Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Resource Identifier:
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BAHAMAS EDITION



Bahamas:
International!
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Volume: .103:No.10





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Lawyer could challenge |
scheme if it becomes law

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune. Business Editor

THE National Health Insur-
ance scheme may be challenged
on constitutional grounds if it
becomes law, with a Bahamian
attorney yesterday arguing that
its provisions could also breach
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.

Fred Smith, a partner with
Callender’s &.Co, told The Tri-
bune., “Tf. they pass this legisla-
tion, I will seek 'a declaration
first, as a citizen of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas,

that if the tax is collected it

must be paid into the Consoli-

dated Fund, and I will chal-

lenge whether it is payable in
_ Freeport as a tax on the earn-
. ings of.a licensee.”
.~. He argued that the National

‘Health Insurance scheme
(NHI) could be unconstitu-
tional because it allegedly
breaches Article 128 of the
Bahamas constitution.

This article, which comes
under Chapter 9, dealing with
. _ the nation’s finances, stipulates

_ that all tax revenues collected
‘by the Government.of the
Bahamas are to be paid into
the Consolidated Fund, Mr
Smith said.

However, the. Government

is proposing that under its NHI.
scheme monies are to be paid:

into a National Health Insur-
ance Fund.

Emphasising that he sup-
ported the principle of univer-
sal healthcare access for all, Mr
Smith said: “I’m all for provid-
_ ing healthcare for every



Bahamian. It’s not the provi-
sion of services, but the lawful- .
ness of the approach. I support
universal healthcare. How it is
achieved is a different matter.”

Mr, Smith argued that
because NHI contributions
were an income tax, they could
not be levied in Freeport as a
result of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement.

He drew attention to the
1955 agreement’s Clause 2;
Sub-Elause 8;-which stipulates.
that no taxes — including
income. taxes — can be levied
against “the earnings of a

licensee in the Port area” or

against “any salaries and remu-
nerations” paid ‘to employees
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and their licensees,”
provided they live in the Port
area.

Although the tax exemption
initially lasted for.35 years, Mr

Smith said it was extended:by

the 1993 Freeport Act until

2018.
He added that he had par-
tially won a similar legal action

he brought in 1988 against the

then Minister of Housing and
National Insurance. In a case
that went all the way to the
Privy Council, the ultimate
court of appeal for the
Bahamas backed Mr Smith’s
contention that contributions
to the National Insurance
Board (NIB) were a tax, but
ruled that they were ‘not an
income tax, but one based on
being employed.
(See Business Section
- for full story)

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Cardiologist
‘agrees with |
idea of NHI |

' By PAUL TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter —

CARDIOLOGIST Dr! By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter i

; ; i items, including Fendi, Coach,
and. Gucci bags, even fake i
Michael Jordan tennis were
iby the Supreme Court — the
: matter is expected to be heard
: as early as Monday — could lead
In the presence of police and ; to the extradition of Mr Babak,
Custom’s officials, Mr Ma said : who is reportedly currently in

: that he had no idea that the :
: Bahamas.

Conville Brown, whose patients:
have included Prime Minister. :
Perry Christie, Opposition :
‘Leader Hubert Ingraham, and. :

rate a “healthy dose” of his :

Perierod Care model ot heath, 2 have beet collected:in the last :

: 10 days by the National Coali-
wot Brawn said he agreed ; tion for Healthcare Reform in ; |

: their online petition and. “sig- :
Insurance, provided that it : nificantly more” are expected }
-utilised the government, the pri- : to-be added to that number |

This tri-partite system, he : when letters, faxes and other }
‘ Ba a i. “hard copy” signatures are
a ee Ce oae : counted, one of the Coalition’s :

y g i consultants revealed yesterday. :

In an interview with The Tri- }

care delivery.

vate and the public at large.

ernment sector, private sector,

Beene juecr On Benya abuelte : bune yesterday, Winston Rolle,
sector. This user sector can }

SEE page 14

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1,.2006



SIR CLIFFORD DARLING, the’ Bahamas’ first. Minister of.
National Insurance, unveils a plaque yesterday to signify the renam-
ing of the National Insurance Building to The Clifford Darling Com-
plex. Prime Minister Perry Christie, speaking at the event, said:
“There ‘is no. individual living in our country today who is more
deserving of the honour that is bestowed in the naming of this build-
ing than Sir Clifford Darling.” be
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Thousands |
sign petition
— urging NHI
‘slow down’

THOUSANDS of Bahami- :

: pene etre have signed the petition urg- }
the late Sir Lynden Pindling, : an claw, i
yesterday advocated that gov- : ihe ae ee e on i. ene
érnment’s National Health | {i mblementation of ts pro
Insurance plan should incorpo i rice echames i

More than 3,500 signatures

SEE page 14

et is

Ca goaga ANE



‘Fake designer
items seized in|

_warehouse raid

“VAST amounts” of coun- j
i. terfeit items were seized in a :
i joint Customs/police raid on a’:
: warehouse in East Street South ; Hannes Babak to Fox Hill
: yesterday morning.

A number of fake designer :
: of the Grand Bahama Port

: confiscated from Shan Ma,

owner and operator of the
warehouse.

items were counterfeit. ,

SEE page 11



“T didn’t know that was coun- }

terfeit, but they find now that :

it’s counterfeit. But I really : of Callenders and Co speculat-

don’t know that. Because I just } ed that a similar motion asking

get them on the internet and : for the incarceration of Sir Jack

: they telling me that what I buy : Hayward could also be forth-
from that they are real,” he said. : coming in the near future if suf-

When asked if he thought it :
was possible to buy a Fendi or :

: Gucci bag for $15, Mr Ma said

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Re i eas

Ce

~ Motion on Babak
_ served on suspended
_ chairman’s attorneys

: By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE motion to commit

i. prison was served on the attor-

neys of the suspended chairman

Authority yesterday afternoon.
A possible committal order

Miami, Florida, back to the

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, attorney Fred Smith

ficient evidence can be gath-
ered.
“The Supreme Court still

SEE page 11









PAGE 2, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



a eee eee
Hodder plans to build international

ties between COB and South Africa

COLLEGE of the Bahamas
president Janyne Hodder is set
to travel to South Africa to
build international ties ahead
of the adoption of university
status.

On December 2, Mrs Hod-
der and vice president of
research, graduate programmes
and international relations Dr
Linda Davis, will depart from
Nassau on a visit to several
South African Universities.

At the invitation of the Min-
ister of Education, Science and
Technology Alfred Sears the
University/College of the

. Bahamas team will also be join-
ing him at a high-level educa-
tion conference before return-
ing to the Bahamas.

Also representing the
Bahamas are two other mem-
bers of the College communi-
ty, students Angelique Sawyer
and Dale Gelin, winners of an
essay competition organised by
the Ministry of Education.

According to Mrs Hodder,
the trip is a part of a well-
defined campaign to extend
COB’s global outreach and has
been directly influenced by the
Bahamas-South Africa Joint
Bilateral Commission Meeting
held in Freeport in 2005 which
identified several avenues for
potential co-operation.

"VP Davis and I are commit-
ted to negotiating linkages and
forging partnership agreements

with some key South African

universities. The goal is to
advance the mission of the col-
lege and the working vision of
the University of the Bahamas.

We are particularly interested |

in partnerships in the areas of
student and faculty exchanges,
research collaboration through
support of inter-institutional
research teams, creation of joint
degree programmes at the
undergraduate and graduate
levels, support of visiting schol-
ars at partner institutions
including post-doctoral

exchanges and faculty-research
stays and joint conference plan-
ning," she said.

Mrs Hodder and Dr Davis
will visit the University of
KwaZulu-Natal, the Universi-

































































ty of Johannesburg, the Uni-
versity of Witwatersrand, the
University of the Western Cape
and Rhodes University.

Possible collaboration areas
include education; hotel, culi-
nary and tourism, management;
financial services; law; marine
and environmental science; and
cultural studies.

Coincident with the trip the
South African Department of
Education will be hosting the
16th Conference of Common-
wealth Education Ministers
(16CCEM) in Cape Town

where ministers will meet to dis- ©

cuss the challenges and oppor-
tunities their countries face.

A COB spokesperson said it
will provide an ideal forum for
Mr Sears to advance the coun-
try’s university agenda and to
establish international partner-
ships with South African uni-
versities.

Dr Davis spoke of two specia!
items on the college's list of pri-
orities for the history-making
outreach.

"We will work assiduously
toward forging an agreement
with University of KwaZulu-
Natal in marine science, anoth-

‘er with the University of the

Western Cape in the field of
education and in particular ear-
ly childhood education and edu-

. cational policy," she said:

Mrs Hodder said the college
has identified the area of
tourism and hospitality as a

@ JANYNE Hodder |

potential area of partnership
with the University of Johan-
nesburg, an institution that has
benefited from a $3.1 million
donation from Sol Kerzner of
Kerzner International, whose
Atlantis is the flagship property
of tourism in the Bahamas.
"For the. College/University
of the Bahamas, the strategy

_ would involve a formal partner-

ship between the COB Culinary
and Hospitality Management



Institute and the Kerzner School
at the University of Johannes-
burg. The quality of the pro-
grammes offered by both
Schools, combined with the
importance of the Kerzner group
to both South Africa and the
Bahamas, presents an interesting
opportunity to link these two
important university tourism and
hospitality resources in exciting
and mutually beneficial ways,"
Mrs Hodder said.

en ae
research work at COB

THE College of the Bahamas

should lead the way in strate-

gic planning for the Bahamas,

- Perry Christie told students and

staff.

Speaking at the launch of the
National Policy Research Fel-
lowship Awards Programme,
the prime minister spoke of the
need for the college to “lead

research and well-reasoned

debate on issues of national -

importance”.

“We must begin to introduce
and support a research-based
culture, to the point where our

programmes, services, initia-
tives, investments are based on
concrete, sound, reliable evi-
dence and not just on experi-
ence and instinct alone,” he said

“We need institutions that

will facilitate specific ‘research
needs and support policy ideas -

in youth development, culture,
tourism, anchor projects, invest-
ments, financial services, edu-
cation, social services, policing
and corrections, urban renewal
and planning, just to name a
few.”

Mr Christie also announced

the establishment of an
endowed chair in Urban
Renewal at the college. Urban
renewal is a central plank of the
government’s policy, and is
widely publicised as being under

the ptimne mihister’s'persorial’

fhe WRat

portfolio.
‘He did not address détails of

2

what the new position would :

involve.

Key to the research role, Mr.

Christie said, was keeping up
with the government’s much-
touted philosophy of “key
developments” on every island.

“For instance, out of the
Labour Market Survey pro-

duced by the Department. of :

Statistics, the Fellowship Pro-
gramme may wish to conduct a
manpower assessment and pro-
jection for a particular category
of profession or industry, to
identify the number of poten-
tial employees needed and at
which levels,” he said.

He also spoke of the need for
research-based strategic. plan-
ning for investments and finan-
cial support, access to interna-
tional funding, recruitment and
training, trends and projections
and human resource planning

The prime minister went on
to lament the level of ignorance
among young people about
Bahamian history, and called
upon students to become biog-
raphers for Bahamian luminaries
such as civil rights activist Joseph
Gould Watkins, actor Bert
Williams, social pioneer Frances
“Mother” Butler and education
campaigner RM Bailey.

eae

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2



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 3





In brief |

Attorney says
Anna Nicole
must leave
by Thursday

A former boyfriend of-Anna
Nicole Smith has obtained a
court judgment ordering the
reality TV star out of her ocean-
front residence and he plans to
seek her forcible eviction unless
she leaves by Thursday, accord-
ing to his lawyer, according to
Associated Press.

Emerick Knowles, the attor-
ney for South Carolina busi-
nessman Ben, Thompson, said
he entered the default judgment
on Tuesday after Smith missed
a deadline to respond to his suit
declaring his client the rightful
owner of the gated mansion.

Smith, who moved to the
Bahamas while pregnant with
her nearly 3-month-old daugh-
ter, has remained; secluded in
the house since her 20-year-old
son Daniel died under mysteri-
ous circumstances at her hospi-
tal bedside on Sept. 10.

The 39-year-old former Play-
boy playmate has claimed that
Thompson bought her the near-
ly US$1 million house as a gift.
Thompson, who had a brief
relationship with Smith, says it
was a loan.

Knowles said he gained
authority to file the judgment
with the Supreme Court after
a two-week deadline expired on
Monday, and he asked Smith in

writing to vacate by Thursday.
If she does not comply, they will
ask court officers to remove her
from the property, he said.

Donors press
Haiti to
promote good
governance

m@ SPAIN
Madrid

DONOR countries pumping

millions of dollars into Haiti

pressed its government Thurs-
day to enact a program of
reforms designed to nudge it
toward a future free of poverty,

violence and corruption, accord- .

ing to Associated Press.

A conference in Spain that.

brought together more than 30
countries and international
organizations was designed as
a follow-up to a July meeting
at which US$750 million was
pledged to boost the country’s
infrastructure and development.
The goal of Thur$day’s con-
' ference was to examine how
that money is being spent, and

‘although no fresh pledges had
been expected for visiting Prime
Minister Jacques Edouard
Alexis, the European Union did
announce US$79 million in new
money.

Europe’s wealthy bloc said it
‘has concluded that Haiti this
week met a condition of pre-
senting a programme of good
. governance. ‘

Chilean troops
to remain in
Haiti for six
months more

@ CHILE
Santiago

THE Senate extended Chile’s
commitment to the United
Nations peacekeeping force in
Haiti for another six months
beginning Thursday, according
' to Associated Press.

The Senate voted 25-8
Wednesday night to allow the
600-member contingent made
up of soldiers and police to
remain with the Brazil-led force
keeping peace on the troubled
Caribbean island. _

The vote came after a lengthy
debate,with the right-wing
opposition complaining the gov-
ernment had requested the
renewal of the mandatory
authorization only two days
before it was set to expire.

Defense Minister -Vivianne.

Blanlot apologized to the sena-
tors for the last-minute request.

In order to gain approval for
extension, the government
agreed to establish a congres-
sional commission to oversee
Chile’s participation in interna-
tional peacekeeping forces in
the future. The commission will
be headed by an opposition law-
maker.

Chile has.contributed troops
to the U.N. force in Haiti since
it was established in 2004.

Lita eA
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
au es Yada



Call

for looser regulations over

deaths in private facilities

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT has been

asked to loosen the regulations
regarding the handling of
deaths in private medical facil-
ities.
In the 2005 report of the
Hospitals and Healthcare
Facilities Licensing Board —
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday — it was
recommended that a legal
requirement that the chief
medical officer, Dr Merceline
Dahl-Regis, be informed of all
deaths in private medical facil-
ities and the name of the med-
ical practitioner who was in
attendance within 48 hours of
the event, be scrapped.

The requirement currently
appears in the Hospitals and
Healthcare Facilities Act 1998
under section 23(4).

The new recommendation
follows claims made in August

‘by the board's most recent

chairman Jerome Gomez,
appointed in February 2006,

i . that he felt this stipulation in

the Act represented a “dis-

juncture" that should be cor-

rected between the act and
“current protocol."



B JEROME Gomez

According to Mr Gomez,
most medical officers were not

‘in the habit of informing the

CMO, but only of filling in a
"medical certificate of death"
which is stored in hospital
records.

He said that if that particular
section. of the Act was
enforced, and all deaths were
brought to the attention of the
board — whose foremost
responsibility is in determin-
ing the fitness of private med-
ical facilities for licensing — it
would be "overwhelmed."

In July, Mr Gomez's opin-
ion was borne out in concerns
raised by a group of citizens
that the board appeared to
have no statistical record of
deaths in facilities it was
responsible for licensing
despite the stipulation in the
Act.

Aside from appearing to be
in conflict with the require-
ments of section 23(4), the
group said it also contravened
the Act's stipulation that the
board should refuse licences
to a hospital or healthcare
facility if the facility is being
operated "in a manner...inju-
rious to public health."

Concern.

It was noted by the con-
cerned citizens that a high
death rate could indicate that
appropriate care is not being
provided by a given treatment
centre whether or not it was
found to have satisfied all oth-
er licensing criteria.

Their claim followed a com-
plaint made to the board by a
member of the public that a
hospital had received a licence
despite documentation from

Sea Hauler survivors’ fury at
lack of government action

â„¢ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SURVIVORS of the noto-
rious Sea Hauler accident say

_ they refuse to suffer silently

any longer while the govern-
ment continues to ignore their
plights.

More than three years after
the tragic crash claimed the
lives of four passengers and
injured 25, the victims and
family of the deceased are still
waiting for monetary compen-

i : sation to deal with the bills the
? .. continue to.mount.

The collision of the two
large vessels —- Sea Hauler and
the United Star - occurred on
‘August 2, 2003 in the waters
off the southwest coast of
Eleuthera.

Victims of the crash and
family of the decéased came
together yesterday to protest
an “intolerable situation” and
to plead with the government

i for assistance.

Claiming that the govern-
ment was negligent in allow-
ing the-Sea Hauler and the
United Star to operate with-

" out proper insurance, the sur-

‘vivors are demanding that top
officials come to their aid.

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Teneson Leslie, 25, who lost
both his right leg and his wife
of three years during the crash,
said he has to struggle just to
survive and take care of his
two kids.

Mr Leslie, a self-employed
tiler, plumber and mason
recalled waking up after the

collision to the sight of his wife.

with part of.a crane lodged in
her head.

His wife, Brenell Leslie, who
died on the scene has three
children who are now in the
care of her sister, Lashandell
Smith.

Ms Smith, 22, whose.mother
also died as a result of the acci-
dent, said she has to sacrifice
nearly all of her pay-cheques
just to make ends meet.

She recalled the scene three
years.ago, as she was also a
passenger on the Sea Hauler.

“What began as a fun trip,
ended in tragedy,” she said emo-
tionally. She lost both her moth-
er and sister during that trip.

Her aunt, Rosemarie Smith,
also a passenger on the fate-
ful trip, said, “We aren’t get-
ting, any support or no kind of
help. They trying to sweep this
under the rug.

“We paid our money to go

on the boat and'these people,

shouldn’t have to do this thing
over and over just for their
rights. The government is
‘ignoring the situation. Its
ridiculous. It’s not our fault
and it’s not fair. We are stand-
ing up for our rights because
they are being taken away.”

Another passenger, Cedric
Hart, said his bills have piled
so high he can’t even begin to
pay them.

He claims to have personal-

ly sought the help’ of séveral~”

government officials including

Prime Minister Perry Christie. ;
and Deputy Prime Minister’ :

_ Cynthia Pratt to no avail.

Mr Hart has had to resort,

to begging on the streets. At
one point, he said, he was even
homeless as he could not
afford to keep up with his rent.

“We are not happy in this
condition and I feel that we
should be compensated. In the
name of God please help us,”
he said.

The victims are currently

receiving help from the grass- °

roots organisation Bahamas
Loving Care, who organised
the press conference for them.

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bri

Dr Dahl-Regis affirming that
the institution had not been sup-
plying her with all death notifi-
cations. .

The Act as it stands states
that any administrator at a
medical facility who does not
forward death notifications
within 48 hours should be
"liable to a...fine of five thou-
sands dollars or to imprison-
ment or to both that fine and
imprisonment."

The report was accompanied
by the financial statements of
the board for the fiscal year
2004-2005. This is the first time

- that these financial records have

been tabled in parliament,
despite it being required in the

Act which mandated the board
in 1998 that both the board and
the minister of health have a
duty to ensure that a copy of
the financial report be tabled
in parliament each year.

In early 2006 The Tribune
reported that no such records
had ever’been tabled. Months
of silence from the Ministry of
Health on the unaccounted
funds which the board would
have accrued since 1995 fol-
lowed prior to the tabling of the
2004-2005 report on Wednes-
day. Since the tabling of that
report, questions continue to be
asked as to the content of the.

board's accounts in the years
prior to 2004,

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES .

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

‘Health needs reasoned debate

PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie told the
House of Assembly Wednesday, as he opened
debate on the National Health Insurance Act,
that he had no difficulty acknowledging that
“this is an emotional debate.”

“This,” he said, “is a debate about people
being able to have hope as they move for-
ward in this country; a reality that they will
have access to affordable health care, access
to the great doctors that we have in this coun-
ty who will provide the services.”

He referred to'a letter written to the Min-
istry of Health by a doctor, the essence of
which, he said, was a “plaintive cry of a doc-
tor saying ‘I can’t treat these patients unless
you pay me.’” In other words, said the Prime
Minister, unless the Ministry could find a way
to pay him, “patients cannot access a service
that only he can provide in this country.” -

No one will deny that life and death can be
an emotional matter, but no one wants the
prime minister of one’s country leading a
debate with his heart rather than his head.
The people’s health is far too important and
the way in which medical services are to be
provided to maintain that health without
destroying the country’s economy is far too
serious for it to be a matter of the heart. This
is a matter for the head — considered com-
passionately, but also rationally. Leave the
tears and oratory at home. This is serious
business.

What has to be accepted is that no one
trusts any government with its health. Can
government point to any enterprise that it
has managed successfully, including National
Insurance, which spends far more than it
should on its own administration?

At least Prime Minister Christie has got
one message clear — all parties involved —
employers, union leaders, doctors and
employees —agree that all residents should
have access to health care, regardless of their
ability to pay.

What they don’t agree with is governmen-
t’s present blueprint of how that service is to
be delivered. Also, they are not comfortable
that they and their doctor both lose control
over their treatment. In the final analysis it is
government, because it controls the funds,
that will determine the extent of the patient’s
care — not the doctor. It is going to be the

doctor, who, because of lack of funds from |

government, is going to be forced to play God
— when supplies run out, it is he. who. will
have to determine who lives and who dies.
The elderly — just like the premature babies
described in Mr Buckner’s letter on this page

289 Market St. South:« P.O. Box N-7984 e' Nassau, Bahamas
of THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

& People don't care how much you know

until they know how much you care.” |

' SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

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Phone: 323-6452 * 393-5798
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today — will be expendable:

As a New York doctor wrote: “One or two
generations ago, many people dreamed that
socialised. medicare would provide every cit-

izen with all the health care he needed or .

wanted. But history has proved irrefutably
that socialised medicine is simply a means of
imposing Procrustean rationing on the entire
population. In other words, some citizens
receive care and live, while others are denied
care and are permitted to die as quickly as

possible.”

Of course, Mr Christie says that what he is
offering is not socialised medicine. Let him
have his way and call it whatever he likes,
the results are the same — when the funds run
out, so does the care.

Mr Christie also insists that this is not a tax
— nor, says he, is National Insurance a tax.
We would really like to know how he defines
the word “tax”. Anyway if lawyer Fred Smith
challenges this proposed Bill on constitutional
grounds the matter of when a tax is a tax will
soon be settled.

In 1988 Mr Smith got the Privy Council to
agree that National Insurance was in fact a
tax, although it was not an income tax, but a
tax based on employment. i

On that reasoning then there is no doubt

. that NHI is a tax because it includes not cnly

the employed, but also pensioners — and as it
is based on one’s income, reasoning can go
even further and conclude that it is a tax on
income — income tax.

Mr Christie curls his lip and wrinkles his |
nose in disdain at doctors who dare ask how -

they are going to be paid for their services. Mr
Christie, as a lawyer, would ask the same
question if a government. threatened his
income from his legal practice. After all, like
him, the doctors have bills, other obligations

‘and families to support. -

However, unlike Mr Christie, they have
invested far more money, years and effort
into qualifying for their profession.

Again, unlike Mr Christie, to set up in med-

ical practice some have to go deeply into debt
to provide their offices with expensive equip-

-ment — far more costly than the law books
_and computers needed in a legal practice. .

And so these doctors have every right to
ask who will pay for their “services that only

“they can provide” after many years of study
and sacrifice. Instead of sneering as though |

such a question leaves a bad odour in their
nostrils, it’s the duty of the Christie govern-
ment to answer these questions and the many
other questions the public wants answered.







R@@MS|

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

§ Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
: Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: SPAY,

THE TRIBUNE

Questions on
proposed NHI

EDITOR, The Tribune.

RECENTLY, a council of the
National Health Service in the
UK determined that babies born
prematurely at or before 22
weeks were to be denied medical
attention and be left to die. The
truth is that it is very hard to
treat these babies and doctors
estimate that only about 10 per
cent born at or before 22 weeks
survive. Still, great strides have
been made recently in health
care for premature babies.— or
“preemies” as many call them.
So many are now surviving that
Toys “R” Us in the U.S, has a
department for them featuring
some of the smallest clothes you
have ever seen. In the U.S. the
choice regarding giving inten-
sive care to these babies lies with
the parents. In the U.K. the
politicians decide and they have
cut the survival rate from 10 per
cent to zero. The National
Health Services decision was not
based upon medicine. Nor was it
based upon parent choice, which
is not taken into account. It was
based upon competition for the
Government budget. In other
words Britain’s socialist health
system has to let babies die
because of politics.

Government is not trying to
gain support for its National
Health plan by demonstrating
to people the specifics of how it
will help them. No arguments
have been put forward proving
that medicine will be better
under the new plan, nor that
waits for operations will be cut
or access to care increased.
These things have all been
“promised”, but none of it has
been demonstrated. Hard ques-
tions regarding costs, budgeting,

quality control, fraud, choice, -

and privacy have all gone unan-
swered. Unlike the U.K. Council
our politicians have not pub-
lished guidelines setting out who
will get care and who will be
denied, who they will decide
lives and who will die. In fact
Government is refusing to dis-
cuss these issues with the health
professionals who understand
them. No critic has come out
against extending health cover-
age to all Bahamians. The argu-
ment is about how it is to be
extended and paid for. Instead
of seeking dialogue on these
important issues Government
has lined up a number of senior
ministers to loudly claim that
those who are against their plan
are against the poor and the
middle class. In other words, like
the National Health denying
care to preemies, the Govern-
ment has decided to play poli-
tics..

We all know that BEC, BTC
and Bahamasair are Govern-
ment-controlled monopolies that
are not interested in their cus-
tomers. We know they charge
unreasonable rates that force the
cost of living and of doing busi-
ness up to unreasonable levels,
making a good standard of living
very expensive and making
many of our businesses uncom-
petitive. We know that they pro-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



vide a poor and intermittent
product. None of this is the fault
of the good people who work in
these corporations. It is the fault
of a system that is not responsive
to people’s wants but IS respon-
sive only to politics.

The politicians who run BEC,
BTC and Bahamasair make
choices regarding the delivery
of their services, the quality and
cost of the product and the use
of their resources based upon
political concerns that are often
at odds with the customer’s
needs. The customer would like
a choice of good services at a
good price. Forget it. Politics
jealously does not allow this and
we all know this and understand
this from the experience of our
own lives.

Now the PLP wants to take
away the decisions regarding our
health. Just as with BEC, BTC
and Bahamasair, we the

‘Bahamian people can trust

politicians to make their man-
agerial decisions for political rea-
sons. Just like those in the U:K.
It will come down to choices,
and you will not be the one mak-
ing the choices. Just like you
have no choice which electricity
company or telephone compa-
ny to use, you will have no
choice over the‘health care deci-
sions that affect your life. Gov-
ernment will decide for you. Will
you get the good health care or
will the good health care go to
the Anna Nichole Smiths of this
world? Who will be fast tracked
and who will be left to wait? We
have all seen the answers neatly
demonstrated.

What about access? Ask the
Housing contractors who have

come forward with claims of cor- -
ruption concerning access to the '

public housing market. We all
know there is a game that is
played. We all know who can be
trusted and who cannot be trust-
ed. Some of us refuse to play
and are left on the outside alone
and the others go along to get
along.

Do you want games played
with your health? No one will
want to be on the outside when
it comes to his or her health and
everyone. will pay to play. The
cost of corruption will be on top
of the new Income Tax. Gov-
ernment has not factored the
cost of corruption into its num-
bers because, of course, corrup-
tion does not exist.

I want better health care for
all Bahamians.

There are better ways to get it.
Let us look hard at the econom-
ic costs of operating health care
facilities in the Bahamas and see
how we can reduce them. We all
know that electric power is very
expensive in this country and
that medical equipment uses a
lot of power. Can we get the cost
of power down and thereby
make treatment cheaper? I think
the answer is yes. What can be
done to find cheaper alternant
sources of drugs?

Can more bulk buying bring
prices down (remember not to
trust Government with this one
— their clinics and hospitals are
often out of drugs because the
politicos forget to order them)?
What about training? Can we

find ways to help pay for train-
ing? What about not only giv-
ing tax breaks but tax offsets to
those in the medical field? These
are all options that can be
explored that would make a
meaningful difference in improv-
ing the quality and availability’
of the existing healthcare sys-
tem, while not compromising
choice, privacy and the undeni-
able benefits that come from
consumer control as opposed to
political control. These same
benefits can be extended to the

. insurance industry. For exam-

ple, are insurance companies
exempt from import duties,

. property tax, and stamp tax?

Shouldn’t they be? If Govern-
ment wants more money for
health why not find it by cutting
away some of its own inefficien-
cies?

Which brings us to cost. It is
simply a lie to say that a manda-
tory 5 per cent contribution tak-
en from one’s salary is not
Income Tax. If the PLP is willing
to deliberately set out to mis-
lead the people about how the
cost is to be covered then where’
will the misleading stop? Do we .
want choices regarding our
health made by people who will
so nakedly seek to mislead us?
This needs to be accounted for.

Accountability is very impor-
tant. In May this year the FNM .
revealed that infant mortality
has risen dramatically under the
PLP watch from 12.7 deaths per
1,000 to 17.3 deathss a 36 per
cent increase. Dr. Nottage
admitted to this alarming fail-
ure and promised an investiga-
tion. But as with so many
‘promised investigations no
answers have been forthcoming.
The people have not been told
about any new policies to bring
infant mortality down to the rate
achieved under the FNM (under
the last PLP Government infant
mortality was as high as 24 per
1,000, 89 per cent higher than
under the FNM). How will Gov-
ernment account to people for
its actions under its proposed
Health Plan?

PLP Ministers have already
shown us when it comes to
accountability they think silence.
or cover-ups or threatening the
free press are the right. ways to

‘answer questions. Now they

resort to bullying those who
raise questions, lashing out at:
them and calling professional
people, respected in the com-
munity, “greedy” and saying
they do not care about the poor,
This sort of overly aggressive
attitude, empty of logic or argu-
ment, only divides people and
makes people angry. It does not
answer questions. Nor in the
modern Bahamas will it make
people shut up. ~

This is not about the poor or
the middle class or even about
health.

If it were Government would
make a big and sincere effort to
answer all of these questions. It
would be looking for everyone’s
five cents. It is about the PLP’s
worries about its own health.
The PLP is sick, it is dying in
office and it desperately needs a
shot in the arm. It needs it fast
before the bell rings. So it is
rushing and bullying, trying. to
ram this down our throats.

GARTH BUCKNER
Nassau,
November 24, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Cubans await
for appearance
of Castro in
milestone
anniversary
parade

@ HAVANA

BANNERS hanging from
restored buildings in this sea-
side city encourage ailing
leader Fidel Castro to live to
160, but Cubans are now
grappling with the realisa-
tion that his days as their
charismatic leader may be
over, according to Associated
Press.

Most Cubans have known
no other ruler than Castro,
who 50 years ago Saturday
landed on a boat from Mexi-
co with fellow rebels to
launch a revolution that tri-
umphed on Jan. 1, 1959. But
Castro, waylaid for four
months with an intestinal ail-
ment, was still too sick to
attend Tuesday’s kickoff of a
five-day celebration of his
80th birthday. He turned 80
on Aug. 13 but postponed
the party because of surgery
two weeks earlier.

Castro’s supporters in this
Caribbean island of 11 mil-
lion fervently wish he will at
least appear for the military
parade Saturday marking the
semicentennial anniversary
of the boat landing.

Traffic cops in blue uni-
forms and black boots this:
week were directing traffic,
primarily smog-belching
Russian Lada sedans and
1950s-era American cars,

‘from the enormous Plaza de
la Revolucion, which wag

being readied for the parade.
But if Castro fails to
appear on the grandstand,

some will take his absence as’

a sign he.will never return to
power, although it is consid-

ered sacrilege among the
Castro faithful to even speak ~
of the ie posse

} the Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

DERE i

FRIDAY,
DECEMBER 1ST

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise

11:00 Immediate Response

Noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response
(Cont'd)
A Special Report
Yes Virginia, There’s A
Santa Claus

2:00 Christmas Toy

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 International Fellowship of
Christian & Jews _

3:30 Ed Young

4:00 — Legends: Whence We
Came: Dr. Gail Saunders

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 —Bahamaian Spirit: Millie
Sands

0:00 Kerzner Today

6:15 Good News Bahamas

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Jessye Norman Sings For
The Healing Of AIDS

9:00 55 Degrees North

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 12

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30 Community Page 1540 am

SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 2ND
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 — Intemational Fit Dance
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego

11:30
noon Underdog

NOTE ZNS-TV 12 reserves the
make ‘ast minute
nNefeksuae



@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

NINE out of 10 persons liv-
ing with HIV/AIDS in the
Bahamas are to be found in the
workplace, according to the
International Labour Organi-
sation.

The Baha:
inroads

the impact on workers, provide
care and treatment for infected
workers and eliminate the dis-
crimination on the job on the
grounds of HIV status.

The report attributes the suc-
cess of the Bahamas and its
regional counterparts to the
benefits of wider access to anti-
retroviral treatment.



This statement comes on the
back of the latest World Health
Organisation report that iden-
tified the Bahamas, Barbados,
and Jamaica as among the
countries that are making
inroads against their HIV epi-
demics.

The ILO claimed that it is
focusing on the “world of
work” as one of the critical
avenues of a comprehensive
response to the epidemic.

The organisation said it plans
to try and prevent the spread of
HIV in the workplace, mitigate

Reports

the balanced approach — which
combines HIV prevention and
treatment — that has been
adopted in Barbados.

It-praised the Bahamas for
the decline of HIV infections
in young pregnant women in
_the early 2000s and a steep
decline in AIDS death rates.

The Tribune contacted the

The report also comments
on the encouraging results of

HIV/AIDS National Pro-
gramme for feedback on the
report, and programme direc-
tor Rosa Mae Bain said she
was not surprised about the
findings.

According to Ms Bain, ‘the
Bahamas was “singled out” last
year along with Barbados and
Bermuda for having a success-
ful national HIV/AIDS pro-

gramme.
She said: “One of the rea-
sons we made progress was

because in the Bahamas we
started caring for people with

~ HIV/AIDS way before the

treatment was available.”

A total of 250,000 persons
are living with HIV in the
Caribbean, with Haiti and the
Dominican Republic account-
ing for three quarters of this
number. An. estimated 27,000
people became infected with
HIV in 2006 in ithe Caribbean,







@ THE mansion on Paradise Island — (Photo: paradisemansion.com) as

Harajchi mansion
on sale for $24.5m

BANKER Mohammed Harajchi is offering his Paradise Island
mansion for sale over the Internet - for about $24.5 million.”

The 30-room home, with its guest residence, five acres of grounds
and a deluxe guest suite, is billed as “a mansion in paradise” on a web-
site promoting the property’s virtues.

Mr Harajchi, whose Suisse Security Bank and Trust had its licence
withdrawn by the government, is now said to be living in Europe after
his final bid to retrieve his licence failed.

Having closed his scandal-driven tabloid newspaper, The Confi-
dential Source, Mr Harajchi appears to be winding up his other.
Bahamas interests by selling off his Paradise Island estate.

The mansion - with two large. outdoor swimming pools, one boast-
ing its own island - -has its own pool suite with an incredible harbour
view.

A 15-foot waterfall, which rushes water round a landscaped island,
is another feature of the property, reckoned to be one of the finest in
the Bahamas. The 15,000 square feet main residence includes an
underground wine cellar. The 5,000 square feet guest property has
three bedrooms. Both homes are set in landscaped grounds with
numerous pools, ponds and fountains.

Described as “one of the largest privately-owned pieces of land on
Paradise Island”, the property is being sold partially furnished. It
stands on the island’s highest point and enjoys extensive water views.

Its five lots extend to just under five acres. A five-car garage is .
among its attractions.

Mr Harajchi was a financial backer of the PLP during the 2002 gen-
eral election. However, he fell foul of the government when they failed
to restore his banking licence.

His newspaper - printed on his own press in Nassau - was launched
primarily to attack the PLP for blocking his bid to reopen his bank.

* However, at one-point it faced a $5 million libel action after calling
fellow foreign investor Derek Turner, a Paradise Island: neighbour
with similarly lavish tastes, a crook. :

The action fell through when Turner - a stock trader who scammed
millions from DaaUSpeciits investors -.was jailed in the United States
for fraud.

SuperClubs, 2

Bahamas

has vacancy for:
FRONT OFFICE MANAGER

The ideal candidate must have:
Computer literacy with thorough knowledge of Microsoft pograms
A minimum of two years experience in the hotel industry or related field
ata supervisory or managerial position
Highly developed problem solving, social and analytical skills
Diploma or degree in Hospitality Management
Excellent oral and written communications skills
Ability to speak a foreign language would be an asset

A working knowledge of Tour Operator Wholesaler and hotel linkages

A working knowledge of rooms inventory control procedures and yield
management ‘

The candidate’s responsibilities will include:

Management of all related Front Office areas (Front Desk, Reservations,
PBX Operations, Bell Services and Reservations)

Training and development of all Front office personnel

Adherence to company policies and procedures

Budgets for all Front office areas

Interested candidates should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
SuperClub Breezes Bahamas
Fax: 242-327-2986
Email: craig.fox@ superclubs.com

(All applications must be submitted by Friday, December 10, 2006)
Please note that only short listed candidates will be contacted.

a: RIN nN S/o 3





FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 5

as compared: to 25,000. in.

2004.

Eighty-six partner enterpris- .

es in Belize, Guyana, Barba-
dos and Jamaica have so far
committed themselves to tack-
le HIV/AIDS in collaboration





with the International Labour
Organisation.

While HIV/AIDS claimed
fewer lives in the Caribbean in
2006 than in 2004, it is still one
of the leading causes of death
among adults in the Caribbean.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





SAM Duncombe



Concert at Arawak
Cay to highlight
opposition to LNG |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

An environmental organisa-
tion is set to host the country's
first concert to highlight the
views of those opposing the
introduction of LNG to the
Bahamas.

The event — to be held on Sat-

‘ urday at Arawak Cay — is being

: Thursday November, 30th, 2006

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hosted by the organisation

reEarth, which hopes that it
will also provide an opportu-
nity for the group to collect
signatures in protest of the
proposed construction of a
Liquefied Natural Gas
(LNG) plant at Ocean Cay,
near Bimini.

The free concert will run
between 6pm and midnight,
and will present audience
members with a chance to

watch performances by a:

variety of Bahamian artists
such as Soulful Groovers, Da
Brilanders, Lassie, Doe Boys,
Tingum Dem Band, Nita
Ellis, Novie Pierre, Trez Hep-
burn, and Funky D

In addition, the winner of
the 2006 Bahamas Annual DJ
competition, “Xcitement”,
will MC the event.

According to reEarth pres-

ident Sam Duncombe, the
organisation was spurred on
to holding the event by the
"overwhelming support and
positive energy" they have
received for their anti-LNG
stance.

She said reEarth hopes the
concert will help "bring this
collective voice to our gov-
ernment, that we do not want
LNG now, or any time in the
future." |

"Politicians are here to do
what we, the people, tell them
to do and not continue to
ignore our voice. Our message
is loud and. clear: No LNG,



not now, not ever," she said.

The controversial LNG
facility proposal — which is
currently under consideration
by the government — would
entail the construction of a
100 miles of pipeline between
the Bahamas and the US
coast in order to supply LNG,
a cheap source of fuel to the
South Florida market.

Protesters have said that,
if given the "go-ahead", the
facility will be an environ-
mental and health hazard,
and even a potential terrorist
target. ,

They add that Florida has
rejected the possibility of hav-
ing the facility on, or any clos-
er to, their land mass because
of these dangers.

"All of the same risks that
stop Florida from housing
LNG in its territories are the
same for. us here in the
Bahamas," said Ms Dun-
combe.

"We need to preserve our
environs for our children, not
look at risky. ventures that
could de-stabilise our main
economies like tourism and
fishing for another country’s
gain!” she said.

The government, however,
has rejected the proposition
that LNG is inherently risky
‘and has proposed that the
facility could provide jobs for

Bahamians, and bring tens of.

millions of dollars into the
economy each year.

THE proposed LNG facility at Ocean Cay



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slow cookers,warning trays, ice crusher,
immersion blenders, food processors,
ramekine.......

So come in and enjoy

The Home Store
Sandyport Mall
Monday thru Saturday
10:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.
or call us at 327-1132,

Secretary / Typist

Professional Office has an immediate Opening for a Secretary / Typist.
The ideal candidate must possess exceptional telephone etiquette, good
attitude, ability to work independently or as team; with a minimum type
writing skills of 50 wpm; and about Three Year Office experience
-w/excellent communications and Computer Skills; and be proficient in.
use of Windows XP or 2000 environment; particularly w/ software such
as M.S. Word, Excel and Quickbooks.

Bahamians and/or any Nationality are invited to apply

Please Fax Resume to 394-4458
Or e-mail: Ilehteb@coralwave.com



In brief

Antigua PM
urges east

_ Caribbean
_ to union

m ANTIGUA
St John’s

ANTIGUA’S Prime Minis-
ter Baldwin Spencer urged rep-
resentatives from nine eastern
Caribbean states on Wednes-
day to focus on forming an eco-
nomic union as a strategy to
boost investment and raise liv-
ing standards, according to
Associated Press.

Spencer, who spoke at the
opening of a one-day caucus of
the Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States, told delegates
such a union was within their
grasp.

“If we are to realize our goal
of making the economic union .
fully operational, we must also:
move forward with a compre-
hensive work program that will
address the important areas of
our survival as a grouping,”
Spencer said, noting those
included increased cooperation
in developing tourism and
rebuilding agriculture following
cuts in European subsidies. :

The caucus was called to dis-
cuss topics including the eco-
nomic union, the Caribbean oil.
deal-with Venezuela, maritime
boundaries and air transporta-
tion for the 2007 cricket World
Cup.

The OECS states — Antigua,
Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Kitts,
St. Vincent, Grenada and the
British territories.of Anguilla,
Montserrat and the British Vir-

: gin Islands — share a common

currency and have a central
bank. They have been dis-
cussing the possibility of form-
ing an economic union for two

i years.

Sell

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on Mondays

















SuperClubs, >

Bahamas

has vacancy for:

PUBLIC RELATIONS COORDINATOR

The ideal candidate must have:

Tertiary level education in mass Communication or Sales and Marketing
_A minimum of two years experience in the hotel andusity or related field

at a supervisory or managerial position

Excellent oral and written communications skills

Highly developed social and analytical skills

Computer Literacy with thorough knowledge of Microsoft Programmes

Ability to speak a foreign language would be an asset

Ability to drive would be an asst

The candidate’s responsibilities will include:

Ensuring the property receives maximum publicity through local media

houses

Hosting Journalist, Travel Agents, Television and radio Personalities

visiting the property.

Coordinating property involement in photo shoots and community

activities.

Coordinating wedding for guests.

Interested candidates should send applications wih detail resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
SuperClub Breezes Bahamas
Fax: 242-327-2986
Email:craig.fox@ superclubs.com

(All applications must be submitted by Friday, December 10, 2006)
Please note that only short listed candidates will be comtacted.



+"



THE TRIBUNE



amily law attorney calls
for courts to recognise
prenuptial agreements

A FAMILY law attorney has called
for legal recognition of prenuptial agree-
ments in the Bahamas.

The acceptance of such agreements
by the courts could help diffuse charged
emotions, smooth the transition between
marriage and divorce — and potentially
save lives, she said.

“In an ideal world, everyone who mar-
ried would live happily ever after,” said
Nerissa Greene, a senior associate with
the firm of Halsbury Chambers. “But
the reality is one out of every two mar-
riages will end in divorce and it is during
the break-up and before matters are set-
tled that we often see tensions reach
such levels that people behave in ways
that even they would not believe they
are capable of.

“We are doing ourselves a grave and
potentially deadly injustice by failing to
amend the law to recognise that there is
a way to provide for the prudent dis-

Se ‘Albans Dr.
D.O: Box: N-8877
Nassau, Bahamas

pensation of child support, alimony and
separation of assets while cooler heads
prevail,” she said.

A prenuptial agreement is a document
signed prior to marriage detailing own-
ership of assets and could include estate
management wishes as well as mutually

agreed upon principles for alimony and
child support should the marriage end.

Under the current law, courts are
open to drawing an inference from a
prenuptial agreement — but do not recog-
nise it as a binding contract.

Miss Greene’s comments came dur-
ing a lengthy interview at her office at
the firm’s headquarters on Village
Road.

She sought to reverse the perception
that prenuptial agreements mean “you
don’t trust each other and you think the
marriage might not work so you might as
well figure out who is going to get what
before you ever walk down the aisle.

Fax: 242-363-1173

“A good prenuptial agreement is like
an insurance policy that you hope you
never need, but should you have an
emergency whether medical or a natur-
al disaster, you'll be very thankful you do
have it.”

Miss Greene explained that it is often
inappropriate to discuss allocation of
assets during a break-up, — “when feel-
ings are hurt and lives bruised” — as such
conversations require a calm and ratio-
nal approach.

While judges bring experience and
wisdom to individual cases, Miss Greene
noted, their ability to refer to an agree-
ment freely and voluntarily signed by
both parties long before they reached
the courtroom would reduce the arbi-
trary nature of decisions, simplify the
divorce process, free up court time and
most importantly, have the potential to
lessen violence. “It would even save legal
fees.”



i NERISSA Greene

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, cuvo, rnuc 7

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The Rotary Club of West
~ Nassau ticket outlets for
the 33rd Annual Night of
Christmas Music Program
Sunday December 3rd,
~ RainForest Theatre.

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Tel: 323-1983

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Tel: 327-4271

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

Monday th
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a



RBDF beating a sign of our times

t is disturbing when law

enforcement officers are
accused of brutally and pub-
licly beating an Inaguan man
last Sunday.

According to The Tribune,
Dexter Wilson, a 27-year-old
Morton Salt marine worker,
was-scevagely beaten by
Defence Force officers in
Tnagua over the weekend.

Reports are that an alterca-
tion occurred at around 3.30am
at the bar of the Supers night-
club (Mathew Town) after Mr
Wilson had began chatting with
a female officer.

Purportedly, a male officer '

objected to the conversation,
instigating a row and allegedly
slapping Mr Wilson in the face.
Locals claimed that subsequent
to this initial confrontation,
about 15 officers mobbed Wil-
son, barbarically beating him.

Locals also claimed that,
although Mr Wilson broke free
and fled, officers chased him,
beating him to a semi-conscious
state while repeatedly dropping
a rock on his head.

Two witnesses of the episode,
Diverne Ingraham and Gerard
Moultrie, whose presence pos-

sibly saved Mr Wilson’s life, .

said the officers approached
them, proceeded to fire gun-
shots into the air and then

‘threatened to kill Mr Wilson

and any witnesses to the vicious
beat down.

Furthermore, witnesses of

the incident have claimed that

~when Mr Wilson was rushed to

the local clinic an officer -sug-
gested to the doctor that he
should “let him die”. Follow-
ing the receipt of medical care
on the island, Mr Wilson was
reportedly sedated and airlifted
to Nassau for emergency treat-
ment and tests. |

hen a group of law
enforcement offi-
cers allegedly engage in a bar
room brawl, with none of them
seemingly having the where-
withal to exhibit leadership and
avert such.a conflict, it must be
apparent that our society has
taken a violent, distressing turn
for the worse. -
If the accusations. that
Defence Force officers behaved
like lawless street fighters in



IADRI



TN

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

GIBSON



Inagua are truthful, new Com-
modore Clifford Scavella must
hurriedly be rid of the bad
apples seeking to further derail
the scandal-ridden RBDF
(which he has pledged to clean
up).
The Inagua fiasco is one of
several incidents involving
Defence Force officers this
year.

In February, American
reporter Mario Vallego, a vis-
iting journalist, was allegedly
attacked by an overly aggres-
sive Defence Force officer at
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre. Since the alleged
assault, very little has been
heard of the investigative out-
come and whether or not any
disciplinary measures were tak-
en.
It is troubling to observe how
many Bahamians, even those
in law enforcement, are becom-
ing violent egomaniacs, who
persist in displaying a blatant
disregard for the lives of others.

Who will protect us when our
protectors begin to conduct
themselves like a violent street
gang? Why is this apparent
streak of brutality now afflicting
almost all of our law enforce-
ment agencies?

enneth Russell; MP

for High Rock, sug-

gested some time ago that

crooks and cowboys are con-

stantly being recruited and

hired by our law enforcement
agencies.

According to Mr Russell, .

several of the young officers
‘being recruited have been
charged or convicted of a crime
and therefore possess a less
than wholesome police record.
If this is so, there is no wonder
why rogue elements within

these organisations persistently .

behave criminally, perceiving
themselves to be above the law
because they wear a uniform.
Are proper vetting proce-
dures being followed when
recruitingiofficers? Are tecruits

—

given psychological evaluations
to ensure that they are mental-
ly stable before placing them
on the streets?

Based upon the allégations
of brutality, the findings of the
Police Tribunal and the count-
less accusations levelled at
police and Defence Force offi-
cers for rape and/or violent
behaviour, it is obvious that
there is more than a handful of
hooligans masquerading as law
enforcement officers.

It has been widely suspected
that certain law enforcement
officers were/are gang mem-
bers who continue to maintain
their association and yet are
allowed to join law enforce-
ment agencies such as the
police, which they use as a plat-
form for “legitimate” retalia-
tion by using the power of the
law.

hen off-duty

Defence Force offi-
cers can carry loaded revolvers
and recklessly fire them, it
reflects: the American-influ-
enced hoodlum mentality now
afflicting many of today’s
youths.

Today, many Bahamian
youngsters prefer the ‘empow-
erment’ of a gun above educa-
tional advancement. This way-
ward frame of mind highlights
the sad reality of the current
social outlook of many Bahami-
an youngsters and is conse-
quently the reason why the rate
of violent crime has soared.

If a female officer was
inclined to converse with any-
one, so be it! Why should a
male officer become jealous or
protective if his colleague .wel-
comed conversation with the

opposite sex, particularly as,

officers are not supposed to
date within their ranks?

Now that some Defence

Force officers have joined the
ever growing list of role mod-

els-turned-fighters, what should:
- parents tell. their.children?

After the Cabinet Room fight

THE TRIBUNE

between MPs Keod Smith and
Kenyatta Gibson, and now the
Inagua mugging, what should
administrators tell students
when they ask why they are
being disciplined?

What example does this set
for the “trigger happy” young-
sters in the inner city?

Now that an investigation has
been launched into the Inagua
pounding, if these officers are
proven guilty, Commodore
Scavella must waste no time in
ridding taxpayers of any bar-
barian who may have perceived
himself to be above the law and
thereby perpetrated such a
heinous act—any such person
belongs in prison:stripes, not
law enforcement uniforms!

LAND REGISTRATION

bout three weeks

ago, my grandmother
bequeathed to me two acres of
property in Long Island, The
property was clearly given asa
‘deed of gift’.

However, in attempting to.

register the property, I discov-
ered that government had insti-
tuted an imprudent policy call-
‘ing for people given property
as gifts to pay a stamp tax.

I was also told that the per-

‘ centage a property holder was

expected to pay must be a frac-
tion of the appraised value of
the property.

If property was given as a
deed of gift, is it fair that I, or
other Bahamians, pay for an
appraisal, then have to turn
around and find the funds to
pay stamp tax on a gift? Is it
right for government to set pol-
icy where Bahamians must pay
anywhere from two to eight per
cent of the property value of a
gift?

After speaking to a former
senior administrator in the reg-
istrar’s office, I have come to
share this individual’s opinion
that “placing stamp tax on
property that was legitimately
given is just another way for
the government to keep their
feet on the necks of poor
Bahamians.” Indeed it is!

If anyone can offer further
insight on this troubling poli-
cy, please e-mail your com-

ments. . 4

ajbahama@hotmail. com



»
ci
@

ICG

La,



rowards the Links safe House for females in crises.








’ Tickets are available at 4 cost of $50.00’and may be
purchased from Floral Arts andfrom members of the Nassau '




mi
Chapter of the Links,
ncorporated.





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 9
We talk to officials, parents and children about how best to
eliminate the problem of low grades and failing achievement

Is it time to separate the sexes? ©







lm By CRYSTAL
JOHNSON-COLLIE

AS politicians and educators
wrack their brains for ways to
improve the ailing public school
system, a long discarded strate-
gy seems to be gaining in popu-
_ larity.

Single-sex schools, never in
the majority, were phased out
decades ago in the Bahamas,
but now parents of children in
both public and private schools
are calling on the government
to resurrect the practice — and
assist in spreading it through-
out the country.

These parents are not alone,
as some teachers echo the sen-
timent, and believe a new
debate is at hand that empha-
sises equality in the classroom
as a remedy to the many prob-
lems that continue to plague
public schools.

An official of the Ministry of
Education commented on the
matter, encouraging parents and
teachers to push for such a
change. “I am quite confident
that may students would be in a
new environment that would
allow them to focus on their
education,” she said.

Teachers who agree with the
single-sex education system say
the government needs to make
the matter a “high priority like
they are making the National
Health Insurance plan, because
a move like this would put the
country on a new level,” as one
put it.

“J think the single-sex edu-
cation system is an excellent
idea. I don’t see it as sexual dis-

‘ crimination as some do. I see it
as a better way of educating our
young men and women in an
environment with less distrac-
tions,” said Anthony Brown, a
high school teacher.

“An all-girls school would be
an amazing start for our young

women as I believe it would °

also be for. our young men.


























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They get to be comfortable and
confident about themselves.
Young girls would minimise the
use of cosmetics to enhance
their beauty for the young men
at school to notice them,” said
another educator.

“Single-sex education is what
I need for my children,” the
mother of two grade 11 students
said. “The system would mean,
smaller classes, less fights over
boyfriend and girlfriend, and
less distractions from both sex-
es, which will allow them to
concentrate on their work.”

Perhaps surprising to some
parents, many of the students
interviewed by The Tribune said
they agree that such a change
would have a positive impact



I see itasa
better way of
educating our

young men and

women in an
environment
with less |
distractions



Anthony Brown,
high school teacher

on their education.

“I think I would be able to
concentrate more in school if
we had the new system. I can’t
focus right now with all the girls
in my class.-who always wear
those short jumpers and come
to school all ‘nice-up’ and look-
ing good, so I could deal with a
change. My education is worth

The



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more than them. After I make
something good of myself in
life, I can choose and refuse
women,” said grade 12 student
Don McKenzie.

Cindy Cartwright, also in
grade 12, said it would be a
good idea because “boys are a
distraction themselves”.

“They go all out in school try-
ing to impress us and are always
fighting and acting wild, so this
system would be nice,” she said.

“The BGCSE examination
scores are very low and that is
something both the ministry
and the government is trying to
hide from the public,” one pri-
vate school teacher noted.

Problems

He added that the govern-

ment should make this problem
a priority, because as each year
passes, thousands of young
Bahamians graduate high
school unskilled and unquali-
fied for a well-paying, decent
job.

“Parents preferring single-sex
education tend to believe that in
the absence of the opposite sex,
their children will develop-more
self-esteem and much likely
encounter role models of the
same-sex in leadership and aca-
demics,” teacher Chelsea Smith
said.

Everyone interviewed agreed
that the biggest question is
whether separating the sexes
would actually improve learn-
ing in the Bahamas.

Researchers at the University

_of London’s Institute of Edu-

cation recently found that all-
girl schools do well in exam
league tables. Their evidence
was released just before the
publication of A-level and
GCSE results which proved that
British women in such institu-
tions have excelled for many
years.

However a few parents intere?':




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PART OF YOUR LIFE

@ A PICTURE from May
1966, when St Augustine’s
College was still an all-male
establishment and girls from

Frances Xavier College joined ©

the swimming team for a con-
test against St Andrew’s

viewed believe that single-sex
education for female students
would not be a good idea. One
explained that in her view, all-
girl schools “would only lead to
too much competition and
pupils will be prone to spiteful-
ness.”

On the other hand, many
believe that the system would
highlight and enhance the aca-
demic achievement of the coun-
try’s young men — who, educa-

tors say, continue to fall behind
“their female counterparts. «- |

-Nature’s Art for a Cause”

An art show of jewelry and home >
accessories made from conch shells,
coconut shells and other natural products

Artists- Dominga Leroy and Maria Hidalgo

St. Anselm’s Catholic Church
Bernard Road, Fox Hill

The Parish Advent Mission will be held Beginning
on Sunday, December 3rd until Tuesday, December
5th, 2006, under the theme “Who Do You .Say: I
Am.” On Sunday the service will begin at 5:00 p.m.
with Evening Prayer, Benediction and the anointing
of the sick. Monday and Tuesday service will begin
7:30 p.m. nightly. On Monday: evening.a service of
reconciliation will take place. Fr. Anselm Russell
OSB of St. Merinard Monastery, Indiana, will
conduct the mission.





Parishioners are encouraged
to attend these services.

ALL are welcomed.

Saturday December 2nd. 2006
10:00am-6:00pm

at Wild Orchid Designs
55 Madeira St., Palmdale

Opposite Micronet Business Technology, East of McDonalds

Telephone: 326-7738

A portion of profits will be donated to
The Cancer Society of The Bahamas.












PAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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La Parfumerie * David Yurman » Dooney & Ba atke ¢ Gaceis Guess * John Bull Business Centre

Blue Lagoon Island

ena

Dolphin Encounters Ltd. is proudly celebrating the birth of three healthy
dolphin calves this fall by hosting a student contest to help name one of
the babies! Students (grades K-12) are invited to submit suggestions for |
the name of one of our newest female dolphins, born to Gégeg on
September 2nd, 2006. Keeping with our Bahamian culture, the name
selected for her must be related to island culture, history or
geography: Submit your ballot along with a reason you feel that name
should be chosen. The student winner will receive a special Dolphin Gift
Kit. AND a free Dolphin Adventure Program for their whole class!

Use this ballot form or download a form at www.dolphinencounters.com.

_ Ballots can be submitted by fax to 394-2244 or emailed to
education@dolphinencounters.com. Be sure to check the list below of
the names of the animals at Blue Lagoon so you don't pick one of
the ones already in use. One submission . per applicant.
Contest ends December 7th; 2006.

Current Names of Marine Mammals at Blue Lagoon Island:

Salvador
Shawn
Soca
Stormy

Phone: 359-0278
or 426-5661

Abaco Dot
Andy Fatman
Aunty V Goombay
Chippy Jake

Torey
Xena

Kalika Murray
Maggie Nina
McGyver Pid,
Miss Merlin Princess

Fax: 394-2244 eee Cente aenca
“Student Name:

Teacher: a
Female name for the baby dolphin:

Why should the name be chosen?

. mony of the





Clifford Darling Complex opened



f= RAYNARD Rigby, Alfred Sears, Ron Pinder and Perry Christie view a Sieschtatan of i images
from the life of Clifford Darling




@ PERRY Christie
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Darling at the
event






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namng cere-

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General of the
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Invest in Your...

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“Getting Started: Taking your Business from Dreams to Reality”

Date: Saturday, December 2, 2006
Time: 9am-Spm



Venue: New Providence Community Centre, Blake Rd
Admission: $3 per person



SPEAKERS INCLUDE:
® Michael Halkitis, M.P.,Chairman BAIC
Opening Remarks
e Jerome Gomez, Director, Bahamas Venture Capital Fund
~ “Creative Ways to Fund your Business”
° Philip Simon, Executive Director, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
~ “Future Trends ~An Eye on China"
° Lydia Ferguson, Owner & President, Weight Watchers Bahamas
— “Starting and Maintaining a Successful Business”
° Kendrick Christie, CPA, President of BICA

~ "The Role of Your Chartered Accountant in New Business Ventures”

FEATURING ENTREPRENEURS IN:
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THE TRIBUNE



Fake designer
items seized in
warehouse raid

FROM page one

at he had no idea.

I don know because
I'm not into this business not
too Jone you see. | dont
know what (be real price is,”

said,

Police said that it is possi-
ble that Mr Ma could face
fines ranging from $10,060
up to $100,000 or up to five
vears in prison. Moreover,
they said, he could face
penalties from Customs tf
oreeches are discovered.



Inspector Michael Mox-
ey said that the fake prod-
wets will be destroyed.

Authorities to
release three
prisoners
—convic ted in
1983 coup

it ST GEORGE'S,
Grenada





THREE men convicted of
killings in a 1983 coup in Grena-
da that triggered a U.S. invasion
will be released early from
prison for good behavior, offi-
cials said The ursday, according
io Associated Press.

The former soldiers — Cos-
mos Richardson. Andy Mitchell
and Vincent Joseph — will be
freed Saturday after serving 20
years of 30-year sentences, the
Ministry of National Security
said in a statement.

“Under the law governing
sentencing regulations, inmates’
sentences are reduced by one
third if they have been deemed
as being industrious and well
behaved,” the siatement said.
“These inmates have qualitied
for the reduction in their sen-
tences.” i

The three — members of the
so-called “Grenada 17” — were
convicted of manslaughter in the
killings of forrner Prime Minister
Maurice Bishop, four Cabinet
ministers aad six of their sup-
porters on dct. 19, 1983. The
other m f the Grenada
17 were coi of murder and

















“justice,

suspende

FROM page one

means something in the
Bahamas. The law still means
something in the Bahamas.
Contempt is contempt and the
consequence for Sir Jack is that
he could also face jail time, he
can be penalised in fines, he.can
be committed for contempt,”
Mr Smith said.

Earlier this week, the attor-
neys for the family of the late
chairman of tthe GBPA
Edward St George obtained
an order by Supreme Court
Justice Jeanne Thompson giv-
ing them leave to request that
Mr Babak be imprisoned for

being in contempt of court. _..---

One. -of--the~ plaintiff's S
lawyers. former senator Dami-
an Gomez, lold The Tribune
that Mr Babak has failed to
comply with Justice John
Lyons’ order from November 2
to hand over documentation
regarding the operations and
business dealings of the Port

Authority and its affiliates to
the law firm of Callenders and
Co.

The documents, he said, are
needed in the various lawsuits
against Sir Jack, Mr Babak,
and the Port Authority, as the
dispute over the ownership ol
the GBPA rages on. . ,

Mr Smith said yesterday
that his firm Callenders and
Co will be asking for the com-
mittal order to be heard by
Supreme Court Justice Anita
Allen.on Monday morning.

“Following a typical order
on a contempt proceeding, a
person is committed to Fox

‘Hill for a period of six weeks,

with the condition imposed in
the order, that it will not have
effect providing they (the
defendants) purge their con-
tempt,” Mr Smith explained.
Should Justice Allen order

for Mr Babak to be commit-'

ted to prison at a time when
the suspended chairman is still
in Miami, US authorities are
expected to cooperate with the
Bahamas and extradite back
to the Bahamas.

~ “No doubt we could seek to
extradite Mr Babak from the
US to bring him back and face
* Mor Smith said.



eofo7 le NEWS

The Grand Bahama lawye
emphasised that the St George
family has as its first priority to
avoid disrupting business in
Freeport and to allow the
group of companies to oper-
ate effectively despite the
ongoing debate between the
shareholders.

Last Sunday night Justice
























































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Thompson, in an ‘emergency
hearing. ordered Mr Babak be
placed under an injunction,
restraining him trom acting as
chairman or participating in
the management of the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd.

Justice Thompson granted

‘an order appointing joint
* receivers and managers of the

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 11

Motion on oe is served on |
d chairman’s attorneys

Port Group Ltd and the
GBPA in the persons of Clif-
ford Culmer and Miles Culmer
of the chartered accountant
firm BDO Mann Judd.

Mr Smith said yesterday that
Sir Jack and attorney Thomas
Evans, on behalf of the GBPA
and the Port Group Ltd, have
both filed a summons to set





aside this order.

The hearing for this matter
is scheduled for Monday at
11.30am before Justice Alle::.

Mr Smith said that neither.
Sir Jack’s lawyer Gregory
Moss nor Mr Evans served
Callenders and Co with any
affidavits to support their sus:
mons.

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

us
we
,

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ie

Phe Luncheon Pilot Club,of Nassau meets ever

MONDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to‘inform the public of its meeting
times and places: New Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the
first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at New Providence Commu-
nity Centre,/Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar,
blood pressure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info
call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every
month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

n CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
day’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hiiton Mondays at 7pm. :

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every
third Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St. f oe



TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday -
6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm. :

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at.5:30pm on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace,
Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more info:

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays
at Nassau.GymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more
info. i

@ CIVIC CLUBS

.sThe Kiwanis Club.of New Providence meets every Tuesday at
7:30pm at the Holy Cross Con

unity Centre: Highbury Park.





eon‘ Pil ‘Tuesday at
SuperClubs Breézes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C C Sweeting
Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickchar-
ney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros.¢ Club 7178 meets each
Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Ter-

. race, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority; Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every

.second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham

Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

\ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm

@ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more
info. : : :

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third Tuesday of
the month at 6pm at the J P Whitney Building; First Terrace,
Collins Avenue. he

- The 8th Annual Harlequin Masked Ball, hosted by the men of

Omega Psi Phi fraternity, will be held Saturday, December 2, at
the Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa. The event will begin
at 8pm with a cocktail reception featuring a selection of choice '
appetizer delicacies, followed by sumptuous dining and entertain-
ment at 9pm. Tickets may be purchased from members of Omega
Psi Phi in New Providence or from Mortimer’s Candy Kitchen ©
(top-of-the-hill, East Street) or Vaughn L Culmer & Associates
Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd (Rosetta Street). . a j

WEDNESDAY



@ ENTERTAINMENT

Express Yourself: Poets, vocalists, musicians, visual artists, story
tellers. dancers, talented people - are invited to an Open Mic
Night @ Da Island Club on West Bay Street (inside the Nassau
Beach Hotel)-the place ay

where “the grown folks hang out”. The evening takes place every
Wednesday night at 8pm. This is the Bahamian cultural expression
that your ears have been craving for in a cool, comfortable and
safe environment. Express Yourself is the brain child of the tal-
ented spoken word artist Mrs. Nadine Thomas Brown. The ses-
sions have developed to showcase Bahamian singers, musicians,
dancers, movie makers, storytellers, sculptors and visual artists.

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednes-
day 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting

times and places: New Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday -

"The brewery of The







Vf












LEASE PUT

ad enccccccsencecccscvevesccecses even enecececcocvececccence: ea eecccenscsscccscenwecessccsccecccsseceree

e EXCITEMEN
continues te mount as
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film festival gets read
to kick off-its thir
annual celebration of |
films, events and panels
‘December 7-10. -



6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm
to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the first Wednesday
of every month at 6:30pm at New Providence Community Center
Blake Road. For more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878.
FREE Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas’ Support Group meets every
Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two
doors south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors, their family mem-
bers and friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

(
@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every Wednesday
from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship. If you would like to
attend our meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@got-
tardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com. ‘

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

’ International Training in Communication, Essence Club #3173

holds its bi-monthly meetings on the ist and 3rd Wednesda: of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public to its regular
weekly meetings held every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial ‘Hilton. Kiwanis -is a worldwid rvice organisation dedi-
cated to changing the world One Child?‘Q@ne Community at a
time." rR, ;




School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo - Free Every
Wednesdays from 10am - 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans
Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242) 356-2274
now to make Reservations. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sun-
day from 9am - 6pm. Inquire about additional activities and pro-
grammes. : a ! :

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th floor of the Min-
istry of Health, Meeting Street at 6 pm. :

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahamian Talent
Explosion-this and every Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on
Carmichael Road. This event features upcoming Bahamian artist
who are ready. to showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition every week which is open
to the public at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until
11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

‘@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physicians are
held at Doctors Hospital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room. Free screenings .

.between Spm & 6pm. For more information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday
6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Thursdays
at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or for more
info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and related Chal-
lenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month |
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road. 3

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Bahamas Historical Society is scheduled to hold its next
meeting Thursday, November 30 @ 6pm. Jim Lawlor will give an
address titled "Dr Paul Albury: Rotarian.” The venue is the Muse-
um on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue. After the meeting
Captain Paul Aranha will have copies of his new book "The Island
Airman" for sale.

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast meeting every
Thursday morning at 7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel.
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am) :

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday at 8pm

at the Holy Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are wel-
come. : ’

Please Drink a

ou















THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU

AROUND

YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
“OUT THERE”
' PHOTOGRAPHS ARE

IN THE SUBJECT LINE
WELCOME

ee eenecensecncescnsecece: saccceececsceccessecece: Acc ercesccccccccesescescscsneosocesccccecoo sees



Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and third Thurs-
day at the Ministry of Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Evetyone is welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Professionals,
Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @
Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Baord Retiree Asso-
ciation (NIBRA), meets every fourth Thursday in the month, in
the National Insurance. Board’s (NIB) training room, Wulf Road
office complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meeting every
Thursday at Choices resturant on the campus of the College of the
Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from 1pm to 2pm. meee



\ FRIDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm
to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fridays @ 6pm
to 7pm New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to -
8pm. : ; :

Stop AIDS...Keep the Promise: Commemorate World AIDS Day
December 1 by participating in the creation of a Human Red Rib-
bon in Rawson Square (north side) at 10am OR wear your World
AIDS Day T-shirt on December 1st OR join the AIDS Walk on
Saturday December 2 at 6am. World AIDS Day T-shirts needed
for these events are available at the AIDS Foundation (325-
9326/7) or e-mail: aidsfoundationbahamas@yahoo.com

m@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas will switch on the lights of
their 40 foot Love Tree at 7pm.at the Mall at Marathon on Friday,
November 24. The public is cordially invited to attend this annual
lighting ceremony which signals the beginning of the Christmas
Season. ’

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community
College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each
month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary.
For more info call 325.1947, after 4pm. a

AMISTAD is a club'which promotes the Spanish language and
culture in the community. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to attend meetings on
the third Friday of the month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.



SATURDAY

@ HEALTH .

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 10am to 11am.

Stop AIDS...Keep the Promise: Commemorate World AIDS Day
by join the AIDS Walk on Saturday, December 2 at 6am. World
AIDS Day T-shirts needed for these events are available at the
AIDS Foundation (325-9326/7).or e-mail: aidsfoundationba-
hamas@yahoo.com sen

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday, 2:30pm
(except August and December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. Sa

“Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors

Hospital Community Training Representative at 302.4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer
a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will
be held every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle.
Parents interested in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY

® PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, features special
entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean Express -
every Sunday. from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting

times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

ET
Send all your civic and social events
(attach pictures if possible) to

The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net -— Out there in subject line

Responsibly





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS



Eleven brew up
a storm for new

beer naming



i JAMES Sands, president of Bahamian Brewery and Beverage
Company, (second from right) presented winners of the “Name
that Beer Competition” with a $500 cheque on Wednesday at
the site of the new brewery in Freeport. Seen from left are
Christine Garvey; Sarah Kirkby, Barefoot Marketing, lawyer
Fred Sinith, attorney for BBBC; winners Ali Campbell, Deanna
Mosko, Anita Osman, Berndera Hepburn and Agatha Wallace;
model Vanessa Lunn, James Sands, and winner Gary Williams.
Winner Robbie Butler is not present.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
_Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Eleven per-
sons emerged as winners in the
Name that Beer Competition,
splitting the $5,500 cash prize
offered by Bahamian Brewery
and Beverage Company in its

search for two new beer names. .
Nassau businessman Jamés

Sands, who is president of the ~ *

company, is constructing aBise es

million brewery in Freeport. In
an effort to get Grand Bahami-
ans involved in the project, the
launched the compeution on
September 1.
Mr Sands announced that the
-’ name chosen for the first of two
.. beers is ‘Sands’ which was sub-
“mitted by all11 winners.
“It is my family name, and
we have been here 200-plus
years in the Bahamas, and it
makes me very proud to
announce my family name to
be the name of the Bahamian
beer that will be brewed in
Grand Bahama,” he said.
Instead of sharing the original
$3,000 cash prize, which would
have yielded only $273 a piece,
Mr Sands decided to give each
of the winners $500, bringing
the total cash prize to $5,500.
The presentation of cheques

(Photo: Derek Carroll) ;

was held at the brewery’s site

on Queens Highway .on

Wednesday.

The winners were Berndera
Hepburn, Deanna Mosko, Gary
Williams, Robbie Butler, Ali
Campbell, Tavere Kelly, Anita
Osman, Joel Wildgoose, Chris-
tine Garvey, Martin Williams,

and Agatha Wallace.

‘Response

Mr Sands said he was pleased
with the response to the com-
petition, which yielded over
3,798 names submitted by 1,899
entrants.

He said the second name will
be chosen during the Christmas
season from the same batch of
entries, when only one winner
will be. chosen for 3, 000 cash
prize.

The construction of 40,000
square foot brewery is present-
ly underway on 20 acres of land
at the intersection of Queen’s
Highway and Grand Bahama
Way.

The brewery is expected to
open in 2007 and initially
employ about 50 Bahamians.
Eventually, according to Mr
Sands, it will employ up to 150
persons.

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PAGE




FROM page one

again be divided into three sec-

tions - those insured, those who

can pay privately, and finally

those incapable of paying or

who require a government sub-
idly.

Most systems that are simi-
ar, said Dr Brown, the Cana-
dian and the UK system tend
io utilise two sectors predom-

nately the government and
uset/public sector with mini-
inal private sector input.

In resncuse to the problems
bulag experienced by these
cuutitries, he said, they are
now turning more to the pri-
vate sector to assist with reso-
lution.

According to Dr Brown, the
Partnered Care Model is one
that he has developed to
enhance and facilitate the
delivery of advanced health-
care services to the entire pop-
ulation. Through this process,
he said, all patients will receive
the best possible care regard-
less of their ability to pay.

“That’s it in a nutshell. Now
we are talking about advanced
services. Now just getting your
blood tested for your sugar,
that is not an advanced ser-
vice. That is a general service.
The advanced services there-
fore would be; initially at the
Heart Centre, things like
nuclear cardiology, open-heart
surgery, angioplasty and





























14, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

stents, and pacemakers.
“More recently for cancer
care, the most expensive part
of cancer care is radiation
therapy where you can have a
bill easily from anywhere from
$10,000 to $90,000. Open heart
surgery is a $25,000 to $40,000
dollar write up for the less
expensive forms. So we’re
talking big money. So the
Partnered Care Model was
developed to provide those
services to people irrespective
of their ability to pay,” he said.
The plan in its simplicity
would take the burden off the
government of having to con-
tribute millions of dollars as
private investors would

‘finance the facility and its var-

ious services as at the Cancer
Centre and the physician com-
munity. However, of the most
vital importance would be the
discounted service that would
be provided. j

Basing an example on the
Medical Association of the
Bahamas’ (MAB) fee sched-
ule Dr Brown explained the
discounted system and the fee
schedule.

“So the MAB puts out a fee
schedule and that’s the one we

_use as our base schedule. Any
schedule after that has to be _

lower than that, not higher
because this is a discounted
system. So the insured patients





LOCALNEWS ._

Cardiologist with idea of NHI’

gets the Medical Association
fees schedule and let’s say the
service costs $100 — that’s
what they get charged.

“Then the private self-pay
patient, who does not have
insurance, he is obviously pay-
ing cash, so he gets a cash dis-
count of let’s say 25 per cent.
Which also makes it easier for
him to'access it because it isn’t
costing him as much because if
he could have afforded insur-
ance chances are he would
have had it. So you have facil-
itated him.

“And now the final and
most important group is the
guy who cannot afford insur-
ance, nor can he afford to go
private. So that is your typi-
cal government or public
patient and they receive a 50
per cent discount. He has to
go to PMH. I work at both
hospitals both PMH and Doc-
tor’s, and I have my own pri-
vate heart centre, but I like to
know that I’m treating Tom,
Dick, and Harry, Mary, Sue,

and Paula, as long as they can '

benefit from our services,” he
said.

Dr Brown explained that his
model will provide the high-
est level of service for all
patients, minimizing long lines,
and equating those without

any private insurance to those

with the highest level.





With this in mind, Dr Brown
said that he took grave excep-
tion to being painted with the
political pandering that he and
other doctors were objecting
to the NHI plan because they
didn’t care about the poor.

“That is extremely offensive
and insulting when the politi-
cians do that. Because there
are people like myself who
have gone out on a limb for
our poor people — I am also a
consultant at PMH where I
help to take care of poor peo-
ple every day of the week for
the last 16 years — since 1990.

“So don’t tell me nothing
about we,don’t care about the
poor people. That’s a prob-
lem. And that’s where you'll
find most of the doctors will
go off the deep end and that’s
where you’ll get most of your
rage. Because you’re insulting
the integrity of people in our
profession when you do that,”
he said.

Dr Brown is also the direc-
tor of the Cardiology and
Interventional Associates. He
is stationed at the Bahamas
Heart Centre and the Cancer
Centre in which he and part-
ners (mainly Bahamian physi-
cians) have invested close to
$20 million in both of the
“state-of-the-art” facilities on

‘Collins Avenue at the Centre-

ville Medical Pavilion.

ont





“petition urging

THE TRIBUNE




NHI ‘slowdown’

FROM page one

past president of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and

? ‘consultant to the Coalition,

said that the signatures are
continuing to come in on a
“steady basis.”

In addition to the signa-
tures, Mr Rolle, said that the
comments and expressions
of concern by the people
have been of the “greatest
value” to the Coalition.

“People are obviously hav-
ing major concerns, espe-
cially when it comes to their
private health insurance.
They are asking questions
like ‘what is going to happen
to my private health insur-
ance, what is going to hap-

pen to all the money I have.

already invested?’
“These are all issues that
the Coalition will address,”

store

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_ SHOPPING PLAZA

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a

Mr Rolle said.
Representing a cross-sec-
tion of members of the coun-
try’s business organisations,
labour unions and profes-
sional medical groups, the
Coalition in principle sup-
ports a national healthcare
plan for all Bahamians.
However, the group
believes that insufficient
information has been pro-
vided to the public about the
NHI plan as proposed by the
Blue Ribbon Commission
and its steering committee.
The Coalition is recom-
mending that government
should make the upgrading
of present healthcare infra-
structure its number one pri-
ority.
The group is further calling

4

on government to implement |

the NHI plan ina ‘phase-in’
approach and to allow the

public to retain. the right to.

choose theit insurance and
healthcare providers.

that he is pleased. with Prime
Minister Perry Christie’s dec-
laration in parliament on
Wednesday that the consul-

holders will continue.

“It was encouraging to
hear him say that the con-
sultation is still ongoing; that
he’s prepared to sit in a room

cuss the issues that need: to
be discussed. That’s what we
have been asking for from
our inception,” he said...

Mr Rolle: said that. the

provide further details on the
NHI plan by today. | -

analytical work and prov
anput,” he said. a
i ae Si dhaseoed Me

John S. George

Here so help, every step of the ways

Mr Rolle yesterday said -

tation process with all stake-

and close the door and dis-













PONAN

a de?

Ministry’*of: Health has .
promised the Coalition to’

“Once we have that infor-
mation, we will begin our .

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 15



Call for politicians supporting
NHI to receive treatment at PMH

ALL politicians backing the
government’s national health
plan should stop seeking treat-
ment at the Mayo Clinic and
other foreign healthcare facili-
ties and stand in line at Princess
Margaret Hospital, it was sug-
gested yesterday.

“If they like the NHI so
much, let’s make it a condition
that all politicians, including
Cabinet ministers, become a
part of it so that all their treat-
ment is also done at PMH,” said
a civil servant who resents being
subjected to what he regards as
a health tax.

The source cited several
instances in recent years where
senior Bahamian politicians had
turned their backs on local
treatment to seek healthcare
elsewhere.

He said Prime Minister Perry
Christie had gone to Johns
Hopkins Hospital in Maryland
following his stroke last year.

Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell took his annual check-
ups at the Mayo €linic:in the
United States.

And Minister of State for
Finance James Smith had, he
claimed, also sought treatment
in.Washington DC.





Store Hous

Swaday~Thusday tlam~ t2 Nignight Pent bucava Mente Pace
Feletaty & Skandia " Whara~tpra Quran:s Miginoen

“What’s more, the Deputy
Prime Minister’s husband also
went for treatment abroad
when he was ill last year,” said
the civil servant.

“As far as I’m aware, he went
to Mount Sinai in Florida,” he
added.

If the PLP. hierarchy is so
keen on a national health ser-
vice for all, “let them stand in
line with the rest of us at PMH,”
he said.

In addition, the plan should
include a five per cent contri-
bution from everyone earning
over $75,000 a year - anda
major annual donation from the
Bahamas Christian Council,
which has come out in support
of the scheme.

“They claim they are loving
and caring - well, let’s see them
come up with some of the mon-
ey needed to make this thing
work,” he added.

The civil servant, who feared
victimisation if hé revealed his
name, said: “They are planning
to tax me and send me to PHM.
But.will they be standing in line
as well?”

His comments came as the
NHI debate gained momentum,
with the prime minister declar-

ing that the mandatory contri-
butions were not a tax, and that
the PLP’s promotion of NHI

was not an election ploy.

However, opponents of the
scheme say it is unworkable
because the budget set aside to
fund it is hopelessly inadequate.

They also claim that the PLP
has introduced the bill in the
run-up to the election in the
hope of retaining the working-
class vote - and diverting press
attention away from a string of



e !
Hip-ho
pee
ImMmusician
e e e@
in Haiti
HAITIAN-BORN
hip-hop musician Wyclef
Jean puts a bandanna
with the Haitian flag on
the head of a boy in
Jacmel, a small south-
‘eastern port city some
110 miles from Port-au-
Prince, Haiti, Thursday,
Nov. 30, 2006. Wyclef will
hold.a concert in Haiti
tomorrow. :

(AP Photo/
Ariana Cubillos)



lm PRINCESS Margaret Hospital

our favorite «



scandals which have rocked the
government in recent months.
Medical sources have claimed


























that a scheme matching
Britain’s National Health Ser-
vice - itself the target of fierce
criticism because of alleged
under-funding - would cost the
Bahamas at least $1.2 billion,
instead of the $235 million sug-
gested by the government. And
that’s without taking into
account the fact that health
costs are higher here.

They fear that an under-
resourced health service would
penalise everyone, forcing
employers to abandon their cur-
rent insurance arrangements to
the detriment of their work-

‘force, and leaving ordinary

Bahamians with a health ser-
vice that can’t deliver.
Yesterday, Independent MP
Pierre Dupuch raised what
many critics see as the biggest
fault in the plan - the presence

of between 40,000 and 100,000
Haitians in the country, all of
whom would be seeking ‘free’ -
health care under the scheme.
He also raised the same con-
cern as the civil servant, asking .
the government why a $60,000 a
year income. ceiling had been
imposed in determining the lev-
el of contributions.
“Why don’t we get the money
he (the poor man) would be
aying from the guy who makes
100,000, $200,000, or

~ $500,000?” .

He said the money should be
coming from the rich - not the
poor, who the government was
claiming to support.

Mr Dupuch said that, in the
circumstances, the scheme
would be seen as mainly a vote-
catcher.

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Raising a glass to annual ‘Festival

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama — If
you are “a regular” at Festival Noel,
you know what to expect — a glitter-
ing setting with tasty wines, delicious
foods, fabulous art and jewelry.

However, if you have never attend-
ed the annual event, which is the
main fundraiser for the Grand
Bahama branch of the Bahamas
National Trust, then you are in for a
treat on Friday, December 1. .

Festival Noel, to be held at the
Rand Nature Centre, is primarily a
wine tasting soiree.

Bristol Wines and Spirits is the
sponsor for this portion of the event
and will bring to the table many
wines from all over the world.

Upon entry into the event, atten-
dees will be given a card that details
each wine. “You can make notes
about the wines you’ve tried and
know the pricing so you'll be able to
purchase them later from Bristol
Wines and Spirits,” explained one
organiser. “The variety of wines will
range from the very pricey ‘to the
more affordable. So you can enjoy
a taste of something really special
that you may never be able to afford,













Blayesne Bude, apie ae iad ea ae.

but also become familiar with vari-
eties of wine that are more in your
price range.”

Art is being showcased as well,
with the feature artist being Bahami-
an legend Eddie Minnis.

Mr Minnis, will be joined by his
talented daughter and fellow artist
Nicole Minnis-Ferguson.

Many other local artists will all be
displaying and selling their fines:
works.

A new sponsor of the festival this
year is John Bull, a company estab-
lished in 1929 that has become a tra’
dition of shopping excellence in the
Bahamas.

Starting out as an old English
tobacco house in Nassau, John Bull
now represents many of the world's
most sought after brand name luxu-
ty goods. Product categories include
watches, fine jewellery, leather goods,
perfume, cosmetics, photographic
equipment, writing instruments and
cigars.

At the festival, John Bull has
arranged for some special items to
be offered for a silent auction in sup-
port of the Rand Nature Centre.

These include a Dooney and Burke
hand bag and wallet; his and hers
watches from Movado; a leather doc-
ument case, brief case and leather
portfolio by Kenneth Cole; a ster-
ling silver key ring by Dorfman.
Also up for auction will be special
gift items and packages from Ani-
male, La Spa at La Belle, La Dolce
Vita, the Pub at Port Lucaya, Bristol
Wines and Spirits, Top Notch and a
special piece from Eddie Minnis.
While attendees are sampling the
fine wines and perusing the art and
jewelry, they will be fortified by sam-

plings from many Grand Bahama’

restaurants.

Each restaurant will be competing
to be the coveted Chef Noel at Fes-
tival.award and featured for the gala
event will be returning champion
Iries Restaurant.

They are bringing with ihe Chine
Beach, another well known restau-
rant from Our Lucaya.

Added to this will be Old Bahama
Bay, chefs from the School of Hos-
pitality, the Harbour Room, Joe Ret
and new comer the Grouper Grill
from Ocean Reef and Yacht Club.

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business@tribunemedia.net

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



Attorney: NHI Bill breaches

constitution, Fr

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

prominent
Bahamian
attorney yes-
terday told
The Tribune
“he was likely to file a legal
challenge to the Government’s
proposed National Health
Insurance (NHI) Bill when it is
passed, on the grounds that it is
‘unconstitutional and breaches
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.
_ Fred Smith, a partner with
-Callender’s & Co, told The Tri-
bune that the NHI scheme
could be unconstitutional
because it allegedly breaches
Article 128 of the Bahamian
‘constitution. :

This article, which comes
under Chapter 9, dealing with.
the nation’s finances, stipulates
that all tax revenues collected

by the Government of the
Bahamas are to be paid into
the Consolidated Fund, Mr
Smith said.

However, the Government
is proposing that under its NHI
scheme, contributions - set at
5.3 per cent of a salaried work-
er’s monthly income, to be split
50/50 between employer and
employee - be paid into a
National Health Insurance
Fund.

This will be separate from
the Consolidated Fund, and
managed and controlled by a
10-member National Health
Insurance Commission.

Emphasising that he sup-
ported the principle of univer-
sal healthcare access for all, Mr
Smith said: “I’m all for provid-
ing healthcare for every
Bahamian. It’s not the provi-
sion of services, but the law-
fulness of the approach. I sup-
port universal healthcare. How

it is achieved
is a different
matter.”
And Mr
Smith added
that because
NHI contri-
butions were
an .income
tax, they
could not be
levied in
Freeport as a
result of the



@ SMITH

Hawksbill

Creek Agreement.

He drew attention to the
1955. agreement’s Clause 2,
Sub-Clause 8, which stipulates

that no taxes - including

income taxes -.can be levied

against “the earnings of a:

licensee in the Port area” or
against “any salaries and remu-
nerations” paid to employees
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and their licensees”,



eport Act

Fred Smith plans challenge on seounds fa National
Health ‘tax’ contravenes Hawksbill Creek Agreement

provided they live in the Port

area.
Although the tax exemption

=") initially lasted for 35 years, Mr

Smith said it, was extended by

the 1993b Freeport Act until»
» . 2018 (see other story on this

page).
He told The Tribune yester-
day: “The Prime Minister is

talking nonsense, of course...

The National Health Insurance
contributions, under the
intended scheme, area tax.
They. are nothing more, and
nothing less, than a tax on
income.

“Since they are to- ‘Be

received, held and adminis- ~

tered by the National oe

Insurance Fund, they are

unconstitutional. The constitu-
tion requires that all taxes’be

paid into the Consolidated .
- an Appropriations Bill, and

Fund.”

Mr Smith said this part of
the Constitution flowed from
the British model it was based
upon, and the abolition of the
monarchy’s - or executive’s -
powers to spend money with-
out reference to Parliament.

This, he added, was done to
ensure elected MPs could
“determine and approve where
the taxpayer’s money is spent
next year”, remaining account-
able to the people for how
their funds were used.

In the Bahamas, final esti-

mates of revenues and expen-

diture had to be laid in the
House of Assembly by the
Minister of Finance, along with

voted on by MPs.

“The collection of funds out-
side Parliament’s control is the
mischief Article 128 seeks to
protect the Bahamian public
from,” Mr Smith said.

“This approach to legislation
is typical of all governments,
all administrations, who regu-
larly fail to take into account
the precepts of the constitu-
tion ‘and the unique position
of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-

“ment in the jurisprudence of

the Bahamas.



NIB case sets stage for Bay | Street awaits the bleachers ‘nightmare’

1 Smith’s NIB

o By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EVEN if National Health
Insurance (NHI) contributions
are payable in the rest of the

"*. Bahamas, attorney Fred Smith

argued yesterday that because
they are an income tax they do

not have to be paid by busi- —

nesses and residents in
. Freeport due to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.
' He pointed out that he had
partially won a similar legal
action he brought in 1988
against the then Minister of
Housing and National Insur-
ance. In a case that went all the
way to the Privy Council, the
ultimate court of appeal for the
Bahamas backed Mr Smith’s
contention that contributions
to the National Insurance
Board (NIB) were a tax, but
ruled that they were not an
income tax, but one based on
being employed.

Revealing that he was con-
sidering mounting a similar
challenge to the Government’s

‘challenge’

proposed NIB scheme, once

the Bill becomes law, Mr Smith
told The Tribune: “If they pass
this legislation, I will seek a
declaration first, as a citizen of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, that if the tax is col-
lected it must be paid into the

‘Consolidated. Fund, and I will
challenge whether itis payable .

in Freeport as a tax on the
earnings of a licencee.”

' Mr Smith argued that
because NHI contributions
were an income tax, they could
not be levied in Freeport as a
result of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement.

He drew attention to the —

1955 agreement’s Clause 2,

-Sub-Clause 8, which stipulates
that no taxes - including

income taxes - can be levied
against “the earnings of a

-licensee in the Port area” or
against “any salaries and remu-. °

nerations” paid to employees

of the Grand Bahama Port

SEE page 4B

Law firms gain top rating

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

_ FOUR Bahamian law firms
have been ranked in Tier 1 -
the top possible ranking - by
a major international publica-
tion that reviews and rates the
world’s top attorneys.

’ Graham, Thompson & Co,
Higgs & Johnson, Lennox
Paton and McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes have all been
ranked as Tier 1 law firms by
the IFLR 1000, a publication of
the Legal Media Group.

In its assessment of the top
Bahamian law firms, the IFLR
said a number of the major
Bahamian commercial banks
- Commonwealth Bank, Sco-
tiabank and Bank of the
Bahamas International - were
clients of Graham, Thompson
& Co, which advised them on
. transactions, corporate and
project finance, and regulatory
issues. ..

The IFLR added that the
company benefited from
strong links with the Bahamian
government, due to the pres-
ence among its partners of
attorneys such as ex-attorney

{
t

general Sean McWeeney. Oth-
er prominent partners were
named as Michael Barnett,

Craig Roberts and Dana Wells. °

Meanwhile, Higgs & John-
son was said to be benefiting
from the high level of foreign
direct investment projects in
the Bahamas, acting as. adviser
to the Royal Bank of Canada,

_ JP Morgan Chase and Royal

Bank of Scotland. The latter,
the IFLR said, was the major
bank investor in foreign direct
investment projects.

The review said Higgs &
Johnson had actea as Bahami-
an attorneys to a group of
banks lending $548 million to
Bahamian-incorporated com-
panies; represented another
bank in a $100 million ship-
ping industry financing;
advised a Norwegian bank on

providing a $110 million cred- ||

it facility to a Bahamas ship-
ping firm; and advised on a $90
million loan to a Bahamian
firm to buy property in Lon-
don.

Higgs & Johnson was also

SEE page 7B

= By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL —

Tribune Business Reporter make

2
Stores ‘lucky if they-get.10 good.pre-Christmas shopping days’



BAY Street merchants are about to
enter “the nightmarish” Christmas shop-
ping period, blaming potential losses in
revenues and profits on the Junkanoo

bleachers that block access and visibility of .

their storefronts.

Charles Klonaris, chairman of the Nas-
sau Tourism Development Board
(NTDB), said that once again Bay Street

retailers were being forced to endure the »

inconvenience of the bleachers, resulting
in a loss of Christmas spirit.

“The. bleachers are always a concern.
They are an obstruction that disrupts the
entire city for just two days at the busiest

F

time of the ne Klonaris said.

The situation is:so bad that merchants
are increasingly losing hope that they will
make a strong profit during the period
between Thanksgiving and New’s Year
Day.

They are lucky if they get 10 good

shopping days in right before Christmas,”.

the NTDB chairman added.

Mr Klonaris said:the bleachers block
the entire downtown area, and are a nui-
sance to store owners, taxi drivers,
motorists and pedestrians.

“This is a problem that seriously needs
to be addressed before they spend mil-











lions of dollars on a Bay. ‘Street redevel-
opment plan. Retailers are. very depen-
dent on their holiday sales, but the place-
ment of the bleachers drastically cuts into
profits,” he added.

Mr Klonaris noted that despite many
meetings on the subject, suggestions for a
suitable alternative such as increasing
manpower to put the bleachers up as late

__as possible have not been heeded.

“I want to emphaise that we are not
against Junkanoo. It is a major part of our

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





women



THE 500-member strong
DREAMS _ Investment
Group, which aims to assist
Bahamian women in taking
their business from dreams
to reality, will host its first
one-day Entrepreneurial
Seminar and Tradeshow on
December 2.

The Seminar and
Tradeshow, to be held at
New Providence.Community
Centre, Blake Road, from
9am until 3pm, is intended
to educate DREAMS mem-
bers and the general public
on the steps to take to
become entrepreneurs.

It will also focus on how
businesswomen, can maintain
what they have started, while
promoting products and ser-
vices of already-established
entrepreneurs.

Organisers

One of the organisers,
Cecillia Cox, manager of
financial services and invest-
ments at British American
Insurance Company,
explained: “The average per-
son works for someone else,
with a person or a company
for three-quarters of their
lifetime.

Many persons wonder how
they can turn hobbies - and
even professions - into their
own businesses. The hardest
part is getting started and
that’s what we hope to
inspire people to do.”
British American Insur-































achieve

business DREAMS

ance helped to establish the
DREAMS group.

Some of the topics to be
addressed are Creative ways
to fund your Business, which
will be presented by Jerome
P. Gomez, director of the
Bahamas Venture Capital
Fund, and Future Trends —An
eye on China, presented by
Philip Simon, executive
director, Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce.

Kendrick Christie, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Insti-
tute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA), will also speak
on The role of your Charted
Accountant in New Business
Ventures.

In addition to the presen-
tations by these speakers,
there will be entrepreneurs
featuring a local clothing line,
t-shirts with Bahamian slo-
gans, hand crafted hand bags,
skin and hair care products,
an accounting firm, and
Bahamian-made products.

All attendees will be able
to view and purchase these
fine products at reasonable

. cost.

Some of the benefits from
the seminar will include see-
ing and hearing how others
got started, learning how
hobbies and/or professions
can become high-income
generating businesses, learn-
ing how to plan for contin-
ued success, and financing
and expanding your product
or service into the Family
Islands.






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The British Colonial Hilton invites applications for the following positions:

Executive Housekeeper

A highly efficient, organized, results- oriented, and dynamic individual is needed for this
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. and laundry teams. Responsible for team performance and productivity level including
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Highly energetic with the ability to work long and flexible hours including weekends

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the hotel.

The position requires the following:

e Asuccessful track record with 2-3 years experience in security management preferably
with the hospitality environment

¢ Strong observation skills with keen attention to details

¢ Excellent communication skills with the ability to produce accurate reports
¢ Focused and disciplined individual with the ability to adhere to and enforce compliance
with company safety and security standards.
e Sound customer and team relation skills.
e Ability to work shifts, weekends and holidays.
Credible high school education essential with BGCSE passes in at least two sublects
including English Language.

Individuals who meet the above requirements are invited to forward their resumes to:

Deadline: December 5, 2006



The Human Resource Department |
BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON, NASSAU
1 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-302-9040
Email: recruitment@hilton.com

The primary purpose of '

Business

_ Sense



culate the likely response you
are going to get.

* To reduce your returns. By
following up after a sales or
service call, you.can keep your
product returns to a minimum.

* It is flexible. You can use it
to introduce your product, new
initiatives, build traffic on your
shop floor, test your pricing,
and sell larger pre-order items
that you don’t want to keep‘in
stock

If you want to send out direct
mail, you will.need to follow
the following steps:

Step 1: COMPILE A LIST -

~ You will need to compile a list

of people to send your mailing
to. You have two choices:

* Compile your own list —
Lists are time consuming to
create and take a lot of effort to
keep up to date. If this is the
way you want to go, get some-
one-to start collecting and
recording all your customer
data information, from past
invoices, accounts, files, sales
receipts, warranties and phone
messages. Then create.a cen-
tral list with as much informa-

.tion as possible to include

name, address, telephone num-
ber, e-mail, purchasing histo-
ry.

Specify whether they are
large, medium or small
spenders according to volume.
Then categorise them as active,
prospective, and inactive. Get
your sales people to capture
this data from everyone who
comes into your shop.

* Rent a list.- There are

" mafly thailing lists that you can)
rent, containing information

HES





about just about any type of
individual you wish to target

’ for your mailings based on
demographic, behavioural and |

geographic data. If you want
to send your mail to Democ-

| ratic voting, defrocked priests

who live in California, there is
bound to be a list there for you.
These lists are not cheap, but
can be extremely profitable to
you.

Step 2: WRITE YOUR
COPY - You need to give your
customers a compelling reason
to buy by creating.an irre-
sistible proposition. This area is

dealt with in detail in my pre- .

vious column, Writing Great
Copy, and in next week’s col-
umn, which deals with Direct

Response Marketing.

Step 3: THINK OF WAYS
TO GET YOUR MONEY UP
FRONT - You should always
be trying to get your money up
front. Consider the following
methods:

* Give the customer a gift
for making the order.

* Offer to take payment by
credit card.

* Offer a Quid Pro Quo. -
Let the customer know that:by
getting money up front, you
can save on collection costs and
you are passing this saving on
to them.

* Link money up front to a
special price or special time-
frame offer.

* Offer to pay the shipping,
or offer to send the product
COD if the customer orders
within a specified time period.

* Offer a Toll Free Number

to encourage people to pick up

the phone and pay.

Step 4: CREATE YOUR
PACKAGE - Make sure your
direct mail package includes a

letter, a brochure if. possible; he
reserved:

an order form and a reply

envelope.

You are now ready to go and
send out a mailing. Here are

3

‘
a

y
4

some tips for a successful direct

‘mail campaign:

Tip 1: Make sure you Follow

Up - Follow up your customers —

and prospects. Keep making
offers regularly, every two
weeks or every month, espe-
cially in slow periods. See what
works and stick to it.

- Tip 2: Clean Your Databases
— Lists get out of date quickly,
so make sure the dead people,
and people who don’t want to
be written to, are removed.
This will take time. There are
companies that can clean your
lists for you.

Don’t be an antipreneur and
make the following mistakes:

* Ignore the power of Direct
Mail

* Use outdated prospect lists

* Write poor.copy in your

~ mailing
* Forget to ask for money up

front

Marketing your business is. ;

an important area and will

require constant effort. So, in ~

order to avoid the trap of’

antipreneurship, make sure you
spend time on direct market-

“ing, as this exercise could bring
in extra sales for your compa-—

ny.

NB: Adapted from his
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How to Avoid It,

Mark draws on 20 years of top ~

level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He
is chief operating officer of

. www.ezpzemail.com, current-

ly lives in Nassau, and can be

contacted at markalex-—

palmer@mac.com

Cet

© Mark Palmer. All il rights Be

i}

WE'RE MOVING

Royal Bank of Canada Trust _
Company (Bahamas) Limited is
pleased to announce that on
December 4, 2006 it will be

Royal Bank

of Canada

Trust Company
is on the move

Sey www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

© Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC ar

Pun oa Mena

changing its place of business to

Bayside Executive Park
Floor 2, Building #3
Blake Road and West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 702 5900
Fax (242) 327 7382

The postal address for the
company will remain

PO Box N-3024

Nassau, NP, Bahamas

Royal Bank

of Canada
Se

RCA AN

Le SD DG



a as

wd ae ae

“ne

Oe

~ rw woe wae



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 3B



a se Eee eee eee

$428k subsidy
saves PUC from
six-figure loss

m By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter

WITHOUT government’s
$428,440 subsidy, the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC)
would have incurred an oper-.
ating loss of $373,547 for fis-
cal year 2005, its audited report
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly has revealed.

According to the Ernst and
Young audit tabled by Prime
Minister Perry Christie, the
Government gave the telecom-
munications sector regulator
$428,440 for the year ending
June 30, 2005.

The report also revealed that

Cable

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas last night
announced that its 2006 third
quarter net income had risen
by 31.5 per cent to $4.646 mil-
lion compared to 2005, with
the company deciding to con-

tinue its share repurchase pro- .

gramme on the open market.
Apart from the increase in
net income upon the $3.534

Aalto
AN
Pea a tel ee aT Core)
Secale Relea neon AOL)
IC tere NUL
arlene alec
eronraciem MMe UL

Bu her Meta eis
: Available to recent
Earn your degree in

net income for the year was
$54,893, compared to the
$317,003 recorded for 2004. ¢

The PUC’s retained earnings
at the beginning of the year,
previously reported at
$875,141, fell to a deficit of
$485,265 due to adjustments
made to its 2004 accounts
worth $1.36 million.

Ernst and Young explained
that the adjustments to the
earnings had to be made
because the accounting for the
PUC’s defined benefit pension
plan in previous years did not
correctly reflect the costs of
the plan, and its related pen-
sion assets and liabilities.

In addition, government

profits

million achieved during the

three months to September 30,
2005, Cable Bahamas added
that for the first nine months in
its current financial year, net
income was up by 28.4 per cent
to $13.36 million compared to
$10.409 million.

Gross revenues for the three
months to September 30 were
ahead by 16.4 per cent at
$16.683 million, compared to
$14.329 million, while for the

subsidies were incorrectly
reported as contributed capital
rather than included in income
for prior years. A capital con-
tribution in 2001 was incor-
rectly included in income.

The report indicated that the
PUC’s income relies heavily
on the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC),
from which it collected
$968,036 in phone service and
$174,800 in cellular fees.

The PUC also collected
$193,435 in fees from ZNS for
radio communications.

In addition, the PUC has
the right to collect revenue
derived from the issuance of
radio communications as a

erOow

year-to-date, revenues were up
just over 15 per cent at $48.426
million.

Operating expenses, though,
had been relatively well-con-
tained, standing 11.3 per cent
and 10 per cent up for the third
quarter and first nine months
respectively, at $8.352 million
and $24.148 million.

Operating income for, the
2006 third quarter was 22 per
cent ahead of last year, stand-



result of a partnership
between the Bahamas Mar-
itime Authority (BMA) and
BTC.

The agreement allows the
BMA to collect all the licence
revenues for the Commission
and then to retain a percentage
of those revenues for its ser-
vices.

According to the audit, the
revenue owed to the PUC

from this arrangement is .

$706,374, with $339,060 owed
by it to the BMA.

The amount BTC owed the .
_ PUC had increased to $314,994

at 2005 year-end, compared to
$56,480 a year earlier, a more
than fivefold increase.

41.5%

ing at $8.331 million compared
to $6.817 million, while for the
year-to-date it was 20.8 per
cent up at $24.278 million com-
pared to $20.099 million.

Net income per ordinary
share was $0.23, compared to
$0.18 the previous year, while
for the first nine months it

stood at $0.67 as opposed to _

$0.52.





FULL COLOR
PRESSMAN
Needed

MUST BE EXPERIENCED IN PRINTING
HIGH QUALITY WORK ON A’

5 COLOR HEIDELBERG

(minimum 5 years experience)

Call: 394-8667

Exclusive Boutique
Resort & Spa
Recruiting
Passionate, pemonable and Honest

Individuals who have at least 3 years experience in
the Hospitality Industry to fill the following |
"positions:

Executive Chef
Food and Beverage Manager
* Boutique Manager
Room Division Manager |
Spa Manager
Spa Therapist
Maintenance Supervisor
Entertainment Coordinator
Concierge .
Receptionist
Maitre D
Bartenders
Waiters
Housekeeping
Bellman
Security Personnel
Beach/Pool Attendant

All applications are appreciated but only qualified
individuals will be considered. Applications must
be received before December 22, 2006. Our email
address is stephmresort@ yahoo.com or you can
mail it.to.AP-59223 Slot 440, Nassau, Bahamas.



INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of the
Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased to advise
that the cheque disbursement for ALL students in the Loan Program will take
place at Holy Trinity Activity Centre, Stapledon Gardens, beginning December
4 to December 8, 2006, from 9:00am to 3:00pm as follows::

NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS

Surnames

Lyset a Loe

Monday, December 4, 2006
Tuesday, December 5, 2006
Wednesday, December 6, 2006
Thursday, December 7, 2006
Friday, December 8, 2006

TIME: 9:00AM - 3:00PM
PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre

Stapledon Gardens

Returning Students and/or Guarantors should be present and must
bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance

Card).

New Students and Guarantors should be present and bring relevant
identification, (valid Passport, National Insurance Card, current
job letter and copy of a utility bill).

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation
has been completed.



ae



PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



NIB case sets stage for Smith’ NIB ‘cl

initially lasted for 35 years, Mr
Smith said it was extended by
the 1993b Freeport Act until
2018.

The full clause in question
reads: “ That for 35 years from
the date of this Agreement no
taxes of any kind shall be
levied upon or against the
earnings of the Port Authority

FROM page 1B

Authority and their licensees”,
provided they live in the Port
area.

Although the tax exemption

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good-cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












RELATIONSHIP MANAG

Trust & Corporate Services



A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of ervices to local and
international clients. .









|
An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter wit
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporat
Services team. The successful candidate will report atitly. to the Senior

Relationship Manager.





















Core Responsibilities

= Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust, estates
and agencies.

# Provide financial information to clients as requested.

® Acton clients’behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

= Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

"Bachelor's Degree in Business or related eiscipIng from a well ue
university.

= A minimum of five years progressive’ Fiduciary pxperiengee Financial
Services Industry.

= STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.
» ® ~ Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

® Strong interperscnal, communication, problem solving, projeet
management and customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 10, 2006







‘ Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

Email: recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs

_ www.butterfieldbank.bs







BIS

Pricing Information As Of:
30 November 200 6 .

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas X
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdi

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per eae paid in the last 12 months

_ MARKET TERMS

* in the Port Area and outside

the Colony or upon or against
the earnings of a Licensee in
the Port Area and outside the
Colony or against any rentals
or licence fees paid by any
lessee or by a Licensee to the
Port Authority or upon or
against any interests or divi-
dends paid by the Port Author-
ity or by any lessee company of
the Port Authority or by a
Licensee to the holders of the
evidences of indebtedness
and/or shares or other securi-
ties of the Port Authority or
of the company holding such
lease from the Port Authority
or of a licensee or upon or
against any salaries and remu-
neration by way of bonus par-
ticipation in profits commis-
sion or otherwise paid by the
Port Authority or by any lessee
from the Port Authority or by
a Licensee to any person
employed by the Port Author-
ity or by such lessee or by a
Licensee within the Port Area.
Provided that the person
receiving such salary and/or
remuneration is ordinarily res-
ident within the Port Area."
Recalling the 1988 case, Mr
Smith said he had sought a

declaration that, as a Port
Authority licencee, he did not
have to National Insurance
contributions because they
were a tax he was exempt form
paying as a result of that
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
clause.

He added that while he lost
his case at the Supreme Court,
the Court of Appeal via a
majority verdict held it was a
tax, and gave a declaration that
Mr Smith was exempt from

paying it asa result of being a

Port Authority licencee.
Government

The Government then
appealed to the Privy Council,
which backed Mr Smith on

NIB contributions being a tax. .

However, it overturned the
declaration, ruling that he was
still liable to pay it because it
was not an income tax, but one
on being employed. As a
result, it did not fall under the
Clause 2,:Sub-Clause 8 of the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

“They said the contributions
that.an an employer is required
to pay under the National
Insurance Act were not a tax

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LARDIBALA OVERSEAS LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ‘ LARDIBALA OVERSEAS LTD. is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions
of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

- The dissolution of .the said company commenced

on the 28th November, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

. Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Dizame
Consulting SA. Pasea Estate, Road Town

Tortola, BVI.

Dated this O1st day of December, A.D. 2006

- Dizame Consulting SA
Liquidator’



Legal Notice

NOTICE

PENZA TILE CORPORATION

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 27th day of November 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Weekly Vol.

YIELD - ast 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful!
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bah.

- Trading volume of the prior week

Stock Ind J.

1, 1994 = 100



EPS$

NAV KEY
*-17 November 2006
** - 31 October 2006
** - 31 October 2006

31 October 2006



on the earnings of the employ-
er, but the tax is payable
regardless of an employer’s
earnings. As a result, you were
still liable to pay contribu-
tions,” Mr Smith recalled.
But he added: “In the case of
National Health Insurance
contributions, it is unquestion-
ably calibrated on income.
Only those earning money pay.
It is therefore a tax on income,
as well as a tax on earnings.
“It is.not only unconstitu-
tional, but also a contraven-
tion of Clause 2, Sub-Clause 8

- of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-

ment, and it is not payable in
Freeport even it if is payable in
the rest of the Bahamas.”
The final format of the Bill
was unclear at this time, Mr
Smith said. Given that self-
employed persons have to con-

tribute the full 5.3 per cent of

their income to the NHI
scheme, and that many of
these will be business owners

and, in Freeport, Port Author-
ity licencees, a strong legal case
could be made for their
exemption, along with that of
salaried workers living in the ~
Freeport area.

And in its 1990 ruling on Mr
Smith’s NIB case, the Privy
Council acknowledged in rela-
tion to employed and self-
employed workers that “a
powerful argument can be
deployed to support the sub-
mission that in their case, the
contributions are a tax on their
earnings. The tax is only
payable if they have carnings,
and it is fixed as a percentage
of their earnings”.

Although a literal reading of
Clause 2, Sub-Clause 8
appeared to exempt them from
NIB contributions, the Privy
Council said this would “have
bizarre consequences” if the
tax on employers was treated
differently from the tax on
them. ,

- BAHAMAS FIRST |
HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby,
“notifies all its shareholders that based on
unaudited results for the quarter ended
30th September 2006 the Board of Direc-
tors has declared an interim dividend of
two cents (2¢) per common share to be
_ paid 8th December 2006 to all sharehold-
ers of record as of Ist December 2006.



Legal Notice
NOTICE
SNOW ANGEL LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SNOW ANGEL LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies

Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 21st July, 2006 when the Articles of
_ Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Mark
‘Edward Jackman of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02,

Singapore 039393.

Dated this 01st day of December, A.D. 2006

Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator

WE ARE LOOKING FOR

GROCERY BUYER

That is:

*Experienced in the Retail Business

*Analytical and Energetic

| °Creative and willing to Travel

*An excellent communicator

*Proficient in Excel & Word Suites

We offer Great Benefits:

*Growth & Advancement within the organization| |

°A salary that will commensurate with

experience

°Group Medical & Pension Plans

*Employee Discounts
°Profit Sharing

°A Supportive team environment

Send resumes via e-mail to:
cshumanresources@aol.com





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 5B



US retailers tap into festive spirit FQ

@ By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Business Writer

WALLK into any Gap clothing
store this holiday season and
expect to see red T-shirts, red
hats and red bracelets.

Of course decorating with red
is nothing unusual this time of
year, but the merchandise is
meant to remind customers of
something not often associated
with the holidays: the global
AIDS epidemic.

Gap is one of a number of
companies this year who are
tapping into consumers’ grow-
ing desire to do good deeds with
their purchasing dollars.

Other retailers selling prod-
ucts to benefit humanitarian
causes include Bath and Body
Works, a division of Limited
Brands Inc., which recently
launched a line of candles and
fragrances that benefit the
Elton John AIDS Foundation,
as well as Macy’s, which is sell-
ing baskets made by Rwandan
widows to help support that
nation’s developing economy.

“JT think the demand for these
types of products has always
been there, but companies just
weren’t filling it until now,” said
Dan Henkle, Gap’s vice presi-
dent for social responsibility.

For the Gap, filling that
demand means donating half
the profits from all items
marked with a Product Red
label to the Global Fund to
Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and
Malaria. Items launched in
October range from a $20 can-
dle to a $350 leather jacket
modeled by director Steven
Spielberg in the company’s star-
studded marketing campaign.

Product Red is the brainchild
of U2 rock star and activist
Bono and philanthropist Robert
Shriver, who convinced compa-
nies like Gap Inc., Apple Com-
puter Inc., and American
Express Co. to design cus-
tomized red products.

The portion of profits donat-

‘ed to the Global Fund varies
for each company, with Apple

donating $10 from each $199 -

red iPod sold and American
Express pledging one percent
of each purchase made with its
red credit card: All of the com-

#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts,
Palmdale

“says about our brand,”

panies have contracted to pro-
mote the products for at least
four years.

But don’t confuse this new
spirit of giving with a charity,
say Product Red developers.

“Our focus is really on creat-
ing a sustainable business mod-
el, and the only way to do that is
to make it beneficial for the
companies as well,” said Julie
Cordua, vice president of mar-
keting for Product Red.
“Because if it’s something that
makes good business sense for
them they’re going to want to
keep doing it.”

But it’s the lingering “busi-
ness sense” hanging over the
red campaign that has attracted
heavy criticism from some cor-
ners.

More than a few bloggers
have pointed to the crassness
of companies using a deadly dis-
ease as a marketing vehicle to
sell more clothes and electron-

ics. Radio talk show host’
. Michael Medved has charged
on his blog that companies have .

used the campaign as an excuse
to hike prices and make more
money for themselves.

“A Gap long-sleeved T-shirt
that last week cost $14.50, now
goes for $45... meaning the com-
pany still gets an extra $8 of
your money on an absurdly
overpriced piece of cloth,”
Medved writes.

Other online critics point out
that since most of the money
from red products will go
toward buying medicine for
AIDS victims in Africa, the
campaign will help bankroll
pharmaceutical companies who
are unwilling to distribute their
drugs for free.

So what’s the payoff for par-
ticipating in an effort that
attracts such tough scrutiny?

“T’ve always said ’doing good
is good business’, and I recom-
mend it to my clients,” said Britt
Beamer, chairman, of market-
ing firm America’s Research
Group.

According to Beamer, the
' positive feedback generated by

charitable outreach always off-
sets any dollar loss to the com-
pany.

“What’s important is what it
said

(Next to City Market)
P.O. Box N-10620

How":

COMPANY LIMITED

Tel: 242-328-0048
Fax:242-328-0049
Tis' the Season te

~ HP Photosmart C3180 Printer
$D/256 Media Card
HP Q1977A Photo Paper:.4’x6”

Nassau

LOWEST PRICE.

Brad Stevens, Starbuck Monee s
vice president of U.S. Market-
ing. ,
The Seattle-based coffee
giant recently kicked off an
effort to hand out 10,000 cards
called “cheer passes” daily, ask-
ing recipients to perform one
act of kindness for someone else

and pass the card along. The -

drive is not tied to any cause
and the cards are not
reedemable for merchandise,
but recipients can track their
card’s progress online.

“It says that we at Starbucks
are willing to use our resources
to try and start this chain of
good will,” said Stevens.

Twenty years ago the major- ©

ity of Americans said the mea-
sure of a reputable company
was the number of years it had
been in business, according to
Beamer. Today only six percent
of Americans judge a business
by its longevity.

“I think consumers saw all

these big companies go out of .

business — the Montgomery
Wards of the world — and con-
cluded that the measure of a
quality company had to be
something more,” Beamer said.

Some businesses have begun
promoting the way they treat
their workers as the measure of
their quality as a company.

In fact, the founders of start-
up clothing company Fair Indi-
go have based their entire busi-
ness strategy on the idea that
consumers will seek out mer-
chandise made by people work-
ing for decent wages.

The Madison, Wisc.-based
apparel maker recently
launched its first line of “fair

“trade” clothing, meaning that

all the clothes were made by
workers in developing countries
paid above minimum wage and
not working in sweatshop con-
ditions.

The term “fair trade” is typi-
cally applied to deals with farm-
ers growing commodities like
rice and sugar, but the founders
of Fair Indigo are betting that

the same consumers who drink
fair trade coffee, if given the .

choice, will also ep for fair

trade clothes. oe
“Clearly there are more e:peo-

ple out there becoming more

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conscious of how their purchas-
es affect society and the envi-
ronment,” said CEO Bill Bass,
who co-founded the company
after leaving his job as vice pres-
ident of e-commerce at Lands’
End.

Whereas in his previous job,
Bass says he would push facto-
ry owners in Asia and Latin










Ayistita ‘to make clothes for 7

less money, he is now insisting

they take more money — and

pass it along to the workers.
“Tt really freaks some of them

out,” Bass said. “They realize

pretty quickly though that this
will actually reduce their
turnover and help them attract .
the best workers.”

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| BAHAMAS HOT MIX

Asphalt Products Manufacturer
Civil Engineering Contractor |

Now Hiring For Abaco Projects
NB: Personnel To Be Hired In Abaco |

Nassau Office

Airport Industrial Park
Po Box.Cb 10990
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 377-6351
Fax: (242) 377-2193 _

Dump Truck Drivers
Excavator Operators

Dozer Operators
General Labourers

_ Abaco Office '
Airport Roundabout
P.O. Box AB-20184
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 367-3956
Fax: (242) 367-3959

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT (the”FIU”) |

PUBLIC NOTICE >

Pursuant to Section 16(1)(b) of The. Financial
Intelligence Unit Act, 2000, the Public is hereby
notified that the FIU intends to issue its Revised
Suspicious Transaction Guidelines. Relating to
the Prevention of Money Laundering and the
Financing of Terrorism.

Financial institutions,

industry organizations,

that

are representative of those financial institutions and
interested parties, that are likely to be affected by
the proposed Guidelines, are invited to express their
interest in being consulted in the
development of the Guidelines to the FIU no later
than 31st January, 2007

Copies of

the
may be obtained from the FIU,

draft

course of the

proposed Guidelines

Third Floor,

Norfolk House, Frederick Street, P.O.Box SB-50086,
Nassau, Bahamas,Telephone Numbers: 356- 6327;
— 356-9808; or 326-3814.

Director

Financial Intelligence Unit

P.O.Box SB-50086
Nassau, Bahamas





fe ee ene

PAGE 68, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006




TT



fi By RACHEL BECK
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Remember when Wal-Mart
was talked about as the retail-
er where America shopped?
At least in recent months, it
looks like consumers increas-
ingly have taken their money
elsewhere.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. should
be a dominant force during the
all-important holiday season,
but instead it has tallied terri-
ble results. ‘Its same-store sales
fell for the first time in a
decade in November and it is
forecasting anemic growth this
month as well.

Blame for such missteps
can’t go just to the slowing US.
economy. Wal-Mart’s reputa-

tion as a difficult employer and
the growing perception that it
doesn’t always offer the lowest
prices have led consumers to
shop at competitors of the
world’s largest retailer.

Given Wal-Mart’s size and
power, what it does matters.

’ With more than 6,600 stores

worldwide and sales for 2006
estimated to average out to just

under $1 billion a day, the Ben- -

tonville, Ark., discount chain
has long been considered an
industry and economic bell-
wether.

But its recent woes show a
vulnerable side to this retail-
ing behemoth. Maybe Wal-
Mart’s problems are just Wal-
Mart’s problems.

Its November same-store

sales dipped 0.1 percent, mark-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PURBECK VENTURES INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
| of the International Business Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000
| PURBECK VENTURES INC., is in dissolution, as of

| November 29, 2006.

Saavedra Registrars Limited of Geneva Place, Waterfront
| Drive, P.O. Box 3469, Tortola, Road Town, British Virgin

‘| Islands.

e

BUSINESS

ing the third consecutive
month of disappointing results.
Those weak sales came despite
Wal-Mart’s price cuts on toys,
electronics and other items in
an attempt to draw shoppers.

For the heart of the holiday
season, Wal-Mart is expecting
December same-store sales to
be flat to no more than 1 per-
cent higher than a year earlier.
The company blamed weak
sales of apparel and a slump
in its home furnishings busi-
ness.

The initial take on Wall
Street earlier in the week —
when Wal-Mart tipped its hand
that November wasn’t looking
good — was that the weakness
was. symptomatic of a slow-
down in overall economic
growth. The stock market sold
off on the idea that the housing
market correction coupled
with an uncertain jobs outlook
might be spurring consumers
to hold off on some spending.

But for that argument to
hold up, there should be other
warning signs as well — and
there aren’t. Consumer spend-
ing has picked up in recent
months as gas prices have
dropped, and new retail sales
show strong results from other
merchants.

Rival discount chain Target
Corp. tallied better-than-
expected same-store sales of

5.9 percent in November.
Shoppers scooped up its trendy
offerings even though they
bypassed them at Wal-Mart.
The department store chains
also fared well, including the
8.9 percent gain at Federated
Department Stores Inc., which
also boosted its December
sales forecast.

“We are beginning to ques-
tion if its (Wal-Mart’s) sales
issues are broader and more
secular than we are currently

being led to. believe,” JPMor- .
gan retail analyst Charles .

Grom said.
Plaguing

One big issue plaguing Wal-
Mart has to do with its prices.
Consumers long believed if
they shopped at Wal-Mart,
they got the best price. And
they were willing to put up
with dated stores and sloppy
displays so long as they were
paying less.

But this year, that might not

have held true. While the com-:

pany has started remodeling
— which also has turned off
shoppers because of the dis-
ruption to the stores — most
stores haven’t been redone yet.
At the same time, Wal-Mart
hasn’t always offered the low-
est prices.

The discounter failed terribly



LIQUIDATOR



Perec

| International Investment Group
based in Nassau seeks Accountant for
general accounting duties; preparation of
financial statements, cash flow, budgets,
account reconciliations and financial

| analysis. | Knowledge of GAAP,

| consolidation eliminations necessary.
BS Degree in Accounting and CPA or
equivalent licensing required.

Send resume & salary history
via email to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international
trust company, is presently looking for a |

TRUST OFFICER

This position is open to candidates with the following
minimum requirements:

Qualifications

- © Bachelor’s degree in a relevant discipline;
Post graduate degree in law and/or a STEP
designation;

Minimum three years experience in an offshore
trust company; :
Ability to speak a second language is a plus; *
Extensive PC knowledge.

Personal qualities

¢ Good analytical, organisational and
communication skills;

e Committed to service excellence;

e Able to work on own initiative;

° Positive and flexible attitude;

e Team player.

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should
apply in writing, on or before December 10, 2006
enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

Or

hrbahamas@ubs.com

ESSIEN SET CE ERS VOR NTE BIRPSTD ES CL RTTIE ROO YOR TSAO











Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that BRIAN JAMES MOODIE OF
#80 SOUTH WESTRIDGE, P.O. BOX N-3180, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

otice
“NOTICE is hereby given that WILDA MICHEL-PIERRE OF;

GENERAL DELIVERY, TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 24TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Abaco, Bahamas.







RISK OFFICER

Operational Risk Management























The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of service local and
international clients.



An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter wit
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Operational Ris
Team. The successful candidate will report directly to thes&istant Manager,
Operational Risk Management.



Core Responsibilities

® Assist with the development and implementation of the Risk.
Management Framework within the bank and to deputize for the
Assistant Manager, Operational Risk Management in her absence.

® Assist with, the monitoring of the company’ adherence to the groups
ORM policies and procedures by providing service and support to all
business lines.

8 _ Assist with identification of risk and completion of risk rating analysis
within the unit. : |

® Assist in thecreation of the bank’ risk database using Methodware
' software

= ‘Manage the timely recording and review of incident reports and ensuring
‘timely resolution and reporting.

® Assist in the preparation of training sessions and briefings relating to any
Group wide Operational Risk Procedure rebuts.

Desired Qualifications

S: Bachelor's Degree in Accounting, Finance or related discipline from a
well recognized university.

= A minimum of five years experience in the Financial Services Industry.

2 The ability to learn newsoftware programs speedily.

= Advanced skills in Microsoft Office (Excel, Word & Power Point)

= The ability to work with minimal supervision and to work accurately and
effectively under pressure.



= Excellent interpersonal, communication, time management and préém
solving skills.

Closing Date: December 10, 2006

Contact

Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

Email: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs

www.butterfieldbank.bs .








ad

Butterfield Bank



when it attempted to, attract
higher-income shoppers by
offering more fashionable
items such as clothes that were
sold at higher price points. It
also shifted its advertising away
from a low-price focus, but
now is emphasizing cost again.
In the meantime, its com-
petitors intensified their price-
cutting on the same or similar
items sold at Wal-Mart, includ-
ing food and grocery items.
That was especially true over
Thanksgiving weekend.
Wal-Mart started discount-
ing toys in October and elec-
tronics in early November,
hoping to “gain mind share”
as the low-price leader over
the holiday season, according
to Goldman Sachs analyst

‘Adrianne Shapira.

But then it failed to deliver

‘as competitors offered better

deals on Black Friday and
through last weekend. “The
rest of the world caught up in
promotions when it mattered
and margins were hit across
the board,” Shapira said, not-
ing that its biggest declines in
customer traffic came during
the week of Thanksgiving.

Also at issue is whether Wal-
Mart has expanded so much
over the last four decades that
finding new store locations and
capturing additional sales in
certain categoriés are becom-
ing increasingly difficult.

As Merrill Lynch’s Virginia
Genereux noted, Wal-Mart
could have hit a “market-share
wall” — since it might not be
able to see much more upside
to its 30 percent of share of
such things as men’s under-
.wear and pet food, or in certain

THE TRIBUNE



art woes self-inflicted |

markets like Springfield, Mo.

Then there is Wal-Mart’s
publicity problem. Two years
ago, a poll of 1,800 shoppers
found that 2 percent to 8 per-
cent of respondents said they
had stopped shopping at the
retailer because of negative
press. The findings came in a
report to Wal-Mart by con-
sulting firm McKinsey & Co.

That decline was before the
recent onslaught of attacks
from two union-backed
groups, WakeUpWalMart.com
and Wal-Mart Watch, which |
have gotten lots of media
attention for taking on Wal-
Mart’s treatment of workers
so publicly. Wal-Mart bashing
was also popular on the cam-
paign trail during this election
season.

Wal-Mart has fought back
through its own intensified
public relations effort. “We
continue to create jobs,
advance careers and enhance
communities across the coun-
try,” Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott
said during the Nov. 14 third-
quarter earnings call.

Of course, no one should
write off Wal-Mart yet. It is
big. It is strong. It is resilient. It
is in many of the nation’s
neighborhoods, catering to
many of the nation’s shoppers.
No other chain comes even
close to the sway that it has
over American consumers.

A year from now a different
Wal-Mart story could be told,
one of better times ahead. For
that to really happen, though,

the retailer might want to |

review how it got where it is
today, and what shoppers have
long looked for in its stores...

“tothe Ghief-Passport ‘Officer,’ P.O: Box .N=742): Nassaws:
' “'Bahamas*no'later-than ‘thirty (30) days after-the daté of



PUBLIC NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CINDY ALCIMON
AND CINDY LOUIDOR of PO. Box N-7940, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to CINDY
HILAIRE. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections:














publication of this’notice.

Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELINE EUGENE OF PORT
NELSON, RUM CAY, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registraiion/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization vhx\ld
not,be granted, should send a written and signed stats7"et
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1ST day +;
DECEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationain.¢ ¥-.



A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices inj




and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Venn Helpers and
Sales Persons Wanted

Harbourside Marine is looking for marine
helpers. Must have mechanical knowledge and
strong work ethics.

Please fax resumes to: 394-7659

Harbourside Marine is looking for sales
person with knowledge of generators, golf
cars and the marine industry.

Must be self driven.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659



Legal Notice

: NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MELVIN ASSETS S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
MELVIN ASSETS S.A. has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 18th day of August, 2006.

FIDES LIQUIDATORS INC.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 7B



NOW HIRING

Nolen ew eC eicialt

BLEACHERS, from 1B

culture and we look forward to it. However,
there has to a better solution so that the bleach-
ers go up for the parade, but do not shut down
the city during the peak of holiday shopping,” he
said.

Although Mr Klonaris said yesterday that it
was hard to place a dollar value on the potential
loss caused by the bleacher placements, Bay
Street retailers estimated they lost a combined
$7.5 million in sales due to the two-week place-
ment of bleachers for the Junkanoo parades in
2002.

The public treasury was estimated to have
lost out on $1 million in stamp and customs
duties, and retailers estimated they lost between
10-25 per cent of Christmas sales depending on
where they were positioned in relation to the

LAW FIRMS, from 1B

involved in the compulsory liquidation of the
Moore Park group, and the $100 million insol-
vency of the Realto Group.

As for Lennox Paton, the IFLR review noted
that it had advised Ginn Clubs & Resorts on its
$5 billion West End project, and acted for Star-
wood Hotels in its proposed involvement with
the Baha Mar development.

The firm had also played a role in the $54
million purchase of Winn-Dixie’s majority 78 per
cent stake in Bahamas Supermarkets, and
advised Credit Suisse over the $2.3 billion lend-
ing facility that financed Kerzner International’s
buyout.

IFLR noted that Lennox Paton had suffered



bleachers.

The Nassau Tourism and Development Board
predicated that prior to the 2003 parades retail-
ers would, as a result of poor planning and con-
sultation, lose some $5-$10 million in sales for
December 2003, with the cost to Government
some $1-$2 millionintaxrevenues.

The board further predicted that employees
could lose some $200,000 on sales commission
revenue, with a Bahamas Taxi Cab Union offi-
cial having told the board that the lost parking
and traffic congestion in 2002 cost its mem-
bers $150,000.

Individual stores The Tribune spoke with yes-
terday said they preferred not to make individ-
ual statements, allowing the Nassau Tourism
Development Board speak for them.



a “bumpy ride” in 2005 through the loss of three
partners - Bryan Glinton, Roy Sweeting and
Andy O’Brien - who had formed their own law
firm, Glinton, Sweeting & O’Brien.

In their new practice, the three had handled
more than $60 million in deals, including a debt
offering, acquisition financing and resort financ-
ing. The IFLR review placed Callenders & Co in
Tier 2, noting how it had set up a trust and
foundations group to exploit the Foundations
Act, and established a correspondent relation-
ship with a,Chinese law firm.

Placed in Tier 3, along with Glinton, Sweeting
& O’Brien, were Alexiou, Knowles & Co, and
Harry B. Sands &:Co.

esb consultants limited

Presently considering applications for

FULL-TIME
ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS

Looking for candidates with:

1. Some experience with drafting and the creation of _ construction

documents.

a Working knowledge of the AutoCAD software.
3. .Autodesk Land Desktop experience is a plus.

Responsibilities include:

1. The drafting and creation of construction documents.
2. Assisting Engineers on site with supervision and management duties.

Are you an energetic, organized, hardworking CCIE] who
seeks a Career-oriented position with an established company?

Then this might be the position for you!

Administrative Assistant needed to support busy Human Resources
Department in performing various clerical support duties.

Qualifications:

Strong organization skills

Excellent oral and written communication skills
Exceptional customer service skills

Team oriented

Ability to multi task

Enormous attention to detail

Goal oriented

Able to work in a fast paced, deadline oriented
environment

Solid data entry skills

Strong initiative

Results-driven

Basic working knowledge of computers and Windows
software, in particular Word, Excel, Power Point

Great benefits include competitive salary commensurate with
experience, free Training and development, Paid Vacation, Health
Insurance, Life Insurance and more. ;

Interested persons should submit résumé to:
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-746
Nassau, Bahamas

‘ ies
Candidates should be hard working and be able to handle a number of
projects simultaneously. ¢sb consultants limited is a team orientated
company, and eons employees should be capable of adapting to this
philosophy.

All interested candidates should email there resumes to:

mark@ecsbconsultantslimited.com
OR fax to: (282) a: 7209 ATIN: Mr. Mark Williams

VACANCY

CHIEF ENGINEER
Out island Resorct

Job Description:

The Chief Engineer is a member of the hotels Executive Committee. Previous experience in managing capital
projects is required. The ideal candidate will have outstanding communication, organizational and planning skills,
and the ability to establish positive working relationships with vendors, and the other departments within the hotel.

- Position will be responsible for supervising/overseeing Maintenance Engineering and Landscaping.

- Requires Hotel Engineering supervisory experience.

- Requires a minimum of 5 year(s) of supervisory experience and a minimum of 5 year(s) of hotel maintenance
engineering experience.

- Must have experience at properties of similar size and quality.

- Position will be required to work a varied schedule that may include evenings, nights, and weekends.

Technical Requirements

- Create and implement preventive maintenance program.

- Strong technical skills in HVAC, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, carpentry, etc.

- Familiar with chillers, cooling towers, chemical treatments, pneumatics, control systems, water systems, boilers,
- refrigeration, compressors, etc.

- Pool chemical testing must be completed and recorded once a day.

- Create and up keep civil; mechanical and structural as built drawings.

Managerial Requirements _

- Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects.

- Demonstrate team building experience.

- Demonstrate ability to lead by example.

- Experience communicating, training, and managing multi-lingual staffs.

- Experience in training and cross-training employees.

- Experience in training and developing employees with limited education/experience.

Business Skills

- Strong technical skills

- Excellent time management skills.
- Strong organizational skills.

- Good knowledge of computers.

- Exceptional detail in follow-up.

- Solid scheduling experience.

Serious inquiries only need apply. Send Resume’s to:





PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006



SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
IMPORTANT NOTICE |
2006 DECEMBER DISBURSEMENT ag

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS: »
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME



THE FOLLOWING PERSONS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE CHECKS.

CHECK DISTRIBUTION EXERCISES WILL BEGIN ON DECEMBER 4â„¢, 2006 AND WILL
END ON DECEMBER 8", 2006: FROM 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M. AT THE FOLLOWING ©
LOCATIONS:

- THE HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE, STAPLETON GARDENS, NEW
PROVIDENCE AND ©

- THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA |
(Grand Bahama and the Northern Bahamas)

CHECKS WILL BE DISTRIBUTED BY LAST NAME IN ARES ORDER.
LISTEN FOR WHEN YOU ARE TO REPORT TO THE D. ENT

New students and their guarantors are required to bring a valid Sane National Insurance

Card, and a job letter with them.

Returning students and/or guarantors are required t to bring a valid Passport o or other identification Me

DO. NOT’ TO COME TO THE DISBURSEMENT CENT! RE IF YOUR NAME DOES NOTAPPEAR

ON THE FOLLOWING LIST.

ONLY PERSONS WHO COME ON THEIR ASSIGNED DATE WILL BE SERVED.
CHECKS WILL NOT BE RELEASED UNLESS ALL ACCOUNTS ARE CURRENT .

PLEASE CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS

“THE EDUCATION LOAN COMMITTEE



. Surname First name Middle name CH

: ADDERLEY CRAIG ~ TREVOR © ALLENS. ar! NP’ ©
ADDERLEY * WIAA ROKER” SS-1958' : NP
ADDERLEY II" WILFRED TIMOTHY” NASSAU TEAST SOUTH NP -
ALBURY JUSTIN JERMAINE CR-54 ., NP
ALBURY LATOYA ANASTACIA SOUTHERN HEIGHT: Says NP -
ALCIME DEBRA ALTHIA SAFFRON LN., CAMPER, HGTS NP
ALLEN JASMINE SHEINAY OAKES FIELD ~ ‘NP
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APAU JULIETTE -ARNETTE GOLDEN GATES #2 ; NP

. ARANHA ° DONJULIE LOUISEA ANNE N-3648 Bp aes. So NRE Ss
ARCHER ALYSIA AGENES ALENE SS-6626 : vey NP
ARCHER LATEISHA ° SHAVONNE CR-11717 uous “NP:
ARCHER OMAR TARAN CB-11717 ; NP
ARMBRISTER JANIQUA JOYELLE RAHMINIQUE YAMACRAW. vec NP
ARMBRISTER JURAAN GEORGE CORALHARBOUR © °°... NP.
ARMBRISTER KENYA SIMONE SUNSHINE PARK PEC SUAS | ccs
ARMBRISTER NATHANIEL . OMAR. CARMICHAEL DRIVE... > (NP.
ARMBRISTER RONNELL CANDICE SASHA ve BAY STREET” He NP
ARTHUR CARNID “CALSEY . N-9213: - i > NP
ARTHUR WAYNETTE . SHANDEIKAHSHARON GOLDEN GATES ry NP:
ASTWOOD ANDERO AARON REDLANDACRES . . ~——sNP
AUSTIN DOMINIC. DEREK GT-2149. - ios DLONPO
BAILEY ROBERT MBOYA CHIPPINGHAM. *. NP
BAIN ALICEIA SABRINA SOUTH BEACH ESTATES _ NP
BAIN INDIRA CRYSTAL CHERINA N-9220 NP
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BARRY: CHARLENE . SHANGELIAALLISON YELLOW.ELDER GARDENS NP...
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BELLE LATANYA ~ LATOYA N-74 NP
BENEBY DARRYL LIVINGSTONE .- YELLOW ELDER GARDENS _ NP
BENEBY D'ASANTE HERMIA N-912 ‘ NP...
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BETHEL PHILIP - JORDAN SS-5761 , NP
BETHEL QUINTON SHACARRO N-10841 NP
BETHELL DONNEE se CARMICHAEL ROAD SNP.
BETHELL MIKIKO TAMANGI PINEWOOD GARDENS — "NP
BEVANS ~ KEITH SOLOMON MARTIN BLAIR ESTATES . : NP
BLACK SASKIA TABITHA SS-5946 NP
BODIE ALICIA CLARANIQUE MT PLESANT VILLAGE “NP
BODIE ASHLEY LATARIO CB-12440 “NP
BODIE BERNARD ~~ JONATHAN SUNSET PARK NP...
BODIE Ill GEORGE | ALLINGTON EE-15324 | - “NP.
BONAMY KENT VAN CORAL HEIGHTS WEST NP
BONAMY KURT VON CORAL HEIGHTS WEST NP.
BOOTLE JODY AUDRA SB 52517 Ws NP
BOOTLE YVONNE PATRICIA Cae ROAD NP >
BOTIN-RIVERT MELISSA GEN DEL NP
BOWE ANDREW ANTHONY CORAL HARBOUR NP .
BOWE. JOSEPH SHEAN SB-52273 ; NP.
BOWE LATOYA ANITA STACHANS SUBDIVISION NP -
BOWE , LESEAN NIKITA KENNEDY SUBDIVISION © NP
BRENNEN DELRIKA LOUISE SOUTHERN HEIGHTS “NP
BRENNEN DEVONN NIKITA SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP
BRENNEN * DONIQUA LAKESHIA GEORGETOWN. - EXUMA
BRICE XAVIER ELIZABETH ESTATES NP.
BROWN ANTHONY CRAIG FOX HILL ROAD NP. -
BROWN ASHLEY ° LA' SHAN NASSAU VILLLAGE . NP
BROWN KOURTNEY = EUGENE NASSAU VILLAGE NP
BROWN KRYSTAL TAMIKA BAYWATER ESTATES NP
BROWN SHANDEA LATOYA GAMBIER VILLAGE ‘NP
BROWN SHERMAN ANTHONY WINTON MEADOWS NP
BROWN SHONET ANDRENE DANNOTTAGE ESTATES - NP
BROWN VICTOR ALEXANDER JEREMY GOLDEN GATES #2 NP
BROWN-RUSSELL — INDIRA NYOKA GOLDEN GATES #2 "NP
BULLARD-FARQUHARSON 'VERLINCIA ROBERTHA CORAL HARBOUR NP
BULLARD-KNOWLES INEASE CIA’ CORAL HGHTS, CORAL HARBOUR NP
BULLARD-STAMP RHODA BLANCHE WINTON HEIGHTS ‘NP
BURNSIDE GIA LINDERIA STAPLEDON GARDENS “NP -
BURROWS ASHLEE TRANEA CARMICHAEL ROAD NP

i
iy

Sumame

BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS

_ BURROWS

BURTON
BUTLER
BUTLER
BUTLER
CADET
CAMBRIDGE

’ CAMPBELL

CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL JR
CANCINO
CAPRON
CAPRON
CARDRON
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CARGILL
CARROLL

~ CARTWRIGHT

CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT

COLEBROOK

COLEBROOKE
COLEBROOKE
COLLIE
COLLIE
COLLIE

- COLLIE

COLLIE
COLLIE

COLLIE JR.
COLLINS
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER II
COOPER-BODIE
CUNNINGHAM
CURRY

DAMES
DARLING
DARLING -
DARLING
DARVILLE

~ DARVILLE

DARVILLE
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS

DEW,
DORESTANT
RSETT . a
RSETT
DORSETT ©
DOUGLAS .

DOUGLAS
DUNCOMBE

DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE II
ELLIS

EMILE
EVANS-ROLLE
FARQUHARSON
FARQUHARSON
FARQUHARSON

FARQUHARSON-ARTHUR

FARRINGTON

~ FERGUSON

FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON

FERGUSON

FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON JR ,
FERNANDER .. .

FINLAYSON

FITZGERALD

‘FORBES -

FORBES —
FORBES .
FORD

FORD
FOWLER
FOWLER
FRANCIS
FRANCIS

- FRANCIS

FRASER
FRASER
FRASER
FRAZIER
GARDINER |
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON

- GIBSON

GILBERT
GOMEZ
GOODMAN
GORDON JR
GRANT

GRAY

GRAY
GREENE
GREENSLADE

‘HALL

HANLAN
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HART
HASSAN
HEILD.
HENDERSON
HENFIELD
HEPBURN
HIGGS
HIGGS
HIGGS

HIGGS, Ill
HINES
‘HOYTE

HUDSON JR -
HUNT

HUTCHESON
HUTCHESON
HUTCHINSON

TAMIKA

LATINA

First name

JACKLYN
KENWOOD
LYNEER
WILFRED
TAMEKA
LINDRICK
OREN
PORTIA
MARIANNE
COLETTE
KRISHANDA
NICKALET
SHENICA
RONALD
LAMAR
INDIRA
MCCARDIA
BURNELL
ANDREW
EDWARD
PATRELL
PAULINA
RENALDO
ALDYN
CHERYL
EUGENE
GREGORY
IANTHE
THEODORA
MAURISKA
JAMILA
TIA
CAPRI.
ANTHONY
DARA
JAMES
MONIQUE
ANGELICA
LISAGAY
ANDRE
LESTER
SHARI
ALVADALE
CASSANDRA
COLLEEN
KEVIN
KISHNELL
SHAKERA
WENDELL
HEIDI
GREGARIO
MARCIA
BRADLEY
NICOLE

- CASSEY

DONOVAN
TARA

Middle name

QUINCY
ANYA
ALEXANDER
EVEANNA
LUCAS"
REYNARD
TAMI

CURLENE
INZLEY
OLIVIA
ANYA
ALBERT

~ ANTHONY

MICHELLE YVETTE
ADRIANNE

ARNOLD
CARL

DELCINE INDIANNA
DAVID

RENARDE L
ANTOINETTE
ANTHONY

YOLANDA
NAOMI
FELICIA
GEORGIA

. ASHLEY

PAUL
VERNESSA
LEROY
ELIZABETH
SHONETTE
TRUDIAN
PATRICK
LINKE
ALICIA
BENITA
NAKITA

LEAN
RENALDO DURAN -

TYVETTE
VALREEN
JAMES

ROSETTE

‘OMARSHARIFF

ANDREEA
STEPHEN
DOREEN

TAMEKA HAKENYA
CHRISTOPHER
ELIZABETH

CARLENSEANO —

STEVON
SUZLA ~
GABRIELLE
LAWRENCE
O'KEISHA
ALVIN
ANTEREU
CAROL
DAVID
GLENVILLE
RICCARDO
ANTONYA
KENO.
LATHICE
GACINTHA
KEISHA
RUVANIA
CASSANDRA
TRACEE

FRANGUY
MALISSA
ANTHONIQUE
DENO
LEILA
ZANIA
ABIGAIL. .
AILEEN
BEVERLEY .
D'ANDRA\
DERRICK
JAMAAL
JOHNETTE
KIRA
LACHEZ
NAVEEN ~

- RAMON - :

SEAN
“SHARELL _

LIONEL
MORGAN.
ALEXIS —

ANTOINE
KASMINE
TIFFANY
DENICE
YACASTA
CLEMENT
DANNY
JANAE
SIMONE
WEL'ANDRA
ASHLEY
BRADISHA
GARITH
ANN
THERESE
CHRISTY
DEANDRA
D'SORAJI
GLENALEE
JENNA
LAVARDO
ZINA
SILAS
JULIAN
ACHARA
JAMAL
SHANRIA
JOMAR
MONIQUE
KERESA
CRAIG
AMY
ANWAR
ERIC
ACCINO

. KHADNA

CARLA
SOLOMON
INDIRA
JEMMA
ARETHA
MIYOSHI

SH
DONZALEIGH
EDWIN
ALENA
GABRIELLE
ERICA

DEANDO
MICHELLE
CHANTAL
RICHARD
DESIREE
FRED
PEREZ

» CHARLENE

McHALE
ARLINGTON
ALEXANDER
KETIA

AKEEM

TENILLE

NAKOTA FELECIA
ANISKHA

EVITTA

ELAINE




GERRIANNE N

2 JACINDE
SHAMELL
“STEVANYA

IONA

GREGORY
VICTORIA KENVA
SHANTEL
‘SHARLENE
TAMARA

» TERRELL

LATOYA
LESA

HILDA
ROSE
JENEE
GLENWILL

MAUDE.CLOTHILDA
NIKISHA

‘MIZPHA CORETTA
.. LASHAN TERRANCE

FRANKLYN
GERRARD
DORCAS VIOLA
VIOLA MABLE

“ARTHUR

CORY CRAIG.

». NOELLE
TAMARA

PHILIP.
DESHAE
SHAVORNE
MCKELL.
MARIA,
JACOB
GLEN
LATOYA
DENISE

_ ANQUINIQUE ROYALTY
KANDICE

MARIE
NATALYA — -
MARGARET
NICOLE
DOMONIQUE
KAVANA LASHANTI
D'LAJA
VIOLA
TERYL
VALENTINO
MADONNA °
NIGEL
ALONZO
SIMONE .
BENJAMIN
CRYSTAL TEREZ
NGARA
ALYEAN
OLYMPIA
EVERTON
ALICIA
ADDINGTON
O'NEAL
NAMAL

IMAN
LOUISE
KAREEM JAMES
ALEXANDIRA
DE'ANDRA
PATRICIA
CARDINA
OMAR
ALEXANDER
CHRISLYN
DEVERGO
DWIGHT
OSCAR
VALENTINE
PATRICE
MELINDA

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
Island

City

FAITH GARDENS
GEORGE TOWN
CARMICHAEL ROAD
BAHAMIA SOUTH
CARMICHAEL ROAD
GOLDEN GATES #2
ST ANDREWS BCH. ESTATES
FOX HILL

N-8889

GARDEN HILLS #2
CB-11950

NASSAU VILLAGE
NASSAU EAST
CARMICHAEL ROAD
VISTA MARINA
ELIZABETH ESTATES
N-1880

‘CAMPERDOWN HEIGHTS

GLENISTON GARDENS
DOMINGO HEIGHTS
GEN DEL

FREEPORT

TARPUM BAY
EE-16855

SEABREEZE

EE 16107

_ SOUTH BEACH

$S-5864

CLEMENT BETHELL ESTATES.

SANDILANDS VILLAGE
CB-11306

CR-56211

N-4036

VILLAGE, SUBDIVISION
MARATHON ESTATES
N-696

ROBERTHA DRIVE
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
GT-2758

FREEPORT
PINEWOOD GARDENS
N-8841

N-9176

N-10719

PINEWOOD GARDENS
CORAL HEIGHTS WEST
ELIZABETH ESTATE
KLUDEER: ©

N10305

$S8-6160

. PINE YARD ROAD

SEA BEACH ESTATES
WESTWARD VILLAS

~ GOLDEN GATES

BIG POND SUBDIV

N-4135
MOUNT PLEASANT VILLAGE
COLONY VILLAGE -

- §S-19272

SHIRLEY STREET
CORAL HARBOUR
FOX att

~ N-349

LOU ADDERLEY ESTATES
PINE YARD ROAD
CHIPPINGHAM

MURPHY TOWN
CARMICHAEL ROAD

SEA BREEZE ESTATES
MURPHY TOWN

~ ELIZABETHE ESTATES
_ CENTERVILLE
. ROCK SOUND

GOLDEN GATES #2
DANNOTTAGE ESTATES

- CARMICHEAL ROAD

N-9542
Nota DR.,, BAMBOO TOWN

BUTTONWOOD re SEA BREEZE
ANDROS TOW

' SOUTH BEACH

CR-56890
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS
GLENISTON GARDENS
BAMBOO TOWN
CB-11875

CB-13114

N-3825

HERITAGE ESTATES
N-10296

TWYNAM HEIGHTS
GAMBLE HEIGHTS
COLONY VILLAGE

' CENTERVILLE

NASSAU VILLAGE
CORAL HEIGHTS EAST
EAST STREET

GARDEN HILL III.

PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE
N-408

* MARATHON ESTATES.

FLAMINGO GARDENS
NASSAU EAST
CARMICHAEL ROAD. _ .
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
GLENDALE SUBDIVISIONS

SHERWOOD FOREST
‘CABLE BEACH,

YAMACRAW SHORES
B-1177

STAPLEDON GARDENS
N-10067

CENTER DR., MILLERS HEIGHTS :

SUNSET RIDGE DRIVE
HARBOUR ISLAND
YAMACRAW

SILVER GATES

~ PERPALL TRACT -

soe BEACH

B 13360
STAPLEDON GARDENS
N-S066
PINEWOOD GARDENS
STAPLEDON GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS
MARATHON ESTATES
SS-6168
ENGLERSTON
MILLARS HEIGHTS
MARKET STREET
TROPICAL GARDENS
SB-50765
WINTON
PERPAL TRACT
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE
FOXDALE SUBDIVISION
N 4319
FLAMINGO GARDENS
GARDEN HILL #2
N-3451
MARATHON ESTATES
KENNEDY. SUBDIVISION
RODGELAND PARK
WINDSOR ESTATES
WEST BAY STREET
EE-16923
JOE FARRINGTON ROAD
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS

YAMACRAW

GARDEN HILLS II
SS-5079
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
ROBINSON ROAD
YELLOW ELDER, GARDENS
NEW PROVIDENCE
NEW PROVIDENCE
GT-2626
N-4897

N-10454
GOLDEN GATES

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

BL reer ae nee meee ae ers ee ee ch a ee ee eee





Se a a ee ar at co rete nR RE oe

Surname First name
HUYLER DEBARO
HUYLER PHILECE
INGRAHAM KAYLA
INGRAHAM KENCOVIA
INGRAHAM KORY
INGRAHAM WILDERA
JEAN SHERLINE
JESUBATHAM JULIAN
JESUBATHAN JEREMY
JOHNSON ANDREA
JOHNSON CHARLEASE
JOHNSON CHRISTIAAN
JOHNSON CHRISTOPHE
JOHNSON DE'LECIA
JOHNSON DELORES
JOHNSON DESHAWN
JOHNSON DEVARIO
JOHNSON EBONY
JOHNSON KATURAH
JOHNSON KHRISTLE
JOHNSON KRISTY
JOHNSON LAKEISHA
JOHNSON LASHAN
JOHNSON NICKITO
JOHNSON QUANTRIEA
JOHNSON ROBERT
JOHNSON ROSA
JOHNSON SAMANTHA
JOHNSON TAMEKA
JOHNSON-FERGUSON + MICHELLE
JONES DANITA
JONES MARIO
JONES TAMEKA
JOSEPH MADELEINE
JULIEN ROMONA
KELLY * RHONDA
KELLY VERNITA
KERR ANTONIA
KERR © ~~... DENRICKA__
KNOWLES BIANCA
KNOWLES BYRON
KNOWLES CHERYL
KNOWLES EVA
KNOWLES FELESHIA
KNOWLES LARANO
KNOWLES MELISSA
KNOWLES RAQUEL
KNOWLES RENO
KNOWLES SHAW
LAING MEGAN
LAING TAJAH |
LARAMORE PHYLICIA
LEVARITY MATTHAN
LEWIS ALETHIA
LEWIS LATEISHA
LEWIS .....LORENZO __
LIGHTBOURNE CARISSMA
LIGHTBOURNE TREVOR
LIGHTFOOT SEAN
LONGLEY JOETTE
LONGLEY TREVAL
LUNDY AGNESSA
LUNDY TIFFANY
LUNN ANNETTE
LUNN JASPER
MACKEY BERRANDO
MACKEY. BRYSHON
MACKEY DANIELLE
MACKEY KERLANO
MACKEY KHALIA
MACKEY LAKEISHA
. MACKEY VANESSA
MACKEY-PAUL SHENIQUE
MAJOR ANNA
MAJOR JAMAAL
MAJOR KENDRA
MAJOR LEAH
MAJOR _MEKO:
MAJOR. &: NADIA
! MAJOR os ‘THERESA: ..;
+ MAJOROEca TRACY i
. MARRIOTT = ° ANGELA
MARSHALL: VALENTINO «
MARTIN DAVARD
MCALPINE ~ KEISHA
MCCLAIN _ ALEXANDRA
~ MCFALL ~ RANNICE
MCINTOSH CAROL
MCKENZIE FLORINE
MCKENZIE JAMAAL
MCKENZIE SHAVONNE -
MCKENZIE SID.
MCKINNEY DELTHIA
MCKINNEY ’ STEPHEN’
MCKINNEY-COX _. ARIELLA
MCPHEE AMANDA
MCPHEE TRAVANO
MCQUAY SUENAE
MIDDLETON . RICHARD
MILLER DACONIL
MILLER DeANDREA
~ MILLER RUDENA
- MILLER SAMITRIA
MILLER ~~ ~~ ~~~ SHAVONNE---
MILLER SHONIQUE
MILLS OMAR
MINNIS INDERA .
’ MITCHELL DEXTER
MITCHELL. SHAVON
MORLEY ' EUGENA
MORTIMER ANTHONIQUE
MORTIMER JASON
MORTIMER KIVONNE
MORTIMER PRINCESS
MOSS CINDY
MOSS CYPRIANNA
MOSS DELISA
“MOSS GAZNA
MOSS GIANNE
MOSS INDIRA
MOSS JAHMALAH-
MOSS KAREN:
MOSS SEAN
MOXEY ’ LYNETTE
MOXEY MARCUS
MOXEY II BRADLEY
MUNNINGS’ CINDY
MUNNINGS NEVILLINA
MUNROE JAWANZA
MUNROE KAILESA
MUNROE - KAYLE
MUNROE KIERON
MUNROE NICOLE
MUNROE ROSSETA
MUNROE SUDIA
MURPHY RANIQUE
MUSGROVE D'ANTAE
NAIRN VERONICA
NEELEY RENALDO
NEWBOLD DAREN
NEWRY. ANTOINETTE
NEWTON CLAUDETTE
NEWTON LOFTON
NEWTON SHEANDRA
NICHOLLS GIOVANNI
NORVILLE-SMITH ERIC
PATTON SHAKERIA
PAUL-PARADA-OBREQUE CICELYN
PEARCE RICARDO
PEARCE RYAN
PHILIPPE KEITH
PILGRIM BRENDAN
PILGRIM BRENDIA
PINDER ANTIONETTE
PINDER LATANYA
POITIER JR~ PHILIP
OMe DAVID
PRATT ERNEST
PRATT KENWOOD
PRATT ROBIN






i BIANCA
R

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Middle name

DOMIQUE
D'ANDRE
CASSANDRA

IVY CURLEAN
STEPHAN KENDAL
BONITA

JERROD

ROHAN
MICAHLEAN

KASIF

BARNARD JAMAAL
MARK ASHLEIGH
ANNIE

OLGA

DELORIS MEGAN
ULYSSIS
FLORENCIA

SUSAN

AMI VERNEE
ANASTACIA
ANASTASIA
LAWANDA

AZARD NEWTALIN
DRISKELL

CRAIG FRANCIS.
LUEANNE =O
ALEXIS

ANTURA

DENISE

MINDY.

FRANKLYN
ROCHELLE KEISHA

NEKERA, REGIA
ALEXANDIRA
LAVERN

SHANTEL CARESSA
CARLETTE

WADED

MARVA
ADELAIDE
ALEXANDRIA
STAFFORD
LAUREL
SAMANTHA
PATRICK -
HENRY ELDRIDGE
BROOKE
ELLAMAE
NYREE JOAN
JAVAN
DARRELL
NATASHA
JOHN
CHAMARVIA
ANDREW
RYAN

CARA
LETOYA
LAURELLE .
LEAH

~CHARLENE

JAMES LIVINGSTONE

ARLINGTON

SHAMIKA

SIMONE

KACHAD

JANAE

SIMONE

AVERY

LATOYA

FRANCIS

NORMAN

DIONNE -

LETETIA BRICKELLE ~
RIQUE as

RANDENIA
JOY

GARY . 2
CLAUDETTE CONDACY
BRICE

LEANDRA SHANAE.

ARTHUR
oe JULIANA
EST!

EDISON LEWIS
LOUISE
KARLISSON
DESHEEN
ELIAZABETH
REGINA
ELIZABETH
SYNETTE
LAURETTE ~~ -
DANA |

JAMAL...
MICHELLE
CELESTINE.
ANTONYA LOUISE
NTOINE
STEPHANNE
DOMINIQUE
LEVERN
ELAINE
MARIA
ELESIA .
WINIKA
LASHAN
RAASHAN _
FIONA
RENALDO —
LATEDRA CASSIEA =:
MOODY

KEVIN

AMANDA

AKEEM EDWARDO:
RODRICO

SHENELL

KAREN

PRISCILLA

EZELINE PECOLAâ„¢*
SHANDERA :
ARLETTE

O'NEAL

INZELY

SAMBRIANNA

ALEXIS

ANDREW

MICHELLE

PHILIP

CHARLES

ANDERIA
ALEXANDRIA KEISHLA
PAUL

JONATHAN

ANTHONY
ALEXANDRIA
PATRICIA
LAKEISHA

LEMUEL
WHITNEY

LOFTHOUSE =
SADE ADDICIA

a

City

NASSAU VILLAGE
GARDEN HILLS #2
GT-2242

$S-5118

CB-13804

BLUE HILLS

FARM ROAD
TUCKAWAY RD
VILLAGE ROAD...
Sarton GARDENS
WINTON HEIGHTS
WINTON HEIGHTS
PINEWOOD GARDENS.

PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE.

CARMICHAEL ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
SUNSET PARK

-GOLDEN GATES #2
- N-8007

EASTWOOD ESTATES =
GOLDEN GATES #2° *
SOUTH BEACH

FOX HILL

N-15510
BLUE HILL ESTATES:

* LEEWARD.EAST.

- $8-19364

SUNSET PARK -

KOOL ACRES
PINEWOOD GARDENS
GOLDEN GATES

SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
a a

EE-17

CARMICHAEL ROAD”
-4863
YELLOW ELDER. GARDENS.

BLAIR ESTATES
N- er

N-49 eae
BALLOU HILLS ESTATES
--PINEWOOD GARDENS -

$S-6232
‘C/O N-1347

- WINTON

SS-5309
N-7030

ORCHARD CLOSE, SEAOREEZE LN

CARMICHAEL ROAD —
NASSAU EAST
GARDEN HILL #1
EE-17098
JUBILEE GARDENS -- ;
STAPLEDON GARDENS .

- FH 14332

FOX HILL

~ ENGLERSTON -

N-54 |

. $8-544
IMPERIAL PARK

N-9229
BLUE HILLS HEIGHTS —

-N-7957. .

N-1072

- GLADSTONE ROAD

NASSAU EAST
N-10862

; N-7289

’ GARDEN HILL II

NASSAU VILLAGE...
DELAPORTE

‘N-583
ei PARK .
N-980:

‘EE-1522



~ YELLOW /ELDER GARDE NS. a
-- CHIPPINGHAM ~
| CARMICHAEL ROAD,



TEU GPELOER GAR
GOLDEN GATES I

CB- eee
MOUNT V

ERNON
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION

. N-8404

FOX HILL

N-7882 °
EE-16454

NEW PROVIDENCE
CARMICHAEL ROAD: - ee

' SAN SOUCI

SAN SOUCI -

* N-330. Rie
ELIZABETH AVENUE

© CR55131

- CR-55442
_ FREEPORT. ~
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION

“FOX HILL

CB-12066
CB-13219
GARDEN HILLS #2.
EE-15552 so
CR-56669

- PINEWOOD. GARDENS.

ELIZABETH ESTATES _

BIG POND SUBDIVISION
EASTERN ESTATES —
PALMETTO VILLAGE

N- ie

‘ GARDEN HILL #1,
.CR-54785
~ PINEWOOOD.GARDENS

~ ELIZABETH ESTATES
~ BEL-AIR EST, CARMI

CR-55'
FH-145
N-696
SEA BREEZE LANE
Ee ESTATES

CB-
SEA BREEZE ee

LITTLE HYDE PARK
PINEWOOD GARDENS’

EE-16827
N-1500

3 co GATES MN

R-55407 :
MARSH HARBOUR
HAMILTON ADDITION
C/O GT-2242
N-8915
N-8680
N-7442

.N-7442

ELIZABETH ESTATES
NASSAU EAST BLVD
N-781

AP 59223

CB-13055

N-10526

GT-2557 i
NASSAU EAST NORTH
GT-2459

N-4388

VISTA MARINA
N-458 :
WEST BAY STREET

- EE-15272



PINEWOOD GARDENS. i.

SS-5545
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS

WESTWOOD VILLAS

BE ity ras N
PINEWOOD GARDENS (

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006, PAGE 0B |



PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006
World’s largest retail group issues warning

@ By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. issued a sobering warn-
ing for the holiday shopping sea-
son Thursday, predicting its Decem-
ber same-store sales gain would be
no better than 1 percent.

The news, coupled with Wal-
Mart’s expected announcement that
it suffered its first same-store
decline in more than 10 years dur-
ing November, came as the nation’s
retailers reported an overall mixed

sales performance for the month. .

Same-store sales reflect business at
stores open at least a year and are
the industry standard for measuring
a retailer’s strength.

Wal-Mart’s disappointment was
a sharp contrast with results from
Target Corp., which beat Wall
Street forecasts, and Federated
Department Stores Inc., which far
exceeded expectations. Other retail-
ers had mixed sales. J.C. Penney
Co. and Costco Wholesale Corp.
both fell short of Wall Street pro-
jections.

Industry analysts generally
believed that Wal-Mart’s problems
weren’t a sign that other retailers
would have a disappointing holi-

day season. But a Labor Depart-
ment report Thursday that showed
a jump in claims for jobless benefits
last week did add some uncertainty
to the outlook for holiday sales.

The timing of Wal-Mart’s news
couldn’t have been worse for the
world’s largest retailer, coming just
after most consumers started holi-
day shopping. While many retail-
ers had a strong Thanksgiving
weekend, Wal-Mart had warned
Saturday that its November sales
would be weaker than expected.

Wal-Mart reported a 0.1 percent
dip in same-store sales for Novem-
ber. That’s in line with the reduced
forecast from analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial, which forecast
unchanged growth. Including a
drop in gasoline revenues from its
Sam’s Club division, which Wal-
Mart did not include in its calcula-
tion, same store-sales fell 0. 3 per-
cent.

Wal-Mart has struggled in recent
months on a mix of problems,
including the fact that its lower-
income customers were hurt by
soaring gas prices. But the compa-
ny’s lackluster sales have persisted
even as the cost. of gas eased, an
indication that there are other fac-
tors that are dragging down Wal-

Minimum wage

@ By ELLEN SIMON
AP Business Writer

TWO months into her minimum
wage job at Target Corp., Tara
Dennis realized she and her three
children would be better off if she
was unemployed and on food
stamps. 'So she quit.

“As a single mom, minimum
wage isn’t going to get me ahead.
It’s not even going to get me caught
up,” said Dennis, who lives in Mis-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

soula, Mont.

A proposed hike that would
bring the Federal minimum wage
to $7.25 would give workers like
Dennis their first raise since the
Federal minimum increased to
$5.15 in 1997. But some low-income
workers and their advocates say the
wage increase won’t affect many
workers and is not a way out of
poverty for minimum wage work-
ers. Since the last hike; wages for
most of the lowest-paid workers

2003
GEN/CLE.
No 01253

Common Law and Equity Division

BETWEEN

HENRY & ELIZABETH MOXEY

Plaintiffs

AND
THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

and , |.
THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRU; T

and

18t Defendant

an "Defendant |

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL *

ORDER OF SUBSTITUED SERVICE |

3rd Defendant

Mart’ s results.

“This is pretty discouraging,” said
Ken Perkins, president of Retail-
Metrics LLC, a research company
in Swampscott, Mass. But he added
that Wal-Mart’s weak sales “will
not be a harbinger of a broad based
weakness across the retail sector.”

Wal-Mart’s discount stores suf-
fered a 0.5 percent decline, while
Sam’s Clubs had a 2.0 percent
increase.

One of Wal-Mart’s main prob-
lems is that its strategy to broaden
its appeal to higher-income shop-
pers with upscale merchandise was
poorly executed. It filled its fall
clothing racks with too many trendy
items like skinny jeans that shop-
pers just didn’t want. The company
said in October that it’s cutting back
on distribution of the clothing line
Metro 7, but the move is too late for
the holiday season.

Despite Wal-Mart’s problems,
many other retailers do have hopes
for a strong season. Sales during
the Thanksgiving weekend rose a
respectable 2.8 percent, according
to the research firm ShopperTrak
RCT Corp.

The International Council of
Shopping Centers-UBS tally of
November same-store rose 2.1 per-

increase

have risen above the federal mini-
mum wage, while prices for neces-
sities such as housing and trans-
portation have grown faster.

“We should be aware that this is
an extremely moderate proposal,”
said Jared Bernstein, senior econo-
mist of the Economic Policy Insti-
tute.

The minimum wage hike, which
Democrats have put at the top of
their agenda. when the next Con-

- gress convenes in January, would

affect 1.9 million hourly workers
who make minimum wage and
workers who get tips, who can
make less than minimum wage. It
would raise wages for an estimated
6.5 million workers or 4 percent of
the work force — janitors, waitstaff,
security guards, cashiers.and store
clerks — according to the Eco-
nomic Policy Institute.

Adjusting for inflation, the min-
imum wage of $5.15 is at its lowest
level since 1955. By 2009, a $7.25
minimum wage would have the
spending power of $6.75: today,
Bernstein calculated using Con-
gressional Budget Office projec-
tions.

A wage increase to $7.25 would
help, but “it wouldn’t put anybody
in the clear,” said Cara Prince, 41,
of Louisville, Kentucky. She has
been working for a temporary
agency for two years, doing factory,
warehouse and restaurant work at
$6 an hour.

“There’s a whole lot I-can’t do,”
because of the low pay, she said.

pass

cent, less than the forecast for a 3
percent gain. Excluding Wal-Mart,
the tally rose 4.0 percent.

Still, there are concerns about
how confident consumers are going
into the season. The latest measure
of confidence by the Conference
Board fell during November, and
reports of job cuts and buyouts at
companies including Pfizer Inc. and
Ford Motor Co. could make con-
sumers even more uneasy.

Thursday’s Labor Department
report of an unexpected jump in
first-time claims for unemployment
benefits also raised some questions
about consumers’ comfort level.The
department said 357,000 claims
were filed last week, up 34,000 from
the previous week. Economists said
it was too soon to tell whether the
unexpected increase indicated a
weakening in the job market.

October figures on consumer
income and spending issued Thurs-
day showed that consumers had
reason to be upbeat, at least during
that month. The’ Commerce
Department said incomes rose a
healthy 0.4 percent, while spend-
ing rose 0.2 percent after a decline
in September. The data was encour-
aging but does not guarantee that
consumers shopping for the holi-

days will feel like sé sponding freely —
something that was clear the day
after Thanksgiving, when shoppers
focused on getting the best bargain,
gravitating toward early bird spe-
cials and then leaving stores when
the deals disappeared.

“This tells me that the customers
is ever savvy about shopping for
markdowns,” said John Morris, a
managing director at Wachovia
Securities “It takes promotions to
stimulate demand in this early part
of the season. The next couple of
weeks will be really telling.”

Discounter Target said same-
store sales rose 5.9 percent, topping
forecasts of a 5.7 percent gain, as
consumers bought electronics and
health care and consumer products

But Costco reported a 5 percent
gain in same-store sales, below the
5.7 percent estimate. The retailer,
which sells gasoline, was hurt by

declining prices at the pump.

‘Among department stores, Fed-
erated Department Stores Inc.,
which acquired May Department
Stores Co. last year, reported a
robust 8.9 percent gain in same-
store sales; beating the 4.8 percent
estimate. Same-store sales include
only Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s.
It also raised its December fore-

THE TRIBUNE

cast.

Nordstrom had a 5.4 percent gain
in same-store sales, matching Wall
Street expectations. Saks Inc., which
shed its mid-brow stores to focus
on its luxury business, reported a
7.2 percent gain in same-store sales, . ' ,
better than the 7 percent estimate. |’

But results from Kohl’s Corp.
and Penney were disappointing.
Penney said same-store sales at its
department stores rose 1.4 percent,
falling short of the 3.7 percent fore-
cast from Wall Street.

Kohl’s had a 3.7 percent gain i in
same-store sales, below the 4.8 per-
cent prediction.

Limited Brands Inc. had a 12 per-
cent increase in same-store sales,
exceeding the 7.8 percent estimate.

Gap Inc., which is-still struggling
to find the right fashion formula,
suffered an 8 percent drop in same-
store sales, worse than the 5.4 per-
cent forecast...

Teen retailers generally did well.
Wet Seal Inc. had a 5.5 percent
same-store gain, beating the 4.0 per-

cent estimate. American Eagle Out-

fitters Inc. said Wednesday its ©
same-store sales rose 14 percent in
November from year-ago levels,
boosted bya strong start to the hol-
iday shopping season.

would boost some staff

“By the time they take taxes out,’

there’s nothing left. Just $23 a day.”
But the proposed increase “is not

a solution to poverty,” said Matt

Fellowes, a scholar at the. Brook-

ings Institute. “This is, for the most

part, a symbolic effort,” he said.

Twenty-eight states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia will have 2007
minimum-wages above the Federal
level. The highest minimum wage in
the nation.is Washington state’s
$7.63 an hour, which is set to
increase to $7.94 on Jan. 1. A min-
imum wage worker in the state
working full time would make
$16,515 a year before taxes. The
federal poverty threshold for a fam-
ily of three is $16,600.

The real-life math of the mini-
mum wage is even more complex.

Dennis, who is 23 and has three

children, said she lost her food’

stamps when she went to work. Her
family lives.in subsidized housing
and when her income increased,
her rent did too. Plus, she got a bill
for previous months at the higher
rate. Then there were the day.care
costs.

“It got to the point where if I
wasn’t working there, I could be
with my kids and pay my bills,” said
Dennis, who lives in Missoula,
Mont.

Mo tana was among states that
minimum wage increases in
the November election, along with
Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Neva-
da and Ohio.

Herman (Mack) McCowan, 61,

DATED the 3° day of November A..D., 2006. Before His

Lordship The Honourable Mister Justice John Lyons, in
Chambers the Supreme Court building in the City of Nassau.

UPON SUMMONS filed herein on the 8¢ day of September
A.D., 2006.

UPO! THE APPLICATION by Summons filed herein on
the 8" day of September A.D., 2006 by the 2nd Defendant
herein.

UPON HEARING Mr. Romauld S.E.A. Ferreira Esq. Counsel
for the 29 Defendant.

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of Mr. Eric Carey.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that pursuant to an action in the

Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Common Law & Equity Divisio on,

and to an Order filed on the 14!
duly signed by your Ladyship on the 4t
2005; whereby IT WAS ORDERED: —

Nover| er, A.D., 2005 and
November, A.D.,

1. The Plaintiff's action against the Defendants herein be struck

out for failure to file and serve a statement of claim pursuant
to the Rules of the Supreme Court and under the inherent
jurisdiction of the court;

2. The Plaintiffs herein whether by themselves their servants
and/or agreements or licencees or any of them or otherwise or
howsoever be restrain from fencing or obstructing any roadway,
track or path, or clearing, cutting or interfering with vegetation,
or cultivating any crops or fruit trees or maintaining or.
introducing any livestock or residing or erecting or suffering
any building, cage or pen to remain thereon or doing any other

-act, matter or thing (save in the use of the same as a National
Park as a member of the public within the area of land included
in the said Lease); \

3. Leave to apply for vacant possession is granted; and

' 4. The costs of this application and action be paid’ by. the
Plaintiffs to be taxed if not agreed.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED THAT:
1. The 28¢ Defendant has leave to issue and serve by way of
Substituted Service any necessary: and relevant documents
(including but not limited to any Judgements, Orders and
Pleadings) which may have to be served on The Plaintiffs from
time to time and such service be effected by inserting and
_ publishing an advertisement to the above named Plaintiffs,
Henry and Elizabeth Moxey in a local daily in the form set
forth in the Schedule hereto on two occasions one week apart.

AND that such advertisement so published shall be deemed to
be good and sufficient service.

AND that the costs of the application be costs in the cause.
Dated the 34 day of November A.D., 2006

REGISTRAR
Ferreira & Company
Chambers
Kemp Building
#39 East Street
Nassau, The Bahamas.

Attorneys for the 2" Defendant

GEN/CLE/ 01253 of 2003 .

SN OMe PUN SUicyUre

Information Technology

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range bservices to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter wit
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Informatio

Technology team. The successful candidate will report dittly to the Head of |.

Information Technology.

Core Responsibilities

Develop, maintain, support and optimize the organization’ network
infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communications, and
telecommunications systems.

-Ensure hardware and softwaz.is maintained and data is secured through

proper backups and staff training.

Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentatio!
to secure procedures and prevent system failure. This includes IT Disast
Recovery / Business Continyitplanning.

Provide management and direction for endiser support function in
support of business operations, inclusive of management of the Help

Desk function.

Manage and direct software, hardware, network, telecommunications
and web providers to epnenceppet atonal efficiencies and RO! based on
the banks business objectives.

Desired Qualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well
recognized university.

A minimum offive years progressive professional IT experience prefekab|
in the Financial Services Industry.

" [Tbased training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from

accredited institutions will be advantageous.

Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs;
telecommunications, Webbased applicatins, clientserver applications,
and PGbased software applications.

Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Office and Microsoft Exchange
Server systems.

Strong interpersonal, communication, prdlem solving, project
management and customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 10, 2006

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs

www.butte rfieldbank.bs

Butterfield Bank

4

of Cleveland, was active in the Ohio
office of Let Justice Roll, an orga-
nization that advocated for a high-
er minimum wage. In Ohio, the
minimum. wage increased from
$5.15 to $6.85 and will now be
indexed to inflation.

“At $5.15 an hour, you can’t real-
ly extend yourself, you only exist,”
he said. McCowan worked for four
years as a day laborer, making $5.15

“an hour, before landing a $6 an-

hour job at a community center.
With the roughly $80 a week a
full-time worker would have after

the federal wage hike, “You're able’

to afford a telephone, able to pay
your light bill on time, able to pay
your rent,” he said. |

If there are two people at home
“it will allow you to put a little more
food.on the table, sustain yourself a
little bit better: than before,”
McCowan said. “You will be able to
relieve a lot of the stress.”

Stagnating wages for unskilled
workers coupled with increased

"housing costs have put more work-
‘ing people at risk of being home-

less. For instance, about 28 percent
of homeless adults in Louisville,
Kentucky homeless shelters are
working, according to the Louisville
Coalition for the Homeless.

One-quarter of hourly workers
who make minimum wage are
teenagers, but about half are older
than 25, according to the Bureau
of Labor Statistics.

For some.workers, a job near
minimum wage is their only option.
Paula Berrios, 66, helps support her
daughter and grandchildren in El

Salvador working in a hotel kitchen

. for $7.18 an hour. Berrios, who lives

in Alexandria, Virginia, does not
speak English.

“I’m desperate,” she said, speak-
ing through a translator. “That’s all
Ican get.”

At the current minimum wage,
households where everyone who
works makes minimum wage would
need more than three full-time
workers to pay market rent on a

‘two-bedroom apartment in New

York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, .
Massachusetts, California, Colorado
and Nevada, according to the
National Low Income Housing
Coalition.

A jump to $7.25 would make a
two-bedroom apartment affordable
to families with two minimum wage
earners in all but 19 states, said
Danilo Pelletiere, research direc-
tor at the National Low Income
Housing Coalition.

“If you’re a single mom or dad

with a kid, who can’t sleep in one
room, you’re still out of luck,” he
said. But for families with more
than one full-time minimum wage
earner, an increase could cut the
number of jobs they would need to
work, he said.
‘. In some areas, especially where
the cost of living is high, pay for
low-skill jobs has already surpassed
$7.25 an hour.

“Eight dollars an hour is a start-
ing wage for a dishwasher,” said
Paul Turley, owner of Turley’s
Restaurant in Boulder, Colorado.
“The minimum wage in Colorado is
really a non-issue.”

Legal Notice
Notice
Anti 's Holdi Limited

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 24th day of November, 2006.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
Antiquus Holding Limited

WE ARE SEEKING vibrant, vivacious
and enthusiastic persons to employ in
our hospitality department of Bimini
Sands. The positions available are
bartenders, waiters, bus boys, cooks,
office personnel and entertainment co-
ordinator.

Persons interested must be able to
relocate.

All interested persons please respond
via email to: bimini@biminisands.com
or 242-347-3500. .

LTT ee NS NT ae Ee OCR RMR TE





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS _ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2006, PAGE 11B

















FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 1, 2006

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PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006



COMICS PAGE



i
JUDGE PARKER

I THOUGHT
YOU MIGHT
BE ANORY






















I HAD A FEELING
YOU MIGHT BE
FOLLOWING IN HIS

FOOTSTEPS /

BUT WHEN
YOUR DAD
ANNOUNCED
HE WAS

RETIRING...












50 ALAN RAN HOME TO MAINE.
I'M NOT SURPRISED—



PLANS, LUANN2/ ME A NOTE.

(eo
O

es







[ / 0 BE HAPPY IF WE
WE'RE STILL. \ MAKE IT THROUGH
CATERING BY CLOSING TIME |.
TOMORROW
MORNING!

WELL, { HOPE YOU'RE STILL
CATERING WHEN IT'S TIME
FOR AMANDA'S WEDDING

0O YOU
REMEMBER
CATERING MY
WEDDING?

WE SURE
00!











South dealer. .
Both sides vulnerable.


















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Me BRAINY BOY // A907
The bidding:
. South West North East
: liv Pass 39 Pass
: 4%

Opening lead — queen of spades.

Assume you’re declarer at four
hearts and West leads the spade
queen. It’s dollars to doughnuts East
has the ace of spades, so you follow
low from dummy, hoping he was




Sure enough, East wins the queen




THERE'S No TIME To Doth TiS

re eh ea WASTE! I'VE GOT COUNT No, singleton — and shifts to a club at
| : : trickgwo. ,:..

Ae okt? él Be aaa vane still not out of the woods

*'BRENOAT after you win the club with dummy’s

king. If you lead a trump now, there’s

«





















YY Now... WHar \ iS GONE-YouR.
} ABOUT YOUR _ ) QUESTIONS GAVE
STOMACHACHE? ) ME A HEAVACHE
4 INSTEAD!

\/ S0C\AL SECURITY? CLAIM

NUMBER? MOTHERS MAVEN
NAME? FATHERS
BIRTHPLACE 7

Po You HAVE
MEVICAIP?
- MEVICARE?
MASOR.
MEDICAL?










HOW many words of four



there must be at least. one
letter word. No plurals
TODAY’S TARGET

- 43 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

- CRYPTICPUZZLE =——sd~=

C INKLE, TWINKLE, Jo
BUT WE'RE TOO FAR AWAY TO HEAR MY

Reward for Good Behavior

dealt the singleton or doubleton ace. __

with the ace — proving the ace was:

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st

Century
Dictionary

letters or more can yu make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must.
contain the centre letter and

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



"CANDY ?








the danger that West will win with

’ the ace and return the jack of spades,
and East will ruff the king. If that
occurs — and you'd have to be
somewhat unlucky for all this to hap-
pen — you’d eventually go down

: one, since you'd be left with a spade
loser. f

So you don your thinking cap at

trick three and look for a means. of

“saving the contract if West was actu-
ally dealt the singleton ace of trumps
and East the other two trumps. That’s
the, only combination: of cards that
can stop you from making four
hearts.

And, as you think about it, the
solution suddenly dawns on. you.
Even if the situation is as you fear,
there’s a sure way out of the

_ dilemma.

Accordingly, after winning the
club return, you cash the A-K of dia-
monds, the ace of clubs, and then ruff
a club in dummy. Now, having elim-
inated all your minor-suit cards from
both hands, you lead a trump.

West wins with the ace and
returns the jack of spades to
dummy’s king, and, sure enough,
East muffs. But as a direct result of
your early spadework, poor East

must now return a diamond or aclub. |

This allows you ‘to discard your

spade loser as you trump’ in.dummy,*

and the contract is saved.

â„¢m. irate
tre rain
re titan

titre train trainee trait trite

o
ae
~~
|
a
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Be
ES
aS
ao
AA
ag
af
a8

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

inner intent inter inte
iterate nine nitrate -ni
rani rein retain retina rite
taint tier tine tint ti

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

nine-

Good 21; very good 32; excellent



T THINK DAD LIKES
HALLOWEEN AS MUCH

\S HE GOING TO STAY
HOME, AND GIVE OUT:



























NO, HE'S GOING TO SITIN

THE BUSHES WITH THE
GARDEN HOSE AND DRENCK
POTENTIAL T.PERS.





























SATURDAY, |
DECEMBER 2

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
Do' you feel like disaster in store?
You’ve had feelings like this before
and nothing ever came of it, Aries.
Don’t worry this time either; every-
thing will work out.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21



‘JA coworker has been making com-

ments under his/her breath. It might
not be something you’re doing
wrong. This person may just feel left
out. So keep it in mind.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Stop wasting time trying to get. oth-
ers to do what they are really not
interested in, Gemini. It could be

guilt that are compelling you.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
It’s impossible to tackle everything

‘fon your to-do list at once. Make a

list of everything you need to get
done and then take baby steps
toward accomplishing it.

LEO -— Jul 23/Aug 23

If you’re engaged in a struggle this
week with an equally matched oppo-
nént, Leo; think about coming to a

win situation.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22
This: week you should lighten up,
Virgo. Interject some silly moments
within the serious ones and your
mood will instantly be improved.
Others will enjoy the change, too.

LIBRA -— Sept 23/Oct 23

‘Old habits can be keeping you back
from what-you really want to enjoy, ;
Libra. Cast aside those habits and try
some new things. You just may be
surprised how good it feels.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 |

The stars hand you a chance for some

Look deep inside to discover what
makes you tick. Then live for the
moment.

SAGITTARIUS — Noy 23/Dec 21
You may want to tone down your
outgowing tendencies and be a bit
more conservative this ‘week,
Sagittarius. This comes in espe-
cially handy on the business front.

CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20
Use the power of flatter this week to
get something you really have your
eyes on, Capricom. Whether it’s a

introspection’ this week, Scorpio. .




that you have misplaced feelings of

compromise rather than fiting a no- °

i ift from your
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4 It's empty, but clean (6) ° 1 Lash out around closing time, but ates Serie Hey. 0n tie compl nnents:
7. What'en actor makes 60 as to with restraint (5) Pe AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
charm? (8) - 2 Is supportive, also, in stresstul word Narrow-mindedness will not get you
8 forbidden to indulge, he shouldn't extremes (5) ati OT nes
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be fuming (6) 3 Nice woman with a deadhead a what others say may have some
10 White as an ow (5) layabout (4) ia ‘validity to it. :
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Series a Re ew Ty Now that the holiday rush is about
14 | The ring of saintiness (4) 6 — AFrench oven with no duck seems Bh, through, it’s time to reign in expenses,
15 Be warm hearted and make the best irregular! (6) a laa party Pisces. Keep the credit cards locked
of things (4) 9 “Historic kingdom, possibly part of : , up for a while. i
16 Railway timetable America (6) ee
section (3) 11 Asnooze on the carpet (3) CHESS by Leonard Barden
17 t's most important one gets a man 12 She might bring much woe to her
out (4) "fellow (6) na
© People found in parts of Iceland (4) 13 Natrose to become a Markus Schaefer v ae Walton,
21 Ablooming motor politician (7) feel Amsterdam 2006. When a
race! (9) 15 _ It's been mispronounced (3) eels cheb ieee wee -
23 Be after a bit of fun in the shed (4) 16 Insular person? (3) Sr P rbarathadk tt otter means
24 Loatheome person, 18 Clever enough to correct a fault: the game has reached a cisis 8
a produce of today (not the 4th of outright (6) : where some minutes spentin 7
July) (4) 20. Stay and do wrong in ACROSS : calculation can pay off. Here I
26 -Deeerter, a bit of breaking a leg (5) 4 Straight (6) DOWN Black has an extra pawn and
an ingrate (3) 21 One's share of the meat? (3) 7 Door (8) 1 Danger (5). White looming threats against
27° Hardly a handy measure? (4), 22 Juvenile drink? (3) Lis 8 Spread (6) 3 See () the king, = waters a a ”
Happy Nf6-e4 was m
- roeearn ae Ni is scans 4 Subtract (5) randomness and confusion. 3
boy (4). of threat (6) N 5 Ceremony (4)
pronoun (4) White can capture on e6, take on
32 The gentle engine noise when you 25 Needs to be in touch, assuredly (3) —- 14 Speech defect (4) 6 Believe (6) e4, or threaten the black queen 2
tum up with a posh car? (4) 28 Give one’s address, there's no - 15. Unleavened bread (4) 9 Agreement (6) by Rb3. German master Schaefer |
33 They can't really all chargel (6) on be eck 11 Delve (3) thought for a while, then rattled
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34. She maybe all set (6) 31 Half dead, it’s all up with her! (5) uu 21 Heavy (9) ae Fie (a) ” which brought about his
35 Artistic as a seasoned 32 Work for fun? (4) 23 Bird's arm (4) “16 Coach (3) opponent's resignation. What
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‘ 36 Amole at the waterside (6) person (4) 26 Humour (3) 20 Humid (5)
. z oma = | 2 and,
29 Deities (4) Sake Ba )
a
Yesterday’s cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions a See, oe (5) 25 Fuss (3)
ACROSS: 1, Barges 7, Text-book 8, Fi-do 10, Hardup 11, | ACROSS: 1, Savage 7, Venomous 8, Base 10, Flagon 11, 34 Dress (6) 28 Regions (5)
On tour 14, E’-EN 16, Lea-PT 17, Deer 19, Hyped 21, Pitied 14, Sin 16, Tense 17, Echo 19, Talon 35 Attained (8) 30 = Small fruit (5) *
Coney 22, Paper 23, War-M 26, Order 28, Six 29, 21, Manor 22, Merit 23, Pays 26, Sited 28, Ham 29, 31. Malicious (5) a F
Pai:te-d 30, Banish 31, Eggs 22, Excluded 33, Amends 30, Baraly 31, Odin 32, Clemency 33, Se-Conmands (6) 32. Disgusting (4) wes soniine Sze: [Biel foes 2 Ba Gr td
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6, Skirt 8, Free 9, Dun 12, T-ed 13, Upper 15, Robin 6, Aside 8, Bash 9, Son 12, Ten 13, Essay 15, Mensa quiz: Butterscotch.
D-y-nes 18, Ex-tra 19, Hop 20, Per 21, Careful 22, Pen 23, Mania 18, Claim 19, Tar 20, Lot 21, Meddled * One possible word ladder solution is: GATE, late,
Winger 24, A-Xi-s 25, Mahout 26, Op-t-ed 27, Ditch 28, 22, Men 23, Parity 24, Amen 25, Saying 26, lane, lone, lose, lost, POST.

Sag 30, Beds Sauce 27, Tenet 28, Had 30, Boys









TRIBUNE SPORTS

=a



: — S
.
_

S
SS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 13B

SPORTS

es g Sees oe :





li PAKISTAN'S batsman Mohammad Yousaf, center, hits boundary as Pakistani skipper Inzamamul Haq, left, and West Indies wicketkeeper Denesh Ramdin look on during the third and final test against =~ -
West Indies, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 at National stadium in Karachi, Pakistan. Master batsman Mohammad Yousuf broke the 30-year-old world record of most test runs in a calendar year with his ninth

century in 2006 and led Pakistan toward setting up a stiff target for the West Indies in the third test.
| (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)

; rd of
in a calendar year

RR
CS

of most runs scored by a Pakistani c < —

ousuf breaks world rec
‘most test runs

‘" BECRICKET





KARACHI, Pakistan
Associated Press



PAKISTAN batsman Moham-
mad Yousuf broke Viv Richards:
30-year-old record for the most
test runs scored in a calendar year
during the ongoing third test
against the West Indies on Thurs-
day.

Yousuf drove fast bowler
Corey Collymore to the boundary
through mid-on to reach 48 on
the fourth day of the third and
final cricket test against the West
Indies to surpass Richard's record
of 1,710 runs set by the former
West Indies captain in 11 test
matches in 1976. ‘

"I am happy for my country
because whenever the record will
be discussed it's going to be
remembered as ‘Pakistan's bats-
man'," said Yousuf.

"I would like to dedicate my
performance in 2006 to my moth-
er, wife and sisters."

Yousuf, 32, scored nine cen-
turies from 11 test matches this
year for a total of 1,788 runs.

He made two centuries in the
home series against India early
this year before recording three
against England and four in five
test innings against the West

Indies.
Medal

The Pakistan Cricket Board
announced a gold medal and a

reward of one million rupees

(US$16,600) for Yousuf's record-
breaking performance in 2006.

"He will be awarded the gold
medal and cash reward at the
closing ceremony of the third test
against the West Indies on Fri-
day," PCB director of communi-
cations Ahsan Malik said in a
statement. .

Yousuf has been the mainstay
of the Pakistan middle-order bat-
ting lineup for several years and
completed his 23rd test century
when he followed his first innings

102 with 124 in the second innings

on Thursday.

He also became the sixth Pak-
istani batsman after Hanif
Mohammad, Javed Miandad,
Wajahatullah Wasti, Yasir
Hameed and current captain
Inzamam-ul-Haq to score cen-
turies in each inning of a test
match.

When Yousuf reached 43 ear-
lier in the day, he broke country-
man Zaheer Abbas' (583) record

\

batsman in a three-test series.

Yousuf, changed his name
from Yousuf Youhana after
embracing Islam in 2005.

Despite breaking Richards'
record, Yousuf rated the former
West Indies captain and present
skipper Brian Lara as the two
best cricketers of this century.

“They are simply the best,"
Yousuf said.

"It's not easy to score 300, 400
and 500 runs in one innings of a.
cricket match, but Lara has done
that."

Yousuf said he was under pres-
sure to score the required 46 runs
to beat Richards record on the
fourth day.

"After all, I am also-a human
being and yes there was a pres-
sure on me, but I adjusted accord-
ing to the conditions," he said.

Lara, the world's leading test
run maker, said Yousuf was a per-
fect role model for young crick-
eters.

"Yousuf's run of form is
tremendous and he's not only a
role model for cricketers in Pak-'
istan, but for any young cricketer
in the world," Lara said.

‘" Anyone who scores nine cen-
turies in 11 test matches must be
magnificent, and it's slightly unbe-
lievable."

Pakistan coach Bob Woolmer
described Yousuf as a dedicated
cricketer. '

"Yousuf is a quiet man, a ded-
icated professional when it comes
to batting and training," Woolmer
said. "Like all great players he
plays late and it would be inter-
esting to see how well he watches
the ball." ;

Yousuf now has scored 6,402
runs from 73 test matches with
23 centuries and 26 half centuries.

@ PAKISTAN'S batsman
Mohammad Yousuf acknowl-
edges his fans during the third
and final test against West
Indies, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006
at‘National stadium in Karachi,
Pakistan. Master batsman
Yousuf broke the 30-year-old
world record of most test runs
im a calendar year with his ninth
century in 2006 and led Pak-
istan toward setting up a stiff
target for the West Indies in the
third test.

(AP Photo/Shakil Adil)





PAGE 14B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

Freeman better than ever
after his two-year hiatus

STUBBS

ORT MYERS:

.& Freeman ‘the Nat-

xral’ Barr has settled into

his new home in South
Florida.

He’s down in Naples,

‘Florida with his wife, chil-

dren and his brother, Well-
mon. He fights out of the
SJC Boxing Club under the
supervision of Steve Can-
ton, who has groomed him
since he migrated to South
Florida at the beginning of
his professional career.

This is his second time
around for the former
World Boxing Organisa-
tion’s super middleweight
champion who is making a
return to the ring after a
21/2 year break.

So far, in his two fights
this year, Barr looked
much better fighting as a
light heavyweight than he
did as a super mid-
dleweight. He has attrib-
uted his success to the fact
that he’s more relaxed
fighting at a heavier
weight.

Despite his impressive

OPINION



28-4 win-loss record fight- .

ing out of SJC Boxing,
Barr would quickly remind
everyone that he came



from the Bahamas where
he officially began his
career.

He even wears a minia-
ture flag sewed on the
front of his black trunks to
indicate that he’s a
Bahamian. And if he had a
choice, Barr said this is
definitely where he would
want to fight.

But Barr said if a fight
comes up, he would defi-
nitely not want it to be
against a Bahamian.

“He’s trying to get to my
level and I’m trying to get
to the next level,” Barr
pointed out. “So there’s no
need. for either of us trying
to tear the other one
down.” ,

Instead, Barr has his
sights set on former two-
time, American world
champion Roy Jones Jr.,
who at one time was con-
sidered the best pound-for-
pound champion.

After toying around with
Acker in his return bout a
couple months ago, Barr
looked nothing like a fight-
er who has been inactive
for more than two years.

Best

Davydenko to face
first match of Davis

@ TENNIS
MOSCOW
Associated




N IKE
iighest-rankéd player in the Davis Cup
inal, will face the lowest-ranked man
Friday i in the opening singles match
when Russia plays Argentina.

Juan Ignacio Chela won’t be too con- .

cerned with the rankings, however.
The 33rd-ranked Argentine has beaten
the third-ranked Davydenko all five
times they have met.

“I’m very confident and ready to
fight tomorrow and win,” Chela said
Thursday after the draw. “Davydenko
likes to play short points. ... I like to
change rhythm and that’s what bothers
him.”

Two-time Grand Slam champion
Marat Safin will face David Nalban-
dian in the second singles match, while
Dmitry Tursunov and Mikhail Youzh-
ny play Nalbandian and Agustin Cal-
leri in Saturday’s doubles.

The Hawk-Eye video system, which
allows players to review and challenge
calls, is making its Davis Cup debut in
Moscow after being tested at several
ATP events.

The reverse singles of the best-of-
five series are Sunday. Team captains
can.change their lineups up to one hour
before play.

“Three players are very | similar i in
terms of rankings and have very good |

conditions and shape — that is anoth-
er point that I took into considera-
tion,” Argentina captain Alberto
Mancini said of his choices.

Chela has beaten Davydenko three
times on clay and twice on hardcourts.
Friday’s match will be on synthetic car-
pet at the Olympic Stadium.

“There is now way Calleri or (J ose)
Acasuso can beat me on this surface,”
Davydenko said. “That’s. why Chela
was nominated.”

Chela is 2-1 on carpet in the Davis
Cup, including beating Sasa Tuksar of
defending champion Croatia in five
sets in this year’s quarterfinals.

Safin is 6-2 against Nalbandian. In
the 2002 semifinals, the Russian beat
Nalbandian in four sets to help his
team reach the final, where Russia won
its only Davis Cup title after defeat-
ing host France.

They played two matches this season
— both on hardcourt. Safin won in the
second round of the U.S. Open, and
Nalbandian won in straight sets in the
quarterfinals of the Madrid Masters.

“When (Safin) plays well, he can
beat anyone, including me,” Nalban-
dian said. “I’m ready for the best
Safin.”

Safin has, been plagued by knee
injuries for almost two seasons, but
he’s better now and looking for a Davis
Cup title to help boost his confidence.

“It took me six months. to learn to
run around the court without feeling
pain and I dropped in the rankings and
lost my confidence,” Safin said. “So to

’ win this title is probably the most

important thing for me in the past two
years.”
Russia, which hasn’t lost at home in

DENKO, the »

H RUSSIA'S Nikolay Davydenko,
left, and Argentina's Juan Ignacio
Chella pose for photographers after
the draw ceremony for the Davis
Cup final in Moscow, Thursday, Nov.
30, 2006. Russia hosts Argentina in
the Davis Cup final on December 1-

3, 2006, at the Olympic indoor stadi-
um in Moscow.

@ ARGENTINA‘S Agustin Cal-
leri returns a ball during a practice
session in Moscow, Thursday, Noy.
30, 2006. Russia hosts Argentina in
the Davis Cup final on December 1-
3, 2006, at the Olympic indoor stadi-
um in Moscow.

(AP Photos/Misha Japaridze)

11 years, is making its fourth appear-
ance in the final. It lost to Sweden in
1994 and to the United States the fol-
lowing year.

“I do not know when will we have
another chance to play in the final,”
Safin said. “Me and (Mikhail) Youzh-
ny have already won, but for the other
half of the team it’s a first opportunity.”

Argentina has never won the tro-
phy, but it lost in the final to the Unit-
ed States in 1981. If Argentina wins it
will become the 13th champion since
the competition’s inception in 1900 and
the sixth different winner in as many
years.

He gave himself a B+
grade against Menefee, an





support he gets from his

family.



“So far, in his two fights this
year, Barr looked much better
fighting as a light heavyweight
than he did as a super
middleweight. He has
attributed his success to the
fact that he’s more relaxed
fighting at a heavier weight.”



increase from the C that he
awarded himself against
Acker.

If Barr continues to-

shine, he could be on:his
way to claim the world title
that got away from him as
a super middleweight when
he fought and lost to Bert
Schenk in Cottbus, Ger-
many more than a decade
ago.

At least he doesn’t have

.to worry about the moral

His wife, Tanya, is a reg-
istered nurse.

“J think he’s stronger, I
think he’s confident and
he’s ready,” she pro-
claimed. “My goal is to get
him on the map and to help
him become a world cham-
pion.

“That is where we are
going. I’m going to make
sure that he can get into
the ring and kick some

butt. He eats good. He has’

TRIBUNE SPORTS



\ ’

nin

a good lifestyle. He doesn’t.
need anything else.”

At the same token, his
older brother Wellmon?
migrated from the-
Bahamas in 2001 to be in”
Barr’s corner, both in the
gym and at fight time.

“To me, he’s more con-.
fident,” Wellmon pointed °
out. “He’s more relaxed.
and set. I think he can go .
very far in this his second
time around.

“But I’ve told him every”
time he got into the ring to:
fight that losers never quit. °
I’m confident that he can
go out there and do it. He
is solid.”

Two years on from his:
break, Barr is hoping that
the second time around .
will be the charm for him - |
in his bid to become only
the second world champi-
on from the Bahamas. :

He has adjusted very well
to his surroundings.

At age 32, Barr has it all,
a house, car and his family »
and friends - and he should ,
definitely be one of the
fighters to watch from the
Bahamas.

Chela in
Cup final















Today Saturday Today Saturday : -. Today Saturday

High Low W High Low W Low W High Low W High Low W High Low .

FC. FIC Fic. Fc ee FIC FIC
Albuquerqué “46/7 26/3 s 44/6 247-4 pc Indianapo is Bae up 3.
Anchorage 27/-2 14/-10 sf 24/-4 14/-10 _ pc 79126 55/12
Atlanta’ 57AS" 87/2 t 58/14 39/8 pe: 40/4 22/-5. po
Atlantic City 73/22, 37/2 t 50/10. 31/0 pe 61/16 37/2 o o
Baltimore 72/22 40/4 -t 500° 30/-1 pe : ; 25/-3 s Gai ttots
. Boston 62/16 40/4 © 49/9 33/0 pc
Buffalo = 44/6 °28/-2 or 88/8" 28/2 sf : :
Charleston, SC_ 76/24 50/10 t 62/16 49/9 Cc 40/4 “29/-1
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Cleveland 40/4 29/-1 © 38/3 27/-2 ¢ 35/1 A? 8
Dallas. 51/10 28/-2 s 48/8 32/0 -s a
Denver _ 39/3 14/-10 ¢ 30/-1 11/-11 sn New Orleans —56/13 _ 45/7
Detroit 36/2" 25/-8 r= 35/1 23/5 ce =~ New York : A i 20: 69/18: pe:
Honolulu 80/26 70/21 pe 81/27 69/20 pc Oklahoma City _ 43/6 21/-6 s 42/5 25/-3 pc Tucson 67/19 34/1 s 70/21. 35/1. s
Houston: 57A3 35/1 «s 63/17, 38/3. -s Orlando. 83/28 64A7- pc 80/26 63/1 Washington, DC 74/23 39/3 t 52/11 36/2 pe

THE WEATHER REPORT

VL Bw 4
























Partly to mostly » Times of ciclils and |




Mainly clear. . “Sunshine and patchy. Partly sunny. ©






‘clouds. © sun.

High: 84°... High: 74°

Low: teat =p Low 71% Low: 61°
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The Sa ce acanater RealFeel nan is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine int ansity, cloudiness, rei ae ee
: elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or. cold.a person feels. Tameeralutes reflect the high and the low fat the day.





ws 12° F/22° ¢

... 80° F/27°C

... 68° F/20° C

igh .: .- 86° F/30° C

peal RSAOW. scsvssostnssoseediseasescecestosse 66° F/19° C
Precipitation

~As-of 1:p.m. yesterday ad 0:00”

Year to date ............... 46.56”

» Normal year to date ........c..cccsscssseesesssseeee 49.52”




High: 84° F/29°C
Low: 74° F/23°C







~ High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 68° F/20°C —








All forecasts and maps provided by
-AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006





KEY WEST
High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 76° F/24°C










Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows. E
e : Low: 75° F/24°C —







































AccuWeather.com —

GREATINAGUA
High: 89° F/32°C.
Low: 75° F/24°

- The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the




greater the need for eye and skin protection.

4:04 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:00 a.m.
5:25 p.m.
§:54 a.m.”
- 6:17 p.m.
6:45 a.m.
7:08 p.m.”

Today
Saturday
Sunday

Monday

Sunrise...... 6:38 a.m, Moonrise ....2:38p.m.
Sunset... ...5:20'p.m.. Moonset ..... 2:55am,



Dec. 12

Dec. 4

SAN SALVADOR
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 73° F/23°C



MAYAGUANA
_ High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 74° F/23°C-





Low

a a.m.
10:27 p.m.

11:25 a.m.
11:19 p.m.

12:19 p.m:

1:10: p.m.

12:10 a.m.

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

Su B/G =
73/22 pc.

) 76/24 pc







‘Marine Foaenast ? ee
WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet : 6-7 Miles 79° F
Saturday: Eat 8-16 Knots - 2-3 Feet 6-7 Miles - 79° F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 17° F
Saturday: __E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
ABACO Today: ESE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
Saturday: Eat 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F













BOUTS com

Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice





Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

















































FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

SECTION

' Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

_ The Tribune |



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Teeside
Pe CofA et gy

opinion





Freeman cru
victory

@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
‘Senior Sports Reporter

FORT MYERS: For five
rounds, Freeman ‘the Natural’
Barr battered and bruised vet-
eran Tony Menefee on Tues-
day night at the Harbourside
Event Center.

At the start of the sixth
when Barr decided to put an
end to the misery, referee
Frank Santore Jr. stepped in
and checked the bloodied
nose and the eyes of Mene-
fee.

Sensing that there was no

way that Menefee could |

absorb any more punishment,
Santore raised Barr’s hands,
signaling the end of the sched-
uled 10-round main event of

the SJC Boxing Promotions -

show dubbed: “Season’s Beat-
ings Fights.”

“The guy had. a lot of expe-
rience, but I sparred with a
lot of good guys and so it was-
n’t a-problem for me going
out there and getting in a
workout against Menefee,”
stated Barr, who improved his
win-loss record to 28-4.

“I knew it was only a matter
of time before I got to him. I
knew I could match up good
against him. He has the expe-
rience and I have the experi-
ence. But I always believe I’m
a much better fighter, so I’m
not afraid of anybody.”

Menefee, who at age 33, has
fought in more than 100 pro
fights, admitted that after

Barr “rang his bell” in the

fourth round, he just wanted
to get out of the ring.

“T felt like I hit him a cou-
ple times with a couple good
shots, but I just got a little
careless,” Menefee stated. “I
only fought once this year and
I didn’t have any sparring
until the last week or week
and a half.

“But he was a decent oppo-

nent and if J had a little more
sparring, I would have been
able to put up a better show-
ing. But he was tough.”

Ring doctor Rodolfo Eich-
berg said because Menefee
wasn’t breathing properly
through his nose and his eyes
weren’t steady, he instructed
the referee to call off the fight.

Barr, who weighed in at 172
pounds, compared to Mene-
fee’s 173, won all five rounds
to control the fight. He took
control from the second
round when he connected
with Menéfee’s nose.

Round after round, Barr
used his jab effective to pound
away at Menefee’s nose. Each

round, he.left Menefee on the



i



0

in sixth round





- ABOVE: Freeman Barr, left, knocks Tony Menefee' s head back with a jab Tuesday night i in
the main event i in Fort Myers, FL.

| RIGHT: Referee Frank Santore Jr, centre, holds up the arm of Freeman Barr, right, after
stopping Tony Menefee at two seconds of the sixth round in a light heavyweight bout scheduled for
eight rounds Tuesday in Fort Myers, FL.

defence, wiping away the

blood as he avoided getting.

him again.
Barr, however, said he had

to be extra careful.

“Sometimes when you get a

man hurt, you have to be
patient, especially with a vet-

eran like him,” Barr reflected.
“Plus, I needed a couple more
rounds, so I didn’t want to
end it too early.

“Tf I saw that he was mak-
ing a run at it, then I would
have stepped up and took him
out of there. I didn’t have to
worry about that because the
referee realised that he could-
n’t continue.” +.

SJC’s Boxing manager/pro-

‘ moter Steve Canton said Batr

simply lived up to his expec-
tations.

“That was a real fighter he

fought and he didn’t even win

around,” Canton emphasised. Ea
“What he did was exactly :
what we. discussed, 100:per

cent, no diversion.

“You have to respect Tony:

Menefee’s power. He’s won
more than 70 fights. He’s.a
big puncher. He’s a good kid.
He’s been in boxing since he
was 11 years old. Tony is not
what he was five years ago,
but Freeman isn’t either.”
Canton said Barr put
together his punches at the
tight time and he took advan-
tage of Menefee’s inability to

mount a serious defence to '

stop the onslaught.

In his.second bout back
after taking two years off to
recuperate from a series of
injuries, Barr said he would

give himself a B+. He

(Photos: Gail Janotta, Florida Boxing News)

acknowledged that it was
much better than the C he
gave himself when he fought
his last fight in July.

“T was able to work off a

lot of the rust,” he pointed
out!!“If I can get another
fight, then ] think I can
improve my performance
even more.”

Barr is not expected to fight

" again until the new year. He

and Canton indicated that

fight with former world cham-:*_
pion Roy Jones, who is.alsoâ„¢:
making a comeback after a.

Knockout season eT

they are going to pursue a

two-year hiatus. .

for amateur boxing

= BOXING
_ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Amateur Boxing Federation of
the Bahamas has planned a knockout

season, transforming their programmes.

Even though the sport has hada suc-
cessful year, president Wellington Miller
said that there is still room for improve-
ment.

. According to Miller, the new ideas
brought forward by the executive mem-
bers should also assist with the success on
the international scene, adding to the

number of amateur boxers in the country. .

He said: “This year has been a tremen-
dous one for the sport, but it will only get
-better as the new year approaches.

“We are proud to announce that the
national coach, Andre Seymour, has got-
ten a job with the ministry, this is a full
time job;-so we can now have his ser-
vices fulltime now.

“But it only gets better from here for
boxing. We will be embarking on a new
project which will include the Urban
Renewal Project, and surrounding
schools. This project will help us build

boxing in the country.”

The federation’s main focus will be
their after school programme, which will
be' conducted by national head coach
Seymour, Quincy Pratt, Steven Larri-
more and Leonard ‘Boston Blackie’

' Miller.
The federation is also targeting schools

in the Family Islands, receiving assistance
with the programme from coaches such
as Carlin Ingraham and John Ford i in
Inagua.

Coach

The after school programme will con-
tinue through the summer months, with

each coach being assigned to more than |

five schools.
The schools targeted so far are AF

“Adderley, SC McPherson, Gerald Cash,

Children’s Emergency Hostel, CH
Reeves, HO Nash, Fox Hill Primary, CC
Sweeting senior and junior, Oakes Field
and Albury Sayles primary along with
the Simpson Penn School.

Miller added: “We feel that its impact
will go a long way in helping to shape

a“ ia alae sca
a \ Address_








: ~

P.O a

and steer many of our young boys to
become meaningful and productive citi-
zens in the wonderful country. Each of
these coaches has a long and distin-
guished ring record and they would do an
excellent job in the after school pro-

‘gramme.

“We are very excited about the
prospects that Freeport is currently bran-
dishing. In a recent meeting with Bert
Perry and Terry Goldsmith in Freeport,
the executives were very pleased to learn
of the plans that they have for the North-
ern Bahamas. They too have targeted
schools in Grand Bahama and once they
get their programme underway, they
would be able to incorporate the islands
of Abaco and Bimini.

“The success these programmes will
have will only mean a brighter future for
boxing, we had much success but we
know that more will come.”

‘Miller also added that the. boxing. fed-
eration’s charge to move forward will
call for more local promoters on the pro-
fessional level.

He applauded the work of First Class
Promotions so far, but said more busi-
nesses like these should step forward.













Full Text




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The Tribune





Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



Bahamas:
International!
Filmmfestivall

Film Festival

Bahamas %
international y



Volume: .103:No.10





PVC A |
Were CUT
by tT ee CI

ST a Sse

Lawyer could challenge |
scheme if it becomes law

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune. Business Editor

THE National Health Insur-
ance scheme may be challenged
on constitutional grounds if it
becomes law, with a Bahamian
attorney yesterday arguing that
its provisions could also breach
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.

Fred Smith, a partner with
Callender’s &.Co, told The Tri-
bune., “Tf. they pass this legisla-
tion, I will seek 'a declaration
first, as a citizen of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas,

that if the tax is collected it

must be paid into the Consoli-

dated Fund, and I will chal-

lenge whether it is payable in
_ Freeport as a tax on the earn-
. ings of.a licensee.”
.~. He argued that the National

‘Health Insurance scheme
(NHI) could be unconstitu-
tional because it allegedly
breaches Article 128 of the
Bahamas constitution.

This article, which comes
under Chapter 9, dealing with
. _ the nation’s finances, stipulates

_ that all tax revenues collected
‘by the Government.of the
Bahamas are to be paid into
the Consolidated Fund, Mr
Smith said.

However, the. Government

is proposing that under its NHI.
scheme monies are to be paid:

into a National Health Insur-
ance Fund.

Emphasising that he sup-
ported the principle of univer-
sal healthcare access for all, Mr
Smith said: “I’m all for provid-
_ ing healthcare for every



Bahamian. It’s not the provi-
sion of services, but the lawful- .
ness of the approach. I support
universal healthcare. How it is
achieved is a different matter.”

Mr, Smith argued that
because NHI contributions
were an income tax, they could
not be levied in Freeport as a
result of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement.

He drew attention to the
1955 agreement’s Clause 2;
Sub-Elause 8;-which stipulates.
that no taxes — including
income. taxes — can be levied
against “the earnings of a

licensee in the Port area” or

against “any salaries and remu-
nerations” paid ‘to employees
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and their licensees,”
provided they live in the Port
area.

Although the tax exemption
initially lasted for.35 years, Mr

Smith said it was extended:by

the 1993 Freeport Act until

2018.
He added that he had par-
tially won a similar legal action

he brought in 1988 against the

then Minister of Housing and
National Insurance. In a case
that went all the way to the
Privy Council, the ultimate
court of appeal for the
Bahamas backed Mr Smith’s
contention that contributions
to the National Insurance
Board (NIB) were a tax, but
ruled that they were ‘not an
income tax, but one based on
being employed.
(See Business Section
- for full story)

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Cardiologist
‘agrees with |
idea of NHI |

' By PAUL TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter —

CARDIOLOGIST Dr! By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter i

; ; i items, including Fendi, Coach,
and. Gucci bags, even fake i
Michael Jordan tennis were
iby the Supreme Court — the
: matter is expected to be heard
: as early as Monday — could lead
In the presence of police and ; to the extradition of Mr Babak,
Custom’s officials, Mr Ma said : who is reportedly currently in

: that he had no idea that the :
: Bahamas.

Conville Brown, whose patients:
have included Prime Minister. :
Perry Christie, Opposition :
‘Leader Hubert Ingraham, and. :

rate a “healthy dose” of his :

Perierod Care model ot heath, 2 have beet collected:in the last :

: 10 days by the National Coali-
wot Brawn said he agreed ; tion for Healthcare Reform in ; |

: their online petition and. “sig- :
Insurance, provided that it : nificantly more” are expected }
-utilised the government, the pri- : to-be added to that number |

This tri-partite system, he : when letters, faxes and other }
‘ Ba a i. “hard copy” signatures are
a ee Ce oae : counted, one of the Coalition’s :

y g i consultants revealed yesterday. :

In an interview with The Tri- }

care delivery.

vate and the public at large.

ernment sector, private sector,

Beene juecr On Benya abuelte : bune yesterday, Winston Rolle,
sector. This user sector can }

SEE page 14

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1,.2006



SIR CLIFFORD DARLING, the’ Bahamas’ first. Minister of.
National Insurance, unveils a plaque yesterday to signify the renam-
ing of the National Insurance Building to The Clifford Darling Com-
plex. Prime Minister Perry Christie, speaking at the event, said:
“There ‘is no. individual living in our country today who is more
deserving of the honour that is bestowed in the naming of this build-
ing than Sir Clifford Darling.” be
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Thousands |
sign petition
— urging NHI
‘slow down’

THOUSANDS of Bahami- :

: pene etre have signed the petition urg- }
the late Sir Lynden Pindling, : an claw, i
yesterday advocated that gov- : ihe ae ee e on i. ene
érnment’s National Health | {i mblementation of ts pro
Insurance plan should incorpo i rice echames i

More than 3,500 signatures

SEE page 14

et is

Ca goaga ANE



‘Fake designer
items seized in|

_warehouse raid

“VAST amounts” of coun- j
i. terfeit items were seized in a :
i joint Customs/police raid on a’:
: warehouse in East Street South ; Hannes Babak to Fox Hill
: yesterday morning.

A number of fake designer :
: of the Grand Bahama Port

: confiscated from Shan Ma,

owner and operator of the
warehouse.

items were counterfeit. ,

SEE page 11



“T didn’t know that was coun- }

terfeit, but they find now that :

it’s counterfeit. But I really : of Callenders and Co speculat-

don’t know that. Because I just } ed that a similar motion asking

get them on the internet and : for the incarceration of Sir Jack

: they telling me that what I buy : Hayward could also be forth-
from that they are real,” he said. : coming in the near future if suf-

When asked if he thought it :
was possible to buy a Fendi or :

: Gucci bag for $15, Mr Ma said

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pees Heit











Re i eas

Ce

~ Motion on Babak
_ served on suspended
_ chairman’s attorneys

: By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE motion to commit

i. prison was served on the attor-

neys of the suspended chairman

Authority yesterday afternoon.
A possible committal order

Miami, Florida, back to the

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, attorney Fred Smith

ficient evidence can be gath-
ered.
“The Supreme Court still

SEE page 11






PAGE 2, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



a eee eee
Hodder plans to build international

ties between COB and South Africa

COLLEGE of the Bahamas
president Janyne Hodder is set
to travel to South Africa to
build international ties ahead
of the adoption of university
status.

On December 2, Mrs Hod-
der and vice president of
research, graduate programmes
and international relations Dr
Linda Davis, will depart from
Nassau on a visit to several
South African Universities.

At the invitation of the Min-
ister of Education, Science and
Technology Alfred Sears the
University/College of the

. Bahamas team will also be join-
ing him at a high-level educa-
tion conference before return-
ing to the Bahamas.

Also representing the
Bahamas are two other mem-
bers of the College communi-
ty, students Angelique Sawyer
and Dale Gelin, winners of an
essay competition organised by
the Ministry of Education.

According to Mrs Hodder,
the trip is a part of a well-
defined campaign to extend
COB’s global outreach and has
been directly influenced by the
Bahamas-South Africa Joint
Bilateral Commission Meeting
held in Freeport in 2005 which
identified several avenues for
potential co-operation.

"VP Davis and I are commit-
ted to negotiating linkages and
forging partnership agreements

with some key South African

universities. The goal is to
advance the mission of the col-
lege and the working vision of
the University of the Bahamas.

We are particularly interested |

in partnerships in the areas of
student and faculty exchanges,
research collaboration through
support of inter-institutional
research teams, creation of joint
degree programmes at the
undergraduate and graduate
levels, support of visiting schol-
ars at partner institutions
including post-doctoral

exchanges and faculty-research
stays and joint conference plan-
ning," she said.

Mrs Hodder and Dr Davis
will visit the University of
KwaZulu-Natal, the Universi-

































































ty of Johannesburg, the Uni-
versity of Witwatersrand, the
University of the Western Cape
and Rhodes University.

Possible collaboration areas
include education; hotel, culi-
nary and tourism, management;
financial services; law; marine
and environmental science; and
cultural studies.

Coincident with the trip the
South African Department of
Education will be hosting the
16th Conference of Common-
wealth Education Ministers
(16CCEM) in Cape Town

where ministers will meet to dis- ©

cuss the challenges and oppor-
tunities their countries face.

A COB spokesperson said it
will provide an ideal forum for
Mr Sears to advance the coun-
try’s university agenda and to
establish international partner-
ships with South African uni-
versities.

Dr Davis spoke of two specia!
items on the college's list of pri-
orities for the history-making
outreach.

"We will work assiduously
toward forging an agreement
with University of KwaZulu-
Natal in marine science, anoth-

‘er with the University of the

Western Cape in the field of
education and in particular ear-
ly childhood education and edu-

. cational policy," she said:

Mrs Hodder said the college
has identified the area of
tourism and hospitality as a

@ JANYNE Hodder |

potential area of partnership
with the University of Johan-
nesburg, an institution that has
benefited from a $3.1 million
donation from Sol Kerzner of
Kerzner International, whose
Atlantis is the flagship property
of tourism in the Bahamas.
"For the. College/University
of the Bahamas, the strategy

_ would involve a formal partner-

ship between the COB Culinary
and Hospitality Management



Institute and the Kerzner School
at the University of Johannes-
burg. The quality of the pro-
grammes offered by both
Schools, combined with the
importance of the Kerzner group
to both South Africa and the
Bahamas, presents an interesting
opportunity to link these two
important university tourism and
hospitality resources in exciting
and mutually beneficial ways,"
Mrs Hodder said.

en ae
research work at COB

THE College of the Bahamas

should lead the way in strate-

gic planning for the Bahamas,

- Perry Christie told students and

staff.

Speaking at the launch of the
National Policy Research Fel-
lowship Awards Programme,
the prime minister spoke of the
need for the college to “lead

research and well-reasoned

debate on issues of national -

importance”.

“We must begin to introduce
and support a research-based
culture, to the point where our

programmes, services, initia-
tives, investments are based on
concrete, sound, reliable evi-
dence and not just on experi-
ence and instinct alone,” he said

“We need institutions that

will facilitate specific ‘research
needs and support policy ideas -

in youth development, culture,
tourism, anchor projects, invest-
ments, financial services, edu-
cation, social services, policing
and corrections, urban renewal
and planning, just to name a
few.”

Mr Christie also announced

the establishment of an
endowed chair in Urban
Renewal at the college. Urban
renewal is a central plank of the
government’s policy, and is
widely publicised as being under

the ptimne mihister’s'persorial’

fhe WRat

portfolio.
‘He did not address détails of

2

what the new position would :

involve.

Key to the research role, Mr.

Christie said, was keeping up
with the government’s much-
touted philosophy of “key
developments” on every island.

“For instance, out of the
Labour Market Survey pro-

duced by the Department. of :

Statistics, the Fellowship Pro-
gramme may wish to conduct a
manpower assessment and pro-
jection for a particular category
of profession or industry, to
identify the number of poten-
tial employees needed and at
which levels,” he said.

He also spoke of the need for
research-based strategic. plan-
ning for investments and finan-
cial support, access to interna-
tional funding, recruitment and
training, trends and projections
and human resource planning

The prime minister went on
to lament the level of ignorance
among young people about
Bahamian history, and called
upon students to become biog-
raphers for Bahamian luminaries
such as civil rights activist Joseph
Gould Watkins, actor Bert
Williams, social pioneer Frances
“Mother” Butler and education
campaigner RM Bailey.

eae

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- ss 3

2
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 3





In brief |

Attorney says
Anna Nicole
must leave
by Thursday

A former boyfriend of-Anna
Nicole Smith has obtained a
court judgment ordering the
reality TV star out of her ocean-
front residence and he plans to
seek her forcible eviction unless
she leaves by Thursday, accord-
ing to his lawyer, according to
Associated Press.

Emerick Knowles, the attor-
ney for South Carolina busi-
nessman Ben, Thompson, said
he entered the default judgment
on Tuesday after Smith missed
a deadline to respond to his suit
declaring his client the rightful
owner of the gated mansion.

Smith, who moved to the
Bahamas while pregnant with
her nearly 3-month-old daugh-
ter, has remained; secluded in
the house since her 20-year-old
son Daniel died under mysteri-
ous circumstances at her hospi-
tal bedside on Sept. 10.

The 39-year-old former Play-
boy playmate has claimed that
Thompson bought her the near-
ly US$1 million house as a gift.
Thompson, who had a brief
relationship with Smith, says it
was a loan.

Knowles said he gained
authority to file the judgment
with the Supreme Court after
a two-week deadline expired on
Monday, and he asked Smith in

writing to vacate by Thursday.
If she does not comply, they will
ask court officers to remove her
from the property, he said.

Donors press
Haiti to
promote good
governance

m@ SPAIN
Madrid

DONOR countries pumping

millions of dollars into Haiti

pressed its government Thurs-
day to enact a program of
reforms designed to nudge it
toward a future free of poverty,

violence and corruption, accord- .

ing to Associated Press.

A conference in Spain that.

brought together more than 30
countries and international
organizations was designed as
a follow-up to a July meeting
at which US$750 million was
pledged to boost the country’s
infrastructure and development.
The goal of Thur$day’s con-
' ference was to examine how
that money is being spent, and

‘although no fresh pledges had
been expected for visiting Prime
Minister Jacques Edouard
Alexis, the European Union did
announce US$79 million in new
money.

Europe’s wealthy bloc said it
‘has concluded that Haiti this
week met a condition of pre-
senting a programme of good
. governance. ‘

Chilean troops
to remain in
Haiti for six
months more

@ CHILE
Santiago

THE Senate extended Chile’s
commitment to the United
Nations peacekeeping force in
Haiti for another six months
beginning Thursday, according
' to Associated Press.

The Senate voted 25-8
Wednesday night to allow the
600-member contingent made
up of soldiers and police to
remain with the Brazil-led force
keeping peace on the troubled
Caribbean island. _

The vote came after a lengthy
debate,with the right-wing
opposition complaining the gov-
ernment had requested the
renewal of the mandatory
authorization only two days
before it was set to expire.

Defense Minister -Vivianne.

Blanlot apologized to the sena-
tors for the last-minute request.

In order to gain approval for
extension, the government
agreed to establish a congres-
sional commission to oversee
Chile’s participation in interna-
tional peacekeeping forces in
the future. The commission will
be headed by an opposition law-
maker.

Chile has.contributed troops
to the U.N. force in Haiti since
it was established in 2004.

Lita eA
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
au es Yada



Call

for looser regulations over

deaths in private facilities

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT has been

asked to loosen the regulations
regarding the handling of
deaths in private medical facil-
ities.
In the 2005 report of the
Hospitals and Healthcare
Facilities Licensing Board —
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday — it was
recommended that a legal
requirement that the chief
medical officer, Dr Merceline
Dahl-Regis, be informed of all
deaths in private medical facil-
ities and the name of the med-
ical practitioner who was in
attendance within 48 hours of
the event, be scrapped.

The requirement currently
appears in the Hospitals and
Healthcare Facilities Act 1998
under section 23(4).

The new recommendation
follows claims made in August

‘by the board's most recent

chairman Jerome Gomez,
appointed in February 2006,

i . that he felt this stipulation in

the Act represented a “dis-

juncture" that should be cor-

rected between the act and
“current protocol."



B JEROME Gomez

According to Mr Gomez,
most medical officers were not

‘in the habit of informing the

CMO, but only of filling in a
"medical certificate of death"
which is stored in hospital
records.

He said that if that particular
section. of the Act was
enforced, and all deaths were
brought to the attention of the
board — whose foremost
responsibility is in determin-
ing the fitness of private med-
ical facilities for licensing — it
would be "overwhelmed."

In July, Mr Gomez's opin-
ion was borne out in concerns
raised by a group of citizens
that the board appeared to
have no statistical record of
deaths in facilities it was
responsible for licensing
despite the stipulation in the
Act.

Aside from appearing to be
in conflict with the require-
ments of section 23(4), the
group said it also contravened
the Act's stipulation that the
board should refuse licences
to a hospital or healthcare
facility if the facility is being
operated "in a manner...inju-
rious to public health."

Concern.

It was noted by the con-
cerned citizens that a high
death rate could indicate that
appropriate care is not being
provided by a given treatment
centre whether or not it was
found to have satisfied all oth-
er licensing criteria.

Their claim followed a com-
plaint made to the board by a
member of the public that a
hospital had received a licence
despite documentation from

Sea Hauler survivors’ fury at
lack of government action

â„¢ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SURVIVORS of the noto-
rious Sea Hauler accident say

_ they refuse to suffer silently

any longer while the govern-
ment continues to ignore their
plights.

More than three years after
the tragic crash claimed the
lives of four passengers and
injured 25, the victims and
family of the deceased are still
waiting for monetary compen-

i : sation to deal with the bills the
? .. continue to.mount.

The collision of the two
large vessels —- Sea Hauler and
the United Star - occurred on
‘August 2, 2003 in the waters
off the southwest coast of
Eleuthera.

Victims of the crash and
family of the decéased came
together yesterday to protest
an “intolerable situation” and
to plead with the government

i for assistance.

Claiming that the govern-
ment was negligent in allow-
ing the-Sea Hauler and the
United Star to operate with-

" out proper insurance, the sur-

‘vivors are demanding that top
officials come to their aid.

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Teneson Leslie, 25, who lost
both his right leg and his wife
of three years during the crash,
said he has to struggle just to
survive and take care of his
two kids.

Mr Leslie, a self-employed
tiler, plumber and mason
recalled waking up after the

collision to the sight of his wife.

with part of.a crane lodged in
her head.

His wife, Brenell Leslie, who
died on the scene has three
children who are now in the
care of her sister, Lashandell
Smith.

Ms Smith, 22, whose.mother
also died as a result of the acci-
dent, said she has to sacrifice
nearly all of her pay-cheques
just to make ends meet.

She recalled the scene three
years.ago, as she was also a
passenger on the Sea Hauler.

“What began as a fun trip,
ended in tragedy,” she said emo-
tionally. She lost both her moth-
er and sister during that trip.

Her aunt, Rosemarie Smith,
also a passenger on the fate-
ful trip, said, “We aren’t get-
ting, any support or no kind of
help. They trying to sweep this
under the rug.

“We paid our money to go

on the boat and'these people,

shouldn’t have to do this thing
over and over just for their
rights. The government is
‘ignoring the situation. Its
ridiculous. It’s not our fault
and it’s not fair. We are stand-
ing up for our rights because
they are being taken away.”

Another passenger, Cedric
Hart, said his bills have piled
so high he can’t even begin to
pay them.

He claims to have personal-

ly sought the help’ of séveral~”

government officials including

Prime Minister Perry Christie. ;
and Deputy Prime Minister’ :

_ Cynthia Pratt to no avail.

Mr Hart has had to resort,

to begging on the streets. At
one point, he said, he was even
homeless as he could not
afford to keep up with his rent.

“We are not happy in this
condition and I feel that we
should be compensated. In the
name of God please help us,”
he said.

The victims are currently

receiving help from the grass- °

roots organisation Bahamas
Loving Care, who organised
the press conference for them.

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bri

Dr Dahl-Regis affirming that
the institution had not been sup-
plying her with all death notifi-
cations. .

The Act as it stands states
that any administrator at a
medical facility who does not
forward death notifications
within 48 hours should be
"liable to a...fine of five thou-
sands dollars or to imprison-
ment or to both that fine and
imprisonment."

The report was accompanied
by the financial statements of
the board for the fiscal year
2004-2005. This is the first time

- that these financial records have

been tabled in parliament,
despite it being required in the

Act which mandated the board
in 1998 that both the board and
the minister of health have a
duty to ensure that a copy of
the financial report be tabled
in parliament each year.

In early 2006 The Tribune
reported that no such records
had ever’been tabled. Months
of silence from the Ministry of
Health on the unaccounted
funds which the board would
have accrued since 1995 fol-
lowed prior to the tabling of the
2004-2005 report on Wednes-
day. Since the tabling of that
report, questions continue to be
asked as to the content of the.

board's accounts in the years
prior to 2004,

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES .

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

‘Health needs reasoned debate

PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie told the
House of Assembly Wednesday, as he opened
debate on the National Health Insurance Act,
that he had no difficulty acknowledging that
“this is an emotional debate.”

“This,” he said, “is a debate about people
being able to have hope as they move for-
ward in this country; a reality that they will
have access to affordable health care, access
to the great doctors that we have in this coun-
ty who will provide the services.”

He referred to'a letter written to the Min-
istry of Health by a doctor, the essence of
which, he said, was a “plaintive cry of a doc-
tor saying ‘I can’t treat these patients unless
you pay me.’” In other words, said the Prime
Minister, unless the Ministry could find a way
to pay him, “patients cannot access a service
that only he can provide in this country.” -

No one will deny that life and death can be
an emotional matter, but no one wants the
prime minister of one’s country leading a
debate with his heart rather than his head.
The people’s health is far too important and
the way in which medical services are to be
provided to maintain that health without
destroying the country’s economy is far too
serious for it to be a matter of the heart. This
is a matter for the head — considered com-
passionately, but also rationally. Leave the
tears and oratory at home. This is serious
business.

What has to be accepted is that no one
trusts any government with its health. Can
government point to any enterprise that it
has managed successfully, including National
Insurance, which spends far more than it
should on its own administration?

At least Prime Minister Christie has got
one message clear — all parties involved —
employers, union leaders, doctors and
employees —agree that all residents should
have access to health care, regardless of their
ability to pay.

What they don’t agree with is governmen-
t’s present blueprint of how that service is to
be delivered. Also, they are not comfortable
that they and their doctor both lose control
over their treatment. In the final analysis it is
government, because it controls the funds,
that will determine the extent of the patient’s
care — not the doctor. It is going to be the

doctor, who, because of lack of funds from |

government, is going to be forced to play God
— when supplies run out, it is he. who. will
have to determine who lives and who dies.
The elderly — just like the premature babies
described in Mr Buckner’s letter on this page

289 Market St. South:« P.O. Box N-7984 e' Nassau, Bahamas
of THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

& People don't care how much you know

until they know how much you care.” |

' SUNDAY SERVICES
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PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D. |
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Phone: 323-6452 * 393-5798
Fax:.326-4488/394-4819 -

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today — will be expendable:

As a New York doctor wrote: “One or two
generations ago, many people dreamed that
socialised. medicare would provide every cit-

izen with all the health care he needed or .

wanted. But history has proved irrefutably
that socialised medicine is simply a means of
imposing Procrustean rationing on the entire
population. In other words, some citizens
receive care and live, while others are denied
care and are permitted to die as quickly as

possible.”

Of course, Mr Christie says that what he is
offering is not socialised medicine. Let him
have his way and call it whatever he likes,
the results are the same — when the funds run
out, so does the care.

Mr Christie also insists that this is not a tax
— nor, says he, is National Insurance a tax.
We would really like to know how he defines
the word “tax”. Anyway if lawyer Fred Smith
challenges this proposed Bill on constitutional
grounds the matter of when a tax is a tax will
soon be settled.

In 1988 Mr Smith got the Privy Council to
agree that National Insurance was in fact a
tax, although it was not an income tax, but a
tax based on employment. i

On that reasoning then there is no doubt

. that NHI is a tax because it includes not cnly

the employed, but also pensioners — and as it
is based on one’s income, reasoning can go
even further and conclude that it is a tax on
income — income tax.

Mr Christie curls his lip and wrinkles his |
nose in disdain at doctors who dare ask how -

they are going to be paid for their services. Mr
Christie, as a lawyer, would ask the same
question if a government. threatened his
income from his legal practice. After all, like
him, the doctors have bills, other obligations

‘and families to support. -

However, unlike Mr Christie, they have
invested far more money, years and effort
into qualifying for their profession.

Again, unlike Mr Christie, to set up in med-

ical practice some have to go deeply into debt
to provide their offices with expensive equip-

-ment — far more costly than the law books
_and computers needed in a legal practice. .

And so these doctors have every right to
ask who will pay for their “services that only

“they can provide” after many years of study
and sacrifice. Instead of sneering as though |

such a question leaves a bad odour in their
nostrils, it’s the duty of the Christie govern-
ment to answer these questions and the many
other questions the public wants answered.







R@@MS|

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

§ Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
: Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: SPAY,

THE TRIBUNE

Questions on
proposed NHI

EDITOR, The Tribune.

RECENTLY, a council of the
National Health Service in the
UK determined that babies born
prematurely at or before 22
weeks were to be denied medical
attention and be left to die. The
truth is that it is very hard to
treat these babies and doctors
estimate that only about 10 per
cent born at or before 22 weeks
survive. Still, great strides have
been made recently in health
care for premature babies.— or
“preemies” as many call them.
So many are now surviving that
Toys “R” Us in the U.S, has a
department for them featuring
some of the smallest clothes you
have ever seen. In the U.S. the
choice regarding giving inten-
sive care to these babies lies with
the parents. In the U.K. the
politicians decide and they have
cut the survival rate from 10 per
cent to zero. The National
Health Services decision was not
based upon medicine. Nor was it
based upon parent choice, which
is not taken into account. It was
based upon competition for the
Government budget. In other
words Britain’s socialist health
system has to let babies die
because of politics.

Government is not trying to
gain support for its National
Health plan by demonstrating
to people the specifics of how it
will help them. No arguments
have been put forward proving
that medicine will be better
under the new plan, nor that
waits for operations will be cut
or access to care increased.
These things have all been
“promised”, but none of it has
been demonstrated. Hard ques-
tions regarding costs, budgeting,

quality control, fraud, choice, -

and privacy have all gone unan-
swered. Unlike the U.K. Council
our politicians have not pub-
lished guidelines setting out who
will get care and who will be
denied, who they will decide
lives and who will die. In fact
Government is refusing to dis-
cuss these issues with the health
professionals who understand
them. No critic has come out
against extending health cover-
age to all Bahamians. The argu-
ment is about how it is to be
extended and paid for. Instead
of seeking dialogue on these
important issues Government
has lined up a number of senior
ministers to loudly claim that
those who are against their plan
are against the poor and the
middle class. In other words, like
the National Health denying
care to preemies, the Govern-
ment has decided to play poli-
tics..

We all know that BEC, BTC
and Bahamasair are Govern-
ment-controlled monopolies that
are not interested in their cus-
tomers. We know they charge
unreasonable rates that force the
cost of living and of doing busi-
ness up to unreasonable levels,
making a good standard of living
very expensive and making
many of our businesses uncom-
petitive. We know that they pro-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



vide a poor and intermittent
product. None of this is the fault
of the good people who work in
these corporations. It is the fault
of a system that is not responsive
to people’s wants but IS respon-
sive only to politics.

The politicians who run BEC,
BTC and Bahamasair make
choices regarding the delivery
of their services, the quality and
cost of the product and the use
of their resources based upon
political concerns that are often
at odds with the customer’s
needs. The customer would like
a choice of good services at a
good price. Forget it. Politics
jealously does not allow this and
we all know this and understand
this from the experience of our
own lives.

Now the PLP wants to take
away the decisions regarding our
health. Just as with BEC, BTC
and Bahamasair, we the

‘Bahamian people can trust

politicians to make their man-
agerial decisions for political rea-
sons. Just like those in the U:K.
It will come down to choices,
and you will not be the one mak-
ing the choices. Just like you
have no choice which electricity
company or telephone compa-
ny to use, you will have no
choice over the‘health care deci-
sions that affect your life. Gov-
ernment will decide for you. Will
you get the good health care or
will the good health care go to
the Anna Nichole Smiths of this
world? Who will be fast tracked
and who will be left to wait? We
have all seen the answers neatly
demonstrated.

What about access? Ask the
Housing contractors who have

come forward with claims of cor- -
ruption concerning access to the '

public housing market. We all
know there is a game that is
played. We all know who can be
trusted and who cannot be trust-
ed. Some of us refuse to play
and are left on the outside alone
and the others go along to get
along.

Do you want games played
with your health? No one will
want to be on the outside when
it comes to his or her health and
everyone. will pay to play. The
cost of corruption will be on top
of the new Income Tax. Gov-
ernment has not factored the
cost of corruption into its num-
bers because, of course, corrup-
tion does not exist.

I want better health care for
all Bahamians.

There are better ways to get it.
Let us look hard at the econom-
ic costs of operating health care
facilities in the Bahamas and see
how we can reduce them. We all
know that electric power is very
expensive in this country and
that medical equipment uses a
lot of power. Can we get the cost
of power down and thereby
make treatment cheaper? I think
the answer is yes. What can be
done to find cheaper alternant
sources of drugs?

Can more bulk buying bring
prices down (remember not to
trust Government with this one
— their clinics and hospitals are
often out of drugs because the
politicos forget to order them)?
What about training? Can we

find ways to help pay for train-
ing? What about not only giv-
ing tax breaks but tax offsets to
those in the medical field? These
are all options that can be
explored that would make a
meaningful difference in improv-
ing the quality and availability’
of the existing healthcare sys-
tem, while not compromising
choice, privacy and the undeni-
able benefits that come from
consumer control as opposed to
political control. These same
benefits can be extended to the

. insurance industry. For exam-

ple, are insurance companies
exempt from import duties,

. property tax, and stamp tax?

Shouldn’t they be? If Govern-
ment wants more money for
health why not find it by cutting
away some of its own inefficien-
cies?

Which brings us to cost. It is
simply a lie to say that a manda-
tory 5 per cent contribution tak-
en from one’s salary is not
Income Tax. If the PLP is willing
to deliberately set out to mis-
lead the people about how the
cost is to be covered then where’
will the misleading stop? Do we .
want choices regarding our
health made by people who will
so nakedly seek to mislead us?
This needs to be accounted for.

Accountability is very impor-
tant. In May this year the FNM .
revealed that infant mortality
has risen dramatically under the
PLP watch from 12.7 deaths per
1,000 to 17.3 deathss a 36 per
cent increase. Dr. Nottage
admitted to this alarming fail-
ure and promised an investiga-
tion. But as with so many
‘promised investigations no
answers have been forthcoming.
The people have not been told
about any new policies to bring
infant mortality down to the rate
achieved under the FNM (under
the last PLP Government infant
mortality was as high as 24 per
1,000, 89 per cent higher than
under the FNM). How will Gov-
ernment account to people for
its actions under its proposed
Health Plan?

PLP Ministers have already
shown us when it comes to
accountability they think silence.
or cover-ups or threatening the
free press are the right. ways to

‘answer questions. Now they

resort to bullying those who
raise questions, lashing out at:
them and calling professional
people, respected in the com-
munity, “greedy” and saying
they do not care about the poor,
This sort of overly aggressive
attitude, empty of logic or argu-
ment, only divides people and
makes people angry. It does not
answer questions. Nor in the
modern Bahamas will it make
people shut up. ~

This is not about the poor or
the middle class or even about
health.

If it were Government would
make a big and sincere effort to
answer all of these questions. It
would be looking for everyone’s
five cents. It is about the PLP’s
worries about its own health.
The PLP is sick, it is dying in
office and it desperately needs a
shot in the arm. It needs it fast
before the bell rings. So it is
rushing and bullying, trying. to
ram this down our throats.

GARTH BUCKNER
Nassau,
November 24, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Cubans await
for appearance
of Castro in
milestone
anniversary
parade

@ HAVANA

BANNERS hanging from
restored buildings in this sea-
side city encourage ailing
leader Fidel Castro to live to
160, but Cubans are now
grappling with the realisa-
tion that his days as their
charismatic leader may be
over, according to Associated
Press.

Most Cubans have known
no other ruler than Castro,
who 50 years ago Saturday
landed on a boat from Mexi-
co with fellow rebels to
launch a revolution that tri-
umphed on Jan. 1, 1959. But
Castro, waylaid for four
months with an intestinal ail-
ment, was still too sick to
attend Tuesday’s kickoff of a
five-day celebration of his
80th birthday. He turned 80
on Aug. 13 but postponed
the party because of surgery
two weeks earlier.

Castro’s supporters in this
Caribbean island of 11 mil-
lion fervently wish he will at
least appear for the military
parade Saturday marking the
semicentennial anniversary
of the boat landing.

Traffic cops in blue uni-
forms and black boots this:
week were directing traffic,
primarily smog-belching
Russian Lada sedans and
1950s-era American cars,

‘from the enormous Plaza de
la Revolucion, which wag

being readied for the parade.
But if Castro fails to
appear on the grandstand,

some will take his absence as’

a sign he.will never return to
power, although it is consid-

ered sacrilege among the
Castro faithful to even speak ~
of the ie posse

} the Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

DERE i

FRIDAY,
DECEMBER 1ST

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise

11:00 Immediate Response

Noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response
(Cont'd)
A Special Report
Yes Virginia, There’s A
Santa Claus

2:00 Christmas Toy

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 International Fellowship of
Christian & Jews _

3:30 Ed Young

4:00 — Legends: Whence We
Came: Dr. Gail Saunders

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 —Bahamaian Spirit: Millie
Sands

0:00 Kerzner Today

6:15 Good News Bahamas

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Jessye Norman Sings For
The Healing Of AIDS

9:00 55 Degrees North

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 12

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30 Community Page 1540 am

SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 2ND
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 — Intemational Fit Dance
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego

11:30
noon Underdog

NOTE ZNS-TV 12 reserves the
make ‘ast minute
nNefeksuae



@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

NINE out of 10 persons liv-
ing with HIV/AIDS in the
Bahamas are to be found in the
workplace, according to the
International Labour Organi-
sation.

The Baha:
inroads

the impact on workers, provide
care and treatment for infected
workers and eliminate the dis-
crimination on the job on the
grounds of HIV status.

The report attributes the suc-
cess of the Bahamas and its
regional counterparts to the
benefits of wider access to anti-
retroviral treatment.



This statement comes on the
back of the latest World Health
Organisation report that iden-
tified the Bahamas, Barbados,
and Jamaica as among the
countries that are making
inroads against their HIV epi-
demics.

The ILO claimed that it is
focusing on the “world of
work” as one of the critical
avenues of a comprehensive
response to the epidemic.

The organisation said it plans
to try and prevent the spread of
HIV in the workplace, mitigate

Reports

the balanced approach — which
combines HIV prevention and
treatment — that has been
adopted in Barbados.

It-praised the Bahamas for
the decline of HIV infections
in young pregnant women in
_the early 2000s and a steep
decline in AIDS death rates.

The Tribune contacted the

The report also comments
on the encouraging results of

HIV/AIDS National Pro-
gramme for feedback on the
report, and programme direc-
tor Rosa Mae Bain said she
was not surprised about the
findings.

According to Ms Bain, ‘the
Bahamas was “singled out” last
year along with Barbados and
Bermuda for having a success-
ful national HIV/AIDS pro-

gramme.
She said: “One of the rea-
sons we made progress was

because in the Bahamas we
started caring for people with

~ HIV/AIDS way before the

treatment was available.”

A total of 250,000 persons
are living with HIV in the
Caribbean, with Haiti and the
Dominican Republic account-
ing for three quarters of this
number. An. estimated 27,000
people became infected with
HIV in 2006 in ithe Caribbean,







@ THE mansion on Paradise Island — (Photo: paradisemansion.com) as

Harajchi mansion
on sale for $24.5m

BANKER Mohammed Harajchi is offering his Paradise Island
mansion for sale over the Internet - for about $24.5 million.”

The 30-room home, with its guest residence, five acres of grounds
and a deluxe guest suite, is billed as “a mansion in paradise” on a web-
site promoting the property’s virtues.

Mr Harajchi, whose Suisse Security Bank and Trust had its licence
withdrawn by the government, is now said to be living in Europe after
his final bid to retrieve his licence failed.

Having closed his scandal-driven tabloid newspaper, The Confi-
dential Source, Mr Harajchi appears to be winding up his other.
Bahamas interests by selling off his Paradise Island estate.

The mansion - with two large. outdoor swimming pools, one boast-
ing its own island - -has its own pool suite with an incredible harbour
view.

A 15-foot waterfall, which rushes water round a landscaped island,
is another feature of the property, reckoned to be one of the finest in
the Bahamas. The 15,000 square feet main residence includes an
underground wine cellar. The 5,000 square feet guest property has
three bedrooms. Both homes are set in landscaped grounds with
numerous pools, ponds and fountains.

Described as “one of the largest privately-owned pieces of land on
Paradise Island”, the property is being sold partially furnished. It
stands on the island’s highest point and enjoys extensive water views.

Its five lots extend to just under five acres. A five-car garage is .
among its attractions.

Mr Harajchi was a financial backer of the PLP during the 2002 gen-
eral election. However, he fell foul of the government when they failed
to restore his banking licence.

His newspaper - printed on his own press in Nassau - was launched
primarily to attack the PLP for blocking his bid to reopen his bank.

* However, at one-point it faced a $5 million libel action after calling
fellow foreign investor Derek Turner, a Paradise Island: neighbour
with similarly lavish tastes, a crook. :

The action fell through when Turner - a stock trader who scammed
millions from DaaUSpeciits investors -.was jailed in the United States
for fraud.

SuperClubs, 2

Bahamas

has vacancy for:
FRONT OFFICE MANAGER

The ideal candidate must have:
Computer literacy with thorough knowledge of Microsoft pograms
A minimum of two years experience in the hotel industry or related field
ata supervisory or managerial position
Highly developed problem solving, social and analytical skills
Diploma or degree in Hospitality Management
Excellent oral and written communications skills
Ability to speak a foreign language would be an asset

A working knowledge of Tour Operator Wholesaler and hotel linkages

A working knowledge of rooms inventory control procedures and yield
management ‘

The candidate’s responsibilities will include:

Management of all related Front Office areas (Front Desk, Reservations,
PBX Operations, Bell Services and Reservations)

Training and development of all Front office personnel

Adherence to company policies and procedures

Budgets for all Front office areas

Interested candidates should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
SuperClub Breezes Bahamas
Fax: 242-327-2986
Email: craig.fox@ superclubs.com

(All applications must be submitted by Friday, December 10, 2006)
Please note that only short listed candidates will be contacted.

a: RIN nN S/o 3





FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 5

as compared: to 25,000. in.

2004.

Eighty-six partner enterpris- .

es in Belize, Guyana, Barba-
dos and Jamaica have so far
committed themselves to tack-
le HIV/AIDS in collaboration





with the International Labour
Organisation.

While HIV/AIDS claimed
fewer lives in the Caribbean in
2006 than in 2004, it is still one
of the leading causes of death
among adults in the Caribbean.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





SAM Duncombe



Concert at Arawak
Cay to highlight
opposition to LNG |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

An environmental organisa-
tion is set to host the country's
first concert to highlight the
views of those opposing the
introduction of LNG to the
Bahamas.

The event — to be held on Sat-

‘ urday at Arawak Cay — is being

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hosted by the organisation

reEarth, which hopes that it
will also provide an opportu-
nity for the group to collect
signatures in protest of the
proposed construction of a
Liquefied Natural Gas
(LNG) plant at Ocean Cay,
near Bimini.

The free concert will run
between 6pm and midnight,
and will present audience
members with a chance to

watch performances by a:

variety of Bahamian artists
such as Soulful Groovers, Da
Brilanders, Lassie, Doe Boys,
Tingum Dem Band, Nita
Ellis, Novie Pierre, Trez Hep-
burn, and Funky D

In addition, the winner of
the 2006 Bahamas Annual DJ
competition, “Xcitement”,
will MC the event.

According to reEarth pres-

ident Sam Duncombe, the
organisation was spurred on
to holding the event by the
"overwhelming support and
positive energy" they have
received for their anti-LNG
stance.

She said reEarth hopes the
concert will help "bring this
collective voice to our gov-
ernment, that we do not want
LNG now, or any time in the
future." |

"Politicians are here to do
what we, the people, tell them
to do and not continue to
ignore our voice. Our message
is loud and. clear: No LNG,



not now, not ever," she said.

The controversial LNG
facility proposal — which is
currently under consideration
by the government — would
entail the construction of a
100 miles of pipeline between
the Bahamas and the US
coast in order to supply LNG,
a cheap source of fuel to the
South Florida market.

Protesters have said that,
if given the "go-ahead", the
facility will be an environ-
mental and health hazard,
and even a potential terrorist
target. ,

They add that Florida has
rejected the possibility of hav-
ing the facility on, or any clos-
er to, their land mass because
of these dangers.

"All of the same risks that
stop Florida from housing
LNG in its territories are the
same for. us here in the
Bahamas," said Ms Dun-
combe.

"We need to preserve our
environs for our children, not
look at risky. ventures that
could de-stabilise our main
economies like tourism and
fishing for another country’s
gain!” she said.

The government, however,
has rejected the proposition
that LNG is inherently risky
‘and has proposed that the
facility could provide jobs for

Bahamians, and bring tens of.

millions of dollars into the
economy each year.

THE proposed LNG facility at Ocean Cay



THIE HOMIE STORE

Cordially invites you to come and see all of its

NEW ARRIVALS

Wonderful aift ideas and cooking supplies for
the holidays.

Every kitchen gadget you could possibly want.
Zesters, mandolins, coffee makers,
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The Home Store
Sandyport Mall
Monday thru Saturday
10:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.
or call us at 327-1132,

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The ideal candidate must possess exceptional telephone etiquette, good
attitude, ability to work independently or as team; with a minimum type
writing skills of 50 wpm; and about Three Year Office experience
-w/excellent communications and Computer Skills; and be proficient in.
use of Windows XP or 2000 environment; particularly w/ software such
as M.S. Word, Excel and Quickbooks.

Bahamians and/or any Nationality are invited to apply

Please Fax Resume to 394-4458
Or e-mail: Ilehteb@coralwave.com



In brief

Antigua PM
urges east

_ Caribbean
_ to union

m ANTIGUA
St John’s

ANTIGUA’S Prime Minis-
ter Baldwin Spencer urged rep-
resentatives from nine eastern
Caribbean states on Wednes-
day to focus on forming an eco-
nomic union as a strategy to
boost investment and raise liv-
ing standards, according to
Associated Press.

Spencer, who spoke at the
opening of a one-day caucus of
the Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States, told delegates
such a union was within their
grasp.

“If we are to realize our goal
of making the economic union .
fully operational, we must also:
move forward with a compre-
hensive work program that will
address the important areas of
our survival as a grouping,”
Spencer said, noting those
included increased cooperation
in developing tourism and
rebuilding agriculture following
cuts in European subsidies. :

The caucus was called to dis-
cuss topics including the eco-
nomic union, the Caribbean oil.
deal-with Venezuela, maritime
boundaries and air transporta-
tion for the 2007 cricket World
Cup.

The OECS states — Antigua,
Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Kitts,
St. Vincent, Grenada and the
British territories.of Anguilla,
Montserrat and the British Vir-

: gin Islands — share a common

currency and have a central
bank. They have been dis-
cussing the possibility of form-
ing an economic union for two

i years.

Sell

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on Mondays

















SuperClubs, >

Bahamas

has vacancy for:

PUBLIC RELATIONS COORDINATOR

The ideal candidate must have:

Tertiary level education in mass Communication or Sales and Marketing
_A minimum of two years experience in the hotel andusity or related field

at a supervisory or managerial position

Excellent oral and written communications skills

Highly developed social and analytical skills

Computer Literacy with thorough knowledge of Microsoft Programmes

Ability to speak a foreign language would be an asset

Ability to drive would be an asst

The candidate’s responsibilities will include:

Ensuring the property receives maximum publicity through local media

houses

Hosting Journalist, Travel Agents, Television and radio Personalities

visiting the property.

Coordinating property involement in photo shoots and community

activities.

Coordinating wedding for guests.

Interested candidates should send applications wih detail resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
SuperClub Breezes Bahamas
Fax: 242-327-2986
Email:craig.fox@ superclubs.com

(All applications must be submitted by Friday, December 10, 2006)
Please note that only short listed candidates will be comtacted.



+"
THE TRIBUNE



amily law attorney calls
for courts to recognise
prenuptial agreements

A FAMILY law attorney has called
for legal recognition of prenuptial agree-
ments in the Bahamas.

The acceptance of such agreements
by the courts could help diffuse charged
emotions, smooth the transition between
marriage and divorce — and potentially
save lives, she said.

“In an ideal world, everyone who mar-
ried would live happily ever after,” said
Nerissa Greene, a senior associate with
the firm of Halsbury Chambers. “But
the reality is one out of every two mar-
riages will end in divorce and it is during
the break-up and before matters are set-
tled that we often see tensions reach
such levels that people behave in ways
that even they would not believe they
are capable of.

“We are doing ourselves a grave and
potentially deadly injustice by failing to
amend the law to recognise that there is
a way to provide for the prudent dis-

Se ‘Albans Dr.
D.O: Box: N-8877
Nassau, Bahamas

pensation of child support, alimony and
separation of assets while cooler heads
prevail,” she said.

A prenuptial agreement is a document
signed prior to marriage detailing own-
ership of assets and could include estate
management wishes as well as mutually

agreed upon principles for alimony and
child support should the marriage end.

Under the current law, courts are
open to drawing an inference from a
prenuptial agreement — but do not recog-
nise it as a binding contract.

Miss Greene’s comments came dur-
ing a lengthy interview at her office at
the firm’s headquarters on Village
Road.

She sought to reverse the perception
that prenuptial agreements mean “you
don’t trust each other and you think the
marriage might not work so you might as
well figure out who is going to get what
before you ever walk down the aisle.

Fax: 242-363-1173

“A good prenuptial agreement is like
an insurance policy that you hope you
never need, but should you have an
emergency whether medical or a natur-
al disaster, you'll be very thankful you do
have it.”

Miss Greene explained that it is often
inappropriate to discuss allocation of
assets during a break-up, — “when feel-
ings are hurt and lives bruised” — as such
conversations require a calm and ratio-
nal approach.

While judges bring experience and
wisdom to individual cases, Miss Greene
noted, their ability to refer to an agree-
ment freely and voluntarily signed by
both parties long before they reached
the courtroom would reduce the arbi-
trary nature of decisions, simplify the
divorce process, free up court time and
most importantly, have the potential to
lessen violence. “It would even save legal
fees.”



i NERISSA Greene

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~ Nassau ticket outlets for
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Sunday December 3rd,
~ RainForest Theatre.

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Tel: 323-1983

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

Monday th
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a



RBDF beating a sign of our times

t is disturbing when law

enforcement officers are
accused of brutally and pub-
licly beating an Inaguan man
last Sunday.

According to The Tribune,
Dexter Wilson, a 27-year-old
Morton Salt marine worker,
was-scevagely beaten by
Defence Force officers in
Tnagua over the weekend.

Reports are that an alterca-
tion occurred at around 3.30am
at the bar of the Supers night-
club (Mathew Town) after Mr
Wilson had began chatting with
a female officer.

Purportedly, a male officer '

objected to the conversation,
instigating a row and allegedly
slapping Mr Wilson in the face.
Locals claimed that subsequent
to this initial confrontation,
about 15 officers mobbed Wil-
son, barbarically beating him.

Locals also claimed that,
although Mr Wilson broke free
and fled, officers chased him,
beating him to a semi-conscious
state while repeatedly dropping
a rock on his head.

Two witnesses of the episode,
Diverne Ingraham and Gerard
Moultrie, whose presence pos-

sibly saved Mr Wilson’s life, .

said the officers approached
them, proceeded to fire gun-
shots into the air and then

‘threatened to kill Mr Wilson

and any witnesses to the vicious
beat down.

Furthermore, witnesses of

the incident have claimed that

~when Mr Wilson was rushed to

the local clinic an officer -sug-
gested to the doctor that he
should “let him die”. Follow-
ing the receipt of medical care
on the island, Mr Wilson was
reportedly sedated and airlifted
to Nassau for emergency treat-
ment and tests. |

hen a group of law
enforcement offi-
cers allegedly engage in a bar
room brawl, with none of them
seemingly having the where-
withal to exhibit leadership and
avert such.a conflict, it must be
apparent that our society has
taken a violent, distressing turn
for the worse. -
If the accusations. that
Defence Force officers behaved
like lawless street fighters in



IADRI



TN

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

GIBSON



Inagua are truthful, new Com-
modore Clifford Scavella must
hurriedly be rid of the bad
apples seeking to further derail
the scandal-ridden RBDF
(which he has pledged to clean
up).
The Inagua fiasco is one of
several incidents involving
Defence Force officers this
year.

In February, American
reporter Mario Vallego, a vis-
iting journalist, was allegedly
attacked by an overly aggres-
sive Defence Force officer at
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre. Since the alleged
assault, very little has been
heard of the investigative out-
come and whether or not any
disciplinary measures were tak-
en.
It is troubling to observe how
many Bahamians, even those
in law enforcement, are becom-
ing violent egomaniacs, who
persist in displaying a blatant
disregard for the lives of others.

Who will protect us when our
protectors begin to conduct
themselves like a violent street
gang? Why is this apparent
streak of brutality now afflicting
almost all of our law enforce-
ment agencies?

enneth Russell; MP

for High Rock, sug-

gested some time ago that

crooks and cowboys are con-

stantly being recruited and

hired by our law enforcement
agencies.

According to Mr Russell, .

several of the young officers
‘being recruited have been
charged or convicted of a crime
and therefore possess a less
than wholesome police record.
If this is so, there is no wonder
why rogue elements within

these organisations persistently .

behave criminally, perceiving
themselves to be above the law
because they wear a uniform.
Are proper vetting proce-
dures being followed when
recruitingiofficers? Are tecruits

—

given psychological evaluations
to ensure that they are mental-
ly stable before placing them
on the streets?

Based upon the allégations
of brutality, the findings of the
Police Tribunal and the count-
less accusations levelled at
police and Defence Force offi-
cers for rape and/or violent
behaviour, it is obvious that
there is more than a handful of
hooligans masquerading as law
enforcement officers.

It has been widely suspected
that certain law enforcement
officers were/are gang mem-
bers who continue to maintain
their association and yet are
allowed to join law enforce-
ment agencies such as the
police, which they use as a plat-
form for “legitimate” retalia-
tion by using the power of the
law.

hen off-duty

Defence Force offi-
cers can carry loaded revolvers
and recklessly fire them, it
reflects: the American-influ-
enced hoodlum mentality now
afflicting many of today’s
youths.

Today, many Bahamian
youngsters prefer the ‘empow-
erment’ of a gun above educa-
tional advancement. This way-
ward frame of mind highlights
the sad reality of the current
social outlook of many Bahami-
an youngsters and is conse-
quently the reason why the rate
of violent crime has soared.

If a female officer was
inclined to converse with any-
one, so be it! Why should a
male officer become jealous or
protective if his colleague .wel-
comed conversation with the

opposite sex, particularly as,

officers are not supposed to
date within their ranks?

Now that some Defence

Force officers have joined the
ever growing list of role mod-

els-turned-fighters, what should:
- parents tell. their.children?

After the Cabinet Room fight

THE TRIBUNE

between MPs Keod Smith and
Kenyatta Gibson, and now the
Inagua mugging, what should
administrators tell students
when they ask why they are
being disciplined?

What example does this set
for the “trigger happy” young-
sters in the inner city?

Now that an investigation has
been launched into the Inagua
pounding, if these officers are
proven guilty, Commodore
Scavella must waste no time in
ridding taxpayers of any bar-
barian who may have perceived
himself to be above the law and
thereby perpetrated such a
heinous act—any such person
belongs in prison:stripes, not
law enforcement uniforms!

LAND REGISTRATION

bout three weeks

ago, my grandmother
bequeathed to me two acres of
property in Long Island, The
property was clearly given asa
‘deed of gift’.

However, in attempting to.

register the property, I discov-
ered that government had insti-
tuted an imprudent policy call-
‘ing for people given property
as gifts to pay a stamp tax.

I was also told that the per-

‘ centage a property holder was

expected to pay must be a frac-
tion of the appraised value of
the property.

If property was given as a
deed of gift, is it fair that I, or
other Bahamians, pay for an
appraisal, then have to turn
around and find the funds to
pay stamp tax on a gift? Is it
right for government to set pol-
icy where Bahamians must pay
anywhere from two to eight per
cent of the property value of a
gift?

After speaking to a former
senior administrator in the reg-
istrar’s office, I have come to
share this individual’s opinion
that “placing stamp tax on
property that was legitimately
given is just another way for
the government to keep their
feet on the necks of poor
Bahamians.” Indeed it is!

If anyone can offer further
insight on this troubling poli-
cy, please e-mail your com-

ments. . 4

ajbahama@hotmail. com



»
ci
@

ICG

La,



rowards the Links safe House for females in crises.








’ Tickets are available at 4 cost of $50.00’and may be
purchased from Floral Arts andfrom members of the Nassau '




mi
Chapter of the Links,
ncorporated.


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 9
We talk to officials, parents and children about how best to
eliminate the problem of low grades and failing achievement

Is it time to separate the sexes? ©







lm By CRYSTAL
JOHNSON-COLLIE

AS politicians and educators
wrack their brains for ways to
improve the ailing public school
system, a long discarded strate-
gy seems to be gaining in popu-
_ larity.

Single-sex schools, never in
the majority, were phased out
decades ago in the Bahamas,
but now parents of children in
both public and private schools
are calling on the government
to resurrect the practice — and
assist in spreading it through-
out the country.

These parents are not alone,
as some teachers echo the sen-
timent, and believe a new
debate is at hand that empha-
sises equality in the classroom
as a remedy to the many prob-
lems that continue to plague
public schools.

An official of the Ministry of
Education commented on the
matter, encouraging parents and
teachers to push for such a
change. “I am quite confident
that may students would be in a
new environment that would
allow them to focus on their
education,” she said.

Teachers who agree with the
single-sex education system say
the government needs to make
the matter a “high priority like
they are making the National
Health Insurance plan, because
a move like this would put the
country on a new level,” as one
put it.

“J think the single-sex edu-
cation system is an excellent
idea. I don’t see it as sexual dis-

‘ crimination as some do. I see it
as a better way of educating our
young men and women in an
environment with less distrac-
tions,” said Anthony Brown, a
high school teacher.

“An all-girls school would be
an amazing start for our young

women as I believe it would °

also be for. our young men.


























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They get to be comfortable and
confident about themselves.
Young girls would minimise the
use of cosmetics to enhance
their beauty for the young men
at school to notice them,” said
another educator.

“Single-sex education is what
I need for my children,” the
mother of two grade 11 students
said. “The system would mean,
smaller classes, less fights over
boyfriend and girlfriend, and
less distractions from both sex-
es, which will allow them to
concentrate on their work.”

Perhaps surprising to some
parents, many of the students
interviewed by The Tribune said
they agree that such a change
would have a positive impact



I see itasa
better way of
educating our

young men and

women in an
environment
with less |
distractions



Anthony Brown,
high school teacher

on their education.

“I think I would be able to
concentrate more in school if
we had the new system. I can’t
focus right now with all the girls
in my class.-who always wear
those short jumpers and come
to school all ‘nice-up’ and look-
ing good, so I could deal with a
change. My education is worth

The



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more than them. After I make
something good of myself in
life, I can choose and refuse
women,” said grade 12 student
Don McKenzie.

Cindy Cartwright, also in
grade 12, said it would be a
good idea because “boys are a
distraction themselves”.

“They go all out in school try-
ing to impress us and are always
fighting and acting wild, so this
system would be nice,” she said.

“The BGCSE examination
scores are very low and that is
something both the ministry
and the government is trying to
hide from the public,” one pri-
vate school teacher noted.

Problems

He added that the govern-

ment should make this problem
a priority, because as each year
passes, thousands of young
Bahamians graduate high
school unskilled and unquali-
fied for a well-paying, decent
job.

“Parents preferring single-sex
education tend to believe that in
the absence of the opposite sex,
their children will develop-more
self-esteem and much likely
encounter role models of the
same-sex in leadership and aca-
demics,” teacher Chelsea Smith
said.

Everyone interviewed agreed
that the biggest question is
whether separating the sexes
would actually improve learn-
ing in the Bahamas.

Researchers at the University

_of London’s Institute of Edu-

cation recently found that all-
girl schools do well in exam
league tables. Their evidence
was released just before the
publication of A-level and
GCSE results which proved that
British women in such institu-
tions have excelled for many
years.

However a few parents intere?':




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PART OF YOUR LIFE

@ A PICTURE from May
1966, when St Augustine’s
College was still an all-male
establishment and girls from

Frances Xavier College joined ©

the swimming team for a con-
test against St Andrew’s

viewed believe that single-sex
education for female students
would not be a good idea. One
explained that in her view, all-
girl schools “would only lead to
too much competition and
pupils will be prone to spiteful-
ness.”

On the other hand, many
believe that the system would
highlight and enhance the aca-
demic achievement of the coun-
try’s young men — who, educa-

tors say, continue to fall behind
“their female counterparts. «- |

-Nature’s Art for a Cause”

An art show of jewelry and home >
accessories made from conch shells,
coconut shells and other natural products

Artists- Dominga Leroy and Maria Hidalgo

St. Anselm’s Catholic Church
Bernard Road, Fox Hill

The Parish Advent Mission will be held Beginning
on Sunday, December 3rd until Tuesday, December
5th, 2006, under the theme “Who Do You .Say: I
Am.” On Sunday the service will begin at 5:00 p.m.
with Evening Prayer, Benediction and the anointing
of the sick. Monday and Tuesday service will begin
7:30 p.m. nightly. On Monday: evening.a service of
reconciliation will take place. Fr. Anselm Russell
OSB of St. Merinard Monastery, Indiana, will
conduct the mission.





Parishioners are encouraged
to attend these services.

ALL are welcomed.

Saturday December 2nd. 2006
10:00am-6:00pm

at Wild Orchid Designs
55 Madeira St., Palmdale

Opposite Micronet Business Technology, East of McDonalds

Telephone: 326-7738

A portion of profits will be donated to
The Cancer Society of The Bahamas.









PAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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La Parfumerie * David Yurman » Dooney & Ba atke ¢ Gaceis Guess * John Bull Business Centre

Blue Lagoon Island

ena

Dolphin Encounters Ltd. is proudly celebrating the birth of three healthy
dolphin calves this fall by hosting a student contest to help name one of
the babies! Students (grades K-12) are invited to submit suggestions for |
the name of one of our newest female dolphins, born to Gégeg on
September 2nd, 2006. Keeping with our Bahamian culture, the name
selected for her must be related to island culture, history or
geography: Submit your ballot along with a reason you feel that name
should be chosen. The student winner will receive a special Dolphin Gift
Kit. AND a free Dolphin Adventure Program for their whole class!

Use this ballot form or download a form at www.dolphinencounters.com.

_ Ballots can be submitted by fax to 394-2244 or emailed to
education@dolphinencounters.com. Be sure to check the list below of
the names of the animals at Blue Lagoon so you don't pick one of
the ones already in use. One submission . per applicant.
Contest ends December 7th; 2006.

Current Names of Marine Mammals at Blue Lagoon Island:

Salvador
Shawn
Soca
Stormy

Phone: 359-0278
or 426-5661

Abaco Dot
Andy Fatman
Aunty V Goombay
Chippy Jake

Torey
Xena

Kalika Murray
Maggie Nina
McGyver Pid,
Miss Merlin Princess

Fax: 394-2244 eee Cente aenca
“Student Name:

Teacher: a
Female name for the baby dolphin:

Why should the name be chosen?

. mony of the





Clifford Darling Complex opened



f= RAYNARD Rigby, Alfred Sears, Ron Pinder and Perry Christie view a Sieschtatan of i images
from the life of Clifford Darling




@ PERRY Christie
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Darling at the
event






i DR Bernard
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namng cere-

National Insur-
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Headquarters
after the for-
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General of the
Bahamas —~

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> Free quarterly seminars with engaging speakers
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> Investments & Savings

Invest in Your...

dreams

“Getting Started: Taking your Business from Dreams to Reality”

Date: Saturday, December 2, 2006
Time: 9am-Spm



Venue: New Providence Community Centre, Blake Rd
Admission: $3 per person



SPEAKERS INCLUDE:
® Michael Halkitis, M.P.,Chairman BAIC
Opening Remarks
e Jerome Gomez, Director, Bahamas Venture Capital Fund
~ “Creative Ways to Fund your Business”
° Philip Simon, Executive Director, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
~ “Future Trends ~An Eye on China"
° Lydia Ferguson, Owner & President, Weight Watchers Bahamas
— “Starting and Maintaining a Successful Business”
° Kendrick Christie, CPA, President of BICA

~ "The Role of Your Chartered Accountant in New Business Ventures”

FEATURING ENTREPRENEURS IN:
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Space is limited, to RSVP call 461-1044 or 461-1035



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THE TRIBUNE



Fake designer
items seized in
warehouse raid

FROM page one

at he had no idea.

I don know because
I'm not into this business not
too Jone you see. | dont
know what (be real price is,”

said,

Police said that it is possi-
ble that Mr Ma could face
fines ranging from $10,060
up to $100,000 or up to five
vears in prison. Moreover,
they said, he could face
penalties from Customs tf
oreeches are discovered.



Inspector Michael Mox-
ey said that the fake prod-
wets will be destroyed.

Authorities to
release three
prisoners
—convic ted in
1983 coup

it ST GEORGE'S,
Grenada





THREE men convicted of
killings in a 1983 coup in Grena-
da that triggered a U.S. invasion
will be released early from
prison for good behavior, offi-
cials said The ursday, according
io Associated Press.

The former soldiers — Cos-
mos Richardson. Andy Mitchell
and Vincent Joseph — will be
freed Saturday after serving 20
years of 30-year sentences, the
Ministry of National Security
said in a statement.

“Under the law governing
sentencing regulations, inmates’
sentences are reduced by one
third if they have been deemed
as being industrious and well
behaved,” the siatement said.
“These inmates have qualitied
for the reduction in their sen-
tences.” i

The three — members of the
so-called “Grenada 17” — were
convicted of manslaughter in the
killings of forrner Prime Minister
Maurice Bishop, four Cabinet
ministers aad six of their sup-
porters on dct. 19, 1983. The
other m f the Grenada
17 were coi of murder and

















“justice,

suspende

FROM page one

means something in the
Bahamas. The law still means
something in the Bahamas.
Contempt is contempt and the
consequence for Sir Jack is that
he could also face jail time, he
can be penalised in fines, he.can
be committed for contempt,”
Mr Smith said.

Earlier this week, the attor-
neys for the family of the late
chairman of tthe GBPA
Edward St George obtained
an order by Supreme Court
Justice Jeanne Thompson giv-
ing them leave to request that
Mr Babak be imprisoned for

being in contempt of court. _..---

One. -of--the~ plaintiff's S
lawyers. former senator Dami-
an Gomez, lold The Tribune
that Mr Babak has failed to
comply with Justice John
Lyons’ order from November 2
to hand over documentation
regarding the operations and
business dealings of the Port

Authority and its affiliates to
the law firm of Callenders and
Co.

The documents, he said, are
needed in the various lawsuits
against Sir Jack, Mr Babak,
and the Port Authority, as the
dispute over the ownership ol
the GBPA rages on. . ,

Mr Smith said yesterday
that his firm Callenders and
Co will be asking for the com-
mittal order to be heard by
Supreme Court Justice Anita
Allen.on Monday morning.

“Following a typical order
on a contempt proceeding, a
person is committed to Fox

‘Hill for a period of six weeks,

with the condition imposed in
the order, that it will not have
effect providing they (the
defendants) purge their con-
tempt,” Mr Smith explained.
Should Justice Allen order

for Mr Babak to be commit-'

ted to prison at a time when
the suspended chairman is still
in Miami, US authorities are
expected to cooperate with the
Bahamas and extradite back
to the Bahamas.

~ “No doubt we could seek to
extradite Mr Babak from the
US to bring him back and face
* Mor Smith said.



eofo7 le NEWS

The Grand Bahama lawye
emphasised that the St George
family has as its first priority to
avoid disrupting business in
Freeport and to allow the
group of companies to oper-
ate effectively despite the
ongoing debate between the
shareholders.

Last Sunday night Justice
























































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Thompson, in an ‘emergency
hearing. ordered Mr Babak be
placed under an injunction,
restraining him trom acting as
chairman or participating in
the management of the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd.

Justice Thompson granted

‘an order appointing joint
* receivers and managers of the

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 11

Motion on oe is served on |
d chairman’s attorneys

Port Group Ltd and the
GBPA in the persons of Clif-
ford Culmer and Miles Culmer
of the chartered accountant
firm BDO Mann Judd.

Mr Smith said yesterday that
Sir Jack and attorney Thomas
Evans, on behalf of the GBPA
and the Port Group Ltd, have
both filed a summons to set





aside this order.

The hearing for this matter
is scheduled for Monday at
11.30am before Justice Alle::.

Mr Smith said that neither.
Sir Jack’s lawyer Gregory
Moss nor Mr Evans served
Callenders and Co with any
affidavits to support their sus:
mons.

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

us
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,

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Phe Luncheon Pilot Club,of Nassau meets ever

MONDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to‘inform the public of its meeting
times and places: New Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the
first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at New Providence Commu-
nity Centre,/Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar,
blood pressure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info
call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every
month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

n CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
day’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hiiton Mondays at 7pm. :

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every
third Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St. f oe



TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday -
6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm. :

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at.5:30pm on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace,
Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more info:

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays
at Nassau.GymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more
info. i

@ CIVIC CLUBS

.sThe Kiwanis Club.of New Providence meets every Tuesday at
7:30pm at the Holy Cross Con

unity Centre: Highbury Park.





eon‘ Pil ‘Tuesday at
SuperClubs Breézes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C C Sweeting
Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickchar-
ney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros.¢ Club 7178 meets each
Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Ter-

. race, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority; Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every

.second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham

Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

\ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm

@ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more
info. : : :

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third Tuesday of
the month at 6pm at the J P Whitney Building; First Terrace,
Collins Avenue. he

- The 8th Annual Harlequin Masked Ball, hosted by the men of

Omega Psi Phi fraternity, will be held Saturday, December 2, at
the Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa. The event will begin
at 8pm with a cocktail reception featuring a selection of choice '
appetizer delicacies, followed by sumptuous dining and entertain-
ment at 9pm. Tickets may be purchased from members of Omega
Psi Phi in New Providence or from Mortimer’s Candy Kitchen ©
(top-of-the-hill, East Street) or Vaughn L Culmer & Associates
Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd (Rosetta Street). . a j

WEDNESDAY



@ ENTERTAINMENT

Express Yourself: Poets, vocalists, musicians, visual artists, story
tellers. dancers, talented people - are invited to an Open Mic
Night @ Da Island Club on West Bay Street (inside the Nassau
Beach Hotel)-the place ay

where “the grown folks hang out”. The evening takes place every
Wednesday night at 8pm. This is the Bahamian cultural expression
that your ears have been craving for in a cool, comfortable and
safe environment. Express Yourself is the brain child of the tal-
ented spoken word artist Mrs. Nadine Thomas Brown. The ses-
sions have developed to showcase Bahamian singers, musicians,
dancers, movie makers, storytellers, sculptors and visual artists.

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednes-
day 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting

times and places: New Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday -

"The brewery of The







Vf












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e EXCITEMEN
continues te mount as
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to kick off-its thir
annual celebration of |
films, events and panels
‘December 7-10. -



6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm
to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the first Wednesday
of every month at 6:30pm at New Providence Community Center
Blake Road. For more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878.
FREE Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas’ Support Group meets every
Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two
doors south of ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors, their family mem-
bers and friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

(
@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every Wednesday
from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always
an interesting speaker and great fellowship. If you would like to
attend our meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@got-
tardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com. ‘

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

’ International Training in Communication, Essence Club #3173

holds its bi-monthly meetings on the ist and 3rd Wednesda: of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public to its regular
weekly meetings held every Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British
Colonial ‘Hilton. Kiwanis -is a worldwid rvice organisation dedi-
cated to changing the world One Child?‘Q@ne Community at a
time." rR, ;




School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo - Free Every
Wednesdays from 10am - 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans
Drive and Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242) 356-2274
now to make Reservations. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sun-
day from 9am - 6pm. Inquire about additional activities and pro-
grammes. : a ! :

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th floor of the Min-
istry of Health, Meeting Street at 6 pm. :

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahamian Talent
Explosion-this and every Thursday night at the Patio Bar & Grill on
Carmichael Road. This event features upcoming Bahamian artist
who are ready. to showcase their original material to the world.
There will also be a freestyle competition every week which is open
to the public at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until
11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

‘@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physicians are
held at Doctors Hospital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room. Free screenings .

.between Spm & 6pm. For more information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday
6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Thursdays
at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or for more
info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and related Chal-
lenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month |
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road. 3

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Bahamas Historical Society is scheduled to hold its next
meeting Thursday, November 30 @ 6pm. Jim Lawlor will give an
address titled "Dr Paul Albury: Rotarian.” The venue is the Muse-
um on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue. After the meeting
Captain Paul Aranha will have copies of his new book "The Island
Airman" for sale.

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast meeting every
Thursday morning at 7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel.
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am) :

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday at 8pm

at the Holy Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are wel-
come. : ’

Please Drink a

ou















THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU

AROUND

YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
“OUT THERE”
' PHOTOGRAPHS ARE

IN THE SUBJECT LINE
WELCOME

ee eenecensecncescnsecece: saccceececsceccessecece: Acc ercesccccccccesescescscsneosocesccccecoo sees



Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and third Thurs-
day at the Ministry of Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Evetyone is welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Professionals,
Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @
Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Baord Retiree Asso-
ciation (NIBRA), meets every fourth Thursday in the month, in
the National Insurance. Board’s (NIB) training room, Wulf Road
office complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meeting every
Thursday at Choices resturant on the campus of the College of the
Bahamas. Fellowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from 1pm to 2pm. meee



\ FRIDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm
to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fridays @ 6pm
to 7pm New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to -
8pm. : ; :

Stop AIDS...Keep the Promise: Commemorate World AIDS Day
December 1 by participating in the creation of a Human Red Rib-
bon in Rawson Square (north side) at 10am OR wear your World
AIDS Day T-shirt on December 1st OR join the AIDS Walk on
Saturday December 2 at 6am. World AIDS Day T-shirts needed
for these events are available at the AIDS Foundation (325-
9326/7) or e-mail: aidsfoundationbahamas@yahoo.com

m@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas will switch on the lights of
their 40 foot Love Tree at 7pm.at the Mall at Marathon on Friday,
November 24. The public is cordially invited to attend this annual
lighting ceremony which signals the beginning of the Christmas
Season. ’

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community
College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each
month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary.
For more info call 325.1947, after 4pm. a

AMISTAD is a club'which promotes the Spanish language and
culture in the community. Residents of the Bahamas who speak
Spanish or are learning Spanish are invited to attend meetings on
the third Friday of the month during the academic year at 7pm in
room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.



SATURDAY

@ HEALTH .

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 10am to 11am.

Stop AIDS...Keep the Promise: Commemorate World AIDS Day
by join the AIDS Walk on Saturday, December 2 at 6am. World
AIDS Day T-shirts needed for these events are available at the
AIDS Foundation (325-9326/7).or e-mail: aidsfoundationba-
hamas@yahoo.com sen

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday, 2:30pm
(except August and December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. Sa

“Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors

Hospital Community Training Representative at 302.4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer
a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will
be held every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle.
Parents interested in registering their children should contact
organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY

® PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, features special
entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean Express -
every Sunday. from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting

times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

ET
Send all your civic and social events
(attach pictures if possible) to

The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net -— Out there in subject line

Responsibly


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS



Eleven brew up
a storm for new

beer naming



i JAMES Sands, president of Bahamian Brewery and Beverage
Company, (second from right) presented winners of the “Name
that Beer Competition” with a $500 cheque on Wednesday at
the site of the new brewery in Freeport. Seen from left are
Christine Garvey; Sarah Kirkby, Barefoot Marketing, lawyer
Fred Sinith, attorney for BBBC; winners Ali Campbell, Deanna
Mosko, Anita Osman, Berndera Hepburn and Agatha Wallace;
model Vanessa Lunn, James Sands, and winner Gary Williams.
Winner Robbie Butler is not present.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
_Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Eleven per-
sons emerged as winners in the
Name that Beer Competition,
splitting the $5,500 cash prize
offered by Bahamian Brewery
and Beverage Company in its

search for two new beer names. .
Nassau businessman Jamés

Sands, who is president of the ~ *

company, is constructing aBise es

million brewery in Freeport. In
an effort to get Grand Bahami-
ans involved in the project, the
launched the compeution on
September 1.
Mr Sands announced that the
-’ name chosen for the first of two
.. beers is ‘Sands’ which was sub-
“mitted by all11 winners.
“It is my family name, and
we have been here 200-plus
years in the Bahamas, and it
makes me very proud to
announce my family name to
be the name of the Bahamian
beer that will be brewed in
Grand Bahama,” he said.
Instead of sharing the original
$3,000 cash prize, which would
have yielded only $273 a piece,
Mr Sands decided to give each
of the winners $500, bringing
the total cash prize to $5,500.
The presentation of cheques

(Photo: Derek Carroll) ;

was held at the brewery’s site

on Queens Highway .on

Wednesday.

The winners were Berndera
Hepburn, Deanna Mosko, Gary
Williams, Robbie Butler, Ali
Campbell, Tavere Kelly, Anita
Osman, Joel Wildgoose, Chris-
tine Garvey, Martin Williams,

and Agatha Wallace.

‘Response

Mr Sands said he was pleased
with the response to the com-
petition, which yielded over
3,798 names submitted by 1,899
entrants.

He said the second name will
be chosen during the Christmas
season from the same batch of
entries, when only one winner
will be. chosen for 3, 000 cash
prize.

The construction of 40,000
square foot brewery is present-
ly underway on 20 acres of land
at the intersection of Queen’s
Highway and Grand Bahama
Way.

The brewery is expected to
open in 2007 and initially
employ about 50 Bahamians.
Eventually, according to Mr
Sands, it will employ up to 150
persons.

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PAGE




FROM page one

again be divided into three sec-

tions - those insured, those who

can pay privately, and finally

those incapable of paying or

who require a government sub-
idly.

Most systems that are simi-
ar, said Dr Brown, the Cana-
dian and the UK system tend
io utilise two sectors predom-

nately the government and
uset/public sector with mini-
inal private sector input.

In resncuse to the problems
bulag experienced by these
cuutitries, he said, they are
now turning more to the pri-
vate sector to assist with reso-
lution.

According to Dr Brown, the
Partnered Care Model is one
that he has developed to
enhance and facilitate the
delivery of advanced health-
care services to the entire pop-
ulation. Through this process,
he said, all patients will receive
the best possible care regard-
less of their ability to pay.

“That’s it in a nutshell. Now
we are talking about advanced
services. Now just getting your
blood tested for your sugar,
that is not an advanced ser-
vice. That is a general service.
The advanced services there-
fore would be; initially at the
Heart Centre, things like
nuclear cardiology, open-heart
surgery, angioplasty and





























14, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

stents, and pacemakers.
“More recently for cancer
care, the most expensive part
of cancer care is radiation
therapy where you can have a
bill easily from anywhere from
$10,000 to $90,000. Open heart
surgery is a $25,000 to $40,000
dollar write up for the less
expensive forms. So we’re
talking big money. So the
Partnered Care Model was
developed to provide those
services to people irrespective
of their ability to pay,” he said.
The plan in its simplicity
would take the burden off the
government of having to con-
tribute millions of dollars as
private investors would

‘finance the facility and its var-

ious services as at the Cancer
Centre and the physician com-
munity. However, of the most
vital importance would be the
discounted service that would
be provided. j

Basing an example on the
Medical Association of the
Bahamas’ (MAB) fee sched-
ule Dr Brown explained the
discounted system and the fee
schedule.

“So the MAB puts out a fee
schedule and that’s the one we

_use as our base schedule. Any
schedule after that has to be _

lower than that, not higher
because this is a discounted
system. So the insured patients





LOCALNEWS ._

Cardiologist with idea of NHI’

gets the Medical Association
fees schedule and let’s say the
service costs $100 — that’s
what they get charged.

“Then the private self-pay
patient, who does not have
insurance, he is obviously pay-
ing cash, so he gets a cash dis-
count of let’s say 25 per cent.
Which also makes it easier for
him to'access it because it isn’t
costing him as much because if
he could have afforded insur-
ance chances are he would
have had it. So you have facil-
itated him.

“And now the final and
most important group is the
guy who cannot afford insur-
ance, nor can he afford to go
private. So that is your typi-
cal government or public
patient and they receive a 50
per cent discount. He has to
go to PMH. I work at both
hospitals both PMH and Doc-
tor’s, and I have my own pri-
vate heart centre, but I like to
know that I’m treating Tom,
Dick, and Harry, Mary, Sue,

and Paula, as long as they can '

benefit from our services,” he
said.

Dr Brown explained that his
model will provide the high-
est level of service for all
patients, minimizing long lines,
and equating those without

any private insurance to those

with the highest level.





With this in mind, Dr Brown
said that he took grave excep-
tion to being painted with the
political pandering that he and
other doctors were objecting
to the NHI plan because they
didn’t care about the poor.

“That is extremely offensive
and insulting when the politi-
cians do that. Because there
are people like myself who
have gone out on a limb for
our poor people — I am also a
consultant at PMH where I
help to take care of poor peo-
ple every day of the week for
the last 16 years — since 1990.

“So don’t tell me nothing
about we,don’t care about the
poor people. That’s a prob-
lem. And that’s where you'll
find most of the doctors will
go off the deep end and that’s
where you’ll get most of your
rage. Because you’re insulting
the integrity of people in our
profession when you do that,”
he said.

Dr Brown is also the direc-
tor of the Cardiology and
Interventional Associates. He
is stationed at the Bahamas
Heart Centre and the Cancer
Centre in which he and part-
ners (mainly Bahamian physi-
cians) have invested close to
$20 million in both of the
“state-of-the-art” facilities on

‘Collins Avenue at the Centre-

ville Medical Pavilion.

ont





“petition urging

THE TRIBUNE




NHI ‘slowdown’

FROM page one

past president of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and

? ‘consultant to the Coalition,

said that the signatures are
continuing to come in on a
“steady basis.”

In addition to the signa-
tures, Mr Rolle, said that the
comments and expressions
of concern by the people
have been of the “greatest
value” to the Coalition.

“People are obviously hav-
ing major concerns, espe-
cially when it comes to their
private health insurance.
They are asking questions
like ‘what is going to happen
to my private health insur-
ance, what is going to hap-

pen to all the money I have.

already invested?’
“These are all issues that
the Coalition will address,”

store

HARBOUR BAY
_ SHOPPING PLAZA

- PHONE: 394-7040

a

Mr Rolle said.
Representing a cross-sec-
tion of members of the coun-
try’s business organisations,
labour unions and profes-
sional medical groups, the
Coalition in principle sup-
ports a national healthcare
plan for all Bahamians.
However, the group
believes that insufficient
information has been pro-
vided to the public about the
NHI plan as proposed by the
Blue Ribbon Commission
and its steering committee.
The Coalition is recom-
mending that government
should make the upgrading
of present healthcare infra-
structure its number one pri-
ority.
The group is further calling

4

on government to implement |

the NHI plan ina ‘phase-in’
approach and to allow the

public to retain. the right to.

choose theit insurance and
healthcare providers.

that he is pleased. with Prime
Minister Perry Christie’s dec-
laration in parliament on
Wednesday that the consul-

holders will continue.

“It was encouraging to
hear him say that the con-
sultation is still ongoing; that
he’s prepared to sit in a room

cuss the issues that need: to
be discussed. That’s what we
have been asking for from
our inception,” he said...

Mr Rolle: said that. the

provide further details on the
NHI plan by today. | -

analytical work and prov
anput,” he said. a
i ae Si dhaseoed Me

John S. George

Here so help, every step of the ways

Mr Rolle yesterday said -

tation process with all stake-

and close the door and dis-













PONAN

a de?

Ministry’*of: Health has .
promised the Coalition to’

“Once we have that infor-
mation, we will begin our .

Py
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 15



Call for politicians supporting
NHI to receive treatment at PMH

ALL politicians backing the
government’s national health
plan should stop seeking treat-
ment at the Mayo Clinic and
other foreign healthcare facili-
ties and stand in line at Princess
Margaret Hospital, it was sug-
gested yesterday.

“If they like the NHI so
much, let’s make it a condition
that all politicians, including
Cabinet ministers, become a
part of it so that all their treat-
ment is also done at PMH,” said
a civil servant who resents being
subjected to what he regards as
a health tax.

The source cited several
instances in recent years where
senior Bahamian politicians had
turned their backs on local
treatment to seek healthcare
elsewhere.

He said Prime Minister Perry
Christie had gone to Johns
Hopkins Hospital in Maryland
following his stroke last year.

Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell took his annual check-
ups at the Mayo €linic:in the
United States.

And Minister of State for
Finance James Smith had, he
claimed, also sought treatment
in.Washington DC.





Store Hous

Swaday~Thusday tlam~ t2 Nignight Pent bucava Mente Pace
Feletaty & Skandia " Whara~tpra Quran:s Miginoen

“What’s more, the Deputy
Prime Minister’s husband also
went for treatment abroad
when he was ill last year,” said
the civil servant.

“As far as I’m aware, he went
to Mount Sinai in Florida,” he
added.

If the PLP. hierarchy is so
keen on a national health ser-
vice for all, “let them stand in
line with the rest of us at PMH,”
he said.

In addition, the plan should
include a five per cent contri-
bution from everyone earning
over $75,000 a year - anda
major annual donation from the
Bahamas Christian Council,
which has come out in support
of the scheme.

“They claim they are loving
and caring - well, let’s see them
come up with some of the mon-
ey needed to make this thing
work,” he added.

The civil servant, who feared
victimisation if hé revealed his
name, said: “They are planning
to tax me and send me to PHM.
But.will they be standing in line
as well?”

His comments came as the
NHI debate gained momentum,
with the prime minister declar-

ing that the mandatory contri-
butions were not a tax, and that
the PLP’s promotion of NHI

was not an election ploy.

However, opponents of the
scheme say it is unworkable
because the budget set aside to
fund it is hopelessly inadequate.

They also claim that the PLP
has introduced the bill in the
run-up to the election in the
hope of retaining the working-
class vote - and diverting press
attention away from a string of



e !
Hip-ho
pee
ImMmusician
e e e@
in Haiti
HAITIAN-BORN
hip-hop musician Wyclef
Jean puts a bandanna
with the Haitian flag on
the head of a boy in
Jacmel, a small south-
‘eastern port city some
110 miles from Port-au-
Prince, Haiti, Thursday,
Nov. 30, 2006. Wyclef will
hold.a concert in Haiti
tomorrow. :

(AP Photo/
Ariana Cubillos)



lm PRINCESS Margaret Hospital

our favorite «



scandals which have rocked the
government in recent months.
Medical sources have claimed


























that a scheme matching
Britain’s National Health Ser-
vice - itself the target of fierce
criticism because of alleged
under-funding - would cost the
Bahamas at least $1.2 billion,
instead of the $235 million sug-
gested by the government. And
that’s without taking into
account the fact that health
costs are higher here.

They fear that an under-
resourced health service would
penalise everyone, forcing
employers to abandon their cur-
rent insurance arrangements to
the detriment of their work-

‘force, and leaving ordinary

Bahamians with a health ser-
vice that can’t deliver.
Yesterday, Independent MP
Pierre Dupuch raised what
many critics see as the biggest
fault in the plan - the presence

of between 40,000 and 100,000
Haitians in the country, all of
whom would be seeking ‘free’ -
health care under the scheme.
He also raised the same con-
cern as the civil servant, asking .
the government why a $60,000 a
year income. ceiling had been
imposed in determining the lev-
el of contributions.
“Why don’t we get the money
he (the poor man) would be
aying from the guy who makes
100,000, $200,000, or

~ $500,000?” .

He said the money should be
coming from the rich - not the
poor, who the government was
claiming to support.

Mr Dupuch said that, in the
circumstances, the scheme
would be seen as mainly a vote-
catcher.

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Raising a glass to annual ‘Festival

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama — If
you are “a regular” at Festival Noel,
you know what to expect — a glitter-
ing setting with tasty wines, delicious
foods, fabulous art and jewelry.

However, if you have never attend-
ed the annual event, which is the
main fundraiser for the Grand
Bahama branch of the Bahamas
National Trust, then you are in for a
treat on Friday, December 1. .

Festival Noel, to be held at the
Rand Nature Centre, is primarily a
wine tasting soiree.

Bristol Wines and Spirits is the
sponsor for this portion of the event
and will bring to the table many
wines from all over the world.

Upon entry into the event, atten-
dees will be given a card that details
each wine. “You can make notes
about the wines you’ve tried and
know the pricing so you'll be able to
purchase them later from Bristol
Wines and Spirits,” explained one
organiser. “The variety of wines will
range from the very pricey ‘to the
more affordable. So you can enjoy
a taste of something really special
that you may never be able to afford,













Blayesne Bude, apie ae iad ea ae.

but also become familiar with vari-
eties of wine that are more in your
price range.”

Art is being showcased as well,
with the feature artist being Bahami-
an legend Eddie Minnis.

Mr Minnis, will be joined by his
talented daughter and fellow artist
Nicole Minnis-Ferguson.

Many other local artists will all be
displaying and selling their fines:
works.

A new sponsor of the festival this
year is John Bull, a company estab-
lished in 1929 that has become a tra’
dition of shopping excellence in the
Bahamas.

Starting out as an old English
tobacco house in Nassau, John Bull
now represents many of the world's
most sought after brand name luxu-
ty goods. Product categories include
watches, fine jewellery, leather goods,
perfume, cosmetics, photographic
equipment, writing instruments and
cigars.

At the festival, John Bull has
arranged for some special items to
be offered for a silent auction in sup-
port of the Rand Nature Centre.

These include a Dooney and Burke
hand bag and wallet; his and hers
watches from Movado; a leather doc-
ument case, brief case and leather
portfolio by Kenneth Cole; a ster-
ling silver key ring by Dorfman.
Also up for auction will be special
gift items and packages from Ani-
male, La Spa at La Belle, La Dolce
Vita, the Pub at Port Lucaya, Bristol
Wines and Spirits, Top Notch and a
special piece from Eddie Minnis.
While attendees are sampling the
fine wines and perusing the art and
jewelry, they will be fortified by sam-

plings from many Grand Bahama’

restaurants.

Each restaurant will be competing
to be the coveted Chef Noel at Fes-
tival.award and featured for the gala
event will be returning champion
Iries Restaurant.

They are bringing with ihe Chine
Beach, another well known restau-
rant from Our Lucaya.

Added to this will be Old Bahama
Bay, chefs from the School of Hos-
pitality, the Harbour Room, Joe Ret
and new comer the Grouper Grill
from Ocean Reef and Yacht Club.

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business@tribunemedia.net

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



Attorney: NHI Bill breaches

constitution, Fr

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

prominent
Bahamian
attorney yes-
terday told
The Tribune
“he was likely to file a legal
challenge to the Government’s
proposed National Health
Insurance (NHI) Bill when it is
passed, on the grounds that it is
‘unconstitutional and breaches
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.
_ Fred Smith, a partner with
-Callender’s & Co, told The Tri-
bune that the NHI scheme
could be unconstitutional
because it allegedly breaches
Article 128 of the Bahamian
‘constitution. :

This article, which comes
under Chapter 9, dealing with.
the nation’s finances, stipulates
that all tax revenues collected

by the Government of the
Bahamas are to be paid into
the Consolidated Fund, Mr
Smith said.

However, the Government
is proposing that under its NHI
scheme, contributions - set at
5.3 per cent of a salaried work-
er’s monthly income, to be split
50/50 between employer and
employee - be paid into a
National Health Insurance
Fund.

This will be separate from
the Consolidated Fund, and
managed and controlled by a
10-member National Health
Insurance Commission.

Emphasising that he sup-
ported the principle of univer-
sal healthcare access for all, Mr
Smith said: “I’m all for provid-
ing healthcare for every
Bahamian. It’s not the provi-
sion of services, but the law-
fulness of the approach. I sup-
port universal healthcare. How

it is achieved
is a different
matter.”
And Mr
Smith added
that because
NHI contri-
butions were
an .income
tax, they
could not be
levied in
Freeport as a
result of the



@ SMITH

Hawksbill

Creek Agreement.

He drew attention to the
1955. agreement’s Clause 2,
Sub-Clause 8, which stipulates

that no taxes - including

income taxes -.can be levied

against “the earnings of a:

licensee in the Port area” or
against “any salaries and remu-
nerations” paid to employees
of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and their licensees”,



eport Act

Fred Smith plans challenge on seounds fa National
Health ‘tax’ contravenes Hawksbill Creek Agreement

provided they live in the Port

area.
Although the tax exemption

=") initially lasted for 35 years, Mr

Smith said it, was extended by

the 1993b Freeport Act until»
» . 2018 (see other story on this

page).
He told The Tribune yester-
day: “The Prime Minister is

talking nonsense, of course...

The National Health Insurance
contributions, under the
intended scheme, area tax.
They. are nothing more, and
nothing less, than a tax on
income.

“Since they are to- ‘Be

received, held and adminis- ~

tered by the National oe

Insurance Fund, they are

unconstitutional. The constitu-
tion requires that all taxes’be

paid into the Consolidated .
- an Appropriations Bill, and

Fund.”

Mr Smith said this part of
the Constitution flowed from
the British model it was based
upon, and the abolition of the
monarchy’s - or executive’s -
powers to spend money with-
out reference to Parliament.

This, he added, was done to
ensure elected MPs could
“determine and approve where
the taxpayer’s money is spent
next year”, remaining account-
able to the people for how
their funds were used.

In the Bahamas, final esti-

mates of revenues and expen-

diture had to be laid in the
House of Assembly by the
Minister of Finance, along with

voted on by MPs.

“The collection of funds out-
side Parliament’s control is the
mischief Article 128 seeks to
protect the Bahamian public
from,” Mr Smith said.

“This approach to legislation
is typical of all governments,
all administrations, who regu-
larly fail to take into account
the precepts of the constitu-
tion ‘and the unique position
of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-

“ment in the jurisprudence of

the Bahamas.



NIB case sets stage for Bay | Street awaits the bleachers ‘nightmare’

1 Smith’s NIB

o By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EVEN if National Health
Insurance (NHI) contributions
are payable in the rest of the

"*. Bahamas, attorney Fred Smith

argued yesterday that because
they are an income tax they do

not have to be paid by busi- —

nesses and residents in
. Freeport due to the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.
' He pointed out that he had
partially won a similar legal
action he brought in 1988
against the then Minister of
Housing and National Insur-
ance. In a case that went all the
way to the Privy Council, the
ultimate court of appeal for the
Bahamas backed Mr Smith’s
contention that contributions
to the National Insurance
Board (NIB) were a tax, but
ruled that they were not an
income tax, but one based on
being employed.

Revealing that he was con-
sidering mounting a similar
challenge to the Government’s

‘challenge’

proposed NIB scheme, once

the Bill becomes law, Mr Smith
told The Tribune: “If they pass
this legislation, I will seek a
declaration first, as a citizen of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, that if the tax is col-
lected it must be paid into the

‘Consolidated. Fund, and I will
challenge whether itis payable .

in Freeport as a tax on the
earnings of a licencee.”

' Mr Smith argued that
because NHI contributions
were an income tax, they could
not be levied in Freeport as a
result of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement.

He drew attention to the —

1955 agreement’s Clause 2,

-Sub-Clause 8, which stipulates
that no taxes - including

income taxes - can be levied
against “the earnings of a

-licensee in the Port area” or
against “any salaries and remu-. °

nerations” paid to employees

of the Grand Bahama Port

SEE page 4B

Law firms gain top rating

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

_ FOUR Bahamian law firms
have been ranked in Tier 1 -
the top possible ranking - by
a major international publica-
tion that reviews and rates the
world’s top attorneys.

’ Graham, Thompson & Co,
Higgs & Johnson, Lennox
Paton and McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes have all been
ranked as Tier 1 law firms by
the IFLR 1000, a publication of
the Legal Media Group.

In its assessment of the top
Bahamian law firms, the IFLR
said a number of the major
Bahamian commercial banks
- Commonwealth Bank, Sco-
tiabank and Bank of the
Bahamas International - were
clients of Graham, Thompson
& Co, which advised them on
. transactions, corporate and
project finance, and regulatory
issues. ..

The IFLR added that the
company benefited from
strong links with the Bahamian
government, due to the pres-
ence among its partners of
attorneys such as ex-attorney

{
t

general Sean McWeeney. Oth-
er prominent partners were
named as Michael Barnett,

Craig Roberts and Dana Wells. °

Meanwhile, Higgs & John-
son was said to be benefiting
from the high level of foreign
direct investment projects in
the Bahamas, acting as. adviser
to the Royal Bank of Canada,

_ JP Morgan Chase and Royal

Bank of Scotland. The latter,
the IFLR said, was the major
bank investor in foreign direct
investment projects.

The review said Higgs &
Johnson had actea as Bahami-
an attorneys to a group of
banks lending $548 million to
Bahamian-incorporated com-
panies; represented another
bank in a $100 million ship-
ping industry financing;
advised a Norwegian bank on

providing a $110 million cred- ||

it facility to a Bahamas ship-
ping firm; and advised on a $90
million loan to a Bahamian
firm to buy property in Lon-
don.

Higgs & Johnson was also

SEE page 7B

= By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL —

Tribune Business Reporter make

2
Stores ‘lucky if they-get.10 good.pre-Christmas shopping days’



BAY Street merchants are about to
enter “the nightmarish” Christmas shop-
ping period, blaming potential losses in
revenues and profits on the Junkanoo

bleachers that block access and visibility of .

their storefronts.

Charles Klonaris, chairman of the Nas-
sau Tourism Development Board
(NTDB), said that once again Bay Street

retailers were being forced to endure the »

inconvenience of the bleachers, resulting
in a loss of Christmas spirit.

“The. bleachers are always a concern.
They are an obstruction that disrupts the
entire city for just two days at the busiest

F

time of the ne Klonaris said.

The situation is:so bad that merchants
are increasingly losing hope that they will
make a strong profit during the period
between Thanksgiving and New’s Year
Day.

They are lucky if they get 10 good

shopping days in right before Christmas,”.

the NTDB chairman added.

Mr Klonaris said:the bleachers block
the entire downtown area, and are a nui-
sance to store owners, taxi drivers,
motorists and pedestrians.

“This is a problem that seriously needs
to be addressed before they spend mil-











lions of dollars on a Bay. ‘Street redevel-
opment plan. Retailers are. very depen-
dent on their holiday sales, but the place-
ment of the bleachers drastically cuts into
profits,” he added.

Mr Klonaris noted that despite many
meetings on the subject, suggestions for a
suitable alternative such as increasing
manpower to put the bleachers up as late

__as possible have not been heeded.

“I want to emphaise that we are not
against Junkanoo. It is a major part of our

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





women



THE 500-member strong
DREAMS _ Investment
Group, which aims to assist
Bahamian women in taking
their business from dreams
to reality, will host its first
one-day Entrepreneurial
Seminar and Tradeshow on
December 2.

The Seminar and
Tradeshow, to be held at
New Providence.Community
Centre, Blake Road, from
9am until 3pm, is intended
to educate DREAMS mem-
bers and the general public
on the steps to take to
become entrepreneurs.

It will also focus on how
businesswomen, can maintain
what they have started, while
promoting products and ser-
vices of already-established
entrepreneurs.

Organisers

One of the organisers,
Cecillia Cox, manager of
financial services and invest-
ments at British American
Insurance Company,
explained: “The average per-
son works for someone else,
with a person or a company
for three-quarters of their
lifetime.

Many persons wonder how
they can turn hobbies - and
even professions - into their
own businesses. The hardest
part is getting started and
that’s what we hope to
inspire people to do.”
British American Insur-































achieve

business DREAMS

ance helped to establish the
DREAMS group.

Some of the topics to be
addressed are Creative ways
to fund your Business, which
will be presented by Jerome
P. Gomez, director of the
Bahamas Venture Capital
Fund, and Future Trends —An
eye on China, presented by
Philip Simon, executive
director, Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce.

Kendrick Christie, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Insti-
tute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA), will also speak
on The role of your Charted
Accountant in New Business
Ventures.

In addition to the presen-
tations by these speakers,
there will be entrepreneurs
featuring a local clothing line,
t-shirts with Bahamian slo-
gans, hand crafted hand bags,
skin and hair care products,
an accounting firm, and
Bahamian-made products.

All attendees will be able
to view and purchase these
fine products at reasonable

. cost.

Some of the benefits from
the seminar will include see-
ing and hearing how others
got started, learning how
hobbies and/or professions
can become high-income
generating businesses, learn-
ing how to plan for contin-
ued success, and financing
and expanding your product
or service into the Family
Islands.






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60 w.p.m.

Ability to work flexible schedules as evenings and weekends are essential at times.
An Associate’s degree in business administration/hospitality management,

would be an asset.

Security Officers: Mature, dependale physically and emotionally strong and directed
individuals are required for these positions, Responsible for property and guest protection,
ensuring accident prevention and safety and security for guests and team members within

the hotel.

The position requires the following:

e Asuccessful track record with 2-3 years experience in security management preferably
with the hospitality environment

¢ Strong observation skills with keen attention to details

¢ Excellent communication skills with the ability to produce accurate reports
¢ Focused and disciplined individual with the ability to adhere to and enforce compliance
with company safety and security standards.
e Sound customer and team relation skills.
e Ability to work shifts, weekends and holidays.
Credible high school education essential with BGCSE passes in at least two sublects
including English Language.

Individuals who meet the above requirements are invited to forward their resumes to:

Deadline: December 5, 2006



The Human Resource Department |
BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON, NASSAU
1 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-302-9040
Email: recruitment@hilton.com

The primary purpose of '

Business

_ Sense



culate the likely response you
are going to get.

* To reduce your returns. By
following up after a sales or
service call, you.can keep your
product returns to a minimum.

* It is flexible. You can use it
to introduce your product, new
initiatives, build traffic on your
shop floor, test your pricing,
and sell larger pre-order items
that you don’t want to keep‘in
stock

If you want to send out direct
mail, you will.need to follow
the following steps:

Step 1: COMPILE A LIST -

~ You will need to compile a list

of people to send your mailing
to. You have two choices:

* Compile your own list —
Lists are time consuming to
create and take a lot of effort to
keep up to date. If this is the
way you want to go, get some-
one-to start collecting and
recording all your customer
data information, from past
invoices, accounts, files, sales
receipts, warranties and phone
messages. Then create.a cen-
tral list with as much informa-

.tion as possible to include

name, address, telephone num-
ber, e-mail, purchasing histo-
ry.

Specify whether they are
large, medium or small
spenders according to volume.
Then categorise them as active,
prospective, and inactive. Get
your sales people to capture
this data from everyone who
comes into your shop.

* Rent a list.- There are

" mafly thailing lists that you can)
rent, containing information

HES





about just about any type of
individual you wish to target

’ for your mailings based on
demographic, behavioural and |

geographic data. If you want
to send your mail to Democ-

| ratic voting, defrocked priests

who live in California, there is
bound to be a list there for you.
These lists are not cheap, but
can be extremely profitable to
you.

Step 2: WRITE YOUR
COPY - You need to give your
customers a compelling reason
to buy by creating.an irre-
sistible proposition. This area is

dealt with in detail in my pre- .

vious column, Writing Great
Copy, and in next week’s col-
umn, which deals with Direct

Response Marketing.

Step 3: THINK OF WAYS
TO GET YOUR MONEY UP
FRONT - You should always
be trying to get your money up
front. Consider the following
methods:

* Give the customer a gift
for making the order.

* Offer to take payment by
credit card.

* Offer a Quid Pro Quo. -
Let the customer know that:by
getting money up front, you
can save on collection costs and
you are passing this saving on
to them.

* Link money up front to a
special price or special time-
frame offer.

* Offer to pay the shipping,
or offer to send the product
COD if the customer orders
within a specified time period.

* Offer a Toll Free Number

to encourage people to pick up

the phone and pay.

Step 4: CREATE YOUR
PACKAGE - Make sure your
direct mail package includes a

letter, a brochure if. possible; he
reserved:

an order form and a reply

envelope.

You are now ready to go and
send out a mailing. Here are

3

‘
a

y
4

some tips for a successful direct

‘mail campaign:

Tip 1: Make sure you Follow

Up - Follow up your customers —

and prospects. Keep making
offers regularly, every two
weeks or every month, espe-
cially in slow periods. See what
works and stick to it.

- Tip 2: Clean Your Databases
— Lists get out of date quickly,
so make sure the dead people,
and people who don’t want to
be written to, are removed.
This will take time. There are
companies that can clean your
lists for you.

Don’t be an antipreneur and
make the following mistakes:

* Ignore the power of Direct
Mail

* Use outdated prospect lists

* Write poor.copy in your

~ mailing
* Forget to ask for money up

front

Marketing your business is. ;

an important area and will

require constant effort. So, in ~

order to avoid the trap of’

antipreneurship, make sure you
spend time on direct market-

“ing, as this exercise could bring
in extra sales for your compa-—

ny.

NB: Adapted from his
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How to Avoid It,

Mark draws on 20 years of top ~

level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He
is chief operating officer of

. www.ezpzemail.com, current-

ly lives in Nassau, and can be

contacted at markalex-—

palmer@mac.com

Cet

© Mark Palmer. All il rights Be

i}

WE'RE MOVING

Royal Bank of Canada Trust _
Company (Bahamas) Limited is
pleased to announce that on
December 4, 2006 it will be

Royal Bank

of Canada

Trust Company
is on the move

Sey www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

© Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC ar

Pun oa Mena

changing its place of business to

Bayside Executive Park
Floor 2, Building #3
Blake Road and West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 702 5900
Fax (242) 327 7382

The postal address for the
company will remain

PO Box N-3024

Nassau, NP, Bahamas

Royal Bank

of Canada
Se

RCA AN

Le SD DG



a as

wd ae ae

“ne

Oe

~ rw woe wae
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 3B



a se Eee eee eee

$428k subsidy
saves PUC from
six-figure loss

m By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter

WITHOUT government’s
$428,440 subsidy, the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC)
would have incurred an oper-.
ating loss of $373,547 for fis-
cal year 2005, its audited report
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly has revealed.

According to the Ernst and
Young audit tabled by Prime
Minister Perry Christie, the
Government gave the telecom-
munications sector regulator
$428,440 for the year ending
June 30, 2005.

The report also revealed that

Cable

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas last night
announced that its 2006 third
quarter net income had risen
by 31.5 per cent to $4.646 mil-
lion compared to 2005, with
the company deciding to con-

tinue its share repurchase pro- .

gramme on the open market.
Apart from the increase in
net income upon the $3.534

Aalto
AN
Pea a tel ee aT Core)
Secale Relea neon AOL)
IC tere NUL
arlene alec
eronraciem MMe UL

Bu her Meta eis
: Available to recent
Earn your degree in

net income for the year was
$54,893, compared to the
$317,003 recorded for 2004. ¢

The PUC’s retained earnings
at the beginning of the year,
previously reported at
$875,141, fell to a deficit of
$485,265 due to adjustments
made to its 2004 accounts
worth $1.36 million.

Ernst and Young explained
that the adjustments to the
earnings had to be made
because the accounting for the
PUC’s defined benefit pension
plan in previous years did not
correctly reflect the costs of
the plan, and its related pen-
sion assets and liabilities.

In addition, government

profits

million achieved during the

three months to September 30,
2005, Cable Bahamas added
that for the first nine months in
its current financial year, net
income was up by 28.4 per cent
to $13.36 million compared to
$10.409 million.

Gross revenues for the three
months to September 30 were
ahead by 16.4 per cent at
$16.683 million, compared to
$14.329 million, while for the

subsidies were incorrectly
reported as contributed capital
rather than included in income
for prior years. A capital con-
tribution in 2001 was incor-
rectly included in income.

The report indicated that the
PUC’s income relies heavily
on the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC),
from which it collected
$968,036 in phone service and
$174,800 in cellular fees.

The PUC also collected
$193,435 in fees from ZNS for
radio communications.

In addition, the PUC has
the right to collect revenue
derived from the issuance of
radio communications as a

erOow

year-to-date, revenues were up
just over 15 per cent at $48.426
million.

Operating expenses, though,
had been relatively well-con-
tained, standing 11.3 per cent
and 10 per cent up for the third
quarter and first nine months
respectively, at $8.352 million
and $24.148 million.

Operating income for, the
2006 third quarter was 22 per
cent ahead of last year, stand-



result of a partnership
between the Bahamas Mar-
itime Authority (BMA) and
BTC.

The agreement allows the
BMA to collect all the licence
revenues for the Commission
and then to retain a percentage
of those revenues for its ser-
vices.

According to the audit, the
revenue owed to the PUC

from this arrangement is .

$706,374, with $339,060 owed
by it to the BMA.

The amount BTC owed the .
_ PUC had increased to $314,994

at 2005 year-end, compared to
$56,480 a year earlier, a more
than fivefold increase.

41.5%

ing at $8.331 million compared
to $6.817 million, while for the
year-to-date it was 20.8 per
cent up at $24.278 million com-
pared to $20.099 million.

Net income per ordinary
share was $0.23, compared to
$0.18 the previous year, while
for the first nine months it

stood at $0.67 as opposed to _

$0.52.





FULL COLOR
PRESSMAN
Needed

MUST BE EXPERIENCED IN PRINTING
HIGH QUALITY WORK ON A’

5 COLOR HEIDELBERG

(minimum 5 years experience)

Call: 394-8667

Exclusive Boutique
Resort & Spa
Recruiting
Passionate, pemonable and Honest

Individuals who have at least 3 years experience in
the Hospitality Industry to fill the following |
"positions:

Executive Chef
Food and Beverage Manager
* Boutique Manager
Room Division Manager |
Spa Manager
Spa Therapist
Maintenance Supervisor
Entertainment Coordinator
Concierge .
Receptionist
Maitre D
Bartenders
Waiters
Housekeeping
Bellman
Security Personnel
Beach/Pool Attendant

All applications are appreciated but only qualified
individuals will be considered. Applications must
be received before December 22, 2006. Our email
address is stephmresort@ yahoo.com or you can
mail it.to.AP-59223 Slot 440, Nassau, Bahamas.



INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of the
Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased to advise
that the cheque disbursement for ALL students in the Loan Program will take
place at Holy Trinity Activity Centre, Stapledon Gardens, beginning December
4 to December 8, 2006, from 9:00am to 3:00pm as follows::

NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS

Surnames

Lyset a Loe

Monday, December 4, 2006
Tuesday, December 5, 2006
Wednesday, December 6, 2006
Thursday, December 7, 2006
Friday, December 8, 2006

TIME: 9:00AM - 3:00PM
PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre

Stapledon Gardens

Returning Students and/or Guarantors should be present and must
bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance

Card).

New Students and Guarantors should be present and bring relevant
identification, (valid Passport, National Insurance Card, current
job letter and copy of a utility bill).

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation
has been completed.



ae
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



NIB case sets stage for Smith’ NIB ‘cl

initially lasted for 35 years, Mr
Smith said it was extended by
the 1993b Freeport Act until
2018.

The full clause in question
reads: “ That for 35 years from
the date of this Agreement no
taxes of any kind shall be
levied upon or against the
earnings of the Port Authority

FROM page 1B

Authority and their licensees”,
provided they live in the Port
area.

Although the tax exemption

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good-cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












RELATIONSHIP MANAG

Trust & Corporate Services



A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of ervices to local and
international clients. .









|
An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter wit
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporat
Services team. The successful candidate will report atitly. to the Senior

Relationship Manager.





















Core Responsibilities

= Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust, estates
and agencies.

# Provide financial information to clients as requested.

® Acton clients’behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

= Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

"Bachelor's Degree in Business or related eiscipIng from a well ue
university.

= A minimum of five years progressive’ Fiduciary pxperiengee Financial
Services Industry.

= STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.
» ® ~ Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

® Strong interperscnal, communication, problem solving, projeet
management and customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 10, 2006







‘ Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

Email: recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs

_ www.butterfieldbank.bs







BIS

Pricing Information As Of:
30 November 200 6 .

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas X
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdi

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per eae paid in the last 12 months

_ MARKET TERMS

* in the Port Area and outside

the Colony or upon or against
the earnings of a Licensee in
the Port Area and outside the
Colony or against any rentals
or licence fees paid by any
lessee or by a Licensee to the
Port Authority or upon or
against any interests or divi-
dends paid by the Port Author-
ity or by any lessee company of
the Port Authority or by a
Licensee to the holders of the
evidences of indebtedness
and/or shares or other securi-
ties of the Port Authority or
of the company holding such
lease from the Port Authority
or of a licensee or upon or
against any salaries and remu-
neration by way of bonus par-
ticipation in profits commis-
sion or otherwise paid by the
Port Authority or by any lessee
from the Port Authority or by
a Licensee to any person
employed by the Port Author-
ity or by such lessee or by a
Licensee within the Port Area.
Provided that the person
receiving such salary and/or
remuneration is ordinarily res-
ident within the Port Area."
Recalling the 1988 case, Mr
Smith said he had sought a

declaration that, as a Port
Authority licencee, he did not
have to National Insurance
contributions because they
were a tax he was exempt form
paying as a result of that
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
clause.

He added that while he lost
his case at the Supreme Court,
the Court of Appeal via a
majority verdict held it was a
tax, and gave a declaration that
Mr Smith was exempt from

paying it asa result of being a

Port Authority licencee.
Government

The Government then
appealed to the Privy Council,
which backed Mr Smith on

NIB contributions being a tax. .

However, it overturned the
declaration, ruling that he was
still liable to pay it because it
was not an income tax, but one
on being employed. As a
result, it did not fall under the
Clause 2,:Sub-Clause 8 of the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

“They said the contributions
that.an an employer is required
to pay under the National
Insurance Act were not a tax

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LARDIBALA OVERSEAS LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ‘ LARDIBALA OVERSEAS LTD. is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions
of Section 137 (4) of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

- The dissolution of .the said company commenced

on the 28th November, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

. Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Dizame
Consulting SA. Pasea Estate, Road Town

Tortola, BVI.

Dated this O1st day of December, A.D. 2006

- Dizame Consulting SA
Liquidator’



Legal Notice

NOTICE

PENZA TILE CORPORATION

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 27th day of November 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Weekly Vol.

YIELD - ast 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful!
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bah.

- Trading volume of the prior week

Stock Ind J.

1, 1994 = 100



EPS$

NAV KEY
*-17 November 2006
** - 31 October 2006
** - 31 October 2006

31 October 2006



on the earnings of the employ-
er, but the tax is payable
regardless of an employer’s
earnings. As a result, you were
still liable to pay contribu-
tions,” Mr Smith recalled.
But he added: “In the case of
National Health Insurance
contributions, it is unquestion-
ably calibrated on income.
Only those earning money pay.
It is therefore a tax on income,
as well as a tax on earnings.
“It is.not only unconstitu-
tional, but also a contraven-
tion of Clause 2, Sub-Clause 8

- of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-

ment, and it is not payable in
Freeport even it if is payable in
the rest of the Bahamas.”
The final format of the Bill
was unclear at this time, Mr
Smith said. Given that self-
employed persons have to con-

tribute the full 5.3 per cent of

their income to the NHI
scheme, and that many of
these will be business owners

and, in Freeport, Port Author-
ity licencees, a strong legal case
could be made for their
exemption, along with that of
salaried workers living in the ~
Freeport area.

And in its 1990 ruling on Mr
Smith’s NIB case, the Privy
Council acknowledged in rela-
tion to employed and self-
employed workers that “a
powerful argument can be
deployed to support the sub-
mission that in their case, the
contributions are a tax on their
earnings. The tax is only
payable if they have carnings,
and it is fixed as a percentage
of their earnings”.

Although a literal reading of
Clause 2, Sub-Clause 8
appeared to exempt them from
NIB contributions, the Privy
Council said this would “have
bizarre consequences” if the
tax on employers was treated
differently from the tax on
them. ,

- BAHAMAS FIRST |
HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby,
“notifies all its shareholders that based on
unaudited results for the quarter ended
30th September 2006 the Board of Direc-
tors has declared an interim dividend of
two cents (2¢) per common share to be
_ paid 8th December 2006 to all sharehold-
ers of record as of Ist December 2006.



Legal Notice
NOTICE
SNOW ANGEL LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SNOW ANGEL LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies

Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 21st July, 2006 when the Articles of
_ Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Mark
‘Edward Jackman of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02,

Singapore 039393.

Dated this 01st day of December, A.D. 2006

Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator

WE ARE LOOKING FOR

GROCERY BUYER

That is:

*Experienced in the Retail Business

*Analytical and Energetic

| °Creative and willing to Travel

*An excellent communicator

*Proficient in Excel & Word Suites

We offer Great Benefits:

*Growth & Advancement within the organization| |

°A salary that will commensurate with

experience

°Group Medical & Pension Plans

*Employee Discounts
°Profit Sharing

°A Supportive team environment

Send resumes via e-mail to:
cshumanresources@aol.com


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 5B



US retailers tap into festive spirit FQ

@ By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Business Writer

WALLK into any Gap clothing
store this holiday season and
expect to see red T-shirts, red
hats and red bracelets.

Of course decorating with red
is nothing unusual this time of
year, but the merchandise is
meant to remind customers of
something not often associated
with the holidays: the global
AIDS epidemic.

Gap is one of a number of
companies this year who are
tapping into consumers’ grow-
ing desire to do good deeds with
their purchasing dollars.

Other retailers selling prod-
ucts to benefit humanitarian
causes include Bath and Body
Works, a division of Limited
Brands Inc., which recently
launched a line of candles and
fragrances that benefit the
Elton John AIDS Foundation,
as well as Macy’s, which is sell-
ing baskets made by Rwandan
widows to help support that
nation’s developing economy.

“JT think the demand for these
types of products has always
been there, but companies just
weren’t filling it until now,” said
Dan Henkle, Gap’s vice presi-
dent for social responsibility.

For the Gap, filling that
demand means donating half
the profits from all items
marked with a Product Red
label to the Global Fund to
Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and
Malaria. Items launched in
October range from a $20 can-
dle to a $350 leather jacket
modeled by director Steven
Spielberg in the company’s star-
studded marketing campaign.

Product Red is the brainchild
of U2 rock star and activist
Bono and philanthropist Robert
Shriver, who convinced compa-
nies like Gap Inc., Apple Com-
puter Inc., and American
Express Co. to design cus-
tomized red products.

The portion of profits donat-

‘ed to the Global Fund varies
for each company, with Apple

donating $10 from each $199 -

red iPod sold and American
Express pledging one percent
of each purchase made with its
red credit card: All of the com-

#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts,
Palmdale

“says about our brand,”

panies have contracted to pro-
mote the products for at least
four years.

But don’t confuse this new
spirit of giving with a charity,
say Product Red developers.

“Our focus is really on creat-
ing a sustainable business mod-
el, and the only way to do that is
to make it beneficial for the
companies as well,” said Julie
Cordua, vice president of mar-
keting for Product Red.
“Because if it’s something that
makes good business sense for
them they’re going to want to
keep doing it.”

But it’s the lingering “busi-
ness sense” hanging over the
red campaign that has attracted
heavy criticism from some cor-
ners.

More than a few bloggers
have pointed to the crassness
of companies using a deadly dis-
ease as a marketing vehicle to
sell more clothes and electron-

ics. Radio talk show host’
. Michael Medved has charged
on his blog that companies have .

used the campaign as an excuse
to hike prices and make more
money for themselves.

“A Gap long-sleeved T-shirt
that last week cost $14.50, now
goes for $45... meaning the com-
pany still gets an extra $8 of
your money on an absurdly
overpriced piece of cloth,”
Medved writes.

Other online critics point out
that since most of the money
from red products will go
toward buying medicine for
AIDS victims in Africa, the
campaign will help bankroll
pharmaceutical companies who
are unwilling to distribute their
drugs for free.

So what’s the payoff for par-
ticipating in an effort that
attracts such tough scrutiny?

“T’ve always said ’doing good
is good business’, and I recom-
mend it to my clients,” said Britt
Beamer, chairman, of market-
ing firm America’s Research
Group.

According to Beamer, the
' positive feedback generated by

charitable outreach always off-
sets any dollar loss to the com-
pany.

“What’s important is what it
said

(Next to City Market)
P.O. Box N-10620

How":

COMPANY LIMITED

Tel: 242-328-0048
Fax:242-328-0049
Tis' the Season te

~ HP Photosmart C3180 Printer
$D/256 Media Card
HP Q1977A Photo Paper:.4’x6”

Nassau

LOWEST PRICE.

Brad Stevens, Starbuck Monee s
vice president of U.S. Market-
ing. ,
The Seattle-based coffee
giant recently kicked off an
effort to hand out 10,000 cards
called “cheer passes” daily, ask-
ing recipients to perform one
act of kindness for someone else

and pass the card along. The -

drive is not tied to any cause
and the cards are not
reedemable for merchandise,
but recipients can track their
card’s progress online.

“It says that we at Starbucks
are willing to use our resources
to try and start this chain of
good will,” said Stevens.

Twenty years ago the major- ©

ity of Americans said the mea-
sure of a reputable company
was the number of years it had
been in business, according to
Beamer. Today only six percent
of Americans judge a business
by its longevity.

“I think consumers saw all

these big companies go out of .

business — the Montgomery
Wards of the world — and con-
cluded that the measure of a
quality company had to be
something more,” Beamer said.

Some businesses have begun
promoting the way they treat
their workers as the measure of
their quality as a company.

In fact, the founders of start-
up clothing company Fair Indi-
go have based their entire busi-
ness strategy on the idea that
consumers will seek out mer-
chandise made by people work-
ing for decent wages.

The Madison, Wisc.-based
apparel maker recently
launched its first line of “fair

“trade” clothing, meaning that

all the clothes were made by
workers in developing countries
paid above minimum wage and
not working in sweatshop con-
ditions.

The term “fair trade” is typi-
cally applied to deals with farm-
ers growing commodities like
rice and sugar, but the founders
of Fair Indigo are betting that

the same consumers who drink
fair trade coffee, if given the .

choice, will also ep for fair

trade clothes. oe
“Clearly there are more e:peo-

ple out there becoming more

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conscious of how their purchas-
es affect society and the envi-
ronment,” said CEO Bill Bass,
who co-founded the company
after leaving his job as vice pres-
ident of e-commerce at Lands’
End.

Whereas in his previous job,
Bass says he would push facto-
ry owners in Asia and Latin










Ayistita ‘to make clothes for 7

less money, he is now insisting

they take more money — and

pass it along to the workers.
“Tt really freaks some of them

out,” Bass said. “They realize

pretty quickly though that this
will actually reduce their
turnover and help them attract .
the best workers.”

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| BAHAMAS HOT MIX

Asphalt Products Manufacturer
Civil Engineering Contractor |

Now Hiring For Abaco Projects
NB: Personnel To Be Hired In Abaco |

Nassau Office

Airport Industrial Park
Po Box.Cb 10990
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 377-6351
Fax: (242) 377-2193 _

Dump Truck Drivers
Excavator Operators

Dozer Operators
General Labourers

_ Abaco Office '
Airport Roundabout
P.O. Box AB-20184
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 367-3956
Fax: (242) 367-3959

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT (the”FIU”) |

PUBLIC NOTICE >

Pursuant to Section 16(1)(b) of The. Financial
Intelligence Unit Act, 2000, the Public is hereby
notified that the FIU intends to issue its Revised
Suspicious Transaction Guidelines. Relating to
the Prevention of Money Laundering and the
Financing of Terrorism.

Financial institutions,

industry organizations,

that

are representative of those financial institutions and
interested parties, that are likely to be affected by
the proposed Guidelines, are invited to express their
interest in being consulted in the
development of the Guidelines to the FIU no later
than 31st January, 2007

Copies of

the
may be obtained from the FIU,

draft

course of the

proposed Guidelines

Third Floor,

Norfolk House, Frederick Street, P.O.Box SB-50086,
Nassau, Bahamas,Telephone Numbers: 356- 6327;
— 356-9808; or 326-3814.

Director

Financial Intelligence Unit

P.O.Box SB-50086
Nassau, Bahamas


fe ee ene

PAGE 68, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006




TT



fi By RACHEL BECK
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Remember when Wal-Mart
was talked about as the retail-
er where America shopped?
At least in recent months, it
looks like consumers increas-
ingly have taken their money
elsewhere.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. should
be a dominant force during the
all-important holiday season,
but instead it has tallied terri-
ble results. ‘Its same-store sales
fell for the first time in a
decade in November and it is
forecasting anemic growth this
month as well.

Blame for such missteps
can’t go just to the slowing US.
economy. Wal-Mart’s reputa-

tion as a difficult employer and
the growing perception that it
doesn’t always offer the lowest
prices have led consumers to
shop at competitors of the
world’s largest retailer.

Given Wal-Mart’s size and
power, what it does matters.

’ With more than 6,600 stores

worldwide and sales for 2006
estimated to average out to just

under $1 billion a day, the Ben- -

tonville, Ark., discount chain
has long been considered an
industry and economic bell-
wether.

But its recent woes show a
vulnerable side to this retail-
ing behemoth. Maybe Wal-
Mart’s problems are just Wal-
Mart’s problems.

Its November same-store

sales dipped 0.1 percent, mark-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PURBECK VENTURES INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
| of the International Business Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000
| PURBECK VENTURES INC., is in dissolution, as of

| November 29, 2006.

Saavedra Registrars Limited of Geneva Place, Waterfront
| Drive, P.O. Box 3469, Tortola, Road Town, British Virgin

‘| Islands.

e

BUSINESS

ing the third consecutive
month of disappointing results.
Those weak sales came despite
Wal-Mart’s price cuts on toys,
electronics and other items in
an attempt to draw shoppers.

For the heart of the holiday
season, Wal-Mart is expecting
December same-store sales to
be flat to no more than 1 per-
cent higher than a year earlier.
The company blamed weak
sales of apparel and a slump
in its home furnishings busi-
ness.

The initial take on Wall
Street earlier in the week —
when Wal-Mart tipped its hand
that November wasn’t looking
good — was that the weakness
was. symptomatic of a slow-
down in overall economic
growth. The stock market sold
off on the idea that the housing
market correction coupled
with an uncertain jobs outlook
might be spurring consumers
to hold off on some spending.

But for that argument to
hold up, there should be other
warning signs as well — and
there aren’t. Consumer spend-
ing has picked up in recent
months as gas prices have
dropped, and new retail sales
show strong results from other
merchants.

Rival discount chain Target
Corp. tallied better-than-
expected same-store sales of

5.9 percent in November.
Shoppers scooped up its trendy
offerings even though they
bypassed them at Wal-Mart.
The department store chains
also fared well, including the
8.9 percent gain at Federated
Department Stores Inc., which
also boosted its December
sales forecast.

“We are beginning to ques-
tion if its (Wal-Mart’s) sales
issues are broader and more
secular than we are currently

being led to. believe,” JPMor- .
gan retail analyst Charles .

Grom said.
Plaguing

One big issue plaguing Wal-
Mart has to do with its prices.
Consumers long believed if
they shopped at Wal-Mart,
they got the best price. And
they were willing to put up
with dated stores and sloppy
displays so long as they were
paying less.

But this year, that might not

have held true. While the com-:

pany has started remodeling
— which also has turned off
shoppers because of the dis-
ruption to the stores — most
stores haven’t been redone yet.
At the same time, Wal-Mart
hasn’t always offered the low-
est prices.

The discounter failed terribly



LIQUIDATOR



Perec

| International Investment Group
based in Nassau seeks Accountant for
general accounting duties; preparation of
financial statements, cash flow, budgets,
account reconciliations and financial

| analysis. | Knowledge of GAAP,

| consolidation eliminations necessary.
BS Degree in Accounting and CPA or
equivalent licensing required.

Send resume & salary history
via email to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international
trust company, is presently looking for a |

TRUST OFFICER

This position is open to candidates with the following
minimum requirements:

Qualifications

- © Bachelor’s degree in a relevant discipline;
Post graduate degree in law and/or a STEP
designation;

Minimum three years experience in an offshore
trust company; :
Ability to speak a second language is a plus; *
Extensive PC knowledge.

Personal qualities

¢ Good analytical, organisational and
communication skills;

e Committed to service excellence;

e Able to work on own initiative;

° Positive and flexible attitude;

e Team player.

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should
apply in writing, on or before December 10, 2006
enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

Or

hrbahamas@ubs.com

ESSIEN SET CE ERS VOR NTE BIRPSTD ES CL RTTIE ROO YOR TSAO











Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that BRIAN JAMES MOODIE OF
#80 SOUTH WESTRIDGE, P.O. BOX N-3180, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

otice
“NOTICE is hereby given that WILDA MICHEL-PIERRE OF;

GENERAL DELIVERY, TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 24TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Abaco, Bahamas.







RISK OFFICER

Operational Risk Management























The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of service local and
international clients.



An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter wit
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Operational Ris
Team. The successful candidate will report directly to thes&istant Manager,
Operational Risk Management.



Core Responsibilities

® Assist with the development and implementation of the Risk.
Management Framework within the bank and to deputize for the
Assistant Manager, Operational Risk Management in her absence.

® Assist with, the monitoring of the company’ adherence to the groups
ORM policies and procedures by providing service and support to all
business lines.

8 _ Assist with identification of risk and completion of risk rating analysis
within the unit. : |

® Assist in thecreation of the bank’ risk database using Methodware
' software

= ‘Manage the timely recording and review of incident reports and ensuring
‘timely resolution and reporting.

® Assist in the preparation of training sessions and briefings relating to any
Group wide Operational Risk Procedure rebuts.

Desired Qualifications

S: Bachelor's Degree in Accounting, Finance or related discipline from a
well recognized university.

= A minimum of five years experience in the Financial Services Industry.

2 The ability to learn newsoftware programs speedily.

= Advanced skills in Microsoft Office (Excel, Word & Power Point)

= The ability to work with minimal supervision and to work accurately and
effectively under pressure.



= Excellent interpersonal, communication, time management and préém
solving skills.

Closing Date: December 10, 2006

Contact

Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

Email: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs

www.butterfieldbank.bs .








ad

Butterfield Bank



when it attempted to, attract
higher-income shoppers by
offering more fashionable
items such as clothes that were
sold at higher price points. It
also shifted its advertising away
from a low-price focus, but
now is emphasizing cost again.
In the meantime, its com-
petitors intensified their price-
cutting on the same or similar
items sold at Wal-Mart, includ-
ing food and grocery items.
That was especially true over
Thanksgiving weekend.
Wal-Mart started discount-
ing toys in October and elec-
tronics in early November,
hoping to “gain mind share”
as the low-price leader over
the holiday season, according
to Goldman Sachs analyst

‘Adrianne Shapira.

But then it failed to deliver

‘as competitors offered better

deals on Black Friday and
through last weekend. “The
rest of the world caught up in
promotions when it mattered
and margins were hit across
the board,” Shapira said, not-
ing that its biggest declines in
customer traffic came during
the week of Thanksgiving.

Also at issue is whether Wal-
Mart has expanded so much
over the last four decades that
finding new store locations and
capturing additional sales in
certain categoriés are becom-
ing increasingly difficult.

As Merrill Lynch’s Virginia
Genereux noted, Wal-Mart
could have hit a “market-share
wall” — since it might not be
able to see much more upside
to its 30 percent of share of
such things as men’s under-
.wear and pet food, or in certain

THE TRIBUNE



art woes self-inflicted |

markets like Springfield, Mo.

Then there is Wal-Mart’s
publicity problem. Two years
ago, a poll of 1,800 shoppers
found that 2 percent to 8 per-
cent of respondents said they
had stopped shopping at the
retailer because of negative
press. The findings came in a
report to Wal-Mart by con-
sulting firm McKinsey & Co.

That decline was before the
recent onslaught of attacks
from two union-backed
groups, WakeUpWalMart.com
and Wal-Mart Watch, which |
have gotten lots of media
attention for taking on Wal-
Mart’s treatment of workers
so publicly. Wal-Mart bashing
was also popular on the cam-
paign trail during this election
season.

Wal-Mart has fought back
through its own intensified
public relations effort. “We
continue to create jobs,
advance careers and enhance
communities across the coun-
try,” Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott
said during the Nov. 14 third-
quarter earnings call.

Of course, no one should
write off Wal-Mart yet. It is
big. It is strong. It is resilient. It
is in many of the nation’s
neighborhoods, catering to
many of the nation’s shoppers.
No other chain comes even
close to the sway that it has
over American consumers.

A year from now a different
Wal-Mart story could be told,
one of better times ahead. For
that to really happen, though,

the retailer might want to |

review how it got where it is
today, and what shoppers have
long looked for in its stores...

“tothe Ghief-Passport ‘Officer,’ P.O: Box .N=742): Nassaws:
' “'Bahamas*no'later-than ‘thirty (30) days after-the daté of



PUBLIC NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CINDY ALCIMON
AND CINDY LOUIDOR of PO. Box N-7940, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to CINDY
HILAIRE. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections:














publication of this’notice.

Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELINE EUGENE OF PORT
NELSON, RUM CAY, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registraiion/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization vhx\ld
not,be granted, should send a written and signed stats7"et
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1ST day +;
DECEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationain.¢ ¥-.



A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices inj




and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Venn Helpers and
Sales Persons Wanted

Harbourside Marine is looking for marine
helpers. Must have mechanical knowledge and
strong work ethics.

Please fax resumes to: 394-7659

Harbourside Marine is looking for sales
person with knowledge of generators, golf
cars and the marine industry.

Must be self driven.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659



Legal Notice

: NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MELVIN ASSETS S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
MELVIN ASSETS S.A. has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 18th day of August, 2006.

FIDES LIQUIDATORS INC.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 7B



NOW HIRING

Nolen ew eC eicialt

BLEACHERS, from 1B

culture and we look forward to it. However,
there has to a better solution so that the bleach-
ers go up for the parade, but do not shut down
the city during the peak of holiday shopping,” he
said.

Although Mr Klonaris said yesterday that it
was hard to place a dollar value on the potential
loss caused by the bleacher placements, Bay
Street retailers estimated they lost a combined
$7.5 million in sales due to the two-week place-
ment of bleachers for the Junkanoo parades in
2002.

The public treasury was estimated to have
lost out on $1 million in stamp and customs
duties, and retailers estimated they lost between
10-25 per cent of Christmas sales depending on
where they were positioned in relation to the

LAW FIRMS, from 1B

involved in the compulsory liquidation of the
Moore Park group, and the $100 million insol-
vency of the Realto Group.

As for Lennox Paton, the IFLR review noted
that it had advised Ginn Clubs & Resorts on its
$5 billion West End project, and acted for Star-
wood Hotels in its proposed involvement with
the Baha Mar development.

The firm had also played a role in the $54
million purchase of Winn-Dixie’s majority 78 per
cent stake in Bahamas Supermarkets, and
advised Credit Suisse over the $2.3 billion lend-
ing facility that financed Kerzner International’s
buyout.

IFLR noted that Lennox Paton had suffered



bleachers.

The Nassau Tourism and Development Board
predicated that prior to the 2003 parades retail-
ers would, as a result of poor planning and con-
sultation, lose some $5-$10 million in sales for
December 2003, with the cost to Government
some $1-$2 millionintaxrevenues.

The board further predicted that employees
could lose some $200,000 on sales commission
revenue, with a Bahamas Taxi Cab Union offi-
cial having told the board that the lost parking
and traffic congestion in 2002 cost its mem-
bers $150,000.

Individual stores The Tribune spoke with yes-
terday said they preferred not to make individ-
ual statements, allowing the Nassau Tourism
Development Board speak for them.



a “bumpy ride” in 2005 through the loss of three
partners - Bryan Glinton, Roy Sweeting and
Andy O’Brien - who had formed their own law
firm, Glinton, Sweeting & O’Brien.

In their new practice, the three had handled
more than $60 million in deals, including a debt
offering, acquisition financing and resort financ-
ing. The IFLR review placed Callenders & Co in
Tier 2, noting how it had set up a trust and
foundations group to exploit the Foundations
Act, and established a correspondent relation-
ship with a,Chinese law firm.

Placed in Tier 3, along with Glinton, Sweeting
& O’Brien, were Alexiou, Knowles & Co, and
Harry B. Sands &:Co.

esb consultants limited

Presently considering applications for

FULL-TIME
ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS

Looking for candidates with:

1. Some experience with drafting and the creation of _ construction

documents.

a Working knowledge of the AutoCAD software.
3. .Autodesk Land Desktop experience is a plus.

Responsibilities include:

1. The drafting and creation of construction documents.
2. Assisting Engineers on site with supervision and management duties.

Are you an energetic, organized, hardworking CCIE] who
seeks a Career-oriented position with an established company?

Then this might be the position for you!

Administrative Assistant needed to support busy Human Resources
Department in performing various clerical support duties.

Qualifications:

Strong organization skills

Excellent oral and written communication skills
Exceptional customer service skills

Team oriented

Ability to multi task

Enormous attention to detail

Goal oriented

Able to work in a fast paced, deadline oriented
environment

Solid data entry skills

Strong initiative

Results-driven

Basic working knowledge of computers and Windows
software, in particular Word, Excel, Power Point

Great benefits include competitive salary commensurate with
experience, free Training and development, Paid Vacation, Health
Insurance, Life Insurance and more. ;

Interested persons should submit résumé to:
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-746
Nassau, Bahamas

‘ ies
Candidates should be hard working and be able to handle a number of
projects simultaneously. ¢sb consultants limited is a team orientated
company, and eons employees should be capable of adapting to this
philosophy.

All interested candidates should email there resumes to:

mark@ecsbconsultantslimited.com
OR fax to: (282) a: 7209 ATIN: Mr. Mark Williams

VACANCY

CHIEF ENGINEER
Out island Resorct

Job Description:

The Chief Engineer is a member of the hotels Executive Committee. Previous experience in managing capital
projects is required. The ideal candidate will have outstanding communication, organizational and planning skills,
and the ability to establish positive working relationships with vendors, and the other departments within the hotel.

- Position will be responsible for supervising/overseeing Maintenance Engineering and Landscaping.

- Requires Hotel Engineering supervisory experience.

- Requires a minimum of 5 year(s) of supervisory experience and a minimum of 5 year(s) of hotel maintenance
engineering experience.

- Must have experience at properties of similar size and quality.

- Position will be required to work a varied schedule that may include evenings, nights, and weekends.

Technical Requirements

- Create and implement preventive maintenance program.

- Strong technical skills in HVAC, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, carpentry, etc.

- Familiar with chillers, cooling towers, chemical treatments, pneumatics, control systems, water systems, boilers,
- refrigeration, compressors, etc.

- Pool chemical testing must be completed and recorded once a day.

- Create and up keep civil; mechanical and structural as built drawings.

Managerial Requirements _

- Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects.

- Demonstrate team building experience.

- Demonstrate ability to lead by example.

- Experience communicating, training, and managing multi-lingual staffs.

- Experience in training and cross-training employees.

- Experience in training and developing employees with limited education/experience.

Business Skills

- Strong technical skills

- Excellent time management skills.
- Strong organizational skills.

- Good knowledge of computers.

- Exceptional detail in follow-up.

- Solid scheduling experience.

Serious inquiries only need apply. Send Resume’s to:


PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006



SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
IMPORTANT NOTICE |
2006 DECEMBER DISBURSEMENT ag

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS: »
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME



THE FOLLOWING PERSONS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE CHECKS.

CHECK DISTRIBUTION EXERCISES WILL BEGIN ON DECEMBER 4â„¢, 2006 AND WILL
END ON DECEMBER 8", 2006: FROM 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M. AT THE FOLLOWING ©
LOCATIONS:

- THE HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE, STAPLETON GARDENS, NEW
PROVIDENCE AND ©

- THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA |
(Grand Bahama and the Northern Bahamas)

CHECKS WILL BE DISTRIBUTED BY LAST NAME IN ARES ORDER.
LISTEN FOR WHEN YOU ARE TO REPORT TO THE D. ENT

New students and their guarantors are required to bring a valid Sane National Insurance

Card, and a job letter with them.

Returning students and/or guarantors are required t to bring a valid Passport o or other identification Me

DO. NOT’ TO COME TO THE DISBURSEMENT CENT! RE IF YOUR NAME DOES NOTAPPEAR

ON THE FOLLOWING LIST.

ONLY PERSONS WHO COME ON THEIR ASSIGNED DATE WILL BE SERVED.
CHECKS WILL NOT BE RELEASED UNLESS ALL ACCOUNTS ARE CURRENT .

PLEASE CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS

“THE EDUCATION LOAN COMMITTEE



. Surname First name Middle name CH

: ADDERLEY CRAIG ~ TREVOR © ALLENS. ar! NP’ ©
ADDERLEY * WIAA ROKER” SS-1958' : NP
ADDERLEY II" WILFRED TIMOTHY” NASSAU TEAST SOUTH NP -
ALBURY JUSTIN JERMAINE CR-54 ., NP
ALBURY LATOYA ANASTACIA SOUTHERN HEIGHT: Says NP -
ALCIME DEBRA ALTHIA SAFFRON LN., CAMPER, HGTS NP
ALLEN JASMINE SHEINAY OAKES FIELD ~ ‘NP
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APAU JULIETTE -ARNETTE GOLDEN GATES #2 ; NP

. ARANHA ° DONJULIE LOUISEA ANNE N-3648 Bp aes. So NRE Ss
ARCHER ALYSIA AGENES ALENE SS-6626 : vey NP
ARCHER LATEISHA ° SHAVONNE CR-11717 uous “NP:
ARCHER OMAR TARAN CB-11717 ; NP
ARMBRISTER JANIQUA JOYELLE RAHMINIQUE YAMACRAW. vec NP
ARMBRISTER JURAAN GEORGE CORALHARBOUR © °°... NP.
ARMBRISTER KENYA SIMONE SUNSHINE PARK PEC SUAS | ccs
ARMBRISTER NATHANIEL . OMAR. CARMICHAEL DRIVE... > (NP.
ARMBRISTER RONNELL CANDICE SASHA ve BAY STREET” He NP
ARTHUR CARNID “CALSEY . N-9213: - i > NP
ARTHUR WAYNETTE . SHANDEIKAHSHARON GOLDEN GATES ry NP:
ASTWOOD ANDERO AARON REDLANDACRES . . ~——sNP
AUSTIN DOMINIC. DEREK GT-2149. - ios DLONPO
BAILEY ROBERT MBOYA CHIPPINGHAM. *. NP
BAIN ALICEIA SABRINA SOUTH BEACH ESTATES _ NP
BAIN INDIRA CRYSTAL CHERINA N-9220 NP
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BARRY: CHARLENE . SHANGELIAALLISON YELLOW.ELDER GARDENS NP...
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BELLE LATANYA ~ LATOYA N-74 NP
BENEBY DARRYL LIVINGSTONE .- YELLOW ELDER GARDENS _ NP
BENEBY D'ASANTE HERMIA N-912 ‘ NP...
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BETHEL ANAISHA _ LASHONYA, Sarai puts Fees NP
BETHEL FALLON NICOLE PALMDA NP:
BETHEL JAIME CAMERON SOUTHERN BREEZES _NP
BETHEL KIKO FOLI . - CARMICHAEL = ° “NP
BETHEL NIKETRA TAMIKA CR 54538 NP
BETHEL PHILIP - JORDAN SS-5761 , NP
BETHEL QUINTON SHACARRO N-10841 NP
BETHELL DONNEE se CARMICHAEL ROAD SNP.
BETHELL MIKIKO TAMANGI PINEWOOD GARDENS — "NP
BEVANS ~ KEITH SOLOMON MARTIN BLAIR ESTATES . : NP
BLACK SASKIA TABITHA SS-5946 NP
BODIE ALICIA CLARANIQUE MT PLESANT VILLAGE “NP
BODIE ASHLEY LATARIO CB-12440 “NP
BODIE BERNARD ~~ JONATHAN SUNSET PARK NP...
BODIE Ill GEORGE | ALLINGTON EE-15324 | - “NP.
BONAMY KENT VAN CORAL HEIGHTS WEST NP
BONAMY KURT VON CORAL HEIGHTS WEST NP.
BOOTLE JODY AUDRA SB 52517 Ws NP
BOOTLE YVONNE PATRICIA Cae ROAD NP >
BOTIN-RIVERT MELISSA GEN DEL NP
BOWE ANDREW ANTHONY CORAL HARBOUR NP .
BOWE. JOSEPH SHEAN SB-52273 ; NP.
BOWE LATOYA ANITA STACHANS SUBDIVISION NP -
BOWE , LESEAN NIKITA KENNEDY SUBDIVISION © NP
BRENNEN DELRIKA LOUISE SOUTHERN HEIGHTS “NP
BRENNEN DEVONN NIKITA SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP
BRENNEN * DONIQUA LAKESHIA GEORGETOWN. - EXUMA
BRICE XAVIER ELIZABETH ESTATES NP.
BROWN ANTHONY CRAIG FOX HILL ROAD NP. -
BROWN ASHLEY ° LA' SHAN NASSAU VILLLAGE . NP
BROWN KOURTNEY = EUGENE NASSAU VILLAGE NP
BROWN KRYSTAL TAMIKA BAYWATER ESTATES NP
BROWN SHANDEA LATOYA GAMBIER VILLAGE ‘NP
BROWN SHERMAN ANTHONY WINTON MEADOWS NP
BROWN SHONET ANDRENE DANNOTTAGE ESTATES - NP
BROWN VICTOR ALEXANDER JEREMY GOLDEN GATES #2 NP
BROWN-RUSSELL — INDIRA NYOKA GOLDEN GATES #2 "NP
BULLARD-FARQUHARSON 'VERLINCIA ROBERTHA CORAL HARBOUR NP
BULLARD-KNOWLES INEASE CIA’ CORAL HGHTS, CORAL HARBOUR NP
BULLARD-STAMP RHODA BLANCHE WINTON HEIGHTS ‘NP
BURNSIDE GIA LINDERIA STAPLEDON GARDENS “NP -
BURROWS ASHLEE TRANEA CARMICHAEL ROAD NP

i
iy

Sumame

BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS

_ BURROWS

BURTON
BUTLER
BUTLER
BUTLER
CADET
CAMBRIDGE

’ CAMPBELL

CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL JR
CANCINO
CAPRON
CAPRON
CARDRON
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CAREY
CARGILL
CARROLL

~ CARTWRIGHT

CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT
CARTWRIGHT

COLEBROOK

COLEBROOKE
COLEBROOKE
COLLIE
COLLIE
COLLIE

- COLLIE

COLLIE
COLLIE

COLLIE JR.
COLLINS
COOPER
COOPER
COOPER II
COOPER-BODIE
CUNNINGHAM
CURRY

DAMES
DARLING
DARLING -
DARLING
DARVILLE

~ DARVILLE

DARVILLE
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS

DEW,
DORESTANT
RSETT . a
RSETT
DORSETT ©
DOUGLAS .

DOUGLAS
DUNCOMBE

DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE II
ELLIS

EMILE
EVANS-ROLLE
FARQUHARSON
FARQUHARSON
FARQUHARSON

FARQUHARSON-ARTHUR

FARRINGTON

~ FERGUSON

FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON

FERGUSON

FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON JR ,
FERNANDER .. .

FINLAYSON

FITZGERALD

‘FORBES -

FORBES —
FORBES .
FORD

FORD
FOWLER
FOWLER
FRANCIS
FRANCIS

- FRANCIS

FRASER
FRASER
FRASER
FRAZIER
GARDINER |
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON

- GIBSON

GILBERT
GOMEZ
GOODMAN
GORDON JR
GRANT

GRAY

GRAY
GREENE
GREENSLADE

‘HALL

HANLAN
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HART
HASSAN
HEILD.
HENDERSON
HENFIELD
HEPBURN
HIGGS
HIGGS
HIGGS

HIGGS, Ill
HINES
‘HOYTE

HUDSON JR -
HUNT

HUTCHESON
HUTCHESON
HUTCHINSON

TAMIKA

LATINA

First name

JACKLYN
KENWOOD
LYNEER
WILFRED
TAMEKA
LINDRICK
OREN
PORTIA
MARIANNE
COLETTE
KRISHANDA
NICKALET
SHENICA
RONALD
LAMAR
INDIRA
MCCARDIA
BURNELL
ANDREW
EDWARD
PATRELL
PAULINA
RENALDO
ALDYN
CHERYL
EUGENE
GREGORY
IANTHE
THEODORA
MAURISKA
JAMILA
TIA
CAPRI.
ANTHONY
DARA
JAMES
MONIQUE
ANGELICA
LISAGAY
ANDRE
LESTER
SHARI
ALVADALE
CASSANDRA
COLLEEN
KEVIN
KISHNELL
SHAKERA
WENDELL
HEIDI
GREGARIO
MARCIA
BRADLEY
NICOLE

- CASSEY

DONOVAN
TARA

Middle name

QUINCY
ANYA
ALEXANDER
EVEANNA
LUCAS"
REYNARD
TAMI

CURLENE
INZLEY
OLIVIA
ANYA
ALBERT

~ ANTHONY

MICHELLE YVETTE
ADRIANNE

ARNOLD
CARL

DELCINE INDIANNA
DAVID

RENARDE L
ANTOINETTE
ANTHONY

YOLANDA
NAOMI
FELICIA
GEORGIA

. ASHLEY

PAUL
VERNESSA
LEROY
ELIZABETH
SHONETTE
TRUDIAN
PATRICK
LINKE
ALICIA
BENITA
NAKITA

LEAN
RENALDO DURAN -

TYVETTE
VALREEN
JAMES

ROSETTE

‘OMARSHARIFF

ANDREEA
STEPHEN
DOREEN

TAMEKA HAKENYA
CHRISTOPHER
ELIZABETH

CARLENSEANO —

STEVON
SUZLA ~
GABRIELLE
LAWRENCE
O'KEISHA
ALVIN
ANTEREU
CAROL
DAVID
GLENVILLE
RICCARDO
ANTONYA
KENO.
LATHICE
GACINTHA
KEISHA
RUVANIA
CASSANDRA
TRACEE

FRANGUY
MALISSA
ANTHONIQUE
DENO
LEILA
ZANIA
ABIGAIL. .
AILEEN
BEVERLEY .
D'ANDRA\
DERRICK
JAMAAL
JOHNETTE
KIRA
LACHEZ
NAVEEN ~

- RAMON - :

SEAN
“SHARELL _

LIONEL
MORGAN.
ALEXIS —

ANTOINE
KASMINE
TIFFANY
DENICE
YACASTA
CLEMENT
DANNY
JANAE
SIMONE
WEL'ANDRA
ASHLEY
BRADISHA
GARITH
ANN
THERESE
CHRISTY
DEANDRA
D'SORAJI
GLENALEE
JENNA
LAVARDO
ZINA
SILAS
JULIAN
ACHARA
JAMAL
SHANRIA
JOMAR
MONIQUE
KERESA
CRAIG
AMY
ANWAR
ERIC
ACCINO

. KHADNA

CARLA
SOLOMON
INDIRA
JEMMA
ARETHA
MIYOSHI

SH
DONZALEIGH
EDWIN
ALENA
GABRIELLE
ERICA

DEANDO
MICHELLE
CHANTAL
RICHARD
DESIREE
FRED
PEREZ

» CHARLENE

McHALE
ARLINGTON
ALEXANDER
KETIA

AKEEM

TENILLE

NAKOTA FELECIA
ANISKHA

EVITTA

ELAINE




GERRIANNE N

2 JACINDE
SHAMELL
“STEVANYA

IONA

GREGORY
VICTORIA KENVA
SHANTEL
‘SHARLENE
TAMARA

» TERRELL

LATOYA
LESA

HILDA
ROSE
JENEE
GLENWILL

MAUDE.CLOTHILDA
NIKISHA

‘MIZPHA CORETTA
.. LASHAN TERRANCE

FRANKLYN
GERRARD
DORCAS VIOLA
VIOLA MABLE

“ARTHUR

CORY CRAIG.

». NOELLE
TAMARA

PHILIP.
DESHAE
SHAVORNE
MCKELL.
MARIA,
JACOB
GLEN
LATOYA
DENISE

_ ANQUINIQUE ROYALTY
KANDICE

MARIE
NATALYA — -
MARGARET
NICOLE
DOMONIQUE
KAVANA LASHANTI
D'LAJA
VIOLA
TERYL
VALENTINO
MADONNA °
NIGEL
ALONZO
SIMONE .
BENJAMIN
CRYSTAL TEREZ
NGARA
ALYEAN
OLYMPIA
EVERTON
ALICIA
ADDINGTON
O'NEAL
NAMAL

IMAN
LOUISE
KAREEM JAMES
ALEXANDIRA
DE'ANDRA
PATRICIA
CARDINA
OMAR
ALEXANDER
CHRISLYN
DEVERGO
DWIGHT
OSCAR
VALENTINE
PATRICE
MELINDA

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
Island

City

FAITH GARDENS
GEORGE TOWN
CARMICHAEL ROAD
BAHAMIA SOUTH
CARMICHAEL ROAD
GOLDEN GATES #2
ST ANDREWS BCH. ESTATES
FOX HILL

N-8889

GARDEN HILLS #2
CB-11950

NASSAU VILLAGE
NASSAU EAST
CARMICHAEL ROAD
VISTA MARINA
ELIZABETH ESTATES
N-1880

‘CAMPERDOWN HEIGHTS

GLENISTON GARDENS
DOMINGO HEIGHTS
GEN DEL

FREEPORT

TARPUM BAY
EE-16855

SEABREEZE

EE 16107

_ SOUTH BEACH

$S-5864

CLEMENT BETHELL ESTATES.

SANDILANDS VILLAGE
CB-11306

CR-56211

N-4036

VILLAGE, SUBDIVISION
MARATHON ESTATES
N-696

ROBERTHA DRIVE
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
GT-2758

FREEPORT
PINEWOOD GARDENS
N-8841

N-9176

N-10719

PINEWOOD GARDENS
CORAL HEIGHTS WEST
ELIZABETH ESTATE
KLUDEER: ©

N10305

$S8-6160

. PINE YARD ROAD

SEA BEACH ESTATES
WESTWARD VILLAS

~ GOLDEN GATES

BIG POND SUBDIV

N-4135
MOUNT PLEASANT VILLAGE
COLONY VILLAGE -

- §S-19272

SHIRLEY STREET
CORAL HARBOUR
FOX att

~ N-349

LOU ADDERLEY ESTATES
PINE YARD ROAD
CHIPPINGHAM

MURPHY TOWN
CARMICHAEL ROAD

SEA BREEZE ESTATES
MURPHY TOWN

~ ELIZABETHE ESTATES
_ CENTERVILLE
. ROCK SOUND

GOLDEN GATES #2
DANNOTTAGE ESTATES

- CARMICHEAL ROAD

N-9542
Nota DR.,, BAMBOO TOWN

BUTTONWOOD re SEA BREEZE
ANDROS TOW

' SOUTH BEACH

CR-56890
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS
GLENISTON GARDENS
BAMBOO TOWN
CB-11875

CB-13114

N-3825

HERITAGE ESTATES
N-10296

TWYNAM HEIGHTS
GAMBLE HEIGHTS
COLONY VILLAGE

' CENTERVILLE

NASSAU VILLAGE
CORAL HEIGHTS EAST
EAST STREET

GARDEN HILL III.

PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE
N-408

* MARATHON ESTATES.

FLAMINGO GARDENS
NASSAU EAST
CARMICHAEL ROAD. _ .
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
GLENDALE SUBDIVISIONS

SHERWOOD FOREST
‘CABLE BEACH,

YAMACRAW SHORES
B-1177

STAPLEDON GARDENS
N-10067

CENTER DR., MILLERS HEIGHTS :

SUNSET RIDGE DRIVE
HARBOUR ISLAND
YAMACRAW

SILVER GATES

~ PERPALL TRACT -

soe BEACH

B 13360
STAPLEDON GARDENS
N-S066
PINEWOOD GARDENS
STAPLEDON GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS
MARATHON ESTATES
SS-6168
ENGLERSTON
MILLARS HEIGHTS
MARKET STREET
TROPICAL GARDENS
SB-50765
WINTON
PERPAL TRACT
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE
FOXDALE SUBDIVISION
N 4319
FLAMINGO GARDENS
GARDEN HILL #2
N-3451
MARATHON ESTATES
KENNEDY. SUBDIVISION
RODGELAND PARK
WINDSOR ESTATES
WEST BAY STREET
EE-16923
JOE FARRINGTON ROAD
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS

YAMACRAW

GARDEN HILLS II
SS-5079
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
ROBINSON ROAD
YELLOW ELDER, GARDENS
NEW PROVIDENCE
NEW PROVIDENCE
GT-2626
N-4897

N-10454
GOLDEN GATES

NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP
NP

BL reer ae nee meee ae ers ee ee ch a ee ee eee


Se a a ee ar at co rete nR RE oe

Surname First name
HUYLER DEBARO
HUYLER PHILECE
INGRAHAM KAYLA
INGRAHAM KENCOVIA
INGRAHAM KORY
INGRAHAM WILDERA
JEAN SHERLINE
JESUBATHAM JULIAN
JESUBATHAN JEREMY
JOHNSON ANDREA
JOHNSON CHARLEASE
JOHNSON CHRISTIAAN
JOHNSON CHRISTOPHE
JOHNSON DE'LECIA
JOHNSON DELORES
JOHNSON DESHAWN
JOHNSON DEVARIO
JOHNSON EBONY
JOHNSON KATURAH
JOHNSON KHRISTLE
JOHNSON KRISTY
JOHNSON LAKEISHA
JOHNSON LASHAN
JOHNSON NICKITO
JOHNSON QUANTRIEA
JOHNSON ROBERT
JOHNSON ROSA
JOHNSON SAMANTHA
JOHNSON TAMEKA
JOHNSON-FERGUSON + MICHELLE
JONES DANITA
JONES MARIO
JONES TAMEKA
JOSEPH MADELEINE
JULIEN ROMONA
KELLY * RHONDA
KELLY VERNITA
KERR ANTONIA
KERR © ~~... DENRICKA__
KNOWLES BIANCA
KNOWLES BYRON
KNOWLES CHERYL
KNOWLES EVA
KNOWLES FELESHIA
KNOWLES LARANO
KNOWLES MELISSA
KNOWLES RAQUEL
KNOWLES RENO
KNOWLES SHAW
LAING MEGAN
LAING TAJAH |
LARAMORE PHYLICIA
LEVARITY MATTHAN
LEWIS ALETHIA
LEWIS LATEISHA
LEWIS .....LORENZO __
LIGHTBOURNE CARISSMA
LIGHTBOURNE TREVOR
LIGHTFOOT SEAN
LONGLEY JOETTE
LONGLEY TREVAL
LUNDY AGNESSA
LUNDY TIFFANY
LUNN ANNETTE
LUNN JASPER
MACKEY BERRANDO
MACKEY. BRYSHON
MACKEY DANIELLE
MACKEY KERLANO
MACKEY KHALIA
MACKEY LAKEISHA
. MACKEY VANESSA
MACKEY-PAUL SHENIQUE
MAJOR ANNA
MAJOR JAMAAL
MAJOR KENDRA
MAJOR LEAH
MAJOR _MEKO:
MAJOR. &: NADIA
! MAJOR os ‘THERESA: ..;
+ MAJOROEca TRACY i
. MARRIOTT = ° ANGELA
MARSHALL: VALENTINO «
MARTIN DAVARD
MCALPINE ~ KEISHA
MCCLAIN _ ALEXANDRA
~ MCFALL ~ RANNICE
MCINTOSH CAROL
MCKENZIE FLORINE
MCKENZIE JAMAAL
MCKENZIE SHAVONNE -
MCKENZIE SID.
MCKINNEY DELTHIA
MCKINNEY ’ STEPHEN’
MCKINNEY-COX _. ARIELLA
MCPHEE AMANDA
MCPHEE TRAVANO
MCQUAY SUENAE
MIDDLETON . RICHARD
MILLER DACONIL
MILLER DeANDREA
~ MILLER RUDENA
- MILLER SAMITRIA
MILLER ~~ ~~ ~~~ SHAVONNE---
MILLER SHONIQUE
MILLS OMAR
MINNIS INDERA .
’ MITCHELL DEXTER
MITCHELL. SHAVON
MORLEY ' EUGENA
MORTIMER ANTHONIQUE
MORTIMER JASON
MORTIMER KIVONNE
MORTIMER PRINCESS
MOSS CINDY
MOSS CYPRIANNA
MOSS DELISA
“MOSS GAZNA
MOSS GIANNE
MOSS INDIRA
MOSS JAHMALAH-
MOSS KAREN:
MOSS SEAN
MOXEY ’ LYNETTE
MOXEY MARCUS
MOXEY II BRADLEY
MUNNINGS’ CINDY
MUNNINGS NEVILLINA
MUNROE JAWANZA
MUNROE KAILESA
MUNROE - KAYLE
MUNROE KIERON
MUNROE NICOLE
MUNROE ROSSETA
MUNROE SUDIA
MURPHY RANIQUE
MUSGROVE D'ANTAE
NAIRN VERONICA
NEELEY RENALDO
NEWBOLD DAREN
NEWRY. ANTOINETTE
NEWTON CLAUDETTE
NEWTON LOFTON
NEWTON SHEANDRA
NICHOLLS GIOVANNI
NORVILLE-SMITH ERIC
PATTON SHAKERIA
PAUL-PARADA-OBREQUE CICELYN
PEARCE RICARDO
PEARCE RYAN
PHILIPPE KEITH
PILGRIM BRENDAN
PILGRIM BRENDIA
PINDER ANTIONETTE
PINDER LATANYA
POITIER JR~ PHILIP
OMe DAVID
PRATT ERNEST
PRATT KENWOOD
PRATT ROBIN






i BIANCA
R

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Middle name

DOMIQUE
D'ANDRE
CASSANDRA

IVY CURLEAN
STEPHAN KENDAL
BONITA

JERROD

ROHAN
MICAHLEAN

KASIF

BARNARD JAMAAL
MARK ASHLEIGH
ANNIE

OLGA

DELORIS MEGAN
ULYSSIS
FLORENCIA

SUSAN

AMI VERNEE
ANASTACIA
ANASTASIA
LAWANDA

AZARD NEWTALIN
DRISKELL

CRAIG FRANCIS.
LUEANNE =O
ALEXIS

ANTURA

DENISE

MINDY.

FRANKLYN
ROCHELLE KEISHA

NEKERA, REGIA
ALEXANDIRA
LAVERN

SHANTEL CARESSA
CARLETTE

WADED

MARVA
ADELAIDE
ALEXANDRIA
STAFFORD
LAUREL
SAMANTHA
PATRICK -
HENRY ELDRIDGE
BROOKE
ELLAMAE
NYREE JOAN
JAVAN
DARRELL
NATASHA
JOHN
CHAMARVIA
ANDREW
RYAN

CARA
LETOYA
LAURELLE .
LEAH

~CHARLENE

JAMES LIVINGSTONE

ARLINGTON

SHAMIKA

SIMONE

KACHAD

JANAE

SIMONE

AVERY

LATOYA

FRANCIS

NORMAN

DIONNE -

LETETIA BRICKELLE ~
RIQUE as

RANDENIA
JOY

GARY . 2
CLAUDETTE CONDACY
BRICE

LEANDRA SHANAE.

ARTHUR
oe JULIANA
EST!

EDISON LEWIS
LOUISE
KARLISSON
DESHEEN
ELIAZABETH
REGINA
ELIZABETH
SYNETTE
LAURETTE ~~ -
DANA |

JAMAL...
MICHELLE
CELESTINE.
ANTONYA LOUISE
NTOINE
STEPHANNE
DOMINIQUE
LEVERN
ELAINE
MARIA
ELESIA .
WINIKA
LASHAN
RAASHAN _
FIONA
RENALDO —
LATEDRA CASSIEA =:
MOODY

KEVIN

AMANDA

AKEEM EDWARDO:
RODRICO

SHENELL

KAREN

PRISCILLA

EZELINE PECOLAâ„¢*
SHANDERA :
ARLETTE

O'NEAL

INZELY

SAMBRIANNA

ALEXIS

ANDREW

MICHELLE

PHILIP

CHARLES

ANDERIA
ALEXANDRIA KEISHLA
PAUL

JONATHAN

ANTHONY
ALEXANDRIA
PATRICIA
LAKEISHA

LEMUEL
WHITNEY

LOFTHOUSE =
SADE ADDICIA

a

City

NASSAU VILLAGE
GARDEN HILLS #2
GT-2242

$S-5118

CB-13804

BLUE HILLS

FARM ROAD
TUCKAWAY RD
VILLAGE ROAD...
Sarton GARDENS
WINTON HEIGHTS
WINTON HEIGHTS
PINEWOOD GARDENS.

PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE.

CARMICHAEL ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
SUNSET PARK

-GOLDEN GATES #2
- N-8007

EASTWOOD ESTATES =
GOLDEN GATES #2° *
SOUTH BEACH

FOX HILL

N-15510
BLUE HILL ESTATES:

* LEEWARD.EAST.

- $8-19364

SUNSET PARK -

KOOL ACRES
PINEWOOD GARDENS
GOLDEN GATES

SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
a a

EE-17

CARMICHAEL ROAD”
-4863
YELLOW ELDER. GARDENS.

BLAIR ESTATES
N- er

N-49 eae
BALLOU HILLS ESTATES
--PINEWOOD GARDENS -

$S-6232
‘C/O N-1347

- WINTON

SS-5309
N-7030

ORCHARD CLOSE, SEAOREEZE LN

CARMICHAEL ROAD —
NASSAU EAST
GARDEN HILL #1
EE-17098
JUBILEE GARDENS -- ;
STAPLEDON GARDENS .

- FH 14332

FOX HILL

~ ENGLERSTON -

N-54 |

. $8-544
IMPERIAL PARK

N-9229
BLUE HILLS HEIGHTS —

-N-7957. .

N-1072

- GLADSTONE ROAD

NASSAU EAST
N-10862

; N-7289

’ GARDEN HILL II

NASSAU VILLAGE...
DELAPORTE

‘N-583
ei PARK .
N-980:

‘EE-1522



~ YELLOW /ELDER GARDE NS. a
-- CHIPPINGHAM ~
| CARMICHAEL ROAD,



TEU GPELOER GAR
GOLDEN GATES I

CB- eee
MOUNT V

ERNON
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION

. N-8404

FOX HILL

N-7882 °
EE-16454

NEW PROVIDENCE
CARMICHAEL ROAD: - ee

' SAN SOUCI

SAN SOUCI -

* N-330. Rie
ELIZABETH AVENUE

© CR55131

- CR-55442
_ FREEPORT. ~
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION

“FOX HILL

CB-12066
CB-13219
GARDEN HILLS #2.
EE-15552 so
CR-56669

- PINEWOOD. GARDENS.

ELIZABETH ESTATES _

BIG POND SUBDIVISION
EASTERN ESTATES —
PALMETTO VILLAGE

N- ie

‘ GARDEN HILL #1,
.CR-54785
~ PINEWOOOD.GARDENS

~ ELIZABETH ESTATES
~ BEL-AIR EST, CARMI

CR-55'
FH-145
N-696
SEA BREEZE LANE
Ee ESTATES

CB-
SEA BREEZE ee

LITTLE HYDE PARK
PINEWOOD GARDENS’

EE-16827
N-1500

3 co GATES MN

R-55407 :
MARSH HARBOUR
HAMILTON ADDITION
C/O GT-2242
N-8915
N-8680
N-7442

.N-7442

ELIZABETH ESTATES
NASSAU EAST BLVD
N-781

AP 59223

CB-13055

N-10526

GT-2557 i
NASSAU EAST NORTH
GT-2459

N-4388

VISTA MARINA
N-458 :
WEST BAY STREET

- EE-15272



PINEWOOD GARDENS. i.

SS-5545
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS

WESTWOOD VILLAS

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006, PAGE 0B |
PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006
World’s largest retail group issues warning

@ By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. issued a sobering warn-
ing for the holiday shopping sea-
son Thursday, predicting its Decem-
ber same-store sales gain would be
no better than 1 percent.

The news, coupled with Wal-
Mart’s expected announcement that
it suffered its first same-store
decline in more than 10 years dur-
ing November, came as the nation’s
retailers reported an overall mixed

sales performance for the month. .

Same-store sales reflect business at
stores open at least a year and are
the industry standard for measuring
a retailer’s strength.

Wal-Mart’s disappointment was
a sharp contrast with results from
Target Corp., which beat Wall
Street forecasts, and Federated
Department Stores Inc., which far
exceeded expectations. Other retail-
ers had mixed sales. J.C. Penney
Co. and Costco Wholesale Corp.
both fell short of Wall Street pro-
jections.

Industry analysts generally
believed that Wal-Mart’s problems
weren’t a sign that other retailers
would have a disappointing holi-

day season. But a Labor Depart-
ment report Thursday that showed
a jump in claims for jobless benefits
last week did add some uncertainty
to the outlook for holiday sales.

The timing of Wal-Mart’s news
couldn’t have been worse for the
world’s largest retailer, coming just
after most consumers started holi-
day shopping. While many retail-
ers had a strong Thanksgiving
weekend, Wal-Mart had warned
Saturday that its November sales
would be weaker than expected.

Wal-Mart reported a 0.1 percent
dip in same-store sales for Novem-
ber. That’s in line with the reduced
forecast from analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial, which forecast
unchanged growth. Including a
drop in gasoline revenues from its
Sam’s Club division, which Wal-
Mart did not include in its calcula-
tion, same store-sales fell 0. 3 per-
cent.

Wal-Mart has struggled in recent
months on a mix of problems,
including the fact that its lower-
income customers were hurt by
soaring gas prices. But the compa-
ny’s lackluster sales have persisted
even as the cost. of gas eased, an
indication that there are other fac-
tors that are dragging down Wal-

Minimum wage

@ By ELLEN SIMON
AP Business Writer

TWO months into her minimum
wage job at Target Corp., Tara
Dennis realized she and her three
children would be better off if she
was unemployed and on food
stamps. 'So she quit.

“As a single mom, minimum
wage isn’t going to get me ahead.
It’s not even going to get me caught
up,” said Dennis, who lives in Mis-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

soula, Mont.

A proposed hike that would
bring the Federal minimum wage
to $7.25 would give workers like
Dennis their first raise since the
Federal minimum increased to
$5.15 in 1997. But some low-income
workers and their advocates say the
wage increase won’t affect many
workers and is not a way out of
poverty for minimum wage work-
ers. Since the last hike; wages for
most of the lowest-paid workers

2003
GEN/CLE.
No 01253

Common Law and Equity Division

BETWEEN

HENRY & ELIZABETH MOXEY

Plaintiffs

AND
THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

and , |.
THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRU; T

and

18t Defendant

an "Defendant |

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL *

ORDER OF SUBSTITUED SERVICE |

3rd Defendant

Mart’ s results.

“This is pretty discouraging,” said
Ken Perkins, president of Retail-
Metrics LLC, a research company
in Swampscott, Mass. But he added
that Wal-Mart’s weak sales “will
not be a harbinger of a broad based
weakness across the retail sector.”

Wal-Mart’s discount stores suf-
fered a 0.5 percent decline, while
Sam’s Clubs had a 2.0 percent
increase.

One of Wal-Mart’s main prob-
lems is that its strategy to broaden
its appeal to higher-income shop-
pers with upscale merchandise was
poorly executed. It filled its fall
clothing racks with too many trendy
items like skinny jeans that shop-
pers just didn’t want. The company
said in October that it’s cutting back
on distribution of the clothing line
Metro 7, but the move is too late for
the holiday season.

Despite Wal-Mart’s problems,
many other retailers do have hopes
for a strong season. Sales during
the Thanksgiving weekend rose a
respectable 2.8 percent, according
to the research firm ShopperTrak
RCT Corp.

The International Council of
Shopping Centers-UBS tally of
November same-store rose 2.1 per-

increase

have risen above the federal mini-
mum wage, while prices for neces-
sities such as housing and trans-
portation have grown faster.

“We should be aware that this is
an extremely moderate proposal,”
said Jared Bernstein, senior econo-
mist of the Economic Policy Insti-
tute.

The minimum wage hike, which
Democrats have put at the top of
their agenda. when the next Con-

- gress convenes in January, would

affect 1.9 million hourly workers
who make minimum wage and
workers who get tips, who can
make less than minimum wage. It
would raise wages for an estimated
6.5 million workers or 4 percent of
the work force — janitors, waitstaff,
security guards, cashiers.and store
clerks — according to the Eco-
nomic Policy Institute.

Adjusting for inflation, the min-
imum wage of $5.15 is at its lowest
level since 1955. By 2009, a $7.25
minimum wage would have the
spending power of $6.75: today,
Bernstein calculated using Con-
gressional Budget Office projec-
tions.

A wage increase to $7.25 would
help, but “it wouldn’t put anybody
in the clear,” said Cara Prince, 41,
of Louisville, Kentucky. She has
been working for a temporary
agency for two years, doing factory,
warehouse and restaurant work at
$6 an hour.

“There’s a whole lot I-can’t do,”
because of the low pay, she said.

pass

cent, less than the forecast for a 3
percent gain. Excluding Wal-Mart,
the tally rose 4.0 percent.

Still, there are concerns about
how confident consumers are going
into the season. The latest measure
of confidence by the Conference
Board fell during November, and
reports of job cuts and buyouts at
companies including Pfizer Inc. and
Ford Motor Co. could make con-
sumers even more uneasy.

Thursday’s Labor Department
report of an unexpected jump in
first-time claims for unemployment
benefits also raised some questions
about consumers’ comfort level.The
department said 357,000 claims
were filed last week, up 34,000 from
the previous week. Economists said
it was too soon to tell whether the
unexpected increase indicated a
weakening in the job market.

October figures on consumer
income and spending issued Thurs-
day showed that consumers had
reason to be upbeat, at least during
that month. The’ Commerce
Department said incomes rose a
healthy 0.4 percent, while spend-
ing rose 0.2 percent after a decline
in September. The data was encour-
aging but does not guarantee that
consumers shopping for the holi-

days will feel like sé sponding freely —
something that was clear the day
after Thanksgiving, when shoppers
focused on getting the best bargain,
gravitating toward early bird spe-
cials and then leaving stores when
the deals disappeared.

“This tells me that the customers
is ever savvy about shopping for
markdowns,” said John Morris, a
managing director at Wachovia
Securities “It takes promotions to
stimulate demand in this early part
of the season. The next couple of
weeks will be really telling.”

Discounter Target said same-
store sales rose 5.9 percent, topping
forecasts of a 5.7 percent gain, as
consumers bought electronics and
health care and consumer products

But Costco reported a 5 percent
gain in same-store sales, below the
5.7 percent estimate. The retailer,
which sells gasoline, was hurt by

declining prices at the pump.

‘Among department stores, Fed-
erated Department Stores Inc.,
which acquired May Department
Stores Co. last year, reported a
robust 8.9 percent gain in same-
store sales; beating the 4.8 percent
estimate. Same-store sales include
only Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s.
It also raised its December fore-

THE TRIBUNE

cast.

Nordstrom had a 5.4 percent gain
in same-store sales, matching Wall
Street expectations. Saks Inc., which
shed its mid-brow stores to focus
on its luxury business, reported a
7.2 percent gain in same-store sales, . ' ,
better than the 7 percent estimate. |’

But results from Kohl’s Corp.
and Penney were disappointing.
Penney said same-store sales at its
department stores rose 1.4 percent,
falling short of the 3.7 percent fore-
cast from Wall Street.

Kohl’s had a 3.7 percent gain i in
same-store sales, below the 4.8 per-
cent prediction.

Limited Brands Inc. had a 12 per-
cent increase in same-store sales,
exceeding the 7.8 percent estimate.

Gap Inc., which is-still struggling
to find the right fashion formula,
suffered an 8 percent drop in same-
store sales, worse than the 5.4 per-
cent forecast...

Teen retailers generally did well.
Wet Seal Inc. had a 5.5 percent
same-store gain, beating the 4.0 per-

cent estimate. American Eagle Out-

fitters Inc. said Wednesday its ©
same-store sales rose 14 percent in
November from year-ago levels,
boosted bya strong start to the hol-
iday shopping season.

would boost some staff

“By the time they take taxes out,’

there’s nothing left. Just $23 a day.”
But the proposed increase “is not

a solution to poverty,” said Matt

Fellowes, a scholar at the. Brook-

ings Institute. “This is, for the most

part, a symbolic effort,” he said.

Twenty-eight states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia will have 2007
minimum-wages above the Federal
level. The highest minimum wage in
the nation.is Washington state’s
$7.63 an hour, which is set to
increase to $7.94 on Jan. 1. A min-
imum wage worker in the state
working full time would make
$16,515 a year before taxes. The
federal poverty threshold for a fam-
ily of three is $16,600.

The real-life math of the mini-
mum wage is even more complex.

Dennis, who is 23 and has three

children, said she lost her food’

stamps when she went to work. Her
family lives.in subsidized housing
and when her income increased,
her rent did too. Plus, she got a bill
for previous months at the higher
rate. Then there were the day.care
costs.

“It got to the point where if I
wasn’t working there, I could be
with my kids and pay my bills,” said
Dennis, who lives in Missoula,
Mont.

Mo tana was among states that
minimum wage increases in
the November election, along with
Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Neva-
da and Ohio.

Herman (Mack) McCowan, 61,

DATED the 3° day of November A..D., 2006. Before His

Lordship The Honourable Mister Justice John Lyons, in
Chambers the Supreme Court building in the City of Nassau.

UPON SUMMONS filed herein on the 8¢ day of September
A.D., 2006.

UPO! THE APPLICATION by Summons filed herein on
the 8" day of September A.D., 2006 by the 2nd Defendant
herein.

UPON HEARING Mr. Romauld S.E.A. Ferreira Esq. Counsel
for the 29 Defendant.

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of Mr. Eric Carey.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that pursuant to an action in the

Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Common Law & Equity Divisio on,

and to an Order filed on the 14!
duly signed by your Ladyship on the 4t
2005; whereby IT WAS ORDERED: —

Nover| er, A.D., 2005 and
November, A.D.,

1. The Plaintiff's action against the Defendants herein be struck

out for failure to file and serve a statement of claim pursuant
to the Rules of the Supreme Court and under the inherent
jurisdiction of the court;

2. The Plaintiffs herein whether by themselves their servants
and/or agreements or licencees or any of them or otherwise or
howsoever be restrain from fencing or obstructing any roadway,
track or path, or clearing, cutting or interfering with vegetation,
or cultivating any crops or fruit trees or maintaining or.
introducing any livestock or residing or erecting or suffering
any building, cage or pen to remain thereon or doing any other

-act, matter or thing (save in the use of the same as a National
Park as a member of the public within the area of land included
in the said Lease); \

3. Leave to apply for vacant possession is granted; and

' 4. The costs of this application and action be paid’ by. the
Plaintiffs to be taxed if not agreed.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED THAT:
1. The 28¢ Defendant has leave to issue and serve by way of
Substituted Service any necessary: and relevant documents
(including but not limited to any Judgements, Orders and
Pleadings) which may have to be served on The Plaintiffs from
time to time and such service be effected by inserting and
_ publishing an advertisement to the above named Plaintiffs,
Henry and Elizabeth Moxey in a local daily in the form set
forth in the Schedule hereto on two occasions one week apart.

AND that such advertisement so published shall be deemed to
be good and sufficient service.

AND that the costs of the application be costs in the cause.
Dated the 34 day of November A.D., 2006

REGISTRAR
Ferreira & Company
Chambers
Kemp Building
#39 East Street
Nassau, The Bahamas.

Attorneys for the 2" Defendant

GEN/CLE/ 01253 of 2003 .

SN OMe PUN SUicyUre

Information Technology

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and
United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range bservices to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter wit
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Informatio

Technology team. The successful candidate will report dittly to the Head of |.

Information Technology.

Core Responsibilities

Develop, maintain, support and optimize the organization’ network
infrastructure, server infrastructure, data communications, and
telecommunications systems.

-Ensure hardware and softwaz.is maintained and data is secured through

proper backups and staff training.

Prepare and maintain technical specifications and related documentatio!
to secure procedures and prevent system failure. This includes IT Disast
Recovery / Business Continyitplanning.

Provide management and direction for endiser support function in
support of business operations, inclusive of management of the Help

Desk function.

Manage and direct software, hardware, network, telecommunications
and web providers to epnenceppet atonal efficiencies and RO! based on
the banks business objectives.

Desired Qualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Computing or related discipline from a well
recognized university.

A minimum offive years progressive professional IT experience prefekab|
in the Financial Services Industry.

" [Tbased training or qualifications (MCSE, CISSP and CCNA) from

accredited institutions will be advantageous.

Proficient in computer systems and network management, LANs, WANs;
telecommunications, Webbased applicatins, clientserver applications,
and PGbased software applications.

Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Office and Microsoft Exchange
Server systems.

Strong interpersonal, communication, prdlem solving, project
management and customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 10, 2006

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs

www.butte rfieldbank.bs

Butterfield Bank

4

of Cleveland, was active in the Ohio
office of Let Justice Roll, an orga-
nization that advocated for a high-
er minimum wage. In Ohio, the
minimum. wage increased from
$5.15 to $6.85 and will now be
indexed to inflation.

“At $5.15 an hour, you can’t real-
ly extend yourself, you only exist,”
he said. McCowan worked for four
years as a day laborer, making $5.15

“an hour, before landing a $6 an-

hour job at a community center.
With the roughly $80 a week a
full-time worker would have after

the federal wage hike, “You're able’

to afford a telephone, able to pay
your light bill on time, able to pay
your rent,” he said. |

If there are two people at home
“it will allow you to put a little more
food.on the table, sustain yourself a
little bit better: than before,”
McCowan said. “You will be able to
relieve a lot of the stress.”

Stagnating wages for unskilled
workers coupled with increased

"housing costs have put more work-
‘ing people at risk of being home-

less. For instance, about 28 percent
of homeless adults in Louisville,
Kentucky homeless shelters are
working, according to the Louisville
Coalition for the Homeless.

One-quarter of hourly workers
who make minimum wage are
teenagers, but about half are older
than 25, according to the Bureau
of Labor Statistics.

For some.workers, a job near
minimum wage is their only option.
Paula Berrios, 66, helps support her
daughter and grandchildren in El

Salvador working in a hotel kitchen

. for $7.18 an hour. Berrios, who lives

in Alexandria, Virginia, does not
speak English.

“I’m desperate,” she said, speak-
ing through a translator. “That’s all
Ican get.”

At the current minimum wage,
households where everyone who
works makes minimum wage would
need more than three full-time
workers to pay market rent on a

‘two-bedroom apartment in New

York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, .
Massachusetts, California, Colorado
and Nevada, according to the
National Low Income Housing
Coalition.

A jump to $7.25 would make a
two-bedroom apartment affordable
to families with two minimum wage
earners in all but 19 states, said
Danilo Pelletiere, research direc-
tor at the National Low Income
Housing Coalition.

“If you’re a single mom or dad

with a kid, who can’t sleep in one
room, you’re still out of luck,” he
said. But for families with more
than one full-time minimum wage
earner, an increase could cut the
number of jobs they would need to
work, he said.
‘. In some areas, especially where
the cost of living is high, pay for
low-skill jobs has already surpassed
$7.25 an hour.

“Eight dollars an hour is a start-
ing wage for a dishwasher,” said
Paul Turley, owner of Turley’s
Restaurant in Boulder, Colorado.
“The minimum wage in Colorado is
really a non-issue.”

Legal Notice
Notice
Anti 's Holdi Limited

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 24th day of November, 2006.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
Antiquus Holding Limited

WE ARE SEEKING vibrant, vivacious
and enthusiastic persons to employ in
our hospitality department of Bimini
Sands. The positions available are
bartenders, waiters, bus boys, cooks,
office personnel and entertainment co-
ordinator.

Persons interested must be able to
relocate.

All interested persons please respond
via email to: bimini@biminisands.com
or 242-347-3500. .

LTT ee NS NT ae Ee OCR RMR TE


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS _ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2006, PAGE 11B

















FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 1, 2006

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PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006



COMICS PAGE



i
JUDGE PARKER

I THOUGHT
YOU MIGHT
BE ANORY






















I HAD A FEELING
YOU MIGHT BE
FOLLOWING IN HIS

FOOTSTEPS /

BUT WHEN
YOUR DAD
ANNOUNCED
HE WAS

RETIRING...












50 ALAN RAN HOME TO MAINE.
I'M NOT SURPRISED—



PLANS, LUANN2/ ME A NOTE.

(eo
O

es







[ / 0 BE HAPPY IF WE
WE'RE STILL. \ MAKE IT THROUGH
CATERING BY CLOSING TIME |.
TOMORROW
MORNING!

WELL, { HOPE YOU'RE STILL
CATERING WHEN IT'S TIME
FOR AMANDA'S WEDDING

0O YOU
REMEMBER
CATERING MY
WEDDING?

WE SURE
00!











South dealer. .
Both sides vulnerable.


















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Me BRAINY BOY // A907
The bidding:
. South West North East
: liv Pass 39 Pass
: 4%

Opening lead — queen of spades.

Assume you’re declarer at four
hearts and West leads the spade
queen. It’s dollars to doughnuts East
has the ace of spades, so you follow
low from dummy, hoping he was




Sure enough, East wins the queen




THERE'S No TIME To Doth TiS

re eh ea WASTE! I'VE GOT COUNT No, singleton — and shifts to a club at
| : : trickgwo. ,:..

Ae okt? él Be aaa vane still not out of the woods

*'BRENOAT after you win the club with dummy’s

king. If you lead a trump now, there’s

«





















YY Now... WHar \ iS GONE-YouR.
} ABOUT YOUR _ ) QUESTIONS GAVE
STOMACHACHE? ) ME A HEAVACHE
4 INSTEAD!

\/ S0C\AL SECURITY? CLAIM

NUMBER? MOTHERS MAVEN
NAME? FATHERS
BIRTHPLACE 7

Po You HAVE
MEVICAIP?
- MEVICARE?
MASOR.
MEDICAL?










HOW many words of four



there must be at least. one
letter word. No plurals
TODAY’S TARGET

- 43 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

- CRYPTICPUZZLE =——sd~=

C INKLE, TWINKLE, Jo
BUT WE'RE TOO FAR AWAY TO HEAR MY

Reward for Good Behavior

dealt the singleton or doubleton ace. __

with the ace — proving the ace was:

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st

Century
Dictionary

letters or more can yu make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must.
contain the centre letter and

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



"CANDY ?








the danger that West will win with

’ the ace and return the jack of spades,
and East will ruff the king. If that
occurs — and you'd have to be
somewhat unlucky for all this to hap-
pen — you’d eventually go down

: one, since you'd be left with a spade
loser. f

So you don your thinking cap at

trick three and look for a means. of

“saving the contract if West was actu-
ally dealt the singleton ace of trumps
and East the other two trumps. That’s
the, only combination: of cards that
can stop you from making four
hearts.

And, as you think about it, the
solution suddenly dawns on. you.
Even if the situation is as you fear,
there’s a sure way out of the

_ dilemma.

Accordingly, after winning the
club return, you cash the A-K of dia-
monds, the ace of clubs, and then ruff
a club in dummy. Now, having elim-
inated all your minor-suit cards from
both hands, you lead a trump.

West wins with the ace and
returns the jack of spades to
dummy’s king, and, sure enough,
East muffs. But as a direct result of
your early spadework, poor East

must now return a diamond or aclub. |

This allows you ‘to discard your

spade loser as you trump’ in.dummy,*

and the contract is saved.

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tre rain
re titan

titre train trainee trait trite

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ES
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ag
af
a8

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

inner intent inter inte
iterate nine nitrate -ni
rani rein retain retina rite
taint tier tine tint ti

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

nine-

Good 21; very good 32; excellent



T THINK DAD LIKES
HALLOWEEN AS MUCH

\S HE GOING TO STAY
HOME, AND GIVE OUT:



























NO, HE'S GOING TO SITIN

THE BUSHES WITH THE
GARDEN HOSE AND DRENCK
POTENTIAL T.PERS.





























SATURDAY, |
DECEMBER 2

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
Do' you feel like disaster in store?
You’ve had feelings like this before
and nothing ever came of it, Aries.
Don’t worry this time either; every-
thing will work out.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21



‘JA coworker has been making com-

ments under his/her breath. It might
not be something you’re doing
wrong. This person may just feel left
out. So keep it in mind.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Stop wasting time trying to get. oth-
ers to do what they are really not
interested in, Gemini. It could be

guilt that are compelling you.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
It’s impossible to tackle everything

‘fon your to-do list at once. Make a

list of everything you need to get
done and then take baby steps
toward accomplishing it.

LEO -— Jul 23/Aug 23

If you’re engaged in a struggle this
week with an equally matched oppo-
nént, Leo; think about coming to a

win situation.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22
This: week you should lighten up,
Virgo. Interject some silly moments
within the serious ones and your
mood will instantly be improved.
Others will enjoy the change, too.

LIBRA -— Sept 23/Oct 23

‘Old habits can be keeping you back
from what-you really want to enjoy, ;
Libra. Cast aside those habits and try
some new things. You just may be
surprised how good it feels.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 |

The stars hand you a chance for some

Look deep inside to discover what
makes you tick. Then live for the
moment.

SAGITTARIUS — Noy 23/Dec 21
You may want to tone down your
outgowing tendencies and be a bit
more conservative this ‘week,
Sagittarius. This comes in espe-
cially handy on the business front.

CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20
Use the power of flatter this week to
get something you really have your
eyes on, Capricom. Whether it’s a

introspection’ this week, Scorpio. .




that you have misplaced feelings of

compromise rather than fiting a no- °

i ift from your
ACROSS te promotion or a gift { y
4 It's empty, but clean (6) ° 1 Lash out around closing time, but ates Serie Hey. 0n tie compl nnents:
7. What'en actor makes 60 as to with restraint (5) Pe AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
charm? (8) - 2 Is supportive, also, in stresstul word Narrow-mindedness will not get you
8 forbidden to indulge, he shouldn't extremes (5) ati OT nes
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be fuming (6) 3 Nice woman with a deadhead a what others say may have some
10 White as an ow (5) layabout (4) ia ‘validity to it. :
. te ae eee ta es ik sticks (4) a celebrant who PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
Series a Re ew Ty Now that the holiday rush is about
14 | The ring of saintiness (4) 6 — AFrench oven with no duck seems Bh, through, it’s time to reign in expenses,
15 Be warm hearted and make the best irregular! (6) a laa party Pisces. Keep the credit cards locked
of things (4) 9 “Historic kingdom, possibly part of : , up for a while. i
16 Railway timetable America (6) ee
section (3) 11 Asnooze on the carpet (3) CHESS by Leonard Barden
17 t's most important one gets a man 12 She might bring much woe to her
out (4) "fellow (6) na
© People found in parts of Iceland (4) 13 Natrose to become a Markus Schaefer v ae Walton,
21 Ablooming motor politician (7) feel Amsterdam 2006. When a
race! (9) 15 _ It's been mispronounced (3) eels cheb ieee wee -
23 Be after a bit of fun in the shed (4) 16 Insular person? (3) Sr P rbarathadk tt otter means
24 Loatheome person, 18 Clever enough to correct a fault: the game has reached a cisis 8
a produce of today (not the 4th of outright (6) : where some minutes spentin 7
July) (4) 20. Stay and do wrong in ACROSS : calculation can pay off. Here I
26 -Deeerter, a bit of breaking a leg (5) 4 Straight (6) DOWN Black has an extra pawn and
an ingrate (3) 21 One's share of the meat? (3) 7 Door (8) 1 Danger (5). White looming threats against
27° Hardly a handy measure? (4), 22 Juvenile drink? (3) Lis 8 Spread (6) 3 See () the king, = waters a a ”
Happy Nf6-e4 was m
- roeearn ae Ni is scans 4 Subtract (5) randomness and confusion. 3
boy (4). of threat (6) N 5 Ceremony (4)
pronoun (4) White can capture on e6, take on
32 The gentle engine noise when you 25 Needs to be in touch, assuredly (3) —- 14 Speech defect (4) 6 Believe (6) e4, or threaten the black queen 2
tum up with a posh car? (4) 28 Give one’s address, there's no - 15. Unleavened bread (4) 9 Agreement (6) by Rb3. German master Schaefer |
33 They can't really all chargel (6) on be eck 11 Delve (3) thought for a while, then rattled
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34. She maybe all set (6) 31 Half dead, it’s all up with her! (5) uu 21 Heavy (9) ae Fie (a) ” which brought about his
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TRIBUNE SPORTS

=a



: — S
.
_

S
SS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006, PAGE 13B

SPORTS

es g Sees oe :





li PAKISTAN'S batsman Mohammad Yousaf, center, hits boundary as Pakistani skipper Inzamamul Haq, left, and West Indies wicketkeeper Denesh Ramdin look on during the third and final test against =~ -
West Indies, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 at National stadium in Karachi, Pakistan. Master batsman Mohammad Yousuf broke the 30-year-old world record of most test runs in a calendar year with his ninth

century in 2006 and led Pakistan toward setting up a stiff target for the West Indies in the third test.
| (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)

; rd of
in a calendar year

RR
CS

of most runs scored by a Pakistani c < —

ousuf breaks world rec
‘most test runs

‘" BECRICKET





KARACHI, Pakistan
Associated Press



PAKISTAN batsman Moham-
mad Yousuf broke Viv Richards:
30-year-old record for the most
test runs scored in a calendar year
during the ongoing third test
against the West Indies on Thurs-
day.

Yousuf drove fast bowler
Corey Collymore to the boundary
through mid-on to reach 48 on
the fourth day of the third and
final cricket test against the West
Indies to surpass Richard's record
of 1,710 runs set by the former
West Indies captain in 11 test
matches in 1976. ‘

"I am happy for my country
because whenever the record will
be discussed it's going to be
remembered as ‘Pakistan's bats-
man'," said Yousuf.

"I would like to dedicate my
performance in 2006 to my moth-
er, wife and sisters."

Yousuf, 32, scored nine cen-
turies from 11 test matches this
year for a total of 1,788 runs.

He made two centuries in the
home series against India early
this year before recording three
against England and four in five
test innings against the West

Indies.
Medal

The Pakistan Cricket Board
announced a gold medal and a

reward of one million rupees

(US$16,600) for Yousuf's record-
breaking performance in 2006.

"He will be awarded the gold
medal and cash reward at the
closing ceremony of the third test
against the West Indies on Fri-
day," PCB director of communi-
cations Ahsan Malik said in a
statement. .

Yousuf has been the mainstay
of the Pakistan middle-order bat-
ting lineup for several years and
completed his 23rd test century
when he followed his first innings

102 with 124 in the second innings

on Thursday.

He also became the sixth Pak-
istani batsman after Hanif
Mohammad, Javed Miandad,
Wajahatullah Wasti, Yasir
Hameed and current captain
Inzamam-ul-Haq to score cen-
turies in each inning of a test
match.

When Yousuf reached 43 ear-
lier in the day, he broke country-
man Zaheer Abbas' (583) record

\

batsman in a three-test series.

Yousuf, changed his name
from Yousuf Youhana after
embracing Islam in 2005.

Despite breaking Richards'
record, Yousuf rated the former
West Indies captain and present
skipper Brian Lara as the two
best cricketers of this century.

“They are simply the best,"
Yousuf said.

"It's not easy to score 300, 400
and 500 runs in one innings of a.
cricket match, but Lara has done
that."

Yousuf said he was under pres-
sure to score the required 46 runs
to beat Richards record on the
fourth day.

"After all, I am also-a human
being and yes there was a pres-
sure on me, but I adjusted accord-
ing to the conditions," he said.

Lara, the world's leading test
run maker, said Yousuf was a per-
fect role model for young crick-
eters.

"Yousuf's run of form is
tremendous and he's not only a
role model for cricketers in Pak-'
istan, but for any young cricketer
in the world," Lara said.

‘" Anyone who scores nine cen-
turies in 11 test matches must be
magnificent, and it's slightly unbe-
lievable."

Pakistan coach Bob Woolmer
described Yousuf as a dedicated
cricketer. '

"Yousuf is a quiet man, a ded-
icated professional when it comes
to batting and training," Woolmer
said. "Like all great players he
plays late and it would be inter-
esting to see how well he watches
the ball." ;

Yousuf now has scored 6,402
runs from 73 test matches with
23 centuries and 26 half centuries.

@ PAKISTAN'S batsman
Mohammad Yousuf acknowl-
edges his fans during the third
and final test against West
Indies, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006
at‘National stadium in Karachi,
Pakistan. Master batsman
Yousuf broke the 30-year-old
world record of most test runs
im a calendar year with his ninth
century in 2006 and led Pak-
istan toward setting up a stiff
target for the West Indies in the
third test.

(AP Photo/Shakil Adil)


PAGE 14B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

Freeman better than ever
after his two-year hiatus

STUBBS

ORT MYERS:

.& Freeman ‘the Nat-

xral’ Barr has settled into

his new home in South
Florida.

He’s down in Naples,

‘Florida with his wife, chil-

dren and his brother, Well-
mon. He fights out of the
SJC Boxing Club under the
supervision of Steve Can-
ton, who has groomed him
since he migrated to South
Florida at the beginning of
his professional career.

This is his second time
around for the former
World Boxing Organisa-
tion’s super middleweight
champion who is making a
return to the ring after a
21/2 year break.

So far, in his two fights
this year, Barr looked
much better fighting as a
light heavyweight than he
did as a super mid-
dleweight. He has attrib-
uted his success to the fact
that he’s more relaxed
fighting at a heavier
weight.

Despite his impressive

OPINION



28-4 win-loss record fight- .

ing out of SJC Boxing,
Barr would quickly remind
everyone that he came



from the Bahamas where
he officially began his
career.

He even wears a minia-
ture flag sewed on the
front of his black trunks to
indicate that he’s a
Bahamian. And if he had a
choice, Barr said this is
definitely where he would
want to fight.

But Barr said if a fight
comes up, he would defi-
nitely not want it to be
against a Bahamian.

“He’s trying to get to my
level and I’m trying to get
to the next level,” Barr
pointed out. “So there’s no
need. for either of us trying
to tear the other one
down.” ,

Instead, Barr has his
sights set on former two-
time, American world
champion Roy Jones Jr.,
who at one time was con-
sidered the best pound-for-
pound champion.

After toying around with
Acker in his return bout a
couple months ago, Barr
looked nothing like a fight-
er who has been inactive
for more than two years.

Best

Davydenko to face
first match of Davis

@ TENNIS
MOSCOW
Associated




N IKE
iighest-rankéd player in the Davis Cup
inal, will face the lowest-ranked man
Friday i in the opening singles match
when Russia plays Argentina.

Juan Ignacio Chela won’t be too con- .

cerned with the rankings, however.
The 33rd-ranked Argentine has beaten
the third-ranked Davydenko all five
times they have met.

“I’m very confident and ready to
fight tomorrow and win,” Chela said
Thursday after the draw. “Davydenko
likes to play short points. ... I like to
change rhythm and that’s what bothers
him.”

Two-time Grand Slam champion
Marat Safin will face David Nalban-
dian in the second singles match, while
Dmitry Tursunov and Mikhail Youzh-
ny play Nalbandian and Agustin Cal-
leri in Saturday’s doubles.

The Hawk-Eye video system, which
allows players to review and challenge
calls, is making its Davis Cup debut in
Moscow after being tested at several
ATP events.

The reverse singles of the best-of-
five series are Sunday. Team captains
can.change their lineups up to one hour
before play.

“Three players are very | similar i in
terms of rankings and have very good |

conditions and shape — that is anoth-
er point that I took into considera-
tion,” Argentina captain Alberto
Mancini said of his choices.

Chela has beaten Davydenko three
times on clay and twice on hardcourts.
Friday’s match will be on synthetic car-
pet at the Olympic Stadium.

“There is now way Calleri or (J ose)
Acasuso can beat me on this surface,”
Davydenko said. “That’s. why Chela
was nominated.”

Chela is 2-1 on carpet in the Davis
Cup, including beating Sasa Tuksar of
defending champion Croatia in five
sets in this year’s quarterfinals.

Safin is 6-2 against Nalbandian. In
the 2002 semifinals, the Russian beat
Nalbandian in four sets to help his
team reach the final, where Russia won
its only Davis Cup title after defeat-
ing host France.

They played two matches this season
— both on hardcourt. Safin won in the
second round of the U.S. Open, and
Nalbandian won in straight sets in the
quarterfinals of the Madrid Masters.

“When (Safin) plays well, he can
beat anyone, including me,” Nalban-
dian said. “I’m ready for the best
Safin.”

Safin has, been plagued by knee
injuries for almost two seasons, but
he’s better now and looking for a Davis
Cup title to help boost his confidence.

“It took me six months. to learn to
run around the court without feeling
pain and I dropped in the rankings and
lost my confidence,” Safin said. “So to

’ win this title is probably the most

important thing for me in the past two
years.”
Russia, which hasn’t lost at home in

DENKO, the »

H RUSSIA'S Nikolay Davydenko,
left, and Argentina's Juan Ignacio
Chella pose for photographers after
the draw ceremony for the Davis
Cup final in Moscow, Thursday, Nov.
30, 2006. Russia hosts Argentina in
the Davis Cup final on December 1-

3, 2006, at the Olympic indoor stadi-
um in Moscow.

@ ARGENTINA‘S Agustin Cal-
leri returns a ball during a practice
session in Moscow, Thursday, Noy.
30, 2006. Russia hosts Argentina in
the Davis Cup final on December 1-
3, 2006, at the Olympic indoor stadi-
um in Moscow.

(AP Photos/Misha Japaridze)

11 years, is making its fourth appear-
ance in the final. It lost to Sweden in
1994 and to the United States the fol-
lowing year.

“I do not know when will we have
another chance to play in the final,”
Safin said. “Me and (Mikhail) Youzh-
ny have already won, but for the other
half of the team it’s a first opportunity.”

Argentina has never won the tro-
phy, but it lost in the final to the Unit-
ed States in 1981. If Argentina wins it
will become the 13th champion since
the competition’s inception in 1900 and
the sixth different winner in as many
years.

He gave himself a B+
grade against Menefee, an





support he gets from his

family.



“So far, in his two fights this
year, Barr looked much better
fighting as a light heavyweight
than he did as a super
middleweight. He has
attributed his success to the
fact that he’s more relaxed
fighting at a heavier weight.”



increase from the C that he
awarded himself against
Acker.

If Barr continues to-

shine, he could be on:his
way to claim the world title
that got away from him as
a super middleweight when
he fought and lost to Bert
Schenk in Cottbus, Ger-
many more than a decade
ago.

At least he doesn’t have

.to worry about the moral

His wife, Tanya, is a reg-
istered nurse.

“J think he’s stronger, I
think he’s confident and
he’s ready,” she pro-
claimed. “My goal is to get
him on the map and to help
him become a world cham-
pion.

“That is where we are
going. I’m going to make
sure that he can get into
the ring and kick some

butt. He eats good. He has’

TRIBUNE SPORTS



\ ’

nin

a good lifestyle. He doesn’t.
need anything else.”

At the same token, his
older brother Wellmon?
migrated from the-
Bahamas in 2001 to be in”
Barr’s corner, both in the
gym and at fight time.

“To me, he’s more con-.
fident,” Wellmon pointed °
out. “He’s more relaxed.
and set. I think he can go .
very far in this his second
time around.

“But I’ve told him every”
time he got into the ring to:
fight that losers never quit. °
I’m confident that he can
go out there and do it. He
is solid.”

Two years on from his:
break, Barr is hoping that
the second time around .
will be the charm for him - |
in his bid to become only
the second world champi-
on from the Bahamas. :

He has adjusted very well
to his surroundings.

At age 32, Barr has it all,
a house, car and his family »
and friends - and he should ,
definitely be one of the
fighters to watch from the
Bahamas.

Chela in
Cup final












Today Saturday Today Saturday : -. Today Saturday

High Low W High Low W Low W High Low W High Low W High Low .

FC. FIC Fic. Fc ee FIC FIC
Albuquerqué “46/7 26/3 s 44/6 247-4 pc Indianapo is Bae up 3.
Anchorage 27/-2 14/-10 sf 24/-4 14/-10 _ pc 79126 55/12
Atlanta’ 57AS" 87/2 t 58/14 39/8 pe: 40/4 22/-5. po
Atlantic City 73/22, 37/2 t 50/10. 31/0 pe 61/16 37/2 o o
Baltimore 72/22 40/4 -t 500° 30/-1 pe : ; 25/-3 s Gai ttots
. Boston 62/16 40/4 © 49/9 33/0 pc
Buffalo = 44/6 °28/-2 or 88/8" 28/2 sf : :
Charleston, SC_ 76/24 50/10 t 62/16 49/9 Cc 40/4 “29/-1
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Cleveland 40/4 29/-1 © 38/3 27/-2 ¢ 35/1 A? 8
Dallas. 51/10 28/-2 s 48/8 32/0 -s a
Denver _ 39/3 14/-10 ¢ 30/-1 11/-11 sn New Orleans —56/13 _ 45/7
Detroit 36/2" 25/-8 r= 35/1 23/5 ce =~ New York : A i 20: 69/18: pe:
Honolulu 80/26 70/21 pe 81/27 69/20 pc Oklahoma City _ 43/6 21/-6 s 42/5 25/-3 pc Tucson 67/19 34/1 s 70/21. 35/1. s
Houston: 57A3 35/1 «s 63/17, 38/3. -s Orlando. 83/28 64A7- pc 80/26 63/1 Washington, DC 74/23 39/3 t 52/11 36/2 pe

THE WEATHER REPORT

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Partly to mostly » Times of ciclils and |




Mainly clear. . “Sunshine and patchy. Partly sunny. ©






‘clouds. © sun.

High: 84°... High: 74°

Low: teat =p Low 71% Low: 61°
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... 68° F/20° C

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peal RSAOW. scsvssostnssoseediseasescecestosse 66° F/19° C
Precipitation

~As-of 1:p.m. yesterday ad 0:00”

Year to date ............... 46.56”

» Normal year to date ........c..cccsscssseesesssseeee 49.52”




High: 84° F/29°C
Low: 74° F/23°C







~ High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 68° F/20°C —








All forecasts and maps provided by
-AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006





KEY WEST
High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 76° F/24°C










Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows. E
e : Low: 75° F/24°C —







































AccuWeather.com —

GREATINAGUA
High: 89° F/32°C.
Low: 75° F/24°

- The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the




greater the need for eye and skin protection.

4:04 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:00 a.m.
5:25 p.m.
§:54 a.m.”
- 6:17 p.m.
6:45 a.m.
7:08 p.m.”

Today
Saturday
Sunday

Monday

Sunrise...... 6:38 a.m, Moonrise ....2:38p.m.
Sunset... ...5:20'p.m.. Moonset ..... 2:55am,



Dec. 12

Dec. 4

SAN SALVADOR
High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 73° F/23°C



MAYAGUANA
_ High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 74° F/23°C-





Low

a a.m.
10:27 p.m.

11:25 a.m.
11:19 p.m.

12:19 p.m:

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

Su B/G =
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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet : 6-7 Miles 79° F
Saturday: Eat 8-16 Knots - 2-3 Feet 6-7 Miles - 79° F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 17° F
Saturday: __E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
ABACO Today: ESE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
Saturday: Eat 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F













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T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice





Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.














































FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2006

SECTION

' Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

_ The Tribune |



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Teeside
Pe CofA et gy

opinion





Freeman cru
victory

@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
‘Senior Sports Reporter

FORT MYERS: For five
rounds, Freeman ‘the Natural’
Barr battered and bruised vet-
eran Tony Menefee on Tues-
day night at the Harbourside
Event Center.

At the start of the sixth
when Barr decided to put an
end to the misery, referee
Frank Santore Jr. stepped in
and checked the bloodied
nose and the eyes of Mene-
fee.

Sensing that there was no

way that Menefee could |

absorb any more punishment,
Santore raised Barr’s hands,
signaling the end of the sched-
uled 10-round main event of

the SJC Boxing Promotions -

show dubbed: “Season’s Beat-
ings Fights.”

“The guy had. a lot of expe-
rience, but I sparred with a
lot of good guys and so it was-
n’t a-problem for me going
out there and getting in a
workout against Menefee,”
stated Barr, who improved his
win-loss record to 28-4.

“I knew it was only a matter
of time before I got to him. I
knew I could match up good
against him. He has the expe-
rience and I have the experi-
ence. But I always believe I’m
a much better fighter, so I’m
not afraid of anybody.”

Menefee, who at age 33, has
fought in more than 100 pro
fights, admitted that after

Barr “rang his bell” in the

fourth round, he just wanted
to get out of the ring.

“T felt like I hit him a cou-
ple times with a couple good
shots, but I just got a little
careless,” Menefee stated. “I
only fought once this year and
I didn’t have any sparring
until the last week or week
and a half.

“But he was a decent oppo-

nent and if J had a little more
sparring, I would have been
able to put up a better show-
ing. But he was tough.”

Ring doctor Rodolfo Eich-
berg said because Menefee
wasn’t breathing properly
through his nose and his eyes
weren’t steady, he instructed
the referee to call off the fight.

Barr, who weighed in at 172
pounds, compared to Mene-
fee’s 173, won all five rounds
to control the fight. He took
control from the second
round when he connected
with Menéfee’s nose.

Round after round, Barr
used his jab effective to pound
away at Menefee’s nose. Each

round, he.left Menefee on the



i



0

in sixth round





- ABOVE: Freeman Barr, left, knocks Tony Menefee' s head back with a jab Tuesday night i in
the main event i in Fort Myers, FL.

| RIGHT: Referee Frank Santore Jr, centre, holds up the arm of Freeman Barr, right, after
stopping Tony Menefee at two seconds of the sixth round in a light heavyweight bout scheduled for
eight rounds Tuesday in Fort Myers, FL.

defence, wiping away the

blood as he avoided getting.

him again.
Barr, however, said he had

to be extra careful.

“Sometimes when you get a

man hurt, you have to be
patient, especially with a vet-

eran like him,” Barr reflected.
“Plus, I needed a couple more
rounds, so I didn’t want to
end it too early.

“Tf I saw that he was mak-
ing a run at it, then I would
have stepped up and took him
out of there. I didn’t have to
worry about that because the
referee realised that he could-
n’t continue.” +.

SJC’s Boxing manager/pro-

‘ moter Steve Canton said Batr

simply lived up to his expec-
tations.

“That was a real fighter he

fought and he didn’t even win

around,” Canton emphasised. Ea
“What he did was exactly :
what we. discussed, 100:per

cent, no diversion.

“You have to respect Tony:

Menefee’s power. He’s won
more than 70 fights. He’s.a
big puncher. He’s a good kid.
He’s been in boxing since he
was 11 years old. Tony is not
what he was five years ago,
but Freeman isn’t either.”
Canton said Barr put
together his punches at the
tight time and he took advan-
tage of Menefee’s inability to

mount a serious defence to '

stop the onslaught.

In his.second bout back
after taking two years off to
recuperate from a series of
injuries, Barr said he would

give himself a B+. He

(Photos: Gail Janotta, Florida Boxing News)

acknowledged that it was
much better than the C he
gave himself when he fought
his last fight in July.

“T was able to work off a

lot of the rust,” he pointed
out!!“If I can get another
fight, then ] think I can
improve my performance
even more.”

Barr is not expected to fight

" again until the new year. He

and Canton indicated that

fight with former world cham-:*_
pion Roy Jones, who is.alsoâ„¢:
making a comeback after a.

Knockout season eT

they are going to pursue a

two-year hiatus. .

for amateur boxing

= BOXING
_ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Amateur Boxing Federation of
the Bahamas has planned a knockout

season, transforming their programmes.

Even though the sport has hada suc-
cessful year, president Wellington Miller
said that there is still room for improve-
ment.

. According to Miller, the new ideas
brought forward by the executive mem-
bers should also assist with the success on
the international scene, adding to the

number of amateur boxers in the country. .

He said: “This year has been a tremen-
dous one for the sport, but it will only get
-better as the new year approaches.

“We are proud to announce that the
national coach, Andre Seymour, has got-
ten a job with the ministry, this is a full
time job;-so we can now have his ser-
vices fulltime now.

“But it only gets better from here for
boxing. We will be embarking on a new
project which will include the Urban
Renewal Project, and surrounding
schools. This project will help us build

boxing in the country.”

The federation’s main focus will be
their after school programme, which will
be' conducted by national head coach
Seymour, Quincy Pratt, Steven Larri-
more and Leonard ‘Boston Blackie’

' Miller.
The federation is also targeting schools

in the Family Islands, receiving assistance
with the programme from coaches such
as Carlin Ingraham and John Ford i in
Inagua.

Coach

The after school programme will con-
tinue through the summer months, with

each coach being assigned to more than |

five schools.
The schools targeted so far are AF

“Adderley, SC McPherson, Gerald Cash,

Children’s Emergency Hostel, CH
Reeves, HO Nash, Fox Hill Primary, CC
Sweeting senior and junior, Oakes Field
and Albury Sayles primary along with
the Simpson Penn School.

Miller added: “We feel that its impact
will go a long way in helping to shape

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P.O a

and steer many of our young boys to
become meaningful and productive citi-
zens in the wonderful country. Each of
these coaches has a long and distin-
guished ring record and they would do an
excellent job in the after school pro-

‘gramme.

“We are very excited about the
prospects that Freeport is currently bran-
dishing. In a recent meeting with Bert
Perry and Terry Goldsmith in Freeport,
the executives were very pleased to learn
of the plans that they have for the North-
ern Bahamas. They too have targeted
schools in Grand Bahama and once they
get their programme underway, they
would be able to incorporate the islands
of Abaco and Bimini.

“The success these programmes will
have will only mean a brighter future for
boxing, we had much success but we
know that more will come.”

‘Miller also added that the. boxing. fed-
eration’s charge to move forward will
call for more local promoters on the pro-
fessional level.

He applauded the work of First Class
Promotions so far, but said more busi-
nesses like these should step forward.