Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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4 jevin' it |

any The Tnibun

SUNN WITH |
fx FSTORM |
one : ‘ ad



BAHAMAS EDITION

www. tribune242. com





‘Volume: 106 No.218

Minister on warpath
Over website's lies

Maynard gathering
evidence for possible |
police investigation



By TANEKA : lawsuit. According to
THOMPSON the minister, he has
Tribune Staff gathered sufficient evi-
Reporter dence that could be
tthompson@ turned over the police

tribunemedia.net

CULTURE Minister
Charles Maynard may
soon file a criminal
complaint against the
operators of an online
blog which. has posted

"scandalous lies" about

blog's content.

"We have proof that
it's done by Bahamians
locally this is not one of
these things’ where
police can say they,
don't know who they

“ EVIDENCE’:
him. Charles Maynard are. And I've gotten

advice that some of the
things they've done are.criminal
— it's more than allegations. My
understanding is that it is crim-

SEE page 15

Mr Maynard told
The Tribune yesterday that he
has been advised that some of
the content posted,on the web-
site may warrant criminal
charges, instead of a civil libel

Man turns himself in hours
after relative’s stabbing death

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A FAMILY member, ‘alleged to be responsible for-the stabbing
death of a 21-year-old male relative, turned himself in to police yes-
terday evening — hours after the incident.

Police report the man is now assisting them with their investi-

‘SEE page 15






KING DEALS
















to launch a criminal...
investigation into the.’

_FRIDAY, AUGUST JS 2010

By MEGAN REYNOLDS.
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net






in Norman’s Cay, Exuma.

‘Wednesday.

ee page 15



-AN INVESTIGATION is under |,
way to determine how four pilot |
whales became washed up on a beach . |,

The male and female adults, around
12 to 14ft long, and two juveniles, each: |
around 8ft long, were found by Nigel, &
Bower and Mona’ Wiethuchter as they: f
were passing by in a boat, taking two
guests from Ship Channel Cay to
MacDuff’s at Norman’s Cay Beach
_Club for dinner at around 4.30pm on








WASHED ASHORE:




Police give travel agent chance to
show she acted in good faith

_ By ALISON LOWE
. Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

A TRAVEL agént who is
said.to have taken thousands
of dollars from would+be cus-
tomers seeking to.purchase
airline tickets, only for them
to find their tickets and pack-
ages were not paid for, is
being given an opportunity to
prove she acted in good faith
to avoid criminal charges.

The Tribune understands
that all four of those who
complained to the police
about handing over money to
the agent, only to find that
their tickets did not exist
claimed they had for “many
years” dealt with the same
travel agency with no prob-
lems. ‘

For this reason, police are
unwilling to “jump on” the
agent without anowing her the

AN ras) aU TTRSS TU UL ae

opportunity to explain what
may have happened.

A police source told The
Tribune: “That particular
agent, I guess by some fault,
may have lapsed in payment
to whoever was doing busi-
ness with her which resulted in
all of her matters being can-
celled.

“She is basically assisting
the police with a paper trail
to show us she paid these
funds (given to her by the
clients) to certain people and
was expecting for tickets. to
be honoured.”

Our source was referring to
the fact that despite not being
directly licensed to sell tick-
ets, the agent allegedly
claimed she had been making
reservations on behalf of
clients through an arrange-

ment with other licensed enti- . }

ties.

_ SEE page 15

Two of the four pilot whales which were washed up in Exuma.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25).

Meade nate dos Me aa aeeaG.

FNM has ‘best
chance of winning
with Ingraham’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Free National Movement
was described yesterday as still hav-
ing the best chance of winning the
next general. election with Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham at its
helm. :

: Dismissing earlier reports that
- the party could stand a “better
chance” of winning in 2012 with a.
“younger” candidate at the helm, a
senior FNM strategist who spoke to
The Tribune on condition of
‘anonymity yesterday said that

SEE page 15
























‘TREMENDOUS STORM’ BREWING AT LYFORD CAY

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

A “TREMENDOUS STORM” is brewing at the exclusive res-
idential community Lyford Cay with the adoption of a new poliey.,
by the Lyford Cay Freperty Owners Association, according to”
Tribune sources.

The “bad weather” i is aimed at property owners who may be
using the private roadways to transport construction personnel,
building material and service vehicles for “unauthorized building
construction and maintenance activities”, according to documents

SEE page 15 7
NYGARD, BACON SPAT ‘SET TO END IN HILARITY’

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

. THE spat between Lyford Cay millionaires Peter Nygard and
Louis Bacon over a disputed property easement is set to end in
hilarity, when all of the evidence comes to light, according to
sources close to the matter.

“For some time now Nygard has been trying to make his prob-
lems look like a fight with his immediate neighbours. And the
timing of the lawsuit, and threats of more, appears to be a contin-

SEE page 15



MACUL UROL aha SLL
APSA ACACUA DS MaRS chor Oak
CRUCIAL ESCOLA SRSA CULL)

RUUD Lea St UNTRUE

SURE

Aa hth



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

i ee

Abaco plant supplies
power for first time

Ministry expects programme
to inspire education reform

THE Ministry of Education has announced it is intensi-
tying efforts to improve labour market opportunities for
Bahamian graduates and facilitate their transition to higher
education by strengthening literacy, numeracy, technology
and vocational skills.

Under a new name, INSPIRE (Investing in Students and
Programmes for the Innovative Reform of Education) and

a new project management team, the former SPTET (Sup- .

port Programme for Transforming Education and Training)
will be relaunched on August 16 during a ceremony at CC
Sweeting.

The government, with the support of an $8 million loan
from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), “will
support interventions designed to address the educational
and training needs of Bahamian youth, facilitate economic
progress, and reduce social problems,” said the ministry in
astatement. . ; .

The specific goals of the programme are grouped under
three components: . ‘

¢ NATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR TECHNICAL
AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
To ensure a relevant education system, articulated at the

secondary and BTVI/post-secondary levels aligned with |
international standards, informed by local research, which -

facilitate entrepreneurship programmes and reforms in cur-
ricula.

» INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

Addressing early development of children to improve —

quality and equity of early childhood education, incorpo-
rating parents and community assistance for children with
developmental needs and to create a council of stakehold-
ers responsible for driving policies and implementing stan-
dards of practice to govern early education in the Bahamas.
_ Additionally, focus will be given to inclusive education,
which will enhance programmes and support services that
assist students with diverse needs and help them achieve
their academic and human potential. The thrust of inclusive
education is to demonstrate the capacity of regular schools
to successfully educate students with various needs.

° STRENGTHENING SECTOR MANAGEMENT

Establishing a Technical Coordination Unit (TCU) tasked

with implementing an e-Education Strategy designed to
address inefficiencies within the Ministry of Education
focused around (i) Educational Management Information
Systems (EMIS), (ii) Technical Support, particularly for
schools and (iii) Integration of ICT across the curriculum.

In addition, the role of the Monitoring and Evaluation (M
& E) Unit will be strengthening the focus on conducting
research,.analyzing data, and providing oversight needed to
enhance sector-wide co-ordination and quality assurance.

M &E will conduct interim evaluations and a final eval-
uation for phase 1 of the INSPIRE Project.

The statement said: “INSPIRE is one of the innovative
educational initiatives that the Ministry of Education has
embarked upon to improve educational performances and
basic skills of youth in the Bahamas. It is expected that
these innovations will benefit on an annual basis, approxi-

mately 38,000 secondary and post-secondary students, 12,000

pre-schoolers, as well as several thousand students with
special needs. ae

terernescosresssesesessecesrrerseterestesesecesetetsete

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aseetecee

Testing of —

one of four

generators ~
begins"

By ALISON LOWE __
Tribune Staff. Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ABACO’s Wilson City pow-
er-plant successfully supplied
power to the island communi-
ties for the first time this week,
as testing of one of its four 12
megawatt generators began.

The Abaco power grid has
been fed 1.5 megawatts of pow-
er on a daily basis since
Wednesday and officials antici-
pate that by next week as much
as 12 megawatts of power — or
almost two thirds of the area’s
present peak demand — will be
produced by the new plant for
use by residents.

The development comes as
the islands of Abaco have just
started to recover from a eco-
nomically trying — and some’
have claimed, disastrous — two
and a half month period of
extended power outages as fail-
ing power generators at the old
BEC plant in Marsh Harbour,
unable to keep pace with
demand in the bustling Family
Islands, were placed into load-
shedding mode for up to nine
hours a day.

‘The Wilson City plant is
being constructed to address the
growing. power needs of the
Abaco islands in the long term.
In the meantime, the islands’
homes and businesses are being
supported by three mobile gen-
erators which were brought in
two weeks ago.

According to BEC general
manager Kevin Basden the Wil- .
son City generator testing
comes after issues over access to
telecommunications at the Wil-
son City plant were resolved.

blended beverage —

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Food & Beverage Sampling
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Support our Back To Sthool Drive
Bring along a donation of one or more school
items and receive a complimentary talliced —

coffee or coffee of the day. ~



_ During a tour of the plant last
month Prime Minister Hubert

- Ingraham, MP for North Aba-

co, was informed by Carlos

Escobar, site manager for gen- -

eral contractor MAN Diesel,
that inconsistent access to com-
munications that would enable
the Wilson City plant to co-ordi-
nate testing with the Marsh
Harbour plant was hindering
progress in bringing the new
generators online.

- Mr Basden was unwilling to

suggest a date when the power:

plant would be fully brought on
stream, but said testing will con-
tinue and BEC will have a bet-
ter.idea of when this will be pos-
sible “by. next week.” :
The Wilson City plan
includes four generators, each
with a generation capacity of 12

‘megawatts.

Abaco’s present peak power

demand amounts to 18 to 19-
Megawatts. . Twenty-two

megawatts are presently being
supplied through a combination
of the Marsh Harbour power
plant generators and the mobil
generators. :

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 3

(SULLA 8 OB BATS

Judges may be using ‘possibly
unconstitutional practice’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A COURT of Appeal judge
has raised the possibility that
the former Chief Justice was
not in accordance with the Con-
stitution when he failed to
deliver a judgment in open
court — and that other judges
may be continuing to use the
same possibly unconstitutional
practice.

Justice George Newman sug-
gested that if this:is the case, it

may have significant wide-rang-

ing legal implications.
In his August 10 written
judgment relating to an appli-

cation for an extension of time .

to appeal a judgment, made by
former Chief Justice Sir Bur-
ton Hall, Justice Newman said
there is a “strong arguable
“case” to be.-made that Sir Bur-
ton did not comply. with the
Constitution when he had his
written judgment on a matter

delivered to the Chambers of

the two lawyers representing
the individuals concerned
rather than reading it in open
court.

Justice Newman allowed the
extension of time to appeal, giv-
en that:‘Wayne Munroe, the
attorney for one of the individ-
uals whose matter Sir Burton
was deciding, said he did not

receive the judgment until long.

after it was supposedly deliv-
ered and felt that the failure by
the former Chief Justice to read
the judgment in open court was
unconstitutional.

In this regard, Justice New-
man agreed that it is “an essen-
tial element of justice that it is
dispensed in public.”

“The Constitution does not
contemplate a procedure other
than an announcement of the
decision of the court in public.
A pronouncement of the court

means a pronouncement by-a.
judge of the decision in court,”

he stated.

Judgement

_ Speaking of the act of send-
ing the judgment to the lawyers

_ rather than reading it in public

in July, 2009, Justice Newman
said: “A decision in respect to
this practice is urgently
required. The matter must be
clarified as soon as possible.”
Furthermore, the Court of
Appeal judge noted that “the
urgency” of determining

‘whether the practice is uncon-
stitutional is “even more press- .

ing” given that he got the
impression “this is a practice
which may well be continuing”

based on information he has

received.
He proposed that a full court

will now “not only need to

| determine whether or not there
has been what amounts to a
non-compliance with the Con-
stitution but also... what the
consequences of non-compli-
ance should be.”

One possible consequence,
he noted, could be that there
would be considered to be “no
judgment at all” made by the
judge in question in the matter
or any others in which the pur-

ported judgment was delivered .



in this form.

In this case, Just
said questions should be raised
as to what extent the parties

-" ‘concerned are-bound by the

judgments reached when ‘they
are not delivered in open court.
“As I say, these matters,
touching on civil rights obliga-
tions, are important,” he said.
Justice Newman’s comments
came with respect to an appli-
cation, made by Wayne
Munroe, attorney for applicant
Alarice Maria Ifill, for an exten-
sion of time to appeal the judg-
ment reached by Chief Justice
Sir Burton Hall. .
The judgment related to

divorce proceedings between’:
~ Ms Ifill and Grantley Errol Ifill,
~ the respondent in the matter.

Mr Munroe applied for an
extension of time to appeal the
judgment after he and his client
failed to receive the judgment

‘in time to appeal it, as his client
wished to do.

This, Justice Newman said,
was because Sir Burton had had
the judgment delivered, to Mr
Munroe’s private Chambers at
a time that he was relocating
offices due to the dissolution
of his partnership with his for-

mer law partner, Elliott Lock-

hart.

Court

“He did not receive the judg-
ment at delivery or for some
time after... It was upon
receipt of the order of the court
that Mr Munroe became aware
of what had happened, namely
what the judge had purported

‘to decide,” said Justice New-

man.

‘The judge said that given the
potential for Mr Munroe’s
client to have been subjected
to an application for his com-
mittal — to be confined to prison
for having “failed to obey the
order of the court drawn up on
the basis of the document deliv-
ered as a judgment” — the issue
was all the more serious,

He allowed the appeal for an
extension of time made by Mr
Munroe on behalf of. Ms Ifill,

‘stating that not only should it

be allowed, but it must be
“expedited.”

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GRANT-BETHEL GRANTED AVE TO APPLY FOR JUDICIAL REVIEW

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

(a TE |
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General and Department of Public Prosecu-
tions to the. Law Reform and Revision Com-
mission.

He also granted leave for the proceedings
of the JDLS with regard to Mrs Grant-Bethel’s
application for the post of Director of Public
Prosecutions to be reviewed.

Mrs Grant-Bethel’s application seeking leave
for a review was filed July 21. In it, she called
for an injunction against Attorney General
John Delaney which would bar him from "inter-
fering" with her ability to carry out the duties of
the Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions — a
job that the Office of the Attorney General

CHERYL Grant-Bethel has been granted
leave by the courts to apply for a judicial review
of the decision to deny her the post of Director
of Public Prosecutions. ;

The legal team of Mrs Grant-Bethel, who is
the former Deputy Director of Public Prose-
cutiors, now has 14 days to file a motion.

In a closed court hearing yesterday, Senior
Justice John Isaacs gave permission for a judi-
cial review to be conducted with regard to the

TRANSFERRED
Cheryl Grant-Bethel



decision by the Judicial and Legal Services
Commission (JDLS) to appoint Mrs Grant-
Bethel to the post of Deputy Law Reform Com-
missioner — a move that involved her being
transferred from the Office of the Attorney

Witness: Doctor kept secret ©
medical files on Anna Nicole.

LOS ANGELES

SEVEN months after Anna
Nicole Smith's death, a law
enforcement team entered the
home of the model's doctor with
a search warrant and guns drawn,
and found her medical records
under a pile of clothing in a clos-
et, investigators testified Thurs-
day, according to Associated
Press.

Carmen Aguillera Marquez,
a senior investigator for the Cal-
ifornia Medical Board, said she
and team leader Jon Genens had
been told by Dr. Sandeep
Kapoor that he did not have any
patient files at home. But when
she poked her hand into a pile-of
neatly folded clothing on the
floor of his bedroom closet, she
said, she felt papers and extract-
ed a file folder with Smith's name
inside, along with one of her
pseudonyms and the name of her
son.

Genens testified that three dif-
ferent files were found — two in
the home and one in Kapoor's
lawyer's office — detailing a sin-
gle home visit made to Smith a
year before she died. One of
them mentioned that she had a
possible addiction to opiates, he
said. i

Kapoor; Dr. Khristine Ero-
shevich and Smith's boyfriend-
lawyer Howard K. Stern have
pleaded not guilty to charges that
include conspiring to provide
Smith with excessive drugs, pre-
scribing to an addict, and pre-
scribing to Smith under fraudu-:
lent names.

They are not charged with
causing her 2007 death from a
drug overdose.

With the medical records dis-
played on a courtroom screen in
Los Angeles, Genens showed
jurors how the three files con-
tained different information for
the same visit. One detailed the
drugs prescribed to Smith, and

" Ohe had a blank space for med-
ications. :

One had the notation: "benzo
addicted? To avoid." The appar-
ent reference to addiction to
sedatives known as benzodia-
zopines was missing from the sec-
ond set of files for the same day,
he said.

Superior Court Judge Robert’
Perry warned jurors repeatedly
Thursday that the investigators’
testimony is beirig offered only
against Kapoor. Kapoor's lawyer,
Ellyn Garafalo, challenged the
methods in which the records
were handled. Another witness,

?



‘MEDICAL RECORDS’:
Anna Nicole Smith

attorney Lawrence Wolfe, who »

was appointed as a special master
to oversee the collection, testi-
fied about the chain of custody.

Garafalo also questioned the
display of guns by the large team
of investigators, but Genens said

‘that was routine. ’

In a hearing Thursday outside
the jury's presence, Perry ques-
tioned the relevance of the doc-
uments and Deputy District
Attorney David Barkhurst said,
"Our contention is Dr. Kapoor
was creating those records after
the visit for some nefarious rea-
son."

Marquez said she also found a
private journal of Kapoor's in
his bedroom. Its contents have

become a key issue in the case.

describing his one social contact

with Smith when he rode with ;

her in a gay pride parade.

Smith suffered from pain most
of her life; a doctor testified
Wednesday, saying he treated
her with prescription drugs to
alleviate her chronic pain syn-
drome even though he consid-
ered her an addict.

"People with substance abuse
disorders have the right to pain
relief," said Dr. Victor Kovner,
who tréated Smith for three
years before he sold his practice
to Kapoor.

Kovner said had a substance
abuse disorder and treating her
was a challenge.

Kovner said Smith told him
when they met in 2001 that she
was an addict and had been
treated at the Betty Ford Center

for addictions:to Vicodin and ©

alcohol.

Kovner later learned she had
suffered from migraines and
seizures as a child. She also
reported pain in her back, arm
and intestinal area.

After failing to find a physi-
cal cause for the pain, Kovner
said he concluded Smith suffered
from chronic pain syndrome.and
treated her with Methadone,
Xanax and other drugs.

Kovner said Smith took pre-
scription drugs for physical and
emotional relief. Some of the
medications he prescribed were
for anxiety and depression, he
added.

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has maintained is no longer hers.

Justice Isaacs gave the respondents — the
application named the entire Judicial and Legal
Services Commission and the Attorney General -
— 48 hours to respond’to the injunction.

. S..JO

recat
380-FLIX

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INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS

Our

NASSAU, FREEPORT,

ABACO

AND EXUMA OFFICES.

WILL BE CLOSED ON

FRIDAY

1 3â„¢ AUGUST, 2010

a ee eee

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ALL Branches will resume
Monday, 16 August, 2010

We apologize for any inconvenience

caused







PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



eal de Ea TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL. D., Dz Litt.

' Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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updated daily at 2pm

Time to test defamation and the web

THE WORLD-WIDE web has certainly
made the world a smaller place. It has gone
a long way in creating a global community by
helping people to better understand their
similarities as well as their differences thus
assisting them in participating in the global
conversation.

However, the flow of news coming from
all directions is almost too fast for the human
brain to process. It seems there are more
unhinged, violent and angry people than
ever before. Is it because of better commu-
nications that we are learning of events that
have always happened, or is it because the
human brain can no longer digest all the
‘information with which it is being bom-
barded, and in desperation man clutches his
head and explodes?

There is also a very serious downside to
this global communication’s network. There
are few rules and little responsibility in the
way information is being disseminated on
various blogs. Today anyone can put infor-
mation on the web without regard to

_ whether it is true or false. We have heard
persons, who want to spread malicious
rumours, laugh and say they can put what-
ever they want on their website because at
last the law of defamation can’t touch them.

““Séme of the most-scandalous things are
being openly said about people, whose —
names are being called, and apparently it is
:believed that: nothing can be done to halt
the vicious spiral.

Unlike a newspaper, which by law has
to print the name of its publisher, and.the
location at which it is published, no:such
information is required of the managers of
these scandalous websites. However, there
are ways and means of checking their iden-
tity — it’s just that everyone has assumed
that such a search is: useless.’ Immobilized

- with this belief the victims do nothing while
the perpetrators continue down the road of
publishing irresponsible and destructive gos-
sip.

Defamation laws will now have to be
extended to this new means of communica-
tion to force responsibility on those, putting
careless, often false information in the pub-
lic domain — for all the world to see. If
something is not done we shall start to see ' -
people taking the law into their own hands.
Police will have a new form of criminal retal-
iation to add to their already heavy crime
sheet. ' .

Mr Charles Maynard has announced that -

he is going to go to the police to take a stand
against the defamatory content posted
against him on one of these blogs. All the
ingredients of libel are there — false and
defamatory statements carelessly published
to a third party — in this case to the world —
and the person defamed is identifiable. In Mr

Maynard’s case he is actually named, and -

so there is.no guessing as to who has been
defamed. Mr Maynard — whose reputation

someone or some group is intent on destroy-

ing — calls what is being said about him
“scandalous lies.” What is being printed in
permanent form, whether true or false, could

‘ destroy him — in his marriage, his political
career and certainly lower him in the eyes of -

the community — and as it is on the web it
will not only damage him in the eyes of the
local community, but the world. So the audi-
ence is wide which makes the damage —
and damages if he wins his case — even
more severe.

Mr Maynard has been advised that some
of the content posted on the website could
warrant criminal charges. He said that the
blog has “waged all out war” against him.
This is the very essence of criminal libel. It
becomes criminal when the perpetrator

- keeps repeating and repeating, hounding
‘and hounding, continuously displaying

vicious and hateful malice. It is the repetition
and the depth of the malice that tips the
scales, moving his complaint from the civil to
the criminal side of the court. We have seen

» these blogs and know that Mr Maynard has

been repeatedly bombarded with what he
calls “vicious lies.”

If they are false and he has a case then he
has a duty to step forward. He will certainly
make history as the first person to do so.

It is said that this is all being done in the*
name of politics. Politics is no excuse to drag ~

this community into the gutter. If Bahamians
want higher standards then any political par-
ty that will condone and even assist such

salacious publications should be denied the

vote of decent Bahamians.

Indecent politics has already gone too
far in destroying human relations, human
respect and all standards of decency.

If Mr Maynard is satisfied that he has a
case, then he should step up to the plate
and take a stand for decency and snatch pol-
itics from the smutty hands of those who
thrive in the gutter. And the best lawyers in
this town should stand behind him by offer-

ing their services pro bono.



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A nightmare
us ride with
my children

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am very concerned about
the type of service rendered
by our public bus system.

On Friday, July 16, 2010
between 4 - 4.30pm what
should ‘have been a delight-
ful experience for my children
turned out to be a nightmare.

I had dropped off my car to,

be cleaned and was waiting
for my husband. However, he
called to inform me that he
was caught up in performing a
procedure at the hospital, and
it would take a while before
he could pick us up. I decided

_ to take the public bus service.

I thought this would be a
wonderful experience for my
three small children. They
were excited for the new ven-
ture.

We took the 10a bus N28.
When we arrived at our drop
off point Skyline Lakes, my
daughter who is a special
needs‘child with autism was

- hesitant to get off the bus.

The driver became infuriated
and began to shout at me to
get off the bus. I tried to

explain to him that my daugh-:

ter was a special needs child
and I needed a minute to
coach her to get off. He then

m letters@tribunemedia.net






Dawa

like a patient. I'don’t have
time for any fu----- patient
today. You shouldn’t bring a
patient on the bus; get off my
bus.”

I attempted to get him to
understand, but he became

more verbally hostile which |
made my daughter more ©

stressed: She began to cover
her ears’ with her hands. She
was not disruptive rather qui-
et and calm. He then’shouted
at my two small boys, “Get

‘back inside I don’t have time

for this shit.” He then shouted

to me: “Sit down I’m drop-

ping you at another-bus stop,
just take another bus.” He
pulled off before I even had a
chance to sit down. During

his rude indignant behaviour, »

I just said a prayer asking
God to protect my children
and to keep me calm. I could
have reacted, but I was mind-
ful that I am constantly try-

ing to teach my boys about -

conflict resolution, and when
to walk away, especially if
someone is unreasonable.

He drove all the way
around passing several ‘bus
stops. Finally. he stopped in
front of Breezes Hotel and

' told us: “Get off here.” I felt

humiliated and disrespected
as a citizen, as a mother, and
as a woman. We walked
across the street and took a
taxicab home. My four-year-
old son said “Mommy that
man talk to us like an ani-
mal.” This experience has had
a negative affect on my chil-
dren. This encounter remind-
ed me of the Rosa Park’s sto-
ry.

_ I think I am only one out of
many citizens who are treated
in an indignant and inhumane
mannet during some bus com-
mutes. Hardworking, law-
abiding Bahamians should not

"have to endure such treat-

ment by our public bus ser-
vice. Greed‘and lack of com-
passion seem to be replacing
common courtesy and empa-
thy for one another. I am call-
ing upon the government to
seriously consider urgently a
national transportation ser-

vice operated by the govern-

ment.

KAREN MOSS
Nassau, .

shouted, “Your daughter look

. July 30, 2010.

The black bonnet situation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

On a daily basis, we all read insightful,
intriguing, uproarious letters that comment
on crime, politics and the like submitted to
our local newspapers. While I agree it is an
age-old forum for such opinions I do believe
there is space for social.commentary that does
not fall in-between the lines of the aforemen-
tioned topics.

As such, I submit my comments regarding
the black bonnet situation:

We’ve all seen them, driving through our
streets, walking in the Mall, on line at the
bank, on school pick-up, the grocery store,
really. everywhere, our ladies, intentionally
out in public with the black bonnet on their
heads.

If you are unsure what I mean, I am refer-
ring to the black satin “shower cap” that has

taken the place of the tied silk scarf that once
covered a woman’s head when her hair was in
curlers.

The difference, however in my opinion, is
the seeming degradation of what is acceptable
to be worn outside of one’s household.

I qualify. In years past a woman wearing
curlers in her hair was usually on a one-way
journey from her hairdresser directly to her

home, to continue preparations for whatever
’ function she was attending.

She was discreet, reluctant to linger on a
stop light or even hail a friend in passing, lest
she be seen with a head loaded with plastic
cylinders and aluminum clips or in some cases
wearing a wrap band if her end- style was
straight.

In today’s Bahamas it seems like there is a

segment of women who do not believe that
hair coverings are meant for a specific pur-

~ pose: protecting a style or implements of that
- style.

It appears that the black bonnet is now as
acceptable as a Sunday hat, baseball cap, ban-

. dana or straw hat.

I liken this practice to the powdery neck at
3:30 in the afternoon and no shower was
involved, or the bédroom slippers worn to
work and passed off for outside-of-the-house-
shoes because they are black and have little
beads, or even a personal favourite: out-in-
public-with-facial-cream-on.

Perhaps I am missing something, some cru-
cial moment in society when this change was
discussed and enacted into our societal norms.
Maybe nowadays women are not getting their
hair done anymore or the styles are more com-
plete when they leave the salon. .

I certainly notice the influx of supplemental
hair products, in particular the lace front wig.
I also notice the cemented hair-dos that are
wrapped and:sculpted and only undoable by
water or some other solvent.

So perhaps the necessity for protective cov-
erings in public has decreased.

I beg for an explanation, then, why are so .

many women walking around this town with
these blasted black bonnets on their heads! I
would like to personally lead the charge in
opposition to this practice and state the fol-
lowing:

1. It’s not cool

2. It’s not attractive

3. It’s not acceptable

4, It’s not understandable

Theye actually are. no viable excuses for
wearing one outside of your home (the back-
yard, if enclosed is okay). I have tried to ascer-
tain excuses and the only one I care to dis-
cuss is, “My hair is not fixed.”

It isn’t? Guess what ladies, when the black °

bonnet is on, your hair is still not fixed. In fact
the black bonnet is just as bad as your “un-
fixed” hair, worse even. It is an announce-
ment of your lack of a “do”. What is so bad

about yout hair that wearing a fancy shower
cap in public is more bearable? It is as though
the public deserves only two choices, fresh
from the salon or the black bonnet.

If there is a psychologist reading this, please
help me.

Why are our women so ashamed of their
hair? It must be something mental. I am.a
firm believer in the truth that hair was created
without quality. There is no good hair or.bad
hair.

You can have damaged hair or illnesses that
affect your hair, but essentially the idea of
good hair versus bad is garbage.

Ladies, the world truly does not mind if
your hair is not perfectly sculpted, or burned
straight or curled 360 degrees.

The world does not care if you just have
your hair pulled back in a ponytail or if it is
short, just neatly combed.

Perhaps if we had less emphasis on hair
styling and more on hair care, there would be
more pride in just our hair and not what we
think the world thinks about it.

A.woman I love said to me that she was
told as a child that her hair was her crowning
glory. That statement, she explained, was .the
genesis of her “hair complex”; a complex that
pushed her over 30 years to do unimaginable
things to maintain and adorn her “crown”.

With maturity and growth, her focus is now
on taking care of the beautiful « crown God
blessed her with.

She owns a black bonnet to contain the

‘ curlers she rolls in and holds in the moisture

and natural oils she applies. She does this at

night, strictly in the privacy of her bedroom.
So ladies, all I ask is that you put more atten-

tion into taking care of your crown everyday.

’ Learn how to wash it on your own, treat it

with safer chemicals or natural products, and
simplify your styles so you can keep them up
yourself. ,

Perhaps this can eradicate the helpless
dependency on. wigs, weaves and over-
processed hair and I say that admitting that I
do appreciate the occasional change that these
supplements provide.

‘Simply put, love’ your hair so you can love
yourself because if you love yourself, you will
leave the black bonnet at home, in the top
drawer where it belongs.

ERIC NATHAN HALL

Nassau,
‘July 27, 2010.

AEN OAR ELAS TL

EDITOR, The Tribune.













Thank you for allowing me a space in
your paper. BaTelCo in The Mall at
Marathon has far too many women
working there and it appears that only a
few of them knows what they are doing
or demonstrates some kind of profes-
sionalism.

Pick any. one of the six days to visit
BaTelCo in the mall and you would see
female employees gossiping to each oth-
er or on the telephone with their
boyfriends, while we the paying cus-
tomers are sitting down in front of desk
four, six, eight, a, or b for example to
get service.

I can’t.wait for BaTelCo to be priva-
tised!




















ROLLE
Nassau,
July 27, 2010.







THE TRIBUNE

POTHOLE PROBLEMS ON ROBINSON ROAD









MIND THE GAP: A deep pothole on Robinson Road. B
need to be carefully negotiated. -

Most calls to BASRA from boaters

‘stranded with broken engines’

sea are playing “Russian roulette” with
their lives — and sometimes the lives of res-
cuers.

He believes that boaters should lose their
certification if they fail to fulfill safety
requirements,

Asked if boat safety training courses
should be a requirement for all boaters,
Mr Snisky agreed that, they should.

“That would be a phenomenal move in
the right direction if we make it a require-
ment to take boat safety.

“In the US the Coast Guard can board a
boat any time and by law have you to be
‘ able to perform’a one minute safety drill to

“We average 30 calls a month and we’ __ put your life jacket on and to prepare for an
assist 20 to 30 people, possibly more,” he emergency, and if you can’t do it they can
said. : pull the certification on the boat right there

Justin Snisky, vice chairman of BASRA, and now you are no longer allowed to oper-
said many times, they dispatch a rescue ate the boat and the captain.would get a
team following an emergency call, only to —_ write up and a major fine,” he said.
discover that the vessel ran out of gas. “It. is definitely something we should

He explained that BASRA isintendedto —_look into in the Bahamas as every boat
provide emergency search and rescue ser- _ that is being checked is one less boat we
vices throughéut the Bahamas. have to worry about out there,” Mr Snisky

“One of the biggest misconceptions of _ said.

BASRA is that we are. commercial assis- He said four years ago, BASRA started
tance. We are not there to tow youinif you a youth programme offering free courses in
run out of gas; our main priority is saving water safety and boating safety to schools,
lives,” he stressed. ; organisations and summer camps on Grand
Mr Snisky said those who take chances at’ Bahama.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Emergency rescue offi-
cials say many boating mishaps could be
avoided if boaters took the time to follow
proper safety procedures before venturing
out to sea.

Tom Christian, director of search and
rescue at the Bahamas Air/Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA), said that the major-
ity of calls they receive are from people
stranded at sea because their engine broke
down. . tia

PROJECT ADVISOR (rut. time emptoyment)



FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 5



Phase two of GB Chamber of

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce has embarked on phase
two of its Economic Develop-
ment Strategy and Implemen-
tation Plan to stimulate the
island’s economy.

Chamber president Peter
Turnquest called on residents
to support the organisation in
its efforts to promote entrepre-
neurial development and iden-
tify significant catalyst projects
to promote economic develop-
ment.

“We. are all aware of the
challenges facing Grand
Bahama both economically and
socially as we continue in this
period of financial instability
and recession, and while there
are reported areas of improve-
ment in tourism and potential
investments which continue to
give us hope, we the residents
of Grand Bahama have to
resolve to take control of our
destiny for the sustainable
development of our island,” he

| Commerce economic strategy

Dwight Anderson, production
plant II manager, PharmaChem
Technologies Grand Bahama
Ltd; Vanessa Mallory, execu-
tive vice president, Modelena
Investments Ltd; Jeffery Allen,
James Sarles Realty; and Minna
Outten-Winters, Global Train-
ing consultants.

Mr Turnquest said the cora-
mittee, working along with an
international economic devel-
opment firm, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, the
Freeport Container Port and
others, will be responsible for
the development and manage-
ment of the formal plan and the
co-ordination of consultative
forums in various communities.

“It is an awesome task as
they are all volunteers but I
have every confidence in them
to complete the task given and
to produce a final working doc-
ument that will be the guide for
future development and shape
not only the business strategy
for Grand Bahama, but also its
political and social future,
which will necessarily be affect-
ed, to ensure viability and sus-
tainability,” he said. :

said on Wednesday. Mr Turnquest invited mem-
es bers of the public to provide
‘ ideas and input to the chamber
Mr Snisky said the course received high Sessions

praise from the US Coast Guard and BAS-
RA is looking to expand it to cover the
entire Bahamas.

“We also offered adult classes and it was
not well received. We find that the age 3-12
group is most receptive to information,”
he said.

Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police
Quinn McCartney agrees that boat safety
training is important and should be con-
sidered. as

“There are quite a number of boats going
out on a daily basis and we need to get
people sensitised about boat safety. Some-
times you have to enforce it through legis-
lation.” ;

He said the police force, BASRA, the
Defence Force, the Port Department and
Customs should meet and come up with
recommendations for. new legislation or
regulations to monitor boat safety. Mr
McCartney said that the police work close-
ly with the Defence Force and BASRA
when responding to boating emergencies.

“In very short order we will put VHF
radios in the police station at West End
and in our Control Room here. It used to
be there but was discontinued, and we think
it is important to put it back there and
monitor channel 16,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said an Eco-
nomic Development Commit-
tee, made up of persons from a
wide cross section of the busi-
ness community, will hold con-
sultation sessions.

“Phase II is critical and it is
essential that we reach a con-
sensus on how to resolve critical
issues (that have been identi-
fied) during this phase,” he not-
ed.

The committee is chaired by
Jennivee Nelson, manager of
Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank
and Trust. Other members
include: Neville Wilchombe,
attorney at Dupuch and Turn-
quest; Don Cornish, adminis-
trator in the Office of the Prime
Minister; Derick Newbold,
business development manager
at the Grand Bahama Port
Authority; James Turner, busi-
ness development manager at
the Freeport Container Port;
Charles Pratt, manager, of the
Enterprise Centre at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority,

a

by its email address — gbcham-
ber@batelnet.bs — and to attend
the public forums.

He also appealed to resi-
dents and businesses to sup-
port the chamber’s fundraising
events.

The first event will be a.
Mock Casino Night on Sep-
tember. 25 at the Our Lucaya
Hotel, where patrons will have
the opportunity to play various
casino games for prizes rang-
ing from large flat screen tele-
visions to holidays and cruises.

He said there also will be an
auction of works by talented
local artists such as Chantal
Bethel, Claudette Dean and
Leo Brown.

yd)

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| Together for
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Court system seems ‘somewhere

between chaotic and shambolic’
YOUNG: EN : VIEW

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



A legal system must be seen as
a set of institutions (concepts,
rules and principles of inter-
pretation) impressed with a
given purpose or purposes, the
system's responsiveness and
effectiveness measured against
the degree of attainment of
explicit as well as implicit
goals. — Boris Kozolchyk.

HE court sys-

tem in the

Bahamas

seems some-

where between chaotic and

shambolic. Legalistic foot-

dragging and the dysfunc-

tional legal system has

caused many Bahamians to

lose faith in the justice ‘sys-
tem.

Legal theorist Joseph

Raz states that “in identify-

ing a legal system, we are —

holding for all the pervasive
principles and traditional
institutional structure and
practices that permeate the
system and lend to its dis-
tinctive character.”

People need to know that
the law will be enforced at
every level of society with-
out fear or favour, without
any reference to group or
familial interests, and with-
out intervention by any cor?



Ioeponn (8 STS 118/

SPH
Pager, (43 SAHIN « STS-3005

Exurna, Bahamas.

) Peale oes

{1A Bas Corl Raa Peper, 8, Bahamas Rotiidon and Soldier Reese Masson, A, Hiahoraas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

of Stuart Manor Exuma, will be held on Sunday August 15th
2010 at 10:00am at Mt. Thompson Seventh-Day Adventist
_ Church, Mt Thompson, Exuma. Officiating will be Pastor Craig
Williams assisted by Elder Teddy Clarke and Elder [van Rolle.
interment will follow in The Public Genet Stuart Manor

Lett to cherish his memories are his wife: Alvera Smith Father: ’
Eugene Smith Mother: ~ trebella Smith 4 Sons: ~Cely Jr, Deargo,
Tamazz, and Tazmon Smith. 3- Daughters - Quana, Kayshell
and Tanasha Smith. 9- Brothers: Edison, David, Headley, Bob,
Ray, Eugene Jr., Don, Pat and. Alley Smith. 1 Adopted Brother
~ Jeffery Smith. 5- Sister: Patricia, Kate, Betty, Donnell and Able
woman Marine Delarene Smith of the Royal Bahamas Defense
Force. father-in-law: Cecil Munnings and Gary Lord Rolle mother-
in-law: Dosha Hart, 27-Nephews: Glenroy, Jermaine, Tameko,
Laron, Davardo, Sherwin, Durand, Keno, Jedson, Ramon,
Renaldo, Rajiv, Amal, Tavares; Carlton Jamaine, Micah,.Deon,
Pat Jr. Janerro, Zavian, Clayron, Clayjuan, Israel, Perez, Tanario
| ,and Tanaj Smith. 18-Nieces: Nicky, Deantra, Patrika, Latoya,
_ Cameisha, Dashanda, Donneka, Rayshanna Headlesa, leishka,
Cyprianna, Tonya, Donita, Ashanti, Edisonell, Quania, Razmon
and Darekia Smith. 6Aunts: Caroline Thompson, Laura Smith,
Glenda Hepbum, Stephanie. Dean, Nettie and Annamae Smith.
of Miami Florida 3- Uncles Andrew Dean, Labon Thompson, and
Philip Hepburn. 4-Sister-in-law: - Dina, Sophia, Ethel and Laurlin
Smith. 1-Grand Aunt: Florence Smith. 6 Grand Nephew Trevon
Smith, Malik Jones, Donatoe, Keontae, Doneyo, Devarian
and Akeem Smith. 7 Grand Nieces:Tyreka, Zantie, Hunnie,
Danea, Drearnia, Glenesse and Dovonya Smith Cousiris: Nola
Curry. and Family, Barry Smith of Dania Beach Florida. Karen
and Devi Smith of Atlanta Georgia, Nicky and Maury Smith of
Miami Florida, Michael Smith of Arizona Gertalene, Patricia, and
Annie Dean , Judy, Marcia, Patrice, Emestine, Crystal, Patral,
. Dwayne, Patrick Pheromone, Kayla, Davantie, Troy, Terrell,
Jason, Dustin, Raymos, Chino, Clifford, Andrew Jr, Anthon,
‘Unell, Kenny, Crystal, Vince. Susan, Nancy, Janet, Harris,
Nathan, Carol, Leslie; Sidney, Randy, Rose, Barbie, Tishka,
Lavance and Sophia Smith, Dean Whylly, Francina and the
Clarke family. A host of other relatives including: Elliott Lockhart,
Lemuel Maycock Fredrick Ferguson, David Rolle, Norman
Lloyd, Ann Richardson, |zona Rolle and Family, Sarah Rolle and
Family, Cedric Smith and Family, The Curling Family Mr. Burke
and Eloise Smith and Family from Staniel Cay Exuma, The
Maycock Family, the Smith Family from Farmers Hill Exuma and
the whole Communities of Stuart Manor, Curtis, Rolleville, and
Barraterre Exuma and The Bonefish Lounge Committee. °

Viewing will be held at Mt. Thompson Seventh-Day Adventist
Church on Saturday from 3:00pm until service time on Sunday.

Le

rupt process, especially in
law enforcement.

As a prospective officer
of the courts, I.am aware

that there are some in the. -

legal profession who are dri-
ving the country towards the
nether world of criminality.
Frankly, blatant nepotism
and what appears to be
selective justice has beset
the Bahamas’ legal system
and led to a mounting back-
log of cases.

Moreover, antiquated
legislation contributes to the
delays plaguing the coun-
try’s molasses-like legal sys-
tem. Whilst the police can,
in some instances, better
prepare cases, the police
force must. be weary of
arresting and re-arresting
the same people who
repeatedly exploit legal
loopholes or, upon arraign-
ment and/or delayed court

dates and legal arguments:

about the violation of their
constitutional rights, are
released on bail.

The depressingly long
case backlog is a matter of
grave concern in the




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Pago (202) 340.8085 + Fax: AD 940-8094










for the late
Mr. Cely
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Smith,45





























































Bahamas, particularly since
citizens/residents are seem-
ingly being denied justice on
several fronts. It is unac-
ceptable when less than 10

murder cases are disposed °

of per year.

The increasing incidents
of violent/commercial
crimes are almost over-
whelming and are almost
certainly due to the snail-
paced, molasses-like dispos-
al of cases.

Sluggish

Bahamians, some of

whom are fed-up with the,

sluggish, inefficient justice
system, will be—or possibly
already are—resorting to
vigilante justice, illegally tak-
ing the law into their own
hands.

In a modern Bahamas,
there is a pressing need for
specialization of the legal
process. Undoubtedly, spe-
cialized courts would height-
en the efficiency of the jus-
tice System and bring a
greater focus to specific mat-
ters whilst alleviating the
long-standing case backlog.

Law Pre-essor Rose-
Marie Belle Antoine, in her
seminal work. Law and
Legal Systems, writes that
“any particular jurisdiction
may have specialized courts
and tribunals in the form of
industrial.courts and tri-
bunals, family courts, Juve-
nile Courts, divorce courts,
administrative courts, rev-
enue courts, and-income tax
appeal boards or tribunals
and even Public Service
Commissions.”

“The concept of special-

ized courts and tribunals.

emerged as a response to
the need for adjudicating
bodies which would give

.separate attention and

expertise to certain matters
that could not be properly
addressed in ordinary courts
of law. There are a number
of reasons why the ordinary
courts may be considered
inadequate to address these
matters. It may be for expe-
diency. For example, there
may be an overwhelming
bulk of legal matters to be

- determined in a particular













The depressingly long case backlog is a
matter of grave concern in the Bahamas, par-
ticularly since citizens/residents are seem-
ingly being denied justice on several fronts. It
is unacceptable when less than 10 murder

cases are disposed of pet year.

subject area. Another rea-
son is that the nature of cer-

tain matters may go beyond .

the boundaries of the strict-
ly legal or could be highly
technical and specific. There
may also be a need to sim-
plify certain procedures,”
stated Mrs Antoine.

Indeed, the local Juvenile
Court is a specialized court,
meting out sanctions for
wayward, law-breaking juve-
niles while permitting coun-
seling and rehabilitation for
youngsters and during trial,
shielding them from being
beleaguered by overaggres-
sive lawyers.

Undeniably, there is a
need for specialized courts
that, each having original

jurisdiction, can issue war- .

rants, possess a separate reg-
istry and render yearly law
reports.

The current Coroner’s
Court, which serves as an
inquisitorial court that
inquires into the cause of
deaths and, if necessary,
holds an inquest, was a spe-
cialized court with its man-
date set out in Chapter 56
(Coroners Act) of. the
Bahamas’ statute laws.

The Coroners court was

formerly a specialist court.

until it was abolished by the
PLP in 2007. Today, it is a
part of the Magistrate’s
court.

Frankly, while the Indus-
trial Tribunal has jurisdic-
tion over industrial matters
in the country, a separate
Industrial Court should be
developed.

According to Professor
Antoine:

“All the countries in the -

region have some special
mechanism with which to
determine industrial rela-
tions matters. These are
either industrial courts or
industrial tribunals. Indus-
trial tribunals may be either
separate quasi-judicial bod-
ies as in Jamaica, Dominica
and Belize, or a division
under the Ministry of
Labour. In the latter
instance,.the body is purely
administrative.” |

“It was believed that a

special court, as well as a -

special type of law and legal
procedure, should be
designed for the important
area of labour relations to
alleviate such political and
ideological biases and anti-
labour judicial attitudes,”
she states.

The esteemed Caribbean
law scholar writes:

“With such justifications
for their establishment, it is

not surprising that industri-

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& Associates

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Company
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International Medical Group CIMcG)

~al courts have a unique ori-
entation. For example, they
are characterized by the
‘principles and practices of
good industrial relations’, a
concept peculiar to the area
of labour relations and
unknown to other areas of
law. They are expected to
take into consideration the
principles of equity and

‘good conscience’ in exam-
ining the substantial merits
of a case. In addition, legal

techniques are not priori-

tized in such courts. Rather,
the requirements of human
relations which are essential
to industrial relations, such
as negotiation, take prece-
dence.”

N ecessies

Moreover, the develop-
ment of family courts is an
absolute necessity-in the
Bahamas.

“The year 1975 saw the
heralding of a new dawn in
family relations for the legal
system of Jamaica, with the
passing of the Judicature
(Family Court) Act. This
provided for a single court
with jurisdictional powers
over all legal proceedings
related to family life, except

that of divorce,” writes
Antoine. :
She says: “Family Courts

do not conform to a univer-

' sal definition because of the

divergent nature of the
problems which concern the
family in different societies.
The jurisdiction of such
courts varies depending on
the priority given to the
court and the nature of the
problem. Some courts may
take the form of a court of
summary jurisdiction, while
others may be placed on a
par with a superior Court of
Record. For instance, if it is
felt that certain family mat-
ters need to be afforded
more respect, a country may.
‘choose a superior court.”
“The Family Court has
an obvious sociological
thrust. Its main aim. can be
viewed as.the prevention of
the breakdown of the family
unit and generally, to pro-
tect the welfare of the mem- |
bers of the family, especial-*
ly children. Where such
attempt at prevention of
family breakdown fails, it
seeks to improve the gener-
al administration of family
laws and speedy rehabilita-

‘tion of those who seek the

court’s assistance. There is
a greater underlying aim,
that is, an increase in the sta-
bility of the country as a

Are no longer authorized to
conduct business on behalf of

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whole,” asserts Professor
Antoine.
In the Bahamas, with so

_ Many issues afflicting today’s

families, a Family Court
should be a superior court.
In the Bahamas, there is a
need for the establishment
of a commercial court, swift-
ly moving along litigation—
related to business— in con-
currence with international-
ly accepted legal standards.
Furthermore, the devel-
opment of revenue courts is
long overdue. Today, with
$400 million in property tax-
es uncollected, in addition
to revenue shortfalls due to
persons failing to pay cus-
toms duties, business license
fees, casino taxes, etcetera, a
Revenue Court is mandato-
ry. A Revenue Court, simi-
lar to the court established
in Jamaica in 1972 can, as
Antoine states, serve as a
“Superior Court of Record
which deals with questions
relating to taxes, duties and
other impositions due to the
Government—a modern
day Court of Exchequer.”
Moreover, when will a
Gun Court be established in
the Bahamas?
The inexcusable shortage
of judges, court and registry
staff also contributes to the
frequent mismanagement of
cases and court records. The
Bahamas’ current judge-
general population ratio is
one of the worst in the
world.I have previously sug-
gested that the government
establish tribunals and utilise
fair-minded Justices of the
Peace to. settle minor dis-
putes and deliver justice in a
timely manner. This recom-

' mendation, along with other

legislative changes, such as
amending the Bail Act, pass-
ing a Jurors Act and imple-
menting a law that supports
plea bargaining, will, no
doubt help to alleviate the
60,000-plus case backlog.

There is also a need to’
extend court hours into the
night and also on weekends.

“What's more, technologi-
cal upgrades are desperate-
ly needed as court staff are
still forced to use antiquated
means for record-keeping,
particularly since numerous
court buildings lack. com-
puters, the internet and the
other relevant technologies
of 21st century societies.

The Bahamas has yet to
catch up with the developed
world that now “e-manage”
case files, documents, war-
rants, judgments, notices
and other court-related
work.

This can Rnaueationably
be an improvement over the
present situation and reduce
the likelihood of files sud-
denly being "lost" or "miss-
ing."

Lastly, in championing
the administration of justice,
the government must also
ensure that the construction
of new court houses is com-

pleted.



















THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2u10, PAGE 7



GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY’S ‘SELF-STORAGE/WAREHOUSE’ PROGRAMME
GBPA makes
business
ownership
easier

FOR specific business cat-
egories in Freeport, the cost
of starting a business just got
lower, thanks to the newest
business development ini-
tiative launched by the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority.

The recently introduced
‘Self-Storage/Warehouse’
programme allows individ-
uals in specified trades to
use storage facilities as
approved premises to apply
for a GBPA. business
licence.

Company president, Ian
Rolle, explained the premise
of the initiative.

“Tt is a fact that there is a
great demand to enter into
business, but the start-up
costs makes it difficult for
some. cera

“The Self-Storage/Ware-
house initiative allows entre-
preneurs, in specific cate-
gories, to take advantage of
the benefits offered as a
GBPA licensee.” |
_ Additionally, according to
GBPA’s business develop-
ment manager, Derek New-
bold, “This initiative pro-
vides a good opportunity for
reduction in overhead
expenses for certain busi-
ness categories. . i

“We are cognisant of the

current economic climate



business development manger, Derek Newbold.

~ and will continue to seek out

initiatives that can provide

some level of relief to small

businesses.”

John Gallagher, propri-

etor of Albacore Storage
Units, agrees.
\ “If you take a small busi-
ness person like a window
cleaner, he doesn’t need to
rent an office.

“Now he can get a stor-
age unit, put all of his equip-
ment in it where it’s secured,
and operate his business
using a cell phone.”

Albacore and Bronces-

tone Self Storeaway Unit

_are two on-island facilities.

offering self-storage units.
Opened in 2000, Bronces-
tone features 36 units in
three sizes - 5’ x 10’, 10’ x

10’, and 10’ x 20’.

Rental prices range from
$139 to $289 per month,
along with a refundable $100
security deposit.

Broncestone’s propri-
etress, Pauline Hepburn is
equally excited about
GBPA’s newest concept.

- “I’m open to this new ini-

tiative because these are



‘GBPA INITIATIVE BOOSTS BUSINESS = Albacore’s president, John Gallagher, chats with GBPA

.

hard times and I think it’s
fair for the Port-to do this
to allow others to become
business owners,” she said.

Abroad

She anticipates benefiting
from the programme as a
provider of self-storage facil-
ities, a concept which she
and her husband brought to
the island after viewing sim-
ilar structures abroad.

Located on Logwood
Road West, Broncestone
has 24-hour security and



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O DISCUSS STORIE





“It is a fact
that there is a
great demand
to enter into
business, but
the start-up.
costs makes it
difficult for
some.”



Ian Rolle

controlled gate access.

Units can be rented by
completing a simple appli-
cation form and submitting a
photo ID.

Albacore’s application
process is just as simple and
the facility on Settlers Way
offers 46 units in four sizes —

‘10’ x 10’, 10’ x 15’, 10° x 20°

and 20’ x 20’.

Monthly rental prices
range from $100 to $300,
along with a refundable
security deposit of one mon-
th’s rent.

Since opening its doors in
January of this year, Alba-




LOU EM LUT CTU RL

BRONCESTONE
STORAGE UNITS -
Proprietress, Padline
Hepburn, shows off
one of three sizes of
units available for
rental at her facility.

core has been inundated

. with tenants, prompting Mr

Gallagher to convert some
of his former 20’ x 20’ units
into dual 10’ x 20’ units.
The new facility features
coded gate access, along
with individual locks on the
roll-up doors for each unit
and individual intérior locks
for the newly converted dual
compartments. :
Complete fire-proofing,
daylight only access and
night-guard lighting add to
Albacore’s security. .
Now with the launch of
GBPA’s new ‘Self-stor-
age/Warehouse’ initiative,

_ both storage facility owners

are looking forward to
increased rentals as more
persons take advantage of
their premises in their quest
to become GBPA licensees.
In fact, they’re both consid-
ering expanding their self-
storage facilities as the need
arises.

“Allowing certain trades-
people to use storage units
as approved premises to
apply for a GBPA business
license is a great idea,” Mr
Gallagher said.

“T like the open door pol-
icy and the new initiatives
launched by the Port to
assist licensees.”











PAGE 8, CaP AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Boosting io ties



By VLADIMIR PETROVIC



ast week, I was proud

to participate in the

ongoing strengthen-

ing of relations

between my country, the Republic
of Serbia, and your beautiful
nation. Though we are an ocean
apart, we share mutual interests
in the sanctity of state sovereignty,
international law and religious
freedom. Moreover, with the
understanding that what is hap-
pening in the Balkans will have
‘lasting repercussions globally,
Prime Minister Ingraham and

Deputy Prime-Minister-Simenette -

have been leaders in addressing
the current stalemate over
Kosovo's future for which the peo-
‘ple of Serbia are grateful.

In 2008, ethnic-Albanian Mus-

lims in the Kosovo province of Ser-
bia unilaterally declared their inde-
pendence in contravention to our
constitution, threatening our sov-
ereignty and territorial integrity.
As the Prime Minister and I dis-

cussed, Serbia has not wavered:

from its position that it will never
recognise such a declaration. ‘This
position was born out of a com-
mitment-to. our.constitution and
international law. eas

The international_-community
faces an age of uncertainty if the
damage is not quickly contained.
Constantly shifting borders and.a
heightened threat of armed con-
flict as states are reshaped by eth-
nic and religious minorities from
within will challenge international
peace and security.. The borders
of every multi-ethnic and multi-
region state would be permanent-
ly threatened by secessionism, pro-
ducing lasting instability through-
out the world. ~

Separatist groups eager to carve
out a piece of their existing states

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_via secession are watching the legal

developments over Kosovo with a

-keen eye. More than 100 of these

groups in dozens of countries are
weighing the potential benefits of
using the Kosovo textual template.
Whether in Central Asia and the

Caucasus, the Pyrenees, the Mid-
‘dle East, the Far East, Africa or’

the Caribbean, this recipe is likely
to be followed.

: Serbia is fully committed to find-
ing a realistic approach to closing

‘the Pandora's box opened up by

Kosovo's aggression, by attempting
to succeed, through a multilateral
peaceful dialogue that produces a
mutually acceptable solution to all
outstanding issués.. UN Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon has stated
that the General Assembly "will
determine how to proceed on this
matter," and we look forward to
focusing on the consequences and
implications of Kosovo's actions.

Integrity
Our ongoing political and diplo-

matic defence of the Kosovo
province is not limited, however, to

maintaining our territorial integri- |

ty.

Kosovo, in many ways, is the cul-
tural and spiritual heartland of Ser-
bian Orthodox Christians. Some
have: gone so far as to say that for

us, it is our Jerusalem.

Within the Kosovo province are
the churches, monasteries and oth-
er religious sites cherished by the
Serbian Orthodox Church. These
are the only cultural monuments
on the European continent, some
of which date to the 12th, 13th and

14th century, that need to be .

guarded by international armed
forces because they would likely
be defaced or demolished without
protection. For the devout, this is
deeply holy land threatened by
hostile forces.

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URGENT SESSION: Serbian lawmakers convene at a session of the Serbian Parliament in baled; Serbia, Monday, July

“Marko Drobnjakovie/AP Photo

26, 2010. Lawmakers in Serbia have met for an urgent session expected to reaffirm the country’s bid to keep Kosovo despite
a World Court ruling backing the legality of Kosovo’s independence declaration.

The road ahead is uncertain, but
we are committed to a peaceful
solution. This is our one and only
option. If the Albanian leaders in
Pristina are willing to rejoin us at
the negotiating table, we believe

_that a mutually agreeable solution

is possible. This is the only way to
reinforce shared priorities, and to
complete the democratic transfor-
mation of the Balkans into a sta-
ble, prosperous region fully inte-
grated into the European Union.
In the meantime, we will continue
to seek out allies in every corner of
the world to reinforce basic prin-

ciples of international law and |

achieve prosperity and stability in
the region.

e Mr Petrovic is the Ambassador
of the Republic of Serbia to the
United States and Special Envoy
of the President of Serbia to the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.



(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)
KEY DEBATE: Serbian President, Boris Tadic, 2nd left, attends a session of the Ser-
bian-Parliament in Belgrade, Serbia, Monday, July 26, 2010.

Small Ship and Yacht Inspector/ Surveyor Trainee |

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is a world class International Ship ee. and
a flag of choice, with an expanding Yacht Register.

We would like to identify suitable candidates to be trained as small ship and
yacht inspectors/surveyors; whose jobs would include, but not be.limited to; the
inspection and surveying of vessels less than 500GT, in accordance with the
relevant IMO Conventions, Caribbean Cargo Ship Safety Code (CCSSC), Small
Commercial Vessel Code (SCV) and the Bahamas Yacht Code as required,

QUALIFICATIONS
The prospective applicants should be in possession of Master up to 3000 GT,

Near Coastal or Limited (extended) Coastal Trades or Chief Engineer up to 3000
kW Propulsion Power. Officers holding an Officer In Charge of a Navigational

Watch Certificate or an Officer In Charge of an Engineering Watch Certificate

with at least 12 months approved sea-going sefvice as an officer holding since
acquiring that certificate may express an interest. Persons not holding STCW
certification but having two years approved sea-going experience plus inspection
and or surveying experience may also be considered. Documentary evidence
demonstrating the required qualification and/or experience must be submitted
with the applications. | .

Candidates wil also have to have a medical certificate of fitness valid for not
more than two years and be at least 20 years of age.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 30" September 2010

Applications must be sent to:-
The Director
Bahamas Maritime Authority
Manx Corporate Centre
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-4679
Neeson ae

TO TET STORIES ON ryt PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 9



Jamaican intellectual | 7! ~

Dudley Thompson
addresses audience
in the Bahamas

Event held under the patronage of
Governor General and Lady Foulkes

SCORES of Bahamians were
treated to a lecture ‘by
renowned Jamaican intellectual
Dudley Thompson at a‘recep-
tion sponsored by Delta Lamb-
da Boulé of Sigma Phi Pi Fra-
ternity.

The event was held at the
Balmoral Club under the
patronage of Governor General
Sir Arthur and Lady, Foulkes.

Delta Lambda Boulé is the
local chapter of Sigma Pi Phi
Fraternity which w2s estab-
lished in Philadelphia in 1904
in order to afford successful,
university-educated ‘men of
colour’ who were excluded from
mainstream American society
because of their race, an oppor-
tunity to meet and get to know
the best of each other.

Fraternity

Some prominent members of
the fraternity included persons
such as WEB Dubois; Rev Mar-
tin Luther King, Jr; US
Supreme Court Justice Thur-
good Marshall; Atlanta Mayor
and former UN Ambassador
Andrew Young; former head of
the Urban League and advisor
to presidents, Vernon Jordan;
the late tennis great, Arthur
Ashe; the late Secretary of
Commerce Ron Brown; and
noted Historian John Hope
Franklin.

Today there are three mem-
bers of the fraternity serving in
President Obama’s Cabinet,
including Attorney General
Eric Holder, and eight in the



& _
S |

United States Congress. Sigma
Pi Phi-has 125 chapters in the
United States and the Bahamas.

Delta Lambda Boulé's best
known social action programme
is the Gentlemen’s Club, which
has centered on developing
the best in young Bahamian
men. i

Scholarships

Over the past 19 years, nearly
700 young mén have’ passed
through the Gentlemen’s Club

‘and approximately 43 million

has been awarded these gents
in scholarships to Fisk Univer-
sity, Morehouse College and
Saint John’s University.

Dr Dudley Thompson, aged
93, has enjoyed a very success-
ful legal and political career in
Africa and the Caribbean.

Born in Panama, he entered
Oxford University as Jamaica’s
Rhodes Scholar in 1947 and in
1950 was called to the Bar in
London from Gray’s Inn after
which he practised as a barrister
in East Africa, 'Tanganyika
(now Tanzania) and Kenya,

where he was part of the inter- -

national team defending Jomo
Kenyatta in the Mau Mau tri-
als in Kenya.

He has also practiced law in
Trinidad, Barbados, St Kitts,
Dominica, the Bahamas, Grena-
da and elsewhere in the West
Indies.

He has served as a member
of both the Senate and as the
leader of Government Business
in the House of Representatives

rol

NO, ah ADPROIANT
~

RECEPTION: Members of Delta Lambda Boulé along with Dr Dudley Thompson and Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes

in Jamaica. eS

He also served in various
Cabinet posts in the Jamaican
government including as Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs, Nation-
al Security, and Mines and Nat-
ural Resources.

Independence

Dr Thompson?’s lecture, enti-
tled “the African Renaissance”,
focused on his involvement in
the Pan African movement
which culminated in the inde-
pendence of several countries
in Africa and the West Indies
from Great Britain.

During his lecture, Dr
Thompson noted that “slavery
was not the beginning of our
history, but that it interrupted
our history”.

He noted that “we did not
descend from slavery, we
ascended from slavery.”

Commenting on the event,
Arnold Forbes, president of

DW

@

Wet ie Net :

13-5310 ah Gi

Delta Lambda Boulé, said:
“This event is one in a series of
distinguished lectures that the
Boule intends to sponsor.
“The opportunity to hear Dr



Thompson is an honour and a
privilege and is of tremendous

‘ historical import for Bahami-

ans to be featured to such an
outstanding Caribbean icon.”

Ecuador shaken by

7.1 magnit

QUITO, Ecuador

ude quake

A POWERFUL earthquake shook the South American nation of
Ecuador on Thursday, but there were only scattered reports.of damage
or injury, according to Associated Press. ;

The magnitude-7.1 quake that hit-at 6:54 a.m. (1154 GMT) was felt
across much of the nation, including the capital, Quito.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake was centered 110 miles (175

kilometers) southeast of Quito.

But it was also-very deep — 131 miles (211 kilometers) below the sur-
face — a distance that might have blunted its damage.
Ecuador's national Geophysics Institute reported that some areas

shook for almost 10 minutes.

It said several houses were reported damaged in the cities of Guayaquil

LLL nc

‘and Manta, where one person suffered minor injuries.







PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ATO ines
CEE
TEU

_ (BIS Photo: Derek Smith)
TOURISM BOOST: Pictured (from left) are Mr Rahming, Ms
Walkine, Mr. Maranescu and Tyrone Sawyer, director of
Sports Tourism.

y
,

The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation and the
Bahamas Judo Federation are entertaining the possibil-
ity of having the Bahamas host large-scale judo compe-
titions that would bring great numbers of visitors and
media opportunities.

Bahamas Judo Federation president D’Arcy Rahmine
and International Judo Federation representative Vlad
Maranescu called on Tourism Director General Vernice
Walkine and introduced the idea of hosting future tour-
naments. ~

Ms Walkine said events that attract media attention
while bringing visitors to fill hotel rooms and patronise
local businesses are enterprises that the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation wants to encourage.

Experience

She also pointed out that the Bahamas has had much
experience in staging large-scale international events.

“We have hosted many international events, not the
least of which was Miss Universe last year,” she said.

“Prior to that, we hosted the FIFA World Congress.
The point I am making here is that we have demon-
strated our ability to host these international events.”

Ms Walkine also explained that convenient flight ser-
vices and the availability of language interpreters and oth-
er professional services makes the Bahamas an attractive
place for hosting multi-national events.

riving Instructor’s Manual
puts focus on road safety

ROAD SAFETY: Transport Permanent Secrelati Colin Higgs addressing the launch workshop for the Driving Instructor’ s Manual.
Also shown, from left, are: Marc Ingraham, economist in the Transportation Policy and Planning Unit; Kenrick Bowe and Sterling
Moss, senior examiners in the Road Traffic Department; Errol McPhee, deputy controller; and Vashti Hinds.

THE launch of the Driving Instruc-
tor’s Manual and the introduction of
driving simulators are evidence of the
government’s commitment to improv-

. Ing road safety, Transport permanent

secretary Colin Higgs said.
On Thursday at Workers House, Mr
Higgs addressed the launch workshop

for the manual, which contains sec-.

tions on: traffic rules and regulations,
road conditions, preparations for the
driving test and how to use a round-
about.

In attendance was Elizabeth Keju,
newly appointed undersecretary; Errol
McPhee. assistant controller; Khader

che co-or:nator for the New
Providence Road Improvement Pro-
ject; Albie Hope, transportation spe-
cialist; and representatives of the Traf-
fic Division of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.

Mr Higgs said the training options -
-available to people learning to drive





in the Bahamas are not “consistent”
and do not meet internationally recog-
nised standards.

As a result, he said, “many of our
novice drivers do not have the skills,
knowledge or attitudes needed to dri-
ve safely in the traffic conditions they
face on our roads.”

Workshop

Mr Higgs informed workshop par-
ticipants that in recognition of this defi-
ciency, the government, as part of the
New Providence Transport Pro-
gramme, engaged the services of the
Transport and Research Laboratory,
based in the United Kingdom, to assist
the Road Traffic Department in devel-
oping a Driving Instructor’s Manual
for the Bahamas.

The manual provides a standardised
set of guidelines that should be fol-

PHOTO: Letisha Henderson/BIS

tors. He did not say whether the gov-
ernment intends to make use of the
manual mandatory.
. According to Mr Higgs, the manual
has been produced to guide established
driving schools and instructors; those
who wish to become driving instruc-
tors; schools that run driver training
programmes; the Royal Bahamas
Police Force; examiners at the Road
Traffic Department; and representa-
tives of the car insurance industry.

“It is the government’s intention to
put into place regulations to regulate

‘driving schools and driving instruc-

tors,” said Mr Higgs. “However, prior
to bringing these regulations into force
it is proposed to introduce the Driver
Instructor’s Manual to better prepare
those in the industry to standardise an
approach to instructing persons learn-
ing to drive.”

The manual will be accessible on the
government’s Weo-sile, he added.



_. + -. ATLANTIS

PARADISE ISLAND».

JOB OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE
for

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(FOOD & BEVERAGE)

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internal controls, accounting policies and procedures, monitoring
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in finance / accounting in the hospitality industry.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS



lowed 2 all driver education instruc-

Former Venezuelan general
accused of revealing secrets

CARACAS, Venezuela

A former Venezuelan army general who .

has denounced: growing involvement by Cuban
troops in President Hugo Chavez's military
appeared before prosecutors Wednesday to
respond to charges of insulting the armed

forces and revealing military secrets, according

to Associated Press.

Retired Brig. Gen. Antonio Rivero was once
the government's emergency management
director, but he grew concerned about what he
saw as growing Cuban influence in the military
and retired early in protest over that and oth-
er issues.

He now. faces accusations that carry a pos-
sible penalty of up to 10 years in prison.

Rivero said after the arraignment hearing
before military prosecutors that he was barred
from discussing details of the case while the
investigation proceeds. He has not yet been
formally charged.

‘Innocent

In a telephone interview Tuesday night
before the hearing, he said: "I'm totally inno-
cent. ... I'm going to face it because I'm con-
vinced that I haven't committed any crime,
and I'm doing it simply for the good of my
country."

Rivero has become a political opponent of
Chavez since leaving the military and is run-
ning for a National Assembly seat in Septem-
ber elections. Some government opponents
call the case against him one more attempt to
silence a government critic through the courts.

Rivero has denounced what he calls a "pas-
sive invasion" by Cuban soldiers, saying their
influence goes far beyond what should be per-
mitted. He has said Cuban officers participat-
ed in high-level military meetings, trained
snipers, gained detailed knowledge of com-
munications and advised the military on under-
ground bunkers built to store and conceal
weapons. Rivero has expressed concern the

‘Cuban advisers now know where the. Venezue-

lan military stores weapons and where its com-
mand offices are. -

He also has said the Cubans have been help-
ing with a digital radio communications system
for security forces, meaning they have sensitive
information on antenna locations and radio
frequencies — knowledge that could be used to
help secure the status quo in Venezuela in the

‘future.

Among other issues that bother the 49-year-
old career-soldier is what he calls the "politi-
cization" of the military, including the slogan
that soldiers now repeat when saluting: "Social-
ist homeland or death!" Rivero also condemns
Chavez's enlistment of supporters in a growing
civilian militia and says it's improper for the
president, a civilian, to wear a military uni-
form as he often does.

Rivero's lawyer, Guillermo Heredia, said
his client hasn't insulted the military or
revealed anything that isn't already public
knowledge.

"Soldiers who retire have the right to give
their opinions about things in the country, ‘and
to denounce things they consider abnormal,"
Heredia told reporters after the closed hearing.

Military prosecutors did not ea
comment on the case.

Chavez, who views Fidel Castro asa "father"

and mentor, has acknowledged that Cuban

troops are teaching his soldiers how to repair
radios in tanks and to store ammunition,

among other tasks.

He has declined to elaborate on the mili-
tary assistance, saying everything his close ally
does helps strengthen Venezuela.

Cuban officials.have dismissed claims of
undue influence in Venezuela, saying the vast
majority of Cubans working in the country
are assigned to medical, education, sports and
cultural programs. Other Cubans have been
working on software for Venezuela's passport
and identification-card systems.

Venezuela, in turn, is Cuba's largest trading
partner and provides more than 100, ),000 barrels
of oil a day in exchange for social services
such as the Cuban doctors who see patients in
free neighborhood clinics.

Jamaica policeman charged with killing suspect

KINGSTON, Jamaica

A Jamaican police officer
allegedly caught on video
beating and shooting a sus-
pect to death has been
charged with murder,
according to Associated
Press.

Sgt. Lloyd Kelly was
released Tuesday on $12,000
bond.

charge.

in late July.

them.

Two other
detained in the case have
been released without

Kelly is accused of killing
aman who was suspected of
stabbing a woman to death

Police initially said the
officers acted in self-defense
when the man ORES

But police later said the
man was unarmed and sub-
dued after reviewing ama-
teur footage recorded by an
unknown eyewitness.

Attorney Oswest Senior-
Smith said Kelly is innocent.

Jamaica has one of the
highest rates of police
killings in the Western
Hemisphere, according to
Amnesty International...

officers

GE LOG ON TO Anti Py oe COM





THE TRIBU

—

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A YEAR ago, Meacher
‘Pain’ Major suffered a fourth
round TKO loss to American
‘Dangerous’ Dorin Sprivey
for the NABA lightweight
title in Buffalo, New York.

Today, they are beginning
their sparring session as new
team-mates in the X-Cel
Worldwide. Promotions as
they prepare their return in
separate matches in Virginia
Beach, Virginia on August 28.

“I’m excited to being here
and IJ want the fight fans to
know that I’m going to go out
there and give it all I got,”
said Major, who will be fight-
ing in the co-main event at
the Virginia Beach Conven-



TC eS
for NACRA

Under-13 men's
ATT eS
TM ETT

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



THE Bahamas Rugby
Union is gearing up for one of
its biggest tournaments ever
held at the Winton Rugby
Union.

On Saturday, the BRU will
open the North America
Caribbean Rugby Association
(NACRA) Under-19 men
and women tournament, fea-.
turing teams from the
‘Bahamas, the Cayman
Islands, Mexico, Bermuda,
Trinidad & Tobago, Barba-
dos, the United States, Cana-
da and a Caribbean Select.

According to Elystan Miles,
the event coordinator, the
tournament is being split in
two.

The men’s tournament has
six teams comprising of two
divisions with the Cayman
Islands, the Bahamas and
Bermuda in the A and Mexi-
co, Trinidad & Tobago and*
Barbados.

There are five teams in the
women’s tournament from
the United States, Canada,
the Cayman Islands, the
Bahamas and the Caribbean
Select.

The Caribbean Select team
is comprised of the best play-
ers from Jamaica, Bermuda,
Guyana, Barbados, British
Virgin Islands, St. Vincent &°
Grenadines and Mexico.

“This is.a pretty big deal
for us,” said Miles, noting that
this is the first time that the
Bahamas has hosted such a
prestigious event. “This is also
the first time that we are hav-
ing a ladies’ team.

“We’re not really antici-
pating great things from them.
We're just glad that they have
finally gotten a team together.
This is the first step for wom-
en’s rugby in the country.”

e The Bahamian women’s
team is comprised of the fol-
lowing:

Deja Rutherford, Morgan-
na Thurston, Aiva Beckford,
Antinique Bastian, Jewette
Rodgers, Comptessa Hanna,
Tazia Rutherford, Alex New-
bold (Captain), Phylicia
Woods, Jayde Knowles,
Dawn Demeritte (Co-Cap-
tain/Backs Captain), Bronia
Beckford, Michaela Knowles,
Ashley Blyden, Lynette
Nixon, Lorraine Lafleur and
June Collie.

This will be their initial
appearance with their first.
match ‘set for Thursday at 5
p-m. against the Caribbean
Select. They won’t play again
until Saturday, August 21
against the Cayman Islands.

SEE page 14



Trains with new team-mate
Sprivey for co-main event

POOP OEOOHSOSSOOHAHOOSHGOTHTOHSHOHSOOHOO HHT OHOSOSEEDOOHODABE0ROOe

tion Center against an oppo-
nent yet to be named.

Now fighting at the 130
pound lightweight division,
Major said unlike when he

was home and he was just.

fighting one or two rounds
‘because of his dominant per-
formances, he now has to pre-
pare to go longer distances.
This fight is scheduled for
eight rounds and so Major
said he will have to take his
time and really pace himself
because he’s in a different
style of training in Virginia.
“Some guys just come in
there to take fights, but they



are normally hard to stop,”
Major said, “So I just have to
get used to that and put in the
work so.that I can be able to
perform when the fight
comes.”

Since losing to Sprivey on
November 6, Major came
home on April 11 when he
won on points over Ameri-
can Robert DaLuz to improve
his win-loss record to 17-4
with one draw.

Now he’s in Virginia where
he noted that it’s not only hot

‘and humid, but he also has a

challenge in sparring with
Sprivey leading up to the

Major prepares for fight in August

fight.

“Everything is coming
along great. It’s good that I
have this opportunity. to-work
with him,” said Major of his
former opponent, who has
moved up to the mid-
dleweight division.

“Even though I just fought
him last year, he was the ener-
gy, but now we’re just like
best friends. He’s a great, cool
guy. I’m glad that we can

- work together. He just signed

with X-Cel and Nick
Garone.”

Despite the fact that Major

has ventured into a new envi-

ronment, he said he’s trying to
learn as much as he possibly
can to help him as he tries to
progress in the future. °

SEE page 14




READY: Meacher Major






























SOFTBALL
LATE RITES ©
FORWOOD ~

e A series of sesportsrvices
in New Providence and
Eleuthera have been planned
for next week for the late
Tyrone ‘Ron, Figure’ Wood.

A wake is set for Wednesday
at 7 p.m. at the Banker’s Field
at the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex. On Thursday at 7:30
p-m. at Bethel Baptist on Meet-
ing Street, a Memorial Service
will take place.

Then on Sunday at 1 p.m. at

_Harvest Time Tabernacle in
Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, the
funeral service will take place.

Interested persons wishing to
travel to Eleuthera for the ser-
vice should note that Pineapple
Air is putting a number of extra
flights to and from Eleuthera
on Sunday.

The Island Link will also be
leaving from the Hatchet Bay

Tar Heels rout Giants 130-87
in Summer of Thunder







«

College Scrimmages opener

By BRENT STUBBS , ‘
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE North Carolina Tar Heels and famed _

coach Roy Williams didn’t have any mercy
_on the Bahamas Basketball Federation’s
national champions Commonwealth Bank
Giants. Ae 5

Playing in the opening game of the Sum-
mer of Thunder College Scrimmages on
Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium, the Tar Heels clobbered the Giants
130-87.

The Tar Heels, who won the last of their
five NCAA Division One championship
titles in 2009, had seven players in double fig-
ures in what turned out to be an exciting
match for the fans.

Tyler Zeller, playing 26 minutes, led the
attack with 24 points on 8-of-12 shooting
from the field and 8-of-11 from the foul line.
He also pulled down a game high 13
rebounds.

Before fouling out, Harrison Barnes and
Reggie Bullock, who came off the bench,
both contributed 21 points with eight
rebounds apiece. Dexter Strickland added
18, Justin Watts 13, John Henson. 11, Will

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE

Graves 10 and Leslie McDonald chipped in
with nine.

Coach Williams, who is returning for his
second stint in the Bahamas, having brought
his Tar Heels here five years ago when they
were successful in their double header, said:
“T love it here. It’s great for our team. It was
good for our team in 05 and hopefully it will
be good for us here again.” '

Williams spoke as they were preparing to '

play to play their final game last night against
a Bahamas All-Star team. : :

“It’s a beautiful place, the people treat
you great. So I have nothing, but great pos-
itive feelings.”

Williams said he was quite impressed with
the level of talent, as he had been during
his initial visit. /

He noted that the trip would help his team
as they prepared for the upcoming. colle-
giate season. ;

For the Giants, who were outmatched in
height, but made up with some spectacular
plays, Jeremy Hutchinson pumped in a game
high 29 points on 7-of-16 shooting from the

SEE page 14 ‘
SEE pictures on pg 14

BIG JAM: North

weath Bank Giants...

... and finishes
strong to the rim.

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dock at 6 p.m. on Sunday. -

Ceoeccoeeccccccoscccocecccosose

SOFTBALL
BGDSA ALL-STAR
WEEKEND

e THE Bahamas Govern-

ment Departmental Softball
Association wishes to thank its

>















: i smany fans who showed up on
Carolina Tar Heels Saturday to view the 32rd Slow-
Jason Watts fly to pitch Softball All-Star games at
the rim for a two the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-

_ handed dunk plex.
against Common- This year, the BGDSA exec-

utives played against the execu-
tives of the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Basketball
Association in softball and bas-
ketball.

In softball, the BGDSA won
15-5 in the opener before they
moved to. the gym where the
BGDSA took an early 9-2 lead
and held on for a 20-15 win in
basketball.

The D’Albenas Agency was
the major sponsor for the event.














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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

PGA begins after

fog delay, and
little is clear



By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer

SHEBOYGAN, Wis. (AP)
— Golfers finally got.on the
course after a 3-hour delay at
the PGA Championship, only
to have fog bring play to a
halt once again.

What a fittingly odd start
to the final major in what's
become the strangest of sea-
sons.

Tee times were pushed
back 3 hours and 10 minutes
because of fog so soupy it
obscured Lake Michigan, and
Tiger Woods and other play-
ers could do little but wait it
out on the driving range and
putting green. A handful of
groups made it on the course
before play was halted again
because of poor visibility on
No. 3, but players stayed on
the course and the second
delay lasted only six minutes.

The PGA is known for pro-
ducing some unexpected win-
ners, but it's even more wide
open than usual this year.
Woods' game is as big a mess
as his personal life, Phil Mick-

elson has forsaken his beloved *

burgers for broccoli because
of arthritis and Lee. West-
wood is at home with a calf
injury. With five of the last

six majors won by first-timers,
including the U.S. Open
(Graeme McDowell) and the
British Open (Louis Oost-
huizen), just about every guy

in the locker room is think-’

ing this could be his week.
"This.is probably as wide
open a major as we've seen
in a long time," Steve Stricker
said. "I think we all have a
sense that if you can play well
and get it going, then you
have that great opportunity
to win here." -
Woods, who needs a good
week to hang onto his No. 1
ranking and end the hubbub
over his Ryder Cup status, is

‘now teeing off at midday ina |

group with Vijay Singh, the
winner the last time the PGA
was at Whistling Straits, and
defending champion Y.E.
Yang. a

It was Yang's victory at last
year's PGA that was the first
sign of trouble for Woods,
though no one could have
imagined this dramatic of a
downfall.

Woods hasn't come close
to winning a tournament since
running over that fire hydrant
on Thanksgiving, unleashing a
firestorm of tawdry details
about his rampant infidelities.
While his personal life is

beginning to "normalize," his
game is doing the exact oppo-
site.

He slumped to a néw low
last week, shooting a whop-
ping 18-over 298 and manag-
ing to beat only one player in
the 80-man field at Firestone
— a course where he's won
seven times. He's broken par
in only four of his last 20

rounds, and is scrambling to |

hang onto the No. 1 ranking
he's held for a record 270
weeks in a row.

Mickelson has come up
short in his previous oppor-
tunities to reach No. | for the
first time in his career. But he
could do it this week with five
scenarios: a victory; runner-
up finish with Woods out of
the top three; third-place fin-
ish with Woods out of the top
11; fourth-place finish with
Woods outside the top 46; a
two-way tie for fourth with
Woods missing the cut.

Mickelson tees off in the
afternoon with McDowell and

_Oosthuizen. Playing two

groups ahead of them are
Stricker, the Wisconsin native
and No. 4 player in the world,
and Rory Mcllroy, who tied a
major championship record
with a 63 in the first round of
the British Open.







GOOD STROKE: Tiger Woods hits a shot on the 18th hole in a driving rain during a practice round for
the PGA Championship golf tournament on Wednesday at Whistling Straits in Haven, Wis.
. (AP Photo)

\



GOLD FEVER: Hungary's
Katinka Hosszu swims to
winning the gold medal in the
women's 200m individual
medley final at the European
Swimming Championships in
Budapest, Hungary, on
Thursday.
; (AP Photo)





Ivanovic turns down
wild card at Rogers Cup

MONTREAL (AP) —
Ana Ivanovic has declined a
wild-card entry into the main
draw of the Rogers Cup next
week.

’ Ina posting on her website,
Ivanovic said her request for'a

wild card was turned down;

weeks ago. Tournament
director Eugene Lapierre
offered‘her direct entry.into
the Montreal tournament
Tuesday, but she turned it
down.

Ivanovic, whose first major
victory came in Montreal in
2006, said she declined
because of comments made
by Lapierre to a Montreal
newspaper. Lapierre said the
62nd-ranked player didn't
deserve a wild card and hoped
to leave a spot open for a
Canadian player. si

The 2008 French 'Open win-
ner wrote she would have
loved to play but was hurt by
Lapierre's comments.

Lapierre issued a statement
saying Ivanovic was always
welcome at the Rogers Cup.





. HURT CARD: Serbian Ana Ivanovic hits a backhand in her match

against Yaroslava Shvedova, of Kazakhstan, at the Cincinnati Open

_ tournament on Wednesday in Mason, Ohio.

Fo TES TT |

(AP Photo)

FACE OFF: Chad Dawson (left) faces off with Jean Pascal during a news conference Wednesday in
Montreal. The two will fight for Pascal's WBC-IBO light heavyweight title on Saturday in Montreal.

(AP Photo)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

patriot Evelyn Verraszto. os,

‘onds Thursday with Vérraszto just 0.01 sec-





Hosszu leads Hungary’s 1-2
in medley at Europeans.

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Katinka
Hosszu of Hungary set a meet record in the
200-meter individual medley at the European
swimming championships after edging com-

Lotte Friis of Denmark won the 800
freestyle in 8:23.27, followed Ophelie Cyriell:
Etienne of France,and Federica Pellegrini of
Italy... os bes hay? BoA ss

_.. The 30th-edition ‘of the European champi-
onships is the first major international event
where competitors can no longer wear body-
suits, which helped swimmers set dozens of
world records in recent years.

Hosszu touched in 2 minutes, 10.09 sec-

onds behind. Hannah Miley of Britain was
third.

S \ S SS
S RN
S \ \



FUTURE SIGHTS: Roger Federer of Switzerland answers questions during news conference
at the Rogers Cup ATP tournament in Toronto.



(AP Photo)

Federer sets

sights on 20

Grand Slam
titles |

November 2003.

However, Federer told the BBC that
winning 20 majors is "is something
doable for me." ;

Federer overtook Pete Sampras'
record of 14 Grand Slam titles at Wim-

, bledon in 2009. By winning the French
Open a month earlier, he became only
the sixth man in history to win all four
Grand Slam titles.

LONDON (AP) — Roger Federer
has set a goal of winning at least 20
Grand Slam titles before he retires.

The 29-year-old Swiss added his 16th
title with a victory at the Australian
Open this year.

But he failed to get beyond the quar-
terfinals at the French Open and Wim-
bledon. He's dropped to No. 3 in the
rankings, his lowest position since









‘TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 13

oT



Dolphins sign
CB Hobhis,
G Feinga

DAVIE, Fla, (AP) — Cor-
nerback Kevin Hobbs has
signed with the Miami Dol-
phins to replace reserve cor-
nerback Evan Oglesby, who
was placed on injured reserve
with a left ankle injury.

The Dolphins also re-
signed guard Ray Feinga and

waived receiver Taurus John- :

son. Feinga and Hobbs took
part in practice Thursday.The
Dolphins cut Feinga at the
start of training camp two
weeks ago. He reinforces
depth in the offensive line,
where guard Nate Garner is
idled by a foot injury.

Hobbs is a fourth-year pro
who spent two years with
Seattle and played in 14
games with two starts last year
for Detroit.








FRESH START: Donovan McNabb gestures during a game against the Washington Redskins in
Philadelphia. McNabb has one foot planted in the nation's capital and the other firmly in the City of
Brotherly Love. He is a Redskin now, but part of him will always be an Eagle.

(AP Photo)

Redskins, Bills
start anew in Ist

over five games.

The carry-over was evident in. their 6-10 regular sea-

son.

Tlie Redskins were even worse, going 4-12. Now both’
teams have new coaches, both are installing 3-4 defens-
. es, and both have questions at receiver and offensive

line.

preseason game

LANDOVER, Md. (AP) — The Buffalo Bills say it
will be funny to see Donovan McNabb in a Washington
Redskins uniform Friday night.

But the Bills will more interested in putting on a good
DeHOFanCr, Buffalo had a terrible preseason last year
— when the starting offense scored only three points



And there will be plenty of interest in McNabb, who
is learning a new offense for the first time his rookie sea-

son in 1999,

In other preseason games Friday night, it's Jack-
sonville at Philadelphia and Kansas City at Atlanta.



4

In the land of soccer, NBA eyes African inroads

By RUKMINI CALLIMACHI
Associated Press Writer

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) —
On a rectangle of dirt sepa-
rating two arms of a congest-
ed highway, a game of soccer
is under way — just as it is
every day in cities through-
out Africa. Not far away, a
team of coaches from the

NBA is trying to expand the -

continent's options. .

For the eighth consecutive
year, and the first time in
Senegal, coaches from the
NBA are mentoring 60 of
Africa's best players during
the annual Basketball With-
out Borders camp, hoping to
raise the profile of a sport that
lags far behind soccer across
much of the continent.

"We are here and we are
making an investment in
Africa," said, Senegalese
native Amadou Gallo Fall,
the NBA's vice president of
development in Africa.
"There are 6-foot-8 soccer
players out there that don't
know that there is another
sport where their height is
actually a positive.

"Our goal is to see more
kids bouncing than kicking
the ball."

In Senegal, however, there
are so few basketball courts
that NBA officials say most
cities and towns outside
Dakar can consider them-
selves lucky if they have even
one. Many players practice
dunks with a soccer ball
because basketballs are scarce
and expensive,

Despite ‘the

¢

lack of

resources, the NBA says -

LeBron, Carmelo,

Africa has one of the globe's |

greatest reserves of untapped
talent.’

Since 1984, 25 players from
Africa have made it to the
NBA — five times more than
from China, which was con-
sidered the next talent
pipeline after Yao Ming's
meteoric rise, according to

NBA senior vice president of _

basketball qperations-inter-
national Kim Bohuny. And
last year, a count performed
by The Associated Press
found more than 170 African
players at U.S. colleges, junior
colleges-and universities dur-
ing the 2008-09 season.

"We're just starting to tap
into that potential," Bohuny
said.

This year, the 60 players
from 22 countries represent a
cross-section of the challenges

faced by those attempting to

play basketball on a continent
where soccer is not only the
most popular sport but also a
way out of poverty. For years,
one of the largest billboards in

Dakar featured Senegal strik- ©

er El Hadji Diouf in an ad for

Tigo, a major cell phone:

provider. Barefoot boys
throughout the city play in
alleyways, on highway medi-
ans and on the beach in the
hopes of being discovered by
a scout and getting a chance
at a better life.

Cedric Amegah, a lanky .

teenager from Burkina Faso
who attended the camp, said
his parents are constantly try-
ing to’ reorient him toward
soccer,

"When me and my friends

go to shoot hoops, our par- -



BS Kage,

NBA SCOUTING: A young African player defends against New York
Knicks’ Ronny Turiaf (right) during a Basketball Without Borders

training session in Dakar, Senegal.

ents are always saying, 'No.
Don't play basketball. Play
soccer,'" he said.

Among the messages that
the NBA camp is hoping to
project is that basketball can
be just as lucrative.

(AP Photo)

On the opening day of the
camp last Thursday, the play-
ers and officials that took
turns at the podium were
walking examples of success,
such as the 7-foot-2 Dikem-
be Mutombo, originally from

Congo, who is considered one
of the league's greatest defen-
sive players of all time. He
used his NBA earnings to
finance a $29 million hospital
in Kinshasa, the Congolese
capital where he grew up. .
Other NBA players at the
clinic included Charlotte Bob-

cats center DeSagana Diop,’

who grew up in a gritty Dakar
suburb where the only place
to practice was a sandy court
that made it nearly impossible
to dribble, and Memphis
Grizzlies center Hasheem
Thabeet of Tanzania, the sec-
ond pick in the 2009 draft.
Yet for the young players
attending this year's camp,

perhaps the most convincing :

proof of the opportunities
that lie ahead are the NBA
players who were discovered
at past Basketball Without
Borders camps. They include
Luc Mbah a Moute, who
understood only a few words
of English when he attended
the first NBA camp held in
Africa in Johannesburg in
2003.

Mbah a Moute, a native of
the French-speaking part of
Cameroon, used the contacts
he made at the camp to win a
scholarship to the Montverde
Academy in Florida and then
went on to UCLA before
being drafted by the Milwau-
kee Bucks.

Hoping more and more
Africans will get that chance,
the NBA has opened its first
permanent office in Africa,
based in Johannesburg, in
March.

Chukwudi Maduabum, a
19-year-old Nigerian who is

just shy of 7 feet, said his first

“sport was soccer but every

year as he got taller, his long
limbs got progressively more

‘in his way until he was trip-

ping over the other players.
Still it was hard to leave his
favorite sport. .

"I got taller and taller. And

then it didn't work out any- -

more," Maduabum said.
"And then I found basket-
ball." -

Because it is still relatively
difficult for boys to take up
basketball in the land of soc-
cer, Fall said those who do

often end up doing playing it

with passion.

He points to his own strug-
gleto learn the pane as an
example.

In the regional capital of
Kaolack, in central Senegal
where his family lived, Fall
said there was a single hoop,

’ and it was inside a walled

compound.

The then-teenager would
scale the wall to get inside and
only had a limited amount of
time to practice before a
guard came running. Each
time he was beaten with a
stick — and yet he kept com-
ing back for more. |

Fall went on to. play center
for the University of the Dis-
trict of Columbia, then spent
12 years as director of player
personnel for the Dallas Mav-
ericks.

"I'm a scout at heart and
I'm telling you the potential
here is greater than anywhere
in the world," Fall said.

"There is a Michael Jordan -

in every neighborhood wait-

_ing to be discovered."

Wade attend
negotiating
session

By RACHEL COHEN -

AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — LeBron
James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane
Wade and Chris Paul were among

the players who attended a negoti- _

ating session, between the NBA and
the union Thursday. | '
"It's important for me that all of us,

as being the faces of the NBA, to be.

involved in the negotiations and
what's going on," Anthony said as
he left. "Our future is in jeopardy if
we can't come into a mutual agree-
ment."

' Players' association executive
director Billy Hunter said 14 players
participated in the meeting in Man-
hattan. He. said the sides agreed to
hold another session before training
camp so players can take part again.

The current collective bargaining . .

agreement expires June 30, 2011.

"It was great conversation, great
dialogue going back and forth," said
Anthony, the Denver Nuggets star.
"The communication was great.
Hopefully we can come to an agree-
ment soon.'

It was the first bargaining session,

since February's All-Star weekend,
when the players rejected the owners'
proposal. The union recently sub-
mitted its own proposal, but com-
missioner David Stern has indicated

it's similar to the current CBA, and -

the owners are seeking significant
changes to the system.

Stern has.estimated the league will
lose about $370 million this season,
which the union disputes. The sides
began discussions last year but
remained far apart, creating fears of
a lockqut next summer.



Old man Odom ready seeking another chance for gold

By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer

.NEW YORK (AP) — Lamar

Odom is an old man, at least when it
comes to this U.S. basketball team.

He was reminded of that right
from the first practice in New York,
when he was so winded that he
struggled to reach the rim shooting
free throws.

While praising his leadership,
coach Mike Krzyzewski and USA
Basketball chairman Jerry Colan-
gelo acknowledge Odom isn't ready
to play.

‘Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol,
teammates on the Los Angeles Lak-
ers, are sitting out the world cham-
pionships after three straight trips
‘to the NBA finals.

So why was Odom. running
around in a college gym Wednes-
day instead of getting the rest he
needs?

"Because I was asked," he said,
"and it's a huge compliment."

"The first thing I was able to tell
Coach K and Mr. Colangelo (was)

where my body was at and they

understood. And they wanted some-
thing else from me and that was
leadership. It takes a certain type
of confidence, cockiness, humble-
ness, humility to be able to win
games, championships. For them to
have the faith in me that I have that,
it was just something I couldn’ tsay
no to."

There's more to it, though. Odom
suited up for the Americans during
their disappointing performance in
the 2004 Olympics and has wanted
another chance to wear a USA uni-

form ever since, but was stopped by '

everything from tragedy to injury.
"He had a whole series of things
that prevented him from playing.
He always wanted to play, he was
always committed to play," Colan-





OLD MAN: Lakers forward Lamar Odom
launches latest G-Shock GX56 timepiece |
at the Casio "Shock the World" press
conference at the Manhattan Center in
New York.

(AP Photo)

gelo said. "There wasn't a big sell
here to be done with Lamar Odom.
He wanted to play, he has wanted to
play. He wasn't able to."

Odom finally has the opportunity,
and even now at age 30, envisions



himself being in London in 2012 —

hopefully with a better result than

the bronze medal from Athens.
"Opening ceremony of the

Olympics is something I would love »

for my kids to be able to:see,"
Odom said during an interview at
Niketown. "That opportunity, you
don't come across something like
that, an opportunity I would say yes
to every time."

He was selected to the original
national team of players in 2006, but
pulled out before training camp after
the death of his 6?-month-old son
while sleeping in his crib. Odom
couldn't participate the following
year after having surgery on his left
shoulder.

But Colangelo went back to. him
for this pool, making Odom the only
player from the original group to be

invited back without ever appear-_

ing for the team ‘from 2006-08.

"He's a great big. It will be huge
for us," Denver point guard
Chauncey Billups said. "He can talk
on defense, pass the ball. His expe-
rience will be valuable for this
team." .

Billups, who will be 34 next
month, is the only player older than
Odom on a roster with five players
that are 21. Besides being much
younger, most of his teammates had
much longer breaks than Odom,
whose season didn't end until June
18. ,

He was back on the floor a month
later at training camp in Las Vegas,

and the world championships in —

Turkey start Aug. 28.
"A lot of these guys had a little bit
-more time off, so they were able to
prepare for these games a little bit,"
Odom said. "But the games that
count don't start until the 28th. They
all‘ count, but as far as the medal
games, I'll work myself back into
shape. Got enough time to do that."

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Trying to squeeze in as much rest
time as possible, Odom took the
redeye to New York and didn't
arrive until Tuesday morning, hours
before the first workout. He would-
n't be relaxing much in his home-
town, planning a trip after practice

‘Wednesday to Queens to spend time

with his two children.

. Odom wasn't on the floor much
while the Americans scrimmaged,
but his playing time will likely
increase next week when they head
to Europe.

"He's got to use all these exhibi-
tions to get into his game shape,
He's not there, but he willbe there.
He's a pro and he's an NBA cham-
pion," Krzyzewski said. ."The fact
he's here is good, and just a matter
of getting his legs under him."

Besides his experience, the Amer-
icans need Odom for his size. At 6-
foot-10, he's one of the tallest play-
ers on the undersized roster and
would perhaps even see time at cen-
ter.

"He's been a great leader, been a
great coach, teacher to me and all
the guys that play his position,"
Kevin Durant said. "We're going to
need that type of experience and

' knowledge, and his skill-set is rare, a

guy 6-10:can bring the ball up, pass,
shoot, get to the rim. We're going to
need him."

Odom may not be the old man if
he plays two years from now, when
some of the 2008 Olympians could
return. Colangelo said that was
another strength of Odom, that he'd
fit'in no matter what type of team
was around him.

"I'm a New Yorker. I'm from
Queens, New York," Odom said.
"You put me anywhere, you drop
me off in the middle of any country
in the world’ and I'll find my way
around, find out how to get to the
airport and then get back home."





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

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Poli mdeteeohs

FROM page 11

On Saturday, the men’s
team will begin play against
the Cayman Islands at 3 p.m.
The Cayman Islands is the

defending champions, having °

won the title in the Cayman
Islands. Last year, the
Bahamas was sixth.

Garfield Morrison, coach
of the men’s team, said they

are a lot b etter prepared than

last year, so they are looking
forward to improving on their
performance.

“We spent a lot more time
in preparation of our skill lev-
el,” Morrison said. “We have
good overall team speed and
we are physical.

“We have some good
endyrance and we have the
sunshine on our side. We

Major
FROM page 11 .

“JT just want to thank my
sponsor, Nautillus Water, for
assisting me in this venture,”
Major said. “Everything is
cool. This is a beautiful place.
It’s nice.

“T’m hoping to do at least
one more show down here
before the year is over. I think
I’m going to be stationed
between here and Buffalo.
Nick has some great plans
here in Virginia Beach.”

Major said while he’s doing
his thing in Virginia, he’s
excited about what he’s hear-
ing from the amateur and pro-







have some players that we
expect to perform very well. If
they do, we should do very
well in this tournament.”

Miles, however, said the
Bahamas will definitely have
their work cut out for them
because they have to play
against the Cayman Islands
in the opening match.

“The boys were very raw
last year, but they should
come through this. year,”
Miles said. “They trained very
hard for this tournament. The
Caymans are the favorites.
They are very strong. That’s
the benchmark for us.”

Miles said the BRU defi-
nitely have the best facilities
in the region with two fields at
the Winton Rugby Pitch and
so that should help in mak-
ing the Bahamas teams com-
petitive. ,

¢ The list of the men’s team
was not available.

\ SQ we lq"

WU



fessional segment of the sport
in the Bahamas.

He congratulated Valentino
Knowles for winning the gold
medal at the XXI Central
American and Caribbean
Games and Taureano ‘Reno’
Johnson for his success in his
fourth pro fight in Atlanta.

Major said that while it’s
good to hear that Freeman
‘the Natural’ Barr is making a
comeback on August 28 as
well in Fort Myers, he’s even
more delighted for Sherman
‘the Tank’ Williams, who will
be taking on former world
champion Evander Holyfield
in November 5 at the Joe
Louis Arena in Detroit.

“It’s good for boxing,”
Major stressed.



LALLA OLN LATALPA LLL LLL LOSI
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Tar Heels, Giants
FROM page 11

field and 15-of-19 from the
foul line in 39 minutes.
He was joined by
Gameliel Rose, who. con-
nected on 8-of-14 from the
field and 5-of-8 from the
three throw line for 21
points. Both also had five
rebounds. The only other
player in double figure was
Michael ‘Fernley’ Bain
with 11.
Jamington Johnson
came off the bench and
worked his way inside for

nine, but Mark Hanna was

limited to just seven on 2-
of-12 from the field, 1-of-4
from the three-point arch
and 2-of-5 from the foul
line.

Despite losing the game
after trailing 37-15 at the
end of the first quarter and
67-40 at the half, Hutchin-
son said the experience
was what really counted
the most.

“This was good for us to
see what we need to do to
get to the level of the
North Carolina Tar
Heels,” Hutchinson said.
“We could have been
much: better, especially if
we had controlled our
turnovers.

“But we played a hell of
a game against North Car-
olina. Everybody expect-
ed us to get blown out. But
we played a hell of a game.
If.we had controlled our
turnovers, we would have
played much better. I’m
satisfied with the way my

“But we played
a hell of a game
against North
Carolina.
Everybody
expected us to
get blown out.
But we played a
hell of a game.”

— Jeremy Hutchinson

team played.”

As for his own personal
game, Hutchinson said he
really needed to work on
his jump shot.

“Tf I can get that togeth-
er, I know I can be just as
competitive as any of these
guys,” he said.

Giants’ coach Perry
Thompson, who watched
as the Tar Heels extended
their lead with a 38-26
spurt in the third, said for
the short space of time,
two weeks, that they had
to prepare themselves,
they played very well.

“I’m proud that the guys
came out here and played
as well as they did,” he
said. “The first quarter, we
were kind of tentative. But
we came around in the sec-
ond quarter and we found
our rhythm and we made it
a much better game.

““But definitely, I knew
that fatigue was' going to
be a problem. The Tar
Heels. were definitely in
better condition than we
were. That was definitely
a factor coming down the
second half of the game.
They fought hard: So I’m
proud of them. Hats of to
North Carolina.”

e Also Wednesday night,
the NIT All-Stars pounded
the Police Crimestoppers,
which featured some of the
high school players home
from the Frank Rutherford
programme in Houston,
Texas.

With basically only six
players in action, the NIT
Stars got a game high 33
points from Dane Miller
on 13-of-13 from the field,
5-of-5 from the three-point
arch and 2-of-4 from the
foul line in 35 minutes.

Cornelius Vines had 26
points with seven assists;
Joe Muzzulla had 22
points; Brandon Triche 20
points with six assists and
five rebounds and
Jonathan Mitchell ended
up with 15 points and a
game high 10 rebounds.

Vernon Stubbs led the
Crimestoppers with 20
points, Warner Bail had
17, Michael Carey had 11
and Demyko Pinder ended
up with seven.

NIT opened a 24-17 lead
after the first quarter and

they pushed it to.52-33 at

the half. Using a 42-22
margin, the visitors were
up 94-55 at the end of the
third.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 15



‘Tremendous
storm’ brewing

FROM page one

obtained by The Tribune.

One of the prime culprits,
but not the only one, accord-
ing to Tribune sources is Cana-
dian fashion designer Peter
Nygard, who is under investi-
gation by the goverrment for
infractions to the Physical Plan-
ning Bill and the Conservation
of the Physical Landscape of
The Bahamas Act, among oth-
er areas, confirmed Earl
Deveaux, Minister of the Envi-
ronment.

The new regulations, aimed
to prevent unlawful use of

property inside the subdivision,.

are “untested” in court, accord-
ing to Tribune sources.

Vehicles delivering building
materials, transporting con-
struction personnel and service
vehicles will now be required
to produce copies of permits or
licenses in order to gain access
to the private roads.

Where the Property Owners
Association (POA) has “actual
knowledge” that access is being
sought for “a purpose connect-
ed with unlawful use of prop-
erty”, access will be denied.

“There is a policy the board
has adopted. We want to know
if people are doing things with-
out permission and if we can
verify that we won’t.allow entry

of supplies and manpower. The’
board wants to take that posi- »

tion because they are con-
cerned about the breakdown of
things that are happening. Mr
Nygard being the biggest viola-
tor, but there are others,” said 4
property owner with intimate
knowledge of the’situation.

An official POA report out-
lining the problem of the non-
compliance of specific residents,
expressed concern that the
“free reign” of some residents
could make others follow suit
and feel they can ignore inter-
nal rules and regulations and
national laws.

Mr Nygard’s activities have
come under increased scrutiny
by the Lyford Cay community
and the government in recent
weeks. Analysis from an inter-
national environmental con-

FROM page one



AN AERIAL vi view of the Nygard Cay property. .

sulting firm estimates Mr
Nygard’s property increased by
180 per cent between 1984 and

- 2007 due to “unauthorised”

dredging activity.

Recently, a letter was sent'to
Mr Nygard by the Office of the
Prime Minister addressing the
expansion activities. The attor-
ney general’s office is said to
be reviewing “all of the gov-
ernment's options,” including
the option of compulsory
demolition, confirmed Mr
Deveaux.

The POA has documented
its support of the government’s
recent position to clamp down
on the “ongoing reclamation of

Crown Land”, based on docu- ,

ments that were signed by POA
chairman, Christopher Hamp-
ton-Davies.

‘ Sources connected to the

POA said.a letter was circulat- -

ed to members advising them of
the new “standing policy.” Mr
Nygard is not a member of the
POA; however, a letter was
sent to his residence, according
to the source. Many members
are said to be “thrilled” of the
action, “because they are sick of
it.”

Not all of the home owners
have received the communica-
tion as yet, based on The Tri-
bune’s attempts to seek com-
ment from some. Mr Nygard
did not reply to messages left
for him to,comment.

“T haye not heard of the new
policy, but I know for we who
pay alot of money to the POA,
it has been irksome. He pays
nothing and‘he has access to
our roads and benefits from our
security,” said a Lyford Cay res-
ident.

The relationship between Mr

Nygard and the Lyford Cay

Community has caused “fric-
tion” oyer the years. Mr Nygard
was once a member of the

POA, but ceased paying dues’

more than ten years ago, when
he also resigned from the asso-
ciation.

His property, as well as other
‘lots on Simms Point, and a few
in the main subdivision, are not

- subject to. the same “restrictive

covenants” that guide the land
use of properties in the actual
Lyford'Cay sub division, estab-
lished in the 1950s. These prop-
erties were already owned
when:the subdivision was
planned, according to Tribune
sources.

“Even though there are
properties that do not have the
restrictive covenants on their
deeds, generally they all con-
tribute and pay dues to the
‘association, with the exception
of Mr Nygard,” said the source.

' The dispute that led to Mr
Nygard’s resignation from the

association is believed: to be’

related to his desire to pay fees

based on the assessment of his

-property at the time of pur-
“chase, and not improvements

made over the years, as is the
_ Standard policy of the POA.

“He has a right of way over

the roads.

“That is something that peo-
ple with their property have a
right to use the road for lawful
purposes. We do not interfere
with that. The roads in Lyford

‘ Cay are private, but we can’t

block access to his property
even though he-:doesn’t pay us.
That is why people get_a little
hysterical, because they pay
their dues and he doesn’t,” said
a property owner.

Travel agent

Police working in the force’s Commercial
Crimes unit recently brought the agent in for

questioning after receiving complaints from mem-"

bers of the public last week.

She is alleged to have continued selling travel
packages and-airline tickets out of the GWS
building on East and. Young Street under the
name of Fiesta Travel and Tours Ltd after thé
original owner of the business exited it five years

ago. He told ZNS news he leased the ie to the -

Pilot whales washed

FROM page one

Ms Wiethuchter said the

agent at this time.

“One particular customer said that he’d been
going to that particular agent for almost over
ten years,” said a police officer working on the
matter. ;

“People have been loyal, knowing they always
got the tickets. So now it has come to this, we’re
not going to just jump on her saying it’s fraud
without ae her a chance to eee herself.”

four whales were lying face up
near the high water mark ona
small beach on the east side
of Norman’s Cay, 12 miles
south of the beach club, ahd
the adult male was bleeding.
“It was really sad, we could-
n’t believe-it at first,” she said.
“Whales are usually on the
opposite side of the island, in
the deep ocean, so something

must have distracted or dis- .

orientated them to bring them
intg the shallows.”
Captain Bower took pho-

tographs of the whales and
sent them directly to the

Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) who posted Exuma
Land and Sea Park wardens
at the beach to collect tissue
samples. yesterday.
. And a veterinarian is
expected to visit the site today.
BNT park warden for Aba-
co David Knowles explained
how the BNT is part of the
Bahamas Marine Mammal
Stranding Network and there-
fore staff at national parks
across the country are trained

up on Exuma beach

in cbilecting tissue samples
- from beached whales wherev-

er they are found. .
“No one knows at this point .

_ what is happening and we
don’t want to speculate,” he ©

said.
“But the samples will more
or less be able to tell us some-

‘ thing.”

However, Department of
Marine Resources director
Michael Braynen said the sam-

‘ples do not always explain why

whales are beached.

“Samples are collected to .
, build up the knowledge base

and they can provide useful
information,” he said. : ©

“But determining the cause
of death can be a very com-
plex undertaking, with success
more likely if experts can get

to the carcass soon after death. ©

“In most instances this is

never determined. -

- “JT do not claim to be a
whale expert, but I do know
that pilot whales are often
found in large groups and it
appears that perfectly healthy
ones sometime end up strand-
ing due to group behaviour.”

Five pilot whales were
found washed up on the rocky
shores of Deadman’s Reef in

/Grand Bahama in April,
including a 17ft pilot whale
estimated to weigh around
3,000lbs, while the others were
12-15ft long: and around
1,800lbs.

However, they had been
beached for several days
before. they were found and
samples were not collected.

The. reason they ‘were
beached is still unknown.

A beached whale was also

FROM page one

‘youth does not bring with: it a very important’

factor — experience.
“There can never be a comparison between

Hubert Alexander Ingraham and the young

Branville McCartney. Mr Ingraham was a cabinet
minister in the Pindling administration. He was
subsequently fired from that cabinet and went on
to win. his seat as an independent Member of
Parliament. He then went on to become leader of

the FNM and: lead that party to a resounding

victory at the polls in 1992:and 1997.

“What has Mr McCartney done in compari-
son? Yes, he was a Minister of Immigration —
which we all know is a very emotive ministry.
But what has he done? What were his accom-
plishments during his tenure in Tourism? So
before someone.can come to me and say here is

a man who is ready to become Prime Minister I .

have to ask them on what Br ounds they are
speaking,” the source said.

However, according to other well: -placed
FNMs, Mr McCartney’ s “experience” and tenure
in the party does not factor in as much as his
public appeal with independent voters. While
they would admit that it is yet to be seen what
level of support the young FNM MP could attract
at a national convention, they feel certain of his
public support — especially with the growing
number, of young voters.

This demographic, The Tribune was told, may

FNM ‘best chance’

be more inclined to vote for a candidate with
which they can “relate”, versus the stereotypical

“experienced based” argument. And, he said,

considering the fact that the PLP will be putting
forth a'leader would be then in his late 60s in.2012

‘only adds to the appeal of the new “Branville

campaign.’

“It would be a landslide victory for the FNM
with a young Branville at the helm versus Perry
Christie. One is the embodiment of youth at its
prime. One is the face of the young people; a
change to future,” he said.

However, the party’s strategist, sees this argu-
ment ina totally different light.

“With Hubert Ingraham having been brought
back by the people to lead them in 2007 it would
be a slap in the face to the public for him to step
aside now. It would the surest way for the FNM
to lose an election in 2012; and that isn’t even

. considering, what such a move would do to his -

legacy as a politician.
“Just remember, in 2012 the national stadium
will be built.

“The road improvement projects will be com-
pleted. A new straw market. Baha Mar will be
coming on stream, and crime will be under con-
trol. Those will be tangible accomplishments that
the people can see and feel that Hubert InSeaham
would have delivered to them in only five short
years. There is no spompatison, he said.

found in Andros on August 4.

FROM page one

uation of this approach. In reality, this is.a ‘head
in the sand’ approach, because it is both the
forces of government and an entire community
that is sick and tired of the never ending expan-
sions and the unauthorised operations,” said
the source, who wished not to be identified.
Mr Nygard, a Canadian fashion designer, is
currently locked in a stand off with the gov-
ernment, which has ordered him to remove
structures erected on unauthorised land formed

: ” over the protected seabed.

The July 21 directive from the Office of the
Prime Minister represents the latest effort of the

government in a battle that is older than 15.

years.

During this time, the Lyford Cay Property
Owner’s Association has been involved in press-
ing the government to investigate and regulate
activities on Mr Nygard’s property.

In the Supreme Court action filed by Mr
Nygard against his Lyford Cay neighbour Louis
Bacon, a list of over 11 claims are outlined
related to a right of passage through Mr Bacon’s
property.

According to the writ, the property owned by

Mr Nygard was assigned two rights of way by
easement across the property of Mr Bacon

when it was conveyed in 1984.
It claims that between 2004 and 2008, a gate

a was constructed “at the eastern end of road-

way of the easement” that “restricted or pre-
vented” access to Nygard Cay by Mr Nygard, his
family and guests. Mr Nygard claims he was
never given a key to the gate.

The roadway was also “disrupted, blocked
and realigned” without the permission of Mr .

Nygard, according to the writ. It claims the gra-

dient of the roadway was changed in sucha .

way that it directed “water to the mouth of the
gate of Nygard Cay” causing the collection of
water. ‘

ano page one

? inal libel not just civil," he said, responding to questions put to him
: by The Tribune.
Recently the blog has posted numerous stories on Mr Mayne
i alleging the minister has engaged in extra-marital affairs and
? benefited from alleged criminal proceeds passed down to him by
ie his father, Andrew "Dud" Maynard, a former PLP chairman.
Last -month, Mr Maynard said he did not think he had legal
? recourse to sue the bloggers for character defamation explaining
; that the country's laws had not yet caught up with the influence
of the world wide web. But now it seems he is prepared to seek
? some form of redress explaining that someone must take a stand
? against defamatory content posted on the Internet.
: “Atsome point I am going to report it all to the police because
: it's all out there," said the Cabinet minister. "Somebody has got
? to stop it — at one point.somebody needs to set a standard that
: kind of political (strategy) has no use in this country," he said,
} adding that the blog has "waged all out war" on him.

According to the Defamation Act, "words spoken and pub- .
? lished of any person imputing adultery, unchastity, fornication,
4 : incest, incontinence or drunkenness shall be actionable without

: proof of special damage."

TWIST

Nygard, Bacon

Attorneys for the two defendants, Mr Bacon
and his company, The Point House Corpora-

tion, are preparing to submit a legal defence

by the August 20 deadline. It is unclear whether
they plan to file a counter claim.

The Supreme Court filing came days after
Mr Nygard filed a criminal complaint through
his attorney Keod Smith with the Commission-

er of Police, Elliston Greenslade, over actions

Mr Nygard claimed caused him “headaches and.
irregular heart-beats, requiring him to have to
lie down to recuperate.”

Police raided the home of Mr Bacon confis-
cating the speakers referred to in Mr Nygard’s
report as “prohibited military speakers" that
caused him “great nuisance.’

Speaking to the “speaker dispute”, arelease
issued by Point House stated: “The design intent
of the Meyer SB-1 speakers: at Point House
was to. counterbalance loud music that origi- '
nated from the Nygard property. The speak-
ers were part of an audio system constructed to
reverberate loud music emanating from
Nygard’s property and direct it back to the spe-
cific location of the music.”

“The Meyer SB-1 speaker dnd associated
system arrived in the Bahamas, cleared cus-
toms and duty was paid. The units were mount-
ed on Point House property and were painted
green to blend in with the surrounding foliage
not because they are of military vintage,” stat-
ed the release.

After the police raid, it was rumoured that Mr
Bacon planned to sell his property. One Lyford
Cay resident said: “It is unclear at this point
whether he is going to change his mind..I am still
hopeful that is not the case.’

Thére has been no official statement issued by
Mr Bacon on the matter. Mr Nygard did not
respond to messages left for him seeking com-
ment. ;

Charles a: | subbing death

FROM page. one

; i ations into the death of Gar-
? nell Clarke, a resident of But-
: ler Street, located in the Nas-
: sau Village area.
: The man was taken to the
: East Street police station by
: family members and co-work-
: ers from the Magic Kingdom
? Tyre Shop in Nassau Village,
: where the incident occurred.
i It was alleged that around
: 12.30 pm the two men — who
: both worked at the shop — got
? into an argument over a tyre
? which resulted in Mr Clarke
' } being stabbed in the head and
: left hand with a screwdriver.
: Mr Clarke was taken to
: hospital, however he died of
: his injuries shortly afterwards.
: Police investigations into
: this matter — the nation’s 57th
? homicide — are continuing.

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FRIDAY, ee 13, 201 a PAGE. 16

THE EVENT

On the morning of Friday, August
6th, 2010 at 1 37 a.m., BIC's Net-

‘work Operations Command Center

(NOCC), reported a failure of the

Digital Access Cross Connect Sys-

tem (DACS), This is an element of
the network that facilitates the pro-
cessing of both cellular and en
phone calls. ¥

This dévice is normally slepered by !
-@ full redundancy component to
address system faults. However, this
component malfunctioned as well,
causing a failure that impacted alll
pre-paid cellular customers and a
significant number of landline cus-
tomers. The affected customers

were unable to make or receive’

calls.

BTC technicians restored services by
2:45 p.m. that afternoon; however,
some customers did not receive full
functionality until later that evening.
BIC's preliminary investigations. in-
dicate that this incident was an iso-
lated event. The core elements of
BIC's networks continue to work ac-
cording : seer cation.

NEXT STEPS



Customers should be assured that |



to, and frustration felt by, you as val- nor charged as s overage.

1 ic that if will take all necessary steps -














with all such events, BIC is. examin- |
ing and re- examining its. processes for Jone |
and planned response. procedures ¢ oo
to avoid as much as possible any
future occurance. The following |
list represents some of the follow up”
activities ” BIG: :

.

don

tended.






e Review of pew technical aa their clients, family
administrative enhancements that where |

robustness and rehabilty on this and
other key piarons in the network _

RESPONDING TO OUR ou oré ary Pia en eos
~iS calls by post paid cellu-
CUSTOMERS ee oy be. charged

BTC understands the inconvenience against their in- “package a allotments,

ued customers during this event. AS. oo
noted above, BTC assures the pub- ! :





lL B
NS i









spree RRR cognate

FRIDAY,

AUGUST



13, 2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net |

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

‘



BIC privatisation committee ‘working’ with Cable & Wireless

By CHESTER.ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CABLE & Wireless Communica-

tions could be the new name in
Bahamas telecommunications by the
end of the year.

Industry sources told Tribune
Business yesterday that high-level
government officials have recently,
and frequently, engaged the region-
al telco which has operations in‘ 13
other Caribbean countries.

A deal could possibly be sealed

before 2011.

This newspaper was informed
that the Government-appointed
Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany's (BTC) privatisation commit-
tee has been “working for a little
while” with Cable & Wireless, hav-
ing rejected earlier bids from the JP
Morgan/Vodafone combination, plus
the Atlantic Tele-Network/CFAL
duo.

Other sources familiar with the
situation also told Tribune Business
that BTC employees have been
whispering among themselves, ner-

vous about the future of their jobs if
Cable & Wireless is to take control
of the helm at BTC and restructure
it entirely.

However, the BTC privatisation
is by no means ‘a done deal’, as
numerous issues still need to be
resolved via negotiation between the

committee/Government and Cable :

& Wireless. This newspaper also
understands, from reliable sources,
that there is at least one other
“major party” that has expressed an
interest in becoming BTC’s strategic
partner, after learning that all the

proposals submitted by the four par-
ties that qualified for the due dili-
gence round had been rejected.
While the BTC privatisation com-
mittee believes Cable & Wireless is
“very focused and serious” in its
attempt to acquire a majority BTC
stake, Tribune Business was told that
the committee would also look at
other serious prospects to ensure it
did not “jump too soon”, thereby

‘making sure the Government, got

the best strategic partner both in
terms of purchase price and
terms/conditions.

Cable & Wireless was described’
by one source as “really well suited:
as the strategic partner. The com-
mittee believes they're very inter-
ested in this asset, and have the right
idea about value, but there are some
important issues that would need to

.be negotiated”.

“Some very fruitful discussions”
were said to have taken place
between the BTC privatisation com-
mittee and Cable & Wireless, in a:
bid to get to a point where the Gov-
ernment might find its proposal
attractive.

When it comes to foreign labour,
Bahamians ‘own worst enemies’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

any Bahamians

are complicit in

the country's

dependence on
foreign labour and “are our
own worst enemies" by per-
forming at substandard levels
on the job - or worse not
showing up at all, said a for-
mer senator.

Speaking at a forum dis-
cussing the role of foreign
labour in the Bahamas,
accountant Philip Galanis said
the country must develop
short and long-term plans for

- national development, create
a national manpower needs
assessment, and overhaul the
educational system to address
‘21st century changes-- all to
ensure more Bahamians are
qualified for posts currently
filled by expatriates. ~

Government must also lead

the way in decreasing the

amount of foreign labour in
the country by hiring Bahami-
ans to fill all posts held by for-
eigners, he added. These
changes, among several oth-
ers, are needed in order to
reverse a common problem
facing those in human
resources - a lack of qualified
Bahamians in the country's
job pool.

"Too often we hear com-

‘plaints that Bahamians are not

prepared to work hard, to con-
sistently apply themselves to
their employment activities.
They are accused, and some-
times justifiably so, of lacking
discipline, sometimes not only
not showing up to work but
also performing at a substan-
dard level. In some ways we

-are our own worst enemies

and sometimes make it diffi-
cult for persons engaged in
human resources to persist in
ferreting out suitably qualified
Bahamians to fill vacancies,"

Jahamas Ferries hit
with hundreds of

fraudulent credit

card tran

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Ferries has
been hit with at least 500
fraudulent credit card trans-
actions in almost one year,
the companies customer ser-

vice manager told Tribune

Business yesterday.

Joy Russell said the com-
pany has had to change its
credit card processing proce-
dures and also how those who
purchase tickets for Bahamas
Ferries on the Internet col-
lect those tickets.

According to Ms: Russell,
while the police are investi-
gating the.matter, Bahamas
Ferries is keeping a vigilant
eye on its ticket sales that
involve an online payment.

She intimated that many of

the fraudulent purchases have °

come from someone living in
Eleuthera, and that the ‘per-
sonisa Bahamian citizen. |
“In my opinion it’s a
Bahamian, and I believe it’s
someone who lives in
Eleuthera because the trans-
action are going or coming
from Eleuthera,”’she said.
Ms Russell‘said her com-
pany processes a considerable
number of online bookings
and due to the fraudulent
activity have had to insist now
that the card holder be the
person to collect the tickets.
They also have to present
identification and sign before
taking receipt of the tickets.
Despite these efforts, Ms
Russell said at the end of July
a fraudulent purchase was
made.
“Basically credit card

charges are being done and °

we get the charge back from
the original card holder who
say they haven't done any

SAH BLO Ike



business with Bahamas Fer-
ries.” she said. ono

“We are actually still work-
ing on a lot of it and have

made contact with the police. *

“Back in June, when we

had a very large amount of

ticket purchases, we made an
attempt to contact the police
in Harbour Island but they
were closed.”

According to her, they have
attempted to corner the pos-
sible fraudster after a large
ticket purchase was made.
However, the tickets were
never collected.

Ms Russell said in those
cases Bahamas Ferries lose a
lot of revenue.

She said in other instances

“we haven’t been able to fig-
ure out how he has been col-
lecting the tickets without us
knowing”.

Police said on Wednesday
that credit card scams and
fraudulent cheque schemes
are just some of the methods
employed by fraudsters who
stole more than $2million in
some 180 crimes reported to
the Business and Technolo-
gy Crimes section of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit in the first

‘ six months of the year.

Assistant Superintendent
Michael Moxey, who is in
charge of the department,
said 2, 063,705.21 was misap-
propriated between January
and June, 58 per cent of

which was stolen, and 42 per

cent obtained by fraud.

Ms Russell said she has
made it a personal resolution
to see the person who has
committed these crimes
against Bahamas Ferries
brought to justice.

“This individual we have
been trying to track down
even purchased tickets for

’ crabfest,” she said.



ON LABOUR: Accountant Philip Galanis.

Mr Galanis, a former Pro-
gressive Liberal Party sena-
tor, told a crowd at forum
hosted by the Bahamas
Human Resources Develop-
ment Association.

The private sector should
also re-institute the: manpow-
er projection survey with the
Department of Immigration
to outline plans each company
hiring foreigners has for train-

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ing and replacing expatriates
with Bahamians, said Mr
Galanis.

He also called for a greater
emphasis on vocational and
technical training to bridge the
"tremendous qualification
gap" between Bahamians and
foreigners; and called on
Bahamians to become whistle

blowers on foreigners who |

hold jobs that can be aptly



‘Health

performed by qualified locals.

He noted several areds in
the public and private sector
that are populated with for-
eign workers - banking, hos-
pitality, the insurance indus-
try and the judiciary - and rea-
soned this was a symptom of a
deep-rooted insecurity and the
public's failure to put pressure
on government to stop this
practice.

"We are a docile, submis-
sive, obsequious people who
would rather go along to get
along.

“We have become and .

often act like lambs being led
to the slaughter," he lamented.

Fellow panelist, and former
senator, Darron Cash argued
that the debate on foreign

labour should -be. centred on

how the public and private
sector can strike the right bal-
ance between short-term eco-
nomic goals, political interests
and the country's long-term
national interest.

He noted that.as a develop-
ing nation, the Bahamas does
not possess all the skills nec-
essary to best serve its inter-
ests and as a result, "must
embrace expatriate talent".

Still he criticised successive

governments for blatantly

affronting "the spirit of
Bahamianisation" by placing a
“glass ceiling" over many

A DIVISION OF

qualified Gahamians who are
constantly overlooked in
favour of foreign workers.

"The most unkind cut of all
comes with respect to issuance.
of government contracts.
From the government's per-
spective, it seems that
Bahamians are never quite
skilled or experienced
enough," said the certified
public accountant and former
senator with the Free Nation-
al Movement.



FAMILY GUARDIAN -

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED os 2.

ry ot}





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

a eee Ee



By The Associated Press

A LOOK at economic
developments and activity in
major stock markets around
the world Thursday:

Japanese gov
on surge in yen

TOKYO — _— Japan
finance's chief said the gov-
ernment will "respond appro-
-priately" to a surge in the yen
after it hit a 15-year-high
against the dollar amid a
weakening US economic
recovery.

"We are closely monitor-
ing a rapid rise in the yen,"
Finance Minister Yoshihiko
Noda said. He declined to
comment on currency inter-
ventions by the government

‘to prop up the greenback.

A foreign exchange dealer
in Tokyo said there were
rumours about the Bank of
Japan buying dollars but it
was unlikely that Japanese

‘authorities have taken such

steps. The BOJ hasn't inter-
vened in the currency market
since March 2004.

The benchmark Nikkei 225
stock average closed down 0.9
per cent, South Korea's Kospi
dived 2.1 per cent, Australia's
S&P/ASX 200 fell 1.2 per
cent, Hong Kong's Hang
Seng retreated 0.9 per cent
and the Shanghai Composite:
Index dropped 0.7 per cent.

Greece's recession
deepens i in Q2

ATHENS, Greece —

Greece's recession deepened
in the second quarter as the
country felt the painful con-
sequences of the governmen-
t's drive to reduce its debt
load with aggressive austerity
cuts.

Gross domestic product
declined by 1.5 per cent from
the previous quarter as the
government reduced spend-
ing.

The unemployment rate,
meanwhile, rose to 12 per
cent in May from 11.9 per
cent.

India's industrial
growth production slips
‘ to 13-month low in June

MUMBAI, India —
Growth in India's industrial
production slipped to a 13-

Stocks fall after Cisco

By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG ae
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Technology companies led
the stock market to its third
straight loss Thursday after
an earnings report from Cis-
co Systems raised more’
questions about the econo-
my.

A weekly employment
report that was weaker than
expected also made
investors uneasy about the
strength of the economic.
recovery. The Dow Jones
industrial average fell 58
pointsandnow hasan _
almost 380-point loss the
past three days. The Dow
has also fallen five of the last
six days. The Nasdaq com-
posite index had a steeper
loss in percentage terms, a
reflection of the drop in tech
stocks.
_ Cisco Systems Inc.
released earnings after the
market closed Wednesday.
Cisco is seen by many
traders and analysts as an
indicator of the economy's

health, and it disappointed
investors in several ways.
The computer networking
company's revenue for its
fiscal fourth quarter and

_ forecast for revenue fell

short of analysts' expecta-
tions. Investors are focused
on the connection between

_ revenue and the economy. If

revenue is weak, that could
be a sign that consumers are
reluctant to spend and could
start to affect companies'
profits.

The timing of Cisco's
report was also troubling.

- Craig Peckham, a market
- strategist at Jefferies & Co.,

noted that Cisco's quarter
ended in July, a month later
than most at companies, so
it gives investors a first look
at how businesses are doing

in the July-September peri- —

od.

Peckham said investors
also reacted to comments by
Cisco CEO John Chambers,
who said late Wednesday,

- "We think the words 'unusu-

al uncertainty’ are an accu-
rate description of what's
occurring" in the economy.

Te

Chambers echoed the words
chosen by Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
last month.

- Technology stocks were
the worst performer Thurs-
day among the nine sectors
that make up the Standard
& Poor's 500 index. The
tech sector fell 1.15 per cent.
Cisco was down 10 per cent.
Microsoft Corp. was down
1.5 per cent, and Oracle
Corp. fell three per cent.

Other big stocks seen as
vulnerable in a weak econo-

‘ my also fell. Shipper FedEx

Corp. lost 1.4 per cent and
heavy equipment maker
Caterpillar Inc. fell 1.8 per
cent. Health care compa-
nies, called defensive stocks
because they are likely to do
well in a weak economy,
were among the day's win-
ners.

Investors have generally
been selling since the stock
market reached its 2010
peak in late April because
they don't have a sense of
whether the recovery will
hold. Somé fear that the
economy will fall back into

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month low in June.as the
effects of government stimu-
lus waned and expansion
returned to more normal lev-
els.

The slowdown to year-on-
year growth of 7.1 per cent in
June comes after eight
months of double-digit expan-
sion.

The moderation is in large
part attributable to the high
levels of industrial production
at the same last year when
growth was rebounding from
the global recession, econo-
mists say. °

Ireland's deflation
may be ending

DUBLIN — Ireland's year-
long experience of deflation
may be ending as price

_ sion.

A look at economic developments around the world

. declines in July eased to fiat
0.1 per cent.

The last time iveland

recorded such a small annual

decline in average prices was'

January 2009.

That was the first month
that average prices began to
decline following the coun-
try's 2008 descent into reces-

Since then, prices slumped
by as much as 6.6 per cent
annually in October 2009
before gradually easing to
July's almost flat level.

Industrial production
falls in June

LONDON — Industrial
production in the 16 countries
that use the euro unexpect-
edly fell in June, raising fears

THE TRIBUNE



that economic growth in the
eurozone may not be as high
as anticipated.

Germany's: DAX closed
down 0.3 per cent and the
CAC-40 in France fell 0.2 per
cent.

The FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares ended
0.4 per cent higher.

- Big-ticket European
projects put on hold

PARIS — A rebuilt Pruss-
ian palace in Berlin. High-
speed rail from Lisbon to
Kiev.

A new visitor center for

' Britain's Stonehenge. They're

just some of the big-ticket
European projects put on
hold by the continent's gov-
ernment debt crisis.

earnings, jobless data

recession because of high
unemployment and weak
consumer spending. They
cite a long string of weak
economic reports and rev- -
enue disappointments like
Cisco's as reasons for their
pessimism. And earlier this
week, the Fed said the.
recovery had slowed and it
would buy government
notes and bonds in hopes of
stimulating lending and the
economy as a whole.

The uncertainty has kept
many traders.out of the mar-
ket in July and August,
months when trading vol-
ume is already down
because of vacations. Ana-
lysts say low volume has
exaggerated price changes.

The Dow fell 58.88, or 0.6
per cent, to 10,319.95. The
average has lost 360 points
over the past six days.

’ The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 5.86, or 0.5 per
cent, to 1,083.61. The Nas-

‘ daq composite index fell

18.36, or 0.8 per cent, to
2,190.27.

Losing stocks were ahead
of gainers by about two to
one on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume

- came to one billion shares.

Interest rates rose in the:
Treasury market after
falling sharply Wednesday,
when investors were seeking
the safety of government
securities. The yield on the
10-year Treasury note,

which rises.as its price falls,
was 2.75 per cent, up from -
late Wednesday’ s 2.69 per
cent.

The Labour Department
said that the number of peo-
ple filing for unemployment
benefits for the first time
rose last week to 484,000.
The gain was small at 2,000,
but economists had expect-
ed the number to drop. The
news pointed to continuing
weakness in the labour mar-

-ket, yet another sign that the
economic recovery is slow-

ing.
Charlie Smith, chief

investment officer with Fort —

Pitt Capital Group in Pitts-
burgh, predicted few major
market moves for the rest of
the month because so many
traders are away.

Smith also said the mar-
ket's drop over the past few
months was due more to a
negative outlook by
investors rather than a fun-
damental change in the

~ economy.

"We had a weak recovery
back in March and April,"
Smith said. At that point,
the market was moving
toward its highest. level since
the financial crisis struck in
September 2008. Stocks
began falling after the major
indexes peaked in late April.

There were disappoint-
ments among Thursday's
earnings reports.

Sara Lee Corp.'s revenue

missed analysts' forecasts. .
And retailer Kohl's Corp.

‘disappointed the market by

lowering its'earnings out-
look because it expects sales
to slow during the second
half of the year. That period
includes the holiday season,
when retailers make a large
part of their profits.

Sara Lee fell 10 cents, or
0.7 per cent, to $14.37.
Kohl's fell $1.28, or 2.7 per
cent, to $46.50.

In other earnings news,
General Motors Co. report-
ed net income of $1.33 bil-
lion in the April-June quar-
ter, its second straight quar-
terly profit.

The company, which is 61
per cent owned by the feder-
al government, is moving

. toward a public offering of

its shares. The company also
had a surprise announce-
ment.

CEO Ed Whitacre will
step down September 1 and
be replaced by GM board
member Daniel Akerson,
head of the global buyout
unit of The Carlyle Group, a
private equity firm.

Cisco fell $2.37, or 10 per
cent, to $21.36. Microsoft
was off 37 cents, or 1.5 per
cent, at $24.49. And Oracle
dropped 72 cents, or three
per cent; to $22.94.

Caterpillar fell $1.21, or
1.8 per cent, to $67.50, while
FedEx fell $1.19, or 1.4 per
cent, to $81.94.

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

Collects environmental samples and perform analysis with required paperwork in
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_ necessary for disposal

Collects. and reporting of weather data
Provides BORCO specitic eny ronmental training to groups within the te rminal
and contractors

Preparation and /or updating, of environmental procedures for the BORCO/VTB

— terminal

Development and tracking of waste minimization data ’
Responds and assists with spill response measures; assists in cleanup as required;

INonitors waste management Issues? perfor ms sampling: maintains

documentation and sinalytica| data: maintains oil spill resources inventory
response team organization as required

Assists with regulation research; files environmental regulatory updates; assists

with data gathering, documentation, and regulatory interpretations for permit

_ applications. amendments and renewals

Performs other duties assigned by mani Agen nt that fall within the generally
expected scope of this pestis i

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Bachelors of Science in Environmental Sciences, Biology, Chemistry, or
Engineering
3-6 years exper ience ina plant or islatony environment
Experience working with and proven understanding of various governme ntal
regulations/ageney
Experience working with air emissions, Waste walter, and olher pote tially:
hazardous pollutants

‘Trained as Laboratory Technician-on Waste Water Testing & Analysis.

" Solid computer skills including ability to use Microsoft Office Suite, various email

and internet applications, sales and financial databases, government systems, cle. -
Solid English communications skills, both oval and avritten
Ability to multi-task; good organizational skills

Customer service focus: bility to influence; ability to communicate ”

diplomatically”
\

‘To Apply: Please forward your resume via email to
Heather. Parker@vopak.com
On or before August 16, 2010.



PUBLIC NOTICE
TENDER — MOTOR

INSURANCE 2010 - 2011

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BIC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor -
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifica-
tion from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 7
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. |

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before Tues-

‘day, September 7th, 2010. Tenders should be sealed and

marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE” and should be op
livered to the attention of:

Mr. I. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas

_ BIC reserves the right to reject any



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13,




Small downtown bar
trying to reinvent itself

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SMALL Downtown bar is try-
ing to reinvent icself to become an
“off the beaten path” local, cos-
mopolitan spot with local flare and
fair and international appeal.

Partner, Rodari Turnquest, said
he and his colleagues hope to turn
the small Elizabeth Ave spot called
TJ’s Sports Bar and Lounge, into
what “our grandparents had before
us”, and bring that same atmosphere
back to Downtown. |



The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited

Winterbotham Place ~ P.O. Box N-3026 ~ Marlborough & Queen Streets
Nassau - The Bahamas

“We are going to be a really
diverse sports bar where
sporting enthusiasts, regular

guys from the island, domino

players, pool shooters, dart

throwers and basketball and .

football fans can come

and be comfortable.” -
— Partner Rodari
Turnquest

Tel: (1-242) 356-5454 ~ Fax: (1-242) 356-9432

E-mail: nassau@winterbotham.com ~ Website: www.winterbotham.com

JOB OPPORTUNITY

The ‘Winterbotham Trust Company Limited { is looking to fill the position of Corporate

Administrator:

In this challenging position you will be responsible for but not limited to the following tasks:

Incorporation of International Business Companies and Ordinary Companies

One of TJ’s more unique offer-
ings is‘a live rake and scrape band
every Friday night, where the bar is
taken over “old island style”.

' “We really want to be diverse,”
said Mr Turnquest.

“We are a bunch of island guys
trying to offer something to locals
and to the tourists.”

According to him, the bar, which
used to be an art gallery, is a mixed-
use sports bar and lounge that can
accommodate myriad tastes in
music, sports, gaming and atmos-
phere.

“We are going to be a really



Administration of International Business Companies and Ordinary Companies —

Liaising with the Registrar General’s Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
* Registrar of Insurance Companies, The Central Bank of The Bahamas, The Inspector

of Financial and Corporate Service Providers and various consulates

Ensuring the accuracy of banking and administrative statements of account before,

dispatch to clients

Conducting comprehensive Annual file reviews
Know Your Customer (Due Diligence) documentation collection
Opening of bank and administrative accounts

The, successful applicant must have the following qualifications:

Knowledge of the processes associated with the incorporation and ongoing
administration of International Business Companies and Ordinary Companies
Basic knowledge of the Legislation governing International Business Companies,

Ordinary Companies and Financial and Corporate Service Providers.
Knowledge of the process associated with legalization of documents
Knowledge of requirements for completing the Know Your Customer (Due

Diligence) process

Computer literate (MS Office products)
Strong organization and communication skills

Ability to analyze client financial needs to provide solutions with products and/or

services offered by the company
Fluency in Spanish or Portuguese an asset but not required

\

i i

Applications/resume should be sent by e-mail to nassau@winterbotham.com
Under reference “Corporate Administrator”
ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE INQUIRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED

Persons not meeting the above requirement need not apply

Deadline for applications Friday, August 20, 2010



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

SE INTERNATIONAR RANK

-On-the-spot financing and insurance
24-month/24,000- mile factory warranty.

diverse sports bar where sporting
enthusiasts, regular guys from the
island, domino players, pool shoot-
ers, dart throwers and basketball and
football fans can come and be com-
fortable,” he said.

TJ’s is still adorned with its
uniquely tiled floor and bar from its
former art days, with earth-toned
walls to set the mood of the joint.

Upstairs is what Mr Turnquest
described as an exclusive lounge and
with only black lighting to set the
mood.

“Our lounge plays a wide rage of
music with a chill mood,” he said

- have food,”

“And we are looking at renting it
out for parties and having house
nights.”

He added that Ty s will begin to
serve a light fair as of next week and
will begin a course of various gaming
tournaments with prizes, to draw in
a cross-section of patrons.

“We will have Wii gaming tour-
naments, we have wifi and we will
said Mr Turnquest.

According to him, most of the
bar’s marketing has been done
through Facebook, where its offer-
ings and upcoming events can be
found.





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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE







RES ACTS LID
Cup a US Ta | profit

meu AAS



-

PROFIT RISE: A supporter of the Ghana team brings beer to his friends during the World Cup group
D soccer match between Serbia and Ghana at Loftus Versfeld stadium in Pretoria, South Africa.

Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, the world's largest brewer, says World Cup fervor helped drive sec- —

ond-quarter profit and-sales above expectations. Profit is seen continuing to rise for the fest of
the yea:
(AP Photo)

Solidarity

THE BAHAMAS UNION OF TEACHERS
August 10, 2010

APPROVED LIST OF CANDIDATES
FOR BUT ELECTIONS,
21st SEPTEMBER 2010

The Chairman of the Elections Committee, Bro. Philip Johnson wishes to inform
the members of the Bahamas Union of Teacher that the Candidates Committee
has completed its work, and the Chairman has submitted the Approved List of
Candidates for the Elections-scheduled for 21st September. Forty candidates
were nominated for 15 positions, and 39 were approved

PRESIDENT
Belinda Wilson
Francis Friend

VICE PRESIDENT
Phillip Dorsett

Fr. Franklin Colebrooke
William. McFord
SECRETARY GENERAL
Stephen McPhee

Helena Cartwright
’.Jacquline Mckenzie
Villadale Bain

Brenda Albury

ASST. SECRETARY GENERAL
Jeleah Turnquest
Leason Burrows

ASSISTANT TREASURER
Kim Williams

Valencia Carroll

Janice Armbrister

Nicole Munroe

TREASURER
Andrea Lockhart
Karen Butler
Lorraine Knowles
EXECUTIVE MEMBERS
Janell Nairn
Tiffany Delancey
Florine Neilly
*-Wayne Thompson.
Joneth Edden’
Zane Lightbourne
John Musgrove

TRUSTEES
_Margaret Major-Albury
Jacob Rolle
~--— — Hiamae dohnson= Roberts: ee
Virginia Johnson
Mizpah Munroe
Haldane Stubbs

A.V.P. GRAND BAHAMA
Quintin Laroda
Meoshe Curtis

A.V.P. NEW PROVIDENCE
Bridgette Seymour
Shron Rahming

A.V.P. SOUTHERN BAHAMAS
Annafaye Knowles.
Philip Sturrup

A.V.P. NORTHEN BAHAMAS
Yolanda Curry

Union Members are advised that the Final List of Candidates will be
published immediately after the Appeals Process for aggrieved candidates,

ends on Ficay 20th eee

PHILLIP JOHNSON
CHAIRMAN
‘ELECTION COMMITEE



Travel agency
MakeMyTrip
‘soars in the

market debut

By TALI ARBEL
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Shares of Indian travel agency
MakeMyTrip Ltd: soared as
much as 80 per cent in their
market debut on the Nasdaq
exchange, even as the broad-
er markets declined.

The stock is on track to log
the best first-day performance
for an IPO since 2007. Finan-
cial advisory firm Financial
Engines Inc., which has post-
ed the top first-day return this

year, closed up nearly 44 per -

cent in its debut in mid-
March. Since the recession
began, online restaurant
reservation company,
OpenTable Inc. had the best
first day with a 59 per. cent
gain in May 2009.
MakeMyTrip likely attract-
ed so much investor interest
because there are very few
Indian companies listed in the

US that focus on growth-with-: --

in India, said: Josef Schuster of
IPOX Capital Management,
IPO investment advisors.

MakeMyTrip Ltd. began as
a website in the US, mainly
serving Indian expats wanting
to travel to India.

In 2005, it began operations
in India, offering airline tick-
ets as well as hotel bookings,
bus tickets and other services
to the country's fast growing
demographic of middle-class
consumers.

MakeMyTrip cites data
from consultancy McKinsey

saying that the Indian middle,

&

class is expected to grow to
583 million people in 2025
from 50 million people in
2005.00

India has a much smaller
segment of its population on
the Internet than the US does,
and the company says its rev-
enue will rise as increasingly
wealthy Indians get online.

The company's revenue
grew throughout the reces-
sion, and MakeMyTrip claims
it is the largest online travel
company in India based on
bookings in 2009.

In the year ended March
31, 1.6 million domestic air
ticket transactions were
booked through Make-
MyTnip's website in India, up
from 1.2 million in the previ-
ous 12 months.

"There's a taste for compa-

nies that will dominate a pos-
sible niche," said Francis
Gaskins of IPO research firm
IPOdesktop.

-- But some analysts; such-as---- -

Scott Sweet, the owner of
IPO Boutique, expressed sur-
prise at MakeMyTrip's per-
formance Thursday, saying
the company has never posted
an annual operating profit
and faces competition from
Indian versions of big travel
sites such as Expedia Inc. and
Travelocity. mn

"They're a long way from
making money," Sweet said.

But Schuster suggested that

MakeMyTrip could be an >

acquisition target for' rival
companies such as Expedia
or Priceline.com Inc.

BAT Bahamas Limited

Career Opportunity
TERRITORY SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Description:

Another factor likely pro- '
pelling MakeMyTrip's shares
were strong second-quarter

--results from Orbitz World-

d

wide Inc. and Priceline,
Schuster said.

_ MakeMyTrip plans to use
proceeds from the IPO for
acquisitions, new investments

‘in technology and for working

capital.

The company raised $70
million by pricing five million
shares for $14 each, the high
end of its expected $12 to $14
range.

In late afternoon trading,
shares. gained $10.50, or 75
per cent, to $24.50 on the Nas-
daq, having risen as high as
$25.16 earlier in the session.
Another Thursday. IPO

-debut, real estate software

company RealPage Inc., also
jumped $3.56, or 32 per cent,
to $14.56.

Meanwhile, broader mar-
kets dipped further after big
losses on Wednesday, with
the Standard & Poor's 500
dropping 0.8 per cent.

It's a good sign for compa-
nies wanting to raise funds
through the. IPO market.
Many companies have post-
poned their offerings because
of weak démand from
investors wary of the volatile
stock market, or had to cut
the prices on shares steeply
to get to market. .

_ RealPage, for example,
priced shares at $11 apiece,
significantly below expecta- -
tions. It had hoped ‘shares
would fetch $13 to $15 each.

This is a strategic role which will assist in delivering 1BM’s revenue in The Bahamas. This role
will work ina contracted capacity, performing in conjunction with IBM's. Sales.and Technical

Support Teams, covering accounts in The Bahamas, ‘Responsibilities will include:
* Execution of Sales Leadership
> Demonstration of Sales Proficiency
* Driving new business in the territory and maintaining existing relationships
Working collaboratively with Client Team and other Brands
Developing and maintaining strong customer relationships
Assisting with Opportunity Identification and Valid Sales Stages
Pr ofessional engagement of appropriate Integrated Technology Services
Act as Opportunity Owner for specific client transactions

(

Qualifications:

equivalent experience
* Business to business selling is an asset
« Proven success in prospecting and managing a territory
* A solid track record of achieving/ exceeding sales targets
* Strong written and Verbal skills

* University degree in Sales/Marketing. Business Administration of

An equal ory employer, [BM provides competitive salaries and benefits. ‘Thus,

‘compensation wil

[be commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Please submit detailed applications ar electronic resume to the attention of:

Human Resources Administrator

TBM Bahamas Limited
Fourth Floor
Atlantic House

Second Terrace & Collins Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas
e-Mail: jmoss@bs.ibm.com

Deadline: August 31*, 2010

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence. Only npplipante who are short-listed will

be contacted,

PA eT
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 5B



GM posts another profit,
moves toward stock sale

By DEE-ANN DURBIN
and TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — Ina
signal moment for the turn-
around of the Ainerican auto
industry, General Motors is
edging toward a public stock
sale, and its profits are now
solid enough..that the
demanding CEO will step
aside, saying his work is done.

GM said Thursday that it
made $1.3 billion from April
through June, its second
straight quarter in the black
and a complete reversal from
last year, when it was forced
into bankruptcy and the US
government took a majority
stake.

CEO Ed Whitacre said he
would leave his post Septem-

- ber 1. He said the GM board
knew all along that he would

‘do so after the company
returned to health, and indus-
try analysts said it was an
important step leading up to
the stock sale.

Whitacre, who will stay on
as chairman through the end
of this year, will be replaced
as CEO by Daniel Akerson, a
61-year-old former telecom-
munications executive who
sits on the GM board.

While executives would not
discuss the stock sale Thurs-
day, GM is expected to file
its initial paperwork with fed-
eral regulators as early as Fri-
day.- :

"Things look good. There's
a foundation in place, a good
foundation," said Whitacre,
who was drafted out of his
first retirement by the gov-
ernment to fix the troubled
GM. "I believe we've accom-
plished what we set out. to
do."

Last year, GM lost nearly
$13 billion in the second quar-
ter alone..In the first six

“months of this year, GM .

made $2.2 billion as cost cuts.
took full effect, sales in China.
grew and people paid more
for GM's revamped vehicles
in the US.

For example, GM's
crossovers, which are similar
to SUVs but built on car

undercarriages, are fetching’

$3,000 more this year than
last. Crossovers such as the
Chevrolet Equinox and Buick
Enclave have sold well, and
the company has high hopes
later this year for the Chevy





PUBLIC OFFERING: Ed Whitacre, General Motors Co. Chairman and CEO, speaks at a news conference
in Detroit. Demand for General Motors Co. stock should be good once the company decides to offer shares
to the public, CEO Ed Whitacre said Thursday.

Cruze, its first decent com-
pact, and the Volt, a $41,000
rechargeable electric car.

The federal government
got a 61 per cent stake in GM
in exchange for $43 billion in
aid to keep it alive. It could
sell some:or all of that when
GM makes its public stock
offering, perhaps as early as
November.

GM must first reveal to the
Securities and Exchange
Commission how many
shares it intends to sell on the
open market and at what
price. The government would
then tell GM how much of its
stake it will sell, and GM
would disclose that in anoth-
er filing.

If GM's shares sell for too
little, the government and
other stakeholders are less
likely to get their money back
and GM is less likely to raise
money to pay off debt.

The environment for new
stock offerings is less than
welcoming. Six initial public
offerings have been post-
poned since June 1, in part

‘out of fear that they wouldn't

fetch a high enough share
price, said Matt Therian, an

‘analyst with Renaissance
* Capital, a Greenwich, Conn.,

firm specializing in public
stock offering research.

GM, however, may have
enough to overcome the slug-
gish economy, Therian said.

"The IPO market can be a
case-by-case basis," he said.
"I think in many ways GM is
going to be:a unique story."

Scott Sweet, owner of IPO
research firm IPO Boutique,
said the Obama administra-

NOTICE

SIGRIDINA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SIGRIDINA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on »°
the 10th August, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and iedleletey by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the. said) company is CST

Administration

(Bahamas)

Limited, _The Bahamas

Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,

Bahamas

Dated this 13th day of August, A. D. 2010



_CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE ISHEREBY GIVEN 2s follows

(a) QUALITY SELECTION FUND LIMITED isin dissolution under epson ofthe

International Basness Companies Act 200,

{b) The Dissolution of seid Company commenced on August 12, 20:0 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted and registered by he Rewisrar General

(c} The Ligudator of the said company is Zaki Services Lid. of 2

Nassau, Bakamas.

ee

Terrace West, Centreville,

(Q) All persons having Cains apunst the above-named Company are required on or befor the 24
day of September 2010 to send their names and addresses and particulars oftheir debts or claims to
te Liga of the commpaay or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the bene fany

distbuion made before such debis are proved,

AUGUST 13, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LID,

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



tion may be pressuring GM
to sell prematurely to influ-
ence the November congres-
sional elections and make the
government's controversial
investment look smart.
Whitacre and the government
have both said GM is in
charge of the timing of the
IPO.

Akerson will be GM's
fourth CEO in 18 months.
Like Whitacre, a former CEO
of AT&T, Akerson worked
in top executive positions at
major telecommunications
companies. He held top posts
at MCI and Nextel.

Both have been described
as hard-charging executives
who demand _ results.
Whitacre,68, who was known
within GM for his disdain for
PowerPoint presentations and
his surprise visits to factories,
said Akerson shares his vision
for the company.

‘Whitacre didn't directly
address a question about
whether executives with auto-
motive experience were con-
sidered for the job. But he
said Akerson has learned the
auto business in his year on
the board.

"Dan has been involved
every step of the way,"
Whitacre said. "He knows
this business from a board
perspective and also from
personal conversations."

Akerson will stay on with
The Carlyle Group, a private
equity firm, until he starts as
GM CEO next month.

Bob Lutz, a former GM
vice chairman who retired
earlier this year, satu in an e-
mail that Akerson doesn't

(AP Photo)

need auto experience to run
GM because it has a solid
management team. But he
does need to listen to that
team, Lutz said.

"He's very strong, very
opinionated, not always right,
and needs to work on listen-
ing skills," Lutz said. "If he
can bring himself to trust his
now-outstanding senior exec-
utive group and lead rather
than direct, | think he'll do
an outstanding job."

GM still faces problems. Its
US sales rose 14 per cent in
the first six months of this

' year, lagging behind the aver-

age industry increase of 17
per cent. It spends more on
car buyer incentives than any
other automaker, according
to Edmunds.com.

GM has also relied heavily
on sales to rental car compa-
nies, governments and corpo-
rations, which are less lucra-
tive than sales to individual
customers.

GM's return to profitability
and impending stock sale are
milestones in the restructur-
ing of the beleaguered Amer-
ican auto industry. The
administration rushed to its
aid last year, after the 2008
bailouts of major banks.

Ford Motor Co.. which
never needed gavernment
help, made $2.6 billion in the
second quarter, its fifth
straight quarterly profit.
Chrysler Group LLC, which
got $15.5 billion in federal aid,
narrowed its second-quarter
loss to $172 million.

GM's profits, coming at a
tough time for overall car
sales in the US, are proof

NOTICE
ARANCETO LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ARANCETO LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
,the 10th August, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and. registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST

Administration

(Bahamas)

Limited, The Bahamas

Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,

Bahamas

Dated this 10th day of August, A. D: 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator



Public Notice
LPIA Expansion Project Stage 2/3

Contractors and suppliers are advised to monitor media outlets (newspaper,
radio) in the coming weeks for details related to the tendeting of Stage 2,
New International Arrivals Terminal and Stage 3, Domestic
Departures / Domestic Arrivals Terminal.
posted/broadcast as it becomes available on NAD's website, www.nas.bs

Whitacre has put the compa-
ny on solid footing, said
David Cole, the chairman of
the Center for Automotive
Research in Ann Arbor,
Michigan.

Cole said Whitacre was
smart enough to leave in
place things that were work-
ing — product development,
which has produced some
hot-sellers, and manufactur-
ing, which has grown more

!













before August 26, 2010



bottom line? We want you!

Skills and Requirements

product markers

© @ Ability to multitask

applications

® Strong leadership skills

® Profe



fonal appearance

Afinimum Requirements

applications




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000), South River Place Investments Inc. is in
dissolution. Ms. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marboreuen & Queen
Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas. .

anlar Oe) Lolaeut yy

Marketing Manager

Are you acharismatic and innovative individual, with a passion
for success, the ability to initiate progress and concern for the

® Strong arganizational skills along with ¢ Xeellent oral and
written communication abilicy

® Ability to plan, organize, direct, contralto achieve shart:
range and lang-range business development objectives in

@ Ability to work ina fast paced environment

® Ability re work well under pressure

® Proficient in Graphic Software, and Microsoft Office

® Excellent interpersonal skills

'@ A desire and passion to get ahead

® Bachelor's degree or MBA in marketing
preferred marketing or business administration

@ Atleast 5 years of marketing experienee in rerail fudustry

@ Proficient in Graphic Software, and Microsalt Office

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
interviewwithhre@gmail. com







Additional information will be |

efficient — while he stream-
lined GM's bloated manage-
ment. /

GM is now using 93 per
cent of its North American
factory capacity, compared
with 39 per cent in the sec-
ond quarter of last year as it
idled factories while in bank-
ruptcy protection.

"T think he'll be remem-
bered as a short-term but
effective leader," Cole said.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES |
ACT |
(No.45 of 2000)

|

In Voluntary Liquidation

All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator

|
Alrena Moxey |
-Liquidator |





















and management








& International



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



US mortgage rates hit 4.44
per cent as economy sours

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Growing pessimism over the
weak economic recovery
pushed mortgage rates to the
lowest level in decades for the
seventh time in eight weeks.

The average rate on a 30-
year fixed mortgage hit 4.44
per cent this week, mortgage
buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday. And some brokers
say homeowners looking to
refinance have even managed
to do so for as low as four per
cent.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010

_IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land com-
prising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres
situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant
on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on
the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIE’S PLACE LTD.

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF SADIE’S PLACE in respect of:-

Still, cheap rates have done
little to boost the struggling
housing market. Instead, they
are highlighting investors’
fears that the rebound is
stalling and the country could
be slipping back into a reces-
sion.

Investors are shifting their —
money away from stocks and
into safer Treasury bonds.
That is sending Treasury
yields lower. Mortgage rates
track those yields.

And the Federal Reserve
is pushing those yields down
even further. The central
bank said Tuesday it would
buy Treasurys to help aid the
recovery, using the proceeds
from debt and mortgage-
backed securities it bought
from Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac.

That move alone is unlike-
ly to push average rates down
to four per cent, said Bob
Walters, chief economist at
Quicken Loans. But average
rates that low are still a possi-
bility if the economic outlook
worsens even further.

"The silver lining ta a bad
economy is that interest rates
fall," Walters said. "If you can
lower your debt burden by
refinancing, that's great."

Up to now, low rates have
failed to spark a struggling
housing market. Slow job
growth, a 9.5 per cent unem-
ployment rate and tight cred-

it standards have kept people “

from buying homes. Applica-
tions to refinance have grown
but remain well short of a
massive boom.

Overall home loan applica-
tioris rose only 0.6 per cent
last week from a week earlier,
the Mortgage Bankers Asso-
ciation said Wednesday:

For those homeowners with
solid finances, the opportuni-
ty to refinance below four per
cent is persuading some to
consider 15-year fixed loans.
Those average rates dropped
to 3.92 per cent, down from
3.95 per cent last week and
the lowest in decades.

More homeowners are
choosing that option because
it allows them to save money



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VALERIE RITA NOYES of
HARTSWELL, P.O. BOX EX-29213, GREAT EXUMA, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13th day of August, 2010 to the Minister responsible for



Mortgage rates fall

ThE avErago MalG OF & 2Qyear
fixed rate mortgage tell 19 4.48
percent this week, its Kwest level
on record.

Average 30-year fixer rate |
mortgage. weekly

bY percent



AGONE I OMAMS JA
BOR 8019
Average fixed rate mortgage

Ost. 9.1991 Aug. 8, 2010
FOYE" yaBate 8.39%
15. Der, 18.1984 Aug. & 2018

2.89% 3.85%

done 29,2006 Aug. S, 2010
8.39% 3.63%



etale mortgage

SQURCE: Freddie Mac / AP

in the long run, though it costs
more in monthly payments.
Freddie Mac says nearly a
third of borrowers refinanc-
ing 30-year loans in the April-
to-June picked loans with 15-
year or 20-year terms.

Still, savvy. consumers can
already find 30-year fixed
rates at or near four per cent
if they are willing to pay a lit-
tle more upfront.

Chik Quintans, assistant
sales manager with Atlas
Mortgage in Seattle, said he
was able to get two clients

into mortgages with a four per
cent interest rate and a fee of |
one per cent of the total mort--
gage amount on Wednesday.
But rates have inched up
since then. ,

"Every day's different,"
Quintans said. "Sometimes
people have to ruminate, and
then the opportunity's gone."

Refinancing could pick up
significantly if rates fall fur-
ther. An average rate below
4.375 per.cent could be
enough of a drop so that
many people who refinanced
last year could shave a half of
a percentage point of their
mortgage rates, said Scott
Buchta, chief mortgage strate-
gist with Braver Stern Securi-
ties.

Lenders could find them-
selves in a bind if traffic picks
up, Buchta said. Many have
laid off thousands of workers
over the past three years and
don't have enough staff to
handle a crush of new appli-
cations.

Mortgage rates often fluc-
tuate significantly, even with-
in a given day. To calculate
the national average, Freddie
Mac collects mortgage rates
on Monday through Wednes-
day of each week from about
125 banks, thrifts and credit
unions around the country in
a voluntary survey.

Rate quotes from parts of
the country with more lending
activity — such as the West
and Northeast — are given
more weight in creating the




average.

Rates on five-year
adjustable-rate mortgages
averaged 3.56 per cent, down
from 3.63 per cent a week ear-
lier. Rates on one-year
adjustable-rate mortgages fell
to an average of 3.53 per cent
from 3.55 per cent.

The rates do not include
add-on fees known as points.
One point is equal to one per
cent of the total loan amount.
The nationwide fee for loans
in Freddie Mac's survey aver-
aged 0.7 a point for all loans
except for 15-year mortgages,
which averaged 0.6 of a point.

Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIFAN PIERRE of COLLINS
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as.a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registratior/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6° day of August, 2010 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

In respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising
One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres situate
approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant on the
East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant
land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet
and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and.
running thereon 138.47 feet to a.point thence SOUTH-
WARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to
a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTH-
WARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate
of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point

- thence WESTWARDLY and by land_ 5.04 feet to a point
thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon
12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon
169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or for-
merly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon
37.78 feet to the beginning.

TS

For the stories
TUTTE
rT ES

~ on Mondays











ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work
COLONIAL

Sadie’s Place claims to be the owner of the unincum-
bered fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3)
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have it’s title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be

AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital



LOCKHART & Co.
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas












BISX AL
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in.closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings .

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Protected TIGRS, Series 3

“YIE
Bid $

t 124 dividends divided by clasing price

- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions Famguard
. . Finco
of the said Act. FirstCaribbean Bank
Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be eae
Focol Class B Preference
inspected during normal office hours in the following ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson ; A 10.5
places: Premier Real Estate 0.156 0.800 84.1 8.00
SSS Ww e>F>FjF WO WOOO WW Sy
: ; 52wk-Hi 5S2wk-Low » Security ls Interest Maturity
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) 0.00 20 November 2029
Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nas- EIR IS eps Nove eenOn ae i srcicmiaens
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0,00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
sau, Bahamas; and 4 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C),+ 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
2 The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Re- Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 0.00 < Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
* " WANA AY SN SSG \ WN WY N WN
tiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas. 52wk-Low Last Price DailyVol.. EPS$ Div$ PIE Yield
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets -2.945 0.000 N/M
: 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 0.000 0.480 N/M
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower 0-001 0.000... 256.6
QUARARRAREERARR .
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not rec- 4540 0.000. 9.03
ognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration oe eeeedinae a
ee ae UA o—h»e»_U_U
of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these: Last 12 Months NAV 3MTH NAV 6MTH NAV Date
ae ; CFAL Bond Fund 1.460225 1.438700 30-Jun-10
presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Pe- 2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9101 0.80% 0.19% 2.902023 2.906145 31Jul-10
vat : : we 1.4817. CFAL Money Market Fund "4.5451 2.52% 4.28% 1.528885 1.512735 30-Jul-10
titioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in : 2.8522 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.8216 9.47% -9.40% 31-Jul-10
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed . 13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.4110 0.33% 3.32% 30-Jun-10
. ; 101.6693 CFAL Global Bond Fund 109.3929 5.20% 7.60% 107.570620 103,987340 30-Jun-10
therewith. : 93.1998 . CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.1833 1.52% 3.56% 105.779543 101.725415 30-Jun-10
. 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 4.1223 2.98% 5.25% 31-Jul-10
\ 1.0917 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0761 0.76% 5.35% 31-Jul-10
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement 1.1198 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1198 2.67% 5.53% 31-Jul-10
: “ 9.5955 9.1005 -Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal .
of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) Brotected TERS, Series't ’ 9.5955 2.71% 5.96% Sinlubld
. . ‘ 11,2361 10,0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
days after the final publication of these presents shall Protected TIGRS, Series 2 10.3734 3,69% 3.38% 31-Jul-10
. 4 10,0000 9.3299 Royal Fidelity Bah Int! Investment Fund Principal
operate as bar to such claims. 9.3648 6.35% -6.35% 31-Jul-10

-Jul-10





EPS $- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV -

Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

“FO TRADE CALLE CRAL 242.802-7040 | ROVALFIDBLITY 242-356-7768 | FO CAPITAL MARKETS 2a2 9004000 | COLONIAL 2a2 802702

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM -

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 7B

THE TRIBUNE



_ APT 3-G

THEY'RE ALL ADULTS,
BAM..-WE CAN'T TELL
THEM WHAT TO DO!

AND IF NEP GOES BACK
TO MARK, IT'LL SHAKE
HIS CONFIDENCE!

THE GUY'S TRYING
TO FULFILL A

DREAM... SAVE YOUR DRAMA

m,. FOR THE SHOW.

yy

WHY YOU CAN RELATE
TO JULES! OKAY, PEOPLE, THAT'S

A WRAP. SEE YOU INTHE DON'T WE GET TO

Ie





SCRIBBLE
SCRIBBLE BBLE

' SCRIBBLE SCRIBBLE
e~ |

YOU KNOW, THIS ISN'T AS
EASY AS ITLOOKS .



UM J.C.DITHERS, CEO
OF J.C. DITHERS AND

TM FRANK, THE WAITER,
MOVING TO

) MONTANA
| TOMORROW! ),

YOU DON'T NEED TO
SHOUT! I'M (ay
RIGHT HERE Eg’


















(©2010 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.




VACME WINDOW COMPANY

IT SAYS:
-CAN SOLVE YOUR PROBLEM”.

" NEED MORE LIGHT
i YOUR HOME 2”




‘CAUSE HE CANT.
RUN AKOUNP
IN SQUARES!

HOW Come Your

VOG |S RUNNING
AROUN? IN
CIRCLES?












Bb
a



©2010 dy King Features Syncicate, Inc. Wood rignts reserved.








HOW AM I SUPPOSED To

HOW many words of four letters




The Target










"LEARN SURGERY IF I
CANT DISSECT ANYTHING ? or more can you make from the
letters shown here? in making
uses a word, each letter may be used
d : once only. Each must contain the
words in centre letter and there must be
’ at least one nine-fetter ward.
athe main — No piurats.
Ne body of Seed is eaky good 1G;excetient 24
PEO Rs > very @ ; excellen’
qs a Owe Chambers Gr more) Solution tomorrow.
So] et te
Sa alist ; YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION,
a om I : . cent cite cited code coded coin
unl Century coined conduit cone coned cote
bt count counted cued cute deduct
Dictionary pepuctION dice diced duct
(1999 food icon piduice induced widuel
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with iced icon induce inauced induc
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers edition). ee Ce erie Gane ACO

1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the. same number only once.
The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from
Monday to Sunday

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is
to fill all of the.empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the
sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left,
and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its
top. No number may be used in the same block more than
once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases
from Monday to Sunday.




















































©2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.











©2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.













1/5/2]617/4|3/9/8
9/4/8/2/311|6/7/5 aes on
;
7/3/6{9/5 8]2/ 1/4) Fee mratolel7 6
7/6) 2|5/8|3] 1/2/8916 (2
eee 9/7 M13 .2Mms 4
Sf 5 4|8/3|9/6/1 1/213 M9118
“HEY, MOM WHEN 1 SOIN THE Boy ScouTs az see ti6|4|2 ale 8 [9 |7\5 1 Me|6 8
CAN REET.” © i 7/30 -
ICA HELP YOU CROSS THE z Difficulty Level ORE ena ma g{3i4 711/516] 817 M8 171219)



CRYPTIC PUZZLE ~~

Across Down
1 Complained when awoken 1 Pious — nothing short of

Bidding Quiz

after midnight (7)

Should prove uncommonly
tough (5)

A number lead the union in
time-wasting action (9)

It reduces toil. (3)

Still one that is found in
Himalayan mythology (4)
Congratulations on a boring
job completed (4,4)

Dog or sow had run amok
(6)

Sportsmen may shoot them
for fun (6)

Sent about 10 cents as a
deposit (8)

Don’t go on stage (4)

| write a note and leave (3)
Turned up to see about our
set's repair (9)

Experience discrimination
(5)

They may be required to be
met (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Distinct, 5 Opus, 9
Marat, 10 Emotive, 11 Cool
customer, 13 Auntie, 14 Peg leg, 17
Maiden speech, 20 Article, 21
Teeth, 22 Dawn, 23 Clarinet.

Down: 1 Dame, 2 Sirloin, 3
Intelligence, 4 Cherub, 6 Prism, 7
. Steerage, 8 For the better, 12
. Farmyard, 15 Lectern, 16 As well,
18 In tow, 19 Chat.

It’s blended in a French diet

goodly (5)

Reputedly wise light
sleeper (3)

Take-off is a bit of a risk it
seems (4)

Indeed upset when refused
(6) |
Put on too much weight (8)
Go get soil so he may
study it (9) y A:

They provide information
for people at the bank (7)
They can produce drops in
performance (4,5)

Traffic force includes
thousands (8)

Dubious character (7)

(6)

Requests said to give
satisfaction (5)

The hollow sound of
success in business (4).
Numbers rise in this issue
(3)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Frippery, 5 Spur, 9
Onset, 10 Meaning, 11 Mean
business, 13 Patchy, 14 Topple,
17 Deliberately, 20 Morocco, 21
Inane, 22 Crew, 23 Feckless.

Down: 1 Fool, 2 Inspect, 3 Pat on
, the back, 4 Rumpus, 6 Poise, 7
Register, 8 Lay it on thick, 12
Epidemic, 15: Pillage, 16 Groove,
18 Large, 19 Lees.

EASY PUZZLE

i
qq

1
5
8

=
o
=
o

Across

Afraid (7)

Pay a call on (5)
Unofficial test of
opinion (5,4)

A sugar cane liquor

_()

Symbol of servitude
(4)

Pupil of a leader (8)
Elect (6)

Rigorous (6)
Communiqué (8)
Cease (4)

Say further (3)
Bugbear (4,5)
Adversary (5)
Fidelity (7)

=
o



Down

1

2

Arousing suspicion
(5)

Earth’s atmosphere
(3)

Domestic cock or
hen (4)

Chance of success
(4-2)

Speed (8)

Cause of hurt
feelings (4,5)
Violent storm (7)
Information (9)

A legislative body
(8)

A green leaf
vegetable (7)

A handgun (6)
Devoutness (5)
Jealousy (4)
Harmful (3)



You are South, and the bidding
has gone:

East South West North
L& Dble Pass 29
Pass ?

What would you bid now with
each of the following six hands?

1. @ K862 ¥ K86 @ K862 # K8
2. # K862 ¥ Q862 #AQ62 # 8

3. #K1062 ¥ K862 #AQ62 #8
4. @AQ862 ¥ K86 # AKI6 # Q
5. 4 J985 ¥ A85S # KQL0 # AJ4
6. #AI94 ¥ Q6 @AKQS # AS4

eek

(This bidding quiz and the answers
below appeared some years ago in
“Rate Your Own Game,” then a
monthly feature of The Bridge World
Magazine. The problems were pre-
ceded by the statement that a single-
jump response to a takeout double
shows nine to 11 points and is not
forcing.)

1. Pass. Positionally promoted val-
ues notwithstanding, this is a mini-
mum double with minimum heart
support. Doubler should have no
thought of reaching game.

2. Three hearts. In spite of the low
point count, this is a sound ratse
because of the playing strength for
hearts. The absence of a cuebid by
North in clubs, which suggests that
he has some clubs to ruff, is a favor-
able sign.

3, Four hearts, Game cannot be

guaranteed, but with prime values
behind the opener, good trumps and
good ruffing potential, you would be
putting too much pressure on partner
with a mere invitational bid of three
hearts. Your values are such that ifa
little luck is needed (such as a couple
of finesses), you will have more than
the usual chance because of East's
opening bid.

4, Two spades. Game must be
reached, but you can’t tell whether it
should be bid in notrump, spades,
hearts or diamonds. Further investi-
gation is needed, and since two
spades is forcing and properly
descriptive, you need look no further
for the best way to proceed.

5. Two notrump. This does not
deny the heart support suggested by
your takeout double; it merely offers
notrump as an alternative contract. If
partner is bidding mainly on distribu-
tion, he can retreat to a suit contract.

6. Three clubs, Three notrump,
with only one club stopper, would be
unnecessarily precipitate. Instead,
you force partner to give you more
information — without yourself
sending a misdescription — by using
a strength-showing cuebid. This does
not affirm or deny interest in hearts;
you plan to clarify your intentions on
the next round (as by bidding three
notrump, which, following the cue-
bid, is more tentative than a direct
jump).

Tomorrow: To cogitate is not a sin.
©2010 King Features Syndicate Inc,



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Jobs picture dims as
unemployment claims rise

By CHRISTOPHER S
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The economy is looking
bleaker as new applications
for jobless benefits rose last
week to the highest level in
almost six months.

It's a sign that hiring
remains weak and employers
may be going back to cutting
their staffs. Analysts say the
increase suggests companies
won't be adding enough
workers in August to lower

the 9.5 per cent unemploy-
ment rate.

First-time claims for jobless

benefits edged up by 2,000 to
a seasonally adjusted 484,000,
the Labour Department said
Thursday. That's the highest
total since February. Analysts
had expected claims to fall.
Initial claims have now
risen in thrée of the last four
weeks and are close to their
high point for the year of
490,000, reached in late Janu-

ary. The four-week average, -

which smooths volatility,
soared by 14,250 to 473,500,

MOS Ia ad

_ also the highest since late

February.

The report "represents a
very adverse turn in. the
labour market, threatening
income growth and consumer
spending," Pierre Ellis, an
*economist at Decision Eco-

‘nomics, wrote in a note to

clients. _
Even ‘the lowest mortgage
rates in decades are a gloomy
sign for the economy. Aver-
age rates on 30-year fixed
mortgages fell to 4.44 per
cent, Freddie Mac said Thurs-
day. While that's good for

SALES FALL: A sign at a Wendy's restaurant is shown in Doral, Florida. Wendy's/Arby's
Group Inc. said yesterday that its second-quarter net income fell by more than 28 per cent as
sales fell and charges cut into results.

THE WEATHER REPORT i222

Eee Frees

4-8 knots

TODAY

Partly sunny with a

thunderstorm

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeal Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine-intensity, cloudiness, pracipitation, pesseure,
and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person fesls, Temperatures reflact the high and the low for the day.

UCP tr :

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday

Shown is sc s yeatie rf. Temperatures are today's

highs and

onights's lows. . ,

Pcs il acl SHG as Lula SM ll il

PH abe, =
wn eynw #

BMH MIM NM
MMMM HK

O DISCUSS STORIES ON THI

(AP Photo)



TONIGHT

Partly cloudy

SATURDAY

A mix of sun and
clouds
High: 92°
Low: 79°

BCU GET Tae

people looking to refinance
or buy a home, low rates
haven't been enough to ener-
gize a struggling housing mar-
ket.

And the drop suggests

investors are losing confi- -
dence in the recovery. Mort-
_ gage rates track the yields on

US Treasurys. They are
falling because investors :are
shifting more money away
from stocks and into the safe-
ty of Treasurys, which forces
those. yields down.

Those yields were pushed
even lower this week after the
Federal Reserve downgrad-
ed its assessment of the econ-
omy on Tuesday and
announced a programme, to
buy more, ‘Treasurys to help
lift the recovery.

The stock market has been
falling since the Fed's ‘more
pessimistic outlook. The Dow
Jones industrial average
dropped 37 points in midday
trading Thursday, and is down
more than 300 points for the
week.

Economists closely watch
weekly claims, which are con-
sidered a gauge of the pace
of layoffs and an indication
of employers’ willingness to
hire. Sap
The government's July jobs
report, released Friday,
showed that the economy lost
a net total of 131,000 jobs last
month. Excluding the.impact
of the elimination of 143,000
temporary census jobs, the
economy added a meager
12,000 positions, as layoffs by

SUNDAY

Nae

{Intervals of clouds
and sunshine
Highs 89°

Low: 80°

GUE

High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Normal high

MONDAY

Partly sunny, a
t-storm Possible

state and local governments
almost cancelled out weak
hiring by businesses.
Thursday's: report on job-
less claims indicates that trend

may not change soon. Claims _

fell steadily last, year from
their peak of 651,000, reached

in March 2009. But they have

mostly leveled out this year

‘ator above 450,000. In a

healthy economy with rapid
hiring, claims usually drop
below 400,000.

The rise in claims is a sign
that private employers may
be ramping up layoffs, which

declined as recently as June,

according to a separate gov-
ernment report released
Wednesday.

States with the largest
increases in claims two weeks
ago cited rising layoffs in the
construction and manufactur-
ing industries. The state data

‘Jags the national report by

one week.

Claims could also be rising
_ because of large job cuts by ©

state and local governments,
which are struggling with
unprecedented budget gaps.
State and local governments
cut 48,000 jobs.in July, the
most in a year.

Some economists speculate
that many census workers
whose jobs are finished are
requesting unemployment

benefits. Another possibility is
‘ that small companies, facing

tight credit, are still reducing
their staffs, even as larger cor-
porations slowly resume hir-
ing.

msn AY

“Partly sunny

The report comes after the
Federal Reserve said Tues:..
day that “employers remain
reluctant to add to payrolls."
The centra] bank said the
pace of economic recovery is
likely to be more modest ‘than
anticipated.

And on Wednesday, the

Commerce Department said

June imports jumped while
exports dropped. That pushed
the trade gap to its widest
point since October 2008.
Many economists say’that
could reduce economic
growth estimates in the April-
to-June quarter to 1.2 per cent
— half the 2.4 per cent annu-
al rate the government esti-
mated last month. That's a
sharp slowdown from the five -
per cent growth in the final
quarter of 2009 and the 3.7
per cent pace in the January-
to-March quarter. That.weak-
ening could be prompting
more employers to cut staff,
or at least hold off on hiring.
’ The total number of peo-

' ple receiving benefits dropped

118,000 to 4.45 million, the
department said. But that
doesn't include another 5.3
million people receiving
extended benefits paid for by
the federal government, as of
the week ending July 24, the
latest data available.

Some companies are still
.cutting workers. Medical
products manufacturer. Care-
Fusion Corp. said Wednesday
it plans to eliminate 700 jobs,
saving the company up to

_ $120 million a year.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

UV inpex Topay

“The baie the saunas uv index™ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Times For Nassau

w+» 91° F/33° C

Normal low. .:
Last year's high
Last year's low ....

Monday

High -HR(f.) Low _HR(ft.) |

Today
10:20p.m. 3.3. 4:19 p.m. 0.0 -

Saturday 10:56am. 3.5
WAS p.m. 3.0 5:16 p.m. 0.3

Sunday

70:01am. 3.6 3:49am. -0.3
4:38 am. -0.3
Vi3am. 3.4

12:09 a.m.
1

Wednesday 2: 15 a.m.

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .

Year to date .
Normal year to dats

\

AccuWeather.com
_ Forecasts and graphics provided by
‘AccuWeather, Inc, ©2010

8-16 knots

UP V YI sae ar cht yh

WINDS

Today: W at 3-6 Knots

3:02 p.m.

Thursday. = 3:20 a.m.

4:02 p.m.

Sun ano —
Sunrise ...... 6:43 a.m. Moonrise... .
Sunset. ... . :-7:46 p.m, Moonset... .

First Full

10:26 a.m.
10:42 p.m.

Last New

Aug. 24 -Sep.1

"7-14 knots

WAVES

VISIBILITY WATER, TEMES.
2-4 Feet PF

7 Miles

“Saturday: WSW at 4-8 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles a3° F
ANBROS Today cea BERT Knots. 1-3 Feet” 10 Miles” SCS

1-3 Feet 10 Miles

Skt Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 85°F
CAI : ESE at 6-12 Knots” 1-3 Feet 10 Miles , 88° F
— :

EUTHERA
FREEPORT
GREAT EXUMA = Today:
GREAT INAGUA Today:
LONG ISLAND
MAYAGUANA

SAN SALVADOR = Today:

ESE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at 6-12 Knots
. SE at 6-12 Knots
SSE at 4-8 Knots
SSW at’3-6 Knots
WSW at 3-6 Knots
SE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at 6-12 Knots
ESE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at_4-8 Knots
ESE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at 6-12 Knots
~ BSE at 7-14 Knots
Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots
Today: SE at 6-12 Knots
turday:. ~ SE at 4-8 Knots
SE at 8-16 Knots
aturday: SE at.6-
1D. Today: E at 6-12 Knots
turday; __ SE at 4-8 Knots

Saturd
Today:
Saturday:
Today:
Saturday:

‘_ Saturday:

Saturday:
Today:

= Saturd:
Today:

2-4 Feet
1-3 Feet:
2-4 Feet
1-3 Feet
0-1 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-3 Feet.
1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet
2-4 Feet
2-4 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet 10 Miles
1-3 Feet 10 Miles

~3 Feet 10 Mites
1-2 Feet 10 Mites
1-2 Feet 10 Miles

10 Mites
10 Mites
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Mites
10 Miles.
10 Mites
6 Mites

GE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





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PAGE 2F

THE TRIBUNE





BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010

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LEA

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

ith just a few short

weeks until school

reopens, Minister
of Education Desmond
Bannister told The Tribune
that “there is no question
we will be absolutely
ready” to start the 2010/
2011 academic year.

He said that the repairs to school
buildings will be completed, the
teachers will be prepared and he
expects there to be no hiccups as the
new term starts.

Mr Bannister said that he has no
major expectations for the year, just
that every school continue to show
the fantastic improvements that they

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_

have been making.

“Quite frankly when I look at the
improvement in some of our schools, :
it’s outstanding. One public school
in New Providence last year had 24
students who got five or more sub-
jects with C grades or above. That
same school this year had 44 students
with five or more BGCSEs at Cor
above.

“A school in Grand Bahama that
last year had 12 students who’ got
five subjects with a C grade or above
this year had 30 and so it is an amaz-
ing improvement in one year. That’
school also had one student who got
nine BGCSEs with grades C or
above,” said the Education Minister.

Mr Bannister said the Ministry of
Education has been able to complete
an analysis of BGCSE and BJC

_Tesults by school and found that the

public system had results that “com-
pared very favourably with the

What will it take to help
our children learn?

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

NEIGHBOURHOODS should
get involved to help children learn,
said stakeholders in the education
sector. :

Responding to the state of edu-
: cation in the country, with the

national grade average at E- and D,

in Math and English, respectively,
community members weighed in on
what students and parents could do
to change the score.

“Parents and students should get
together and study or they can work
with the neighbours and get every-
one together and have a group dis-



cussion about what children learn in
school,” said Claudesha Gray, a
grade ten Government High School
student. °
‘ “The people who do poorly do
not pay.attention in school like how
the others pay attention. The chil-
dren who pay attention are quiet
and listen. The others just talk and
disrupt the class,” she said. j
Several weeks ago, Desmond Ban-
nister, Minister of Education said
exam results in the latest sitting of
the Bahamas General Certificate of
Secondary Education (BGCSE) are
a cause for national concern.
However, the Bahamas did see

‘the biggest improvement “in the his-

tory of the examination” based on





a!

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results of independent schools.”
Additionally, every school in the
public school system will be required
to submit a school improvement plan
to the Ministry of Education outlin-

ing how it will work to effectively. .

address the academic and social
needs of its students.

Mr Bannister stressed that the suc-
cess of students does not rest entire-
lv on the educators however and

encouraged parents. to take a active ©

role in their children’s education.

“We will be having our parents
seminar on the 28th and I would
encourage parents to attend. It is crit-
ical that parents make the effort to
contribute to their children’s educa-
tion. The success of a student is often
directly related to the parental
involvement.”

This year saw the retirement of a
number of veteran educators and the
ministry has added 20 new teachers

the number of students who received
at least a C or above grade average

in five or more subjects, according to. -

Mr Bannister.

Minister Keith Gray, director of
the Hope Center, a safe haven for at
risk youth, said parents had to made
a real investment in their children’s
education, not with money, but with
time and interest.

“We are the sum total of all that is
deposited in us. If nothing is deposit-
ed in the child - no time, no values,
no help - then the proof will be in the
pudding. If we can’t find the time,
get people to help,” said Minister
Gray.

“The only thing is when you can’t
find the time you have to invest in
someone helping you to deal with
your life issues. If I have to go to
work at four or five, or if I just don’t
have the time, if I can’t help the

: child, find someone who knows how
to help the child. It may be a family
member, church member or some-
one in a civic club. If you find the

to schools throughout the country. .

Despite the economic challenges
facing many parents, Mr Bannister
said that there has not been an influx
of private school children transfer-
ring to public schools.”

“In fact a number of colleges and
independent schools have indicated

help it is just as good as helping them
directly,” he said.

It is not good enough for parents
to simply instruct children to study if
they want their children to be suc-
cessful, said Minister Gray.

He said parents have to make
them study by spending time and
helping the children to engage in the
subject matter. He said this was
especially important for children
who do not learn well in a classroom
environment, which is the case with
some.

“The problem is that a lot of par-
ents just want kids to do things for

themselves, when they are supposed .

to be helping them along the way.
You can’t just say go study; come
on, hello. I could pretend I am study-
ing, but it is different if I open the
book with them, read with them; and
go over their stuff,” he said.

Some parents are faced with the
situation where they are unable to
help their children in school, because
they are not proficient in the sub-

Wie ct



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|





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\



to me that they have some of their
largest class sizes this year.”

Mr Bannister added that the min-
istry is looking at additional mea-
sures to improve security ‘and reduce
the level of crime taking place in

‘schools. He said that this will include

additional CCT cameras.

ject matter. In this case, Minister
Gray said it is important for parents
to be honest with their children and
get external help.

Claudesha said some students are
satisfied with a passing grade, and
feel good knowing the national
grade average is a D. She said this
makes them know they have passed.

“People don’t always care about
getting A grades and B grades; they
just want to pass. They think D is a
pass,” she said.

The difference between those who
do well and those who don’t; she
said, is often determined by the rela-
tionship between the child and par-
ent.

“I care about doing well-because
my parents work hard to buy me
school stuff, so I want to pay them
back by doing well in school. I don’t
think the set who are disruptive in
class care if they do well. The set
who want to make their parents
proud, they care about doing well,”
Claudesha said.

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THE TRIBUNE



By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



N a Bahamian college
_ essay titled Black Tar

Baby, the writer shares
her experience of what it ~
was like being the darkest
child in a class of whites
and mulattos. This visible
difference in skin complex-
ion made her the center of

attention and banter.

The antagonising remarks from
her peers propelled her to bleach
her skin, and chemically process her
hair. She thought that by doing this,
the teasing would stop, but the only
thing it did was damage her hair and
destroy her skin.

The effects of teasing and bullying
are more serious than parents and
teachers realise. Dr Michelle Major,
at the Caribbean Children's Devel-
opment Center, told The Tribune in
a recent interview that some chil-
dren have attempted and commit-
ted suicide because of constant
antagonising from peers.

"Bullying is very serious. We have
found that victims of bullying retal- _

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BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010











iate by hurting themselves and hurt-
ing others. We have had children
who have attempted suicide and
killed themselves.as a result of pro-
longed bullying," she said.

Children who are victims of bully-
ing have a higher tendency of having
emotional problems. They may cry
easily, have high levels of anxiety,
show symptoms of depression and
‘they may actually become depressed,
depending on the length and type of
bullying that occurs.

It is the duty of parents and teach-
ers to be observant. They must recog-
nisé when something is not right with
a child. For instance, if a child says
they don’t want.to go to school it

Visthe boxe

s

do. 7;



! gether is important
_ *Teach children tobe assertive
2 - Always stay together in groups » : oe
Teach others to stick up for their friends
Teach them to ignore the bullies
° Always report bullying incidences : -
the situation :

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could be a sign that somethi 18
bothering the child the doctor id.
"Usually anytime a child dS t
want to go to school, it is a si: that
something is wrong. Maybe § not
school, maybe the bullying hap-
pening at a club ar at churcPh° any-
time your child doesn't wt to go
somewhere it is importa tO find
out why. It doesn't neces‘ily mean
you are not going to serthem, for
example they must go tchool, but
you need to find out 4Y, so that
you can take care of thssue by talk-
ing to the school ad;Mistration or
something like that, Major said.
Since most bully @ctivities take
place at school, tea€Ts Must recog-

nise!e two types of bullying, one
mo dangerous than the other.
feachers primarily need to
qerstand that there's overt bully-
ip that’s bullying like aggression.
iat’s what people usually think
yout when they think about bully-
og so somebody's getting beat up
or somebody's getting pushed, there
is some kind of physical contact.”
However, she said the most harm-

ful bullying is covert bullying. "This

is when they use non verbal com-
munication, for instance making a
pointed gun with their fingers or
they say things up in their face, avoid

talking to them, or as soon as they -

walk into a room everyone is told
to walk out. These things aren't so
obvious because they don't manifest
into some kind of physical alterca-
tion. They are the more dangerous,
and harder to pick out and teachers
need to be aware and pay attention
to that," she said.

The harmful acts of bullying have
everything to do with interpersonal
issues on both sides. Children who
are secure in who they are not tar-
gets for this type of behaviour.

"Bullies actually don't have access
to a child unless there is a loop hole
so to speak. There is a weakness.
And when you get rid of the weak-

PAGE 3F








ness, then bullies don't have an
opportunity to bully that child any-
more. Sometimes you can't change
the weakness. You can't change a
child's colour so a child has to learn
how to build their own self esteem
and feel confident in their skin and

.who they are," she said.

"Predominantly the bully needs
help. Bullies are not going to stop
because of the victum. They will
change to another person. So the
bully needs help as well to see where
this need to demean people comes

' from. It is a self esteem issue for the

bully as well that by putting people
down they feel better about them-
selves.

Dr Major said parents can help
build their child's self esteem by hav-
ing them participate in things they
are successful in and focusing on the
things they are good at, giving them
lots of praise and comfort at home.

"Give them avenues that they can
feel as though they are contributing
to this world by the jobs they have at
home and the things they partici-
pate in outside of home. Educating
kids to stand up for those who are
being bullied is the fastest way to
alleviate the issue. Its hard to do it. It
requires them to be educated,” she

_ Said. :

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PAGE 4F

THE TRIBUNE



BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



.. Bernique PINDER -

Salathiel R. WELLS

Jerelle RAHMING -

POCCOCOOSEEOE OOOO SOROS OHO OOOO OO OOOOH OE HLSODOOADO ODODE OOLOLOSOSOLOLOOOSOHDESODODLEOOOOOOOOOR OOS



BerniQue pinper

Peeeescocegccsesesverse0e00000

¢ Bernique Pinder is a 12th
grade student at the Crooked
Island High School. She is.a
winner of the 2009 Martin
Luther King Essay Competi-

tion, the Templeton Founda-. :
Essay ©

tion “Laws of Life”
Contest and the National
Women’s Week Essay Con-
test. Ms Pinder achieved 7
BJCs, receiving A’s and B’s.

Bernique’s commitment to
her studies earned her the
2008 best BJC results for the
MICAL District.

In January 2009, she also
won the Family Island divi-
sion of the Martin Luther
King Jr, Essay Competition.
This young lady’s checklist for
success includes; believing in
yourself, dream big dreams
and work to make them a
reality, count your blessings,
not your limitations.

Salathiel I. wes

e Salathiel R. Wells, a stu-
\lent at the NGM Major high
shool was awarded the 2010
aledictorian Award for
‘ha Phi Alpha Fraternity
. Wch recognised him as the
OMnisation’s most Coutstahds

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Bahamas for the year.

He also won the Ministry
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2009. Mr Well’s has a very
long list of achievements
including:

Deputy Head Boy in 2008-
2009, Head Boy in 2009-2010
and Class Vice President in
2009-2010. He obtained top

’ marks: in the BJC examina-

tions earning six A’s and two

B’s. He was privileged to —

attend the National Student
Leadership Forum in Wash-
ington DC with Rev Ruby
Ann Darling, where he met
several United States Con-
gressmen.

He was also featured as.a
ZNS TV Student ofthe week.
In addition to his focus on
academics, Salathiel has aspi-

rations of one day becoming

the Bishop of the Anglican
Diocese in The Bahamas and
the Turks & Caicos Islands.
Salathiel has already been
accepted into Florida Inter-
national University.

Jerelle ranmine ,

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~*e 12th, Grade, R.M. Bailey
“Senior High School: student

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Queens College (incl. Skorts)
R.M. Bailey

Sir Gerald Cash

St Annes

St Augustine

St Cecilia

St Francis/Joseph

St Johins

Jerelle Rahming holds many

leadership positions at the
school including the Praise
and Worship team, the Girls’
Ensemble, Clarinet section
leader in the school band,
head vocalist in the choir, a
member of the school’s track
and field team and senior pre-
fect. Her involvement in
church includes being a mem-
ber of the Southwest ‘Cathe-

_ dral Youth Choir, The Girls’

Club, Militant Invaders, dra-
ma team, church band and
dance group.

‘ The versatile student main-
tains a 3.30 grade point aver- .
age and mentors young girls
at her school and church. Ms
Rahming believes that each
student has the ability to
achieve through education
and hard.work.. Her sugges-
tions for success are to have
Christ as your foundation,

-stay focus on education,

engage in positive activities

“and tse your talents to assist

others.

Michelle ereene

e Mickelle Greene com-
pleted most of her education
in San Salvador. The singer
has participated in the
National Arts Festival, and
won several competitions. |

She has captured winning
placements in the James
Cater Williams Speech
(2008); the National Youth
Month Speech (2008) and the
International Day Against
Illicit Drug Speech Safety
Ambassador Competition
(2010). =

Michelle became, a two-.
time member. of the Cat.
Island, San Salvador and Rum’


















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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 5F

eS

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



Michelle GREENE



Myrkeeva JOHNSON





Robyn NEWTON





Torrence CASH





Byron MCCARTNEY



Donovan DEAN



POO eee OOo oo OOOO OOOO OOOO OOO DOO OOH OOOO OSE DODO OOOOH OOOO OO NOOO OT OO EE OOO OOOO OOO HOODOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OSHS OOOO ODOT OOS O OOOO ODODE TOOD OOOO OT OOOOSOS EOD OOOO OOOO OHH OOOO SOOO EE OEE OHS OO OOOO OOO OOH OOS ESOS OOSELO000

Cay District Debate Champi-

onship Team. She has been a
member of San Salvador High
School’s Writer’s Club, Gavel
Club, French Club and Sports
Clubs, as well.as the Lady’s
Cacique Basketball, Volley-
ball, Track Teams, and Choir.

Michelle earned four
Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Education pass-
es in the eleventh grade.

She plans to pursue a
degree in Communications
which she will use to acquive a
job in Broadcast Journalism.
She also intends to develop
her musical talent and hopes
to release a Gospel CD.

MyrkKe@VC JoHNSON

Coveoocereooasoeacerooseoeoccce

e Myrkeeva Johnson, a
twelfth grader of Doris John-
son Senior High is the Deputy
Head Girl at Doris Johnson
Senior High, a member of the
Interact and Key Club, and
an active member of the Mys-
tic Marlin’s soccer and track
teams.

She has maintained a 3.45
GPA; and competed in the
Sir John Templeton “Laws of
Life” competition. Her work
was featured in The Tribune
newspaper’s ‘Write On’ col-
umr on February 15, 2010.

More recently, Myrkeeva.
was presented-with the Brass .

& Leather Award for ‘Excel-
lence in Education’ for the
Northeastern District.

IRODYN NEWTON
Robyn Newton is a recent

graduate of CV Bethel Senior

High, and-participated in

clubs such as Ladies Club,

_ SHOES AND ACCESSORIES
ROSETTA ST. 325-4944 CARMICHAEL ROAD 361-6876

\

Junior Achievement, Invest-
ment Club, and the choir.

Robyn graduated with hon-
ours with a cumulative GPA
of 3.27, and .excelled in the
Bahamas Junior Certificate
(BJC) where she obtained 5
A’s and 1B. She recently sat
the Bahamas General Cer-
tificate Secondary Education
(BGCSE) where she received
8 BGCSE’s, including an A
in English Language, Eco-
nomics, Keyboarding and
History.

She also obtained an SAT
score of 1490 and recently

‘took the AP Language exam.

Robyn is an incoming fresh-
man at the College of the
Bahamas where she is obtain-
ing a Bachelor’s degree in
Banking and Finance with a
foreign language. She hopes
to become a banker.

TOIMeENCe cas

Coceceveccecvesccsecccnecssoooe

° Torrence Cash recently
completed his final year at
CR Walker High School

. where he proudly served as

Deputy Head Boy, and
obtained 7 BJC’s.

_ During his final year at CR -
“Walker, Torrence became a

member of the distinguished
Gentlemen’s Club. ~

‘Torrence was the first recip-
ient of a full scholarship
awarded by the Gentlemen’s
Club to Morehouse College
in Atlanta, where he will pur-
sue a career in Civil Engi-
neering.

BYrOn mccartney

eeeccecccseccccccscccuncossccce

e Byron McCartney
recently completed his final

‘year of school at North

Andros High School where

' he proudly served as Head

Boy; and graduated with top
honors.

He sat eight BJC’s in the
ninth grade and earned the
most outstanding results in
North Andros and the Berry
Islands for the year 2007.:

Byron sat eight BGCSE’s
ranging from “A’s” to “C’s”.
He passed.all with tremen-

.dous results including Math-

ematics and English and was
accepted to The College of
The Bahamas. :

Byron’s career goals are
to \obtain a Doctorate
Degree in both Civil Engi-
neering and Architectural
Designs.

Call 393-1303
VILLAGE ROAD SOUTH

MN



DONOVAN bEAN -

e Donovan Dean is a
proud graduate of the St
John’s College Class of 2010.
His academic achievements
include 5 A’s and 2 B’s at the
BJC level and obtaining an
A in physics and a C in both
math and chemistry at the
BGCSE level.

He remained in the top five
in his class rankings during
grades 11 and 12 and gradu-
ated with distinction, winning
the vice principal’s prize for
academic excellence.

Donovan received ‘A’
grades in his BGCSE exami-
nations, for Math, English
Language, Spanish, Religion,

_- Chemistry, Physics, Geogra-
‘phy and Music subjects.

His career goal is to
become a civil engineer. He
plans to attend the College
of the Bahamas and later
transfer to a University
abroad to complete his stud-
ies. ©

Donovan was also a mem-

ber of the Gentlemen’s Club:

2010. Additionally, Dono-
van participated in the Goy-
ernor General’s Youth
Award (GGYA) programme
in which he obtained bronze
and silver medals.
Additionally, Donovan is

‘an avid swimmer who trains

with the Dolphin Swimming
Club, representing the club
in the annual National Swim-

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Donovan’s hobbies
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his computer skills, playing
the piano and hanging out
with friends.

BrUuniQUue sanps

e Burnique Sands was the
head girl in her school in the
MICAL constieuncy as was a
member of the school’s cham-
pionship debate team. She
obtained a 3.31 GPA and has
been lauded for her leader-
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PAGE 6F

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Krishaun Johnson Tre’ Adderley

The Tribune's

aN “| '

Antonia Johnson

Name: Krishaun Johnson

- Age: 16°
School: CV Bethel High School
Parent: Sherry L Johnson:




i

Q : College attending: College of the

s ) Bahamas ~

Sa Ambition: Plans to obtain a
degree in law.

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School: C V Bethel High School
Parents: Tamala Lynes and Syd-

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College attending: Linden Wood
University in St Charles, Missouri
Ambition: To one day become an
electrical engineer

Name: Antonia Johnson

Age: 16 |

School: C V Bethel High School
Parents: Garth and Annamae —
Johnson

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Ambition: To become a forensic
scientist

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_ Name: Cameron Pratt

Age:17_

School: CV Bethel High School
Parents: Charles and Clarise
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College attending: ATP Flight
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Ambition: To become an airline
pilot

| . Name: Garnisha Pinder

Age: 17
School: C V Bethel High School



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: Garnisha Pinder

Parents: Denice Thompson and
Garnett Pinder i

College attending: College of the
Bahamas, then Florida Interna- ~
tional University

Ambition: To become a speech
and writing therapist

Name: Cordero Saunders

Age: 17

School: C V Bethel High School
Parent: Tanya Johnson

College attending: Gupton Jones
College of Funeral Service
Ambition: To become a morti-
cian

Name: Renel Brown

Age: 17
~ School: CV Bethel High School

Parents: Renae and Nelson

- Brown

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Ambition: To become an actress
Name: Sanay Collie

Age: 18

School: St Anne's School
College attending: St Mary's -
University, Halifax, Canada













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Cordero. Saunders

Ambition: To obtain a Bachelor's

_ and Master's Degree in com-

merce.

Name: Megan Burrows

Age: 17

School: Queen's College
Parents: Sandra and Llewellyn
Burrows

College attending: Southeastern
University:

Name: Chelseyann Bipat

Age: 15 °

School: Queen's College
Parents: Jean and Bishwanand
Bipat

College attending: New York
Institute of Technology

Name: Kerri Pinder

Age: 17

School: Queen's College
Parents: Dennis and Gail Pinder
College attending: University of
Vermont

Name: Sidney Russell

Age: 17

School: Queen's College

. Parents: Ingrid and Sidney Rus-

sell
College attending: Clarkson Uni-
versity |

Name: Dominic Duidcornbe

Age: 18

School: Queen's College
Parents: Velda and Phillip Dun-
combe ©

College attending: College of the
Bahamas :

Name: Anaard Lunn

Age: 17

School: Queen's College
Parents: Anthony and Dorothea
Lunn

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Name: Adria McCardy

Age: 17

School: Queen's College

~ Parents: Cardinal and Hope ~

McCardy

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Name: Nicholas Archer

Age: 16

School: St John’s College
Parents: Anthony and Nicholette
Archer:

College attending: Li Po Chun
United World College

Ambition: To become an electri-
cal-engineer and create an elec-
trical system powered by alterna-
tive or renewable energy.

Name: Ra'Shan Stubbs

Age: 17

School: St John’s College
Parents: William and Crystal
Stubbs :

_ College attending: College of the

Bahamas

Ambition: To be the best diag-
nostic cytologist and forensic
scientist in the Bahamas

-Name: Noelle Sawyer

Age: 16

School: St John’s College ©
Parents: Clyde and Evelyn
Sawyer

College attending: Vassar Col-
lege

Ambition: To become an satica:
tor in mathematics and history
Name: Jode Ferguson

Age: 17

School: StJohn’s College
Parents: Alexa and Theodore Fle
guson
College attending: Ohio Wes-

~ Jeyan University

Ambition: To return to the
Bahamas to become a general
surgeon

_ Name: Aston Symonette

ge: 17
School: St John’s College
Parents: Albrion Sr and Camille
Symonette
College attending: University of
New Orleans
Ambition: To become a qualified
engineer and work as a marine
engineer and ship InSPEGOE
Name: Vandia Lashan
Age: 10
Schaal: ‘Sandilands EIR)
School
Parent’s Name: Norma & Pascal
Joseph
Career Goal: To become a doc-
tor and a athlete
Ambition: To continue reaching

. academic excellence by making

the honor roll and maintaining
her 3.84 grade point average

Name: Phaefrisia C.R. Strachan

School: St John’s College (11th
grade)

Parents names: Burlington and
Paula Strachan

Ambition: To become a veteri-
narian and an artist. At the end of
the 2009/2010 academic year,
she placed 3rd out of 103 stu-
dents in her grade level.



THE TRIBUNE

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010

PAGE 7F





_ Nicholas Archer

Pee






(Nae
cai HMTAISY HHS

stennay



Anaard Lunn

Phaefrisia C.R.Strachan Chelseyann Bipat

EO



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an awar:
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.











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PAGE 8F

THE TRIBUNE



ac SUCCESS
( Tiffany Lavette
Grant poses in
front of the
school sign at the
University of
. King's College,
“i Halifax, Nova
n= Scotia, Canada.
Tiffany obtained
her Bachelor of
Journalism (Hon-
ours) Degree.

angen
ASS "

























Former Tribune reporter
obtains Journalism Degree



By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor



iffany Lavette Grant, a
‘ former Tribune Staff

Reporter, graduated in
May of this year with a Bach-
elor of Journalism (Honours)
Degree from the University of
King's College, Halifax, Nova:
Scotia, Canada.

In 2004, Tiffany graduated with
an Associate of Arts Degree in
Journalism and Mass Communica-

‘ tions with credit from The College

of The Bahamas before working
at this newspaper from 2004-2006
when she left to further her studies.

During her last year in universi-
ty, she was the editor for
AfricVoice, the newsletter of the
Black Student Advising Centre
(BSAC) at Dalhousie University

and in 2009, she also interned at
Halifax Magazine where a number
of her stories were published.
“One of my requirements for my
degree was to write an honours
paper where I examined a medi-
um. I choose to look at: The Tri-
bune newspaper. I asked the ques-

~ tion: Why does The Tribune focus

a lot of their content on political
reporting.
“In investigating this, I talked to

my former boss newsroom editor

Paco Nunez, , Sir Arthur Foulkes,
a former Bahamian politician and
then director general of Bahamas
Information Services, and Branville
McCartney, the then minister of

state for immigration, along with
other individuals. :

“Overall, the reason why there is
so much focus on politics in The
Tribune is due to a culture where
Bahamians are interested in polit-

¢

“Even though | was a
hard news reporter
at one point in my life,.
~ my true passion is
about finding out
about what people do,
~why-they do it; and the .
struggles and success-
es they have in life.”

COCOCOHTHS ET OOOOH HA OOOTO LOSES SEDO E500

ical reporting.”

Tiffany explained that she chose
to study journalism because she
has always had an interest in writ-
ing about people and social mat-

. ters.

“Byen though I was a hard news
‘reporter at one point in my life,
my true passion is about finding
out about what people do, why
they do it, and the struggles and
successes they have in life.

“While daily news is essential in
today's world, I feel more accom-
plished writing a feature on issues
such as people dealing with mental
illness or how people are, affected
by the financial crisis. I believe
every story should have “heart”
and, “head.” This means, that it
should have a human interest.angle
that people can relate to, the
“heart” and the “head”, which are
_the statistics and the research that
has been done concerning. an
issue.”

She recently received her. post-
graduate work permit, which will
enable her to work in Canada for
three years.

“Tt took'me a while to adjust to
being in Halifax, but now I consid-
er it my second home.”

Her career plans will include
contributing to magazines, assist-
ing with documentaries, as well as
some public relations work such as
writing press kits for individuals.

“Getting that dream job is all a

. process. It's a process I am willing
and able to go through.”

Tiffany attributes her success to
her mother Juanita Grant. ae:
-, “My mother was a single moth-
er who always strived to give her
children the best and I will always
be so grateful for everything that
she did for me and my. brother..J
also. want to thank my brother
Jamaal Grant who also sacrificed,
so that I could have and my Gram
my Dorothy Nairn, whom ‘J know
prayed for me while I was in school
and continues to pray for me.”

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-PAGE 10F

THE TRIBUNE



BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



BAHAMAS BAPTIST COMMUNITY COLLEGE



New
courses

By REUBEN SHEARER

\ \ | ith a new acade-
’ mic year soon

upon them, students of the
Bahamas Baptist Commu-
nity College have much to
look forward to. New cours-
es and professors are just a
few of the changes students
can expect.

‘According to Sir Baltron
Bethel, BBCC’s president,
the economic downturn may

not have a major impact on |

this year’s enrollment.
The college president
expects. enrollment to

. remain steady. The school

is offering 30 Associate of
Arts degree programs, a
variety of professional cer-
tificate courses, and a col-

lege preparatory program
for students that haven’t met ,

college entry requirements.
“We hope to continue to

see our programs -sub- »

scribe,” said Sir Baltron,
who looks forward to a pro-
ductive school year. ““We’re
all set to go, and we’re cele-
brating our 15th anniversary.
We have a number of activ-

ities which we.are planning -

to observe for the 15th
anniversary of the school.”

“All of the programs
which we offer on the col-
lege level are approved by
the Ministry of Education,













/ HOPEFUL:
/ Sir Baltron Bethel

-and are accepted at institu-

tions abroad, and the Col-
lege of the Bahamas,” ‘he
explained.

BBCC expects over 700.

students this school year,

“including recent high school

graduates and working
adults.
Degrees being offered

include an Associate of Arts |
’ degree in Accounting, Busi-

ness Administration, Com-
puter Information Systems,
HRM Management, Mar-
keting and Office Adminis-
tration. _

BBCC will offer several
new programs for the new
school year, including a pre-

school auxiliary certificate
Hospiality A

program,
Accounting and Microso
Quickbooks Certificate




: courses ‘6 cater toa new. cal-

iber of students. =

The school’s Hospitality
Accounting certificate
course is designed for per-
sons who have been working

in the accounts department

of hotels and restaurants
who may not have had any
formal accounts training. lt
is a one semester course.’

Persons interested in the -
medical field can enroll in
the medical transcription
program which will give
them the necessary skills to
maintain records in medical
offices.

The College Preparatory
programme is designed to.
assist students who do not
have the required grades in
their BGCSEs. *

The College Preparatory
program includes courses in
Mathematics I and 2, Eng-
lish 1 and 2, Biology with
lab, Chemistry with lab, His-

-tory, Geography, and Stu-
“dent Development Seminar.

While pursuing excellence
in education in.a Christian

- environment, BBCGi 24s.com-

mitted to providing’ ZODPOr-
tunities for as many 1 -
ans as possible,. cat all levels

_ of society.

__ Studies can be pursued ona
» full-time: or. part-time. basis,
or ata ‘distance education

programme in Eleuthera.

We're all set to go,
and we’re celebrating
our 15th anniversary.
We have a number of
_ activities which we are

planning to observe

» . for the 15th anniver-
sary of the school.

Sir Baltron Bethel

“Making sure
She's prepared

Fidelity Fast Track Loan





THE TRIBUNE









¢

Ve
£0 ee

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

HE Anglican Diocese
of the Bahamas is

upholding its mandate to pro-
vide a unique educational expe-
rience for the students attend-
ing the four schools under its
umbrella.

And according to education
stakeholders, they have made
an invaluable contribution to
Bahamian society by develop-
ing the whole child spiritually,
academically, physically, emo-
tionally and socially. ,

Like the Catholic and Bap-
tist Educational Boards in the
Bahamas, the Anglican Central
Education Authority said it is
continuously revamping its
facilities and incorporating new
programmes to ensure their stu-
dents are exposed to new rele-
vant information as well as a
range of extracurricular activi-
ties to help them reach their
highest scholastic potential.

Makia Gibson, Anglican
deputy director of education
and curriculum, said the Angli-
can Authority has exerted its
efforts towards a number of
new initiatives to improve the
schools.

Along with the addition of
new courses, a new science
block has, been established at
St John’s College in Nassau.

"There are number of new
initiatives we have implement-
ed for the new school year. At
St John’s College we have

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added. a new science block
which is a state-of-the-art
space," he said.

As it concerns new spaces,
the Anglican Central Educa-
tion Authority has made the
decision to also expand the St
Andrew’s School in Exuma.

"St Andrew’s in Exuma went.

from nursery to grade nine. We
are building a senior high
school and next year will be the
first graduating class from
there," Mr Gibson told The Tri-
bune. \

The Bishop Michael Eldon
High School in Freeport has
also undergone a facelift and a
new cafeteria has been added.

And the advanced placement
programme, which aims to
make the transition from sec-
ondary school to college easier
for students, has proven suc-
cessful.

The Anglican Authority has
also introduced a new literacy
initiative at all of its schools.









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are afforded the opportunity to

Sec its inception, The Catholic
Board of Education in the Bahamas
has been on a mission to uphold academic
excellence through the fundamental prin-
ciples of Christianity.

They have tried to find innovative new
avenues to provide students with conducive
learning environments and effective cur-




With this new initiative teachers
will set aside non-negotiable
time for reading, learning new
skills and strategies. The board
believes that this literacy activ-
ity will have great benefits for
their students.

"Students can also take this
time to discuss with their teach-
ers and peers their thoughts
about different subject mat-
ters," Mr Gibson explained.

During the past year, St
Anne’s School joined forces
with the Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) to create a
unique hospitality and tourism
studies course.

And while the collaboration
with the BHA is nothing new to

‘schools in the Bahamas, the

Anglican Central Authority
started it as an academic pro-
gramme instead of a practical
one.

With the hospitality and
tourism studies course students

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

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visit hotel properties in New
Providence and on the Family
Islands.

“The hospitality and tourism
studies course has been very
successful over the past year
and it provides a number of
opportunities for the students,”
Mr Gibson said.

Another initiative, the global
citizens programme - an expe-
rience oriented programme that
introduces students to new cul-
tures and languages - has also
been launched. ° :

The Anglican Education
Authority said it is particularly
excited about this programme
because students get the oppor-
tunity to travel to different
countries and participate in an
exchange of cultures.

With unemployment being a
prevalent problem in the
Bahamas today, the Anglican
schools have designed a pay-
ment plan to assist parents who
are finding it difficult to meet
tuition obligations. Before the
school year commences, par-
ents are required to pay 25 per
cent of the tuition and then
make ten equal payments until
March of next year.

Mr Gibson also said though
unemployment is still high they
have not seen any noticeable
losses in the number of students
attending and enrolling in the
schools.

“We haven’t seen a signifi-
cant loss. As a matter of fact,
three out of four of the schools
grew and our enrollment is
strong,” he said. ;




riculums designed to challenge all learning
styles and capacities.

For the new school semester, which starts
in just a few short weeks, the well estab-
lished system has not been short of new ini-
tiatives to take their educational experience
to the next level.

Students attending the fourteen schools
under its jurisdiction can expect an exciting

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PAGE 12F



[sack TOSCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010
How to use the

PEDES



Advice for children using —
the pedestrian crossing

e If there is a pedestrian
crossing, use it. Do not cross
on the zig-zag lines — only on
the black and white stripes.

“e Drivers need plenty of
- time to slow down and stop.

Wait on the pavement near
the kerb until all the traffic
has stopped before you start
tocross. ~

Remember, vehicles need
more time to slow down if .
the road is wet or slippery.

After the traffic has

‘ tions, walk across. Keep -
looking all round and listen-
ing in case a driver has not
seen you. Watch out for
overtaking vehicles.

° If there is an ‘sland in the
middle of the crossing, stop
on it. Look all around and
listen, and after the traffic
has stopped, walk across.

_ Advice for drivers and riders
using the pedestrian crossing

¢ When coming to a pedes-

’ trian crossing marked with

white stripes (a “zebra”
crossing) be ready to slow



properly |

stopped from both direc-. .. ..--

THE TRIBUNE



‘down and stop to let people
Cross. _

¢ You must stop once they
have stepped onto the cross-
ing.

e You must not overtake on

or near,a pedestrian crossing
because this may. make it
difficult for you to see a
pedestrian who has stepped
onto the crossing and will
make it difficult for them to
see you.

¢ For the same reason, you
must not park your vehicle
on a pedestrian crossing or
near one..

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FROM page 11

school experience this year.

In a recent interview with the Tribune,
Claudette Rolle, director of the Catholic Board of
Education said that they did have to make adjust-

-ments to offset the government’s decesion to

reduce its subsidiaries to the private schools in
this. year’s budget and to reflect the economic
challenges that may affect parents.

She explained that board had to suspend salary
increases for the 2010-2011 academic year and
will also have to decrease the number of teacher’s
aides that they have in first grade to minimise the
possibility of having to lay off staff at a later
date.

‘ Because the economy has not recovered fully
from the downturn, Catholic schools are doing

their best to work with parents who may find it__.

difficult to keep up with tuition fees.

“In the past we have offered a payment plan
extending over a period of three months. We
allowed the tuition fees to be paid in parts. Now
we are extending it to nine months. So parents

will be able to pay the child's tuition over a nine-

month period. However, parents must make
arrangements before the opening of school,” she
explained.

Ms Rolle added that the Advanced Place-
ment Programme, a programme that allows qual-

" ifying secondary school students the opportunity

to pursue advance courses eligible for college
credits, will be implemented this year starting

“xawith Aquinas College.

* “Students'who. are in grades ten and eleven

and haye been successful in their BGCSE’s will
qualify for the advanced placement programmes.
Starting with Aquinas College, we will be imple-:
menting auto mechanics and history advanced
placement courses and at Catholic High in Grand
Bahama we will implement the math advanced
placement course," Ms Rolle said... ..

Additionally, the Catholic Board of Education
is also making progressive steps'to introduce
Spanish as an advanced peer course next
year.

“As the years progress we are Jooking. to

’ phase in other advanced placement courses,” Ms

Rolle told The Tribune.

With the advancements in technology and
knowledge, the Catholic Board saw fitting to
revise their science, social studies, and informa-
tion technology curriculums for the new school
year as we Hi.

‘Additionally’ the organisation i is also dividing
their focus to the sporting facilities.

“At Aquinas College a sports field is in devel-
opment. The new sports field includes a track
field, basketball court, volley ball court, and a soft
ball field. We are also looking to expand in all of
our schools,” she said. ;

Ms Rolle said what concerns the board -the
most is the health of students. She said they want
to take a holistic approach to education so they
will be educating students on healthy foods and
enforcing nutritious lunch programmes.

“We are concerned.to see where the country
is going. There are so many ailments that are-
connected to obesity and that is why.we. snUSt
be conscious of what our children are ta
their bodies,” Ms Rolle explained.



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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 13F



Ten study habits of

1. Try not to do too much studying at
one time.

If you try to do too much studying at
one time, you will tire and your study-
ing will not be very effective. Space the
work you have to do over shorter peri-
ods of time. Taking short breaks will
restore your mental energy.

2. Plan specific times for studying.
Study time is any time you are doing

something related to schoolwork. It can °

be completing assigned reading, work-
ing on a paper or project, or studying
for a test. Schedule specific times
throughout the week for your study
time.

3. Try to study at the same times each
day.

Studying at the same times each day
establishes a routine that bécomes:a
regular part of your life, just like sleep-
ing and eating. When a scheduled study
time comes up during the day, you will
be mentally prepared to begin study-
ing. :

4. Set specific goals for study times.

Goals will help you stay focused and
monitor your progress. Simply sitting
down to study has little value. You
must be very clear about wnat you
want to accomplish during your study
times.

5. Start studying when planned.
You may delay starting your studying
because you don't like an assignment

or think it is too hard. A delay in study-

ing is called "procrastination." If you
procrastinate for any reason, you will





find it difficult to get everything done
when you need to. You may rush to

-‘maké up the time you wasted getting

started, resulting in careless work and
errors.

6.Work on the assignment you find

most difficult first. .

Your most difficult assignment will
require the most effort. Start with your
most difficult assignment since this. is
when you have the most mental ener-

8y-

7. Review notes before beginning an
assignment,

_ Reviewing your notes can help you

make sure you.are doing an assignment
correctly. Also, your notes may include
information that will help you com-
plete an assignment.

8. Tell friends not to call during study
times.



Two study problems can occur if your,

friends call you during your study
times.
It is not that easy to get-back to what
you were doing. Second, your friends
may talk about things that will distract
you from what you need to do. Here's
a simple idea - turn off your cell phone
during your study times. -

9. Call another student when you have
difficulty with an assignment.

This is a case where "two heads may -
be better than one."

10. Review schoolwork over the week-
end.

Yes, weekends should be fun time. But
there is also time to do some review..
This will help you be ready to go on
Monday morning when another school
week begins.

@ Taken from ww.howtostudy.com

First, your work is interrupted.

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PAGE 14F

THE TRIBUNE





hen you dri-

ve to take

your child to

school or
commute to work, do you
have room for other passen-
gers? Have you ever noticed
how many others around you
are driving with a lot of room
for others too?

Carpooling is when two or
more adult commuters plan
to share the responsibility of
taking their children to school
or employees sharing the ride
to work on a continuous basis,
regardless of their relation-
ship to each other or the cost
of the sharing agreements. .

Carpooling is the most
common form of ride sharing
that parents and employees
can use as a tool to get their
children to school and them-
selvés to the work site.

It enables employees and
parents to cut stress by.shar-
ing the driving responsibili-
ties, develop friendships, save
money and have more time
to relax.







Ly

LL
Wy yy

yt



SS

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feces

We



po mcalonypiiy



BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 201

THE DEPARTMENT OF ROAD TRAFFIC PROVIDES INFORMATION FOR PARENTS AND EMPLOYEES







WITH traffic congestion having become a major problem
on the streets of New Providence, the Department of Road |
Traffic is encouraging parents to carpool for daily school

drives when the new term starts on August 31.

Bonaventure
Medical

LABORATORY

It is a great choice for those
who do not need their car at
work everyday, have a con-
sistent work schedule and
travel more than 10 minutes
to work.

Carpooling is flexible. You
can carpool all the time, or
just a few days a week. It can

BAY TO SCROML
















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willie yyy

Yjijiitior

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improve travel through the
more efficient use of the
country’s existing transporta-
tion system by reducing traffic
congestion.

Even one day out of five
can mean a 20 per cent reduc-
tion in weekly wear and tear
on your car and helps in pro-
tecting the environment.

Carpooling advantages

Saves money

The Department of Road
Traffic said it has been
researching carpooling in var-
ious countries and it hasn't
been uncommon to read sto-
ries of people who save a cou-
ple of hundred dollars a
month in transport costs by
sharing a ride with someone
else or sharing the responsi-
bilities of school drop off and
pick up. :

Constant city driving is
notorious for causing wear on
vehicles - all the stopping and
starting wears out engines,
brakes and gearboxes, not to
mention tvre wear.

According to the American
Automobile Association, it
costs an average of 26.2 cents

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Rca
dale
aS

Ce Toi Us ae
FOR ROS

we
Aer ALI AE





per mile to drive a car; and
that's just gas and wear and
tear combined.’

' Decongests roads

According to.a recent US
study, "Commuting in Amer-

Ica :

- US drivers waste approxi-
mately 4.2 billion hours sit-
ting in traffic

- Traffic congestion wastes
approximately 2.9 billion gal-
lons of fuel and

- In Los Angeles, the average
driver wastes 72 hours per
year going nowhere. If every-
one car pooled, imagine the
many hundreds of thousands
of vehicles that would be off
the road each day. This would
lessen traffic congestion, mak-
ing trips faster, cutting fuel
and car maintenance costs
even further.

Social /emotional advantages

Through sharing a ride, |

you'll meet other people.

The internet online world
is steadily disconnecting peo-
ple and that can be unhealthy
for many folks.

For some people there's
nothing like a pep session
before the daily grind and a

counselling session immedi- °

ately afterwards.

Also, if you find driving to
work stressful, car pooling can
alleviate the frustration in
travelling to and from the

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You may‘even find time to
carry out other tasks during.
the drive instead, such as
preparing for meetings etc.

Flexibility through technology:

In the early days of car-
pooling, it was fairly restric-
tive and it could be difficult to
find people you get along with
‘to team up to share a ride.
The advent of the World
Wide Web has changed all
that.

Many online services have
sprung up in states such as
Florida that provide:a good
choice of people to ride share

‘with and therefore greater
flexibility with your own
timetable.

The Bahamas can adopt this
pattern from Florida in the
future to better organize the
car pooling system.

Carpooling precautions

Wherever humans are
involved, there is always
potential for things to go
wrong and not everyone in
the world is balanced and
organised.

If you're new to the idea of
carpooling with people you
don't know, here's some basic
guidelines to bear in mind.

e Try to meet your prospec-
tive new carpooling partner
in a public place first before
making firm arrangements to
travel together. Don't reveal
too much personal informa-
tion up to that point.

e Ask some probing questions
about driving habits. You
don't want to end up being
stuck with someone prone to
road rage or other habits that
don't suit you.

Tne

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3pk Transparent Tape.......s.now $ 1.16
+#3400-82391/UPC# 60107 82391

Mead Spiral Notebook 120 sheets..now $ 1.9
#3600-05/46/UPC#43100 05746

Mead Spiral Notebook 180 sheets....now $ 2.64
#3600-05680/UPC#43100 05680

Mead Spiral Notebook 100 sheets.....now $ 2.28
# 3600-0551 4/UPC#43100 05514

Encore Plastic Pencil Box.....:.....0..o0w § 2.12
#3600-87107/UPC# 60107 87107

Encore 32pk Crayons......ssssseseeeOwW $ 1.48
#3600-12111/UPC#60107 12111

Learn to Letter w/guidelines...........now $ 4.08
+#3400-48004/UPC#43100 48004

Encore Jumbo Pk Elastic Bands.....now $ 1.68
#3400-90473/UPC# 60107 90473

Encore Clip Hightlighter...............m0w $ 1.68
P

e Try to confirm. your
prospective travel. partner's
identity. Ask to see their dri-
ver's license or other state-
issued ID and reciprocate the
gesture.

e Trust your instincts. If some-
thing doesn't feel quite right,
don't go ahead with the
arrangement. ‘

¢ Be sure you exchange emer-
gency medical information
once you're comfortable and
decide to go ahead with the
arrangement. This is in case
you're in an accident.

e Make sure you settle on
issues such as eating/drinking
in the vehicle, stops along the
way and flexibility in pickup
times; for example how late
can a person be before they'll
miss a lift.

e Have a backup plan as:
sometimes unavoidable situa-
tions will occur such as you
become ill or the other person -
is ill.

- @ It's really important that

everyone involved in the ride
sharing arrangement is aware
of and agrees upon the
ground rules .and it's proba-
bly wise to have them written
down. Playing it by ear is a

sure-fire recipe for disaster.

pooling, please feel free to con-
tact the Transport Policy and
Planning Unit of the Road
Traffic Department at tele-
Phone numbers 328-4825/6. A
carpool survey will be con-
ducted at schools in. New
Providence in early Septem-
ber. Please participate and let’s

‘put a dent in traffic.conges-
tion.)






*Except
on net
items



#60107 89850
Encore Vinyl Bindet................N0W $ 2.60
#3400-97580/UPC#30107 97580

Encore 4pk Permanent Markers...now $ 1.40
#3600-95230/UPC# 60107 95230

Encore 15pk Sheet Protectors...now $ 1.48
+#3400-94582/0C4E60107 96582

Encore 2pk Lettering Stencils....now $ 1.68
+#3600-96614/UPC#60107 96614 .

sale ends Sept 4th, 2010



PAGE 15F





THE TRIBUNE
BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010
: creative tips for packing healthier
(ARA) - ents who appreciate the simplicity of





t's that time of year again:
= back-to-school season.
7 Amidst the jam-packed
4m... schedule of a child's school
day, it's nice to know there is one
area where parents make a differ- |
‘ence - lunchtime.

The mission is to create a nutri-
tious lunch that your hungry kids will
look forward to eating. To help, here
are five creative tips to selecting
healthier options.

1. Colour, colour, colour: Kids ° .
love colour so make it a point to pick

a different colour for each day/week

(or better yet, let them pick) and add
it to your child's lunch in fun ways.
For example, on a purple day pack a
small plum or handful of grapes. Red
is fun if you pair raspberries and
strawberry yogurt for dipping, and
peaches or baby carrots make deli-
cious orange. options. It's not only a
fun way to get them excited about
lunch, it helps introduce new fruits
and vegetables they might have been
uninterested in trying before.

2. Portion control: Finding pre-
portioned snacks can help save both

time and calories. Instead of reaching:

for bags of chips that can be higher in

_fat, try low-fat pretzels or 100-calorie
’ snacks instead. For example, Sny-

der's of Hanover offers a wide vari-
ety of items in its 100-Calorie Lunch
Pack line, including Minis, Sticks and
Snaps Pretzels as well as Eatsmart
Naturals Veggie Crisps. Snyder's also
offers a variety pack of Peanut But-
ter and Cheddar Cheese Pretzel
Sandwiches available in compostable
outer packaging. Single serving
snacks are perfect for on-the-go par-

Weenie te ee
Pease enna
Pilinerise

ae eau by

‘be. Make Sunday a preparation day
« for the week ahead and_.get the

putting a bag in a lunch box. For
more information and snack ideas,
visit www.snydersofhanover.com.

-3. Fun surprises: Yes, some kids
are content with the same lunch day
after day after day, but for the ones
who need variety, make it fun.
Change it up and do something unex-
pected. For example, ever thought of
making breakfast for lunch? Why
not? Pack two or three small whole-
grain pancakes with fruit and yogurt
for toppings. To replace sugary juice,
pack homemade fruit-flavored water
in a reusable bottle. Jazz up.a typical
sandwich by cutting it with a cookie
cutter, and wrapping it in wax paper
tied with a bow. A knock-knock joke
or little stickers can add even more
fun.

4. Choose a theme: For example,
create a picnic theme with turkey
tortilla roll-ups and fruit kabobs. For
a tea party theme} make miniature
sandwiches and include sliced
cucumbers with fruity-tea. The possi-
bilities are endless, so get your kids
involved and asked them what fun
lunch themes they would enjoy. ae

5! Plan.ahead and save: While
packing lunches might seem too
time-consuming, it doesn't have to

whole family involved to help out.
Pick colours (see tip No. 1) you
might include or prepare little note
cards with jokes. By planning ahead,
you're less tempted to give in to
packing more expensive, quicker
options and instead you can save
money by looking for deals and using
coupons.

Courtesy of ARAcontent >

Cy

ES p

eS
| SHARPENER
OA eAt Aaa

| 24pk CRAYOLA CRAYONS Lie watcha hy

ea

PRsc leah ia

LAU

Reap eles
Rae Wiese (3
1 250ct FOLDER SHEETS

NOC) eect





Puneet
USN tS
3.3 PRONG PAPER FOLDERS
Frasiturien Sa





PAGE 16F THE TRIBUNE
BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



5” Screen CD/DVD,
indows 7, 160G
ard Drive with the purchase
of a case of Vitamalt





BAHAMAS B aS IN

Cash Paid ‘i
THE So

“With the purchase of any
Kids Lunch Packet enter te
Win a designer Handbag ara

QUERN SIZE MATTRESS
and BOR SPRING .

$299.99
Ph 326-2940

PHOTO ADS SELL!

! Call today 328-0002 / 502-2351

es ees $75 gas card ea sete | : S25 AT

aa Se REA: gevec Buiiging

: chae! ‘Ra, (opp. police station)
oe peak aponslhtee = sea









PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

INEVVFAR RIVALSAPARGE SiS EVE CTIO
WHTRIEOUR aes DVIS u

UTTER ai. Tat,



TOYOTA TOWNACE —_—=HONDA CIVIC



994"2002

TOYOTA TERCEL __ MONTH WARRANTY INCLUDED RSTO



Fi x ‘& | i eB sy, Ss “¥YOU CAN PAY MORE, BUT YOU WON'T BUY BETTERM
Ne otors’ sCrse BETTER SELECTION BETTER REPRESENTATIONS - SETTER SERVICE

ees oa Vehicles

Most vehicles carry a warranty
‘package, inciuding license,
inspection, gas, and service.

Tel.: 323-2640

wwe CeeluiverCnorspreqwned. con





TRIBUNE










BSF # 944

2002 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
asking $8,000 ONO,

phi 376-6967 / 323-5538 / 557-3567





BBF #807
2007 F-150,
charcoal grey, V-6, CLEAN TITLE, 23,000
miles, ice cold, AC, satellite radio, 20” rims,
asking $24,000 ONO,
ph# 565-9950 / 427-2125

2004 Chrysler 300M,
leather seats, sunroof, standard or automatic
“shift, AC, 6 Disc changer, just in from US, just
serviced, asking $9,000 ONO,
ph# 448- 7490 / 434-3194

2004 CHEVY IMPALA,
20” rims, ice cold AC, clean in and out, CD
player asking $5,000, owner going back to Ja-
maica, ph# 455-1184 .

BEF #835

* Fully Loaded 22" inch, rims, 34000 miles.
Asking $17, 500.0bo..
Owner leaving town,

ph#ee7r664S:Golh4257264. Ms.Brawns-

DODGE DAKOTA.

BBF #836
: 1999 BMW 318 TI COUPE,

terior, AC, power windows, air bag, power

steering, sun roof, power locks, Automatic

transmission, CD & DVD included, asking
$6.500,ph# 636-4861



1998 HONDA ACCORD,
white, head lights, tan leather seats, AC, CD
player, 18” low profile rims and original factory
rims, custom rear view lights, body kit,
asking $5,000, ph# 565-8799 / 426-4398

2005 NISSAN MAXIMA,
leather interior, bose music system, low miles,
owner oar island, ey buy, aski
11,500
eon 525-7278

BBF #851
2003 INFINITI I35,
power windows, seats, door, trunk, sunroof,
black leather interior, mahogany wood all
eo remote start, and pioneer sound sys-
tem,-AC, Alarm, in excellent condition, asking
$8,500 price negotiable,
phi 465-4245 / 61-5253
1 month tribune eee 79 076

Â¥

2006 CHEVY EQUINOX,

AC, CD’ player, good running condition,
asking ee
566-4613 / 392-7934

recently serviced, fully loaded, black leather in-






BBF #859

3.2 2001 Akura CL, %

fully loaded, 2-door, excellent condition,

asking $7,500, ph# 454-6557 / 425-4095
1 month tribune issue 78 019

2004 DODGE DURANGO,
blue with grey interior, fully loaded, 6 CD in
dash, CD player, sunroof, factory DVD player,
3rd row seating, asking $14,500 ONO,
ph# 466-8036

SBF #873 : ,
1996 ACCORD 2.7L V6,
Leather int. sunroof, 4dr, 12" rims an int and
ext. cold air intake, groundin
$2800 O.N.O., ph# 4256978 / 3 13473

BBF #874 j
1998 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
pearl, good condition, teather interior, power
everything, DVD screen, clean,
asking $3,000 ONO,
ph# 434-0758

2000 MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT,
Factory Alarm System, CD and DVD player,
AC, power windows and locks and mirrors,

limited edition, leather interior, fold down seats,
of, 3.0 engine size, asking $4,000,
yaa PH# 454-9150 / 323-5750



FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 3









BBF #878 |



1898 FORD EXPLORER,

excellent condition, CD player, AC, power

windows, good condition,.serious inquiries
only, asking $3,000, ph# 448-7521

2004 KIA SORENTO SUV,

Engine: V6, Automatic, 4 wheel drive, recently
serviced, 5/2010, perfect condition, very well
looked after, excellent fuel, economy & Reliabil-
ity, AC, radio, 12 disc CD changer,
licensed until May 2011, asking $12,500,
ph# 423-4512

BBF #883_
2003 NISSAN ALTIMA,
leather, AC, DVD, power everything,
Asking $5,500 ONO, as is.
ph# 468-3297 ~

2002 CHEVY ASTRO VAN,
ASKING $7,000,
ALSO 2003 FORD TAURUS,
; asking $7,000,

ph# 356-5796

BBF #885
2003 FORD EXPLORER, |
just in from foreign, green, AC, CD player, im-
maculate condition, asking $7,500 OBO,
ph# 565-4472






1999 HONDA ACCORD,
leather interior; sunroof, V6, clean in and out,
need to see to appreciate;
asking $6,000 ONO,
ph# 565-6161 / 322-2192

BBF #891
2001 HONDA CIVIC,
2 door, black exterior, black interior, excellent
condition, AC, Automatic, asking $6,000,
: ph# 466-8461 :

BBF #893 :
1998 NISSAN MAXIMA,

good condition, AC, CD player, everything
_. works, asking $3,00 ONO,
ph# 544-7201 / 677-5166

BBF #894





2003 HONDA CIVIC EX,
good condition, sunroof, AC, P/N, CD player,
Remote-entry, Factory Alloy Wheels, ph#

422-3150 ,



BBF #895
2007 CHEVROLET MALIBU
FOR SALE ©
$11,500 ONO,
Call or Text 426-7543

#89
TOYOTA ARISTO FOR SALE
1500 O.N.O,
Call or text 426-7543

XG

2004 CHEVY IMPALA, .
leather interior, AC, CD player, 22” rims, ask-
ing $6,000 with rims ONO, without rims
asking $5,000 ONO,
ph# 535-5816

BBF #900
2001 NISSAN-MAXIMA,
grey leather interior, all red HID, serviced on
time, sound system,
~ asking $7,500,
ph# 556-8349

2000 HONDA ACCORD,
18” rims, runs well, must see to appreciate,
asking $7,000 ONO,
ph# 454-2213 / 326-4110

2004 SL 500, MERCEDES,
asking $45,000 ONO,
ph# 552-1654






BBF #903 .
2007 GRAND CHEROKEE,
excellent condition, must see to appreciate,
Bank financing assistance available, asking
: $21,500 ONO, ;
ph# 426-4565

2001 FORD WINSTAR,
AM/FM, CD, Tape, DVD player, 6 Cylender,
AC, asking $7,5000,
ph# 454-9150

: 2002 JEEP CHEROKEE,

53,000 miles, clean title, AC, CD player, excel-
lent condition, recently serviced, asking $9,000,
Ph# 456-1419 / 325-3403
10 days tribune issue 80 005

SN

2003 ACURA TL :
4dr. Type-S, Silver w/ Black Lthr. Interior,
Disc Factory CD changer, Sunroof, Alloy ~
_wheels, asking $5,800 O.N.O, ‘
ph#361-0184

2009 HONDA. ACCORD, V6,
Fully loaded, sunroof, leather, power, 6 disc
changer, 22” chrome rims, clean title, asking

$33,000,
ph# 423-6549 / 322-1248

THE TRIBU

RIB #353
2001 HONDA CIVIC
Plum exterior with beige interior _
/ $8,000.00
Excellent condition, alarm, power everything.
Serious inquiries only.
_Cell 436-3787 or 636-1602

|BBF #929 =a

2004 NISSAN MAXIMA SL,
6 CD changer, leather interior, sunroof, HID -
lights, low mileage, call for price,
ph# 552-9889

BBF #931
2000 FORD EXPLORER, /
AC, Runs good, serviced on time, CD player,
good condition, ph# 432-2083 / 364-5458

ol abou

AS
\\\
\

UT SS
* ~~ SS. Go

2003 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
4dr 3.7L V-6, AC, AM/FM CD Player, Cloth In-
terior, Like New..Asking $11,000 o.n.o.,
Serious inquiries only. contact 242-392-4805,
a 242-552-5757
- or 242-727-9644









2007 Nissan titan,
4 door, AC, power everything, backup camera,
asking $18,900 OBO, also 2005 Honda Civic,
full power, automatic transmission, cold AC,
asking $9,000 OBO,
ph# 327-1888 / 454-1245:










iiss



BBF #932
2000 dodge neon,
clean interior, good condition, 4 cylinder, good
on gas, asking $1,800,
ph# 425-0369 / 323-4870 /35-91815
"6 Disc CD changer, Dual climate control, for
'03-'07 Honda Accord, asking $350.00 O.B.O.

2004 Honda Accord,

42,000 miles, AC, DVD player, clean in & out,
asking $10,300 OBO, also 2003 G35 coupe
custom front bumper, asking $600 OBO,
ph# 558-0184 / 392-1451

BBF #939
2009 Honda Accord special edition,
clean title, call for price, 2002 Chevy Silverado,
extended Cab, Flair side, serious inquires only,
ph# 376-8600 / 324-6356



2010 Nissan Maxima, .
Hotess thing in any parking lot, clean title, low
mileage, ae $32,000,
ph# 323-7405 / 466-5925
10 days tribune issue 80 015

2001 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
DVD player, HID head lights, sound system,
best offer wins,
ph# 423-2812

0
1983 INTERNATIONAL
Licensed and insured, ready to work now
$18,000.00
Or two dumptruck for $25,000.00
Cell 466-7698

BBF #943
2002 BUICK CENTURY
Brown, 4 door, AC, CD player and tape player,
asking $5,200 ONO, Also 2004 Pontiac grand
Am, Silver 4 door, AC, CD player, asking
$5,800 ONO, ph# 324-7266 / 424-5354

RIB #360
2002 ISUZU RODEO

Black exterior. Fully Loaded with all options. CD

changer leather interior cold ac. and sunroof.
Priced for a quick sale. @ $8,500.00
phone 434-6184

2002 FORD RANGER - EDGE
White, single cab, grey interior
CD player, A/C $9,000.00
Phone 393 5412

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 5















RIB #358
1997 HONDA SMX
Silver exterior with black leather seats, 3 door
coupe, CD player, AC, leather interior,
“clean inside and out. $5,000.00 ono
Cell 676-3387 or 468-2440 or 535-1716

RIB #381
2006 FORD EXPEDITION LIMITED.
Black exterior. Tan leather interior
2nd row bucket seats, 3rd row seating
Mileage - 42,000. Asking $31, 500.00
Showing by appointment
Serious offers only
Contact: Thea Glinton
Phone: 242-327-3540
Email: Theaglinton@ hotmail.com

2003 INFINITI G35
Black exterior, full tan leather interior
Asking 13,000.00 ono
Call 341-1265 or 431-5007.

RIB #408



2
1998 HONDA PRELUDE
.Silver exterior,black interior, auto tiptronic shift,
H22 vtec engine, low miles, cold Ac, very clean
j $4700
96 PRELUDE:
“5 speed H22 vtec engine equally clean with
all options. Sacrafice for $4,400. 376-9126














2005 GMC ENVOY
Runs great, fully loaded, 6 CD changer,leather
interior. Was hit on driver side in 2008
but repaired. Call 341-3546. Only persons with
cash in hand and serious enquiries call.

Make offer over. $8500.00



FOR SALE
1999 BLUE FORD EXPEDITION
$5000 OR BEST OFFER
CONTACT 361-2120

2001 Nissan Maxima,
leather interior, clean in and out, -
asking $6,500 ONO,
Also 2002 Ford Taurus asking $4,500 ONO,
ph# 636-4861









:
< vs Qa

AC

IK

2002 HONDA CIVIC
4 door, automatic, RHD, gold exterior,
grey/leather interior, AC,power everything,

12 disc CD player, tinted rims, keyless entry,
alarm, NMC maintained. excellent condition,

sparkling clean, 100000kms.

Asking $6900.00. 465-2169

please leave message.

RIB #455
1999 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior with silver/leather interior
Limited Edition, 3.0 v6-v tech with distributor,
‘ Pioneer CD player, AC, automatic everything
with sunroof. Asking $6,500.00 ono
Call 394-1009 or 434-2523

RIB #464
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 DIESEL
Dark grey exterior with grey interior
Call 425-5938

420
1994 CHEVY ASTRO VAN
Blue-exterior with blue & grey interior.
$2800.00 ono
Running in good condition.
Serious back for load.
Cell 467-2269







, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

AY SON

1994 TOYOTA STARLET GT TURBO
Black exterior, dark grey interior. 5 speed, cold
AC, custom wheels, power everything, own a

turbo charged car for cheap. $2800.00 ono
2002 DODGE RAM PICK-UP
5 speed, 5.21, clean, low miles.
$11,500,ono. 376-9126

(a

2000 MITSUBISHI MIRAGE
Grey exterior with grey interior, AC, alarm, CD,
P.W, P.L. As is. $4,500.00
Call 422-2255.

RIB #439
2003 HONDA INSPIRE
Black exterior with grey interior Just in, loaded
; with T.V. $9,800.00 -
Also 2001 HONDA INSPIRE. $7,500.00
loaded with TV. For other vehicles
Call 341-2096 cell 427-3505

RIB #451
2005 CHEVY COLORADO
4 cylinder $9,500.00
Call 525-6268

RIB #672
' | 2004 LINCOLN LS SEDAN
; lack exterior, black leather interior,
power window, seats, sunroof, 6 disc changer,
a/c, low miles, no reasonable offer refused.
$8,500.0.b.0.
Phone 426-4426 or 455-2026

2006 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO LTZ
Silver exterior, black interior, 2 door, fully
loaded, sunroof, leather seats, dvd player,
excellent condition, low mileage.
$8,500 O.N.O
Phone 393-1405,
436-7407 or 557-8273

RIB #459
1996 HONDA INSPIRE
Black exterior with grey interior
$4,500.00 ono
Great condition, CD player, alarm, low
mileage, runs smooth
Call 362-2165 cell 357-8183.

2009 HONDA ACCORD
Just in! conprehensive insurance ready, like
brand new, maroone exterior/tan interior, 4
door, 4 cylinder, automatic, very low miles,
loaded. asking $28,000 ono
Must see to appreciate.
Phone 466-2059,636-9945,432-3378

2004 HONDA CRV
Excellent condition, AC, power windows, auto
lock, alarm, 6 disc CD changer. Just serviced
@ Nassau Motors. 94,000 miles
$15,000.00 ono
Cell 455-3175

1980 MACK R
White and grey. $10,000.00 obo :
Owner leaving Island. Truck ready to work
strong gear box. Only serius inquiries.
Call 341-6201 or 535-5450

RIB #467 j
2001 HONDA CIVIC

Purple exterior, tan interior, AC, CD player,
: $4000.00 obo

Phone: 324-1901 or 431-9814 or 454-9345

RIB #471
40 ANNIVERSARY
2004 FORD MUSTANG
Silver exterior with cloth(grey)interior
music system, alarm, keyless entry, cold Ac.

Recently serviced. Owner going off to school.

; $10,500.00 ono

Cell 424-6219

2008 HONDA ACCORD
Rose red exterior, with tan/cloth interior, 4 door,
under 9k miles, one owner. Bank financing
available, cash price neg $26,000.00
Car eperaieed for $33,000.0
el” 556-1059

\\
~

\
AGG

2006 MERCURY MONTAINEER
Off white exterior with/leather interior,. top of
the line in this class. The jeep is in very good
condition (new) good title
Price $16,000.00 to view.
Call 326-3001 or 424-0636

=p
a

AS
\\

RIB #728 :
1998 TOYOTA AVALON
Blue with tan interior, cold Ac, runs and shifts
perfect, RHD, expat owned, well taken care off
Motivated seller, no reasonable offer refused. |
$3,500 ono
2001 DODGE RAM PICK UP
Reg cab, many extras, clean $10,500
376-9126



TRIBUNE



RIB #502
2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC
Green exterior, Power everything, MP3 and
MP4 player, recently service, Vehicle running
excellent. Owner leaving island”
Asking $12, 000 negotiable
Call: 392-3106 or 376-9954

2001 ISUZU CARGO VAN 16FT
AC, automatic, V8 engine, low miles
Ready for work.

1 $8,900.00 ono
Call 362-6040 or 426-5181

White exterior with tab interior
$5,000;00 ono
Very clean. Must see
Call 394-4187 or 565-0944

2007 FORD F-150
White exterior, grey interior, clean title,
automatic, fully loaded alarm,
_ Must go. $18,000.00 obo ..
Phone: 361-5467, 477-3125, 535-9335

NS

RIB #665 ]
2001 CHEVROLET TAHOE
Clover Green Interior, three dvd touch screens,
sound system, sitting on'24",brand new tires,
tan leather seats, good condition, cold a/c and
crystal back lights, $14,000 with everything,
$12,000, without dvd's and sound system.
646-3676,423-399 1 393-4066



RIB #673 ;
i 2001 FORD F-250
Burnt orange exterior, brown interior, super
duty, 4 door crew cab, automatic, v8 engine,
extra long bed, trailor hitch, low miles, a/¢,
power windows, great work truck. $9,500 obo
Phone: 426-4426 or 455-2026

CAR FOR SALE:
1995 HONDA ASCOT,
Japanese made, right hand drive, 4 door, auto-
4 matic windows. $3500
Call 357-3295 or work 302-4303

ides #677



RIB #683 .
i 2002 PONTIAC (SUNFIRE)

New tyres, excellent condition, smooth running
& ice cold Ac. Must see to appreciate.
$3,000.00.00
Call 324-080 4 or 432-3755



TRIB #742
‘ 2002 GMC ENVOY SUV
Red exterior with tan leather interior,-fully
loaded, power everything, cool Ac, fold-down
rear seats, on star, Surround sound, 6 CD
changer, no dents, no nicks.
Asking $11,800.00 obo_
Call 392-6471 or 454-3303





690 etl :
1999 FORD EXPLORER XLS
White exterior, grey (cloth w/leather) interior,
one owner, clean title, runs excellent and kept
in excellent condition, serviced ontime, under
62,000 miles, cd player and cold a/c.
$6,800.00.
Phone 456-3542 or 426-2089





2001 HONDA ACCORD
Champagne exteior with tan and brown interior
clean in and out, running, great condition,

5 speed shift. $6,500.00 ono
2010 CRYPTON BLUE SCOOTER, $1,500.00
Call 455-6184

2006 DODGE RAM
Blue exterior with dark blue interior,

5.7 Hemi, clean in & out, quad flow bed cover,
DVD player, dual flow master exhaust, 22” rims
k&n filter. $18,000.00
Call 458-7808 or 242-367-2558

2003 HONDA CICIC VTI
$8,500.00
Excelllent condition, leather seats,
tinted windows.
Call 393-1196 cell 424-9050

9
2005 DODGE MAGNUM .
Alabaster white exterior. $17,275.00
Clean title, low miles, DVD navigation, powerful
engine, folging rear 3rd row seats.
Comprehensive insurance 1 year. full tank of

t petrol included.

Ph: 376-6063,427-0292

RIB #723

2000 FORD MUSTANG G.T
White & black exterior with beige leather inte-
rior $7,500.00 ono. Very clean, very fast, flow
master, dual exhaust, hedders, sound system,

- cold Ac,
Also 650XR TRAIL. $4,500.00
242-426-0376, 556-1751
Ask for philp





FRIDAY,

2002 NISSAN MAXIMA.

Aqua- green exterior, light grey leather interior
20”rims, cold Ac, very good condition. Also full
fuel assembly and “luster available for
2000-2003 Maxima.

__ $7,900.00 ono
Call 325-3707 or 433-4722

RIB #731-A
FOR SALE BY OWNER
AS |S

( )
2004 JEEP WRANGLER
IN GOOD CONDITION
PRICE: $8,500.00 (O.N.O)
CONTACT BILL WARBURG
Telephone: 242.369.2330 or Vibe 225.2443
bill@tiamoresorts.com

1993 TOYOTA HILUX
Navy blue exterior with black & grey interior
with sunroof
$5,500.00 As Is.
Call 324-3781 cell 434-3601

5
2010 FORD MUSTANG
Blue exterior with black interior .
Brand new and reliable. Owner must sell.
: $25,000.00
Cell 423-0636

1999 MITSUBISHI MIRAGE
Gold exterior with black interior. ’
Must sell! two door, tinted windows, cool AC,
Just’ $1,500.00 ono Must Sell!
Call 328-3523, 436-3415




AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 7

RIB #734 nap at
2005 FORD- FIVE HUNDRED
LIMITED EDITION
Burgundy exterior, tan leather & cherry oak-

wood interior. Immaculate condition, fully

loaded, six disc changer, sunroof, fog light, ice
cold ac, heated seat, keyless codes entry
.. $12,900.00 ono. 357-7545,432-6682

or 552-4331

RIB #736 ; di
2000 MERCEDES BENZ CLK 200
Dark blue exterior with black/leather interior ,
drop low with 18” rims and pioneer carrozzeria
touch screen DVD player with hard drive, well
maintained, excellent condition.
Asking $14,000.00 ono
361-4693 or 455-4093, 357-4533

TRIB #737

1995 HONDA ACCORD
Navy blue exterior with grey interior
Excellent condition in & out. CD player,
power windows. ts
d $2,500.00 ‘
Call 242-455-9094 cell 445-7942



RIB # 2
2005 CHEVY VECTRA
Navy blue exterior with black leather interior
4,000.00 ono
call 324-7751





1996 HONDA ASCORT :
Silver exterior with grey interior
Running well, one owner must see to
appreciate. All offers accepts. $3,000.00
Call 434-3381 or 454-7896 5





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13,





SN

RIB #744

2001 FORD EXPEDITION
Green. exterior with tan/leather interior
Eddie Baurer. Power locks windows & door,
AC, 6 disc, CD player, tv, factory rins,
Good running condition.
Asking $7,200.00 onbo
j Call 322-8306, 558-6841, 324-8766

|

“TRIB #747

i 1998 HONDA ACCORD »
Silver, power everything, cool a/c. Good condi-
tion. Regular service with Nassau Motors. Just

serviced in June $1,000 spent.
$3,500 obo- phone 449-6266 or
324-2351

RIB #748
, 2005 NISSAN SENTRA -~
Champagne exterior with grey interior
$6,800.00
Excellent body and running condition, AC, CD
player, power everything, have to see to
appreciate. Serious inquiries only.
Call 425-4238 cell 395-8219

RIB #905

1999 NISSAN SKYLINE
Silver exterior with grey interior
; $6500.00 |
(six thousand five hundred) Spot car, fully
: loaded. Call 544-7385 |

2010

2006 CHEVY MALIBU LT
White exterior with tan interior
Asking $8,500.00
Call 328-1821 or 426-2696






2003 NISSAN MAXMA
Black exterior with black/leather interior, Ac,
6 disc CD changer, factory rims. Excellent buy.
Price to go. Three thousand, seven hundred.
$3,700.00 ono
Call 324-6435 456-0572 or 636-7339

RIB #755
2008 SUZUKI SWIFT
Black exterior with black interior
$16,000.00
Excellent condition, service current like brand
new. Call 393-4697 cell 455-7077 or
328-3787/8

2001 DODGE CARAVAN
Green exterior, cold AC,
automatic start, new interior,
’ CD player.
$7,500.00 or best offer.

Call 326-0087 cell 557-8035

RIB #921
2001 NISSAN MAXIMA
White exterior, tan interor, fully loaded like new,
s/r, a/c, cd, leather, spoiler $8,000 O.N.O
ALSO 1999 HONDA ACCORD, a/c, cd, tape,
sound system, $6,000. Phone: 364-3691 or
, 557-1205



TRIB #756

2005 NISSAN MAXIMA
Candy mix exterior with black leather interior
Cold AC, CD player, 22” chrome rims, sunroof,
fresh paint job, bring your mechanic.
Smokes from mufflers. $8,200.00
also engine heads and sloch 3.5 only $600.00
Call 324-8347 ,636-9200,445-5985

2004 S60 VOLVO
Gold exterior, Very good condiion, runs great,
Ac, leather interior, cd/cassette players, power
system, sunroof. Asking $14,500.00 obo |
Call 448-8775 or 535-8885

RIB #800 ;
1996 PONTIAC GRAND A
Black exterior with beige interior,
3.1 litre engine, dual exhaut, Power everyting,
AC. Call 325-5060

er .

ed

A

\

RIB #801
2005 HONDA CRV
Silver exterior with black/grey inteior, 4 door
4 cylinder, AC, power windows, fully loaded.
$20,000.00
Call 394-4578 or 565-2339 or 393-2088

2008 CLUB CAR 4 PASSENGER GOLF
CARTS LIKE NEW

INCLUDES NEW ; BODIES, TOP, LIGHT

PKG., BATT. INDICATOR, TIRES, SEATS
SALE PRICE $5995

NEW 2010 2 PASSENGER CARTS STARTING
@ $7400 W/OPTIONS INCLUDED
394-4823/FAMILY ISL.
TOLL FREE 242-300-1213.



Pia) bel =o)



RIB #803

1998 SATURN SC2
Red-hot exterior, like-new body, A/C, pwr
features, CD player, full-sized spare tire.
Great condition at $3,000.

Call 448-4904. ~

RIB #804
2005 HONDA ACCORD 2
Dark grey exterior with grey & black interior
: $10,000.00 obo
Low mileage, minor scratches, Less than one
year old.
Call 677-4495 cell 425-4198 or 305-424-1329

RIB #805 §
1997 HONDA LOGO
Blue exterior, grey interior $5,000.00
expat moving, compact car bought for
BH $7,500.00
in February 2009
Serviced regularly reliable, clean and tidy.
Cell 376-4648

CAG
= .

2005 CHEVY EQUINOX
GreY exterior with silver interior
$13,500.00 obo
22inch rims, sunroof, touch screen DVD player,
Under 40 thousand miles, fully loaded leather
Cell 525-9790 cell 467-9440

1999 MAZDA 626 .
Green exterior with tan interior,
4 door standard shift

$3,500.00

NISSAN SENTRA,

2 door standard shift Must see to appreciate.
Call 341-3056 or 448-2407 or 429-2537

or 341-2433







N ~
A

2000 MITSUBISHI: LANCER :
- ° $4,800.00 ono
CD, alarm, ac, right-hand drive.
Call 356-4315 cell 424-4791

RIB #901
1996 NISSAN PRIMERA
Silver exterior .$3;200.00 ono
AC, right hand drive -
Call 356-4315 cell 424-4791

RIB #903
- 2003 MITSUBISHI MONTERO
Dark blue exterior
$7,300.00, _.
_CD, left hand drive.
Call 356-4315 cell 424-4791

1999 DODGE CARAVAN
Green exterior with grey interior
$3,500.00 :
Call anytime between 8: am-8:00pm
364-4236 or 468-8542

RIB #928 * z
2000 HONDA ACCORD EX
Black exterior with grey interior.
Just in from US. $6,000.0 ono
V6, leather seats, sunroof, factory CD player,
power everything, halo lights, 2 door, very
clean. Must see.
Call 341-2000 or 525-6553

RIB #908 . ‘
2009 HONDA ACCORD
Grey exterior with leather interior, 4 door.
Fully loaded.
$26,000.00
Call 361-4546 -

1996 HONDA LEGEND :
Black exterior with black interior, 4 door sedan
$4,200.00 as is
Good condition, AC, power steering
CD changer.
cell 552-3221

1996 CHEVY LUMINA
$3,800.00.
Good condition.
One owner- deaier serviced
Cal 325-7313 or 323-4952

#Q
Brand New NMC Chevrolet
o. Silverado
White exteriot single cab. $30,000 - Including
Licensing & $1,200 towards INSURANCE!
4.3L. Chevy Chrome Bumper & Rims.
For viewing 357-8232.

RIB #934

2002 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior with grey/leather interior
4 door, sunrof, CD player AC working,
good condition. $6,000.00 ono
Call 341-1896 or 454-6703

RIB #914
2003 TRAIL BLAZER
Asking $7,500.00 ono. 20” rims, clean in and
out. One owner, AC piping. Must see to
appreciate. Also ;
2004 HONDA ACCORD
White, leather, sunroof-& alarm
Asking $10,000.00 ono © .
(d)326-1887, 364-4454(n) 454-4172,428-3713

RIB #917
2000 NISSAN MAXIMA
Gold exterior, tan interior, a/c, sound system,
very low mileage, Must see!! $6,000.00
Phone: 429-4180 or 242-646-4395

RIB #918 : ;
2001 NISSAN ALTIMA j
Blue exterior, gr y interior, leather seats, factory rims,
sunroof, AC, power everything, good with gas,
excellent condition. Asking $5,700.00 ono
467-4446 ,426-8468,326-4037
2002 DODGE CARAVAN Gold exterior, tan interior
leather seats, tan interior, power everything,
$6,800.00
467-4446 or 326-4037

x

x . 5 oo ~
MGC
oS

RIB #943 ‘

1999 FORD EXPLORER
Phone: 556-5602 .

asturrup @ customfoundation.org

2007 CADILLAC CTS
Blue ext, tan int. Must see to appreciate,
fully loaded. $22,000. :
Tel 376-3005.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 9.

&

RIB #924

2004 HONDA CR-V
Silver exterior, tan interior . $15,000.00 obo
Just in comprehensive insurance, 2.8 engine,
4 cylinder, AC, power windows, sound system,
20” rims or the original rims.
Serious offers, fully loaded. - ;
. Call 323-1305,544-0523,425-1790 Daniel

2002 KIA SODONA VAN
Green exterior with beige interior, 7 seaters,
AC, sunroof, power everything, fully loaded, CD
player, low miles. : 3
Excellent condition.
$3,9500,00 ono
Call 323-1805, 544-0523,
328-0864

2007 JEEP CHEROKEE LAREDO .

* Black exterior, grey interior, 48k miles,
clean title, auto in excellent condition, must see
to appreciate. $21,500 ono
Contact: 468-8009

: 2002 NISSAN ALTIMA
priced right for only 3500.00 firm call 325-088T
for more details

WISE
SS \ a

1998-04 NISSAN AD WAGONS
from. 1800.00 and up
call 325-0881





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13,





RIB #930
2005 MERCEDES BENZ
Black exterior, light beig interior, low mileage.
PErfect condition, like new. Asking $35,000.
Call 424-0277

Cee

1997 NISSAN CAFIRS
Black ext grey/black int. good condition, alarm,
4 door air condition, fully loaded, must go,
owner leaving. $2,700.00
361-3667, 456-2808.

RIB #947 .
2003 NISSAN SENTRA
Super saloon. White exterior, grey interior
Fully loaded $7,000.00 obo
Also
2001 Taurus for Sale. $6,500.00
Clean title. Excellent condition
Cell 455-0507

RIB #930
2005 MERCEDES BENZ E320
Black ext, light beige int. 1000 mileage.
Perfect condition, like new. Asking $35,000.
Call 424-0277.

203 LINCOLN AVIATOR
White exterior with beige /tan exterior
$9,500.00 ono
Great running condition.

Cell 426-6468

#941
1995 MAZDA PROTEGEE SALOON
Blue ext, grey int Sedan.
$1,100 ono.
Tel 327-5824, 364-6427.

2002-3 FORD FOCUS'S
priced at 2500 each call 325-0881
for more de-
tails

RIB #949
2007 FORD FOCUS
White exterior with. two-tone black/grey/leather interior,
4 door coupe, under 25,000 miles, 6 disc CD changer,
new wheels and tires, gets 33 miles to gallon. Under
25,000 miles
$11,500.00. Call 393-9355





1999 ISUZI NPR DIESEL BOX TRUCK






RIB #946
2001 IZUSU RODEO JEEP
Black exterior, beige interior
$5,000.00.0BO
clean title, good condition.
Call 361-2666 or 376-9166

2002 GEO TRACKER
priced right for only 2,800.00
call 325-0881



SSS NX

RIB #953 %
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
Black exterior, grey interior

$12,900.00 .

CD, AM/FM Radio, 5 speed, mint condition

chrome rims
Call 427-7095

2003 SUZUKI BALENO

priced right for only 3500.00
call 325-0881 for :

more details

\ .
V ae

NS
\
\N
wi

FORD EXPLORER 1999.

THE TRIBUNE

RIB, #950-D
1999 CHEVY CAVALIER
priced right for only 2500.00 call 325-0881 for
; more details

RIB #950-C
2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT
-priced right for only 2,800.00 call 325-0881 for
more details



2004 HONDA COUPE
Green exterior with black interior leather inte-
rior, 6 disc changer, HID lights, sunroof, power
everthing,

Asking $11,000.00 ono
Call 376-9079 or 394-3918 after 5



CAR FOR SALE
2000 Pontiac Grand Prix
2 Door Black Ext & Int. Sport GT Rims
Perfect condition, low miles. $6,000
Telephone: 361-5177 &
361-5220 ext 239 or 241



2004 FORD TAURUS

Low mileage and fantastic condition. Owner
leaving the island. Limited edition Eddie Bauer
leather upholstery. Taxed till April. Only 2 previ-
ous owners. $7,500.

Tel: 556 5602

White exterior, brown interior, runs great, a/c,
cd, low miles, just in trom U.S.A. Must sell.
$6,800 O.B.O Also 1999 NISSAN MAXIMA.

Asking $4,300 O.N.O, leather cd, a/c, sunroof.

Phone: 364-0639 or 449-6254

AUTO WITH REEFER COOLER AND LIFT
TAIL GATE LIENCE READY TO WORK
asking $16,500,00 ONO, ALSO 1995 ISUZI
NPR BOX TRUCK asking $10,000,
TEL 397-1464 OR CELL 457-2298. Ie

1999 CHEVY MALIBU
not running and not sure why for 800.00 call
325-0881 for more details







THE TRIBUNE



: 1997 HONDA PRELUDE

Black exterior with grey interior, 2 door sport
$3,900.00. CD, AC, 5 speed
Call 362-0817 or 466-5582

2008 SEADOO 150 SPEEDSTER 15FT
215 HP Rotax Engine Supercharged
With Trailer. Beverege Cooler,
Storage space, Pull-up Ski Pylon,
Nice Sound System,,90 Hours Only
Like New, Great Boat Great Deal
Asking 16.800,00
Call: 302-6366 or 376-1914

BBF #945
2004 YAMAHA FX 110 WAVERUNNER
with trailer, cover and 3 life vests, asking
$6,000, ph# 395-1612 10 days
tribune issue 80019.

RIB #802.
31 FOOT CENTER CONSOLE MONZA BOAT
FOR SALE,
Twin 225 engine out riggers. ready for fishing
Call 327-0985 or 357-5537

TRIB #806_

1996 CRV HONDA JEEP
Green exterior with light grey interior

$5,500.00

» |. Radio tape player, AC. In good condition

Call 392-5950 cell 456-5756

RIB #938 . ‘
2008 MERCEDES C CLASS ,
White exterior with grey interior $45,00.00
Garage kept, low mileage, fully loaded,
like brean new. Cell 426-6468

RIB #710

1974 36FT SPORT FISHERMAN BOAT
Yellow and white, 2-3208 caterpiller 1-8.8 onon
generator, 100 gal water maker, AC, New fly
fridge, VHF, GPS out riggers, new fuel tanks
in great shape. Bait box and fishing chair.
$60,000.00
call 336-2353 cell 357-0390

31 Contender “Tournament” edition 2008.
Twin Yamaha 250 hp 4 strokes. Loaded with
options. Garmin GPS/RADAR/Bottom
_ Sounder. VHF, SAT Stereo. Extra wide T-top,
leaning post, 3 livewells, rear bench seat.
Great blue water boat;
Asking $120,000.00 trades considered.
393-0262.

2005 16’ SPORT BOAT
green. ($4,000.00)
Fearly new
Call 327-8271 or 465-4287 or 357-4214

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 11

RIB #920
2000 NISAN SENTRA
Blue exterior, grey interior, a/c, cd player, good
condition, 17" rims under 70,000 miles. Must
see. $3,500.00 O.N.O
Ph: 525-8436 or 466-5683 -

1963 37 FT EGG HARBOR
(Real size 40ft) boat builders (North Carolina)
2 twin detroit diesel engines, 8.2 liters,
een speed 9 knots, new electronics
(GPS,VHS, depth finders) New hyraulic auto
pilot, power 110 and 12V and power inverter
\ $24,000. 362-4628,424-2344

a

SSS
RIB #731

FOR SALE BY OWNER
AS IS

)

1993 - 22FT GLACIER BAY CATAMARAN
PRICE:8,900.00 eNO)
FEATURES:

2 EVINRUDE 90HP E-TEC OUTBOARD
ENGINES
CONTACT BILL:

Email: bill@tiamoresorts.com
Telephone: 242.369.2330 or VIBE phone:
225.2443

200HP PRE-MIX
YAMAHA

with very low hours

comes with harness

kit, shift cables and
stainless prop
4500.00 firm
call 364-6208

RIB #951
1997 ISUZU RODEO SUV
Dark green exterior with grey interior’
$3,000.00
Cell 376-1232

28FT CENTER CONSOLE,

2 x 225 HP Mercury Optimax, 200
Gallon fuel, 45 Gallon live well,
Massive fish boxes,
ph#-424-8240 /
393-4498 ask for Nick

RIB #102.

Hatteras 45' 1973, DUTY PAID,
$50,000 as is, needs generator and forward
clutch on one engine. In Treasure Cay, Abaco.
Contact hatteras4sale @ att.net,
561-228-1424 or 242-365-8057.

cc
a ee
1990 17 BOSTON WALER MONTARK
:_ White on white, 9Ohp mercury engine
(low hours) trailer included, willing to sell boat
hull only.
$6800.00 ono
Cell 422-9343 or 456-5165

RIB #465 :

1979 2 TWIN FORD LEHMAN DIESEL 43 FT,
new electronics, (radar,GPS,depth finder)
power inverter, 6KW Onan generator, AC unit,
water heater, etc, interior all mahogany and
“teak, forward cabin and aft maser bedroom,
$64,0000,

Phone: 362-4628 or 424-2344





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

RIB #758 2
FULY EQUIPPED FIBREGLASS FISHING
VESSEL 1990.

55 ft long, ac, two staterooms-4 crews bunks,
power-one 8v71 GM single screw-two rudders
one k4-32.0 kw generator set. Refrigerated
35,000Ibs capacity and more.

Serious inquiries call 352-8805.
$225,000 (neg)

805 -

2003 KAWASAKI 636 NINJA
Project bike wrecked 636 ninja engine
Still good. Ideal if you are looking for a

bike to build. $500.00
Call 426-6455

RIB #369
- 26 INCH RIMS AND TIRES

Best deal in town. $2,200.00 ono
Cell 558-6614 or 466-4010

RIB #632
' 22' PALADIN CHROME 5 LUG
- great condition recently reduced
(black cover comes off)
RIMS & TIRES ONLY $1500.00 ONO
. 376-6121:

12' MALIBU DINGHY
with a 15hp mercury great little dive boat only
_ $2500.00
call 394-7633

RIB #931
2005 HONDA VX
Black ext. Chrome. $9500.
Tel 445-0706, 445-706.

“TURN KEY READY TO FLY"
A cessna plane (172) p-model
In annual
Price @ $38,000.00
Contact: 465-7618

20" RIMS
1650.00 0.B.O
3260332, 4220122

305-45-22
265/35/22

Low profile tires for sale, NanKang, Kuhmo, 285-50-20

Falken, Nexxen, Spectre,
35

215-35-18
225-40-18
225-35-20
235-30-22
245-35-20
225/30/20
'|245-30-22
255-30-22

$135

$180

$235
$180

$180

225-40-19
205-40-17
215-40-17
215-45-17
225-45-17
265-35-22
305-35-24

HID tights $180

Call: 434-4054, or 323-4365

BBF #898
25FT SEAFOX,
excellent condition, rewired, June 2010, 225.4
Stroke engine, fresh water wash, salt water
wash, live well, New lights, Porta Potty Garmin, |
GPS, ph# 422-3150

RIB #808
' 2005 HONDA CBR 1000RR
Candy red customized paint, chromed,
excellent conditon, well maintainted, garage
kept, too many extras to mention.
Must see to appreciate.
$5,500.00 ono |
Call 465-9101 cell 376-4357 or 393-1850

Kawasaki KLR 650 $ 5200
gloss black custom paint,new chain and tires, :
steel braided brake lines , FMF exhaust,
too many parts to list a must see.
Also for sale honda cbr 954 clean new tires
custom body ,two brothers exhaust $ 4500
376-9126.

CHROME 22’s
With brand Nexen tires 305/40/r22 w/Z rating,
5.5mm bolt pattern. $1,300.00 ono
F-150 flare side 97-03 A.R.E. fiberglass bed
cover w/carpet. $600.00 ono or get both for
$1500.00. 395-0183 24/7

BBF #812

Low profile Tyres. Summer

Specials

Window Tinting Specials

215-35-18
225-40-18
225-35-20
2385-30-22
245-35-20
225/30/20
245-30-22.
_ |255-30-22

$130
$130
-$180
$235
$180
$180
$255
$240
$305
$200

Twin Engine Conirol
: Box- $400 |
Yamaha Key Switch -
$100
Mercury Mirage SS
Propeller — 17P -
$400 |
(fits Yamaha)
Tel: 376-4350

CRUISERS $200,
20” female bikes $135, 12” bikes $85,
Also Sale on bicycle tires 20” $8, 24” $9,
: 26” $10

ph# 552-3497 / 448-0012 / 361-7382

RIB #491
FOR SALE- BRAND NEW
Mens 26’ 18 speed mountain bike grey & blue
230

Hp mini laptop w/web cam $375
Hp desktop w/18.5” Led monitor $615
pioneer car Cd playeaDeh1200mp w/remote
150

Call 525-6223

ie

Pacey

RIB #956
FORSALE_ 3

22” AKUZA BIG PAPI RIMS AND TIRES

- Price negotiable $1,750.00. Call 432-5678

305-45-22
265/35/22
285-50-20
225-40-19
205-40-17
215-40-17
215-45-17
~225-45-17
265-35-22
305-35-24

$265
$275
_ $200
$210
$95
$110
$110
$115
“$275.
$310

$180

HID Lights :
Call: 356-2109





RIB #877D
GUARDIAN STANDBY GENERATORS
Convenient, Hands-Free Operation
No fueling. No manual start. No-extension
cords. Runs on natural gas or liquid propane
Clean, Smooth Power
True Powerâ„¢ Technology provides safe
operation of sensitive electronics
; - Quietest, .
Starting @ $2995
394-4823/FAMILYISL.TOLL FREE
» "242-300-1213.

REEMA MASE

BBF #699 ay
HID KITS FOR ANY VEHICLE OR BIKES
130

also ballast and bulbs replacement
contact # 433-5290 or 448-2926
10 days tribune issue 79 111

ELEGANT WEDDING

§) DRESS OC by OLEG CASSINI! }.

Sleeveless Sequined Satin Gown,
Size 6. My measurements: Bust:
36, Waist: 30, Hips: 42. Sequined
details at shoulder straps &
‘ruching at center bust with tiered
sequins from bust to waist. $300
393-2564/
islandspice82 @ gmail.com

RIB #735B
: PANDORA
Beads in all colors and Designs

Serious Persons only CONTACT: 225-2856

Lose up to 20lbs in
1.month

With Botanical Slim-
ming pills made from all
natural plantextracts
1 pill a day needed

36 pills for $19.99
9:00am to 5:00pm

Call: 326-8322

RIB #877C
Hurricane Season Special 25% off of U.S.
List Price
Tradewinds & Multiquip
7kW — 1500kW
Perkins & John Deere Engines

Complete Standby Generator Systems

394-4823 / FAMILY ISL. TOLL FREE
242-300-1213.

WOMEN’S SMOOTH ROLLERBLADES
Sizé 9, Like NEW! Used only once! $125,
393-2564/islandspice82 @ gmail.com

NEW IVORY
DAVID’S BRDAL
WEDDING DRESS
Negotible

Call 556-7290
or s
395-6076

RIB #735C
MAC Cosmetics
Eyeshadow palettes, lip glosses mascaras and

more.
Serious Persons only CONTACT: 225-2856

NBA JERSEY
Authentic just $60
or 2 for $100. We

have the
new heat #6
James Lakers
back to back
champs, huge
inventory many to
choose from.
Â¥ Call'432-2428

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 13

RIB #877B
PORTABLE GENERATORS
RELIABLE NAMES YOU CAN TRUST / 2
YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY
GENERATORS STARTING @ $759
CALL SHIRLEY ENTERPRISES LTD.
394-4823 / FAMILY ISL. TOLL FREE
242-300-1213.

CLARINET: SELMER STUDENT CLARINET

Gently Used. No dents or pitting! Mouthpiece and case
included! $200, 393-2564/islandspice82 @ gmail.com

Price $10-15
Tel: 434-3938 or 325-7061

HOLLYWOOD WHITE
Skin Whitening Line -

MIRACLE GROW
Hair growth stimulator
* No more-embarrassing bald spot. -
Serious Persons only CONTACT: 225-2856

RIB #910
LAKERS NBA 2009 CHAMPIONSHIP RINGS
Also Chicago BUlls 1998 Championship rings
just $25 a sports fan must have.
Phone: 432-2428

RIB #877E
’MARSHALLTOWN TOOLS
‘MASONRY, CONRETE, DRYWALL TOOLS
: HOT SUMMER SALE
35% OFF TO END. OF JULY
Cal 394-4823

RIB #610
RHEEM HOT WATER
For solor water heater 80 us gal $250.00
120 us gal. $300.00
New, not used. Call 242-376-2600

RIB #877 :
: WHOLESALE DIAPERS!!!
B.J.’S BRAND SIZE 3-5 $39 PER CASE
& WIPES 720 COUNT $29.95
CALL 394 — 7926 FOR DETAILS

Used wigs available starting at $99.00.
Ask about our NEW Glueless Wig

“Serious Persons only CONTACT: 328-6898 or
designersensations @ hotmail.com .

CASIO G-SHOCK
Just $60.0
We have white, black, blue red, yellow.
Call 432-2428





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

#289 MARKET ST SOUTH ° PO BOX N-7984, NASSAU

THREE SERVICES SUNDAYS
7:00 AM, 9:00 AM, 11:15 AM

PRAYERS FOR YOUR BABIES EVERY SUNDAY
WEDDINGS* FUNERALS*HOMES» CARS
Just call the numbers listed, Earle Francés 0D.
ll personally handle your request. Pastor

(242) 393-5798, (242) 323-6452

) ONGRAL SAA

einuptshahaan ca

DP-ATRE TSR? -

DRIVEN FOR DEPENDABILITY
----- Telephone-----

323 - 8427 (Sales) or 326- 6380

ss (Rentals) Visit our site:
. www.avis.com.bs/preownedvehicles.html

SNe a peaGinhoiats. core.”

Nursery & Preschoo!

SATORU SUC gRe SU TOM toy
x RAWOUS RO nS AE

Hey Ladies!!

Looking for a salon that
specializes in excellent hair care?
We grow and maintain healthy hair.

Try our strand by strand weayin
technique for a more natural loo
We offer, on shaping, waxing,
Eye lashes,
{Special for the month of August)
We are serving childen as weil,
Free consuitetion with first service

NY
* Telephone (242)364-6211 ~ 557-2539
PRINCE CHARLES DRIVE

THE TRIBU

ADVERTISE
VOUR BUSINESS
HERE!!







THE TRIBUNE = ErIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 15

wwe) y ' | —, gg. ny ry - ea 7 : r-
age if NESS. bad Bad S| Se & ICE

URANT DIRE! CTO ORY







oe £625,200 Bs Bod Gad 2.
3 BEST SEUZCMON OF = SepPumnces S BuO
TEREANCUE: GAR EGEAEES Ear, GEEK GR sts






Coa











oe SS Poy Vers Se Sie ee v) vi pees





- PHONEZPSP TECHNICIAN RAPES 2 FTA CES o - poe
Millar Tuck Ch AptaT SS4D3 eee : Distributors
Phone: 242-351-SHRNIIZAS OE i Need.
Email: caspardunnumail.com Free Tasting.
5

i m Month Supply

- The Store That Selis It Because You Wasnt Tt! $48.

PlayStation 1 Apparel, Electronics, Gadgets, Accessories =“3Call 242-395-9836




and so riuch rrore.... shop now!!!!



Call us now to book a suit
Tel:242-525-9529/242-465-8554
Fax: 242-361-8076
Email: SunsetSuites @ gmail.com
P.O.Box EE-17016,
Nassau, N.P, Bahamas




ei " Weeniog. Rope Twist, And
For more information contact Gle at
395-6686 & 433-0757



veagrapes

Photo Studio

(242) 364-1954





“Technology Solutions that you can trust”
Yetwork Support Services
*s Managed Services
“ Network Monitoring
“ VPN Tunneling

** P X and IP Phone System Installation
* Network Infrastructure design and implementation

Office: 1.242.225.8654 -mail: info@projectsolutionsbahamas.com

Sa het Sh a
WENT GLASSES
THES + SEALERS

Open: Monday cn hon Scene
Sundays Wan -hotinn



steps, t
seat covers, igre Bat

Tei 364-3465 @
- B.O.Box N-1246 &







RESIDENTIAL © COMMERCIAL
Ductless Air Conditioning
= Heat Pump Systems






PAGE 16, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010












Dns 2s
Xoneee ore cee nS
Pare eT yy

THOMPSON’S BARGAIN CENTRE |
Nassau Street opposite the Courts
Tel: 424-8860 - Hours: 10am - 7pm

Ultra Sheer Pantyhose $1.50 - $1.75
Hedy’s Pantyhose, Tall - XTall ...... ...$2.99 or 3/$8.00
Hedy’s Pantyhose, ...............-3X-4X $3.99 or 3/$11.00
Ladies T-Back Blouses(many colors) ..............$8.95
Ladies Tights (Short)..........0.000 iaginataceecauenes sive - $8.95
Girl’s special occasion white dress
Boys dressy vest set
DESIGNER HAND BAGS - GREAT PRICES



BOCUPIVE

ced an Administrative Assistant?
ontract a Freelance Admin today
© Work from our own office assisting
“our clients anytime, anywhere in the

RQ AES WARE EEE. .
je do it virtually...

& Accessories
: s Software —
internet & Networking
-Tel:325-5040

Cell: 465-0610 or 454-7934
WE PICK UP AND DELIVER

ON ee eae

WWw.mynoveltease.com

* Thongs, G’s, Boyshorts

*Bra Sets
* Camisole Sets *Babydolls/Chemises
* Bustier / Corset Sets *Gowns/ Dresses

a

*Lingenie Costumes *Novelty Items

| *Retail / Wholesale Sales *Bridal Showers.
*Bachelorette Parties

Girl’s Night Out Parties
; *Lingerie Baskets

423-3274 or 544-9304

b5

SERVICES
will purchase and Phone: 954 - 495-9057
1 97-O
~~” Contact in Nassau; 468 - 7474 Monique
me Emaildips7@hotmail.com

WILFRED SMITH








ALECTION OF S



WP

RSPR EER
y Moria

Yr

HELP UNLIMITED..LET US HEL
TEMPORARY OFFICE STAFF,

by the hour, day, or week.

Marketing Plans * Accounting » Bookkeeping,

Administrative * Secretarial *« Clerical + Filing,

MARKETING SKILLS

TEL: 565-2312

aS UNITING CULTURBs @ PROVIDING LANGUAGE SOLUTIONS
SPANISH FOR BUSINESS I & II
ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS I & II
30hrs @ $300.00
Includes Registration and Class Materials
AM Day SPANISH IMMERSION CAMP

A

EMplerse es & Safely QL Aids
SYN SALSA DANCE SJNOOG RIEL TRIPS WATS

Ph: (242) 356-3953 ; 677-4542
bahamastransiators@qmail.com

° £92 GZKamaunann

ALL ABOUT ELEGANCE
We rent chair covers, tie -backs, table
cloths, overlays & dinner napkins for all
occasions :

- Tel: 558-5664, 477-6443 or 456-

. 9979
~ allaboutelegance @ ymail.com

. “Creating Beautiful Memories”

SRIWNGES = SiHiOryriN
SOSA (Tr. GES GR SOSaBsen




!

GOL BLHRGKHGMGUG.





THE TRIBUNE









Wie kl i oloi kr Ff 8S UII EDS =
Bm ad ee a ee ee OO

SRI TAS, EONS AOL IRIS SOT FAS
wlLetter ricacs
r= rivecionpre =

Wee ctictisag trmvwvitaticorm=
WWVYecdiadimgd tyrmn Sreceois
-Srochures
-rorms

Tickets

Stickers

Comm pwuter Forres
eFausit Colour Printing

“For Ai Your Printing & rubber Stanp

Owner Services Oriorad-
Ee = nd Pn tae Ot a RIEL)
mn Fd Rao

7g
=| PRINTING Lo oe

PS rn eo Pek te tad On ch s

Wk ANHWQ

= Storg THATS

TAKE YOUR BUSINESS TO THE NEXT LEVEL

Sell your products and promote your
services online in your very own
_ fully functional Web Store.

Basic Package Starts af SIS} ger month.
ive de ail afthe werk for yeu!

Sahamahiaze.cam

The Entire Bahamas Ontine.

E:bahamablaze@yahoo.com Sales: 225-3533

Ceseclexere Tractor a Photog
x Painting «fated

*Passport & Visa Photos
Private Fhoto Shoots
‘Freelance

“Eveats

Call: (242) 487-5343 fo

WS
Dada taay PS
Emait candacehurray

WS Sop HT QA;





FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 17











P SERN ES & SHOPPIN
GEE) OR BO2-2ES0

{o



; ANTHONY SMITH BOOK-KEEPING/
A ‘Couch of COlamour Rhotography ACCOUNTING SERVICES HIGH POINT ESTATES SUBDIVISION,

Weddings-Brides home to reception. : “Finding time for tfiose tedious tasks” Nassau Bahamas _
Special Events-Showers, Anniversary, Family Portraits, Baby Specializing in: 5 = Two adjoining multifamily lots
Christians, Glamour, Proms, Graduation, Beauty Pageants. Abkomated small business accounting systems eS Te : [ Atand 42

Show this flyer and get 10% OFF; SSS SSS Bank reconciliations and Financial Statements es iH | Gated community all services
Sa package from your choice. System conversions gt | installed, Great investment! -

‘ Photography created by La-winter Outsourcing of Administrative work i BE. im i 2 b Contact Joyce

sae *'Visit us on Facebook: La-winter Robinson ‘ Jaaee ms - sa . ee: joyce_hield@ hotmail.com
P.O. Box SB-51337 Tel: 392-2272 or 477-6534 SS re SPs 1 (561) 317-3104, or 1 (561) 833-4734
Nassau, BAHAMAS smuthony1954@yahoo.com ~—ine! f Sak Gh 4 (242) 373-1503 (leave message)

cee DIRTY FURNITURE? ' , eEvouin cei a aT ee UrTT

Sofa $75, Love Seat $55, Arm Chair $40 f 100 % Natural | Kiddies World & Fort Charlotte ete
DIRTY CAR SEAT?DIRTY CARPET & ; Lose 10-15 pounds monthly WU New eine cevccuteh el Ui mam errr Terie mao!

| RUGS? ROOMS UNDER 150 sq. ft $35 | | gga Fit fat epeitension
| If we can’t clean it throw it away. | Be High Binbd Sugar | ‘6 ae Mae develop the whole child
Dry in one hour. ‘ : Check Solomons & Most ati eorLarS them for LIFE.
Like new! Pharmacies \ Bele la serra ol 1

Tel: (242) 325-5108, 362-1444 LL \ AK Phone: 393 - 5157 or 557-1369 = Noe eres a
Fax(242) 362-2384 s

CLOSE SATURDAY. fl Oy ae | aad Erie 3373 or 325-8604
HERMAN G. BENSON gi MAGIC HAIR

MECHANICS ANGINEER CONTRACTOR | - $ LADIES DO YOU sae oto AND
{ Photo Albums, Video Tapes and your : b INSTANTLY? th yikes NEW UNDETECTABLE
mpater (Digingd Photos} ee : hair extension for balding and thinning hair.
: WH : ‘ - OR
“ wir : OSes we . Strand by Strand extension worn by your favorite
Call today anc let ane bring them . fig ina beauty WY SS: ——— sar Ch . ue Coco SEWING
SO : or :
MUSICAL PHOTO MOVIE DVD - peg Pei tet weatment Flan | | Hair regrowth treatment for balding, thinning and hair breakage.
(MAKES PEG) oi ct.0e GIFT} : : Home Nat ; e 100% remy human hair for sale
GREG @325-6135/395-3560 : &. Vincent Road, Sulier Heights, Tele 5 HTG290 Call today for a FREE treatment!

_ of gream@coralwave.com PO Box $B-5214?, Nassau, Bahamas Cellular: 65086 CALL FOR APPOINTMENT, 455- 8856

















GHILDREN‘’S SUMMER .COMPUTER GAMP

Ae s Keyboard: a4
AIR-CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION LTD. ceca gages? 4

z j j ; hu
Pir ime a cay tT rit Parts - Sales Service Installation e July S—Aug 8 2010 \
: Auto-Air Gas Up starts at $25.00 een Preaing oor rile
Refrigeration Gas Up starts at $50.00 SylVeskivtonth Rename ted itt

Ww fixe I 4
re. + = @ WW Corolla * Sprinter & B18 Sentra’s | | Gas Stove,Washer,Dryer Repairs starts at $50.00 4 ae Computer
TOYOTA seONDA Bumpers Window & Wall A/C Unit starts at $250.00 ©16 years Teaching Galton vital

“Seek and find all your Fenders - Grills & Lights Ete. Ductless A/C Units starts at $500.00 i Experience Phone: @42) 477-1018
hard to find Japanese Paits” prone: (242) noe oes Central A/C Unit starts at $1,200.00 - eFowerPoit

We alse do Special Orders (242) 436- 8407 i . Advancement Computing Center







Lawrence A. Davis
Technical Engineer

rey

| Computer Repair & Network Phone: 242-364-1965
Surveillance & CCTV Cameras Mobile: 242-359-0215
Audio/Visual & Lighting ;Fax: 242-364-0514
Surround Theaters & Satellite ,Email:specialeffects2000@
Systems oo com

nd Theaters & Satelite Systems















“CASERTAG FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
P.O.Box CB-12843 eNassau, The Bahamas °
Tel: (242)466-7599
Email Address:bflbahamas @coralwave.com
Catering to parties, fairs, corporate and community events









ASS SSS

#913
- OAKLEY SHADES. .GASCON
-And oil rigs with fire lens. Many colors to
choose from. Just $60.00
Call 432-2428

BBF #919
ACER EM MINI Laptop: ‘
1GB RAM. 250HD. WIFI. Windows 7. Webcam.
Card Reader. Anti Virus Software. 1 Year War-
ranty. Finance | LayAway from $379.99. Call
323.6315.

BBF #920 :
; IBM Lenovo Laptop:
Webcam; 3GB RAM; 250GB HD; CD/DVD
Burner, Windows 7; Anti Virus; 2.1 Ghz; WIFI
+ 1 Year Warranty. Price from $559.99.
Finance/LayAway. Call 323.6315.

BB :
Apple Itunes Gift Card:
Purchase virus free songs from ITUNES. $15
card for $20. $20 card for $25.
Call 323.6315

PAGE 18, FRIDAY, AUGUS1 1:3, 2010

1 $499,99

BBF #915
ACER EM 15” Laptop Special:

Win 7. CD/DVD RW. 2GHz. 3GB RAM: 250HD.
WIFI. Card Reader. Facebook and Twitter
Ready. Anti Virus. 1 Year Warranty. Finance |
LayAway from $499.99.

Call 323.6315.

$99.99

BBF #907 :
HP All in one Printer Special:
Copy, Printer, Scan. 1 Black & 1 Color Ink car-
tridge included. Power Cord. Windows Capabil-
ity. Borderless Photos. 1 Year Warranty. From
$99.99. Call 323.6315;

Gateway Laptop Special: rs
Webcam; 3GB RAM; 250GB HD; CD/DVD
Burner; Windows 7; Anti Virus; 2.2 Ghz; WIFI;
1 Year Warranty. Price from $599.99.
Finance/LayAway. Call 323.6315. 1 month

»

COMPUTERS AND COMPONENTS!!
. desktops starting at $549
laptops starting at $449,
10” mini laptops starting at $349,

Best deals on the island, all name brands , all
computers come with, anti-virus, Microsoft office,
Operating System of your choice
Starting a business? Ask about our wholesale

. '. price! —
ph# 466-6771 / 393-2080(evenings)
Also for computer repairs
Call: 361-4489 /
465-3543

BBF #913
Sandisk 4GB Memory Card Sale:

Fast transfer rate for copy/download/backup.
Low battery consumption. Perfect for cameras
+ digital recorders. Price at $19.99. Call
323.6315.

BBF #906 :
Computer Webcam + Microphone Sale:5.0
Mega Pixel. Built in microphone, flexible cam-

era. Compatible with Win XP/ Vista/ 7. Just
plug and play. 1 Year Warranty. Price $19.99.

: Call #323.6315; 4,

BBF #909
Universal Laptop Chargers:
Charger compatible with most pc laptops. Fits
Dell, Acer, Toshiba, HP, Sony, Compaq, Fu-
jitsu, Asus, NEC ad more. 90W with multiple
connectors. Warranty included. Price $39.99.
. Call 323.6315;

Toshiba Laptop 15” Special:
Windows 7; CD/DVD RW; 2.1 GHz ; 2GB
RAM; 250 HD; Card Reader;. WIFI; Anti Virus
Software; 1 Year Warranty. Financel LayAway.
Price $489.99. Call 323.6315.

Apple Macbook Unibody Sale:

OS X Snow Leopard; iLife; 2 GB RAM; 250 GB
HD; Webcam; Bluetooth; WIFI; CD/DVD
Burner. 1 Year Warranty. Finance/ LayAway
: from $999.99.”

Call 323.6315.

369.99

Acer Mini Laptop Special:
1GB RAM. 160HD. WIFI. Windows 7. Webcam.
Card Reader. Anti Virus Software. 1 Year War-
ranty. Finance |-LayAway from $369.99.
Call 323.6315. ,

THE TRIBUNE

Hp Allin One Printer Special: PRINT,
SCAN, COPY & FAX. 1 Black & 1 Color Ink
cartridge included. Power Cord. Windows Ca-
pability. Borderless Photos. 1 Year Warranty.
From $99.99. Call 323.6315;

BBF #921
HP COMPAQ COMPLETE DESKTOP
SPECIAL: 3GB RAM; 320 HD; CD/DVD RW;
USB Ports; Windows 7 + More; Anti-Virus;
Speakers included. Finance/LayAway from
' $599.99. Call 323.6315.

Computer Linksys, Wireless G Router Reces-
sion Special: Includes router; Ethernet Cord;
adapter; 4 port switch; and Wireless G -
(802.11g) Access Point & Push button technol-
ogy. Warranty included. Price $79.99.
- Call 323.6315.

TOP LINE COMPUTER FOR SALE,
great deal, 1GB memory, 160 GB hard drive,
with LCD Flat screen monitor,Keyboard &
mouse, DVD/CD Burner with Anti-Virus and Mi-
crosoft Office Suit installed.
Layaway/Financing available, only $599.00
you cant beat it, F

677-4487

Dell Zino Desktop Special:
2GB RAM; 250 HD; CD/DVD RW; USB Ports;
Win Vista | 7 + More; Anti-Virus; Speakers;
* NOT included. Finance/LayAway from
$599.99. Call 323.6315.





THE TRIBUNE

29
NEW TOSHIBA LAPTOPS
$479.00 250
GB Hard drive, 2GB RAM, Wi-Fi 15” monitor,
windows 7, 1 year warranty, free software, free
antivirus, free installation. Call 364-7854

TRIB #955/784

N-FUSION NEW
PROGRAM
Solaris, Phoenix and (older
model Nova)

Also Sonic 360
Premier and elite
satellite recieve
available (new) now watch
adult chs and ppv movies
and events.
Phone: 426-1437

or
636-3916

BRAND NEW
CELLPHONES

Moto Rokr.

BlackB. Javelin. $450
BlackB. Bold....$420
LG KS360 $199

CALL FOR MORE
INFO
364-9001 or 558-3267

TALKDAT DUAL SIM
IPHONE
Mini Iphone.... $140
Mini with tv.... $175
Nano with

2Gb, mp3, mp4, fm
radio, video recorder,
blk, wht,
: pnk colors
| Tel: 341-0460/552-9793

BBF #914
Apple iPAD WiFi Sale: 16 GB Hard Drive;
1ghz processor. Save over 4000 songs or 16
hours of video. Bluetooth enabled. Over
140,000 applications plus more. 1 Year War-
ranty included. Price $649.99. Call 323.6315.

#928
MAGIC JACK VOIP TELEPHONE.

Use your computer and Internet service so you
can make calls to the US and Canada with no
monthly bill. 1 Year Warranty included. Price:

$49.99. Call 323-6315

Brand New NINTENDO WII
Complete Wii system with 5 games Wi-Fi Inter-
net and extras evel ne
(BRAND NEW) PERFECT FO S! every-
ONLY’ $285.00/ Mr. Robinson

thing included
376-4052- fSoA 394

FOR SALE- BRAND

: NEW
Motorola EM30
w/camera, MP3, blue-
tooth & radio $160
LG cookie
touchscreen $170
Blackberry curve
8520 wW/WiFi $380
Nokia E63 w/WiFi

- $285

Call 525-6223

NEW MOTOROLA
- 6088
Dual touch
2gb, mp3, mp4, fm
bluetooth camera
video,
2 movies download
black metallic
12 in stock for $175

Call 341-0460
or
552-9793

BBF #926
XBOX Points Cards: XBOX Points Card:
1,600 points redeemable for content available
in the Xbox Live Marketplace. Update your
games with add-ons like songs,
maps, levels and characters.
Call 323.6315

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 19

XBOX 360
2 Games
$299 99.
BBF #927
XBOX 360 CONSOLE, WIRELESS CON-
TROLLER + 2 FREE GAMES
Xbox 360 Console & Wireless Controller:
Xbox 360 Console, 2 Games, Xbox 360 wire-

less controller, Warranty Included. Limited
Quantities. Price $299.99. Call 323.6315

ARCADE VIDEO
GAMES FOR SALE
Call 364-3632

cell 427-2954

Brand New Authentic Unlocked IPhones
with all accesories. 3g 8gb $550 3gs $700
Call 341-5933, 434-2325, 423-1096 or
454-1288. Iphone 4g 16gb unlocked NOW
AVAILABLE!!, Call 341-5933, 434-2325,
454-1288, 423-1096

IPHONE CLONE,

Dual Sim, WIFI, FM
‘Radio, TV, Comes
with: Cellphone,
2 Batteries, Charger,

Earphone, USB Cable,

Car Charger., for
$299.99,
LAYAWAY
AVAILABLE...., $100
DOWN AND $50 PER

WEEK FOR 4 WEEKS.

328-1801/436-0986



TRIB #971
HUGH CLEARENCE SALE
On Gucci watches 75% off now just. $50.00
must go.
Call 432-2428

HP 4GB Flash Drive Sale:
Store data, important files, videos, pictures and
take them with you. Works on any laptop or
destin just plug and play into any usb port.
Price $1 19.99. 1 Year warranty.
Call 323.6315

BBF #912

BBF #911
Norton Antivirus Sale:

Industry leading protection against viruses, spy-
ware. Removes threats, causes no damage.
Scans constantly to stop future attacks. Price

$29.99. Call 323.6315.

Wifi Celiphones,
‘$249.99 -
$299.99, Layaway
Available,

328-1801
Or.
/ 436-0986

Call:

PlayStation
Network Cards:
Purchase games,

MapPacks,
demos, and more.
$10 card for $15.
$20 card for $25.

Call 323.6315

a.

TRIB #936-A

PROFORM ELETRIC
TREADMILL
From $350. Tel 362-6040.





PAGE 20, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

06-07 Honda Neer 2door Foglights
175.00
~ 03-05 Honda Ae eo be 4door Foglights -
1

50.00
ALL ITEMS ARE BRAND NEW AND COMES ;
WITH ALL ASSEMBLY PARTS
CONTACT: 448-9643

TWO AMERICAN EAGLE POOL TABLES
Great condition, $2,500 each.
Tel 426-6468.

TRIB #936
NEW STAINLESS
STEEL,
family fridge/ice
water in door.

Only $875.00.

Tel:362-6040

NEW FRIGIDAIRE

9 Cu Ft Chest
Freezer
Only $425.00
Call 362-6040

#807
_PITTBULL PUPPIES FOR SALE
$400.00
Call 394-4175 or 449-9806

36 ,
3 PIECE LIVING ROOM SET,
sofa, love seat, and arm chair, only $500, ph#
356-1643 / 427-9961 / 324-5552 10 days trib-
une issue 80 012

#815
RESTAURANT APPLIANCES FOR SALE,
rotisserie chicken machine, up to 20 chickens,
deep fryer, slushy machine, and more,
call: 456-7253

SODA VENDING .
MACHINE FOR
SALE,
this machine is in
perfect condition,

has eight. (8) selections

and it accepts coins &

dollars. So if you are in

the market to make
some extra money,
give us a call at
426-3149,426-8605.
$2,700 obo

RIB #915

PURE BREED,
Red nose pitbull for sale ‘de-wormed and first
shot. Bully blood line. $500.00
Call 324-9597/544-6798. Serious inquiries only

RIB #746
PURE BREED ROTTY PUPPIES FOR SALE
6 female left @ $600.00 each
2 male left @ $500.00ea
Call 392-1107 cell 556-2021 or 302-3948

#935
DINING ROOM SET SEATS 6,
front room set sofa, love seat, 3 tables, Make
an offer, owner leaving town,
ph# 677-4965 / 677-4951 / 435-4517






RIB #370
CENTRAL AIR CARRIER CONDENSERS
2ton(household and 4ton
(3 Phase Commercial)
Both -$800
Call 434-3965

NEW G.E STACK
WASHER DRYER
Only $1150.00
Value $1600.00

Call.362-6040

0
BICHON PUPPIES FOR SALE
1st shot .$450.00. Call 364-2710 evening or
557-1336 cell or 424-8465 ‘

RIB #754
SHIT-TZU PUPPIES FOR SALE
2 puppies left, 12 weeks old and had shots.
$550.00
Call 466-4713 Ken
364-2557 evenings



THE TRIBUNE

TENT FORSALE .
40’ x 60’. Canvas Tent .
(Need minor repairs) :
Three years old ‘(must sell) $5,000.00 abo
Great for Chruch activities- large meetings
community ‘events, etc. ~
' Can seat over 300 comfortably.
Telephone
242-365-0065, 242-365-0007, 242-475-3226






BBF #810



FOR SALE

Sikkens.Lesonal & Wanda Paint System with
Paint Supplies. Make an offer,

ph#6774965 / 6775390 / 6763124





NEW FRIGIDAIRE
SIDE BY SIDE
Only $799.99 -





Call 362-6040



PUPPIES FOR SALE
Scottish, Chihuahua
Male, Female available, very tiny
1 Female Bichon Frise.
Call 361-3104 or 436-7128

COCATIELS FOR
! SALE
Pet stores $80.00 and
up. Your price $60.00
and down.
Call 364-7897



THE TRIBUNE

|The Tribune |



EXCLUSIVES
ELEUTHERA! A short walk to
Surfer's Beach, this 9,600SF
lot is located between. the
ridges which gives it good pro-
tection and has potential for
ocean views from a_ second
floor residence. Perfect spot for
beach enthusiasts looking for
peace & tranquility. Web Ref:
564368 Price: $17,000 :
ROLLING HILLS! In a quiet,
gated community, this Sbd/2bt
home has lots of extras includ-
ing large breakfast bar, sepa-
rate laundry room, lots of stor-
age, walk-in closet, carport &

more. Web Ref: 564686.
Price: $299,500 .
PARADISE ISLAND! Just

steps to the beach, this private
and peaceful 2bd/2bt villa-style

home is a rare find! Immacu-
lately kept villa features
open-beamed timbered _ ceil-

ings, large enclosed courtyard
& fully air-conditioned. Web
Ref: 564612. Price: $349,000

WEST PLACE CLOSE! Situ-
ated at a cul-de-sac and con-
taining 13,703 SF this residen-
tial lot in upscale community
with foundation laid & fully ap-
proved plans is a great find!

Web Ref: 564636. Price:
$350,000
MCKINNEY AVE! Well con-

structed four-plex in great loca-
tion! Two apartments have
2bd/1bt“’and two apartments
have 1bd/1bt. Fully rented and
offers an excellent income op-
portunity! Web Ref: 564680.
Price: $395,000

GARDEN HILLS! !mmaculate
Sbd/2bt home with tons of up-
grades; granite kitchen counter
tops, base & crown moulding,
separate shower stall in, master
bath, Jacuzzi tub, 15KW gen-
erator & electric gate to name a
few. Web Ref: 564693. Price:

$420,000
SKYLINE DR! Lushly §land-
scaped property features

5bd/4.5bt home, Italian marble
tile floors, French doors, fire-
place, 2 guest cottages, heated
pool, gazebo & hurricane shut-
ters are just a few features.
Web Ref: 563053. Price:
$1.95M

WEST BAY ST! If island living
with all the modern conven-
iences and great location close
to all amenities and entertain-
ment is what you're looking for,
this is the home for you! Over-
looking a_ beautiful mile-long
beach this special property has
all you expect & more. Call for
viewing! Web Ref: 563767.
Price: US$2.995M

FOR SALE
FREEPORT! 2bd/2.5bt town-
house in gated community with
swimming pool, sunning deck
& lovely canal views. A_fantas-
tic buy! Web Ref: 564703.
Price: $139,500

Contact Bahamas Realty Ltd.
Ph: 242-396-0000
www.bahamasrealty.bs

‘COLUMBUS COVE!



YAMACRAW SHORES! Newly
constructed 2bd/2.5bt town-
house feature 18" ceramic tiles
on the ground floor, hardwood
flooring on the second floor,
central a/c, solid oak and ma-
ple kitchen cabinets and much
more. Web Ref: 564427 Price:
$255,000

TREASURE COVE! Hard to
find 3bd/2.5bt home in family
oriented community has tons of
features. Granite counter tops,
Ss appliances, travertine
floors, tons of space, pool,
deck & more! Web Ref:
564728. Price: $519,000
DELAPORTE POINT! Just
steps away from the ocean this
3ba/3.5bt condo is a_ special
find. Lovely waterfront views,
bamboo wood -flooring, new
windows, recessed lights, mod-
ern kitchen with corian count-

ers, ss: appliances & more!
Web Ref: . 564599 _—s Price:
$595,000

PARADISE 1S! Immaculate

3bd/3.5bt condo at gated com-
munity surrounded by acres of
lush tropical foliage and breath-
taking harbour views. Tray ceil-
ings, porcelain tiled floors, Ba-
hama shutters, walk-in closets,
private patio and comfortably

furnished. Web Ref: 564487
Price: $990,000

FOR RENT
SEA BEACH - ESTATES!

Clean and comfortable 1bd/ibt
apartment all in a neat pack-

age. On-site laundry, | tiled
throughout, central a/c & all
utilities except phone! Web
Ref: 564640. Price: $1,000
p/m

SANDYPORT! Canal front
2bd/2.5bt townhouse with

dock, central air & more lo-
cated in much desired, exclu-
sive gated community with
24-hr security, tennis courts,
pools & a beach. Web Ref:
564651. Price: $2,250 p/m

Quality
workmanship, luxury features &
prime beachfront location, this
designer condo overlooks the
pool & has spectacular ocean
views. 3bd/2bt — a must see!

Web Ref: 564702. Price:
$3,600 p/m
THE GROVE! Immaculate

3bd/2.5bt furnished townhouse
located in gated community.
Lots of eco-friendly features,
overly spacious living room,
formal dining room flows onto a
wrap-around deck & gazebo.
Electrical shutters on
windows/doors, central air &
2-car garage. Web
564708. $4,150 p/m

SANDYPORT! Experience a
peaceful & serene Bahamian
lifestyle at this exquisite
3bd+/3bt home with — private
beach/dock & — spectacular
views. Richly detailed living
can be yours today! Web Ref:
564594. Price: $4,200 p/m

Contact Bahamas Realty Ltd.
h: 242-396-0000
www.bahamasrealty.bs

Ref:

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 21

E-mail: classifieds @ tribunemedia.net

KINGS REALTY
SERENITY

Tranquil and exclusive gated
community in Western New
Providence offering and af-
fordable lifestyle loaded with
amenities including kids play-
grounds, pools, tennis courts,
basketball courts, club house
and more. Single family lots
starting at a mere $85k secure
yours now.

SERENITY ESTATE LOTS
Large residential parcels rang-

ing from 30,500 sq. ft. to
42,821 sq. ft. starting at only
$250k — build your dream

home today.
SAFFRON HILL
Luxury community opposite Or-
ange Hill Beach provides a
calming lifestyle within this éx-
clusive community. Amenities
include swimming pool and
tennis courts. Asking $175k
NORMANS CAY ACREAGE
Four adjacent lots in world fa-
mous Normans Cay, Exuma
totaling just under 2 acres with
panoramic ocean views and
414ft on the Exuma Sound
don't miss out on your oppor-
tunity to own aé slice of
heaven. Asking 1.6 million
TIKI VILLA NORMANS CAY
Fabulous remodeled 3 bed 3.5
bath beachfront villa in Nor-
mans Cay with amazing ocean
views. Asian inspired interior
design this villa comes _ fully
furnished and equipped with
designer touches such as IPE

wood flooring and marble
baths. 2 million

STAPLEDON GARDENS
HOME

Well maintained 3 bed 3 bath
home on landscaped property
with fruit bearing trees. This
home comes equipped with
dual central a/c units, covered
entry and rear porch and a two
car garage. Selling for $350k
JUBILEE GARDENS HOME

3 bed 2 bath well maintained
home with automatic stand by
generator, tank-less water
heater, granite countertops,
honey oak cabinets, stainless
steel appliances, hurricane im-
pact windows, well water sys-
tem, storage shed and land-
scaped yard this home is a
steal at $210k

SHIRLEY STREEET COM-
MERCIAL BUILDING

Looking for that ideal commer-
cial investment — look no fur-
ther with this Commercial
\Plaza ideally located for your
income generating investment
with four shop spaces each
with open space floor plan and
bathrooms to rent out. The
ground floor unit also has an
office area. The building has
fixed glass shop fronts that are
secure with security bars and
the ground floor units have
controlled entrances with mo-

tion sensors. Each shop
space is climate controlled
with central air. $450k

PHONE: 323-8000 /
E-MAIL:
BAHAMAS @KINGSRE
ALTY.COM

LT Y
Venice Bay Lot

14,910 sq. ft. residential lot
with access to ocean views.

A
steal at $130k

SALES
SEAWELL MANOR SUB:
This Single family 3 bed, 2.5

bath home, is in a quite neigh-

borhood. This 2463 sq. ft. |.

home is immaculately main-
tained, includes a separate liv-
ing, family and dining room,
very spacious. kitchen, re-
cessed lighting, storage room,
security bars, and _ separate
laundry room. $316,000.00

CAREFREE CONDO: This
lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom
condo is being sold fully fur-
nished and offers a view of the
ocean, has beach access and
pool. It is well maintained and
tastefully furnished. The
kitchen features solid wood
cabinets, Corian counter tops
and stainless steel appliances.
The main living, dining and
kitchen areas are tiled and the
bedrooms are carpeted. Each
bedroom has an en suite bath
and the master bedroom has a
walk in closet. There are laun-
dry facilities on site. FYI - This
building does -not allow chil-

dren or pets. Asking
$349,500.
CABLE BEACH: 2 bed, 2

bath apartment with spacious
living and dining room and the
only unit with a personal utility
room. Swimming pool at en-
trance of the complex. Asking
$259,000.
GARDEN HILLS HOME: 3
bedroom, 2.5 bath 2,069 sq. ft.
split level home. Features in-
clude central air, granite coun-
tertops, porcelain tiles, alarm
system, covered garage and
home was recently renovated.
Asking $310,000
BAHAMIA WEST LOT:
20,775 sq. ft. lot asking
$217,000 a steal of a deal as
large lots in the West are a
rare find — don't miss this deal.
e RENTALS
EAST BAY STREET COM-
MERCIALThis 2 story com-
mercial/office building is. com-
prised of 2,698 square feet.
For rent at $24.72 per square
foot / CAM charge at $4.00
per square foot. Includes pri-
vate offices, spacious open
floor plan, his/her bathrooms,
parking For 30+ cars, private
entrance and exit gates, secu-
rity and generator. ,
YAMACRAW HILL ROAD: 1 -
One bedroom, one bathroom
for rent unfurnished $600.00 a
month
YAMACRAW HILL ROAD: 1-
Two bedroom, one bathroom
for rent unfurnished $750.00 a
month
YAMACRAW HILL ROAD: 1-
Townhome style 2 bedroom,
1.5 bathroom for rent $900.00
a month

PHONE: 323-8000 /
E-MAIL:

BAHAMAS @KINGSRE
ALTY.COM

aoe SS

(JACKISAACS )

REALTY



we OF

eS

OF

HIGH POINT MANOR: Spa-
cious 3 bed 2.5 bath town-
house in’ Gated Community.
New construction. Granite
kitchen counter tops, Oak cabi-
nets. $299,000.00

EASTERN RD. TOWNHOUSE:
Panoramic Oceanviews 3 bed,
3 bath. Living and dining areas
extend to terrace. Loft with full
bathroom. beautiful pool, laun-
dry facilities, seconds from
beach. $399,000.00

OLDE TOWN SANDYPORT
TOWNHOUSE: 3 bed 8 bath
home in Gated Community.
Canal and lagoon views. Lo-
cated close to shopping,
schools and_ entertainment.
$499,000.00

DELAPORT TOWNHOUSE:
Oceanfront 3 bed 2 bath town-
house with ocean views from
every room. Stand-by genera-
tor. Gated community in Cable
Beach area. $595,000.00

LOTS

FOX HILL: Approximately
6,100 sq ft lot with duplex belt
course. $92,000.00

YAMACRAW Single family
lots approximately -6,253 Sq.
Ft. Starting $95,000.00

CORAL HARBOUR LOTS:
Single family lots approxi-
mately 8,000 Sq. Ft. Starting
$99,000.00

WEST BAY ST. SAFFRON
HILL: Single Family lots start-
ing $175,000.00

Sandy Beach ROSE ISLAND
LOTS: Great lots 100’ beach-
front. Approx. 13,350 sq _ ft.
$180,000.00 Each

MULTI FAMILY WEST LAKE
PLANTATION: 9,100 Sq. Ft.
Lots starting $200,000.00

BEACHFRONT LOT — OCEAN
CLUB ESTATES-EXCLUSIVE:
Unique lot with white sandy
beach in Exclusive Gated
Community on Paradise Island.
$4,990,000.00

JACK ISAACS
REAL ESTATE
CALL: 322-1069
info @ bahamasproperty.com

www.bahamasproperty.com

FOR SALE.
MULTI-FAMILY LOT
10,566sq.ft.
Westridge Estates North -
paved road, underground

utilities. Ideal for 4 condos.
$159,000.00
Bank Financing available.
Telephone 325-1325,
422-4489, 477-0200.





LIGHTBOURN
REALTY

HOMES/APARTMENTS

7114 Baycroft Apartment. 1 bd,
1 bth.,Off Eastern road. Great
for First Time Buyer. $165,000

7155 Canal front home. 2 bed,
2 bath. $299,000

TRIPLEX/DUPLEX

7119 Triplex-3 bed/2 .bth plus
2-1 bed/1 bth. $310,000

7137 Reduced Duplex, be-
tween Blair and Village Rd.
$319,000

LOTS
7136 Large Multifamily lot Kool
Acres $120,000

6997 Triplex
$140,000

6234 Venice Bay 10,000 sq. fi
lot. Owner financing $99,900

lot. 8,525 sq.ft.

5471 South Ocean Estates
11,700sq.ft. lot. Owner financ-
ing $155,000

Tel: 242-393-8630-7
sales @coldwellbankerbaha
mas.com
www.coldwellbankerbahamas.
com

HOT!! HOT!!
Recession Listings
Allen Dr. off Carmichae!

50x79$49,000

Carmichael Rd. 50x75

$40,000

Dorsette Sub. corner lot 50 x
100 $73,000

Pine Wood/ Bread Fruit St. 50
x 100 $65,000

Royal Paim St. off Mackey St.
new 2Bedrm Hse.$145,000

Woods Alley off Markey St.

new 2Bedrm,2Bth, hse.
$150,000

Yellow Elder corner lot, off Be-
thel Ave. 3Brm,1ibth Hse.
$110,000

Elizabeth Est. corner lot,
3Bedrm, 2bth hse. $135,000
Stapleton Grd. 2Brm. Api
$150,000

Centerville/ Hampton St. 50 x
100 $75,000

McKinnie Dr. opp.Hostel 60 x
100 $76,000

Ask about da
recession special
434-2044



sails 22, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010



FOR SALE
WESTRIDGE: 1.0148
Acre Lot, :
$330K Net. Serious
enquiries only.

Call 457-4185 to view.

BLESSED ROCK

REALTY
TELEPHONE
341-4303, 558-3890/454-1702

Coral 80x100,

99,500.00
Off Pineyard 52x140, $60,000

Off Carmichael Rd, 52x110,
71.550.00

Off Soldier
$57, 000.00

Off Carmichael Duplex Lot,
60x108, $86,000.00

Harbour,

Road, 50x100,

Spring Field, 60X100,
$79,000.00 :
Carmichael Rd, 57x106,
$65,000.00

Off Carmichael Rd, 50x130,
$90,000.00

Fox Hill Duplex Lots, BOx100.
$60,000.00

Chippingham Duplex _ Lots,
97x50, $65,000.00 :
Chippingham Duplex Lots,

50x97, $60,000.00

Coral Horbour Residental Lot,
60x150, $108,000.00

Coral Breeze Gated, 75x100,
$99,500.00

St. Andrews Beach, 90X90,
$123,000.00
Bacardi Road, 80x100,
$90,000.00

Yuma Estates Gated, 65x100,
$95,000.00

Serenity, 60x100, SERIO: -00

: ued Gardens, @x100,
$75,000.00
eer Hills, -60x100,
$75,000.0

South Ocean Estate, 100x124
$158,000.00

TecBEAGES

Off Airport Road, 5 Acres,
$650,000.00

Off Gladstone Rd, 9 Acres,
$1.63 Mil

West Bay Street, 100 ACERS.

$10 Mil ono

Nassau Village 2bed 1bath),

80x100, $120,000.00
Golden Gates '3bd 2 bath,
50x100, $150,000.00
-Village Road Montagu Villas
250,000.00

COMMERCIAL LOTS
Andros PRONE:
$54,000.00
Fox Hill, 70x320, $210,000.00
Prince Charles Near Marco’ Ss
5 Acres, 1.75 mil.

45x100,-

URGENTLY

Vacant Land
Houses, Duplexes/3-plexes
Apartments
Commercial Properties
We buy and Sell

Please call Ludec
393-1183 or 557-3225

anytime.

WINTON HEIGHTS LOT
with hill-top view situated
on 1/2 acre lot size
120x179.

Sold with approved plans
for a 6bed/5bath, 3 storey
house.
Construction completed to
roof.
Asking.$650.000 Net.
Appraised for $762,000.
Serious inquiries only.
No agents!

_ Must see to appreciate.
Phone 477-4741.

APARTMENT
FOR SALE
2-bed, 1-bath,
$250,000
Good commercial
potential
$8,000 back at closing.
394-8568.

APT LOT FOR SALE —

Ph:434-5331
50 x. 130
Cowpen $85, 000 O.B.O
All utilities in
Ask 4 Hanna

3-BED, 2 BATH.
HOUSES
STARTING FROM
$110,000

‘PH: 394-2002.
FAX: 394-6100, |

VENICE BAY :
Ocean front lots starting @
$450,000

Fourplex Lots. starting @
$151,000
Canal front lots starting -@
$275,000
Elevated- lots. starting @
$150,000

Residential
$140,000

Ocean front lot zone for

‘rooms. Hotel or other

commercial use $550,000
Bank or on spot in-house
financing up tp 25 years °

lots starting @

Contact us at Venice Bay’s
Sales Office
Nassau, Bahamas

Emaill: .
venicebay @coralwave.com
or our website
venicebaybahamas.com

a














20



GROSHAM PROPERTY LTD.
Cable Beach Lot for Sale.

Oceanfront lot 80 X 90. Ready
for house to be built.
$310,000.00 Great location,
access to pool & beach.

Ask for R.E. Barnes 327 0806



\
Limited

LOT SALE
LOT IN TREASURE COVE
on the waterfront.
Ideal for boaters, beachlovers.
Has 24-hous security patrol in
a desirable, gated community.
Tel 364-4075.

MULTI-FAMILY PROPERTY
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Located St. Vincent Road
West. 8051-sq.ft
$85,000 0.B.O
Phone: 327-8276,429-4680,
395-8733

DEEDED TIME SHARE
FOR SALE
Availablé time: Red Week
Location: 10 minutes away
Prom Disney, Kissimee, Fla,
Silver Lakes Resort,
Kissimee, Fla
Contact: 242-535-4041

“FOR SALE
3-bed, 2-bath house with
1-bed apartment attached.
Cockburn St, off Bernard Road.
Good investment opportunity.
Reduced price, $160,000 net
$3,000 Rebate
Ph: 357-7922

LOT FOR SALE
(1) Lot #A, off Prince Charles
Drive. Size 5,000sq. ft.
Zoning: Single/Multi-family
Appraised Value is $67,000
Viewing available by appoin-
ment
Please submit all bids in sealed
Envelope on or before August
31, 2010 to
Attention:
Managing Director-
Seaied Bid BIRCCCU
#9 Village Road,
PO Box GT-2944,
Nassau, Bahamas.

BIRCCCU reserves, The Right
To Reject Any Or All Bids
For more information or

. a Co nueoe call
(242%. -0331 et 23/27.

FOR SALE
Soe nei Altea

N
CORAL HARBOUR

2.3 ACRES
OWNER WILL FINANCE
PHONE: 362-1820



1-BEBDROOM with 2 walk-in
closets. Fridge, stove, alarm,
central air, & water.
Cowpen Road west.
362-2435, 422-2702,. 466-5470
4-PLEX PROPERTIES
NEAR SEA
50x139 $90,000
50x143 $92,000
50x147 $97,000
50x150 $99,000
Ph. 359-1439- Pearce
424-0675- Cartwright

ABACO LAND

OPPORTUNITY
MORES ISLAND: Residential
and Commercial Sites
Lowest Price Lots in Abaco
Short walk from. government
paved airstrip. Insurable -tile,
immediate availability
Government Electricity,
telephone service
On Bahamas Government Fu-
ture Development Path.

Tel V Coakley, 455-5329 (D),
465-4889 evenings
Abaco Ocean Club.

GREAT LOCATION!!
2-bed, 2.5-bath. Gated condo
Seaview Drive, The Grove
West. Serious inquires and/or
bank pre-approved only.
Asking $249,000 Net, obo.
362-2240 after 6pm, or
467-3063.

FOR SALE

12 -unit Apartment Complex
2 buildings 6 unit in each.
6 Units already renovated
Great Harbour Cay, Berry is-
lands
Phone:1(242)367-8273/GHC,
225-2193/327-4192/Nassau.

FORA SALE
BERNARD - ROAD: 3-bed,
2-bath, fixer upper, 8,000 plus
sq.ft. Lot $160,000

BOATSWAIN HILL, CARMI-

water,

CHAEL: Lots - multi,
$65,000-$97.000

OFF FAITH AVE _ 80x90,
$75,000

FOXDALE: 2-bed, house,
$130,000

FREDDIE MUNNINGS: 3-bed,
2-bath, off: Prince. Charles,
$217,000

MULTI-FAMILY lot 9,245sq.ft
Cowpen $94,000,

Rd,
5045s. qft. Duplex $65,000

CARMICHAEL: Mult lots, Ge-
neva Brass corner off Allens
Drive, $87,000, 6,600

433-1952, or 324-4441.

FOR SALE

Gated Single Family Lots

Located South West Ridge
Size:60x130, $105,000 Net.

Call 376- 9590, 434-3549

FOR SALE
3-BEDROOM, 2.5-BATH
Townhouse,

Sea Beach Estate central-air.
Ph: 225-2193, 451-0308 cell.






















ARE YOU READY to
Buy or Sell Real Estate, or
need an Appraisal.
Call m Cleare first at
Tel 364-4075.

FOR SALE

BLUE HILL ROAD SOUTH
Lot For Sale 50x100,
73,000 Gross.

- Contact 341-2231.

- FOR SALE BY OWNER
Westwind, gated community
(Love Beach). Residential lot.
6,000sq.ft. $130,000 negotia-
ble. Contact:556-9538.

FOR SALE
Four bed, two bathroom,
beautiful home house for sale
by owner. 225,000.
Phone number 429-5996.

WESTRIDGE: 2 BED, 2 BATH’

UNIT, $155,00 Net
1 BED, 1BATH UNIT,
$105,000 NET
Phone:327-0172/341-7457

WESTRIDGE: Duplex Lot,

$109,000 NET. Phone:
327-0172 or 341-7457

QUICK SALE .
PROPERTY:
COLLAGE GARDENS
By owner $68,000
~ If closed in 30 days, $60,000
Tel:395- 2714/324- 5904.

FOR SALE BY OWNER
3-bed, 2-bath, Golden Gates,
encl yard, a/c, sec bars,
well maintained, must see to
appreciate. $205,000.

Ph 556-8144.

HIGHBURY PARK:
House For Sale by Owner
2 bed, 1 bath & bedroom apv/
efficiency
Asking $199,900
225-1832, 544-1955, 425-1999

KEMP ROAD.
PROPERTY FOR SALE
w/2 2-bedroom houses.
Contact Tasha@
322-3301 ext 4101/429-9913.
Price $100,000.

MULTI-FAMILY LOT FOR
SALE

KOOL ACRES
6,00sq.ft, $80,000 net.
Serious inquiries. Phone
341-2015/434-9546.

TWO STOREY DUPLEX

Townhouses, Sea Breeze,
lots 50x145 aan & sea view,
10,000.
Telephone 393-0897.

MULTI-FAMILY/ LOT,
169 feet X 90 feet or
15,169 sq.ft. (size of two lots)
build 6 - 12 apartments.
Lumumba Lane
(by Sea Breeze
Call 677-5385, 324-6135 or
426-2117

THE TRIBUNE

BAHAMAS

TROPICAL
RearrY

LOTS
* Bellot Rd. Duplex lots
$85,000 with .$4,250. deposit.
Good rental area!

“ Adelaide Duplex & Triplex
lots overlooking Adelaide
Pond. Prices start @ $80,000
with $4,000 down.

* Twynam Heights 80x146
Residential lot. Price reduced
to $160,000 with $8,000 down.

* Kilarney Shores Near to
South Westridge. Approxi-
mately 10,000 sq.feet -residen-
tial lots starting @ $132,000.

Wayne Wells
Bahamas Tropical Realty
(242) 327-1102

+ COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
on Carmichael Road,
100x200, $250,000 Net.
Call Larry, 544-3714.

BRAND NEW DUPLEX
FOR SALES 80% complete.
1°2-bed, 2-bath; 2-bed, 1-bath,
Abbie's Close, off Carmichael
Rd. Perfect location of school,
clinic & food store.

Lot 64x100 & extra space to
add on a 1-bedroom apt.
Must sell. Serious inquiries
only. Asking $195,000. ASAP.

Phone 427-6832. '

HOUSE FOR SALE
3-bed, 2-bath, large yard,
fruit trees, single car garage,
in exclusive quiet neighbour-
hood, High Vista Dr
off Eastern Road.

Only $265,000 net.

Call: 395-0667 for appointment

BEAUTIFUL BEACHFRONT
TOWNHOMES

Gorgeous oceanviews,

~ Located WINTON ESTATES

3,000sq.ft. tri-level,
3-bed, 2.5-bath
Car.garage and much more.
Appraised at $670,000
will accept $589,000.
Rental $4,800.
Contact 1-242-552-0670.



DUPLEX LOT FOR SALE
50 x 100 WindsorPlace South
of Soldier Rd, all utilities,
paved road, good

neighborhood.
$60,000.00
Tel: 325-1325 or 422-4489





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 23



SEACESTRIET ||
FOR SALE

BY OWNER
Single Family
100 x 60
Westwinds Subdivision
$115,000.00
Phone: 424-0035



FOR SALE
Lot of Land 60’x100’, Blue Hill
Road opposite Commonwealth
Bank near Golden Gates Shop-
ping Centre.
Phone 356-2592, 449-9169, or
324-6824 after 7pm.

. LOTS FOR SALE
Off St Vincent Road.
Call 356-5973, or 376-7553.

NEWLY REFURBISHED
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath condo in
single story building. St.
Albans Drive. Kitchen
appliances, central air,
washer/dryer combo.
$127,500.00
Tel: 325-1325 or 422-4489

TURN-KEY BUSINESS
FOR SALE
». M.H.Abaco.
Start making money instantly.
Serious inquiries only
Phone:242-458-5137
E-mail:
jwsignature @ gmail.com



1-BEDROM. Fridge/stove, sofa

set
blinds, water
Off McKinney
341-5268.

1-BEDROOM APT Cable
Beach, fully furnished, pool,
patio, central air, electric gate.
Close to beach and shopping,
$1300. Tel - 327-2694,
557-8980.

1-BEDROOM APT,
Nassau Village. Water, a/c,
blinds, washer, dryer. $550.

393-4454/394-1880.

1-BEDROOM APT, light,
water, cable, $600/pm, first,
last plus $400 sec.
448-7699, 535-5114,
393-4529.

—_——
1-BEDROOM UNFURNISHED
APT South Beach, w/cable,
b/bars. $575/mth, first, last,
$330 sec) 376-0774/392-5923.
No pets/children.

washer/dryer stackable,
included. $700.
Close Cr.

NEW HUGE 2-bed, _ 1-bath,
water, a/c, security bars,
washer/dryer facilities,

$700/pm. 434-2650/361-6836.

NAIL & HAIR BOOTH
FOR RENT

1 Barber booth for rent.
Ph: 361-8536

BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED

1 bedroom cottage. Gated
community near Old Fort Bay.
~ 1 person. Utiliites included.

First, last & security required.
$1,050/mnth.
Ph: 362-6451/455-6267



[FOR RENT | RENT | FORRENT | RENT | FORRENT | RENT

2-BED, 2-BATH APT,
all utilities included, quiet area,
fridge, stove, washer/dryer,

$1,150/pm.
557-9975, 323-7302,
322-2960.
2-BED, 2.5-BATH, semi-fur-

nished condo. Located Lee-
ward East. First, last and sec
dep. Call 364-8664, 436-0028.

2-BEDROOM APT
OFF Soldier Road,
Water and a/c.
$675/mth, $300 sec dep. Phon
535-9806/394-7469.

2-BEDROOM .- Light & water
give per week. 456-0943, East
t.
2-BEDROOM APARTMENT
7 WITH WATER NEAR
3C’S FOOD STORE,
SOnRieP Ree. VILLAGE.

=
364-8831/364-8304/395-0370.

2-BEDROOM APARTMENT,
townhouse styled, _ furnished.
washer/dryer, central air, cable
and telephone ready, water in-
cluded. Colony Village East,
near private high school, shop-

ping plaza. Ideal share for pro-
fessionals.Tel: 324-6182 or
557-2555

‘'2-BEDROOM APARTMENT.
Alarm, a/c and water in-
cluded.$750/mth, first, last&
$500 sec dep.
364-6688/467-1365.

' 2-BEDROOM APARTMENT.

Water, cable, gas, internet,
bars, a/c. $700/mthly.
Ph: 324-6435/636-7339
Eastern Area

2-BEDROOM APT, Carmichael
A/C, bars and water included.
$625/pm, $300 sec dep. Ph
364-4637/422-4799.

2-BEDROOM APT, kitchen,
living room, 1-bath for rent.
Tel 359-3712, 394-6487,
Mrs Brown

2-BEDROOM Sea Breeze, un-
furnished.
2.-bedroom apt, Market Street.
557-8069.

2-BEDROOM, 1-BATH, $700.
First, last, security.
1-BEDROOM, 1-BATH, $600.

First, last, security Marathon
Estates. Ph: . 393-7900 or
394-2122

2-BEDROOM, 1-BATH, fully

furnished apt with sec_ bas,
alarm, a/c in Carmichael Pines.
$725 per month & /4300 sec
dep. Ph 341-0637, or
422-2267.

2-BEDROOMS, 1-BATH APT,
off Gladstone Road.
Security system, fridge, stove,
ceiling fans, water, included.
Call 325-5228 after 5:30pm.
Must see!!

2-BED, 2.5-BATH Townhouse.
Pristine beach near Love
Beach. Fully furnished.
$2,200/pm. 423- *g246

2-BED, 2-BATH APT in West-

ern area. Includes: fridge,
stove, washer, dryer, C/air,
c/fans, bars, alarm sys.

$1,200/mth. Call 424-0577.

2BED/2BATH VILLA - PI pri-
vate pool, double enclosed ga-
rage, generator, central and
individual a/c units; security
alarm and bars; roll down hurri-
cane shutters; additional water
holding _ tank. $3,000 _ per
month. Call 457-4185 to view.
Serious inquiries only.

3-BED, 2-BATH HOUSE in
Eastern area. Partly furnished.
Security bars and alarm. Good

neighbourhood. $1,500. Tel
456-7353
3-BED, 2.5-BATH HOUSE,

fully furnished, $2,600. Cable
Beach, 424-1030, or 327-5448.

A FULLY FURNISHED one
bedroom efficiency for rent. All
utilities included, $200.00 per
week. Call:341-2579.

APARTMENT FOR RENT
2-bed, 2.5-bath
Appliances eDual A/C
Generator *Electric gates
Water incldued.
$1,300/month deposit required,
Contat 424-5683

APARTMENT FOR RENT
Oakesfield, Crawford St.
$650.00 per month.
Tel: 552-5541, or 428-3210.

APARTMENT FOR RENT
Semi-furnished, two'bed, one
bath, off Carmichael Road.
436-7838, or 362-0605.

. APT FOR RENT $700
2-bed, 1-bath, semi-furnished,
central-air Faith Ava,
557-0170.

airy, one bedroom
apartment in Palmdale.
Secure, upstairs location.
New everything!

Fully furnished .

Water incldued.

$750 per month.
Phone:422-3534/325-3177



BARBER BOOTH FOR RENT
$100/wk 2-5 years experience
needed. Fanciers Road. Des-
tiny Plaza

Tel 323-0664, ‘427-5378.

BEAUTIFUL ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT, On hill off
Soldier Rd. Stove, fridge,

security bar, a/c , hurricane
shutters, water included, $650

a month, $500 security deposit,

1st and last rent is required.
Call 432-7338

BLAIR ESTATE
town house for rent brand new
and fully furnished end unit
priced for only 2000.00 P/M.
Two bed, one and a half bath,
laundry room. Unit is approx.
1300 square feet.
Call 376-5422

BOOTH FOR RENT
Hair stylist & Barber
Trendsetters, 6th Street.
PH 467-6559, 327-8827.

2-BEDROOM, 1-BATH, water
included, $700/mth, first, last,
$350 sec. McKinney Drive, off
Carmichael

1-bed, 1-bath, water included,
$550,/mth first and last Farring-
ton Rd. 323-2378, 457-3864.

BOATSWAIN HILL, Carmi-
chael Road West, furnished ef-
ficiency, w/bars, light, water &
cable included, $650 _ per

month, first, last plus $300 sec’ -

BOATSWAIN HILL, furnished,
two bed, 1.5 bath, w/b, light,
water & cable included. $800
per month, first, last plus $400
sec,

Phone 328-1150, 565-8018.

BRAND NEW!!
Two, one-bedroom apts.
Includes water, cable & a/c.
Phone: 426-7004 or 467-7377

CABLE BEACH
ONE-BEDROOM APT,
FULLY FURNISHED,
ALL UTILITIES
INCLUDED:

WASHER/DRYER, A/C,
TEL, CATV, INTERNET.
$1200/MTH, $300/SD.
TEL:327-2184



CABLE BEACH,
3-BED, 3 1/2- BATH,
TOWN HOUSE, A/C,

FULLY FURNISHED, POOL,
ELEC GATES, EXECUTIVE
QUALITY, CLOSE TO BEACH,
SHOPPING, BUS.
SEVERAL AVAI.
$2,200 TO $2,500.
327-2694, 557-8980.

fur-
nished, 2-bed apt by Sandals.
$1,300/pm.
Tel 535-1118.

CABLE BEACH, secure,

COLONY VILLAGE,
unfurnished 2-bed, 1 bath apt,
$750 p/m.
1furnished,2-bed,2-bath apt,
$950 p/m. Includes s/bars,
s/lights,wall a/c,c/fans,laundry
facilities,water, 1st & last rent +
security, year lease.Phone:
429-4725, 359-7039, 357-8042

COMMISION OR BOOTH
RENTAL
Barbers, Hair Stylist, Nail Tech.

Phone: 362-2284

COWPEN ROAD WEST:
2-bed, 1-bath apt, $600/mth,
first, last $300 sec dep. Water,
cable, a/c included. Phone
376-6083. F
DELAPORTE Beautiful
apartment 6th floor, panoramic
‘ sea views. Furnished
2-bed, 2-bath, security, pools,
on the ocean i
$2, 500 per month. 424- 1738.

DELAPORTE BEAUTIFUL

APARTMENT |
Sixth floor, paroramic sea
views. Furnished 2-bed,
2-bath, security, pools, on the
ocean, $2,500 per month.
424-1738

EFFICIENCY APT |
very small SANS SOUCI
* $500/month i
Semi/furnished, utilities
included Internet, |
1 person only. 448-9788

FOR RENT/SALE SPACIOUS

2 bed, 1 bath split lével Condo.
Sans Souci
426-9765/361-5043

FOR RENT

EFFICIENCY FOR RENT
quiet Neighborhood
Eastern Estates
$500/month 1st/last/security
Semi/furnished
light/water/Internet, single
person only. 449-8622

EFFICIENCY FOR RENT:
Sunset Park, Carmichael. Fully
furnished, all utilities included.
No children. 4550/pm, first, last
7 security. $300.

APARTMENT: Rocky Pine, off
McKinney Drive, Carmichael. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, refrigerator,
central air, water included.
$780/pm, security $500.

No children. Call after 6pm,
361-7658. Available August 31,



EXECUTIVE HOMES
PARADISE ISLAND"
2-bedrooms, $1800,
3-bedrooms $4,000
EAST, $1,200, $1,500 and
$ 000. R

2,

WEST 2-bedroom, $1500,
3 bedroom $2,000, $3,800,
$2,5000. Much more
Tel:393-0868,393-2559 or
454-1230 Cell

EXTRA LARGE, nicely’ fur-
nished 1 bed apt, carpet, ceil-
ing fans, a/c, centrally located,
private subd, secure & quiet,
water & gas included.

Tel, cable and laundry avail.
Must see to appreciate. $695,
or $680/pm. Phone 393-5014

FIRE TRAIL ROAD spacious
2-br, kitchen, dining, living,
laundry room a/c, water in-
cluded. $750/pm & $400 dep.
Tel 392-4228, 456-9618,
424-4867.

FOR RENT

Near Palmdale area. One
bedroom apts for one person
only. Basic furniture. Also two

rooms for commercial use.
Good character/job references

required. Tel:394-1846 and

393-3324

FOR RENT
Telephone
364-235. 394-3974
477-3706

MONESTARY PARK: 3 _ bed-
room, 2 bath, front room, dining
room tv, room, large kitch,
walking distance to. St
Augustine's College, Kingsway
Academy and W Young
School. Ideal for QC teachers
as well.,$1,500. Can be fur-
nished at $1,725 per month.

QUAIL ROOST RIDGE: 3 bea-
room, 2 bath apartment, fridge,
stove, washer and dryer in-
cluded. $1,500 per month (near
St Andrew's and St Anne's
School).

JOHNSON ESTATE: Large 1
-bedroom, 1.5 bath and stove
$650 per month, can be fur-
nished at $725 per month.
(Near Kingsway Academy)

JOHNSON ESTATE: Effi-
ciency apartment, furnished,
water, light and cable included.
$625 per month.

HAIR BOOTH FOR RENT
PHONE 376-0101

‘water,

FOR RENT |



FOX HILL near Carla’s Pizza,

unfurnished 2-bedroom __ apt,
$650/mth, first, last and $500
sec dep. Water included.
Phone 364-391 2/324-3296.

FULLY FURNISHED
1-bedroom.and 2-bedroom
apartment in Mona and Hope
Road, Jamaican, 5 min for UWI
adequate water supply!!!
US $1200
Call:1876—382-3015,
jagga @cjamaica.com

FULLY FURNISHED b/n, effi-
ciency, burglar bars, a/c, light,
gas, cable, internet,
quiet area. Close to Pl/Palm-
dale. $750/mth, first/last + $300
sec dep. 393-6876/225-1528.

FURNISHED 1-BEDROOM
APT, burglar bars/ceiling fans,
a/c/water & light included, $700

monthly. Eastern Area.

FURNISHED COTTAGE
FOR RENT in Seven Hills,
2-bedroom, 2 bathrooms,
living, dining and kitchen
for $850p/m. Phone: 361-7659

FURNISHED EFFICIENCY
all utilites including phone &
cable. $160/pw. Also furn A/G
room, all utilites including
phone cable and TV.$180/pw
Phone 357-4753, 454-2148, or
436-6527.

FURNISHED ROOM
FOR RENT Sandilands Village,
$450 per month.

Cell 454-7840, (H) 676-2201.

FURNISHED ROOM for rent
Single males only. All utilities
included. $100 per week.
Phone 392-3944.

FURNISHED STUDIO, 1-bed-
room Rocky Pine Rad, all utili-
ties, no kids/pets. Quiet mature
persons only. You must have-a
car, $400 to move in. $550
monthly. Phone: 434-8340 or
341-4365

HANNA ROAD: 2-bedroom apt
includes water, blinds, washing
facilities, fridge and_ stove,
$700 per month, sec dep $200.
Phone 477-4422.

HANNA ROAD: Large 2-bed-
room apartments, includes wa-
ter, security bars, blinds, a/c
and washing facilities, $750 per
month, sec dep, $200. Phone
327-6899.

HOUSE FOR RENT, 3-bed,
2-bath, unfurnished. Excluded
water. Garden Hills #3.
424-31 Sr), 364-3426 after
9pm.

IDEAL FOR young profession-
als, teachers. 2 bedroom, fully
furnished, includes water, Pine
Yard Road, off Fox Hill Road
opp the prison. Serious inquir-
ies only, Z7am- 11pm,
364-7882.

IMPERIAL PARK APT for rent.
Utilities | included. $700/pm.
Phone 324-1991.

NEED AN APARTMENT
CALL MR ROLLE, 324-4309.



PAGE 24, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

The Tribune



JOE FARRINGTON ROAD.
New. 1 bed unfurnished Apt.
A/C, c-fans, bars, huge _ kit,
bath, bed, closet. Water incl.
$595/mth, first/last/ sec $300.
Tel:364-8911, 302-9016.

LEEWARD EAST
New 2-bedrooms, 1-bathroom
apartment
quiet cul-de-sac, off street
parking, good yard space
Price: $147,000.00
Call: 242-359-1764 anytime

2 BEDROOM, unfurnished.
$850. L & w included.
Sea Breeze.

Tel 544-8099, 327-0039.

2-BED, 1-BATH SPACIOUS
APT. Stapleton are,water,
security bars, cable/phone
ready. Phone: 554-7582

2-BED, 1-BATH, fully furnished
apartment, Prince Charles
Drive, immaculate condition,
washer, dryer and water in-
cluded. $875.00 per month, se-
curity deposit $875.00. Tel
324-0627.

LOVE BEACH COTTAGE,
3-bed, 2-bath, furnished,
enclosed garden deck, beach
across road, $2,100. 457-4911.

LOVE BEACH fully furnished,
1-bed/bath apartment. Water
included. Phone 467-6559,
327-8827, 434-4691.

NASSAU VILLAGE,
2 bed apt, fan, water, bars
included. $600/mth.
Tel 393-8991/427-3426.

NEW 1-bed apt, Blue Hill
south. Stove, water, a/c, cus-
tom cabinets included.
454-4477.

NEW 1-bed, efficiency. Water,
light, good security. $150/pw,
$600 to move in . Blue Hill Rd

opp St Agnes Church.
322-1031, 466-8372.

NEW 1-bedroom apt, spacious,
quiet area, off Prince Charles,
all utilities. 364-6921, or
454-4653

ST. ANDREWS BEACH EST.
2 bedroom, 1° bathroom apt.
Central air, security bars,
fenced in yard, fridge and
stove.$750 per month,$500
security deposit. Ph: 364-2770
or 558-7471

NEW OFFICE SPACE
‘for lease 630 sq ft, Harrold Rd
West, move in ready (tiled,
painted, bathroom fixtures,
» A/C, security keypad)
Ph: 356-7502

NEW RENOVATED one-bed-
room apt for rent, Sandilands
Road, ai-condition, stove and
utilities included. $625 monthly.
Call 324-0737.

ONE-BEDROOM APART-
MENT for rent $550 a month,
store, a/c and water included.

Located in Johnson Road.

Call: 357-9477 for more info
ask for Mr Wells.

TAKE-AWAY FOR RENT,
700.

$
324-8539/327-2025,
call after 7pm. ’



mail:

“FOR RENT





NEWLY RENOVATED
TRIPLEX building 1-bedroom,
fully furnished, security bars,
water, first, last plus security
deposit. $750/pm
2 bedroom,central air,

washer/dryer, security bars,
water. First, last, $800/pm, sec
dep $500, ready Sept.
361-5305/457-3423

NICELY FURNISHED ROOM
near Bay. Starting at $125.
All utilities included.
325-3939, 327-8271,
Cell 357-4214

OAKSFIELD, 2-bed, 1-bath

apt, unfurnished. Incl: water,

~ very nice & safe complex.
$650. 445-0165.

OFF CARMICHAEL
2 bed, 1 bath, $700/mth
OFF CHARLES SAUNDERS,
$690.00/mth
Tel 702-1540(day),
341-4912(night).

ONE - TWO BEDROOM
FOR RENT. Light $600/mth,
first and last. Ph 393-2025.

ONE AIRCONDITIONED
APARTMENT, SAN SOUCI,
avaiable now, completely
furnished, one bedroom apt,
full bathroom with large walk-in
closet, full kitchen, including full
tank of gas, washing machine,
all appliance are brand new.
Utilities included: Light, water
and cable, premises is internet
and telephone ready. $900 first
and last month, yearly rent
agreement preferred.
Single occupancy - preferred.
Ideal for professional person.
Quiet environment, premises
are enclosed.

Ph: 364-8072, 326-7218

ONE BEDROOM APT
; SMITHVILLE.
CALL AFTER 5, 364-5691.

ONE BEDROOM APT
MARSHALL
RD SPACIOUS Burglar Bars,
A/C, Laundry Facility, Water
included, Semi-furnished
$675.00 First & Last Month;
Security Deposit $400.
Tel: 392-3149

ONE BEDROOM semi-
furnished apt in the Western
district,near beach and airport.
Very quiet/electricity and water
included. Asking $950/pm.
Contact 327-7177 Mr. Stuart

ONE BEDROOM, Carmichael
Road, fridge, stove, blinds,
A/C, $675/mth, first, last+ $500
sec. 364-7183, 428-1944.

ONE BEDROOM. Newly reno-
vated apt, fully furnished, utili-
ties included, partially air-con-
ditioned, cable and_ internet
available, secure grounds and
surroundings, conveniently lo-
cated within walking distance
from public schools, grocery
stores, and public transporta-
tion, #5 Granada_ Crescent,
Golden Gates #2. Phone
242-341-5554, 448-7532.

PALM TREE AVE: Spacious,
1-bedroom apt includes, water,

a/c, washing facilities, stove,
security bars and __ blinds,
$600/pm, sec’ dep $200:

Phone 327-6899

| FORRENT | RENT.

QUIET NASSAU EAST. 1-bed

apt, fully & tastefully furnished

light, water, private parking.
$700/pm, Sh last & $400-de-
posit. 364-72

Telephone 322-1986.
Sleselfieds @1n0buner ae net

| FORRENT | RENT

ROOM FOR RENT
Furnished, water and light free
. Foxdale
Please call 324-2153,
cell 432-3561.



RAWSON COURT
Cable beach, gated community
with security, $2500 square
feet, 3-bed, 3.5 bath, ocean
view, pool and beach assess,
fully furnished,water included,
$3000 per month. Call
676-2903 for more info

Rent-To-Own $20,000 down
Camperdown/Sans Souci
area, 2-bed 21/2-bath, turnkey
townhouse fully furnished,
(office) second bedroom,
security system/stainless steel
appliances/recessed lighting,
W&D/generator, landscaped
yard, 2-car driveway, In-suite
master bath, $2,550/month.
324-9150/324-8527.




REALTY

_iSH asta

Gack ISAACS.



RENTALS

WEST BAY STREET HOUSE:
Lovely 3 bedroom, 2. bath
home located in Cable Beach.
Fully furnished . Alarm system,
central a/c Mature tropical
arden $3,000.00 Web Ref:
0709

DELAPORT TOWNHOUSE:
Three storey townhouse on the
ocean’s edge, views’ from
every room. 3 bedroom, 3
bathroom fully furnished central
air and_ stand-by generator.
$3,500.00 Web Ref: 39409

Vista Marina THE GROVE :
Beautiful 4 bed 3 bath house.
Traditional Bahamian home ex-
terior with modern __ interior.
Beautiful enclosed yard with
mature and _ flowering trees.
$3,900.00 Web Ref: 36509

OCEAN VIEW HOUSE:
Ocean views from: terraced
community on West Bay St.
Lovely 3 bed 3 bath home with
pool. $4,500.00 Web Ref:
34809

SANDYPORT COTTAGE: 3
bedroom, 3 bath property is
conveniently located in the
ated community of Sandyport.
andy canal beach private
dock. Notable features; ; spa-
cious kitchen, covered carport,
screened in porch, alarm sys-
tem and 2 central air units
servicing each floor. $4,500.00
web Ref:42609

JACK ISAACS

REAL ESTATE

CALL: 322-1069
info@ bahamasproperty.com
www.bahamasproperty.com

RENTAL
SHOP/OFF SPACE
Beauty Salon
For Sale
Food store appliances.
Phone 565-0757, or 323-5905,

ROOM FOR_- RENT. East
STreet. Utilities included.
Phone: 558-3555

ROOM IN PRIVATE HOME,
single person only, must be
working. Ph:361-2498,
(cell)465-7916. call after 7pm.
$110-wk, $250 to move in.

SEA BREEZE LANE,
semi-furnished,
fridge/stove/washer/ dryer,
central-air, water included.
$850/mth, first/last/sec dep.
Phone 429-4829, 393-0002.

SEMI-FURNISHED, one _ bed-
room apartment. Fox Hill, $600
per month, first and last with
$200 deposit. Phone: 364-0014

SINGLE FAMILY two _ bed-
room, one bathroom, enclosed
yard, security bars, first & last
rent, cable included. $700 per
month plus $500 security de-
posit. Located in Golden Gates
#1. Tel 364-7064/324-6937.

SMALL ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT located in rear
of building $550 sec, no last
month payment. If has A/C,
burglar bars, security gates
and includes, light water, cable
and internet. Tel: 467-9035.

SPACIOUS ONE-BEDROOM
APT, all utilities “included,
stove, fridge and cable.
$750/pm, $400 sec dep.
456-4049, 425-9688.

SPACIOUS, 3-BED, 1-BATH
House, located Tall Pines Es-
tates, Cable & Telepohone
ready aoing $850.00 per mth,
1st, Last & Security Deposit re-
quired. Tel: 525-1654.

SPACIOUS, BEAUTIFUL
Highland Park, off Marlin Dr,
3-bed, 2-bath, semi-furnished,
recently rented. C/air, washer,
dryer, water enclosed yard
w/gazebo & carport for only
$2,000/pm. Ph 323-4541, or
322-7032.

2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, newly
built apartment in quiet
cul-de-sal area. Very: spacious,
semi-furnished, security system
ready. First and last month re-
quired $850/pm, security dep,
$500. Water included. Phone
324-7158.

STAPLETON GARDENS:
Spacious 1-bed, unfurn Apt
S/screens, A/C/water. Ideal for
teacher from St John’s or HO

Nash.
Call 502-4745, 10am-6pm;
323-4312 after 6pm.



TWO BED/1BATH
Unfurnished Appt.,

Off Sea-Breeze Lane,
Recently renovated,
air-conditioning, security
screens, cable/Internet ready
$600 monthly, First/Last/



Security
Tel. 324-3155/ Leave message

TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENT FOR RENT.
Carmichael Road West,
one corner after Daron’s.
Fridge,stove,water,security
screen and centrl a/c.
For more information.
$750 per month
Call:242-426-1436.
242-454-4366,

TWO BEDROOM APT, Carmi-
chael. $675 per month, _in-
cludes water, /c, ceiling fans,
close to us stop. 225-4130, or
426-7587

TWYNAM AVENUE, large
one-bedroom, fully furnished,
private entrance, all utilities,
a/c, ceiling fans, water, electric-
ity, telephone, secutlty: bars,
cable, washer/dryer.

394-1637 after 5pm “465-1194

UNFURNISHED, spacious 2
bedroom, newly renovate ‘town-
house style apartment. Ceiling
fans, water included. Blue Hill
Road, opposite SC McPherson
Jr High. $60 per monih, first
and last plus $300 sec dep req.
Please call 362-1431 after
10am to 9pm.

WAREHOUSE
This grand space include a
large storage area; reception
area, 2 office spaces, and an
a/c unit centrally located just off
Robinson Road.

Phone 422-4764/324-3839.
eolng for $450,000 make an
offer.

FOR SALE

WEEKLY RENTAL
Attractive, quiet fully equipped
one-bed apts.

A/C, TV, internet, parking,
laundry. Near downtown & PI.
$250 to $350/week.
Tel:394-1711, cell:565-7283.

WESTWINDS SUBDIVISION:
2-bed,1-bath apt
in gated community.
Water, A/C, stainless fridge,
stove, microwave, washer/
dryer and wooden blinds
included.
Tel:362-2754/502-2371.
: Ask for Esther

LEEWARD EAST- Very quiet

neighborhood. Beautiful town-.

house. Must see to appreciate.
2-bedroom, 2.5-bath, fridge,
stove, washer, dryer included,
$1500 per month.

Call: 466-9323 anythime.
364-1734 (after 5 p.m)



TAKE AWAY RESTURANT-
BAKERY
High traffic area out East.
Reasonably priced.
_ Ph:324-1619

NEW STUDIO APT, fridge &
water included. Carmichael Rd
West. 1 quiet mature adult
only. No kids $475/pm, $300
sec. Ph’436-4629::

LOVE BEACH COTTAGE
3-bed, 2-bath. Gated.
Newly refurbished, fully fur-
nished, private beach & deck.
1 year lease required. $2,100/
month. Contact 424-5683.

(2) 1 BEDROOM APT, water

included. DOmingo Heights.
Tel: 392-3277, 552-6048 or
558-7850 i

THE TRIBUNE










(1) 2 BEDROOM APT.

upstairs, Cowpen Rd. Air Con-
ditioning + water , $400 secu-
rity deposit.

Ph: 558-4864 Mr. Rolle

1 BEDROOM 1 BATH un-furn.
townhouse apt Twynam near
beach, cozy and quiet, $600
p.m , single person only no
Rida/pete,

Tel 467-4556/364-9034, email
sanford5 @ hotmail.com

1 BEDROM APT FOR RENT,
everything included, $550 per
month. Call 392-5043

1 BEDROOM, all utiltiies light,
water, enclosed yard, $650 per
month, 1st, last and $300
security deposit,

C. W Saunders Highway.
Tel:394-5275 after 4 o’clock,
544-0491.

(2) 1 BEDROOM APT,
furnished except bedrom. -
light,water, bars included at the
price of $675 per month. Cable
and phone ready. Contact at
~ 392-0907

1 BRAND NEW, SPACIOUS 1
BED APT. inclusive of central
air, water, L.P Gas 7 Tank,
phone and cable ready. Secure
premises, extra amenities.
Must see, $700 per month.
Phone:364-1715

1-BED EFFICIENCY
light, water, cable included,
20 per week,
$750 to move in. 448-2806.

1-BED, 1-BATH APT
Faith Gardens, fridge, stove,
microwave, water, gas, cable,
internet, a/c, ceiling fans.
No kids, pet, smoking
$700/monthly, $450 security
Tel 341-5918.

1-BED, 1-BATH APT for rent,
South Beach, Summer Haven,
$600/pm, $300 sec dep. Call-
427-6061/361-6061.

1-BED, 1-BATH APT, Bacardi

Road, immaculate condition,
electric gate, fully enclosed,
central air condition, security

system, fridge, stove and water
included. Washer and dryer fa-
cility $700/pm, sec dep $500.
Tel 544-5964

1-BED, 1-BATH, fridge, stove,
central-air, water, gas, cable,
wireless net. S650/pm.

Tel: 558-5451

1-BED, 1-BATH, newly reno-
vated semi-furnished apart-
ment for rent in quiet eastern
area neighbourhood, security
bars water included. Near ma-
jor schools and stores.
$800/pm, first and last moth’s’
rent & security deposit of $500.
Must see to appreciate. Phone
427-3156.

1-BED, 1-BATH, Victoria Gar-

dens, off Gladstone Rd.
$650/mth, 1st, last, $400 sec.
535-4387.

1-BEDOOM, fully — furnished

apt, security screens, electricity
and water. No kids, no pets.
Soldier Road. $550/pm. Tel
357-8106. ;



THE TRIBUNE

2 BEDROOM, large itchen +
living room, central air,

washing machine. $700 p.m,
first, last, $500 security.

Phone: 364-0714 2

1-BEDROOM, 1BATH, fully
furnished apartment with sec
bars, alarm, a/c in Carmichale
pines. $600 per month & $300
ec dep. Phone 341-0637, or
422-2267.

1-BEDROOM, § semi-furnished,
all utilities included, $700/pm.
Quiet area in East. 2 persons
max. Tel 565-3753.

2 1-BED, 1-BATH APT East-
ern area. Electricity, water, ca-
ble, internet included. $650 per
month. Phone 324-2792,
636-2413, 544-5978.

2 BEDROOM APT Sandilands
Village Rd} a/c, washer, dryer,
wooden blinds,
$650/mth, $400 dep.
Phone 324-7545, 425-6629.

WANTS

TO SHARE



LOOKING FOR ROOMATE to
share in private home.
Everything included. First and
last, $400 per month.
Ph:392-5950

MATURE FEMALE to:share

-Apt. Furnished, East area.

Cell 432-0078, text please.
W/l/cable included.

SPACIOUS 2-BED,1-BATH.
Alarm, ceiling fans, fridge,
stove,washer, dryer,cable &
internet. Utilities included,
$140/wk,$680 to move in.
Tel: 357-7273/431-6680

HELP WANTED

: AVON
Want to be an Avon
representative.Be your own
boss or a helper. 50% in
earning.

Tel:326-71 eee or 376-1208
ell
Email:rosedee42 @ hotmail.com
AVON

Buy, Sell or Sign-up.
Telephone:
361-5556, 429-4922
. kempcorp @hotmail.com
*

PROFESSIONAL BARBER &
NAIL TECH
FOR RENT STARTING @ $60
OR COMMISSION.
CALL 356-2311, 535-7026,
565-5379

CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE needed.
Recent high school graduate,
great personality, fast learner,

honest hardworking, well
groomed.
E-mail for intervieww.
Salesdreamjob @ hotmailcom

KINDERGARTEN
WITH EXPERIENCED
TEACHER .
for ages 3-6, guaranteed
beginning reading skills.
Prince Charles oY
Tel:324-0269 |

BOUTIQUE LUXURY HOTEL
EXECUTIVE CHEF
BAHAMAS OUT ISLAND
LOCATION
Dunmore Beach Hotel is seek-
ing an experienced Executive
Chef to assume full responsibil-
ity for the food and beverage
operation of the’ hotel restau-

rant and bar.

ien e 13+ years

as Executive Chef of upscale
restaurant serving sophisti-
cated clientele.

3+ years as Sous Chef of up-
scale restaurant serving so-
phisticated clientele.

Extensive experience planning
and catering for large events

(i.e. weddings, conferences,
etc.) is a must. .
Experience creating menus

and wine lists required.

Strong understanding and
knowledge of the Food and
Beverage operations.

Education: Degree in Culinary
Arts.

Reports to: General Manager.
Chef is fully responsible for
day to day operation of the
food and beverage business.
Financial oversight and sup-
port provided by Owner's cor-
porate office.

Duties:Responsible for the pur-
chasing, receiving and main-
taining of food and beverage
stock.

Solely responsible for creating
and executing the breakfast,
lunch and dinner menu offer-
ings at the high quality stan-
dard expected of a luxury ho-
tel restaurant. i

Responsible for planning and
executing the catering of all
special events held at the Ho-
tel. Develop catering pack-
ages. that demonstrate the at-
tributes that our facility has to
offer.

Recruits and- hires restaurant
staff. Establishes and imple-
ments training regimen for all

restaurant employees’ and
constantly monitors service
quality.

Creates a hospitable culture
through positive, direct inter-
action with staff and guests
daily; Further, trains and man-
ages the restaurant employ-
ees to provide outstanding
service and high attention to
detail to guest needs and re-
quests.

Assures that the restaurant and
kitchen is maintained to the
highest standards of cleanli-
ness, repair and condition at
all times. _Coordinates capital
improvement projects to
maintain/upgrade quality
standards and property im-
age.

Personal Characteristics:Must
be highly motivated, self-di-
rected, with strong initiative
and desire for achievement
and success.

Exceptional customer service
and guest relations skills a
must. A positive attitude and
winning personality are. es-
sential.

Inspiring leader who is respect-
ful ‘of and mentor to staff and
.who can motivate the team to

provide top level service.

Must have excellent communi-
cations skills and be strong
and positive representative of
the hotel and the Owner in
the community.

Must have strong computer
skills, knowledge of restau-
rant systems and processes,
and basic restaurant account-
ing procedures.

Candidates should also be
comfortable living and work-
ing in a small island environ-
ment and be willing to be-
come an active participant in
that community.

Management Position: Yes

Position Available: Immedi-
ately
To apply: Submit your re-

sume to PO Box EL-27122
Harbdur Island, Bahamas

MATERIALS ENGINEER
Qualified & experienced mate-
rials Engineers to ASTM stan-
dards & FDOT '99
Required for:

1. Soils Testing

2. Marshall Mix Designs

3. Pavement Testing

4. Plant Calibration & Monitor-
ing

5.Concrete Mix
testing :

6. Quality Control and reporting

EXPERIENCED
DIESEL MECHANIC

Design and

Qualifications required:

1. Must have 6 years electrical
experience in the mechanical
field

2. Must have exposure to cat-
erpillar system

3. Must have Caterpillar Dealer
Certificate

4. Must be able to repair en-
gine hydraulics transmission
under carriage and power
train

5. Must be able to maintain die-
sel equipment

QUANTITY SURVEYOR
lificati

1.Minimum of 5° years experi-
ence in road_ construction
through all of its technical as-
pects

2. Managing Road construction
projects from estimating, con-
tract letting payments

3. Client liaison through to con-
tract completion and final set-
tlement of account

4. Liaise with construction site
crews to ensure proper and
timely construction of projects

5. Repeating of interim and fi-
nal account valuation

6. Claim preparation

7. Budgets & financial reporting

8. Disputing Resolution

GENERAL LABORER
Qualifications required:

1. Must. be able to utilize lute
machines

2. Must be able to build plat-
form

3. Must be able to shovel &
clean ground facility of resi-
due

Please Fax resumes to:
(877-2193,
Human Resources Manager :

[FARM ‘LABOURER
-West End? Full time: nor 7143.

VACANCY

Primary Responsibilities:
-Series 3 completion a require-
ment and current series 7.
Knowledge of investments %’s
& formulas KF, CE, SR and
RA.

Use of Excel and DB software
SQL server.

Test will be issued.

eFully knowledgeable with
CQG, Bloomberg & PATS or-
der systems.

eWork on Asian team hours
9:00 pm — 4:00 am.
(Some-day and extended eve-
ning work on short notice).

eKnowledge of Financial securi-
ties Asia time zone.

Requirements of the Candidate

include:

°6+ years extensive experience
(i.e., nearly exclusive) analyz-
ing securities data including
execution destinations and
pricing schedules.

eMath skills and experience
with numerical computation
and large XLS spread sheets.

eSolid, stable career including:
2 personal and _ professional
references from industry pro-
fessionals. Valid current Driv-
ers license and Passport.

eComfortable with the fact that
the work location may change
unexpectedly.

eAbility to travel and an under-

standing of financial securities

contract law and ISDA _ re-

quired. :

SALARY COMMENSURATE

OF QUALIFICATIONS

ONLY QUALIFIED PERSONS

NEED APPLY (code cm)

To: P.O. Box SS-19098

NEEDED
PUBLIC ADJUSTER, min 25
yrs experience, strong insur-
ance background, ability to

swiftly interpret international
complicated contracts and ap-
ply them.

Provide resume to CopyMaxx,
Collins Ave and 6th Terrace.

Wanted

Cashiers, Cooks, Customer
Service persons for fast food
restaurant

at Airport

Individuals must have worked
at a fast food franchise, takea-
way food outlet or other fast
paced restaurant. Please fax
resume to 323-2154 or email to
info @ gomezcorp.com

A SECURITY COMPANY is
seeking a matured individual to
fill the position of a Custodian.
You must be able to perform
general cleaning duties with lit-
tle or no supervision and pos-
sess the ability to work in a fast
paced environment. Contact
325-6170/4, ‘Mon-Fri, 9am-Spm
for further details.

BARBER NEEDED to work in
busy upscale store.
Centrally located in Palmdale
area. Booths for rent or work
on commission.
Contact Cameron at 326-2642,
357-9895.

needed.

VACANCY

Primary Responsibilities:
eSeries 3, 7 and 63 completion

a requirement.

Knowledge of investments %’s
& formulas SR and STD.
*Preferred past executive of

FCM and member of ex-
change. és
eFully knowledgeable with

CQG, Bloomberg & PATS or- |

der systems.

eHours 6:30 -6:30 p.m..

(Some evening and weekend
work on ee notice).
R ir of th
include:
°10+ years extensive experi-
ence (i.e., nearly exclusive)
analyzing securities data _in-
cluding execution destinations
and pricing schedules.
eMath_ skills and’ experience
with XLS spread sheets.
eSolid, stable career in financlal
related industry

°2 personal and_ professional
references from industry pro-
fessionals.

eValid current Drivers license
and Passport with ability to
travel.

eComfortable with the fact that
the work location may change
unexpectedly.
eAn understanding: of Agricul-
ture and Financial securities

ndidat

transactions. and global cost
structure required.
SALARY _COMMENSURATE

OF QUALIFICATIONS

ONLY QUALIFIED PERSONS
NEED APPLY (code JMC)

To: P.O. Box SS-19098

WANTED: j
2 live-in housekeeper.
Police certificate, referenes
and drivers license a must,
please respond in:
PO Box N7117,
Nassau, Bahamas.

SECRETARY/BOOKKEEPER
needed, full-time/part-time.
Flexible hours. Great for
college student. E-mail resume
to: meldatrading @ hotmail.com
Subject box: HELP WANTED.

SEEKING HANDYMAN to
work around family home
located #36 Milton Sgtreet,
off Market St, $175 per week
Interested person.

Call 328-1002.

COOK, KITCHEN
OPERATOR.
Must be able to cook. $125.00
Mon-Sat
Tel 341-1882, 676-6917.

HAIR STYLIST & BARBER,
Nail Tech.
Ph 467-6559,
327-8827,Trendsetters, 6th St

NEEDED

One experienced Auto Body
Repairman. Contact 393-5635
between 8am-4pm.
REGISTERED NURSE with 15
years experience requirec for
Auskell Medical, Mars’ Har-
bour, Abaco. Please call 1
(242) 326-0070

SALES CLERK needed.
gah 856-2837,.225-46387.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 25



SALES PERSON NEEDED.
Mature female. sales rep.
needed between the age of
18-30. Call 326-2355.

THREE FARM LABOURERS
needed in -Marsh’_ Harbour,
Abaco. Must have experience
w/goats and pigs.
Phone:1-242-559-8473.

EXPERIENCED WINDOW
TINTER wanted for window
Fabrication Company. Please
fax resume 325-6638.

GARDENER needed in
Exuma, to work on farm.
Salary $175.00 per week.
~ Ph 1-242-465-1555.

HARDWARE STORE seeks
persons to give out flyers. Con-
tact firstchoicebahamas @ hot-
mail.com

MAID NEEDED to care for eld-
erly gentleman and do light
housework. 393-3274.

SMITH & KELLY is-in need of
two female Farm Labourers.
Interested persons,
242-367-7004.

TRAVEL AGENT TRAINEE.
Experience not a must, but
could be helpful. Phone
326-2104 between 10am-6pm.

WANTED: 1 - Handyman, 5
days a week @ $250. Contact
A&C Maintenance, 458-2346,
Abaco.

BUS DRIVER FOR ROUTE 21
Tel: 364-0884 8am-10am or
7pm-9pm

BUS DRIVER NEEDED FOR
ROUTE #7A (NO A/C)
Call 323-5519, 525-7936

NAIL TECHNICHAN
to work on Commission.
Phone 376-0101.

SALES SUPERVISOR
Well established equipment
business requires individual to
handle Sales, Customer Serv-
ice and Sales Counter transac-
tions. Must be professional,
computer literate, reliable, cus-
tomer service orientated, parts
& inventory exp. a plus, able to
manage time and work w/ mini-
mal supervision. Excellent Sal-
ary & Advancement Opportuni-
ties Apply - send Resume to
sales @ sebahamas. com. Or fax
to 394-1826 :

call

LICENCED BOAT CAPTAIN
wanted in San Salvador,
full time. 6 day per week day
Charter on motor yachts.
For details send application,
resume and references to:
jlem38134 @ aol.com

Wanted
Manager for
Fast Food Restaurant at

Airport
Individual must have worked at
a fast food franchise or other
fast paced restaurant. Must
know every aspect of a restau-
rant, Inventory ordering, menu
preparation, cashing, customer
service, etc: Please fax re-
sume, to 323-2154 or email to

‘Info @ gomezcorp. com



PAGE 26, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

SENIOR ENGINEER
Primary Re iliti
eDeveloping & maintaining
large scale ‘financial analysis

and applications working di- j

recily with user.

eVery technical role - 30%
analysis, 70% C# and C++ pro-
gramming. \
Require f idate
include:

°7+ years of extensive (i. e.,
nearly exclusive) professional
programming experience in a
client / server environment.

eKnowledge of Sybase®,
SQL® and Xwindows® (Mo-
tif® preferred) & Tibco®.

eExpert in: C++. -Proficient in:
Perl, Tcl and shell scripting.

Test will be issued.

eFamiliar with: Java’ TM, Ver-
ilog HDL, Lex and Yacc.

eMasters degree in Physics /
Engineering or closely related
field.

eStrong math skills and experi-
ence in scientific research.

Test will be issued.

eSome evening and weekend
work due to scheduling is re-
quired.

eLanguages: German as_ sec-

language is preferable.

Current international passport,
valid driver's license and sta-
ble career record.

° ersonal and professional
references

SALARY —_ COMMENSURATE
OF QUALIFICATIONS
QUALIFIED PERSONS

(Code AS). P.O. Box SS-19098



EXPERIENCED FURNITURE
BUILDER AND ' JOURNERY
NEEDED, ten years
experience. Call 426-6642

AN OBU REQUIRES AN
OFFICER FOR "BANK
OFFICE OPERATION”

with proven skills in handling of
FINANCE accounting system,
SWIFT ‘operations, treasury
settlements, IT systems, etc.
Ths candidates should be a
raduate or of equivalent quali-
ication and should have a
minimum of 5 years of working
experience in related ‘areas
with proficiency in Hindi and
English languages. Mon
salary of $2200 (approx).
Interested persons. may
their
resume to 1-242-326- 3969 or
mail it to PO Box N3118,
Nassau, Bahamas,
later than August 20th.”
Selection/rejection of cariidate
is solely at our discretion.
without assigning any reason.

CREW WANTED
(To serve as full deckhand
and guesi services)
Applicants must be: outgoing,
friendly, well-spoken, and a
strong swimmer. Life guard
certificatian’and boating
experience are a plus.
This is a postiion in the »°
hospitalit¥industry and
applicants are required to work
weekend: sealing and

ho

Pudadé. a eee stO%.
Bev j os
ventu “5510







teach/a @gmailcom
vappp@g








AN OBU REQUIRES AN
OFFICER FOR "TRADE

FINANCE AND COMPLIANCE

FUNCTION"
with proven. skills in handling
of FINACLE accounting
system, SWIFT operations,
UCPDC 600, IT systems, etc.
The candidates should be a
graduate or of equivalent quali-
fication and should have a
minimum of 5 years of working
experience in related areas
with proficiency in Hindi and
English languages, Monthly
salary of $2200 (approx).
Interested persons may. fax
their
resume to 1-242-326-3969 or
mail it to PO Box N3118, Nas-
sau, The _ Bahamas,no later
than Aug 20th. Selection/rejec-
tion of candidate is solely at
our discretion without assigning
any reason.

DATA CONVERSION AND

MANAGEMENT OMPANY
has immediate openings for:
Data Entry and Conversion
Personnel.
Candidates should be _ profi-
cient in the use of computers
and the following software:
Microsoft Excel and Access
Adobe Photoshop and Acrobat
pmepage Pro.
Please forward resume to: Hu-
man Resources Manager, the-
BO meee fate com or
PO Box
Nassau, Bahamas.

LIVE-OUT HOUSEKEEPER
WANTED



to look after a young infant and
do light housekeeping. Only
poole with paperwork in or-
ali.. Being able to
on k Filipino janguage is_an
asset and preferred. Call
326-2978, or 544-9181

TWO WORKERS NEEDED to
work on farm.
Call 333-2700, or 554-06021
for info

ee
NEEDED SEPTEMBER, 2010:
Christian Teacher to teach
generat subjects at Jr High
Level in private Christian
School.

Applicants mit meet the fol

towing criteria:

21 7, pabanian or Permanent
2. College ODegree/Teacher

Certificate

3. Minimum 2 years teaching

‘ experience

4° Willing to assist with extra
curricular activities

5. Music or coaching experi-
ence an.asset

Please ~ to:

email resume

OFFICE ASSISTANT for retail
business. Must be a highly
motivated seif- starting
individual with computer skills
and some accounting and
-bd6ok-keeping experience. ;
Required to work 2-3 days per
week but job may evolve into
ull-time epositions: 328-4742, or
324-6413

, CUSTODIAN required by |
me corporate ‘Offi¢e” .

ersBSge SageMane Bho


















A LEADING FIRM IS
SEEKING
FILING CLERK
Job description
eLarge volume
and efficiency.
eCreating employee, client files
and other files regularly
eFaxing. Photocopying
data in putting
eOccasional outdoor work to in-
clude deliveries to other as-
sociated offices
eCover for switchboard when
necessary
eGenerally provide support in a
busy working environment.

filing quickly

and

eMust be mature, enthusiastic,
able to work with little to no
supervision and willing to
learn

°2-3 years experience working
in an office environment is
preferred.

eMust have BGCSE in. English
and Maths in Grade or
above

eProficient in basic computers
and Microsoft Office ‘applica-
tions

eGood organization and com-
munication skills a must.

interested persons must submit

a resume to the following ad-

dress:

Human Resources Department
PO Box CB-11444,
Nassau, Bahamas

2 BARMAID WANTED
between the ages of 18 and 35
years. Phone 428-3084.,

SALES ASSOCIATE




Clothing & Variety Store
Prior eperience with sales is a
-must. Email resume and/or
questions to nassau @



salesperson.net

AN UPSCALE BARBERSHOP
with a unique concept in
grooming for men is hiring hair
care professionals. Barbers
@nust be qualified and/ or
certified. Serious inquires may
contact Robyn at 225-2251/
467-7736 or email
premierbarber@ yahoo.com.

ONE LIVE-IN MAID required
occasionally to cook and to
take care of needs of a small
child. Write P.O.Box EE-15131

CAREGIVER LOOKING — |

for work to take care ofa
elderly person.
Ph: 436-6264

PURCHASING/ANVENTORY
CLERK



Qualifications required:

1. Must be computer literate
with experience in MS Office
and Outlook

2. Must have purchasing and
inventory experience

3. Must be able to. multi task

Please mail resumes to:
P O Box AB-20184
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

BEAUTY SALON in a safe and
busy environment has immedi-
ate openings for a natural hair
stylist, a-children's braidet and,

@ salon’ regare tel B93-GE3g—

daily 10am




1 TEACHER TO TEACH
Grade 1-6
Please call 341-8855

BARBERS WANTED
URGENTLY. Good location.
Call 431-9184 for more info.

ROWIN
Peay Von; is looking
for licensed Pharmacist
and Pharmacy Techni-

cians for full time and
part time

positions. Kindly fax

resumes to 323-0880.





LADY SEEKS job on Sunday
and evenings o care for the
elderly, babysitting, janitorial,
resturants etc. Tel: 466-1594

LADY SEEKS live-in job as
babysitter. Ph:558-7959 or
525-9883

LADY seeks live-in job as
baby-sitter, care-giver or days
work, Call 425-6818.

MATURE LADY seeking days
work 328-0933, 3pm-9pm:

LOOKING FOR A RELIABLE,
dependable plumber

Specialize in roughing, installa-
tions, construction and renova-
tions, repairs,and services. Call
for estimates, ask for Patrick,
465-9391. *

MATURE LADY seeks job as

care taker for elderly, days
work, kitchen helper or
Papysier: Call:455-1344.
Joyce

LADY seeking employment
home caretaker, senior citizen,
babysitting, assistant cook and
office cleaning.
PHONE:325-2187, 431-5995.

MATURE LADY seeks job to
care for an elderly person or a
baby. - Contact. 364-8547, or
525-2396

LADY ‘Sa0ks baby-sitting, care
for the ee or days work.
Could drive.

Call Bev @ 535-0943.

LAD seeks’ day, weekly,
\nightly, evening job. Live-out.
428-2960;

LADY seeks housekeeping or
days work. Phone 552-5403.

LADY seeks job as days work,
baby-sitter. or janitor. Tel
361-7384, or 426-6255.

YOUNG LADY with associate
degree seeking job to work in
private school or business firm.
Tel 323-6513, 423-2650,
433-1366.

LADY seeks job as house-
keeping, days work or look af-
ter an’ elderly person.Live-in or
live-outl

Mon-Fri. Serious inquiriés only.
Pleage call 448-5976

! LADY. -seeks.-job rin astauzant



















to Wwasb Giabes: iclaan: @emare |}

for'the.gidenya Gallt2ar8405.

DUE TO RECESSION, 35
years lady seeks part-time job
as’ housekeeper,
secretary. Call
556-3497.

EXPERIENCED NURSE AID
with Diploma And CPR Certi-
fied seeking job. Available im-
mediately,
Serious offers please call
(242) 468 2045 ar email
(nurseaid75 @ hotmail.com)

HELP URGENTLY

' Nikkie,

Kashela Rolle asking you for a’

job, Monday - Saturday, days
or nights. Kitchen helper, sales
clerk, office cleaning, or shelf
stocking. Tel 556-0960.

LADY seeking live-in job as
baby-sitter. Phone 341-3663.

SUPERNATURAL PRAYERS
& DIVINE DELIVERANCE
Call: 433-7146 for es

TV REPAIRS Free > pickupydrop
off. House calls welcome.
- 322-1031

UNLOCK CODES - ATT CELL
PHONES
As tow as $20. Other networks

slightly higher.
Tel:35 q

'-7273/431 -6680









WHOLESALE
MAC & PANDORA. |
Earn extra cash. Tel 225-2856






















PURE HA
HOT SUMMER SPECIAL
oo Relaxer,treat,clip,style





Designed, Relaxer,

Treat,Clip,Style $30

Weave $50 and up.

~ Lace Cap Applicaton: $i oo
‘i _ Phone: 322-280

\ we

ELEGANTAE LIMO.
SERVICE

erience In Excellence

hat Special Gccasion

An Ex
For
Weddings, Birthday's,
Anniversaries, Funerats
Contact 424.70962.a:73)
Visit our website @emsqe-
www.eventselegantaelinvescist-



waitress, or.










! Alrbrush ..

THE TRIBUNE



GERMAN TRB ee
OFFFERED.
(REM 387. 8822

LOWEST COST EVER!
Make-up application
(grooming, .and. skincare)
seminar available for Summer.
Call for more information
428-0074.

FOR THE BEST IN WOOD |
CABINET, raise and flat panel,
any style and shape. For the
best priceand quality contact
us at 431-6906 /322-7972

SAWYER’S A-1 PAINTING
Boxing cleaning special
Interior & exterior painting.
Free estimates
556-3753/362-1116.






HAIR
BRAIDING,
Shingling,
Comrow,
Twisting,
Locks.

3 weave-in,
micro shingles

lock extension,
$10-$100.

Call
393-8201/

INTERNET - Turn $10 a month
into $1QK a month....no strings
attached.

Aeply at:
pocketwealth1 @ gmail.com

_HEN'S- LANDSCAPING
Major tree cutting
Hurricane Special.
Call us now!
392-4691 ,433-2482.

HAVING PROBLEMS with
_ your Computer?
Can't get online?

Virus problems, software
installation & hardware.
Computer keep freezing up?
Don’t worry we'll fix it
Starting price $40
Tel:242-454-8173 ask for Cliff.

K-93 TRUCKING & CUSTOM
BROKERAGE
Foxdale Subdivision —

P.O. Box

>Fax:242-324-6641
Customs is our business
You pile it we tote-i!!



? French fips
Cheese cakg....
Natural Nails




Pedi/Mani ..

NATURAL HAIR STYLIST
Lock maintenance, braids/rope
twists/kinky twists & cornrows

for adults and kids.
556-7290/3G62-12 16.

“OUTSOURCE ACCOUNTING
AND

_ BOOK-KEEPING SERVICES

available now. BBA and:CPA
Call 565-Gd. Safar. 392hRQGEG0R



THE TRIBUNE

\



MIKE’S JANITORIAL
SERVICES 3

We provide area rug cleanin
Unlike other machines used to
clean area rugs. Our machine
does not only clean the area
rug it maintains the colour of
the area rug, removes stains
and odour, and keeps your
area rug feeling soft.
We'll come at your house and
pick your area rugs up, clean
them and drop them off the
same day.

For more information call
448-7808, or 558-5634, or
you could e-mail us at
mikescleaning @ live.com

ARE YOU MEETING your fit-
ness goals? J

eDo you spend late nights at
the office and ignore your fit-
ness gas?

eAre you a beginner in the
world of exercise and need
some direction?

eAre you a mature individual
who wants to feel ten years
younger?

eDo you have aches and pains
that would go away with con-
sistent workouts?

Call 422-5061 for a free per-
sonal training session with an
ISSA certified personal trainer.

CALL GRASSHOPPER
LANDSCAPING & HOME
MAINTENANCE
For all your yard maintenance,
Trash Removal, Pressure

Cleaning, Painting.
Ph:364-8854
Cell:426-4224

CAR PARTS
Let me help you fine any car
part that you need.
Phone 428-9767

CARPENTRY, PAINTING,
FENCING Sign Installation and
much more. Call Andrew,
468-6267, 558-3552.

COMPUTERS, TVs
(LCD and Plasma)
and printer repairs, password
removal. Onsite repairs, or
pickup and aoe.
Phone 393-0715/535-5702.

wise ae
eddin;

Contact 424-7096 email
duchess1905 @ hotmail.com

SIZZLING SUMMER
SPECIALS

Ropestwisl é.32$70.00-22 fo

Kinky twist ......$35.00

cunaee ‘agavestes eos

Kids eyes aanes 10.00
hone:324-7883.







‘| Tel:325-5060

. PATIO SALE
Windsor place #46 Yellow Apt
opp corner.

Back to School Patid Sale,
children’s clothing, girls khaki
skorts hoes, books, small
household items, and
much more.
Saturday, August 14th

5 DAYS OF



“Back To School Revision"
August 16-20, 2010
From 10:00am - 1:00pm
Grades K-9 in
Maths, English and Reading
Contact 392-1173 or
Email:adeltisbs @ hotmail.com

ADA IMPORT/EXPORT
For the best price in all your
building needs Windows,
Doors, PVC Decking, PVC
Doors: and PVC Fencing and
lots more
(We Do Special Orders).

Call us at (242)544 3198 or

* email us at ‘ 8 to 3pm,
adaimportexport @ hotmail.com) Wulff Road near Tom Maes
Pharmacy



AVON
Helpers wanted make between
15%-40% commission plus
receive bonuses gift certificate
free products, etc.

FOR SALE
Attractive Hurricane Shutters
Built to order for double
windows $190

Call Mon — Fri, 3-10pm, Singles $100
Pay Se Orth: Ph: 426-8704
5 . \
Â¥ ; FOR SALE
HAIR CLASSES . living room set

EVERYHING INCLUDED
Ph: 322-2801- 565-8190

KIDS KINGDOM

Registration:
or struggling students who
need to learn in a smaller
environment. Space in limited
Phone 324-5220



Black 3 pc,
,000

Black 6 seat dining room set

and china closet $800 each

Black GE Whirlpool side by

side ice/water refrigerator $900

BRonze and glass 3 pc coffee

table set $400 0.B.0

All in good condition

Ph: 392 - 2084

FOR SALE
Dining table 5-pc(purchase at
Roberts). Good condition. .
Real wood, (oak look), $1200
434-8340/341-4365

FOR SALE
Full featured PS2 Rcing Wheel
and petals. in brand new
Booth also available condition. Selling for $70.00

Call for more details. Phone 324-8908 ;

Phone 431-9030, or 558-7211. FOR S
Motorola back flip $500.00

SN Oe oe

Private Pilots Course
Instrument & Commercial

Theory
535-2484 359-0904
Email:
flightshopbahamas @ hotmail.
com

E-mail
kidskingdombah @ gmail.com

AUNT JENNY'S PRESCHOOL
NOW REGISTERING.
TEL: 356-7544.

HAIR CLASSES & NAILS
CLASSES Available.
Evening including.

t!

LITTLE. ANGEL CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY Kim Crescent off
Blue Hill Road. Now Register-
ing, for September. 341-0677.

TOYA’S
Now Registering for
September Term

ALE
Computer 3-in-1 Courses.

All-in-1 job training. BOXING WORKOUT with
Call:393-7045 Register now! Ray Minus Jr. pate econ co. eoedon Ore
Wulff Rd Fitness Classes and | Place orders with me.

WANT TO LEARN
a new language.
Register today for creole

one on one work out

Ph:356-5312/433-4937 Tel: 425-5056/535-1988

A-1 PAYLESS


























classes. *
Today to Sunday
For all ages. 454-4477. ° : New side-by-side. lg. fridge
BGCSE 1 YARD SALE Large tam fridge $425
BJC 1 (2010) Sunset Ridge & Prince Charles | Chest freezer 9 cu.ft. $450
-Accounts/Math Drive, Saturday, August 14th, | Upright freezer $275
-English 7:30am. Clothes, __ furniture, | New upright freezer $550
-Sciences : -] shoes, household items. New bedroom fridge $150
Sineconenre HUGE PATIO SALE ro Se tidgs. i 9 Ki
* e, i sn-
Iz-wgek ‘course begine Sept | Fumiture, nen, glassware, ro-| New Whutipool, Kenmore wa

large stack washer
dyer only $1195

Apt Whirlpool gas stack washer
dryer only $79!

Gas dryer new $525

Elec dryer fr $250

Microwave oven fr $60

30” gas stove $250

Sofa bed fr $250

Lazy boy chair $125

Ceiling fans $60

Dell computer set $275

Filing cabinet fr
Bureau & chest $275

Elec & grperat $4000 waits

Loads of good stuff
Register Now! 325-5060 Eastern oad between High

EXOTIC BRAIDING CLASSES | V'sta & Mt Vernon,
Do you want to learn a trade in | Saturday, 7-12 noon.
as little as 4 weeks and make a SAT, AUG. 14th_ AUG. 14th Household
lot of money? items sheets, towels, tv bed-
Then look no further. room set, treadmill, dining room
You will learn: Cor rows, twin- | set baby items, play pen, car-
ning, shingles, rope twist and rier, clothing car seats’ and
exotic pin ups. Registration be- | school supplies and jeep for
gins Monday, Sept 6 - 13th, by| sale traveling west on West
fag cage A207 a aaking | Bay ctrl, in on fo Grove
. . ve, then 2nd le at T-junc-
Sept 13th, 2010 tion, first left, first left, first
















Cost: $600 which includes all] house on T, cream & pink | 8h 2

materials and registration fee. 322-6534, 6:30-12pm. PI one Shee $350
LANGUAGES TODDLER FURNITURE, Beco alt aisee trom $35

-Creole accessories, toys and clothes | wheelchair $125

Zones Coase 38 ee Cable TV all sizes’ 52, 48, 36,

-Spanis fa . -Close East, Treasure Cove, ~ fs to” vi *

-Hebrewiilsoiiapeleainoeve www SO N@amacraw, Naesaa,scs yt 32, 27,19" ‘fr $128.

12-week course begins Sept ;
20, 2010
Register Now

on Saturday, August 14th
from 10am to 4pm. Expat
moving. Contact David,
. s@ 376-4648

{TEMS FOR SALE
Small cribs for sale

Tel 356-7544, 325-7866





FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 27

Articles ©
For Sale

: IR SAI
PRESCHOOL MATERIAL -
metal chairs, plastic chairs,

sleeping mats, posters, toys,

metal stacher, book case

& tables.
Tel 364-0146.

PRETTY BOY SWAG
SPECIAL!
Certified pre-owned Rolex, all
stainless steel Oyster perpetual
date just with pink Mother of
Pearl diamond dial & diamond
vvs Bezel. Contact 466-6367.

RESTAURANT SUPPLIES .
: FOR SALE
Sinks, hoods, coolers, stoves,
tables..
Call 322-3605.

T-SHIRT SCREEN PRINTING
SPECIAL PRICE THIS WEEK
OPEN: 8am-8pm

1 Box printed T-shirt $40.00
Portable swimming pool

$350.00 still in the bax
Tel:393-2733.

TO LOOK AND FEEL exciting
again drink. Cranberry Aloe
and Le-vive Juice.

Call 322-3885/465-9219.

USED DELL COMPUTER
KB/M/17" LCD/XP
Internet ready
512 Megs/40 gig hd)
Ph: 323-6731

USED TIRES FOR SALE
All sizes are available. Starting
price is $25 @ Best Autos and
accessories on Prince Charles
Drive next to Sammys Chicken.

IPHONE AND IPAD
SPECIALS
Iphone 12 -accessory pieces
50.00 >
Ipad accessory bundle $60.00
Call 357-8867

FOR SALE
Quality paintings, custom
frames for photos & paintings
daplay available. A must see
or Art Collectors.
Kenwork Shop, 324-0012.

FOR SALE
WEDDING GOWN
Champagne colour silk w/ivory
lace bodice. Lace coatee in-
cluded. $2,000. 376-4042.

. FOR SALE
White bunk bed combo, single
bed at top & double bed at the
bottom. Tel 361-6285.

30"
18" cu.ft.
, fri

s stove
estinghouse
ge, ;
One bedroom aoe
Telephone 364-3555

FOR SALE
One car wash tent :
1 pressure tank galvanized 40
galion, like new.
3 horse power well pump, like-

new

Contact 376-9570 between

hours Qam-7pm to make an of-
tr

‘Le-vive

For - weight lost, arthritis,
diabetes, improved vision and
one aoe sleep better.
Phone 322;3885/465-9219.
wh MUST GO
Two 12” 1,000 Watts Speak-
ers (in bin) and 2.Amps.
‘el: 393-5376.





-SMALL DESIGNER GLASS
entertainment center $300
-Sofa, love seat, chair $900
-Designer mirror dresser and z
night tables $1,200
436-3512/552-1486

2 STAGE TOWER
2 small stage

small ice machine.
Phone 428-9767.

27” FLAT SCREEN JVC TV
$250.00
Matching chest & nightstand
300.00
Phone 468-1166.

BEAUTIFUL living room se
with:silk customs, 3 glass
coffee tables, & 2-lamps
$1800. 424-7096.

BRAND NEW LADIES
» CLOTHING FOR SALE
Name brand suits, Pants,
Tops, Dresses. From size 6-14
Best prices ever (50% off)
Ph: 422-507 1/424-4280

COMPUTER DESK & CHAIR
$125.00 or make. an offer.
: 376-1874.

COMPUTER SYSTEM
INTERNET READY. $300.
Call 445-6507.

FOR SALE
Bamboo flooring, Maple cabi
nets, Mahogany doors, Custon
wood closets.
Telephone 636-0625
interiorservicessolutions @
yahoo.com ‘

FOR SALE
1 Tough Book Computer, usec
in military
1 Dell Computer.
556-3753/395-6076.

FOR SALE
10-pc front room set.
393-7444, 357-7220.:

FOR SALE :
18,000 btu A/C, $350. Te
434-2044.
FOR SALE

2 Sofa sets for sale must sel
$350.00 ono. 449-8622

FOR SALE
Attractive Hurricane Shutter
Build to order for double
windows, $190. |
Singles $100
Ph:426-8704

FOR SALE Custom-
made bedroom set
100% wood made in
The Bahamas,
10 years warranty.
323-6540.

GAS & ELECTRIC STOVE
washing machine for sate
533-9924/351-6035.

Ome: * 3'TQ. it By teray
foot ee 40
foot
container needed.
Please call Kirk, 364-0155.







PAGE 28, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

riumas www.bahamasrealty.bs








wey



RRS




A Member of the ;



#564567: 3-BED/2-BATH: $249,000 |

Family home featuring three bedrooms and two baths with 1,726 sq. ft. of interior space
in a well established area of New Providence.








This spacious home has a formal living and dining room and a comfortable family
room. There-is a nice, easy to care for yard, a covered carport, covered entrance, new
carpet and tiles throughout, a rear patio.and security bars. Recently painted inside and
outside, this comfortable home is ready for its new owners. Sold unfurnished with
option to purchase furniture. Minutes from schools, shopping and ail necessities.

cae Samrat | T: 396.0016 DESERET eros ne i













CAVES HEIGHTS

#564756: 3bd/3bth: $1,200,000

MEW! LISTENG: Gorgeous 5th floor, 2,439 sq. ft. luxury condo NEW LISTING: Cozy, yet spacious cottage just steps away |
with private balcony and wonderful ocean views. Completed in from the Cable Beach Strip and minutes from restaurants,

ASHFORD VILLAS

#564742; 1bd/1.5bth: $259,000



#564451: 3bd/3.5bth: $4,000 P/M

WEW LISTING: Lovely end unit townhouse boasting a
+ spacious floor plan, modern kitchen with solid wood cabinets, |





















{
2010, this unit features an open living area, gourmet kitchen entertainment and shopping. Features include modern stainless stee appliances & granite countertops, quaint |
with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances, wet bar furniture, open living/dining area, tongue and groove ceiling, | covered patio facing a zero entry pool, waterfall and lovely :
& powder room with marble countertops, each bedroom has crown mouldings, stainless steel appliances, hard wood floors | tropical gardens. The master bedroom has walk-in closet and |
Beatie bath & sliding glass doors leading to a private halcony. upstairs, tiles downstairs, lots of storage and washer & dryer. L ensuite bath with double sinks and glass enclosed shower. i
L as sean bopanea catia SN ae a cee ee a ea) ec so cae sek





eee eG Sree rca ae











564086 Goat Cay, Berry islands 21.96 Acre Island $1,200,000 | | 8612 Harbour Mews 5-BED/3.5-BATH $6,500 P/M.



i i
:
564362 Poincianna Cay, Sandyport 9,662 Sq. Ft. $ 500,000 | 564297 Sulgrave Manor, Cable Beach 3-BED/3-BATH © $5,500 P/M
564636 West Place Close, Westridge 13,703 Sq. Ft. $ 350,000 | | 562345 Sandyport Drive . . 3-BED/3.5-BATH $5,000 P/M
564671 Bootle Bay,Grand Bahama = 20,000 Sq. Ft. $ 290,000 564500 Camperdown 3-BED/3-BATH $3,500 P/M '
564345. South Ocean Estates 12,507 Sq. Ft. $. 165,000 | 562728 Sand Dollar Island, Sandyport | 3-BED/3.5-BATH $3,200 P/M (Us)
563880 _. Coral Vista .? 9,000 Sq. Ft. $ 135,000. . | 564536 Beach Lane,Sandyport- 3-BED/3-BATH $3,000 P/M |
564552 -High Point Estates : 8,517 Sq. Ft. $ 129,500 | 564723 Bahama Cottages 2-BED/2-BATH $2,600 P/M -
564377 Adelaide Road 13,404 Sq. Ft. $ 125,000 563527 Blair Estates - 2-BED/2.5-BATH | $2,000 P/M :
564554 Emeraid Coast 7,140 Sq. Ft. $ 119,000 564428 Paradise Villas, Paradise Island 2-BED/1-BATH $2,000 P/M
564657 Windermere; Grand Bahama 20,929 Sq. Ft. $ 38,900 | 564679 Janse! Court, Grand Bahama 2-BED/2-BATH $ 800 P/M





dali REALTY HOW






T: 242.396.0000 (Nassau) [F) curcemetomeztnobahames.com T: 242.367.3262 (Abaco)






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one : ‘ ad



BAHAMAS EDITION

www. tribune242. com





‘Volume: 106 No.218

Minister on warpath
Over website's lies

Maynard gathering
evidence for possible |
police investigation



By TANEKA : lawsuit. According to
THOMPSON the minister, he has
Tribune Staff gathered sufficient evi-
Reporter dence that could be
tthompson@ turned over the police

tribunemedia.net

CULTURE Minister
Charles Maynard may
soon file a criminal
complaint against the
operators of an online
blog which. has posted

"scandalous lies" about

blog's content.

"We have proof that
it's done by Bahamians
locally this is not one of
these things’ where
police can say they,
don't know who they

“ EVIDENCE’:
him. Charles Maynard are. And I've gotten

advice that some of the
things they've done are.criminal
— it's more than allegations. My
understanding is that it is crim-

SEE page 15

Mr Maynard told
The Tribune yesterday that he
has been advised that some of
the content posted,on the web-
site may warrant criminal
charges, instead of a civil libel

Man turns himself in hours
after relative’s stabbing death

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A FAMILY member, ‘alleged to be responsible for-the stabbing
death of a 21-year-old male relative, turned himself in to police yes-
terday evening — hours after the incident.

Police report the man is now assisting them with their investi-

‘SEE page 15






KING DEALS
















to launch a criminal...
investigation into the.’

_FRIDAY, AUGUST JS 2010

By MEGAN REYNOLDS.
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net






in Norman’s Cay, Exuma.

‘Wednesday.

ee page 15



-AN INVESTIGATION is under |,
way to determine how four pilot |
whales became washed up on a beach . |,

The male and female adults, around
12 to 14ft long, and two juveniles, each: |
around 8ft long, were found by Nigel, &
Bower and Mona’ Wiethuchter as they: f
were passing by in a boat, taking two
guests from Ship Channel Cay to
MacDuff’s at Norman’s Cay Beach
_Club for dinner at around 4.30pm on








WASHED ASHORE:




Police give travel agent chance to
show she acted in good faith

_ By ALISON LOWE
. Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

A TRAVEL agént who is
said.to have taken thousands
of dollars from would+be cus-
tomers seeking to.purchase
airline tickets, only for them
to find their tickets and pack-
ages were not paid for, is
being given an opportunity to
prove she acted in good faith
to avoid criminal charges.

The Tribune understands
that all four of those who
complained to the police
about handing over money to
the agent, only to find that
their tickets did not exist
claimed they had for “many
years” dealt with the same
travel agency with no prob-
lems. ‘

For this reason, police are
unwilling to “jump on” the
agent without anowing her the

AN ras) aU TTRSS TU UL ae

opportunity to explain what
may have happened.

A police source told The
Tribune: “That particular
agent, I guess by some fault,
may have lapsed in payment
to whoever was doing busi-
ness with her which resulted in
all of her matters being can-
celled.

“She is basically assisting
the police with a paper trail
to show us she paid these
funds (given to her by the
clients) to certain people and
was expecting for tickets. to
be honoured.”

Our source was referring to
the fact that despite not being
directly licensed to sell tick-
ets, the agent allegedly
claimed she had been making
reservations on behalf of
clients through an arrange-

ment with other licensed enti- . }

ties.

_ SEE page 15

Two of the four pilot whales which were washed up in Exuma.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25).

Meade nate dos Me aa aeeaG.

FNM has ‘best
chance of winning
with Ingraham’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Free National Movement
was described yesterday as still hav-
ing the best chance of winning the
next general. election with Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham at its
helm. :

: Dismissing earlier reports that
- the party could stand a “better
chance” of winning in 2012 with a.
“younger” candidate at the helm, a
senior FNM strategist who spoke to
The Tribune on condition of
‘anonymity yesterday said that

SEE page 15
























‘TREMENDOUS STORM’ BREWING AT LYFORD CAY

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

A “TREMENDOUS STORM” is brewing at the exclusive res-
idential community Lyford Cay with the adoption of a new poliey.,
by the Lyford Cay Freperty Owners Association, according to”
Tribune sources.

The “bad weather” i is aimed at property owners who may be
using the private roadways to transport construction personnel,
building material and service vehicles for “unauthorized building
construction and maintenance activities”, according to documents

SEE page 15 7
NYGARD, BACON SPAT ‘SET TO END IN HILARITY’

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

. THE spat between Lyford Cay millionaires Peter Nygard and
Louis Bacon over a disputed property easement is set to end in
hilarity, when all of the evidence comes to light, according to
sources close to the matter.

“For some time now Nygard has been trying to make his prob-
lems look like a fight with his immediate neighbours. And the
timing of the lawsuit, and threats of more, appears to be a contin-

SEE page 15



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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

i ee

Abaco plant supplies
power for first time

Ministry expects programme
to inspire education reform

THE Ministry of Education has announced it is intensi-
tying efforts to improve labour market opportunities for
Bahamian graduates and facilitate their transition to higher
education by strengthening literacy, numeracy, technology
and vocational skills.

Under a new name, INSPIRE (Investing in Students and
Programmes for the Innovative Reform of Education) and

a new project management team, the former SPTET (Sup- .

port Programme for Transforming Education and Training)
will be relaunched on August 16 during a ceremony at CC
Sweeting.

The government, with the support of an $8 million loan
from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), “will
support interventions designed to address the educational
and training needs of Bahamian youth, facilitate economic
progress, and reduce social problems,” said the ministry in
astatement. . ; .

The specific goals of the programme are grouped under
three components: . ‘

¢ NATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR TECHNICAL
AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
To ensure a relevant education system, articulated at the

secondary and BTVI/post-secondary levels aligned with |
international standards, informed by local research, which -

facilitate entrepreneurship programmes and reforms in cur-
ricula.

» INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

Addressing early development of children to improve —

quality and equity of early childhood education, incorpo-
rating parents and community assistance for children with
developmental needs and to create a council of stakehold-
ers responsible for driving policies and implementing stan-
dards of practice to govern early education in the Bahamas.
_ Additionally, focus will be given to inclusive education,
which will enhance programmes and support services that
assist students with diverse needs and help them achieve
their academic and human potential. The thrust of inclusive
education is to demonstrate the capacity of regular schools
to successfully educate students with various needs.

° STRENGTHENING SECTOR MANAGEMENT

Establishing a Technical Coordination Unit (TCU) tasked

with implementing an e-Education Strategy designed to
address inefficiencies within the Ministry of Education
focused around (i) Educational Management Information
Systems (EMIS), (ii) Technical Support, particularly for
schools and (iii) Integration of ICT across the curriculum.

In addition, the role of the Monitoring and Evaluation (M
& E) Unit will be strengthening the focus on conducting
research,.analyzing data, and providing oversight needed to
enhance sector-wide co-ordination and quality assurance.

M &E will conduct interim evaluations and a final eval-
uation for phase 1 of the INSPIRE Project.

The statement said: “INSPIRE is one of the innovative
educational initiatives that the Ministry of Education has
embarked upon to improve educational performances and
basic skills of youth in the Bahamas. It is expected that
these innovations will benefit on an annual basis, approxi-

mately 38,000 secondary and post-secondary students, 12,000

pre-schoolers, as well as several thousand students with
special needs. ae

terernescosresssesesessecesrrerseterestesesecesetetsete

aeeeaacereerseete

aseetecee

Testing of —

one of four

generators ~
begins"

By ALISON LOWE __
Tribune Staff. Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ABACO’s Wilson City pow-
er-plant successfully supplied
power to the island communi-
ties for the first time this week,
as testing of one of its four 12
megawatt generators began.

The Abaco power grid has
been fed 1.5 megawatts of pow-
er on a daily basis since
Wednesday and officials antici-
pate that by next week as much
as 12 megawatts of power — or
almost two thirds of the area’s
present peak demand — will be
produced by the new plant for
use by residents.

The development comes as
the islands of Abaco have just
started to recover from a eco-
nomically trying — and some’
have claimed, disastrous — two
and a half month period of
extended power outages as fail-
ing power generators at the old
BEC plant in Marsh Harbour,
unable to keep pace with
demand in the bustling Family
Islands, were placed into load-
shedding mode for up to nine
hours a day.

‘The Wilson City plant is
being constructed to address the
growing. power needs of the
Abaco islands in the long term.
In the meantime, the islands’
homes and businesses are being
supported by three mobile gen-
erators which were brought in
two weeks ago.

According to BEC general
manager Kevin Basden the Wil- .
son City generator testing
comes after issues over access to
telecommunications at the Wil-
son City plant were resolved.

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Bring along a donation of one or more school
items and receive a complimentary talliced —

coffee or coffee of the day. ~



_ During a tour of the plant last
month Prime Minister Hubert

- Ingraham, MP for North Aba-

co, was informed by Carlos

Escobar, site manager for gen- -

eral contractor MAN Diesel,
that inconsistent access to com-
munications that would enable
the Wilson City plant to co-ordi-
nate testing with the Marsh
Harbour plant was hindering
progress in bringing the new
generators online.

- Mr Basden was unwilling to

suggest a date when the power:

plant would be fully brought on
stream, but said testing will con-
tinue and BEC will have a bet-
ter.idea of when this will be pos-
sible “by. next week.” :
The Wilson City plan
includes four generators, each
with a generation capacity of 12

‘megawatts.

Abaco’s present peak power

demand amounts to 18 to 19-
Megawatts. . Twenty-two

megawatts are presently being
supplied through a combination
of the Marsh Harbour power
plant generators and the mobil
generators. :

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 3

(SULLA 8 OB BATS

Judges may be using ‘possibly
unconstitutional practice’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A COURT of Appeal judge
has raised the possibility that
the former Chief Justice was
not in accordance with the Con-
stitution when he failed to
deliver a judgment in open
court — and that other judges
may be continuing to use the
same possibly unconstitutional
practice.

Justice George Newman sug-
gested that if this:is the case, it

may have significant wide-rang-

ing legal implications.
In his August 10 written
judgment relating to an appli-

cation for an extension of time .

to appeal a judgment, made by
former Chief Justice Sir Bur-
ton Hall, Justice Newman said
there is a “strong arguable
“case” to be.-made that Sir Bur-
ton did not comply. with the
Constitution when he had his
written judgment on a matter

delivered to the Chambers of

the two lawyers representing
the individuals concerned
rather than reading it in open
court.

Justice Newman allowed the
extension of time to appeal, giv-
en that:‘Wayne Munroe, the
attorney for one of the individ-
uals whose matter Sir Burton
was deciding, said he did not

receive the judgment until long.

after it was supposedly deliv-
ered and felt that the failure by
the former Chief Justice to read
the judgment in open court was
unconstitutional.

In this regard, Justice New-
man agreed that it is “an essen-
tial element of justice that it is
dispensed in public.”

“The Constitution does not
contemplate a procedure other
than an announcement of the
decision of the court in public.
A pronouncement of the court

means a pronouncement by-a.
judge of the decision in court,”

he stated.

Judgement

_ Speaking of the act of send-
ing the judgment to the lawyers

_ rather than reading it in public

in July, 2009, Justice Newman
said: “A decision in respect to
this practice is urgently
required. The matter must be
clarified as soon as possible.”
Furthermore, the Court of
Appeal judge noted that “the
urgency” of determining

‘whether the practice is uncon-
stitutional is “even more press- .

ing” given that he got the
impression “this is a practice
which may well be continuing”

based on information he has

received.
He proposed that a full court

will now “not only need to

| determine whether or not there
has been what amounts to a
non-compliance with the Con-
stitution but also... what the
consequences of non-compli-
ance should be.”

One possible consequence,
he noted, could be that there
would be considered to be “no
judgment at all” made by the
judge in question in the matter
or any others in which the pur-

ported judgment was delivered .



in this form.

In this case, Just
said questions should be raised
as to what extent the parties

-" ‘concerned are-bound by the

judgments reached when ‘they
are not delivered in open court.
“As I say, these matters,
touching on civil rights obliga-
tions, are important,” he said.
Justice Newman’s comments
came with respect to an appli-
cation, made by Wayne
Munroe, attorney for applicant
Alarice Maria Ifill, for an exten-
sion of time to appeal the judg-
ment reached by Chief Justice
Sir Burton Hall. .
The judgment related to

divorce proceedings between’:
~ Ms Ifill and Grantley Errol Ifill,
~ the respondent in the matter.

Mr Munroe applied for an
extension of time to appeal the
judgment after he and his client
failed to receive the judgment

‘in time to appeal it, as his client
wished to do.

This, Justice Newman said,
was because Sir Burton had had
the judgment delivered, to Mr
Munroe’s private Chambers at
a time that he was relocating
offices due to the dissolution
of his partnership with his for-

mer law partner, Elliott Lock-

hart.

Court

“He did not receive the judg-
ment at delivery or for some
time after... It was upon
receipt of the order of the court
that Mr Munroe became aware
of what had happened, namely
what the judge had purported

‘to decide,” said Justice New-

man.

‘The judge said that given the
potential for Mr Munroe’s
client to have been subjected
to an application for his com-
mittal — to be confined to prison
for having “failed to obey the
order of the court drawn up on
the basis of the document deliv-
ered as a judgment” — the issue
was all the more serious,

He allowed the appeal for an
extension of time made by Mr
Munroe on behalf of. Ms Ifill,

‘stating that not only should it

be allowed, but it must be
“expedited.”

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GRANT-BETHEL GRANTED AVE TO APPLY FOR JUDICIAL REVIEW

By AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

(a TE |
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General and Department of Public Prosecu-
tions to the. Law Reform and Revision Com-
mission.

He also granted leave for the proceedings
of the JDLS with regard to Mrs Grant-Bethel’s
application for the post of Director of Public
Prosecutions to be reviewed.

Mrs Grant-Bethel’s application seeking leave
for a review was filed July 21. In it, she called
for an injunction against Attorney General
John Delaney which would bar him from "inter-
fering" with her ability to carry out the duties of
the Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions — a
job that the Office of the Attorney General

CHERYL Grant-Bethel has been granted
leave by the courts to apply for a judicial review
of the decision to deny her the post of Director
of Public Prosecutions. ;

The legal team of Mrs Grant-Bethel, who is
the former Deputy Director of Public Prose-
cutiors, now has 14 days to file a motion.

In a closed court hearing yesterday, Senior
Justice John Isaacs gave permission for a judi-
cial review to be conducted with regard to the

TRANSFERRED
Cheryl Grant-Bethel



decision by the Judicial and Legal Services
Commission (JDLS) to appoint Mrs Grant-
Bethel to the post of Deputy Law Reform Com-
missioner — a move that involved her being
transferred from the Office of the Attorney

Witness: Doctor kept secret ©
medical files on Anna Nicole.

LOS ANGELES

SEVEN months after Anna
Nicole Smith's death, a law
enforcement team entered the
home of the model's doctor with
a search warrant and guns drawn,
and found her medical records
under a pile of clothing in a clos-
et, investigators testified Thurs-
day, according to Associated
Press.

Carmen Aguillera Marquez,
a senior investigator for the Cal-
ifornia Medical Board, said she
and team leader Jon Genens had
been told by Dr. Sandeep
Kapoor that he did not have any
patient files at home. But when
she poked her hand into a pile-of
neatly folded clothing on the
floor of his bedroom closet, she
said, she felt papers and extract-
ed a file folder with Smith's name
inside, along with one of her
pseudonyms and the name of her
son.

Genens testified that three dif-
ferent files were found — two in
the home and one in Kapoor's
lawyer's office — detailing a sin-
gle home visit made to Smith a
year before she died. One of
them mentioned that she had a
possible addiction to opiates, he
said. i

Kapoor; Dr. Khristine Ero-
shevich and Smith's boyfriend-
lawyer Howard K. Stern have
pleaded not guilty to charges that
include conspiring to provide
Smith with excessive drugs, pre-
scribing to an addict, and pre-
scribing to Smith under fraudu-:
lent names.

They are not charged with
causing her 2007 death from a
drug overdose.

With the medical records dis-
played on a courtroom screen in
Los Angeles, Genens showed
jurors how the three files con-
tained different information for
the same visit. One detailed the
drugs prescribed to Smith, and

" Ohe had a blank space for med-
ications. :

One had the notation: "benzo
addicted? To avoid." The appar-
ent reference to addiction to
sedatives known as benzodia-
zopines was missing from the sec-
ond set of files for the same day,
he said.

Superior Court Judge Robert’
Perry warned jurors repeatedly
Thursday that the investigators’
testimony is beirig offered only
against Kapoor. Kapoor's lawyer,
Ellyn Garafalo, challenged the
methods in which the records
were handled. Another witness,

?



‘MEDICAL RECORDS’:
Anna Nicole Smith

attorney Lawrence Wolfe, who »

was appointed as a special master
to oversee the collection, testi-
fied about the chain of custody.

Garafalo also questioned the
display of guns by the large team
of investigators, but Genens said

‘that was routine. ’

In a hearing Thursday outside
the jury's presence, Perry ques-
tioned the relevance of the doc-
uments and Deputy District
Attorney David Barkhurst said,
"Our contention is Dr. Kapoor
was creating those records after
the visit for some nefarious rea-
son."

Marquez said she also found a
private journal of Kapoor's in
his bedroom. Its contents have

become a key issue in the case.

describing his one social contact

with Smith when he rode with ;

her in a gay pride parade.

Smith suffered from pain most
of her life; a doctor testified
Wednesday, saying he treated
her with prescription drugs to
alleviate her chronic pain syn-
drome even though he consid-
ered her an addict.

"People with substance abuse
disorders have the right to pain
relief," said Dr. Victor Kovner,
who tréated Smith for three
years before he sold his practice
to Kapoor.

Kovner said had a substance
abuse disorder and treating her
was a challenge.

Kovner said Smith told him
when they met in 2001 that she
was an addict and had been
treated at the Betty Ford Center

for addictions:to Vicodin and ©

alcohol.

Kovner later learned she had
suffered from migraines and
seizures as a child. She also
reported pain in her back, arm
and intestinal area.

After failing to find a physi-
cal cause for the pain, Kovner
said he concluded Smith suffered
from chronic pain syndrome.and
treated her with Methadone,
Xanax and other drugs.

Kovner said Smith took pre-
scription drugs for physical and
emotional relief. Some of the
medications he prescribed were
for anxiety and depression, he
added.

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has maintained is no longer hers.

Justice Isaacs gave the respondents — the
application named the entire Judicial and Legal
Services Commission and the Attorney General -
— 48 hours to respond’to the injunction.

. S..JO

recat
380-FLIX

Use your e-card to reserve fickets at 380-3549 or visit us at
www. bahamasiccal.com



HNSON

PEACE OF MIND



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AND EXUMA OFFICES.

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Monday, 16 August, 2010

We apologize for any inconvenience

caused




PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



eal de Ea TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL. D., Dz Litt.

' Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE

’ www.tribune242:com —

updated daily at 2pm

Time to test defamation and the web

THE WORLD-WIDE web has certainly
made the world a smaller place. It has gone
a long way in creating a global community by
helping people to better understand their
similarities as well as their differences thus
assisting them in participating in the global
conversation.

However, the flow of news coming from
all directions is almost too fast for the human
brain to process. It seems there are more
unhinged, violent and angry people than
ever before. Is it because of better commu-
nications that we are learning of events that
have always happened, or is it because the
human brain can no longer digest all the
‘information with which it is being bom-
barded, and in desperation man clutches his
head and explodes?

There is also a very serious downside to
this global communication’s network. There
are few rules and little responsibility in the
way information is being disseminated on
various blogs. Today anyone can put infor-
mation on the web without regard to

_ whether it is true or false. We have heard
persons, who want to spread malicious
rumours, laugh and say they can put what-
ever they want on their website because at
last the law of defamation can’t touch them.

““Séme of the most-scandalous things are
being openly said about people, whose —
names are being called, and apparently it is
:believed that: nothing can be done to halt
the vicious spiral.

Unlike a newspaper, which by law has
to print the name of its publisher, and.the
location at which it is published, no:such
information is required of the managers of
these scandalous websites. However, there
are ways and means of checking their iden-
tity — it’s just that everyone has assumed
that such a search is: useless.’ Immobilized

- with this belief the victims do nothing while
the perpetrators continue down the road of
publishing irresponsible and destructive gos-
sip.

Defamation laws will now have to be
extended to this new means of communica-
tion to force responsibility on those, putting
careless, often false information in the pub-
lic domain — for all the world to see. If
something is not done we shall start to see ' -
people taking the law into their own hands.
Police will have a new form of criminal retal-
iation to add to their already heavy crime
sheet. ' .

Mr Charles Maynard has announced that -

he is going to go to the police to take a stand
against the defamatory content posted
against him on one of these blogs. All the
ingredients of libel are there — false and
defamatory statements carelessly published
to a third party — in this case to the world —
and the person defamed is identifiable. In Mr

Maynard’s case he is actually named, and -

so there is.no guessing as to who has been
defamed. Mr Maynard — whose reputation

someone or some group is intent on destroy-

ing — calls what is being said about him
“scandalous lies.” What is being printed in
permanent form, whether true or false, could

‘ destroy him — in his marriage, his political
career and certainly lower him in the eyes of -

the community — and as it is on the web it
will not only damage him in the eyes of the
local community, but the world. So the audi-
ence is wide which makes the damage —
and damages if he wins his case — even
more severe.

Mr Maynard has been advised that some
of the content posted on the website could
warrant criminal charges. He said that the
blog has “waged all out war” against him.
This is the very essence of criminal libel. It
becomes criminal when the perpetrator

- keeps repeating and repeating, hounding
‘and hounding, continuously displaying

vicious and hateful malice. It is the repetition
and the depth of the malice that tips the
scales, moving his complaint from the civil to
the criminal side of the court. We have seen

» these blogs and know that Mr Maynard has

been repeatedly bombarded with what he
calls “vicious lies.”

If they are false and he has a case then he
has a duty to step forward. He will certainly
make history as the first person to do so.

It is said that this is all being done in the*
name of politics. Politics is no excuse to drag ~

this community into the gutter. If Bahamians
want higher standards then any political par-
ty that will condone and even assist such

salacious publications should be denied the

vote of decent Bahamians.

Indecent politics has already gone too
far in destroying human relations, human
respect and all standards of decency.

If Mr Maynard is satisfied that he has a
case, then he should step up to the plate
and take a stand for decency and snatch pol-
itics from the smutty hands of those who
thrive in the gutter. And the best lawyers in
this town should stand behind him by offer-

ing their services pro bono.



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A nightmare
us ride with
my children

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am very concerned about
the type of service rendered
by our public bus system.

On Friday, July 16, 2010
between 4 - 4.30pm what
should ‘have been a delight-
ful experience for my children
turned out to be a nightmare.

I had dropped off my car to,

be cleaned and was waiting
for my husband. However, he
called to inform me that he
was caught up in performing a
procedure at the hospital, and
it would take a while before
he could pick us up. I decided

_ to take the public bus service.

I thought this would be a
wonderful experience for my
three small children. They
were excited for the new ven-
ture.

We took the 10a bus N28.
When we arrived at our drop
off point Skyline Lakes, my
daughter who is a special
needs‘child with autism was

- hesitant to get off the bus.

The driver became infuriated
and began to shout at me to
get off the bus. I tried to

explain to him that my daugh-:

ter was a special needs child
and I needed a minute to
coach her to get off. He then

m letters@tribunemedia.net






Dawa

like a patient. I'don’t have
time for any fu----- patient
today. You shouldn’t bring a
patient on the bus; get off my
bus.”

I attempted to get him to
understand, but he became

more verbally hostile which |
made my daughter more ©

stressed: She began to cover
her ears’ with her hands. She
was not disruptive rather qui-
et and calm. He then’shouted
at my two small boys, “Get

‘back inside I don’t have time

for this shit.” He then shouted

to me: “Sit down I’m drop-

ping you at another-bus stop,
just take another bus.” He
pulled off before I even had a
chance to sit down. During

his rude indignant behaviour, »

I just said a prayer asking
God to protect my children
and to keep me calm. I could
have reacted, but I was mind-
ful that I am constantly try-

ing to teach my boys about -

conflict resolution, and when
to walk away, especially if
someone is unreasonable.

He drove all the way
around passing several ‘bus
stops. Finally. he stopped in
front of Breezes Hotel and

' told us: “Get off here.” I felt

humiliated and disrespected
as a citizen, as a mother, and
as a woman. We walked
across the street and took a
taxicab home. My four-year-
old son said “Mommy that
man talk to us like an ani-
mal.” This experience has had
a negative affect on my chil-
dren. This encounter remind-
ed me of the Rosa Park’s sto-
ry.

_ I think I am only one out of
many citizens who are treated
in an indignant and inhumane
mannet during some bus com-
mutes. Hardworking, law-
abiding Bahamians should not

"have to endure such treat-

ment by our public bus ser-
vice. Greed‘and lack of com-
passion seem to be replacing
common courtesy and empa-
thy for one another. I am call-
ing upon the government to
seriously consider urgently a
national transportation ser-

vice operated by the govern-

ment.

KAREN MOSS
Nassau, .

shouted, “Your daughter look

. July 30, 2010.

The black bonnet situation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

On a daily basis, we all read insightful,
intriguing, uproarious letters that comment
on crime, politics and the like submitted to
our local newspapers. While I agree it is an
age-old forum for such opinions I do believe
there is space for social.commentary that does
not fall in-between the lines of the aforemen-
tioned topics.

As such, I submit my comments regarding
the black bonnet situation:

We’ve all seen them, driving through our
streets, walking in the Mall, on line at the
bank, on school pick-up, the grocery store,
really. everywhere, our ladies, intentionally
out in public with the black bonnet on their
heads.

If you are unsure what I mean, I am refer-
ring to the black satin “shower cap” that has

taken the place of the tied silk scarf that once
covered a woman’s head when her hair was in
curlers.

The difference, however in my opinion, is
the seeming degradation of what is acceptable
to be worn outside of one’s household.

I qualify. In years past a woman wearing
curlers in her hair was usually on a one-way
journey from her hairdresser directly to her

home, to continue preparations for whatever
’ function she was attending.

She was discreet, reluctant to linger on a
stop light or even hail a friend in passing, lest
she be seen with a head loaded with plastic
cylinders and aluminum clips or in some cases
wearing a wrap band if her end- style was
straight.

In today’s Bahamas it seems like there is a

segment of women who do not believe that
hair coverings are meant for a specific pur-

~ pose: protecting a style or implements of that
- style.

It appears that the black bonnet is now as
acceptable as a Sunday hat, baseball cap, ban-

. dana or straw hat.

I liken this practice to the powdery neck at
3:30 in the afternoon and no shower was
involved, or the bédroom slippers worn to
work and passed off for outside-of-the-house-
shoes because they are black and have little
beads, or even a personal favourite: out-in-
public-with-facial-cream-on.

Perhaps I am missing something, some cru-
cial moment in society when this change was
discussed and enacted into our societal norms.
Maybe nowadays women are not getting their
hair done anymore or the styles are more com-
plete when they leave the salon. .

I certainly notice the influx of supplemental
hair products, in particular the lace front wig.
I also notice the cemented hair-dos that are
wrapped and:sculpted and only undoable by
water or some other solvent.

So perhaps the necessity for protective cov-
erings in public has decreased.

I beg for an explanation, then, why are so .

many women walking around this town with
these blasted black bonnets on their heads! I
would like to personally lead the charge in
opposition to this practice and state the fol-
lowing:

1. It’s not cool

2. It’s not attractive

3. It’s not acceptable

4, It’s not understandable

Theye actually are. no viable excuses for
wearing one outside of your home (the back-
yard, if enclosed is okay). I have tried to ascer-
tain excuses and the only one I care to dis-
cuss is, “My hair is not fixed.”

It isn’t? Guess what ladies, when the black °

bonnet is on, your hair is still not fixed. In fact
the black bonnet is just as bad as your “un-
fixed” hair, worse even. It is an announce-
ment of your lack of a “do”. What is so bad

about yout hair that wearing a fancy shower
cap in public is more bearable? It is as though
the public deserves only two choices, fresh
from the salon or the black bonnet.

If there is a psychologist reading this, please
help me.

Why are our women so ashamed of their
hair? It must be something mental. I am.a
firm believer in the truth that hair was created
without quality. There is no good hair or.bad
hair.

You can have damaged hair or illnesses that
affect your hair, but essentially the idea of
good hair versus bad is garbage.

Ladies, the world truly does not mind if
your hair is not perfectly sculpted, or burned
straight or curled 360 degrees.

The world does not care if you just have
your hair pulled back in a ponytail or if it is
short, just neatly combed.

Perhaps if we had less emphasis on hair
styling and more on hair care, there would be
more pride in just our hair and not what we
think the world thinks about it.

A.woman I love said to me that she was
told as a child that her hair was her crowning
glory. That statement, she explained, was .the
genesis of her “hair complex”; a complex that
pushed her over 30 years to do unimaginable
things to maintain and adorn her “crown”.

With maturity and growth, her focus is now
on taking care of the beautiful « crown God
blessed her with.

She owns a black bonnet to contain the

‘ curlers she rolls in and holds in the moisture

and natural oils she applies. She does this at

night, strictly in the privacy of her bedroom.
So ladies, all I ask is that you put more atten-

tion into taking care of your crown everyday.

’ Learn how to wash it on your own, treat it

with safer chemicals or natural products, and
simplify your styles so you can keep them up
yourself. ,

Perhaps this can eradicate the helpless
dependency on. wigs, weaves and over-
processed hair and I say that admitting that I
do appreciate the occasional change that these
supplements provide.

‘Simply put, love’ your hair so you can love
yourself because if you love yourself, you will
leave the black bonnet at home, in the top
drawer where it belongs.

ERIC NATHAN HALL

Nassau,
‘July 27, 2010.

AEN OAR ELAS TL

EDITOR, The Tribune.













Thank you for allowing me a space in
your paper. BaTelCo in The Mall at
Marathon has far too many women
working there and it appears that only a
few of them knows what they are doing
or demonstrates some kind of profes-
sionalism.

Pick any. one of the six days to visit
BaTelCo in the mall and you would see
female employees gossiping to each oth-
er or on the telephone with their
boyfriends, while we the paying cus-
tomers are sitting down in front of desk
four, six, eight, a, or b for example to
get service.

I can’t.wait for BaTelCo to be priva-
tised!




















ROLLE
Nassau,
July 27, 2010.




THE TRIBUNE

POTHOLE PROBLEMS ON ROBINSON ROAD









MIND THE GAP: A deep pothole on Robinson Road. B
need to be carefully negotiated. -

Most calls to BASRA from boaters

‘stranded with broken engines’

sea are playing “Russian roulette” with
their lives — and sometimes the lives of res-
cuers.

He believes that boaters should lose their
certification if they fail to fulfill safety
requirements,

Asked if boat safety training courses
should be a requirement for all boaters,
Mr Snisky agreed that, they should.

“That would be a phenomenal move in
the right direction if we make it a require-
ment to take boat safety.

“In the US the Coast Guard can board a
boat any time and by law have you to be
‘ able to perform’a one minute safety drill to

“We average 30 calls a month and we’ __ put your life jacket on and to prepare for an
assist 20 to 30 people, possibly more,” he emergency, and if you can’t do it they can
said. : pull the certification on the boat right there

Justin Snisky, vice chairman of BASRA, and now you are no longer allowed to oper-
said many times, they dispatch a rescue ate the boat and the captain.would get a
team following an emergency call, only to —_ write up and a major fine,” he said.
discover that the vessel ran out of gas. “It. is definitely something we should

He explained that BASRA isintendedto —_look into in the Bahamas as every boat
provide emergency search and rescue ser- _ that is being checked is one less boat we
vices throughéut the Bahamas. have to worry about out there,” Mr Snisky

“One of the biggest misconceptions of _ said.

BASRA is that we are. commercial assis- He said four years ago, BASRA started
tance. We are not there to tow youinif you a youth programme offering free courses in
run out of gas; our main priority is saving water safety and boating safety to schools,
lives,” he stressed. ; organisations and summer camps on Grand
Mr Snisky said those who take chances at’ Bahama.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Emergency rescue offi-
cials say many boating mishaps could be
avoided if boaters took the time to follow
proper safety procedures before venturing
out to sea.

Tom Christian, director of search and
rescue at the Bahamas Air/Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA), said that the major-
ity of calls they receive are from people
stranded at sea because their engine broke
down. . tia

PROJECT ADVISOR (rut. time emptoyment)



FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 5



Phase two of GB Chamber of

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce has embarked on phase
two of its Economic Develop-
ment Strategy and Implemen-
tation Plan to stimulate the
island’s economy.

Chamber president Peter
Turnquest called on residents
to support the organisation in
its efforts to promote entrepre-
neurial development and iden-
tify significant catalyst projects
to promote economic develop-
ment.

“We. are all aware of the
challenges facing Grand
Bahama both economically and
socially as we continue in this
period of financial instability
and recession, and while there
are reported areas of improve-
ment in tourism and potential
investments which continue to
give us hope, we the residents
of Grand Bahama have to
resolve to take control of our
destiny for the sustainable
development of our island,” he

| Commerce economic strategy

Dwight Anderson, production
plant II manager, PharmaChem
Technologies Grand Bahama
Ltd; Vanessa Mallory, execu-
tive vice president, Modelena
Investments Ltd; Jeffery Allen,
James Sarles Realty; and Minna
Outten-Winters, Global Train-
ing consultants.

Mr Turnquest said the cora-
mittee, working along with an
international economic devel-
opment firm, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, the
Freeport Container Port and
others, will be responsible for
the development and manage-
ment of the formal plan and the
co-ordination of consultative
forums in various communities.

“It is an awesome task as
they are all volunteers but I
have every confidence in them
to complete the task given and
to produce a final working doc-
ument that will be the guide for
future development and shape
not only the business strategy
for Grand Bahama, but also its
political and social future,
which will necessarily be affect-
ed, to ensure viability and sus-
tainability,” he said. :

said on Wednesday. Mr Turnquest invited mem-
es bers of the public to provide
‘ ideas and input to the chamber
Mr Snisky said the course received high Sessions

praise from the US Coast Guard and BAS-
RA is looking to expand it to cover the
entire Bahamas.

“We also offered adult classes and it was
not well received. We find that the age 3-12
group is most receptive to information,”
he said.

Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police
Quinn McCartney agrees that boat safety
training is important and should be con-
sidered. as

“There are quite a number of boats going
out on a daily basis and we need to get
people sensitised about boat safety. Some-
times you have to enforce it through legis-
lation.” ;

He said the police force, BASRA, the
Defence Force, the Port Department and
Customs should meet and come up with
recommendations for. new legislation or
regulations to monitor boat safety. Mr
McCartney said that the police work close-
ly with the Defence Force and BASRA
when responding to boating emergencies.

“In very short order we will put VHF
radios in the police station at West End
and in our Control Room here. It used to
be there but was discontinued, and we think
it is important to put it back there and
monitor channel 16,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said an Eco-
nomic Development Commit-
tee, made up of persons from a
wide cross section of the busi-
ness community, will hold con-
sultation sessions.

“Phase II is critical and it is
essential that we reach a con-
sensus on how to resolve critical
issues (that have been identi-
fied) during this phase,” he not-
ed.

The committee is chaired by
Jennivee Nelson, manager of
Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank
and Trust. Other members
include: Neville Wilchombe,
attorney at Dupuch and Turn-
quest; Don Cornish, adminis-
trator in the Office of the Prime
Minister; Derick Newbold,
business development manager
at the Grand Bahama Port
Authority; James Turner, busi-
ness development manager at
the Freeport Container Port;
Charles Pratt, manager, of the
Enterprise Centre at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority,

a

by its email address — gbcham-
ber@batelnet.bs — and to attend
the public forums.

He also appealed to resi-
dents and businesses to sup-
port the chamber’s fundraising
events.

The first event will be a.
Mock Casino Night on Sep-
tember. 25 at the Our Lucaya
Hotel, where patrons will have
the opportunity to play various
casino games for prizes rang-
ing from large flat screen tele-
visions to holidays and cruises.

He said there also will be an
auction of works by talented
local artists such as Chantal
Bethel, Claudette Dean and
Leo Brown.

yd)

Exterminators

Pest Control
322-2157



The Bahamas Red Cross Society invites applicants for
the position of Project Advisor for a project funded by
The American Red Cross. |

The Project Advisor (full time employment) will
be based in New Providence to provide technical
assistance and support to a Caribbean HIV prevention
program, principally in the Bahamas and Guyana.
Responsibilities include: support for project. start up
including work. planning and tool development,
program implementation monitoring and oversight, and
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+
aut,
hy

| Together for
humanity /'

f

a







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East Street Ph: 322-5276
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Court system seems ‘somewhere

between chaotic and shambolic’
YOUNG: EN : VIEW

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



A legal system must be seen as
a set of institutions (concepts,
rules and principles of inter-
pretation) impressed with a
given purpose or purposes, the
system's responsiveness and
effectiveness measured against
the degree of attainment of
explicit as well as implicit
goals. — Boris Kozolchyk.

HE court sys-

tem in the

Bahamas

seems some-

where between chaotic and

shambolic. Legalistic foot-

dragging and the dysfunc-

tional legal system has

caused many Bahamians to

lose faith in the justice ‘sys-
tem.

Legal theorist Joseph

Raz states that “in identify-

ing a legal system, we are —

holding for all the pervasive
principles and traditional
institutional structure and
practices that permeate the
system and lend to its dis-
tinctive character.”

People need to know that
the law will be enforced at
every level of society with-
out fear or favour, without
any reference to group or
familial interests, and with-
out intervention by any cor?



Ioeponn (8 STS 118/

SPH
Pager, (43 SAHIN « STS-3005

Exurna, Bahamas.

) Peale oes

{1A Bas Corl Raa Peper, 8, Bahamas Rotiidon and Soldier Reese Masson, A, Hiahoraas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

of Stuart Manor Exuma, will be held on Sunday August 15th
2010 at 10:00am at Mt. Thompson Seventh-Day Adventist
_ Church, Mt Thompson, Exuma. Officiating will be Pastor Craig
Williams assisted by Elder Teddy Clarke and Elder [van Rolle.
interment will follow in The Public Genet Stuart Manor

Lett to cherish his memories are his wife: Alvera Smith Father: ’
Eugene Smith Mother: ~ trebella Smith 4 Sons: ~Cely Jr, Deargo,
Tamazz, and Tazmon Smith. 3- Daughters - Quana, Kayshell
and Tanasha Smith. 9- Brothers: Edison, David, Headley, Bob,
Ray, Eugene Jr., Don, Pat and. Alley Smith. 1 Adopted Brother
~ Jeffery Smith. 5- Sister: Patricia, Kate, Betty, Donnell and Able
woman Marine Delarene Smith of the Royal Bahamas Defense
Force. father-in-law: Cecil Munnings and Gary Lord Rolle mother-
in-law: Dosha Hart, 27-Nephews: Glenroy, Jermaine, Tameko,
Laron, Davardo, Sherwin, Durand, Keno, Jedson, Ramon,
Renaldo, Rajiv, Amal, Tavares; Carlton Jamaine, Micah,.Deon,
Pat Jr. Janerro, Zavian, Clayron, Clayjuan, Israel, Perez, Tanario
| ,and Tanaj Smith. 18-Nieces: Nicky, Deantra, Patrika, Latoya,
_ Cameisha, Dashanda, Donneka, Rayshanna Headlesa, leishka,
Cyprianna, Tonya, Donita, Ashanti, Edisonell, Quania, Razmon
and Darekia Smith. 6Aunts: Caroline Thompson, Laura Smith,
Glenda Hepbum, Stephanie. Dean, Nettie and Annamae Smith.
of Miami Florida 3- Uncles Andrew Dean, Labon Thompson, and
Philip Hepburn. 4-Sister-in-law: - Dina, Sophia, Ethel and Laurlin
Smith. 1-Grand Aunt: Florence Smith. 6 Grand Nephew Trevon
Smith, Malik Jones, Donatoe, Keontae, Doneyo, Devarian
and Akeem Smith. 7 Grand Nieces:Tyreka, Zantie, Hunnie,
Danea, Drearnia, Glenesse and Dovonya Smith Cousiris: Nola
Curry. and Family, Barry Smith of Dania Beach Florida. Karen
and Devi Smith of Atlanta Georgia, Nicky and Maury Smith of
Miami Florida, Michael Smith of Arizona Gertalene, Patricia, and
Annie Dean , Judy, Marcia, Patrice, Emestine, Crystal, Patral,
. Dwayne, Patrick Pheromone, Kayla, Davantie, Troy, Terrell,
Jason, Dustin, Raymos, Chino, Clifford, Andrew Jr, Anthon,
‘Unell, Kenny, Crystal, Vince. Susan, Nancy, Janet, Harris,
Nathan, Carol, Leslie; Sidney, Randy, Rose, Barbie, Tishka,
Lavance and Sophia Smith, Dean Whylly, Francina and the
Clarke family. A host of other relatives including: Elliott Lockhart,
Lemuel Maycock Fredrick Ferguson, David Rolle, Norman
Lloyd, Ann Richardson, |zona Rolle and Family, Sarah Rolle and
Family, Cedric Smith and Family, The Curling Family Mr. Burke
and Eloise Smith and Family from Staniel Cay Exuma, The
Maycock Family, the Smith Family from Farmers Hill Exuma and
the whole Communities of Stuart Manor, Curtis, Rolleville, and
Barraterre Exuma and The Bonefish Lounge Committee. °

Viewing will be held at Mt. Thompson Seventh-Day Adventist
Church on Saturday from 3:00pm until service time on Sunday.

Le

rupt process, especially in
law enforcement.

As a prospective officer
of the courts, I.am aware

that there are some in the. -

legal profession who are dri-
ving the country towards the
nether world of criminality.
Frankly, blatant nepotism
and what appears to be
selective justice has beset
the Bahamas’ legal system
and led to a mounting back-
log of cases.

Moreover, antiquated
legislation contributes to the
delays plaguing the coun-
try’s molasses-like legal sys-
tem. Whilst the police can,
in some instances, better
prepare cases, the police
force must. be weary of
arresting and re-arresting
the same people who
repeatedly exploit legal
loopholes or, upon arraign-
ment and/or delayed court

dates and legal arguments:

about the violation of their
constitutional rights, are
released on bail.

The depressingly long
case backlog is a matter of
grave concern in the




Rees Guo i
Pago (202) 340.8085 + Fax: AD 940-8094










for the late
Mr. Cely
Jerome
Smith,45





























































Bahamas, particularly since
citizens/residents are seem-
ingly being denied justice on
several fronts. It is unac-
ceptable when less than 10

murder cases are disposed °

of per year.

The increasing incidents
of violent/commercial
crimes are almost over-
whelming and are almost
certainly due to the snail-
paced, molasses-like dispos-
al of cases.

Sluggish

Bahamians, some of

whom are fed-up with the,

sluggish, inefficient justice
system, will be—or possibly
already are—resorting to
vigilante justice, illegally tak-
ing the law into their own
hands.

In a modern Bahamas,
there is a pressing need for
specialization of the legal
process. Undoubtedly, spe-
cialized courts would height-
en the efficiency of the jus-
tice System and bring a
greater focus to specific mat-
ters whilst alleviating the
long-standing case backlog.

Law Pre-essor Rose-
Marie Belle Antoine, in her
seminal work. Law and
Legal Systems, writes that
“any particular jurisdiction
may have specialized courts
and tribunals in the form of
industrial.courts and tri-
bunals, family courts, Juve-
nile Courts, divorce courts,
administrative courts, rev-
enue courts, and-income tax
appeal boards or tribunals
and even Public Service
Commissions.”

“The concept of special-

ized courts and tribunals.

emerged as a response to
the need for adjudicating
bodies which would give

.separate attention and

expertise to certain matters
that could not be properly
addressed in ordinary courts
of law. There are a number
of reasons why the ordinary
courts may be considered
inadequate to address these
matters. It may be for expe-
diency. For example, there
may be an overwhelming
bulk of legal matters to be

- determined in a particular













The depressingly long case backlog is a
matter of grave concern in the Bahamas, par-
ticularly since citizens/residents are seem-
ingly being denied justice on several fronts. It
is unacceptable when less than 10 murder

cases are disposed of pet year.

subject area. Another rea-
son is that the nature of cer-

tain matters may go beyond .

the boundaries of the strict-
ly legal or could be highly
technical and specific. There
may also be a need to sim-
plify certain procedures,”
stated Mrs Antoine.

Indeed, the local Juvenile
Court is a specialized court,
meting out sanctions for
wayward, law-breaking juve-
niles while permitting coun-
seling and rehabilitation for
youngsters and during trial,
shielding them from being
beleaguered by overaggres-
sive lawyers.

Undeniably, there is a
need for specialized courts
that, each having original

jurisdiction, can issue war- .

rants, possess a separate reg-
istry and render yearly law
reports.

The current Coroner’s
Court, which serves as an
inquisitorial court that
inquires into the cause of
deaths and, if necessary,
holds an inquest, was a spe-
cialized court with its man-
date set out in Chapter 56
(Coroners Act) of. the
Bahamas’ statute laws.

The Coroners court was

formerly a specialist court.

until it was abolished by the
PLP in 2007. Today, it is a
part of the Magistrate’s
court.

Frankly, while the Indus-
trial Tribunal has jurisdic-
tion over industrial matters
in the country, a separate
Industrial Court should be
developed.

According to Professor
Antoine:

“All the countries in the -

region have some special
mechanism with which to
determine industrial rela-
tions matters. These are
either industrial courts or
industrial tribunals. Indus-
trial tribunals may be either
separate quasi-judicial bod-
ies as in Jamaica, Dominica
and Belize, or a division
under the Ministry of
Labour. In the latter
instance,.the body is purely
administrative.” |

“It was believed that a

special court, as well as a -

special type of law and legal
procedure, should be
designed for the important
area of labour relations to
alleviate such political and
ideological biases and anti-
labour judicial attitudes,”
she states.

The esteemed Caribbean
law scholar writes:

“With such justifications
for their establishment, it is

not surprising that industri-

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creg Smith and/or Greg Smith
& Associates

Authorized Agents for:
RoyalStar Assurance Limited
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Company
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International Medical Group CIMcG)

~al courts have a unique ori-
entation. For example, they
are characterized by the
‘principles and practices of
good industrial relations’, a
concept peculiar to the area
of labour relations and
unknown to other areas of
law. They are expected to
take into consideration the
principles of equity and

‘good conscience’ in exam-
ining the substantial merits
of a case. In addition, legal

techniques are not priori-

tized in such courts. Rather,
the requirements of human
relations which are essential
to industrial relations, such
as negotiation, take prece-
dence.”

N ecessies

Moreover, the develop-
ment of family courts is an
absolute necessity-in the
Bahamas.

“The year 1975 saw the
heralding of a new dawn in
family relations for the legal
system of Jamaica, with the
passing of the Judicature
(Family Court) Act. This
provided for a single court
with jurisdictional powers
over all legal proceedings
related to family life, except

that of divorce,” writes
Antoine. :
She says: “Family Courts

do not conform to a univer-

' sal definition because of the

divergent nature of the
problems which concern the
family in different societies.
The jurisdiction of such
courts varies depending on
the priority given to the
court and the nature of the
problem. Some courts may
take the form of a court of
summary jurisdiction, while
others may be placed on a
par with a superior Court of
Record. For instance, if it is
felt that certain family mat-
ters need to be afforded
more respect, a country may.
‘choose a superior court.”
“The Family Court has
an obvious sociological
thrust. Its main aim. can be
viewed as.the prevention of
the breakdown of the family
unit and generally, to pro-
tect the welfare of the mem- |
bers of the family, especial-*
ly children. Where such
attempt at prevention of
family breakdown fails, it
seeks to improve the gener-
al administration of family
laws and speedy rehabilita-

‘tion of those who seek the

court’s assistance. There is
a greater underlying aim,
that is, an increase in the sta-
bility of the country as a

Are no longer authorized to
conduct business on behalf of

STAR GENERAL INSURANCE
AGENCY (GRAND BAHAMA) LTD.

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whole,” asserts Professor
Antoine.
In the Bahamas, with so

_ Many issues afflicting today’s

families, a Family Court
should be a superior court.
In the Bahamas, there is a
need for the establishment
of a commercial court, swift-
ly moving along litigation—
related to business— in con-
currence with international-
ly accepted legal standards.
Furthermore, the devel-
opment of revenue courts is
long overdue. Today, with
$400 million in property tax-
es uncollected, in addition
to revenue shortfalls due to
persons failing to pay cus-
toms duties, business license
fees, casino taxes, etcetera, a
Revenue Court is mandato-
ry. A Revenue Court, simi-
lar to the court established
in Jamaica in 1972 can, as
Antoine states, serve as a
“Superior Court of Record
which deals with questions
relating to taxes, duties and
other impositions due to the
Government—a modern
day Court of Exchequer.”
Moreover, when will a
Gun Court be established in
the Bahamas?
The inexcusable shortage
of judges, court and registry
staff also contributes to the
frequent mismanagement of
cases and court records. The
Bahamas’ current judge-
general population ratio is
one of the worst in the
world.I have previously sug-
gested that the government
establish tribunals and utilise
fair-minded Justices of the
Peace to. settle minor dis-
putes and deliver justice in a
timely manner. This recom-

' mendation, along with other

legislative changes, such as
amending the Bail Act, pass-
ing a Jurors Act and imple-
menting a law that supports
plea bargaining, will, no
doubt help to alleviate the
60,000-plus case backlog.

There is also a need to’
extend court hours into the
night and also on weekends.

“What's more, technologi-
cal upgrades are desperate-
ly needed as court staff are
still forced to use antiquated
means for record-keeping,
particularly since numerous
court buildings lack. com-
puters, the internet and the
other relevant technologies
of 21st century societies.

The Bahamas has yet to
catch up with the developed
world that now “e-manage”
case files, documents, war-
rants, judgments, notices
and other court-related
work.

This can Rnaueationably
be an improvement over the
present situation and reduce
the likelihood of files sud-
denly being "lost" or "miss-
ing."

Lastly, in championing
the administration of justice,
the government must also
ensure that the construction
of new court houses is com-

pleted.
















THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2u10, PAGE 7



GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY’S ‘SELF-STORAGE/WAREHOUSE’ PROGRAMME
GBPA makes
business
ownership
easier

FOR specific business cat-
egories in Freeport, the cost
of starting a business just got
lower, thanks to the newest
business development ini-
tiative launched by the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority.

The recently introduced
‘Self-Storage/Warehouse’
programme allows individ-
uals in specified trades to
use storage facilities as
approved premises to apply
for a GBPA. business
licence.

Company president, Ian
Rolle, explained the premise
of the initiative.

“Tt is a fact that there is a
great demand to enter into
business, but the start-up
costs makes it difficult for
some. cera

“The Self-Storage/Ware-
house initiative allows entre-
preneurs, in specific cate-
gories, to take advantage of
the benefits offered as a
GBPA licensee.” |
_ Additionally, according to
GBPA’s business develop-
ment manager, Derek New-
bold, “This initiative pro-
vides a good opportunity for
reduction in overhead
expenses for certain busi-
ness categories. . i

“We are cognisant of the

current economic climate



business development manger, Derek Newbold.

~ and will continue to seek out

initiatives that can provide

some level of relief to small

businesses.”

John Gallagher, propri-

etor of Albacore Storage
Units, agrees.
\ “If you take a small busi-
ness person like a window
cleaner, he doesn’t need to
rent an office.

“Now he can get a stor-
age unit, put all of his equip-
ment in it where it’s secured,
and operate his business
using a cell phone.”

Albacore and Bronces-

tone Self Storeaway Unit

_are two on-island facilities.

offering self-storage units.
Opened in 2000, Bronces-
tone features 36 units in
three sizes - 5’ x 10’, 10’ x

10’, and 10’ x 20’.

Rental prices range from
$139 to $289 per month,
along with a refundable $100
security deposit.

Broncestone’s propri-
etress, Pauline Hepburn is
equally excited about
GBPA’s newest concept.

- “I’m open to this new ini-

tiative because these are



‘GBPA INITIATIVE BOOSTS BUSINESS = Albacore’s president, John Gallagher, chats with GBPA

.

hard times and I think it’s
fair for the Port-to do this
to allow others to become
business owners,” she said.

Abroad

She anticipates benefiting
from the programme as a
provider of self-storage facil-
ities, a concept which she
and her husband brought to
the island after viewing sim-
ilar structures abroad.

Located on Logwood
Road West, Broncestone
has 24-hour security and



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O DISCUSS STORIE





“It is a fact
that there is a
great demand
to enter into
business, but
the start-up.
costs makes it
difficult for
some.”



Ian Rolle

controlled gate access.

Units can be rented by
completing a simple appli-
cation form and submitting a
photo ID.

Albacore’s application
process is just as simple and
the facility on Settlers Way
offers 46 units in four sizes —

‘10’ x 10’, 10’ x 15’, 10° x 20°

and 20’ x 20’.

Monthly rental prices
range from $100 to $300,
along with a refundable
security deposit of one mon-
th’s rent.

Since opening its doors in
January of this year, Alba-




LOU EM LUT CTU RL

BRONCESTONE
STORAGE UNITS -
Proprietress, Padline
Hepburn, shows off
one of three sizes of
units available for
rental at her facility.

core has been inundated

. with tenants, prompting Mr

Gallagher to convert some
of his former 20’ x 20’ units
into dual 10’ x 20’ units.
The new facility features
coded gate access, along
with individual locks on the
roll-up doors for each unit
and individual intérior locks
for the newly converted dual
compartments. :
Complete fire-proofing,
daylight only access and
night-guard lighting add to
Albacore’s security. .
Now with the launch of
GBPA’s new ‘Self-stor-
age/Warehouse’ initiative,

_ both storage facility owners

are looking forward to
increased rentals as more
persons take advantage of
their premises in their quest
to become GBPA licensees.
In fact, they’re both consid-
ering expanding their self-
storage facilities as the need
arises.

“Allowing certain trades-
people to use storage units
as approved premises to
apply for a GBPA business
license is a great idea,” Mr
Gallagher said.

“T like the open door pol-
icy and the new initiatives
launched by the Port to
assist licensees.”








PAGE 8, CaP AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Boosting io ties



By VLADIMIR PETROVIC



ast week, I was proud

to participate in the

ongoing strengthen-

ing of relations

between my country, the Republic
of Serbia, and your beautiful
nation. Though we are an ocean
apart, we share mutual interests
in the sanctity of state sovereignty,
international law and religious
freedom. Moreover, with the
understanding that what is hap-
pening in the Balkans will have
‘lasting repercussions globally,
Prime Minister Ingraham and

Deputy Prime-Minister-Simenette -

have been leaders in addressing
the current stalemate over
Kosovo's future for which the peo-
‘ple of Serbia are grateful.

In 2008, ethnic-Albanian Mus-

lims in the Kosovo province of Ser-
bia unilaterally declared their inde-
pendence in contravention to our
constitution, threatening our sov-
ereignty and territorial integrity.
As the Prime Minister and I dis-

cussed, Serbia has not wavered:

from its position that it will never
recognise such a declaration. ‘This
position was born out of a com-
mitment-to. our.constitution and
international law. eas

The international_-community
faces an age of uncertainty if the
damage is not quickly contained.
Constantly shifting borders and.a
heightened threat of armed con-
flict as states are reshaped by eth-
nic and religious minorities from
within will challenge international
peace and security.. The borders
of every multi-ethnic and multi-
region state would be permanent-
ly threatened by secessionism, pro-
ducing lasting instability through-
out the world. ~

Separatist groups eager to carve
out a piece of their existing states

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_via secession are watching the legal

developments over Kosovo with a

-keen eye. More than 100 of these

groups in dozens of countries are
weighing the potential benefits of
using the Kosovo textual template.
Whether in Central Asia and the

Caucasus, the Pyrenees, the Mid-
‘dle East, the Far East, Africa or’

the Caribbean, this recipe is likely
to be followed.

: Serbia is fully committed to find-
ing a realistic approach to closing

‘the Pandora's box opened up by

Kosovo's aggression, by attempting
to succeed, through a multilateral
peaceful dialogue that produces a
mutually acceptable solution to all
outstanding issués.. UN Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon has stated
that the General Assembly "will
determine how to proceed on this
matter," and we look forward to
focusing on the consequences and
implications of Kosovo's actions.

Integrity
Our ongoing political and diplo-

matic defence of the Kosovo
province is not limited, however, to

maintaining our territorial integri- |

ty.

Kosovo, in many ways, is the cul-
tural and spiritual heartland of Ser-
bian Orthodox Christians. Some
have: gone so far as to say that for

us, it is our Jerusalem.

Within the Kosovo province are
the churches, monasteries and oth-
er religious sites cherished by the
Serbian Orthodox Church. These
are the only cultural monuments
on the European continent, some
of which date to the 12th, 13th and

14th century, that need to be .

guarded by international armed
forces because they would likely
be defaced or demolished without
protection. For the devout, this is
deeply holy land threatened by
hostile forces.

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URGENT SESSION: Serbian lawmakers convene at a session of the Serbian Parliament in baled; Serbia, Monday, July

“Marko Drobnjakovie/AP Photo

26, 2010. Lawmakers in Serbia have met for an urgent session expected to reaffirm the country’s bid to keep Kosovo despite
a World Court ruling backing the legality of Kosovo’s independence declaration.

The road ahead is uncertain, but
we are committed to a peaceful
solution. This is our one and only
option. If the Albanian leaders in
Pristina are willing to rejoin us at
the negotiating table, we believe

_that a mutually agreeable solution

is possible. This is the only way to
reinforce shared priorities, and to
complete the democratic transfor-
mation of the Balkans into a sta-
ble, prosperous region fully inte-
grated into the European Union.
In the meantime, we will continue
to seek out allies in every corner of
the world to reinforce basic prin-

ciples of international law and |

achieve prosperity and stability in
the region.

e Mr Petrovic is the Ambassador
of the Republic of Serbia to the
United States and Special Envoy
of the President of Serbia to the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.



(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)
KEY DEBATE: Serbian President, Boris Tadic, 2nd left, attends a session of the Ser-
bian-Parliament in Belgrade, Serbia, Monday, July 26, 2010.

Small Ship and Yacht Inspector/ Surveyor Trainee |

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is a world class International Ship ee. and
a flag of choice, with an expanding Yacht Register.

We would like to identify suitable candidates to be trained as small ship and
yacht inspectors/surveyors; whose jobs would include, but not be.limited to; the
inspection and surveying of vessels less than 500GT, in accordance with the
relevant IMO Conventions, Caribbean Cargo Ship Safety Code (CCSSC), Small
Commercial Vessel Code (SCV) and the Bahamas Yacht Code as required,

QUALIFICATIONS
The prospective applicants should be in possession of Master up to 3000 GT,

Near Coastal or Limited (extended) Coastal Trades or Chief Engineer up to 3000
kW Propulsion Power. Officers holding an Officer In Charge of a Navigational

Watch Certificate or an Officer In Charge of an Engineering Watch Certificate

with at least 12 months approved sea-going sefvice as an officer holding since
acquiring that certificate may express an interest. Persons not holding STCW
certification but having two years approved sea-going experience plus inspection
and or surveying experience may also be considered. Documentary evidence
demonstrating the required qualification and/or experience must be submitted
with the applications. | .

Candidates wil also have to have a medical certificate of fitness valid for not
more than two years and be at least 20 years of age.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 30" September 2010

Applications must be sent to:-
The Director
Bahamas Maritime Authority
Manx Corporate Centre
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-4679
Neeson ae

TO TET STORIES ON ryt PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 9



Jamaican intellectual | 7! ~

Dudley Thompson
addresses audience
in the Bahamas

Event held under the patronage of
Governor General and Lady Foulkes

SCORES of Bahamians were
treated to a lecture ‘by
renowned Jamaican intellectual
Dudley Thompson at a‘recep-
tion sponsored by Delta Lamb-
da Boulé of Sigma Phi Pi Fra-
ternity.

The event was held at the
Balmoral Club under the
patronage of Governor General
Sir Arthur and Lady, Foulkes.

Delta Lambda Boulé is the
local chapter of Sigma Pi Phi
Fraternity which w2s estab-
lished in Philadelphia in 1904
in order to afford successful,
university-educated ‘men of
colour’ who were excluded from
mainstream American society
because of their race, an oppor-
tunity to meet and get to know
the best of each other.

Fraternity

Some prominent members of
the fraternity included persons
such as WEB Dubois; Rev Mar-
tin Luther King, Jr; US
Supreme Court Justice Thur-
good Marshall; Atlanta Mayor
and former UN Ambassador
Andrew Young; former head of
the Urban League and advisor
to presidents, Vernon Jordan;
the late tennis great, Arthur
Ashe; the late Secretary of
Commerce Ron Brown; and
noted Historian John Hope
Franklin.

Today there are three mem-
bers of the fraternity serving in
President Obama’s Cabinet,
including Attorney General
Eric Holder, and eight in the



& _
S |

United States Congress. Sigma
Pi Phi-has 125 chapters in the
United States and the Bahamas.

Delta Lambda Boulé's best
known social action programme
is the Gentlemen’s Club, which
has centered on developing
the best in young Bahamian
men. i

Scholarships

Over the past 19 years, nearly
700 young mén have’ passed
through the Gentlemen’s Club

‘and approximately 43 million

has been awarded these gents
in scholarships to Fisk Univer-
sity, Morehouse College and
Saint John’s University.

Dr Dudley Thompson, aged
93, has enjoyed a very success-
ful legal and political career in
Africa and the Caribbean.

Born in Panama, he entered
Oxford University as Jamaica’s
Rhodes Scholar in 1947 and in
1950 was called to the Bar in
London from Gray’s Inn after
which he practised as a barrister
in East Africa, 'Tanganyika
(now Tanzania) and Kenya,

where he was part of the inter- -

national team defending Jomo
Kenyatta in the Mau Mau tri-
als in Kenya.

He has also practiced law in
Trinidad, Barbados, St Kitts,
Dominica, the Bahamas, Grena-
da and elsewhere in the West
Indies.

He has served as a member
of both the Senate and as the
leader of Government Business
in the House of Representatives

rol

NO, ah ADPROIANT
~

RECEPTION: Members of Delta Lambda Boulé along with Dr Dudley Thompson and Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes

in Jamaica. eS

He also served in various
Cabinet posts in the Jamaican
government including as Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs, Nation-
al Security, and Mines and Nat-
ural Resources.

Independence

Dr Thompson?’s lecture, enti-
tled “the African Renaissance”,
focused on his involvement in
the Pan African movement
which culminated in the inde-
pendence of several countries
in Africa and the West Indies
from Great Britain.

During his lecture, Dr
Thompson noted that “slavery
was not the beginning of our
history, but that it interrupted
our history”.

He noted that “we did not
descend from slavery, we
ascended from slavery.”

Commenting on the event,
Arnold Forbes, president of

DW

@

Wet ie Net :

13-5310 ah Gi

Delta Lambda Boulé, said:
“This event is one in a series of
distinguished lectures that the
Boule intends to sponsor.
“The opportunity to hear Dr



Thompson is an honour and a
privilege and is of tremendous

‘ historical import for Bahami-

ans to be featured to such an
outstanding Caribbean icon.”

Ecuador shaken by

7.1 magnit

QUITO, Ecuador

ude quake

A POWERFUL earthquake shook the South American nation of
Ecuador on Thursday, but there were only scattered reports.of damage
or injury, according to Associated Press. ;

The magnitude-7.1 quake that hit-at 6:54 a.m. (1154 GMT) was felt
across much of the nation, including the capital, Quito.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake was centered 110 miles (175

kilometers) southeast of Quito.

But it was also-very deep — 131 miles (211 kilometers) below the sur-
face — a distance that might have blunted its damage.
Ecuador's national Geophysics Institute reported that some areas

shook for almost 10 minutes.

It said several houses were reported damaged in the cities of Guayaquil

LLL nc

‘and Manta, where one person suffered minor injuries.




PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ATO ines
CEE
TEU

_ (BIS Photo: Derek Smith)
TOURISM BOOST: Pictured (from left) are Mr Rahming, Ms
Walkine, Mr. Maranescu and Tyrone Sawyer, director of
Sports Tourism.

y
,

The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation and the
Bahamas Judo Federation are entertaining the possibil-
ity of having the Bahamas host large-scale judo compe-
titions that would bring great numbers of visitors and
media opportunities.

Bahamas Judo Federation president D’Arcy Rahmine
and International Judo Federation representative Vlad
Maranescu called on Tourism Director General Vernice
Walkine and introduced the idea of hosting future tour-
naments. ~

Ms Walkine said events that attract media attention
while bringing visitors to fill hotel rooms and patronise
local businesses are enterprises that the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation wants to encourage.

Experience

She also pointed out that the Bahamas has had much
experience in staging large-scale international events.

“We have hosted many international events, not the
least of which was Miss Universe last year,” she said.

“Prior to that, we hosted the FIFA World Congress.
The point I am making here is that we have demon-
strated our ability to host these international events.”

Ms Walkine also explained that convenient flight ser-
vices and the availability of language interpreters and oth-
er professional services makes the Bahamas an attractive
place for hosting multi-national events.

riving Instructor’s Manual
puts focus on road safety

ROAD SAFETY: Transport Permanent Secrelati Colin Higgs addressing the launch workshop for the Driving Instructor’ s Manual.
Also shown, from left, are: Marc Ingraham, economist in the Transportation Policy and Planning Unit; Kenrick Bowe and Sterling
Moss, senior examiners in the Road Traffic Department; Errol McPhee, deputy controller; and Vashti Hinds.

THE launch of the Driving Instruc-
tor’s Manual and the introduction of
driving simulators are evidence of the
government’s commitment to improv-

. Ing road safety, Transport permanent

secretary Colin Higgs said.
On Thursday at Workers House, Mr
Higgs addressed the launch workshop

for the manual, which contains sec-.

tions on: traffic rules and regulations,
road conditions, preparations for the
driving test and how to use a round-
about.

In attendance was Elizabeth Keju,
newly appointed undersecretary; Errol
McPhee. assistant controller; Khader

che co-or:nator for the New
Providence Road Improvement Pro-
ject; Albie Hope, transportation spe-
cialist; and representatives of the Traf-
fic Division of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.

Mr Higgs said the training options -
-available to people learning to drive





in the Bahamas are not “consistent”
and do not meet internationally recog-
nised standards.

As a result, he said, “many of our
novice drivers do not have the skills,
knowledge or attitudes needed to dri-
ve safely in the traffic conditions they
face on our roads.”

Workshop

Mr Higgs informed workshop par-
ticipants that in recognition of this defi-
ciency, the government, as part of the
New Providence Transport Pro-
gramme, engaged the services of the
Transport and Research Laboratory,
based in the United Kingdom, to assist
the Road Traffic Department in devel-
oping a Driving Instructor’s Manual
for the Bahamas.

The manual provides a standardised
set of guidelines that should be fol-

PHOTO: Letisha Henderson/BIS

tors. He did not say whether the gov-
ernment intends to make use of the
manual mandatory.
. According to Mr Higgs, the manual
has been produced to guide established
driving schools and instructors; those
who wish to become driving instruc-
tors; schools that run driver training
programmes; the Royal Bahamas
Police Force; examiners at the Road
Traffic Department; and representa-
tives of the car insurance industry.

“It is the government’s intention to
put into place regulations to regulate

‘driving schools and driving instruc-

tors,” said Mr Higgs. “However, prior
to bringing these regulations into force
it is proposed to introduce the Driver
Instructor’s Manual to better prepare
those in the industry to standardise an
approach to instructing persons learn-
ing to drive.”

The manual will be accessible on the
government’s Weo-sile, he added.



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for

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(FOOD & BEVERAGE)

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in finance / accounting in the hospitality industry.

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lowed 2 all driver education instruc-

Former Venezuelan general
accused of revealing secrets

CARACAS, Venezuela

A former Venezuelan army general who .

has denounced: growing involvement by Cuban
troops in President Hugo Chavez's military
appeared before prosecutors Wednesday to
respond to charges of insulting the armed

forces and revealing military secrets, according

to Associated Press.

Retired Brig. Gen. Antonio Rivero was once
the government's emergency management
director, but he grew concerned about what he
saw as growing Cuban influence in the military
and retired early in protest over that and oth-
er issues.

He now. faces accusations that carry a pos-
sible penalty of up to 10 years in prison.

Rivero said after the arraignment hearing
before military prosecutors that he was barred
from discussing details of the case while the
investigation proceeds. He has not yet been
formally charged.

‘Innocent

In a telephone interview Tuesday night
before the hearing, he said: "I'm totally inno-
cent. ... I'm going to face it because I'm con-
vinced that I haven't committed any crime,
and I'm doing it simply for the good of my
country."

Rivero has become a political opponent of
Chavez since leaving the military and is run-
ning for a National Assembly seat in Septem-
ber elections. Some government opponents
call the case against him one more attempt to
silence a government critic through the courts.

Rivero has denounced what he calls a "pas-
sive invasion" by Cuban soldiers, saying their
influence goes far beyond what should be per-
mitted. He has said Cuban officers participat-
ed in high-level military meetings, trained
snipers, gained detailed knowledge of com-
munications and advised the military on under-
ground bunkers built to store and conceal
weapons. Rivero has expressed concern the

‘Cuban advisers now know where the. Venezue-

lan military stores weapons and where its com-
mand offices are. -

He also has said the Cubans have been help-
ing with a digital radio communications system
for security forces, meaning they have sensitive
information on antenna locations and radio
frequencies — knowledge that could be used to
help secure the status quo in Venezuela in the

‘future.

Among other issues that bother the 49-year-
old career-soldier is what he calls the "politi-
cization" of the military, including the slogan
that soldiers now repeat when saluting: "Social-
ist homeland or death!" Rivero also condemns
Chavez's enlistment of supporters in a growing
civilian militia and says it's improper for the
president, a civilian, to wear a military uni-
form as he often does.

Rivero's lawyer, Guillermo Heredia, said
his client hasn't insulted the military or
revealed anything that isn't already public
knowledge.

"Soldiers who retire have the right to give
their opinions about things in the country, ‘and
to denounce things they consider abnormal,"
Heredia told reporters after the closed hearing.

Military prosecutors did not ea
comment on the case.

Chavez, who views Fidel Castro asa "father"

and mentor, has acknowledged that Cuban

troops are teaching his soldiers how to repair
radios in tanks and to store ammunition,

among other tasks.

He has declined to elaborate on the mili-
tary assistance, saying everything his close ally
does helps strengthen Venezuela.

Cuban officials.have dismissed claims of
undue influence in Venezuela, saying the vast
majority of Cubans working in the country
are assigned to medical, education, sports and
cultural programs. Other Cubans have been
working on software for Venezuela's passport
and identification-card systems.

Venezuela, in turn, is Cuba's largest trading
partner and provides more than 100, ),000 barrels
of oil a day in exchange for social services
such as the Cuban doctors who see patients in
free neighborhood clinics.

Jamaica policeman charged with killing suspect

KINGSTON, Jamaica

A Jamaican police officer
allegedly caught on video
beating and shooting a sus-
pect to death has been
charged with murder,
according to Associated
Press.

Sgt. Lloyd Kelly was
released Tuesday on $12,000
bond.

charge.

in late July.

them.

Two other
detained in the case have
been released without

Kelly is accused of killing
aman who was suspected of
stabbing a woman to death

Police initially said the
officers acted in self-defense
when the man ORES

But police later said the
man was unarmed and sub-
dued after reviewing ama-
teur footage recorded by an
unknown eyewitness.

Attorney Oswest Senior-
Smith said Kelly is innocent.

Jamaica has one of the
highest rates of police
killings in the Western
Hemisphere, according to
Amnesty International...

officers

GE LOG ON TO Anti Py oe COM


THE TRIBU

—

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

A YEAR ago, Meacher
‘Pain’ Major suffered a fourth
round TKO loss to American
‘Dangerous’ Dorin Sprivey
for the NABA lightweight
title in Buffalo, New York.

Today, they are beginning
their sparring session as new
team-mates in the X-Cel
Worldwide. Promotions as
they prepare their return in
separate matches in Virginia
Beach, Virginia on August 28.

“I’m excited to being here
and IJ want the fight fans to
know that I’m going to go out
there and give it all I got,”
said Major, who will be fight-
ing in the co-main event at
the Virginia Beach Conven-



TC eS
for NACRA

Under-13 men's
ATT eS
TM ETT

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



THE Bahamas Rugby
Union is gearing up for one of
its biggest tournaments ever
held at the Winton Rugby
Union.

On Saturday, the BRU will
open the North America
Caribbean Rugby Association
(NACRA) Under-19 men
and women tournament, fea-.
turing teams from the
‘Bahamas, the Cayman
Islands, Mexico, Bermuda,
Trinidad & Tobago, Barba-
dos, the United States, Cana-
da and a Caribbean Select.

According to Elystan Miles,
the event coordinator, the
tournament is being split in
two.

The men’s tournament has
six teams comprising of two
divisions with the Cayman
Islands, the Bahamas and
Bermuda in the A and Mexi-
co, Trinidad & Tobago and*
Barbados.

There are five teams in the
women’s tournament from
the United States, Canada,
the Cayman Islands, the
Bahamas and the Caribbean
Select.

The Caribbean Select team
is comprised of the best play-
ers from Jamaica, Bermuda,
Guyana, Barbados, British
Virgin Islands, St. Vincent &°
Grenadines and Mexico.

“This is.a pretty big deal
for us,” said Miles, noting that
this is the first time that the
Bahamas has hosted such a
prestigious event. “This is also
the first time that we are hav-
ing a ladies’ team.

“We’re not really antici-
pating great things from them.
We're just glad that they have
finally gotten a team together.
This is the first step for wom-
en’s rugby in the country.”

e The Bahamian women’s
team is comprised of the fol-
lowing:

Deja Rutherford, Morgan-
na Thurston, Aiva Beckford,
Antinique Bastian, Jewette
Rodgers, Comptessa Hanna,
Tazia Rutherford, Alex New-
bold (Captain), Phylicia
Woods, Jayde Knowles,
Dawn Demeritte (Co-Cap-
tain/Backs Captain), Bronia
Beckford, Michaela Knowles,
Ashley Blyden, Lynette
Nixon, Lorraine Lafleur and
June Collie.

This will be their initial
appearance with their first.
match ‘set for Thursday at 5
p-m. against the Caribbean
Select. They won’t play again
until Saturday, August 21
against the Cayman Islands.

SEE page 14



Trains with new team-mate
Sprivey for co-main event

POOP OEOOHSOSSOOHAHOOSHGOTHTOHSHOHSOOHOO HHT OHOSOSEEDOOHODABE0ROOe

tion Center against an oppo-
nent yet to be named.

Now fighting at the 130
pound lightweight division,
Major said unlike when he

was home and he was just.

fighting one or two rounds
‘because of his dominant per-
formances, he now has to pre-
pare to go longer distances.
This fight is scheduled for
eight rounds and so Major
said he will have to take his
time and really pace himself
because he’s in a different
style of training in Virginia.
“Some guys just come in
there to take fights, but they



are normally hard to stop,”
Major said, “So I just have to
get used to that and put in the
work so.that I can be able to
perform when the fight
comes.”

Since losing to Sprivey on
November 6, Major came
home on April 11 when he
won on points over Ameri-
can Robert DaLuz to improve
his win-loss record to 17-4
with one draw.

Now he’s in Virginia where
he noted that it’s not only hot

‘and humid, but he also has a

challenge in sparring with
Sprivey leading up to the

Major prepares for fight in August

fight.

“Everything is coming
along great. It’s good that I
have this opportunity. to-work
with him,” said Major of his
former opponent, who has
moved up to the mid-
dleweight division.

“Even though I just fought
him last year, he was the ener-
gy, but now we’re just like
best friends. He’s a great, cool
guy. I’m glad that we can

- work together. He just signed

with X-Cel and Nick
Garone.”

Despite the fact that Major

has ventured into a new envi-

ronment, he said he’s trying to
learn as much as he possibly
can to help him as he tries to
progress in the future. °

SEE page 14




READY: Meacher Major






























SOFTBALL
LATE RITES ©
FORWOOD ~

e A series of sesportsrvices
in New Providence and
Eleuthera have been planned
for next week for the late
Tyrone ‘Ron, Figure’ Wood.

A wake is set for Wednesday
at 7 p.m. at the Banker’s Field
at the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex. On Thursday at 7:30
p-m. at Bethel Baptist on Meet-
ing Street, a Memorial Service
will take place.

Then on Sunday at 1 p.m. at

_Harvest Time Tabernacle in
Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, the
funeral service will take place.

Interested persons wishing to
travel to Eleuthera for the ser-
vice should note that Pineapple
Air is putting a number of extra
flights to and from Eleuthera
on Sunday.

The Island Link will also be
leaving from the Hatchet Bay

Tar Heels rout Giants 130-87
in Summer of Thunder







«

College Scrimmages opener

By BRENT STUBBS , ‘
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE North Carolina Tar Heels and famed _

coach Roy Williams didn’t have any mercy
_on the Bahamas Basketball Federation’s
national champions Commonwealth Bank
Giants. Ae 5

Playing in the opening game of the Sum-
mer of Thunder College Scrimmages on
Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium, the Tar Heels clobbered the Giants
130-87.

The Tar Heels, who won the last of their
five NCAA Division One championship
titles in 2009, had seven players in double fig-
ures in what turned out to be an exciting
match for the fans.

Tyler Zeller, playing 26 minutes, led the
attack with 24 points on 8-of-12 shooting
from the field and 8-of-11 from the foul line.
He also pulled down a game high 13
rebounds.

Before fouling out, Harrison Barnes and
Reggie Bullock, who came off the bench,
both contributed 21 points with eight
rebounds apiece. Dexter Strickland added
18, Justin Watts 13, John Henson. 11, Will

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE

Graves 10 and Leslie McDonald chipped in
with nine.

Coach Williams, who is returning for his
second stint in the Bahamas, having brought
his Tar Heels here five years ago when they
were successful in their double header, said:
“T love it here. It’s great for our team. It was
good for our team in 05 and hopefully it will
be good for us here again.” '

Williams spoke as they were preparing to '

play to play their final game last night against
a Bahamas All-Star team. : :

“It’s a beautiful place, the people treat
you great. So I have nothing, but great pos-
itive feelings.”

Williams said he was quite impressed with
the level of talent, as he had been during
his initial visit. /

He noted that the trip would help his team
as they prepared for the upcoming. colle-
giate season. ;

For the Giants, who were outmatched in
height, but made up with some spectacular
plays, Jeremy Hutchinson pumped in a game
high 29 points on 7-of-16 shooting from the

SEE page 14 ‘
SEE pictures on pg 14

BIG JAM: North

weath Bank Giants...

... and finishes
strong to the rim.

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dock at 6 p.m. on Sunday. -

Ceoeccoeeccccccoscccocecccosose

SOFTBALL
BGDSA ALL-STAR
WEEKEND

e THE Bahamas Govern-

ment Departmental Softball
Association wishes to thank its

>















: i smany fans who showed up on
Carolina Tar Heels Saturday to view the 32rd Slow-
Jason Watts fly to pitch Softball All-Star games at
the rim for a two the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-

_ handed dunk plex.
against Common- This year, the BGDSA exec-

utives played against the execu-
tives of the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Basketball
Association in softball and bas-
ketball.

In softball, the BGDSA won
15-5 in the opener before they
moved to. the gym where the
BGDSA took an early 9-2 lead
and held on for a 20-15 win in
basketball.

The D’Albenas Agency was
the major sponsor for the event.














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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

PGA begins after

fog delay, and
little is clear



By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer

SHEBOYGAN, Wis. (AP)
— Golfers finally got.on the
course after a 3-hour delay at
the PGA Championship, only
to have fog bring play to a
halt once again.

What a fittingly odd start
to the final major in what's
become the strangest of sea-
sons.

Tee times were pushed
back 3 hours and 10 minutes
because of fog so soupy it
obscured Lake Michigan, and
Tiger Woods and other play-
ers could do little but wait it
out on the driving range and
putting green. A handful of
groups made it on the course
before play was halted again
because of poor visibility on
No. 3, but players stayed on
the course and the second
delay lasted only six minutes.

The PGA is known for pro-
ducing some unexpected win-
ners, but it's even more wide
open than usual this year.
Woods' game is as big a mess
as his personal life, Phil Mick-

elson has forsaken his beloved *

burgers for broccoli because
of arthritis and Lee. West-
wood is at home with a calf
injury. With five of the last

six majors won by first-timers,
including the U.S. Open
(Graeme McDowell) and the
British Open (Louis Oost-
huizen), just about every guy

in the locker room is think-’

ing this could be his week.
"This.is probably as wide
open a major as we've seen
in a long time," Steve Stricker
said. "I think we all have a
sense that if you can play well
and get it going, then you
have that great opportunity
to win here." -
Woods, who needs a good
week to hang onto his No. 1
ranking and end the hubbub
over his Ryder Cup status, is

‘now teeing off at midday ina |

group with Vijay Singh, the
winner the last time the PGA
was at Whistling Straits, and
defending champion Y.E.
Yang. a

It was Yang's victory at last
year's PGA that was the first
sign of trouble for Woods,
though no one could have
imagined this dramatic of a
downfall.

Woods hasn't come close
to winning a tournament since
running over that fire hydrant
on Thanksgiving, unleashing a
firestorm of tawdry details
about his rampant infidelities.
While his personal life is

beginning to "normalize," his
game is doing the exact oppo-
site.

He slumped to a néw low
last week, shooting a whop-
ping 18-over 298 and manag-
ing to beat only one player in
the 80-man field at Firestone
— a course where he's won
seven times. He's broken par
in only four of his last 20

rounds, and is scrambling to |

hang onto the No. 1 ranking
he's held for a record 270
weeks in a row.

Mickelson has come up
short in his previous oppor-
tunities to reach No. | for the
first time in his career. But he
could do it this week with five
scenarios: a victory; runner-
up finish with Woods out of
the top three; third-place fin-
ish with Woods out of the top
11; fourth-place finish with
Woods outside the top 46; a
two-way tie for fourth with
Woods missing the cut.

Mickelson tees off in the
afternoon with McDowell and

_Oosthuizen. Playing two

groups ahead of them are
Stricker, the Wisconsin native
and No. 4 player in the world,
and Rory Mcllroy, who tied a
major championship record
with a 63 in the first round of
the British Open.







GOOD STROKE: Tiger Woods hits a shot on the 18th hole in a driving rain during a practice round for
the PGA Championship golf tournament on Wednesday at Whistling Straits in Haven, Wis.
. (AP Photo)

\



GOLD FEVER: Hungary's
Katinka Hosszu swims to
winning the gold medal in the
women's 200m individual
medley final at the European
Swimming Championships in
Budapest, Hungary, on
Thursday.
; (AP Photo)





Ivanovic turns down
wild card at Rogers Cup

MONTREAL (AP) —
Ana Ivanovic has declined a
wild-card entry into the main
draw of the Rogers Cup next
week.

’ Ina posting on her website,
Ivanovic said her request for'a

wild card was turned down;

weeks ago. Tournament
director Eugene Lapierre
offered‘her direct entry.into
the Montreal tournament
Tuesday, but she turned it
down.

Ivanovic, whose first major
victory came in Montreal in
2006, said she declined
because of comments made
by Lapierre to a Montreal
newspaper. Lapierre said the
62nd-ranked player didn't
deserve a wild card and hoped
to leave a spot open for a
Canadian player. si

The 2008 French 'Open win-
ner wrote she would have
loved to play but was hurt by
Lapierre's comments.

Lapierre issued a statement
saying Ivanovic was always
welcome at the Rogers Cup.





. HURT CARD: Serbian Ana Ivanovic hits a backhand in her match

against Yaroslava Shvedova, of Kazakhstan, at the Cincinnati Open

_ tournament on Wednesday in Mason, Ohio.

Fo TES TT |

(AP Photo)

FACE OFF: Chad Dawson (left) faces off with Jean Pascal during a news conference Wednesday in
Montreal. The two will fight for Pascal's WBC-IBO light heavyweight title on Saturday in Montreal.

(AP Photo)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

patriot Evelyn Verraszto. os,

‘onds Thursday with Vérraszto just 0.01 sec-





Hosszu leads Hungary’s 1-2
in medley at Europeans.

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Katinka
Hosszu of Hungary set a meet record in the
200-meter individual medley at the European
swimming championships after edging com-

Lotte Friis of Denmark won the 800
freestyle in 8:23.27, followed Ophelie Cyriell:
Etienne of France,and Federica Pellegrini of
Italy... os bes hay? BoA ss

_.. The 30th-edition ‘of the European champi-
onships is the first major international event
where competitors can no longer wear body-
suits, which helped swimmers set dozens of
world records in recent years.

Hosszu touched in 2 minutes, 10.09 sec-

onds behind. Hannah Miley of Britain was
third.

S \ S SS
S RN
S \ \



FUTURE SIGHTS: Roger Federer of Switzerland answers questions during news conference
at the Rogers Cup ATP tournament in Toronto.



(AP Photo)

Federer sets

sights on 20

Grand Slam
titles |

November 2003.

However, Federer told the BBC that
winning 20 majors is "is something
doable for me." ;

Federer overtook Pete Sampras'
record of 14 Grand Slam titles at Wim-

, bledon in 2009. By winning the French
Open a month earlier, he became only
the sixth man in history to win all four
Grand Slam titles.

LONDON (AP) — Roger Federer
has set a goal of winning at least 20
Grand Slam titles before he retires.

The 29-year-old Swiss added his 16th
title with a victory at the Australian
Open this year.

But he failed to get beyond the quar-
terfinals at the French Open and Wim-
bledon. He's dropped to No. 3 in the
rankings, his lowest position since






‘TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 13

oT



Dolphins sign
CB Hobhis,
G Feinga

DAVIE, Fla, (AP) — Cor-
nerback Kevin Hobbs has
signed with the Miami Dol-
phins to replace reserve cor-
nerback Evan Oglesby, who
was placed on injured reserve
with a left ankle injury.

The Dolphins also re-
signed guard Ray Feinga and

waived receiver Taurus John- :

son. Feinga and Hobbs took
part in practice Thursday.The
Dolphins cut Feinga at the
start of training camp two
weeks ago. He reinforces
depth in the offensive line,
where guard Nate Garner is
idled by a foot injury.

Hobbs is a fourth-year pro
who spent two years with
Seattle and played in 14
games with two starts last year
for Detroit.








FRESH START: Donovan McNabb gestures during a game against the Washington Redskins in
Philadelphia. McNabb has one foot planted in the nation's capital and the other firmly in the City of
Brotherly Love. He is a Redskin now, but part of him will always be an Eagle.

(AP Photo)

Redskins, Bills
start anew in Ist

over five games.

The carry-over was evident in. their 6-10 regular sea-

son.

Tlie Redskins were even worse, going 4-12. Now both’
teams have new coaches, both are installing 3-4 defens-
. es, and both have questions at receiver and offensive

line.

preseason game

LANDOVER, Md. (AP) — The Buffalo Bills say it
will be funny to see Donovan McNabb in a Washington
Redskins uniform Friday night.

But the Bills will more interested in putting on a good
DeHOFanCr, Buffalo had a terrible preseason last year
— when the starting offense scored only three points



And there will be plenty of interest in McNabb, who
is learning a new offense for the first time his rookie sea-

son in 1999,

In other preseason games Friday night, it's Jack-
sonville at Philadelphia and Kansas City at Atlanta.



4

In the land of soccer, NBA eyes African inroads

By RUKMINI CALLIMACHI
Associated Press Writer

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) —
On a rectangle of dirt sepa-
rating two arms of a congest-
ed highway, a game of soccer
is under way — just as it is
every day in cities through-
out Africa. Not far away, a
team of coaches from the

NBA is trying to expand the -

continent's options. .

For the eighth consecutive
year, and the first time in
Senegal, coaches from the
NBA are mentoring 60 of
Africa's best players during
the annual Basketball With-
out Borders camp, hoping to
raise the profile of a sport that
lags far behind soccer across
much of the continent.

"We are here and we are
making an investment in
Africa," said, Senegalese
native Amadou Gallo Fall,
the NBA's vice president of
development in Africa.
"There are 6-foot-8 soccer
players out there that don't
know that there is another
sport where their height is
actually a positive.

"Our goal is to see more
kids bouncing than kicking
the ball."

In Senegal, however, there
are so few basketball courts
that NBA officials say most
cities and towns outside
Dakar can consider them-
selves lucky if they have even
one. Many players practice
dunks with a soccer ball
because basketballs are scarce
and expensive,

Despite ‘the

¢

lack of

resources, the NBA says -

LeBron, Carmelo,

Africa has one of the globe's |

greatest reserves of untapped
talent.’

Since 1984, 25 players from
Africa have made it to the
NBA — five times more than
from China, which was con-
sidered the next talent
pipeline after Yao Ming's
meteoric rise, according to

NBA senior vice president of _

basketball qperations-inter-
national Kim Bohuny. And
last year, a count performed
by The Associated Press
found more than 170 African
players at U.S. colleges, junior
colleges-and universities dur-
ing the 2008-09 season.

"We're just starting to tap
into that potential," Bohuny
said.

This year, the 60 players
from 22 countries represent a
cross-section of the challenges

faced by those attempting to

play basketball on a continent
where soccer is not only the
most popular sport but also a
way out of poverty. For years,
one of the largest billboards in

Dakar featured Senegal strik- ©

er El Hadji Diouf in an ad for

Tigo, a major cell phone:

provider. Barefoot boys
throughout the city play in
alleyways, on highway medi-
ans and on the beach in the
hopes of being discovered by
a scout and getting a chance
at a better life.

Cedric Amegah, a lanky .

teenager from Burkina Faso
who attended the camp, said
his parents are constantly try-
ing to’ reorient him toward
soccer,

"When me and my friends

go to shoot hoops, our par- -



BS Kage,

NBA SCOUTING: A young African player defends against New York
Knicks’ Ronny Turiaf (right) during a Basketball Without Borders

training session in Dakar, Senegal.

ents are always saying, 'No.
Don't play basketball. Play
soccer,'" he said.

Among the messages that
the NBA camp is hoping to
project is that basketball can
be just as lucrative.

(AP Photo)

On the opening day of the
camp last Thursday, the play-
ers and officials that took
turns at the podium were
walking examples of success,
such as the 7-foot-2 Dikem-
be Mutombo, originally from

Congo, who is considered one
of the league's greatest defen-
sive players of all time. He
used his NBA earnings to
finance a $29 million hospital
in Kinshasa, the Congolese
capital where he grew up. .
Other NBA players at the
clinic included Charlotte Bob-

cats center DeSagana Diop,’

who grew up in a gritty Dakar
suburb where the only place
to practice was a sandy court
that made it nearly impossible
to dribble, and Memphis
Grizzlies center Hasheem
Thabeet of Tanzania, the sec-
ond pick in the 2009 draft.
Yet for the young players
attending this year's camp,

perhaps the most convincing :

proof of the opportunities
that lie ahead are the NBA
players who were discovered
at past Basketball Without
Borders camps. They include
Luc Mbah a Moute, who
understood only a few words
of English when he attended
the first NBA camp held in
Africa in Johannesburg in
2003.

Mbah a Moute, a native of
the French-speaking part of
Cameroon, used the contacts
he made at the camp to win a
scholarship to the Montverde
Academy in Florida and then
went on to UCLA before
being drafted by the Milwau-
kee Bucks.

Hoping more and more
Africans will get that chance,
the NBA has opened its first
permanent office in Africa,
based in Johannesburg, in
March.

Chukwudi Maduabum, a
19-year-old Nigerian who is

just shy of 7 feet, said his first

“sport was soccer but every

year as he got taller, his long
limbs got progressively more

‘in his way until he was trip-

ping over the other players.
Still it was hard to leave his
favorite sport. .

"I got taller and taller. And

then it didn't work out any- -

more," Maduabum said.
"And then I found basket-
ball." -

Because it is still relatively
difficult for boys to take up
basketball in the land of soc-
cer, Fall said those who do

often end up doing playing it

with passion.

He points to his own strug-
gleto learn the pane as an
example.

In the regional capital of
Kaolack, in central Senegal
where his family lived, Fall
said there was a single hoop,

’ and it was inside a walled

compound.

The then-teenager would
scale the wall to get inside and
only had a limited amount of
time to practice before a
guard came running. Each
time he was beaten with a
stick — and yet he kept com-
ing back for more. |

Fall went on to. play center
for the University of the Dis-
trict of Columbia, then spent
12 years as director of player
personnel for the Dallas Mav-
ericks.

"I'm a scout at heart and
I'm telling you the potential
here is greater than anywhere
in the world," Fall said.

"There is a Michael Jordan -

in every neighborhood wait-

_ing to be discovered."

Wade attend
negotiating
session

By RACHEL COHEN -

AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — LeBron
James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane
Wade and Chris Paul were among

the players who attended a negoti- _

ating session, between the NBA and
the union Thursday. | '
"It's important for me that all of us,

as being the faces of the NBA, to be.

involved in the negotiations and
what's going on," Anthony said as
he left. "Our future is in jeopardy if
we can't come into a mutual agree-
ment."

' Players' association executive
director Billy Hunter said 14 players
participated in the meeting in Man-
hattan. He. said the sides agreed to
hold another session before training
camp so players can take part again.

The current collective bargaining . .

agreement expires June 30, 2011.

"It was great conversation, great
dialogue going back and forth," said
Anthony, the Denver Nuggets star.
"The communication was great.
Hopefully we can come to an agree-
ment soon.'

It was the first bargaining session,

since February's All-Star weekend,
when the players rejected the owners'
proposal. The union recently sub-
mitted its own proposal, but com-
missioner David Stern has indicated

it's similar to the current CBA, and -

the owners are seeking significant
changes to the system.

Stern has.estimated the league will
lose about $370 million this season,
which the union disputes. The sides
began discussions last year but
remained far apart, creating fears of
a lockqut next summer.



Old man Odom ready seeking another chance for gold

By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer

.NEW YORK (AP) — Lamar

Odom is an old man, at least when it
comes to this U.S. basketball team.

He was reminded of that right
from the first practice in New York,
when he was so winded that he
struggled to reach the rim shooting
free throws.

While praising his leadership,
coach Mike Krzyzewski and USA
Basketball chairman Jerry Colan-
gelo acknowledge Odom isn't ready
to play.

‘Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol,
teammates on the Los Angeles Lak-
ers, are sitting out the world cham-
pionships after three straight trips
‘to the NBA finals.

So why was Odom. running
around in a college gym Wednes-
day instead of getting the rest he
needs?

"Because I was asked," he said,
"and it's a huge compliment."

"The first thing I was able to tell
Coach K and Mr. Colangelo (was)

where my body was at and they

understood. And they wanted some-
thing else from me and that was
leadership. It takes a certain type
of confidence, cockiness, humble-
ness, humility to be able to win
games, championships. For them to
have the faith in me that I have that,
it was just something I couldn’ tsay
no to."

There's more to it, though. Odom
suited up for the Americans during
their disappointing performance in
the 2004 Olympics and has wanted
another chance to wear a USA uni-

form ever since, but was stopped by '

everything from tragedy to injury.
"He had a whole series of things
that prevented him from playing.
He always wanted to play, he was
always committed to play," Colan-





OLD MAN: Lakers forward Lamar Odom
launches latest G-Shock GX56 timepiece |
at the Casio "Shock the World" press
conference at the Manhattan Center in
New York.

(AP Photo)

gelo said. "There wasn't a big sell
here to be done with Lamar Odom.
He wanted to play, he has wanted to
play. He wasn't able to."

Odom finally has the opportunity,
and even now at age 30, envisions



himself being in London in 2012 —

hopefully with a better result than

the bronze medal from Athens.
"Opening ceremony of the

Olympics is something I would love »

for my kids to be able to:see,"
Odom said during an interview at
Niketown. "That opportunity, you
don't come across something like
that, an opportunity I would say yes
to every time."

He was selected to the original
national team of players in 2006, but
pulled out before training camp after
the death of his 6?-month-old son
while sleeping in his crib. Odom
couldn't participate the following
year after having surgery on his left
shoulder.

But Colangelo went back to. him
for this pool, making Odom the only
player from the original group to be

invited back without ever appear-_

ing for the team ‘from 2006-08.

"He's a great big. It will be huge
for us," Denver point guard
Chauncey Billups said. "He can talk
on defense, pass the ball. His expe-
rience will be valuable for this
team." .

Billups, who will be 34 next
month, is the only player older than
Odom on a roster with five players
that are 21. Besides being much
younger, most of his teammates had
much longer breaks than Odom,
whose season didn't end until June
18. ,

He was back on the floor a month
later at training camp in Las Vegas,

and the world championships in —

Turkey start Aug. 28.
"A lot of these guys had a little bit
-more time off, so they were able to
prepare for these games a little bit,"
Odom said. "But the games that
count don't start until the 28th. They
all‘ count, but as far as the medal
games, I'll work myself back into
shape. Got enough time to do that."

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Trying to squeeze in as much rest
time as possible, Odom took the
redeye to New York and didn't
arrive until Tuesday morning, hours
before the first workout. He would-
n't be relaxing much in his home-
town, planning a trip after practice

‘Wednesday to Queens to spend time

with his two children.

. Odom wasn't on the floor much
while the Americans scrimmaged,
but his playing time will likely
increase next week when they head
to Europe.

"He's got to use all these exhibi-
tions to get into his game shape,
He's not there, but he willbe there.
He's a pro and he's an NBA cham-
pion," Krzyzewski said. ."The fact
he's here is good, and just a matter
of getting his legs under him."

Besides his experience, the Amer-
icans need Odom for his size. At 6-
foot-10, he's one of the tallest play-
ers on the undersized roster and
would perhaps even see time at cen-
ter.

"He's been a great leader, been a
great coach, teacher to me and all
the guys that play his position,"
Kevin Durant said. "We're going to
need that type of experience and

' knowledge, and his skill-set is rare, a

guy 6-10:can bring the ball up, pass,
shoot, get to the rim. We're going to
need him."

Odom may not be the old man if
he plays two years from now, when
some of the 2008 Olympians could
return. Colangelo said that was
another strength of Odom, that he'd
fit'in no matter what type of team
was around him.

"I'm a New Yorker. I'm from
Queens, New York," Odom said.
"You put me anywhere, you drop
me off in the middle of any country
in the world’ and I'll find my way
around, find out how to get to the
airport and then get back home."


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

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Poli mdeteeohs

FROM page 11

On Saturday, the men’s
team will begin play against
the Cayman Islands at 3 p.m.
The Cayman Islands is the

defending champions, having °

won the title in the Cayman
Islands. Last year, the
Bahamas was sixth.

Garfield Morrison, coach
of the men’s team, said they

are a lot b etter prepared than

last year, so they are looking
forward to improving on their
performance.

“We spent a lot more time
in preparation of our skill lev-
el,” Morrison said. “We have
good overall team speed and
we are physical.

“We have some good
endyrance and we have the
sunshine on our side. We

Major
FROM page 11 .

“JT just want to thank my
sponsor, Nautillus Water, for
assisting me in this venture,”
Major said. “Everything is
cool. This is a beautiful place.
It’s nice.

“T’m hoping to do at least
one more show down here
before the year is over. I think
I’m going to be stationed
between here and Buffalo.
Nick has some great plans
here in Virginia Beach.”

Major said while he’s doing
his thing in Virginia, he’s
excited about what he’s hear-
ing from the amateur and pro-







have some players that we
expect to perform very well. If
they do, we should do very
well in this tournament.”

Miles, however, said the
Bahamas will definitely have
their work cut out for them
because they have to play
against the Cayman Islands
in the opening match.

“The boys were very raw
last year, but they should
come through this. year,”
Miles said. “They trained very
hard for this tournament. The
Caymans are the favorites.
They are very strong. That’s
the benchmark for us.”

Miles said the BRU defi-
nitely have the best facilities
in the region with two fields at
the Winton Rugby Pitch and
so that should help in mak-
ing the Bahamas teams com-
petitive. ,

¢ The list of the men’s team
was not available.

\ SQ we lq"

WU



fessional segment of the sport
in the Bahamas.

He congratulated Valentino
Knowles for winning the gold
medal at the XXI Central
American and Caribbean
Games and Taureano ‘Reno’
Johnson for his success in his
fourth pro fight in Atlanta.

Major said that while it’s
good to hear that Freeman
‘the Natural’ Barr is making a
comeback on August 28 as
well in Fort Myers, he’s even
more delighted for Sherman
‘the Tank’ Williams, who will
be taking on former world
champion Evander Holyfield
in November 5 at the Joe
Louis Arena in Detroit.

“It’s good for boxing,”
Major stressed.



LALLA OLN LATALPA LLL LLL LOSI
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Tar Heels, Giants
FROM page 11

field and 15-of-19 from the
foul line in 39 minutes.
He was joined by
Gameliel Rose, who. con-
nected on 8-of-14 from the
field and 5-of-8 from the
three throw line for 21
points. Both also had five
rebounds. The only other
player in double figure was
Michael ‘Fernley’ Bain
with 11.
Jamington Johnson
came off the bench and
worked his way inside for

nine, but Mark Hanna was

limited to just seven on 2-
of-12 from the field, 1-of-4
from the three-point arch
and 2-of-5 from the foul
line.

Despite losing the game
after trailing 37-15 at the
end of the first quarter and
67-40 at the half, Hutchin-
son said the experience
was what really counted
the most.

“This was good for us to
see what we need to do to
get to the level of the
North Carolina Tar
Heels,” Hutchinson said.
“We could have been
much: better, especially if
we had controlled our
turnovers.

“But we played a hell of
a game against North Car-
olina. Everybody expect-
ed us to get blown out. But
we played a hell of a game.
If.we had controlled our
turnovers, we would have
played much better. I’m
satisfied with the way my

“But we played
a hell of a game
against North
Carolina.
Everybody
expected us to
get blown out.
But we played a
hell of a game.”

— Jeremy Hutchinson

team played.”

As for his own personal
game, Hutchinson said he
really needed to work on
his jump shot.

“Tf I can get that togeth-
er, I know I can be just as
competitive as any of these
guys,” he said.

Giants’ coach Perry
Thompson, who watched
as the Tar Heels extended
their lead with a 38-26
spurt in the third, said for
the short space of time,
two weeks, that they had
to prepare themselves,
they played very well.

“I’m proud that the guys
came out here and played
as well as they did,” he
said. “The first quarter, we
were kind of tentative. But
we came around in the sec-
ond quarter and we found
our rhythm and we made it
a much better game.

““But definitely, I knew
that fatigue was' going to
be a problem. The Tar
Heels. were definitely in
better condition than we
were. That was definitely
a factor coming down the
second half of the game.
They fought hard: So I’m
proud of them. Hats of to
North Carolina.”

e Also Wednesday night,
the NIT All-Stars pounded
the Police Crimestoppers,
which featured some of the
high school players home
from the Frank Rutherford
programme in Houston,
Texas.

With basically only six
players in action, the NIT
Stars got a game high 33
points from Dane Miller
on 13-of-13 from the field,
5-of-5 from the three-point
arch and 2-of-4 from the
foul line in 35 minutes.

Cornelius Vines had 26
points with seven assists;
Joe Muzzulla had 22
points; Brandon Triche 20
points with six assists and
five rebounds and
Jonathan Mitchell ended
up with 15 points and a
game high 10 rebounds.

Vernon Stubbs led the
Crimestoppers with 20
points, Warner Bail had
17, Michael Carey had 11
and Demyko Pinder ended
up with seven.

NIT opened a 24-17 lead
after the first quarter and

they pushed it to.52-33 at

the half. Using a 42-22
margin, the visitors were
up 94-55 at the end of the
third.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 15



‘Tremendous
storm’ brewing

FROM page one

obtained by The Tribune.

One of the prime culprits,
but not the only one, accord-
ing to Tribune sources is Cana-
dian fashion designer Peter
Nygard, who is under investi-
gation by the goverrment for
infractions to the Physical Plan-
ning Bill and the Conservation
of the Physical Landscape of
The Bahamas Act, among oth-
er areas, confirmed Earl
Deveaux, Minister of the Envi-
ronment.

The new regulations, aimed
to prevent unlawful use of

property inside the subdivision,.

are “untested” in court, accord-
ing to Tribune sources.

Vehicles delivering building
materials, transporting con-
struction personnel and service
vehicles will now be required
to produce copies of permits or
licenses in order to gain access
to the private roads.

Where the Property Owners
Association (POA) has “actual
knowledge” that access is being
sought for “a purpose connect-
ed with unlawful use of prop-
erty”, access will be denied.

“There is a policy the board
has adopted. We want to know
if people are doing things with-
out permission and if we can
verify that we won’t.allow entry

of supplies and manpower. The’
board wants to take that posi- »

tion because they are con-
cerned about the breakdown of
things that are happening. Mr
Nygard being the biggest viola-
tor, but there are others,” said 4
property owner with intimate
knowledge of the’situation.

An official POA report out-
lining the problem of the non-
compliance of specific residents,
expressed concern that the
“free reign” of some residents
could make others follow suit
and feel they can ignore inter-
nal rules and regulations and
national laws.

Mr Nygard’s activities have
come under increased scrutiny
by the Lyford Cay community
and the government in recent
weeks. Analysis from an inter-
national environmental con-

FROM page one



AN AERIAL vi view of the Nygard Cay property. .

sulting firm estimates Mr
Nygard’s property increased by
180 per cent between 1984 and

- 2007 due to “unauthorised”

dredging activity.

Recently, a letter was sent'to
Mr Nygard by the Office of the
Prime Minister addressing the
expansion activities. The attor-
ney general’s office is said to
be reviewing “all of the gov-
ernment's options,” including
the option of compulsory
demolition, confirmed Mr
Deveaux.

The POA has documented
its support of the government’s
recent position to clamp down
on the “ongoing reclamation of

Crown Land”, based on docu- ,

ments that were signed by POA
chairman, Christopher Hamp-
ton-Davies.

‘ Sources connected to the

POA said.a letter was circulat- -

ed to members advising them of
the new “standing policy.” Mr
Nygard is not a member of the
POA; however, a letter was
sent to his residence, according
to the source. Many members
are said to be “thrilled” of the
action, “because they are sick of
it.”

Not all of the home owners
have received the communica-
tion as yet, based on The Tri-
bune’s attempts to seek com-
ment from some. Mr Nygard
did not reply to messages left
for him to,comment.

“T haye not heard of the new
policy, but I know for we who
pay alot of money to the POA,
it has been irksome. He pays
nothing and‘he has access to
our roads and benefits from our
security,” said a Lyford Cay res-
ident.

The relationship between Mr

Nygard and the Lyford Cay

Community has caused “fric-
tion” oyer the years. Mr Nygard
was once a member of the

POA, but ceased paying dues’

more than ten years ago, when
he also resigned from the asso-
ciation.

His property, as well as other
‘lots on Simms Point, and a few
in the main subdivision, are not

- subject to. the same “restrictive

covenants” that guide the land
use of properties in the actual
Lyford'Cay sub division, estab-
lished in the 1950s. These prop-
erties were already owned
when:the subdivision was
planned, according to Tribune
sources.

“Even though there are
properties that do not have the
restrictive covenants on their
deeds, generally they all con-
tribute and pay dues to the
‘association, with the exception
of Mr Nygard,” said the source.

' The dispute that led to Mr
Nygard’s resignation from the

association is believed: to be’

related to his desire to pay fees

based on the assessment of his

-property at the time of pur-
“chase, and not improvements

made over the years, as is the
_ Standard policy of the POA.

“He has a right of way over

the roads.

“That is something that peo-
ple with their property have a
right to use the road for lawful
purposes. We do not interfere
with that. The roads in Lyford

‘ Cay are private, but we can’t

block access to his property
even though he-:doesn’t pay us.
That is why people get_a little
hysterical, because they pay
their dues and he doesn’t,” said
a property owner.

Travel agent

Police working in the force’s Commercial
Crimes unit recently brought the agent in for

questioning after receiving complaints from mem-"

bers of the public last week.

She is alleged to have continued selling travel
packages and-airline tickets out of the GWS
building on East and. Young Street under the
name of Fiesta Travel and Tours Ltd after thé
original owner of the business exited it five years

ago. He told ZNS news he leased the ie to the -

Pilot whales washed

FROM page one

Ms Wiethuchter said the

agent at this time.

“One particular customer said that he’d been
going to that particular agent for almost over
ten years,” said a police officer working on the
matter. ;

“People have been loyal, knowing they always
got the tickets. So now it has come to this, we’re
not going to just jump on her saying it’s fraud
without ae her a chance to eee herself.”

four whales were lying face up
near the high water mark ona
small beach on the east side
of Norman’s Cay, 12 miles
south of the beach club, ahd
the adult male was bleeding.
“It was really sad, we could-
n’t believe-it at first,” she said.
“Whales are usually on the
opposite side of the island, in
the deep ocean, so something

must have distracted or dis- .

orientated them to bring them
intg the shallows.”
Captain Bower took pho-

tographs of the whales and
sent them directly to the

Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) who posted Exuma
Land and Sea Park wardens
at the beach to collect tissue
samples. yesterday.
. And a veterinarian is
expected to visit the site today.
BNT park warden for Aba-
co David Knowles explained
how the BNT is part of the
Bahamas Marine Mammal
Stranding Network and there-
fore staff at national parks
across the country are trained

up on Exuma beach

in cbilecting tissue samples
- from beached whales wherev-

er they are found. .
“No one knows at this point .

_ what is happening and we
don’t want to speculate,” he ©

said.
“But the samples will more
or less be able to tell us some-

‘ thing.”

However, Department of
Marine Resources director
Michael Braynen said the sam-

‘ples do not always explain why

whales are beached.

“Samples are collected to .
, build up the knowledge base

and they can provide useful
information,” he said. : ©

“But determining the cause
of death can be a very com-
plex undertaking, with success
more likely if experts can get

to the carcass soon after death. ©

“In most instances this is

never determined. -

- “JT do not claim to be a
whale expert, but I do know
that pilot whales are often
found in large groups and it
appears that perfectly healthy
ones sometime end up strand-
ing due to group behaviour.”

Five pilot whales were
found washed up on the rocky
shores of Deadman’s Reef in

/Grand Bahama in April,
including a 17ft pilot whale
estimated to weigh around
3,000lbs, while the others were
12-15ft long: and around
1,800lbs.

However, they had been
beached for several days
before. they were found and
samples were not collected.

The. reason they ‘were
beached is still unknown.

A beached whale was also

FROM page one

‘youth does not bring with: it a very important’

factor — experience.
“There can never be a comparison between

Hubert Alexander Ingraham and the young

Branville McCartney. Mr Ingraham was a cabinet
minister in the Pindling administration. He was
subsequently fired from that cabinet and went on
to win. his seat as an independent Member of
Parliament. He then went on to become leader of

the FNM and: lead that party to a resounding

victory at the polls in 1992:and 1997.

“What has Mr McCartney done in compari-
son? Yes, he was a Minister of Immigration —
which we all know is a very emotive ministry.
But what has he done? What were his accom-
plishments during his tenure in Tourism? So
before someone.can come to me and say here is

a man who is ready to become Prime Minister I .

have to ask them on what Br ounds they are
speaking,” the source said.

However, according to other well: -placed
FNMs, Mr McCartney’ s “experience” and tenure
in the party does not factor in as much as his
public appeal with independent voters. While
they would admit that it is yet to be seen what
level of support the young FNM MP could attract
at a national convention, they feel certain of his
public support — especially with the growing
number, of young voters.

This demographic, The Tribune was told, may

FNM ‘best chance’

be more inclined to vote for a candidate with
which they can “relate”, versus the stereotypical

“experienced based” argument. And, he said,

considering the fact that the PLP will be putting
forth a'leader would be then in his late 60s in.2012

‘only adds to the appeal of the new “Branville

campaign.’

“It would be a landslide victory for the FNM
with a young Branville at the helm versus Perry
Christie. One is the embodiment of youth at its
prime. One is the face of the young people; a
change to future,” he said.

However, the party’s strategist, sees this argu-
ment ina totally different light.

“With Hubert Ingraham having been brought
back by the people to lead them in 2007 it would
be a slap in the face to the public for him to step
aside now. It would the surest way for the FNM
to lose an election in 2012; and that isn’t even

. considering, what such a move would do to his -

legacy as a politician.
“Just remember, in 2012 the national stadium
will be built.

“The road improvement projects will be com-
pleted. A new straw market. Baha Mar will be
coming on stream, and crime will be under con-
trol. Those will be tangible accomplishments that
the people can see and feel that Hubert InSeaham
would have delivered to them in only five short
years. There is no spompatison, he said.

found in Andros on August 4.

FROM page one

uation of this approach. In reality, this is.a ‘head
in the sand’ approach, because it is both the
forces of government and an entire community
that is sick and tired of the never ending expan-
sions and the unauthorised operations,” said
the source, who wished not to be identified.
Mr Nygard, a Canadian fashion designer, is
currently locked in a stand off with the gov-
ernment, which has ordered him to remove
structures erected on unauthorised land formed

: ” over the protected seabed.

The July 21 directive from the Office of the
Prime Minister represents the latest effort of the

government in a battle that is older than 15.

years.

During this time, the Lyford Cay Property
Owner’s Association has been involved in press-
ing the government to investigate and regulate
activities on Mr Nygard’s property.

In the Supreme Court action filed by Mr
Nygard against his Lyford Cay neighbour Louis
Bacon, a list of over 11 claims are outlined
related to a right of passage through Mr Bacon’s
property.

According to the writ, the property owned by

Mr Nygard was assigned two rights of way by
easement across the property of Mr Bacon

when it was conveyed in 1984.
It claims that between 2004 and 2008, a gate

a was constructed “at the eastern end of road-

way of the easement” that “restricted or pre-
vented” access to Nygard Cay by Mr Nygard, his
family and guests. Mr Nygard claims he was
never given a key to the gate.

The roadway was also “disrupted, blocked
and realigned” without the permission of Mr .

Nygard, according to the writ. It claims the gra-

dient of the roadway was changed in sucha .

way that it directed “water to the mouth of the
gate of Nygard Cay” causing the collection of
water. ‘

ano page one

? inal libel not just civil," he said, responding to questions put to him
: by The Tribune.
Recently the blog has posted numerous stories on Mr Mayne
i alleging the minister has engaged in extra-marital affairs and
? benefited from alleged criminal proceeds passed down to him by
ie his father, Andrew "Dud" Maynard, a former PLP chairman.
Last -month, Mr Maynard said he did not think he had legal
? recourse to sue the bloggers for character defamation explaining
; that the country's laws had not yet caught up with the influence
of the world wide web. But now it seems he is prepared to seek
? some form of redress explaining that someone must take a stand
? against defamatory content posted on the Internet.
: “Atsome point I am going to report it all to the police because
: it's all out there," said the Cabinet minister. "Somebody has got
? to stop it — at one point.somebody needs to set a standard that
: kind of political (strategy) has no use in this country," he said,
} adding that the blog has "waged all out war" on him.

According to the Defamation Act, "words spoken and pub- .
? lished of any person imputing adultery, unchastity, fornication,
4 : incest, incontinence or drunkenness shall be actionable without

: proof of special damage."

TWIST

Nygard, Bacon

Attorneys for the two defendants, Mr Bacon
and his company, The Point House Corpora-

tion, are preparing to submit a legal defence

by the August 20 deadline. It is unclear whether
they plan to file a counter claim.

The Supreme Court filing came days after
Mr Nygard filed a criminal complaint through
his attorney Keod Smith with the Commission-

er of Police, Elliston Greenslade, over actions

Mr Nygard claimed caused him “headaches and.
irregular heart-beats, requiring him to have to
lie down to recuperate.”

Police raided the home of Mr Bacon confis-
cating the speakers referred to in Mr Nygard’s
report as “prohibited military speakers" that
caused him “great nuisance.’

Speaking to the “speaker dispute”, arelease
issued by Point House stated: “The design intent
of the Meyer SB-1 speakers: at Point House
was to. counterbalance loud music that origi- '
nated from the Nygard property. The speak-
ers were part of an audio system constructed to
reverberate loud music emanating from
Nygard’s property and direct it back to the spe-
cific location of the music.”

“The Meyer SB-1 speaker dnd associated
system arrived in the Bahamas, cleared cus-
toms and duty was paid. The units were mount-
ed on Point House property and were painted
green to blend in with the surrounding foliage
not because they are of military vintage,” stat-
ed the release.

After the police raid, it was rumoured that Mr
Bacon planned to sell his property. One Lyford
Cay resident said: “It is unclear at this point
whether he is going to change his mind..I am still
hopeful that is not the case.’

Thére has been no official statement issued by
Mr Bacon on the matter. Mr Nygard did not
respond to messages left for him seeking com-
ment. ;

Charles a: | subbing death

FROM page. one

; i ations into the death of Gar-
? nell Clarke, a resident of But-
: ler Street, located in the Nas-
: sau Village area.
: The man was taken to the
: East Street police station by
: family members and co-work-
: ers from the Magic Kingdom
? Tyre Shop in Nassau Village,
: where the incident occurred.
i It was alleged that around
: 12.30 pm the two men — who
: both worked at the shop — got
? into an argument over a tyre
? which resulted in Mr Clarke
' } being stabbed in the head and
: left hand with a screwdriver.
: Mr Clarke was taken to
: hospital, however he died of
: his injuries shortly afterwards.
: Police investigations into
: this matter — the nation’s 57th
? homicide — are continuing.

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FRIDAY, ee 13, 201 a PAGE. 16

THE EVENT

On the morning of Friday, August
6th, 2010 at 1 37 a.m., BIC's Net-

‘work Operations Command Center

(NOCC), reported a failure of the

Digital Access Cross Connect Sys-

tem (DACS), This is an element of
the network that facilitates the pro-
cessing of both cellular and en
phone calls. ¥

This dévice is normally slepered by !
-@ full redundancy component to
address system faults. However, this
component malfunctioned as well,
causing a failure that impacted alll
pre-paid cellular customers and a
significant number of landline cus-
tomers. The affected customers

were unable to make or receive’

calls.

BTC technicians restored services by
2:45 p.m. that afternoon; however,
some customers did not receive full
functionality until later that evening.
BIC's preliminary investigations. in-
dicate that this incident was an iso-
lated event. The core elements of
BIC's networks continue to work ac-
cording : seer cation.

NEXT STEPS



Customers should be assured that |



to, and frustration felt by, you as val- nor charged as s overage.

1 ic that if will take all necessary steps -














with all such events, BIC is. examin- |
ing and re- examining its. processes for Jone |
and planned response. procedures ¢ oo
to avoid as much as possible any
future occurance. The following |
list represents some of the follow up”
activities ” BIG: :

.

don

tended.






e Review of pew technical aa their clients, family
administrative enhancements that where |

robustness and rehabilty on this and
other key piarons in the network _

RESPONDING TO OUR ou oré ary Pia en eos
~iS calls by post paid cellu-
CUSTOMERS ee oy be. charged

BTC understands the inconvenience against their in- “package a allotments,

ued customers during this event. AS. oo
noted above, BTC assures the pub- ! :





lL B
NS i






spree RRR cognate

FRIDAY,

AUGUST



13, 2010

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net |

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

‘



BIC privatisation committee ‘working’ with Cable & Wireless

By CHESTER.ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CABLE & Wireless Communica-

tions could be the new name in
Bahamas telecommunications by the
end of the year.

Industry sources told Tribune
Business yesterday that high-level
government officials have recently,
and frequently, engaged the region-
al telco which has operations in‘ 13
other Caribbean countries.

A deal could possibly be sealed

before 2011.

This newspaper was informed
that the Government-appointed
Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany's (BTC) privatisation commit-
tee has been “working for a little
while” with Cable & Wireless, hav-
ing rejected earlier bids from the JP
Morgan/Vodafone combination, plus
the Atlantic Tele-Network/CFAL
duo.

Other sources familiar with the
situation also told Tribune Business
that BTC employees have been
whispering among themselves, ner-

vous about the future of their jobs if
Cable & Wireless is to take control
of the helm at BTC and restructure
it entirely.

However, the BTC privatisation
is by no means ‘a done deal’, as
numerous issues still need to be
resolved via negotiation between the

committee/Government and Cable :

& Wireless. This newspaper also
understands, from reliable sources,
that there is at least one other
“major party” that has expressed an
interest in becoming BTC’s strategic
partner, after learning that all the

proposals submitted by the four par-
ties that qualified for the due dili-
gence round had been rejected.
While the BTC privatisation com-
mittee believes Cable & Wireless is
“very focused and serious” in its
attempt to acquire a majority BTC
stake, Tribune Business was told that
the committee would also look at
other serious prospects to ensure it
did not “jump too soon”, thereby

‘making sure the Government, got

the best strategic partner both in
terms of purchase price and
terms/conditions.

Cable & Wireless was described’
by one source as “really well suited:
as the strategic partner. The com-
mittee believes they're very inter-
ested in this asset, and have the right
idea about value, but there are some
important issues that would need to

.be negotiated”.

“Some very fruitful discussions”
were said to have taken place
between the BTC privatisation com-
mittee and Cable & Wireless, in a:
bid to get to a point where the Gov-
ernment might find its proposal
attractive.

When it comes to foreign labour,
Bahamians ‘own worst enemies’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

any Bahamians

are complicit in

the country's

dependence on
foreign labour and “are our
own worst enemies" by per-
forming at substandard levels
on the job - or worse not
showing up at all, said a for-
mer senator.

Speaking at a forum dis-
cussing the role of foreign
labour in the Bahamas,
accountant Philip Galanis said
the country must develop
short and long-term plans for

- national development, create
a national manpower needs
assessment, and overhaul the
educational system to address
‘21st century changes-- all to
ensure more Bahamians are
qualified for posts currently
filled by expatriates. ~

Government must also lead

the way in decreasing the

amount of foreign labour in
the country by hiring Bahami-
ans to fill all posts held by for-
eigners, he added. These
changes, among several oth-
ers, are needed in order to
reverse a common problem
facing those in human
resources - a lack of qualified
Bahamians in the country's
job pool.

"Too often we hear com-

‘plaints that Bahamians are not

prepared to work hard, to con-
sistently apply themselves to
their employment activities.
They are accused, and some-
times justifiably so, of lacking
discipline, sometimes not only
not showing up to work but
also performing at a substan-
dard level. In some ways we

-are our own worst enemies

and sometimes make it diffi-
cult for persons engaged in
human resources to persist in
ferreting out suitably qualified
Bahamians to fill vacancies,"

Jahamas Ferries hit
with hundreds of

fraudulent credit

card tran

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Ferries has
been hit with at least 500
fraudulent credit card trans-
actions in almost one year,
the companies customer ser-

vice manager told Tribune

Business yesterday.

Joy Russell said the com-
pany has had to change its
credit card processing proce-
dures and also how those who
purchase tickets for Bahamas
Ferries on the Internet col-
lect those tickets.

According to Ms: Russell,
while the police are investi-
gating the.matter, Bahamas
Ferries is keeping a vigilant
eye on its ticket sales that
involve an online payment.

She intimated that many of

the fraudulent purchases have °

come from someone living in
Eleuthera, and that the ‘per-
sonisa Bahamian citizen. |
“In my opinion it’s a
Bahamian, and I believe it’s
someone who lives in
Eleuthera because the trans-
action are going or coming
from Eleuthera,”’she said.
Ms Russell‘said her com-
pany processes a considerable
number of online bookings
and due to the fraudulent
activity have had to insist now
that the card holder be the
person to collect the tickets.
They also have to present
identification and sign before
taking receipt of the tickets.
Despite these efforts, Ms
Russell said at the end of July
a fraudulent purchase was
made.
“Basically credit card

charges are being done and °

we get the charge back from
the original card holder who
say they haven't done any

SAH BLO Ike



business with Bahamas Fer-
ries.” she said. ono

“We are actually still work-
ing on a lot of it and have

made contact with the police. *

“Back in June, when we

had a very large amount of

ticket purchases, we made an
attempt to contact the police
in Harbour Island but they
were closed.”

According to her, they have
attempted to corner the pos-
sible fraudster after a large
ticket purchase was made.
However, the tickets were
never collected.

Ms Russell said in those
cases Bahamas Ferries lose a
lot of revenue.

She said in other instances

“we haven’t been able to fig-
ure out how he has been col-
lecting the tickets without us
knowing”.

Police said on Wednesday
that credit card scams and
fraudulent cheque schemes
are just some of the methods
employed by fraudsters who
stole more than $2million in
some 180 crimes reported to
the Business and Technolo-
gy Crimes section of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit in the first

‘ six months of the year.

Assistant Superintendent
Michael Moxey, who is in
charge of the department,
said 2, 063,705.21 was misap-
propriated between January
and June, 58 per cent of

which was stolen, and 42 per

cent obtained by fraud.

Ms Russell said she has
made it a personal resolution
to see the person who has
committed these crimes
against Bahamas Ferries
brought to justice.

“This individual we have
been trying to track down
even purchased tickets for

’ crabfest,” she said.



ON LABOUR: Accountant Philip Galanis.

Mr Galanis, a former Pro-
gressive Liberal Party sena-
tor, told a crowd at forum
hosted by the Bahamas
Human Resources Develop-
ment Association.

The private sector should
also re-institute the: manpow-
er projection survey with the
Department of Immigration
to outline plans each company
hiring foreigners has for train-

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ee

ing and replacing expatriates
with Bahamians, said Mr
Galanis.

He also called for a greater
emphasis on vocational and
technical training to bridge the
"tremendous qualification
gap" between Bahamians and
foreigners; and called on
Bahamians to become whistle

blowers on foreigners who |

hold jobs that can be aptly



‘Health

performed by qualified locals.

He noted several areds in
the public and private sector
that are populated with for-
eign workers - banking, hos-
pitality, the insurance indus-
try and the judiciary - and rea-
soned this was a symptom of a
deep-rooted insecurity and the
public's failure to put pressure
on government to stop this
practice.

"We are a docile, submis-
sive, obsequious people who
would rather go along to get
along.

“We have become and .

often act like lambs being led
to the slaughter," he lamented.

Fellow panelist, and former
senator, Darron Cash argued
that the debate on foreign

labour should -be. centred on

how the public and private
sector can strike the right bal-
ance between short-term eco-
nomic goals, political interests
and the country's long-term
national interest.

He noted that.as a develop-
ing nation, the Bahamas does
not possess all the skills nec-
essary to best serve its inter-
ests and as a result, "must
embrace expatriate talent".

Still he criticised successive

governments for blatantly

affronting "the spirit of
Bahamianisation" by placing a
“glass ceiling" over many

A DIVISION OF

qualified Gahamians who are
constantly overlooked in
favour of foreign workers.

"The most unkind cut of all
comes with respect to issuance.
of government contracts.
From the government's per-
spective, it seems that
Bahamians are never quite
skilled or experienced
enough," said the certified
public accountant and former
senator with the Free Nation-
al Movement.



FAMILY GUARDIAN -

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED os 2.

ry ot}


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

a eee Ee



By The Associated Press

A LOOK at economic
developments and activity in
major stock markets around
the world Thursday:

Japanese gov
on surge in yen

TOKYO — _— Japan
finance's chief said the gov-
ernment will "respond appro-
-priately" to a surge in the yen
after it hit a 15-year-high
against the dollar amid a
weakening US economic
recovery.

"We are closely monitor-
ing a rapid rise in the yen,"
Finance Minister Yoshihiko
Noda said. He declined to
comment on currency inter-
ventions by the government

‘to prop up the greenback.

A foreign exchange dealer
in Tokyo said there were
rumours about the Bank of
Japan buying dollars but it
was unlikely that Japanese

‘authorities have taken such

steps. The BOJ hasn't inter-
vened in the currency market
since March 2004.

The benchmark Nikkei 225
stock average closed down 0.9
per cent, South Korea's Kospi
dived 2.1 per cent, Australia's
S&P/ASX 200 fell 1.2 per
cent, Hong Kong's Hang
Seng retreated 0.9 per cent
and the Shanghai Composite:
Index dropped 0.7 per cent.

Greece's recession
deepens i in Q2

ATHENS, Greece —

Greece's recession deepened
in the second quarter as the
country felt the painful con-
sequences of the governmen-
t's drive to reduce its debt
load with aggressive austerity
cuts.

Gross domestic product
declined by 1.5 per cent from
the previous quarter as the
government reduced spend-
ing.

The unemployment rate,
meanwhile, rose to 12 per
cent in May from 11.9 per
cent.

India's industrial
growth production slips
‘ to 13-month low in June

MUMBAI, India —
Growth in India's industrial
production slipped to a 13-

Stocks fall after Cisco

By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG ae
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Technology companies led
the stock market to its third
straight loss Thursday after
an earnings report from Cis-
co Systems raised more’
questions about the econo-
my.

A weekly employment
report that was weaker than
expected also made
investors uneasy about the
strength of the economic.
recovery. The Dow Jones
industrial average fell 58
pointsandnow hasan _
almost 380-point loss the
past three days. The Dow
has also fallen five of the last
six days. The Nasdaq com-
posite index had a steeper
loss in percentage terms, a
reflection of the drop in tech
stocks.
_ Cisco Systems Inc.
released earnings after the
market closed Wednesday.
Cisco is seen by many
traders and analysts as an
indicator of the economy's

health, and it disappointed
investors in several ways.
The computer networking
company's revenue for its
fiscal fourth quarter and

_ forecast for revenue fell

short of analysts' expecta-
tions. Investors are focused
on the connection between

_ revenue and the economy. If

revenue is weak, that could
be a sign that consumers are
reluctant to spend and could
start to affect companies'
profits.

The timing of Cisco's
report was also troubling.

- Craig Peckham, a market
- strategist at Jefferies & Co.,

noted that Cisco's quarter
ended in July, a month later
than most at companies, so
it gives investors a first look
at how businesses are doing

in the July-September peri- —

od.

Peckham said investors
also reacted to comments by
Cisco CEO John Chambers,
who said late Wednesday,

- "We think the words 'unusu-

al uncertainty’ are an accu-
rate description of what's
occurring" in the economy.

Te

Chambers echoed the words
chosen by Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
last month.

- Technology stocks were
the worst performer Thurs-
day among the nine sectors
that make up the Standard
& Poor's 500 index. The
tech sector fell 1.15 per cent.
Cisco was down 10 per cent.
Microsoft Corp. was down
1.5 per cent, and Oracle
Corp. fell three per cent.

Other big stocks seen as
vulnerable in a weak econo-

‘ my also fell. Shipper FedEx

Corp. lost 1.4 per cent and
heavy equipment maker
Caterpillar Inc. fell 1.8 per
cent. Health care compa-
nies, called defensive stocks
because they are likely to do
well in a weak economy,
were among the day's win-
ners.

Investors have generally
been selling since the stock
market reached its 2010
peak in late April because
they don't have a sense of
whether the recovery will
hold. Somé fear that the
economy will fall back into

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month low in June.as the
effects of government stimu-
lus waned and expansion
returned to more normal lev-
els.

The slowdown to year-on-
year growth of 7.1 per cent in
June comes after eight
months of double-digit expan-
sion.

The moderation is in large
part attributable to the high
levels of industrial production
at the same last year when
growth was rebounding from
the global recession, econo-
mists say. °

Ireland's deflation
may be ending

DUBLIN — Ireland's year-
long experience of deflation
may be ending as price

_ sion.

A look at economic developments around the world

. declines in July eased to fiat
0.1 per cent.

The last time iveland

recorded such a small annual

decline in average prices was'

January 2009.

That was the first month
that average prices began to
decline following the coun-
try's 2008 descent into reces-

Since then, prices slumped
by as much as 6.6 per cent
annually in October 2009
before gradually easing to
July's almost flat level.

Industrial production
falls in June

LONDON — Industrial
production in the 16 countries
that use the euro unexpect-
edly fell in June, raising fears

THE TRIBUNE



that economic growth in the
eurozone may not be as high
as anticipated.

Germany's: DAX closed
down 0.3 per cent and the
CAC-40 in France fell 0.2 per
cent.

The FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares ended
0.4 per cent higher.

- Big-ticket European
projects put on hold

PARIS — A rebuilt Pruss-
ian palace in Berlin. High-
speed rail from Lisbon to
Kiev.

A new visitor center for

' Britain's Stonehenge. They're

just some of the big-ticket
European projects put on
hold by the continent's gov-
ernment debt crisis.

earnings, jobless data

recession because of high
unemployment and weak
consumer spending. They
cite a long string of weak
economic reports and rev- -
enue disappointments like
Cisco's as reasons for their
pessimism. And earlier this
week, the Fed said the.
recovery had slowed and it
would buy government
notes and bonds in hopes of
stimulating lending and the
economy as a whole.

The uncertainty has kept
many traders.out of the mar-
ket in July and August,
months when trading vol-
ume is already down
because of vacations. Ana-
lysts say low volume has
exaggerated price changes.

The Dow fell 58.88, or 0.6
per cent, to 10,319.95. The
average has lost 360 points
over the past six days.

’ The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 5.86, or 0.5 per
cent, to 1,083.61. The Nas-

‘ daq composite index fell

18.36, or 0.8 per cent, to
2,190.27.

Losing stocks were ahead
of gainers by about two to
one on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume

- came to one billion shares.

Interest rates rose in the:
Treasury market after
falling sharply Wednesday,
when investors were seeking
the safety of government
securities. The yield on the
10-year Treasury note,

which rises.as its price falls,
was 2.75 per cent, up from -
late Wednesday’ s 2.69 per
cent.

The Labour Department
said that the number of peo-
ple filing for unemployment
benefits for the first time
rose last week to 484,000.
The gain was small at 2,000,
but economists had expect-
ed the number to drop. The
news pointed to continuing
weakness in the labour mar-

-ket, yet another sign that the
economic recovery is slow-

ing.
Charlie Smith, chief

investment officer with Fort —

Pitt Capital Group in Pitts-
burgh, predicted few major
market moves for the rest of
the month because so many
traders are away.

Smith also said the mar-
ket's drop over the past few
months was due more to a
negative outlook by
investors rather than a fun-
damental change in the

~ economy.

"We had a weak recovery
back in March and April,"
Smith said. At that point,
the market was moving
toward its highest. level since
the financial crisis struck in
September 2008. Stocks
began falling after the major
indexes peaked in late April.

There were disappoint-
ments among Thursday's
earnings reports.

Sara Lee Corp.'s revenue

missed analysts' forecasts. .
And retailer Kohl's Corp.

‘disappointed the market by

lowering its'earnings out-
look because it expects sales
to slow during the second
half of the year. That period
includes the holiday season,
when retailers make a large
part of their profits.

Sara Lee fell 10 cents, or
0.7 per cent, to $14.37.
Kohl's fell $1.28, or 2.7 per
cent, to $46.50.

In other earnings news,
General Motors Co. report-
ed net income of $1.33 bil-
lion in the April-June quar-
ter, its second straight quar-
terly profit.

The company, which is 61
per cent owned by the feder-
al government, is moving

. toward a public offering of

its shares. The company also
had a surprise announce-
ment.

CEO Ed Whitacre will
step down September 1 and
be replaced by GM board
member Daniel Akerson,
head of the global buyout
unit of The Carlyle Group, a
private equity firm.

Cisco fell $2.37, or 10 per
cent, to $21.36. Microsoft
was off 37 cents, or 1.5 per
cent, at $24.49. And Oracle
dropped 72 cents, or three
per cent; to $22.94.

Caterpillar fell $1.21, or
1.8 per cent, to $67.50, while
FedEx fell $1.19, or 1.4 per
cent, to $81.94.

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

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Preparation and /or updating, of environmental procedures for the BORCO/VTB

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" Solid computer skills including ability to use Microsoft Office Suite, various email

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Solid English communications skills, both oval and avritten
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Customer service focus: bility to influence; ability to communicate ”

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‘To Apply: Please forward your resume via email to
Heather. Parker@vopak.com
On or before August 16, 2010.



PUBLIC NOTICE
TENDER — MOTOR

INSURANCE 2010 - 2011

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BIC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor -
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifica-
tion from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 7
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. |

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before Tues-

‘day, September 7th, 2010. Tenders should be sealed and

marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE” and should be op
livered to the attention of:

Mr. I. Kirk Griffin, Acting President and CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas

_ BIC reserves the right to reject any



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM )
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13,




Small downtown bar
trying to reinvent itself

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SMALL Downtown bar is try-
ing to reinvent icself to become an
“off the beaten path” local, cos-
mopolitan spot with local flare and
fair and international appeal.

Partner, Rodari Turnquest, said
he and his colleagues hope to turn
the small Elizabeth Ave spot called
TJ’s Sports Bar and Lounge, into
what “our grandparents had before
us”, and bring that same atmosphere
back to Downtown. |



The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited

Winterbotham Place ~ P.O. Box N-3026 ~ Marlborough & Queen Streets
Nassau - The Bahamas

“We are going to be a really
diverse sports bar where
sporting enthusiasts, regular

guys from the island, domino

players, pool shooters, dart

throwers and basketball and .

football fans can come

and be comfortable.” -
— Partner Rodari
Turnquest

Tel: (1-242) 356-5454 ~ Fax: (1-242) 356-9432

E-mail: nassau@winterbotham.com ~ Website: www.winterbotham.com

JOB OPPORTUNITY

The ‘Winterbotham Trust Company Limited { is looking to fill the position of Corporate

Administrator:

In this challenging position you will be responsible for but not limited to the following tasks:

Incorporation of International Business Companies and Ordinary Companies

One of TJ’s more unique offer-
ings is‘a live rake and scrape band
every Friday night, where the bar is
taken over “old island style”.

' “We really want to be diverse,”
said Mr Turnquest.

“We are a bunch of island guys
trying to offer something to locals
and to the tourists.”

According to him, the bar, which
used to be an art gallery, is a mixed-
use sports bar and lounge that can
accommodate myriad tastes in
music, sports, gaming and atmos-
phere.

“We are going to be a really



Administration of International Business Companies and Ordinary Companies —

Liaising with the Registrar General’s Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
* Registrar of Insurance Companies, The Central Bank of The Bahamas, The Inspector

of Financial and Corporate Service Providers and various consulates

Ensuring the accuracy of banking and administrative statements of account before,

dispatch to clients

Conducting comprehensive Annual file reviews
Know Your Customer (Due Diligence) documentation collection
Opening of bank and administrative accounts

The, successful applicant must have the following qualifications:

Knowledge of the processes associated with the incorporation and ongoing
administration of International Business Companies and Ordinary Companies
Basic knowledge of the Legislation governing International Business Companies,

Ordinary Companies and Financial and Corporate Service Providers.
Knowledge of the process associated with legalization of documents
Knowledge of requirements for completing the Know Your Customer (Due

Diligence) process

Computer literate (MS Office products)
Strong organization and communication skills

Ability to analyze client financial needs to provide solutions with products and/or

services offered by the company
Fluency in Spanish or Portuguese an asset but not required

\

i i

Applications/resume should be sent by e-mail to nassau@winterbotham.com
Under reference “Corporate Administrator”
ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE INQUIRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED

Persons not meeting the above requirement need not apply

Deadline for applications Friday, August 20, 2010



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

SE INTERNATIONAR RANK

-On-the-spot financing and insurance
24-month/24,000- mile factory warranty.

diverse sports bar where sporting
enthusiasts, regular guys from the
island, domino players, pool shoot-
ers, dart throwers and basketball and
football fans can come and be com-
fortable,” he said.

TJ’s is still adorned with its
uniquely tiled floor and bar from its
former art days, with earth-toned
walls to set the mood of the joint.

Upstairs is what Mr Turnquest
described as an exclusive lounge and
with only black lighting to set the
mood.

“Our lounge plays a wide rage of
music with a chill mood,” he said

- have food,”

“And we are looking at renting it
out for parties and having house
nights.”

He added that Ty s will begin to
serve a light fair as of next week and
will begin a course of various gaming
tournaments with prizes, to draw in
a cross-section of patrons.

“We will have Wii gaming tour-
naments, we have wifi and we will
said Mr Turnquest.

According to him, most of the
bar’s marketing has been done
through Facebook, where its offer-
ings and upcoming events can be
found.





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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE







RES ACTS LID
Cup a US Ta | profit

meu AAS



-

PROFIT RISE: A supporter of the Ghana team brings beer to his friends during the World Cup group
D soccer match between Serbia and Ghana at Loftus Versfeld stadium in Pretoria, South Africa.

Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, the world's largest brewer, says World Cup fervor helped drive sec- —

ond-quarter profit and-sales above expectations. Profit is seen continuing to rise for the fest of
the yea:
(AP Photo)

Solidarity

THE BAHAMAS UNION OF TEACHERS
August 10, 2010

APPROVED LIST OF CANDIDATES
FOR BUT ELECTIONS,
21st SEPTEMBER 2010

The Chairman of the Elections Committee, Bro. Philip Johnson wishes to inform
the members of the Bahamas Union of Teacher that the Candidates Committee
has completed its work, and the Chairman has submitted the Approved List of
Candidates for the Elections-scheduled for 21st September. Forty candidates
were nominated for 15 positions, and 39 were approved

PRESIDENT
Belinda Wilson
Francis Friend

VICE PRESIDENT
Phillip Dorsett

Fr. Franklin Colebrooke
William. McFord
SECRETARY GENERAL
Stephen McPhee

Helena Cartwright
’.Jacquline Mckenzie
Villadale Bain

Brenda Albury

ASST. SECRETARY GENERAL
Jeleah Turnquest
Leason Burrows

ASSISTANT TREASURER
Kim Williams

Valencia Carroll

Janice Armbrister

Nicole Munroe

TREASURER
Andrea Lockhart
Karen Butler
Lorraine Knowles
EXECUTIVE MEMBERS
Janell Nairn
Tiffany Delancey
Florine Neilly
*-Wayne Thompson.
Joneth Edden’
Zane Lightbourne
John Musgrove

TRUSTEES
_Margaret Major-Albury
Jacob Rolle
~--— — Hiamae dohnson= Roberts: ee
Virginia Johnson
Mizpah Munroe
Haldane Stubbs

A.V.P. GRAND BAHAMA
Quintin Laroda
Meoshe Curtis

A.V.P. NEW PROVIDENCE
Bridgette Seymour
Shron Rahming

A.V.P. SOUTHERN BAHAMAS
Annafaye Knowles.
Philip Sturrup

A.V.P. NORTHEN BAHAMAS
Yolanda Curry

Union Members are advised that the Final List of Candidates will be
published immediately after the Appeals Process for aggrieved candidates,

ends on Ficay 20th eee

PHILLIP JOHNSON
CHAIRMAN
‘ELECTION COMMITEE



Travel agency
MakeMyTrip
‘soars in the

market debut

By TALI ARBEL
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Shares of Indian travel agency
MakeMyTrip Ltd: soared as
much as 80 per cent in their
market debut on the Nasdaq
exchange, even as the broad-
er markets declined.

The stock is on track to log
the best first-day performance
for an IPO since 2007. Finan-
cial advisory firm Financial
Engines Inc., which has post-
ed the top first-day return this

year, closed up nearly 44 per -

cent in its debut in mid-
March. Since the recession
began, online restaurant
reservation company,
OpenTable Inc. had the best
first day with a 59 per. cent
gain in May 2009.
MakeMyTrip likely attract-
ed so much investor interest
because there are very few
Indian companies listed in the

US that focus on growth-with-: --

in India, said: Josef Schuster of
IPOX Capital Management,
IPO investment advisors.

MakeMyTrip Ltd. began as
a website in the US, mainly
serving Indian expats wanting
to travel to India.

In 2005, it began operations
in India, offering airline tick-
ets as well as hotel bookings,
bus tickets and other services
to the country's fast growing
demographic of middle-class
consumers.

MakeMyTrip cites data
from consultancy McKinsey

saying that the Indian middle,

&

class is expected to grow to
583 million people in 2025
from 50 million people in
2005.00

India has a much smaller
segment of its population on
the Internet than the US does,
and the company says its rev-
enue will rise as increasingly
wealthy Indians get online.

The company's revenue
grew throughout the reces-
sion, and MakeMyTrip claims
it is the largest online travel
company in India based on
bookings in 2009.

In the year ended March
31, 1.6 million domestic air
ticket transactions were
booked through Make-
MyTnip's website in India, up
from 1.2 million in the previ-
ous 12 months.

"There's a taste for compa-

nies that will dominate a pos-
sible niche," said Francis
Gaskins of IPO research firm
IPOdesktop.

-- But some analysts; such-as---- -

Scott Sweet, the owner of
IPO Boutique, expressed sur-
prise at MakeMyTrip's per-
formance Thursday, saying
the company has never posted
an annual operating profit
and faces competition from
Indian versions of big travel
sites such as Expedia Inc. and
Travelocity. mn

"They're a long way from
making money," Sweet said.

But Schuster suggested that

MakeMyTrip could be an >

acquisition target for' rival
companies such as Expedia
or Priceline.com Inc.

BAT Bahamas Limited

Career Opportunity
TERRITORY SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Description:

Another factor likely pro- '
pelling MakeMyTrip's shares
were strong second-quarter

--results from Orbitz World-

d

wide Inc. and Priceline,
Schuster said.

_ MakeMyTrip plans to use
proceeds from the IPO for
acquisitions, new investments

‘in technology and for working

capital.

The company raised $70
million by pricing five million
shares for $14 each, the high
end of its expected $12 to $14
range.

In late afternoon trading,
shares. gained $10.50, or 75
per cent, to $24.50 on the Nas-
daq, having risen as high as
$25.16 earlier in the session.
Another Thursday. IPO

-debut, real estate software

company RealPage Inc., also
jumped $3.56, or 32 per cent,
to $14.56.

Meanwhile, broader mar-
kets dipped further after big
losses on Wednesday, with
the Standard & Poor's 500
dropping 0.8 per cent.

It's a good sign for compa-
nies wanting to raise funds
through the. IPO market.
Many companies have post-
poned their offerings because
of weak démand from
investors wary of the volatile
stock market, or had to cut
the prices on shares steeply
to get to market. .

_ RealPage, for example,
priced shares at $11 apiece,
significantly below expecta- -
tions. It had hoped ‘shares
would fetch $13 to $15 each.

This is a strategic role which will assist in delivering 1BM’s revenue in The Bahamas. This role
will work ina contracted capacity, performing in conjunction with IBM's. Sales.and Technical

Support Teams, covering accounts in The Bahamas, ‘Responsibilities will include:
* Execution of Sales Leadership
> Demonstration of Sales Proficiency
* Driving new business in the territory and maintaining existing relationships
Working collaboratively with Client Team and other Brands
Developing and maintaining strong customer relationships
Assisting with Opportunity Identification and Valid Sales Stages
Pr ofessional engagement of appropriate Integrated Technology Services
Act as Opportunity Owner for specific client transactions

(

Qualifications:

equivalent experience
* Business to business selling is an asset
« Proven success in prospecting and managing a territory
* A solid track record of achieving/ exceeding sales targets
* Strong written and Verbal skills

* University degree in Sales/Marketing. Business Administration of

An equal ory employer, [BM provides competitive salaries and benefits. ‘Thus,

‘compensation wil

[be commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Please submit detailed applications ar electronic resume to the attention of:

Human Resources Administrator

TBM Bahamas Limited
Fourth Floor
Atlantic House

Second Terrace & Collins Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas
e-Mail: jmoss@bs.ibm.com

Deadline: August 31*, 2010

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence. Only npplipante who are short-listed will

be contacted,

PA eT
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 5B



GM posts another profit,
moves toward stock sale

By DEE-ANN DURBIN
and TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — Ina
signal moment for the turn-
around of the Ainerican auto
industry, General Motors is
edging toward a public stock
sale, and its profits are now
solid enough..that the
demanding CEO will step
aside, saying his work is done.

GM said Thursday that it
made $1.3 billion from April
through June, its second
straight quarter in the black
and a complete reversal from
last year, when it was forced
into bankruptcy and the US
government took a majority
stake.

CEO Ed Whitacre said he
would leave his post Septem-

- ber 1. He said the GM board
knew all along that he would

‘do so after the company
returned to health, and indus-
try analysts said it was an
important step leading up to
the stock sale.

Whitacre, who will stay on
as chairman through the end
of this year, will be replaced
as CEO by Daniel Akerson, a
61-year-old former telecom-
munications executive who
sits on the GM board.

While executives would not
discuss the stock sale Thurs-
day, GM is expected to file
its initial paperwork with fed-
eral regulators as early as Fri-
day.- :

"Things look good. There's
a foundation in place, a good
foundation," said Whitacre,
who was drafted out of his
first retirement by the gov-
ernment to fix the troubled
GM. "I believe we've accom-
plished what we set out. to
do."

Last year, GM lost nearly
$13 billion in the second quar-
ter alone..In the first six

“months of this year, GM .

made $2.2 billion as cost cuts.
took full effect, sales in China.
grew and people paid more
for GM's revamped vehicles
in the US.

For example, GM's
crossovers, which are similar
to SUVs but built on car

undercarriages, are fetching’

$3,000 more this year than
last. Crossovers such as the
Chevrolet Equinox and Buick
Enclave have sold well, and
the company has high hopes
later this year for the Chevy





PUBLIC OFFERING: Ed Whitacre, General Motors Co. Chairman and CEO, speaks at a news conference
in Detroit. Demand for General Motors Co. stock should be good once the company decides to offer shares
to the public, CEO Ed Whitacre said Thursday.

Cruze, its first decent com-
pact, and the Volt, a $41,000
rechargeable electric car.

The federal government
got a 61 per cent stake in GM
in exchange for $43 billion in
aid to keep it alive. It could
sell some:or all of that when
GM makes its public stock
offering, perhaps as early as
November.

GM must first reveal to the
Securities and Exchange
Commission how many
shares it intends to sell on the
open market and at what
price. The government would
then tell GM how much of its
stake it will sell, and GM
would disclose that in anoth-
er filing.

If GM's shares sell for too
little, the government and
other stakeholders are less
likely to get their money back
and GM is less likely to raise
money to pay off debt.

The environment for new
stock offerings is less than
welcoming. Six initial public
offerings have been post-
poned since June 1, in part

‘out of fear that they wouldn't

fetch a high enough share
price, said Matt Therian, an

‘analyst with Renaissance
* Capital, a Greenwich, Conn.,

firm specializing in public
stock offering research.

GM, however, may have
enough to overcome the slug-
gish economy, Therian said.

"The IPO market can be a
case-by-case basis," he said.
"I think in many ways GM is
going to be:a unique story."

Scott Sweet, owner of IPO
research firm IPO Boutique,
said the Obama administra-

NOTICE

SIGRIDINA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SIGRIDINA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on »°
the 10th August, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and iedleletey by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the. said) company is CST

Administration

(Bahamas)

Limited, _The Bahamas

Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,

Bahamas

Dated this 13th day of August, A. D. 2010



_CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE ISHEREBY GIVEN 2s follows

(a) QUALITY SELECTION FUND LIMITED isin dissolution under epson ofthe

International Basness Companies Act 200,

{b) The Dissolution of seid Company commenced on August 12, 20:0 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted and registered by he Rewisrar General

(c} The Ligudator of the said company is Zaki Services Lid. of 2

Nassau, Bakamas.

ee

Terrace West, Centreville,

(Q) All persons having Cains apunst the above-named Company are required on or befor the 24
day of September 2010 to send their names and addresses and particulars oftheir debts or claims to
te Liga of the commpaay or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the bene fany

distbuion made before such debis are proved,

AUGUST 13, 2010
ZAKRIT SERVICES LID,

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



tion may be pressuring GM
to sell prematurely to influ-
ence the November congres-
sional elections and make the
government's controversial
investment look smart.
Whitacre and the government
have both said GM is in
charge of the timing of the
IPO.

Akerson will be GM's
fourth CEO in 18 months.
Like Whitacre, a former CEO
of AT&T, Akerson worked
in top executive positions at
major telecommunications
companies. He held top posts
at MCI and Nextel.

Both have been described
as hard-charging executives
who demand _ results.
Whitacre,68, who was known
within GM for his disdain for
PowerPoint presentations and
his surprise visits to factories,
said Akerson shares his vision
for the company.

‘Whitacre didn't directly
address a question about
whether executives with auto-
motive experience were con-
sidered for the job. But he
said Akerson has learned the
auto business in his year on
the board.

"Dan has been involved
every step of the way,"
Whitacre said. "He knows
this business from a board
perspective and also from
personal conversations."

Akerson will stay on with
The Carlyle Group, a private
equity firm, until he starts as
GM CEO next month.

Bob Lutz, a former GM
vice chairman who retired
earlier this year, satu in an e-
mail that Akerson doesn't

(AP Photo)

need auto experience to run
GM because it has a solid
management team. But he
does need to listen to that
team, Lutz said.

"He's very strong, very
opinionated, not always right,
and needs to work on listen-
ing skills," Lutz said. "If he
can bring himself to trust his
now-outstanding senior exec-
utive group and lead rather
than direct, | think he'll do
an outstanding job."

GM still faces problems. Its
US sales rose 14 per cent in
the first six months of this

' year, lagging behind the aver-

age industry increase of 17
per cent. It spends more on
car buyer incentives than any
other automaker, according
to Edmunds.com.

GM has also relied heavily
on sales to rental car compa-
nies, governments and corpo-
rations, which are less lucra-
tive than sales to individual
customers.

GM's return to profitability
and impending stock sale are
milestones in the restructur-
ing of the beleaguered Amer-
ican auto industry. The
administration rushed to its
aid last year, after the 2008
bailouts of major banks.

Ford Motor Co.. which
never needed gavernment
help, made $2.6 billion in the
second quarter, its fifth
straight quarterly profit.
Chrysler Group LLC, which
got $15.5 billion in federal aid,
narrowed its second-quarter
loss to $172 million.

GM's profits, coming at a
tough time for overall car
sales in the US, are proof

NOTICE
ARANCETO LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ARANCETO LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
,the 10th August, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and. registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST

Administration

(Bahamas)

Limited, The Bahamas

Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,

Bahamas

Dated this 10th day of August, A. D: 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator



Public Notice
LPIA Expansion Project Stage 2/3

Contractors and suppliers are advised to monitor media outlets (newspaper,
radio) in the coming weeks for details related to the tendeting of Stage 2,
New International Arrivals Terminal and Stage 3, Domestic
Departures / Domestic Arrivals Terminal.
posted/broadcast as it becomes available on NAD's website, www.nas.bs

Whitacre has put the compa-
ny on solid footing, said
David Cole, the chairman of
the Center for Automotive
Research in Ann Arbor,
Michigan.

Cole said Whitacre was
smart enough to leave in
place things that were work-
ing — product development,
which has produced some
hot-sellers, and manufactur-
ing, which has grown more

!













before August 26, 2010



bottom line? We want you!

Skills and Requirements

product markers

© @ Ability to multitask

applications

® Strong leadership skills

® Profe



fonal appearance

Afinimum Requirements

applications




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000), South River Place Investments Inc. is in
dissolution. Ms. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marboreuen & Queen
Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas. .

anlar Oe) Lolaeut yy

Marketing Manager

Are you acharismatic and innovative individual, with a passion
for success, the ability to initiate progress and concern for the

® Strong arganizational skills along with ¢ Xeellent oral and
written communication abilicy

® Ability to plan, organize, direct, contralto achieve shart:
range and lang-range business development objectives in

@ Ability to work ina fast paced environment

® Ability re work well under pressure

® Proficient in Graphic Software, and Microsoft Office

® Excellent interpersonal skills

'@ A desire and passion to get ahead

® Bachelor's degree or MBA in marketing
preferred marketing or business administration

@ Atleast 5 years of marketing experienee in rerail fudustry

@ Proficient in Graphic Software, and Microsalt Office

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
interviewwithhre@gmail. com







Additional information will be |

efficient — while he stream-
lined GM's bloated manage-
ment. /

GM is now using 93 per
cent of its North American
factory capacity, compared
with 39 per cent in the sec-
ond quarter of last year as it
idled factories while in bank-
ruptcy protection.

"T think he'll be remem-
bered as a short-term but
effective leader," Cole said.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES |
ACT |
(No.45 of 2000)

|

In Voluntary Liquidation

All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator

|
Alrena Moxey |
-Liquidator |





















and management








& International



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



US mortgage rates hit 4.44
per cent as economy sours

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Growing pessimism over the
weak economic recovery
pushed mortgage rates to the
lowest level in decades for the
seventh time in eight weeks.

The average rate on a 30-
year fixed mortgage hit 4.44
per cent this week, mortgage
buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday. And some brokers
say homeowners looking to
refinance have even managed
to do so for as low as four per
cent.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010

_IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land com-
prising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres
situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant
on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on
the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIE’S PLACE LTD.

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF SADIE’S PLACE in respect of:-

Still, cheap rates have done
little to boost the struggling
housing market. Instead, they
are highlighting investors’
fears that the rebound is
stalling and the country could
be slipping back into a reces-
sion.

Investors are shifting their —
money away from stocks and
into safer Treasury bonds.
That is sending Treasury
yields lower. Mortgage rates
track those yields.

And the Federal Reserve
is pushing those yields down
even further. The central
bank said Tuesday it would
buy Treasurys to help aid the
recovery, using the proceeds
from debt and mortgage-
backed securities it bought
from Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac.

That move alone is unlike-
ly to push average rates down
to four per cent, said Bob
Walters, chief economist at
Quicken Loans. But average
rates that low are still a possi-
bility if the economic outlook
worsens even further.

"The silver lining ta a bad
economy is that interest rates
fall," Walters said. "If you can
lower your debt burden by
refinancing, that's great."

Up to now, low rates have
failed to spark a struggling
housing market. Slow job
growth, a 9.5 per cent unem-
ployment rate and tight cred-

it standards have kept people “

from buying homes. Applica-
tions to refinance have grown
but remain well short of a
massive boom.

Overall home loan applica-
tioris rose only 0.6 per cent
last week from a week earlier,
the Mortgage Bankers Asso-
ciation said Wednesday:

For those homeowners with
solid finances, the opportuni-
ty to refinance below four per
cent is persuading some to
consider 15-year fixed loans.
Those average rates dropped
to 3.92 per cent, down from
3.95 per cent last week and
the lowest in decades.

More homeowners are
choosing that option because
it allows them to save money



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VALERIE RITA NOYES of
HARTSWELL, P.O. BOX EX-29213, GREAT EXUMA, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13th day of August, 2010 to the Minister responsible for



Mortgage rates fall

ThE avErago MalG OF & 2Qyear
fixed rate mortgage tell 19 4.48
percent this week, its Kwest level
on record.

Average 30-year fixer rate |
mortgage. weekly

bY percent



AGONE I OMAMS JA
BOR 8019
Average fixed rate mortgage

Ost. 9.1991 Aug. 8, 2010
FOYE" yaBate 8.39%
15. Der, 18.1984 Aug. & 2018

2.89% 3.85%

done 29,2006 Aug. S, 2010
8.39% 3.63%



etale mortgage

SQURCE: Freddie Mac / AP

in the long run, though it costs
more in monthly payments.
Freddie Mac says nearly a
third of borrowers refinanc-
ing 30-year loans in the April-
to-June picked loans with 15-
year or 20-year terms.

Still, savvy. consumers can
already find 30-year fixed
rates at or near four per cent
if they are willing to pay a lit-
tle more upfront.

Chik Quintans, assistant
sales manager with Atlas
Mortgage in Seattle, said he
was able to get two clients

into mortgages with a four per
cent interest rate and a fee of |
one per cent of the total mort--
gage amount on Wednesday.
But rates have inched up
since then. ,

"Every day's different,"
Quintans said. "Sometimes
people have to ruminate, and
then the opportunity's gone."

Refinancing could pick up
significantly if rates fall fur-
ther. An average rate below
4.375 per.cent could be
enough of a drop so that
many people who refinanced
last year could shave a half of
a percentage point of their
mortgage rates, said Scott
Buchta, chief mortgage strate-
gist with Braver Stern Securi-
ties.

Lenders could find them-
selves in a bind if traffic picks
up, Buchta said. Many have
laid off thousands of workers
over the past three years and
don't have enough staff to
handle a crush of new appli-
cations.

Mortgage rates often fluc-
tuate significantly, even with-
in a given day. To calculate
the national average, Freddie
Mac collects mortgage rates
on Monday through Wednes-
day of each week from about
125 banks, thrifts and credit
unions around the country in
a voluntary survey.

Rate quotes from parts of
the country with more lending
activity — such as the West
and Northeast — are given
more weight in creating the




average.

Rates on five-year
adjustable-rate mortgages
averaged 3.56 per cent, down
from 3.63 per cent a week ear-
lier. Rates on one-year
adjustable-rate mortgages fell
to an average of 3.53 per cent
from 3.55 per cent.

The rates do not include
add-on fees known as points.
One point is equal to one per
cent of the total loan amount.
The nationwide fee for loans
in Freddie Mac's survey aver-
aged 0.7 a point for all loans
except for 15-year mortgages,
which averaged 0.6 of a point.

Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELIFAN PIERRE of COLLINS
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as.a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registratior/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6° day of August, 2010 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

In respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising
One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024) acres situate
approximately 300 Feet East of Wally’s Restaurant on the
East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant
land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet
and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and.
running thereon 138.47 feet to a.point thence SOUTH-
WARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to
a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTH-
WARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate
of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point

- thence WESTWARDLY and by land_ 5.04 feet to a point
thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon
12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon
169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or for-
merly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon
37.78 feet to the beginning.

TS

For the stories
TUTTE
rT ES

~ on Mondays











ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work
COLONIAL

Sadie’s Place claims to be the owner of the unincum-
bered fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3)
of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have it’s title to the
said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be

AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital



LOCKHART & Co.
Chambers
#35 Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas












BISX AL
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in.closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings .

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Protected TIGRS, Series 3

“YIE
Bid $

t 124 dividends divided by clasing price

- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions Famguard
. . Finco
of the said Act. FirstCaribbean Bank
Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be eae
Focol Class B Preference
inspected during normal office hours in the following ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson ; A 10.5
places: Premier Real Estate 0.156 0.800 84.1 8.00
SSS Ww e>F>FjF WO WOOO WW Sy
: ; 52wk-Hi 5S2wk-Low » Security ls Interest Maturity
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) 0.00 20 November 2029
Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nas- EIR IS eps Nove eenOn ae i srcicmiaens
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 0,00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
sau, Bahamas; and 4 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C),+ 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
2 The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Re- Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 0.00 < Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
* " WANA AY SN SSG \ WN WY N WN
tiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas. 52wk-Low Last Price DailyVol.. EPS$ Div$ PIE Yield
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets -2.945 0.000 N/M
: 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 0.000 0.480 N/M
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower 0-001 0.000... 256.6
QUARARRAREERARR .
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not rec- 4540 0.000. 9.03
ognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration oe eeeedinae a
ee ae UA o—h»e»_U_U
of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these: Last 12 Months NAV 3MTH NAV 6MTH NAV Date
ae ; CFAL Bond Fund 1.460225 1.438700 30-Jun-10
presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Pe- 2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9101 0.80% 0.19% 2.902023 2.906145 31Jul-10
vat : : we 1.4817. CFAL Money Market Fund "4.5451 2.52% 4.28% 1.528885 1.512735 30-Jul-10
titioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in : 2.8522 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.8216 9.47% -9.40% 31-Jul-10
the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed . 13.0484 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.4110 0.33% 3.32% 30-Jun-10
. ; 101.6693 CFAL Global Bond Fund 109.3929 5.20% 7.60% 107.570620 103,987340 30-Jun-10
therewith. : 93.1998 . CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.1833 1.52% 3.56% 105.779543 101.725415 30-Jun-10
. 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 4.1223 2.98% 5.25% 31-Jul-10
\ 1.0917 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0761 0.76% 5.35% 31-Jul-10
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement 1.1198 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1198 2.67% 5.53% 31-Jul-10
: “ 9.5955 9.1005 -Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal .
of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) Brotected TERS, Series't ’ 9.5955 2.71% 5.96% Sinlubld
. . ‘ 11,2361 10,0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal
days after the final publication of these presents shall Protected TIGRS, Series 2 10.3734 3,69% 3.38% 31-Jul-10
. 4 10,0000 9.3299 Royal Fidelity Bah Int! Investment Fund Principal
operate as bar to such claims. 9.3648 6.35% -6.35% 31-Jul-10

-Jul-10





EPS $- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV -

Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

“FO TRADE CALLE CRAL 242.802-7040 | ROVALFIDBLITY 242-356-7768 | FO CAPITAL MARKETS 2a2 9004000 | COLONIAL 2a2 802702

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM -

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 7B

THE TRIBUNE



_ APT 3-G

THEY'RE ALL ADULTS,
BAM..-WE CAN'T TELL
THEM WHAT TO DO!

AND IF NEP GOES BACK
TO MARK, IT'LL SHAKE
HIS CONFIDENCE!

THE GUY'S TRYING
TO FULFILL A

DREAM... SAVE YOUR DRAMA

m,. FOR THE SHOW.

yy

WHY YOU CAN RELATE
TO JULES! OKAY, PEOPLE, THAT'S

A WRAP. SEE YOU INTHE DON'T WE GET TO

Ie





SCRIBBLE
SCRIBBLE BBLE

' SCRIBBLE SCRIBBLE
e~ |

YOU KNOW, THIS ISN'T AS
EASY AS ITLOOKS .



UM J.C.DITHERS, CEO
OF J.C. DITHERS AND

TM FRANK, THE WAITER,
MOVING TO

) MONTANA
| TOMORROW! ),

YOU DON'T NEED TO
SHOUT! I'M (ay
RIGHT HERE Eg’


















(©2010 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.




VACME WINDOW COMPANY

IT SAYS:
-CAN SOLVE YOUR PROBLEM”.

" NEED MORE LIGHT
i YOUR HOME 2”




‘CAUSE HE CANT.
RUN AKOUNP
IN SQUARES!

HOW Come Your

VOG |S RUNNING
AROUN? IN
CIRCLES?












Bb
a



©2010 dy King Features Syncicate, Inc. Wood rignts reserved.








HOW AM I SUPPOSED To

HOW many words of four letters




The Target










"LEARN SURGERY IF I
CANT DISSECT ANYTHING ? or more can you make from the
letters shown here? in making
uses a word, each letter may be used
d : once only. Each must contain the
words in centre letter and there must be
’ at least one nine-fetter ward.
athe main — No piurats.
Ne body of Seed is eaky good 1G;excetient 24
PEO Rs > very @ ; excellen’
qs a Owe Chambers Gr more) Solution tomorrow.
So] et te
Sa alist ; YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION,
a om I : . cent cite cited code coded coin
unl Century coined conduit cone coned cote
bt count counted cued cute deduct
Dictionary pepuctION dice diced duct
(1999 food icon piduice induced widuel
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with iced icon induce inauced induc
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers edition). ee Ce erie Gane ACO

1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the. same number only once.
The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from
Monday to Sunday

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is
to fill all of the.empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the
sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left,
and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its
top. No number may be used in the same block more than
once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases
from Monday to Sunday.




















































©2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.











©2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.













1/5/2]617/4|3/9/8
9/4/8/2/311|6/7/5 aes on
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7/3/6{9/5 8]2/ 1/4) Fee mratolel7 6
7/6) 2|5/8|3] 1/2/8916 (2
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Sf 5 4|8/3|9/6/1 1/213 M9118
“HEY, MOM WHEN 1 SOIN THE Boy ScouTs az see ti6|4|2 ale 8 [9 |7\5 1 Me|6 8
CAN REET.” © i 7/30 -
ICA HELP YOU CROSS THE z Difficulty Level ORE ena ma g{3i4 711/516] 817 M8 171219)



CRYPTIC PUZZLE ~~

Across Down
1 Complained when awoken 1 Pious — nothing short of

Bidding Quiz

after midnight (7)

Should prove uncommonly
tough (5)

A number lead the union in
time-wasting action (9)

It reduces toil. (3)

Still one that is found in
Himalayan mythology (4)
Congratulations on a boring
job completed (4,4)

Dog or sow had run amok
(6)

Sportsmen may shoot them
for fun (6)

Sent about 10 cents as a
deposit (8)

Don’t go on stage (4)

| write a note and leave (3)
Turned up to see about our
set's repair (9)

Experience discrimination
(5)

They may be required to be
met (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Distinct, 5 Opus, 9
Marat, 10 Emotive, 11 Cool
customer, 13 Auntie, 14 Peg leg, 17
Maiden speech, 20 Article, 21
Teeth, 22 Dawn, 23 Clarinet.

Down: 1 Dame, 2 Sirloin, 3
Intelligence, 4 Cherub, 6 Prism, 7
. Steerage, 8 For the better, 12
. Farmyard, 15 Lectern, 16 As well,
18 In tow, 19 Chat.

It’s blended in a French diet

goodly (5)

Reputedly wise light
sleeper (3)

Take-off is a bit of a risk it
seems (4)

Indeed upset when refused
(6) |
Put on too much weight (8)
Go get soil so he may
study it (9) y A:

They provide information
for people at the bank (7)
They can produce drops in
performance (4,5)

Traffic force includes
thousands (8)

Dubious character (7)

(6)

Requests said to give
satisfaction (5)

The hollow sound of
success in business (4).
Numbers rise in this issue
(3)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Frippery, 5 Spur, 9
Onset, 10 Meaning, 11 Mean
business, 13 Patchy, 14 Topple,
17 Deliberately, 20 Morocco, 21
Inane, 22 Crew, 23 Feckless.

Down: 1 Fool, 2 Inspect, 3 Pat on
, the back, 4 Rumpus, 6 Poise, 7
Register, 8 Lay it on thick, 12
Epidemic, 15: Pillage, 16 Groove,
18 Large, 19 Lees.

EASY PUZZLE

i
qq

1
5
8

=
o
=
o

Across

Afraid (7)

Pay a call on (5)
Unofficial test of
opinion (5,4)

A sugar cane liquor

_()

Symbol of servitude
(4)

Pupil of a leader (8)
Elect (6)

Rigorous (6)
Communiqué (8)
Cease (4)

Say further (3)
Bugbear (4,5)
Adversary (5)
Fidelity (7)

=
o



Down

1

2

Arousing suspicion
(5)

Earth’s atmosphere
(3)

Domestic cock or
hen (4)

Chance of success
(4-2)

Speed (8)

Cause of hurt
feelings (4,5)
Violent storm (7)
Information (9)

A legislative body
(8)

A green leaf
vegetable (7)

A handgun (6)
Devoutness (5)
Jealousy (4)
Harmful (3)



You are South, and the bidding
has gone:

East South West North
L& Dble Pass 29
Pass ?

What would you bid now with
each of the following six hands?

1. @ K862 ¥ K86 @ K862 # K8
2. # K862 ¥ Q862 #AQ62 # 8

3. #K1062 ¥ K862 #AQ62 #8
4. @AQ862 ¥ K86 # AKI6 # Q
5. 4 J985 ¥ A85S # KQL0 # AJ4
6. #AI94 ¥ Q6 @AKQS # AS4

eek

(This bidding quiz and the answers
below appeared some years ago in
“Rate Your Own Game,” then a
monthly feature of The Bridge World
Magazine. The problems were pre-
ceded by the statement that a single-
jump response to a takeout double
shows nine to 11 points and is not
forcing.)

1. Pass. Positionally promoted val-
ues notwithstanding, this is a mini-
mum double with minimum heart
support. Doubler should have no
thought of reaching game.

2. Three hearts. In spite of the low
point count, this is a sound ratse
because of the playing strength for
hearts. The absence of a cuebid by
North in clubs, which suggests that
he has some clubs to ruff, is a favor-
able sign.

3, Four hearts, Game cannot be

guaranteed, but with prime values
behind the opener, good trumps and
good ruffing potential, you would be
putting too much pressure on partner
with a mere invitational bid of three
hearts. Your values are such that ifa
little luck is needed (such as a couple
of finesses), you will have more than
the usual chance because of East's
opening bid.

4, Two spades. Game must be
reached, but you can’t tell whether it
should be bid in notrump, spades,
hearts or diamonds. Further investi-
gation is needed, and since two
spades is forcing and properly
descriptive, you need look no further
for the best way to proceed.

5. Two notrump. This does not
deny the heart support suggested by
your takeout double; it merely offers
notrump as an alternative contract. If
partner is bidding mainly on distribu-
tion, he can retreat to a suit contract.

6. Three clubs, Three notrump,
with only one club stopper, would be
unnecessarily precipitate. Instead,
you force partner to give you more
information — without yourself
sending a misdescription — by using
a strength-showing cuebid. This does
not affirm or deny interest in hearts;
you plan to clarify your intentions on
the next round (as by bidding three
notrump, which, following the cue-
bid, is more tentative than a direct
jump).

Tomorrow: To cogitate is not a sin.
©2010 King Features Syndicate Inc,
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Jobs picture dims as
unemployment claims rise

By CHRISTOPHER S
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The economy is looking
bleaker as new applications
for jobless benefits rose last
week to the highest level in
almost six months.

It's a sign that hiring
remains weak and employers
may be going back to cutting
their staffs. Analysts say the
increase suggests companies
won't be adding enough
workers in August to lower

the 9.5 per cent unemploy-
ment rate.

First-time claims for jobless

benefits edged up by 2,000 to
a seasonally adjusted 484,000,
the Labour Department said
Thursday. That's the highest
total since February. Analysts
had expected claims to fall.
Initial claims have now
risen in thrée of the last four
weeks and are close to their
high point for the year of
490,000, reached in late Janu-

ary. The four-week average, -

which smooths volatility,
soared by 14,250 to 473,500,

MOS Ia ad

_ also the highest since late

February.

The report "represents a
very adverse turn in. the
labour market, threatening
income growth and consumer
spending," Pierre Ellis, an
*economist at Decision Eco-

‘nomics, wrote in a note to

clients. _
Even ‘the lowest mortgage
rates in decades are a gloomy
sign for the economy. Aver-
age rates on 30-year fixed
mortgages fell to 4.44 per
cent, Freddie Mac said Thurs-
day. While that's good for

SALES FALL: A sign at a Wendy's restaurant is shown in Doral, Florida. Wendy's/Arby's
Group Inc. said yesterday that its second-quarter net income fell by more than 28 per cent as
sales fell and charges cut into results.

THE WEATHER REPORT i222

Eee Frees

4-8 knots

TODAY

Partly sunny with a

thunderstorm

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeal Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine-intensity, cloudiness, pracipitation, pesseure,
and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person fesls, Temperatures reflact the high and the low for the day.

UCP tr :

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday

Shown is sc s yeatie rf. Temperatures are today's

highs and

onights's lows. . ,

Pcs il acl SHG as Lula SM ll il

PH abe, =
wn eynw #

BMH MIM NM
MMMM HK

O DISCUSS STORIES ON THI

(AP Photo)



TONIGHT

Partly cloudy

SATURDAY

A mix of sun and
clouds
High: 92°
Low: 79°

BCU GET Tae

people looking to refinance
or buy a home, low rates
haven't been enough to ener-
gize a struggling housing mar-
ket.

And the drop suggests

investors are losing confi- -
dence in the recovery. Mort-
_ gage rates track the yields on

US Treasurys. They are
falling because investors :are
shifting more money away
from stocks and into the safe-
ty of Treasurys, which forces
those. yields down.

Those yields were pushed
even lower this week after the
Federal Reserve downgrad-
ed its assessment of the econ-
omy on Tuesday and
announced a programme, to
buy more, ‘Treasurys to help
lift the recovery.

The stock market has been
falling since the Fed's ‘more
pessimistic outlook. The Dow
Jones industrial average
dropped 37 points in midday
trading Thursday, and is down
more than 300 points for the
week.

Economists closely watch
weekly claims, which are con-
sidered a gauge of the pace
of layoffs and an indication
of employers’ willingness to
hire. Sap
The government's July jobs
report, released Friday,
showed that the economy lost
a net total of 131,000 jobs last
month. Excluding the.impact
of the elimination of 143,000
temporary census jobs, the
economy added a meager
12,000 positions, as layoffs by

SUNDAY

Nae

{Intervals of clouds
and sunshine
Highs 89°

Low: 80°

GUE

High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 79° F/26° C

Normal high

MONDAY

Partly sunny, a
t-storm Possible

state and local governments
almost cancelled out weak
hiring by businesses.
Thursday's: report on job-
less claims indicates that trend

may not change soon. Claims _

fell steadily last, year from
their peak of 651,000, reached

in March 2009. But they have

mostly leveled out this year

‘ator above 450,000. In a

healthy economy with rapid
hiring, claims usually drop
below 400,000.

The rise in claims is a sign
that private employers may
be ramping up layoffs, which

declined as recently as June,

according to a separate gov-
ernment report released
Wednesday.

States with the largest
increases in claims two weeks
ago cited rising layoffs in the
construction and manufactur-
ing industries. The state data

‘Jags the national report by

one week.

Claims could also be rising
_ because of large job cuts by ©

state and local governments,
which are struggling with
unprecedented budget gaps.
State and local governments
cut 48,000 jobs.in July, the
most in a year.

Some economists speculate
that many census workers
whose jobs are finished are
requesting unemployment

benefits. Another possibility is
‘ that small companies, facing

tight credit, are still reducing
their staffs, even as larger cor-
porations slowly resume hir-
ing.

msn AY

“Partly sunny

The report comes after the
Federal Reserve said Tues:..
day that “employers remain
reluctant to add to payrolls."
The centra] bank said the
pace of economic recovery is
likely to be more modest ‘than
anticipated.

And on Wednesday, the

Commerce Department said

June imports jumped while
exports dropped. That pushed
the trade gap to its widest
point since October 2008.
Many economists say’that
could reduce economic
growth estimates in the April-
to-June quarter to 1.2 per cent
— half the 2.4 per cent annu-
al rate the government esti-
mated last month. That's a
sharp slowdown from the five -
per cent growth in the final
quarter of 2009 and the 3.7
per cent pace in the January-
to-March quarter. That.weak-
ening could be prompting
more employers to cut staff,
or at least hold off on hiring.
’ The total number of peo-

' ple receiving benefits dropped

118,000 to 4.45 million, the
department said. But that
doesn't include another 5.3
million people receiving
extended benefits paid for by
the federal government, as of
the week ending July 24, the
latest data available.

Some companies are still
.cutting workers. Medical
products manufacturer. Care-
Fusion Corp. said Wednesday
it plans to eliminate 700 jobs,
saving the company up to

_ $120 million a year.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

UV inpex Topay

“The baie the saunas uv index™ number, the

greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Times For Nassau

w+» 91° F/33° C

Normal low. .:
Last year's high
Last year's low ....

Monday

High -HR(f.) Low _HR(ft.) |

Today
10:20p.m. 3.3. 4:19 p.m. 0.0 -

Saturday 10:56am. 3.5
WAS p.m. 3.0 5:16 p.m. 0.3

Sunday

70:01am. 3.6 3:49am. -0.3
4:38 am. -0.3
Vi3am. 3.4

12:09 a.m.
1

Wednesday 2: 15 a.m.

As of 2 p.m. yesterday .

Year to date .
Normal year to dats

\

AccuWeather.com
_ Forecasts and graphics provided by
‘AccuWeather, Inc, ©2010

8-16 knots

UP V YI sae ar cht yh

WINDS

Today: W at 3-6 Knots

3:02 p.m.

Thursday. = 3:20 a.m.

4:02 p.m.

Sun ano —
Sunrise ...... 6:43 a.m. Moonrise... .
Sunset. ... . :-7:46 p.m, Moonset... .

First Full

10:26 a.m.
10:42 p.m.

Last New

Aug. 24 -Sep.1

"7-14 knots

WAVES

VISIBILITY WATER, TEMES.
2-4 Feet PF

7 Miles

“Saturday: WSW at 4-8 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles a3° F
ANBROS Today cea BERT Knots. 1-3 Feet” 10 Miles” SCS

1-3 Feet 10 Miles

Skt Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 85°F
CAI : ESE at 6-12 Knots” 1-3 Feet 10 Miles , 88° F
— :

EUTHERA
FREEPORT
GREAT EXUMA = Today:
GREAT INAGUA Today:
LONG ISLAND
MAYAGUANA

SAN SALVADOR = Today:

ESE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at 6-12 Knots
. SE at 6-12 Knots
SSE at 4-8 Knots
SSW at’3-6 Knots
WSW at 3-6 Knots
SE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at 6-12 Knots
ESE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at_4-8 Knots
ESE at 7-14 Knots
ESE at 6-12 Knots
~ BSE at 7-14 Knots
Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots
Today: SE at 6-12 Knots
turday:. ~ SE at 4-8 Knots
SE at 8-16 Knots
aturday: SE at.6-
1D. Today: E at 6-12 Knots
turday; __ SE at 4-8 Knots

Saturd
Today:
Saturday:
Today:
Saturday:

‘_ Saturday:

Saturday:
Today:

= Saturd:
Today:

2-4 Feet
1-3 Feet:
2-4 Feet
1-3 Feet
0-1 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-3 Feet.
1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet
2-4 Feet
2-4 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet 10 Miles
1-3 Feet 10 Miles

~3 Feet 10 Mites
1-2 Feet 10 Mites
1-2 Feet 10 Miles

10 Mites
10 Mites
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Miles
10 Mites
10 Miles.
10 Mites
6 Mites

GE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


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PAGE 2F

THE TRIBUNE





BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010

OOOO TT ATOM Mg

ED mE er Is
' ahi - r

\\



LEA

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

ith just a few short

weeks until school

reopens, Minister
of Education Desmond
Bannister told The Tribune
that “there is no question
we will be absolutely
ready” to start the 2010/
2011 academic year.

He said that the repairs to school
buildings will be completed, the
teachers will be prepared and he
expects there to be no hiccups as the
new term starts.

Mr Bannister said that he has no
major expectations for the year, just
that every school continue to show
the fantastic improvements that they

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_

have been making.

“Quite frankly when I look at the
improvement in some of our schools, :
it’s outstanding. One public school
in New Providence last year had 24
students who got five or more sub-
jects with C grades or above. That
same school this year had 44 students
with five or more BGCSEs at Cor
above.

“A school in Grand Bahama that
last year had 12 students who’ got
five subjects with a C grade or above
this year had 30 and so it is an amaz-
ing improvement in one year. That’
school also had one student who got
nine BGCSEs with grades C or
above,” said the Education Minister.

Mr Bannister said the Ministry of
Education has been able to complete
an analysis of BGCSE and BJC

_Tesults by school and found that the

public system had results that “com-
pared very favourably with the

What will it take to help
our children learn?

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

NEIGHBOURHOODS should
get involved to help children learn,
said stakeholders in the education
sector. :

Responding to the state of edu-
: cation in the country, with the

national grade average at E- and D,

in Math and English, respectively,
community members weighed in on
what students and parents could do
to change the score.

“Parents and students should get
together and study or they can work
with the neighbours and get every-
one together and have a group dis-



cussion about what children learn in
school,” said Claudesha Gray, a
grade ten Government High School
student. °
‘ “The people who do poorly do
not pay.attention in school like how
the others pay attention. The chil-
dren who pay attention are quiet
and listen. The others just talk and
disrupt the class,” she said. j
Several weeks ago, Desmond Ban-
nister, Minister of Education said
exam results in the latest sitting of
the Bahamas General Certificate of
Secondary Education (BGCSE) are
a cause for national concern.
However, the Bahamas did see

‘the biggest improvement “in the his-

tory of the examination” based on





a!

EI

“ y




sy







results of independent schools.”
Additionally, every school in the
public school system will be required
to submit a school improvement plan
to the Ministry of Education outlin-

ing how it will work to effectively. .

address the academic and social
needs of its students.

Mr Bannister stressed that the suc-
cess of students does not rest entire-
lv on the educators however and

encouraged parents. to take a active ©

role in their children’s education.

“We will be having our parents
seminar on the 28th and I would
encourage parents to attend. It is crit-
ical that parents make the effort to
contribute to their children’s educa-
tion. The success of a student is often
directly related to the parental
involvement.”

This year saw the retirement of a
number of veteran educators and the
ministry has added 20 new teachers

the number of students who received
at least a C or above grade average

in five or more subjects, according to. -

Mr Bannister.

Minister Keith Gray, director of
the Hope Center, a safe haven for at
risk youth, said parents had to made
a real investment in their children’s
education, not with money, but with
time and interest.

“We are the sum total of all that is
deposited in us. If nothing is deposit-
ed in the child - no time, no values,
no help - then the proof will be in the
pudding. If we can’t find the time,
get people to help,” said Minister
Gray.

“The only thing is when you can’t
find the time you have to invest in
someone helping you to deal with
your life issues. If I have to go to
work at four or five, or if I just don’t
have the time, if I can’t help the

: child, find someone who knows how
to help the child. It may be a family
member, church member or some-
one in a civic club. If you find the

to schools throughout the country. .

Despite the economic challenges
facing many parents, Mr Bannister
said that there has not been an influx
of private school children transfer-
ring to public schools.”

“In fact a number of colleges and
independent schools have indicated

help it is just as good as helping them
directly,” he said.

It is not good enough for parents
to simply instruct children to study if
they want their children to be suc-
cessful, said Minister Gray.

He said parents have to make
them study by spending time and
helping the children to engage in the
subject matter. He said this was
especially important for children
who do not learn well in a classroom
environment, which is the case with
some.

“The problem is that a lot of par-
ents just want kids to do things for

themselves, when they are supposed .

to be helping them along the way.
You can’t just say go study; come
on, hello. I could pretend I am study-
ing, but it is different if I open the
book with them, read with them; and
go over their stuff,” he said.

Some parents are faced with the
situation where they are unable to
help their children in school, because
they are not proficient in the sub-

Wie ct



|
)
|





E
\



to me that they have some of their
largest class sizes this year.”

Mr Bannister added that the min-
istry is looking at additional mea-
sures to improve security ‘and reduce
the level of crime taking place in

‘schools. He said that this will include

additional CCT cameras.

ject matter. In this case, Minister
Gray said it is important for parents
to be honest with their children and
get external help.

Claudesha said some students are
satisfied with a passing grade, and
feel good knowing the national
grade average is a D. She said this
makes them know they have passed.

“People don’t always care about
getting A grades and B grades; they
just want to pass. They think D is a
pass,” she said.

The difference between those who
do well and those who don’t; she
said, is often determined by the rela-
tionship between the child and par-
ent.

“I care about doing well-because
my parents work hard to buy me
school stuff, so I want to pay them
back by doing well in school. I don’t
think the set who are disruptive in
class care if they do well. The set
who want to make their parents
proud, they care about doing well,”
Claudesha said.

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THE TRIBUNE



By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer



N a Bahamian college
_ essay titled Black Tar

Baby, the writer shares
her experience of what it ~
was like being the darkest
child in a class of whites
and mulattos. This visible
difference in skin complex-
ion made her the center of

attention and banter.

The antagonising remarks from
her peers propelled her to bleach
her skin, and chemically process her
hair. She thought that by doing this,
the teasing would stop, but the only
thing it did was damage her hair and
destroy her skin.

The effects of teasing and bullying
are more serious than parents and
teachers realise. Dr Michelle Major,
at the Caribbean Children's Devel-
opment Center, told The Tribune in
a recent interview that some chil-
dren have attempted and commit-
ted suicide because of constant
antagonising from peers.

"Bullying is very serious. We have
found that victims of bullying retal- _

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iate by hurting themselves and hurt-
ing others. We have had children
who have attempted suicide and
killed themselves.as a result of pro-
longed bullying," she said.

Children who are victims of bully-
ing have a higher tendency of having
emotional problems. They may cry
easily, have high levels of anxiety,
show symptoms of depression and
‘they may actually become depressed,
depending on the length and type of
bullying that occurs.

It is the duty of parents and teach-
ers to be observant. They must recog-
nisé when something is not right with
a child. For instance, if a child says
they don’t want.to go to school it

Visthe boxe

s

do. 7;



! gether is important
_ *Teach children tobe assertive
2 - Always stay together in groups » : oe
Teach others to stick up for their friends
Teach them to ignore the bullies
° Always report bullying incidences : -
the situation :

eS
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could be a sign that somethi 18
bothering the child the doctor id.
"Usually anytime a child dS t
want to go to school, it is a si: that
something is wrong. Maybe § not
school, maybe the bullying hap-
pening at a club ar at churcPh° any-
time your child doesn't wt to go
somewhere it is importa tO find
out why. It doesn't neces‘ily mean
you are not going to serthem, for
example they must go tchool, but
you need to find out 4Y, so that
you can take care of thssue by talk-
ing to the school ad;Mistration or
something like that, Major said.
Since most bully @ctivities take
place at school, tea€Ts Must recog-

nise!e two types of bullying, one
mo dangerous than the other.
feachers primarily need to
qerstand that there's overt bully-
ip that’s bullying like aggression.
iat’s what people usually think
yout when they think about bully-
og so somebody's getting beat up
or somebody's getting pushed, there
is some kind of physical contact.”
However, she said the most harm-

ful bullying is covert bullying. "This

is when they use non verbal com-
munication, for instance making a
pointed gun with their fingers or
they say things up in their face, avoid

talking to them, or as soon as they -

walk into a room everyone is told
to walk out. These things aren't so
obvious because they don't manifest
into some kind of physical alterca-
tion. They are the more dangerous,
and harder to pick out and teachers
need to be aware and pay attention
to that," she said.

The harmful acts of bullying have
everything to do with interpersonal
issues on both sides. Children who
are secure in who they are not tar-
gets for this type of behaviour.

"Bullies actually don't have access
to a child unless there is a loop hole
so to speak. There is a weakness.
And when you get rid of the weak-

PAGE 3F








ness, then bullies don't have an
opportunity to bully that child any-
more. Sometimes you can't change
the weakness. You can't change a
child's colour so a child has to learn
how to build their own self esteem
and feel confident in their skin and

.who they are," she said.

"Predominantly the bully needs
help. Bullies are not going to stop
because of the victum. They will
change to another person. So the
bully needs help as well to see where
this need to demean people comes

' from. It is a self esteem issue for the

bully as well that by putting people
down they feel better about them-
selves.

Dr Major said parents can help
build their child's self esteem by hav-
ing them participate in things they
are successful in and focusing on the
things they are good at, giving them
lots of praise and comfort at home.

"Give them avenues that they can
feel as though they are contributing
to this world by the jobs they have at
home and the things they partici-
pate in outside of home. Educating
kids to stand up for those who are
being bullied is the fastest way to
alleviate the issue. Its hard to do it. It
requires them to be educated,” she

_ Said. :

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PAGE 4F

THE TRIBUNE



BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



.. Bernique PINDER -

Salathiel R. WELLS

Jerelle RAHMING -

POCCOCOOSEEOE OOOO SOROS OHO OOOO OO OOOOH OE HLSODOOADO ODODE OOLOLOSOSOLOLOOOSOHDESODODLEOOOOOOOOOR OOS



BerniQue pinper

Peeeescocegccsesesverse0e00000

¢ Bernique Pinder is a 12th
grade student at the Crooked
Island High School. She is.a
winner of the 2009 Martin
Luther King Essay Competi-

tion, the Templeton Founda-. :
Essay ©

tion “Laws of Life”
Contest and the National
Women’s Week Essay Con-
test. Ms Pinder achieved 7
BJCs, receiving A’s and B’s.

Bernique’s commitment to
her studies earned her the
2008 best BJC results for the
MICAL District.

In January 2009, she also
won the Family Island divi-
sion of the Martin Luther
King Jr, Essay Competition.
This young lady’s checklist for
success includes; believing in
yourself, dream big dreams
and work to make them a
reality, count your blessings,
not your limitations.

Salathiel I. wes

e Salathiel R. Wells, a stu-
\lent at the NGM Major high
shool was awarded the 2010
aledictorian Award for
‘ha Phi Alpha Fraternity
. Wch recognised him as the
OMnisation’s most Coutstahds

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Bahamas for the year.

He also won the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture
Most outstanding Youth
Award for Long Island in
2009. Mr Well’s has a very
long list of achievements
including:

Deputy Head Boy in 2008-
2009, Head Boy in 2009-2010
and Class Vice President in
2009-2010. He obtained top

’ marks: in the BJC examina-

tions earning six A’s and two

B’s. He was privileged to —

attend the National Student
Leadership Forum in Wash-
ington DC with Rev Ruby
Ann Darling, where he met
several United States Con-
gressmen.

He was also featured as.a
ZNS TV Student ofthe week.
In addition to his focus on
academics, Salathiel has aspi-

rations of one day becoming

the Bishop of the Anglican
Diocese in The Bahamas and
the Turks & Caicos Islands.
Salathiel has already been
accepted into Florida Inter-
national University.

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~*e 12th, Grade, R.M. Bailey
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R.M. Bailey

Sir Gerald Cash

St Annes

St Augustine

St Cecilia

St Francis/Joseph

St Johins

Jerelle Rahming holds many

leadership positions at the
school including the Praise
and Worship team, the Girls’
Ensemble, Clarinet section
leader in the school band,
head vocalist in the choir, a
member of the school’s track
and field team and senior pre-
fect. Her involvement in
church includes being a mem-
ber of the Southwest ‘Cathe-

_ dral Youth Choir, The Girls’

Club, Militant Invaders, dra-
ma team, church band and
dance group.

‘ The versatile student main-
tains a 3.30 grade point aver- .
age and mentors young girls
at her school and church. Ms
Rahming believes that each
student has the ability to
achieve through education
and hard.work.. Her sugges-
tions for success are to have
Christ as your foundation,

-stay focus on education,

engage in positive activities

“and tse your talents to assist

others.

Michelle ereene

e Mickelle Greene com-
pleted most of her education
in San Salvador. The singer
has participated in the
National Arts Festival, and
won several competitions. |

She has captured winning
placements in the James
Cater Williams Speech
(2008); the National Youth
Month Speech (2008) and the
International Day Against
Illicit Drug Speech Safety
Ambassador Competition
(2010). =

Michelle became, a two-.
time member. of the Cat.
Island, San Salvador and Rum’


















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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 5F

eS

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



Michelle GREENE



Myrkeeva JOHNSON





Robyn NEWTON





Torrence CASH





Byron MCCARTNEY



Donovan DEAN



POO eee OOo oo OOOO OOOO OOOO OOO DOO OOH OOOO OSE DODO OOOOH OOOO OO NOOO OT OO EE OOO OOOO OOO HOODOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OSHS OOOO ODOT OOS O OOOO ODODE TOOD OOOO OT OOOOSOS EOD OOOO OOOO OHH OOOO SOOO EE OEE OHS OO OOOO OOO OOH OOS ESOS OOSELO000

Cay District Debate Champi-

onship Team. She has been a
member of San Salvador High
School’s Writer’s Club, Gavel
Club, French Club and Sports
Clubs, as well.as the Lady’s
Cacique Basketball, Volley-
ball, Track Teams, and Choir.

Michelle earned four
Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Education pass-
es in the eleventh grade.

She plans to pursue a
degree in Communications
which she will use to acquive a
job in Broadcast Journalism.
She also intends to develop
her musical talent and hopes
to release a Gospel CD.

MyrkKe@VC JoHNSON

Coveoocereooasoeacerooseoeoccce

e Myrkeeva Johnson, a
twelfth grader of Doris John-
son Senior High is the Deputy
Head Girl at Doris Johnson
Senior High, a member of the
Interact and Key Club, and
an active member of the Mys-
tic Marlin’s soccer and track
teams.

She has maintained a 3.45
GPA; and competed in the
Sir John Templeton “Laws of
Life” competition. Her work
was featured in The Tribune
newspaper’s ‘Write On’ col-
umr on February 15, 2010.

More recently, Myrkeeva.
was presented-with the Brass .

& Leather Award for ‘Excel-
lence in Education’ for the
Northeastern District.

IRODYN NEWTON
Robyn Newton is a recent

graduate of CV Bethel Senior

High, and-participated in

clubs such as Ladies Club,

_ SHOES AND ACCESSORIES
ROSETTA ST. 325-4944 CARMICHAEL ROAD 361-6876

\

Junior Achievement, Invest-
ment Club, and the choir.

Robyn graduated with hon-
ours with a cumulative GPA
of 3.27, and .excelled in the
Bahamas Junior Certificate
(BJC) where she obtained 5
A’s and 1B. She recently sat
the Bahamas General Cer-
tificate Secondary Education
(BGCSE) where she received
8 BGCSE’s, including an A
in English Language, Eco-
nomics, Keyboarding and
History.

She also obtained an SAT
score of 1490 and recently

‘took the AP Language exam.

Robyn is an incoming fresh-
man at the College of the
Bahamas where she is obtain-
ing a Bachelor’s degree in
Banking and Finance with a
foreign language. She hopes
to become a banker.

TOIMeENCe cas

Coceceveccecvesccsecccnecssoooe

° Torrence Cash recently
completed his final year at
CR Walker High School

. where he proudly served as

Deputy Head Boy, and
obtained 7 BJC’s.

_ During his final year at CR -
“Walker, Torrence became a

member of the distinguished
Gentlemen’s Club. ~

‘Torrence was the first recip-
ient of a full scholarship
awarded by the Gentlemen’s
Club to Morehouse College
in Atlanta, where he will pur-
sue a career in Civil Engi-
neering.

BYrOn mccartney

eeeccecccseccccccscccuncossccce

e Byron McCartney
recently completed his final

‘year of school at North

Andros High School where

' he proudly served as Head

Boy; and graduated with top
honors.

He sat eight BJC’s in the
ninth grade and earned the
most outstanding results in
North Andros and the Berry
Islands for the year 2007.:

Byron sat eight BGCSE’s
ranging from “A’s” to “C’s”.
He passed.all with tremen-

.dous results including Math-

ematics and English and was
accepted to The College of
The Bahamas. :

Byron’s career goals are
to \obtain a Doctorate
Degree in both Civil Engi-
neering and Architectural
Designs.

Call 393-1303
VILLAGE ROAD SOUTH

MN



DONOVAN bEAN -

e Donovan Dean is a
proud graduate of the St
John’s College Class of 2010.
His academic achievements
include 5 A’s and 2 B’s at the
BJC level and obtaining an
A in physics and a C in both
math and chemistry at the
BGCSE level.

He remained in the top five
in his class rankings during
grades 11 and 12 and gradu-
ated with distinction, winning
the vice principal’s prize for
academic excellence.

Donovan received ‘A’
grades in his BGCSE exami-
nations, for Math, English
Language, Spanish, Religion,

_- Chemistry, Physics, Geogra-
‘phy and Music subjects.

His career goal is to
become a civil engineer. He
plans to attend the College
of the Bahamas and later
transfer to a University
abroad to complete his stud-
ies. ©

Donovan was also a mem-

ber of the Gentlemen’s Club:

2010. Additionally, Dono-
van participated in the Goy-
ernor General’s Youth
Award (GGYA) programme
in which he obtained bronze
and silver medals.
Additionally, Donovan is

‘an avid swimmer who trains

with the Dolphin Swimming
Club, representing the club
in the annual National Swim-

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Donovan’s hobbies
include reading, improving
his computer skills, playing
the piano and hanging out
with friends.

BrUuniQUue sanps

e Burnique Sands was the
head girl in her school in the
MICAL constieuncy as was a
member of the school’s cham-
pionship debate team. She
obtained a 3.31 GPA and has
been lauded for her leader-
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PAGE 6F

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Krishaun Johnson Tre’ Adderley

The Tribune's

aN “| '

Antonia Johnson

Name: Krishaun Johnson

- Age: 16°
School: CV Bethel High School
Parent: Sherry L Johnson:




i

Q : College attending: College of the

s ) Bahamas ~

Sa Ambition: Plans to obtain a
degree in law.

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Name: Tre’ Adderley
Age: 17

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Cameron Pratt

School: C V Bethel High School
Parents: Tamala Lynes and Syd-

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College attending: Linden Wood
University in St Charles, Missouri
Ambition: To one day become an
electrical engineer

Name: Antonia Johnson

Age: 16 |

School: C V Bethel High School
Parents: Garth and Annamae —
Johnson

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Ambition: To become a forensic
scientist

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_ Name: Cameron Pratt

Age:17_

School: CV Bethel High School
Parents: Charles and Clarise
Pratt

College attending: ATP Flight
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Ambition: To become an airline
pilot

| . Name: Garnisha Pinder

Age: 17
School: C V Bethel High School



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Parents: Denice Thompson and
Garnett Pinder i

College attending: College of the
Bahamas, then Florida Interna- ~
tional University

Ambition: To become a speech
and writing therapist

Name: Cordero Saunders

Age: 17

School: C V Bethel High School
Parent: Tanya Johnson

College attending: Gupton Jones
College of Funeral Service
Ambition: To become a morti-
cian

Name: Renel Brown

Age: 17
~ School: CV Bethel High School

Parents: Renae and Nelson

- Brown

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Ambition: To become an actress
Name: Sanay Collie

Age: 18

School: St Anne's School
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University, Halifax, Canada













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Ambition: To obtain a Bachelor's

_ and Master's Degree in com-

merce.

Name: Megan Burrows

Age: 17

School: Queen's College
Parents: Sandra and Llewellyn
Burrows

College attending: Southeastern
University:

Name: Chelseyann Bipat

Age: 15 °

School: Queen's College
Parents: Jean and Bishwanand
Bipat

College attending: New York
Institute of Technology

Name: Kerri Pinder

Age: 17

School: Queen's College
Parents: Dennis and Gail Pinder
College attending: University of
Vermont

Name: Sidney Russell

Age: 17

School: Queen's College

. Parents: Ingrid and Sidney Rus-

sell
College attending: Clarkson Uni-
versity |

Name: Dominic Duidcornbe

Age: 18

School: Queen's College
Parents: Velda and Phillip Dun-
combe ©

College attending: College of the
Bahamas :

Name: Anaard Lunn

Age: 17

School: Queen's College
Parents: Anthony and Dorothea
Lunn

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Name: Adria McCardy

Age: 17

School: Queen's College

~ Parents: Cardinal and Hope ~

McCardy

College attending: College of the
Bahamas

Name: Nicholas Archer

Age: 16

School: St John’s College
Parents: Anthony and Nicholette
Archer:

College attending: Li Po Chun
United World College

Ambition: To become an electri-
cal-engineer and create an elec-
trical system powered by alterna-
tive or renewable energy.

Name: Ra'Shan Stubbs

Age: 17

School: St John’s College
Parents: William and Crystal
Stubbs :

_ College attending: College of the

Bahamas

Ambition: To be the best diag-
nostic cytologist and forensic
scientist in the Bahamas

-Name: Noelle Sawyer

Age: 16

School: St John’s College ©
Parents: Clyde and Evelyn
Sawyer

College attending: Vassar Col-
lege

Ambition: To become an satica:
tor in mathematics and history
Name: Jode Ferguson

Age: 17

School: StJohn’s College
Parents: Alexa and Theodore Fle
guson
College attending: Ohio Wes-

~ Jeyan University

Ambition: To return to the
Bahamas to become a general
surgeon

_ Name: Aston Symonette

ge: 17
School: St John’s College
Parents: Albrion Sr and Camille
Symonette
College attending: University of
New Orleans
Ambition: To become a qualified
engineer and work as a marine
engineer and ship InSPEGOE
Name: Vandia Lashan
Age: 10
Schaal: ‘Sandilands EIR)
School
Parent’s Name: Norma & Pascal
Joseph
Career Goal: To become a doc-
tor and a athlete
Ambition: To continue reaching

. academic excellence by making

the honor roll and maintaining
her 3.84 grade point average

Name: Phaefrisia C.R. Strachan

School: St John’s College (11th
grade)

Parents names: Burlington and
Paula Strachan

Ambition: To become a veteri-
narian and an artist. At the end of
the 2009/2010 academic year,
she placed 3rd out of 103 stu-
dents in her grade level.
THE TRIBUNE

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010

PAGE 7F





_ Nicholas Archer

Pee






(Nae
cai HMTAISY HHS

stennay



Anaard Lunn

Phaefrisia C.R.Strachan Chelseyann Bipat

EO



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an awar:
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.











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PAGE 8F

THE TRIBUNE



ac SUCCESS
( Tiffany Lavette
Grant poses in
front of the
school sign at the
University of
. King's College,
“i Halifax, Nova
n= Scotia, Canada.
Tiffany obtained
her Bachelor of
Journalism (Hon-
ours) Degree.

angen
ASS "

























Former Tribune reporter
obtains Journalism Degree



By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor



iffany Lavette Grant, a
‘ former Tribune Staff

Reporter, graduated in
May of this year with a Bach-
elor of Journalism (Honours)
Degree from the University of
King's College, Halifax, Nova:
Scotia, Canada.

In 2004, Tiffany graduated with
an Associate of Arts Degree in
Journalism and Mass Communica-

‘ tions with credit from The College

of The Bahamas before working
at this newspaper from 2004-2006
when she left to further her studies.

During her last year in universi-
ty, she was the editor for
AfricVoice, the newsletter of the
Black Student Advising Centre
(BSAC) at Dalhousie University

and in 2009, she also interned at
Halifax Magazine where a number
of her stories were published.
“One of my requirements for my
degree was to write an honours
paper where I examined a medi-
um. I choose to look at: The Tri-
bune newspaper. I asked the ques-

~ tion: Why does The Tribune focus

a lot of their content on political
reporting.
“In investigating this, I talked to

my former boss newsroom editor

Paco Nunez, , Sir Arthur Foulkes,
a former Bahamian politician and
then director general of Bahamas
Information Services, and Branville
McCartney, the then minister of

state for immigration, along with
other individuals. :

“Overall, the reason why there is
so much focus on politics in The
Tribune is due to a culture where
Bahamians are interested in polit-

¢

“Even though | was a
hard news reporter
at one point in my life,.
~ my true passion is
about finding out
about what people do,
~why-they do it; and the .
struggles and success-
es they have in life.”

COCOCOHTHS ET OOOOH HA OOOTO LOSES SEDO E500

ical reporting.”

Tiffany explained that she chose
to study journalism because she
has always had an interest in writ-
ing about people and social mat-

. ters.

“Byen though I was a hard news
‘reporter at one point in my life,
my true passion is about finding
out about what people do, why
they do it, and the struggles and
successes they have in life.

“While daily news is essential in
today's world, I feel more accom-
plished writing a feature on issues
such as people dealing with mental
illness or how people are, affected
by the financial crisis. I believe
every story should have “heart”
and, “head.” This means, that it
should have a human interest.angle
that people can relate to, the
“heart” and the “head”, which are
_the statistics and the research that
has been done concerning. an
issue.”

She recently received her. post-
graduate work permit, which will
enable her to work in Canada for
three years.

“Tt took'me a while to adjust to
being in Halifax, but now I consid-
er it my second home.”

Her career plans will include
contributing to magazines, assist-
ing with documentaries, as well as
some public relations work such as
writing press kits for individuals.

“Getting that dream job is all a

. process. It's a process I am willing
and able to go through.”

Tiffany attributes her success to
her mother Juanita Grant. ae:
-, “My mother was a single moth-
er who always strived to give her
children the best and I will always
be so grateful for everything that
she did for me and my. brother..J
also. want to thank my brother
Jamaal Grant who also sacrificed,
so that I could have and my Gram
my Dorothy Nairn, whom ‘J know
prayed for me while I was in school
and continues to pray for me.”

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-PAGE 10F

THE TRIBUNE



BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



BAHAMAS BAPTIST COMMUNITY COLLEGE



New
courses

By REUBEN SHEARER

\ \ | ith a new acade-
’ mic year soon

upon them, students of the
Bahamas Baptist Commu-
nity College have much to
look forward to. New cours-
es and professors are just a
few of the changes students
can expect.

‘According to Sir Baltron
Bethel, BBCC’s president,
the economic downturn may

not have a major impact on |

this year’s enrollment.
The college president
expects. enrollment to

. remain steady. The school

is offering 30 Associate of
Arts degree programs, a
variety of professional cer-
tificate courses, and a col-

lege preparatory program
for students that haven’t met ,

college entry requirements.
“We hope to continue to

see our programs -sub- »

scribe,” said Sir Baltron,
who looks forward to a pro-
ductive school year. ““We’re
all set to go, and we’re cele-
brating our 15th anniversary.
We have a number of activ-

ities which we.are planning -

to observe for the 15th
anniversary of the school.”

“All of the programs
which we offer on the col-
lege level are approved by
the Ministry of Education,













/ HOPEFUL:
/ Sir Baltron Bethel

-and are accepted at institu-

tions abroad, and the Col-
lege of the Bahamas,” ‘he
explained.

BBCC expects over 700.

students this school year,

“including recent high school

graduates and working
adults.
Degrees being offered

include an Associate of Arts |
’ degree in Accounting, Busi-

ness Administration, Com-
puter Information Systems,
HRM Management, Mar-
keting and Office Adminis-
tration. _

BBCC will offer several
new programs for the new
school year, including a pre-

school auxiliary certificate
Hospiality A

program,
Accounting and Microso
Quickbooks Certificate




: courses ‘6 cater toa new. cal-

iber of students. =

The school’s Hospitality
Accounting certificate
course is designed for per-
sons who have been working

in the accounts department

of hotels and restaurants
who may not have had any
formal accounts training. lt
is a one semester course.’

Persons interested in the -
medical field can enroll in
the medical transcription
program which will give
them the necessary skills to
maintain records in medical
offices.

The College Preparatory
programme is designed to.
assist students who do not
have the required grades in
their BGCSEs. *

The College Preparatory
program includes courses in
Mathematics I and 2, Eng-
lish 1 and 2, Biology with
lab, Chemistry with lab, His-

-tory, Geography, and Stu-
“dent Development Seminar.

While pursuing excellence
in education in.a Christian

- environment, BBCGi 24s.com-

mitted to providing’ ZODPOr-
tunities for as many 1 -
ans as possible,. cat all levels

_ of society.

__ Studies can be pursued ona
» full-time: or. part-time. basis,
or ata ‘distance education

programme in Eleuthera.

We're all set to go,
and we’re celebrating
our 15th anniversary.
We have a number of
_ activities which we are

planning to observe

» . for the 15th anniver-
sary of the school.

Sir Baltron Bethel

“Making sure
She's prepared

Fidelity Fast Track Loan


THE TRIBUNE









¢

Ve
£0 ee

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

HE Anglican Diocese
of the Bahamas is

upholding its mandate to pro-
vide a unique educational expe-
rience for the students attend-
ing the four schools under its
umbrella.

And according to education
stakeholders, they have made
an invaluable contribution to
Bahamian society by develop-
ing the whole child spiritually,
academically, physically, emo-
tionally and socially. ,

Like the Catholic and Bap-
tist Educational Boards in the
Bahamas, the Anglican Central
Education Authority said it is
continuously revamping its
facilities and incorporating new
programmes to ensure their stu-
dents are exposed to new rele-
vant information as well as a
range of extracurricular activi-
ties to help them reach their
highest scholastic potential.

Makia Gibson, Anglican
deputy director of education
and curriculum, said the Angli-
can Authority has exerted its
efforts towards a number of
new initiatives to improve the
schools.

Along with the addition of
new courses, a new science
block has, been established at
St John’s College in Nassau.

"There are number of new
initiatives we have implement-
ed for the new school year. At
St John’s College we have

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ox

added. a new science block
which is a state-of-the-art
space," he said.

As it concerns new spaces,
the Anglican Central Educa-
tion Authority has made the
decision to also expand the St
Andrew’s School in Exuma.

"St Andrew’s in Exuma went.

from nursery to grade nine. We
are building a senior high
school and next year will be the
first graduating class from
there," Mr Gibson told The Tri-
bune. \

The Bishop Michael Eldon
High School in Freeport has
also undergone a facelift and a
new cafeteria has been added.

And the advanced placement
programme, which aims to
make the transition from sec-
ondary school to college easier
for students, has proven suc-
cessful.

The Anglican Authority has
also introduced a new literacy
initiative at all of its schools.









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are afforded the opportunity to

Sec its inception, The Catholic
Board of Education in the Bahamas
has been on a mission to uphold academic
excellence through the fundamental prin-
ciples of Christianity.

They have tried to find innovative new
avenues to provide students with conducive
learning environments and effective cur-




With this new initiative teachers
will set aside non-negotiable
time for reading, learning new
skills and strategies. The board
believes that this literacy activ-
ity will have great benefits for
their students.

"Students can also take this
time to discuss with their teach-
ers and peers their thoughts
about different subject mat-
ters," Mr Gibson explained.

During the past year, St
Anne’s School joined forces
with the Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) to create a
unique hospitality and tourism
studies course.

And while the collaboration
with the BHA is nothing new to

‘schools in the Bahamas, the

Anglican Central Authority
started it as an academic pro-
gramme instead of a practical
one.

With the hospitality and
tourism studies course students

xcellence

Christi

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

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visit hotel properties in New
Providence and on the Family
Islands.

“The hospitality and tourism
studies course has been very
successful over the past year
and it provides a number of
opportunities for the students,”
Mr Gibson said.

Another initiative, the global
citizens programme - an expe-
rience oriented programme that
introduces students to new cul-
tures and languages - has also
been launched. ° :

The Anglican Education
Authority said it is particularly
excited about this programme
because students get the oppor-
tunity to travel to different
countries and participate in an
exchange of cultures.

With unemployment being a
prevalent problem in the
Bahamas today, the Anglican
schools have designed a pay-
ment plan to assist parents who
are finding it difficult to meet
tuition obligations. Before the
school year commences, par-
ents are required to pay 25 per
cent of the tuition and then
make ten equal payments until
March of next year.

Mr Gibson also said though
unemployment is still high they
have not seen any noticeable
losses in the number of students
attending and enrolling in the
schools.

“We haven’t seen a signifi-
cant loss. As a matter of fact,
three out of four of the schools
grew and our enrollment is
strong,” he said. ;




riculums designed to challenge all learning
styles and capacities.

For the new school semester, which starts
in just a few short weeks, the well estab-
lished system has not been short of new ini-
tiatives to take their educational experience
to the next level.

Students attending the fourteen schools
under its jurisdiction can expect an exciting

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PAGE 12F



[sack TOSCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010
How to use the

PEDES



Advice for children using —
the pedestrian crossing

e If there is a pedestrian
crossing, use it. Do not cross
on the zig-zag lines — only on
the black and white stripes.

“e Drivers need plenty of
- time to slow down and stop.

Wait on the pavement near
the kerb until all the traffic
has stopped before you start
tocross. ~

Remember, vehicles need
more time to slow down if .
the road is wet or slippery.

After the traffic has

‘ tions, walk across. Keep -
looking all round and listen-
ing in case a driver has not
seen you. Watch out for
overtaking vehicles.

° If there is an ‘sland in the
middle of the crossing, stop
on it. Look all around and
listen, and after the traffic
has stopped, walk across.

_ Advice for drivers and riders
using the pedestrian crossing

¢ When coming to a pedes-

’ trian crossing marked with

white stripes (a “zebra”
crossing) be ready to slow



properly |

stopped from both direc-. .. ..--

THE TRIBUNE



‘down and stop to let people
Cross. _

¢ You must stop once they
have stepped onto the cross-
ing.

e You must not overtake on

or near,a pedestrian crossing
because this may. make it
difficult for you to see a
pedestrian who has stepped
onto the crossing and will
make it difficult for them to
see you.

¢ For the same reason, you
must not park your vehicle
on a pedestrian crossing or
near one..

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FROM page 11

school experience this year.

In a recent interview with the Tribune,
Claudette Rolle, director of the Catholic Board of
Education said that they did have to make adjust-

-ments to offset the government’s decesion to

reduce its subsidiaries to the private schools in
this. year’s budget and to reflect the economic
challenges that may affect parents.

She explained that board had to suspend salary
increases for the 2010-2011 academic year and
will also have to decrease the number of teacher’s
aides that they have in first grade to minimise the
possibility of having to lay off staff at a later
date.

‘ Because the economy has not recovered fully
from the downturn, Catholic schools are doing

their best to work with parents who may find it__.

difficult to keep up with tuition fees.

“In the past we have offered a payment plan
extending over a period of three months. We
allowed the tuition fees to be paid in parts. Now
we are extending it to nine months. So parents

will be able to pay the child's tuition over a nine-

month period. However, parents must make
arrangements before the opening of school,” she
explained.

Ms Rolle added that the Advanced Place-
ment Programme, a programme that allows qual-

" ifying secondary school students the opportunity

to pursue advance courses eligible for college
credits, will be implemented this year starting

“xawith Aquinas College.

* “Students'who. are in grades ten and eleven

and haye been successful in their BGCSE’s will
qualify for the advanced placement programmes.
Starting with Aquinas College, we will be imple-:
menting auto mechanics and history advanced
placement courses and at Catholic High in Grand
Bahama we will implement the math advanced
placement course," Ms Rolle said... ..

Additionally, the Catholic Board of Education
is also making progressive steps'to introduce
Spanish as an advanced peer course next
year.

“As the years progress we are Jooking. to

’ phase in other advanced placement courses,” Ms

Rolle told The Tribune.

With the advancements in technology and
knowledge, the Catholic Board saw fitting to
revise their science, social studies, and informa-
tion technology curriculums for the new school
year as we Hi.

‘Additionally’ the organisation i is also dividing
their focus to the sporting facilities.

“At Aquinas College a sports field is in devel-
opment. The new sports field includes a track
field, basketball court, volley ball court, and a soft
ball field. We are also looking to expand in all of
our schools,” she said. ;

Ms Rolle said what concerns the board -the
most is the health of students. She said they want
to take a holistic approach to education so they
will be educating students on healthy foods and
enforcing nutritious lunch programmes.

“We are concerned.to see where the country
is going. There are so many ailments that are-
connected to obesity and that is why.we. snUSt
be conscious of what our children are ta
their bodies,” Ms Rolle explained.



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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 13F



Ten study habits of

1. Try not to do too much studying at
one time.

If you try to do too much studying at
one time, you will tire and your study-
ing will not be very effective. Space the
work you have to do over shorter peri-
ods of time. Taking short breaks will
restore your mental energy.

2. Plan specific times for studying.
Study time is any time you are doing

something related to schoolwork. It can °

be completing assigned reading, work-
ing on a paper or project, or studying
for a test. Schedule specific times
throughout the week for your study
time.

3. Try to study at the same times each
day.

Studying at the same times each day
establishes a routine that bécomes:a
regular part of your life, just like sleep-
ing and eating. When a scheduled study
time comes up during the day, you will
be mentally prepared to begin study-
ing. :

4. Set specific goals for study times.

Goals will help you stay focused and
monitor your progress. Simply sitting
down to study has little value. You
must be very clear about wnat you
want to accomplish during your study
times.

5. Start studying when planned.
You may delay starting your studying
because you don't like an assignment

or think it is too hard. A delay in study-

ing is called "procrastination." If you
procrastinate for any reason, you will





find it difficult to get everything done
when you need to. You may rush to

-‘maké up the time you wasted getting

started, resulting in careless work and
errors.

6.Work on the assignment you find

most difficult first. .

Your most difficult assignment will
require the most effort. Start with your
most difficult assignment since this. is
when you have the most mental ener-

8y-

7. Review notes before beginning an
assignment,

_ Reviewing your notes can help you

make sure you.are doing an assignment
correctly. Also, your notes may include
information that will help you com-
plete an assignment.

8. Tell friends not to call during study
times.



Two study problems can occur if your,

friends call you during your study
times.
It is not that easy to get-back to what
you were doing. Second, your friends
may talk about things that will distract
you from what you need to do. Here's
a simple idea - turn off your cell phone
during your study times. -

9. Call another student when you have
difficulty with an assignment.

This is a case where "two heads may -
be better than one."

10. Review schoolwork over the week-
end.

Yes, weekends should be fun time. But
there is also time to do some review..
This will help you be ready to go on
Monday morning when another school
week begins.

@ Taken from ww.howtostudy.com

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#29 Jerome & Mt. Pleasant Avenue




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PAGE 14F

THE TRIBUNE





hen you dri-

ve to take

your child to

school or
commute to work, do you
have room for other passen-
gers? Have you ever noticed
how many others around you
are driving with a lot of room
for others too?

Carpooling is when two or
more adult commuters plan
to share the responsibility of
taking their children to school
or employees sharing the ride
to work on a continuous basis,
regardless of their relation-
ship to each other or the cost
of the sharing agreements. .

Carpooling is the most
common form of ride sharing
that parents and employees
can use as a tool to get their
children to school and them-
selvés to the work site.

It enables employees and
parents to cut stress by.shar-
ing the driving responsibili-
ties, develop friendships, save
money and have more time
to relax.







Ly

LL
Wy yy

yt



SS

\ 4

feces

We



po mcalonypiiy



BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 201

THE DEPARTMENT OF ROAD TRAFFIC PROVIDES INFORMATION FOR PARENTS AND EMPLOYEES







WITH traffic congestion having become a major problem
on the streets of New Providence, the Department of Road |
Traffic is encouraging parents to carpool for daily school

drives when the new term starts on August 31.

Bonaventure
Medical

LABORATORY

It is a great choice for those
who do not need their car at
work everyday, have a con-
sistent work schedule and
travel more than 10 minutes
to work.

Carpooling is flexible. You
can carpool all the time, or
just a few days a week. It can

BAY TO SCROML
















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willie yyy

Yjijiitior

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| , i
Yy lee

MMIOUAL tt






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improve travel through the
more efficient use of the
country’s existing transporta-
tion system by reducing traffic
congestion.

Even one day out of five
can mean a 20 per cent reduc-
tion in weekly wear and tear
on your car and helps in pro-
tecting the environment.

Carpooling advantages

Saves money

The Department of Road
Traffic said it has been
researching carpooling in var-
ious countries and it hasn't
been uncommon to read sto-
ries of people who save a cou-
ple of hundred dollars a
month in transport costs by
sharing a ride with someone
else or sharing the responsi-
bilities of school drop off and
pick up. :

Constant city driving is
notorious for causing wear on
vehicles - all the stopping and
starting wears out engines,
brakes and gearboxes, not to
mention tvre wear.

According to the American
Automobile Association, it
costs an average of 26.2 cents

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Rca
dale
aS

Ce Toi Us ae
FOR ROS

we
Aer ALI AE





per mile to drive a car; and
that's just gas and wear and
tear combined.’

' Decongests roads

According to.a recent US
study, "Commuting in Amer-

Ica :

- US drivers waste approxi-
mately 4.2 billion hours sit-
ting in traffic

- Traffic congestion wastes
approximately 2.9 billion gal-
lons of fuel and

- In Los Angeles, the average
driver wastes 72 hours per
year going nowhere. If every-
one car pooled, imagine the
many hundreds of thousands
of vehicles that would be off
the road each day. This would
lessen traffic congestion, mak-
ing trips faster, cutting fuel
and car maintenance costs
even further.

Social /emotional advantages

Through sharing a ride, |

you'll meet other people.

The internet online world
is steadily disconnecting peo-
ple and that can be unhealthy
for many folks.

For some people there's
nothing like a pep session
before the daily grind and a

counselling session immedi- °

ately afterwards.

Also, if you find driving to
work stressful, car pooling can
alleviate the frustration in
travelling to and from the

_ workplace.

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You may‘even find time to
carry out other tasks during.
the drive instead, such as
preparing for meetings etc.

Flexibility through technology:

In the early days of car-
pooling, it was fairly restric-
tive and it could be difficult to
find people you get along with
‘to team up to share a ride.
The advent of the World
Wide Web has changed all
that.

Many online services have
sprung up in states such as
Florida that provide:a good
choice of people to ride share

‘with and therefore greater
flexibility with your own
timetable.

The Bahamas can adopt this
pattern from Florida in the
future to better organize the
car pooling system.

Carpooling precautions

Wherever humans are
involved, there is always
potential for things to go
wrong and not everyone in
the world is balanced and
organised.

If you're new to the idea of
carpooling with people you
don't know, here's some basic
guidelines to bear in mind.

e Try to meet your prospec-
tive new carpooling partner
in a public place first before
making firm arrangements to
travel together. Don't reveal
too much personal informa-
tion up to that point.

e Ask some probing questions
about driving habits. You
don't want to end up being
stuck with someone prone to
road rage or other habits that
don't suit you.

Tne

rea eTe}o)

ue




ddl

liiblidiidisbiitold



ack .

reg $12.85





$127

Ia-te RM ekp













3600-8985

7:00am-9;00pm
closed

P30)
O.

School

} Supplies

#3 600-0991 8/UPC#43100 09918

Oxford Geometry Set.e..sssssesseeeeow $5.16
#3600-10010/UPC# 79252 02359

Encore Correction pen w/Fluid.......now $ 1.56
_#3600-97065/UPC#60107 81193:

Encore 2pk Correction Fluid...........now $ 1.59
#3600-96840/UPC#60107 96840

Kidskraft 12p¢ Jumbo Crayons.......now $ 1.40
#£3600-93152/UPC#40107 93152 oan

Encore One Hole Punch......cs.now § 1.56
+#3600:20225/UPC##60]07 20225

Encore Mini Calculator.........0000N0w $ 1.40
#3600-18077/UPC#60107 80744

Construction Paper 96 sheets........now $ 3.08
#3600-53336/UPC#43100 53336 :

3pk Transparent Tape.......s.now $ 1.16
+#3400-82391/UPC# 60107 82391

Mead Spiral Notebook 120 sheets..now $ 1.9
#3600-05/46/UPC#43100 05746

Mead Spiral Notebook 180 sheets....now $ 2.64
#3600-05680/UPC#43100 05680

Mead Spiral Notebook 100 sheets.....now $ 2.28
# 3600-0551 4/UPC#43100 05514

Encore Plastic Pencil Box.....:.....0..o0w § 2.12
#3600-87107/UPC# 60107 87107

Encore 32pk Crayons......ssssseseeeOwW $ 1.48
#3600-12111/UPC#60107 12111

Learn to Letter w/guidelines...........now $ 4.08
+#3400-48004/UPC#43100 48004

Encore Jumbo Pk Elastic Bands.....now $ 1.68
#3400-90473/UPC# 60107 90473

Encore Clip Hightlighter...............m0w $ 1.68
P

e Try to confirm. your
prospective travel. partner's
identity. Ask to see their dri-
ver's license or other state-
issued ID and reciprocate the
gesture.

e Trust your instincts. If some-
thing doesn't feel quite right,
don't go ahead with the
arrangement. ‘

¢ Be sure you exchange emer-
gency medical information
once you're comfortable and
decide to go ahead with the
arrangement. This is in case
you're in an accident.

e Make sure you settle on
issues such as eating/drinking
in the vehicle, stops along the
way and flexibility in pickup
times; for example how late
can a person be before they'll
miss a lift.

e Have a backup plan as:
sometimes unavoidable situa-
tions will occur such as you
become ill or the other person -
is ill.

- @ It's really important that

everyone involved in the ride
sharing arrangement is aware
of and agrees upon the
ground rules .and it's proba-
bly wise to have them written
down. Playing it by ear is a

sure-fire recipe for disaster.

pooling, please feel free to con-
tact the Transport Policy and
Planning Unit of the Road
Traffic Department at tele-
Phone numbers 328-4825/6. A
carpool survey will be con-
ducted at schools in. New
Providence in early Septem-
ber. Please participate and let’s

‘put a dent in traffic.conges-
tion.)






*Except
on net
items



#60107 89850
Encore Vinyl Bindet................N0W $ 2.60
#3400-97580/UPC#30107 97580

Encore 4pk Permanent Markers...now $ 1.40
#3600-95230/UPC# 60107 95230

Encore 15pk Sheet Protectors...now $ 1.48
+#3400-94582/0C4E60107 96582

Encore 2pk Lettering Stencils....now $ 1.68
+#3600-96614/UPC#60107 96614 .

sale ends Sept 4th, 2010
PAGE 15F





THE TRIBUNE
BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010
: creative tips for packing healthier
(ARA) - ents who appreciate the simplicity of





t's that time of year again:
= back-to-school season.
7 Amidst the jam-packed
4m... schedule of a child's school
day, it's nice to know there is one
area where parents make a differ- |
‘ence - lunchtime.

The mission is to create a nutri-
tious lunch that your hungry kids will
look forward to eating. To help, here
are five creative tips to selecting
healthier options.

1. Colour, colour, colour: Kids ° .
love colour so make it a point to pick

a different colour for each day/week

(or better yet, let them pick) and add
it to your child's lunch in fun ways.
For example, on a purple day pack a
small plum or handful of grapes. Red
is fun if you pair raspberries and
strawberry yogurt for dipping, and
peaches or baby carrots make deli-
cious orange. options. It's not only a
fun way to get them excited about
lunch, it helps introduce new fruits
and vegetables they might have been
uninterested in trying before.

2. Portion control: Finding pre-
portioned snacks can help save both

time and calories. Instead of reaching:

for bags of chips that can be higher in

_fat, try low-fat pretzels or 100-calorie
’ snacks instead. For example, Sny-

der's of Hanover offers a wide vari-
ety of items in its 100-Calorie Lunch
Pack line, including Minis, Sticks and
Snaps Pretzels as well as Eatsmart
Naturals Veggie Crisps. Snyder's also
offers a variety pack of Peanut But-
ter and Cheddar Cheese Pretzel
Sandwiches available in compostable
outer packaging. Single serving
snacks are perfect for on-the-go par-

Weenie te ee
Pease enna
Pilinerise

ae eau by

‘be. Make Sunday a preparation day
« for the week ahead and_.get the

putting a bag in a lunch box. For
more information and snack ideas,
visit www.snydersofhanover.com.

-3. Fun surprises: Yes, some kids
are content with the same lunch day
after day after day, but for the ones
who need variety, make it fun.
Change it up and do something unex-
pected. For example, ever thought of
making breakfast for lunch? Why
not? Pack two or three small whole-
grain pancakes with fruit and yogurt
for toppings. To replace sugary juice,
pack homemade fruit-flavored water
in a reusable bottle. Jazz up.a typical
sandwich by cutting it with a cookie
cutter, and wrapping it in wax paper
tied with a bow. A knock-knock joke
or little stickers can add even more
fun.

4. Choose a theme: For example,
create a picnic theme with turkey
tortilla roll-ups and fruit kabobs. For
a tea party theme} make miniature
sandwiches and include sliced
cucumbers with fruity-tea. The possi-
bilities are endless, so get your kids
involved and asked them what fun
lunch themes they would enjoy. ae

5! Plan.ahead and save: While
packing lunches might seem too
time-consuming, it doesn't have to

whole family involved to help out.
Pick colours (see tip No. 1) you
might include or prepare little note
cards with jokes. By planning ahead,
you're less tempted to give in to
packing more expensive, quicker
options and instead you can save
money by looking for deals and using
coupons.

Courtesy of ARAcontent >

Cy

ES p

eS
| SHARPENER
OA eAt Aaa

| 24pk CRAYOLA CRAYONS Lie watcha hy

ea

PRsc leah ia

LAU

Reap eles
Rae Wiese (3
1 250ct FOLDER SHEETS

NOC) eect





Puneet
USN tS
3.3 PRONG PAPER FOLDERS
Frasiturien Sa


PAGE 16F THE TRIBUNE
BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT 2010



5” Screen CD/DVD,
indows 7, 160G
ard Drive with the purchase
of a case of Vitamalt


BAHAMAS B aS IN

Cash Paid ‘i
THE So

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Kids Lunch Packet enter te
Win a designer Handbag ara

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

INEVVFAR RIVALSAPARGE SiS EVE CTIO
WHTRIEOUR aes DVIS u

UTTER ai. Tat,



TOYOTA TOWNACE —_—=HONDA CIVIC



994"2002

TOYOTA TERCEL __ MONTH WARRANTY INCLUDED RSTO



Fi x ‘& | i eB sy, Ss “¥YOU CAN PAY MORE, BUT YOU WON'T BUY BETTERM
Ne otors’ sCrse BETTER SELECTION BETTER REPRESENTATIONS - SETTER SERVICE

ees oa Vehicles

Most vehicles carry a warranty
‘package, inciuding license,
inspection, gas, and service.

Tel.: 323-2640

wwe CeeluiverCnorspreqwned. con


TRIBUNE










BSF # 944

2002 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
asking $8,000 ONO,

phi 376-6967 / 323-5538 / 557-3567





BBF #807
2007 F-150,
charcoal grey, V-6, CLEAN TITLE, 23,000
miles, ice cold, AC, satellite radio, 20” rims,
asking $24,000 ONO,
ph# 565-9950 / 427-2125

2004 Chrysler 300M,
leather seats, sunroof, standard or automatic
“shift, AC, 6 Disc changer, just in from US, just
serviced, asking $9,000 ONO,
ph# 448- 7490 / 434-3194

2004 CHEVY IMPALA,
20” rims, ice cold AC, clean in and out, CD
player asking $5,000, owner going back to Ja-
maica, ph# 455-1184 .

BEF #835

* Fully Loaded 22" inch, rims, 34000 miles.
Asking $17, 500.0bo..
Owner leaving town,

ph#ee7r664S:Golh4257264. Ms.Brawns-

DODGE DAKOTA.

BBF #836
: 1999 BMW 318 TI COUPE,

terior, AC, power windows, air bag, power

steering, sun roof, power locks, Automatic

transmission, CD & DVD included, asking
$6.500,ph# 636-4861



1998 HONDA ACCORD,
white, head lights, tan leather seats, AC, CD
player, 18” low profile rims and original factory
rims, custom rear view lights, body kit,
asking $5,000, ph# 565-8799 / 426-4398

2005 NISSAN MAXIMA,
leather interior, bose music system, low miles,
owner oar island, ey buy, aski
11,500
eon 525-7278

BBF #851
2003 INFINITI I35,
power windows, seats, door, trunk, sunroof,
black leather interior, mahogany wood all
eo remote start, and pioneer sound sys-
tem,-AC, Alarm, in excellent condition, asking
$8,500 price negotiable,
phi 465-4245 / 61-5253
1 month tribune eee 79 076

Â¥

2006 CHEVY EQUINOX,

AC, CD’ player, good running condition,
asking ee
566-4613 / 392-7934

recently serviced, fully loaded, black leather in-






BBF #859

3.2 2001 Akura CL, %

fully loaded, 2-door, excellent condition,

asking $7,500, ph# 454-6557 / 425-4095
1 month tribune issue 78 019

2004 DODGE DURANGO,
blue with grey interior, fully loaded, 6 CD in
dash, CD player, sunroof, factory DVD player,
3rd row seating, asking $14,500 ONO,
ph# 466-8036

SBF #873 : ,
1996 ACCORD 2.7L V6,
Leather int. sunroof, 4dr, 12" rims an int and
ext. cold air intake, groundin
$2800 O.N.O., ph# 4256978 / 3 13473

BBF #874 j
1998 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
pearl, good condition, teather interior, power
everything, DVD screen, clean,
asking $3,000 ONO,
ph# 434-0758

2000 MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT,
Factory Alarm System, CD and DVD player,
AC, power windows and locks and mirrors,

limited edition, leather interior, fold down seats,
of, 3.0 engine size, asking $4,000,
yaa PH# 454-9150 / 323-5750



FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 3









BBF #878 |



1898 FORD EXPLORER,

excellent condition, CD player, AC, power

windows, good condition,.serious inquiries
only, asking $3,000, ph# 448-7521

2004 KIA SORENTO SUV,

Engine: V6, Automatic, 4 wheel drive, recently
serviced, 5/2010, perfect condition, very well
looked after, excellent fuel, economy & Reliabil-
ity, AC, radio, 12 disc CD changer,
licensed until May 2011, asking $12,500,
ph# 423-4512

BBF #883_
2003 NISSAN ALTIMA,
leather, AC, DVD, power everything,
Asking $5,500 ONO, as is.
ph# 468-3297 ~

2002 CHEVY ASTRO VAN,
ASKING $7,000,
ALSO 2003 FORD TAURUS,
; asking $7,000,

ph# 356-5796

BBF #885
2003 FORD EXPLORER, |
just in from foreign, green, AC, CD player, im-
maculate condition, asking $7,500 OBO,
ph# 565-4472



1999 HONDA ACCORD,
leather interior; sunroof, V6, clean in and out,
need to see to appreciate;
asking $6,000 ONO,
ph# 565-6161 / 322-2192

BBF #891
2001 HONDA CIVIC,
2 door, black exterior, black interior, excellent
condition, AC, Automatic, asking $6,000,
: ph# 466-8461 :

BBF #893 :
1998 NISSAN MAXIMA,

good condition, AC, CD player, everything
_. works, asking $3,00 ONO,
ph# 544-7201 / 677-5166

BBF #894





2003 HONDA CIVIC EX,
good condition, sunroof, AC, P/N, CD player,
Remote-entry, Factory Alloy Wheels, ph#

422-3150 ,



BBF #895
2007 CHEVROLET MALIBU
FOR SALE ©
$11,500 ONO,
Call or Text 426-7543

#89
TOYOTA ARISTO FOR SALE
1500 O.N.O,
Call or text 426-7543

XG

2004 CHEVY IMPALA, .
leather interior, AC, CD player, 22” rims, ask-
ing $6,000 with rims ONO, without rims
asking $5,000 ONO,
ph# 535-5816

BBF #900
2001 NISSAN-MAXIMA,
grey leather interior, all red HID, serviced on
time, sound system,
~ asking $7,500,
ph# 556-8349

2000 HONDA ACCORD,
18” rims, runs well, must see to appreciate,
asking $7,000 ONO,
ph# 454-2213 / 326-4110

2004 SL 500, MERCEDES,
asking $45,000 ONO,
ph# 552-1654






BBF #903 .
2007 GRAND CHEROKEE,
excellent condition, must see to appreciate,
Bank financing assistance available, asking
: $21,500 ONO, ;
ph# 426-4565

2001 FORD WINSTAR,
AM/FM, CD, Tape, DVD player, 6 Cylender,
AC, asking $7,5000,
ph# 454-9150

: 2002 JEEP CHEROKEE,

53,000 miles, clean title, AC, CD player, excel-
lent condition, recently serviced, asking $9,000,
Ph# 456-1419 / 325-3403
10 days tribune issue 80 005

SN

2003 ACURA TL :
4dr. Type-S, Silver w/ Black Lthr. Interior,
Disc Factory CD changer, Sunroof, Alloy ~
_wheels, asking $5,800 O.N.O, ‘
ph#361-0184

2009 HONDA. ACCORD, V6,
Fully loaded, sunroof, leather, power, 6 disc
changer, 22” chrome rims, clean title, asking

$33,000,
ph# 423-6549 / 322-1248

THE TRIBU

RIB #353
2001 HONDA CIVIC
Plum exterior with beige interior _
/ $8,000.00
Excellent condition, alarm, power everything.
Serious inquiries only.
_Cell 436-3787 or 636-1602

|BBF #929 =a

2004 NISSAN MAXIMA SL,
6 CD changer, leather interior, sunroof, HID -
lights, low mileage, call for price,
ph# 552-9889

BBF #931
2000 FORD EXPLORER, /
AC, Runs good, serviced on time, CD player,
good condition, ph# 432-2083 / 364-5458

ol abou

AS
\\\
\

UT SS
* ~~ SS. Go

2003 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
4dr 3.7L V-6, AC, AM/FM CD Player, Cloth In-
terior, Like New..Asking $11,000 o.n.o.,
Serious inquiries only. contact 242-392-4805,
a 242-552-5757
- or 242-727-9644









2007 Nissan titan,
4 door, AC, power everything, backup camera,
asking $18,900 OBO, also 2005 Honda Civic,
full power, automatic transmission, cold AC,
asking $9,000 OBO,
ph# 327-1888 / 454-1245:







iiss



BBF #932
2000 dodge neon,
clean interior, good condition, 4 cylinder, good
on gas, asking $1,800,
ph# 425-0369 / 323-4870 /35-91815
"6 Disc CD changer, Dual climate control, for
'03-'07 Honda Accord, asking $350.00 O.B.O.

2004 Honda Accord,

42,000 miles, AC, DVD player, clean in & out,
asking $10,300 OBO, also 2003 G35 coupe
custom front bumper, asking $600 OBO,
ph# 558-0184 / 392-1451

BBF #939
2009 Honda Accord special edition,
clean title, call for price, 2002 Chevy Silverado,
extended Cab, Flair side, serious inquires only,
ph# 376-8600 / 324-6356



2010 Nissan Maxima, .
Hotess thing in any parking lot, clean title, low
mileage, ae $32,000,
ph# 323-7405 / 466-5925
10 days tribune issue 80 015

2001 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
DVD player, HID head lights, sound system,
best offer wins,
ph# 423-2812

0
1983 INTERNATIONAL
Licensed and insured, ready to work now
$18,000.00
Or two dumptruck for $25,000.00
Cell 466-7698

BBF #943
2002 BUICK CENTURY
Brown, 4 door, AC, CD player and tape player,
asking $5,200 ONO, Also 2004 Pontiac grand
Am, Silver 4 door, AC, CD player, asking
$5,800 ONO, ph# 324-7266 / 424-5354

RIB #360
2002 ISUZU RODEO

Black exterior. Fully Loaded with all options. CD

changer leather interior cold ac. and sunroof.
Priced for a quick sale. @ $8,500.00
phone 434-6184

2002 FORD RANGER - EDGE
White, single cab, grey interior
CD player, A/C $9,000.00
Phone 393 5412

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010, PAGE 5















RIB #358
1997 HONDA SMX
Silver exterior with black leather seats, 3 door
coupe, CD player, AC, leather interior,
“clean inside and out. $5,000.00 ono
Cell 676-3387 or 468-2440 or 535-1716

RIB #381
2006 FORD EXPEDITION LIMITED.
Black exterior. Tan leather interior
2nd row bucket seats, 3rd row seating
Mileage - 42,000. Asking $31, 500.00
Showing by appointment
Serious offers only
Contact: Thea Glinton
Phone: 242-327-3540
Email: Theaglinton@ hotmail.com

2003 INFINITI G35
Black exterior, full tan leather interior
Asking 13,000.00 ono
Call 341-1265 or 431-5007.

RIB #408



2
1998 HONDA PRELUDE
.Silver exterior,black interior, auto tiptronic shift,
H22 vtec engine, low miles, cold Ac, very clean
j $4700
96 PRELUDE:
“5 speed H22 vtec engine equally clean with
all options. Sacrafice for $4,400. 376-9126














2005 GMC ENVOY
Runs great, fully loaded, 6 CD changer,leather
interior. Was hit on driver side in 2008
but repaired. Call 341-3546. Only persons with
cash in hand and serious enquiries call.

Make offer over. $8500.00



FOR SALE
1999 BLUE FORD EXPEDITION
$5000 OR BEST OFFER
CONTACT 361-2120

2001 Nissan Maxima,
leather interior, clean in and out, -
asking $6,500 ONO,
Also 2002 Ford Taurus asking $4,500 ONO,
ph# 636-4861









:
< vs Qa

AC

IK

2002 HONDA CIVIC
4 door, automatic, RHD, gold exterior,
grey/leather interior, AC,power everything,

12 disc CD player, tinted rims, keyless entry,
alarm, NMC maintained. excellent condition,

sparkling clean, 100000kms.

Asking $6900.00. 465-2169

please leave message.

RIB #455
1999 HONDA ACCORD
Silver exterior with silver/leather interior
Limited Edition, 3.0 v6-v tech with distributor,
‘ Pioneer CD player, AC, automatic everything
with sunroof. Asking $6,500.00 ono
Call 394-1009 or 434-2523

RIB #464
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 DIESEL
Dark grey exterior with grey interior
Call 425-5938

420
1994 CHEVY ASTRO VAN
Blue-exterior with blue & grey interior.
$2800.00 ono
Running in good condition.
Serious back for load.
Cell 467-2269




, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

AY SON

1994 TOYOTA STARLET GT TURBO
Black exterior, dark grey interior. 5 speed, cold
AC, custom wheels, power everything, own a

turbo charged car for cheap. $2800.00 ono
2002 DODGE RAM PICK-UP
5 speed, 5.21, clean, low miles.
$11,500,ono. 376-9126

(a

2000 MITSUBISHI MIRAGE
Grey exterior with grey interior, AC, alarm, CD,
P.W, P.L. As is. $4,500.00
Call 422-2255.

RIB #439
2003 HONDA INSPIRE
Black exterior with grey interior Just in, loaded
; with T.V. $9,800.00 -
Also 2001 HONDA INSPIRE. $7,500.00
loaded with TV. For other vehicles
Call 341-2096 cell 427-3505

RIB #451
2005 CHEVY COLORADO
4 cylinder $9,500.00
Call 525-6268

RIB #672
' | 2004 LINCOLN LS SEDAN
; lack exterior, black leather interior,
power window, seats, sunroof, 6 disc changer,
a/c, low miles, no reasonable offer refused.
$8,500.0.b.0.
Phone 426-4426 or 455-2026

2006 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO LTZ
Silver exterior, black interior, 2 door, fully
loaded, sunroof, leather seats, dvd player,
excellent condition, low mileage.
$8,500 O.N.O
Phone 393-1405,
436-7407 or 557-8273

RIB #459
1996 HONDA INSPIRE
Black exterior with grey interior
$4,500.00 ono
Great condition, CD player, alarm, low
mileage, runs smooth
Call 362-2165 cell 357-8183.

2009 HONDA ACCORD
Just in! conprehensive insurance ready, like
brand new, maroone exterior/tan interior, 4
door, 4 cylinder, automatic, very low miles,
loaded. asking $28,000 ono
Must see to appreciate.
Phone 466-2059,636-9945,432-3378

2004 HONDA CRV
Excellent condition, AC, power windows, auto
lock, alarm, 6 disc CD changer. Just serviced
@ Nassau Motors. 94,000 miles
$15,000.00 ono
Cell 455-3175

1980 MACK R
White and grey. $10,000.00 obo :
Owner leaving Island. Truck ready to work
strong gear box. Only serius inquiries.
Call 341-6201 or 535-5450

RIB #467 j
2001 HONDA CIVIC

Purple exterior, tan interior, AC, CD player,
: $4000.00 obo

Phone: 324-1901 or 431-9814 or 454-9345

RIB #471
40 ANNIVERSARY
2004 FORD MUSTANG
Silver exterior with cloth(grey)interior
music system, alarm, keyless entry, cold Ac.

Recently serviced. Owner going off to school.

; $10,500.00 ono

Cell 424-6219

2008 HONDA ACCORD
Rose red exterior, with tan/cloth interior, 4 door,
under 9k miles, one owner. Bank financing
available, cash price neg $26,000.00
Car eperaieed for $33,000.0
el” 556-1059

\\
~

\
AGG

2006 MERCURY MONTAINEER
Off white exterior with/leather interior,. top of
the line in this class. The jeep is in very good
condition (new) good title
Price $16,000.00 to view.
Call 326-3001 or 424-0636

=p
a

AS
\\

RIB #728 :
1998 TOYOTA AVALON
Blue with tan interior, cold Ac, runs and shifts
perfect, RHD, expat owned, well taken care off
Motivated seller, no reasonable offer refused. |
$3,500 ono
2001 DODGE RAM PICK UP
Reg cab, many extras, clean $10,500
376-9126



TRIBUNE



RIB #502
2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC
Green exterior, Power everything, MP3 and
MP4 player, recently service, Vehicle running
excellent. Owner leaving island”
Asking $12, 000 negotiable
Call: 392-3106 or 376-9954

2001 ISUZU CARGO VAN 16FT
AC, automatic, V8 engine, low miles
Ready for work.

1 $8,900.00 ono
Call 362-6040 or 426-5181

White exterior with tab interior
$5,000;00 ono
Very clean. Must see
Call 394-4187 or 565-0944

2007 FORD F-150
White exterior, grey interior, clean title,
automatic, fully loaded alarm,
_ Must go. $18,000.00 obo ..
Phone: 361-5467, 477-3125, 535-9335

NS

RIB #665 ]
2001 CHEVROLET TAHOE
Clover Green Interior, three dvd touch screens,
sound system, sitting on'24",brand new tires,
tan leather seats, good condition, cold a/c and
crystal back lights, $14,000 with everything,
$12,000, without dvd's and sound system.
646-3676,423-399 1 393-4066
RIB #673 ;
i 2001 FORD F-250
Burnt orange exterior, brown interior, super
duty, 4 door crew cab, automatic, v8 engine,
extra long bed, trailor hitch, low miles, a/¢,
power windows, great work truck. $9,500 obo
Phone: 426-4426 or 455-2026

CAR FOR SALE:
1995 HONDA ASCOT,
Japanese made, right hand drive, 4 door, auto-
4 matic windows. $3500
Call 357-3295 or work 302-4303

ides #677



RIB #683 .
i 2002 PONTIAC (SUNFIRE)

New tyres, excellent condition, smooth running
& ice cold Ac. Must see to appreciate.
$3,000.00.00
Call 324-080 4 or 432-3755



TRIB #742
‘ 2002 GMC ENVOY SUV
Red exterior with tan leather interior,-fully
loaded, power everything, cool Ac, fold-down
rear seats, on star, Surround sound, 6 CD
changer, no dents, no nicks.
Asking $11,800.00 obo_
Call 392-6471 or 454-3303





690 etl :
1999 FORD EXPLORER XLS
White exterior, grey (cloth w/leather) interior,
one owner, clean title, runs excellent and kept
in excellent condition, serviced ontime, under
62,000 miles, cd player and cold a/c.
$6,800.00.
Phone 456-3542 or 426-2089