital, where he was
treated by doctors for his injury.





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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PLP ‘malicious lie’ condemned

cafe News

Moroccan Infusion

Follow us on

FROM page one

hard, however, to ensure that
no civil servants are let go in
the face of fiscal cutbacks.

"The government has
worked tirelessly to ensure
that no public officers were
made redundant and that no
salaries were cut even though
increments cannot be paid and
allowances have been reduced
during the economic crisis,"
said the statement.

"We note the number of
countries in the region and
around the world that have
had to reduce public sector
employment and salaries.

"We condemn the Opposi-
tion for conjuring up this mali-
cious lie. We confirm that the
Government of the Bahamas
does not have the financial
ability to make payments to
public officers as suggested by
the Opposition in what can
best be described as a figment
of their fertile imagination."

The statement also thanked
public servants for their
"restraint" during the worst
economic crisis in the last 60
years.

Meantime, President of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union John Pinder said he
wished the reports were true
adding that an increment pay-
out would ease the financial
burden of those in the civil
service.

Mr Pinder hopes to begin
negotiations on a new indus-
trial agreement for the public
service on February 24 when
he will lobby for more benefits
and raises.

"It would be really nice if
Government could make
good on retroactive payments
to our members and some
other outstanding financial
matters.

"I know that some persons
that were at the maximum of
their salary scales are entitled
to their increments in the form
of a lump sum, there are per-
sons owed tuition reimburse-

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ments and persons who have
had promotions withheld.

"Our (proposed) industrial
agreement speaks to them
Opening up salaries scales and
making good, asking for a
general pay increase and for
health insurance," said the
union leader.

In a statement issued this
week, the PLP said claimed
payments were on the hori-
zon for government workers
and questioned if this was a
ploy to gain voter confi-
dence.

"While we support all legit-
imate payment increases to
public servants, we have to

point out to them the cynical
nature of what is proposed,”
said the statement.

The party said the situation
harks back to 1997, when on
the night before the police
force voted, they were
"reminded" of a $1,500 lump
sum payment due to them the
following morning.

Fortunately, the PLP said,
times have changed and
Bahamians will no longer be
fooled by such tactics — which
they said amount to "seeking
to bribe voters."

The statement said: "The
PLP says take the money but
remember that it was (Prime

Minister) Ingraham's admin-
istration that mistreated pub-
lic servants during this term.
You should reward Mr Ingra-
ham and his FNM colleagues
by voting PLP in the next gen-
eral election."

The party said if reports of
the payments are true, it sug-
gests the existence of a "sinis-
ter plot" in which the govern-
ment failed to honour certain
financial terms of its industri-
al agreement with the Public
Service Union, in addition to
withholding salary increments
and promotions "until it
becomes politically convenient
to do so."

eee eRe IU SS



BCPOU LEADER Bernard Evans with William Carrol of the BCPOU in the House of Assembly this week.

FROM page one

gonna get it,”

said Mr Evans.

His comments brought condemnation from
Dion Foulkes, Minister of Labour, who

“what our plans are going forward.”

Earlier this week, Mr Evans suggested
unionists would take to the streets in a similar
fashion to the ongoing protests in Egypt. His
comments came after the government signed
BTC sale documents with the regional tele-
coms provider Cable and Wireless and laid
documents in the House of Assemble regard-
ing the sale.

“We will continue our stance. The will of
the people is the strength of the people, and I
guess if the Bahamas is ready and the govern-
ment is ready to see a small Egypt then they

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demanded an apology from Mr Evans.

Mr Foulkes said the comments were intend-
ed to “instigate social unrest and to destabilise
the Free National Movement and the Bahami-
an economy.”

“Bernard Evans should apologise to the
members of the BCPOU and to the Bahamian
people for his irresponsible and reckless “small
Egypt’ statement,” said Mr Foulkes.

Earlier this week, union leaders forecast
an interruption of services to the public. It is
unclear when this will take effect, and in what
form.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 9



Popular fundraiser to |

showcase larger array

of chefs and restaurants

NPCC and Tommy Hilfiger
names as co-sponsors of
third annual Paradise Plates

HANDS For Hunger has
named the New Providence
Development Company
and Tommy Hilfiger as co-
presenting sponsors for
their third annual Paradise
Plates fundraiser.

Both companies have
continued their sponsor-
ships, having donated
$10,000 each for the unique
event, which will feature an
even larger array of
gourmet food this year from
celebrated chefs and restau-
rants in the Bahamas.

Held on Saturday, May
21 from 7pm — 11pm at the
Atlantis Crown Ballroom,
Paradise Plates will feature
an exquisite ensemble of
fine food and drinks, live
entertainment as well as a
raffle and silent auction.

Chefs will gather from
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their signature dishes, com-
plemented by drink pur-
veyors serving samples of
wine, local beer and spirits.

All proceeds will benefit
Hands For Hunger, the
non-profit food-rescue pro-
gramme committed to the
elimination of hunger and
the reduction of food waste
in the Bahamas.

“The New Providence
Development Company is
pleased to continue our
sponsorship of Paradise
Plates,” said Rhys Duggan,
president and CEO of New
Providence Development
Company Limited. “Hands
For Hunger fulfills a real
need on the island by pro-
viding food to those who
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we have seen the tremen-
dous impact that Hands For
Hunger has had in such a
short period of time, and
we continue to. be
impressed with their suc-
cessful approach, opera-
tions and their extensive
reach into the community.
New Providence Develop-
ment Company is proud to
support their efforts as they
expand to make an even
larger positive impact on
our community.”

“Tommy Hilfiger is very
proud to be a co-present-
ing sponsor for Hands For
Hunger's Paradise Plates
for a second consecutive
year,” said Elizabeth Cov-
ington, owner of Tommy
Hilfiger (Bahamas).

“Tommy Hilfiger believes
in taking a proactive stance
and giving back to the com-
munity by working with and
empowering young people
who are trying to make a
difference.

“Supporting these pas-
sionate young Bahamians
who endeavour to address
the problem of hunger in
this country is inspiring and
should remind all of us that
our problems are not insur-
mountable. Hunger can be
alleviated and Hands For
Hunger is doing a fantastic

job. The Bahamas is a
wealthy nation; people
should not go hungry. Tom-
my Hilfiger is proud to con-
tinue to support Hands For
Hunger. We hope more
Bahamians will support this
great and urgent
cause.”

Rosamund Roberts,
director of fundraising for
Hands For Hunger, said:
“The very generous dona-
tions from New Providence
Development Company
and Tommy Hilfiger
(Bahamas) will help to off-
set the costs of Paradise
Plates. We are very grateful
to them and our other spon-
sors for their kind support.
We are so pleased that Par-
adise Plates continues to
receive tremendous
response from the public.

“This year promises to be
even more memorable as
new chefs, restaurants and
venues have joined us to
create an evening unlike
any other.”

Chefs from many of Nas-
sau’s finest restaurants are
returning this year to show-
case their extraordinary
food including: Mesa Grill;
Nobu; Dune; British Colo-
nial Hilton; Old Fort Bay
Club; and Lucianos to name
a few.

Other sponsors include:




From
$149

Mhude with Ltt Cb i fot GCM.

Seacret Designs
Elizabeth on Bay

Bay St. and Elizabeth Ave.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



7T:328 2218



PICTURED (L-R) ARE: posing Roberts, Hands for Hunger (HH) director of fundraising; Andrea
Strommer, co-chair of Paradise Plates 2010: Alanna Rodgers, HH founder and programme co-ordina-
tor; Ashley Lepine, HH executive director; Elizabeth Covington, owner of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas);
Etienne Christen of Tommy Hilfiger (Bahamas) and Rhys Duggan, President and CEO of New Provi-
dence Development Company at last year’s Paradise Plates.

Atlantis, Mendoza Wine
Imports and Creative Rela-
tions.

All proceeds from Par-
adise Plates will go to
Hands For Hunger and its
food rescue programmes.
Each day, Hands For
Hunger picks-up fresh, high
quality food that would oth-
erwise go to waste and
delivers it to community
centres, shelters, churches
and soup kitchens through-
out New Providence.

“Hunger is a solvable
problem. It is a fact that
there is more than enough
food on this island to amply
feed every single woman,
man and child. Hands For
Hunger functions to con-
nect this excess supply with
the unmet, ever growing
need through the more
equitable and efficient dis-
tribution of resources, ”said
Alanna Rodgers, founder
and programme co-ordina-
tor of Hands For Hunger.
“The proceeds raised from
Paradise Plates will go
directly to addressing a

most basic human need in
our community.”

The array of food and
drink will complemented by
a Silent auction, raffle, live
entertainment and beauti-
ful décor.

For ticket information
call, 327-1660 ext 241 or
email info@hands-
forhunger.org.

Hands For Hunger was

started by a group of
Bahamian student leaders
in early 2008, who were and
still are, committed to mak-
ing a difference in the
world.

The organisation is a reg-
istered, not-for-profit char-
ity that relies on donations
from community groups,
foundations, corporations
and the general public.

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Third man charged with
murder of prison officer

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FROM page one

Carmichael Road on Friday,
July 9.

The victim was taken to
hospital by ambulance where
he later died of his injuries.

Travis Davis, 39, of Bell-
dock Avenue, and Gregory
Armbrister, 34, of Hopkins
Drive, have already been
charged with the murder of
Sergeant Strachan.

Humes, who was not rep-
resented by an attorney, was
not required to enter a plea to
the charge during his arraign-
ment before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane.

Standing in the prisoner’s
dock, Humes told the magis-
trate: “I am in fear for my life
from prison officers. I
received some threats. They
said they would kill me.”

Chief Magistrate Gomez
said the prison authorities
would be notified of his con-
cern.

Sergeant Claudette
McKenzie, the prosecutor,
asked that the matter be
transferred to Court 6, Par-
liament Street.

She informed the court that
on March 14, a Voluntary Bill
of Indictment is expected to
be presented in the case.

Humes was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison and is
expected back in court on
Wednesday, February 16, for
a fixture hearing.



CHARGED: Presley Humes is shown going into court yesterday.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MP ‘unconcerned’

with reports that

constituency may
be cut into two

FROM page one

next general election, vow-
ing that wherever he decides
to run he will soundly defeat
any opponent the FNM
decides to send.

Open
Saturdays

10,00am-
2.00pm



Having represented the
MICAL constituency which
consists of Mayaguana,
Inagua, Crooked Island,
Acklins and Long Cay since
2002, Mr Gray said he has
heard of reports of a possi-
ble split in his constituency
before.

However, the often ram-
bunctious MP said he was
personally assured by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
that his seat would not be
affected by any boundary
changes ahead of the 2012
general election.

Not taking these assur-
ances at face value, Mr Gray
said he is going to “err on
the side of caution” and
watch to see what the Prime
Minister does instead.

At this point, Mr Gray
said he has heard reports
that his constituency may be
split into two - one joining
Inagua and Mayaguana, and

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



the other consisting of Ack-
lins, Long Cay, and Crooked
Island.

If such a split were to
occur, Mr Gray said he
would have to choose which
area to represent.

“If he (Prime Minister)
splits it, I believe I would
have to decide which area I
want to run in, and that is
an easy decision for me
because wherever Acklins is
T will run, and whoever runs
against me will get beat.

“IT can’t control the
Bahamas, but I can defi-
nitely say that in my con-
stituency even Hubert Ingra-
ham can’t beat me,” Mr
Gray laughed.

As proof of his growing
support in the constituency,
Mr Gray said he now has a
former FNM general in the
area campaigning for him.
He wished however not to
reveal the person’s identity,
stating he would prefer to
have that bit of information
to “lick the FNM over the
head with” at the next sit-
ting of the House of Assem-
bly.

“T wait with great antici-
pation for what the final
determination will be. The
earlier I know, the better for
me so I can concentrate on
which area I will be running
in.

“In the meantime I am
concentrating on the whole
area because like the
Prime Minister told me he
can not justify cutting the
seat because the popula-
tion is smaller than it was
in 2007.

“But I know he is looking
for areas to run his men in,
but no matter how he cuts it
he cannot beat me. It’s like
the young people say, I ain’t
on his run. I feel very
secure.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

DU



ines:

FRIDAY,



=

FEBRUARY 11,



Minister meets
Sector on plane
lax Concerns

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net_

Domestic airline opera-
tors and Odyssey Aviation
expressed concerns about
the Department of Customs’
plans to collect allegedly

stamp tax from those who
have brought planes into the
Bahamas in a meeting with
the Minister of Tourism and
Aviation.

According to sources
close to some of the aircraft
operators who attended the
February 3 meeting, which
included representatives
from Golden Wings char-
ters, Sky Bahamas, Take
Flight Charters, Safari Sea-
planes, Odyssey Aviation
and more, the sector was
told they may benefit from
“staying out of the newspa-
per” when it came to the tax
dispute.

spoke to this newspaper on

SEE page 4B

BISK ‘contacted
over BIC's IPO

* Exchange chief met

this week with Heineken

executives over Burns
House/Commonwealth
Brewery IPO

* Offering targeted at
end-Q1/Q2, but awaits
government approval

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

The Government has
already been in contact
with the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) to inquire about
listing procedures for the 9
per cent of the Bahamas
Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC) that it hopes
to sell to the public later
this year, while Heineken
executives met with
exchange executives this
week over their planned
$60-$65 million initial pub-
lic offering (IPO).

Confirming both develop-

chief executive, told Tribune

SEE page 5B

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Food retailer in
$5m capital offer

| By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor

Phil’s Food Services, the

a i Gladstone Road-based food
eee i retailer and wholesaler, is
i seeking to raise $5 million
: from a private placement
? corporate bond offering, Tri-

: bune Business can reveal.

The retailer, which has

i made a big impact on the
i Nassau groceries scene
:? despite being a relative new-
i comer, is offering to pay
; investors an 8.5 per cent
i interest rate on the bond,
? which has a five-year dura-
i tion before it matures.

An e-mail sent out to

i prospective investors by
i Wesley Percentie, an execu-
i tive with Family Guardian
“They were told that if they } (FG) . Capital Markets,
keep their complaints out of } which is helping to place the
the media then Customs may i | ‘
back off,” said a source, who ; JS currently a private place-
; ment taking place for Phil’s
? Food Services. Phil’s Food

i Services provides wholesale

bond offering, said: “There



SEEKING TO RAISE $5M: Phil’s Food Services.

and retail food distribution
to New Providence and the
Family Islands. “The offer-
ing size is $5 million and the
security offered is an 8.5 per
cent Corporate Bond, with a
term of five years. The offer-
ing will close on February
15, 2011.”

No other details were
forthcoming, though. Tri-

AML FOODS CHAIRMAN TELLS



DIONISIO D’AGUILAR

By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor

AML Foods chairman last

i night urged the Securities Com-
? mission “to show a little back-
: bone” and prevent Mark Fin-
? layson’s $12 million bid to
? acquire majority control of the
i company from “dragging on for
? ever”, telling Tribune Business
i the situation was “causing too
i much turmoil in the market”
? and uncertainty among staff.

Speaking after Mr Finlayson

i earlier this week indicated the
? tender offer to acquire 51 per
i cent of AML Foods may be
, : ? delayed, after investors in Asso-
ments, Keith Davies, BISX’s ; ciated Bahamian Distillers and

i Brewers (ABDAB), in which

SEE page 4B

SANDYPORT TOWNHOUSE

EXCLUSIVE: 4-BED

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Localed in a popular galed community, this very spacious and

COMMISSION: ‘SHOW BACKBONE

* Urges regulator to
‘maintain orderly
market’ by not letting
$12m offer ‘drag on
indefinitely’, affecting
share price and staff
* Effectively tells
Mark Finlayson: ‘Put
up or shut up’

FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY —

bune Business was told that
FG Capital Markets was
assisting the main placement
agent for Phil’s Food Ser-
vices, Sean Longley, the for-
mer CFAL executive who is
now running his own busi-
ness, Leno Corporate Ser-
vices.

SEE page 4B

responsible ‘for errors aft, omissi J
from the daily report,



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Bahamas lost
‘good slice of
growth’ on BIC

* BIC chairman says ‘a pity’ state-owned incumbent not
privatised back in 1998, as 12-year delay has ‘cost the

economy tremendously’
* Says Bahamas can be CWC’s best performing country
in Caribbean, as buyer has best synergies and fit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Failure to privatise the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) earlier has “cost the economy
tremendously”, the company’s exec-
utive chairman told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday, adding that the
opportunity cost was likely equiva-
lent to “a good slice of gross domes-
tic product growth”.

Julian Francis, who also served as
the Government-appointed privati-
sation committee’s deputy chairman,
told this newspaper it was “a pity”
that the Government did not privatise BTC back in 1998, just
after the first Ingraham administration announced its intention
to do so, a period when telecommunications stocks were at
their peak and buyer interest might have generated a higher pur-
chase price.

Describing BTC’s privatisation, via this week’s signing of
the $210 million agreement for the sale of a 51 per cent stake to

SEE page 7B

BIC’S $37.5M ACQUISITION
‘VETO’ THRESHOLD

JULIAN FRANCIS



By NEIL HARTNELL * { {

Tribune Business Editor Mobile shift and
The Government must first product bundling means

approve any moves bya priva- logs of same-island free

tised Bahamas Telecommuni- ;

cations Company (BTC) to landline calls may not be

acquire rival carriers/operations 4, , ;

worth more than $37.5 million, big issue

its executive chairman con- *

firmed yesterday, adding that Three-year cellular

the possible end to free same- is ‘

island calls may “not be a big exclusivity extension

issue” d h hif

elu heeded to prevent BIC
Julian Francis, who was also getting ‘creamed’ by
SEE page 5B competition

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





a



=
=
=
=
=
=
—
=
=
=
=
=
—_
—_—
—
a
—

ED WILCHINSKI

Become a FAN of BIC on Facebook so that you can
participate in our Valentine's Day Competition!
YOU MUST BECOME A FAN IN ORDER TO WIN!

Visit: www.facebook.com/mybic and click ‘LIKE’

HOW MUCH DO | LOVE YOU?
Ler tent toulet thee p Wht

What do | have to do?
Facebook Fans must write to BTC about their significant other. They must list three rea-
sons why they love their mate and elaborate with 50 words on each reason. They will
also have fo include a photo of them and their significant other. Please send your
submission to prébicbahamas.com.

mh | Ana = >
,
"wh

The winning writer will win a PAIR of BlackBerry eee both loaded with two months
of prepaid BlackBerry data services!

BIC will select the best entry and the winner will be
announced at 4:30pm on Valentine's Day, This competition runs from

FaRhruicra rh Farr mane | ee ey i SF IF
rSeOrvary fill = FEeRBIVGaly ivill Gi vom

Winners can collect thelr prizes on Tuesday, February 15th at 1am from
our Marketing Office on Bay Street (in the Old Mikes Shoe Store Building)

Start orem your writing skills now!l!
elines/Rules:
You must be a legal Bohamian resident. Provide o copy of your passport or driver's license
dlong with your submission or It will not be accepted.
. You must be 18 years or older.
You must be o Fan of BIC on Facebook.
You must include 3 reasons you love your mate and elaborate with no less than 50 words and
not exceeding 75 words on each reason.
You must include a photo of you and your mate together.

BTC employees are not eligible to participate.

lf you require further clarification on the promotion, please send an emall to
or@lbtcbahamas.com

To Become a FAN of BTC on Facebook
ae : f = 2 @ el ala / F f
Wy uy WeTz aC CHWUVUA.UC UIT awiye Le
and click ‘LIKE’
Connected Anijtinné... Anipnhere...

3)%

spread ie word ell everyone fo become a ian of BIC on

City Markets appoints
first female chief exec



ORINOCO BETHEL

BENITA RAHMING

City Markets has named Benita Rahming as the supermarket
chain’s first female chief executive in its more than 50-year histo-

Mrs Rahming has previously been employed in posts such as
retail territory manager and market analyst at Esso Standard Oil,
where she was offered the chance to become that company’s first
female chief executive — a position she turned down due to work
in her family business.

She has also headed the mortgage department at Citibank. In
October 2010, she was hired as a consultant at Solomon’s Mines,
and in November she moved to serve as the consultant for Bahamas
Supermarkets, City Markets’ parent company.

Her international work experience includes General Manager of
Modern Bu-Jutsu out of Chicago, Illinois and Financial Analyst for
Van Leer Containers Inc in Illinois. She holds an MBA in
Accounting and Organization Behaviour from the Kellogg Grad-
uate School of Business in Chicago, Illinois

Mark Finlayson, president of Trans-Island Traders, the 78 per
cent majority owner of City Markets, called Mrs Rahming’s
appointment a “no brainer”.

“Apart from her excellent ability to execute the company’s
mandate, Benita is a wife, mother and a shopper. Essentially she
represents a key ingredient in the overall strategy and success of the
City Market chain”, Mr Finlayson said.

“Another major factor in her role as chief executive is the fact
that she retains an executive management team mostly comprised
of women.”

Mrs Rahming added: “We are already out of the gate, and
much of what we intend to do is directly a result of listening to our
customers and our intention to create a shopping and food expe-
rience in this country that is unparalleled.”

Other executive appointments continue the theme of Mr Fin-
layson putting former Solomon’s Mines and Burns House staffers
into his new business.

Ed Wilchinski has been appointed vice-president and chief
administrative officer of Bahamas Supermarkets. Mr Wilchinski will
be responsible for the purchasing of products, special projects
and human resource development.

Prior to joining the company he was general manager of
Bahamas Distillers and Todhunter Mitchell Distillery. He also
served as deputy general manager of Burns House.

Another appointment is Orinoco Bethell as vice-president and
chief operations officer of Bahamas Supermarkets. She will be
responsible for the company’s day-to-day operating activities,
including sales and revenue growth, expenses, cost and margin con-
trol, directing company operations to meet budget and other
financial goals.

Mrs Bethell brings with her 20 years’ work experience, and her
last post was division manager for the Solomon’s Mines Perfume
Bar.

Karen Culmer has been named as chief financial controller of
Bahamas Supermarkets. Miss Culmer will be responsible for the
company’s day- to-day accounting and financial reporting.

Her work experience includes financial controller and account-
ing manager at Burns House, and assistant manager of mutual
funds at MeesPierson (Bahamas) Fundservices.

Judy Terrell has been appointed vice-president and chief strate-
gist at Bahamas Supermarkets. Miss Terrell will be responsible for
working closely with the chief executive and chief operating offi-
cer in directing and executing the company’s vision.

She has more than 20 years combined experience in the elec-
tronic media/broadcasting, corporate communications and public
and private sector, having held the position as communication
director and government liaison at Ginn sur Mer, and news direc-
tor at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas.

Atlantis inducted as cruise
forum’s Platinum member



INDUCTION: Henry Bain, Atlantis’s director of sales and marketing for the
marine and water park division, accepted the induction from the FCCA’s
president, Michelle Paige, and Michael Ronan, Royal Caribbean’s vice-pres-
ident for government relations.

Kerzner International’s Atlantis resort was officially inducted
as a Platinum Member of the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Associa-
tion (FCCA) last month.

Henry Bain, Atlantis’s director of sales and marketing for the
marine and water park division, accepted the induction from the
FCCA’s president, Michelle Paige, and Michael Ronan, Royal
Caribbean’s vice-president for government relations.

“This was a great and important honour, since Atlantis, Paradise
Island, offers numerous types of excursions to cruise lines such as
Aquaventure, Dolphin Interactions, Snorkel tours and Beach Day
packages,” said Mr Bain.

“Tt was a natural fit for us to join the FCCA, and we feel that this
new relationship will help Atlantis be a positive ambassador for the
Bahamas, and help establish even better working relationships
with some of the most prominent figures and decision-makers in the
cruise industry.”

The Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association (FCCA) is a not-
for-profit trade organisation composed of 14 member bruise lines
operating more than 100 vessels in Floridian, Caribbean and Latin
American waters.

Created in 1972, the FCCA’s mandate 1s to provide a forum for
discussion on legislation, tourism development, ports, tour oper-
ations, safety, security and other cruise industry issues.

The FCCA works with governments, ports and all private/pub-
lic sector representatives to maximise cruise passenger, cruise line
and cruise line employee spending, as well as enhancing the des-
tination experience and the amount of cruise passengers returning
as stay-over visitors.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2011, PAGE 3B





BAHAMAS ‘FINDS
WAY" TO REWARDS

MasterCard has renewed its commitment to the Bahamas
‘Find Your Way' promotion through a re-launch of the cam-
paign maximising value for Bahamians and tourists alike.

It allows MasterCard card holders armed with a Master-
Card booklet or map and their card to take advantage of
specials offered by participating attractions, excursions,
restaurants, hotels and stores.

The programme has grown by nearly 50 per cent since its
inception in 2009, with some 47 partners participating this
year. The launch, held at the British Colonial Hilton, drew the
Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace; chairman of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce,
Khaalis Rolle; president of the Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) Stuart Bowe; executive vice-president of the BHA,
Frank Comito; MasterCard vice-president of strategic part-
nerships for Latin America and the Caribbean, Patricio
Rubalcaba, and leading merchants, restaurateurs and media.



CREATING VALUE - Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Senator
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace (right) speaks with MasterCard’s
vice-president of strategic partnerships for Latin America and the
Caribbean, Patricio Rubalcaba (left) and MasterCard director of
acceptance, Rafael Fuentes during the launch of the Find Your
Way program. This is the third year MasterCard and the Ministry
of Tourism have partnered in the campaign that Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace said added value, helping to give the Bahamas a com-
petitive edge in an environment where savvy vacation shoppers
are searching for a difference. Mr Rubalcaba told the crowd
gathered for the event at the British Colonial Hilton that in addi-
tion to an increase in the number of participating merchants - up
57 per cent since inception in 2009 - the program boosted
actual spend by 5 per cent, while spend in the industry as a
whole declined and, most importantly, showed a customer sat-
isfaction rating of 90 per cent.




z a | aa

THREE HATS, ONE NIGHT - Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
chairman Khaalis Rolle comes up a winner. Barely off the podi-
um as a guest speaker talking to hospitality and business lead-
ers at the re-launch of the MasterCard Find Your Way program
for the third year, he steps back onstage to accept a winner's
cheque for partner of the month for his own tourist excursion
business, Bahamas Undersea Adventures.




JEWELS-BY-THE-LAUNCH -- Rory Dean (centre) of Jewels-by-
the-Sea on West Bay Street, and wife Marcy, chat with Anthony
Smith, marketing manager of Diamonds International in down-
town Nassau, during last week's launch of the MasterCard Find
Your Way program in partnership with the Ministry of Tourism.
Pictured in the background are Michael Wicky, manager of
Anthony's Grill on Paradise Island, and Michael Symonette,
Bahamas Experience Tours.



IT'S IN THE DETAILS - Public relations executive Diane Phillips
co-hosts MasterCard re-launch with Downtown Nassau Part-
nership managing directorm Vaughn Roberts. Her firm manages
the MasterCard Find Your Way program locally, distributing
maps and brochures at the cruise port, to hotel and other
guests, and in stores. Residents who hold MasterCard are able
to take advantage of the program by collecting booklets at par-
ticipating merchants or restaurants, and it was a Bahamian
who won the first Sweepstakes after completing a transaction at
Scotiabank and going online to complete the Sweepstakes entry
form.

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Site’s ‘big windfall’
for Bahamas hotels

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A former travel/tourism photographer
who has developed the latest tool for
beach lovers seeking the perfect vaca-
tion destination is encouraging Bahami-
an hoteliers to flaunt their “beach front”
status.

John Everingham, who last week
launched The Beachfront Club, a website
aimed at holidaymakers who want to
find accommodation that lives up to the
true meaning of “beach front”, said that
getting involved with the website could
equal a “big windfall” for Bahamian
hotels.

The site, two years in the making, was
inspired by Mr Everingham’s experience
as a photographer, and later a publisher,
in the travel industry in Thailand and
South East Asia, where he admits he
took and promoted images of hotels
which appeared to be - but were not actu-

ally - “right on the beach”. “Hotels would
ask me to take photos which made it
look like they were right on the beach,
but really there was a busy road in the
way.

“Over the years I saw so many people
who were seriously angry. They want to
be on the beach, they are paying good
money for their hotel and they were so
disappointed to find that the advertising
was misleading. That was really the basis
of what inspired me to start the web-
site,” said Mr Everingham.

At www.thebeachfrontclub.com, visi-
tors can find 7,000 hotels listed - includ-
ing 41 in the Bahamas at present - which
Mr Everingham says his team have iden-
tified as being “truly beach front”.

Hotels have been identified using satel-
lite imagery, aerial photographs
“brochures and whatever information is
available”, said Mr Everingham.

More hotels can be added as they are
identified and achieve their beach front
“credentials”, and those who are already

mapped on the website can get in touch
with The Beachfront Club to take pos-
session of their page on the site, which
will then be populated with details about
the accommodation.

“They can request an invitation. We
will send them one and they can register,
get a password, and claim the hotel for
free,” said Mr Everingham. For a “pre-
mium” $200 a month service, hotels get
to link their own booking system to the
website's hotel pages, and receive higher
visibility on the website's beach maps.

“We need the participation of the
hotels and the beach lovers to really
make this work.”

Mr Everingham said he believes the
website will have a “real impact on the
beach resorts of the world, drawing busi-
ness towards those that are really on the
beach”.

“A beach lover’s first choice is to be
right on the beach. Those who qualify
will find this is a big boon and a big wind-
fall for them,” he said.

Maritime industry is warned on pollution

commit to will make the dif-



By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -_ The
Bahamas National Trust’s
(BNT) executive director has
urged the shipping industry
to employ practices that will
help minimise potential neg-
ative impacts on the world’s
oceans and its marine life.

Eric Carey noted that the
world’s oceans are under
threat from pollution and
marine debris related to ship-
ping and land-based activities.

“Our activities constantly
threaten to destroy the ocean
and its wildlife,” Mr Carey
told persons at the Bahamas
Maritime Conference and
Trade Show luncheon in
Freeport last week.

The BNT executive said the
Trust is presently working
with the Dolphin Caribbean
Fisheries Institute on a cam-
paign to create awareness
about marine debris in the
Bahamas.

He indicated they are going
to be working with interna-
tional shipping companies and
land-based companies to
reduce marine debris and pol-
lution in Bahamian waters.

Mr Carey stressed that
everyone has a responsibility
to keep the ocean healthy.

Oceans

“In addition to providing
the means by which many of
you move products and peo-
ple around the globe, we must
not forget that beneath the
waves exists life, and these
oceans provide food, recre-
ation, clean air, carbon miti-
gation and many things we
take for granted,” he
explained.

At the opening of the con-
ference, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said the
Bahamian maritime industry
is taking on new and
increased importance in the
overall economy, noting that
the country has an impressive
ship register, one of the
largest in the world with over
52 million gross tons.

Mr Ingraham also noted
that the country has two sig-
nificant fuel and crude oil
transshipment terminals, one
of which is the largest in the
region.

Mr Carey said the move-
ment of petroleum products
is always risky. He noted that
accidental releases and colli-
sions can still occur, despite
the best efforts and highest
environmental standards.

“We need to make sure
that where practical we have
double hull ships carrying
hazard materials and petro-
leum products,” he said.

Mr Carey also noted that
certain paints are not good
for the environment, and
encouraged the use of alter-
native products with less
impact.

“The BNT and Bahamas
Maritime Authority support

high standards for any vessel
carrying the Bahamian flag,”
he said.

“We understand there has
to be impact... but as an
organisation we are charged
with trying to encourage peo-
ple with having minimum
impact.

“On your ships, you can
encourage taking less waste
and reducing packaging so
there is less temptation for
people to throw stuff over-
board.”

Mr Carey said vessels

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, a specialist

should change ballast water
in deeper oceans, rather than
near shore areas.

He also encouraged vessels
to have sludge tanks on board
instead of releasing bilge, with
high petroleum concentration,
into the ocean.

“There are lots of things we
can do as an industry, whether
you work in a corner office in
New York or in a hole of the
ship, everybody has an impor-
tant role to play,” Mr Carey
said.

“And practices that we

ference in whether or not our
oceans remain healthy.”

Mr Carey encouraged
mariners and shipping com-
panies to support conserva-
tion organisations, such as the
BNT and the Nature Conser-
vancy.

“We need support to do
our work. The Government
supports us, but we need the
support of the industry,” he
said.

in private banking,

fiduciary services and wealth management has an opening for the
position of

MANAGER - INTERNAL AUDIT

Reporting to: Audit & Finance Committee & the Managing Director

Responsibilities:

* Performing risk-based internal audits in all areas of the bank

Developing audit work programmes based on risk assessment
drawn from risk matrices

Producing reports for review by the Audit & Finance Committee

& Management

Performing process improvement reviews and reviews of new
systems implemented

Assisting external auditors during any special

investigations

Core competencies:

reviews and

* Bachelor's Degree and hold a professional certification in
accounting or banking

Minimum of five years’ audit experience in a public accounting
firm or financial services company

Knowledge of banking operations including credit operations and

fiduciary services

Analytical capability

Highly proficient in Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, etc) and
knowledge of banking systems

Strong written and verbal communication skills

* Knowledge of regulatory guidelines

All interested and qualified applicants should submit a cover letter and

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited

resume to the attention of:

Human Resources

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: vacancies@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications is Friday February 11, 2011