Citation

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 5B



= Ses
Price controls placing

business ‘in time warp’

FROM page 1B

products such as gasoline.

Pointing out that price controls “distorted”
the market for goods they were imposed on,
especially if Bahamian companies were forced
to sell below the ‘market clearing’ or equilib-
rium price, Mr Lowe noted the impact that
fixed margins had on the petroleum retail sec-
tor.

Using the example of a gas station needing
20,000 gallons to fill its tanks, the Nassau Insti-
tute executive said an increase in global oil
prices from $1 to $1.50, a 50 per cent increase,
would raise the retailer’s cost to purchase this
amount from the oil company by the same
percentage - from $20,000 to $30,000.

“Tf they can’t make a higher margin to get
more turnover, more cash flow, they’re forced
to make additional arrangements with the
banks etc to get additional float that will make
up the inventory,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“That’s a problem, because they’re work-
ing on razor thin margins, the service stations.”

With fixed margins of $0.44 per gallon of
gasoline, and $0.33 per gallon of diesel, Mr
Lowe said Bahamian petroleum retailers, in
common with many other businesses, might
find it prudent to exit the industry because
they were unable to get the necessary return on
their investment.

When that happened, and no replacements
entered the sector due to the unattractive fixed



mark-ups, product
shortages were the
likely result.

“A lot of business-
es today would prob-
ably do better putting
money in the bank
than the returns they
get by staying open,”
Mr Lowe told Tri-
bune Business.

“If businessmen
are not getting a 3-5
per cent return on
turnover, they’re bet-
ter off sticking mon-
ey in the bank.

“These price controls make it so you can’t
adjust your business model as times change.
Youre putting businesses in a time warp, as
everything is changing around them.

“They’re mark-up restrictions, not price con-
trols.”

Reacting to Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s comments on Saturday, when he sug-
gested that price controls on the petroleum

HUBERT INGRAHAM

industry had protected Bahamian consumers,
Mr Lowe contrasted this with what happened
when then-president Ronald Reagan removed
similar controls in the US in the early 1980s.

Arguing that “things were back to normal”
within two weeks in the US, following the
removal of controls imposed in the aftermath
of oil price-driven inflation in the 1970s, Mr
Lowe added: “Government just needs to get
out of the way.

“T think it [the petroleum industry situa-
tion] just again proves that price control does-
n’t work because there are too many factors
involved. We’ve had 40 centuries of price con-
trols and governments putting them on, and
then another government takes them off,
throughout the world.

“They don’t take into consideration all the
things necessary to put a product on the mar-
ket, things we in the Bahamas don’t control,
such as the initial costs, transportation, the
potential blockages in the Middle East.

“Ultimately, we end up with shortages,” Mr
Lowe said.

“Tf the gas stations feel that they can’t get a

Eventually, it costs more than they get in
through profits.

“What do they do? Maybe they look for a
new business, so ultimately shortages result
from price controls.

“What happens is that intervention causes
the businessman to lay off staff, causing more
unemployment. That’s really the unintended
consequences of public policy.”

Again arguing that it was not the Govern-
ment’s duty to intervene in transactions
between business and consumer, Mr Lowe
said the ultimate solution lay in ‘freeing the
market’ and allowing the three oil companies
- Shell, Texaco and Esso - to compete at the
wholesale level, with the dealers also compet-
ing among themselves.

This, he suggested, would force all con-
cerned to be more efficient and, by allowing
gas retailers to charge the margins and prices
they wanted, consumers would naturally grav-
itate to those offering the lowest costs.

“They distort the margins you might get, or
do not normally get,” Mr Lowe told Tribune
Business of price controls.

“And prices have gone up all the time. Price
control is not preventing prices going up,
because petroleum costs are based on the
international market.

“No one can control that. Mr Obama can’t
control it, and Mr Bush couldn’t control it.
It’s a little bit of a fallacy to say there’s price
control.

“If you want to say price management, that’s
fine.”

Major transport firm
in 35% fuel cost hike

FROM page 1B

devise and implement a
long-term solution to oil
price shocks.

Khaalis Rolle, Bahamas
Ferries’ chief marketing offi-
cer, said that in his capacity
as the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC)
chairman, he was exploring
fuel hedging options
designed to shield all
Bahamian companies - espe-
cially those that were trans-
portation-based - from expo-
sure to rapidly increasing oil
prices.

And he criticised the
Bahamas’ tendency as a
nation to focus on short-
term, temporary solutions
rather than long-term fixes,
while the National Energy
Policy and alternative ener-
gy forms seemed to become
a secondary issue once oil
prices started on a down-
ward trend in late 2008.

“Tt is extremely high,” Mr
Rolle told Tribune Business,
when asked about Bahamas
Ferries’ current fuel bill. “I
think we’re up about 35 per
cent compared to last year.
When you use close to one
million gallons of fuel a year,
it is ridiculous.”

And, turning to the
Bahamas’ failure as a nation
to draw up and implement a
comprehensive strategy to
deal with oil and energy-
related cost increases, the
BCCEC chairman said: “We
keep sounding this alarm.
We keep going through
these temporary fixes, and
we’re not looking to long-
term solutions.

“We keep ending up right
back where we started.
There isn’t any substantial
pressure to resolve this
problem. We’re back right
where we were, and the
minute prices started to
trend downwards, nobody
looked at it. This wasn’t an
issue any more; it became a
secondary issue.”

A National Energy Poli-

cy now looks more needed
than ever. Global oil prices
moved close to $120 per bar-
rel yesterday, with specula-
tors moving in to exploit the
uncertainty caused by Mid-
dle East turbulence, the lat-
est bout of which is in Libya,
while investors sought a safe
haven in gold.

“Now is the time for us,
because these issues don’t
go away,” Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. “They may
disappear for a second, but
they don’t go away. They
usually come right back at
you, and when they come
back around, they’re more
ferocious and more danger-
ous. We have to figure this
one out.”

Hedging

The BCCEC chairman
confirmed that he was
exploring various hedging
strategies and options, and is
set to meet this week with
one of the major oil compa-
nies, having already spoken
to commercial banks in the
Bahamas and abroad.

Hedging is a strategy
where private sector com-
panies, anticipating a future
increase in oil prices, lock-in
existing prices by agrecing
contracts to purchase oil at a
fixed price over a certain
period of time. In agreeing
to do this, they are hoping to
save against future oil price
increases.

However, major Bahami-
an institutions, such as BEC
and Bahamasair, while look-
ing at this possibility have
declined to hedge in the
past, fearing that they may
come down on the wrong
side of a ‘hedge’ and suffer
losses that will result in
political repercussions.

“I’m looking at some
options that we haven’t
explored in the past,” Mr
Rolle said, “like hedging.
We’re looking at an option
to hedge from a very global
perspective. We’re looking
at hedging for everyone that

NOTICE

JADAJOLEA LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

JADAJOLEA LIMITED is in voluntar
dissolution under the provisions of
137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

ection

The dissolution of the said company
commenced on the 4th March, 2011 when
the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is

Manex Limited, The Bahamas

inancial

Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,

Bahamas

Dated this 8th day of March, A. D. 2011



Manex Limited
Liquidator



reasonable profit, they’re not going to sell it.

APD Limited

APD Limited is seeking bids from Bahamian firms for the demolition and disposal of the old
Customs building an the east end of Arawak Cay, All interested applicants should sulamit their
proposal to APD Limited's offices in the House of Moshe located at the corner of Victoria Ave
and Bay Street. Prapodals can abo be emailed te nfoBapdport.com-.
is fuel dependent, especially
companies that are fuel
dependent like our business.

“We’ve had some prelim-
inary discussions, and I think
we're going to try and fur-
ther those discussions to
speed this up. We actually
have a meeting with one of
the oil majors this week, but
we’ve spoken to some of the
commercial banks here and
abroad.

“It’s been positive. We
just have to now look at the
possibilities and look at how
practical it is, what the
options are and how practi-
cal those options are.”

Mr Rolle added that the
BCCEC was set to meet
with Bahamian petroleum
retailers this week to discuss
their situation, where oil
price increases were forcing
them to increase their
upfront capital outlay to buy
supplies from the whole-
salers.

This is causing cash flow
and overdraft problems for
the retailers.

“We’ve had a couple of
discussions with them, but
nothing is substantiated as
yet,” Mr Rolle added.

“I’m going to meet witha
couple of them this week
just to discuss it briefly and
see what, if any support, can
be given to them through
the Chamber.”

Proposals should address the following

The ald Customs Building contains asbestos which must be removed and disposed of in
accordance with Department of Environmental Health protocol of ashestes abatement.
The cortractor must be a certified asbestos abatement contractor and hold a valid
certification. The asbestos removal process must be detailed within the applicant's
proposal. Any questions regarding the qualification criteria should be directed to the
Department of Environmental Health,

All debris and scrap te include the steel, scrap vehicles, concrete, building parts, trash,
attached to or immediately adjacent to the building are to be removed by the tenderer
and a plan detailing the disposal methods 6 to be included within the proposal, The
demolition and disposal of the concrete foundation & not required and is mot to be
included in the proposal.

The applicant must provide a safety plan describing how they will secure the site and
protect the health and safety of their employees and subcontractors.

All applicants should understand that the site 6 4 high rick site and that the structure is
unstable.

The applicants proposal should consider a start date of no later than April 7" 2011 anda
completion date of ne later than June 7°" 2011.

Demolition and Disposal proposals should be delivered to APD Limited
by March 18"", 2011.

APD Limited, Moshe Bullding, Ray and Victoria, Ph. (242) 322-2142











pay less for insuring your home!

Have you heard the good news?
You CAN save money!



Ask NIBA for a home insurance quote! Home insurance with
NIBA costs less AND you receive cover with a claims service
that lives up to its promise! In addition to low

deductibles, you can choose to pay by interest free
installments for added convenience,



It's time to pay less for insuring your
home!




Tel.677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com














Open
Saturdays

10.00arm-
2.00pm




NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED
Atlantit House, 2nd Terrace & Collings Avenue
BO. Box W-? 764 Nassau Tel 677-6422 wean. nibaquote.com










$8.9m FINCO

hoost through
loan provision
policy change

* Reduction in credit
allowances from 40% to 30%
of non-accrual loans key factor
in quadrupling of mortgage
lender’s 2010 income

* Non-performing loans hit
$88.64m or 10.47% of total
loan portfolio

* FINCO insurance subsidiary
was still seeking licence
renewal at balance sheet date
By NEIL HARTNELL

A change in its loan pro-
visioning policy resulted in :
Finance Corporation of the ;
Bahamas (FINCO) reduc- :
ing credit loss provisions by }
$8.9 million during its 2010 }
financial year, a key factor ; the first census in 1978.
behind ta quadru- : is perceived as one of the sec-
pling to more than $18 mil- ? tors with little economic activi-
i ty, and therefore its contribu-
? tion to the Gross National
i Product is considered minimal.
? As an agricultural professional,
? and as per the definition for
? economic activity, nothing
? could be further from the
i truth,” said Mr Minns in a

SEE page 4B

Chamber unveils
Mystery Shop plan

Aims ‘to test every single
business in the Bahamas’ on
customer service and front-line

performance for indefinite period

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third

| party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

THE TRIBUNE

usiness



TUESDAY,

MARCH 8,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Agriculture could be gener-

i ating $305 million per year
i towards
? Domestic Product (GDP), com-
? pared to the $40.2 million
i recorded in the most recent sta-
i tistics, if proper reporting and
? recording of all agricultural out-
? puts took place, a Department
? of Agriculture official said yes-

Tribune Business Editor = terday.

Bahamian Gross

Leslie Minns, a statistician
with the Department, said in
his most recently-issued report
on agriculture’s contribution to
the Bahamian economy that
there has been “under-report-
ing” of agricultural output since

“Agriculture in the Bahamas

report released to senior agri-
culture officials in January.

A fact which Mr Minns sug-
gests highlights this appears in
this report. In it, an increase in
the total value of agricultural
production from $78 million in
2008 to around $194.8 million in
2009 is documented.

Acreage recorded as being
under cultivation by farmers or
being used for livestock
increased by 511 per cent, from
5,793 acres in 2005/2006, to
35,402 acres in 2009.

However, rather than being a
consequence of a significant rise
in actual output created by
farmers or other individuals
producing agricultural goods,
Mr Minns suggests this increase
is primarily due to better
recordkeeping and data collec-
tion, which needs to be further
improved if a true picture of
agriculture’s contribution to the
economy is to be obtained.
Between 1994 and 2006, only
“reported data” - that willingly
made available by a relatively
small selection of farmers - was
used to estimate agricultural
output.

From 2005, the department

PRICE CONTROLS PLACING
BUSINESS “IN TIME WARP"

: By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Chamber of i} —..
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC) ;
has launched a Mystery
Shopper project that aims }
“to test every single business }
in the Bahamas” on front- :
line performance and cus- i nomic climate, a think-tank
i executive yesterday charging
? that they ultimately resulted
? in product shortages.

Price controls are putting
Bahamian businesses “in a
time warp”, leaving them
unable to adjust margins in
the face of increasing costs
and other changes in the eco-

Rick Lowe, of the Nassau

i Institute, said the Govern-
i ment-imposed price controls
i on industries such as petrole-
? um and food, ostensibly to
i protect the interests of low
i income Bahamian consumers,
i were misnamed and failed to
i work because they could not
i impact international factors
? outside this nation’s control.

Suggesting that it was real-

: ly “price management”,
i rather than “price control”,
i? that the Government-dictated
i mark-ups imposed on various
i? Bahamian businesses, Mr
i Lowe said a better solution
i was for the administration to
i “get out of the way” and let
i the market, through competi-
i tion, determine the price of

SEE page 5B

Sotheby's

* Think tank executive warns
government-imposed margin and
mark-up restrictions ultimately
cause product shortages and
distort market

* Government urged to ‘get out
of the way’ and let market decide
prices through competition

* ‘Many firms would do better
putting money in the bank than
staying open’

Agriculture output
$305m per annum

: By ALISON LOWE
? Business Reporter
: alowe@tribunemedia.net

turned to the Farmers’ Register
to better estimate production
and its value. Farmers become
registered to obtain incentives
such as duty-free agricultural
equipment, imports and hurri-
cane relief, and such a register
has been one of the only ways
for the Government to get a
better handle on the farming
industry, given that there have
traditionally been few other
incentives for producers to
make themselves known for
data collection purposes.

Mr Minns said he hopes that
in the future input from other
areas, from which economic
value is derived from agricul-
ture, can be included in reports
detailing agriculture’s input into
the national economy. Agricul-
ture’s contribution to the $6.7
billion GDP in 2008 was found
to be just 0.6 per cent or $40.2
million. In 2009, this rose to 0.7
per cent.

The statistician laments that
only economic value derived
from the production of crops
and livestock in the Bahamas

SEE page 4B



66

When you use
close to one

: million gallons of

fuel a year, it is

} ridiculous.”

KHAALIS ROLLE

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

aaa ola



ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money ot Mirah





Cree, erg







UALS

(242) 356-901

FREEPORT
(242) 351-2010

MARSH HARBCHUR
(243) 367-3135




fer bestia aca

Airport’s $138m

second

stage to

start March 17

* Plan to construct 226,000 sq ft

arrivals terminal a
* Contracts for sto

nd pier
nework, masonry

and carpeting now before NAD/Airport
Authority Board for approvals

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Work on the $138.3
million Phase II stage of
the Lynden Pindling
International Airport
(LPIA) redevelopment
will begin on Thursday,
March 17, with the
selective demolition of
the existing US depar-
ture terminal.

The second stage,
which follows comple-

SEE page 3B

GUIDED TOUR: A tour of the Air-
port last year.



MAJOR TRANSPORT FIRM
IN 35% FUEL COST HIKE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading Bahamian
transportation company,
which consumes almost one
million gallons of diesel per
year, yesterday said it had
seen its fuel costs rise 35 per
cent year-over-year, a senior
executive telling Tribune
Business it was “ridiculous”
that this nation had yet to

SEE page 5B

* Bahamas Ferries executive
says ‘ridiculous’ that nation
has yet to devise long-term
solution to fuel price
inflation, his firm using
almost one million gallons
per year

* Now exploring hedging
strategy to aid all fuel-
dependent Bahamian
companies, via talks with oil
firms and major banks

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

*

Damianos |

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Prime Income Fund

¢ A higher, stable rate of return ¢ Professional fund management

e Long-term capital preservation ° Diversified portfolio

PARADISE ISLAND ~ OCEAN CLUB ESTATES e Lower risk investment

BEACHFRONT CABBAGE BEACH LOT
Large elevated lot on world-famous Cabbage Beach with 149 feet on the beach.
Priced to sell at US$6.9m.

Contact: George. Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.362.4211 BAHAMAS
242.356.9801

242.351.3010

BARBADOS
meet

ROYAL FIDELITY

lia 1 Mela 4

Nassau: 246.435.1955

Member of ani
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | the Bahamas MLS | MID) Cen Gi)

Freeport:





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 9B








The Tribune

B

O Di A N

e

eeewM | N D



ith





Welg 4
Koyo ecbiue



ht

in self
gained



By ALESHA CADET
Tribune Features Reporter

ROM diet plans to

weight loss programs,

women out there are
going the extra mile to stay
fit. Whether it is for health
or personal issues, they are
determined to take it off
and keep it off.

Jennifer Hudson, the singer and
actress who won an Academy
Award for her performance in
Dream Girls recently made an
appearance on the Oprah Winfrey
show and discussed how joing
Weight Watchers helped her drop
the pounds.

Bouncing in her seat and saying
"I want to tell it!" - Jennifer revealed
the magic number.

She said: “I've lost 80 pounds,”
and received a standing ovation.”

"It's like a brand new me," she
said. "Sometimes I don't even recog-
nise myself.”

She told Oprah, she made the
decision to lose the weight while she
was pregnant with her now 2-year-
old son, and she eventually went
from a size 16 to a size 6.

She also spoke tearfully a bit
about the tragedy that occurred
more than two years ago when her
mother, brother and young nephew
were murdered. She said she was
able to survive that loss with the help

that Dr Diggiss was looking for
patients who wanted to have the
surgery, but who were also willing
to be a spokesperson for the proce-
dure and tell their story.

"It was a just a dream come for
me- because it meant that I didn't
have to travel , but I would be able
to have the surgery performed at
home, in the facility where I worked
by a fellow countryman and I
jumped at the opportunity."

Samantha said she was never
afraid of the medical risks associated
with any elective surgical procedure.

"T just focused on the new me. I
was ashamed of my body going into
surgery, ( I was wearing a size 32)
but Dr Diggiss assured me before
we went in that what I was seeing
then, I would never see again.
Samantha describes the day of her
surgery as “ the day that Dr Diggiss
rescued me.”

TV personality, Kelly Osbourne
graced the cover of Shape Magazine
last year displaying her life changing
weight loss. In an interview with
Claire Conners of Shape Magazine,
Kelly stated: "I was called fat and
ugly in the press almost my entire
life. I understand that being judged
by others comes with the territory,
but it broke my heart and ruined my
self-esteem. It sets you up to hate
yourself in a huge way. I was so
angry about the things people said
about me. I truly believe it's the main
reason I turned to Vicodin and end-
ed up in rehab three times. I just

Being overweight caused me a lot of pain and rejec-
tion. | had a situation where | had applied for a job
and | was actually told, 'We're sorry, you have a
great attitude and excellent qualifications and a pretty
face, but we cannot hire an overweight person as the
first contact to our clients.’ That crushed me.

= SAMANTHA EVANS

of "my family, my baby and God."

"The only thing I can do to honour
their memory is to make them
proud,” she said.

Like Jennifer , two years ago, a
Bahamian resident, Samantha Evans
walked around "wearing a smile, but
carrying a heart full of pain," des-
perate to end the cycle of obesity
that had controlled her life since her
early teens.

That desperation led her to make
medical history, becoming one of
the first people in the Bahamas to
have a lap -band surgery done local-
ly by Doctor Charles Diggiss.

"Being overweight caused me a
lot of pain and rejection. I had a sit-
uation where I had applied for a job
and I was actually told, "We're sorry,
you have a great attitude and excel-
lent qualifications and a pretty face,
but we cannot hire an overweight
person as the first contact to our
clients.’ That crushed me."

"At my heaviest, I was well over
300 pounds,” she said. “ Fortunately,
I didn't have any of the medical con-
ditions associated with obesity like
hypertension or diabetes, but I knew
Thad to do something to change my
life. I have four children and I was
not able to do things with them.”

"Twas familiar with the concept of
weight loss surgery, I had even cor-
responded with a doctor in Mexico,
but one day, I was at work (in the
surgical unit of Doctor's Hospital)
and my coworker asked me if I knew

hated myself. I'm an emotional eater.
When I get upset, my diet goes out
the window.”

It was not until she signed up for
Dancing With the Stars six months
later, she says, that she realised how
bad her diet really was. "I'd fill up on
French fries and pizza all day and
wonder why I wasn't losing weight.
In the very beginning, I kept getting
sick during rehearsals because I was
eating such terrible, fatty food and
feeling so exhausted.”

It was her dance partner, Louis
van Amstel, who taught her about
nutrition. "He made me eat turkey
burgers and salads and explained to
me that a high-protein, low-carb diet
would keep me energised,” she says.
"Then I started losing weight and
realised, ‘Oh, it's true what they say:
Diet and exercise really work!’

Over the last nine months, Kel-
ly's dropped another 30 pounds,
bringing her weight loss to a total of
50." She says: "Ultimately, I'm real-
ly glad I lost the weight the way I
did," says Kelly. "I never thought in
a million years I'd be that healthy
girl who wakes up every morning to
exercise. After being called 'cherubic
and chubby,’ I'm rocking a bikini! I
feel silly, but I think I'm going to
cry. Being on the cover of SHAPE is
the biggest victory I could ever hope
for.”

Going further, in an exclusive first
person story for Glamour Magazine,
Star Jones also discussed her battle




















































Because you're worth it
LLOREA
PARIS

JENNIFER Hudson waves to photog-
Pee) cee STUN MSs] CL eL6

| Women in Hollywood luncheon in
Beverly Hills, Calif., Thursday, Feb.
PAU

Mm
=

LING OL

SWAROVSKI ELEMEN TS

"© YOU'Te worth it
(kas



with weight, and her ultimate
decision to have gastric bypass
surgery.

TELEVISION personality and singer
Kelly Osbourne arrives at the 2011
Elton John Academy Award viewing
party in West Hollywood, Calif. on
Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. (AP)

CHANGE

She openly told the magazine:
“T could also start in the summer
of 2000, when I was a co-host on
“The View” and the first media
stories about my weight started to
surface, but that, too, would be
too easy. So why don’t I start on
the day that changed how I would
physically appear to the world
and would force me to face the
reasons such drastic steps needed
to be taken, August 19, 2003.”
“We African American women
are taught to be proud of our
curves, full breasts and shapely
hips. I used to look in the mirror
and take pride in my figure, but
that was when I was legitimately
a full-figured woman. I’d gradu-
ally gone from full-figured to
morbidly obese. Finally, one of
my dearest friends sat me down,
looked me in the eye and said,
“So, what are we going to do
about your weight?” She knew
my weight was a subject no one
dared mention, but she didn’t
care — she loved me too much,
she said, to allow me to continue
killing myself. While it was easy
to deny the little voice inside my
head, I found it impossible to
deny my friend’s. I knew in my
heart that her love and respect
for me were pure. I cried; I got
angry — but eventually I took
the first step and walked into a
doctor’s office,” she said.

“The night before the surgery,
Iconvinced myself that afterward
everything would be fine and I
could get on with the rest of my
life. I had no idea that before I
could move on, I would have to
face the present and the past as
they were, not as I wished them
to be.”



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



Got some greens to detox your body?
RECIPES TO HELP YOU ON YOUR JOURNEY!

RESEARCH will verify the myr-
iad of benefits of consuming greens
(smoothies). To date we've shared
quite a bit of information, ranging
from how to make a GREEN
SMOOTHIE, the health and nutri-
tional benefits derived from con-
suming GREEN SMOOTHIES and
why incorporating them into your
detoxification regimen is greatly ben-
eficial.

Now, here are some recipes (in
case you still haven't formulated
your own) to try and enjoy. Happy
blending!!

From the Kitchen of RHONDA
WRIGHT, SEEDlings' Place

NOTE: All recipes can make
approximately 6-7 cups so adjust
quantities accordingly as well as to
taste

GREEN ZING SMOOTHIE
1 banana

1 cup homemade almond mylk

2 cups of mustard greens

Guaco (or some other nutritive addi-
tive)

2-3 cups water (add 1 cup ata time)

MORE ZING GREEN JUICE

1 cucumber

1 cup Irish moss

2 cups of mustard greens

1/4 piece of avocado

4-6 dates

1 pear

1 cup coconut water

1-2 cups water (add a bit at a time)

NOTE: Mustard Greens are a
‘spicy’ green, so be ready for the
ZING!!

NUTTY KALE SMOOTHIE
2-3 cups of Kale

1/2 cup Irish moss

1 Tbl maple syrup

1 cup almond mylk

3 bananas

1” ginger

ADDITIONAL RECIPES:-
BASIC SMOOTHIE

4 bananas or

2-3 bananas and 1/2 cup of frozen
blueberries

2 tsp bee pollen

1 sachet of Berry Radical Antioxidant
Superfood (or fresh blueberries)

1 cup of water or fresh squeezed
orange juice

generous portion of greens

1 tsp vanilla extract (this is the secret
of calming down the greenness that
can sometimes overpower the
smoothie, if you have put a bit too
much in taste wise)

PARSLEY & LEMON
TAKES MY LIVER

TO HEAVEN

1 bunch of flat leaf parsley

(keep the tender stalks and chop off
the tough ones)

1-2 lemons with the rind, pith and
seeds removed

1-2 bananas

20-30g of sweetener of choice

1 cup of ice blocks

2 cups of water

ENZYME FRENZY

2 bananas

1 cup chopped papaya (red or yel-
low)

1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
a big handful of greens

This naturally enzyme rich
smoothie is easy to digest as it won't
tax your own pancreas!

Bloody Great Green Smoothie

55 per cent coconut water

45 per cent greens

Blood is made up plasma and
blood cells. Plasma comprises 55
per cent of blood, fluid and is most-
ly water (90 per cent by volume) and
containing dissolved proteins, glu-
cose, mineral ions, hormones, car-
bon dioxide, platelets and blood cells
themselves. Blood cells are mainly
red blood cells, white blood cells and
platelets. Red blood cells are the
most abundant and they contain
hemoglobin, an iron-containing pro-
tein.

The plant version of hemoglobin is
chlorophyll which is a green pigment
based around a magnesium ion as
opposed to iron (haem). Both hemo-
globin and chlorophyll exist to
obtain energy.

Coconut water is a natural liquid
closest in structure to blood plasma
and has been used in wars instead of
plasma when supplies were low. So
combine 55 per cent coconut water
and 45 per cent greens and you have
a BLOODy great smoothie!

So there you have it - no excuses
to not get in the kitchen (or wher-
ever the blender can fit) and get to
blending. You have your tips, your
rationale, discounts on blenders from
Q-Club - the only thing missing now
is you.

Join the Love Yourself team Tues-
day, March 8, for the next Let's Talk
Wellness Tuesday forum where
Chad Thompson and Mark Daniels
of h.o.m.e.grown will speak on the
topic: Backyard Farming made easy.
They will share the basics on grow-
ing naturally so you can grow greens
in your own backyard. It will be held
at the Ardastra Gardens (next to
Botanical Gardens) at 6.30pm. The
forum is open to the general public
and is free to attend.

To get more details on these and
other events of the campaign,
befriend us on _ facebook:
seedlingsplace or Love Yourself and
Your Health Campaign, or call us
at 361-6314.

Disclaimer: The information
enclosed in this article does not
replace medical advice. Please see
your medical practitioner for guid-
ance before you begin or make any
adjustment to your current wellness
plan.

Resources: www.squidoo.com



One shoe can change your life!

BABY boomers might be
surprised to learn that many
of their generation are wear-
ing the wrong size shoes.
Overtime, feet can widen or
flatten, and fat padding on the
sole of the feet can wear
down. Weight gain or loss,
activity and lifestyle changes,
and foot problems can also
contribute to changes in shoe
fit. Itis important to be fitted
by a professional occasionally,
rather than simply choosing
the sizes you have worn in the
past.

Reduce Stress on Your
Body and Sole - Stress on the
feet can lead to many major
health problems!

There are many things that
contribute to feet widening
and flattening such as flip
flops. Most flip flops are awful
for your feet as they lack the
support necessary to control
and support the foot.

However, you can very well
wear a flip flop designed to



give the appropriate support
for your arch type (high,
medium or low), and having a
‘heel cup’ to stop the heel
from spreading and at the
same time adequately support
the ankle.

A supportive flip flop com-
bined with a _ properly
designed ‘foot bed’ will put
your foot in its natural posi-
tion for walking and standing.
By putting your foot in bal-
ance, the alignment of other
joints will be improved. Prop-
erly aligned joints mean less
stress and strain and pain.

As the feet widen or flat-
ten, due to improper footwear
or weight gain, it is often
squeezed into the same size
shoes. This is extremely dan-

gerous as it can interfere with
your blood circulation and
can pose a major health prob-
lem such as a stroke.

In today's business world,
while it is important for you
to look your very best by
complementing that perfect
outfit with a cute pair of high
heel shoes or for the men,
trendy looking shoes, it is
absolutely necessary to note
that these magnificent cre-
ations often lead to foot pain
at the end of the day. While I
understand that certain occa-
sions require you to wear
shoes with less support, I
would recommend that you
follow these simple tips to get
away with looking your best
while feeling great:

1. Try to choose shoes with a
reasonable heel height of 1.5
to 2 inches. Look for shoes
that provide ample toe room
(beware of pointed toe
styles) and contain a back

strap or enclosed back. The
same holds true for men
with the exception of heel
height.

2. If you are having trouble
achieving the appropriate fit
with shoes you already own,
take them to a local special-
ty footwear store or Pedor-
thic facility and they can
modify your shoes to fit
your feet.

3. Purchase a slim arch sup-
port that your shoe can
accommodate. Specialty
footwear stores and Pedor-
thic facilities have options
that will fit almost any shoe.

In conclusion, it is impor-
tant to note that as the body
changes in size so do the feet.
We often fail to recognise this
fact, even though we are
wearing larger sizes in dresses
and slacks. Believe it or not,
your feet have changed in size

and shape in some cases due
to the stress of ill fitting, tight,
and too small shoes over the
years. However, kudos goes
to the few who always did and
continue to pay attention to
their feet in wearing properly
fitted footwear.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a
Board Certified & Licensed
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of
Foot Solutions, a health and
wellness franchise that focuses
on foot care and proper shoe
fit, located in the Trinity Plaza,
West Bay Street, Nassau.
Bahamas

www. footsolutions.com/nassau
"The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any
of its subsidiary and/or affiliat-
ed companies. Please direct
any questions or comments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or
322-FOOT (3668).



Dental Anxiety and Phobia

IN THE general population,
psychological problems relating
to receiving dental treatments
are common. It is reported that
about half of all dental patients
experience some anxiety
towards their dental visit. This
fear can lead to a delay in seek-
ing necessary dental care, can-
cellation of appointments and
poor cooperation in the dental
chair. Dental fear is one of the
most troublesome patient man-
agement problems for a dental
team. It causes distress for the
patient and results in high stress
levels in dentists.

An anxiety and a phobia are
quite different and the words
should not be used synony-
mously. They are managed and
treated differently by your den-
tal practitioner. An anxiety is a
normal state of apprehension,
uncertainty, and fear resulting
from the anticipation of a real-
istic or fantasised threatening
event or situation. It often
impairs physical and psycho-
logical functioning. A phobia is
an abnormal intense and irra-
tional fear of a given situation,
organism, or object. A dental
anxiety is a normal state of
mind and a dental phobia is an
abnormal state of mind.

Dental phobia is classified in
the Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental Disorders,
fourth edition, text revision
(DSM-IV-TR) as a specific pho-
bia, which involves a marked
and persistent fear of a specific
object, activity or situation that
results in anxiety on confronting
the phobic stimulus. People with
dental phobia commonly
describe two types of experi-
ences: a painful or traumatic
dental procedure or a negative
personal interaction with dental
staff. It is common for the expe-
riences to first occur in child-
hood or in adolescence
autonomously. However, fear-
ful attitudes and feelings of lack
of control in dental situations
can also be learnt from others.

The 'blood-injection-injury'



type of specific phobia includes
fear of needles, injections, drills
and fear of blood in the dental
situation. In the ‘situational!’
type of specific phobia, there
may be fear of the dental room,
dental personnel or the smells
and sounds associated with den-
tal treatment. In the 'other' type
of specific phobia, the person is
anxious about occurrences such
as gagging and retching. It is
worth noting that gagging and
retching result from a combina-
tion of psychological and phys-
iological factors. The gagging
and retching response can be
so intense

that some persons cannot
wear dentures or take dental
impressions.

Dental practitioners have a

responsibility to avoid subject-
ing patients to traumatic den-
tal experiences, but may not
always be aware when they are
occurring. It is sometimes not
advisable to perform several
extractions or complete large
amounts of conservation work
in different areas of the mouth
at a single office visit. These
types of procedures can create
or exacerbate anxieties (nor-
mal) which can grow into pho-
bias (abnormal). The

practitioner must be espe-
cially careful, if there is poor
patient cooperation or if there is
patient distress.

Dental practitioners can treat
dental phobias themselves or
enlist the help of the patient's
general practitioner or psychol-
ogist. It is very important for
dentists to understand patients’
fears and to explain the pro-
posed

dental treatment.

People with specific fears
such as gagging and needle pho-
bia may respond best to empa-
thetic patient care, with the



addition of relaxation tech-
niques. Relaxation techniques
can sometimes last up to four
hours prior to the

procedure. Patients may also
be offered a mixture of nitrous
oxide (laughing gas) and oxy-
gen to inhale, which can reduce
pain experienced and produce
relaxation. Tranquilizers inject-
ed directly into the veins can
also

help. Some practitioners will
in addition, play soothing music
to promote patient relaxation.
Only a few patients will require
this type of specialist care.

Those with severe symptoms
should have a thorough assess-
ment by an experienced psy-
chologist or psychiatrist and a
carefully structured treatment
programme. A psychiatrist is
sometimes needed because den-
tal anxiety may be part ofa
greater type of anxiety disorder
e.g. generalised anxiety disor-
der, panic disorder or agora-
phobia (a pathological fear of
being in public places).

It is crucial that if you sus-

FEAR OF THE
CHAIR: It is
reported that
about half of
all dental
patients expe-
rience some
anxiety
towards their
dental visit.
This fear can
lead to a delay
in seeking nec-
essary dental
care, cancella-
tion of
appointments
and poor
cooperation in
the dental
chair.

pect you have a dental phobia,
to set up a meeting with your
dental healthcare provider. He
will ensure you get the help you
need. What you consider a pho-
bia (abnormal) may be just an
anxiety

(normal). Do not delay in
seeking necessary dental help
because of a possible dental
anxiety. It can be managed suc-
cessfully and you can enjoy
excellent oral health.

¢ Dr. André R. Clarke, DDS, MBBS
Special Care Dentistry

“This article is for informational
purposes only. It is not intended
and may not be treated as, a sub-
stitute for professional medical/den-
tal advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
Always seek the advice of a physi-
cian or dental professional with any
questions you may have regarding
a medical/dental condition. Never
disregard professional medical/den-
tal advice or delay in seeking it
because of a purely informational
publication."



DISORDER: Alopecia X usually
occurs in plush -coated breeds,
most commonly Pomeranians
and Samoyeds, but can occur in
any breed of dog.

Alopecia X



ALOPECIA X is a disor-
der of the hair follicles that
most likely reflects a defect
in the ability of the hair fol-
licles to cycle properly
through its growing and rest-
ing stages.

Alopecia X may be a com-
ponent of a typical Cushing
Disease. It usually occurs in
plush -coated breeds, most
commonly Pomeranians and
Samoyeds, but can occur in
any breed of dog. It can also
occur in at any age. Gradual
loss of primary hair pro-
gresses to complete alpoe-
cia of the neck, tail, both
sides of the trunk, back of
thighs and under the tail.
Usually the head and front
limbs are spared. Hair loss
is bilaterally, symmetrical
and the alopecic skin
becomes hyper-pigmented
and thin.

Mid seborrhea and sec-
ondary superficial pyoder-
ma may occur. There are no
systemic signs of illness with
this condition. It usually
diagnosed by ruling out oth-
er causes of endocrine alope-
cla.

Controversy exists as to
whether this disease requires
treatment because it is main-
ly a cosmetic problem and
affected dogs are otherwise
healthy. Neutering of intact
dogs may induce permanent
or temporary hair re-
growths. Drugs such as mela-
tonin, mitotane trilostane
have been used for this con-
dition.

The decision whether to
treat this condition in your
dog requires a thoughtful
discussion with your veteri-
narian, as well as careful
weighing of the pros and
cons of treatment. The prog-
nosis for hair re -growth is
unpredictable. This is a cos-
metic disease only that does
not affect the dog’s quality of
life.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 11B






A spotlight on the talented

women in our community







ES D







he’s Doctor do-good

and then some

when a family friend sug-

gests it won't be long before
her dad, well-known attorney and
Member of Parliament for Cat
Island Philip 'Brave' Davis, is
introduced as the father of the

famed Dr Philippa Davis.

"Never," chuckles the MP's daughter,
in Nassau for a short visit recently. A
Lyford Cay Foundation recipient, Dr Davis
completed her undergraduate degree at
McGill University in Canada (with dis-
tinction), her medical degree at George-
town University School of Medicine in
Washington, DC (earning membership in
the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honour
Society), her internship in internal medi-
cine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York,
her residency in Anesthesiology at
Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston
and her fellowship in Critical Care Medi-
cine at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in
California.

After 13 years of college and med school,
she was certified in Critical Care Medi-
cine in October and at the age of 31 is
licensed to practise in California, Massa-
chusetts and Virginia --and, by the way,
had time along the way to volunteer in
Mwanza, Tanzania.

Piven: Davis, MD, laughs

"IT would not have made it this far with-
out the loving support and sacrifices of my
family and friends, especially my parents
and grandparents," said Dr Davis, now
affiliated with Inova Fairfax Hospital in
Fairfax, Virginia, a level one trauma centre.

The long journey, she said, also taught
her that "the things most worthwhile are
not easy to come by."

"The one thing she had to give up," says
mom, Janice Davis, who has been with the
Government of The Bahamas for 30 years,
"is sports." A star athlete, Davis repre-
sented The Bahamas at the Caribbean
Island Swimming Championships in Cura-
cao at the age of 12.

It was a trade-off she was willing to
make.

"Iam humbled and blessed that God has
given me the gifts to care for patients in
their most vulnerable times of need," says
Dr Davis, amember of the American Soci-
ety of Anesthesiology and the Society of
Critical Care Medicine. After lengthy train-
ing, Davis wants to gain more experience in
high volume and acuity level one trauma
before returning to The Bahamas to practise.

* Know another woman who is making it
big? Email us at features@tribunemedia.net
ae she may be featured as the next “You Go

irl.”

@e@eeeeeooeoeeeoeeeeaeaeoeeneeoeoeeeoeeeeoeeeeneeoeeeeeoeeeevneeeeneeeseeoeeeneeeoe®s



b wou

d not have made it this far without the



OV-

ing support and sacrifices of my family and

friends, especially my parents and grandparent.

Dr. Philippa Davis






Francis recognised
for exemplary
character trait

By DEBI SWICK-CRUSE

JESSICA Francis, a student at
Potomac State College (PSC) of West
Virginia University, has been recog-
nised for exemplifying the character
trait of respect.

Each year, the college honours select-
ed students by choosing them as
CHARACTER COUNTS! students
for various character traits.

One individual who nominated Fran-
cis stated, “In my 19 years of working in
higher education, Jessica is one of the
most respectful students I have had the
opportunity to work with.”

Francis is a general agriculture major
from Nassau in the Bahamas and a grad-
uate of CV Bethel Senior High School.
She plays the position of center on the
Potomac State Catamounts basketball
team and according to Head Coach Jim
Walton, “Jessica always gives one hun-
dred per cent and has contributed to
our current record of 23-3.”

Jessica was born and raised in Nas-
sau. She took karate for 13 years, retir-
ing with a first-degree black belt. She
performed volunteer community ser-
vice at a geriatric hospital and was
named ‘Rookie of the Year’ by a night-
league basketball team in the Bahamas.
She is the daughter of Jeffrey and
Andrea Francis.

Potomac State continues to honour
students with the CHARACTER
COUNTS! Program, which is an out-
growth of The Joseph
& Edna Josephson
Institute of
Ethics. This non-
profit organisa-
tion is dedicated
to helping peo-
ple make prin-
cipled decisions
in order that “
they might live
with greater
integrity.















Jessica
Francis





Stomach pacemaker could help obese lose weight

LONDON
Associated Press

PATRICK Hetzner tried
diets and exercise, just about
everything short of stomach sta-
pling to lose weight. Nothing
worked. Five months ago he
tried something new: a stomach
pacemaker that curbed his
appetite.

Since having it implanted,
Hetzner, a 20-year-old Munich
mailman, has knocked off more
than 10 kilos (22 pounds) from
his earlier weight of 104 kilos
(229 pounds).

Hetzner got the device as part
of a clinical trial. Since being
approved by Britain last month,
the device is available for sale
across the European Union. It
works a bit like a cardiac pace-
maker, and consists of a stimu-
lator and a sensor surgically
implanted onto the stomach.

The stimulator sends out elec-
trical pulses meant to trick the
stomach and brain into think-
ing the body is full. Hetzner said
the pulses kick in a few minutes
after he starts eating or drinking.
He said they make him feel full
after finishing about half the
amount of food he would nor-
mally eat.

"It feels like a little pressure



on my stomach ora tickle, but __!N THIS Friday, Feburary 25, 2011 photo Thomas Horbach, chief of surgery at Stadtkrankenhaus Schwabach, who led one of the trials, is seen in his office in the hospital in Schwabach,
it's not a bad feeling,” he saidin Near Nuremberg, Germany, Horbach implanted a stomach pacemaker that helps regulate the amount of food users take in. Patrick Hetzner, a 20-year-old Munich mailman, has

a telephone interview.
"It's been like a little guide

to help me change my life,” he
said.

So far, about 65 patients in
two studies have received the
device from U.S. pacemaker
manufacturer Intrapace. Only
about half of those have had
the pacemaker for at least a
year, and most lost about 20 per
cent of their weight and kept it
off.

Other stomach pacemakers
are on the market but most are
used to relieve symptoms like
nausea and vomiting, not to
fight obesity.

Appetite is partly controlled
by signals sent from nerves
around the stomach to the
brain; the stomach pacemaker
taps into that communication
system, sending a message to
the brain that the body is full

after a relatively small amount
of food is consumed.

"If you can stimulate the
nerves going from the stomach
to the brain, that should indeed
have an effect in reducing food
intake,” said Stephen Bloom,
an obesity expert at Imperial
College in London, who is not
connected to Intrapace or the
clinical trials.

Bloom, however, questioned
whether the device would work
long-term, as people might
eventually get used to the elec-
trical pulses and keep eating
anyway.

Doctors familiar with the
pacemaker say there will always
be ways for patients to eat and
work around the system. "We
could make the (stomach pace-
maker) work so people feel like

they're going to throw up, but
we don't want that," said
Thomas Horbach, chief of
surgery at Stadtkrankenhaus
Schwabach, near Munich, who
led one of the trials.

"If you take away all the
responsibilities from the patient,
they will not change on their
own."

As an additional benefit, the
sensor tracks when patients eat,
drink or exercise, so patients
can chart their progress. Intra-
pace has also created an online
network for patients to trade
weight loss advice and share
experiences.

Other surgical approaches to
weight loss come with serious
side effects.

People who have their stom-
ach stapled or have a gastric

knocked off more than 10 kilos (22 pounds) from his earlier weight of 104 kilos (229 pounds). (AP)

band must eat smaller amounts
of mostly low-fat foods, because
their stomachs can't accommo-
date or process large volumes. If
they overeat, they will feel nau-
seous, vomit, or suffer from oth-
er problems.

The most serious side effect
seen in the pacemaker has been
an infection linked to surgery. In
Britain, the pacemaker costs
about 15,000 pounds ($24,040),
including the keyhole surgery
used to implant it. Intrapace
President Chuck Brynelsen said
that's comparable to other
weight loss surgeries.

The device is authorised for
sale across the EU, though the
company is first targeting weight
loss clinics in Britain, Germany
and Spain. It also plans to sub-
mit the device for approval in

the US once it has more data,
and hopes it will be available
there in 2014.

The pacemaker hasn't yet
been implanted commercially
in Europe, but Intrapace is in
talks with clinics interested in
offering it.

Brynelsen said the battery in
the device lasts about five years
and it will be up to patients how
long they want to keep the
pacemaker. "We don't know if
patients will see (the stomach
pacemaker) as a bridge to
recovery or whether this is a
crutch they will need for the
longer term,” he said.

Some experts said the pace-
maker did not address people's
underlying reasons for overeat-
ing. "The problem with these
devices is they assume people

are rational and that they eat
because they're hungry,” said
Stephan Rossner, a professor
in the obesity unit at Karolinska
University Hospital.

"A lot of obese patients eat
because they're depressed, they
can't sleep at night, or they have
nobody to have sex with,” he
said. "So whatever you insert
into their stomach, they can out-
eat that device because it's oth-
er things that drive them to con-
sume.”

Hetzner said he intends to
keep the stomach pacemaker
for about four years.

"T don't want to backslide,"
he said, adding he would rec-
ommend the device to others. "I
want to be sure I can stick with
it and that my body adapts to
this new way of eating.”





By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

THE TRIBUNE

LO

HEN we have lost sight of our dreams, while getting

caught up in his, we are loving too much. When we

keep hoping that he will change, even though we
know deep down inside that this transformation will never
occur, we are loving too much. When we plan our entire exis-
tence around him, we are loving too much. And when we try
to hold onto a relationship that is terribly broken and cannot
be revived we are loving too much.

In an attempt to fill the void of loneli-
ness and share in true companionship
with another, some women get carried
away in this quest. They become so
obsessed with being in a relationship that
they end up settling for less, at the
expense of losing themselves and all of
their hopes and dreams. In essence they
end up loving too much!

But where do they find the answers
to this ordeal. How do they stop them-
selves from becoming so absorbed in
their mate, and how do stop themselves
from loving too much?

Tribune Woman spoke to a few ladies
to seek answers. Some of the women
expressed their views on this issue and
even admitted to loving so much, to that
point where they became both physical-
ly and emotionally wounded.

Shantavia Sweeting* told Tribune
Woman how she came to overcome her

Jergens
& naturals.

Put your best skin
out there

emotional wreckage. “I am so guilty of
loving too much. I surrounded my entire
life around my boyfriend and I didn’t
realise what I was doing. Before mak-
ing plans with friends I had to check with
my boyfriend first to make sure he didn’t
have plans for us. Every single weekend
would meet me spending time with him.
And when he decided to go out with his
friends instead of hanging out with me
that was a major problem. I would find
anything to argue about just so that he
would not go out anymore and my
behaviour was just sad man. I didn’t have
a life. Ineeded a life. Then it came to the
point where I just had it with me being so
consumed with him.”

“Thad to evaluate myself and I found
that I was so emotionally dependent.
Then I realised I had to get my own life
and do the things that made me happy. I
had to find my own happiness,” she said.

TUESDAY, MARCH 8,

-

Melody Edgecombe had this to say:
“T feel as though its okay to love some-
one but not to the point where it seems as
though you may love them more than
you love yourself and you shouldn’t
waste time giving love to someone that
doesn’t appreciate you that much or
doesn’t think that much of you because in
the end you'll only end up hurting your-
self,” she said.

Latoya Poitier said whenever she saw
a beautiful couple out she always felt the
need to be in a relationship.

“T’m sure at some point and time we all
have. We find ourselves going crazy just
to keep someone who really doesn't val-
ue us because there is always something
new for men to go after. I’ve always been
in relationships, I don’t like being alone
or the thought of being alone did some-
thing to me. It’s like when you're not
with someone whenever you go out you
see all the couples out holding hands. I
hate the thought of failing at anything.
What I would do is go out and date then
fall in love all over again. But that never
changed anything and the cycle contin-
ued,” she said.

“That's why I took a very short break
and I allowed love to come to me instead
of going out there looking for it.”

In an effort to bring upliftment to
women, Stanya Davis, decided to start
Eve’s Journey, a workshop designed to
help women discover their true beauty.

Tribune Woman sat down with Stanya




2011

EMPTINESS: In an
attempt to fill the
void of loneliness
and share in true
companionship
with another, some
women get carried
away in this quest.
They become so
obsessed with
being ina relation-
ship that they end
up settling for less,
at the expense of
losing themselves
and all of their
hopes and dreams.





Dom

Davis, organiser of the workshop
“Women Who love Too Much”, who
expressed her views on the issue.

“When being in love means being in
pain we are loving too much. When most
of our conversations with intimate friends
are about him, we are loving too much.
When we keep hoping he will change
we are loving too much. When our rela-
tionship jeopardises our emotional well
being and perhaps even our physical
health and safety we are definitely loving
too much. This characterises the women
that love too much and I think all women
have been at this point where they are
guilty of loving too much.”

Ms Davis is a life coach and had done
a great deal of research on “Women
Who Love Too Much.

“The thing these women fear is being
along and they think if Thold on to this it
can work. It is almost as though they
cannot see the light at the end of the
tunnel or they don’t see themselves doing
better or they don’t think they can find
something better.”

She said women who are guilty of lov-
ing too much must find time to evaluate
themselves. She said they must learn to
love themselves truly before they can
love anyone else. “Loving yourself does
not happen in one day”.

The workshop takes place this Satur-
day.

For more information log onto their
facebook page Eve’s Journey.







im lovin

82F
71F

PLEASANT WITH

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 107 No.89

aU a

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SIXTY-SIX people have
been the victims of armed
robbery within the past two
months — an average of one
person per day — it has been
revealed.

But police say at least half
of these crimes could have
been prevented had the vic-
tims carried out basic proac-
tive measures.

Personal responsibility is
said to be a vital prerequisite
of crime prevention.

Supt Stephen Dean, direc-
tor of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force’s National
Crime Prevention (NCP)
office, said: “Opportunity is
the key element in crime,
reduce the opportunity,
reduce crime.

“A lot of these cases were
unnecessary and could have
been avoided had persons
utitlised basic common sense
in terms of their personal
safety.”

According to police reports
compiled by The Tribune, 39

J us iawn

ne H

NIKI

SEE WOMAN SECTION



persons were robbed by
armed thugs in January, and
27 in February.

Construction sites, cash-
based businesses, phone card
vendors, asue recipients, trav-
ellers and persons walking at
night were all said to be at
increased risk.

Anticipating an increase
in cash flow in the capital due
to new construction projects —
most notably the 1,000 acre,
$3.4 billion Baha Mar resort
development at Cable Beach
— Supt Dean explained that
his department sought to
crack down on emerging
trends.

Supt Dean said: “Preven-
tion. Not to raise alarm, but
to prevent similar events
from recurring, to minimise
armed robbery. When we see
these trends we try to address
it before it gets out of con-
trol.”

On Friday afternoon,
three armed men burst into
the office of the TG Glover
construction site on Pitt
Road. Armed with handguns,

SEE page eight

Wife |



TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

eS
a
AND REAL aes

SEES Sy

66 armed ober
victims in 2 months

Half could have been
avoided, say police





_ SEE SECTION E



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

MAN CHARGED
WITH KILLING
HIS MOTHER

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN accused of killing
his mother appeared in court
yesterday.

Ronado Adderley, 33, of
Dundas Town, Abaco, was
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane, yesterday,
charged in the murder of
Yvonne Adderley.

It is alleged the accused

SEE page eight



HARD AT WORK: Roadworks taking place on Marathon Road yesterday. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said on Sunday that progress is being
made on the New Providence Road Improvement Project, but more monthly productivity will be needed to meet the government’s schedule.

PLP CHAIRMAN: COMMITTEE NOT AWARE OF
‘FRAUD’ ALLEGATIONS sis TO CANDIDATE

By NOELLE
NICOLLS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nnicolls@
tribunemedia.net iy

THE candidates
selection committee
of the Progressive
Liberal Party was
not aware of a
Canadian TV sta-
tion’s allegations
linking political hopeful
Arnold Forbes to an alleged
$170 million investment
“fraud”, it was claimed yes-
terday.

PLP chairman Bradley

Fidelity Fast Track

Debt Consolidation
saves him $300 per month



PLP CHAIRMAN
Bradley Roberts

Roberts said the
committee only
learned about the
accusations after Mr
Forbes was already
ratified as the PLP
candidate for the
Mount Moriah con-
stituency.

Having learned of
the claims, Mr
Roberts said, to the
best of his knowl-
edge, the party is not
reviewing its recommenda-
tion because “there is no
basis for a review.”

Details of Mr Forbes’

SEE page eight

PUBLIC RAISES CONCERNS OVER NETS
USED IN LAKE KILLARNEY FISHING

By CELESTE NIXON
Trbune Staff Reporter
cnixon@tribunemedia.net

PERSONS seen fishing in
Lake Killarney might be
using nets that are killing
protected species of birds.

According to past presi-
dent and executive member
of the Bahamas National
Trust, Pericles Mallis, while
it is not illegal to fish in Lake
Killarney or to use nets of a
certain mesh, the “gill nets,”
which are suspected of being
used in this case can be left
in the water for hours,
increasing the possibility of

trapping and killing birds
such as diving and ruddy
ducks — both protected in the
Bahamas.

Concerns were first raised
when photographs surfaced
of persons pulling large nets
filled with fish out of Lake
Killarney.

Members of the public
called The Tribune to claim
this method of fishing is ille-
gal.

But Earl Deveaux, Minis-
ter for the Environment, said
the Bahamas does not cur-
rently have fishery regula-

SEE page eight

Get out of debt Fast!

Get out of Debt Fast with a Fidelity
Fast Track Debt Consolidation loan.

e Decisions Fast
e Money Fast

e Plus Visa Credit Card Fast

Call 356.7764 today!

www. fidelitygroup.com
FREDERICK STREET | WULFF ROAD | MADEIRA PLAZA | ROBIN HOOD | CABLE BEACH | FREEPORT | MARSH HARBOUR



NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



= ) FIDELITY |



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Business owners, RAI Ka Ea
informed of er OS dt a

LATOYA WALKER, an employee of Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles SA, informing a repre-
sentative of an East Street business of upcoming road work on East Street and Robinson Road.

PICK 2

SALAD VALUE
























call real.

PICK ANY *MEDIUM

corey. tea





THE Ministry of Public Works and We also have a series of information
Transport is sending out officers to meetings that we continue to hold, most
inform residents and business owners of | of them at the Mall at Marathon, until
upcoming road works on various corri- we can secure other venues.”
dors that are a part of the New Provi- The next information meeting will be
dence Road Improvement and Infra- held on Thursday at the Mall at
structure Project. Marathon from 10am to 6pm. It will
Charlene Collie, project engineer, said: focus on the work being done on Prince
“We've been trying to inform business Charles Drive, Robinson Road and
owners and residents along the routes by Marathon Road.
walking door-to-door, handing them fly- All members of the public are invited
ers and advising them of upcoming _ to attend. Officers from the ministry will
works and the duration of the works. _ be present to answer questions.

Air pick « A bonus em. DEFENCE FORCE CHURCH SERVICE AND PARADE

MINISTER OF NATIONAL

SECURITY Tommy Turn-

a Royal Bahamas Defence

Force’s annual church
service and parade at
Grace Community Church
on Sunday.












sPIECE SMALL CRISPYCHICKEN JR. CHEESEBURGER JR. BACON

HUGGETS CHILI SANDWICH DELUXE CHEESEBURGER THE HE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE took to the streets of the Marathon Sub-division following

their annual church service on Sunday.

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING

“Lowest Prices On The Island”



STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm



GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Arthur Foulkes and Lady Foulkes headed
the list of officials attending. Also pictured at left is Minister of
National Security Tommy Turnquest.

SI MBP) ery
SUB B AS

FREE DELIVERY, ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

* E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture
And Appliance Centre MAR. 8 ory i

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875 rR SEU ae ere Road



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





Police launch
investigation of
Suicide attempt

¢ POLICE have launched
an investigation into the
attempted suicide of a 30-
year-old woman.

The Fire Trail Road resi-
dent apparently attempted to
end her life by cutting her
wrists and taking an excessive
amount of unspecified tablets
on Sunday evening, police say.

The woman was taken to
the hospital by ambulance and
was yesterday listed in stable
condition.
POLICE SEARCH FOR
MASKED MEN WHO ROBBED
AND ASSAULTED A WOMAN

¢ POLICE are searching
for two masked men who
assaulted and robbed a
woman at her home.

The men — one armed with
a handgun and the other with
a knife -— ambushed the
woman when she arrived at
her home on Miami Street off
Balfour Avenue yesterday,
shortly after 3am.

They forced the victim into
her home, assaulted her, and
stole her jewellery.

Several hours later, another
woman was robbed by two
masked men on Swordfish
Drive off McKinney Avenue.

The culprits, one of whom
was armed with a handgun,
stole the victim’s bag con-
taining her cell phone, keys
and other personal effects
shortly after 9.30pm.

ARMED MAN STEALS CASH
FROM ISLAND LUCK

¢ A MAN armed with a
handgun stole an undeter-
mined amount of cash from
Island Luck and damaged a
window before fleeing the
area on foot.

The culprit was wearing
dark clothing and a black hat
when he entered the webshop
on East Street south off Wulff
Road shortly after 7pm on
Sunday.

MAN QUESTIONED IN
CONNECTION WITH
MOTORCYCLE THEFT

e¢ A 21-year-old man is
being questioned by police in
connection with the theft of
a motorcycle.

It was reported that a man
armed with a handgun robbed
a 25-year-old man of his 150
CBR 2003 model Honda
motorcycle. The victim was at
Rupert Dean Lane around
noon on Sunday when he was
approached by the culprit.

The 21-year-old in custody
is a resident of Baillou Hill
Road South.

THREE MEN ARRESTED AFTER
OFFICERSPOLICE SEIZE
AMMUNITION FROM HOME

¢ OFFICERS attached to
Operation Rapid Strike
arrested three men after seiz-
ing a quantity of ammunition
at a home.

Police discovered the con-
traband during a search of a
house on Podoleo Street
around 10pm on Friday. The
men taken into custody were
19, 22, and 29 years old.

Two armoured
car employees
arraigned

TWO armoured car employ-
ees accused of stealing from a
local bank were arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Alfred Pinder, 24, of Golden
Gates, and Arlington Rolle, 27,
of Carmichael Road, are
accused of stealing by reason
of employment. It is alleged
that on Thursday, March 3, the
two men stole cash in the
amount of $50,000 from First
Caribbean International Bank.

Both men pleaded not guilty
to the charge during their
arraignment before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane.

Pinder was represented by
attorney Stephanie Wells.

Both men were granted
$20,000 bail with two sureties.
They were both ordered to
report to the Carmichael Road
police station every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
before 6pm. The case was
adjourned to June 20 and trans-
ferred to Court 5, Bank Lane.





Govt ‘expects to be awarded costs’
after Grant-Bethell case ruling

Cheryl Grant-Bethell

THE government expects
to be awarded costs in view
of a Supreme Court judge’s
decision not to rule in favour
of veteran prosecutor Cheryl-
Grant Bethell, who protested
being passed over for a top
post.

Despite Mrs Grant-Bethell
declaring victory with respect
to a verdict she felt cleared
her reputation, Senior Justice
Jon Isaacs refused to grant
any of the relief declarations
sought by the veteran prose-
cutor.

When asked to comment on
the matter on Saturday, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
said: “I have no comment on
it but I say this; that the Attor-
ney General was sued in his
personal capacity, that was
thrown out by the court. The
Attorney General was sued as
Attorney General of the

Bahamas, that too was thrown
out, and we expect for costs
to be awarded against the par-
ty that brought the action —
Mrs Bethell — and we expect
for her to pay it.”

He went on to state: “A
request was made to the court
for 10 or 11 separate orders
and the court refused each
and every one. It said many
things but at the end of the
day it said, ‘No, no, no, no’.

“At the end of the day, the
party that took the Judicial
and Legal Services to court to
say that they had been trans-
ferred to the Law Reform
Commission and that they
should have remained as
Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions and should have
been made Director of Prose-
cutions (DPP), lost and they
are still exactly where they
were when the case began.”



Voter registration continues
to be a ‘gradual process’

By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter

cnixon@tribunemedia.net

VOTER registration con-
tinues to proceed at a moder-
ate pace.

With just about 23,500
Bahamians registered for the
next general election so far,
Parliamentary Commissioner
Errol Bethel said that while
the rate has increased since the
holiday season, registration
continues to be a gradual
process.

Persons seeking to register
as voters must be Bahamian
citizens 18 years or older, and
must have lived in a particu-
lar constituency for three
months or more.

Voter registration centres
are open in New Providence
between the hours of 10am
and 4pm at the following loca-
tions:

¢ The Parliamentary Regis-

tration Department, Farring-
ton Road.

¢ Town Centre Mall and
Marathon Mall.

¢ The General Post Office,
East Hill Street.

¢ The Sub-Post Office,
Carmichael Road.

¢ The Sub-Post Office, Eliz-
abeth Estates.

¢ The National Insurance
Board, Baillou Hill Road.

¢ Commonwealth Bank,
Mackey Street and Golden
Gates branches.

In Grand Bahama, centres
are open between the hours of
9.30am and 4.30pm at the fol-
lowing locations:

¢ The Parliamentary Regis-
tration Department, Freeport.

¢ The Administrator's
Office, Eight Mile Rock.

¢ The Administrator's
Office, High Rock (Tuesdays
and Thursdays).

In the Family Islands, regis-
tration takes place at the



MODERATE PACE: Parliamentary Commissioner Errol Bethel (above)
said that while the rate has increased since the holiday season, reg-
istration continues to be a gradual process.

Do it yourself oil change:
"STEP 2; Remove drain
plug and drain old cil into
an oil pan

Wk A CASTROL GOLF SHIRT:
Callin ta StarTJ6.5 FA's

“Set Meck for the Soul" show from
d-4pim on Friday and giv Drad steps
1-5 towing Garteel batt Shirt

Ea ate
STC
BAY STREET GARAGE

MTs TAMA

aS Re

CARIB GENERATORS

DIESEL GENERATORS

SUPER SILENT — PERKINS, CUMMINS, ISUZU:

Automatic Transfer
1OO/200 gallon fuel tanks,

Switch,
Deep Sea

Controllers, Stamford Altennators,
Weather Proof Enclosures,

Shipping & Customs Duties Included ...

oO Ko

ae 60 day ene

suru 20kw,

SUF 2K
Cuerinmeins.
Cummins

CUM. Perkins GOtow
UK. Perkins 9

Dies sel
Diesel

ISKW TO 4000KW FACTORY DIRECT

NASSAU & FAMILY ISLANDS

Phone 427-3749

www.ecaribgenerators.com



Administrator’s Office
between the hours of 9.30am
and 4.30pm.

Businesses and organisations
with at least 20 eligible
employees or members may
contact the department at tele-
phone numbers 325-2888/9 or
397-2000 to schedule a visit
from registration agents.

Woy} tee]
ee LL

aa Maer
322-2157



The prime minister also said
he had no idea whether Mrs
Grant-Bethell will remain in
her present post.

Mrs Grant-Bethell filed an
application for a judicial
review after being passed over
for the post of DPP.

She was instead appointed
Deputy Law Reform Com-
missioner.

Mrs Grant-Bethell had
sought to have the judge
quash the decision of the Judi-
cial and Legal Services Com-

mission (JLSC) purporting to
appoint her to the post of
Deputy Law Reform Com-
missioner.

She had also sought: a dec-
laration that she remain in her
substantive post as Deputy
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions; a declaration that she,
having acted as DPP for the
requisite period, be entitled
to that post; and a declaration
that any other appointment to
the post of DPP be declared
null and void.

Pee UE TM MUR ELOL A ae Re a De



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THe Moe? Tete Reis
Sal CRT Serie, (rain

Austheerivnd Sine Tincihy Myre mal tr

c AL L PROC HEM | BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 « 323-1594

& Ops Evil
Steed) Lake? & rie erie (ah Sh ee.

&, Oe Tee hoe i Pee!

PROLECELESE SVS TEM (un)

ONLY WE CAN DOT RIGHTY

Oe

=m © wie



siemrirckpen. com 9 ewe ie

rie

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBLATION!

ff'S AGRAND TIME

OF PRAISE &

CELEBRATION, IT a

TIME OF FELLO
PRAISE £ WOK:

March 13-20, 2011 - ‘East Street Tabernacle
THEME: “LED BY HIS SPIRIT PF ose :.:1

SPECIAL GUBST SPEARS & PRESET ERE:

BISHOP CLAYTON MARTI
fread Finalayter

BISHOF DAVID BRYAN
{doled Oivtresch Tarecctor
BISHOF ROBERT DAVIS
Phteabe Greve od Fhogda

BISHOF JEFFERY DAVIS
Attacte Overseer of North facolix

BISHOF TIMOTHY COALTER
State Onesies od Soatth facolies
BISHOP CLARENCE WILL Ma
Overseer od The Toda 4. adcon Isovds

BISH OF GON BROOCH
MR. ELLISON GREENSLAGE

Conmudsskoer ot Police
THOS VE et CS ae: Ce Webs)
Sonventian Sinan, the Convention Praise
Tesau, Taterncde Caxvert Cia, sand other
Chinen Civaivs, Fosdse Tess, Salaiete, aard
Stinging ‘Gyaups. The Behsws. Bases Boor,
Bahauses Youth sod Jima: Byavas Bao,
and the Cousaders Brass Bed wil provide

Specie] wniek:.

Monday, March 14th, 2011

Bishop Dv. Diaaemt B. Raloning, CMG,
BP, JF, Watiwal Creseer and Moclera-
tea Will deliver his Ama] Matiggial Ad

7 LOG Gv ror”!

Wn Oop DeLee. OE
POR Lane eer EVEMAG wea

rm at rg aT! rh py cae



Sunday, March 20th, 2011

The Govention closes oi Suoedary, March
20th, 2OLL with the fuwwual Parade med
Water Bapthonal Senviece at the Wester Be
Plogade, aed with the Hue 2H Radio 15-40
A, 200 AM ood EN OY Le evenbeg broad
fast sender. niviag thinsenice, the Maton]
Oversee, Bishop lv. Elgsnet B. Aehouing will
delivery the fine] message on thre Convention's



PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 201

1

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

STR ETIENNE DUPUCH,

Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Not the time for union unrest

ONE WOULD have thought that unions
— especially the hotel union in Freeport —
would have learned its lesson by now with
the closure in 2004 of the Royal Oasis Golf
Resort and Casino, putting more that 1,200
Bahamians out of work.

This hotel struggled under union pressure
from the day the new owners bought it in
1999 to the day in 2004 when Hurricane
Frances so badly damaged it that the owners
decided not to reopen. It was clear that the
disruptive behaviour of the unions played a
major role in that decision.

A year before Hurricane Frances made
the decision for everyone, Donald Archer,
the hotel’s senior vice president, broke his
silence to complain about the poor level of
service from certain staff about which guests
were also complaining. He warned them that
not only would a strike be illegal, but that
“any responsible union would examine the
current and future needs of its members, the
fragile economic environment, the financial
status of the company and global conditions.”
At the time the Iraq war was threatening.

Mr Archer warned at the time that more
than 1,200 families would be affected by a
strike “to say nothing of the impact on these
families and the businesses that they patro-
nise.”

But what union leaders did not appreciate
was how much they had hurt their member-
ship who had a stake in the International
Bazaar, which also faced closure. With the
hotel closed, the Bazaar’s patrons had dis-
appeared.

Commenting on this in November 2005,
we wrote: “This should teach the union a les-
son that when it pushes its claims too far
everything can collapse under the strain, tak-
ing even the union with it.”

Seven years later the Royal Oasis Golf
Resort remains closed.

And so we were surprised at the beginning
of this year to hear of labour unrest at Our
Lucaya resort, which everyone knew was
struggling to keep its doors open in a world
recession that was leaving millions jobless.

But apparently, Obie Ferguson, president
of the Bahamas Hotel Managerial Associa-
tion, saw a chink of light somewhere that no
one else saw. In January he said that “now the
economy is showing signs of recovery,” he
thought it “time to do what should be done.”

“Workers rights,” he said, “are as impor-
tant as profits. We will take the necessary
poll and then do what we have to do.” Of
course, the poll he was hinting at was a strike
vote.

Hotel staff knew that the hotel was not
doing well. As a matter fact there was no
place on the globe that was not suffering from
the world crash. However, in the Bahamas
there are those among us — including, if not

c









BANK

especially, some politicians — who think that
the Bahamas is somehow not a part of the
economically broken world, and that our peo-
ple, despite our exorbitant public debt, should
not have to lower their financial expectations.

As a matter of fact Prime Minister Ingra-
ham thanked the Hutchison-Whampoa group
for keeping Our Lucaya open, when others
would have closed it. It was known that the
hotel was subsiding the staff’s payroll and
could not afford more. Yet Mr Ferguson, the
union man, continued his background rum-
blings. Last week it was announced that Our
Lucaya had closed two of its three hotels.
Instead of closing completely, it consolidated
its operation on one property — Breakers
Cay —to save 800 jobs. However, to save the
800, 200 staff had to go.

Government is now working with the hotel
to try to find employment for these 200, and
to retrain some of them in other skills to qual-
ify for other jobs.

When will Bahamians understand what is
going on in the world, and appreciate the
jobs they now have? This is not the time for
government corporations — some of whose
staff are the best paid in the Bahamas — to be
talking of salary increases. Look at other
countries and see how heavily they have
reduced their public service to streamline
their economies. It is acknowledged that our
civil service is over stacked and could do with
a heavy trim. But, government has as yet
shown no inclination to do so.

Even the Cuban Workers Federation
announced that half of its work force will
lose their jobs by next year. The Cuban gov-
ernment currently employs 85 per cent of
that island’s workers.

These workers will have to either go back
to the farms, find construction work, become
self employed or join a cooperative.

Today’s economic downturn is forcing
Cuba closer to the free enterprise system.

“Our state can’t keep maintaining... bloat-
ed payrolls,” the Cuban Workers Federation
told The Wall Street Journal.

This is something that local unions and
many Bahamians have yet to grasp. Although
we might not know it we are a part of the
world and if any part of that world is injured,
the whole unit will feel it. Already petroleum
retailers want to raise their prices to offset the
troubles driving prices up in the oil rich Mid-
dle East. The increase in oil will push up costs
across the board. Businessmen have no con-
trol over these costs. Therefore, when they are
forced to cut costs to keep their businesses
operational — the decision forced on the Our
Lucaya owners will be forced on them. Staff
become redundant.

It is no time in such a climate for the
unions to create further instability — in the
end only its members will suffer.



ee ayAN Bs

PUBLIC NOTICE



Commonwealth Bank, F

reeport Branch is trying

to locate customer Philip Kelly

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:

#11 Pearl Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Mr. Kelly or his next of kin

is asked to please contact

the Manager of Commonwealth Bank Limited,

Freeport Branch as soon as possible.

Mr. J. Rupert Roberts, Sr. Manager, Freeport Branch

Tel: (242) 352-8307

“Leader in Personal Banking Services”



| www.combankltd.com

Better union
leadership
needed at
Our Lucaya

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Since the last layoffs at Our
Lucaya Resort back in 2008, I
am surprised that it took so
long for another mass dis-
missal. As reported, the resort
has lost an average of over
$30 million per year over the
past few years.

Despite being one of those
employees who was given bad
news this past week, I feel
Hutchison should be com-
mended for keeping us
employed for so long with
such financial challenges.

I think it was misleading for
our union representatives to
know the facts prior to the
layoffs and then in a last ditch
attempt for headlines pretend
management has done some-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



thing wrong. Better and more
responsible union leadership
is needed at Our Lucaya mov-
ing forward.

I feel confident that Hutchi-
son will find a way to make a
success out of the resort and it
was great to hear that a
greater emphasis will be
placed on marketing.

I accepted my notice with
dignity and did not follow the
union’s advice to protest. I
never believe in burning
bridges.

I came to Our Lucaya with

my head up and left with my
head high. I thank God for
the opportunity to provide for
my family and I pray there is
a new form of take over at
Our Lucaya and better days
are ahead.

GRATEFUL
FORMER
EMPLOYEE -
OUR LUCAYA
Nassau,

March 6, 2011.

P.S. “Man has such a
predilection for systems and
abstract deductions that he is
ready to distort the truth
intentionally, he is ready to
deny the evidence of his sens-
es only to justify his logic.” —
Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Impressed by quick Government
response to Our Lucaya layoffs

EDITOR, The Tribune:

I am very impressed and happy at how
quickly the Government responded to the lay-
off of 200 employees at Our Lucaya in Grand
Bahama this past week. My heart and prayers
go out to all of those individuals and families
affected.

The good news is that within days of the
announcement of the layoffs, the Government
had a targeted package of responses such as
job placement and retraining, the creation of a
one stop shop for various benefits, and finan-
cial and spiritual counselling.

My friends in Freeport told me that Minis-
ter of Labour and Social Development Dion
Foulkes went to Grand Bahama on Friday
and stayed through most of the weekend to
coordinate the Government's response.

This all got me to wondering what the
response from the PLP would have been like if
this happened on their watch. From their slow
response to hurricanes that hit GB, the Our
Lucaya employees would be in big trouble
and on their own.

Perry Christie probably would have flown in
with a big delegation of cabinet ministers and
officials and given some emotional speeches
and made plenty of promises.

He would have promised to go back to Nas-
sau and consult with various people about
what to do. Knowing Mr. Christie, his con-
sulting would probably have gone on and on
and on.

He would probably have also held several
cabinet meetings on the layoffs without bring-
ing the matter to conclusion for some time.
Then after extensive consultation with his cab-
inet and experts he may have appointed a
committee to study the problem of the lay-
offs with the committee told to report back
in 30 days or so.

'S

2
etidi Lena —_

[WONG'S HOME C



Gledwtone Floed (acquit) " Mame, Behera *

Email: worngs entreigTiad con

Selective.







NTRE|

*

et OTE
x Ga) ae

Telephone: (242) 341-7871

PECIAL

O9¢ ner sauare ft.
Pe



Then his cabinet would have spent a long
time discussing the report with many Grand
Bahamian families suffering and anxious as
the many months went by as Mr. Christie tried
to decide what to do never really able to make
up his mind.

Unfortunately for the former Our Lucaya
employees the Government's response under
Mr. Christie would have been in my opinion
quite limited if and when it came. There would
have been no NIB Unemployment Benefit to
help tide over those laid off. There would have
been less social assistance such as was offered
by this Government during the worldwide
financial crisis.

There would have been no Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture Self-Starter's Pro-
gramme to help offer training and other assis-
tance such as starter loans which have helped
quite a number of Bahamians to start their
own small businesses.

There would also have been less training
opportunities at BTVI and probably no
apprenticeships in conjunction with the pri-
vate sector such as was organized by the Gov-
ernment as a part of the successful National
Retraining Programme.

The old Emerald Bay, which is now Sandals,
would have probably still been closed on the
PLP's watch and unavailable to provide some
hotels jobs for those laid off from Our Lucaya.

When people are hurting or in crisis they
need more than promises and talk about com-
passion.

They need action because talk doesn't pay
the rent or the mortgage and consultation
without quick action doesn't put food on the
table.

BLS
Nassau,
March 7, 2011.

A sad day for
the Bahamas

? EDITOR, The Tribune.

Last week was a sad day for
the Bahamas and we will be
reeling from the backlash for
years to come.

While I agree that we all
have a right to demonstrate, I
just cannot sit back and have
you embarrassing me by say-
ing you are representing me
while acting like a mob. I did
not give you permission to go
down town saying you are
protesting on my behalf.

If I wanted to protest I
would have done so myself. I
would not have let the oppo-
sition or unions with hidden
agendas fill me with alcohol
give me a few dollars and a
tee shirt and ask me to come
to Bay Street to protest some-
thing that I do not even
understand. I would not have
embarrassed myself by
cussing and fighting with the
law. I would not have to
explain to my children why I
let them down by acting so
stupidly in public. I just want
to make it clear that you were
representing yourself.

TONY
Nassau,
March 1, 2011.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PLP leader expresses

‘concern and sympathy’
for laid-off hotel staff

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Opposition
Leader Perry Christie was in
Grand Bahama yesterday,
where he expressed “concern
and sympathy” for the 200
persons laid-off by the Our
Lucaya Resort.

Mr Christie said the PLP is

“here for the people of
Freeport” and pledged that
the party will do all that it can
to push government to lend
more of a helping hand to the
city.

“T want to first and fore-
most express my concern and
sympathy to all those who
have lost their jobs in this
most recent round of lay-offs
at the Our Lucaya Resort.

“These dismissals come at
the same time when the Prime
Minister and his Minister of
State in Finance Zhivargo
Laing are busy boasting that
the economy is turning
around.

“T ask: turning around for
whom? Not those 200
employees who have been
fired.”

On Friday, the hotel termi-

aU tds NaC ee Ls

FILLING IN FORMS for the One Stop Shop programme.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Laid off
workers at the Our Lucaya
Resort turned out yesterday
to register for the govern-
ment’s One Stop Shop pro-
gramme at the Foster B Pes-
taina Hall.

Around 100 persons filled
out application forms for
employment at Sandals Exu-
ma, where 40 jobs are being
offered, and at the Bimini
Big Game Resort where 19
jobs are available.

The programme also
offers persons the opportu-
nity for training in a variety
of skill sets at BTVI and
College of the Bahamas. The
government will pay the
tuition.

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes said six months
apprenticeship will also be
offered at industrial compa-
nies on the island and the
government will subsidise
salaries.

The 202 workers laid-off
by the resort will also
receive unemployment ben-
efit assistance once their sev-
erance packages have
expired, as well as access to
other assistance programmes
if they qualify.

They will also be consid-
ered for the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture’s
Self-Starter’s Programme,
which offers $5,000 to per-
sons interested in starting
their own business.

One worker, who was
employed for 15 years at the

Santander

hotel, commended the gov-
ernment for providing some
relief and alternative options
for employment.

“T have a lot of financial
obligations and I am wary
about to moving to Exuma
for employment because I
have a family here that
depends on me, but I will
definitely enroll for training



PhotoMandyke Hepburn

at BTVI and apprenticeship
that will be offered at BOR-
CO,” he said.

The government will also
provide financial and pro-
fessional advice, and mem-
bers of the Grand Bahama
Pastor’s Forum were on
hand to offer counselling to
the laid-off workers yester-
day.

Se Se eae aS
eae eee a ela

Peet Tee

Tiiteteps Pele coe slab

LOT sis tc lie

re

TT | fila

te Re CeE Lar l a a



Banco Santander Bahamas International Bank Limited
Applications are invited from suitably qualified Bahamians for the following posttion:

ASSISTANT MANAGER — GROUP FINANCING

Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or Finance

A minimum of 3 years in banking with a lange intemational institution.
Ability to speak and write English and Spanish fluently.

Experience in Analysis of Financial Ratios, Variance Analysis, Managenvent
Information System, Forecasting, Budgeting, Accounting in the Ruropean

market and Management of Derivative Instruments,

Knowledge and working experience with all Microsoft Office applications.
Ability to evaluate financial reports sent to our Head Ofties, create andor
implement new financial reports according to Head Office guidelines and
streaniline the business segments,

Compensation and other benefits commensorate with qualifications and experience

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed

to the Director of Human Resources, Santinder Bank & Troost Lod.

P.O), Box -1682,

Nassau, Bahamas or via fax to 502 7955 mot later than March 14, 2011.



nated 202 workers and closed
two of the three hotels on the
property in an effort to
streamline its expenses and
keep the resort operational,
thereby saving 800 jobs.

Accompanying Mr Christie
to Freeport were West End
and Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe, Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell and Golden Gates
MP Shane Gibson.

During a press conference
at PLP Headquarters attend-
ed by PLP candidates Sena-
tor Dr Michael Darville and
Gregory Moss, Mr Christie
commented on how none of
the FNM MPs on Grand
Bahama had mentioned the
lay-offs in the House of
Assembly.

“Tt took a PLP MP to raise
the issue in the House. Not
one FNM member of the
House, not one government
minister including three who
represent this island said one
word.

“The very least they could
have done was to express sym-
pathy for the people who were
laid off,” he said.

Mr Christie stated that only
after the firings did the Min-
istry of Labour announce it
initiated emergency measures
to help those who had been
laid off.

On Saturday, Minister Dion
Foulkes announced that the
government had put in place
several initiatives to provide



assistance and relief to the
workers.

Mr Foulkes met with hotel
and union executives while in
Freeport on Friday, but said
he had not met with the dis-
missed workers when asked
by the media.

The ‘One Stop Shop’ pro-
gramme launched by the gov-
ernment yesterday offers job
and training opportunities,
unemployment benefit assis-
tance and counselling for
workers.

“While, one welcomes relief
where relief is offered, the
question is whether or not the
government was aware that
this was coming, when did
they know and were they
proactive seeking to lessen the
impact on the work force,”
said Mr Christie.

He stressed that the PLP is
concerned about the “hands-
off attitude” which the FNM
administration seems to have
about Freeport.

He stated that for four
years, the FNM has sat idly
by as the city lurched from
one economic crisis to the
next, without any clear vision
of what to do to stop the prob-
lems.

Mr Christie said while there
are serious issues facing the
development of Freeport, the
FNM government has its head
in the sand.

He believes that Freeport
is critical to the survival of the



“These dismissals
come at the same
time when the
Prime Minister
and his Minister
of State in Finance
Zhivargo Laing
are busy boasting
that the economy
is turning
around.”

Perry Christie |

Bahamas.

“Tt is not one’s interest for
this city to collapse, the press
on Nassau would be unrelent-
ing if that were to occur,” he
said. “When I held my party’s
convocation in Grand
Bahama, I chastised the Prime
Minister for saying that he
would not talk to the Grand
Bahama Port Authority about
the fact that the tax exemp-
tions for this city will expire
in 2015. That is simply wrong.
A PLP government would
never shut the door to dia-
logue,” he said.

Mr Christie encouraged
Freeporters to hold on as elec-
tions are to be held within a
year.

“Help and hope are on the
way from our party. I hope
that as we reach out our hand
in friendship to you, that you
will accept what we have to
offer.

“The party has chosen three
excellent candidates: men of
vision and of empathy for peo-
ple. We are nearing the choice
of three more people,” he
said.

at ee Ble
rem Taam
Pest Contral
ae es
Kaa

LOGS

ULTIMATE SLIP RESISTANT CLOG





SHOE STORE

121 EAST ST. PH 322-5276

Sobucend

Tate eee) soe





ate

SIZES 7-14



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



International travelling
performers assist with ‘Keep
Grand Bahama Clean’ efforts

DURING their one-week visit to
Grand Bahama, cast members of
the international performing group
‘Up with People’ (UWP) assisted
the Keep Grand Bahama Clean
(KGBC) committee with various
tasks on the island.

Cast members lent their physical
strength as they engaged in clean-
ups at the Grand Bahama Home for
the Aged (GBHA) and along the
streets. Much needed support was
also rendered to staff of the Rand
Nature Centre as UWP members
performed various odd jobs.

The artistic talents of group mem-
bers came to the fore during spe-
cial performances along with the
KGBC puppets at several of the
island’s schools and at the Sir
Charles Hayward Children’s
Library.

“We were extremely thrilled to
have UWP in our midst for the past

‘UP WITH PEOPLE’
help ‘Keep Grand
Bahama Clean’ —
Cast members and
students of St
Paul's College col-
lect and bag litter.

week. The level of energy they dis-
played along with their genuine
commitment to service was out-
standing,” said KGBC chairperson
Nakira Wilchcombe.

GBHA supervisor Adrianne
Dorsett was also full of praise. “We
greatly appreciated them coming
and helping us. They cleaned the
windows and screens, weeded the
flower beds and spent time inter-
acting with the residents. It was a
joyous occasion,” she said.

Walls of the children’s section of
the library were transformed as the
UWP members drew and painted
oversized illustrations of favourite
cartoon characters on them. The
paintings brought story time to life
for visiting students who were read
to by the UWP group.

Geneva Rutherford, director of
community relations with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA),





KGBC PUPPETS — Whilst on-island, visiting ‘Up with People’ cast members made special appearances as the popular
KGBC puppets at various schools. Pictured (left to right): Cassie Williams of the US; Kit Palabyab of the Philippines; Bogar
Garcia Milan of Mexico and Katie of the US.

expressed appreciation for this latest
gesture which she described as “a
permanent fixture of the group’s
contribution to students of Grand
Bahama.”

Three cast members who hail
from the United States, Philippines
and Mexico took on roles of the
popular KGBC puppets spreading
environmentally friendly messages
during special school assemblies.

Emma Whitehead headed the
UWP sub-group assigned to assist
KGBC and served as its spokesper-
son.

“We love being able to come into
communities and meet the needs of
people who are here and existing.
Grand Bahama is such a beautiful
island and being able to help make
other people’s lives better is truly
rewarding. We try to unite youn
people to take action in their com-
munities and in so many ways our
visits spark people to be unified and
get behind a common goal,” she
stated.

As an expression of gratitude,
management of Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace (PLM) Bourbon Street



CULTURAL INTERCHANGE -— Visiting ‘Up with People’ members get a chance to
enjoy local culture in Count Bassie Square, Port Lucaya Marketplace.

Limited, hosted cast members who
assisted KGBC to lunch and enter-
tainment in Count Basie Square.
“PLM was very excited to host
UWP cast members. We trust that it
allowed for a cultural interchange
as they observed some of our local

talent. Hopefully, they can incorpo-
rate some aspect of it into their rou-
tine and even include talented
Bahamians in their travelling ensem-
ble,” said Karen Ferguson-Bain,
entertainment and marketing coor-
dinator for PLM.

RAFFLE WINNERS

St. Cecilia’s Church Annual Bazaar & Raffle
Saturday, March 5th, 2011

1. Name: Agatha Saunders
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Los Angeles, CA
(Accommodations)

2. Name: All My Sister In GT
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Detroit, MI

3. Name: Sean Brathwraite
Round Trip Ticket for Two to New York, NY

4. Name: Anissa Ambrister
Round Trip Ticket for Two to New Jersey, NJ

5. Name: Kim
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Charlotte, N.C.

6. Name: Juses Loves
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Atlanta, GA

7. Name: Chirssy H
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Tampa, FL

8. Name: Lenice Burrows
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Orlando, FL

9. Name:
Round 7
West Palm Beach,

10. Name: Deshti Kno’
Round Trip Ticket for T\
Fort Lauderdale, FL

11. Name: Jamaal Hamilton
Round Trip Ticket for Two to
Miami, FL

12. Name: Dwainisha Adderley
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Freeport, G.B.

13. Name: My Bag R Packed

Round Trip Ticket for Two to
Abaco

14. Name: Clive Cooper
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Harbour Island

15. Name: Chanade Rolle
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Bimini













Ticket No. 49835

Ticket No. 53255

Ticket No. 05847

Ticket No. 14681

Ticket No. 37160

Ticket No. 22214

Ticket No. 09921

Ticket No. 02431

Ticket No. 36926

Ticket No. 04458

Ticket No. 09760

Ticket No. 04330

Ticket No. 47417

Ticket No. 25148





Ticket No. 21508

Interested persons should contact

Please bring in ticket stubbs to collect prizes.

PRIME OFFICE SPACE

CMUCVY

of our dear !

hushand, daddy,

grandfather and brorhes

Dan't grieve for me |
am free, f followed a

park
me, J took his hand
when he called, f bid
this world good bye
and deft it all if nrg
Parting
void, fill it with the
remembered joy, lift
up your heart and
rejoice with me, Cod
has me sow he hes
Sef mie free.

Wilfred Rolle Sr.
“Long Boy”

Who Departed This Life on
Miser: tn, 201

Precious memories will forever linger

God laid for

has left a

Ideal

int the

hearts of his wife Decones Ruthmae Rolle, six
children, qrand children, son-in-law,daughter-in-

law family and friends

Rest in Peace

Contact Owner at 362-5787

Housekeeper Wanted

Live -in housekeeper wanted immediately
for family of 4 + 2 dogs. Responsibilities to
include laundry (including ironing), cooking,
cleaning and care of 2 young children.

357-7381.

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second
floor space is available in newly constructed
building at the corner of Marlborough and
Cumberland Streets.

Two (2) on-site car spaces included.

location for offshore

trust company, law or accounting firm, or
other professions.



ification.

costume item.

way its people live.

bank,

RON Me Seat

THE Bahamian American Cultural Society has taken
its Bahamas Junkanoo Workshop to the Harlem School
of the Arts in Harlem, New York — the mecca of Black
Culture in the United States.

The Bahamas Junkanoo Workshop is a flexible four-
part presentation, prepared by BACS, which is geared
toward children and teenagers. It emphasises knowl-
edge, hands on skills, entertainment and behavior mod-

With Junkanoo music playing in the background,
around 50 young people enjoyed making at least one

Costumes

After verbal and visual presentations the children,
wearing costumes displaying the colours of the
Bahamas, junkanooed around the hall to the sound of
bells, horns and drums.

The audience of about 200 stayed for a video presen-
tation and to ask questions about the Bahamas and the

The afternoon saw an unexpected turn of events
when a participating parent heard a familiar voice on
the video of last year’s Boxing Day and New Years
Junkanoo events in the Bahamas.

She rushed over to look, and to her amazement, she
recognised a relative whom she had not seen for many
years, who is now living in the Bahamas.

TGS a

Golden Gates Assembly Park * Carmichael Road





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Salvation Army beneficiary of GBPA clothing drive

Over 1,000 units of
clothing collected

EMPLOYEES of the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority and Group of
Companies recently made a
donation to the Salvation
Army following a successful
clothing drive amongst staff
members.

Yanique Pinder, the
2010/11 ‘Group Employee
of the Year’, said over 1,000
units were collected, con-
sisting of men’s, women’s
and children’s apparel, shoes
and fashion accessories.

“We are extremely excit-
ed at the success of our cam-
paign, “Walk a mile in my
shoes, share the clothes on
my back’. It was very impor-
tant for every member of
the GBPA family to support
this drive so that we in turn
would be able to assist the
Salvation Army in their
efforts to service the needs
of those in the community,”
she said.

A brainchild of GBPA’s
community relations depart-
ment, the clothing drive was
conducted over a two-week
period, with staff members
from throughout the group
bringing in clothing and oth-
er apparel with the aim of
supplying sufficient items to
restock the Salvation
Army’s Goodwill Store.

Ian Rolle, GBPA presi-
dent, praised their efforts.

ROTARY CLUB NEWS



“This gesture demon-
strates that the employees
have bought into our mis-
sion statement, ‘To better
the lives of the Grand
Bahama community, and by
extension, the Bahamas’.
And so today [’'m very
pleased to see our employ-
ees join together in partner-
ship to display in their own
way, GBPA’s commitment
to the Grand Bahama com-
munity.”

On hand to receive the
donation were Roger and
Cheryl Compton, com-
manding officers off the Sal-
vation Army. Captain Roger
explained that the donation
could not have come at a
better time, considering
their current depleted stock
at the thrift store.

“At Christmas time peo-
ple are cleaning out their
closets and such and we get
really bounteous donations
around then, but now our
inventory has almost run
down to nothing.

“So, it’s great that GBPA
remembered us and as you
can see from what has been
donated today, these are
high quality items that we
will be able to offer at
reduced prices.”

Expressing similar senti-
ments, Captain Cheryl
stressed the significance of

ae

. ar ey #



GBPA DONATES TO THE SALVATION ARMY -— After a successful canna drive, GBPA management and Sanrio Employees of the Year’
presented commanding officers of the Salvation Army with clothing, footwear and accessories. Pictured (front row, left to right): Captain Cheryl
Compton of the Salvation Army; Ginger Moxey, vice-president of the GBPA; lan Rolle, GBPA president; Geneva Rutherford, GBPA’s director
of community relations, and Captain Roger Compton of the Salvation Army.

the Salvation Army’s thrift
store in the effort to assist
the needy in the community.

“All of our programmes,
whether it be food, things
with the children and youth,
the ministry and all of the
different aspects of our dis-
aster services, are funded by
proceeds from the Goodwill

Store and the generosity of
those on the island. It’s real-
ly our thrift store that helps
to generate funds for our
overall operations, so that’s
why this donation is so
meaningful to us because
now we have items for
resale that can help fund our
programs longer,” she said.

The Salvation Army’s
Goodwill Store is opened
from 10am — 4pm, every day
except Sunday. Social work-
ers are also on-site 10am —
2pm on Tuesdays and
Thursdays to render assis-
tance or advice to any in
need.

“GBPA was pleased at

the success of our compa-
ny’s clothing drive.

“We seek to lead by
example and hopefully this
will encourage other corpo-
rate citizens and those in the
wider community to donate
generously to organisations
like the Salvation Army,”
Mr Pinder said.

BUSINESSES ‘UNAWARE OF BEING
ABLE T0 OBTAIN FUNDS FROM GEF’ |

By LAMECH JOHNSON

ROTARY Club of Nassau’s guest speaker at its weekly meeting
Friday told club members that businesses are not aware that they can
receive funding for environmental projects from the Global Envi-
ronment Facility, which was established in 1991.

Stacy Moultrie, a project consultant for the Global Environ-
ment Facility (GEF) National Portfolio Formulation exercise, gave
a power point presentation and described the workings of GEF,
which is the largest funding organisation of projects to improve the
global environment.

“GEF is an independent financial organization starting from
the World Bank that provides grants to developing countries and
countries in transition for projects related to the environment,” she
said.

Currently the government is the only entity in the Bahamas that
receives funding from the organisation. GEF has an incentive where,
depending on the size of the project, the company can receive any-
where from $25,000 to $50,000 to draw up the proposals.

The GEF unites 182 member governments, “of which the
Bahamas is a part,” in partnership with international institutions,
non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to address
global environmental issues.

Ms Moultrie said that GEF’s focal areas are “biodiversity, chem-
icals, climate change, international waters, land degradation and sus-
tainable forestry management.” Any project, in order to receive fund-
ing, must fit into one of these categories, she said.

Persons interested should note that GEF approval normally
takes between 12 to 18 months and requires co-financing. “For
every dollar you ask, you must have a dollar to match,” she said.

According to GEF’s website, the Bahamas has had nine projects
since 1997, though approval and completion of them came at a lat-
er date.

For more information on how to qualify and receive funding for
an environmental project, visit their website at www.thegef.org.

COE ENC Ue IEE

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Book Drive for Primary School

— LAMECH JOHNSON

WITH March globally recognised
as literacy month for Rotary Inter-
national, a local Rotary club has
decided to host a book drive for one
of Nassau’s primary schools in order

i to help stock its library.

The Rotary Club of East Nassau
(RCEN) is assisting Thelma Gibson
Primary students in acquiring read-
ing materials for their understocked
library.

RCEN president Joanne Smith
told The Tribune that the school has
more than 700 students who “need
reading material to feed their young,
eager minds.”

RCEN members were encouraged
to donate books and other reading

Introducing The All NEW

materials at the club’s weekly lun-
cheon on Friday.

Ms Smith is now also appealing
to members of the public to donate.

“You can bring books to Media
Enterprises at 31 Shirley Park
Avenue,” she said.

Principal of Thelma Gibson
Angela Russell said she is grateful
for RCEN’s help with the initiative.

“It’s difficult to put a number on
the amount of books that the library
needs for our students, but the more
the merrier,” she said.

It was the club’s initial interest in
helping with the construction of a
playground for the Thelma Gibson
pre-school that made the school
seek further assistance with their
mission to acquire more books for



their
stu-
dents.

Rotary is an organisation with
more than 1.2 million members
worldwide.

There are six clubs in New Provi-
dence, of which RCEN is the biggest
with over 100 members.

Others are located in Cat Island,
Eleuthera, Abaco and Freeport.

2011 FORD MUSTANG

an American Icon

Shop & Compare

All new, all new, nothing like it available
in The Bahamas, a true American Sports
car. With the new 3.7L, 305 HP, V6 with
Automatic Transmission, custom 17 inch
alloy wheels, power windows, locks and
mirrors, side curtain air bags,

plus leather interior and the all new Sync
System and all standard features,

PLUS 3 years/36000 mile warranty,

3 years roadside assistance,

3 years rust protection, licence and
inspection to birthday, full tank of gas,
floor mats, first five services

If you are lOOKiINg for the Des€ value available
You owe it to yourself to visit our showroom

DP

2011

orive one. FORD FUSION

hop @ ‘Gompare

2.5L four cylinder engine with automatic transmission,
the most fuel efficient vehicle in its class, 6 disc cd system,
power windows locks and mirrors, side curtain air bags,
17 inch allow wheels, completely new aerodynamic body
design, all of this plus 3 years/36000 mile warranty, 3
years roadside assistance, 3 years rust protection, licence
and inspection to birthday, full tank of gas, floor mats,

first five services.

Sunroof & Sync System

Reserve yours now available at

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LT



THOMPSON BOULEVARD
TEL.: 3567100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com
WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



MAN CHARGED WITH
KILLING HIS MOTHER

FROM page one

intentionally acaused Mrs Adderley’s
death on Monday, February 28.

Mrs Adderley was found dead inside an }

apartment in Dundas Town, with injuries

to the back of her head. Police believe she
had been involved in an argument prior to :

her death.

The accused, who was not represented :
by an attorney yesterday, was not }

required to enter a plea to the murder
charge.

Prosecutor Sandradee Gardiner said }
the prosecution intends to proceed witha
Voluntary Bill of Indictment in the mat- }
ter- bypassing a preliminary inquiry in }

the Magistrate’s Court.

The case was adjourned to May 9, with
Adderley remanded to Her Majesty’s }

Prison.

66 ARMED ROBBERY
VICTIMS IN 2 MONTHS

FROM page one

the robbers escaped with an undisclosed
amount of cash in a white 2006 Chevy
Suburban they stole from an employee.
Police later found the vehicle abandoned
at Bain Street, off Nassau Street.

Construction sites and other busi-
nesses that employ cash payroll were
urged yesterday to invest in a checking
system which would eliminate the
increased risk of keeping large sums of
cash on site. All cash-based businesses
are advised to invest in high-quality sur-
veillance, security guards, and have
greater communication with the police.

Supt Dean added: “Call the police,
call the crime prevention office, we can
give recommendations on how you can
make your home or business more
secure. Our officers will come out to
your place and conduct a survey, for
free, and present you with recommen-
dations based on our findings.”

Anyone with any information that
might assist police in their investigations
into all criminal matters should call 911,
919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymous-
ly on 328-TIPS (8477).

Public raises concerns

over nets used in Lake

FROM page one

tions concerning fresh water fish.

Mr Mallis told The Tribune yesterday
that talapia, a fresh water fish, was brought
to the Bahamas in the 1960s to populate
lakes, ponds and wells in hopes that it
would become a "backyard agriculture
product" for Bahamians, and as a conserva-
tion tactic to attract indigenous fish-eating
birds.

Mr Mallis said that the talapia has flour-
ished, however "mass killings using gill nets
will not be sustainable in a closed system”
like Lake Killarney and will wipe out the
species.

He added that the numbers of talapia
seem to have been dwindling in recent
years.

Last year, a source reported finding a gill
net in the middle of the lake that had killed
several diving ducks, but the owner of the
net was never found.

Even if he were, there is no guarantee
that legal action would be taken.

"This is an unprecedented issue," Mr
Mallis admitted, but added that if the use of
gill nets on the lake is harming protected
species, it should be made illegal and cov-
ered by legislation.

While Mr Mallis stressed there is no way
to know if there are any health risks associ-
ated with eating the fish from Lake Killar-
ney, as the water and fish have not been
tested, lead poisoning is a possibility.

For years, cheaper lead pellets have been
used in shotguns by hunters in the Bahamas,
rather than steel pellets.

When birds are hunted on lakes, stray
lead shot can be eaten by fish or can break
down, contaminating the water and possibly
resulting in lead poisoning for anyone who
uses the lake as a food source.

Mr Deveaux said that following The Tri-
bune’s inquiries, the ministries of Public
Health, Agriculture and Marine Resources
have been alerted to the matter.

He said a public alert will be issued.

UTS UTE) |

Yesterday's Question

Which Government department is investigating
companies for alleged tax evasion?

Yesterdays Answer

The Customs Department

Yesterdays Winners

Jillian Mullings
Calvin Missick
Shawn Moree

dps
2ts
Ipt

Click the ‘Like’ button on the Tribune News Network
Facebook page to play Tribune Trivia |

Ai] oye

WV a

sti Residents Only

7?

One Lucky Winner monthly. Pick up a copy
of TheTribune and visit us on facebook.

Fiowsbhs

a!
weistn
1 day Hotel

When booking your next trip to Florida, choose
Eee em ele emesis l ay

1 day car rental

7 rn

py

Leal Aeris

(1) Roundtrip Airfare

Nassau to Miami



CONCERNS WERE RAISED when photographs surfaced of persons pulling large nets filled with fish
out of Lake Killarney.

PLP chairman says
Oommittee not aware

Killarney fishing

































of ‘fraud’ allegations
link to candidate

FROM page one

alleged connection were
recently broadcast by Cana-
dian station CTV in a tele-
vision special. The news sta-
tion reported on an alleged
connection between Mr
Forbes and a Bahamian reg-
istered company, GSF Lim-
ited, accused of squander-
ing client investments.

Arnold Forbes & Co was
the “registered office/agent”
for GSF Limited, and Mr
Forbes served as a director
with two Quebec residents,
Jean-Pierre Tremblay and
Stephane Hardy.

GSF Limited was at the
centre of a high-profile trial
last year, when Canadian
millionaire Nick Djokich
was found guilty of conspir-
acy to commit kidnapping
and murder for hire.

“Those claims are all a
bunch of b¥*****t, And you
can quote me on that. They
say they were looking for
$6 million and they found it
in the end. Where is the sto-
ry in that?” Mr Roberts
asked.

“When it came over the
television and we looked at
it there was nothing in it.
The claims were asinine.
His role in whatever took
place is the role that lawyers
in Nassau do every day and
continue to do today,” he
said.

Mr Forbes said the report
disparaged his character
and he plans to sue the
Canadian broadcaster.

“We incorporated the
company which is a normal
practice for law firms espe-
cially those in corporate
law,” said Mr Forbes in
explaining his involvement.

“We provided a corporate
service to a client and it was

normal to always act as offi-
cers and directors.

“We got all the due dili-
gence that is needed and
these chents checked out
clean.

“When I found out that
these guys were up to no
good we terminated (busi-
ness with them) immediate-
ly,” he said

In the Djokich trial, Djo-
kich claimed he invested $6
million in GSF Limited with
an understanding that his
annual interest rate was 20
per cent and his principal
funds were guaranteed.

The CTV report claims
that when Mr Djokich went
to cash out money in 2004,
he was informed by compa-
ny directors that the money
was all gone.

The report claims Djo-
kich went to desperate
lengths to uncover the story
behind his missing money.
He tried working through
various Canadian authori-
ties, including the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police
fraud squad in Calgary, the
Quebec Provincial Police
and the Quebec Securities
Commission. But after years
of unsuccessful attempts, he
was driven to launch his
own experiment in vigilan-
tism, according to CTV.

Based on details revealed
in the trial, Djokich orches-
trated a series of kidnap-
pings, torture sessions and
attempted murder, includ-
ing an alleged hit placed on
Mr Forbes and Richard
DeVries, a Canadian lawyer
living in the Bahamas, as
well as others. Djokich’s
scheme unraveled when the
hit-man he hired turned out
to be an undercover US
Immigration and Customs
enforcement agent.

A segment in the CTV
programme depicts a Cana-
dian reporter speaking with
Mr Forbes, asking for his
account of what happened
to the millions of dollars
that passed through GSF
Limited.

Mr Forbes was then con-
fronted with copies of doc-
uments that purportedly
bore his signature and
alleged he was a director
and signing officer for the
company and had autho-
rised hundreds of thousands
of dollars in payouts.

On the programme, Mr
Forbes asked the television
crew to return in a couple
of days so he could provide
them with documents to
clear him and his company
of any wrongdoing. The
report claimed that when
the crew returned Mr
Forbes could offer nothing
“conclusive.”

Mr Forbes maintains he
never had a connection to
Djokich, and the allegations
have “no bearing” on what
he plans to do in the con-
stituency of Mount Moriah.

National Security Minis-
ter Tommy Turnquest, the
Member of Parliament for
Mount Moriah, said he did
not want to comment on the
situation at this time.

When asked if he antici-
pated the allegations fac-
toring into the upcoming
elections, he said: “I don't
need the misfortunes of oth-
ers to win.”

Mr Turnquest won the
last election by more than
500 votes, and he said he is
confident his support is still
strong.

He said any support he
may have lost would likely
be counter-balanced by new
supporters gained.



PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





GAZA HAMAS POLICE SEIZE
Peat UU

IBRAHIM BARZAK,
Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip

The Gaza Strip's Hamas government announced Sun-
day that it has arrested the spiritual leader of an extrem-
ist Islamic group after a two-year search.

It was one of the most high-profile arrests against a
series of shadowy groups that have tried to challenge
Hamas rule in Gaza in recent years. These groups, known
as Salafis, draw inspiration from the al-Qaida terror net-
work and believe the Iranian-backed Hamas is too mod-
erate.

Hamas said Sheikh Abu Walid-al-Maqdasi, the leader
of the group "Monotheism and Holy War," was arrested
in a crowded beachside neighborhood of Gaza City last
week.

Al-Maqdasi's group shares the same name as an al-Qai-
da inspired group suspected in hotel bombings in Egyp-
t's Sinai desert between 2004 and 2005 that killed more
than 120 people. It's not clear if it's the same group.

In Gaza, al-Maqdasi's group says Hamas, a funda-
mentalist group that has killed hundreds of Israelis in sui-
cide bombings, shootings and rocket attacks, should do
more to battle Israel. It also says Hamas must impose an
even more extreme version of Muslim law in Gaza.

His group has also claimed responsibility for firing
rockets at Israel in defiance of an unwritten truce between
the Jewish state and Gaza's Hamas rulers. It is believed
to have attracted former Hamas loyalists disenchanted
with the militant group's enforcement of a two-year-old
cease-fire.

Hamas has been especially wary of their hardline chal-
lengers, particularly since the spiritual mentor of anoth-
er shadowy group defied Hamas and announced a sepa-
rate Islamic state in southern Gaza in 2009. That prompt-
ed a gun battle with Hamas police that killed more than
20 people.

Hamas spokesman Salah Bardawil says al-Maqdasi
spread incitement against Hamas and tried to attract
youths to his organization.

Al-Maqdasi, who is Palestinian, sneaked into Gaza in
2006, with his wife and seven children, Hamas officials
said. He is believed to be about 50, and he also is known
as Hisham al-Suaydani. Hamas has been trying to track
him down for two years.



March 2011

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Gates:
involve

ROBERT BURNS,
AP National Security Writer
BAGRANM, Afghanistan

U.S. Defense Secretary
Robert Gates said Monday that
both the U.S. and Afghan gov-
ernments agree the American
military should remain involved
in Afghanistan after the
planned 2014 end of combat
operations to help train and
advise Afghan forces.

"Obviously it would be a
small fraction of the presence
that we have today, but I think
we're willing to do that,” Gates
told a group of U.S. troops at
Bagram air field, which is head-
quarters for U.S. and NATO
forces in eastern Afghanistan.
"My sense is, they (Afghan offi-
cials) are interested in having us
do that."

A soldier asked Gates about
a long-term military presence,
and Gates noted that Washing-
ton and Kabul have recently
begun negotiating a security
partnership. He mentioned no
details. He was to meet later in
the day with Afghan President
Hamid Karzai.

On Sunday, the Afghan
National Security Council dis-
cussed the matter of a long-
term security accord with the
US., according to a statement
issued by Karzai's office. The
statement said Karzai told the
council that the U.S. wants the
deal worked out as soon as pos-
sible. And he said that on the
Afghan side it was matter not
just for the government but for
the Afghan people to decide.

The U.S. has said it wants a
long-term relationship with



A SLA 2 TORR SEAS Pr 57,
PUA Ape iis Wry)

A OZ LARSL 2 TORS
AS A 3

BL LARGE TOR fb MR tee 37,
PLA TS We) aE

iui Lae A ST
LUM A RET CLS A A
SL PE PEE Deu]
Tia] ioe

wi 2 LABRET
FOAL FOS Sa

i ke |
A AT A aril

7s

Las PE eT
SL PE
TL-1a

TOPAAG A fio

LUST
2S Pee
iad d

LOS PIS
SS Fe Pees
tiated

Ler, Be
Ld Pe Py
-el

MM Mee
aril

2 TLE, TOP
PDAS Poe

OL Le | ee 2
FID, A Wee wr.
peuea

OL APY HOU

re i ad
FLED ki ET | CY A
APT PU LT Pe

Gt Mya
SPEDLTF PAS A
GET BOF b APPT T

a AL Ca Da
Ferra BwHHETE
ota t |
One
Cea

my PU a a
A, TTT
ans SHU
ori
nieerw

OF ey POR Ca DA
AA, ITTE
SATS - SU
ors
sire

Gartei (echt ele,

chery breed, peerelte

pera a clin mara
aber

beg fn eee ed
prt ae hie! UP
wl pe ee

A New Opportunity in Sales Awaits

You!

If you are a self-motivated sales professional, this is THE opportunity for

you.

Requirements:

* Prior sales experience with a proven track record of closing sales

* Excellent communication skills
Must have own transportation
Basic computer skills
Ability to work flexible hours

Ability to manage all aspects of client accounts, including collections

Successful candidates will be expected to manage an existing client
portfolio AND actively pursue new clients for the company.

Full training will be provided and an excellent commission based

remuneration package awaits successful candidates.

If you have what it takes to join our team we are waiting to hear from

you......
Please send your applications to:

DA i257
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau



Afghanistan, in part to ensure
the country does not again
become a haven for al-Qaida
or affiliated terrorist groups.
Karzai's interest is rooted in his
desire for U.S. security guaran-
tees and commitments that
could help bring stability and
prosperity.

Gates is at the start of a two-
day visit with USS. troops, allied
commanders and Afghan lead-
ers to gauge war progress as the
Obama administration moves
toward crucial decisions on
reducing troop levels.

The trip comes during
heightened tensions between
the U.S. and Afghanistan. On
Sunday, Karzai rejected a US.
apology for the mistaken killing
of nine Afghan boys in a
NATO air attack. The Afghan
president told Gen. David
Petraeus, the top commander
of coalition forces in
Afghanistan, that expressing
regret was insufficient for last
week's killing of the boys, ages
12 and under, by coalition heli-
copters.

A planned visit to a combat
outpost south of Kabul was
scratched due to poor weath-
er, and instead Gates made a
brief flight north to Bagram,
headquarters for the U.S.-led
command that is responsible
for eastern Afghanistan. The
Pentagon chief visited a combat
hospital, where Maj. Gen. John
Campbell told reporters three
soldiers had been admitted ear-
lier in the day with wounds
from a roadside bomb blast.

In his remarks to troops

Pakistani PM
praises slain
Christian at
memorial

MUNIR AHMED,
Associated Press
ZARAR KHAN,
Associated Press
ISLAMABAD

assembled inside a cavernous
building on the air field, Gates
offered encouragement.

"I know you've had a tough
winter, and it's going to be a
tougher spring and summer, but
you've made a lot of headway,”
he said. "I think you've proven,
with your Afghan partners, that
this thing is going to work and
that we'll be able to prevail.”

Defense Department
spokesman Geoff Morrell told
reporters flying with the Pen-
tagon chief from Washington
that Gates wants to get a first-
hand feel for changes on the
ground since he last was in
Afghanistan in December.

The U.S. is committed to
beginning a troop withdrawal
in July. But the size and scope
of the pullback will depend on
the degree of progress toward
handing off full control to the
shaky Afghan government.

Morrell said Gates expects
to hear from troops and com-
manders that U.S. and NATO
strategy is making important
progress against the relentless
Taliban, who are thought to be
gearing up for a spring offen-
sive. Campbell told reporters
in Bagram that the number of
roadside bomb attacks has risen
in the last two weeks.

"The enemy is trying to get
an early start on what he would
call a spring offensive," Camp-
bell said, adding that it was not
yet clear whether there has
been an increase in Taliban
fighter infiltration from the
Pakistan side of the border.

U.S. commanders have been

Pakistan's prime minister told mourners at a

US should stay
din Afghanistan



(AP Photo/Mandel Ngan, Pool)
GREETING: Gen. David Petraeus, left, top commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan, greets U.S. Defense
Secretary Robert Gates upon Gates’ arrival in Kabul, Afghanistan Monday, March 7, 2011. Gates arrived
in Afghanistan Monday, beginning a two-day visit with U.S. troops, allied commanders and Afghan
leaders to gauge war progress as the Obama administration moves toward crucial decisions on reducing
troop levels.

saying for weeks that the Tal-
iban are suffering big losses in
territory and personnel, while
being denied the funding and
infiltration routes they have
relied on in the past to ramp
up guerrilla operations each
spring.

Marine Maj. Gen. Richard
Mills, top commander in the
southwestern province of Hel-
mand, told reporters last week
that a Taliban counteroffensive
is anticipated.

Mills said he expects the Tal-
iban to try "to regain very, very
valuable territory ... lost over
the past six to eight months."
He added that US. and allied
forces are intercepting "as
many of the foreign fighters as
we can" who come from Pak-
istan to attack U.S. and Afghan
troops. Gates sees the spring as
a potentially decisive period for
President Barack Obama's war
strategy, which includes begin-
ning to withdraw U.S. forces in
July.

This week's visit is Gates’
13th trip to Afghanistan, and
probably one of his last as
defense secretary. He has said
he will retire this year but has
not given a date.

After Afghanistan, Gates
planned to fly to the Stuttgart,
Germany, headquarters of U.S.
Africa Command to attend a
ceremony Wednesday marking
the arrival of a new comman-
der, Army Gen. Carter Ham.

Gates will attend a NATO
defense ministers meeting in
Brussels on Thursday and Fri-
day.



(AP Photo/B.K.Bangash)

Friday funeral Mass for a Christian politician
assassinated for opposing harsh blasphemy laws
that they had a lost a great leader and that the
government would do its "utmost" to bring his
killers to justice.

Shahbaz Bhatti, the sole Christian government
minister, was shot dead Wednesday after being
threatened for opposing laws that impose the
death penalty for insulting Islam. He was the
second Pakistani politician killed in two months
over the matter, and his death underscored the
perils facing a government that is increasingly
too weak to govern well or buck the religious
right.

Also Friday, a bomb went off in a mosque in
northwest Pakistan, killing eight people and
wounding 25 around prayer time. Police official
Saif Ali Khan says the blast in Akbarpura village
occurred as worshippers gathered at a shrine
attached to the mosque to collect free food.

Islamist extremists frequently attack Muslims
as well religious minorities to sow fear and under-
mine confidence in the Pakistani government.

As anguished friends and relatives of Bhatti, a
42-year-old Roman Catholic, prepared to bury
him in his home village of Khushpur on Friday,
mourners packed an Islamabad church in the
morning to pay their respects. There, Prime Min-
ister Yousuf Raza Gilani praised a man many

COMFORT: Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousaf Raza
Gilani comforts the mother of slain Christian leader
Shahbaz Bhatti during Bhatti's funeral ceremony at a
local church in Islamabad, Pakistan on Friday, March
4, 2011. Pakistan's prime minister told mourners at a
Friday funeral Mass for a Christian politician assassi-
nated for opposing harsh blasphemy laws that they
had a lost a great leader and that the government
would do its "utmost" to bring his killers to justice.

described as gentle, humble and devoted to help-
ing Pakistan's downtrodden religious minorities.

"People like him, they are very rare," Gilani
told the overflow crowd. "All the minorities have
lost a great leader. I assure you, we will try our
utmost to bring the culprits to justice."

The prime minister did not specifically mention
Islamist extremists who have waged a war on a
country, though he has issued statements
denouncing them in recent days. Gilani also
avoided mentioning the blasphemy laws, which
rights groups have long deplored as vague and
misused to persecute minorities.

Christians are the largest religious minority in
Pakistan, where 95 percent of the country's 180
million people are Muslim. They often are the
victims of discrimination and persecution, and
they typically live in poor parts of towns and do
low-skilled, badly paid jobs.



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

LICKETY SPLIT
HOSTS ‘GIVE A
PINT, GET A PINT’
BLOOD DRIVE

IN response to the
Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal’s pleas for more blood
donors, Lickety Split invit-
ed the public to partici-
pate in an innovative
blood drive in which those
who donated a pint of
blood, got a pint of Edy’s
Grand ice cream free.

The “Edy’s Give A Pint,
Get A Pint Blood Drive”
was held at the Lickety
Split diner on JFK Drive.

Managing director of
the company Llewellyn
Burrows was first in line
to donate, followed by
various Lickety Split staff
members.

Throughout the six-hour
blood drive, a steady
stream of customers lined
up to give a pint of blood
and get their ice cream
prize.

The event was Lickety
Split’s fourth blood drive
in aid of the PMH Blood
Bank.

Thanks to the compa-
ny’s efforts and the giving
spirit of the donors, the
PMH Blood Bank was
able to collect almost 30
pints.

LLEWLLYN BURROWS. Lickety Split managing director, was first to donate.

PMH BLOOD BANK staffer
starts the flow on a donor.




























































FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

al your stat

[- get sound investment advice
[7 benefit from multiple fund options
[7 earn potentially higher returns

GA all of the above

A SUBSIDIARY OF

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

Billet ah

MU es



ABLOOD DONOR anticipates her free pint of ice cream.

Obama restarts
Guantanamo trials

WASHINGTON
Associated Press

PRESIDENT Barack Oba-
ma reversed course Monday
and ordered a resumption of
military trials for terror suspects
at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
making his once ironclad
promise to close the isolated
prison look even more distant.

Guantanamo has been a
major political and national
security headache for the pres-
ident since he took office
promising to close the prison
within a year, a deadline that
came and went without him
ever setting a new one.

Obama made the change
with clear reluctance, bowing
to the reality that Congress’
vehement opposition to trying
detainees on U.S. soil leaves
them nowhere else to go. The
president emphasized his pref-
erence for trials in federal civil-
ian courts, and his administra-
tion blamed congressional med-
dling for closing off that avenue.

"I strongly believe that the
American system of justice is a
key part of our arsenal in the
war against al-Qaida and its
affiliates, and we will continue
to draw on all aspects of our
justice system — including (fed-
eral) courts — to ensure that
our security and our values are
strengthened,” Obama said in
a statement.

"Going forward, all branches
of government have a responsi-
bility to come together to forge
a strong and durable approach
to defend our nation and the
values that define who we are as
a nation."

The first Guantanamo trial
likely to proceed under Oba-
ma's new order would involve
Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the
alleged mastermind of the 2000
bombing of the USS Cole. Al-
Nashiri, a Saudi of Yemeni
descent, has been imprisoned

j

ii

at Guantanamo since 2006.

Defense officials have said
that of the around 170 detainees
at Guantanamo, about 80 are
expected to face trial by mili-
tary commission.

On Monday, the White
House reiterated that the
administration remains com-
mitted to eventually closing
Guantanamo — which is on a
U.S. Navy base — and that
Monday's actions were in pur-
suit of that goal. But the out-
come Obama wants seemed
even more distant.

Critics of the military com-
mission system, which was
established specifically to deal
with the detainees at Guan-
tanamo, contend that suspects
are not given some of the most
basic protections afforded peo-
ple prosecuted in American
courts and that that serves as a
recruitment tool for terrorists.

Obama's administration has
enacted some changes to the
military commission system
while aiming to close down
Guantanamo.

More than two dozen
detainees have been charged
there, but the charges against a
number of them were dismissed
in the wake of Obama's order in
January 2009 to halt the com-
mission process.

So far six detainees have
been convicted and sentenced,
including Ali Hamza al-Bahlul,
Osama bin Laden's media spe-
cialist who told jurors he had
volunteered to be the 20th Sept.
11 hijacker. He is serving a life
sentence at Guantanamo.

Meanwhile, the first Guan-
tanamo detainee tried in civilian
court — in New York — was
convicted in November on just
one of more than 280 charges
that he took part in the al-Qai-
da bombings of two U.S.
embassies in Africa. That case
ignited strident opposition to
any further such trials.

A!

Wom uit La

ULL Ha ese







$8.9m FINCO

hoost through
loan provision
policy change

* Reduction in credit
allowances from 40% to 30%
of non-accrual loans key factor
in quadrupling of mortgage
lender’s 2010 income

* Non-performing loans hit
$88.64m or 10.47% of total
loan portfolio

* FINCO insurance subsidiary
was still seeking licence
renewal at balance sheet date
By NEIL HARTNELL

A change in its loan pro-
visioning policy resulted in :
Finance Corporation of the ;
Bahamas (FINCO) reduc- :
ing credit loss provisions by }
$8.9 million during its 2010 }
financial year, a key factor ; the first census in 1978.
behind ta quadru- : is perceived as one of the sec-
pling to more than $18 mil- ? tors with little economic activi-
i ty, and therefore its contribu-
? tion to the Gross National
i Product is considered minimal.
? As an agricultural professional,
? and as per the definition for
? economic activity, nothing
? could be further from the
i truth,” said Mr Minns in a

SEE page 4B

Chamber unveils
Mystery Shop plan

Aims ‘to test every single
business in the Bahamas’ on
customer service and front-line

performance for indefinite period

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third

| party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

THE TRIBUNE

usiness



TUESDAY,

MARCH 8,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Agriculture could be gener-

i ating $305 million per year
i towards
? Domestic Product (GDP), com-
? pared to the $40.2 million
i recorded in the most recent sta-
i tistics, if proper reporting and
? recording of all agricultural out-
? puts took place, a Department
? of Agriculture official said yes-

Tribune Business Editor = terday.

Bahamian Gross

Leslie Minns, a statistician
with the Department, said in
his most recently-issued report
on agriculture’s contribution to
the Bahamian economy that
there has been “under-report-
ing” of agricultural output since

“Agriculture in the Bahamas

report released to senior agri-
culture officials in January.

A fact which Mr Minns sug-
gests highlights this appears in
this report. In it, an increase in
the total value of agricultural
production from $78 million in
2008 to around $194.8 million in
2009 is documented.

Acreage recorded as being
under cultivation by farmers or
being used for livestock
increased by 511 per cent, from
5,793 acres in 2005/2006, to
35,402 acres in 2009.

However, rather than being a
consequence of a significant rise
in actual output created by
farmers or other individuals
producing agricultural goods,
Mr Minns suggests this increase
is primarily due to better
recordkeeping and data collec-
tion, which needs to be further
improved if a true picture of
agriculture’s contribution to the
economy is to be obtained.
Between 1994 and 2006, only
“reported data” - that willingly
made available by a relatively
small selection of farmers - was
used to estimate agricultural
output.

From 2005, the department

PRICE CONTROLS PLACING
BUSINESS “IN TIME WARP"

: By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Chamber of i} —..
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC) ;
has launched a Mystery
Shopper project that aims }
“to test every single business }
in the Bahamas” on front- :
line performance and cus- i nomic climate, a think-tank
i executive yesterday charging
? that they ultimately resulted
? in product shortages.

Price controls are putting
Bahamian businesses “in a
time warp”, leaving them
unable to adjust margins in
the face of increasing costs
and other changes in the eco-

Rick Lowe, of the Nassau

i Institute, said the Govern-
i ment-imposed price controls
i on industries such as petrole-
? um and food, ostensibly to
i protect the interests of low
i income Bahamian consumers,
i were misnamed and failed to
i work because they could not
i impact international factors
? outside this nation’s control.

Suggesting that it was real-

: ly “price management”,
i rather than “price control”,
i? that the Government-dictated
i mark-ups imposed on various
i? Bahamian businesses, Mr
i Lowe said a better solution
i was for the administration to
i “get out of the way” and let
i the market, through competi-
i tion, determine the price of

SEE page 5B

Sotheby's

* Think tank executive warns
government-imposed margin and
mark-up restrictions ultimately
cause product shortages and
distort market

* Government urged to ‘get out
of the way’ and let market decide
prices through competition

* ‘Many firms would do better
putting money in the bank than
staying open’

Agriculture output
$305m per annum

: By ALISON LOWE
? Business Reporter
: alowe@tribunemedia.net

turned to the Farmers’ Register
to better estimate production
and its value. Farmers become
registered to obtain incentives
such as duty-free agricultural
equipment, imports and hurri-
cane relief, and such a register
has been one of the only ways
for the Government to get a
better handle on the farming
industry, given that there have
traditionally been few other
incentives for producers to
make themselves known for
data collection purposes.

Mr Minns said he hopes that
in the future input from other
areas, from which economic
value is derived from agricul-
ture, can be included in reports
detailing agriculture’s input into
the national economy. Agricul-
ture’s contribution to the $6.7
billion GDP in 2008 was found
to be just 0.6 per cent or $40.2
million. In 2009, this rose to 0.7
per cent.

The statistician laments that
only economic value derived
from the production of crops
and livestock in the Bahamas

SEE page 4B



66

When you use
close to one

: million gallons of

fuel a year, it is

} ridiculous.”

KHAALIS ROLLE

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

aaa ola



ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money ot Mirah





Cree, erg







UALS

(242) 356-901

FREEPORT
(242) 351-2010

MARSH HARBCHUR
(243) 367-3135




fer bestia aca

Airport’s $138m

second

stage to

start March 17

* Plan to construct 226,000 sq ft

arrivals terminal a
* Contracts for sto

nd pier
nework, masonry

and carpeting now before NAD/Airport
Authority Board for approvals

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Work on the $138.3
million Phase II stage of
the Lynden Pindling
International Airport
(LPIA) redevelopment
will begin on Thursday,
March 17, with the
selective demolition of
the existing US depar-
ture terminal.

The second stage,
which follows comple-

SEE page 3B

GUIDED TOUR: A tour of the Air-
port last year.



MAJOR TRANSPORT FIRM
IN 35% FUEL COST HIKE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading Bahamian
transportation company,
which consumes almost one
million gallons of diesel per
year, yesterday said it had
seen its fuel costs rise 35 per
cent year-over-year, a senior
executive telling Tribune
Business it was “ridiculous”
that this nation had yet to

SEE page 5B

* Bahamas Ferries executive
says ‘ridiculous’ that nation
has yet to devise long-term
solution to fuel price
inflation, his firm using
almost one million gallons
per year

* Now exploring hedging
strategy to aid all fuel-
dependent Bahamian
companies, via talks with oil
firms and major banks

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

*

Damianos |

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Prime Income Fund

¢ A higher, stable rate of return ¢ Professional fund management

e Long-term capital preservation ° Diversified portfolio

PARADISE ISLAND ~ OCEAN CLUB ESTATES e Lower risk investment

BEACHFRONT CABBAGE BEACH LOT
Large elevated lot on world-famous Cabbage Beach with 149 feet on the beach.
Priced to sell at US$6.9m.

Contact: George. Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.362.4211 BAHAMAS
242.356.9801

242.351.3010

BARBADOS
meet

ROYAL FIDELITY

lia 1 Mela 4

Nassau: 246.435.1955

Member of ani
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | the Bahamas MLS | MID) Cen Gi)

Freeport:





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Economists and business
leaders yesterday joined
Opposition MPs in ques-
tioning the Government’s
decision to allow more than
a year-and-a-half to pass
without producing any
updated unemployment fig-
ures, each stressing the
importance of such data for
proper economic and social
policy formulation.

The last available statis-
tics on the level of unem-
ployment in the Bahamas
were released in September
2009, following a survey con-
ducted in May of that year.
At that time it was found
that the unemployment rate
was the highest it had been
since the early 1990s.

For New Providence, the
unemployment rate of 8.7
per cent in 2008 increased
to 12.1 per cent in February
2009, then to 14 per cent in
May 2009. A similar trend
was experienced in Grand
Bahama, with rates of 9 per
cent, 14.6 per cent and 17.4
per cent recorded for those
three dates.

A labour force survey,
which records the unem-
ployment rate, is tradition-
ally undertaken on an annu-
al basis, except in a Census
year, when it is bypassed in
favour of focusing on this
larger, once in a decade,
project.

Ryan Pinder, MP for Eliz-
abeth and a tax attorney by
profession, raised the dearth
of statistics relating to unem-




























































< -

ey

vy

A Brand New i-'

limely economic
lata demanded

ployment, a key economic
indicator, as a matter of con-
cern in the House of Assem-
bly last week.

Speaking with Tribune
Business yesterday, he said
the unemployment figures
are important “so we have
an understanding not only
of the unemployment figure,
but of who is unemployed -
from what sectors and age
groups”, with such data key
to better positioning those
concerned to “establish poli-
cies to really provide some
buoyancy to the situation”.

Responding in Parliament
to Mr Pinder’s criticism over
the lack of figures, minister
of state for finance, Zhivar-
go Laing, noted that last
year the Department of Sta-
tistics undertook a nation-
wide Census ,and for this
reason, resource limitations
did not permit the opportu-
nity for a labour force sur-
vey to be conducted as usu-

ee



Pad! One Winner Every V



RYAN PINDER

al. Director of Statistics,
Kalsie Dorsett, yesterday
confirmed that a labour

You Can’tion VuoIs!

Get 1-Medium,

4-Topping, Pizza



ZHIVARGO LAING

force survey has never been
undertaken in a Census
year, and her department
would not have had the
capacity, either financially,
human or infrastructure, to
do both.

However, Mr Pinder and
others have suggested this
may not be an adequate rea-
son to ditch the survey at
this time.

“We are in a unique cli-
mate where I think that
decision is not in the best
interests of the country, and
if we have to do something
different because of the
challenges we have and the
situation we find ourselves
in, then we do it. That is the
responsibility of a govern-
ment,” Mr Pinder said.

“T understand the propo-
sition they don’t do it ina
Census year, but I also say if
it’s only a matter of
resources, much more bene-
fit would come from having
the unemployment statistics
than not having it. You get
more than just a number, it’s
an analysis of what’s going

on out there in terms of
employment.”

James Smith, former min-
ister of state for finance
under the Christie adminis-
tration, concurred. “Espe-
cially during a recession,
when we went through a
period of high joblessness
and lay offs - and we’re still
seeing them - it’s very
important to have timely
economic data on all areas
of the economy,” he said.

“I think many sectors of
the economy have been
looking forward to having
some idea of how deep and
broad this recession is, and
how it’s impacting the
labour force.

“At the very least I think
an appeal should be made
to the Government in the
general interest of econom-
ic planning to try to make
the resources available,
because businesses also
depend on that kind of
information to plan going
forward. The level of unem-
ployment gives you a mea-
sure of the level of demand
for your goods and services
and so many other things.”

Khaalis Rolle, chairman
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC),
said he feels strongly that
more emphasis and
resources must be brought
to bear on information gath-
ering in the Bahamian econ-
omy generally.

Instead of being prepared
on an annual basis as they
have traditionally been, Mr
Rolle said he would support
resources being put in place
to ensure such statistics can
be compiled on a “monthly
or quarterly basis”.

“It’s difficult for me to say
precisely why it wasn’t done
(the Labour Force survey in
2010). I think in any given
period it’s always critical to
have information, and one

of our key economic indica-
tors is unemployment. I
don’t believe that informa-
tion should not be available
and compiled on a regular
basis,” he said.

“You are at the mercy of
making decisions in a vacu-
um or in the dark if you
don’t have quality informa-
tion.”

Dion Foulkes, Labour
Minister, yesterday reiterat-
ed the Government’s posi-
tion that it would have been
impractical for the Depart-
ment of Statistics to do both
the Census and the Labour
Force Survey in 2010.

“We hired hundreds of
people to conduct the Cen-
sus, which comes up every
10 years. It was very detailed
and took a very long time,
and the Department of Sta-
tistics got a special alloca-
tion to hire those people and
provide the necessary equip-
ment and documents to con-
duct the survey,” he said.

“Money is only a part of
the equation. It’s also a
question of capacity in terms
of infrastructure, buildings,
desks, computers, training.
It’s a very comprehensive
and holistic approach, espe-
cially with unemployment
figures because you want
them to be as accurate as
possible.”

Ms Dorsett, head of the
Department of Statistics,
said that besides her staff
and offices being occupied
with Census-related work,
another problem with
attempting to undertake a
LabourForce survey in a
Census year, which cannot
be combated by the alloca-
tion of more resources, is a
simple matter of public
cooperation.

“The most important
thing is you can’t go to
householders twice like that
in a year. They are already
getting tired of you (after
the Census),” she said.

Mr Foulkes, meanwhile,
suggested that the Govern-
ment has been able to assess
the unemployment situation
to some degree using other
“barometers”, such as the
number of individuals sign-
ing up to obtain unemploy-
ment benefits - which has
dropped sharply.

“We believe a tremendous
amount of jobs have been
created through projects
such as the airport re-devel-
opment, the road improve-
ment project, the straw mar-
ket. Atlantis has taken on
some 300 people recently,”
he added.

Chamber unveils Mystery Shop plan

FROM page 1B

tomer service, its chairman yesterday
describing it as another plank in the organ-
isation’s drive to deliver value-added ser-

vices to its members.

Khaalis Rolle, who is also Bahamas Fer-
ries’ chief marketing officer, told Tribune
Business: “We just launched the Mystery
Shopper project, and that’s an initiative most
businesses can benefit from.

“T find that to be a very effective means of
monitoring the performance of your busi-
ness, particularly on the front line. It is a
project designed to test that level and qual-
ity of service that you’re offering to the cus-

tomer.

“It’s a well-constructed, diagnosis type of
project where people go into the business
and evaluate the type of experience they
have. They give a report on how businesses

perform in every key area.”

Mr Rolle told Tribune Business that
Bahamas Ferries “has been using it [the
Mystery Shopper initiative] for a couple of

years now, and when we started everyone
thought it was a nuisance, and now at the

members”.

beginning of the month e-mails start flying
on when the report’s due. Each departments
wants to know how it’s done”.

The BCCEC chairman described the Mys-
tery Shopper programme as “one of the val-
ue-added services we’re offering to our

He told Tribune Business that the initia-
tive would continue “indefinitely”, and
added: “We hope to test every single busi-
ness in the Bahamas”.

Looking at the bigger picture and the
long-term future, after he demits office as
BCCEC chairman in June, Mr Rolle added:
“T wanted to leave the Chamber with a val-
ue proposition. That [the Mystery Shopper]
really adds value to the membership.

“T want businesses to say that the Cham-
ber is not only an advocacy organisation,
but a value added organisation. This is one
of the diverse revenue streams we wanted to
add, diversifying revenue streams beyond
just membership fees.”



afi TM

AN

OPA SAMA AS oun CRS =e ker MMP ex cys



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 3B





Second student wave
enters Spanish school

SECOND INDUCTION: The Association of International Banks and Trust Companies (AIBT) has unveiled the second

induction of students into its language school.

Initiated in 2010, the language classes have been well supported by members of AIBT, and 30 students have enjoyed
free beginners and intermediate Spanish classes. In addition to those students who will continue with their language
education, the AIBT has welcomed a further 17 candidates who have begun their studies in Spanish.

FROM page 1B

tion of work on the first
Stage - the construction of a
new US departures termi-
nal and pier - includes the
construction of a 226,000
square foot International
Arrivals Terminal and Inter-
national Departures Pier on
the site of what will soon
becom the former US
departures terminal.

It is scheduled to be
opened in late 2012, and will
be be followed by a third
terminal in 2013.

Contracts have so far been
awarded for airside and
landside civil work for the
international arrivals termi-
nal, inclusive of the parking
lots and apron areas.

“There are several con-
tracts in with the Board for
approval at the moment,
including works for
stonework, masonry and
carpeting,” said Shonalee
Johnson, communications
manager at the Nassau Air-
port Development Compa-
ny (NAD), which is over-
seeing the airport redevel-
opment.

Other works that will be
undertaken as part of Phase
II are: complete demolition
of the pier attached to the
former US departures ter-
minal and demolition of all
electrical and mechanical
systems.

The roadway canopy that
currently covers the road
where visitors, taxis and bus-
es pull in to the airport to
load and offload passengers
and baggage will be extend-
ed.

The roof of the facility will
be replaced with a rounded,
“barrel vault” type structure
similar to that used in the
new US departures termi-
nal.

Work on the second stage
is set to begin concurrent
with the opening of the new
US Terminal, which has
now been completed. On
Saturday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Cab-
inet Ministers toured the
$190.8 million facility ahead
of its March 16 opening to
the travelling public.

Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Tender No. 747/11
Group Medical & Life Insurance Services

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation’s Administrative Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone
302-1158

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker
Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Tender No. 747/11

Group Medical &
Life Insurance Services

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
March 25, 2011
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders please
contact Mrs. Antionette Turnquest

at telephone 302-1166



Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

TRADE-INS ON NEW
a

Check Out: These Great Values

'08 SUZUKI SWIFT

‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘09 HYUNDAI TUCSON
'08 CHEVY CMV VAN

'05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

‘01 MAZDA MPV

'91 HONDA ACCORD

'98 FORD EXPLORER

'01 FORD TAURUS

‘00 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘00 DODGE NEON

‘01 DAIHATSU CUORE
sales (2)

3 QUALITY:

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

ot Gig ity Aapte Sayles [Pome pewe] Lied Vier g eveiicwe ead 5 Gayapeneay, heey, DP ah 2
i Abe Alone We Dh Many Ghd, Da Pd

OPEN: Mon to Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm * Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm

auto ,

Wie get hero





















VACANCY

Are you a motivated, innovative, business-minded
professional looking for a challenging career in the
supermarket or food franchise business? Then
come and grow with AML Foods Limited. As we
continue to expand our operations, we are seeking
qualified applicants for the following positions:

Store Manager
Assistant Store Manager
Manager in Training
Grocery Supervisor
Front-End Supervisors
Warehouse Supervisor
Meat Supervisor
Produce Supervisor
Buyers
Drivers
Customer Service Representatives

Outstanding salary, benefits and incentives offered.
Experience desired.

Interested candidates should forward their resumes
to hr@amlfoods.com.
No telephone calls please. Only persons selected for
an interview will be contacted,



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



$8.9m FINCO boost through | Agriculture
loan provision policy change

FROM page 1B

lion, even though non-per-
forming loans exceeded 10
per cent of its total portfolio.

The BISX-listed mortgage
lender, which is 75 per cent
owned by Royal Bank of
Canada’s Bahamian sub-
sidiary, revealed in its finan-
cial statements for the year
to October 31, 2010, that it
reduced the allowance for
credit (loan) losses from the
40 per cent of non-accrual
loan threshold used in 2009
to 30 per cent last year.

This move, following a
Board and management
review of FINCO’s provi-
sioning policy, which
assessed factors such as the
quality of security held over
its mortgage portfolio and
recovery rates, resulted ina
considerable boost to the
mortgage lender’s 2010
financial results.

“This review resulted in

the Corporation [FINCO]

reducing its provisioning
policy ratio to 30 per cent
of non-accrual loans, and a
reduction of $8.9 million in
the amount charged for pro-
vision of credit losses,” the
financial statements, audited
by Deloitte & Touche, stat-
ed.

“While current provisions
are considered conservative,
the Corporation will contin-
ue to review its provision-
ing policy and methodology
to ensure that levels remain
appropriate and conserva-
tive.”

The $8.9 million reduction
in FINCO’s loan loss provi-
sions went straight back into
the income statement, and
were a key factor behind the
lender’s dramatically
improved performance in
2010 compared to the pre-
vious year.

Indeed, the more than
$13.7 million reduction in
credit loss allowances, from

LOT FOR SALE

Locator Lyford Cay Price: SS80LIMM Sine; 1702 1M) Say ft; DN phe

Lyfead Owe b
Panasting,
dieing the vorkbreerened Lyon Cay
Cay Club é chanperchap po
sched aed elas cee a the C

Promudeney

A Pr
security and prrvileges off the cd Led chitiaye ia floed Cry

iegifeem pews pede alee
Ai Linde propre wihin a
Chath. E

“a

nate og the peed eke tip of Bee
Aout. ir

120] acre gg

wuky amagec: place ts live

Cente! Brien Ain SEE [sper STS cp) Eastin Tabet coe
erte Ta ee ri, cs



$15.073 million to $1.345
million, was the main rea-
son for the 399 per cent
growth in FINCO’s net
income to $18.188 million
from $4.563 million the year
before.

Flat

Otherwise, the lender’s
2010 performance would
have been essentially flat
compared to 2009. Net inter-
est income actually declined
slightly to $28.241 million,
compared to $28.314 million
the year before, as a 6.9 per
cent rise in interest income
to $65.467 million was can-
celled out by a 13 per cent
increase in interest expense
to some $37.226 million.

Elsewhere, FINCO’s
financials disclosed that its
non-accrual loan portfolio
(loans that are more than 90
days past due) now account-
ed for 10.47 per cent of its
$847.212 million loan port-
folio, having increased from
8.09 per cent at year-end
2009.

“Loans classified as non-
accrual represent 10.47 per
cent (2009: 8.09 per cent) of
the total loan portfolio,” the
Deloitte & Touche audited
financial statements said.
“At the consolidated bal-
ance sheet date, the carry-
ing amounts of loans whose
terms were renegotiated
during the year were $22.429
million, and interest accrued
on loans to date were $1.58
million.”

The total value of FIN-
CO’s non-accrual loans had
also increased by 36.8 per
cent year-over-year, hitting

BAHAMAS FiRST

Pe? (Ff IRSURANCE. ROMY. TOROAPCEY,

Career opportunity for an ambitious career oriented individual

Application Support Specialist

Our Application Specialist must have excellent Service and Customer
Skills and must be an expert in Application Support in a multi-tier
environment (IIS, Java, Apache / [Tomcat & HTML / XML) with
experience in XML / HTML front end applications.

Skills:

IIs
e Websphere

Qualifications:

e Relevant IT education to de

° Java

e Apache / Tomcat
¢ Communications Framework ¢ SQL Query

ree level

e HTML / XML

e 3 years Project Management Experience (Certification a plus)

Competencies:

e 3+ years experience working with IT groups or proprietary
application software support environments in a demanding,
dynamic environment

3+ years experience working with User Groups

Experience in defining, establishing and implementing testing
‘best practices’ techniques, policies and standardized trouble
shooting in addition to workflow procedures

Documenting issues and working with other functional groups
to develop updated processes and workarounds.

Strong client focus: troubleshooting and follow-up skills;

commitment to continuous improvement.

There will be shift work involved.

Compensation commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications.

The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casualty insurance
company in the Bahamas and has an A- (Excellent) Rating from A. M.
Best, reflecting the company’s financial stability and sound risk

management practices.

Please apply before aith March, 2011 to:

Group HR & Training Manager
Bahamas First Corporate Services, 32 Collins Avenue

P.O. Box SS-6268
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email to:

careers@bahamasfirst.com



$88.64 million compared to
$64.812 million the year }
before. However, the cumu-
lative value of residential }
mortgages that were non-
performing fell from $00.534 |
million to $59.769 million.
The increase was caused by |

a dramatic surge in non-per- :
forming “non-residential” ;
mortgage loans, from $3.862 ;

million to $28.457 million,

likely due to a surge in delin-
quencies among business }

clients.

Elsewhere, Deloitte & have traditionally been included in reports detailing the sector’s

uN ? contribution to the economy.
wholly-owned subsidiary, :
FINCO Insurance Agency, :

? areas, and this definition of the economic contribution of agricul-

Touche noted that FINCO’s

was still awaiting renewal of

its insurance licence by the }
Insurance Commission as at }
the January 28, 2011, bal- :

? to be properly documented, include animal husbandry (the breed-

@ ? ing of domestic pets and farm animals for sale); dairy farming
As of the balance sheet ¢ and the production of animal products; horticultural services (such

date, FINCO Insurance :

: Ast ? as landscaping; and the production and sale of ornamental plants
Agency’s application for and flowers), hunting and forestry.

renewal of its agency licence

ance sheet date.

is pending with the Insur-

ance Commission of the :
Bahamas. FINCO Insurance :
Agency is taking steps to ? Bahamian boat builders harvesting local wood for their vessels and
satisfy all regulatory require- i the use of local woods for furniture and more.

ments,” the accounting firm } ities take place in the Bahamas’. Nothing could be further from the

said. FINCO added that a :

= truth. While for this report we may only be reporting a modest esti-
Bank of the : mate of $3.5 million, this sub-sector of agriculture is contributing
: greatly to our economy,” said Mr Minns in the report.

some of its loans be risk-
weighted at 100 per cent }
impacted its capital ratios. }
For Tier 1 and Total Capital :
ratios, these fell to 15.86 per }
cent and 17.11 per cent :
respectively at year-end :
2010, compared to 18.53 per

Central
Bahamas’ directive that

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



1%

output
$305 million
per annum

FROM page 1B

However, the problem with this, he added, is that there has not
been full and accurate reporting of statistics relating to these

ture to the Bahamas is too narrow.

Mr Minns suggests that some of the key areas in which economic
value is being derived from agriculture in the Bahamas, but are yet

Within these groups, Mr Minns said he has reason to believe that

: hunting and forestry-related economic activity may be worth $25

million a year to the Bahamian economy through activities such as
foreign visitors engaging in hunting of wild animals in the Bahamas,

“Tt has been said that ‘no significant hunting and forestry activ-

He also suggests that a much greater value is being derived
from the harvesting of top (straw), coal, Brazilian pepper (used for
animal feed) and cotton than he has been able to record due to min-
imal reporting.

Fruit

The growth of fruit bearing trees, vegetable seedlings and herbs

cent and 19.78 per cent the ; and spices for sale, combined with the provision of landscaping ser-

year before.

? vices and the production of ornamental plants at local nurseries for
: sale to people using them in their gardens and homes, could be
? worth a combined $150 million annually to the Bahamian econo-
? my but is not yet properly documented, said Mr Minns.

Mr Minns further notes that of all the animal products available

in the Bahamas, the Department of Agriculture only tracks the pro-
? duction of eggs and honey, which were worth $9.6 million and
? $193,000 in 2009, respectively.

Egg production in 2009 produced around six million eggs valued

at $9.6 million. Of that amount, $1.96 million in economic value was
? derived from chickens in New Providence, $7.64 million came
? from Grand Bahama and $22,464 from Long Island.

The Bahamas also produced 6,341 gallons of honey worth

: $193,050 in 2009. The greatest honey-producing island in 2009
? was Eleuthera, which made 158,525 gallons, followed by Andros
? with 19,000, New Providence with 9,000, Abaco with 3,200 and
? Grand Bahama with 3,100.

Mr Minns suggests that other animal products, or by-products,

i from which significant economic value is being derived but not
: recorded include chicken manure and milk.

“Perhaps the most used animal product for which no value has

been placed is chicken manure, which we know is used widely
; throughout the Bahamas,” he said.

The statistician said that unless farmers make available infor-

? mation on harvests, and agricultural officers from the various
? Family Islands and throughout New Providence report the data
relating to output from the various agricultural sectors, he is
? unable to put them in his reports.

Mr Minns calls for more resources to be invested in conducting

: surveys of the undocumented agricultural sectors, such as horti-
? cultural services, animal husbandry, hunting and forestry, so that
? a true picture of their economic value can be determined going for-
? ward, adding to the traditionally documented crop and livestock
: production.

Apollo Medical

Specialty Suite

INTRODUCES...

TRANSITIONS LIFESTYLE SYSTEM®

A weight-management program!

Guaranteed low-ghcemicindex eeling, asenise, sess reduction

and supplementation. Find oul why this system works and why we can

Trensitions|

Lah nate

gre you 2 100% quarsniee! This 6 a comprehensive. low-glycemec wenght
Manajement 5
fem feowides you wth educsion maetenak, a daly jwmel bw -]hCamic
food options,
Ve aght ee.
success. INTENSE 17 WEEK PROGAAMS NOW BEING OFF

yolem that you will actually enjoy. Transrions Liestyle Sws-

and clinically proven supplemants fo promote permanant
ith Transitions Liteatyie Sytem, you can have 100% ielong
FRED

Free Health Awareness Test

Discover the State of Your Health
Bone Density, % Body Fat, Metabolic Age ete
PLUS Nutraceutical Physical & Nutrition Consult
By Appointment with Transitions Wellness Coaches



242-327-3633

Suite 210 Marina Village, Sandyport, Nassau, The Bahamas



Full Text

PAGE 1

V olume: 107 No.89TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 W EATHER PLEASANTWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 82F LOW 71F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Women who love SEESECTIONE Too much Angels get game 1 victory By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter a turnquest@tribunemedia.net SIXTY-SIX people have been the victims of armed robbery within the past twom onths an average of one person per day it has been revealed. B ut police say at least half of these crimes could have been prevented had the victims carried out basic proac tive measures. Personal responsibility is said to be a vital prerequisite of crime prevention. Supt Stephen Dean, direc tor of the Royal Bahamas Police Forces National Crime Prevention (NCP office, said: Opportunity is the key element in crime, reduce the opportunity, reduce crime. A lot of these cases were unnecessary and could have been avoided had persons utitlised basic common sense in terms of their personal safety. According to police reports compiled by The Tribune 39 persons were robbed by armed thugs in January, and2 7 in February. Construction sites, cashbased businesses, phone card vendors, asue recipients, travellers and persons walking at night were all said to be at increased risk. A nticipating an increase i n cash flow in the capital due to new construction projects most notably the 1,000 acre, $3.4 billion Baha Mar resort development at Cable Beach Supt Dean explained that h is department sought to crack down on emerging trends. Supt Dean said: Prevention. Not to raise alarm, but to prevent similar events from recurring, to minimise armed robbery. When we see these trends we try to address it before it gets out of control. On Friday afternoon, three armed men burst into the office of the TG Glover construction site on Pitt Road. Armed with handguns, M cCOMBO O F THE DAY N E W The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM www.fidelitygroup.comCall 356.7764today! Get out of Debt Fast with a Fidelity Fast Track Debt Consolidation loan. Decisions Fast Money Fast Plus Visa Credit Card FastGetoutofdebt Fast! N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER 66 armed robbery victims in 2 months Half could have been avoided, say police BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page eight B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net A MAN accused of killing his mother appeared in court yesterday. R onado Adderley, 33, of Dundas Town, Abaco, was arraigned before Chief Mag-i strate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, yesterday, charged in the murder of Yvonne Adderley. It is alleged the accused SEE page eight MAN CHARGED WITH KILLING HIS MOTHER By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@ tribunemedia.net THE candidates selection committee of the Progressive Liberal Party was not aware of a Canadian TV sta tions allegations linking political hopeful Arnold Forbes to an alleged $170 million investment fraud, it was claimed yes terday. PLP chairman Bradley Roberts said the committee only learned about the accusations after Mr Forbes was already ratified as the PLP candidate for the Mount Moriah con stituency. Having learned of the claims, Mr Roberts said, to the best of his knowledge, the party is not reviewing its recommendation because there is no basis for a review. Details of Mr Forbes By CELESTE NIXON Trbune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net PERSONS seen fishing in Lake Killarney might be using nets that are killing protected species of birds. According to past presi dent and executive member of the Bahamas National Trust, Pericles Mallis, while it is not illegal to fish in Lake Killarney or to use nets of a certain mesh, the gill nets, which are suspected of being used in this case can be left in the water for hours, increasing the possibility of trapping and killing birds such as diving and ruddy ducks both protected in the Bahamas. Concerns were first raised when photographs surfaced of persons pulling large nets filled with fish out of Lake Killarney. Members of the public called The Tribune to claim this method of fishing is illegal. But Earl Deveaux, Minister for the Environment, said the Bahamas does not cur rently have fishery regulaPUBLIC RAISES C ON CERNS OVER NET S USED IN LAKE KILLARNEY FISHING SEE page eight PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts SEE page eight HARDATWORK: Roadworks taking place on Marathon Road yesterday. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said on Sunday that progress is being made on the New Providence Road Improvement Project, but more monthly productivity will be needed to meet the governments schedule. ONTHEROADTOIMPROVEMENT TIM CLARKE/TRIBUNE STAFF PLP CHAIRMAN:COMMITTEE NOT AWARE OF FRAUD ALLEGA TIONS LINK T O CANDIDATE

PAGE 2

L OCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Business owners, residents informed of road works L ATOYA WALKER an employee of Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles SA, informing a representative of an East Street business of upcoming road work on East Street and Robinson Road. T HE Ministry of Public Works and Transport is sending out officers to inform residents and business owners of upcoming road works on various corridors that are a part of the New Providence Road Improvement and Infrastructure Project. C harlene Collie, project engineer, said: We've been trying to inform business owners and residents along the routes by w alking door-to-door, handing them flye rs and advising them of upcoming w orks and the duration of the works. W e also have a series of information meetings that we continue to hold, most of them at the Mall at Marathon, until we can secure other venues. The next information meeting will be held on Thursday at the Mall at Marathon from 10am to 6pm. It will f ocus on the work being done on Prince C harles Drive, Robinson Road and Marathon Road. A ll members of the public are invited t o attend. Officers from the ministry will b e present to answer questions. MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnq uest speaking at the Royal Bahamas Defence Forces annual church s ervice and parade at G race Community Church on Sunday. DEFENCE FORCE CHURCH SERVICE AND PARADE GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Arthur Foulkes and Lady Foulkes headed the list of officials attending. Also pictured at left is Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest. THE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE took to the streets of the Marathon Sub-division following their annual church service on Sunday.

PAGE 3

By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net V O TE R r e g is t r a t i o n c o n tinues to proceed at a moder ate pace. W i t h j u s t a b o u t 2 3 5 0 0 Bahamians registered for the n e xt g e n e r a l e l ec t io n so fa r Pa rl ia men t a ry C o mmission er Er ro l Be t h e l s a id th a t wh i le t h e r a te ha s i nc r ea se d s i nc e t he h o l i d a y s e a s o n r e g i s t r a t i o n c o n t i n u e s t o b e a g r a d u a l process. Persons seeking to register as v ot er s m u st be B ah a mia n citizens 18 years or older, and must h ave li v ed i n a particul a r c o n s t i t u e n c y f o r t h r e e months or more. V o t e r r e g is t r a ti o n c e n tr e s are o pe n in N ew P ro vid en ce b e t w e e n t h e h o u r s o f 1 0 a m and 4pm at the f oll owi ng loca tions: The Parliamentary Regis t r ation Dep artmen t, Fa rrington Road. T o w n C e n t r e M a l l a n d Marathon Mall. The General Post Office, East Hill Street. T h e S u b P o s t O f f i c e Carmichael Road. T h e SubP os t Of fi ce, El iz abeth Estates. Th e N a t i o n a l I n s u r a n c e Board, Baillou Hill Road. C o m m o n w e a l t h B a n k M a c k e y S t r e e t a n d G o l d e n Gates branches. In Gran d B a ha ma, ce ntres a re open bet w een t he hours of 9.30am and 4.30pm at the fol lowing locations: The Parliamentary Regis t rat ion Depar tm ent, F r eeport. T h e A d m i n i s t r a t o r s Office, Eight Mile Rock. T h e A d m i n i s t r a t o r s Office, High Rock (Tuesdays and Thursdays). In the F ami ly Islands, regis t r a t i o n t a k e s p l a c e a t t h e A d m i n i s t r a t o r s O f f i c e between the hours of 9.30am and 4.30pm. B u s i n es s e s a nd or g a ni s at i on s w i t h a t l e a s t 2 0 e l i g i b l e e m p l o y e e s o r m e mb er s m a y con t ac t t he dep ar t me nt at t el e phone numbers 325-2888/9 or 3 9 7 2 0 0 0 t o s c h e d u le a v i s it from registration agents. T W O a r m ou r ed c ar e m pl o yees accused of s teal ing f rom a l ocal bank were arr aigned in a Magi st rate' s Court y ester d ay Al fr e d P i nde r 2 4, o f G ol d en G a t e s a nd A r l i n gt on R ol l e 2 7, o f C a r m i c h a e l R o a d a r e ac cused of steal ing by reason o f e mp l o ym e n t. I t i s a ll eg e d t h at on T hur s da y, M ar c h 3 t he t w o m e n s t o l e c a s h i n t h e am ou nt of $50, 000 from F i rst C a ri b bea n I nt er na ti o nal B a nk. B ot h m e n pl e ad ed not g ui l t y t o t h e c h a r g e d u r i n g t h e i r a r r a i g n m en t b ef or e C h i e f M a g i st rate R oger Gomez in Court O ne, Bank Lane. P ind er wa s rep res en t e d by at torney Stephani e Wel ls. B o t h m e n w e r e g r a n t e d $20, 000 bai l wi th t wo sureti es. T h e y w e r e b o t h o r d e r e d t o r e por t t o t he C ar m i ch ael R o ad police stati o n ev ery Mo nday W e d n e s d a y a n d S a t u r d a y b e f o r e 6 p m T h e c a s e w a s a d j ou r n e d t o J un e 2 0 a n d t r an s f erred to Court 5, Bank Lane. T H E g o v e r n m e n t e x p e c t s to b e a w a rd e d c o st s i n v i ew o f a S u p r e me C o u r t ju d g e 's de cis ion no t to ru le in fav o ur of v eteran p rosec utor Chery l Gra nt Beth e ll, wh o pr ote ste d b e i n g p a ss e d o v e r f o r a t o p po st. De sp ite M rs G ra nt-B eth el l de clarin g vic tory with re sp ect to a v e r d i c t s h e f e l t c l e a r e d her re pu tatio n, S en ior Ju stice J o n I s a a c s r e f u s e d t o g r a n t an y of th e re lief de cla ra tio ns so ug ht by th e v e ter an p ro sec u t o r When as ked to co mm ent on t he mat ter on Sat urday, Pri me M i n i s t e r H u b e r t I n g r a h a m said : "I h a ve n o c om me nt o n i t but I s ay t hi s; th at t he At t or ne y G en er al wa s su ed in h is p e r s o n a l c a p a c i t y t h a t w a s thr own o u t b y t he co u rt. Th e A ttor ney Gener al was sued as A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l o f t h e Baha mas tha t too wa s t hr own o u t, a nd we e x pe ct f or c o sts to be aw ar ded ag ains t the par t y th a t b ro u g h t th e a c t io n M rs Be th ell an d we ex pe ct f or he r to p ay it." H e w e n t o n t o s t a t e : A requ es t w as made t o the cou r t f o r 1 0 o r 1 1 se p a ra te o rd e rs a n d t h e c o u r t r e f u s e d e a c h a n d ev e ry o n e. I t sa id ma n y t h i n g s b u t a t t h e e n d o f t h e d a y it s aid No no n o, n o '. At t he e nd o f t he d ay th e p a r t y t h a t t o o k t h e J u d ic i a l a nd Legal S ervices to cou rt to s ay th a t th ey h a d be en t ran sf e r r e d t o t h e L a w R e f o r m C o m m i s s i o n a n d t h a t t h e y s h o u l d h a v e r e m a i n e d a s D e p u t y D i r e c t o r o f P u b l i c P ros ecution s a nd sho uld ha ve b een ma de Di re ctor o f P rosec u tion s ( DP P ), los t an d the y a r e s t i l l e x a c t l y w h e r e t h e y w ere wh en th e c ase b eg an ." T he pr i me m i ni s te r al s o s ai d h e ha d n o id e a wh e the r M rs G ra ntBeth e ll will re mai n in h e r p res en t p o st. M rs Gra nt -Beth e ll file d a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r a j u d i c i a l revi ew a ft er bei ng pass ed ov er f or the p os t of D P P. S he was in stea d ap p oin te d D e p u t y L a w R e f o r m C o m m i s s i o n e r M r s G r a n t B e t h e l l h a d s o u g h t t o h a v e t h e j u d g e quash t he d eci si on of t he J udi c ial a n d Le ga l S erv ice s Co mm issio n (JLS C) p ur po rtin g to a p p o i n t h e r t o t h e p o s t o f D e p u t y L a w R e f o r m C o m m i s s i o n e r S he h ad a lso so ug h t: a de clar ati on that s he r emai n in her s u b s t a n t i v e p o s t a s D e p u t y D i r e c to r o f P u b l i c P r o s e c u t ion s; a de cla ra tio n th at sh e, h a vin g ac te d as DP P f or th e r e q u i si te p e r io d b e e n ti tl e d to that p ost; and a declarati o n that any ot h er appoint ment to t he p o st o f D PP be de cla re d n u ll an d vo id LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y MARCH 8, 201 1, P AGE 3 G o v t e x p e c t s t o b e a w a r d e d c o s t s a f t e r G r a n t B e t h e l l c a s e r u l i n g T wo ar moured car employees ar raigned POLI C E ha ve launc hed a n i n v e s t i g a t i o n i n t o t h e a t t e m p t e d s u i c i d e o f a 3 0 y ea r -o ld w oma n. T he F ir e T ra il Ro ad r es id ent ap paren tly atte mpte d to e n d h e r l i f e b y c u t t i n g h e r w ri sts a nd t ak in g a n e x c essi v e a mo unt o f unsp ec i fie d ta ble ts o n S u n d a y e v e n i n g p o l i c e sa y T h e wo ma n was t ak en t o t h e h o s p i t a l b y a m b u l a n c e a n d w as ye s te rday l isted in stabl e c o n d i t i o n POLICE SEARCH FOR MASKED MEN WHO ROBBED AND ASSAULTED A WOMAN P O L I C E a r e s e a r c h i n g f o r t w o m a s k e d m e n w h o a s s a u l t e d a n d r o b b e d a woman at her home. T he me n one armed w ith a h an dgu n and th e oth er wi th a k n i f e a m b u s h e d t h e w o man when s he ar r ived at h e r ho me on Mia m i S tre e t of f Ba l f o u r A v en u e y e s t e r d a y, shortly after 3am. They forc ed the v ic tim in to her home, assaulted her, and stole her jewellery. S e ve r a l h o ur s la t e r, a n o th e r wo m a n w as r o b b e d b y t wo m a s k e d m e n o n S w o r d f i s h D rive off McK inn ey A ve nue The culprits, one of whom was ar med wi th a han dg un, s t o l e t h e v i c t i m s b a g c o n tain ing her cell p hone, k eys a n d o t h e r p e r s o n a l e f f e c t s shortly after 9.30pm. ARMED MAN STEALS CASH FROM ISLAND LUCK A M A N a r m e d w i t h a h a n d g u n s t o l e a n u n d e t e r mined amoun t of cash f rom Is land L uc k and d amage d a w i n d o w b e f o r e f l e e i n g t h e area on foot. T h e c u l p r i t w a s w e a r i n g da r k clothing and a bla ck hat w h e n h e e n te r e d th e w eb sh o p o n E a st S tr e et so ut h o f f W u lf f R o a d s h o r t l y a f t e r 7 p m o n Sunday. MA N QUEST I ONED IN CONNECTION WITH MOTORCYCLE THEFT A 2 1 y e a r o l d m a n i s b eing qu estioned by p olic e in c onnection with the theft of a motorcycle. It was reported that a man a r m e d w i th a h a n d g u n ro b b e d a 25-year-old man of his 150 C B R 2 0 0 3 m o d e l H o n d a m o tor c yc l e Th e v ic t im w as a t R u p e r t D e a n L a n e a r o u n d n oo n on S un da y w he n he wa s approached by the culprit. The 21-year-old in custody is a r es id ent of Bail lo u Hi ll Road South. T H R E E ME N A RR E S T E D A F T E R O F F I C E R S P O L I C E S E I Z E A M M U N I T I O N F R O M H O M E OF FI CE R S att ac h ed to O p e r a t i o n R a p i d S t r i k e a rr e sted thre e men a fter seiz ing a qua ntity o f amm unition at a home. Police discovered the con traband during a search of a h o u s e o n P o d o l e o S t r e e t around 10pm on Friday. The men taken into custody were 19, 22, and 29 years old. Police launch investigation of suicide attempt POLICE NEWS V o t e r r e g i s t r a t i o n c o n t i n u e s t o b e a g r a d u a l p r o c e s s Cheryl Grant-Bethell M ODE RAT E P ACE : Pa rl ia m e nta ry Co mm i ss i on e r E rro l B et he l (a b ov e ) said that while the rate has increased since the holiday season, reg istration continues to be a gradual process.

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Since the last layoffs at Our L ucaya Resort back in 2008, I a m surprised that it took so long for another mass dism issal. As reported, the resort h as lost an average of over $30 million per year over the past few years. Despite being one of those e mployees who was given bad n ews this past week, I feel Hutchison should be comm ended for keeping us employed for so long with s uch financial challenges. I think it was misleading for o ur union representatives to k now the facts prior to the layoffs and then in a last ditch attempt for headlines pretend management has done something wrong. Better and more responsible union leadershipi s needed at Our Lucaya moving forward. I feel confident that Hutchis on will find a way to make a s uccess out of the resort and it was great to hear that a greater emphasis will be placed on marketing. I accepted my notice with dignity and did not follow theu nions advice to protest. I never believe in burning bridges. I came to Our Lucaya with my head up and left with my head high. I thank God for the opportunity to provide for m y family and I pray there is a new form of take over at Our Lucaya and better days a re ahead. GRATEFUL FORMER EMPLOYEE O UR LUCAYA N assau, March 6, 2011. P.S. Man has such a p redilection for systems and a bstract deductions that he is r eady to distort the truth i ntentionally, he is ready to deny the evidence of his senses only to justify his logic. Fyodor Dostoyevsky. E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm ONE WOULD have thought that unions especially the hotel union in Freeport would have learned its lesson by now with the closure in 2004 of the Royal Oasis Golf Resort and Casino, putting more that 1,200 Bahamians out of work. This hotel struggled under union pressure from the day the new owners bought it in 1999 to the day in 2004 when Hurricane Frances so badly damaged it that the owners decided not to reopen. It was clear that the disruptive behaviour of the unions played a major role in that decision. A year before Hurricane Frances made the decision for everyone, Donald Archer, the hotels senior vice president, broke his silence to complain about the poor level of service from certain staff about which guests were also complaining. He warned them that not only would a strike be illegal, but that any responsible union would examine the current and future needs of its members, the fragile economic environment, the financial status of the company and global conditions. At the time the Iraq war was threatening. Mr Archer warned at the time that more than 1,200 families would be affected by a strike to say nothing of the impact on these families and the businesses that they patro nise. But what union leaders did not appreciate was how much they had hurt their member ship who had a stake in the International Bazaar, which also faced closure. With the hotel closed, the Bazaars patrons had disappeared. Commenting on this in November 2005, we wrote: This should teach the union a les son that when it pushes its claims too far everything can collapse under the strain, taking even the union with it. Seven years later the Royal Oasis Golf Resort remains closed. And so we were surprised at the beginning of this year to hear of labour unrest at Our Lucaya resort, which everyone knew was struggling to keep its doors open in a world recession that was leaving millions jobless. But apparently, Obie Ferguson, president of the Bahamas Hotel Managerial Associa tion, saw a chink of light somewhere that no one else saw. In January he said that now the economy is showing signs of recovery, he thought it time to do what should be done. Workers rights, he said, are as important as profits. We will take the necessary poll and then do what we have to do. Of course, the poll he was hinting at was a strike vote. Hotel staff knew that the hotel was not doing well. As a matter fact there was no place on the globe that was not suffering from the world crash. However, in the Bahamas there are those among us including, if not especially, some politicians who think that the Bahamas is somehow not a part of the economically broken world, and that our people, despite our exorbitant public debt, should not have to lower their financial expectations. As a matter of fact Prime Minister Ingraham thanked the Hutchison-Whampoa group for keeping Our Lucaya open, when others would have closed it. It was known that the hotel was subsiding the staffs payroll and could not afford more. Yet Mr Ferguson, the union man, continued his background rumblings. Last week it was announced that Our Lucaya had closed two of its three hotels. Instead of closing completely, it consolidated its operation on one property Breakers Cay to save 800 jobs. However, to save the 800, 200 staff had to go. Government is now working with the hotel to try to find employment for these 200, and to retrain some of them in other skills to qualify for other jobs. When will Bahamians understand what is going on in the world, and appreciate the jobs they now have? This is not the time for government corporations some of whose staff are the best paid in the Bahamas to be talking of salary increases. Look at other countries and see how heavily they have reduced their public service to streamline their economies. It is acknowledged that our civil service is over stacked and could do witha heavy trim. But, government has as yet shown no inclination to do so. Even the Cuban Workers Federation announced that half of its work force will lose their jobs by next year. The Cuban gov ernment currently employs 85 per cent of that islands workers. These workers will have to either go back to the farms, find construction work, become self employed or join a cooperative. Todays economic downturn is forcing Cuba closer to the free enterprise system. Our state cant keep maintaining bloat ed payrolls, the Cuban Workers Federation told The Wall Street Journal. This is something that local unions and many Bahamians have yet to grasp. Although we might not know it we are a part of the world and if any part of that world is injured, the whole unit will feel it. Already petroleum retailers want to raise their prices to offset the troubles driving prices up in the oil rich Mid dle East. The increase in oil will push up costs across the board. Businessmen have no control over these costs. Therefore, when they are forced to cut costs to keep their businesses operational the decision forced on the Our Lucaya owners will be forced on them. Staff become redundant. It is no time in such a climate for the unions to create further instability in the end only its members will suffer. Better union leadership needed at Our Lucaya LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Not the time for union unrest EDITOR, The Tribune : I am very impressed and happy at how quickly the Government responded to the layoff of 200 employees at Our Lucaya in GrandB ahama this past week. My heart and prayers g o out to all of those individuals and families affected. The good news is that within days of the a nnouncement of the layoffs, the Government h ad a targeted package of responses such as job placement and retraining, the creation of a one stop shop for various benefits, and financial and spiritual counselling. My friends in Freeport told me that Minister of Labour and Social Development Dion F oulkes went to Grand Bahama on Friday and stayed through most of the weekend to coordinate the Government's response. This all got me to wondering what the response from the PLP would have been like if this happened on their watch. From their slow response to hurricanes that hit GB, the Our L ucaya employees would be in big trouble and on their own. P erry Christie probably would have flown in with a big delegation of cabinet ministers and o fficials and given some emotional speeches and made plenty of promises. He would have promised to go back to Nassau and consult with various people about what to do. Knowing Mr. Christie, his consulting would probably have gone on and on and on. He would probably have also held several cabinet meetings on the layoffs without bring ing the matter to conclusion for some time. Then after extensive consultation with his cabinet and experts he may have appointed a committee to study the problem of the layoffs with the committee told to report back in 30 days or so. Then his cabinet would have spent a long time discussing the report with many Grand B ahamian families suffering and anxious as the many months went by as Mr. Christie tried to decide what to do never really able to makeu p his mind. U nfortunately for the former Our Lucaya employees the Government's response under Mr. Christie would have been in my opinionq uite limited if and when it came. There would h ave been no NIB Unemployment Benefit to help tide over those laid off. There would have been less social assistance such as was offered by this Government during the worldwide financial crisis. There would have been no Ministry of Y outh, Sports and Culture Self-Starter's Pro gramme to help offer training and other assistance such as starter loans which have helped quite a number of Bahamians to start their own small businesses. There would also have been less training opportunities at BTVI and probably no a pprenticeships in conjunction with the pri vate sector such as was organized by the Gove rnment as a part of the successful National Retraining Programme. T he old Emerald Bay, which is now Sandals, would have probably still been closed on the PLP's watch and unavailable to provide some hotels jobs for those laid off from Our Lucaya. When people are hurting or in crisis they need more than promises and talk about compassion. They need action because talk doesn't pay the rent or the mortgage and consultation without quick action doesn't put food on the table. BLS Nassau, March 7, 2011. Impressed by quick Government response to Our Lucaya layoffs EDITOR, The Tribune. Last week was a sad day for the Bahamas and we will be reeling from the backlash for years to come. While I agree that we all have a right to demonstrate, I just cannot sit back and have you embarrassing me by saying you are representing me while acting like a mob. I did not give you permission to go down town saying you are protesting on my behalf. If I wanted to protest I would have done so myself. I would not have let the opposition or unions with hidden agendas fill me with alcohol give me a few dollars and a tee shirt and ask me to come to Bay Street to protest some thing that I do not even understand. I would not have embarrassed myself by cussing and fighting with the law. I would not have to explain to my children why I let them down by acting so stupidly in public. I just want to make it clear that you were representing yourself. TONY Nassau, March 1, 2011. A sad day for the Bahamas

PAGE 5

By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT Opposition Leader Perry Christie was in Grand Bahama yesterday, where he expressed concern and sympathy for the 200 persons laid-off by the OurL ucaya Resort. M r Christie said the PLP is here for the people of Freeport and pledged that the party will do all that it can to push government to lend more of a helping hand to thec ity. I want to first and forem ost express my concern and sympathy to all those who have lost their jobs in this most recent round of lay-offs at the Our Lucaya Resort. These dismissals come at the same time when the Prime Minister and his Minister of State in Finance Zhivargo Laing are busy boasting thatt he economy is turning around. I ask: turning around for whom? Not those 200 employees who have been fired. On Friday, the hotel terminated 202 workers and closed two of the three hotels on the property in an effort to s treamline its expenses and k eep the resort operational, thereby saving 800 jobs. Accompanying Mr Christie t o Freeport were West End a nd Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe, Fox Hill MP Fred M itchell and Golden Gates MP Shane Gibson. D uring a press conference at PLP Headquarters attended by PLP candidates Sena-t or Dr Michael Darville and Gregory Moss, Mr Christie commented on how none of the FNM MPs on Grand Bahama had mentioned the lay-offs in the House of A ssembly. It took a PLP MP to raise the issue in the House. Not one FNM member of theH ouse, not one government minister including three who represent this island said one w ord. The very least they could h ave done was to express sympathy for the people who were l aid off, he said. Mr Christie stated that only after the firings did the Mini stry of Labour announce it initiated emergency measures to help those who had beenl aid off. On Saturday, Minister Dion Foulkes announced that the government had put in places everal initiatives to provide assistance and relief to the workers. Mr Foulkes met with hotel a nd union executives while in F reeport on Friday, but said he had not met with the dismissed workers when askedb y the media. T he One Stop Shop programme launched by the gove rnment yesterday offers job and training opportunities, u nemployment benefit assistance and counselling for workers. While, one welcomes relief where relief is offered, the question is whether or not the government was aware that this was coming, when did they know and were they p roactive seeking to lessen the i mpact on the work force, said Mr Christie. He stressed that the PLP is c oncerned about the handsoff attitude which the FNM administration seems to have a bout Freeport. H e stated that for four y ears, the FNM has sat idly by as the city lurched from o ne economic crisis to the next, without any clear vision of what to do to stop the probl ems. Mr Christie said while there are serious issues facing thed evelopment of Freeport, the FNM government has its head in the sand. He believes that Freeport i s critical to the survival of the Bahamas. It is not ones interest for this city to collapse, the press o n Nassau would be unrelenti ng if that were to occur, he said. When I held my partys convocation in GrandB ahama, I chastised the Prime M inister for saying that he would not talk to the Grand B ahama Port Authority about the fact that the tax exempt ions for this city will expire in 2015. That is simply wrong. A PLP government would n ever shut the door to dialogue, he said. Mr Christie encouraged Freeporters to hold on as elections are to be held within a year. Help and hope are on the w ay from our party. I hope that as we reach out our hand in friendship to you, that youw ill accept what we have to offer. The party has chosen three e xcellent candidates: men of v ision and of empathy for peop le. We are nearing the choice of three more people, he s aid. By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Laid off workers at the Our Lucaya Resort turned out yesterdayt o register for the govern ments One Stop Shop programme at the Foster B Pestaina Hall. Around 100 persons filled out application forms fore mployment at Sandals Exum a, where 40 jobs are being offered, and at the Bimini Big Game Resort where 19 j obs are available. T he programme also offers persons the opportunity for training in a variety of skill sets at BTVI and College of the Bahamas. The government will pay the t uition. Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes said six monthsa pprenticeship will also be offered at industrial companies on the island and the government will subsidises alaries. The 202 workers laid-off by the resort will also receive unemployment benefit assistance once their sev erance packages have expired, as well as access to other assistance programmes if they qualify. They will also be considered for the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cultures Self-Starters Programme, which offers $5,000 to persons interested in startingtheir own business. One worker, who was employed for 15 years at the hotel, commended the gove rnment for providing some relief and alternative options for employment. I have a lot of financial o bligations and I am wary a bout to moving to Exuma for employment because I h ave a family here that depends on me, but I will definitely enroll for training at BTVI and apprenticeship t hat will be offered at BORCO, he said. The government will also provide financial and pro-f essional advice, and memb ers of the Grand Bahama Pastors Forum were on h and to offer counselling to the laid-off workers yester day. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 5 LAID-OFF WORKERS REGISTER FOR GOVT PROGRAMME PLP leader expresses concern and sympathy for laid-off hotel staff T T h h e e s s e e d d i i s s m m i i s s s s a a l l s s c c o o m m e e a a t t t t h h e e s s a a m m e e t t i i m m e e w w h h e e n n t t h h e e P P r r i i m m e e M M i i n n i i s s t t e e r r a a n n d d h h i i s s M M i i n n i i s s t t e e r r o o f f S S t t a a t t e e i i n n F F i i n n a a n n c c e e Z Z h h i i v v a a r r g g o o L L a a i i n n g g a a r r e e b b u u s s y y b b o o a a s s t t i i n n g g t t h h a a t t t t h h e e e e c c o o n n o o m m y y i i s s t t u u r r n n i i n n g g a a r r o o u u n n d d . P erry Christie F ILLINGINFORMS f or the One Stop Shop programme.Photo/ V andyke Hepburn

PAGE 6

L OCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE $SSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUHIHHWRIVHFRQG VSDFHLVDYDLODEOHLQQHZO\FRQVWUXFWHG EXLOGLQJDWWKHFRUQHURI0DUOERURXJKDQG &XPEHUODQGWUHHWV 7ZRfRQVLWHFDUVSDFHVLQFOXGHG ,GHDOORFDWLRQIRURIIVKRUHEDQN WUXVWFRPSDQ\ODZRUDFFRXQWLQJRU RWKHUSURIHVVLRQV&RQWDFWZQHU 35,0()),&($&( DURING their one-week visit to Grand Bahama, cast members ofthe international performing group Up with People (UWP t he Keep Grand Bahama Clean (KGBC tasks on the island. Cast members lent their physical strength as they engaged in cleanups at the Grand Bahama Home for the Aged (GBHA s treets. Much needed support was also rendered to staff of the Rand Nature Centre as UWP members performed various odd jobs. The artistic talents of group members came to the fore during special performances along with the KGBC puppets at several of the i slands schools and at the Sir C harles Hayward Childrens Library. We were extremely thrilled to have UWP in our midst for the past week. The level of energy they displayed along with their genuine commitment to service was out-s tanding, said KGBC chairperson N akira Wilchcombe. GBHA supervisor Adrianne Dorsett was also full of praise. We greatly appreciated them coming and helping us. They cleaned the windows and screens, weeded the flower beds and spent time inter-a cting with the residents. It was a joyous occasion, she said. Walls of the childrens section of the library were transformed as the UWP members drew and painted oversized illustrations of favourite cartoon characters on them. The paintings brought story time to life f or visiting students who were read t o by the UWP group. Geneva Rutherford, director of c ommunity relations with the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA expressed appreciation for this latest gesture which she described as a permanent fixture of the groups contribution to students of Grand Bahama. Three cast members who hail f rom the United States, Philippines a nd Mexico took on roles of the popular KGBC puppets spreading e nvironmentally friendly messages during special school assemblies. Emma Whitehead headed the UWP sub-group assigned to assist KGBC and served as its spokespers on. We love being able to come into c ommunities and meet the needs of p eople who are here and existing. Grand Bahama is such a beautiful island and being able to help make other peoples lives better is truly r ewarding. We try to unite young p eople to take action in their comm unities and in so many ways our v isits spark people to be unified and get behind a common goal, she s tated. A s an expression of gratitude, m anagement of Port Lucaya Mark etplace (PLM Limited, hosted cast members who a ssisted KGBC to lunch and entertainment in Count Basie Square. PLM was very excited to host U WP cast members. We trust that it allowed for a cultural interchange a s they observed some of our local talent. Hopefully, they can incorpor ate some aspect of it into their routine and even include talented B ahamians in their travelling ensemb le, said Karen Ferguson-Bain, entertainment and marketing coord inator for PLM. THE Bahamian American Cultural Society has taken its Bahamas Junkanoo Workshop to the Harlem School of the Arts in Harlem, New York the mecca of Black Culture in the United States. The Bahamas Junkanoo Workshop is a flexible fourpart presentation, prepared by BACS, which is geared toward children and teenagers. It emphasises knowledge, hands on skills, entertainment and behavior modification. With Junkanoo music playing in the background, around 50 young people enjoyed making at least one costume item. Costumes After verbal and visual presentations the children, wearing costumes displaying the colours of the Bahamas, junkanooed around the hall to the sound of bells, horns and drums. The audience of about 200 stayed for a video presentation and to ask questions about the Bahamas and the way its people live. The afternoon saw an unexpected turn of events when a participating parent heard a familiar voice on the video of last years Boxing Day and New Years Junkanoo events in the Bahamas. She rushed over to look, and to her amazement, she recognised a relative whom she had not seen for many years, who is now living in the Bahamas. International travelling performers assist with Keep Grand Bahama Clean efforts K GBC PUPPETS Whilst on-island, visiting Up with People cast members made special appearances as the popular K GBC puppets at various schools. Pictured (left to right Garcia Milan of Mexico and Katie of the US. CULTURAL INTERCHANGE Visiting Up with People members get a chance to enjoy local culture in Count Bassie Square, Port Lucaya Marketplace. UP WITH PEOPLE h elp Keep Grand Bahama Clean Cast members and students of St Pauls College coll ect and bag litter. JUNKANOO GOES TO HARLEM SCHOOL

PAGE 7

EMPLOYEES of the G rand Bahama Port A uthority and Group of C ompanies recently made a donation to the Salvation Army following a successful clothing drive amongst staff m embers. Y anique Pinder, the 2 010/11 Group Employee o f the Year, said over 1,000 u nits were collected, cons isting of mens, womens and childrens apparel, shoes and fashion accessories. We are extremely excited at the success of our campaign, Walk a mile in my shoes, share the clothes on m y back. It was very import ant for every member of the GBPA family to support t his drive so that we in turn w ould be able to assist the S alvation Army in their efforts to service the needs of those in the community, s he said. A brainchild of GBPAs c ommunity relations department, the clothing drive was conducted over a two-week period, with staff members from throughout the groupb ringing in clothing and other apparel with the aim of supplying sufficient items tor estock the Salvation Armys Goodwill Store. I an Rolle, GBPA president, praised their efforts. This gesture demons trates that the employees h ave bought into our miss ion statement, To better the lives of the Grand Bahama community, and by extension, the Bahamas. A nd so today Im very p leased to see our employe es join together in partners hip to display in their own w ay, GBPAs commitment t o the Grand Bahama community. On hand to receive the donation were Roger and Cheryl Compton, commanding officers off the Salvation Army. Captain Roger e xplained that the donation c ould not have come at a better time, considering t heir current depleted stock a t the thrift store. At Christmas time people are cleaning out their closets and such and we get r eally bounteous donations around then, but now our i nventory has almost run down to nothing. So, its great that GBPA remembered us and as you can see from what has beend onated today, these are high quality items that we will be able to offer atr educed prices. Expressing similar sentim ents, Captain Cheryl stressed the significance of the Salvation Armys thrift s tore in the effort to assist t he needy in the community. All of our programmes, whether it be food, things with the children and youth, the ministry and all of the different aspects of our disaster services, are funded by proceeds from the Goodwill Store and the generosity of t hose on the island. Its reall y our thrift store that helps to generate funds for our overall operations, so thats why this donation is so meaningful to us because now we have items for resale that can help fund our programs longer, she said. The Salvation Armys G oodwill Store is opened f rom 10am 4pm, every day except Sunday. Social workers are also on-site 10am 2pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays to render assistance or advice to any in need. GBPA was pleased at the success of our compan ys clothing drive. We seek to lead by example and hopefully this will encourage other corporate citizens and those in the wider community to donate generously to organisations like the Salvation Army, Mr Pinder said. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 7 By LAMECH JOHNSON WITH March globally recognised a s literacy month for Rotary International, a local Rotary club has decided to host a book drive for one of Nassaus primary schools in ordert o help stock its library. The Rotary Club of East Nassau (RCENP rimary students in acquiring readi ng materials for their understocked library. RCEN president Joanne Smith told The Tribune that the school has m ore than 700 students who need reading material to feed their young, eager minds. RCEN members were encouraged t o donate books and other reading materials at the clubs weekly lun cheon on Friday. M s Smith is now also appealing t o members of the public to donate. You can bring books to Media Enterprises at 31 Shirley ParkA venue, she said. Principal of Thelma Gibson Angela Russell said she is grateful for RCENs help with the initiative. Its difficult to put a number on the amount of books that the library needs for our students, but the more the merrier, she said. I t was the clubs initial interest in helping with the construction of a playground for the Thelma Gibson pre-school that made the school seek further assistance with their mission to acquire more books for their stu d ents. Rotary is an organisation with more than 1.2 million members worldwide. There are six clubs in New Providence, of which RCEN is the biggest with over 100 members. O thers are located in Cat Island, E leuthera, Abaco and Freeport. By LAMECH JOHNSON ROTARY Club of Nassaus guest speaker at its weekly meeting Friday told club members that businesses are not aware that they can receive funding for environmental projects from the Global Environment Facility, which was established in 1991. Stacy Moultrie, a project consultant for the Global Environ ment Facility (GEF a power point presentation and described the workings of GEF, which is the largest funding organisation of projects to improve the global environment. GEF is an independent financial organization starting from the World Bank that provides grants to developing countries and countries in transition for projects related to the environment, she said. Currently the government is the only entity in the Bahamas that receives funding from the organisation. GEF has an incentive where, depending on the size of the project, the company can receive anywhere from $25,000 to $50,000 to draw up the proposals. The GEF unites 182 member governments, of which the Bahamas is a part, in partnership with international institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to address global environmental issues. Ms Moultrie said that GEFs focal areas are biodiversity, chemicals, climate change, international waters, land degradation and sustainable forestry management. Any project, in order to receive funding, must fit into one of these categories, she said. Persons interested should note that GEF approval normally takes between 12 to 18 months and requires co-financing. For every dollar you ask, you must have a dollar to match, she said. According to GEFs website, the Bahamas has had nine projects since 1997, though approval and completion of them came at a later date. For more information on how to qualify and receive funding for an environmental project, visit their website at www.thegef.org. Salvation Army beneficiary of GBPA clothing drive GBPA DONATES TO THE SALVATION ARMY After a successful clothing drive, GBPA management and Departmental Employees of the Year presented commanding officers of the Salvation Army with clothing, footwear and accessories. Pictured (front row, left to right Compton of the Salvation Army; Ginger Moxey, vice-president of the GBPA; Ian Rolle, GBPA president; Geneva Rutherford, GBPAs directoro f community relations, and Captain Roger Compton of the Salvation Army. BUSINESSES UN A WARE OF BEING ABLE T O OBTAIN FUNDS FROM GEF ROT AR Y CLUBNEWS Book Drive for Primary School Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Over 1,000 units of clothing collected

PAGE 8

L OCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE intentionally acaused Mrs Adderleys death on Monday, February 28. Mrs Adderley was found dead inside an apartment in Dundas Town, with injuriest o the back of her head. Police believe she h ad been involved in an argument prior to her death. The accused, who was not represented by an attorney yesterday, was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. Prosecutor Sandradee Gardiner said t he prosecution intends to proceed with a Voluntary Bill of Indictment in the matterbypassing a preliminary inquiry inthe Magistrates Court. The case was adjourned to May 9, with A dderley remanded to Her Majestys Prison. tions concerning fresh water fish. Mr Mallis told The Tribune yesterday that talapia, a fresh water fish, was broughtt o the Bahamas in the 1960s to populate l akes, ponds and wells in hopes that it would become a "backyard agriculture product" for Bahamians, and as a conservation tactic to attract indigenous fish-eating birds. M r Mallis said that the talapia has flourished, however "mass killings using gill nets will not be sustainable in a closed systeml ike Lake Killarney and will wipe out the species. He added that the numbers of talapia s eem to have been dwindling in recent years. Last year, a source reported finding a gill n et in the middle of the lake that had killed s everal diving ducks, but the owner of the net was never found. Even if he were, there is no guarantee t hat legal action would be taken. "This is an unprecedented issue," Mr Mallis admitted, but added that if the use of g ill nets on the lake is harming protected s pecies, it should be made illegal and covered by legislation. While Mr Mallis stressed there is no way t o know if there are any health risks associ ated with eating the fish from Lake Killarney, as the water and fish have not beent ested, lead poisoning is a possibility. F or years, cheaper lead pellets have been used in shotguns by hunters in the Bahamas, rather than steel pellets. When birds are hunted on lakes, stray lead shot can be eaten by fish or can break down, contaminating the water and possiblyr esulting in lead poisoning for anyone who uses the lake as a food source. Mr Deveaux said that following The Tribunes inquiries, the ministries of Public H ealth, Agriculture and Marine Resources have been alerted to the matter. He said a public alert will be issued. alleged connection were recently broadcast by Canadian station CTV in a television special. The news station reported on an alleged connection between Mr Forbes and a Bahamian registered company, GSF Lim ited, accused of squandering client investments. Arnold Forbes & Co was the registered office/agent for GSF Limited, and Mr Forbes served as a director with two Quebec residents, Jean-Pierre Tremblay and Stephane Hardy. GSF Limited was at the centre of a high-profile trial last year, when Canadian millionaire Nick Djokich was found guilty of conspiracy to commit kidnapping and murder for hire. Those claims are all a bunch of b******t. And you can quote me on that. They say they were looking for $6 million and they found it in the end. Where is the story in that? Mr Roberts asked. When it came over the television and we looked at it there was nothing in it. The claims were asinine. His role in whatever took place is the role that lawyers in Nassau do every day and continue to do today, he said. Mr Forbes said the report disparaged his character and he plans to sue the Canadian broadcaster. We incorporated the company which is a normal practice for law firms espe cially those in corporate law, said Mr Forbes in explaining his involvement. We provided a corporate service to a client and it was n ormal to always act as offi cers and directors. We got all the due diligence that is needed and these clients checked out clean. When I found out that these guys were up to no good we terminated (busi ness with them) immediately, he said In the Djokich trial, Djokich claimed he invested $6 million in GSF Limited with an understanding that his annual interest rate was 20 per cent and his principal funds were guaranteed. The CTV report claims that when Mr Djokich went to cash out money in 2004, he was informed by company directors that the money was all gone. The report claims Djo kich went to desperate lengths to uncover the story behind his missing money. He tried working through various Canadian authorities, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police fraud squad in Calgary, the Quebec Provincial Police and the Quebec Securities Commission. But after years of unsuccessful attempts, he was driven to launch his own experiment in vigilantism, according to CTV. Based on details revealed in the trial, Djokich orches trated a series of kidnap pings, torture sessions and attempted murder, including an alleged hit placed on Mr Forbes and Richard DeVries, a Canadian lawyer living in the Bahamas, as well as others. Djokichs scheme unraveled when the hit-man he hired turned out to be an undercover US Immigration and Customs enforcement agent. A segment in the CTV programme depicts a Canadian reporter speaking with Mr Forbes, asking for his account of what happened to the millions of dollars that passed through GSF Limited. Mr Forbes was then con fronted with copies of documents that purportedly bore his signature and alleged he was a director and signing officer for the company and had authorised hundreds of thousands of dollars in payouts. On the programme, Mr Forbes asked the television crew to return in a couple of days so he could provide them with documents to clear him and his company of any wrongdoing. The report claimed that when the crew returned Mr Forbes could offer nothing conclusive. Mr Forbes maintains he never had a connection to Djokich, and the allegations have no bearing on what he plans to do in the constituency of Mount Moriah. National Security Minis ter Tommy Turnquest, the Member of Parliament for Mount Moriah, said he did not want to comment on the situation at this time. When asked if he anticipated the allegations fac toring into the upcoming elections, he said: I don't need the misfortunes of others to win. Mr Turnquest won the last election by more than 500 votes, and he said he is confident his support is still strong. He said any support he may have lost would likely be counter-balanced by new supporters gained. the robbers escaped with an undisclosed amount of cash in a white 2006 Chevy Suburban they stole from an employee. P olice later found the vehicle abandoned at Bain Street, off Nassau Street. Construction sites and other busin esses that employ cash payroll were urged yesterday to invest in a checking s ystem which would eliminate the increased risk of keeping large sums of cash on site. All cash-based businesses a re advised to invest in high-quality surveillance, security guards, and have g reater communication with the police. Supt Dean added: Call the police, call the crime prevention office, we can g ive recommendations on how you can make your home or business more s ecure. Our officers will come out to y our place and conduct a survey, for free, and present you with recommendations based on our findings. Anyone with any information that m ight assist police in their investigations into all criminal matters should call 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymous ly on 328-TIPS (8477 PLP c hair man sa ys committee not aware of fraud allegations link to candidate FROM page one MAN CHARGED WITH KILLING HIS MOTHER FROM page one 66 ARMED ROBBERY VICTIMS IN 2 MONTHS FROM page one Public raises concerns over nets used in Lake Killarney fishing F ROM page one CONCERNS WERE RAISED when photographs surfaced of persons pulling large nets filled with fish o ut of Lake Killarney.

PAGE 9

ROBERT BURNS, A P National Security Writer BAGRAM, Afghanistan U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Monday that both the U.S. and Afghan governments agree the American military should remain involved in Afghanistan after the p lanned 2014 end of combat operations to help train and advise Afghan forces. "Obviously it would be a small fraction of the presence that we have today, but I think we're willing to do that," Gates told a group of U.S. troops at Bagram air field, which is headq uarters for U.S. and NATO forces in eastern Afghanistan. "My sense is, they (Afghan officials) are interested in having us do that." A soldier asked Gates about a long-term military presence, and Gates noted that Washington and Kabul have recently begun negotiating a security partnership. He mentioned no details. He was to meet later in the day with Afghan President Hamid Karzai. On Sunday, the Afghan National Security Council discussed the matter of a longterm security accord with the U.S., according to a statement issued by Karzai's office. The statement said Karzai told the council that the U.S. wants the deal worked out as soon as possible. And he said that on the Afghan side it was matter not just for the government but for the Afghan people to decide. The U.S. has said it wants a long-term relationship with Afghanistan, in part to ensure the country does not again become a haven for al-Qaida or affiliated terrorist groups. Karzai's interest is rooted in his desire for U.S. security guarantees and commitments that c ould help bring stability and prosperity. Gates is at the start of a twoday visit with U.S. troops, allied commanders and Afghan leaders to gauge war progress as the Obama administration moves toward crucial decisions on reducing troop levels. The trip comes during heightened tensions between the U.S. and Afghanistan. On Sunday, Karzai rejected a U.S. apology for the mistaken killing of nine Afghan boys in a NATO air attack. The Afghan president told Gen. David Petraeus, the top commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan, that expressing regret was insufficient for last week's killing of the boys, ages 12 and under, by coalition heli copters. A planned visit to a combat outpost south of Kabul was scratched due to poor weath er, and instead Gates made a brief flight north to Bagram, headquarters for the U.S.-led command that is responsible for eastern Afghanistan. The Pentagon chief visited a combat hospital, where Maj. Gen. John Campbell told reporters three soldiers had been admitted earlier in the day with wounds from a roadside bomb blast. In his remarks to troops assembled inside a cavernous building on the air field, Gates offered encouragement. "I know you've had a tough winter, and it's going to be a tougher spring and summer, but you've made a lot of headway," h e said. "I think you've proven, with your Afghan partners, that this thing is going to work and that we'll be able to prevail." Defense Department spokesman Geoff Morrell told reporters flying with the Pentagon chief from Washington that Gates wants to get a firsthand feel for changes on the ground since he last was in Afghanistan in December. The U.S. is committed to beginning a troop withdrawal in July. But the size and scope of the pullback will depend on the degree of progress toward handing off full control to the shaky Afghan government. Morrell said Gates expects to hear from troops and commanders that U.S. and NATO strategy is making important progress against the relentless Taliban, who are thought to be gearing up for a spring offensive. Campbell told reporters in Bagram that the number of roadside bomb attacks has risen in the last two weeks. "The enemy is trying to get an early start on what he would call a spring offensive," Campbell said, adding that it was not yet clear whether there has been an increase in Taliban fighter infiltration from the Pakistan side of the border. U.S. commanders have been saying for weeks that the Taliban are suffering big losses in territory and personnel, while being denied the funding and infiltration routes they have relied on in the past to ramp up guerrilla operations each s pring. Marine Maj. Gen. Richard Mills, top commander in the southwestern province of Helmand, told reporters last week that a Taliban counteroffensive is anticipated. Mills said he expects the Taliban to try "to regain very, very valuable territory ... lost over the past six to eight months." He added that U.S. and allied forces are intercepting "as many of the foreign fighters as we can" who come from Pakistan to attack U.S. and Afghan troops. Gates sees the spring as a potentially decisive period for President Barack Obama's war strategy, which includes begin ning to withdraw U.S. forces in July. This week's visit is Gates' 13th trip to Afghanistan, and probably one of his last as defense secretary. He has said he will retire this year but has not given a date. After Afghanistan, Gates planned to fly to the Stuttgart, Germany, headquarters of U.S. Africa Command to attend a ceremony Wednesday marking the arrival of a new commander, Army Gen. Carter Ham. Gates will attend a NATO defense ministers meeting in Brussels on Thursday and Fri day. I NTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Gates: US should stay involved in Afghanistan I BRAHIM BARZAK, A ssociated Press GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip The Gaza Strip's Hamas government announced Sunday that it has arrested the spiritual leader of an extremist Islamic group after a two-year search. It was one of the most high-profile arrests against a s eries of shadowy groups that have tried to challenge Hamas rule in Gaza in recent years. These groups, known as Salafis, draw inspiration from the al-Qaida terror network and believe the Iranian-backed Hamas is too moderate. Hamas said Sheikh Abu Walid-al-Maqdasi, the leader o f the group "Monotheism and Holy War," was arrested in a crowded beachside neighborhood of Gaza City last week. A l-Maqdasi's group shares the same name as an al-Qaid a inspired group suspected in hotel bombings in Egypt 's Sinai desert between 2004 and 2005 that killed more t han 120 people. It's not clear if it's the same group. I n Gaza, al-Maqdasi's group says Hamas, a fundam entalist group that has killed hundreds of Israelis in suicide bombings, shootings and rocket attacks, should do more to battle Israel. It also says Hamas must impose an even more extreme version of Muslim law in Gaza. His group has also claimed responsibility for firing rockets at Israel in defiance of an unwritten truce between the Jewish state and Gaza's Hamas rulers. It is believed t o have attracted former Hamas loyalists disenchanted w ith the militant group's enforcement of a two-year-old cease-fire. H amas has been especially wary of their hardline chall engers, particularly since the spiritual mentor of anothe r shadowy group defied Hamas and announced a separate Islamic state in southern Gaza in 2009. That prompted a gun battle with Hamas police that killed more than2 0 people. Hamas spokesman Salah Bardawil says al-Maqdasi spread incitement against Hamas and tried to attract youths to his organization. Al-Maqdasi, who is Palestinian, sneaked into Gaza in 2006, with his wife and seven children, Hamas officials said. He is believed to be about 50, and he also is known a s Hisham al-Suaydani. Hamas has been trying to track h im down for two years. MUNIR AHMED, Associated Press ZARAR KHAN, Associated Press ISLAMABAD Pakistan's prime minister told mourners at a Friday funeral Mass for a Christian politician assassinated for opposing harsh blasphemy laws that they had a lost a great leader and that the government would do its "utmost" to bring his killers to justice. Shahbaz Bhatti, the sole Christian government minister, was shot dead Wednesday after being threatened for opposing laws that impose the death penalty for insulting Islam. He was the second Pakistani politician killed in two months over the matter, and his death underscored the perils facing a government that is increasingly too weak to govern well or buck the religious right. Also Friday, a bomb went off in a mosque in northwest Pakistan, killing eight people and wounding 25 around prayer time. Police official Saif Ali Khan says the blast in Akbarpura village occurred as worshippers gathered at a shrine attached to the mosque to collect free food. Islamist extremists frequently attack Muslims as well religious minorities to sow fear and undermine confidence in the Pakistani government. As anguished friends and relatives of Bhatti, a 42-year-old Roman Catholic, prepared to bury him in his home village of Khushpur on Friday, mourners packed an Islamabad church in the morning to pay their respects. There, Prime Min ister Yousuf Raza Gilani praised a man many described as gentle, humble and devoted to help ing Pakistan's downtrodden religious minorities. "People like him, they are very rare," Gilani told the overflow crowd. "All the minorities have lost a great leader. I assure you, we will try our utmost to bring the culprits to justice." The prime minister did not specifically mention Islamist extremists who have waged a war on a country, though he has issued statements denouncing them in recent days. Gilani also avoided mentioning the blasphemy laws, which rights groups have long deplored as vague and misused to persecute minorities. Christians are the largest religious minority in Pakistan, where 95 percent of the country's 180 million people are Muslim. They often are the victims of discrimination and persecution, and they typically live in poor parts of towns and do low-skilled, badly paid jobs. GAZA HAMAS POLICE SEIZE HARDLINE EXTREMIST MUSLIM (AP Photo/Mandel Ngan, Pool GREETING: Gen. David Petraeus, left, top commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan, greets U.S. Defense S ecretary Robert Gates upon Gates arrival in Kabul, Afghanistan Monday, March 7, 2011. Gates arrived i n Afghanistan Monday, beginning a two-day visit with U.S. troops, allied commanders and Afghan leaders to gauge war progress as the Obama administration moves toward crucial decisions on reducing troop levels. Pakistani PM praises slain Christian at memorial (AP Photo/B.K.Bangash COMFORT: Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani comforts the mother of slain Christian leader Shahbaz Bhatti during Bhatti's funeral ceremony at a local church in Islamabad, Pakistan on Friday, March 4, 2011. Pakistan's prime minister told mourners at a Friday funeral Mass for a Christian politician assassi nated for opposing harsh blasphemy laws that they had a lost a great leader and that the government would do its "utmost" to bring his killers to justice.

PAGE 10

L OCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE get sound investment advice benet from multiple fund options earn potentially higher returnsall of the aboveinvestmentsplan your strategy call us today at (242396-4076 A SUBSIDIARY OFCORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY & SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com IN response to the Princess Margaret Hospit als pleas for more blood d onors, Lickety Split invite d the public to participate in an innovative blood drive in which those who donated a pint of blood, got a pint of Edys Grand ice cream free. The Edys Give A Pint, G et A Pint Blood Drive w as held at the Lickety S plit diner on JFK Drive. Managing director of the company Llewellyn Burrows was first in line to donate, followed by various Lickety Split staff members. T hroughout the six-hour b lood drive, a steady stream of customers lined u p to give a pint of blood a nd get their ice cream p rize. The event was Lickety Splits fourth blood drivei n aid of the PMH Blood Bank. Thanks to the compa nys efforts and the givings pirit of the donors, the PMH Blood Bank was able to collect almost 30 p ints. LICKETY SPLIT HOSTS GIVE A PINT, GET A PINT B LOOD DRIVE L LEWLLYN BURROWS Lickety Split managing director, was first to donate. CINDY BROWN Lickety Split store manager, puts on a brave face. P MH BLOOD BANK s taffer starts the flow on a donor. A BLOOD DONOR anticipates her free pint of ice cream. WASHINGTON Associated Press PRESIDENT Barack Oba ma reversed course Monday and ordered a resumption of military trials for terror suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, making his once ironclad promise to close the isolated prison look even more distant. Guantanamo has been a major political and national security headache for the president since he took office promising to close the prison within a year, a deadline that came and went without him ever setting a new one. Obama made the change with clear reluctance, bowing to the reality that Congress' vehement opposition to trying detainees on U.S. soil leaves them nowhere else to go. The president emphasized his preference for trials in federal civilian courts, and his administra tion blamed congressional med dling for closing off that avenue. "I strongly believe that the American system of justice is a key part of our arsenal in the war against al-Qaida and its affiliates, and we will continue to draw on all aspects of our justice system including (federal) courts to ensure that our security and our values are strengthened," Obama said ina statement. "Going forward, all branches of government have a responsi bility to come together to forge a strong and durable approach to defend our nation and the values that define who we are as a nation." The first Guantanamo trial likely to proceed under Obama's new order would involve Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the alleged mastermind of the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole. AlNashiri, a Saudi of Yemeni descent, has been imprisoned at Guantanamo since 2006. Defense officials have said that of the around 170 detainees at Guantanamo, about 80 are expected to face trial by mili tary commission. On Monday, the White House reiterated that the administration remains com mitted to eventually closing Guantanamo which is on a U.S. Navy base and that Monday's actions were in pursuit of that goal. But the out come Obama wants seemed even more distant. Critics of the military com mission system, which was established specifically to deal with the detainees at Guan tanamo, contend that suspects are not given some of the most basic protections afforded people prosecuted in American courts and that that serves as a recruitment tool for terrorists. Obama's administration has enacted some changes to the military commission system while aiming to close down Guantanamo. More than two dozen detainees have been charged there, but the charges against a number of them were dismissed in the wake of Obama's order in January 2009 to halt the commission process. So far six detainees have been convicted and sentenced, including Ali Hamza al-Bahlul, Osama bin Laden's media spe cialist who told jurors he had volunteered to be the 20th Sept. 11 hijacker. He is serving a life sentence at Guantanamo. Meanwhile, the first Guantanamo detainee tried in civilian court in New York was convicted in November on just one of more than 280 charges that he took part in the al-Qai da bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa. That case ignited strident opposition to any further such trials. Obama r estar ts Guantanamo tr ials

PAGE 11

SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.72 $4.72 $4.72 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 r"" ttrrf n$tb By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Price controls are putting Bahamian businesses in at ime warp, leaving them unable to adjust margins in the face of increasing costs a nd other changes in the eco nomic climate, a think-tank executive yesterday charging that they ultimately resulted i n product shortages. Rick Lowe, of the Nassau Institute, said the Govern-m ent-imposed price controls on industries such as petroleum and food, ostensibly to protect the interests of low i ncome Bahamian consumers, were misnamed and failed to work because they could noti mpact international factors outside this nations control. Suggesting that it was really price management, rather than price control, that the Government-dictated mark-ups imposed on various Bahamian businesses, Mr Lowe said a better solution was for the administration to get out of the way and let the market, through competi tion, determine the price of PRICE CONTROLS PLACING BUSINESS IN TIME W ARP Think tank executive warns government-imposed margin andm ark-up restrictions ultimately cause product shortages and distort market* Government urged to get out of the way and let market decide prices through competition* Many firms would do better putting money in the bank than staying open SEE page 5B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A leading Bahamian t ransportation company, which consumes almost one million gallons of diesel per year, yesterday said it had seen its fuel costs rise 35 per cent year-over-year, a senior executive telling TribuneB usiness it was ridiculous that this nation had yet to MAJOR TRANSPORT FIRM IN 35% FUEL C OST HIKE Bahamas Ferries executive s ays ridiculous that nation has yet to devise long-term solution to fuel price inflation, his firm using almost one million gallons per year* Now exploring hedging strategy to aid all fueldependent Bahamian companies, via talks with oil firms and major banks SEE page 5B KHAALIS ROLLE When you use close to one million gallons of fuel a year it is ridiculous. B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A change in its loan provisioning policy resulted in Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FINCO ing credit loss provisions by $8.9 million during its 2010 financial year, a key factor b ehind net income quadrupling to more than $18 mil$8.9m FINCO boost through loan provision policy change Reduction in credit allowances from 40% to 30% o f non-accrual loans key factor i n quadrupling of mortgage l enders 2010 income Non-performing loans hit $88.64m or 10.47% of totall oan portfolio FINCO insurance subsidiary w as still seeking licence renewal at balance sheet date SEE page 4B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas Chamber of C ommerce and Employers Confederation (BCCEC has launched a MysteryS hopper project that aims to test every single business in the Bahamas on frontline performance and cusChamber unveils Mystery Shop plan Aims to test every single business in the Bahamas onc ustomer service and front-line performance for indefinite period SEE page 2B By ALISON LOWE B usiness Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net W ork on the $138.3 million Phase II stage of the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA will begin on Thursday, March 17, with the s elective demolition of t he existing US depar ture terminal. T he second stage, w hich follows comple Airports $138m second stage to start March 17 Plan to construct 226,000 sq ft a rrivals terminal and pier Contracts for stonework, masonry and carpeting now before NAD/Airport Authority Board for approvals SEE page 3B GUIDEDTOUR: A tour of the Airp ort last year. By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Agriculture could be generating $305 million per year towards Bahamian Gross Domestic Product (GDP pared to the $40.2 million recorded in the most recent statistics, if proper reporting and recording of all agricultural outputs took place, a Department of Agriculture official said yesterday. Leslie Minns, a statistician with the Department, said in his most recently-issued report on agricultures contribution to the Bahamian economy that there has been under-reporting of agricultural output since the first census in 1978. Agriculture in the Bahamas is perceived as one of the sectors with little economic activity, and therefore its contribution to the Gross National Product is considered minimal. As an agricultural professional, and as per the definition for economic activity, nothing could be further from the truth, said Mr Minns in a report released to senior agriculture officials in January. A fact which Mr Minns suggests highlights this appears in this report. In it, an increase in the total value of agricultural production from $78 million in 2008 to around $194.8 million in 2009 is documented. Acreage recorded as being under cultivation by farmers or being used for livestock increased by 511 per cent, from 5,793 acres in 2005/2006, to 35,402 acres in 2009. However, rather than being a consequence of a significant rise in actual output created by farmers or other individuals producing agricultural goods, Mr Minns suggests this increase is primarily due to better recordkeeping and data collection, which needs to be further improved if a true picture of agricultures contribution to the economy is to be obtained. Between 1994 and 2006, only reported data that willingly made available by a relatively small selection of farmers was used to estimate agricultural output. From 2005, the department turned to the Farmers Register to better estimate production and its value. Farmers become registered to obtain incentives such as duty-free agricultural equipment, imports and hurricane relief, and such a register has been one of the only ways for the Government to get a better handle on the farming industry, given that there have traditionally been few other incentives for producers to make themselves known for data collection purposes. Mr Minns said he hopes that in the future input from other areas, from which economic value is derived from agriculture, can be included in reports detailing agricultures input into the national economy. Agricultures contribution to the $6.7 billion GDP in 2008 was found to be just 0.6 per cent or $40.2 million. In 2009, this rose to 0.7 per cent. The statistician laments that only economic value derived from the production of crops and livestock in the Bahamas Agriculture output $305m per annum SEE page 4B

PAGE 12

By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net Economists and business leaders yesterday joined Opposition MPs in questioning the Governments d ecision to allow more than a year-and-a-half to pass w ithout producing any updated unemployment figures, each stressing the importance of such data for proper economic and social policy formulation. The last available statist ics on the level of unemp loyment in the Bahamas were released in September 2009, following a survey conducted in May of that year. At that time it was found t hat the unemployment rate was the highest it had been since the early 1990s. F or New Providence, the u nemployment rate of 8.7 p er cent in 2008 increased to 12.1 per cent in February2 009, then to 14 per cent in M ay 2009. A similar trend was experienced in Grand Bahama, with rates of 9 per cent, 14.6 per cent and 17.4 per cent recorded for those three dates. A labour force survey, w hich records the unemployment rate, is traditionally undertaken on an annual basis, except in a Census year, when it is bypassed in f avour of focusing on this l arger, once in a decade, p roject. Ryan Pinder, MP for Eliza beth and a tax attorney by p rofession, raised the dearth of statistics relating to unemployment, a key economic indicator, as a matter of concern in the House of Assembly last week. Speaking with Tribune Business yesterday, he said t he unemployment figures a re important so we have a n understanding not only o f the unemployment figure, b ut of who is unemployed f rom what sectors and age groups, with such data key to better positioning thosec oncerned to establish policies to really provide some buoyancy to the situation. Responding in Parliament t o Mr Pinders criticism over the lack of figures, minister of state for finance, Zhivarg o Laing, noted that last y ear the Department of Stat istics undertook a nationwide Census ,and for thisr eason, resource limitations d id not permit the opportunity for a labour force survey to be conducted as usua l. Director of Statistics, Kalsie Dorsett, yesterdayc onfirmed that a labour force survey has never been u ndertaken in a Census y ear, and her department w ould not have had the capacity, either financially, human or infrastructure, tod o both. However, Mr Pinder and others have suggested this may not be an adequate rea-s on to ditch the survey at this time. We are in a unique cli mate where I think that d ecision is not in the best interests of the country, and if we have to do somethingd ifferent because of the c hallenges we have and the situation we find ourselves in, then we do it. That is the responsibility of a govern m ent, Mr Pinder said. I understand the proposition they dont do it in aC ensus year, but I also say if its only a matter of resources, much more bene fit would come from having t he unemployment statistics t han not having it. You get more than just a number, its an analysis of whats going on out there in terms of employment. James Smith, former minister of state for finance under the Christie administration, concurred. Espec ially during a recession, w hen we went through a p eriod of high joblessness a nd lay offs and were still s eeing them its very i mportant to have timely economic data on all areas of the economy, he said. I think many sectors of the economy have been looking forward to having some idea of how deep and b road this recession is, and how its impacting the labour force. At the very least I think a n appeal should be made t o the Government in the general interest of econom-i c planning to try to make t he resources available, because businesses also depend on that kind of information to plan going forward. The level of unemp loyment gives you a measure of the level of demand for your goods and servicesa nd so many other things. Khaalis Rolle, chairman of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and EmployersC onfederation (BCCEC said he feels strongly that more emphasis and resources must be broughtt o bear on information gathering in the Bahamian econ omy generally. I nstead of being prepared o n an annual basis as they have traditionally been, Mr Rolle said he would support resources being put in placet o ensure such statistics can be compiled on a monthly or quarterly basis. Its difficult for me to say precisely why it wasnt done (the Labour Force survey in 2010). I think in any givenp eriod its always critical to have information, and one of our key economic indicators is unemployment. I d ont believe that information should not be available and compiled on a regular basis, he said. You are at the mercy of making decisions in a vacuu m or in the dark if you d ont have quality informat ion. Dion Foulkes, Labour Minister, yesterday reiterated the Governments position that it would have been impractical for the Department of Statistics to do both t he Census and the Labour F orce Survey in 2010. We hired hundreds of people to conduct the Census, which comes up every 10 years. It was very detailed a nd took a very long time, and the Department of Statistics got a special allocat ion to hire those people and p rovide the necessary equipm ent and documents to conduct the survey, he said. Money is only a part of t he equation. Its also a question of capacity in terms of infrastructure, buildings, desks, computers, training. Its a very comprehensive and holistic approach, especially with unemployment f igures because you want them to be as accurate as possible. Ms Dorsett, head of the Department of Statistics, s aid that besides her staff a nd offices being occupied w ith Census-related work, another problem witha ttempting to undertake a L abourForce survey in a Census year, which cannot be combated by the alloca tion of more resources, is a simple matter of public cooperation. The most important t hing is you cant go to householders twice like that in a year. They are alreadyg etting tired of you (after t he Census), she said. Mr Foulkes, meanwhile, suggested that the Govern ment has been able to assesst he unemployment situation to some degree using other barometers, such as then umber of individuals signing up to obtain unemployment benefits which has dropped sharply. We believe a tremendous a mount of jobs have been created through projects such as the airport re-devel-o pment, the road improvement project, the straw mar ket. Atlantis has taken on some 300 people recently, he added. B USINESS P AGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE tomer service, its chairman yesterday describing it as another plank in the organisations drive to deliver value-added ser vices to its members. Khaalis Rolle, who is also Bahamas Ferries chief marketing officer, told Tribune Business: We just launched the Mystery Shopper project, and thats an initiative most businesses can benefit from. I find that to be a very effective means of monitoring the performance of your business, particularly on the front line. It is a project designed to test that level and quality of service that youre offering to the cus tomer. Its a well-constructed, diagnosis type of project where people go into the business and evaluate the type of experience they have. They give a report on how businesses perform in every key area. Mr Rolle told Tribune Business that Bahamas Ferries has been using it [the Mystery Shopper initiative] for a couple of years now, and when we started everyone thought it was a nuisance, and now at the beginning of the month e-mails start flying on when the reports due. Each departments wants to know how its done. The BCCEC chairman described the Mys tery Shopper programme as one of the value-added services were offering to our members. He told Tribune Business that the initiative would continue indefinitely, and added: We hope to test every single business in the Bahamas. Looking at the bigger picture and the long-term future, after he demits office as BCCEC chairman in June, Mr Rolle added: I wanted to leave the Chamber with a value proposition. That [the Mystery Shopper] really adds value to the membership. I want businesses to say that the Cham ber is not only an advocacy organisation, but a value added organisation. This is one of the diverse revenue streams we wanted to add, diversifying revenue streams beyond just membership fees. Chamber unveils Mystery Shop plan FROM page 1B Timely economic data demanded RYAN PINDER ZHIVARGOLAING

PAGE 13

B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 3B %DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\&RUSRUDWLRQ7HQGHU7KH%DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\&RUSRUDWLRQLQYLWHV 7HQGHUVIRUWKHVHUYLFHVGHVFULEHGEHORZ 7 *URXSHGLFDOt/LIH,QVXUDQFHHUYLFHV %LGGHUVDUHUHTXLUHGWRFROOHFWSDFNDJHVIURP WKH&RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLYHIFH%OXH +LOOt7XFNHURDGV &RQWDFW 0V&KDUOHQHPLWK DW WHOHSKRQH 6XEPLVVLRQVVKRXOGEHPDUNHGDVIROORZV 0U.HYLQ%DVGHQ *HQHUDODQDJHU %DKDPDV(OHFWULFLW\&RUSRUDWLRQ ([HFXWLYHIFHV%OXH+LOOtXFNHU 5RDGV 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 7 *URXSHGLFDOt /LIH,QVXUDQFHHUYLFHV 'HDGOLQHIRUGHOLYHU\WR%(& 7KH&RUSRUDWLRQUHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRDFFHSW RUUHMHFWDQ\RUDOOSURSRVDOV )RUDOOLQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHWHQGHUVSOHDVH FRQWDFW $QWLRQHWWHXUQTXHVW DWWHOHSKRQH tion of work on the first stage the construction of anew US departures termin al and pier includes the construction of a 226,000 square foot InternationalA rrivals Terminal and International Departures Pier on the site of what will soon becom the former US departures terminal. It is scheduled to be opened in late 2012, and willbe be followed by a third terminal in 2013. Contracts have so far been awarded for airside and landside civil work for the international arrivals termi nal, inclusive of the parking lots and apron areas. There are several con tracts in with the Board for approval at the moment, including works for stonework, masonry and carpeting, said Shonalee Johnson, communications manager at the Nassau Airport Development Compa ny (NAD seeing the airport redevelopment. Other works that will be undertaken as part of PhaseII are: complete demolition of the pier attached to the former US departures terminal and demolition of all electrical and mechanical systems. The roadway canopy that currently covers the road where visitors, taxis and buses pull in to the airport to load and offload passengers and baggage will be extended. The roof of the facility will be replaced with a rounded, barrel vault type structure similar to that used in the new US departures terminal. Work on the second stage is set to begin concurrent with the opening of the new US Terminal, which has now been completed. On Saturday, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Cab inet Ministers toured the $190.8 million facility ahead of its March 16 opening to the travelling public. AIRPOR T S $1 38M SEC OND S TAGE TO START MARCH 17 Second student wave enters Spanish school SECOND INDUCTION: The Association of International Banks and Trust Companies (AIBT i nduction of students into its language school. I nitiated in 2010, the language classes have been well supported by members of AIBT, and 30 students have enjoyed free beginners and intermediate Spanish classes. In addition to those students who will continue with their language education, the AIBT has welcomed a further 17 candidates who have begun their studies in Spanish. FROM page 1B P ROJECT: A file photo on work at the Airport.

PAGE 14

lion, even though non-performing loans exceeded 10 per cent of its total portfolio. The BISX-listed mortgage l ender, which is 75 per cent o wned by Royal Bank of C anadas Bahamian subsidiary, revealed in its finan-c ial statements for the year to October 31, 2010, that it r educed the allowance for c redit (loan 4 0 per cent of non-accrual loan threshold used in 2009t o 30 per cent last year. T his move, following a Board and management review of FINCOs provisioning policy, which assessed factors such as the quality of security held over its mortgage portfolio and r ecovery rates, resulted in a c onsiderable boost to the m ortgage lenders 2010 f inancial results. This review resulted in the Corporation [FINCO] reducing its provisioning policy ratio to 30 per cent of non-accrual loans, and a r eduction of $8.9 million in t he amount charged for prov ision of credit losses, the financial statements, audited by Deloitte & Touche, stated. While current provisions a re considered conservative, t he Corporation will continue to review its provision-i ng policy and methodology t o ensure that levels remain appropriate and conservative. The $8.9 million reduction in FINCOs loan loss provisions went straight back into the income statement, and w ere a key factor behind the l enders dramatically i mproved performance in 2 010 compared to the prev ious year. I ndeed, the more than $13.7 million reduction in credit loss allowances, from $15.073 million to $1.345 million, was the main reason for the 399 per cent growth in FINCOs net i ncome to $18.188 million f rom $4.563 million the year b efore. Flat Otherwise, the lenders 2010 performance would h ave been essentially flat compared to 2009. Net interest income actually declined s lightly to $28.241 million, c ompared to $28.314 million t he year before, as a 6.9 per cent rise in interest incomet o $65.467 million was canc elled out by a 13 per cent increase in interest expense to some $37.226 million. Elsewhere, FINCOs financials disclosed that its non-accrual loan portfolio (loans that are more than 90 d ays past due) now accounted for 10.47 per cent of its $847.212 million loan portf olio, having increased from 8.09 per cent at year-end 2 009. Loans classified as nonaccrual represent 10.47 per cent (2009: 8.09 per cent the total loan portfolio, theD eloitte & Touche audited financial statements said. At the consolidated bala nce sheet date, the carrying amounts of loans whose t erms were renegotiated during the year were $22.429 million, and interest accrued on loans to date were $1.58m illion. The total value of FIN COs non-accrual loans had a lso increased by 36.8 per c ent year-over-year, hitting $88.64 million compared to $64.812 million the year before. However, the cumulative value of residential m ortgages that were nonp erforming fell from $60.534 m illion to $59.769 million. The increase was caused bya dramatic surge in non-performing non-residential m ortgage loans, from $3.862 m illion to $28.457 million, l ikely due to a surge in delinquencies among businessc lients. E lsewhere, Deloitte & Touche noted that FINCOs wholly-owned subsidiary, FINCO Insurance Agency, was still awaiting renewal of its insurance licence by the Insurance Commission as at t he January 28, 2011, bala nce sheet date. As of the balance sheet d ate, FINCO Insurance A gencys application for r enewal of its agency licence is pending with the Insurance Commission of the Bahamas. FINCO Insurance Agency is taking steps to satisfy all regulatory requirements, the accounting firm s aid. FINCO added that a Central Bank of the Bahamas directive that s ome of its loans be riskw eighted at 100 per cent i mpacted its capital ratios. For Tier 1 and Total Capitalr atios, these fell to 15.86 per c ent and 17.11 per cent respectively at year-end 2010, compared to 18.53 per cent and 19.78 per cent they ear before. B USINESS P AGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE $8.9m FINCO boost through loan provision policy change FROM page 1B have traditionally been included in reports detailing the sectors contribution to the economy. However, the problem with this, he added, is that there has not been full and accurate reporting of statistics relating to these areas, and this definition of the economic contribution of agriculture to the Bahamas is too narrow. Mr Minns suggests that some of the key areas in which economic value is being derived from agriculture in the Bahamas, but are yet to be properly documented, include animal husbandry (the breeding of domestic pets and farm animals for sale); dairy farming and the production of animal products; horticultural services (such as landscaping; and the production and sale of ornamental plants and flowers), hunting and forestry. Within these groups, Mr Minns said he has reason to believe that hunting and forestry-related economic activity may be worth $25 million a year to the Bahamian economy through activities such as foreign visitors engaging in hunting of wild animals in the Bahamas, Bahamian boat builders harvesting local wood for their vessels and the use of local woods for furniture and more. It has been said that no significant hunting and forestry activities take place in the Bahamas. Nothing could be further from the truth. While for this report we may only be reporting a modest estimate of $3.5 million, this sub-sector of agriculture is contributing greatly to our economy, said Mr Minns in the report. He also suggests that a much greater value is being derived from the harvesting of top (straw), coal, Brazilian pepper (used for animal feed) and cotton than he has been able to record due to minimal reporting. Fruit T he growth of fruit bearing trees, vegetable seedlings and herbs and spices for sale, combined with the provision of landscaping ser vices and the production of ornamental plants at local nurseries for sale to people using them in their gardens and homes, could be worth a combined $150 million annually to the Bahamian economy but is not yet properly documented, said Mr Minns. Mr Minns further notes that of all the animal products available in the Bahamas, the Department of Agriculture only tracks the pro duction of eggs and honey, which were worth $9.6 million and$ 193,000 in 2009, respectively. Egg production in 2009 produced around six million eggs valued at $9.6 million. Of that amount, $1.96 million in economic value was derived from chickens in New Providence, $7.64 million came from Grand Bahama and $22,464 from Long Island. The Bahamas also produced 6,341 gallons of honey worth $193,050 in 2009. The greatest honey-producing island in 2009 was Eleuthera, which made 158,525 gallons, followed by Andros with 19,000, New Providence with 9,000, Abaco with 3,200 andG rand Bahama with 3,100. Mr Minns suggests that other animal products, or by-products, from which significant economic value is being derived but not recorded include chicken manure and milk. Perhaps the most used animal product for which no value has been placed is chicken manure, which we know is used widely throughout the Bahamas, he said. The statistician said that unless farmers make available infor mation on harvests, and agricultural officers from the various Family Islands and throughout New Providence report the data relating to output from the various agricultural sectors, he is unable to put them in his reports. Mr Minns calls for more resources to be invested in conducting surveys of the undocumented agricultural sectors, such as horti cultural services, animal husbandry, hunting and forestry, so that a true picture of their economic value can be determined going forward, adding to the traditionally documented crop and livestock production. Agriculture output $305 million per annum F ROM page 1B Share your news The Tribune wants to h ear from people who are m aking news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 15

d evise and implement a long-term solution to oilp rice shocks. K haalis Rolle, Bahamas Ferries chief marketing officer, said that in his capacity as the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers Confederation (BCCEC chairman, he was exploringf uel hedging options d esigned to shield all Bahamian companies espe cially those that were trans p ortation-based from expos ure to rapidly increasing oil prices. And he criticised the Bahamas tendency as an ation to focus on shortterm, temporary solutionsrather than long-term fixes, w hile the National Energy Policy and alternative energy forms seemed to becomea secondary issue once oil p rices started on a downw ard trend in late 2008. It is extremely high, Mr Rolle told Tribune Business,w hen asked about Bahamas Ferries current fuel bill. I think were up about 35 per cent compared to last year. When you use close to one million gallons of fuel a year, it is ridiculous. And, turning to the Bahamas failure as a nation to draw up and implement a comprehensive strategy to deal with oil and energyrelated cost increases, the BCCEC chairman said: We keep sounding this alarm. We keep going through these temporary fixes, and were not looking to longterm solutions. We keep ending up right back where we started. There isnt any substantial pressure to resolve this problem. Were back right where we were, and the minute prices started to trend downwards, nobody looked at it. This wasnt an issue any more; it became a secondary issue. A National Energy Poli cy now looks more needed than ever. Global oil prices moved close to $120 per barrel yesterday, with specula tors moving in to exploit theu ncertainty caused by Middle East turbulence, the latest bout of which is in Libya, w hile investors sought a safe h aven in gold. Now is the time for us, because these issues dont g o away, Mr Rolle told Trib une Business. They may disappear for a second, but they dont go away. Theyu sually come right back at y ou, and when they come back around, theyre more ferocious and more dangerous. We have to figure thiso ne out. Hedg ing The BCCEC chairman confirmed that he was exploring various hedging strategies and options, and iss et to meet this week with o ne of the major oil compa nies, having already spoken to commercial banks in the Bahamas and abroad. Hedging is a strategy where private sector com panies, anticipating a future increase in oil prices, lock-in existing prices by agreeing contracts to purchase oil at a fixed price over a certain period of time. In agreeing to do this, they are hoping to save against future oil price increases. However, major Bahamian institutions, such as BEC and Bahamasair, while looking at this possibility have declined to hedge in the past, fearing that they may come down on the wrong side of a hedge and suffer losses that will result in political repercussions. Im looking at some options that we havent explored in the past, Mr Rolle said, like hedging. Were looking at an option to hedge from a very global perspective. Were looking at hedging for everyone that is fuel dependent, especially companies that are fuel dependent like our business. Weve had some prelim inary discussions, and I thinkw ere going to try and further those discussions to speed this up. We actually h ave a meeting with one of t he oil majors this week, but w eve spoken to some of the commercial banks here and a broad. Its been positive. We just have to now look at the possibilities and look at howp ractical it is, what the o ptions are and how practi cal those options are. Mr Rolle added that the BCCEC was set to meetw ith Bahamian petroleum retailers this week to discuss their situation, where oilp rice increases were forcing them to increase their upfront capital outlay to buy supplies from the whole-s alers. This is causing cash flow and overdraft problems for the retailers. Weve had a couple of discussions with them, but nothing is substantiated asy et, Mr Rolle added. Im going to meet with a couple of them this week just to discuss it briefly and see what, if any support, can be given to them through the Chamber. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 5B products such as gasoline. Pointing out that price controls distorted the market for goods they were imposed on, especially if Bahamian companies were forced to sell below the market clearing or equilib-r ium price, Mr Lowe noted the impact that fixed margins had on the petroleum retail sector. Using the example of a gas station needing 20,000 gallons to fill its tanks, the Nassau Instit ute executive said an increase in global oil prices from $1 to $1.50, a 50 per cent increase, w ould raise the retailers cost to purchase this amount from the oil company by the same percentage from $20,000 to $30,000. If they cant make a higher margin to get more turnover, more cash flow, theyre forced to make additional arrangements with the banks etc to get additional float that will make up the inventory, Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. Thats a problem, because theyre working on razor thin margins, the service stations. With fixed margins of $0.44 per gallon of gasoline, and $0.33 per gallon of diesel, MrL owe said Bahamian petroleum retailers, in c ommon with many other businesses, might find it prudent to exit the industry because t hey were unable to get the necessary return on their investment. W hen that happened, and no replacements e ntered the sector due to the unattractive fixed mark-ups, product shortages were thel ikely result. A lot of businesses today would probably do better putting money in the bank than the returns they g et by staying open, M r Lowe told Trib une Business. If businessmen are not getting a 3-5 per cent return on turnover, theyre bett er off sticking mone y in the bank. These price controls make it so you cant adjust your business model as times change. Youre putting businesses in a time warp, as everything is changing around them. Theyre mark-up restrictions, not price controls. Reacting to Prime Minister Hubert Ingrah ams comments on Saturday, when he sugg ested that price controls on the petroleum industry had protected Bahamian consumers, Mr Lowe contrasted this with what happenedw hen then-president Ronald Reagan removed similar controls in the US in the early 1980s. Arguing that things were back to normal within two weeks in the US, following the removal of controls imposed in the aftermath of oil price-driven inflation in the 1970s, MrL owe added: Government just needs to get o ut of the way. I think it [the petroleum industry situation] just again proves that price control doesnt work because there are too many factorsi nvolved. Weve had 40 centuries of price cont rols and governments putting them on, and t hen another government takes them off, throughout the world. They dont take into consideration all the things necessary to put a product on the mark et, things we in the Bahamas dont control, such as the initial costs, transportation, the potential blockages in the Middle East. Ultimately, we end up with shortages, Mr Lowe said. If the gas stations feel that they cant get a reasonable profit, theyre not going to sell it. Eventually, it costs more than they get in through profits. What do they do? Maybe they look for a n ew business, so ultimately shortages result from price controls. What happens is that intervention causes t he businessman to lay off staff, causing more unemployment. Thats really the unintended consequences of public policy. A gain arguing that it was not the Governments duty to intervene in transactions b etween business and consumer, Mr Lowe said the ultimate solution lay in freeing the market and allowing the three oil companies Shell, Texaco and Esso to compete at the wholesale level, with the dealers also competing among themselves. This, he suggested, would force all conc erned to be more efficient and, by allowing gas retailers to charge the margins and prices they wanted, consumers would naturally grav-i tate to those offering the lowest costs. They distort the margins you might get, or do not normally get, Mr Lowe told Tribune Business of price controls. And prices have gone up all the time. Price control is not preventing prices going up, b ecause petroleum costs are based on the international market. No one can control that. Mr Obama cant c ontrol it, and Mr Bush couldnt control it. I ts a little bit of a fallacy to say theres price control. If you want to say price management, thats fine. Price controls placing business in time warp FROM page 1B HUBERT INGRAHAM Major transport firm in 35% fuel cost hike FROM page 1B

PAGE 16

SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.72 $4.72 $4.72 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 r"" ttrrf n$tb By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Price controls are putting Bahamian businesses in at ime warp, leaving them unable to adjust margins in the face of increasing costs a nd other changes in the eco nomic climate, a think-tank executive yesterday charging that they ultimately resulted i n product shortages. Rick Lowe, of the Nassau Institute, said the Govern-m ent-imposed price controls on industries such as petroleum and food, ostensibly to protect the interests of low i ncome Bahamian consumers, were misnamed and failed to work because they could noti mpact international factors outside this nations control. Suggesting that it was really price management, rather than price control, that the Government-dictated mark-ups imposed on various Bahamian businesses, Mr Lowe said a better solution was for the administration to get out of the way and let the market, through competi tion, determine the price of PRICE CONTROLS PLACING BUSINESS IN TIME W ARP Think tank executive warns government-imposed margin andm ark-up restrictions ultimately cause product shortages and distort market* Government urged to get out of the way and let market decide prices through competition* Many firms would do better putting money in the bank than staying open SEE page 5B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A leading Bahamian t ransportation company, which consumes almost one million gallons of diesel per year, yesterday said it had seen its fuel costs rise 35 per cent year-over-year, a senior executive telling TribuneB usiness it was ridiculous that this nation had yet to MAJOR TRANSPORT FIRM IN 35% FUEL C OST HIKE Bahamas Ferries executive s ays ridiculous that nation has yet to devise long-term solution to fuel price inflation, his firm using almost one million gallons per year* Now exploring hedging strategy to aid all fueldependent Bahamian companies, via talks with oil firms and major banks SEE page 5B KHAALIS ROLLE When you use close to one million gallons of fuel a year it is ridiculous. B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A change in its loan provisioning policy resulted in Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FINCO ing credit loss provisions by $8.9 million during its 2010 financial year, a key factor b ehind net income quadrupling to more than $18 mil$8.9m FINCO boost through loan provision policy change Reduction in credit allowances from 40% to 30% o f non-accrual loans key factor i n quadrupling of mortgage l enders 2010 income Non-performing loans hit $88.64m or 10.47% of totall oan portfolio FINCO insurance subsidiary w as still seeking licence renewal at balance sheet date SEE page 4B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas Chamber of C ommerce and Employers Confederation (BCCEC has launched a MysteryS hopper project that aims to test every single business in the Bahamas on frontline performance and cusChamber unveils Mystery Shop plan Aims to test every single business in the Bahamas onc ustomer service and front-line performance for indefinite period SEE page 2B By ALISON LOWE B usiness Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net W ork on the $138.3 million Phase II stage of the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA will begin on Thursday, March 17, with the s elective demolition of t he existing US depar ture terminal. T he second stage, w hich follows comple Airports $138m second stage to start March 17 Plan to construct 226,000 sq ft a rrivals terminal and pier Contracts for stonework, masonry and carpeting now before NAD/Airport Authority Board for approvals SEE page 3B GUIDEDTOUR: A tour of the Airp ort last year. By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Agriculture could be generating $305 million per year towards Bahamian Gross Domestic Product (GDP pared to the $40.2 million recorded in the most recent statistics, if proper reporting and recording of all agricultural outputs took place, a Department of Agriculture official said yesterday. Leslie Minns, a statistician with the Department, said in his most recently-issued report on agricultures contribution to the Bahamian economy that there has been under-reporting of agricultural output since the first census in 1978. Agriculture in the Bahamas is perceived as one of the sectors with little economic activity, and therefore its contribution to the Gross National Product is considered minimal. As an agricultural professional, and as per the definition for economic activity, nothing could be further from the truth, said Mr Minns in a report released to senior agriculture officials in January. A fact which Mr Minns suggests highlights this appears in this report. In it, an increase in the total value of agricultural production from $78 million in 2008 to around $194.8 million in 2009 is documented. Acreage recorded as being under cultivation by farmers or being used for livestock increased by 511 per cent, from 5,793 acres in 2005/2006, to 35,402 acres in 2009. However, rather than being a consequence of a significant rise in actual output created by farmers or other individuals producing agricultural goods, Mr Minns suggests this increase is primarily due to better recordkeeping and data collection, which needs to be further improved if a true picture of agricultures contribution to the economy is to be obtained. Between 1994 and 2006, only reported data that willingly made available by a relatively small selection of farmers was used to estimate agricultural output. From 2005, the department turned to the Farmers Register to better estimate production and its value. Farmers become registered to obtain incentives such as duty-free agricultural equipment, imports and hurricane relief, and such a register has been one of the only ways for the Government to get a better handle on the farming industry, given that there have traditionally been few other incentives for producers to make themselves known for data collection purposes. Mr Minns said he hopes that in the future input from other areas, from which economic value is derived from agriculture, can be included in reports detailing agricultures input into the national economy. Agricultures contribution to the $6.7 billion GDP in 2008 was found to be just 0.6 per cent or $40.2 million. In 2009, this rose to 0.7 per cent. The statistician laments that only economic value derived from the production of crops and livestock in the Bahamas Agriculture output $305m per annum SEE page 4B

PAGE 17

WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y MARCH 8, 201 1, P AGE 9B B O D Y A N D M I N D By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter F ROM diet plans to weight loss programs, women out there are going the extra mile to stay fit. Whether it is for health or personal issues, they are determined to take it off and keep it off. Jennifer Hu dson, th e s inger and a c t r e s s w h o w o n a n A c a d e m y A w a r d f o r h e r p e r f o r m a n c e i n D r e a m G i r l s r e c e n t l y m a d e a n appearance on the Oprah Winfrey s h o w a n d d i s c u s s e d h o w j o i n g W ei ght Watcher s h elped her dr op the pounds. Bouncing i n h e r seat and saying I w a n t t o t e l l i t! J e n n i f e r re v e a l e d the magic number. S he s ai d: "I 'v e lo s t 80 p ou nd s ," and received a standing ovation." "I t s l ik e a b r and new m e, s he s a id S om e t im e s I do n 't e v e n r e c og nise myself." S h e t o l d O p r a h s h e m a d e t h e d ec isi on to l ose th e w ei gh t w h ile sh e was pregnant with her now 2-yearo l d s o n a n d s h e e v en t u a l l y w e n t from a size 16 to a size 6. S h e a l s o s p o k e t e a r f u l l y a b i t a b o u t t h e t r a g e d y t h a t o c c u r r e d more than two years ago when her mother, brother and young nephew wer e m ur de r ed Sh e s ai d s he wa s a b l e to su rv i v e th a t l o ss w it h t h e h e l p of "my family, my baby and God." T h e o n l y t h i n g I c a n d o t o h o n ou r t h e i r m e m o r y i s t o m a k e t h e m proud," she said. L ike Jenn ifer two ye ars ago, a B ah a m i a n re s id e n t, Sa m a n th a E v a ns w a l k ed ar ou n d w ea r in g a sm il e b ut c ar rying a heart full of pain," d e s per at e t o end th e cycle o f o bes i ty t hat h ad c on troll ed h er li fe sin ce her early teens. That desperation led her to make me d ic al h is t o r y b e co mi n g o n e o f the first people in the Bahamas to h av e a la p -ba nd surge ry do ne lo ca lly by Doctor Charles Diggiss. "Be ing o ver wei ght caus ed me a lot of pain and r e jection. I had a s itu ation w here I h ad app lied for a job a n d I w as a c tu a ll y t ol d, 'W e re so rry y ou hav e a great attitude a nd ex celle nt qua lifica tions a nd a pretty fac e, but we can not hi re a n ov er weigh t p er s o n as t h e f i r s t c o n t a ct t o o u r clients.' That crushed me." "At my heaviest, I was well over 3 0 0 po u nd s, s he sa i d. Fo rt u na t el y I d id n' t ha v e a n y o f t he me d ic a l c o nditions associated with obesity like h y pe rt e nsi o n o r d i ab e te s, bu t I kn e w I had to d o some t h ing to c hang e my life. I have four children and I was not able to do things with them." I w as f a mi li a r w it h t he c on c e p t of weight loss surgery, I had even cor responded with a doctor in Mexico, but one day, I was at work ( in the sur g ical unit of Doctor 's Hospit al) a n d my c o w o rk e r a sk e d me i f I k n e w t h a t D r D i g g i s s w a s l o o k i n g f o r p a t i e n t s wh o w a n t e d t o h a v e t h e s urgery, but who were also willing to be a spokesperson for the proce dure and tell their story. "It was a j ust a dream c ome for mebeca us e it meant that I didn't have to travel but I would be able t o h av e t h e s u r g er y p er f o r m ed at hom e, i n the fa c ili ty w he re I w o r k ed b y a f e l l o w c o u n t r y m a n a n d I jumped at the opportunity." S a m a n t h a s a i d s h e w a s n e v e r af ra i d of t he me d ic a l r isk s a sso c ia t ed w ith a n y e le c tiv e s urg ic a l pro c e dur e. "I just focused on the new me. I was as ha med of my body going int o surgery, ( I was wearing a size 32) b ut D r Di ggis s ass u red me bef or e we w ent in that what I wa s seeing t h e n I w o u l d n e v e r s e e a g a i n Samantha describes the day of her surgery as the day that Dr Diggiss rescued me." TV personality, Kelly Osbourne gra c ed th e c ov er of Sh ap e Mag a zi ne la st ye ar di spl ay in g he r l ife ch an gi ng w e i g h t l o s s I n a n i n t e r v i e w w i t h Claire Conners of Shape Magazine, Kelly s tated: "I was called f a t a n d ugly in th e pr ess a lm ost my entir e life. I understand that being judged by others comes with the territory, bu t i t bro ke m y he a rt an d rui ne d my s elf -est eem. I t set s you up to hat e y o u r s e l f i n a h u g e w a y I w a s s o angry about the things people said a b o u t m e I t r u l y b e l i e v e i t' s th e m a i n r e ason I turne d to V icod in and end e d u p i n r eh ab t hr e e t i me s I j us t h a t e d m y se l f I' m a n e m o t i o n a l e a t e r. When I get upset, my diet goes out the window." It was not until she signed up for Dancing With the Stars six months late r, s h e s a ys, tha t she re alise d how b a d h e r d i e t r e a l ly w a s I' d f i l l u p on F rench fr ies and pizza al l day an d wonder why I wasn't losing weight. I n the v ery be ginn ing, I kept ge tting s i ck du r i ng rehe arsals bec ause I wa s eating such terrible, fatty food and feeling so exhausted." I t was h er dan ce pa r tn er L ou is van Amstel, who taught her about nutrition. "He made me eat turkey bur g ers and salads and explain ed to me th at a hi g hpr ot ei n lo w -c a rb di e t w oul d ke e p me e ne rg ise d, sh e sa ys. "T h en I s tar t ed lo s ing we igh t an d rea li sed 'Oh it' s t rue w ha t the y sa y: Diet and exercise really work!' Over th e l as t nin e mon ths Kell y s d r o p p e d a n o t h e r 3 0 p o u n d s bringi ng her we ight loss to a tota l o f 50. She says: "U ltimate ly, I'm real ly glad I los t the w eight the way I did," say s K elly I ne ver though t in a millio n year s I'd be th a t hea lt hy girl w ho wa kes up ev ery m or nin g to e x e rc i s e A ft e r b e i ng c a l l e d c h e r ub i c and chubby,' I'm rocking a bikini! I f eel s i lly but I t hi nk I m goi ng t o c ry B e i ng on th e c o v e r of S H APE i s the bi gg es t v ic t ory I c ou ld e v er ho pe for." G oi ng f urth e r, in a n e xc l usi ve firs t pe rso n sto ry f or G la mo ur Ma g a zi n e, Star Jones also discussed her battle W e i g h t l o s t f a i t h i n s e l f g a i n e d h e a l t h w i t h w e i g h t a n d h e r u l t i m a t e de cis io n t o hav e gas t ri c byp as s surgery. CHANGE She openly told the magazine: "I coul d a lso start in the summer of 2000, when I was a co-host on "The View" and the first media st o r ie s a b o ut m y w e i g h t s ta r t e d t o surface, but that, too, would be too easy. So why don't I start on t h e d a y t h a t c h a n g e d h o w I w o u l d p hy s i cal l y a pp e ar t o t h e w or l d and would force me to face the re a son s suc h dra st ic ste p s ne e de d to be taken, August 19, 2003." W e Af r i c a n A m e r i c a n w o m e n a r e t a u g h t t o b e p r o u d o f o u r curves full br ea s ts and shapely hips. I used to look in the mirror and take pride in my figure, but that was when I was legitimately a full-figured woman. I'd gradu a l l y g o n e f r o m f u l l f i g u r e d t o mor bidly obese. Finally, one of my dearest friends sat me down, loo ked me in the eye and s aid, S o w h a t a r e w e g o i n g t o d o abo ut yo ur wei ght?" S he knew my weight was a subject no one d a r e d m e n t i o n b u t s h e d i d n t care she loved me too much, she s a id, to a llow me to con t i nue killing myself. While it was easy to deny the little voice inside my h e a d I f o u n d i t i m p o s s i b l e t o deny my friend's. I knew in my hear t th at her l ove and res pect for me were pure. I cried; I got an gr y bu t e ve nt ua ll y I t oo k the first step and walked into a doctor's office," she said. T he nig ht be for e the sur g ery, I c o nv i n c e d m y se l f t ha t a f te r w a rd ever ythin g wou ld be fin e an d I could get on with the rest of my life. I had no idea that before I could move on, I would have to face the present and the past as they were, not as I wished them to be." Being over weight caused me a lot of pain and rejection. I had a situation where I had applied for a job and I was actually told, 'W e're sorr y you have a great attitude and excellent qualifications and a pr etty face, but we cannot hire an over weight person as the first contact to our clients.' That crushed me. SAMANTHA EVANS T E L E V I S I O N pe r so nality and s inger K e lly O s bour ne a r rives at t he 2011 Elton John Academy Award viewing p ar ty in West Ho lly w ood Ca lif on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. (AP) JENNIFER Hudson waves to photog raphers at Essence magazine's Black W o m en i n H o ll y w o o d l u n ch e o n i n Bever ly Hil ls, Calif ., Thur sday, Feb. 24, 2011. (AP

PAGE 18

IN THE g ene ra l p opu lati o n, p s y c h o lo g ic a l p r o bl e ms r e la ti ng to r ec eiv i n g de ntal tre atmen t s a r e c o mm o n. I t is r e p o r te d th a t a bo ut h alf o f a l l de nta l pa ti e nts e x p e r i e n c e s o m e a n x i e t y tow ar ds the i r den t a l v isit. Th i s fe a r c an le a d to a d e lay in s e e king nec es s ar y den tal c ar e, ca nc ell a t ion of app oi n t me nt s an d p oor coo pe ra t ion in the de ntal c ha i r De ntal fea r is on e o f the m os t tr o u ble s om e pa tie nt ma na ge ment p rob lems f o r a de ntal te am. I t c aus es d istre ss for the p a t ie n t a n d r e s u lts in h ig h s tr e s s le vels i n den t is t s An anx iety and a p hob i a a re quit e dif f erent and t he words s h o u l d n o t b e u s e d s y n o n y m ou sly T he y a re ma n ag e d a n d tr e a te d dif fer e n tly b y yo u r d e nta l pr a c titio ne r An a nx ie ty is a n orma l state o f a ppr eh ens ion, u nc er t a inty, an d fear r es ult ing fr om the a nti c ipation of a r ealist ic or f ant a si s ed t hrea t eni ng e v e n t o r s i t u a t i o n I t o f t e n i m pa i rs p hy si ca l an d p syc ho lo gic a l fun ctio nin g. A ph ob ia is a n a bno rmal inten se an d irr ation al fe ar o f a giv en s i tu ati o n, o rg an i s m, o r obje ct. A de ntal a n x i e t y i s a n o r m a l s t a t e o f mind a nd a d enta l pho bia is a n a bno rma l s tate of mind. Den tal ph ob i a is c l a s sified in th e Di agnost i c and St at ist i cal Ma nual of M ent al Di so rders, f o u r t h e d i t i o n t e x t r e v i s i o n ( D S M -I V -T R ) a s a s p e c i fi c p h o bi a, w hi ch in vol ves a marked a nd per s i s tent fea r of a s pe cifi c o bje ct, a c t iv ity or s it u atio n th at r e s u l ts i n a n x ie t y o n c o n f r o n t in g t h e p h o b i c s t im u l u s P e o p l e w i t h d e n t a l p h o b i a c o m m o n l y descri b e t wo t yp es of exp eri en ces : a pa i nf ul o r t ra um at i c d enta l p ro ce dur e o r a ne ga t ive p e r s o n a l in te r a c t io n w ith d e n ta l s t a f f. I t i s c o m m o n fo r t h e e x p e r i en ces t o fi r st occur i n chil dh o o d o r i n a d o l e s c e n c e a uto no mou sly Ho we ve r, f e a rf ul a ttit ud e s a nd f e el in g s o f l a c k of co nt r ol in de nt al s i tuat ions c an a lso b e lea rn t fro m other s The 'bl ood-i njecti on-i njury' ty pe o f s pe c ific ph ob ia i n c lud es fe a r o f n e e dle s in jec ti on s d r ills a nd fea r of b lood in the de ntal si t ua t i on I n t he s i t u a t i o n al typ e of speci f i c phobi a, the r e m a y be fea r of th e de n ta l r o o m, d en t a l pe rs on nel or the sme ll s a n d s o u n d s a s s o c ia t e d w it h d e n t a l tr e a tm e n t I n t h e o th e r ty p e o f s p ec ific p ho bia th e p er s o n is a n x io u s a b ou t oc c u r r e n c e s s u c h as gag gi ng a nd re t chi n g. It i s w orth no t ing tha t g agg ing an d r e tc h in g r es u lt fr om a c o mb ina tion of ps yc holog ica l a nd phy sio l o gica l fac tor s. Th e ga ggin g and retch ing respon s e can be s o inten se t h a t s o m e p e r s o n s c a n n o t wea r dent u res or t ak e den t al i m p r e s s i o n s Dent al pra ct it ioners have a r es po ns i b il ity t o av oid su bjec t ing pati e nts to trau mat ic dent a l ex p er i e nc e s, b u t m a y n o t a lway s be awa re whe n the y ar e o cc urr ing. I t is some t imes not ad vi sa b l e t o p e rf o rm s ev e ra l ext r a c t i ons or com pl et e large a mou nts o f con se rv ation wor k in d if fer e nt a r eas of the mo uth at a s i ng l e o f f i ce vi si t Th ese ty pes of pr oc ed ur es ca n cr ea te or ex ace rbat e anx i et i es (no rma l) whic h ca n g ro w i n t o p hob ias ( ab nor mal) T he p ra c t i t i o n er m u st be e sp e cial l y caref ul i f th ere is poo r p a ti e n t c o o p e r a t i o n o r if t h e r e is p atient dis t r es s De nt a l p r a c tit io n e r s c a n tr e a t dent al ph obi as t hem sel ves o r e nlist the help o f the pa t ie nt' s g e n er a l p r a c tition e r o r ps y c h ologist It i s very i mport ant fo r d e ntis ts to un d er s ta nd p atie nts f ears and t o ex pl a i n t he pro p o s e d de ntal tre atment. P e o p l e w i t h s p e c i f i c f e a r s s u c h a s g a g g in g a n d n e e d l e p h o b ia ma y re sp ond be s t t o e mpat h e t i c p a t i e n t c a r e w i t h t h e a d d i t i o n o f r e l a x a t i o n t e c h nique s. Relax ation tec hn i q ues can so m e t imes las t up to four hou rs prio r to the p r o c e d u r e P a tie n ts ma y a l s o be off e re d a mix t u re of n i tr ous oxide ( l a ugh i ng ga s) and o xyge n to inh a le, wh ic h ca n r e du c e pain ex pe rien ce d and pr od uc e re la x atio n T r an q uiliz e r s in je cte d direct l y i nt o th e v eins can a l s o he lp. So me p ra ctit ion er s wil l in a d di tio n p la y s o o th in g mu s i c t o pro mote p atient r elax ation. Only a fe w p atie n ts will r eq u ir e t h i s t y pe o f s pe cialis t c ar e. Th os e with s ev er e s ymp toms sho uld ha ve a thor ou gh a ss es sm e nt by an e xpe ri en ced psy cho l o gis t or ps yc hiatr ist a nd a car ef u l ly s t r ucture d trea t ment p rog ram m e. A psy chi at r i st i s s o m e ti m e s n e e d e d b e c a u s e d e n t a l a n xi e t y m a y b e p ar t o f a gr e a te r ty pe o f a n x ie ty dis o r d er e. g g ener ali s ed an xi e t y di s ord er, p ani c di so rde r or ag ora phob i a ( a pa t h ologic al fear of being i n pub l ic p lac es ). It i s c ruci a l t hat i f you suspec t y ou h ave a de ntal pho bia, t o se t up a mee ti n g with y ou r den t a l he althc ar e pr ovide r. He wil l e n s u r e y o u g e t th e h e lp y o u ne e d Wh a t y o u c o n s id e r a p h obia ( ab no rma l ) ma y b e j u st a n a n x i e t y (no rmal ). Do not del ay i n seeking nec ess ary de nt al help b e c a u s e o f a p o s s i b l e d e n t a l a n x ie ty I t c a n b e m a n a g e d s u c c e s s f u l l y a n d y o u c a n e n j o y exc ellen t o ra l h ealth. Dr. An drÂŽ R. C l a rke D DS, MBB S Spe cia l C are D en t is tr y Th i s a rt ic le is for in f o rmation al purp os es on ly. It is no t inten de d an d may n ot be trea ted a s, a s ubs t it u te f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l m e d i c a l /d e n t a l a d vi ce d ia gn os is o r trea tme nt. Alway s se ek the ad vic e of a phy s i c ia n o r d e n ta l p r o fe s s io n a l w i th a n y qu es tio ns y o u ma y ha v e r e g a r d in g a m edic al/d enta l c ond iti o n. N ev er d i s r e g a rd p r o f e s s i o n a l m e d i c a l /d e n t al adv i ce or d el ay i n see ki ng i t be ca us e o f a pu r e ly in f o rmation al p u b l i c a t i o n B A B Y boomer s might be surprised to learn that many of their generation are wear i n g t h e w r o n g s i z e s h o e s Overtime, feet can widen or f l a t te n a n d f a t p a d di n g o n t h e s o l e o f t h e f e e t c a n w e a r d o wn W e i g h t g a i n o r l o s s a ctivity a nd life s ty le c hang es, an d f o ot p r o bl em s ca n a ls o c ontribute to c hang es in sho e fit. It is imp or ta nt t o be fitte d b y a p r of e s si o na l o c c a s io n a l l y rat her t han si mply choos ing t h e si z e s y o u h a ve w o rn i n t h e past. R e d u c e S t r e s s o n Y o u r B ody and Sol e S tr e ss on th e feet can lead to many major health problems! There are ma ny thin gs th at co nt r i b ut e t o f ee t w id en i ng a n d f l a t t e n i n g s u c h a s f l i p f l o p s Mo s t f l ip f l op s a re a w f u l for your feet as they lack the support necessary to control and support the foot. H ow e v e r, y o u c a n v e ry w e l l w e ar a fl ip fl op des ign ed to give the appropriate support f o r y o u r a r c h t y p e ( h i g h m e d iu m o r lo w ), a nd h a v in g a h e e l c u p t o s t o p t h e h e e l f r o m s p r e a d i n g a n d a t t h e s a m e t i me a d e qu a t e l y s up p o rt the ankle. A suppo rtive flip flo p co mb i n e d w i t h a p r o p e r l y des ig ned 'f oot bed wi ll p ut your foot in its natural posi t io n fo r w al k in g a nd s ta nd in g B y putt ing your foot in balance, the alignment of other j oi nt s w i ll b e im pro ve d Pro perly aligned joints mean less stress and strain and pain. As the feet w i den or f latt e n du e t o i m p ro p e r fo o t w e a r o r w e i g h t g a i n i t i s o f t e n squeezed into t he same s iz e shoes. This is extremely dan g e rous as it c an i nte rfere wi th y o u r b l o o d c i r c u l a t i o n a n d c a n p o se a ma jo r he a l th p rob lem such as a stroke. In t oday 's busines s world, while it is important for you t o l o o k y o u r v e r y b e s t b y comp le men t ing th at p er f ect outfit with a c ute pair of high h e e l s h o e s o r f o r t h e m e n t r e n d y l o o k i n g s h o e s i t i s absolutely necessary to note t h a t t h e s e m a g n i f i c e n t c r e ations often lead to foot pain a t the e nd of the day W hile I u nderstand that ce r ta in o cc as i o n s r e q u i r e y o u t o w e a r s h o e s w i t h l e s s s u p p o r t I woul d r eco mm end th at y ou f ol low th ese sim ple tip s t o ge t away with looking your best while feeling great: 1. Try to choose shoes with a reasonable heel height of 1.5 to 2 inches. Look for shoes that provide ample toe room (beware of pointed toe styles) and contain a back strap or enclosed back. The same holds true for men with the exception of heel height. 2. If you are having trouble achieving the appropriate fit with shoes you already own, take them to a local special ty footwear store or Pedorthic facility and they can modify your shoes to fit your feet. 3. Purchase a slim arch sup port that your shoe can accommodate. Specialty footwear stores and Pedorthic facilities have options that will fit almost any shoe. In conclus ion, it is impor tant to note that as the body cha ng es in s i ze so do th e fee t. W e o fte n f a il to re c o g ni se th is f a c t e v e n t h o u g h w e a r e we a ri ng la rg e r siz e s in dre sse s and slacks. Believe it or not, yo u r fe e t h a v e c ha n g e d i n s i z e and shape in some cases due to th e st re ss of i ll f it ti ng t ig ht and too small shoes over the year s. However, kudos goes to th e fe w w ho a l w a y s d i d a n d continue to pay attention to thei r fe et in we arin g prope r l y fitted footwear. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified & Licensed Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Trinity Plaza, West Bay Street, Nassau. Bahamas www.footsolutions.com/nassau "The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 322-FOOT (3668). ALOPECIA X is a disor der of the hair follicles that most likely reflects a defect in the ability of the hair fol l i c l e s t o c y c l e p r o p e r l y t hr o u g h it s g r o w in g a n d r e s t ing stages. A l o p e ci a X ma y b e a co m ponent of a typical Cushing Disease. It usually occurs in pl ush -coated b re eds most co mmo nly Po me ra n ia n s a n d Samoyeds, but can occur in an y bre e d of d og It ca n a lso occur i n a t a ny a g e. Gra du al l o s s o f p r i m a r y h a i r p r o gr ess es to c om pl ete al poec i a o f t h e n e c k t a i l b o t h s i des of th e tr unk, b ack of t h i g h s a n d u n d e r t h e t a i l Usually the head and front l im bs a re spa red. Hai r l oss i s b i l a t e r a l l y s y m m e tr i c a l a n d t h e a l o p e c i c s k i n b e c om es h y pe r -p i g m en t ed and thin. M i d s e b o r r h e a a n d s e c o nd ar y s u per fi c i al pyo de rm a ma y o c cu r. Th ere a re no sys te mic sign s of illnes s w i t h t h i s c o n d i t i o n I t u s u a l l y diag no se d b y r uling ou t o th e r c a u s e s o f e n d o c r in e a lo p e cia. C on t r o ve rs y e xi s ts as t o w he t h e r t h is d is e a s e r e q u ir e s t re a t me n t b e ca us e i t is ma in l y a c os meti c p rob l em and affected dogs are otherwise healthy. Neutering of intact dog s ma y indu ce pe rman en t o r t e m p o r a r y h a i r r e g r o w t h s Dr u g s s u c h a s me la t o n i n m i t o t a n e t r i l o s t a n e hav e b ee n use d f or th i s c o ndition. The d ec i si o n wh eth er to treat this condition in your d o g r e q u i r e s a t h o u g h t f u l discussion with your veteri n a r i a n a s w e l l a s c a r e f u l w e i g h i n g o f t h e p r o s a n d co ns o f t re a t m e nt T h e pr o g nosi s f or hair re -g rowth i s unpredictable. This is a cos m e tic disease only tha t do es n o t a f f e ct t h e d o g s q u a li t y o f life. WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y MARCH 8, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE R E S E A R C H w ill verify the myriad of benefits of consuming greens (smoothies). To date we've shared quite a bit of information, ranging f r o m h o w t o m a k e a G R E E N SMOOTHIE, the health and nutri t io n a l be n ef it s d e r i v ed f r o m co n su m in g GR E E N S MOO TH IE S an d why inco rp or atin g the m int o you r d e t o x i f i c a ti o n re g i m e n i s g re a tl y b e n eficial. No w, h er e ar e s o me r e cip es ( in ca s e y o u s t i l l h a v e n t f o r m u l a t e d your own) to try and enjoy. Happy blending!! From the Kitchen of RHONDA WRIGHT, SEEDlings' Place NOTE : All recipes can make approximately 6-7 cups so adjust quantities accordingly as well as to taste GREEN ZING SMOOTHIE 1 banana 1 cup homemade almond mylk 2 cups of mustard greens Guaco (or some other nutritive additive) 2-3 cups water (add 1 cup at a time) M O R E Z I N G G R E E N J U I C E 1 cucumber 1 cup Irish moss 2 cups of mustard greens 1/4 piece of avocado 4-6 dates 1 pear 1 cup coconut water 1-2 cups water (add a bit at a time) NOTE: Mustard Greens are a 'spicy' green, so be ready for the ZING!! NUTTY KALE SMOOTHIE 2-3 cups of kale 1/2 cup Irish moss 1 Tbl maple syrup 1 cup almond mylk 3 bananas 1" ginger ADDITIONAL RECIPES:BASIC SMOOTHIE 4 bananas or 2-3 bananas and 1/2 cup of frozen blueberries 2 tsp bee pollen 1 sachet of Berry Radical Antioxidant Superfood (or fresh blueberries) 1 cup of water or fresh squeezed orange juice generous portion of greens 1 tsp vanilla extract (this is the secret of calming down the greenness that can sometimes overpower the smoothie, if you have put a bit too much in taste wise) PARSLEY & LEMON TAKES MY LIVER TO HEAVEN 1 bunch of flat leaf parsley (keep the tender stalks and chop off the tough ones) 1-2 lemons with the rind, pith and seeds removed 1-2 bananas 20-30g of sweetener of choice 1 cup of ice blocks 2 cups of water ENZYME FRENZY 2 bananas 1 cup chopped papaya (red or yellow) 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice a big handful of greens T h i s n a t u r a l l y e n z y m e r i c h sm ooth ie i s e a sy to di ge st as it w on 't tax your own pancreas! Bloody Great Green Smoothie 55 per cent coconut water 45 per cent greens B l o o d i s m a d e u p p l a s m a a n d bl oo d ce ll s P las m a co mp r is es 55 per cent of blood, fluid and is most l y w at e r (9 0 pe r c e n t b y v o l um e ) a n d contai ning di ss olved pr ot eins glucose, mineral ion s, hor mones, carb o n d i o x i de p l a te l e t s a n d b l o o d c e l l s themselves. Blood cells are mainly re d bl o o d c e l l s, w hi t e b l oo d c e ll s a n d p la t el e t s R ed b lo o d c el l s ar e t he m o s t a b u n d a n t a n d t h e y c o n t a i n h em og lo bi n, a n i ron -c on ta in in g pro tein. Th e p l a n t v e r si o n o f h e m o g l o b i n i s c h l or op h y ll w h ic h is a g re e n p i g me n t bas ed aroun d a m agnesiu m ion as o p p os e d t o i ro n ( h a e m ). B ot h h e m o g l o b i n a n d c h l o r o p h y l l e x i s t t o obtain energy. Coconut water is a natural liquid closest in structure to blood plasma a nd h a s b ee n u sed in w a rs in ste ad o f plasma whe n supplies were low. So combine 55 per cent coconut water a nd 4 5 p e r c e n t g re e ns a nd y ou ha v e a BLOODy great smoothie! So there you have it no excuses to not get in the kitchen (or wher ever the blender can fit) and get to blending. You have your tips, your r a t i o n a l e d i sc ou n t s o n b l e n d e rs fr o m Q -C lu b t he o nly t hin g mi ssin g no w is you. J o i n th e L o v e Y o u rs e l f t e a m Tu e sd a y Ma rc h 8, fo r th e n e xt L et 's T al k W e l l n e s s T u e s d a y f o r u m w h e r e Chad Thompson and Mark Daniels of h.o.m.e.grown will speak on the t op ic : B ac k y ar d Fa rm in g m a de e a sy They will share the basics on grow i ng na tu ra ll y so y o u c an gro w gre e ns i n y o ur o w n b a c k ya r d. It w i ll be he l d at t he Ar da s t r a G ar d en s ( n ext t o B otani cal Ga r d ens) at 6. 30pm. The forum is open to the general public and is free to attend. To get more details on these and o t h e r e v e n t s o f t h e c a m p a i g n b e f r i e n d u s o n f a c e b o o k : s ee d li ng sp la c e o r Lov e Y o urse l f an d Your Healt h Campaign, or c al l us at 361-6314. D i s c l a i m e r : T h e i n f o r m a t i o n e n c l o s e d i n t h i s a r t i c l e d o e s n o t replace medical advice. Please see your medical practitioner for guid ance before you begin or make any a djustme nt to y our c urrent we llne s s plan. Resources: www.squidoo.com G o t s o m e g r e e n s t o d e t o x y o u r b o d y ? By RHONDA WRIGHT L O V E Y O U R S E L F & Y O U R H E A L T H RECIPES TO HELP YOU ON YOUR JOURNEY! Alopecia X By DR BASIL SANDS D ISOR DER: Alope cia X u suall y occurs in plush -coated breeds, m o st co mm on ly Po m er an i ans and S amo ye ds but c an oc c ur i n any breed of dog. One shoe can change your life! B y B E R N A D E T T E G I B S O N FOOT SOLUTIONS Dental Anxiety and Phobia B y A N D R E C L A R K E KEEPING YOUR MOUTH ALIVE FEAR OF THE CHAIR: It is reported that about half of all dental patients expe rience some anxiety towards their dental visit. This fear can lead to a delay in seeking necessary dental care, cancellation of appointments and poor cooperation in the dental chair.

PAGE 19

WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y MARCH 8, 201 1, P AGE 1 1B LONDON Associated Press P A T R I C K H e t z n e r t r i e d diets a nd exe rci se, j u st ab ou t e v e r y t h i n g s h o r t o f s t o m a c h s t a pli n g t o l o se w eigh t Nothing wor k ed F ive mo n ths ag o h e t r i e d s o m e t h i n g n e w : a s t o m a c h p a c e m a k e r t h a t c u r b e d h i s a p p e t i t e S in c e h a v in g it i mp la n t e d H et z ner a 20 ye ar -o l d Mun ic h m a i l m a n h as k n oc k e d o f f m o r e t ha n 10 ki l os (2 2 poun ds ) f ro m hi s ear l ie r w ei ght of 10 4 ki l os ( 22 9 p ound s) H e t z n e r g o t t h e d e v i c e a s p a r t of a cli nical tri al. Since being a p p r o v e d b y B r i t a i n l a s t m o n t h, t he de vi c e i s a va i la bl e f or s al e a cr os s th e E ur ope an U ni o n. It w o rks a bi t l i ke a c ar di a c pa cem ak er a nd c ons i st s o f a s t i mula to r a n d a s en s o r s u r g ic al ly i m pl a nt ed o nt o t he s t om ac h. T h e s t i m u l a t o r s e n d s o u t e l e c t r i ca l pul s es m ean t t o tr i c k t he s t om ac h an d br ai n i nt o t hi nk i n g t h e b o d y i s f u l l H e t z n e r s a i d t he p u l s e s k i c k i n a f e w m i n u t e s a f t e r h e s t a r t s e a t i n g o r d r i n k i n g H e s a i d t he y ma ke h i m f e el f ul l after fin ishin g ab o ut ha lf the a mo unt of f o od he w oul d n orm al l y eat "I t f e el s l i k e a l i tt l e p re ss ur e o n m y s t om ac h or a t i ckl e but i t s n o t a b a d f e e l i n g he s a i d i n a t el ep hone i nt er vi e w "I t s b een l i ke a l i t t l e g ui de t o h el p m e c han ge m y l i f e, he s a i d So f ar, a bout 65 pat i ent s i n t w o st udi es have rec ei ved t he de v ic e fr o m U.S p a ce ma k er m anuf ac tur er Int ra pace Onl y abo ut ha l f o f th ose h ave h ad th e pa c e ma k e r fo r at le as t a y e a r a n d m o s t l o s t a b o ut 2 0 p e r c en t of t hei r w e i ght and ke pt it o f f Ot her s tom ach pac emaker s a re o n t he m ar ke t bu t m os t ar e u se d t o r el i e ve s ym pt om s l i ke n a u s e a a n d v o m i ti n g n o t t o f i g ht obe si t y. Ap pet i t e i s p ar tl y c ont r ol l ed b y s i g n a l s s e n t f r o m n e r v e s a r o u n d t h e s t o m a c h t o t h e b ra i n; t he s t om ac h p ac em ake r t aps i n t o that communicat ion s y s tem, sen di n g a message to t he bra i n t hat t he bo dy i s fu ll a f te r a r el at i ve l y sm al l am oun t o f f o od i s co nsu me d. I f y o u c a n s t i m u l a t e t h e n er ve s go i ng f r om t he st om a ch t o t h e b ra i n t ha t s h ou l d i nd ee d h ave a n e ff e ct i n re duc i ng f ood i ntake, said S t eph en B loom, an obe s ity expe r t at Im p eri a l C o ll e ge i n L o ndon w h o i s no t c onn ec te d t o I nt r apa ce or t he c l i ni c al t ri a l s. B l oo m h ow e ve r q ue s t i on ed w he t h e r t h e d ev i c e w ou l d w o r k l o n g t e r m a s p e o p l e m i g h t e ve nt ual l y ge t us ed t o th e e l ec trica l pu lse s an d k ee p e atin g a n y w a y D o c t o r s f a m i l i a r w i t h t h e p a c e m a k e r s a y t h e r e w i l l a l w a y s b e w ay s f o r pa t i ent s t o ea t a nd w o rk ar oun d t he sy st e m. We c o ul d m ak e t he ( s t om a ch p ac e m ak e r ) w o r k s o pe o p l e f e e l l i k e t h ey' r e g oi ng t o t hr ow up, bu t w e d o n t w a n t t h a t s a i d T h o m a s H o r b a c h c h i e f o f su rg ery at S ta d tk ran k en h a us S ch wa ba ch, nea r Mu ni ch w ho l e d on e of t he tr i al s I f y o u t a k e a w a y a l l t h e r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s f r o m t h e p a t i e n t t h ey wi ll n ot chan ge on the i r o w n As an add i ti o nal be nef i t t he s en s o r t r a c ks w h e n p a t i e n t s e a t drink o r exerc i se so p atients c an ch ar t th ei r pr ogr es s In t ra p ac e h as al s o cr ea te d a n o nl i ne netw o rk f o r p ati en t s to trade weig h t lo ss a dv ic e a nd sh a re e x p e r i e n c e s O t he r s u r gi c a l a pp r oa c he s t o w e ig ht l oss co me wi t h s er io us s i de ef f ec t s. Pe opl e w ho hav e th ei r s t om ach sta ple d o r ha ve a ga stric ban d m us t e at s m al l e r a m oun t s of m o s t l y l o w f a t f o o d s b e c a u s e th ei r s t om ac hs c an t ac c om mo d a t e o r p r o c e s s l a r g e v o l u m e s I f t he y o ve r e at t h ey w i l l f e el na u s e o u s v o m i t o r s u f f e r f r o m o t h er pro bl em s T he mo st s er i ous s i de ef f ec t s e e n i n t h e p a c e m a k e r h a s be e n a n i n f e c t i o n l i n k e d t o s u r g e r y I n B rita in t he pa c ema k er co sts abo ut 1 5, 0 00 p oun ds ( $2 4, 0 40 ), incl udi ng t he keyhol e s urge ry u se d to imp la nt it I ntr ap a ce Pr e s i d e n t C h u c k B r y n e l s e n s a i d t h a t s c o m p a r a b l e t o o t h e r we i ght l os s su rg er i es T he dev i ce i s aut ho ri s ed f or sa le ac ro ss t he E U t houg h t he c o m p a n y i s f i r s t t a r g e t i n g w e i g h t l os s c l i ni c s i n B r i t ai n G e rm a ny and Spai n It a l so pl an s t o s ub mi t th e dev i ce f o r ap pr ova l i n th e US on ce i t h as m or e dat a and hop e s i t w i ll be avai la ble th er e i n 2 01 4. Th e p a c e m a k e r h a sn 't y e t b een impl anted com merci al ly in E ur ope but I nt ra pac e is i n tal ks w it h c l ini c s i nt er est ed i n of fe r in g i t B r yne l s en sa i d t he bat t e ry i n t he d e vi c e l a s t s a b ou t f i ve ye a r s a nd i t w i l l b e up t o p a t i e n t s h o w l o n g t h e y w a n t t o k e e p t h e pac em ak er We do n' t k now i f pat ie nt s w i l l see (t he st om ach p a c e m a k e r ) a s a b r i d g e t o r eco ver y or wh eth er this is a c ru tch th e y will ne ed for th e lo nge r t e rm h e s ai d. So me ex per t s sa i d t he pa ce ma ke r di d n ot ad dr es s p eo pl e s un de r l yi ng r e as o ns f or ov er e a t ing. "T he probl em w i th t hese dev ic es i s t hey as s um e pe opl e are rat iona l a nd tha t t hey e at because they' re hungry, s aid S t ep han R o s sne r a p r o f essor i n t h e o b e s i t y u n i t a t K a r o l i n s k a Un iv er s i ty Ho sp i ta l A l ot o f ob es e pat i e nt s ea t be c a u s e t h e y r e de p r e s s e d, t he y c a n t s l e e p a t n i g h t o r t h e y h a v e nobody to have s ex w i th, he sai d. "So what ever you i nser t i n t o t h e i r s t o m a c h t h e y c a n o u t ea t t h at de vi c e be c au se i t s ot h e r t h i ng s t h a t d r i v e t h e m t o c o n s u m e Hetz ne r said h e inte nd s to k eep the st omach p acemaker fo r a bou t f ou r y ea rs I d on' t w a nt t o b ac ks l id e, he s ai d, addi ng he wo uld rec o m m e n d t h e d e v i c e t o o t h e r s I wa nt t o b e s ur e I c an s t i ck w it h i t an d th at m y bo dy ad apt s t o th i s n ew w ay of eat i ng Stomach pacemaker could help obese lose weight I N T H IS F r i d a y F e b u ra r y 2 5 2 0 1 1 p h o t o T h o m a s Ho r b a c h c h i e f o f s u r g e ry a t S t a d t k r a n k e n h a u s S c h w a b a c h wh o l e d o n e o f t h e t r i a l s i s s e e n i n h i s o ff i c e i n t h e h o s p i t a l i n S c h w a b a c h near Nuremberg, Germany, Horbach implanted a stomach pacemaker that helps regulate the amount of food users take in. Patrick Hetzner, a 20-year-old Munich mailman, has knocked off more than 10 kilos (22 pounds) from his earlier weight of 104 kilos (229 pounds). (AP) P hilippa Davis, MD, laughs when a family friend suggests it won't be long before her dad, well-known attorney and Member of Parliament for Cat Island Philip 'Brave' Davis, is introduced as the father of the famed Dr Philippa Davis. N ever c h uc k les th e MP 's da ug ht er, i n N a s s a u f o r a s h o r t v i s i t r e c e n t l y A L y f or d Ca y Fo u nd a t i o n r e ci p i e nt D r D a v i s c o mp let ed h er un d er g ra d ua te de gr ee at M c G il l U n iv er s i ty in C a n ad a ( w it h d is tinc tion ), h er medic al d egree at Geo rget o w n U n i v e r s i t y S c h o o l o f M e d i c i n e i n Wash i n gton DC (ear ning membe rsh i p in the Al ph a Omeg a Alpha Medical H ono ur So ciety) her inter nsh ip in intern al medici ne at Mou nt S in ai H osp i ta l i n New York h e r r e s i d e n c y i n A n e s t h e s i o l o g y a t Bri g ham and W om en' s H ospi ta l i n Bo ston and her fellows hip in Cr iti c al Care M edic in e at S tan fo r d Ho sp ita l an d C linic s in Califor nia. Af t e r 13 y e a r s o f c ol l e ge a n d m e d sc ho ol s he wa s c e rt ifie d in Cr it ic al C ar e M ed ic i n e i n Oc to b er a n d at t h e a g e o f 3 1 i s licen sed to prac tise in Ca l ifo rnia, Mas sac hu set ts an d V irgin ia --an d, by th e way, h ad t im e a lo n g t h e w ay to v o lu n te e r i n M wanz a, Tan zan ia. "I wou ld not have made it t his far without the lov ing support and sa c ri fi ces of m y family an d f riends esp ecially my pare nts a n d gr a n d p a r e n ts s a id D r Da vi s n o w af filiated with In ova F air fax Ho sp ital in Fa i r f a x Vi rg i n i a a l e v e l on e t ra u m a ce n t re Th e l o ng jour ney, she s ai d also ta ught h er th at "th e th i n gs most wor thw hil e are n ot easy to c ome by. " The one t hing she had to gi ve up," sa ys mom J a nice D av is, who ha s be en wi th t he Go ve rnm en t of The Ba ham a s for 3 0 y ea rs, is s p o rt s A s ta r a th le te, D avi s r ep r es e n t e d T h e B a h a m a s a t t h e C a r i b b e a n Island Swi mm ing Champi onships i n Cura c ao at the age of 12. I t w a s a t r a d e o f f s h e w a s w i l l i n g t o mak e. I am h um bl ed a nd bl ess ed t hat G od ha s given me the gifts to care fo r patients in th ei r m os t v ul ne ra bl e t i me s o f n ee d," say s Dr D av i s, a me m ber of t he A m eri ca n S oci ety of Anesthe s i ology and t h e Socie ty of Cr i t i ca l Ca r e Me d i ci n e A f t e r l e ng t hy t ra i n i ng D a v i s w an t s t o g ai n m or e e x pe r i e nce i n hig h vol ume a nd acuit y l eve l one t raum a b e f o r e r e t u r n i n g t o T h e B a h a m a s t o p r a c t i s e K now anothe r woma n who i s m ak i ng i t bi g? Em a il us at fea ture s@ tribune m edi a. ne t a nd she ma y be fea ture d a s the ne x t You Go G i r l By DEBI SWICK-CRUSE J E S S I C A F r a n c i s a s t u d e n t a t P otomac State Colleg e (PS C) of W e st Vi rgi ni a Uni versi t y, has been recog ni sed f or exem pl i f yi ng t he charact er tr ait o f r es pe ct. E a c h y e a r t h e c o l le g e h o n o u r s s e le c te d s t u d e n t s b y c h o o s i n g t h e m a s CH A RA CT E R CO U N T S! st u de nt s for va riou s c ha ra cter t r aits. On e in d i v id u a l wh o n o mi n a te d F r a n c is s ta t e d I n my 1 9 y e a r s o f w o r k i n g i n h i g he r e duc ation J es sic a is one of t h e m os t re s p e ctfu l s tu d en ts I ha v e ha d th e o ppo rtun i ty to wo rk wi th." F r a nc i s is a g e n e r a l ag r i c u ltu r e m a jo r f r o m N a s s a u i n t h e B a h a m a s a n d a g r a d u a t e of CV Be t h e l S en ior High S c ho ol. S he pla y s th e p os itio n of c e nte r o n th e P oto ma c S ta t e C ata mou nts b as k etb all t e a m a nd a c c o r d in g t o H e a d C oa c h J im Wa lton J es s ica a lwa y s giv e s on e hu nd red pe r c ent a nd h as con t r i b ut e d to o ur c ur r e nt r e co r d o f 23 3 ." Je ss ica wa s b or n a nd ra i s ed in Na ss a u. Sh e t o ok k ar a te for 1 3 ye a rs r e tiring with a firs td eg re e b lac k b elt. Sh e pe rformed v ol unteer communit y s ervi c e at a ge r i at r i c h o sp i t a l a n d w as n a me d Ro o kie of th e Ye a r by a ni g htl e a g u e b a s k e t ba l l te a m in t h e B a h a ma s S h e i s t h e d a u g h t e r o f J e f f r e y a n d And re a Fr an cis Pot omac St at e cont inues t o honour s t u d e n t s w i t h t h e C H A R A C T E R COU NTS! Program, which i s an out gr ow th of The Jos eph & Edna Joseph son I n s t i t u t e o f E th ic s T h is n o n prof i t o rgan i satio n is de dic a t e d to helpi ng peopl e m ak e pr i n c ip le d d e c is ion s i n o r d e r t h a t t h e y m i g h t l i v e w i t h g r e a t e r int egrit y. Francis recognised for exemplar y character trait Philippa ES Davis, MD: She's Doctor do-good and then some I would not have made it this far without the loving suppor t and sacrifices of my family and friends, especially my parents and grandparent. Jessica Francis Dr. Philippa Davis

PAGE 20

I n a n a tt e mp t to fi l l t he v o i d o f lo n el i ne s s an d share i n true c omp ani onship w it h a no th e r, so m e w o me n g e t c a rri ed a w ay i n t h i s q u e s t T h e y b ec o m e s o o b s e s s e d w i t h b e i n g i n a r e l a t i o n s h i p t h a t t h e y e n d u p s e t t l i n g f o r l e s s a t t h e e xp e ns e o f lo si ng th e ms el v e s a nd a ll o f th e ir ho pe s an d dr ea m s. In e sse nc e t he y e nd u p l o vi n g to o m u c h! B u t w he re d o th e y fi nd the a nsw e rs to th i s o rde a l Ho w d o t he y st op t he m s elves fr om becom ing s o abs or bed i n th e ir m at e a nd h o w d o st op t he m se lv e s fro m l o vi ng to o m u c h? T ri bu n e W om a n sp o ke t o a f e w l a di e s to seek answers Some of the women e xp re sse d th e ir v i e w s on th i s is sue a nd e v e n a d mi t te d t o l o v in g s o m u c h to t h a t po i nt w h er e th e y be c a m e bo th p hy s ic a l ly a nd em o ti on a ll y w o un d ed S h an t av i a S w ee t i n g t o l d T r i b u n e W o m a n h ow she c am e t o ov e rc o me h e r e m ot io na l w re c ka g e I a m so gu i lt y o f l o v i n g t o o m u c h. I s u rr o u n d e d m y e n t i r e li fe arou nd my bo yfrie nd and I did n't re a li se w ha t I w a s do in g. B e for e m ak i n g p l a n s w i t h f ri e n d s I h a d t o c h e c k w i t h m y b o y fr i e n d f i r s t t o m a k e s u r e h e d i d n t h a v e pl a ns fo r us E ve r y si ng l e w e e ke n d w o u ld m e e t me s pe n d in g t i me w i t h hi m A nd w he n he d e c id e d t o g o ou t w i th h is f rie n ds in ste a d of ha n g in g ou t w i th m e t ha t w a s a ma j or p ro bl e m. I w o ul d f in d a n yt hi n g to a rg ue ab o ut j us t so t ha t h e w o u l d n o t g o o u t a n y m o r e a n d m y b e h a v i o u r w a s j u s t s a d m a n I d i d n t h a v e a l i f e I n e e d e d a l i f e Th e n i t c a m e to t h e p o i n t w h e r e I j u s t h a d i t w i t h m e b e i n g s o c o ns um e d w it h h im "I h a d to e va l ua t e m ys el f a n d I fo un d that I w as s o emot ionally d e p endent. Th e n I re a li se d I h a d t o ge t m y ow n l if e a n d d o t h e th i n g s th a t m a d e m e h a p p y I h a d t o f i n d m y o w n h a p p i n e ss s h e s a i d Me lo dy E dg e c om be h a d th is to say : "I fe e l as th ou g h it s o ka y to l ov e so m eo n e b u t n o t t o t h e p o i n t w h e r e i t s e e m s a s tho ug h y ou ma y l ov e t he m m ore th an y o u l ov e yo u r s e l f a nd y o u s h o ul d n t w as te t im e g i vi n g l ov e t o so me o ne th at d o es n 't ap p r eci at e y ou t ha t mu ch or d o e s n t t h i n k t h a t m u c h o f y o u b e c a u s e i n th e en d y ou ll o nl y e n d u p hu rt in g y o urse lf ," sh e sa i d. La to y a Po it i er sa id w h e ne v e r sh e sa w a b e a u t i f u l c o u p l e o u t sh e a l w a y s f e l t t h e ne e d to be in a re l a ti on sh ip I m s u r e a t s o m e p o i n t a n d t i m e w e a l l ha v e W e fi n d o u rse l ve s g oi n g c ra z y j ust to k e e p s om e o n e w ho r e a l l y d oe sn t v a lue u s b e c a use t h er e is a lw a y s s om e th in g n e w f o r m e n t o g o a f t e r I v e a l w a y s b e e n in re l a ti on sh ip s, I d on 't l i ke be i ng a l on e or th e t ho ug h t of b e in g a lo n e d id so m ething to m e. It's like wh en yo u're not w it h s om e on e w h e ne v e r y ou g o o ut y ou se e a ll t he c o up l es o ut h ol di n g ha n ds I ha te t he th o ug h t o f f ai l in g at a ny t hi ng W ha t I w o u ld d o i s g o o u t a nd d a t e th e n fa l l in l ov e a l l o v er a g a in B u t t h a t n e v e r c ha n ge d a ny t hi ng an d th e c y c le c on ti nue d ," sh e sa i d. Th at 's w hy I t oo k a v e ry sh ort br ea k a n d I a l l o w e d l o v e t o c o m e t o m e i n st e a d of g o in g o ut th er e l oo ki n g f or i t. I n an e ff o r t t o br i ng u pl i ft m en t t o w om e n, S ta n ya D a v is, d e c id e d to sta rt E ve s J ou rn ey a w o rk sho p d e sig n e d to he l p w om e n d is c ov e r th ei r tr ue be a ut y T ri b u n e W o m a n s a t d o w n w i th S t a n y a D a v i s o r g a n i s e r o f t h e w o r k s h o p W om en Wh o l ov e T oo Mu c h" w h o e x pre ss ed he r v ie w s o n th e i ssu e W h e n be i ng in l ov e me a ns b e in g i n p a i n w e a r e l o v i n g t o o m u c h W h e n m o s t o f o u r c o n v e r s a t i o n s w i t h i n t i m a t e f r i e n d s a re a bo u t h i m, w e a re l o vi n g to o mu c h W hen w e ke ep h opin g he w ill c ha nge w e a re lo v in g to o m u c h. W h en o ur r el a ti o nsh ip je o pa rd is es o ur e mo ti o na l w e l l b ein g an d p er hap s even ou r ph ys ical h e a l t h a n d s a f e t y w e a r e d e f i n i te l y l o v i n g t oo m u c h Th i s c h a ra c t e ri s e s t h e w o m e n t h a t l o v e t o o m u c h a n d I t h i n k a l l w o m e n ha v e b ee n a t t hi s p oi n t w h e re th ey a re g ui lt y o f l ov i ng to o m uc h M s D av i s i s a li fe c o a c h a n d ha d do ne a gr eat dea l o f r es ea rch o n "Wo men W h o Lo ve To o Mu c h. Th e t hi n g th e se w o m en fe a r i s be i ng a l o n g a n d th e y t h i n k i f I h o l d o n t o t h i s i t ca n w or k. It is almost as t houg h they c a nn ot se e th e l ig h t a t th e e nd of t he t u n n e l o r t h e y d o n t s e e t h e m s e l v e s d o i n g be t te r o r th ey d on 't th in k t he y c a n fi n d so me t hi ng be t te r. S h e s a i d w o m e n w h o a r e g u i lt y o f l o v i ng to o mu c h mu st fi nd ti m e t o ev a l ua te th e ms el v e s. Sh e sa i d th e y mu st le a rn t o love th emselve s truly be f o r e the y ca n l ov e a ny o ne e ls e. Lo v in g y ou rse l f d oe s no t h a pp e n in on e d a y ". T he w o rk sh op t a ke s pl a c e th i s S a tu rd a y F or m or e in fo rm a ti on l o g on t o th ei r fa c e b oo k p ag e E v e' s J ou rn e y. T H E T R I B U N E SECTION B HEAL TH: Body and mind T U E S D A Y M A R C H 8 2 0 1 1 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer W HEN we have lost sight of our dreams, while getting caught up in his, we are loving too much. When we keep hoping that he will change, even though we know deep down inside that this transformation will never occur, we are loving too much. When we plan our entire exis tence around him, we are loving too much. And when we try to hold onto a relationship that is terribly broken and cannot be revived we are loving too much. WOMEN LOVE MUCH EMPTINESS: In an attempt to fill the void of loneliness and share in true companionship with another, some women get carried away in this quest. They become so obsessed with being in a relationship that they end up settling for less, at the expense of losing themselves and all of their hopes and dreams.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 5B



= Ses
Price controls placing

business ‘in time warp’

FROM page 1B

products such as gasoline.

Pointing out that price controls “distorted”
the market for goods they were imposed on,
especially if Bahamian companies were forced
to sell below the ‘market clearing’ or equilib-
rium price, Mr Lowe noted the impact that
fixed margins had on the petroleum retail sec-
tor.

Using the example of a gas station needing
20,000 gallons to fill its tanks, the Nassau Insti-
tute executive said an increase in global oil
prices from $1 to $1.50, a 50 per cent increase,
would raise the retailer’s cost to purchase this
amount from the oil company by the same
percentage - from $20,000 to $30,000.

“Tf they can’t make a higher margin to get
more turnover, more cash flow, they’re forced
to make additional arrangements with the
banks etc to get additional float that will make
up the inventory,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“That’s a problem, because they’re work-
ing on razor thin margins, the service stations.”

With fixed margins of $0.44 per gallon of
gasoline, and $0.33 per gallon of diesel, Mr
Lowe said Bahamian petroleum retailers, in
common with many other businesses, might
find it prudent to exit the industry because
they were unable to get the necessary return on
their investment.

When that happened, and no replacements
entered the sector due to the unattractive fixed



mark-ups, product
shortages were the
likely result.

“A lot of business-
es today would prob-
ably do better putting
money in the bank
than the returns they
get by staying open,”
Mr Lowe told Tri-
bune Business.

“If businessmen
are not getting a 3-5
per cent return on
turnover, they’re bet-
ter off sticking mon-
ey in the bank.

“These price controls make it so you can’t
adjust your business model as times change.
Youre putting businesses in a time warp, as
everything is changing around them.

“They’re mark-up restrictions, not price con-
trols.”

Reacting to Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham’s comments on Saturday, when he sug-
gested that price controls on the petroleum

HUBERT INGRAHAM

industry had protected Bahamian consumers,
Mr Lowe contrasted this with what happened
when then-president Ronald Reagan removed
similar controls in the US in the early 1980s.

Arguing that “things were back to normal”
within two weeks in the US, following the
removal of controls imposed in the aftermath
of oil price-driven inflation in the 1970s, Mr
Lowe added: “Government just needs to get
out of the way.

“T think it [the petroleum industry situa-
tion] just again proves that price control does-
n’t work because there are too many factors
involved. We’ve had 40 centuries of price con-
trols and governments putting them on, and
then another government takes them off,
throughout the world.

“They don’t take into consideration all the
things necessary to put a product on the mar-
ket, things we in the Bahamas don’t control,
such as the initial costs, transportation, the
potential blockages in the Middle East.

“Ultimately, we end up with shortages,” Mr
Lowe said.

“Tf the gas stations feel that they can’t get a

Eventually, it costs more than they get in
through profits.

“What do they do? Maybe they look for a
new business, so ultimately shortages result
from price controls.

“What happens is that intervention causes
the businessman to lay off staff, causing more
unemployment. That’s really the unintended
consequences of public policy.”

Again arguing that it was not the Govern-
ment’s duty to intervene in transactions
between business and consumer, Mr Lowe
said the ultimate solution lay in ‘freeing the
market’ and allowing the three oil companies
- Shell, Texaco and Esso - to compete at the
wholesale level, with the dealers also compet-
ing among themselves.

This, he suggested, would force all con-
cerned to be more efficient and, by allowing
gas retailers to charge the margins and prices
they wanted, consumers would naturally grav-
itate to those offering the lowest costs.

“They distort the margins you might get, or
do not normally get,” Mr Lowe told Tribune
Business of price controls.

“And prices have gone up all the time. Price
control is not preventing prices going up,
because petroleum costs are based on the
international market.

“No one can control that. Mr Obama can’t
control it, and Mr Bush couldn’t control it.
It’s a little bit of a fallacy to say there’s price
control.

“If you want to say price management, that’s
fine.”

Major transport firm
in 35% fuel cost hike

FROM page 1B

devise and implement a
long-term solution to oil
price shocks.

Khaalis Rolle, Bahamas
Ferries’ chief marketing offi-
cer, said that in his capacity
as the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC)
chairman, he was exploring
fuel hedging options
designed to shield all
Bahamian companies - espe-
cially those that were trans-
portation-based - from expo-
sure to rapidly increasing oil
prices.

And he criticised the
Bahamas’ tendency as a
nation to focus on short-
term, temporary solutions
rather than long-term fixes,
while the National Energy
Policy and alternative ener-
gy forms seemed to become
a secondary issue once oil
prices started on a down-
ward trend in late 2008.

“Tt is extremely high,” Mr
Rolle told Tribune Business,
when asked about Bahamas
Ferries’ current fuel bill. “I
think we’re up about 35 per
cent compared to last year.
When you use close to one
million gallons of fuel a year,
it is ridiculous.”

And, turning to the
Bahamas’ failure as a nation
to draw up and implement a
comprehensive strategy to
deal with oil and energy-
related cost increases, the
BCCEC chairman said: “We
keep sounding this alarm.
We keep going through
these temporary fixes, and
we’re not looking to long-
term solutions.

“We keep ending up right
back where we started.
There isn’t any substantial
pressure to resolve this
problem. We’re back right
where we were, and the
minute prices started to
trend downwards, nobody
looked at it. This wasn’t an
issue any more; it became a
secondary issue.”

A National Energy Poli-

cy now looks more needed
than ever. Global oil prices
moved close to $120 per bar-
rel yesterday, with specula-
tors moving in to exploit the
uncertainty caused by Mid-
dle East turbulence, the lat-
est bout of which is in Libya,
while investors sought a safe
haven in gold.

“Now is the time for us,
because these issues don’t
go away,” Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. “They may
disappear for a second, but
they don’t go away. They
usually come right back at
you, and when they come
back around, they’re more
ferocious and more danger-
ous. We have to figure this
one out.”

Hedging

The BCCEC chairman
confirmed that he was
exploring various hedging
strategies and options, and is
set to meet this week with
one of the major oil compa-
nies, having already spoken
to commercial banks in the
Bahamas and abroad.

Hedging is a strategy
where private sector com-
panies, anticipating a future
increase in oil prices, lock-in
existing prices by agrecing
contracts to purchase oil at a
fixed price over a certain
period of time. In agreeing
to do this, they are hoping to
save against future oil price
increases.

However, major Bahami-
an institutions, such as BEC
and Bahamasair, while look-
ing at this possibility have
declined to hedge in the
past, fearing that they may
come down on the wrong
side of a ‘hedge’ and suffer
losses that will result in
political repercussions.

“I’m looking at some
options that we haven’t
explored in the past,” Mr
Rolle said, “like hedging.
We’re looking at an option
to hedge from a very global
perspective. We’re looking
at hedging for everyone that

NOTICE

JADAJOLEA LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

JADAJOLEA LIMITED is in voluntar
dissolution under the provisions of
137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

ection

The dissolution of the said company
commenced on the 4th March, 2011 when
the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is

Manex Limited, The Bahamas

inancial

Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,

Bahamas

Dated this 8th day of March, A. D. 2011



Manex Limited
Liquidator



reasonable profit, they’re not going to sell it.

APD Limited

APD Limited is seeking bids from Bahamian firms for the demolition and disposal of the old
Customs building an the east end of Arawak Cay, All interested applicants should sulamit their
proposal to APD Limited's offices in the House of Moshe located at the corner of Victoria Ave
and Bay Street. Prapodals can abo be emailed te nfoBapdport.com-.
is fuel dependent, especially
companies that are fuel
dependent like our business.

“We’ve had some prelim-
inary discussions, and I think
we're going to try and fur-
ther those discussions to
speed this up. We actually
have a meeting with one of
the oil majors this week, but
we’ve spoken to some of the
commercial banks here and
abroad.

“It’s been positive. We
just have to now look at the
possibilities and look at how
practical it is, what the
options are and how practi-
cal those options are.”

Mr Rolle added that the
BCCEC was set to meet
with Bahamian petroleum
retailers this week to discuss
their situation, where oil
price increases were forcing
them to increase their
upfront capital outlay to buy
supplies from the whole-
salers.

This is causing cash flow
and overdraft problems for
the retailers.

“We’ve had a couple of
discussions with them, but
nothing is substantiated as
yet,” Mr Rolle added.

“I’m going to meet witha
couple of them this week
just to discuss it briefly and
see what, if any support, can
be given to them through
the Chamber.”

Proposals should address the following

The ald Customs Building contains asbestos which must be removed and disposed of in
accordance with Department of Environmental Health protocol of ashestes abatement.
The cortractor must be a certified asbestos abatement contractor and hold a valid
certification. The asbestos removal process must be detailed within the applicant's
proposal. Any questions regarding the qualification criteria should be directed to the
Department of Environmental Health,

All debris and scrap te include the steel, scrap vehicles, concrete, building parts, trash,
attached to or immediately adjacent to the building are to be removed by the tenderer
and a plan detailing the disposal methods 6 to be included within the proposal, The
demolition and disposal of the concrete foundation & not required and is mot to be
included in the proposal.

The applicant must provide a safety plan describing how they will secure the site and
protect the health and safety of their employees and subcontractors.

All applicants should understand that the site 6 4 high rick site and that the structure is
unstable.

The applicants proposal should consider a start date of no later than April 7" 2011 anda
completion date of ne later than June 7°" 2011.

Demolition and Disposal proposals should be delivered to APD Limited
by March 18"", 2011.

APD Limited, Moshe Bullding, Ray and Victoria, Ph. (242) 322-2142











pay less for insuring your home!

Have you heard the good news?
You CAN save money!



Ask NIBA for a home insurance quote! Home insurance with
NIBA costs less AND you receive cover with a claims service
that lives up to its promise! In addition to low

deductibles, you can choose to pay by interest free
installments for added convenience,



It's time to pay less for insuring your
home!




Tel.677-6422 or visit
www.nibaquote.com














Open
Saturdays

10.00arm-
2.00pm




NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED
Atlantit House, 2nd Terrace & Collings Avenue
BO. Box W-? 764 Nassau Tel 677-6422 wean. nibaquote.com







$8.9m FINCO

hoost through
loan provision
policy change

* Reduction in credit
allowances from 40% to 30%
of non-accrual loans key factor
in quadrupling of mortgage
lender’s 2010 income

* Non-performing loans hit
$88.64m or 10.47% of total
loan portfolio

* FINCO insurance subsidiary
was still seeking licence
renewal at balance sheet date
By NEIL HARTNELL

A change in its loan pro-
visioning policy resulted in :
Finance Corporation of the ;
Bahamas (FINCO) reduc- :
ing credit loss provisions by }
$8.9 million during its 2010 }
financial year, a key factor ; the first census in 1978.
behind ta quadru- : is perceived as one of the sec-
pling to more than $18 mil- ? tors with little economic activi-
i ty, and therefore its contribu-
? tion to the Gross National
i Product is considered minimal.
? As an agricultural professional,
? and as per the definition for
? economic activity, nothing
? could be further from the
i truth,” said Mr Minns in a

SEE page 4B

Chamber unveils
Mystery Shop plan

Aims ‘to test every single
business in the Bahamas’ on
customer service and front-line

performance for indefinite period

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third

| party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

THE TRIBUNE

usiness



TUESDAY,

MARCH 8,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Agriculture could be gener-

i ating $305 million per year
i towards
? Domestic Product (GDP), com-
? pared to the $40.2 million
i recorded in the most recent sta-
i tistics, if proper reporting and
? recording of all agricultural out-
? puts took place, a Department
? of Agriculture official said yes-

Tribune Business Editor = terday.

Bahamian Gross

Leslie Minns, a statistician
with the Department, said in
his most recently-issued report
on agriculture’s contribution to
the Bahamian economy that
there has been “under-report-
ing” of agricultural output since

“Agriculture in the Bahamas

report released to senior agri-
culture officials in January.

A fact which Mr Minns sug-
gests highlights this appears in
this report. In it, an increase in
the total value of agricultural
production from $78 million in
2008 to around $194.8 million in
2009 is documented.

Acreage recorded as being
under cultivation by farmers or
being used for livestock
increased by 511 per cent, from
5,793 acres in 2005/2006, to
35,402 acres in 2009.

However, rather than being a
consequence of a significant rise
in actual output created by
farmers or other individuals
producing agricultural goods,
Mr Minns suggests this increase
is primarily due to better
recordkeeping and data collec-
tion, which needs to be further
improved if a true picture of
agriculture’s contribution to the
economy is to be obtained.
Between 1994 and 2006, only
“reported data” - that willingly
made available by a relatively
small selection of farmers - was
used to estimate agricultural
output.

From 2005, the department

PRICE CONTROLS PLACING
BUSINESS “IN TIME WARP"

: By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Chamber of i} —..
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC) ;
has launched a Mystery
Shopper project that aims }
“to test every single business }
in the Bahamas” on front- :
line performance and cus- i nomic climate, a think-tank
i executive yesterday charging
? that they ultimately resulted
? in product shortages.

Price controls are putting
Bahamian businesses “in a
time warp”, leaving them
unable to adjust margins in
the face of increasing costs
and other changes in the eco-

Rick Lowe, of the Nassau

i Institute, said the Govern-
i ment-imposed price controls
i on industries such as petrole-
? um and food, ostensibly to
i protect the interests of low
i income Bahamian consumers,
i were misnamed and failed to
i work because they could not
i impact international factors
? outside this nation’s control.

Suggesting that it was real-

: ly “price management”,
i rather than “price control”,
i? that the Government-dictated
i mark-ups imposed on various
i? Bahamian businesses, Mr
i Lowe said a better solution
i was for the administration to
i “get out of the way” and let
i the market, through competi-
i tion, determine the price of

SEE page 5B

Sotheby's

* Think tank executive warns
government-imposed margin and
mark-up restrictions ultimately
cause product shortages and
distort market

* Government urged to ‘get out
of the way’ and let market decide
prices through competition

* ‘Many firms would do better
putting money in the bank than
staying open’

Agriculture output
$305m per annum

: By ALISON LOWE
? Business Reporter
: alowe@tribunemedia.net

turned to the Farmers’ Register
to better estimate production
and its value. Farmers become
registered to obtain incentives
such as duty-free agricultural
equipment, imports and hurri-
cane relief, and such a register
has been one of the only ways
for the Government to get a
better handle on the farming
industry, given that there have
traditionally been few other
incentives for producers to
make themselves known for
data collection purposes.

Mr Minns said he hopes that
in the future input from other
areas, from which economic
value is derived from agricul-
ture, can be included in reports
detailing agriculture’s input into
the national economy. Agricul-
ture’s contribution to the $6.7
billion GDP in 2008 was found
to be just 0.6 per cent or $40.2
million. In 2009, this rose to 0.7
per cent.

The statistician laments that
only economic value derived
from the production of crops
and livestock in the Bahamas

SEE page 4B



66

When you use
close to one

: million gallons of

fuel a year, it is

} ridiculous.”

KHAALIS ROLLE

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

aaa ola



ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money ot Mirah





Cree, erg







UALS

(242) 356-901

FREEPORT
(242) 351-2010

MARSH HARBCHUR
(243) 367-3135




fer bestia aca

Airport’s $138m

second

stage to

start March 17

* Plan to construct 226,000 sq ft

arrivals terminal a
* Contracts for sto

nd pier
nework, masonry

and carpeting now before NAD/Airport
Authority Board for approvals

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Work on the $138.3
million Phase II stage of
the Lynden Pindling
International Airport
(LPIA) redevelopment
will begin on Thursday,
March 17, with the
selective demolition of
the existing US depar-
ture terminal.

The second stage,
which follows comple-

SEE page 3B

GUIDED TOUR: A tour of the Air-
port last year.



MAJOR TRANSPORT FIRM
IN 35% FUEL COST HIKE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading Bahamian
transportation company,
which consumes almost one
million gallons of diesel per
year, yesterday said it had
seen its fuel costs rise 35 per
cent year-over-year, a senior
executive telling Tribune
Business it was “ridiculous”
that this nation had yet to

SEE page 5B

* Bahamas Ferries executive
says ‘ridiculous’ that nation
has yet to devise long-term
solution to fuel price
inflation, his firm using
almost one million gallons
per year

* Now exploring hedging
strategy to aid all fuel-
dependent Bahamian
companies, via talks with oil
firms and major banks

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

*

Damianos |

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Prime Income Fund

¢ A higher, stable rate of return ¢ Professional fund management

e Long-term capital preservation ° Diversified portfolio

PARADISE ISLAND ~ OCEAN CLUB ESTATES e Lower risk investment

BEACHFRONT CABBAGE BEACH LOT
Large elevated lot on world-famous Cabbage Beach with 149 feet on the beach.
Priced to sell at US$6.9m.

Contact: George. Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.362.4211 BAHAMAS
242.356.9801

242.351.3010

BARBADOS
meet

ROYAL FIDELITY

lia 1 Mela 4

Nassau: 246.435.1955

Member of ani
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | the Bahamas MLS | MID) Cen Gi)

Freeport:


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 9B








The Tribune

B

O Di A N

e

eeewM | N D



ith





Welg 4
Koyo ecbiue



ht

in self
gained



By ALESHA CADET
Tribune Features Reporter

ROM diet plans to

weight loss programs,

women out there are
going the extra mile to stay
fit. Whether it is for health
or personal issues, they are
determined to take it off
and keep it off.

Jennifer Hudson, the singer and
actress who won an Academy
Award for her performance in
Dream Girls recently made an
appearance on the Oprah Winfrey
show and discussed how joing
Weight Watchers helped her drop
the pounds.

Bouncing in her seat and saying
"I want to tell it!" - Jennifer revealed
the magic number.

She said: “I've lost 80 pounds,”
and received a standing ovation.”

"It's like a brand new me," she
said. "Sometimes I don't even recog-
nise myself.”

She told Oprah, she made the
decision to lose the weight while she
was pregnant with her now 2-year-
old son, and she eventually went
from a size 16 to a size 6.

She also spoke tearfully a bit
about the tragedy that occurred
more than two years ago when her
mother, brother and young nephew
were murdered. She said she was
able to survive that loss with the help

that Dr Diggiss was looking for
patients who wanted to have the
surgery, but who were also willing
to be a spokesperson for the proce-
dure and tell their story.

"It was a just a dream come for
me- because it meant that I didn't
have to travel , but I would be able
to have the surgery performed at
home, in the facility where I worked
by a fellow countryman and I
jumped at the opportunity."

Samantha said she was never
afraid of the medical risks associated
with any elective surgical procedure.

"T just focused on the new me. I
was ashamed of my body going into
surgery, ( I was wearing a size 32)
but Dr Diggiss assured me before
we went in that what I was seeing
then, I would never see again.
Samantha describes the day of her
surgery as “ the day that Dr Diggiss
rescued me.”

TV personality, Kelly Osbourne
graced the cover of Shape Magazine
last year displaying her life changing
weight loss. In an interview with
Claire Conners of Shape Magazine,
Kelly stated: "I was called fat and
ugly in the press almost my entire
life. I understand that being judged
by others comes with the territory,
but it broke my heart and ruined my
self-esteem. It sets you up to hate
yourself in a huge way. I was so
angry about the things people said
about me. I truly believe it's the main
reason I turned to Vicodin and end-
ed up in rehab three times. I just

Being overweight caused me a lot of pain and rejec-
tion. | had a situation where | had applied for a job
and | was actually told, 'We're sorry, you have a
great attitude and excellent qualifications and a pretty
face, but we cannot hire an overweight person as the
first contact to our clients.’ That crushed me.

= SAMANTHA EVANS

of "my family, my baby and God."

"The only thing I can do to honour
their memory is to make them
proud,” she said.

Like Jennifer , two years ago, a
Bahamian resident, Samantha Evans
walked around "wearing a smile, but
carrying a heart full of pain," des-
perate to end the cycle of obesity
that had controlled her life since her
early teens.

That desperation led her to make
medical history, becoming one of
the first people in the Bahamas to
have a lap -band surgery done local-
ly by Doctor Charles Diggiss.

"Being overweight caused me a
lot of pain and rejection. I had a sit-
uation where I had applied for a job
and I was actually told, "We're sorry,
you have a great attitude and excel-
lent qualifications and a pretty face,
but we cannot hire an overweight
person as the first contact to our
clients.’ That crushed me."

"At my heaviest, I was well over
300 pounds,” she said. “ Fortunately,
I didn't have any of the medical con-
ditions associated with obesity like
hypertension or diabetes, but I knew
Thad to do something to change my
life. I have four children and I was
not able to do things with them.”

"Twas familiar with the concept of
weight loss surgery, I had even cor-
responded with a doctor in Mexico,
but one day, I was at work (in the
surgical unit of Doctor's Hospital)
and my coworker asked me if I knew

hated myself. I'm an emotional eater.
When I get upset, my diet goes out
the window.”

It was not until she signed up for
Dancing With the Stars six months
later, she says, that she realised how
bad her diet really was. "I'd fill up on
French fries and pizza all day and
wonder why I wasn't losing weight.
In the very beginning, I kept getting
sick during rehearsals because I was
eating such terrible, fatty food and
feeling so exhausted.”

It was her dance partner, Louis
van Amstel, who taught her about
nutrition. "He made me eat turkey
burgers and salads and explained to
me that a high-protein, low-carb diet
would keep me energised,” she says.
"Then I started losing weight and
realised, ‘Oh, it's true what they say:
Diet and exercise really work!’

Over the last nine months, Kel-
ly's dropped another 30 pounds,
bringing her weight loss to a total of
50." She says: "Ultimately, I'm real-
ly glad I lost the weight the way I
did," says Kelly. "I never thought in
a million years I'd be that healthy
girl who wakes up every morning to
exercise. After being called 'cherubic
and chubby,’ I'm rocking a bikini! I
feel silly, but I think I'm going to
cry. Being on the cover of SHAPE is
the biggest victory I could ever hope
for.”

Going further, in an exclusive first
person story for Glamour Magazine,
Star Jones also discussed her battle




















































Because you're worth it
LLOREA
PARIS

JENNIFER Hudson waves to photog-
Pee) cee STUN MSs] CL eL6

| Women in Hollywood luncheon in
Beverly Hills, Calif., Thursday, Feb.
PAU

Mm
=

LING OL

SWAROVSKI ELEMEN TS

"© YOU'Te worth it
(kas



with weight, and her ultimate
decision to have gastric bypass
surgery.

TELEVISION personality and singer
Kelly Osbourne arrives at the 2011
Elton John Academy Award viewing
party in West Hollywood, Calif. on
Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. (AP)

CHANGE

She openly told the magazine:
“T could also start in the summer
of 2000, when I was a co-host on
“The View” and the first media
stories about my weight started to
surface, but that, too, would be
too easy. So why don’t I start on
the day that changed how I would
physically appear to the world
and would force me to face the
reasons such drastic steps needed
to be taken, August 19, 2003.”
“We African American women
are taught to be proud of our
curves, full breasts and shapely
hips. I used to look in the mirror
and take pride in my figure, but
that was when I was legitimately
a full-figured woman. I’d gradu-
ally gone from full-figured to
morbidly obese. Finally, one of
my dearest friends sat me down,
looked me in the eye and said,
“So, what are we going to do
about your weight?” She knew
my weight was a subject no one
dared mention, but she didn’t
care — she loved me too much,
she said, to allow me to continue
killing myself. While it was easy
to deny the little voice inside my
head, I found it impossible to
deny my friend’s. I knew in my
heart that her love and respect
for me were pure. I cried; I got
angry — but eventually I took
the first step and walked into a
doctor’s office,” she said.

“The night before the surgery,
Iconvinced myself that afterward
everything would be fine and I
could get on with the rest of my
life. I had no idea that before I
could move on, I would have to
face the present and the past as
they were, not as I wished them
to be.”
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



Got some greens to detox your body?
RECIPES TO HELP YOU ON YOUR JOURNEY!

RESEARCH will verify the myr-
iad of benefits of consuming greens
(smoothies). To date we've shared
quite a bit of information, ranging
from how to make a GREEN
SMOOTHIE, the health and nutri-
tional benefits derived from con-
suming GREEN SMOOTHIES and
why incorporating them into your
detoxification regimen is greatly ben-
eficial.

Now, here are some recipes (in
case you still haven't formulated
your own) to try and enjoy. Happy
blending!!

From the Kitchen of RHONDA
WRIGHT, SEEDlings' Place

NOTE: All recipes can make
approximately 6-7 cups so adjust
quantities accordingly as well as to
taste

GREEN ZING SMOOTHIE
1 banana

1 cup homemade almond mylk

2 cups of mustard greens

Guaco (or some other nutritive addi-
tive)

2-3 cups water (add 1 cup ata time)

MORE ZING GREEN JUICE

1 cucumber

1 cup Irish moss

2 cups of mustard greens

1/4 piece of avocado

4-6 dates

1 pear

1 cup coconut water

1-2 cups water (add a bit at a time)

NOTE: Mustard Greens are a
‘spicy’ green, so be ready for the
ZING!!

NUTTY KALE SMOOTHIE
2-3 cups of Kale

1/2 cup Irish moss

1 Tbl maple syrup

1 cup almond mylk

3 bananas

1” ginger

ADDITIONAL RECIPES:-
BASIC SMOOTHIE

4 bananas or

2-3 bananas and 1/2 cup of frozen
blueberries

2 tsp bee pollen

1 sachet of Berry Radical Antioxidant
Superfood (or fresh blueberries)

1 cup of water or fresh squeezed
orange juice

generous portion of greens

1 tsp vanilla extract (this is the secret
of calming down the greenness that
can sometimes overpower the
smoothie, if you have put a bit too
much in taste wise)

PARSLEY & LEMON
TAKES MY LIVER

TO HEAVEN

1 bunch of flat leaf parsley

(keep the tender stalks and chop off
the tough ones)

1-2 lemons with the rind, pith and
seeds removed

1-2 bananas

20-30g of sweetener of choice

1 cup of ice blocks

2 cups of water

ENZYME FRENZY

2 bananas

1 cup chopped papaya (red or yel-
low)

1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
a big handful of greens

This naturally enzyme rich
smoothie is easy to digest as it won't
tax your own pancreas!

Bloody Great Green Smoothie

55 per cent coconut water

45 per cent greens

Blood is made up plasma and
blood cells. Plasma comprises 55
per cent of blood, fluid and is most-
ly water (90 per cent by volume) and
containing dissolved proteins, glu-
cose, mineral ions, hormones, car-
bon dioxide, platelets and blood cells
themselves. Blood cells are mainly
red blood cells, white blood cells and
platelets. Red blood cells are the
most abundant and they contain
hemoglobin, an iron-containing pro-
tein.

The plant version of hemoglobin is
chlorophyll which is a green pigment
based around a magnesium ion as
opposed to iron (haem). Both hemo-
globin and chlorophyll exist to
obtain energy.

Coconut water is a natural liquid
closest in structure to blood plasma
and has been used in wars instead of
plasma when supplies were low. So
combine 55 per cent coconut water
and 45 per cent greens and you have
a BLOODy great smoothie!

So there you have it - no excuses
to not get in the kitchen (or wher-
ever the blender can fit) and get to
blending. You have your tips, your
rationale, discounts on blenders from
Q-Club - the only thing missing now
is you.

Join the Love Yourself team Tues-
day, March 8, for the next Let's Talk
Wellness Tuesday forum where
Chad Thompson and Mark Daniels
of h.o.m.e.grown will speak on the
topic: Backyard Farming made easy.
They will share the basics on grow-
ing naturally so you can grow greens
in your own backyard. It will be held
at the Ardastra Gardens (next to
Botanical Gardens) at 6.30pm. The
forum is open to the general public
and is free to attend.

To get more details on these and
other events of the campaign,
befriend us on _ facebook:
seedlingsplace or Love Yourself and
Your Health Campaign, or call us
at 361-6314.

Disclaimer: The information
enclosed in this article does not
replace medical advice. Please see
your medical practitioner for guid-
ance before you begin or make any
adjustment to your current wellness
plan.

Resources: www.squidoo.com



One shoe can change your life!

BABY boomers might be
surprised to learn that many
of their generation are wear-
ing the wrong size shoes.
Overtime, feet can widen or
flatten, and fat padding on the
sole of the feet can wear
down. Weight gain or loss,
activity and lifestyle changes,
and foot problems can also
contribute to changes in shoe
fit. Itis important to be fitted
by a professional occasionally,
rather than simply choosing
the sizes you have worn in the
past.

Reduce Stress on Your
Body and Sole - Stress on the
feet can lead to many major
health problems!

There are many things that
contribute to feet widening
and flattening such as flip
flops. Most flip flops are awful
for your feet as they lack the
support necessary to control
and support the foot.

However, you can very well
wear a flip flop designed to



give the appropriate support
for your arch type (high,
medium or low), and having a
‘heel cup’ to stop the heel
from spreading and at the
same time adequately support
the ankle.

A supportive flip flop com-
bined with a _ properly
designed ‘foot bed’ will put
your foot in its natural posi-
tion for walking and standing.
By putting your foot in bal-
ance, the alignment of other
joints will be improved. Prop-
erly aligned joints mean less
stress and strain and pain.

As the feet widen or flat-
ten, due to improper footwear
or weight gain, it is often
squeezed into the same size
shoes. This is extremely dan-

gerous as it can interfere with
your blood circulation and
can pose a major health prob-
lem such as a stroke.

In today's business world,
while it is important for you
to look your very best by
complementing that perfect
outfit with a cute pair of high
heel shoes or for the men,
trendy looking shoes, it is
absolutely necessary to note
that these magnificent cre-
ations often lead to foot pain
at the end of the day. While I
understand that certain occa-
sions require you to wear
shoes with less support, I
would recommend that you
follow these simple tips to get
away with looking your best
while feeling great:

1. Try to choose shoes with a
reasonable heel height of 1.5
to 2 inches. Look for shoes
that provide ample toe room
(beware of pointed toe
styles) and contain a back

strap or enclosed back. The
same holds true for men
with the exception of heel
height.

2. If you are having trouble
achieving the appropriate fit
with shoes you already own,
take them to a local special-
ty footwear store or Pedor-
thic facility and they can
modify your shoes to fit
your feet.

3. Purchase a slim arch sup-
port that your shoe can
accommodate. Specialty
footwear stores and Pedor-
thic facilities have options
that will fit almost any shoe.

In conclusion, it is impor-
tant to note that as the body
changes in size so do the feet.
We often fail to recognise this
fact, even though we are
wearing larger sizes in dresses
and slacks. Believe it or not,
your feet have changed in size

and shape in some cases due
to the stress of ill fitting, tight,
and too small shoes over the
years. However, kudos goes
to the few who always did and
continue to pay attention to
their feet in wearing properly
fitted footwear.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a
Board Certified & Licensed
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of
Foot Solutions, a health and
wellness franchise that focuses
on foot care and proper shoe
fit, located in the Trinity Plaza,
West Bay Street, Nassau.
Bahamas

www. footsolutions.com/nassau
"The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any
of its subsidiary and/or affiliat-
ed companies. Please direct
any questions or comments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or
322-FOOT (3668).



Dental Anxiety and Phobia

IN THE general population,
psychological problems relating
to receiving dental treatments
are common. It is reported that
about half of all dental patients
experience some anxiety
towards their dental visit. This
fear can lead to a delay in seek-
ing necessary dental care, can-
cellation of appointments and
poor cooperation in the dental
chair. Dental fear is one of the
most troublesome patient man-
agement problems for a dental
team. It causes distress for the
patient and results in high stress
levels in dentists.

An anxiety and a phobia are
quite different and the words
should not be used synony-
mously. They are managed and
treated differently by your den-
tal practitioner. An anxiety is a
normal state of apprehension,
uncertainty, and fear resulting
from the anticipation of a real-
istic or fantasised threatening
event or situation. It often
impairs physical and psycho-
logical functioning. A phobia is
an abnormal intense and irra-
tional fear of a given situation,
organism, or object. A dental
anxiety is a normal state of
mind and a dental phobia is an
abnormal state of mind.

Dental phobia is classified in
the Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental Disorders,
fourth edition, text revision
(DSM-IV-TR) as a specific pho-
bia, which involves a marked
and persistent fear of a specific
object, activity or situation that
results in anxiety on confronting
the phobic stimulus. People with
dental phobia commonly
describe two types of experi-
ences: a painful or traumatic
dental procedure or a negative
personal interaction with dental
staff. It is common for the expe-
riences to first occur in child-
hood or in adolescence
autonomously. However, fear-
ful attitudes and feelings of lack
of control in dental situations
can also be learnt from others.

The 'blood-injection-injury'



type of specific phobia includes
fear of needles, injections, drills
and fear of blood in the dental
situation. In the ‘situational!’
type of specific phobia, there
may be fear of the dental room,
dental personnel or the smells
and sounds associated with den-
tal treatment. In the 'other' type
of specific phobia, the person is
anxious about occurrences such
as gagging and retching. It is
worth noting that gagging and
retching result from a combina-
tion of psychological and phys-
iological factors. The gagging
and retching response can be
so intense

that some persons cannot
wear dentures or take dental
impressions.

Dental practitioners have a

responsibility to avoid subject-
ing patients to traumatic den-
tal experiences, but may not
always be aware when they are
occurring. It is sometimes not
advisable to perform several
extractions or complete large
amounts of conservation work
in different areas of the mouth
at a single office visit. These
types of procedures can create
or exacerbate anxieties (nor-
mal) which can grow into pho-
bias (abnormal). The

practitioner must be espe-
cially careful, if there is poor
patient cooperation or if there is
patient distress.

Dental practitioners can treat
dental phobias themselves or
enlist the help of the patient's
general practitioner or psychol-
ogist. It is very important for
dentists to understand patients’
fears and to explain the pro-
posed

dental treatment.

People with specific fears
such as gagging and needle pho-
bia may respond best to empa-
thetic patient care, with the



addition of relaxation tech-
niques. Relaxation techniques
can sometimes last up to four
hours prior to the

procedure. Patients may also
be offered a mixture of nitrous
oxide (laughing gas) and oxy-
gen to inhale, which can reduce
pain experienced and produce
relaxation. Tranquilizers inject-
ed directly into the veins can
also

help. Some practitioners will
in addition, play soothing music
to promote patient relaxation.
Only a few patients will require
this type of specialist care.

Those with severe symptoms
should have a thorough assess-
ment by an experienced psy-
chologist or psychiatrist and a
carefully structured treatment
programme. A psychiatrist is
sometimes needed because den-
tal anxiety may be part ofa
greater type of anxiety disorder
e.g. generalised anxiety disor-
der, panic disorder or agora-
phobia (a pathological fear of
being in public places).

It is crucial that if you sus-

FEAR OF THE
CHAIR: It is
reported that
about half of
all dental
patients expe-
rience some
anxiety
towards their
dental visit.
This fear can
lead to a delay
in seeking nec-
essary dental
care, cancella-
tion of
appointments
and poor
cooperation in
the dental
chair.

pect you have a dental phobia,
to set up a meeting with your
dental healthcare provider. He
will ensure you get the help you
need. What you consider a pho-
bia (abnormal) may be just an
anxiety

(normal). Do not delay in
seeking necessary dental help
because of a possible dental
anxiety. It can be managed suc-
cessfully and you can enjoy
excellent oral health.

¢ Dr. André R. Clarke, DDS, MBBS
Special Care Dentistry

“This article is for informational
purposes only. It is not intended
and may not be treated as, a sub-
stitute for professional medical/den-
tal advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
Always seek the advice of a physi-
cian or dental professional with any
questions you may have regarding
a medical/dental condition. Never
disregard professional medical/den-
tal advice or delay in seeking it
because of a purely informational
publication."



DISORDER: Alopecia X usually
occurs in plush -coated breeds,
most commonly Pomeranians
and Samoyeds, but can occur in
any breed of dog.

Alopecia X



ALOPECIA X is a disor-
der of the hair follicles that
most likely reflects a defect
in the ability of the hair fol-
licles to cycle properly
through its growing and rest-
ing stages.

Alopecia X may be a com-
ponent of a typical Cushing
Disease. It usually occurs in
plush -coated breeds, most
commonly Pomeranians and
Samoyeds, but can occur in
any breed of dog. It can also
occur in at any age. Gradual
loss of primary hair pro-
gresses to complete alpoe-
cia of the neck, tail, both
sides of the trunk, back of
thighs and under the tail.
Usually the head and front
limbs are spared. Hair loss
is bilaterally, symmetrical
and the alopecic skin
becomes hyper-pigmented
and thin.

Mid seborrhea and sec-
ondary superficial pyoder-
ma may occur. There are no
systemic signs of illness with
this condition. It usually
diagnosed by ruling out oth-
er causes of endocrine alope-
cla.

Controversy exists as to
whether this disease requires
treatment because it is main-
ly a cosmetic problem and
affected dogs are otherwise
healthy. Neutering of intact
dogs may induce permanent
or temporary hair re-
growths. Drugs such as mela-
tonin, mitotane trilostane
have been used for this con-
dition.

The decision whether to
treat this condition in your
dog requires a thoughtful
discussion with your veteri-
narian, as well as careful
weighing of the pros and
cons of treatment. The prog-
nosis for hair re -growth is
unpredictable. This is a cos-
metic disease only that does
not affect the dog’s quality of
life.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 11B






A spotlight on the talented

women in our community







ES D







he’s Doctor do-good

and then some

when a family friend sug-

gests it won't be long before
her dad, well-known attorney and
Member of Parliament for Cat
Island Philip 'Brave' Davis, is
introduced as the father of the

famed Dr Philippa Davis.

"Never," chuckles the MP's daughter,
in Nassau for a short visit recently. A
Lyford Cay Foundation recipient, Dr Davis
completed her undergraduate degree at
McGill University in Canada (with dis-
tinction), her medical degree at George-
town University School of Medicine in
Washington, DC (earning membership in
the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honour
Society), her internship in internal medi-
cine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York,
her residency in Anesthesiology at
Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston
and her fellowship in Critical Care Medi-
cine at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in
California.

After 13 years of college and med school,
she was certified in Critical Care Medi-
cine in October and at the age of 31 is
licensed to practise in California, Massa-
chusetts and Virginia --and, by the way,
had time along the way to volunteer in
Mwanza, Tanzania.

Piven: Davis, MD, laughs

"IT would not have made it this far with-
out the loving support and sacrifices of my
family and friends, especially my parents
and grandparents," said Dr Davis, now
affiliated with Inova Fairfax Hospital in
Fairfax, Virginia, a level one trauma centre.

The long journey, she said, also taught
her that "the things most worthwhile are
not easy to come by."

"The one thing she had to give up," says
mom, Janice Davis, who has been with the
Government of The Bahamas for 30 years,
"is sports." A star athlete, Davis repre-
sented The Bahamas at the Caribbean
Island Swimming Championships in Cura-
cao at the age of 12.

It was a trade-off she was willing to
make.

"Iam humbled and blessed that God has
given me the gifts to care for patients in
their most vulnerable times of need," says
Dr Davis, amember of the American Soci-
ety of Anesthesiology and the Society of
Critical Care Medicine. After lengthy train-
ing, Davis wants to gain more experience in
high volume and acuity level one trauma
before returning to The Bahamas to practise.

* Know another woman who is making it
big? Email us at features@tribunemedia.net
ae she may be featured as the next “You Go

irl.”

@e@eeeeeooeoeeeoeeeeaeaeoeeneeoeoeeeoeeeeoeeeeneeoeeeeeoeeeevneeeeneeeseeoeeeneeeoe®s



b wou

d not have made it this far without the



OV-

ing support and sacrifices of my family and

friends, especially my parents and grandparent.

Dr. Philippa Davis






Francis recognised
for exemplary
character trait

By DEBI SWICK-CRUSE

JESSICA Francis, a student at
Potomac State College (PSC) of West
Virginia University, has been recog-
nised for exemplifying the character
trait of respect.

Each year, the college honours select-
ed students by choosing them as
CHARACTER COUNTS! students
for various character traits.

One individual who nominated Fran-
cis stated, “In my 19 years of working in
higher education, Jessica is one of the
most respectful students I have had the
opportunity to work with.”

Francis is a general agriculture major
from Nassau in the Bahamas and a grad-
uate of CV Bethel Senior High School.
She plays the position of center on the
Potomac State Catamounts basketball
team and according to Head Coach Jim
Walton, “Jessica always gives one hun-
dred per cent and has contributed to
our current record of 23-3.”

Jessica was born and raised in Nas-
sau. She took karate for 13 years, retir-
ing with a first-degree black belt. She
performed volunteer community ser-
vice at a geriatric hospital and was
named ‘Rookie of the Year’ by a night-
league basketball team in the Bahamas.
She is the daughter of Jeffrey and
Andrea Francis.

Potomac State continues to honour
students with the CHARACTER
COUNTS! Program, which is an out-
growth of The Joseph
& Edna Josephson
Institute of
Ethics. This non-
profit organisa-
tion is dedicated
to helping peo-
ple make prin-
cipled decisions
in order that “
they might live
with greater
integrity.















Jessica
Francis





Stomach pacemaker could help obese lose weight

LONDON
Associated Press

PATRICK Hetzner tried
diets and exercise, just about
everything short of stomach sta-
pling to lose weight. Nothing
worked. Five months ago he
tried something new: a stomach
pacemaker that curbed his
appetite.

Since having it implanted,
Hetzner, a 20-year-old Munich
mailman, has knocked off more
than 10 kilos (22 pounds) from
his earlier weight of 104 kilos
(229 pounds).

Hetzner got the device as part
of a clinical trial. Since being
approved by Britain last month,
the device is available for sale
across the European Union. It
works a bit like a cardiac pace-
maker, and consists of a stimu-
lator and a sensor surgically
implanted onto the stomach.

The stimulator sends out elec-
trical pulses meant to trick the
stomach and brain into think-
ing the body is full. Hetzner said
the pulses kick in a few minutes
after he starts eating or drinking.
He said they make him feel full
after finishing about half the
amount of food he would nor-
mally eat.

"It feels like a little pressure



on my stomach ora tickle, but __!N THIS Friday, Feburary 25, 2011 photo Thomas Horbach, chief of surgery at Stadtkrankenhaus Schwabach, who led one of the trials, is seen in his office in the hospital in Schwabach,
it's not a bad feeling,” he saidin Near Nuremberg, Germany, Horbach implanted a stomach pacemaker that helps regulate the amount of food users take in. Patrick Hetzner, a 20-year-old Munich mailman, has

a telephone interview.
"It's been like a little guide

to help me change my life,” he
said.

So far, about 65 patients in
two studies have received the
device from U.S. pacemaker
manufacturer Intrapace. Only
about half of those have had
the pacemaker for at least a
year, and most lost about 20 per
cent of their weight and kept it
off.

Other stomach pacemakers
are on the market but most are
used to relieve symptoms like
nausea and vomiting, not to
fight obesity.

Appetite is partly controlled
by signals sent from nerves
around the stomach to the
brain; the stomach pacemaker
taps into that communication
system, sending a message to
the brain that the body is full

after a relatively small amount
of food is consumed.

"If you can stimulate the
nerves going from the stomach
to the brain, that should indeed
have an effect in reducing food
intake,” said Stephen Bloom,
an obesity expert at Imperial
College in London, who is not
connected to Intrapace or the
clinical trials.

Bloom, however, questioned
whether the device would work
long-term, as people might
eventually get used to the elec-
trical pulses and keep eating
anyway.

Doctors familiar with the
pacemaker say there will always
be ways for patients to eat and
work around the system. "We
could make the (stomach pace-
maker) work so people feel like

they're going to throw up, but
we don't want that," said
Thomas Horbach, chief of
surgery at Stadtkrankenhaus
Schwabach, near Munich, who
led one of the trials.

"If you take away all the
responsibilities from the patient,
they will not change on their
own."

As an additional benefit, the
sensor tracks when patients eat,
drink or exercise, so patients
can chart their progress. Intra-
pace has also created an online
network for patients to trade
weight loss advice and share
experiences.

Other surgical approaches to
weight loss come with serious
side effects.

People who have their stom-
ach stapled or have a gastric

knocked off more than 10 kilos (22 pounds) from his earlier weight of 104 kilos (229 pounds). (AP)

band must eat smaller amounts
of mostly low-fat foods, because
their stomachs can't accommo-
date or process large volumes. If
they overeat, they will feel nau-
seous, vomit, or suffer from oth-
er problems.

The most serious side effect
seen in the pacemaker has been
an infection linked to surgery. In
Britain, the pacemaker costs
about 15,000 pounds ($24,040),
including the keyhole surgery
used to implant it. Intrapace
President Chuck Brynelsen said
that's comparable to other
weight loss surgeries.

The device is authorised for
sale across the EU, though the
company is first targeting weight
loss clinics in Britain, Germany
and Spain. It also plans to sub-
mit the device for approval in

the US once it has more data,
and hopes it will be available
there in 2014.

The pacemaker hasn't yet
been implanted commercially
in Europe, but Intrapace is in
talks with clinics interested in
offering it.

Brynelsen said the battery in
the device lasts about five years
and it will be up to patients how
long they want to keep the
pacemaker. "We don't know if
patients will see (the stomach
pacemaker) as a bridge to
recovery or whether this is a
crutch they will need for the
longer term,” he said.

Some experts said the pace-
maker did not address people's
underlying reasons for overeat-
ing. "The problem with these
devices is they assume people

are rational and that they eat
because they're hungry,” said
Stephan Rossner, a professor
in the obesity unit at Karolinska
University Hospital.

"A lot of obese patients eat
because they're depressed, they
can't sleep at night, or they have
nobody to have sex with,” he
said. "So whatever you insert
into their stomach, they can out-
eat that device because it's oth-
er things that drive them to con-
sume.”

Hetzner said he intends to
keep the stomach pacemaker
for about four years.

"T don't want to backslide,"
he said, adding he would rec-
ommend the device to others. "I
want to be sure I can stick with
it and that my body adapts to
this new way of eating.”


By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

THE TRIBUNE

LO

HEN we have lost sight of our dreams, while getting

caught up in his, we are loving too much. When we

keep hoping that he will change, even though we
know deep down inside that this transformation will never
occur, we are loving too much. When we plan our entire exis-
tence around him, we are loving too much. And when we try
to hold onto a relationship that is terribly broken and cannot
be revived we are loving too much.

In an attempt to fill the void of loneli-
ness and share in true companionship
with another, some women get carried
away in this quest. They become so
obsessed with being in a relationship that
they end up settling for less, at the
expense of losing themselves and all of
their hopes and dreams. In essence they
end up loving too much!

But where do they find the answers
to this ordeal. How do they stop them-
selves from becoming so absorbed in
their mate, and how do stop themselves
from loving too much?

Tribune Woman spoke to a few ladies
to seek answers. Some of the women
expressed their views on this issue and
even admitted to loving so much, to that
point where they became both physical-
ly and emotionally wounded.

Shantavia Sweeting* told Tribune
Woman how she came to overcome her

Jergens
& naturals.

Put your best skin
out there

emotional wreckage. “I am so guilty of
loving too much. I surrounded my entire
life around my boyfriend and I didn’t
realise what I was doing. Before mak-
ing plans with friends I had to check with
my boyfriend first to make sure he didn’t
have plans for us. Every single weekend
would meet me spending time with him.
And when he decided to go out with his
friends instead of hanging out with me
that was a major problem. I would find
anything to argue about just so that he
would not go out anymore and my
behaviour was just sad man. I didn’t have
a life. Ineeded a life. Then it came to the
point where I just had it with me being so
consumed with him.”

“Thad to evaluate myself and I found
that I was so emotionally dependent.
Then I realised I had to get my own life
and do the things that made me happy. I
had to find my own happiness,” she said.

TUESDAY, MARCH 8,

-

Melody Edgecombe had this to say:
“T feel as though its okay to love some-
one but not to the point where it seems as
though you may love them more than
you love yourself and you shouldn’t
waste time giving love to someone that
doesn’t appreciate you that much or
doesn’t think that much of you because in
the end you'll only end up hurting your-
self,” she said.

Latoya Poitier said whenever she saw
a beautiful couple out she always felt the
need to be in a relationship.

“T’m sure at some point and time we all
have. We find ourselves going crazy just
to keep someone who really doesn't val-
ue us because there is always something
new for men to go after. I’ve always been
in relationships, I don’t like being alone
or the thought of being alone did some-
thing to me. It’s like when you're not
with someone whenever you go out you
see all the couples out holding hands. I
hate the thought of failing at anything.
What I would do is go out and date then
fall in love all over again. But that never
changed anything and the cycle contin-
ued,” she said.

“That's why I took a very short break
and I allowed love to come to me instead
of going out there looking for it.”

In an effort to bring upliftment to
women, Stanya Davis, decided to start
Eve’s Journey, a workshop designed to
help women discover their true beauty.

Tribune Woman sat down with Stanya




2011

EMPTINESS: In an
attempt to fill the
void of loneliness
and share in true
companionship
with another, some
women get carried
away in this quest.
They become so
obsessed with
being ina relation-
ship that they end
up settling for less,
at the expense of
losing themselves
and all of their
hopes and dreams.





Dom

Davis, organiser of the workshop
“Women Who love Too Much”, who
expressed her views on the issue.

“When being in love means being in
pain we are loving too much. When most
of our conversations with intimate friends
are about him, we are loving too much.
When we keep hoping he will change
we are loving too much. When our rela-
tionship jeopardises our emotional well
being and perhaps even our physical
health and safety we are definitely loving
too much. This characterises the women
that love too much and I think all women
have been at this point where they are
guilty of loving too much.”

Ms Davis is a life coach and had done
a great deal of research on “Women
Who Love Too Much.

“The thing these women fear is being
along and they think if Thold on to this it
can work. It is almost as though they
cannot see the light at the end of the
tunnel or they don’t see themselves doing
better or they don’t think they can find
something better.”

She said women who are guilty of lov-
ing too much must find time to evaluate
themselves. She said they must learn to
love themselves truly before they can
love anyone else. “Loving yourself does
not happen in one day”.

The workshop takes place this Satur-
day.

For more information log onto their
facebook page Eve’s Journey.




im lovin

82F
71F

PLEASANT WITH

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 107 No.89

aU a

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SIXTY-SIX people have
been the victims of armed
robbery within the past two
months — an average of one
person per day — it has been
revealed.

But police say at least half
of these crimes could have
been prevented had the vic-
tims carried out basic proac-
tive measures.

Personal responsibility is
said to be a vital prerequisite
of crime prevention.

Supt Stephen Dean, direc-
tor of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force’s National
Crime Prevention (NCP)
office, said: “Opportunity is
the key element in crime,
reduce the opportunity,
reduce crime.

“A lot of these cases were
unnecessary and could have
been avoided had persons
utitlised basic common sense
in terms of their personal
safety.”

According to police reports
compiled by The Tribune, 39

J us iawn

ne H

NIKI

SEE WOMAN SECTION



persons were robbed by
armed thugs in January, and
27 in February.

Construction sites, cash-
based businesses, phone card
vendors, asue recipients, trav-
ellers and persons walking at
night were all said to be at
increased risk.

Anticipating an increase
in cash flow in the capital due
to new construction projects —
most notably the 1,000 acre,
$3.4 billion Baha Mar resort
development at Cable Beach
— Supt Dean explained that
his department sought to
crack down on emerging
trends.

Supt Dean said: “Preven-
tion. Not to raise alarm, but
to prevent similar events
from recurring, to minimise
armed robbery. When we see
these trends we try to address
it before it gets out of con-
trol.”

On Friday afternoon,
three armed men burst into
the office of the TG Glover
construction site on Pitt
Road. Armed with handguns,

SEE page eight

Wife |



TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

eS
a
AND REAL aes

SEES Sy

66 armed ober
victims in 2 months

Half could have been
avoided, say police





_ SEE SECTION E



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

MAN CHARGED
WITH KILLING
HIS MOTHER

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN accused of killing
his mother appeared in court
yesterday.

Ronado Adderley, 33, of
Dundas Town, Abaco, was
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane, yesterday,
charged in the murder of
Yvonne Adderley.

It is alleged the accused

SEE page eight



HARD AT WORK: Roadworks taking place on Marathon Road yesterday. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said on Sunday that progress is being
made on the New Providence Road Improvement Project, but more monthly productivity will be needed to meet the government’s schedule.

PLP CHAIRMAN: COMMITTEE NOT AWARE OF
‘FRAUD’ ALLEGATIONS sis TO CANDIDATE

By NOELLE
NICOLLS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nnicolls@
tribunemedia.net iy

THE candidates
selection committee
of the Progressive
Liberal Party was
not aware of a
Canadian TV sta-
tion’s allegations
linking political hopeful
Arnold Forbes to an alleged
$170 million investment
“fraud”, it was claimed yes-
terday.

PLP chairman Bradley

Fidelity Fast Track

Debt Consolidation
saves him $300 per month



PLP CHAIRMAN
Bradley Roberts

Roberts said the
committee only
learned about the
accusations after Mr
Forbes was already
ratified as the PLP
candidate for the
Mount Moriah con-
stituency.

Having learned of
the claims, Mr
Roberts said, to the
best of his knowl-
edge, the party is not
reviewing its recommenda-
tion because “there is no
basis for a review.”

Details of Mr Forbes’

SEE page eight

PUBLIC RAISES CONCERNS OVER NETS
USED IN LAKE KILLARNEY FISHING

By CELESTE NIXON
Trbune Staff Reporter
cnixon@tribunemedia.net

PERSONS seen fishing in
Lake Killarney might be
using nets that are killing
protected species of birds.

According to past presi-
dent and executive member
of the Bahamas National
Trust, Pericles Mallis, while
it is not illegal to fish in Lake
Killarney or to use nets of a
certain mesh, the “gill nets,”
which are suspected of being
used in this case can be left
in the water for hours,
increasing the possibility of

trapping and killing birds
such as diving and ruddy
ducks — both protected in the
Bahamas.

Concerns were first raised
when photographs surfaced
of persons pulling large nets
filled with fish out of Lake
Killarney.

Members of the public
called The Tribune to claim
this method of fishing is ille-
gal.

But Earl Deveaux, Minis-
ter for the Environment, said
the Bahamas does not cur-
rently have fishery regula-

SEE page eight

Get out of debt Fast!

Get out of Debt Fast with a Fidelity
Fast Track Debt Consolidation loan.

e Decisions Fast
e Money Fast

e Plus Visa Credit Card Fast

Call 356.7764 today!

www. fidelitygroup.com
FREDERICK STREET | WULFF ROAD | MADEIRA PLAZA | ROBIN HOOD | CABLE BEACH | FREEPORT | MARSH HARBOUR



NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



= ) FIDELITY |
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Business owners, RAI Ka Ea
informed of er OS dt a

LATOYA WALKER, an employee of Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles SA, informing a repre-
sentative of an East Street business of upcoming road work on East Street and Robinson Road.

PICK 2

SALAD VALUE
























call real.

PICK ANY *MEDIUM

corey. tea





THE Ministry of Public Works and We also have a series of information
Transport is sending out officers to meetings that we continue to hold, most
inform residents and business owners of | of them at the Mall at Marathon, until
upcoming road works on various corri- we can secure other venues.”
dors that are a part of the New Provi- The next information meeting will be
dence Road Improvement and Infra- held on Thursday at the Mall at
structure Project. Marathon from 10am to 6pm. It will
Charlene Collie, project engineer, said: focus on the work being done on Prince
“We've been trying to inform business Charles Drive, Robinson Road and
owners and residents along the routes by Marathon Road.
walking door-to-door, handing them fly- All members of the public are invited
ers and advising them of upcoming _ to attend. Officers from the ministry will
works and the duration of the works. _ be present to answer questions.

Air pick « A bonus em. DEFENCE FORCE CHURCH SERVICE AND PARADE

MINISTER OF NATIONAL

SECURITY Tommy Turn-

a Royal Bahamas Defence

Force’s annual church
service and parade at
Grace Community Church
on Sunday.












sPIECE SMALL CRISPYCHICKEN JR. CHEESEBURGER JR. BACON

HUGGETS CHILI SANDWICH DELUXE CHEESEBURGER THE HE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE took to the streets of the Marathon Sub-division following

their annual church service on Sunday.

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING

“Lowest Prices On The Island”



STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm



GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Arthur Foulkes and Lady Foulkes headed
the list of officials attending. Also pictured at left is Minister of
National Security Tommy Turnquest.

SI MBP) ery
SUB B AS

FREE DELIVERY, ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

* E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture
And Appliance Centre MAR. 8 ory i

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875 rR SEU ae ere Road
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





Police launch
investigation of
Suicide attempt

¢ POLICE have launched
an investigation into the
attempted suicide of a 30-
year-old woman.

The Fire Trail Road resi-
dent apparently attempted to
end her life by cutting her
wrists and taking an excessive
amount of unspecified tablets
on Sunday evening, police say.

The woman was taken to
the hospital by ambulance and
was yesterday listed in stable
condition.
POLICE SEARCH FOR
MASKED MEN WHO ROBBED
AND ASSAULTED A WOMAN

¢ POLICE are searching
for two masked men who
assaulted and robbed a
woman at her home.

The men — one armed with
a handgun and the other with
a knife -— ambushed the
woman when she arrived at
her home on Miami Street off
Balfour Avenue yesterday,
shortly after 3am.

They forced the victim into
her home, assaulted her, and
stole her jewellery.

Several hours later, another
woman was robbed by two
masked men on Swordfish
Drive off McKinney Avenue.

The culprits, one of whom
was armed with a handgun,
stole the victim’s bag con-
taining her cell phone, keys
and other personal effects
shortly after 9.30pm.

ARMED MAN STEALS CASH
FROM ISLAND LUCK

¢ A MAN armed with a
handgun stole an undeter-
mined amount of cash from
Island Luck and damaged a
window before fleeing the
area on foot.

The culprit was wearing
dark clothing and a black hat
when he entered the webshop
on East Street south off Wulff
Road shortly after 7pm on
Sunday.

MAN QUESTIONED IN
CONNECTION WITH
MOTORCYCLE THEFT

e¢ A 21-year-old man is
being questioned by police in
connection with the theft of
a motorcycle.

It was reported that a man
armed with a handgun robbed
a 25-year-old man of his 150
CBR 2003 model Honda
motorcycle. The victim was at
Rupert Dean Lane around
noon on Sunday when he was
approached by the culprit.

The 21-year-old in custody
is a resident of Baillou Hill
Road South.

THREE MEN ARRESTED AFTER
OFFICERSPOLICE SEIZE
AMMUNITION FROM HOME

¢ OFFICERS attached to
Operation Rapid Strike
arrested three men after seiz-
ing a quantity of ammunition
at a home.

Police discovered the con-
traband during a search of a
house on Podoleo Street
around 10pm on Friday. The
men taken into custody were
19, 22, and 29 years old.

Two armoured
car employees
arraigned

TWO armoured car employ-
ees accused of stealing from a
local bank were arraigned in a
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Alfred Pinder, 24, of Golden
Gates, and Arlington Rolle, 27,
of Carmichael Road, are
accused of stealing by reason
of employment. It is alleged
that on Thursday, March 3, the
two men stole cash in the
amount of $50,000 from First
Caribbean International Bank.

Both men pleaded not guilty
to the charge during their
arraignment before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court
One, Bank Lane.

Pinder was represented by
attorney Stephanie Wells.

Both men were granted
$20,000 bail with two sureties.
They were both ordered to
report to the Carmichael Road
police station every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
before 6pm. The case was
adjourned to June 20 and trans-
ferred to Court 5, Bank Lane.





Govt ‘expects to be awarded costs’
after Grant-Bethell case ruling

Cheryl Grant-Bethell

THE government expects
to be awarded costs in view
of a Supreme Court judge’s
decision not to rule in favour
of veteran prosecutor Cheryl-
Grant Bethell, who protested
being passed over for a top
post.

Despite Mrs Grant-Bethell
declaring victory with respect
to a verdict she felt cleared
her reputation, Senior Justice
Jon Isaacs refused to grant
any of the relief declarations
sought by the veteran prose-
cutor.

When asked to comment on
the matter on Saturday, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
said: “I have no comment on
it but I say this; that the Attor-
ney General was sued in his
personal capacity, that was
thrown out by the court. The
Attorney General was sued as
Attorney General of the

Bahamas, that too was thrown
out, and we expect for costs
to be awarded against the par-
ty that brought the action —
Mrs Bethell — and we expect
for her to pay it.”

He went on to state: “A
request was made to the court
for 10 or 11 separate orders
and the court refused each
and every one. It said many
things but at the end of the
day it said, ‘No, no, no, no’.

“At the end of the day, the
party that took the Judicial
and Legal Services to court to
say that they had been trans-
ferred to the Law Reform
Commission and that they
should have remained as
Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions and should have
been made Director of Prose-
cutions (DPP), lost and they
are still exactly where they
were when the case began.”



Voter registration continues
to be a ‘gradual process’

By CELESTE NIXON
Tribune Staff Reporter

cnixon@tribunemedia.net

VOTER registration con-
tinues to proceed at a moder-
ate pace.

With just about 23,500
Bahamians registered for the
next general election so far,
Parliamentary Commissioner
Errol Bethel said that while
the rate has increased since the
holiday season, registration
continues to be a gradual
process.

Persons seeking to register
as voters must be Bahamian
citizens 18 years or older, and
must have lived in a particu-
lar constituency for three
months or more.

Voter registration centres
are open in New Providence
between the hours of 10am
and 4pm at the following loca-
tions:

¢ The Parliamentary Regis-

tration Department, Farring-
ton Road.

¢ Town Centre Mall and
Marathon Mall.

¢ The General Post Office,
East Hill Street.

¢ The Sub-Post Office,
Carmichael Road.

¢ The Sub-Post Office, Eliz-
abeth Estates.

¢ The National Insurance
Board, Baillou Hill Road.

¢ Commonwealth Bank,
Mackey Street and Golden
Gates branches.

In Grand Bahama, centres
are open between the hours of
9.30am and 4.30pm at the fol-
lowing locations:

¢ The Parliamentary Regis-
tration Department, Freeport.

¢ The Administrator's
Office, Eight Mile Rock.

¢ The Administrator's
Office, High Rock (Tuesdays
and Thursdays).

In the Family Islands, regis-
tration takes place at the



MODERATE PACE: Parliamentary Commissioner Errol Bethel (above)
said that while the rate has increased since the holiday season, reg-
istration continues to be a gradual process.

Do it yourself oil change:
"STEP 2; Remove drain
plug and drain old cil into
an oil pan

Wk A CASTROL GOLF SHIRT:
Callin ta StarTJ6.5 FA's

“Set Meck for the Soul" show from
d-4pim on Friday and giv Drad steps
1-5 towing Garteel batt Shirt

Ea ate
STC
BAY STREET GARAGE

MTs TAMA

aS Re

CARIB GENERATORS

DIESEL GENERATORS

SUPER SILENT — PERKINS, CUMMINS, ISUZU:

Automatic Transfer
1OO/200 gallon fuel tanks,

Switch,
Deep Sea

Controllers, Stamford Altennators,
Weather Proof Enclosures,

Shipping & Customs Duties Included ...

oO Ko

ae 60 day ene

suru 20kw,

SUF 2K
Cuerinmeins.
Cummins

CUM. Perkins GOtow
UK. Perkins 9

Dies sel
Diesel

ISKW TO 4000KW FACTORY DIRECT

NASSAU & FAMILY ISLANDS

Phone 427-3749

www.ecaribgenerators.com



Administrator’s Office
between the hours of 9.30am
and 4.30pm.

Businesses and organisations
with at least 20 eligible
employees or members may
contact the department at tele-
phone numbers 325-2888/9 or
397-2000 to schedule a visit
from registration agents.

Woy} tee]
ee LL

aa Maer
322-2157



The prime minister also said
he had no idea whether Mrs
Grant-Bethell will remain in
her present post.

Mrs Grant-Bethell filed an
application for a judicial
review after being passed over
for the post of DPP.

She was instead appointed
Deputy Law Reform Com-
missioner.

Mrs Grant-Bethell had
sought to have the judge
quash the decision of the Judi-
cial and Legal Services Com-

mission (JLSC) purporting to
appoint her to the post of
Deputy Law Reform Com-
missioner.

She had also sought: a dec-
laration that she remain in her
substantive post as Deputy
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions; a declaration that she,
having acted as DPP for the
requisite period, be entitled
to that post; and a declaration
that any other appointment to
the post of DPP be declared
null and void.

Pee UE TM MUR ELOL A ae Re a De



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THe Moe? Tete Reis
Sal CRT Serie, (rain

Austheerivnd Sine Tincihy Myre mal tr

c AL L PROC HEM | BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 « 323-1594

& Ops Evil
Steed) Lake? & rie erie (ah Sh ee.

&, Oe Tee hoe i Pee!

PROLECELESE SVS TEM (un)

ONLY WE CAN DOT RIGHTY

Oe

=m © wie



siemrirckpen. com 9 ewe ie

rie

IT’S A TIME OF JOY AND JUBLATION!

ff'S AGRAND TIME

OF PRAISE &

CELEBRATION, IT a

TIME OF FELLO
PRAISE £ WOK:

March 13-20, 2011 - ‘East Street Tabernacle
THEME: “LED BY HIS SPIRIT PF ose :.:1

SPECIAL GUBST SPEARS & PRESET ERE:

BISHOP CLAYTON MARTI
fread Finalayter

BISHOF DAVID BRYAN
{doled Oivtresch Tarecctor
BISHOF ROBERT DAVIS
Phteabe Greve od Fhogda

BISHOF JEFFERY DAVIS
Attacte Overseer of North facolix

BISHOF TIMOTHY COALTER
State Onesies od Soatth facolies
BISHOP CLARENCE WILL Ma
Overseer od The Toda 4. adcon Isovds

BISH OF GON BROOCH
MR. ELLISON GREENSLAGE

Conmudsskoer ot Police
THOS VE et CS ae: Ce Webs)
Sonventian Sinan, the Convention Praise
Tesau, Taterncde Caxvert Cia, sand other
Chinen Civaivs, Fosdse Tess, Salaiete, aard
Stinging ‘Gyaups. The Behsws. Bases Boor,
Bahauses Youth sod Jima: Byavas Bao,
and the Cousaders Brass Bed wil provide

Specie] wniek:.

Monday, March 14th, 2011

Bishop Dv. Diaaemt B. Raloning, CMG,
BP, JF, Watiwal Creseer and Moclera-
tea Will deliver his Ama] Matiggial Ad

7 LOG Gv ror”!

Wn Oop DeLee. OE
POR Lane eer EVEMAG wea

rm at rg aT! rh py cae



Sunday, March 20th, 2011

The Govention closes oi Suoedary, March
20th, 2OLL with the fuwwual Parade med
Water Bapthonal Senviece at the Wester Be
Plogade, aed with the Hue 2H Radio 15-40
A, 200 AM ood EN OY Le evenbeg broad
fast sender. niviag thinsenice, the Maton]
Oversee, Bishop lv. Elgsnet B. Aehouing will
delivery the fine] message on thre Convention's
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 201

1

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

STR ETIENNE DUPUCH,

Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Not the time for union unrest

ONE WOULD have thought that unions
— especially the hotel union in Freeport —
would have learned its lesson by now with
the closure in 2004 of the Royal Oasis Golf
Resort and Casino, putting more that 1,200
Bahamians out of work.

This hotel struggled under union pressure
from the day the new owners bought it in
1999 to the day in 2004 when Hurricane
Frances so badly damaged it that the owners
decided not to reopen. It was clear that the
disruptive behaviour of the unions played a
major role in that decision.

A year before Hurricane Frances made
the decision for everyone, Donald Archer,
the hotel’s senior vice president, broke his
silence to complain about the poor level of
service from certain staff about which guests
were also complaining. He warned them that
not only would a strike be illegal, but that
“any responsible union would examine the
current and future needs of its members, the
fragile economic environment, the financial
status of the company and global conditions.”
At the time the Iraq war was threatening.

Mr Archer warned at the time that more
than 1,200 families would be affected by a
strike “to say nothing of the impact on these
families and the businesses that they patro-
nise.”

But what union leaders did not appreciate
was how much they had hurt their member-
ship who had a stake in the International
Bazaar, which also faced closure. With the
hotel closed, the Bazaar’s patrons had dis-
appeared.

Commenting on this in November 2005,
we wrote: “This should teach the union a les-
son that when it pushes its claims too far
everything can collapse under the strain, tak-
ing even the union with it.”

Seven years later the Royal Oasis Golf
Resort remains closed.

And so we were surprised at the beginning
of this year to hear of labour unrest at Our
Lucaya resort, which everyone knew was
struggling to keep its doors open in a world
recession that was leaving millions jobless.

But apparently, Obie Ferguson, president
of the Bahamas Hotel Managerial Associa-
tion, saw a chink of light somewhere that no
one else saw. In January he said that “now the
economy is showing signs of recovery,” he
thought it “time to do what should be done.”

“Workers rights,” he said, “are as impor-
tant as profits. We will take the necessary
poll and then do what we have to do.” Of
course, the poll he was hinting at was a strike
vote.

Hotel staff knew that the hotel was not
doing well. As a matter fact there was no
place on the globe that was not suffering from
the world crash. However, in the Bahamas
there are those among us — including, if not

c









BANK

especially, some politicians — who think that
the Bahamas is somehow not a part of the
economically broken world, and that our peo-
ple, despite our exorbitant public debt, should
not have to lower their financial expectations.

As a matter of fact Prime Minister Ingra-
ham thanked the Hutchison-Whampoa group
for keeping Our Lucaya open, when others
would have closed it. It was known that the
hotel was subsiding the staff’s payroll and
could not afford more. Yet Mr Ferguson, the
union man, continued his background rum-
blings. Last week it was announced that Our
Lucaya had closed two of its three hotels.
Instead of closing completely, it consolidated
its operation on one property — Breakers
Cay —to save 800 jobs. However, to save the
800, 200 staff had to go.

Government is now working with the hotel
to try to find employment for these 200, and
to retrain some of them in other skills to qual-
ify for other jobs.

When will Bahamians understand what is
going on in the world, and appreciate the
jobs they now have? This is not the time for
government corporations — some of whose
staff are the best paid in the Bahamas — to be
talking of salary increases. Look at other
countries and see how heavily they have
reduced their public service to streamline
their economies. It is acknowledged that our
civil service is over stacked and could do with
a heavy trim. But, government has as yet
shown no inclination to do so.

Even the Cuban Workers Federation
announced that half of its work force will
lose their jobs by next year. The Cuban gov-
ernment currently employs 85 per cent of
that island’s workers.

These workers will have to either go back
to the farms, find construction work, become
self employed or join a cooperative.

Today’s economic downturn is forcing
Cuba closer to the free enterprise system.

“Our state can’t keep maintaining... bloat-
ed payrolls,” the Cuban Workers Federation
told The Wall Street Journal.

This is something that local unions and
many Bahamians have yet to grasp. Although
we might not know it we are a part of the
world and if any part of that world is injured,
the whole unit will feel it. Already petroleum
retailers want to raise their prices to offset the
troubles driving prices up in the oil rich Mid-
dle East. The increase in oil will push up costs
across the board. Businessmen have no con-
trol over these costs. Therefore, when they are
forced to cut costs to keep their businesses
operational — the decision forced on the Our
Lucaya owners will be forced on them. Staff
become redundant.

It is no time in such a climate for the
unions to create further instability — in the
end only its members will suffer.



ee ayAN Bs

PUBLIC NOTICE



Commonwealth Bank, F

reeport Branch is trying

to locate customer Philip Kelly

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:

#11 Pearl Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Mr. Kelly or his next of kin

is asked to please contact

the Manager of Commonwealth Bank Limited,

Freeport Branch as soon as possible.

Mr. J. Rupert Roberts, Sr. Manager, Freeport Branch

Tel: (242) 352-8307

“Leader in Personal Banking Services”



| www.combankltd.com

Better union
leadership
needed at
Our Lucaya

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Since the last layoffs at Our
Lucaya Resort back in 2008, I
am surprised that it took so
long for another mass dis-
missal. As reported, the resort
has lost an average of over
$30 million per year over the
past few years.

Despite being one of those
employees who was given bad
news this past week, I feel
Hutchison should be com-
mended for keeping us
employed for so long with
such financial challenges.

I think it was misleading for
our union representatives to
know the facts prior to the
layoffs and then in a last ditch
attempt for headlines pretend
management has done some-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



thing wrong. Better and more
responsible union leadership
is needed at Our Lucaya mov-
ing forward.

I feel confident that Hutchi-
son will find a way to make a
success out of the resort and it
was great to hear that a
greater emphasis will be
placed on marketing.

I accepted my notice with
dignity and did not follow the
union’s advice to protest. I
never believe in burning
bridges.

I came to Our Lucaya with

my head up and left with my
head high. I thank God for
the opportunity to provide for
my family and I pray there is
a new form of take over at
Our Lucaya and better days
are ahead.

GRATEFUL
FORMER
EMPLOYEE -
OUR LUCAYA
Nassau,

March 6, 2011.

P.S. “Man has such a
predilection for systems and
abstract deductions that he is
ready to distort the truth
intentionally, he is ready to
deny the evidence of his sens-
es only to justify his logic.” —
Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Impressed by quick Government
response to Our Lucaya layoffs

EDITOR, The Tribune:

I am very impressed and happy at how
quickly the Government responded to the lay-
off of 200 employees at Our Lucaya in Grand
Bahama this past week. My heart and prayers
go out to all of those individuals and families
affected.

The good news is that within days of the
announcement of the layoffs, the Government
had a targeted package of responses such as
job placement and retraining, the creation of a
one stop shop for various benefits, and finan-
cial and spiritual counselling.

My friends in Freeport told me that Minis-
ter of Labour and Social Development Dion
Foulkes went to Grand Bahama on Friday
and stayed through most of the weekend to
coordinate the Government's response.

This all got me to wondering what the
response from the PLP would have been like if
this happened on their watch. From their slow
response to hurricanes that hit GB, the Our
Lucaya employees would be in big trouble
and on their own.

Perry Christie probably would have flown in
with a big delegation of cabinet ministers and
officials and given some emotional speeches
and made plenty of promises.

He would have promised to go back to Nas-
sau and consult with various people about
what to do. Knowing Mr. Christie, his con-
sulting would probably have gone on and on
and on.

He would probably have also held several
cabinet meetings on the layoffs without bring-
ing the matter to conclusion for some time.
Then after extensive consultation with his cab-
inet and experts he may have appointed a
committee to study the problem of the lay-
offs with the committee told to report back
in 30 days or so.

'S

2
etidi Lena —_

[WONG'S HOME C



Gledwtone Floed (acquit) " Mame, Behera *

Email: worngs entreigTiad con

Selective.







NTRE|

*

et OTE
x Ga) ae

Telephone: (242) 341-7871

PECIAL

O9¢ ner sauare ft.
Pe



Then his cabinet would have spent a long
time discussing the report with many Grand
Bahamian families suffering and anxious as
the many months went by as Mr. Christie tried
to decide what to do never really able to make
up his mind.

Unfortunately for the former Our Lucaya
employees the Government's response under
Mr. Christie would have been in my opinion
quite limited if and when it came. There would
have been no NIB Unemployment Benefit to
help tide over those laid off. There would have
been less social assistance such as was offered
by this Government during the worldwide
financial crisis.

There would have been no Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture Self-Starter's Pro-
gramme to help offer training and other assis-
tance such as starter loans which have helped
quite a number of Bahamians to start their
own small businesses.

There would also have been less training
opportunities at BTVI and probably no
apprenticeships in conjunction with the pri-
vate sector such as was organized by the Gov-
ernment as a part of the successful National
Retraining Programme.

The old Emerald Bay, which is now Sandals,
would have probably still been closed on the
PLP's watch and unavailable to provide some
hotels jobs for those laid off from Our Lucaya.

When people are hurting or in crisis they
need more than promises and talk about com-
passion.

They need action because talk doesn't pay
the rent or the mortgage and consultation
without quick action doesn't put food on the
table.

BLS
Nassau,
March 7, 2011.

A sad day for
the Bahamas

? EDITOR, The Tribune.

Last week was a sad day for
the Bahamas and we will be
reeling from the backlash for
years to come.

While I agree that we all
have a right to demonstrate, I
just cannot sit back and have
you embarrassing me by say-
ing you are representing me
while acting like a mob. I did
not give you permission to go
down town saying you are
protesting on my behalf.

If I wanted to protest I
would have done so myself. I
would not have let the oppo-
sition or unions with hidden
agendas fill me with alcohol
give me a few dollars and a
tee shirt and ask me to come
to Bay Street to protest some-
thing that I do not even
understand. I would not have
embarrassed myself by
cussing and fighting with the
law. I would not have to
explain to my children why I
let them down by acting so
stupidly in public. I just want
to make it clear that you were
representing yourself.

TONY
Nassau,
March 1, 2011.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PLP leader expresses

‘concern and sympathy’
for laid-off hotel staff

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Opposition
Leader Perry Christie was in
Grand Bahama yesterday,
where he expressed “concern
and sympathy” for the 200
persons laid-off by the Our
Lucaya Resort.

Mr Christie said the PLP is

“here for the people of
Freeport” and pledged that
the party will do all that it can
to push government to lend
more of a helping hand to the
city.

“T want to first and fore-
most express my concern and
sympathy to all those who
have lost their jobs in this
most recent round of lay-offs
at the Our Lucaya Resort.

“These dismissals come at
the same time when the Prime
Minister and his Minister of
State in Finance Zhivargo
Laing are busy boasting that
the economy is turning
around.

“T ask: turning around for
whom? Not those 200
employees who have been
fired.”

On Friday, the hotel termi-

aU tds NaC ee Ls

FILLING IN FORMS for the One Stop Shop programme.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Laid off
workers at the Our Lucaya
Resort turned out yesterday
to register for the govern-
ment’s One Stop Shop pro-
gramme at the Foster B Pes-
taina Hall.

Around 100 persons filled
out application forms for
employment at Sandals Exu-
ma, where 40 jobs are being
offered, and at the Bimini
Big Game Resort where 19
jobs are available.

The programme also
offers persons the opportu-
nity for training in a variety
of skill sets at BTVI and
College of the Bahamas. The
government will pay the
tuition.

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes said six months
apprenticeship will also be
offered at industrial compa-
nies on the island and the
government will subsidise
salaries.

The 202 workers laid-off
by the resort will also
receive unemployment ben-
efit assistance once their sev-
erance packages have
expired, as well as access to
other assistance programmes
if they qualify.

They will also be consid-
ered for the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture’s
Self-Starter’s Programme,
which offers $5,000 to per-
sons interested in starting
their own business.

One worker, who was
employed for 15 years at the

Santander

hotel, commended the gov-
ernment for providing some
relief and alternative options
for employment.

“T have a lot of financial
obligations and I am wary
about to moving to Exuma
for employment because I
have a family here that
depends on me, but I will
definitely enroll for training



PhotoMandyke Hepburn

at BTVI and apprenticeship
that will be offered at BOR-
CO,” he said.

The government will also
provide financial and pro-
fessional advice, and mem-
bers of the Grand Bahama
Pastor’s Forum were on
hand to offer counselling to
the laid-off workers yester-
day.

Se Se eae aS
eae eee a ela

Peet Tee

Tiiteteps Pele coe slab

LOT sis tc lie

re

TT | fila

te Re CeE Lar l a a



Banco Santander Bahamas International Bank Limited
Applications are invited from suitably qualified Bahamians for the following posttion:

ASSISTANT MANAGER — GROUP FINANCING

Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or Finance

A minimum of 3 years in banking with a lange intemational institution.
Ability to speak and write English and Spanish fluently.

Experience in Analysis of Financial Ratios, Variance Analysis, Managenvent
Information System, Forecasting, Budgeting, Accounting in the Ruropean

market and Management of Derivative Instruments,

Knowledge and working experience with all Microsoft Office applications.
Ability to evaluate financial reports sent to our Head Ofties, create andor
implement new financial reports according to Head Office guidelines and
streaniline the business segments,

Compensation and other benefits commensorate with qualifications and experience

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed

to the Director of Human Resources, Santinder Bank & Troost Lod.

P.O), Box -1682,

Nassau, Bahamas or via fax to 502 7955 mot later than March 14, 2011.



nated 202 workers and closed
two of the three hotels on the
property in an effort to
streamline its expenses and
keep the resort operational,
thereby saving 800 jobs.

Accompanying Mr Christie
to Freeport were West End
and Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe, Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell and Golden Gates
MP Shane Gibson.

During a press conference
at PLP Headquarters attend-
ed by PLP candidates Sena-
tor Dr Michael Darville and
Gregory Moss, Mr Christie
commented on how none of
the FNM MPs on Grand
Bahama had mentioned the
lay-offs in the House of
Assembly.

“Tt took a PLP MP to raise
the issue in the House. Not
one FNM member of the
House, not one government
minister including three who
represent this island said one
word.

“The very least they could
have done was to express sym-
pathy for the people who were
laid off,” he said.

Mr Christie stated that only
after the firings did the Min-
istry of Labour announce it
initiated emergency measures
to help those who had been
laid off.

On Saturday, Minister Dion
Foulkes announced that the
government had put in place
several initiatives to provide



assistance and relief to the
workers.

Mr Foulkes met with hotel
and union executives while in
Freeport on Friday, but said
he had not met with the dis-
missed workers when asked
by the media.

The ‘One Stop Shop’ pro-
gramme launched by the gov-
ernment yesterday offers job
and training opportunities,
unemployment benefit assis-
tance and counselling for
workers.

“While, one welcomes relief
where relief is offered, the
question is whether or not the
government was aware that
this was coming, when did
they know and were they
proactive seeking to lessen the
impact on the work force,”
said Mr Christie.

He stressed that the PLP is
concerned about the “hands-
off attitude” which the FNM
administration seems to have
about Freeport.

He stated that for four
years, the FNM has sat idly
by as the city lurched from
one economic crisis to the
next, without any clear vision
of what to do to stop the prob-
lems.

Mr Christie said while there
are serious issues facing the
development of Freeport, the
FNM government has its head
in the sand.

He believes that Freeport
is critical to the survival of the



“These dismissals
come at the same
time when the
Prime Minister
and his Minister
of State in Finance
Zhivargo Laing
are busy boasting
that the economy
is turning
around.”

Perry Christie |

Bahamas.

“Tt is not one’s interest for
this city to collapse, the press
on Nassau would be unrelent-
ing if that were to occur,” he
said. “When I held my party’s
convocation in Grand
Bahama, I chastised the Prime
Minister for saying that he
would not talk to the Grand
Bahama Port Authority about
the fact that the tax exemp-
tions for this city will expire
in 2015. That is simply wrong.
A PLP government would
never shut the door to dia-
logue,” he said.

Mr Christie encouraged
Freeporters to hold on as elec-
tions are to be held within a
year.

“Help and hope are on the
way from our party. I hope
that as we reach out our hand
in friendship to you, that you
will accept what we have to
offer.

“The party has chosen three
excellent candidates: men of
vision and of empathy for peo-
ple. We are nearing the choice
of three more people,” he
said.

at ee Ble
rem Taam
Pest Contral
ae es
Kaa

LOGS

ULTIMATE SLIP RESISTANT CLOG





SHOE STORE

121 EAST ST. PH 322-5276

Sobucend

Tate eee) soe





ate

SIZES 7-14
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



International travelling
performers assist with ‘Keep
Grand Bahama Clean’ efforts

DURING their one-week visit to
Grand Bahama, cast members of
the international performing group
‘Up with People’ (UWP) assisted
the Keep Grand Bahama Clean
(KGBC) committee with various
tasks on the island.

Cast members lent their physical
strength as they engaged in clean-
ups at the Grand Bahama Home for
the Aged (GBHA) and along the
streets. Much needed support was
also rendered to staff of the Rand
Nature Centre as UWP members
performed various odd jobs.

The artistic talents of group mem-
bers came to the fore during spe-
cial performances along with the
KGBC puppets at several of the
island’s schools and at the Sir
Charles Hayward Children’s
Library.

“We were extremely thrilled to
have UWP in our midst for the past

‘UP WITH PEOPLE’
help ‘Keep Grand
Bahama Clean’ —
Cast members and
students of St
Paul's College col-
lect and bag litter.

week. The level of energy they dis-
played along with their genuine
commitment to service was out-
standing,” said KGBC chairperson
Nakira Wilchcombe.

GBHA supervisor Adrianne
Dorsett was also full of praise. “We
greatly appreciated them coming
and helping us. They cleaned the
windows and screens, weeded the
flower beds and spent time inter-
acting with the residents. It was a
joyous occasion,” she said.

Walls of the children’s section of
the library were transformed as the
UWP members drew and painted
oversized illustrations of favourite
cartoon characters on them. The
paintings brought story time to life
for visiting students who were read
to by the UWP group.

Geneva Rutherford, director of
community relations with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA),





KGBC PUPPETS — Whilst on-island, visiting ‘Up with People’ cast members made special appearances as the popular
KGBC puppets at various schools. Pictured (left to right): Cassie Williams of the US; Kit Palabyab of the Philippines; Bogar
Garcia Milan of Mexico and Katie of the US.

expressed appreciation for this latest
gesture which she described as “a
permanent fixture of the group’s
contribution to students of Grand
Bahama.”

Three cast members who hail
from the United States, Philippines
and Mexico took on roles of the
popular KGBC puppets spreading
environmentally friendly messages
during special school assemblies.

Emma Whitehead headed the
UWP sub-group assigned to assist
KGBC and served as its spokesper-
son.

“We love being able to come into
communities and meet the needs of
people who are here and existing.
Grand Bahama is such a beautiful
island and being able to help make
other people’s lives better is truly
rewarding. We try to unite youn
people to take action in their com-
munities and in so many ways our
visits spark people to be unified and
get behind a common goal,” she
stated.

As an expression of gratitude,
management of Port Lucaya Mar-
ketplace (PLM) Bourbon Street



CULTURAL INTERCHANGE -— Visiting ‘Up with People’ members get a chance to
enjoy local culture in Count Bassie Square, Port Lucaya Marketplace.

Limited, hosted cast members who
assisted KGBC to lunch and enter-
tainment in Count Basie Square.
“PLM was very excited to host
UWP cast members. We trust that it
allowed for a cultural interchange
as they observed some of our local

talent. Hopefully, they can incorpo-
rate some aspect of it into their rou-
tine and even include talented
Bahamians in their travelling ensem-
ble,” said Karen Ferguson-Bain,
entertainment and marketing coor-
dinator for PLM.

RAFFLE WINNERS

St. Cecilia’s Church Annual Bazaar & Raffle
Saturday, March 5th, 2011

1. Name: Agatha Saunders
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Los Angeles, CA
(Accommodations)

2. Name: All My Sister In GT
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Detroit, MI

3. Name: Sean Brathwraite
Round Trip Ticket for Two to New York, NY

4. Name: Anissa Ambrister
Round Trip Ticket for Two to New Jersey, NJ

5. Name: Kim
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Charlotte, N.C.

6. Name: Juses Loves
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Atlanta, GA

7. Name: Chirssy H
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Tampa, FL

8. Name: Lenice Burrows
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Orlando, FL

9. Name:
Round 7
West Palm Beach,

10. Name: Deshti Kno’
Round Trip Ticket for T\
Fort Lauderdale, FL

11. Name: Jamaal Hamilton
Round Trip Ticket for Two to
Miami, FL

12. Name: Dwainisha Adderley
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Freeport, G.B.

13. Name: My Bag R Packed

Round Trip Ticket for Two to
Abaco

14. Name: Clive Cooper
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Harbour Island

15. Name: Chanade Rolle
Round Trip Ticket for Two to Bimini













Ticket No. 49835

Ticket No. 53255

Ticket No. 05847

Ticket No. 14681

Ticket No. 37160

Ticket No. 22214

Ticket No. 09921

Ticket No. 02431

Ticket No. 36926

Ticket No. 04458

Ticket No. 09760

Ticket No. 04330

Ticket No. 47417

Ticket No. 25148





Ticket No. 21508

Interested persons should contact

Please bring in ticket stubbs to collect prizes.

PRIME OFFICE SPACE

CMUCVY

of our dear !

hushand, daddy,

grandfather and brorhes

Dan't grieve for me |
am free, f followed a

park
me, J took his hand
when he called, f bid
this world good bye
and deft it all if nrg
Parting
void, fill it with the
remembered joy, lift
up your heart and
rejoice with me, Cod
has me sow he hes
Sef mie free.

Wilfred Rolle Sr.
“Long Boy”

Who Departed This Life on
Miser: tn, 201

Precious memories will forever linger

God laid for

has left a

Ideal

int the

hearts of his wife Decones Ruthmae Rolle, six
children, qrand children, son-in-law,daughter-in-

law family and friends

Rest in Peace

Contact Owner at 362-5787

Housekeeper Wanted

Live -in housekeeper wanted immediately
for family of 4 + 2 dogs. Responsibilities to
include laundry (including ironing), cooking,
cleaning and care of 2 young children.

357-7381.

Approximately 2,200 square feet of second
floor space is available in newly constructed
building at the corner of Marlborough and
Cumberland Streets.

Two (2) on-site car spaces included.

location for offshore

trust company, law or accounting firm, or
other professions.



ification.

costume item.

way its people live.

bank,

RON Me Seat

THE Bahamian American Cultural Society has taken
its Bahamas Junkanoo Workshop to the Harlem School
of the Arts in Harlem, New York — the mecca of Black
Culture in the United States.

The Bahamas Junkanoo Workshop is a flexible four-
part presentation, prepared by BACS, which is geared
toward children and teenagers. It emphasises knowl-
edge, hands on skills, entertainment and behavior mod-

With Junkanoo music playing in the background,
around 50 young people enjoyed making at least one

Costumes

After verbal and visual presentations the children,
wearing costumes displaying the colours of the
Bahamas, junkanooed around the hall to the sound of
bells, horns and drums.

The audience of about 200 stayed for a video presen-
tation and to ask questions about the Bahamas and the

The afternoon saw an unexpected turn of events
when a participating parent heard a familiar voice on
the video of last year’s Boxing Day and New Years
Junkanoo events in the Bahamas.

She rushed over to look, and to her amazement, she
recognised a relative whom she had not seen for many
years, who is now living in the Bahamas.

TGS a

Golden Gates Assembly Park * Carmichael Road


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Salvation Army beneficiary of GBPA clothing drive

Over 1,000 units of
clothing collected

EMPLOYEES of the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority and Group of
Companies recently made a
donation to the Salvation
Army following a successful
clothing drive amongst staff
members.

Yanique Pinder, the
2010/11 ‘Group Employee
of the Year’, said over 1,000
units were collected, con-
sisting of men’s, women’s
and children’s apparel, shoes
and fashion accessories.

“We are extremely excit-
ed at the success of our cam-
paign, “Walk a mile in my
shoes, share the clothes on
my back’. It was very impor-
tant for every member of
the GBPA family to support
this drive so that we in turn
would be able to assist the
Salvation Army in their
efforts to service the needs
of those in the community,”
she said.

A brainchild of GBPA’s
community relations depart-
ment, the clothing drive was
conducted over a two-week
period, with staff members
from throughout the group
bringing in clothing and oth-
er apparel with the aim of
supplying sufficient items to
restock the Salvation
Army’s Goodwill Store.

Ian Rolle, GBPA presi-
dent, praised their efforts.

ROTARY CLUB NEWS



“This gesture demon-
strates that the employees
have bought into our mis-
sion statement, ‘To better
the lives of the Grand
Bahama community, and by
extension, the Bahamas’.
And so today [’'m very
pleased to see our employ-
ees join together in partner-
ship to display in their own
way, GBPA’s commitment
to the Grand Bahama com-
munity.”

On hand to receive the
donation were Roger and
Cheryl Compton, com-
manding officers off the Sal-
vation Army. Captain Roger
explained that the donation
could not have come at a
better time, considering
their current depleted stock
at the thrift store.

“At Christmas time peo-
ple are cleaning out their
closets and such and we get
really bounteous donations
around then, but now our
inventory has almost run
down to nothing.

“So, it’s great that GBPA
remembered us and as you
can see from what has been
donated today, these are
high quality items that we
will be able to offer at
reduced prices.”

Expressing similar senti-
ments, Captain Cheryl
stressed the significance of

ae

. ar ey #



GBPA DONATES TO THE SALVATION ARMY -— After a successful canna drive, GBPA management and Sanrio Employees of the Year’
presented commanding officers of the Salvation Army with clothing, footwear and accessories. Pictured (front row, left to right): Captain Cheryl
Compton of the Salvation Army; Ginger Moxey, vice-president of the GBPA; lan Rolle, GBPA president; Geneva Rutherford, GBPA’s director
of community relations, and Captain Roger Compton of the Salvation Army.

the Salvation Army’s thrift
store in the effort to assist
the needy in the community.

“All of our programmes,
whether it be food, things
with the children and youth,
the ministry and all of the
different aspects of our dis-
aster services, are funded by
proceeds from the Goodwill

Store and the generosity of
those on the island. It’s real-
ly our thrift store that helps
to generate funds for our
overall operations, so that’s
why this donation is so
meaningful to us because
now we have items for
resale that can help fund our
programs longer,” she said.

The Salvation Army’s
Goodwill Store is opened
from 10am — 4pm, every day
except Sunday. Social work-
ers are also on-site 10am —
2pm on Tuesdays and
Thursdays to render assis-
tance or advice to any in
need.

“GBPA was pleased at

the success of our compa-
ny’s clothing drive.

“We seek to lead by
example and hopefully this
will encourage other corpo-
rate citizens and those in the
wider community to donate
generously to organisations
like the Salvation Army,”
Mr Pinder said.

BUSINESSES ‘UNAWARE OF BEING
ABLE T0 OBTAIN FUNDS FROM GEF’ |

By LAMECH JOHNSON

ROTARY Club of Nassau’s guest speaker at its weekly meeting
Friday told club members that businesses are not aware that they can
receive funding for environmental projects from the Global Envi-
ronment Facility, which was established in 1991.

Stacy Moultrie, a project consultant for the Global Environ-
ment Facility (GEF) National Portfolio Formulation exercise, gave
a power point presentation and described the workings of GEF,
which is the largest funding organisation of projects to improve the
global environment.

“GEF is an independent financial organization starting from
the World Bank that provides grants to developing countries and
countries in transition for projects related to the environment,” she
said.

Currently the government is the only entity in the Bahamas that
receives funding from the organisation. GEF has an incentive where,
depending on the size of the project, the company can receive any-
where from $25,000 to $50,000 to draw up the proposals.

The GEF unites 182 member governments, “of which the
Bahamas is a part,” in partnership with international institutions,
non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to address
global environmental issues.

Ms Moultrie said that GEF’s focal areas are “biodiversity, chem-
icals, climate change, international waters, land degradation and sus-
tainable forestry management.” Any project, in order to receive fund-
ing, must fit into one of these categories, she said.

Persons interested should note that GEF approval normally
takes between 12 to 18 months and requires co-financing. “For
every dollar you ask, you must have a dollar to match,” she said.

According to GEF’s website, the Bahamas has had nine projects
since 1997, though approval and completion of them came at a lat-
er date.

For more information on how to qualify and receive funding for
an environmental project, visit their website at www.thegef.org.

COE ENC Ue IEE

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Book Drive for Primary School

— LAMECH JOHNSON

WITH March globally recognised
as literacy month for Rotary Inter-
national, a local Rotary club has
decided to host a book drive for one
of Nassau’s primary schools in order

i to help stock its library.

The Rotary Club of East Nassau
(RCEN) is assisting Thelma Gibson
Primary students in acquiring read-
ing materials for their understocked
library.

RCEN president Joanne Smith
told The Tribune that the school has
more than 700 students who “need
reading material to feed their young,
eager minds.”

RCEN members were encouraged
to donate books and other reading

Introducing The All NEW

materials at the club’s weekly lun-
cheon on Friday.

Ms Smith is now also appealing
to members of the public to donate.

“You can bring books to Media
Enterprises at 31 Shirley Park
Avenue,” she said.

Principal of Thelma Gibson
Angela Russell said she is grateful
for RCEN’s help with the initiative.

“It’s difficult to put a number on
the amount of books that the library
needs for our students, but the more
the merrier,” she said.

It was the club’s initial interest in
helping with the construction of a
playground for the Thelma Gibson
pre-school that made the school
seek further assistance with their
mission to acquire more books for



their
stu-
dents.

Rotary is an organisation with
more than 1.2 million members
worldwide.

There are six clubs in New Provi-
dence, of which RCEN is the biggest
with over 100 members.

Others are located in Cat Island,
Eleuthera, Abaco and Freeport.

2011 FORD MUSTANG

an American Icon

Shop & Compare

All new, all new, nothing like it available
in The Bahamas, a true American Sports
car. With the new 3.7L, 305 HP, V6 with
Automatic Transmission, custom 17 inch
alloy wheels, power windows, locks and
mirrors, side curtain air bags,

plus leather interior and the all new Sync
System and all standard features,

PLUS 3 years/36000 mile warranty,

3 years roadside assistance,

3 years rust protection, licence and
inspection to birthday, full tank of gas,
floor mats, first five services

If you are lOOKiINg for the Des€ value available
You owe it to yourself to visit our showroom

DP

2011

orive one. FORD FUSION

hop @ ‘Gompare

2.5L four cylinder engine with automatic transmission,
the most fuel efficient vehicle in its class, 6 disc cd system,
power windows locks and mirrors, side curtain air bags,
17 inch allow wheels, completely new aerodynamic body
design, all of this plus 3 years/36000 mile warranty, 3
years roadside assistance, 3 years rust protection, licence
and inspection to birthday, full tank of gas, floor mats,

first five services.

Sunroof & Sync System

Reserve yours now available at

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LT



THOMPSON BOULEVARD
TEL.: 3567100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com
WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



MAN CHARGED WITH
KILLING HIS MOTHER

FROM page one

intentionally acaused Mrs Adderley’s
death on Monday, February 28.

Mrs Adderley was found dead inside an }

apartment in Dundas Town, with injuries

to the back of her head. Police believe she
had been involved in an argument prior to :

her death.

The accused, who was not represented :
by an attorney yesterday, was not }

required to enter a plea to the murder
charge.

Prosecutor Sandradee Gardiner said }
the prosecution intends to proceed witha
Voluntary Bill of Indictment in the mat- }
ter- bypassing a preliminary inquiry in }

the Magistrate’s Court.

The case was adjourned to May 9, with
Adderley remanded to Her Majesty’s }

Prison.

66 ARMED ROBBERY
VICTIMS IN 2 MONTHS

FROM page one

the robbers escaped with an undisclosed
amount of cash in a white 2006 Chevy
Suburban they stole from an employee.
Police later found the vehicle abandoned
at Bain Street, off Nassau Street.

Construction sites and other busi-
nesses that employ cash payroll were
urged yesterday to invest in a checking
system which would eliminate the
increased risk of keeping large sums of
cash on site. All cash-based businesses
are advised to invest in high-quality sur-
veillance, security guards, and have
greater communication with the police.

Supt Dean added: “Call the police,
call the crime prevention office, we can
give recommendations on how you can
make your home or business more
secure. Our officers will come out to
your place and conduct a survey, for
free, and present you with recommen-
dations based on our findings.”

Anyone with any information that
might assist police in their investigations
into all criminal matters should call 911,
919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymous-
ly on 328-TIPS (8477).

Public raises concerns

over nets used in Lake

FROM page one

tions concerning fresh water fish.

Mr Mallis told The Tribune yesterday
that talapia, a fresh water fish, was brought
to the Bahamas in the 1960s to populate
lakes, ponds and wells in hopes that it
would become a "backyard agriculture
product" for Bahamians, and as a conserva-
tion tactic to attract indigenous fish-eating
birds.

Mr Mallis said that the talapia has flour-
ished, however "mass killings using gill nets
will not be sustainable in a closed system”
like Lake Killarney and will wipe out the
species.

He added that the numbers of talapia
seem to have been dwindling in recent
years.

Last year, a source reported finding a gill
net in the middle of the lake that had killed
several diving ducks, but the owner of the
net was never found.

Even if he were, there is no guarantee
that legal action would be taken.

"This is an unprecedented issue," Mr
Mallis admitted, but added that if the use of
gill nets on the lake is harming protected
species, it should be made illegal and cov-
ered by legislation.

While Mr Mallis stressed there is no way
to know if there are any health risks associ-
ated with eating the fish from Lake Killar-
ney, as the water and fish have not been
tested, lead poisoning is a possibility.

For years, cheaper lead pellets have been
used in shotguns by hunters in the Bahamas,
rather than steel pellets.

When birds are hunted on lakes, stray
lead shot can be eaten by fish or can break
down, contaminating the water and possibly
resulting in lead poisoning for anyone who
uses the lake as a food source.

Mr Deveaux said that following The Tri-
bune’s inquiries, the ministries of Public
Health, Agriculture and Marine Resources
have been alerted to the matter.

He said a public alert will be issued.

UTS UTE) |

Yesterday's Question

Which Government department is investigating
companies for alleged tax evasion?

Yesterdays Answer

The Customs Department

Yesterdays Winners

Jillian Mullings
Calvin Missick
Shawn Moree

dps
2ts
Ipt

Click the ‘Like’ button on the Tribune News Network
Facebook page to play Tribune Trivia |

Ai] oye

WV a

sti Residents Only

7?

One Lucky Winner monthly. Pick up a copy
of TheTribune and visit us on facebook.

Fiowsbhs

a!
weistn
1 day Hotel

When booking your next trip to Florida, choose
Eee em ele emesis l ay

1 day car rental

7 rn

py

Leal Aeris

(1) Roundtrip Airfare

Nassau to Miami



CONCERNS WERE RAISED when photographs surfaced of persons pulling large nets filled with fish
out of Lake Killarney.

PLP chairman says
Oommittee not aware

Killarney fishing

































of ‘fraud’ allegations
link to candidate

FROM page one

alleged connection were
recently broadcast by Cana-
dian station CTV in a tele-
vision special. The news sta-
tion reported on an alleged
connection between Mr
Forbes and a Bahamian reg-
istered company, GSF Lim-
ited, accused of squander-
ing client investments.

Arnold Forbes & Co was
the “registered office/agent”
for GSF Limited, and Mr
Forbes served as a director
with two Quebec residents,
Jean-Pierre Tremblay and
Stephane Hardy.

GSF Limited was at the
centre of a high-profile trial
last year, when Canadian
millionaire Nick Djokich
was found guilty of conspir-
acy to commit kidnapping
and murder for hire.

“Those claims are all a
bunch of b¥*****t, And you
can quote me on that. They
say they were looking for
$6 million and they found it
in the end. Where is the sto-
ry in that?” Mr Roberts
asked.

“When it came over the
television and we looked at
it there was nothing in it.
The claims were asinine.
His role in whatever took
place is the role that lawyers
in Nassau do every day and
continue to do today,” he
said.

Mr Forbes said the report
disparaged his character
and he plans to sue the
Canadian broadcaster.

“We incorporated the
company which is a normal
practice for law firms espe-
cially those in corporate
law,” said Mr Forbes in
explaining his involvement.

“We provided a corporate
service to a client and it was

normal to always act as offi-
cers and directors.

“We got all the due dili-
gence that is needed and
these chents checked out
clean.

“When I found out that
these guys were up to no
good we terminated (busi-
ness with them) immediate-
ly,” he said

In the Djokich trial, Djo-
kich claimed he invested $6
million in GSF Limited with
an understanding that his
annual interest rate was 20
per cent and his principal
funds were guaranteed.

The CTV report claims
that when Mr Djokich went
to cash out money in 2004,
he was informed by compa-
ny directors that the money
was all gone.

The report claims Djo-
kich went to desperate
lengths to uncover the story
behind his missing money.
He tried working through
various Canadian authori-
ties, including the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police
fraud squad in Calgary, the
Quebec Provincial Police
and the Quebec Securities
Commission. But after years
of unsuccessful attempts, he
was driven to launch his
own experiment in vigilan-
tism, according to CTV.

Based on details revealed
in the trial, Djokich orches-
trated a series of kidnap-
pings, torture sessions and
attempted murder, includ-
ing an alleged hit placed on
Mr Forbes and Richard
DeVries, a Canadian lawyer
living in the Bahamas, as
well as others. Djokich’s
scheme unraveled when the
hit-man he hired turned out
to be an undercover US
Immigration and Customs
enforcement agent.

A segment in the CTV
programme depicts a Cana-
dian reporter speaking with
Mr Forbes, asking for his
account of what happened
to the millions of dollars
that passed through GSF
Limited.

Mr Forbes was then con-
fronted with copies of doc-
uments that purportedly
bore his signature and
alleged he was a director
and signing officer for the
company and had autho-
rised hundreds of thousands
of dollars in payouts.

On the programme, Mr
Forbes asked the television
crew to return in a couple
of days so he could provide
them with documents to
clear him and his company
of any wrongdoing. The
report claimed that when
the crew returned Mr
Forbes could offer nothing
“conclusive.”

Mr Forbes maintains he
never had a connection to
Djokich, and the allegations
have “no bearing” on what
he plans to do in the con-
stituency of Mount Moriah.

National Security Minis-
ter Tommy Turnquest, the
Member of Parliament for
Mount Moriah, said he did
not want to comment on the
situation at this time.

When asked if he antici-
pated the allegations fac-
toring into the upcoming
elections, he said: “I don't
need the misfortunes of oth-
ers to win.”

Mr Turnquest won the
last election by more than
500 votes, and he said he is
confident his support is still
strong.

He said any support he
may have lost would likely
be counter-balanced by new
supporters gained.
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE





GAZA HAMAS POLICE SEIZE
Peat UU

IBRAHIM BARZAK,
Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip

The Gaza Strip's Hamas government announced Sun-
day that it has arrested the spiritual leader of an extrem-
ist Islamic group after a two-year search.

It was one of the most high-profile arrests against a
series of shadowy groups that have tried to challenge
Hamas rule in Gaza in recent years. These groups, known
as Salafis, draw inspiration from the al-Qaida terror net-
work and believe the Iranian-backed Hamas is too mod-
erate.

Hamas said Sheikh Abu Walid-al-Maqdasi, the leader
of the group "Monotheism and Holy War," was arrested
in a crowded beachside neighborhood of Gaza City last
week.

Al-Maqdasi's group shares the same name as an al-Qai-
da inspired group suspected in hotel bombings in Egyp-
t's Sinai desert between 2004 and 2005 that killed more
than 120 people. It's not clear if it's the same group.

In Gaza, al-Maqdasi's group says Hamas, a funda-
mentalist group that has killed hundreds of Israelis in sui-
cide bombings, shootings and rocket attacks, should do
more to battle Israel. It also says Hamas must impose an
even more extreme version of Muslim law in Gaza.

His group has also claimed responsibility for firing
rockets at Israel in defiance of an unwritten truce between
the Jewish state and Gaza's Hamas rulers. It is believed
to have attracted former Hamas loyalists disenchanted
with the militant group's enforcement of a two-year-old
cease-fire.

Hamas has been especially wary of their hardline chal-
lengers, particularly since the spiritual mentor of anoth-
er shadowy group defied Hamas and announced a sepa-
rate Islamic state in southern Gaza in 2009. That prompt-
ed a gun battle with Hamas police that killed more than
20 people.

Hamas spokesman Salah Bardawil says al-Maqdasi
spread incitement against Hamas and tried to attract
youths to his organization.

Al-Maqdasi, who is Palestinian, sneaked into Gaza in
2006, with his wife and seven children, Hamas officials
said. He is believed to be about 50, and he also is known
as Hisham al-Suaydani. Hamas has been trying to track
him down for two years.



March 2011

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Gates:
involve

ROBERT BURNS,
AP National Security Writer
BAGRANM, Afghanistan

U.S. Defense Secretary
Robert Gates said Monday that
both the U.S. and Afghan gov-
ernments agree the American
military should remain involved
in Afghanistan after the
planned 2014 end of combat
operations to help train and
advise Afghan forces.

"Obviously it would be a
small fraction of the presence
that we have today, but I think
we're willing to do that,” Gates
told a group of U.S. troops at
Bagram air field, which is head-
quarters for U.S. and NATO
forces in eastern Afghanistan.
"My sense is, they (Afghan offi-
cials) are interested in having us
do that."

A soldier asked Gates about
a long-term military presence,
and Gates noted that Washing-
ton and Kabul have recently
begun negotiating a security
partnership. He mentioned no
details. He was to meet later in
the day with Afghan President
Hamid Karzai.

On Sunday, the Afghan
National Security Council dis-
cussed the matter of a long-
term security accord with the
US., according to a statement
issued by Karzai's office. The
statement said Karzai told the
council that the U.S. wants the
deal worked out as soon as pos-
sible. And he said that on the
Afghan side it was matter not
just for the government but for
the Afghan people to decide.

The U.S. has said it wants a
long-term relationship with



A SLA 2 TORR SEAS Pr 57,
PUA Ape iis Wry)

A OZ LARSL 2 TORS
AS A 3

BL LARGE TOR fb MR tee 37,
PLA TS We) aE

iui Lae A ST
LUM A RET CLS A A
SL PE PEE Deu]
Tia] ioe

wi 2 LABRET
FOAL FOS Sa

i ke |
A AT A aril

7s

Las PE eT
SL PE
TL-1a

TOPAAG A fio

LUST
2S Pee
iad d

LOS PIS
SS Fe Pees
tiated

Ler, Be
Ld Pe Py
-el

MM Mee
aril

2 TLE, TOP
PDAS Poe

OL Le | ee 2
FID, A Wee wr.
peuea

OL APY HOU

re i ad
FLED ki ET | CY A
APT PU LT Pe

Gt Mya
SPEDLTF PAS A
GET BOF b APPT T

a AL Ca Da
Ferra BwHHETE
ota t |
One
Cea

my PU a a
A, TTT
ans SHU
ori
nieerw

OF ey POR Ca DA
AA, ITTE
SATS - SU
ors
sire

Gartei (echt ele,

chery breed, peerelte

pera a clin mara
aber

beg fn eee ed
prt ae hie! UP
wl pe ee

A New Opportunity in Sales Awaits

You!

If you are a self-motivated sales professional, this is THE opportunity for

you.

Requirements:

* Prior sales experience with a proven track record of closing sales

* Excellent communication skills
Must have own transportation
Basic computer skills
Ability to work flexible hours

Ability to manage all aspects of client accounts, including collections

Successful candidates will be expected to manage an existing client
portfolio AND actively pursue new clients for the company.

Full training will be provided and an excellent commission based

remuneration package awaits successful candidates.

If you have what it takes to join our team we are waiting to hear from

you......
Please send your applications to:

DA i257
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau



Afghanistan, in part to ensure
the country does not again
become a haven for al-Qaida
or affiliated terrorist groups.
Karzai's interest is rooted in his
desire for U.S. security guaran-
tees and commitments that
could help bring stability and
prosperity.

Gates is at the start of a two-
day visit with USS. troops, allied
commanders and Afghan lead-
ers to gauge war progress as the
Obama administration moves
toward crucial decisions on
reducing troop levels.

The trip comes during
heightened tensions between
the U.S. and Afghanistan. On
Sunday, Karzai rejected a US.
apology for the mistaken killing
of nine Afghan boys in a
NATO air attack. The Afghan
president told Gen. David
Petraeus, the top commander
of coalition forces in
Afghanistan, that expressing
regret was insufficient for last
week's killing of the boys, ages
12 and under, by coalition heli-
copters.

A planned visit to a combat
outpost south of Kabul was
scratched due to poor weath-
er, and instead Gates made a
brief flight north to Bagram,
headquarters for the U.S.-led
command that is responsible
for eastern Afghanistan. The
Pentagon chief visited a combat
hospital, where Maj. Gen. John
Campbell told reporters three
soldiers had been admitted ear-
lier in the day with wounds
from a roadside bomb blast.

In his remarks to troops

Pakistani PM
praises slain
Christian at
memorial

MUNIR AHMED,
Associated Press
ZARAR KHAN,
Associated Press
ISLAMABAD

assembled inside a cavernous
building on the air field, Gates
offered encouragement.

"I know you've had a tough
winter, and it's going to be a
tougher spring and summer, but
you've made a lot of headway,”
he said. "I think you've proven,
with your Afghan partners, that
this thing is going to work and
that we'll be able to prevail.”

Defense Department
spokesman Geoff Morrell told
reporters flying with the Pen-
tagon chief from Washington
that Gates wants to get a first-
hand feel for changes on the
ground since he last was in
Afghanistan in December.

The U.S. is committed to
beginning a troop withdrawal
in July. But the size and scope
of the pullback will depend on
the degree of progress toward
handing off full control to the
shaky Afghan government.

Morrell said Gates expects
to hear from troops and com-
manders that U.S. and NATO
strategy is making important
progress against the relentless
Taliban, who are thought to be
gearing up for a spring offen-
sive. Campbell told reporters
in Bagram that the number of
roadside bomb attacks has risen
in the last two weeks.

"The enemy is trying to get
an early start on what he would
call a spring offensive," Camp-
bell said, adding that it was not
yet clear whether there has
been an increase in Taliban
fighter infiltration from the
Pakistan side of the border.

U.S. commanders have been

Pakistan's prime minister told mourners at a

US should stay
din Afghanistan



(AP Photo/Mandel Ngan, Pool)
GREETING: Gen. David Petraeus, left, top commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan, greets U.S. Defense
Secretary Robert Gates upon Gates’ arrival in Kabul, Afghanistan Monday, March 7, 2011. Gates arrived
in Afghanistan Monday, beginning a two-day visit with U.S. troops, allied commanders and Afghan
leaders to gauge war progress as the Obama administration moves toward crucial decisions on reducing
troop levels.

saying for weeks that the Tal-
iban are suffering big losses in
territory and personnel, while
being denied the funding and
infiltration routes they have
relied on in the past to ramp
up guerrilla operations each
spring.

Marine Maj. Gen. Richard
Mills, top commander in the
southwestern province of Hel-
mand, told reporters last week
that a Taliban counteroffensive
is anticipated.

Mills said he expects the Tal-
iban to try "to regain very, very
valuable territory ... lost over
the past six to eight months."
He added that US. and allied
forces are intercepting "as
many of the foreign fighters as
we can" who come from Pak-
istan to attack U.S. and Afghan
troops. Gates sees the spring as
a potentially decisive period for
President Barack Obama's war
strategy, which includes begin-
ning to withdraw U.S. forces in
July.

This week's visit is Gates’
13th trip to Afghanistan, and
probably one of his last as
defense secretary. He has said
he will retire this year but has
not given a date.

After Afghanistan, Gates
planned to fly to the Stuttgart,
Germany, headquarters of U.S.
Africa Command to attend a
ceremony Wednesday marking
the arrival of a new comman-
der, Army Gen. Carter Ham.

Gates will attend a NATO
defense ministers meeting in
Brussels on Thursday and Fri-
day.



(AP Photo/B.K.Bangash)

Friday funeral Mass for a Christian politician
assassinated for opposing harsh blasphemy laws
that they had a lost a great leader and that the
government would do its "utmost" to bring his
killers to justice.

Shahbaz Bhatti, the sole Christian government
minister, was shot dead Wednesday after being
threatened for opposing laws that impose the
death penalty for insulting Islam. He was the
second Pakistani politician killed in two months
over the matter, and his death underscored the
perils facing a government that is increasingly
too weak to govern well or buck the religious
right.

Also Friday, a bomb went off in a mosque in
northwest Pakistan, killing eight people and
wounding 25 around prayer time. Police official
Saif Ali Khan says the blast in Akbarpura village
occurred as worshippers gathered at a shrine
attached to the mosque to collect free food.

Islamist extremists frequently attack Muslims
as well religious minorities to sow fear and under-
mine confidence in the Pakistani government.

As anguished friends and relatives of Bhatti, a
42-year-old Roman Catholic, prepared to bury
him in his home village of Khushpur on Friday,
mourners packed an Islamabad church in the
morning to pay their respects. There, Prime Min-
ister Yousuf Raza Gilani praised a man many

COMFORT: Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousaf Raza
Gilani comforts the mother of slain Christian leader
Shahbaz Bhatti during Bhatti's funeral ceremony at a
local church in Islamabad, Pakistan on Friday, March
4, 2011. Pakistan's prime minister told mourners at a
Friday funeral Mass for a Christian politician assassi-
nated for opposing harsh blasphemy laws that they
had a lost a great leader and that the government
would do its "utmost" to bring his killers to justice.

described as gentle, humble and devoted to help-
ing Pakistan's downtrodden religious minorities.

"People like him, they are very rare," Gilani
told the overflow crowd. "All the minorities have
lost a great leader. I assure you, we will try our
utmost to bring the culprits to justice."

The prime minister did not specifically mention
Islamist extremists who have waged a war on a
country, though he has issued statements
denouncing them in recent days. Gilani also
avoided mentioning the blasphemy laws, which
rights groups have long deplored as vague and
misused to persecute minorities.

Christians are the largest religious minority in
Pakistan, where 95 percent of the country's 180
million people are Muslim. They often are the
victims of discrimination and persecution, and
they typically live in poor parts of towns and do
low-skilled, badly paid jobs.
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

LICKETY SPLIT
HOSTS ‘GIVE A
PINT, GET A PINT’
BLOOD DRIVE

IN response to the
Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal’s pleas for more blood
donors, Lickety Split invit-
ed the public to partici-
pate in an innovative
blood drive in which those
who donated a pint of
blood, got a pint of Edy’s
Grand ice cream free.

The “Edy’s Give A Pint,
Get A Pint Blood Drive”
was held at the Lickety
Split diner on JFK Drive.

Managing director of
the company Llewellyn
Burrows was first in line
to donate, followed by
various Lickety Split staff
members.

Throughout the six-hour
blood drive, a steady
stream of customers lined
up to give a pint of blood
and get their ice cream
prize.

The event was Lickety
Split’s fourth blood drive
in aid of the PMH Blood
Bank.

Thanks to the compa-
ny’s efforts and the giving
spirit of the donors, the
PMH Blood Bank was
able to collect almost 30
pints.

LLEWLLYN BURROWS. Lickety Split managing director, was first to donate.

PMH BLOOD BANK staffer
starts the flow on a donor.




























































FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

al your stat

[- get sound investment advice
[7 benefit from multiple fund options
[7 earn potentially higher returns

GA all of the above

A SUBSIDIARY OF

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED

Billet ah

MU es



ABLOOD DONOR anticipates her free pint of ice cream.

Obama restarts
Guantanamo trials

WASHINGTON
Associated Press

PRESIDENT Barack Oba-
ma reversed course Monday
and ordered a resumption of
military trials for terror suspects
at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
making his once ironclad
promise to close the isolated
prison look even more distant.

Guantanamo has been a
major political and national
security headache for the pres-
ident since he took office
promising to close the prison
within a year, a deadline that
came and went without him
ever setting a new one.

Obama made the change
with clear reluctance, bowing
to the reality that Congress’
vehement opposition to trying
detainees on U.S. soil leaves
them nowhere else to go. The
president emphasized his pref-
erence for trials in federal civil-
ian courts, and his administra-
tion blamed congressional med-
dling for closing off that avenue.

"I strongly believe that the
American system of justice is a
key part of our arsenal in the
war against al-Qaida and its
affiliates, and we will continue
to draw on all aspects of our
justice system — including (fed-
eral) courts — to ensure that
our security and our values are
strengthened,” Obama said in
a statement.

"Going forward, all branches
of government have a responsi-
bility to come together to forge
a strong and durable approach
to defend our nation and the
values that define who we are as
a nation."

The first Guantanamo trial
likely to proceed under Oba-
ma's new order would involve
Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the
alleged mastermind of the 2000
bombing of the USS Cole. Al-
Nashiri, a Saudi of Yemeni
descent, has been imprisoned

j

ii

at Guantanamo since 2006.

Defense officials have said
that of the around 170 detainees
at Guantanamo, about 80 are
expected to face trial by mili-
tary commission.

On Monday, the White
House reiterated that the
administration remains com-
mitted to eventually closing
Guantanamo — which is on a
U.S. Navy base — and that
Monday's actions were in pur-
suit of that goal. But the out-
come Obama wants seemed
even more distant.

Critics of the military com-
mission system, which was
established specifically to deal
with the detainees at Guan-
tanamo, contend that suspects
are not given some of the most
basic protections afforded peo-
ple prosecuted in American
courts and that that serves as a
recruitment tool for terrorists.

Obama's administration has
enacted some changes to the
military commission system
while aiming to close down
Guantanamo.

More than two dozen
detainees have been charged
there, but the charges against a
number of them were dismissed
in the wake of Obama's order in
January 2009 to halt the com-
mission process.

So far six detainees have
been convicted and sentenced,
including Ali Hamza al-Bahlul,
Osama bin Laden's media spe-
cialist who told jurors he had
volunteered to be the 20th Sept.
11 hijacker. He is serving a life
sentence at Guantanamo.

Meanwhile, the first Guan-
tanamo detainee tried in civilian
court — in New York — was
convicted in November on just
one of more than 280 charges
that he took part in the al-Qai-
da bombings of two U.S.
embassies in Africa. That case
ignited strident opposition to
any further such trials.

A!

Wom uit La

ULL Ha ese




$8.9m FINCO

hoost through
loan provision
policy change

* Reduction in credit
allowances from 40% to 30%
of non-accrual loans key factor
in quadrupling of mortgage
lender’s 2010 income

* Non-performing loans hit
$88.64m or 10.47% of total
loan portfolio

* FINCO insurance subsidiary
was still seeking licence
renewal at balance sheet date
By NEIL HARTNELL

A change in its loan pro-
visioning policy resulted in :
Finance Corporation of the ;
Bahamas (FINCO) reduc- :
ing credit loss provisions by }
$8.9 million during its 2010 }
financial year, a key factor ; the first census in 1978.
behind ta quadru- : is perceived as one of the sec-
pling to more than $18 mil- ? tors with little economic activi-
i ty, and therefore its contribu-
? tion to the Gross National
i Product is considered minimal.
? As an agricultural professional,
? and as per the definition for
? economic activity, nothing
? could be further from the
i truth,” said Mr Minns in a

SEE page 4B

Chamber unveils
Mystery Shop plan

Aims ‘to test every single
business in the Bahamas’ on
customer service and front-line

performance for indefinite period

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third

| party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

THE TRIBUNE

usiness



TUESDAY,

MARCH 8,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Agriculture could be gener-

i ating $305 million per year
i towards
? Domestic Product (GDP), com-
? pared to the $40.2 million
i recorded in the most recent sta-
i tistics, if proper reporting and
? recording of all agricultural out-
? puts took place, a Department
? of Agriculture official said yes-

Tribune Business Editor = terday.

Bahamian Gross

Leslie Minns, a statistician
with the Department, said in
his most recently-issued report
on agriculture’s contribution to
the Bahamian economy that
there has been “under-report-
ing” of agricultural output since

“Agriculture in the Bahamas

report released to senior agri-
culture officials in January.

A fact which Mr Minns sug-
gests highlights this appears in
this report. In it, an increase in
the total value of agricultural
production from $78 million in
2008 to around $194.8 million in
2009 is documented.

Acreage recorded as being
under cultivation by farmers or
being used for livestock
increased by 511 per cent, from
5,793 acres in 2005/2006, to
35,402 acres in 2009.

However, rather than being a
consequence of a significant rise
in actual output created by
farmers or other individuals
producing agricultural goods,
Mr Minns suggests this increase
is primarily due to better
recordkeeping and data collec-
tion, which needs to be further
improved if a true picture of
agriculture’s contribution to the
economy is to be obtained.
Between 1994 and 2006, only
“reported data” - that willingly
made available by a relatively
small selection of farmers - was
used to estimate agricultural
output.

From 2005, the department

PRICE CONTROLS PLACING
BUSINESS “IN TIME WARP"

: By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Chamber of i} —..
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC) ;
has launched a Mystery
Shopper project that aims }
“to test every single business }
in the Bahamas” on front- :
line performance and cus- i nomic climate, a think-tank
i executive yesterday charging
? that they ultimately resulted
? in product shortages.

Price controls are putting
Bahamian businesses “in a
time warp”, leaving them
unable to adjust margins in
the face of increasing costs
and other changes in the eco-

Rick Lowe, of the Nassau

i Institute, said the Govern-
i ment-imposed price controls
i on industries such as petrole-
? um and food, ostensibly to
i protect the interests of low
i income Bahamian consumers,
i were misnamed and failed to
i work because they could not
i impact international factors
? outside this nation’s control.

Suggesting that it was real-

: ly “price management”,
i rather than “price control”,
i? that the Government-dictated
i mark-ups imposed on various
i? Bahamian businesses, Mr
i Lowe said a better solution
i was for the administration to
i “get out of the way” and let
i the market, through competi-
i tion, determine the price of

SEE page 5B

Sotheby's

* Think tank executive warns
government-imposed margin and
mark-up restrictions ultimately
cause product shortages and
distort market

* Government urged to ‘get out
of the way’ and let market decide
prices through competition

* ‘Many firms would do better
putting money in the bank than
staying open’

Agriculture output
$305m per annum

: By ALISON LOWE
? Business Reporter
: alowe@tribunemedia.net

turned to the Farmers’ Register
to better estimate production
and its value. Farmers become
registered to obtain incentives
such as duty-free agricultural
equipment, imports and hurri-
cane relief, and such a register
has been one of the only ways
for the Government to get a
better handle on the farming
industry, given that there have
traditionally been few other
incentives for producers to
make themselves known for
data collection purposes.

Mr Minns said he hopes that
in the future input from other
areas, from which economic
value is derived from agricul-
ture, can be included in reports
detailing agriculture’s input into
the national economy. Agricul-
ture’s contribution to the $6.7
billion GDP in 2008 was found
to be just 0.6 per cent or $40.2
million. In 2009, this rose to 0.7
per cent.

The statistician laments that
only economic value derived
from the production of crops
and livestock in the Bahamas

SEE page 4B



66

When you use
close to one

: million gallons of

fuel a year, it is

} ridiculous.”

KHAALIS ROLLE

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

aaa ola



ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money ot Mirah





Cree, erg







UALS

(242) 356-901

FREEPORT
(242) 351-2010

MARSH HARBCHUR
(243) 367-3135




fer bestia aca

Airport’s $138m

second

stage to

start March 17

* Plan to construct 226,000 sq ft

arrivals terminal a
* Contracts for sto

nd pier
nework, masonry

and carpeting now before NAD/Airport
Authority Board for approvals

By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Work on the $138.3
million Phase II stage of
the Lynden Pindling
International Airport
(LPIA) redevelopment
will begin on Thursday,
March 17, with the
selective demolition of
the existing US depar-
ture terminal.

The second stage,
which follows comple-

SEE page 3B

GUIDED TOUR: A tour of the Air-
port last year.



MAJOR TRANSPORT FIRM
IN 35% FUEL COST HIKE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A leading Bahamian
transportation company,
which consumes almost one
million gallons of diesel per
year, yesterday said it had
seen its fuel costs rise 35 per
cent year-over-year, a senior
executive telling Tribune
Business it was “ridiculous”
that this nation had yet to

SEE page 5B

* Bahamas Ferries executive
says ‘ridiculous’ that nation
has yet to devise long-term
solution to fuel price
inflation, his firm using
almost one million gallons
per year

* Now exploring hedging
strategy to aid all fuel-
dependent Bahamian
companies, via talks with oil
firms and major banks

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

*

Damianos |

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Prime Income Fund

¢ A higher, stable rate of return ¢ Professional fund management

e Long-term capital preservation ° Diversified portfolio

PARADISE ISLAND ~ OCEAN CLUB ESTATES e Lower risk investment

BEACHFRONT CABBAGE BEACH LOT
Large elevated lot on world-famous Cabbage Beach with 149 feet on the beach.
Priced to sell at US$6.9m.

Contact: George. Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.362.4211 BAHAMAS
242.356.9801

242.351.3010

BARBADOS
meet

ROYAL FIDELITY

lia 1 Mela 4

Nassau: 246.435.1955

Member of ani
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | the Bahamas MLS | MID) Cen Gi)

Freeport:


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



By ALISON LOWE
Business Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Economists and business
leaders yesterday joined
Opposition MPs in ques-
tioning the Government’s
decision to allow more than
a year-and-a-half to pass
without producing any
updated unemployment fig-
ures, each stressing the
importance of such data for
proper economic and social
policy formulation.

The last available statis-
tics on the level of unem-
ployment in the Bahamas
were released in September
2009, following a survey con-
ducted in May of that year.
At that time it was found
that the unemployment rate
was the highest it had been
since the early 1990s.

For New Providence, the
unemployment rate of 8.7
per cent in 2008 increased
to 12.1 per cent in February
2009, then to 14 per cent in
May 2009. A similar trend
was experienced in Grand
Bahama, with rates of 9 per
cent, 14.6 per cent and 17.4
per cent recorded for those
three dates.

A labour force survey,
which records the unem-
ployment rate, is tradition-
ally undertaken on an annu-
al basis, except in a Census
year, when it is bypassed in
favour of focusing on this
larger, once in a decade,
project.

Ryan Pinder, MP for Eliz-
abeth and a tax attorney by
profession, raised the dearth
of statistics relating to unem-




























































< -

ey

vy

A Brand New i-'

limely economic
lata demanded

ployment, a key economic
indicator, as a matter of con-
cern in the House of Assem-
bly last week.

Speaking with Tribune
Business yesterday, he said
the unemployment figures
are important “so we have
an understanding not only
of the unemployment figure,
but of who is unemployed -
from what sectors and age
groups”, with such data key
to better positioning those
concerned to “establish poli-
cies to really provide some
buoyancy to the situation”.

Responding in Parliament
to Mr Pinder’s criticism over
the lack of figures, minister
of state for finance, Zhivar-
go Laing, noted that last
year the Department of Sta-
tistics undertook a nation-
wide Census ,and for this
reason, resource limitations
did not permit the opportu-
nity for a labour force sur-
vey to be conducted as usu-

ee



Pad! One Winner Every V



RYAN PINDER

al. Director of Statistics,
Kalsie Dorsett, yesterday
confirmed that a labour

You Can’tion VuoIs!

Get 1-Medium,

4-Topping, Pizza



ZHIVARGO LAING

force survey has never been
undertaken in a Census
year, and her department
would not have had the
capacity, either financially,
human or infrastructure, to
do both.

However, Mr Pinder and
others have suggested this
may not be an adequate rea-
son to ditch the survey at
this time.

“We are in a unique cli-
mate where I think that
decision is not in the best
interests of the country, and
if we have to do something
different because of the
challenges we have and the
situation we find ourselves
in, then we do it. That is the
responsibility of a govern-
ment,” Mr Pinder said.

“T understand the propo-
sition they don’t do it ina
Census year, but I also say if
it’s only a matter of
resources, much more bene-
fit would come from having
the unemployment statistics
than not having it. You get
more than just a number, it’s
an analysis of what’s going

on out there in terms of
employment.”

James Smith, former min-
ister of state for finance
under the Christie adminis-
tration, concurred. “Espe-
cially during a recession,
when we went through a
period of high joblessness
and lay offs - and we’re still
seeing them - it’s very
important to have timely
economic data on all areas
of the economy,” he said.

“I think many sectors of
the economy have been
looking forward to having
some idea of how deep and
broad this recession is, and
how it’s impacting the
labour force.

“At the very least I think
an appeal should be made
to the Government in the
general interest of econom-
ic planning to try to make
the resources available,
because businesses also
depend on that kind of
information to plan going
forward. The level of unem-
ployment gives you a mea-
sure of the level of demand
for your goods and services
and so many other things.”

Khaalis Rolle, chairman
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Employers
Confederation (BCCEC),
said he feels strongly that
more emphasis and
resources must be brought
to bear on information gath-
ering in the Bahamian econ-
omy generally.

Instead of being prepared
on an annual basis as they
have traditionally been, Mr
Rolle said he would support
resources being put in place
to ensure such statistics can
be compiled on a “monthly
or quarterly basis”.

“It’s difficult for me to say
precisely why it wasn’t done
(the Labour Force survey in
2010). I think in any given
period it’s always critical to
have information, and one

of our key economic indica-
tors is unemployment. I
don’t believe that informa-
tion should not be available
and compiled on a regular
basis,” he said.

“You are at the mercy of
making decisions in a vacu-
um or in the dark if you
don’t have quality informa-
tion.”

Dion Foulkes, Labour
Minister, yesterday reiterat-
ed the Government’s posi-
tion that it would have been
impractical for the Depart-
ment of Statistics to do both
the Census and the Labour
Force Survey in 2010.

“We hired hundreds of
people to conduct the Cen-
sus, which comes up every
10 years. It was very detailed
and took a very long time,
and the Department of Sta-
tistics got a special alloca-
tion to hire those people and
provide the necessary equip-
ment and documents to con-
duct the survey,” he said.

“Money is only a part of
the equation. It’s also a
question of capacity in terms
of infrastructure, buildings,
desks, computers, training.
It’s a very comprehensive
and holistic approach, espe-
cially with unemployment
figures because you want
them to be as accurate as
possible.”

Ms Dorsett, head of the
Department of Statistics,
said that besides her staff
and offices being occupied
with Census-related work,
another problem with
attempting to undertake a
LabourForce survey in a
Census year, which cannot
be combated by the alloca-
tion of more resources, is a
simple matter of public
cooperation.

“The most important
thing is you can’t go to
householders twice like that
in a year. They are already
getting tired of you (after
the Census),” she said.

Mr Foulkes, meanwhile,
suggested that the Govern-
ment has been able to assess
the unemployment situation
to some degree using other
“barometers”, such as the
number of individuals sign-
ing up to obtain unemploy-
ment benefits - which has
dropped sharply.

“We believe a tremendous
amount of jobs have been
created through projects
such as the airport re-devel-
opment, the road improve-
ment project, the straw mar-
ket. Atlantis has taken on
some 300 people recently,”
he added.

Chamber unveils Mystery Shop plan

FROM page 1B

tomer service, its chairman yesterday
describing it as another plank in the organ-
isation’s drive to deliver value-added ser-

vices to its members.

Khaalis Rolle, who is also Bahamas Fer-
ries’ chief marketing officer, told Tribune
Business: “We just launched the Mystery
Shopper project, and that’s an initiative most
businesses can benefit from.

“T find that to be a very effective means of
monitoring the performance of your busi-
ness, particularly on the front line. It is a
project designed to test that level and qual-
ity of service that you’re offering to the cus-

tomer.

“It’s a well-constructed, diagnosis type of
project where people go into the business
and evaluate the type of experience they
have. They give a report on how businesses

perform in every key area.”

Mr Rolle told Tribune Business that
Bahamas Ferries “has been using it [the
Mystery Shopper initiative] for a couple of

years now, and when we started everyone
thought it was a nuisance, and now at the

members”.

beginning of the month e-mails start flying
on when the report’s due. Each departments
wants to know how it’s done”.

The BCCEC chairman described the Mys-
tery Shopper programme as “one of the val-
ue-added services we’re offering to our

He told Tribune Business that the initia-
tive would continue “indefinitely”, and
added: “We hope to test every single busi-
ness in the Bahamas”.

Looking at the bigger picture and the
long-term future, after he demits office as
BCCEC chairman in June, Mr Rolle added:
“T wanted to leave the Chamber with a val-
ue proposition. That [the Mystery Shopper]
really adds value to the membership.

“T want businesses to say that the Cham-
ber is not only an advocacy organisation,
but a value added organisation. This is one
of the diverse revenue streams we wanted to
add, diversifying revenue streams beyond
just membership fees.”



afi TM

AN

OPA SAMA AS oun CRS =e ker MMP ex cys
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011, PAGE 3B





Second student wave
enters Spanish school

SECOND INDUCTION: The Association of International Banks and Trust Companies (AIBT) has unveiled the second

induction of students into its language school.

Initiated in 2010, the language classes have been well supported by members of AIBT, and 30 students have enjoyed
free beginners and intermediate Spanish classes. In addition to those students who will continue with their language
education, the AIBT has welcomed a further 17 candidates who have begun their studies in Spanish.

FROM page 1B

tion of work on the first
Stage - the construction of a
new US departures termi-
nal and pier - includes the
construction of a 226,000
square foot International
Arrivals Terminal and Inter-
national Departures Pier on
the site of what will soon
becom the former US
departures terminal.

It is scheduled to be
opened in late 2012, and will
be be followed by a third
terminal in 2013.

Contracts have so far been
awarded for airside and
landside civil work for the
international arrivals termi-
nal, inclusive of the parking
lots and apron areas.

“There are several con-
tracts in with the Board for
approval at the moment,
including works for
stonework, masonry and
carpeting,” said Shonalee
Johnson, communications
manager at the Nassau Air-
port Development Compa-
ny (NAD), which is over-
seeing the airport redevel-
opment.

Other works that will be
undertaken as part of Phase
II are: complete demolition
of the pier attached to the
former US departures ter-
minal and demolition of all
electrical and mechanical
systems.

The roadway canopy that
currently covers the road
where visitors, taxis and bus-
es pull in to the airport to
load and offload passengers
and baggage will be extend-
ed.

The roof of the facility will
be replaced with a rounded,
“barrel vault” type structure
similar to that used in the
new US departures termi-
nal.

Work on the second stage
is set to begin concurrent
with the opening of the new
US Terminal, which has
now been completed. On
Saturday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Cab-
inet Ministers toured the
$190.8 million facility ahead
of its March 16 opening to
the travelling public.

Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Tender No. 747/11
Group Medical & Life Insurance Services

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation’s Administrative Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads

Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone
302-1158

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices — Blue Hill & Tucker
Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Tender No. 747/11

Group Medical &
Life Insurance Services

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
March 25, 2011
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

For all inquiries regarding the tenders please
contact Mrs. Antionette Turnquest

at telephone 302-1166



Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
and TRUCKS

TRADE-INS ON NEW
a

Check Out: These Great Values

'08 SUZUKI SWIFT

‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘09 HYUNDAI TUCSON
'08 CHEVY CMV VAN

'05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

‘01 MAZDA MPV

'91 HONDA ACCORD

'98 FORD EXPLORER

'01 FORD TAURUS

‘00 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘00 DODGE NEON

‘01 DAIHATSU CUORE
sales (2)

3 QUALITY:

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

ot Gig ity Aapte Sayles [Pome pewe] Lied Vier g eveiicwe ead 5 Gayapeneay, heey, DP ah 2
i Abe Alone We Dh Many Ghd, Da Pd

OPEN: Mon to Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm * Sat 8:30am - 12:30pm

auto ,

Wie get hero





















VACANCY

Are you a motivated, innovative, business-minded
professional looking for a challenging career in the
supermarket or food franchise business? Then
come and grow with AML Foods Limited. As we
continue to expand our operations, we are seeking
qualified applicants for the following positions:

Store Manager
Assistant Store Manager
Manager in Training
Grocery Supervisor
Front-End Supervisors
Warehouse Supervisor
Meat Supervisor
Produce Supervisor
Buyers
Drivers
Customer Service Representatives

Outstanding salary, benefits and incentives offered.
Experience desired.

Interested candidates should forward their resumes
to hr@amlfoods.com.
No telephone calls please. Only persons selected for
an interview will be contacted,
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

THE TRIBUNE



$8.9m FINCO boost through | Agriculture
loan provision policy change

FROM page 1B

lion, even though non-per-
forming loans exceeded 10
per cent of its total portfolio.

The BISX-listed mortgage
lender, which is 75 per cent
owned by Royal Bank of
Canada’s Bahamian sub-
sidiary, revealed in its finan-
cial statements for the year
to October 31, 2010, that it
reduced the allowance for
credit (loan) losses from the
40 per cent of non-accrual
loan threshold used in 2009
to 30 per cent last year.

This move, following a
Board and management
review of FINCO’s provi-
sioning policy, which
assessed factors such as the
quality of security held over
its mortgage portfolio and
recovery rates, resulted ina
considerable boost to the
mortgage lender’s 2010
financial results.

“This review resulted in

the Corporation [FINCO]

reducing its provisioning
policy ratio to 30 per cent
of non-accrual loans, and a
reduction of $8.9 million in
the amount charged for pro-
vision of credit losses,” the
financial statements, audited
by Deloitte & Touche, stat-
ed.

“While current provisions
are considered conservative,
the Corporation will contin-
ue to review its provision-
ing policy and methodology
to ensure that levels remain
appropriate and conserva-
tive.”

The $8.9 million reduction
in FINCO’s loan loss provi-
sions went straight back into
the income statement, and
were a key factor behind the
lender’s dramatically
improved performance in
2010 compared to the pre-
vious year.

Indeed, the more than
$13.7 million reduction in
credit loss allowances, from

LOT FOR SALE

Locator Lyford Cay Price: SS80LIMM Sine; 1702 1M) Say ft; DN phe

Lyfead Owe b
Panasting,
dieing the vorkbreerened Lyon Cay
Cay Club é chanperchap po
sched aed elas cee a the C

Promudeney

A Pr
security and prrvileges off the cd Led chitiaye ia floed Cry

iegifeem pews pede alee
Ai Linde propre wihin a
Chath. E

“a

nate og the peed eke tip of Bee
Aout. ir

120] acre gg

wuky amagec: place ts live

Cente! Brien Ain SEE [sper STS cp) Eastin Tabet coe
erte Ta ee ri, cs



$15.073 million to $1.345
million, was the main rea-
son for the 399 per cent
growth in FINCO’s net
income to $18.188 million
from $4.563 million the year
before.

Flat

Otherwise, the lender’s
2010 performance would
have been essentially flat
compared to 2009. Net inter-
est income actually declined
slightly to $28.241 million,
compared to $28.314 million
the year before, as a 6.9 per
cent rise in interest income
to $65.467 million was can-
celled out by a 13 per cent
increase in interest expense
to some $37.226 million.

Elsewhere, FINCO’s
financials disclosed that its
non-accrual loan portfolio
(loans that are more than 90
days past due) now account-
ed for 10.47 per cent of its
$847.212 million loan port-
folio, having increased from
8.09 per cent at year-end
2009.

“Loans classified as non-
accrual represent 10.47 per
cent (2009: 8.09 per cent) of
the total loan portfolio,” the
Deloitte & Touche audited
financial statements said.
“At the consolidated bal-
ance sheet date, the carry-
ing amounts of loans whose
terms were renegotiated
during the year were $22.429
million, and interest accrued
on loans to date were $1.58
million.”

The total value of FIN-
CO’s non-accrual loans had
also increased by 36.8 per
cent year-over-year, hitting

BAHAMAS FiRST

Pe? (Ff IRSURANCE. ROMY. TOROAPCEY,

Career opportunity for an ambitious career oriented individual

Application Support Specialist

Our Application Specialist must have excellent Service and Customer
Skills and must be an expert in Application Support in a multi-tier
environment (IIS, Java, Apache / [Tomcat & HTML / XML) with
experience in XML / HTML front end applications.

Skills:

IIs
e Websphere

Qualifications:

e Relevant IT education to de

° Java

e Apache / Tomcat
¢ Communications Framework ¢ SQL Query

ree level

e HTML / XML

e 3 years Project Management Experience (Certification a plus)

Competencies:

e 3+ years experience working with IT groups or proprietary
application software support environments in a demanding,
dynamic environment

3+ years experience working with User Groups

Experience in defining, establishing and implementing testing
‘best practices’ techniques, policies and standardized trouble
shooting in addition to workflow procedures

Documenting issues and working with other functional groups
to develop updated processes and workarounds.

Strong client focus: troubleshooting and follow-up skills;

commitment to continuous improvement.

There will be shift work involved.

Compensation commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications.

The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casualty insurance
company in the Bahamas and has an A- (Excellent) Rating from A. M.
Best, reflecting the company’s financial stability and sound risk

management practices.

Please apply before aith March, 2011 to:

Group HR & Training Manager
Bahamas First Corporate Services, 32 Collins Avenue

P.O. Box SS-6268
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email to:

careers@bahamasfirst.com



$88.64 million compared to
$64.812 million the year }
before. However, the cumu-
lative value of residential }
mortgages that were non-
performing fell from $00.534 |
million to $59.769 million.
The increase was caused by |

a dramatic surge in non-per- :
forming “non-residential” ;
mortgage loans, from $3.862 ;

million to $28.457 million,

likely due to a surge in delin-
quencies among business }

clients.

Elsewhere, Deloitte & have traditionally been included in reports detailing the sector’s

uN ? contribution to the economy.
wholly-owned subsidiary, :
FINCO Insurance Agency, :

? areas, and this definition of the economic contribution of agricul-

Touche noted that FINCO’s

was still awaiting renewal of

its insurance licence by the }
Insurance Commission as at }
the January 28, 2011, bal- :

? to be properly documented, include animal husbandry (the breed-

@ ? ing of domestic pets and farm animals for sale); dairy farming
As of the balance sheet ¢ and the production of animal products; horticultural services (such

date, FINCO Insurance :

: Ast ? as landscaping; and the production and sale of ornamental plants
Agency’s application for and flowers), hunting and forestry.

renewal of its agency licence

ance sheet date.

is pending with the Insur-

ance Commission of the :
Bahamas. FINCO Insurance :
Agency is taking steps to ? Bahamian boat builders harvesting local wood for their vessels and
satisfy all regulatory require- i the use of local woods for furniture and more.

ments,” the accounting firm } ities take place in the Bahamas’. Nothing could be further from the

said. FINCO added that a :

= truth. While for this report we may only be reporting a modest esti-
Bank of the : mate of $3.5 million, this sub-sector of agriculture is contributing
: greatly to our economy,” said Mr Minns in the report.

some of its loans be risk-
weighted at 100 per cent }
impacted its capital ratios. }
For Tier 1 and Total Capital :
ratios, these fell to 15.86 per }
cent and 17.11 per cent :
respectively at year-end :
2010, compared to 18.53 per

Central
Bahamas’ directive that

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



1%

output
$305 million
per annum

FROM page 1B

However, the problem with this, he added, is that there has not
been full and accurate reporting of statistics relating to these

ture to the Bahamas is too narrow.

Mr Minns suggests that some of the key areas in which economic
value is being derived from agriculture in the Bahamas, but are yet

Within these groups, Mr Minns said he has reason to believe that

: hunting and forestry-related economic activity may be worth $25

million a year to the Bahamian economy through activities such as
foreign visitors engaging in hunting of wild animals in the Bahamas,

“Tt has been said that ‘no significant hunting and forestry activ-

He also suggests that a much greater value is being derived
from the harvesting of top (straw), coal, Brazilian pepper (used for
animal feed) and cotton than he has been able to record due to min-
imal reporting.

Fruit

The growth of fruit bearing trees, vegetable seedlings and herbs

cent and 19.78 per cent the ; and spices for sale, combined with the provision of landscaping ser-

year before.

? vices and the production of ornamental plants at local nurseries for
: sale to people using them in their gardens and homes, could be
? worth a combined $150 million annually to the Bahamian econo-
? my but is not yet properly documented, said Mr Minns.

Mr Minns further notes that of all the animal products available

in the Bahamas, the Department of Agriculture only tracks the pro-
? duction of eggs and honey, which were worth $9.6 million and
? $193,000 in 2009, respectively.

Egg production in 2009 produced around six million eggs valued

at $9.6 million. Of that amount, $1.96 million in economic value was
? derived from chickens in New Providence, $7.64 million came
? from Grand Bahama and $22,464 from Long Island.

The Bahamas also produced 6,341 gallons of honey worth

: $193,050 in 2009. The greatest honey-producing island in 2009
? was Eleuthera, which made 158,525 gallons, followed by Andros
? with 19,000, New Providence with 9,000, Abaco with 3,200 and
? Grand Bahama with 3,100.

Mr Minns suggests that other animal products, or by-products,

i from which significant economic value is being derived but not
: recorded include chicken manure and milk.

“Perhaps the most used animal product for which no value has

been placed is chicken manure, which we know is used widely
; throughout the Bahamas,” he said.

The statistician said that unless farmers make available infor-

? mation on harvests, and agricultural officers from the various
? Family Islands and throughout New Providence report the data
relating to output from the various agricultural sectors, he is
? unable to put them in his reports.

Mr Minns calls for more resources to be invested in conducting

: surveys of the undocumented agricultural sectors, such as horti-
? cultural services, animal husbandry, hunting and forestry, so that
? a true picture of their economic value can be determined going for-
? ward, adding to the traditionally documented crop and livestock
: production.

Apollo Medical

Specialty Suite

INTRODUCES...

TRANSITIONS LIFESTYLE SYSTEM®

A weight-management program!

Guaranteed low-ghcemicindex eeling, asenise, sess reduction

and supplementation. Find oul why this system works and why we can

Trensitions|

Lah nate

gre you 2 100% quarsniee! This 6 a comprehensive. low-glycemec wenght
Manajement 5
fem feowides you wth educsion maetenak, a daly jwmel bw -]hCamic
food options,
Ve aght ee.
success. INTENSE 17 WEEK PROGAAMS NOW BEING OFF

yolem that you will actually enjoy. Transrions Liestyle Sws-

and clinically proven supplemants fo promote permanant
ith Transitions Liteatyie Sytem, you can have 100% ielong
FRED

Free Health Awareness Test

Discover the State of Your Health
Bone Density, % Body Fat, Metabolic Age ete
PLUS Nutraceutical Physical & Nutrition Consult
By Appointment with Transitions Wellness Coaches



242-327-3633

Suite 210 Marina Village, Sandyport, Nassau, The Bahamas