Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.226

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The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

Sy
eS
AND REAL ESTATE

THE BAHAMAS’ BIGGEST

Young Bu | iS



two weekend
homicides

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

A YOUNG Deejay was
gunned down and murdered in
what friends say was a dispute
over a woman in the early
hours of Saturday morning.

The killing of 29-year-old
Steven Walkes, also known as
“DJ Box” on Gibbs Corner,
brought the murder count for
2010 to 61. Walkes regularly
deejayed at a club on Gibbs
Corner, known as “Kelsie’s
Club.”

He had stopped at a friend’s
house on Gibbs Corner at

around 2.30am when he was
reportedly met by three men,
one of whom pulled out a
handgun and shot him after an
“exchange of words”, accord-
ing to police. He died on the
scene.

His death came just hours
after another man, 27-year-old
Omar Malakius — also a bud-
ding deejay — was murdered.

Malakius was shot multiple
times about the body in the
area of Blue Hill Road and
Weir Street on Friday evening
at around 10.50pm after what
eye-witnesses told police was

SEE page 11

PLP caucus holds talks on vote
over Baha Mar labour resolution

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Progressive Liberal Party's caucus held talks last night to
come to a consensus on how the party will vote on the govern-
ment's Baha Mar labour resolution when it is brought to the
House next month.

Party officials spoke with The Tribune before the meeting yes-

SEE page 11








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Govt appeals the road
work project injunction

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT has
appealed the injunction grant-
ed by Supreme Court judge
Justice Neville Adderley that
stalled the road work project
on Blue Hill Road and Market
Streets.

Meantime, the Coconut
Grove Business League that
filed the suit against the gov-
ernment over the road project
hope to meet with Minister of
Works Neko Grant to come to
an amicable solution before
they meet again in court on
September 21.

According to Paul Moss, one
of the attorneys representing
the league, a letter was sent to
Mr Grant last week requesting

a meeting. Up to press time he
said the group received no
word from Mr Grant.

Mr Moss said the group
would like government to con-
sider installing a third lane onto
Blue Hill Road and Market
Street.

"The third lane will permit
traffic to go in both directions
and at the same time permit
government to have persons in
the southern end of the island
be able to get to Bay Street — so
everyone will benefit,” said Mr
Moss.

In Justice Adderley's judg-
ment of the case he found that
the Ministry of Works and
Transport never dealt with the
impact road construction and

SEE page 11



CRIME SCENE: A bullet hole circled by police stands out on n this wal on Blue Hill Road and Weir Street following the death of 27-year-old ae
Malakius. Malakius was shot on Friday night and died of his injuries in hospital.

Claims that passport office employee
received bribe are being investigated

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SENIOR officers at
the Passport Office are
investigating claims
made on a local talk
show that an employee
at the passport office
requested and received
a bribe from a mother
applying for passports for her
two children — and later got
himself caught red handed
when he was recorded talk-
ing about it on her cellphone.

Deputy Prime Minister and

Qe



‘AWARE OF

CLAIMS:
Brent Symonette © GEMS radio station

Minister of Foreign
Affairs with responsi-
bility for the Passport
Office, Brent Symon-
ette, told The Tribune
yesterday that he was
aware of the allegations
¥ made on “The Nation”
radio talk show, host-
ed by Lincoln Bain of
Controversy TV fame

on Friday, and had

been advised that the matter
is now being followed up on.
“Tam aware of it. Senior
officers at the Passport Office

SEE page 11

¢ SEE MAIN STORY

Minister: stop making children
of Haitian parentage ‘scapegoats’

: By ALISON LOWE
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN parents who

: are not living up to their
? responsibility to provide the
} support their children need
: to achieve their potential
? must focus on doing this
? rather than making children
: of Haitian parentage “scape-
? goats” in the education sys-
? tem, according to the Minis-
i ter of Education.

Pointing out that there are

children of both Bahamian
: and Haitian parentage who
} are excelling in their schools,

Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister chalked
this up to the supportive envi-
ronment these children’s par-
ents have provided for them
and said that as Minister of
Education one of his priori-
ties is “trying to create an
awareness of the need for
Bahamian parents to pay
attention to the education
needs of our children.”

“We have many success
stories — if you see the high
level of attainment we had
this year it has given me a
problem because I have to

SEE page 16

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NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS? VLEADING NEWSPAPER



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

A NEN ere
Queen’s cousin Lord Brabourne ‘is

houseguest’ of Lyford Cay resident |

THE Queen's cousin Lord
Brabourne, according to the
London press, is now in the
Bahamas and the houseguest of
local fashion designer and Lyford
Cay resident Lady Nuttall

The Daily Mail of London
reports that the pair was seen
food shopping last week at
Goodfellow Farms and talking
with friends as they walked along
the beach near Lady Nuttall's
estate in the posh gated commu-
nity.

The 62-year-old 8th Baron of
Brabourne, heir to the Mount-
batten dynasty, is the first cousin
once removed of the Duke of
Edinburgh.

According to The Daily Mail
Lady Brabourne, 57, his wife of
30 years, is alleged to have called
the staff of their 60-bedroom
Hampshire manor — Broadlands
in Romsey — together to tell
them that her husband was “in
the air” on his way to the
Bahamas and would not be
returning. It is claimed that she
announced that she would now
be running the estate alone.

Activist

Lady Nuttall, known to her
friends as Jeannie, is the widow
of prominent environmental
activist and marine conserva-
tionist Sir Nicholas Nuttall, 3rd
Baronet Nuttall. She designs jew-
ellery and hand beaded kaftans,
dresses and tops under her label
“Jeannie McWeeney”.

The line donates part proceeds
of special tunic sales to the local
environmental advocacy group
BREEFF, founded in 1993 by her
late husband to educate people
about the underwater environ-
ment.

Sir Nicholas married Lady
Nuttall — formerly Eugenie
McWeeney — in 1983, after emi-
grating to the country in 1979.
The couple had one child,
Alexander.

Born in 1933 in Leicestershire,
England, Sir Nicholas was the
only child of Sir Edmund and
Lady Nuttall. At the age of eight
he became the 3rd Baronet Nut-
tall after his father's death in the
Second World War. He moved
to Lyford Cay with his third wife,



Photo/Chris Bott

LORD BRABOURNE and Lady Nuttall leaving Goodfellow Farms in Nassau.

ing a long illness. Lady Nuttall,
now 58, and his children were at
his bedside.

Norton Knatchbull, the for-
mer Lord Romsey, who became
Lord Brabourne on his father’s

©

death in 2005, is the grandson of
Lord Mountabatten of Burma
who used to spend much time in
the Bahamas in his later years.
The Brabourne family own a
Windemere on

home at




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Lord Mountbatten and Lord
Brabourne’s younger brother,
Nicholas, one of twins, were
killed in an IRA attack on their
boat in Ireland in 1979.




i By TANEKA
: THOMPSON
? Tribune Staff
? Reporter

i tthompson@

: tribunemedia.net

i ers should throw their
: support behind "ordi-
i nary" members of soci-
i ety instead of continu-
? ously electing lawyers
: to the halls of Parlia-
i ment, said Bishop Simeon
? Hall.



| Bishop Simeon Hall speaks
out against electing
lawyers to Pau

BAHAMIAN vot- |

The senior pastor of New

i Covenant Baptist Church rea-
? soned that lawyers — many of
? whom profit from the "present
i? culture of criminality" — cannot
? be expected to solve the crime
? problem or change the systems
i? in place which have led to this

"national nightmare."
He added that men and

i? women who have proven
i themselves successful in com-
? munity building and business
? would make better political
i candidates. While several
i lawyers are the architects of
: the nation's foundation, and
i have an indispensable role in
i nation building, Parliament
? needs more contractors, suc-
i cessful entrepreneurs, farmers

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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eee
BISHOP
SIMEON HALL walks of our society to

] and community
builders to take the
Bahamas to the
“promised land,” said
the religious leader.
"It is time for the
country's electorate to
help in reducing the
number of lawyers we
have in our Parliament
and allow more persons
from the ordinary

participate in our
national debate," said Mr Hall
in a statement released yester-
day.

"There exists an urgent and
immediate need for ordinary
persons to represent the com-
mon masses. It cannot be
expected that this national
nightmare of crime will be
(remedied) by the wisdom of
one group. While lawyers, in
the main, do not cause crime,
they are the major beneficia-
ries of the present culture of
criminality and this cannot be
expected to do what is needed
to change things.”

"The Bahamian people, by
and large, have bought into the
lie that only lawyers are best
suited to sit in Parliament,"
said Mr Hall as he called all
political parties to choose ordi-
nary persons with a reputation
of community leadership for
their election tickets.

The country needs fresh
ideas and new perspectives in
the national dialogue, he
added, “if we are to change the
status quo which sees ordinary
persons on the edge of des-
peration”.

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Miranda, former wife of Peter a
ile

Sellers. They later divorced and
he married Bahamian born Jean-
nie McWeeney.

Sir Nicholas was well known
throughout the Bahamas and in
local schools where he gave
many talks on the fragile marine
environment and endangered
fisheries. His agitation was the
driving force behind the intro-
duction of a closed grouper fish-
ing season in the Bahamas.

Sir Nicholas died of cancer in
July 2007 at the age of 73 follow-

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Police officer
found dead in
his home

POLICE yesterday
announced the death of an
officer, who was found life-
less in his living room by his
wife.

According to Assistant
Commissioner of Police
Glenn Miller, foul play is not
suspected in the death of 41-
year-old Constable 345
Oneil Ricardo Gibson,
although an autopsy will be
conducted to ascertain the
precise cause of death.

“He was discovered seat-
ed in a ‘La-z-boy’ chair at
8am by his wife. Apparently
he’d been watching TV,”
said ACP Miller.

The senior officer noted
that Constable Gibson gave
25 years of service to the
police force and had most
recently been stationed at
the Central Police Station
downtown.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,

Kt, O.B.E., K.M, K.C.S.G,,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com

— updated daily at 2pm

Talks to test Netanyahu’s will for peace

JERUSALEM — Hawkish Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has the security
credentials and the political strength to pull
off a peace deal with Palestinians now that the
US. has brokered a new start to direct talks.

The big questions is: Does he have the will?
Netanyahu heads to Washington on Sept. 1
for the launch of the first direct negotiations in
nearly two years with the Palestinians. The
White House hopes to forge a deal that has
eluded its predecessors within a year — a for-
midable challenge.

Though Netanyahu has built his political
career in part as an outspoken critic of peace
moves by past Israeli leaders, he has shown
surprising pragmatism in dealing with the mod-
erate Palestinian leadership of the West Bank.
Netanyahu has made a series of concessions
under heavy U.S. pressure — an indication
that he is both pragmatic and susceptible to
arm-twisting from Israel's closest and most
important ally. Shortly after his re-election a
year ago, the prime minister removed dozens of
military checkpoints in the West Bank. The
lifting of the travel restrictions, which Israel
said were a security measure during a previous
decade of violence, helped breathe life into
what has become a miniature economic boom
in the Palestinian territory.

Last year, Netanyahu endorsed the concept
of a Palestinian state, and later imposed a 10-
month slowdown on construction of new homes
in West Bank Jewish settlements. Earlier this
year, he informally imposed a similar, albeit
undeclared, freeze on new Jewish housing
developments in east Jerusalem. Such moves
would have been unthinkable for him a few
years ago. Still there are enormous obstacles to
overcome before any deal can be reached.

Netanyahu says he will not give up east
Jerusalem and has not talked about the possi-
bility of a broad withdrawal from the West
Bank, where more than 200,000 Jewish set-
tlers live among about 2.4 million Palestinians
and Israel maintains military control. Pales-
tinians claim all the West Bank and east
Jerusalem as well as Gaza — areas captured by
Israel in the 1967 Mideast war — for their
future state. The international community
backs the Palestinian demand.

This has made the Palestinians extremely
leery about speaking to the Israeli leader.

Another problem is the roughly 4 million
Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza are
deeply divided. They have different govern-
ments. And Netanyahu's partner for talks,
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, is weak
and only represents about half the Palestinians
in the territories.

Nevertheless, there is some reason for hope
that President Barack Obama's initiative will
fare better than the doomed attempts of past
American leaders. In dealing with the Israeli
public, Netanyahu's credibility as a security
hawk and secure political standing could enable
him to follow in the footsteps of former Prime
Ministers Menachem Begin and Ariel Sharon,

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two other right-wing icons who ultimately made
sweeping gestures for peace.

Begin reached the 1979 historic peace
accord with Egypt, requiring a full withdrawal
from the Sinai Peninsula, while Sharon with-
drew all Israeli troops and settlements from
the Gaza Strip five years ago.

Netanyahu's actions have not always
matched his tough-talking rhetoric. In his pre-
vious term as prime minister in the 1990s, he
withdrew Israeli forces from Hebron and hand-
ed over additional control of the West Bank to
Palestinians. Equally significant, his coalition
government, a grouping dominated by a mix of
nationalistic and hard-line religious parties,
has remained solidly intact despite unhappi-
ness with some of Netanyahu's moves.

Without any serious opposition, Netanyahu
has great freedom in conducting negotiations.
And if any hard-line coalition partners were to
break away, Netanyahu could turn to the mod-
erate opposition to remain in power.

For now, it remains unclear whether
Netanyahu is ready to make bold steps toward
peace. One reason for scepticism is his
endorsement of Palestinian independence last
year included so many caveats that the Pales-
tinians said it was insincere. Likewise, the lim-
ited settlement freeze included several loop-
holes that allowed construction of thousands of
apartments to proceed.

A former army commando and the son of a
renowned hawkish Zionist historian who still
wields heavy influence over him, Netanyahu
has led the fight against previous peace initia-
tives over the past two decades. His opposition
has been rooted in both security grounds and
an ideology stressing the Jewish people's con-
nection to the Holy Land.

Since winning election last year, Netanyahu
has given few signs that he is willing to make
the tough concessions demanded by the Pales-
tinians and the international community: a
withdrawal from occupied lands claimed by
the Palestinians, shared sovereignty of the holy
city of Jerusalem and a solution for the millions
of Palestinians who became refugees as a result
of Israel's creation in 1948. The Palestinians
view him with deep suspicion.

To lure Netanyahu to the negotiating table,
the White House had to agree to his demands
that there be no preconditions and that he not
be bound to pledges made by more dovish
Israeli leaders in the past. In accepting the
White House's invitation, Netanyahu said pro-
tecting Israel's security interests would be his
foremost concern. The Palestinians joined the
talks only after the international Quartet of
Mideast mediators issued an accompanying
statement Friday calling for an agreement "that
ends the occupation which began in 1967."

A senior Palestinian official said the Pales-
tinians had received assurances from the U.S.
that it will remain heavily involved and push for
a solution based on the 1967 borders.

(This article was written by Josef Federman,
an Associated Press writer).



THE TRIBUNE





What is being

proposed for
Cable Beach?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A few years ago I publicly
voiced my displeasure when
the former government
approved the re-routing of
Adelaide Road and gave it to
a private developer to build
million dollar residences.

The public road was closed
off and given to a private
developer to enhance its
development and provide
some employment.

Every time I’m going home
from the Coral Harbour area,
I cuss them for the inconve-
nience I’m caused to get
home. Now it is the Baha Mar
Cable Beach development
and again there is talk of road
re-routing.

New Providence is a very
small island with probably
close to 250,000 persons living
on it. One looks at Paradise
Island and the limited access
available.

There was a time when one
could go to the airport and
travel abroad. Now the air-
port land is Ocean Club
Estates, a gated community.
On the opposite end of Par-
adise Island, access is limited.
One is forced to wonder when
will the limited access end?
Are we in New Providence
going to be forced to live in an
area packed like sardines?
Will Bahamians access to our
country continue to dwindle
for the sake of a few jobs?

There is a much bigger pic-
ture here. If our access is lim-
ited today then twenty years
from now our grandchildren
will have no access. Is the
politician thinking that far?
Or is he doing what I like to
refer to as wanting instant
gratification? Gimme it now!
I want it now!

I sincerely believe we are
setting a dangerous prece-
dent.

A precedent I believe will
come back to haunt us —
maybe not in my lifetime but
certainly for future genera-
tions.

The fact of the matter is I
believe we are being governed
by politicians with tunnel
vision, are looking towards
the next general elections and
could care less about 20-25
years into the future. And
that is so sad.

I note with interest the role
the Bahamas Contractors
Association is playing in the
proposed Baha Mar/Chinese
development. And I believe
that the BCA may be acting
unconstitutionally. The fact
of the matter is that construc-
tion is not legislated by the

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letters@triounemedia.net



Parliament of the Bahamas.
Therefore, there is no such
thing as a contractor’s licence.
One has only to pay $100 to
the Ministry of Finance and
complete a business licence
form to operate a construc-
tion business and he will be
issued a licence.

Which brings me to the
point: Who if anyone has
authorised the BCA in giving
the impression that they are
the representative for any
legal body — because they are
not.

They are nothing more
than an association that is per-
ceived to be the representa-
tive for the construction
industry.

It is unfair to the contrac-
tor. Baha Mar development
is not obligated to entertain
the BCA. In fact, they ought
to be dealing directly with the
contractor and _ hiring
whomever they wish. Because
as I understand the BCA is
confusing the issue and press-
ing the government to put
into legislation a complicated
set of policies that I believe
will discriminate against the
average contractor. In fact,
I’m shocked that no one in
the business have stood up
and started to ask questions.
There is nothing stopping any
other contractor from form-
ing an association and mak-
ing representation to Baha
Mar or any other develop-
ment. I applaud the govern-
ment for not following up on
the pressuring tactics from the
BCA to legislate the con-
struction industry. I would
like to know who has autho-
rised the BCA to certify con-
tractors? And what does the
BCA certification mean? Is it
that the contractors not certi-
fied by the BCA will not be
allowed to be employed? And
what if some contractors are

never able to meet the certi-
fication standards? Where
does this leave them? This to
me sounds like blatant dis-
crimination. And why is
BTVI being talked about in
the same conversation as the
proposed Baha Mar develop-
ment? The men at BTVI are
learning to lay blocks and
read a house plan. Who is
playing games and why?

With reference to the pro-
posed $2.6 billion project, it
seems as if this proposed pro-
ject was doomed from its
inception. The original part-
ners were run out of town. It
was criticised by the govern-
ment. Not one government
minister was present at the
signing in Miami, or at the
announcement in China. I’ve
also heard that the Chinese
government wants the
Bahamas government to
guarantee the loan for the
development.

One vital question I must
ask is what exactly is being
proposed for Cable Beach?
At one time the development
was $1.4 billion now it’s up to
$2.6 billion.

How will our access be hon-
estly affected in the Cable
Beach area?

Each time you see a story
on TV touting the develop-
ment you see a different pic-
ture. Are we going to contin-
ue to prostitute ourselves for
the left over and say to hell
with future generations? Why
each time a developer sets
foot on Bahamian soil his goal
is to limit access? My parents
and grandparents were born
here. How much more
Bahamian can I get? Why do
Ihave to ask for permission to
set foot in my own country?
There is something wrong
with even the thought! In
closing I say the real men who
fought for this country must
be turning over in their
graves!

PAT STRACHAN
Nassau,
July 30, 2010.

PO Soa A

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Does anyone know precisely what the unemployed Con-
struction Worker count is at this particular time?

For the next phase of Atlantis how many construction work-
ers will be needed?

My suspicion is of the current reasonably trained construction
workers would be totally absorbed over on Paradise Island so in
essence what we all wish there would be total employment in

that sector.
Now let’s stay sane.

bank or hotel employees who were laid-

off a year or so ago cannot be included as they have no experi-

ence in the construction trade.

Can someone answer this?

I suspect Atlantis Phase 4 will immediately solve all the
unemployment in the construction sector.

H HUMES
Nassau,
August 11 ,2010.



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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



172 countries should matter:
Making sure the G20 listen

insight |

WORLD VIEW

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

THE G20 should be the
‘T20’ — trustees not just of
the 20 rich countries that sit
at their meetings but also of
the 172 nations that are
denied a seat at their table.

This powerful statement
has been advanced jointly
by the Secretaries-General
of the Commonwealth and
La Francophonie, two orga-
nizations whose members
are mostly developing states.

The custodians of the
G20’s self-bestowed man-




















date to oversee the world
economy justify their
monopoly of global deci-
sion-making on the fact that
they account for 90 per cent
of global GDP. But, while
that is so, 90 per cent of the
world’s countries are exclud-
ed from their discussions.
As the two Secretaries
General (Kamalesh Sharma,
Commonwealth and Abdou
Diouf, La Francophonie)
have argued: “The simple

fact of globalization dictates
that all countries, the world
over, have been affected by
a tsunami of crises — of
finance and food, of energy
and the environment. Equal-
ly, all have an interest in
what goes into the G20
meeting, and what comes
out of it.”

Almost a year ago (Octo-
ber 2009) in a commentary
entitled ‘Can the Caribbean
depend on the G20?’, I



SIR RONALD SANDERS

made the argument that
“Membership of the G20
has little to do with fair rep-
resentation and much to do

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“Three G20 meetings have
now been held without
representation by the small
states in Africa, Oceania, the
Caribbean, and the Pacific.”



with self interest. Together,
the G20 countries cover
more than eighty-five per
cent of world economic
activity. They can afford to
ignore, or at least pay lip ser-
vice to, the other nations
who account for the remain-
ing fifteen per cent of global
economic activity, even as
Ban-ki-Moon, the UN sec-
retary-General, reminds that
eighty-five per cent of the
world’s countries are not
represented at the G20. In
the end it is power that mat-
ters and power in this
instance is purchasing capac-
ity and market size.”

I argued then that the
Caribbean collectively
should argue for a seat at
the G20 table to advance its
own interests which are
neglected by the Interna-
tional Financial Institutions
that continue to apply tra-
ditional prescriptions and
criteria to Caribbean prob-
lems, many of which are
caused by events in the
world’s richest economies
such as the United States,
Britain, France, Germany
and Japan.

No initiative has been
pursued by the Caribbean
in this regard as far as I
know.

Concern

Three G20 meetings have
now been held without rep-
resentation by the small
states in Africa, Oceania, the
Caribbean, and the Pacific. I
acknowledge that Canada’s
Prime Minister, Stephen
Harper, as Chairman of the
last G20 meeting in Toronto
did have a meeting with the
Secretaries-General of the
Commonwealth and La
Francophonie to get an
understanding of the chal-
lenges faced by the member
countries of their organiza-
tions that were not repre-
sented at the meeting. But,
Prime Minister Harper’s
generous concern for non-
represented countries, while
laudable, is not a substitute
for a structured and pre-
dictable participation in the
G20 deliberations by the
world’s small countries.

The call that inspired the
American Revolution, “No
taxation without represen-
tation”, is relevant today in
the international political
economy. G20 countries
consume the majority of the
world’s resources; they are
its biggest polluters; and
their actions, across a variety
of areas, materially affect
the survival of smaller coun-

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tries. They should at least
listen to the valid problems
of others. The G20 cannot
claim economic leadership
but deny economic respon-
sibility and obligations.

The G20 countries — even
the large developing coun-
tries such as China, India
and Brazil — prefer to limit
the number of nations in
their council, keeping it as
a club for large nations that
now aims to set the eco-
nomic parameters for the
world to fit their purpose. It
also suits them to keep their
relations with small
economies at a bilateral lev-
el where enough can be
done to maintain influence
over them without over-
hauling the global appara-
tus, such as the Internation-
al Financial Institutions and
the World Trade Organiza-
tion in which they are dis-
advantaged.

Given this reality, small
states should seek to insti-
tutionalize the initiative tak-
en by Canadian Prime Min-
ister Stephen Harper to
invite the Secretaries-Gen-
eral of the Commonwealth
and La Francophonie for
consultations prior to the
meeting. They should push
to ensure that the Chair per-
son of every G20 meeting
seeks proposals from the
two Secretaries-General on
behalf of their disenfran-
chised members, and that
such proposals are tabled
and considered by the meet-
ing.

In the case of the Com-
monwealth, 32 of its 54
members are small states
and five of its larger mem-
bers — Australia, Britain,
Canada, India, and South
Africa — are members of the
G20. La Francophonie has
56 member states. Ten coun-
tries are members of both
organizations, which togeth-
er comprise 72 countries
that are not represented at
the G20.

Crisis

Surely, proposals from
two persons representing 72
countries and almost a bil-
lion people should be wel-
come by the G20 in a spirit
of genuine regard not only
for international democra-
cy, but also for dealing with
the plight of small countries
that have been hit particu-
larly hard by the effects of
the international financial
crisis and who are still suf-
fering from its conse-
quences.

The two Secretaries-Gen-
eral have publicly observed
that, for 2010 alone, the
World Bank has indicated
that US$315 billion is
required to meet the gap
between what developing
countries require and what
is currently available if they
are to meet the Millennium
Development Goals set by
all nations. They have pro-
posed that “the G20 should
endorse a serious action
plan to identify innovative
potential sources of non-sov-
ereign financing, embracing
widespread consultation
with those not at their
table.”

If the Caribbean cannot
collectively push for a seat at
the G20 table, the region
should at least join other
small countries in seeking to
institutionalize Prime Min-
ister Harper’s initiative that
the Commonwealth Secre-
tary-General presents our
case to which we should
contribute well researched
and viable arguments.

Reponses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









ma Cancer Society to sponsor

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

IN these
days of
heightened
security con-
cerns, we’re
all a little
more pro-
tective of
our privacy.
However, if
you’re sell-
ing a home,
you also
know that
showing it is

an absolute must for success- }

fully landing a buyer.

When you know pho- }
tographs of your home will be }
shown in print ads and on the }
website, pack away personal }
valuables such as jewellery, ;
electronics, silverware and }
family heirlooms. You may }
want to remove computers, }
wide-screen televisions, crys- }
tal and valuable collectibles }
from the camera’s eye. There }
is no need to advertise your }
— your home’s fea- }
tures will speak for them- }

belongings

selves.

This is the ideal time to }
take an inventory of any items }
that may be included in the }
sale of your home. Provide :
your Bahamas Real Estate }
Association (BREA) agent }
with a copy of the inventory. |

You can further protect }
your home with motion sen- :

sor lights inside and out.

If you have a security sys- }
tem, make sure it’s active and }
that the service has an emer- }
gency contact number for }

you.

will do the same for them.

There’s likely no need to ;
worry, but why not play it ;

safe?

down.

(Mike Lightbourn is
president of Coldwell
Banker Lightbourn Realty)

Questions or comments?
Email me at

ask@ColdwellBankerBahamas.com



Ask your neighbours to be :
on the lookout for any suspi- ;
cious activity. You, of course, }

Tip of the Week — The old
adage, Better be Safe than }
Sorry, will never let you ;

32-mile kayaking stint

Trip from
Exuma to New
Providence
will take at
least six hours

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Staff Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

A THIRTY-two mile
kayaking stint sponsored by
the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas will take place on
an open body of water from
Ship Channel Cay, Exuma,
to Glemore Beach, New
Providence, all in the good
efforts of raising monies for
the Monty Higgs Kayak for
Cancer Fund.

“In 2004, Monty Higgs,
with Peter Higgs and Dave
Meller set out on a kayaking
trip from George Town,
Exuma to Ship Channel
Cay, Exuma,” read a state-
ment on the event. “This
adventure covered over 120
miles and two weeks of pad-
dling some of the most
beautiful shore lines and
waters in the Bahamas.”

The trio had intended to
kayak to New Providence
from Ship Channel but the
weather built and they were
unable to complete the final
leg.

Participants in this week’s
event — Saturday, August
28 — will attempt to finish
the final leg of Higgs’ and
Miller. But this will depend
largely on the weather and

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the tide, said Jeff Robert-
son, a participant who told
The Tribune that organizers
have accounted for the pos-
sibility that this could be a
setback going forward.

It will take approximately
six to eight hours to com-
plete.

Weather

Scattered thunderstorms
have been forecast for the
day of the event. But despite
the dismal weather projec-
tion, Andrew Higgs, coordi-
nator of the kayaking event
looks forward to an exciting
time.

Mr Higgs is fundraising

and organizing the event in
honour of his father Monty
Higgs, who died of acute

myeloid leukemia (AML) in
2006.
Monty Higgs won

Olympic medals in different
sailing events.

Jeff Robertson, a partici-
pant in the event said:
“When I found out that it
was to raise monies for can-
cer, I definitely wanted to
participate.”

“I’m just excited and
ready and I’m still raising
money; around $1600 in
total,” Mr Robertson
explained.

In addition to his contri-
bution, cheques have been

mailed to the Cancer Society
by the general public, and
to Mr Higgs who has col-
lected $3,000 in donations
thus far.

Funding

One-hundred per cent of
the funding is going toward
the Cancer Society.

“Kayaking is an exhilarat-
ing experience,” he said.
“You're water-levelled, get-
ting splashed while sitting
inside the vehicle.

“You feel the wind, you
feel the waves, and it’s inter-
esting to see the number of
yachts and scenery as you
paddle by.”

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

OF N=] =) 7 Ba eS




HIP HOP singer
Wyclef Jean, sec-
ond right, greets
Supporters at the
airport in Port-au-

ce

Prince, Haiti, recent- “i _
ly. Jean said he will . ae

try to get the courts : b Pe CO
to overturn a deci- ‘ 4 wi ee

sion disqualifying
him from the Haiti
presidential race.

- =

Ramon Espinosa/AP

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 1A

East Street (south), Zion Blvd & Bamboo Blvd.
TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSION
(ROAD PAVEMENT WORKS)

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles §.A wishes to inform the motoring public that Temporary Road
Closures & traffic diversions will be implemented on sections of East Street, Zion Blyd. & Bamboo
Blvd, to allow Road Pavement Works from Wednesday August 25 to 2010
between the hours of 6pm to bam.

We kindly ask that motorist follow & observe the traffic management scheme and diversions in place.

Tsay nar uD

Motorist travelling in the following directions should divert to the specified route:

EAST STREET (south
+ Motorist travelling northbound should we VALENCIA DRIVE, ANTONIO DRIVE
& VICTORIA BLVD as an alternate and continue on East Street (south) to their
destination.
4 Motorist travelling southbound should we VICTORIA BLVD, ANTONIO DRIVE &
VALENCIA DRIVE as an alternate and continue on East Street (south) to their destination.
ZION BLYD
4 Motorist travelling east or westbound should we ANTONIO DRIVE & VICTORIA
BLVD as an alternate.
BAMBOO BLYD
+ Motorist travelling east or westhound should we THATCH PALM AVE &

SAPODILLA AVE as an alternate and continue on East Street to their destination.

Motorist and pedestrians are advised to avon these areas during peak hours as the final pavement works
on the above mentioned streets will be ongoing.
Your patience throughout this project is greatly appreciated, We sincerely apologize for the
inconvenience and delays caused.

For further information please contact:

desg Cartellong Constrocrienes Civiles 5.4 Ministry of Works & Transpart

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Wyclef Jean:

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

HIP-HOP singer Wyclef
Jean said Sunday that he is
not abandoning his presi-
dential bid just yet and will
try to get the courts to
overturn a decision dis-
qualifying him from the
race, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Speaking to The Associ-
ated Press by telephone
from his home in Croix des
Bouquets, Jean said his
lawyers will file an appeal
with the national electoral
dispute office.

Jean said that he has a
document "which shows
everything is correct" and
that he and his aides "feel
that what is going on here
has everything to do with
Haitian politics."

"They are trying to keep
us out of the race," he said,
referring to Haiti's politi-
cal establishment.

Haiti's elections board
rejected Jean's candidacy
Friday night — presumably
because it decided he had
not met residency require-
ments, although the board
did not cite a specific rea-
son. Under Haitian law, a
presidential candidate must
have lived in the country
for five consecutive years
leading up to the election.

Jean has argued that he
was not required to com-
ply with the law so strictly
because after President
Rene Preval appointed him
as roving ambassador in
2007, he was allowed to
travel and live outside the
country.

The 40-year-old singer
said that he is appealing
the Haitian board's deci-
sion on the basis that it
rejected his candidacy
before the national elec-
toral dispute office, or
BCEN, could issue a final
ruling on the residency
issue.

Jean said that shortly
after he filed his papers to
run in the Nov. 28 election,
two Haitian citizens chal-
lenged his candidacy, say-
ing he had not met the res-
idency requirements.

The BCEN ruled in his
favor, Jean asserted, but
the two citizens appealed
the decision. The case was

Keim Cem ay tY
up my bid for
URSA mara!

still pending when the
Haitian elections board
decided to disqualify Jean,
the singer said.

It was not clear whether
Jean's legal argument
would hold up. Elections
board spokesman Richard-
son Dumel said that as of
Sunday afternoon, he had
not seen any paperwork
from the candidate indi-
cating an appeal, but he
declined to comment fur-
ther.

The board on Friday
accepted 19 candidates and
rejected 15. A spokesman
read out the names of the
approved and rejected can-
didates quickly at a late,
hastily called news confer-
ence.

It would have helped
both candidates and voters
if the council had explained
the basis of their decisions,
said officials from the Joint
Mission of Electoral
Observation, a division of
the Organization of Amer-
ican States and the
Caribbean Community.

"Regarding the 15 can-
didacies that were deemed
ineligible, explications
about the reasons for inval-
idating them would have
contributed to the trans-
parency of the process,"
the OAS wrote in a news
release issued Saturday.

Jean said he had planned
to leave the country this
weekend to see his family
in New Jersey, but has
decided to stay in Haiti to
see the appeal process
through.

Shortly after informing
the AP of his decision Sun-
day morning, Jean
announced it again on his
Twitter feed, saying:
"Tomorrow our Lawyers
(sic) are appealing the
decision of the CEP (the
elections board). We have
met all the requirements
set by the laws. And the
law must be Respected."

Some officials in Haiti
were worried about politi-
cal unrest among Jean sup-
porters after his candidacy
was rejected. But the singer
had asked his fans to stay
calm, and there have been
no significant election-
related protests or violence
over the weekend.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Govt appeals injunction

FROM page one

are looking into it and will
decide what to do probably
tomorrow when I come into
town,” said Mr Symonette
during a phone interview yes-
terday afternoon.

The alleged exposé took
place on Mr Bain’s radio
show when a caller, who iden-
tified herself as Kim, was put
on air by Mr Bain. Kim said
that two months ago she had
gone to the passport office to
get two passports for her chil-
dren, the legitimate fee for
which would be $25 - $50 per
passport.

While being served at the
passport office, which is locat-
ed on Thompson Boulevard,
Kim said the passport officer
who was dealing with her
application told her he “could
assist (her) in getting (her)
passports at an earlier time.”

“He was trying to charge
me $100 for two kids’ pass-
ports I had paid $50 for. I said
to him, ‘“That’s ridiculous. [’m
paying $100 for something I
paid $50 for?’”

Passport office

The woman said that ulti-
mately she decided to hand
over $40 to the passport offi-
cer in the hope of speeding
up the process as she was due
to travel with her children
shortly and passport produc-
tion at the office has been
widely publicised as bogged
down by delays. She said she
put the $40 in an envelope,
which she passed to the offi-
cer.

However, Kim said that
after she left the Passport
Office, she received a “dis-
gusting” voice mail on her
phone, allegedly from the
passport officer. In the mes-
sage, he “rowed her out” for
only placing $40 in the enve-
lope after he asked her for
$100. Kim said that for the
rest of the day her phone
“was blowing up” with calls
from the same number, which
she presumed to be from the
officer.

After going to Mr Bain
with her story, Kim said she
and the radio host decided to

call the officer back. The
radio host then aired a record-
ing of a conversation alleged
to be between the woman and
the officer in which they dis-
cussed the alleged payment.

“You made me look stu-
pid,” said the alleged officer
in the phone conversation,
apparently referring to how
she only put $40 in the enve-
lope. “Now [ve got to pay for
that,” he said, a comment that
the woman said she took to
mean there were other people
involved in the corrupt “fast
tracking” scheme.

The woman then asked him
if he wanted the additional
$60 that she claims he asked
her for, to which he said “No,
that’s okay, take care.”

Kim told Mr Bain that ulti-
mately the two passports she
put the application in for took
two days longer than her
receipt indicated they would
take — two and a half months
in total, she alleged. “I guess I
got swing,” she told Mr Bain.

Mr Symonette said: “It’s
unfortunate not only that
members of the public try to
fast track facilities by paying

whatever kind of fee...that’s
unfortunate....and when offi-
cers who work for govern-
ment accept that kind of mon-
ey.”

Numerous signs displayed
in the Passport Office state
that it is “illegal to tip a Gov-
ernment officer.”

The Deputy Prime Minis-
ter said that while he would
not wish to comment on the
particular instance alleged on
the radio talk show as the
authenticity of the recordings
has yet to be verified, he said
that “appropriate action
should always be taken” to
counter corruption.

“Tt’s probably more wide-
spread than we realise,” he
added.

Asked whether, if the alle-
gations of corruption are
authenticated, the officer
would be subject to dismissal
from his job, Mr Symonette
said he would “not want to
comment on that at the
moment.”

However, he said that at
the least such behaviour
would “certainly warrant dis-
ciplinary action.”

PLP caucus holds talks

FROM page one

terday and said their decision would come
after weighing the social and economic
repercussions voting for or against the res-
olution. The former prime minister, who
gave the green light the $2.6 billion project
when the developers were still tied to their
former partners Harrah's Entertainment,
said top PLPs have gone over the details of
the deal with Baha Mar officials in the
past few days.

"We will be directly influenced by the
complete urgency to do something with
respect to the economy of the Bahamas. It
is an increasingly serious state of affairs
that exists here,” said PLP Leader Perry
Christie.

"The country is desperately in need of
relief in respect to this dire unemploy-
ment situation. The question for us is
examining in detail the implications of
whatever the number of work permits are,
the impact on Bahamian labour, and the
length of time of the work permits," he
added.

While not revealing how the party will
vote on the resolution, Mr Christie restat-
ed his discontent with the government for
putting the burden of a decision meant
for Cabinet onto the shoulders of Parlia-
ment.

He thinks that the large num-
ber of Chinese labour requested
by the Chinese government for
the project may be due to poor
negotiations on the part of the
Ingraham administration.

"Our initial dismay was that
something wasn't done by the
Bahamian government whether
directly or indirectly when nego-
tiating with the Chinese gov-
ernment with respect to the
amount of work permits
(requested).

"Our view is that it is an exec-
utive decision, it is really a deci-
sion to be made by the govern-
ment of the Bahamas. The FNM
is reluctant to make the decision on its
own and wants to drag Parliament into it.
It's the first of its kind where the legisla-
ture is asked to share in the decision mak-
ing of the executive on a decision of grant-
ing work permits."

Leader of Opposition Business in the
House of Assembly Obie Wilchcombe said
the amount of foreign labour the project is
calling for is "politically toxic" adding that
the government wants Parliament to vote
on the matter so it does not take the brunt
of expected public criticism.

"It is politically toxic considering the
fact that tons of Bahamians are out of



URGENCY:
Perry Christie

on vote

work in the construction industry,
not just here in New Providence
but also in Grand Bahama," said
the West End and Bimini MP.
"So to make a decision to allow
for a large number of foreigners
to come in the country” will not
be taken lightly.

In spite of this, the project is
needed to help stimulate the slug-
gish economy, he said.

Yesterday Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell said he will vote in
accordance with the rest of his
party adding that a resolution to
the deal is long overdue.

He blamed Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for the delay
in getting the project underway arguing
that old financiers Harrah's Entertain-
ment pulled out of the project because of
Mr Ingraham's earlier public statements
on the deal.

Leader of Government Business in the
House Tommy Turnquest told the media
last week that the Baha Mar resolution
will be brought to Parliament on Septem-
ber 8 for a vote.

The investors behind the luxury rede-
velopment of Cable Beach are requesting
work permits for 4,920 Chinese labourers
for the construction of the project.

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FROM page one

? rerouting would have on businesses in the area of Blue Hill Road
? and Market Street, despite it insisting that two studies — costing $3.3
i million — were undertaken before the work began.

i Justice Neville Adderley's judgment states that an affidavit sub-
: mitted by Joy John, of the Ministry's Project Execution Unit, said
i a "professional report" was done by engineers Mott McDonald at
? acost of $2 million, and a further “economic appraisal" done in May
i 2008 at a cost of $1.3 million, prior to the start of the New Provi-
: dence Road Improvement Project.

i However, Justice Adderley found: "In perusing these various
i reports, it is clear to the court that none of them dealt with the
? impact on businesses located along Corridors 11A and 11B (Blue

: Hill Road and Market Street)."

? The Ministry of Works was granted a stay that would allow
i them to continue work on the roads because the injunction should
i: "not take effect immediately due to the stage of the works," accord-
i ing to the Justice Adderley's judgment.

FROM page one

? a confrontation between him
i and another man.

i He was rushed to hospital
i but died of his injuries in the
? operating theatre at around
i 1am. Police said a man wear-
i ing a hooded sweater holding
: a handgun was seen fleeing
i the area after Malakius was
i shot.
i Yesterday Assistant Com-
? missioner of Police in charge
i of crime, Glenn Miller, said

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

DJ shot

that the two incidents “could
be connected” but the police
had no evidence to specifical-
ly prove this at this time.

According to ACP Miller,
no one was in custody up to
press time last evening in con-
nection with either of the
killings.

These latest homicides
bring the murder count to 61
for the year.

Essentially, the waters of

life will always flow as long
as time goes on. Therefore,
accept your challenges in
life, and let them flow with
the tide.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

S
\

FIFTH: Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie

FERGUSON-McKENZIE

VETERAN sprinter
Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie, competing at the
Berlin World Challenge in
Germany yesterday, fin-
ished fifth in the womrn’s
100 metres.

She ran 11.29 seconds.
The race was won by

Jamaican Sherone Simpson

in 11.09. Trinidad &
Tobago’s Kelly-Ann Bap-
tiste was second in 11.14.
Third place went to Vere-
na Sailer of Germany in
11.24 and Blessing Okag-
bare of Nigeria was fourth
in 11.27

NPSA ACTION

THE New Providence
Softball Association will
resume play in their regu-
lar season on Tuesday at
the Banker’s field at the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex with a double
header.

At 7 p.m. the Comman-
do Security Truckers will
play the Mighty mitts and
at 8:30 p.m, the Freedom
Farm Horsemen will meet
the Dorsey Park Boyz.

BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council will hold a very
important meeting on Sat-
urday at 10 a.m. at the
National Cycling Track for
all Churches wishing to
participate in the upcom-
ing Barron Musgrove/Roy
Colebrooke Cycling Clas-
sic, the Rev. Anthony Car-
roll Softball Classic, the
Rev.

Elliston Smith Track and
Classic and the Jason
Saunders Volleyball Clas-
sic.

Plans for all of these
events, scheduled to start
in

September, will be dis-
cussed. Each Church is
asked to send two repre-
sentatives.

NPVA MANAGEMENT
MEETING

THE New Providence
Volleyball Association

(N.P.V.A.) has scheduled a

Management Committee
meeting for Tuesday,
August 24 at the DW
Davis Junior High School
beginning 7p.m.

Association president
DeVince Smith (and not
Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith, as
printed on Saturday), is
asking that all persons
interested, submit their
teams for the upcoming
season.

Each team is requested

to send two representatives
as matters pertaining to the

start of the league will be
discussed.




PAGE 12



§

MONDAY, AUGUST 23,

Jason Rolle

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

N what is now listed as the
longest match played at the
Gym Tennis Club and proba-
bly the longest played locally in
recent time, Kevin Major Jr. out-lasted
Jason Rolle in three gruelling sets to
win the 17th AID Clay Court Champi-
onships' open men's singles title.

The three hours and 25 minutes
match saw the 15-year-old number two
seed prevail with a 4-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (11)
win over the 20-year-old collegian on
Saturday at the clay courts in Winton
Meadows.

"IT don't know if we have official
records of those matches, but from my
recollection, this would be the longest
match, certainly for AID, that I have
witnessed," said tournament director
Mickey Williams, who has seen quite a
number of matches in his time.

Reminiscent of a match he played in
El Salvador on the junior circuit, Major
Jr. said what he went through with Rolle
was exactly what he had to do against
the Mexican.

"I won that match in El Salvador in
the hot sun in about four hours after I
came from 5-1 down in the second set
after losing the first set," Major Jr
reflected.

"In this one, I just kept digging. I
didn't think about the score. I just want-
ed to win. I was prepared to stay out

mm 17TH AID CLAY COURT CHAMPIONSHIPS

Kevin

ts

2010




THRILLER: Kevin Major Jr. (left) outlasts Jason Rolle in three sets. The match at the Gym Club lasted 3 hours and 25 minutes.

there as long as he did and play him
point for point for as long as it.”
Earlier in the summer, Major Jr.
needed just two sets to win the Gatorade
National Open title over Rolle on the

Cy CMe UR TOM ya ai ca

TENT FAls
settle for
TMH Ee

In women’s division, Bahamas
lose 48-0 to Cayman Islands

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER getting off to an impressive start,
the Bahamas had to settle for fourth place at
the North American and Caribbean Rugby
Association's (NACRA) Under-19 men tourna-

ment at the Winton Rugby Pitch.

The tournament, which also featured a
ladies’ division, came to a close on Saturday
with Bermuda carting of the men’s crown with a
18-15 decision over Trinidad & Tobago.

Mexico

The Bahamas had a chance finish to third,
but ended up losing 22-17 to Mexico in the
plate match.

After falling behind when Mexico scored on
a penalty, the Bahamas took the lead minutes

SEE page 14



ROUGH AND TUMBLE: In the ladies division, the Bahamas played for the c
Cayman Islands. Centre Lolitta Hanna got two early tries for aquick 10-0 lead and Lisa Bird and Emily Davies followed
with one each while Katie Bayles had a conversion as Cayman extended their margin to 22-0 at the half.



aor Jr wins
n tennis duel

hard courts at the National Tennis Cen-
ter.

But on Saturday, he said he had to
make a lot of adjustment with the ball
because of the surface. That was one of



=

hampionship, but got blanked 48-0 by the





the reasons why he felt he lost the first
set and trailed 5-1 in the second.

SEE page 14

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 13



SPORTS



CAL RIPKEN/60 WORLD SERIES: FREEDOM FARM CELEBRATION



aluting the champions

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE boys are back from the
Cal Ripken/60 World Series
and they enjoyed every
moment of their celebrations
on Friday night and Saturday.

Although the motorcade
was called off due to their late
arrival on Friday night, family
and friends still showed up at
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport to greet the team
home from Wilson County,
North Carolina where they
clinched the under-12 title with
a 7-1 win over Vasilia, Califor-
nia on Thursday.

What they didn't do on Fri-
day because of the lateness, was
made up on Saturday as the
team had a rally at Freedom
Farm in Yamacraw, took to the
streets on a float parade and
were then feted at the park on
their return.

"It's really hard to fathom
what we've done," said Robert
Cox, an assistant coach on the
team. "When you look at the
magnitude that little Bahamas
competed against in the United
States, it was just awesome, an
awesome experience."

Cox said when Freedom
Farm made the initial trip to
the Southwest Region Tourna-
ment a few weeks ago, they
only looked at it as a tourna-
ment to win. Never in their
wildest dreams, Cox said they
envisioned that they would be
returning home as World Series
champions.

"It was a lot of team work.
The core of this team started
working out in May to go to
Florida in July," he pointed out.
"But this team never wavered.
We gave them the work and
they came to practice and did it.
That's why they are the cham-
pions today."

Manager Greg Burrows Jr.
said when he returned home,
he really just came to the reali-
ty that the team did what no
other team has done before and
that was to win the World
Series title.

"I'm so happy for this team.
I couldn't ask for it to end no
other way," he stated. "Last
year we got eliminated from
the first round in the Southwest
region and so I knew we had
to be more prepared. As I
coach, I learnt from the mis-
takes we made and we were
quite ready for them this year."

Burrows Jr. said the support
from everybody involved in
Freedom Farm was tremen-
dous, especially considering the
short turn around they had in
getting from the regional to the
world series.

He singled out Meressa
Thompson, Andrew Thomp-
son, Pat Moss, Burrows Sr, CJ
McKenzie, Robert Cox and
Jamiko Sands. They all pitched
in to make it all happen.

Now that they have returned
as champions, Burrows Jr. said
the team will have to move up
to the 13-only division next
year, but they still have to
chance to duplicate the feat
next year because they will still
be together.

As the under-12 division,
Burrows Jr. said they will have
to go through a rebuilding
process, but he is confident that
based on the success of the
team, they are convinced that
Freedom Farm will be able to
field another strong team to
travel next year.

Some of the players on hand
for the celebrations, were quite
thrilled about being champions.

"It feels good. We had a
good team and everybody
worked hard," said Chavey
Young. "We all knew that we
had the best team in the
Bahamas. We just had to go out
there and proved that we were



the best team in the tourna-
ment and we did that."

Anthony Villalon, who was
one of the pitchers and key
offensive sparks, said: "It was a
great experience. We had the
hits just when we needed them
and we won. We had a very
good team. I was very pleased
with how we played.”

Myron Johnson, the most
valuable player of the tourna-
ment, noted: "It was very good.
We played a lot of defense and
out bats really came through
for us. I felt good going out
there and pitching. We are the
champions."

Ashton Moxey said: "We
played very good, especially in
the championship game. We
didn't allowed them one hit and
they thought they had us. But
we came out swinging with our
bats and we won it. It was a
good team. We could go any-
where and win."

Wayde Beckford added:
"From our first practice as a
team, we felt that we would go
far and we went there to win
it. We had a pretty good. When
we were down, we never gave
up. We performed to the best
of our abilities and I think we
did a great job."

Jeff '‘Sangy’ Francis, who has
been around helping out Free-
dom Farm from its inception,






said the team just showed what
persistent and hard work will
do for you.

"Greg (Burrows Sr) always
had this vision that we should
play out of the south Florida
area and make our way up into
the World Series," he said.
"I've seen the success of this
coming for a long time because
we had so many players who
went before this crew and so
the program just continued to
grow.

"And most of those players
who left and went off to school
and played some professional
baseball, are coming back home
and are coaching in Freedom
Farm program like Greg Bur-
rows Jr and Jamiko Sands. So
these guys know what it is to
compete because they have
guys coaching them who have
been at that level."

Francis, who still remain
president of the New Provi-
dence Baseball Association,
said it's his hope that whenever
baseball can have a permanent
home for the senior players that
the Bahamas will get the oppor-
tunity to take its national team
off to compete in more of the
major tournaments because
there is so much talent in the
sport in the country.

Pat Moss, another stalwart
at Freedom Farm, said the

PHOTOS: /revene Saunders



team's success speaks volume
for what they are doing.

"We have a pretty good
coaching staff from t-ball up,
so every year, we just continue
to turn over good ball players,"
he stated. "It's all through the
hard and dedication of every-

















































body. But once you achieve
goals like being World Series
champions, we have to main-
tain it.

"So we just have to start get-
ting the guys ready so that they
can compete next year. We will
basically have the same coach-

= BB

es, but we will have a lot of new
players, so we have to groom
them for this caliber of play.
But I'm sure that what this
team has achieved will help
them coming in.”

Burrows Sr., who orches-
trated the Freedom Farm
league, said all they have to do
is improve on what they
achieved.

"We just need to get the 13-
year-old, 14's, 15's and up to
do the same thing,” he stressed.
"The thing is to be able to play
and win at that level. We knew
that we could lay at this level
for a long time. Now we have
proven that we can win up
there.

"So the thing is for us to con-
tinue to win at a higher level
every time we go back. So it
will never stop. The success of
this team only means that we
have just put one piece of the
puzzle together and now we
have to do the rest of it."

Jeff Martinborough, one of
the coaches and sponsors of the
league, said the team did very
well and they worked hard to
perform at the level that they
did.

"The results speak for
itself," he insisted. "A lot of
people who didn't know about
Freedom Farm are now com-
ing out and taking a look at
what we are doing, so that is a
positive step in the right direc-
tion for us. I'm sure that
Bahamians are just as proud of
them as we are of them at Free-
dom Farm.”

And Odessa Black, a proud
parent of two boys playing in
the league, said the team win-
ning the World Series was just
"indescribable.

"When they came through
the doors last night, I went
down on my knees and prayed.
I was in tears," she said. "Some
of them call me mom because I
also help out in the concession
stand.

"But there's nothing like
when you can see the success
as we've seen in their perfor-
mances. I'm really proud of all
of them."

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles would have preferred for him and
Mardy Fish to be playing in the final of the Western
and Southern Financial Group Masters in Mason,
Cincinnati. But he was just as proud of watching the
American as he came within two games of upsetting
Roger Federer in the men's singles final yesterday.

"That would have been nice, but for us, on the last
day that we played, he had a three hour match with
Andy Murray and obviously with him doing so well in
singles, he used a lot of energy,” Knowles pointed out.
"We lost a tough super tie breaker, so it was a tough
loss for us.

"But I think it was a greater benefit for Mardy to fin-
ish so well in Cincinnati and almost win that title. It's
one of those catch 20/20 where with him having so
much success, you have to be moderate how things
are going. But as a team, we're playing great. It's a good
position to be in with him winning a lot of singles and
we as a team winning a lot of doubles."

In their quarter-final match on Friday night,
Knowles and Fish were eliminated 6-4, 3-6, 12-10 by the
team of Wesley Woodie and Dick Norman. The match
came after Fish pulled off an exhausting 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4)
win over number four seed Murray in the singles quar-
ter's.

After upsetting number nine seed Andy Roddick 6-
4, 7-5 in Saturday's semifinal, Fish took number three
seed Federer to the limit yesterday, losing a hard fought

6-7, 7-6, 6-4 decision in a match that lasted two hours MAGNIFICENT MARDY: Mardy Fish, from Tampa, Fla., hits a forehand at the Cincinnati Masters tennis tourna-
ment, this week. In the final yesterday he played Switzerland’s Roger Federer. Federer won a thrilling encounter

and 40 minutes.



Bahamas
settle for
fourth place

FROM page 12

with a try from Sean Kemp.
The Bahamas went up 10-3
at the half on a touch down
from Ronaldo Young.

But Mexico responded
with a penalty try and they
converted for a 10-10. Mexi-
co eventually went up on a
pair of tries for a 22-10 lead.

The Bahamas then came
back with asecond try from
Kemp and a conversion
from Albury to trim the
lead to the final margin.

Garfield Morrison, an
assistant coach on the
Bahamas’ under-19 team,
said they fell apart and that
caused them to miss out on
keeping the hardware here.

Playing out of pool A, the
Bahamas upset defending
champions Cayman Islands
26-6 in their opener. Howevy-
er, they lost their second
game 12-10 to Bermuda, but
advanced to the third and
fourth place playoff by
virtue of the point spread.

The Cayman Island got
the bottom bowl title with a
15-5 decision over Barbados
to drop all the way to fifth



Al Behrman/AP Photo

In that match, Federer came through with the only
break at 5-4 in the third set and held serve to snap a
seven-month drought in which he haven't been able to
win a tournament.

As the runner-up, Fish will climb in the top 25 in sin-
gles for the first time and will definitely be a competi-
tor to watch at the US Open, the final Grand slam
tournament for the year, that will start next Monday in
Flushing Meadows, New York.

But Knowles said he's not concerned because he
doesn't feel it will take away from their doubles part-
nership.

"He's a great guy. Not too many guys would have
probably hung in there in Cincinnati and played the
doubles after a gruelling match with Andy Murray,"

6-7 (5), 7-6 (1), 6-4.

Knowles stressed. "But he understand that he made a
commitment to which, he honored.

"So I'm certain that we will continue to play for the
rest of the year and like he said in his own submission,
it's a tough situation to be in, winning a lot of matches
in singles and then have to also do so in doubles."

The good thing about the US Open, according to
Knowles, is that Fish will have a a well deserved week's
rest before they get ready for the Grand slam, which
they hope to turn in another great showing.

"We're obviously one of the better teams in doubles
and he's put himself in a position to be one of the
favorites in singles, so it's an exciting time for him and

also an exciting time for us. But tournaments like
Cincinnati are always tougher because you have to
double up, playing singles and doubles in the sane day.
But in the US Open, like the other Grand slams, you
don’t play singles and doubles in the same day. So it
shouldn't be that grueling.”

The 38-year-old Knowles and Fish, unseeded as
they made their return after winning the Legg Mason
Classic in Washington in their last tournament played
a few weeks ago, had to watch as the No.2 seeds Bob
and Mike Bryan played the No.4 seeds Mahesh Bhu-
pathi and Max Mirnyi in the final of the men's doubles
yesterday.

Ml INAUGURAL YOUTH OLYMPICS IN SINGAPORE
Tynia Gaither makes history for Bahamas

By Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson
BAAA’s Public Relations Officer

At 10:49pm Saturday night Nas-
sau time, Grand Bahamian Tynia
Gaither, won the silver medal in the
women’s 200 metres at the inaugural
Youth Olympics in Singapore, making
history for the Bahamas.

Gaither, who will enter grade 12
at Osceola High School in Florida,
ran 23.68 seconds from lane six, having
run 24.09sec to win her first round
heat.

Nigeria’s Florence Ndikura Nwake
won the gold medal with a 23.46sec
run. The bronze medal was captured
by Olivia Expone of the USA in
23.75sec.

Gaither was born on March 16th,
1993 and shares a birthday with leg-
endary sprinter Tommy Robinson,

triple jump great Dr. Timothy Barret
and Hugh Bullard, deceased sprinter
who competed in the 1960 Olympics.

Her mother is Ms. Sabrina Johnson
and she attends Cornerstone Baptist
Church.

Gaither was the school’s Athlete
of The Year as well as Honour Roll
Student for 2008, 2009, and 2010. She
was also selected as an All Bahamian
Scholar Athlete for 2010.

Raquel Williams finished seventh in
the B final of the shot put with a heave
of 11.86 metres. Her series was
11.15m, 11.79m, and 11.86m. She
fouled her final throw. In the first
round Williams finished in fifteenth
place with a throw of 11.59m.

On Monday morning (Nassau
time), Stephen Newbold will partici-
pate in the B final of the 400m hurdles
and Lathone Collie-Minns in the B
final of the triple jump. This will be the
final day for track and field.

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Newbold, who ran 54.40sec in the
first round, will run out of lane three.
His personal best is 52.75sec done in
winning the Under-17 event at the
Carifta Games.

Collie-Minns has a personal best
of 15.35m. He is this year’s Carifta
Games Champion in the Under 17
Division. Collie-Minns jumped 14.66m
in the first round for tenth place.

He will be the fifth jumper in the B
final.

On the first day of the finals on
Saturday, Grand Bahama’s Rashan
Brown clocked a personal best in the
400m of 53.63sec to finish fourth.
Brown’s previous Personal Best was
53.65sec.

Brown was not initially selected for
the Youth Olympics, but when World
Junior champion Shaunae Miller
decided she did not wish to go to Sin-
gapore, Brown was substituted.

The event winner was Robin

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Reynolds of the USA, who clocked a
seasonal best of 52.67sec. High
jumper Ryan Ingraham, who finished
in ninth place in the qualification
round with a 2.07m clearance, jumped
a personal best in the B final with a
height of 2.13m. The second place fin-
isher was George Dimitrou of Roma-
nia who jumped 2.10m.

Julian Munroe of Grand Bahama
clocked 11.04sec in the B final of the
100m for seventh place. Munroe ran
11.53sec in the first round and has a
personal best of 10.97sec.

Carlos Manuel Sampaio Nasci-
mento of Portugal won the B final in
10.79sec. Jamaica’s Odame Skeen won
the A final in a personal best of
10.42sec.

Marva Etienne of CR Walker High
School was scheduled to run in the
Girlls B final but did not show. It is
not known at this time the reason for
Etienne not to show.

place after winning the last
title. Barbados finished in
sixth place.

In the ladies division, the
Bahamas played for the
championship, but got
blanked 48-0 by the Cayman
Islands. Centre Lolitta Han-
na got two early tries for
aquick 10-0 lead and Lisa
Bird and Emily Davies fol-
lowed with one each while
Katie Bayles had a conver-
sion as Cayman extended
their margin to 22-0 at the
half. In the second half,
Bird, Hanna, Kehoe and
Lawrence each came up
with one and Bayles added a
conversion to finish off the
Bahamas.

While the experience
showed in the performance
from the visitors, this was
the first time that the
Bahamas has fielded a
ladies' team and Morrison,
their head coach, said they
have nothing to feel bad
about.

"They played much bet-
ter than they did in their
first game," said Morrison,
reflecting on their 65-0 loss
to the Caribbean Select
team, which comprised of
some of the best layers from
anumber of Caribbean
Islands.

"The ladies are coming
along. They just need to play
more games.”

Canada beat the United
States 6-3 to clinch the
NACRA Under-20 women’s
15s championship.

Kevin Major Je wins marathon tennis duet

FROM page 12

After simply letting the first set "get away" from him, Major Jr.
got twice at 5-3 and 5-5 before they both held at 6-6 to force the first
tie breaker. In the period, Major Jr. took a 5-2 lead and he never
looked back.

Just how Rolle looked a little fatigued in the second, Major Jr.
did the same in the third.

That enabled Rolle to go up a break at 4-2. But after getting his
"second wind,” Major Jr. regrouped and managed to cut the deficit
to 5-4 on a break.

They eventually held serve to the second tie breaker.

In this extra period, neither player gave the other the edge as
they stayed even at 6-6, 7-7, 8-8, 9-9, 10-10 and 11-11. At 12-11,
Major Jr. got a volley return to take the slim lead. Then Rolle hit
a return volley into the net to end the epic match.

"It was close. I had him just like the last time, but in the end, he
came out with it," said Rolle, who remembered playing a long
match like this at Missouri Valley where he attends school. "He
deserved it.”

Rolle, who returned to school on Sunday where he's on a ten-
nis scholarship, said he would have certainly like to get that par-
ticular victory under his belt, considering that he was the defend-
ing champion.

"But he played well. [had him 5-1 in the second set and he came
back to win that. I was serving for the match several times in the
third and he came back. He just out played me today."

It was the second tournament victory for Major Jr. earlier in the
tournament, he had to come from behind as well in a 4-6, 6-0, 6-4
win over Jody Turnquest for the boys under-18 title.

While Rolle lost the big one again to Major Jr., he did team up
with Danielle Thompson as the number two seeds to pull off the
mixed doubles with a 6-1, 6-1 decision over top seeds Derron
Donaldson and Autise Mortimer.

But Rolle and Donaldson, the number two seeds, lost to the top
seeded team of Robbie Isaacs and Jardian Turnquest 6-1, 6-3 in the
men's open doubles.

The two-week long tournament also featured a junior veterans
division for players over the age of 35.

Larry Rolle, unseeded, knocked off number three seed Har-
rington Saunders 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 for the men's vet singles title. The
doubles crown went to the team of Cameron Carey and Gerry
Kanuka.

Williams said the tournament was a success with seven divisions
contested. But he said because of a lack of entries, there was no
ladies division played.

"We did have a mixed doubles competition and all of the top
seeded players pretty much came through to form,” Williams
pointed out. "This match in particular (men's open final), was
the best one for the tournament.

"Obviously people here have not seen this caliber of tennis in
quite a while. So the future certainly looks bright because both of
those players (Major Jr. and Rolle) are still very young and in a few
years they could be the players to watch at the international level."

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



‘Love My Bahamas’
project transforms
downtown Nassau

By DIANE PHILLIPS

THE colours, murals and
sculptures are everywhere -
on sides of buildings, on
facades and under eaves,
adorning stairs - 15 works of
art that are transforming 15
buildings and sites in down-
town Nassau.

It's all part of Nassau's
first full-fledged art in public
places initiative. ‘Love My
Bahamas’, co-sponsored by
the Coca-Cola and Down-
town Nassau Partnership, is
adding a splash of colour to a
city that plays hosts to mil-
lions of visitors a year.

Part of a 15-month long
campaign to bring excite-
ment through art to historic
Nassau, Love My Bahamas
got another step closer to its
official launch this week
when signs were erected
tying sponsors into the pro-
ject and Coca-Cola's tag line
‘Open Happiness’ into the
visual displays.

"This is a life-changing
opportunity for downtown
Nassau,” said Vaughn
Roberts, managing director
of the Downtown Nassau
Partnership (DNP), the
organization charged with
spearheading the revitalisa-
tion of historic Nassau. "I
don't think there has ever
been a more exciting time
for art and this is the first
time we have ever had any-
thing of this magnitude."

For the local bottler of
Coca-Cola, Caribbean Bot-
tling Company, the project
is both corporate and per-
sonal.

Company CEO Walter
Wells recalls downtown Nas-
sau in its heyday.

"Just walking along Bay
Street made you feel alive.
The air was electric. You
could sense the buzz and
excitement," he says. On a
corporate level, supporting
the redevelopment is what
Mr Wells called “one of the
most important initiatives we
have ever undertaken
because of the size, scope
and length of commitment.
The project also reflects the
company's Live Positively
philosophy."



Coca-Cola supported the
competition leading to the
selection of artists and coor-
dinated the workshop bring-
ing together local and inter-
national talent.

"We cannot thank Coca-
Cola enough for its contri-
bution to this massive
undertaking,” said DNP
Co-chairman Charles
Klonaris.

"The art has changed the
cityscape of Nassau and pro-
vided visitors with something





TRANSFORMING DOWNTOWN: ‘Love My Bahamas’ moves closer to its official launch.

new to look at, talk about
and photograph. It has given
rise to a new reason to do a
walking tour. Anything that
adds to the visitor experi-
ence is good for us as a des-

tination and should be cele-
brated."

Participating artists include
Antonius Roberts, John
Beadle, Chantal Bethel, Lil-
lian Blades, John Cox,

Claudette Dean, Tyrone Fer-
guson, Maya Hayuk, Jace
McKinney, Toby Lunn, Kis-
han Munroe, Jolyon Smith,
Allan Wallace, Arjuna Wat-
son and Daniel Weise.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

Ss

& BILLING CHANGES

Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
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during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
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The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing
July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates
will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

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11.95 cents per unit
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(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel)

KVA CHARGE
$11.36 per KVA
8.70 cents per unit
6.20 cents per unit
$ 568.00

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COMBOS

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JK. FROSTY,
SMALL FRY

PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Minister: stop making
children of Haitian
parentage ‘scapegoats’

FROM page one

find funding for scholarships
at a level we have never seen
before, even though we put
$7 million for scholarships this
year it is still not enough,
(because) so many of our chil-
dren who are getting parental
support who are doing mag-
nificently in school.

“What I am concerned
about those parents not
spending time with kids whose
kids are engaging in anti-social
conduct and who are not
doing well, and who are using
children of Haitian origin as
scapegoats. We don’t need
that in our country. We need
all of our children to do well,”
said the Minister.

Mr Bannister was speaking
on Island FM’s Parliament
Street radio talk show yester-
day afternoon.

In response to a question
from host Dr Sophia Rolle in
which she asked him to
respond to “some of your
detractors who would be over-
ly concerned about the num-
ber of foreign students in the
Bahamian school system”, Mr
Bannister said: “This issue is
very explosive in The
Bahamas. Extremely explo-
sive.”

He noted how he had been
the subject of “some really
nasty remarks” after The Tri-
bune printed an article in July
in which he was quoted as
acknowledging the impressive
achievements of many Hait-
ian children in Bahamian pub-
lic schools and said that The
Bahamas has an obligation to
ensure every child is educated.

He also commented at that
time on the fact that many
Haitian parents take a very
active interest in their child’s

Mount Moriah

Reker

Roses by

OO

MESSAGE TO PARENTS:
Desmond Bannister

education, which was enabling
them to excel in school.

Speaking yesterday Mr
Bannister said: “Since then
people have attributed all
kinds of remarks to me which
are not true. What I am trying
to create in The Bahamas is
an awareness of the need for
Bahamian parents to pay
attention to the education
needs of our children.

“Too many parents have
dropped the ball in terms of
spending the time that is
required to help their children
achieve success in education
so children of Haitian abstrac-
tion will always be a focus of
discontent because so many
of them are doing well, and
so many of our parents —
many are doing good jobs —
but some who are not doing a
good job are going to utilise
(children of Haitian parent-
age) as scapegoats when the
reality is got to focus on what
our children are doing.”

Illustrating the role that par-

THE TRIBUNE

enting plays in creating the
environment which can allow
a child to excel, Mr Bannister
noted the example of a friend
who home-schooled his son.

“He called me the other day
so gratified we helped his son
take his BGCSEs. His son got
eight A’s in the BGCSEs.
He’s put everything into this
child, so of course that meant
sacrifices at home, that meant
someone staying at home, less
income for the family, but the
child did extremely well.”

Meanwhile, he spoke of two
girls born in the Bahamas,
each of whom has one or
more parents of Haitian ori-
gin, who are both valedictori-
ans at their respective public
high schools in New Provi-
dence.

“They are no more intelli-
gent than any other child who
is in the school, they are enti-
tled to be in our system, but
the reality is that the parents
are spending the time with
them and they are excelling.

Someone called me from
Grand Bahama and someone
called me from Abaco and
they told me the same story
and it’s not that anyone is any
smarter than any of our chil-
dren but it’s time for us to
appreciate children will excel
when they get parental sup-
port.

“Tf you get up in the morn-
ing and don’t pay attention to
your children, don’t make sure
they get breakfast, that they’re
prepared for school, if you
stay out late at night and don’t
help them with their home-
work if you are not putting
time into their lives they are
not going to see what these
children (the ones who do well
at school) see,” said Mr Ban-
nister.

August 28, 2010 | (2 moon = until
Tom Grant Park

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MMA oR MALO Matteo Ue

- MR. ARNOLD FORBES

MU ce ea ca Tee he Tete

COTA ages ae Morea men
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bouncing castle etc

GAG SRS Te UE

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government enjoyed

a 38 per cent increase in

revenues collected from

the rent/lease of Crown

Land in a three-year

period between 2005 and 2008, an
Inter-American Development Bank
(IDB) report has revealed, although
only 60 per cent of the backlog in sur-
veying this land had been eliminated.
The IDB, in its evaluation of the

THE TRIBUNE

S

AUGUST 23,

iness

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

8% Crown Land revenue increase



=he

BREITLING

* IDB paper discloses just 60% of Crown Land survey backlog cleared, though, as project

Land Use Policy and Administration

Project (LUPAP), which was designed
to enhance the Government’s man-
agement and oversight of Crown and

Government on target

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has done
what was required to ensure
that the Planning and Subdivi-
sions Act can be implemented
on October 1 this year as
planned, the minister of the
environment told Tribune Busi-
ness, adding that claims mil-
lions of dollars’ worth of real
estate developments were being
held up was “wrong”.

Responding to claims that
numerous real estate-based
projects had been delayed
indefinitely because the Town
Planning Committee was not
meeting, or had said it was not
approving any applications, Dr
Earl Deveaux said the true pic-
ture was “totally to the con-
trary”.

He explained that the Town
Planning Committee’s term in
office had expired on July 1,
2010, and that all they had done
was issue a letter to the Direc-
tor of Physical Planning,
Michael Major, requesting that
he not issue any approvals until
they received letters from the
Governor-General confirming
their reappointment.

The Town Planning Com-
mittee, which prior to the July 1
expiration held a meeting on
June 29 or June 30, received its
letters of reappointment on
July 11, 2010, a 10-day gap.

“The claim and belief that
projects were being held up was
wrong,” Dr Deveaux said.

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor



PLANNING ACT: Earl Deveaux

“What the Committee asked
the director to do in a letter
was not to issue any approvals
between July 1-10, until they
received their letters.”

Meanwhile, Dr Deveaux said
his ministry and key govern-
ment agencies had completed
all that was necessary to bring
the Planning and Subdivisions
Act to implementation by the
revised October 1, 2010, dead-
line.

He explained that the three
key tasks had been to complete
an audited list of approved sub-
divisions, so the Bahamian pub-
lic would know which develop-
ments had received full gov-
ernment approval; finish the
Land Use Plan for New Provi-
dence; and develop a “referral
process” to accompany the
Act’s provisions.

“We have done these things,
and will be in a position to meet
the October 1 deadline,” Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.

THE CARICOM body charged with overseeing regional
standards and quality for traded goods and services is this
week conducting a mission to this nation to assess “how the
Bahamas could set up” its own Standards Bureau, the senior
official co-ordinating the visit telling Tribune Business that its
establishment was “closer than it was 10 years ago”.

Alpheus Forbes, deputy permanent secretary in the Ministry
of Labour and Social Development, confirmed that the
Caribbean Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality
(CROSQ) is staging a week-long mission to the Bahamas,
meeting with the private sector, plus the Government and
social organisations, to discuss establishing a Bahamas Bureau

of Standards.

The Bahamas signed up to CROSQ membership under the
former Christie-led PLP administration, but has never created
its own formal Standards Bureau,

as demanded by legislation passed

SEE page 7B

General insurers
mull name change

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas General
Insurance Association (BGIA)
and its members are mulling
whether to change its name to
the Bahamas Insurance Asso-
ciation to better reflect
attendee composition, Tribune
Business can reveal, its chair-
man also telling this newspaper
the organisation was “feeling
fairly positive” it could resolve
its current regulatory concerns.

Timothy Ingraham, who is
also head of Summit Insurance,
declined to comment directly
on an existing motion to change
the BGIA’s name to the
Bahamas Insurance Associa-
tion, telling Tribune Business
he did not want to pre-empt the

Bahamian insurance industry
feeling ‘fairly positive’ it can
resolve differences with
regulator over Act
and regulations

outcome of any discussions.

However, he did confirm:
“We’re working together on
this for sure, and looking to the
future. We’re going to have
something formal in the next
few weeks. We just need to
make sure we’re on the same
track and headed in the right
direction.”

Tribune Business under-
stands that the name changed is
being mulled to better reflect

SEE page 4B

Treasury land, in addition to develop-
ing a parcel-based mapping system of
Bahamian real estate, said it had deliv-

ered a “comprehensive Crown Land
Policy study” that had “formed the
basis for reform of land management

in the Bahamas”.
Noting that the Government had
“shown interest” in establishing a

Manager wins $26,600

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER receivables
manager at SuperClubs Breezes
has been awarded $26,560 after
the Supreme Court found the
Nassau-based all-inclusive
resort wrongfully dismissed her,
the judge ruling it had failed to
prove she had falsified compa-
ny documents as alleged.

Justice Neville Adderley, in
his August 6, 2010, ruling,
detailed how SuperClubs
Breezes watered down its justi-
fication for dismissing Marion

Ex-supervisor found wrongfully dismissed by hotel
chain, in episode related to $300,000 overstatement
of Bahamian all-inclusive resort’s accounts receivables

Morris, going from the Novem-
ber 18, 2004, summary dismissal
letter, which alleged she had
altered invoice dates and made
accounts receivables uncol-
lectible, to its argument of
‘gross negligence’ made at trial.

Although SuperClubs
Breezes, in its defence, argued
that it had carried out an inves-
tigation determining that Ms

Morris was guilty “on a balance
of probability” of the alleged
‘falsification’ conduct, Justice
Adderley noted that it aban-
doned this to argue at trial the
dismissal was justified by ‘gross
negligence’ - something the
resort chain had not even
pleaded.

SEE page 6B

provides foundation for ‘comprehensive land management reform’ in Bahamas
* Crown Land revenues exceed $1.5m, just shy of targeted 40% rise,
as government ‘shows interest’ in creating National Land Agency
* Resource critical for Bahamian economic empowerment, with Government
again urged to clear $300m real property taxes outstanding
* Bahamian surveyors resent stereotype as ‘uncooperative, secretive and old-fashioned’

Bahamian National Land Agency, sim-

SEE page 5B

| The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



Fidelity expects profits return in second half

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas)
expects to return to profitabili-
ty in the 2010 second half after
suffering a more than $900,000
reverse that pushed it into a
$327,247 loss for the six months
to June 30, its chief executive
telling Tribune Business its loan
arrears, as a percentage of the
total portfolio, was some 4.4
percentage points better than
industry average.

Anwer Sunderji said the
BISX-listed bank expected to
benefit from a reduction in loan
loss provisioning, as non-per-
forming loans “levelled off”,
while interest margins were set

* Chief executive says bank’s loan arrears 4.4 percentage points
better than industry, standing at 12.96% compared to 17.36%
* Adds that non-performing percentage better at 8.4%,
compared to commercial bank average of 8.7%
* Bank expects improved interest margins resulting from falling deposit rates, and
lower loan loss provisions, to propel it back into black during final six months of 2010
* Eyeing higher loan book yield, as higher-yielding consumer loans
increase from 18% to 23% of total book during 2010 first half

to benefit from reduced “cost of
funds” as deposit rates in the
Bahamian commercial banking
system came under pressure
from surplus liquidity.

Both developments would
benefit Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) financial perfor-

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mance and help to drag it back
into the black, Mr Sunderji said,
adding that an increased pro-
portion of consumer loans with-
in its overall portfolio would
also aid its loan/asset yield.
“A positive development has
been the change in mix of the

loan book,” Mr Sunderji told
Tribune Business. “We’re now
at 77 per cent/23 per cent [mort-
gages/consumer loans], which
is a change from 82 per cent/18
per cent at the start of the year.

SEE page 2B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Fidelity expects profits return in second half

FROM page 1B

“We're getting more higher
margin loans on the books, and
our yield from the loan book is
improving.”






The Tribune



Fidelity Bank (Bahamas), the
smallest institution in the
Bahamian commercial banking
sector, has traditionally been a
mortgage lender, but its man-







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agement has pursued - to the
extent it can during a recession
- the strategy of diversifying its
loan book to move more into
consumer loans, which carry
higher interest rates and yield
margins because of their per-
ceived greater risk.

Meanwhile, Mr Sunderji said
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) per-
formance for the 2010 first half,
during which it fell to a
$327,247 net loss for the six
months to June 30, 2010, com-
pared to a $582,089 profit in
the same period last year, was
“consistent with what we
expected”.

Pointing out that Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) was not the
only Bahamian commercial
bank to suffer a net loss dur-
ing its current financial year,
and that the industry’s woes
related directly to a bad econo-
my and high unemployment,
Mr Sunderji said: “We’re seeing
non-performing loans levelling
off. We’re not seeing that prob-
lem get any worse.

“The industry, on total
arrears, was a 17.36 per cent at
the end of June, and our total
arrears was 12.96 per cent,
which is kind of a big differ-
ence of 4.4 percentage points
between ourselves and the
industry, and the industry is get-
ting progressively worse.

“Our total arrears is better,
and the non-performing book is
now stable. It’s at 8.4 per cent

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of our loan book, and the
industry is at about 8.7 per cent.
That is marginally better, but
in any event it’s better.

“Tt’s still bad, but we think
there is light at the end of the
tunnel - it’s not getting worse -
and are actually quite hopeful
that we will have some recovery
through the balance of the
year.”

Pointing to “positive signs”
from the Paradise Island-based
resort industry, where both
Atlantis and Comfort Suites
appeared to have resumed
some hiring, Mr Sunderji told
Tribune Business: “We’re
hopeful our provisioning will
not be as high as it has been,
and hopefully our margins will
increase as the cost of funds is
going down.

“We expect the bottom line
to improve, and both of those
factors will assist us in getting
back into the black. That’s our
expectation.”

The Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) chief executive
explained that interest paid on
deposits throughout the
Bahamian commercial banking
system was likely to continue
declining due to the high sur-
plus liquidity levels, the avail-
able money supply depressing
rates and competition for
depositors.

“Credit demand has col-
lapsed, really, and liquidity in
the banking system has risen

ele!
al Options

very substantially, so we’re sit-
ting on surplus cash and can’t
lay it off,” Mr Sunderji
explained. “So there’s a drag
on the system, and that’s the
reason for some aggressive
lending elsewhere.”

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) saw
this reflected in its net interest
income for the 2010 half year,
which fell by 9.4 per cent to
$3.938 million, compared to
$4.347 million the year before.

While interest income
remained relatively flat, drop-
ping by only $45,000 despite the
non-performing loan rise, inter-
est expense (interest paid on
deposits) rose year-over-year
by more than $360,000.

This reflected the fact that
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
deposit base, which grew by 2.2
per cent or $4.7 million to
$221.755 million, expanded at a
faster rate than the bank’s loan
book, which grew by just over
$1 million - from $200.122 mil-
lion to $201.329 million. The
lack of loan opportunities also
hit Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
non-interest income, such as
fees, which fell from $2.703 mil-
lion to $2.597 million.

“It’s tough to find good loan
prospects in this economy,” Mr
Sunderji explained. “If the
economy does not grow, there
can be limited expansion of
growth in loan books.

“We think there may be
some progress next year, when

ESTABLISHED 1920

,

the economy is expected to
grow by 1 per cent. I think we
may resume growth in the loan
book in a controlled way next
year, dependent on jobs, depen-
dent on Baha Mar, dependent
on foreign direct investment.
There are lots of variables and
unknowns.

“Tt’s too early to say that
we’re cautiously optimistic, but
the worst may be past us, even
though recovery may not be
swift. It’s an economic cycle.”

The Bahamian banking
industry would need time to
work its way through current
non-performing loans, but in
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) case,
Mr Sunderji said: “With the
improvement we’re getting on
the loan book, expectations of
lower costs of funds that will
boost our interest margins, and
expectations of provisions not
increasing, will help us in the
second half.”

On the expenses side, Mr
Sunderji said a more than
$240,000 increase in deprecia-
tion and amortisation was relat-
ed to the bank’s new software
and technology system, which it
had to depreciate.

Salaries and employee bene-
fits, along with general admin-
istrative expenses, were held
relatively flat during the 2010
first half, while loan loss pro-
visions rose by less than
$100,000 year-over-year - grow-
ing from $584,248 to $669,060.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3B



New Straw Market
meeting its targets

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE NEW Straw Market is
ahead of schedule and on bud-
get, a senior architect at Pat
Rahming and Associates told
Tribune Business Thursday.

Collin Johnson, who is also
the project architect for the
Straw Market, said the build-
ing’s roof was currently being
constructed and could be set in
place in another few days. This,
he said, will give the project a
feel of near completion, though
it is not scheduled to be fin-
ished for another year.

“Hopefully it (the roof) will
add a bit of beauty to the pro-
ject,” said Mr Johnson. “Once
the roof gets on it looks as
though we are doing some-
thing.”

According to him, they are
not being too optimistic about
the project, as several days of
rain have slowed work some-
what, forcing the team to work
12 hours per day to catch up.

“There is diligence from all
consultants, and especially the
contractor,” he said.

“They are very adamant

about getting this building done
on time.

“Schedule is August of next
year, even though we have had
a couple of rainy days, but they
have been working feverishly
from 7am to 7pm to try to
make up for those rainy days.”

Despite the weather woes,
Mr Johnson said the project has
not encountered any major
snags during the building, and
they have managed to avoid
any major impediment to Bay
Street vehicular and pedestri-
an traffic.

“We haven’t hampered that
in any way,” he said. “We have
foot traffic and vehicular traffic
as normal.”

The new building is already
beginning to enhance Down-
town Nassau’s appearance,
something he hopes will inspire
other property owners who
have let their buildings deteri-
orate.

Mr Johnson said while he is
not sure what will become of
the existing, tented Straw Mar-
ket site, he hopes it could
become a parking area for the
Pompey Museum, where tour
buses can drop their guests.

However, Tribune Business

Building security
plan aims to
save thousands

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

ARAWAK Homes is saving clients almost $3,000 during the
building of their homes by removing the threat of material lost
through theft, the company’s vice-president of sales told Tribune
Business.

Dena Ingraham said home builders rarely consider the cost of
stolen construction material when cruching the numbers on the
overall cost of a home, but Arawak Homes chairman, Franklyn
Wilson, intimated during the dedication of their newly-refrubished
Blue Hill Road office that theft has become a grave concern.

Ms Ingraham said this concern prompted the company to form
and deploy a dedicated security team to protect properties under
construction in order to minimise the loss of material.

She said the security unit at Arawak Homes was created due to
the increasing level of crime on the island.

“We had to respond to that need baesd on the amount of build-
ing materials we have lost,” she said. “With Arawak Homes you
have that coverage.”

Crime has become a worrisome reality to the business commu-
nity recently. Many business owners lament the costs associated
with protecting a business and its employees from violent crime and
theft.

President of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis
Rolle, said recently that doing business in this country has become
extremely frightening.

Mr Rolle said criminals seem to not fear the law, and Ms Ingra-
ham said thieves will steal the newly installed toilet bowls out of an
under-construction house.

Arawak Homes has its in-house security firm patrol the houses
it builds as a part of the complete package the company offers its
customers.

Ms Ingraham said purchasing the services offered by her com-
pany separately could increase construction costs exponentially. She
added that their packages, which now include security for their
building sites, can save thousands on a build.

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learned that extending the
Pompey Museum into the space
when the vendors move into
their new building is being
mulled by officials.

“Being such a valuable site, I
don’t think they will do that
(create a parking lot),” he said.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

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FROM page 1B

the BGIA’s composition and
attendance at its regular meet-
ings. Apart from brokers and

















































Employment Opportunity
SENIOR SALES & TRAINING MANAGER

A leading jewellery retailer seeks a qualified person to fill the
position of Senior Sales & Training Manager. The successful
candidate will be responsible for ensuring sales and profits are
optimized by customer service and proper maintenance of
inventory controls according to established company procedures.
Suitable candidates must be of integrity, proactive and able to
demonstrate strong leadership skills.

The ideal candidate should possess:

- A minimum of 10 years management experience in the

jewellery retail

sector and the ability to supervise staff is a must.
Associate degree or above; An Accredited jewellery
professional qualification (GIA or equivalent).
Good knowledge of computers and administration
Proven skills with inventory management,
merchandising, marketing and training.

Excellent remuneration and benefits package.
Interested persons may submit resume to:

Attn: Recruitment
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242.328.4211
Or

Email: recruitment@luxuryretaillimited.com

TERMS OR REFERENCE

HANDICRAFT & MARKETING
PROJECT CONSULTANT

BAHAMAS AGRICULTURAL &
INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION (BAIC)

1. Design and Develop a Virtual Portal that portrays the
Bahamas as a “tier-one” provider of quality goods, on
par with any other region around the World.

2. Identify and source complimentary software; data
validation, System design and development, beta
release and quality assurance testing.

3. Prepare and maintain accounts for members,
allowing them access to the internet, for the sales of
their crafts, purchasing supplies from vendors locally
globally and payments of fees.

4. Coordinate and organize advertisements and events,
through the internet, to ensure the promotion of the
Bahamas National Craft Association (BNCA).

5. Training of the selected Members of the MSME on e-
Commerce benefits and how to develop sales channels
through the internet.

6. Define a strategy/plan to expand the Bahamas
Virtual Platform.

7. Provide feed back and guidance to the Corporation
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8. Provide ongoing monitoring of the Platform.

agents, representatives of
Bahamas-based life and health
insurers have been regular
attendees at BGIA meetings in
recent years.

They used to have their own
organisation, the Bahamas
Association of Life and Health
Insurers (BALHI), but that
split apart and effectively
ceased to exist following the
wave of consolidation in that
segment of the Bahamian insur-
ance market over the past
decade.

BALHI was also dealt a
blow when Colina Insurance
Company, the largest life and
health insurer by asset size,
withdrew from it due to its
anger at opposition from com-
petitors to its purchase of Impe-
rial Life Insurance Company.

“For a few years there’s been

an interest on both sides to do
something along these lines,
some interest in moving that
way,” Mr Ingraham said of any
possible name change, pointing
out that in major international
markets the insurance industry
was usually represented by one
organisation or one voice, such
as the Association of British
Insurers (ABI) in the UK.
Meanwhile, the Bahamian
insurance industry appears con-
fident that it can resolve its con-
cerns/differences with sector
regulator, the Insurance Com-
mission of the Bahamas, despite
its August 13, 2010, letter which
demanded that it be shown “a
greater degree of respect” by
Superintendent Lennox
McCartney and his staff.
Warning that the industry
would resist end-September

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General insurers
mull name change

deadlines to comply with the
Insurance Act’s regulations,
amid fears that “excessive cap-
ital requirements” will raise
consumer premium prices and
impair the regional competi-
tiveness of local insurance play-
ers, the BGIA had also pledged
to “bring pressure to bear on
the Government” to amend the
Insurance Act 2005 and its
accompanying regulations,
warning that they “could seri-
ously and adversely damage the
operations of many of the insur-
ers and insurance intermedi-
aries presently doing business in
the country” if they are not
resolved.

However, the temperature
appears to have cooled, Mr
Ingraham telling Tribune Busi-
ness: “We feel fairly positive
following our meeting last
Monday, and are going to meet
with them [the Commission] to
talk over some things in short
order.

“After the meeting, we all
left felling very positive about
the future progress and about
the relationship with the Insur-
ance Commission. We’re look-
ing forward to resolving all
issues raised recently between
us.”

Mr Ingraham acknowledged
that the August 13 letter to Mr
McCartney and minister of
state, Zhivargo Laing, which he
himself signed, appeared to
have concentrated minds and
“brought everyone together”.

However, he said the indus-
try’s meeting with the Insur-
ance Commission might have
been held before the BGIA let-
ter reached the regulator, and
added: “The letter outlines
some of the concerns we have,
but right now we seem to be
on the right track.

“We all have the same goal
in mind, effective regulation of
the industry, and when we sat
down with them we all had the
same goal in mind.”

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YOUR CONWNECTIONeTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

. JENDER- MOTOR
INSURANCE 2010 - 2011
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BIC) is

pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifica-
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building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00

a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before Tues-
day, September 7th, 2010. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE" and should be de-
liveréed to the attention of:

Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO
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P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 5B



38 per cent
Crown Land
revenue rise

FROM page 1B

ilar to such bodies operating in
other Caribbean nations, like
Jamaica, the IDB report indi-
cated that the project had pro-
vided the foundation for sev-
eral draft legislative reforms
unveiled by the Ingraham
administration last week - the
Land Ajudication Act, the Reg-
istered Land Bill, and the Law
of Property Bill.

With the Government offi-

cially confirming its belief that
land security, and the posses-
sion of secure and marketable
title, as key to Bahamian eco-
nomic empowerment, the IDB
said: “A Land Ajudication Bill
will permit the certification of
fee simple title to generation
and commonage lands, and also
legislation will be put in place
for a Law of Property Act and a
Registered Land Act.” All of
which the Ingraham adminis-
tration has now done.

Turning to the IDB-financed

HUMAN RESOURCES
ASSISTANT

JOB DESCRIPTION

A professional services firm is looking for a Human
Resources Assistant to assist with the administra-
tion of the day-to-day operations of the human
resources department.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

¢ Health benefit administration (submits and
monitors all claims, new enrollments etc.)

¢ Recruitment assistance ( tracking, screening,
responding to applicants}

* Coordination of training logistics and materials

¢ Update and maintain all training and learning

history for staff.

¢ Update and maintain all employee leave
information (sick leave, vacation, etc.}

¢ Responsible for employee administration
(job letters, employee data, filing etc.)

¢ Assists the Human Resources Manager with

special projects

¢ Performs all other related duties as required.

EDUCATION AND SKILLS

¢ High School Diploma

¢ Human Resources Designation and/or
certificate would be an asset
¢ Minimum: two years human resources

experience

¢ Proficient in Microsoft Office suite
¢ Familiar with Human Resources Information

Systems (HRIS)

« Excellent verbal and written communication

skills.

¢ Excellent organizational and record keeping

skills

Applicants should send their resume and cover

letter via email to

Att: Human Resources Manager

dhrresumes@gmail.com



LUPAP project’s accomplish-
ments, the Bank’s assessment
stated: “The target was for a 40
per cent increase in revenues
generated from Crown Lands
by year three of the project
from a 2005 baseline of $1.1
million.

“According to project man-
agement reports, revenues actu-
ally increased to $1.522 million
up to November 2008. This rep-
resents a 38 per cent increase.”

This was despite the Estate
Management System (EMS),
which was designed help the
Government better manage its
Crown and Treasury lands, only
becoming fully operational by
December 2009. The system
was intended to reduce the time
taken by the Department of
Lands and Surveys to make rec-
ommendations on Crown Land
applications from three months
to one.

“Measures to eliminate the
backlog and speed up the time
taken to execute Crown Land
surveys are required to sustain
the current increase in rev-
enue,” the IDB warned, adding
that the project failed to com-
plete eliminate the backlog in
these surveys.

Noting that only 60 per cent
of the Crown Land survey
backlog was eliminated by the
LUPAP project, the IDB
explained: “One of the reasons
for not achieving this output is
the scarcity of land surveyors
in the Bahamas, as the few
existing land surveyors were
fully employed by private land
developers.

“At the end of the project,
the Department of Lands and
Surveys hired land surveyors
from other Caribbean countries
to carry out the remaining
Crown Land surveys, financed
with local resources. It is
expected that this backlog will
be eliminated in short order.”

The IDB report also urged
the Government to “recoup the
significant amount of real prop-
erty tax arrears” outstanding,
a figure conservatively estimat-
ed as being around $300 mil-
lion.

Calling on the Government
to improve the real property
tax system in the Bahamas, the
IDB report added that the par-
cel-based land information
management system should be
used “as a tool to identify miss-
ing properties and bring them
on to the tax roll, as well as
undertake a general reassess-
ment of all properties on the
islands to establish an equitable
valuation as a reference base”.

Some 15 per cent of Bahami-
an land parcels were thought

Employment Opportunity

STORE MANAGER

A. leading jewellery retailer seeks a qualified person to fill the position of Store

Manager.

The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring sales and

profits are optimized through excellent customer service and proper maintenance
of inventory controls according 1o established company procedures

The ideal candidate should possess:
Integrity. Energetic motivational skills and Assertiveness
A Minimum of 3 years management experience in the jewellery,
watch and luxury goods sectors.
Strong knowbedge of luxury watches, buying merchandising, selling

and repairs.
Ability to manage, train amd motivate staff,

An eve for detail,
Good educational backpround, Professional qualification (GLA or
equivalent) or suitable work expenence would be an asset.

Proven skills in inventory management, merchandising, marketing

and trainime.

Ability to prepare basic accounts, budgets and assist with extemal

audits

Ability to prepare, maintain and update operating manuals and

procedures

Strong knowledge of computers and administration
Ability to prepare matters for senior management and lead

discussions,

We offer excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested persons submit resume to:

ATTN: Recruitment
P.O. Box M-5235
Nassau, Ralwamas
Fax: 242,328.421 1
Or

Email: recnuitmenti@luxuryretaillirn



to have been in dispute when
the LUPAP project was started,
and the IDB recommended
that the unit tasked with man-
aging the new parcel-based sys-
tem for registering Bahamian
land be included, in the long-
term, inside a Bahamian
National Land Agency.

A new project, the bank sug-
gested, was needed to fully
“consolidate the land manage-
ment system in the Bahamas”
over a five to 10-year period,
with one Family Island done at
a time.

“The Parcel Information
Management System (PIMS) is
fully being implemented and
will contribute to the efficient
functioning of the local land
markets in support of private
sector development, including
facilitation of foreign invest-
ment, thereby contributing
directly to the objectives of the
bank’s strategy for the
Bahamas,” the IDB said. “Geo-
graphic profiles of Andros,
Inagua and Abaco represent a
good point of departure for
land use and natural resources
management.”

Dave Turner, secretary of the
Bahamas Association of Land
Surveyors, during a meeting to
evaluate the LUPAP project,
said its team had “incorrectly
typified Bahamian surveyors as
being uncooperative, secretive
and old-fashioned”.

Some 40 per cent of the 20
active Bahamian land survey-
ors used global positioning sys-
tems (GPS) in their work, and
Mr Turner said the Association
and its members wanted to
cooperate with the Surveyor
General, including the manda-
tory registration of surveys.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to callact packages fram the
Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 725/10

Wilson City Road Construction
Central Abaco, Bahamas

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices = Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC;
3” September, 2010
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals,
For all inquires regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Michael Wilson at telephone 302-1209

UE Ta SA UT

Td MSC RRL

just call 902-2371 today!



CAYSIDE TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

Has an opening for an

ATTORNEY

Applicants must:

- Be a qualified attorney with at least three (3) years experience in the practice
of law relating to financial services in the areas of trust, banking or

Investments.

« Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents
relating to special projects and financial transactions; must be able to
effectively and confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax

advisors on the same,

* Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project, coordinating
its various parts and managing the team associated with the same.

« Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

« Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a sound
understanding of investment and financial transactions.

« Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant supervision,

« Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.

Applications may be delivered by hand and marked
Private and Confidential to:

The Directors

Cayside Trust Company Limited
LYFORD MANOR (WEST BUILDING), LYFORD CAY
NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS
Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 702-2040

Applications must be received by 31st August, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





ee ee

| GRAPHIC ARTIST
(MARKETING DEPARTMENT)

QUALIFICATIONS. REQUIRED
* EDUCATION

0 High Sschincl Deplgrran ple Sh ne rene eis eee oe
a i Degese or Techical School Carifiozie mqvired
LATO By SS Cg and Oban bub ening

© TRAMING & CXPCRICNCE
0 Applicant ecest haa artistic sidis in design and layout
0 Ad Lest Rec’ heer to er WE CAC! pros
© Aue! Gas abe $5 dota chads putea ered in idan Corrie
demang and pubbshing scott

* BRILLS
2 Praga chamiagt kirpourtil, agp ili ante recat der Ector, int,
pares 2, PRA, ugrege, Gookiate anc other paried and qeaphé: materaln.
© Demonstrate ably to cmaie ioohnica! Musrations desks,
Lae a) a a ed ae) Pe Pe ee GA
o Exhibe koowtedge of commerce! art mettocs, technique, preapreors, ane
scanning
O Worl Incnandeniy and oa part of a seam
Gy vcard eh learn ahd area ea
0 fdonGor scheduling and overall job production and curcinats
rbaceiied actheities with other daparinents
O Adhero to aanokent osganizational skis
6 Excellent! ofa) and erilen coninuncaton ahd
o Enthuseorhe with aocelent resiomer senice skis
0 A uest be pide fo mee with (FRR or ni Bipeerwisena
0 Must be familar mith PC 4 Mao operating aysions
6 Gernariiiia anpearliee in Quark Prec 6.0, Maceonedia FeeaHand
WM, Adote Pageblater, Adghe Phoncehop, Aciohe lustrain and
Micenaot PowirPoani

POSITION SUMMIT Y-

Linger the direction of the Aseistant ‘vice Presigent of Operations, the Graphio Artist
wil perform duties in anoordanod wih ailablahed marwling prachons ond pokes
fed sped obruchon a wel ae pertonmn a randy of duties reid in the degn
aed lect of printed arc Qranhic materials, and parton myting and corripden, choles.
fe-the preperation of printing specifications

Parthia repaired

Salary fo commencucate with experience

Danelent baneitts

ere et eRe eB Bowe gi oa
oh Ra bs A sh pte}

NOTICE

ZAIDE HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

ZAIDE HOLDINGS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 18th August, 2010 when the Articles

of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

Manager wins
$26,600 from the
Superclubs Breezes

FROM page 1B

The judge added that Super-
Clubs Breezes “conceded that it
did not prove, on a balance of
probability, that at the time of
the dismissal it reasonable
believed that the plaintiff was
guilty of falsification of compa-
ny documents, which it aban-
doned by the evidence of its
only witness, Mrs Tynes-Miller,
and in its closing submissions, in
favour of the claim of gross
negligence”.

The affair surrounding Ms
Morris’s wrongful dismissal was
the almost $300,000 overstate-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



ment of SuperClubs Breezes
accounts receivables during the
resort’s 2003 financial year, Jus-
tice Adderley noting that seven
months prior to her enforced
departure, the resort chain had
congratulated her department
for collecting 121 per cent of
their outstanding account quo-
ta.

Detailing the case’s factual
background, Justice Adderley
said the accounts receivables
overstatement was only detect-
ed when the SuperClubs resort
chain switched to a new soft-
ware system in mid-2004.

Invoices were issued to tour
operators, in a bid to collect
monies due for guest stays, and
in this case were largely related
to three companies - Apple
Vacations East, Liberty Travel
Go Go Tours, and Internation-
al Lifestyles.

Accounts receivables were
overstated by $299,732, Justice
Adderley noted, with the
resort’s general ledger not bal-
ancing with the receivables
department’s sub-ledger.

The problem went undetect-
ed by SuperClubs Breezes audi-
tors in their review of the 2003
accounts, the judgment noting
that the main impact, apart
from upsetting some tour oper-
ators, was that the Bahamian
resort “had unwittingly
informed its creditors and
shareholders that it had more
assets than it actually had”.

At trial, Ms Morris said there
had been problems with ageing
accounts - those 30 and 90 days
past due - under the previous
software system, and there were

numerous reasons why credits
would not have been posted to
invoices - human error, the wait
for back-up documents, dis-
putes over rates between
SuperClubs Breezes and the
tour operators, and waiting for
Camille Tynes-Miller, the finan-
cial controller, to determine
what adjustments were need-
ed.

Mrs Tynes-Miller, though,
giving evidence on SuperClubs
Breezes’ behalf, denied Ms
Morris’s claim that both she
and the general manager were
aware of outstanding amounts
waiting to be credited.

Giving reasons for his ver-
dict, Justice Adderley said Ms
Morris’s claim had to succeed
because SuperClubs Breezes
had failed to meet the standard
demanded by the Employment
Act, namely that it had “an
honest and reasonable belief
on a balance of probability”
that she had falsified company
document.

Shooting down the argument
by the resort’s attorney, Paula
Adderley, that ‘document fal-
sification’ was “not inconsis-
tent” with gross negligence, the
judge ruled that SuperClubs
Breezes “could not honestly
believe” that she was guilty of
the latter.



“The plaintiff had a team of
three persons in her depart-
ment, all of whom posted items
to the accounts receivable
ledger, the system required a
monthly balancing of her
department’s sub-ledger against
the general ledger checked and
maintained by Mrs Tynes-
Miller, her supervisor,” the
judgment said.

“Mistakes are made in
accounting, and these are
detected and resolved by rec-
onciliations. Indeed, the mis-
takes in this case were so cor-
rected. Each month, Mrs
Tynes-Miller signed off on the
balanced accounts. The fact
that Mrs Tynes-Miller was not
dismissed, and having regard
to the evidence on the account-
ing process given by Mrs Tynes-
Miller and the plaintiff, the
approval of the 2003 accounts
by the auditors, and all the cir-
cumstances lead me to the view
that the defendant did not hon-
estly believe that the errors
made in the accounts were due
to gross negligence by the plain-
tiff.”

Justice Adderley added that
there was no suggestion Ms
Morris was given a chance to
respond to the allegations the
resort chain made against her
prior to dismissal.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, JASON ALEXANDER
MILLER of #8 Christie Avenue, Stapledon Gardens, P.O.
Box N-10470, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to JASON ALEXANDER MORTIMER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
writesuch objections to the Chief Passport Officer, .O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.








PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicishereby advised that!, WAYNE WILLIAMS
RICHARDSON of Cowpen Road,P.0.Box N-9707
Bahamas intend to change my name to WAYNE
WILLIAM MISSICK. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such

The Liquidator ot the said‘company is CST THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT

Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,

Nassau, Bahamas The Registrar General's Department wehes to infor oor valoed customers and
the genetal public that our British Coknial Hilton and Apsley House Olfices will
be relocating to Shirley House, 450 Shorey Street opposite Finca effective

Dated this 23rd day of August, A. D. 2010
Monday, 3* Aupest, 2010.



CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should ba marked as follows:

Tender No. 732/10

Engine Cleaning &
Maintenance of Surrounding Areas
Blue Hills Power Station

Tendars are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadilina for delivery to BEC:
10th September, 2010
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
of rejact any or all proposals.
For all inquires regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Nir. Andrew Darville al telephone 341-5515



We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

AUDITOR

Responsibility:

* Understand business environment and
trends and client business strategies and
translates this understanding into business
advice for clients

« Uses the relevant internal and external
knowledge data bases to obtain information to
benefit clients and the firm

* Assists in the timely resolution of any
professional, technical or client service
problem or request.

Requirements:

* Candidates should have 1 — 3 years of
practical accounting experience,

* Bachelor’s in Accounting Accounting
Designation (CPA or ACCA)

* Salary or equivalent to commensurate
with experience

Applicants should send their resume and
cover letter via email to

Att: Human Resources Manager
dhrresumes@gmail.com

days after the date of publication of this notice.

Pharmacy Technician

EDUCATION: Two (2) years Pharmacy Technician Training oF
equivalent in experience,

EXPERIENCE: Minimum of 1 year preferred in Phanmacy.

TRAINING: Basic computer skills: Microsoft Word, Excel Auto
mated pharmacy syatems. Sell directed, motivated

LICENSURE: Licensed with the Bahamas Health Professionals
Council,

OTHER: Excellent written and oral communication skills, Excellent
Customer Service Skills,

POSITION SUMMARY: Assit with and interpret physicians
prescriptions and medication orders. Assist pharmacist, be a drug
information resource to patients, medical staff, nursing staff and
ancillary department personnel. Assist with compounding and
diipeniing prescribed medications and other pharmaceuticals foe
patient The resource person te the Coordinator of Pharmacy ward
stock



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 7B





Standards Bureau
moving forward

FROM page 1B

during the previous govern-
ment’s 2002-2007 tenure. This
means that the Standards Act,
while passed into law, has nev-
er been enforced.

“CROSQ has been trying to
see how the Bahamas could set
up its Standards Bureau for
quite some time,” Mr Forbes
told Tribune Business. “We’ve
been looking at various means
and the opportune time that
the Standards Bureau could
take effect.”

He described the role of any
Bahamian Standards Bureau as
“facilitative, not prohibitive”,
anticipating the concerns of
some in the private sector who
are likely to fear such a body
would merely add another lay-
er of bureaucracy and red tape,
thus increasing business costs.

Standards Bureau as an educa-
tional tool, Mr Forbes said it
would ensure that all goods and
services traded and sold locally
met acceptable quality criteria,
thus protecting Bahamian con-
sumers.

It would scrutinise imports
to ensure they met acceptable
standards, and also help
Bahamian goods and services
exporters to meet standard
requirements in overseas coun-
tries.

“T think it is safe to say that it
is closer than it was 10 years
ago,” Mr Forbes told Tribune
Business of the creation of a
Bahamian Standards Bureau.
“It is to facilitate trade and
commerce.”

He added that during its vis-
it, CROSQ would attend the
creation of a Bahamian Nation-

the national body that would
come under the Caribbean’s
Regional Building Standards
Programme and provide advice
to it.

Caribbean

The Bahamas was one of
only two Caribbean countries
still lacking such a sub-com-
mittee, Mr Forbes said, the ini-
tiative’s overall aim being the
creation of uniform safe build-
ing/construction standards in
the Caribbean, and ensure they
complied with international
standards.

CROSQ will tomorrow hold

and oe

a workshop for small and medi-
um-sized Bahamian companies,
followed by a Wednesday sem-
inar on Regional Quality Infra-
structure, dealing with stan-
dards, awareness of them and
various methodologies.

The final two days of the
organisation’s visit will involve
public and private sector con-
sultations to determine “the
general overall view of the
acceptance of a Standards
Bureau in the Bahamas”.

Mr Forbes, though, said the
Government would be guided
by its own agenda and timelines
on the implementation of a
Bahamian Standards Bureau.

Pointing to the benefits of a al Technical Sub-Committee,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JANNEL ALEXANDRA
MILLER of #8 Christie Avenue, Stapledon Gardens, PO.
Box N-10470, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to JANNEL ALEXANDRA MORTIMER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.
45 of 2000),the Dissolution of ARKUS OVERSEAS
LIMITED, has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dis-
solution was the 29th day of June, 2010.
uae.
ane John B. Forester
Liquidator

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

Airfield Maintenance Technician

The Nassau Airport Develooment Company (MAD) ib senking
candidates for the pesrhon of dirheld Maintenance Technican

REPORTS TO - Manager, Public Salary

Kay responsitinies inclde but are oct iniied to: Maintenance are
upkeap of the aprons. maneuvering areas, lawayS, runways and
nfield to ensure sale and efficent airside operations. Grass cutiing
widife control, FOD moniloning and remove

QUALIFICATIONS.

+ High school diploma

* Trade certiicals in selected field is prefered

+ 1-2 ears eepeieese in a mulifuncional eainlerance
anneonmerl

+ Proven maith lo Work In a team error

For more details, please visit the PEOPLE section of
our Wwebsibe at wwiw.nds.bs

Fyou are quale] and moresied, poose cabin your
oune by September J, B00 ta

Manager, People

Nassau Airport Developement Company
Pi. Box AP 6228

Nassau, Bahamas

of é-thail peoplghnad.ba

“W FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
6 BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Ze

COLON TAL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 20 AUGUST 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,520.16 | CHG 0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -45.22 | YTD % -2.89
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

1.60
5.94
8.50
8.77
3.75
1.00
5.00
9.95
10.00

1.90
6.07
8.80
9.74
5.01
1.00
5.59
9.95
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.781
0.422
0.111
0.627

-0.003
0.168
0.720
0.366
0.000
0.407
0.952
0.156

Div $
0.040
0.200
0.260
0.000
0.090
0.040
0.300
0.040
0.230
0.052
0.110
0.240
0.520
0.350
0.170
0.000
0.240
0.640
0.800

Change Daily Vol.

1.94
1.90
6.07
8.80
9.74
5.01
1.00
5.59
9.95
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Low
99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Interest
0.00 6.95%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol. Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)

Bid
5.01

52wk-Low Symbol
5.01 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

Last Price
14.00
0.55

Ask © Yield

6.01

EPS $
-2.945
0.001

Div P/E
0.000 N/M
0.000

Daily Wo.

0.40 256.6

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

52wk-Low
1.4387
2.8266
1.4842

NAV
1.4825
2.9101
1.5479
2.8216

13.4110
109.3929
100.1833

1.1223
1.0761
1.1198

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund

2.8522 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
101.6693 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3
Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

9.5955
10.0000
10.3734
9.3299
9.3648

4.8105 7.5997

YTD%

-9.47%

-1.52%

-3.69%

-6.35%
-1.52%

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.902023
1.531489

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.906145
1.515417

NAV Date
30-Jun-10
31-Jul-10
13-Aug-10
31-Jul-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
31-Jul-10
31-Jul-10
31-Jul-10

Last 12 Months %
6.96%
0.19%
4.29%
-9.40%
3.32%
7.60%
3.56%
5.25%
5.35%
5.53%

3.04%
0.80%
2.71%

0.33%
5.20% 107.570620

105.779543

103.987340
101.725415
2.98%
0.76%
2.67%

2.71% 5.96% 31-Jul-10

3.38% 31-Jul-10

-6.35%
11.83%

31-Jul-10
31-Jul-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months.

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




























The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricily Garporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to collact packages {ram the
Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Ms, Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should bé marked as follows:

Tender No. 733/10
Engine Cleaning &
Maintenance of Surrounding Areas
Clifton Pier Power Station

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices = Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
10th September, 2010
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
of reject any or all proposals.
For all inquires regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Ronnie Stevenson at telaphone 362-5220

NOTICE
FREEPORT CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE THAT FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(formerly CIBC (Bahamas) Limited) (hereinafter
referred to as “the Bank”) the Debenture Holder
and Mortgagee under a Debenture and First
Demand Legal Mortgage dated the 21% day
of September, A .D., 2001 and made between
the Bank of the one part and FREEPORT
CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED (hereinafter
referred to as “the Company’) of the other part
HEREBY GIVES YOU NOTICE that by an
Appointment dated the 14' day of July, 2010
the Bank duly appointed MARIA FERERE of
FT CONSULTANTS LTD. to be the Receiver
and Manager of the properties described in the
schedule hereto.

THE SCHEDULE HEREINBEFORE
REFERRED TO

FIRST, ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing 126.75 acres or thereabouts being
tract “V” situate in the East Airport Zone in the
City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas which said piece parcel or tract of land
has such positions boundaries shape marks and
dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan
attached to an Indenture of Conveyance dated
the 15" day of November 1996 from Freeport
Commercial and Industrial Limited to Freeport
Concrete Company Limited and now of record
at the Registry of Records in the City of Nassau
in volume 8049 at pages 64 to 74 and is thereon
coloured Pink.

SECOND, ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land comprised in and demised by a Lease and
Supply Agreement dated the 1% day of June
2005 and made between Bahama Rock Limited
of the one part and Freeport Concrete Company
Limited of the other part which said piece parcel
or lot of land begins on the southern boundary
of Old Queen’s Highway (50’) and the common
property line of Bahama Cement Co. and
Bahama Rock Ltd, and commencing along said
common line S 22°06'07” a distance of 600.12
feet to a point; thence N 112°06'17” a distance
of 430.04 feet to a point; thence N 202°0617” a
distance of 412.81 feet to a point located on the
southem boundary of Old Queen’s Highway (50’);
thence continuing along said road S 268°34’06”
a distance of 469.06 feet to a point being the
point of beginning (hereinafter referred to as the
“Leasehold Premises”) This tract as described
contains 5.0 acres, as shown on survey for
Freeport Harbour by Low's Surveying Company,
Limited, dated 4” February, 2005.



MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010



INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

AUTISM - a mental condition characterized
by great difficulty in communicating with
others and in using language and abstract
concepts.

— The Concise Oxford Dictionary

ial» 3 a

Who will care for the autistic
members of Bahamian society?

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ost parents fret about
their children’s future
and safety until their off-
spring reach an age
where they are capable
of taking care of themselves. Parents are
usually overcome with questions of “How
are they going to manage when I am
gone?” and “Who will take care of them?”

These concerns are born out of love and
are generally a mark of a good, caring
guardian. Most times these fears never
materialise into reality and a parent can
breathe a sigh of relief once the children
are off to college or have landed good
jobs. But think of how terrifying it is when
the child is unable to care for themselves
even after they are well past their teenage
years.

For too many families of children with
autism, this is a real concern with no solu-
tion on the horizon. Last week I came face
to face with some of these parents’ strug-
gles during an autism awareness recep-
tion hosted by US Ambassador Nicole
Avant in conjunction with local autism
advocacy group REACH.

REACH was formed 12 years ago to
provide a support network for parents of
children with special needs and to increase
awareness about autism. Since its incep-
tion, the group has also raised scholarship
money to train Bahamian teachers to bet-
ter serve autistic children.

EE 4nd
EV gc

The common link in many of those par-
ents’ lives is a deficit in adequate and
affordable local treatment centres for
autistic children and assisted living cen-
tres to house those children when they
become adults.

"Currently there is one autistic primary
school class at Garvin Tynes Primary and
one high school class at Anatol Rodgers
Secondary School. In the country there
are only three therapists that work with the
Ministry of Education and there is a very
long waiting list.

“A lot of the (autistic) kids are growing
older now and we need living assistance
for them — we're not going to be here for-
ever and after parents pass away there's a
concern of who takes care of the kids,”
lamented Kim Gibson, public relations
officer at REACH, and mother to a seven-
year-old autistic son.

Opposition Leader and former Prime
Minister Perry Christie — father of 22-year-
old Adam, who also is autistic — echoed
these sentiments during a recent interview
with The Tribune. He added that while
there have been notable advancements in
special needs care over the last ten years or
so, those improvements pale in compari-
son to what is left undone.

"Every parent's fear is, if they were to
die what would happen to this child? That
is the most common worry for parents of
disabled children.

These parents are so committed to help-
ing disabled children but they know that it
doesn't necessarily mean a sibling or oth-
er relative will be as committed.

"That is where the state has to recognise
that it has not yet put in place the kind of
after care to address issues of that kind.
Any government that comes to power has
a commitment to address the issue but
has to take a balanced approach to the
allocation of resources so we are ensuring
that these special persons get fair treat-
ment.

“Sometimes they are overlooked and
even though there is improvement (over
the last few years) there is still more to be
done,” said Mr Christie.

According to American statistics, about
one in every 110 children are autistic with
boys three times as likely to be autistic
than girls.

Local psychologist and autism specialist
Dr Michelle Major, clinical director of the
Seahorse Institute, thinks the condition is
just as prevalent in the Bahamas.

"I don't think that they're that far off
from what the national statistics are in the
US to be honest with you. When we talk
about the whole spectrum (of autism), I do
feel that we are pretty much in the same
area,” said Dr Major when asked to com-
pare Bahamian rates of autism to those
in the States.

While autism numbers have grown in
the United States over the past few years,
something observers attribute to better
detection methods, many afflicted chil-
dren go undiagnosed here — either due to
a lack of understanding about develop-
mental disorders, a lack of trained doc-
tors who can make a diagnosis, or because
of the negative stigma attached to having

a disability.

Dr Major has diagnosed autistic chil-
dren from Abaco, Eleuthera and Long
Island and says while resources are scarce
in New Providence they are virtually non-
existent in the family islands.

During his travels throughout the coun-
try, Mr Christie said he has encountered
many children with disabilities who were
not receiving proper treatment from state
care facilities. He thinks this is because
government agencies haven’t canvassed
the remote areas to identify persons with
special needs.

"We have to recognise that some groups
have done a lot to help. The Stapleton
School (in New Providence) is tremen-
dous asset to the country but I've always
felt that we haven't done the kind of
national audit that we need to find out in
all of the remote areas of the Bahamas
where these children are.”

Those families who are fighting for
social improvements for their autistic chil-
dren will tell you that there is no simple
solution to the myriad of problems they
face every day: the stigma of having a dif-
ferently abled child, the stares, lack of
understanding, to the strain on their pock-
et books and marriages.

However, the parents, educators and
physicians who tackle these problems head
on and who have organised themselves
without any prompting from any public
agency deserve much more praise and all
the help they can get. They stand as exam-
ples of good parenting, concerned and
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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Los Angeles unveils $578m school,

By CHRISTINA HOAG
Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Next month's opening of the
Robert F Kennedy Commu-
nity Schools will be auspicious
for a reason other than its
both storied and infamous his-
tory as the former Ambas-
sador Hotel, where the
Democratic presidential con-
tender was assassinated in
1968.

With an eye-popping price
tag of $578 million, it will
mark the inauguration of the
nation's most expensive pub-
lic school ever.

The K-12 complex to house
4,200 students has raised eye-
brows across the country as
the creme de la creme of "Taj
Mahal" schools, $100 million-
plus campuses boasting both
architectural panache and
deluxe amenities.

"There's no more of the
old, windowless cinderblock
schools of the "70s where kids
felt, 'Oh, back to jail," said
Joe Agron, editor-in-chief of
American School & Univer-
sity, a school construction
journal. "Districts want a
showpiece for the community,
a really impressive environ-
ment for learning."

Not everyone is similarly

enthusiastic.

"New buildings are nice,
but when they're run by the
same people who've given us
a 50 per cent dropout rate,
they're a big waste of taxpay-
er money,” said Ben Austin,
executive director of Parent
Revolution who sits on the
California Board of Educa-
tion. "Parents aren't fooled."

At RFK, the features
include fine art murals and a
marble memorial depicting
the complex's namesake, a
manicured public park, a
state-of-the-art swimming
pool and preservation of
pieces of the original hotel.

Partly by circumstance and
partly by design, the Los
Angeles Unified School Dis-
trict has emerged as the
mogul of Taj Mahals.

The RFK complex follows
on the heels of two other LA
schools among the nation's
costliest — the $377 million
Edward R Roybal Learning
Center, which opened in 2008,
and the $232 million Visual
and Performing Arts High
School that debuted in 2009.

The pricey schools have
come during a sensitive peri-
od for the nation’s second-
largest school system: Nearly
3,000 teachers have been laid
off over the past two years,



THE VISUAL and Performing Arts High School is seen in Los Angeles. Next month's opening of the Robert
F Kennedy Community Schools will be auspicious for a reason other than its both storied and infamous
history as the former Ambassador Hotel, where the Democratic presidential contender was assassinated
in 1968. With an eye-popping price tag of $578 million, it will mark the inauguration of the nation's most
expensive public school ever.

(AP Photo)

nae
MaRsTHON

the academic year and pro-
grammes have been slashed.
The district also faces a $640
million shortfall and some
schools persistently rank
among the nation's lowest
performing.

Los Angeles is not alone,
however, in building big.
Some of the most expensive
schools are found in low-per-
forming districts — New York
City has a $235 million cam-
pus; New Brunswick, N.J.,
opened a $185 million high
school in January.

Nationwide, dozens of
schools have surpassed $100
million with amenities includ-
ing atriums, orchestra-pit
auditoriums, food courts, even
bamboo nooks. The extrava-
gance has led some to won-
der where the line should be
drawn and whether more
money should be spent on
teachers.

"Architects and builders
love this stuff, but there's a
little bit of a lack of discipline
here," said Mary Filardo,
executive director of 21st
Century School Fund in
Washington, DC, which pro-
motes urban school construc-
tion.

Some experts say it's not all

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT

the costliest public one in the US

FROM page 2C

flourish and that children
learn better in more pleasant
surroundings.

Many schools incorporate
large windows to let in natur-
al light and install energy-sav-
ing equipment, spending
more upfront for reduced bills
later. Cafeterias are getting
fancier, seeking to retain stu-
dents who venture off cam-
pus. Wireless Internet and
other high-tech installations
have become standard.

Some pricey projects have
had political fallout.

After a firestorm over the
$197.5 million Newton North
High School in Massachusetts,
Mayor David Cohen chose
not to seek re-election and
state Treasurer Timothy
Cahill reined in school con-
struction spending.

Now to get state funds for a
new school, districts must
choose among three designs
costing $49 million to $64 mil-
lion. "We had to bring some
sense to this process," Cahill
said.

In Los Angeles, officials say
the new schools were planned
long before the economic
pinch and are funded by $20
billion in voter-approved
bonds that do not affect the
educational budget.

Still, even LA Unified
Superintendent Ramon
Cortines derided some of the
extravagance, noting that
donations should have been

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Connie Rice, member of
the district's School Bond
Oversight Committee, noted
the megaschools are only

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three of 131 that the district is
building to alleviate over-
crowding. RFK "is an amaz-
ing facility,” she said. "Is it a
lot of money? Yes. We did-
n't like it, but they got it
done."

Construction costs at LA
Unified are the second-high-
est in the nation — something
the district blames on sky-
rocketing material and land
prices, rigorous seismic codes
and unionized labour.

James Sohn, the district's
chief facilities executive, said
the megaschools were built
when global raw material
shortages caused costs to sky-
rocket to an average of $600
per square foot in 2006 and
2007 — triple the price from
2002. Costs have since eased
to $350 per square foot.

On top of that, each pro-
ject had its own cost drivers.

After buildings were
demolished at the site of the
2,400-student Roybal school,
contaminated soil, a methane
gas field and an earthquake
fault were discovered. A gas
mitigation system cost $17
million.

Over 20 years, the project
grew to encompass a dance
studio with cushioned maple
floors, a modern kitchen with
a restaurant-quality pizza
oven, a 10-acre park and
teacher planning rooms
between classrooms.

The 1,700-student arts
school was designed as a land-
mark, with a stainless steel,
postmodernistic tower encir-
cled by a rollercoaster-like
swirl, while the RFK site
involved 15 years of litigation
with historic preservationists
and Donald Trump, who
wanted to build the world's
tallest building there. The
wrangling cost $9 million.

Methane mitigation cost
$33 million and the district
paid another $15 million pre-
serving historic features,
including a wall of the famed
Cocoanut Grove nightclub
and turning the Paul
Williams-designed coffee
shop into a faculty lounge.

ston

Sohn said LA Unified has
reached the end of its Taj
Mahal building spree. "These
are definitely the exceptions,”

he said. "We don't anticipate
schools costing hundreds of
millions of dollars in the
future.”

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT





PEOPLE participate in a rally against a proposed mosque and Islamic community center near ground zero
in New York on Sunday, August 22, 2010.



DEMONSTRATORS in favour of the proposed Islamic center near ground zero make their feelings about
the emotionally charged subject known on Church Avenue in lower Manhattan on Sunday, August 22, 2010.
Opponents and supporters of the Islamic cultural center were separated by barricades and police officers
as both groups demonstrated near the proposed site.

(AP Photos)

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Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
proposed mosque near
ground zero drew hundreds
of fever-pitch demonstrators
Sunday, with opponents car-
rying signs associating Islam
with blood, supporters shout-
ing, "Say no to racist fear!"
and American flags waving
on both sides.

Police separated the two
groups but there were some
nose-to-nose confrontations,
including a man and a woman
screaming at each other
across a barricade under a
steady rain.

Opponents of the plan to
build a $100 million, 13-story
Islamic center and mosque
two blocks from the World
Trade Center site appeared
to outnumber supporters.
Bruce Springsteen's "Born in
the USA" blared over loud-
speakers as mosque oppo-
nents chanted, "No mosque,
no way!"

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PEOPLE participate in the rally.

describe Islam's Shariah law.
Around the corner, NYPD
officers guarded a cordoned-
off stretch of Park Place occu-
pied by the old building that is
to become the Islamic center.

Steve Ayling, a 40-year-old
Brooklyn plumber who took
his "SHARIA" sign to a dry
spot by an office building, said
the people behind the mosque
project are "the same people
who took down the twin tow-
ers."

Opponents demand that
the mosque be moved farther
from the site where nearly
3,000 people were killed on
September 11, 2001. Ayling
said, "They should put it in
the Middle East," and added
that he still vividly remem-
bers watching television on
9/11 "and seeing people jump-
ing from the towers, and ash-
es falling on my house."

On a nearby sidewalk,
police chased away a group
that unfurled a banner with
images of beating, stoning and
other torture they said was
committed by those who fol-
lowed Islamic law.

The mosque project is
being led by Imam Feisal
Abdul Rauf and his wife,
Daisy Khan, who insist the
center will promote moder-
ate Islam. The dispute has
sparked a national debate on
religious freedom and Amer-
ican values and is becoming
an issue on the campaign trail
ahead of the midterm elec-
tions. Republicans have been
critical of President Barack
Obama's stance: He has said
the Muslims have the right to
build the center at the site but
has not commented on
whether he thinks they
should.

At a pro-mosque rally
staged a block away from
opponents’ demonstration,
several hundred people chant-
ed, "Muslims are welcome
here! We say no to racist
fear!"

Dr Ali Akram, a Brooklyn
physician, came with his three
sons and an 11-year-old



nephew waving an American
flag in his hand. He noted that
scores of Muslims were
among those who died in the
towers, and he called those
who oppose the mosque "un-
American."

"They teach their children
about the freedom of religion
in America — but they don't
practice what they preach,”
Akram said.

Gila Barzvi, whose son,
Guy Barzvi, was killed in the
towers, stood with mosque
opponents, clutching a large
photo of her son with both
hands.

"This is sacred ground and
it's where my son was
buried," the native Israeli
from Queens said. She said
the mosque would be "like a
Knife in our hearts."

She was joined by a close
friend, Kobi Mor, who flew
from San Francisco to partic-
ipate in the rally.

If the mosque gets built,
"we will bombard it," Mor
said. He would not elaborate
but added that he believes the
project "will never happen."

The Sunday rallies coincid-
ed with an annual motorcy-
cle ride by a group that raises
money for September 11 first
responders.

Bikers rolled in from the
two other September 11
attack sites, Washington and
Shanksville, Pa.

The imam behind the pro-
ject is in the middle of a
Mideast trip funded by the
US State Department that is
intended to promote religious
tolerance.

He has discussed efforts to
combat extremism, but has
avoided any comments on the
rancor over the planned
Islamic center.

Rauf told the Al Wasat
newspaper in Bahrain that the
freedoms enshrined by the
US Constitution also reflect
true Muslim values. A por-
tion of the interview — to be
published Monday — was
seen Sunday by The Associ-
ated Press.

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THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Farms recalling
eggs share suppliers
and other ties

By MARY CLARE
JALONICK
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Two Iowa farms that recalled
more than a half-billion eggs
linked to as many as 1,300
cases of salmonella poisoning
share suppliers of chickens
and feed as well as ties to an
Iowa business routinely cited
for violating state and federal
law.

Food and Drug Adminis-
tration investigators have yet
to determine the cause of the
salmonella outbreaks at
Wright County Egg and Hil-
landale Farms. The FDA
investigation could take
months, and sources of cont-
amination are often difficult
to find.

The number of illnesses,
which can be life-threatening,
especially to those with weak-
ened immune systems, is
expected to increase. The
most common symptoms are
diarrhea, abdominal cramps
and fever eight to 72 hours of
eating a contaminated prod-
uct.

The company Quality Ege
supplies young chickens and
feed to both Wright County
Egg and Hillandale Farms.
The two share other suppli-
ers, said Jewanna Porter, a
spokeswoman for the egg
industry, but she did not
name them.

The egg industry has con-
solidated over recent years,
placing fewer, larger busi-
nesses in control over much
of the nation’s egg supply to
consumers.

The salmonella outbreak
has raised questions about
federal inspections of egg
farms. The FDA oversees
inspections of shell eggs,
while the Agriculture Depart-
ment is in charge of inspecting
other egg products.

William D Marler, a Seattle
attorney for a person who
filed suit alleging illness from
tainted eggs in a salad at a
restaurant in Kenosha, Wis.,
said Sunday his firm has been
retained by two dozen fami-
lies and was representing a
woman who was hospitalized
in California.

"The history of ignoring the
law makes the sickening of
1,300 and the forced recall of
550 million eggs shockingly
understandable," Marler said
in an e-mail to The Associat-
ed Press. "You have to won-
der where the USDA and
FDA inspectors were."

Businessman Austin "Jack"
DeCoster owns Wright Coun-
ty Egg and Quality Egg.
Wright County Egg recalled
380 million eggs August 13
after it was linked to more
than 1,000 cases of salmonel-
la poisoning. A week later,
Hillandale Farms recalled 170
million eggs.

DeCoster is no stranger to
controversy in his food and
farm operations:

— In 1994, the state of
Iowa assessed at least four
separate penalties against
DeCoster Farms for environ-
mental violations, many of
them involving hog waste.

— In 1997, DeCoster Egg
Farms agreed to pay $2 mil-
lion in fines to settle citations
brought in 1996 for health
and safety violations at
DeCoster's farm in Turner,
Maine. The nation's labour
secretary at the time, Robert

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BUILDINGS at the egg operations run by Wright County Egg on

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Reich, said conditions were
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as any sweatshop." Reich's
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called the state of the farms
"simply atrocious,” citing
unguarded machinery, elec-
trical hazards, exposure to
harmful bacteria and other
unsanitary conditions.

Designated

— In 2000, Iowa designated
DeCoster a "habitual viola-
tor" of environmental regu-
lations for problems that
included hog manure runoff
into waterways. The label
made him subject to
increased penalties and pro-
hibited him from building
new farms.

— In 2002, the federal
Equal Employment Oppor-
tunity Commission
announced a more than $1.5
million settlement of an
employment discrimination
lawsuit against DeCoster
Farms on behalf of Mexican
women who reported they
were subjected to sexual
harassment, including rape,
abuse and retaliation by some
supervisory workers at
DeCoster's Wright County
plants.

— In 2007, 51 workers were
arrested during an immigra-

? DOCTORS H

(AP Photo)

tion raid at six DeCoster egg
farms. His farms had been the
subject of at least three pre-
vious raids.

— In June 2010, Maine
Contract Farming, the suc-
cessor company to DeCoster
Egg Farms, agreed in state
court to pay $25,000 in penal-
ties and to make a one-time
payment of $100,000 to the
Maine Department of Agri-
culture over animal cruelty
allegations that were spurred
by a hidden-camera investi-
gation by an animal welfare
organization.

A spokeswoman for
DeCoster, Hinda Mitchell,
said Sunday that she had no
comment on DeCoster's his-
tory of violations and that
DeCoster himself would not
be available for an interview.

Wright County Egg also
faces a lawsuit from food dis-
tributor Dutch Farms alleg-
ing that the company used
unauthorized cartons to pack-
age and sell eggs under its
brand without its knowledge.

The CDC said last week
that investigations by 10 states
since April have identified 26
cases where more than one
person became ill.

Preliminary information
showed that Wright was the
supplier in at least 15 of those
cases.

OSPITAL

Heath Far Lit

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MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 5C

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2010/PRO/npr/00488
Whereas THOMAS COOPER of Seven Hills, on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
SHIRLEY ELIZABETH COOPER late of Seven Hills in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the

expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2010/PRO/npr/00507

IN THE ESTATE OF WHITELAW REID, late of 73 West Patent Road in the Town of
Bedford Hills, Westchester County, in the State of New York, one of he States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days [rom the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
PETER G. FLETCHER of the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for obtaining the Re-sealing Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to ELIZABETH B REID and WILLIAM B WARREN the Executors, by the State of

New York, Westchester County Surrogate’s Court, on the 1" day of June, 2009.

(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2010/PRO/npr/00508

Whereas SHARON STURRUP, of the City of Freeport, in the Island of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
ROSALEE WELLS a.k.a ROSEALEE WELLS a.k.a ROSALIE WELLS late of the City
of Freeport, in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the

expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

\alb Mio. ‘e wherodelr

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2010/PRO/npr/00509

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE S. BAYOUD, late of the County of Dallas, in the State of
Texas, one of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
CLEMENT T. MAYNARD III of Gibson &company, the G.K. Symonette Building, Shirley
Street, on the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Re-
Sealing Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted to GEORGE S. BAYOUD
JR. the Executor, by the State of Texas, Dallas County Probate Court, on the 8" day of February,

2010.

ae ree Sct eee
(for) REGISTRAR

Aue 2 € e0ib
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

2010/PRO/npr/00510

IN THE ESTATE OF JAMES FOSTER SCHAEFFER S5R., late of 1914 Poplar Avenue,
Apartment 812, in the City of Memphis in the County of Shelby, in the State of Tennessee, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
ADAM D.R. CAFFERATA of Poinciana House, West Mall & Poinciana Drive, in the City of
Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted to AMY MCQUEEN and JAMES F.
SCHAEFFER JR., the Co-Executors, by the State of Tennessee, Fayette County, on the 21" day

of April, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 7C



INSIGHT



American troops unlikely to
resume combat duties in Iraq

By LOLITA C BALDOR
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — It
would take "a complete failure" of
the Iraqi security forces for the US
to resume combat operations there,
the top American commander in
Iraq said as the final US fighting
forces prepared to leave the country.

With a major military milestone
in sight, General Ray Odierno said
in interviews broadcast Sunday that
any resumption of combat duties by
American forces is unlikely.

"We don't see that happening,”
Odierno said. The Iraqi security
forces have been doing "so well for
so long now that we really believe
we're beyond that point."

President Barack Obama plans a
major speech on Iraq after his return
to Washington, according to a senior
administration official who spoke on
condition of anonymity Sunday
because details were being finalized.
The speech will come shortly after
Obama returns to the White House
on August 29 from his Martha's
Vineyard vacation.

About 50,000 US troops will
remain in the country until the end
of 2011 to serve as a training and
assistance force, a dramatic draw-
down from the peak of more than
170,000 during the surge of Ameri-
can forces in 2007.

Obama will face a delicate bal-
ancing act in his speech between wel-
coming signs of progress and bring-
ing an end to the seven-year-old war
without prematurely declaring the
mission accomplished, as former
President George W Bush once did.

US involvement in Iraq beyond

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UNITED STATES Army colour guard soldiers hold the American flag and their brigade flag at the casing ceremony for 4th Brigade,
2nd Infantry Division, the last American combat brigade to serve in Iraq, on Saturday, August 21, 2010, at Camp Virginia, Kuwait.

the end of 2011, Odierno said, prob-
ably would involve assisting the
Iraqis secure their airspace and bor-
ders.

While Iraq forces can handle inter-
nal security and protect Iraqis,
Odierno said he believes military
commanders want to have the US
involved beyond 2011 to help Iraqis
acquire the required equipment,
training and technical capabilities.

He said Iraq's security forces have
matured to the point where they will
be ready to shoulder enough of the
burden to permit the remaining
50,000 soldiers to go home at the

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end of next year.

If the Iraqis asked that American
troops remain in the country after
2011, Odierno said US officials
would consider it, but that would be
a policy decision made by the presi-
dent and his national security advis-
ers.

Odierno's assessment, while opti-
mistic, also acknowledges the diffi-
cult road ahead for the Iraqis as they
take control of their own security,
even as political divisions threaten
the formation of the fledgling
democracy.

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hopes "we will have an enduring
relationship of having some military
presence in Iraq.

“T think that would be smart not
to let things unwind over the next
three or five years.”

On Thursday, the 4th Stryker
Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division began
crossing the border from Iraq into
Kuwait, becoming the last combat
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destined to leave in the coming days,
fulfills Obama's pledge to end com-
bat operations in Iraq by August 31.

In interviews with CBS' "Face the
Nation” and CNN's "State of the
Union," Odierno said it may take
several years before America can
determine if the war was a success.

"A strong democratic Iraq will
bring stability to the Middle East,
and if we see Iraq that’s moving
toward that, two, three, five years
from now, I think we can call our
operations a success,” he said.

Much of that may hinge on
whether Iraq's political leaders can
overcome ethnic divisions and work
toward a more unified government,
while also enabling security forces
to tamp down a simmering insur-
gency.

Iraq's political parties have been
bickering for more than five months
since the March parliamentary elec-
tions failed to produce a clear win-
ner. They have yet to reach agree-
ments on how to share power or
whether to replace embattled Shi-
ite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki,
and amid the political instability,
other economic and governmental
problems fester.

Fuelling that instability is neigh-
bouring Iran which, Odierno said,
continues to fund and train Shiite
extremist groups.

"They don't want to see Iraq turn
into a strong democratic country.
They'd rather see it become a weak
governmental institution,” said
Odierno.

He added that he is not worried
that Iraq will fall back into a military
dictatorship, as it was under the reign
of Saddam Hussein.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 106 No.226MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNWITH SHOWER HIGH 89F LOW 79F I N S I D E B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net A YOUNG Deejay was gunned down and murdered in what friends say was a dispute over a woman in the early hours of Saturday morning. T he killing of 29-year-old Steven Walkes, also known as DJ Box on Gibbs Corner, brought the murder count for 2010 to 61. Walkes regularly deejayed at a club on Gibbs Corner, known as KelsiesC lub. He had stopped at a friends h ouse on Gibbs Corner at around 2.30am when he was r eportedly met by three men, one of whom pulled out ah andgun and shot him after an exchange of words, accordi ng to police. He died on the scene. His death came just hours after another man, 27-year-old Omar Malakius also a bud ding deejay was murdered. Malakius was shot multiple times about the body in the area of Blue Hill Road and Weir Street on Friday evening at around 10.50pm after what eye-witnesses told police was Killing is one of tw o w eekend homicides The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST B AHAMASEDITION McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W www.tribune242.com Y oung DJ is shot dead BULLET HOLE ATSCENEOFSHOOTING CRIMESCENE: A bullet holecircled by police stands out on this wall on Blue Hill Road and Weir Street following the death of 27-year-old Omar Malakius. Malakius was shot on Friday night and died of his injuries in hospital. SEEMAINSTORY By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Progressive Liberal Party's caucus held talks last night to come to a consensus on how the party will vote on the government's Baha Mar labour resolution when it is brought to the House next month. Party officials spoke with The Tribune before the meeting yes By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SENIOR officers at the Passport Office are investigating claims made on a local talk show that an employee at the passport office requested and received a bribe from a mother applying for passports for her two children and later got himself caught red handed when he was recorded talking about it on her cellphone. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs with responsi bility for the Passport Office, Brent Symonette, told The Tribune yesterday that he was aware of the allegations made on The Nation radio talk show, hosted by Lincoln Bain of Controversy TV fame on GEMS radio station on Friday, and had been advised that the matter is now being followed up on. I am aware of it. Senior officers at the Passport Office Claims that passport office employee received bribe are being investigated SEE page 11 AWARE OF CLAIMS: Brent Symonette By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN parents who are not living up to their responsibility to provide the support their children need to achieve their potential must focus on doing this rather than making children of Haitian parentage scapegoats in the education sys tem, according to the Minister of Education. Pointing out that there are children of both Bahamian and Haitian parentage who are excelling in their schools, Minister of Education Desmond Bannister chalked this up to the supportive environment these childrens par ents have provided for them and said that as Minister of Education one of his priorities is trying to create an awareness of the need for Bahamian parents to pay attention to the education needs of our children. We have many success stories if you see the high level of attainment we had this year it has given me a problem because I have to Minister:stop making children of Haitian parentage scapegoats SEE page 16 SEE page 11 PLP caucus holds talks on vote over Baha Mar labour resolution SEE page 11 B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net G OVERNMENT has appealed the injunction grante d by Supreme Court judge J ustice Neville Adderley that stalled the road work project o n Blue Hill Road and Market Streets. M eantime, the Coconut Grove Business League thatf iled the suit against the government over the road project hope to meet with Minister of Works Neko Grant to come to an amicable solution before t hey meet again in court on September 21. A ccording to Paul Moss, one of the attorneys representing t he league, a letter was sent to Mr Grant last week requesting a meeting. Up to press time he said the group received no word from Mr Grant. M r Moss said the group would like government to con-s ider installing a third lane onto Blue Hill Road and Market S treet. "The third lane will permit traffic to go in both directions and at the same time permit government to have persons int he southern end of the island be able to get to Bay Street soe veryone will benefit," said Mr Moss. I n Justice Adderley's judgment of the case he found that the Ministry of Works and Transport never dealt with the impact road construction and Govt appeals the road work project injunction S EE page 11 Queens cousin is houseguest of Lyford Cay resident SEEFULLSTORYONPAGETHREE CARSFORSALE, HELP WANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E THEBAHAMASBIGGEST

PAGE 2

THE Queen's cousin Lord Brabourne, according to the London press, is now in the Bahamas and the houseguest ofl ocal fashion designer and Lyford Cay resident Lady Nuttall The Daily Mail of London reports that the pair was seen f ood shopping last week at Goodfellow Farms and talking with friends as they walked along the beach near Lady Nuttall's estate in the posh gated commu-n ity. The 62-year-old 8th Baron of Brabourne, heir to the Mountbatten dynasty, is the first cousin o nce removed of the Duke of Edinburgh. According to The Daily Mail Lady Brabourne, 57, his wife of 30 years, is alleged to have calledt he staff of their 60-bedroom Hampshire manor Broadlands in Romsey together to tell them that her husband was in t he air on his way to the Bahamas and would not be returning. It is claimed that she announced that she would now be running the estate alone. Activist Lady Nuttall, known to her friends as Jeannie, is the widow of prominent environmental a ctivist and marine conservationist Sir Nicholas Nuttall, 3rd Baronet Nuttall. She designs jewellery and hand beaded kaftans,d resses and tops under her label Jeannie McWeeney. The line donates part proceeds of special tunic sales to the local environmental advocacy group B REEF, founded in 1993 by her late husband to educate people a bout the underwater environ ment. S ir Nicholas married Lady Nuttall formerly Eugenie McWeeney in 1983, after emigrating to the country in 1979. The couple had one child, A lexander. Born in 1933 in Leicestershire, E ngland, Sir Nicholas was the only child of Sir Edmund and L ady Nuttall. At the age of eight he became the 3rd Baronet Nut tall after his father's death in the Second World War. He movedto Lyford Cay with his third wife, M iranda, former wife of Peter Sellers. They later divorced and h e married Bahamian born Jean nie McWeeney. S ir Nicholas was well known throughout the Bahamas and in local schools where he gave many talks on the fragile marine environment and endangered f isheries. His agitation was the driving force behind the introd uction of a closed grouper fish ing season in the Bahamas. S ir Nicholas died of cancer in July 2007 at the age of 73 followi ng a long illness. Lady Nuttall, now 58, and his children were at his bedside. Norton Knatchbull, the former Lord Romsey, who becameL ord Brabourne on his fathers d eath in 2005, is the grandson of Lord Mountabatten of Burma who used to spend much time in the Bahamas in his later years. The Brabourne family own ah ome at Windemere on E leuthera. Lord Mountbatten and Lord Brabournes younger brother, Nicholas, one of twins, were killed in an IRA attack on theirb oat in Ireland in 1979. B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@ tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN vote rs should throw their s upport behind "ordinary" members of society instead of continuously electing lawyers t o the halls of Parliament, said Bishop Simeon Hall. The senior pastor of New C ovenant Baptist Church reas oned that lawyers many of whom profit from the "present culture of criminality" cannot be expected to solve the crime p roblem or change the systems in place which have led to this "national nightmare." He added that men and w omen who have proven themselves successful in community building and business would make better political candidates. While several lawyers are the architects of the nation's foundation, and have an indispensable role in n ation building, Parliament needs more contractors, suc cessful entrepreneurs, farmers and community builders to take the B ahamas to the promised land, said the religious leader. "It is time for the country's electorate toh elp in reducing the number of lawyers we have in our Parliament and allow more persons f rom the ordinary walks of our society to participate in our national debate," said Mr Hall in a statement released yester-d ay. "There exists an urgent and immediate need for ordinary persons to represent the comm on masses. It cannot be expected that this national nightmare of crime will be (remedied one group. While lawyers, int he main, do not cause crime, they are the major beneficiaries of the present culture of criminality and this cannot be e xpected to do what is needed to change things." "The Bahamian people, by and large, have bought into the l ie that only lawyers are best suited to sit in Parliament," s aid Mr Hall as he called all political parties to choose ordin ary persons with a reputation of community leadership for their election tickets. T he country needs fresh ideas and new perspectives int he national dialogue, he added, if we are to change the s tatus quo which sees ordinary persons on the edge of desp eration". C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWongs Plaza Wongs Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a POLICE yesterday announced the death of an officer, who was found lifeless in his living room by his wife. According to Assistant Commissioner of Police Glenn Miller, foul play is not suspected in the death of 41year-old Constable 345 Oneil Ricardo Gibson, although an autopsy will be conducted to ascertain the precise cause of death. He was discovered seated in a La-z-boy chair at 8am by his wife. Apparently hed been watching TV, said ACP Miller. The senior officer noted that Constable Gibson gave25 years of service to the police force and had most recently been stationed at the Central Police Station downtown. Police officer found dead in his home Bishop Simeon Hall speaks out against electing lawyers to Parliament Queens cousin Lord Brabourne is houseguest of Lyford Cay resident LORD BRABOURNE and Lady Nuttall leaving Goodfellow Farms in Nassau. Photo/ Chris Bott BISHOP SIMEONHALL

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EDITOR, The Tribune. A few years ago I publicly voiced my displeasure when t he former government a pproved the re-routing of Adelaide Road and gave it to a private developer to build million dollar residences. The public road was closed o ff and given to a private d eveloper to enhance its development and provide some employment. E very time Im going home from the Coral Harbour area, I cuss them for the inconvenience Im caused to get home. Now it is the Baha Mar Cable Beach development and again there is talk of road r e-routing. N ew Providence is a very s mall island with probably c lose to 250,000 persons living on it. One looks at Paradise I sland and the limited access available. T here was a time when one c ould go to the airport and t ravel abroad. Now the airport land is Ocean Club Estates, a gated community. O n the opposite end of Paradise Island, access is limited. One is forced to wonder whenw ill the limited access end? Are we in New Providence going to be forced to live in an area packed like sardines? W ill Bahamians access to our c ountry continue to dwindle for the sake of a few jobs? T here is a much bigger pic ture here. If our access is limited today then twenty years from now our grandchildren w ill have no access. Is the politician thinking that far? Or is he doing what I like to refer to as wanting instant gratification? Gimme it now!I want it now! I sincerely believe we are setting a dangerous prece dent. A precedent I believe will c ome back to haunt us maybe not in my lifetime but certainly for future genera tions. The fact of the matter is I believe we are being governed by politicians with tunnel vision, are looking towards the next general elections and could care less about 20-25 years into the future. Andt hat is so sad. I note with interest the role the Bahamas Contractors Association is playing in the proposed Baha Mar/Chinese development. And I believe that the BCA may be acting unconstitutionally. The fact of the matter is that construction is not legislated by the P arliament of the Bahamas. T herefore, there is no such t hing as a contractors licence. One has only to pay $100 to the Ministry of Finance and complete a business licencef orm to operate a construction business and he will be issued a licence. W hich brings me to the p oint: Who if anyone has authorised the BCA in giving the impression that they aret he representative for any legal body because they are not. T hey are nothing more t han an association that is perceived to be the representative for the construction i ndustry. It is unfair to the contractor. Baha Mar developmenti s not obligated to entertain t he BCA. In fact, they ought to be dealing directly with the contractor and hiring whomever they wish. Because as I understand the BCA is confusing the issue and press-i ng the government to put into legislation a complicated set of policies that I believe will discriminate against the a verage contractor. In fact, Im shocked that no one in the business have stood up a nd started to ask questions. There is nothing stopping any other contractor from form i ng an association and making representation to Baha Mar or any other develop ment. I applaud the govern m ent for not following up on the pressuring tactics from the BCA to legislate the con s truction industry. I would like to know who has autho rised the BCA to certify cont ractors? And what does the B CA certification mean? Is it that the contractors not certi fied by the BCA will not be a llowed to be employed? And what if some contractors are never able to meet the certification standards? Where does this leave them? This to me sounds like blatant disc rimination. And why is B TVI being talked about in the same conversation as the proposed Baha Mar development? The men at BTVI are learning to lay blocks andr ead a house plan. Who is p laying games and why? With reference to the proposed $2.6 billion project, it s eems as if this proposed project was doomed from its i nception. The original partners were run out of town. It was criticised by the government. Not one government minister was present at the s igning in Miami, or at the a nnouncement in China. Ive a lso heard that the Chinese g overnment wants the Bahamas government to g uarantee the loan for the development. O ne vital question I must a sk is what exactly is being p roposed for Cable Beach? At one time the development was $1.4 billion now its up to $ 2.6 billion. How will our access be honestly affected in the CableB each area? Each time you see a story on TV touting the development you see a different pict ure. Are we going to continu e to prostitute ourselves for the left over and say to hell w ith future generations? Why each time a developer sets foot on Bahamian soil his goal is to limit access? My parents a nd grandparents were born here. How much more Bahamian can I get? Why do I have to ask for permission to set foot in my own country? There is something wrongw ith even the thought! In closing I say the real men who fought for this country must be turning over in theirg raves! PAT STRACHAN Nassau, July 30, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm JERUSALEM Hawkish Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has the security credentials and the political strength to pull off a peace deal with Palestinians now that the U.S. has brokered a new start to direct talks. The big questions is: Does he have the will? Netanyahu heads to Washington on Sept. 1 for the launch of the first direct negotiations in nearly two years with the Palestinians. The White House hopes to forge a deal that has eluded its predecessors within a year a formidable challenge. Though Netanyahu has built his political career in part as an outspoken critic of peace moves by past Israeli leaders, he has shown surprising pragmatism in dealing with the moderate Palestinian leadership of the West Bank. Netanyahu has made a series of concessions under heavy U.S. pressure an indication that he is both pragmatic and susceptible to arm-twisting from Israel's closest and most important ally. Shortly after his re-election a year ago, the prime minister removed dozens of military checkpoints in the West Bank. The lifting of the travel restrictions, which Israel said were a security measure during a previous decade of violence, helped breathe life into what has become a miniature economic boom in the Palestinian territory. Last year, Netanyahu endorsed the concept of a Palestinian state, and later imposed a 10month slowdown on construction of new homes in West Bank Jewish settlements. Earlier this year, he informally imposed a similar, albeit undeclared, freeze on new Jewish housing developments in east Jerusalem. Such moves would have been unthinkable for him a few years ago. Still there are enormous obstacles to overcome before any deal can be reached. Netanyahu says he will not give up east Jerusalem and has not talked about the possi bility of a broad withdrawal from the West Bank, where more than 200,000 Jewish settlers live among about 2.4 million Palestinians and Israel maintains military control. Palestinians claim all the West Bank and east Jerusalem as well as Gaza areas captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war for their future state. The international community backs the Palestinian demand. This has made the Palestinians extremely leery about speaking to the Israeli leader. Another problem is the roughly 4 million P alestinians in the West Bank and Gaza are deeply divided. They have different govern ments. And Netanyahu's partner for talks, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, is weak and only represents about half the Palestinians in the territories. Nevertheless, there is some reason for hope t hat President Barack Obama's initiative will fare better than the doomed attempts of past American leaders. In dealing with the Israeli public, Netanyahu's credibility as a security hawk and secure political standing could enable him to follow in the footsteps of former Prime Ministers Menachem Begin and Ariel Sharon, two other right-wing icons who ultimately made sweeping gestures for peace. Begin reached the 1979 historic peace accord with Egypt, requiring a full withdrawal from the Sinai Peninsula, while Sharon withdrew all Israeli troops and settlements from the Gaza Strip five years ago. Netanyahu's actions have not always matched his tough-talking rhetoric. In his previous term as prime minister in the 1990s, he withdrew Israeli forces from Hebron and handed over additional control of the West Bank to Palestinians. Equally significant, his coalition government, a grouping dominated by a mix of nationalistic and hard-line religious parties, has remained solidly intact despite unhappiness with some of Netanyahu's moves. Without any serious opposition, Netanyahu has great freedom in conducting negotiations. And if any hard-line coalition partners were to break away, Netanyahu could turn to the moderate opposition to remain in power. For now, it remains unclear whether Netanyahu is ready to make bold steps toward peace. One reason for scepticism is his endorsement of Palestinian independence last year included so many caveats that the Palestinians said it was insincere. Likewise, the limited settlement freeze included several loop holes that allowed construction of thousands of apartments to proceed. A former army commando and the son of a renowned hawkish Zionist historian who still wields heavy influence over him, Netanyahu has led the fight against previous peace initia tives over the past two decades. His opposition has been rooted in both security grounds and an ideology stressing the Jewish people's con nection to the Holy Land. Since winning election last year, Netanyahu has given few signs that he is willing to make the tough concessions demanded by the Palestinians and the international community: a withdrawal from occupied lands claimed by the Palestinians, shared sovereignty of the holy city of Jerusalem and a solution for the millions of Palestinians who became refugees as a result of Israel's creation in 1948. The Palestinians view him with deep suspicion. To lure Netanyahu to the negotiating table, the White House had to agree to his demands that there be no preconditions and that he not be bound to pledges made by more dovish I sraeli leaders in the past. In accepting the White House's invitation, Netanyahu said pro tecting Israel's security interests would be his foremost concern. The Palestinians joined the talks only after the international Quartet of Mideast mediators issued an accompanying statement Friday calling for an agreement "that e nds the occupation which began in 1967." A senior Palestinian official said the Pales tinians had received assurances from the U.S. that it will remain heavily involved and push for a solution based on the 1967 borders. (This article was written by Josef Federman, an Associated Press writer). What is being proposed for Cable Beach? LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Talks to test Netanyahus will for peace Caves Village Professional Turn Key Oe Suites For Rent The premier choice for serious business 1,550sq.ft $5,037.50 per month incl. CAM fees ** New Low Rate. ** 1,056sq.ft $3,432.00 per month incl. CAM fees 850sq.ft. $2,762.50 per month incl. CAM fees Available 1st June 2010: 1,056sq.ft $3,432.00 per month incl. CAM fees 850sq.ft. $2,762.50 per month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610 Email: simon@cavesheights.com EDITOR, The Tribune. Does anyone know precisely what the unemployed Construction Worker count is at this particular time? For the next phase of Atlantis how many construction workers will be needed? M y suspicion is of the current reasonably trained construction workers would be totally absorbed over on Paradise Island so in essence what we all wish there would be total employment in that sector. Now lets stay sane......bank or hotel employees who were laidoff a year or so ago cannot be included as they have no experi ence in the construction trade. Can someone answer this? I suspect Atlantis Phase 4 will immediately solve all the unemployment in the construction sector. H HUMES Nassau, August 11 ,2010. How many unemployed constr uction workers are there?

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS ( The writer is a C onsultant and former Caribbean diplomat) THE G20 should be the T20 trustees not just of the 20 rich countries that sitat their meetings but also of the 172 nations that are d enied a seat at their table. T his powerful statement has been advanced jointly by the Secretaries-General of the Commonwealth and La Francophonie, two organizations whose members are mostly developing states. T he custodians of the G 20s self-bestowed mand ate to oversee the world e conomy justify their m onopoly of global decision-making on the fact that they account for 90 per cent of global GDP. But, while t hat is so, 90 per cent of the w orlds countries are excluded from their discussions. A s the two Secretaries G eneral (Kamalesh Sharma, C ommonwealth and Abdou Diouf, La Francophonie)h ave argued: The simple f act of globalization dictates t hat all countries, the world o ver, have been affected by a tsunami of crises of finance and food, of energy and the environment. Equall y, all have an interest in w hat goes into the G20 meeting, and what comes o ut of it. A lmost a year ago (Octob er 2009) in a commentary entitled Can the Caribbeand epend on the G20?, I made the argument that Membership of the G20 h as little to do with fair repr esentation and much to do w ith self interest. Together, t he G20 countries cover more than eighty-five per cent of world economic activity. They can afford to i gnore, or at least pay lip service to, the other nations who account for the remaini ng fifteen per cent of global e conomic activity, even as B an-ki-Moon, the UN secretary-General, reminds thate ighty-five per cent of the w orlds countries are not represented at the G20. In the end it is power that mat ters and power in this instance is purchasing capacity and market size. I argued then that the C aribbean collectively s hould argue for a seat at the G20 table to advance its o wn interests which are n eglected by the Internat ional Financial Institutions that continue to apply traditional prescriptions and criteria to Caribbean problems, many of which are caused by events in the worlds richest economies s uch as the United States, Britain, France, Germany and Japan. No initiative has been p ursued by the Caribbean in this regard as far as I know. Concern T hree G20 meetings have now been held without representation by the smalls tates in Africa, Oceania, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. I acknowledge that Canadas Prime Minister, StephenH arper, as Chairman of the last G20 meeting in Toronto did have a meeting with the Secretaries-General of the Commonwealth and La Francophonie to get an understanding of the challenges faced by the member countries of their organiza tions that were not repre sented at the meeting. But,P rime Minister Harpers generous concern for nonrepresented countries, while laudable, is not a substitute for a structured and pre dictable participation in the G20 deliberations by the worlds small countries. The call that inspired the American Revolution, No taxation without represen tation, is relevant today in the international political economy. G20 countries consume the majority of the worlds resources; they are its biggest polluters; and their actions, across a variety of areas, materially affect the survival of smaller count ries. They should at least l isten to the valid problems of others. The G20 cannot claim economic leadership but deny economic respons ibility and obligations. The G20 countries even the large developing count ries such as China, India a nd Brazil prefer to limit t he number of nations in their council, keeping it asa club for large nations that n ow aims to set the economic parameters for the world to fit their purpose. It also suits them to keep their relations with small economies at a bilateral lev el where enough can bed one to maintain influence o ver them without over hauling the global appara-t us, such as the Internationa l Financial Institutions and t he World Trade Organization in which they are disadvantaged. Given this reality, small states should seek to institutionalize the initiative taken by Canadian Prime Mini ster Stephen Harper to invite the Secretaries-General of the Commonwealth and La Francophonie forc onsultations prior to the meeting. They should push to ensure that the Chair per son of every G20 meeting s eeks proposals from the two Secretaries-General on behalf of their disenfran c hised members, and that s uch proposals are tabled and considered by the meet ing. In the case of the Com monwealth, 32 of its 54 members are small states and five of its larger mem b ers Australia, Britain, Canada, India, and South Africa are members of the G20. La Francophonie has 56 member states. Ten countries are members of both organizations, which togeth er comprise 72 countries that are not represented at the G20. Crisis Surely, proposals from two persons representing 72 countries and almost a billion people should be welcome by the G20 in a spirit of genuine regard not only for international democra cy, but also for dealing with the plight of small countries that have been hit particularly hard by the effects of the international financial crisis and who are still suffering from its conse quences. The two Secretaries-General have publicly observed that, for 2010 alone, the World Bank has indicated that US$315 billion is required to meet the gap between what developing countries require and what is currently available if they are to meet the Millennium Development Goals set by all nations. They have pro posed that the G20 should endorse a serious action plan to identify innovative potential sources of non-sovereign financing, embracing widespread consultation with those not at their table. If the Caribbean cannot collectively push for a seat at the G20 table, the region should at least join other small countries in seeking to institutionalize Prime Min ister Harpers initiative that the Commonwealth Secretary-General presents our case to which we should contribute well researched and viable arguments. Reponses and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM G G r r a a b b y y o o u u r r d d i i s s c c o o u u n n t t o o u u t t o o f f t t h h e e B B a a g g !Harbour bay 394-5767 S S i i z z e e s s X X S S t t o o 3 3 X X L L 172 countries should matter: Making sure the G20 listen WORLDVIEW SIRRONALDSANDERS T T h h r r e e e e G G 2 2 0 0 m m e e e e t t i i n n g g s s h h a a v v e e n n o o w w b b e e e e n n h h e e l l d d w w i i t t h h o o u u t t r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t a a t t i i o o n n b b y y t t h h e e s s m m a a l l l l s s t t a a t t e e s s i i n n A A f f r r i i c c a a , O O c c e e a a n n i i a a , t t h h e e C C a a r r i i b b b b e e a a n n , a a n n d d t t h h e e P P a a c c i i f f i i c c .

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Break away from the ordinary and discover how to experience life to the fullest. The Isuzu D-MAX is the ultimate multi-purpose pick-up truck which enables you to drive through tough roadsand load a variety of cargoes. It is specially designed to be powerful, stylish and highly functional. The Isuzu D-MAX is one toughvehicle that willnever let you down!T H E I S U Z U D M A XPOWERFUL COMFORTABLE VERSATILE T YREFLEX S T AR MO TORSCall us today for your new IsuzuD-MAX Pick-UpTruck at 325.4961Wulff Road, P.O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 R EPLACEMENT BULBS for all uses MEDICINE CABINET BULBS, SHOP LIGHT BULBS AND MORE!!!I f its a Bulb we sell it NASSAU GLASS Mackey St 393-8165T HE LIGHT BULB CENTREa t the Nassau Glass Lighting Centre By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Staff Reporter rshearer@tribunemedia.net A THIRTY-two mile kayaking stint sponsored by t he Cancer Society of The B ahamas will take place on an open body of water from S hip Channel Cay, Exuma, t o Glemore Beach, New P rovidence, all in the good efforts of raising monies for the Monty Higgs Kayak forC ancer Fund. In 2004, Monty Higgs, with Peter Higgs and Dave Meller set out on a kayaking trip from George Town, Exuma to Ship Channel Cay, Exuma, read a statem ent on the event. This a dventure covered over 120 m iles and two weeks of paddling some of the mostb eautiful shore lines and w aters in the Bahamas. The trio had intended to kayak to New Providence from Ship Channel but thew eather built and they were unable to complete the final leg. P articipants in this weeks event Saturday, August 28 will attempt to finish the final leg of Higgs andM iller. But this will depend largely on the weather and the tide, said Jeff Robertson, a participant who told T he Tribune t hat organizers have accounted for the poss ibility that this could be a setback going forward. It will take approximately six to eight hours to complete. Weather S cattered thunderstorms h ave been forecast for the day of the event. But despite the dismal weather projec-t ion, Andrew Higgs, coordi nator of the kayaking event looks forward to an exciting time. M r Higgs is fundraising and organizing the event in honour of his father Monty H iggs, who died of acute myeloid leukemia (AML 2 006. Monty Higgs won Olympic medals in different sailing events. Jeff Robertson, a particip ant in the event said: When I found out that it w as to raise monies for cancer, I definitely wanted to participate. Im just excited and ready and Im still raising money; around $1600 in total, Mr Robertsone xplained. I n addition to his contri bution, cheques have been mailed to the Cancer Society by the general public, and t o Mr Higgs who has collected $3,000 in donations t hus far. Funding O ne-hundred per cent of the funding is going toward the Cancer Society. Kayaking is an exhilarati ng experience, he said. Youre water-levelled, get ting splashed while sitting inside the vehicle. You feel the wind, you feel the waves, and its inter esting to see the number of yachts and scenery as youp addle by. Cancer Society to sponsor 32-mile kayaking stint B B y y M M I I K K E E L L I I G G H H T T B B O O U U R R N N IN these days of heightened security conc erns, were all a little more protective of our privacy. However, if youre selling a home, you also k now that showing it is an absolute must for successfully landing a buyer. When you know photographs of your home will be shown in print ads and on the website, pack away personal valuables such as jewellery, e lectronics, silverware and family heirlooms. You may want to remove computers, wide-screen televisions, crystal and valuable collectibles from the cameras eye. There is no need to advertise your belongings your homes features will speak for themselves. T his is the ideal time to take an inventory of any items that may be included in the sale of your home. Provide your Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA with a copy of the inventory. You can further protect your home with motion sens or lights inside and out. If you have a security system, make sure its active and that the service has an emergency contact number for you. Ask your neighbours to be on the lookout for any suspi cious activity. You, of course, will do the same for them. Theres likely no need to worry, but why not play it safe? Tip of the Week The old adage, Better be Safe than Sorry, will never let you down. (Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty) Questions or comments? Email me at ask@ColdwellBankerBahamas.com Protecting your home P RACTICEMAKESPERFECT: T im Aylen (foreground mile kayak from Exuma to Nassau that takes place August 28th. Trip from Exuma to New Providence will take at least six hours REALESTATE

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P ORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti HIP-HOPsinger Wyclef Jean said Sunday that he is not abandoning his presid ential bid just yet and will t ry to get the courts to overturn a decision disqualifying him from the race, according to Associated Press. Speaking to The Associated Press by telephone f rom his home in Croix des B ouquets, Jean said his lawyers will file an appeal w ith the national electoral d ispute office. J ean said that he has a d ocument "which shows e verything is correct" and t hat he and his aides "feel t hat what is going on here h as everything to do with Haitian politics." "They are trying to keep us out of the race," he said, referring to Haiti's political establishment. Haiti's elections board r ejected Jean's candidacy Friday night presumably because it decided he had n ot met residency requirem ents, although the board d id not cite a specific reason. Under Haitian law, ap residential candidate must h ave lived in the country for five consecutive years leading up to the election. J ean has argued that he was not required to comply with the law so strictly because after PresidentR ene Preval appointed him a s roving ambassador in 2007, he was allowed tot ravel and live outside the c ountry. The 40-year-old singer said that he is appealing the Haitian board's deci s ion on the basis that it rejected his candidacy before the national electoral dispute office, or BCEN, could issue a final ruling on the residency issue. J ean said that shortly a fter he filed his papers to r un in the Nov. 28 election, two Haitian citizens chal lenged his candidacy, sayi ng he had not met the res idency requirements. The BCEN ruled in his favor, Jean asserted, but the two citizens appealed the decision. The case was s till pending when the Haitian elections board decided to disqualify Jean, the singer said. It was not clear whether J ean's legal argument w ould hold up. Elections board spokesman Richardson Dumel said that as of Sunday afternoon, he had not seen any paperwork from the candidate indicating an appeal, but he d eclined to comment furt her. The board on Friday a ccepted 19 candidates and r ejected 15. A spokesman r ead out the names of the a pproved and rejected can d idates quickly at a late, h astily called news confere nce. I t would have helped both candidates and voters if the council had explained the basis of their decisions, said officials from the Joint Mission of Electoral Observation, a division of t he Organization of American States and the Caribbean Community. Regarding the 15 cand idacies that were deemed i neligible, explications about the reasons for inval-i dating them would have c ontributed to the transparency of the process," the OAS wrote in a newsr elease issued Saturday. Jean said he had planned to leave the country this weekend to see his familyi n New Jersey, but has d ecided to stay in Haiti to see the appeal processt hrough. S hortly after informing the AP of his decision Sunday morning, Jean announced it again on hisT witter feed, saying: "Tomorrow our Lawyers (sic decision of the CEP (the elections board). We have met all the requirements set by the laws. And the l aw must be Respected." S ome officials in Haiti w ere worried about political unrest among Jean sup porters after his candidacy w as rejected. But the singer had asked his fans to stay calm, and there have been no significant electionrelated protests or violence over the weekend. C M Y K C M Y K CARIBBEAN NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Wyclef Jean: Im not giving up my bid for presidency yet HIP HOP singer W yclef Jean, seco nd right, greets s upporters at the airport in Port-auPrince, Haiti, recently. Jean said he will try to get the courts t o overturn a decis ion disqualifying him from the Haiti presidential race. R a m o n E s p i n o s a / A P

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM RSVP at www.barry.edu/ed/rsvpFor details contact Lincoln Pettaway at 305-899-3705 lpettaway@mail.barry.edu OPEN HOUSE for EducatorsBARRY UNIVERSITYis hosting two Open Houses for Educators. Join us August 25 and 26 to learn how BARRY UNIVERSITYcan provide you with the foundational knowledge and support you need to develop professionally and take your career to the next level. BARRYoffers educators sustained professional development, a reputation of academic excellence, and affordable academic programs.www.barry.edu/ElementaryYore invitedOPEN HOUSE FOR EDUCATORSAugust 25, 6:00 8:00 pm August 26, 6:00 8:00 pm Genesis Academy Shirley Street Nassau, Bahamas Main Campus: 11300 NE Second Avenue Miami Shores, Florida 33161-6695 800-695-2279 Classes to begin on September 17 at Genesis Academy Master of Science in Elementary Curriculum and Instruction courses will be offered one weekend each month (Friday-Sunday summer and midterm breaks The program of studies leads to the integration of theory, research, and practice Courses offer advanced study in specific content areas and methods of instruction using an interdisciplinary framework S e p t e m b e r 1 s t d e a d l i n e i s f a s t a p p r o a c h i n g R e g i s t e r t o d a y w h i l e s p a c e i s s t i l l a v a i l a b l e (VVHQWLDOO\WKHZDWHUVRI OLIHZLOODOZD\VIORZDVORQJ DVWLPHJRHVRQKHUHIRUH \RXU LQ OLIHDQGOHWWKHPIORZZLWK WKHWLGHa 4WffkFSk^ad XRWH a confrontation between him and another man. He was rushed to hospital b ut died of his injuries in the operating theatre at around 1am. Police said a man wearing a hooded sweater holding a handgun was seen fleeingt he area after Malakius was shot. Yesterday Assistant Commissioner of Police in charge o f crime, Glenn Miller, said t hat the two incidents could be connected but the police had no evidence to specifically prove this at this time. According to ACP Miller, no one was in custody up to press time last evening in connection with either of the killings. T hese latest homicides bring the murder count to 61 for the year. are looking into it and will decide what to do probably tomorrow when I come into town, said Mr Symonette during a phone interview yesterday afternoon. The alleged expos took place on Mr Bains radio show when a caller, who identified herself as Kim, was put on air by Mr Bain. Kim said that two months ago she had gone to the passport office to get two passports for her children, the legitimate fee for which would be $25 $50 per passport. While being served at the passport office, which is located on Thompson Boulevard, Kim said the passport officer who was dealing with her application told her he could assist (herher passports at an earlier time. He was trying to charge me $100 for two kids passports I had paid $50 for. I said to him, Thats ridiculous. Im paying $100 for something I paid $50 for? The woman said that ultimately she decided to hand over $40 to the passport officer in the hope of speeding up the process as she was due to travel with her children shortly and passport production at the office has been widely publicised as bogged down by delays. She said she p ut the $40 in an envelope, w hich she passed to the offic er. However, Kim said that after she left the Passport Office, she received a disgusting voice mail on her phone, allegedly from the passport officer. In the message, he rowed her out for only placing $40 in the envelope after he asked her for $100. Kim said that for the rest of the day her phone was blowing up with calls from the same number, which she presumed to be from the officer. After going to Mr Bain with her story, Kim said shea nd the radio host decided to call the officer back. The radio host then aired a recording of a conversation alleged to be between the woman and the officer in which they discussed the alleged payment. You made me look stupid, said the alleged officer in the phone conversation, apparently referring to how she only put $40 in the envelope. Now Ive got to pay for that, he said, a comment that the woman said she took to mean there were other people involved in the corrupt fast tracking scheme. The woman then asked him if he wanted the additional $60 that she claims he asked her for, to which he said No, thats okay, take care. Kim told Mr Bain that ultimately the two passports she put the application in for took two days longer than her receipt indicated they would take two and a half months i n total, she alleged. I guess I g ot swing, she told Mr Bain. M r Symonette said: Its unfortunate not only that members of the public try to fast track facilities by paying whatever kind of fee...thats unfortunate....and when officers who work for government accept that kind of money. Numerous signs displayed in the Passport Office state that it is illegal to tip a Government officer. The Deputy Prime Minister said that while he would not wish to comment on the particular instance alleged on the radio talk show as the authenticity of the recordings has yet to be verified, he said that appropriate action should always be taken to counter corruption. Its probably more widespread than we realise, he added. Asked whether, if the allegations of corruption are authenticated, the officer would be subject to dismissal from his job, Mr Symonette said he would not want to c omment on that at the m oment. H owever, he said that at the least such behaviour would certainly warrant disciplinary action. rerouting would have on businesses in the area of Blue Hill Road and Market Street, despite it insisting that two studies costing $3.3 m illion were undertaken before the work began. J ustice Neville Adderley's judgment states that an affidavit submitted by Joy John, of the Ministry's Project Execution Unit, said a "professional report" was done by engineers Mott McDonald at a cost of $2 million, and a further "economic appraisal" done in May2 008 at a cost of $1.3 million, prior to the start of the New Providence Road Improvement Project. However, Justice Adderley found: "In perusing these various reports, it is clear to the court that none of them dealt with the i mpact on businesses located along Corridors 11A and 11B (Blue H ill Road and Market Street)." The Ministry of Works was granted a stay that would allow them to continue work on the roads because the injunction should "not take effect immediately due to the stage of the works," accord-i ng to the Justice Adderley's judgment. F ROM page one DJshot Govt appeals injunction FROM page one terday and said their decision would come a fter weighing the social and economic repercussions voting for or against the resolution. The former prime minister, who gave the green light the $2.6 billion project when the developers were still tied to theirf ormer partners Harrah's Entertainment, said top PLPs have gone over the details oft he deal with Baha Mar officials in the past few days. We will be directly influenced by the complete urgency to do something with respect to the economy of the Bahamas. It is an increasingly serious state of affairs that exists here," said PLP Leader Perry C hristie. "The country is desperately in need of r elief in respect to this dire unemployment situation. The question for us is e xamining in detail the implications of whatever the number of work permits are, the impact on Bahamian labour, and the length of time of the work permits," he added. W hile not revealing how the party will vote on the resolution, Mr Christie restat-e d his discontent with the government for putting the burden of a decision meant f or Cabinet onto the shoulders of Parlia ment. H e thinks that the large num ber of Chinese labour requested b y the Chinese government for the project may be due to poor negotiations on the part of the Ingraham administration. "Our initial dismay was that s omething wasn't done by the Bahamian government whetherd irectly or indirectly when nego tiating with the Chinese gove rnment with respect to the amount of work permits (requested "Our view is that it is an executive decision, it is really a deci-s ion to be made by the government of the Bahamas. The FNM i s reluctant to make the decision on its own and wants to drag Parliament into it. It's the first of its kind where the legisla ture is asked to share in the decision making of the executive on a decision of granting work permits." Leader of Opposition Business in the H ouse of Assembly Obie Wilchcombe said the amount of foreign labour the project is c alling for is "politically toxic" adding that the government wants Parliament to vote on the matter so it does not take the brunt of expected public criticism. "It is politically toxic considering the fact that tons of Bahamians are out of w ork in the construction industry, not just here in New Providence b ut also in Grand Bahama," said the West End and Bimini MP. "So to make a decision to allow for a large number of foreigners to come in the country" will notb e taken lightly. In spite of this, the project is n eeded to help stimulate the slug gish economy, he said. Y esterday Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell said he will vote in accordance with the rest of his party adding that a resolution to the deal is long overdue. H e blamed Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham for the delay i n getting the project underway arguing that old financiers Harrah's Entertain ment pulled out of the project because of Mr Ingraham's earlier public statements on the deal. Leader of Government Business in the House Tommy Turnquest told the medial ast week that the Baha Mar resolution will be brought to Parliament on Septemb er 8 for a vote. The investors behind the luxury rede velopment of Cable Beach are requesting work permits for 4,920 Chinese labourers for the construction of the project. F ROM page one Passport office PLP caucus holds talks on vote URGENCY: Perry Christie FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 PAGE 14 Knowles so proud of Mardy Fish TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamas settle for fourth place By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net I N what is now listed as the longest match played at the Gym Tennis Club and probably the longest played locally in recent time, Kevin Major Jr. out-lasted Jason Rolle in three gruelling sets to win the 17th AID Clay Court Championships' open men's singles title. The three hours and 25 minutes match saw the 15-year-old number two seed prevail with a 4-6, 7-6 (211 win over the 20-year-old collegian on Saturday at the clay courts in Winton Meadows. "I don't know if we have official records of those matches, but from my recollection, this would be the longest match, certainly for AID, that I have witnessed," said tournament director Mickey Williams, who has seen quite a number of matches in his time. Reminiscent of a match he played in El Salvador on the junior circuit, Major Jr. said what he went through with Rolle was exactly what he had to do against the Mexican. "I won that match in El Salvador in the hot sun in about four hours after I came from 5-1 down in the second set after losing the first set," Major Jr reflected. "In this one, I just kept digging. I didn't think about the score. I just want ed to win. I was prepared to stay out there as long as he did and play him point for point for as long as it." Earlier in the summer, Major Jr. needed just two sets to win the Gatorade National Open title over Rolle on the hard courts at the National Tennis Cen ter. But on Saturday, he said he had to make a lot of adjustment with the ball because of the surface. That was one of the reasons why he felt he lost the first set and trailed 5-1 in the second. Kevin Major Jr. wins marathon tennis duel TRACK F ERGUSON-McKENZIE VETERAN sprinter D ebbie Ferguson-McKenzie, competing at the B erlin World Challenge in Germany yesterday, fini shed fifth in the womrns 100 metres. S he ran 11.29 seconds. The race was won by Jamaican Sherone Simpsoni n 11.09. Trinidad & T obagos Kelly-Ann Bap tiste was second in 11.14. Third place went to Verena Sailer of Germany in1 1.24 and Blessing Okagbare of Nigeria was fourth in 11.27 SOFTB ALL N PSA ACTION T HE New Providence Softball Association will resume play in their regu lar season on Tuesday at t he Bankers field at the B aillou Hills Sporting Complex with a doubleheader. A t 7 p.m. the Command o Security Truckers will play the Mighty mitts and at 8:30 p.m, the Freedom Farm Horsemen will meet the Dorsey Park Boyz. SOFTBALL BSC MEETING THE Baptist Sports Council will hold a very important meeting on Saturday at 10 a.m. at the National Cycling Track for all Churches wishing to participate in the upcoming Barron Musgrove/Roy Colebrooke Cycling Classic, the Rev. Anthony Carroll Softball Classic, the Rev. Elliston Smith Track and Classic and the Jason Saunders Volleyball Clas sic. Plans for all of these events, scheduled to start in September, will be discussed. Each Church is asked to send two representatives. V OLLEYBALL NPVA MANAGEMENT MEETING THE New Providence Volleyball Association (N.P.V.A. Management Committee meeting for Tuesday, August 24 at the DW Davis Junior High School beginning 7p.m. Association president DeVince Smith (and not Joseph Joe Mo Smith, as printed on Saturday), is asking that all persons interested, submit their teams for the upcoming season. Each team is requested to send two representatives as matters pertaining to the start of the league will be discussed. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER getting off to an impressive start, the Bahamas had to settle for fourth place at the North American and Caribbean Rugby Association's (NACRA ment at the Winton Rugby Pitch. The tournament, which also featured a ladies division, came to a close on Saturday with Bermuda carting of the mens crown with a 18-15 decision over Trinidad & Tobago. Me xico The Bahamas had a chance finish to third, but ended up losing 22-17 to Mexico in the plate match. After falling behind when Mexico scored on a penalty, the Bahamas took the lead minutes sports NOTES n 17TH AID CLAY COURT CHAMPIONSHIPS Kevin Major Jr. J ason Rolle THRILLER: Kevin Major Jr. (left n (NACRA) tournament at Winton Rugby Pitch SEE page 14 SEE page 14 ROUGHAND TUMBLE: In the ladies division, the Bahamas played for the championship, but got blanked 48-0 by the Cayman Islands. Centre Lolitta Hanna got two early tries for aquick 10-0 lead and Lisa Bird and Emily Davies followed with one each while Katie Bayles had a conversion as Cayman extended their margin to 22-0 at the half. F IFTH: D ebbie Ferguson-McKenzie I n womens division, Bahamas lose 48-0 to Cayman Islands

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE boys are back from the Cal Ripken/60 World Series and they enjoyed every moment of their celebrations on Friday night and Saturday. Although the motorcade was called off due to their late arrival on Friday night, familyand friends still showed up at the Lynden Pindling International Airport to greet the team home from Wilson County, North Carolina where they clinched the under-12 title with a 7-1 win over Vasilia, California on Thursday. What they didn't do on Friday because of the lateness, was made up on Saturday as the team had a rally at Freedom Farm in Yamacraw, took to the streets on a float parade and were then feted at the park on their return. "It's really hard to fathom what we've done," said Robert Cox, an assistant coach on the team. "When you look at the magnitude that little Bahamas competed against in the United States, it was just awesome, an awesome experience." Cox said when Freedom Farm made the initial trip to the Southwest Region Tournament a few weeks ago, they only looked at it as a tournament to win. Never in their wildest dreams, Cox said they envisioned that they would be returning home as World Series champions. "It was a lot of team work. The core of this team started working out in May to go to Florida in July," he pointed out. "But this team never wavered.We gave them the work and they came to practice and did it. That's why they are the cham pions today." Manager Greg Burrows Jr. said when he returned home, he really just came to the reali ty that the team did what no other team has done before and that was to win the World Series title. "I'm so happy for this team. I couldn't ask for it to end no other way," he stated. "Lastyear we got eliminated from the first round in the Southwest region and so I knew we had to be more prepared. As I coach, I learnt from the mis takes we made and we were quite ready for them this year." Burrows Jr. said the support from everybody involved in Freedom Farm was tremendous, especially considering the short turn around they had in getting from the regional to the world series. He singled out Meressa Thompson, Andrew Thompson, Pat Moss, Burrows Sr, CJ McKenzie, Robert Cox and Jamiko Sands. They all pitched in to make it all happen. Now that they have returned as champions, Burrows Jr. said the team will have to move up to the 13-only division next year, but they still have to chance to duplicate the feat next year because they will still be together. As the under-12 division, Burrows Jr. said they will have to go through a rebuilding process, but he is confident that based on the success of the team, they are convinced that Freedom Farm will be able to field another strong team to travel next year. Some of the players on hand for the celebrations, were quite thrilled about being champions. "It feels good. We had a good team and everybody worked hard," said Chavey Young. "We all knew that we had the best team in the Bahamas. We just had to go out there and proved that we were the best team in the tourna ment and we did that." Anthony Villalon, who was one of the pitchers and key offensive sparks, said: "It was a great experience. We had the hits just when we needed them and we won. We had a very good team. I was very pleased with how we played." Myron Johnson, the most valuable player of the tournament, noted: "It was very good. We played a lot of defense and out bats really came through for us. I felt good going out there and pitching. We are the champions." Ashton Moxey said: "We played very good, especially in the championship game. We didn't allowed them one hit and they thought they had us. But we came out swinging with our bats and we won it. It was a good team. We could go anywhere and win." Wayde Beckford added: "From our first practice as a team, we felt that we would go far and we went there to win it. We had a pretty good. When we were down, we never gave up. We performed to the best of our abilities and I think we did a great job." Jeff 'Sangy' Francis, who has been around helping out Freedom Farm from its inception, said the team just showed what persistent and hard work will do for you. "Greg (Burrows Sr had this vision that we should play out of the south Florida area and make our way up into the World Series," he said. "I've seen the success of this coming for a long time because we had so many players who went before this crew and so the program just continued to grow. "And most of those players who left and went off to school and played some professional baseball, are coming back home and are coaching in Freedom Farm program like Greg Burrows Jr and Jamiko Sands. So these guys know what it is to compete because they have guys coaching them who have been at that level." Francis, who still remain president of the New Providence Baseball Association, said it's his hope that whenever baseball can have a permanent home for the senior players that the Bahamas will get the oppor tunity to take its national team off to compete in more of the major tournaments because there is so much talent in the sport in the country. Pat Moss, another stalwart at Freedom Farm, said the team's success speaks volume for what they are doing. "We have a pretty good coaching staff from t-ball up, so every year, we just continue to turn over good ball players," he stated. "It's all through the hard and dedication of everybody. But once you achieve goals like being World Series champions, we have to maintain it. "So we just have to start get ting the guys ready so that they can compete next year. We will basically have the same coaches, but we will have a lot of new players, so we have to groom them for this caliber of play. But I'm sure that what this team has achieved will help them coming in." Burrows Sr., who orchest rated the Freedom Farm league, said all they have to do is improve on what they achieved. "We just need to get the 13year-old, 14's, 15's and up to do the same thing," he stressed. "The thing is to be able to play and win at that level. We knew t hat we could lay at this level for a long time. Now we have proven that we can win up there. "So the thing is for us to continue to win at a higher level every time we go back. So it will never stop. The success of this team only means that we have just put one piece of the puzzle together and now we have to do the rest of it." Jeff Martinborough, one of the coaches and sponsors of the league, said the team did very well and they worked hard to perform at the level that they did. "The results speak for itself," he insisted. "A lot of people who didn't know about Freedom Farm are now coming out and taking a look at what we are doing, so that is a positive step in the right direction for us. I'm sure that Bahamians are just as proud of them as we are of them at Freedom Farm." And Odessa Black, a proud parent of two boys playing in the league, said the team win ning the World Series was just "indescribable. "When they came through the doors last night, I went down on my knees and prayed.I was in tears," she said. "Some of them call me mom because I also help out in the concession stand. "But there's nothing like when you can see the success as we've seen in their performances. I'm really proud of all of them." C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Saluting the champions PHOTOS: T revene Saunders C AL RIPKEN/60 WORLD SERIES: FREEDOMFARMCELEBRATION Y OUVE DONEUSPROUD: B ahamians celebrate the teams achievement in returning home as World Series champions.

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C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS P AGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles would have preferred for him and Mardy Fish to be playing in the final of the Western and Southern Financial Group Masters in Mason, Cincinnati. But he was just as proud of watching the American as he came within two games of upsetting Roger Federer in the men's singles final yesterday. "That would have been nice, but for us, on the last day that we played, he had a three hour match with Andy Murray and obviously with him doing so well in singles, he used a lot of energy," Knowles pointed out. "We lost a tough super tie breaker, so it was a tough loss for us. "But I think it was a greater benefit for Mardy to finish so well in Cincinnati and almost win that title. It's one of those catch 20/20 where with him having so much success, you have to be moderate how things are going. But as a team, we're playing great. It's a good position to be in with him winning a lot of singles and we as a team winning a lot of doubles." In their quarter-final match on Friday night, Knowles and Fish were eliminated 6-4, 3-6, 12-10 by the team of Wesley Woodie and Dick Norman. The match came after Fish pulled off an exhausting 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4 win over number four seed Murray in the singles quarter's. After upsetting number nine seed Andy Roddick 64, 7-5 in Saturday's semifinal, Fish took number three seed Federer to the limit yesterday, losing a hard fought 6-7, 7-6, 6-4 decision in a match that lasted two hoursand 40 minutes. In that match, Federer came through with the only break at 5-4 in the third set and held serve to snap a seven-month drought in which he haven't been able to win a tournament. As the runner-up, Fish will climb in the top 25 in singles for the first time and will definitely be a competitor to watch at the US Open, the final Grand slam tournament for the year, that will start next Monday in Flushing Meadows, New York. But Knowles said he's not concerned because he doesn't feel it will take away from their doubles part nership. "He's a great guy. Not too many guys would have probably hung in there in Cincinnati and played the doubles after a gruelling match with Andy Murray," Knowles stressed. "But he understand that he made a commitment to which, he honored. "So I'm certain that we will continue to play for the rest of the year and like he said in his own submission, it's a tough situation to be in, winning a lot of matches in singles and then have to also do so in doubles." The good thing about the US Open, according to Knowles, is that Fish will have a a well deserved week's rest before they get ready for the Grand slam, which they hope to turn in another great showing. "We're obviously one of the better teams in doubles and he's put himself in a position to be one of the favorites in singles, so it's an exciting time for him and also an exciting time for us. But tournaments like Cincinnati are always tougher because you have to double up, playing singles and doubles in the sane day. But in the US Open, like the other Grand slams, you dont play singles and doubles in the same day. So it shouldn't be that grueling." The 38-year-old Knowles and Fish, unseeded as they made their return after winning the Legg Mason Classic in Washington in their last tournament playeda few weeks ago, had to watch as the No.2 seeds Bob and Mike Bryan played the No.4 seeds Mahesh Bhupathi and Max Mirnyi in the final of the men's doubles yesterday. Knowles proud of Fishs Cincinnati achievements By Alpheus Hawk Finlayson BAAAs Public Relations Officer At 10:49pm Saturday night Nas s au time, Grand Bahamian Tynia Gaither, won the silver medal in the w omens 200 metres at the inaugural Youth Olympics in Singapore, making history for the Bahamas. G aither, who will enter grade 12 at Osceola High School in Florida, r an 23.68 seconds from lane six, having run 24.09sec to win her first round h eat. Nigerias Florence Ndikura Nwake won the gold medal with a 23.46sec run. The bronze medal was captured by Olivia Expone of the USA in2 3.75sec. Gaither was born on March 16th, 1 993 and shares a birthday with leg endary sprinter Tommy Robinson, t riple jump great Dr. Timothy Barret and Hugh Bullard, deceased sprinter who competed in the 1960 Olympics. Her mother is Ms. Sabrina Johnson a nd she attends Cornerstone Baptist C hurch. G aither was the schools Athlete of The Year as well as Honour Roll S tudent for 2008, 2009, and 2010. She was also selected as an All Bahamian S cholar Athlete for 2010. Raquel Williams finished seventh in the B final of the shot put with a heave of 11.86 metres. Her series was 11.15m, 11.79m, and 11.86m. She fouled her final throw. In the first round Williams finished in fifteenth place with a throw of 11.59m. On Monday morning (Nassau t ime), Stephen Newbold will particip ate in the B final of the 400m hurdles a nd Lathone Collie-Minns in the B final of the triple jump. This will be the final day for track and field. N ewbold, who ran 54.40sec in the first round, will run out of lane three. His personal best is 52.75sec done in winning the Under-17 event at the C arifta Games. C ollie-Minns has a personal best o f 15.35m. He is this years Carifta Games Champion in the Under 17 D ivision. Collie-Minns jumped 14.66m in the first round for tenth place. H e will be the fifth jumper in the B final. On the first day of the finals on Saturday, Grand Bahamas Rashan Brown clocked a personal best in the 400m of 53.63sec to finish fourth. Browns previous Personal Best was 53.65sec. Brown was not initially selected for t he Youth Olympics, but when World J unior champion Shaunae Miller d ecided she did not wish to go to Sin gapore, Brown was substituted. The event winner was Robin R eynolds of the USA, who clocked a seasonal best of 52.67sec. High jumper Ryan Ingraham, who finished in ninth place in the qualification r ound with a 2.07m clearance, jumped a personal best in the B final with a h eight of 2.13m. The second place fin isher was George Dimitrou of Roma n ia who jumped 2.10m. Julian Munroe of Grand Bahama c locked 11.04sec in the B final of the 100m for seventh place. Munroe ran 11.53sec in the first round and has a personal best of 10.97sec. Carlos Manuel Sampaio Nascimento of Portugal won the B final in 10.79sec. Jamaicas Odame Skeen won the A final in a personal best of 10.42sec. M arva Etienne of CR Walker High S chool was scheduled to run in the G irlls B final but did not show. It is not known at this time the reason for Etienne not to show. Tynia Gaither makes history for Bahamas After simply letting the first set "get away" from him, Major Jr. got twice at 5-3 and 5-5 before they both held at 6-6 to force the first tie breaker. In the period, Major Jr. took a 5-2 lead and he never looked back. Just how Rolle looked a little fatigued in the second, Major Jr. did the same in the third. That enabled Rolle to go up a break at 4-2. But after getting his "second wind," Major Jr. regrouped and managed to cut the deficit to 5-4 on a break. They eventually held serve to the second tie breaker. In this extra period, neither player gave the other the edge as they stayed even at 6-6, 7-7, 8-8, 9-9, 10-10 and 11-11. At 12-11, Major Jr. got a volley return to take the slim lead. Then Rolle hit a return volley into the net to end the epic match. "It was close. I had him just like the last time, but in the end, he came out with it," said Rolle, who remembered playing a long match like this at Missouri Valley where he attends school. "He deserved it." Rolle, who returned to school on Sunday where he's on a ten nis scholarship, said he would have certainly like to get that particular victory under his belt, considering that he was the defend ing champion. "But he played well. I had him 5-1 in the second set and he came back to win that. I was serving for the match several times in the third and he came back. He just out played me today." It was the second tournament victory for Major Jr. earlier in the tournament, he had to come from behind as well in a 4-6, 6-0, 6-4 win over Jody Turnquest for the boys under-18 title. While Rolle lost the big one again to Major Jr., he did team up with Danielle Thompson as the number two seeds to pull off the mixed doubles with a 6-1, 6-1 decision over top seeds Derron Donaldson and Autise Mortimer. But Rolle and Donaldson, the number two seeds, lost to the top seeded team of Robbie Isaacs and Jardian Turnquest 6-1, 6-3 in the men's open doubles. The two-week long tournament also featured a junior veterans division for players over the age of 35. Larry Rolle, unseeded, knocked off number three seed Har rington Saunders 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 for the men's vet singles title. The doubles crown went to the team of Cameron Carey and Gerry Kanuka. Williams said the tournament was a success with seven divisions contested. But he said because of a lack of entries, there was no ladies division played. "We did have a mixed doubles competition and all of the top seeded players pretty much came through to form," Williams pointed out. "This match in particular (men's open final the best one for the tournament. "Obviously people here have not seen this caliber of tennis in quite a while. So the future certainly looks bright because both of those players (Major Jr. and Rolle years they could be the players to watch at the international level." Kevin Major Jr wins marathon tennis duel FROM page 12 with a try from Sean Kemp. The Bahamas went up 10-3 at the half on a touch down from Ronaldo Young. But Mexico responded with a penalty try and they converted for a 10-10. Mexi-c o eventually went up on a pair of tries for a 22-10 lead. The Bahamas then came back with asecond try from Kemp and a conversion from Albury to trim the lead to the final margin. G arfield Morrison, an assistant coach on the Bahamas under-19 team, said they fell apart and that caused them to miss out on keeping the hardware here. P laying out of pool A, the Bahamas upset defending c hampions Cayman Islands 2 6-6 in their opener. However, they lost their second g ame 12-10 to Bermuda, but a dvanced to the third and f ourth place playoff by virtue of the point spread. The Cayman Island got t he bottom bowl title with a 15-5 decision over Barbados to drop all the way to fifth p lace after winning the last t itle. Barbados finished in s ixth place. In the ladies division, the B ahamas played for the championship, but got blanked 48-0 by the CaymanI slands. Centre Lolitta Hann a got two early tries for a quick 10-0 lead and Lisa Bird and Emily Davies followed with one each while Katie Bayles had a conversion as Cayman extendedt heir margin to 22-0 at the half. In the second half, Bird, Hanna, Kehoe and L awrence each came up with one and Bayles added a conversion to finish off theB ahamas. W hile the experience showed in the performance from the visitors, this wast he first time that the Bahamas has fielded a ladies' team and Morrison, t heir head coach, said they have nothing to feel bad about. "They played much bet t er than they did in their first game," said Morrison, reflecting on their 65-0 loss to the Caribbean Select team, which comprised of some of the best layers from a number of Caribbean I slands. "The ladies are coming along. They just need to playm ore games." Canada beat the United States 6-3 to clinch theN ACRA Under-20 womens 15s championship. Bahamas settle for fourth place FROM page 12 n IN AUGURAL Y OUTH OLYMPICS IN SINGAPORE MAGNIFICENTMARDY: Mardy Fish, from Tampa, Fla., hits a forehand at the Cincinnati Masters tennis tournam ent, this week. In the final yesterday he played Switzerlands Roger Federer. Federer won a thrilling encounter 6-7 (51 A l B e h r m a n / A P P h o t o MARKKNOWLES

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By DIANE PHILLIPS THE colours, murals and sculptures are everywhere on sides of buildings, on facades and under eaves, adorning stairs 15 works of art that are transforming 15 buildings and sites in downtown Nassau. It's all part of Nassau's f irst full-fledged art in public places initiative. 'Love My Bahamas', co-sponsored by the Coca-Cola and Downt own Nassau Partnership, is adding a splash of colour to a city that plays hosts to millions of visitors a year. P art of a 15-month long campaign to bring excitement through art to historic N assau, Love My Bahamas got another step closer to its o fficial launch this week when signs were erected tying sponsors into the proj ect and Coca-Cola's tag line 'Open Happiness' into the v isual displays. "This is a life-changing o pportunity for downtown N assau," said Vaughn Roberts, managing director o f the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP o rganization charged with spearheading the revitalisation of historic Nassau. "I d on't think there has ever been a more exciting time f or art and this is the first time we have ever had anything of this magnitude." For the local bottler of Coca-Cola, Caribbean Bot t ling Company, the project is both corporate and personal. C ompany CEO Walter Wells recalls downtown Nassau in its heyday. Just walking along Bay Street made you feel alive. The air was electric. You could sense the buzz ande xcitement," he says. On a c orporate level, supporting the redevelopment is what Mr Wells called "one of the most important initiatives we have ever undertaken because of the size, scope and length of commitment. T he project also reflects the c ompany's Live Positively p hilosophy." C oca-Cola supported the competition leading to the selection of artists and coordinated the workshop bring-i ng together local and inter n ational talent. "We cannot thank CocaCola enough for its contribution to this massive undertaking," said DNP Co-chairman Charles Klonaris. The art has changed the c ityscape of Nassau and pro v ided visitors with something n ew to look at, talk about a nd photograph. It has given r ise to a new reason to do a walking tour. Anything that a dds to the visitor experience is good for us as a dest ination and should be celeb rated." P articipating artists include Antonius Roberts, John B eadle, Chantal Bethel, Lillian Blades, John Cox, C laudette Dean, Tyrone Ferg uson, Maya Hayuk, Jace M cKinney, Toby Lunn, Kishan Munroe, Jolyon Smith, A llan Wallace, Arjuna Watson and Daniel Weise. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM + .&+( ) &&# &* -!% (* !) *t &+(&*!)f!)*)&%,%!%*-.*& ) &'!%#!%&%#!%r,.*!$.&+$$!%!$+$'+( -!* .&+(&*nf.&+/##+*&$##. %**&-!%) &''!%)'(nf!&%*& *) &&#.&+( &!!,#+".-!%%()-!## &)bn &*&$ &&# bnrr rtr NEW RATES& BILLING CHANGES EffectiveJuly1st,2010TheBahamasElectricityCorporation (BEC ProvidenceandtheFamilyIslands.Billingsforallconsumers during this transition period will be carried out as follows:BillsfortheserviceperiodMay16thtoJune15thwiththebillingdate July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for payment on July 23rd at the old rates; Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated period are due for payment on August 6th; The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing July1st,2010.Meterreadingsforthisserviceperiodwilltakeplace attheendofJuly,andbillswillbesentoutinmid-August.Paymentfor this period will become due on September 6th, 2010. Commercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates. The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows: RESIDENTIAL0-200 units per month10.95 cents per unit 201-800 units per month11.95 cents per unit Remaining units14.95 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$5.00COMMERCIALAll units per month15.00 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$10.00GENERAL SERVICEMONTHLY BILLS UNIT CHARGE KVA CHARGE Demand charge per month$11.36 per KVA 0-900,000 units per month8.70 cents per unit Remaining units per month6.20 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$ 568.00TEMPORARY SUPPLIES16.38 cents per unit $20.00 connection fee $10.00 per month Meter RentalFUEL CHARGE(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel SPECIAL SERVICES Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse Replacement $5.00 Meter Test Minimum charge$10.00 Visit with intent to disconnect Residential Consumer Commercial Consumer $10.00 $15.00 Reconnection Fee $20.00 Returned Cheque Fee$15.00 TARIFFBAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639 Love My Bahamas project transforms downtown Nassau TRANSFORMINGDOWNTOWN: Love My Bahamas moves closer to its official launch.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS P AGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM find funding for scholarships at a level we have never seen before, even though we put $7 million for scholarships this year it is still not enough, (because d ren who are getting parental support who are doing magnificently in school. What I am concerned about those parents not spending time with kids whose k ids are engaging in anti-social c onduct and who are not doing well, and who are using c hildren of Haitian origin as scapegoats. We dont need t hat in our country. We need a ll of our children to do well, s aid the Minister. M r Bannister was speaking on Island FMs Parliament S treet radio talk show yester day afternoon. In response to a question f rom host Dr Sophia Rolle in w hich she asked him to respond to some of your detractors who would be overly concerned about the number of foreign students in the Bahamian school system, MrB annister said: This issue is very explosive in The Bahamas. Extremely explosive. He noted how he had been the subject of some really n asty remarks after T he Trib une p rinted an article in July in which he was quoted as acknowledging the impressivea chievements of many Haiti an children in Bahamian pub lic schools and said that The B ahamas has an obligation to ensure every child is educated. He also commented at that time on the fact that many H aitian parents take a very active interest in their childs education, which was enabling them to excel in school. S peaking yesterday Mr Bannister said: Since then people have attributed all k inds of remarks to me which a re not true. What I am trying to create in The Bahamas is an awareness of the need forB ahamian parents to pay attention to the education needs of our children. Too many parents have d ropped the ball in terms of spending the time that is required to help their children a chieve success in education so children of Haitian abstraction will always be a focus ofd iscontent because so many o f them are doing well, and so many of our parents many are doing good jobs b ut some who are not doing a good job are going to utilise (children of Haitian parent a ge) as scapegoats when the reality is got to focus on what our children are doing. Illustrating the role that par enting plays in creating the environment which can allow a child to excel, Mr Bannister noted the example of a friend who home-schooled his son. He called me the other day s o gratified we helped his son take his BGCSEs. His son got eight As in the BGCSEs. Hes put everything into this child, so of course that meant sacrifices at home, that meant someone staying at home, lessi ncome for the family, but the child did extremely well. Meanwhile, he spoke of two girls born in the Bahamas, each of whom has one or more parents of Haitian orig in, who are both valedictorians at their respective public h igh schools in New Providence. They are no more intelligent than any other child who is in the school, they are entit led to be in our system, but the reality is that the parents a re spending the time with t hem and they are excelling. Someone called me from Grand Bahama and someone called me from Abaco and t hey told me the same story a nd its not that anyone is any s marter than any of our child ren but its time for us to appreciate children will excel w hen they get parental support. If you get up in the morni ng and dont pay attention to your children, dont make sure they get breakfast, that theyre prepared for school, if you stay out late at night and donth elp them with their home work if you are not putting t ime into their lives they are n ot going to see what these children (the ones who do well at school) see, said Mr Ban-n ister. Minister:stop making children of Haitian parentage scapegoats FROM page one M ESSAGETOPARENTS: Desmond Bannister

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE CARICOM body charged with overseeing regional standards and quality for traded goods and services is this week conducting a mission to this nation to assess how the Bahamas could set up its own Standards Bureau, the senior official co-ordinating the visit telling Tribune Business that its establishment was closer than it was 10 years ago. Alpheus Forbes, deputy permanent secretary in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development, confirmed that the Caribbean Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ meeting with the private sector, plus the Government and social organisations, to discuss establishing a Bahamas Bureau of Standards. The Bahamas signed up to CROSQ membership under the former Christie-led PLP administration, but has never created its own formal Standards Bureau, as demanded by legislation passed Manager wins $26,600 from Superclubs Breezes C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from at hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.24 $4.29 $4.26 B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas e xpects to return to profitabili ty in the 2010 second half after suffering a more than $900,000 reverse that pushed it into a $327,247 loss for the six months t o June 30, its chief executive telling Tribune Business its loan a rrears, as a percentage of the total portfolio, was some 4.4 p ercentage points better than industry average. Anwer Sunderji said the B ISX-listed bank expected to benefit from a reduction in loan l oss provisioning, as non-performing loans levelled off, w hile interest margins were set to benefit from reduced cost of funds as deposit rates in the B ahamian commercial banking system came under pressure f rom surplus liquidity. Both developments would benefit Fidelity Bank (Bahamas mance and help to drag it back into the black, Mr Sunderji said, a dding that an increased proportion of consumer loans withi n its overall portfolio would also aid its loan/asset yield. A positive development has been the change in mix of the loan book, Mr Sunderji told Tribune Business. Were now a t 77 per cent/23 per cent [mortgages/consumer loans], which i s a change from 82 per cent/18 per cent at the start of the year. By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A FORMER receivables manager at SuperClubs Breezes h as been awarded $26,560 after the Supreme Court found the N assau-based all-inclusive resort wrongfully dismissed her, the judge ruling it had failed to prove she had falsified compa ny documents as alleged. J ustice Neville Adderley, in his August 6, 2010, ruling,d etailed how SuperClubs Breezes watered down its justif ication for dismissing Marion Morris, going from the November 18, 2004, summary dismissall etter, which alleged she had altered invoice dates and made a ccounts receivables uncollectible, to its argument of gross negligence made at trial. Although SuperClubs B reezes, in its defence, argued that it had carried out an inves tigation determining that Ms Morris was guilty on a balance of probability of the alleged falsification conduct, Justice Adderley noted that it aban d oned this to argue at trial the dismissal was justified by gross n egligence something the resort chain had not even p leaded. By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T h e Government enjoyed a 38 per cent increase in revenues collected from the rent/lease of Crown L and in a three-year p eriod between 2005 and 2008, an Inter-American Development Bank (IDB only 60 per cent of the backlog in sur-v eying this land had been eliminated. The IDB, in its evaluation of the Land Use Policy and Administration Project (LUPAP t o enhance the Governments mana gement and oversight of Crown and Treasury land, in addition to developi ng a parcel-based mapping system of Bahamian real estate, said it had deliv ered a comprehensive Crown Land P olicy study that had formed the basis for reform of land management in the Bahamas. N oting that the Government had shown interest in establishing a Bahamian National Land Agency, sim38% Crown Land revenue increase By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas General Insurance Association (BGIA and its members are mulling whether to change its name to the Bahamas Insurance Association to better reflect attendee composition, Tribune Business can reveal, its chairman also telling this newspaper the organisation was feeling fairly positive it could resolve its current regulatory concerns. Timothy Ingraham, who is also head of Summit Insurance, declined to comment directly on an existing motion to change the BGIAs name to the Bahamas Insurance Association, telling Tribune Business he did not want to pre-empt the outcome of any discussions. However, he did confirm: Were working together on this for sure, and looking to the future. Were going to have something formal in the next few weeks. We just need to make sure were on the same track and headed in the right direction. Tribune Business under stands that the name changed is being mulled to better reflect General insurers mull name change By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T HE Government has done what was required to ensure t hat the Planning and Subdivisions Act can be implemented o n October 1 this year as planned, the minister of the environment told Tribune Business, adding that claims mil lions of dollars worth of real e state developments were being held up was wrong. R esponding to claims that numerous real estate-based p rojects had been delayed indefinitely because the Town Planning Committee was not meeting, or had said it was not approving any applications, Dr E arl Deveaux said the true picture was totally to the con-t rary. He explained that the Town P lanning Committees term in office had expired on July 1, 2010, and that all they had done was issue a letter to the Director of Physical Planning, M ichael Major, requesting that he not issue any approvals until t hey received letters from the Governor-General confirming t heir reappointment. The Town Planning Com mittee, which prior to the July 1 expiration held a meeting on June 29 or June 30, received its l etters of reappointment on July 11, 2010, a 10-day gap. The claim and belief that projects were being held up was wrong, Dr Deveaux said. What the Committee asked the director to do in a letter was not to issue any approvals between July 1-10, until they received their letters. M eanwhile, Dr Deveaux said his ministry and key govern m ent agencies had completed all that was necessary to bring t he Planning and Subdivisions Act to implementation by the revised October 1, 2010, deadline. He explained that the three k ey tasks had been to complete an audited list of approved sub d ivisions, so the Bahamian pub lic would know which develop m ents had received full government approval; finish the Land Use Plan for New Providence; and develop a referral process to accompany the A cts provisions. We have done these things, a nd will be in a position to meet the October 1 deadline, Dr D eveaux told Tribune Business. Government on target with the Planning Act IDB paper discloses just 60% of Crown Land survey backlog cleared, though, as project provides foundation for comprehensive land management reform in Bahamas Crown Land revenues exceed $1.5m, just shy of targeted 40% rise, as government shows interest in creating National Land Agency Resource critical for Bahamian economic empowerment, with Government again urged to clear $300m real property taxes outstanding Bahamian surveyors resent stereotype as uncooperative, secretive and old-fashioned PLANNING ACT: Earl Deveaux Standards Bureau moving forward Ex-supervisor found wrongfully dismissed by hotel chain, in episode related to $300,000 overstatement of Bahamian all-inclusive resorts accounts receivables S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B Fidelity expects profits return in second half Chief executive says bank s loan arrears 4.4 percentage points better than industry, standing at 12.96% compared to 17.36% Adds that non-performing percentage better at 8.4%, compared to commercial bank average of 8.7% Bank expects improved interest margins resulting from falling deposit rates, and lower loan loss provisions, to propel it back into black during final six months of 2010 Eyeing higher loan book yield, as higher -yielding consumer loans increase from 18% to 23% of total book during 2010 first half Bahamian insurance industry feeling fairly positive it can resolve differences with regulator over Act and regulations

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM rrf nt n nn Q QfrnQtnbr Qrr rnQrr f rffnt Fidelity expects profits return in second half Were getting more higher margin loans on the books, and our yield from the loan book is improving. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas s mallest institution in the Bahamian commercial banking sector, has traditionally been a mortgage lender, but its management has pursued to the e xtent it can during a recession the strategy of diversifying its loan book to move more into consumer loans, which carry higher interest rates and yieldm argins because of their perceived greater risk. Meanwhile, Mr Sunderji said Fidelity Bank (Bahamas f ormance for the 2010 first half, during which it fell to a $327,247 net loss for the six months to June 30, 2010, compared to a $582,089 profit int he same period last year, was consistent with what we expected. Pointing out that Fidelity B ank (Bahamas only Bahamian commercial bank to suffer a net loss during its current financial year, and that the industrys woesr elated directly to a bad economy and high unemployment, Mr Sunderji said: Were seeing non-performing loans levelling o ff. Were not seeing that problem get any worse. The industry, on total arrears, was a 17.36 per cent at the end of June, and our total arrears was 12.96 per cent, w hich is kind of a big difference of 4.4 percentage points b etween ourselves and the industry, and the industry is get-t ing progressively worse. Our total arrears is better, a nd the non-performing book is now stable. Its at 8.4 per cent of our loan book, and the i ndustry is at about 8.7 per cent. That is marginally better, but in any event its better. Its still bad, but we think there is light at the end of thet unnel its not getting worse and are actually quite hopeful that we will have some recovery through the balance of the y ear. Pointing to positive signs from the Paradise Island-based resort industry, where both Atlantis and Comfort Suitesa ppeared to have resumed some hiring, Mr Sunderji told Tribune Business: Were hopeful our provisioning will n ot be as high as it has been, and hopefully our margins will increase as the cost of funds is going down. We expect the bottom line t o improve, and both of those factors will assist us in getting back into the black. Thats our expectation. T he Fidelity Bank (Bahamas explained that interest paid on deposits throughout the Bahamian commercial banking system was likely to continue d eclining due to the high surplus liquidity levels, the avail a ble money supply depressing rates and competition ford epositors. Credit demand has coll apsed, really, and liquidity in the banking system has risen very substantially, so were sitt ing on surplus cash and cant lay it off, Mr Sunderji explained. So theres a drag on the system, and thats the reason for some aggressivel ending elsewhere. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas this reflected in its net interest income for the 2010 half year, w hich fell by 9.4 per cent to $3.938 million, compared to $4.347 million the year before. While interest income remained relatively flat, drop-p ing by only $45,000 despite the non-performing loan rise, interest expense (interest paid on deposits) rose year-over-year b y more than $360,000. This reflected the fact that Fidelity Bank (Bahamas deposit base, which grew by 2.2 per cent or $4.7 million to$ 221.755 million, expanded at a faster rate than the banks loan book, which grew by just over $1 million from $200.122 mill ion to $201.329 million. The lack of loan opportunities also hit Fidelity Bank (Bahamas non-interest income, such as fees, which fell from $2.703 million to $2.597 million. Its tough to find good loan prospects in this economy, Mr S underji explained. If the economy does not grow, therec an be limited expansion of growth in loan books. We think there may be some progress next year, when the economy is expected to g row by 1 per cent. I think we may resume growth in the loan book in a controlled way next year, dependent on jobs, dependent on Baha Mar, dependento n foreign direct investment. There are lots of variables and unknowns. Its too early to say that w ere cautiously optimistic, but the worst may be past us, even though recovery may not be swift. Its an economic cycle. The Bahamian banking i ndustry would need time to work its way through current non-performing loans, but in Fidelity Bank (Bahamas M r Sunderji said: With the improvement were getting on the loan book, expectations of lower costs of funds that will boost our interest margins, ande xpectations of provisions not increasing, will help us in the second half. On the expenses side, Mr S underji said a more than $240,000 increase in depreciation and amortisation was related to the banks new software and technology system, which it had to depreciate. S alaries and employee benefits, along with general admin i strative expenses, were held relatively flat during the 2010f irst half, while loan loss pro visions rose by less than $ 100,000 year-over-year growing from $584,248 to $669,060. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net THE NEW Straw Market is ahead of schedule and on bud-g et, a senior architect at Pat Rahming and Associates told Tribune Business Thursday. Collin Johnson, who is also t he project architect for the S traw Market, said the buildings roof was currently being constructed and could be set in place in another few days. This,h e said, will give the project a feel of near completion, though it is not scheduled to be finished for another year. Hopefully it (the roof a dd a bit of beauty to the project, said Mr Johnson. Once the roof gets on it looks as though we are doing some-t hing. According to him, they are not being too optimistic about the project, as several days of rain have slowed work somewhat, forcing the team to work1 2 hours per day to catch up. There is diligence from all c onsultants, and especially the contractor, he said. They are very adamant about getting this building done on time. Schedule is August of next year, even though we have hada couple of rainy days, but they have been working feverishly from 7am to 7pm to try to make up for those rainy days. D espite the weather woes, Mr Johnson said the project has not encountered any major snags during the building, and they have managed to avoida ny major impediment to Bay Street vehicular and pedestrian traffic. We havent hampered that i n any way, he said. We have foot traffic and vehicular traffic as normal. The new building is already beginning to enhance Down-t own Nassaus appearance, something he hopes will inspire other property owners who have let their buildings deterio rate. M r Johnson said while he is n ot sure what will become of t he existing, tented Straw Mark et site, he hopes it could become a parking area for the P ompey Museum, where tour buses can drop their guests. H owever, Tribune Business learned that extending the Pompey Museum into the space when the vendors move into their new building is beingm ulled by officials. Being such a valuable site, I dont think they will do that (create a parking lot C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Have you heard the good news? You CAN save money!Ask NIBA for a motor insurance quote! Not only do you pay less with NIBA,you receive cover thats hard to beat and a claims service that doesnt keep you waiting! Its time to pay less for insuring your car!Tel.677-6422 or visit www.nibaquote.com NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com New Straw Market meeting its targets O N SCHEDULE: T he New Straw Market, Bay Street. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A RAWAK Homes is saving clients almost $3,000 during the building of their homes by removing the threat of material lostt hrough theft, the companys vice-president of sales told Tribune Business. D ena Ingraham said home builders rarely consider the cost of stolen construction material when cruching the numbers on the overall cost of a home, but Arawak Homes chairman, Franklyn Wilson, intimated during the dedication of their newly-refrubished Blue Hill Road office that theft has become a grave concern. M s Ingraham said this concern prompted the company to form and deploy a dedicated security team to protect properties under c onstruction in order to minimise the loss of material. She said the security unit at Arawak Homes was created due to t he increasing level of crime on the island. We had to respond to that need baesd on the amount of build ing materials we have lost, she said. With Arawak Homes you have that coverage. Crime has become a worrisome reality to the business commu n ity recently. Many business owners lament the costs associated with protecting a business and its employees from violent crime and t heft. President of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis R olle, said recently that doing business in this country has become extremely frightening. Mr Rolle said criminals seem to not fear the law, and Ms Ingraham said thieves will steal the newly installed toilet bowls out of an under-construction house. A rawak Homes has its in-house security firm patrol the houses it builds as a part of the complete package the company offers its c ustomers. Ms Ingraham said purchasing the services offered by her com p any separately could increase construction costs exponentially. She added that their packages, which now include security for their b uilding sites, can save thousands on a build. Building security plan aims to sa v e thousands

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the BGIAs composition and attendance at its regular meetings. Apart from brokers and agents, representatives of Bahamas-based life and health insurers have been regulara ttendees at BGIA meetings in recent years. They used to have their own organisation, the Bahamas A ssociation of Life and Health Insurers (BALHI split apart and effectively ceased to exist following the wave of consolidation in thats egment of the Bahamian insurance market over the past decade. BALHI was also dealt a b low when Colina Insurance Company, the largest life and health insurer by asset size, withdrew from it due to its anger at opposition from com-p etitors to its purchase of Imperial Life Insurance Company. For a few years theres been an interest on both sides to do something along these lines, some interest in moving thatw ay, Mr Ingraham said of any possible name change, pointing out that in major international markets the insurance industry w as usually represented by one organisation or one voice, such as the Association of British Insurers (ABI Meanwhile, the Bahamian i nsurance industry appears confident that it can resolve its concerns/differences with sector regulator, the Insurance Comm ission of the Bahamas, despite its August 13, 2010, letter which demanded that it be shown a greater degree of respect by Superintendent LennoxM cCartney and his staff. Warning that the industry would resist end-September deadlines to comply with the Insurance Acts regulations, amid fears that excessive cap-i tal requirements will raise consumer premium prices and impair the regional competitiveness of local insurance playe rs, the BGIA had also pledged to bring pressure to bear on the Government to amend the Insurance Act 2005 and its accompanying regulations,w arning that they could seriously and adversely damage the operations of many of the insurers and insurance intermedia ries presently doing business in the country if they are not resolved. However, the temperature appears to have cooled, MrI ngraham telling Tribune Business: We feel fairly positive following our meeting last Monday, and are going to meet w ith them [the Commission] to t alk over some things in short o rder. After the meeting, we all l eft felling very positive about the future progress and about t he relationship with the Insurance Commission. Were look i ng forward to resolving all issues raised recently betweenu s. Mr Ingraham acknowledged t hat the August 13 letter to Mr McCartney and minister of state, Zhivargo Laing, which he himself signed, appeared to have concentrated minds and brought everyone together. However, he said the indust rys meeting with the Insur ance Commission might have been held before the BGIA letter reached the regulator, and added: The letter outlines s ome of the concerns we have, but right now we seem to beo n the right track. We all have the same goal i n mind, effective regulation of the industry, and when we sat down with them we all had the same goal in mind. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Employment OpportunityS ENIOR SALES & TRAINING MANAGERAleadingjewelleryretailerseeks a qualified person to fill the position of SeniorSales&TrainingManager The successful c andidatewillberesponsibleforensuringsalesandprofitsare optimizedbycustomerserviceandpropermaintenanceof inventorycontrolsaccordingtoestablishedcompanyprocedures. S uitablecandidatesmustbeofintegrity,proactiveandable to demonstratestrong leadership skills. The ideal candidate should possess: Aminimumof10yearsmanagementexperienceinthe jewelleryretail sector and the ability to supervise staffisamust. -Associatedegreeorabove;AnAccreditedjewellery professionalqualification(GIAorequivalent). -Goodknowledgeofcomputersandadministration -Provenskillswithinventorymanagement, m erchandising,marketingandtraining. Excellentremunerationandbenefitspackage. Interested persons maysubmitresumeto: A ttn:Recruitment P.O.BoxN-623 Nassau,Bahamas Fax:242.328.4211 Or Email: recruitment@luxuryretaillimited.com General insurers mull name change I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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i lar to such bodies operating in other Caribbean nations, like Jamaica, the IDB report indicated that the project had pro-vided the foundation for several draft legislative reforms unveiled by the Ingraham administration last week the Land Ajudication Act, the Regi stered Land Bill, and the Law of Property Bill. With the Government officially confirming its belief that land security, and the possession of secure and marketablet itle, as key to Bahamian economic empowerment, the IDB said: A Land Ajudication Bill will permit the certification of f ee simple title to generation and commonage lands, and also legislation will be put in place for a Law of Property Act and a Registered Land Act. All ofw hich the Ingraham administration has now done. Turning to the IDB-financed LUPAP projects accomplishments, the Banks assessment stated: The target was for a 40p er cent increase in revenues generated from Crown Lands by year three of the project from a 2005 baseline of $1.1 m illion. According to project management reports, revenues actually increased to $1.522 million up to November 2008. This rep-r esents a 38 per cent increase. This was despite the Estate Management System (EMS which was designed help the G overnment better manage its C rown and Treasury lands, only b ecoming fully operational by D ecember 2009. The system w as intended to reduce the time taken by the Department of L ands and Surveys to make recommendations on Crown Land a pplications from three months to one. Measures to eliminate the backlog and speed up the time t aken to execute Crown Land surveys are required to sustain the current increase in revenue, the IDB warned, adding that the project failed to com p lete eliminate the backlog in these surveys. N oting that only 60 per cent of the Crown Land survey backlog was eliminated by the LUPAP project, the IDB explained: One of the reasons f or not achieving this output is the scarcity of land surveyorsi n the Bahamas, as the few existing land surveyors were f ully employed by private land developers. At the end of the project, the Department of Lands and Surveys hired land surveyors f rom other Caribbean countries to carry out the remaining C rown Land surveys, financed with local resources. It is e xpected that this backlog will be eliminated in short order. The IDB report also urged the Government to recoup the significant amount of real prop e rty tax arrears outstanding, a figure conservatively estimat e d as being around $300 mil lion. C alling on the Government to improve the real property tax system in the Bahamas, the IDB report added that the par cel-based land information management system should be used as a tool to identify miss-i ng properties and bring them on to the tax roll, as well as undertake a general reassess ment of all properties on the i slands to establish an equitable valuation as a reference base. S ome 15 per cent of Bahamian land parcels were thought to have been in dispute when the LUPAP project was started, and the IDB recommendedt hat the unit tasked with managing the new parcel-based system for registering Bahamian land be included, in the longt erm, inside a Bahamian National Land Agency. A new project, the bank suggested, was needed to fully consolidate the land manage-m ent system in the Bahamas over a five to 10-year period, with one Family Island done ata time. The Parcel Information M anagement System (PIMS f ully being implemented and w ill contribute to the efficient f unctioning of the local land markets in support of private s ector development, including facilitation of foreign invest m ent, thereby contributing directly to the objectives of theb anks strategy for the Bahamas, the IDB said. Geog raphic profiles of Andros, Inagua and Abaco represent a good point of departure for land use and natural resources management. D ave Turner, secretary of the Bahamas Association of Land S urveyors, during a meeting to evaluate the LUPAP project, said its team had incorrectly typified Bahamian surveyors as being uncooperative, secretive a nd old-fashioned. Some 40 per cent of the 20 a ctive Bahamian land surveyors used global positioning sys t ems (GPS Mr Turner said the Association and its members wanted to cooperate with the Surveyor General, including the mandat ory registration of surveys. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM -2%'(6&5,37,21 $ SURIHVVLRQDOVHUYLFHVULVORRNLQJIRU+XPDQ 5HVRXUFHV$VVLVWDQWWRDVVLVWZLWKWKHDGPLQLVWUD WLRQRIWKHGD\WRGD\RSHUDWLRQVRIWKHKXPDQ UHVRXUFHVGHSDUWPHQW (66(17,$/'87,(6$1'(63216,%,/,7,(6 +HDOWKEHQHWDGPLQLVWUDWLRQVXEPLWVDQG PRQLWRUVDOOFODLPVQHZHQUROOPHQWVHWFf 5HFUXLWPHQWDVVLVWDQFHWUDFNLQJVFUHHQLQJ UHVSRQGLQJWRDSSOLFDQWVf &RRUGLQDWLRQRIWUDLQLQJORJLVWLFVDQGPDWHULDOV 8SGDWHDQGPDLQWDLQDOOWUDLQLQJDQGOHDUQLQJ KLVWRU\IRUVWDI 8SGDWHDQGPDLQWDLQDOOHPSOR\HHOHDYH LQIRUPDWLRQVLFNOHDYHYDFDWLRQHWFf 5HVSRQVLEOHIRUHPSOR\HHDGPLQLVWUDWLRQ MREOHWWHUVHPSOR\HHGDWDOLQJHWFf $VVLVWVWKH+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHUZLWK V SHFLDOSURMHFWV 3HUIRUPVDOORWKHUUHODWHGGXWLHVDVUHTXLUHG ('8&$7,21$1'.,//6 +LJKFKRRO'LSORPD +XPDQHVRXUFHV'HVLJQDWLRQDQGRU FHUWLFDWHZRXOGEHDQDVVHW 0LQLPXPWZR\HDUVKXPDQUHVRXUFHV H[SHULHQFH 3UFLHQWLQLFURVRIWIFHVXLWH )DPLOLDUZLWK+XPDQHVRXUFHV,QIRUPDWLRQ 6\VWHPV+5,6f ([FHOOHQWYHUEDODQGZULWWHQFRPPXQLFDWLRQ VNLOOV ([FHOOHQWRUJDQL]DWLRQDODQGUHFRUGNHHSLQJ VNLOOV $SSOLFDQWVVKRXOGVHQGWKHLUUHVXPHDQGFRYHU OHWWHUYLDHPDLOWR $WW+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHU GKUUHVXPHV#JPDLOFRP +80$1(6285&(6 38 per cent Crown Land revenue rise F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

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The judge added that SuperClubs Breezes conceded that it did not prove, on a balance of p robability, that at the time of the dismissal it reasonable believed that the plaintiff was guilty of falsification of company documents, which it aban-d oned by the evidence of its only witness, Mrs Tynes-Miller, and in its closing submissions, in favour of the claim of gross n egligence. The affair surrounding Ms Morriss wrongful dismissal was the almost $300,000 overstatement of SuperClubs Breezes a ccounts receivables during the resorts 2003 financial year, Justice Adderley noting that seven months prior to her enforced d eparture, the resort chain had congratulated her department for collecting 121 per cent of their outstanding account quota. D etailing the cases factual background, Justice Adderley said the accounts receivables overstatement was only detecte d when the SuperClubs resort chain switched to a new software system in mid-2004. Invoices were issued to tour o perators, in a bid to collect monies due for guest stays, and i n this case were largely related to three companies Apple V acations East, Liberty Travel Go Go Tours, and Internation-a l Lifestyles. Accounts receivables were o verstated by $299,732, Justice Adderley noted, with the resorts general ledger not bala ncing with the receivables departments sub-ledger. T he problem went undetected by SuperClubs Breezes audi-t ors in their review of the 2003 accounts, the judgment noting t hat the main impact, apart from upsetting some tour operators, was that the Bahamian r esort had unwittingly informed its creditors ands hareholders that it had more assets than it actually had. A t trial, Ms Morris said there had been problems with ageing accounts those 30 and 90 days past due under the previous software system, and there were numerous reasons why credits w ould not have been posted to invoices human error, the wait for back-up documents, disputes over rates between S uperClubs Breezes and the tour operators, and waiting for Camille Tynes-Miller, the financial controller, to determine what adjustments were need-e d. Mrs Tynes-Miller, though, giving evidence on SuperClubs Breezes behalf, denied Ms M orriss claim that both she and the general manager were aware of outstanding amounts waiting to be credited. G iving reasons for his verdict, Justice Adderley said Ms M orriss claim had to succeed because SuperClubs Breezes h ad failed to meet the standard demanded by the EmploymentA ct, namely that it had an honest and reasonable belief o n a balance of probability that she had falsified company document. S hooting down the argument by the resorts attorney, Paula A dderley, that document falsification was not inconsis-t ent with gross negligence, the judge ruled that SuperClubs B reezes could not honestly believe that she was guilty of the latter. The plaintiff had a team of t hree persons in her department, all of whom posted items to the accounts receivable ledger, the system required a m onthly balancing of her departments sub-ledger against the general ledger checked and maintained by Mrs TynesMiller, her supervisor, thej udgment said. Mistakes are made in accounting, and these are detected and resolved by reco nciliations. Indeed, the mistakes in this case were so corrected. Each month, Mrs Tynes-Miller signed off on the b alanced accounts. The fact that Mrs Tynes-Miller was not d ismissed, and having regard to the evidence on the account i ng process given by Mrs TynesMiller and the plaintiff, thea pproval of the 2003 accounts by the auditors, and all the circ umstances lead me to the view that the defendant did not honestly believe that the errors m ade in the accounts were due to gross negligence by the plain t iff. Justice Adderley added that t here was no suggestion Ms Morris was given a chance to r espond to the allegations the resort chain made against her prior to dismissal. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $8',725 Manager wins $26,600 from the Superclubs Breezes F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear f r om people who are m aking news in their neighbour hoods. Per h aps y ou ar e raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for impr o vements in the area or have won an awar d I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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during the previous governments 2002-2007 tenure. This means that the Standards Act, w hile passed into law, has never been enforced. CROSQ has been trying to see how the Bahamas could set u p its Standards Bureau for quite some time, Mr Forbes told Tribune Business. Weve been looking at various means and the opportune time that t he Standards Bureau could take effect. He described the role of any Bahamian Standards Bureau as facilitative, not prohibitive, anticipating the concerns of some in the private sector who are likely to fear such a body would merely add another lay-e r of bureaucracy and red tape, thus increasing business costs. Pointing to the benefits of a Standards Bureau as an educational tool, Mr Forbes said it would ensure that all goods and services traded and sold locally m et acceptable quality criteria, thus protecting Bahamian consumers. It would scrutinise imports t o ensure they met acceptable standards, and also help Bahamian goods and services exporters to meet standard requirements in overseas countries. think it is safe to say that it is closer than it was 10 years ago, Mr Forbes told Tribune B usiness of the creation of a Bahamian Standards Bureau. It is to facilitate trade and commerce. He added that during its visit, CROSQ would attend the creation of a Bahamian National Technical Sub-Committee, the national body that would come under the Caribbeans Regional Building Standards Programme and provide advice t o it. Caribbean T he Bahamas was one of only two Caribbean countries still lacking such a sub-committee, Mr Forbes said, the initiatives overall aim being the creation of uniform safe building/construction standards in the Caribbean, and ensure they complied with international s tandards. CROSQ will tomorrow hold a workshop for small and medium-sized Bahamian companies, followed by a Wednesday seminar on Regional Quality Infras tructure, dealing with standards, awareness of them and various methodologies. The final two days of the o rganisations visit will involve public and private sector consultations to determine the general overall view of the acceptance of a Standards Bureau in the Bahamas. Mr Forbes, though, said the Government would be guided by its own agenda and timelines o n the implementation of a Bahamian Standards Bureau. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.341.00AML Foods Limited1.041.040.000.2500.0404.23.85% 1 0.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0500.200212.61.88% 6 .255.00Bank of Bahamas5.005.000.000.5980.2608.45.20% 0.580.20Benchmark0.200.200.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1680.09018.82.86% 2 .152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0550.04039.51.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas10.7710.770.001.4080.3007.62.79% 2 .842.50Colina Holdings2.502.500.000.7810.0403.21.60% 7.005.00Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.726.720.000.4220.23015.93.42% 3.651.93Consolidated Water BDRs1.931.940.010.1110.05217.52.68% 2.551.60Doctor's Hospital1.901.900.000.6270.1103.05.79% 6.995.94Famguard6.076.070.00-0.0030.240N/M3.95% 10.208.50Finco8.808.800.000.1680.52052.45.91% 1 1.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.749.740.000.7200.35013.53.59% 5.253.75Focol (S)5.015.010.000.3660.17013.73.39% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 5 .595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.24013.74.29% 10.509.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.80064.18.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029FRIDAY, 20 AUGUST 2010BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,520.16 | CHG 0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -45.22 | YTD % -2.89BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas Supermarkets5.016.0114.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.48251.4387CFAL Bond Fund1.48253.04%6.96%1.460225 2.92652.8266CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.91010.80%0.19%2.902023 1.54791.4842CFAL Money Market Fund1.54792.71%4.29%1.531489 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.8216-9.47%-9.40% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.41100.33%3.32% 109.3929101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund109.39295.20%7.60%107.570620 105.779593.1998CFAL Global Equity Fund100.1833-1.52%3.56%105.779543 1.12231.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.12232.98%5.25% 1.09171.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.07610.76%5.35% 1.11981.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.11982.67%5.53% 9.59559.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.59552.71%5.96% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.3734-3.69%3.38% 10.00009.3299Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 39.3648-6.35%-6.35% 7.96644.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund7.5997-1.52%11.83% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-10 31-Jul-10 103.987340 101.725415 30-Jun-10 31-Jul-10 NAV 6MTH 1.438700 2.906145 1.515417TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 31-Jul-10 13-Aug-10 31-Jul-10MARKET TERMS31-Jul-10 30-Jun-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-10BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 31-Jul-10 31-Jul-10 127,&( )5((3257&21&5(7(&203$1
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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 The stories behind the news Who will care for the autistic members of Bahamian society? By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net M ost parents fret about their childrens future and safety until their offspring reach an age where they are capable of taking care of themselves. Parents are usually overcome with questions of How are they going to manage when I am gone? and Who will take care of them? These concerns are born out of love and are generally a mark of a good, caring guardian. Most times these fears never materialise into reality and a parent can breathe a sigh of relief once the children are off to college or have landed good jobs. But think of how terrifying it is when the child is unable to care for themselves even after they are well past their teenage years. For too many families of children with autism, this is a real concern with no solution on the horizon. Last week I came face to face with some of these parents' struggles during an autism awareness reception hosted by US Ambassador Nicole Avant in conjunction with local autism advocacy group REACH. REACH was formed 12 years ago to provide a support network for parents of children with special needs and to increase awareness about autism. Since its inception, the group has also raised scholarship money to train Bahamian teachers to better serve autistic children. The common link in many of those parents lives is a deficit in adequate and affordable local treatment centres for autistic children and assisted living centres to house those children when they become adults. "Currently there is one autistic primary school class at Garvin Tynes Primary and one high school class at Anatol Rodgers Secondary School. In the country there are only three therapists that work with the Ministry of Education and there is a very long waiting list. A lot of the (autistic older now and we need living assistance for them we're not going to be here forever and after parents pass away there's a concern of who takes care of the kids, lamented Kim Gibson, public relations officer at REACH, and mother to a sevenyear-old autistic son. Opposition Leader and former Prime Minister Perry Christie father of 22-yearold Adam, who also is autistic echoed these sentiments during a recent interview with The Tribune He added that while there have been notable advancements in special needs care over the last ten years or so, those improvements pale in compari son to what is left undone. "Every parent's fear is, if they were to die what would happen to this child? That is the most common worry for parents of disabled children. These parents are so committed to helping disabled children but they know that it doesn't necessarily mean a sibling or other relative will be as committed. "That is where the state has to recognise that it has not yet put in place the kind of after care to address issues of that kind. Any government that comes to power has a commitment to address the issue but has to take a balanced approach to the allocation of resources so we are ensuring that these special persons get fair treatment. Sometimes they are overlooked and even though there is improvement (over the last few years) there is still more to be done, said Mr Christie. According to American statistics, about one in every 110 children are autistic with boys three times as likely to be autistic than girls. Local psychologist and autism specialist Dr Michelle Major, clinical director of the Seahorse Institute, thinks the condition is just as prevalent in the Bahamas. "I don't think that they're that far off from what the national statistics are in the US to be honest with you. When we talk about the whole spectrum (of autism feel that we are pretty much in the same area, said Dr Major when asked to com pare Bahamian rates of autism to those in the States. While autism numbers have grown in the United States over the past few years, something observers attribute to better detection methods, many afflicted chil dren go undiagnosed here either due to a lack of understanding about developmental disorders, a lack of trained doc tors who can make a diagnosis, or because of the negative stigma attached to having a disability. Dr Major has diagnosed autistic children from Abaco, Eleuthera and Long Island and says while resources are scarce in New Providence they are virtually nonexistent in the family islands. During his travels throughout the country, Mr Christie said he has encountered many children with disabilities who were not receiving proper treatment from state care facilities. He thinks this is because government agencies havent canvassed the remote areas to identify persons with special needs. "We have to recognise that some groups have done a lot to help. The Stapleton School (in New Providence dous asset to the country but I've always felt that we haven't done the kind of national audit that we need to find out in all of the remote areas of the Bahamas where these children are. Those families who are fighting for social improvements for their autistic chil dren will tell you that there is no simple solution to the myriad of problems they face every day: the stigma of having a dif ferently abled child, the stares, lack of understanding, to the strain on their pock et books and marriages. However, the parents, educators and physicians who tackle these problems head on and who have organised themselves without any prompting from any public agency deserve much more praise and all the help they can get. They stand as exam ples of good parenting, concerned and productive members of civil society. AUTISM a mental condition characterized by great difficulty in communicating with others and in using language and abstract concepts. The Concise Oxford Dictionary

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By CHRISTINA HOAG Associated Press Writer LOS ANGELES (AP Next month's opening of the Robert F Kennedy Community Schools will be auspicious for a reason other than its both storied and infamous history as the former Ambass ador Hotel, where the D emocratic presidential cont ender was assassinated in 1968. With an eye-popping price tag of $578 million, it will mark the inauguration of the nation's most expensive public school ever. The K-12 complex to house 4,200 students has raised eyebrows across the country as the creme de la creme of "Taj Mahal" schools, $100 millionplus campuses boasting both architectural panache and deluxe amenities. "There's no more of the o ld, windowless cinderblock s chools of the '70s where kids f elt, 'Oh, back to jail,'" said Joe Agron, editor-in-chief of American School & Univer sity, a school construction journal. "Districts want a showpiece for the community,a really impressive environment for learning." Not everyone is similarly enthusiastic. "New buildings are nice, but when they're run by the same people who've given us a 50 per cent dropout rate, they're a big waste of taxpayer money," said Ben Austin, executive director of Parent Revolution who sits on the California Board of Education. "Parents aren't fooled." At RFK, the features include fine art murals and a marble memorial depicting the complex's namesake, a manicured public park, a state-of-the-art swimming pool and preservation of pieces of the original hotel. Partly by circumstance and partly by design, the Los Angeles Unified School District has emerged as the mogul of Taj Mahals. The RFK complex follows on the heels of two other LA schools among the nation's costliest the $377 million Edward R Roybal Learning Center, which opened in 2008, and the $232 million Visual and Performing Arts High School that debuted in 2009. The pricey schools have come during a sensitive period for the nation's secondlargest school system: Nearly 3,000 teachers have been laid off over the past two years, the academic year and programmes have been slashed. The district also faces a $640 million shortfall and some schools persistently rank among the nation's lowest performing. Los Angeles is not alone, however, in building big. Some of the most expensive schools are found in low-performing districts New York City has a $235 million campus; New Brunswick, N.J., opened a $185 million high school in January. Nationwide, dozens of schools have surpassed $100 million with amenities including atriums, orchestra-pit auditoriums, food courts, even bamboo nooks. The extravagance has led some to wonder where the line should be drawn and whether more money should be spent on teachers. "Architects and builders love this stuff, but there's a little bit of a lack of discipline here," said Mary Filardo, executive director of 21st Century School Fund in Washington, DC, which promotes urban school construction. Some experts say it's not all C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Los Angeles unveils $578m school, S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e THE VISUAL and Performing Arts High School is seen in Los Angeles. Next month's opening of the Robert F Kennedy Community Schools will be auspicious for a reason other than its both storied and infamous history as the former Ambassador Hotel, where the Democratic presidential contender was assassinated in 1968. With an eye-popping price tag of $578 million, it will mark the inauguration of the nation's most expensive public school ever. (AP Photo

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flourish and that children learn better in more pleasant surroundings. Many schools incorporate large windows to let in natur-al light and install energy-saving equipment, spending more upfront for reduced bills later. Cafeterias are getting fancier, seeking to retain students who venture off campus. Wireless Internet and other high-tech installations have become standard. Some pricey projects have had political fallout. After a firestorm over the $197.5 million Newton NorthHigh School in Massachusetts, Mayor David Cohen chose not to seek re-election and state Treasurer Timothy Cahill reined in school construction spending. Now to get state funds for a new school, districts must choose among three designs costing $49 million to $64 million. "We had to bring some sense to this process," Cahill said. In Los Angeles, officials say the new schools were planned long before the economic pinch and are funded by $20 billion in voter-approved bonds that do not affect the educational budget. Still, even LA Unified Superintendent Ramon Cortines derided some of the extravagance, noting that donations should have been sought to fund the RFK project's talking benches commemorating the site's history. Connie Rice, member of the district's School Bond Oversight Committee, noted the megaschools are only three of 131 that the district is building to alleviate overcrowding. RFK "is an amazing facility," she said. "Is it a lot of money? Yes. We didn't like it, but they got it done." Construction costs at LA Unified are the second-highest in the nation something the district blames on skyrocketing material and land prices, rigorous seismic codes and unionized labour. James Sohn, the district's chief facilities executive, said the megaschools were built when global raw material shortages caused costs to skyrocket to an average of $600 per square foot in 2006 and 2007 triple the price from 2002. Costs have since eased to $350 per square foot. On top of that, each project had its own cost drivers. After buildings were demolished at the site of the 2,400-student Roybal school, contaminated soil, a methane gas field and an earthquake fault were discovered. A gas mitigation system cost $17 million. Over 20 years, the project grew to encompass a dance studio with cushioned maple floors, a modern kitchen with a restaurant-quality pizza oven, a 10-acre park and teacher planning rooms between classrooms. The 1,700-student arts school was designed as a landmark, with a stainless steel, postmodernistic tower encircled by a rollercoaster-like swirl, while the RFK site involved 15 years of litigation with historic preservationists and Donald Trump, who wanted to build the world's tallest building there. The wrangling cost $9 million. Methane mitigation cost $33 million and the district paid another $15 million preserving historic features, including a wall of the famed Cocoanut Grove nightclub and turning the Paul Williams-designed coffee shop into a faculty lounge. Sohn said LA Unified has reached the end of its Taj Mahal building spree. "These are definitely the exceptions," he said. "We don't anticipate schools costing hundreds of millions of dollars in the future." C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM the costliest public one in the US F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 2 2 C C T HE VISUAL a nd Performing Arts High School.

PAGE 23

By VERENA DOBNIK Associated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP proposed mosque near ground zero drew hundreds of fever-pitch demonstrators Sunday, with opponents car rying signs associating Islam with blood, supporters shouting, "Say no to racist fear!" and American flags waving on both sides. Police separated the two groups but there were some nose-to-nose confrontations, including a man and a woman screaming at each other across a barricade under a steady rain. Opponents of the plan to build a $100 million, 13-story Islamic center and mosque two blocks from the World Trade Center site appeared to outnumber supporters. Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the USA" blared over loudspeakers as mosque oppo nents chanted, "No mosque, no way!" Signs hoisted by hundreds of protesters standing behind police barricades read "SHARIA" using dripping, blood-red letters to describe Islam's Shariah law. Around the corner, NYPD officers guarded a cordonedoff stretch of Park Place occu pied by the old building that is to become the Islamic center. Steve Ayling, a 40-year-old Brooklyn plumber who took his "SHARIA" sign to a dry spot by an office building, said the people behind the mosque project are "the same people who took down the twin towers." Opponents demand that the mosque be moved farther from the site where nearly 3,000 people were killed on September 11, 2001. Ayling said, "They should put it in the Middle East," and added that he still vividly remembers watching television on 9/11 "and seeing people jump ing from the towers, and ashes falling on my house." On a nearby sidewalk, police chased away a group that unfurled a banner with images of beating, stoning and other torture they said was committed by those who followed Islamic law. The mosque project is being led by Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf and his wife, Daisy Khan, who insist the center will promote moderate Islam. The dispute has sparked a national debate on religious freedom and American values and is becoming an issue on the campaign trail ahead of the midterm elections. Republicans have been critical of President Barack Obama's stance: He has said the Muslims have the right to build the center at the site but has not commented on whether he thinks they should. At a pro-mosque rally staged a block away from opponents' demonstration, several hundred people chanted, "Muslims are welcome here! We say no to racist fear!" Dr Ali Akram, a Brooklyn physician, came with his three sons and an 11-year-old nephew waving an American flag in his hand. He noted that scores of Muslims were among those who died in the towers, and he called those who oppose the mosque "unAmerican." "They teach their children about the freedom of religion in America but they don't practice what they preach," Akram said. Gila Barzvi, whose son, Guy Barzvi, was killed in the towers, stood with mosque opponents, clutching a large photo of her son with both hands. "This is sacred ground and it's where my son was buried," the native Israeli from Queens said. She said the mosque would be "like a knife in our hearts." She was joined by a close friend, Kobi Mor, who flew from San Francisco to partic ipate in the rally. If the mosque gets built, "we will bombard it," Mor said. He would not elaborate but added that he believes the project "will never happen." The Sunday rallies coincided with an annual motorcycle ride by a group that raises money for September 11 first responders. Bikers rolled in from the two other September 11 attack sites, Washington and Shanksville, Pa. The imam behind the project is in the middle of a Mideast trip funded by the US State Department that is intended to promote religious tolerance. He has discussed efforts to combat extremism, but has avoided any comments on the rancor over the planned Islamic center. Rauf told the Al Wasat newspaper in Bahrain that the freedoms enshrined by the US Constitution also reflect true Muslim values. A portion of the interview to be published Monday was seen Sunday by The Associated Press. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 4C, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Rallies over mosque near ground zero get heated PEOPLE participate in the rally. PEOPLE participate in a rally against a proposed mosque and Islamic community center near ground zero in New York on Sunday, August 22, 2010. DEMONSTRATORS in favour of the proposed Islamic center near ground zero make their feelings about t he emotionally charged subject known on Church Avenue in lower Manhattan on Sunday, August 22, 2010. Opponents and supporters of the Islamic cultural center were separated by barricades and police officers as both groups demonstrated near the proposed site. (AP Photos

PAGE 24

By MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press Writer W ASHINGTON (AP Two Iowa farms that recalled more than a half-billion eggs linked to as many as 1,300 cases of salmonella poisoning share suppliers of chickens and feed as well as ties to an Iowa business routinely cited f or violating state and federal law. Food and Drug Administ ration investigators have yet to determine the cause of the salmonella outbreaks at Wright County Egg and Hil-l andale Farms. The FDA investigation could take months, and sources of contamination are often difficultt o find. T he number of illnesses, which can be life-threatening, especially to those with weakened immune systems, is expected to increase. Them ost common symptoms are d iarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever eight to 72 hours of eating a contaminated product. The company Quality Egg s upplies young chickens and f eed to both Wright County Egg and Hillandale Farms. The two share other suppliers, said Jewanna Porter, a spokeswoman for the egg industry, but she did notn ame them. The egg industry has consolidated over recent years, placing fewer, larger busi-n esses in control over much of the nation's egg supply to c onsumers. The salmonella outbreak h as raised questions about federal inspections of eggf arms. The FDA oversees inspections of shell eggs, w hile the Agriculture Department is in charge of inspecting o ther egg products. William D Marler, a Seattle a ttorney for a person who filed suit alleging illness from tainted eggs in a salad at a restaurant in Kenosha, Wis.,s aid Sunday his firm has been retained by two dozen families and was representing a woman who was hospitalized in California. "The history of ignoring the law makes the sickening of 1,300 and the forced recall of 550 million eggs shockingly understandable," Marler said i n an e-mail to The Associated Press. "You have to won d er where the USDA and FDA inspectors were." Businessman Austin "Jack" DeCoster owns Wright County Egg and Quality Egg. Wright County Egg recalled 380 million eggs August 13 after it was linked to more than 1,000 cases of salmonella poisoning. A week later, Hillandale Farms recalled 170 million eggs. DeCoster is no stranger to controversy in his food and farm operations: In 1994, the state of Iowa assessed at least four separate penalties against DeCoster Farms for environmental violations, many of them involving hog waste. In 1997, DeCoster Egg Farms agreed to pay $2 million in fines to settle citations brought in 1996 for health and safety violations at DeCoster's farm in Turner, Maine. The nation's labour secretary at the time, Robert Reich, said conditions were "as dangerous and oppressive as any sweatshop." Reich's successor, Alexis Herman, called the state of the farms "simply atrocious," citing unguarded machinery, electrical hazards, exposure toh armful bacteria and other unsanitary conditions. Designated In 2000, Iowa designated D eCoster a "habitual violator" of environmental regul ations for problems that included hog manure runoff i nto waterways. The label made him subject toi ncreased penalties and pro hibited him from building new farms. In 2002, the federal E qual Employment Opportunity Commission announced a more than $1.5 million settlement of an employment discrimination lawsuit against DeCoster Farms on behalf of Mexican women who reported they were subjected to sexual harassment, including rape, abuse and retaliation by somes upervisory workers at DeCoster's Wright County plants. In 2007, 51 workers were arrested during an immigration raid at six DeCoster egg farms. His farms had been the subject of at least three previous raids. In June 2010, Maine Contract Farming, the successor company to DeCoster Egg Farms, agreed in statec ourt to pay $25,000 in penalties and to make a one-time p ayment of $100,000 to the Maine Department of Agri c ulture over animal cruelty allegations that were spurredb y a hidden-camera investigation by an animal welfare o rganization. A spokeswoman for D eCoster, Hinda Mitchell, said Sunday that she had noc omment on DeCoster's his tory of violations and that DeCoster himself would not be available for an interview. W right County Egg also faces a lawsuit from food distributor Dutch Farms alleging that the company used unauthorized cartons to pack age and sell eggs under its brand without its knowledge. The CDC said last week that investigations by 10 states since April have identified 26 cases where more than onep erson became ill. Preliminary information showed that Wright was the supplier in at least 15 of those cases. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 5C SUPREME COURTGN-1088 Farms recalling eggs share suppliers and other ties Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. BUILDINGS at the egg operations run by Wright County Egg on Highway 69, near Galt, Iowa. (AP Photo

PAGE 25

C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 7C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By LOLITA C BALDOR Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP would take "a complete failure" of the Iraqi security forces for the US to resume combat operations there, the top American commander in Iraq said as the final US fighting forces prepared to leave the country. With a major military milestone in sight, General Ray Odierno said in interviews broadcast Sunday that any resumption of combat duties by American forces is unlikely. "We don't see that happening," Odierno said. The Iraqi security forces have been doing "so well for so long now that we really believe we're beyond that point." President Barack Obama plans a major speech on Iraq after his return to Washington, according to a senior administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity Sunday because details were being finalized. T he speech will come shortly after O bama returns to the White House o n August 29 from his Martha's Vineyard vacation. About 50,000 US troops will remain in the country until the end of 2011 to serve as a training and assistance force, a dramatic drawdown from the peak of more than 170,000 during the surge of American forces in 2007. Obama will face a delicate balancing act in his speech between welcoming signs of progress and bringing an end to the seven-year-old war without prematurely declaring the mission accomplished, as former President George W Bush once did. US involvement in Iraq beyond the end of 2011, Odierno said, probably would involve assisting the Iraqis secure their airspace and borders. While Iraq forces can handle internal security and protect Iraqis, Odierno said he believes military commanders want to have the US involved beyond 2011 to help Iraqis acquire the required equipment, training and technical capabilities. He said Iraq's security forces have matured to the point where they will be ready to shoulder enough of the burden to permit the remaining 50,000 soldiers to go home at the end of next year. If the Iraqis asked that American troops remain in the country after 2011, Odierno said US officials would consider it, but that would bea policy decision made by the president and his national security advisers. Odierno's assessment, while optimistic, also acknowledges the difficult road ahead for the Iraqis as they take control of their own security, even as political divisions threaten the formation of the fledgling democracy. South Carolina GOP Senator Lindsey Graham, who's on the Senate Armed Services Committee, told CBS' "Face the Nation" that he hopes "we will have an enduring relationship of having some military presence in Iraq. I think that would be smart not to let things unwind over the next three or five years." On Thursday, the 4th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division began crossing the border from Iraq into Kuwait, becoming the last combat brigade to leave Iraq. Its exodus, along with that of the approximately 2,000 remaining US combat forces destined to leave in the coming days, fulfills Obama's pledge to end combat operations in Iraq by August 31. In interviews with CBS' "Face the Nation" and CNN's "State of the Union," Odierno said it may take several years before America can d etermine if the war was a success. A strong democratic Iraq will bring stability to the Middle East, and if we see Iraq that's moving toward that, two, three, five years from now, I think we can call our operations a success," he said. Much of that may hinge on whether Iraq's political leaders can overcome ethnic divisions and work toward a more unified government, while also enabling security forces to tamp down a simmering insurgency. Iraq's political parties have been bickering for more than five months since the March parliamentary elections failed to produce a clear winner. They have yet to reach agreements on how to share power or whether to replace embattled Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, and amid the political instability, other economic and governmental problems fester. Fuelling that instability is neighbouring Iran which, Odierno said, continues to fund and train Shiite extremist groups. "They don't want to see Iraq turn into a strong democratic country. They'd rather see it become a weak governmental institution," said Odierno. He added that he is not worried that Iraq will fall back into a military dictatorship, as it was under the reign of Saddam Hussein. American troops unlikely to resume combat duties in Iraq UNITED STATES Army colour guard soldiers hold the American flag and their brigade flag at the casing ceremony for 4th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, the last American combat brigade to serve in Iraq, on Saturday, August 21, 2010, at Camp Virginia, Kuwait. (AP Photo


McCOMBO
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Volume: 106 No.226

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The Tribune

THE PEOPLE’S PAPER — BIGGEST AND BEST

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

Sy
eS
AND REAL ESTATE

THE BAHAMAS’ BIGGEST

Young Bu | iS



two weekend
homicides

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

A YOUNG Deejay was
gunned down and murdered in
what friends say was a dispute
over a woman in the early
hours of Saturday morning.

The killing of 29-year-old
Steven Walkes, also known as
“DJ Box” on Gibbs Corner,
brought the murder count for
2010 to 61. Walkes regularly
deejayed at a club on Gibbs
Corner, known as “Kelsie’s
Club.”

He had stopped at a friend’s
house on Gibbs Corner at

around 2.30am when he was
reportedly met by three men,
one of whom pulled out a
handgun and shot him after an
“exchange of words”, accord-
ing to police. He died on the
scene.

His death came just hours
after another man, 27-year-old
Omar Malakius — also a bud-
ding deejay — was murdered.

Malakius was shot multiple
times about the body in the
area of Blue Hill Road and
Weir Street on Friday evening
at around 10.50pm after what
eye-witnesses told police was

SEE page 11

PLP caucus holds talks on vote
over Baha Mar labour resolution

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Progressive Liberal Party's caucus held talks last night to
come to a consensus on how the party will vote on the govern-
ment's Baha Mar labour resolution when it is brought to the
House next month.

Party officials spoke with The Tribune before the meeting yes-

SEE page 11








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Govt appeals the road
work project injunction

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT has
appealed the injunction grant-
ed by Supreme Court judge
Justice Neville Adderley that
stalled the road work project
on Blue Hill Road and Market
Streets.

Meantime, the Coconut
Grove Business League that
filed the suit against the gov-
ernment over the road project
hope to meet with Minister of
Works Neko Grant to come to
an amicable solution before
they meet again in court on
September 21.

According to Paul Moss, one
of the attorneys representing
the league, a letter was sent to
Mr Grant last week requesting

a meeting. Up to press time he
said the group received no
word from Mr Grant.

Mr Moss said the group
would like government to con-
sider installing a third lane onto
Blue Hill Road and Market
Street.

"The third lane will permit
traffic to go in both directions
and at the same time permit
government to have persons in
the southern end of the island
be able to get to Bay Street — so
everyone will benefit,” said Mr
Moss.

In Justice Adderley's judg-
ment of the case he found that
the Ministry of Works and
Transport never dealt with the
impact road construction and

SEE page 11



CRIME SCENE: A bullet hole circled by police stands out on n this wal on Blue Hill Road and Weir Street following the death of 27-year-old ae
Malakius. Malakius was shot on Friday night and died of his injuries in hospital.

Claims that passport office employee
received bribe are being investigated

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SENIOR officers at
the Passport Office are
investigating claims
made on a local talk
show that an employee
at the passport office
requested and received
a bribe from a mother
applying for passports for her
two children — and later got
himself caught red handed
when he was recorded talk-
ing about it on her cellphone.

Deputy Prime Minister and

Qe



‘AWARE OF

CLAIMS:
Brent Symonette © GEMS radio station

Minister of Foreign
Affairs with responsi-
bility for the Passport
Office, Brent Symon-
ette, told The Tribune
yesterday that he was
aware of the allegations
¥ made on “The Nation”
radio talk show, host-
ed by Lincoln Bain of
Controversy TV fame

on Friday, and had

been advised that the matter
is now being followed up on.
“Tam aware of it. Senior
officers at the Passport Office

SEE page 11

¢ SEE MAIN STORY

Minister: stop making children
of Haitian parentage ‘scapegoats’

: By ALISON LOWE
: Tribune Staff Reporter
: alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN parents who

: are not living up to their
? responsibility to provide the
} support their children need
: to achieve their potential
? must focus on doing this
? rather than making children
: of Haitian parentage “scape-
? goats” in the education sys-
? tem, according to the Minis-
i ter of Education.

Pointing out that there are

children of both Bahamian
: and Haitian parentage who
} are excelling in their schools,

Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister chalked
this up to the supportive envi-
ronment these children’s par-
ents have provided for them
and said that as Minister of
Education one of his priori-
ties is “trying to create an
awareness of the need for
Bahamian parents to pay
attention to the education
needs of our children.”

“We have many success
stories — if you see the high
level of attainment we had
this year it has given me a
problem because I have to

SEE page 16

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NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS? VLEADING NEWSPAPER
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

A NEN ere
Queen’s cousin Lord Brabourne ‘is

houseguest’ of Lyford Cay resident |

THE Queen's cousin Lord
Brabourne, according to the
London press, is now in the
Bahamas and the houseguest of
local fashion designer and Lyford
Cay resident Lady Nuttall

The Daily Mail of London
reports that the pair was seen
food shopping last week at
Goodfellow Farms and talking
with friends as they walked along
the beach near Lady Nuttall's
estate in the posh gated commu-
nity.

The 62-year-old 8th Baron of
Brabourne, heir to the Mount-
batten dynasty, is the first cousin
once removed of the Duke of
Edinburgh.

According to The Daily Mail
Lady Brabourne, 57, his wife of
30 years, is alleged to have called
the staff of their 60-bedroom
Hampshire manor — Broadlands
in Romsey — together to tell
them that her husband was “in
the air” on his way to the
Bahamas and would not be
returning. It is claimed that she
announced that she would now
be running the estate alone.

Activist

Lady Nuttall, known to her
friends as Jeannie, is the widow
of prominent environmental
activist and marine conserva-
tionist Sir Nicholas Nuttall, 3rd
Baronet Nuttall. She designs jew-
ellery and hand beaded kaftans,
dresses and tops under her label
“Jeannie McWeeney”.

The line donates part proceeds
of special tunic sales to the local
environmental advocacy group
BREEFF, founded in 1993 by her
late husband to educate people
about the underwater environ-
ment.

Sir Nicholas married Lady
Nuttall — formerly Eugenie
McWeeney — in 1983, after emi-
grating to the country in 1979.
The couple had one child,
Alexander.

Born in 1933 in Leicestershire,
England, Sir Nicholas was the
only child of Sir Edmund and
Lady Nuttall. At the age of eight
he became the 3rd Baronet Nut-
tall after his father's death in the
Second World War. He moved
to Lyford Cay with his third wife,



Photo/Chris Bott

LORD BRABOURNE and Lady Nuttall leaving Goodfellow Farms in Nassau.

ing a long illness. Lady Nuttall,
now 58, and his children were at
his bedside.

Norton Knatchbull, the for-
mer Lord Romsey, who became
Lord Brabourne on his father’s

©

death in 2005, is the grandson of
Lord Mountabatten of Burma
who used to spend much time in
the Bahamas in his later years.
The Brabourne family own a
Windemere on

home at




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Lord Mountbatten and Lord
Brabourne’s younger brother,
Nicholas, one of twins, were
killed in an IRA attack on their
boat in Ireland in 1979.




i By TANEKA
: THOMPSON
? Tribune Staff
? Reporter

i tthompson@

: tribunemedia.net

i ers should throw their
: support behind "ordi-
i nary" members of soci-
i ety instead of continu-
? ously electing lawyers
: to the halls of Parlia-
i ment, said Bishop Simeon
? Hall.



| Bishop Simeon Hall speaks
out against electing
lawyers to Pau

BAHAMIAN vot- |

The senior pastor of New

i Covenant Baptist Church rea-
? soned that lawyers — many of
? whom profit from the "present
i? culture of criminality" — cannot
? be expected to solve the crime
? problem or change the systems
i? in place which have led to this

"national nightmare."
He added that men and

i? women who have proven
i themselves successful in com-
? munity building and business
? would make better political
i candidates. While several
i lawyers are the architects of
: the nation's foundation, and
i have an indispensable role in
i nation building, Parliament
? needs more contractors, suc-
i cessful entrepreneurs, farmers

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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eee
BISHOP
SIMEON HALL walks of our society to

] and community
builders to take the
Bahamas to the
“promised land,” said
the religious leader.
"It is time for the
country's electorate to
help in reducing the
number of lawyers we
have in our Parliament
and allow more persons
from the ordinary

participate in our
national debate," said Mr Hall
in a statement released yester-
day.

"There exists an urgent and
immediate need for ordinary
persons to represent the com-
mon masses. It cannot be
expected that this national
nightmare of crime will be
(remedied) by the wisdom of
one group. While lawyers, in
the main, do not cause crime,
they are the major beneficia-
ries of the present culture of
criminality and this cannot be
expected to do what is needed
to change things.”

"The Bahamian people, by
and large, have bought into the
lie that only lawyers are best
suited to sit in Parliament,"
said Mr Hall as he called all
political parties to choose ordi-
nary persons with a reputation
of community leadership for
their election tickets.

The country needs fresh
ideas and new perspectives in
the national dialogue, he
added, “if we are to change the
status quo which sees ordinary
persons on the edge of des-
peration”.

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7
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Miranda, former wife of Peter a
ile

Sellers. They later divorced and
he married Bahamian born Jean-
nie McWeeney.

Sir Nicholas was well known
throughout the Bahamas and in
local schools where he gave
many talks on the fragile marine
environment and endangered
fisheries. His agitation was the
driving force behind the intro-
duction of a closed grouper fish-
ing season in the Bahamas.

Sir Nicholas died of cancer in
July 2007 at the age of 73 follow-

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ANU CLIC

Police officer
found dead in
his home

POLICE yesterday
announced the death of an
officer, who was found life-
less in his living room by his
wife.

According to Assistant
Commissioner of Police
Glenn Miller, foul play is not
suspected in the death of 41-
year-old Constable 345
Oneil Ricardo Gibson,
although an autopsy will be
conducted to ascertain the
precise cause of death.

“He was discovered seat-
ed in a ‘La-z-boy’ chair at
8am by his wife. Apparently
he’d been watching TV,”
said ACP Miller.

The senior officer noted
that Constable Gibson gave
25 years of service to the
police force and had most
recently been stationed at
the Central Police Station
downtown.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,

Kt, O.B.E., K.M, K.C.S.G,,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com

— updated daily at 2pm

Talks to test Netanyahu’s will for peace

JERUSALEM — Hawkish Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has the security
credentials and the political strength to pull
off a peace deal with Palestinians now that the
US. has brokered a new start to direct talks.

The big questions is: Does he have the will?
Netanyahu heads to Washington on Sept. 1
for the launch of the first direct negotiations in
nearly two years with the Palestinians. The
White House hopes to forge a deal that has
eluded its predecessors within a year — a for-
midable challenge.

Though Netanyahu has built his political
career in part as an outspoken critic of peace
moves by past Israeli leaders, he has shown
surprising pragmatism in dealing with the mod-
erate Palestinian leadership of the West Bank.
Netanyahu has made a series of concessions
under heavy U.S. pressure — an indication
that he is both pragmatic and susceptible to
arm-twisting from Israel's closest and most
important ally. Shortly after his re-election a
year ago, the prime minister removed dozens of
military checkpoints in the West Bank. The
lifting of the travel restrictions, which Israel
said were a security measure during a previous
decade of violence, helped breathe life into
what has become a miniature economic boom
in the Palestinian territory.

Last year, Netanyahu endorsed the concept
of a Palestinian state, and later imposed a 10-
month slowdown on construction of new homes
in West Bank Jewish settlements. Earlier this
year, he informally imposed a similar, albeit
undeclared, freeze on new Jewish housing
developments in east Jerusalem. Such moves
would have been unthinkable for him a few
years ago. Still there are enormous obstacles to
overcome before any deal can be reached.

Netanyahu says he will not give up east
Jerusalem and has not talked about the possi-
bility of a broad withdrawal from the West
Bank, where more than 200,000 Jewish set-
tlers live among about 2.4 million Palestinians
and Israel maintains military control. Pales-
tinians claim all the West Bank and east
Jerusalem as well as Gaza — areas captured by
Israel in the 1967 Mideast war — for their
future state. The international community
backs the Palestinian demand.

This has made the Palestinians extremely
leery about speaking to the Israeli leader.

Another problem is the roughly 4 million
Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza are
deeply divided. They have different govern-
ments. And Netanyahu's partner for talks,
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, is weak
and only represents about half the Palestinians
in the territories.

Nevertheless, there is some reason for hope
that President Barack Obama's initiative will
fare better than the doomed attempts of past
American leaders. In dealing with the Israeli
public, Netanyahu's credibility as a security
hawk and secure political standing could enable
him to follow in the footsteps of former Prime
Ministers Menachem Begin and Ariel Sharon,

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two other right-wing icons who ultimately made
sweeping gestures for peace.

Begin reached the 1979 historic peace
accord with Egypt, requiring a full withdrawal
from the Sinai Peninsula, while Sharon with-
drew all Israeli troops and settlements from
the Gaza Strip five years ago.

Netanyahu's actions have not always
matched his tough-talking rhetoric. In his pre-
vious term as prime minister in the 1990s, he
withdrew Israeli forces from Hebron and hand-
ed over additional control of the West Bank to
Palestinians. Equally significant, his coalition
government, a grouping dominated by a mix of
nationalistic and hard-line religious parties,
has remained solidly intact despite unhappi-
ness with some of Netanyahu's moves.

Without any serious opposition, Netanyahu
has great freedom in conducting negotiations.
And if any hard-line coalition partners were to
break away, Netanyahu could turn to the mod-
erate opposition to remain in power.

For now, it remains unclear whether
Netanyahu is ready to make bold steps toward
peace. One reason for scepticism is his
endorsement of Palestinian independence last
year included so many caveats that the Pales-
tinians said it was insincere. Likewise, the lim-
ited settlement freeze included several loop-
holes that allowed construction of thousands of
apartments to proceed.

A former army commando and the son of a
renowned hawkish Zionist historian who still
wields heavy influence over him, Netanyahu
has led the fight against previous peace initia-
tives over the past two decades. His opposition
has been rooted in both security grounds and
an ideology stressing the Jewish people's con-
nection to the Holy Land.

Since winning election last year, Netanyahu
has given few signs that he is willing to make
the tough concessions demanded by the Pales-
tinians and the international community: a
withdrawal from occupied lands claimed by
the Palestinians, shared sovereignty of the holy
city of Jerusalem and a solution for the millions
of Palestinians who became refugees as a result
of Israel's creation in 1948. The Palestinians
view him with deep suspicion.

To lure Netanyahu to the negotiating table,
the White House had to agree to his demands
that there be no preconditions and that he not
be bound to pledges made by more dovish
Israeli leaders in the past. In accepting the
White House's invitation, Netanyahu said pro-
tecting Israel's security interests would be his
foremost concern. The Palestinians joined the
talks only after the international Quartet of
Mideast mediators issued an accompanying
statement Friday calling for an agreement "that
ends the occupation which began in 1967."

A senior Palestinian official said the Pales-
tinians had received assurances from the U.S.
that it will remain heavily involved and push for
a solution based on the 1967 borders.

(This article was written by Josef Federman,
an Associated Press writer).



THE TRIBUNE





What is being

proposed for
Cable Beach?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A few years ago I publicly
voiced my displeasure when
the former government
approved the re-routing of
Adelaide Road and gave it to
a private developer to build
million dollar residences.

The public road was closed
off and given to a private
developer to enhance its
development and provide
some employment.

Every time I’m going home
from the Coral Harbour area,
I cuss them for the inconve-
nience I’m caused to get
home. Now it is the Baha Mar
Cable Beach development
and again there is talk of road
re-routing.

New Providence is a very
small island with probably
close to 250,000 persons living
on it. One looks at Paradise
Island and the limited access
available.

There was a time when one
could go to the airport and
travel abroad. Now the air-
port land is Ocean Club
Estates, a gated community.
On the opposite end of Par-
adise Island, access is limited.
One is forced to wonder when
will the limited access end?
Are we in New Providence
going to be forced to live in an
area packed like sardines?
Will Bahamians access to our
country continue to dwindle
for the sake of a few jobs?

There is a much bigger pic-
ture here. If our access is lim-
ited today then twenty years
from now our grandchildren
will have no access. Is the
politician thinking that far?
Or is he doing what I like to
refer to as wanting instant
gratification? Gimme it now!
I want it now!

I sincerely believe we are
setting a dangerous prece-
dent.

A precedent I believe will
come back to haunt us —
maybe not in my lifetime but
certainly for future genera-
tions.

The fact of the matter is I
believe we are being governed
by politicians with tunnel
vision, are looking towards
the next general elections and
could care less about 20-25
years into the future. And
that is so sad.

I note with interest the role
the Bahamas Contractors
Association is playing in the
proposed Baha Mar/Chinese
development. And I believe
that the BCA may be acting
unconstitutionally. The fact
of the matter is that construc-
tion is not legislated by the

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Parliament of the Bahamas.
Therefore, there is no such
thing as a contractor’s licence.
One has only to pay $100 to
the Ministry of Finance and
complete a business licence
form to operate a construc-
tion business and he will be
issued a licence.

Which brings me to the
point: Who if anyone has
authorised the BCA in giving
the impression that they are
the representative for any
legal body — because they are
not.

They are nothing more
than an association that is per-
ceived to be the representa-
tive for the construction
industry.

It is unfair to the contrac-
tor. Baha Mar development
is not obligated to entertain
the BCA. In fact, they ought
to be dealing directly with the
contractor and _ hiring
whomever they wish. Because
as I understand the BCA is
confusing the issue and press-
ing the government to put
into legislation a complicated
set of policies that I believe
will discriminate against the
average contractor. In fact,
I’m shocked that no one in
the business have stood up
and started to ask questions.
There is nothing stopping any
other contractor from form-
ing an association and mak-
ing representation to Baha
Mar or any other develop-
ment. I applaud the govern-
ment for not following up on
the pressuring tactics from the
BCA to legislate the con-
struction industry. I would
like to know who has autho-
rised the BCA to certify con-
tractors? And what does the
BCA certification mean? Is it
that the contractors not certi-
fied by the BCA will not be
allowed to be employed? And
what if some contractors are

never able to meet the certi-
fication standards? Where
does this leave them? This to
me sounds like blatant dis-
crimination. And why is
BTVI being talked about in
the same conversation as the
proposed Baha Mar develop-
ment? The men at BTVI are
learning to lay blocks and
read a house plan. Who is
playing games and why?

With reference to the pro-
posed $2.6 billion project, it
seems as if this proposed pro-
ject was doomed from its
inception. The original part-
ners were run out of town. It
was criticised by the govern-
ment. Not one government
minister was present at the
signing in Miami, or at the
announcement in China. I’ve
also heard that the Chinese
government wants the
Bahamas government to
guarantee the loan for the
development.

One vital question I must
ask is what exactly is being
proposed for Cable Beach?
At one time the development
was $1.4 billion now it’s up to
$2.6 billion.

How will our access be hon-
estly affected in the Cable
Beach area?

Each time you see a story
on TV touting the develop-
ment you see a different pic-
ture. Are we going to contin-
ue to prostitute ourselves for
the left over and say to hell
with future generations? Why
each time a developer sets
foot on Bahamian soil his goal
is to limit access? My parents
and grandparents were born
here. How much more
Bahamian can I get? Why do
Ihave to ask for permission to
set foot in my own country?
There is something wrong
with even the thought! In
closing I say the real men who
fought for this country must
be turning over in their
graves!

PAT STRACHAN
Nassau,
July 30, 2010.

PO Soa A

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Does anyone know precisely what the unemployed Con-
struction Worker count is at this particular time?

For the next phase of Atlantis how many construction work-
ers will be needed?

My suspicion is of the current reasonably trained construction
workers would be totally absorbed over on Paradise Island so in
essence what we all wish there would be total employment in

that sector.
Now let’s stay sane.

bank or hotel employees who were laid-

off a year or so ago cannot be included as they have no experi-

ence in the construction trade.

Can someone answer this?

I suspect Atlantis Phase 4 will immediately solve all the
unemployment in the construction sector.

H HUMES
Nassau,
August 11 ,2010.



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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



172 countries should matter:
Making sure the G20 listen

insight |

WORLD VIEW

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

THE G20 should be the
‘T20’ — trustees not just of
the 20 rich countries that sit
at their meetings but also of
the 172 nations that are
denied a seat at their table.

This powerful statement
has been advanced jointly
by the Secretaries-General
of the Commonwealth and
La Francophonie, two orga-
nizations whose members
are mostly developing states.

The custodians of the
G20’s self-bestowed man-




















date to oversee the world
economy justify their
monopoly of global deci-
sion-making on the fact that
they account for 90 per cent
of global GDP. But, while
that is so, 90 per cent of the
world’s countries are exclud-
ed from their discussions.
As the two Secretaries
General (Kamalesh Sharma,
Commonwealth and Abdou
Diouf, La Francophonie)
have argued: “The simple

fact of globalization dictates
that all countries, the world
over, have been affected by
a tsunami of crises — of
finance and food, of energy
and the environment. Equal-
ly, all have an interest in
what goes into the G20
meeting, and what comes
out of it.”

Almost a year ago (Octo-
ber 2009) in a commentary
entitled ‘Can the Caribbean
depend on the G20?’, I



SIR RONALD SANDERS

made the argument that
“Membership of the G20
has little to do with fair rep-
resentation and much to do

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“Three G20 meetings have
now been held without
representation by the small
states in Africa, Oceania, the
Caribbean, and the Pacific.”



with self interest. Together,
the G20 countries cover
more than eighty-five per
cent of world economic
activity. They can afford to
ignore, or at least pay lip ser-
vice to, the other nations
who account for the remain-
ing fifteen per cent of global
economic activity, even as
Ban-ki-Moon, the UN sec-
retary-General, reminds that
eighty-five per cent of the
world’s countries are not
represented at the G20. In
the end it is power that mat-
ters and power in this
instance is purchasing capac-
ity and market size.”

I argued then that the
Caribbean collectively
should argue for a seat at
the G20 table to advance its
own interests which are
neglected by the Interna-
tional Financial Institutions
that continue to apply tra-
ditional prescriptions and
criteria to Caribbean prob-
lems, many of which are
caused by events in the
world’s richest economies
such as the United States,
Britain, France, Germany
and Japan.

No initiative has been
pursued by the Caribbean
in this regard as far as I
know.

Concern

Three G20 meetings have
now been held without rep-
resentation by the small
states in Africa, Oceania, the
Caribbean, and the Pacific. I
acknowledge that Canada’s
Prime Minister, Stephen
Harper, as Chairman of the
last G20 meeting in Toronto
did have a meeting with the
Secretaries-General of the
Commonwealth and La
Francophonie to get an
understanding of the chal-
lenges faced by the member
countries of their organiza-
tions that were not repre-
sented at the meeting. But,
Prime Minister Harper’s
generous concern for non-
represented countries, while
laudable, is not a substitute
for a structured and pre-
dictable participation in the
G20 deliberations by the
world’s small countries.

The call that inspired the
American Revolution, “No
taxation without represen-
tation”, is relevant today in
the international political
economy. G20 countries
consume the majority of the
world’s resources; they are
its biggest polluters; and
their actions, across a variety
of areas, materially affect
the survival of smaller coun-

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tries. They should at least
listen to the valid problems
of others. The G20 cannot
claim economic leadership
but deny economic respon-
sibility and obligations.

The G20 countries — even
the large developing coun-
tries such as China, India
and Brazil — prefer to limit
the number of nations in
their council, keeping it as
a club for large nations that
now aims to set the eco-
nomic parameters for the
world to fit their purpose. It
also suits them to keep their
relations with small
economies at a bilateral lev-
el where enough can be
done to maintain influence
over them without over-
hauling the global appara-
tus, such as the Internation-
al Financial Institutions and
the World Trade Organiza-
tion in which they are dis-
advantaged.

Given this reality, small
states should seek to insti-
tutionalize the initiative tak-
en by Canadian Prime Min-
ister Stephen Harper to
invite the Secretaries-Gen-
eral of the Commonwealth
and La Francophonie for
consultations prior to the
meeting. They should push
to ensure that the Chair per-
son of every G20 meeting
seeks proposals from the
two Secretaries-General on
behalf of their disenfran-
chised members, and that
such proposals are tabled
and considered by the meet-
ing.

In the case of the Com-
monwealth, 32 of its 54
members are small states
and five of its larger mem-
bers — Australia, Britain,
Canada, India, and South
Africa — are members of the
G20. La Francophonie has
56 member states. Ten coun-
tries are members of both
organizations, which togeth-
er comprise 72 countries
that are not represented at
the G20.

Crisis

Surely, proposals from
two persons representing 72
countries and almost a bil-
lion people should be wel-
come by the G20 in a spirit
of genuine regard not only
for international democra-
cy, but also for dealing with
the plight of small countries
that have been hit particu-
larly hard by the effects of
the international financial
crisis and who are still suf-
fering from its conse-
quences.

The two Secretaries-Gen-
eral have publicly observed
that, for 2010 alone, the
World Bank has indicated
that US$315 billion is
required to meet the gap
between what developing
countries require and what
is currently available if they
are to meet the Millennium
Development Goals set by
all nations. They have pro-
posed that “the G20 should
endorse a serious action
plan to identify innovative
potential sources of non-sov-
ereign financing, embracing
widespread consultation
with those not at their
table.”

If the Caribbean cannot
collectively push for a seat at
the G20 table, the region
should at least join other
small countries in seeking to
institutionalize Prime Min-
ister Harper’s initiative that
the Commonwealth Secre-
tary-General presents our
case to which we should
contribute well researched
and viable arguments.

Reponses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






ma Cancer Society to sponsor

By MIKE LIGHTBOURN

IN these
days of
heightened
security con-
cerns, we’re
all a little
more pro-
tective of
our privacy.
However, if
you’re sell-
ing a home,
you also
know that
showing it is

an absolute must for success- }

fully landing a buyer.

When you know pho- }
tographs of your home will be }
shown in print ads and on the }
website, pack away personal }
valuables such as jewellery, ;
electronics, silverware and }
family heirlooms. You may }
want to remove computers, }
wide-screen televisions, crys- }
tal and valuable collectibles }
from the camera’s eye. There }
is no need to advertise your }
— your home’s fea- }
tures will speak for them- }

belongings

selves.

This is the ideal time to }
take an inventory of any items }
that may be included in the }
sale of your home. Provide :
your Bahamas Real Estate }
Association (BREA) agent }
with a copy of the inventory. |

You can further protect }
your home with motion sen- :

sor lights inside and out.

If you have a security sys- }
tem, make sure it’s active and }
that the service has an emer- }
gency contact number for }

you.

will do the same for them.

There’s likely no need to ;
worry, but why not play it ;

safe?

down.

(Mike Lightbourn is
president of Coldwell
Banker Lightbourn Realty)

Questions or comments?
Email me at

ask@ColdwellBankerBahamas.com



Ask your neighbours to be :
on the lookout for any suspi- ;
cious activity. You, of course, }

Tip of the Week — The old
adage, Better be Safe than }
Sorry, will never let you ;

32-mile kayaking stint

Trip from
Exuma to New
Providence
will take at
least six hours

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Staff Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

A THIRTY-two mile
kayaking stint sponsored by
the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas will take place on
an open body of water from
Ship Channel Cay, Exuma,
to Glemore Beach, New
Providence, all in the good
efforts of raising monies for
the Monty Higgs Kayak for
Cancer Fund.

“In 2004, Monty Higgs,
with Peter Higgs and Dave
Meller set out on a kayaking
trip from George Town,
Exuma to Ship Channel
Cay, Exuma,” read a state-
ment on the event. “This
adventure covered over 120
miles and two weeks of pad-
dling some of the most
beautiful shore lines and
waters in the Bahamas.”

The trio had intended to
kayak to New Providence
from Ship Channel but the
weather built and they were
unable to complete the final
leg.

Participants in this week’s
event — Saturday, August
28 — will attempt to finish
the final leg of Higgs’ and
Miller. But this will depend
largely on the weather and

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PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT: Tim ie (foreground) and Jeff Robertson practising for the 32
mile kayak from Exuma to Nassau that takes place August 28th.

the tide, said Jeff Robert-
son, a participant who told
The Tribune that organizers
have accounted for the pos-
sibility that this could be a
setback going forward.

It will take approximately
six to eight hours to com-
plete.

Weather

Scattered thunderstorms
have been forecast for the
day of the event. But despite
the dismal weather projec-
tion, Andrew Higgs, coordi-
nator of the kayaking event
looks forward to an exciting
time.

Mr Higgs is fundraising

and organizing the event in
honour of his father Monty
Higgs, who died of acute

myeloid leukemia (AML) in
2006.
Monty Higgs won

Olympic medals in different
sailing events.

Jeff Robertson, a partici-
pant in the event said:
“When I found out that it
was to raise monies for can-
cer, I definitely wanted to
participate.”

“I’m just excited and
ready and I’m still raising
money; around $1600 in
total,” Mr Robertson
explained.

In addition to his contri-
bution, cheques have been

mailed to the Cancer Society
by the general public, and
to Mr Higgs who has col-
lected $3,000 in donations
thus far.

Funding

One-hundred per cent of
the funding is going toward
the Cancer Society.

“Kayaking is an exhilarat-
ing experience,” he said.
“You're water-levelled, get-
ting splashed while sitting
inside the vehicle.

“You feel the wind, you
feel the waves, and it’s inter-
esting to see the number of
yachts and scenery as you
paddle by.”

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

OF N=] =) 7 Ba eS




HIP HOP singer
Wyclef Jean, sec-
ond right, greets
Supporters at the
airport in Port-au-

ce

Prince, Haiti, recent- “i _
ly. Jean said he will . ae

try to get the courts : b Pe CO
to overturn a deci- ‘ 4 wi ee

sion disqualifying
him from the Haiti
presidential race.

- =

Ramon Espinosa/AP

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

NOTICE
CORRIDOR 1A

East Street (south), Zion Blvd & Bamboo Blvd.
TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSION
(ROAD PAVEMENT WORKS)

Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles §.A wishes to inform the motoring public that Temporary Road
Closures & traffic diversions will be implemented on sections of East Street, Zion Blyd. & Bamboo
Blvd, to allow Road Pavement Works from Wednesday August 25 to 2010
between the hours of 6pm to bam.

We kindly ask that motorist follow & observe the traffic management scheme and diversions in place.

Tsay nar uD

Motorist travelling in the following directions should divert to the specified route:

EAST STREET (south
+ Motorist travelling northbound should we VALENCIA DRIVE, ANTONIO DRIVE
& VICTORIA BLVD as an alternate and continue on East Street (south) to their
destination.
4 Motorist travelling southbound should we VICTORIA BLVD, ANTONIO DRIVE &
VALENCIA DRIVE as an alternate and continue on East Street (south) to their destination.
ZION BLYD
4 Motorist travelling east or westbound should we ANTONIO DRIVE & VICTORIA
BLVD as an alternate.
BAMBOO BLYD
+ Motorist travelling east or westhound should we THATCH PALM AVE &

SAPODILLA AVE as an alternate and continue on East Street to their destination.

Motorist and pedestrians are advised to avon these areas during peak hours as the final pavement works
on the above mentioned streets will be ongoing.
Your patience throughout this project is greatly appreciated, We sincerely apologize for the
inconvenience and delays caused.

For further information please contact:

desg Cartellong Constrocrienes Civiles 5.4 Ministry of Works & Transpart

‘Office Hours: Mon-Fri Soifem to tcp ‘The Project Execution Unit

(Mew: (247) IET-WUL! 3T2-Peld Hailing: (242) 302-070

Emall; habgnnpomeiph brio artellone open or bEomail; pe bier bese the ee enna s, pire tes



Wyclef Jean:

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

HIP-HOP singer Wyclef
Jean said Sunday that he is
not abandoning his presi-
dential bid just yet and will
try to get the courts to
overturn a decision dis-
qualifying him from the
race, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Speaking to The Associ-
ated Press by telephone
from his home in Croix des
Bouquets, Jean said his
lawyers will file an appeal
with the national electoral
dispute office.

Jean said that he has a
document "which shows
everything is correct" and
that he and his aides "feel
that what is going on here
has everything to do with
Haitian politics."

"They are trying to keep
us out of the race," he said,
referring to Haiti's politi-
cal establishment.

Haiti's elections board
rejected Jean's candidacy
Friday night — presumably
because it decided he had
not met residency require-
ments, although the board
did not cite a specific rea-
son. Under Haitian law, a
presidential candidate must
have lived in the country
for five consecutive years
leading up to the election.

Jean has argued that he
was not required to com-
ply with the law so strictly
because after President
Rene Preval appointed him
as roving ambassador in
2007, he was allowed to
travel and live outside the
country.

The 40-year-old singer
said that he is appealing
the Haitian board's deci-
sion on the basis that it
rejected his candidacy
before the national elec-
toral dispute office, or
BCEN, could issue a final
ruling on the residency
issue.

Jean said that shortly
after he filed his papers to
run in the Nov. 28 election,
two Haitian citizens chal-
lenged his candidacy, say-
ing he had not met the res-
idency requirements.

The BCEN ruled in his
favor, Jean asserted, but
the two citizens appealed
the decision. The case was

Keim Cem ay tY
up my bid for
URSA mara!

still pending when the
Haitian elections board
decided to disqualify Jean,
the singer said.

It was not clear whether
Jean's legal argument
would hold up. Elections
board spokesman Richard-
son Dumel said that as of
Sunday afternoon, he had
not seen any paperwork
from the candidate indi-
cating an appeal, but he
declined to comment fur-
ther.

The board on Friday
accepted 19 candidates and
rejected 15. A spokesman
read out the names of the
approved and rejected can-
didates quickly at a late,
hastily called news confer-
ence.

It would have helped
both candidates and voters
if the council had explained
the basis of their decisions,
said officials from the Joint
Mission of Electoral
Observation, a division of
the Organization of Amer-
ican States and the
Caribbean Community.

"Regarding the 15 can-
didacies that were deemed
ineligible, explications
about the reasons for inval-
idating them would have
contributed to the trans-
parency of the process,"
the OAS wrote in a news
release issued Saturday.

Jean said he had planned
to leave the country this
weekend to see his family
in New Jersey, but has
decided to stay in Haiti to
see the appeal process
through.

Shortly after informing
the AP of his decision Sun-
day morning, Jean
announced it again on his
Twitter feed, saying:
"Tomorrow our Lawyers
(sic) are appealing the
decision of the CEP (the
elections board). We have
met all the requirements
set by the laws. And the
law must be Respected."

Some officials in Haiti
were worried about politi-
cal unrest among Jean sup-
porters after his candidacy
was rejected. But the singer
had asked his fans to stay
calm, and there have been
no significant election-
related protests or violence
over the weekend.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Govt appeals injunction

FROM page one

are looking into it and will
decide what to do probably
tomorrow when I come into
town,” said Mr Symonette
during a phone interview yes-
terday afternoon.

The alleged exposé took
place on Mr Bain’s radio
show when a caller, who iden-
tified herself as Kim, was put
on air by Mr Bain. Kim said
that two months ago she had
gone to the passport office to
get two passports for her chil-
dren, the legitimate fee for
which would be $25 - $50 per
passport.

While being served at the
passport office, which is locat-
ed on Thompson Boulevard,
Kim said the passport officer
who was dealing with her
application told her he “could
assist (her) in getting (her)
passports at an earlier time.”

“He was trying to charge
me $100 for two kids’ pass-
ports I had paid $50 for. I said
to him, ‘“That’s ridiculous. [’m
paying $100 for something I
paid $50 for?’”

Passport office

The woman said that ulti-
mately she decided to hand
over $40 to the passport offi-
cer in the hope of speeding
up the process as she was due
to travel with her children
shortly and passport produc-
tion at the office has been
widely publicised as bogged
down by delays. She said she
put the $40 in an envelope,
which she passed to the offi-
cer.

However, Kim said that
after she left the Passport
Office, she received a “dis-
gusting” voice mail on her
phone, allegedly from the
passport officer. In the mes-
sage, he “rowed her out” for
only placing $40 in the enve-
lope after he asked her for
$100. Kim said that for the
rest of the day her phone
“was blowing up” with calls
from the same number, which
she presumed to be from the
officer.

After going to Mr Bain
with her story, Kim said she
and the radio host decided to

call the officer back. The
radio host then aired a record-
ing of a conversation alleged
to be between the woman and
the officer in which they dis-
cussed the alleged payment.

“You made me look stu-
pid,” said the alleged officer
in the phone conversation,
apparently referring to how
she only put $40 in the enve-
lope. “Now [ve got to pay for
that,” he said, a comment that
the woman said she took to
mean there were other people
involved in the corrupt “fast
tracking” scheme.

The woman then asked him
if he wanted the additional
$60 that she claims he asked
her for, to which he said “No,
that’s okay, take care.”

Kim told Mr Bain that ulti-
mately the two passports she
put the application in for took
two days longer than her
receipt indicated they would
take — two and a half months
in total, she alleged. “I guess I
got swing,” she told Mr Bain.

Mr Symonette said: “It’s
unfortunate not only that
members of the public try to
fast track facilities by paying

whatever kind of fee...that’s
unfortunate....and when offi-
cers who work for govern-
ment accept that kind of mon-
ey.”

Numerous signs displayed
in the Passport Office state
that it is “illegal to tip a Gov-
ernment officer.”

The Deputy Prime Minis-
ter said that while he would
not wish to comment on the
particular instance alleged on
the radio talk show as the
authenticity of the recordings
has yet to be verified, he said
that “appropriate action
should always be taken” to
counter corruption.

“Tt’s probably more wide-
spread than we realise,” he
added.

Asked whether, if the alle-
gations of corruption are
authenticated, the officer
would be subject to dismissal
from his job, Mr Symonette
said he would “not want to
comment on that at the
moment.”

However, he said that at
the least such behaviour
would “certainly warrant dis-
ciplinary action.”

PLP caucus holds talks

FROM page one

terday and said their decision would come
after weighing the social and economic
repercussions voting for or against the res-
olution. The former prime minister, who
gave the green light the $2.6 billion project
when the developers were still tied to their
former partners Harrah's Entertainment,
said top PLPs have gone over the details of
the deal with Baha Mar officials in the
past few days.

"We will be directly influenced by the
complete urgency to do something with
respect to the economy of the Bahamas. It
is an increasingly serious state of affairs
that exists here,” said PLP Leader Perry
Christie.

"The country is desperately in need of
relief in respect to this dire unemploy-
ment situation. The question for us is
examining in detail the implications of
whatever the number of work permits are,
the impact on Bahamian labour, and the
length of time of the work permits," he
added.

While not revealing how the party will
vote on the resolution, Mr Christie restat-
ed his discontent with the government for
putting the burden of a decision meant
for Cabinet onto the shoulders of Parlia-
ment.

He thinks that the large num-
ber of Chinese labour requested
by the Chinese government for
the project may be due to poor
negotiations on the part of the
Ingraham administration.

"Our initial dismay was that
something wasn't done by the
Bahamian government whether
directly or indirectly when nego-
tiating with the Chinese gov-
ernment with respect to the
amount of work permits
(requested).

"Our view is that it is an exec-
utive decision, it is really a deci-
sion to be made by the govern-
ment of the Bahamas. The FNM
is reluctant to make the decision on its
own and wants to drag Parliament into it.
It's the first of its kind where the legisla-
ture is asked to share in the decision mak-
ing of the executive on a decision of grant-
ing work permits."

Leader of Opposition Business in the
House of Assembly Obie Wilchcombe said
the amount of foreign labour the project is
calling for is "politically toxic" adding that
the government wants Parliament to vote
on the matter so it does not take the brunt
of expected public criticism.

"It is politically toxic considering the
fact that tons of Bahamians are out of



URGENCY:
Perry Christie

on vote

work in the construction industry,
not just here in New Providence
but also in Grand Bahama," said
the West End and Bimini MP.
"So to make a decision to allow
for a large number of foreigners
to come in the country” will not
be taken lightly.

In spite of this, the project is
needed to help stimulate the slug-
gish economy, he said.

Yesterday Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell said he will vote in
accordance with the rest of his
party adding that a resolution to
the deal is long overdue.

He blamed Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham for the delay
in getting the project underway arguing
that old financiers Harrah's Entertain-
ment pulled out of the project because of
Mr Ingraham's earlier public statements
on the deal.

Leader of Government Business in the
House Tommy Turnquest told the media
last week that the Baha Mar resolution
will be brought to Parliament on Septem-
ber 8 for a vote.

The investors behind the luxury rede-
velopment of Cable Beach are requesting
work permits for 4,920 Chinese labourers
for the construction of the project.

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FROM page one

? rerouting would have on businesses in the area of Blue Hill Road
? and Market Street, despite it insisting that two studies — costing $3.3
i million — were undertaken before the work began.

i Justice Neville Adderley's judgment states that an affidavit sub-
: mitted by Joy John, of the Ministry's Project Execution Unit, said
i a "professional report" was done by engineers Mott McDonald at
? acost of $2 million, and a further “economic appraisal" done in May
i 2008 at a cost of $1.3 million, prior to the start of the New Provi-
: dence Road Improvement Project.

i However, Justice Adderley found: "In perusing these various
i reports, it is clear to the court that none of them dealt with the
? impact on businesses located along Corridors 11A and 11B (Blue

: Hill Road and Market Street)."

? The Ministry of Works was granted a stay that would allow
i them to continue work on the roads because the injunction should
i: "not take effect immediately due to the stage of the works," accord-
i ing to the Justice Adderley's judgment.

FROM page one

? a confrontation between him
i and another man.

i He was rushed to hospital
i but died of his injuries in the
? operating theatre at around
i 1am. Police said a man wear-
i ing a hooded sweater holding
: a handgun was seen fleeing
i the area after Malakius was
i shot.
i Yesterday Assistant Com-
? missioner of Police in charge
i of crime, Glenn Miller, said

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

DJ shot

that the two incidents “could
be connected” but the police
had no evidence to specifical-
ly prove this at this time.

According to ACP Miller,
no one was in custody up to
press time last evening in con-
nection with either of the
killings.

These latest homicides
bring the murder count to 61
for the year.

Essentially, the waters of

life will always flow as long
as time goes on. Therefore,
accept your challenges in
life, and let them flow with
the tide.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

S
\

FIFTH: Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie

FERGUSON-McKENZIE

VETERAN sprinter
Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie, competing at the
Berlin World Challenge in
Germany yesterday, fin-
ished fifth in the womrn’s
100 metres.

She ran 11.29 seconds.
The race was won by

Jamaican Sherone Simpson

in 11.09. Trinidad &
Tobago’s Kelly-Ann Bap-
tiste was second in 11.14.
Third place went to Vere-
na Sailer of Germany in
11.24 and Blessing Okag-
bare of Nigeria was fourth
in 11.27

NPSA ACTION

THE New Providence
Softball Association will
resume play in their regu-
lar season on Tuesday at
the Banker’s field at the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex with a double
header.

At 7 p.m. the Comman-
do Security Truckers will
play the Mighty mitts and
at 8:30 p.m, the Freedom
Farm Horsemen will meet
the Dorsey Park Boyz.

BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council will hold a very
important meeting on Sat-
urday at 10 a.m. at the
National Cycling Track for
all Churches wishing to
participate in the upcom-
ing Barron Musgrove/Roy
Colebrooke Cycling Clas-
sic, the Rev. Anthony Car-
roll Softball Classic, the
Rev.

Elliston Smith Track and
Classic and the Jason
Saunders Volleyball Clas-
sic.

Plans for all of these
events, scheduled to start
in

September, will be dis-
cussed. Each Church is
asked to send two repre-
sentatives.

NPVA MANAGEMENT
MEETING

THE New Providence
Volleyball Association

(N.P.V.A.) has scheduled a

Management Committee
meeting for Tuesday,
August 24 at the DW
Davis Junior High School
beginning 7p.m.

Association president
DeVince Smith (and not
Joseph ‘Joe Mo’ Smith, as
printed on Saturday), is
asking that all persons
interested, submit their
teams for the upcoming
season.

Each team is requested

to send two representatives
as matters pertaining to the

start of the league will be
discussed.




PAGE 12



§

MONDAY, AUGUST 23,

Jason Rolle

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

N what is now listed as the
longest match played at the
Gym Tennis Club and proba-
bly the longest played locally in
recent time, Kevin Major Jr. out-lasted
Jason Rolle in three gruelling sets to
win the 17th AID Clay Court Champi-
onships' open men's singles title.

The three hours and 25 minutes
match saw the 15-year-old number two
seed prevail with a 4-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (11)
win over the 20-year-old collegian on
Saturday at the clay courts in Winton
Meadows.

"IT don't know if we have official
records of those matches, but from my
recollection, this would be the longest
match, certainly for AID, that I have
witnessed," said tournament director
Mickey Williams, who has seen quite a
number of matches in his time.

Reminiscent of a match he played in
El Salvador on the junior circuit, Major
Jr. said what he went through with Rolle
was exactly what he had to do against
the Mexican.

"I won that match in El Salvador in
the hot sun in about four hours after I
came from 5-1 down in the second set
after losing the first set," Major Jr
reflected.

"In this one, I just kept digging. I
didn't think about the score. I just want-
ed to win. I was prepared to stay out

mm 17TH AID CLAY COURT CHAMPIONSHIPS

Kevin

ts

2010




THRILLER: Kevin Major Jr. (left) outlasts Jason Rolle in three sets. The match at the Gym Club lasted 3 hours and 25 minutes.

there as long as he did and play him
point for point for as long as it.”
Earlier in the summer, Major Jr.
needed just two sets to win the Gatorade
National Open title over Rolle on the

Cy CMe UR TOM ya ai ca

TENT FAls
settle for
TMH Ee

In women’s division, Bahamas
lose 48-0 to Cayman Islands

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER getting off to an impressive start,
the Bahamas had to settle for fourth place at
the North American and Caribbean Rugby
Association's (NACRA) Under-19 men tourna-

ment at the Winton Rugby Pitch.

The tournament, which also featured a
ladies’ division, came to a close on Saturday
with Bermuda carting of the men’s crown with a
18-15 decision over Trinidad & Tobago.

Mexico

The Bahamas had a chance finish to third,
but ended up losing 22-17 to Mexico in the
plate match.

After falling behind when Mexico scored on
a penalty, the Bahamas took the lead minutes

SEE page 14



ROUGH AND TUMBLE: In the ladies division, the Bahamas played for the c
Cayman Islands. Centre Lolitta Hanna got two early tries for aquick 10-0 lead and Lisa Bird and Emily Davies followed
with one each while Katie Bayles had a conversion as Cayman extended their margin to 22-0 at the half.



aor Jr wins
n tennis duel

hard courts at the National Tennis Cen-
ter.

But on Saturday, he said he had to
make a lot of adjustment with the ball
because of the surface. That was one of



=

hampionship, but got blanked 48-0 by the





the reasons why he felt he lost the first
set and trailed 5-1 in the second.

SEE page 14

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 13



SPORTS



CAL RIPKEN/60 WORLD SERIES: FREEDOM FARM CELEBRATION



aluting the champions

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE boys are back from the
Cal Ripken/60 World Series
and they enjoyed every
moment of their celebrations
on Friday night and Saturday.

Although the motorcade
was called off due to their late
arrival on Friday night, family
and friends still showed up at
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport to greet the team
home from Wilson County,
North Carolina where they
clinched the under-12 title with
a 7-1 win over Vasilia, Califor-
nia on Thursday.

What they didn't do on Fri-
day because of the lateness, was
made up on Saturday as the
team had a rally at Freedom
Farm in Yamacraw, took to the
streets on a float parade and
were then feted at the park on
their return.

"It's really hard to fathom
what we've done," said Robert
Cox, an assistant coach on the
team. "When you look at the
magnitude that little Bahamas
competed against in the United
States, it was just awesome, an
awesome experience."

Cox said when Freedom
Farm made the initial trip to
the Southwest Region Tourna-
ment a few weeks ago, they
only looked at it as a tourna-
ment to win. Never in their
wildest dreams, Cox said they
envisioned that they would be
returning home as World Series
champions.

"It was a lot of team work.
The core of this team started
working out in May to go to
Florida in July," he pointed out.
"But this team never wavered.
We gave them the work and
they came to practice and did it.
That's why they are the cham-
pions today."

Manager Greg Burrows Jr.
said when he returned home,
he really just came to the reali-
ty that the team did what no
other team has done before and
that was to win the World
Series title.

"I'm so happy for this team.
I couldn't ask for it to end no
other way," he stated. "Last
year we got eliminated from
the first round in the Southwest
region and so I knew we had
to be more prepared. As I
coach, I learnt from the mis-
takes we made and we were
quite ready for them this year."

Burrows Jr. said the support
from everybody involved in
Freedom Farm was tremen-
dous, especially considering the
short turn around they had in
getting from the regional to the
world series.

He singled out Meressa
Thompson, Andrew Thomp-
son, Pat Moss, Burrows Sr, CJ
McKenzie, Robert Cox and
Jamiko Sands. They all pitched
in to make it all happen.

Now that they have returned
as champions, Burrows Jr. said
the team will have to move up
to the 13-only division next
year, but they still have to
chance to duplicate the feat
next year because they will still
be together.

As the under-12 division,
Burrows Jr. said they will have
to go through a rebuilding
process, but he is confident that
based on the success of the
team, they are convinced that
Freedom Farm will be able to
field another strong team to
travel next year.

Some of the players on hand
for the celebrations, were quite
thrilled about being champions.

"It feels good. We had a
good team and everybody
worked hard," said Chavey
Young. "We all knew that we
had the best team in the
Bahamas. We just had to go out
there and proved that we were



the best team in the tourna-
ment and we did that."

Anthony Villalon, who was
one of the pitchers and key
offensive sparks, said: "It was a
great experience. We had the
hits just when we needed them
and we won. We had a very
good team. I was very pleased
with how we played.”

Myron Johnson, the most
valuable player of the tourna-
ment, noted: "It was very good.
We played a lot of defense and
out bats really came through
for us. I felt good going out
there and pitching. We are the
champions."

Ashton Moxey said: "We
played very good, especially in
the championship game. We
didn't allowed them one hit and
they thought they had us. But
we came out swinging with our
bats and we won it. It was a
good team. We could go any-
where and win."

Wayde Beckford added:
"From our first practice as a
team, we felt that we would go
far and we went there to win
it. We had a pretty good. When
we were down, we never gave
up. We performed to the best
of our abilities and I think we
did a great job."

Jeff '‘Sangy’ Francis, who has
been around helping out Free-
dom Farm from its inception,






said the team just showed what
persistent and hard work will
do for you.

"Greg (Burrows Sr) always
had this vision that we should
play out of the south Florida
area and make our way up into
the World Series," he said.
"I've seen the success of this
coming for a long time because
we had so many players who
went before this crew and so
the program just continued to
grow.

"And most of those players
who left and went off to school
and played some professional
baseball, are coming back home
and are coaching in Freedom
Farm program like Greg Bur-
rows Jr and Jamiko Sands. So
these guys know what it is to
compete because they have
guys coaching them who have
been at that level."

Francis, who still remain
president of the New Provi-
dence Baseball Association,
said it's his hope that whenever
baseball can have a permanent
home for the senior players that
the Bahamas will get the oppor-
tunity to take its national team
off to compete in more of the
major tournaments because
there is so much talent in the
sport in the country.

Pat Moss, another stalwart
at Freedom Farm, said the

PHOTOS: /revene Saunders



team's success speaks volume
for what they are doing.

"We have a pretty good
coaching staff from t-ball up,
so every year, we just continue
to turn over good ball players,"
he stated. "It's all through the
hard and dedication of every-

















































body. But once you achieve
goals like being World Series
champions, we have to main-
tain it.

"So we just have to start get-
ting the guys ready so that they
can compete next year. We will
basically have the same coach-

= BB

es, but we will have a lot of new
players, so we have to groom
them for this caliber of play.
But I'm sure that what this
team has achieved will help
them coming in.”

Burrows Sr., who orches-
trated the Freedom Farm
league, said all they have to do
is improve on what they
achieved.

"We just need to get the 13-
year-old, 14's, 15's and up to
do the same thing,” he stressed.
"The thing is to be able to play
and win at that level. We knew
that we could lay at this level
for a long time. Now we have
proven that we can win up
there.

"So the thing is for us to con-
tinue to win at a higher level
every time we go back. So it
will never stop. The success of
this team only means that we
have just put one piece of the
puzzle together and now we
have to do the rest of it."

Jeff Martinborough, one of
the coaches and sponsors of the
league, said the team did very
well and they worked hard to
perform at the level that they
did.

"The results speak for
itself," he insisted. "A lot of
people who didn't know about
Freedom Farm are now com-
ing out and taking a look at
what we are doing, so that is a
positive step in the right direc-
tion for us. I'm sure that
Bahamians are just as proud of
them as we are of them at Free-
dom Farm.”

And Odessa Black, a proud
parent of two boys playing in
the league, said the team win-
ning the World Series was just
"indescribable.

"When they came through
the doors last night, I went
down on my knees and prayed.
I was in tears," she said. "Some
of them call me mom because I
also help out in the concession
stand.

"But there's nothing like
when you can see the success
as we've seen in their perfor-
mances. I'm really proud of all
of them."

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK Knowles would have preferred for him and
Mardy Fish to be playing in the final of the Western
and Southern Financial Group Masters in Mason,
Cincinnati. But he was just as proud of watching the
American as he came within two games of upsetting
Roger Federer in the men's singles final yesterday.

"That would have been nice, but for us, on the last
day that we played, he had a three hour match with
Andy Murray and obviously with him doing so well in
singles, he used a lot of energy,” Knowles pointed out.
"We lost a tough super tie breaker, so it was a tough
loss for us.

"But I think it was a greater benefit for Mardy to fin-
ish so well in Cincinnati and almost win that title. It's
one of those catch 20/20 where with him having so
much success, you have to be moderate how things
are going. But as a team, we're playing great. It's a good
position to be in with him winning a lot of singles and
we as a team winning a lot of doubles."

In their quarter-final match on Friday night,
Knowles and Fish were eliminated 6-4, 3-6, 12-10 by the
team of Wesley Woodie and Dick Norman. The match
came after Fish pulled off an exhausting 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4)
win over number four seed Murray in the singles quar-
ter's.

After upsetting number nine seed Andy Roddick 6-
4, 7-5 in Saturday's semifinal, Fish took number three
seed Federer to the limit yesterday, losing a hard fought

6-7, 7-6, 6-4 decision in a match that lasted two hours MAGNIFICENT MARDY: Mardy Fish, from Tampa, Fla., hits a forehand at the Cincinnati Masters tennis tourna-
ment, this week. In the final yesterday he played Switzerland’s Roger Federer. Federer won a thrilling encounter

and 40 minutes.



Bahamas
settle for
fourth place

FROM page 12

with a try from Sean Kemp.
The Bahamas went up 10-3
at the half on a touch down
from Ronaldo Young.

But Mexico responded
with a penalty try and they
converted for a 10-10. Mexi-
co eventually went up on a
pair of tries for a 22-10 lead.

The Bahamas then came
back with asecond try from
Kemp and a conversion
from Albury to trim the
lead to the final margin.

Garfield Morrison, an
assistant coach on the
Bahamas’ under-19 team,
said they fell apart and that
caused them to miss out on
keeping the hardware here.

Playing out of pool A, the
Bahamas upset defending
champions Cayman Islands
26-6 in their opener. Howevy-
er, they lost their second
game 12-10 to Bermuda, but
advanced to the third and
fourth place playoff by
virtue of the point spread.

The Cayman Island got
the bottom bowl title with a
15-5 decision over Barbados
to drop all the way to fifth



Al Behrman/AP Photo

In that match, Federer came through with the only
break at 5-4 in the third set and held serve to snap a
seven-month drought in which he haven't been able to
win a tournament.

As the runner-up, Fish will climb in the top 25 in sin-
gles for the first time and will definitely be a competi-
tor to watch at the US Open, the final Grand slam
tournament for the year, that will start next Monday in
Flushing Meadows, New York.

But Knowles said he's not concerned because he
doesn't feel it will take away from their doubles part-
nership.

"He's a great guy. Not too many guys would have
probably hung in there in Cincinnati and played the
doubles after a gruelling match with Andy Murray,"

6-7 (5), 7-6 (1), 6-4.

Knowles stressed. "But he understand that he made a
commitment to which, he honored.

"So I'm certain that we will continue to play for the
rest of the year and like he said in his own submission,
it's a tough situation to be in, winning a lot of matches
in singles and then have to also do so in doubles."

The good thing about the US Open, according to
Knowles, is that Fish will have a a well deserved week's
rest before they get ready for the Grand slam, which
they hope to turn in another great showing.

"We're obviously one of the better teams in doubles
and he's put himself in a position to be one of the
favorites in singles, so it's an exciting time for him and

also an exciting time for us. But tournaments like
Cincinnati are always tougher because you have to
double up, playing singles and doubles in the sane day.
But in the US Open, like the other Grand slams, you
don’t play singles and doubles in the same day. So it
shouldn't be that grueling.”

The 38-year-old Knowles and Fish, unseeded as
they made their return after winning the Legg Mason
Classic in Washington in their last tournament played
a few weeks ago, had to watch as the No.2 seeds Bob
and Mike Bryan played the No.4 seeds Mahesh Bhu-
pathi and Max Mirnyi in the final of the men's doubles
yesterday.

Ml INAUGURAL YOUTH OLYMPICS IN SINGAPORE
Tynia Gaither makes history for Bahamas

By Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson
BAAA’s Public Relations Officer

At 10:49pm Saturday night Nas-
sau time, Grand Bahamian Tynia
Gaither, won the silver medal in the
women’s 200 metres at the inaugural
Youth Olympics in Singapore, making
history for the Bahamas.

Gaither, who will enter grade 12
at Osceola High School in Florida,
ran 23.68 seconds from lane six, having
run 24.09sec to win her first round
heat.

Nigeria’s Florence Ndikura Nwake
won the gold medal with a 23.46sec
run. The bronze medal was captured
by Olivia Expone of the USA in
23.75sec.

Gaither was born on March 16th,
1993 and shares a birthday with leg-
endary sprinter Tommy Robinson,

triple jump great Dr. Timothy Barret
and Hugh Bullard, deceased sprinter
who competed in the 1960 Olympics.

Her mother is Ms. Sabrina Johnson
and she attends Cornerstone Baptist
Church.

Gaither was the school’s Athlete
of The Year as well as Honour Roll
Student for 2008, 2009, and 2010. She
was also selected as an All Bahamian
Scholar Athlete for 2010.

Raquel Williams finished seventh in
the B final of the shot put with a heave
of 11.86 metres. Her series was
11.15m, 11.79m, and 11.86m. She
fouled her final throw. In the first
round Williams finished in fifteenth
place with a throw of 11.59m.

On Monday morning (Nassau
time), Stephen Newbold will partici-
pate in the B final of the 400m hurdles
and Lathone Collie-Minns in the B
final of the triple jump. This will be the
final day for track and field.

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Newbold, who ran 54.40sec in the
first round, will run out of lane three.
His personal best is 52.75sec done in
winning the Under-17 event at the
Carifta Games.

Collie-Minns has a personal best
of 15.35m. He is this year’s Carifta
Games Champion in the Under 17
Division. Collie-Minns jumped 14.66m
in the first round for tenth place.

He will be the fifth jumper in the B
final.

On the first day of the finals on
Saturday, Grand Bahama’s Rashan
Brown clocked a personal best in the
400m of 53.63sec to finish fourth.
Brown’s previous Personal Best was
53.65sec.

Brown was not initially selected for
the Youth Olympics, but when World
Junior champion Shaunae Miller
decided she did not wish to go to Sin-
gapore, Brown was substituted.

The event winner was Robin

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Reynolds of the USA, who clocked a
seasonal best of 52.67sec. High
jumper Ryan Ingraham, who finished
in ninth place in the qualification
round with a 2.07m clearance, jumped
a personal best in the B final with a
height of 2.13m. The second place fin-
isher was George Dimitrou of Roma-
nia who jumped 2.10m.

Julian Munroe of Grand Bahama
clocked 11.04sec in the B final of the
100m for seventh place. Munroe ran
11.53sec in the first round and has a
personal best of 10.97sec.

Carlos Manuel Sampaio Nasci-
mento of Portugal won the B final in
10.79sec. Jamaica’s Odame Skeen won
the A final in a personal best of
10.42sec.

Marva Etienne of CR Walker High
School was scheduled to run in the
Girlls B final but did not show. It is
not known at this time the reason for
Etienne not to show.

place after winning the last
title. Barbados finished in
sixth place.

In the ladies division, the
Bahamas played for the
championship, but got
blanked 48-0 by the Cayman
Islands. Centre Lolitta Han-
na got two early tries for
aquick 10-0 lead and Lisa
Bird and Emily Davies fol-
lowed with one each while
Katie Bayles had a conver-
sion as Cayman extended
their margin to 22-0 at the
half. In the second half,
Bird, Hanna, Kehoe and
Lawrence each came up
with one and Bayles added a
conversion to finish off the
Bahamas.

While the experience
showed in the performance
from the visitors, this was
the first time that the
Bahamas has fielded a
ladies' team and Morrison,
their head coach, said they
have nothing to feel bad
about.

"They played much bet-
ter than they did in their
first game," said Morrison,
reflecting on their 65-0 loss
to the Caribbean Select
team, which comprised of
some of the best layers from
anumber of Caribbean
Islands.

"The ladies are coming
along. They just need to play
more games.”

Canada beat the United
States 6-3 to clinch the
NACRA Under-20 women’s
15s championship.

Kevin Major Je wins marathon tennis duet

FROM page 12

After simply letting the first set "get away" from him, Major Jr.
got twice at 5-3 and 5-5 before they both held at 6-6 to force the first
tie breaker. In the period, Major Jr. took a 5-2 lead and he never
looked back.

Just how Rolle looked a little fatigued in the second, Major Jr.
did the same in the third.

That enabled Rolle to go up a break at 4-2. But after getting his
"second wind,” Major Jr. regrouped and managed to cut the deficit
to 5-4 on a break.

They eventually held serve to the second tie breaker.

In this extra period, neither player gave the other the edge as
they stayed even at 6-6, 7-7, 8-8, 9-9, 10-10 and 11-11. At 12-11,
Major Jr. got a volley return to take the slim lead. Then Rolle hit
a return volley into the net to end the epic match.

"It was close. I had him just like the last time, but in the end, he
came out with it," said Rolle, who remembered playing a long
match like this at Missouri Valley where he attends school. "He
deserved it.”

Rolle, who returned to school on Sunday where he's on a ten-
nis scholarship, said he would have certainly like to get that par-
ticular victory under his belt, considering that he was the defend-
ing champion.

"But he played well. [had him 5-1 in the second set and he came
back to win that. I was serving for the match several times in the
third and he came back. He just out played me today."

It was the second tournament victory for Major Jr. earlier in the
tournament, he had to come from behind as well in a 4-6, 6-0, 6-4
win over Jody Turnquest for the boys under-18 title.

While Rolle lost the big one again to Major Jr., he did team up
with Danielle Thompson as the number two seeds to pull off the
mixed doubles with a 6-1, 6-1 decision over top seeds Derron
Donaldson and Autise Mortimer.

But Rolle and Donaldson, the number two seeds, lost to the top
seeded team of Robbie Isaacs and Jardian Turnquest 6-1, 6-3 in the
men's open doubles.

The two-week long tournament also featured a junior veterans
division for players over the age of 35.

Larry Rolle, unseeded, knocked off number three seed Har-
rington Saunders 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 for the men's vet singles title. The
doubles crown went to the team of Cameron Carey and Gerry
Kanuka.

Williams said the tournament was a success with seven divisions
contested. But he said because of a lack of entries, there was no
ladies division played.

"We did have a mixed doubles competition and all of the top
seeded players pretty much came through to form,” Williams
pointed out. "This match in particular (men's open final), was
the best one for the tournament.

"Obviously people here have not seen this caliber of tennis in
quite a while. So the future certainly looks bright because both of
those players (Major Jr. and Rolle) are still very young and in a few
years they could be the players to watch at the international level."

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



‘Love My Bahamas’
project transforms
downtown Nassau

By DIANE PHILLIPS

THE colours, murals and
sculptures are everywhere -
on sides of buildings, on
facades and under eaves,
adorning stairs - 15 works of
art that are transforming 15
buildings and sites in down-
town Nassau.

It's all part of Nassau's
first full-fledged art in public
places initiative. ‘Love My
Bahamas’, co-sponsored by
the Coca-Cola and Down-
town Nassau Partnership, is
adding a splash of colour to a
city that plays hosts to mil-
lions of visitors a year.

Part of a 15-month long
campaign to bring excite-
ment through art to historic
Nassau, Love My Bahamas
got another step closer to its
official launch this week
when signs were erected
tying sponsors into the pro-
ject and Coca-Cola's tag line
‘Open Happiness’ into the
visual displays.

"This is a life-changing
opportunity for downtown
Nassau,” said Vaughn
Roberts, managing director
of the Downtown Nassau
Partnership (DNP), the
organization charged with
spearheading the revitalisa-
tion of historic Nassau. "I
don't think there has ever
been a more exciting time
for art and this is the first
time we have ever had any-
thing of this magnitude."

For the local bottler of
Coca-Cola, Caribbean Bot-
tling Company, the project
is both corporate and per-
sonal.

Company CEO Walter
Wells recalls downtown Nas-
sau in its heyday.

"Just walking along Bay
Street made you feel alive.
The air was electric. You
could sense the buzz and
excitement," he says. On a
corporate level, supporting
the redevelopment is what
Mr Wells called “one of the
most important initiatives we
have ever undertaken
because of the size, scope
and length of commitment.
The project also reflects the
company's Live Positively
philosophy."



Coca-Cola supported the
competition leading to the
selection of artists and coor-
dinated the workshop bring-
ing together local and inter-
national talent.

"We cannot thank Coca-
Cola enough for its contri-
bution to this massive
undertaking,” said DNP
Co-chairman Charles
Klonaris.

"The art has changed the
cityscape of Nassau and pro-
vided visitors with something





TRANSFORMING DOWNTOWN: ‘Love My Bahamas’ moves closer to its official launch.

new to look at, talk about
and photograph. It has given
rise to a new reason to do a
walking tour. Anything that
adds to the visitor experi-
ence is good for us as a des-

tination and should be cele-
brated."

Participating artists include
Antonius Roberts, John
Beadle, Chantal Bethel, Lil-
lian Blades, John Cox,

Claudette Dean, Tyrone Fer-
guson, Maya Hayuk, Jace
McKinney, Toby Lunn, Kis-
han Munroe, Jolyon Smith,
Allan Wallace, Arjuna Wat-
son and Daniel Weise.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

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Effective July 1st, 2010 The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) has introduced new rates for all consumers in New
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during this transition period will be carried out as follows:

Bills for the service period May 16th to June 15th with the billing date
July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for
payment on July 23rd at the old rates;

Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with
a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated
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July ist, 2010. Meter readings for this service period will take place
at the end of July, and bills will be sent out in mid-August. Payment for
this period will become due on September 6th, 2010.

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will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates.

The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows:

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$10.00

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(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel)

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$11.36 per KVA
8.70 cents per unit
6.20 cents per unit
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PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

Minister: stop making
children of Haitian
parentage ‘scapegoats’

FROM page one

find funding for scholarships
at a level we have never seen
before, even though we put
$7 million for scholarships this
year it is still not enough,
(because) so many of our chil-
dren who are getting parental
support who are doing mag-
nificently in school.

“What I am concerned
about those parents not
spending time with kids whose
kids are engaging in anti-social
conduct and who are not
doing well, and who are using
children of Haitian origin as
scapegoats. We don’t need
that in our country. We need
all of our children to do well,”
said the Minister.

Mr Bannister was speaking
on Island FM’s Parliament
Street radio talk show yester-
day afternoon.

In response to a question
from host Dr Sophia Rolle in
which she asked him to
respond to “some of your
detractors who would be over-
ly concerned about the num-
ber of foreign students in the
Bahamian school system”, Mr
Bannister said: “This issue is
very explosive in The
Bahamas. Extremely explo-
sive.”

He noted how he had been
the subject of “some really
nasty remarks” after The Tri-
bune printed an article in July
in which he was quoted as
acknowledging the impressive
achievements of many Hait-
ian children in Bahamian pub-
lic schools and said that The
Bahamas has an obligation to
ensure every child is educated.

He also commented at that
time on the fact that many
Haitian parents take a very
active interest in their child’s

Mount Moriah

Reker

Roses by

OO

MESSAGE TO PARENTS:
Desmond Bannister

education, which was enabling
them to excel in school.

Speaking yesterday Mr
Bannister said: “Since then
people have attributed all
kinds of remarks to me which
are not true. What I am trying
to create in The Bahamas is
an awareness of the need for
Bahamian parents to pay
attention to the education
needs of our children.

“Too many parents have
dropped the ball in terms of
spending the time that is
required to help their children
achieve success in education
so children of Haitian abstrac-
tion will always be a focus of
discontent because so many
of them are doing well, and
so many of our parents —
many are doing good jobs —
but some who are not doing a
good job are going to utilise
(children of Haitian parent-
age) as scapegoats when the
reality is got to focus on what
our children are doing.”

Illustrating the role that par-

THE TRIBUNE

enting plays in creating the
environment which can allow
a child to excel, Mr Bannister
noted the example of a friend
who home-schooled his son.

“He called me the other day
so gratified we helped his son
take his BGCSEs. His son got
eight A’s in the BGCSEs.
He’s put everything into this
child, so of course that meant
sacrifices at home, that meant
someone staying at home, less
income for the family, but the
child did extremely well.”

Meanwhile, he spoke of two
girls born in the Bahamas,
each of whom has one or
more parents of Haitian ori-
gin, who are both valedictori-
ans at their respective public
high schools in New Provi-
dence.

“They are no more intelli-
gent than any other child who
is in the school, they are enti-
tled to be in our system, but
the reality is that the parents
are spending the time with
them and they are excelling.

Someone called me from
Grand Bahama and someone
called me from Abaco and
they told me the same story
and it’s not that anyone is any
smarter than any of our chil-
dren but it’s time for us to
appreciate children will excel
when they get parental sup-
port.

“Tf you get up in the morn-
ing and don’t pay attention to
your children, don’t make sure
they get breakfast, that they’re
prepared for school, if you
stay out late at night and don’t
help them with their home-
work if you are not putting
time into their lives they are
not going to see what these
children (the ones who do well
at school) see,” said Mr Ban-
nister.

August 28, 2010 | (2 moon = until
Tom Grant Park

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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government enjoyed

a 38 per cent increase in

revenues collected from

the rent/lease of Crown

Land in a three-year

period between 2005 and 2008, an
Inter-American Development Bank
(IDB) report has revealed, although
only 60 per cent of the backlog in sur-
veying this land had been eliminated.
The IDB, in its evaluation of the

THE TRIBUNE

S

AUGUST 23,

iness

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

8% Crown Land revenue increase



=he

BREITLING

* IDB paper discloses just 60% of Crown Land survey backlog cleared, though, as project

Land Use Policy and Administration

Project (LUPAP), which was designed
to enhance the Government’s man-
agement and oversight of Crown and

Government on target

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has done
what was required to ensure
that the Planning and Subdivi-
sions Act can be implemented
on October 1 this year as
planned, the minister of the
environment told Tribune Busi-
ness, adding that claims mil-
lions of dollars’ worth of real
estate developments were being
held up was “wrong”.

Responding to claims that
numerous real estate-based
projects had been delayed
indefinitely because the Town
Planning Committee was not
meeting, or had said it was not
approving any applications, Dr
Earl Deveaux said the true pic-
ture was “totally to the con-
trary”.

He explained that the Town
Planning Committee’s term in
office had expired on July 1,
2010, and that all they had done
was issue a letter to the Direc-
tor of Physical Planning,
Michael Major, requesting that
he not issue any approvals until
they received letters from the
Governor-General confirming
their reappointment.

The Town Planning Com-
mittee, which prior to the July 1
expiration held a meeting on
June 29 or June 30, received its
letters of reappointment on
July 11, 2010, a 10-day gap.

“The claim and belief that
projects were being held up was
wrong,” Dr Deveaux said.

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor



PLANNING ACT: Earl Deveaux

“What the Committee asked
the director to do in a letter
was not to issue any approvals
between July 1-10, until they
received their letters.”

Meanwhile, Dr Deveaux said
his ministry and key govern-
ment agencies had completed
all that was necessary to bring
the Planning and Subdivisions
Act to implementation by the
revised October 1, 2010, dead-
line.

He explained that the three
key tasks had been to complete
an audited list of approved sub-
divisions, so the Bahamian pub-
lic would know which develop-
ments had received full gov-
ernment approval; finish the
Land Use Plan for New Provi-
dence; and develop a “referral
process” to accompany the
Act’s provisions.

“We have done these things,
and will be in a position to meet
the October 1 deadline,” Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.

THE CARICOM body charged with overseeing regional
standards and quality for traded goods and services is this
week conducting a mission to this nation to assess “how the
Bahamas could set up” its own Standards Bureau, the senior
official co-ordinating the visit telling Tribune Business that its
establishment was “closer than it was 10 years ago”.

Alpheus Forbes, deputy permanent secretary in the Ministry
of Labour and Social Development, confirmed that the
Caribbean Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality
(CROSQ) is staging a week-long mission to the Bahamas,
meeting with the private sector, plus the Government and
social organisations, to discuss establishing a Bahamas Bureau

of Standards.

The Bahamas signed up to CROSQ membership under the
former Christie-led PLP administration, but has never created
its own formal Standards Bureau,

as demanded by legislation passed

SEE page 7B

General insurers
mull name change

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas General
Insurance Association (BGIA)
and its members are mulling
whether to change its name to
the Bahamas Insurance Asso-
ciation to better reflect
attendee composition, Tribune
Business can reveal, its chair-
man also telling this newspaper
the organisation was “feeling
fairly positive” it could resolve
its current regulatory concerns.

Timothy Ingraham, who is
also head of Summit Insurance,
declined to comment directly
on an existing motion to change
the BGIA’s name to the
Bahamas Insurance Associa-
tion, telling Tribune Business
he did not want to pre-empt the

Bahamian insurance industry
feeling ‘fairly positive’ it can
resolve differences with
regulator over Act
and regulations

outcome of any discussions.

However, he did confirm:
“We’re working together on
this for sure, and looking to the
future. We’re going to have
something formal in the next
few weeks. We just need to
make sure we’re on the same
track and headed in the right
direction.”

Tribune Business under-
stands that the name changed is
being mulled to better reflect

SEE page 4B

Treasury land, in addition to develop-
ing a parcel-based mapping system of
Bahamian real estate, said it had deliv-

ered a “comprehensive Crown Land
Policy study” that had “formed the
basis for reform of land management

in the Bahamas”.
Noting that the Government had
“shown interest” in establishing a

Manager wins $26,600

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER receivables
manager at SuperClubs Breezes
has been awarded $26,560 after
the Supreme Court found the
Nassau-based all-inclusive
resort wrongfully dismissed her,
the judge ruling it had failed to
prove she had falsified compa-
ny documents as alleged.

Justice Neville Adderley, in
his August 6, 2010, ruling,
detailed how SuperClubs
Breezes watered down its justi-
fication for dismissing Marion

Ex-supervisor found wrongfully dismissed by hotel
chain, in episode related to $300,000 overstatement
of Bahamian all-inclusive resort’s accounts receivables

Morris, going from the Novem-
ber 18, 2004, summary dismissal
letter, which alleged she had
altered invoice dates and made
accounts receivables uncol-
lectible, to its argument of
‘gross negligence’ made at trial.

Although SuperClubs
Breezes, in its defence, argued
that it had carried out an inves-
tigation determining that Ms

Morris was guilty “on a balance
of probability” of the alleged
‘falsification’ conduct, Justice
Adderley noted that it aban-
doned this to argue at trial the
dismissal was justified by ‘gross
negligence’ - something the
resort chain had not even
pleaded.

SEE page 6B

provides foundation for ‘comprehensive land management reform’ in Bahamas
* Crown Land revenues exceed $1.5m, just shy of targeted 40% rise,
as government ‘shows interest’ in creating National Land Agency
* Resource critical for Bahamian economic empowerment, with Government
again urged to clear $300m real property taxes outstanding
* Bahamian surveyors resent stereotype as ‘uncooperative, secretive and old-fashioned’

Bahamian National Land Agency, sim-

SEE page 5B

| The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



Fidelity expects profits return in second half

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas)
expects to return to profitabili-
ty in the 2010 second half after
suffering a more than $900,000
reverse that pushed it into a
$327,247 loss for the six months
to June 30, its chief executive
telling Tribune Business its loan
arrears, as a percentage of the
total portfolio, was some 4.4
percentage points better than
industry average.

Anwer Sunderji said the
BISX-listed bank expected to
benefit from a reduction in loan
loss provisioning, as non-per-
forming loans “levelled off”,
while interest margins were set

* Chief executive says bank’s loan arrears 4.4 percentage points
better than industry, standing at 12.96% compared to 17.36%
* Adds that non-performing percentage better at 8.4%,
compared to commercial bank average of 8.7%
* Bank expects improved interest margins resulting from falling deposit rates, and
lower loan loss provisions, to propel it back into black during final six months of 2010
* Eyeing higher loan book yield, as higher-yielding consumer loans
increase from 18% to 23% of total book during 2010 first half

to benefit from reduced “cost of
funds” as deposit rates in the
Bahamian commercial banking
system came under pressure
from surplus liquidity.

Both developments would
benefit Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) financial perfor-

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mance and help to drag it back
into the black, Mr Sunderji said,
adding that an increased pro-
portion of consumer loans with-
in its overall portfolio would
also aid its loan/asset yield.
“A positive development has
been the change in mix of the

loan book,” Mr Sunderji told
Tribune Business. “We’re now
at 77 per cent/23 per cent [mort-
gages/consumer loans], which
is a change from 82 per cent/18
per cent at the start of the year.

SEE page 2B

BREITLING

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Fidelity expects profits return in second half

FROM page 1B

“We're getting more higher
margin loans on the books, and
our yield from the loan book is
improving.”






The Tribune



Fidelity Bank (Bahamas), the
smallest institution in the
Bahamian commercial banking
sector, has traditionally been a
mortgage lender, but its man-







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agement has pursued - to the
extent it can during a recession
- the strategy of diversifying its
loan book to move more into
consumer loans, which carry
higher interest rates and yield
margins because of their per-
ceived greater risk.

Meanwhile, Mr Sunderji said
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) per-
formance for the 2010 first half,
during which it fell to a
$327,247 net loss for the six
months to June 30, 2010, com-
pared to a $582,089 profit in
the same period last year, was
“consistent with what we
expected”.

Pointing out that Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) was not the
only Bahamian commercial
bank to suffer a net loss dur-
ing its current financial year,
and that the industry’s woes
related directly to a bad econo-
my and high unemployment,
Mr Sunderji said: “We’re seeing
non-performing loans levelling
off. We’re not seeing that prob-
lem get any worse.

“The industry, on total
arrears, was a 17.36 per cent at
the end of June, and our total
arrears was 12.96 per cent,
which is kind of a big differ-
ence of 4.4 percentage points
between ourselves and the
industry, and the industry is get-
ting progressively worse.

“Our total arrears is better,
and the non-performing book is
now stable. It’s at 8.4 per cent

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of our loan book, and the
industry is at about 8.7 per cent.
That is marginally better, but
in any event it’s better.

“Tt’s still bad, but we think
there is light at the end of the
tunnel - it’s not getting worse -
and are actually quite hopeful
that we will have some recovery
through the balance of the
year.”

Pointing to “positive signs”
from the Paradise Island-based
resort industry, where both
Atlantis and Comfort Suites
appeared to have resumed
some hiring, Mr Sunderji told
Tribune Business: “We’re
hopeful our provisioning will
not be as high as it has been,
and hopefully our margins will
increase as the cost of funds is
going down.

“We expect the bottom line
to improve, and both of those
factors will assist us in getting
back into the black. That’s our
expectation.”

The Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) chief executive
explained that interest paid on
deposits throughout the
Bahamian commercial banking
system was likely to continue
declining due to the high sur-
plus liquidity levels, the avail-
able money supply depressing
rates and competition for
depositors.

“Credit demand has col-
lapsed, really, and liquidity in
the banking system has risen

ele!
al Options

very substantially, so we’re sit-
ting on surplus cash and can’t
lay it off,” Mr Sunderji
explained. “So there’s a drag
on the system, and that’s the
reason for some aggressive
lending elsewhere.”

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) saw
this reflected in its net interest
income for the 2010 half year,
which fell by 9.4 per cent to
$3.938 million, compared to
$4.347 million the year before.

While interest income
remained relatively flat, drop-
ping by only $45,000 despite the
non-performing loan rise, inter-
est expense (interest paid on
deposits) rose year-over-year
by more than $360,000.

This reflected the fact that
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
deposit base, which grew by 2.2
per cent or $4.7 million to
$221.755 million, expanded at a
faster rate than the bank’s loan
book, which grew by just over
$1 million - from $200.122 mil-
lion to $201.329 million. The
lack of loan opportunities also
hit Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
non-interest income, such as
fees, which fell from $2.703 mil-
lion to $2.597 million.

“It’s tough to find good loan
prospects in this economy,” Mr
Sunderji explained. “If the
economy does not grow, there
can be limited expansion of
growth in loan books.

“We think there may be
some progress next year, when

ESTABLISHED 1920

,

the economy is expected to
grow by 1 per cent. I think we
may resume growth in the loan
book in a controlled way next
year, dependent on jobs, depen-
dent on Baha Mar, dependent
on foreign direct investment.
There are lots of variables and
unknowns.

“Tt’s too early to say that
we’re cautiously optimistic, but
the worst may be past us, even
though recovery may not be
swift. It’s an economic cycle.”

The Bahamian banking
industry would need time to
work its way through current
non-performing loans, but in
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) case,
Mr Sunderji said: “With the
improvement we’re getting on
the loan book, expectations of
lower costs of funds that will
boost our interest margins, and
expectations of provisions not
increasing, will help us in the
second half.”

On the expenses side, Mr
Sunderji said a more than
$240,000 increase in deprecia-
tion and amortisation was relat-
ed to the bank’s new software
and technology system, which it
had to depreciate.

Salaries and employee bene-
fits, along with general admin-
istrative expenses, were held
relatively flat during the 2010
first half, while loan loss pro-
visions rose by less than
$100,000 year-over-year - grow-
ing from $584,248 to $669,060.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3B



New Straw Market
meeting its targets

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE NEW Straw Market is
ahead of schedule and on bud-
get, a senior architect at Pat
Rahming and Associates told
Tribune Business Thursday.

Collin Johnson, who is also
the project architect for the
Straw Market, said the build-
ing’s roof was currently being
constructed and could be set in
place in another few days. This,
he said, will give the project a
feel of near completion, though
it is not scheduled to be fin-
ished for another year.

“Hopefully it (the roof) will
add a bit of beauty to the pro-
ject,” said Mr Johnson. “Once
the roof gets on it looks as
though we are doing some-
thing.”

According to him, they are
not being too optimistic about
the project, as several days of
rain have slowed work some-
what, forcing the team to work
12 hours per day to catch up.

“There is diligence from all
consultants, and especially the
contractor,” he said.

“They are very adamant

about getting this building done
on time.

“Schedule is August of next
year, even though we have had
a couple of rainy days, but they
have been working feverishly
from 7am to 7pm to try to
make up for those rainy days.”

Despite the weather woes,
Mr Johnson said the project has
not encountered any major
snags during the building, and
they have managed to avoid
any major impediment to Bay
Street vehicular and pedestri-
an traffic.

“We haven’t hampered that
in any way,” he said. “We have
foot traffic and vehicular traffic
as normal.”

The new building is already
beginning to enhance Down-
town Nassau’s appearance,
something he hopes will inspire
other property owners who
have let their buildings deteri-
orate.

Mr Johnson said while he is
not sure what will become of
the existing, tented Straw Mar-
ket site, he hopes it could
become a parking area for the
Pompey Museum, where tour
buses can drop their guests.

However, Tribune Business

Building security
plan aims to
save thousands

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

ARAWAK Homes is saving clients almost $3,000 during the
building of their homes by removing the threat of material lost
through theft, the company’s vice-president of sales told Tribune
Business.

Dena Ingraham said home builders rarely consider the cost of
stolen construction material when cruching the numbers on the
overall cost of a home, but Arawak Homes chairman, Franklyn
Wilson, intimated during the dedication of their newly-refrubished
Blue Hill Road office that theft has become a grave concern.

Ms Ingraham said this concern prompted the company to form
and deploy a dedicated security team to protect properties under
construction in order to minimise the loss of material.

She said the security unit at Arawak Homes was created due to
the increasing level of crime on the island.

“We had to respond to that need baesd on the amount of build-
ing materials we have lost,” she said. “With Arawak Homes you
have that coverage.”

Crime has become a worrisome reality to the business commu-
nity recently. Many business owners lament the costs associated
with protecting a business and its employees from violent crime and
theft.

President of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis
Rolle, said recently that doing business in this country has become
extremely frightening.

Mr Rolle said criminals seem to not fear the law, and Ms Ingra-
ham said thieves will steal the newly installed toilet bowls out of an
under-construction house.

Arawak Homes has its in-house security firm patrol the houses
it builds as a part of the complete package the company offers its
customers.

Ms Ingraham said purchasing the services offered by her com-
pany separately could increase construction costs exponentially. She
added that their packages, which now include security for their
building sites, can save thousands on a build.

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learned that extending the
Pompey Museum into the space
when the vendors move into
their new building is being
mulled by officials.

“Being such a valuable site, I
don’t think they will do that
(create a parking lot),” he said.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

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FROM page 1B

the BGIA’s composition and
attendance at its regular meet-
ings. Apart from brokers and

















































Employment Opportunity
SENIOR SALES & TRAINING MANAGER

A leading jewellery retailer seeks a qualified person to fill the
position of Senior Sales & Training Manager. The successful
candidate will be responsible for ensuring sales and profits are
optimized by customer service and proper maintenance of
inventory controls according to established company procedures.
Suitable candidates must be of integrity, proactive and able to
demonstrate strong leadership skills.

The ideal candidate should possess:

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2. Identify and source complimentary software; data
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release and quality assurance testing.

3. Prepare and maintain accounts for members,
allowing them access to the internet, for the sales of
their crafts, purchasing supplies from vendors locally
globally and payments of fees.

4. Coordinate and organize advertisements and events,
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agents, representatives of
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insurers have been regular
attendees at BGIA meetings in
recent years.

They used to have their own
organisation, the Bahamas
Association of Life and Health
Insurers (BALHI), but that
split apart and effectively
ceased to exist following the
wave of consolidation in that
segment of the Bahamian insur-
ance market over the past
decade.

BALHI was also dealt a
blow when Colina Insurance
Company, the largest life and
health insurer by asset size,
withdrew from it due to its
anger at opposition from com-
petitors to its purchase of Impe-
rial Life Insurance Company.

“For a few years there’s been

an interest on both sides to do
something along these lines,
some interest in moving that
way,” Mr Ingraham said of any
possible name change, pointing
out that in major international
markets the insurance industry
was usually represented by one
organisation or one voice, such
as the Association of British
Insurers (ABI) in the UK.
Meanwhile, the Bahamian
insurance industry appears con-
fident that it can resolve its con-
cerns/differences with sector
regulator, the Insurance Com-
mission of the Bahamas, despite
its August 13, 2010, letter which
demanded that it be shown “a
greater degree of respect” by
Superintendent Lennox
McCartney and his staff.
Warning that the industry
would resist end-September

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General insurers
mull name change

deadlines to comply with the
Insurance Act’s regulations,
amid fears that “excessive cap-
ital requirements” will raise
consumer premium prices and
impair the regional competi-
tiveness of local insurance play-
ers, the BGIA had also pledged
to “bring pressure to bear on
the Government” to amend the
Insurance Act 2005 and its
accompanying regulations,
warning that they “could seri-
ously and adversely damage the
operations of many of the insur-
ers and insurance intermedi-
aries presently doing business in
the country” if they are not
resolved.

However, the temperature
appears to have cooled, Mr
Ingraham telling Tribune Busi-
ness: “We feel fairly positive
following our meeting last
Monday, and are going to meet
with them [the Commission] to
talk over some things in short
order.

“After the meeting, we all
left felling very positive about
the future progress and about
the relationship with the Insur-
ance Commission. We’re look-
ing forward to resolving all
issues raised recently between
us.”

Mr Ingraham acknowledged
that the August 13 letter to Mr
McCartney and minister of
state, Zhivargo Laing, which he
himself signed, appeared to
have concentrated minds and
“brought everyone together”.

However, he said the indus-
try’s meeting with the Insur-
ance Commission might have
been held before the BGIA let-
ter reached the regulator, and
added: “The letter outlines
some of the concerns we have,
but right now we seem to be
on the right track.

“We all have the same goal
in mind, effective regulation of
the industry, and when we sat
down with them we all had the
same goal in mind.”

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
beste le phd (ea T a
on Mondays

YOUR CONWNECTIONeTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

. JENDER- MOTOR
INSURANCE 2010 - 2011
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BIC) is

pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifica-
tion from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00

a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before Tues-
day, September 7th, 2010. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE" and should be de-
liveréed to the attention of:

Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lid
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

www.btcbahamas.com « www.facebook.com/mybtc

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 5B



38 per cent
Crown Land
revenue rise

FROM page 1B

ilar to such bodies operating in
other Caribbean nations, like
Jamaica, the IDB report indi-
cated that the project had pro-
vided the foundation for sev-
eral draft legislative reforms
unveiled by the Ingraham
administration last week - the
Land Ajudication Act, the Reg-
istered Land Bill, and the Law
of Property Bill.

With the Government offi-

cially confirming its belief that
land security, and the posses-
sion of secure and marketable
title, as key to Bahamian eco-
nomic empowerment, the IDB
said: “A Land Ajudication Bill
will permit the certification of
fee simple title to generation
and commonage lands, and also
legislation will be put in place
for a Law of Property Act and a
Registered Land Act.” All of
which the Ingraham adminis-
tration has now done.

Turning to the IDB-financed

HUMAN RESOURCES
ASSISTANT

JOB DESCRIPTION

A professional services firm is looking for a Human
Resources Assistant to assist with the administra-
tion of the day-to-day operations of the human
resources department.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

¢ Health benefit administration (submits and
monitors all claims, new enrollments etc.)

¢ Recruitment assistance ( tracking, screening,
responding to applicants}

* Coordination of training logistics and materials

¢ Update and maintain all training and learning

history for staff.

¢ Update and maintain all employee leave
information (sick leave, vacation, etc.}

¢ Responsible for employee administration
(job letters, employee data, filing etc.)

¢ Assists the Human Resources Manager with

special projects

¢ Performs all other related duties as required.

EDUCATION AND SKILLS

¢ High School Diploma

¢ Human Resources Designation and/or
certificate would be an asset
¢ Minimum: two years human resources

experience

¢ Proficient in Microsoft Office suite
¢ Familiar with Human Resources Information

Systems (HRIS)

« Excellent verbal and written communication

skills.

¢ Excellent organizational and record keeping

skills

Applicants should send their resume and cover

letter via email to

Att: Human Resources Manager

dhrresumes@gmail.com



LUPAP project’s accomplish-
ments, the Bank’s assessment
stated: “The target was for a 40
per cent increase in revenues
generated from Crown Lands
by year three of the project
from a 2005 baseline of $1.1
million.

“According to project man-
agement reports, revenues actu-
ally increased to $1.522 million
up to November 2008. This rep-
resents a 38 per cent increase.”

This was despite the Estate
Management System (EMS),
which was designed help the
Government better manage its
Crown and Treasury lands, only
becoming fully operational by
December 2009. The system
was intended to reduce the time
taken by the Department of
Lands and Surveys to make rec-
ommendations on Crown Land
applications from three months
to one.

“Measures to eliminate the
backlog and speed up the time
taken to execute Crown Land
surveys are required to sustain
the current increase in rev-
enue,” the IDB warned, adding
that the project failed to com-
plete eliminate the backlog in
these surveys.

Noting that only 60 per cent
of the Crown Land survey
backlog was eliminated by the
LUPAP project, the IDB
explained: “One of the reasons
for not achieving this output is
the scarcity of land surveyors
in the Bahamas, as the few
existing land surveyors were
fully employed by private land
developers.

“At the end of the project,
the Department of Lands and
Surveys hired land surveyors
from other Caribbean countries
to carry out the remaining
Crown Land surveys, financed
with local resources. It is
expected that this backlog will
be eliminated in short order.”

The IDB report also urged
the Government to “recoup the
significant amount of real prop-
erty tax arrears” outstanding,
a figure conservatively estimat-
ed as being around $300 mil-
lion.

Calling on the Government
to improve the real property
tax system in the Bahamas, the
IDB report added that the par-
cel-based land information
management system should be
used “as a tool to identify miss-
ing properties and bring them
on to the tax roll, as well as
undertake a general reassess-
ment of all properties on the
islands to establish an equitable
valuation as a reference base”.

Some 15 per cent of Bahami-
an land parcels were thought

Employment Opportunity

STORE MANAGER

A. leading jewellery retailer seeks a qualified person to fill the position of Store

Manager.

The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring sales and

profits are optimized through excellent customer service and proper maintenance
of inventory controls according 1o established company procedures

The ideal candidate should possess:
Integrity. Energetic motivational skills and Assertiveness
A Minimum of 3 years management experience in the jewellery,
watch and luxury goods sectors.
Strong knowbedge of luxury watches, buying merchandising, selling

and repairs.
Ability to manage, train amd motivate staff,

An eve for detail,
Good educational backpround, Professional qualification (GLA or
equivalent) or suitable work expenence would be an asset.

Proven skills in inventory management, merchandising, marketing

and trainime.

Ability to prepare basic accounts, budgets and assist with extemal

audits

Ability to prepare, maintain and update operating manuals and

procedures

Strong knowledge of computers and administration
Ability to prepare matters for senior management and lead

discussions,

We offer excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested persons submit resume to:

ATTN: Recruitment
P.O. Box M-5235
Nassau, Ralwamas
Fax: 242,328.421 1
Or

Email: recnuitmenti@luxuryretaillirn



to have been in dispute when
the LUPAP project was started,
and the IDB recommended
that the unit tasked with man-
aging the new parcel-based sys-
tem for registering Bahamian
land be included, in the long-
term, inside a Bahamian
National Land Agency.

A new project, the bank sug-
gested, was needed to fully
“consolidate the land manage-
ment system in the Bahamas”
over a five to 10-year period,
with one Family Island done at
a time.

“The Parcel Information
Management System (PIMS) is
fully being implemented and
will contribute to the efficient
functioning of the local land
markets in support of private
sector development, including
facilitation of foreign invest-
ment, thereby contributing
directly to the objectives of the
bank’s strategy for the
Bahamas,” the IDB said. “Geo-
graphic profiles of Andros,
Inagua and Abaco represent a
good point of departure for
land use and natural resources
management.”

Dave Turner, secretary of the
Bahamas Association of Land
Surveyors, during a meeting to
evaluate the LUPAP project,
said its team had “incorrectly
typified Bahamian surveyors as
being uncooperative, secretive
and old-fashioned”.

Some 40 per cent of the 20
active Bahamian land survey-
ors used global positioning sys-
tems (GPS) in their work, and
Mr Turner said the Association
and its members wanted to
cooperate with the Surveyor
General, including the manda-
tory registration of surveys.

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to callact packages fram the
Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 725/10

Wilson City Road Construction
Central Abaco, Bahamas

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices = Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC;
3” September, 2010
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals,
For all inquires regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Michael Wilson at telephone 302-1209

UE Ta SA UT

Td MSC RRL

just call 902-2371 today!



CAYSIDE TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

Has an opening for an

ATTORNEY

Applicants must:

- Be a qualified attorney with at least three (3) years experience in the practice
of law relating to financial services in the areas of trust, banking or

Investments.

« Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents
relating to special projects and financial transactions; must be able to
effectively and confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax

advisors on the same,

* Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project, coordinating
its various parts and managing the team associated with the same.

« Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

« Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a sound
understanding of investment and financial transactions.

« Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant supervision,

« Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.

Applications may be delivered by hand and marked
Private and Confidential to:

The Directors

Cayside Trust Company Limited
LYFORD MANOR (WEST BUILDING), LYFORD CAY
NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS
Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 702-2040

Applications must be received by 31st August, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





ee ee

| GRAPHIC ARTIST
(MARKETING DEPARTMENT)

QUALIFICATIONS. REQUIRED
* EDUCATION

0 High Sschincl Deplgrran ple Sh ne rene eis eee oe
a i Degese or Techical School Carifiozie mqvired
LATO By SS Cg and Oban bub ening

© TRAMING & CXPCRICNCE
0 Applicant ecest haa artistic sidis in design and layout
0 Ad Lest Rec’ heer to er WE CAC! pros
© Aue! Gas abe $5 dota chads putea ered in idan Corrie
demang and pubbshing scott

* BRILLS
2 Praga chamiagt kirpourtil, agp ili ante recat der Ector, int,
pares 2, PRA, ugrege, Gookiate anc other paried and qeaphé: materaln.
© Demonstrate ably to cmaie ioohnica! Musrations desks,
Lae a) a a ed ae) Pe Pe ee GA
o Exhibe koowtedge of commerce! art mettocs, technique, preapreors, ane
scanning
O Worl Incnandeniy and oa part of a seam
Gy vcard eh learn ahd area ea
0 fdonGor scheduling and overall job production and curcinats
rbaceiied actheities with other daparinents
O Adhero to aanokent osganizational skis
6 Excellent! ofa) and erilen coninuncaton ahd
o Enthuseorhe with aocelent resiomer senice skis
0 A uest be pide fo mee with (FRR or ni Bipeerwisena
0 Must be familar mith PC 4 Mao operating aysions
6 Gernariiiia anpearliee in Quark Prec 6.0, Maceonedia FeeaHand
WM, Adote Pageblater, Adghe Phoncehop, Aciohe lustrain and
Micenaot PowirPoani

POSITION SUMMIT Y-

Linger the direction of the Aseistant ‘vice Presigent of Operations, the Graphio Artist
wil perform duties in anoordanod wih ailablahed marwling prachons ond pokes
fed sped obruchon a wel ae pertonmn a randy of duties reid in the degn
aed lect of printed arc Qranhic materials, and parton myting and corripden, choles.
fe-the preperation of printing specifications

Parthia repaired

Salary fo commencucate with experience

Danelent baneitts

ere et eRe eB Bowe gi oa
oh Ra bs A sh pte}

NOTICE

ZAIDE HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

ZAIDE HOLDINGS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 18th August, 2010 when the Articles

of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

Manager wins
$26,600 from the
Superclubs Breezes

FROM page 1B

The judge added that Super-
Clubs Breezes “conceded that it
did not prove, on a balance of
probability, that at the time of
the dismissal it reasonable
believed that the plaintiff was
guilty of falsification of compa-
ny documents, which it aban-
doned by the evidence of its
only witness, Mrs Tynes-Miller,
and in its closing submissions, in
favour of the claim of gross
negligence”.

The affair surrounding Ms
Morris’s wrongful dismissal was
the almost $300,000 overstate-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



ment of SuperClubs Breezes
accounts receivables during the
resort’s 2003 financial year, Jus-
tice Adderley noting that seven
months prior to her enforced
departure, the resort chain had
congratulated her department
for collecting 121 per cent of
their outstanding account quo-
ta.

Detailing the case’s factual
background, Justice Adderley
said the accounts receivables
overstatement was only detect-
ed when the SuperClubs resort
chain switched to a new soft-
ware system in mid-2004.

Invoices were issued to tour
operators, in a bid to collect
monies due for guest stays, and
in this case were largely related
to three companies - Apple
Vacations East, Liberty Travel
Go Go Tours, and Internation-
al Lifestyles.

Accounts receivables were
overstated by $299,732, Justice
Adderley noted, with the
resort’s general ledger not bal-
ancing with the receivables
department’s sub-ledger.

The problem went undetect-
ed by SuperClubs Breezes audi-
tors in their review of the 2003
accounts, the judgment noting
that the main impact, apart
from upsetting some tour oper-
ators, was that the Bahamian
resort “had unwittingly
informed its creditors and
shareholders that it had more
assets than it actually had”.

At trial, Ms Morris said there
had been problems with ageing
accounts - those 30 and 90 days
past due - under the previous
software system, and there were

numerous reasons why credits
would not have been posted to
invoices - human error, the wait
for back-up documents, dis-
putes over rates between
SuperClubs Breezes and the
tour operators, and waiting for
Camille Tynes-Miller, the finan-
cial controller, to determine
what adjustments were need-
ed.

Mrs Tynes-Miller, though,
giving evidence on SuperClubs
Breezes’ behalf, denied Ms
Morris’s claim that both she
and the general manager were
aware of outstanding amounts
waiting to be credited.

Giving reasons for his ver-
dict, Justice Adderley said Ms
Morris’s claim had to succeed
because SuperClubs Breezes
had failed to meet the standard
demanded by the Employment
Act, namely that it had “an
honest and reasonable belief
on a balance of probability”
that she had falsified company
document.

Shooting down the argument
by the resort’s attorney, Paula
Adderley, that ‘document fal-
sification’ was “not inconsis-
tent” with gross negligence, the
judge ruled that SuperClubs
Breezes “could not honestly
believe” that she was guilty of
the latter.



“The plaintiff had a team of
three persons in her depart-
ment, all of whom posted items
to the accounts receivable
ledger, the system required a
monthly balancing of her
department’s sub-ledger against
the general ledger checked and
maintained by Mrs Tynes-
Miller, her supervisor,” the
judgment said.

“Mistakes are made in
accounting, and these are
detected and resolved by rec-
onciliations. Indeed, the mis-
takes in this case were so cor-
rected. Each month, Mrs
Tynes-Miller signed off on the
balanced accounts. The fact
that Mrs Tynes-Miller was not
dismissed, and having regard
to the evidence on the account-
ing process given by Mrs Tynes-
Miller and the plaintiff, the
approval of the 2003 accounts
by the auditors, and all the cir-
cumstances lead me to the view
that the defendant did not hon-
estly believe that the errors
made in the accounts were due
to gross negligence by the plain-
tiff.”

Justice Adderley added that
there was no suggestion Ms
Morris was given a chance to
respond to the allegations the
resort chain made against her
prior to dismissal.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, JASON ALEXANDER
MILLER of #8 Christie Avenue, Stapledon Gardens, P.O.
Box N-10470, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to JASON ALEXANDER MORTIMER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
writesuch objections to the Chief Passport Officer, .O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.








PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicishereby advised that!, WAYNE WILLIAMS
RICHARDSON of Cowpen Road,P.0.Box N-9707
Bahamas intend to change my name to WAYNE
WILLIAM MISSICK. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such

The Liquidator ot the said‘company is CST THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT

Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,

Nassau, Bahamas The Registrar General's Department wehes to infor oor valoed customers and
the genetal public that our British Coknial Hilton and Apsley House Olfices will
be relocating to Shirley House, 450 Shorey Street opposite Finca effective

Dated this 23rd day of August, A. D. 2010
Monday, 3* Aupest, 2010.



CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to collect packages from the
Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Ms. Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should ba marked as follows:

Tender No. 732/10

Engine Cleaning &
Maintenance of Surrounding Areas
Blue Hills Power Station

Tendars are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices - Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Deadilina for delivery to BEC:
10th September, 2010
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
of rejact any or all proposals.
For all inquires regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Nir. Andrew Darville al telephone 341-5515



We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

AUDITOR

Responsibility:

* Understand business environment and
trends and client business strategies and
translates this understanding into business
advice for clients

« Uses the relevant internal and external
knowledge data bases to obtain information to
benefit clients and the firm

* Assists in the timely resolution of any
professional, technical or client service
problem or request.

Requirements:

* Candidates should have 1 — 3 years of
practical accounting experience,

* Bachelor’s in Accounting Accounting
Designation (CPA or ACCA)

* Salary or equivalent to commensurate
with experience

Applicants should send their resume and
cover letter via email to

Att: Human Resources Manager
dhrresumes@gmail.com

days after the date of publication of this notice.

Pharmacy Technician

EDUCATION: Two (2) years Pharmacy Technician Training oF
equivalent in experience,

EXPERIENCE: Minimum of 1 year preferred in Phanmacy.

TRAINING: Basic computer skills: Microsoft Word, Excel Auto
mated pharmacy syatems. Sell directed, motivated

LICENSURE: Licensed with the Bahamas Health Professionals
Council,

OTHER: Excellent written and oral communication skills, Excellent
Customer Service Skills,

POSITION SUMMARY: Assit with and interpret physicians
prescriptions and medication orders. Assist pharmacist, be a drug
information resource to patients, medical staff, nursing staff and
ancillary department personnel. Assist with compounding and
diipeniing prescribed medications and other pharmaceuticals foe
patient The resource person te the Coordinator of Pharmacy ward
stock



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 7B





Standards Bureau
moving forward

FROM page 1B

during the previous govern-
ment’s 2002-2007 tenure. This
means that the Standards Act,
while passed into law, has nev-
er been enforced.

“CROSQ has been trying to
see how the Bahamas could set
up its Standards Bureau for
quite some time,” Mr Forbes
told Tribune Business. “We’ve
been looking at various means
and the opportune time that
the Standards Bureau could
take effect.”

He described the role of any
Bahamian Standards Bureau as
“facilitative, not prohibitive”,
anticipating the concerns of
some in the private sector who
are likely to fear such a body
would merely add another lay-
er of bureaucracy and red tape,
thus increasing business costs.

Standards Bureau as an educa-
tional tool, Mr Forbes said it
would ensure that all goods and
services traded and sold locally
met acceptable quality criteria,
thus protecting Bahamian con-
sumers.

It would scrutinise imports
to ensure they met acceptable
standards, and also help
Bahamian goods and services
exporters to meet standard
requirements in overseas coun-
tries.

“T think it is safe to say that it
is closer than it was 10 years
ago,” Mr Forbes told Tribune
Business of the creation of a
Bahamian Standards Bureau.
“It is to facilitate trade and
commerce.”

He added that during its vis-
it, CROSQ would attend the
creation of a Bahamian Nation-

the national body that would
come under the Caribbean’s
Regional Building Standards
Programme and provide advice
to it.

Caribbean

The Bahamas was one of
only two Caribbean countries
still lacking such a sub-com-
mittee, Mr Forbes said, the ini-
tiative’s overall aim being the
creation of uniform safe build-
ing/construction standards in
the Caribbean, and ensure they
complied with international
standards.

CROSQ will tomorrow hold

and oe

a workshop for small and medi-
um-sized Bahamian companies,
followed by a Wednesday sem-
inar on Regional Quality Infra-
structure, dealing with stan-
dards, awareness of them and
various methodologies.

The final two days of the
organisation’s visit will involve
public and private sector con-
sultations to determine “the
general overall view of the
acceptance of a Standards
Bureau in the Bahamas”.

Mr Forbes, though, said the
Government would be guided
by its own agenda and timelines
on the implementation of a
Bahamian Standards Bureau.

Pointing to the benefits of a al Technical Sub-Committee,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JANNEL ALEXANDRA
MILLER of #8 Christie Avenue, Stapledon Gardens, PO.
Box N-10470, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to JANNEL ALEXANDRA MORTIMER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.
45 of 2000),the Dissolution of ARKUS OVERSEAS
LIMITED, has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dis-
solution was the 29th day of June, 2010.
uae.
ane John B. Forester
Liquidator

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

NAD

Nassau Airport
Development Company

Airfield Maintenance Technician

The Nassau Airport Develooment Company (MAD) ib senking
candidates for the pesrhon of dirheld Maintenance Technican

REPORTS TO - Manager, Public Salary

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“W FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
6 BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Ze

COLON TAL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 20 AUGUST 2010
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,520.16 | CHG 0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -45.22 | YTD % -2.89
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

1.60
5.94
8.50
8.77
3.75
1.00
5.00
9.95
10.00

1.90
6.07
8.80
9.74
5.01
1.00
5.59
9.95
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

EPS $
0.250
0.050
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.408
0.781
0.422
0.111
0.627

-0.003
0.168
0.720
0.366
0.000
0.407
0.952
0.156

Div $
0.040
0.200
0.260
0.000
0.090
0.040
0.300
0.040
0.230
0.052
0.110
0.240
0.520
0.350
0.170
0.000
0.240
0.640
0.800

Change Daily Vol.

1.94
1.90
6.07
8.80
9.74
5.01
1.00
5.59
9.95
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)

52wk-Low
99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Security
Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029)
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
BAH29
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Last Sale

Change Interest
0.00 6.95%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Daily Vol. Maturity
20 November 2029
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

99.46
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (OQver-The-Counter Securities)

Bid
5.01

52wk-Low Symbol
5.01 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

30.13
0.45

Last Price
14.00
0.55

Ask © Yield

6.01

EPS $
-2.945
0.001

Div P/E
0.000 N/M
0.000

Daily Wo.

0.40 256.6

CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds

52wk-Low
1.4387
2.8266
1.4842

NAV
1.4825
2.9101
1.5479
2.8216

13.4110
109.3929
100.1833

1.1223
1.0761
1.1198

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund

2.8522 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
101.6693 CFAL Global Bond Fund

93.1998 CFAL Global Equity Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

9.1005 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 1
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 2
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
Protected TIGRS, Series 3
Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

9.5955
10.0000
10.3734
9.3299
9.3648

4.8105 7.5997

YTD%

-9.47%

-1.52%

-3.69%

-6.35%
-1.52%

NAV 3MTH
1.460225
2.902023
1.531489

NAV 6MTH
1.438700
2.906145
1.515417

NAV Date
30-Jun-10
31-Jul-10
13-Aug-10
31-Jul-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
30-Jun-10
31-Jul-10
31-Jul-10
31-Jul-10

Last 12 Months %
6.96%
0.19%
4.29%
-9.40%
3.32%
7.60%
3.56%
5.25%
5.35%
5.53%

3.04%
0.80%
2.71%

0.33%
5.20% 107.570620

105.779543

103.987340
101.725415
2.98%
0.76%
2.67%

2.71% 5.96% 31-Jul-10

3.38% 31-Jul-10

-6.35%
11.83%

31-Jul-10
31-Jul-10

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months.

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

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The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

The Bahamas Electricily Garporation invites
Tenders for the services described below:

Bidders are required to collact packages {ram the
Corporation's Administrative Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Contact: Ms, Charlene Smith at telephone 302-1158

Submissions should bé marked as follows:

Tender No. 733/10
Engine Cleaning &
Maintenance of Surrounding Areas
Clifton Pier Power Station

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Executive Offices = Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
10th September, 2010
no later than 4:00 p.m.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
of reject any or all proposals.
For all inquires regarding the tenders and site visits, contact
Mr. Ronnie Stevenson at telaphone 362-5220

NOTICE
FREEPORT CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE THAT FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
(formerly CIBC (Bahamas) Limited) (hereinafter
referred to as “the Bank”) the Debenture Holder
and Mortgagee under a Debenture and First
Demand Legal Mortgage dated the 21% day
of September, A .D., 2001 and made between
the Bank of the one part and FREEPORT
CONCRETE COMPANY LIMITED (hereinafter
referred to as “the Company’) of the other part
HEREBY GIVES YOU NOTICE that by an
Appointment dated the 14' day of July, 2010
the Bank duly appointed MARIA FERERE of
FT CONSULTANTS LTD. to be the Receiver
and Manager of the properties described in the
schedule hereto.

THE SCHEDULE HEREINBEFORE
REFERRED TO

FIRST, ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing 126.75 acres or thereabouts being
tract “V” situate in the East Airport Zone in the
City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas which said piece parcel or tract of land
has such positions boundaries shape marks and
dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan
attached to an Indenture of Conveyance dated
the 15" day of November 1996 from Freeport
Commercial and Industrial Limited to Freeport
Concrete Company Limited and now of record
at the Registry of Records in the City of Nassau
in volume 8049 at pages 64 to 74 and is thereon
coloured Pink.

SECOND, ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land comprised in and demised by a Lease and
Supply Agreement dated the 1% day of June
2005 and made between Bahama Rock Limited
of the one part and Freeport Concrete Company
Limited of the other part which said piece parcel
or lot of land begins on the southern boundary
of Old Queen’s Highway (50’) and the common
property line of Bahama Cement Co. and
Bahama Rock Ltd, and commencing along said
common line S 22°06'07” a distance of 600.12
feet to a point; thence N 112°06'17” a distance
of 430.04 feet to a point; thence N 202°0617” a
distance of 412.81 feet to a point located on the
southem boundary of Old Queen’s Highway (50’);
thence continuing along said road S 268°34’06”
a distance of 469.06 feet to a point being the
point of beginning (hereinafter referred to as the
“Leasehold Premises”) This tract as described
contains 5.0 acres, as shown on survey for
Freeport Harbour by Low's Surveying Company,
Limited, dated 4” February, 2005.
MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010



INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

AUTISM - a mental condition characterized
by great difficulty in communicating with
others and in using language and abstract
concepts.

— The Concise Oxford Dictionary

ial» 3 a

Who will care for the autistic
members of Bahamian society?

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ost parents fret about
their children’s future
and safety until their off-
spring reach an age
where they are capable
of taking care of themselves. Parents are
usually overcome with questions of “How
are they going to manage when I am
gone?” and “Who will take care of them?”

These concerns are born out of love and
are generally a mark of a good, caring
guardian. Most times these fears never
materialise into reality and a parent can
breathe a sigh of relief once the children
are off to college or have landed good
jobs. But think of how terrifying it is when
the child is unable to care for themselves
even after they are well past their teenage
years.

For too many families of children with
autism, this is a real concern with no solu-
tion on the horizon. Last week I came face
to face with some of these parents’ strug-
gles during an autism awareness recep-
tion hosted by US Ambassador Nicole
Avant in conjunction with local autism
advocacy group REACH.

REACH was formed 12 years ago to
provide a support network for parents of
children with special needs and to increase
awareness about autism. Since its incep-
tion, the group has also raised scholarship
money to train Bahamian teachers to bet-
ter serve autistic children.

EE 4nd
EV gc

The common link in many of those par-
ents’ lives is a deficit in adequate and
affordable local treatment centres for
autistic children and assisted living cen-
tres to house those children when they
become adults.

"Currently there is one autistic primary
school class at Garvin Tynes Primary and
one high school class at Anatol Rodgers
Secondary School. In the country there
are only three therapists that work with the
Ministry of Education and there is a very
long waiting list.

“A lot of the (autistic) kids are growing
older now and we need living assistance
for them — we're not going to be here for-
ever and after parents pass away there's a
concern of who takes care of the kids,”
lamented Kim Gibson, public relations
officer at REACH, and mother to a seven-
year-old autistic son.

Opposition Leader and former Prime
Minister Perry Christie — father of 22-year-
old Adam, who also is autistic — echoed
these sentiments during a recent interview
with The Tribune. He added that while
there have been notable advancements in
special needs care over the last ten years or
so, those improvements pale in compari-
son to what is left undone.

"Every parent's fear is, if they were to
die what would happen to this child? That
is the most common worry for parents of
disabled children.

These parents are so committed to help-
ing disabled children but they know that it
doesn't necessarily mean a sibling or oth-
er relative will be as committed.

"That is where the state has to recognise
that it has not yet put in place the kind of
after care to address issues of that kind.
Any government that comes to power has
a commitment to address the issue but
has to take a balanced approach to the
allocation of resources so we are ensuring
that these special persons get fair treat-
ment.

“Sometimes they are overlooked and
even though there is improvement (over
the last few years) there is still more to be
done,” said Mr Christie.

According to American statistics, about
one in every 110 children are autistic with
boys three times as likely to be autistic
than girls.

Local psychologist and autism specialist
Dr Michelle Major, clinical director of the
Seahorse Institute, thinks the condition is
just as prevalent in the Bahamas.

"I don't think that they're that far off
from what the national statistics are in the
US to be honest with you. When we talk
about the whole spectrum (of autism), I do
feel that we are pretty much in the same
area,” said Dr Major when asked to com-
pare Bahamian rates of autism to those
in the States.

While autism numbers have grown in
the United States over the past few years,
something observers attribute to better
detection methods, many afflicted chil-
dren go undiagnosed here — either due to
a lack of understanding about develop-
mental disorders, a lack of trained doc-
tors who can make a diagnosis, or because
of the negative stigma attached to having

a disability.

Dr Major has diagnosed autistic chil-
dren from Abaco, Eleuthera and Long
Island and says while resources are scarce
in New Providence they are virtually non-
existent in the family islands.

During his travels throughout the coun-
try, Mr Christie said he has encountered
many children with disabilities who were
not receiving proper treatment from state
care facilities. He thinks this is because
government agencies haven’t canvassed
the remote areas to identify persons with
special needs.

"We have to recognise that some groups
have done a lot to help. The Stapleton
School (in New Providence) is tremen-
dous asset to the country but I've always
felt that we haven't done the kind of
national audit that we need to find out in
all of the remote areas of the Bahamas
where these children are.”

Those families who are fighting for
social improvements for their autistic chil-
dren will tell you that there is no simple
solution to the myriad of problems they
face every day: the stigma of having a dif-
ferently abled child, the stares, lack of
understanding, to the strain on their pock-
et books and marriages.

However, the parents, educators and
physicians who tackle these problems head
on and who have organised themselves
without any prompting from any public
agency deserve much more praise and all
the help they can get. They stand as exam-
ples of good parenting, concerned and
productive members of civil society.

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Los Angeles unveils $578m school,

By CHRISTINA HOAG
Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Next month's opening of the
Robert F Kennedy Commu-
nity Schools will be auspicious
for a reason other than its
both storied and infamous his-
tory as the former Ambas-
sador Hotel, where the
Democratic presidential con-
tender was assassinated in
1968.

With an eye-popping price
tag of $578 million, it will
mark the inauguration of the
nation's most expensive pub-
lic school ever.

The K-12 complex to house
4,200 students has raised eye-
brows across the country as
the creme de la creme of "Taj
Mahal" schools, $100 million-
plus campuses boasting both
architectural panache and
deluxe amenities.

"There's no more of the
old, windowless cinderblock
schools of the "70s where kids
felt, 'Oh, back to jail," said
Joe Agron, editor-in-chief of
American School & Univer-
sity, a school construction
journal. "Districts want a
showpiece for the community,
a really impressive environ-
ment for learning."

Not everyone is similarly

enthusiastic.

"New buildings are nice,
but when they're run by the
same people who've given us
a 50 per cent dropout rate,
they're a big waste of taxpay-
er money,” said Ben Austin,
executive director of Parent
Revolution who sits on the
California Board of Educa-
tion. "Parents aren't fooled."

At RFK, the features
include fine art murals and a
marble memorial depicting
the complex's namesake, a
manicured public park, a
state-of-the-art swimming
pool and preservation of
pieces of the original hotel.

Partly by circumstance and
partly by design, the Los
Angeles Unified School Dis-
trict has emerged as the
mogul of Taj Mahals.

The RFK complex follows
on the heels of two other LA
schools among the nation's
costliest — the $377 million
Edward R Roybal Learning
Center, which opened in 2008,
and the $232 million Visual
and Performing Arts High
School that debuted in 2009.

The pricey schools have
come during a sensitive peri-
od for the nation’s second-
largest school system: Nearly
3,000 teachers have been laid
off over the past two years,



THE VISUAL and Performing Arts High School is seen in Los Angeles. Next month's opening of the Robert
F Kennedy Community Schools will be auspicious for a reason other than its both storied and infamous
history as the former Ambassador Hotel, where the Democratic presidential contender was assassinated
in 1968. With an eye-popping price tag of $578 million, it will mark the inauguration of the nation's most
expensive public school ever.

(AP Photo)

nae
MaRsTHON

the academic year and pro-
grammes have been slashed.
The district also faces a $640
million shortfall and some
schools persistently rank
among the nation's lowest
performing.

Los Angeles is not alone,
however, in building big.
Some of the most expensive
schools are found in low-per-
forming districts — New York
City has a $235 million cam-
pus; New Brunswick, N.J.,
opened a $185 million high
school in January.

Nationwide, dozens of
schools have surpassed $100
million with amenities includ-
ing atriums, orchestra-pit
auditoriums, food courts, even
bamboo nooks. The extrava-
gance has led some to won-
der where the line should be
drawn and whether more
money should be spent on
teachers.

"Architects and builders
love this stuff, but there's a
little bit of a lack of discipline
here," said Mary Filardo,
executive director of 21st
Century School Fund in
Washington, DC, which pro-
motes urban school construc-
tion.

Some experts say it's not all

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“Fieporting for The Tribune 1s a

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right to know everyday. I'm

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proud to be a part of the leading

print medium in The Bahamas.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

The Tribune

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT

the costliest public one in the US

FROM page 2C

flourish and that children
learn better in more pleasant
surroundings.

Many schools incorporate
large windows to let in natur-
al light and install energy-sav-
ing equipment, spending
more upfront for reduced bills
later. Cafeterias are getting
fancier, seeking to retain stu-
dents who venture off cam-
pus. Wireless Internet and
other high-tech installations
have become standard.

Some pricey projects have
had political fallout.

After a firestorm over the
$197.5 million Newton North
High School in Massachusetts,
Mayor David Cohen chose
not to seek re-election and
state Treasurer Timothy
Cahill reined in school con-
struction spending.

Now to get state funds for a
new school, districts must
choose among three designs
costing $49 million to $64 mil-
lion. "We had to bring some
sense to this process," Cahill
said.

In Los Angeles, officials say
the new schools were planned
long before the economic
pinch and are funded by $20
billion in voter-approved
bonds that do not affect the
educational budget.

Still, even LA Unified
Superintendent Ramon
Cortines derided some of the
extravagance, noting that
donations should have been

JONES & CO

You'll wonder how you ever got along without it.

sought to fund the RFK pro-
ject's talking benches com-
memorating the site's histo-

ry.

THE VISUAL and Performing Arts High School.

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Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-2188/9



Connie Rice, member of
the district's School Bond
Oversight Committee, noted
the megaschools are only

©2010 CreativeRelations.net



three of 131 that the district is
building to alleviate over-
crowding. RFK "is an amaz-
ing facility,” she said. "Is it a
lot of money? Yes. We did-
n't like it, but they got it
done."

Construction costs at LA
Unified are the second-high-
est in the nation — something
the district blames on sky-
rocketing material and land
prices, rigorous seismic codes
and unionized labour.

James Sohn, the district's
chief facilities executive, said
the megaschools were built
when global raw material
shortages caused costs to sky-
rocket to an average of $600
per square foot in 2006 and
2007 — triple the price from
2002. Costs have since eased
to $350 per square foot.

On top of that, each pro-
ject had its own cost drivers.

After buildings were
demolished at the site of the
2,400-student Roybal school,
contaminated soil, a methane
gas field and an earthquake
fault were discovered. A gas
mitigation system cost $17
million.

Over 20 years, the project
grew to encompass a dance
studio with cushioned maple
floors, a modern kitchen with
a restaurant-quality pizza
oven, a 10-acre park and
teacher planning rooms
between classrooms.

The 1,700-student arts
school was designed as a land-
mark, with a stainless steel,
postmodernistic tower encir-
cled by a rollercoaster-like
swirl, while the RFK site
involved 15 years of litigation
with historic preservationists
and Donald Trump, who
wanted to build the world's
tallest building there. The
wrangling cost $9 million.

Methane mitigation cost
$33 million and the district
paid another $15 million pre-
serving historic features,
including a wall of the famed
Cocoanut Grove nightclub
and turning the Paul
Williams-designed coffee
shop into a faculty lounge.

ston

Sohn said LA Unified has
reached the end of its Taj
Mahal building spree. "These
are definitely the exceptions,”

he said. "We don't anticipate
schools costing hundreds of
millions of dollars in the
future.”

“Pensure that vital
equipment arcund the
hospital are in perfect
working condition
aocording te strict
specifirarionts,
ensuring thar vou and
vour family receive
safe and comfortable
freatment, each and
every time.”

Kody Ferguson

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT





PEOPLE participate in a rally against a proposed mosque and Islamic community center near ground zero
in New York on Sunday, August 22, 2010.



DEMONSTRATORS in favour of the proposed Islamic center near ground zero make their feelings about
the emotionally charged subject known on Church Avenue in lower Manhattan on Sunday, August 22, 2010.
Opponents and supporters of the Islamic cultural center were separated by barricades and police officers
as both groups demonstrated near the proposed site.

(AP Photos)

Rallies over mosque near
round zero get heated

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By VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
proposed mosque near
ground zero drew hundreds
of fever-pitch demonstrators
Sunday, with opponents car-
rying signs associating Islam
with blood, supporters shout-
ing, "Say no to racist fear!"
and American flags waving
on both sides.

Police separated the two
groups but there were some
nose-to-nose confrontations,
including a man and a woman
screaming at each other
across a barricade under a
steady rain.

Opponents of the plan to
build a $100 million, 13-story
Islamic center and mosque
two blocks from the World
Trade Center site appeared
to outnumber supporters.
Bruce Springsteen's "Born in
the USA" blared over loud-
speakers as mosque oppo-
nents chanted, "No mosque,
no way!"

Signs hoisted by hundreds
of protesters standing behind
police barricades read
"SHARIA" — using drip-
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PEOPLE participate in the rally.

describe Islam's Shariah law.
Around the corner, NYPD
officers guarded a cordoned-
off stretch of Park Place occu-
pied by the old building that is
to become the Islamic center.

Steve Ayling, a 40-year-old
Brooklyn plumber who took
his "SHARIA" sign to a dry
spot by an office building, said
the people behind the mosque
project are "the same people
who took down the twin tow-
ers."

Opponents demand that
the mosque be moved farther
from the site where nearly
3,000 people were killed on
September 11, 2001. Ayling
said, "They should put it in
the Middle East," and added
that he still vividly remem-
bers watching television on
9/11 "and seeing people jump-
ing from the towers, and ash-
es falling on my house."

On a nearby sidewalk,
police chased away a group
that unfurled a banner with
images of beating, stoning and
other torture they said was
committed by those who fol-
lowed Islamic law.

The mosque project is
being led by Imam Feisal
Abdul Rauf and his wife,
Daisy Khan, who insist the
center will promote moder-
ate Islam. The dispute has
sparked a national debate on
religious freedom and Amer-
ican values and is becoming
an issue on the campaign trail
ahead of the midterm elec-
tions. Republicans have been
critical of President Barack
Obama's stance: He has said
the Muslims have the right to
build the center at the site but
has not commented on
whether he thinks they
should.

At a pro-mosque rally
staged a block away from
opponents’ demonstration,
several hundred people chant-
ed, "Muslims are welcome
here! We say no to racist
fear!"

Dr Ali Akram, a Brooklyn
physician, came with his three
sons and an 11-year-old



nephew waving an American
flag in his hand. He noted that
scores of Muslims were
among those who died in the
towers, and he called those
who oppose the mosque "un-
American."

"They teach their children
about the freedom of religion
in America — but they don't
practice what they preach,”
Akram said.

Gila Barzvi, whose son,
Guy Barzvi, was killed in the
towers, stood with mosque
opponents, clutching a large
photo of her son with both
hands.

"This is sacred ground and
it's where my son was
buried," the native Israeli
from Queens said. She said
the mosque would be "like a
Knife in our hearts."

She was joined by a close
friend, Kobi Mor, who flew
from San Francisco to partic-
ipate in the rally.

If the mosque gets built,
"we will bombard it," Mor
said. He would not elaborate
but added that he believes the
project "will never happen."

The Sunday rallies coincid-
ed with an annual motorcy-
cle ride by a group that raises
money for September 11 first
responders.

Bikers rolled in from the
two other September 11
attack sites, Washington and
Shanksville, Pa.

The imam behind the pro-
ject is in the middle of a
Mideast trip funded by the
US State Department that is
intended to promote religious
tolerance.

He has discussed efforts to
combat extremism, but has
avoided any comments on the
rancor over the planned
Islamic center.

Rauf told the Al Wasat
newspaper in Bahrain that the
freedoms enshrined by the
US Constitution also reflect
true Muslim values. A por-
tion of the interview — to be
published Monday — was
seen Sunday by The Associ-
ated Press.

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THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Farms recalling
eggs share suppliers
and other ties

By MARY CLARE
JALONICK
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Two Iowa farms that recalled
more than a half-billion eggs
linked to as many as 1,300
cases of salmonella poisoning
share suppliers of chickens
and feed as well as ties to an
Iowa business routinely cited
for violating state and federal
law.

Food and Drug Adminis-
tration investigators have yet
to determine the cause of the
salmonella outbreaks at
Wright County Egg and Hil-
landale Farms. The FDA
investigation could take
months, and sources of cont-
amination are often difficult
to find.

The number of illnesses,
which can be life-threatening,
especially to those with weak-
ened immune systems, is
expected to increase. The
most common symptoms are
diarrhea, abdominal cramps
and fever eight to 72 hours of
eating a contaminated prod-
uct.

The company Quality Ege
supplies young chickens and
feed to both Wright County
Egg and Hillandale Farms.
The two share other suppli-
ers, said Jewanna Porter, a
spokeswoman for the egg
industry, but she did not
name them.

The egg industry has con-
solidated over recent years,
placing fewer, larger busi-
nesses in control over much
of the nation’s egg supply to
consumers.

The salmonella outbreak
has raised questions about
federal inspections of egg
farms. The FDA oversees
inspections of shell eggs,
while the Agriculture Depart-
ment is in charge of inspecting
other egg products.

William D Marler, a Seattle
attorney for a person who
filed suit alleging illness from
tainted eggs in a salad at a
restaurant in Kenosha, Wis.,
said Sunday his firm has been
retained by two dozen fami-
lies and was representing a
woman who was hospitalized
in California.

"The history of ignoring the
law makes the sickening of
1,300 and the forced recall of
550 million eggs shockingly
understandable," Marler said
in an e-mail to The Associat-
ed Press. "You have to won-
der where the USDA and
FDA inspectors were."

Businessman Austin "Jack"
DeCoster owns Wright Coun-
ty Egg and Quality Egg.
Wright County Egg recalled
380 million eggs August 13
after it was linked to more
than 1,000 cases of salmonel-
la poisoning. A week later,
Hillandale Farms recalled 170
million eggs.

DeCoster is no stranger to
controversy in his food and
farm operations:

— In 1994, the state of
Iowa assessed at least four
separate penalties against
DeCoster Farms for environ-
mental violations, many of
them involving hog waste.

— In 1997, DeCoster Egg
Farms agreed to pay $2 mil-
lion in fines to settle citations
brought in 1996 for health
and safety violations at
DeCoster's farm in Turner,
Maine. The nation's labour
secretary at the time, Robert

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986



BUILDINGS at the egg operations run by Wright County Egg on

Highway 69, near Galt, lowa.

Reich, said conditions were
"as dangerous and oppressive
as any sweatshop." Reich's
successor, Alexis Herman,
called the state of the farms
"simply atrocious,” citing
unguarded machinery, elec-
trical hazards, exposure to
harmful bacteria and other
unsanitary conditions.

Designated

— In 2000, Iowa designated
DeCoster a "habitual viola-
tor" of environmental regu-
lations for problems that
included hog manure runoff
into waterways. The label
made him subject to
increased penalties and pro-
hibited him from building
new farms.

— In 2002, the federal
Equal Employment Oppor-
tunity Commission
announced a more than $1.5
million settlement of an
employment discrimination
lawsuit against DeCoster
Farms on behalf of Mexican
women who reported they
were subjected to sexual
harassment, including rape,
abuse and retaliation by some
supervisory workers at
DeCoster's Wright County
plants.

— In 2007, 51 workers were
arrested during an immigra-

? DOCTORS H

(AP Photo)

tion raid at six DeCoster egg
farms. His farms had been the
subject of at least three pre-
vious raids.

— In June 2010, Maine
Contract Farming, the suc-
cessor company to DeCoster
Egg Farms, agreed in state
court to pay $25,000 in penal-
ties and to make a one-time
payment of $100,000 to the
Maine Department of Agri-
culture over animal cruelty
allegations that were spurred
by a hidden-camera investi-
gation by an animal welfare
organization.

A spokeswoman for
DeCoster, Hinda Mitchell,
said Sunday that she had no
comment on DeCoster's his-
tory of violations and that
DeCoster himself would not
be available for an interview.

Wright County Egg also
faces a lawsuit from food dis-
tributor Dutch Farms alleg-
ing that the company used
unauthorized cartons to pack-
age and sell eggs under its
brand without its knowledge.

The CDC said last week
that investigations by 10 states
since April have identified 26
cases where more than one
person became ill.

Preliminary information
showed that Wright was the
supplier in at least 15 of those
cases.

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MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 5C

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2010/PRO/npr/00488
Whereas THOMAS COOPER of Seven Hills, on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
SHIRLEY ELIZABETH COOPER late of Seven Hills in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the

expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2010/PRO/npr/00507

IN THE ESTATE OF WHITELAW REID, late of 73 West Patent Road in the Town of
Bedford Hills, Westchester County, in the State of New York, one of he States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days [rom the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
PETER G. FLETCHER of the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for obtaining the Re-sealing Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to ELIZABETH B REID and WILLIAM B WARREN the Executors, by the State of

New York, Westchester County Surrogate’s Court, on the 1" day of June, 2009.

(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2010/PRO/npr/00508

Whereas SHARON STURRUP, of the City of Freeport, in the Island of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
ROSALEE WELLS a.k.a ROSEALEE WELLS a.k.a ROSALIE WELLS late of the City
of Freeport, in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the

expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

\alb Mio. ‘e wherodelr

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2010/PRO/npr/00509

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE S. BAYOUD, late of the County of Dallas, in the State of
Texas, one of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
CLEMENT T. MAYNARD III of Gibson &company, the G.K. Symonette Building, Shirley
Street, on the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Re-
Sealing Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted to GEORGE S. BAYOUD
JR. the Executor, by the State of Texas, Dallas County Probate Court, on the 8" day of February,

2010.

ae ree Sct eee
(for) REGISTRAR

Aue 2 € e0ib
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

2010/PRO/npr/00510

IN THE ESTATE OF JAMES FOSTER SCHAEFFER S5R., late of 1914 Poplar Avenue,
Apartment 812, in the City of Memphis in the County of Shelby, in the State of Tennessee, one
of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
ADAM D.R. CAFFERATA of Poinciana House, West Mall & Poinciana Drive, in the City of
Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted to AMY MCQUEEN and JAMES F.
SCHAEFFER JR., the Co-Executors, by the State of Tennessee, Fayette County, on the 21" day

of April, 2006.

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and share your story. (for) REGISTRAR


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010, PAGE 7C



INSIGHT



American troops unlikely to
resume combat duties in Iraq

By LOLITA C BALDOR
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — It
would take "a complete failure" of
the Iraqi security forces for the US
to resume combat operations there,
the top American commander in
Iraq said as the final US fighting
forces prepared to leave the country.

With a major military milestone
in sight, General Ray Odierno said
in interviews broadcast Sunday that
any resumption of combat duties by
American forces is unlikely.

"We don't see that happening,”
Odierno said. The Iraqi security
forces have been doing "so well for
so long now that we really believe
we're beyond that point."

President Barack Obama plans a
major speech on Iraq after his return
to Washington, according to a senior
administration official who spoke on
condition of anonymity Sunday
because details were being finalized.
The speech will come shortly after
Obama returns to the White House
on August 29 from his Martha's
Vineyard vacation.

About 50,000 US troops will
remain in the country until the end
of 2011 to serve as a training and
assistance force, a dramatic draw-
down from the peak of more than
170,000 during the surge of Ameri-
can forces in 2007.

Obama will face a delicate bal-
ancing act in his speech between wel-
coming signs of progress and bring-
ing an end to the seven-year-old war
without prematurely declaring the
mission accomplished, as former
President George W Bush once did.

US involvement in Iraq beyond

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UNITED STATES Army colour guard soldiers hold the American flag and their brigade flag at the casing ceremony for 4th Brigade,
2nd Infantry Division, the last American combat brigade to serve in Iraq, on Saturday, August 21, 2010, at Camp Virginia, Kuwait.

the end of 2011, Odierno said, prob-
ably would involve assisting the
Iraqis secure their airspace and bor-
ders.

While Iraq forces can handle inter-
nal security and protect Iraqis,
Odierno said he believes military
commanders want to have the US
involved beyond 2011 to help Iraqis
acquire the required equipment,
training and technical capabilities.

He said Iraq's security forces have
matured to the point where they will
be ready to shoulder enough of the
burden to permit the remaining
50,000 soldiers to go home at the

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end of next year.

If the Iraqis asked that American
troops remain in the country after
2011, Odierno said US officials
would consider it, but that would be
a policy decision made by the presi-
dent and his national security advis-
ers.

Odierno's assessment, while opti-
mistic, also acknowledges the diffi-
cult road ahead for the Iraqis as they
take control of their own security,
even as political divisions threaten
the formation of the fledgling
democracy.

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Lindsey Graham, who's on the Sen-
ate Armed Services Committee, told
CBS' "Face the Nation” that he
hopes "we will have an enduring
relationship of having some military
presence in Iraq.

“T think that would be smart not
to let things unwind over the next
three or five years.”

On Thursday, the 4th Stryker
Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division began
crossing the border from Iraq into
Kuwait, becoming the last combat
brigade to leave Iraq. Its exodus,
along with that of the approximate-
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destined to leave in the coming days,
fulfills Obama's pledge to end com-
bat operations in Iraq by August 31.

In interviews with CBS' "Face the
Nation” and CNN's "State of the
Union," Odierno said it may take
several years before America can
determine if the war was a success.

"A strong democratic Iraq will
bring stability to the Middle East,
and if we see Iraq that’s moving
toward that, two, three, five years
from now, I think we can call our
operations a success,” he said.

Much of that may hinge on
whether Iraq's political leaders can
overcome ethnic divisions and work
toward a more unified government,
while also enabling security forces
to tamp down a simmering insur-
gency.

Iraq's political parties have been
bickering for more than five months
since the March parliamentary elec-
tions failed to produce a clear win-
ner. They have yet to reach agree-
ments on how to share power or
whether to replace embattled Shi-
ite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki,
and amid the political instability,
other economic and governmental
problems fester.

Fuelling that instability is neigh-
bouring Iran which, Odierno said,
continues to fund and train Shiite
extremist groups.

"They don't want to see Iraq turn
into a strong democratic country.
They'd rather see it become a weak
governmental institution,” said
Odierno.

He added that he is not worried
that Iraq will fall back into a military
dictatorship, as it was under the reign
of Saddam Hussein.

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SAN SALVADOR
High: 82" 2370
Lose: Ta F/G" G

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MAYAGUAMA
High: 92" FGI" C.
Leer TH" Ae

CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
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RAGRED ISLAND
High: 92" 3a" C
Loran: PE" R24" G

GREAT IMAGUA
Hiph: 95" F/25"C
Lows PEC Gan

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Toke

Tuesciony
ANDADS Toca
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CET GLAS Toms

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CROOKED ISLAND Toca,
Tustadlin,
To
Tumi

FREEPOET Tray

ELEUTSERA

GEEAT AGL
Lie Laan
MATABLLN A
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SAN SALE R
BAGGED Lam

Love: 79" F265" C

oil,

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£-16 knots

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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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