Citation

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


22% WEEK ON
WEEK SALES RISE
AT CITY MARKETS

Despite 38%
drop in Xmas
top line due to
loss of two
stores, company
says sales have
risen 135%
since takeover

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

DESPITE Christmas
sales dropping 38 per cent
year-over-year due to the
loss of two stores, City
Markets executives told
Tribune Business that its
top line has averaged a 22
per cent week-over-week
increase in the past fort-
night, giving them encour-
agement that a $100 mil-
lion target for their first
12 months is “not an
unreasonable expecta-
tion”.

Disclosing that the nine-
store supermarket chain’s
sales had more than dou-
bled, increasing by 135 per
cent since the Mark Fin-
layson-led Trans Island
Traders acquired 78 per
cent majority ownership
in Bahamas Supermarkets
on November 10 last year,
Philip Kemp, the compa-
ny’s chief financial officer,
told this newspaper it was
looking to boost customer
counts even further
through offering an
enhanced product mix.

While a more-than-dou-
bling of City Markets’
sales since the takeover is
not surprising, given how
bare the supermarket
chain’s shelves were due
to lack of inventory, Mr
Kemp told Tribune Busi-
ness the company was
“pretty much on sched-
ule” in terms of manage-
ment’s expectations.

“Over the last two
weeks, we averaged a 22
per cent sales increase
week-over-week,” Mr
Kemp told Tribune Busi-
ness. “In terms of the
Christmas period, we were
only down about 38 per
cent, which is not bad con-
sidering we lost two
stores.”

Those are the Oakes
Field and Village Road
outlets, lost after landlord
Neil MacTaggart and the
company decided to part
ways, but Mr Kemp
added: “If you look at it
from the first week we
took over to now, we’ve
seen about a 135 per cent
increase in sales. We see
our traffic in the stores
picking up quire signifi-
cantly also.”

He told this newspaper
that City Markets was
now focusing on its prod-
uct mix, ensuring con-
sumers met the majority
of their grocery needs with
it and were not tempted
to look elsewhere.

“If we can close that
gap, get to 80-90 per cent
of their product mix for
the week, we will start to

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



THE TRIBUNE

usine

MONDAY,

JANUARY LO,



2011

1BB4



Doctors targets 50/50
medical tourism split



Barry Rassin

DOCTORS HOSPITAL PRESIDENT:

cent.

Customs accused
of breaching AG
court undertaking

Freeport businessman says latest
moves over ‘bonded goods sales’
an ‘attempt to force Freeport into
duty-paid world and increase
government revenues’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING Freeport
businessman has accused
Bahamas Customs of
breaching an undertaking
given by the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office on its behalf by
persisting with demands for
‘bonded goods _ sales
reports’, telling Tribune
Business that the situation
was imposing “a further
depression on post-Christ-
mas trade” in the city.

Christopher Lowe, opera-
tions manager at Kelly’s
(Freeport), told this news-
paper that Customs was
informing all 3,500 Grand

NEAL & MASSY HIT
BY CITY MARKETS
‘HORROR SHOWING’

* Bahamian supermarket
chain produced $0.142
per share loss for
Trinidad conglomerate,
some 75% of all discon-
tinued operations losses

* Blames ‘important
structural disadvantages’
and ‘increasing competi-
tive intensity’ for turn-
around failure

* Wrote-off $8.156m
investment to turn firm
around, which included
guarantee for Royal Bank
loan

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY MARKETS’ melt-
down under the disastrous
former BSL Holdings owner-
ship cost its main Trinidadian
shareholder a $0.142 per
share loss for its 2010 financial
year, with “structural disad-
vantages” and “increasing
competitive intensity” in
Bahamian food retailing
blamed for the failure to turn
the supermarket chain
around.

Gervase Warner, chief
executive of Trinidadian con-
glomerate Neal & Massy,
which previously owned 31
per cent of Bahamas Super-
markets’ shares via its 40 per
cent stake in majority share-
holder, BSL Holdings, admit-
ted the company failed to
“anticipate” the depth of the
problems faced by the then-11
store chain operating as City

SEE page 7B

Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licencees that with
effect from this month, they
are required to submit to it
on a monthly basis reports
on all goods they have sold
bonded, or duty-free, to oth-
er licencees for use in the
latter’s business.

This, he argued, meant
that Customs was breaching
the undertaking the Attor-
ney General’s Office had
given on its behalf to the
Supreme Court that it would
not demand ‘bonded good
sales reports’, or impose
sanctions for its non-sub-
mission, until the substan-

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DOCTORS Hospital is aiming to
grow and diversify its business mix
into an ultimate 50/50 split between its
current core and medical tourism, its
president telling Tribune Business that
moving into the latter area would
enable it to “not worry about prof-
itability” following a year when local
patient activity dropped off by 25 per

* Move targeting increased revenue streams that will ensure

With the BISX-listed healthcare
provider’s prostate cancer treatment
program already in place as its first
medical tourism initiative, Barry
Rassin told this newspaper that Doc-
tors Hospital hoped to establish a

year.

aN

‘HEDGES BETS’

ON ENERGY,
FOOD RISES

* Supermarket chain
activating advance
bulk buying plans, as
owner expects energy
costs to ‘double’

* Beats Christmas pro-
jections by some 2%

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

SUPERVALUE is
dusting off plans to bulk
purchase in advance in a
bid to head off escalating
food prices expected to hit
later this year, its president
and owner also expressing
fears that energy prices
might “double” during
2011.

With commodity price
increases an emerging
threat that might knock

SEE page 7B

=a]
a Tr
'.
he.

"Srey 4
ek he be

The Superocean Heritage 46

BREITLING BOUTIQUE

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spinal surgery centre in Nassau within
the next five to six months, followed
by a centre for hips, knee and joint
replacement - possibly as early as next



BISX-listed firm ‘does not have to worry’ about profitability

* President says recession caused ‘25% drop in patient activity
across the board, with tourist percentage of mix down from
18% to 11%

* Med tourism could help boost staff levels ‘10-20%’, with
spinal centre and knee/hip facility possibly both arriving
within year

* Targeting 1,000 medical tourism patients in two-three years

Describing medical tourism as a
“strong part of our future”, Mr Rassin
said Doctors Hospital would likely

SEE page 6B

AML’s 10% buy back
to combat ‘severely
undervalued’ stock

* BISX-listed food group unveils 36-month share repur-
chase to fight illiquid market

* Chairman says stock ‘damn good buy’, amid frustra-
tion that market does not reflect fundamentals and con-
sistent profits

* ‘95% of the population don’t understand shares’, he
says, with price dictated by cash-seeking small sellers

* AML Foods prepared to borrow to finance deals, and
expects other listed Bahamian firms to follow suit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AML Foods has become
the latest BISX-listed compa-
ny to unveil a share buy back
program, its chairman telling
Tribune Business the move
to acquire up to 10 per cent of
the stock over a 36-month
period was sparked by an
illiquid market that failed to
reflect the group’s return to
consistent profitability in a
“severely undervalued” share
price.

SEE page 4B



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an ¢ | 5 (ey
Na BY, IY

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE

ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRAP

By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS






















BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE

It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian
stock market.

Investors traded in three out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, with no advancers nor decliners.

Pen eer eee ()) Pererererrrernr nie reemereeeseren O)()/
SES ()() Seeerrernmeenrerrreeeeres 0.00%
()\) Sede ertnee ee terete eres 0.00%
eee ee () Ree cere eemerrrertes (C00

EQUITYMARKET == | RRESSTEStsn sere trees e000) eee ee eee Oe eee 0.00%

A total of 34,700 shares changed hands, represent- 0 0.00%
ing a significant decrease of 36,221 shares compared PPerrrrerererrrrrrirrr rier etre het tier errr rere er eee ee eee eee ee ee eee ee . 0
to the previous week's trading volume of 70,921 2) eee ee 0.00%

shares. ; (ER eee era ee nan: 0.00%

Benchmark Bahamas (BBL) was the volume 4.000 0.00%

leader, trading a volume of 30,500 shares to close a aaa aaa ea alia petal

unchanged at$0.18. §| $§§ = # | Eee eee 0.00%
I eT TN 10.38%

seer steerer 0.00%
Pee ore Orne Tee 0.00%
Le Te tate 0.00%
ee ene eee Te, 0.00%
EERE EE 0.00%
fe ere ee a eer ee 0.00%
Protea eres eee ores 0.00%
Rr ee get reer reece ees 0.00%
See eee ere es 0.00%

BOND MARKET
No notes traded during last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:
There were no earnings reports released last week.

INTERNATIONAL MARKETS

FOREX Rates





Se Sse] Se Se ee eS =>

Currency Weekly % Change

BOND MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS
CAD 1.0086 1.47

BISX SYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE

GBP 1.5557 0.72

FBB1 FBB i N Due 201 i
at 12915 155 B Series C Notes Due 2013 $1,000

FBB15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015 $1,000

FBB1 FBB ies AN Due 201 1
COMMODITIES 7 Series A Notes Due 2017 $1,000

. FBB22 FBB Series B Notes Due 2022 $1,000
Commodity Weekly

Crude Oil 93.58
Gold 1,367.00

Share your news

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people who are making news in their
neighbourhoods.

Perhaps you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for improvements in
the area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your
story.

INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES

Index Weekly y% Change

DJIA 11,674.76 0.84

S&P 500 1,271.50 1.10

NASDAQ 2,703.17

Nikkei 10,541.04

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(hw

THE TRIBUNE

(EW

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 3B
























COLINA — Insurance
hopes customers will notice
something different when
they phone or walk into a
branch of the life and health
insurer, as it has taken a new
customer service pledge.

The five-point pledge
serves as the guideline for
Colina’s standard of client
interaction and service qual-
ity, dealing with everything
from telephone etiquette
and client waiting time limits
to ways of addressing co-
workers on company
premises.

Colina has mounted the
pledge on the walls of all its
branches to remind staff of
the new service motto, ‘Ser-
vice Excellence: Our Policy;
Our Promise’, since it was
launched with a week of cus-

Colin



tomer appreciation activities
and giveaways at all branch-
es in Nassau and the Family
Islands.

Vice-president of life
operations, Wendy Butler,
said: “Our customers
deserve our best effort as
well as our respect and cour-
tesy. By placing the cus-
tomer as the central element
of all of our work, we will
enhance our culture of cus-
tomer awareness and sustain
the highest quality of cus-
tomer satisfaction, personal
accountability and profes-
sional commitment.”

Ms Butler said the new
service pledge focuses on
the needs of clients as
human beings as well as
patrons of an establishment.

“We've recognized that

pa

customer service must be
more proactive and go
beyond satisfying the cus-
tomer’s basic need,” Ms
Butler said.

“This means exceeding a
customer’s expectation by
delivering a service prior to
the turnaround time wher-
ever possible, or facilitating















Colon
Comf

a’s pledge on
customer service

customers who make special
requests that are qualified
exceptions to our standard
procedures.”

Colina expects new tech-
nology will boost the pro-
gramme this year, and give
clients easier and more con-
venient ways to interact with
the insurer.

COLINA REPRESENTATIVES and
clients stand in front of a poster declar-
ing the first principle of the company’s
| new Customer Service Pledge. L-R:
executive vice-chairman Emanuel Alex-
iou; customer services manager Julie
Dean; clients Margaret Pratt, Monica
Porter and Latoya Cooper; vice-presi-
dent, life operations, Wendy Butler; and
customer services manager, Lavaughn
Fernander.

BELOW: At the launch of Colina’s

new Customer Service Pledge at the
company’s Rosetta Branch, client
Raquel Pyfrom (second from left) is
greeted by Wendy Butler, vice-presi-
dent, life operations; Emanuel Alexiou,
executive vice-chairman; and Alice
Woodside, branch administrator.

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





AMUs 10% buy back to combat ‘severely undervalued’ stock

FROM page one

Hinting at the food retail
group’s frustration that its
positive fundamentals,
namely two years’ of consis-
tent profitability amid the
worst recession in living
memory, were not being
reflected by the Bahamian
stock market, Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said AML Foods’
current $0.97 per share
stock price was “a damn
good buy”.

The BISX-listed food
retail group this follows the
lead established by Cable
Bahamas and Common-
wealth Bank in establishing
a share buy back program,
announcing on Friday that
it would repurchase up to 10
per cent of its outstanding
1,540,417 shares (just over
154,000) over a 36-month or
three-year period to Janu-

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ary 31, 2014.

The move is designed to
support AML Foods’ share
price for the benefit of long-
term investors, such as pen-
sion funds and insurance
companies; stimulate inter-
est and market demand for
the stock, indicate to the
market where the company
fees the ‘true value’ should
be’; and provide more liq-
uidity to existing investors
that enables them to sell
more easily.

Tribune Business under-
stands that AML Foods’
Board and senior manage-
ment had been discussing
initiating a share buy back
program for some 18
months, and Mr D’Aguilar
said the company might
even be prepared to “tem-
porarily borrow” to finance
purchases of its own stock
if the terms were right.



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Pointing to the lack of
overall liquidity in the
Bahamian stock market,
which was making it diffi-
cult for buyers and sellers
of many stocks to conduct
trade, Mr D’Aguilar also
lamented the “lack of
sophistication” among
investors, telling Tribune
Business: “Ninety-five per
cent of the population don’t
understand shares.”

AML Foods’ payment of
a dividend last year - the
first such payment for seven
to eight years - sparked
upward movement in the
stock price despite the
improved fundamentals, and
Mr D’ Aguilar said the com-
pany’s market price was too
often being dictated by
small retail investors need-
ing to sell several hundred
or a thousand shares to raise
cash at values that did not
reflect the group’s worth,

He added: “The main rea-
son we’re doing it is that the
shares are trading at $0.97,
and we feel the stock’s
severely undervalued.

“We feel it’s worth a lot
more than that, and given
the illiquid market, the lack
of liquidity in the market,
and the lack of interest in
the shares, we felt we’d cre-
ate a little bit of interest and

a bit of activity at $1 a share.
If no one is prepared to but
it at $1 a share, which is a
damn good buy, the compa-
ny will buy it.”

The AML Foods chair-
man said the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) had told
the company it must notify
the market of a specific
amount of shares it would
attempt to repurchase, and
over what period of time,
hence the 10 per cent at
three-year period to Janu-
ary 2014.

Telling Tribune Business
that AML Foods would “see
how it goes”, Mr D’ Aguilar
said: “Given cash flow con-
siderations, we gave our-
selves three years to accom-
plish this goal, and after
three years we’ll see.

“T expect almost immedi-
ately that there will be some
bump up in the shares, and
if the company is prepared
to buy back its shares at $1,
the current market price, it
must be sending the market
a message. We paid a divi-
dend last year, and that did
not cause a bump up in the
share price.

“That’s the way a sophis-
ticated market works, but it
does not seem to work that
way here. At Christmas

time, people want money.
The price is dictated, not by
the fundamentals, but the
desire of the small share-
holder to sell 1,000 shares
to get money for Christmas.
That tends to drive the price
down, but not for the right
reasons. Ninety-five per cent
of the population don’t
understand shares, don’t
maintain an interest in
shares, and that creates illiq-
uidity. People are not pre-
pared to play the market.”

Explaining that AML
Foods was effectively “cre-
ating a market for our-
selves” through its share buy
back program, Mr
D’ Aguilar said he expected
more publicly-listed
Bahamian companies to fol-
low suit “to put the price
where it should be”.

“T think that’s probably
the way until people become
a little more sophisticated,”
Mr D’ Aguilar told Tribune
Business. “I think it’s almost
necessary, as there are so
few trades apart from Com-
monwealth Bank. I think
more companies, who look
at their fundamentals, look
at what the share price
reflects, will go out and
announce it.”

While AML Foods had
not allocated a specific sum

to finance its share repur-
chase program, Mr
D’Aguilar said: “If the
opportunity arises, and we
think the shares are under-
valued, we will go into the
market.”

Noting that the company
was conscious of cash flows
and capital expenditures it
needed to finance, namely
its $4.5 million Solomon’s
Fresh Market store in west-
ern New Providence, the
chairman added: “If the
cash is available and the
price is right, we will buy it.
If we think it’s a damn good
deal, we will temporarily
borrow to take advantage of
it. We have no debt, so if a
good situation arises and we
want to take advantage of
the opportunity, we’re going
to do what we need to do in
that regard, and if we have
to borrow to take advantage
of this, that’s what we’ll do.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said the buy
back program would ensure
AML Foods’ share price
“doesn’t go any lower, and
strengthens and trends up
to where it should be. We
feel that we can provide
increased shareholder value
by buying back some of our
outstanding ordinary shares,
and improving earnings and
dividends per share.”

22 per cent week on week
sales rise at City Markets

FROM page one

hit these kinds of numbers,”

able.

“Going forward, Christmas was quite
encouraging, and we’ve identified those
areas we need to focus on. There’s still a

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Dated Highwire

Mr Kemp
said. What we’ve seen so far is quite
encouraging. We’re not out of the woods
yet, but we’ve kind of got to grips with
this model, so we feel more comfort-

lot of people out there that want City
Markets to succeed, and traffic has been
quite encouraging.

“We’ve been on target with expecta-
tions. We knew coming in that there
would be a lot of challenges. But there’s
no surprise in terms of where we are at
this time; we’re pretty much on sched-

ule.”

Noting that sorting out lingering refrig-
eration issues was a “high priority”, Mr
Kemp said City Markets was still on tar-

get to reach $100 million in sales during
the first year of Trans Island Traders’

majority ownership.

“We'd like to,” he added of the $100
million sales objective. “If the growth
continues as we are doing now, that’s
not an unreasonable expectation, but
it’s very difficult to predict at this point.

“Tt’s an extremely competitive envi-

ronment, and I’m sure the competitors
are not going to lie down and let us
recapture the market share we lost.”

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THE TRIBUNE

6

A

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 5B



Customs accused of breaching
AG court undertaking

FROM page one

tive issues between it and
Kelly’s (Freeport) are deter-
mined by the court.

Kelly’s (Freeport) has
filed a Judicial Review
action of Customs’ demand
for such a report, and the
terms of the undertaking, as
read out by the company’s
attorney, Fred Smith of Cal-
lender’s & Co, state: “Until
judgment in this matter or
further Order, neither the
Respondent, nor any Cus-
toms officer or employee or
agent of H.M. Customs, may
detain goods, or refuse to
process imported goods for
entry in the usual way, or
refuse to accept returns for
Duty Paid Sales, or other-
wise take enforcement
action against the applicant
or other GBPA Licensees,
on the basis of non-receipt
of duty exempt bonded sales
reports or on any other basis
not sanctioned by law."

Glenn Gomez, Customs
Comptroller, could not be
reached by Tribune Busi-
ness for comment on late
Friday afternoon.

However, Mr Lowe told
Tribune Business: "In the
face of the undertaking by
the Attorney General of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, that Bahamas
Customs will not pursue
‘Bonded Sales reports’ until
the substantive issue of
bonded goods reporting is
heard before a judge of the
Supreme Court, Bahamas
Customs is notifying
licensees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority that
they are now, effective Jan-
uary 2011, required to report
on a monthly basis all of
their bonded purchases and,
in addition, requiring all sell-
ers of bonded goods to
report on all sales to
licensees.

“Also, a new declaration
form called a C14A must be
signed by the licensee for
each and every monthly
invoice submission (pur-
chase), and a C14B declara-
tion by the seller on licensee
purchases report.”

The C14A, Mr Lowe
explained, was effectively
for buyers, who Customs is
requiring to sign off that
they bought all these goods

“It feels good to choose a health plan



KELLY’S (FREEPORT )
ATTORNEY Fred Smith of
Callender’s & Co

for use in their own busi-
ness.

The C14B, he added,
requires licencees to confirm
that they sold bonded goods
to legitimate licencees.

All this, Mr Lowe said,
had added to the confusion
and consternation caused by
Customs’ move to require
all GBPA licencees to pro-
duce a National Insurance
Board (NIB) Letter of
Good Standing, showing
they were up to date on
employee contributions,
before they would be issued
with a ‘bonded letter’
enabling them to purchase
goods duty-free in 2011.

“Already in effect Janu-
ary 1 is the de-facto denial of
the right to purchase bonded
goods via a new require-
ment to furnish to Bahamas
Customs a ‘letter of good
standing’ from the National
Insurance Board in order to
obtain an ‘Over the Counter
Bonded Purchase Letter’,
which according to Bahamas
Customs enables the forgo-
ing of their requirement for
each and every purchase
order to be approved,” Mr
Lowe said.

“Apparently this letter is
being issued from NIB in
Nassau, and there is some
question as to what other
Government departments
are in collusion with respect
to overdue fees or amounts
owing by Freeport business-
es.

“Also, these letters are
slow in coming and are

thereby denying a right by
way of Government lethargy
or explicit intent.

“This is, of course, a ques-
tionable practice which has
never been required or
enforced, as the right to pur-
chase Conditionally Duty
Free is granted to licensees
by the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, not the NIB.”

Asked by Tribune Busi-
ness about the impact all this
was having on Freeport’s
economy, Mr Lowe replied:
“T think a further depression
of the post-Christmas trade,
because [have a feeling that
a number of licencee com-
panies are putting off any
work they have that uses
duty-free materials until
they get approval to pur-
chase for the ensuing year.

“So, practically, it’s going
to have the effect of delay-
ing construction after Christ-
mas, especially on jobs
requiring duty-free materi-
als.

“Licensees are being
forced by Bahamas Customs
into purchasing materials
required by their businesses
in a duty paid state, thereby
increasing costs but also cre-
ating potential legal issues
where contracts have been
signed for duty free con-
struction or service contracts
needing bonded materials.”

And Mr Lowe added: “If
Customs continues to act
unlawfully and arbitrarily,
it’s going to get pretty rough
in Freeport, and ultimately it
strikes me as a deliberate
attempt by the Government
to force Freeport into the
duty-paid world and
increase their revenues.”

Bonded goods sales is a
practice whereby Freeport-
based wholesalers, such as
Dolly Madison, Kelly's
(Freeport) and Bellevue
Business Depot, are able to
sell products to other GBPA
licencees for use in their
respective businesses only,
without any duty being paid
to Customs/Government on
their sale.

It is a report on this activ-
ity that Customs is seeking,
but Kelly's (Freeport) and
its attorneys are arguing that
this has never been request-
ed before, and is not includ-
ed in any statute law, policy
or agreement concerning
their relationship.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

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department of Princess Margaret Hospitals

Tenders are invited from qualified contractors to provide
cleaning services for the food and nutrition department of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, Public Hospitals Authority, for a
period of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to
tenderers, specifications and other relevant information, can be
collected 9 am - 5:00 pm Monday to Friday at the Public Hospitals
Authority, corporate centre “B”, Third & West Terraces
Collins Avenue.

A tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or
package identified as a tender for the provision of cleaning
services, food and nutrition department of the Princess Margaret
Hospital and addressed to:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE “B”
THIRD AND WEST TERRACES COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX NB8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY NO LATER THAN 5:00 PM. ON

anuary 28th, 2011.

A copy of a current business license and a certificate verifying up
to date National Insurance Contributions should accompany all
proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all Tender(s).



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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Adamants Investment and Management Company Ltd.
(Company number 146,344B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of Adamants Investment

and Management Company Ltd. hereby certify that the
winding up and dissolution of Adamants Investment
and Management Company Ltd. has been completed
in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that
Adamants Investment and Management Company
Ltd. has been dissolved as of 28th day of December,

2010.
Dated this 6th day of January, 2011
Pine Limited

Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FSO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(Company number 153,433B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of FSO INVESTMENT

MANAGEMENT LIMITED hereby certify that the

winding up and dissolution of FSO INVESTMENT

MANAGEMENT LIMITED has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that
FSO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LIMITED has
been dissolved as of 23rd day of December, 2010.

Dated this 6th day of January, 2011

Pine Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FSO Forex and Special Opportunities Fund Ltd.
(Company number 153,447B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Vanessa Z. Coleby and J. Eleanor Bain, Liquidators
of FSO Forex and Special Opportunities Fund Ltd.
hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of FSO
Forex and Special Opportunities Fund Ltd. has been
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution
and that FSO Forex and Special Opportunities Fund
Ltd. has been dissolved as of 21st day of December,
2010.
Dated this 6th day of January, 2011

Vanessa Z. Coleby / J. Eleanor Bain
Liquidators

Wachael Ross Goat

is pleased to announce

the establishment of his legal pratice
effective the 22nd of November 2010

under the name of

(Seat and Ga

Counsel and Attorney at Law
Lagoon Court, Executive Suite 115
Sandy Port, West Bay Street,

PO. Box SP-60606
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone (242) 527-1161
Fax: (242) 527-0282
London address:

115 Temple Chambers Temple Avenue
London EC4Y ODA
Telephone (011) 44 207-353-8868
Email: mrscott@scottchambers.bs

wwwiscottchambers.bs



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

THE TRIBUNE



Doctors targets 50/50
medical tourism split

FROM page one

have to add “another 10-20
per cent” to its staffing levels
- possibly as much as 50-100
jobs - once medical tourism
took off and the hospital’s
business from
residents/tourists returned to
pre-recession levels.

Explaining that Doctors
Hospital was looking to
attract 250 patients per year
to the Bahamas through the
spinal treatment and surgery
centre, Mr Rassin said of the
rationale behind the medical
tourism move: “Increased rev-
enue streams, pure and sim-
ple. The Bahamas is a very
small population, and to pro-
vide service to a small popu-
lation we can see it [the
effects] now, especially with
the recession.”

The Doctors Hospital pres-
ident said the recession’s
impact had been especially
heavy on the business it gen-

erated from providing treat-
ments to visiting stopover and
cruise ship tourists.

While tourists normally
accounted for 18 per cent of
the hospital’s patient activity,
Mr Rassin said this percent-
age had dropped to 11 per
cent due to the recession and
reduction in travel demand.
“Half of our tourists we’re not
getting, and that’s the biggest
blow to the top and bottom
line,” said Mr Rassin.”

Noting that Doctors Hos-
pital had seen “an almost 25
per cent drop in activity
across the board”, he
explained that the company
was looking to build on its
existing core business to
diversify into medical tourism,
reducing its reliance on resi-
dents and transient visitors
for 100 per cent of its rev-
enues.

“We don’t want to rely on
foreign visitors and, where
business activity drops 25 per

cent as it did last year, not
worry about profitability. We
want another revenue
stream,” Mr Rassin said,
adding that Doctors Hospital
wanted something that
“Jumps us into profits” in both
good and bad times.

“For the Bahamas, the
spin-off is fantastic,” he
added. “Two hundred and
fifty cases bringing with them
family members, each of
those staying in the hotels. It’s
big for the hospital and big
for tourism. Id like to see us
get to a 50/50 ratio, 50 per
cent local, 50 per cent med-
ical tourism.”

With the High Intensity
Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)
prostate cancer treatment
centre, headed by Dr Robin
Roberts, attracting 15-20
patients per month, Mr
Rassin said Doctors Hospital
was hoping to attract 250
patients annually to each of
the spinal and knee/joint

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replacement centres during
their formative years.

“You’re talking 1,000
patients a year, which I think
we can get to over two-three
years,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “That’s gigantic business
for us. It makes us interna-
tional. It should take our bot-
tom and top line to a place
where we have all the cash we
need to make sure we stay up
to date with technology.”

Doctors Hospital had
worked painstakingly over
many years to put in place the
foundations to break into
medical tourism, Mr Rassin
said, describing as a “gigan-
tic step” the attaining of Joimt
Commission International
accreditation last June - a
standard that signals to Amer-
icans that the BISX-listed
healthcare provider is the
equal of any US hospital in
terms of quality care and out-
comes.

Building on the HIFU pro-
gramme’s initial success, Mr
Rassin said Doctors Hospital
was working with Bahamian
specialist, Dr Val Grimes, to
set-up the spinal surgery and
care centre as part of a con-
sortium, together with spe-
cialists from Florida and
Washington, plus a spinal
parts manufacturer.

The consortium’s plan was
to give overseas patients
options as to whether they
had their treatment at home
or in Nassau. If the latter was
chosen, Mr Rassin said a
“unique” feature was that the
programme brought both
patient and surgeon to the
Bahamas, an element
designed to give Doctors Hos-
pital a market niche and stand
out from the competition.

Explaining that it was criti-
cal to “get it done right”,
ensuring that accreditations
and quality care were all in
place, Mr Rassin said Doctors
Hospital was hoping to get
the spinal surgery centre
operational within the next
five-six months. And, with the
same partners involved in the
knee/hip/joint replacement
programme, he added that
this might be established “by
the end of this year or Janu-
ary next year”.

“It’s a very competitive
business, so we want to focus
on niche markets, and no one
else is looking to bring the
surgeons over,” Mr Rassin
said.

While the likes of Thailand,
Singapore and Malaysia had
stolen an early march on the
competition, primarily
through a cost structure that
paid 10 per cent of US salary
costs, Mr Rassin said medical
costs in the Bahamas were
“about 20 per cent less” than
in or northern neighbour.

The Bahamas’ and Doctors
Hospital’s competitive advan-
tage, Mr Rassin said, lay in
its ability to offer a combina-
tion of 20-25 per cent cost sav-
ings; quality assurance
through the JCI accreditation;
and bringing the surgeons to
Nassau. “The insurance com-
panies like that combination,”
he explained.

And, with patients from
overseas also set to be attract-
ed through Doctors Hospi-
tal’s Internet marketing, Mr
Rassin said this was “where
the spin-offs will be created”
for Bahamian doctors and
surgeons as the reputation for
quality care spread. Bahamian
doctors would be the ones
doing the operations here,
and “that’s when the benefits
to surgeons will jump”.





an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 7B





Neal & Massy hit by City Markets ‘horror showing’

FROM page one

Markets.

He also, in his year-end
report to Neal & Massy
shareholders, revealed that
the company invested some
$52.2 million Trinidadian dol-
lars ($8.156 million in
Bahamian/US dollars) in try-
ing to turn Bahamas Super-
markets around during the
conglomerate’s 2010 financial
year.

“We did not anticipate the
depth of the economic reces-
sion and increasing competi-
tive intensity in food retail-
ing in the Bahamas, which
overcame the group’s efforts
to turn around Bahamas

Supermarkets,” Mr Warner
confessed to Neal & Massy
shareholders.

While it was no secret that
Bahamas Supermarkets had
“incurred continued losses
over the last several financial
years”, Mr Warner confirmed
that Neal & Massy’s Board
decided to sell the company
during the July-September
quarter, the last one in its
financial year. That coincided
with when Neal & Massy
stopped investing in City
Markets.

Referring to both Bahamas
Supermarkets and another
loss-making business that
Neal & Massy has disposed
of, Mr Warner added:
“Attempts to turn around

these companies proved
unsuccessful as important
structural disadvantages were
too significant to overcome.”

The Trinidadian conglom-
erate’s report noted that
Bahamas Supermarkets
accounted for 75 per cent or
three-quarters of the losses it
suffered from discontinued
operations in 2010. The
Bahamian supermarket chain
produced a TT$0.91 or
US$0.1428 loss per share,
with pre-tax losses generat-
ed by City Markets standing
at TT$87.818 million or
US$13.54 million.

The latter figure compared
to a loss of TT'$19.515 million
or US$3.049 million in 2009.

Neal & Massy noted that

it inherited Bahamas Super-
markets as an “underper-
forming company” when it
acquired Barbados Shipping
& Trading, the original 40 per
cent equity investor in BSL
Holdings, which was also City
Markets’ operating partner.
Its financial statements
added: “The net asset value
for Bahamas Supermarkets
at the end of the last financial
year was $27 million
(US$4.22 million). In the first
quarter of the financial year,
the group invested a further
$52.2 million (US$8.156 mil-
lion) by way of a cash injec-
tion of $35 million (US$5.47
million) and a guarantee giv-
en to Royal Bank of Canada
for $17.2 million (US$2.69

Supervalue ‘hedges bets’
on energy, food rises

FROM page one

any Bahamian economic
recovery off course, Rupert
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness that the grocery chain
would employ the methods it
used in 2008 to try and protect
the Bahamian consumer from
impending food price increas-
es.
Noting that staples such as
cooking oil and tuna appeared
to be rising once again, Mr
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness he had informed his buy-
ing team on Friday afternoon
to obtain the latest consumer
reports and “buy everything
they can” up front before the
expected price increases took
hold.

He explained that Super-
value “rode it out” two years
ago and was “able to hold the
prices” by employing a strat-
egy of buying core products,
in bulk, in advance. Through
“hedging our bets” in such
fashion, said Mr Roberts, the
chain obtained better prices
than if they had left the pur-
chases later, and were able to
pass the savings on to con-
sumers.

Supervalue’s 105,000 square
foot warehouse was more
than adequate to cope with
bulk inventory purchases, Mr
Roberts said, while the gro-

wholesalers were well-posi-
tioned to inform it in advance
of any price hikes.

“We were able to protect
the country from price
increases that way,” Mr
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Our people notify us,
and we know what to do. The
way we do it costs money, and
we tie up resources, we tie up
space, but if we can hold our
prices and competitors can’t,
we increase volumes and pay
for it that way.

“We have the variety and
we have the price. We’re still
on a roll. We were able to
protect the country from price
increases that way in 2008.
We’re just planning this now.
Some stuff we’ve bought,
we’re going to buy more, and
see what else is going to take
an increase.

“ T would think that for the
next six months, because of
energy costs, I’m guesstimat-
ing that prices are going to go
up.”

While the cold weather in
Florida and the Bahamas had
resulted in price increases for
some produce as a result of
supply disruption, Mr Roberts

and other actions by his buy-
ing team had protected Super-
value from the effects.
While perishable goods
prices still seemed to be sta-
ble, Mr Roberts also
expressed fears about increas-
ing energy costs in 2011, after
oil prices again broke through
the $91 per gallon barrier
towards the end of last week.
Noting that this could
impact both Supervalue’s
electricity and transportation
costs, Mr Roberts told Tri-
bune Business: “If energy
goes up, freight goes up. One
of the bid problems is going to
be if energy goes up, and I
expect energy costs to double
by the end of the year.
“That’s going to be a big
problem. On the first of every




month I have to write BEC a
cheque for $250,000, and it
might increase to $500,000. I
can’t ask the consumer to pay
for that, you have to cut back.
You cannot increase the cost
of living, especially in a reces-
sion.”

While some analysts sug-
gested the recession was over,
Mr Roberts told Tribune
Business that he estimated it
would “take three years for
the jobs to come back”, unless
the $2.6 billion Baha Mar pro-
ject and other developments
like it were able to “bridge
the gap”.

The Supervalue owner told
Tribune Business that the
chain exceeded his Christmas
projections by 2 per cent,
“which in our business is
almost $1 million”. He added
that by doing a month’s busi-
ness in a week or two, the
supermarket chain’s costs
were spread out over a
greater volume of sales units.

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
AND PRODUCTION (OKHOTSK) LIMITED






NOTICE





Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the



International Business Companies Act 2000, notice

million) for a Bahamas
Supermarket loan.

“On November 10, 2010,
the holding company in which
the group had invested sold
its investment in Bahamas
Supermarkets for $1 and Neal
& Massy wrote-off the value



















POSITION OPENING

QUALIFICATIONS

of its investment at the finan-
cial year ended 2010.”

Also impacted was Barba-
dos Shipping & Trading, Neal
& Massy’s subsidiary, which
suffered a $16.587 million loss
on Bahamas Supermarkets in
Barbadian dollars.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that | LILIETH BILLIE JANE
JOHN, of Yellow Elder Constituency of the Island of New
Providence, intend to change her name to LILIETH BILLIE
JANE GREENE. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
the Deputy Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau,
Bahamas, no later than thirty (80) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

cery chain’s suppliers and

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
AND PRODUCTION (YAMAL GYDAN) LIMITED

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 21% day of December, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 5th day of January, A.D., 2011.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
(YAMAL GYDAN) LIMITED

NOTICE

REIGNDROP LIMITED
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) REIGNDROP LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 31% December 2010 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Octagon
Management Limited, The Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 31* day of December, A. D. 2010



Octagon Management Limited
Liquidator

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is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 21% day of December, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 5th day of January, A.D., 2011.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
(OKHOTSK) LIMITED

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANGOLA
(INNER TREND) LIMITED

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 21% day of December, A.D., 2010.

Dated the 5th day of January, A.D., 2011.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ANGOLA (INNER TREND) LIMITED

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
No.45 of 2000

PAID HOLDINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000), PAID HOLDINGS INC. has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 8th day of December, 2010.

Hamilton Management Services Limited
Fiman House, St. George’s Place
St. Peter Port, Guernsey
GY1 2BH
Liquidator

shop repairs to diesel engine parts mandatory
Top wages. Uniforms furnished after
probationary period.

Please come by and fill out an application, and give us
your resume a

Rock Crusher Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Temple Christian Hi gh School

Shirley Street
TEACHING VACANCY

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2010 - 2011 School Year.

Math/Commerce (Grs. 10-12)

Applicants must:

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who 1s
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of
Temple Christian School.
Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the area
of specialization.
Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra
curricular programmes.

Applications must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566

Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is January 21°, 2011



PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011





Less worried about
layofis, jobholders
are spending more

WASHINGTON
Associated Press

A STEADY decline in
layoffs is giving the vast
majority of adults who
have jobs the confidence
to spend more freely and
help energize the econo-
my. They no longer worry
so much about losing their
jobs.

Their renewed confi-
dence has boosted retail
sales — just what's needed
to spark what economists
call a "virtuous cycle":
Higher consumer spend-
ing raises company prof-
its, which spurs hiring,
which fuels more spend-
ing and growth.

Consumer spending is
critical because it powers
about 70 percent of the

economy. It rose for five
straight months through
November, kicking off the
strongest holiday shopping
season since 2006. Many
shoppers are showing
enough confidence to
splurge on new cars: Auto
sales rebounded 11 per-
cent in 2010, the first
increase since 2005.

"The strongest showing
for consumers since the
peak years of the last
expansion signals that the
broader economy is near a
threshold of self-sustain-
ing growth,” analysts at
Citi Investment Research
& Analysis wrote last
week.

Federal Reserve Chair-
man Ben Bernanke
echoed that point Friday.
He told a Senate panel he

sees evidence that a "self-
sustaining" recovery is
taking hold because con-
sumers and businesses are
spending more.

Morgan Stanley econo-
mists say 4 percent growth
is "likely, perhaps even
conservative” in 2011, up
from an estimated 3.1 per-
cent last year. Late this
month, the government
will estimate economic
growth for the final quar-
ter of 2010.

Consumer spending is
rising because the vast
majority of working-age
Americans are now
breathing casier, despite
9.4 percent unemploy-
ment. People who had
jobs feared being laid off
during the recession,
which ended in June 2009,



SHOPPERS ARE photographed on 34th Street, in New York in December. Consumer spending rose for five
straight months through November, kicking off the strongest holiday shopping season since 2006. (AP)

and for months after. Few-
er worry now, because
most companies have
stopped cutting staff.

ROYAL FIDELITY

honey an ark

EJ FG CAPITAL MARKETS
iF BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
E

cr AL crm

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 13 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,598.67 | CHG 0.35 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD 33.29 | YTD % 2.13
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.04 1.04 0.00 0.250
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050
5.23 Bank of Bahamas 5.24 5.24 0.00 0.598
0.40 Benchmark 0.40 0.40 0.00 -O.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 Fidelity Bank melt 2.17 0.00 0.055
9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07 12.07 0.00
2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84 2.84 0.00
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.63 6.66 0.03
ee | Consolidated Water BDRs 2.82 2.76 -0.06
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00
8.75 Finca 9.08 9.00 -0.08
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60 10.60 0.00
3.75 Focol (S$) 5.08 5.08 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete O2F 0.27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 850
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 t%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets. 10.06 11.06 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55

1.406
0.249
0.460
oO.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securit Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

52wk-Low EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E

0.000

0.480

0.000

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV Last 12 Months %

1.4674 1.99 6.66
2.9020 0.52 -0.11
1.5302 1.53 4.88

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000
YTD% NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.514105

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.498375

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

1.3758
2.8266
1.4590
3.0368 Par 4.99
13.5654 1.48 5.47
107.5706 3.45 6.99
105.7706 3.989 13.50
1.1034 1.25 5.25
1.0764 0.79 4.37
1.1041 1.23 5.34
9.4839 1.52 7.41

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

9.1005
10.0000 ity 10.6709 -0.93 12.33
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying ity

58.37

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

‘or daily volume
ighted price for daily volume
m day to day
aded today
jends per share paid in the last 12 months
9 price divided by the last 12 month earnings
Stock Split - Effec Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ig
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Senior Client Relationship Manager

Societe Generale Private Banking (Bahamas)
Lid., part of the Société Générale Group, is a
private bank providing a comprehensive

of investment, trust and banking products
and fluenency in Spanish ls mandadory .
Some knowledge of Portuguese would be an
wealth management service. asset, and proficient in the use of
Computers. The incumbent will be required
Saciete Generale Private Banking is currently to travel on a regular basis to designated
looking to recruit a Senior Client Relationship marketing regions.
Manager. Your primary role will be to
introduce, maintain and grow profitable client The position offers an attractive salary and
relationships in Latin America for Societe benefits package including, pension and
Generale Private Banking (Bahamas) Ltd and bonus schemes.
ensure adherence to legal, regulatory and
industry standards Applications should be submitted to the
following address, to arrive on or before 12
You should ideally hold the Chartered January 2011.
Institute of Bankers Diploma or equivalent
professional qualifications, and have at least Head of Human Resources
5 to 8 years" international private banking! Societe Generale Private Banking (Bahamas)
Led

PO Box NFFSo

marketing sales experience.
You should have excellent client relationship Nassau

and selling skills, an in-depth knowledge Bahamas

SOCIETE GENERALE

Private Banking

Sothte Giewralke Private Banking aharias) Led. te

licensed ender the Bank & Trust Companies Regulations Act

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Workers who survived
the job cuts of the past
three years have begun to
conclude: "If they haven't
fired me by now, they're
not going to," says
Michael Koskuba, portfo-
lio manager with Victory
Capital Management.

By October 2010, layoffs
and other dismissals had
sunk to their lowest point
since August 2006. In
December, employers
added just 103,000 jobs —
too few even to keep up
with population growth.
But that was mainly
because they're still reluc-
tant to hire, not because
they're still cutting jobs.

The number of people
applying for unemploy-
ment benefits — a proxy
for the pace of layoffs —
has dropped in the past
four months. And econo-
mists think employers will
finally ramp up hiring this
year.

"You've got 10 percent
unemployment, and you
add another 5 or 10 per-
cent" for discouraged
workers or those stuck in
part-time positions,
because they can't find
full-time work, says Doug
Hart, a retail specialist at
the consulting firm BDO
USA. But the remaining
80 percent, having sur-
vived the worst of the lay-
offs, "are feeling more
secure about their jobs."

In 2009, consumers
across all income groups
froze up. The Labor
Department's Bureau of
Labor Statistics recorded
the first annual drop in
consumer spending in
records dating to 1984.

Now, BDO's Hart says,
"The fear factor has sub-
sided."

That's evident among
consumers like Monique
Aguilar, 27, of Saugus,
Mass. Aguilar put off a car
purchase last year after
the restaurant chain where
she's a manager
announced layoffs. But
there she was Friday at a
Chevrolet dealership in
neighboring Lynn, Mass.,
shopping for a new Mal-
ibu.

What's changed? She
doesn't worry so much
about being let go. Her
employer's sales have
improved, and she's
encouraged by reports of
slowing layoffs and of
companies starting to hire.

"In general, I feel like
we're going in the right
direction,” Aguilar says.
"That makes me comfort-
able in my purchase."

Many households also
feel better able to spend
because they've sharply
reduced credit card and
other debt they ran up
during the mid-2000s.

Economists say con-
sumers seem increasingly
divided into "haves" and
"have-nots." The haves
are more secure in their
jobs. Their finances are
solid. So is their credit.

They dominate the high-
est-earning 20 percent of
Americans, who con-
tribute nearly 40 percent
of consumer spending.
Among managers and
professionals, for instance,

unemployment in Decem-
ber was just 4.6 percent —
less than half the overall
unemployment rate.

The have-nots are strug-
gling with shaky finances
and job security. Unem-
ployment is running at 12
percent for transportation
workers, for example. It
exceeds 20 percent for
construction workers.

A 20 percent run-up in
the Dow Jones industrial
average since July has also
skewed the consumer
rebound in favor of upper-
income shoppers — and
the luxury stores that
serve them.

"It's a two-tier market,"
says Doug Roberts, chief
investment strategist for
Channel Capital
Research. The affluent
"are beginning to feel
more confident because
their (stock) portfolios are
up."

During the holidays,
high-end retailers like
Nordstrom Inc. and Saks
Inc. reported the strongest
sales. Michael Niemira,
chief economist at the
International Council of
Shopping Centers, says
luxury sales rise and fall
almost in lockstep with
the stock market.

After hunkering down
during the recession, for
example, Jerrie McKen-
non of Burleson, Texas,
last year splurged ona
Lexus and two expensive
vacations. The main rea-
son was that most of her
investment portfolio had
recovered from its losses
during the financial crisis.

"T loosened up in 2010,"
she says. "The money we
lost came back."

Few expect a return to
the carefree spending of
the mid-2000s. Falling
home prices are weighing
on consumers’ confidence
and their ability to bor-
row. Nearly one in four
homeowners owe more on
their mortgage than their
homes are worth. Rising
gasoline prices and the
prospect of higher food
prices are also likely to
limit spending in 2011.

But analysts at Barclays
Capital say a cut in Social
Security taxes for workers
this year will help them
absorb higher gasoline
prices. That tax break will
put more money in peo-
ple's pockets — $1,000
more for an individual
earning $50,000 a year.

Higher spending and
growth don't mean the
unemployment rate will
fall significantly this year.
Most economists think it
will remain around 9 per-
cent at year's end.
Bernanke said Friday it
could take up to five years
for unemployment to drop
to a historically normal
rate of around 6 percent.

Still, economists say,
more consumers are con-
fident the worst of the job
cuts are over. And that
points to a stronger econ-
omy ahead.

"If you think back to a
year ago, we were still
questioning whether we'd
seen the end of the reces-
sion," Niemira says. "So
we've come a long way."





(hn

THE TRIBUNE

6

(Wn

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 13B



Stocks are riding on higher profit margins

NEW YORK
Associated Press

CAN Corporate America
continue to cut its way to
profits?

If you're betting that
stocks will rise in 2011, the
answer is critical. Profits
jumped last year largely
because companies ran
smarter and squeezed more
from workers. Sales are
picking up, but probably not
enough to keep profits from
rising fast in the new year
unless companies can get
even more out of their
workers.

"How can they squeeze
costs more than they are
now?" asks Howard Sil-
verblatt, a senior analyst at
Standard & Poor's. "Are
they going to fire more peo-
ple? We're down to the
skeleton."

Professional stock pickers
aren't worried. They expect
margins, or the profit made
on each sale, will near a
record this year. By the end
of 2011, U.S. companies will
be pocketing $9.50 in profit
for every $100 in sales, or
9.5 percent, exceeding a
boom-time record that is
considered a bit of an aber-
ration, according to Stan-
dard & Poor's. The average
over nearly three decades is

$7.10. A clue as to whether
the experts are right comes
next week as companies
begin reporting their fourth-
quarter results. If investors
begin to doubt those lofty
margins are within reach,
stocks could tumble. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
rose 15 percent last year.
Experts predict the index
will rise another 11 percent
in 2011.

The problem with margins
is that they have already
risen seven quarters in a
row. The average margin is
now 8.95 percent, nearly two
percentage points higher
than average.

Margins tend to stay
around the historical aver-
age for two reasons. When
the economy is weak, com-
panies cut workers and
exploit technology to boost
margins. But there's a limit
to the number of people you
can lay off and the software
you can buy. When the
economy strengthens and
people start buying what
you're selling, you have to
hire more people to meet
the demand and pay more
to keep them. Margins drop
fast, often back to the aver-

age.
In a report Friday, Lon-
don analyst Andrew

Smithers wrote investors are

fooling themselves that
stocks are a bargain with
margins so high. He says
margins are certain to suf-
fer a large fall. It's a lonely
view but it's shared by dis-
tinguished company. Jere-
my Grantham, the leg-
endary Boston money man-
ager who predicted the
housing crash, says margins
are abnormal and set to
drop.

These two have been say-
ing this for most of the past
year and could be proven
wrong again. UBS econo-
mist Larry Hatheway says
companies have learned to
operate much more effi-
ciently than in past decades.
They use more workers in
India and China to drive
labor costs down and shop
around more for cheaper
raw materials and parts.

Then there is the elixir of
a recovering economy. Peo-
ple are buying more cars,
and they went on the biggest
holiday shopping spree since
2006. What's more, the gov-
ernment reported Friday
that the jobless rate fell to
94 percent from 9.8 percent,
though the rate fell mostly
because many people gave
up looking for jobs.

As companies begin to
report earnings this week,
watch closely those that

American Eagle has used
most of $1.4M Wyo. subsidy

CHEYENNE, Wyo.
Associated Press

IT TOOK American Eagle Airlines three
months to use 73 percent of a $1.4 million
subsidy that Wyoming awarded the compa-
ny for its first year of operation at the
Cheyenne Regional Airport.

Greater Cheyenne Airport Manager Dave
Haring told the Wyoming Tribune Eagle

that the rapid use of the subsidy is not
unheard of or alarming.
The airline began nonstop regional jet

fall.

service on July 15 from Cheyenne to Dal-

las/Fort Worth International Airport.
American Eagle used $198,359 of the $1.4

million subsidy for a July revenue short-

The airline is a subsidiary of AMR Corp.,
the company that owns American Airlines.

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Road Traffic Department is pleased to remind the general public of
the established protocols for the Inspection and Licensing of Company

Vehicles.

The month of March is traditionally companies’ registration month at the
Road Traffic Department. In an effort to expedite and ensure a smooth
registration process the department advises that registration will
commence January 10, 2011. All companies with a fleet of five (5) or
more vehicles are encouraged to prepare and submit the required
documents on the second (2â„¢ ) floor to the Controller's Office in the
Clarence A. Bain Building to ensure an appointment for Inspection. The
Department further wishes to advise that applications will be processed
on first come, first come basis.

The following documents are required:-

(1) Cover note stating the make, model, year and chassis number

(2) Total number of all vehicles to be licensed

(3) Acopy of the current disc for each vehicle

(4) — Original certificate of insurance (no copies will be accepted)

(5) Special Permit Letter (Ministry of Works) for all miscellaneous

vehicles

Please note that payments can be made in the form of:

Certified Cheque made payable to the Public Treasury
(absolutely no personal/ company cheques)

Visa/ Mater Card
Suncard
Cash

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

could find it difficult to pass
higher costs to consumers.
Morgan Stanley strategist
Adam Parker, who has writ-
ten extensively about mar-
gins, lists more than a dozen
in a report last week, among
them Arm & Hammer
banking soda maker Church
& Dwight Co. and steel

maker Nucor Corp.

Tally Leger, a strategist at
Barclays Capital, predicts
stocks will climb 14 percent
this year on rising margins,
but even he is worried. He
notes that if the optimists
are wrong even a little, the
impact on corporate for-
tunes could be great. Wall

Street analysts see earnings
for the S&P 500 hitting a
record $95 a share.

But if the margins they
assume are off by a dollar,
earnings will come in 10 per-
cent lower. That would be
a big blow to a stock market
that already reflects high
expectations.

Here’s how this month’s changes to
NIB Benefit & Contribution Regulations
will impact You

Higher Insurable Wage Ceiling
® Contributions [for both the employer and the employee) in respect of the employee whe

makes more than $400 per week has increaded. While the rate of contributions remains the
sare, the new wage ceiling 6 5300 per week/S2.167 per month. For weekly paid persons,

the first salary deduction at the higher rate will be for the pay period in which January 3 falls

Contributions for self-employed persons who make more than $1,733 per month have in
creased. The new ceiling is 52,167 per month, with the first contribution payment on the
higher rate due at the end of January.

Contribution Rate Increase for Some Self-Employed Persons; Industrial Benefit

Coverage for All

® The contribution rate for all categories of selfemployed persans

ployed persons are now covered for Industrial benefits.

Sickness Benefit

5 meow BO: all Selfeem

® inorder to qualify for Sickness Benefit, a claimant rust be employed at the time of the onset
of the illness for which they are claiming the benefit. A Form Med-1 must be completed by

the employer as support for the claim.

Additional Benefit for some Widow) Widowers
® Widows and witowers who qualify or previously qualified for Retirement of Invalidity Benefit
and Survivors Benefit simultaneously, may mow qualify for ome and a portion of the other,
respectively, Such persons would have been limited under the previous rules ta receiving

only one benefit - the higher of the two. Applications for the additional benafit may be sub

mitted beginning this meanth.

More Stringent Contribution Conditions for Retirement Benefit

® To qualify for Retirement Benefit, claimants must have paid at least 500 weeks of contribu-
honk lapproxinmataly 10 wea rsh Ha daimant & 65 year: or older and has paid less than SOC)
contributions but more than 190 contributions, he will qualify for a one-time grant

For further information on how the amendments affect you, please visit aac, oib-bobomos. com,
contact your nearest NIB Local Office, or call the Consumer Hotlines at 925-4653,5



Kingsway Academy
(An Evangelical, Non-denominational, Christian School)
Entrance Examinations for the 2011-2012 School Year

High School Division (Grades 7 to 12

Applications for the 2011-2012 school year (starting in September 2011)
are invited for grades 7 to 10.

Testing Date: 8.00 am January 15, 2011

The high school division supplies a premium offering of courses from grades

7 to 12.

These include Arts, Sciences, Technical and Vocational Subjects in addition to
sound fundamentals in Christian education.
This school provides one of the most balanced ranges of subject offerings in
the Bahamas. Students are prepared for examinations such as BJC, BGCSE,
PSAT, SAT, SAT Subject Tests and Advance Placement (AP) tests.
Accelerated Track - Students with exceptional ability are allowed to accelerate
beginning in grade 9 with a view towards college preparatory courses in

grade 12.

In addition, the school provides a wide range of extracurricular activities
including all BAISS core sports, Governor General’s Youth Award, Junior
Achievement, Travel Club, Key Club, Science Club etc.

The achievements of our students during and after high school speak for

themselves.

Elementary Division (K3 to Grade 6)

Applications are invited for the 2011-2012 school year for all grade levels

from K3 to Grade 6.

* The elementary division offers a curriculum that blends the A
Beka and Harcourt Brace curricula.

* The experience also offers a stimulating blend of extracurricular
activities to enhance the academic and social development of your

child.

Testing Dates:

K3 - Saturday, January 15, 2011 at 10.00 am. (must be 3
years old by October 31, 2011)

K4 - Friday, February 4 and Friday February 18, 2011
from 8.30 am to 1.40 pm.

(Must be 4 years old by December 31, 2011.)

K5 -

Saturday, March 5, 2011 from 8.00 am to 1.00 pm.

(Must be 5 years old by December 31, 2011)
Grades 1 to 6 - Saturday, March 5, 2011 beginning

at 9.00 am.







(iy The Tribune =:

him lowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

82F
71F

SUN, CLOUDS,
BREEZY, HUMID

Volume: 107 No.39

_
=
=
w
=





SEE INSIGHT ON PAGE 16B

cov







Deputy PM makes
announcement after first
three murders of 2011

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE launched investi-
gations into the first three
murders of the year this
weekend as Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette
unveiled government plans to
invest $8.5 million in the fight
against crime over the next
six months.

Mr Symonette told hun-
dreds of officers gathered for
the annual police church ser-
vice at Christ Church Cathe-
dral in George Street yester-
day that crime had reached
unacceptable levels in 2010,
with the record murder count
of 96 and an increase in gun
and violent crime being the
worst.

The $8.5 million will fund
three new police squads, of
around 30 officers each, to be
established by February, as
well as an increase in the
enrolment capacity of the
police cadet programme in
New Providence to 72 and
establishment of a new police
cadet programme in



CRIME FIGHT:
Brent Symonette

Grand Bahama.

More resources also will be
purchased for the RBPF as
well as improved Crime Scene
Investigation technology for
the Force.

“We as a force remain com-
mitted and determined to
ensure that the Bahamas is a
place where we can all live in

SEE page 13

WISHING
You
A
HEALTHY
AND

HAPPY
ereNew YEAR.

Slctem etek

HEALTHE & ALWATS PRESS

GEORGE ST., MADEIRA RD

HARBOUR BAY, BLUE HILL RD.,

TOWN CENTER MALL, JFK





MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

CARS FOR SALE,
TCAs eee
MSc Paes

SPENT Sy





SEE SECTION E





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

MINISTER DENIES
BIC DEAL HAS
BEEN FINALISED

GOVERNMENT officials denied
reports yesterday that it has already
signed 51 per cent of Bahamas
Telecommunications Company over
to Cable and Wireless (LIME).

However, according to a source
within the government, it is under-



a -



stood that the $210 million sale was
finalised on Friday, January 7.
However, Zhivargo Laing, State
Minister for Finance, denied the
rumour.
there has been no such thing. When
the time comes the government will
keep the public informed of any
development in that matter,”

SEE page 12

“T cannot confirm that,

he said.



COMMISSIONER OF POLICE Ellison Greenslade greets families of officers fallen from the ranks in a ceremony held at Police Head-
quarters. The Royal Bahamas Police Force held its Annual Church Service and Parade yesterday.

UNIONISTS TO HOLD MASS RALLY
AGAINST PLANNED BTC SALE TODAY

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter

nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

A MASS rally of union-
ists, opposed to the govern-
ment’s planned sale of BTC,
is set to mark the anniver-
sary of Majority Rule day,
today.

In its Bahamas for
Bahamians campaign, the
National Congress of Trade
Unions is continuing to

r¢

spread the word about the
meaning behind the 1958
General strike led by Sir
Clifford Darling and its con-
nection to Majority Rule
Day.

“Today we talk about the
fight for majority rule. It
seems Now we are going to
back to colonialism; having
to fight for what the fore-
fathers fought for. If we

SEE page 12

a &

UNE)

THE SMART CHOICE

when you are hungry for a value

e SEE PAGE TWO

PLP ‘TO SUPPORT DEMONSTRATION’

THE Progressive Liberal
Party plans to support the
demonstration organised by
union members to protest the
sale of BTC and commemo-
rate Majority Rule Day,
according to Ryan Pinder,
Elizabeth Member of Parlia-
ment.

Mr Pinder said an invita-
tion was sent to the party and
some MPs were advised to
invite their constituents.

Bradley Roberts, PLP
chairman, said the invitation
from one of the BTC unions
was “oral.” It was not an invi-
tation to participate in the

Taz. Bowl, Mashed

Potatees,
Gray, Gorn Gorn, Bite sized
Grispy Chicken



NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

programme, but to simply
attend the event, and invite
PLP supporters.

“Tam just going to be one
of the many who will be
there,” said Mr Roberts.

William Carroll, president
of the Bahamas Communica-
tions Public Managers Union
(BCPMU), said invitations
were sent out “to the general
public”, and the unions “did
not target the PLP or FNM.”

Perry Christie, PLP leader,
said he was informed by Mr
Pinder that a “communication

SEE page 12

bE EET





PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ON THE MARCH: Scenes
from yesterday’s Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Annual Church Service and
Parade.

Officers marched on Bay
Street before the service at
Christ Church Cathedral
which was attended by
members of the force, offi-
cials and Parliamentarians.

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HEALTH & FITNESS
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PATRICK J. MCFALL APPLICATION FORMS

Apphtalion kerma wil be available 4% of
] ; : : : H Wednesday, Dacambareancd Thay mary be
Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer ss esenecsi'a leieatneseeer ras ge aketeitiy ones abdiaelicieal a
: Apolicart must ba Bahamian cilizena & residents of ns trot ae ee al aa
, Now Providanoo botwenn the ages ol 14 8 90 years sanquanars, Sir Clitord Daring Gamplea
Mr. McFall's most recent position was that of Assistant Vice-President, Corporate . seienals cunt hove a veal eae ean Ballou Hil Ficed, The Orug Pian Oitice at Wubt
Accounts which he has held since 2003. Mr, McFall has over seventeen years Than 30 and have ane ar more of the following ee
, , ; ; , Hestyiec conditions: hypertension, high chokesteral Fitness, & fen Tt sabato Helios Lid, Marketing
axperance in the field of Accounting and has bean with Gommonwaalth Bank since diabetes or ischacmic heart disanse Fintan 1 Terrace Gentreville
A , : Applicants fuel be commited to compels ihe entire
2001. During his tenure with Commonwealth Bank he served in the capacity of senior 12 week programma and all of its raquiramants APPLICATION SUBMISSION DEADLINE:

; : : : * JApolicants must have their cam trameportation and be All application tome and photos must ba
Manager, Corporate Accounts. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Accounting and is a present at all required meatings and appointments rejumed to The Counsellore Lid. Markating

member of the Association of Certified Public Accountants and the Bahamas. Institute > Apsiicants must ba willing to appaar in all publicity Firm, Firsl Terrace Gentrenile by S puam.,
for the Gel Well Bahamas Chalenge, including bul fdonday, January 17, 2091. Please address

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= Eeipiyyees of The National brewrance Board and Participants will be selected by Jem Health
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







an
NaS,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Fire Trail residents blame
govt over shanty towns

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FIRE TRAIL residents
criticised several government
agencies yesterday, blaming
them for the proliferation of
shanty towns in the area.

In a statement released by
the Fire Trail Community
Association, the Ministry of
Works, and the departments
of Immigration and Environ-
mental Health were blamed
for compromising residents’
standard of living by their fail-
ure to ensure that the stan-
dards set by law are met.

The statement read:

“We are simply asking that
our government agencies
work for us, the taxpayers. As
home owners, we were
required to get permits and
pass inspections to build our
houses to code. This was nec-
essary to obtain occupancy

Outcry comes weeks
after Mackey Yard fire

certificates which were needed
to get utilities. Let’s hold all
persons living in the Bahamas
to these standards.”

The outcry by residents
comes three weeks after the
devastating fire at Mackey
Yard — an area on Alan Drive
off Carmichael Road which
was thought to be one of the
oldest shanty towns in New
Providence. The fire destroyed
more than 100 homes and dis-
placed more than 300 people.
While the group expressed its
sympathy to the hundreds of
persons displaced in the Box-
ing Day fire, it called on the
government to crack down on
the remaining three villages in
the area.

The statement read:
“Inspectors have turned a
‘blind eye’ towards these vil-
lages. By allowing more than
one hundred homes to exist
without being up to code, they
have failed their jobs. The
Ministry of Works has also
allowed the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation to provide
electricity to these houses
without being built according
to the provided codes, being
structurally sound, and with-
out the possession of electrical
permits.”

The group said that due to
improper bathroom facilities,
the shanty towns pose a great
health risk to the entire com-
munity.

The statement continued:
“This is a concern since some
of us must pump well water
to our homes.

“T may add that these are
not homes that were given to
us, but these are new homes
that we are paying mortgages
on.

“We are concerned about
the number of old cars, large
piles of bottles and the piles of
garbage which attract rodents
and pose health problems for
this entire community.”

The association charged
that the Department of Immi-
gration also ignored the move-
ments of illegal persons in
shanty towns, which they feel
has allowed them to establish
themselves in the country.

It added: “This is perhaps
the only country in the world
where an illegal immigrant can
come and without any status,
build on government land; get
electricity, cable and internet;

Investigations into cause
of fatal house fire continue

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Investigations are con-
tinuing into the cause of a house fire that
claimed the life of a one-year-old Rajish

Cox on Friday morning.

As police officially released the iden-
tity of the toddler on Saturday, police
press liaison officer assistant superinten-
dent Loretta Mackey said the child lived
at two homes, one in Sunset Subdivision,
Freeport, and another in Sweeting’s Cay,

East Grand Bahama.

He was staying in Freeport with his
mother at the time of the fire.

Velma Clarke, the paternal grand-
mother who lives in Eight Mile Rock,
spoke with The Tribune on Sunday.

She said that her son, Rajish, is very
distraught over the loss of his son.

“He is taking it very hard,”
“Right now, he is resting. And the doctor
told us to keep a close eye on him and
not to bother him while he is sleeping.”

She said her family is trying to cope

with the loss.

“We still don’t have a full under-
she said.
Ms Clarke said little Rajish lived with
his mother, who would bring him on
occasions to visit with his father in Eight

standing of what happened,”

Mile Rock.

“He was a very happy baby. If you
see him you will fall in love with him

UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS
‘NOT ACCURATE METHOD’
TO ASSESS ECONOMY

MEASURING unemploy-
ment claims is not an “accurate
method” to assess the state of
the economy, said Shane Gib-
son Golden Gates Member of
Parliament.

Responding to the claims by
government officials that the 70
per cent drop in unemployment
claims is evidence of a
“rebounding” economy with
fewer job loses, Mr Gibson said,
“this is an outrageous falsehood
and gross misleading of the
Bahamian people.”

The current policy of the
National Insurance Board is to
pay “only 13 weeks of unem-
ployment benefits to any eligi-
ble person,” according to Mr
Gibson. Since many lay offs
occurred early last year, most
unemployed people “have
exhausted their 13 weeks and
are no longer eligible for unem-
ployment benefits,” he claimed.

“The absolute truth, based
on this 70 per cent drop is that
70 per cent of the unemployed
are now destitute, frustrated
and desperate. While these per-
sons cry out because they have
lost their dignity, the FNM gov-
ernment remains unapologetic
and continue to feed them false
hope with bogus and erroneous
statistics which further insult
their intelligence,” said Mr Gib-
son.

He called on the government
to “discontinue its inaccurate
portrayal of the situation,”
based on the fact that the drop
in claims is a result of the NIB
policy and its impact.

“No one can argue the unem-
ployment rate is in direct corre-
lation with the break down of
the social fiber of this country
and has resulted in a nation of
frustrated and desperate peo-
ple,” said Mr Gibson.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

she said.

right way because he just lay right on
your chest; he was a very loving baby,”
his grandmother said.

Police received a report of a fire at 100
Pioneer’s Way West in Sunset Subdivi-
sion just after 8am on Friday.

Firefighters responding to the alarm
found flames confined to a washroom in
the east front section of a grey and white
single story house.

POLICE 2 a the scene of Friday’ $ fire in 1 Grand pahanne:



After the fire was extinguished, they
discovered the toddler inside the wash-

room, near the door.

The house had severe smoke damage
throughout and is no longer habitable.
No one was at the residence on Sunday.

Anyone who may be able to assist
investigations into the fire should call
police at 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers

anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

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ALL APPLICATIONS RECEIVED WILL BE IN CONFIDENCE
No faxed of emailed reswmes will he corsidered,
Please take your completed
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FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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Ale
on ALL;

Christmas ribbon
Decorations
Poinsettias——

Weel

Trees





The Ree eas Eee eel

run web shops; sell food,
drinks and clothes without
business licenses and work
without work permits. Can
you blame them for taking
advantage of the slackness and
lawlessness that exists in our
country?”

The residents also called
on the Office of the Attorney
General to address the pub-
lic on their rights as home-
owners and how they can pro-
tect themselves against tres-
passing.

The statement continued:
“A great number of us are
new homeowners who are not
yet financially able to fence in
our yards or to afford the
amount of fencing that is
required to keep the residents
of these villages from walking
through our yards as they
move from village to village.
This is a major problem for
us and we need to know how
we as law-abiding citizens can
protect ourselves in this situa-
tion.”

The association is urging
persons who share similar
views to attend a march on
Fire Trail Road tomorrow at
6pm.

The statement read: “This
is not about party politics, this
is about enforcing the laws of
the Bahamas and making it
better in the Bahamas for
Bahamians again.”













"Studies have
shown that using a
synthetic motor oil
can improve fuel
efficiency. Castrol
Syntec,"

REPORTS THAT
BAHAMASAIR BAG
BEHIND MIAMI
BOMB SCARE

ARE DENIED

REPORTS that a bomb
scare at Miami Interna-
tional Airport was
sparked by a suspicious
bag unloaded from a
Bahamasair plane have
been denied by officials
at the Bahamian Con-
sulate in Miami.

US network NBC
reported on Wednesday
the suspicious bag from a
Bahamasair aircraft was
investigated in Miami
after bomb-sniffing dogs
sounded the alarm.

The bomb squad was
alerted and the concourse
at Miami International
Airport was evacuated
until the carry-on bag had
been investigated by the
TSA and cleared of con-
taining explosives by
11am, the network’s local
news website
nbcmiami.com reported.

Inspector Wayne
Woodside, who is
attached to the Bahamas
Consulate Office in Mia-
mi, investigated the mat-
ter on behalf of the
Bahamas, said spokes-
woman for the consulate
Phyllis Johnson.

And he confirmed the
matter was in no way
related to a Bahamasair
passenger, she said.

“For security reasons
we cannot reveal the
name of the passenger but
the name was not mani-
fested to Bahamasair,”
Ms Johnson said.

S Castrol
“QUOTE OF THE DAY”

Distributed By

Toe

Wet el

RTA Sra

Galleria ert mas




















sealer ee ae ae aa
pment ne
[3:30 | WA |

‘(HRUMIGLES OF HAN L
TROW LE Gate

ee your @-card to reaeres lickets e= S80-224419 co vieti us ai
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Christmas candles

Pra att

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AE RCE Preneer over the past year,
We wish you 4 New Year of Peace, Bite

tis ENDS . rte a, ne Ce

JANUARY



Home Fabri 5

sheers ee Ca Ry eVect) CPLR E i






(en)
NU LY,

PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

(e"\
WY

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master













































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

A false claim made against The Tribune

WE ARE told that last week a talk show
host was complaining that The Tribune’s
editorials were not supportive of the people.
The reference, of course, was to the current
BTC union’s fight against the sale of 51 per
cent of BTC to Cable & Wireless (LIME).
Our position is that this sale, and all that
Cable & Wireless offers, will be the best
transaction for the country, and, therefore,
for all of the Bahamian people, including
BTC employees — especially those who
have a good work ethic.

The 40 per cent being retained by gov-
ernment will eventually be offered to the
public, so that Bahamians can truly become
shareholders in their company.

Dr Donaldson was the guest of the show
and his contribution to the discussion was
that if anyone knew the history of The Tri-
bune, they would know that The Tribune
has never been supportive of the black peo-
ple’s movement.

Dr Donaldson should have known that
this was not true. So should his host. But
the host laughed it off in agreement, and
the show went on with the falsehoods.
Today’s Bahamians do not know their his-
tory, which the PLP tried to rewrite after
they won the government in 1965. The PLP
story is the only so-called “history” that
many of this generation have heard. And
they have not bothered to dig further to dis-
cover the truth.

The Tribune will be 108 years old in
November. It was founded by Leon Dupuch,
grandfather of the present publisher, at a
time, according to his son, the late Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch, when “there was no racial
consciousness in Nassau.” Wrote Sir Eti-
enne: “The coloured people were too far
behind to be conscious of a destiny. There
was not even conflict between the ‘haves’
and ‘have nots.’ The island was poor during
this period. It was described as a glorified
fishing village; no one had a great deal; many
working people walked the streets bare-
footed, but everyone was contented and it
was a happy community.”

At the time there was only one division in
the community — the “Ins” and the “Outs.”
The “Ins” were the families — most of whom
lived on East Hill Street — that were invited
to Government House, and The Nassau
Guardian, a social newspaper, wrote only
for this set. The “Outs,” both white and
black, had no newspaper, therefore, no voice.
At the turn of the century the “Outs” felt the
need of a second newspaper. A company
was formed to which Bay Street merchants
subscribed. Leon Dupuch, who was on the
staff of The Guardian, joined the group, and
was invited to edit the Watchman. However,
Leon soon discovered that this was not the
type of newspaper he had envisioned — it
was just a newspaper for another social class.

He believed in a newspaper for all Bahami-
ans — white and black of every social strata.
And so he quit and, at great sacrifice, start-
ed The Tribune. Shortly afterwards The
Watchman folded.

Sir Etienne, only four when The Tribune
was started, was too small to make any con-
tribution, but at the age of five he pinched an
armful of papers — The Tribune was then
located on Market Street — walked across
East Street, then known as New Road, and
eventually established a delivery route as
far as Farm Road. This was the first time
that black Bahamians had a newspaper.

Although the newspaper was for all
Bahamians, it espoused the black Bahami-
an’s cause because this was the group that
was the most downtrodden, and certainly
had no voice.

The Tribune, either spearheaded or was
a part of every social reform in this country.
Sir Etienne, as a member of the House of
Assembly and the editor of this newspaper,
was, for example, very active as a member of
Dr C C Sweeting’s House committee, which
brought in the Bill that established Govern-
ment High School for black students. Dr
Sweeting was a white Bahamian. Again Sir
Etienne was among those who supported
Mrs Mary Ingraham in her fight for the vote
for women.

And then, of course, there was the night
on the floor of the House in 1956 when Sir
Etienne was almost arrested in his fight to
break down racial discrimination in the
Bahamas.

He won that fight, but the PLP in their
new version of history has dishonestly tried
to claim the victory, and even today they
pretend that it never took place. It is one
date in their litany of dates that they con-
stantly ignore. It is as though that dangerous
and tension-filled night never took place.

However, as someone commented years
later, if it were not for that night in 1956, the
men and women who are now free to walk
through those once closed doors, wouldn’t be
ruling in parliament today. There certainly
would have been no majority rule without
bloodshed.

It was Sir Etienne’s Resolution in 1956
that prevented it.

Sir Etienne assisted the PLP when it was
founded. He felt that here at last was a polit-
ical party that could be an answer to the
people’s needs. He even assisted them when
they decided to send a small delegation to
the Colonial Office in London to complain
over the way that the UBP had decided to
appoint public boards — a battle that they
won.

However, they lost the support of The
Tribune on their return from England.

We shall reserve that story for tomor-
row.

Drive one.

In a class by itself
APhop Jo “ompare

1. Wh with oe oped sutomatic teed, LLATIEE In ThA
47) WAKO PRE OOMMeLMICATION oie RTAIMMENT
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comparing apices bo applce, chore i me dung ice ti tka

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Taare, Equipped inh 35 Lh, mal Wa he ate

niet eh cael heeled pereer ecabs woke curtis ‘tirtagh 4 eter

Fibs Cer Hrebes, fell poever equip, alice wheels, ond eerecthiag

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finwi frre services, full io of gos gad floor oni

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FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LT

Improve services
for ferry passengers
waiting to board

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE Bahamas Fast Fer-
ries company has been in
operation for a number of
years and I am of the opin-
ion that it has been reason-
ably successful financially.
It has been of great assis-
tance for passengers travel-
ling to the Family Islands
which it services and the
communities of Eleuthera,
Andros and Abaco in par-
ticular are very grateful for
its existence.

However, it is widely
believed that more can be
done to accommodate pas-
sengers awaiting boarding
at the various ports. For
instance, at Spanish Wells,
Current and Harbour Island
there is no terminal where
passengers can sit in com-
fort and wait for the arrival
of the vessel. There are no
toilet facilities, and, should
there be rain or diverse
weather, the passengers
have nowhere to shelter.

This was especially evi-
dent on January 3 at Cur-
rent for the hapless passen-
gers on the Fast ferry “Sea
Wind.” Departure time was
given for 7pm and passen-
gers began arriving at 6pm.
In many instances passen-
gers were dropped off and

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



their rides were not ina
position to wait with them
for the arrival of the vessel.
Also, persons with cars for
transport to Nassau were
not prepared to leave and
travel to settlements as far
away as Savannah Sound,
and then returning. Fortu-
nately, this being one of the
winter months there was not
the invasion of sandflies and
mosquitoes which regularly
plague persons at the dock
in the summer months.
However, heavy draft was
falling and some moles were
exposed.

After no boat had arrived
by 7pm questions were
asked and information was
received that the boat would
not arrive until about
8.30pm. This time was
changed on at least one
occasion and the vessel did
not eventually arrive in the
Current until about 9.15pm
and the passengers eventu-
ally arrived at their destina-
tion at 12.45am on January
4. The explanation given
was that the vessel had lost
an engine.

In the meantime passen-

gers consisting of babies and
toddlers, teenagers, pets,
senior citizens and other
adults were left to wait at
the terminal where the only
shelter was a rustic building
with uncomfortable wood-
en benches, (which inciden-
tally were not provided by
the company), and absolute-
ly no toilet facilities besides
the nearby brush. Also, in
keeping with its excellent
record in North Eleuthera,
BEC contributed to the dis-
comfort with at least three
power cuts which also affect-
ed the oncoming vessel.
Surely it is time that the
company provide some ser-
vices for its passengers, at
least comfortable seating
and toilet facilities. They
could also provide a conces-
sion area where refresh-
ments can be sold. This is
also a way to provide some
employment in the form of
persons to clean and sell and
also to oversee the facility. I
am looking forward to
something being done by
the company in 2011. Should
I also dare hope for
improvement to the road
approaching the dock site?

JEANNIE THOMPSON
Nassau,
January 6, 2011.

Bahamas National Insurance Board raises taxes again

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WALLETS are a little bit lighter this week
as a result of increases in the NIB payroll tax

of up to 25 peer cent.

packet of employees before they receive it,
and then the government spends the funds on

buildings or new programmes and bureaucra-
cies that will inevitably deplete the fund as

their own actuarial studies report.

Yor owe yoursel = t ushowroom

.. Introducing The All NEW

There is no doubt many people receive
financial help from the National Insurance
Board that might otherwise be forced to do
without, and that's fair enough if that's why the
NIB was created.

But according to the NIB's web site:

"Its primary mission was and is to provide
income-replacement in respect of sickness, inva-
lidity, maternity, retirement, death, industrial
injury/disease, and involuntary loss of income."

Obviously this is paid from the money tak-
en from workers themselves in the first place.

As the political class began to see the votes
they might get if they appear to be concerned
about the less fortunate, the mission changed
as the NIB confirms.

They tells us that:

"NIB’s added mission in the administration
of the country’s social security programme, is to
provide assistance for needy citizens and to
assist with the social and infrastructural devel-
opment of the country." (emphasis added).

And so as the potential political payoff
clouds the original intent of NIB even more,
Bahamians will have to be taxed more and
more if they are to ever receive the retire-
ment benefits they were forced to "con-
tribute."

What is just as distasteful is the law forces
employers to deduct the NIB tax from the pay

There is a better way.

The NIB should be converted from a pay as
you go system and the funds contributed (in
this case it would be a contribution and not a
tax) are kept in an account earmarked for
each individual that pays NIB, and if a con-
tributor does not want to utilise the govern-
ment programme, they should have every
right to join the private pension plan of their
choice.

With regard to help for the poor, find ways
to encourage people to donate to private char-
ities.

One possibility is to allow property owners
to pay reduced property taxes if they con-
tribute the funds to charitable causes. For
example; if the annual property tax rate is
$1,000 the property owner might be allowed to
donate $600 to a private charity in lieu of pay-
ing any property tax.

These are not the only potential solutions to
helping the poor and protecting individuals
retirement funds, but there must be a better
way than following the failed "government
social safety nets” around the world.

The Nassau Institute
www.nassauinstitute.org
Nassau,

December 9, 2011.

GML Foods Limited

announces that, subject to a

directors resolution of January
6th, 2011, if will begin a share buy
program of its issued ordinary
shares on January 10, 2011.

The
purchase of up to

resolution authorizes the
10% of

the Company's current issued

ordinary shares or

1,540,417

shares overa 36 month period
to January 31, 2014.

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&

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 5

&

THE TRIBUNE

6

LOCAL NEWS

Accusations prompt
test of water supply



PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOP
By Jamaal Rolle

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A TEAM of experts will test
the water supply at the Water
and Sewerage Corporation’s
reverse osmosis plant in Grand
Cay, Abaco, following accusa-
tions that the water is undrink-
able.

PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts hit out at the Water and
Sewerage Corporation (WSC),
which he once headed as Minis-
ter for Works in the former gov-
ernment, for failing to remedy
the high levels of Hydrogen Sul-
fide (H2S) in water supplies at
the Grand Cay Reverse Osmosis
(RO) plant before December 31
as promised.

But Minister of Works Phenton Ney-
mour accused Mr Roberts of whipping up
undue alarm as the WSC reported on
December 28 that the quality of the water
had improved significantly.

When Mr Roberts issued a public state-
ment yesterday insisting the water was
still foul smelling and not drinkable, Mr
Neymour contacted customers in Grand
Cay who assured him the water was better
than it had been before Christmas, he
said.

The minister also assured customers the
WSC was sending an RO supplier and
hydrologist to investigate the cause of com-
plaints as those customers who informed
Mr Roberts their water supply is still
undrinkable may have had a cross-connec-
tion in their water supply.

The WSC’s assistant general manager
for the Family Islands and area manager for
Abaco are also flying into Abaco this morn-
ing to investigate the cause of complaints
and test for H2S levels at the Grand Cay
plant.

Mr Neymour said he believes the WSC is
living up to its mandate to provide cus-
tomers with clean water that is safe to
drink, as the corporation hired a new con-



ASSURANCE:
Phenton Neymour

tractor to install a new system
when H2S problems arose late
last year.

Hydrogen Sulfide is a com-
mon problem at water plants
throughout the Bahamas as
organic matter in the soil gives
off the H2S gas, which can build
up and make the water undrink-
able, as it did at WSC RO plants
in Exuma and Acklins under Mr
Roberts’ watch as Minister of
Works, Mr Neymour said.

The colourless, flammable
gas, characterised by its rotten
egg odour, is considered an
extremely hazardous toxic com-
pound and in high concentra-
tions attacks the human body
as a chemical asphyxiant, similar
to carbon monoxide and
cyanide, inhibiting cellular res-
piration and uptake of oxygen and caus-
ing biochemical suffocation; according to
website safetydirectory.com.

Because of this, the WSC regularly aer-
ates water at their plants to rid it of H2S,
the minister said.

“Hydrogen Sulfide challenges are not
uncommon in the Bahamas,” he asserted.

“The WSC has indicated that in the
Bahamas anywhere between 25 and 30 per
cent of the time they experience Hydro-
gen Sulfide at various levels, so with all of
that information, I am indeed shocked by
Mr Roberts, because he is a former Minis-
ter of Works with responsibility for the
Water and Sewerage Corporation, and dur-
ing his tenure experienced the same chal-
lenges throughout the Bahamas.

“So I think it’s wrong of him to raise, or
attempt to raise, some major alarm.

“I feel Mr Roberts should demonstrate
some maturity and not try to raise undue
alarm where it’s not necessary.

“T consider his actions to be political, but
not only are they political, but also hypo-
critical.

“The WSC, in my view, are taking their
standard procedures and adhering to
them.”

91 Haitians, 46 Dominicans repatriated

REPATRIATION exercis-
es returned 91 citizens of Haiti
to the country’s capital Port-
au-Prince and 46 Dominicans
to Santo Domingo in the
Dominican Republic this
week.

Director of Immigration
Jack Thompson said the 72
Haitian men and 19 Haitian
women repatriated this week-
end included the 57 migrants
apprehended in Exuma last
Sunday, as well as 34 Haitians
found to be living in New Prov-
idence without legal status.

Those apprehended in Exu-
ma were found onboard a

sloop near Sandy Cay on the
southern side of Great Exuma
at around 2am on Sunday, Jan-
uary 4.

They were apprehended by
a team of immigration officers
and Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) marines who
flew in from Nassau to board
the vessel at sunrise. A total
of 44 undocumented men and
13 women were apprehended
in the exercise and taken to
Nassau for processing.

Among the 46 Dominicans
repatriated were five men
arrested for illegal landing in
Abaco, as well as 41 arrested

by the RBDF for poaching in
Bahamian waters.

“The Immigration Depart-
ment along with its other law
enforcement agencies remains
vigilant regarding the Immi-
gration law,” Mr Thompson
said.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PLP supporters urged to recapture
‘the spirit of political idealism’

Majority Rule anniversary

PROGRESSIVE Liberal
Party supporters were called on
to recapture the spirit of politi-
cal idealism culminated in the
Majority Rule Day of 1967 yes-
terday.

Party members charged that
after 44 years, the dream and
promise of economic justice
through equitable wealth dis-
tribution remains unfulfilled.

Commemorating the
anniversary of the historic
event, the party hosted a prayer
breakfast in the ballroom of the
Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

During his keynote address,
leader of the party Perry
Christie told supporters that the
anniversary memorialized an
era of the “Golden Age of ide-
alism in Bahamian politics.”

“Tt was an era marked by an
extraordinary spirit of selfless
struggle and sacrifice,” said Mr
Christie. “An age that was

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

marked by a collective desire
to be a part of what was clearly
understood to be.

“Those were the good old
days of Bahamian politics
because it was all about uplift-
ing our people and uplifting our
country rather than seeing what
one could get for oneself,” he
said. Majority Rule day — rec-
ognized on January 10 each
year — signifies the end of the
governance of the majority of
Bahamians by a minority.

Following a general election,
the then governing United
Bahamian Party was replaced
by the PLP, with the support
of recently elected Sir Randol
Fawkes, a Labour member, and
Sir Alvin Braynen, an Inde-
pendent member.

At yesterday’s event, the
party leader advised support-

ers to be inspired by the
progress made by past genera-
tions and to use its momentum
to meet the current societal
challenges.

Mr Christie said: “We can-
not allow this to be an occasion
for simple minded remem-
brance and instead we have to
seize this moment. This 44th
anniversary is a reminder of the
urgent need to embrace afresh
the ideals that guided our party
in an earlier time.

“Just as the front line war-
riors of the PLP took on the
great challenges of their time
and overcame them, we too are
now summoned by history to
meet the major challenges that
confront our society today,” he
said. The brunch preceded a
mass demonstration organized
by labour unions for this

evening — the latest demon-
stration in their continuing
argument with the government
over the sale of BTC.

Actions taken by the unions
seek to commemorate the gen-
eral strike of 1958, in which
thousands of workers took part.

The strike, which resulted
in the Trade Union and Indus-
trial Conciliation Act and the
creation of the Labour Depart-
ment, is also credited with influ-
encing Sir Allan Lennox Boyd,
then Secretary of State for the
Colonies, to order the first con-
stitutional steps toward Major-
ity Rule for the Bahamas.

Additional speakers includ-
ed party chairman Bradley
Roberts and Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell.

The Fox Hill MP spoke in
the absence of Lady Marguerite

a

Pindling, wife of former Prime
Minister, the late Sir Lynden
Pindling.

Mr Mitchell chronicled the
events that led up to the politi-
cal and national achievement,
highlighting its significance to
the PLP and the Bahamian
people.

Acknowledging that for
many Bahamians — in some
respects — there has been
regression in the years follow-
ing Majority Rule, Mr Roberts
urged those present to remem-
ber the promise of the historic
milestone.

“Wherever there is injus-
tice,” said Mr Roberts, “be it
social, political or economic, we
have a responsibility to speak
out and to correct it. Wherever
freedom is being stifled and
replaced with dictatorship and



MAJORITY RULE DAY:
Perry Christie

oppression, we have a respon-
sibility to fearlessly stand
against it — this generation has
the responsibility of continuing
the struggle and fulfilling the
promises of Majority Rule
which are deeply rooted in the
principles of democracy, jus-
tice, freedom and fair play
which collectively embody the
Bahamian dream.

“Your country demands no
less of you.”

He eee eee ee Teta

Vandyke Hepburn
ne ||

ARTHUR HANNA and Mrs. Anne Marie Davis, wife of Phili



Wid



p ‘Brave’ Davis, were guests at a prayer breakfast held

in Freeport to commemorate Majority Rule Day. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe is seen making a
presentation to Mrs Davis and Mr Hanna.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Progres-
sive Liberal Party on Grand
Bahama recognized 27 residents
here on Sunday while commemo-
rating the 44th anniversary of
Majority Rule in the Bahamas.

A prayer breakfast was held
at the Our Lucaya Resort on Sun-
day under the patronage of for-
mer Governor General Arthur
Hanna.

Those honoured were
Patronella Bowen-Simms, Peatrel
Russell, Dora Bartlett, Rejoina
Martin, Felix Seymour, Violet
Pintard-Johnson, Naomi Sim-
mons, Asa Jones, Stanley Sim-
mons, George Curtis, Antoinette
Seymour, Lorenzo Bullard, Mau-
rice Moore, Earnest Armbrister,

Addison Culmer, Arlington
‘Spike’ Mackey, Dennis ‘Preach-
er’ Hall, Andrew Munnings,
Mable Colton, Edgar Outten,
Hilton Bowleg, Lenny Butler,
Earl Walkin, Rejoina Curtis,
Clarence Bartlett, Granville Gar-
vey, and Mary Wilchcombe.
Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, Deputy
Leader of the PLP, and Member
of Parliament for West End and
Bimini Obie Wilchcombe were
also present and addressed those
honoured. Rev. Dr. Keith Russell
prayed for the nation, and the Rt.
Rev. Cornell J. Moss, VII Dioce-
san Bishop of Guyana, including
the Ceyanne and Surinam, prayed
for the Leader of the PLP.
Majority Rule is celebrated on
January 10. Carolyn Kinglocke,
chairman of GB PLP Convention
Organizing Committee, said all
Bahamians benefited, in one way

Scripture Thought

Micah Chapter 2 verse 1-5

WOE TO EVILDOERS

Woe to those who devise iniquity,and work out
evil on their beds! At morning light they practice
it, because it is in the power of their hand. They
covet fields and take them by violence, also
houses, and seize them. So they oppress a man
and his house, a man and his inheritance.

Therefore thus says the LORD: “ Behold, against
this family I am devising disaster, from which you
cannot remove your necks; nor shall you walk
haughtily, for this is an evil time. In that day one
shall take up a proverb against you, and lament
with a bitter lamentation, saying: We are utterly
destroyed! He has changed the heritage of my
people; how He has removed it from me! To a

turncoat He has divided our fields.

wn

Therefore

you will have no one to determine boundaries
by lot In the assembly of the LORD.



or another, from the historic event
that took place on January 10,
1967.

“Majority Rule presented the
opportunity for real democracy
to come to the Bahamas, under-
pinned by equality, tolerance, eco-
nomic justice, social justice, all
important elements in the cre-
ation of a free, modern, democ-
ratic state,” she said.

“We pay homage to the per-
sonalities and players in this epic
struggle. In a hard fought and
competitive election in 1967, the
PLP delivered the following 18
members to a 38-member House
of Assembly. They were: Lynden
Pindling, Preston Albury,
Clarence Bain, Milo Butler, Clif-
ford Darling, Elwood Donaldson,
Arthur Foulkes, Carlton Francis,
Arthur Hanna, Warren Levarity,
Curtis MacMillan, Uriah McPhee,
Maurice Moore, Edmund Mox-
ey, Jimmy Shepherd, George
Thompson, Jeffrey Thompson
and Cecil Wallace Whitfield.

“Randol Fawkes, who suc-
cessfully ran as Labour in 1962
and 1967 with the support of the
PLP, threw his support behind the
PLP and became a member of the
first Majority Rule cabinet. He
figured prominently in the move-
ment toward Majority Rule,” she
recalled.

Ms Kinglocke revealed that
the upcoming PLP mini-conven-
tion is slated for Grand Bahama
at the end of January. She noted
that Majority Rule is the singular
event in Bahamian history that
played a significant role in shaping
the modern Bahamas of today.

“The significant events lead-
ing up and emanating from
Majority Rule must become per-
manently etched in the Bahamian
historical landscape as these
events define us as a people,
reveals what we believe in as
Bahamians, and serves as a con-
stant reminder to us of our vision
and values,” she said.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 7



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Stern finds vindication in Anna Nicole Smith case

By LINDA DEUTSCH,
AP Special Correspondent

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
After losing Anna Nicole Smith
and then a court battle over her
estate, Howard K. Stern says a
judge's dismissal of convictions
in a prescription drug case vin-
dicates both him and the late
Playboy model.

"I loved Anna and I cared
for her so much. I have no
regrets," Stern told The Asso-
ciated Press in an interview
Thursday, hours after the court
reversed his two conspiracy
convictions for using his name
on prescriptions for Smith.

"The regrets I have are for
what people caused afterward,”
he said, referring to multiple
legal complications that arose
after Smith died of a drug over-
dose in Florida in February,
2007.

The most agonizing post-
script, he said, was the pre-
scription drug abuse charges
filed in Los Angeles against
Stern, Smith's psychiatrist Dr.
Khristine Eroshevich and Dr.
Sandeep Kapoor, Smith's gen-
eral physician. He called the
months of trial a nightmare.

Prosecutors had argued that
Smith was an addict, and the
defendants were feeding her
addiction rather than provid-
ing prescription drugs for any
legitimate medical purpose.

But after a long and costly
prosecution, Superior Court
Judge Robert Perry threw out
conspiracy convictions against
Stern and Eroshevich on Thurs-
day, allowing one charge
against her to remain but reduc-
ing it to a misdemeanour. The
jury had already acquitted
Kapoor of all charges against
him.

The judge concluded that
Smith was not an addict by
legal definition but was rather a
woman seeking relief from
chronic pain. He said the jury
verdicts suggested they agreed.

Perry said Stern clearly did
not intend to violate the law
when he used his name on drug
prescriptions for Smith. The
judge said the defendants who
used false names for Smith
were trying to protect her pri-
vacy in a manner used by many
celebrities.

Stern praised the ruling as
"a huge victory and vindication
for Anna and the person she
really was, not the person the
prosecution tried to portray her
as."

He called the case "a dis-
honest prosecution with no pur-
pose but to ruin our lives and
for their publicity and political
gain.”

Los Angeles County District
Attorney Steve Cooley criti-
cized the judge's decision, say-
ing it "denigrates the substan-
tial investigative efforts con-
ducted by the state Department
of Justice and the medical
board." He said he would
appeal.

Stern attorney Steve Sadow



said his strongest and most
unusual defense theme was
love.

He told jurors that Smith
was the love of Stern's life and
he would never have done any-
thing to hurt her.

He said prosecutors at times
portrayed Stern as a Svengali
trying to control Smith for mon-
ey, acclaim he said was false.

"The love was a fact," Sad-
ow said. “It was the truth and
all I had to do was sell the true
facts to the jury. They had to
understand the relationship
between Howard and Anna
rather than the false and ficti-
tious relationship the prosecu-
tion tried to sell. And of course
we had the pictures."

Sadow said the turning point
in the trial came when the pros-
ecution imported two nannies
from the Bahamas who testi-
fied that Smith was in a

Betty Taylor

Journalist | Entrepreneur

HOWARD K STERN and the late ANNA NICOLE SMITH



drugged, semi-comatose state
for weeks after the birth of her
child and accused Stern of
keeping her drugged.

The defense then produced
dozens of dazzling photographs
of the blonde beauty from the
same time period, showing her
vibrant and smiling, cuddling
her baby, posing with Stern, cel-
ebrating her birthday and par-
ticipating in their commitment
ceremony on a yacht.

Stern said he sometimes
marvels at the turn of fate that
led him to Smith and the love
story that consumed his life. He
was her lawyer first and then
her lover.

"Back then could I ever have
anticipated where I am now?
Not in a million years," he said.

At 41, he said he has not had
time to evaluate his future or
to mourn for his lost love.

He said a bright light in his

Don't waste time in
life...because you

cannot do anything in
death.

life is Smith's daughter, Dan-
nielynn, who he once thought
was his. She is being raised by
her father, photographer Larry
Birkhead.

He said he and Birkhead,
who once fought in court, are

now working together on
Smith's estate and Birkhead
will probably become its sole
administrator.

He said he will have visits
with Dannielynn and hopes to
tell her about her mother.

"She just reminds me of her
mom," he said of the 4-year-
old child.

"She's a junior version of
Anna. Larry is doing a great
job with her. She's the happiest
little girl you'll ever see."

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

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ere Liteireact of The [seal of Mew Prev hence
hae Ha beara, Ona ining single siorey pirreare
Teh erice TPR ST Ce frill ceartege Creare)
eniry pooch, [rene nom, ding none, rich
en, bumadry mom, farvily room, sitting area
4 bedrooms, ¥ hai d patin, The to
tal area of bind 2 movely T8419 fi
Apopra bsnl value 5! ML

BOL) len parcels of fd contaming 21.120
sql. situated on the southern side of fost
Shirley Street and 100 doet west of tte. pane
tine veth “Shira” in the Eastern Cisirict of
the Idand ol New Preeddence- The Baharers.
Situated thereon ia. Ges Station and avin
Thequair sharp. Appraband Vue

Bi| Sinple Family Hesichenice
onthern side of est [a Sires
diviely Bast of Caprice Comal
plex (Lath Hear 7
feet const of 5 bednocens, 4 Li horihenomea
detached building double cour paragel is 60h
square feet, with prinfnreed sea weal, curbs
ming pool 4 deck, The waterfront property
fersa land ste nd A squeee Beet Apqerabeel
Voke $0 0251

BOL) Ab that pore orlet of and being Lets
Fllland 11 in (inrk 28 oft Larner San
van, Cnatiainertg a ship z plas oa [hee ln
18 trapeviie in aferpan, fh. uci Sa] Geet. Age
praised coho 32.15.0006

| = Abthat piece oe parcel of lot contain
ing A897 sq . seated 0 fasiem aden?
Last Street fs Tmt erie ty
utilined bn amimerctal building. Beected on
the property ea hee storey rernmery struction
teh peas area Comet of ghee to Beraiing:
Floor (Grand & Secor - 341 gp fi, Stor-
age: S020. Ft, Lunch Rosen - 70S sap ft, Pa
tice b Walloveay - | SM Say Pt, Aprpeeaisad valor
TRA

Act) «All thet fece or pamel ot nt con ing
B07) syrene feet suaies on the Soren se
of Samal Lane Port Fincastle City Cestrict, The
property is comenencal hy zoned with ae old
Hahn style boiling constricted af wood
from with cement sucess walls, The build

ing cone sts of the following: danound Plonor-
Porch, 4 Offices, [lerontion, Err and
Storage. Upper levees dices. Confer
nem, | Aathirosen & nara Thar iron ip

purencirmay ely 3, POL) aepiare fewt with porch are i
1H ey Appraised wale TRA

BLL Besidentialommenct! property
bon? 107" Incaied Oalmerreiile, Easier Che
iret, New Provalonce with ssize of 4000 oy
fit, The property Cum LMI gay
Ti bathe reg,, ttpeper Levi: 3 bend 1 hail: apeari-
leerk Bequty salen, The building
ck wall, #" concn
Partitions, seqitenl wh ne rool, tike! (nore
toca) Ceiling, priveds waler ester, stared -
ard wlintrical are) plurrdzinng lig tues, Gimiral
air-condition [pli syshenn), brergier bees, Ag
fori weed tem Jems 3101 TERS

BLL) Toy bts 8 24 boca Drove ttl
Subdiedom, Soei here District, Saw Poke
On which an incomplete burial img is stu atend
properties ane rest dieratial yard rralti-bernty
nil pradked, inser laredecapre!
emaaal inane) widen. The Bariiilin gin 4ehti
soe UU aed oe 2 atevevsy reed ti-fearn iby at hee resaal
webagee with | beccd regres url ally ached There: dora:
scvrineatital inet Foe Whee capper Mier: 4 emit
| bead 1 bath etch Serta, 1 eal | bath each,

vot Teor - 2 bed b hath

bath. which in
1. Appriimed val

i tl
Fireleward im thee Wie “lire ate

ric of Bern’ PA
Titet of ft #15 jennings uw

ra 3 bend I 2 bathmnens
restidheracs: oral Chines: rcsickereses tirechor
inicio; Appiainad value 350,000.09.
(thar f tT bn 01S eect, Comair of
Orae acre, Apprdeed valee 317100.
80) Parcel of land situated in the suba-
Vien id Glisten Garden 11,250 eg ft Lew

AW PROVIDE eB
(RN) Vacant property locnied 49 fi. east of
Hal’ Mle on the nonherm dide ol Bara Shirky
Sect ated lo as “Od Plantain Ine,
in the eaanem diate af Mew Provikenes
Property mot + Msg Tl, al open soning
Appraised value SL BLIGE
BOD) Thee singles tami by rrvaltictamn Dy nest
dential vacant parcels of lard being Lins &
10, 114 12 cieeated onthe Somhem sie of
Ping Trail Rol i9 the Wiser [hair] of ene
T mas, Pengeerty Sines are Lint #1 - ST
* 100) ~ S015 ft. aed Lion 2 !
a ql. Appoaised value: $85,000 for each bor.
(i) Vara Lot Win La | = = at
item aude of Foe Hid Ae fh
of Ponce Charles Drive, eeu, st
[he open zoning) hti-borely property soe
is appen, 12205 sgt Appraised value
$150,000
CE) aaa been ce Ladd Ieee tid Wines Bea
Stroet, chineacthy oppeesite & the entrance to + Chig-
Pings Hine, Pease Bahamas - The prog
erly cones! of approdimna A
acess. Property has 1 cadmarely a6
ata n Nong: with prokected anche
eee Ue sat teerte Of Alaris k Cay
ced A A conimins 27,4 ft weal Parcel Fi
convin MA, Abreasonadle offers will be
considered,

ol i tha cubed

(istrict « dite Id and of Mew Provilenc: being
Lot Mumnber 14 in flock Number 4. property
is appinos Te sath. Appraised Value TA

2 Bec parce! arline of lanvdl ba

koran asf ARTIBNS?
inthe Southern Disirect of the bee
Providence Appraised value $6500

Lol Ma. 10. Sou hea Comerno! Man-
, Sa Apple: Baad, Seared Saeed
We, Sie 14H egy OL Ayers vali

ceed on Maripold Rod! in the Seba ividion

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-350-2

(AIM) Mrs. Pomkque Crnwford

{S01 Mr Jerome Pinder

AZ] Mr. Arian Enviveeless

:S04) Mr Vandy ke Pratt

BM) Mrs. Higee Sealey

(S04) Mrs. Tiffany Simms 0 beten
(806) Mrs. Lois Wallis

LAT | kin. Lesnar Com

(0H) Mrs. DaShann Clare: Paul
SALLI) Me. Lidia Rahiming

PALMIDIMLE SHORPAING CENTIEE
Tel: 242-322-44219 of 242-Bi2- 5

Sl) Mrs, Parige Richie

8 hock a0 in the cbstnict of Mew Prowdence

Coen ing | hen ei one ree ceene, proand foeor
aime akitchen, dintrgecom, lounge, a fom-

ih room, a veranda the fromt anal side wtih

a pert bo the beac of they b

flour contains 2 balm, 3

inched and rapa Te witha k

maser bedineca Appice stare! bailing 0001

eq. Apprmeal TRA

SH) Lint #27 oP eae Alloirmeni #14 the
faatern District, contuming rsalence stual-
et om Denwer Street off Parkges ie Gress i thar
Arm's Town Cordiiuence, Sarw Providence
Peoperty size 2.5000 ay, ft, Avebciing, sine “AMI
ogy FL. Appreninan] vad ne S50 O

SA) Lint ae? in block #1, Steward fined, Coral
Heergeats Coast Selb sia natuated tries einnn
District of Mew Providence appre, toe FAM
sy, A witha split bevel oor brining bee bed, Gave
bath, Giving, dining & faeniby me

aml etlity mom - appre. #

7AM, H, Appremser wale

S69] Lint 2b meseentia pooperty ocaiee
Sdovline Heighos, Appemised value $20,000

S69) Lot of Rnd being fot number 11 ini
Hock nueniber 10on a phaniot allotmerss laid
out by Vilage Ceiate Lommed amd fied inte
depe of Land & Sarees a marreer 102 fe

and sttuted on ihe Eastern [astrict of Feerw
Preaigenice, Properts contains ther bed bn
bath resdence, Appraised value 5105000041

S| Lot Soi 21579 fatieied on the
noth ice of Stell Fish Road, betes the thiect
let west of Fire Tra Road and east ol Ham
ster Road with a cme hal dhopkes restdertial
prenmess. Appraised tale TEA

7 bocaded Vilage Mbotrnent with
ier - S400

wa Lin I
fourples

BS) Property dined on Wiliams Lares off
ke mg Hine, Mew Provident. Batanas con
Lining a baroeenorey beeue add an a pea rirene
balling consisting of ]B00 o. BL Appraised
rilue 2100

S69) Loot land sinned ist Trail Road
being a partition of Glas [hot PL hee
Ponvidence, Banas oon tal ning cram hoe
PRT LT aed a 1

fsted as Appraised ta

Fadth ‘teen

trict of Mee Prowiiece, Rohner oon

Ing a doples aparenent comprising of men
2. bedroom! |) bathroom aprnenis. Ay

fnlsed valor $1) 7500000.

Bea) Lin al land SRB? shout on ei
bh Fineeboed Gardiores lin the ou her

of the land of Mew Provtite

Hall conarected cance redidence le Feeil.

‘pore vale TAA

Lor @ 1006 in Gebdes
8? Sublivkiom sina
Dis irhcr of the bs Lad of
lalndng adie Shorey pitivene i
fi. Pra Be my appeat. Le

Cares Eanes
E muh Winter i

564) Lote B Bloc B sive
Sree! in the Cacey’s Sibelivis oe
ifoer balroom to bath resides
aio: | 2 so Feet. Peery sie apy
oy RL Appriised Valeo 2145 00),

Sra Sirah honey triples, ei Mind:

i rane is Mui Folk; Residential, Meesrallt
I Bi sq ft with the living aed measering
2752 2g fh Appaieed value 3474199 00
All dat Southwestern Moker of Hall
Of Lark being part of a Tract of
perhy caliod “ANS TOA
rs Sik on (HL feet Saruthi-
faa! of Kem p's Rc i
the & slated of Mew Pr
15 cori i
1a S0 fi Jepreised 351000.

SAS) Lote Aine 8 ont Month diet Car
Michie Ad. Naseer with bedkling ated foun
tition fi awerehoine Property site b5,72

ep). Appraised rake: £32") 100

9) All that piece parcel or bot of kane sii-
revie om the Cast Side of bel bers Road an
Ate Sl ht Sogh of Lannicte

a contaning a Uniplex Property a

DOM ELD say Tt} Ageprrag seed Cabo TF

S|) Loi f2. Bock Enplersioa 300 i
tidoe, Southern CHstrict of MP containing
4 panty comep keted bu fic ine Dperty Sze
Ippo, FS a Aye praised val = SA fl

$08) Propemy containing 4 bed lath home
Siege Famiiy Blesid ence. AD that piece of pear
celorlet of land being Lot. Suan ber 2275 rime
Within the Subdhetston Ener as Cedar proees
Palate situated in ihe Souther District of che
aaiceD Yeu Providence in The Common:
hoof the lahore Property Shee A
ag 5h) Alihenp ce car
ie ortho Beheeer Gospel nel. Pine
Charles De identified as Farce “HW” andcon
Wining Cheneon a Sour Unie Apartment oom
flex. Property dae i 20501] aq th Apperiiset
abe 54.57 Ky
56S) Al that plece parcel or bot al bared sit
teed in Englerson being Lot @l2 and #2
Containing an comet: ries apartesent
Appraised wal ues 195, 000

569) All then ene pemcel or bo of bared sia
Jed Pinewood Gardens conial ning thereon 2
et betoomsedidence. Appraised vale $

Al char piece patodd of fot ofan cain
beved Lot fa? Auaralia Hivd_ Elisabed Es
Fite tar aistitag tt Toon a Three Ib
fskieice Apprabed value §

56S) All chat piece pared of Let of lad

es Subdivision on the dared

An Provence mid contains tkereon &
1445 soLf. building. Said Property ib SK
ag Appraised Valor £179 1)
569) Alc! pee: parcel of Lat of aed
bese) 0905. aed 6385 i ec 22) it the cre
falkod mind knoe as Mesa Vile Su bet
Won On the idan of Mew Paavide ic: and oni -
laine theron 1559.1 apparent building
Said Property b SO) agit Appraised Vike
617400
569) Loe 001 Atawek Ace
Wales Sal sliv

ie of Pinon Ee

CO og fh ("2 100) Ap

101) Lat Ret on the northwestern aided
Merkrwi Sint, Blizuteeth & Eulaliy Fa el Picea

wt Prowidetice
kland Lot of the lated say fl. with &
22-year old single level eden Vbedrnoris
I bathroom. Appraised vali $44 ATL

SA) AM that poor perroel or plod of Larned
porn pial, 2519 eof. alate on the East
em side of Aetiedtrong 5. ard EPpIE. f

i
rented alrictuer. Ajyprmbacd Vile: $152 125

SO) Libel Landen the nas! sale of Millers

Pavac! doe kaeoevn an Pesca Ad) ened 276 SH
Feet sith of Carmichael Hel ie
Titre of the felon of Mew Prowic sured
Sontag Ciro a dupe (band | berth
Rea keiinig | ADE so. aed property ATT
fy EL Arpad eu S20 Da

S64) Lot of bond bring Lot #44 nf the wuh-
dhviaain Ered oe [inser Galate ailialedl
the Eastern Miwtrict, Mie Prrcicknice, and con-
laining foment a tne eliery crete buill-
ity Aj puta bond vo S277 0

S68) Tractof keed sttuaie Seth of Crapen
Rew! in the Bastern Cieirici, bland of Mire
Presidency, containing thensan a ane dam-
opal alructin:. Apepraband Vedi $125,000)

S64) Loto! end kore ps Lot 21 on Treas
wee Cire Subdividoe diated in the eastern
Distinct of New Preaidence and co MTLUITENE
therenun a 3-hedream 2 “bath rissdther a

ing appess
ay & Appraised

S69) Lotef bond ie Shirky bright: Subir
dom being Lot ei Bleck 2] coneening thereon

VOU e iO) ool ee he

kn ae Kod Acres, Lot ia apipirine
ft, Appraised vilue 33,000

59{ Vacant ltdnale famby cond ng. Linea
2) ofthe wabdickien called “Southors Shores”
Cintas Subdivision locavd on Marshall
Plow Poopeenty sacar is sorree fr’, ise em ta
gph posed aed 1S Son onesie, 3 SEL al the
hark ard some 85.61 on the other side of
57S sg it of lad space. Apprakeed valuc
56000
S| Ldhewekopredd bots 4A, 18, 17, Bb ar
14 lorated ¢ hapirein Deisies, Wed tere Ay
praised vaue S40

Sad) All chal plece parcel or It ool lard be:
itna | z

PLAS ey

aiverbe it Ihe Vici ny of Semalikan
in the Featem Pieirect of the Iskemndl [ Narev
Prvadence, Agpramed Value 114

5a) All that plece parcel of lot of land
fimabened Lit e3 be a fect cal Let
Croun Lean ARAA siete And ff Carti-
chose fied in the Southem Cisirict of the
Iskind of Here Provence, Property is SS
oq. Appraised value 5590001

Be Ab chat ecep lott land alr
Waited an the nits fof Palit
Lane & flome Street, Po Hill in the East-
cto! Mew Prredenice, Appears

KE

TH Ab diat Mece parcel or lot ol landbe
ing Lor #5 in Hkeck 23 in the Sebhdiveiom
brea os Miler Hargabas situerte in Lhe Weal
enn (istrict of the bland of ew Proeaence
To 3100 appenc 7 ay fr Ap
praised value 1A
Bid) All hat piece parce of bot of Land bo-
tated Cored Heights Feel. Appratual ealie
THA

(57 All thea piece pew cel or lot of kind

rat as Lot? 3 being a portion of a larger
Tree Of Land ko as Le of 2 1 af Souther i
Fitts Sulivision silat in the Seater
(Dis triet of the tsk) of Meee Providence, Prig-
erty is (222° x S29" apopureg TA say fee

Appeaised Value S300

(S88) Lotof bend eae Lot #4 bho ka
ine Subdiveion calles bomen z= Heal -
lou Dale sicmed ie thc Sothern District in
the Land of New Providence. Bahamas. ip-
fntised Vaduie THA.

Ska, All that piece parcol or bet of kine be-
Img Loi of the ores] [iter Subdesion
sinamed South of Lamperdoan Urive and
appr fest of Culbents Hill Orie to
jaled in the Rene Oieiet of the [sland of
Nis Previdkeme. Property ie 15/661 capt are’
fs bell tops Acrileed value 32001 (HL 00

34] Lot of and being Lot #2] Cireniaena
Subdivision simiac in the Western District
Of de bland of Meu Peovide nce it

feoniueral th of the Hahei. Pre quar ap-
prrtrs 6,506) oe. Tt Apprremeen] alee StRh ML

(4) Lotof land beimga portion of Lot. #5
of block Es d Hilk Su bated:
fon in the } strict of the

raw 2. Praga bs Wiacaa
mmacersatren 9006 oy Apeprinieen) Va 3415

S711) Lotef land beng Lot 4m a Subdre
son Enoewn.a8 and calked "Whe a's Vinewand
slnanee In the Southiwestene DMs trict of NeW
Providence. Prog, i 7.25% 29.0. Appra iad
ralue S700

64) Lorbof land henemg an area ol SU) age
being Lot #12 Gameca Beach Estates inthe
Aastem dbirict of Mew Proved ero. Frome the
ime reciion of Fo Hill Rd and Yorecrw
Hi Bd Deter eee Vite raw’ Hil Flee, take:
(he firs) omerver cry Chee right, Gake they fire
left aed property is second propertyon the
Tight. Appraised values3 1.000

56a) Lot? situated on the weer skical
Gokken bls Roel South of Cae

in the Western District of Meer

Appt rast Talue Si Oo i

FREEPORT

JEOL) Vieeant propery Ioeated) Aadvamiia
So, Aleck 16 bo acai, Crate Ra-
hema Coreiding of YL Alay fl, Apprabas
wale £2 60

2) Vacant Gonmercial Lot Moc 24. Bock

OFFICERS

(205) Mirs. Anya Major

NASSAU AN BRANCH

Del: 242-522-8710

(700) Mr. lomes Strachan

(01) Mis, Thyra Johnson

(04) irs. Alicia Thompeom
MAVOKEY STREET BRANCH

Pele 242-593-4097

(05 Mls. Nicole Fans

JOHN FE KES SEDY DRIVE ARASH
Feb 242-425-4711

(0) Mr Robert Renin
PARADISE ESAT) BRANCH
Telephone: 242-333-1004

(S50) Mis. Cherefe Martin hang

PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Tek 242-305-7505
500) Ms, Nicola Walker
(505) Sls. Patricia Bussell
CARLE REACH BRANCH
Pel 42-327 -6077

(BG) Mr, Derek Sbanrup

LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel; 242-302-517 5)
[TIB) Ms. Quincy Fisher
(717) Mrs, Nancy Swaby
Ms. Deke King
Ms. Marguerise Johnson
Mire. Cathar ir Davis

(Sra) Ms Annishe Wilson
NASSAU INTL ADR

Tel: 242-377-3179

(ES) Mrs, Retiea Vidlkine
LYRORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-440 or 242-F2-T
(VOL-M) Peis. (Limclery Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELPUTHERA

Tel: 242-392. 2856/0

(i) Ma. Bethe Burrows
HARRCHIE ELLAND BRANCH
Teh2a2-343-2200

(POL) Ms. Vekherine Larocla

concrete building. Appraised

I Lod (uber 227, Coral Harbor Water:
was Subd raisin, Westen (astct, Sew Prov-
dence containing. spin level Shed 4 1/2 beh
reaikerce Lieieg 5 pex EB Se at Poopeerty
1004 say ft, Appears Value P9700)

HES) Lotol nd being Lot i siteatein dar
denHils €2 Subdividen inthe Southern [ierict
af the Idandef Mew Providence and oomiain-
ing thereon 2 peartialhy completed 2 hopping
plazx which measumes 1.500 alt
eae 15 TA ay Ee. Appa bad Veal SBF

G68) Lot of hind being Lot member 076 in
he Subdheisian called and knowrias Pinewnod
Curiens See ¢ Cast-Ceniral District of
the klond of Mew Moetiesce and containing
thereon 2 3-hedroom Iba concrete read:
aenoe, Appraed Ya Dov

68) Lots of land being Lows sumer 359
and 674 inche Sebcitvision cabled and known
25 Stapledon Gendens sitmane in ihe Westem
District of the landol Mew Providence, con-
fining thereon penal units. Appraised value
TBA

MOE) Loc ol land sean on the Nonhem side
af Taney Sree with meaty oomainucted 2
1 orey offer building. Property sioe is.ap
prea, 1g. Appa od vale S92
01) Lot of tend with cereal complex ain
aed In Union ¥ilage Saas, Bahamas. Ap
prakeod valued $500 10,

69) Lot of land sisanse on the Seuthem
dik of Marin & and conidniag hereon a
tiple (2 oF ed | hath undies amd (1) Phe 9

Drive appocs S70 fl south of Bird Biel in the
Soulhem Disiictot Mew Providence, Prop
eny comeains thereon a Car Wash Stied-S7'
ay ft, oltioe [Beauty Sabon STH sq [1 Hestaii
Win! and Bar Ake = Lésdeg fh. Tonal p fapeety
Bap. 5.0Mieg h. Appraise dvalo: BA

t Of Mand sinmate in thee Sormchaeat.

emi Lal the bland of Nea prvi ence
and bering LL 3 of the Sabah 1 Ca Dial
ated kivoaet irs Sunshine Pi ek ies conan
nig heron @ BO 2 fod atom for a di
ples. Property 6 Os fi. Aepiradsed value
365,000

71) Letathind being Loc fhe ae in Ganon
Hills #2 Seb sion in the Southern Dales of
the Klaine of Mew Pekicscr and conning
thitod na partial pooped shopped eg place
which measmes BA sg Property dae
17 AA 2g St Ap pain value 50076 oo

71) La uf laral sitiaved in Rough Es-

Heig hes
eqtalniag thes K
tdihy. Pec. ls A sift. bil, i L 740 ay fi
Appindsed valae £15100

coe it Hii: Easocin Dis.
ui F being Lot AS Will Road
and containdn a tharaan in office building.
Praperty bh 4500 ag. fe 50" 2 90") Appa bac
vale THA

FREEPORT

OH) Sargge Sdory in-pla hukknp, one -
bediecene anid ban |tandcon [cated coma
wea lti-farvely Lat hoa, tober 3, ie bery Lane
sactive |, Hobos Beef Yacht 4 Country Cuts
Subilivieion, Freeport Grew! Haharres, Prop
erty siae beaperos, [6421 so feet Appraised
fhe 348, 000,

: Liat lee

(eOS) All heat pre pened of hod flea are
mnprrceeionts theron: rarer oe Mend bhoerk
18 Habeas Marina & Section (X incatil in
terse coh of Peenpes a wul Fiater-
reat Manl Appeed. 1507 or OA acres
prenpeerty cel aires dogs bere eave Ding. App rkan
pale 3 iat (ae

(b01-P) Residential Cancel [ots 0 0) be}, Bleck

Stal hision Freeeaet, Garanel Ra-

onlaining bw sborey Houses, 4 beeel

Stiatal on 1.82 Acnsoof lanl. Ap-
prapaal wdue $1 4722001



2 Aakers Subclevesn V] coniaireng becres
located Pree por. Grand Pahams. Appraised
Value Sd

(104) Viesant Sinple Family lo a5 Block F
Raburn Som Su, Proepeor, Crane Fetia-
Tel Appraised Vi 385, 1

(4) Dodevetonesd [oi 145. Sein Lane
Locaqan Beach Sud rrisbon. Ciramd Hatearna,
LETSD aquare fect. Appraised value: THA
RT) Veet land Lo a4, Block 21. Baa.
berms Weed fh Civasion [Port seal of Proe-
por, Land Bao Property stoe aperoa
25,500 qh. Appriised value Sho 0),

(564) All thal ploee parod of kot of dora be-
ig Loe], Ainel 6 sitmatiod in Bahan Soh
wiser, Peeepiert, Creal Ferterres, Ap
dvalue S00)
La fa, Br kT Aberdeen Drive, Ba
hilviskot

71)

Lacan pro

a in the Fre
Section], Ferepe
fer Appridsed value
B71) Lot of tnd being number ten [10]
flock Maamber Three 61) Bristed Rene febdli-
Tejon. Unit Cine (1) im the City of Freeport
in the island of Grand Hahama. Bahamas
Property ibapprn a2 ore. Appraised vali
S2c1, [EO

oy Cone edie of Lint A
Tt Hides Subdivision,
a Bohan. Bata.

(ALL) Vacant Lot of land located Vier Brel
rand Bahar comming WE] square deel
of 2hacres seamed in Ginn Sur Mer sebd|

1 land of Cinta Baber. Ap

peealied value: S575 1M)

PAUL) Vewreeet bom icf Lard a, Versailles Sar
Mer Club & Hesoct, esi End Mat Mo. 3 sub-
vision, on the island of Grand Batam, Ba
harnas. Appiridsed value 550 0

PPO) Lele, Linde S, Aleck 22 Charan
Com Lauculn Geen Saal ietian

fama, residential properte App ribet ale
TRA



ANDES TOWN PRAMCH
Tel; 242-358-207 1

|400) Ms Hianca Sines
MARSH HARBOE, AACE
Tel: 242-387-2400

(S08) Wir. Julius Seymour
(900) Mors. Syhia Poitier
(S00) Mir Kierenit ery
TIMINI BRANCH

Tel: 242-347-3041

(100) Ms. Italia Beckford
GAS, DONG BLAND
‘Tel: 242-3374 ciel

EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 24203251

(iG) Ms. hincelyn fackey
FREEPORT, ADIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-226 12

(LOL-F] es. Garpeell Frith

(102) Ais. Elaine Collie

(103) Wore. Chena Mewtedd-Cartwriehit
(MOR) Pits. Sytele Carey

SPANISH WELLS

‘Tel: 242-345-415) of 242-345-4145
[S60 Pir. Wiadber Carey



THE TRIBUNE





CARICOM or
CARI-GONE?



By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

THE New Year started
with a great deal of frustration
being publicly expressed over
the Caribbean regional inte-
gration project which, this year,
will have been in construction
for forty-three years. Other
integration efforts, such as the
European Union (EU), which
began after the Caribbean
Community and Common
market (CARICOM), have
moved ahead much faster and
much more effectively for the
benefit of the people of their
member countries.

It is understandable, there-
fore, that, in an editorial, one
of the Caribbean’s oldest news-
paper observed that a majority
of people believe that “any
official attempt to unite the
region as envisaged in the
CARICOM Single Market
and Economy (CSME) is noth-
ing but reverie and doomed to
failure.” To be fair the editor-
ial did not trumpet this obser-
vation with glee or satisfaction.
It said that “as we enter the
second decade of this century,
we hold fast, nevertheless, to
the idea of one region.”

So, on the one hand, this
editorial, reflecting the views
of many, still believes in the
notion of a deeply integrated
Caribbean — “one region,” but
it expresses no faith that, after
forty-three years, we will see
a CSME anytime soon. The
editorial identified four con-
temporary reasons for its lack
of faith in any “official”
attempt to unite the region.

These reasons were: an
unfortunate statement last year
by the Trinidad and Tobago
Prime Minister that her gov-
ernment would no longer be
“an ATM” machine for other
countries of CARICOM; an
injudicious remark by the same
Prime Minister that, in the pro-
vision by her government of
assistance to the islands of St
Lucia and St Vincent and the
Grenadines she would expect
some benefit for the construc-
tion industry of Trinidad and
Tobago; the more recent sug-
gestion by Prime Minister
Bruce Golding of Jamaica that
his government favoured set-
ting up its own national final
Court of Appeal rather than
acceding to the Caribbean
Court of Justice (CCJ); and
that CARICOM heads of gov-
ernment are yet to establish
“any executive machinery to
enforce” their own policy deci-
sions.

All of these points are valid.
There are many more besides.
Among them are that instead
of getting on with fashioning
CARICOM into an effective
vehicle to help with the
improvement of their people’s
lives and progressing develop-
ment in their countries, some
governments are busily trying
to cultivate relations with oth-
er larger countries far beyond
the region to try to get what
they can while they can. The
latter strategy is, of course,
unsustainable.

And, as has happened in the
past, the governments now
flirting, on their own, with big-
ger countries not on their
doorstep will return to the
regional fold which is not only
their natural home, but also
their best hope.

Fortunately, the statements
by the Prime Minister of
Trinidad and Tobago, while
indicative of an attitude to
CARICOM held by many in
that country, were made in the
early flush of government.

In the past, other heads of
government have made equal-
ly hurtful (and not fully
informed) comments in other
contexts.

The truth is that Trinidad
and Tobago is the principal
beneficiary of trade in goods
and services to CARICOM —
benefits are not a one-way
street.

This is the message that the
government in Port-of-Spain
should be delivering to its peo-
ple.

Also, to those who say that
Trinidad and Tobago does not
need the CARICOM market,
they should be challenged to
identify the alternative mar-
kets, how quickly could they



SIR RONALD SANDERS

be developed if they could be
developed at all, and at what
cost.

With regard to the state-
ment that Mr Golding has
made about establishing
Jamaica’s own national, final
court of appeal instead of join-
ing the CCJ for this purpose, it
really is time that someone
bells the cat on this as well. As
I pointed out in my last com-
mentary (“Time to make up
your mind”), by April this year
Jamaicans will head five
extremely important CARI-
COM-wide institutions. These
are positions for which the
Jamaica government fought
and other CARICOM coun-
tries agreed. What is the mes-
sage that is being sent to the
people of CARICOM by
Jamaica? Is it that all is well
when Jamaica holds the reins,
but it isn’t well when other
CARICOM nationals are
involved? This cannot be so,
and Mr Golding is far too intel-
ligent a man and too well
informed to hold such a posi-
tion. The time has come for
Jamaica’s leadership to cease
pandering to the false notion of
some special Jamaican capaci-
ty, and, instead, spread the true
message that this region is one
— and one to which Jamaica’s
contribution has been highly
regarded by its Caribbean
brothers and sisters.

The quicker that the CARI-
COM Secretariat, as part of an
overall reform of all its activi-
ties, is given the resources and
empowered to mount a sus-
tained, multi-media campaign
throughout the region on how
membership of the Caribbean
Community has benefitted,
and can continue to benefit,
the people of each CARICOM
country the better. And, every
government should regard it
as its responsibility and oblig-
ation to carry out its own
domestic programme of edu-
cation and information.

Of the four points made in
the Editorial to which this com-
mentary refers, the most cru-
cial is its observation that “the
decade closed without the
establishment of any executive
machinery to enforce the
implementation of policy deci-
sions by heads of government.”
This is — and has been for
decades — the fundamental
problem with the lack of
progress of CARICOM in
establishing the CSME and
even in carrying out a range of
activities that are routine in
organisations similar to CARI-
COM.

In his New Year’s address
as Chairman of CARICOM
until July 2011, the Prime Min-
ister of Grenada, Tillman
Thomas, said that “the cry for
the ‘quickening of the pace’
was heard” and “active con-
sideration of new governance
structures” was given by
CARICOM leaders. He
offered that “one of the main
ideas in taking the necessary
steps will be tested in this com-
ing year with the establishment
of the Permanent Committee
of CARICOM Ambassadors”
which, he said, “heralds a new
dawn for our Community.”

Mr Thomas is right to hold
out hope, but it is difficult to
see how another layer of
national representatives will
implement policy decisions of
Heads, when ministers and the
Secretariat were not able to do
SO.

The CARICOM vehicle
needs an urgent overhaul, or
it really will be a case of
“CARICOM and gone.”

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com



an
NaS,

THE TRIBUNE





MIKE LIGHTBOURN

REAL ESTATE: A
‘LITTLE’ BIT GOES
A LONG WAY -
THE INTERIOR
OF YOUR HOME

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

YOU MIGHT think
that the living room or
family room is the heart
of your home, but in the
eyes of potential pur-
chasers, there are at least
three other rooms that
will demand your atten-
tion as you prepare to sell
your home for top dollar.
Avoiding improvements
in the following areas
may cost you a lot more
than the small investment
it takes to impress buy-
ers.

For purchasers, the
kitchen is often the most
important area, and while
you may not need to
replace your cabinets,
resurfacing or just sand-
ing and painting will goa
long way towards improv-
ing their appearance.
Don’t overlook the coun-
tertops — this is an imme-
diate eye catcher. If the
floor is in poor condition,
consider replacing it.

In the bathrooms, fresh
paint and new flooring
are also fine improve-
ments, but your greatest
payoff might come from
simply investing a couple
hundred dollars in a new
mirror and vanity. Make
sure the toilets are secure
and are in good condi-
tion.

The laundry room is
often overlooked when it
comes to improvements,
but purchasers will
respond positively if you
install built-in shelving
and storage. If your laun-
dry area isn’t flooded
with light, consider
upgrading the light fix-
tures. While you’re at it,
that fresh paint and new
flooring wouldn’t hurt
here, either.

Trust me that if these
three rooms are bright,
neat and clean, it conveys
the message that you are
a responsible seller with
pride of ownership, and
hopefully worthy of a full
price offer.

Tip of the week: Even
if your home is in good
condition as outlined
above, if it is not
PRICED PROPERLY it
will languish on the mar-
ket. Remember PRICE,
PRICE, PRICE is what it
takes if you are serious
about selling.

(Mike Lightbourn is
president of Coldwell
Banker Lightbourn
Realty)

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



(en)
Na LY,

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 9

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

EXLIMA

008) Lote? Rabe Soil of aii hat
a oli store oT kanal sitet: vet The: Saved heal
erm parrdicos of The Forest Estate racer Seth
ade and The Poorest Crest Exurres, Property
sia 10,000 say ft, Paid ing stse 2400) sq ft, Con-
gating of 2- l bedrooms and bath unit and 1-2
beclenoms bath und. Apepradsed wale £21920
569) Low? M4567 "Bahama Sound” Ean
Bhocnted abou! 10 ini nertiieee of Genre
Pott Exiaria and aleout | mikeeo eh of Erreet-
ald Bary, The Foti Soe es Baier and) Robes’.
Print Lircatend Ai. Thon prac eed Farrer’
Hall. The property is DOH 9g fi im are wath
80h frontage on (pucen’s Highway; the menn
mad. he property contains. a pe artialy ot:
Pleted apartment compiles with Hee, | bed-
room ini, 4 Bicency ani and | shop space
Araed value S4ER 2h.
$08) Progeerty comaiiitg] bev L-bath hone
SATU chad of concrete blocks leaped Mires
Treaty comal meairriae 1A in The: Deeqearienent of
Hoa ursirng, Sai bedi fi, ices Ties Fairies Rea
homers, Property Sie TESS. Appraised Velie
113.6
Ml) Peoperty containing 6 Unies |-bexd
L-hath apartment units to Fest Floor Beli
Course, Partially developed properties. All
Ihose pisos or kes of bared be in og Lot f 16 re]
an! 1680 Bahama Sound Subdivisk ili
fia Nuniber 3, Great Erte Properties Sint
OC wee Teves, Apu paca bead laos $3005 OL,
ici) Partialhy chirver pret I property kiecalia!
(anit Bavebevard, irvi# 21, | arin flay [states
rene Gecege own, Exim, Bahamas. [beland
2017 square leet and beng developed wit
41 Tee Storey ApeNIMen! comple warich a Lhe
ing area of L770 eo L The te oath, EB
conn pleted 10 thet
ehectricadl, plui
here bewn «
Aggy ramand f s1b0t6a
S081) | Developed property berate! bots A
B11 168i, a hermes Speed AL, Creat Fon
bond is 7.200 square feet containing digplen
rel: Ssullding ireae |, 705 Syne feet weitht
1) ec teed! Sheath it aed C1) rev bees | beat
Tied. Appia hos Pale $185 376.
Me) Developed pooper) locancd k
Boaleaiitas Shou edd 29 ciated cat hee re
erm potion of the Prrrest Estate in bee '
af the eetlements of Minuet Thormpesn are
Parreaer’s Hell nd ters eo
of Genre Town, Great Exures. The land &
1000 square dori deweloped with a single
fimily residence wiih [300 square feet of
ving are, containing theee bedrooms. ard
Tha Beatanomes. The bu Tid ing bs coms ircned
o hardi-dding. Appraised value met 2

GOH) Laat katte! alot 11.5 4 teeth.

reese Of Cesepee Pema, Badiairea Sa WH Fal
WotR? abe ietad com cf kaeal situated af tha
nenhessionn portional The Purest Estate, in
the vicmity ol Mit. Jhompaon and banners bhil
Great Cem fahormess, Ste contains 10000
aq fiand is developed wiih a duplex apari-
Then containing CL D> bev a pear eras.
2,160 eq hlving a (hardigant construc

Thi. Appear bad voile 3 ] 95 Sone,

fH) Loin + Loecalid) Haliairea Saviited
Nae. 7 ea, co cali eel erted cot aT Lael iat at Ch
eanterm por ti Fike Forest Estate inv the 1i-









Feahemnza. £
aening of Ibe
sq lt. Lint at
19,0500
ia lend F 12975, 14 Bahar Send,
Fad iia oi Teac eet is ey ices.
nad) of Cenge Town). Conwining Handi
Ww triples, puartion
bets arn] 1-bud
beth unripe, Fuokig sive 2G) ay Pe Land sae
1000 sq) ft. Apprmsed value $080,000

008) Lot’ BST deed approedmaiehy 1
Thiles north west of the st tthe mene of Cenmge

aiming ooecrene build imp
2 beth bo ree (oberg
DOOD 00 sy 11 Appraised value

DALIA

Me All that piece parcel orion oyna bie.
leg Lorin 102 inthe Su beledsion krvcrari ae
EXUMA HARBOWH” Geear Rain meas
fg 00000 wey W. Arpyrdniciaeal vee STO

SR) AM bert piece pond or Lint of kind
beung Lots #060 and 907 Bahama Soren of
bum Mod, asubalvishon of hind situate at
Ihe ee ccm porte acl the E ST Estate in
the vicdinit REST. (inea! Fxtiives Hala.
thr en be SW gy PY Agena al uae
©7LU)

3) Single family readenoal Lot? 11696
Bahama soured Sebel #1. West. Cineat Eau
fia Siac appre. bog fp peed Pale:
$15 00.

5fe0) Singde farvaty resabendtial Lar} Min, 1) T0C
Pahoa Souad Soba, Surber 11 West, Great
un. Ses appro, Tea I Appar bad
Faloe $15 10H),

00H) Vacant bor of land S642 Bahama
Sri. Paina Medak Cina Ema Prope
fy Saray LCR ay 1 A pepe ad Verlany $80





0) Partially developed parcel af land he-
ing WO ett. shuaeed aban the easiem
porto ne The Forest Estate in the vichniny of
Ihe sete nes of Southside aid The Farce
besng Lid Marnbeer 408 in Bahama Sore!
of Exuma 4’, Fume The Bahamas. Ap pratad
waloe 325 1





S00) All that piece parce of boo and bared
on the Bland of Great ow one of the eabd
Falvarvea lacks are sitiate ait Ger are
oni-beall (10 12 tries: Nirrilemestaeelly of
Fenmpe Tran weich aed psc parcel or lint of
land is number POT) Bahama Sound ChALE
80,300 sq ft. Appraised value 965.000,

108) Aa undeseli ped wooeriront ke) 0G2
Aue LOAD a I. ine: Raleatie Solin of Ex.
uma Sebalrasion Number || Wot, Canal Ex-
Ler, Beata. Appraised value 2





am Reddenilal Propercy all that
or lot of land being lot Mo. 14
folie Sound Wn Masih vise a tract
of lard situsdis! appricitody | 48 miles
suinbessdvandt of George Tran, Pxurnes fa-
homes. Property Sine 19,000 ay fh Appr bed
Value $2 0/000.





0H) Vacant Reddential Property all thal
plect od parce oe bol of Land beiag a partion of
Log Wn 4), Ane, Paokn Hall Section, Plarrange

(COOMIMEMCIAL RANKING CENTHE
Tel; 242-355-0568
BAO Mrs, Monique Crawford
Ar. Jerome Pinder
. Brian Knowles
aexdike Pratt
}HO4) Mors. Hope Sealey
|HOG) Pers. Tang Sinoims C hirien
|ROG} Mire. Los Holle
(ROT) Bele, Lester Cony
(B08) Mire, DuaShanin Cline-Paal



oem, Bahama Sound Wo. 7 cet. Located be.

Tei Ge ener a ol AA. Thanet. cata

the foneal, Crit Bouma, Aalaiere Cr

ng a Griples of Own 1-besd 1-bath un saad
+ Frealriwonts |-berth wedi, Fuilding sine

7Sa7 A Properte sie 00) ay fi, Appeabaal

wah S510 4a,

nH) Lint Fao 9900, Bahama Sound No Ia

aii mama the |
at thee selene

trips. Huai cop od dah BND wy Me Popes ade
P00 sy Mt Appraised value 5

06) Al that pec of parcel of lots of femal
fein Loot han fiM, Haber Sound Ain, T East
Aaubivision of land Suite at he este
Ponion of the Fores Estate in th nityal
Southside aed Foret, Geeat Esourna. Bata
eae. Propercy sae 10000 2g fh. Comoiniieg
aduples: Bulking aie 1052 sq ft Appraiied
fa hea: 8.1 HH SE

70) Lait of Laredl beeing Lt #56 Raha
Sour] O56 Est si tveste at they narriheerdenn poe
fen of-The Forest Bette” Eure in the ti-
mtr of Mt Thom pan and ba mens Hill and
Conti leing (hereon a dupes Thed | beh each
she) cig bs 1, BD) sq. pormypertir bs 10000) sq ft
Appr. wal. $250.00.

BLEUTHERA

Meg Let of bend 4a a eg (So Qe
High jut sopth ef Palevetie Point Bleuthers
with a ban stocep stone bel ching conten i reg
io apariments. Each nit bers 3 bedi 1/2
bath, khchen, living mom and J linen clos
es Apa ised talus S247 205,

$01) Lowe? conmining 4 bedroom shah
OO eRE HE einietare incated Tria Shaves Hine.
Bavar kveal, Fkeathera. Property sine Bit 9 120
SEY L200. Appraised valuaad ot $242,7

SM) | Lint? block # sienna Hor-
bour bhind Blevihers containing Lbed 2 bath
hen mom, dining roam, & kiiches- cone
srnotone. [ii og. fh enoden desc 321
opery SEIN sy. f= appraised value

400) Lock” Barack Siew, Harboe bland

CLT ig a 2 A

4 lwal 4 hath

ny SCH “Fo ay fi. prapeerity Heras ay, [, - 2

praiaal value - 3479236

MDE we == sen ed! Legal Monpape over Lot eA
I Harbout Eleuthera

Deact of Lak boca The: Hl Hever,
cnerhioking the beatiful Bal Harbou, Peep
erty contains free parceds ef land with a total
ae sof appre 1 Saieg ft, Property =

| vpeopee nt Linnigins a
oi-ples condominiom under constriction ep
jobeli-course anda private dock Aporaed
valor £1,116),

S02) Loti Merh Pe arnetin Poa Eeeuera
OTM = i
averted iy
4 5000a. fh; budding size Me

scorned porch, Appreea! Vi





Tip plete partial Pi 1p yale
fina 1, bot1

Se Lot #4, Lower Boger, Slevikera con-
eee 2- bedi] ‘berth dupler. Pa perty ene
Stay ft. Appraised waboe 217
202) Lot? CAL. Palmeste Shores, South
Falmetio Point, Elewthera. containing 3-10
fev 4 bedroom 2 bach house apy 13h ay
ih living space Sor Tw aioe 81 B68 aay Pr. vip.
praial vale: 32500
Se) Lot sedith of Paloetio Prt on the
meer Ekeutters Higher, Bieuthers, Ferbe-
mar containing a2 bed, | bath chaprles
with gross floor anes 1457 Aa each, Br
haces. Appraised value &
20 XE and 1208 Jobson:
\ = four klared
Fleuthe fm, Wilh digpes 2 bedinmes, | hah

Bay Estates a sebdiveion situated imenedi-
ety snuth of Ceeorge Tiree, cory the [bared of
Bouma Bohai. Property Siac 10206 aq ft
Appraised value $35,000.00

06) Al thal pitts: parcad oor lit of feel be-
mg Lot hon 497, Banas. Sanaa Pio, , 0
gibdivision of lind steted a the nocihem
portion of The Forest Estate’ in the vicinity of
the settlement of Mi. Thempecn and

ers HOLL Crear Exinia, Habortiax, bl

from Geoege Toran. The suber site co
1.08 sy Rare uncievenped Appraised caher
of SIR,

06) All thar piece parce or lot of and be
ig Lint No. MS725-7 & 192844 loca Baha.
fret Saver] Me. 2!) om Tani Way. a eebilieion
alata ata at appecedireately 2006) feet
noms eal of Leone Tiran, he Alpert and
abou! LS miles souiheas! of the sachet
af Geenge Foun, Creat Exima, Bahari The
Giidevclogel penpertics aoe a detal of AS
ay Appraised! value S020

0) Loi #14957, Bahama Sun fin, 17,
qubcivision appocdimatety 14 mie South-
eastranihy of the Sour side ated | mile from
hint Toes Mippait, Creat Roam, Hahainas,
eat Menning Glory Road. This parteadly
developed [nj contains 40)eaq Appraised
alee 12.704,

8) Vacant property loif 048, Bahama
Sound 66, simmated abot the northeast
partion ef The Pirie! Estate in the © I
tho vligges of Moan Thempaon and Fr x
Hil, Greet Bruna, Baheenas, Appraised vale
NBA

MG) (Lin Mo. 1982 od Bolas Sore
Wo. 3 Bast, a wal 1 lated si iaved on dee
say cbse pert nea The Finite! Eaton, in
ihe vicinity of the setikerment of ihe Souih-
side and The bored, Great Eeuma, bahamas
This undeveloped propery is. J Od
af O00 ay Ap prided wales $12 000,
08) Lot No 11215, located Balen Send
Nin Fi, ae subwlivision of lone situated at the
SRR PRET N 0 The Forest Batten
the vicinity of the setihemencs of Southside
and The Forest. tire Bouma. Bahamas. The
developed lan etal of 10,000 sq. Ap.
peated valor of $13,000

SE) Lae a2 witeaterd at the noite.
em portion of The Forest Ustaie in ithe vicin-
ey of the sete mens of Wit. Thom poon and

[BI L) Ms. Lydia Rahoning
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-222-409 on 242-402-300)
(SOL) Mors. Patrice Ritchie

(208) Mors. Anya Major
NASSAU WAIN) BRANCH
Tel: 242-222-1700

(TOL) Mr. fames Stree han
POL} Ms. Thy
(S04) Mrs, Alicia Them penn
MACKEY STREET RRAMCH

Tel; 242-234-307

(BOL) Ms. Nicole Eyam

JOUN E RENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-225-4711

}OOL) Mir. Robert Pantry







cach Aperaizal THA
SPANISH WELLS

Seth Lav ofl bead f 2 Sons View Selnlivcion,
feel) bland adjacent in the ment of
Sqeanish Wells, Property etre 11,121 99. ft, bard
Ing sioe 2250 aq. A containing 3 bednonens, 2
bath, living room. an eat-in kiechem, dining
DOT. ed) en, CPE TE porch, a
lage. ind a oovened waren tank. App ral sed
wale 5259 00)

S60) Lat oP lard in Spearsinh Wills bisated |

Leetonia Sth street iter The [shined

tr She qi. F mis wee LEA ep PL Ee

worcalen sinaciuri) siz L371 ay i rn

ing 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, front rosin

room and kitchen, Mouse is in god ¢

fon Proper lindscaping with poured com
ays volkay Appraised value

Let nunibees band? ofa teetod sey
on panoeks Detweech Harker Rodel aiid the
Min Public: Road r rel Sinea S xirish
Well: Raharmvas. Property sine 12.4
Building sice #o bhp, fi, comianing
bath, Gving mom. aneat-in klichen, lauredry
Peer, coreeread porch, and 2 creer vater
tank. Basement ollere a garage, work-shiog,
play oor and smafl office area. House Is in
eae lien Brower bind sea ping with
pared oir anys & tality Ag
potiaedad Vile $555,179.

Se Lick cl Deen esis tha: eae Tren [2]
Of the Sahel vision called onl leeran aa Ooean
states, Aiesell fskvned, Spearnists Welle, Prem
exty size 12.174 99, A, bunlcbng sine 1976 sy fi
Suilding is constructed of lumber and heardy
lank, concainineg 3 ed eons. 2 berth, [ein
feo, ah eat-in Michen, dinieg room. uti licy
z ed

Lintkcaged with poured conse dr
% tial Appeared nabia $455,190
Lat oT Beartal ort Promcainll [wkeemal, Secu
lls, Property ste 1b 5 fi, buikd
Ing wen Ill ay fi, contai PMT,
2bath, aneai-in kiiches, baingidiningrecen,
utiliey eoom. lundiry room. covered porch,
cowered driveway and a two Car garage. Abo
alfa 6 0000 gallon ralnieaver tank, Age
Dred value S460 78)

S60) Lota? ina siibdivision of 6 panes
situated iremestionly cast of Qeean Heights
Sulnivicion, Aiea! lekind, Sevmish Welk,
Pru pert ling: sccy [EA
g a, 2 here,
an eat-in bichon. [ning dineng mam, koneiry
Peon aed a ee car erage Coeered (romt en
ony a observation deck and a patio The
hinee bs ie eocelen comdiiion. Appraised
value 5.2) 4.00)
Se Lat aD bined bei het 1, Sata View Sal
lintedtem, Aircel] Kaa, Seewtdla
erty sur LL. oi squit, Aundching, sic
containing & buacl, 3 bah,
l Ch ng Pm ark
fangs, covered ni
vend a rear patio water tank. Property
lance iped, with poured concrete d i
and walloway. Appraised value
S600) Lot of lad [S00 foe west of che poy
ceric dock al Murckiy Hole, Romeell Iskatad,
Sqranial Walle, Property sitar 17,049 ay. f1. Budd
bt i ft Coolmine 1 bedroom,
212 bathrncans, free mse! diriyg mcm,
anchen, garage and covered (mont porch, Age
e701



Liwiieg teen, Wie bee i, Lad '

porch, aid a eovened waned mink

In get conulitian, preemper Larcbuaee
frened cincmie trivia & malkne iy Ap
preed value 00

AN [NFA
0) Property in Calabash Bay, Andros, 75°

lat piace pucels Clot afin ca.
iT Lael 5
in avegls red Sesh vi co
thon 25 foatema Sound of Fours Secthon
12 Es. Property is 20000 aq. i Appraised
value £170 0.

400) VWeoaae lot of batid and being part of
a pence! of a treet of Land bea I

ers, lireat baie The pro

Of ALG6) say. Appraised yall

Oe) All chen plece perce of land being
forS101 hocarvedl Bohai poured 4,

az ove cand The Bonest, Gorat Exum

Jppraised value THA
53H eTeeR and 27k
OT Fagen Stibel vista “
aleon the Bland of Geral Faima, Aalarreaa.
Appraised value Sci (0



00) Al that piece parcel of land located

4210 in the subd hskon known 2 Ha henna

Sod 012 siualed about 7 miles nontrevest al

George Tim, Geet Eximia Appraised voli
fl.



O08) Lot Kin, SUG sidpeste im the eatbalivi-
doe called and known ae fhe Sound of
Exumma fh On the Blond of Crea! Equa and
Lot he. 6795 sinated fen aiid one hall miles.
moths of Loerge Tira Gein of Balin
Sound Mo, eee Exum Bahar Both Lots
ae Vacant ane are 1000 sq ft in sto. Ape
poked THA

OR) Lot Mo. A729 Bahama Sound Mo
Ll of i Ruin Haha Peogert
VOLES ey Of eal prniperte Aipperea eeed vee
S1K,Me1









00) Lot #4919 Bahama Sound hin. &, Ey-
STL Propemy Shee | 0h00 sq f. Vacant prop
eny. Appraised value S)0 M1
O06) A that picce ol parcel or bot of eal
basnig lil Mee S682 ROR of Baleares Sia
So 0 Lea Pour seuabe abe 12 ies.
Soriteest of setter

amd. Ratwnas. P
Onl properly Ae





O08) Lint #L 20. Aaharrea Satine Me. 5 Ex.
mera, Lavt see 10S cy BL Apepecnisand value

ts



C157 with asimall grocery eMere SB) oy. i andl
an incomaplene 9 bed 2 bah hoe 8M ag. 1.
Alprpeca iain volbaa 385, 008)

400) Lat Loree Hil, Arobeas titel bi ng 20,000
oy & Prepercy contains 2 '

-hoth residence, Appraboed value $1) 0,000

18 Lot i dtugied Queens Highway in
Cargill Creek. findene, cotalling 300K) oq fh.
I Completed bulking 2
feet, and wo idler
Correct ne. Ay pa bee wale $224 Se
400) Late #07 & wld Chet Alone,
Low: Hil Settee, Andros. Containeng ¢
Iwteshorery ms Aipeprca bead Vou bas 21001 J
18) Lote stinatedinGoader tigh, betrieg
Point As Halling 3 209sq fH. Prope ry
Slit bevel Abed 2 bath 2 286 og ft
house. Appraised value» $196,253
4H Let @b6 is sitiated in Main Rade
ln thé acdc of Fresh Croek Anal nina, 0a-
Cidlingg 16 20M aay PL, Prexper ty coe laires a cee:
hedinecer one hath bose BAD ey ht Ayrprciinee!
value - 280
8 Letofland contaning 72.712 sq4 in
the settlement of Davis Creek. Presh Creek
TiraTi Ave ml Andree. stand. containing
iding S10 sq I. pehich house a
Apia Dope Apna aed yale

B65) Let weet of the Creretal Water free
ar] eve of Qhesen’s Highwery directly opps
abte Horrid Plreacd the becca tion nif ther fs

dence Property stor (60° 5
pr 72S eo. Appraised vale $75

ABA

1 Let 2 Meadors Park, os aemall sa heh
isa ihe cutscirts of Trseaire Coy, Aan
u M4 8a] Bl concrete Hock residence
wi Lasphak shriek roar }- bed, 2- bert, Exreiby
foo, Ding room, dining room, andiciichen
Apoperca bos) veubuoe > 6) 27 00H,

SOY Le 52 Crown Apot

Marni Toon, bach tith sox

#9 f. Comnining a one sorey Navuce with 4
hed /2 hath -Caneret: Bleek Soret ume — yr-
praised value 320K



G08) Loi! 23incated in the Subdivision
Spine Laty, Ahaco with size being 4425 §]
Th Loman ing 4 one soey wenn ope ne
house with a beds i bath of 79R5 sq ft. Ap
fitalsed value S000

99 Lo 624. Tindas Foam, Abaco known
as Lo) comeing 4914.29 1 coining
adi pion with oS bed 2 bath dl ated 2 hel
| bath unt talon g up fetal of 2M ian:
feet, Appraised wale; 2181 108



S| Lot? 2 comprising sportion of Com
mercial Parcel Loi A. situate
eat Monet Dewan the Idan
edining 14725 square fost with wooden
chop “with a2bed? Shathanda 2 bed | bath
remo! Lindt, with v- polit ocllings and coniral
air-conditioning. Appried calue - Sooo
Let 48, being
ply Poeen Cnrean Allnimentsen | w idanul nl
Abe, reeuning O80 sqiciee beet, coreg
toga duples wih 2 beds and | aihs foreach
Un. Appraised walie - at 22200109
S08) Lor 856-1. sinene inthe sete ment of
Maorpiyy Toe on thie island of Abaco, meas
Uning 7.601 spam beet Comal ig a ori piles
Chait fais tv 2 eed 8 bates ciated a | Bd 1 bath.
Ajrpea tea: wale TRA



SOAQ Let-of Lond situate in the setilerromt
of Deareckas Town corn perisin g a parrtnrn oof ani
WUD of the Genk Tire Crowe Alloimenis
om cheisiend of Abaco, combining reskiece
Appealoesd value TEA.

5) Les ot land conaining 10,176 sq ft
and 10,1768 8, being o pene Mere Tom
Crontt Akotnent Mo. PO sitieate in the Setthe-

4 LAL
ELEUTINERA

MOS) Vera Lor] 8 Block 24 Section “LC”
Rainbow Bay on tie Bland of Heather. Ba
hiattias. The proparty & kecaied in a cirrel-
oped residential site nwith ell armneni-
fe, Appraised value $5 (oe,

80) Allchal piece pa me lobed band being

He ‘thee rm
SSA

bland. Bedkatias. Appraised! Walibe

PeBS) Waccant Lav 2 |) BS 1) si tee
n lango Lane Section” Hi Flock #15, Pleurhera
land Shores on the Idiand of Hlevihera Ap
ehaieed Yale 350,164

S65) Vacant bat i beealed Eleuthera blared
Shei, Semis ivi Setlien A



Lon ® loom prisieg ba6 ay fsito
aned on Monheau side of the Queens High
On the blind of Heather appro Thos bin.
dnedithe ofa cele Seetheaed of the Paladin
Prent crea ing Appraised Value a eal

Se Lot of bond in ames Cite on
Elsothera, Rohamas measering appro bKK
aa [L. Appeatend valor: TEA

S66) Lot 4 Bing portion of dhe sabuli-
ikon of a trestle boos! in the vile
Speragimeyie ty ies [ie ses ot
myss Meh, Ele are reas
uring 3.240 acres S| Apres
ver bia: S01 fa)

ABU

SKEO Lint #1. Arent Pat's Nay Subdivtsan ,
Elbow Cay, Abaco containing 144 sqpeare
feet. Appraised value: TAA



S08) Lot fod. in the Hopetoeen Poine Sabi
VEN locaoed Hope Ton, Abe Cay Abacn
Appraised value TRA

(0) Let of lord sie onthe Satimaiem
cde nt 5. U. bouik High appordirencly

a 1 the setdemeni

ol Marg tii nthe and of Abaco con
mining 40S aquane feet. Appraised Value
aA



See Lot 24, eceied Central Pines Suh-
division containing 12.473 square feet situ-
ate Seth of Dundes Town inet weal of Marsh





ire nhof Munphy Tora. Abecn. containing &
Hepler. Valid 3,000

(8) Lit #95, Ciontnal Pires Subeliviaann,
anilh of Canukes Tren, weed of Marsh Her-
hour , Ml font bry |) feet nviuining a | -KM
square feet house com prisiag of 1 becker
and? bathrooms, letchen , rangand dining
aed. doped value THA

(S09) Lot 856 locaced Murty Tones Alot
Traces, ariel dd nena shoe a 10 ay Lice: fest bey
108 square foot coating a dogees with at
area of 1456 square foot and each ini haw.
ing tren | sure on bathroom, ass areal
hilchen ane

aie Lb

of Le

eapeist Chum ch in the
1 the island of
af

1,500 scat feet and dined Bedi
treet bent vores, Agsqera iter eabae:: 4157,
(id) Lot MO being «pe in iof [aunders
Town Crean Mlotmmts containing a 4-plox
located Dundes Town. Alco. Appraised vale
S220
(S08) Lot) Donde Tora, Abaco contaie
ing a3 bedroom 2hath wooden srmcorne
Aporked value $130.00).
(Sie) Lowel
thrs Tira, Aas
niesihenca:, Appraised! raliay &16
(MH) Lote lla insertion 4 Enews
— Point, Abaco combing
Sidence. Appraised value S24K

10 Lotal land locgved Man: O) Waar lay

7 134 a] anc a ee

il Paties Eaten, Dan

Appr eed value en

(10) Parcel oie! Erevan as kes Crk 14
moles south of Treeeure ay containing JAZ
acres located at joe's Creek, dhe Sea view
Living ares, upper & Lower, Cape workstion
Carport. |? ce ling. can oe. of aalrs, interior
Exterior togroand level. covered porch and
Entra lange kinchen, 24° 14° wis top of the
lie cupioik. Appiradied valine: $625,000





OVHER FAMILY ISLANDS.

[ELL] | Propert containing Liandn “Wwhlle-
nam Of, Ue 4-201, bathing 37, Phase 10:
7 bedrooms. J bathrooms. Bying poom, din
ing room. Williey chose) & patho, Sdreed in
Ihe aren kingne os Birninl Bay Resor, Bimini
Bahairers. Ap praised walee $485 JM,

(tei) i Hg. with thie
hed), Ienar mice, arn HY 5
ER diiiatial Bealey Teen, forth Biren, Ap-
praised value S200)





HI0L-F] Peoperty situated Alice Town. The [s-
lind ol orth Bimini being Parcel “A” meas
uring 9,267 sy) fl. with incomplete Oey
ang bir) hone. Anpniiesd vale S200
(ELL) = (Com



|-bevths ath | 14 1 fi, front porch, halce ay
aml renin ayc Appraised value; $2260 (hon
(BLL) Condor Unit Hornined Berp Subd | -
? bed, 2 bath Ue wun, [35
are feet, incl patio! hale cmmned Hinire
Fa Moeth Bimink Appraited vale 419.5980
100) Deweloged property beige pation
Mate! oflend bean as Morkeys Tract cor
ner Lot with ao Geetige of 145 feed, running
1420 (Lave thee Naor aycemad orp coral) 0200 1 cn
the South boundaens: The property is sitented
in Lower Deadman: Cary, Long bland weh
heme (seven pears abd) under com
1%. complete Appraised wali
(105)

iia,
TLIO H

larbaer, setilementin the Central Cheinet of
the stam of Great Abeon, Appraised value
TH.

S05) Ten acres of hated a Woods Cay, Lit
th: Abaen, beter Ox Vs Toth ard Ci-
dar Harbour, Abeico, Balarrers, Tha property
undeveloped but basa seavies from both
the nom and soma dide. Appraised Value
S107, 750

960 Vim peldential Lian’ G1 (TAD 2g,
fe) Creasy Witenes kext Muay

Abgcn- Appraised value $18 (Ot,

900) Lot? i. in bhock Me. 144 eesidential
property shad in Treauine Cay. Abaco, Ap
pine vale SE 0.00

S10) land aid house Wcdned a1 Theasee
Cap. Appenised va her: S40)000 10

Mt fewer lopedd residential propercy Pet
a Lot Mn, Bock 200, [reassure Coy, Abacn,
Appriised walie: $75,000.00

OTHER FAMILY SLAMS

S68) Lot 91a Sorton 2 Phase (0 Siclla
Waris Saibedivisanr, Leornge Iskemel. Property in
LE P0 say Ft Aypprradsecd wali S05 (0



so ‘Warant land, Lote iof Phere A, Ser:

Hon 2 Sella Maris Sutelvision [11 500 ge |
siriiale at Adderley, Long Iskand. Appraised
value: 30,000



4 Ager af vaca! lind being portion
of Losi a4, Flowers fica Driggs Hil South
Andros, Append vue £20, 1

eS) Lot és 13 & 4 Block 8 dinecmew
Estates — mC 4

Sei | Tran eemipeeerib lit 125
my ftand Lot (2d S201 sq fi) Creek Bay
dis 1ST. Russ | (stared aT om the reerih-
. Spankh
(1 bots that offer
ashort patho
ees vai Lait [abe S500
50



10S) Letof kad situate tn Sout Hieind be
Ing ot 1) Bock No.2 of tie Buccanser Poli
Sul fishin Blinn) Rabaives Appirabsnd Vala:
THe



PARADISE LAND BRANCH
Teleptrane: 242-365-1404

(55) Mis. Cherelle Meurtin boreugh
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING
CENTRE
‘Tel: 242-250. 7 5030

[S0L) i. Ninoda Walker

[SHG Pets. Patric in Raceesell
(CABLE RESCH BAAN
Tel: 242-527-6077

(965) Beir, Derek Sorry Tel:
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-0@-5 1) U502-3100
(71) fis. Quincy Fisher

(717) Pers, Macy Sweaty

721) fei. Deidre King
Pes. Marguerite johnson
56) Firs. Cotherine Caves
She) Feline, Weneessal Sot

a7) Mir, Bon Kemp

TL) Pins. Ferve: Duara els:

oral Me. Pye Froth

ST ol Ms, Anise Wilson
NASSAU INT'L AIPORT

Tel: 282-377-7179

433) Mrs, Renea Walkine
LYRORD CAT BRANCH

Tel: 242-32 4340 or 242-360 7
HO1-N| Mors. Limckey Peterson
(AV ERNCH'S HARBOUR,
ELEAITHERA

2-392-25588

(02) Ms Evetle Burns
HARBOUT LAND BIANCH
Telit “13-220

01) Ms. Vekderine Larocla
ANDROS TOWN TRAM
Tel: 242-388-207 1

LEO) Ws. Alario Sdimeeres
MUAURSH HARAOSUR, AAC











Tel: 242-357-2400

[SS Pale, Daal S

(900) Mors, Satie Pitzer
810) Mr Kerenit Garry
MIMIND BRANCH

Telia? -d47 0

(106) Mis. Italia Beckford
GHAW"S, LONG ISLAND
Tel: 242-337-0101

(100) Pers, Linc Walle
ENUM A BRANCH

Tel: 242-503-5251

iid) Ms. loyoelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
‘Tel: 242-332-312

[)0L-F) fds. Gannell Prith
(102) Ms. Flaine Collie

(10) Febrs, Damnilin Boe teoid Carta Tighe
(10) Mis. Syhele Corey
SPANESH WELLS

Tel: 242-533-415) or 242-543-4145
(fy) Mir. Walter Caney









an (ey
Na BY, IY
PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Royal Bahamas Police Force
National Crime Prevention Office

‘Safety Tips for Drivers’

JOB OPPORTUNITY

The Bahamian Contractors Association is looking for a person to fill the position of

“Project Administrator”

Job Duties:
Daily correspondence with persons within the private sector, government
agencies and inter-governmental/ international agencies.

Coordinate, monitor and liaise with all other sub-cortractors involved in the
scope of work delegated to your portfolio.

Prepare progress reports, including detailed budgetary and procurement
information.

Qualifications:
At least Bachelors degree in business, finance, economics, or other relevant
certifications and experience in the field.

At least 5 years experience in project management, administrative management
or business consultancy-having served in a supervisory capacity is a plus.

Good working knowledge with Microsoft Office and relevant Accounting
Software-QuickBooks or Quicken.

Good command of the English language, both spoken and written.

Please provide a copy of your CV with all relevant employment information
along with brief cover letter, addressed to:

Projects’ Director

The Bahamian Contractors Association
PO. Box N-9286

Or by email to:

Email bcabahamas@gmail.com

Applicaiton Deadline: January 30th, 2011.



By POLICE CONSTABLE
MAKILLE PINDER

hoods or school zones, watch
for children who may be in a
hurry to get to school and may

MOTORISTS not be thinking about getting
BEWARE - SCHOOL there safely.
HAS STARTED

UNFORTUNATELY, the
beginning of school is also a
time when children are at
increased risk of transportation-
related injuries from pedestrian,
school bus, and motor vehicle
crashes.

The reason is fairly obvious;
there are many more children
on the road each morning and
afternoon, as well as an overall
change in motorists’ patterns.

As schools open their doors,
it's time for motorists to
improve their traffic safety
practices.

The following tips can help
make this a safe and happy
school year for the whole com-
munity:

¢ Slow down. Obey all traffic
laws and speed limits.

¢ Be extra cautious around
school crossing areas, slow
down and watch for children
on the way to school.

¢ When driving in neighbor-

¢ The posted speed limit in
school zones is 15 MPH from
7:30am - 9:00am and 2:30pm —
4pm.

¢ Allow children waiting at a
pedestrian crossing to cross.

¢ Be alert and ready to stop.
Watch for children walking in
the street, especially where
there are no sidewalks.

¢ When using an intersection
where children are trying to
cross, slow down; make eye
contact with the children to
determine what they are going
to do next.

¢ Always stop for a jitney or
school bus that has stopped to
load and unload passengers

¢ Before entering a pedestri-
an crossing area, be sure there
are no children in the lane or
adjacent lanes.

¢ When passing a parked
vehicle, check for children who
may run out into the street.

¢ When approaching a school



POLICE CONSTABLE
Makille Pinder

bus that has stopped to drop
off or pick up students,
motorists must stop a safe dis-
tance behind.

¢ When approaching a school
speed zone reduce speed below
the required speed limit and
maintain it until the end of the
school zone.

¢ During school hours Motor
Vehicle Laws will be strictly
enforced.

Please share this information
with every driver in your fami-

ly.
Let’s all work together to
have a safe school year.

US flights canceled, states declare emergencies
as blast of icy weather hits parts of the South

JACKSON, Miss.

Mississippi officials warned motorists

A BLAST of winter weather pushed
across the South on Sunday, coating
bridges and roads with snow, sleet and
freezing rain and causing hundreds of flight
cancelations, according to Associated Press.

The governors of Louisiana, Alabama
and Georgia issued emergency declara-
tions. Alabama Gov. Bob Riley said work-
ers had readied snow and salt trucks to
help clear icy roads, and he asked all resi-
dents to stay home Sunday night and Mon-
day unless necessary.

early Sunday that ice was already accu-
mulating on roads and bridges in many
counties, creating hazardous driving con-
ditions.

The National Weather Service posted
winter storm warnings from east Texas to
the Carolinas.

Daniel Lamb, a meteorologist with the
National Weather Service in Jackson,
Miss., said heavy snow had fallen Sunday
afternoon from Arkansas to north Missis-
sippi. Other areas of the South saw freez-
ing rain and sleet.



CAREER OPPORTUNITY
LEGAL SECRETARY

Excellent opportunity is available for a professional individual
to move ahead in a great career. Leading law firm is seeking
to employ a highly qualified Legal Secretary. The successful
candidate should possess the following skills and experience:

Béb bail & Home

Gt OPNC & Sale

Ability to:

"i
H
2 2 ne en

Understand and follow oral and written directions.

Type and assemble information into proper legal form from
outlined instructions or established procedures.

Produce legal and other documents using word processing
software.

Maintain a wide variety of legal files, records, and reports working
independently in the absence of specific instructions.



- => .
z
= . ‘a =
i ’
ee eee

Establish and maintain effective working relationships with clients,
legal and court-related personnel, attorneys, and staff.

Luxurious Diamond Pintuck 8pc Comforter Set - $69.99
Gibson Main Element 12pe Dinnerware - $18.99

Home Dynamix 20°x36° Wall Pictures - $39.99

Home Dynamix 20"x24" Wall Pictures - $19.99

Revere Mills/Giant Bath Towels - $11.99

Toastmaster 4-slice Toaster - $42.99 »
North Crest Sheet Sets - 20% OFF
Feather Down Pillows - 20% OFF
Hibachi Table Top Grill - $11.99
Oval 5x8 Area Rug - 20% OFF
Camry Bath Scales - #13.99
Kitchen Curtains - $11.99

Throw Pillows - $14.99

SALE START
GATURDAY JANUARY:

Prioritize assigned duties.

Job Requirements:

Extensive experience and sound knowledge of proper legal format
and processes.










7 — 10 years legal secretarial experience.

Knowledge of Microsoft Office and shorthand/speedwriting skills
are essential.

To Apply:

All applicants must submit a resume by 14 January, 2011 to:

Legal Secretary
c/o Box N-3207
DA# 97562
The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas








Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





SUPPORT: RYAN PINDER

FROM page one

Government signed a
Memorandum of Under-
standing with C&W on
December 2, 2010. It is
expected to debate the docu-
ment when Parliament recon-
venes on January 19 after the
Christmas recess. The House
has to approve the sale
before it can be finalised.

Government officials, who
wished to remain anony-






ce :









rm TOUR



By, ee
aire la

came out,”

meeting,” he said.

the general strike.

call.

LOCAL NEWS

PLP ‘TO SUPPORT DEMONSTRATION’

FROM page one

but he did not speak to any members of }
parliament about the event. :

“T have not invited a single soul out. There is no MP}
who could say they have even spoke to me about a ;

Ata prayer breakfast Sunday, Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill
member of parliament, encouraged party supporters to }
support the labour movement, as they did in 1958 during :

“We have our work to do 44 years after the fact. It is
economic empowerment which must now be the clarion ;

“Tt is a call to serve all Bahamians to make them the }
full masters of the commanding heights of our economy. }
That is why we must resolutely and firmly oppose the
FNM government’s plans to sell BTC in the way in }
which they are doing it and to support the trade unions }

in their fight to stop the Leviathan,” said Mr Mitchell.

MINISTER DENIES BTC DEAL HAS BEEN FINALISED

mous, were sceptical that an
agreement was finalised last
week as the business plan for
BTC had not yet been pre-
sented. It was said that only
after a business model had
been finalised would negoti-
ations with C&W on the con-

tract start.

Meanwhile, a mass demon-
stration has been organized
for this evening as labour
unions continue their efforts
to prevent the utility compa-

MCR yore

BUILDERS MALL « 168 Wulff Road
Store Hours: Mon-Fri Tam-dpm * Sat Tam-3pm





Day

Sale’ *
January 11th - 22nd, 2011

ITEMS FOR

123 Zinsser Primer

ny from being privatised.

As the unions are opposed :
to the sale of 51 per cent of }
BTC to C&W, they are urg- }
ing government to find a }
Bahamian consortium to pur- }
chase the majority stake in }

the company.

Last week, it was con- }
firmed that the unions rep- }
resenting BTC employees }
were in talks with their legal }
team to file suit against the :
government to block the sale. ;



Interior Flat Dover
5qgal.

Standard Size
Whirlpool Tubs

Unionists to
hold mass rally
against planned

BIC sale today

FROM page one

start selling everything back
to the former colonisers,
England, then we are turning
back around to do what our
forefathers (decried),” said
William Carroll, president of
the Bahamas Communica-
tions Public Managers
Union (BCPMU).

The demonstration is
planned for RM Bailey Park
at 7pm today. Union lead-
ers promise to reveal “the
facts”, as they escalate the
opposition of the govern-
ment’s planned sale of BTC















—ITiLew ‘NG

aT EP Ris LIMITED

p=) ie ee ee a ce a be oe
Pepe tem we m el) ett eta ih [ets pes mare
Pa emitters te ce tiar ler Pir eet |



Le

£8

elite eed

eee hy
Se EB nal

to Cable and Wireless Com-
munications.

While some say it is a false
comparison to tie the gener-
al strike to the current
labour movement, there are
many historians and politi-
cal commentators that agree
that labour was an impor-
tant part of Majority Rule.

Historians say Majority
Rule was achieved out of the
January 10, 1967 general
election, when the govern-
ing United Bahamian Party
and the Progressive Liberal
Party won 18 seats each in
the House of Assembly.

Sir Lynden was able to
form the first black govern-
ment in Bahamian history,
explained Fred Mitchell, Fox
Hill Member of Parliament,
when Sir Randol Fawkes,
“the lone Labour MP”, vot-
ed to stand with the PLP,
and Sir Alvin Braynen, an
independent MP, assumed
the Speaker’s chair.

“The difficulty we have
today is a Free National
Movement political admin-
istration that is set on decon-
structing and destabilizing
everything that majority rule
sought to build which is a
country of equality, social
mobility and justice for all
Bahamians,” said Mr
Mitchell.

Next to emancipation and
independence, Majority
Rule is probably “the most
significant day that constitu-
tional freedoms were ush-
ered in,” according to Perry
Christie, leader of the oppo-
sition.

“In the union’s effort to
save the Bahamas against a
bad decision I think they
must think the significance
of (Majority Rule Day)
would stir people; pump the
heart, beat the soul and get
everyone out. It is not a bad
decision to have the event
on this day,” said Mr
Christie.

Several major events pre-
dating Majority Rule are
believed to have influenced
it centrally.

The general strike is one
of them, and it ultimately
gave birth to the Trade
Union and Industrial Con-
ciliation Act and the creation
of the Labour Department,
note some.

January 13, 1958 was the
day hundreds of taxi drivers,
hotel workers, garbage col-
lectors, tourism industry
employees, construction
workers, and others, walked
off their jobs in a move that
brought the economic
engine of the country to a
“virtual standstill.”

While political heavy
weights Sir Lynden and Sir
Randol Fawkes were major
leaders in this culminating
effort, it was Sir Clifford,

who in November of 1957,
as leader of the taxi union,
led about 200 outraged taxi
men to blockade the new
international airport at
Windsor Field forcing flight
cancellations, stated politi-
cal scientist Larry Smith.

The industrial action
protested an “exclusive
agreement” planned
between major hotel opera-
tors and a taxi company set
up by the Symonette fami-
I

According to the governor
at the time, the deal would
have established a “monop-
oly excluding the taxi cab
union entirely.”

Two months later, with the
labour movement still disaf-
fected, and opposition polit-
ical forces in full support,
workers united for the Gen-
eral strike, which shut down
New Providence for almost
three weeks.

Describing the significance
of the labour unrest, Sir Clif-
ford said: “Little did I know
on that Sunday morning in
January 1958 that the stun-
ning and unexpected after-
math of the general strike
would pave the way for the
turbulent decade of the six-
ties, ultimately leading to the
freedom of majority rule for
all Bahamians.”

The new decade of poli-
tics would see women’s suf-
frage and other constitu-
tional reforms.

The aftermath included:
“International pressure on
the Bay Street regime to
democratise the country.
Within three months a
senior British cabinet minis-
ter was in Nassau pushing
for constitutional reforms,
and that October, legislation
was passed to set up a labour
department and a process
for industrial conciliation.
The following year saw abo-
lition of the company vote,
extension of the franchise to
all men over 21, and the cre-
ation of four new parlia-
mentary seats (all of which
were won by the PLP),”
states Mr Smith.

On the timeline of
progress, Mr Mitchell
includes: 1 June 1942, Burma
Road; the 1950 founding of
the Citizens Committee and
the fight to show “No Way
Out”, Sidney Poitier's first
film; the 1953 founding of
the PLP; the election of
Sammy Isaacs, Cyril Steven-
son, Randal Fawkes, Lyn-
den Pindling, Clarence Bain
and Milo Butler to the
House of Assembly in 1956;
the General Strike of 1958;
the bye elections of 1960; the
1962 election defeat; the con-
stitutional changes of 1964;
Black Tuesday on April 27,
1965 and the general elec-
tion of January 10, 1967.

The Shoe Village

Assistant Manager

Needed

« Bahamian

25 years or older

« Minimum 5 years experience in the retail industry

+ Strong communication skills

+ Good motivator for achieving goals

+ Salary commensurate with experience
ALL APPLICATIONS RECEIVED WILL BE IN CONFIDENCE

No faxed or emailed resumes will be considered.

Please take your completed
applications to our head office.

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(hn

THE TRIBUNE

A

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 13

6

LOCAL NEWS



Govt’s $8.5m to fight crime

JC
Cc

FROM page one

peace,” Mr Symonette said.

“The criminals this year
will be defeated.”

His announcement before
an audience of officers from
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, Customs and Immi-
gration, Road Traffic
Department, the Airport
Authority, and high-ranking
government officials, was fol-
lowed with remarks by
Bahamas Christian Council
leader Reverend Patrick
Paul.

He said: “There are too
many guns in our streets; sun
laws must be enforced and
amended where necessary.

“We must ensure persons
charged with serious crimes
such as armed robberies and
murders cannot walk free in
our communities until they
have been completely exon-
erated.”

Meanwhile police are
investigating the deadly
shooting of a man gunned
down on the porch of a
home in Bishop Way, Wind-
sor Place, off Soldier Road
at around 6.40pm on Satur-
day.

Police press liaison officer
Set Chrislyn Skippings said
police were called when gun-
fire rang out in the area and
officers found the man with
multiple gunshot wounds.

He was pronounced dead
at the scene by Emergency
Medical Services (EMS).

A 21-year-old man is
being questioned in connec-
tion with the homicide.

The second murder
inquiry of 2011 was launched
just a day after police found
the body of a man, unoffi-
cially identified by local
media as Samuel Allad, 47,
lying on a makeshift bed
behind the Burger Barn in
Carmichael Road at 10.20am
on Friday. He had visible

injuries on his back and
police classified the death as
the first murder of the year
later that night.

And late last night, news
reached The Tribune of
another homicide, when a
female was shot dead on
Wulff Road near the Texaco
Service Station.

In addition to the latest
murder probes, police are
investigating the stabbing of
a 19-year-old Nassau Village
man attacked by three rob-
bers just an hour after the
fatal shooting on Saturday
night.

Sgt Skippings said the man
was in an area of Soldier
Road east of East Street
when three men attempted
to rob him, and a struggle
followed.

The teenager was stabbed
several times and taken to
hospital by EMS where he
has been detained in stable
condition.

Police are also looking for
the two men who robbed
Crazy Ink Studio in the
Kennedy Subdivision at
around 2pm on Friday. They
reportedly stormed the shop
armed with a handgun and
stole an undetermined
amount of cash before dri-
ving off towards Pinewood
Gardens in the white Nissan
Maxima they had parked
outside.

Intensive investigations
have been launched into all
matters and police are
appealing for information
from the public.

Anyone with any infor-
mation that may relate to the
murders, stabbing, or armed
robbery, should report it as a
matter of urgency by calling
the Central Detective Unit
(CDU) on 502-9930/9991,
the police emergency line on
911 or 919, or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 13A

ROBINSON ROAD
MINNIE STREET to EAST STREET

TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSION

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles $.A wishes to advise the motoring public that a Temporary Road Closure
will be carried out on sections of Robinson Road between WASHINGTON STREET and EAST STREET.
With immediate effective Road Construction works will be ongoing westbound to facilitate the installation of
new twenty-four inches (24”) water main. Construction works will be carried out in different stages as the works
progress towards East Street.

Other works to be carried out during this phase of construction will include:

Milling of existing pavement

Installation of new Drainage facilities
Installation of new/upgrade Utility services
Sidewalks

Improved Street Lighting

New Asphalt Pavement

FRIDAY
Motorist travelling eastbound should divert through:

MIAMI ST. ————->BALFOUR AVE. ————~ WASHINGTON STREET.
Motorist travelling westbound should continue on the one lane traffic system to their destination.

MONDAY- Full Closure

Motorist travelling eastbound & westbound should divert through:

MIAMI ST. ————-> BALFOUR AVE.————> WASHINGTON STREET
Local access will be granted to residents, pedestrians and the affected businesses during the construction process.
Signs will be in place to identify safe passage for Pedestrians and Access points to the businesses in the area.
The public will be updated through the local media (radio & television) for regular updates.
We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience that may be caused by the closure and look forward to the co-
operation of the motoring public throughout this project.

Your patience throughout this project is greatly appreciated. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience
and delays caused.

For further information please contact :

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
Office:(242)322-8341/322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.ar

Ministry of Works & Transport

The Project Execution Unit
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs



TRIDUNETKIV

January 7th Question

How much does the Bahamas Diving Association
estimate shark related tourism has brought to the
Bahamian economy over the last 20 years?

January 7th Answer

FRIDAY WINNERS

million

Blair Tasia
Randell Johnson
Jillian Mullings

Click the ‘Like’ button on the Tribune News
Network Facebook page to play

Tribune Trivia

*Nassau Residents Only

Win!!!

One Lucky Winner monthly. Pick up a copy
of TheTribune and visit us on facebook.

PFhukhs

many

1 day Hote

1 day car rental

When booking your next trip to Florida, choose
Bahamasair, Dollar/Thrifty and The Best Western

1
¢ ‘yf
Lad Wii

Win!!!

(1) Roundtrip Airfare

Nassau to Miami

GEOFFREY CHARLES (“SMITTY”) HIGGS

Geoffrey Charles Higgs, known better as “Smitty”, passed aioy pencefiilly on
Sunday, 2 of fanuery, 2001, at the age of sixty-three. He was diagnosed, almost
exactly erghteen months previously, with an aggressioe bratn homer, buf refused bo

submit to tt easily, carrying on, Instead, with marvelous joyeux de vivre,

ots
2uts
Tpt

Smitty wes born the third son of the Hon. Godfrey W Higgs and Suzanne Stoll
(formerly Higes), He attended St. Andrew's School in Nassau and St. Andrew's
College in Aurore, Ontirto and graduated from the University of Miami. He
alos had a profound love for tis home—The Batantas. He was a master sailor,
legendary spear fisherman, accomplished mischief-maker, and expert raconteur. [Ff he
could not be found entertaining friends and family at home, he would certainly be
fownd at Rose Island “celebrating life”, as he would say. Always the gentlerman, bts
spirit was unbounded, fis concern for others and is enormous ability to [ft others
up with never a second thought for himself endured until the end. His humble

demeanour was outshined only by his smile.

Smitty ives on trough his devoted wife Joyce and son Spencer, his brother Peter,
his stepsister Anne Ritter, sisters-in-law Judy Higgs, Colette Higgs, and Lynn
Vincent, brother-in-law Mark Kieene, mother-in-law Cortnne Kleene, nephews
Andrew, Chris, and Grouper Higes, cousins Godfrey E Lightbourn, Roddy Stneclatr,
Derek Higgs, Christopher Lightbourn, Andrea Brownrigg, and Allison Ferber, and
remy more relatives, all of whore he loved dearly. He will be missed by memy close
and dear friends in Nassau and the world over, A funeral service will be held at
Christ Church Cathedral, Thursday, 13 January 2011 at 3:00 p.m. All are asked to

dress in bright and wenn colours as this will be has grandest “Celebration of Life”.

If persons should wish to make donations in memory of Geoff, the family would be
thankful for your consideration of either the Cancer Soctety of the Bahamas, P.O.
Box 55-6539 or fhe St. Andrew's College Forerdation, 15800 Youge Street, Aurora,
Ontario, L4G 3HZ, Canada for the Geoffrey Higgs Fund, the use of which will be

chosen by foyce ana Spericer.



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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Suspect in attack
on congresswoman
faces five charges

TUCSON, Ariz.
Associated Press

FEDERAL prosecutors
brought charges Sunday
against the gunman
accused of attempting to
assasinate Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords and killing six
people at a political event
in Arizona.

Investigators said they
carried out a search war-
rant at Jared Loughner's
home and seized an enve-
lope from a safe with mes-
sages such as "I planned
ahead,” ''My assassina-
tion” and the name "Gif-
fords" next to what
appears to be the man's
signature. He allegedly
purchased the Glock pis-
tol used in the attack in
November at Sportsman's
Warehouse in Tucson.

Court documents also
show that Loughner had
contact with Giffords in
the past. Other evidence
included a letter addressed
to him from Giffords’ con-
gressional stationery in
which she thanked him for
attending a "Congress on
your Corner" event at a
mall in Tucson in 2007.

Heather Williams, the
first assistant federal pub-
lic defender in Arizona,
says the 22-year-old sus-
pect doesn't yet have a
lawyer, but that her office
is working to get a lawyer
appointed.

Meanwhile, authorities
released 911 calls in which
a person witnessing the
mass shooting outside a
grocery store in Tucson
describes a frantic scene
and says, "I do believe
Gabby Giffords was hit."

Loughner fired at Gif-
fords’ district director and
shooting indiscriminately
at staffers and others
standing in line to talk to
the congresswoman, said
Mark Kimble, a communi-
cations staffer for Giffords.

REP. GABRIELLE GIFFORDS, D-Ariz

"He was not more than
three or four feet from the
congresswoman and the
district director," Kimble
said, describing the scene
as "just complete chaos,
people screaming, crying."

Loughner is accused of
killing six people, includ-
ing a federal judge, an aide
to Giffords and a 9-year-
old girl who was born on
Sept. 11, 2001.

Fourteen others were
wounded, including the
three-term Democrat law-
maker. Authorities don't
know his motive, but said
he targeted Giffords at a
public gathering around 10
a.m. Saturday.

Doctors treating the law-
maker provided an opti-
mistic update about her
chances for survival, say-
ing they are "very, very
encouraged" by her ability



Susan Walsh/AP

to respond to simple com-
mands along with their
success in controlling her
bleeding.

Mourners crammed into
the tiny sanctuary of Gif-
fords’ synagogue in Tuc-
son to pray that she quick-
ly recovered. Outside the
hospital, candles flickered
at a makeshift memorial.
Signs read "Peace + love
are stronger," ''God bless
America and "We love
you, Gabrielle."

People also laid down
bouquets of flowers,
American flags and pic-
tures of Giffords.

One of the victims was
Christina Taylor Green,
who was a member of the
student council at her local
school and went to the
event because of her inter-
est in government. She is
the granddaughter of for-

WELL WISHERS gather outside Un



i Bi i

iversity Medical center at a make-shift memorial in Tucson, Ariz., Sunday.



U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot in the head Saturday during a speech at a local supermarket. (AP)

mer Philadelphia Phillies
manager Dallas Green.

She was born on 9/11
and featured in a book
called "Faces of Hope"
that chronicled one baby
from each state born on
the day terrorists killed
nearly 3,000 people.

The fact that Christina's
life ended in tragedy was
especially tragic to those
who knew her.

"Tragedy seems to have
happened again," said the
author of the book, Chris-
tine Naman. "In the form
of this awful event."

Authorities said the
dead included U.S. District
Judge John M. Roll;
Green; Giffords aide Gabe
Zimmerman, 30; Dorothy
Morris, 76; Dorwin Stod-
dard, 76; and Phyllis Sch-
neck, 79. Judge Roll had
just stopped by to see his
friend Giffords after
attending Mass.

An unidentified man
who authorities earlier said
might have acted as an
accomplice was cleared
Sunday of any involve-
ment. Pima County sherif-
f's deputy Jason Ogan told
The Associated Press on
Sunday that the man was
a cab driver who drove the

gunman to the grocery
store outside of which the
shooting occurred.

In one of several
YouTube videos, which
featured text against a
dark background, Lough-
ner described inventing a
new U.S. currency and
complained about the illit-
eracy rate among people
living in Giffords’ con-
gressional district in Ari-
zona.

"I know who's listening:
Government Officials, and
the People,” Loughner
wrote.

"Nearly all the people,
who don't know this accu-
rate information of a new
currency, aren't aware of
mind control and brain-
wash methods. If I have
my civil rights, then this
message wouldn't have
happen (sic)."

In Loughner's middle-
class neighborhood —
about a five-minute drive
from the scene — sheriff's
deputies had much of the
street blocked off. The
neighborhood sits just off a
bustling Tucson street and
is lined with desert land-
scaping and palm trees.

Neighbors said Loughn-
er lived with his parents

and kept to himself. He
was often seen walking his
dog, almost always wear-
ing a hooded sweat shirt
and listening to his iPod.

The assassination
attempt left Americans
questioning whether divi-
sive politics had pushed
the suspect over the edge.

Giffords faced frequent
backlash from the right
over her support of the
health care reform last
year, and had her office
vandalized the day the
House approved the land-
mark measure.

Pima County Sheriff
Clarence Dupnik lashed
out at what he called an
excessively "vitriolic"
atmosphere in the months
leading up to the rampage
as he described the chaos
of the day.

The sheriff said the ram-
page ended only after two
people tackled the gun-
man.

A third person inter-
vened and tried to pull a
clip away from Loughner
as he attempted to reload,
the sheriff said.

"He was definitely on a
mission,” according to
event volunteer Alex Vil-
lec, former Giffords intern.

NASA won't speculate on flight by Giffords’ husband

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

THE SHOCKING gundown of
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords has left
NASA reeling: Her astronaut hus-
band was due to rocket away in
just three months as perhaps the
last space shuttle commander, and
her brother-in-law is currently on
the International Space Station,
according to Associated Press.

Shuttle commander Mark Kelly
rushed to his wife's hospital bed-
side Saturday as his identical twin
brother, Scott, did his best to keep
updated on the Arizona shooting
through Mission Control, the
Internet and the lone phone
aboard the space station.

"I want to thank everyone for
their thoughts and prayers, words
of condolences and encourage-
ment for the victims and their fam-
ilies of this horrific event," Scott
Kelly tweeted from space.

"My sister-in-law, Gabrielle Gif-
fords is a kind, compassionate, bril-
liant woman, loved by friends and
political adversaries alike — a true
patriot.

“What is going on in our country
that such a good person can be the
subject of such senseless vio-
lence?"

It was the worst news to befall
an astronaut in orbit since Christ-
mas 2007, when a space station res-
ident learned of his mother's death
in a car-train collision.

That astronaut, Daniel Tani, was
working in Mission Control in
Houston last week, in touch with
Scott Kelly and the five other
members of the space station crew.

The chief of the astronaut office
broke the news to Scott Kelly that
a gunman had shot his sister-in-
law at a political gathering in Tuc-
son soon after it happened.

NASA officials said Sunday it
was premature to speculate on
whether Mark Kelly would step
down as commander of the April
flight of the shuttle Endeavour.

But it was hard to imagine how
he could keep up with the grueling

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THIS UNDATED PHOTO provided by NASA shows Capt. Mark E. Kelly. The astronauts
wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011 when an
assailant opened fire in an area where the lawmaker was meeting with constituents
in Tucson, congressional officials said. (AP)

training in the next three months,
primarily in Houston, and still
spend time with his wife of three
years, hospitalized in critical con-
dition in Arizona.

Kelly's mission is higher profile

than most. Endeavour's final flight
will deliver an elaborate physics
experiment by a Nobel Prize win-
ner.

For now anyway, it's slated to
be the last voyage of the 30-year

shuttle program. That fact alone
propelled 46-year-old Mark Kelly
onto the cover of this month's Air
& Space magazine of the Smith-
sonian Institution; he shares the
cover with the first shuttle com-
mander, moonwalker John Young.

In an interview with The Asso-
ciated Press last fall, Kelly, a Navy
officer and three-time shuttle flier,
said it was “timing and luck” that
snared him one last coveted com-
mander's seat, not his influential
wife. She loved sharing his adven-
ture. "She's excited about going
to Florida for the launch," he said
then.

Until last month, NASA hoped
the Kelly brothers would meet in
orbit, a PR dream for a space
agency often confronted with bad
news.

But after fuel tank cracks
grounded another shuttle mission,
Mark Kelly's flight was bumped
to April. His brother is to return
home in March on a Russian
spacecraft, so the reunion in space
is off.

As for the rippling effects of Sat-
urday's shooting, there is no prece-
dent for anything like this at
NASA. Astronauts have had to
bow out of space missions over the
decades, but never a commander
so close to flight and never for
something so brutal.

Mark Kelly's co-pilot, retired
Air Force Col. Gregory Johnson,
could take over. Or NASA could
free up another astronaut with fly-
ing-to-the-space-station experi-
ence.

"It is premature to speculate on
any of this,” NASA spokesman
James Hartsfield said in an e-mail
Sunday.

"For now, the focus is on sup-
porting Mark and Scott, and things
need to be taken day by day, and
all thoughts are with the victims."

NASA Administrator Charles
Bolden called Giffords a "a long-
term supporter of NASA... who
not only has made lasting contri-
butions to our country, but is a

strong advocate for the nation's
space program and a member of
the NASA family."

Mark Kelly's two teenage
daughters from a previous mar-
riage were reportedly with him in
Tucson.

The couple met in China in 2003
during a young leaders’ forum and
married in November 2007 at an
organic farm south of Tucson. Gif-
fords, 40, a Democrat, served on
the House Science and Technolo-
gy Committee, and took on NASA
affairs while heading the space sub-
committee.

She admitted to being nervous at
her husband's shuttle launch in
2008. "It's a risky job," she told
The Associated Press. "You don't
really relax" until touchdown.

Mark Kelly readily accepted his
wife's fame.

He considered her the bigger
star in the family.

Scott Kelly, who like his brother
has two daughters, will end his 5?-
month mission in March, flying in
a Russian Soyuz capsule to Kaza-
khstan.

On Sunday, Scott Kelly and his
crewmates — another American,
one Italian and three Russians —
kept busy with maintenance work.
A busy few weeks are ahead with a
spacewalk by two of the Russians
and the late January arrival of the
first-of-its-kind Japanese cargo
ship.

The brothers describe them-
selves as best friends. Both are
Navy captains and former test
pilots, and both became astronauts
in 1996. They grew up in West
Orange, N.J., the sons of police
officers.

Neither ever missed the other
brother's space launches. Mark
was there in October, right at the
launch pad, when Scott boarded a
Russian Soyuz rocket for the space
station.

Both were disappointed when,
just weeks later, shuttle fuel tank
cracks conspired to keep them
apart in space.





PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS















US envoy over
WikiLeaks probe

LONDON

THE American ambas-
sador to Reykjavik has
been summoned to explain
why U.S. investigators are
trying to access the private
details of an Icelandic law-
maker's online activity as
they try to build a criminal
case against WikiLeaks,
according to Associated
Press.

ICELANDIC LAWMAKER Birgitta Jonsdottir poses for this pho-
to Feb. 24, 2010 at an unknown location. In a statement, Satur-
day Jan. 8, 2011, WikiLeaks said U.S. investigators had gone to
the San Francisco-based Twitter Inc. to demand the private
messages, contact information and other personal details of
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and other supporters Assange
has promised to fight the order, as has Jonsdottir, who said in
a Twitter message that she had "no intention to hand my infor-
mation over willingly." (AP)

Revelations that the U.S.
Justice Department
obtained a court order to
examine data held by Twit-
ter Inc. on Birgitta Jons-
dottir, an Icelandic parlia-
mentarian who sits on the
country's Foreign Affairs
Committee, immediately
caused consternation in the
tiny North Atlantic nation.

"(It is) very serious that a
foreign state, the United
States, demands such per-
sonal information of an Ice-
landic person, an elected
official," Interior Minister
Ogmundur Jonasson told
Icelandic broadcaster
RUV.

"This is even more seri-
ous when put (in) perspec-
tive and concerns freedom
of speech and people's free-

RBC Royal Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Retail Banking Leadership
Appointments

RBC Royal Bank is pleased to
announce the following

appointments:

Mrs. Joyce Riviere formerly Manager,
Personal Financial Services, New
Providence and Grand Bahama has been
appointed Vice President, Retail Banking,
New Providence. Mrs. Riviere will have

dom in general," he added.

Jonsdottir is a one-time
WikiLeaks collaborator
also known for her work on
Iceland's media initiative,
which aims to turn the
island nation into a free
speech haven.

Jonsdottir told The Asso-
ciated Press she was too
overwhelmed to comment
Sunday, but in a recent post
to Twitter, she said she was
talking with American
lawyers about how to beat
the order — and was drum-
ming up support in Iceland
as well.

U.S. Ambassador Luis E.
Arreaga has been sum-
moned for a meeting at Ice-
land's Foreign Ministry to
discuss the issue, Foreign
Ministry spokeswoman
Urdur Gunnarsdottir said
Sunday. It was not clear
when the meeting was tak-
ing place.

U.S. Embassy in Reyk-
javik said no one there
would be available for com-
ment until Monday.

The evolving diplomatic
spat illustrates the chal-
lenge American prosecu-
tors face as they weigh
whether to bring charges
against WikiLeaks, an
international, tech-savvy
operation that has angered
and embarrassed Washing-
ton with a series of huge
leaks of classified informa-
tion.

The most recent disclo-
sure of thousands of secret

State Department cables
saw U.S. diplomats being
ordered to gather the DNA
and fingerprints of their
international counterparts,
captured backroom dealing
over issues such as Guan-
tanamo and rendition, and
publicized unflattering
assessments of friends and
foes alike.

The U.S. says the disclo-
sures have damaged inter-
national diplomacy and put
the safety of informants
and foreign human rights
activists at risk.

WikiLeaks has dismissed
the claims, but Washington
has been trying to find a
way to prosecute the group
and its leader, 39-year-old
Julian Assange, who is cur-
rently in England.

A court order unsealed
earlier this week revealed
that American authorities
had gone to court to seek
data from Twitter about
Assange, Jonsdottir, and
others either known or sus-
pected to have interacted
with WikiLeaks.

Some of those named in
the court order have said
they suspect other compa-
nies — such as Facebook
Inc., Google Inc., and the
eBay Inc.-owned Internet
communications company
Skype — have also been
secretly asked to hand over
their personal data.

Assange and Jonsdottir
have vowed to fight the
court order.

Clinton presses
Persian Gulf
countries on Iran

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates

responsibility for RBC’s retail operations in
New Providence which includes a network
of 10 branches.

Mrs. Riviere will continue to report directly
to Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, President and
Country Head, RBC Bahamas and Turks
and Caicos Islands.

Mr. Michael Munnings formerly Manager,
Client Care and Operations, New
Providence and Grand Bahama has been
appointed Vice President, Retail Banking,
Family Islands. Mr. Munnings will have
responsibility for RBC’s retail network of 10
branches in seven family islands including,
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros, Exuma,
Eleuthera, Long Island and Bimini.

Mr. Munnings will continue to report
directly to Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, President
and Country Head, RBC Bahamas and Turks
and Caicos Islands.

Please join RBC in congratulating
Mrs. Riviere and Mr. Munnings
on their new appointments.

SMe to mee Gtr ay

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

RBC Royal Bank



US. SECRETARY of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sun-
day that the world must keep pressure on Iran over its suspect
nuclear program despite recent estimates that the country may be
further behind in efforts to develop atomic weapons than previously
thought, according to Associated Press.

Clinton told reporters accompanying her on a three-nation tour
of the Persian Gulf that Iran "remains a serious concern” no mat-
ter when it might be able to produce a nuclear weapon. And she
urged countries in the region that do business with Iran "to do
everything within reason" to help ensure the sanctions are enforced.

"We have had a consistent message to our friends in the Gulf
that there is no part of the world that has more at stake in trying to
deter Iran from becoming the creator and possessor of nuclear
weapons than you,” she said.

"T don't know that it gives much comfort to someone who is in
the Gulf or in a country that Iran has vowed to destroy that it's a
one-year or three-year timeframe. So, I think we should keep the
focus where it belongs,” she said, referring to the sanctions and
efforts by world powers to persuade Iran to halt uranium enrich-
ment.

Her comments were the first from a senior U.S. official in
response to reports in Israel on Friday that Israel's newly retired
spy chief thinks Iran won't be able to build a nuclear bomb before
2015, further pushing back Israeli intelligence estimates of when
Tehran might become a nuclear power.

"We don't want anyone to be misled by anyone's intelligence
analysis," Clinton said. "This remains a serious concern. We expect
all our partners ... to stay as focused as they can and do everything
within reason that will help to implement these sanctions."

As recently as 2009, Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak said
Iran would be able to build a nuclear bomb by 2011. But since then
the projected deadline has been extended. The Israeli Cabinet
minister in charge of strategic affairs, Moshe Yaalon, said last
week it would take the Iranians at least three years to develop a
nuclear weapon.

Many Arab nations share U‘S. fears that Iran is using a civilian
atomic energy program to hide weapons development. Those con-
cerns were amplified in leaked diplomatic cables released by the
WikiLeaks website late last year that revealed deep mistrust of Iran
by Sunni Arab leaders who must deal with an increasing embold-
ened Shiite neighbor.

Clinton acknowledged that one reason for her trip to the Unit-
ed Arab Emirates, Oman and Qatar was to try to contain damage
done by the release of the classified cables, which have exposed
embarrassing secrets and tensions in the region.

Her visit comes ahead of a new round of international talks
with Iran, tentatively scheduled for Jan. 21-22 in Turkey. The five
permanent members of the U.N. Security Council — the USS.,
Russia, China, Britain and France — along with Germany will
again try to compel Iran to come clean about its nuclear intentions,
in return for incentives.

Iran is under four sets of U.N. sanctions because of its refusal to
halt urantum enrichment, which can be used to produce nuclear fuel
or materials for bombs. U.S. officials believe the penalties are
hitting Iran's economy, but want them to be more strictly enforced
and would like individual countries to take separate punitive mea-
sures on their own.

Tehran insists its uranium enrichment and other programs are
meant only for peaceful purposes to generate fuel for a future
network of nuclear reactors.

Clinton's trip to the Gulf is her second in as many months. She
also attended an international security conference in Bahrain in
December. While Iran is always high on the agenda during such vis-
its to the region, her focus this time will be broader.





Full Text




22% WEEK ON
WEEK SALES RISE
AT CITY MARKETS

Despite 38%
drop in Xmas
top line due to
loss of two
stores, company
says sales have
risen 135%
since takeover

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

DESPITE Christmas
sales dropping 38 per cent
year-over-year due to the
loss of two stores, City
Markets executives told
Tribune Business that its
top line has averaged a 22
per cent week-over-week
increase in the past fort-
night, giving them encour-
agement that a $100 mil-
lion target for their first
12 months is “not an
unreasonable expecta-
tion”.

Disclosing that the nine-
store supermarket chain’s
sales had more than dou-
bled, increasing by 135 per
cent since the Mark Fin-
layson-led Trans Island
Traders acquired 78 per
cent majority ownership
in Bahamas Supermarkets
on November 10 last year,
Philip Kemp, the compa-
ny’s chief financial officer,
told this newspaper it was
looking to boost customer
counts even further
through offering an
enhanced product mix.

While a more-than-dou-
bling of City Markets’
sales since the takeover is
not surprising, given how
bare the supermarket
chain’s shelves were due
to lack of inventory, Mr
Kemp told Tribune Busi-
ness the company was
“pretty much on sched-
ule” in terms of manage-
ment’s expectations.

“Over the last two
weeks, we averaged a 22
per cent sales increase
week-over-week,” Mr
Kemp told Tribune Busi-
ness. “In terms of the
Christmas period, we were
only down about 38 per
cent, which is not bad con-
sidering we lost two
stores.”

Those are the Oakes
Field and Village Road
outlets, lost after landlord
Neil MacTaggart and the
company decided to part
ways, but Mr Kemp
added: “If you look at it
from the first week we
took over to now, we’ve
seen about a 135 per cent
increase in sales. We see
our traffic in the stores
picking up quire signifi-
cantly also.”

He told this newspaper
that City Markets was
now focusing on its prod-
uct mix, ensuring con-
sumers met the majority
of their grocery needs with
it and were not tempted
to look elsewhere.

“If we can close that
gap, get to 80-90 per cent
of their product mix for
the week, we will start to

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



THE TRIBUNE

usine

MONDAY,

JANUARY LO,



2011

1BB4



Doctors targets 50/50
medical tourism split



Barry Rassin

DOCTORS HOSPITAL PRESIDENT:

cent.

Customs accused
of breaching AG
court undertaking

Freeport businessman says latest
moves over ‘bonded goods sales’
an ‘attempt to force Freeport into
duty-paid world and increase
government revenues’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LEADING Freeport
businessman has accused
Bahamas Customs of
breaching an undertaking
given by the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office on its behalf by
persisting with demands for
‘bonded goods _ sales
reports’, telling Tribune
Business that the situation
was imposing “a further
depression on post-Christ-
mas trade” in the city.

Christopher Lowe, opera-
tions manager at Kelly’s
(Freeport), told this news-
paper that Customs was
informing all 3,500 Grand

NEAL & MASSY HIT
BY CITY MARKETS
‘HORROR SHOWING’

* Bahamian supermarket
chain produced $0.142
per share loss for
Trinidad conglomerate,
some 75% of all discon-
tinued operations losses

* Blames ‘important
structural disadvantages’
and ‘increasing competi-
tive intensity’ for turn-
around failure

* Wrote-off $8.156m
investment to turn firm
around, which included
guarantee for Royal Bank
loan

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CITY MARKETS’ melt-
down under the disastrous
former BSL Holdings owner-
ship cost its main Trinidadian
shareholder a $0.142 per
share loss for its 2010 financial
year, with “structural disad-
vantages” and “increasing
competitive intensity” in
Bahamian food retailing
blamed for the failure to turn
the supermarket chain
around.

Gervase Warner, chief
executive of Trinidadian con-
glomerate Neal & Massy,
which previously owned 31
per cent of Bahamas Super-
markets’ shares via its 40 per
cent stake in majority share-
holder, BSL Holdings, admit-
ted the company failed to
“anticipate” the depth of the
problems faced by the then-11
store chain operating as City

SEE page 7B

Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licencees that with
effect from this month, they
are required to submit to it
on a monthly basis reports
on all goods they have sold
bonded, or duty-free, to oth-
er licencees for use in the
latter’s business.

This, he argued, meant
that Customs was breaching
the undertaking the Attor-
ney General’s Office had
given on its behalf to the
Supreme Court that it would
not demand ‘bonded good
sales reports’, or impose
sanctions for its non-sub-
mission, until the substan-

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DOCTORS Hospital is aiming to
grow and diversify its business mix
into an ultimate 50/50 split between its
current core and medical tourism, its
president telling Tribune Business that
moving into the latter area would
enable it to “not worry about prof-
itability” following a year when local
patient activity dropped off by 25 per

* Move targeting increased revenue streams that will ensure

With the BISX-listed healthcare
provider’s prostate cancer treatment
program already in place as its first
medical tourism initiative, Barry
Rassin told this newspaper that Doc-
tors Hospital hoped to establish a

year.

aN

‘HEDGES BETS’

ON ENERGY,
FOOD RISES

* Supermarket chain
activating advance
bulk buying plans, as
owner expects energy
costs to ‘double’

* Beats Christmas pro-
jections by some 2%

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

SUPERVALUE is
dusting off plans to bulk
purchase in advance in a
bid to head off escalating
food prices expected to hit
later this year, its president
and owner also expressing
fears that energy prices
might “double” during
2011.

With commodity price
increases an emerging
threat that might knock

SEE page 7B

=a]
a Tr
'.
he.

"Srey 4
ek he be

The Superocean Heritage 46

BREITLING BOUTIQUE

WWW .BREITLING.COM



spinal surgery centre in Nassau within
the next five to six months, followed
by a centre for hips, knee and joint
replacement - possibly as early as next



BISX-listed firm ‘does not have to worry’ about profitability

* President says recession caused ‘25% drop in patient activity
across the board, with tourist percentage of mix down from
18% to 11%

* Med tourism could help boost staff levels ‘10-20%’, with
spinal centre and knee/hip facility possibly both arriving
within year

* Targeting 1,000 medical tourism patients in two-three years

Describing medical tourism as a
“strong part of our future”, Mr Rassin
said Doctors Hospital would likely

SEE page 6B

AML’s 10% buy back
to combat ‘severely
undervalued’ stock

* BISX-listed food group unveils 36-month share repur-
chase to fight illiquid market

* Chairman says stock ‘damn good buy’, amid frustra-
tion that market does not reflect fundamentals and con-
sistent profits

* ‘95% of the population don’t understand shares’, he
says, with price dictated by cash-seeking small sellers

* AML Foods prepared to borrow to finance deals, and
expects other listed Bahamian firms to follow suit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AML Foods has become
the latest BISX-listed compa-
ny to unveil a share buy back
program, its chairman telling
Tribune Business the move
to acquire up to 10 per cent of
the stock over a 36-month
period was sparked by an
illiquid market that failed to
reflect the group’s return to
consistent profitability in a
“severely undervalued” share
price.

SEE page 4B



BREITLING

[INSTRUMENTS FOR PROFESSIONALS"â„¢
an ¢ | 5 (ey
Na BY, IY

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE

ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRAP

By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS






















BISX SYMBOL CLOSING PRICE WKLY PRICE CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE CHANGE

It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian
stock market.

Investors traded in three out of the 24 listed secu-
rities, with no advancers nor decliners.

Pen eer eee ()) Pererererrrernr nie reemereeeseren O)()/
SES ()() Seeerrernmeenrerrreeeeres 0.00%
()\) Sede ertnee ee terete eres 0.00%
eee ee () Ree cere eemerrrertes (C00

EQUITYMARKET == | RRESSTEStsn sere trees e000) eee ee eee Oe eee 0.00%

A total of 34,700 shares changed hands, represent- 0 0.00%
ing a significant decrease of 36,221 shares compared PPerrrrerererrrrrrirrr rier etre het tier errr rere er eee ee eee eee ee ee eee ee . 0
to the previous week's trading volume of 70,921 2) eee ee 0.00%

shares. ; (ER eee era ee nan: 0.00%

Benchmark Bahamas (BBL) was the volume 4.000 0.00%

leader, trading a volume of 30,500 shares to close a aaa aaa ea alia petal

unchanged at$0.18. §| $§§ = # | Eee eee 0.00%
I eT TN 10.38%

seer steerer 0.00%
Pee ore Orne Tee 0.00%
Le Te tate 0.00%
ee ene eee Te, 0.00%
EERE EE 0.00%
fe ere ee a eer ee 0.00%
Protea eres eee ores 0.00%
Rr ee get reer reece ees 0.00%
See eee ere es 0.00%

BOND MARKET
No notes traded during last week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:
There were no earnings reports released last week.

INTERNATIONAL MARKETS

FOREX Rates





Se Sse] Se Se ee eS =>

Currency Weekly % Change

BOND MARKET - TRADING STATISTICS
CAD 1.0086 1.47

BISX SYMBOL DESCRIPTION VOLUME PAR VALUE

GBP 1.5557 0.72

FBB1 FBB i N Due 201 i
at 12915 155 B Series C Notes Due 2013 $1,000

FBB15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015 $1,000

FBB1 FBB ies AN Due 201 1
COMMODITIES 7 Series A Notes Due 2017 $1,000

. FBB22 FBB Series B Notes Due 2022 $1,000
Commodity Weekly

Crude Oil 93.58
Gold 1,367.00

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INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES

Index Weekly y% Change

DJIA 11,674.76 0.84

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
(hw

THE TRIBUNE

(EW

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 3B
























COLINA — Insurance
hopes customers will notice
something different when
they phone or walk into a
branch of the life and health
insurer, as it has taken a new
customer service pledge.

The five-point pledge
serves as the guideline for
Colina’s standard of client
interaction and service qual-
ity, dealing with everything
from telephone etiquette
and client waiting time limits
to ways of addressing co-
workers on company
premises.

Colina has mounted the
pledge on the walls of all its
branches to remind staff of
the new service motto, ‘Ser-
vice Excellence: Our Policy;
Our Promise’, since it was
launched with a week of cus-

Colin



tomer appreciation activities
and giveaways at all branch-
es in Nassau and the Family
Islands.

Vice-president of life
operations, Wendy Butler,
said: “Our customers
deserve our best effort as
well as our respect and cour-
tesy. By placing the cus-
tomer as the central element
of all of our work, we will
enhance our culture of cus-
tomer awareness and sustain
the highest quality of cus-
tomer satisfaction, personal
accountability and profes-
sional commitment.”

Ms Butler said the new
service pledge focuses on
the needs of clients as
human beings as well as
patrons of an establishment.

“We've recognized that

pa

customer service must be
more proactive and go
beyond satisfying the cus-
tomer’s basic need,” Ms
Butler said.

“This means exceeding a
customer’s expectation by
delivering a service prior to
the turnaround time wher-
ever possible, or facilitating















Colon
Comf

a’s pledge on
customer service

customers who make special
requests that are qualified
exceptions to our standard
procedures.”

Colina expects new tech-
nology will boost the pro-
gramme this year, and give
clients easier and more con-
venient ways to interact with
the insurer.

COLINA REPRESENTATIVES and
clients stand in front of a poster declar-
ing the first principle of the company’s
| new Customer Service Pledge. L-R:
executive vice-chairman Emanuel Alex-
iou; customer services manager Julie
Dean; clients Margaret Pratt, Monica
Porter and Latoya Cooper; vice-presi-
dent, life operations, Wendy Butler; and
customer services manager, Lavaughn
Fernander.

BELOW: At the launch of Colina’s

new Customer Service Pledge at the
company’s Rosetta Branch, client
Raquel Pyfrom (second from left) is
greeted by Wendy Butler, vice-presi-
dent, life operations; Emanuel Alexiou,
executive vice-chairman; and Alice
Woodside, branch administrator.

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Lanpkin & Compiay staff menibers Jenifer Bain, Carrol
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Lompkin & Company staff members Jennifer Baia, Carrel
Betiell, Sandra Knowles, Jeanine Lampkin Uravla Weeek Staff
making presenianions io
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Lampkia & Company staf members Jennifer Bain, Carrol
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making presentations te
Nezareth Center- represented
by Mrs, Ruth Strachan
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





AMUs 10% buy back to combat ‘severely undervalued’ stock

FROM page one

Hinting at the food retail
group’s frustration that its
positive fundamentals,
namely two years’ of consis-
tent profitability amid the
worst recession in living
memory, were not being
reflected by the Bahamian
stock market, Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said AML Foods’
current $0.97 per share
stock price was “a damn
good buy”.

The BISX-listed food
retail group this follows the
lead established by Cable
Bahamas and Common-
wealth Bank in establishing
a share buy back program,
announcing on Friday that
it would repurchase up to 10
per cent of its outstanding
1,540,417 shares (just over
154,000) over a 36-month or
three-year period to Janu-

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ary 31, 2014.

The move is designed to
support AML Foods’ share
price for the benefit of long-
term investors, such as pen-
sion funds and insurance
companies; stimulate inter-
est and market demand for
the stock, indicate to the
market where the company
fees the ‘true value’ should
be’; and provide more liq-
uidity to existing investors
that enables them to sell
more easily.

Tribune Business under-
stands that AML Foods’
Board and senior manage-
ment had been discussing
initiating a share buy back
program for some 18
months, and Mr D’Aguilar
said the company might
even be prepared to “tem-
porarily borrow” to finance
purchases of its own stock
if the terms were right.



ae Melia,

CARNIVAL

at the Queen Elizabeth

Sporting Complex

Pointing to the lack of
overall liquidity in the
Bahamian stock market,
which was making it diffi-
cult for buyers and sellers
of many stocks to conduct
trade, Mr D’Aguilar also
lamented the “lack of
sophistication” among
investors, telling Tribune
Business: “Ninety-five per
cent of the population don’t
understand shares.”

AML Foods’ payment of
a dividend last year - the
first such payment for seven
to eight years - sparked
upward movement in the
stock price despite the
improved fundamentals, and
Mr D’ Aguilar said the com-
pany’s market price was too
often being dictated by
small retail investors need-
ing to sell several hundred
or a thousand shares to raise
cash at values that did not
reflect the group’s worth,

He added: “The main rea-
son we’re doing it is that the
shares are trading at $0.97,
and we feel the stock’s
severely undervalued.

“We feel it’s worth a lot
more than that, and given
the illiquid market, the lack
of liquidity in the market,
and the lack of interest in
the shares, we felt we’d cre-
ate a little bit of interest and

a bit of activity at $1 a share.
If no one is prepared to but
it at $1 a share, which is a
damn good buy, the compa-
ny will buy it.”

The AML Foods chair-
man said the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) had told
the company it must notify
the market of a specific
amount of shares it would
attempt to repurchase, and
over what period of time,
hence the 10 per cent at
three-year period to Janu-
ary 2014.

Telling Tribune Business
that AML Foods would “see
how it goes”, Mr D’ Aguilar
said: “Given cash flow con-
siderations, we gave our-
selves three years to accom-
plish this goal, and after
three years we’ll see.

“T expect almost immedi-
ately that there will be some
bump up in the shares, and
if the company is prepared
to buy back its shares at $1,
the current market price, it
must be sending the market
a message. We paid a divi-
dend last year, and that did
not cause a bump up in the
share price.

“That’s the way a sophis-
ticated market works, but it
does not seem to work that
way here. At Christmas

time, people want money.
The price is dictated, not by
the fundamentals, but the
desire of the small share-
holder to sell 1,000 shares
to get money for Christmas.
That tends to drive the price
down, but not for the right
reasons. Ninety-five per cent
of the population don’t
understand shares, don’t
maintain an interest in
shares, and that creates illiq-
uidity. People are not pre-
pared to play the market.”

Explaining that AML
Foods was effectively “cre-
ating a market for our-
selves” through its share buy
back program, Mr
D’ Aguilar said he expected
more publicly-listed
Bahamian companies to fol-
low suit “to put the price
where it should be”.

“T think that’s probably
the way until people become
a little more sophisticated,”
Mr D’ Aguilar told Tribune
Business. “I think it’s almost
necessary, as there are so
few trades apart from Com-
monwealth Bank. I think
more companies, who look
at their fundamentals, look
at what the share price
reflects, will go out and
announce it.”

While AML Foods had
not allocated a specific sum

to finance its share repur-
chase program, Mr
D’Aguilar said: “If the
opportunity arises, and we
think the shares are under-
valued, we will go into the
market.”

Noting that the company
was conscious of cash flows
and capital expenditures it
needed to finance, namely
its $4.5 million Solomon’s
Fresh Market store in west-
ern New Providence, the
chairman added: “If the
cash is available and the
price is right, we will buy it.
If we think it’s a damn good
deal, we will temporarily
borrow to take advantage of
it. We have no debt, so if a
good situation arises and we
want to take advantage of
the opportunity, we’re going
to do what we need to do in
that regard, and if we have
to borrow to take advantage
of this, that’s what we’ll do.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said the buy
back program would ensure
AML Foods’ share price
“doesn’t go any lower, and
strengthens and trends up
to where it should be. We
feel that we can provide
increased shareholder value
by buying back some of our
outstanding ordinary shares,
and improving earnings and
dividends per share.”

22 per cent week on week
sales rise at City Markets

FROM page one

hit these kinds of numbers,”

able.

“Going forward, Christmas was quite
encouraging, and we’ve identified those
areas we need to focus on. There’s still a

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Mr Kemp
said. What we’ve seen so far is quite
encouraging. We’re not out of the woods
yet, but we’ve kind of got to grips with
this model, so we feel more comfort-

lot of people out there that want City
Markets to succeed, and traffic has been
quite encouraging.

“We’ve been on target with expecta-
tions. We knew coming in that there
would be a lot of challenges. But there’s
no surprise in terms of where we are at
this time; we’re pretty much on sched-

ule.”

Noting that sorting out lingering refrig-
eration issues was a “high priority”, Mr
Kemp said City Markets was still on tar-

get to reach $100 million in sales during
the first year of Trans Island Traders’

majority ownership.

“We'd like to,” he added of the $100
million sales objective. “If the growth
continues as we are doing now, that’s
not an unreasonable expectation, but
it’s very difficult to predict at this point.

“Tt’s an extremely competitive envi-

ronment, and I’m sure the competitors
are not going to lie down and let us
recapture the market share we lost.”

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THE TRIBUNE

6

A

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 5B



Customs accused of breaching
AG court undertaking

FROM page one

tive issues between it and
Kelly’s (Freeport) are deter-
mined by the court.

Kelly’s (Freeport) has
filed a Judicial Review
action of Customs’ demand
for such a report, and the
terms of the undertaking, as
read out by the company’s
attorney, Fred Smith of Cal-
lender’s & Co, state: “Until
judgment in this matter or
further Order, neither the
Respondent, nor any Cus-
toms officer or employee or
agent of H.M. Customs, may
detain goods, or refuse to
process imported goods for
entry in the usual way, or
refuse to accept returns for
Duty Paid Sales, or other-
wise take enforcement
action against the applicant
or other GBPA Licensees,
on the basis of non-receipt
of duty exempt bonded sales
reports or on any other basis
not sanctioned by law."

Glenn Gomez, Customs
Comptroller, could not be
reached by Tribune Busi-
ness for comment on late
Friday afternoon.

However, Mr Lowe told
Tribune Business: "In the
face of the undertaking by
the Attorney General of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, that Bahamas
Customs will not pursue
‘Bonded Sales reports’ until
the substantive issue of
bonded goods reporting is
heard before a judge of the
Supreme Court, Bahamas
Customs is notifying
licensees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority that
they are now, effective Jan-
uary 2011, required to report
on a monthly basis all of
their bonded purchases and,
in addition, requiring all sell-
ers of bonded goods to
report on all sales to
licensees.

“Also, a new declaration
form called a C14A must be
signed by the licensee for
each and every monthly
invoice submission (pur-
chase), and a C14B declara-
tion by the seller on licensee
purchases report.”

The C14A, Mr Lowe
explained, was effectively
for buyers, who Customs is
requiring to sign off that
they bought all these goods

“It feels good to choose a health plan



KELLY’S (FREEPORT )
ATTORNEY Fred Smith of
Callender’s & Co

for use in their own busi-
ness.

The C14B, he added,
requires licencees to confirm
that they sold bonded goods
to legitimate licencees.

All this, Mr Lowe said,
had added to the confusion
and consternation caused by
Customs’ move to require
all GBPA licencees to pro-
duce a National Insurance
Board (NIB) Letter of
Good Standing, showing
they were up to date on
employee contributions,
before they would be issued
with a ‘bonded letter’
enabling them to purchase
goods duty-free in 2011.

“Already in effect Janu-
ary 1 is the de-facto denial of
the right to purchase bonded
goods via a new require-
ment to furnish to Bahamas
Customs a ‘letter of good
standing’ from the National
Insurance Board in order to
obtain an ‘Over the Counter
Bonded Purchase Letter’,
which according to Bahamas
Customs enables the forgo-
ing of their requirement for
each and every purchase
order to be approved,” Mr
Lowe said.

“Apparently this letter is
being issued from NIB in
Nassau, and there is some
question as to what other
Government departments
are in collusion with respect
to overdue fees or amounts
owing by Freeport business-
es.

“Also, these letters are
slow in coming and are

thereby denying a right by
way of Government lethargy
or explicit intent.

“This is, of course, a ques-
tionable practice which has
never been required or
enforced, as the right to pur-
chase Conditionally Duty
Free is granted to licensees
by the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, not the NIB.”

Asked by Tribune Busi-
ness about the impact all this
was having on Freeport’s
economy, Mr Lowe replied:
“T think a further depression
of the post-Christmas trade,
because [have a feeling that
a number of licencee com-
panies are putting off any
work they have that uses
duty-free materials until
they get approval to pur-
chase for the ensuing year.

“So, practically, it’s going
to have the effect of delay-
ing construction after Christ-
mas, especially on jobs
requiring duty-free materi-
als.

“Licensees are being
forced by Bahamas Customs
into purchasing materials
required by their businesses
in a duty paid state, thereby
increasing costs but also cre-
ating potential legal issues
where contracts have been
signed for duty free con-
struction or service contracts
needing bonded materials.”

And Mr Lowe added: “If
Customs continues to act
unlawfully and arbitrarily,
it’s going to get pretty rough
in Freeport, and ultimately it
strikes me as a deliberate
attempt by the Government
to force Freeport into the
duty-paid world and
increase their revenues.”

Bonded goods sales is a
practice whereby Freeport-
based wholesalers, such as
Dolly Madison, Kelly's
(Freeport) and Bellevue
Business Depot, are able to
sell products to other GBPA
licencees for use in their
respective businesses only,
without any duty being paid
to Customs/Government on
their sale.

It is a report on this activ-
ity that Customs is seeking,
but Kelly's (Freeport) and
its attorneys are arguing that
this has never been request-
ed before, and is not includ-
ed in any statute law, policy
or agreement concerning
their relationship.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

Tender for provision of cleaning services, food and nutrition
department of Princess Margaret Hospitals

Tenders are invited from qualified contractors to provide
cleaning services for the food and nutrition department of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, Public Hospitals Authority, for a
period of one (1) year.

Tender documents, which include instructions to
tenderers, specifications and other relevant information, can be
collected 9 am - 5:00 pm Monday to Friday at the Public Hospitals
Authority, corporate centre “B”, Third & West Terraces
Collins Avenue.

A tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed envelope or
package identified as a tender for the provision of cleaning
services, food and nutrition department of the Princess Margaret
Hospital and addressed to:

THE CHAIRMAN,
TENDERS COMMITTEE
THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
CORPORATE CENTRE “B”
THIRD AND WEST TERRACES COLLINS AVENUE
P.O. BOX NB8200
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

TENDERS ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS
AUTHORITY NO LATER THAN 5:00 PM. ON

anuary 28th, 2011.

A copy of a current business license and a certificate verifying up
to date National Insurance Contributions should accompany all
proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all Tender(s).



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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Adamants Investment and Management Company Ltd.
(Company number 146,344B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of Adamants Investment

and Management Company Ltd. hereby certify that the
winding up and dissolution of Adamants Investment
and Management Company Ltd. has been completed
in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that
Adamants Investment and Management Company
Ltd. has been dissolved as of 28th day of December,

2010.
Dated this 6th day of January, 2011
Pine Limited

Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FSO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(Company number 153,433B)

An International Business Company

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of FSO INVESTMENT

MANAGEMENT LIMITED hereby certify that the

winding up and dissolution of FSO INVESTMENT

MANAGEMENT LIMITED has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that
FSO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LIMITED has
been dissolved as of 23rd day of December, 2010.

Dated this 6th day of January, 2011

Pine Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FSO Forex and Special Opportunities Fund Ltd.
(Company number 153,447B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

We, Vanessa Z. Coleby and J. Eleanor Bain, Liquidators
of FSO Forex and Special Opportunities Fund Ltd.
hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of FSO
Forex and Special Opportunities Fund Ltd. has been
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution
and that FSO Forex and Special Opportunities Fund
Ltd. has been dissolved as of 21st day of December,
2010.
Dated this 6th day of January, 2011

Vanessa Z. Coleby / J. Eleanor Bain
Liquidators

Wachael Ross Goat

is pleased to announce

the establishment of his legal pratice
effective the 22nd of November 2010

under the name of

(Seat and Ga

Counsel and Attorney at Law
Lagoon Court, Executive Suite 115
Sandy Port, West Bay Street,

PO. Box SP-60606
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone (242) 527-1161
Fax: (242) 527-0282
London address:

115 Temple Chambers Temple Avenue
London EC4Y ODA
Telephone (011) 44 207-353-8868
Email: mrscott@scottchambers.bs

wwwiscottchambers.bs



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

THE TRIBUNE



Doctors targets 50/50
medical tourism split

FROM page one

have to add “another 10-20
per cent” to its staffing levels
- possibly as much as 50-100
jobs - once medical tourism
took off and the hospital’s
business from
residents/tourists returned to
pre-recession levels.

Explaining that Doctors
Hospital was looking to
attract 250 patients per year
to the Bahamas through the
spinal treatment and surgery
centre, Mr Rassin said of the
rationale behind the medical
tourism move: “Increased rev-
enue streams, pure and sim-
ple. The Bahamas is a very
small population, and to pro-
vide service to a small popu-
lation we can see it [the
effects] now, especially with
the recession.”

The Doctors Hospital pres-
ident said the recession’s
impact had been especially
heavy on the business it gen-

erated from providing treat-
ments to visiting stopover and
cruise ship tourists.

While tourists normally
accounted for 18 per cent of
the hospital’s patient activity,
Mr Rassin said this percent-
age had dropped to 11 per
cent due to the recession and
reduction in travel demand.
“Half of our tourists we’re not
getting, and that’s the biggest
blow to the top and bottom
line,” said Mr Rassin.”

Noting that Doctors Hos-
pital had seen “an almost 25
per cent drop in activity
across the board”, he
explained that the company
was looking to build on its
existing core business to
diversify into medical tourism,
reducing its reliance on resi-
dents and transient visitors
for 100 per cent of its rev-
enues.

“We don’t want to rely on
foreign visitors and, where
business activity drops 25 per

cent as it did last year, not
worry about profitability. We
want another revenue
stream,” Mr Rassin said,
adding that Doctors Hospital
wanted something that
“Jumps us into profits” in both
good and bad times.

“For the Bahamas, the
spin-off is fantastic,” he
added. “Two hundred and
fifty cases bringing with them
family members, each of
those staying in the hotels. It’s
big for the hospital and big
for tourism. Id like to see us
get to a 50/50 ratio, 50 per
cent local, 50 per cent med-
ical tourism.”

With the High Intensity
Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)
prostate cancer treatment
centre, headed by Dr Robin
Roberts, attracting 15-20
patients per month, Mr
Rassin said Doctors Hospital
was hoping to attract 250
patients annually to each of
the spinal and knee/joint

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replacement centres during
their formative years.

“You’re talking 1,000
patients a year, which I think
we can get to over two-three
years,” he told Tribune Busi-
ness. “That’s gigantic business
for us. It makes us interna-
tional. It should take our bot-
tom and top line to a place
where we have all the cash we
need to make sure we stay up
to date with technology.”

Doctors Hospital had
worked painstakingly over
many years to put in place the
foundations to break into
medical tourism, Mr Rassin
said, describing as a “gigan-
tic step” the attaining of Joimt
Commission International
accreditation last June - a
standard that signals to Amer-
icans that the BISX-listed
healthcare provider is the
equal of any US hospital in
terms of quality care and out-
comes.

Building on the HIFU pro-
gramme’s initial success, Mr
Rassin said Doctors Hospital
was working with Bahamian
specialist, Dr Val Grimes, to
set-up the spinal surgery and
care centre as part of a con-
sortium, together with spe-
cialists from Florida and
Washington, plus a spinal
parts manufacturer.

The consortium’s plan was
to give overseas patients
options as to whether they
had their treatment at home
or in Nassau. If the latter was
chosen, Mr Rassin said a
“unique” feature was that the
programme brought both
patient and surgeon to the
Bahamas, an element
designed to give Doctors Hos-
pital a market niche and stand
out from the competition.

Explaining that it was criti-
cal to “get it done right”,
ensuring that accreditations
and quality care were all in
place, Mr Rassin said Doctors
Hospital was hoping to get
the spinal surgery centre
operational within the next
five-six months. And, with the
same partners involved in the
knee/hip/joint replacement
programme, he added that
this might be established “by
the end of this year or Janu-
ary next year”.

“It’s a very competitive
business, so we want to focus
on niche markets, and no one
else is looking to bring the
surgeons over,” Mr Rassin
said.

While the likes of Thailand,
Singapore and Malaysia had
stolen an early march on the
competition, primarily
through a cost structure that
paid 10 per cent of US salary
costs, Mr Rassin said medical
costs in the Bahamas were
“about 20 per cent less” than
in or northern neighbour.

The Bahamas’ and Doctors
Hospital’s competitive advan-
tage, Mr Rassin said, lay in
its ability to offer a combina-
tion of 20-25 per cent cost sav-
ings; quality assurance
through the JCI accreditation;
and bringing the surgeons to
Nassau. “The insurance com-
panies like that combination,”
he explained.

And, with patients from
overseas also set to be attract-
ed through Doctors Hospi-
tal’s Internet marketing, Mr
Rassin said this was “where
the spin-offs will be created”
for Bahamian doctors and
surgeons as the reputation for
quality care spread. Bahamian
doctors would be the ones
doing the operations here,
and “that’s when the benefits
to surgeons will jump”.


an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 7B





Neal & Massy hit by City Markets ‘horror showing’

FROM page one

Markets.

He also, in his year-end
report to Neal & Massy
shareholders, revealed that
the company invested some
$52.2 million Trinidadian dol-
lars ($8.156 million in
Bahamian/US dollars) in try-
ing to turn Bahamas Super-
markets around during the
conglomerate’s 2010 financial
year.

“We did not anticipate the
depth of the economic reces-
sion and increasing competi-
tive intensity in food retail-
ing in the Bahamas, which
overcame the group’s efforts
to turn around Bahamas

Supermarkets,” Mr Warner
confessed to Neal & Massy
shareholders.

While it was no secret that
Bahamas Supermarkets had
“incurred continued losses
over the last several financial
years”, Mr Warner confirmed
that Neal & Massy’s Board
decided to sell the company
during the July-September
quarter, the last one in its
financial year. That coincided
with when Neal & Massy
stopped investing in City
Markets.

Referring to both Bahamas
Supermarkets and another
loss-making business that
Neal & Massy has disposed
of, Mr Warner added:
“Attempts to turn around

these companies proved
unsuccessful as important
structural disadvantages were
too significant to overcome.”

The Trinidadian conglom-
erate’s report noted that
Bahamas Supermarkets
accounted for 75 per cent or
three-quarters of the losses it
suffered from discontinued
operations in 2010. The
Bahamian supermarket chain
produced a TT$0.91 or
US$0.1428 loss per share,
with pre-tax losses generat-
ed by City Markets standing
at TT$87.818 million or
US$13.54 million.

The latter figure compared
to a loss of TT'$19.515 million
or US$3.049 million in 2009.

Neal & Massy noted that

it inherited Bahamas Super-
markets as an “underper-
forming company” when it
acquired Barbados Shipping
& Trading, the original 40 per
cent equity investor in BSL
Holdings, which was also City
Markets’ operating partner.
Its financial statements
added: “The net asset value
for Bahamas Supermarkets
at the end of the last financial
year was $27 million
(US$4.22 million). In the first
quarter of the financial year,
the group invested a further
$52.2 million (US$8.156 mil-
lion) by way of a cash injec-
tion of $35 million (US$5.47
million) and a guarantee giv-
en to Royal Bank of Canada
for $17.2 million (US$2.69

Supervalue ‘hedges bets’
on energy, food rises

FROM page one

any Bahamian economic
recovery off course, Rupert
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness that the grocery chain
would employ the methods it
used in 2008 to try and protect
the Bahamian consumer from
impending food price increas-
es.
Noting that staples such as
cooking oil and tuna appeared
to be rising once again, Mr
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness he had informed his buy-
ing team on Friday afternoon
to obtain the latest consumer
reports and “buy everything
they can” up front before the
expected price increases took
hold.

He explained that Super-
value “rode it out” two years
ago and was “able to hold the
prices” by employing a strat-
egy of buying core products,
in bulk, in advance. Through
“hedging our bets” in such
fashion, said Mr Roberts, the
chain obtained better prices
than if they had left the pur-
chases later, and were able to
pass the savings on to con-
sumers.

Supervalue’s 105,000 square
foot warehouse was more
than adequate to cope with
bulk inventory purchases, Mr
Roberts said, while the gro-

wholesalers were well-posi-
tioned to inform it in advance
of any price hikes.

“We were able to protect
the country from price
increases that way,” Mr
Roberts told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Our people notify us,
and we know what to do. The
way we do it costs money, and
we tie up resources, we tie up
space, but if we can hold our
prices and competitors can’t,
we increase volumes and pay
for it that way.

“We have the variety and
we have the price. We’re still
on a roll. We were able to
protect the country from price
increases that way in 2008.
We’re just planning this now.
Some stuff we’ve bought,
we’re going to buy more, and
see what else is going to take
an increase.

“ T would think that for the
next six months, because of
energy costs, I’m guesstimat-
ing that prices are going to go
up.”

While the cold weather in
Florida and the Bahamas had
resulted in price increases for
some produce as a result of
supply disruption, Mr Roberts

and other actions by his buy-
ing team had protected Super-
value from the effects.
While perishable goods
prices still seemed to be sta-
ble, Mr Roberts also
expressed fears about increas-
ing energy costs in 2011, after
oil prices again broke through
the $91 per gallon barrier
towards the end of last week.
Noting that this could
impact both Supervalue’s
electricity and transportation
costs, Mr Roberts told Tri-
bune Business: “If energy
goes up, freight goes up. One
of the bid problems is going to
be if energy goes up, and I
expect energy costs to double
by the end of the year.
“That’s going to be a big
problem. On the first of every




month I have to write BEC a
cheque for $250,000, and it
might increase to $500,000. I
can’t ask the consumer to pay
for that, you have to cut back.
You cannot increase the cost
of living, especially in a reces-
sion.”

While some analysts sug-
gested the recession was over,
Mr Roberts told Tribune
Business that he estimated it
would “take three years for
the jobs to come back”, unless
the $2.6 billion Baha Mar pro-
ject and other developments
like it were able to “bridge
the gap”.

The Supervalue owner told
Tribune Business that the
chain exceeded his Christmas
projections by 2 per cent,
“which in our business is
almost $1 million”. He added
that by doing a month’s busi-
ness in a week or two, the
supermarket chain’s costs
were spread out over a
greater volume of sales units.

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
AND PRODUCTION (OKHOTSK) LIMITED






NOTICE





Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the



International Business Companies Act 2000, notice

million) for a Bahamas
Supermarket loan.

“On November 10, 2010,
the holding company in which
the group had invested sold
its investment in Bahamas
Supermarkets for $1 and Neal
& Massy wrote-off the value



















POSITION OPENING

QUALIFICATIONS

of its investment at the finan-
cial year ended 2010.”

Also impacted was Barba-
dos Shipping & Trading, Neal
& Massy’s subsidiary, which
suffered a $16.587 million loss
on Bahamas Supermarkets in
Barbadian dollars.

® 65 or Diploma from an accredited

Nursing Program



# Registration with the Nursing Council of




The Bahamas
® ACLS/BLS certification

« Intensive Care Nurses should possess certificate




of Critical Care Nursing

Solory commensurate with qualircotans and expenence,






Please submit all applications/resume ta:
HUALAN RESOURCES GEPARTMENT
a





Pak BO A301
AAS SAL), BAe Avs

EAAIL: sha ingidactorshosp com













Fags (242) o-4 738

DOTS HOSTAL

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE.








DIESEL TECHNICIAN / MACHINIST

Prior experience on repairs to heavy trucks
mandatory. Experience repairing Internation,
Mack, and Cummins engines and Electronics
necessary. Extensive expenence in machine

said the six month contracts

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that | LILIETH BILLIE JANE
JOHN, of Yellow Elder Constituency of the Island of New
Providence, intend to change her name to LILIETH BILLIE
JANE GREENE. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
the Deputy Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-792, Nassau,
Bahamas, no later than thirty (80) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

cery chain’s suppliers and

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
AND PRODUCTION (YAMAL GYDAN) LIMITED

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 21% day of December, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 5th day of January, A.D., 2011.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
(YAMAL GYDAN) LIMITED

NOTICE

REIGNDROP LIMITED
N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) REIGNDROP LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 31% December 2010 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Octagon
Management Limited, The Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 31* day of December, A. D. 2010



Octagon Management Limited
Liquidator

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 21% day of December, A.D., 2010.
Dated the 5th day of January, A.D., 2011.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
(OKHOTSK) LIMITED

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANGOLA
(INNER TREND) LIMITED

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The Registrar
General on the 21% day of December, A.D., 2010.

Dated the 5th day of January, A.D., 2011.

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator of
ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ANGOLA (INNER TREND) LIMITED

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
No.45 of 2000

PAID HOLDINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000), PAID HOLDINGS INC. has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 8th day of December, 2010.

Hamilton Management Services Limited
Fiman House, St. George’s Place
St. Peter Port, Guernsey
GY1 2BH
Liquidator

shop repairs to diesel engine parts mandatory
Top wages. Uniforms furnished after
probationary period.

Please come by and fill out an application, and give us
your resume a

Rock Crusher Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Temple Christian Hi gh School

Shirley Street
TEACHING VACANCY

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following positions for the
2010 - 2011 School Year.

Math/Commerce (Grs. 10-12)

Applicants must:

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who 1s
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of
Temple Christian School.
Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the area
of specialization.
Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra
curricular programmes.

Applications must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566

Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is January 21°, 2011
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011





Less worried about
layofis, jobholders
are spending more

WASHINGTON
Associated Press

A STEADY decline in
layoffs is giving the vast
majority of adults who
have jobs the confidence
to spend more freely and
help energize the econo-
my. They no longer worry
so much about losing their
jobs.

Their renewed confi-
dence has boosted retail
sales — just what's needed
to spark what economists
call a "virtuous cycle":
Higher consumer spend-
ing raises company prof-
its, which spurs hiring,
which fuels more spend-
ing and growth.

Consumer spending is
critical because it powers
about 70 percent of the

economy. It rose for five
straight months through
November, kicking off the
strongest holiday shopping
season since 2006. Many
shoppers are showing
enough confidence to
splurge on new cars: Auto
sales rebounded 11 per-
cent in 2010, the first
increase since 2005.

"The strongest showing
for consumers since the
peak years of the last
expansion signals that the
broader economy is near a
threshold of self-sustain-
ing growth,” analysts at
Citi Investment Research
& Analysis wrote last
week.

Federal Reserve Chair-
man Ben Bernanke
echoed that point Friday.
He told a Senate panel he

sees evidence that a "self-
sustaining" recovery is
taking hold because con-
sumers and businesses are
spending more.

Morgan Stanley econo-
mists say 4 percent growth
is "likely, perhaps even
conservative” in 2011, up
from an estimated 3.1 per-
cent last year. Late this
month, the government
will estimate economic
growth for the final quar-
ter of 2010.

Consumer spending is
rising because the vast
majority of working-age
Americans are now
breathing casier, despite
9.4 percent unemploy-
ment. People who had
jobs feared being laid off
during the recession,
which ended in June 2009,



SHOPPERS ARE photographed on 34th Street, in New York in December. Consumer spending rose for five
straight months through November, kicking off the strongest holiday shopping season since 2006. (AP)

and for months after. Few-
er worry now, because
most companies have
stopped cutting staff.

ROYAL FIDELITY

honey an ark

EJ FG CAPITAL MARKETS
iF BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
E

cr AL crm

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 13 MAY 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,598.67 | CHG 0.35 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD 33.29 | YTD % 2.13
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.04 1.04 0.00 0.250
9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.050
5.23 Bank of Bahamas 5.24 5.24 0.00 0.598
0.40 Benchmark 0.40 0.40 0.00 -O.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168
2.14 Fidelity Bank melt 2.17 0.00 0.055
9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.07 12.07 0.00
2.69 Colina Holdings 2.84 2.84 0.00
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 6.63 6.66 0.03
ee | Consolidated Water BDRs 2.82 2.76 -0.06
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00
5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00
8.75 Finca 9.08 9.00 -0.08
9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.60 10.60 0.00
3.75 Focol (S$) 5.08 5.08 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 Freeport Concrete O2F 0.27 0.00
5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 850
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 t%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets. 10.06 11.06 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55

1.406
0.249
0.460
oO.111
0.627
-0.003
0.168
0.678
0.366
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Securit Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

52wk-Low EPS $
-2.945
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E

0.000

0.480

0.000

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV Last 12 Months %

1.4674 1.99 6.66
2.9020 0.52 -0.11
1.5302 1.53 4.88

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000
YTD% NAV 3MTH
1.446000
2.886947
1.514105

NAV 6MTH
1.419947
2.830013
1.498375

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.5448 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1

1.3758
2.8266
1.4590
3.0368 Par 4.99
13.5654 1.48 5.47
107.5706 3.45 6.99
105.7706 3.989 13.50
1.1034 1.25 5.25
1.0764 0.79 4.37
1.1041 1.23 5.34
9.4839 1.52 7.41

103.987340
101.725415

103.095570
99.417680
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

9.1005
10.0000 ity 10.6709 -0.93 12.33
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.9664 3.23
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying ity

58.37

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

‘or daily volume
ighted price for daily volume
m day to day
aded today
jends per share paid in the last 12 months
9 price divided by the last 12 month earnings
Stock Split - Effec Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ig
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Senior Client Relationship Manager

Societe Generale Private Banking (Bahamas)
Lid., part of the Société Générale Group, is a
private bank providing a comprehensive

of investment, trust and banking products
and fluenency in Spanish ls mandadory .
Some knowledge of Portuguese would be an
wealth management service. asset, and proficient in the use of
Computers. The incumbent will be required
Saciete Generale Private Banking is currently to travel on a regular basis to designated
looking to recruit a Senior Client Relationship marketing regions.
Manager. Your primary role will be to
introduce, maintain and grow profitable client The position offers an attractive salary and
relationships in Latin America for Societe benefits package including, pension and
Generale Private Banking (Bahamas) Ltd and bonus schemes.
ensure adherence to legal, regulatory and
industry standards Applications should be submitted to the
following address, to arrive on or before 12
You should ideally hold the Chartered January 2011.
Institute of Bankers Diploma or equivalent
professional qualifications, and have at least Head of Human Resources
5 to 8 years" international private banking! Societe Generale Private Banking (Bahamas)
Led

PO Box NFFSo

marketing sales experience.
You should have excellent client relationship Nassau

and selling skills, an in-depth knowledge Bahamas

SOCIETE GENERALE

Private Banking

Sothte Giewralke Private Banking aharias) Led. te

licensed ender the Bank & Trust Companies Regulations Act

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Workers who survived
the job cuts of the past
three years have begun to
conclude: "If they haven't
fired me by now, they're
not going to," says
Michael Koskuba, portfo-
lio manager with Victory
Capital Management.

By October 2010, layoffs
and other dismissals had
sunk to their lowest point
since August 2006. In
December, employers
added just 103,000 jobs —
too few even to keep up
with population growth.
But that was mainly
because they're still reluc-
tant to hire, not because
they're still cutting jobs.

The number of people
applying for unemploy-
ment benefits — a proxy
for the pace of layoffs —
has dropped in the past
four months. And econo-
mists think employers will
finally ramp up hiring this
year.

"You've got 10 percent
unemployment, and you
add another 5 or 10 per-
cent" for discouraged
workers or those stuck in
part-time positions,
because they can't find
full-time work, says Doug
Hart, a retail specialist at
the consulting firm BDO
USA. But the remaining
80 percent, having sur-
vived the worst of the lay-
offs, "are feeling more
secure about their jobs."

In 2009, consumers
across all income groups
froze up. The Labor
Department's Bureau of
Labor Statistics recorded
the first annual drop in
consumer spending in
records dating to 1984.

Now, BDO's Hart says,
"The fear factor has sub-
sided."

That's evident among
consumers like Monique
Aguilar, 27, of Saugus,
Mass. Aguilar put off a car
purchase last year after
the restaurant chain where
she's a manager
announced layoffs. But
there she was Friday at a
Chevrolet dealership in
neighboring Lynn, Mass.,
shopping for a new Mal-
ibu.

What's changed? She
doesn't worry so much
about being let go. Her
employer's sales have
improved, and she's
encouraged by reports of
slowing layoffs and of
companies starting to hire.

"In general, I feel like
we're going in the right
direction,” Aguilar says.
"That makes me comfort-
able in my purchase."

Many households also
feel better able to spend
because they've sharply
reduced credit card and
other debt they ran up
during the mid-2000s.

Economists say con-
sumers seem increasingly
divided into "haves" and
"have-nots." The haves
are more secure in their
jobs. Their finances are
solid. So is their credit.

They dominate the high-
est-earning 20 percent of
Americans, who con-
tribute nearly 40 percent
of consumer spending.
Among managers and
professionals, for instance,

unemployment in Decem-
ber was just 4.6 percent —
less than half the overall
unemployment rate.

The have-nots are strug-
gling with shaky finances
and job security. Unem-
ployment is running at 12
percent for transportation
workers, for example. It
exceeds 20 percent for
construction workers.

A 20 percent run-up in
the Dow Jones industrial
average since July has also
skewed the consumer
rebound in favor of upper-
income shoppers — and
the luxury stores that
serve them.

"It's a two-tier market,"
says Doug Roberts, chief
investment strategist for
Channel Capital
Research. The affluent
"are beginning to feel
more confident because
their (stock) portfolios are
up."

During the holidays,
high-end retailers like
Nordstrom Inc. and Saks
Inc. reported the strongest
sales. Michael Niemira,
chief economist at the
International Council of
Shopping Centers, says
luxury sales rise and fall
almost in lockstep with
the stock market.

After hunkering down
during the recession, for
example, Jerrie McKen-
non of Burleson, Texas,
last year splurged ona
Lexus and two expensive
vacations. The main rea-
son was that most of her
investment portfolio had
recovered from its losses
during the financial crisis.

"T loosened up in 2010,"
she says. "The money we
lost came back."

Few expect a return to
the carefree spending of
the mid-2000s. Falling
home prices are weighing
on consumers’ confidence
and their ability to bor-
row. Nearly one in four
homeowners owe more on
their mortgage than their
homes are worth. Rising
gasoline prices and the
prospect of higher food
prices are also likely to
limit spending in 2011.

But analysts at Barclays
Capital say a cut in Social
Security taxes for workers
this year will help them
absorb higher gasoline
prices. That tax break will
put more money in peo-
ple's pockets — $1,000
more for an individual
earning $50,000 a year.

Higher spending and
growth don't mean the
unemployment rate will
fall significantly this year.
Most economists think it
will remain around 9 per-
cent at year's end.
Bernanke said Friday it
could take up to five years
for unemployment to drop
to a historically normal
rate of around 6 percent.

Still, economists say,
more consumers are con-
fident the worst of the job
cuts are over. And that
points to a stronger econ-
omy ahead.

"If you think back to a
year ago, we were still
questioning whether we'd
seen the end of the reces-
sion," Niemira says. "So
we've come a long way."


(hn

THE TRIBUNE

6

(Wn

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 13B



Stocks are riding on higher profit margins

NEW YORK
Associated Press

CAN Corporate America
continue to cut its way to
profits?

If you're betting that
stocks will rise in 2011, the
answer is critical. Profits
jumped last year largely
because companies ran
smarter and squeezed more
from workers. Sales are
picking up, but probably not
enough to keep profits from
rising fast in the new year
unless companies can get
even more out of their
workers.

"How can they squeeze
costs more than they are
now?" asks Howard Sil-
verblatt, a senior analyst at
Standard & Poor's. "Are
they going to fire more peo-
ple? We're down to the
skeleton."

Professional stock pickers
aren't worried. They expect
margins, or the profit made
on each sale, will near a
record this year. By the end
of 2011, U.S. companies will
be pocketing $9.50 in profit
for every $100 in sales, or
9.5 percent, exceeding a
boom-time record that is
considered a bit of an aber-
ration, according to Stan-
dard & Poor's. The average
over nearly three decades is

$7.10. A clue as to whether
the experts are right comes
next week as companies
begin reporting their fourth-
quarter results. If investors
begin to doubt those lofty
margins are within reach,
stocks could tumble. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
rose 15 percent last year.
Experts predict the index
will rise another 11 percent
in 2011.

The problem with margins
is that they have already
risen seven quarters in a
row. The average margin is
now 8.95 percent, nearly two
percentage points higher
than average.

Margins tend to stay
around the historical aver-
age for two reasons. When
the economy is weak, com-
panies cut workers and
exploit technology to boost
margins. But there's a limit
to the number of people you
can lay off and the software
you can buy. When the
economy strengthens and
people start buying what
you're selling, you have to
hire more people to meet
the demand and pay more
to keep them. Margins drop
fast, often back to the aver-

age.
In a report Friday, Lon-
don analyst Andrew

Smithers wrote investors are

fooling themselves that
stocks are a bargain with
margins so high. He says
margins are certain to suf-
fer a large fall. It's a lonely
view but it's shared by dis-
tinguished company. Jere-
my Grantham, the leg-
endary Boston money man-
ager who predicted the
housing crash, says margins
are abnormal and set to
drop.

These two have been say-
ing this for most of the past
year and could be proven
wrong again. UBS econo-
mist Larry Hatheway says
companies have learned to
operate much more effi-
ciently than in past decades.
They use more workers in
India and China to drive
labor costs down and shop
around more for cheaper
raw materials and parts.

Then there is the elixir of
a recovering economy. Peo-
ple are buying more cars,
and they went on the biggest
holiday shopping spree since
2006. What's more, the gov-
ernment reported Friday
that the jobless rate fell to
94 percent from 9.8 percent,
though the rate fell mostly
because many people gave
up looking for jobs.

As companies begin to
report earnings this week,
watch closely those that

American Eagle has used
most of $1.4M Wyo. subsidy

CHEYENNE, Wyo.
Associated Press

IT TOOK American Eagle Airlines three
months to use 73 percent of a $1.4 million
subsidy that Wyoming awarded the compa-
ny for its first year of operation at the
Cheyenne Regional Airport.

Greater Cheyenne Airport Manager Dave
Haring told the Wyoming Tribune Eagle

that the rapid use of the subsidy is not
unheard of or alarming.
The airline began nonstop regional jet

fall.

service on July 15 from Cheyenne to Dal-

las/Fort Worth International Airport.
American Eagle used $198,359 of the $1.4

million subsidy for a July revenue short-

The airline is a subsidiary of AMR Corp.,
the company that owns American Airlines.

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Road Traffic Department is pleased to remind the general public of
the established protocols for the Inspection and Licensing of Company

Vehicles.

The month of March is traditionally companies’ registration month at the
Road Traffic Department. In an effort to expedite and ensure a smooth
registration process the department advises that registration will
commence January 10, 2011. All companies with a fleet of five (5) or
more vehicles are encouraged to prepare and submit the required
documents on the second (2â„¢ ) floor to the Controller's Office in the
Clarence A. Bain Building to ensure an appointment for Inspection. The
Department further wishes to advise that applications will be processed
on first come, first come basis.

The following documents are required:-

(1) Cover note stating the make, model, year and chassis number

(2) Total number of all vehicles to be licensed

(3) Acopy of the current disc for each vehicle

(4) — Original certificate of insurance (no copies will be accepted)

(5) Special Permit Letter (Ministry of Works) for all miscellaneous

vehicles

Please note that payments can be made in the form of:

Certified Cheque made payable to the Public Treasury
(absolutely no personal/ company cheques)

Visa/ Mater Card
Suncard
Cash

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

could find it difficult to pass
higher costs to consumers.
Morgan Stanley strategist
Adam Parker, who has writ-
ten extensively about mar-
gins, lists more than a dozen
in a report last week, among
them Arm & Hammer
banking soda maker Church
& Dwight Co. and steel

maker Nucor Corp.

Tally Leger, a strategist at
Barclays Capital, predicts
stocks will climb 14 percent
this year on rising margins,
but even he is worried. He
notes that if the optimists
are wrong even a little, the
impact on corporate for-
tunes could be great. Wall

Street analysts see earnings
for the S&P 500 hitting a
record $95 a share.

But if the margins they
assume are off by a dollar,
earnings will come in 10 per-
cent lower. That would be
a big blow to a stock market
that already reflects high
expectations.

Here’s how this month’s changes to
NIB Benefit & Contribution Regulations
will impact You

Higher Insurable Wage Ceiling
® Contributions [for both the employer and the employee) in respect of the employee whe

makes more than $400 per week has increaded. While the rate of contributions remains the
sare, the new wage ceiling 6 5300 per week/S2.167 per month. For weekly paid persons,

the first salary deduction at the higher rate will be for the pay period in which January 3 falls

Contributions for self-employed persons who make more than $1,733 per month have in
creased. The new ceiling is 52,167 per month, with the first contribution payment on the
higher rate due at the end of January.

Contribution Rate Increase for Some Self-Employed Persons; Industrial Benefit

Coverage for All

® The contribution rate for all categories of selfemployed persans

ployed persons are now covered for Industrial benefits.

Sickness Benefit

5 meow BO: all Selfeem

® inorder to qualify for Sickness Benefit, a claimant rust be employed at the time of the onset
of the illness for which they are claiming the benefit. A Form Med-1 must be completed by

the employer as support for the claim.

Additional Benefit for some Widow) Widowers
® Widows and witowers who qualify or previously qualified for Retirement of Invalidity Benefit
and Survivors Benefit simultaneously, may mow qualify for ome and a portion of the other,
respectively, Such persons would have been limited under the previous rules ta receiving

only one benefit - the higher of the two. Applications for the additional benafit may be sub

mitted beginning this meanth.

More Stringent Contribution Conditions for Retirement Benefit

® To qualify for Retirement Benefit, claimants must have paid at least 500 weeks of contribu-
honk lapproxinmataly 10 wea rsh Ha daimant & 65 year: or older and has paid less than SOC)
contributions but more than 190 contributions, he will qualify for a one-time grant

For further information on how the amendments affect you, please visit aac, oib-bobomos. com,
contact your nearest NIB Local Office, or call the Consumer Hotlines at 925-4653,5



Kingsway Academy
(An Evangelical, Non-denominational, Christian School)
Entrance Examinations for the 2011-2012 School Year

High School Division (Grades 7 to 12

Applications for the 2011-2012 school year (starting in September 2011)
are invited for grades 7 to 10.

Testing Date: 8.00 am January 15, 2011

The high school division supplies a premium offering of courses from grades

7 to 12.

These include Arts, Sciences, Technical and Vocational Subjects in addition to
sound fundamentals in Christian education.
This school provides one of the most balanced ranges of subject offerings in
the Bahamas. Students are prepared for examinations such as BJC, BGCSE,
PSAT, SAT, SAT Subject Tests and Advance Placement (AP) tests.
Accelerated Track - Students with exceptional ability are allowed to accelerate
beginning in grade 9 with a view towards college preparatory courses in

grade 12.

In addition, the school provides a wide range of extracurricular activities
including all BAISS core sports, Governor General’s Youth Award, Junior
Achievement, Travel Club, Key Club, Science Club etc.

The achievements of our students during and after high school speak for

themselves.

Elementary Division (K3 to Grade 6)

Applications are invited for the 2011-2012 school year for all grade levels

from K3 to Grade 6.

* The elementary division offers a curriculum that blends the A
Beka and Harcourt Brace curricula.

* The experience also offers a stimulating blend of extracurricular
activities to enhance the academic and social development of your

child.

Testing Dates:

K3 - Saturday, January 15, 2011 at 10.00 am. (must be 3
years old by October 31, 2011)

K4 - Friday, February 4 and Friday February 18, 2011
from 8.30 am to 1.40 pm.

(Must be 4 years old by December 31, 2011.)

K5 -

Saturday, March 5, 2011 from 8.00 am to 1.00 pm.

(Must be 5 years old by December 31, 2011)
Grades 1 to 6 - Saturday, March 5, 2011 beginning

at 9.00 am.




(iy The Tribune =:

him lowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

82F
71F

SUN, CLOUDS,
BREEZY, HUMID

Volume: 107 No.39

_
=
=
w
=





SEE INSIGHT ON PAGE 16B

cov







Deputy PM makes
announcement after first
three murders of 2011

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE launched investi-
gations into the first three
murders of the year this
weekend as Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette
unveiled government plans to
invest $8.5 million in the fight
against crime over the next
six months.

Mr Symonette told hun-
dreds of officers gathered for
the annual police church ser-
vice at Christ Church Cathe-
dral in George Street yester-
day that crime had reached
unacceptable levels in 2010,
with the record murder count
of 96 and an increase in gun
and violent crime being the
worst.

The $8.5 million will fund
three new police squads, of
around 30 officers each, to be
established by February, as
well as an increase in the
enrolment capacity of the
police cadet programme in
New Providence to 72 and
establishment of a new police
cadet programme in



CRIME FIGHT:
Brent Symonette

Grand Bahama.

More resources also will be
purchased for the RBPF as
well as improved Crime Scene
Investigation technology for
the Force.

“We as a force remain com-
mitted and determined to
ensure that the Bahamas is a
place where we can all live in

SEE page 13

WISHING
You
A
HEALTHY
AND

HAPPY
ereNew YEAR.

Slctem etek

HEALTHE & ALWATS PRESS

GEORGE ST., MADEIRA RD

HARBOUR BAY, BLUE HILL RD.,

TOWN CENTER MALL, JFK





MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

CARS FOR SALE,
TCAs eee
MSc Paes

SPENT Sy





SEE SECTION E





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

MINISTER DENIES
BIC DEAL HAS
BEEN FINALISED

GOVERNMENT officials denied
reports yesterday that it has already
signed 51 per cent of Bahamas
Telecommunications Company over
to Cable and Wireless (LIME).

However, according to a source
within the government, it is under-



a -



stood that the $210 million sale was
finalised on Friday, January 7.
However, Zhivargo Laing, State
Minister for Finance, denied the
rumour.
there has been no such thing. When
the time comes the government will
keep the public informed of any
development in that matter,”

SEE page 12

“T cannot confirm that,

he said.



COMMISSIONER OF POLICE Ellison Greenslade greets families of officers fallen from the ranks in a ceremony held at Police Head-
quarters. The Royal Bahamas Police Force held its Annual Church Service and Parade yesterday.

UNIONISTS TO HOLD MASS RALLY
AGAINST PLANNED BTC SALE TODAY

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter

nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

A MASS rally of union-
ists, opposed to the govern-
ment’s planned sale of BTC,
is set to mark the anniver-
sary of Majority Rule day,
today.

In its Bahamas for
Bahamians campaign, the
National Congress of Trade
Unions is continuing to

r¢

spread the word about the
meaning behind the 1958
General strike led by Sir
Clifford Darling and its con-
nection to Majority Rule
Day.

“Today we talk about the
fight for majority rule. It
seems Now we are going to
back to colonialism; having
to fight for what the fore-
fathers fought for. If we

SEE page 12

a &

UNE)

THE SMART CHOICE

when you are hungry for a value

e SEE PAGE TWO

PLP ‘TO SUPPORT DEMONSTRATION’

THE Progressive Liberal
Party plans to support the
demonstration organised by
union members to protest the
sale of BTC and commemo-
rate Majority Rule Day,
according to Ryan Pinder,
Elizabeth Member of Parlia-
ment.

Mr Pinder said an invita-
tion was sent to the party and
some MPs were advised to
invite their constituents.

Bradley Roberts, PLP
chairman, said the invitation
from one of the BTC unions
was “oral.” It was not an invi-
tation to participate in the

Taz. Bowl, Mashed

Potatees,
Gray, Gorn Gorn, Bite sized
Grispy Chicken



NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

programme, but to simply
attend the event, and invite
PLP supporters.

“Tam just going to be one
of the many who will be
there,” said Mr Roberts.

William Carroll, president
of the Bahamas Communica-
tions Public Managers Union
(BCPMU), said invitations
were sent out “to the general
public”, and the unions “did
not target the PLP or FNM.”

Perry Christie, PLP leader,
said he was informed by Mr
Pinder that a “communication

SEE page 12

bE EET


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ON THE MARCH: Scenes
from yesterday’s Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Annual Church Service and
Parade.

Officers marched on Bay
Street before the service at
Christ Church Cathedral
which was attended by
members of the force, offi-
cials and Parliamentarians.

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Executive cl

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THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
JEMI HEALTH & WELLNESS 4ND BODY ZONE FITNESS

The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Ltd. Is pleased
to announce the appointment of Patrick McFall as Vice-President
and Chief Financial Officer of the Bank effective January 1, 2011.

HEALTH & FITNESS
CHALLENGE

JANUARY — APRIL, 2011

GET WELL BAHAMAS is

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- Screening during the S-month period, 9“ ee
PATRICK J. MCFALL APPLICATION FORMS

Apphtalion kerma wil be available 4% of
] ; : : : H Wednesday, Dacambareancd Thay mary be
Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer ss esenecsi'a leieatneseeer ras ge aketeitiy ones abdiaelicieal a
: Apolicart must ba Bahamian cilizena & residents of ns trot ae ee al aa
, Now Providanoo botwenn the ages ol 14 8 90 years sanquanars, Sir Clitord Daring Gamplea
Mr. McFall's most recent position was that of Assistant Vice-President, Corporate . seienals cunt hove a veal eae ean Ballou Hil Ficed, The Orug Pian Oitice at Wubt
Accounts which he has held since 2003. Mr, McFall has over seventeen years Than 30 and have ane ar more of the following ee
, , ; ; , Hestyiec conditions: hypertension, high chokesteral Fitness, & fen Tt sabato Helios Lid, Marketing
axperance in the field of Accounting and has bean with Gommonwaalth Bank since diabetes or ischacmic heart disanse Fintan 1 Terrace Gentreville
A , : Applicants fuel be commited to compels ihe entire
2001. During his tenure with Commonwealth Bank he served in the capacity of senior 12 week programma and all of its raquiramants APPLICATION SUBMISSION DEADLINE:

; : : : * JApolicants must have their cam trameportation and be All application tome and photos must ba
Manager, Corporate Accounts. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Accounting and is a present at all required meatings and appointments rejumed to The Counsellore Lid. Markating

member of the Association of Certified Public Accountants and the Bahamas. Institute > Apsiicants must ba willing to appaar in all publicity Firm, Firsl Terrace Gentrenile by S puam.,
for the Gel Well Bahamas Chalenge, including bul fdonday, January 17, 2091. Please address

of Chartered Accountants. nol imiied to enision appearances and iter: submBaaiore to Gal Wal Bahamas ot The
pholography, prin and radio infervigws Counsellors Lid, Nassau, Bahamas.
* Apollos’ National ireurance payments should be
up- losdale SELECTION PROCESS

= Eeipiyyees of The National brewrance Board and Participants will be selected by Jem Health
fs advertising and public relations agencins arr not 4 Welness and Body Zone Fitness. Personal

. : . . os eligite ho particina
BAN K | “Leader in Personal Banking Services partcinants befoea salection of the final 40
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




an
NaS,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Fire Trail residents blame
govt over shanty towns

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FIRE TRAIL residents
criticised several government
agencies yesterday, blaming
them for the proliferation of
shanty towns in the area.

In a statement released by
the Fire Trail Community
Association, the Ministry of
Works, and the departments
of Immigration and Environ-
mental Health were blamed
for compromising residents’
standard of living by their fail-
ure to ensure that the stan-
dards set by law are met.

The statement read:

“We are simply asking that
our government agencies
work for us, the taxpayers. As
home owners, we were
required to get permits and
pass inspections to build our
houses to code. This was nec-
essary to obtain occupancy

Outcry comes weeks
after Mackey Yard fire

certificates which were needed
to get utilities. Let’s hold all
persons living in the Bahamas
to these standards.”

The outcry by residents
comes three weeks after the
devastating fire at Mackey
Yard — an area on Alan Drive
off Carmichael Road which
was thought to be one of the
oldest shanty towns in New
Providence. The fire destroyed
more than 100 homes and dis-
placed more than 300 people.
While the group expressed its
sympathy to the hundreds of
persons displaced in the Box-
ing Day fire, it called on the
government to crack down on
the remaining three villages in
the area.

The statement read:
“Inspectors have turned a
‘blind eye’ towards these vil-
lages. By allowing more than
one hundred homes to exist
without being up to code, they
have failed their jobs. The
Ministry of Works has also
allowed the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation to provide
electricity to these houses
without being built according
to the provided codes, being
structurally sound, and with-
out the possession of electrical
permits.”

The group said that due to
improper bathroom facilities,
the shanty towns pose a great
health risk to the entire com-
munity.

The statement continued:
“This is a concern since some
of us must pump well water
to our homes.

“T may add that these are
not homes that were given to
us, but these are new homes
that we are paying mortgages
on.

“We are concerned about
the number of old cars, large
piles of bottles and the piles of
garbage which attract rodents
and pose health problems for
this entire community.”

The association charged
that the Department of Immi-
gration also ignored the move-
ments of illegal persons in
shanty towns, which they feel
has allowed them to establish
themselves in the country.

It added: “This is perhaps
the only country in the world
where an illegal immigrant can
come and without any status,
build on government land; get
electricity, cable and internet;

Investigations into cause
of fatal house fire continue

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Investigations are con-
tinuing into the cause of a house fire that
claimed the life of a one-year-old Rajish

Cox on Friday morning.

As police officially released the iden-
tity of the toddler on Saturday, police
press liaison officer assistant superinten-
dent Loretta Mackey said the child lived
at two homes, one in Sunset Subdivision,
Freeport, and another in Sweeting’s Cay,

East Grand Bahama.

He was staying in Freeport with his
mother at the time of the fire.

Velma Clarke, the paternal grand-
mother who lives in Eight Mile Rock,
spoke with The Tribune on Sunday.

She said that her son, Rajish, is very
distraught over the loss of his son.

“He is taking it very hard,”
“Right now, he is resting. And the doctor
told us to keep a close eye on him and
not to bother him while he is sleeping.”

She said her family is trying to cope

with the loss.

“We still don’t have a full under-
she said.
Ms Clarke said little Rajish lived with
his mother, who would bring him on
occasions to visit with his father in Eight

standing of what happened,”

Mile Rock.

“He was a very happy baby. If you
see him you will fall in love with him

UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS
‘NOT ACCURATE METHOD’
TO ASSESS ECONOMY

MEASURING unemploy-
ment claims is not an “accurate
method” to assess the state of
the economy, said Shane Gib-
son Golden Gates Member of
Parliament.

Responding to the claims by
government officials that the 70
per cent drop in unemployment
claims is evidence of a
“rebounding” economy with
fewer job loses, Mr Gibson said,
“this is an outrageous falsehood
and gross misleading of the
Bahamian people.”

The current policy of the
National Insurance Board is to
pay “only 13 weeks of unem-
ployment benefits to any eligi-
ble person,” according to Mr
Gibson. Since many lay offs
occurred early last year, most
unemployed people “have
exhausted their 13 weeks and
are no longer eligible for unem-
ployment benefits,” he claimed.

“The absolute truth, based
on this 70 per cent drop is that
70 per cent of the unemployed
are now destitute, frustrated
and desperate. While these per-
sons cry out because they have
lost their dignity, the FNM gov-
ernment remains unapologetic
and continue to feed them false
hope with bogus and erroneous
statistics which further insult
their intelligence,” said Mr Gib-
son.

He called on the government
to “discontinue its inaccurate
portrayal of the situation,”
based on the fact that the drop
in claims is a result of the NIB
policy and its impact.

“No one can argue the unem-
ployment rate is in direct corre-
lation with the break down of
the social fiber of this country
and has resulted in a nation of
frustrated and desperate peo-
ple,” said Mr Gibson.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

she said.

right way because he just lay right on
your chest; he was a very loving baby,”
his grandmother said.

Police received a report of a fire at 100
Pioneer’s Way West in Sunset Subdivi-
sion just after 8am on Friday.

Firefighters responding to the alarm
found flames confined to a washroom in
the east front section of a grey and white
single story house.

POLICE 2 a the scene of Friday’ $ fire in 1 Grand pahanne:



After the fire was extinguished, they
discovered the toddler inside the wash-

room, near the door.

The house had severe smoke damage
throughout and is no longer habitable.
No one was at the residence on Sunday.

Anyone who may be able to assist
investigations into the fire should call
police at 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers

anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).

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ALL APPLICATIONS RECEIVED WILL BE IN CONFIDENCE
No faxed of emailed reswmes will he corsidered,
Please take your completed
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FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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ReaD |





Ale
on ALL;

Christmas ribbon
Decorations
Poinsettias——

Weel

Trees





The Ree eas Eee eel

run web shops; sell food,
drinks and clothes without
business licenses and work
without work permits. Can
you blame them for taking
advantage of the slackness and
lawlessness that exists in our
country?”

The residents also called
on the Office of the Attorney
General to address the pub-
lic on their rights as home-
owners and how they can pro-
tect themselves against tres-
passing.

The statement continued:
“A great number of us are
new homeowners who are not
yet financially able to fence in
our yards or to afford the
amount of fencing that is
required to keep the residents
of these villages from walking
through our yards as they
move from village to village.
This is a major problem for
us and we need to know how
we as law-abiding citizens can
protect ourselves in this situa-
tion.”

The association is urging
persons who share similar
views to attend a march on
Fire Trail Road tomorrow at
6pm.

The statement read: “This
is not about party politics, this
is about enforcing the laws of
the Bahamas and making it
better in the Bahamas for
Bahamians again.”













"Studies have
shown that using a
synthetic motor oil
can improve fuel
efficiency. Castrol
Syntec,"

REPORTS THAT
BAHAMASAIR BAG
BEHIND MIAMI
BOMB SCARE

ARE DENIED

REPORTS that a bomb
scare at Miami Interna-
tional Airport was
sparked by a suspicious
bag unloaded from a
Bahamasair plane have
been denied by officials
at the Bahamian Con-
sulate in Miami.

US network NBC
reported on Wednesday
the suspicious bag from a
Bahamasair aircraft was
investigated in Miami
after bomb-sniffing dogs
sounded the alarm.

The bomb squad was
alerted and the concourse
at Miami International
Airport was evacuated
until the carry-on bag had
been investigated by the
TSA and cleared of con-
taining explosives by
11am, the network’s local
news website
nbcmiami.com reported.

Inspector Wayne
Woodside, who is
attached to the Bahamas
Consulate Office in Mia-
mi, investigated the mat-
ter on behalf of the
Bahamas, said spokes-
woman for the consulate
Phyllis Johnson.

And he confirmed the
matter was in no way
related to a Bahamasair
passenger, she said.

“For security reasons
we cannot reveal the
name of the passenger but
the name was not mani-
fested to Bahamasair,”
Ms Johnson said.

S Castrol
“QUOTE OF THE DAY”

Distributed By

Toe

Wet el

RTA Sra

Galleria ert mas




















sealer ee ae ae aa
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AE RCE Preneer over the past year,
We wish you 4 New Year of Peace, Bite

tis ENDS . rte a, ne Ce

JANUARY



Home Fabri 5

sheers ee Ca Ry eVect) CPLR E i



(en)
NU LY,

PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

(e"\
WY

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master













































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

A false claim made against The Tribune

WE ARE told that last week a talk show
host was complaining that The Tribune’s
editorials were not supportive of the people.
The reference, of course, was to the current
BTC union’s fight against the sale of 51 per
cent of BTC to Cable & Wireless (LIME).
Our position is that this sale, and all that
Cable & Wireless offers, will be the best
transaction for the country, and, therefore,
for all of the Bahamian people, including
BTC employees — especially those who
have a good work ethic.

The 40 per cent being retained by gov-
ernment will eventually be offered to the
public, so that Bahamians can truly become
shareholders in their company.

Dr Donaldson was the guest of the show
and his contribution to the discussion was
that if anyone knew the history of The Tri-
bune, they would know that The Tribune
has never been supportive of the black peo-
ple’s movement.

Dr Donaldson should have known that
this was not true. So should his host. But
the host laughed it off in agreement, and
the show went on with the falsehoods.
Today’s Bahamians do not know their his-
tory, which the PLP tried to rewrite after
they won the government in 1965. The PLP
story is the only so-called “history” that
many of this generation have heard. And
they have not bothered to dig further to dis-
cover the truth.

The Tribune will be 108 years old in
November. It was founded by Leon Dupuch,
grandfather of the present publisher, at a
time, according to his son, the late Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch, when “there was no racial
consciousness in Nassau.” Wrote Sir Eti-
enne: “The coloured people were too far
behind to be conscious of a destiny. There
was not even conflict between the ‘haves’
and ‘have nots.’ The island was poor during
this period. It was described as a glorified
fishing village; no one had a great deal; many
working people walked the streets bare-
footed, but everyone was contented and it
was a happy community.”

At the time there was only one division in
the community — the “Ins” and the “Outs.”
The “Ins” were the families — most of whom
lived on East Hill Street — that were invited
to Government House, and The Nassau
Guardian, a social newspaper, wrote only
for this set. The “Outs,” both white and
black, had no newspaper, therefore, no voice.
At the turn of the century the “Outs” felt the
need of a second newspaper. A company
was formed to which Bay Street merchants
subscribed. Leon Dupuch, who was on the
staff of The Guardian, joined the group, and
was invited to edit the Watchman. However,
Leon soon discovered that this was not the
type of newspaper he had envisioned — it
was just a newspaper for another social class.

He believed in a newspaper for all Bahami-
ans — white and black of every social strata.
And so he quit and, at great sacrifice, start-
ed The Tribune. Shortly afterwards The
Watchman folded.

Sir Etienne, only four when The Tribune
was started, was too small to make any con-
tribution, but at the age of five he pinched an
armful of papers — The Tribune was then
located on Market Street — walked across
East Street, then known as New Road, and
eventually established a delivery route as
far as Farm Road. This was the first time
that black Bahamians had a newspaper.

Although the newspaper was for all
Bahamians, it espoused the black Bahami-
an’s cause because this was the group that
was the most downtrodden, and certainly
had no voice.

The Tribune, either spearheaded or was
a part of every social reform in this country.
Sir Etienne, as a member of the House of
Assembly and the editor of this newspaper,
was, for example, very active as a member of
Dr C C Sweeting’s House committee, which
brought in the Bill that established Govern-
ment High School for black students. Dr
Sweeting was a white Bahamian. Again Sir
Etienne was among those who supported
Mrs Mary Ingraham in her fight for the vote
for women.

And then, of course, there was the night
on the floor of the House in 1956 when Sir
Etienne was almost arrested in his fight to
break down racial discrimination in the
Bahamas.

He won that fight, but the PLP in their
new version of history has dishonestly tried
to claim the victory, and even today they
pretend that it never took place. It is one
date in their litany of dates that they con-
stantly ignore. It is as though that dangerous
and tension-filled night never took place.

However, as someone commented years
later, if it were not for that night in 1956, the
men and women who are now free to walk
through those once closed doors, wouldn’t be
ruling in parliament today. There certainly
would have been no majority rule without
bloodshed.

It was Sir Etienne’s Resolution in 1956
that prevented it.

Sir Etienne assisted the PLP when it was
founded. He felt that here at last was a polit-
ical party that could be an answer to the
people’s needs. He even assisted them when
they decided to send a small delegation to
the Colonial Office in London to complain
over the way that the UBP had decided to
appoint public boards — a battle that they
won.

However, they lost the support of The
Tribune on their return from England.

We shall reserve that story for tomor-
row.

Drive one.

In a class by itself
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FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LT

Improve services
for ferry passengers
waiting to board

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE Bahamas Fast Fer-
ries company has been in
operation for a number of
years and I am of the opin-
ion that it has been reason-
ably successful financially.
It has been of great assis-
tance for passengers travel-
ling to the Family Islands
which it services and the
communities of Eleuthera,
Andros and Abaco in par-
ticular are very grateful for
its existence.

However, it is widely
believed that more can be
done to accommodate pas-
sengers awaiting boarding
at the various ports. For
instance, at Spanish Wells,
Current and Harbour Island
there is no terminal where
passengers can sit in com-
fort and wait for the arrival
of the vessel. There are no
toilet facilities, and, should
there be rain or diverse
weather, the passengers
have nowhere to shelter.

This was especially evi-
dent on January 3 at Cur-
rent for the hapless passen-
gers on the Fast ferry “Sea
Wind.” Departure time was
given for 7pm and passen-
gers began arriving at 6pm.
In many instances passen-
gers were dropped off and

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



their rides were not ina
position to wait with them
for the arrival of the vessel.
Also, persons with cars for
transport to Nassau were
not prepared to leave and
travel to settlements as far
away as Savannah Sound,
and then returning. Fortu-
nately, this being one of the
winter months there was not
the invasion of sandflies and
mosquitoes which regularly
plague persons at the dock
in the summer months.
However, heavy draft was
falling and some moles were
exposed.

After no boat had arrived
by 7pm questions were
asked and information was
received that the boat would
not arrive until about
8.30pm. This time was
changed on at least one
occasion and the vessel did
not eventually arrive in the
Current until about 9.15pm
and the passengers eventu-
ally arrived at their destina-
tion at 12.45am on January
4. The explanation given
was that the vessel had lost
an engine.

In the meantime passen-

gers consisting of babies and
toddlers, teenagers, pets,
senior citizens and other
adults were left to wait at
the terminal where the only
shelter was a rustic building
with uncomfortable wood-
en benches, (which inciden-
tally were not provided by
the company), and absolute-
ly no toilet facilities besides
the nearby brush. Also, in
keeping with its excellent
record in North Eleuthera,
BEC contributed to the dis-
comfort with at least three
power cuts which also affect-
ed the oncoming vessel.
Surely it is time that the
company provide some ser-
vices for its passengers, at
least comfortable seating
and toilet facilities. They
could also provide a conces-
sion area where refresh-
ments can be sold. This is
also a way to provide some
employment in the form of
persons to clean and sell and
also to oversee the facility. I
am looking forward to
something being done by
the company in 2011. Should
I also dare hope for
improvement to the road
approaching the dock site?

JEANNIE THOMPSON
Nassau,
January 6, 2011.

Bahamas National Insurance Board raises taxes again

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WALLETS are a little bit lighter this week
as a result of increases in the NIB payroll tax

of up to 25 peer cent.

packet of employees before they receive it,
and then the government spends the funds on

buildings or new programmes and bureaucra-
cies that will inevitably deplete the fund as

their own actuarial studies report.

Yor owe yoursel = t ushowroom

.. Introducing The All NEW

There is no doubt many people receive
financial help from the National Insurance
Board that might otherwise be forced to do
without, and that's fair enough if that's why the
NIB was created.

But according to the NIB's web site:

"Its primary mission was and is to provide
income-replacement in respect of sickness, inva-
lidity, maternity, retirement, death, industrial
injury/disease, and involuntary loss of income."

Obviously this is paid from the money tak-
en from workers themselves in the first place.

As the political class began to see the votes
they might get if they appear to be concerned
about the less fortunate, the mission changed
as the NIB confirms.

They tells us that:

"NIB’s added mission in the administration
of the country’s social security programme, is to
provide assistance for needy citizens and to
assist with the social and infrastructural devel-
opment of the country." (emphasis added).

And so as the potential political payoff
clouds the original intent of NIB even more,
Bahamians will have to be taxed more and
more if they are to ever receive the retire-
ment benefits they were forced to "con-
tribute."

What is just as distasteful is the law forces
employers to deduct the NIB tax from the pay

There is a better way.

The NIB should be converted from a pay as
you go system and the funds contributed (in
this case it would be a contribution and not a
tax) are kept in an account earmarked for
each individual that pays NIB, and if a con-
tributor does not want to utilise the govern-
ment programme, they should have every
right to join the private pension plan of their
choice.

With regard to help for the poor, find ways
to encourage people to donate to private char-
ities.

One possibility is to allow property owners
to pay reduced property taxes if they con-
tribute the funds to charitable causes. For
example; if the annual property tax rate is
$1,000 the property owner might be allowed to
donate $600 to a private charity in lieu of pay-
ing any property tax.

These are not the only potential solutions to
helping the poor and protecting individuals
retirement funds, but there must be a better
way than following the failed "government
social safety nets” around the world.

The Nassau Institute
www.nassauinstitute.org
Nassau,

December 9, 2011.

GML Foods Limited

announces that, subject to a

directors resolution of January
6th, 2011, if will begin a share buy
program of its issued ordinary
shares on January 10, 2011.

The
purchase of up to

resolution authorizes the
10% of

the Company's current issued

ordinary shares or

1,540,417

shares overa 36 month period
to January 31, 2014.

THOMPSON BOULEVARD
TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

Wt token


&

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 5

&

THE TRIBUNE

6

LOCAL NEWS

Accusations prompt
test of water supply



PUSHIN’ DA ENVELOP
By Jamaal Rolle

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A TEAM of experts will test
the water supply at the Water
and Sewerage Corporation’s
reverse osmosis plant in Grand
Cay, Abaco, following accusa-
tions that the water is undrink-
able.

PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts hit out at the Water and
Sewerage Corporation (WSC),
which he once headed as Minis-
ter for Works in the former gov-
ernment, for failing to remedy
the high levels of Hydrogen Sul-
fide (H2S) in water supplies at
the Grand Cay Reverse Osmosis
(RO) plant before December 31
as promised.

But Minister of Works Phenton Ney-
mour accused Mr Roberts of whipping up
undue alarm as the WSC reported on
December 28 that the quality of the water
had improved significantly.

When Mr Roberts issued a public state-
ment yesterday insisting the water was
still foul smelling and not drinkable, Mr
Neymour contacted customers in Grand
Cay who assured him the water was better
than it had been before Christmas, he
said.

The minister also assured customers the
WSC was sending an RO supplier and
hydrologist to investigate the cause of com-
plaints as those customers who informed
Mr Roberts their water supply is still
undrinkable may have had a cross-connec-
tion in their water supply.

The WSC’s assistant general manager
for the Family Islands and area manager for
Abaco are also flying into Abaco this morn-
ing to investigate the cause of complaints
and test for H2S levels at the Grand Cay
plant.

Mr Neymour said he believes the WSC is
living up to its mandate to provide cus-
tomers with clean water that is safe to
drink, as the corporation hired a new con-



ASSURANCE:
Phenton Neymour

tractor to install a new system
when H2S problems arose late
last year.

Hydrogen Sulfide is a com-
mon problem at water plants
throughout the Bahamas as
organic matter in the soil gives
off the H2S gas, which can build
up and make the water undrink-
able, as it did at WSC RO plants
in Exuma and Acklins under Mr
Roberts’ watch as Minister of
Works, Mr Neymour said.

The colourless, flammable
gas, characterised by its rotten
egg odour, is considered an
extremely hazardous toxic com-
pound and in high concentra-
tions attacks the human body
as a chemical asphyxiant, similar
to carbon monoxide and
cyanide, inhibiting cellular res-
piration and uptake of oxygen and caus-
ing biochemical suffocation; according to
website safetydirectory.com.

Because of this, the WSC regularly aer-
ates water at their plants to rid it of H2S,
the minister said.

“Hydrogen Sulfide challenges are not
uncommon in the Bahamas,” he asserted.

“The WSC has indicated that in the
Bahamas anywhere between 25 and 30 per
cent of the time they experience Hydro-
gen Sulfide at various levels, so with all of
that information, I am indeed shocked by
Mr Roberts, because he is a former Minis-
ter of Works with responsibility for the
Water and Sewerage Corporation, and dur-
ing his tenure experienced the same chal-
lenges throughout the Bahamas.

“So I think it’s wrong of him to raise, or
attempt to raise, some major alarm.

“I feel Mr Roberts should demonstrate
some maturity and not try to raise undue
alarm where it’s not necessary.

“T consider his actions to be political, but
not only are they political, but also hypo-
critical.

“The WSC, in my view, are taking their
standard procedures and adhering to
them.”

91 Haitians, 46 Dominicans repatriated

REPATRIATION exercis-
es returned 91 citizens of Haiti
to the country’s capital Port-
au-Prince and 46 Dominicans
to Santo Domingo in the
Dominican Republic this
week.

Director of Immigration
Jack Thompson said the 72
Haitian men and 19 Haitian
women repatriated this week-
end included the 57 migrants
apprehended in Exuma last
Sunday, as well as 34 Haitians
found to be living in New Prov-
idence without legal status.

Those apprehended in Exu-
ma were found onboard a

sloop near Sandy Cay on the
southern side of Great Exuma
at around 2am on Sunday, Jan-
uary 4.

They were apprehended by
a team of immigration officers
and Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) marines who
flew in from Nassau to board
the vessel at sunrise. A total
of 44 undocumented men and
13 women were apprehended
in the exercise and taken to
Nassau for processing.

Among the 46 Dominicans
repatriated were five men
arrested for illegal landing in
Abaco, as well as 41 arrested

by the RBDF for poaching in
Bahamian waters.

“The Immigration Depart-
ment along with its other law
enforcement agencies remains
vigilant regarding the Immi-
gration law,” Mr Thompson
said.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PLP supporters urged to recapture
‘the spirit of political idealism’

Majority Rule anniversary

PROGRESSIVE Liberal
Party supporters were called on
to recapture the spirit of politi-
cal idealism culminated in the
Majority Rule Day of 1967 yes-
terday.

Party members charged that
after 44 years, the dream and
promise of economic justice
through equitable wealth dis-
tribution remains unfulfilled.

Commemorating the
anniversary of the historic
event, the party hosted a prayer
breakfast in the ballroom of the
Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

During his keynote address,
leader of the party Perry
Christie told supporters that the
anniversary memorialized an
era of the “Golden Age of ide-
alism in Bahamian politics.”

“Tt was an era marked by an
extraordinary spirit of selfless
struggle and sacrifice,” said Mr
Christie. “An age that was

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

marked by a collective desire
to be a part of what was clearly
understood to be.

“Those were the good old
days of Bahamian politics
because it was all about uplift-
ing our people and uplifting our
country rather than seeing what
one could get for oneself,” he
said. Majority Rule day — rec-
ognized on January 10 each
year — signifies the end of the
governance of the majority of
Bahamians by a minority.

Following a general election,
the then governing United
Bahamian Party was replaced
by the PLP, with the support
of recently elected Sir Randol
Fawkes, a Labour member, and
Sir Alvin Braynen, an Inde-
pendent member.

At yesterday’s event, the
party leader advised support-

ers to be inspired by the
progress made by past genera-
tions and to use its momentum
to meet the current societal
challenges.

Mr Christie said: “We can-
not allow this to be an occasion
for simple minded remem-
brance and instead we have to
seize this moment. This 44th
anniversary is a reminder of the
urgent need to embrace afresh
the ideals that guided our party
in an earlier time.

“Just as the front line war-
riors of the PLP took on the
great challenges of their time
and overcame them, we too are
now summoned by history to
meet the major challenges that
confront our society today,” he
said. The brunch preceded a
mass demonstration organized
by labour unions for this

evening — the latest demon-
stration in their continuing
argument with the government
over the sale of BTC.

Actions taken by the unions
seek to commemorate the gen-
eral strike of 1958, in which
thousands of workers took part.

The strike, which resulted
in the Trade Union and Indus-
trial Conciliation Act and the
creation of the Labour Depart-
ment, is also credited with influ-
encing Sir Allan Lennox Boyd,
then Secretary of State for the
Colonies, to order the first con-
stitutional steps toward Major-
ity Rule for the Bahamas.

Additional speakers includ-
ed party chairman Bradley
Roberts and Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell.

The Fox Hill MP spoke in
the absence of Lady Marguerite

a

Pindling, wife of former Prime
Minister, the late Sir Lynden
Pindling.

Mr Mitchell chronicled the
events that led up to the politi-
cal and national achievement,
highlighting its significance to
the PLP and the Bahamian
people.

Acknowledging that for
many Bahamians — in some
respects — there has been
regression in the years follow-
ing Majority Rule, Mr Roberts
urged those present to remem-
ber the promise of the historic
milestone.

“Wherever there is injus-
tice,” said Mr Roberts, “be it
social, political or economic, we
have a responsibility to speak
out and to correct it. Wherever
freedom is being stifled and
replaced with dictatorship and



MAJORITY RULE DAY:
Perry Christie

oppression, we have a respon-
sibility to fearlessly stand
against it — this generation has
the responsibility of continuing
the struggle and fulfilling the
promises of Majority Rule
which are deeply rooted in the
principles of democracy, jus-
tice, freedom and fair play
which collectively embody the
Bahamian dream.

“Your country demands no
less of you.”

He eee eee ee Teta

Vandyke Hepburn
ne ||

ARTHUR HANNA and Mrs. Anne Marie Davis, wife of Phili



Wid



p ‘Brave’ Davis, were guests at a prayer breakfast held

in Freeport to commemorate Majority Rule Day. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe is seen making a
presentation to Mrs Davis and Mr Hanna.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Progres-
sive Liberal Party on Grand
Bahama recognized 27 residents
here on Sunday while commemo-
rating the 44th anniversary of
Majority Rule in the Bahamas.

A prayer breakfast was held
at the Our Lucaya Resort on Sun-
day under the patronage of for-
mer Governor General Arthur
Hanna.

Those honoured were
Patronella Bowen-Simms, Peatrel
Russell, Dora Bartlett, Rejoina
Martin, Felix Seymour, Violet
Pintard-Johnson, Naomi Sim-
mons, Asa Jones, Stanley Sim-
mons, George Curtis, Antoinette
Seymour, Lorenzo Bullard, Mau-
rice Moore, Earnest Armbrister,

Addison Culmer, Arlington
‘Spike’ Mackey, Dennis ‘Preach-
er’ Hall, Andrew Munnings,
Mable Colton, Edgar Outten,
Hilton Bowleg, Lenny Butler,
Earl Walkin, Rejoina Curtis,
Clarence Bartlett, Granville Gar-
vey, and Mary Wilchcombe.
Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, Deputy
Leader of the PLP, and Member
of Parliament for West End and
Bimini Obie Wilchcombe were
also present and addressed those
honoured. Rev. Dr. Keith Russell
prayed for the nation, and the Rt.
Rev. Cornell J. Moss, VII Dioce-
san Bishop of Guyana, including
the Ceyanne and Surinam, prayed
for the Leader of the PLP.
Majority Rule is celebrated on
January 10. Carolyn Kinglocke,
chairman of GB PLP Convention
Organizing Committee, said all
Bahamians benefited, in one way

Scripture Thought

Micah Chapter 2 verse 1-5

WOE TO EVILDOERS

Woe to those who devise iniquity,and work out
evil on their beds! At morning light they practice
it, because it is in the power of their hand. They
covet fields and take them by violence, also
houses, and seize them. So they oppress a man
and his house, a man and his inheritance.

Therefore thus says the LORD: “ Behold, against
this family I am devising disaster, from which you
cannot remove your necks; nor shall you walk
haughtily, for this is an evil time. In that day one
shall take up a proverb against you, and lament
with a bitter lamentation, saying: We are utterly
destroyed! He has changed the heritage of my
people; how He has removed it from me! To a

turncoat He has divided our fields.

wn

Therefore

you will have no one to determine boundaries
by lot In the assembly of the LORD.



or another, from the historic event
that took place on January 10,
1967.

“Majority Rule presented the
opportunity for real democracy
to come to the Bahamas, under-
pinned by equality, tolerance, eco-
nomic justice, social justice, all
important elements in the cre-
ation of a free, modern, democ-
ratic state,” she said.

“We pay homage to the per-
sonalities and players in this epic
struggle. In a hard fought and
competitive election in 1967, the
PLP delivered the following 18
members to a 38-member House
of Assembly. They were: Lynden
Pindling, Preston Albury,
Clarence Bain, Milo Butler, Clif-
ford Darling, Elwood Donaldson,
Arthur Foulkes, Carlton Francis,
Arthur Hanna, Warren Levarity,
Curtis MacMillan, Uriah McPhee,
Maurice Moore, Edmund Mox-
ey, Jimmy Shepherd, George
Thompson, Jeffrey Thompson
and Cecil Wallace Whitfield.

“Randol Fawkes, who suc-
cessfully ran as Labour in 1962
and 1967 with the support of the
PLP, threw his support behind the
PLP and became a member of the
first Majority Rule cabinet. He
figured prominently in the move-
ment toward Majority Rule,” she
recalled.

Ms Kinglocke revealed that
the upcoming PLP mini-conven-
tion is slated for Grand Bahama
at the end of January. She noted
that Majority Rule is the singular
event in Bahamian history that
played a significant role in shaping
the modern Bahamas of today.

“The significant events lead-
ing up and emanating from
Majority Rule must become per-
manently etched in the Bahamian
historical landscape as these
events define us as a people,
reveals what we believe in as
Bahamians, and serves as a con-
stant reminder to us of our vision
and values,” she said.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 7



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Stern finds vindication in Anna Nicole Smith case

By LINDA DEUTSCH,
AP Special Correspondent

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
After losing Anna Nicole Smith
and then a court battle over her
estate, Howard K. Stern says a
judge's dismissal of convictions
in a prescription drug case vin-
dicates both him and the late
Playboy model.

"I loved Anna and I cared
for her so much. I have no
regrets," Stern told The Asso-
ciated Press in an interview
Thursday, hours after the court
reversed his two conspiracy
convictions for using his name
on prescriptions for Smith.

"The regrets I have are for
what people caused afterward,”
he said, referring to multiple
legal complications that arose
after Smith died of a drug over-
dose in Florida in February,
2007.

The most agonizing post-
script, he said, was the pre-
scription drug abuse charges
filed in Los Angeles against
Stern, Smith's psychiatrist Dr.
Khristine Eroshevich and Dr.
Sandeep Kapoor, Smith's gen-
eral physician. He called the
months of trial a nightmare.

Prosecutors had argued that
Smith was an addict, and the
defendants were feeding her
addiction rather than provid-
ing prescription drugs for any
legitimate medical purpose.

But after a long and costly
prosecution, Superior Court
Judge Robert Perry threw out
conspiracy convictions against
Stern and Eroshevich on Thurs-
day, allowing one charge
against her to remain but reduc-
ing it to a misdemeanour. The
jury had already acquitted
Kapoor of all charges against
him.

The judge concluded that
Smith was not an addict by
legal definition but was rather a
woman seeking relief from
chronic pain. He said the jury
verdicts suggested they agreed.

Perry said Stern clearly did
not intend to violate the law
when he used his name on drug
prescriptions for Smith. The
judge said the defendants who
used false names for Smith
were trying to protect her pri-
vacy in a manner used by many
celebrities.

Stern praised the ruling as
"a huge victory and vindication
for Anna and the person she
really was, not the person the
prosecution tried to portray her
as."

He called the case "a dis-
honest prosecution with no pur-
pose but to ruin our lives and
for their publicity and political
gain.”

Los Angeles County District
Attorney Steve Cooley criti-
cized the judge's decision, say-
ing it "denigrates the substan-
tial investigative efforts con-
ducted by the state Department
of Justice and the medical
board." He said he would
appeal.

Stern attorney Steve Sadow



said his strongest and most
unusual defense theme was
love.

He told jurors that Smith
was the love of Stern's life and
he would never have done any-
thing to hurt her.

He said prosecutors at times
portrayed Stern as a Svengali
trying to control Smith for mon-
ey, acclaim he said was false.

"The love was a fact," Sad-
ow said. “It was the truth and
all I had to do was sell the true
facts to the jury. They had to
understand the relationship
between Howard and Anna
rather than the false and ficti-
tious relationship the prosecu-
tion tried to sell. And of course
we had the pictures."

Sadow said the turning point
in the trial came when the pros-
ecution imported two nannies
from the Bahamas who testi-
fied that Smith was in a

Betty Taylor

Journalist | Entrepreneur

HOWARD K STERN and the late ANNA NICOLE SMITH



drugged, semi-comatose state
for weeks after the birth of her
child and accused Stern of
keeping her drugged.

The defense then produced
dozens of dazzling photographs
of the blonde beauty from the
same time period, showing her
vibrant and smiling, cuddling
her baby, posing with Stern, cel-
ebrating her birthday and par-
ticipating in their commitment
ceremony on a yacht.

Stern said he sometimes
marvels at the turn of fate that
led him to Smith and the love
story that consumed his life. He
was her lawyer first and then
her lover.

"Back then could I ever have
anticipated where I am now?
Not in a million years," he said.

At 41, he said he has not had
time to evaluate his future or
to mourn for his lost love.

He said a bright light in his

Don't waste time in
life...because you

cannot do anything in
death.

life is Smith's daughter, Dan-
nielynn, who he once thought
was his. She is being raised by
her father, photographer Larry
Birkhead.

He said he and Birkhead,
who once fought in court, are

now working together on
Smith's estate and Birkhead
will probably become its sole
administrator.

He said he will have visits
with Dannielynn and hopes to
tell her about her mother.

"She just reminds me of her
mom," he said of the 4-year-
old child.

"She's a junior version of
Anna. Larry is doing a great
job with her. She's the happiest
little girl you'll ever see."

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.



PO Ome ele

RET PE TEAL

WL) Lot #10 in Sandilands ADnimes: on
themestern aide of Coosewind Hood beteeen
Seghrecore Lae and Moeyaed Head en the ba
ere Liteireact of The [seal of Mew Prev hence
hae Ha beara, Ona ining single siorey pirreare
Teh erice TPR ST Ce frill ceartege Creare)
eniry pooch, [rene nom, ding none, rich
en, bumadry mom, farvily room, sitting area
4 bedrooms, ¥ hai d patin, The to
tal area of bind 2 movely T8419 fi
Apopra bsnl value 5! ML

BOL) len parcels of fd contaming 21.120
sql. situated on the southern side of fost
Shirley Street and 100 doet west of tte. pane
tine veth “Shira” in the Eastern Cisirict of
the Idand ol New Preeddence- The Baharers.
Situated thereon ia. Ges Station and avin
Thequair sharp. Appraband Vue

Bi| Sinple Family Hesichenice
onthern side of est [a Sires
diviely Bast of Caprice Comal
plex (Lath Hear 7
feet const of 5 bednocens, 4 Li horihenomea
detached building double cour paragel is 60h
square feet, with prinfnreed sea weal, curbs
ming pool 4 deck, The waterfront property
fersa land ste nd A squeee Beet Apqerabeel
Voke $0 0251

BOL) Ab that pore orlet of and being Lets
Fllland 11 in (inrk 28 oft Larner San
van, Cnatiainertg a ship z plas oa [hee ln
18 trapeviie in aferpan, fh. uci Sa] Geet. Age
praised coho 32.15.0006

| = Abthat piece oe parcel of lot contain
ing A897 sq . seated 0 fasiem aden?
Last Street fs Tmt erie ty
utilined bn amimerctal building. Beected on
the property ea hee storey rernmery struction
teh peas area Comet of ghee to Beraiing:
Floor (Grand & Secor - 341 gp fi, Stor-
age: S020. Ft, Lunch Rosen - 70S sap ft, Pa
tice b Walloveay - | SM Say Pt, Aprpeeaisad valor
TRA

Act) «All thet fece or pamel ot nt con ing
B07) syrene feet suaies on the Soren se
of Samal Lane Port Fincastle City Cestrict, The
property is comenencal hy zoned with ae old
Hahn style boiling constricted af wood
from with cement sucess walls, The build

ing cone sts of the following: danound Plonor-
Porch, 4 Offices, [lerontion, Err and
Storage. Upper levees dices. Confer
nem, | Aathirosen & nara Thar iron ip

purencirmay ely 3, POL) aepiare fewt with porch are i
1H ey Appraised wale TRA

BLL Besidentialommenct! property
bon? 107" Incaied Oalmerreiile, Easier Che
iret, New Provalonce with ssize of 4000 oy
fit, The property Cum LMI gay
Ti bathe reg,, ttpeper Levi: 3 bend 1 hail: apeari-
leerk Bequty salen, The building
ck wall, #" concn
Partitions, seqitenl wh ne rool, tike! (nore
toca) Ceiling, priveds waler ester, stared -
ard wlintrical are) plurrdzinng lig tues, Gimiral
air-condition [pli syshenn), brergier bees, Ag
fori weed tem Jems 3101 TERS

BLL) Toy bts 8 24 boca Drove ttl
Subdiedom, Soei here District, Saw Poke
On which an incomplete burial img is stu atend
properties ane rest dieratial yard rralti-bernty
nil pradked, inser laredecapre!
emaaal inane) widen. The Bariiilin gin 4ehti
soe UU aed oe 2 atevevsy reed ti-fearn iby at hee resaal
webagee with | beccd regres url ally ached There: dora:
scvrineatital inet Foe Whee capper Mier: 4 emit
| bead 1 bath etch Serta, 1 eal | bath each,

vot Teor - 2 bed b hath

bath. which in
1. Appriimed val

i tl
Fireleward im thee Wie “lire ate

ric of Bern’ PA
Titet of ft #15 jennings uw

ra 3 bend I 2 bathmnens
restidheracs: oral Chines: rcsickereses tirechor
inicio; Appiainad value 350,000.09.
(thar f tT bn 01S eect, Comair of
Orae acre, Apprdeed valee 317100.
80) Parcel of land situated in the suba-
Vien id Glisten Garden 11,250 eg ft Lew

AW PROVIDE eB
(RN) Vacant property locnied 49 fi. east of
Hal’ Mle on the nonherm dide ol Bara Shirky
Sect ated lo as “Od Plantain Ine,
in the eaanem diate af Mew Provikenes
Property mot + Msg Tl, al open soning
Appraised value SL BLIGE
BOD) Thee singles tami by rrvaltictamn Dy nest
dential vacant parcels of lard being Lins &
10, 114 12 cieeated onthe Somhem sie of
Ping Trail Rol i9 the Wiser [hair] of ene
T mas, Pengeerty Sines are Lint #1 - ST
* 100) ~ S015 ft. aed Lion 2 !
a ql. Appoaised value: $85,000 for each bor.
(i) Vara Lot Win La | = = at
item aude of Foe Hid Ae fh
of Ponce Charles Drive, eeu, st
[he open zoning) hti-borely property soe
is appen, 12205 sgt Appraised value
$150,000
CE) aaa been ce Ladd Ieee tid Wines Bea
Stroet, chineacthy oppeesite & the entrance to + Chig-
Pings Hine, Pease Bahamas - The prog
erly cones! of approdimna A
acess. Property has 1 cadmarely a6
ata n Nong: with prokected anche
eee Ue sat teerte Of Alaris k Cay
ced A A conimins 27,4 ft weal Parcel Fi
convin MA, Abreasonadle offers will be
considered,

ol i tha cubed

(istrict « dite Id and of Mew Provilenc: being
Lot Mumnber 14 in flock Number 4. property
is appinos Te sath. Appraised Value TA

2 Bec parce! arline of lanvdl ba

koran asf ARTIBNS?
inthe Southern Disirect of the bee
Providence Appraised value $6500

Lol Ma. 10. Sou hea Comerno! Man-
, Sa Apple: Baad, Seared Saeed
We, Sie 14H egy OL Ayers vali

ceed on Maripold Rod! in the Seba ividion

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-350-2

(AIM) Mrs. Pomkque Crnwford

{S01 Mr Jerome Pinder

AZ] Mr. Arian Enviveeless

:S04) Mr Vandy ke Pratt

BM) Mrs. Higee Sealey

(S04) Mrs. Tiffany Simms 0 beten
(806) Mrs. Lois Wallis

LAT | kin. Lesnar Com

(0H) Mrs. DaShann Clare: Paul
SALLI) Me. Lidia Rahiming

PALMIDIMLE SHORPAING CENTIEE
Tel: 242-322-44219 of 242-Bi2- 5

Sl) Mrs, Parige Richie

8 hock a0 in the cbstnict of Mew Prowdence

Coen ing | hen ei one ree ceene, proand foeor
aime akitchen, dintrgecom, lounge, a fom-

ih room, a veranda the fromt anal side wtih

a pert bo the beac of they b

flour contains 2 balm, 3

inched and rapa Te witha k

maser bedineca Appice stare! bailing 0001

eq. Apprmeal TRA

SH) Lint #27 oP eae Alloirmeni #14 the
faatern District, contuming rsalence stual-
et om Denwer Street off Parkges ie Gress i thar
Arm's Town Cordiiuence, Sarw Providence
Peoperty size 2.5000 ay, ft, Avebciing, sine “AMI
ogy FL. Appreninan] vad ne S50 O

SA) Lint ae? in block #1, Steward fined, Coral
Heergeats Coast Selb sia natuated tries einnn
District of Mew Providence appre, toe FAM
sy, A witha split bevel oor brining bee bed, Gave
bath, Giving, dining & faeniby me

aml etlity mom - appre. #

7AM, H, Appremser wale

S69] Lint 2b meseentia pooperty ocaiee
Sdovline Heighos, Appemised value $20,000

S69) Lot of Rnd being fot number 11 ini
Hock nueniber 10on a phaniot allotmerss laid
out by Vilage Ceiate Lommed amd fied inte
depe of Land & Sarees a marreer 102 fe

and sttuted on ihe Eastern [astrict of Feerw
Preaigenice, Properts contains ther bed bn
bath resdence, Appraised value 5105000041

S| Lot Soi 21579 fatieied on the
noth ice of Stell Fish Road, betes the thiect
let west of Fire Tra Road and east ol Ham
ster Road with a cme hal dhopkes restdertial
prenmess. Appraised tale TEA

7 bocaded Vilage Mbotrnent with
ier - S400

wa Lin I
fourples

BS) Property dined on Wiliams Lares off
ke mg Hine, Mew Provident. Batanas con
Lining a baroeenorey beeue add an a pea rirene
balling consisting of ]B00 o. BL Appraised
rilue 2100

S69) Loot land sinned ist Trail Road
being a partition of Glas [hot PL hee
Ponvidence, Banas oon tal ning cram hoe
PRT LT aed a 1

fsted as Appraised ta

Fadth ‘teen

trict of Mee Prowiiece, Rohner oon

Ing a doples aparenent comprising of men
2. bedroom! |) bathroom aprnenis. Ay

fnlsed valor $1) 7500000.

Bea) Lin al land SRB? shout on ei
bh Fineeboed Gardiores lin the ou her

of the land of Mew Provtite

Hall conarected cance redidence le Feeil.

‘pore vale TAA

Lor @ 1006 in Gebdes
8? Sublivkiom sina
Dis irhcr of the bs Lad of
lalndng adie Shorey pitivene i
fi. Pra Be my appeat. Le

Cares Eanes
E muh Winter i

564) Lote B Bloc B sive
Sree! in the Cacey’s Sibelivis oe
ifoer balroom to bath resides
aio: | 2 so Feet. Peery sie apy
oy RL Appriised Valeo 2145 00),

Sra Sirah honey triples, ei Mind:

i rane is Mui Folk; Residential, Meesrallt
I Bi sq ft with the living aed measering
2752 2g fh Appaieed value 3474199 00
All dat Southwestern Moker of Hall
Of Lark being part of a Tract of
perhy caliod “ANS TOA
rs Sik on (HL feet Saruthi-
faa! of Kem p's Rc i
the & slated of Mew Pr
15 cori i
1a S0 fi Jepreised 351000.

SAS) Lote Aine 8 ont Month diet Car
Michie Ad. Naseer with bedkling ated foun
tition fi awerehoine Property site b5,72

ep). Appraised rake: £32") 100

9) All that piece parcel or bot of kane sii-
revie om the Cast Side of bel bers Road an
Ate Sl ht Sogh of Lannicte

a contaning a Uniplex Property a

DOM ELD say Tt} Ageprrag seed Cabo TF

S|) Loi f2. Bock Enplersioa 300 i
tidoe, Southern CHstrict of MP containing
4 panty comep keted bu fic ine Dperty Sze
Ippo, FS a Aye praised val = SA fl

$08) Propemy containing 4 bed lath home
Siege Famiiy Blesid ence. AD that piece of pear
celorlet of land being Lot. Suan ber 2275 rime
Within the Subdhetston Ener as Cedar proees
Palate situated in ihe Souther District of che
aaiceD Yeu Providence in The Common:
hoof the lahore Property Shee A
ag 5h) Alihenp ce car
ie ortho Beheeer Gospel nel. Pine
Charles De identified as Farce “HW” andcon
Wining Cheneon a Sour Unie Apartment oom
flex. Property dae i 20501] aq th Apperiiset
abe 54.57 Ky
56S) Al that plece parcel or bot al bared sit
teed in Englerson being Lot @l2 and #2
Containing an comet: ries apartesent
Appraised wal ues 195, 000

569) All then ene pemcel or bo of bared sia
Jed Pinewood Gardens conial ning thereon 2
et betoomsedidence. Appraised vale $

Al char piece patodd of fot ofan cain
beved Lot fa? Auaralia Hivd_ Elisabed Es
Fite tar aistitag tt Toon a Three Ib
fskieice Apprabed value §

56S) All chat piece pared of Let of lad

es Subdivision on the dared

An Provence mid contains tkereon &
1445 soLf. building. Said Property ib SK
ag Appraised Valor £179 1)
569) Alc! pee: parcel of Lat of aed
bese) 0905. aed 6385 i ec 22) it the cre
falkod mind knoe as Mesa Vile Su bet
Won On the idan of Mew Paavide ic: and oni -
laine theron 1559.1 apparent building
Said Property b SO) agit Appraised Vike
617400
569) Loe 001 Atawek Ace
Wales Sal sliv

ie of Pinon Ee

CO og fh ("2 100) Ap

101) Lat Ret on the northwestern aided
Merkrwi Sint, Blizuteeth & Eulaliy Fa el Picea

wt Prowidetice
kland Lot of the lated say fl. with &
22-year old single level eden Vbedrnoris
I bathroom. Appraised vali $44 ATL

SA) AM that poor perroel or plod of Larned
porn pial, 2519 eof. alate on the East
em side of Aetiedtrong 5. ard EPpIE. f

i
rented alrictuer. Ajyprmbacd Vile: $152 125

SO) Libel Landen the nas! sale of Millers

Pavac! doe kaeoevn an Pesca Ad) ened 276 SH
Feet sith of Carmichael Hel ie
Titre of the felon of Mew Prowic sured
Sontag Ciro a dupe (band | berth
Rea keiinig | ADE so. aed property ATT
fy EL Arpad eu S20 Da

S64) Lot of bond bring Lot #44 nf the wuh-
dhviaain Ered oe [inser Galate ailialedl
the Eastern Miwtrict, Mie Prrcicknice, and con-
laining foment a tne eliery crete buill-
ity Aj puta bond vo S277 0

S68) Tractof keed sttuaie Seth of Crapen
Rew! in the Bastern Cieirici, bland of Mire
Presidency, containing thensan a ane dam-
opal alructin:. Apepraband Vedi $125,000)

S64) Loto! end kore ps Lot 21 on Treas
wee Cire Subdividoe diated in the eastern
Distinct of New Preaidence and co MTLUITENE
therenun a 3-hedream 2 “bath rissdther a

ing appess
ay & Appraised

S69) Lotef bond ie Shirky bright: Subir
dom being Lot ei Bleck 2] coneening thereon

VOU e iO) ool ee he

kn ae Kod Acres, Lot ia apipirine
ft, Appraised vilue 33,000

59{ Vacant ltdnale famby cond ng. Linea
2) ofthe wabdickien called “Southors Shores”
Cintas Subdivision locavd on Marshall
Plow Poopeenty sacar is sorree fr’, ise em ta
gph posed aed 1S Son onesie, 3 SEL al the
hark ard some 85.61 on the other side of
57S sg it of lad space. Apprakeed valuc
56000
S| Ldhewekopredd bots 4A, 18, 17, Bb ar
14 lorated ¢ hapirein Deisies, Wed tere Ay
praised vaue S40

Sad) All chal plece parcel or It ool lard be:
itna | z

PLAS ey

aiverbe it Ihe Vici ny of Semalikan
in the Featem Pieirect of the Iskemndl [ Narev
Prvadence, Agpramed Value 114

5a) All that plece parcel of lot of land
fimabened Lit e3 be a fect cal Let
Croun Lean ARAA siete And ff Carti-
chose fied in the Southem Cisirict of the
Iskind of Here Provence, Property is SS
oq. Appraised value 5590001

Be Ab chat ecep lott land alr
Waited an the nits fof Palit
Lane & flome Street, Po Hill in the East-
cto! Mew Prredenice, Appears

KE

TH Ab diat Mece parcel or lot ol landbe
ing Lor #5 in Hkeck 23 in the Sebhdiveiom
brea os Miler Hargabas situerte in Lhe Weal
enn (istrict of the bland of ew Proeaence
To 3100 appenc 7 ay fr Ap
praised value 1A
Bid) All hat piece parce of bot of Land bo-
tated Cored Heights Feel. Appratual ealie
THA

(57 All thea piece pew cel or lot of kind

rat as Lot? 3 being a portion of a larger
Tree Of Land ko as Le of 2 1 af Souther i
Fitts Sulivision silat in the Seater
(Dis triet of the tsk) of Meee Providence, Prig-
erty is (222° x S29" apopureg TA say fee

Appeaised Value S300

(S88) Lotof bend eae Lot #4 bho ka
ine Subdiveion calles bomen z= Heal -
lou Dale sicmed ie thc Sothern District in
the Land of New Providence. Bahamas. ip-
fntised Vaduie THA.

Ska, All that piece parcol or bet of kine be-
Img Loi of the ores] [iter Subdesion
sinamed South of Lamperdoan Urive and
appr fest of Culbents Hill Orie to
jaled in the Rene Oieiet of the [sland of
Nis Previdkeme. Property ie 15/661 capt are’
fs bell tops Acrileed value 32001 (HL 00

34] Lot of and being Lot #2] Cireniaena
Subdivision simiac in the Western District
Of de bland of Meu Peovide nce it

feoniueral th of the Hahei. Pre quar ap-
prrtrs 6,506) oe. Tt Apprremeen] alee StRh ML

(4) Lotof land beimga portion of Lot. #5
of block Es d Hilk Su bated:
fon in the } strict of the

raw 2. Praga bs Wiacaa
mmacersatren 9006 oy Apeprinieen) Va 3415

S711) Lotef land beng Lot 4m a Subdre
son Enoewn.a8 and calked "Whe a's Vinewand
slnanee In the Southiwestene DMs trict of NeW
Providence. Prog, i 7.25% 29.0. Appra iad
ralue S700

64) Lorbof land henemg an area ol SU) age
being Lot #12 Gameca Beach Estates inthe
Aastem dbirict of Mew Proved ero. Frome the
ime reciion of Fo Hill Rd and Yorecrw
Hi Bd Deter eee Vite raw’ Hil Flee, take:
(he firs) omerver cry Chee right, Gake they fire
left aed property is second propertyon the
Tight. Appraised values3 1.000

56a) Lot? situated on the weer skical
Gokken bls Roel South of Cae

in the Western District of Meer

Appt rast Talue Si Oo i

FREEPORT

JEOL) Vieeant propery Ioeated) Aadvamiia
So, Aleck 16 bo acai, Crate Ra-
hema Coreiding of YL Alay fl, Apprabas
wale £2 60

2) Vacant Gonmercial Lot Moc 24. Bock

OFFICERS

(205) Mirs. Anya Major

NASSAU AN BRANCH

Del: 242-522-8710

(700) Mr. lomes Strachan

(01) Mis, Thyra Johnson

(04) irs. Alicia Thompeom
MAVOKEY STREET BRANCH

Pele 242-593-4097

(05 Mls. Nicole Fans

JOHN FE KES SEDY DRIVE ARASH
Feb 242-425-4711

(0) Mr Robert Renin
PARADISE ESAT) BRANCH
Telephone: 242-333-1004

(S50) Mis. Cherefe Martin hang

PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Tek 242-305-7505
500) Ms, Nicola Walker
(505) Sls. Patricia Bussell
CARLE REACH BRANCH
Pel 42-327 -6077

(BG) Mr, Derek Sbanrup

LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel; 242-302-517 5)
[TIB) Ms. Quincy Fisher
(717) Mrs, Nancy Swaby
Ms. Deke King
Ms. Marguerise Johnson
Mire. Cathar ir Davis

(Sra) Ms Annishe Wilson
NASSAU INTL ADR

Tel: 242-377-3179

(ES) Mrs, Retiea Vidlkine
LYRORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-440 or 242-F2-T
(VOL-M) Peis. (Limclery Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELPUTHERA

Tel: 242-392. 2856/0

(i) Ma. Bethe Burrows
HARRCHIE ELLAND BRANCH
Teh2a2-343-2200

(POL) Ms. Vekherine Larocla

concrete building. Appraised

I Lod (uber 227, Coral Harbor Water:
was Subd raisin, Westen (astct, Sew Prov-
dence containing. spin level Shed 4 1/2 beh
reaikerce Lieieg 5 pex EB Se at Poopeerty
1004 say ft, Appears Value P9700)

HES) Lotol nd being Lot i siteatein dar
denHils €2 Subdividen inthe Southern [ierict
af the Idandef Mew Providence and oomiain-
ing thereon 2 peartialhy completed 2 hopping
plazx which measumes 1.500 alt
eae 15 TA ay Ee. Appa bad Veal SBF

G68) Lot of hind being Lot member 076 in
he Subdheisian called and knowrias Pinewnod
Curiens See ¢ Cast-Ceniral District of
the klond of Mew Moetiesce and containing
thereon 2 3-hedroom Iba concrete read:
aenoe, Appraed Ya Dov

68) Lots of land being Lows sumer 359
and 674 inche Sebcitvision cabled and known
25 Stapledon Gendens sitmane in ihe Westem
District of the landol Mew Providence, con-
fining thereon penal units. Appraised value
TBA

MOE) Loc ol land sean on the Nonhem side
af Taney Sree with meaty oomainucted 2
1 orey offer building. Property sioe is.ap
prea, 1g. Appa od vale S92
01) Lot of tend with cereal complex ain
aed In Union ¥ilage Saas, Bahamas. Ap
prakeod valued $500 10,

69) Lot of land sisanse on the Seuthem
dik of Marin & and conidniag hereon a
tiple (2 oF ed | hath undies amd (1) Phe 9

Drive appocs S70 fl south of Bird Biel in the
Soulhem Disiictot Mew Providence, Prop
eny comeains thereon a Car Wash Stied-S7'
ay ft, oltioe [Beauty Sabon STH sq [1 Hestaii
Win! and Bar Ake = Lésdeg fh. Tonal p fapeety
Bap. 5.0Mieg h. Appraise dvalo: BA

t Of Mand sinmate in thee Sormchaeat.

emi Lal the bland of Nea prvi ence
and bering LL 3 of the Sabah 1 Ca Dial
ated kivoaet irs Sunshine Pi ek ies conan
nig heron @ BO 2 fod atom for a di
ples. Property 6 Os fi. Aepiradsed value
365,000

71) Letathind being Loc fhe ae in Ganon
Hills #2 Seb sion in the Southern Dales of
the Klaine of Mew Pekicscr and conning
thitod na partial pooped shopped eg place
which measmes BA sg Property dae
17 AA 2g St Ap pain value 50076 oo

71) La uf laral sitiaved in Rough Es-

Heig hes
eqtalniag thes K
tdihy. Pec. ls A sift. bil, i L 740 ay fi
Appindsed valae £15100

coe it Hii: Easocin Dis.
ui F being Lot AS Will Road
and containdn a tharaan in office building.
Praperty bh 4500 ag. fe 50" 2 90") Appa bac
vale THA

FREEPORT

OH) Sargge Sdory in-pla hukknp, one -
bediecene anid ban |tandcon [cated coma
wea lti-farvely Lat hoa, tober 3, ie bery Lane
sactive |, Hobos Beef Yacht 4 Country Cuts
Subilivieion, Freeport Grew! Haharres, Prop
erty siae beaperos, [6421 so feet Appraised
fhe 348, 000,

: Liat lee

(eOS) All heat pre pened of hod flea are
mnprrceeionts theron: rarer oe Mend bhoerk
18 Habeas Marina & Section (X incatil in
terse coh of Peenpes a wul Fiater-
reat Manl Appeed. 1507 or OA acres
prenpeerty cel aires dogs bere eave Ding. App rkan
pale 3 iat (ae

(b01-P) Residential Cancel [ots 0 0) be}, Bleck

Stal hision Freeeaet, Garanel Ra-

onlaining bw sborey Houses, 4 beeel

Stiatal on 1.82 Acnsoof lanl. Ap-
prapaal wdue $1 4722001



2 Aakers Subclevesn V] coniaireng becres
located Pree por. Grand Pahams. Appraised
Value Sd

(104) Viesant Sinple Family lo a5 Block F
Raburn Som Su, Proepeor, Crane Fetia-
Tel Appraised Vi 385, 1

(4) Dodevetonesd [oi 145. Sein Lane
Locaqan Beach Sud rrisbon. Ciramd Hatearna,
LETSD aquare fect. Appraised value: THA
RT) Veet land Lo a4, Block 21. Baa.
berms Weed fh Civasion [Port seal of Proe-
por, Land Bao Property stoe aperoa
25,500 qh. Appriised value Sho 0),

(564) All thal ploee parod of kot of dora be-
ig Loe], Ainel 6 sitmatiod in Bahan Soh
wiser, Peeepiert, Creal Ferterres, Ap
dvalue S00)
La fa, Br kT Aberdeen Drive, Ba
hilviskot

71)

Lacan pro

a in the Fre
Section], Ferepe
fer Appridsed value
B71) Lot of tnd being number ten [10]
flock Maamber Three 61) Bristed Rene febdli-
Tejon. Unit Cine (1) im the City of Freeport
in the island of Grand Hahama. Bahamas
Property ibapprn a2 ore. Appraised vali
S2c1, [EO

oy Cone edie of Lint A
Tt Hides Subdivision,
a Bohan. Bata.

(ALL) Vacant Lot of land located Vier Brel
rand Bahar comming WE] square deel
of 2hacres seamed in Ginn Sur Mer sebd|

1 land of Cinta Baber. Ap

peealied value: S575 1M)

PAUL) Vewreeet bom icf Lard a, Versailles Sar
Mer Club & Hesoct, esi End Mat Mo. 3 sub-
vision, on the island of Grand Batam, Ba
harnas. Appiridsed value 550 0

PPO) Lele, Linde S, Aleck 22 Charan
Com Lauculn Geen Saal ietian

fama, residential properte App ribet ale
TRA



ANDES TOWN PRAMCH
Tel; 242-358-207 1

|400) Ms Hianca Sines
MARSH HARBOE, AACE
Tel: 242-387-2400

(S08) Wir. Julius Seymour
(900) Mors. Syhia Poitier
(S00) Mir Kierenit ery
TIMINI BRANCH

Tel: 242-347-3041

(100) Ms. Italia Beckford
GAS, DONG BLAND
‘Tel: 242-3374 ciel

EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 24203251

(iG) Ms. hincelyn fackey
FREEPORT, ADIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-226 12

(LOL-F] es. Garpeell Frith

(102) Ais. Elaine Collie

(103) Wore. Chena Mewtedd-Cartwriehit
(MOR) Pits. Sytele Carey

SPANISH WELLS

‘Tel: 242-345-415) of 242-345-4145
[S60 Pir. Wiadber Carey



THE TRIBUNE





CARICOM or
CARI-GONE?



By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

THE New Year started
with a great deal of frustration
being publicly expressed over
the Caribbean regional inte-
gration project which, this year,
will have been in construction
for forty-three years. Other
integration efforts, such as the
European Union (EU), which
began after the Caribbean
Community and Common
market (CARICOM), have
moved ahead much faster and
much more effectively for the
benefit of the people of their
member countries.

It is understandable, there-
fore, that, in an editorial, one
of the Caribbean’s oldest news-
paper observed that a majority
of people believe that “any
official attempt to unite the
region as envisaged in the
CARICOM Single Market
and Economy (CSME) is noth-
ing but reverie and doomed to
failure.” To be fair the editor-
ial did not trumpet this obser-
vation with glee or satisfaction.
It said that “as we enter the
second decade of this century,
we hold fast, nevertheless, to
the idea of one region.”

So, on the one hand, this
editorial, reflecting the views
of many, still believes in the
notion of a deeply integrated
Caribbean — “one region,” but
it expresses no faith that, after
forty-three years, we will see
a CSME anytime soon. The
editorial identified four con-
temporary reasons for its lack
of faith in any “official”
attempt to unite the region.

These reasons were: an
unfortunate statement last year
by the Trinidad and Tobago
Prime Minister that her gov-
ernment would no longer be
“an ATM” machine for other
countries of CARICOM; an
injudicious remark by the same
Prime Minister that, in the pro-
vision by her government of
assistance to the islands of St
Lucia and St Vincent and the
Grenadines she would expect
some benefit for the construc-
tion industry of Trinidad and
Tobago; the more recent sug-
gestion by Prime Minister
Bruce Golding of Jamaica that
his government favoured set-
ting up its own national final
Court of Appeal rather than
acceding to the Caribbean
Court of Justice (CCJ); and
that CARICOM heads of gov-
ernment are yet to establish
“any executive machinery to
enforce” their own policy deci-
sions.

All of these points are valid.
There are many more besides.
Among them are that instead
of getting on with fashioning
CARICOM into an effective
vehicle to help with the
improvement of their people’s
lives and progressing develop-
ment in their countries, some
governments are busily trying
to cultivate relations with oth-
er larger countries far beyond
the region to try to get what
they can while they can. The
latter strategy is, of course,
unsustainable.

And, as has happened in the
past, the governments now
flirting, on their own, with big-
ger countries not on their
doorstep will return to the
regional fold which is not only
their natural home, but also
their best hope.

Fortunately, the statements
by the Prime Minister of
Trinidad and Tobago, while
indicative of an attitude to
CARICOM held by many in
that country, were made in the
early flush of government.

In the past, other heads of
government have made equal-
ly hurtful (and not fully
informed) comments in other
contexts.

The truth is that Trinidad
and Tobago is the principal
beneficiary of trade in goods
and services to CARICOM —
benefits are not a one-way
street.

This is the message that the
government in Port-of-Spain
should be delivering to its peo-
ple.

Also, to those who say that
Trinidad and Tobago does not
need the CARICOM market,
they should be challenged to
identify the alternative mar-
kets, how quickly could they



SIR RONALD SANDERS

be developed if they could be
developed at all, and at what
cost.

With regard to the state-
ment that Mr Golding has
made about establishing
Jamaica’s own national, final
court of appeal instead of join-
ing the CCJ for this purpose, it
really is time that someone
bells the cat on this as well. As
I pointed out in my last com-
mentary (“Time to make up
your mind”), by April this year
Jamaicans will head five
extremely important CARI-
COM-wide institutions. These
are positions for which the
Jamaica government fought
and other CARICOM coun-
tries agreed. What is the mes-
sage that is being sent to the
people of CARICOM by
Jamaica? Is it that all is well
when Jamaica holds the reins,
but it isn’t well when other
CARICOM nationals are
involved? This cannot be so,
and Mr Golding is far too intel-
ligent a man and too well
informed to hold such a posi-
tion. The time has come for
Jamaica’s leadership to cease
pandering to the false notion of
some special Jamaican capaci-
ty, and, instead, spread the true
message that this region is one
— and one to which Jamaica’s
contribution has been highly
regarded by its Caribbean
brothers and sisters.

The quicker that the CARI-
COM Secretariat, as part of an
overall reform of all its activi-
ties, is given the resources and
empowered to mount a sus-
tained, multi-media campaign
throughout the region on how
membership of the Caribbean
Community has benefitted,
and can continue to benefit,
the people of each CARICOM
country the better. And, every
government should regard it
as its responsibility and oblig-
ation to carry out its own
domestic programme of edu-
cation and information.

Of the four points made in
the Editorial to which this com-
mentary refers, the most cru-
cial is its observation that “the
decade closed without the
establishment of any executive
machinery to enforce the
implementation of policy deci-
sions by heads of government.”
This is — and has been for
decades — the fundamental
problem with the lack of
progress of CARICOM in
establishing the CSME and
even in carrying out a range of
activities that are routine in
organisations similar to CARI-
COM.

In his New Year’s address
as Chairman of CARICOM
until July 2011, the Prime Min-
ister of Grenada, Tillman
Thomas, said that “the cry for
the ‘quickening of the pace’
was heard” and “active con-
sideration of new governance
structures” was given by
CARICOM leaders. He
offered that “one of the main
ideas in taking the necessary
steps will be tested in this com-
ing year with the establishment
of the Permanent Committee
of CARICOM Ambassadors”
which, he said, “heralds a new
dawn for our Community.”

Mr Thomas is right to hold
out hope, but it is difficult to
see how another layer of
national representatives will
implement policy decisions of
Heads, when ministers and the
Secretariat were not able to do
SO.

The CARICOM vehicle
needs an urgent overhaul, or
it really will be a case of
“CARICOM and gone.”

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com
an
NaS,

THE TRIBUNE





MIKE LIGHTBOURN

REAL ESTATE: A
‘LITTLE’ BIT GOES
A LONG WAY -
THE INTERIOR
OF YOUR HOME

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

YOU MIGHT think
that the living room or
family room is the heart
of your home, but in the
eyes of potential pur-
chasers, there are at least
three other rooms that
will demand your atten-
tion as you prepare to sell
your home for top dollar.
Avoiding improvements
in the following areas
may cost you a lot more
than the small investment
it takes to impress buy-
ers.

For purchasers, the
kitchen is often the most
important area, and while
you may not need to
replace your cabinets,
resurfacing or just sand-
ing and painting will goa
long way towards improv-
ing their appearance.
Don’t overlook the coun-
tertops — this is an imme-
diate eye catcher. If the
floor is in poor condition,
consider replacing it.

In the bathrooms, fresh
paint and new flooring
are also fine improve-
ments, but your greatest
payoff might come from
simply investing a couple
hundred dollars in a new
mirror and vanity. Make
sure the toilets are secure
and are in good condi-
tion.

The laundry room is
often overlooked when it
comes to improvements,
but purchasers will
respond positively if you
install built-in shelving
and storage. If your laun-
dry area isn’t flooded
with light, consider
upgrading the light fix-
tures. While you’re at it,
that fresh paint and new
flooring wouldn’t hurt
here, either.

Trust me that if these
three rooms are bright,
neat and clean, it conveys
the message that you are
a responsible seller with
pride of ownership, and
hopefully worthy of a full
price offer.

Tip of the week: Even
if your home is in good
condition as outlined
above, if it is not
PRICED PROPERLY it
will languish on the mar-
ket. Remember PRICE,
PRICE, PRICE is what it
takes if you are serious
about selling.

(Mike Lightbourn is
president of Coldwell
Banker Lightbourn
Realty)

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



(en)
Na LY,

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 9

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

EXLIMA

008) Lote? Rabe Soil of aii hat
a oli store oT kanal sitet: vet The: Saved heal
erm parrdicos of The Forest Estate racer Seth
ade and The Poorest Crest Exurres, Property
sia 10,000 say ft, Paid ing stse 2400) sq ft, Con-
gating of 2- l bedrooms and bath unit and 1-2
beclenoms bath und. Apepradsed wale £21920
569) Low? M4567 "Bahama Sound” Ean
Bhocnted abou! 10 ini nertiieee of Genre
Pott Exiaria and aleout | mikeeo eh of Erreet-
ald Bary, The Foti Soe es Baier and) Robes’.
Print Lircatend Ai. Thon prac eed Farrer’
Hall. The property is DOH 9g fi im are wath
80h frontage on (pucen’s Highway; the menn
mad. he property contains. a pe artialy ot:
Pleted apartment compiles with Hee, | bed-
room ini, 4 Bicency ani and | shop space
Araed value S4ER 2h.
$08) Progeerty comaiiitg] bev L-bath hone
SATU chad of concrete blocks leaped Mires
Treaty comal meairriae 1A in The: Deeqearienent of
Hoa ursirng, Sai bedi fi, ices Ties Fairies Rea
homers, Property Sie TESS. Appraised Velie
113.6
Ml) Peoperty containing 6 Unies |-bexd
L-hath apartment units to Fest Floor Beli
Course, Partially developed properties. All
Ihose pisos or kes of bared be in og Lot f 16 re]
an! 1680 Bahama Sound Subdivisk ili
fia Nuniber 3, Great Erte Properties Sint
OC wee Teves, Apu paca bead laos $3005 OL,
ici) Partialhy chirver pret I property kiecalia!
(anit Bavebevard, irvi# 21, | arin flay [states
rene Gecege own, Exim, Bahamas. [beland
2017 square leet and beng developed wit
41 Tee Storey ApeNIMen! comple warich a Lhe
ing area of L770 eo L The te oath, EB
conn pleted 10 thet
ehectricadl, plui
here bewn «
Aggy ramand f s1b0t6a
S081) | Developed property berate! bots A
B11 168i, a hermes Speed AL, Creat Fon
bond is 7.200 square feet containing digplen
rel: Ssullding ireae |, 705 Syne feet weitht
1) ec teed! Sheath it aed C1) rev bees | beat
Tied. Appia hos Pale $185 376.
Me) Developed pooper) locancd k
Boaleaiitas Shou edd 29 ciated cat hee re
erm potion of the Prrrest Estate in bee '
af the eetlements of Minuet Thormpesn are
Parreaer’s Hell nd ters eo
of Genre Town, Great Exures. The land &
1000 square dori deweloped with a single
fimily residence wiih [300 square feet of
ving are, containing theee bedrooms. ard
Tha Beatanomes. The bu Tid ing bs coms ircned
o hardi-dding. Appraised value met 2

GOH) Laat katte! alot 11.5 4 teeth.

reese Of Cesepee Pema, Badiairea Sa WH Fal
WotR? abe ietad com cf kaeal situated af tha
nenhessionn portional The Purest Estate, in
the vicmity ol Mit. Jhompaon and banners bhil
Great Cem fahormess, Ste contains 10000
aq fiand is developed wiih a duplex apari-
Then containing CL D> bev a pear eras.
2,160 eq hlving a (hardigant construc

Thi. Appear bad voile 3 ] 95 Sone,

fH) Loin + Loecalid) Haliairea Saviited
Nae. 7 ea, co cali eel erted cot aT Lael iat at Ch
eanterm por ti Fike Forest Estate inv the 1i-









Feahemnza. £
aening of Ibe
sq lt. Lint at
19,0500
ia lend F 12975, 14 Bahar Send,
Fad iia oi Teac eet is ey ices.
nad) of Cenge Town). Conwining Handi
Ww triples, puartion
bets arn] 1-bud
beth unripe, Fuokig sive 2G) ay Pe Land sae
1000 sq) ft. Apprmsed value $080,000

008) Lot’ BST deed approedmaiehy 1
Thiles north west of the st tthe mene of Cenmge

aiming ooecrene build imp
2 beth bo ree (oberg
DOOD 00 sy 11 Appraised value

DALIA

Me All that piece parcel orion oyna bie.
leg Lorin 102 inthe Su beledsion krvcrari ae
EXUMA HARBOWH” Geear Rain meas
fg 00000 wey W. Arpyrdniciaeal vee STO

SR) AM bert piece pond or Lint of kind
beung Lots #060 and 907 Bahama Soren of
bum Mod, asubalvishon of hind situate at
Ihe ee ccm porte acl the E ST Estate in
the vicdinit REST. (inea! Fxtiives Hala.
thr en be SW gy PY Agena al uae
©7LU)

3) Single family readenoal Lot? 11696
Bahama soured Sebel #1. West. Cineat Eau
fia Siac appre. bog fp peed Pale:
$15 00.

5fe0) Singde farvaty resabendtial Lar} Min, 1) T0C
Pahoa Souad Soba, Surber 11 West, Great
un. Ses appro, Tea I Appar bad
Faloe $15 10H),

00H) Vacant bor of land S642 Bahama
Sri. Paina Medak Cina Ema Prope
fy Saray LCR ay 1 A pepe ad Verlany $80





0) Partially developed parcel af land he-
ing WO ett. shuaeed aban the easiem
porto ne The Forest Estate in the vichniny of
Ihe sete nes of Southside aid The Farce
besng Lid Marnbeer 408 in Bahama Sore!
of Exuma 4’, Fume The Bahamas. Ap pratad
waloe 325 1





S00) All that piece parce of boo and bared
on the Bland of Great ow one of the eabd
Falvarvea lacks are sitiate ait Ger are
oni-beall (10 12 tries: Nirrilemestaeelly of
Fenmpe Tran weich aed psc parcel or lint of
land is number POT) Bahama Sound ChALE
80,300 sq ft. Appraised value 965.000,

108) Aa undeseli ped wooeriront ke) 0G2
Aue LOAD a I. ine: Raleatie Solin of Ex.
uma Sebalrasion Number || Wot, Canal Ex-
Ler, Beata. Appraised value 2





am Reddenilal Propercy all that
or lot of land being lot Mo. 14
folie Sound Wn Masih vise a tract
of lard situsdis! appricitody | 48 miles
suinbessdvandt of George Tran, Pxurnes fa-
homes. Property Sine 19,000 ay fh Appr bed
Value $2 0/000.





0H) Vacant Reddential Property all thal
plect od parce oe bol of Land beiag a partion of
Log Wn 4), Ane, Paokn Hall Section, Plarrange

(COOMIMEMCIAL RANKING CENTHE
Tel; 242-355-0568
BAO Mrs, Monique Crawford
Ar. Jerome Pinder
. Brian Knowles
aexdike Pratt
}HO4) Mors. Hope Sealey
|HOG) Pers. Tang Sinoims C hirien
|ROG} Mire. Los Holle
(ROT) Bele, Lester Cony
(B08) Mire, DuaShanin Cline-Paal



oem, Bahama Sound Wo. 7 cet. Located be.

Tei Ge ener a ol AA. Thanet. cata

the foneal, Crit Bouma, Aalaiere Cr

ng a Griples of Own 1-besd 1-bath un saad
+ Frealriwonts |-berth wedi, Fuilding sine

7Sa7 A Properte sie 00) ay fi, Appeabaal

wah S510 4a,

nH) Lint Fao 9900, Bahama Sound No Ia

aii mama the |
at thee selene

trips. Huai cop od dah BND wy Me Popes ade
P00 sy Mt Appraised value 5

06) Al that pec of parcel of lots of femal
fein Loot han fiM, Haber Sound Ain, T East
Aaubivision of land Suite at he este
Ponion of the Fores Estate in th nityal
Southside aed Foret, Geeat Esourna. Bata
eae. Propercy sae 10000 2g fh. Comoiniieg
aduples: Bulking aie 1052 sq ft Appraiied
fa hea: 8.1 HH SE

70) Lait of Laredl beeing Lt #56 Raha
Sour] O56 Est si tveste at they narriheerdenn poe
fen of-The Forest Bette” Eure in the ti-
mtr of Mt Thom pan and ba mens Hill and
Conti leing (hereon a dupes Thed | beh each
she) cig bs 1, BD) sq. pormypertir bs 10000) sq ft
Appr. wal. $250.00.

BLEUTHERA

Meg Let of bend 4a a eg (So Qe
High jut sopth ef Palevetie Point Bleuthers
with a ban stocep stone bel ching conten i reg
io apariments. Each nit bers 3 bedi 1/2
bath, khchen, living mom and J linen clos
es Apa ised talus S247 205,

$01) Lowe? conmining 4 bedroom shah
OO eRE HE einietare incated Tria Shaves Hine.
Bavar kveal, Fkeathera. Property sine Bit 9 120
SEY L200. Appraised valuaad ot $242,7

SM) | Lint? block # sienna Hor-
bour bhind Blevihers containing Lbed 2 bath
hen mom, dining roam, & kiiches- cone
srnotone. [ii og. fh enoden desc 321
opery SEIN sy. f= appraised value

400) Lock” Barack Siew, Harboe bland

CLT ig a 2 A

4 lwal 4 hath

ny SCH “Fo ay fi. prapeerity Heras ay, [, - 2

praiaal value - 3479236

MDE we == sen ed! Legal Monpape over Lot eA
I Harbout Eleuthera

Deact of Lak boca The: Hl Hever,
cnerhioking the beatiful Bal Harbou, Peep
erty contains free parceds ef land with a total
ae sof appre 1 Saieg ft, Property =

| vpeopee nt Linnigins a
oi-ples condominiom under constriction ep
jobeli-course anda private dock Aporaed
valor £1,116),

S02) Loti Merh Pe arnetin Poa Eeeuera
OTM = i
averted iy
4 5000a. fh; budding size Me

scorned porch, Appreea! Vi





Tip plete partial Pi 1p yale
fina 1, bot1

Se Lot #4, Lower Boger, Slevikera con-
eee 2- bedi] ‘berth dupler. Pa perty ene
Stay ft. Appraised waboe 217
202) Lot? CAL. Palmeste Shores, South
Falmetio Point, Elewthera. containing 3-10
fev 4 bedroom 2 bach house apy 13h ay
ih living space Sor Tw aioe 81 B68 aay Pr. vip.
praial vale: 32500
Se) Lot sedith of Paloetio Prt on the
meer Ekeutters Higher, Bieuthers, Ferbe-
mar containing a2 bed, | bath chaprles
with gross floor anes 1457 Aa each, Br
haces. Appraised value &
20 XE and 1208 Jobson:
\ = four klared
Fleuthe fm, Wilh digpes 2 bedinmes, | hah

Bay Estates a sebdiveion situated imenedi-
ety snuth of Ceeorge Tiree, cory the [bared of
Bouma Bohai. Property Siac 10206 aq ft
Appraised value $35,000.00

06) Al thal pitts: parcad oor lit of feel be-
mg Lot hon 497, Banas. Sanaa Pio, , 0
gibdivision of lind steted a the nocihem
portion of The Forest Estate’ in the vicinity of
the settlement of Mi. Thempecn and

ers HOLL Crear Exinia, Habortiax, bl

from Geoege Toran. The suber site co
1.08 sy Rare uncievenped Appraised caher
of SIR,

06) All thar piece parce or lot of and be
ig Lint No. MS725-7 & 192844 loca Baha.
fret Saver] Me. 2!) om Tani Way. a eebilieion
alata ata at appecedireately 2006) feet
noms eal of Leone Tiran, he Alpert and
abou! LS miles souiheas! of the sachet
af Geenge Foun, Creat Exima, Bahari The
Giidevclogel penpertics aoe a detal of AS
ay Appraised! value S020

0) Loi #14957, Bahama Sun fin, 17,
qubcivision appocdimatety 14 mie South-
eastranihy of the Sour side ated | mile from
hint Toes Mippait, Creat Roam, Hahainas,
eat Menning Glory Road. This parteadly
developed [nj contains 40)eaq Appraised
alee 12.704,

8) Vacant property loif 048, Bahama
Sound 66, simmated abot the northeast
partion ef The Pirie! Estate in the © I
tho vligges of Moan Thempaon and Fr x
Hil, Greet Bruna, Baheenas, Appraised vale
NBA

MG) (Lin Mo. 1982 od Bolas Sore
Wo. 3 Bast, a wal 1 lated si iaved on dee
say cbse pert nea The Finite! Eaton, in
ihe vicinity of the setikerment of ihe Souih-
side and The bored, Great Eeuma, bahamas
This undeveloped propery is. J Od
af O00 ay Ap prided wales $12 000,
08) Lot No 11215, located Balen Send
Nin Fi, ae subwlivision of lone situated at the
SRR PRET N 0 The Forest Batten
the vicinity of the setihemencs of Southside
and The Forest. tire Bouma. Bahamas. The
developed lan etal of 10,000 sq. Ap.
peated valor of $13,000

SE) Lae a2 witeaterd at the noite.
em portion of The Forest Ustaie in ithe vicin-
ey of the sete mens of Wit. Thom poon and

[BI L) Ms. Lydia Rahoning
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-222-409 on 242-402-300)
(SOL) Mors. Patrice Ritchie

(208) Mors. Anya Major
NASSAU WAIN) BRANCH
Tel: 242-222-1700

(TOL) Mr. fames Stree han
POL} Ms. Thy
(S04) Mrs, Alicia Them penn
MACKEY STREET RRAMCH

Tel; 242-234-307

(BOL) Ms. Nicole Eyam

JOUN E RENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-225-4711

}OOL) Mir. Robert Pantry







cach Aperaizal THA
SPANISH WELLS

Seth Lav ofl bead f 2 Sons View Selnlivcion,
feel) bland adjacent in the ment of
Sqeanish Wells, Property etre 11,121 99. ft, bard
Ing sioe 2250 aq. A containing 3 bednonens, 2
bath, living room. an eat-in kiechem, dining
DOT. ed) en, CPE TE porch, a
lage. ind a oovened waren tank. App ral sed
wale 5259 00)

S60) Lat oP lard in Spearsinh Wills bisated |

Leetonia Sth street iter The [shined

tr She qi. F mis wee LEA ep PL Ee

worcalen sinaciuri) siz L371 ay i rn

ing 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, front rosin

room and kitchen, Mouse is in god ¢

fon Proper lindscaping with poured com
ays volkay Appraised value

Let nunibees band? ofa teetod sey
on panoeks Detweech Harker Rodel aiid the
Min Public: Road r rel Sinea S xirish
Well: Raharmvas. Property sine 12.4
Building sice #o bhp, fi, comianing
bath, Gving mom. aneat-in klichen, lauredry
Peer, coreeread porch, and 2 creer vater
tank. Basement ollere a garage, work-shiog,
play oor and smafl office area. House Is in
eae lien Brower bind sea ping with
pared oir anys & tality Ag
potiaedad Vile $555,179.

Se Lick cl Deen esis tha: eae Tren [2]
Of the Sahel vision called onl leeran aa Ooean
states, Aiesell fskvned, Spearnists Welle, Prem
exty size 12.174 99, A, bunlcbng sine 1976 sy fi
Suilding is constructed of lumber and heardy
lank, concainineg 3 ed eons. 2 berth, [ein
feo, ah eat-in Michen, dinieg room. uti licy
z ed

Lintkcaged with poured conse dr
% tial Appeared nabia $455,190
Lat oT Beartal ort Promcainll [wkeemal, Secu
lls, Property ste 1b 5 fi, buikd
Ing wen Ill ay fi, contai PMT,
2bath, aneai-in kiiches, baingidiningrecen,
utiliey eoom. lundiry room. covered porch,
cowered driveway and a two Car garage. Abo
alfa 6 0000 gallon ralnieaver tank, Age
Dred value S460 78)

S60) Lota? ina siibdivision of 6 panes
situated iremestionly cast of Qeean Heights
Sulnivicion, Aiea! lekind, Sevmish Welk,
Pru pert ling: sccy [EA
g a, 2 here,
an eat-in bichon. [ning dineng mam, koneiry
Peon aed a ee car erage Coeered (romt en
ony a observation deck and a patio The
hinee bs ie eocelen comdiiion. Appraised
value 5.2) 4.00)
Se Lat aD bined bei het 1, Sata View Sal
lintedtem, Aircel] Kaa, Seewtdla
erty sur LL. oi squit, Aundching, sic
containing & buacl, 3 bah,
l Ch ng Pm ark
fangs, covered ni
vend a rear patio water tank. Property
lance iped, with poured concrete d i
and walloway. Appraised value
S600) Lot of lad [S00 foe west of che poy
ceric dock al Murckiy Hole, Romeell Iskatad,
Sqranial Walle, Property sitar 17,049 ay. f1. Budd
bt i ft Coolmine 1 bedroom,
212 bathrncans, free mse! diriyg mcm,
anchen, garage and covered (mont porch, Age
e701



Liwiieg teen, Wie bee i, Lad '

porch, aid a eovened waned mink

In get conulitian, preemper Larcbuaee
frened cincmie trivia & malkne iy Ap
preed value 00

AN [NFA
0) Property in Calabash Bay, Andros, 75°

lat piace pucels Clot afin ca.
iT Lael 5
in avegls red Sesh vi co
thon 25 foatema Sound of Fours Secthon
12 Es. Property is 20000 aq. i Appraised
value £170 0.

400) VWeoaae lot of batid and being part of
a pence! of a treet of Land bea I

ers, lireat baie The pro

Of ALG6) say. Appraised yall

Oe) All chen plece perce of land being
forS101 hocarvedl Bohai poured 4,

az ove cand The Bonest, Gorat Exum

Jppraised value THA
53H eTeeR and 27k
OT Fagen Stibel vista “
aleon the Bland of Geral Faima, Aalarreaa.
Appraised value Sci (0



00) Al that piece parcel of land located

4210 in the subd hskon known 2 Ha henna

Sod 012 siualed about 7 miles nontrevest al

George Tim, Geet Eximia Appraised voli
fl.



O08) Lot Kin, SUG sidpeste im the eatbalivi-
doe called and known ae fhe Sound of
Exumma fh On the Blond of Crea! Equa and
Lot he. 6795 sinated fen aiid one hall miles.
moths of Loerge Tira Gein of Balin
Sound Mo, eee Exum Bahar Both Lots
ae Vacant ane are 1000 sq ft in sto. Ape
poked THA

OR) Lot Mo. A729 Bahama Sound Mo
Ll of i Ruin Haha Peogert
VOLES ey Of eal prniperte Aipperea eeed vee
S1K,Me1









00) Lot #4919 Bahama Sound hin. &, Ey-
STL Propemy Shee | 0h00 sq f. Vacant prop
eny. Appraised value S)0 M1
O06) A that picce ol parcel or bot of eal
basnig lil Mee S682 ROR of Baleares Sia
So 0 Lea Pour seuabe abe 12 ies.
Soriteest of setter

amd. Ratwnas. P
Onl properly Ae





O08) Lint #L 20. Aaharrea Satine Me. 5 Ex.
mera, Lavt see 10S cy BL Apepecnisand value

ts



C157 with asimall grocery eMere SB) oy. i andl
an incomaplene 9 bed 2 bah hoe 8M ag. 1.
Alprpeca iain volbaa 385, 008)

400) Lat Loree Hil, Arobeas titel bi ng 20,000
oy & Prepercy contains 2 '

-hoth residence, Appraboed value $1) 0,000

18 Lot i dtugied Queens Highway in
Cargill Creek. findene, cotalling 300K) oq fh.
I Completed bulking 2
feet, and wo idler
Correct ne. Ay pa bee wale $224 Se
400) Late #07 & wld Chet Alone,
Low: Hil Settee, Andros. Containeng ¢
Iwteshorery ms Aipeprca bead Vou bas 21001 J
18) Lote stinatedinGoader tigh, betrieg
Point As Halling 3 209sq fH. Prope ry
Slit bevel Abed 2 bath 2 286 og ft
house. Appraised value» $196,253
4H Let @b6 is sitiated in Main Rade
ln thé acdc of Fresh Croek Anal nina, 0a-
Cidlingg 16 20M aay PL, Prexper ty coe laires a cee:
hedinecer one hath bose BAD ey ht Ayrprciinee!
value - 280
8 Letofland contaning 72.712 sq4 in
the settlement of Davis Creek. Presh Creek
TiraTi Ave ml Andree. stand. containing
iding S10 sq I. pehich house a
Apia Dope Apna aed yale

B65) Let weet of the Creretal Water free
ar] eve of Qhesen’s Highwery directly opps
abte Horrid Plreacd the becca tion nif ther fs

dence Property stor (60° 5
pr 72S eo. Appraised vale $75

ABA

1 Let 2 Meadors Park, os aemall sa heh
isa ihe cutscirts of Trseaire Coy, Aan
u M4 8a] Bl concrete Hock residence
wi Lasphak shriek roar }- bed, 2- bert, Exreiby
foo, Ding room, dining room, andiciichen
Apoperca bos) veubuoe > 6) 27 00H,

SOY Le 52 Crown Apot

Marni Toon, bach tith sox

#9 f. Comnining a one sorey Navuce with 4
hed /2 hath -Caneret: Bleek Soret ume — yr-
praised value 320K



G08) Loi! 23incated in the Subdivision
Spine Laty, Ahaco with size being 4425 §]
Th Loman ing 4 one soey wenn ope ne
house with a beds i bath of 79R5 sq ft. Ap
fitalsed value S000

99 Lo 624. Tindas Foam, Abaco known
as Lo) comeing 4914.29 1 coining
adi pion with oS bed 2 bath dl ated 2 hel
| bath unt talon g up fetal of 2M ian:
feet, Appraised wale; 2181 108



S| Lot? 2 comprising sportion of Com
mercial Parcel Loi A. situate
eat Monet Dewan the Idan
edining 14725 square fost with wooden
chop “with a2bed? Shathanda 2 bed | bath
remo! Lindt, with v- polit ocllings and coniral
air-conditioning. Appried calue - Sooo
Let 48, being
ply Poeen Cnrean Allnimentsen | w idanul nl
Abe, reeuning O80 sqiciee beet, coreg
toga duples wih 2 beds and | aihs foreach
Un. Appraised walie - at 22200109
S08) Lor 856-1. sinene inthe sete ment of
Maorpiyy Toe on thie island of Abaco, meas
Uning 7.601 spam beet Comal ig a ori piles
Chait fais tv 2 eed 8 bates ciated a | Bd 1 bath.
Ajrpea tea: wale TRA



SOAQ Let-of Lond situate in the setilerromt
of Deareckas Town corn perisin g a parrtnrn oof ani
WUD of the Genk Tire Crowe Alloimenis
om cheisiend of Abaco, combining reskiece
Appealoesd value TEA.

5) Les ot land conaining 10,176 sq ft
and 10,1768 8, being o pene Mere Tom
Crontt Akotnent Mo. PO sitieate in the Setthe-

4 LAL
ELEUTINERA

MOS) Vera Lor] 8 Block 24 Section “LC”
Rainbow Bay on tie Bland of Heather. Ba
hiattias. The proparty & kecaied in a cirrel-
oped residential site nwith ell armneni-
fe, Appraised value $5 (oe,

80) Allchal piece pa me lobed band being

He ‘thee rm
SSA

bland. Bedkatias. Appraised! Walibe

PeBS) Waccant Lav 2 |) BS 1) si tee
n lango Lane Section” Hi Flock #15, Pleurhera
land Shores on the Idiand of Hlevihera Ap
ehaieed Yale 350,164

S65) Vacant bat i beealed Eleuthera blared
Shei, Semis ivi Setlien A



Lon ® loom prisieg ba6 ay fsito
aned on Monheau side of the Queens High
On the blind of Heather appro Thos bin.
dnedithe ofa cele Seetheaed of the Paladin
Prent crea ing Appraised Value a eal

Se Lot of bond in ames Cite on
Elsothera, Rohamas measering appro bKK
aa [L. Appeatend valor: TEA

S66) Lot 4 Bing portion of dhe sabuli-
ikon of a trestle boos! in the vile
Speragimeyie ty ies [ie ses ot
myss Meh, Ele are reas
uring 3.240 acres S| Apres
ver bia: S01 fa)

ABU

SKEO Lint #1. Arent Pat's Nay Subdivtsan ,
Elbow Cay, Abaco containing 144 sqpeare
feet. Appraised value: TAA



S08) Lot fod. in the Hopetoeen Poine Sabi
VEN locaoed Hope Ton, Abe Cay Abacn
Appraised value TRA

(0) Let of lord sie onthe Satimaiem
cde nt 5. U. bouik High appordirencly

a 1 the setdemeni

ol Marg tii nthe and of Abaco con
mining 40S aquane feet. Appraised Value
aA



See Lot 24, eceied Central Pines Suh-
division containing 12.473 square feet situ-
ate Seth of Dundes Town inet weal of Marsh





ire nhof Munphy Tora. Abecn. containing &
Hepler. Valid 3,000

(8) Lit #95, Ciontnal Pires Subeliviaann,
anilh of Canukes Tren, weed of Marsh Her-
hour , Ml font bry |) feet nviuining a | -KM
square feet house com prisiag of 1 becker
and? bathrooms, letchen , rangand dining
aed. doped value THA

(S09) Lot 856 locaced Murty Tones Alot
Traces, ariel dd nena shoe a 10 ay Lice: fest bey
108 square foot coating a dogees with at
area of 1456 square foot and each ini haw.
ing tren | sure on bathroom, ass areal
hilchen ane

aie Lb

of Le

eapeist Chum ch in the
1 the island of
af

1,500 scat feet and dined Bedi
treet bent vores, Agsqera iter eabae:: 4157,
(id) Lot MO being «pe in iof [aunders
Town Crean Mlotmmts containing a 4-plox
located Dundes Town. Alco. Appraised vale
S220
(S08) Lot) Donde Tora, Abaco contaie
ing a3 bedroom 2hath wooden srmcorne
Aporked value $130.00).
(Sie) Lowel
thrs Tira, Aas
niesihenca:, Appraised! raliay &16
(MH) Lote lla insertion 4 Enews
— Point, Abaco combing
Sidence. Appraised value S24K

10 Lotal land locgved Man: O) Waar lay

7 134 a] anc a ee

il Paties Eaten, Dan

Appr eed value en

(10) Parcel oie! Erevan as kes Crk 14
moles south of Treeeure ay containing JAZ
acres located at joe's Creek, dhe Sea view
Living ares, upper & Lower, Cape workstion
Carport. |? ce ling. can oe. of aalrs, interior
Exterior togroand level. covered porch and
Entra lange kinchen, 24° 14° wis top of the
lie cupioik. Appiradied valine: $625,000





OVHER FAMILY ISLANDS.

[ELL] | Propert containing Liandn “Wwhlle-
nam Of, Ue 4-201, bathing 37, Phase 10:
7 bedrooms. J bathrooms. Bying poom, din
ing room. Williey chose) & patho, Sdreed in
Ihe aren kingne os Birninl Bay Resor, Bimini
Bahairers. Ap praised walee $485 JM,

(tei) i Hg. with thie
hed), Ienar mice, arn HY 5
ER diiiatial Bealey Teen, forth Biren, Ap-
praised value S200)





HI0L-F] Peoperty situated Alice Town. The [s-
lind ol orth Bimini being Parcel “A” meas
uring 9,267 sy) fl. with incomplete Oey
ang bir) hone. Anpniiesd vale S200
(ELL) = (Com



|-bevths ath | 14 1 fi, front porch, halce ay
aml renin ayc Appraised value; $2260 (hon
(BLL) Condor Unit Hornined Berp Subd | -
? bed, 2 bath Ue wun, [35
are feet, incl patio! hale cmmned Hinire
Fa Moeth Bimink Appraited vale 419.5980
100) Deweloged property beige pation
Mate! oflend bean as Morkeys Tract cor
ner Lot with ao Geetige of 145 feed, running
1420 (Lave thee Naor aycemad orp coral) 0200 1 cn
the South boundaens: The property is sitented
in Lower Deadman: Cary, Long bland weh
heme (seven pears abd) under com
1%. complete Appraised wali
(105)

iia,
TLIO H

larbaer, setilementin the Central Cheinet of
the stam of Great Abeon, Appraised value
TH.

S05) Ten acres of hated a Woods Cay, Lit
th: Abaen, beter Ox Vs Toth ard Ci-
dar Harbour, Abeico, Balarrers, Tha property
undeveloped but basa seavies from both
the nom and soma dide. Appraised Value
S107, 750

960 Vim peldential Lian’ G1 (TAD 2g,
fe) Creasy Witenes kext Muay

Abgcn- Appraised value $18 (Ot,

900) Lot? i. in bhock Me. 144 eesidential
property shad in Treauine Cay. Abaco, Ap
pine vale SE 0.00

S10) land aid house Wcdned a1 Theasee
Cap. Appenised va her: S40)000 10

Mt fewer lopedd residential propercy Pet
a Lot Mn, Bock 200, [reassure Coy, Abacn,
Appriised walie: $75,000.00

OTHER FAMILY SLAMS

S68) Lot 91a Sorton 2 Phase (0 Siclla
Waris Saibedivisanr, Leornge Iskemel. Property in
LE P0 say Ft Aypprradsecd wali S05 (0



so ‘Warant land, Lote iof Phere A, Ser:

Hon 2 Sella Maris Sutelvision [11 500 ge |
siriiale at Adderley, Long Iskand. Appraised
value: 30,000



4 Ager af vaca! lind being portion
of Losi a4, Flowers fica Driggs Hil South
Andros, Append vue £20, 1

eS) Lot és 13 & 4 Block 8 dinecmew
Estates — mC 4

Sei | Tran eemipeeerib lit 125
my ftand Lot (2d S201 sq fi) Creek Bay
dis 1ST. Russ | (stared aT om the reerih-
. Spankh
(1 bots that offer
ashort patho
ees vai Lait [abe S500
50



10S) Letof kad situate tn Sout Hieind be
Ing ot 1) Bock No.2 of tie Buccanser Poli
Sul fishin Blinn) Rabaives Appirabsnd Vala:
THe



PARADISE LAND BRANCH
Teleptrane: 242-365-1404

(55) Mis. Cherelle Meurtin boreugh
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING
CENTRE
‘Tel: 242-250. 7 5030

[S0L) i. Ninoda Walker

[SHG Pets. Patric in Raceesell
(CABLE RESCH BAAN
Tel: 242-527-6077

(965) Beir, Derek Sorry Tel:
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-0@-5 1) U502-3100
(71) fis. Quincy Fisher

(717) Pers, Macy Sweaty

721) fei. Deidre King
Pes. Marguerite johnson
56) Firs. Cotherine Caves
She) Feline, Weneessal Sot

a7) Mir, Bon Kemp

TL) Pins. Ferve: Duara els:

oral Me. Pye Froth

ST ol Ms, Anise Wilson
NASSAU INT'L AIPORT

Tel: 282-377-7179

433) Mrs, Renea Walkine
LYRORD CAT BRANCH

Tel: 242-32 4340 or 242-360 7
HO1-N| Mors. Limckey Peterson
(AV ERNCH'S HARBOUR,
ELEAITHERA

2-392-25588

(02) Ms Evetle Burns
HARBOUT LAND BIANCH
Telit “13-220

01) Ms. Vekderine Larocla
ANDROS TOWN TRAM
Tel: 242-388-207 1

LEO) Ws. Alario Sdimeeres
MUAURSH HARAOSUR, AAC











Tel: 242-357-2400

[SS Pale, Daal S

(900) Mors, Satie Pitzer
810) Mr Kerenit Garry
MIMIND BRANCH

Telia? -d47 0

(106) Mis. Italia Beckford
GHAW"S, LONG ISLAND
Tel: 242-337-0101

(100) Pers, Linc Walle
ENUM A BRANCH

Tel: 242-503-5251

iid) Ms. loyoelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
‘Tel: 242-332-312

[)0L-F) fds. Gannell Prith
(102) Ms. Flaine Collie

(10) Febrs, Damnilin Boe teoid Carta Tighe
(10) Mis. Syhele Corey
SPANESH WELLS

Tel: 242-533-415) or 242-543-4145
(fy) Mir. Walter Caney






an (ey
Na BY, IY
PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Royal Bahamas Police Force
National Crime Prevention Office

‘Safety Tips for Drivers’

JOB OPPORTUNITY

The Bahamian Contractors Association is looking for a person to fill the position of

“Project Administrator”

Job Duties:
Daily correspondence with persons within the private sector, government
agencies and inter-governmental/ international agencies.

Coordinate, monitor and liaise with all other sub-cortractors involved in the
scope of work delegated to your portfolio.

Prepare progress reports, including detailed budgetary and procurement
information.

Qualifications:
At least Bachelors degree in business, finance, economics, or other relevant
certifications and experience in the field.

At least 5 years experience in project management, administrative management
or business consultancy-having served in a supervisory capacity is a plus.

Good working knowledge with Microsoft Office and relevant Accounting
Software-QuickBooks or Quicken.

Good command of the English language, both spoken and written.

Please provide a copy of your CV with all relevant employment information
along with brief cover letter, addressed to:

Projects’ Director

The Bahamian Contractors Association
PO. Box N-9286

Or by email to:

Email bcabahamas@gmail.com

Applicaiton Deadline: January 30th, 2011.



By POLICE CONSTABLE
MAKILLE PINDER

hoods or school zones, watch
for children who may be in a
hurry to get to school and may

MOTORISTS not be thinking about getting
BEWARE - SCHOOL there safely.
HAS STARTED

UNFORTUNATELY, the
beginning of school is also a
time when children are at
increased risk of transportation-
related injuries from pedestrian,
school bus, and motor vehicle
crashes.

The reason is fairly obvious;
there are many more children
on the road each morning and
afternoon, as well as an overall
change in motorists’ patterns.

As schools open their doors,
it's time for motorists to
improve their traffic safety
practices.

The following tips can help
make this a safe and happy
school year for the whole com-
munity:

¢ Slow down. Obey all traffic
laws and speed limits.

¢ Be extra cautious around
school crossing areas, slow
down and watch for children
on the way to school.

¢ When driving in neighbor-

¢ The posted speed limit in
school zones is 15 MPH from
7:30am - 9:00am and 2:30pm —
4pm.

¢ Allow children waiting at a
pedestrian crossing to cross.

¢ Be alert and ready to stop.
Watch for children walking in
the street, especially where
there are no sidewalks.

¢ When using an intersection
where children are trying to
cross, slow down; make eye
contact with the children to
determine what they are going
to do next.

¢ Always stop for a jitney or
school bus that has stopped to
load and unload passengers

¢ Before entering a pedestri-
an crossing area, be sure there
are no children in the lane or
adjacent lanes.

¢ When passing a parked
vehicle, check for children who
may run out into the street.

¢ When approaching a school



POLICE CONSTABLE
Makille Pinder

bus that has stopped to drop
off or pick up students,
motorists must stop a safe dis-
tance behind.

¢ When approaching a school
speed zone reduce speed below
the required speed limit and
maintain it until the end of the
school zone.

¢ During school hours Motor
Vehicle Laws will be strictly
enforced.

Please share this information
with every driver in your fami-

ly.
Let’s all work together to
have a safe school year.

US flights canceled, states declare emergencies
as blast of icy weather hits parts of the South

JACKSON, Miss.

Mississippi officials warned motorists

A BLAST of winter weather pushed
across the South on Sunday, coating
bridges and roads with snow, sleet and
freezing rain and causing hundreds of flight
cancelations, according to Associated Press.

The governors of Louisiana, Alabama
and Georgia issued emergency declara-
tions. Alabama Gov. Bob Riley said work-
ers had readied snow and salt trucks to
help clear icy roads, and he asked all resi-
dents to stay home Sunday night and Mon-
day unless necessary.

early Sunday that ice was already accu-
mulating on roads and bridges in many
counties, creating hazardous driving con-
ditions.

The National Weather Service posted
winter storm warnings from east Texas to
the Carolinas.

Daniel Lamb, a meteorologist with the
National Weather Service in Jackson,
Miss., said heavy snow had fallen Sunday
afternoon from Arkansas to north Missis-
sippi. Other areas of the South saw freez-
ing rain and sleet.



CAREER OPPORTUNITY
LEGAL SECRETARY

Excellent opportunity is available for a professional individual
to move ahead in a great career. Leading law firm is seeking
to employ a highly qualified Legal Secretary. The successful
candidate should possess the following skills and experience:

Béb bail & Home

Gt OPNC & Sale

Ability to:

"i
H
2 2 ne en

Understand and follow oral and written directions.

Type and assemble information into proper legal form from
outlined instructions or established procedures.

Produce legal and other documents using word processing
software.

Maintain a wide variety of legal files, records, and reports working
independently in the absence of specific instructions.



- => .
z
= . ‘a =
i ’
ee eee

Establish and maintain effective working relationships with clients,
legal and court-related personnel, attorneys, and staff.

Luxurious Diamond Pintuck 8pc Comforter Set - $69.99
Gibson Main Element 12pe Dinnerware - $18.99

Home Dynamix 20°x36° Wall Pictures - $39.99

Home Dynamix 20"x24" Wall Pictures - $19.99

Revere Mills/Giant Bath Towels - $11.99

Toastmaster 4-slice Toaster - $42.99 »
North Crest Sheet Sets - 20% OFF
Feather Down Pillows - 20% OFF
Hibachi Table Top Grill - $11.99
Oval 5x8 Area Rug - 20% OFF
Camry Bath Scales - #13.99
Kitchen Curtains - $11.99

Throw Pillows - $14.99

SALE START
GATURDAY JANUARY:

Prioritize assigned duties.

Job Requirements:

Extensive experience and sound knowledge of proper legal format
and processes.










7 — 10 years legal secretarial experience.

Knowledge of Microsoft Office and shorthand/speedwriting skills
are essential.

To Apply:

All applicants must submit a resume by 14 January, 2011 to:

Legal Secretary
c/o Box N-3207
DA# 97562
The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas








Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





SUPPORT: RYAN PINDER

FROM page one

Government signed a
Memorandum of Under-
standing with C&W on
December 2, 2010. It is
expected to debate the docu-
ment when Parliament recon-
venes on January 19 after the
Christmas recess. The House
has to approve the sale
before it can be finalised.

Government officials, who
wished to remain anony-






ce :









rm TOUR



By, ee
aire la

came out,”

meeting,” he said.

the general strike.

call.

LOCAL NEWS

PLP ‘TO SUPPORT DEMONSTRATION’

FROM page one

but he did not speak to any members of }
parliament about the event. :

“T have not invited a single soul out. There is no MP}
who could say they have even spoke to me about a ;

Ata prayer breakfast Sunday, Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill
member of parliament, encouraged party supporters to }
support the labour movement, as they did in 1958 during :

“We have our work to do 44 years after the fact. It is
economic empowerment which must now be the clarion ;

“Tt is a call to serve all Bahamians to make them the }
full masters of the commanding heights of our economy. }
That is why we must resolutely and firmly oppose the
FNM government’s plans to sell BTC in the way in }
which they are doing it and to support the trade unions }

in their fight to stop the Leviathan,” said Mr Mitchell.

MINISTER DENIES BTC DEAL HAS BEEN FINALISED

mous, were sceptical that an
agreement was finalised last
week as the business plan for
BTC had not yet been pre-
sented. It was said that only
after a business model had
been finalised would negoti-
ations with C&W on the con-

tract start.

Meanwhile, a mass demon-
stration has been organized
for this evening as labour
unions continue their efforts
to prevent the utility compa-

MCR yore

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Store Hours: Mon-Fri Tam-dpm * Sat Tam-3pm





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January 11th - 22nd, 2011

ITEMS FOR

123 Zinsser Primer

ny from being privatised.

As the unions are opposed :
to the sale of 51 per cent of }
BTC to C&W, they are urg- }
ing government to find a }
Bahamian consortium to pur- }
chase the majority stake in }

the company.

Last week, it was con- }
firmed that the unions rep- }
resenting BTC employees }
were in talks with their legal }
team to file suit against the :
government to block the sale. ;



Interior Flat Dover
5qgal.

Standard Size
Whirlpool Tubs

Unionists to
hold mass rally
against planned

BIC sale today

FROM page one

start selling everything back
to the former colonisers,
England, then we are turning
back around to do what our
forefathers (decried),” said
William Carroll, president of
the Bahamas Communica-
tions Public Managers
Union (BCPMU).

The demonstration is
planned for RM Bailey Park
at 7pm today. Union lead-
ers promise to reveal “the
facts”, as they escalate the
opposition of the govern-
ment’s planned sale of BTC















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aT EP Ris LIMITED

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to Cable and Wireless Com-
munications.

While some say it is a false
comparison to tie the gener-
al strike to the current
labour movement, there are
many historians and politi-
cal commentators that agree
that labour was an impor-
tant part of Majority Rule.

Historians say Majority
Rule was achieved out of the
January 10, 1967 general
election, when the govern-
ing United Bahamian Party
and the Progressive Liberal
Party won 18 seats each in
the House of Assembly.

Sir Lynden was able to
form the first black govern-
ment in Bahamian history,
explained Fred Mitchell, Fox
Hill Member of Parliament,
when Sir Randol Fawkes,
“the lone Labour MP”, vot-
ed to stand with the PLP,
and Sir Alvin Braynen, an
independent MP, assumed
the Speaker’s chair.

“The difficulty we have
today is a Free National
Movement political admin-
istration that is set on decon-
structing and destabilizing
everything that majority rule
sought to build which is a
country of equality, social
mobility and justice for all
Bahamians,” said Mr
Mitchell.

Next to emancipation and
independence, Majority
Rule is probably “the most
significant day that constitu-
tional freedoms were ush-
ered in,” according to Perry
Christie, leader of the oppo-
sition.

“In the union’s effort to
save the Bahamas against a
bad decision I think they
must think the significance
of (Majority Rule Day)
would stir people; pump the
heart, beat the soul and get
everyone out. It is not a bad
decision to have the event
on this day,” said Mr
Christie.

Several major events pre-
dating Majority Rule are
believed to have influenced
it centrally.

The general strike is one
of them, and it ultimately
gave birth to the Trade
Union and Industrial Con-
ciliation Act and the creation
of the Labour Department,
note some.

January 13, 1958 was the
day hundreds of taxi drivers,
hotel workers, garbage col-
lectors, tourism industry
employees, construction
workers, and others, walked
off their jobs in a move that
brought the economic
engine of the country to a
“virtual standstill.”

While political heavy
weights Sir Lynden and Sir
Randol Fawkes were major
leaders in this culminating
effort, it was Sir Clifford,

who in November of 1957,
as leader of the taxi union,
led about 200 outraged taxi
men to blockade the new
international airport at
Windsor Field forcing flight
cancellations, stated politi-
cal scientist Larry Smith.

The industrial action
protested an “exclusive
agreement” planned
between major hotel opera-
tors and a taxi company set
up by the Symonette fami-
I

According to the governor
at the time, the deal would
have established a “monop-
oly excluding the taxi cab
union entirely.”

Two months later, with the
labour movement still disaf-
fected, and opposition polit-
ical forces in full support,
workers united for the Gen-
eral strike, which shut down
New Providence for almost
three weeks.

Describing the significance
of the labour unrest, Sir Clif-
ford said: “Little did I know
on that Sunday morning in
January 1958 that the stun-
ning and unexpected after-
math of the general strike
would pave the way for the
turbulent decade of the six-
ties, ultimately leading to the
freedom of majority rule for
all Bahamians.”

The new decade of poli-
tics would see women’s suf-
frage and other constitu-
tional reforms.

The aftermath included:
“International pressure on
the Bay Street regime to
democratise the country.
Within three months a
senior British cabinet minis-
ter was in Nassau pushing
for constitutional reforms,
and that October, legislation
was passed to set up a labour
department and a process
for industrial conciliation.
The following year saw abo-
lition of the company vote,
extension of the franchise to
all men over 21, and the cre-
ation of four new parlia-
mentary seats (all of which
were won by the PLP),”
states Mr Smith.

On the timeline of
progress, Mr Mitchell
includes: 1 June 1942, Burma
Road; the 1950 founding of
the Citizens Committee and
the fight to show “No Way
Out”, Sidney Poitier's first
film; the 1953 founding of
the PLP; the election of
Sammy Isaacs, Cyril Steven-
son, Randal Fawkes, Lyn-
den Pindling, Clarence Bain
and Milo Butler to the
House of Assembly in 1956;
the General Strike of 1958;
the bye elections of 1960; the
1962 election defeat; the con-
stitutional changes of 1964;
Black Tuesday on April 27,
1965 and the general elec-
tion of January 10, 1967.

The Shoe Village

Assistant Manager

Needed

« Bahamian

25 years or older

« Minimum 5 years experience in the retail industry

+ Strong communication skills

+ Good motivator for achieving goals

+ Salary commensurate with experience
ALL APPLICATIONS RECEIVED WILL BE IN CONFIDENCE

No faxed or emailed resumes will be considered.

Please take your completed
applications to our head office.

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(hn

THE TRIBUNE

A

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 13

6

LOCAL NEWS



Govt’s $8.5m to fight crime

JC
Cc

FROM page one

peace,” Mr Symonette said.

“The criminals this year
will be defeated.”

His announcement before
an audience of officers from
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, Customs and Immi-
gration, Road Traffic
Department, the Airport
Authority, and high-ranking
government officials, was fol-
lowed with remarks by
Bahamas Christian Council
leader Reverend Patrick
Paul.

He said: “There are too
many guns in our streets; sun
laws must be enforced and
amended where necessary.

“We must ensure persons
charged with serious crimes
such as armed robberies and
murders cannot walk free in
our communities until they
have been completely exon-
erated.”

Meanwhile police are
investigating the deadly
shooting of a man gunned
down on the porch of a
home in Bishop Way, Wind-
sor Place, off Soldier Road
at around 6.40pm on Satur-
day.

Police press liaison officer
Set Chrislyn Skippings said
police were called when gun-
fire rang out in the area and
officers found the man with
multiple gunshot wounds.

He was pronounced dead
at the scene by Emergency
Medical Services (EMS).

A 21-year-old man is
being questioned in connec-
tion with the homicide.

The second murder
inquiry of 2011 was launched
just a day after police found
the body of a man, unoffi-
cially identified by local
media as Samuel Allad, 47,
lying on a makeshift bed
behind the Burger Barn in
Carmichael Road at 10.20am
on Friday. He had visible

injuries on his back and
police classified the death as
the first murder of the year
later that night.

And late last night, news
reached The Tribune of
another homicide, when a
female was shot dead on
Wulff Road near the Texaco
Service Station.

In addition to the latest
murder probes, police are
investigating the stabbing of
a 19-year-old Nassau Village
man attacked by three rob-
bers just an hour after the
fatal shooting on Saturday
night.

Sgt Skippings said the man
was in an area of Soldier
Road east of East Street
when three men attempted
to rob him, and a struggle
followed.

The teenager was stabbed
several times and taken to
hospital by EMS where he
has been detained in stable
condition.

Police are also looking for
the two men who robbed
Crazy Ink Studio in the
Kennedy Subdivision at
around 2pm on Friday. They
reportedly stormed the shop
armed with a handgun and
stole an undetermined
amount of cash before dri-
ving off towards Pinewood
Gardens in the white Nissan
Maxima they had parked
outside.

Intensive investigations
have been launched into all
matters and police are
appealing for information
from the public.

Anyone with any infor-
mation that may relate to the
murders, stabbing, or armed
robbery, should report it as a
matter of urgency by calling
the Central Detective Unit
(CDU) on 502-9930/9991,
the police emergency line on
911 or 919, or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 13A

ROBINSON ROAD
MINNIE STREET to EAST STREET

TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSION

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles $.A wishes to advise the motoring public that a Temporary Road Closure
will be carried out on sections of Robinson Road between WASHINGTON STREET and EAST STREET.
With immediate effective Road Construction works will be ongoing westbound to facilitate the installation of
new twenty-four inches (24”) water main. Construction works will be carried out in different stages as the works
progress towards East Street.

Other works to be carried out during this phase of construction will include:

Milling of existing pavement

Installation of new Drainage facilities
Installation of new/upgrade Utility services
Sidewalks

Improved Street Lighting

New Asphalt Pavement

FRIDAY
Motorist travelling eastbound should divert through:

MIAMI ST. ————->BALFOUR AVE. ————~ WASHINGTON STREET.
Motorist travelling westbound should continue on the one lane traffic system to their destination.

MONDAY- Full Closure

Motorist travelling eastbound & westbound should divert through:

MIAMI ST. ————-> BALFOUR AVE.————> WASHINGTON STREET
Local access will be granted to residents, pedestrians and the affected businesses during the construction process.
Signs will be in place to identify safe passage for Pedestrians and Access points to the businesses in the area.
The public will be updated through the local media (radio & television) for regular updates.
We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience that may be caused by the closure and look forward to the co-
operation of the motoring public throughout this project.

Your patience throughout this project is greatly appreciated. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience
and delays caused.

For further information please contact :

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
Office:(242)322-8341/322-2610

Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.ar

Ministry of Works & Transport

The Project Execution Unit
Hotline: (242) 302-9700

Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs



TRIDUNETKIV

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estimate shark related tourism has brought to the
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January 7th Answer

FRIDAY WINNERS

million

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GEOFFREY CHARLES (“SMITTY”) HIGGS

Geoffrey Charles Higgs, known better as “Smitty”, passed aioy pencefiilly on
Sunday, 2 of fanuery, 2001, at the age of sixty-three. He was diagnosed, almost
exactly erghteen months previously, with an aggressioe bratn homer, buf refused bo

submit to tt easily, carrying on, Instead, with marvelous joyeux de vivre,

ots
2uts
Tpt

Smitty wes born the third son of the Hon. Godfrey W Higgs and Suzanne Stoll
(formerly Higes), He attended St. Andrew's School in Nassau and St. Andrew's
College in Aurore, Ontirto and graduated from the University of Miami. He
alos had a profound love for tis home—The Batantas. He was a master sailor,
legendary spear fisherman, accomplished mischief-maker, and expert raconteur. [Ff he
could not be found entertaining friends and family at home, he would certainly be
fownd at Rose Island “celebrating life”, as he would say. Always the gentlerman, bts
spirit was unbounded, fis concern for others and is enormous ability to [ft others
up with never a second thought for himself endured until the end. His humble

demeanour was outshined only by his smile.

Smitty ives on trough his devoted wife Joyce and son Spencer, his brother Peter,
his stepsister Anne Ritter, sisters-in-law Judy Higgs, Colette Higgs, and Lynn
Vincent, brother-in-law Mark Kieene, mother-in-law Cortnne Kleene, nephews
Andrew, Chris, and Grouper Higes, cousins Godfrey E Lightbourn, Roddy Stneclatr,
Derek Higgs, Christopher Lightbourn, Andrea Brownrigg, and Allison Ferber, and
remy more relatives, all of whore he loved dearly. He will be missed by memy close
and dear friends in Nassau and the world over, A funeral service will be held at
Christ Church Cathedral, Thursday, 13 January 2011 at 3:00 p.m. All are asked to

dress in bright and wenn colours as this will be has grandest “Celebration of Life”.

If persons should wish to make donations in memory of Geoff, the family would be
thankful for your consideration of either the Cancer Soctety of the Bahamas, P.O.
Box 55-6539 or fhe St. Andrew's College Forerdation, 15800 Youge Street, Aurora,
Ontario, L4G 3HZ, Canada for the Geoffrey Higgs Fund, the use of which will be

chosen by foyce ana Spericer.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Suspect in attack
on congresswoman
faces five charges

TUCSON, Ariz.
Associated Press

FEDERAL prosecutors
brought charges Sunday
against the gunman
accused of attempting to
assasinate Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords and killing six
people at a political event
in Arizona.

Investigators said they
carried out a search war-
rant at Jared Loughner's
home and seized an enve-
lope from a safe with mes-
sages such as "I planned
ahead,” ''My assassina-
tion” and the name "Gif-
fords" next to what
appears to be the man's
signature. He allegedly
purchased the Glock pis-
tol used in the attack in
November at Sportsman's
Warehouse in Tucson.

Court documents also
show that Loughner had
contact with Giffords in
the past. Other evidence
included a letter addressed
to him from Giffords’ con-
gressional stationery in
which she thanked him for
attending a "Congress on
your Corner" event at a
mall in Tucson in 2007.

Heather Williams, the
first assistant federal pub-
lic defender in Arizona,
says the 22-year-old sus-
pect doesn't yet have a
lawyer, but that her office
is working to get a lawyer
appointed.

Meanwhile, authorities
released 911 calls in which
a person witnessing the
mass shooting outside a
grocery store in Tucson
describes a frantic scene
and says, "I do believe
Gabby Giffords was hit."

Loughner fired at Gif-
fords’ district director and
shooting indiscriminately
at staffers and others
standing in line to talk to
the congresswoman, said
Mark Kimble, a communi-
cations staffer for Giffords.

REP. GABRIELLE GIFFORDS, D-Ariz

"He was not more than
three or four feet from the
congresswoman and the
district director," Kimble
said, describing the scene
as "just complete chaos,
people screaming, crying."

Loughner is accused of
killing six people, includ-
ing a federal judge, an aide
to Giffords and a 9-year-
old girl who was born on
Sept. 11, 2001.

Fourteen others were
wounded, including the
three-term Democrat law-
maker. Authorities don't
know his motive, but said
he targeted Giffords at a
public gathering around 10
a.m. Saturday.

Doctors treating the law-
maker provided an opti-
mistic update about her
chances for survival, say-
ing they are "very, very
encouraged" by her ability



Susan Walsh/AP

to respond to simple com-
mands along with their
success in controlling her
bleeding.

Mourners crammed into
the tiny sanctuary of Gif-
fords’ synagogue in Tuc-
son to pray that she quick-
ly recovered. Outside the
hospital, candles flickered
at a makeshift memorial.
Signs read "Peace + love
are stronger," ''God bless
America and "We love
you, Gabrielle."

People also laid down
bouquets of flowers,
American flags and pic-
tures of Giffords.

One of the victims was
Christina Taylor Green,
who was a member of the
student council at her local
school and went to the
event because of her inter-
est in government. She is
the granddaughter of for-

WELL WISHERS gather outside Un



i Bi i

iversity Medical center at a make-shift memorial in Tucson, Ariz., Sunday.



U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot in the head Saturday during a speech at a local supermarket. (AP)

mer Philadelphia Phillies
manager Dallas Green.

She was born on 9/11
and featured in a book
called "Faces of Hope"
that chronicled one baby
from each state born on
the day terrorists killed
nearly 3,000 people.

The fact that Christina's
life ended in tragedy was
especially tragic to those
who knew her.

"Tragedy seems to have
happened again," said the
author of the book, Chris-
tine Naman. "In the form
of this awful event."

Authorities said the
dead included U.S. District
Judge John M. Roll;
Green; Giffords aide Gabe
Zimmerman, 30; Dorothy
Morris, 76; Dorwin Stod-
dard, 76; and Phyllis Sch-
neck, 79. Judge Roll had
just stopped by to see his
friend Giffords after
attending Mass.

An unidentified man
who authorities earlier said
might have acted as an
accomplice was cleared
Sunday of any involve-
ment. Pima County sherif-
f's deputy Jason Ogan told
The Associated Press on
Sunday that the man was
a cab driver who drove the

gunman to the grocery
store outside of which the
shooting occurred.

In one of several
YouTube videos, which
featured text against a
dark background, Lough-
ner described inventing a
new U.S. currency and
complained about the illit-
eracy rate among people
living in Giffords’ con-
gressional district in Ari-
zona.

"I know who's listening:
Government Officials, and
the People,” Loughner
wrote.

"Nearly all the people,
who don't know this accu-
rate information of a new
currency, aren't aware of
mind control and brain-
wash methods. If I have
my civil rights, then this
message wouldn't have
happen (sic)."

In Loughner's middle-
class neighborhood —
about a five-minute drive
from the scene — sheriff's
deputies had much of the
street blocked off. The
neighborhood sits just off a
bustling Tucson street and
is lined with desert land-
scaping and palm trees.

Neighbors said Loughn-
er lived with his parents

and kept to himself. He
was often seen walking his
dog, almost always wear-
ing a hooded sweat shirt
and listening to his iPod.

The assassination
attempt left Americans
questioning whether divi-
sive politics had pushed
the suspect over the edge.

Giffords faced frequent
backlash from the right
over her support of the
health care reform last
year, and had her office
vandalized the day the
House approved the land-
mark measure.

Pima County Sheriff
Clarence Dupnik lashed
out at what he called an
excessively "vitriolic"
atmosphere in the months
leading up to the rampage
as he described the chaos
of the day.

The sheriff said the ram-
page ended only after two
people tackled the gun-
man.

A third person inter-
vened and tried to pull a
clip away from Loughner
as he attempted to reload,
the sheriff said.

"He was definitely on a
mission,” according to
event volunteer Alex Vil-
lec, former Giffords intern.

NASA won't speculate on flight by Giffords’ husband

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

THE SHOCKING gundown of
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords has left
NASA reeling: Her astronaut hus-
band was due to rocket away in
just three months as perhaps the
last space shuttle commander, and
her brother-in-law is currently on
the International Space Station,
according to Associated Press.

Shuttle commander Mark Kelly
rushed to his wife's hospital bed-
side Saturday as his identical twin
brother, Scott, did his best to keep
updated on the Arizona shooting
through Mission Control, the
Internet and the lone phone
aboard the space station.

"I want to thank everyone for
their thoughts and prayers, words
of condolences and encourage-
ment for the victims and their fam-
ilies of this horrific event," Scott
Kelly tweeted from space.

"My sister-in-law, Gabrielle Gif-
fords is a kind, compassionate, bril-
liant woman, loved by friends and
political adversaries alike — a true
patriot.

“What is going on in our country
that such a good person can be the
subject of such senseless vio-
lence?"

It was the worst news to befall
an astronaut in orbit since Christ-
mas 2007, when a space station res-
ident learned of his mother's death
in a car-train collision.

That astronaut, Daniel Tani, was
working in Mission Control in
Houston last week, in touch with
Scott Kelly and the five other
members of the space station crew.

The chief of the astronaut office
broke the news to Scott Kelly that
a gunman had shot his sister-in-
law at a political gathering in Tuc-
son soon after it happened.

NASA officials said Sunday it
was premature to speculate on
whether Mark Kelly would step
down as commander of the April
flight of the shuttle Endeavour.

But it was hard to imagine how
he could keep up with the grueling

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THIS UNDATED PHOTO provided by NASA shows Capt. Mark E. Kelly. The astronauts
wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011 when an
assailant opened fire in an area where the lawmaker was meeting with constituents
in Tucson, congressional officials said. (AP)

training in the next three months,
primarily in Houston, and still
spend time with his wife of three
years, hospitalized in critical con-
dition in Arizona.

Kelly's mission is higher profile

than most. Endeavour's final flight
will deliver an elaborate physics
experiment by a Nobel Prize win-
ner.

For now anyway, it's slated to
be the last voyage of the 30-year

shuttle program. That fact alone
propelled 46-year-old Mark Kelly
onto the cover of this month's Air
& Space magazine of the Smith-
sonian Institution; he shares the
cover with the first shuttle com-
mander, moonwalker John Young.

In an interview with The Asso-
ciated Press last fall, Kelly, a Navy
officer and three-time shuttle flier,
said it was “timing and luck” that
snared him one last coveted com-
mander's seat, not his influential
wife. She loved sharing his adven-
ture. "She's excited about going
to Florida for the launch," he said
then.

Until last month, NASA hoped
the Kelly brothers would meet in
orbit, a PR dream for a space
agency often confronted with bad
news.

But after fuel tank cracks
grounded another shuttle mission,
Mark Kelly's flight was bumped
to April. His brother is to return
home in March on a Russian
spacecraft, so the reunion in space
is off.

As for the rippling effects of Sat-
urday's shooting, there is no prece-
dent for anything like this at
NASA. Astronauts have had to
bow out of space missions over the
decades, but never a commander
so close to flight and never for
something so brutal.

Mark Kelly's co-pilot, retired
Air Force Col. Gregory Johnson,
could take over. Or NASA could
free up another astronaut with fly-
ing-to-the-space-station experi-
ence.

"It is premature to speculate on
any of this,” NASA spokesman
James Hartsfield said in an e-mail
Sunday.

"For now, the focus is on sup-
porting Mark and Scott, and things
need to be taken day by day, and
all thoughts are with the victims."

NASA Administrator Charles
Bolden called Giffords a "a long-
term supporter of NASA... who
not only has made lasting contri-
butions to our country, but is a

strong advocate for the nation's
space program and a member of
the NASA family."

Mark Kelly's two teenage
daughters from a previous mar-
riage were reportedly with him in
Tucson.

The couple met in China in 2003
during a young leaders’ forum and
married in November 2007 at an
organic farm south of Tucson. Gif-
fords, 40, a Democrat, served on
the House Science and Technolo-
gy Committee, and took on NASA
affairs while heading the space sub-
committee.

She admitted to being nervous at
her husband's shuttle launch in
2008. "It's a risky job," she told
The Associated Press. "You don't
really relax" until touchdown.

Mark Kelly readily accepted his
wife's fame.

He considered her the bigger
star in the family.

Scott Kelly, who like his brother
has two daughters, will end his 5?-
month mission in March, flying in
a Russian Soyuz capsule to Kaza-
khstan.

On Sunday, Scott Kelly and his
crewmates — another American,
one Italian and three Russians —
kept busy with maintenance work.
A busy few weeks are ahead with a
spacewalk by two of the Russians
and the late January arrival of the
first-of-its-kind Japanese cargo
ship.

The brothers describe them-
selves as best friends. Both are
Navy captains and former test
pilots, and both became astronauts
in 1996. They grew up in West
Orange, N.J., the sons of police
officers.

Neither ever missed the other
brother's space launches. Mark
was there in October, right at the
launch pad, when Scott boarded a
Russian Soyuz rocket for the space
station.

Both were disappointed when,
just weeks later, shuttle fuel tank
cracks conspired to keep them
apart in space.


PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS















US envoy over
WikiLeaks probe

LONDON

THE American ambas-
sador to Reykjavik has
been summoned to explain
why U.S. investigators are
trying to access the private
details of an Icelandic law-
maker's online activity as
they try to build a criminal
case against WikiLeaks,
according to Associated
Press.

ICELANDIC LAWMAKER Birgitta Jonsdottir poses for this pho-
to Feb. 24, 2010 at an unknown location. In a statement, Satur-
day Jan. 8, 2011, WikiLeaks said U.S. investigators had gone to
the San Francisco-based Twitter Inc. to demand the private
messages, contact information and other personal details of
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and other supporters Assange
has promised to fight the order, as has Jonsdottir, who said in
a Twitter message that she had "no intention to hand my infor-
mation over willingly." (AP)

Revelations that the U.S.
Justice Department
obtained a court order to
examine data held by Twit-
ter Inc. on Birgitta Jons-
dottir, an Icelandic parlia-
mentarian who sits on the
country's Foreign Affairs
Committee, immediately
caused consternation in the
tiny North Atlantic nation.

"(It is) very serious that a
foreign state, the United
States, demands such per-
sonal information of an Ice-
landic person, an elected
official," Interior Minister
Ogmundur Jonasson told
Icelandic broadcaster
RUV.

"This is even more seri-
ous when put (in) perspec-
tive and concerns freedom
of speech and people's free-

RBC Royal Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Retail Banking Leadership
Appointments

RBC Royal Bank is pleased to
announce the following

appointments:

Mrs. Joyce Riviere formerly Manager,
Personal Financial Services, New
Providence and Grand Bahama has been
appointed Vice President, Retail Banking,
New Providence. Mrs. Riviere will have

dom in general," he added.

Jonsdottir is a one-time
WikiLeaks collaborator
also known for her work on
Iceland's media initiative,
which aims to turn the
island nation into a free
speech haven.

Jonsdottir told The Asso-
ciated Press she was too
overwhelmed to comment
Sunday, but in a recent post
to Twitter, she said she was
talking with American
lawyers about how to beat
the order — and was drum-
ming up support in Iceland
as well.

U.S. Ambassador Luis E.
Arreaga has been sum-
moned for a meeting at Ice-
land's Foreign Ministry to
discuss the issue, Foreign
Ministry spokeswoman
Urdur Gunnarsdottir said
Sunday. It was not clear
when the meeting was tak-
ing place.

U.S. Embassy in Reyk-
javik said no one there
would be available for com-
ment until Monday.

The evolving diplomatic
spat illustrates the chal-
lenge American prosecu-
tors face as they weigh
whether to bring charges
against WikiLeaks, an
international, tech-savvy
operation that has angered
and embarrassed Washing-
ton with a series of huge
leaks of classified informa-
tion.

The most recent disclo-
sure of thousands of secret

State Department cables
saw U.S. diplomats being
ordered to gather the DNA
and fingerprints of their
international counterparts,
captured backroom dealing
over issues such as Guan-
tanamo and rendition, and
publicized unflattering
assessments of friends and
foes alike.

The U.S. says the disclo-
sures have damaged inter-
national diplomacy and put
the safety of informants
and foreign human rights
activists at risk.

WikiLeaks has dismissed
the claims, but Washington
has been trying to find a
way to prosecute the group
and its leader, 39-year-old
Julian Assange, who is cur-
rently in England.

A court order unsealed
earlier this week revealed
that American authorities
had gone to court to seek
data from Twitter about
Assange, Jonsdottir, and
others either known or sus-
pected to have interacted
with WikiLeaks.

Some of those named in
the court order have said
they suspect other compa-
nies — such as Facebook
Inc., Google Inc., and the
eBay Inc.-owned Internet
communications company
Skype — have also been
secretly asked to hand over
their personal data.

Assange and Jonsdottir
have vowed to fight the
court order.

Clinton presses
Persian Gulf
countries on Iran

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates

responsibility for RBC’s retail operations in
New Providence which includes a network
of 10 branches.

Mrs. Riviere will continue to report directly
to Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, President and
Country Head, RBC Bahamas and Turks
and Caicos Islands.

Mr. Michael Munnings formerly Manager,
Client Care and Operations, New
Providence and Grand Bahama has been
appointed Vice President, Retail Banking,
Family Islands. Mr. Munnings will have
responsibility for RBC’s retail network of 10
branches in seven family islands including,
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros, Exuma,
Eleuthera, Long Island and Bimini.

Mr. Munnings will continue to report
directly to Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, President
and Country Head, RBC Bahamas and Turks
and Caicos Islands.

Please join RBC in congratulating
Mrs. Riviere and Mr. Munnings
on their new appointments.

SMe to mee Gtr ay

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

RBC Royal Bank



US. SECRETARY of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sun-
day that the world must keep pressure on Iran over its suspect
nuclear program despite recent estimates that the country may be
further behind in efforts to develop atomic weapons than previously
thought, according to Associated Press.

Clinton told reporters accompanying her on a three-nation tour
of the Persian Gulf that Iran "remains a serious concern” no mat-
ter when it might be able to produce a nuclear weapon. And she
urged countries in the region that do business with Iran "to do
everything within reason" to help ensure the sanctions are enforced.

"We have had a consistent message to our friends in the Gulf
that there is no part of the world that has more at stake in trying to
deter Iran from becoming the creator and possessor of nuclear
weapons than you,” she said.

"T don't know that it gives much comfort to someone who is in
the Gulf or in a country that Iran has vowed to destroy that it's a
one-year or three-year timeframe. So, I think we should keep the
focus where it belongs,” she said, referring to the sanctions and
efforts by world powers to persuade Iran to halt uranium enrich-
ment.

Her comments were the first from a senior U.S. official in
response to reports in Israel on Friday that Israel's newly retired
spy chief thinks Iran won't be able to build a nuclear bomb before
2015, further pushing back Israeli intelligence estimates of when
Tehran might become a nuclear power.

"We don't want anyone to be misled by anyone's intelligence
analysis," Clinton said. "This remains a serious concern. We expect
all our partners ... to stay as focused as they can and do everything
within reason that will help to implement these sanctions."

As recently as 2009, Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak said
Iran would be able to build a nuclear bomb by 2011. But since then
the projected deadline has been extended. The Israeli Cabinet
minister in charge of strategic affairs, Moshe Yaalon, said last
week it would take the Iranians at least three years to develop a
nuclear weapon.

Many Arab nations share U‘S. fears that Iran is using a civilian
atomic energy program to hide weapons development. Those con-
cerns were amplified in leaked diplomatic cables released by the
WikiLeaks website late last year that revealed deep mistrust of Iran
by Sunni Arab leaders who must deal with an increasing embold-
ened Shiite neighbor.

Clinton acknowledged that one reason for her trip to the Unit-
ed Arab Emirates, Oman and Qatar was to try to contain damage
done by the release of the classified cables, which have exposed
embarrassing secrets and tensions in the region.

Her visit comes ahead of a new round of international talks
with Iran, tentatively scheduled for Jan. 21-22 in Turkey. The five
permanent members of the U.N. Security Council — the USS.,
Russia, China, Britain and France — along with Germany will
again try to compel Iran to come clean about its nuclear intentions,
in return for incentives.

Iran is under four sets of U.N. sanctions because of its refusal to
halt urantum enrichment, which can be used to produce nuclear fuel
or materials for bombs. U.S. officials believe the penalties are
hitting Iran's economy, but want them to be more strictly enforced
and would like individual countries to take separate punitive mea-
sures on their own.

Tehran insists its uranium enrichment and other programs are
meant only for peaceful purposes to generate fuel for a future
network of nuclear reactors.

Clinton's trip to the Gulf is her second in as many months. She
also attended an international security conference in Bahrain in
December. While Iran is always high on the agenda during such vis-
its to the region, her focus this time will be broader.






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Govts $8.5m to fight crime C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 107 No.39MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUN, CLOUDS, BREEZY, HUMID HIGH 82F LOW 71F I N S I G H T S EEINSIGHTONPAGE16B S P O R T S A political SEESECTIONE circus Tuning up for todays journey By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE launched investig ations into the first three murders of the year this weekend as Deputy PrimeM inister Brent Symonette u nveiled government plans to invest $8.5 million in the fight against crime over the nexts ix months. Mr Symonette told hun dreds of officers gathered for t he annual police church service at Christ Church Cathedral in George Street yesterday that crime had reached unacceptable levels in 2010, with the record murder count of 96 and an increase in gun and violent crime being the worst. The $8.5 million will fund three new police squads, of around 30 officers each, to be established by February, as well as an increase in the enrolment capacity of the police cadet programme in New Providence to 72 and establishment of a new police cadet programme in Grand Bahama. More resources also will be purchased for the RBPF as well as improved Crime Scene Investigation technology for the Force. We as a force remain com mitted and determined to ensure that the Bahamas is a place where we can all live in Deputy PM makes announcement after first three murders of 2011 McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E COMMISSIONER OF POLICE Ellison Greenslade greets families of officers fallen from the ranks in a ceremony held at Police Head quarters. The Royal Bahamas Police Force held its Annual Church Service and Parade yesterday. SEEPAGETWO C OMMISSIONER MEET S FAMILIES OF FALLEN OFFICERS Tim Clarke /Tribune staff SEE page 13 CRIME FIGHT: Brent Symonette G OVERNMENT officials denied r eports yesterday that it has already signed 51 per cent of Bahamas Telecommunications Company over t o Cable and Wireless (LIME However, according to a source within the government, it is under-s tood that the $210 million sale was f inalised on Friday, January 7. However, Zhivargo Laing, State Minister for Finance, denied the r umour. I cannot confirm that, there has been no such thing. When the time comes the government willk eep the public informed of any development in that matter, he said. By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net A MASS rally of union ists, opposed to the govern ments planned sale of BTC, is set to mark the anniversary of Majority Rule day, today. In its Bahamas for Bahamians campaign, the National Congress of Trade Unions is continuing to spread the word about the meaning behind the 1958 General strike led by Sir Clifford Darling and its con nection to Majority Rule Day. Today we talk about the fight for majority rule. It seems now we are going to back to colonialism; having to fight for what the forefathers fought for. If we UNIONISTS TO HOLD MASS RALLY A GAINST PLANNED BTC SALE TODAY SEE page 12 MINISTER DENIES BTC DEAL HAS BEEN FINALISED THE Progressive Liberal Party plans to support the demonstration organised by union members to protest the sale of BTC and commemorate Majority Rule Day, according to Ryan Pinder, Elizabeth Member of Parliament. Mr Pinder said an invitation was sent to the party and some MPs were advised to invite their constituents. Bradley Roberts, PLP chairman, said the invitation from one of the BTC unions was oral. It was not an invi tation to participate in the programme, but to simply attend the event, and invite PLP supporters. I am just going to be one of the many who will be there, said Mr Roberts. William Carroll, president of the Bahamas Communications Public Managers Union (BCPMU were sent out to the general public, and the unions did not target the PLP or FNM. Perry Christie, PLP leader, said he was informed by Mr Pinder that a communication PLP TO SUPPORT DEMONSTRATION SEE page 12 SEE page 12

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM POLICEFORCEANNUALCHURCHSERVICEANDPARADE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f ONTHEMARCH: Scenes f rom yesterdays Royal B ahamas Police Force Annual Church Service and Parade. Officers marched on Bay Street before the service at Christ Church Cathedral which was attended by m embers of the force, offic ials and Parliamentarians.

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM REPORTS that a bomb scare at Miami International Airport wass parked by a suspicious bag unloaded from a Bahamasair plane have been denied by officials at the Bahamian Consulate in Miami. US network NBC r eported on Wednesday the suspicious bag from a Bahamasair aircraft was investigated in Miami after bomb-sniffing dogss ounded the alarm. T he bomb squad was a lerted and the concourse at Miami International Airport was evacuated until the carry-on bag hadb een investigated by the T SA and cleared of containing explosives by 11am, the networks local newswebsite n bcmiami.com reported. I nspector Wayne W oodside, who is a ttached to the Bahamas Consulate Office in Miami, investigated the matter on behalf of the B ahamas, said spokeswoman for the consulate P hyllis Johnson. A nd he confirmed the matter was in no way r elated to a Bahamasair p assenger, she said. For security reasons w e cannot reveal the name of the passenger but t he name was not mani fested to Bahamasair, Ms Johnson said. REPORTS THAT BAHAMASAIR BAG BEHIND MIAMI BOMB SCARE A RE DENIED By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net FIRE TRAIL residents criticised several government agencies yesterday, blaming them for the proliferation of shanty towns in the area. I n a statement released by t he Fire Trail Community Association, the Ministry of Works, and the departmentsof Immigration and Environmental Health were blamed for compromising residentss tandard of living by their failure to ensure that the standards set by law are met. T he statement read: We are simply asking that o ur government agencies w ork for us, the taxpayers. As home owners, we were required to get permits and p ass inspections to build our h ouses to code. This was necessary to obtain occupancy c ertificates which were needed t o get utilities. Lets hold all persons living in the Bahamas to these standards. The outcry by residents comes three weeks after thed evastating fire at Mackey Y ard an area on Alan Drive off Carmichael Road which was thought to be one of the oldest shanty towns in New Providence. The fire destroyedm ore than 100 homes and displaced more than 300 people. While the group expressed its s ympathy to the hundreds of p ersons displaced in the Boxi ng Day fire, it called on the government to crack down on the remaining three villages in the area. T he statement read: Inspectors have turned a blind eye towards these villages. By allowing more than one hundred homes to exist without being up to code, theyh ave failed their jobs. The M inistry of Works has also allowed the Bahamas Electricity Corporation to provide electricity to these houses without being built accordingt o the provided codes, being structurally sound, and without the possession of electrical p ermits. T he group said that due to i mproper bathroom facilities, the shanty towns pose a great health risk to the entire community. The statement continued: This is a concern since some of us must pump well water to our homes. I may add that these are not homes that were given tou s, but these are new homes that we are paying mortgages on. We are concerned about the number of old cars, large piles of bottles and the piles of garbage which attract rodents a nd pose health problems for t his entire community. The association charged that the Department of Immigration also ignored the move m ents of illegal persons in s hanty towns, which they feel h as allowed them to establish themselves in the country. It added: This is perhaps the only country in the world where an illegal immigrant canc ome and without any status, build on government land; get electricity, cable and internet; run web shops; sell food, drinks and clothes without business licenses and work without work permits. Can you blame them for taking advantage of the slackness andl awlessness that exists in our country? The residents also called on the Office of the Attorney General to address the public on their rights as homeowners and how they can prot ect themselves against tresp assing. The statement continued: A great number of us are new homeowners who are noty et financially able to fence in o ur yards or to afford the a mount of fencing that is required to keep the residents of these villages from walking through our yards as they move from village to village.T his is a major problem for us and we need to know how we as law-abiding citizens can protect ourselves in this situation. The association is urging persons who share similarv iews to attend a march on Fire Trail Road tomorrow at 6pm. T he statement read: This is not about party politics, this is about enforcing the laws of t he Bahamas and making it b etter in the Bahamas for Bahamians again. MEASURINGunemployment claims is not an accurate method to assess the state of the economy, said Shane Gibson Golden Gates Member of Parliament. Responding to the claims by government officials that the 70 per cent drop in unemployment claims is evidence of a rebounding economy with fewer job loses, Mr Gibson said, this is an outrageous falsehood and gross misleading of the Bahamian people. The current policy of the National Insurance Board is to pay only 13 weeks of unemployment benefits to any eligi ble person, according to Mr Gibson. Since many lay offs occurred early last year, most unemployed people have exhausted their 13 weeks and are no longer eligible for unem ployment benefits, he claimed. The absolute truth, based on this 70 per cent drop is that 70 per cent of the unemployed are now destitute, frustrated and desperate. While these per sons cry out because they have lost their dignity, the FNM gov ernment remains unapologetic and continue to feed them false hope with bogus and erroneous statistics which further insult their intelligence, said Mr Gibson. He called on the government to discontinue its inaccurate portrayal of the situation, based on the fact that the drop in claims is a result of the NIB policy and its impact. No one can argue the unemployment rate is in direct corre lation with the break down of the social fiber of this country and has resulted in a nation of frustrated and desperate people, said Mr Gibson. Fire Trail residents blame govt over shanty towns By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Investigations are continuing into the cause of a house fire that claimed the life of a one-year-old RajishCox on Friday morning. A s police officially released the identity of the toddler on Saturday, police press liaison officer assistant superinten-d ent Loretta Mackey said the child lived a t two homes, one in Sunset Subdivision, Freeport, and another in Sweetings Cay, East Grand Bahama. He was staying in Freeport with his mother at the time of the fire. Velma Clarke, the paternal grandm other who lives in Eight Mile Rock, spoke with The Tribune on Sunday. She said that her son, Rajish, is very distraught over the loss of his son. He is taking it very hard, she said. Right now, he is resting. And the doctor told us to keep a close eye on him and n ot to bother him while he is sleeping. She said her family is trying to cope with the loss. We still dont have a full understanding of what happened, she said. Ms Clarke said little Rajish lived with h is mother, who would bring him on o ccasions to visit with his father in Eight Mile Rock. He was a very happy baby. If you s ee him you will fall in love with him right way because he just lay right on y our chest; he was a very loving baby, his grandmother said. Police received a report of a fire at 100 Pioneers Way West in Sunset Subdivis ion just after 8am on Friday. Firefighters responding to the alarm found flames confined to a washroom int he east front section of a grey and white single story house. After the fire was extinguished, they d iscovered the toddler inside the washroom, near the door. The house had severe smoke damage throughout and is no longer habitable. N o one was at the residence on Sunday. Anyone who may be able to assist investigations into the fire should callp olice at 9 11 9 19 o r call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 ). Investigations into cause of fatal house fire continue POLICE at the scene of Fridays fire in Grand Bahama. UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS OT ACCURATE METHOD TO ASSESS ECONOMY Outcry comes weeks after Mackey Yard fire

PAGE 4

E DITOR, The Tribune. T HEBahamas Fast Ferries company has been in operation for a number of years and I am of the opinion that it has been reasonably successful financially.I t has been of great assistance for passengers travelling to the Family Islands which it services and the communities of Eleuthera, Andros and Abaco in par ticular are very grateful fori ts existence. H owever, it is widely believed that more can be d one to accommodate pass engers awaiting boarding a t the various ports. For instance, at Spanish Wells, Current and Harbour Islandt here is no terminal where passengers can sit in comfort and wait for the arrival of the vessel. There are no toilet facilities, and, should there be rain or diverse weather, the passengers h ave nowhere to shelter. T his was especially evid ent on January 3 at Current for the hapless passen-g ers on the Fast ferry Sea W ind. Departure time was given for 7pm and passengers began arriving at 6pm. In many instances passengers were dropped off and their rides were not in a p osition to wait with them f or the arrival of the vessel. Also, persons with cars for t ransport to Nassau were not prepared to leave and travel to settlements as far a way as Savannah Sound, a nd then returning. Fortun ately, this being one of the w inter months there was not the invasion of sandflies and m osquitoes which regularly plague persons at the dock i n the summer months. However, heavy draft was falling and some moles were exposed. After no boat had arrived b y 7pm questions were a sked and information was received that the boat would n ot arrive until about 8 .30pm. This time was c hanged on at least one occasion and the vessel did not eventually arrive in theC urrent until about 9.15pm and the passengers eventually arrived at their destination at 12.45am on January 4. The explanation given was that the vessel had lost an engine. I n the meantime passeng ers consisting of babies and t oddlers, teenagers, pets, s enior citizens and other adults were left to wait at the terminal where the only shelter was a rustic building with uncomfortable wooden benches, (which inciden-t ally were not provided by the company), and absolutely no toilet facilities besides the nearby brush. Also, in keeping with its excellent record in North Eleuthera, BEC contributed to the disc omfort with at least three p ower cuts which also affect ed the oncoming vessel. S urely it is time that the c ompany provide some serv ices for its passengers, at least comfortable seating and toilet facilities. Theyc ould also provide a concession area where refreshments can be sold. This is also a way to provide some employment in the form of persons to clean and sell and also to oversee the facility. I a m looking forward to s omething being done by t he company in 2011. Should I also dare hope for i mprovement to the road a pproaching the dock site? JEANNIE THOMPSON Nassau, January 6, 2011. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 WE ARE told that last week a talk show host was complaining that The Tribunes editorials were not supportive of the people. The reference, of course, was to the current B TC unions fight against the sale of 51 per cent of BTC to Cable & Wireless (LIME Our position is that this sale, and all that Cable & Wireless offers, will be the best transaction for the country, and, therefore, for all of the Bahamian people, including BTC employees especially those who have a good work ethic. The 40 per cent being retained by gove rnment will eventually be offered to the public, so that Bahamians can truly become shareholders in their company. Dr Donaldson was the guest of the show and his contribution to the discussion was that if anyone knew the history of The Tribune, they would know that The Tribune has never been supportive of the black peoples movement. Dr Donaldson should have known that this was not true. So should his host. But the host laughed it off in agreement, and the show went on with the falsehoods. Todays Bahamians do not know their his tory, which the PLP tried to rewrite after they won the government in 1965. The PLP story is the only so-called history that many of this generation have heard. And they have not bothered to dig further to discover the truth. The Tribune will be 108 years old in November. It was founded by Leon Dupuch, grandfather of the present publisher, at a time, according to his son, the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, when there was no racial consciousness in Nassau. Wrote Sir Eti enne: The coloured people were too far behind to be conscious of a destiny. There was not even conflict between the haves and have nots. The island was poor during this period. It was described as a glorified fishing village; no one had a great deal; many working people walked the streets barefooted, but everyone was contented and it was a happy community. At the time there was only one division in the community the Ins and the Outs. The Ins were the families most of whom lived on East Hill Street that were invited to Government House, and The Nassau Guardian, a social newspaper, wrote only for this set. The Outs, both white and black, had no newspaper, therefore, no voice. At the turn of the century the Outs felt the need of a second newspaper. A company was formed to which Bay Street merchants subscribed. Leon Dupuch, who was on the staff of The Guardian, joined the group, and was invited to edit the Watchman. However, Leon soon discovered that this was not the type of newspaper he had envisioned it was just a newspaper for another social class. He believed in a newspaper for all Bahamians white and black of every social strata. And so he quit and, at great sacrifice, started The Tribune. Shortly afterwards The W atchman folded. Sir Etienne, only four when The Tribune was started, was too small to make any contribution, but at the age of five he pinched an armful of papers The Tribune was then located on Market Street walked across East Street, then known as New Road, and eventually established a delivery route as far as Farm Road. This was the first time t hat black Bahamians had a newspaper. Although the newspaper was for all Bahamians, it espoused the black Bahamians cause because this was the group that was the most downtrodden, and certainly had no voice. The Tribune, either spearheaded or was a part of every social reform in this country. Sir Etienne, as a member of the House of Assembly and the editor of this newspaper, was, for example, very active as a member of Dr C C Sweetings House committee, which brought in the Bill that established Government High School for black students. Dr Sweeting was a white Bahamian. Again Sir Etienne was among those who supported Mrs Mary Ingraham in her fight for the vote for women. And then, of course, there was the night on the floor of the House in 1956 when Sir Etienne was almost arrested in his fight to break down racial discrimination in the Bahamas. He won that fight, but the PLP in their new version of history has dishonestly tried to claim the victory, and even today they pretend that it never took place. It is one date in their litany of dates that they con stantly ignore. It is as though that dangerous and tension-filled night never took place. However, as someone commented years later, if it were not for that night in 1956, the men and women who are now free to walk through those once closed doors, wouldnt be ruling in parliament today. There certainly would have been no majority rule without bloodshed. It was Sir Etiennes Resolution in 1956 that prevented it. Sir Etienne assisted the PLP when it was founded. He felt that here at last was a political party that could be an answer to the peoples needs. He even assisted them when they decided to send a small delegation to the Colonial Office in London to complain over the way that the UBP had decided to appoint public boards a battle that they won. However, they lost the support of The Tribune on their return from England. We shall reserve that story for tomorrow. Improve services for ferry passengers waiting to board LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net A false claim made against The Tribune ShareBuy Programannounces that, s u bject to a directors resolution ofJanuary 6th,2011,itwillbeginasharebuy programofitsissued ordinary shares on January 10th, 2011. Theresolutionauthorizes the purchase ofup to 10% of theCompanys current issued ordinary shares or 1,540,417 shares over a36 month period to January 31, 2014. EDITOR, The Tribune. W ALLETS are a little bit lighter this week as a result of increases in the NIB payroll tax of up to 25 peer cent. T here is no doubt many people receive f inancial help from the National Insurance Board that might otherwise be forced to do w ithout, and that's fair enough if that's why the NIB was created. But according to the NIB's web site: "Its primary mission was and is to provide i ncome-replacement in respect of sickness, invalidity, maternity, retirement, death, industrial injury/disease, and involuntary loss of income." Obviously this is paid from the money tak en from workers themselves in the first place. As the political class began to see the votes they might get if they appear to be concerneda bout the less fortunate, the mission changed as theNIB confirms. They tells us that: NIBs a dded mission i n the administration of the countrys social security programme, is to provide assistance for needy citizens and toa ssist with the social and infrastructural develo pment of the country." (emphasis added And so as the potential political payoff c louds the original intent of NIB even more, Bahamians will have to be taxed more and more if they are to ever receive the retirement benefits they were forced to "con tribute." What is just as distasteful is the law forces employers to deduct the NIB tax from the pay packet of employees before they receive it, a nd then the government spends the funds on b uildings or new programmes and bureaucra cies that will inevitably deplete the fund as their own actuarial studies report. T here is a better way. T he NIB should be converted from a pay as you go system and the funds contributed (in t his case it would be a contribution and not a tax) are kept in an account earmarked for each individual that pays NIB, and if a con tributor does not want to utilise the govern m ent programme, they should have every right to join the private pension plan of their choice. With regard to help for the poor, find ways to encourage people to donate to private charities. One possibility is to allow property owners t o pay reduced property taxes if they con tribute the funds to charitable causes. For example; if the annual property tax rate is$ 1,000 the property owner might be allowed to donate $600 to a private charity in lieu of paying any property tax. T hese are not the only potential solutions to h elping the poor and protecting individuals retirement funds, but there must be a better w ay than following the failed "government social safety nets" around the world. The Nassau Institute www.nassauinstitute.org Nassau, December 9, 2011. Bahamas National Insurance Board raises taxes again

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REPATRIATION exercise s returned 91 citizens of Haiti t o the countrys capital Portau-Prince and 46 Dominicans to Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic this week. Director of Immigration J ack Thompson said the 72 Haitian men and 19 Haitian women repatriated this week-e nd included the 57 migrants apprehended in Exuma last Sunday, as well as 34 Haitians found to be living in New Prov-i dence without legal status. Those apprehended in Exu ma were found onboard a sloop near Sandy Cay on the s outhern side of Great Exuma a t around 2am on Sunday, Jan uary 4. They were apprehended by a team of immigration officers and Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDFf lew in from Nassau to board the vessel at sunrise. A total of 44 undocumented men and1 3 women were apprehended in the exercise and taken to Nassau for processing. Among the 46 Dominicans r epatriated were five men arrested for illegal landing in Abaco, as well as 41 arrested by the RBDF for poaching in B ahamian waters. The Immigration Depart ment along with its other law enforcement agencies remains vigilant regarding the Immigration law, Mr Thompson said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A TEAM of experts will test the water supply at the Water and Sewerage Corporations reverse osmosis plant in Grand Cay, Abaco, following accusations that the water is undrinka ble. P LP chairman Bradley R oberts hit out at the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC which he once headed as Minister for Works in the former gove rnment, for failing to remedy t he high levels of Hydrogen Sulf ide (H2S t he Grand Cay Reverse Osmosis ( RO) plant before December 31 a s promised. But Minister of Works Phenton Neym our accused Mr Roberts of whipping up u ndue alarm as the WSC reported on December 28 that the quality of the water h ad improved significantly. When Mr Roberts issued a public statem ent yesterday insisting the water was still foul smelling and not drinkable, Mr Neymour contacted customers in GrandC ay who assured him the water was better than it had been before Christmas, he s aid. The minister also assured customers the WSC was sending an RO supplier and h ydrologist to investigate the cause of complaints as those customers who informed M r Roberts their water supply is still undrinkable may have had a cross-connection in their water supply. T he WSCs assistant general manager for the Family Islands and area manager for A baco are also flying into Abaco this morning to investigate the cause of complaints and test for H2S levels at the Grand Cayp lant. Mr Neymour said he believes the WSC is l iving up to its mandate to provide cus tomers with clean water that is safe to drink, as the corporation hired a new cont ractor to install a new system when H2S problems arose late last year. Hydrogen Sulfide is a common problem at water plants t hroughout the Bahamas as o rganic matter in the soil gives o ff the H2S gas, which can build u p and make the water undrinkable, as it did at WSC RO plants in Exuma and Acklins under Mr Roberts watch as Minister of Works, Mr Neymour said. The colourless, flammable g as, characterised by its rotten e gg odour, is considered an e xtremely hazardous toxic comp ound and in high concentrations attacks the human body as a chemical asphyxiant, similar t o carbon monoxide and cyanide, inhibiting cellular respiration and uptake of oxygen and causi ng biochemical suffocation; according to website safetydirectory.com. Because of this, the WSC regularly aera tes water at their plants to rid it of H2S, the minister said. Hydrogen Sulfide challenges are not uncommon in the Bahamas, he asserted. The WSC has indicated that in the B ahamas anywhere between 25 and 30 per cent of the time they experience Hydrog en Sulfide at various levels, so with all of that information, I am indeed shocked by M r Roberts, because he is a former Minister of Works with responsibility for the Water and Sewerage Corporation, and dur-i ng his tenure experienced the same challenges throughout the Bahamas. So I think its wrong of him to raise, or attempt to raise, some major alarm. I feel Mr Roberts should demonstrate s ome maturity and not try to raise undue alarm where its not necessary. I consider his actions to be political, but not only are they political, but also hypo-c ritical. The WSC, in my view, are taking their standard procedures and adhering tot hem. Accusations prompt test of water supply 91 Haitians, 46 Dominicans repatriated ASSURANCE: P henton Neymour

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Progres sive Liberal Party on Grand Bahama recognized 27 residents here on Sunday while commemorating the 44th anniversary of Majority Rule in the Bahamas. A prayer breakfast was held at the Our Lucaya Resort on Sun day under the patronage of for mer Governor General Arthur Hanna. Those honoured were Patronella Bowen-Simms, Peatrel Russell, Dora Bartlett, Rejoina Martin, Felix Seymour, Violet Pintard-Johnson, Naomi Sim mons, Asa Jones, Stanley Simmons, George Curtis, Antoinette Seymour, Lorenzo Bullard, Maurice Moore, Earnest Armbrister, Addison Culmer, Arlington Spike Mackey, Dennis Preach er Hall, Andrew Munnings, Mable Colton, Edgar Outten, Hilton Bowleg, Lenny Butler, Earl Walkin, Rejoina Curtis, Clarence Bartlett, Granville Garvey, and Mary Wilchcombe. Philip Brave Davis, Deputy Leader of the PLP, and Member of Parliament for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe were also present and addressed those honoured. Rev. Dr. Keith Russell prayed for the nation, and the Rt. Rev. Cornell J. Moss, VII Diocesan Bishop of Guyana, including the Ceyanne and Surinam, prayed for the Leader of the PLP. Majority Rule is celebrated on January 10. Carolyn Kinglocke, chairman of GB PLP Convention Organizing Committee, said all Bahamians benefited, in one way or another, from the historic event that took place on January 10, 1967. Majority Rule presented the opportunity for real democracy to come to the Bahamas, under pinned by equality, tolerance, economic justice, social justice, all important elements in the cre ation of a free, modern, democ ratic state, she said. We pay homage to the per sonalities and players in this epic struggle. In a hard fought and competitive election in 1967, the PLP delivered the following 18 members to a 38-member House of Assembly. They were: Lynden Pindling, Preston Albury, Clarence Bain, Milo Butler, Clif ford Darling, Elwood Donaldson, Arthur Foulkes, Carlton Francis, Arthur Hanna, Warren Levarity, Curtis MacMillan, Uriah McPhee, Maurice Moore, Edmund Moxey, Jimmy Shepherd, George Thompson, Jeffrey Thompson and Cecil Wallace Whitfield. Randol Fawkes, who successfully ran as Labour in 1962 and 1967 with the support of the PLP, threw his support behind the PLP and became a member of the f irst Majority Rule cabinet. He figured prominently in the movement toward Majority Rule, she recalled. Ms Kinglocke revealed that the upcoming PLP mini-convention is slated for Grand Bahama at the end of January. She noted that Majority Rule is the singular event in Bahamian history that played a significant role in shaping the modern Bahamas of today. The significant events leading up and emanating from Majority Rule must become per manently etched in the Bahamian historical landscape as these events define us as a people, reveals what we believe in as Bahamians, and serves as a constant reminder to us of our vision and values, she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Woe to Evildoers Scripture ThoughtMicah Chapter 2 verse 1-5Woe to thosewho devise iniquity,and work out evil on their beds! At morning light they practice it, because it is in the power of their hand. They houses, and seize them. So they oppress a man and his house, a man and his inheritance. Therefore thus says the LORD: Behold, against this family I am devising disaster, from which you cannot remove your necks; nor shall you walk haughtily, forthis is an evil time. In that day one shall take up a proverb against you, and lament with a bitter lamentation, saying: We are utterly destroyed! He has changed the heritage of my people; how He has removed it from me! To a you will have no one to determine boundaries by lot In the assembly of the LORD. PROGRESSIVE Liberal Party supporters were called on to recapture the spirit of politic al idealism culminated in the Majority Rule Day of 1967 yesterday. Party members charged that after 44 years, the dream and promise of economic justice through equitable wealth distribution remains unfulfilled. Commemorating the a nniversary of the historic event, the party hosted a prayer breakfast in the ballroom of the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. During his keynote address, leader of the party Perry Christie told supporters that the anniversary memorialized an e ra of the Golden Age of idealism in Bahamian politics. It was an era marked by an extraordinary spirit of selfless struggle and sacrifice, said Mr Christie. An age that was marked by a collective desire to be a part of what was clearly understood to be. Those were the good old days of Bahamian politics because it was all about uplifting our people and uplifting our country rather than seeing what one could get for oneself, he said. Majority Rule day recognized on January 10 each year signifies the end of the governance of the majority of Bahamians by a minority. Following a general election, the then governing United Bahamian Party was replaced by the PLP, with the support of recently elected Sir Randol Fawkes, a Labour member, and Sir Alvin Braynen, an Independent member. At yesterdays event, the party leader advised supporters to be inspired by the progress made by past generations and to use its momentum to meet the current societal challenges. Mr Christie said: We cannot allow this to be an occasion for simple minded remembrance and instead we have to seize this moment. This 44th anniversary is a reminder of the urgent need to embrace afresh the ideals that guided our party in an earlier time. Just as the front line warriors of the PLP took on the great challenges of their time and overcame them, we too are now summoned by history to meet the major challenges that confront our society today, he said. The brunch preceded a mass demonstration organized by labour unions for this evening the latest demonstration in their continuing argument with the government o ver the sale of BTC. Actions taken by the unions seek to commemorate the general strike of 1958, in which thousands of workers took part. The strike, which resulted in the Trade Union and Industrial Conciliation Act and the creation of the Labour Departm ent, is also credited with influencing Sir Allan Lennox Boyd, then Secretary of State for the Colonies, to order the first constitutional steps toward Majority Rule for the Bahamas. Additional speakers included party chairman Bradley Roberts and Fox Hill MP Fred M itchell. The Fox Hill MP spoke in the absence of Lady Marguerite Pindling, wife of former Prime Minister, the late Sir Lynden Pindling. M r Mitchell chronicled the events that led up to the political and national achievement, highlighting its significance to the PLP and the Bahamian people. Acknowledging that for many Bahamians in some respects there has been r egression in the years following Majority Rule, Mr Roberts urged those present to remember the promise of the historic milestone. Wherever there is injustice, said Mr Roberts, be it social, political or economic, we have a responsibility to speak o ut and to correct it. Wherever freedom is being stifled and replaced with dictatorship and oppression, we have a responsibility to fearlessly stand against it this generation has the responsibility of continuing the struggle and fulfilling the promises of Majority Rule which are deeply rooted in the principles of democracy, justice, freedom and fair play which collectively embody the Bahamian dream. Your country demands no less of you. PLP supporters urged to recapture the spirit of political idealism ARTHUR HANNA and Mrs. Anne Marie Davis, wife of Philip Brave Davis, were guests at a prayer breakfast held in Freeport to commemorate Majority Rule Day. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe is seen making a presentation to Mrs Davis and Mr Hanna. PLP COMMEMORATES MAJORITY RULE ON GRAND BAHAMA V a n d y k e H e p b u r n MAJORITYRULEDAY: Perry Christie Majority Rule anniversary

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By LINDA DEUTSCH, AP Special Correspondent LOS ANGELES (AP After losing Anna Nicole Smith and then a court battle over her estate, Howard K. Stern says a judge's dismissal of convictions in a prescription drug case vindicates both him and the late Playboy model. "I loved Anna and I cared for her so much. I have no regrets," Stern told The Associated Press in an interview Thursday, hours after the court reversed his two conspiracy convictions for using his name on prescriptions for Smith. "The regrets I have are for what people caused afterward," he said, referring to multiple legal complications that arose after Smith died of a drug overdose in Florida in February, 2007. The most agonizing postscript, he said, was the prescription drug abuse charges filed in Los Angeles against Stern, Smith's psychiatrist Dr. Khristine Eroshevich and Dr. Sandeep Kapoor, Smith's general physician. He called the months of trial a nightmare. Prosecutors had argued that Smith was an addict, and the defendants were feeding her addiction rather than providing prescription drugs for any legitimate medical purpose. But after a long and costly prosecution, Superior Court Judge Robert Perry threw out conspiracy convictions against Stern and Eroshevich on Thursday, allowing one charge against her to remain but reducing it to a misdemeanour. The jury had already acquitted Kapoor of all charges against him. The judge concluded that Smith was not an addict by legal definition but was rather a woman seeking relief from chronic pain. He said the jury verdicts suggested they agreed. Perry said Stern clearly did not intend to violate the law when he used his name on drug prescriptions for Smith. The judge said the defendants who used false names for Smith were trying to protect her privacy in a manner used by many celebrities. Stern praised the ruling as "a huge victory and vindication for Anna and the person she really was, not the person the prosecution tried to portray her as." He called the case "a dis honest prosecution with no pur pose but to ruin our lives and for their publicity and political gain." Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley criti cized the judge's decision, say ing it "denigrates the substantial investigative efforts con ducted by the state Departmentof Justice and the medical board." He said he would appeal. Stern attorney Steve Sadow said his strongest and most unusual defense theme was love. He told jurors that Smith was the love of Stern's life and he would never have done anything to hurt her. H e said prosecutors at times portrayed Stern as a Svengali trying to control Smith for money, a claim he said was false. "The love was a fact," Sadow said. "It was the truth and all I had to do was sell the true facts to the jury. They had to u nderstand the relationship between Howard and Anna rather than the false and ficti tious relationship the prosecution tried to sell. And of course we had the pictures." Sadow said the turning point i n the trial came when the prosecution imported two nannies f rom the Bahamas who testified that Smith was in a drugged, semi-comatose state for weeks after the birth of her child and accused Stern of keeping her drugged. The defense then produced dozens of dazzling photographs of the blonde beauty from thes ame time period, showing her vibrant and smiling, cuddling her baby, posing with Stern, celebrating her birthday and participating in their commitment ceremony on a yacht. Stern said he sometimes marvels at the turn of fate that l ed him to Smith and the love story that consumed his life. He was her lawyer first and then her lover. "Back then could I ever have anticipated where I am now? Not in a million years," he said. A t 41, he said he has not had time to evaluate his future or t o mourn for his lost love. He said a bright light in his life is Smith's daughter, Dannielynn, who he once thought was his. She is being raised by her father, photographer Larry Birkhead. He said he and Birkhead, who once fought in court, are now working together on Smith's estate and Birkhead will probably become its sole administrator. He said he will have visits with Dannielynn and hopes to tell her about her mother. "She just reminds me of her mom," he said of the 4-yearold child. "She's a junior version of Anna. Larry is doing a great job with her. She's the happiest little girl you'll ever see." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Mercedes-Benz C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.T he Mercedes-Benz C-Class is a pleasure t obehold offering a new interpretation of d riving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section a nnounce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. F ew cars can compete with its ability to a djust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology s o quickly and precisely in response t oexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible r esponse is the standard-fit Agility C ontrol Package which includes s elective damping. T he interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere t osuit your taste. As you will see, the C -Class is the perfect embodiment o f the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsW ulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. 'RQWZDVWHWLPH LQ OLIHEHFDXVH\RX FDQQRWGRDQ\WKLQJ LQ GHDWKa 4WffkFSk^ad a XRWH RIWKH ZHHN Stern finds vindication in Anna Nicole Smith case HOWARDKSTERNand the late ANNANICOLESMITH

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE B y SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat) THE New Year started with a great deal of frustrationb eing publicly expressed over the Caribbean regional integration project which, this year, will have been in construction for forty-three years. Other integration efforts, such as the European Union (EU began after the Caribbean Community and Common market (CARICOM moved ahead much faster andm uch more effectively for the benefit of the people of their member countries. It is understandable, theref ore, that, in an editorial, one o f the Caribbeans oldest newspaper observed that a majority o f people believe that any official attempt to unite the region as envisaged in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME i ng but reverie and doomed to failure. To be fair the editor i al did not trumpet this observation with glee or satisfaction. It said that as we enter thes econd decade of this century, we hold fast, nevertheless, tot he idea of one region. S o, on the one hand, this editorial, reflecting the views o f many, still believes in the notion of a deeply integrated C aribbean one region, but it expresses no faith that, after forty-three years, we will see a CSME anytime soon. The e ditorial identified four con temporary reasons for its lack of faith in any official attempt to unite the region. These reasons were: an unfortunate statement last yearb y the Trinidad and Tobago P rime Minister that her gov ernment would no longer be an ATM machine for otherc ountries of CARICOM; an injudicious remark by the same Prime Minister that, in the provision by her government of assistance to the islands of St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines she would expect some benefit for the construct ion industry of Trinidad and Tobago; the more recent sug gestion by Prime Minister B ruce Golding of Jamaica that his government favoured set ting up its own national final Court of Appeal rather than acceding to the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ that CARICOM heads of gov ernment are yet to establish any executive machinery to enforce their own policy decisions. All of these points are valid. There are many more besides. Among them are that instead of getting on with fashioning CARICOM into an effective vehicle to help with the improvement of their peoples lives and progressing development in their countries, some governments are busily trying to cultivate relations with oth er larger countries far beyond the region to try to get what they can while they can. The latter strategy is, of course, unsustainable. And, as has happened in the past, the governments now flirting, on their own, with big ger countries not on their doorstep will return to the regional fold which is not only their natural home, but also their best hope. Fortunately, the statements by the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, while indicative of an attitude to CARICOM held by many in that country, were made in the early flush of government. In the past, other heads of government have made equally hurtful (and not fully informed) comments in other contexts. The truth is that Trinidad and Tobago is the principal beneficiary of trade in goods and services to CARICOM benefits are not a one-way street. This is the message that the government in Port-of-Spain should be delivering to its peo ple. Also, to those who say that Trinidad and Tobago does not need the CARICOM market, they should be challenged to identify the alternative mar kets, how quickly could they be developed if they could be developed at all, and at what cost. With regard to the state m ent that Mr Golding has made about establishing Jamaicas own national, final court of appeal instead of joining the CCJ for this purpose, it really is time that someone b ells the cat on this as well. As I pointed out in my last commentary (Time to make up your mind), by April this yearJ amaicans will head five extremely important CARICOM-wide institutions. These a re positions for which the J amaica government fought and other CARICOM coun tries agreed. What is the mess age that is being sent to the people of CARICOM by Jamaica? Is it that all is well when Jamaica holds the reins, b ut it isnt well when other CARICOM nationals are i nvolved? This cannot be so, a nd Mr Golding is far too intel ligent a man and too well informed to hold such a posi-t ion. The time has come for Jamaicas leadership to cease pandering to the false notion of some special Jamaican capaci t y, and, instead, spread the true message that this region is one and one to which Jamaicas c ontribution has been highly regarded by its Caribbean brothers and sisters. T he quicker that the CARI COM Secretariat, as part of an overall reform of all its activities, is given the resources and e mpowered to mount a sustained, multi-media campaign throughout the region on howm embership of the Caribbean Community has benefitted, and can continue to benefit,t he people of each CARICOM country the better. And, every government should regard it as its responsibility and obligation to carry out its own domestic programme of education and information. Of the four points made in the Editorial to which this com mentary refers, the most crucial is its observation that the decade closed without the establishment of any executive machinery to enforce the implementation of policy decisions by heads of government. This is and has been for decades the fundamental problem with the lack of progress of CARICOM in establishing the CSME and even in carrying out a range of activities that are routine in organisations similar to CARICOM. In his New Years address as Chairman of CARICOM until July 2011, the Prime Minister of Grenada, Tillman Thomas, said that the cry for the quickening of the pace was heard and active consideration of new governance structures was given by CARICOM leaders. He offered that one of the main ideas in taking the necessary steps will be tested in this com ing year with the establishment of the Permanent Committee of CARICOM Ambassadors which, he said, heralds a new dawn for our Community. Mr Thomas is right to hold out hope, but it is difficult to see how another layer of national representatives will implement policy decisions of Heads, when ministers and the Secretariat were not able to do so. The CARICOM vehicle needs an urgent overhaul, or it really will be a case of CARICOM and gone. Responses and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com CARICOM or CARI-GONE? WORLDVIEW S IRRONALDSANDERS

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C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 9 By MIKE LIGHTBOURN Y OU MIGHT think t hat the living room or family room is the heart of your home, but in the e yes of potential purchasers, there are at least t hree other rooms that will demand your attention as you prepare to selly our home for top dollar. Avoiding improvements i n the following areas may cost you a lot more t han the small investment i t takes to impress buyers. F or purchasers, the kitchen is often the most important area, and while you may not need to replace your cabinets,r esurfacing or just sanding and painting will go a l ong way towards improv ing their appearance. Dont overlook the coun t ertops this is an immediate eye catcher. If the floor is in poor condition, consider replacing it. I n the bathrooms, fresh p aint and new flooring are also fine improvements, but your greatestp ayoff might come from simply investing a couple hundred dollars in a new mirror and vanity. Makes ure the toilets are secure and are in good condi tion. The laundry room is o ften overlooked when it comes to improvements, but purchasers will respond positively if you install built-in shelving and storage. If your laun-dry area isnt flooded w ith light, consider upgrading the light fixtures. While youre at it, that fresh paint and new flooring wouldnt hurt here, either. Trust me that if these three rooms are bright, neat and clean, it conveys the message that you area responsible seller with pride of ownership, and hopefully worthy of a full price offer. Tip of the week: Even if your home is in good condition as outlined above, if it is not PRICED PROPERLY it will languish on the mar ket. Remember PRICE, PRICE, PRICE is what it takes if you are serious about selling. (Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty) MIKELIGHTBOURN REALESTATE:A LITTLE BIT GOES A LONG WAY THE INTERIOR OF YOUR HOME Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By POLICE CONSTABLE MAKILLE PINDER MOTORISTS BEWARE SCHOOL HAS STARTED UNFORTUNATELY, the beginning of school is also a time when children are at increased risk of transportationrelated injuries from pedestrian, school bus, and motor vehicle crashes. The reason is fairly obvious; t here are many more children on the road each morning and afternoon, as well as an overall change in motorists' patterns. As schools open their doors, it's time for motorists to improve their traffic safety practices. The following tips can help make this a safe and happys chool year for the whole community: Slow down. Obey all traffic laws and speed limits. Be extra cautious around school crossing areas, slow down and watch for children on the way to school. When driving in neighborhoods or school zones, watch for children who may be in a hurry to get to school and may not be thinking about getting there safely. The posted speed limit in s chool zones is 15 MPH from 7:30am 9:00am and 2:30pm 4pm. Allow children waiting at a pedestrian crossing to cross. Be alert and ready to stop. Watch for children walking in the street, especially where there are no sidewalks. When using an intersection where children are trying to cross, slow down; make eye contact with the children to determine what they are going to do next. Always stop for a jitney or school bus that has stopped to load and unload passengers Before entering a pedestrian crossing area, be sure there are no children in the lane or a djacent lanes. When passing a parked vehicle, check for children who may run out into the street. When approaching a school bus that has stopped to drop off or pick up students, motorists must stop a safe distance behind. When approaching a school speed zone reduce speed below the required speed limit and maintain it until the end of the school zone. During school hours Motor Vehicle Laws will be strictly enforced. Please share this information with every driver in your family. Lets all work together to have a safe school year. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ([FHOOHQWRSSRUWXQLW\LVDYDLODEOHIRUSURIHVVLRQDOLQGLYLGXDO WRPRYHDKHDGLQJUHDWFDUHHU/HDGLQJODZLVVHHNLQJ WRHPSOR\KLJKO\TXDOLHG/HJDO6HFUHWDU\7KHVXFFHVVIXO FDQGLGDWHVKRXOGSRVVHVVWKHIROORZLQJVNLOOVDQGH[SHULHQFH $ELOLW\WR \ 8QGHUVWDQGDQGIROORZRUDODQGZULWWHQGLUHFWLRQV 7\SHDQGDVVHPEOHLQIRUPDWLRQLQWRSURSHUOHJDOIRUPIURP RXWOLQHGLQVWUXFWLRQVRUHVWDEOLVKHGSURFHGXUHV 3URGXFHOHJDODQGRWKHUGRFXPHQWVXVLQJZRUGSURFHVVLQJ VRIWZDUH 0DLQWDLQZLGHYDULHW\RIOHJDOUHFRUGVDQGUHSRUWVZRUNLQJ LQGHSHQGHQWO\LQWKHDEVHQFHRIVSHFLFLQVWUXFWLRQV (VWDEOLVKDQGPDLQWDLQHIIHFWLYHZRUNLQJUHODWLRQVKLSVZLWKFOLHQWV OHJDODQGFRXUWUHODWHGSHUVRQQHODWWRUQH\VDQGVWDI 3ULRULWL]HDVVLJQHGGXWLHV -RE 5HTXLUHPHQWV T ([WHQVLYHH[SHULHQFHDQGVRXQGNQRZOHGJHRISURSHUOHJDOIRUPDW DQGSURFHVVHV \HDUVOHJDOVHFUHWDULDOH[SHULHQFH .QRZOHGJHRI0LFURVRIW2IFHDQGVKRUWKDQGVSHHGZULWLQJVNLOOV DUHHVVHQWLDO 7$SSO\ SSO\ $OODSSOLFDQWVPXVWVXEPLWDUHVXPHE\ WK -DQXDU\ /HJDOHFUHWDU\ 7KH7ULEXQH 1DVVDX%DKDPDV &$5((5781,7< /(*$/(&5(7$5< Royal Bahamas Police Force National Crime Prevention Office Safety Tips for Drivers POLICE CONSTABLE Makille Pinder J ACKSON, Miss. A BLASTof winter weather pushed a cross the South on Sunday, coating b ridges and roads with snow, sleet and freezing rain and causing hundreds of flight cancelations, according to Associated Press. The governors of Louisiana, Alabama a nd Georgia issued emergency declara t ions. Alabama Gov. Bob Riley said work ers had readied snow and salt trucks to help clear icy roads, and he asked all resi d ents to stay home Sunday night and Mon day unless necessary. M ississippi officials warned motorists early Sunday that ice was already accumulating on roads and bridges in many counties, creating hazardous driving conditions. The National Weather Service posted winter storm warnings from east Texas to the Carolinas. D aniel Lamb, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Jackson, Miss., said heavy snow had fallen Sundaya fternoon from Arkansas to north Missis sippi. Other areas of the South saw freezing rain and sleet. US flights canceled, states declare emergencies as blast of icy weather hits parts of the South

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s tart selling everything back t o the former colonisers, E ngland, then we are turning b ack around to do what our forefathers (decried William Carroll, president oft he Bahamas Communications Public Managers Union (BCPMU The demonstration is p lanned for RM Bailey Park at 7pm today. Union leaders promise to reveal the f acts, as they escalate the o pposition of the governm ents planned sale of BTC to Cable and Wireless Comm unications. W hile some say it is a false c omparison to tie the genera l strike to the current l abour movement, there are many historians and political commentators that agreet hat labour was an important part of Majority Rule. Historians say Majority Rule was achieved out of the J anuary 10, 1967 general election, when the govern ing United Bahamian Partya ndthe Progressive Liberal Party won 18 seats each in t he House of Assembly. Sir Lynden was able to form the first black governm ent in Bahamian history, explained Fred Mitchell, Fox H ill Member of Parliament, when Sir Randol Fawkes, the lone Labour MP, vote d to stand with the PLP, and Sir Alvin Braynen, an i ndependent MP, assumed the Speakers chair. The difficulty we have t oday is a Free National Movement political admini stration that is set on deconstructing and destabilizing e verything that majority rule sought to build which is ac ountry of equality, social mobility and justice for all Bahamians, said MrM itchell. N ext to emancipation and independence, Majority Rule is probably the most significant day that constitu t ional freedoms were ushered in, according to Perry Christie, leader of the oppo s ition. In the unions effort to save the Bahamas against a bad decision I think theym ust think the significance o f (Majority Rule Day would stir people; pump the heart, beat the soul and get everyone out. It is not a bad decision to have the event on this day, said Mr C hristie. S everal major events pred ating Majority Rule are believed to have influenced it centrally. The general strike is one of them, and it ultimately gave birth to the Trade Union and Industrial Conciliation Act and the creation of the Labour Department, note some. January 13, 1958 was the day hundreds of taxi drivers, hotel workers, garbage collectors, tourism industry employees, construction workers, and others, walked off their jobs in a move that brought the economic engine of the country to a virtual standstill. While political heavy weights Sir Lynden and Sir Randol Fawkes were major leaders in this culminating effort, it was Sir Clifford, who in November of 1957, a s leader of the taxi union, l ed about 200 outraged taxi m en to blockade the new i nternational airport at W indsor Field forcing flight cancellations, stated political scientist Larry Smith. T he industrial action protested an exclusive agreement planned between major hotel operat ors and a taxi company set up by the Symonette fami ly. A ccording to the governor at the time, the deal would h ave established a monopoly excluding the taxi cab union entirely. T wo months later, with the labour movement still disaff ected, and opposition political forces in full support, workers united for the Gene ral strike, which shut down New Providence for almost t hree weeks. Describing the significance of the labour unrest, Sir Clif-f ord said: Little did I know on that Sunday morning in J anuary 1958 that the stunning and unexpected afterm ath of the general strike would pave the way for thet urbulent decade of the sixties, ultimately leading to the freedom of majority rule fora ll Bahamians. T he new decade of poli tics would see womens suffrage and other constitutional reforms. T he aftermath included: International pressure on the Bay Street regime tod emocratise the country. Within three months a senior British cabinet minister was in Nassau pushingf or constitutional reforms, a nd that October, legislation was passed to set up a labour department and a process for industrial conciliation. The following year saw abo lition of the company vote,e xtension of the franchise to a ll men over 21, and the crea tion of four new parlia mentary seats (all of which were won by the PLP), states Mr Smith. On the timeline of progress, Mr Mitchell includes: 1 June 1942, Burma Road; the 1950 founding of the Citizens Committee and the fight to show No Way Out, Sidney Poitier's first film; the 1953 founding of the PLP; the election of Sammy Isaacs, Cyril Steven son, Randal Fawkes, Lyn den Pindling, Clarence Bain and Milo Butler to the House of Assembly in 1956; the General Strike of 1958; the bye elections of 1960; the 1962 election defeat; the con stitutional changes of 1964; Black Tuesday on April 27, 1965 and the general elec tion of January 10, 1967. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Government signed a Memorandum of Unders tanding with C&W on D ecember 2, 2010. It is expected to debate the docu ment when Parliament reconv enes on January 19 after the Christmas recess. The House has to approve the sale b efore it can be finalised. G overnment officials, who w ished to remain anonymous, were sceptical that an agreement was finalised last week as the business plan for BTC had not yet been presented. It was said that only a fter a business model had been finalised would negotia tions with C&W on the contract start. Meanwhile, a mass demonstration has been organized for this evening as labour u nions continue their efforts to prevent the utility compa ny from being privatised. As the unions are opposed to the sale of 51 per cent of BTC to C&W, they are urging government to find a B ahamian consortium to purchase the majority stake in t he company. Last week, it was confirmed that the unions representing BTC employees were in talks with their legal t eam to file suit against the government to block the sale. came out, but he did not speak to any members of parliament about the event. I have not invited a single soul out. There is no MP w ho could say they have even spoke to me about a meeting, he said. At a prayer breakfast Sunday, Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill member of parliament, encouraged party supporters to support the labour movement, as they did in 1958 during the general strike. We have our work to do 44 years after the fact. It is e conomic empowerment which must now be the clarion call. It is a call to serve all Bahamians to make them the full masters of the commanding heights of our economy. That is why we must resolutely and firmly oppose the FNM governments plans to sell BTC in the way in which they are doing it and to support the trade unionsi n their fight to stop the Leviathan, said Mr Mitchell. FROM page one MINISTER DENIES BTC DEAL HAS BEEN FINALISED PLP TO SUPPORT DEMONSTRATION F ROM page one SUPPORT: RYANPINDER Unionists to hold mass rally against planned BTC sale today F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM peace, Mr Symonette said. The criminals this year will be defeated. His announcement before an audience of officers from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, Customs and Immigration, Road Traffic D epartment, the Airport A uthority, and high-ranking g overnment officials, was followed with remarks by Bahamas Christian Council leader Reverend Patrick P aul. H e said: There are too m any guns in our streets; gun l aws must be enforced and a mended where necessary. We must ensure persons charged with serious crimes such as armed robberies and murders cannot walk free in our communities until they have been completely exon erated. M eanwhile police are i nvestigating the deadly shooting of a man gunned d own on the porch of a h ome in Bishop Way, Wind s or Place, off Soldier Road at around 6.40pm on Saturday. P olice press liaison officer Sgt Chrislyn Skippings said police were called when gunfire rang out in the area and officers found the man with multiple gunshot wounds. He was pronounced dead a t the scene by Emergency M edical Services (EMS A 21-year-old man is being questioned in connec-t ion with the homicide. T he second murder inquiry of 2011 was launched just a day after police foundt he body of a man, unoffic ially identified by local media as Samuel Allad, 47, lying on a makeshift bedb ehind the Burger Barn in Carmichael Road at 10.20amon Friday. He had visible i njuries on his back and police classified the death as the first murder of the year later that night. And late last night, news reached The Tribune of another homicide, when a f emale was shot dead on W ulff Road near the Texaco Service Station. In addition to the latest murder probes, police are investigating the stabbing of a 19-year-old Nassau Village m an attacked by three robb ers just an hour after the f atal shooting on Saturday n ight. S gt Skippings said the man w as in an area of Soldier R oad east of East Street w hen three men attempted to rob him, and a struggle followed. The teenager was stabbed several times and taken to hospital by EMS where he has been detained in stable c ondition. P olice are also looking for the two men who robbed C razy Ink Studio in the K ennedy Subdivision at a round 2pm on Friday. They reportedly stormed the shop armed with a handgun ands tole an undetermined amount of cash before driving off towards Pinewood Gardens in the white Nissan Maxima they had parked outside. Intensive investigations h ave been launched into all m atters and police are a ppealing for information from the public. A nyone with any infor m ation that may relate to the murders, stabbing, or armed robbery, should report it as am atter of urgency by calling t he Central Detective Unit (CDU the police emergency line on9 11 or 919, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Govts $8.5m to fight crime F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM TUCSON, Ariz. Associated Press F EDERALprosecutors b rought charges Sunday against the gunman accused of attempting to assasinate Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and killing six p eople at a political event i n Arizona. I nvestigators said they c arried out a search warr ant at Jared Loughner's home and seized an envelope from a safe with messages such as "I planned ahead," ''My assassination" and the name "Giffords" next to what a ppears to be the man's signature. He allegedly purchased the Glock pist ol used in the attack in November at Sportsman's W arehouse in Tucson. Court documents also show that Loughner had c ontact with Giffords in the past. Other evidence i ncluded a letter addressed to him from Giffords' congressional stationery in w hich she thanked him for attending a "Congress on y our Corner" event at a mall in Tucson in 2007. Heather Williams, the f irst assistant federal public defender in Arizona, s ays the 22-year-old suspect doesn't yet have a l awyer, but that her office is working to get a lawyer a ppointed. Meanwhile, authorities released 911 calls in whicha person witnessing the m ass shooting outside a grocery store in Tucson describes a frantic scene and says, "I do believeG abby Giffords was hit." Loughner fired at Giffords' district director ands hooting indiscriminately at staffers and others standing in line to talk to the congresswoman, saidM ark Kimble, a communic ations staffer for Giffords. "He was not more than three or four feet from thec ongresswoman and the district director," Kimble s aid, describing the scene as "just complete chaos, people screaming, crying." L oughner is accused of killing six people, including a federal judge, an aide to Giffords and a 9-year-o ld girl who was born on S ept. 11, 2001. Fourteen others were wounded, including thet hree-term Democrat lawmaker. Authorities don't know his motive, but said he targeted Giffords at ap ublic gathering around 10 a .m. Saturday. Doctors treating the law maker provided an optimistic update about her chances for survival, say ing they are "very, very encouraged" by her ability to respond to simple commands along with theirs uccess in controlling her bleeding. M ourners crammed into the tiny sanctuary of Giffords' synagogue in Tucs on to pray that she quickly recovered. Outside the hospital, candles flickered at a makeshift memorial.S igns read "Peace + love a re stronger," ''God bless America and "We love you, Gabrielle." P eople also laid down bouquets of flowers, American flags and pic tures of Giffords. O ne of the victims was C hristina Taylor Green, who was a member of the student council at her local school and went to the event because of her inter est in government. She is the granddaughter of for mer Philadelphia Phillies manager Dallas Green. S he was born on 9/11 and featured in a book called "Faces of Hope" that chronicled one baby f rom each state born on the day terrorists killed nearly 3,000 people. T he fact that Christina's l ife ended in tragedy was e specially tragic to those who knew her. Tragedy seems to have h appened again," said the author of the book, Christine Naman. "In the form of this awful event." Authorities said the dead included U.S. District Judge John M. Roll; Green; Giffords aide GabeZ immerman, 30; Dorothy Morris, 76; Dorwin Stoddard, 76; and Phyllis Sch n eck, 79. Judge Roll had just stopped by to see his friend Giffords after attending Mass. A n unidentified man w ho authorities earlier said might have acted as ana ccomplice was cleared S unday of any involvement. Pima County sheriff's deputy Jason Ogan told The Associated Press onS unday that the man was a cab driver who drove the gunman to the grocery store outside of which thes hooting occurred. In one of several YouTube videos, which featured text against a d ark background, Loughner described inventing a new U.S. currency and c omplained about the illite racy rate among people l iving in Giffords' congressional district in Ari-z ona. I know who's listening: Government Officials, and the People," Loughner wrote. "Nearly all the people, who don't know this accu rate information of a new currency, aren't aware ofm ind control and brain wash methods. If I have my civil rights, then thism essage wouldn't have happen (sic In Loughner's middleclass neighborhood a bout a five-minute drive f rom the scene sheriff's deputies had much of thes treet blocked off. The n eighborhood sits just off a bustling Tucson street and is lined with desert land scaping and palm trees. N eighbors said Loughn er lived with his parents and kept to himself. He was often seen walking hisd og, almost always wearing a hooded sweat shirt and listening to his iPod. The assassination a ttempt left Americans questioning whether divisive politics had pushed t he suspect over the edge. G iffords faced frequent b acklash from the right over her support of theh ealth care reform last y ear, and had her office vandalized the day the House approved the land mark measure. Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik lashed out at what he called an excessively "vitriolic"a tmosphere in the months leading up to the rampage as he described the chaoso f the day. The sheriff said the rampage ended only after two people tackled the gun-m an. A third person inter vened and tried to pull a c lip away from Loughner a s he attempted to reload, the sheriff said. "He was definitely on a mission," according toe vent volunteer Alex Vil lec, former Giffords intern. Suspect in attack on congresswoman faces five charges WELL WISHERS gather outside University Medical center at a make-shift memorial in Tucson, Ariz., Sunday. U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot in the head Saturday during a speech at a local supermarket. (AP REP. GABRIELLE GIFFORDS D-Ariz Susan Walsh/AP C APE CANAVERAL, Fla. THE SHOCKING gundown of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords has left NASA reeling: Her astronaut husband was due to rocket away in just three months as perhaps the last space shuttle commander, and her brother-in-law is currently on the International Space Station, according to Associated Press. Shuttle commander Mark Kelly rushed to his wife's hospital bedside Saturday as his identical twin brother, Scott, did his best to keep updated on the Arizona shooting through Mission Control, the Internet and the lone phone aboard the space station. "I want to thank everyone for their thoughts and prayers, wordsof condolences and encourage ment for the victims and their families of this horrific event," Scott Kelly tweeted from space. "My sister-in-law, Gabrielle Giffords is a kind, compassionate, brilliant woman, loved by friends and political adversaries alike a true patriot. What is going on in our country that such a good person can be the subject of such senseless violence?" It was the worst news to befall an astronaut in orbit since Christ mas 2007, when a space station res ident learned of his mother's death in a car-train collision. That astronaut, Daniel Tani, was working in Mission Control in Houston last week, in touch with Scott Kelly and the five other members of the space station crew. The chief of the astronaut office broke the news to Scott Kelly that a gunman had shot his sister-inlaw at a political gathering in Tuc son soon after it happened. NASA officials said Sunday it was premature to speculate on whether Mark Kelly would step down as commander of the April flight of the shuttle Endeavour. But it was hard to imagine how he could keep up with the grueling training in the next three months, primarily in Houston, and still spend time with his wife of three years, hospitalized in critical condition in Arizona. Kelly's mission is higher profile than most. Endeavour's final flight will deliver an elaborate physics experiment by a Nobel Prize win ner. For now anyway, it's slated to be the last voyage of the 30-year s huttle program. That fact alone propelled 46-year-old Mark Kelly onto the cover of this month's Air& Space magazine of the Smith sonian Institution; he shares the cover with the first shuttle commander, moonwalker John Young. In an interview with The Associated Press last fall, Kelly, a Navy officer and three-time shuttle flier, said it was "timing and luck" that snared him one last coveted commander's seat, not his influential wife. She loved sharing his adventure. "She's excited about going to Florida for the launch," he said then. Until last month, NASA hoped the Kelly brothers would meet in orbit, a PR dream for a space agency often confronted with bad news. But after fuel tank cracks grounded another shuttle mission, Mark Kelly's flight was bumped to April. His brother is to return home in March on a Russian spacecraft, so the reunion in space is off. As for the rippling effects of Sat urday's shooting, there is no prece dent for anything like this at NASA. Astronauts have had to bow out of space missions over the decades, but never a commander so close to flight and never for something so brutal. Mark Kelly's co-pilot, retired Air Force Col. Gregory Johnson, could take over. Or NASA could free up another astronaut with flying-to-the-space-station experi ence. "It is premature to speculate on any of this," NASA spokesman James Hartsfield said in an e-mail Sunday. "For now, the focus is on sup porting Mark and Scott, and things need to be taken day by day, and all thoughts are with the victims." NASA Administrator Charles Bolden called Giffords a "a longterm supporter of NASA... who not only has made lasting contri butions to our country, but is a s trong advocate for the nation's space program and a member of the NASA family." Mark Kelly's two teenage daughters from a previous marriage were reportedly with him in Tucson. The couple met in China in 2003 during a young leaders' forum and married in November 2007 at an organic farm south of Tucson. Giffords, 40, a Democrat, served on the House Science and Technology Committee, and took on NASA affairs while heading the space sub committee. She admitted to being nervous at her husband's shuttle launch in 2008. "It's a risky job," she told The Associated Press. "You don't really relax" until touchdown. Mark Kelly readily accepted his wife's fame. He considered her the bigger star in the family. Scott Kelly, who like his brother has two daughters, will end his 5?month mission in March, flying in a Russian Soyuz capsule to Kazakhstan. On Sunday, Scott Kelly and his crewmates another American, one Italian and three Russians kept busy with maintenance work. A busy few weeks are ahead with a spacewalk by two of the Russians and the late January arrival of the first-of-its-kind Japanese cargo ship. The brothers describe themselves as best friends. Both are Navy captains and former test pilots, and both became astronauts in 1996. They grew up in West Orange, N.J., the sons of police officers. Neither ever missed the other brother's space launches. Mark was there in October, right at the launch pad, when Scott boarded a Russian Soyuz rocket for the space station. Both were disappointed when, just weeks later, shuttle fuel tank cracks conspired to keep them apart in space. NASA won't speculate on flight by Giffords husband THIS UNDATED PHOTO provided by NASA shows Capt. Mark E. Kelly. The astronauts wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., was shot Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011 when an assailant opened fire in an area where the lawmaker was meeting with constituents in Tucson, congressional officials said. (AP

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LONDON T HEAmerican ambass ador to Reykjavik has b een summoned to explain why U.S. investigators are trying to access the privated etails of an Icelandic lawmaker's online activity as they try to build a criminal case against WikiLeaks, a ccording to Associated Press. Revelations that the U.S. Justice Department obtained a court order to examine data held by Twitter Inc. on Birgitta Jonsdottir, an Icelandic parliam entarian who sits on the c ountry's Foreign Affairs Committee, immediately c aused consternation in the t iny North Atlantic nation. (It is foreign state, the United States, demands such per s onal information of an Icelandic person, an elected official," Interior Minister Ogmundur Jonasson told Icelandic broadcaster RUV. "This is even more serio us when put (in t ive and concerns freedom o f speech and people's freedom in general," he added. Jonsdottir is a one-time WikiLeaks collaborator also known for her work on Iceland's media initiative, which aims to turn the i sland nation into a free s peech haven. Jonsdottir told The Assoc iated Press she was too o verwhelmed to comment S unday, but in a recent post to Twitter, she said she was talking with Americanl awyers about how to beat the order and was drumming up support in Iceland as well. U.S. Ambassador Luis E. Arreaga has been summoned for a meeting at Icel and's Foreign Ministry to d iscuss the issue, Foreign M inistry spokeswoman Urdur Gunnarsdottir saidS unday. It was not clear w hen the meeting was taking place. U.S. Embassy in Reyk javik said no one there would be available for comment until Monday. The evolving diplomatic s pat illustrates the challenge American prosecu tors face as they weighw hether to bring charges a gainst WikiLeaks, an international, tech-savvy operation that has angered and embarrassed Washing t on with a series of huge leaks of classified information. T he most recent disclo sure of thousands of secret State Department cables saw U.S. diplomats being ordered to gather the DNA and fingerprints of their international counterparts, captured backroom dealing o ver issues such as Guant anamo and rendition, and publicized unflattering a ssessments of friends and f oes alike. T he U.S. says the disclosures have damaged international diplomacy and putt he safety of informants and foreign human rights activists at risk. WikiLeaks has dismissed the claims, but Washington has been trying to find a way to prosecute the group a nd its leader, 39-year-old J ulian Assange, who is cur r ently in England. A court order unsealed e arlier this week revealed t hat American authorities had gone to court to seek data from Twitter about Assange, Jonsdottir, and others either known or suspected to have interacted with WikiLeaks. S ome of those named in the court order have said they suspect other compan ies such as Facebook I nc., Google Inc., and the eBay Inc.-owned Internet communications company Skype have also beens ecretly asked to hand over their personal data. Assange and Jonsdottir h ave vowed to fight the court order. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Iceland summons US envoy over WikiLeaks probe ICELANDIC LAWMAKER Birgitta Jonsdottir poses for this photo Feb. 24, 2010 at an unknown location. In a statement, Saturday Jan. 8, 2011, WikiLeaks said U.S. investigators had gone to the San Francisco-based Twitter Inc. to demand the private messages, contact information and other personal details of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and other supporters Assange has promised to fight the order, as has Jonsdottir, who said in a Twitter message that she had "no intention to hand my information over willingly." (AP ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates U.S. SECRETARYof State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sunday that the world must keep pressure on Iran over its suspect nuclear program despite recent estimates that the country may be further behind in efforts to develop atomic weapons than previously thought, according to Associated Press. Clinton told reporters accompanying her on a three-nation tour of the Persian Gulf that Iran "remains a serious concern" no mat ter when it might be able to produce a nuclear weapon. And she urged countries in the region that do business with Iran "to do everything within reason" to help ensure the sanctions are enforced. "We have had a consistent message to our friends in the Gulf that there is no part of the world that has more at stake in trying to deter Iran from becoming the creator and possessor of nuclear weapons than you," she said. "I don't know that it gives much comfort to someone who is in the Gulf or in a country that Iran has vowed to destroy that it's a one-year or three-year timeframe. So, I think we should keep the focus where it belongs," she said, referring to the sanctions and efforts by world powers to persuade Iran to halt uranium enrich ment. Her comments were the first from a senior U.S. official in response to reports in Israel on Friday that Israel's newly retired spy chief thinks Iran won't be able to build a nuclear bomb before 2015, further pushing back Israeli intelligence estimates of when Tehran might become a nuclear power. "We don't want anyone to be misled by anyone's intelligence analysis," Clinton said. "This remains a serious concern. We expect all our partners ... to stay as focused as they can and do everything within reason that will help to implement these sanctions." As recently as 2009, Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak said Iran would be able to build a nuclear bomb by 2011. But since then the projected deadline has been extended. The Israeli Cabinet minister in charge of strategic affairs, Moshe Yaalon, said last week it would take the Iranians at least three years to develop a nuclear weapon. Many Arab nations share U.S. fears that Iran is using a civilian atomic energy program to hide weapons development. Those concerns were amplified in leaked diplomatic cables released by the WikiLeaks website late last year that revealed deep mistrust of Iran by Sunni Arab leaders who must deal with an increasing emboldened Shiite neighbor. Clinton acknowledged that one reason for her trip to the United Arab Emirates, Oman and Qatar was to try to contain damage done by the release of the classified cables, which have exposed embarrassing secrets and tensions in the region. Her visit comes ahead of a new round of international talks with Iran, tentatively scheduled for Jan. 21-22 in Turkey. The five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France along with Germany will again try to compel Iran to come clean about its nuclear intentions, in return for incentives. Iran is under four sets of U.N. sanctions because of its refusal to halt uranium enrichment, which can be used to produce nuclear fuel or materials for bombs. U.S. officials believe the penalties are hitting Iran's economy, but want them to be more strictly enforced and would like individual countries to take separate punitive measures on their own. Tehran insists its uranium enrichment and other programs are meant only for peaceful purposes to generate fuel for a future network of nuclear reactors. Clinton's trip to the Gulf is her second in as many months. She also attended an international security conference in Bahrain in December. While Iran is always high on the agenda during such vis its to the region, her focus this time will be broader. Clinton presses P er sian Gulf countries on Iran

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By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A LEADING F reeport businessman has accusedB ahamas Customs of breaching an undertaking given by the Attorney Gen erals Office on its behalf byp ersisting with demands for bonded goods sales reports, telling Tribune B usiness that the situation w as imposing a further depression on post-Christmas trade in the city. C hristopher Lowe, operat ions manager at Kellys (Freeport paper that Customs was informing all 3,500 Grand Bahama Port Authority ( GBPA) licencees that with effect from this month, they are required to submit to ito n a monthly basis reports on all goods they have sold bonded, or duty-free, to other licencees for use in thel atters business. T his, he argued, meant that Customs was breaching the undertaking the Attor-n ey Generals Office had g iven on its behalf to the Supreme Court that it wouldnot demand bonded good sales reports, or impose sanctions for its non-submission, until the substanC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.60 $4.64 $4.61 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business E ditor DESPITEChristmas sales dropping 38 per cent year-over-year due to the loss of two stores, City M arkets executives told T ribune Business that its top line has averaged a 22 per cent week-over-weeki ncrease in the past fortnight, giving them encouragement that a $100 mill ion target for their first 1 2 months is not an unreasonable expectation. D isclosing that the ninestore supermarket chains sales had more than dou-b led, increasing by 135 per c ent since the Mark Fin layson-led Trans Island T raders acquired 78 per c ent majority ownership in Bahamas Supermarkets on November 10 last year,P hilip Kemp, the companys chief financial officer, told this newspaper it was looking to boost customerc ounts even further through offering an enhanced product mix. W hile a more-than-dou bling of City Markets sales since the takeover isn ot surprising, given how b are the supermarket chains shelves were due to lack of inventory, MrK emp told Tribune Busi ness the company was pretty much on sched-u le in terms of managements expectations. Over the last two w eeks, we averaged a 22 per cent sales increase week-over-week, Mr Kemp told Tribune Busi n ess. In terms of the Christmas period, we were only down about 38 per cent, which is not bad considering we lost two stores. Those are the Oakes Field and Village Road outlets, lost after landlord Neil MacTaggart and the company decided to part ways, but Mr Kemp added: If you look at it from the first week wetook over to now, weve seen about a 135 per cent increase in sales. We see our traffic in the stores picking up quire signifi cantly also. He told this newspaper that City Markets was now focusing on its product mix, ensuring consumers met the majority of their grocery needs with it and were not temptedto look elsewhere. If we can close that gap, get to 80-90 per cent of their product mix for the week, we will start to By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor DOCTORSHospital is aiming to g row and diversify its business mix i nto an ultimate 50/50 split between its current core and medical tourism, its p resident telling Tribune Business that moving into the latter area would enable it to not worry about prof-i tability following a year when local patient activity dropped off by 25 perc ent. W ith the BISX-listed healthcare p roviders prostate cancer treatment program already in place as its first medical tourism initiative, Barry R assin told this newspaper that Doctors Hospital hoped to establish a spinal surgery centre in Nassau within t he next five to six months, followed b y a centre for hips, knee and joint replacement possibly as early as next year. Describing medical tourism as a strong part of our future, Mr Rassin s aid Doctors Hospital would likely B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AML Foods has become t he latest BISX-listed compa ny to unveil a share buy back program, its chairman telling Tribune Business the move to acquire up to 10 per cent of the stock over a 36-monthp eriod was sparked by an illiquid market that failed to reflect the groups return toc onsistent profitability in a severely undervalued share price. By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business E ditor SUPERVALUE is d usting off plans to bulk purchase in advance in a bid to head off escalating f ood prices expected to hit later this year, its president and owner also expressingf ears that energy prices might double during 2011. With commodity price i ncreases an emerging threat that might knock By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CITY MARKETSmeltdown under the disastrous former BSL Holdings ownership cost its main Trinidadian shareholder a $0.142 per share loss for its 2010 financial year, with structural disad vantages and increasing competitive intensity in Bahamian food retailing blamed for the failure to turn the supermarket chain around. Gervase Warner, chief executive of Trinidadian con glomerate Neal & Massy, which previously owned 31 per cent of Bahamas Super markets shares via its 40 per cent stake in majority share holder, BSL Holdings, admitted the company failed to anticipate the depth of the problems faced by the then-11 store chain operating as City AMLs 10% buy back to combat severely undervalued stock BISX-listed food group unveils 36-month share repurchase to fight illiquid market Chairman says stock damn good buy, amid frustrat ion that market does not reflect fundamentals and consistent profits % of the population don t understand shares, he says, with price dictated by cash-seeking small sellers AML Foods prepared to borrow to finance deals, and expects other listed Bahamian firms to follow suit SEE page 4B DIONISIO DAGUILAR NEAL & MASSY HIT BY CITY MARKETS HORROR SHOWING Bahamian supermarket c hain pr oduced $0.142 per shar e loss f or Trinidad conglomerate, some 75% of all discontinued operations losses Blames important structural disadvantages and increasing competitiv e intensity f or tur nar ound f ailur e Wrote-off $8.156m investment to turn firm ar ound, whic h inc luded guar antee f or Ro yal Bank loan SEE page 5B 22% WEEK ON WEEK SALES RISE AT CITY MARKETS Despite 38% drop in Xmast op line due to l oss of two stores, company says sales have risen 135% since tak eover SEE page 4B SUPERVALUE HEDGES BET ON ENERGY, FOOD RISES Super market chain activ ating adv ance b ulk buying plans, as o w ner e xpects ener gy c osts to double Beats Chr istmas projections by some 2% SEE page 7B SEE page 7B Customs accused of breaching AG court undertaking F reeport businessman says latest moves over bonded goods sales an attempt to f or ce F reeport into duty-paid w orld and increase g o v er nment revenues Doctors targets 50/50 medical tourism split Mo v e targeting increased revenue streams that will ensure B ISX-listed firm does not have to worry about profitability President says recession caused % drop in patient activity across the board, with tourist percentage of mix down from 1 8% to 11% Med tourism could help boost staff levels -20%, with spinal centre and knee/hip facility possibly both arriving w ithin year Targeting 1,000 medical tourism patients in two-three years S EE page 6B D OCTORS HOSPITALPRESIDENT: Barry Rassin

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ROYALFIDELITY MARKET WRAP B ISX SYMBOLCLOSING PRICEWKLY PRICE CHANGEVOLUMEYTD PRICE CHANGE AML...........................$ 0.97...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% BBL............................$ 0.18...............................................$-..............................30,500...........................0.00% BOB............................$ 4.90...............................................$-..............................200................................0.00% B PF.............................$ 10.63...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% B SL.............................$ 5.01...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% BWL...........................$ 2.70...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% CAB............................$ 10.46................................................$...............................-0..................................0.00% CBL............................$ 7.00...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% CHL............................$ 2.40...............................................$-..............................4,000.............................0.00% CIB..............................$ 9.39...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% CWCB........................$ 2.02..............................................$0.19...........................0....................................10.38% D HS............................$ 1.60...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% FAM...........................$ 6.07...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% F BB.............................$ 2.17...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% F CL.............................$ 5.46...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% F CLB..........................$ 1.00...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% FIN..............................$ 7.23...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% I CD.............................$ 7.40...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% J SJ...............................$ 9.82...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% P RE............................$ 10.00...............................................$-..............................0....................................0.00% By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS I t was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian s tock market. Investors traded in three out of the 24 listed securities, with no advancers nor decliners. E QUITY MARKET A total of 34,700 shares changed hands, representi ng a significant decrease of 36,221 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 70,921 shares. Benchmark Bahamas (BBL leader, trading a volume of 30,500 shares to close unchanged at $0.18. B OND MARKET N o notes traded during last week. COMPANY NEWS Earnings Releases: There were no earnings reports released last week. I NTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates CurrencyWeekly% Change C AD1.00861.47 G BP1.55570.72 E UR1.2915-1.55 COMMODITIES CommodityWeekly% Change C rude Oil93.58-0.20 G old1,367.00-0.47 INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES IndexWeeklyy% Change DJIA 11,674.76 0 .84 S&P 500 1 ,271.50 1.10 NASDAQ 2,703.171.90 N ikkei 10,541.04 3.05 B OND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS B ISX SYMBOLDESCRIPTIONVOLUMEPAR VALUE FBB13FBB Series C Notes Due 20130$1,000 F BB15FBB Series D Notes Due 20150$1,000 FBB17FBB Series A Notes Due 20170$1,000F BB22FBB Series B Notes Due 20220$1,000 Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C OLINAInsurance h opes customers will notice something different when t hey phone or walk into a b ranch of the life and health i nsurer, as it has taken a new customer service pledge. The five-point pledge s erves as the guideline for Colinas standard of client interaction and service qual ity, dealing with everything from telephone etiquette and client waiting time limitsto ways of addressing cow orkers on company p remises. Colina has mounted the pledge on the walls of all itsb ranches to remind staff of the new service motto, Ser vice Excellence: Our Policy; Our Promise, since it wasl aunched with a week of cus t omer appreciation activities a nd giveaways at all branch es in Nassau and the FamilyI slands. V ice-president of life o perations, Wendy Butler, said: Our customers deserve our best effort asw ell as our respect and courtesy. By placing the customer as the central element of all of our work, we will enhance our culture of customer awareness and sustain the highest quality of cust omer satisfaction, personal a ccountability and profes sional commitment. Ms Butler said the new s ervice pledge focuses on the needs of clients as human beings as well as patrons of an establishment. Weve recognized that c ustomer service must be m ore proactive and go beyond satisfying the cust omers basic need, Ms B utler said. This means exceeding a customers expectation by delivering a service prior tot he turnaround time wherever possible, or facilitating c ustomers who make special r equests that are qualified exceptions to our standard p rocedures. C olina expects new tech n ology will boost the programme this year, and give clients easier and more con v enient ways to interact with the insurer. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM &RPIRUWDEOHRRPVDW&RPIRUWDEOHDWHV5RRPVIURPMXVWHULJKWSOXVJUDWXLW\5HVWDXUDXQWDQG%DURROHFUHDWLRQRRPHHWLQJRRP$OEDQV'ULYH Colinas pledge on customer service COLINA REPRESENTATIVES and clients stand in front of a poster declaring the first principle of the companys new Customer Service Pledge. L-R: executive vice-chairman Emanuel Alexiou; customer services manager Julie D ean; clients Margaret Pratt, Monica P orter and Latoya Cooper; vice-president, life operations, Wendy Butler; and customer services manager, Lavaughn Fernander. BELOW: At the launch of Colinas new Customer Service Pledge at the companys Rosetta Branch, client Raquel Pyfrom (second from left greeted by Wendy Butler, vice-president, life operations; Emanuel Alexiou, executive vice-chairman; and Alice Woodside, branch administrator.

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Hinting at the food retail groups frustration that its positive fundamentals,n amely two years of consist ent profitability amid the worst recession in living memory, were not being reflected by the Bahamian stock market, Dionisio DAguilar said AML Foodsc urrent $0.97 per share s tock price was a damn good buy. The BISX-listed food retail group this follows the lead established by Cable Bahamas and Common-w ealth Bank in establishing a share buy back program, announcing on Friday that it would repurchase up to 10 per cent of its outstanding 1,540,417 shares (just over 154,000) over a 36-month or three-year period to January 31, 2014. T he move is designed to support AML Foods share price for the benefit of longterm investors, such as pension funds and insurancec ompanies; stimulate interest and market demand for the stock, indicate to the market where the company fees the true value should be; and provide more liquidity to existing investors t hat enables them to sell m ore easily. Tribune Business understands that AML Foods Board and senior management had been discussing initiating a share buy back program for some 18 m onths, and Mr DAguilar said the company might even be prepared to temporarily borrow to finance purchases of its own stocki f the terms were right. Pointing to the lack of o verall liquidity in the Bahamian stock market, which was making it difficult for buyers and sellers of many stocks to conductt rade, Mr DAguilar also lamented the lack of sophistication among investors, telling Tribune Business: Ninety-five per cent of the population dont understand shares. A ML Foods payment of a dividend last year the first such payment for seven to eight years sparked upward movement in the stock price despite the improved fundamentals, and Mr DAguilar said the comp anys market price was too often being dictated by small retail investors needing to sell several hundred or a thousand shares to raisec ash at values that did not r eflect the groups worth, He added: The main reason were doing it is that the shares are trading at $0.97, and we feel the stockss everely undervalued. We feel its worth a lot more than that, and given the illiquid market, the lack of liquidity in the market, and the lack of interest in t he shares, we felt wed crea te a little bit of interest and a bit of activity at $1 a share. I f no one is prepared to but it at $1 a share, which is a damn good buy, the company will buy it. The AML Foods chairm an said the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX the company it must notify the market of a specific amount of shares it would attempt to repurchase, and o ver what period of time, h ence the 10 per cent at three-year period to January 2014. Telling Tribune Business that AML Foods would see how it goes, Mr DAguilar said: Given cash flow cons iderations, we gave ourselves three years to accomplish this goal, and after three years well see. I expect almost immedia tely that there will be some b ump up in the shares, and if the company is prepared to buy back its shares at $1, the current market price, it must be sending the marketa message. We paid a dividend last year, and that did not cause a bump up in the share price. Thats the way a sophisticated market works, but it d oes not seem to work that w ay here. At Christmas time, people want money. T he price is dictated, not by the fundamentals, but the desire of the small shareholder to sell 1,000 shares to get money for Christmas.T hat tends to drive the price down, but not for the right reasons. Ninety-five per cent of the population dont understand shares, dont maintain an interest in shares, and that creates illiqu idity. People are not prep ared to play the market. Explaining that AML Foods was effectively creating a market for ourselves through its share buy back program, Mr DAguilar said he expected m ore publicly-listed Bahamian companies to follow suit to put the price where it should be. I think thats probably t he way until people become a little more sophisticated, Mr DAguilar told Tribune Business. I think its almost necessary, as there are so few trades apart from Com-m onwealth Bank. I think more companies, who look at their fundamentals, look at what the share price reflects, will go out and announce it. W hile AML Foods had n ot allocated a specific sum to finance its share repurc hase program, Mr DAguilar said: If the opportunity arises, and we think the shares are undervalued, we will go into them arket. Noting that the company was conscious of cash flows and capital expenditures it needed to finance, namely its $4.5 million Solomons Fresh Market store in weste rn New Providence, the c hairman added: If the cash is available and the price is right, we will buy it. If we think its a damn good deal, we will temporarily borrow to take advantage of it. We have no debt, so if a g ood situation arises and we want to take advantage of the opportunity, were going to do what we need to do in that regard, and if we havet o borrow to take advantage o f this, thats what well do. Mr DAguilar said the buy back program would ensure AML Foods share price doesnt go any lower, ands trengthens and trends up to where it should be. We feel that we can provide increased shareholder value by buying back some of our outstanding ordinary shares, a nd improving earnings and d ividends per share. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM hit these kinds of numbers, Mr Kemp s aid. What weve seen so far is quite e ncouraging. Were not out of the woods yet, but weve kind of got to grips with t his model, so we feel more comfortable. Going forward, Christmas was quite encouraging, and weve identified thosea reas we need to focus on. Theres still a l ot of people out there that want City Markets to succeed, and traffic has been quite encouraging. Weve been on target with expectations. We knew coming in that there would be a lot of challenges. But theresn o surprise in terms of where we are at this time; were pretty much on schedule. Noting that sorting out lingering refrig e ration issues was a high priority, Mr Kemp said City Markets was still on targ et to reach $100 million in sales during the first year of Trans Island Traders majority ownership. Wed like to, he added of the $100 million sales objective. If the growth continues as we are doing now, thatsn ot an unreasonable expectation, but its very difficult to predict at this point. Its an extremely competitive envi ronment, and Im sure the competitors a re not going to lie down and let us recapture the market share we lost. AMLs 10% buy back to combat severely undervalued stock FROM page one 22 per cent week on week sales rise at City Markets FROM page one

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t ive issues between it and K ellys (Freeport mined by the court. Kellys (Freeport filed a Judicial Review action of Customs demand for such a report, and the terms of the undertaking, as r ead out by the companys a ttorney, Fred Smith of Callenders & Co, state: Until judgment in this matter or further Order, neither the Respondent, nor any Cust oms officer or employee or a gent of H.M. Customs, may detain goods, or refuse to p rocess imported goods for e ntry in the usual way, or r efuse to accept returns for Duty Paid Sales, or otherwise take enforcementa ction against the applicant or other GBPA Licensees, on the basis of non-receipt of duty exempt bonded sales r eports or on any other basis not sanctioned by law." Glenn Gomez, Customs C omptroller, could not be r eached by Tribune Busin ess for comment on late Friday afternoon. H owever, Mr Lowe told T ribune Business: "In the face of the undertaking by the Attorney General of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, that Bahamas C ustoms will not pursue Bonded Sales reports until t he substantive issue of bonded goods reporting is heard before a judge of the Supreme Court, Bahamas Customs is notifyingl icensees of the Grand Bahama Port Authority that they are now, effective Jan uary 2011, required to report o n a monthly basis all of their bonded purchases and, in addition, requiring all sell-e rs of bonded goods to r eport on all sales to licensees. Also, a new declaration form called a C14A must bes igned by the licensee for each and every monthly invoice submission (pur c hase), and a C14B declara tion by the seller on licensee purchases report. The C14A, Mr Lowe explained, was effectively for buyers, who Customs is requiring to sign off that they bought all these goods for use in their own busin ess. T he C14B, he added, requires licencees to confirm t hat they sold bonded goods t o legitimate licencees. A ll this, Mr Lowe said, had added to the confusion and consternation caused byC ustoms move to require all GBPA licencees to produce a National Insurance Board (NIB Good Standing, showing they were up to date on employee contributions, b efore they would be issued w ith a bonded letter e nabling them to purchase goods duty-free in 2011. Already in effect Janua ry 1 is the de-facto denial of the right to purchase bonded goods via a new requirement to furnish to BahamasC ustoms a letter of good standing from the National Insurance Board in order to obtain an Over the Counter Bonded Purchase Letter, which according to Bahamas Customs enables the forgo-i ng of their requirement for e ach and every purchase order to be approved, Mr Lowe said. Apparently this letter is being issued from NIB in Nassau, and there is some question as to what other Government departments are in collusion with respect to overdue fees or amounts owing by Freeport businesse s. Also, these letters are slow in coming and are t hereby denying a right by way of Government lethargy or explicit intent. This is, of course, a questionable practice which has never been required or enforced, as the right to purchase Conditionally Duty Free is granted to licensees by the Grand Bahama Port Authority, not the NIB. Asked by Tribune Business about the impact all this was having on Freeports economy, Mr Lowe replied: I think a further depression of the post-Christmas trade, because I have a feeling that a number of licencee comp anies are putting off any w ork they have that uses duty-free materials until they get approval to purc hase for the ensuing year. So, practically, its going t o have the effect of delaying construction after Christmas, especially on jobsr equiring duty-free materials. Licensees are being forced by Bahamas Customs into purchasing materials required by their businesses in a duty paid state, thereby i ncreasing costs but also crea ting potential legal issues w here contracts have been signed for duty free con-s truction or service contracts n eeding bonded materials. And Mr Lowe added: If Customs continues to act unlawfully and arbitrarily, its going to get pretty rough in Freeport, and ultimately it strikes me as a deliberatea ttempt by the Government to force Freeport into the duty-paid world and increase their revenues. B onded goods sales is a practice whereby Freeportbased wholesalers, such as Dolly Madison, Kelly's( Freeport) and Bellevue Business Depot, are able to sell products to other GBPAl icencees for use in their r espective businesses only, without any duty being paid to Customs/Government on their sale. I t is a report on this activity that Customs is seeking, but Kelly's (Freeporti ts attorneys are arguing that t his has never been requested before, and is not included in any statute law, policy or agreement concerning their relationship. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.326-8191 Suite 5,Jasmine Corporate Center,East Sunrise Highway,P.O.Box F-42655,Freeport Tel.351-3960A member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeHealth insurance premiums have continued to rise,so we are all more sensitive to the levels of cover and service a health plan provides. Feeling good about choosing Premier Health for your business,is knowing your employees receive more service and cover for your premium dollar.Premier Health delivers state-of-the-art administration and claims support to work for your business too.Less hassle on service,care and price issues means more focus on doing what you and your team do best.Call 326-8191 or visit www.cgigroup.bm Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Premier HealthIt feels good to choose a health plan that takes care of my business,my team and me. Premiums have not been controlled by cutting benefits and coverage for catastrophic illnesses Premium increases have on average been lower than the market rate Customs accused of breaching AG court undertaking FROM page one KELLYS (FREEPORT A TTORNEY F red Smith of C allenders & Co

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have to add another 10-20 per cent to its staffing levelspossibly as much as 50-100 j obs once medical tourism t ook off and the hospitals business from r esidents/tourists returned to pre-recession levels. Explaining that Doctors H ospital was looking to a ttract 250 patients per year to the Bahamas through the spinal treatment and surgery centre, Mr Rassin said of the rationale behind the medical tourism move: Increased rev e nue streams, pure and simple. The Bahamas is a very small population, and to prov ide service to a small popu l ation we can see it [the effects] now, especially with t he recession. The Doctors Hospital president said the recessions impact had been especiallyh eavy on the business it gen e rated from providing treatments to visiting stopover and cruise ship tourists. W hile tourists normally accounted for 18 per cent of the hospitals patient activity, M r Rassin said this percenta ge had dropped to 11 per c ent due to the recession and reduction in travel demand. Half of our tourists were not getting, and thats the biggest blow to the top and bottoml ine, said Mr Rassin. N oting that Doctors Hosp ital had seen an almost 25 per cent drop in activity a cross the board, he explained that the company was looking to build on itse xisting core business to diversify into medical tourism, reducing its reliance on resi d ents and transient visitors for 100 per cent of its rev enues. We dont want to rely on f oreign visitors and, where business activity drops 25 per c ent as it did last year, not worry about profitability. We want another revenues tream, Mr Rassin said, adding that Doctors Hospital wanted something that jumps us into profits in both g ood and bad times. For the Bahamas, the spin-off is fantastic, he a dded. Two hundred and fifty cases bringing with them family members, each oft hose staying in the hotels. Its b ig for the hospital and big f or tourism. Id like to see us get to a 50/50 ratio, 50 per c ent local, 50 per cent med ical tourism. With the High Intensity F ocused Ultrasound (HIFU prostate cancer treatment centre, headed by Dr Robin R oberts, attracting 15-20 patients per month, Mr Rassin said Doctors Hospital was hoping to attract 250 p atients annually to each of the spinal and knee/joint r eplacement centres during their formative years. Youre talking 1,000 p atients a year, which I think we can get to over two-three years, he told Tribune Busin ess. Thats gigantic business f or us. It makes us internat ional. It should take our bottom and top line to a place w here we have all the cash we need to make sure we stay up to date with technology. D octors Hospital had w orked painstakingly over m any years to put in place the foundations to break into m edical tourism, Mr Rassin said, describing as a gigantic step the attaining of JointC ommission International accreditation last June a standard that signals to Amer i cans that the BISX-listed healthcare provider is the equal of any US hospital in terms of quality care and out c omes. Building on the HIFU pro grammes initial success, Mr R assin said Doctors Hospital was working with Bahamian specialist, Dr Val Grimes, tos et-up the spinal surgery and care centre as part of a consortium, together with spe cialists from Florida and W ashington, plus a spinal parts manufacturer. The consortiums plan was to give overseas patients options as to whether they had their treatment at home or in Nassau. If the latter wasc hosen, Mr Rassin said a unique feature was that the programme brought bothp atient and surgeon to the Bahamas, an element designed to give Doctors Hos-p ital a market niche and stand o ut from the competition. Explaining that it was critical to get it done right, ensuring that accreditations and quality care were all in place, Mr Rassin said Doctors Hospital was hoping to get the spinal surgery centre operational within the next five-six months. And, with the same partners involved in the knee/hip/joint replacement programme, he added that this might be established by the end of this year or Janu ary next year. Its a very competitive business, so we want to focus on niche markets, and no one else is looking to bring the surgeons over, Mr Rassin said. While the likes of Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia had stolen an early march on the competition, primarily through a cost structure that paid 10 per cent of US salary costs, Mr Rassin said medical costs in the Bahamas were about 20 per cent less than in or northern neighbour. The Bahamas and Doctors Hospitals competitive advan tage, Mr Rassin said, lay in its ability to offer a combina tion of 20-25 per cent cost savings; quality assurance through the JCI accreditation; and bringing the surgeons to Nassau. The insurance com panies like that combination, he explained. And, with patients from overseas also set to be attracted through Doctors Hospitals Internet marketing, Mr Rassin said this was where the spin-offs will be created for Bahamian doctors and surgeons as the reputation for quality care spread. Bahamian doctors would be the ones doing the operations here, and thats when the benefits to surgeons will jump. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM F ROM page one Doctors targets 50/50 medical tourism split

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Markets. H e also, in his year-end report to Neal & Massys hareholders, revealed that the company invested some $52.2 million Trinidadian dol-lars ($8.156 million in Bahamian/US dollars) in try-i ng to turn Bahamas Supermarkets around during thec onglomerates 2010 financial year. We did not anticipate the depth of the economic recession and increasing competi-t ive intensity in food retailing in the Bahamas, which overcame the groups efforts to turn around Bahamas Supermarkets, Mr Warner c onfessed to Neal & Massy shareholders. While it was no secret that Bahamas Supermarkets had incurred continued losses over the last several financial years, Mr Warner confirmedt hat Neal & Massys Board decided to sell the company during the July-September quarter, the last one in its financial year. That coincided with when Neal & Massy stopped investing in CityM arkets. Referring to both Bahamas Supermarkets and another loss-making business that Neal & Massy has disposed of, Mr Warner added: Attempts to turn around these companies proved u nsuccessful as important structural disadvantages were too significant to overcome. The Trinidadian conglomerates report noted that Bahamas Supermarkets accounted for 75 per cent ort hree-quarters of the losses it suffered from discontinued operations in 2010. The Bahamian supermarket chain produced a TT$0.91 or US$0.1428 loss per share, with pre-tax losses generat-e d by City Markets standing at TT$87.818 million or US$13.54 million. The latter figure compared to a loss of TT$19.515 million or US$3.049 million in 2009. N eal & Massy noted that it inherited Bahamas Superm arkets as an underperforming company when it acquired Barbados Shipping & Trading, the original 40 per cent equity investor in BSL Holdings, which was also City Markets operating partner. I ts financial statements added: The net asset value for Bahamas Supermarkets at the end of the last financial year was $27 million (US$4.22 million quarter of the financial year,t he group invested a further $52.2 million (US$8.156 million) by way of a cash injection of $35 million (US$5.47 million) and a guarantee given to Royal Bank of Canada f or $17.2 million (US$2.69 million) for a Bahamas S upermarket loan. On November 10, 2010, the holding company in which the group had invested sold its investment in Bahamas Supermarkets for $1 and Neal& Massy wrote-off the value of its investment at the financ ial year ended 2010. Also impacted was Barbados Shipping & Trading, Neal & Massys subsidiary, which suffered a $16.587 million loss on Bahamas Supermarkets in Barbadian dollars. any Bahamian economic r ecovery off course, Rupert R oberts told Tribune Business that the grocery chain would employ the methods itu sed in 2008 to try and protect the Bahamian consumer from impending food price increase s. N oting that staples such as cooking oil and tuna appeared to be rising once again, MrR oberts told Tribune Business he had informed his buying team on Friday afternoon t o obtain the latest consumer r eports and buy everything they can up front before the expected price increases took h old. He explained that Supervalue rode it out two yearsa go and was able to hold the p rices by employing a strategy of buying core products, in bulk, in advance. Through hedging our bets in such fashion, said Mr Roberts, the chain obtained better pricest han if they had left the purchases later, and were able to pass the savings on to consumers. S upervalues 105,000 square foot warehouse was more t han adequate to cope with b ulk inventory purchases, Mr Roberts said, while the grocery chains suppliers and wholesalers were well-positioned to inform it in advance o f any price hikes. We were able to protect the country from price increases that way, Mr R oberts told Tribune Busi ness. Our people notify us, and we know what to do. Thew ay we do it costs money, and we tie up resources, we tie up space, but if we can hold our prices and competitors cant, we increase volumes and pay for it that way. We have the variety and w e have the price. Were still on a roll. We were able to protect the country from price increases that way in 2008. Were just planning this now. Some stuff weve bought, w ere going to buy more, and s ee what else is going to take an increase. I would think that for the n ext six months, because of energy costs, Im guesstimating that prices are going to go up. W hile the cold weather in Florida and the Bahamas had resulted in price increases for s ome produce as a result of supply disruption, Mr Roberts said the six month contracts and other actions by his buying team had protected Superv alue from the effects. W hile perishable goods prices still seemed to be stable, Mr Roberts also e xpressed fears about increas ing energy costs in 2011, after oil prices again broke throught he $91 per gallon barrier towards the end of last week. Noting that this could impact both Supervalues electricity and transportation costs, Mr Roberts told Tribune Business: If energyg oes up, freight goes up. One of the bid problems is going to be if energy goes up, and I expect energy costs to double by the end of the year. Thats going to be a big p roblem. On the first of every month I have to write BEC a cheque for $250,000, and it might increase to $500,000. I cant ask the consumer to payf or that, you have to cut back. You cannot increase the cost of living, especially in a reces-s ion. While some analysts sugg ested the recession was over, M r Roberts told Tribune B usiness that he estimated it would take three years for the jobs to come back, unlesst he $2.6 billion Baha Mar project and other developmentsl ike it were able to bridge t he gap. T he Supervalue owner told Tribune Business that the chain exceeded his Christmas p rojections by 2 per cent, which in our business is almost $1 million. He addedt hat by doing a months busin ess in a week or two, the supermarket chains costs were spread out over a g reater volume of sales units. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 127,&( ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW 3$,'+2/',1*6,1& 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV RI 3$,'+2/',1*6 KDVEHHQ GLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWR WKH&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU +DPLOWRQDQDJHPHQWHUYLFHV/LPLWHG )LPDQ+RXVHW*HRUJHVODFH 6WHWHURUW*XHUQVH\ /LTXLGDWRU (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21 $1''8&7,21<$0$/*<'$1f/,0,7(' 127,&( 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHVWGD\RI'HFHPEHU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI-DQXDU\ &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRURI (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 $0$/*<'$1f/,0,7(' (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21 $ 1''8&7,21.+276.f/,0,7(' 127,&( 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRIHFWLRQfRIWKH QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIIWKHHJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WRD&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGE\7KHHJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHV WGD\RI'HFHPEHU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI-DQXDU\ &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRURI (;;2102%,/(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 .+276.f/,0,7(' (662(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21$1*2/$ ,11(5(1'f/,0,7(' 127,&( 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHG7KH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHV WGD\RI'HFHPEHU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI-DQXDU\ &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRURI (662(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 $1*2/$,11(5(1'f/,0,7(' FROM page one Supervalue hedges bets on energy, food rises Neal & Massy hit by City Markets horror showing F ROM page one

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WASHINGTON Associated Press A STEADYdecline in l ayoffs is giving the vast majority of adults whohave jobs the confidence to spend more freely and h elp energize the econom y. They no longer worry so much about losing their j obs. T heir renewed confid ence has boosted retail sales just what's neededt o spark what economists c all a "virtuous cycle": Higher consumer spending raises company prof its, which spurs hiring, which fuels more spend-i ng and growth. Consumer spending is c ritical because it powers about 70 percent of the economy. It rose for five straight months through November, kicking off the strongest holiday shopping season since 2006. Many shoppers are showing enough confidence to splurge on new cars: Autos ales rebounded 11 percent in 2010, the first increase since 2005. The strongest showing for consumers since the peak years of the last expansion signals that the b roader economy is near a threshold of self-sustain ing growth," analysts atC iti Investment Research & Analysis wrote last w eek. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke e choed that point Friday. He told a Senate panel he sees evidence that a "selfsustaining" recovery is taking hold because consumers and businesses are spending more. Morgan Stanley economists say 4 percent growth is "likely, perhaps evenc onservative" in 2011, up from an estimated 3.1 percent last year. Late thism onth, the government will estimate economic growth for the final quarter of 2010. C onsumer spending is rising because the vast majority of working-age A mericans are now b reathing easier, despite 9 .4 percent unemployment. People who had jobs feared being laid off d uring the recession, which ended in June 2009, and for months after. Few e r worry now, because most companies have stopped cutting staff. Workers who survived t he job cuts of the past three years have begun to conclude: "If they haven't fired me by now, they're not going to," says Michael Koskuba, portfolio manager with Victory C apital Management. B y October 2010, layoffs a nd other dismissals had sunk to their lowest points ince August 2006. In D ecember, employers added just 103,000 jobs too few even to keep up with population growth. But that was mainly because they're still reluc tant to hire, not becauset hey're still cutting jobs. The number of people applying for unemploy-m ent benefits a proxy f or the pace of layoffs has dropped in the past four months. And economists think employers willf inally ramp up hiring this year. "You've got 10 percent u nemployment, and you add another 5 or 10 percent" for discouraged workers or those stuck inp art-time positions, b ecause they can't find full-time work, says Doug Hart, a retail specialist att he consulting firm BDO U SA. But the remaining 80 percent, having survived the worst of the layoffs, "are feeling more secure about their jobs." In 2009, consumers across all income groups froze up. The Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics recorded the first annual drop in consumer spending in records dating to 1984. Now, BDO's Hart says, "The fear factor has subsided." That's evident among consumers like Monique Aguilar, 27, of Saugus, Mass. Aguilar put off a car purchase last year after the restaurant chain where she's a manager announced layoffs. But there she was Friday at a Chevrolet dealership in neighboring Lynn, Mass., shopping for a new Malibu. What's changed? She doesn't worry so much about being let go. Her employer's sales have improved, and she's encouraged by reports of slowing layoffs and of companies starting to hire. "In general, I feel like we're going in the right direction," Aguilar says. "That makes me comfortable in my purchase." Many households also feel better able to spend because they've sharply reduced credit card and other debt they ran up during the mid-2000s. Economists say consumers seem increasingly divided into "haves" and "have-nots." The haves are more secure in their jobs. Their finances are solid. So is their credit. They dominate the high est-earning 20 percent of Americans, who con tribute nearly 40 percent of consumer spending. Among managers and professionals, for instance, unemployment in Decem b er was just 4.6 percent less than half the overall unemployment rate. The have-nots are struggling with shaky finances and job security. Unemployment is running at 12 p ercent for transportation w orkers, for example. It e xceeds 20 percent for construction workers. A 20 percent run-up in t he Dow Jones industrial average since July has also skewed the consumer rebound in favor of upperincome shoppers and the luxury stores that serve them. It's a two-tier market," says Doug Roberts, chief investment strategist forC hannel Capital R esearch. The affluent "are beginning to feel more confident because their (stocku p." During the holidays, high-end retailers likeN ordstrom Inc. and Saks Inc. reported the strongest sales. Michael Niemira, chief economist at theI nternational Council of S hopping Centers, says luxury sales rise and fall almost in lockstep witht he stock market. A fter hunkering down during the recession, for example, Jerrie McKennon of Burleson, Texas, last year splurged on a Lexus and two expensive vacations. The main reason was that most of her investment portfolio had recovered from its losses during the financial crisis. "I loosened up in 2010," she says. "The money we lost came back." Few expect a return to the carefree spending of the mid-2000s. Falling home prices are weighing on consumers' confidence and their ability to bor row. Nearly one in four homeowners owe more on their mortgage than their homes are worth. Rising gasoline prices and the prospect of higher food prices are also likely to limit spending in 2011. But analysts at Barclays Capital say a cut in Social Security taxes for workers this year will help them absorb higher gasoline prices. That tax break will put more money in people's pockets $1,000 more for an individual earning $50,000 a year. Higher spending and growth don't mean the unemployment rate will fall significantly this year. Most economists think it will remain around 9 per cent at year's end. Bernanke said Friday it could take up to five years for unemployment to drop to a historically normal rate of around 6 percent. Still, economists say, more consumers are confident the worst of the job cuts are over. And that points to a stronger economy ahead. "If you think back to a year ago, we were still questioning whether we'd seen the end of the recession," Niemira says. "So we've come a long way." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.401.00AML Foods Limited1.041.040.000.2500.0404.23.85% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0500.200212.61.88% 6.945.23Bank of Bahamas5.245.240.000.5980.2608.84.96%0 .580.40Benchmark0.400.400.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1680.09018.82.86% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0550.04039.51.84% 12.559.62Cable Bahamas12.0712.070.001.4060.2908.62.40% 2.842.69Colina Holdings2.842.840.000.2490.04011.41.41% 7.005.00Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.636.660.0312,0000.4600.23014.53.45% 3.652.21Consolidated Water BDRs2.822.76-0.060.1110.05224.91.88% 2.551.32Doctor's Hospital2.542.540.000.6270.1104.14.33% 6.995.94Famguard6.076.070.00-0.0030.240N/M3.95% 10.998.75Finco9.089.00-0.085,0000.1680.52053.65.78% 10.609.50FirstCaribbean Bank10.6010.600.000.6780.35015.63.30% 5.533.75Focol (S 5.085.080.001,0000.3660.17013.93.35% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.300.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 5.595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.008500.4070.24013.74.29% 10.509.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.001 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol. EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield 30 May 2013T HURSDAY, 13 MAY 2010B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,598.67 | CHG 0.35 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD 33.29 | YTD % 2.13BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets10.0611.0614.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.46741.3758CFAL Bond Fund1.46741.996.661.446000 2.91162.8266CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.90200.52-0.112.886947 1.53021.4590CFAL Money Market Fund1.53021.534.881.514105 3.20252.9343Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.03682.57-4.99 13.565412.6816Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.56541.485.47 107.5706100.5448CFAL Global Bond Fund107.57063.456.99103.987340 105.776593.1998CFAL Global Equity Fund105.77063.9913.50101.725415 1.10341.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.10341.255.25 1.08011.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.07640.794.37 1.10411.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.10411.235.34 9.57959.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.48391.527.41 11.236110.0000R oyal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6709-0.9312.33 7.96644.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund7.96643.2358.37 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Mar-10 31-Mar-10 31-Mar-10 31-Mar-10 103.095570 99.417680 7-May-10 31-Mar-10MARKET TERMS31-Mar-10 NAV 6MTH 1.419947 2.830013 1.498375TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Apr-10 31-Mar-10 30-Apr-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) B ISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 31-Mar-10 31-Mar-10 31-Mar-10 Less worried about layoffs, jobholders are spending more S HOPPERS ARE p hotographed on 34th Street, in New York in December. Consumer spending rose for five straight months through November, kicking off the strongest holiday shopping season since 2006. (AP

PAGE 23

N EW YORK A ssociated Press CANCorporate America continue to cut its way to profits? If you're betting that s tocks will rise in 2011, the a nswer is critical. Profits j umped last year largely because companies ran smarter and squeezed more from workers. Sales are picking up, but probably not enough to keep profits from rising fast in the new year unless companies can get e ven more out of their w orkers. "How can they squeeze costs more than they are now?" asks Howard Silverblatt, a senior analyst at Standard & Poor's. "Are they going to fire more peop le? We're down to the s keleton." P rofessional stock pickers aren't worried. They expect m argins, or the profit made o n each sale, will near a r ecord this year. By the end of 2011, U.S. companies willb e pocketing $9.50 in profit f or every $100 in sales, or 9.5 percent, exceeding a boom-time record that is considered a bit of an aberration, according to Standard & Poor's. The average over nearly three decades is $7.10. A clue as to whether the experts are right comes next week as companies b egin reporting their fourthq uarter results. If investors b egin to doubt those lofty margins are within reach, stocks could tumble. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 15 percent last year. Experts predict the index will rise another 11 percent in 2011. The problem with margins is that they have already risen seven quarters in a row. The average margin is now 8.95 percent, nearly two percentage points higher than average. Margins tend to stay a round the historical avera ge for two reasons. When the economy is weak, comp anies cut workers and e xploit technology to boost m argins. But there's a limit to the number of people you can lay off and the softwarey ou can buy. When the economy strengthens and people start buying what you're selling, you have to hire more people to meet the demand and pay more to keep them. Margins drop f ast, often back to the avera ge. I n a report Friday, Lond on analyst Andrew S mithers wrote investors are fooling themselves that stocks are a bargain with margins so high. He says m argins are certain to suff er a large fall. It's a lonely v iew but it's shared by distinguished company. Jeremy Grantham, the legendary Boston money manager who predicted the housing crash, says margins are abnormal and set to drop. These two have been saying this for most of the past year and could be proven wrong again. UBS economist Larry Hatheway says companies have learned to operate much more efficiently than in past decades. T hey use more workers in I ndia and China to drive labor costs down and shop a round more for cheaper r aw materials and parts. T hen there is the elixir of a recovering economy. People are buying more cars,a nd they went on the biggest holiday shopping spree since 2006. What's more, the gov ernment reported Friday that the jobless rate fell to 9.4 percent from 9.8 percent, though the rate fell mostly b ecause many people gave u p looking for jobs. A s companies begin to r eport earnings this week, w atch closely those that could find it difficult to pass higher costs to consumers. Morgan Stanley strategist A dam Parker, who has writt en extensively about marg ins, lists more than a dozen in a report last week, among them Arm & Hammer banking soda maker Church & Dwight Co. and steel maker Nucor Corp. Tally Leger, a strategist at Barclays Capital, predicts s tocks will climb 14 percent t his year on rising margins, b ut even he is worried. He notes that if the optimists are wrong even a little, the impact on corporate fortunes could be great. Wall Street analysts see earnings for the S&P 500 hitting a record $95 a share. B ut if the margins they a ssume are off by a dollar, e arnings will come in 10 percent lower. That would bea big blow to a stock market that already reflects high expectations. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2011, PAGE 13B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM .LQJVZD\$FDGHP\ J \ \ $Q(YDQJHOLFDORQGHQRPLQDWLRQDO&KULVWLDQFKRROf J f (QWUDQFH([DPLQDWLRQVIRU